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Sample records for breast-conserving surgery interim

  1. Hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy with subcutaneous amifostine cytoprotection as short adjuvant regimen after breast-conserving surgery: interim report.

    PubMed

    Koukourakis, Michael I; Tsoutsou, Pelagia G; Abatzoglou, Ioannis M; Sismanidou, Kyriaki; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Sivridis, Efthimios

    2009-07-15

    Short radiotherapy schedules might be more convenient for patients and overloaded radiotherapy departments, provided late toxicity is not increased. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of a hypofractionated and highly accelerated radiotherapy regimen supported with cytoprotection provided by amifostine in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery. A total of 92 patients received 12 consecutive fractions of radiotherapy (3.5 Gy/fraction for 10 fractions) to the breast and/or axillary/supraclavicular area and 4 Gy/fraction for 2 fractions to the tumor bed). Amifostine at a dose of 1,000 mg/d was administered subcutaneously. The follow-up of patients was 30-60 months (median, 39). Using a dose individualization algorithm, 77.1% of patients received 1,000 mg and 16.3% received 750 mg of amifostine daily. Of the 92 patients, 13% interrupted amifostine because of fever/rash symptoms. Acute Grade 2 breast toxicity developed in 6.5% of patients receiving 1,000 mg of amifostine compared with 46.6% of the rest of the patients (p < .0001). The incidence of Grade 2 late sequelae was less frequent in the high amifostine dose group (3.2% vs. 6.6%; p = NS). Grade 1 lung fibrosis was infrequent (3.3%). The in-field relapse rate was 3.3%, and an additional 2.2% of patients developed a relapse in the nonirradiated supraclavicular area. c-erbB-2 overexpression was linked to local control failure (p = .01). Distant metastasis appeared in 13% of patients, and this was marginally related to more advanced T/N stage (p = .06). Within a minimal follow-up of 2.5 years after therapy, hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy with subcutaneous amifostine cytoprotection has proved a well-tolerated and effective regimen. Longer follow-up is required to assess the long-term late sequelae.

  2. Hypofractionated and Accelerated Radiotherapy With Subcutaneous Amifostine Cytoprotection as Short Adjuvant Regimen After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael I.

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Short radiotherapy schedules might be more convenient for patients and overloaded radiotherapy departments, provided late toxicity is not increased. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of a hypofractionated and highly accelerated radiotherapy regimen supported with cytoprotection provided by amifostine in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: A total of 92 patients received 12 consecutive fractions of radiotherapy (3.5 Gy/fraction for 10 fractions) to the breast and/or axillary/supraclavicular area and 4 Gy/fraction for 2 fractions to the tumor bed). Amifostine at a dose of 1,000 mg/d was administered subcutaneously. The follow-up of patients was 30-60 months (median, 39). Results: Using a dose individualization algorithm, 77.1% of patients received 1,000 mg and 16.3% received 750 mg of amifostine daily. Of the 92 patients, 13% interrupted amifostine because of fever/rash symptoms. Acute Grade 2 breast toxicity developed in 6.5% of patients receiving 1,000 mg of amifostine compared with 46.6% of the rest of the patients (p < .0001). The incidence of Grade 2 late sequelae was less frequent in the high amifostine dose group (3.2% vs. 6.6%; p = NS). Grade 1 lung fibrosis was infrequent (3.3%). The in-field relapse rate was 3.3%, and an additional 2.2% of patients developed a relapse in the nonirradiated supraclavicular area. c-erbB-2 overexpression was linked to local control failure (p = .01). Distant metastasis appeared in 13% of patients, and this was marginally related to more advanced T/N stage (p = .06). Conclusion: Within a minimal follow-up of 2.5 years after therapy, hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy with subcutaneous amifostine cytoprotection has proved a well-tolerated and effective regimen. Longer follow-up is required to assess the long-term late sequelae.

  3. Additional Surgery after Breast-Conserving Surgery Varies Widely

    Cancer.gov

    A study published in the Feb. 1, 2012, issue of JAMA found that the number of women who have one or more additional surgeries to remove suspected residual tumor tissue (re-excisions) following breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer varies widely across surgeons and hospitals.

  4. Assessing cosmetic results after breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Maria João; Oliveira, Helder; Cardoso, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    "Taking less treating better" has been one of the major improvements of breast cancer surgery in the last four decades. The application of this principle translates into equivalent survival of breast cancer conserving treatment (BCT) when compared to mastectomy, with a better cosmetic outcome. While it is relatively easy to evaluate the oncological results of BCT, the cosmetic outcome is more difficult to measure due to the lack of an effective and consensual procedure. The assessment of cosmetic outcome has been mainly subjective, undertaken by a panel of expert observers or/and by patient self-assessment. Unfortunately, the reproducibility of these methods is low. Objective methods have higher values of reproducibility but still lack the inclusion of several features considered by specialists in BCT to be fundamental for cosmetic outcome. The recent addition of volume information obtained with 3D images seems promising. Until now, unfortunately, no method is considered to be the standard of care. This paper revises the history of cosmetic evaluation and guides us into the future aiming at a method that can easily be used and accepted by all, caregivers and caretakers, allowing not only the comparison of results but the improvement of performance.

  5. Bilateral mastectomy and the retreat from breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Frederick L; Yakoub, Danny

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the consequences for breast cancer patients of the trend away from breast conservation in favor of bilateral and contralateral mastectomy. The methods are followed from the review of the literature from 1991 to 2015. Breast-conserving surgery and sentinel lymph node biopsy, introduced into mainstream practice in the 1980s and 1990s, respectively, are now the standard of care for early-stage breast cancer. Disruptive change has unexpectedly supervened in the guise of bilateral mastectomy for cancer or prophylaxis and contralateral prophylactic mastectomy. These operations are now being resorted to at a rate which cannot be explained by any of the biological imperatives related to breast cancer and related diseases. This phenomenon extends across the Western world and beyond, driven by patients' cancer concern, a misunderstanding of what surgery can and cannot achieve and preserve, and the current popular media/cultural environment. These developments and their consequences for patients are reviewed. Surgical complications, especially those related to reconstruction, are unusually common. Of equal or greater concern are the physical, esthetic, psychosocial, psychosexual morbidities, and other adverse sequelae of these operations.

  6. Characterization of a phantom setup for breast conserving cancer surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwell, Jacob T.; Conley, Rebekah H.; Collins, Jarrod A.; Meszoely, Ingrid M.; Miga, Michael I.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an anatomically and mechanically representative breast phantom for the validation of breast conserving surgical therapies, specifically, in this case, image guided surgeries. Using three patients scheduled for lumpectomy and four healthy volunteers in mock surgical presentations, the magnitude, direction, and location of breast deformations was analyzed. A phantom setup was then designed to approximate such deformations in a mock surgical environment. Specifically, commercially available and custom-built polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) phantoms were used to mimic breast tissue during surgery. A custom designed deformation apparatus was then created to reproduce deformations seen in typical clinical setups of the pre- and intra-operative breast geometry. Quantitative analysis of the human subjects yielded a positive correlation between breast volume and amount of breast deformation. Phantom results reflected similar behavior with the custom-built PVA phantom outperforming the commercial phantom.

  7. Deriving indicators for breast conserving surgery using finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Thanoon, D; Garbey, M; Bass, B L

    2015-01-01

    Breast conserving therapy (BCT), comprising a complete surgical excision of the tumour (partial mastectomy) with post-operative radiotherapy to the remaining breast tissue, is feasible for most women undergoing treatment for breast cancer. The goal of BCT is to achieve local control of the cancer, as well as to preserve a breast that satisfies a woman's cosmetic concerns. Although most women undergo partial mastectomy with satisfactory cosmetic results, in many patients the remaining breast is left with major cosmetic defects including concave deformities, distortion of the nipple-areolar complex, asymmetry and changes in tissue density characterised by excessive density associated with parenchymal scarring, as well as breast pain. There are currently no tools, other than surgical experience and judgement, which can predict the impact of partial mastectomy on the contour, the deformity of the treated breast and the mechanical stress that it induces. In this study, we use a finite element model to execute virtual surgery and carry out a sensitivity analysis on the resection location, the resection size, the breast tissue mechanical property and the different post-surgery recovery stage. We output the result in two different built-in indicators labelled as the cosmetic and the functional indicators. This study used the breast model for three women with breast cancer who have been elected to undergo BCT and are being treated at the Methodist Hospital in Houston, TX. The goal of this study was to propose a first glimpse of the key parameter leading to satisfactory post-BCT cosmetic results.

  8. Breast-conserving surgery is contraindicated for recurrent giant multifocal phyllodes tumours of breast

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The controversy between breast conserving surgery and simple mastectomy for phyllodes tumours of the breast remains because of the unpredictable nature of the disease. Although some benign tumours may show an unusually aggressive behaviour, modified radical surgery for phyllodes tumours offers no survival advantage, and recently more conservative surgical approaches have been deployed. Case presentation A 30-year-old woman with a giant multifocal tumour of the breast underwent breast-conserving surgery that made use of the well- circumscribed feature of the tumour. The case demonstrates the safety, and cosmetic benefit of the breast-conserving approach for multifocal phyllodes tumours except for the high recurrence rate. Conclusions Large size, multifocality, and borderline or malignant histology are contraindications for breast-conserving surgery. PMID:25023082

  9. Tracking Nonpalpable Breast Cancer for Breast-conserving Surgery With Carbon Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanyan; Lin, Nan; Huang, Sheng; Lin, Chongping; Jin, Na; Zhang, Zaizhong; Ke, Jun; Yu, Yinghao; Zhu, Jianping; Wang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To examine the feasibility of using carbon nanoparticles to track nonpalpable breast cancer for breast-conserving surgery. During breast-conserving surgery, it is often very challenging to determine the boundary of tumor and identify involved lymph nodes. Currently used methods are useful in identifying tumor location, but do not provide direct visual guidance for resection margin during surgery. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the Fuzhou General Hospital (Fuzhou, China). The current retrospective analysis included 16 patients with nonpalpable breast cancer receiving breast-conserving surgery under the guidance of preoperative marking using a carbon nanoparticle, as well as 3 patients receiving carbon nanoparticle marking followed by neoadjuvant treatment and then breast-conserving surgery. The Tumor Node Metastasis stage in the 16 cases included: T1N0M0 in 7, T1N1M0 in 2, T2N0M0 in 4, and T2N1M0 in the remaining 3 cases. The nanoparticle was injected at 12 sites at 0.5 cm away from the apparent edge under colored ultrasonography along 6 tracks separated by 60 degrees (2 sites every track). Lymph node status was also examined. The resection edge was free from cancer cells in all 16 cases (and the 3 cases with neoadjuvant treatment). Cancer cells were identified in majority of stained lymph nodes, but not in any of the unstained lymph nodes. No recurrence or metastasis was noticed after the surgery (2 to 22-month follow-up; median: 6 months). Tracking nonpalpable breast cancer with carbon nanoparticle could guide breast-conserving surgery. PMID:25761181

  10. Pedicled dermoglandular flap reconstruction following breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Khafagy, M; Fakhr, I; Hamed, A; Youssef, O

    2012-06-01

    Breast conserving therapy is the gold standard treatment of early breast cancer. However, a balance between good cosmetic outcome and limiting the risk of locoregional recurrence remains the key of success. The aim of this work was to evaluate the outcome of partial breast reconstruction using pedicled dermo-glandular flap from the upper outer quadrant, for central quadrantectomy BCS. Thirty patients underwent wide excision of carcinoma of retroareolar or periareolar regions of the breast, from July 2008 to August 2011. Excisions included the nipple/areola complex down to the pectoralis fascia with a wide safety margin, and complete axillary dissection. Breast reconstruction was done by means of pedicled dermoglandular flap. Mean age of patients was 51.86 years (range from 30 to 70 years). Tumor size ranged from 1 to 4.2 cm. Postoperative pathological results came out with 21 (70.0%) patients mean (range) of the tumor safety margin 2.01 (0.5-2.8). Seventeen (56.7%) patients had positive axillary lymph nodes. All patients received postoperative radiation therapy to the breast, while 17/30 (56.67%) and 6/30 (20%) received endocrine therapy or adjuvant chemotherapy, respectively, and only 7/30 (23.34%) patients received both therapies. During a median follow-up period of 24 months, neither local nor distant metastasis, were detected. The postoperative cosmetic result was excellent in 80% patients, good in 13.3% patients, acceptable in 6.7% with no poor result. Following central quadrantectomy BCS for small centrally located breast cancer, a pedicled dermoglandular flap from the upper outer quadrant is a good reconstructive option. Copyright © 2012 National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of automated breast volume scanner for breast conservation surgery in ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Huang, Anqian; Zhu, Luoxi; Tan, Yanjuan; Liu, Jian; Xiang, Jingjing; Zhu, Qingqing; Bao, Lingyun

    2016-10-01

    The present is a retrospective study examining the use of automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) for guiding breast conservation surgery in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). A total of 142 patients with pathologically confirmed DCIS were initially included in the study. The patients underwent preoperative examination by conventional ultrasound and by ABVS. The BI-RADS category system was used to identify benign and malignant lesions, after which breast conservation surgery was performed, and the therapeutic effects were compared. DCIS lesions were found in each quadrant of the breasts. Typical symptoms included: Duct ectasia and filling in 23 cases, mass (mainly solid, occasionally cystic, with or without calcification) in 38 cases, hypoechoic area (with or without calcification) in 33 cases, calcifications (simple) in 23 cases, and architectural distortion in 17 cases. In addition, 110 cases (82.1%) were detected as grade ≥4 according to the BI-RADS category, and 92 cases (68.7%) were considered malignant lesions following conventional ultrasound scanning. The detection rate of ABVS was significantly higher than that of conventional ultrasound (χ(2)=268.000, P<0.001). The average tumor diameter was 2.5±0.8 cm using ABVS and 2.0±0.9 cm using conventional ultrasound (the former being significantly higher than the latter; t=6.325, P=0.034). Eight patients (5.6%) had recurrences of the cancer, and the tumor diameter in the 8 patients was significantly larger using ABVS as compared to conventional ultrasound. In the diagnosis of DCIS, ABVS was superior to conventional ultrasound scanner in guiding breast conservation surgery and predicting recurrence. However, large-scale studies are required for confirmation of the findings.

  12. Evaluation of automated breast volume scanner for breast conservation surgery in ductal carcinoma in situ

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Anqian; Zhu, Luoxi; Tan, Yanjuan; Liu, Jian; Xiang, Jingjing; Zhu, Qingqing; Bao, Lingyun

    2016-01-01

    The present is a retrospective study examining the use of automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) for guiding breast conservation surgery in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). A total of 142 patients with pathologically confirmed DCIS were initially included in the study. The patients underwent preoperative examination by conventional ultrasound and by ABVS. The BI-RADS category system was used to identify benign and malignant lesions, after which breast conservation surgery was performed, and the therapeutic effects were compared. DCIS lesions were found in each quadrant of the breasts. Typical symptoms included: Duct ectasia and filling in 23 cases, mass (mainly solid, occasionally cystic, with or without calcification) in 38 cases, hypoechoic area (with or without calcification) in 33 cases, calcifications (simple) in 23 cases, and architectural distortion in 17 cases. In addition, 110 cases (82.1%) were detected as grade ≥4 according to the BI-RADS category, and 92 cases (68.7%) were considered malignant lesions following conventional ultrasound scanning. The detection rate of ABVS was significantly higher than that of conventional ultrasound (χ2=268.000, P<0.001). The average tumor diameter was 2.5±0.8 cm using ABVS and 2.0±0.9 cm using conventional ultrasound (the former being significantly higher than the latter; t=6.325, P=0.034). Eight patients (5.6%) had recurrences of the cancer, and the tumor diameter in the 8 patients was significantly larger using ABVS as compared to conventional ultrasound. In the diagnosis of DCIS, ABVS was superior to conventional ultrasound scanner in guiding breast conservation surgery and predicting recurrence. However, large-scale studies are required for confirmation of the findings. PMID:27698816

  13. Intraoperative radiotherapy during breast conserving surgery: a study on 1,822 cases treated with electrons.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Umberto; Orecchia, Roberto; Luini, Alberto; Galimberti, Viviana; Zurrida, Stefano; Intra, Mattia; Veronesi, Paolo; Arnone, Paolo; Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Ciocca, Mario; Lazzari, Roberta; Caldarella, Pietro; Rotmensz, Nicole; Sangalli, Claudia; Sances, Daniele; Maisonneuve, Patrick

    2010-11-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy with electrons (ELIOT) after conservative surgery for breast carcinoma was introduced at the IEO in 1999 as a research programme. The results on 1,822 patients treated from January 2000 to December 2008 are reported. Women with unicentric primary breast carcinoma of less than 2.5 cm in the largest diameter were assessed by imaging. All patients were treated with breast-conserving surgery (quadrantectomy). ELIOT was delivered by two mobile linear accelerators immediately after breast resection with a single dose of 21 Gy. Local side effects of ELIOT were mainly liponecrosis (4.2%) and fibrosis (1.8%). After a mean follow-up of 36.1 months, 42 women (2.3%) developed a local recurrence, 24 (1.3%) a new primary ipsilateral carcinomas and 26 (1.4%) distant metastases as first event. Forty-six women died (2.5%), 28 for breast carcinoma and 18 for other causes. Five- and ten-year survivals were, respectively, 97.4 and 89.7%. ELIOT appears a promising feature in early breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery, reducing the exposure of normal tissues to radiations and shortening the radiation course from 6 weeks to one single session.

  14. [A case of organizing pneumonia which recurred 51 months after radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery].

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Takashi; Takayanagi, Noboru; Sugita, Yutaka; Yoneda, Koichiro; Yanagisawa, Tsutomu; Kawabata, Yoshinori

    2011-02-01

    A 54-year-old woman who had undergone breast-conserving surgery followed by irradiation presented to a local physician after developing a cough and low-grade fever 9 months after radiation therapy. She was given a diagnosis of pneumonia and antibiotics were administered, but since she did not improve, she was transferred to our hospital. We performed lung biopsy via thoracoscopy and diagnosed organizing pneumonia based on pathological findings. Steroid administration based on her chest X-ray findings, improved her condition. After discharge, her steroid dose was tapered on an outpatient basis, but she suffered relapse of her organizing pneumonia three times. The prednisolone dose at relapse was 10 mg/day at 20 months, 7.5 mg/day at 36 months, and 7 mg/day at 51 months after radiation therapy, respectively. Organizing pneumonia that develops after irradiation following breast-conserving surgery has been known to occasionally relapse, and to the best of our knowledge the final relapse reported here, 51 months after radiation therapy is the longest relapse reported.

  15. Impact of axillary ultrasound (AUS) on axillary dissection in breast conserving surgery (BCS).

    PubMed

    Reyna, Chantal; Kiluk, John V; Frelick, Anne; Khakpour, Nazanin; Laronga, Christine; Lee, Marie Catherine

    2015-06-01

    Preoperative axillary ultrasound (AUS) in clinically node-negative patients may increase axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) in ACoSOG Z0011-eligible patients. We hypothesize that AUS identifies operative axillary disease (>3 positive nodes) in women undergoing breast conserving surgery (BCS). After IRB approval, a retrospective review of female breast cancer patients was performed; patients with clinical T1/T2 tumors undergoing BCS were included. Clinical, radiologic, and pathologic data were collected. Of 139 eligible subjects, 119/139 (86%) had nonpalpable axillary nodes. 47/119 patients (40%) had abnormal AUS and 15/47 (32%) had a positive FNA. Fourteen had ALND ;10/14 (71%) had >3 positive nodes. 6/32 (18%) with abnormal AUS but FNA negative were sentinel lymph node (SLN) positive. Of 72 normal AUS, 15 (22%) were SLN positive; 9/15 (60%) had ALND; 1 (11%) had >3 positive nodes. When evaluating for >3 positive nodes, AUS plus FNA had a sensitivity of 91%, specificity of 95%, NPV of 99%, and PPV of 71%. AUS/FNA has a high NPV for axillary metastasis and remarkable sensitivity for three or more positive axillary nodes, therefore AUS-identified metastasis should be treated as clinically node-positive disease, and is appropriate even in patients planning breast conserving surgery. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Tumor-to-breast volume ratio as measured on MRI: a possible predictor of breast-conserving surgery versus mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Faermann, Renata; Sperber, Fani; Schneebaum, Schlomo; Barsuk, Daphna

    2014-02-01

    The surgical approach to breast cancer changed dramatically in the past 20 years. The surgical objective today is to remove the tumor, ensuring negative margins and good cosmetic results, and preserving the breast when possible. Magnetic resonance imaging of the breast has become an essential imaging tool prior to surgery, diagnosing additional tumors and assessing tumor extent. Tumor-to-breast volume ratio, an important predictor of breast conservation, can be measured with MRI and may change the surgical decision. To measure the tumor-to-breast volume ratio using MRI in order to assess whether there is a correlation between this ratio and the type of surgery selected (breast-conserving or mastectomy). The volumes of the tumor and the breast and the tumor-to-breast volume ratio were retrospectively calculated using preoperative breast MRI in 76 patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy. Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) was performed in 64 patients and mastectomy in 12. The average tumor-to-breast volume ratio was 0.06 (6%) in the lumpectomy group and 0.30 (30%) in the mastectomy group (P < 0.0001). The tumor-to-breast volume ratio correlated with the type of surgery. As measured on MRI, this ratio is an accurate means of determining the type of surgery best suited for a given patient. It is recommended that MRI-determined tumor-to-breast volume ratio become part of the surgical planning protocol for patients diagnosed with breast cancer.

  17. Tracking nonpalpable breast cancer for breast-conserving surgery with carbon nanoparticles: implication in tumor location and lymph node dissection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanyan; Lin, Nan; Huang, Sheng; Lin, Chongping; Jin, Na; Zhang, Zaizhong; Ke, Jun; Yu, Yinghao; Zhu, Jianping; Wang, Yu

    2015-03-01

    To examine the feasibility of using carbon nanoparticles to track nonpalpable breast cancer for breast-conserving surgery. During breast-conserving surgery, it is often very challenging to determine the boundary of tumor and identify involved lymph nodes. Currently used methods are useful in identifying tumor location, but do not provide direct visual guidance for resection margin during surgery. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the Fuzhou General Hospital (Fuzhou, China). The current retrospective analysis included 16 patients with nonpalpable breast cancer receiving breast-conserving surgery under the guidance of preoperative marking using a carbon nanoparticle, as well as 3 patients receiving carbon nanoparticle marking followed by neoadjuvant treatment and then breast-conserving surgery. The Tumor Node Metastasis stage in the 16 cases included: T1N0M0 in 7, T1N1M0 in 2, T2N0M0 in 4, and T2N1M0 in the remaining 3 cases. The nanoparticle was injected at 12 sites at 0.5 cm away from the apparent edge under colored ultrasonography along 6 tracks separated by 60 degrees (2 sites every track). Lymph node status was also examined. The resection edge was free from cancer cells in all 16 cases (and the 3 cases with neoadjuvant treatment). Cancer cells were identified in majority of stained lymph nodes, but not in any of the unstained lymph nodes. No recurrence or metastasis was noticed after the surgery (2 to 22-month follow-up; median: 6 months). Tracking nonpalpable breast cancer with carbon nanoparticle could guide breast-conserving surgery.

  18. [Breast-conserving surgery without radiotherapy in the Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo].

    PubMed

    Kasumi, Fujio; Takahashi, Kaoru; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Tada, Keiichiro; Makita, Masujiro; Tada, Takashi; Yoshimoto, Masataka; Akiyama, Futoshi; Akiyama, Goi

    2002-11-01

    We began performing breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in 1986 to achieve complete resection of breast cancer and omit postoperative radiotherapy (RT) if serial and detailed pathologic examination of the resected specimen within a 5-mm width showed that the of margin was cancer free. At of the end of 1998, 1,233 sides of the breast had been conserved, of which 827 sides were shown to have cancer-free margins. As of the end of 2001, with a mean observation period of 79 months, ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was recognized on 46 sides (19 recurrences, 27 multiple cancers), for a recurrence rate 5.6% and an annual recurrence rate of 0.85%. This rate is slightly better than those reported by eminent institutions in the USA and Europe which all perform RT, confirming the accuracy and safety of our BCS.

  19. A review of the management of ductal carcinoma in situ following breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Boxer, M M; Delaney, G P; Chua, B H

    2013-12-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a heterogeneous, pre-malignant disease accounting for 10-20% of all new breast tumours. Evidence shows a statistically significant local control benefit for adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) following breast conserving surgery (BCS) for all patients. The baseline recurrence risk of individual patients varies according to clinical-pathological criteria and in selected patients, omission of RT may be considered, following a discussion with the patient. The role of adjuvant endocrine therapy remains uncertain. Ongoing studies are attempting to define subgroups of patients who are at sufficiently low risk of recurrence that RT may be safely omitted; investigating RT techniques and dose fractionation schedules; and defining the role of endocrine therapy. Future directions in the management of patients with DCIS will include investigation of prognostic and predictive biomarkers to inform individualised therapy tailored to the risk of recurrence.

  20. Correct information to patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery: the medicolegal significance

    PubMed Central

    SANGUINETTI, A.; POLISTENA, A.; LUCCHINI, R.; MONACELLI, M.; AVENIA, S.; GALASSE, S.; CIROCCHI, R.; AVENIA, N.

    2017-01-01

    Many of the women newly diagnosed with breast cancer not have access to all the information they need to make the surgical and treatment choices that are most appropriate for them. Research clearly shows that lumpectomy and other breast-conserving surgeries are just as safe as mastectomy for most women with early stage disease, and yet approximately half will undergo the more disfiguring procedures, but many healthy women who have strong family histories of breast cancer consider prophylactic mastectomies, and their decisions are also based on very limited information, because there are few studies showing the effectiveness of that procedure. This paper delineates how to avoid limited information and biased recommendations is important for a conscious and informed choice by the patients. PMID:28691668

  1. Reoperations after primary breast conserving surgery in women with invasive breast cancer in Catalonia, Spain: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Escribà, J M; Esteban, L; Gálvez, J; Pla, M J; Melià, A; Gil-Gil, M; Clèries, R; Pareja, L; Sanz, X; Bustins, M; Borrás, J M; Ribes, J

    2017-04-01

    Although complete tumor resection is accepted as the best means to reduce recurrence, reoperations after lumpectomy are a common problem in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the reoperation rates after primary breast conserving surgery in invasive breast cancer cases diagnosed in Catalonia, Spain, between 2005 and 2011 and to identify variations based on patient and tumour characteristics. Women with invasive incident breast cancer identified from the Patient's Hospital Discharge Database [174.0-174.9 codes of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) as the primary diagnosis] and receiving primary breast conserving surgery were included in the study and were followed up to 3 and 12 months by collecting information about repeat breast cancer surgery. Reoperation rates after primary breast conserving surgery decreased from 13.0 % in 2005 to 11.7 % in 2011 at 3 months and from 14.2 % in 2005 to 12.9 % in 2011 at 12 months' follow-up. While breast conservation reoperations saw a slight, non-significant increase in the same period (from 5.7 to 7.3 % at 3 months, and from 6.0 to 7.5 % at 12 months), there was a significant decrease in radical reoperation (from 7.3 to 4.4 % at 3 months and from 8.2 to 5.4 % at 12 months). Overall, additional breast surgeries decreased among younger women. Despite the rise of breast conserving surgery, reoperation rates following initial lumpectomy in Catalonia decreased by 10 % at 3 and 12 months' follow-up, remaining low and almost unchanged. Ultimately, there was also a significant decrease in mastectomies.

  2. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence after breast conservation therapy: Outcomes of salvage mastectomy vs. salvage breast-conserving surgery and prognostic factors for salvage breast preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, Tracy E.; Kuerer, Henry M.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Lannin, Donald R.; Haffty, Bruce G. . E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To compare outcomes of salvage mastectomy (SM) and salvage breast-conserving surgery (SBCS) and study the feasibility of SBCS. Methods and Materials: Of 2,038 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy at Yale-New Haven Hospital before 1999, 166 sustained an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Outcomes and prognostic factors of patients treated with SM or SBCS were compared. Patients were considered amenable to SBCS if the recurrence was localized on mammogram and physical examination, and had pathologic size <3 cm, confined to the biopsy site, without skin or lymphovascular invasion, and with {<=}3 positive nodes. Results: Of the 146 patients definitively managed at IBTR, surgery was SM (n = 116) or SBCS (n 30). The median length of follow-up after IBTR was 13.8 years. The SM and SBCS cohorts had no significant differences, except at IBTR the SM cohort had a greater tumor size (p = 0.049). Of the SM cohort, 65.5% were considered appropriate for SBCS, and a localized relapse was predicted by estrogen-receptor positive, diploid, and detection of recurrence by mammogram. Multicentric disease correlated with BRCA1/2 mutation, estrogen-receptor negative, lymph node positive at relapse, and detection of recurrence by physical examination. Survival after IBTR was 64.5% at 10 years, with no significant difference between SM (65.7%) and SBCS (58.0%). Only 2 patients in the SBCS cohort subsequently had a second IBTR, and were salvaged with mastectomy. Conclusions: While mastectomy is considered the standard surgical salvage of IBTR, SBCS is feasible and prognostic factors are related to favorable tumor biology and early detection. Patients with BRCA1/2 germline mutations may be less appropriate for SBCS, as multicentric disease was more prevalent. Patients who underwent SBCS had comparable outcomes as those who underwent SM, but remain at continued risk for IBTR. A prospective trial evaluating repeat lumpectomy and partial breast reirradiation is

  3. Cost Analysis of a Surgical Consensus Guideline in Breast-Conserving Surgery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jennifer; Elmore, Leisha C; Cyr, Amy E; Aft, Rebecca L; Gillanders, William E; Margenthaler, Julie A

    2017-08-01

    The Society of Surgical Oncology and American Society of Radiation Oncology consensus statement was the first professional guideline in breast oncology to declare "no ink on tumor" as a negative margin in patients with stages I/II breast cancer undergoing breast-conservation therapy. We sought to analyze the financial impact of this guideline at our institution using a historic cohort. We identified women undergoing re-excision after breast-conserving surgery for invasive breast cancer from 2010 through 2013 using a prospectively maintained institutional database. Clinical and billing data were extracted from the medical record and from administrative resources using CPT codes. Descriptive statistics were used in data analysis. Of 254 women in the study population, 238 (93.7%) had stage I/II disease and 182 (71.7%) had invasive disease with ductal carcinoma in situ. A subcohort of 83 patients (32.7%) who underwent breast-conservation therapy for stage I/II disease without neoadjuvant chemotherapy had negative margins after the index procedure, per the Society of Surgical Oncology and American Society of Radiation Oncology guideline. The majority had invasive ductal carcinoma (n = 70 [84.3%]) and had invasive disease (n = 45 [54.2%]), and/or ductal carcinoma in situ (n = 49 [59.0%]) within 1 mm of the specimen margin. Seventy-nine patients underwent 1 re-excision and 4 patients underwent 2 re-excisions, accounting for 81 hours of operative time. Considering facility fees and primary surgeon billing alone, the overall estimated cost reduction would have been $195,919, or $2,360 per affected patient, under the guideline recommendations. Implementation of the Society of Surgical Oncology and American Society of Radiation Oncology consensus guideline holds great potential to optimize resource use. Application of the guideline to a retrospective cohort at our institution would have decreased the overall re-excision rate by 5.6% and reduced costs by nearly $200

  4. Quadrantectomy with oxidized regenerated cellulose ("QUORC"): an innovative oncoplastic technique in breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, Gianluca; Sanchez, Alejandro Martin; Visconti, Giuseppe; Di Leone, Alba; Salgarello, Marzia; Masetti, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Oncoplastic surgery of the breast has generated great excitement over the past years and has become an integrated component of the surgical treatment of breast cancer. Oncoplastic procedures (OPP) associate the best surgical oncologic principles to achieve wide tumor-free margins with the best principles of plastic surgery to optimize cosmetic outcomes. Thanks to oncoplastic techniques, the role of breast conserving surgery (BCS) has been extended to include a group of patients who would otherwise require mastectomy to achieve adeguate tumor clearance. However, even with the use of OPP, cosmetic outcomes may result unsatisfying when a large volume of parenchyma has to be removed, particularly in small-medium size breasts. Recently, it has been proposed the use of ORC (Oxidized Regenerated Cellulose) as a reconstructive biomaterial to optimize the aesthetic results after OPP. The aim of this article is to describe the standard pattern of an innovative surgical oncoplastic technique with ORC, that we have called "QUORC" (QUadrantectomy with Oxidized Regenerated Cellulose), to improve cosmetic results and minimize the possible postoperative complications. Breast cancer, Cosmetic results, Oncoplastic surgery results, Oxidized regenerated cellulose, QUORC.

  5. Determinants of receiving breast-conserving surgery. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1983-1986.

    PubMed

    Samet, J M; Hunt, W C; Farrow, D C

    1994-05-01

    Although breast-conserving surgery was used with increasing frequency during the 1980s for management of breast cancer, most women still undergo mastectomy, and a substantial variation has been documented in the proportion of women receiving breast-conserving surgery across regions of the country. Using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program for 1983-1986, we assessed characteristics of the county of residence as predictors of receipt of breast-conserving surgery and determined whether regional variation persisted after considering these characteristics. The data used involved all 19,661 non-Hispanic white women with localized breast cancer diagnosed in 1983 through 1986 in the nine SEER regions. Information on county characteristics was obtained from standard sources and merged with the SEER data. Univariate multivariate statistical methods were used to assess the effects of county characteristics on type of surgery for breast cancer. As anticipated, age was a strong predictor of type of surgery. In analyses that controlled for age, county characteristics that significantly predicted receipt of breast-conserving surgery included physician-to-population ratio, education and income levels, the presence of cancer center, and the presence of a city of at least 100,000. After controlling for these factors using multiple logistic regression, substantial regional variation persisted. Regional variation in treatment of localized breast cancer across the SEER regions is not explained by patient's age or county characteristics. Research is needed to address the decision making of individual patients and their physicians regarding type of surgery.

  6. Cosmetic outcome 1-5 years after breast conservative surgery, irradiation and systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, Gyöngyi; Varga, Zoltán; Lázár, György; Thurzó, László; Kahán, Zsuzsanna

    2012-04-01

    The late side-effects of the local therapy of early breast cancer depend on many patient- and therapy-related parameters. We aimed at investigating the factors that influence the cosmetic and functional outcomes among our breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery and conformal radiotherapy, with or without adjuvant systemic therapy. A study was made of the association of the cosmetic outcome after a median follow-up time of 2.4 years and the clinical data on 198 patients extracted from a prospectively compiled database. Breast tenderness occurred more frequently among patients ≤50 years old (p < 0.05). Long-term side effects were related to radiotherapy-related factors the most, while no effect of the systemic therapy could be detected. The risk of hyperpigmentation, breast edema and breast fibrosis increased by 18%, 23% and 7%, respectively for every 100 cm(3) increase in the irradiated breast volume, while that of breast edema and breast fibrosis increased by 21% and 12%, respectively for every 10 cm(3) increase in the boost volume. Patients who received a photon boost were significantly more likely to develop breast edema and fibrosis than those who received electrons (p < 0.005). Dose inhomogeneity was related to the volume of the irradiated breast (p = 0.037). Dyspigmentation developed more often among patients older than 50 years, while smoking favoured both dyspigmentation and teleangiectasia. Breast edema was related to dyspigmentation (p = 0.003), fibrosis (p < 0.001) and breast asymmetry (p = 0.032), whereas none of these abnormalities were associated with teleangiectasia. Body image changes were more frequent at a younger age (p < 0.005), while the need to change clothing habits occurred more often at an older age (p < 0.05). Radiotherapy-related parameters appear to exert the greatest effect on the overall cosmetic outcome after breast-conserving surgery and postoperative radiotherapy.

  7. Determinants for patient satisfaction regarding aesthetic outcome and skin sensitivity after breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Dahlbäck, Cecilia; Manjer, Jonas; Rehn, Martin; Ringberg, Anita

    2016-12-07

    With the development of new surgical techniques in breast cancer, such as oncoplastic breast surgery, increased knowledge of risk factors for poor satisfaction with conventional breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is needed in order to determine which patients to offer these techniques to. The aim of this study was to investigate patient satisfaction regarding aesthetic result and skin sensitivity in relation to patient, tumour, and treatment factors, in a consecutive sample of patients undergoing conventional BCS. Women eligible for BCS were recruited between February 1, 2008 and January 31, 2012 in a prospective setup. In all, 297 women completed a study-specific questionnaire 1 year after conventional BCS and radiotherapy. Potential risk factors for poor satisfaction were investigated using logistic regression analysis. The great majority of the women, 84%, were satisfied or very satisfied with the overall aesthetic result. The rate of satisfaction regarding symmetry between the breasts was 68% and for skin sensitivity in the operated breast it was 67%. Excision of more than 20% of the preoperative breast volume was associated with poor satisfaction regarding overall aesthetic outcome, as was axillary clearance. A high BMI (≥30 kg/m(2)) seemed to affect satisfaction with symmetry negatively. Factors associated with less satisfied patients regarding skin sensitivity in the operated breast were an excision of ≥20% of preoperative breast volume, a BMI of 25-30 kg/m(2), axillary clearance, and radiotherapy. Re-excision and postoperative infection were associated with lower rates of satisfaction regarding both overall aesthetic outcome and symmetry, as well as with skin sensitivity. Several factors affect patient satisfaction after BCS. A major determinant of poor satisfaction in this study was a large excision of breast volume. If the percentage of breast volume excised is estimated to exceed 20%, other techniques, such as oncoplastic breast surgery, with or

  8. The use of sequential X-ray, CT and MRI in the preoperative evaluation of breast-conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huiyu; Tan, Hongna; Gao, Jianbo; Wei, Yan; Yu, Zhan; Zhou, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the value of sequential application of molybdenum target X-ray, multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative evaluation of breast-conserving surgeries. In total, 76 patients with indications for breast-conserving surgery due to complicated breast cancer participated in the study and were assigned to either control or observation group (n=38 per group). The patients in the control group were evaluated with two sets of random combinations of molybdenum target X-ray, MSCT or MRI with ultrasound inspection, whereas the patients in the observation group were evaluated by sequential inspection methods of molybdenum target X-ray, MSCT and MRI. A comparison of surgery outcomes, incidence of complications, rate of positive surgical margins, and recurrence and survival rates in the groups during a follow-up period of 24 months was made. Comparisons of the preoperative evaluation results for tumor number, average maximum diameter, number of lymphatic metastatic groups and number of metastatic lymph nodes in the observation group showed the numbers to be significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). Conversely, the comparisons of age, tumor distribution and T-staging yielded no significant differences, validating the analysis. The percentage of successful breast-conserving surgeries in the observation group was significantly higher than that in the control group, while the incidence of complications in the observation group was lower (P<0.05). The rate of positive surgical margins and the recurrence rate of cancer in the observation group were lower than those in the control group, and the survival rate in the observation group was higher, with differences having statistical significance (P<0.05). In conclusion, the sequential application of molybdenum target X-ray, MSCT and MRI during the preoperative evaluation for breast-conserving surgery positively affects

  9. Rhomboid Flap Technique in Breast-conserving Surgery: An Alternative Method for the Reconstruction of Lumpectomy Defects

    PubMed Central

    Menekşe, Ebru; Özyazıcı, Sefa; Karateke, Faruk; Turan, Ümit; Kuvvetli, Adnan; Gökler, Cihan; Özdoğan, Mehmet; Önel, Safa

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to present our experience with rhomboid flap reconstruction, which is a simple technique, in breast cancer patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 13 patients with breast cancer who underwent rhomboid flap reconstruction. The patients were evaluated for tumor size, safe surgical margin, and other clinical and pathological features. Results The mean age of the patients was 43.1 years (range: 28–69 years). The mean tumor diameter was 30.8 mm (range: 15–60 mm). The mean of the safe margin of resection was evaluated to be 17.8 mm (range: 5–30 mm). Re-excision was required for one patient in the same session. Conclusion Rhomboid flap reconstruction can facilitate the applicability of breast-conserving surgery in early breast cancer patients with large tumor-to-breast-size ratio or tumors close to the skin.

  10. True Local Recurrences after Breast Conserving Surgery have Poor Prognosis in Patients with Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sarsenov, Dauren; Ilgun, Serkan; Ordu, Cetin; Alco, Gul; Bozdogan, Atilla; Elbuken, Filiz; Nur Pilanci, Kezban; Agacayak, Filiz; Erdogan, Zeynep; Eralp, Yesim; Dincer, Maktav

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed at investigating clinical and histopathologic features of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR) and their effects on survival after breast conservation therapy. Methods: 1,400 patients who were treated between 1998 and 2007 and had breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for early breast cancer (cT1-2/N0-1/M0) were evaluated. Demographic and pathologic parameters, radiologic data, treatment, and follow-up related features of the patients were recorded. Results: 53 patients (3.8%) had IBTR after BCS within a median follow-up of 70 months. The mean age was 45.7 years (range, 27-87 years), and 22 patients (41.5%) were younger than 40 years. 33 patients (62.3%) had true recurrence (TR) and 20 were classified as new primary (NP). The median time to recurrence was shorter in TR group than in NP group (37.0 (6-216) and 47.5 (11-192) months respectively; p = 0.338). Progesterone receptor positivity was significantly higher in the NP group (p = 0.005). The overall 5-year survival rate in the NP group (95.0%) was significantly higher than that of the TR group (74.7%, p < 0.033). Multivariate analysis showed that younger age (<40 years), large tumor size (>20 mm), high grade tumor and triple-negative molecular phenotype along with developing TR negatively affected overall survival (hazard ratios were 4.2 (CI 0.98-22.76), 4.6 (CI 1.07-13.03), 4.0 (CI 0.68-46.10), 6.5 (CI 0.03-0.68), and 6.5 (CI 0.02- 0.80) respectively, p < 0.05). Conclusions: Most of the local recurrences after BCS in our study were true recurrences, which resulted in a poorer outcome as compared to new primary tumors. Moreover, younger age (<40), large tumor size (>2 cm), high grade, triple negative phenotype, and having true recurrence were identified as independent prognostic factors with a negative impact on overall survival in this dataset of patients with recurrent breast cancer. In conjunction with a more intensive follow-up program, the role of adjuvant therapy

  11. Body image of Greek breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy or breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, Fotios; Myrgianni, Spyridoula

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and compare the body image of breast cancer patients (n = 70) whom underwent breast conserving surgery or mastectomy, as well as to compare patients' scores with that of a sample of healthy control women (n = 70). A secondary objective of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of the 10-item Greek version of the Body Image Scale, a multidimensional measure of body image changes and concerns. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses on the items of this scale resulted in a two factor solution, indicating perceived attractiveness, and body and appearance satisfaction. Comparison of the two surgical groups revealed that women treated with mastectomy felt less attractive and more self-conscious, did not like their overall appearance, were dissatisfied with their scar, and avoided contact with people. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that more general body image concerns were associated with belonging to the mastectomy group, compared to the cancer-free group of women. Implications for clinical practice and recommendations for future investigations are discussed.

  12. A new scarless oncoplastic breast-conserving surgery: modified round block technique.

    PubMed

    Zaha, Hisamitsu; Onomura, Mai; Unesoko, Mikiko

    2013-12-01

    Round block technique (RBT) is often utilized in breast-conserving surgery, but has problems of late-onset scar widening and changes in the shape or the position of the areola. We have modified RBT (MRBT) to resolve those problems. A circumferential incision was made without excision of the periareolar skin, and subcutaneous dissection was extended to the entire breast. The wound could be widened and moved onto the distant tumor by application of a wound retractor. Partial mastectomy was then performed under direct vision. The wound was easily closed without tension. Forty breast cancer patients were treated with MRBT. The median distance between the nipple and the tumor was 5.2 cm, and the median areolar size was 2.8 cm. Cosmetic results were satisfactory with minimal scar formation. There were neither subsequent changes in the shape nor the position of the areola. MRBT is a useful oncoplastic technique in patients with small areolae, and/or when the tumor location is distant from the nipple. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ipsilateral axillary recurrence after breast conservative surgery: The protective effect of whole breast radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gentilini, Oreste; Botteri, Edoardo; Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Rotmensz, Nicole; Vila, Jose; Peradze, Nickolas; Thomazini, Maria Virginia; Jereczek, Barbara Alicja; Galimberti, Viviana; Luini, Alberto; Veronesi, Paolo; Orecchia, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) is one of the possible reasons for the low rate of axillary recurrence after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). We retrospectively collected data from 4,129 consecutive patients with breast cancer ⩽2cm and negative sentinel lymph node who underwent BCS between 1997 and 2007. We compared the risk of axillary lymph node recurrence between patients treated by WBRT (n=2939) and patients who received partial breast irradiation (PBI; n=1,190) performed by a single dose of electron intraoperative radiotherapy. Median tumour diameter was 1.1cm in both WBRT and PBI. Women who received WBRT were significantly younger and expressed significantly more multifocality, extensive in situ component, negative oestrogen receptor status and HER2 over-expression than women who received PBI. After a median follow-up of 8.3years, 37 and 28 axillary recurrences were observed in the WBRT and PBI arm, respectively, corresponding to a 10-year cumulative incidence of 1.3% and 4.0% (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis resulted in a hazard ratio of 0.30 (95% CI 0.17-0.51) in favour of WBRT. In this large series of women with T1 breast cancer and negative sentinel lymph node treated by BCS, WBRT lowered the risk of axillary recurrence by two thirds as compared to PBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Outcome of oncoplastic breast-conserving surgery following bracketing wire localization for large breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Malhaire, Caroline; Hequet, Delphine; Falcou, Marie-Christine; Feron, Jean-Guillaume; Tardivon, Anne; Leduey, Alexandre; Guillot, Eugénie; Mosseri, Véronique; Rouzier, Roman; Couturaud, Benoit; Reyal, Fabien

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of breast conserving surgery comparing oncoplastic surgery (OS) and standard lumpectomy (SL) after preoperative bracketing wire localization of large neoplastic lesions. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and the mammograms of patients operated on at the Institut Curie between May 2005 and September 2011 after bracketing wire localization under mammographic and/or sonographic guidance. 113 patients underwent surgery for a pre-operative diagnosis of DCIS (n = 80), micro-invasive carcinoma (n = 9) or invasive carcinoma (n = 24), by OS (n = 73) or SL (n = 40). In the OS group, radiological size (52 mm vs 39 mm, p < 0.001) and resection volumes (246 cc vs 88 cc, p < 0.00001) were significantly higher than in the SL group. Rates of clear histologic margins (60 vs 62%, NS), complete excision of microcalcifications (78% vs 72%, NS) and re-intervention rate (40% vs 42%, NS) were equivalent. The rate of local recurrence at 24 months was 3% [0-7.1] in patients with conservative treatment (n = 3). With a median follow-up of 40 months, 5 local relapses (two with axillary metastatic involvement), two distant metastatic evolution, one contralateral breast cancer and one death unrelated to cancer occurred. Following bracketing wire localization, OS allowed the conserving management of significantly larger lesions with wider resection volumes, without significant increase in margin involvement or re-intervention rate, and equivalent rate of microcalcifications clearance compared to SL. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Breast conservation, mastectomy and axillary surgery in New South Wales women in 1992 and 1995

    PubMed Central

    Kricker, A; Haskill, J; Armstrong, B K

    2001-01-01

    To measure the increase in uptake of BCT in NSW and its determinants, we examined Cancer Registry records of 2020 women with breast cancer in 1992 and 2883 in 1995 linked to records of their surgical treatment in the NSW Inpatient Statistics' Collection. In parallel, we examined trends and determinants in axillary surgery for breast cancer. Breast conservation increased from 39% of breast cancer in 1992 to 45% in 1995, mainly in women with the smallest cancers. In 1995, mastectomy was still most common in women with larger cancers (OR for breast cancers 3+ cm relative to <1 cm = 5.6, 95% CI 2.9–10.7) and cancers that had spread beyond the breast (OR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.4–2.7 relative to localized to the breast). Urban women had fewer mastectomies than rural women. Axillary surgery, common in 1992 (78%) and 1995 (82%), fell steeply with increasing age and more often accompanied mastectomy (93% in 1995) than BCT (67% in 1995). In 1995 the odds for axillary surgery were some two-fold or more higher for all cancers 1 cm or more in diameter compared with those <1.0 cm and highest for 2.0–2.9 cm cancers (OR = 3.3 95% CI 1.7–6.7 relative to <1.0 cm). Regional spread of the cancer at diagnosis was not a strong predictor. In the absence of collection of treatment data by cancer registries, linkage of cancer registry records with hospital inpatient data is an effective alternative for monitoring breast cancer treatment trends. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11531249

  16. Endoscopy-assisted breast-conserving surgery for early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Saimura, Michiyo; Mitsuyama, Shoshu; Anan, Keisei; Koga, Kenichiro; Watanabe, Masato; Ono, Minoru; Toyoshima, Satoshi

    2013-08-01

    Endoscopic surgery is reportedly associated with smaller scars and greater patient satisfaction. Herein we evaluate the early results of endoscopy-assisted breast-conserving surgery(E-BCS). Between May 2009 and October 2010, 61 women with breast cancer underwent E-BCS. We performed E-BCS on patients with tumors measuring less than 2 cm, without skin or pectoralis muscles invasion. Any patients with microcalcified lesions or axillary lymph node metastasis were excluded. We used an endoscopic vein retractor to dissect the dorsal layer of the mammary gland from a small axillar incision. We dissected the subcutaneous layer and cut the mammary gland vertically from a periareolar incision. We evaluated the clinicopathological characteristics, the surgical outcomes, and early cosmetic results. The mean age of the patients was 58.5 years, and the mean tumor size was 1.4 cm. Sentinel node biopsy was positive in seven patients, all of whom underwent axillary node dissection. An additional intraoperative resection of the breast was performed in 12 patients. The mean length of the operation was 167 min, and the mean blood loss was 27 mL. Eight patients received a boost to the tumor bed. The cosmetic results were satisfactory, and the wound scar was inconspicuous in most patients. Herein we demonstrate that E-BCS is a feasible and safe procedure for patients with early breast cancer. It allows for a better cosmetic scar location and offers patients favorable aesthetic results in the short-term follow-up results. © 2013 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Effect of esthetic outcome after breast-conserving surgery on psychosocial functioning and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Waljee, Jennifer F; Hu, Emily S; Ubel, Peter A; Smith, Dylan M; Newman, Lisa A; Alderman, Amy K

    2008-07-10

    Although breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is often assumed to result in minimal deformity, many patients report postoperative breast asymmetry. Understanding the effect of asymmetry on psychosocial functioning is essential for patients to make an informed choice for surgery. All women who underwent BCS at the University of Michigan Medical Center (Ann Arbor, MI) during a 4-year period were surveyed using a mailed questionnaire (N = 714; response rate = 79.5%). Women were queried regarding five aspects of psychosocial functioning: quality of life (QOL), depression, fear of recurrence, stigmatization, and perceived change in health status. Postoperative breast asymmetry was assessed using items from the Breast Cancer Treatment and Outcomes Survey. Multiple regression was used to examine the relationship between breast asymmetry and each outcome, controlling for age, time from surgery in years, race, education level, disease stage, surgical treatment, and the occurrence of postoperative complications. Women with pronounced breast asymmetry were significantly more likely to feel stigmatized as a result of their breast cancer treatment (odds ratio [OR] = 4.58; 95% CI, 2.77 to 7.55) and less likely to report unchanged or improved health after treatment (OR = 0.43; 95% CI, 0.27 to 0.66). Minimal breast asymmetry was associated with higher QOL scores (86.3 v 82.4, P < .001). Finally, women with pronounced breast asymmetry were more likely to exhibit depressive symptoms (minimal asymmetry, 16.2%; moderate asymmetry, 18.0%; pronounced asymmetry, 33.7%, Wald test = 16.6; P = .002). Pronounced breast asymmetry after BCS is significantly correlated with poor psychosocial functioning. Identifying patients at risk for postoperative asymmetry at the time of consultation may allow for improved referral for supportive counseling, prosthetics, and reconstruction.

  18. Breast conserving surgery and accelerated partial breast irradiation using the MammoSite system: initial clinical experience.

    PubMed

    DiFronzo, L Andrew; Tsai, Peter I; Hwang, Julie M; Lee, John J; Ryoo, Monica C; Rahimian, Javad; Tome, Michael; Takasugi, Jan K; Haigh, Philip I

    2005-08-01

    Balloon catheter-based accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) may result in desirable short-term outcomes in patients undergoing breast conserving surgery. Prospective consecutive case series. Tertiary multidisciplinary referral center. Forty selected patients with invasive breast carcinoma undergoing breast conserving surgery and MammoSite device placement. Breast conserving surgery, sentinel and/or axillary node dissection, placement of the new balloon catheter applicator (MammoSite device), and APBI. Infection, early and late seroma, device explantation, time to initiating APBI, acute toxic effects on the skin, and cosmesis using the Harvard Scale. Thirty-nine patients underwent MammoSite device placement at the time of lumpectomy; 1 patient underwent percutaneous device placement after lumpectomy. Nineteen patients (49%) had drainage catheters placed in the breast cavity at the time of lumpectomy. Wound infection developed in 3 patients (8%). Five devices (12%) were explanted because of unfavorable final pathological findings or infection. The mean time to the start of APBI in patients who did not undergo simultaneous drain placement was 7.2 days (range, 5-12 days), compared with 5.1 days (range, 3-8 days) in patients who did (P = .008). With a mean follow-up of 13.3 months (range, 2-28 months), patients completing APBI had limited toxic effects on the skin, with excellent or good cosmetic results in 39 patients (97%). Use of the MammoSite system in APBI has favorable short-term outcomes. Infection and radiation treatment delay are common and may warrant use of perioperative antibiotics and drain placement, respectively. A small number of patients who have device placement at the time of lumpectomy will require explantation because of unfavorable final pathological findings. Short-term outcomes of MammoSite brachytherapy support further studies comparing APBI with standard whole breast irradiation in patients undergoing breast conserving surgery.

  19. Autologous fat graft in postmastectomy pain syndrome following breast conservative surgery and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Maione, Luca; Vinci, Valeriano; Caviggioli, Fabio; Klinger, Francesco; Banzatti, Barbara; Catania, Barbara; Lisa, Andrea; Klinger, Marco

    2014-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide, affecting one in eight women. Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) has become a well-established alternative to mastectomy in the treatment of breast cancer, providing a less invasive treatment. Just as life expectancy after breast cancer has improved, so has morbidity increased. One of the most relevant and debilitating consequences of oncological breast surgery is postmastectomy pain syndrome (PMPS). Our results published in 2011 on the treatment of PMPS in patients who had undergone mastectomy and radiotherapy and our experience in scar treatment with fat grafts were the theoretical bases for this prospective study. From April 2011 to April 2012 a total of 96 patients, who had undergone lumpectomy and radiation therapy, with the diagnosis of PMPS were considered for fat grafts. We performed autologous fat grafting in 59 patients (study group), whereas 37 patients did not receive any further surgical procedure (control group). Pain assessment was performed using the visual analog scale (VAS) before and after treatment in the treated group and in the control group at the first visit and the control visit, with a mean follow-up of 10 months. Results were analyzed using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Four patients were lost to follow-up (two patients in the control group and two patients in the treated group). A significant VAS pain decrease was detected in patients treated with autologous fat grafting (3.1 point reduction, p ≤ 0.005). Because of the safety, efficacy, and optimal tolerability of the procedure, we believe that fat grafting can be considered useful in treating PMPS in patients who have undergone BCS and radiotherapy. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  20. An optoacoustic guide with augmented reality system towards precision breast conserving surgery (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Lu; Liu, Kaiming; Xia, Yan; Wu, Jiayingzi; Li, Rui; Wang, Pu; Han, Linda K.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2017-02-01

    Breast-conserving surgery is a well-accepted breast cancer treatment. However, it is still challenging for the surgeon to accurately localize the tumor during the surgery. Also, the guidance provided by current methods is 1 dimensional distance information, which is indirect and not intuitive. Therefore, it creates problems on a large re-excision rate, and a prolonged surgical time. To solve these problems, we have developed a fiber-delivered optoacoustic guide (OG), which mimics the traditional localization guide wire and is preoperatively placed into tumor mass, and an augmented reality (AR) system to provide real-time visualization on the location of the tumor with sub-millimeter variance. By a nano-composite light diffusion sphere and light absorbing layer formed on the tip of an optical fiber, the OG creates an omnidirectional acoustic source inside tumor mass under pulsed laser excitation. The optoacoustic signal generated has a high dynamic range ( 58dB) and spreads in a large apex angle of 320 degrees. Then, an acoustic radar with three ultrasound transducers is attached to the breast skin, and triangulates the location of the OG tip. With an AR system to sense the location of the acoustic radar, the relative position of the OG tip inside the tumor to the AR display is calculated and rendered. This provides direct visual feedback of the tumor location to surgeons, which will greatly ease the surgical planning during the operation and save surgical time. A proof-of-concept experiment using a tablet and a stereo-vision camera is demonstrated and 0.25 mm tracking variance is achieved.

  1. Full-dose intraoperative radiotherapy with electrons during breast-conserving surgery: experience with 590 cases.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Umberto; Orecchia, Roberto; Luini, Alberto; Galimberti, Viviana; Gatti, Giovanna; Intra, Mattia; Veronesi, Paolo; Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Ciocca, Mario; Lazzari, Roberta; Caldarella, Pietro; Simsek, Serife; Silva, Luzemira Santos; Sances, Daniele

    2005-07-01

    Previous studies show that local recurrences after breast-conserving treatment occur in the site of the primary tumor. The need for postoperative radiotherapy on the whole breast is challenged in favor of radiotherapy limited to the area of the breast at high risk of recurrence. The new mobile linear accelerators easily moved close to the operating table to allow the full-dose irradiation during surgery. From July 1999 to December 2003, 590 patients affected by unifocal breast carcinoma up to a diameter of 2.5 cm received wide resection of the breast followed by intraoperative radiotherapy with electrons (ELIOT). Most patients received 21 Gy intraoperatively, biologically equivalent to 58 to 60 Gy in standard fractionation. Patients were evaluated 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery, and thereafter every 6 months, to look for early, intermediate, late complications, and other events. After a follow-up from 4 to 57 months (mean, 24 months; median, 20 months), 19 patients (3.2%) developed breast fibrosis, mild in 18, severe in 1, which resolved within 24 months. Three patients (0.5%) developed local recurrences, 3 patients ipsilateral carcinomas in other quadrants and other 5 patients contralateral breast carcinoma. One patient (0.2%) died of distant metastases. ELIOT is a safe method for treating conservatively operated breasts, avoids the long period of postoperative radiotherapy, and reduces drastically the cost of radiotherapy. ELIOT reduces radiation to normal tissues and organs. Results on short-term and middle-term toxicity up to 5 years of follow-up are good. Data on local control are encouraging.

  2. Full-Dose Intraoperative Radiotherapy With Electrons During Breast-Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Veronesi, Umberto; Orecchia, Roberto; Luini, Alberto; Galimberti, Viviana; Gatti, Giovanna; Intra, Mattia; Veronesi, Paolo; Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Ciocca, Mario; Lazzari, Roberta; Caldarella, Pietro; Simsek, Serife; Silva, Luzemira Santos; Sances, Daniele

    2005-01-01

    Background: Previous studies show that local recurrences after breast-conserving treatment occur in the site of the primary tumor. The need for postoperative radiotherapy on the whole breast is challenged in favor of radiotherapy limited to the area of the breast at high risk of recurrence. The new mobile linear accelerators easily moved close to the operating table to allow the full-dose irradiation during surgery. Patients and Methods: From July 1999 to December 2003, 590 patients affected by unifocal breast carcinoma up to a diameter of 2.5 cm received wide resection of the breast followed by intraoperative radiotherapy with electrons (ELIOT). Most patients received 21 Gy intraoperatively, biologically equivalent to 58 to 60 Gy in standard fractionation. Patients were evaluated 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery, and thereafter every 6 months, to look for early, intermediate, late complications, and other events. Results: After a follow-up from 4 to 57 months (mean, 24 months; median, 20 months), 19 patients (3.2%) developed breast fibrosis, mild in 18, severe in 1, which resolved within 24 months. Three patients (0.5%) developed local recurrences, 3 patients ipsilateral carcinomas in other quadrants and other 5 patients contralateral breast carcinoma. One patient (0.2%) died of distant metastases. Conclusions: ELIOT is a safe method for treating conservatively operated breasts, avoids the long period of postoperative radiotherapy, and reduces drastically the cost of radiotherapy. ELIOT reduces radiation to normal tissues and organs. Results on short-term and middle-term toxicity up to 5 years of follow-up are good. Data on local control are encouraging. PMID:15973107

  3. Breast conservation surgery versus total mastectomy among women with localized breast cancer in Soweto, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Cubasch, Herbert; Joffe, Maureen; Ruff, Paul; Dietz, Donald; Rosenbaum, Evan; Murugan, Nivashni; Chih, Ming Tsai; Ayeni, Oluwatosin; Dickens, Caroline; Crew, Katherine; Jacobson, Judith S; Neugut, Alfred

    2017-01-01

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) has become the preferred surgical option for the management of patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer in high-income countries. However, little is known about the distribution and determinants of BCS in low-and middle-income countries, especially those with high HIV prevalence. We compared demographic and clinical characteristics of female patients who received BCS and those who received total mastectomy (TM) for nonmetastatic invasive carcinoma of the breast in Soweto, South Africa, 2009-2011. We also developed a multivariable logistic regression model of predictors of type of surgery. Of 445 patients, 354 (80%) underwent TM and 91 (20%) BCS. Of 373 patients screened for HIV, 59 (15.8%) tested positive. Eighty-two of 294 patients with stage I/II disease (28%), but just 9 of 151 (6%) with stage III disease had BCS (p<0.001). All women who received BCS (except for seven who received completion mastectomy within 6 weeks of BCS) and 235 (66.4%) women who received TM were referred for radiation therapy (RT). In our multivariable analysis, age group 50-59 years (OR = 2.28, 95% CI = 1.1-4.8) and ≥70 years (OR = 9.55, 95% CI = 2.9-31.2) vs. age group <40 years, stage at diagnosis (stage II (OR = 3.79, 95% CI = 1.6-8.2) and stage III (OR = 27.8, 95% CI = 9.0-78.8) vs. stage 1, HIV (HIV positive (OR = 3.19, 95% CI = 1.3-7.9) vs. HIV negative) and HER2-enriched subtype (OR = 3.50, 95% CI = 1.2-10.1) vs. triple negative were independently associated with TM. TM was more common than BCS among patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer in Soweto, not only among patients with locally advanced disease at diagnosis, but also among women with stage I and II disease.

  4. Increased Risk of Surgical Site Infection Among Breast-Conserving Surgery Re-Excisions

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Margaret A.; Nickel, Katelin B.; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Wallace, Anna E.; Mines, Daniel; Miller, J. Philip; Fraser, Victoria J.; Warren, David K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after primary breast-conserving surgery (BCS) versus re-excision among women with carcinoma in situ or invasive breast cancer. Methods We established a retrospective cohort of women aged 18–64 years with ICD-9-CM procedure or CPT-4 codes for BCS from 6/29/2004–12/31/2010. Prior insurance plan enrollment of at least 180 days was required to establish the index BCS; subsequent re-excisions within 180 days were identified. SSIs occurring 2–90 days after BCS were identified by ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes. The attributable surgery was defined based on SSI onset compared to the BCS date(s). A chi-square test and generalized estimating equations model were used to compare the incidence of SSI after index and re-excision BCS procedures. Results 23,001 women with 28,827 BCS were identified; 23.2% of women had >1 BCS. The incidence of SSI was 1.82% (418/23,001) for the index BCS and 2.44% (142/5,826) for re-excision BCS (p=0.002). The risk of SSI after re-excision remained significantly higher after accounting for multiple procedures within a woman (odds ratio 1.34, 95% confidence interval, 1.07–1.68). Conclusions Surgeons need to be aware of the increased risk of SSI after re-excision BCS compared to the initial procedure. Our results suggest that risk adjustment of SSI rates for re-excision would allow for better comparison of BCS SSI rates between institutions. PMID:25358666

  5. [A Study of Patients Who Underwent Breast-Conserving Surgery and Developed Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia(COP)].

    PubMed

    Ueno, Soichiro; Nakakuma, Takashi; Murata, Osamu; Sengoku, Norihiko; Karikomi, Kazuhiro; Honma, Megumi

    2016-11-01

    Of the 210 patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer and received radiation therapy for 3 years from April 2012 to March 2015 at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology of our hospital, 6 were diagnosed with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia(COP)-like pneumonia and treated as reported. The mean age of the patients was 51years(40- 65 years), and the pathological subtypes were the luminal type(5 cases)and HER2 type(1case ), all of which were treated with radiation therapy for breast conservation. Postoperative systemic therapy included hormonal therapy with anastrozole in 2 cases, tamoxifen plus LH-RH agonist in 3 cases, and chemotherapy in 1case. The mean onset time of COP was 4.2 months after the completion of irradiation therapy, and all of the 5 patients who received endocrine therapy received it concurrently with radiation therapy. The major symptoms were fever(4 cases)and cough(6 cases). Chest radiography showed an infiltrative shadow consistent with pneumonia. Steroid therapy was effective in all cases while antibiotics were not. It was inferred that COP should be regarded as one of the complications of radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery.

  6. Diffusion of good practices of care and decline of the association with case volume: the example of breast conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fedeli, Ugo; Alba, Natalia; Schievano, Elena; Visentin, Cristiana; Rosato, Rosalba; Zorzi, Manuel; Ruscitti, Giancarlo; Spolaore, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    Background Several previous studies conducted on cancer registry data and hospital discharge records (HDR) have found an association between hospital volume and the recourse to breast conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer. The aim of the current study is to depict concurrent time trends in the recourse to BCS and its association with hospital volume. Methods Admissions of breast cancer patients for BCS or mastectomy in the period 2000–2004 were identified from the discharge database of the Veneto Region (Italy). The role of procedural volume (low < 50, medium 50–100, high > 100 breast cancer surgeries/year), and of individual risk factors obtainable from HDR was assessed through a hierarchical log-binomial regression. Results Overall, the recourse to BCS was higher in medium (risk ratio = 1.12, 95% confidence interval 1.07–1.18) and high-volume (1.09, 1.03–1.14) compared to low-volume hospitals. The proportion of patients treated in low-volume hospitals dropped from 22% to 12%, with a concurrent increase in the activity of medium-volume providers. The increase over time in breast conservation (globally from 56% to 67%) was steeper in the categories of low- and medium-volume hospitals with respect to high caseload. Conclusion The growth in the recourse to BCS was accompanied by a decline of the association with hospital volume; larger centers probably acted as early adopters of breast conservation strategies that subsequently spread to smaller providers. PMID:17945000

  7. For-Profit Hospital Ownership Status and Use of Brachytherapy after Breast-Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Sounok; Soulos, Pamela R.; Herrin, Jeph; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Yu, James B.; Lesnikoski, Beth-Ann; Ross, Joseph S.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Gross, Cary P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Little is known about the relation between surgical care for breast cancer at for-profit hospitals and subsequent use of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT). Among Medicare beneficiaries, we examined whether hospital ownership status is associated with the use of breast brachytherapy – a newer and more expensive modality – as well as overall RT. METHODS We conducted a retrospective study of female Medicare beneficiaries receiving breast-conserving surgery for invasive breast cancer in 2008 and 2009. We assessed the relationship between hospital ownership and receipt of brachytherapy or overall RT using hierarchical generalized linear models. RESULTS The sample consisted of 35,118 women, 8.0% of whom had surgery at for-profit hospitals. Among patients who received RT, those who underwent surgery at for-profit hospitals were significantly more likely to receive brachytherapy (20.2%) than patients treated at not-for-profit hospitals (15.2%; OR for for-profit vs. not-for-profit: 1.50; 95%CI: 1.23–1.84; p<0.001). Among women aged 66–79, there was no relation between hospital ownership status and overall RT use. Among women aged 80–94 years old – the group least likely to benefit from RT due to shorter life expectancy – receipt of surgery at a for-profit hospital was significantly associated with higher overall RT use (OR: 1.22; 95%CI: 1.03–1.45, p=0.03) and brachytherapy use (OR: 1.66; 95%CI: 1.18–2.34, p=0.003). CONCLUSIONS Surgical care at for-profit hospitals was associated with increased use of the newer and more expensive RT modality, brachytherapy. Among the oldest women, who are least likely to benefit from RT, surgical care at a for-profit hospital was associated with higher overall RT use, with this difference largely driven by the use of brachytherapy. PMID:24787104

  8. Oncoplastic breast conservation surgery is oncologically safe when compared to wide local excision and mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Mansell, J; Weiler-Mithoff, E; Stallard, S; Doughty, J C; Mallon, E; Romics, L

    2017-04-01

    Support for the oncological safety of oncoplastic breast conservation surgery (OBCS) is mostly based on evidence comparing recurrence rates after OBCS to wide local excision (WLE). However, OBCS is often indicated for larger cancers and oncological results should also be compared to patients treated with mastectomy. In this study we compared recurrence and survival following OBCS, mastectomy and WLE. Patients treated with OBCS between 2009 and 2012 were identified from a prospectively maintained database. For comparison, consecutive patients treated with WLE or mastectomy with or without immediate reconstruction (Ms ± IR) over the same time period were identified. Histological variables of patients were compared using Fisher Exact or Chi squared tests, and recurrence and survival were compared using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression survival analysis. 980 patients' data were analysed (OBCS: n = 104; WLE: n = 558; Ms ± IR: n = 318). Tumour size, grade, nodal status, ER, and PR expression of patients treated with OBCS were all significantly more adverse compared with patients treated with WLE (p < 0.001). These histological variables were similar in patients treated with Ms ± IR and OBCS. 5-year local recurrence rates were similar in all three groups (WLE: 3.4 per cent, OBCS: 2 per cent, Ms ± IR: 2.6 per cent; log rank = 0.973), while distant recurrence rates were higher after Ms ± IR and OBCS (Ms ± IR:13.1 per cent, OBCS:7.5 per cent, WLE:3.3 per cent; log rank: p < 0.001). OBCS is oncologically safe in patients even when histological results are similar to patients treated with Ms ± IR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-Term Results of Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy (Targit) Boost During Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Jayant S.; Baum, Michael; Tobias, Jeffrey S.; Wenz, Frederik; Massarut, Samuele; Keshtgar, Mohammed; Hilaris, Basil; Saunders, Christobel; Williams, Norman R.; Brew-Graves, Chris; Corica, Tammy; Roncadin, Mario; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Suetterlin, Marc; Bulsara, Max; Joseph, David

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We have previously shown that delivering targeted radiotherapy to the tumour bed intraoperatively is feasible and desirable. In this study, we report on the feasibility, safety, and long-term efficacy of TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy (Targit), using the Intrabeam system. Methods and Materials: A total of 300 cancers in 299 unselected patients underwent breast-conserving surgery and Targit as a boost to the tumor bed. After lumpectomy, a single dose of 20 Gy was delivered intraoperatively. Postoperative external beam whole-breast radiotherapy excluded the usual boost. We also performed a novel individualized case control (ICC) analysis that computed the expected recurrences for the cohort by estimating the risk of recurrence for each patient using their characteristics and follow-up period. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. The median follow up was 60.5 months (range, 10-122 months). Eight patients have had ipsilateral recurrence: 5-year Kaplan Meier estimate for ipsilateral recurrence is 1.73% (SE 0.77), which compares well with that seen in the boosted patients in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer study (4.3%) and the UK STAndardisation of breast RadioTherapy study (2.8%). In a novel ICC analysis of 242 of the patients, we estimated that there should be 11.4 recurrences; in this group, only 6 recurrences were observed. Conclusions: Lumpectomy and Targit boost combined with external beam radiotherapy results in a low local recurrence rate in a standard risk patient population. Accurate localization and the immediacy of the treatment that has a favorable effect on tumour microenvironment may contribute to this effect. These long-term data establish the long-term safety and efficacy of the Targit technique and generate the hypothesis that Targit boost might be superior to an external beam boost in its efficacy and justifies a randomized trial.

  10. Prognostic Impact of Time to Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence after Breast Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gosset, Marie; Hamy, Anne-Sophie; Mallon, Peter; Delomenie, Myriam; Mouttet, Delphine; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Lae, Marick; Fourquet, Alain; Rouzier, Roman; Reyal, Fabien; Feron, Jean-Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Background The poor prognosis of patients who experience ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast conserving surgery (BCS) is established. A short time between primary cancer and IBTR is a prognostic factor but no clinically relevant threshold was determined. Classification of IBTR may help tailor treatment strategies. Purpose We determined a specific time frame, which differentiates IBTR into early and late recurrence, and identified prognostic factors for patients with IBTR at time of the recurrence. Methods We analyzed 2209 patients with IBTR after BCS. We applied the optimal cut-points method for survival data to determine the cut-off times to IBTR. A subgroup analysis was performed by hormone receptor (HR) status. Survival analyses were performed using a Cox proportional hazard model to determine clinical features associated with distant-disease-free survival (DDFS) after IBTR. We therefor built decision trees. Results On the 828 metastatic events observed, the majority occurred within the first 3 months after IBTR: 157 in the HR positive group, 98 in the HR negative group. We found different prognostic times to IBTR: 49 months in the HR positive group, 33 in the HR negative group. After multivariate analysis, time to IBTR was the first discriminant prognostic factor in both groups (HR 0.65 CI95% [0.54–0.79] and 0.42 [0.30–0.57] respectively). The other following variables were significantly correlated with the DDFS: the initial number of positive lymph nodes for both groups, the initial tumor size and grade for HR positive tumors. Conclusion A short interval time to IBTR is the strongest factor of poor prognosis and reflects occult distant disease. It would appear that prognosis after IBTR depends more on clinical and histological parameters than on surgical treatment. A prospective trial in a low-risk group of patients to validate the safety of salvage BCS instead of mastectomy in IBTR is needed. PMID:27494111

  11. Towards a personalized surgical margin for breast conserving surgery-Implications of field cancerization in local recurrence.

    PubMed

    Lebya, Katarina; Garcia-Smith, Randi; Swaminathan, Radha; Jones, Anna; Russell, John; Joste, Nancy; Bisoffi, Marco; Trujillo, Kristina

    2017-02-01

    The amount of normal tissue that should be excised during breast conserving surgery is widely debated. Tissue adjacent to breast tumors, although histologically normal, possesses many of the molecular abnormalities found in tumor tissues. Here, we propose that the ideal physical distance for a surgical margin may not be universal. Rather, an adequate surgical margin likely varies from patient to patient, depending on the biology of the tissue that remains after surgery. J. Surg. Oncol. 2017;115:109-115. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Use of autologous fat grafting for reconstruction postmastectomy and breast conserving surgery: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Agha, Riaz A; Goodacre, Tim; Orgill, Dennis P

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There is growing interest in the potential use of autologous fat grafting (AFG) for the purposes of breast reconstruction. However, concerns have been raised regarding the technique's clinical effectiveness, safety and interference with screening mammography. The objective of this systematic review was to determine the oncological, clinical, aesthetic and functional, patient reported, process and radiological outcomes for AFG. Methods and analysis All original studies, including randomised controlled trials, cohorts studies, case–control studies, case series and case reports involving women undergoing breast reconstruction. All AFG techniques performed for the purposes of reconstruction in the postmastectomy or breast conserving surgery setting will be considered. Outcomes are defined within this protocol along; oncological, clinical, aesthetic and functional, patient reported, process and radiological domains. The search strategy has been devised to find papers about ‘fat grafting and breast reconstruction’ and is outlined within the body of this protocol. The full search strategy is outlined within the body of the protocol. The following electronic databases will be searched from 1 January 1986 to 6 June 2013: PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCOPUS, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SciELO, The Cochrane Library, including the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effect (DARE), the Cochrane Methodology Register, Health Technology Assessment Database, the NHS Economic Evaluation Databases and Cochrane Groups, ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials Database, the World Health Organisation (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, UpToDate.com, NHS Evidence and the York Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Grey literature searches will also be conducted as detailed in our review protocol. Eligibility assessment occurred in two stages, title and

  13. Breast conservation surgery versus total mastectomy among women with localized breast cancer in Soweto, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Donald; Rosenbaum, Evan; Murugan, Nivashni; Chih, Ming Tsai; Ayeni, Oluwatosin; Dickens, Caroline; Crew, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Breast conserving surgery (BCS) has become the preferred surgical option for the management of patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer in high-income countries. However, little is known about the distribution and determinants of BCS in low-and middle-income countries, especially those with high HIV prevalence. Methods We compared demographic and clinical characteristics of female patients who received BCS and those who received total mastectomy (TM) for nonmetastatic invasive carcinoma of the breast in Soweto, South Africa, 2009–2011. We also developed a multivariable logistic regression model of predictors of type of surgery. Results Of 445 patients, 354 (80%) underwent TM and 91 (20%) BCS. Of 373 patients screened for HIV, 59 (15.8%) tested positive. Eighty-two of 294 patients with stage I/II disease (28%), but just 9 of 151 (6%) with stage III disease had BCS (p<0.001). All women who received BCS (except for seven who received completion mastectomy within 6 weeks of BCS) and 235 (66.4%) women who received TM were referred for radiation therapy (RT). In our multivariable analysis, age group 50–59 years (OR = 2.28, 95% CI = 1.1–4.8) and ≥70 years (OR = 9.55, 95% CI = 2.9–31.2) vs. age group <40 years, stage at diagnosis (stage II (OR = 3.79, 95% CI = 1.6–8.2) and stage III (OR = 27.8, 95% CI = 9.0–78.8) vs. stage 1, HIV (HIV positive (OR = 3.19, 95% CI = 1.3–7.9) vs. HIV negative) and HER2-enriched subtype (OR = 3.50, 95% CI = 1.2–10.1) vs. triple negative were independently associated with TM. Conclusion TM was more common than BCS among patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer in Soweto, not only among patients with locally advanced disease at diagnosis, but also among women with stage I and II disease. PMID:28797046

  14. Quality of life following total mastectomy with and without reconstruction versus breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer: A case-controlled cohort study.

    PubMed

    Howes, Benjamin H L; Watson, David I; Xu, Chris; Fosh, Beverley; Canepa, Maximiliano; Dean, Nicola R

    2016-09-01

    Patient-reported outcomes and quality of life following mastectomy are not well understood. This study evaluates the quality of life following surgery for breast cancer and compares outcomes following breast-conserving surgery versus total mastectomy with or without reconstruction. A case-controlled cross-sectional study was conducted using the validated BREAST-Q™ questionnaire and a study-specific questionnaire to determine patient's views about surgical outcomes. Questionnaires were completed by patients following breast-conserving surgery and total mastectomy with or without reconstruction and by controls without breast cancer. A one-way ANOVA was used to compare mean BREAST-Q™ scores between groups and post hoc analysis using Tukey's and Kruskal-Wallis tests. BREAST-Q™ questionnaires were completed by 400 women (123 controls, 97 breast conservations, 93 mastectomies without reconstruction, 87 mastectomies with reconstruction). Women who had undergone mastectomy and reconstruction had higher scores in satisfaction with breast and sexual well-being domains compared with women who had breast-conserving surgery, and women who had total mastectomy without reconstruction had the lowest scores in these two domains. There was no difference in psychosocial well-being between the groups. Women who had undergone breast-conserving surgery scored the lowest in the physical well-being chest domain and the majority reported breast asymmetry. Our study suggests that women who undergo total mastectomy and breast reconstruction for cancer achieve a quality-of-life outcome that is at least as good as that following breast-conserving surgery. Furthermore, breast conservation has been found to be associated with lower physical well-being (i.e., more pain and discomfort) in the chest area and poorer sexual well-being outcomes. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  15. Using DRS during breast conserving surgery: identifying robust optical parameters and influence of inter-patient variation

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Lisanne L.; Hendriks, Benno H. W.; van Duijnhoven, Frederieke; Peeters-Baas, Marie-Jeanne T. F. D. Vrancken; Van de Vijver, Koen; Loo, Claudette E.; Jóźwiak, Katarzyna; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Ruers, Theo J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Successful breast conserving surgery consists of complete removal of the tumor while sparing healthy surrounding tissue. Despite currently available imaging and margin assessment tools, recognizing tumor tissue at a resection margin during surgery is challenging. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), which uses light for tissue characterization, can potentially guide surgeons to prevent tumor positive margins. However, inter-patient variation and changes in tissue physiology occurring during the resection might hamper this light-based technology. Here we investigate how inter-patient variation and tissue status (in vivo vs ex vivo) affect the performance of the DRS optical parameters. In vivo and ex vivo measurements of 45 breast cancer patients were obtained and quantified with an analytical model to acquire the optical parameters. The optical parameter representing the ratio between fat and water provided the best discrimination between normal and tumor tissue, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.94. There was no substantial influence of other patient factors such as menopausal status on optical measurements. Contrary to expectations, normalization of the optical parameters did not improve the discriminative power. Furthermore, measurements taken in vivo were not significantly different from the measurements taken ex vivo. These findings indicate that DRS is a robust technology for the detection of tumor tissue during breast conserving surgery. PMID:28018735

  16. Evaluation of the quality of life of women treated due to breast cancer using amputation or breast conserving surgery in the early postoperative period.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Andrzej; Licznerska, Bernardeta; Rhone, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    Selection of the treatment method in breast cancer patients and its consequences may affect their quality of life through somatic, psychical, and social factors. The aim of the study was early evaluation of the quality of life of women after mastectomy vs. breast conserving surgery. The study included 100 women aged 31 to 79 years (mean: 57) who underwent surgery due to breast cancer (amputation: 52; breast conserving surgery: 48 women) at the Cancer Centre in Bydgoszcz in 2014. The QLQ C-30 and QLQ BR-23 questionnaires were used to evaluate the quality of life of the patients 3 months after surgery. In the Global Health Status/QoL domain, the mean score for women after amputation and breast conserving surgery was 49 and 53, respectively; for Physical Functioning, the scores were 70 and 75, and for Role Functioning, 62 and 68, respectively. For Cognitive Functioning, the mean score was 74 and 73; for Emotional Functioning - 62 and 68, and for Social Functioning 64 and 60, respectively. The difference in the arm symptoms domain was significant at 46 and 33 points, respectively (p = 0.004). The patients treated with breast conserving surgery had a better body image than women after amputation - the mean score was 52 and 66, respectively (p = 0.01). With respect to Global Health Status/QoL and Physical Functioning, the quality of life of women in the early postoperative period was similar in women after breast amputation and those who underwent breast conserving surgery. Patients treated with breast conserving surgery had a better score for body image, while those who underwent amputation more often suffered from arm symptoms, such as pain, oedema, and problems with raising of the limb.

  17. [Oncoplastic versus conventional breast conserving surgery. A comparison of clinicopathological findings, cosmetic results and quality of life in 60 cases].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Gulyás, Gusztáv; Kovács, Eszter; Sándor, Zsuzsanna; Polgár, Csaba; Bartal, Alexandra; Kásler, Miklós

    2014-06-01

    Oncoplastic surgical techniques seem to be suitable for realizing the goal of retaining cosmesis following radical removal of breast tumors. The purpose of the present study is to provide a clinical and pathological comparison of conventional (BCS) and oncoplastic (OPS) breast-conserving surgeries, supplemented by a subjective assessment of cosmesis and quality of life of patients, the first time on a Hungarian sample. The authors performed a retrospective assessment of clinicopathological data of 60 advanced oncoplastic and 60 conventional breast-conserving surgery cases, and following adjuvant radiotherapy, the authors also surveyed patients for cosmetic results and quality of life (EORTC BR23). Comparison of the results was performed by statistical methods. The two groups did not differ substantially in age, tumor location, breast size, type of axillary surgery (sentinel node biopsy vs. axillary lymphadenectomy), tumor grade and receptor status. Tumor size was significantly greater (p=0.0009), the rate of quadranectomies was higher (p=0.0032), metastases in the regional lymph nodes (p=0.0043) and the administration of adjuvant chemotherapy (p=0.0122) were more frequent in the OPS group. The duration of surgeries was longer (p<0.001), the weight of the specimens was greater (p=0.0308), the rate of completion surgeries due to microscopically positive surgical margins was significantly smaller (p=0.0306) in the OPS than in the BCS group. There was no difference between the two groups in the rate of complications and the time elapsed to the start of adjuvant treatment. The cosmetic outcome was clearly superior in the OPS group (p<0.001), and OPS patients had fewer arm, shoulder (p=0.0399), and chest pain (of the affected side) (p=0.0304), upper limb movements of the operated side were also better (p=0.006). The short follow-up period of the OPS group (mean 32.2 vs. 8.7 months in BCS and OPS, respectively) did not allow a meaningful assessment of oncologic endpoints

  18. Should patients with early breast cancer still be offered the choice of breast conserving surgery or mastectomy?

    PubMed

    Johns, N; Dixon, J M

    2016-11-01

    Breast conserving therapy (BCT) for breast cancer aims to achieve long-term local disease control with reduced local morbidity. BCT has similar long-term survival outcomes to mastectomy in patients with early breast cancer and recent studies have reported similar rates of recurrence compared with mastectomy. An increasing number of studies have shown improved overall survival among women treated with BCT regardless of cancer phenotype compared with mastectomy. Despite BCT being at least equivalent in outcome to mastectomy many women with small breast cancers continue to be treated by mastectomy and several studies in the last decade have shown a trend of increasing numbers of unilateral and bilateral mastectomies. The advent of increasingly effective neoadjuvant treatment has allowed even more women to have breast conservation. Not only has neoadjuvant therapy been shown to increase the rates of BCT, it does so without increasing in breast recurrence rates. Patients who are suitable for BCT should be advised that BCT is the best treatment option for them. They should be informed that not only does it confer at least equivalent survival and local recurrence rates but that compared with mastectomy it has the advantages of less complications, better quality of life and many less operations if reconstructive surgery is performed. It may no longer be appropriate to offer women suitable for BCT the choice of mastectomy or BCT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  19. Oncologic safety of breast conserving surgery after tumour downsizing by neoadjuvant therapy: a retrospective single centre cohort study.

    PubMed

    Fitzal, F; Riedl, O; Mittlböck, M; Dubsky, P; Bartsch, R; Steger, G; Jakesz, R; Gnant, M

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study is to analyse local recurrence rates in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (nCT) comparing mastecomized (MX) patients with those undergoing breast conserving therapy (BCT). Patients undergoing breast cancer surgery after nCT (3xCMF or 3-6xED) between 1995 and 2007 at our department were retrospectively analysed. The median follow up was 60 months for 308 patients. Patients who were downsized from MX to BCT with partial or complete response (n = 104) had a similar local recurrence free survival (LRFS) compared to patients who did not experience successful downsizing (n = 67) and finally undergoing MX (LRFS MX-BCT 81% vs. MX-MX 91%; P = 0.79). Uni- and multivariate analyses demonstrated that BCT itself was not an independent prognostic factor for a worse LRFS (P = 0.07 and 0.14). After no pathologic change or progressive disease the risk of local recurrence was increased in patients undergoing BCT (MX-BCT; n = 6 LRFS 66%) compared with MX (n = 44; LRFS 90%; P = 0.04). Overall survival in general was better for the BCT group (n = 197) compared with MX group (n = 111) regardless of clinical response (92% vs. 72%; P < 0.0001). Breast conservation, nodal negativity and low or medium grade histology were prognostic factors for an improved OS (P = 0.02, 0.01, 0.004). In conclusion, our study suggests that BCT is oncologically safe after tumour downsizing by nCT in patients primarily scheduled for mastectomy. These patients, however, should not be treated with breast conservation in the absence of any proven response after nCT.

  20. Sequence of Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Jobsen, Jan J.; Palen, Job van der; Brinkhuis, Marieel; Ong, Francisca; Struikmans, Henk

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The optimal sequence of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in breast-conserving therapy is unknown. Methods and Materials: From 1983 through 2007, a total of 641 patients with 653 instances of breast-conserving therapy (BCT), received both chemotherapy and radiotherapy and are the basis of this analysis. Patients were divided into three groups. Groups A and B comprised patients treated before 2005, Group A radiotherapy first and Group B chemotherapy first. Group C consisted of patients treated from 2005 onward, when we had a fixed sequence of radiotherapy first, followed by chemotherapy. Results: Local control did not show any differences among the three groups. For distant metastasis, no difference was shown between Groups A and B. Group C, when compared with Group A, showed, on univariate and multivariate analyses, a significantly better distant metastasis-free survival. The same was noted for disease-free survival. With respect to disease-specific survival, no differences were shown on multivariate analysis among the three groups. Conclusion: Radiotherapy, as an integral part of the primary treatment of BCT, should be administered first, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy.

  1. Information requirements of young women with breast cancer treated with mastectomy or breast conserving surgery: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Recio-Saucedo, Alejandra; Gerty, Sue; Foster, Claire; Eccles, Diana; Cutress, Ramsey I

    2016-02-01

    Young women with breast cancer have poorer prognosis, greater lifetime risk of local recurrence, contralateral recurrence, and distant disease, regardless of surgery received. Here we systematically review published evidence relating to the information requirements and preferences of young women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer offered a choice between mastectomy and Breast Conservation Surgery (BCS). Findings will inform the development of a surgical decision aid for young women. Eight databases were searched to identify research examining information requirements of young women facing breast oncological surgery treatment decisions (MESH headings). Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. Data were extracted and summarised in a narrative synthesis. Findings indicate that young women prefer greater and more detailed information regarding treatment side effects, sexuality, and body image. Younger age of diagnosis leads to an increased risk perception of developing a second breast cancer. Young women's choices are influenced by factors associated with family and career. Information is required in a continuum throughout the treatment experience and not only at diagnosis when treatment decisions are made. Young women show differing levels of participation preferences. Young women find decision-making challenging when the characteristics of diagnosis provide a surgical choice between mastectomy and breast conservation surgery. Efforts should be made to provide information regarding sexuality, body image, reconstruction, fertility and likelihood of familial predisposition. Further research is needed to identify the specific level and information requirements of this young-onset group. The low number of studies indicate a need to design studies targeting specifically this age group of breast cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nursing Approach Based on Roy Adaptation Model in a Patient Undergoing Breast Conserving Surgery for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ursavaş, Figen Erol; Karayurt, Özgül; İşeri, Özge

    2014-01-01

    The use of models in nursing provides nurses to focus on the role of nursing and its applications rather than medical practice. In addition, it helps patient care to be systematic, purposeful, controlled and effective. One of the commonly used models in nursing is Roy Adaptation Model. According to Roy adaptation model, the aim of nursing is to increase compliance and life expectancy. Roy Adaptation Model evaluates the patient in physiologic mode, self-concept mode, role function mode and interdependence mode aiming to provide holistic care. This article describes the use of Roy Adaptation Model in the care of a patient who has been diagnosed with breast cancer and had breast-conserving surgery. Patient data was evaluated in the four modes of Roy adaptation model (physiologic, self-concept, role function, and interdependence modes) and the nursing process was applied.

  3. Real-time 3-dimensional virtual reality navigation system with open MRI for breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Tomikawa, Morimasa; Hong, Jaesung; Shiotani, Satoko; Tokunaga, Eriko; Konishi, Kozo; Ieiri, Satoshi; Tanoue, Kazuo; Akahoshi, Tomohiko; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Hashizume, Makoto

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to report on the early experiences using a real-time 3-dimensional (3D) virtual reality navigation system with open MRI for breast-conserving surgery. We developed a real-time 3D virtual reality navigation system with open MRI, and evaluated the mismatch between the navigation system and real distance using a 3D phantom. Two patients with nonpalpable MRI-detected breast tumors underwent breast-conserving surgery under the guidance of the navigation system. An initial MRI for the breast tumor using skin-affixed markers was performed immediately before excision. A percutaneous intramammary dye marker was applied to delineate an excision line, and the computer software "3D Slicer" generated a real-time 3D virtual reality model of the tumor and the puncture needle in the breast. Excision of the tumor was performed in the usual manner along the excision line indicated with the dye. The resected specimens were carefully examined histopathologically. The mean mismatch between the navigation system and real distance was 2.01 +/- 0.32 mm when evaluated with the 3D phantom. Under guidance by the navigation system, a percutaneous intramammary dye marker was applied without any difficulty. Fiducial registration errors were 3.00 mm for patient no. 1, and 4.07 mm for patient no. 2. Histopathological examinations of the resected specimens of the 2 patients showed noninvasive ductal carcinoma in situ. The surgical margins were free of carcinoma cells. Real-time 3D virtual reality navigation system with open MRI is feasible for safe and accurate excision of nonpalpable MRI-detected breast tumors. Long-term outcomes of this technique should be evaluated further. Copyright (c) 2010 American College of Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  4. Quality of life after immediate breast reconstruction and skin-sparing mastectomy - a comparison with patients undergoing breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Heneghan, H M; Prichard, R S; Lyons, R; Regan, P J; Kelly, J L; Malone, C; McLaughlin, R; Sweeney, K J; Kerin, M J

    2011-11-01

    Historically breast cancer surgery was associated with significant psychosocial morbidity and suboptimal cosmetic outcome. Recent emphasis on women's quality of life following breast cancer treatment has drawn attention to the importance of aesthetic outcome and potential benefits of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR). Our primary aim was to assess patient's quality of life after IBR, compared to a matched group undergoing breast conservation. We also investigated the oncological safety and morbidity associated with immediate reconstruction. A prospectively collected database of all breast cancer patients who underwent IBR at a tertiary referral breast unit was reviewed. Patients were reviewed clinically, and administered two validated quality of life questionnaires, at least one year after completing their treatment. 255 patients underwent IBR following mastectomy over a 55 month period. Reconstruction with ipsilateral latissimus dorsi flap was most commonly performed (88%). After mean follow-up of 36 months, IBR patients' quality of life was comparable to a group of age-matched women (n = 160) who underwent breast conserving surgery (p = 0.89). No patient experienced local recurrence (0%), distant metastases developed in 4.8% and disease related mortality was 2.2%. Post-operative morbidities included wound infection (11.8%), chronic pain (2.0%), capsular contracture (11%; 36% of whom had radiotherapy) and fat necrosis (14.1%). No patient experienced flap loss. IBR is a highly acceptable form of treatment for women requiring mastectomy. With high rates of patient satisfaction, low associated morbidity, and proven oncological safety, it is an appropriate recommendation for all women requiring mastectomy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Oncoplastic Surgical Techniques for Personalized Breast Conserving Surgery in Breast Cancer Patient with Small to Moderate Sized Breast

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jung Dug; Lee, Jeong Woo; Kim, Wan Wook; Jung, Jin Hyang

    2011-01-01

    Oncoplastic surgery has revolutionized the field of breast conserving surgery (BCS). The final aims of this technique are to obtain an adequate resection margin that will reduce the rate of local recurrence while simultaneously improving cosmetic outcomes. To obtain successful results after oncoplastic surgery, it is imperative that patients be risk-stratified based on risk factors associated with positive margins, that relevant imaging studies be reviewed, and that the confirmation of negative margins be confirmed during the initial operation. Patients who had small- to moderate-sized breasts are the most likely to be dissatisfied with the cosmetic outcome of surgery, even if the defect is small; therefore, oncoplastic surgery in this population is warranted. Reconstruction of the remaining breast tissue is divided into volume displacement and volume replacement techniques. The use of the various oncoplastic surgeries is based on tumor location and excised breast volume. If the excised volume is less than 100 g, the tumor location is used to determine which technique should be used, with the most commonly used technique being volume displacement. However, if the excised volume is greater than 100 g, the volume replacement method is generally used, and in cases where more than 150 g is excised, the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap may be used to obtain a pleasing cosmetic result. The local recurrence rate after oncoplastic surgery was lower than that of conventional BCS, as oncoplastic surgery reduced the rate of positive resection margins by resecting a wider section of glandular tissue. If the surgeon understands the advantages and disadvantages of oncoplastic surgery, and the multidisciplinary breast team is able to successfully collaborate, then the success rate of BCS with partial breast reconstruction can be increased while also yielding a cosmetically appealing outcome. PMID:22323910

  6. Oncoplastic breast conserving surgery: a renaissance of anatomically-based surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, C Y; Calhoun, K E; Masetti, R; Anderson, B O

    2006-10-01

    Using oncoplastic surgical techniques for breast preservation, breast surgeons can achieve widened surgical margins at the same time that the shape and appearance of the breast is preserved and sometimes rejuvenated. Oncoplastic surgical resection is designed to follow the cancer's contour, which generally follows the segmental anatomy of the breast, which has been well understood since the mid 19th century because of pioneering anatomic studies performed by Sir Astley Paston Cooper. The quadrantectomy, developed by Veronesi and colleagues in the 1970's, follows these same anatomic principles of wide segmental resection. The more surgically narrow lumpectomy as popularized in the U.S. uses a smaller, scoop-like non-anatomic resection of cancer. With negative surgical margins, the lumpectomy is equivalent to the quadrantectomy in achieving the goals of breast conservation as measured by local recurrence and survival. However, the lumpectomy is less versatile for resection of larger cancers, and can be more prone to creating suboptimal cosmetic defects. Cancers with large in situ components can be particularly problematic for resection with the standard lumpectomy, when they extend both centrally toward the nipple and peripherally to distal terminal ductulo-lobular units, which typically occur in a pie-shaped segmental distribution. Ductal segments, each of which ultimately drains to a single major lactiferous sinus at the nipple, vary in size and depth in the breast. Breast surgeons should carefully evaluate the cancer distribution and extent in the breast before operation. A combination of imaging methods (mammography with magnification views, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], or all) may yield the best estimates of overall tumor extent. Multiple bracketing wires afford the greater help to complete surgical excision. Those tumors with segmental spreading are best excised by oncoplastic resections according to their distribution.

  7. Endoscopic nipple sparing mastectomy with immediate implant-based reconstruction versus breast conserving surgery: a long-term study

    PubMed Central

    Du, Junze; Liang, Quankun; Qi, Xiaowei; Ming, Jia; Liu, Jing; Zhong, Ling; Fan, Linjun; Jiang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the differences between endoscopic nipple sparing mastectomy (ENSM) with immediate implant-based reconstruction and breast conserving surgery(BCS) applied to early-stage breast cancer in postoperative outcomes, function, and cosmesis. we made a prospective, non-randomized study reviewed a total of 346 cases of breast cancer from January 2007 to December 2011, including 189 cases of BCS and 157 cases of ENSM. All the patients were followed up to April 2016, with a median follow-up time of 74 months. The operative time, blood loss and drainage, postoperative complications, postoperative cosmesis, local recurrence rate, disease-free survival rate and overall survival rate of the two groups were compared. we found out that the operative time of ENSM was longer than that of BCS. There was no difference in blood loss and drainage, the postoperative complications, the disease-free survival rate and overall survival rate between the two groups. In regarding to cosmesis, patients in the ENSM group were more likely to get a satisfactory postoperative breast appearance. we reached a conclusion that ENSM is a safe and effective operative method retainingadvantages of TSSM to further improve the postoperative cosmetic effect, without increasing other risks. The surgery provides a new choice for patients with early-stage breast cancer. PMID:28361955

  8. Survival Comparisons for Breast Conserving Surgery and Mastectomy Revisited: Community Experience and the Role of Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Engel, Jessica M.; Stankowski, Rachel V.; Doi, Suhail A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Evidence suggests superiority of breast conserving surgery (BCS) plus radiation over mastectomy alone for treatment of early stage breast cancer. Whether the superiority of BCS plus radiation is related to the surgical approach itself or to the addition of adjuvant radiation therapy following BCS remains unclear. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women with breast cancer diagnosed from 1994–2012. Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics and treatment specifics were captured electronically. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were performed with inverse probability of treatment weighting to reduce selection bias effects in surgical assignment. Results Data from 5335 women were included, of which two-thirds had BCS and one-third had mastectomy. Surgical decision trends changed over time with more women undergoing mastectomy in recent years. Women who underwent BCS versus mastectomy differed significantly regarding age, cancer stage/grade, adjuvant radiation, chemotherapy, and endocrine treatment. Overall survival was similar for BCS and mastectomy. When BCS plus radiation was compared to mastectomy alone, 3-, 5-, and 10-year overall survival was 96.5% vs 93.4%, 92.9% vs 88.3% and 80.9% vs 67.2%, respectively. Conclusion These analyses suggest that survival benefit is not related only to the surgery itself, but that the prognostic advantage of BCS plus radiation over mastectomy may also be related to the addition of adjuvant radiation therapy. This conclusion requires prospective confirmation in randomized trials. PMID:25487237

  9. Survey of American and Canadian general surgeons' perceptions of margin status and practice patterns for breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Parvez, Elena; Hodgson, Nicole; Cornacchi, Sylvie D; Ramsaroop, Amanda; Gordon, Maggie; Farrokhyar, Forough; Porter, Geoffrey; Quan, May Lynn; Wright, Francis; Lovrics, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Although breast conservation surgery (BCS) is commonly performed, several aspects of the procedure remain controversial. We undertook a cross-sectional survey to compare Canadian (CDN) and American (AM) general surgeons' reported BCS practice patterns to better understand the cross-border differences in early-stage breast cancer surgery care. A modified Dillman Method survey was mailed to 1,447 AM and 1,443 CDN surgeons. Factors evaluated included preoperative assessment, margin definition, surgical techniques, and re-excision practices. The response rate was 26% and 51% for AM and CDN surgeons, respectively. There was variation in use of preoperative core biopsies. American surgeons required wider margins for invasive cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ, and more often recommend re-excision for invasive cancer with 1 and 2 mm margins (p < 0.05). There was also variability in surgical techniques used for intraoperative margin assessment. Wide variation in BCS practice was observed, with some of this variability related to surgeon country. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Mammotome-assisted endoscopic breast-conserving surgery: a novel technique for early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Ming, Jia; Zhou, Yan; Qi, Xiaowei; Fan, Linjun; Jiang, Jun

    2014-04-18

    Because of its minimally invasive and highly accurate nature, the use of Mammotome, a vacuum-assisted breast biopsy device has proven beneficial to the treatment of benign breast lesions. Taking advantage of endoscopic and Mammotome techniques together, we utilized the Mammotome device for therapeutic excision of malignant lesions in breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Between December 2009 and January 2010, two patients with early breast cancer received Mammotome-assisted endoscopic BCSs. Under ultrasound monitoring, the Mammotome system dissected the surrounding tissue and freed the tumor en bloc leaving negative margins; endoscopic axillary lymph node dissection then followed. The operation time was less than 180 minutes and the mean blood loss was 60 ml. The post-operative pathology report confirmed two patients to have invasive ductal carcinoma, one without axillary lymph nodes metastasis (0/11) and the other with one lymph node metastasis (1/21). No adverse events were noted. During a mean follow-up of 26.5 months, no evidence of recurrence or metastasis was found. The patients were satisfied with the cosmetic results. Mammotome-assisted endoscopic surgery appears to be a valuable option for early breast cancer. The long-term therapeutic effect remains to be confirmed.

  11. Mammotome-assisted endoscopic breast-conserving surgery: a novel technique for early-stage breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Because of its minimally invasive and highly accurate nature, the use of Mammotome, a vacuum-assisted breast biopsy device has proven beneficial to the treatment of benign breast lesions. Taking advantage of endoscopic and Mammotome techniques together, we utilized the Mammotome device for therapeutic excision of malignant lesions in breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods Between December 2009 and January 2010, two patients with early breast cancer received Mammotome-assisted endoscopic BCSs. Under ultrasound monitoring, the Mammotome system dissected the surrounding tissue and freed the tumor en bloc leaving negative margins; endoscopic axillary lymph node dissection then followed. Results The operation time was less than 180 minutes and the mean blood loss was 60 ml. The post-operative pathology report confirmed two patients to have invasive ductal carcinoma, one without axillary lymph nodes metastasis (0/11) and the other with one lymph node metastasis (1/21). No adverse events were noted. During a mean follow-up of 26.5 months, no evidence of recurrence or metastasis was found. The patients were satisfied with the cosmetic results. Conclusions Mammotome-assisted endoscopic surgery appears to be a valuable option for early breast cancer. The long-term therapeutic effect remains to be confirmed. PMID:24742110

  12. Identification of Patients at Very Low Risk of Local Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Sally L.; Truong, Pauline T.; Lu, Linghong; Lesperance, Mary; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and pathological factors that identify groups of women with stage I breast cancer with a 5-year risk of local recurrence (LR) ≤1.5% after breast-conserving therapy (BCS) plus whole-breast radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Study subjects were 5974 patients ≥50 years of age whose cancer was diagnosed between 1989 and 2006, and were referred with pT1 pN0 invasive breast cancer treated with BCS and RT. Cases of 5- and 10-year LR were examined using Kaplan-Meier methods. Recursive partitioning analysis was performed in patients treated with and without endocrine therapy to identify combinations of factors associated with a 5-year LR risk ≤1.5%. Results: The median follow-up was 8.61 years. Median age was 63 years of age (range, 50 to 91). Overall 5-year LR was 1.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2%-1.9%) and 10-year LR was 3.4% (95% CI, 2.8%-4.0%). Of 2830 patients treated with endocrine therapy, patient subsets identified with 5-year LR ≤1.5% included patients with grade 1 histology (n=1038; LR, 0.2%; 95% CI, 0%-0.5%) or grade 2 histology plus ≥60 years of age (n=843; LR, 0.5%; 95% CI, 0%-1.0%). Ten-year LR for these groups were 0.8% (95% CI, 0.1%-1.6%) and 0.9% (95% CI, 0.2%-1.6%), respectively. Of 3144 patients treated without endocrine therapy, patients with grade 1 histology plus clear margins had 5-year LR ≤1.5% (n=821; LR, 0.6%; 95% CI, 0.1%-1.2%). Ten-year LR for this group was 2.2% (95% CI, 1.0%-3.4%). Conclusions: Histologic grade, age, margin status, and use of endocrine therapy identified 45% of a population-based cohort of female patients over age 50 with stage I breast cancer with a 5-year LR risk ≤1.5% after BCS plus RT. Prospective study is needed to evaluate the safety of omitting RT in patients with such a low risk of LR.

  13. Treatment Techniques to Reduce Cardiac Irradiation for Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation Therapy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Robert E.; Kim, Leonard; Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Khan, Atif J.; Goyal, Sharad

    2014-01-01

    Thousands of women diagnosed with breast cancer each year receive breast-conserving surgery followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. For women with left-sided breast cancer, there is risk of potential cardiotoxicity from the radiation therapy. As data have become available to quantify the risk of cardiotoxicity from radiation, strategies have also developed to reduce the dose of radiation to the heart without compromising radiation dose to the breast. Several broad categories of techniques to reduce cardiac radiation doses include breath hold techniques, prone positioning, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, and accelerated partial breast irradiation, as well as many small techniques to improve traditional three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. This review summarizes the published scientific literature on the various techniques to decrease cardiac irradiation in women treated to the left breast for breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. PMID:25452938

  14. The Efficacy of Intraoperative Frozen Section Analysis During Breast-Conserving Surgery for Patients with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Cheol Seung; Park, Young Sam; Choi, Eun Hye; Han, Kyu Dam

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Recently, the incidence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a noninvasive breast malignancy, has increased. This has resulted in an increase in the incidence of breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Numerous studies have suggested that intraoperative frozen section analysis (IFSA) could reduce the rate of additional excisions required to obtain adequate resection margins. However, DCIS is a known risk factor for positive margin status during BCS. Furthermore, some authors have concluded that IFSA may not be reliable for the detection of DCIS. AIM The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of IFSA in patients with DCIS. METHODS The operative and pathological reports of patients with DCIS, who underwent BCS at our institute between 2006 and 2015, were retrospectively reviewed. The results of IFSA and the pathological findings of final reanalyzed frozen tissue specimens were analyzed. RESULTS In total, 25 patients were included in our analysis. None of the patients required additional operations. The correct diagnosis rate for IFSA was 89.6%, with a sensitivity and specificity of 60.0% and 95.8%, respectively. CONCLUSION IFSA could be beneficial for determining safety resection margins in patients with DCIS. PMID:27980416

  15. Cosmetic Outcome and Seroma Formation After Breast-Conserving Surgery With Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Boost for Early Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Senthi, Sashendra; Link, Emma; Chua, Boon H.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate cosmetic outcome and its association with breast wound seroma after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) with targeted intraoperative radiation therapy (tIORT) boost for early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: An analysis of a single-arm prospective study of 55 patients with early breast cancer treated with BCS and tIORT boost followed by conventional whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT) between August 2003 and January 2006 was performed. A seroma was defined as a fluid collection at the primary tumor resection site identified clinically or radiologically. Cosmetic assessments using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer rating system were performed at baseline before BCS and 30 months after WBRT was completed. Results: Twenty-eight patients (51%) developed a seroma, with 18 patients (33%) requiring at least 1 aspiration. Tumor location was significantly associated with seroma formation (P=.001). Ten of 11 patients with an upper inner quadrant tumor developed a seroma. Excellent or good overall cosmetic outcome at 30 months was observed in 34 patients (62%, 95% confidence interval 53%-80%). Seroma formation was not associated with the overall cosmetic result (P=.54). Conclusion: BCS with tIORT boost followed by WBRT was associated with an acceptable cosmetic outcome. Seroma formation was not significantly associated with an adverse cosmetic outcome.

  16. How to compare the oncological safety of oncoplastic breast conservation surgery - To wide local excision or mastectomy?

    PubMed

    Mansell, J; Weiler-Mithoff, E; Martin, J; Khan, A; Stallard, S; Doughty, J C; Romics, L

    2015-08-01

    Comparative studies suggest that patients treated with oncoplastic breast conservation surgery (OBCS) have similar pathology to patients treated with wide local excision (WLE). However, patients treated with OBCS have never been compared to patients treated with mastectomy. The aim of this study was to identify which control group was comparable to patients undergoing OBCS. Commonly reported histopathological variables of patients treated with OBCS, WLE or mastectomy ± immediate reconstruction (Ms ± IR) were compared using Fisher Exact or Chi squared tests. 1000 patients' data were analysed (OBCS: n = 119; WLE: n = 600; Ms ± IR: n = 281). Tumour size was significantly bigger after OBCS than WLE (p < 0.001), but similar to Ms ± IR (p = 0.138). Tumour grade was higher after OBCS than WLE (p < 0.001), but similar to Ms ± IR (p = 0.497). More axillary nodes were involved in patients with OBCS than WLE (p < 0.001), but comparable to Ms ± IR (p = 0.175). ER and PR expressions were lower after OBCS compared to WLE (p = 0.007, p = 0.009), but identical to Ms ± IR (p = 1, p = 0.904 respectively). Differences in application of systemic (neo)adjuvant therapy followed the above trend. Striking similarities found between OBCS and mastectomy patients' histopathological results are in sharp contrast with previously published data. This study suggests that oncological outcomes following OBCS should be compared to mastectomy besides WLE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of quality of life of Turkish breast cancer patients receiving breast conserving surgery or modified radical mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Acil, Hande; Cavdar, Ikbal

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in quality of life in patients who received breast conserving surgery (BCS) or modified radical mastectomy (MRM) for breast cancer. A total of 100 women with breast cancer who underwent either BCS or MRM between September 2011 and April 2012 at a private health center and completed their chemotherapy and radiation therapy cycles were included in the study. To assess the quality of life, we used a demographic questionnaire, the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the Quality of Life assessment in Breast Cancer (EORTC QLQ-BR23). Using QLQ-C30, we found that patients who underwent BCS had better functional status and fewer symptoms than patients who underwent MRM. In QLQ-BR23, independent factors improving the functional scales were BCS, higher level of education and marital status (married); independent factors improving symptoms were BCS, higher level of education, younger age and low and normal body mass index (BMI). In QLQ-C30, independent factors affecting the functional and symptom scales were only BCS and higher level of education. We determined that patients who received BCS had better functional status and less frequent symptoms than patients who underwent MRM.

  18. Tumor Location, Interval Between Surgery and Radiotherapy, and Boost Technique Influence Local Control After Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation: Retrospective Analysis of Monoinstitutional Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Knauerhase, Hellen; Strietzel, Manfred; Gerber, Bernd; Reimer, Toralf; Fietkau, Rainer

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To obtain long-term data on local tumor control after treatment of invasive breast cancer by breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT), in consideration of the interstitial high-dose-rate boost technique. Patients and Methods: A total of 263 women with 268 mammary carcinomas (International Union Against Cancer Stage I-IIB) who had undergone breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant RT between 1990 and 1994 were included. The potential risk factors for local recurrence-free survival were investigated. Results: During a median follow-up period of 94 months, 27 locoregional recurrences, 25 of which were in breast, were diagnosed. The cumulative rate of in-breast recurrence was 4.1% {+-} 1.4% at 5 years of follow-up and 9.9% {+-} 2.4% at 10 years. The multivariate analysis identified medial tumor location and delayed RT (defined as an interval of >2 months between surgery and the start of RT) as significant risk factors for in-breast recurrence in the overall study population. Medial tumor location vs. lateral/central location (hazard ratio, 2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-5.84) resulted in a cumulative in-breast recurrence rate of 22.5% {+-} 8.3% vs. 6.9% {+-} 2.3% at 10 years. Delayed RT (hazard ratio, 2.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-7.13) resulted in a cumulative in-breast recurrence rate of 18.5% {+-} 6.2% vs. 6.8% {+-} 2.4% at 10 years. The multivariate analysis also showed that the risk of in-breast recurrence was lower after high-dose-rate boost therapy than after external beam boost therapy in patients with laterally/centrally located tumors (hazard ratio, 3.25; 95% confidence interval, 0.91-11.65). Conclusion: Tumor location, interval between surgery and RT, and boost technique might influence local control of breast cancer treated by breast-conserving surgery and RT.

  19. A prospective study comparing endoscopic subcutaneous mastectomy plus immediate reconstruction with implants and breast conserving surgery for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lin-Jun; Jiang, Jun; Yang, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Yi; Li, Xing-Gang; Chen, Xian-Chun; Zhong, Ling

    2009-12-20

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) has been the standard surgical procedure for the treatment of early breast cancer. Endoscopic subcutaneous mastectomy (ESM) plus immediate reconstruction with implants is an emerging procedure. The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of these two surgical procedures in our clinical setting. From March 2004 to October 2007, 43 patients with breast cancer underwent ESM plus axillary lymph node dissection and immediate reconstruction with implants, while 54 patients underwent BCS. The clinical and pathological characteristics, surgical safety, and therapeutic effects were compared between the two groups. There were no significant differences in the age, clinical stage, histopathologic type of tumor, operative blood loss, postoperative drainage time, and postoperative complications between the two groups (P > 0.05). The postoperative complications were partial necrosis of the nipple and superficial skin flap in the ESM patients, and hydrops in the axilla and residual cavity in the BCS patients. There was no significant difference in the rate of satisfactory postoperative cosmetic outcomes between the ESM (88.4%, 38/43) and BCS (92.6%, 50/54) patients (P > 0.05). During follow-up of 6 months to 4 years, all patients treated with ESM were disease-free, but 3 patients who underwent BCS had metastasis or recurrence -one of these patients died of multiple organ metastasis. After considering the wide indications for use, high surgical safety, and favorable cosmetic outcomes, we conclude that ESM plus axillary lymph node dissection and immediate reconstruction with implants - the new surgery of choice for breast cancer - warrants serious consideration as the prospective next standard surgical procedure.

  20. The Prognostic Impact of Molecular Subtypes and Very Young Age on Breast Conserving Surgery in Early Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Kandace; Alco, Gul; Nur Pilanci, Kezban; Koksal, Ulkuhan I; Elbüken, Filiz; Erdogan, Zeynep; Agacayak, Filiz; Ilgun, Serkan; Sarsenov, Dauren; Öztürk, Alper; İğdem, Şefik; Okkan, Sait; Eralp, Yeşim; Dincer, Maktav; Ozmen, Vahit

    2016-01-01

    Background Premenopausal breast cancer with a triple-negative phenotype (TNBC) has been associated with inferior locoregional recurrence free survival (LRFS) and overall survival (OS) after breast conserving surgery (BCS). The aim of this study is to analyze the association between age, subtype, and surgical treatment on survival in young women (≤40 years) with early breast cancer in a population with a high rate of breast cancer in young women. Methods Three hundred thirty-two patients ≤40 years old with stage I-II invasive breast cancer who underwent surgery at a single institution between 1998 and 2012 were identified retrospectively. Uni- and multivariate analysis evaluated predictors of LRFS, OS, and disease free survival (DFS). Results Most patients (64.2%) underwent BCS. Mean age and follow-up time were 35 (25 ± 3.61) years, and 72 months (range, 24–252), respectively. In multivariate analysis, multicentricity/multifocality and young age (<35 years) independently predicted for poorer DFS and OS. Those aged 35–40 years had higher LRFS and DFS than those <35 in the mastectomy group (p=0.007 and p=0.039, respectively). Patients with TNBC had lower OS compared with patients with luminal A subtype (p=0.042), and those who underwent BCS had higher OS than patients after mastectomy (p=0.015). Conclusion Young age (< 35 years) is an independent predictor of poorer OS and DFS as compared with ages 35–40, even in countries with a lower average age of breast cancer presentation. In addition, TNBC in the young predicts for poorer OS. BCS can be performed in young patients with TNBC, despite their poorer overall survival. PMID:27433412

  1. Comparing oncoplastic breast conserving surgery with mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction: Case-matched patient reported outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kelsall, Jennett E; McCulley, Stephen J; Brock, Lisa; Akerlund, Malin T E; Macmillan, R Douglas

    2017-10-01

    Oncoplastic breast conserving surgery (OBCS) allows women who may otherwise have mastectomy and immediate reconstruction (MxIR) the choice to conserve their breast yet avoid deformity. We compared the outcome of these options. Two cohorts meeting study criteria were identified from prospectively audited series of women undergoing OBCS or MxIR. After case matching for age, tumour size and date of surgery, stratification by breast size and controlling for radiotherapy; body image scale (BIS) scores of psychosocial function and patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) for breast appearance and return to function were analysed. A total of 567 women (286 treated by OBCS and 281 by MxIR) fulfilled inclusion criteria. Demographics were similar between the two unmatched cohorts, except for radiotherapy, age and tumour size (all p < 0.001). Overall, BIS score (p = 0.002), self-rated breast appearance, return to work and function (all p < 0.001) significantly favoured OBCS. Case-matched women with larger breasts treated by OBCS reported better BIS scores (mean 3.30 vs. 5.37, p = 0.011) and self-rated breast appearance score (p < 0.001) than MxIR, whereas no significant difference was observed for smaller breasts. BIS and appearance favoured OBCS, regardless of whether radiotherapy would have been avoided if treated by MxIR. OBCS offers suitable women the option to avoid MxIR while providing faster recovery. Better psychosocial and self-rated satisfaction with breast appearance is achieved for OBCS in all groups, regardless of the need for radiotherapy, apart from those women with smaller breasts for whom the results are comparable. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Observed outcomes on the use of oxidized and regenerated cellulose polymer for breast conserving surgery – A case series

    PubMed Central

    Rassu, Pier Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxidized regenerated cellulose polymer (ORCP) may be used for reshaping and filling lack of volume in breast-conserving surgery (BCS). The study aimed to observe both the aesthetic and diagnostic outcomes in patients with different age, BMI, breast volume, and breast tissue composition over 36 months after BCS with ORCP. Patients and methods 18 patients with early breast cancer and with proliferative benign lesions underwent BCS with ORCP that was layered in three-dimensional wafer, and placed into the Chassaignac space between the mammary gland and the fascia of pectoralis major with no fixation. After surgery, patients started a clinical and instrumental 36-month follow-up with mammography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cytological examination with fine needle aspiration when seroma occurred. Results Below the median age of 66 years old no complications were observed even in case both of overweight, and large breasts with low density. Over the median age seromas occurred with either small or large skin retraction, with the exception of 1 patient having quite dense breasts and low BMI, which had no complications. In elderly patients, 1 case with quite dense breasts and high BMI showed severe seroma and skin retraction, while 1 case with low BMI and less dense breasts highlighted milder complications. Conclusion During 36 months after BCS with ORCP, a significant correlation between positive diagnostic and aesthetic outcomes and low age, dense breasts, and low BMI of patient was observed. Despite of the few number of cases, either low BMI, or high breast density improved the aesthetic outcomes and reduced the entity of complications even in the elderly patients. PMID:26865976

  3. Radioactive Seed Localization Compared to Wire Localization in Breast-Conserving Surgery: Initial 6-Month Experience

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, James O.; Moo, Tracy-Ann; King, Tari A.; Van Zee, Kimberly J.; Villegas, Kristine A.; Stempel, Michelle; Eaton, Anne; St. Germain, Jean M.; Morris, Elizabeth; Morrow, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Wire localization (WL) of non-palpable breast cancers on the day of surgery is uncomfortable for patients and impacts OR efficiency. Radioactive seed localization (RSL) before the day of surgery avoids these disadvantages. In this study we compare outcomes of our initial 6-month experience with RSL to those with WL in the preceding 6 months. Methods Lumpectomies for invasive or intraductal cancers localized with a single 125iodine seed (January-June 2012) were compared to those using 1 wire (July-December 2011). Surgeons and radiologists did not change. Positive and close margins were defined as tumor on ink and tumor ≤1mm from ink, respectively. Demographic and clinical characteristics and outcomes were compared between RSL and WL patients. Results There were 431 RSL and 256 WL lumpectomies performed. Clinicopathologic characteristics did not differ between groups. Most seeds (90%) were placed before the day of surgery. Positive margins were present in 7.7% of RSL versus 5.5% of WL patients, and 16.9% of RSL versus 19.9% of WL had close margins (p=0.38). The median operative time was longer for lumpectomy and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in the RSL group (55 versus 48 minutes, p<0.0001). There was no significant difference in the volume of tissue excised between groups. Conclusions In the first 6 months of RSL, operative scheduling was simplified, while rates of positive and close margins were similar to those seen after many years of experience with WL. Operative time was slightly longer for RSL lumpectomy and SLNB; we anticipate this will decrease with experience. PMID:23943024

  4. Multi-Institutional Experience of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Black vs White Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole Breast Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Carl; Bai, Harrison; Neboori, Hanmanth; Takita, Cristiane; Motwani, Sabin; Wright, Jean L.; Hobeika, Georges; Haffty, Bruce G.; Jones, Tiffanie; Goyal, Sharad; Moran, Meena S.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Given the paucity of data on racial disparities in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the data from a multi-institutional cohort of DCIS patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast radiation therapy (RT) were analyzed to determine whether racial disparities or differences exist. Methods and Materials: A total of 533 white and 76 black DCIS patients from 3 university-based cancer centers were uniformly treated with breast-conserving surgery and RT. All patient data were collected and analyzed as a function of race. Results: The median follow-up was 5.2 years. No significant racial differences were seen in tumor size, age at diagnosis, estrogen receptor status, necrosis, or grade (all P>.05). Of the treatment parameters, the RT dose delivered, boost, positive margin rates, frequency of hormone receptor status assessment, and receipt of hormonal therapy for the 2 cohorts did not significantly differ (all P>.05). The local relapse-free survival was similar at 5 years (96.1% and 98.1%, P=.399) and 10 years (92.8% vs 95.8%, P=.360), with no significant overall survival difference at 10 years (94.0% vs 88.9%, P=.290) between the white and black patients, respectively. On multivariate analysis, race was not an independent predictor of local relapse-free survival or overall survival when accounting for age, grade, and margin status. Conclusion: In our large cohort of DCIS patients uniformly treated at 3 institutions with breast conservation without any apparent differences in treatment delivery parameters, we demonstrated that the clinical and pathologic features and local survival outcomes did not differ as a function of race. Our results suggest that when black patients with DCIS are appropriately selected for breast conservation and receive adjuvant RT without racial disparities in the treatment parameters, differences in the outcomes as a function of race do not exist.

  5. Breast-conserving surgery with intra-operative radiotherapy: the right approach for the 21st century?

    PubMed

    Tobias, J S; Vaidya, J S; Keshtgar, M; Douek, M; Metaxas, M; Stacey, C; Sainsbury, R; D'Souza, D; Baum, M

    2006-04-01

    Wide local excision followed by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to the whole breast has become the standard of care for most patients with localised 'early' breast cancer in the UK, Europe, and the USA. Local relapse rates are low, and overall survival figures have improved during the past decade, with the advent of more effective systemic endocrine- and chemo-therapy. A policy of EBRT for every patient undergoing breast conserving surgery (BCS) is however associated with a number of practical difficulties, acute radiation side effects and longer term toxicity, all of which detract from the obvious benefits of EBRT. In addition, with a disease as common as early breast cancer and a treatment programme typically requiring sophisticated radiation planning and many fractions of treatment, the policy of BCS plus EBRT has enormous resource implications within departments of oncology, greatly contributing to lengthy pre-treatment delays. For all these reasons, we and others have developed an increasing interest in techniques of partial breast irradiation, with an emphasis in our own Department on the emerging technique of intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT), which we initially employed as a boost to the tumour bed for use in conjunction with EBRT to the whole breast. To test the possibility of replacing the whole of the EBRT 3-6 week programme by a single application of IORT at the time of surgery, we and others have commenced a large scale prospectively randomised clinical trail in selected patients. Nine international centres are currently participating, and 350 patients have now been randomised to receive either IORT as part of the initial surgical excision or conventional EBRT with a pragmatic dose policy according to the preference of the contributing centre. The majority of patients undergoing IORT receive this at the time of initial surgery but it is also permissible within the trial programme to randomise suitable patients after the excised specimen has

  6. Adjuvant Radiation Improves Survival in Older Women Following Breast-Conserving Surgery for Estrogen Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, Emily C; Daugherty, Michael R; Bogart, Jeffrey A; Shapiro, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Published prospective trials have questioned the role of post-lumpectomy radiotherapy in older women with early-stage, estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancer. As the population with ER(-) tumors may be at greater risk for relapse, particularly given that endocrine therapy is not effective, we hypothesize the addition of radiation would be of benefit in patients age ≥ 70. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was queried from 1998 to 2011 for patients age ≥ 70 years receiving breast-conserving surgery for T1, ER(-) invasive ductal carcinoma. Patients were separated into 2 cohorts: those treated with and without adjuvant radiotherapy. Chi-square analysis, unpaired t test and Kaplan-Meier log-rank were used to compare patient and tumor characteristics as well as overall and cancer-specific survival between the cohorts. Overall, 3685 patients received radiation and 1493 patients received lumpectomy alone. Patients treated with adjuvant radiation were younger (median age 76 vs. 78 years, P < .0001). Patients who received radiation had improved overall survival, with 5-year survival rates of 81.0% versus 61.7% without radiation (P < .0001). Cancer-specific survival was also improved with radiotherapy, with 5-year cancer-specific survival rates of 93.1% versus 85.0% (P < .0001). This analysis of the SEER database demonstrates that women ages 70 and older treated with lumpectomy and radiotherapy for ER(-), early-stage breast cancer have improved overall survival and breast cancer-specific survival compared with patients treated with lumpectomy alone. This information may help in the decision-making process for this patient population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiation pneumonitis in breast cancer patients who received radiotherapy using the partially wide tangent technique after breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yoonsun; Yoon, Hong In; Kim, Yong Bae; Ahn, Seung Kwon; Keum, Ki Chang; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2012-09-01

    We assessed the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in terms of dosimetric parameters in breast cancer patients, who received radiotherapy using the partially wide tangent technique (PWT), following breast conservation surgery (BCS). We analyzed the data from 100 breast cancer patients who underwent radiotherapy using PWT. The entire breast, supraclavicular lymph node, and internal mammary lymph node (IMN) were irradiated with 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. RP was scored on a scale of 0 to 5, based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. The dosimetric parameters, used in analysis for the ipsilateral lung, were the mean lung dose (MLD), V(5) (percentage of lung volume that received a dose of 5 Gy or more)-V(50), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Of the 100 patients, three suffered from symptomatic RP (symptom grade ≥2), but were relieved by supportive care. The risk of RP was not correlated with the treatment regimen. RP associated mostly with asymptomatic minimal pulmonary radiologic change or mild dry cough developed more frequently in the group with MLD ≥20.5 Gy or NTCP ≥23% than in the group with MLD <20.5 Gy and NTCP <23% (48.6% vs. 25.4%, p=0.018). Dosimetric parameters of MLD and NTCP were correlated with the incidence of RP, but the clinical impact was minimal. We suggest that PWT is a safe technique for the treatment of IMN for BCS patients with low risk of symptomatic RP.

  8. Characteristics of second breast events among women treated with breast-conserving surgery for DCIS in the community.

    PubMed

    Hassett, Michael J; Jiang, Wei; Habel, Laurel A; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Achacoso, Ninah; Acton, Luana; Schnitt, Stuart J; Schrag, Deb; Punglia, Rinaa S

    2016-02-01

    We examined the clinical/pathologic features of ipsilateral second breast cancers (IP-SBCs) following breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for DCIS among community-treated patients and ascertained the degree of correlation between the features of index DCIS and IP-SBC events. From a Cancer Research Network cohort of DCIS patients diagnosed 1990-2001 and treated with BCS, we identified women who subsequently developed an ipsilateral DCIS or invasive breast cancer. All index DCIS tumors underwent expert pathology review. Pathologic characteristics of IP-SBCs were abstracted from available medical records. Logistic regression was used to examine associations between pathologic characteristics and identify factors associated with invasive versus non-invasive IP-SBC. Of 1969 DCIS patients, 182 developed an IP-SBC within a median of 38 months (range 6-160). IP-SBCs were slightly more commonly non-invasive (53 %) versus invasive (47 %). Of invasive IP-SBCs, 31 % were high grade, 67 % were <20 mm, 74 % were estrogen receptor positive, 7 % were HER2 positive, and 16 % were node positive. Of non-invasive IP-SBCs, 33 % were high grade. Comparing index DCIS and IP-SBC specimens, there was moderate-high correlation for HR status and grade. Among patients with IP-SBCs, those who were younger and whose index DCIS tumors were HR negative had shorter intervals (within 3 years) between index and IP-SBC diagnoses. No index DCIS feature was statistically significantly associated with an IP-SBC that was invasive versus non-invasive. Understanding the characteristics of SBCs and identifying correlations between these and index DCIS events could influence treatment choices for DCIS, and may help patients and providers develop treatment paradigms for SBCs.

  9. Locoregional Recurrence of Breast Cancer in Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Sun Young; Lee, Seung Ju; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Park, In Hae; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kang, Han-Sung; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) have been linked with high locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rates. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical outcomes in patients who exhibited LRR and IBTR after being treated by BCS and RT following NCT. Methods and Materials: In total, 251 breast cancer patients treated with BCS and RT following NCT between 2001 and 2006 were included. All patients had been shown to be clinically node-positive. Clinical stage at diagnosis (2003 AJCC) was II in 68% of patients and III in 32% of patients. Of those, 50%, 35%, and 15% of patients received anthracycline-based, taxane-based, and combined anthracycline-taxane NCT, respectively. All patients received RT. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), 26 (10%) patients had LRR, 19 of these patients had IBTR. Five-year actuarial rates of IBTR-free and LRR-free survival were 91% and 89%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, lack of hormone suppression therapy was found to increase both LRR and IBTR rates. Hazard ratios were 7.99 (p < 0.0001) and 4.22 (p = 0.004), respectively. Additionally, pathology stage N2 to N3 increased LRR rate (hazard ratio, 4.22; p = 0.004), and clinical AJCC stage III IBTR rate (hazard ratio, 9.05; p = 0.034). Achievement of pathological complete response and presence of multifocal tumors did not affect LRR or IBTR. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, who were clinically node-positive at presentation, BCS after NCT resulted in acceptably low rates of IBTR and LRR. Mastectomy should be considered as an option in patients who present with clinical stage III tumors or who are not treated with adjuvant hormone suppression therapy, because they exhibit high IBTR rates after NCT and BCS.

  10. Full-dose intra-operative radiotherapy with electrons (ELIOT) during breast-conserving surgery: experience with 1246 cases.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, U; Orecchia, R; Luini, A; Galimberti, V; Gatti, G; Intra, M; Veronesi, P; Leonardi, M C; Ciocca, M; Lazzari, R; Caldarella, P; Rotmensz, N; Sangalli, C; Silva, L S; Sances, D

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies showed that after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer, radiotherapy may be applied to the portion of the breast where the primary tumour was removed (partial breast irradiation (PBI), avoiding the irradiation of the whole breast. We developed a procedure of PBI consisting of a single high dose of radiotherapy of 21 Gy with electrons equivalent to 58-60 Gy in fractionated doses, delivered during the surgical session by a mobile linear accelerator, positioned close to the operating table. From July 1999 to December 2006, 1246 patients with primary carcinoma of less than 2.5-cm maximum diameter, mostly over 48 years, were treated with electron intra-operative radiotherapy (ELIOT) at a single dose of 21 Gy. After a follow-up from 0.3 to 94.7 months (median 26), 24 (1.9%) patients showed a local recurrence and 22 developed distant metastases. Sixteen patients died, seven from breast carcinoma and nine from others causes. The five-year crude survival was 96.5%. Six (0.5%) developed severe breast fibrosis, which resolved in 2-3 years. An additional 40 patients suffered for mild fibrosis. Cosmetic results were good. Electron intra-operative radiotherapy is a safe method for treating conservatively operated breasts and avoids the long period of post-operative radiotherapy, greatly improving the quality of life and reduces the cost of radiotherapy. ELIOT markedly reduces the radiation to normal surrounding tissues and deep organs. Results on short- and medium-term toxicity are good. Data on local control are encouraging.

  11. Long-term toxicity of an intraoperative radiotherapy boost using low energy X-rays during breast-conserving surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta . E-mail: uta.kraus-tiefenbacher@radonk.ma.uni-heidelberg.de; Bauer, Lelia; Scheda, Antonella; Fleckenstein, Katharina; Keller, Anke; Herskind, Carsten; Steil, Volker; Melchert, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a boost for breast cancer delivers a high single dose of radiation to a late-reacting tissue; therefore late toxicity is of particular interest, and long-term follow-up is warranted. To date there are only limited data available on breast cancer patients treated with IORT using low energy X-rays. We analyzed toxicity and cosmesis after IORT as a boost with a minimum follow-up of 18 months. Methods and Materials: A total of 73 patients treated with IORT (20 Gy/50 kV X-rays; INTRABEAM [Carl Zeiss Surgical, Oberkochen, Germany]) to the tumor bed during breast-conserving surgery as a boost followed by whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT, 46 Gy) underwent a prospective, predefined follow-up (median, 25 months; range 18-44 months), including clinical examination and breast ultrasound at 6-months and mammographies at 1-year intervals. Toxicities were documented using the common toxicity criteria (CTC)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and the LENT-SOMA score. Cosmesis was evaluated with a score from 1 to 4. Results: The IORT in combination with WBRT was well tolerated, with no Grade 3 or 4 skin toxicities and no telangiectasias. Fibrosis of the entire breast was observed in 5% of the patients. A circumscribed fibrosis around the tumor bed was palpable in up to 27% with a peak around 18 months after therapy and a decline thereafter. The observed toxicitiy rates were not influenced by age, tumor stage, or systemic therapy. The cosmetic outcome was good to excellent in {>=}90% of cases. Conclusions: After IORT of the breast using low-energy X-rays, no unexpected toxicity rates were observed during long-term-follow-up.

  12. Comparison of health utility weights among elderly patients receiving breast-conserving surgery plus hormonal therapy with or without radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Askal Ayalew; Xiao, Hong; Tawk, Rima; Campbell, Ellen; Semykina, Anastasia; Montero, Alberto J.; Diaby, Vakaramoko

    2017-01-01

    Background The selection of the most appropriate treatment combinations requires the balancing of benefits and harms of these treatment options as well as the patients’ preferences for the resulting outcomes. Objective This research aimed at estimating and comparing the utility weights between elderly women with early stage hormone receptor positive (HR+) breast cancer receiving a combination of radiotherapy and hormonal therapy after breast conserving surgery (BCS) and those receiving a combination of BCS and hormonal therapy. Methods The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) linked with Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (MHOS) was used as the data source. Health utility weights were derived from the VR-12 health-related quality of life instrument using a mapping algorithm. Descriptive statistics of the sample were provided. Two sample t-tests were performed to determine potential differences in mean health utility weights between the two groups after propensity score matching. Results The average age at diagnosis was 72 vs. 76 years for the treated and the untreated groups, respectively. The results showed an inverse relationship between the receipt of radiotherapy and age. Patients who received radiotherapy had, on average, a higher health utility weight (0.70; SD = 0.123) compared with those who did not receive radiotherapy (0.676; SD = 0.130). Only treated patients who had more than two comorbid conditions had significantly higher health utility weights compared with patients who were not treated. Conclusions The mean health utility weights estimated for the radiotherapy and no radiotherapy groups can be used to inform a comparative cost-effectiveness analysis of the treatment options. However, the results of this study may not be generalizable to those who are outside a managed care plan because MHOS data is collected on managed care beneficiaries. PMID:27819160

  13. Towards intra-operative diagnosis of tumours during breast conserving surgery by selective-sampling Raman micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Kenny; Zaabar, Fazliyana; Rakha, Emad; Ellis, Ian; Koloydenko, Alexey; Notingher, Ioan

    2014-10-01

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is increasingly employed for the treatment of early stage breast cancer. One of the key challenges in BCS is to ensure complete removal of the tumour while conserving as much healthy tissue as possible. In this study we have investigated the potential of Raman micro-spectroscopy (RMS) for automated intra-operative evaluation of tumour excision. First, a multivariate classification model based on Raman spectra of normal and malignant breast tissue samples was built and achieved diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma (DC) with 95.6% sensitivity and 96.2% specificity (5-fold cross-validation). The tumour regions were discriminated from the healthy tissue structures based on increased concentration of nucleic acids and reduced concentration of collagen and fat. The multivariate classification model was then applied to sections from fresh tissue of new patients to produce diagnosis images for DC. The diagnosis images obtained by raster scanning RMS were in agreement with the conventional histopathology diagnosis but were limited to long data acquisition times (typically 10 000 spectra mm-2, which is equivalent to ~5 h mm-2). Selective-sampling based on integrated auto-fluorescence imaging and Raman spectroscopy was used to reduce the number of Raman spectra to ~20 spectra mm-2, which is equivalent to an acquisition time of ~15 min for 5 × 5 mm2 tissue samples. This study suggests that selective-sampling Raman microscopy has the potential to provide a rapid and objective intra-operative method to detect mammary carcinoma in tissue and assess resection margins.

  14. Radiation Therapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Does Hospital Surgical Volume Matter? A Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Chun-Ru; Pan, I-Wen; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Tsai, Teressa; Liang, Ji-An; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the association between hospital surgical volume and the use of radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in Taiwan. Methods and Materials: We used claims data from the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan (1997-2005) in this retrospective population-based study. We identified patients with breast cancer, receipt of BCS, use of radiation, and the factors that could potentially associated with the use of RT from enrollment records, and the ICD-9 and billing codes in claims. We conducted logistic regression to examine factors associated with RT use after BCS, and performed subgroup analyses to examine whether the association differs by medical center status or hospital volumes. Results: Among 5,094 patients with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer who underwent BCS, the rate of RT was significantly lower in low-volume hospitals (74% vs. 82%, p < 0.01). Patients treated in low-volume hospitals were less likely to receive RT after BCS (odds ratio = 0.72, 95% confidence interval = 0.62-0.83). In addition, patients treated after the implementation of the voluntary pay-for-performance policy in 2001 were more likely to receive RT (odds ratio = 1.23; 95% confidence interval = 1.05-1.45). Subgroup analyses indicated that the high-volume effect was limited to hospitals accredited as non-medical centers, and that the effect of the pay-for-performance policy was most pronounced among low-volume hospitals. Conclusions: Using population-based data from Taiwan, our study concluded that hospital surgical volume and pay-for-performance policy are positively associated with RT use after BCS.

  15. [Accelerated partial breast irradiation with multicatheters during breast conserving surgery for cancer].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Spiteri Sagredo, Natalia; Martínez Regueira, Fernando; Olartecoechea Linaje, Begoña; Arredondo Chaves, Jorge; Cambeiro Vázquez, Mauricio; Pina Insausti, Luis Javier; Elizalde Pérez, Arlette; y García-Lallana, Amaya; Sola Gallego, Jose Javier

    2013-10-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with multicatheters after lumpectomy for breast cancer (BC) may be an alternative to whole breast irradiation in selected patients. The aim is to show our 5 year experience. Between June 2007 and June 2012, 87 BC patients have been evaluated for APBI. Inclusion criteria were: age over 40 years, unifocal tumour, infiltrating ductal or intraductal carcinoma, tumour size smaller than 3 cm and no lymph node involvement. Complications, cosmetic results and local and distant recurrences were evaluated. Treatment was completed in 48 patients and contraindicated in 39. The average age of treated patients was 59 years. Operating time was 123 min with 9 implanted catheters in each patient. No complications were observed during surgery or radiotherapy. Patients were discharged from hospital after 4 days. Tumour size was 11 mm. Of these, 35 were infiltrating ductal and 13 intraductal carcinomas. A total of 44 patients received adjuvant treatment. Mean follow-up was 22 months with no evidence of local or distant recurrence. The cosmetic outcome was good or excellent in 66% of cases. APBI with multicatheter placed after lumpectomy for BC is feasible and safe but requires a strict selection of patients. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Delay in initiating adjuvant radiotherapy following breast conservation surgery and its impact on survival

    SciTech Connect

    Hershman, Dawn L. . E-mail: dlh23@columbia.edu; Wang Xiaoyan; McBride, Russell

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: Delays in the diagnosis of breast cancer are associated with advanced stage and poor survival, but the importance of the time interval between lumpectomy and initiation of radiation therapy (RT) has not been well studied. We investigated factors that influence the time interval between lumpectomy and RT, and the association between that interval and survival. Patients and Methods: We used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database on women aged 65 years and older, diagnosed with Stages I-II breast cancer, between 1991 and 1999. Among patients who did not receive chemotherapy, we studied factors associated with the time interval between lumpectomy and the initiation of RT, and the association of delay with survival, using linear regression and Cox proportional hazards modeling. Results: Among 24,833 women with who underwent lumpectomy, 13,907 (56%) underwent RT. Among those receiving RT, 97% started treatment within 3 months; older age, black race, advanced stage, more comorbidities, and being unmarried were associated with longer time intervals between surgery and RT. There was no benefit to earlier initiation of RT; however, delays >3 months were associated with higher overall mortality (hazard ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.64-2.24) and cancer-specific mortality (hazard ratio, 3.84; 95% confidence interval 3.01-4.91). Conclusions: Reassuringly, early initiation of RT was not associated with survival. Although delays of >3 months are uncommon, they are associated with poor survival. Whether this association is causal or due to confounding factors, such as poor health behaviors, is unknown; until it is better understood, efforts should be made to initiate RT in a timely fashion.

  17. Does Concurrent Radiochemotherapy Affect Cosmetic Results in the Adjuvant Setting After Breast-Conserving Surgery? Results of the ARCOSEIN Multicenter, Phase III Study: Patients' and Doctors' Views

    SciTech Connect

    Toledano, Alain H. . E-mail: alain.toledano@gmail.com; Bollet, Marc A.; Fourquet, Alain; Azria, David; Gligorov, Joseph; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Miny-Buffet, Joelle; Favre, Anne; Le Foch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cosmetic results of sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy with radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer, and to compare ratings by patients and physicians. Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2000, 716 patients with Stage I-II breast cancers were included in a multicenter, Phase III trial (the ARCOSEIN study) comparing, after breast-conserving surgery with axillary dissection, sequential treatment with chemotherapy first followed by radiotherapy vs. chemotherapy administered concurrently with radiotherapy. Cosmetic results with regard to both the overall aspect of the breast and specific changes (color, scar) were evaluated in a total of 214 patients (107 in each arm) by means of questionnaires to both the patient and a physician whose rating was blinded to treatment allocation. Results: Patients' overall satisfaction with cosmesis was not statistically different between the two arms, with approximately 92% with at least satisfactory results (p = 0.72), although differences between the treated and untreated breasts were greater after the concurrent regimen (29% vs. 14% with more than moderate differences; p 0.0015). Physician assessment of overall cosmesis was less favorable, with lower rates of at least satisfactory results in the concurrent arm (60% vs. 85%; p = 0.001). Consequently, the concordance for overall satisfaction with cosmesis between patients and doctors was only fair ({kappa} = 0.62). Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of chemotherapy with radiotherapy is significantly associated with greater differences between the breasts. These differences do not translate into patients' lessened satisfaction with cosmesis.

  18. Supraclavicular nodal failure in patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes treated with breast conserving surgery and breast irradiation, without supraclavicular node radiation.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Shruthi G; Kiel, Krystyna D

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk factors associated with supraclavicular nodal failure (SCF) in patients with one to three positive axillary nodes treated with breast conserving surgery and axillary dissection without supraclavicular node radiation (S/C RT) to aid in the selection of patients for S/C RT. Two hundred two breast conservation patients with one to three positive axillary nodes on axillary dissection treated with breast irradiation without S/C RT and 20 patients with S/C RT between August 1985 and May 2002 were identified and retrospectively evaluated. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine SCF-free and overall survival curves. Risk factors for SCF were examined. The median follow-up from surgery was 72 months (range: 4-195). Nine of 202 patients (4%) failed in the ipsilateral breast, 4 (2%) in the ipsilateral supraclavicular lymph nodes, 4 (2%) in the ipsilateral axillary and/or internal mammary nodes and 30 (15%) distantly. The 5- and 10-year SCF-free survival was 97.92%. The overall survival at 5, 10, and 15 years was 91.35%, 75.58%, and 67.18%, respectively. SCFs were associated with high grade or ER negative cancers, but not with number of positive nodes. Two of the four SCFs were associated with distant metastases, and two with local failures. One patient with a SCF was salvaged and is disease-free at 134 months. The overall low incidence of SCF in patients with one to three positive nodes treated with breast radiation alone after breast conserving surgery and adequate axillary dissection suggests that additional S/C RT is unnecessary in this cohort. When it occurs, supraclavicular nodal failure is often associated with distant metastases.

  19. Concurrent administration of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery enhances late toxicities: Long-term results of the ARCOSEIN multicenter randomized study

    SciTech Connect

    Toledano, Alain . E-mail: alain.toledano@gmail.com; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Fourquet, Alain; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Breteau, Noel; Body, Gilles; Azria, David; Le Floch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: In 1996, a multicenter randomized study was initiated that compared sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) with radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (ARCOSEIN study). After a median follow-up of 6.7 years (range, 4.3-9 years), we decided to prospectively evaluate the late effects of these 2 strategies. Methods and Materials: A total of 297 patients from the 5 larger participating institutions were asked to report for a follow-up examination. Seventy-two percent (214 patients) were eligible for evaluation of late toxicity. After breast-conserving surgery, patients were treated either with sequential treatment with CT first followed by RT (Arm A) or CT administered concurrently with RT (Arm B). In all patients, CT regimen consisted of mitoxantrone (12 mg/m{sup 2}), 5-FU (500 mg/m{sup 2}), and cyclophosphamide (500 mg/m{sup 2}), 6 cycles (Day 1 to Day 21). Conventional RT was delivered to the whole breast by administration of a 2 Gy per fraction protocol to a total dose of 50 Gy ({+-} boost to the primary tumor bed). The assessment of toxicity was blinded to treatment and was graded by the radiation oncologist, according to the LENT/SOMA scale. Skin pigmentation was also evaluated according to a personal 5-points scoring system (excellent, good, moderate, poor, very poor). Results: Among the 214 evaluable patients, 107 were treated in each arm. The 2 populations were homogeneous for patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Subcutaneous fibrosis (SF), telangectasia (T), skin pigmentation (SP), and breast atrophy (BA) were significantly increased in Arm B. No statistical difference was observed between the 2 arms of the study concerning Grade 2 or higher pain, breast edema, or lymphedema. No deaths were caused by late toxicity. Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of CT with RT is significantly associated with an increase incidence of Grade 2 or greater late side effects.

  20. Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Compliance to the Dosimetry Requirements of RTOG-0413

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Bixiu; Hsu, Howard; Formenti-Ujlaki, George F.; Lymberis, Stella; Magnolfi, Chiara; Zhao Xuan; Chang Jenghwa; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Jozsef, Gabor; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric results from our institution's trials of prone accelerated partial breast irradiation are compared with the dosimetric requirements of RTOG-0413. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 and Trial 2 are 2 consecutive trials of prone-accelerated partial breast irradiation. Eligible for both trials were stage I breast cancer patients with negative margins after breast-conserving surgery. The planning target tumor volume (PTV) was created by extending the surgical cavity 2.0 cm for Trial 1 and 1.5 cm for Trial 2, respectively. Contralateral breast, heart, lungs, and thyroid were contoured. Thirty Gray was delivered in five daily fractions of 6 Gy by a three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy technique in Trial 1 and were by image-guided radiation therapy/intensity-modulated radiation therapy in Trial 2. Dosimetric results from the trials are reported and compared with RTOG 0413 requirements. Results: One hundred forty-six consecutive plans were analyzed: 67 left and 79 right breast cancers. The plans from the trials complied with the required >90% of prescribed dose covering 90% of PTV{sub E}VAL (=generated from the PTV by cropping 0.5 cm from the skin edge and excluding the chest wall): V90% was 98.1 {+-} 3.0% (with V100% and V95%, 89.4 {+-} 12.8%, 96.4 {+-} 5.1%, respectively). No significant difference between laterality was found (Student's t test). The dose constraints criteria of the RTOG-0413 protocol for ipsilateral and contralateral lung (V30 <15% and Dmax <3%), heart (V5 <40%), and thyroid (Dmax <3%) were satisfied because the plans showed an average V5% of 0.6% (range, 0-13.4) for heart, an average V30% of 0.6% (range, 0-9.1%) for ipsilateral lung, and <2% maximum dose to the thyroid. However, our partial breast irradiation plans demonstrated a higher dose to contralateral breast than that defined by RTOG constraints, with a median value of maximum doses of 4.1% (1.2 Gy), possibly as a result of contouring differences. Conclusions: Our

  1. Time Interval From Breast-Conserving Surgery to Breast Irradiation in Early Stage Node-Negative Breast Cancer: 17-Year Follow-Up Results and Patterns of Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Vujovic, Olga; Yu, Edward; Cherian, Anil; Dar, A. Rashid; Stitt, Larry; Perera, Francisco

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: A retrospectivechart review was conducted to determine whether the time interval from breast-conserving surgery to breast irradiation (surgery-radiation therapy interval) in early stage node-negative breast cancer had any detrimental effects on recurrence rates. Methods and Materials: There were 566 patients with T1 to T3, N0 breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and breast irradiation and without adjuvant systemic treatment between 1985 and 1992. The surgery-to-radiation therapy intervals used for analysis were 0 to 8 weeks (201 patients), >8 to 12 weeks (233 patients), >12 to 16 weeks (91 patients), and >16 weeks (41 patients). Kaplan-Meier estimates of time to local recurrence, disease-free survival, distant disease-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were calculated. Results: Median follow-up was 17.4 years. Patients in all 4 time intervals were similar in terms of characteristics and pathologic features. There were no statistically significant differences among the 4 time groups in local recurrence (P=.67) or disease-free survival (P=.82). The local recurrence rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 4.9%, 11.5%, and 15.0%, respectively. The distant disease relapse rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 10.6%, 15.4%, and 18.5%, respectively. The disease-free failure rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 20%, 32.3%, and 39.8%, respectively. Cause-specific survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 92%, 84.6%, and 79.8%, respectively. The overall survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 89.3%, 79.2%, and 66.9%, respectively. Conclusions: Surgery-radiation therapy intervals up to 16 weeks from breast-conserving surgery are not associated with any increased risk of recurrence in early stage node-negative breast cancer. There is a steady local recurrence rate of 1% per year with adjuvant radiation alone.

  2. Decision-Making in the Surgical Treatment of Breast Cancer: Factors Influencing Women’s Choices for Mastectomy and Breast Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bellavance, Emily Catherine; Kesmodel, Susan Beth

    2016-01-01

    One of the most difficult decisions a woman can be faced with when choosing breast cancer treatment is whether or not to undergo breast conserving surgery or mastectomy. The factors that influence these treatment decisions are complex and involve issues regarding access to health care, concerns for cancer recurrence, and the impact of surgery on body image and sexuality. Understanding these factors will help practitioners to improve patient education and to better guide patients through this decision-making process. Although significant scientific and societal advances have been made in improving women’s choices for the breast cancer treatment, there are still deficits in the decision-making processes surrounding the surgical treatment of breast cancer. Further research is needed to define optimal patient education and shared decision-making practices in this area. PMID:27066455

  3. Overall survival according to type of surgery in young (≤40 years) early breast cancer patients: A systematic meta-analysis comparing breast-conserving surgery versus mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Vila, Jose; Gandini, Sara; Gentilini, Oreste

    2015-06-01

    Young age is an independent risk factor for local recurrence after breast conserving surgery (BCS) and whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) for breast cancer. The aim of this study was to carry out a systematic meta-analysis to address the issue as to whether type of surgery might have an impact on overall survival (OS) of young patients with early breast cancer. We summarized six studies comparing OS between BCS + WBRT vs. mastectomy in young patients (≤40 years) with T1-T2 N0-N + M0 breast cancer. Primary endpoint was OS or distant metastasis free survival (DMFS). Only studies with fully adjusted Hazard Ratios (HR) were analyzed. Summary HRs were calculated through random effects models. We investigated publication bias and heterogeneity by means of sensitivity analyses and meta-regression models. Five population-based studies and a pooled study of two clinical trials, for a total of 22598 patients 40 years old or younger, were considered: 10898 patients underwent BCS and 11700 underwent mastectomy. After all the adjustments, including nodal status and tumor size, no difference in risk of death was found between the two groups (10% not significant risk reduction in patients who underwent BCS compared to mastectomy; summary HR = 0·90; 95%CI: 0·81 to 1·00). Between-study heterogeneity was not statistically significant (I(2) = 34% and Chi-square P = 0·15). Heterogeneity investigation did not find any variable influencing results. No indication for publication bias was found (P-value = 0·37). Excluding the only study presenting DMFS the results did not change (HR = 0·88; 95%CI: 0·78 to 1·01). Considering all the limitations, from the present meta-analysis carried out on 22598 patients it appears unlikely that mastectomy provides better OS compared to BCS + WBRT in early breast cancer patients aged 40 years or younger. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Tumor biology correlates with rates of breast-conserving surgery and pathologic complete response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer: findings from the ACOSOG Z1071 (Alliance) prospective multicenter clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Boughey, Judy C.; McCall, Linda M.; Ballman, Karla V.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Ahrendt, Gretchen M.; Wilke, Lee G.; Taback, Bret; Leitch, A. Marilyn; Flippo-Morton, Teresa; Hunt, Kelly K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of tumor biology on rates of breast-conserving surgery and pathologic complete response (pCR) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Summary Background Data The impact of tumor biology on the rate of breast-conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy has not been well studied. Methods We used data from ACOSOG Z1071, a prospective, multicenter study assessing sentinel node surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients presenting with node-positive breast cancer from 2009 through 2011, to determine rates of breast-conserving surgery and pCR after chemotherapy by approximated biologic subtype. Results Of the 756 patients enrolled on Z1071, 694 had findings available from pathologic review of breast and axillary specimens from surgery after chemotherapy. Approximated subtype was triple-negative in 170 (24.5%) patients, HER2-positive in 207 (29.8%), and hormone-receptor-positive, HER2-negative in 317 (45.7%). Patient age and clinical tumor and nodal stage at presentation did not differ across subtypes. Rates of breast-conserving surgery were significantly higher in patients with triple-negative (46.8%) and HER2-positive tumors (43.0%) than in those with hormone-receptor-positive, HER2-negative tumors (34.5%) (P = 0.019). Rates of pCR in both the breast and axilla were 38.2% in triple-negative, 45.4% in HER2-positive, and 11.4% in hormone-receptor-positive, HER2-negative disease (P < 0.0001). Rates of pCR in the breast only and the axilla only exhibited similar differences across tumor subtypes. Conclusions Patients with triple-negative and HER2-positive breast cancers have the highest rates of breast-conserving surgery and pCR after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Patients with these subtypes are most likely to be candidates for less invasive surgical approaches after chemotherapy. PMID:25203877

  5. Breast-conserving surgery with or without irradiation in women aged 65 years or older with early breast cancer (PRIME II): a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kunkler, Ian H; Williams, Linda J; Jack, Wilma J L; Cameron, David A; Dixon, J Michael

    2015-03-01

    For most older women with early breast cancer, standard treatment after breast-conserving surgery is adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy and adjuvant endocrine treatment. We aimed to assess the effect omission of whole-breast radiotherapy would have on local control in older women at low risk of local recurrence at 5 years. Between April 16, 2003, and Dec 22, 2009, 1326 women aged 65 years or older with early breast cancer judged low-risk (ie, hormone receptor-positive, axillary node-negative, T1-T2 up to 3 cm at the longest dimension, and clear margins; grade 3 tumour histology or lymphovascular invasion, but not both, were permitted), who had had breast-conserving surgery and were receiving adjuvant endocrine treatment, were recruited into a phase 3 randomised controlled trial at 76 centres in four countries. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to either whole-breast radiotherapy (40-50 Gy in 15-25 fractions) or no radiotherapy by computer-generated permuted block randomisation, stratified by centre, with a block size of four. The primary endpoint was ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence. Follow-up continues and will end at the 10-year anniversary of the last randomised patient. Analyses were done by intention to treat. The trial is registered on ISRCTN.com, number ISRCTN95889329. 658 women who had undergone breast-conserving surgery and who were receiving adjuvant endocrine treatment were randomly assigned to receive whole-breast irradiation and 668 were allocated to no further treatment. After median follow-up of 5 years (IQR 3·84-6·05), ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence was 1·3% (95% CI 0·2-2·3; n=5) in women assigned to whole-breast radiotherapy and 4·1% (2·4-5·7; n=26) in those assigned no radiotherapy (p=0·0002). Compared with women allocated to whole-breast radiotherapy, the univariate hazard ratio for ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence in women assigned to no radiotherapy was 5·19 (95% CI 1·99-13·52; p=0·0007). No differences in

  6. Esthetic result of rhomboid flap repair after breast-conserving surgery for lower quadrant breast cancer lesion with skin invasion: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Satoru; Nohara, Takehiro; Nakatani, Shuichi; Iwamoto, Mitsuhiko; Sumiyoshi, Kazuhiro; Kimura, Kosei; Takahashi, Yuko; Sato, Nayuko; Tanigawa, Nobuhiko

    2011-06-01

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) has been increasingly performed as a standard operative strategy for patients with breast cancer. The primary purpose of BCS is to acquire both local control and good cosmetic results. An insignificant difference in cancer treatment results has been shown between BCS and total mastectomy. However, achieving sufficiently cosmetic results can be difficult, particularly in patients with tumors that are large or localized to the lower quadrant. To avoid breast deformities and asymmetries after BCS, immediate reconstruction using autologous tissue has been accepted as the standard option. Rhomboid skin and adipose flap repair is a simple, less invasive procedure than the myocutaneous flap, which has primarily been performed in patients with upper quadrant lesions. We herein report the cases of two patients with lower quadrant breast cancer with skin invasion, who underwent BCS with immediate breast repair using a rhomboid flap. This procedure is therefore worth considering as one of the first options for immediate repair after BCS.

  7. Comparison of quality of life, satisfaction with surgery and shoulder-arm morbidity in breast cancer survivors submitted to breast-conserving therapy or mastectomy followed by immediate breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Freitas-Silva, Renata; Conde, Délio Marques; de Freitas-Júnior, Ruffo; Martinez, Edson Zangiacomi

    2010-06-01

    This study was designed to compare the prevalence of shoulder-arm morbidity, patient satisfaction with surgery and the quality of life of women submitted to breast-conserving therapy or modified radical mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction . This study was a cross-sectional study of women who underwent breast-conserving therapy (n = 44) or modified radical mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction (n = 26). Quality of life was evaluated with the SF-36 Health Survey Questionnaire. No differences were found in the prevalence of lymphedema. The movements that were most commonly affected by these procedures were abduction, flexion and external rotation. When the two groups were compared, however, we only found a statistically significant difference for the prevalence of restricted internal rotation, which occurred in 32% of women in the breast-conserving therapy group and 12% of those in the modified radical mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction group (OR: 7.23; p = 0.03 following adjustment for potential confounding factors). No difference in quality of life or satisfaction with surgery was found between the two groups. These data suggest that the type of surgery did not affect the occurrence of lymphedema. Breast-conserving therapy, however, increased the risk of shoulder movement limitation. No differences were found between the two surgical techniques with respect to quality of life or satisfaction with surgery.

  8. Comparison of quality of life, satisfaction with surgery and shoulder-arm morbidity in breast cancer survivors submitted to breast-conserving therapy or mastectomy followed by immediate breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Freitas-Silva, Renata; Conde, Délio Marques; de Freitas-Júnior, Ruffo; Martinez, Edson Zangiacomi

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to compare the prevalence of shoulder-arm morbidity, patient satisfaction with surgery and the quality of life of women submitted to breast-conserving therapy or modified radical mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction. METHODS: This study was a cross-sectional study of women who underwent breast-conserving therapy (n = 44) or modified radical mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction (n = 26). Quality of life was evaluated with the SF-36 Health Survey Questionnaire. RESULTS: No differences were found in the prevalence of lymphedema. The movements that were most commonly affected by these procedures were abduction, flexion and external rotation. When the two groups were compared, however, we only found a statistically significant difference for the prevalence of restricted internal rotation, which occurred in 32% of women in the breast-conserving therapy group and 12% of those in the modified radical mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction group (OR: 7.23; p = 0.03 following adjustment for potential confounding factors). No difference in quality of life or satisfaction with surgery was found between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that the type of surgery did not affect the occurrence of lymphedema. Breast-conserving therapy, however, increased the risk of shoulder movement limitation. No differences were found between the two surgical techniques with respect to quality of life or satisfaction with surgery. PMID:20835555

  9. Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast With Close or Focally Involved Margins Following Breast-Conserving Surgery: Treatment With Reexcision or Radiotherapy With Increased Dosage

    SciTech Connect

    Monteau, Amelie; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Kirova, Youlia M.; Fourchotte, Virginie; Bollet, Marc A.; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Asselain, Bernard; Salmon, Remy J. M.D.; Fourquet, Alain

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Following breast-conserving surgery for DCIS, reexcision before radiotherapy is recommended when margins are close or involved. We investigated whether an additional radiation dose could replace reexcision. Methods: We selected 208 women with DCIS of the breast treated with breast-conserving surgery between 1992 and 2002 who had either close margins (< 2 mm) (89 pts) or focally (< 1 mm) or minimally (1-15 mm) involved margins (119 pts). Sixty-one patients (29%) underwent reexcision before irradiation and 147 patients (71%) received breast irradiation with boost, without reexcision. Results: Median follow-up was 89 months. Median age was 53 years with 7 patients less than 41. Involved margins were less frequent in the non reexcision group than in the reexcised group (50% vs. 74%, p = 0.0019). All other clinical and histological features were comparable. Median whole-breast radiation dose was 50 Gy. Median total doses to the tumour bed were 67 Gy (range, 45-77) and 60 Gy (range, 46-74), respectively (p < 0.0001). Of the 61 reexcised patients, 56% had residual DCIS and 6% had invasive cancer. Six underwent a mastectomy for persistent margin involvement. Seven-year locoregional failure rates were 9.3% without, and 9.6% with reexcision (ns). No differences were observed when adjusting for margin status. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with close (< 2 mm) or focally/minimally involved margins, reexcision may be avoided and satisfactory local control achieved by increasing the radiation dose to the tumour bed to at least 66 Gy. These results only apply to patients older than 40 and would need confirmation in independent series.

  10. Regional recurrence in breast cancer patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Kimiko; Yoshimura, Michio; Inoue, Minoru; Yamauchi, Chikako; Ogura, Masakazu; Toi, Masakazu; Suzuki, Eiji; Takeuchi, Megumi; Takada, Masahiro; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy with breast-conserving therapy plays a crucial role in the treatment of early breast cancer. However, optimal radiotherapy targets have been controversial. We therefore evaluated regional recurrence in breast cancer patients with one to three positive lymph nodes (LNs) treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) followed by whole-breast irradiation (WBI). From 1993 to 2010, 121 breast cancer patients with one to three positive LNs who underwent BCS followed by WBI were analyzed. All patients underwent radiotherapy with two tangential fields to the whole breast. To evaluate the radiation dose to the axillary LNs, we contoured axillary LNs area and evaluated the dose–volumetric parameters. The median follow-up time was 112.4 months (range, 15.6–248.1 months). The 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 95.6% and 86.6%, respectively. The 5-year regional recurrence–free rate (RRFR) was 97.4%. During follow-up, six patients had regional recurrence. The pathological T stage was the factor best associated with the 5-year RRFR using the log-rank test, with 100.0% in the pT1 cohort versus 94.7% in the pT2–4 cohort (P < 0.01). The radiation dose to the axillary LNs did not contribute to the RRFR. In conclusion, while the pathological T stage was the prognostic factor best associated with regional recurrence, few regional recurrences were observed in early breast cancer patients with one to three LNs treated with BCS followed by WBI. Unintentional radiation doses to the axillary LNs using standard WBI were not related to the RRFR after axillary dissection. PMID:27422931

  11. A nationwide pathology study on surgical margins and excision volumes after breast-conserving surgery: There is still much to be gained.

    PubMed

    Haloua, M H; Volders, J H; Krekel, N M A; Barbé, E; Sietses, C; Jóźwiak, K; Meijer, S; van den Tol, M P

    2016-02-01

    The current study aims to assess margin status in relation to amount of healthy breast tissue resected in breast-conserving surgery (BCS) on a nationwide scale. Using PALGA (a nationwide network and registry of histology and cytopathology in the Netherlands), all patients who underwent BCS for primary invasive carcinoma in 2012-13 were selected (10,058 excerpts). 9276 pathology excerpts were analyzed for a range of criteria including oncological margin status and distance to closest margin, specimen weight/volume, greatest tumor diameter, and with or without localization method. Calculated resection ratios (CRR) were assessed to determine excess healthy breast tissue resection. Margins for invasive carcinoma and in situ carcinoma combined were tumor-involved in 498 (5.4%) and focally involved in 1021 cases (11.0%) of cases. Unsatisfactory resections including (focally) involved margins and margins ≤ 1 mm were reported in 33.8% of patients. The median lumpectomy volume was 46 cc (range 1-807 cc; SD 49.18) and median CRR 2.32 (range 0.10-104.17; SD 3.23), indicating the excision of 2.3 the optimal resection volume. The unacceptable rate of tumor-involved margins as well as margins ≤ 1 mm in one third of all patients is also achieved at the expense of healthy breast tissue resection, which may carry the drawback of high rates of cosmetic failure. These data clearly suggest the need for improvement in current breast conserving surgical procedures to decrease tumor-involved margin rates while reducing the amount of healthy breast tissue resected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Oncoplastic breast conserving surgery with nipple-areolar preservation for centrally located breast cancer: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhao-Jun; Li, Xiu-Juan; Xu, Xin-Yu; Xia, Lei; Tang, Jin-Hai

    2014-01-01

    A compariosn was made of survival outcomes of oncoplastic breast conserving therapy (oBCT) with nipple- areolar (NAC) preservation in women with centrally located breast cancer (CLBC) undergoing modified radical mastectomy (MRM) in China in a matched retrospective cohort study. We used a database including patients who received oBCT (n=91) or MRM (n=182) from 2003 to 2013 in our hospital. Matching was conducted according to five variables: age at diagnosis, axillary lymph node status, hormone receptor status, human epidermal growth factor-like receptor 2 status (HER-2) and tumor stage. The match ratio was 1:2. Median follow-up times for the oBCT and MRM groups were 83 and 81 months, respectively. There were no significant differences in 87-month overall, local, or distant recurrence-free survival between patients with oBCT and MRM (89%vs.90%; 93%vs.95%; 91%vs.92%;). For appropriate breast cancer patients, oBCT for CLBC is oncologically safe, oncoplastic techniques improving cosmetic outcomes.

  13. Factors that Affect Patients' Decision-Making about Mastectomy or Breast Conserving Surgery, and the Psychological Effect of this Choice on Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gumus, Mahmut; Ustaalioglu, Basak O.; Garip, Meral; Kiziltan, Emre; Bilici, Ahmet; Seker, Mesut; Erkol, Burcak; Salepci, Taflan; Mayadagli, Alpaslan; Turhal, Nazim S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Primary treatment is surgery, with breast conserving surgery (BCS) being widely used for early-stage disease. Due to changes in body image, depressive symptoms can occur after surgery. Here, we evaluate factors that affect patients’ decision on surgery, and investigate differences in the level of depression after mastectomy or BCS in a population of Turkish patients. Patients and Methods One hundred breast cancer patients who had undergone mastectomy or BCS and were followed up at our institution between 2007 and 2008 were included. Patients were questioned about their involvement in surgical decision-making. Depression was diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III) criteria via a Structural Clinical Interview for DSM (SCID). Severity of depression was evaluated by using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results Patients who were older than 50 years, had more than 1 child, a history of lactation, and a positive family history of breast cancer mostly preferred mastectomy. However, patients who sought a second opinion and further information on BCS preferred BCS (p < 0.005). There was no statistical correlation between marital status, first childbearing age, and educational status and the decision on surgery type (p > 0.005). Mastectomy patients were prone to depression, but this was not statistically significant (p = 0.099). Conclusion Age, parenthood, lactation, and positive familial history, as well as thorough information about the type of surgery were important factors for the patients’ decision. After breast cancer surgery, patients might experience depression affecting treatment and quality of life. Therefore, adequate information and communication are essential. PMID:21048831

  14. Is Short-Interval Mammography Necessary After Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiation Treatment in Breast Cancer Patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Hymas, Richard V.; Gaffney, David K.; Parkinson, Brett T.; Belnap, Thomas W.; Sause, William T.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The optimum timing and frequency of mammography in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) are controversial. The American Society of Clinical Oncology recommends the first posttreatment mammogram 1 year after diagnosis but no earlier than 6 months after completion of radiotherapy. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommends annual mammography. Intermountain Healthcare currently follows a more frequent mammography schedule during the first 2 years in BCT patients. This retrospective study was undertaken to determine the cancer yield mammography during the first 2 years after BCT. Methods and Materials: 1,435 patients received BCT at Intermountain Healthcare between 2003 and 2007, inclusive. Twenty-three patients had bilateral breast cancer (1,458 total breasts). Patients were followed up for 24 months after diagnosis. The 1- and 2-year mammography yields were determined and compared with those of the general screening population. Results: 1,079 breasts had mammography at less than 1 year, and two ipsilateral recurrences (both noninvasive) were identified; 1,219 breasts had mammography during the second year, and nine recurrences (three invasive, six noninvasive) were identified. Of the 11 ipsilateral recurrences during the study, three presented with symptoms and eight were identified by mammography alone. The mammography yield was 1.9 cancers per 1,000 breasts the first year and 4.9 per 1,000 the second year. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that the mammography yield during the first 2 years after BCT is not greater than that in the general population, and they support the policy for initiating followup mammography at 1 year after BCT.

  15. Patterns of nodal staging during breast conservation surgery in the medicare patient: will the ACOSOG Z0011 trial change the pattern of care?

    PubMed

    Loveland-Jones, Catherine E; Ruth, Karen; Sigurdson, Elin R; Egleston, Brian L; Boraas, Marcia; Bleicher, Richard J

    2014-02-01

    ACOSOG Z0011 spares axillary dissection (AD) in breast conservation surgery (BCS) patients with T1/T2 tumors and 1-2 positive nodes. Current patterns of care and the impact of Z0011 on AD versus additional surgery rates for Medicare patients undergoing BCS are unknown. SEER data linked to Medicare claims for 1999-2005 were reviewed for women with invasive nonmetastatic breast cancer who underwent nodal staging on the same day as BCS. There were 3,280 women with T1/T2 tumors and positive nodes who underwent same-day nodal staging; 2,532 (77.2 %) of these women had 1-2 positive nodes. Assuming 25.7 % have extracapsular extension, 651 women would require AD. However, 1,881 women, or 57.4 % of those with T1/T2 tumors and positive nodes, would be spared AD. Meanwhile, among the 748 women having ≥ 3 positive nodes, 579 underwent same-day AD, but under Z0011, would now wait for permanent section. A total of 160 of these women underwent re-excision or completion mastectomy at a later date anyway, when delayed AD could be performed. The remaining 419 women with ≥ 3 positive nodes would require an additional surgery date for the sole purpose of completion AD. The Z0011 paradigm would consequently necessitate an additional surgery date for 1,070 (651 + 419) women, or 32.6 % of those with T1/T2 tumors and positive nodes. The Z0011 paradigm appears to increase the number of Medicare patients undergoing BCS who require an additional surgery date but decrease the number requiring AD to a greater extent. Future changes in the use of AD or axillary irradiation may yet modify that impact substantially.

  16. Photobiomodulation therapy for the management of radiation-induced dermatitis : A single-institution experience of adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Strouthos, Iosif; Chatzikonstantinou, Georgios; Tselis, Nikolaos; Bon, Dimitra; Karagiannis, Efstratios; Zoga, Eleni; Ferentinos, Konstantinos; Maximenko, Julia; Nikolettou-Fischer, Vassiliki; Zamboglou, Nikolaos

    2017-06-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) comprises a key component in the treatment of breast cancer. Radiation-induced skin toxicity is the major adverse event experienced by patients; however, radiodermatitis (RD) prevention and management remains trivial. It is proven that photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy using light-emitting diode (LED) increases wound healing and depicts an anti-inflammatory effect. This single-institute study evaluates the beneficial role of PBM-LED in preventing/reducing RD during breast cancer RT. Of 70 consecutively treated patients, 25 patients were treated with PBM-LED twice a week prior to adjuvant 3D conformal RT after breast-conserving surgery. RD was reported using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0 and pain intensity using a visual analog scale (VAS). For comparison, a control group (n = 45) received RT without PBM-LED. In addition, a "matched" group (n = 25) was generated from the control group based on propensity for potentially confounding variables. In the PBM group, 22 patients (88%) presented grade 1 and 3 (12%) grade 2 RD. In the control group, 25 patients (55.6%) developed grade 1 reactions, 18 patients (40%) grade 2, and 2 (4.4%) patients grade 3 RD. Concerning pain intensity, 15 patients (60%) of the PBM treatment arm reported no pain, 5 patients (20%) VAS 2, and 5 (20%) VAS 3. In the control group, 13 patients (28.9%) reported no pain, 2 (4.4%) VAS 1, 7 (15.6%) VAS 2, 9 patients (20%) reported VAS 3, 12 (26.7%) patients VAS 4, and 2 (4.4%) patients VAS 5. PBM-LED therapy applied prior to RT might be effective in decreasing the incidence and sequelae of radiation-induced skin toxicity in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery.

  17. Comparison of treatment outcome between breast-conservation surgery with radiation and total mastectomy without radiation in patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Il; Park, Seho; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Yong Bae; Suh, Chang Ok; Park, Byeong-Woo

    2011-08-01

    To test the difference in treatment outcome between breast-conservation surgery with radiation and total mastectomy without radiation, to evaluate the benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes. Using the Severance Hospital Breast Cancer Registry, we divided the study population of T1, T2 and one to three axillary node-positive patients into two groups: breast-conservation surgery with radiation (BCS/RT) and total mastectomy without radiation (TM/no-RT). Data related to locoregional recurrence, distant recurrence, and death were collected, and survival rates were calculated. The study population consisted of 125 patients treated with BCS/RT and 365 patients treated with TM/no-RT. With a median follow-up of 68.4 months, the 10-year locoregional recurrence-free survival rate with BCS/RT and TM/no-RT was 90.5% and 79.2%, respectively (p = 0.056). The 10-year distant recurrence-free survival rate was 78.8% for patients treated with BCS/RT vs. 68.0% for those treated with TM/no-RT (p = 0.012). The 10-years overall survival rate for patients treated with BCT/RT and TM/no-RT was 87.5% and 73.9%, respectively (p = 0.035). After multivariate analysis, patients treated with BCT/RT had better distant recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.527; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.297-0.934; p = 0.028), with improving locoregional recurrence-free survival (HR, 0.491; 95% CI, 0.231-1.041; p = 0.064) and overall survival trend (HR, 0.544; 95% CI, 0.277-1.067; p = 0.076). This study provides additional evidence that adjuvant radiation substantially reduces local recurrence, distant recurrence, and mortality for patients with one to three involved nodes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Subsets of Women With Close or Positive Margins After Breast-Conserving Surgery With High Local Recurrence Risk Despite Breast Plus Boost Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lupe, Krystine; Truong, Pauline T.; Alexander, Cheryl; Lesperance, Mary; Speers, Caroline; Tyldesley, Scott

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: (1) To examine the effect of surgical margin status on local recurrence (LR) and survival following breast-conserving therapy; (2) To identify subsets with close or positive margins with high LR risk despite whole breast radiotherapy (RT) plus boost. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 2,264 women with pT1-3, any N, M0 invasive breast cancer, treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast {+-} boost RT. Five-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LR, breast cancer-specific and overall survival (BCSS and OS) were compared between cohorts with negative (n = 1,980), close (n = 222), and positive (n = 62) margins. LR rates were analyzed according to clinicopathologic characteristics. Multivariable Cox regression modeling and matched analysis of close/positive margin cases and negative margin controls were performed. Results: Median follow-up was 5.2 years. Boost RT was used in 92% of patients with close or positive margins. Five-year KM LR rates in the negative, close and positive margin cohorts were 1.3%, 4.0%, and 5.2%, respectively (p = 0.001). BCSS and OS were similar in the three margin subgroups. In the close/positive margin cohort, LR rates were 10.2% with age <45 years, 11.8% with Grade III, 11.3% with lymphovascular invasion (LVI), and 26.3% with {>=}4 positive nodes. Corresponding rates in the negative margin cohort were 2.3%, 2.4%, 1.0%, and 2.4%, respectively. On Cox regression analysis of the entire cohort, close or positive margin, Grade III histology, {>=}4 positive nodes, and lack of systemic therapy were significantly associated with higher LR risk. When close/positive margin cases were matched to negative margin controls, the difference in 5-year LR remained significant (4.25% vs. 0.7%, p < 0.001). Conclusions: On univariable analysis, subsets with close or positive margins, in combination with age <45 years, Grade III, LVI, and {>=}4 positive nodes, have 5-year LR >10% despite whole breast plus boost RT. These patients should be considered for

  19. Comparison of Treatment Outcome Between Breast-Conservation Surgery With Radiation and Total Mastectomy Without Radiation in Patients With One to Three Positive Axillary Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seung Il; Park, Seho; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Yong Bae; Suh, Chang Ok; Park, Byeong-Woo

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To test the difference in treatment outcome between breast-conservation surgery with radiation and total mastectomy without radiation, to evaluate the benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Using the Severance Hospital Breast Cancer Registry, we divided the study population of T1, T2 and one to three axillary node-positive patients into two groups: breast-conservation surgery with radiation (BCS/RT) and total mastectomy without radiation (TM/no-RT). Data related to locoregional recurrence, distant recurrence, and death were collected, and survival rates were calculated. Results: The study population consisted of 125 patients treated with BCS/RT and 365 patients treated with TM/no-RT. With a median follow-up of 68.4 months, the 10-year locoregional recurrence-free survival rate with BCS/RT and TM/no-RT was 90.5% and 79.2%, respectively (p = 0.056). The 10-year distant recurrence-free survival rate was 78.8% for patients treated with BCS/RT vs. 68.0% for those treated with TM/no-RT (p = 0.012). The 10-years overall survival rate for patients treated with BCT/RT and TM/no-RT was 87.5% and 73.9%, respectively (p = 0.035). After multivariate analysis, patients treated with BCT/RT had better distant recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.527; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.297-0.934; p = 0.028), with improving locoregional recurrence-free survival (HR, 0.491; 95% CI, 0.231-1.041; p = 0.064) and overall survival trend (HR, 0.544; 95% CI, 0.277-1.067; p = 0.076). Conclusions: This study provides additional evidence that adjuvant radiation substantially reduces local recurrence, distant recurrence, and mortality for patients with one to three involved nodes.

  20. A comparison study between gross tumor volumes defined by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, postoperative specimens, and tumor bed for radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aiping; Li, Jianbin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yongsheng; Mu, Dianbin; Chen, Zhaoqiu; Shao, Qian; Li, Fengxiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The identification and contouring of target volume is important for breast-conserving therapy. The aim of the study was to compare preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), postoperative pathology, excised specimens’ (ES) size, and tumor bed (TB) delineation as methods for determining the gross tumor volume (GTV) for radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods: Thirty-three patients with breast cancer who underwent preoperative MRI and radiotherapy after BCS were enrolled. The GTVs determined by MRI, pathology, and the ES were defined as GTVMRI, GTVPAT, and GTVES, respectively. GTVMRI+1 was defined as a 1.0-cm margin around the GTVMRI. The radiation oncologist delineated GTV of the TB (GTVTB) using planning computed tomography according to ≥5 surgical clips placed in the lumpectomy cavity (LC). Results: The median GTVMRI, GTVMRI+1, GTVPAT, GTVES, and GTVTB were 0.97 cm3 (range, 0.01–6.88), 12.58 cm3 (range, 3.90–34.13), 0.97 cm3 (range, 0.01–6.36), 15.46 cm3 (range, 1.15–70.69), and 19.24 cm3 (range, 4.72–54.33), respectively. There were no significant differences between GTVMRI and GTVPAT, GTVMRI+1 and GTVES, GTVES and GTVTB (P = 0.188, 0.070, and 0.264, respectively). GTVMRI is positively related with GTVPAT. However, neither GTVES nor GTVTB correlated with GTVMRI (P = 0.071 and 0.378, respectively). Furthermore, neither GTVES nor GTVTB correlated with GTVMRI+1 (P = 0.068 and 0.375, respectively). Conclusion: When ≥5 surgical clips were placed in the LC for BCS, the volume of TB was consistent with the volume of ES. Neither the volume of TB nor the volume of ES correlated significantly with the volume of tumor defined by preoperative MRI. PMID:28079816

  1. HER-2 overexpression is not associated with increased ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence in DCIS treated with breast-conserving surgery followed by radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Noh, Jae Myoung; Lee, Jihae; Choi, Doo Ho; Cho, Eun Yoon; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kil, Won-Ho

    2013-10-01

    We evaluated the clinical implications of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-2 overexpression after adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We reviewed 215 patients with DCIS who underwent breast-conserving surgery followed by RT. The association between HER-2 overexpression and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) was evaluated. HER-2 overexpression was associated with comedo-type architecture, high nuclear grade, and negative hormonal receptors. The median follow-up duration was 75 months. Sixteen patients experienced IBTR; seven as DCIS recurrence and nine as invasive recurrence. The IBTR rate was 11.4% at 10 years. There was no significant difference in IBTR according to HER-2 expression (P = 0.1764), neither in invasive nor DCIS recurrence. Time to recurrence was shorter in HER-2 positive tumors (P = 0.0697). Adjuvant RT seems to counteract the negative effect of HER-2 overexpression in DCIS, while time to recurrence was relatively shorter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. From Radical Mastectomy to Breast-Conserving Therapy and Oncoplastic Breast Surgery: A Narrative Review Comparing Oncological Result, Cosmetic Outcome, Quality of Life, and Health Economy

    PubMed Central

    Kaviani, Ahmad; Sodagari, Nassim; Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Eslami, Vahid; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Safavi, Amin; Noparast, Maryam; Fitoussi, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    Surgical management of breast cancer has evolved considerably over the last two decades. There has been a major shift toward less-invasive local treatments, from radical mastectomy to breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS). In order to investigate the efficacy of each of the three abovementioned methods, a literature review was conducted for measurable outcomes including local recurrence, survival, cosmetic outcome, quality of life (QOL), and health economy. From the point of view of oncological result, there is no difference between mastectomy and BCT in local recurrence rate and survival. Long-term results for OBS are not available. The items assessed in the QOL sound a better score for OBS in comparison with mastectomy or BCT. OBS is also associated with a better cosmetic outcome. Although having low income seems to be associated with lower BCT and OBS utilization, prognosis of breast cancer is worse in these women as well. Thus, health economy is the matter that should be studied seriously. OBS is an innovative, progressive, and complicated subspeciality that lacks published randomized clinical trials comparing surgical techniques and objective measures of outcome, especially from oncologic and health economy points of view. PMID:24167743

  3. Recovery of sensation in immediate breast reconstruction with latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps after breast-conservative surgery and skin-sparing mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Koichi; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko

    2011-04-01

    In breast reconstruction, sensation in the reconstructed breasts affects the patients' quality of life along with its aesthetic outcome. Fortunately, less invasive procedures such as breast-conservative surgery (BCS) and skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) have greatly contributed to the improved aesthetic outcome in immediate breast reconstruction. However, there are few reports on the recovery of breast sensation after BCS and SSM. We retrospectively reviewed 104 consecutive patients who underwent immediate breast reconstruction with the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap between 2001 and 2006 at our institution. The sensations of pain, temperature, touch, and vibration were examined at the nipple and skin envelope during the follow-up period (range: 12-61 months, mean: 31 months), and a stratified analysis was performed to determine the critical factors affecting the sensation recovery after BCS and SSM. We found that large breast size significantly impaired the recovery of sensation in the nipple and skin envelope after BCS as well as SSM. Older age and high body mass index value were the factors which negatively affected the sensation in the skin envelope after SSM. While all our BCS patients underwent postoperative radiation therapy, it did not negatively affect the recovery of sensation in SSM patients. On the basis of these findings, we could further improve the sensation of the reconstructed breasts after BCS and SSM. Especially after SSM, the use of innervated flaps is recommended in the patients with large breast, increased age, or obesity when the nipple-areola complex is resected.

  4. Evaluation the consistency of location of moist desquamation and skin high dose area for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy after breast conservative surgery.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Min; Huang, Eng-Yen; Liang, Ji-An; Meng, Fan-Yun; Chang, Gia-Hsin; Tsao, Min-Jen

    2013-03-06

    To evaluate whether the location of moist desquamation matches high dose area for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservative surgery. One hundred and nine breast cancer patients were enrolled to this study. Their highest skin dose area (the hot spot) was estimated from the treatment planning. We divided the irradiated field into breast; sternal/parasternal; axillary; and inframammary fold areas. The location for moist desquamation was recorded to see if it matches the hot spot. We also analyzed other possible risk factors which may be related to the moist desquamation. Forty-eight patients with 65 locations developed moist desquamation during the RT course. Patients with larger breast sizes and easy to sweat are two independent risk factors for moist desquamation. The distribution of moist desquamation occurred most in the axillary area. All nine patients with the hot spots located at the axillary area developed moist desquamation at the axillary area, and six out of seven patients with the hot spots located at the inframammary fold developed moist desquamation there. The majority of patients with moist desquamation over the breast or sternal/parasternal areas had the hot spots located at these areas. For a patient with moist desquamation, if a hot spot is located at the axillary or inframammary fold areas, it is very likely to have moist desquamation occur there. On the other hand, if moist desquamation occurs over the breast or sternal/parasternal areas, we can highly expect these two areas are also the hot spot locations.

  5. A comparison of the cosmetic and psychological outcome of breast reconstruction, breast conserving surgery and mastectomy without reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, R M; Leinster, S; Sassoon, E M

    2007-08-01

    The cosmetic and psychological outcomes of patients who underwent reconstructive surgery, conservative surgery or simple mastectomy for breast cancer between 1995 and 2002 were compared. There was a significant correlation between good psychological adjustment and good cosmetic outcome scores (p=0.01-0.05). There was no difference in cosmetic outcome between different reconstruction methods. Reconstruction patients rated their cosmetic outcome better than conservative surgery patients, and conservative surgery patients better than mastectomy patients. There were no differences in psychological outcome between patient groups. Good perception of cosmetic outcome is associated with good psychological adjustment. There is no cosmetic advantage of one type of reconstruction over another. Reconstruction patients have a better body image compared with other treatment groups but there are no other psychological advantages of one type of treatment over another.

  6. Breast-conserving surgery in locally advanced breast cancer submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Safety and effectiveness based on ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence and long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Guilherme Freire Angotti; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam; Abrahão-Machado, Lucas Faria; Brentani, Maria Mitzi; Nunes, João Soares; Folgueira, Maria Aparecida Azevedo Koike; da Costa Vieira, René Aloisio

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence after breast-conserving surgery for locally advanced breast cancer. METHODS: A retrospective observational cohort study was performed in patients with locally advanced breast cancer submitted to breast-conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy based on an adriamycin-cyclophosphamide-paclitaxel regimen. We evaluated the clinical, pathologic, immunohistochemistry, and surgical factors that contribute to ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence and locoregional recurrence. A Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox model were used to evaluate the main factors related to disease-free survival. RESULTS: Of the 449 patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 98 underwent breast-conserving surgery. The average diameter of the tumors was 5.3 cm, and 87.2% reached a size of up to 3 cm. Moreover, 86.7% were classified as clinical stage III, 74.5% had T3-T4 tumors, 80.5% had N1-N2 axilla, and 89.8% had invasive ductal carcinoma. A pathologic complete response was observed in 27.6% of the tumors, and 100.0% of samples had free margins. The 5-year actuarial overall survival rate was 81.2%, and the mean follow-up was 72.8 months. The rates of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence and locoregional recurrence were 11.2% and 15.3%, respectively. Multifocal morphology response was the only factor related to ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence disease-free survival (p=0.04). A multivariate analysis showed that the pathologic response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST)-breast cutoff was the only factor related to locoregional recurrence disease-free survival (p=0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Breast-conserving surgery is a safe and effective therapy for selected locally advanced breast tumors. PMID:28355358

  7. Early Postoperative Outcomes in Breast Conservation Surgery Versus Simple Mastectomy with Implant Reconstruction: A NSQIP Analysis of 11,645 Patients.

    PubMed

    Pyfer, Bryan; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Chen, Lilian; Nigriny, John; Czerniecki, Brian; Tchou, Julia; Fisher, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Little has been studied that compares early postoperative outcomes between breast conservation surgery (BCS) and simple mastectomy with implant reconstruction (SM). Our goal was to utilize a large-volume database to compare such outcomes in women with early stage breast cancer. The National Surgery Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database was searched for patients who underwent partial or complete mastectomy between 2009 and 2012. Exclusion criteria eliminated potential confounding factors. We compared preoperative comorbidities and postoperative complication rates between each treatment group by Chi square and two-sample t tests; we also determined the odds ratios for the likelihood of adverse events in a number of categories. A total of 11,645 patients met the study criteria: 9571 underwent BCS and 2074 underwent SM with implant reconstruction. The baseline characteristics of the two groups showed significant differences for age (61.7 years in BCS, 53.5 years in SM), body mass index (29.6 kg/m(2) in BCS, 27.0 kg/m(2) in SM), and rates of hypertension (47.0 % in BCS, 25.6 % in SM), coronary artery disease (1.3 % in BCS, 0.6 % in SM), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (2.4 % in BCS, 1.0 % in SM), and diabetes (11.7 % in BCS, 5.9 % in SM). Statistical analysis between each treatment modality revealed that the SM with implant group had significantly higher total complication (5.5 vs. 2.1 % in BCS), wound (2.8 vs. 1.4 % in BCS), infection (1.9 vs. 0.4 % in BCS), and bleeding (0.2 vs. 0.05 % in BCS) rates than the BCS group. BCS has fewer overall early postoperative wound, infectious, and bleeding complications despite a significantly higher rate of preexisting risk factors.

  8. Plastic surgery for breast conservation therapy: how to define the volume of the tumor bed for the boost?

    PubMed

    Furet, E; Peurien, D; Fournier-Bidoz, N; Servois, V; Reyal, F; Fourquet, A; Rouzier, R; Kirova, Y M

    2014-07-01

    To describe the procedure of definition of the boost volume using pre- and post-operative computed tomography (CT) and surgical clips in the tumor bed after oncoplastic surgical procedure. Thirty-one consecutive breast cancer patients who underwent simple lumpectomy or oncoplastic surgery were studied. All of them underwent pre- and post-operative CT scan in treatment position to evaluate the planning target volume (PTV) boost volume and define the primary tumor (gross tumor volume (GTV)) and tumor bed zones (CTV), with an overall margin of 5 mm in lateral and 10 mm in craniocaudal directions, corresponding to localization and setup uncertainties. Thirteem patients underwent simple lumpectomy and 18 oncoplastic surgery. The volumetric analysis showed that the intersection between GTV and CTV clips was significantly higher in patients with three and more clips (28.4% vs 3.14%; p < 0.001). In the case of patients with oncoplastic surgery, more than three clips were needed to define the tumor bed volume with accuracy. The number of clips was directly related to the exact definition of the boost volume. The use of more than three clips allows better definition of the PTV boost volume after oncoplastic surgical procedure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Patient Prognostic Score and Associations With Survival Improvement Offered by Radiotherapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ: A Population-Based Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Rachel A.; Vaz-Luis, Ines; Mallory, Melissa Anne; Wong, Stephanie M.; Aydogan, Fatih; DeSantis, Stephen; Barry, William T.; Golshan, Mehra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is a standard treatment option for the management of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We sought to determine the survival benefit of RT after BCS on the basis of risk factors for local recurrence. Patients and Methods A retrospective longitudinal cohort study was performed to identify patients with DCIS diagnosed between 1988 and 2007 and treated with BCS by using SEER data. Patients were divided into the following two groups: BCS+RT (RT group) and BCS alone (non-RT group). We used a patient prognostic scoring model to stratify patients on the basis of risk of local recurrence. We performed a Cox proportional hazards model with propensity score weighting to evaluate breast cancer mortality between the two groups. Results We identified 32,144 eligible patients with DCIS, 20,329 (63%) in the RT group and 11,815 (37%) in the non-RT group. Overall, 304 breast cancer–specific deaths occurred over a median follow-up of 96 months, with a cumulative incidence of breast cancer mortality at 10 years in the weighted cohorts of 1.8% (RT group) and 2.1% (non-RT group; hazard ratio, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.62 to 0.88). Significant improvements in survival in the RT group compared with the non-RT group were only observed in patients with higher nuclear grade, younger age, and larger tumor size. The magnitude of the survival difference with RT was significantly correlated with prognostic score (P < .001). Conclusion In this population-based study, the patient prognostic score for DCIS is associated with the magnitude of improvement in survival offered by RT after BCS, suggesting that decisions for RT could be tailored on the basis of patient factors, tumor biology, and the prognostic score. PMID:26834064

  10. Cosmetic Evaluation Methods Adapted to Asian Patients after Breast-Conserving Surgery and Examination of the Necessarily Elements for Cosmetic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hanamura, Noriko; Zaha, Hisamitsu; Kimura, Hiroko; Kashikura, Yumi; Nakamura, Takashi; Noro, Aya; Imai, Nao; Shibusawa, Mai; Ogawa, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although various strategies have been reported, there are no defined criteria for cosmetic evaluation methods after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Since Asians tend to have smaller breasts, indistinct inframammary folds, and conspicuous scars, differences in the cosmetic results are expected. So we examined two subjective methods and one objective method to determine the differences, and elements necessary for a cosmetic evaluation after BCS. Methods Frontal photographs of 190 Japanese were evaluated using the Harris scale (Harris) and the evaluation method proposed by the Japanese Breast Cancer Society Sawai group (Sawai group) as the subjective methods, and the Breast Cancer Conservation Treatment cosmetic results (BCCT.core) as the objective method, respectively. In order to examine the necessary elements for developing a new ideal method, 100 out of 190 were selected and assessed separately by six raters using both the Harris and modified Sawai group methods in the observer assessment. The correlation between the two methods was examined using the Spearman rank-correlation coefficient. Results The results of the BCCT.core and the other two methods were clearly different. In the observer assessment, the consensuses of the six raters were evaluated as follows: 27, 27, 26, and 20 cases were evaluated as "excellent," "good," "fair," and "poor," respectively. For the Spearman rank-correlation coefficient, values higher than 0.7 indicated a strong correlation, as seen by the values of 0.909 for the breast shape and 0.345 for the scar. The breast shape accounted for the most significant part of the evaluation, and the scar had very little correlation. Conclusion In this study, we recognized a clear difference between the subjective and objective evaluation methods, and identified the necessary elements for cosmetic evaluation. We would like to continue developing an ideal cosmetic evaluation that is similar to subjective one and is independent from raters

  11. The use of radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery in hormonally treated breast cancer patients is dependent on patient age, geographic region, and surgeon specialty.

    PubMed

    Chagpar, Anees B; McMasters, Kelly M; Scoggins, Charles R; Martin, Robert C G; Thoene, Cynthia; Edwards, Michael J

    2008-06-01

    The use of radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is inconsistent in patients treated with hormonal therapy (HT). We sought to identify factors influencing the decision to use RT in this setting. Patients in the North American Fareston vs. Tamoxifen Adjuvant (NAFTA) trial who had BCS were evaluated for factors influencing the use of RT using univariate and multivariate analyses. Of the 1,811 patients enrolled in the NAFTA trial, 1,222 (67.4%) had BCS. Of these, 241 (19.7%) did not have RT. There were no significant differences in tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, estrogen receptor status, or nodal status between those who received RT and those who did not. On univariate analyses, patients who did not receive RT were more likely to be older (median 72 versus 66 years, P < .001), have larger tumors (median 1.35 versus 1.10 cm, P = .009), and be progesterone negative (18.3% versus 13.1%, P = .048). Surgeons in the West were most likely to omit RT, whereas those in the Midwest were least likely to omit it (26.7% versus 7.2%, P < .001). Surgical oncologists were more likely to omit RT after BCS than general surgeons (21.8% versus 13.7%, P < .001). Academic affiliation (P < .001), number of breast procedures performed per year (P = .017), and the percentage of breast practice (P = .019) also correlated with whether or not RT was used. On multivariate analysis, patient age (P < .001), geographic region (P = .006), and surgeon specialty (P = .027) remained significant. Patient age, geographic region, and surgeon training influence the decision to use RT after BCS in patients receiving HT.

  12. Cavity Shaving plus Lumpectomy versus Lumpectomy Alone for Patients with Breast Cancer Undergoing Breast-Conserving Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke; Ren, Yu; He, Jianjun

    2017-01-01

    The margin status is a well-established prognostic predictor for patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Recent data suggested that cavity shaving in addition to lumpectomy might be a promising approach for improving the clinical outcomes. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety between cavity shaving plus lumpectomy and lumpectomy alone with a systematic review and meta-analysis. We searched the PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane CENTRAL databases for studies comparing cavity shaving with lumpectomy before June 10, 2016. Both comparative studies and self-control studies were included. A random-effects model was used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) for positive margin rate, reoperation rate, recurrence rate, and weighted mean difference (WMD) for excised tissue volume. Twenty-six studies were included in the meta-analysis. The cavity shaving group had a significantly lower positive margin rate than the BCS-alone group (16.4% vs. 31.9%; OR = 0.41, 95% CI 0.32–0.53, P < 0.05). Cavity shaving was associated with a significantly decreased rate of reoperation (OR = 0.42, 95% CI 0.30–0.59, P < 0.05). The overall locoregional rate was low for cavity shaving and BCS-alone (3% vs. 4%). Cavity shaving had no significant effect on the risk of locoregional recurrence (OR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.32–2.35; P = 0.78). The excised tissue volume did not differ substantially between cavity shaving and BCS alone (WMD = −23.88, 95% CI −55.20 to 7.44, P = 0.14). For patients undergoing BCS, additional cavity shaving was an effective method to decrease the positive margin rate and avoid reoperation. The addition of cavity shaving did not appear to have excessive excised tissue volume compared with partial mastectomy alone. PMID:28046058

  13. Common variants of eNOS and XRCC1 genes may predict acute skin toxicity in breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Terrazzino, Salvatore; La Mattina, Pierdaniele; Masini, Laura; Caltavuturo, Tina; Gambaro, Giuseppina; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Genazzani, Armando A; Krengli, Marco

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of functional polymorphisms in genes related to DNA repair mechanisms (XRCC1, TP53, MSH2, MSH3, XPD), oxidative stress response (GSTP1, GSTA1, eNOS, SOD2) and fibroblast proliferation (TGFβ1) on the risk of acute skin toxicity in breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Skin toxicity was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria in 286 breast cancer patients who received radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery. Genotyping was conducted by PCR-RFLP analysis and real-time PCR allelic discrimination assay on genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood. In the multivariate analysis, nominally significant associations, before multiple testing corrections, were found between XRCC1 T-77C (T carriers vs. CC, OR: 2.240, 95% CI: 1.015-4.941, P=0.046), eNOS G894T polymorphisms (TT vs. G carriers, OR: 2.473, 95% CI: 1.220-5.012, P=0.012), breast diameter (OR: 1.138, 95% CI: 1.001-1.293, P=0.048), boost dose-fractionation (3 Gy vs. no boost, OR: 4.902, 95% CI: 1.458-16.483, P=0.010) and ≥ grade 2 acute radiation skin toxicity in breast cancer patients. As our exploratory study suggests that XRCC1 T-77C and eNOS G874T may confer an increased risk of acute skin reactions to radiotherapy in breast cancer patients, further confirmatory studies are warranted to determine the clinical significance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Late radiation side effects, cosmetic outcomes and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy : Risk-modifying factors.

    PubMed

    Hille-Betz, Ursula; Vaske, Bernhard; Bremer, Michael; Soergel, Philipp; Kundu, Sudip; Klapdor, Rüdiger; Hillemanns, Peter; Henkenberens, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to identify parameters influencing the risk of late radiation side effects, fair or poor cosmetic outcomes (COs) and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2006 and 2013, 159 patients were treated at the Hannover Medical School. Physician-rated toxicity according to the LENT-SOMA criteria, CO and pain were assessed by multivariate analysis. LENT-SOMA grade 1-4 toxicity was observed as follows: fibrosis 10.7 %, telangiectasia 1.2 %, arm oedema 8.8 % and breast oedema 5.0 %. In addition, 15.1 % of patients reported moderate or severe breast pain, and 21.4 % complained about moderate or severe pain in the arm or shoulder. In multivariate analysis, axillary clearing (AC) was significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm [odds ratio (OR) 4.37, p = 0.011, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.4-13.58]. Breast oedema was also highly associated with AC (OR 10.59, p = 0.004, 95 % CI 2.1-53.36), a ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C (OR 5.34, p = 0.029, 95 % CI 1.2-24.12). A ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C were the parameters significantly associated with an unfavourable CO (OR 3.19, p = 0.019, 95 % CI 1.2-8.4). Concerning chronic breast pain, we found a trend related to the prescribed radiation dose including boost (OR 1.077, p = 0.060, 95 % CI 0.997-1.164). Chronic shoulder or arm pain was statistically significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm (OR 3.9, p = 0.027, 95 % CI 1.17-13.5). Chronic arm and breast oedema were significantly influenced by the extent of surgery (AC). Ptotic and large breasts were significantly associated with unfavourable COs and chronic breast oedema. Late toxicities exclusive breast pain were not associated with radiotherapy parameters.

  15. Simultaneous Integrated Boost Irradiation After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Physician-Rated Toxicity and Cosmetic Outcome at 30 Months' Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Bantema-Joppe, Enja J.; Schilstra, Cornelis; Bock, Geertruida H. de; Dolsma, Wil V.; Busz, Dianne M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Maduro, John H.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate toxicity and cosmetic outcome (CO) in breast cancer survivors treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with a hypofractionated, simultaneous integrated boost (3D-CRT-SIB) and to identify risk factors for toxicity, with special focus on the impact of age. Methods and Materials: Included were 940 consecutive disease-free patients treated for breast cancer (Stage 0-III) with 3D-CRT-SIB, after breast-conserving surgery, from 2005 to 2010. Physician-rated toxicity (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0) and CO were prospectively assessed during yearly follow-up, up to 5 years after radiotherapy. Multivariate logistic regression analyses using a bootstrapping method were performed. Results: At 3 years, toxicity scores of 436 patients were available. Grade {>=}2 fibrosis in the boost area was observed in 8.5%, non-boost fibrosis in 49.4%, pain to the chest wall in 6.7%, and fair/poor CO in 39.7% of cases. Radiotherapy before chemotherapy was significantly associated with grade {>=}2 boost fibrosis at 3 years (odds ratio [OR] 2.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-6.0). Non-boost fibrosis was associated with re-resection (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.0) and larger tumors (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.1). At 1 year, chest wall pain was significantly associated with high boost dosage (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2-3.7) and younger age (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.7). A fair/poor CO was observed more often after re-resection (OR 4.5, 95% CI 2.4-8.5), after regional radiotherapy (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.2-7.1), and in larger tumors (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.1). Conclusions: Toxicity and CO are not impaired after 3D-CRT-SIB. Fibrosis was not significantly associated with radiotherapy parameters. Independent risk factors for fibrosis were chemotherapy after radiotherapy, re-resection, and larger tumor size. Re-resection was most predictive for worse CO. Age had an impact on chest wall pain occurrence.

  16. Low p53 Binding Protein 1 (53BP1) Expression Is Associated With Increased Local Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Neboori, Hanmanth J.R.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wu Hao; Yang Qifeng; Aly, Amal; Goyal, Sharad; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Golhar, Ryan; Chen Chunxia; Moore, Dirk; and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the expression of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) has prognostic significance in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCS+RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray of early-stage breast cancer treated with BCS+RT from a cohort of 514 women was assayed for 53BP1, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Through log-rank tests and univariate and multivariate models, the staining profile of each tumor was correlated with clinical endpoints, including ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival (IBRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Of the 477 (93%) evaluable tumors, 63 (13%) were scored as low. Low expression of 53BP1 was associated with worse outcomes for all endpoints studied, including 10-year IBRFS (76.8% vs. 90.5%; P=.01), OS (66.4% vs. 81.7%; P=.02), CSS (66.0% vs. 87.4%; P<.01), DMFS (55.9% vs. 87.0%; P<.01), and RFS (45.2% vs. 80.6%; P<.01). Multivariate analysis incorporating various clinico-pathologic markers and 53BP1 expression found that 53BP1 expression was again an independent predictor of all endpoints (IBRFS: P=.0254; OS: P=.0094; CSS: P=.0033; DMFS: P=.0006; RFS: P=.0002). Low 53BP1 expression was also found to correlate with triple-negative (TN) phenotype (P<.01). Furthermore, in subset analysis of all TN breast cancer, negative 53BP1 expression trended for lower IBRFS (72.3% vs. 93.9%; P=.0361) and was significant for worse DMFS (48.2% vs. 86.8%; P=.0035) and RFS (37.8% vs. 83.7%; P=.0014). Conclusion: Our data indicate that low 53BP1 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for local relapse among other endpoints in early-stage breast cancer and TN breast cancer patients treated with BCS+RT. These results should be verified in larger cohorts of patients to validate their clinical

  17. Long-term Outcomes of Hypofractionation Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Lalani, Nafisha; Paszat, Lawrence; Sutradhar, Rinku; Thiruchelvam, Deva; Nofech-Mozes, Sharon; Hanna, Wedad; Slodkowska, Elzbieta; Done, Susan J.; Miller, Naomi; Youngson, Bruce; Tuck, Alan; Sengupta, Sandip; Elavathil, Leela; Chang, Martin C.; Jani, Prashant A.; Bonin, Michel; and others

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Whole-breast radiation therapy (XRT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) may decrease the risk of local recurrence, but the optimal dose regimen remains unclear. Past studies administered 50 Gy in 25 fractions (conventional); however, treatment pattern studies report that hypofractionated (HF) regimens (42.4 Gy in 16 fractions) are frequently used. We report the impact of HF (vs conventional) on the risk of local recurrence after BCS for DCIS. Methods and Materials: All women with DCIS treated with BCS and XRT in Ontario, Canada from 1994 to 2003 were identified. Treatment and outcomes were assessed through administrative databases and validated by chart review. Survival analyses were performed. To account for systematic differences between women treated with alternate regimens, we used a propensity score adjustment approach. Results: We identified 1609 women, of whom 971 (60%) received conventional regimens and 638 (40%) received HF. A total of 489 patients (30%) received a boost dose, of whom 143 (15%) received conventional radiation therapy and 346 (54%) received HF. The median follow-up time was 9.2 years. The median age at diagnosis was 56 years (interquartile range [IQR], 49-65 years). On univariate analyses, the 10-year actuarial local recurrence–free survival was 86% for conventional radiation therapy and 89% for HF (P=.03). On multivariable analyses, age <45 years (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.4; 95% CI: 1.6-3.4; P<.0001), high (HR=2.9; 95% CI: 1.2-7.3; P=.02) or intermediate nuclear grade (HR=2.7; 95% CI: 1.1-6.6; P=.04), and positive resection margins (HR=1.4; 95% CI: 1.0-2.1; P=.05) were associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. HF was not significantly associated with an increased risk of local recurrence compared with conventional radiation therapy on multivariate analysis (HR=0.8; 95% CI: 0.5-1.2; P=.34). Conclusions: The risk of local recurrence among individuals treated with HF regimens

  18. Who should not undergo breast conservation?

    PubMed

    Nijenhuis, Matthijs V; Rutgers, Emiel J Th

    2013-08-01

    width of the local excision and to improve cosmetic outcome. In larger cancers, the option of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy must be considered: about one-third of "mastectomy candidates" can be conversed to an oncologically safe breast conservation. The most important independent risk factors for a breast relapse are: more than focally incomplete margins (roughly 2 times increased risk), young age (<35 years, 2 times increased risk) no radiotherapy (2-4 times increased risk). These risk factors again may also be influenced by the biological type of breast cancer. Combination of risk factors should be added: e.g. young women (<35 years) who had breast conservation for DCIS without radiotherapy may face 15 years breast relapse rate of over 40%. In aggregate, in the following clinical situations the increased risk of breast relapse should be extensively discussed with the patient and breast conservation should be executed with caution: Very young women (<35 years) Extensive DCIS (heralded by extensive microcalcifications) mounting up to one quarter of the breast, particularly in women under 40 years of age. More than focally incomplete resection of an invasive or in situ cancer. Radiotherapy cannot be given. The following factors should, as it stands, not be considered as a contra indication for breast conservation:multi-focal breast cancer, multi-centric breast cancer, the location of the cancer in the breast (including retro areola location), vascular invasion and lobular histology. All with the provision that by the breast conserving surgery complete margins a good cosmetic outcome should be achieved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Shaping the breast in aesthetic and reconstructive breast surgery: an easy three-step principle. Part III--reconstruction following breast conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Blondeel, Phillip N; Hijjawi, John; Depypere, Herman; Roche, Nathalie; Van Landuyt, Koenraad

    2009-07-01

    Of the relatively few studies that exist regarding the cosmetic satisfaction of patients following breast conservation therapy, several indicate significant dissatisfaction in many patients. Breast conservation often results in some of the most challenging and complex reconstructive problems. Indeed, even defining the problem or analyzing the defect can be difficult for the junior surgeon. For the more seasoned reconstructive surgeon, analyzing the problem and applying solutions may be less difficult, but clearly communicating the defects typically seen after an aggressive lumpectomy and radiotherapy can be difficult, especially with trainees or junior surgeons. The goal of this article, the third in a four-part series, is to provide a template for the analysis and surgical reconstruction of defects resulting from breast conservation therapy utilizing a systematic three-step method. Part I of this series described the three main anatomical features of the breast--the footprint, the conus of the breast, and the skin envelope--and how they interact. By systematically analyzing the breast with this three-step method, a "problem list" based in specific anatomic traits of the breast can be generated, allowing the surgeon to then generate an appropriate surgical plan for reconstruction. Surgical approaches based on the percentage of breast parenchyma resected are suggested, with a focus on glandular rearrangement, breast reduction techniques, and locoregional flaps. The three-step method of breast analysis, evaluating the anatomical deformation of the breast footprint, conus, and skin envelope, remains the fundamental "fall-back" principle of this approach.

  20. Clinicopathologic Significance of Excision Repair Cross-Complementation 1 Expression in Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Sharad; Yang Qifeng

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: The excision repair cross-complementation 1 (ERCC1) enzyme plays a rate-limiting role in the nucleotide excision repair pathway and is associated with resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy in cancers of the head and neck and the lung. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinicopathologic and prognostic significance of ERCC1 expression in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast conservation therapy. Methods and Materials: Paraffin specimens from 504 women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conservation therapy were constructed into tissue microarrays. The array was stained for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and ERCC1. This was then correlated with clinicopathologic factors and outcomes data. Results: ERCC-1 expression was evaluable in 366 cases (72%). In this group, 32% and 38% of patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, respectively. Increased ERCC-1 expression was found to be correlated with ER positivity (p < 0.005), lower T stage (p < 0.017), nodal negativity (p < 0.013), age >50 (p < 0.006), reduced use of adjuvant chemotherapy (p < 0.02), and increased use of adjuvant hormonal therapy (p < 0.004). ERCC1 expression did not correlate with locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, cause-specific survival, or overall survival. In patients who were both ERCC1-negative and -positive, the use of chemotherapy predicted for worse distant metastasis-free survival (p = 0.05 and p = 0.07, respectively) but not cause-specific survival or overall survival. Conclusions: Although ERCC1 expression did not predict for outcome measures in this dataset, overexpression correlated with favorable prognostic factors such as ER positivity, lower T stage, nodal negativity, and age >50. To our knowledge, this is the first study investigating ERCC1 expression in patients receiving adjuvant radiation

  1. Effect of radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery on 10-year recurrence and 15-year breast cancer death: meta-analysis of individual patient data for 10,801 women in 17 randomised trials.

    PubMed

    Darby, S; McGale, P; Correa, C; Taylor, C; Arriagada, R; Clarke, M; Cutter, D; Davies, C; Ewertz, M; Godwin, J; Gray, R; Pierce, L; Whelan, T; Wang, Y; Peto, R

    2011-11-12

    After breast-conserving surgery, radiotherapy reduces recurrence and breast cancer death, but it may do so more for some groups of women than for others. We describe the absolute magnitude of these reductions according to various prognostic and other patient characteristics, and relate the absolute reduction in 15-year risk of breast cancer death to the absolute reduction in 10-year recurrence risk. We undertook a meta-analysis of individual patient data for 10,801 women in 17 randomised trials of radiotherapy versus no radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery, 8337 of whom had pathologically confirmed node-negative (pN0) or node-positive (pN+) disease. Overall, radiotherapy reduced the 10-year risk of any (ie, locoregional or distant) first recurrence from 35·0% to 19·3% (absolute reduction 15·7%, 95% CI 13·7-17·7, 2p<0·00001) and reduced the 15-year risk of breast cancer death from 25·2% to 21·4% (absolute reduction 3·8%, 1·6-6·0, 2p=0·00005). In women with pN0 disease (n=7287), radiotherapy reduced these risks from 31·0% to 15·6% (absolute recurrence reduction 15·4%, 13·2-17·6, 2p<0·00001) and from 20·5% to 17·2% (absolute mortality reduction 3·3%, 0·8-5·8, 2p=0·005), respectively. In these women with pN0 disease, the absolute recurrence reduction varied according to age, grade, oestrogen-receptor status, tamoxifen use, and extent of surgery, and these characteristics were used to predict large (≥20%), intermediate (10-19%), or lower (<10%) absolute reductions in the 10-year recurrence risk. Absolute reductions in 15-year risk of breast cancer death in these three prediction categories were 7·8% (95% CI 3·1-12·5), 1·1% (-2·0 to 4·2), and 0·1% (-7·5 to 7·7) respectively (trend in absolute mortality reduction 2p=0·03). In the few women with pN+ disease (n=1050), radiotherapy reduced the 10-year recurrence risk from 63·7% to 42·5% (absolute reduction 21·2%, 95% CI 14·5-27·9, 2p<0·00001) and the 15-year risk of breast

  2. Society of Surgical Oncology-American Society for Radiation Oncology-American Society of Clinical Oncology Consensus Guideline on Margins for Breast-Conserving Surgery With Whole-Breast Irradiation in Ductal Carcinoma In Situ.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Monica; Van Zee, Kimberly J; Solin, Lawrence J; Houssami, Nehmat; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Harris, Jay R; Horton, Janet; Hwang, Shelley; Johnson, Peggy L; Marinovich, M Luke; Schnitt, Stuart J; Wapnir, Irene; Moran, Meena S

    2016-11-20

    Background Controversy exists regarding the optimal negative margin width for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast irradiation (WBRT). Methods A multidisciplinary consensus panel used a meta-analysis of margin width and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) from a systematic review of 20 studies including 7883 patients and other published literature as the evidence base for consensus. Results Negative margins halve the risk of IBTR compared with positive margins defined as ink on DCIS. A 2 mm margin minimizes the risk of IBTR compared with smaller negative margins. More widely clear margins do not significantly decrease IBTR compared with 2 mm margins. Negative margins less than 2 mm alone are not an indication for mastectomy, and factors known to impact rates of IBTR should be considered in determining the need for re-excision. Conclusion The use of a 2 mm margin as the standard for an adequate margin in DCIS treated with WBRT is associated with low rates of IBTR and has the potential to decrease re-excision rates, improve cosmetic outcome, and decrease health care costs. Clinical judgment should be used in determining the need for further surgery in patients with negative margins < 2 mm.

  3. Efficacy of 'radioguided occult lesion localisation' (ROLL) versus 'wire-guided localisation' (WGL) in breast conserving surgery for non-palpable breast cancer: a randomised controlled multicentre trial.

    PubMed

    Postma, E L; Verkooijen, H M; van Esser, S; Hobbelink, M G; van der Schelling, G P; Koelemij, R; Witkamp, A J; Contant, C; van Diest, P J; Willems, S M; Borel Rinkes, I H M; van den Bosch, M A A J; Mali, W P; van Hillegersberg, R

    2012-11-01

    For the management of non-palpable breast cancer, accurate pre-operative localisation is essential to achieve complete resection with optimal cosmetic results. Radioguided occult lesions localisation (ROLL) uses the radiotracer, injected intra-tumourally for sentinel lymph node identification to guide surgical excision of the primary tumour. In a multicentre randomised controlled trial, we determined if ROLL is superior to the standard of care (i.e. wire-guided localisation, WGL) for preoperative tumour localisation. Women (>18 years.) with histologically proven non-palpable breast cancer and eligible for breast conserving treatment with sentinel node procedure were randomised to ROLL or WGL. Patients allocated to ROLL received an intra-tumoural dose of 120 Mbq technetium-99 m nanocolloid. The tumour was surgically removed, guided by gamma probe detection. In the WGL group, ultrasound- or mammography-guided insertion of a hooked wire provided surgical guidance for excision of the primary tumour. Primary outcome measures were the proportion of complete tumour excisions (i.e. with negative margins), the proportion of patients requiring re-excision and the volume of tissue removed. Data were analysed according to intention-to-treat principle. This study is registered at ClinincalTrials.gov, number NCT00539474. In total, 314 patients with 316 invasive breast cancers were enrolled. Complete tumour removal with negative margins was achieved in 140/162 (86 %) patients in the ROLL group versus 134/152 (88 %) patients in the WGL group (P = 0.644). Re-excision was required in 19/162 (12 %) patients in the ROLL group versus 15/152 (10 %) (P = 0.587) in the WGL group. Specimen volumes in the ROLL arm were significantly larger than those in the WGL arm (71 vs. 64 cm(3), P = 0.017). No significant differences were seen in the duration and difficulty of the radiological and surgical procedures, the success rate of the sentinel node procedure, and cosmetic outcomes. In this first

  4. Comparison of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Alone Versus Radiation Therapy and Endocrine Therapy in Elderly Women With Early-Stage, Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Colin T; Li, Tianyu; Wang, Lora S; Obeid, Elias I; Bleicher, Richard J; Eastwick, Gary; Johnson, Matthew E; Hayes, Shelly B; Weiss, Stephanie E; Anderson, Penny R

    2015-10-01

    Randomized data examining adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) alone in elderly women with low-risk, hormone receptor-positive (HR(+)) breast cancer is lacking. We investigated the outcomes for elderly women treated with adjuvant RT alone versus RT plus endocrine therapy (ET) after breast-conserving surgery. We queried our institutional breast cancer database for the following patients: age > 65 years, stage T1-T2N0, HR(+), and treatment with breast-conserving surgery, including adjuvant RT. The χ(2) analysis identified significant baseline differences between the groups. Cox proportional hazard methods identified predictors of endpoints on multivariate analysis. Kaplan-Meier estimates of survival were compared using the log-rank test. A total of 504 patients were identified, 311 had undergone RT plus ET (62%) and 193, RT alone (38%). The median follow-up time was 88 months. The RT-alone group versus RT plus ET group had different median age (72 vs.71 years, P < .001), different median tumor size (1 vs. 1.3 cm, P < .001), lower grade (40% vs. 29%, P = .05), and fewer close or positive margins (11% vs. 19%, P = .01). The adherence rate to prescribed ET was 70%. Tumor size predicted an increased risk of distant metastasis (DM) (hazard ratio, 1.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-3.13) and worse disease-free survival (DFS) (hazard ratio, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.22-2.86). ET nonadherence versus adherence predicted for risk of DM (hazard ratio, 5.03; 95% CI, 1.98-12.66) and DFS (HR, 4.24; 95% CI, 1.9-10.3). Of the women with DM, 83.8% had tumors > 1 cm in size. ET nonadherence and tumor size > 1 cm predicted an increased risk of DM and worse DFS, favoring the addition of ET in this group. However, RT alone for women with tumors less than or equal to 1 cm may be appropriate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Patients With T1 to T2 Breast Cancer With One to Three Positive Nodes Have Higher Local and Regional Recurrence Risks Compared With Node-Negative Patients After Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole-Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Pauline T. Jones, Stuart O.; Kader, Hosam A.; Wai, Elaine S.; Speers, Caroline H.; Alexander, Abraham S.; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate locoregional recurrence according to nodal status in women with T1 to T2 breast cancer and zero to three positive nodes (0-3N+) treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods and Materials: The study subjects comprised 5,688 women referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency between 1989 and 1999 with pT1 to T2, 0-3N+, M0 breast cancer, who underwent breast-conserving surgery with clear margins and radiotherapy (RT) of the whole breast. The 10-year Kaplan-Meier local, regional, and locoregional recurrence (LR, RR, and LRR, respectively) were compared between the N0 (n = 4,433) and 1-3N+ (n = 1,255) cohorts. The LRR was also examined in patients with one to three positive nodes (1-3N+) treated with and without nodal RT. Multivariate analysis was performed using Cox regression modeling. Results: Median follow-up was 8.6 years. Systemic therapy was used in 97% of 1-3N+ and 41% of N0 patients. Nodal RT was used in 35% of 1-3N+ patients. The 10-year recurrence rates in N0 and 1-3N+ cohorts were as follows: LR 5.1% vs. 5.8% (p = 0.04); RR 2.3% vs. 6.1% (p < 0.001), and LRR 6.7% vs. 10.1% (p < 0.001). Among 817 1-3N+ patients treated without nodal RT, 10-year LRR were 13.8% with age <50 years, 20.3% with Grade III, and 23.4% with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative disease. On multivariate analysis, 1-3N+ status was associated with significantly higher LRR (hazard ratio [HR], 1.85; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-2.55, p < 0.001), whereas nodal RT significantly reduced LRR (HR, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.92, p = 0.02). Conclusion: Patients with 1-3N+ and young age, Grade III, or ER-negative disease have high LRR risks approximating 15% to 20% despite BCS, whole-breast RT and systemic therapy. These patients may benefit with more comprehensive RT volume encompassing the regional nodes.

  6. Radiological and pathological size estimations of pure ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast, specimen handling and the influence on the success of breast conservation surgery: a review of 2564 cases from the Sloane Project

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J; Evans, A; Macartney, J; Pinder, S E; Hanby, A; Ellis, I; Kearins, O; Roberts, T; Clements, K; Lawrence, G; Bishop, H

    2010-01-01

    Background: The Sloane Project, an audit of UK screen-detected non-invasive carcinomas and atypical hyperplasias of the breast, has accrued over 5000 cases in 5 years; with paired radiological and pathological data for 2564 ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) cases at the point of this analysis. We have compared the radiological estimate of DCIS size with the pathological estimate of DCIS size. We have correlated these sizes with histological grade, specimen-handling methods, particularly the use of specimen slice radiographs, and the success or failure of breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods: The Sloane Project database was interrogated to extract information on all patients diagnosed with DCIS with complete radiological and pathological data on the size of DCIS, nuclear grade, specimen handling (with particular reference to specimen radiographs) and whether primary BCS was successful or whether the patient required further conservation surgery or a mastectomy. Results: Of 2564 patients in the study, 2013 (79%) had attempted BCS and 1430 (71%) had a successful single operation. Of the 583 BCS patients who required further surgery, 65% had successful conservation and 97% of them after a single further operation. In successful one-operation BCS patients, there was a close agreement between radiological and pathological DCIS size with radiology tending to marginally overestimate the disease extent. In multiple-operation BCS, radiology underestimated DCIS size in 59% of cases. The agreement between pathological and radiological size of DCIS was poor in mastectomies but was improved by specimen slice radiography, suggesting specimen-handling techniques as a cause. Conclusion: In 30% of patients undergoing BCS for DCIS, preoperative imaging underestimates the extent of disease resulting in a requirement for further surgery. This has implications for the further improvement of preoperative imaging and non-operative diagnosis of DCIS so that second operations are reduced

  7. Optimizing Surgical Margins in Breast Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Ananthakrishnan, Preya; Balci, Fatih Levent; Crowe, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    Adequate surgical margins in breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer have traditionally been viewed as a predictor of local recurrence rates. There is still no consensus on what constitutes an adequate surgical margin, however it is clear that there is a trade-off between widely clear margins and acceptable cosmesis. Preoperative approaches to plan extent of resection with appropriate margins (in the setting of surgery first as well as after neoadjuvant chemotherapy,) include mammography, US, and MRI. Improvements have been made in preoperative lesion localization strategies for surgery, as well as intraoperative specimen assessment, in order to ensure complete removal of imaging findings and facilitate margin clearance. Intraoperative strategies to accurately assess tumor and cavity margins include cavity shave techniques, as well as novel technologies for margin probes. Ablative techniques, including radiofrequency ablation as well as intraoperative radiation, may be used to extend tumor-free margins without resecting additional tissue. Oncoplastic techniques allow for wider resections while maintaining cosmesis and have acceptable local recurrence rates, however often involve surgery on the contralateral breast. As systemic therapy for breast cancer continues to improve, it is unclear what the importance of surgical margins on local control rates will be in the future. PMID:23304479

  8. Surgical Considerations After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy: Breast Conservation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Thomas A; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Hunt, Kelly K

    2015-05-01

    The increasing use of chemotherapy before surgery has affected a number of local-regional treatment decisions including surgical and radiation management of the breast, management of axillary lymph nodes, and the indications for postmastectomy radiation. In this monograph, we will focus on surgical and radiation management as components of breast conservation therapy. The early randomized trials that compared neoadjuvant to adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer demonstrated that rates of breast conservation can be increased when chemotherapy is sequenced first. This was a direct consequence of high response rates seen with neoadjuvant treatment, which permitted downstaging of a large primary tumor to a volume that permitted breast-conserving surgery. Some initial studies found higher rates of breast recurrences with this approach but over time, with improved multidisciplinary coordination and proper patient selection, rates of breast recurrences have improved to the excellent levels achieved when surgery is performed first. New clinical trials are also ongoing to define the role of sentinel lymph node surgery and regional lymph node radiation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Society of Surgical Oncology–American Society for Radiation Oncology Consensus Guideline on Margins for Breast-Conserving Surgery With Whole-Breast Irradiation in Stages I and II Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Meena S.; Schnitt, Stuart J.; Giuliano, Armando E.; Harris, Jay R.; Khan, Seema A.; Horton, Janet; Klimberg, Suzanne; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Freedman, Gary; Houssami, Nehmat; Johnson, Peggy L.; Morrow, Monica

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To convene a multidisciplinary panel of breast experts to examine the relationship between margin width and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and develop a guideline for defining adequate margins in the setting of breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A multidisciplinary consensus panel used a meta-analysis of margin width and IBTR from a systematic review of 33 studies including 28,162 patients as the primary evidence base for consensus. Results: Positive margins (ink on invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ) are associated with a 2-fold increase in the risk of IBTR compared with negative margins. This increased risk is not mitigated by favorable biology, endocrine therapy, or a radiation boost. More widely clear margins than no ink on tumor do not significantly decrease the rate of IBTR compared with no ink on tumor. There is no evidence that more widely clear margins reduce IBTR for young patients or for those with unfavorable biology, lobular cancers, or cancers with an extensive intraductal component. Conclusions: The use of no ink on tumor as the standard for an adequate margin in invasive cancer in the era of multidisciplinary therapy is associated with low rates of IBTR and has the potential to decrease re-excision rates, improve cosmetic outcomes, and decrease health care costs.

  10. A comparative study on the volume and localization of the internal gross target volume defined using the seroma and surgical clips based on 4DCT scan for external-beam partial breast irradiation after breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yun; Li, Jianbin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Suzhen; Wang, Jinzhi; Ma, Zhifang; Shao, Qian; Xu, Min

    2014-03-19

    To explore the volume and localization of the internal gross target volume defined using the seroma and/or surgical clips based on the four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) during free-breathing. Fifteen breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) were recruited for EB-PBI. On the ten sets CT images, the gross target volume formed by the clips, the seroma, both the clips and seroma delineated by one radiation oncologist and defined as GTVc, GTVs and GTVc+s, respectively. The ten GTVc, GTVs and GTVc+s on the ten sets CT images produced the IGTVc, IGTVs, IGTVc+s, respectively. The IGTV volume and the distance between the center of IGTVc, IGTVs, IGTVc+s were all recorded. Conformity index (CI), degree of inclusion (DI) were calculated for IGTV/IGTV, respectively. The volume of IGTVc+s were significantly larger than the IGTVc and IGTVs (p<0.05). There was significant difference between the DIs of IGTVc vs IGTVc+s, the DIs of IGTVs vs IGTVc+s. There was significant difference among the CIs of IGTV/IGTV. The DIs and CIs of IGTV/IGTV were negatively correlated with their centroid distance (r<0, p<0.05). There were volume difference and spatial mismatch between the IGTVs delineated based on the surgical clips and seroma. The IGTV defined as the seroma and surgical clips provided the best overall representation of the 'true' moving GTV.

  11. Society of Surgical Oncology-American Society for Radiation Oncology consensus guideline on margins for breast-conserving surgery with whole-breast irradiation in stages I and II invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Moran, Meena S; Schnitt, Stuart J; Giuliano, Armando E; Harris, Jay R; Khan, Seema A; Horton, Janet; Klimberg, Suzanne; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Freedman, Gary; Houssami, Nehmat; Johnson, Peggy L; Morrow, Monica

    2014-03-01

    To convene a multidisciplinary panel of breast experts to examine the relationship between margin width and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and develop a guideline for defining adequate margins in the setting of breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy. A multidisciplinary consensus panel used a meta-analysis of margin width and IBTR from a systematic review of 33 studies including 28,162 patients as the primary evidence base for consensus. Positive margins (ink on invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ) are associated with a 2-fold increase in the risk of IBTR compared with negative margins. This increased risk is not mitigated by favorable biology, endocrine therapy, or a radiation boost. More widely clear margins than no ink on tumor do not significantly decrease the rate of IBTR compared with no ink on tumor. There is no evidence that more widely clear margins reduce IBTR for young patients or for those with unfavorable biology, lobular cancers, or cancers with an extensive intraductal component. The use of no ink on tumor as the standard for an adequate margin in invasive cancer in the era of multidisciplinary therapy is associated with low rates of IBTR and has the potential to decrease re-excision rates, improve cosmetic outcomes, and decrease health care costs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The impact of the number of excised axillary nodes and of the percentage of involved nodes on regional nodal failure in patients treated by breast-conserving surgery with or without regional irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fortin, Andre . E-mail: afortin@videotron.ca; Dagnault, Anne; Blondeau, Lucie; Thi Trinh Thuc Vu; Larochelle, Marie

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: After breast-conserving surgery, recommendations for regional nodal radiotherapy are usually based on the number of positive nodes. This number is dependent on the number of nodes removed during the axillary dissection. This study examines whether the percentage of positive nodes may help to select patients for regional radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study was conducted on 1,372 T1-T2 node-positive breast cancer patients treated at L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec Hospital between 1972 and 1997. Results: Among the patients who did not receive regional radiotherapy, the percentage of involved nodes was significantly associated with axillary failure. Ten-year axillary control rates were 97% and 91% when the percentage of involved nodes was <50% and {>=}50%, respectively (p = 0.007). In addition, regional radiotherapy is always significantly associated with a decrease in overall regional failure (axillary and/or supraclavicular), regardless of the percentage of involved nodes. However, regional radiotherapy reduced the axillary failure rate (2% vs. 9%, p = 0.007) only when more than a specific percentage of nodes was involved ({>=}40% if N1-3 and {>=}50% if N>3 nodes). Conclusions: The percentage of involved nodes should be taken into consideration in selecting patients for regional radiotherapy. Irradiation of the axilla should be reserved for patients with a specific ratio: >40% involved nodes if N1-3 and {>=}50% involved nodes if N>3 nodes.

  13. Optimal radiation dose for patients with one to three lymph node positive breast cancer following breast-conserving surgery and anthracycline plus taxane-based chemotherapy: A retrospective multicenter analysis (KROG 1418)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Haeyoung; Park, Won; Il Yu, Jeong; Choi, Doo Ho; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Lee, Eun Sook; Lee, Keun Seok; Kang, Han-Sung; Park, In Hae; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Kyubo; Park, Kyung Ran; Kim, Yong Bae; Ahn, Sung Ja; Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Jin Hee; Chun, Mison; Lee, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Jung Soo; Lee, Jong-Young

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study was performed to determine optimal radiation dose in pN1 breast cancer patients who received breast conserving surgery (BCS) and anthracycline plus taxane (AT)-based chemotherapy. Materials and Methods Retrospective chart reviews were performed in 1,147 patients who were treated between January 2006 and December 2010. The impact of radiation dose on treatment outcomes was evaluated. Results Median follow-up time was 66 months. The 5-year rate of disease-free survival (DFS) was 93.2%. Larger tumor size (> 20 mm), positive lymphovascular invasion, high histologic grade, and high ratio of positive nodes (> 0.1) were significantly associated with inferior DFS. By using the 4 factors related to DFS, patients were categorized into high-risk (with ≥ 3 factors) and low-risk (with < 3 factors) groups. In the high-risk group, higher radiation dose (> 60.3 GyEQD2) was significantly associated with better DFS than the lower dose (≤ 60.3 GyEQD2). However, the radiation dose did not impact DFS in the low-risk group. Conclusions Dosing of radiation affects the outcome of post-BCS radiotherapy in pN1 breast cancer. Doses of over 60.3 GyEQD2 were associated with better outcome in the high-risk patients. PMID:27793036

  14. The effect of timing of radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery in patients with positive or close resection margins, young age, and node-negative disease, with long term follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Vujovic, Olga . E-mail: olga.vujovic@lhsc.on.ca; Cherian, Anil; Yu, Edward; Dar, A. Rashid; Stitt, Larry; Perera, Francisco

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of timing of radiotherapy after conservative breast surgery on local recurrence in women with positive resection margins and young age, treated without systemic therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 568 patients with T1 and T2, N0 breast cancer were treated with breast-conserving surgery and breast irradiation, between January 1, 1985, and December 31, 1992, at the London Regional Cancer Centre. 63 patients (11.1%) had positive/close resection margins (<2 mm) and 48 patients (8.4%) were age {<=}40 years. For patients with positive resection margins, the time intervals from breast surgery to breast irradiation used for analysis were, 0 to 8 weeks, >8 to 12 weeks and >12 weeks. For patients {<=}40 years, the intervals used for analysis were 0 to 8 weeks and >8 weeks. Results: Median follow up was 11.2 years. For patients {<=}40 years, local recurrence rate at 5 and 10 years was 17.2% and 19.8% respectively. Four patients (17.4%) treated in the 0-week to 8-week interval and 7 patients (28.0%) treated in the >8 week interval had local recurrences. For patients {<=}40 years with positive resection margins, the local recurrence rate was 25.0%. For patients with positive resection margins, 5-year and 10-year local recurrence rates were as follows: 0 to 8 weeks, 0% and 10.5% respectively; >8 to 12 weeks, 10.3% and 10.3% respectively; and >12 weeks, 13.3% and 20.0% respectively. Conclusion: Patients {<=}40 years have an increased local recurrence rate which occurs early. Patients with positive resection margins have higher local recurrence rates that become apparent when breast irradiation is delayed.

  15. Interim Cosmetic Results and Toxicity Using 3D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Patients With Early-Stage Breast Cancer Treated With Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, Frank A. Chen, Peter; Wallace, Michelle; Mitchell, Christina; Hasan, Yasmin; Grills, Inga; Kestin, Larry; Schell, Scott; Goldstein, Neal S.; Kunzman, Jonathan; Gilbert, Sam; Martinez, Alvaro

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: We present our ongoing clinical experience utilizing three-dimensional (3D)-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Ninety-one consecutive patients were treated with APBI using our previously reported 3D-CRT technique. The clinical target volume consisted of the lumpectomy cavity plus a 10- to 15 -mm margin. The prescribed dose was 34 or 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions given over 5 consecutive days. The median follow-up was 24 months. Twelve patients have been followed for {>=}4 years, 20 for {>=}3.5 years, 29 for >3.0 years, 33 for {>=}2.5 years, and 46 for {>=}2.0 years. Results: No local recurrences developed. Cosmetic results were rated as good/excellent in 100% of evaluable patients at {>=} 6 months (n = 47), 93% at 1 year (n = 43), 91% at 2 years (n = 21), and in 90% at {>=}3 years (n = 10). Erythema, hyperpigmentation, breast edema, breast pain, telangiectasias, fibrosis, and fat necrosis were evaluated at 6, 24, and 36 months after treatment. All factors stabilized by 3 years posttreatment with grade I or II rates of 0%, 0%, 0%, 0%, 9%, 18%, and 9%, respectively. Only 2 patients (3%) developed grade III toxicity (breast pain), which resolved with time. Conclusions: Delivery of APBI with 3D-CRT resulted in minimal chronic ({>=}6 months) toxicity to date with good/excellent cosmetic results. Additional follow-up is needed to assess the long-term efficacy of this form of APBI.

  16. [Comparison of the volume and localization of internal gross target volume and planning target volume delineated by clips and seroma based on 4D-CT scan for external-beam partial breast irradiation after breast conserving surgery].

    PubMed

    Ding, Yun; Li, Jianbin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Suzhen; Wang, Jinzhi; Ma, Zhifang

    2014-10-01

    To explore the differences in volume and localization of the internal gross target volume and planning target volume delineated by clips and/or seroma based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) during free-breathing in breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery. Fifteen breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) were recruited for external-beam partial breast irradiation (EB-PBI). On the ten sets CT images, the gross tumor volumes (GTV) formed by the clips, the seroma, and both the clips and seroma were delineated and defined as GTVc, GTVs and GTVc+s, respectively. Ten GTVc, GTVs and GTVc+s on the ten sets CT images produced the IGTVc, IGTVs, IGTVc+s. The PTVc, PTVs, PTVc+s were created by adding 15 mm to the IGTVc, IGTVs, IGTVc+s, respectively. The IGTV and PTV volume and distance between the centers of IGTVc, IGTVs, IGTVc+s and PTVc, PTVs, PTVc+s were all recorded. Conformity index (CI) and degree of inclusion (DI) were calculated for IGTV/IGTV and PTV/PTV, respectively. The volume of IGTVc+s[(35.73 ± 19.77) cm³] was significantly larger than the IGTVc [(28.35 ± 17.54) cm³] and IGTVs [(24.19 ± 21.53) cm³] (P < 0.05), and the volume of PTVc+s [(191.59 ± 69.74) cm³] was significantly larger than that of the PTVc [(161.53 ± 61.07) cm³] and PTVs [(148.98 ± 62.22)cm³] (P < 0.05). There were significant differences between the DIs of IGTVc in IGTVc+s and IGTVc+s in IGTVc, the DIs of IGTVs in IGTVc+s and IGTVc+s in IGTVs, the DIs of PTVc in PTVc+s and PTVc+s in PTVc, and the DIs of PTVs vs. PTVc+s and PTVc+s in PTVs (P < 0.05 for all). The CI of IGTVc/IGTVc+s (0.63 ± 0.14) and the CI of IGTVs/IGTVc+s (0.54 ± 0.17) were significant larger than that of the CI of IGTVc/IGTVs (0.40 ± 0.14)(P < 0.05). There were non-significant differences among the CI of PTVc/PTVs, PTVc/PTVc+s and PTVs/PTVc+s (0.73 ± 0.12, 0.78 ± 0.13 vs. 0.75 ± 0.17). The DIs and CIs of IGTV/IGTV and PTV/PTV were negatively correlated with their

  17. 1998-1999 Patterns of Care Study process survey of national practice patterns using breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy in the management of Stage I-II breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu; Moughan, Jennifer; White, Julia; Winchester, David P.; Owen, Jean; Wilson, J. Frank

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: The Patterns of Care Study survey process evaluation has been an effective means of assessing the evaluation and treatment practices used by radiation oncologists in the United States for Stage I-II breast cancer. The current 1998-1999 report updates the previous 1989 and 1993-1994 analyses and reflects the recent changes in surgery and systemic therapy observed nationally in the management of early-stage disease. Methods and Materials: A weighted sample size of 71,877 patient records of women treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (RT) was obtained from a stratified two-stage sampling of 353 patient records. These cases were centrally reviewed from academic and private radiation oncology practices across the United States. The data collected included patient characteristics, clinical and pathologic factors, and surgical and RT details. The results were compared with those of previous Patterns of Care Study survey reports. Results: Of the patients in the current survey, 97% had undergone mammography before biopsy. A review of the primary tumor pathologic findings indicated improved quantification of an intraductal component from 7.0% in 1993-1994 to 20.4% in 1998-1999 (p = 0.01). The tumor characteristics were better defined, with estrogen and progesterone receptor measurement performed in 91.4% and 91.3% in the 1998-1999 survey vs. 83.7% and 80.3% in the 1989 survey, respectively (p = 0.03 and p = 0.002, respectively). Axillary dissection was performed in 82.2% in the present survey compared with 93.6% in the 1993-1994 survey (p = 0.0004); sentinel node biopsy was performed in 20.1% of the present cases. The use of CT for planning was increased in the current survey, with 22.9% cases CT planned vs. 9% in 1993-1994 (p = 0.10). In the present survey, 100% had received whole breast RT. When a supraclavicular field was added, the dose was prescribed to a specified depth in 67.5% of cases, most commonly 3 cm. When an axillary field was added

  18. Evaluation of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the p53 Binding Protein 1 (TP53BP1) Gene in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole-Breast Irradiation (BCS + RT)

    SciTech Connect

    Haffty, Bruce G.; Goyal, Sharad; Kulkarni, Diptee; Green, Camille; Vazquez, Alexi; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Yang Qifeng; Ganesan, Shridar; Hirsfield, Kim M.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: TP53BP1 is a key component of radiation-induced deoxyribonucleic acid damage repair. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of a known common single nucleotide polymorphism in this gene (rs560191) in patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast irradiation (BCS + RT). Methods and Materials: The population consisted of 176 premenopausal women treated with BCS + RT (median follow-up, 12 years). Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid was processed by use of TaqMan assays. Each allele for rs560191 was either C or G, so each patient was therefore classified as CC, CG, or GG. Patients were grouped as GG if they were homozygous for the variant G allele or CC-CG if they carried at least one copy of the common C allele (CC or CG). Results: Of the 176 women, 124 (71%) were CC-CG and 52 (29%) were GG. The mean age was 44 years for GG vs. 38 years for CC-CG (p < 0.001). GG was more common in African-American women than white women (69% vs. 13%, p < 0.001) and more commonly estrogen receptor negative (70% vs. 49%, p = 0.02). There were no significant correlations of rs560191 with other critical variables. Despite the fact that GG patients were older, the 10-year rate of local relapses was higher (22% for GG vs. 12% for CC-CG, p = 0.04). Conclusions: This novel avenue of investigation of polymorphisms in radiation repair/response genes in patients treated with BCS + RT suggests a correlation to local relapse. Additional evaluation is needed to assess the biological and functional significance of these single nucleotide polymorphisms, and larger confirmatory validation studies will be required to determine the clinical implications.

  19. Impact of Consensus Guidelines by the Society of Surgical Oncology and the American Society for Radiation Oncology on Margins for Breast-Conserving Surgery in Stages 1 and 2 Invasive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chung, A; Gangi, A; Amersi, F; Bose, S; Zhang, X; Giuliano, A

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact that the release of consensus guidelines for margins in breast-conserving surgery (BCS) had on re-excision rates. A retrospective review examined a prospectively maintained database of patients who had operable invasive breast cancer treated with BCS at the authors' institution. The patients were divided into two groups: (1) those with a diagnosis determined from 1 July 2011 to 31 July 2013 (before release of the guidelines) and (2) those with a diagnosis determined from 1 February 2014 to 31 July 2014 (after release of the guidelines). The groups were evaluated with respect to patient and tumor characteristics, re-excision rates, and reasons for re-excision. A total of 846 cases of BCS were managed: 597 in group 1 and 249 in group 2. Re-excision rates were significantly reduced after release of the consensus guidelines (p = 0.03). Re-excisions were performed for 115 (19 %) of 597 patients in group 1 and 32 (13 %) of 249 patients in group 2. After release of the guidelines, re-excisions were performed for positive margins, as defined by the consensus statement, in 25 (78 %) of 32 cases. The two groups did not differ significantly in terms of age, tumor size, grade, nodal status, estrogen receptor status, progesterone receptor status, or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status. Group 1 had more tumors of mixed ductal and lobular histology than group 2, and group 2 had more lobular tumors than group 1 (p = 0.02). The consensus guidelines on margins for BCS were applied for 78 % of the patients who underwent re-excision and resulted in a significant reduction in re-excision rates.

  20. Surgical Outcome and Cosmetic Results of Autologous Fat Grafting After Breast Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: A Retrospective Cohort Study of 222 Fat Grafting Sessions in 109 Patients.

    PubMed

    van Turnhout, Arjen A; Fuchs, Saskia; Lisabeth-Broné, Kristel; Vriens-Nieuwenhuis, Eline J C; van der Sluis, Wouter B

    2017-08-04

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) often lead to breast deformity. Reconstruction of these defects is a surgical challenge. Lately, the popularity of autologous fat grafting in these patients is growing. The purpose of this study was to assess clinical outcomes and aesthetic results of autologous fat grafting after BCS and RT. A database of all patients who underwent fat grafting after BCS and RT was prospectively maintained. Patient demographics, clinical and surgical characteristics and intra- and postoperative complications were analysed. Preoperative and 6-month postoperative photographs were evaluated by a four-member expert-panel assessing the aesthetic outcome (Harvard scale, five-point aesthetic scale and an overall score). Between June 2008 and January 2016, 109 consecutive patients (114 breasts) underwent 222 fat grafting procedures. The mean clinical postoperative follow-up was 26 ± 19 months (range 10-97). The median number of fat grafting sessions sufficient for a satisfactory surgical result was two (range 1-6). Localized infections occurred in four patients, all treated effectively with oral antibiotics. Fat necrosis that required excision under local anaesthesia occurred once. The overall cosmetic appearance was rated 5.1/10 before and 7.2/10 after reconstruction (p < 0.01). A significant improvement was noted in breast symmetry, volume, shape and scarring. Fat grafting after BCS and RT provides significant aesthetic improvement of the breast. It has a positive effect on the postsurgical scar and irradiated tissue and helps to restore the volume deficit, which makes it suitable as a reconstructive approach in this patient group. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  1. Equivalent Survival With Mastectomy or Breast-conserving Surgery Plus Radiation in Young Women Aged < 40 Years With Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A National Registry-based Stage-by-Stage Comparison.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jason C; Yan, Weisi; Christos, Paul J; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Ravi, Akkamma

    2015-10-01

    Studies have shown that young patients with early-stage breast cancer (BC) are increasingly undergoing mastectomy instead of breast-conserving therapy (BCT) consisting of lumpectomy and radiation. We examined the difference in outcomes in young women (aged < 40 years) who had undergone BCT versus mastectomy. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was queried for women aged < 40 years with stage I or II invasive BC treated with surgery from 1998 to 2003. Breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and the log-rank test between treatment types. Of the 7665 women, 3249 received BCT and 2627 underwent mastectomy without radiation. When separated by stage (I, IIA, and IIB), with a median follow-up duration of 111 months, the BCT and mastectomy-only groups showed no statistically significant differences in BCSS and OS. Overall, the age group of 35 to 39 years (66% of total) was associated with better 10-year BCSS (88%) and OS (86.1%) compared with the younger patients aged 20 to 34 years (34% of total). The latter group had a 10-year BCSS and OS of 84.1% and 82.3%, respectively (P < .001 for both BCSS and OS). However, when the patients of each age group were further subdivided by stage, the BCT group continued to show noninferior BCSS and OS compared with the mastectomy group in all subgroups. The results of our study suggest that although young age might be a poor prognostic factor for BC, no evidence has shown that these patients will have better outcomes after mastectomy than after BCT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Surgical margins in breast conservation.

    PubMed

    Chiappa, Corrado; Rovera, Francesca; Corben, Adriana Dionigi; Fachinetti, Anna; De Berardinis, Valentina; Marchionini, Valentina; Rausei, Stefano; Boni, Luigi; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Dionigi, Renzo

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common tumor affecting women worldwide. Breast-conserving therapy (BCT) followed by irradiation nowadays is the treatment of choice for early-stage disease; there is no difference in long-term survival between mastectomy and BCT combined with external radiotherapy. A positive margin is associated with increased risk of local recurrences after BCT for invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ. The exact definition of an adequate surgical margin after breast cancer resection has long been debated among physicians and represents an area of considerable variation in clinical practice. There is a lack of standardization in the pathology methods of margin evaluation, which yields little consensus regarding what constitutes an adequate negative margin. As a consequence, patient management varies widely based on the threshold that surgeons accept for adequate margins and the subsequent need for re-excision. We analyze and discuss recent literature about this topic both from the pathological and from the surgical point of view.

  3. Breast-Conservative Surgery With Close or Positive Margins: Can the Breast Be Preserved With High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost?

    SciTech Connect

    Guinot, Jose Luis . E-mail: jguinot@fivo.org; Roldan, Susana; Maronas, Maria; Tortajada, Isabel; Carrascosa, Maria; Chust, Maria Luisa; Estornell, Marian; Mengual, Jose Luis; Arribas, Leoncio

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the likelihood of preserving the breast in women who show close or positive margins after conservative surgery for early breast carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Since 1996, 125 women with less than 5 mm or positive margins and positive separate cavity margin sampling were entered in a prospective trial with high-dose radiotherapy. A standard dose of 50 Gy to the whole breast was followed by a high-dose-rate brachytherapy application delivering 3 fractions of 4.4 Gy in 24 hours. The median follow-up was 84 months. Results: There were only seven local recurrences, with an actuarial local control rate of 95.8% at 5 years and 91.1% at 9 years. Actuarial overall and cause-specific survival rates were 92.6% and 95% at 5 years and 86.7% and 90.4% at 9 years, respectively. Late fibrosis was the most common complication, in 30% of patients, with good or excellent cosmetic results in 77%. The final result was that 95.2% of breasts were preserved. Conclusions: Close or positive-margin breast cancer can be well managed with a high-dose boost in a wide tumor bed by means of high-dose-rate brachytherapy. This technique can avoid mastectomy or poor cosmetic resection, with minimal risk of local or general failure.

  4. Planning the breast tumor bed boost: changes in the excision cavity volume and surgical scar location after breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast irradiation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kevin S; Kong, Feng-Ming; Griffith, Kent A; Yanke, Beth; Pierce, Lori J

    2006-11-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the changes in breast and excision cavity volumes after whole-breast irradiation and the adequacy of using the surgical scar to guide boost planning. A total of 30 women consecutively treated for 31 breast cancers were included in this study. Simulation CT scans were performed before and after whole-breast irradiation. CT breast volumes were delineated using clinically defined borders. Excision cavity volumes were contoured based on surgical clips, the presence of a hematoma, and/or other surgical changes. Hypothetical electron boost plans were generated using the surgical scar with a 3-cm margin and analyzed for coverage. The mean CT breast volumes were 774 and 761 cc (p = 0.22), and the excision cavity volumes were 32.1 and 25.1 cc (p < 0.0001), before and after 40 Gy (39-42 Gy) of whole-breast irradiation, respectively. The volume reduction in the excision cavity was inversely correlated with time elapsed since surgery (R = 0.46, p < 0.01) and body weight (R = 0.50, p < 0.01). The scar-guided hypothetical plans failed to cover the excision cavity adequately in 62% and 53.8% of cases using the pretreatment and postradiation CTs, respectively. Per the hypothetical plans, the minimum dose to the excision cavity was significantly lower for tumors located in the inner vs. outer quadrants (p = 0.02) and for cavities >20 cc vs. <20 cc (p = 0.01). This study demonstrates a significant reduction in the volume of the excision cavity during whole-breast irradiation. Scar-guided boost plans provide inadequate coverage of the excision cavity in the majority of cases.

  5. Estrogen-Dependent Prognostic Significance of Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancers Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Haffty, Bruce G. Yang Qifeng; Moran, Meena S.; Tan, Antoinette R.; Reiss, Michael

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic significance of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy (CS+RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1975 and 2003, we retrieved specimens from 504 breast cancer patients treated with CS+RT. The specimens were constructed into tissue microarrays processed and stained for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, Her2/neu, and COX-2. Each core was scored as positive or negative. All data including demographics, clinical, pathologic, staging, and outcome variables were entered into a computerized database. Results: Expression of COX-2 was positive in 58% of cases and correlated with younger age (p = 0.01) and larger tumor size (p 0.001). Expression of COX-2 was predictive of local relapse (relative risk[RR], 3.248; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.340-7.871; p = 0.0091), distant metastasis (RR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.259-3.896; p = 0.0058), and decreased survival (RR, 2.321; 95% CI, 1.324-4.071; p = 0.0033). Among ER-positive patients, COX-2 expression was predictive of worse local control (85% vs. 93%, p = 0.04), distant metastasis (75% vs. 95%, p = 0.002) and worse survival (65% vs. 94%, p = 0.002). Among ER-negative tumors COX-2 expression was not significantly correlated with local control (87 vs. 95%, p = 0.12), distant metastasis (73% vs. 78%, p = 0.39), or survival (77% vs. 87%, p 0.15). Conclusions: In breast cancer patients treated with CS+RT, COX-2 expression is associated with younger age, larger tumor size, worse local control, distant metastasis, and worse overall survival. The significance is limited to hormone receptor-positive tumors, consistent with the known effect of COX-2/PGE2 on aromatase activity. Use of COX-2 inhibitors in estrogen-dependent breast cancers warrants further investigation.

  6. Timing of Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery for Node-Positive Breast Cancer: Long-Term Results From International Breast Cancer Study Group Trials VI and VII.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Per; Cole, Bernard F; Price, Karen N; Gelber, Richard D; Coates, Alan S; Goldhirsch, Aron; Castiglione, Monica; Colleoni, Marco; Gruber, Günther

    2016-10-01

    To update the previous report from 2 randomized clinical trials, now with a median follow-up of 16 years, to analyze the effect of radiation therapy timing on local failure and disease-free survival. From July 1986 to April 1993, International Breast Cancer Study Group trial VI randomly assigned 1475 pre-/perimenopausal women with node-positive breast cancer to receive 3 or 6 cycles of initial chemotherapy (CT). International Breast Cancer Study Group trial VII randomly assigned 1212 postmenopausal women with node-positive breast cancer to receive tamoxifen for 5 years, or tamoxifen for 5 years with 3 early cycles of initial CT. For patients who received breast-conserving surgery (BCS), radiation therapy (RT) was delayed until initial CT was completed; 4 or 7 months after BCS for trial VI and 2 or 4 months for trial VII. We compared RT timing groups among 433 patients on trial VI and 285 patients on trial VII who received BCS plus RT. Endpoints were local failure, regional/distant failure, and disease-free survival (DFS). Among pre-/perimenopausal patients there were no significant differences in disease-related outcomes. The 15-year DFS was 48.2% in the group allocated 3 months initial CT and 44.9% in the group allocated 6 months initial CT (hazard ratio [HR] 1.12; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87-1.45). Among postmenopausal patients, the 15-year DFS was 46.1% in the no-initial-CT group and 43.3% in the group allocated 3 months initial CT (HR 1.11; 95% CI 0.82-1.51). Corresponding HRs for local failures were 0.94 (95% CI 0.61-1.46) in trial VI and 1.51 (95% CI 0.77-2.97) in trial VII. For regional/distant failures, the respective HRs were 1.15 (95% CI 0.80-1.63) and 1.08 (95% CI 0.69-1.68). This study confirms that, after more than 15 years of follow-up, it is reasonable to delay radiation therapy until after the completion of standard CT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Small-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy: A new approach that is superior to fixed-field IMRT in optimizing dosimetric and treatment-relevant parameters for patients undergoing whole-breast irradiation following breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Hu, Tao; Chen, Yeshan

    2016-08-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is considered to deliver a better dose distribution and to shorten treatment time. There is a lack of research regarding breast irradiation after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) using VMAT with prone positioning. We developed a new small-arc VMAT methodology and compared it to conventional (fixed-field) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the dosimetric and treatment relevant parameters for breast cancer patients in the prone position.Ten early-stage breast cancer patients were included in this exploratory study. All patients underwent computed tomography (CT) simulation scan in the prone position and for each patient, IMRT and VMAT plans were generated using the Monaco planning system. Two symmetrical partial arcs were applied in the VMAT plans. The angle ranges of the 2 arcs were set to approximately 60° to 100° and 220° to 260°, with small adjustments to maximize target coverage, while minimizing lung and heart exposure. The IMRT plans used 4 fixed fields. Prescribed doses were 50 Gy in 25 fractions. The target coverage, homogeneity, conformity, dose to organs at risk (OAR), treatment time, and monitor units (MU) were evaluated.Higher median conformal index (CI) and lower homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV) were respectively observed in VMAT and plans group (CI, 95% vs 91%; HI, 0.09 vs 0.12; P < 0.001). The volumes of ipsilateral lung receiving 30, 20, 10, and 5 Gy were lower for VMAT (P < 0.01), being 10%, 14.9%, 25.9%, and 44.9%, respectively, compared to 11.79%, 17.32%, 30.27%, and 50.58% for the IMRT plans. The mean lung dose was also reduced from 10.6 ± 1.8 to 9.6 ± 1.4 Gy (P = 0.001). The volumes of the heart receiving 30 and 40 Gy were similar for the 2 methods. In addition, the median treatment time (161 vs 412 seconds; P < 0.001) and the mean MU (713 vs 878; P < 0.001) were lower for VMAT.Small-arc VMAT plan improved CI and HI for the

  8. Five year outcomes of hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost irradiation in breast conserving therapy; patterns of recurrence.

    PubMed

    Bantema-Joppe, Enja J; Vredeveld, Eline J; de Bock, Geertruida H; Busz, Dianne M; Woltman-van Iersel, Marleen; Dolsma, Wil V; van der Laan, Hans Paul; Langendijk, Johannes A; Maduro, John H

    2013-08-01

    In 2005, we introduced hypofractionated 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost (3D-CRT-SIB) technique after breast conserving surgery. In a consecutive series of 752 consecutive female invasive breast cancer patients (stages I-III) the 5-year actuarial rate for local control was 98.9%. This new technique gives excellent 5-year local control.

  9. Predictors of reexcision findings and recurrence after breast conservation.

    PubMed

    Smitt, Melanie C; Nowels, Kent; Carlson, Robert W; Jeffrey, Stefanie S

    2003-11-15

    To identify predictors of reexcision findings and local recurrence in the setting of breast-conserving therapy with radiation. The records of 535 patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery followed by radiation for Stage I or II cancer between 1972 and 1996 were reviewed. The mean follow-up period for surviving patients without evidence of recurrence is 6 years. Various clinical and pathologic prognostic factors were examined for significance with regard to reexcision findings and recurrence rates. Pathologic margin status was classified as negative, close (

  10. Quality of life among breast cancer patients undergoing autologous breast reconstruction versus breast conserving therapy.

    PubMed

    Dian, D; Schwenn, K; Mylonas, I; Janni, W; Friese, K; Jaenicke, F

    2007-04-01

    Besides the quality of the aesthetic results, the quality of life after surgery is one of the most important criteria when reviewing different operation methods, especially in oncologic diseases. This study was performed to evaluate the difference in the health-related quality of life following breast conserving surgery and autologous breast reconstruction after mastectomy. Hundred and forty-four breast cancer patients were included in this study. Sixty seven patients underwent breast conserving surgery followed by radiotherapy. In 77 patients a mastectomy was performed with immediate or late reconstruction. To evaluate the health-related quality of life we used the SF-36 self-administered questionnaire. A significant difference was found in quality of life in the subscale "physical functioning" showing better results in the breast reconstruction group (P = 0.01). No significant difference was found in the other subscales, but there was a tendency to a better "emotional role" among the breast reconstruction patients. Our study demonstrated that autologous tissue breast reconstruction in breast cancer patients did not affect adversely the health-related quality of life compared to breast conserving therapy when the quality of life is assessed by the standardized questionnaire SF-36. In particular, the physical function is not reported to be significantly influenced negatively by the more extensive surgical therapy.

  11. Whole-breast irradiation with or without a boost for patients treated with breast-conserving surgery for early breast cancer: 20-year follow-up of a randomised phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Bartelink, Harry; Maingon, Philippe; Poortmans, Philip; Weltens, Caroline; Fourquet, Alain; Jager, Jos; Schinagl, Dominic; Oei, Bing; Rodenhuis, Carla; Horiot, Jean-Claude; Struikmans, Henk; Van Limbergen, Erik; Kirova, Youlia; Elkhuizen, Paula; Bongartz, Rudolf; Miralbell, Raymond; Morgan, David; Dubois, Jean-Bernard; Remouchamps, Vincent; Mirimanoff, René-Olivier; Collette, Sandra; Collette, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of breast-conserving treatment, various radiation doses after lumpectomy have been used. In a phase 3 randomised controlled trial, we investigated the effect of a radiation boost of 16 Gy on overall survival, local control, and fibrosis for patients with stage I and II breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving treatment compared with patients who received no boost. Here, we present the 20-year follow-up results. Patients with microscopically complete excision for invasive disease followed by whole-breast irradiation of 50 Gy in 5 weeks were centrally randomised (1:1) with a minimisation algorithm to receive 16 Gy boost or no boost, with minimisation for age, menopausal status, presence of extensive ductal carcinoma in situ, clinical tumour size, nodal status, and institution. Neither patients nor investigators were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was overall survival in the intention-to-treat population. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02295033. Between May 24, 1989, and June 25, 1996, 2657 patients were randomly assigned to receive no radiation boost and 2661 patients randomly assigned to receive a radiation boost. Median follow-up was 17.2 years (IQR 13.0-19.0). 20-year overall survival was 59.7% (99% CI 56.3-63.0) in the boost group versus 61.1% (57.6-64.3) in the no boost group, hazard ratio (HR) 1.05 (99% CI 0.92-1.19, p=0.323). Ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence was the first treatment failure for 354 patients (13%) in the no boost group versus 237 patients (9%) in the boost group, HR 0.65 (99% CI 0.52-0.81, p<0.0001). The 20-year cumulative incidence of ipsilatelal breast tumour recurrence was 16.4% (99% CI 14.1-18.8) in the no boost group versus 12.0% (9.8-14.4) in the boost group. Mastectomies as first salvage treatment for ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence occurred in 279 (79%) of 354 patients in the no boost group versus 178 (75%) of 237 in the boost group. The cumulative

  12. Can axillary and supraclavicular radiotherapy be avoided after breast-conserving surgery and axillary dissection in women with multiple involved axillary nodes? Experience at the European Institute of Oncology.

    PubMed

    Galimberti, Viviana; Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Rotmensz, Nicole; Botteri, Edoardo; Iodice, Simona; Sagona, Andrea; Sahium, Rafaela Cecilio; Bassani, Gulliermo; Berrettini, Anastasio; Monti, Simonetta; Gentilini, Oreste; Sangalli, Claudia; Luini, Alberto; Orecchia, Roberto; Veronesi, Umberto

    2008-01-01

    Although some guidelines recommend adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) to the axilla and supraclavicular nodes if 4 or more axillary nodes are involved, the current practice at our Institute is not to irradiate the axilla but to perform complete axillary dissection in which all 3 Berg levels are removed. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with 4 or more axillary nodes involved and sufficient follow-up to provide indications as to whether our current treatment is adequate. We retrospectively analyzed 287 T1-T3 patients with a median follow-up of 5 years and 4 or more involved nodes treated by quadrantectomy and breast RT but no axillary RT; supraclavicular RT was given only when prognostic factors were unfavorable. A total of 170 (59.2%) patients did not receive supraclavicular RT, while 117 (40.8%) patients received supraclavicular irradiation. No patient received axillary RT. After a median follow-up of 5 years (range, 4-105 months), 4.7% had died and 13.5% had developed distant metastases in the no supraclavicular RT group, compared to 12.0% dead (P = 0.028 log rank) and 24.8% (P = 0.201 log rank) in the supraclavicular RT group. No patients with supraclavicular RT developed supraclavicular metastases compared to 4 in the no supraclavicular RT group. There were no axillary recurrences. Complete axillary dissection appears adequate treatment in patients with 4 or more involved nodes. The low breast recurrence rate also suggests that breast conservation is adequate treatment in such patients. Supraclavicular RT appears to reduce the number of supraclavicular metastases but confers no survival advantage. Although a small number of cases were examined in this retrospective single-center series, all received highly uniform treatment.

  13. Late side-effects and cosmetic results of accelerated partial breast irradiation with interstitial brachytherapy versus whole-breast irradiation after breast-conserving surgery for low-risk invasive and in-situ carcinoma of the female breast: 5-year results of a randomised, controlled, phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Polgár, Csaba; Ott, Oliver J; Hildebrandt, Guido; Kauer-Dorner, Daniela; Knauerhase, Hellen; Major, Tibor; Lyczek, Jaroslaw; Guinot, José Luis; Dunst, Jürgen; Miguelez, Cristina Gutierrez; Slampa, Pavel; Allgäuer, Michael; Lössl, Kristina; Polat, Bülent; Kovács, György; Fischedick, Arnt-René; Fietkau, Rainer; Resch, Alexandra; Kulik, Anna; Arribas, Leo; Niehoff, Peter; Guedea, Ferran; Schlamann, Annika; Pötter, Richard; Gall, Christine; Uter, Wolfgang; Strnad, Vratislav

    2017-02-01

    We previously confirmed the non-inferiority of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with interstitial brachytherapy in terms of local control and overall survival compared with whole-breast irradiation for patients with early-stage breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving surgery in a phase 3 randomised trial. Here, we present the 5-year late side-effects and cosmetic results of the trial. We did this randomised, controlled, phase 3 trial at 16 centres in seven European countries. Women aged 40 years or older with stage 0-IIA breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving surgery with microscopically clear resection margins of at least 2 mm were randomly assigned 1:1, via an online interface, to receive either whole-breast irradiation of 50 Gy with a tumour-bed boost of 10 Gy or APBI with interstitial brachytherapy. Randomisation was stratified by study centre, menopausal status, and tumour type (invasive carcinoma vs ductal carcinoma in situ), with a block size of ten, according to an automated dynamic algorithm. Patients and investigators were not masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint of our initial analysis was ipsilateral local recurrence; here, we report the secondary endpoints of late side-effects and cosmesis. We analysed physician-scored late toxicities and patient-scored and physician-scored cosmetic results from the date of breast-conserving surgery to the date of onset of event. Analysis was done according to treatment received (as-treated population). This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00402519. Between April 20, 2004, and July 30, 2009, we randomly assigned 1328 women to receive either whole-breast irradiation (n=673) or APBI with interstitial brachytherapy (n=655); 1184 patients comprised the as-treated population (551 in the whole-breast irradiation group and 633 in the APBI group). At a median follow-up of 6·6 years (IQR 5·8-7·6), no patients had any grade 4 toxities, and three (<1%) of 484

  14. Extreme Oncoplasty: Breast Conservation for Patients Who Need Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Melvin J; Savalia, Nirav; Khan, Sadia; Ryan, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Extreme oncoplasty is a breast conserving operation, using oncoplastic techniques, in a patient who, in most physicians' opinions, requires a mastectomy. These are generally large, greater than 5 cm multifocal or multicentric tumors. Many will have positive lymph nodes. Most will require radiation therapy, even if treated with mastectomy. Sixty-six consecutive patients with multifocal, multicentric, or locally advanced tumors that spanned more than 50 mm were studied (extreme cases). All patients underwent excision and oncoplastic reconstruction using a standard or split wise pattern reduction and immediate contralateral surgery for symmetry. All received postexcisional standard whole breast radiation therapy with a boost to the tumor bed. The extreme cases were compared with 245 consecutive patients with unifocal or multifocal tumors that spanned 50 mm or less (standard cases). All extreme patients were advised to have a mastectomy; all sought a breast conserving second opinion. Diagnostic evaluation included digital mammography, ultrasound, MRI, and PET-CT (if invasive). Standard cases did extremely well. No ink on tumor was achieved 96% of the time among 245 patients. The median tumor size was 21 mm (mean 23 mm). Margins equal or greater than 1 mm were achieved in 88.6% of patients. Seventeen (6.9%) standard patients underwent re-excision to achieve wider margins and only one patient (0.4%) was converted to mastectomy. With 24 months of median follow-up, three patients (1.2%) experienced local recurrence. For extreme cases, no ink on tumor was achieved 83.3% of the time, which is comparable to published positive margin rates after standard lumpectomy. The median tumor size was 62 mm (mean 77 mm). Margins equal or greater than 1 mm were achieved in 54.5% of patients. Six (9.1%) extreme patients underwent re-excision to achieve wider margins and four patients (6.1%) were converted to mastectomy. With a follow-up of 24 months, one patient (1

  15. Delayed breast cellulitis: an evolving complication of breast conservation.

    PubMed

    Indelicato, Daniel J; Grobmyer, Stephen R; Newlin, Heather; Morris, Christopher G; Haigh, Linda S; Copeland, Edward M; Mendenhall, Nancy Price

    2006-12-01

    Delayed breast cellulitis (DBC) is characterized by the late onset of breast erythema, edema, tenderness, and warmth. This retrospective study analyzes the risk factors and clinical course of DBC. From 1985 through 2004, 580 sequential women with 601 stage T0-2N0-1 breast cancers underwent breast conserving therapy. Cases of DBC were identified according to accepted clinical criteria: diffuse breast erythema, edema, tenderness, and warmth occurring >3 months after definitive surgery and >3 weeks after radiotherapy. Potential risk factors analyzed included patient comorbidity, operative technique, acute complications, and details of adjunctive therapy. Response to treatment and long-term outcome were analyzed to characterize the natural course of this syndrome. Of the 601 cases, 16%, 52%, and 32% were Stage 0, I, and II, respectively. The overall incidence of DBC was 8% (50/601). Obesity, ecchymoses, T stage, the presence and aspiration of a breast hematoma/seroma, removal of >5 axillary lymph nodes, and arm lymphedema were significantly associated with DBC. The median time to onset of DBC from the date of definitive surgery was 226 days. Ninety-two percent of DBC patients were empirically treated with antibiotics. Fourteen percent required more invasive intervention. Twenty-two percent had recurrent episodes of DBC. Ultimately, 2 patients (4%) underwent mastectomy for intractable breast pain related to DBC. Although multifactorial, we believe DBC is primarily related to a bacterial infection in the setting of impaired lymphatic drainage and may appear months after completion of radiotherapy. Invasive testing before a trial of antibiotics is generally not recommended.

  16. Delayed breast cellulitis: An evolving complication of breast conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Indelicato, Daniel J.; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Newlin, Heather; Morris, Christopher G.; Haigh, Linda S.; Copeland, Edward M.; Mendenhall, Nancy Price . E-mail: mendenan@shands.ufl.edu

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: Delayed breast cellulitis (DBC) is characterized by the late onset of breast erythema, edema, tenderness, and warmth. This retrospective study analyzes the risk factors and clinical course of DBC. Methods and Materials: From 1985 through 2004, 580 sequential women with 601 stage T0-2N0-1 breast cancers underwent breast conserving therapy. Cases of DBC were identified according to accepted clinical criteria: diffuse breast erythema, edema, tenderness, and warmth occurring >3 months after definitive surgery and >3 weeks after radiotherapy. Potential risk factors analyzed included patient comorbidity, operative technique, acute complications, and details of adjunctive therapy. Response to treatment and long-term outcome were analyzed to characterize the natural course of this syndrome. Results: Of the 601 cases, 16%, 52%, and 32% were Stage 0, I, and II, respectively. The overall incidence of DBC was 8% (50/601). Obesity, ecchymoses, T stage, the presence and aspiration of a breast hematoma/seroma, removal of >5 axillary lymph nodes, and arm lymphedema were significantly associated with DBC. The median time to onset of DBC from the date of definitive surgery was 226 days. Ninety-two percent of DBC patients were empirically treated with antibiotics. Fourteen percent required more invasive intervention. Twenty-two percent had recurrent episodes of DBC. Ultimately, 2 patients (4%) underwent mastectomy for intractable breast pain related to DBC. Conclusion: Although multifactorial, we believe DBC is primarily related to a bacterial infection in the setting of impaired lymphatic drainage and may appear months after completion of radiotherapy. Invasive testing before a trial of antibiotics is generally not recommended.

  17. Status update and interim results from the asymptomatic carotid surgery trial-2 (ACST-2).

    PubMed

    Halliday, Alison; Bulbulia, Richard; Gray, William; Naughten, Ally; den Hartog, Anne; Delmestri, Antonella; Wallis, Carol; le Conte, Stephanie; Macdonald, Sumaira

    2013-11-01

    ACST-2 is currently the largest trial ever conducted to compare carotid artery stenting (CAS) with carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in patients with severe asymptomatic carotid stenosis requiring revascularization. Patients are entered into ACST-2 when revascularization is felt to be clearly indicated, when CEA and CAS are both possible, but where there is substantial uncertainty as to which is most appropriate. Trial surgeons and interventionalists are expected to use their usual techniques and CE-approved devices. We report baseline characteristics and blinded combined interim results for 30-day mortality and major morbidity for 986 patients in the ongoing trial up to September 2012. A total of 986 patients (687 men, 299 women), mean age 68.7 years (SD ± 8.1) were randomized equally to CEA or CAS. Most (96%) had ipsilateral stenosis of 70-99% (median 80%) with contralateral stenoses of 50-99% in 30% and contralateral occlusion in 8%. Patients were on appropriate medical treatment. For 691 patients undergoing intervention with at least 1-month follow-up and Rankin scoring at 6 months for any stroke, the overall serious cardiovascular event rate of periprocedural (within 30 days) disabling stroke, fatal myocardial infarction, and death at 30 days was 1.0%. Early ACST-2 results suggest contemporary carotid intervention for asymptomatic stenosis has a low risk of serious morbidity and mortality, on par with other recent trials. The trial continues to recruit, to monitor periprocedural events and all types of stroke, aiming to randomize up to 5,000 patients to determine any differential outcomes between interventions. ISRCTN21144362. Copyright © 2013 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Management of the Regional Lymph Nodes Following Breast-Conservation Therapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: An Evolving Paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Laura E.G.; Punglia, Rinaa S.; Wong, Julia S.; Bellon, Jennifer R.

    2014-11-15

    Radiation therapy to the breast following breast conservation surgery has been the standard of care since randomized trials demonstrated equivalent survival compared to mastectomy and improved local control and survival compared to breast conservation surgery alone. Recent controversies regarding adjuvant radiation therapy have included the potential role of additional radiation to the regional lymph nodes. This review summarizes the evolution of regional nodal management focusing on 2 topics: first, the changing paradigm with regard to surgical evaluation of the axilla; second, the role for regional lymph node irradiation and optimal design of treatment fields. Contemporary data reaffirm prior studies showing that complete axillary dissection may not provide additional benefit relative to sentinel lymph node biopsy in select patient populations. Preliminary data also suggest that directed nodal radiation therapy to the supraclavicular and internal mammary lymph nodes may prove beneficial; publication of several studies are awaited to confirm these results and to help define subgroups with the greatest likelihood of benefit.

  19. The Association Between Biological Subtype and Isolated Regional Nodal Failure After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wo, Jennifer Y.; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Nguyen, Paul L.; Raad, Rita Abi; Sreedhara, Meera B.A.; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Wong, Julia S.; Gadd, Michele A.; Smith, Barbara L.; Harris, Jay R.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk of isolated regional nodal failure (RNF) among women with invasive breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiation therapy (RT) and to determine factors, including biological subtype, associated with RNF. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 1,000 consecutive women with invasive breast cancer who received breast-conserving surgery and RT from 1997 through 2002. Ninety percent of patients received adjuvant systemic therapy; none received trastuzumab. Sentinel lymph node biopsy was done in 617 patients (62%). Of patients with one to three positive nodes, 34% received regional nodal irradiation (RNI). Biological subtype classification into luminal A, luminal B, HER-2, and basal subtypes was based on estrogen receptor status-, progesterone receptor status-, and HER-2-status of the primary tumor. Results: Median follow-up was 77 months. Isolated RNF occurred in 6 patients (0.6%). On univariate analysis, biological subtype (p = 0.0002), lymph node involvement (p = 0.008), lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.02), and Grade 3 histology (p = 0.01) were associated with significantly higher RNF rates. Compared with luminal A, the HER-2 (p = 0.01) and basal (p = 0.08) subtypes were associated with higher RNF rates. The 5-year RNF rate among patients with one to three positive nodes treated with tangents alone was 2.4%; we could not identify a subset of these patients with a substantial risk of RNF. Conclusions: Isolated RNF is a rare occurrence after breast-conserving therapy. Patients with the HER-2 (not treated with trastuzumab) and basal subtypes appear to be at higher risk of developing RNF although this risk is not high enough to justify the addition of RNI. Low rates of RNF in patients with one to three positive nodes suggest that tangential RT without RNI is reasonable in most patients.

  20. The Roles and Controversies of Radiation Therapy in Breast Conserving Therapy for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka; Mitsumori; Kokubo

    1997-10-31

    Breast conserving therapy (BCT) is defined as a combination of conservative surgery for resection of the primary tumor, followed by radiation therapy (RT) for the eradication of residual microscopic disease in the breast. At NIH Consensus Development Conference in 1990, BCT was recognized as the preferred treatment for the majority of women with Stage I and II breast cancer. RT is a potent locoregional treament and its role in BCT in reducing local recurrence is already established. On the other hand, the influence of RT on survival outcome has not yet been closely demonstrated so far. RT appears to be useful as neoadjuvant therapy, and also as exclusive local treatment for patients achieving complete regression (CR) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The other possible role of RT is to use it as an alternative to axillary dissection in patients with clinically uninvolved nodes. The question of the appropriateness of using RT in all BCT cases is raised. Since the subgroup of patients who would not deserve any benefit by RT has not yet identified, RT should be delivered as standard treatment following breast conserving surgery for early stage breast cancer.

  1. Surgical margins in breast-conserving therapy: current trends and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Alessandro; Lucchini, Roberta; Santoprete, Stefano; Bistoni, Giovanni; Avenia, Stefano; Triola, Roberto; Avenia, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate surgical margins represent a high risk for adverse clinical outcome in breast-conserving therapy (BCT) for early-stage breast cancer. The majority of studies report positive resection margins in 20% to 40% of the patients who underwent BCT. This may result in an increased local recurrence (LR) rate or additional surgery and, consequently, adverse effects on cosmesis, psychological distress, and health costs. In the literature, various risk factors are reported to be associated with positive margin status after lumpectomy, which may allow the surgeon to distinguish those patients with a higher “a priori” risk for re-excision. However, most risk factors are related to tumor biology and patient characteristics, which cannot be modified as such. Therefore, efforts to reduce the number of positive margins should focus on optimizing the surgical procedure itself, because the surgeon lacks real time intraoperative information on the presence of positive resection margins during breast-conserving surgery. This review presents the status of pre- and intraoperative modalities currently used in BCT. Furthermore, innovative intraoperative approaches, such as positron emission tomography, radio-guided occult lesion localization, and near-infrared fluorescence optical imaging, are addressed, which have to prove their potential value in improving surgical outcome and reducing the need for re-excision in BCT.

  2. Tumour-adapted Reduction Mammoplasty – a New (Old) Breast Conserving Strategy: Review

    PubMed Central

    Eichbaum, M.; Dietrich, A.; Reinhard, J.; Steinwasser, R.; Eichbaum, C.

    2016-01-01

    Today over 70 % of patients treated for primary breast carcinoma in certified breast centres are managed with breast conserving surgery. The classical semicircular incision directly above the tumour, though in many cases easily carried out and associated with good cosmetic results, does have limitations. Unsatisfactory aesthetic results often occur when tumour location is unfavourable or when there is unfavourable tumour size relative to breast size. Distortion of the nipple, changes to breast shape and retraction of skin overlying surgical defects can occur. Tumour-adapted reduction mammoplasty/mastopexy or the “modified B technique” offer excellent chances of combining the oncological demands of breast surgery with satisfactory symmetrical cosmetic results. This article reviews a traditional, old operative technique that has been re-embraced in various new forms. PMID:26855438

  3. Cataract surgery: interim results and complications of a randomised controlled trial. Oxford Cataract Treatment and Evaluation Team (OCTET).

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    A randomised controlled trial in progress for more than five years, with no loss to follow-up (except death), assessed 333 eyes treated by three methods of cataract surgery. They were (A) intracapsular extraction and contact lens usage, (B) intracapsular extraction and implantation of an iris supported lens (Federov I), and (C) extracapsular extraction and implantation of an iridocapsular lens (Binkhorst 2-loop). The purpose of the paper is to report interim visual results, complications, and corneal endothelial cell loss. More eyes in groups A (contact lens) and C (extracapsular + implant) achieved better visual acuity than in group B (intracapsular + Federov lens), which also had more postoperative complications. Both implant groups lost more endothelial cells than the non-implant group, which did not differ significantly from group B before one year. PMID:2872913

  4. Does leg lengthening pose a threat to a child's mental health?: An interim report one year after surgery.

    PubMed

    Niemelä, Birgitta Johansson; Tjernström, Björn; Andersson, Gerhard; Wahlsten, Viveka Sundelin

    2007-09-01

    Previous studies suggest that children react with functional and psychological disturbances after leg lengthening (LL). Long-term effects are not known, and there is a lack of prospective studies. The aim of this interim prospective study was to investigate the psychological impact of the Ilizarov technique on a sample of children 1 year after surgery. : The subjects were 27 patients aged 6 to 16 years treated using the Ilizarov technique at the Pediatric Orthopaedic Department, Uppsala University Hospital, between 1997 and 2005. A control group of healthy children matched for age and sex were also included.Semistructured interviews and psychometric measures (anxiety, depression, self-esteem, behavior) were administered to patients and parents before surgery and 1 year after. Psychological measures were correlated with medical records (days of hospitalization, gained length, etc). The control group was examined at initial assessment only. : Before reconstructive surgery, the LL group had a significantly lower self-esteem compared with the control group. Aggressive behavior, attention and externalization problems, anxiety, and depression were significantly reduced after LL. Parents' state anxiety was also reduced. There were no differences in trait anxiety between the parents of patients and the parents of the control children. : Patients reported pain, psychological discomfort, complications, and restrained function during LL. However, there were no adverse psychological effects at 1-year follow-up; rather, there were signs of improved mental health. No single psychological parameter could predict the outcome after LL.

  5. Breast conservation treatment with perioperative interstitial irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, L.; Mansfield, C.M.; Jewell, W.R.; Reddy, E.K.; Thomas, J.H.; Krishnan, E.C.

    1987-10-01

    Limited resection of the breast combined with radiation has proved to be as effective as more radical surgery in treating early breast cancer. At the University of Kansas Medical Center, the radiotherapy consists of an interstitial implant at the time of lumpectomy to deliver an interstitial boost dose to the tumor bed with iridium-192 immediately following the surgical procedure. An axillary node dissection is also performed at the time of lumpectomy. A dose of 2000 cGy is delivered to the tumor bed between 40 and 60 h. Two to three weeks later, 4500-5000 cGy is delivered to the entire breast with external beam radiation over 5-5.5 weeks. One hundred breasts in 98 patients were so treated between June 1982 and February 1986, with 2 carcinomas in situ, 40 stage I, 51 stage II, and 7 stage III cancers, consisting of 2 TIS, 54 T1, 39 T2, and 5 T3 lesions. Locoregional control with a median follow-up of 31 months was 98%. One recurrence was in a different quadrant, and the other revealed predominantly the in situ component. Immediate implant did not compromise wound healing or cosmesis. The cosmetic result was graded as good to excellent in 88% of the breasts. Our preliminary results appear to suggest a better local control with immediate interstitial irradiation.

  6. In Search of a Gold Standard Scoring System for the Subjective Evaluation of Cosmetic Outcomes Following Breast-Conserving Therapy.

    PubMed

    Racz, Jennifer M; Hong, Nicole Look; Latosinsky, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The absence of a widely accepted method for aesthetic evaluation following breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer limits the ability to evaluate cosmetic outcomes. In this study, two different panel scoring approaches were compared in an attempt to identify a gold standard scoring system for subjectively assessing cosmetic outcomes following breast-conserving therapy. Standardized photographs of each participant were evaluated independently by twelve health care professionals involved in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment using the Danoff four-point scale. Individual Danoff scores were combined using two methods, a random sample "three-panel" score and an iterative "Delphi-panel" score, in order to create a final cosmetic score for each patient. Agreement between these two aggregative approaches was assessed with a weighted kappa (wk) statistic. Patient and professional recruitment occurred at two separate tertiary care multi-disciplinary breast health centers. Women with unilateral breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving therapy (segmental mastectomy or lumpectomy and radiotherapy) and were at least 2 years after radiotherapy were asked to participate. Ninety-seven women were evaluated. The Delphi approach required three rounds of evaluation to obtain greater than 50% agreement in all photographs. The wk statistic between scores generated from the "three-panel" and "Delphi-panel" approaches was 0.80 (95% CI: 0.71-0.89), thus demonstrating substantial agreement. Evaluation of cosmetic outcomes following breast-conserving therapy using a "three-panel" and "Delphi-panel" score provide similar results, confirming the reliability of either approach for subjective evaluation. Simplicity of use and interpretation favors the "three-panel" score. Future work should concentrate on the integration of the three-panel score with objective and patient-reported scales to generate a comprehensive cosmetic evaluation platform. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Analysis of Factors Associated With Radiation-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia Syndrome After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Norihisa Sato, Shuhei; Katsui, Kuniaki; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Tsuda, Toshihide; Yoshida, Atsushi; Morito, Tsuneharu; Nakagawa, Tomio; Mizuta, Akifumi; Waki, Takahiro; Niiya, Harutaka; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate factors associated with radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) syndrome after breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 702 women with breast cancer who received radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery at seven institutions between July 1995 and December 2006 were analyzed. In all patients, the whole breast was irradiated with two tangential photon beams. The criteria used for the diagnosis of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome were as follows: (1) radiotherapy to the breast within 12 months, (2) general and/or respiratory symptoms lasting for {>=}2 weeks, (3) radiographs showing lung infiltration outside the radiation port, and (4) no evidence of a specific cause. Results: Radiation-induced BOOP syndrome was seen in 16 patients (2.3%). Eleven patients (68.8%) were administered steroids. The duration of steroid administration ranged from 1 week to 3.7 years (median, 1.1 years). Multivariate analysis revealed that age ({>=}50 years; odds ratio [OR] 8.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16-67.76; p = 0.04) and concurrent endocrine therapy (OR 3.05; 95% CI 1.09-8.54; p = 0.03) were significantly associated with BOOP syndrome. Of the 161 patients whose age was {>=}50 years and who received concurrent endocrine therapy, 10 (6.2%) developed BOOP syndrome. Conclusions: Age ({>=}50 years) and concurrent endocrine therapy can promote the development of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome after breast-conserving therapy. Physicians should carefully follow patients who received breast-conserving therapy, especially those who are older than 50 years and received concurrent endocrine therapy during radiotherapy.

  8. Interim Principals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beem, Kate

    2003-01-01

    An interim principal can buy a school district time to land a permanent successor. Also lists where to find an interim principal; the interim's steadying influence; Bob Wallace's wild ride as an interim principal in post-retirement; and Roger Prosise's rationale for turning to an interim appointment. (MLF)

  9. Fraction size in radiation therapy for breast conservation in early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Brigid E; James, Melissa L; Lehman, Margot; Hider, Phil N; Jeffery, Mark; Francis, Daniel P; See, Adrienne M

    2016-07-18

    Shortening the duration of radiation therapy would benefit women with early breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery. It may also improve access to radiation therapy by improving efficiency in radiation oncology departments globally. This can only happen if the shorter treatment is as effective and safe as conventional radiation therapy. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2008 and updated in 2009. To assess the effect of altered radiation fraction size for women with early breast cancer who have had breast conserving surgery. We searched the Cochrane Breast Cancer Specialised Register (23 May 2015), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 4), MEDLINE (Jan 1996 to May 2015), EMBASE (Jan 1980 to May 2015), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) search portal (June 2010 to May 2015) and ClinicalTrials.gov (16 April 2015), reference lists of articles and relevant conference proceedings. No language or publication constraints were applied. Randomised controlled trials of altered fraction size versus conventional fractionation for radiation therapy in women with early breast cancer who had undergone breast conserving surgery. Two authors performed data extraction independently, with disagreements resolved by discussion. We sought missing data from trial authors. We studied 8228 women in nine studies. Eight out of nine studies were at low or unclear risk of bias. Altered fraction size (delivering radiation therapy in larger amounts each day but over fewer days than with conventional fractionation) did not have a clinically meaningful effect on: local recurrence-free survival (Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.94, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.15, 7095 women, four studies, high-quality evidence), cosmetic outcome (Risk ratio (RR) 0.90, 95% CI 0.81 to 1.01, 2103 women, four studies, high-quality evidence) or overall survival (HR 0.91, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.03, 5685 women, three studies, high-quality evidence). Acute radiation skin toxicity (RR

  10. Global surgery opportunities for U.S. surgical residents: an interim report.

    PubMed

    Knudson, M Margaret; Tarpley, Margaret J; Numann, Patricia J

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and the American Board of Surgery developed guidelines that allowed time spent and cases performed outside of the United States by surgical residents from ACGME-accredited training programs to be applied toward program completion. We hypothesized that the number of programs with global surgical rotations would have increased after that important development. We also sought to determine the characteristics that led to sustainment of such programs. An Institutional Review Board-approved electronic survey was sent to all 253 program directors of ACGME-approved general surgery residencies requesting information on international rotations available to residents. Responses were requested from program directors with extant rotations. Survey questions focused on locations, funding, nature of the rotations, faculty involvement, keys to success, and the barriers to overcome during program development and sustainment. The survey reported 34 surgery residency programs offering global surgery rotations, up from 23 just 5 years previously. Of these reporting programs, 25 have been approved by the ACGME. Most rotations occur in the postgraduate year 3 or 4 and are primarily clinical rotations. Africa is the main destination. Resident supervision is provided by a mixture of host and home surgeons. A dedicated faculty is considered to be the most important element for success while funding remains a major impediment. The interest in global surgery continues to increase, and general surgical programs will strive to meet the expectations of residents looking for international exposure. Collaboration could facilitate resident opportunities and potentially be more cost-effective. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Locoregional Treatment for Breast Carcinoma After Hodgkin's Lymphoma: The Breast Conservation Option

    SciTech Connect

    Haberer, Sophie; Belin, Lisa; Le Scodan, Romuald; Kirova, Youlia M.; Savignoni, Alexia; Stevens, Denise; Moisson, Patricia; Decaudin, Didier; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Reyal, Fabien; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain; Bollet, Marc A.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report clinical and pathologic characteristics and outcome of breast cancer (BC) after irradiation for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) in women treated at the Institut Curie, with a special focus on the breast-conserving option. Methods and Materials: Medical records of 72 women who developed either ductal carcinoma in situ or Stage I-III invasive carcinoma of the breast after HL between 1978 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Median age at HL diagnosis was 23 years (range, 14-53 years). Median total dose received by the mediastinum was 40 Gy, mostly by a mantle-field technique. Breast cancers occurred after a median interval of 21 years (range, 5-40 years). Ductal invasive carcinoma and ductal carcinoma in situ represented, respectively, 51 cases (71%) and 14 cases (19%). Invasive BCs consisted of 47 cT0-2 tumors (82%), 5 cN1-3 tumors (9%), and 20 Grade 3 tumors (35%). Locoregional treatment for BCs consisted of mastectomy with (3) or without (36) radiotherapy in 39 patients and lumpectomy with (30) or without (2) adjuvant radiotherapy in 32 patients. The isocentric lateral decubitus radiation technique was used in 17 patients after breast-conserving surgery (57%). With a median follow-up of 7 years, 5-year overall survival rate and locoregional control rate were, respectively, 74.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 64-88%) and 82% (95% CI, 72-93%) for invasive carcinoma and 100% (95% CI, 100 -100%) and 92% (95% CI, 79-100%) for in situ carcinoma. In patients with invasive tumors, the 5-year distant disease-free survival rate was 79% (95% CI, 69-91%), and 13 patients died of progressive BC. Contralateral BC was diagnosed in 10 patients (14%). Conclusions: Breast-conserving treatment can be an option for BCs that occur after HL, despite prior thoracic irradiation. It should consist of lumpectomy and adjuvant breast radiotherapy with use of adequate techniques, such as the lateral decubitus isocentric position, to protect the underlying heart and

  12. Localized therapy for male breast cancer: functional advantages with comparable outcomes using breast conservation.

    PubMed

    Fogh, Shannon; Kachnic, Lisa A; Goldberg, Saveli I; Taghian, Alphonse G; Powell, Simon N; Hirsch, Ariel E

    2013-10-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) accounts for approximately 1% of all breast cancers. Given the rarity of this disease, treatment of MBC generally follows the same principles as treatment of female breast cancer. However, the traditional surgical approach for MBC is modified radical mastectomy (MRM) or total simple mastectomy (TSM) instead of breast conservation surgery (BCS). The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of BCS as an alternative to mastectomy for MBC with respect to musculoskeletal functionality and treatment outcome. A retrospective analysis was undertaken of all male patients with breast cancer who presented to Massachusetts General Hospital or Boston Medical Center for localized therapy from 1990 to 2003. Musculoskeletal functionality (tissue fibrosis, arm edema, and range of motion) and treatment outcome (local-regional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival) were evaluated. Functional/cosmetic outcomes were assessed by multidisciplinary review of patient follow-up visits and were scored as either "good-excellent" or "fair-poor" to account for subjectivity between different clinicians. Forty-two patients in total were identified to undergo localized treatment. Thirty patients (71%) received MRM, 4 (10%) had TSM, and 8 (19%) underwent BCS. Actuarial overall 1-year fair-poor documented tissue fibrosis, arm edema, and decreased range of motion rates were 13%, 23%, and 27% for patients receiving MRM; 25%, 0%, and 50% for patients who underwent TSM; and 13%, 0%, and 0% for those undergoing BCS, respectively. Overall survival and disease-free survival were not statistically different between the groups. These data suggest that breast conservation therapy may be considered a reasonable local treatment option for male patients presenting with breast cancer because it may offer functional advantages over mastectomy with comparable rates of local control and disease-free survival and overall survival. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  13. The measurement of amylase in drain fluid for the detection of pancreatic fistula after gastric cancer surgery: an interim analysis.

    PubMed

    De Sol, Angelo; Cirocchi, Roberto; Di Patrizi, Micol Sole; Boccolini, Andrea; Barillaro, Ivan; Cacurri, Alban; Grassi, Veronica; Corsi, Alessia; Renzi, Claudio; Giuliani, Daniele; Coccetta, Marco; Avenia, Nicola

    2015-02-19

    Pancreatic fistula is still one of the most serious and potential complications after D2-D3 distal and total gastrectomy (4% to 6%). Despite their importance, pancreatic fistulas still have not been uniformly defined. Amylase concentration of the drainage fluid after surgery for gastric cancer can be considered as a predictive factor of the presence of pancreatic fistula. From January 2009 to April 2013, 53 patients underwent surgery for gastric cancer. Amylase concentration in the drainage fluid was measured on the first postoperative day and if it was ≥1,000 UI, it was measured again on the third postoperative day. Pancreatic fistula occurred in four cases (7.5%). Pancreatic fistulas were classified using the International Study Group on Pancreatic Fistula (ISGPF) criteria into different grades of severity. Two fistulas were Grade A, one was Grade B, and one was Grade C. Management of drainage tubes is still crucial after gastrectomy, not only for the likelihood of anastomotic leaks but also the eventual diagnosis and management of pancreatic fistula. High amylase drainage content and then the presence of the pancreatic fistula may be due to several causes: the operation itself when it includes splenectomy or pancreatic tail-splenectomy, the extended lymphadenectomy but even the 'gently and softly' pancreatic manipulation, according literature, may be a risk factor. The authors assessed amylase concentration in the drainage fluid collected from the left subphrenic cavity on POD1 and POD3 in 53 patients who had undergone curative gastrectomy for cancer and concluded that amylase drainage content >3 times the serum amylase was a useful predictive risk factor for pancreatic fistula. Our work is an interim analysis and the aim of this study is to increase the accrual of the number of patients to have a significant number. For this reason, a protocol for a multicenter trial will be designed to verify whether the systematic measurement of amylase in drain fluid is

  14. Management of the regional lymph nodes following breast-conservation therapy for early-stage breast cancer: an evolving paradigm.

    PubMed

    Warren, Laura E G; Punglia, Rinaa S; Wong, Julia S; Bellon, Jennifer R

    2014-11-15

    Radiation therapy to the breast following breast conservation surgery has been the standard of care since randomized trials demonstrated equivalent survival compared to mastectomy and improved local control and survival compared to breast conservation surgery alone. Recent controversies regarding adjuvant radiation therapy have included the potential role of additional radiation to the regional lymph nodes. This review summarizes the evolution of regional nodal management focusing on 2 topics: first, the changing paradigm with regard to surgical evaluation of the axilla; second, the role for regional lymph node irradiation and optimal design of treatment fields. Contemporary data reaffirm prior studies showing that complete axillary dissection may not provide additional benefit relative to sentinel lymph node biopsy in select patient populations. Preliminary data also suggest that directed nodal radiation therapy to the supraclavicular and internal mammary lymph nodes may prove beneficial; publication of several studies are awaited to confirm these results and to help define subgroups with the greatest likelihood of benefit. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison between early and late onset breast cancer in Pakistani women undergoing breast conservative therapy: is there any difference?

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Abu Bakar Hafeez; Jamshed, Aarif; Khan, Amina; Siddiqui, Neelam; Muzaffar, Nargis; Shah, Mazhar Ali

    2014-01-01

    Early onset breast cancer is associated with poor outcomes but variable results have been reported. It is a significant problem in Pakistani women but remains under reported. Breast conservation plays an important role in surgical management of this younger patient group. The objective of this study was to determine the outcome of breast conservative therapy in patients with early onset breast cancer in our population and compare it with their older counterparts. A review of patients with invasive breast cancer who underwent breast conservation surgery at Shaukat Khanum Cancer Hospital from 1997 to 2009 was performed. Patients were divided into two groups i.e. Group I age ≤ 40 and Group II >40 years. A total of 401 patients with breast cancer were identified in Group I and 405 patients in Group II. Demographics, histopathological findings and receptor status of the two groups were compared. The Chi square test was used for categorical variables. Outcome was assessed on basis of 10 year locoregional recurrence free survival (LRRFS), disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) . For survival analysis Kaplan Meier curves were used and significance was determined using the Log rank test. Cox regression was applied for multivariate analysis. Median follow up was 4.31 (0.1-15.5) years. Median age at presentation was 34.6 years (17-40) and 51.9 years (41-82) for the two groups. Groups were significantly different from each other with respect to grade, receptor status, tumor stage and use of neoadjuvant therapy. No significant difference was present between the two groups for estimated 10 year LRRFS (86% vs 95%) (p=0.1), DFS (70% vs 70%) (p=0.5) and OS (75% vs 63%) (p=0.1). On multivariate analysis, tumor stage was an independent predictor of LRRFS, DFS and OS. Early onset breast cancer is associated with a distinct biology but does not lead to poorer outcomes in our population.

  16. Interim Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anyaso, Hilary Hurd

    2009-01-01

    The Registry for College and University Presidents places former executives in interim presidential and other senior-level posts and is familiar with the challenges interim executives and institutions encounter in times of leadership transitions. However, the one big advantage interims bring to institutions, says Registry Vice President Kevin J.…

  17. Interim Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anyaso, Hilary Hurd

    2009-01-01

    The Registry for College and University Presidents places former executives in interim presidential and other senior-level posts and is familiar with the challenges interim executives and institutions encounter in times of leadership transitions. However, the one big advantage interims bring to institutions, says Registry Vice President Kevin J.…

  18. Trends and Patterns of Breast Conservation Treatment in Hong Kong: 1994-2007

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, T.-K. Soong, Inda S.; Sze, Henry; Choi, C.-W.; Yeung, M.-W.; Ng, W.-T.; Lee, Anne W.M.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: Breast conservation treatment (BCT) was quite unpopular in Hong Kong until the early 1990s, but the trends and patterns of BCT use in the past 14 years have not been studied since. The purpose of this study was to identify the latest trends and patterns. Methods and Materials: All consecutive cases of female breast cancer referred to a community oncology center in Hong Kong between 1994 and 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 2,375 women with T1-2 invasive breast cancer who underwent surgery, 1,137 (48%) had T1 ({<=}2 cm) disease and 1,238 (52%) had T2 (>2 cm-{<=}5 cm) disease. Median patient age was 51 years (range, 24-95 years); 65% patients had their surgery in public hospitals. Results: Of the total patient cohort, 2,153 (91%) patients presented with palpable breast masses and only 104 (4%) with mammographically detected cancers. Overall, 721 (30%) and 1,654 (70%) patients underwent BCT and mastectomy, respectively. There was no significant increase in the BCT rates (31%, SD 5%; p = 0.804) or mammographic detection rates (5%, SD 1%; p = 0.125) in Hong Kong between 1994 and 2007. In multivariate analyses, age {<=}50 years (OR 2.479; p < 0.001), mammographically detected tumors (OR 1.868; p = 0.007), T1 tumors (OR 3.159; p < 0.001), surgeries in private hospitals (OR 1.288; p = 0.018), and negative nodal status (OR 1.886; p < 0.001) were independent factors predictive of a higher likelihood of a woman having BCT. Conclusions: Our results indicate a satisfactory acceptance of BCT by patients who are young and have small tumors, node-negative disease, or surgery in private hospitals. However, the continuing unpopularity of breast screening is likely a major factor limiting the broad use of BCT.

  19. Trends and patterns of breast conservation treatment in Hong Kong: 1994-2007.

    PubMed

    Yau, Tsz-Kok; Soong, Inda S; Sze, Henry; Choi, Cheuk-Wai; Yeung, Mei-Wan; Ng, Wai-Tong; Lee, Anne W M

    2009-05-01

    Breast conservation treatment (BCT) was quite unpopular in Hong Kong until the early 1990s, but the trends and patterns of BCT use in the past 14 years have not been studied since. The purpose of this study was to identify the latest trends and patterns. All consecutive cases of female breast cancer referred to a community oncology center in Hong Kong between 1994 and 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 2,375 women with T1-2 invasive breast cancer who underwent surgery, 1,137 (48%) had T1 (2 cm-surgery in public hospitals. Of the total patient cohort, 2,153 (91%) patients presented with palpable breast masses and only 104 (4%) with mammographically detected cancers. Overall, 721 (30%) and 1,654 (70%) patients underwent BCT and mastectomy, respectively. There was no significant increase in the BCT rates (31%, SD 5%; p = 0.804) or mammographic detection rates (5%, SD 1%; p = 0.125) in Hong Kong between 1994 and 2007. In multivariate analyses, age surgeries in private hospitals (OR 1.288; p = 0.018), and negative nodal status (OR 1.886; p < 0.001) were independent factors predictive of a higher likelihood of a woman having BCT. Our results indicate a satisfactory acceptance of BCT by patients who are young and have small tumors, node-negative disease, or surgery in private hospitals. However, the continuing unpopularity of breast screening is likely a major factor limiting the broad use of BCT.

  20. The effect of multiple wire localization in breast conservation.

    PubMed

    Fillion, Michelle M; Black, Emily Anne; Hudson, Kathleen B; Morin-Ducote, Garnetta; Bell, John L; Gray, Keith D; Lewis, James M

    2012-05-01

    Variability exists regarding the surgical technique in breast conservation therapy. The purpose of this project was to determine differences between single (SH) or flanking (FH) hooked needle localization wires used for nonpalpable breast lesions. We retrospectively reviewed 201 female patients at a single institution from 2004 to 2008. All patients had biopsy-proven ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive disease. Comparisons were made in regard to margin status, reoperation, completion mastectomy, size of lesion, and breast specimen volume. SH was placed in 122 patients (61%) and FH in 79 patients (39%). In SH, 23 patients (18%) had positive margins and 31 patients (25%) had reoperations as compared with 31 patients (25%) with positive margin and 36 patients (44%) in the FH cohort (P = 0.039 and 0.0037). Average lesion size and volume resected was 1.5 cm and 137 cm(3) in SH and 2.85 cm and 188 cm(3) in FH, respectively (P = 0.0001 and 0.006). Positive margins were associated with lesion size and not volume of tissue excised. The FH technique was associated with more positive margins, reoperation, and completion mastectomy.

  1. Interrogating a Multifactorial Model of Breast Conserving Therapy with Clinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Remi; Garbey, Marc; Moore, Linda W.; Bass, Barbara L.

    2015-01-01

    Most women with early stage breast cancer do not require removal of the entire breast to treat their cancer; instead, up to 70% of women can be effectively and safely treated by breast conserving therapy (BCT) with surgical removal of the tumor only (lumpectomy) followed by radiation treatment of the remaining breast tissue. Unfortunately, the final contour and cosmesis of the treated breast is suboptimal in approximately 30% of patients. The ability to accurately predict breast contour after BCT for breast cancer could significantly improve patient decision-making regarding the choice of surgery for breast cancer. Our overall hypothesis is that the complex interplay among mechanical forces due to gravity, breast tissue constitutive law distribution, inflammation induced by radiotherapy and internal stress generated by the healing process play a dominant role in determining the success or failure of lumpectomy in preserving the breast contour and cosmesis. We have shown here from a first patient study that even in the idealistic situation of excellent cosmetic outcome this problem requires multiscale modeling. We propose a method to decide which component of the model works best for each phase of healing and what parameters should be considered dominant and patient specific. This patient study is part of a clinical trial registered on ClinicalTrial.gov, identifier NCT02310711. PMID:25906048

  2. The Dynamic Tumor Bed: Volumetric Changes in the Lumpectomy Cavity During Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Prendergast, Brendan; Indelicato, Daniel J. Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Saito, Anneyuko I.; Lightsey, Judith L.; Snead, Felicia E.; Morris, Christopher G.; Copeland, Edward M.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To characterize the magnitude of volume change in the postoperative tumor bed before and during radiotherapy, and to identify any factors associated with large volumetric change. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six consecutive patients with early-stage or preinvasive breast cancer underwent breast-conserving therapy at our institution between June 2006 and October 2007. Computed tomography (CT) scans of the breast were obtained shortly after surgery, before the start of radiotherapy (RT) for treatment planning, and, if applicable, before the tumor bed boost. Postoperative changes, seroma, and surgical clips were used to define the tumor bed through consensus agreement of 3 observers (B.P., D.I., and J.L.). Multiple variables were examined for correlation with volumetric change. Results: Between the first and last scan obtained (median time, 7.2 weeks), the tumor bed volume decreased at least 20% in 86% of patients (n = 31) and at least 50% in 64% of patients (n = 23). From the postoperative scan to the planning scan (median time, 3 weeks), the tumor bed volume decreased by an average of 49.9%, or approximately 2.1% per postoperative day. From planning scan to boost scan (median interval, 7 weeks), the median tumor bed volume decreased by 44.6%, at an average rate of 0.95% per postoperative day. No single factor was significantly associated with a change in tumor bed volume greater than 20%. Conclusions: The average postlumpectomy cavity undergoes dramatic volumetric change after surgery and continues this change during RT. The rate of change is inversely proportional to the duration from surgery. In this study no factors studied predicted large volumetric change.

  3. Factors which affect use of breast conservation and mastectomy in an underinsured Hispanic population.

    PubMed

    Olsen-Deeter, Lyndsay; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Nodora, Jesse N; Bouton, Marcia E; Nalagan, Justin; Martinez, Maria Elena; Komenaka, Ian K

    2014-12-01

    Despite no difference in overall survival between breast conservation and mastectomy, significant variation exists between institutions and within populations. Less data exists about racial and ethnic minority populations. The current study was performed to evaluate variables that affect use of breast conservation and mastectomy in an underinsured Hispanic population. A retrospective review was performed of all patients who self-identified as of Hispanic ethnicity and underwent breast cancer operations from July 2001 to February 2011 at a safety net hospital. Sociodemographic, clinical, and treatment variables were evaluated. All patients with documented contraindications to breast conservation were excluded. Univariate analysis and multivariate analysis were performed to identify variables which were associated with type of operation. The average age of the 219 patients included was 50 years. Most of the patients (93%) were insured with Medicaid or uninsured and 59% presented with clinical stage 2A/B cancers. Mastectomy was performed in 33% of patients and 67% had breast conservation. In adjusted multivariate analysis higher pathologic stage (p=0.01) and English speakers (p=0.03) were associated with mastectomy. By contrast, higher BMI (p=0.03) and use of preoperative chemotherapy (p=0.01) were associated with breast conservation. In this underinsured Hispanic population, patients with higher pathologic stage and English speaking patients were more likely to undergo mastectomy. Patients who underwent preoperative chemotherapy and who had higher BMI were more likely to undergo breast conservation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A technique for fabricating single screw-retained implant-supported interim crowns in conjunction with implant surgery.

    PubMed

    McRory, M Eric; Cagna, David R

    2014-06-01

    This article presents an intraoral technique for fabricating single screw-retained implant-supported interim crowns immediately after surgical implant placement in extraction sites. The technique may be used with any implant system that provides a provisional abutment or an open-tray impression coping that can be modified for use as a provisional abutment.

  5. Patient-reported Quality of Life and Satisfaction With Cosmetic Outcomes After Breast Conservation and Mastectomy With and Without Reconstruction: Results of a Survey of Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Jagsi, Reshma; Li, Yun; Morrow, Monica; Janz, Nancy; Alderman, Amy; Graff, John; Hamilton, Ann; Katz, Steven; Hawley, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    Although breast conservation is therapeutically equivalent to mastectomy for most patients with early-stage breast cancer, an increasing number of patients are pursuing mastectomy, which may be followed by breast reconstruction. We sought to evaluate long-term quality of life and cosmetic outcomes after different locoregional management approaches, as perceived by patients themselves. We surveyed women with a diagnosis of nonmetastatic breast cancer from 2005 to 2007, as reported to the Los Angeles and Detroit population-based Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries. We received responses from 2290 women approximately 9 months after diagnosis (73% response rate) and from 1536 of these 4 years later. We evaluated quality of life and patterns and correlates of satisfaction with cosmetic outcomes overall and, more specifically, within the subgroup undergoing mastectomy with reconstruction, using multivariable linear regression. Of the 1450 patients who responded to both surveys and experienced no recurrence, 963 underwent breast-conserving surgery, 263 mastectomy without reconstruction, and 222 mastectomy with reconstruction. Cosmetic satisfaction was similar between those receiving breast conservation therapy and those receiving mastectomy with reconstruction. Among patients receiving mastectomy with reconstruction, reconstruction type and radiation receipt were associated with satisfaction (P < 0.001), with an adjusted scaled satisfaction score of 4.7 for patients receiving autologous reconstruction without radiation, 4.4 for patients receiving autologous reconstruction and radiation therapy, 4.1 for patients receiving implant reconstruction without radiation therapy, and 2.8 for patients receiving implant reconstruction and radiation therapy. Patient-reported cosmetic satisfaction was similar after breast conservation and after mastectomy with reconstruction. In patients undergoing postmastectomy radiation, the use of autologous reconstruction may

  6. Breast-conserving therapy for breast cancer: Cosmetic results and options for delayed reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Negenborn, Vera L; Volders, José H; Krekel, Nicole M A; Haloua, Max H; Bouman, Mark-Bram; Buncamper, Marlon E; Niessen, Frank B; Winters, Hay A H; Terwee, Caroline B; Meijer, Sybren; van den Tol, M Petrousjka

    2017-10-01

    Optimisation of the cosmetic outcome after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) is important. We aimed to determine the cosmetic outcome following BCT and factors influencing this cosmesis and identify the most favourable options for delayed breast reconstruction. Four reconstructive surgeons evaluated the cosmetic outcome of 109 patients after BCT. Additionally, the surgeons indicated which patients were amenable for delayed reconstruction and the preferred type of reconstruction. The inter- and intra-observer agreement of the surgeons was rated. The mean overall cosmetic outcome was rated as fair (2.7/4.0, SD 0.9, 1.0-4.0). Risk factors for a poor cosmesis were larger breast size (OR 3.81, p = 0.040), larger tumour (OR 1.63, p = 0.028) and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) (OR 3.09, p = 0.013). Reconstruction of the ipsilateral side was recommended in 55.6% and 94.5% and contralateral reconstruction in 16.7% and 73.3% of patients with good and poor cosmesis, respectively. Flap reconstruction and lipofilling were most commonly reported for the ipsilateral, and breast reduction for the contralateral breast, with reasonable improvement expected (2.2/4.0, SD 0.5, 1.08-3.3). The inter- (0.5-0.7) and intra-observer (0.63-0.79) agreement of the cosmesis was moderate to good, however, poor regarding the recommended reconstruction techniques (mainly < 0.50). Cosmetic outcome after BCT is influenced by breast and tumour size and ALND. Although several reconstructive options are available, the optimal method for revision surgery has not yet been determined. Future studies are necessary to obtain evidence-based guidelines for reconstructive surgery after BCT. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. PREDICTORS OF INFLAMMATORY LOCAL RECURRENCE AFTER BREAST-CONSERVING THERAPY FOR BREAST CANCER: MATCHED CASE-CONTROL STUDY.

    PubMed

    Akoum, Riad; Abdalla, Eddie K; Saade, Michel; Awdeh, Adnan; Abi-Aad, Fouad; Bejjani, Noha; Ghossain, Antoine; Brihi, Emile; Audi, Akram

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory local recurrence (ILR) after breast-conserving surgery for noninflammatory breast cancer (BC) is associated with dismal prognosis. Risk factors for ILR are not well defined. Between 2001 and 2010, twelve patients at our hospital developed ILR after breast-conserving surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiotherapy for BC. We compared their clinico-pathological characteristics to those of 24 patients with noninflammatory local recurrence (non-ILR), 24 patients with distant metastases, and 48 disease-free controls, matched for age and observation period. The median time to ILR was 10 months. In univariate analysis, extent of lymph node involvement (p < 0.05), multifocality (p < 0.05), c-erbB2 overexpression (p < 0.05), and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (p < 0.001) affected the risk of ILR. Conditional logistic regression analysis showed a significant association between ILR and combined LVI and high histopathological grade. The odds ratio (OR) for ILR versus non-ILR was 6.14 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.48-25.38) and for ILR versus distant metastases it was 3.05 (95% CI 0.09-97.83) when both LVI and high histopathological grade were present. Patients with family history of BC were more likely to present with ILR than non-ILR (OR 5.47; 95% CI 1.55-19.31) or distant relapse (OR 5.62; 95% CI 0.26-119.95). Pre- and postmenopausal women with high-grade BC and LVI are at increased risk to develop ILR, especially in the presence of family history of BC. Identification of risk factors for this lethal form of recurrent BC may lead to more effective preventive treatment strategies in properly selected patients.

  8. Clinical outcome and microvascular blood flow in VAC® - and Sorbalgon® -treated peri-vascular infected wounds in the groin after vascular surgery - an early interim analysis.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Stefan; Monsen, Christina; Dencker, Magnus

    2013-08-01

    Vacuum-assisted wound closure (VAC(®)) therapy is considered to be superior to conventional dressings in the treatment of peri-vascular groin infections after vascular surgery at our department. Therefore, we performed an early interim analysis of the clinical outcomes in these seriously ill patients at risk of amputation and death. Patients were randomised to either VAC(®) (n = 5) or Sorbalgon(®) (n = 5; best alternative treatment) therapy after surgical debridement. Non-invasive, laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) studies of the skin adjacent to the undressed wound were performed after 14 days of wound treatment. There was no difference in LDPI values in VAC(®) versus Sorbalgon(®) treated patients (P = 0·46). One patient in the VAC(®) group suffered from two re-bleeding episodes, leading to vascular resection and transfemoral amputation and in the Sorbalgon(®) group two had a complete wound healing time of more than 4 months and one had a visible interposition bypass graft in the groin after 1 month of treatment. No patient died of the groin infection. Although not statistically proven, fewer wound treatment failures were recorded in the VAC(®) group, justifying this early interim analysis. LDPI studies were feasible.

  9. Breast Conservation Therapy: The Influence of Molecular Subtype and Margins

    SciTech Connect

    Demirci, Senem; Broadwater, Gloria; Marks, Lawrence B.; Clough, Robert; Prosnitz, Leonard R.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment results and prognostic factors, especially margin status and molecular subtype, in early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: The records of 1,058 Stage I or II breast cancer patients treated with BCT (surgical excision plus radiotherapy) at Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, from 1985-2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Conventional receptor analyses were used as surrogate markers for molecular subtype classification (luminal A, luminal B, Her2 positive, and basal like). Actuarial estimates of overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), failure-free survival, and locoregional control (LRC) were computed by use of Kaplan-Meier plots. We analyzed prognostic variables for significance using Cox proportional hazards univariate and multivariate analysis. The study was approved by the Duke University Medical Center Institutional Review Board. Results: The median age of the patients was 56 years (range, 18-89 years). Of the patients, 80% had T1 disease and 66% N0 disease pathologically. With a median follow-up of 9.8 years, an in-breast recurrence developed in 53 patients and 10 patients had nodal failure. For all patients, the 10-year CSS rate was 94%; LRC rate, 94%; and failure-free survival rate, 88%. Luminal A patients had a CSS rate of 95% and LRC rate of 99%. Basal-type patients appeared to do worse, with regard to both CSS rate (74%) and LRC rate (76%), but the numbers were small and the difference was not statistically significant. LRC rates of patients with negative margins (widely negative, close, and extent of margin not known) were virtually identical (93%, 96%, and 94%, respectively). Those with positive margins appeared to fare slightly worse based on LRC rate (88%), but again, the numbers were small and the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions: BCT remains the treatment of choice for early-stage breast cancer

  10. Note: Utilization of polymer gel as a bolus compensator and a dosimeter in the near-surface buildup region for breast-conserving therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fuse, Hiraku Inohira, Masaya; Kawamura, Hiraku; Fujisaki, Tatsuya; Shinoda, Kazuya; Miyamoto, Katsumi; Sakae, Takeji

    2015-09-15

    Tangential beam radiotherapy is routinely used for radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery. A tissue-equivalent bolus placed on the irradiated area shifts the depth of the dose distribution; this bolus provides uniform dose distribution to the breast. The gel bolus made by the BANG-Pro{sup ®} polymer gel and in an oxygen non-transmission pack was applicable as a dosimeter to measure dose distribution in near-surface buildup region. We validated the use of the gel bolus to improve in the whole-breast/chest wall, including the near-surface buildup region.

  11. Hypofractionation with no boost after breast conservation in early-stage breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Arcadipane, Francesca; Franco, Pierfrancesco; De Colle, Chiara; Rondi, Nadia; Di Muzio, Jacopo; Pelle, Emanuela; Martini, Stefania; Ala, Ada; Airoldi, Mario; Donadio, Michela; De Sanctis, Corrado; Castellano, Isabella; Ragona, Riccardo; Ricardi, Umberto

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate local control, survival and toxicity profile of a consecutive cohort of early-stage breast cancer (EBC) patients treated with adjuvant hypofractionated radiotherapy (HF) with no boost delivered to the lumpectomy cavity, after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Between 2005 and 2015, a total of 493 women affected with EBC were treated with HF (46 Gy/20 fractions or 40.05 Gy/15 fractions) to the whole breast without boost to tumor bed, because of age and/or favorable tumor characteristics. The primary endpoint was 5-year actuarial local control (LC); secondary endpoints included survival, toxicity profile and cosmesis. Median follow-up was 57 months (range 6-124). Actuarial 5-year overall, cancer-specific, disease-free survival and LC were 96.3, 98.9, 97.8 and 98.6 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, tumor stage (T1 vs. T2) and hormonal status (positive vs. negative estrogen receptors) were significantly correlated with LC. Only 2 % of patients experienced ≥G3 acute skin toxicity. Late toxicity was mild with only 1 case of G3 fibrosis. Most of the patients (95 %) had good-excellent cosmetic results. HF to the whole breast with no boost delivered to the tumor bed is a safe and effective option for a population of low-risk breast cancer patients after BCS, with excellent 5-year LC, mild toxicity profile and promising cosmetic outcome. A subgroup of patients with larger tumors and/or with no estrogen receptor expression may potentially benefit from treatment intensification with a boost dose to the lumpectomy cavity.

  12. Factors associated with patients in the Scottish Highlands who chose mastectomy when suitable for breast conservation

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Majid; Hubbard, Gill; Abbott, Nick; Daltrey, Ian; Mullen, Russell

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite being suitable for breast conservation surgery (BCS) a proportion of women choose mastectomy. This study aimed to assess the pre-operative pathological and geographic factors associated with choosing mastectomy rather than BCS in a single centre that serves a large geographical area encompassing urban, rural and remote island populations. Methods A retrospective analysis of all patients suitable for BCS between January 2011 and December 2013 was undertaken. Pre-operative pathological features were compared using the Pearson chi squared test as was distance to the treatment centre from the patient’s home. A questionnaire was sent to all those who chose mastectomy to identify the factors that influenced their decision. Results A total of 446 patients suitable for BCS were identified of which 46 (11%) chose to undergo mastectomy. Patients choosing mastectomy were more likely to present symptomatically (P=0.009), have tumours larger than 20 mm at diagnostic imaging (P=0.001) and have positive axillary staging (P=0.004). Patients choosing mastectomy were more likely to live remotely (P=0.051). Those patients who chose mastectomy felt this gave a better long-term outcome (18 patients, 44%) and peace of mind (14 patients, 34%). Conclusions Adverse pre-operative pathological features were associated with patients choosing mastectomy rather than BCS. There was a trend for patients who chose mastectomy to live remotely from the treatment centre. Patients choosing mastectomy most commonly cited a better long-term outcome and peace of mind as the reason behind their decision. Understanding what influences a patient’s surgical choice will allow clinicians and patients to engage in a fully informed pre-operative decision making process. PMID:27563559

  13. Skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate reconstruction with DIEP flap after breast-conserving therapy

    PubMed Central

    Andree, Christoph; Munder, Beatrix; Seidenstuecker, Katrin; Richrath, Philipp; Behrendt, Philipp; Köppe, Tobias; Hagouan, Mazen; Audretsch, Werner; Nestle-Krämling, Carolin; Witzel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Currently about 70% of women who suffer from breast cancer undergo breast-conserving therapy (BCT) without removing the entire breast. Thus, this surgical approach is the standard therapy for primary breast cancer. If corrections are necessary, the breast surgeon is faced with irritated skin and higher risks of complications in wound healing. After radiation, an implant-based reconstruction is only recommended in selected cases. Correction of a poor BCT outcome is often only solved with an additional extended operation using autologous reconstruction. Material/Methods In our plastic surgery unit, which focuses on breast reconstruction, we offer a skin-sparing or subcutaneous mastectomy, followed by primary breast reconstruction based on free autologous tissue transfer to correct poor BCT outcomes. Between July 2004 and May 2011 we performed 1068 deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flaps for breast reconstruction, including 64 skin-sparing or subcutaneous mastectomies, followed by primary DIEP breast reconstruction procedures after BCT procedures. Results In all free flap-based breast reconstruction procedures, we had a total flap loss in 0.8% (9 cases). Within the group of patients after BCT, we performed 41 DIEP flaps and 23 ms-2 TRAM flaps after skin-sparing or subcutaneous mastectomies to reconstruct the breast. Among this group we had of a total flap loss in 1.6% (1 case). Conclusions In cases of large tumour sizes and/or difficult tumour locations, the initial oncologic breast surgeon should inform the patients of a possibly poor cosmetic result after BCT and radiation. In our opinion a skin-sparing mastectomy with primary breast reconstruction should be discussed as a valid alternative. PMID:23197233

  14. Steroid treatment increases the recurrence of radiation-induced organizing pneumonia after breast-conserving therapy.

    PubMed

    Otani, Keisuke; Nishiyama, Kinji; Ito, Yuri; Kawaguchi, Yoshifumi; Inaji, Hideo

    2014-08-01

    Radiation-induced organizing pneumonia (RIOP) is an important complication of postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer. Unfortunately, conventional corticosteroid therapy is frequently associated with relapses. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the outcomes of steroid treatment in patients with RIOP. In total, 26 patients diagnosed with RIOP from among 2404 women who received radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer were included and classified into steroid (n = 7) and nonsteroid (n = 19) groups. Serum, sputum, and bronchoalveolar lavage composition; subjective symptoms (cough, fever, and dyspnea); migratory progression; and RIOP relapse were compared between the groups. Treatment type did not affect the duration of the subjective symptoms, which was 1.6 and 1.7 months for the steroid and nonsteroid groups, respectively. In contrast, RIOP relapse and new pulmonary lesions developed in five patients in the steroid group and only three patients in the nonsteroid group (P = 0.014). By assessing RIOP duration as the time to resolution of symptoms and discontinuation of therapy, the median duration of RIOP was significantly longer in the steroid (17.1 months) than that in the nonsteroid group (2.3 months, P = 0.005), primarily because of frequent relapses. After remission, persistent pulmonary dysfunction did not occur in the nonsteroid group. This single-center retrospective study demonstrates that steroid therapy results in frequent relapses and significantly prolongs RIOP duration. Corticosteroid treatment is considered a critical factor in RIOP recurrence. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Classification of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence after breast-conserving therapy: new primary cancer allows a good prognosis.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Seiichiro; Takahashi, Kaoru; Akiyama, Futoshi; Oguchi, Masahiko; Tada, Keiichiro; Makita, Masujiro; Iwase, Takuji; Yoshimoto, Masataka; Yamashita, Takashi; Sakamoto, Goi; Kasumi, Fujio

    2005-01-01

    To classify and assess ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR) after breast-conserving therapy. Between 1986 and 2001, 2,137 patients who had breast cancer underwent breast-conserving surgery with or without radiotherapy at the Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research. Of these patients, 83 (3.9%) had an IBTR. We classified the IBTR as a new primary cancer (NP) if the primary tumor had completely negative margins at first operation by detailed pathological examination and if the IBTR had an intraductal component. All other IBTRs were judged true local recurrence (TR). Of the 83 patients, 42 patients were classified as TR (29 had no radiotherapy) and 41 as NP (40 had no radiotherapy). Mean time to disease recurrence was 37 months for TR (52% were within 2 years) versus 55 months for NP (19% were within 2 years) (p=0.031). Six patients (14%) with TR did not receive re-operation, and 67% received salvage mastectomy and 19% re-lumpectomy. All cases of NP were operable, 78% underwent salvage mastectomy and 22% underwent re-lumpectomy. Distant metastases were observed in 33% of patients with TR and 5% of patients with NP, and cause-specific death occurred in 6 cases with TR and in one with NP. The patients with NP had improved 5-year rates of overall survival (NP 91% vs. TR 76%, P=0.0627) and distant disease-free survival (NP 93% vs. TR 61%, P=0.0028). Patients with NP more often developed contralateral breast cancer (NP 37% vs. TR 12%, P=0.018) Patients with NP had better survival rates than those with TR. Distinguishing new primary breast carcinomas from local disease recurrences may have importance in therapeutic decisions and chemoprevention strategies.

  16. Outcomes After Breast Conservation Treatment With Radiation in Women With Prior Nonbreast Malignancy and Subsequent Invasive Breast Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nemani, Deepika; Vapiwala, Neha Hwang, W.-T.; Solin, Lawrence J.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: Little information has been reported regarding outcomes after treatment for patients with early-stage invasive breast cancer and a prior nonbreast malignancy. This report analyzes the outcomes in patients with Stage I and II breast cancer after breast conservation treatment (BCT) with a prior nonbreast malignancy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 66 women with invasive breast cancer and a prior nonbreast malignancy. All patients were treated with breast conservation surgery followed by definitive breast irradiation between 1978 and 2003. Median ages at diagnosis of invasive breast cancer and prior malignancy were 57 and 50 years, respectively. The median interval between the prior malignancy and breast cancer was 7.0 years. Median and mean follow-up times after BCT were 5.3 and 7.0 years. Results: The 5-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 94% (95% confidence interval [CI], 82-98%) and 78% (95% CI, 59-89%), respectively. There were 4 patients (6%) with local failure and 10 patients (15%) with distant metastases. The 10-year rate of local failure rate was 5% (95% CI, 2-16%) and freedom from distant metastases was 78% (95% CI, 61-88%). No obvious differences in survival or local control were noted compared with the reported results in the literature for patients with invasive breast cancer alone. Conclusions: Both overall survival and local control at 5 and 10 years were comparable to rates observed in early-stage breast cancer patients without a prior malignancy. Prior nonbreast malignancy is not a contraindication to BCT, if the primary cancer is effectively controlled.

  17. A Phase II Study of Radiotherapy and Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy in Breast-Conserving Treatment for Node-Positive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, William C.; Kim, Janice; Kim, Edward; Silverman, Paula; Overmoyer, Beth; Cooper, Brenda W.; Anthony, Sue; Shenk, Robert; Leeming, Rosemary; Hanks, Shelli H.; Lyons, Janice A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Administering adjuvant chemotherapy before breast radiotherapy decreases the risk of systemic recurrence, but delays in radiotherapy could yield higher local failure. We assessed the feasibility and efficacy of placing radiotherapy earlier in the breast-conserving treatment course for lymph node-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2004, 44 women with node-positive Stage II and III breast cancer were entered into this trial. Breast-conserving surgery and 4 cycles of doxorubicin (60 mg/m{sup 2})/cyclophosphamide (600 mg/m{sup 2}) were followed by 4 cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) delivered every 3 weeks. Radiotherapy was concurrent with the first 2 cycles of paclitaxel. The breast received 39.6 Gy in 22 fractions with a tumor bed boost of 14 Gy in 7 fractions. Regional lymphatics were included when indicated. Functional lung volume was assessed by use of the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide as a proxy. Breast cosmesis was evaluated with the Harvard criteria. Results: The 5-year actuarial rate of disease-free survival is 88%, and overall survival is 93%. There have been no local failures. Median follow-up is 75 months. No cases of radiation pneumonitis developed. There was no significant change in the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide either immediately after radiotherapy (p = 0.51) or with extended follow-up (p = 0.63). Volume of irradiated breast tissue correlated with acute cosmesis, and acute Grade 3 skin toxicity developed in 2 patients. Late cosmesis was not adversely affected. Conclusions: Concurrent paclitaxel chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery shortened total treatment time, provided excellent local control, and was well tolerated.

  18. Treating Breast Conservation Therapy Defects with Brava and Fat Grafting: Technique, Outcomes, and Safety Profile.

    PubMed

    Mirzabeigi, Michael N; Lanni, Michael; Chang, Catherine S; Stark, Ran Y; Kovach, Stephen J; Wu, Liza C; Serletti, Joseph M; Bucky, Louis P

    2017-09-01

    Fat grafting has been demonstrated as a means of reconstructing breast conservation therapy defects. However, there is continued uncertainty regarding its clinical efficacy and oncologic safety. Furthermore, the role of external preexpansion (i.e., with the Brava device) remains unclear in this setting. The purpose of this study was to examine the safety and clinical outcomes of Brava/fat grafting following breast conservation therapy. A retrospective chart review was performed on all patients undergoing fat grafting following breast conservation therapy. Complications were defined as either a clinically palpable oil cyst/area of fat necrosis or infection. The mean time of follow-up was 2.3 years. A total of 27 fat grafting sessions were performed on 20 patients, with an overall complication rate of 25 percent. The mean interval from completion of radiation therapy to fat grafting was 7 years and was not a significant predictor for complications (p = 0.46). Among those who underwent repeated grafting, there was no difference in the complication rates between their first and second encounters (p = 0.56). There was no difference in complication rates between patients with Brava preexpansion and those without preexpansion. Patients undergoing Brava preexpansion had a significantly higher initial fill volume in comparison with those who did not (219 cc versus 51 cc; p = 0.0017). There were no cases of locoregional cancer recurrence following fat grafting. Brava preexpansion was associated with higher initial fill volume in the setting of breast conservation therapy defects.

  19. Cosmetic effect in patients with early breast cancer treated with breast conserving therapy (BCT) and with HDR brachytherapy (HDR-BT) "boost".

    PubMed

    Kulik, Anna; Łyczek, Jarosław; Kawczyn Ska, Maria; Gruszczyn Ska, Ewelina

    2009-06-01

    The estimation of cosmetic effect in 93 patients with early breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery (BCS) followed by combined radiotherapy, including HDR brachytherapy (HDR-BT) boost. After BCS (tumorectomy or quadrantectomy) external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) was used in total dose of 50 Gy for the whole breast. Tumor bed was localized basing on clinical and mammographic preoperative examinations and histopathology evaluation. 10 Gy in one fraction was applied to all patients using HDR-BT. Steel interstitial needles stabilized by plastic templates were used. 192-Ir with 10 Ci nominal activity and HDR-GammaMed 12i unit (Mick Radio-Nuclear Instruments, Inc., Mt. Vernon, NY) and ABACUS software were used. 31 patients received additional chemotherapy. Cosmetic effect was evaluated in 36 month after the end of brachytherapy treatment basing on modified EORTC scale. For statistical analysis the rang of correlation test, contingent test, linear regression test and ProbRough rulet induction test were used. HDR-BT tolerance was good in most of the cases. Excellent and very good cosmetic effect was observed in 79 patients (85%). Statistically important correlations between following examined prognostic factors and cosmetics outcome were observed: clinical and mammographic tumor estimation, method of breast conserving surgery, type of skin incision, number of interstitial applicators, irradiated reference volume (PTV) and type of optimization method. No correlations with cosmetics effect were found in factors such as: age of patients, location of tumor or additional therapy.

  20. Quality of life in patients with recurrent breast cancer after second breast-conserving therapy in comparison with mastectomy: the German experience.

    PubMed

    Jendrian, Svenja; Steffens, Katharina; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Laakmann, Elena; Bergelt, Corinna; Witzel, Isabell

    2017-06-01

    Although some studies suggest that breast-conserving therapy (BCT) shows better psychosocial outcomes than mastectomy in patients with primary breast cancer, little is known about the outcomes of these surgical options in recurrent breast cancer. We investigated differences in overall survival and re-recurrence rates as well as psychosocial outcomes among patients who underwent BCT or mastectomy after the diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer in a single-center setting. 124 of 186 eligible patients who underwent surgical treatment for breast cancer recurrence completed the questionnaires on quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30 and -BR23), fear of progression (PA-F-KF), anxiety and depression (HADS), and body image (BIS). Women after breast-conserving surgery (n = 46) showed significantly better outcomes than women after mastectomy (n = 61) with respect to body image (P < 0.001 in BIS and p < 0.001 in BR23), social functioning (p = 0.016), emotional functioning (p = 0.028), and role functioning (p = 0.043). There were no significant group differences regarding anxiety, depression, and fear of progression as well as re-recurrence and survival rates. Predictors of good quality of life were partnership (OR 2.46), higher monthly family income (OR 3.54), and higher professional qualification (OR 4.3) in our group of patients. Our results indicate that patients treated with breast-conserving therapy after recurrent breast cancer perceive lower impairments in body image and several aspects of quality of life than patients treated with mastectomy.

  1. Sexual functioning in women after mastectomy versus breast conserving therapy for early-stage breast cancer: a prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Aerts, L; Christiaens, M R; Enzlin, P; Neven, P; Amant, F

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer (BC) and/or its treatments may affect sexual functioning based on physiological and psychosocial mechanisms. The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate sexual adjustment of BC patients during a follow-up period of one year after mastectomy (ME) or breast conserving therapy (BCT). In this prospective controlled study, women with BC and an age-matched control group of healthy women completed the Beck Depression Inventory Scale, World Health Organization 5 Well-being scale, Body Image Scale, EORTC QLQ questionnaire, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, Short Sexual Functioning Scale and Specific Sexual Problems Questionnaire to assess various aspects of sexual and psychosocial functioning before surgery, six months and one year after surgical treatment. In total, 149 women with BC and 149 age-matched healthy controls completed the survey. Compared to the situation before surgery, significantly more BCT women reported problems with sexual arousal six months after surgery and significantly more women of the ME group reported problems with sexual desire, arousal and the ability to achieve an orgasm six months and one year after surgery. While in comparison with healthy controls, no significant differences in sexual functioning were found after BCT surgery, significantly more women who underwent ME reported problems with sexual desire, arousal, the ability to achieve an orgasm and intensity of the orgasm. Although little differences were seen in sexual functioning in the BCT group during prospective analyses and in comparison with healthy controls, analyses revealed that women who underwent a ME were at risk for post-operative sexual dysfunctions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Same Quality of Life for Polish Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Mastectomy and Breast Reconstruction or Breast-Conserving Therapy.

    PubMed

    Szutowicz-Wydra, Beata; Wydra, Jacek; Kruszewski, Wiesław J; Ciesielski, Maciej; Szajewski, Mariusz; Walczak, Jakub; Hansdorfer-Korzon, Rita

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer often requires combined oncologic treatments, the base of which is surgery. Quality of life (QoL) after each surgical procedure may influence the process of decision making among women, who qualify for multiple oncological strategies. Our knowledge about QoL in breast cancer patients is derived from comparative studies. Results may differ, depending on country, culture, and societal relations. The aim of the study was to investigate the quality of life of Polish patients treated with breast-conserving therapy (BCT) or mastectomy with breast reconstruction. The study involved women who underwent surgery for breast cancer in the Department of Surgical Oncology of the Gdynia Oncology Center from September 2010 to November 2013. Eighty-two breast reconstructions (in 79 patients) and 226 BCT procedures were performed. QoL was measured with the use of EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. Global QoL was high in both groups and did not differ significantly. Body image was slightly better after BCT than after mastectomy with breast reconstruction, but sexual QoL was lower. Future perspective was quite low in both groups. Disease symptoms were not bothering. The global QoL among Polish breast cancer patients treated with BCT or mastectomy with breast reconstruction is high and does not differ between groups. There is a need for anxiety and disease-related fear prophylaxis and for the improvement of sex life of breast cancer survivors.

  3. Improved Outcomes of Breast-Conserving Therapy for Patients With Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Halasz, Lia M.; Sreedhara, Meera; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Punglia, Rinaa S.; Wong, Julia S.; Harris, Jay R.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Patients treated for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiation therapy (RT) at our center from 1976 to 1990 had a 15% actuarial 10-year local recurrence (LR) rate. Since then, improved mammographic and pathologic evaluation and greater attention to achieving negative margins may have resulted in a lower risk of LR. In addition, clinical implications of hormone receptor and HER-2 status in DCIS remain unclear. We sought to determine the following: LR rates with this more modern approach; the relation between LR and HER-2 status; and clinical and pathologic factors associated with HER-2{sup +} DCIS. Methods and Materials: We studied 246 consecutive patients who underwent BCS and RT for DCIS from 2001 to 2007. Of the patients, 96 (39%) were Grade III and the median number of involved tissue blocks was 3. Half underwent re-excision and 222 (90%) had negative margins (>2 mm). All received whole-breast RT (40-52 Gy) and 99% (244) received a tumor bed boost (8-18 Gy). Routine estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER-2 immunohistochemistry was instituted in 2003. Results: With median follow-up of 58 months, there were no LRs. Seven patients (3%) developed contralateral breast cancer (4 invasive and 3 in situ). Among 163 patients with immunohistochemistry, 124 were ER/PR{sup +}HER-2{sup -}, 27 were ER/PR{sup +}HER-2{sup +}, 6 were ER{sup -}/PR{sup -}HER-2{sup +}, and 6 were ER{sup -}/PR{sup -}HER-2{sup -}. On univariable analysis, HER-2{sup +}was significantly associated with Grade III, ER{sup -}/PR{sup -}, central necrosis, comedo subtype, more extensive DCIS, and postmenopausal status. On multivariable analysis, Grade III and postmenopausal status remained significantly associated with HER-2{sup +}. Conclusions: In an era of mammographically identified DCIS, larger excisions, widely negative margins and the use of a tumor bed boost, we observed no LR regardless of ER/PR/HER-2 status. Factors associated

  4. Thermography in the follow-up of breast cancer patients after breast-conserving treatment by tumorectomy and radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Ulmer, H U; Brinkmann, M; Frischbier, H J

    1990-06-15

    It is often suggested in the literature that thermography is able to diagnose a recurrence in the breast after breast-conserving therapy by a rise in breast temperature much earlier than other diagnostic tools, but no thermographic values are presented. The thermographic data of a prospective study of 309 women after breast-conserving therapy were evaluated. Seventeen of these women had an intramammary recurrence. A total of 2432 individual measured values were evaluated from 292 patients without evidence of a recurrence and 146 measured values from 17 patients with intramammary recurrence. The thermographic behavior of the breast after breast-conserving therapy is not uniform. However, the breast temperatures of the patients with intramammary recurrences were not significantly different from those without recurrences. This means that thermography is of no value in the care after breast-conserving therapy.

  5. Salvage mastectomy after failed breast-conserving therapy for carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed Central

    Barr, L. C.; Brunt, A. M.; Phillips, R. H.; Ellis, H.

    1991-01-01

    The indications, technique and complications of salvage mastectomy in 25 patients with local recurrence after breast-conserving therapy for carcinoma of the breast have been reviewed. Two patients required myocutaneous flaps to repair the defect, and six patients (24%) suffered wound infection or breakdown. Subsequent local relapse occurred in a total of five patients, two of whom died with uncontrolled chest wall skin nodules. PMID:2018316

  6. Time Course of Mild Arm Lymphedema After Breast Conservation Treatment for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bar Ad, Voichita; Cheville, Andrea; Solin, Lawrence J.; Dutta, Pinaki; Both, Stefan; Harris, Eleanor

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Arm lymphedema is a potential consequence of the treatment for breast carcinoma. The objective of this retrospective study was to characterize the progression of mild arm lymphedema after breast conservation treatment for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The study cohort was drawn from 1,713 consecutive Stage I or II breast cancer patients who underwent breast conservation therapy, including axillary staging followed by radiation. Arm lymphedema was documented in 266 (16%) of 1,713 patients. One hundred nine patients, 6% of the overall group and 40% of the patients with arm lymphedema, presented with mild arm lymphedema, defined as a difference of 2 cm or less between the measured circumferences of the affected and unaffected arms. Results: Among the 109 patients with mild arm lymphedema at the time of arm lymphedema diagnosis, the rate of freedom from progression to more severe lymphedema was 79% at 1 year, 66% at 3 years, and 52% at 5 years. The patients who were morbidly obese, had positive axillary lymph nodes, or received supraclavicular irradiation at the time of breast cancer treatment were at higher risk of progression from mild arm lymphedema to more severe edema. Conclusions: Mild arm lymphedema, generally considered to be a minor complication after breast conservation treatment for breast cancer, was associated with a risk of progression to a more severe grade of arm lymphedema in a substantial fraction of patients.

  7. True Recurrence Versus New Primary: An Analysis of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrences After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Panet-Raymond, Valerie; Truong, Pauline T.; McDonald, Rachel E.; Alexander, Cheryl; Ross, Louetta; Ryhorchuk, Aleata; Watson, Peter H.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) can occur in 5-20% of women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Two entities of IBTR have been described: true recurrence (TR), suggested to be regrowth of disease at the tumor bed, and new primary (NP), distinct from the index lesion in histology and location. This study compared survival outcomes between two patient cohorts classified clinically as having either TR or NP. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 1999, 6,020 women were referred to the BC Cancer Agency with newly diagnosed pT1-2, N0-1, M0 invasive breast cancer, treated with breast-conserving surgery. Of these, 289 patients had pathologically confirmed IBTR. Retrospective analysis was performed, and a set of decision rules was applied to classify cases as TR or NP based on change in histology, grade, hormone receptor status, and tumor location. Of 289 patients, 129 (45%) were classified as having TR and 139 (48%) as having NP; 21 (7%) were unclassified. Results: The distributions of age at diagnosis, age at recurrence, and histopathologic factors were similar in the TR and NP cohorts (all p > 0.05). The mean time to recurrence was shorter in TR patients than in NP patients (4.8 years vs. 6.3 years, p = 0.001). Treatment of the IBTR did not differ between the two groups. In the TR and NP cohorts, breast cancer-specific survival was 55.7% vs. 61.3% (p = 0.93), and overall survival was 43.7% vs. 54.8% (p = 0.53). Conclusions: Time to recurrence is significantly shorter in patients with IBTR classified as true recurrence compared to new primary. Non-statistically significant trends for less favorable survival were observed for patients with TR. Further investigation of the hypothesis that TR and NP tumors are distinct entities with different survival prognoses will require standardized pathology review and molecular analyses.

  8. Cancer early detection program based on awareness and clinical breast examination: Interim results from an urban community in Mumbai, India.

    PubMed

    Gadgil, Anita; Sauvaget, Catherine; Roy, Nobhojit; Muwonge, Richard; Kantharia, Surita; Chakrabarty, Anuradha; Bantwal, Kanchan; Haldar, Indrani; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy

    2017-02-01

    Indian women with breast cancer are usually diagnosed in advanced stages leading to poor survival. Improving breast awareness and increasing access to early diagnosis and adequate treatment has been advocated for breast cancer control. We implemented a program to increase awareness on breast cancer and access to its early detection in an occupational health care scheme in Mumbai, India. Breast awareness brochures were mailed annually between June 2013 and June 2016 to a cohort of 22,500 eligible women aged 30-69 years old receiving universal health care from an occupational health care scheme comprising of primary health centres and a referral secondary care hospital in Mumbai. Women with suspected breast cancers were provided with diagnostic investigations and treatment. Socio-demographic information and tumour characteristics were compared between the breast awareness pre-intervention period (Jan 2005-May 2013) and the breast awareness intervention period after four rounds of mailers (June 2013-June 2016). The proportion of women with early tumours and axillary lymph node negative cancers increased from 74% to 81% and 46% to 53% respectively, between the two periods. While the proportion of patients receiving breast conserving surgery increased from 39% to 51%, the proportion receiving chemotherapy decreased from 84% to 56%. Interim results following efforts to improve breast awareness and access to care in a cohort of women in an occupational health care scheme indicate early detection and more conservative treatment of breast cancers. Creating awareness and improving access to care may result in cancer down-staging.

  9. Examining the use of breast-conserving treatment for women with breast cancer in a managed care environment.

    PubMed

    Legorreta, A P; Liu, X; Parker, R G

    2000-10-01

    At a National Institutes of Health Consensus Conference in 1991, conservation treatment was considered preferable for patients with early-stage breast cancer. In the early and mid-1990s, however, less than half of the eligible patients received this treatment and the rates varied with patient and provider characteristics. This study explores whether more eligible patients with breast cancer received conservation treatment in recent years in a managed care environment compared to reports in the literature, and if patient and hospital characteristics affected the rate of acceptance. The study population included 753 women with breast cancer in clinical stages 0, I, or II. Patients with Stage III or IV tumors or with tumors larger that 5.0 cm were excluded. A multiple logistic regression incorporated in a mixed-effect model was used to estimate the effect of patient and facility characteristics on the likelihood of using breast-conserving surgery controlling for clinical stages and demographics such as age, race, and marital status. Among the 753 eligible patients, 474 (62.9%) received conservation surgery. Only Hispanic ethnicity and clinical stage significantly affected the likelihood of receiving conservation treatment. Factors such as patient age, hospital size, and teaching status that had been found to be significant predictors in earlier studies were not statistically significant in this study, although conservation treatment was more frequent in younger women and in teaching hospitals. A larger proportion of eligible patients received conservative treatment in this study than in previous reports. This treatment became available in a broader range of institutions, moving from large, academic teaching centers to smaller community hospitals.

  10. Contralateral breast cancer and other second malignancies in patients treated by breast-conserving therapy with radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, J.M.; Amalric, R.; Brandone, H.; Ayme, Y.; Spitalier, J.M.

    1988-08-01

    Metachronous contralateral breast cancers and other second malignancies were evaluated in 2,850 patients treated between 1960 and 1981 primarily with radiotherapy (RT) either alone or following breast-conserving surgery. One hundred eighty-four contralateral cancers were observed in 22,491 patient-years of observation (818 per 10(5) patient-years), with a cumulative probability of 4.5% at 5, 7.9% at 10, and 11% at 15 and 20 years. Compared to patients with unilateral tumors, those destined to develop contralateral cancers were younger (mean age 51.9 vs 56.6) and more often gave a family history of breast cancer. Contralateral breast cancers were more frequent for more extensive tumors (T3 10% vs T1-26%; with inflammatory signs 10.6% without 6%), and in patients with ipsilateral local recurrence (with 9.1%, without 5.6%). Patients with contralateral cancers had a significantly less favorable survival experience (15-year actuarial survival after primary therapy 42%) than patients without contralateral cancer (15-year survival 65.5%). In early stage patients treated with conservative surgery and RT, contralateral cancer was not prognostically more favorable than ipsilateral breast recurrence. Among 72 other second malignancies (320 per 10(5) patient-years) were 2 soft tissue sarcomas in the irradiated area. This corresponds to an incidence of 21 cases per 10(5) patient-years for survivors beyond the fifth year. The possible influence of RT on contralateral cancers and other second malignancies is discussed.

  11. Impact of the Radiation Boost on Outcomes After Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Colin; Anderson, Penny R.; Li Tianyu; Bleicher, Richard J.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Goldstein, Lori J.; Swaby, Ramona; Denlinger, Crystal; Dushkin, Holly; Nicolaou, Nicos; Freedman, Gary M.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: We examined the impact of radiation tumor bed boost parameters in early-stage breast cancer on local control and cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 3,186 women underwent postlumpectomy whole-breast radiation with a tumor bed boost for Tis to T2 breast cancer from 1970 to 2008. Boost parameters analyzed included size, energy, dose, and technique. Endpoints were local control, cosmesis, and fibrosis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate actuarial incidence, and a Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine independent predictors of outcomes on multivariate analysis (MVA). The median follow-up was 78 months (range, 1-305 months). Results: The crude cosmetic results were excellent in 54%, good in 41%, and fair/poor in 5% of patients. The 10-year estimate of an excellent cosmesis was 66%. On MVA, independent predictors for excellent cosmesis were use of electron boost, lower electron energy, adjuvant systemic therapy, and whole-breast IMRT. Fibrosis was reported in 8.4% of patients. The actuarial incidence of fibrosis was 11% at 5 years and 17% at 10 years. On MVA, independent predictors of fibrosis were larger cup size and higher boost energy. The 10-year actuarial local failure was 6.3%. There was no significant difference in local control by boost method, cut-out size, dose, or energy. Conclusions: Likelihood of excellent cosmesis or fibrosis are associated with boost technique, electron energy, and cup size. However, because of high local control and rare incidence of fair/poor cosmesis with a boost, the anatomy of the patient and tumor cavity should ultimately determine the necessary boost parameters.

  12. Comparison of psychological aspects and patient satisfaction following breast conserving surgery, simple mastectomy and breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghazal, S K; Fallowfield, L; Blamey, R W

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and compare the psychological outcome and satisfaction of patients whom underwent wide local excision, mastectomy alone and mastectomy with breast reconstruction. A total of 577 patients had different types of operations for primary breast cancer (254 (44%) had wide local excision, 202 (35%) had simple mastectomy and 121 (21%) had breast reconstruction). Psychosocial morbidity and satisfaction were studied retrospectively using self-evaluation questionnaires. The three different surgical groups were cross-matched into four different age group. Significant statistical differences existed between the three procedures regarding satisfaction and psychosocial morbidity (anxiety, depression, body image, sexuality and self-esteem) in favour of wide local excision followed by breast reconstruction. Greatest morbidity was seen in the mastectomy group. Patient satisfaction of cosmetic outcome and psychosocial aspects was greater with wide local excision than with breast reconstruction or mastectomy. However, since wide local excision is indicated in only a group of patients, breast reconstruction should be an option available to patients requiring mastectomy.

  13. Imaging of the treated breast post breast conservation surgery/oncoplasty: Pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Subhash K; Rastogi, Ashita; Mahajan, Abhishek; Nair, Nita; Shet, Tanuja; Thakur, Meenakshi H

    2017-08-28

    Mammographic appearance of the normal breast is altered in the post-operative setting. It is essential to be aware of the normal findings as well as to identify features of recurrent disease with particular emphasis on radiological-pathological concordance. Digital breast tomosynthesis and volumetric breast density add incremental value in this clinical setting. We present a pictorial review of various cases to illustrate normal post-operative findings as well as mammographic features suspicious for recurrent disease.

  14. PRONE ACCELERATED PARTIAL BREAST IRRADIATION AFTER BREAST-CONSERVING SURGERY: FIVE YEAR RESULTS OF 100 PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Formenti, Silvia C.; Hsu, Howard; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Roses, Daniel; Guth, Amber; Jozsef, Gabor; Goldberg, Judith D.; DeWyngaert, J. Keith

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report the 5-year results of a prospective trial of three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation in the prone position (P-APBI). Methods Post-menopausal patients with Stage I breast cancer with non palpable <2 cm tumors, negative margins, and negative nodes, positive hormonal receptors, and no extensive intraductal component (EIC) were eligible. The trial was offered only once eligible patients had refused to undergo standard whole-breast radiotherapy. Patients were simulated and treated on a dedicated table for prone set-up. The 3D-CRT delivered was 30 Gy in five 6 Gy/daily fractions over 10 days with port film verification at each treatment. Ipsilateral breast, ipsilateral nodal, contralateral breast, and distant failure (IBF, INF, CBF, DF) were estimated using the cumulative incidence method. Disease-free, overall, and cancer-specific survival (DFS, OS, CSS) were recorded. Results One hundred patients accrued to this IRB- approved prospective trial, one with bilateral breast cancer. One patient withdrew consent after simulation and another elected to interrupt radiotherapy after receiving two treatments. Ninety-eight patients are evaluable for toxicity and, in one case, both breasts were treated with PBI. Median patient age was 68 years (range 53–88 years); in 55% the tumor size was <1 cm. All patients had hormonal receptor positive cancers: 87% underwent adjuvant anti-hormonal therapy. At a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 2–125 months), there was one local recurrence (1% IBF) and one contralateral breast cancer (1% CBF). There were no deaths due to breast cancer by 5 years. Grade 3 late toxicities occurred in 2 patients (1 breast edema, 1 transient breast pain). Cosmesis was rated good/excellent in 89% of patients with at least 36 months follow-up. Conclusions Five-year efficacy and toxicity of 3D-CRT to deliver prone-PBI are comparable to other experiences with similar follow-up. PMID:22494589

  15. Genetic Influence on Toxicity and Prognosis in Women Treated with Breast Conserving Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    XRCC2, XRCC3 , XPD, APE1 Genotyping has been completed as reported in 2005. In addition to the planned genotypes, SNPs related to cell cycle control...were associated with reduced risk of acute toxicity among women with normal weight. • XRCC3 241Thr, XRCC2 188His, NBS1 185 Gln alleles were associated...double-strand break repair genes XRCC3 , XRCC2 and NBS1 are not associated with acute side effects of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients. Cancer

  16. Double-edged sword of radiotherapy: a cause of secondary angiosarcoma after breast conservation therapy.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Fahad Mujtaba; Ahmed, Balen; Vidya, Raghavan

    2016-04-25

    Angiosarcomas are rare and aggressive malignant tumours of vascular or endothelial origin that can originate in the breast. They can be classified as primary or secondary, with the latter most commonly due to postoperative radiotherapy as part of breast conservation therapy (wide local excision and adjuvant radiotherapy) for breast cancer. We report a case of postirradiation secondary angiosarcoma in a 56-year-old woman, alongside a review of the current literature, to inform clinicians of its clinical presentation and characteristics as a high index of clinical suspicion is required for an accurate diagnosis. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  17. Psychological effects of breast conserving therapy in comparison with radical mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Bartelink, H.; van Dam, F.; van Dongen, J.

    1985-02-01

    Psychosocial sequelae of breast conserving therapy (BCT) and radical mastectomy (RM) have been compared. Also, in the BCT group, the cosmetic results were judged by the patients themselves and two plastic surgeons. Body image in the BCT group (n = 114) was significantly more positive than in the RM group (n = 58). Patients treated with BCT had even less fear of recurrence of the cancer and would, if necessary, choose the same treatment again. Cosmetic results were good to excellent in 75% of the cases as judged by the two plastic surgeons. Most of the patients with a bad grading by the surgeons were happy with the results.

  18. Erythema multiforme after radiotherapy with aromatase inhibitor administration in breast-conservation treatment for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Kimiko; Matsumoto, Masaaki; Ue, Hironobu; Nishioka, Akihito; Tanaka, Yousuke; Kodama, Hajime; Sasaguri, Shiro; Ogawa, Yasuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Generalized eruptions associated with radiotherapy such as erythema multiforme (EM), Steven-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are uncommon reactions. A few cases of generalized eruptions during and after radiotherapy have been reported with the use of anticonvulsants and anticancer drugs. However, no reports have described mucocutaneous reactions associated with radiotherapy and concurrent use of anastrozole, an aromatase inhibitor. This report describes EM occurring after radiotherapy performed during breast-conserving treatment for breast cancer in a patient who was taking oral anastrozole.

  19. Patterns of Utilization of Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Outcomes in Black Women After Breast Conservation at a Large Multidisciplinary Cancer Center;Black women; Breast cancer; Radiotherapy; RT; Breast conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards-Bennett, Sophia M.; Jacks, Lindsay M.; McCormick, Beryl; Zhang, Zhigang; Azu, Michelle; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Brown, Carol

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Population-based studies have reported that as many of 35% of black women do not undergo radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservation surgery (BCS). The objective of the present study was to determine whether this trend persisted at a large multidisciplinary cancer center, and to identify the factors that predict for noncompliance with RT and determine the outcomes for this subset of patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2007, 83 black women underwent BCS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and were therefore eligible for the present study. Of the 83 women, 38 (46%) had Stage I, 38 (46%) Stage II, and 7 (8%) Stage III disease. Of the study cohort, 31 (37%) had triple hormone receptor-negative tumors. RT was recommended for 81 (98%) of the 83 patients (median dose, 60 Gy). Results: Of the 81 women, 12 (15%) did not receive the recommended adjuvant breast RT. Nonreceipt of chemotherapy (p = .003) and older age (p = .009) were associated with nonreceipt of RT. With a median follow-up of 70 months, the 3-year local control, locoregional control, recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 99% (actuarial 5-year rate, 97%), 96% (actuarial 5-year rate, 93%), 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 92%), 92% (actuarial 5-year rate, 89%), and 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 91%), respectively. Conclusion: We found a greater rate of utilization adjuvant breast RT (85%) among black women after BCS than has been reported in recent studies, indicating that excellent outcomes are attainable for black women after BCS when care is administered in a multidisciplinary cancer center.

  20. Outcomes of Low-Risk Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Southeast Asian Women Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Fuh Yong; Wang, Fuqiang; Chen, John Ju; Tan, Chiew Har; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcomes of Southeast Asian (SEA) women with low-risk ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Retrospective chart reviews of patients treated with BCS for DCIS from 1995 to 2011 were performed. Patients meeting the selection criteria from Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 5194 were included. Most patients received adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) consisting of whole-breast RT delivered to 50 Gy followed by a 10-Gy boost to the tumor bed. Results: Of 744 patients with pathologic diagnosis of pure DCIS identified, 273 met the selection criteria: low-intermediate grade (LIG), n=219; high grade (HG), n=54. Median follow-up for these patients was 60 months. There were 8 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTRs) in total, 7 of which were DCIS. The estimated actuarial IBTR rates at 5 and 10 years for the entire cohort are 1.8% and 4.3%, respectively. Of the 219 patients with LIG DCIS, 210 received RT and 9 did not. There were 7 IBTRs in LIG DCIS, 2 among the 9 patients who did not receive RT. The IBTR rates in LIG DCIS at 5 and 10 years are 2.3% and 4.2%, respectively. All patients with HG DCIS received RT. There was only 1 IBTR occurring beyond 5 years, giving an estimated IBTR rate of 4.5% at 10 years. Conclusions: SEA women with screen-detected DCIS have exceedingly low rates of IBTR after BCS, comparable to that observed in reports of similar patients with low-risk DCIS treated with adjuvant radiation.

  1. Breast-Conserving Treatment in the Elderly: Long-Term Results of Adjuvant Hypofractionated and Normofractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kirova, Youlia M. Campana, Francois; Savignoni, Alexia; Laki, Fatima; Muresan, Marius; Dendale, Remi; Bollet, Marc A.; Salmon, Remy J.; Fourquet, Alain

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term cause-specific survival (CSS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and metastases-free survival (MFS) in elderly breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant normofractionated (NF) or hypofractionated (HF) radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 1999, 367 women aged {>=}70 years with nonmetastatic Stage T1 or T2 tumors were treated by breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant RT at the Institut Curie. They underwent wide tumor excision with or without lymph node dissection followed by RT. They received either a NF-RT schedule, which delivered a total dose of 50 Gy (25 fractions, 5 fractions weekly) to the whole breast, followed by a boost to the tumor bed when indicated, or a HF-RT schedule, which delivered a total dose of 32.5 Gy (five fractions of 6.5 Gy, once weekly) with no subsequent boost. The HF-RT schedule was indicated for the more elderly patients. Results: A total of 317 patients were in the NF-RT group, with 50 in the HF-RT group. The median follow-up was 93 months (range, 9-140). The 5- and 7-year CSS, LRFS, and MFS rates were similar in both groups. The 5-year NF-RT and HF-RT rate was 96% and 95% for CSS, 95% and 94% for LRFS, and 94% and 95% for MFS, respectively. The 7-year NF-RT and HF-RT rate was 93% and 87% for CSS, 93% and 91% for LRFS, and 92% and 93% for MFS, respectively. Conclusion: According to the findings from this retrospective study, the HF-RT schedule is an acceptable alternative to NF-RT for elderly patients. However, large-scale prospective randomized trials are needed to confirm these results.

  2. Breast-Conserving Treatment With Partial or Whole Breast Irradiation for Low-Risk Invasive Breast Carcinoma-5-Year Results of a Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Polgar, Csaba Fodor, Janos; Major, Tibor; Nemeth, Gyoergy; Loevey, Katalin; Orosz, Zsolt; Sulyok, Zoltan; Takacsi-Nagy, Zoltan; Kasler, Miklos

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a randomized study comparing the survival and cosmetic results of breast-conserving treatment with partial breast irradiation (PBI) or conventional whole breast irradiation (WBI). Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, 258 selected patients with T1 N0-1mi, Grade 1-2, nonlobular breast cancer without presence of extensive intraductal component and resected with negative margins were randomized after breast-conserving surgery to receive 50 Gy/25 fractions WBI (n = 130) or PBI (n = 128). The latter consisted of either 7 x 5.2 Gy high-dose-rate (HDR) multicatheter brachytherapy (BT; n = 88) or 50 Gy/25 fractions electron beam (EB) irradiation (n = 40). Results: At a median follow-up of 66 months, the 5-year actuarial rate of local recurrence was 4.7% and 3.4% in the PBI and WBI arms, respectively (p = 0.50). There was no significant difference in the 5-year probability of overall survival (94.6% vs. 91.8%), cancer-specific survival (98.3% vs. 96.0%), and disease-free survival (88.3% vs. 90.3%). The rate of excellent to good cosmetic result was 77.6% in the PBI group (81.2% after HDR BT; 70.0% after EB) and 62.9% in the control group (52.2% after telecobalt; 65.6% after 6-9-MV photons; p{sub WBI/PBI} = 0.009). Conclusions: Partial breast irradiation using interstitial HDR implants or EB to deliver radiation to the tumor bed alone for a selected group of early-stage breast cancer patients produces 5-year results similar to those achieved with conventional WBI. Significantly better cosmetic outcome can be achieved with carefully designed HDR multicatheter implants compared with the outcome after WBI.

  3. Total Mastectomy or Breast Conservation Therapy? How Radiation Oncologist Accessibility Determines Treatment Choice and Quality: A SEER Data-base Analysis.

    PubMed

    Churilla, Thomas M; Donnelly, Patrick E; Leatherman, Erin R; Adonizio, Christian S; Peters, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    Mastectomy and breast conservation therapy (BCT) are equivalent in survival for treatment of early stage breast cancer. This study evaluated the impact of radiation oncologist accessibility on choice of breast conserving surgery (BCS) versus mastectomy, and the appropriate receipt of radiotherapy after BCS. In the National Cancer Institute Survival, Epidemiology, and End Results data base, the authors selected breast cancer cases from 2004 to 2008 with the following criteria: T2N1M0 or less, lobular or ductal histology, and treatment with simple or partial mastectomy. We combined the Health Resources and Services Administration Area Resource File to define average radiation oncologist density (ROD) by county over the same time period. We evaluated tumor characteristics, demographic information, and ROD with respect to BCS rates and receipt of radiation therapy after BCS in univariable and multivariable analyses. In 118,773 cases analyzed, mastectomy was performed 33.2% of the time relative to BCS. After adjustment for demographic and tumor variables, the odds of having BCS versus mastectomy were directly associated with ROD (multiplicative change in odds for a single unit increase in ROD [95% CI] = 1.02 [1.01-1.03]; p < 0.001). Adjuvant radiation therapy was not administered in 28.2% of BCS cases. When adjusting for demographic and tumor variables, the odds of having BCS without adjuvant radiation were inversely associated with ROD (0.95 [0.94-0.97]; p < 0.001). We observed a direct relationship between ROD and BCS rates independent of demographic and tumor variables, and an inverse trend for omission of radiotherapy after BCS. Access to radiation oncologists may represent an important factor in surgical choice and receiving appropriate BCT in early stage breast cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Clinical-Pathologic Features and Long-Term Outcomes of Tubular Carcinoma of the Breast Compared With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gene-Fu F.; Yang Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Moran, Meena S.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate our institutional experience of treating tubular carcinoma of the breast (TC) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) with conservative surgery and radiation therapy, to compare clinical-pathologic features and long-term outcomes. Methods and Materials: A review of our institution's tumor registry from 1975 to 2007, followed by a central pathology review of available slides, yielded 71 cases of Stage I/II TC and 2,238 cases of Stage I/II IDC treated with breast conservation therapy. Clinical-pathologic features and outcomes were analyzed by subtype to detect significant differences. Results: The median follow-up was 7 years. The TC cohort presented more frequently with pT1 disease (97% vs. 80%, p = 0.0007), pN0 disease (95% vs. 74%, p = 0.0004), hormone-receptor positivity (ER+, 89% vs. 62%, p = 0.0001; PR+, 81% vs. 52%, p = 0.0001), and HER-2 negativity (89% vs. 71%, p = 0.04). Clinical outcomes also favored the TC cohort, with lower rates of breast cancer-related death (1% vs. 10%; p = 0.0109) and distant metastasis (1% vs. 13%; p = 0.0028) and higher rates of 10-year overall (90% vs. 80%; p = 0.033), cause-specific (99% vs. 86%; p = 0.011), and disease-free (99% vs. 82%; p = 0.003) survival. There was a nonsignificant trend toward improved breast cancer relapse-free survival for the TC cohort (95% vs. 87%; p = 0.062) but no difference in nodal relapse-free survival or contralateral breast cancer relapse-free survival (all p values >0.05) between the cohorts. Conclusion: Our institutional experience suggests that TC, when compared with IDC, is associated with more favorable clinical-pathologic features and comparable, if not superior, outcomes after breast conservation therapy, suggesting the appropriateness of a conservative approach to this rare subtype.

  5. Quality of life over 5 years in women with breast cancer after breast-conserving therapy versus mastectomy: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Ziegler, Hartwig; Brenner, Hermann

    2008-12-01

    Breast-conserving therapy (BCT) was developed to improve quality of life (QOL) in early stage breast cancer patients. Except for differences in body image, literature comparing the psychosocial sequelae of BCT with mastectomy is ambiguous and shows a lack of substantial benefits. However, knowledge regarding long term effects of treatment on QOL in breast cancer is very limited as most of the pertinent studies have been performed in the early post-operative period. Therefore we compared QOL in women with breast cancer undergoing BCT versus women undergoing mastectomy over a 5-year period following primary surgery. QOL was assessed at 1, 3, and 5 years after diagnosis in a population based cohort of 315 women with early stage breast cancer (UICC stage I-II) from Saarland (Germany) using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire and the breast cancer specific module BR23. Breast-conserving therapy was performed in 226 women (72%). After control for potential confounding, women with BCT reported better physical and role functioning, were sexually more active and more satisfied with their body image already at 1 year after diagnosis (all P values < 0.05). Differences in overall QOL and social functioning were gradually increasing over time and became statistically significant only at 5 years. Whereas some, very specific benefits of BCT, such as a better body image, are already visible very timely after completion of therapy, benefits in broader measures such as psychosocial well-being and overall quality of life gradually increase over time and become fully apparent only in the long run.

  6. Long-Term Clinical and Cosmetic Outcomes After Breast Conservation Treatment for Women With Early-Stage Breast Carcinoma According to the Type of Breast Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Hill-Kayser, Christine E.; Chacko, David; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Vapiwala, Neha; Solin, Lawrence J.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The present study was performed to compare outcomes after breast conservation treatment with iridium-192 implant boost vs. electron boost. Methods and Materials: From 1977 to 1983, 141 patients were treated with whole breast radiotherapy followed by iridium-192 boost after breast-conserving surgery. They were matched 1:1 to patients treated with electron boost. Outcome measures included survival, local recurrence, cosmesis, and complications. Results: Median follow-up was 16.7 and 12.6 years for the implant vs. electron groups (p < 0.001). Rates of local recurrence, freedom from distant metastases, and overall survival at 10/20 years did not differ between the groups, nor did patterns of first failure. Patients in the electron group were more likely to have excellent/good cosmesis than those in the implant group 1 year after radiotherapy (p = 0.014); this trend continued through 10 years but did not reach statistical significance at years 5/10. Complication rates were similar, although patients receiving electron boost seemed less likely to develop breast fibrosis than did those receiving implant boost (23/141 vs. 58/141, respectively, incidence rate ratio 0.7, p = 0.17). Conclusions: Twenty-year data demonstrate no difference in rates of local recurrence, freedom from distant metastases, overall survival, or patterns of failure between groups treated with these two well-described radiotherapy boost techniques. Better cosmesis was observed in the electron group 1 year after radiotherapy, with a trend continuing for 10 years. The incidence of complications was similar between the groups, with a trend toward increased fibrosis in patients receiving implant boost.

  7. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    1985-06-01

    This Interim Report summarizes the research and development activities of the Superconducting Super Collider project carried out from the completion of the Reference Designs Study (May 1984) to June 1985. It was prepared by the SSC Central Design Group in draft form on the occasion of the DOE Annual Review, June 19--21, 1985. Now largely organized by CDG Divisions, the bulk of each chapter documents the progress and accomplishments to date, while the final section(s) describe plans for future work. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides a basic brief description of the SSC, its physics justification, its origins, and the R&D organization set up to carry out the work. Chapter 2 gives a summary of the main results of the R&D program, the tasks assigned to the four magnet R&D centers, and an overview of the future plans. The reader wishing a quick look at the SSC Phase I effort can skim Chapter 1 and read Chapter 2. Subsequent chapters discuss in more detail the activities on accelerator physics, accelerator systems, magnets and cryostats, injector, detector R&D, conventional facilities, and project planning and management. The magnet chapter (5) documents in text and photographs the impressive progress in successful construction of many model magnets, the development of cryostats with low heat leaks, and the improvement in current-carrying capacity of superconducting strand. Chapter 9 contains the budgets and schedules of the COG Divisions, the overall R&D program, including the laboratories, and also preliminary projections for construction. Appendices provide information on the various panels, task forces and workshops held by the CDG in FY 1985, a bibliography of COG and Laboratory reports on SSC and SSC-related work, and on private industrial involvement in the project.

  8. Intraoperative assessment of margins in breast conserving therapy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Butler-Henderson, Kerryn; Lee, Andy H; Price, Roger I; Waring, Kaylene

    2014-04-01

    Approximately one quarter of patients undergoing breast conserving therapy for breast cancer will require a second operation to achieve adequate clearance of the margins. A number of techniques to assess margins intraoperatively have been reported. This systematic review examines current intraoperative methods for assessing margin status. The final pathology status, statistical measures including accuracy of tumour margin assessment, average time impact on the procedure and second operation rate, were used as criteria for comparison between studies. Although pathological methods, such as frozen section and imprint cytology performed well, they added on average 20-30 min to operation times. An ultrasound probe allows accurate examination of the margins and delivers results in a timely manner, yet it has a limited role with DCIS where calcification is present and in multifocal cancer. Further research is required in other intraoperative margin assessment techniques, such as mammography, radiofrequency spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Novel Segment Classification for Multifocal and Multicentric Breast Cancer to Facilitate Breast-Conservation Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mona P

    2015-01-01

    Breast conservation treatment (BCT) is an appropriate alternative to mastectomy for the treatment of unifocal breast cancer. Multifocal and multicentric breast cancers (MFMCBC) challenge conventional indications for BCT and are often treated with mastectomy. Following progress in treatment strategies for unifocal tumors, there was a movement to evaluate the use of BCT for MFMCBC. Now a growing body of evidence from retrospective data has emerged, demonstrating acceptable local control and overall survival rates with BCT for MFMCBC. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings. One of the possible barriers to such trials is the absence of a standardized classification and nomenclature for MFMCBC at this point in time. A novel segment classification is presented in this article in an endeavor to overcome this deficiency and allow future work on this issue. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Does surgical closure technique affect early mammographic detection of tumor recurrence after breast-conserving therapy?

    PubMed

    Newlin, Heather E; Indelicato, Daniel J; Abbitt, Patricia; Marshall, Julia; Wymer, David; Grobmyer, Stephen; Haigh, Linda; Copeland, Edward; Morris, Christopher G; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2009-10-01

    Scarring in the tumor bed may mask or mimic local recurrence of tumor on surveillance mammography. Type of surgical closure technique used during lumpectomy may impact the pattern or density of scar tissue apparent in the tumor bed on mammography. This study sought to determine whether surgical closure type affects tumor-bed scar formation and impacts interpretation of surveillance mammography in women treated with breast-conserving therapy for early-stage breast cancer. One hundred women who received breast-conserving therapy were selected; 99 of them had 2-year post-treatment mammograms for the treated breast. Craniocaudal and mediolateral oblique views were reviewed by 3 subspecialty radiologists who routinely read mammograms. The mammograms were scored on 5-point scales for overall breast density and scarring within the tumor bed. The analyses did not demonstrate greater scarring or density in breast status post superficial closure compared with breast status post full-thickness closure, or vice versa (P > 0.05 for scarring and density). There were no detectable differences between the 2 closure techniques either within the data from individual reviewers, within the composite data for the entire group of reviewers, or in instances where 2 of 3 reviewers agreed (P > 0.05). There was significant interobserver variability in scoring among the mammographers for both scarring (P = 0.001) and density (P < 0.0001). Based on our study of the 2-year post-treatment mammograms, there was no evidence that closure technique impacts degree of scarring in the tumor bed. However, striking interobserver variability in scoring density and scarring was noted.

  11. Short report: interim safety results for a phase II trial measuring the integration of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) plus surgery for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (MISSILE-NSCLC).

    PubMed

    Palma, David A; Nguyen, Timothy K; Kwan, Keith; Gaede, Stewart; Landis, Mark; Malthaner, Richard; Fortin, Dalilah; Louie, Alexander V; Frechette, Eric; Rodrigues, George B; Yaremko, Brian; Yu, Edward; Dar, A Rashid; Lee, Ting-Yim; Gratton, Al; Warner, Andrew; Ward, Aaron; Inculet, Richard

    2017-01-27

    A phase II trial was launched to evaluate if neoadjuvant stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) before surgery improves oncologic outcomes in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We report a mandated interim safety analysis for the first 10 patients who completed protocol treatment. Operable patients with biopsy-proven T1-2 N0 NSCLC were eligible. SABR was delivered using a risk-adapted fractionation (54Gy/3 fractions, 55/5 or 60/8). Surgical resection was planned 10 weeks later at a high-volume center (>200 lung cancer resections annually). Patients were imaged with dynamic positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans using (18)F-fludeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG-PET CT) and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT before SABR and again before surgery. Toxicity was recorded using CTCAE version 4.0. Twelve patients were enrolled between 09/2014 and 09/2015. Two did not undergo surgery, due to patient or surgeon preference; neither patient has developed toxicity or recurrence. For the 10 patients completing both treatments, median age was 70 (range: 54-76), 60% had T1 disease, and 60% had adenocarcinoma. Median FEV1 was 73% predicted (range: 54-87%). Median time to surgery post-SABR was 10.1 weeks (range: 9.3-15.6 weeks). Surgery consisted of lobectomy (n = 8) or wedge resection (n = 2). Median follow-up post-SABR was 6.3 months. After combined treatment, the rate of acute grade 3-4 toxicity was 10%. There was no post-operative mortality at 90 days. The small sample size included herein precludes any definitive conclusions regarding overall toxicity rates until larger datasets are available. However, these data may inform others who are designing or conducting similar trials. NCT02136355 . Registered 8 May 2014.

  12. Hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy and concomitant boost after breast conservation in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Cante, Domenico; Franco, Pierfrancesco; Sciacero, Piera; Girelli, Giuseppe; Pasquino, Massimo; Casanova Borca, Valeria; Tofani, Santi; Porta, Maria Rosa La; Ricardi, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    To report the 5- and 10-year results of accelerated hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT) with concomitant boost to the tumor bed in 83 consecutive patients with early breast cancer aged >70 years. All patients were treated with breast conservation and hypofractionated WBRT. The prescription dose to the whole breast was 45 Gy (2.25 Gy/20 fractions) with an additional daily concomitant boost of 0.25 Gy to the surgical cavity (2.5 Gy/20 fractions up to 50 Gy). The maximum detected toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. We considered as skin toxicity: erythema, edema, desquamation, ulceration, hemorrhage, necrosis, telangiectasia, fibrosis-induration, hyperpigmentation, retraction and atrophy. Cosmetic results were assessed as set by the Harvard criteria. With a median follow-up of 60 months (range 36-88), no local recurrence was observed. The maximum detected acute skin toxicity was G0 in 57% of patients, G1 in 40% and G2 in 3%. Late skin and subcutaneous toxicity was generally mild with no ≥G3 events. The cosmetic results were excellent in 69% of patients, good in 22%, fair in 5%, and poor in 4%. The present results support the use of hypofractionation employing a concomitant boost to the lumpectomy cavity in women aged >70 years. This is a convenient treatment option for both this type of population and health-care providers.

  13. Is Mastectomy Superior to Breast-Conserving Treatment for Young Women?

    SciTech Connect

    Coulombe, Genevieve; Tyldesley, Scott . E-mail: styldesl@bccancer.bc.ca; Speers, Caroline B.A.; Paltiel, Chuck M.Sc.; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Bernstein, Vanessa; Truong, Pauline T.; Keyes, Mira; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To examine whether modified radical mastectomy (MRM) improves outcomes compared with breast-conserving treatment (BCT) in young women. Methods and Materials: Women aged 20-49 years, diagnosed with early breast cancer between 1989 and 1998, were identified. Management with BCT or MRM was compared for local (L), locoregional (LR), and distant relapse-free survival (DRFS) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) by age group (20-39 years, 40-49 years). The analysis was repeated for patients considered 'ideal' candidates for BCT: tumor size {<=}2 cm, pathologically negative axillary nodes, negative margins, and no reported ductal carcinoma in situ. Results: A total of 1,597 women received BCT, and 801 had MRM. After a median follow-up of 9.0 years, the outcomes (L, LR, BCSS) were worse for the younger age group; however, the outcomes were not statistically different by type of local treatment. For women aged 20-39 years considered 'ideal' for BCT, those treated with BCT had slightly lower LRFS compared with those treated with MRM (p = 0.3), but DRFS and BCSS were similar. Conclusions: A difference in LRFS at 10 years potentially favored MRM among women aged 20-39 years considered 'ideal' BCT candidates but was not statistically significant and did not translate into a noticeable difference in DRFS or BCSS. Our data suggest that young age alone is not a contraindication to BCT.

  14. Is Ki-67 Expression Prognostic for Local Relapse in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy (BCT)?

    SciTech Connect

    Hafeez, Farhaan; Neboori, Hanmanth J.; Harigopal, Malini; Wu, Hao; Haffty, Bruce G.; Yang, Qifeng; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Ki-67 is a human nuclear protein whose expression is strongly up-regulated in proliferating cells and can be used to determine the growth fraction in clonal cell populations. Although there are some data to suggest that Ki-67 overexpression may be prognostic for endpoints such as survival or postmastectomy recurrence, further elucidation of its prognostic significance is warranted. Specifically after breast conservation therapy (BCT) (defined in this setting as breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy), whether Ki-67 predicts for locoregional recurrence has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to assess Ki-67 expression in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients to determine whether a significant independent association between Ki-67 and locoregional relapse exists. Methods and Materials: Ki-67 staining was conducted on a tissue microarray of 438 patients previously treated with BCT, and expression was analyzed with clinicopathologic features and outcomes from our database. Results: Ki-67 expression was more prevalent in black patients (37% of black patients vs 17% of white patients, P<.01), younger patients (27% of patients aged ≤50 years vs 15% of patients aged >50 years, P<.01), estrogen receptor (ER)–negative tumors (25% of ER-negative tumors vs 17% of ER-positive tumors, P=.04), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)/neu–positive tumors (35% of HER2-positive tumors vs 18% of HER2-negative tumors, P=.01), and larger tumors (26% of T2 tumors vs 16% of T1 tumors, P=.03). On univariate/multivariate analysis, Ki-67 did not predict for overall survival (74.4% vs 72.6%), cause-specific survival (82.9% vs 82.1%), local relapse-free survival (83.6% vs 88.5%), distant metastasis-free survival (76.1% vs 81.4%), recurrence-free survival (65.5% vs 74.6%), and locoregional recurrence-free survival (81.6% vs 84.7%): P>.05 for all. Conclusions: Ki-67 appears to be a surrogate marker for aggressive disease and

  15. Can the risk of secondary cancer induction after breast conserving therapy be reduced using intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with low-energy x-rays?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Radiation induced secondary cancers are a rare but severe late effect after breast conserving therapy. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is increasingly used during breast conserving surgery. The purpose of this analysis was to estimate secondary cancer risks after IORT compared to other modalities of breast radiotherapy (APBI - accelerated partial breast irradiation, EBRT - external beam radiotherapy). Methods Computer-tomography scans of an anthropomorphic phantom were acquired with an INTRABEAM IORT applicator (diameter 4 cm) in the outer quadrant of the breast and transferred via DICOM to the treatment planning system. Ipsilateral breast, contralateral breast, ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, spine and heart were contoured. An INTRABEAM source (50 kV) was defined with the tip of the drift tube at the center of the spherical applicator. A dose of 20 Gy at 0 mm depth from the applicator surface was prescribed for IORT and 34 Gy (5 days × 2 × 3.4 Gy) at 10 mm depth for APBI. For EBRT a total dose of 50 Gy in 2 Gy fractions was planned using two tangential fields with wedges. The mean and maximal doses, DVHs and volumes receiving more than 0.1 Gy and 4 Gy of organs at risk (OAR) were calculated and compared. The life time risk for secondary cancers was estimated according to NCRP report 116. Results IORT delivered the lowest maximal doses to contralateral breast (< 0.3 Gy), ipsilateral (1.8 Gy) and contralateral lung (< 0.3 Gy), heart (1 Gy) and spine (< 0.3 Gy). In comparison, maximal doses for APBI were 2-5 times higher. EBRT delivered a maximal dose of 10.4 Gy to the contralateral breast and 53 Gy to the ipsilateral lung. OAR volumes receiving more than 4 Gy were 0% for IORT, < 2% for APBI and up to 10% for EBRT (ipsilateral lung). The estimated risk for secondary cancer in the respective OAR is considerably lower after IORT and/or APBI as compared to EBRT. Conclusions The calculations for maximal doses and volumes of OAR suggest that the risk

  16. The Intentional Interim

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nugent, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    The author spent years in central-office administration, most recently in an interim position. Some interim administrators simply see themselves as placeholders until the real deal is hired, giving the organization the opportunity to coast. There are others who see themselves as change agents and cannot wait to undo or redo what their predecessor…

  17. Cosmetic Outcomes and Complications Reported by Patients Having Undergone Breast-Conserving Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hill-Kayser, Christine E.; Vachani, Carolyn; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Di Lullo, Gloria A.; Metz, James M.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Over the past 30 years, much work in treatment of breast cancer has contributed to improvement of cosmetic and functional outcomes. The goal of breast-conservation treatment (BCT) is avoidance of mastectomy through use of lumpectomy and adjuvant radiation. Modern data demonstrate 'excellent' or 'good' cosmesis in >90% of patients treated with BCT. Methods and Materials: Patient-reported data were gathered via a convenience sample frame from breast cancer survivors using a publically available, free, Internet-based tool for creation of survivorship care plans. During use of the tool, breast cancer survivors are queried as to the cosmetic appearance of the treated breast, as well as perceived late effects. All data have been maintained anonymously with internal review board approval. Results: Three hundred fifty-four breast cancer survivors having undergone BCT and voluntarily using this tool were queried with regard to breast cosmesis and perceived late effects. Median diagnosis age was 48 years, and median current age 52 years. 'Excellent' cosmesis was reported by 27% (n = 88), 'Good' by 44% (n = 144), 'Fair' by 24% (n = 81), and 'Poor' by 5% (n = 18). Of the queries posted to survivors after BCT, late effects most commonly reported were cognitive changes (62%); sexual concerns (52%); changes in texture and color of irradiated skin (48%); chronic pain, numbness, or tingling (35%); and loss of flexibility in the irradiated area (30%). Survivors also described osteopenia/osteoporosis (35%), cardiopulmonary problems (12%), and lymphedema (19%). Conclusions: This anonymous tool uses a convenience sample frame to gather patient reported assessments of cosmesis and complications after breast cancer. Among the BCT population, cosmetic assessment by survivors appears less likely to be 'excellent' or 'good' than would be expected, with 30% of BCT survivors reporting 'fair' or 'poor' cosmesis. Patient reported incidence of chronic pain, as well as cognitive and

  18. Prognosis for Mammographically Occult, Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tzu-I. J.; Yang Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Moran, Meena S.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To compare mammographically occult (MamOcc) and mammographically positive (MamPos) early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conservation therapy (BCT), to analyze differences between the two cohorts. Methods and Materials: Our two cohorts consisted of 214 MamOcc and 2168 MamPos patients treated with BCT. Chart reviews were conducted to assess mammogram reports and method of detection. All clinical-pathologic and outcome parameters were analyzed to detect differences between the two cohorts. Results: Median follow-up was 7 years. There were no differences in final margins, T stage, nodal status, estrogen/progesterone receptor status, or 'triple-negative' status. Significant differences included younger age at diagnosis (p < 0.0001), more positive family history (p = 0.0033), less HER-2+ disease (p = 0.0294), and 1{sup o} histology (p < 0.0001). At 10 years, the differences in overall survival, cause-specific survival, and distant relapse between the two groups did not differ significantly. The MamOcc cohort had more breast relapses (15% vs. 8%; p = 0.0357), but on multivariate analysis this difference was not significant (hazard ratio 1.0, 95% confidence interval 0.993-1.007, p = 0.9296). Breast relapses were mammographically occult in 32% of the MamOcc and 12% of the MamPos cohorts (p = 0.0136). Conclusions: Although our study suggests that there are clinical-pathologic variations for the MamOcc cohort vs. MamPos patients that may ultimately affect management, breast relapse after BCT was not significantly different. Breast recurrences were more often mammographically occult in the MamOcc cohort; consideration should be given to closer follow-up and alternative imaging strategies (ultrasound, breast MRI) for routine posttreatment examination. To our knowledge, this represents the largest series addressing the prognostic significance of MamOcc cancers treated with BCT.

  19. Twenty-year incidence and patterns of contralateral breast cancer after breast conservation treatment with radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hill-Kayser, Christine E. . E-mail: hill@xrt.upenn.edu; Harris, Eleanor; Hwang, W.-T.; Solin, Lawrence J.

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to determine the incidence of contralateral breast cancer (CLB) after treatment for early-stage breast cancer with breast-conserving treatment (BCT), and to observe patterns of CLB presentation. Methods: Medical records of 1,801 women treated for unilateral AJCC Stage 0-II breast cancer with BCT between 1977 and 2000 were analyzed as a retrospective cohort. Results: The incidence of any CLB at 20 years was 15.4%. The annual risk of developing any CLB remained constant at approximately 0.75% per year after treatment. The median time to any CLB was 8.2 years (range, 0.5-26.5 years). No difference in incidence of CLB was demonstrated in patients with primary invasive carcinoma vs. DCIS (p = 0.84). The majority of patients (83%) developing CLB tumors developed invasive disease. The risk of developing an invasive CLB did not differ significantly for patients with DCIS vs. those with primary invasive carcinoma (p = 0.20). The method of detection of the primary tumor (mammography vs. physical examination) was not predictive of detection of the CLB (p = 0.20). Finally, the location of CLB tumors was not affected by that of prior tumors (p 0.82). Conclusions: The risk of development of CLB persists for at least 20 years after treatment for early-stage breast cancer. CLB tumors are frequently invasive, and their location is not influenced by location of prior tumors. Mammography and physical examination remain essential after BCT for detection of a contralateral breast cancer, regardless of the method of detection of the primary tumor.

  20. Outcomes in Black Patients With Early Breast Cancer Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, Michael A.; Mell, Loren K.; Hasselle, Michael D.; Karrison, Theodore G.; MacDermed, Dhara; Meriwether, Amber; Witt, Mary Ellyn; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Chmura, Steven J.

    2011-02-01

    Background: The race-specific impact of prognostic variables for early breast cancer is unknown for black patients undergoing breast conservation. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study of 1,231 consecutive patients {>=}40 years of age with Stage I-II invasive breast cancer treated with lumpectomy and radiation therapy at the University of Chicago Hospitals and affiliates between 1986 and 2004. Patients were classified as either black or nonblack. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model the effects of known prognostic factors and interactions with race. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 82 months. Thirty-four percent of patients were black, and 66% were nonblack (Caucasian, Hispanic, and Asian). Black patients had a poorer 10-year overall survival (64.6% vs. 80.8%; adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-2.06) and 10-year disease-free survival (58.1% vs. 75.4%; HR 1.49; 95% CI, 1.18-1.89) compared with nonblack patients. Tumor sizes were similar between nonblack and black patients with mammographically detected tumors (1.29 cm vs. 1.20 cm, p = 0.20, respectively). Tumor size was significantly associated with overall survival (HR 1.48; 95% CI, 1.12-1.96) in black patients with mammographically detected tumors but not in nonblack patients (HR 1.09; 95% CI, 0.78-1.53), suggesting that survival in black patients depends more strongly on tumor size in this subgroup. Tests for race-size method of detection interactions were statistically significant for overall survival (p = 0.049), locoregional control (p = 0.036), and distant control (p = 0.032) and borderline significant for disease-free survival (p = 0.067). Conclusion: Despite detection at comparable sizes, the prognostic effect of tumor size in patients with mammographically detected tumors is greater for black than in nonblack patients.

  1. The role of specimen radiography in breast-conserving therapy of ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Lange, M; Reimer, T; Hartmann, S; Glass, Ä; Stachs, A

    2016-04-01

    To assess the role of intraoperative specimen radiography (SR) and to define risk factors for positive margins in breast-conserving therapy (BCT) of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). In a retrospective study in calcification-associated DCIS treated with BCT between January 2009 and December 2011, digital mammographs and SR were reviewed and radiological margin width was determined. Clinical, radiological, and histological data were correlated with surgical histological data, and a histologically free margin of at least 2 mm was taken as evidence of successful BCT. 47/91 patients (51.6%) fulfilling the inclusion criteria had histologically involved surgical margins. Univariate analyses revealed DCIS size, mammographic extension of calcification, presence of comedo necrosis, negative progesterone receptor status, and a small radiological margin on SR to be risk factors for unsuccessful BCT. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis showed a radiological margin width of 4 mm to be optimal, with a sensitivity of 72.3% and specificity of 52.3%. The likelihood of surgical free margins was increased 2.9-fold with a radiological margin width ≥4 mm. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, only histological DCIS size >20 mm clearly emerged as an independent predictive factor for surgically involved margins (p < 0.001), while an SR margin <4 mm trended toward significance (p = 0.066). SR is a reliable method for predicting free surgical margins in non-invasive breast cancer where a minimum radiological free margin of 4 Fmm is achieved. However, histological DCIS size remains the most important factor determining successful BCT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Breast conservation therapy without capsular contracture in young augmented women using interstitial brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe a breast-conserving technique using interstitial brachytherapy after lumpectomy and axillary nodal sampling in selected women who are diagnosed with breast cancer in the presence of augmentation mammoplasty. Material and methods Over the past 20 years, we have developed and improved a technique of “pinch view” image-guided catheter insertion that avoids implant puncture. Selection criteria include: 1) women of any age with either subpectoral or retroglandular, augmentation implants (silicone or saline) who were diagnosed with stages Tis, T1, T2, N0, or N1 breast cancer; 2) any pathologic subtype of malignant breast cancer was accepted; 3) microscopic tumor extent ≤ 3 cm; 4) axillary node negative or metastasis to 1 to 3 nodes without extracapsular extension; and 5) surgical margins clear by the NSABP “no ink on tumor” definition. More than 250 women have been successfully treated. Patients were treated with high dose rate Iridium-192 brachytherapy to 34 Gy in 10 or 32 Gy in 8 twice daily fractions. The target volume was the surgical cavity edge with 1.5 to 2 cm margin using 3-D treatment planning systems. Results The implant technique as currently employed is described. There have been no implant ruptures, and the Planning Treatment Volume (PTV-eval) exhibited at least 90% coverage by the 90% isodose line in the vast majority of cases. Dose Homogeneity Index exceeded 70% in most cases. The maximum skin dose was below the prescription dose in every case. Other than some patients with pre-existing capsular contracture, less than 5% experience new capsular contracture after interstitial brachytherapy. Conclusions A technique of reliable and reproducible accelerated partial breast irradiation is described that minimizes the risk of capsular contracture by avoiding circumferential dose to the foreign body in the breast. PMID:25097566

  3. Pattern of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jobsen, Jan; Palen, Job van der; Riemersma, Sietske; Heijmans, Harald; Ong, Francisca; Struikmans, Henk

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze the incidence and prognostic factors of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in a large, population-based, single-center study with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 3595 cases in which BCT was performed in 3824 women with stage I or II breast cancer. The incidence of IBTR was analyzed over time and was based on IBTR as first event. Results: The 15-year local relapse-free survival was 90.9%. The hazard estimates for IBTR showed a time course with 2 peaks, the first at approximately 5 years and the second, twice as high, at 12 years. Stratifying subjects by age and margin status showed that, for women ≤40 years old with negative margins, adjuvant systemic therapy led to a 5-fold reduced risk of recurrence compared to none, and the presence of lymph vascular space invasion (LVSI) had a 3-fold increased risk compared to its absence. For women >40 years old, the presence of LVSI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.5) and the presence of lobular carcinoma in situ in the lumpectomy specimen (HR 2.3) were the only 2 risk factors. Conclusions: We demonstrated a pattern in risk of IBTR over time, with 2 peaks, first at approximately 5 years and a second, much higher peak at approximately 12 years, especially for women ≤40 years old. For women ≤40 years old with tumor-free resection margins, we noted that the absence of adjuvant systemic therapy and the presence of LVSI were independent prognostic factors of IBTR. For women >40 years old, the presence of LVSI and the presence of lobular carcinoma in situ were independent risk factors.

  4. Does Axillary Boost Increase Lymphedema Compared With Supraclavicular Radiation Alone After Breast Conservation?

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Shelly B. Freedman, Gary M.; Li Tianyu; Anderson, Penny R.; Ross, Eric

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To determine independent predictors of lymphedema (LE) after breast radiotherapy and to quantify added risks of LE from regional node irradiation (RNI). Materials and Methods: A total of 2,579 women with T1-2, N 0-3, M0 breast cancer treated with breast conservation between 1970 and 2005 were studied. A total of 2,169 patients (84%) received radiation to the breast (B), 226 (8.8%) to the breast and supraclavicular LNs (B+SC), and 184 (7.1%) to the breast, supraclavicular LNs, and a posterior axillary boost (B+SC+PAB). Median follow-up was 81 months (range, 3-271). Results: Eighteen percent of patients developed LE. LE risks were as follows: 16% (B), 23% (B+SC), and 31% (B+SC+PAB) (p < 0.0001). LE severity was greater in patients who had RNI (p = 0.0002). On multivariate analysis, RT field (p < 0.0001), obesity index (p = 0.0157), systemic therapy (p = 0.0013), and number of LNs dissected (p < 0.0001) independently predicted for LE. In N1 patients, the addition of a SC to tangents (p < 0.0001) and the addition of a PAB to tangents (p = 0.0017) conferred greater risks of LE, but adding a PAB to B+SC RT did not (p = 0.8002). In the N2 patients, adding a PAB increased the risk of LE 4.5-fold over B+SC RT (p = 0.0011). Conclusions: LE predictors included number of LNs dissected, RNI, obesity index, and systemic therapy. LE risk increased when a SC or PAB were added in the N1 subgroup. In the N2 patients, a PAB increased the risk over B+SC. The decision to boost the axilla must be weighed against the increased risk of LE that it imposes.

  5. Breast conservation therapy in patients with stage T1-T2 breast cancer: current challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Perez, Carlos A

    2010-10-01

    Despite the fact that breast conservation therapy has been established as an effective treatment, a number of issues and controversies currently surround the application of this treatment for patients with stage T1 and T2 breast cancer. Records of patients with histologically confirmed stage T1 (n = 1172) and stage T2 (n = 349) breast cancer, treated with wide local tumor excision and whole breast irradiation between January 1970 and December 2000, were prospectively registered on our database. Median follow-up was 6.6 years. Numerous publications addressing issues to be reviewed were collected, and data and prevailing controversies are discussed. The 10-year actuarial incidence of ipsilateral breast relapse was 7% for T1 and 11% for T2 tumors. Results with breast conservation therapy were equivalent in white or black women with T1 or T2 tumors. In patients younger than 40 years, incidence of failures was 10% for T1 (in contrast to 4% for other age groups) and 15% for T2 lesions (in contrast to 6% in other groups). The incidence of ipsilateral recurrences in women younger than 40 years was, for T1 tumors, 9% with negative surgical margins and 12% with close or positive margins and for T2 tumors 12% and 22%, respectively (difference not statistically significant). Use of breast-conserving surgical therapy should be optimized to enhance therapeutic outcome. Many developments in the oncological field and refinements in treatment planning and delivery of radiation therapy provide unique opportunities for the radiation oncologist to continue to play an integral role in the management of patients with breast cancer.

  6. Partial mastectomy and m. latissimus dorsi reconstruction for radiation-induced fibrosis after breast-conserving cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    van Geel, Albertus N; Lans, Titia E; Haen, Roel; Tjong Joe Wai, Rudi; Menke-Pluijmers, Marian B E

    2011-03-01

    Patients with severe complaints of radiation-induced fibrosis after breast-conserving therapy and not responding to conservative therapy, were treated by partial mastectomy and m. latissimus dorsi reconstruction. To determine the feasibility and outcome of this approach, a retrospective study of nine patients was carried out. After a mean follow-up of 46 months, eight of the nine patients experienced improvement of their complaints and shape of the breast. In only one case did the procedure fail, as evidenced by continuation of all complaints. Partial mastectomy and m. latissimus dorsi reconstruction is the ultimate option in the treatment of radiation fibrosis. The procedure is safe with satisfying results.

  7. Mammographic compression after breast conserving therapy: Controlling pressure instead of force

    SciTech Connect

    Groot, J. E. de Branderhorst, W.; Grimbergen, C. A.; Broeders, M. J. M.; Heeten, G. J. den

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: X-ray mammography is the primary tool for early detection of breast cancer and for follow-up after breast conserving therapy (BCT). BCT-treated breasts are smaller, less elastic, and more sensitive to pain. Instead of the current force-controlled approach of applying the same force to each breast, pressure-controlled protocols aim to improve standardization in terms of physiology by taking breast contact area and inelasticity into account. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential for pressure protocols to reduce discomfort and pain, particularly the number of severe pain complaints for BCT-treated breasts. Methods: A prospective observational study including 58 women having one BCT-treated breast and one untreated nonsymptomatic breast, following our hospital's 18 decanewton (daN) compression protocol was performed. Breast thickness, applied force, contact area, mean pressure, breast volume, and inelasticity (mean E-modulus) were statistically compared between the within-women breast pairs, and data were used as predictors for severe pain, i.e., scores 7 and higher on an 11-point Numerical Rating Scale. Curve-fitting models were used to estimate how pressure-controlled protocols affect breast thickness, compression force, and pain experience. Results: BCT-treated breasts had on average 27% smaller contact areas, 30% lower elasticity, and 30% higher pain scores than untreated breasts (allp < 0.001). Contact area was the strongest predictor for severe pain (p < 0.01). Since BCT-treatment is associated with an average 0.36 dm{sup 2} decrease in contact area, as well as increased pain sensitivity, BCT-breasts had on average 5.3 times higher odds for severe pain than untreated breasts. Model estimations for a pressure-controlled protocol with a 10 kPa target pressure, which is below normal arterial pressure, suggest an average 26% (range 10%–36%) reduction in pain score, and an average 77% (range 46%–95%) reduction of the odds for severe pain

  8. Age, breast cancer subtype approximation, and local recurrence after breast-conserving therapy.

    PubMed

    Arvold, Nils D; Taghian, Alphonse G; Niemierko, Andrzej; Abi Raad, Rita F; Sreedhara, Meera; Nguyen, Paul L; Bellon, Jennifer R; Wong, Julia S; Smith, Barbara L; Harris, Jay R

    2011-10-10

    Prior results of breast-conserving therapy (BCT) have shown substantial rates of local recurrence (LR) in young patients with breast cancer (BC). We studied 1,434 consecutive patients with invasive BC who received BCT from December 1997 to July 2006. Ninety-one percent received adjuvant systemic therapy; no patients received trastuzumab. Five BC subtypes were approximated: estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) positive, HER2 negative, and grades 1 to 2 (ie, luminal A); ER positive or PR positive, HER2 negative, and grade 3 (ie, luminal B); ER or PR positive, and HER2 positive (ie, luminal HER2); ER negative, PR negative, and HER2 positive (ie, HER2); and ER negative, PR negative, and HER2 negative (ie, triple negative). Actuarial rates of LR were calculated by using the Kaplan-Meier method. Median follow-up was 85 months. Overall 5-year cumulative incidence of LR was 2.1% (95% CI, 1.4% to 3.0%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of LR was 5.0% (95% CI, 3.0% to 8.3%) for age quartile 23 to 46 years; 2.2% (95% CI, 1.0% to 4.6%) for ages 47 to 54 years; 0.9% (95% CI, 0.3% to 2.6%) for ages 55 to 63 years; and 0.6% (95% CI, 0.1% to 2.2%) for ages 64 to 88 years. The 5-year cumulative incidence of LR was 0.8% (95% CI, 0.4% to 1.8%) for luminal A; 2.3% (95% CI, 0.8% to 5.9%) for luminal B; 1.1% (95% CI, 0.2% 7.4%) for luminal HER2; 10.8% (95% CI, 4.6% to 24.4%) for HER2; and 6.7% (95% CI, 3.6% to 12.2%) for triple negative. On multivariable analysis, increasing age was associated with decreased risk of LR (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.94 to 0.99; P = .009). In the era of systemic therapy and BC subtyping, age remains an independent prognostic factor after BCT. However, the risk of LR for young women appears acceptably low.

  9. Brain metastases after breast-conserving therapy and systemic therapy: incidence and characteristics by biologic subtype.

    PubMed

    Arvold, Nils D; Oh, Kevin S; Niemierko, Andrzej; Taghian, Alphonse G; Lin, Nancy U; Abi-Raad, Rita F; Sreedhara, Meera; Harris, Jay R; Alexander, Brian M

    2012-11-01

    The characteristics of brain metastases (BM) that develop after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) for early-stage breast cancer (BC) remain incompletely defined. We examined 1,434 consecutive patients with stage I/II invasive BC who received BCT from 1997 to 2006, 91 % of whom received adjuvant systemic therapy, according to BC subtype. Median follow-up was 85 months. Overall 5-year cumulative incidence of BM was 1.7 %; 0.1 % for luminal A, 3.3 % for luminal B, 3.2 % for luminal-HER2, 3.7 % for HER2, and 7.4 % for triple negative (TN). Women who developed BM were more likely at BC diagnosis to be younger (P < .0001) and have node-positive (P < .0001), grade 3 (P < .0001), hormone receptor-negative (P = .006), and HER2-positive (P = .01) tumors. Median time from BC diagnosis to BM was 51.4 months (range, 7.6-108 months), which was longer among luminal versus non-luminal subtypes (P = .0002; median, 61.4 vs. 34.5 months). Thirty-four percent of patients who developed distant metastases (DM) eventually developed BM. Median time from DM to BM was 12.8 months but varied by subtype, including 7.4 months for TN, 9.6 months for luminal B, and 27.1 months for HER2. Eighty-one percent of all BM patients presented with neurologic symptoms. Median number of BM at diagnosis was two, and median BM size was 15 mm, with TN (27 mm) and luminal B (16 mm) exhibiting the largest median sizes. In conclusion, the risk of BM after BCT varies significantly by subtype. Given the large size and symptomatic presentation among luminal B and TN subtypes, earlier BM detection might improve quality of life or increase eligibility for non-invasive treatments including stereotactic radiosurgery. Women with DM from these two BC subtypes have a high incidence of BM with a short latency, suggesting an ideal target population for trials evaluating the utility of MRI screening.

  10. The Role of Oncoplastic Breast Surgery in Breast Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Emiroğlu, Mustafa; Sert, İsmail; İnal, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to discuss indications, advantages, disadvantages, oncologic and aesthetic results of Oncoplastic Surgery (OBS). Pubmed and Medline database were searched for articles published between 1998 and 2014 for keywords: oncoplastic breast surgery, therapeutic mammoplasty, oncoplastic breast reduction, synchrenous reconstructions. Role of OBS in breast cancer surgery, its aspects to be considered, its value and results have been interpreted. This technique has advantages by providing more extensive tumourectomy, yielding better aesthetic results compared with breast conserving surgery, allowing oncoplastic reduction in breast cancer patients with macromastia, with higher patient satisfaction and quality of life and by being inexpensive due to single session practice. As for its disadvantages are: re-excision is more difficult, risk for mastectomy is higher, it is depent on the Surgeron’s experience, it has a risk for delay in adjuvant therapies and its requirement for additional imaging studies during management. Main indications are patients with small tumour/breast volume, macromastia, multifocality, procedures which can disrupt breast cosmesis such as surgeries for upper inner breas tquadrient tumours. Contraindications are positive margin problems after wide excision, diffuse malign microcalsifications, inflammatory breast cancer, history of radiotherapy and patients’ preferences. Despite low evidence level, Oncoplastic Breast Surgery seems to be both reliable and acceptable in terms of oncologic and aesthetic aspects. Oncoplastic Breast Surgery increase the application rate of breast conserving surgery by obviating practical limitations and improve the results of breast conserving surgery. Correct patient and technique choice in OBS is vital for optimization of post surgical

  11. Factors associated with local recurrence and cause-specific survival in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast treated with breast-conserving therapy or mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Kestin, Larry; Go, Nel; Krauss, Daniel; Chen, Peter; Goldstein, Neal; Martinez, Alvaro; Vicini, Frank A. . E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast to determine risk factors for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and cause-specific survival (CSS) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) or mastectomy. Materials and Methods: Between 1981 and 1999, 410 cases of DCIS (405 patients) were treated at our institution; 367 were managed with breast-conserving surgery (54 with lumpectomy alone and 313 with adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) [median dose, 45 Gy]). Of these 313 patients, 298 received also a supplemental boost of RT to the lumpectomy cavity (median dose, 16 Gy). Forty-three patients underwent mastectomy; 2 (5%) received adjuvant RT to the chest wall. A true recurrence/marginal miss (TR/MM) IBTR was defined as failure within or adjacent to the tumor bed in patients undergoing BCT. Median follow-up for all patients was 7 years (mean: 6.1 years). Results: Thirty patients (8.2%) experienced an IBTR after BCT (25 [8%] after RT, 5 [9.3%] after no RT), and 2 patients (4.7%) developed a chest wall recurrence after mastectomy. Of the 32 local failures, 20 (63%) were invasive (18/30 [60%] after BCT and 2/2 [100%] after mastectomy), and 37% were DCIS alone. Twenty-four (80%) of the IBTRs were classified as TR/MM. The 10-year freedom from local failure, CSS, and overall survival after BCT or mastectomy were 89% vs. 90% (p = 0.4), 98% vs. 100% (p = 0.7), and 89% vs. 100% (p = 0.3), respectively. Factors associated with IBTR on Cox multivariate analysis were younger age (p = 0.02, hazard ratio [HR] 1.06 per year), electron boost energy {<=}9 MeV (p = 0.03, HR 1.41), final margins {<=}2 mm (p = 0.007; HR, 3.65), and no breast radiation (p = 0.002, HR 5.56). On Cox univariate analysis for BCT patients, IBTR, TR/MM failures, and predominant nuclear Grade 3 were associated with an increased risk of distant metastases and a reduced CSS. Conclusions: After treatment for DCIS, 10-year rates of local control

  12. Breast-conserving therapy in patients with bilateral breast cancer: Do today's treatment choices burn bridges for tomorrow?

    SciTech Connect

    Gilroy, Jeffrey S.; Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, Nancy Price . E-mail: mendenan@shands.ufl.edu

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: To determine how often initial treatment choices limit treatment options for subsequent breast cancer management in patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy (BCT), in particular with treatment of internal mammary nodes. Methods and Materials: Between January 1985 and June 2001, 464 women with pathologic Stage 0, I, and II (T0-2, N0-1) breast cancer underwent BCT at our institution. All 464 patients had computed tomography-based treatment planning. In patients with bilateral breast cancer, the planning computed tomography scans were used to determine the impact initial radiation therapy fields had on treatment options for subsequent contralateral breast cancer. Results: There were 500 breast cancers diagnosed in 464 patients. Thirty-six patients (8%) had bilateral breast cancer with 9 (2%) synchronous and 27 (6%) metachronous primaries. In 80 patients, the ipsilateral internal mammary nodes were explicitly treated. Initial breast cancer treatment choices impacted subsequent treatment decisions for the contralateral breast in only 2 of 464 patients (0.4%) in the study: 2 of 80 patients (2.5%) whose internal mammary nodes were treated, and 2 of 27 patients (7.4%) who developed metachronous bilateral breast cancer. Conclusions: Initial BCT, including internal mammary node irradiation, rarely compromised future contralateral breast-conserving therapy.

  13. Autologous breast reconstruction with endoscopic latissimus dorsi musculosubcutaneous flaps in patients choosing breast-conserving therapy: mammographic appearance.

    PubMed

    Monticciolo, D L; Ross, D; Bostwick, J; Eaves, F; Styblo, T

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this study was to define and evaluate mammographic changes in patients treated with breast-conserving therapy and a new reconstructive technique that uses autologous tissue from a latissimus dorsi musculosubcutaneous flap. Of 20 patients who underwent either immediate or delayed endoscopic latissimus dorsi muscle flap reconstruction after lumpectomy, 13 also had postsurgery mammograms available for review. Radiographic findings assessed included skin thickening, density or radiolucency at the reconstruction site, density around the flap, fat necrosis, calcifications, and the presence of surgical clips. Mammograms for three patients (23%) revealed thickening that we believed was attributable to radiation therapy. No patient had increased density in the flap itself; all flaps were relatively radiolucent centrally (13/13; 100%). Mammograms revealed density around the rim of the flap in four patients (31%). This density was most likely secondary to latissimus dorsi muscle fibers and did not limit radiographic evaluation. One patient had calcifications, probably secondary to fat necrosis. No oil cysts were seen. In the majority of patients (11/13; 85%), surgical clips were visible. Endoscopic latissimus dorsi muscle flap reconstruction, previously used only for mastectomy patients, is now being used for improved esthetic outcome in selected patients who desire breast conservation. Our results indicate that the mammographic findings are predictable. The most common findings are relative radiolucency centrally, with or without density from muscle fibers around the edges of the area of tissue transfer. The transplanted musculosubcutaneous flap does not interfere with mammographic evaluation.

  14. Utilization of breast conserving therapy in stages 0, I, and II breast cancer patients in New Jersey: an American College of Surgeons National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) analysis.

    PubMed

    Daroui, Parima; Gabel, Molly; Khan, Atif J; Haffty, Bruce G; Goyal, Sharad

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the use of breast conservation surgery (BCS) followed by whole breast irradiation [BCS+radiation therapy (RT)] in stages 0, I, and II breast cancer patients treated in New Jersey using the National Cancer Database. A retrospective analysis was conducted using the data from 13 hospitals in New Jersey certified by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer and members of the Cancer Institute of New Jersey's Network affiliates. Subjects with a first primary malignancy of the breast (stages 0, I, and II) treated from 2000 to 2006 were included in the analysis. A total of 11,146 patients with stage 0 (n=2843), stage I (n=4757), and stage II (n=3546) were treated for their breast cancer. Of stage 0, I, and II patients, 72% (n=2053), 73% (n=3482), and 53% (n=1865) received BCS, respectively. Of these patients, 40% (n=826), 67.6% (n=2353), and 63% (n=1177) received adjuvant RT after BCS for their stages 0, I, and II, respectively. Use of BCS+RT was equivalent across racial groups and all ages, except patients above 70 years of age (61% <40 y, 57% 40 to 49 y, 60% 50 to 59 y, 65% 60 to 69 y, and 51% >70 y). These data report an underutilization of RT after BCS in patients with stage 0 breast cancer treated across 13 hospitals in New Jersey. The Commission on Cancer's Rapid Quality Reporting System may be one method of identifying groups of patients not receiving care according to evidence-based guidelines.

  15. [Quality of case allocation of orthopedics and trauma surgery in the 2004 and 2014 versions of the German DRG system. An interim assessment of the development process].

    PubMed

    Franz, D; Schemmann, F; Selter, D D; Auhuber, T; Gehweiler, D; Roeder, N; Siebert, H; Mahlke, L

    2014-10-01

    Since 2004 the German diagnosis-related groups (DRG) system has been applied nationwide in all German somatic hospitals. The G-DRG system is updated annually in order to increase the quality of case allocation. What developments have occurred since 2004 from the perspective of orthopedics and trauma surgery? This article takes stock of the developments between 2004 and 2014. Analysis of relevant diagnoses, medical procedures and G-DRGs in the versions 2004 and 2014 based on the publications of the German DRG Institute (InEK) and the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI). The number of G-DRGs in the whole system increased by 45.1 % between 2004 and 2014. The number of G-DRGs in the major diagnostic category (MDC) 08 that contains the majority of orthopedic and trauma surgery categories increased in the same period by 61.6 %. The reduction of variance of inlier costs in the MDC 08 category, a statistical measure of the performance of the G-DRG system, was below the corresponding value of the total system in 2004 as well in 2014. However, the reduction of variance of inlier costs in MDC 08 (+ 30.0 %) rose more from 2004 to 2014 than the corresponding value of the overall system (+ 21.5 %). Many modifications of the classification systems of diagnoses (ICD-10-GM) and medical procedures (OPS) and the structures of the G-DRG system could significantly improve the quality of case allocation from the perspective of orthopedics and trauma surgery between 2004 and 2014. Th assignment of cases could be differentiated so that complex cases with more utilization of resources were allocated to higher rated G-DRGs and vice versa. However, further improvements of the G-DRG system are necessary. Only correct and complete documentation and coding can provide a high quality of calculation of costs as a basis for a correct case allocation in future G-DRG systems.

  16. External beam boost versus interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost in the adjuvant radiotherapy following breast-conserving therapy in early-stage breast cancer: a dosimetric comparison

    PubMed Central

    Melchert, Corinna; Kovács, György

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to compare the dosimetric data of local tumor's bed dose escalation (boost) with photon beams (external beam radiation therapy – EBRT) versus high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-BT) after breast-conserving treatment in women with early-stage breast cancer. Material and methods We analyzed the treatment planning data of 136 irradiated patients, treated between 2006 and 2013, who underwent breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation (WBI; 50.4 Gy) and boost (HDR-BT: 10 Gy in one fraction [n = 36]; EBRT: 10 Gy in five fractions [n = 100]). Organs at risk (OAR; heart, ipsilateral lung, skin, most exposed rib segment) were delineated. Dosimetric parameters were calculated with the aid of dose-volume histograms (DVH). A non-parametric test was performed to compare the two different boost forms. Results There was no difference for left-sided cancers regarding the maximum dose to the heart (HDR-BT 29.8% vs. EBRT 29.95%, p = 0.34). The maximum doses to the other OAR were significantly lower for HDR-BT (Dmax lung 47.12% vs. 87.7%, p < 0.01; rib 61.17% vs. 98.5%, p < 0.01; skin 57.1% vs. 94.75%, p < 0.01; in the case of right-sided breast irradiation, dose of the heart 6.00% vs. 16.75%, p < 0.01). Conclusions Compared to EBRT, local dose escalation with HDR-BT presented a significant dose reduction to the investigated OAR. Only left-sided irradiation showed no difference regarding the maximum dose to the heart. Reducing irradiation exposure to OAR could result in a reduction of long-term side effects. Therefore, from a dosimetric point of view, an interstitial boost complementary to WBI via EBRT seems to be more advantageous in the adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer. PMID:27648082

  17. No impact of breast magnetic resonance imaging on 15-year outcomes in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ or early-stage invasive breast cancer managed with breast conservation therapy.

    PubMed

    Vapiwala, Neha; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Kushner, Carolyn J; Schnall, Mitchell D; Freedman, Gary M; Solin, Lawrence J

    2017-04-15

    For women undergoing breast conservation therapy (BCT), the added value of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the time of initial diagnosis remains controversial. The current study was performed to determine long-term outcomes after BCT for women with and without pretreatment breast MRI. Between 1992 and 2001, a total of 755 women with ductal carcinoma in situ or early-stage invasive breast cancer underwent breast-conserving surgery (with axillary lymph node staging for invasive carcinoma) followed by definitive breast radiotherapy. Evaluation at the time of the initial diagnosis included conventional mammography in all subjects and breast MRI in 215 women (28%). Clinical, pathologic, and treatment characteristics were comparable for patients with and without breast MRI. Outcomes were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank method. At a median follow-up of 13.8 years, there were 49 local failures (15 women with and 34 women without breast MRI, respectively). The 15-year local failure rates were 8% for women with and 8% for women without MRI (P = .59). There also were no differences noted between women with and without breast MRI with regard to 15-year rates of overall survival (77% vs 71%; P = .24), freedom from distant metastases (86% vs 90%; P = .08), and contralateral breast cancer (10% vs 8%; P = .10). Multivariate analysis demonstrated no significant impact of breast MRI on local failure (P = .96). Breast MRI during the initial evaluation for BCT appears to have no significant impact on 15-year rates for local control, overall survival, freedom from distant metastases, or contralateral breast cancer. The routine use of pretreatment breast MRI is not indicated for patients undergoing BCT. Cancer 2017;123:1324-1332. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  18. Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... pleasing to the person than it was originally. Anesthesia Because surgery is typically painful, it is almost ... three types of anesthesia: Local Regional General Local anesthesia and regional anesthesia These types of anesthesia consist ...

  19. Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary disease (COPD) includes two separate lung problems, emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Some people with COPD have ... improve breathing. The surgery takes care of the emphysema component of COPD. Not everyone is a candidate ...

  20. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  1. Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Five-year Results of 100 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Formenti, Silvia C.; Hsu, Howard; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Roses, Daniel; Guth, Amber; Jozsef, Gabor; Goldberg, Judith D.; DeWyngaert, J. Keith

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a prospective trial of three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation in the prone position. Methods and Materials: Postmenopausal patients with Stage I breast cancer with nonpalpable tumors <2 cm, negative margins and negative nodes, positive hormone receptors, and no extensive intraductal component were eligible. The trial was offered only after eligible patients had refused to undergo standard whole-breast radiotherapy. Patients were simulated and treated on a dedicated table for prone setup. 3D-CRT was delivered at a dose of 30 Gy in five 6-Gy/day fractions over 10 days with port film verification at each treatment. Rates of ipsilateral breast failure, ipsilateral nodal failure, contralateral breast failure, and distant failure were estimated using the cumulative incidence method. Rates of disease-free, overall, and cancer-specific survival were recorded. Results: One hundred patients were enrolled in this institutional review board-approved prospective trial, one with bilateral breast cancer. One patient withdrew consent after simulation, and another patient elected to interrupt radiotherapy after receiving two treatments. Ninety-eight patients were evaluable for toxicity, and, in 1 case, both breasts were treated with partial breast irradiation. Median patient age was 68 years (range, 53-88 years); in 55% of patients the tumor size was <1 cm. All patients had hormone receptor-positive cancers: 87% of patients underwent adjuvant antihormone therapy. At a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 2-125 months), there was one local recurrence (1% ipsilateral breast failure) and one contralateral breast cancer (1% contralateral breast failure). There were no deaths due to breast cancer by 5 years. Grade 3 late toxicities occurred in 2 patients (one breast edema, one transient breast pain). Cosmesis was rated good/excellent in 89% of patients with at least 36 months follow-up. Conclusions: Five-year efficacy and toxicity of 3D-CRT delivered in prone partial breast irradiation are comparable to other experiences with similar follow-up.

  2. Practice patterns and perceptions of margin status for breast conserving surgery for breast carcinoma: National Survey of Canadian General Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Lovrics, Peter J; Gordon, Maggie; Cornacchi, Sylvie D; Farrokhyar, Forough; Ramsaroop, Amanda; Hodgson, Nicole; Quan, May Lynn; Wright, Francis; Porter, Geoffrey

    2012-12-01

    We surveyed Canadian General Surgeons to examine decision-making in early stage breast cancer. A modified Dillman Method was used for this mail survey of 1443 surgeons. Practice patterns and factors that influence management choices for: preoperative assessment, definition of margin status, surgical techniques and recommendations for re-excision were assessed. The response rate was 51% with 41% treating breast cancer. Most (80%) were community surgeons, with equal distribution of low/medium/high volume and years of practice categories. Approximately 25% of surgeons "sometimes or frequently" performed diagnostic excisional biopsies while 90% report "frequently" or "always" performing preoperative core biopsies. There was marked variation in defining negative and close margins, in the use of intra-operative margin assessment techniques and recommendations for re-excision. Responses revealed significant variation in attitudes and practices. These findings likely reflect an absence of consensus in the literature and potential gaps between best evidence and practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Importance of Systemic Therapy in Minimizing Local Recurrence after Breast-Conserving Surgery: The NSABP Experience

    PubMed Central

    Mamounas, Eleftherios P.; Tang, Gong; Liu, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Adjuvant systemic therapy significantly reduces rates of distant recurrence and death. The effect of systemic therapy is not limited to reducing distant recurrences but also extends to reducing loco-regional recurrences, and rates of loco-regional recurrence have steadily declined over the past 25 years. This review focuses on the effect of adjuvant systemic therapy on rates of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence following lumpectomy plus breast irradiation in several pivotal NSABP trials in early-stage breast cancer. PMID:24729388

  4. Genetic Influence on Toxicity and Prognosis in Women Treated with Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    repair genes, e.g. XRCC1, XRCC2, XRCC3 , XPD, APE] Genotyping has been completed for genetic polymorphisms in the following genes that confer reduced...protection from ROS damage: MnSOD, GPX], CAT, GSTT], GSTM], GSTA1, GSTPJ, and in DNA repair genes: XRCC], XRCC2, XRCC3 , NBS1, XPD, APE], and cell cycle...0.54 0.83 (0.40-1.70) 0.60 XRCC3 C 524 83 1.00 1.00 Thr241Met T 364 69 1.22 (0.89-1.69) 0.22 1.15 (0.83-1.59) 0.39 C18067T CC 156 (35.14) 21 1.00

  5. Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy as adjuvant regimen after conserving surgery for early breast cancer: interim report of toxicity after a minimum follow up of 3 years

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Accelerated hypofractionation is an attractive approach for adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy. In this study we evaluated the adverse effects at least 3 years post an accelerated hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy schedule. Methods From October 2004 to March 2006, 39 consecutive patients aged over 18 years with pTis, pT1-2, pN0-1 breast adenocarcinoma who underwent conservative surgery were treated with an adjuvant accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule consisting of 34 Gy in 10 daily fractions over 2 weeks to the whole breast, followed after 1 week by an electron boost dose of 8 Gy in a single fraction to the tumour bed. Skin and lung radiation toxicity was evaluated daily during therapy, once a week for one month after radiotherapy completion, every 3 months for the first year and from then on every six months. In particular lung toxicity was investigated in terms of CT density evaluation, pulmonary functional tests, and clinical and radiological scoring. Paired t-test, Chi-square test and non-parametric Wilcoxon test were performed. Results After a median follow-up of 43 months (range 36-52 months), all the patients are alive and disease-free. None of the patients showed any clinical signs of lung toxicity, no CT-lung toxicity was denoted by radiologist on CT lung images acquired about 1 year post-radiotherapy, no variation of pulmonary density evaluated in terms of normalised Hounsfield numbers was evident. Barely palpable increased density of the treated breast was noted in 9 out of 39 patients (in 2 patients this toxicity was limited to the boost area) and teleangectasia (<1/cm2) limited to the boost area was evident in 2 out of 39 patients. The compliance with the treatment was excellent (100%). Conclusion The radiotherapy schedule investigated in this study (i.e 34 Gy in 3.4 Gy/fr plus boost dose of 8 Gy in single fraction) is a feasible and safe treatment and does not lead to adjunctive acute and late toxicities. A longer

  6. Understanding Women’s Choice of Mastectomy Versus Breast Conserving Therapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jeffrey; Groot, Gary; Holtslander, Lorraine; Engler-Stringer, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To identify factors that influence Saskatchewan women’s choice between breast conserving therapy (BCT) and mastectomy in early-stage breast cancer (ESBC) and to compare and contrast underlying reasons behind choice of BCT versus mastectomy. Methods: Interpretive description methods guided this practice-based qualitative study. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis and presented in thematic maps. Results: Women who chose mastectomy described 1 of the 3 main themes: worry about cancer recurrence, perceived consequences of BCT treatment, or breast-tumor size perception. In contrast, women chose BCT because of 3 different themes: mastectomy being too radical, surgeon influence, and feminine identity. Conclusions: Although individual reasons for choosing mastectomy versus BCT have been discussed in the literature before, different rationale underlying each choice has not been previously described. These results are novel in identifying interdependent subthemes and secondary reasons for each choice. This is important for increased understanding of factors influencing a complicated decision-making process. PMID:28469511

  7. Adjuvant regional irradiation after breast-conserving therapy for early stage breast cancer: a survey of canadian radiation oncologists.

    PubMed

    Clavel, S; Roy, I; Carrier, J-F; Rousseau, P; Fortin, M-A

    2010-02-01

    To document the use of adjuvant regional irradiation after breast-conserving therapy for early stage breast cancer by Canadian radiation oncologists and to identify the factors influencing their clinical decisions. We conducted a survey to assess the above aims. In April 2008, a questionnaire was sent to 167 members of the Canadian and Quebec Associations of Radiation Oncologists with interest in breast cancer management. The answers were obtained through a dedicated website, which collected the raw data collected for analysis. In total, 67 radiation oncologists completed the survey, corresponding to a 40% response rate. Most respondents were experienced and high-volume providers. We identified several areas of variation in the decision-making regarding regional lymph node irradiation after breast-conserving therapy. Regarding the decision to combine regional nodal irradiation with irradiation of the breast, the number of positive nodes after axillary dissection (1-3 vs > or =4) was a crucial determinant. For patients with between one and three positive nodes and a nodal ratio of 50%, most respondents added regional irradiation. Similarly, the same nodal ratio of 50% was the main factor for inclusion of the axillary nodal region in the radiation field. However, few radiation oncologists have chosen to include the internal mammary chain in their treatment plan. The number of positive lymph nodes, the nodal ratio, the number of lymph nodes removed and the presence of extracapsular extension were the primary self-reported factors that directed the decision to offer regional radiotherapy. This survey showed that there is a wide variation of practices among radiation oncologists in Canada. These results support the need for treatment guidelines and provide guidance on which factors should be included in a decision-making algorithm. Copyright (c) 2009 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Intel International Interim Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Wendy; Mandinach, Ellen; Kanaya, Tomoe; Culp, Katie McMillan

    2004-01-01

    This interim report presents preliminary data and observations from evaluations of Intel Teach to the Future being conducted around the world, and recommendations for building and refining this evaluation portfolio to ensure that findings will be instructive at the local, national and international level. The data presented here reflect the…

  9. Online Education Interim Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Protopsaltis, Spiros, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This interim report produced by the Colorado State Board of Education Online Education Task Force examines key issues related to online education. Task force members agree that: (1) online education has become a viable element of Colorado's public education system; (2) the role of technology in educating our children will continue to grow; and (3)…

  10. Interim Budget Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Student Financial Assistance (ED), Washington, DC.

    This report provides the interim budget plan of the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Student Financial Assistance (OSFA) for fiscal year 2000. It reviews factors influencing OSFA's budget request, including legislative requirements, recent accomplishments, the need to maintain both the Direct Loan and Federal Family Education Loan…

  11. 76 FR 4369 - Interim Deputation Agreements; Interim BIA Adult Detention Facility Guidelines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Interim Deputation Agreements; Interim BIA Adult Detention Facility Guidelines... publication of the Interim BIA Adult Detention Facility Guidelines and the Interim Model Deputation Agreements... Interim BIA Adult Detention Facility Guidelines and Interim Model Deputation Agreements are effective on...

  12. CMM Interim Check (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Montano, Joshua Daniel

    2015-03-23

    Coordinate Measuring Machines (CMM) are widely used in industry, throughout the Nuclear Weapons Complex and at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to verify part conformance to design definition. Calibration cycles for CMMs at LANL are predominantly one year in length. Unfortunately, several nonconformance reports have been generated to document the discovery of a certified machine found out of tolerance during a calibration closeout. In an effort to reduce risk to product quality two solutions were proposed – shorten the calibration cycle which could be costly, or perform an interim check to monitor the machine’s performance between cycles. The CMM interim check discussed makes use of Renishaw’s Machine Checking Gauge. This off-the-shelf product simulates a large sphere within a CMM’s measurement volume and allows for error estimation. Data was gathered, analyzed, and simulated from seven machines in seventeen different configurations to create statistical process control run charts for on-the-floor monitoring.

  13. Diagnostic Performance of and Breast Tissue Changes at Early Breast MR Imaging Surveillance in Women after Breast Conservation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jeong; Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Sung Hun; Youn, In Kyung; Baek, Ji Eun; Lee, Hyun Sil

    2017-09-01

    Purpose To investigate the diagnostic performance and tissue changes in early (1 year or less) breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging surveillance in women who underwent breast conservation therapy for breast cancer. Materials and Methods This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained. Between April 2014 and June 2016, 414 women (mean age, 51.5 years; range, 21-81 years) who underwent 422 early surveillance breast MR imaging examinations (median, 6.0 months; range, 2-12 months) after breast conservation therapy were studied. The cancer detection rate, positive predictive value of biopsy, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and area under the curve of surveillance MR imaging, mammography, and ultrasonography (US) were assessed. Follow-up was also obtained in 95 women by using positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). Background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) changes in the contralateral breast were assessed according to adjuvant therapy by using the McNemar test. Results Of 11 detected cancers, six were seen at MR imaging only, one was seen at MR imaging and mammography, two were seen at MR imaging and US, one was seen at mammography only, and one was seen at PET/CT only. Three MR imaging-depicted cancers were observed at the original tumor bed, and two MR imaging-depicted cancers were observed adjacent to the original tumor. Among two false-negative MR imaging diagnoses (two cases of ductal carcinoma in situ), one cancer had manifested as calcifications at mammography without differentiated enhancement at MR imaging, and the other cancer was detected at PET/CT, but MR imaging results were negative because of marked BPE, which resulted in focal lesion masking. The positive predictive value of biopsy and the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and area under the curve for MR imaging were 32.1% (nine of 28), 81.8% (nine of 11), 95.1% (391 of 411), 94.7% (400 of 422), and 0

  14. Early ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences after breast conservation affect survival: An analysis of the National Cancer Institute randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Joseph P.; Danforth, David N.; Albert, Paul; Sciuto, Linda C. B.S.N.; Smith, Sharon L.; Camphausen, Kevin A.; Poggi, Matthew M. . E-mail: MMPoggi@Bethesda.med.navy.mil

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast-conservation therapy (BCT) on survival. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-one women were randomized to BCT. Patients with an IBTR were analyzed to determine survival. Analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier estimates, log-rank tests, and time-dependent covariate Cox models. Results: At a median follow-up of 18.4 years, 27 patients had an IBTR. The median survival time after IBTR was 13.1 years. The 5-year survival rate was 91.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 81.5-100%). The 10-year survival rate was 54.3% (95% CI, 35.8-82.6%). According to a Cox model with time-dependent covariates, the hazard ratio or relative risk of dying for those with an IBTR at <5.3 years after BCT relative to patients without an IBTR after BCT is 1.47 (95% CI, 1.02-2.12%; p = 0.04). The hazard ratio for those who relapse after 5.3 years is 0.59 (95% CI, 0.22-1.61%; p = 0.31). Age at randomization, original tumor size, and the presence of positive regional nodes at initial presentation were not found to be associated with decreased survival. Conclusions: There seems to be a significant association of early IBTR after BCT with decreased survival. Local control should be maximized.

  15. Life quality of women with breast cancer after mastectomy or breast conserving therapy treated with adjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kamińska, Marzena; Ciszewski, Tomasz; Kukiełka-Budny, Bożena; Kubiatowski, Tomasz; Baczewska, Bożena; Makara-Studzińska, Marta; Starosławska, Elżbieta; Bojar, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant neoplasm in women. The evaluation of the quality of life has become a treatment parameter as important as survival. The aim of the study was evaluation of the quality of life among women treated for breast cancer who underwent surgical procedures using two alternative methods: mastectomy or breast conserving therapy (BCT). 85 patients treated with BCT and 94 patients who underwent mastectomy were evaluated. Standard questionnaires for the evaluation of the quality of life of cancer patients were used - QLQ-C30 (Quality of life questionnaire - core 30) with QLQ-BR23 (Breast Cancer Module). The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was also applied. Social and demographic factors (age, education, marital status) influenced the evaluation of the life quality among both groups. Obtained data was also dependent on the type of surgical procedure and chemical treatment. The level of anxiety and depression also influenced the general quality of life and was higher in women who underwent mastectomy. Quality of life plays an important role in the treatment process. Women after BCT declared a higher quality of life compared to patients after mastectomy. The process of making the decision concerning the planned surgical procedure should take into consideration the influence of the intervention on the quality of patients' future life.

  16. Results of breast conservation therapy from a single-institution community hospital in Hawaii with a predominantly Japanese population

    SciTech Connect

    Kanemori, Mark . E-mail: mtkanemori@aol.com; Prygrocki, Maria C.T.R.

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome data from breast conservation therapy performed at the Kuakini Medical Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. The remarkably low rates of recurrence found in this study prompted a review of the literature and evaluation of the prognostic factors that may explain these results. Methods and materials: The data from patients with Tis, T1 or T2 breast tumors, treated with lumpectomy and radiotherapy during the 12-year period between January 1990 and December 2001 were retrospectively reviewed and compared to results found in national publications. Results: Current follow-up data was available in 97.1% of patients who met these criteria, identifying a total of 896 patients who were analyzed in this study. With a median follow-up exceeding 6 years, the local in-breast failure rate was 0.67%. Survival data was superior to the National Cancer Data Base for each stage of disease. Conclusion: This low rate of local relapse is extraordinary and unmatched by the published results generally cited in the literature. The findings are consistent with other studies reporting unusually low rates of breast cancer recurrence in patients of Japanese ancestry.

  17. Mediators of a Brief Hypnosis Intervention to Control Side Effects in Breast Surgery Patients: Response Expectancies and Emotional Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Guy H.; Hallquist, Michael N.; Schnur, Julie B.; David, Daniel; Silverstein, Jeffrey H.; Bovbjerg, Dana H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to test the hypotheses that response expectancies and emotional distress mediate the effects of an empirically validated presurgical hypnosis intervention on postsurgical side effects (i.e., pain, nausea, and fatigue). Method: Women (n = 200) undergoing breast-conserving surgery (mean age = 48.50 years;…

  18. Mediators of a Brief Hypnosis Intervention to Control Side Effects in Breast Surgery Patients: Response Expectancies and Emotional Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Guy H.; Hallquist, Michael N.; Schnur, Julie B.; David, Daniel; Silverstein, Jeffrey H.; Bovbjerg, Dana H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to test the hypotheses that response expectancies and emotional distress mediate the effects of an empirically validated presurgical hypnosis intervention on postsurgical side effects (i.e., pain, nausea, and fatigue). Method: Women (n = 200) undergoing breast-conserving surgery (mean age = 48.50 years;…

  19. New Technologies in Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Thill, Marc; Baumann, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    Since breast-conserving surgery has become the gold standard for early breast cancer, the development of less radical or less burdensome technologies has been pressed for in order to preserve the patient from unnecessary harm through the operative procedure. Different technical approaches are under evaluation, and some of them are already being used in the clinical setting. The aim of this article is to present a perspective on future breast cancer surgery by shedding light on the current innovative and new techniques. PMID:24647775

  20. Guidance: Interim Municipal Settlement Policy

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Interim guidance and fact sheets regarding settlements involving municipalities or municipal waste under Section 122 CERCLA as amended by SARA. Interim policy sets forth the criteria by which EPA generally determines whether to exercise enforcement discretion to pursue MSW generators and transporters as PRPs.

  1. Interim Assessments: A User's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Interim assessments are hot in American schools. Also called benchmark or periodic tests, these assessments are given every four to nine weeks to check on students' progress. Although interim assessments are an important tool for school improvement, they are easy to misuse. In the author's work coaching principals in a number of districts, he has…

  2. Should adjuvant radiotherapy to the supraclavicular fossa be routinely given in patients with breast conservative treatment?

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Wei; Kuo, Wen-Hong; Chang, King-Jen; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2007-08-01

    To analyze the overall outcome, supraclavicular fossa (SCF) recurrence rate, and pattern of failure in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy excluding SCF treatment. A total of 143 patients were enrolled in the study. Ninety-two percent of patients were stages I and II, and 8% were stage III. The median age was 44 years, and 31% of patients were /= 4, and 0.8% in patients with N < 4. The 5-year SCF-recurrence-free survival in patients with N >/= 4 and N < 4 was 80% and 99%, respectively (P < 0.001). N >/= 4 was the only independent predictor for locoregional control (P = 0.045), disease-free survival (P = 0.001), and overall survival (P = 0.008) in multivariate analysis. Women with N >/= 4 have a significantly higher risk of SCF recurrence and poorer survival. The SCF might be safely spared in patients with N < 4, but should be routinely included in the radiotherapy design for those with N >/= 4.

  3. Cosmetic outcome and breast morbidity in breast-conserving treatment--results from the Danish DBCG-82TM national randomized trial in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Jørgen; Overgaard, Jens; Rose, Carsten; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Gadeberg, Carl C; Kjaer, Mogens; Kamby, Claus; Juul-Christensen, Jens; Blichert-Toft, Mogens; Overgaard, Marie

    2002-01-01

    A total of 266 recurrence-free breast cancer patients from the randomized DBCG-82TM breast conservation trial were called in for a follow-up investigation to study the impact of surgical and radiation treatment factors on the cosmetic and functional outcome after breast conservation. The patients were interviewed and examined after a median follow-up time of 6.6 years, and 194 of them (73%) regarded the cosmetic result as excellent or good. Morbidity assessments showed that breast fibrosis, skin telangiectasia, and breast retraction were significantly associated with a less satisfactory cosmetic result. On univariate analysis, it was found that treatment with a direct anterior electron field produced more morbidity and inferior cosmetic outcomes compared with tangential photon treatment, while increasing breast size was associated with increased breast retraction and breast fibrosis. Treatment characteristics that emerged as independent prognostic factors of a poor cosmetic outcome on multivariate analysis were the use of a direct anterior electron field (OR = 2.15, CI 1.25-3.70) and adjuvant systemic therapy (OR = 2.13, 1.22-3.71). A significant but relatively low level of concordance was found between the patients' and the clinician's evaluations of cosmetic results but self-assessments of breast morbidity and psychological distress were significantly related to the observed treatment-induced side effects after breast-conserving treatment, indicating that subjective perceptions and observations as reported by the patients are relevant for the identification of treatment factors that impact on normal tissue reactions.

  4. A pilot study to investigate the role of the 26S proteasome in radiotherapy resistance and loco-regional recurrence following breast conserving therapy for early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Elfadl, Dalia; Hodgkinson, Victoria C; Long, Ervine D; Scaife, Lucy; Drew, Philip J; Lind, Michael J; Cawkwell, Lynn

    2011-08-01

    Breast conserving therapy is a currently accepted method for managing patients with early stage breast cancer. However, approximately 7% of patients may develop loco-regional tumour recurrence within 5 years. We previously reported that expression of the 26S proteasome may be associated with radio-resistance. Here we aimed to analyse the 26S proteasome in a pilot series of early breast cancers and correlate the findings with loco-regional recurrence. Fourteen patients with early breast cancer who developed loco-regional recurrence within 4 years of completing breast conserving therapy were selected according to strict criteria and compared with those from 14 patients who were disease-free at 10 years. Decreased expression of the 26S proteasome was significantly associated with radio-resistance, manifested as the development of a loco-regional recurrence within 4 years of breast conserving therapy (p = 0.018). This small pilot study provides further suggestion that the 26S proteasome may be associated with response to radiotherapy.

  5. Interim storage study report

    SciTech Connect

    Rawlins, J.K.

    1998-02-01

    High-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) in the form of calcine and liquid and liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) will be processed to provide a stable waste form and prepare the waste to be transported to a permanent repository. Because a permanent repository will not be available when the waste is processed, the waste must be stored at ICPP in an Interim Storage Facility (ISF). This report documents consideration of an ISF for each of the waste processing options under consideration.

  6. 24 CFR 35.820 - Interim controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interim controls. 35.820 Section 35...-Possession Multifamily Property § 35.820 Interim controls. HUD shall conduct interim controls in accordance... accordance with § 35.815. Interim controls are considered completed when clearance is achieved in accordance...

  7. Very low local recurrence rates after breast-conserving therapy: analysis of 8485 patients treated over a 28-year period.

    PubMed

    Bosma, S C J; van der Leij, F; van Werkhoven, E; Bartelink, H; Wesseling, J; Linn, S; Rutgers, E J; van de Vijver, M J; Elkhuizen, P H M

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to study the impact of changes in clinical practice on outcome in patients treated with breast-conserving therapy (BCT) over a period of 28 years. Patients with early invasive breast cancer, who were treated with BCT at the Netherlands Cancer Institute between 1980 and 2008, were studied. Clinical characteristics, treatment and outcome were compared between groups (1980-1987; 1988-1998; 1999-2008). The main endpoint analyzed was ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). 8485 patients with a median follow-up of 9 years (IQR 6-14 years) were analyzed. The cumulative 5- and 10-year IBTR incidences were, respectively, 2 and 5 % for the whole cohort and 4 and 9 % in patients ≤40 years. Young age was a significant risk factor for IBTR in multivariable analysis. IBTR-free interval was better for patients who received a RT boost (HR 0.65) or systemic therapy (HR 0.52). In later years, patients less often received a boost and more often underwent adjuvant systemic treatment. 761 patients (9.0 %) underwent a re-excision; the tumor resection margins were tumor free for 85 %. In later years (1999-2008), 89 % of patients had a tumor-free margin. The margin status of invasive carcinoma did not influence IBTR, DM rate, or OS. Between 1980 and 2008, locoregional control after BCT remained stable with low IBTR rates, even in young patients. These good results were achieved under the policy of accepting close or focally positive margins, indicating this is a safe approach. The results of this study may help in lowering the re-excision rates, which are high in many centers.

  8. Continuing Risk of Ipsilateral Breast Relapse After Breast-Conserving Therapy at Long-Term Follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Kreike, Bas; Hart, Augustinus A.M.; Velde, Tony van de; Borger, Jacques; Peterse, Hans; Rutgers, Emiel; Bartelink, Harry; Vijver, Marc J. van de

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: Currently, the local treatment of most patients with early invasive breast cancer consists of breast-conserving therapy (BCT). We have previously reported on the risk factors for ipsilateral breast relapse (IBR) in 1,026 patients treated with BCT after a median follow-up of 5.5 years. In the present study, we evaluated the IBR incidence and the risk factors for IBR after prolonged follow-up. Methods and Materials: We updated the disease outcome for all 1,026 patients using the clinical information collected from the medical registration of The Netherlands Cancer Institute and performed step-wise proportional hazard Cox regression analysis to identify the risk factors associated with an increased risk of IBR after BCT at long-term follow-up. Results: After a median follow-up of 13.3 years, 114 patients had developed an IBR as the first event. The IBR rate was 9.3% and 13.8%, respectively, at 10 and 15 years. Also, the increase in IBR was continuous without reaching a plateau, even after 15 years. Univariate analysis showed that involved surgical resection margins, young age, vascular invasion, and the presence and quantity of an in situ component are risk factors for IBR. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor-positive surgical resection margins (hazard ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-5.2, p = 0.0002) or the presence of vascular invasion (hazard ratio, 2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.2, p = 0.004) is the major independent risk factor for IBR. Conclusions: The data from long-term follow-up showed a constant increase in IBR among patients treated by BCT, even after 15 years, without reaching a plateau. Involved surgical resection margins and vascular invasion were the most important risk factors for IBR.

  9. Axillary Dissection Can Be Avoided in the Majority of Clinically Node-Negative Patients Undergoing Breast-Conserving Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dengel, Lynn; Van Zee, Kimberly J.; King, Tari A.; Stempel, Michelle; Cody, Hiram S.; El-Tamer, Mahmoud; Gemignani, Mary L.; Sclafani, Lisa M.; Sacchini, Virgilio S.; Heerdt, Alexandra S.; Plitas, George; Junqueira, Manuela; Capko, Deborah; Patil, Sujata; Morrow, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Background or Purpose The extent to which ACOSOG Z0011 findings are applicable to patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy (BCT) is uncertain. We prospectively assessed how often axillary dissection (ALND) was avoided in an unselected, consecutive patient cohort meeting Z0011 eligibility criteria and whether subgroups requiring ALND could be identified preoperatively. Methods Patients with cT1,2cN0 breast cancer undergoing BCT were managed without ALND for metastases in <3 sentinel nodes (SNs) and no gross extracapsular extension (ECE). Patients with and without indications for ALND were compared using Fisher's exact and Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Results From 8/2010-11/2012, 2157 invasive cancer patients had BCT. 380 had histologic nodal metastasis; 93 did not meet Z0011 criteria. Of 287 with ≥1 H&E-positive SN (209 macrometastases), 242(84%) had indications for SN only. ALND was indicated in 45 for ≥3 positive SNs (n=29) or ECE (n=16). The median number of SNs removed in the SN group was 3 versus 5 in the ALND group (p<.0001). Age, hormone receptor and HER2 status, and grade did not differ between groups; tumors were larger in the ALND group (p<0.0001). 72% of ALND patients had additional positive nodes (median=1;1-19). No axillary recurrences have occurred (median follow-up, 13 months). Conclusions ALND was avoided in 84% of a consecutive series of patients having BCT, suggesting that most patients meeting ACOSOG Z0011 eligibility have a low axillary tumor burden. Age, ER, and HER2 status were not predictive of ALND, and the criteria used for ALND (≥3SNs, ECE) reliably identified patients at high risk for residual axillary disease. PMID:23975314

  10. Local Therapy in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers with Operable Breast Cancer: Comparison of Breast Conservation and Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Lori J.; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Griffith, Kent A.; Buys, Saundra; Gaffney, David K.; Moran, Meena S.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Ben-David, Merav; Kaufman, Bella; Garber, Judy E.; Merajver, Sofia D.; Balmaña, Judith; Meirovitz, Amichay; Domchek, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations have an elevated risk of breast cancer and ovarian cancer, but also of developing second primary breast cancer. BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with breast cancer must choose between breast conservation (BCT) and mastectomy (M) yet data on outcomes are limited. The purpose of this study is to compare BCT to M in BRCA1/2 carriers. Methods 655 women with BRCA1/2 mutations diagnosed with breast cancer and treated with BCT (n=302) or M (n=353) were identified and underwent follow up to assess local, regional and systemic recurrence. Results Local failure as first failure was significantly more likely in those treated with BCT compared to M, with a cumulative estimated risk of 23.5% vs. 5.5%, respectively, at 15 years (p<0.0001); 15-year estimates in carriers treated with BCT and chemotherapy was 11.9% (p=0.08 when compared to M). Most events appeared to be second primary cancers rather than failure to control the primary tumor. The risk of contralateral breast cancer was high in all groups, exceeding 40%, but was not statistically significantly different by use of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) or not, suggesting no added risk from scatter RT at 10 and 15 years. There were no differences seen in regional or systemic recurrences between the BCT and M groups, and no difference in overall survival. Conclusions BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with breast cancer have similar survivals whether treated with M or BCT. However, women undergoing BCT have an elevated risk of a second in-breast event that is significantly reduced in the presence of chemotherapy. Contralateral breast cancer events are very common. PMID:20411323

  11. Profile of prognostic factors in 1022 Indian women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dinshaw, Ketayun A. . E-mail: dinshaw.tmc@vsnl.com; Budrukkar, Ashwini N.; Chinoy, Roshan F.; Sarin, Rajiv; Badwe, Rajendra M.S.; Hawaldar, Rohini; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: The outcome of breast cancer treatment can vary in different geographic and ethnic groups. A multivariate analysis was performed for various prognostic factors in 1022 Indian women with pathologic Stage I-II breast cancer treated between 1980 and 2000 with standard breast-conserving therapy with or without systemic adjuvant therapy. Methods and Materials: At a mean follow-up of 53 months, the outcomes studied were local failure, locoregional failure, and distant failure, overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS). Results: The median pathologic tumor size was 3 cm (range, 1-5 cm), and axillary lymph node metastasis was present in 39% of women. The actuarial 5- and 10-year OS and DFS rate was 87% and 77% and 76% and 68%, respectively. Lymphovascular emboli or invasion (LVI) was the strongest independent adverse factor for all failure and survival (local failure, hazard ratio 2.85; 95% confidence interval, 1.68-4.83; OS; hazard ratio, 2.01, 95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.99). Lymph node metastasis was also an independent adverse factor for local failure, locoregional failure, distant failure, DFS, and OS (hazard ratio, 1.55, 95% confidence interval, 1.04-2.30). Age {<=}40 years increased the incidence of local recurrence, and patients with inner quadrant tumors had inferior DFS. The incidence of LVI was significantly greater in women with lymph node metastases than in node-negative women (p < 0.001) and in women with Grade 3 tumors than in those with Grade 1 or 2 tumors (p = 0.001). Conclusion: In Indian women, LVI was the strongest independent prognostic factor for OS, DFS, and local recurrence, irrespective of nodal status and systemic adjuvant treatment. Although LVI may not be a contraindication for BCT, as has been proposed by certain groups, it is necessary to define its role in prospective studies in determining local and systemic treatment.

  12. Risk factors for positive margins in conservative surgery for breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bouzón, Alberto; Acea, Benigno; García, Alejandra; Iglesias, Ángela; Mosquera, Joaquín; Santiago, Paz; Seoane, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Breast conservative surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy intends to remove any residual tumor with negative margins. The purpose of this study was to analyze the preoperative clinical-pathological factors influencing the margin status after conservative surgery in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A retrospective study of 91 breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (92 breast lesions) during the period 2006 to 2013. A Cox regression analysis to identify baseline tumor characteristics associated with positive margins after breast conservative surgery was performed. Of all cases, 71 tumors were initially treated with conservative surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Pathologic exam revealed positive margins in 16 of the 71 cases (22.5%). The incidence of positive margins was significantly higher in cancers with initial size >5cm (P=.021), in cancers with low tumor grade (P=.031), and in patients with hormone receptor-positive cancer (P=.006). After a median follow-up of 45.2 months, 7 patients of the 71 treated with conservative surgery had disease recurrence (9.8%). There was no significant difference in terms of disease-free survival according to the margin status (P=.596). A baseline tumor size >5cm, low tumor grade and hormone receptor-positive status increase the risk for surgical margin involvement in breast conservative surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. The influence of the boost in breast-conserving therapy on cosmetic outcome in the EORTC "boost versus no boost" trial. EORTC Radiotherapy and Breast Cancer Cooperative Groups. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vrieling, C; Collette, L; Fourquet, A; Hoogenraad, W J; Horiot, J C; Jager, J J; Pierart, M; Poortmans, P M; Struikmans, H; Van der Hulst, M; Van der Schueren, E; Bartelink, H

    1999-10-01

    To evaluate the influence of a radiotherapy boost on the cosmetic outcome after 3 years of follow-up in patients treated with breast-conserving therapy (BCT). In EORTC trial 22881/10882, 5569 Stage I and II breast cancer patients were treated with tumorectomy and axillary dissection, followed by tangential irradiation of the breast to a dose of 50 Gy in 5 weeks, at 2 Gy per fraction. Patients having a microscopically complete tumor excision were randomized between no boost and a boost of 16 Gy. The cosmetic outcome was evaluated by a panel, scoring photographs of 731 patients taken soon after surgery and 3 years later, and by digitizer measurements, measuring the displacement of the nipple of 3000 patients postoperatively and of 1141 patients 3 years later. There was no difference in the cosmetic outcome between the two treatment arms after surgery, before the start of radiotherapy. At 3-year follow-up, both the panel evaluation and the digitizer measurements showed that the boost had a significant adverse effect on the cosmetic result. The panel evaluation at 3 years showed that 86% of patients in the no-boost group had an excellent or good global result, compared to 71% of patients in the boost group (p = 0.0001). The digitizer measurements at 3 years showed a relative breast retraction assessment (pBRA) of 7.6 pBRA in the no-boost group, compared to 8.3 pBRA in the boost group, indicating a worse cosmetic result in the boost group at follow-up (p = 0.04). These results showed that a boost dose of 16 Gy had a negative, but limited, impact on the cosmetic outcome after 3 years.

  14. Comparison of risk of local-regional recurrence after mastectomy or breast conservation therapy for patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation stratified according to a prognostic index score

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Eugene H.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Chen, Allen M.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hunt, Kelly K.; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Buchholz, Thomas A. . E-mail: tbuchhol@mdanderson.org

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: We previously developed a prognostic index that stratified patients treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy into groups with different risks for local-regional recurrence (LRR). The purpose of this study was to compare the rates of LRR as a function of prognostic index score for patients treated with BCT or mastectomy plus radiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 815 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation. Patients were assigned an index score from 0 to 4 and given 1 point for the presence of each factor: clinical N2 to N3 disease, lymphovascular invasion, pathologic size >2 cm, and multifocal residual disease. Results: The 10-year LRR rates were very low and similar between the mastectomy and BCT groups for patients with an index score of 0 or 1. For patients with a score of 2, LRR trended lower for those treated with mastectomy vs. BCT (12% vs. 28%, p = 0.28). For patients with a score of 3 to 4, LRR was significantly lower for those treated with mastectomy vs. BCT (19% vs. 61%, p = 0.009). Conclusions: This analysis suggests that BCT can provide excellent local-regional treatment for the vast majority of patients after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. For the few patients with a score of 3 to 4, LRR was >60% after BCT and was <20% with mastectomy. If these findings are confirmed in larger randomized studies, the prognostic index may be useful in helping to select the type of surgical treatment for patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation.

  15. Interim dentures and treatment dentures.

    PubMed

    Smith, D E

    1984-04-01

    Improvement in the interim denture procedure in the past decade has been one of the significant advancements in prosthodontic practice. The interim denture approach is only slightly more time-consuming and expensive than the conventional immediate denture approach, yet it has many advantages. Among those advantages are the following: (1) allows rapid results; (2) results in a higher quality definitive denture; (3) allows the surgical treatment to be performed during one appointment; (4) permits duplication of the natural tooth position; and (5) provides the patient with a spare denture after the definitive denture is completed. An interim denture technique was described that utilized a flexible layered silicone mold to form the replaced teeth. The interim denture procedure is flexible and lends itself to many variations in technique to meet unusual clinical situations. An interim removable partial denture technique was described that involves block-out of undesirable undercuts and duplication of the master cast for fabrication of the partial denture. This technique results in an interim partial denture that can be placed with little or no adjustment and that will provide better service for those who require it. Three simple procedures for fabricating treatment dentures were described and the indications for each were discussed. Although treatment dentures are not often used, they are essential for the dentist who is treating difficult patients who require complete dentures.

  16. The Impact of Comorbidities on Outcomes for Elderly Women Treated With Breast-Conservation Treatment for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Eleanor E.R. Hwang, W.-T.; Urtishak, Sandra L.; Plastaras, John; Kinosian, Bruce; Solin, Lawrence J.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Breast cancer incidence increases with age and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly women, but is not well studied in this population. Comorbidities often impact on the management of breast cancer in elderly women. Methods and Materials: From 1979 to 2002, a total of 238 women aged 70 years and older with Stage I or II invasive carcinoma of the breast underwent breast-conservation therapy. Outcomes were compared by age groups and comorbidities. Median age at presentation was 74 years (range, 70-89 years). Age distribution was 122 women (51%) aged 70-74 years, 71 women (30%) aged 75-79 years, and 45 women (19%) aged 80 years or older. Median follow-up was 6.2 years. Results: On outcomes analysis by age groups, 10-year cause-specific survival rates for women aged 70-74, 75-79, and 80 years or older were 74%, 81%, and 82%, respectively (p = 0.87). Intercurrent deaths at 10 years were significantly higher in older patients: 20% in those aged 70-74 years, 36% in those aged 75-79 years, and 53% in those 80 years and older (p = 0.0005). Comorbidities were not significantly more common in the older age groups and did not correlate with cause-specific survival adjusted for age. Higher comorbidity scores were associated with intercurrent death. Conclusions: Older age itself is not a contraindication to standard breast-conservation therapy, including irradiation. Women of any age with low to moderate comorbidity indices should be offered standard breast-conservation treatment if otherwise clinically eligible.

  17. Clinicopathologic features and long-term outcome of patients with medullary breast carcinoma managed with breast-conserving therapy (BCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Ha Vu-Nishino; Tavassoli, Fattaneh A.; Ahrens, Willam A.; Haffty, Bruce G. . E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical characteristics and outcome of medullary carcinoma to infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast in a large cohort of conservatively managed patients with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: Chart records of patients with invasive breast cancer managed with breast-conserving therapy (BCT) at the therapeutic radiology facilities of Yale University School of Medicine before 2001 were reviewed. Forty-six cases (1971-2001) were identified with medullary histology; 1,444 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma served as a control group. Results: The medullary cohort presented at a younger age with a higher percentage of patients in the 35 years or younger age group (26.1% vs. 6.6%, p < 0.00001). Twelve patients with medullary histology underwent genetic screening, and 6 patients were identified with deleterious mutations. This group showed greater association with BRCA1/2 mutations compared with screened patients in the control group (50.0% vs. 15.8%, p 0.0035). The medullary cohort was also significantly associated with greater T stage and tumor size (37.0% vs. 17.2% T2, mean size 3.2 vs. 2.5 cm, p 0.00097) as well as negative ER (84.9% vs. 37.6%, p < 0.00001) and PR (87.5% vs. 48.1%, p = 0.00001) status. As of February 2003, median follow-up times for the medullary and control groups were 13.9 and 14.0 years, respectively. Although breast relapse-free rates were not significantly different (76.7% vs. 85.2%), 10-year distant relapse-free survival in the medullary cohort was significantly better than in the control group (94.9% vs. 77.5%, p = 0.028). Conclusions: Despite poor clinicopathologic features, patients with medullary histology demonstrate favorable long-term distant relapse-free survival. Local control rates of patients with medullary and infiltrating ductal carcinoma are comparable. These findings suggest that patients diagnosed with medullary carcinoma are appropriate candidates for

  18. Similar Survival With Breast Conservation Therapy or Mastectomy in the Management of Young Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Usama; Morris, Christopher; Neuner, Geoffrey; Koshy, Matthew; Kesmodel, Susan; Buras, Robert; Chumsri, Saranya; Bao Ting; Tkaczuk, Katherine; Feigenberg, Steven

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival outcomes of young women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT) or mastectomy, using a large, population-based database. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, information was obtained for all female patients, ages 20 to 39 years old, diagnosed with T1-2 N0-1 M0 breast cancer between 1990 and 2007, who underwent either BCT (lumpectomy and radiation treatment) or mastectomy. Multivariable and matched pair analyses were performed to compare overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) of patients undergoing BCT and mastectomy. Results: A total of 14,764 women were identified, of whom 45% received BCT and 55% received mastectomy. Median follow-up was 5.7 years (range, 0.5-17.9 years). After we accounted for all patient and tumor characteristics, multivariable analysis found that BCT resulted in OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.04; p = 0.16) and CSS (HR, 0.93; CI, 0.83-1.05; p = 0.26) similar to that of mastectomy. Matched pair analysis, including 4,644 BCT and mastectomy patients, confirmed no difference in OS or CSS: the 5-, 10-, and15-year OS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 92.5%, 83.5%, and 77.0% and 91.9%, 83.6%, and 79.1%, respectively (p = 0.99), and the 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 93.3%, 85.5%, and 79.9% and 92.5%, 85.5%, and 81.9%, respectively (p = 0.88). Conclusions: Our analysis of this population-based database suggests that young women with early-stage breast cancer have similar survival rates whether treated with BCT or mastectomy. These patients should be counseled appropriately regarding their treatment options and should not choose a mastectomy based on the assumption of improved survival.

  19. 19 CFR 354.8 - Interim sanctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the procedures of this section. (e) A person against whom interim sanctions are proposed has a right... appeal a decision on interim sanctions to the APO Sanctions Board, if such an appeal is certified by the...

  20. 19 CFR 354.8 - Interim sanctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the procedures of this section. (e) A person against whom interim sanctions are proposed has a right... appeal a decision on interim sanctions to the APO Sanctions Board, if such an appeal is certified by the...

  1. Objective and Longitudinal Assessment of Dermatitis After Postoperative Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated With Breast Conserving Therapy: Reduction of Moisture Deterioration by APBI

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Takenaka, Tadashi; Masuda, Norikazu; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Inoue, Takehiro

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To objectively evaluate the radiation dermatitis caused by accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy. Patients and Methods: The skin color and moisture changes were examined using a newly installed spectrophotometer and corneometer in 22 patients who had undergone APBI using open cavity implant high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (36 Gy in six fractions) and compared with the corresponding values for 44 patients in an external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) control group (50-60 Gy in 25-30 fractions within 5-6 weeks) after breast conserving surgery. Results: All values changed significantly as a result of APBI. The extent of elevation in a Asterisk-Operator (reddish) and reduction in L Asterisk-Operator (black) values caused by APBI were similar to those for EBRT, with slightly delayed recovery for 6-12 months after treatment owing to the surgical procedure. In contrast, only APBI caused a change in the b Asterisk-Operator values, and EBRT did not, demonstrating that the reduction in b Asterisk-Operator values (yellowish) depends largely on the surgical procedure. The changes in moisture were less severe after APBI than after EBRT, and the recovery was more rapid. The toxicity assessment using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3, showed that all dermatitis caused by APBI was Grade 2 or less. Conclusion: An objective analysis can quantify the effects of APBI procedures on color and moisture cosmesis. The radiation dermatitis caused by APBI using the present schedule showed an equivalent effect on skin color and a less severe effect on moisture than the effects caused by standard EBRT.

  2. Current margin practice and effect on re-excision rates following the publication of the SSO-ASTRO consensus and ABS consensus guidelines: a national prospective study of 2858 women undergoing breast-conserving therapy in the UK and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sarah Shuk-Kay; Kaptanis, Sarantos; Haddow, James B; Mondani, Giuseppina; Elsberger, Beatrix; Tasoulis, Marios Konstantinos; Obondo, Christine; Johns, Neil; Ismail, Wisam; Syed, Asim; Kissias, Panayioti; Venn, Mary; Sundaramoorthy, Souganthy; Irwin, Gareth; Sami, Amtul S; Elfadl, Dalia; Baggaley, Alice; Remoundos, Dionysios Dennis; Langlands, Fiona; Charalampoudis, Petros; Barber, Zoe; Hamilton-Burke, Werbena L S; Khan, Ayesha; Sirianni, Chiara; Merker, Louise Anne-Marie Grant; Saha, Sunita; Lane, Risha Arun; Chopra, Sharat; Dupré, Sophie; Manning, Aidan T; St John, Edward R; Musbahi, Aya; Dlamini, Nokwanda; McArdle, Caitlin L; Wright, Chloe; Murphy, James O; Aggarwal, Ravi; Dordea, Matei; Bosch, Karen; Egbeare, Donna; Osman, Hisham; Tayeh, Salim; Razi, Faraz; Iqbal, Javeria; Ledwidge, Serena F C; Albert, Vanessa; Masannat, Yazan

    2017-10-01

    There is variation in margin policy for breast conserving therapy (BCT) in the UK and Ireland. In response to the Society of Surgical Oncology and American Society for Radiation Oncology (SSO-ASTRO) margin consensus ('no ink on tumour' for invasive and 2 mm for ductal carcinoma in situ [DCIS]) and the Association of Breast Surgery (ABS) consensus (1 mm for invasive and DCIS), we report on current margin practice and unit infrastructure in the UK and Ireland and describe how these factors impact on re-excision rates. A trainee collaborative-led multicentre prospective study was conducted in the UK and Ireland between 1st February and 31st May 2016. Data were collected on consecutive BCT patients and on local infrastructure and policies. A total of 79 sites participated in the data collection (75% screening units; average 372 cancers annually, range 70-900). For DCIS, 53.2% of units accept 1 mm and 38% accept 2-mm margins. For invasive disease 77.2% accept 1 mm and 13.9% accept 'no ink on tumour'. A total of 2858 patients underwent BCT with a mean re-excision rate of 17.2% across units (range 0-41%). The re-excision rate would be reduced to 15% if all units applied SSO-ASTRO guidelines and to 14.8% if all units followed ABS guidelines. Of those who required re-operation, 65% had disease present at margin. There continues to be large variation in margin policy and re-excision rates across units. Altering margin policies to follow either SSO-ASTRO or ABS guidelines would result in a modest reduction in the national re-excision rate. Most re-excisions are for involved margins rather than close margins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. An Interim President Sets the Stage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guardo, Carol J.

    2006-01-01

    An interim president often plays a crucial role in leading a college or university. In some instances, the interim can address and resolve troublesome issues and thus clear the way for the new president to generate progress. In others, the interim stays the course so that the institution maintains its momentum and seizes strategic opportunities to…

  4. 22 CFR 127.8 - Interim suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interim suspension. 127.8 Section 127.8 Foreign... Interim suspension. (a) The Managing Director of the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls or the Director of the Office of Defense Trade Controls Compliance is authorized to order the interim suspension...

  5. 12 CFR 268.505 - Interim relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interim relief. 268.505 Section 268.505 Banks... REGARDING EQUAL OPPORTUNITY Remedies and Enforcement § 268.505 Interim relief. (a)(1) When the Board appeals... offer of interim relief. (2) Service under the temporary or conditional restoration provisions of...

  6. 22 CFR 127.8 - Interim suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Interim suspension. (a) The Managing Director of the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls or the Director of the Office of Defense Trade Controls Compliance is authorized to order the interim suspension of... world peace or the security or foreign policy of the United States. The interim suspension orders...

  7. 7 CFR 1735.75 - Interim financing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interim financing. 1735.75 Section 1735.75... Involving Loan Funds § 1735.75 Interim financing. (a) A borrower may submit a written request for RUS approval of interim financing if it is necessary to close an acquisition before the loan to finance...

  8. 7 CFR 1738.21 - Interim financing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interim financing. 1738.21 Section 1738.21... Interim financing. (a) Upon notification by RUS that an applicant's application is considered complete, the applicant may enter into an interim financing agreement with a lender other than RUS or use...

  9. 15 CFR 904.322 - Interim action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interim action. 904.322 Section 904... Sanctions and Denials Permit Sanction for Violations § 904.322 Interim action. (a) To protect marine...) The Judge will order interim action under paragraph (a) of this section, only after finding that...

  10. 42 CFR 417.574 - Interim settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interim settlement. 417.574 Section 417.574 Public... PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.574 Interim settlement. (a) Determination. Within 30 days following the receipt of the HMO's or CMP's final interim cost and enrollment reports, CMS will make...

  11. An Interim President Sets the Stage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guardo, Carol J.

    2006-01-01

    An interim president often plays a crucial role in leading a college or university. In some instances, the interim can address and resolve troublesome issues and thus clear the way for the new president to generate progress. In others, the interim stays the course so that the institution maintains its momentum and seizes strategic opportunities to…

  12. 19 CFR 207.106 - Interim measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Interim measures. 207.106 Section 207.106 Customs... and Committee Proceedings § 207.106 Interim measures. (a) At any time after proceedings are initiated... that would otherwise be kept confidential, or to take other appropriate interim measures. (b) Before...

  13. 19 CFR 207.106 - Interim measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Interim measures. 207.106 Section 207.106 Customs... and Committee Proceedings § 207.106 Interim measures. (a) At any time after proceedings are initiated... that would otherwise be kept confidential, or to take other appropriate interim measures. (b) Before...

  14. 19 CFR 207.106 - Interim measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Interim measures. 207.106 Section 207.106 Customs... and Committee Proceedings § 207.106 Interim measures. (a) At any time after proceedings are initiated... that would otherwise be kept confidential, or to take other appropriate interim measures. (b) Before...

  15. 19 CFR 207.106 - Interim measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Interim measures. 207.106 Section 207.106 Customs... and Committee Proceedings § 207.106 Interim measures. (a) At any time after proceedings are initiated... that would otherwise be kept confidential, or to take other appropriate interim measures. (b) Before...

  16. Primer for the Interim Chair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltys, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Being successful in the role of an Interim Chair requires an approach to transitional leadership that is different from that of individuals filling the Chair role permanently. This article reviews pertinent literature on the topic. Method: The author reviewed the literature, cited pertinent articles, and supplemented with personal…

  17. Project Canada West. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Curriculum Project on Canada Studies, Edmonton (Alberta).

    This first interim report of project Canada West, initiated in April, 1970, includes three papers. "Curriculum Development in Urbanization," by Dr. R. H. Sabey, Acting Executive Director, is an overview of the Project's history, purpose, and the 5 year plan for phases of research development. (See SO 000 283 for complete abstract.) Two…

  18. Collection Analysis Project. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Carol; And Others

    This interim report of the University of Wyoming's Collection Analysis Project, whose purpose is to examine the university library's collection development process and make workable recommendations for process improvement, consists of a brief history of the library's collection, including a review of the evolution of the collection development…

  19. Data breaches. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2007-06-22

    This document establishes regulations to address data breaches regarding sensitive personal information that is processed or maintained by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The regulations implement certain provisions of Title IX of the Veterans Benefits, Health Care, and Information Technology Act of 2006, which require promulgation of these regulations as an interim final rule.

  20. Primer for the Interim Chair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltys, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Being successful in the role of an Interim Chair requires an approach to transitional leadership that is different from that of individuals filling the Chair role permanently. This article reviews pertinent literature on the topic. Method: The author reviewed the literature, cited pertinent articles, and supplemented with personal…

  1. Collection Analysis Project. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Carol; And Others

    This interim report of the University of Wyoming's Collection Analysis Project, whose purpose is to examine the university library's collection development process and make workable recommendations for process improvement, consists of a brief history of the library's collection, including a review of the evolution of the collection development…

  2. A Novel Technique for Immediate Loading Single Root Form Implants With an Interim CAD/CAM Milled Screw-Retained Crown.

    PubMed

    Proussaefs, Periklis

    2016-08-01

    A technique is described where an interim abutment and crown are fabricated in the laboratory by utilizing computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology and placed the day of dental implant surgery. The design and contours of the interim crown are designed by the computer software to be identical to the contours of the tentatively designed definitive prosthesis. The interim crown satisfies esthetics immediately after dental implant surgery while allowing the tissue to heal and obtain contours similar to the contours of the definitive prosthesis. The interim crown can be either cement retained or screw retained. The presented technique describes fabrication of a screw-retentive interim crown. After osseointegration is confirmed, a definitive impression is made with a CAD/CAM impression coping. The definitive prosthesis is then fabricated.

  3. Utility of Clinical Breast Examinations in Detecting Local-Regional Breast Events After Breast-Conservation in Women with a Personal History of High-Risk Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Heather B; Schumacher, Jessica R; Francescatti, Amanda B; Adesoye, Taiwo; Edge, Stephen B; Burnside, Elizabeth S; Vanness, David J; Yu, Menggang; Si, Yajuan; McKellar, Dan; Winchester, David P; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2016-10-01

    Although breast cancer follow-up guidelines emphasize the importance of clinical examinations, prior studies suggest a small fraction of local-regional events occurring after breast conservation are detected by examination alone. Our objective was to examine how local-regional events are detected in a contemporary, national cohort of high-risk breast cancer survivors. A stage-stratified sample of stage II/III breast cancer patients diagnosed in 2006-2007 (n = 11,099) were identified from 1217 facilities within the National Cancer Data Base. Additional data on local-regional and distant breast events, method of event detection, imaging received, and mortality were collected. We further limited the cohort to patients with breast conservation (n = 4854). Summary statistics describe local-regional event rates and detection method. Local-regional events were detected in 5.5 % (n = 265) of patients. Eighty-three percent were ipsilateral or contralateral in-breast events, and 17 % occurred within ipsilateral lymph nodes. Forty-eight percent of local-regional events were detected on asymptomatic breast imaging, 29 % by patients, and 10 % on clinical examination. Overall, 0.5 % of the 4854 patients had a local-regional event detected on examination. Examinations detected a higher proportion of lymph node events (8/45) compared with in-breast events (18/220). No factors were associated with method of event detection. Clinical examinations, as an adjunct to screening mammography, have a modest effect on local-regional event detection. This contradicts current belief that examinations are a critical adjunct to mammographic screening. These findings can help to streamline follow-up care, potentially improving follow-up efficiency and quality.

  4. The evolution of accelerated, partial breast irradiation as a potential treatment option for women with newly diagnosed breast cancer considering breast conservation.

    PubMed

    Dirbas, Frederick M; Jeffrey, Stefanie S; Goffinet, Don R

    2004-12-01

    Breast conservation therapy (BCT) is a safe, effective alternative to mastectomy for many women with newly diagnosed breast cancer. This approach involves local excision of the malignancy with tumor-free margins, followed by 5-7 weeks of external beam whole breast (WB) radiotherapy (XRT) to minimize the risk of an in-breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Though clearly beneficial, the extended course of almost daily postoperative radiotherapy interrupts normal activities and lengthens care. Additional options are now available that shorten the radiotherapy treatment time to 1-5 days (accelerated) and focus an increased dose of radiation on just the breast tissue around the excision cavity (partial breast). Recent trials with accelerated, partial breast irradiation (APBI) have shown promise as a potential replacement to the longer, whole breast treatments for select women with early-stage breast cancer. Current APBI approaches include interstitial brachytherapy, intracavitary (balloon) brachytherapy, and accelerated external beam (3-D conformal) radiotherapy, all of which normally complete treatment over 5 days, while intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) condenses the entire treatment into a single dose delivered immediately after tumor excision. Each approach has benefits and limitations. This study covers over 2 decades of clinical trials exploring APBI, discusses treatment variables that appear necessary for successful implementation of this new form of radiotherapy, compares and contrasts the various APBI approaches, and summarizes current and planned randomized trials that will shape if and how APBI is introduced into routine clinical care. Some of the more important outcome variables from these trials will be local toxicity, local and regional recurrence, and overall survival. If APBI options are ultimately demonstrated to be as safe and effective as current whole breast radiotherapy approaches, breast conservation may become an even more appealing choice, and the

  5. Utility of Clinical Breast Exams in Detecting Local-Regional Breast Events after Breast-Conservation in Women with a Personal History of High-risk Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Heather B.; Schumacher, Jessica R.; Francescatti, Amanda B.; Adesoye, Taiwo; SB, Edge; ES, Burnside; DJ, Vanness; M, Yu; Y, Si; D, McKellar; DP, Winchester; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although breast cancer follow-up guidelines emphasize the importance of clinical exams, prior studies suggest a small fraction of local-regional events occurring after breast conservation are detected by exam alone. Our objective was to examine how local-regional events are detected in a contemporary, national cohort of high-risk breast cancer survivors. Methods A stage-stratified sample of stage II/III breast cancer patients diagnosed in 2006-2007 (n=11,099) were identified from 1,217 facilities within the National Cancer Data Base. Additional data on local-regional and distant breast events, method of event detection, imaging received, and mortality was collected. We further limited the cohort to patients with breast conservation (n=4,854). Summary statistics describe local-regional event rates and detection method. Results Local-regional events were detected in 5.5% (n=265). 83% were ipsilateral or contralateral in-breast events, and 17% within ipsilateral lymph nodes. 48% of local-regional events were detected on asymptomatic breast imaging, 29% by patients, and 10% on clinical exam. Overall, 0.5% of the 4,854 patients had a local-regional event detected on exam. Exams detected a higher proportion of lymph node (8/45) compared to in-breast events (18/220). No factors were associated with method of event detection. Discussion Clinical exams, as an adjunct to screening mammography, have a modest effect on local-regional event detection. This contradicts current belief that exams are a critical adjunct to mammographic screening. These findings can help to streamline follow-up care, potentially improving follow-up efficiency and quality. PMID:27491784

  6. Rates of breast cancer surgery in Canada from 2007/08 to 2009/10: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wagar, Brandon; Bryant, Heather; Hewitt, Maria; Wai, Elaine; Dabbs, Kelly; McFarlane, Anne; Rahal, Rami

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgery is a common and important component of breast cancer treatment. We assessed the rates of breast cancer surgery across Canada from 2007/08 to 2009/10. Methods We used hospital and day surgery data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information to assemble a cohort of women who had undergone breast cancer surgery. We identified the index surgical procedure and subsequent surgical procedures performed within 1 year for each woman included in the analysis. We calculated the crude mastectomy rate for each province, and we calculated the adjusted mastectomy rate for select jurisdictions using a logistic regression model fitted using age, neighbourhood income quintile and travel time. Results In total, 57 840 women underwent breast cancer surgery during the study period. Among women with unilateral invasive breast cancer, the crude mastectomy rate was 39%. Adjusted rates for mastectomy varied widely by province (26%–69%). The rate of re-excision within 1 year for women who had breast-conserving surgery as their index procedure was 23% and varied by province in terms of frequency and type (mastectomy or repeat breast-conserving surgery). Among women who underwent mastectomy for unilateral invasive breast cancer, 6% also underwent contralateral prophylactic mastectomy, and 7% had immediate breast reconstruction following surgery. Of mastectomy procedures, 20% were performed as day surgery; for breast-conserving surgery, 70% were performed as day surgery. Interpretation There is substantial interprovincial variation in surgical care for breast cancer in Canada. Further research is needed to better understand such variation, and continued monitoring should be the focus of quality initiatives. PMID:25077125

  7. Rates of breast cancer surgery in Canada from 2007/08 to 2009/10: retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Porter, Geoff; Wagar, Brandon; Bryant, Heather; Hewitt, Maria; Wai, Elaine; Dabbs, Kelly; McFarlane, Anne; Rahal, Rami

    2014-04-01

    Surgery is a common and important component of breast cancer treatment. We assessed the rates of breast cancer surgery across Canada from 2007/08 to 2009/10. We used hospital and day surgery data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information to assemble a cohort of women who had undergone breast cancer surgery. We identified the index surgical procedure and subsequent surgical procedures performed within 1 year for each woman included in the analysis. We calculated the crude mastectomy rate for each province, and we calculated the adjusted mastectomy rate for select jurisdictions using a logistic regression model fitted using age, neighbourhood income quintile and travel time. In total, 57 840 women underwent breast cancer surgery during the study period. Among women with unilateral invasive breast cancer, the crude mastectomy rate was 39%. Adjusted rates for mastectomy varied widely by province (26%-69%). The rate of re-excision within 1 year for women who had breast-conserving surgery as their index procedure was 23% and varied by province in terms of frequency and type (mastectomy or repeat breast-conserving surgery). Among women who underwent mastectomy for unilateral invasive breast cancer, 6% also underwent contralateral prophylactic mastectomy, and 7% had immediate breast reconstruction following surgery. Of mastectomy procedures, 20% were performed as day surgery; for breast-conserving surgery, 70% were performed as day surgery. There is substantial interprovincial variation in surgical care for breast cancer in Canada. Further research is needed to better understand such variation, and continued monitoring should be the focus of quality initiatives.

  8. [Feasibility and cosmetic outcome of oncoplastic surgery in breast cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Sherwell-Cabello, Santiago; Maffuz-Aziz, Antonio; Villegas-Carlos, Felipe; Domínguez-Reyes, Carlos; Labastida-Almendaro, Sonia; Rodríguez-Cuevas, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading oncological cause of death in Mexican women over 25 years old. Given the need to improve postoperative cosmetic results in patients with breast cancer, oncoplastic surgery has been developed, which allows larger tumour resections and minor cosmetic alterations. To determine the oncological feasibility and cosmetic outcome of oncoplastic surgery at the Instituto de Enfermedades de la Mama, FUCAM, AC. A review was conducted from January 2010 to July 2013, which included patients with breast cancer diagnosis treated with conventional breast-conserving surgery or with oncoplastic surgery in the Institute of Diseases of the Breast, FUCAM AC. Clinical and histopathological parameters were compared between the two groups, and a questionnaire of cosmetic satisfaction and quality of life was applied. Of the 171 patients included, 95 of them were treated with conventional breast-conserving surgery and 76 with oncoplastic surgery. Pathological tumour size was significantly larger in patients treated with oncoplastic surgery (p = 0.002). There were no differences found between the groups as regards the number of patients with positive surgical margin, the rate of complications, and cosmetic satisfaction. This study demonstrates the oncological feasibility and high cosmetic satisfaction of oncoplastic surgery with minimal psycho-social impact on patients. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  9. Burn site groundwater interim measures work plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, Jonathan L.; Hall, Kevin A.

    2005-05-01

    This Work Plan identifies and outlines interim measures to address nitrate contamination in groundwater at the Burn Site, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. The New Mexico Environment Department has required implementation of interim measures for nitrate-contaminated groundwater at the Burn Site. The purpose of interim measures is to prevent human or environmental exposure to nitrate-contaminated groundwater originating from the Burn Site. This Work Plan details a summary of current information about the Burn Site, interim measures activities for stabilization, and project management responsibilities to accomplish this purpose.

  10. A Prospective Longitudinal Clinical Trial Evaluating Quality of Life After Breast Conserving Surgery and High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd A.; Deshields, Teresa L.; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Cyr, Amy E.; Naughton, Michael; Aft, Rebecca; Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy; Matesa, Melissa A.; Ochoa, Laura L.; Zoberi, Imran

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To prospectively examine quality of life (QOL) of patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. Methods And Materials Between March 2004 and December 2008, 151 patients with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase II prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients included those with Tis-T2 tumors measuring ≤ 3 cm excised with negative surgical margins, with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy bid to a total dose of 34 Gy. QOL was measured using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 version 3.0 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. The QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 were evaluated pretreatment, 6-8 weeks, 3-4 months, 6-8 months, 1 year and 2 years after treatment. RESULTS The median follow-up was 55 months. Breast symptom scores remained stable in the months after treatment, and they significantly improved 6-8 months after treatment. Scores for emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective showed significant improvement 2 years after treatment. Symptomatic fat necrosis was associated with several changes in QOL, including increased pain, breast symptoms, systemic treatment side effects, dyspnea, and fatigue, as well as decreased role functioning, emotional functioning, and social functioning. Conclusions HDR multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy was well tolerated with no significant detrimental effect on measured QOL scales/items through 2 years of follow-up. Compared to pretreatment scores, there was improvement in breast symptoms, emotional functioning, social functioning and future perspective 2 years after treatment. PMID:24161428

  11. Cosmetic Analysis Following Breast-Conserving Surgery and Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Prospective Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Naughton, Michael; Aft, Rebecca; Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy; Matesa, Melissa A.; Zoberi, Imran

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To prospectively evaluate cosmetic outcomes in women treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials Between 2004 and 2008, 151 patients with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase II prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients had Tis-T2 tumors ≤3 cm, excised with negative margins, and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy BID to a total dose of 34 Gy. Both patients and the treating radiation oncologist qualitatively rated cosmesis as excellent, good, fair, or poor over time and ascribed a cause for changes in cosmesis. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated quantitatively by the percentage breast retraction assessment (pBRA). Patients also reported their satisfaction with treatment over time. Results Median follow-up was 55 months. The rate of excellent/good cosmesis reported by patients and the treating radiation oncologist was as follows: 92% and 97% pretreatment, 91% and 97% at 3–4 months follow-up, 87% and 94% at 2 years, and 92% and 94% at 3 years. Breast infection and adjuvant chemotherapy were independent predictors of a fair/poor cosmetic outcome at 3 years. Compared to the pretreatment pBRA (7.35), there was no significant change in pBRA over time. V150 was the only significant predictor of pBRA. The vast majority of patients (86.6%) were completely satisfied with their treatment. Conclusions Patients and the treating physician reported a high rate of excellent/good cosmetic outcomes at all follow-up time points. Acute breast infection and chemotherapy were associated with worse cosmetic outcomes. Multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy does not significantly change breast size as measured by pBRA. PMID:23058060

  12. Economic Implications of Widespread Expansion of Frozen Section Margin Analysis to Guide Surgical Resection in Women With Breast Cancer Undergoing Breast-Conserving Surgery.

    PubMed

    Boughey, Judy C; Keeney, Gary L; Radensky, Paul; Song, Christine P; Habermann, Elizabeth B

    2016-04-01

    In the current health care environment, cost effectiveness is critically important in policy setting and care of patients. This study performed a health economic analysis to assess the implications to providers and payers of expanding the use of frozen section margin analysis to minimize reoperations for patients undergoing breast cancer lumpectomy. A health care economic impact model was built to assess annual costs associated with breast lumpectomy procedures with and without frozen section margin analysis to avoid reoperation. If frozen section margin analysis is used in 20% of breast lumpectomies and under a baseline assumption that 35% of initial lumpectomies without frozen section analysis result in reoperations, the potential annual cost savings are $18.2 million to payers and $0.4 million to providers. Under the same baseline assumption, if 100% of all health care facilities adopted the use of frozen section margin analysis for breast lumpectomy procedures, the potential annual cost savings are $90.9 million to payers and $1.8 million to providers. On the basis of 10,000 simulations, use of intraoperative frozen section margin analysis yields cost saving for payers and is cost neutral to slightly cost saving for providers. This economic analysis indicates that widespread use of frozen section margin evaluation intraoperatively to guide surgical resection in breast lumpectomy cases and minimize reoperations would be beneficial to cost savings not only for the patient but also for payers and, in most cases, for providers. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. A Prospective Longitudinal Clinical Trial Evaluating Quality of Life After Breast-Conserving Surgery and High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd A.; Deshields, Teresa L.; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Cyr, Amy E.; Naughton, Michael; Aft, Rebecca; Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy; Matesa, Melissa A.; Ochoa, Laura L.; Zoberi, Imran

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively examine quality of life (QOL) of patients with early stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and December 2008, 151 patients with early stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients included those with Tis-T2 tumors measuring ≤3 cm excised with negative surgical margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. QOL was measured using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30, version 3.0, and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. The QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires were evaluated during pretreatment and then at 6 to 8 weeks, 3 to 4 months, 6 to 8 months, and 1 and 2 years after treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 55 months. Breast symptom scores remained stable in the months after treatment, and they significantly improved 6 to 8 months after treatment. Scores for emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective showed significant improvement 2 years after treatment. Symptomatic fat necrosis was associated with several changes in QOL, including increased pain, breast symptoms, systemic treatment side effects, dyspnea, and fatigue, as well as decreased role functioning, emotional functioning, and social functioning. Conclusions: HDR multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy was well tolerated, with no significant detrimental effect on measured QOL scales/items through 2 years of follow-up. Compared to pretreatment scores, there was improvement in breast symptoms, emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective 2 years after treatment.

  14. Cosmetic Analysis Following Breast-Conserving Surgery and Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Prospective Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Naughton, Michael; Aft, Rebecca; Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy; Matesa, Melissa A.; Zoberi, Imran

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate cosmetic outcomes in women treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2008, 151 patients with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients had stage Tis-T2 tumors of ≤3 cm that were excised with negative margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. Both the patients and the treating radiation oncologist qualitatively rated cosmesis as excellent, good, fair, or poor over time and ascribed a cause for changes in cosmesis. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated quantitatively by percentage of breast retraction assessment (pBRA). Patients also reported their satisfaction with treatment over time. Results: Median follow-up was 55 months. The rates of excellent-to-good cosmesis reported by patients and the treating radiation oncologist were 92% and 97% pretreatment, 91% and 97% at 3 to 4 months' follow-up, 87% and 94% at 2 years, and 92% and 94% at 3 years, respectively. Breast infection and adjuvant chemotherapy were independent predictors of a fair-to-poor cosmetic outcome at 3 years. Compared to pretreatment pBRA (7.35), there was no significant change in pBRA over time. The volume receiving more than 150 Gy (V150) was the only significant predictor of pBRA. The majority of patients (86.6%) were completely satisfied with their treatment. Conclusions: Patients and the treating physician reported a high rate of excellent-to-good cosmetic outcomes at all follow-up time points. Acute breast infection and chemotherapy were associated with worse cosmetic outcomes. Multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy does not significantly change breast size as measured by pBRA.

  15. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: 5-Year Results of the German-Austrian Multicenter Phase II Trial Using Interstitial Multicatheter Brachytherapy Alone After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Strnad, Vratislav; Hildebrandt, Guido; Poetter, Richard; Hammer, Josef; Hindemith, Marion; Resch, Alexandra; Spiegl, Kurt; Lotter, Michael; Uter, Wolfgang; Bani, Mayada; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fietkau, Rainer; Ott, Oliver J.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of accelerated partial breast irradiation on local control, side effects, and cosmesis using multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy as the sole method for the adjuvant local treatment of patients with low-risk breast cancer. Methods and Materials: 274 patients with low-risk breast cancer were treated on protocol. Patients were eligible for the study if the tumor size was < 3 cm, resection margins were clear by at least 2 mm, no lymph node metastases existed, age was >35 years, hormone receptors were positive, and histologic grades were 1 or 2. Of the 274 patients, 175 (64%) received pulse-dose-rate brachytherapy (D{sub ref} = 50 Gy). and 99 (36%) received high-dose-rate brachytherapy (D{sub ref} = 32.0 Gy). Results: Median follow-up was 63 months (range, 9-103). Only 8 of 274 (2.9%) patients developed an ipsilateral in-breast tumor recurrence at the time of analysis. The 5-year actuarial local recurrence-free survival probability was 98%. The 5- year overall and disease-free survival probabilities of all patients were 97% and 96%, respectively. Contralateral in-breast malignancies were detected in 2 of 274 (0.7%) patients, and distant metastases occurred in 6 of 274 (2.2%). Late side effects {>=}Grade 3 (i.e., breast tissue fibrosis and telangiectasia) occurred in 1 patient (0.4%, 95%CI:0.0-2.0%) and 6 patients (2.2%, 95%CI:0.8-4.7%), respectively. Cosmetic results were good to excellent in 245 of 274 patients (90%). Conclusions: The long-term results of this prospective Phase II trial confirm that the efficacy of accelerated partial breast irradiation using multicatheter brachytherapy is comparable with that of whole breast irradiation and that late side effects are negligible.

  16. Regional Nodal Irradiation After Breast Conserving Surgery for Early HER2-Positive Breast Cancer: Results of a Subanalysis From the ALTTO Trial.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Isabelle; Holmes, Eileen; De Azambuja, Evandro; Nguyen, David H A; Izquierdo, Miguel; Anne Zujewski, Jo; Inbar, Moshe; Naume, Bjorn; Tomasello, Gianluca; Gralow, Julie R; Wolff, Antonio C; Harris, Lyndsay; Gnant, Michael; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Piccart, Martine J; Azim, Hatem A

    2017-08-01

    Two randomized trials recently demonstrated that regional nodal irradiation (RNI) could reduce the risk of recurrence in early breast cancer; however, these trials were conducted in the pretrastuzumab era. Whether these results are applicable to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer patients treated with anti-HER2-targeted therapy is unknown. This retrospective analysis was performed on patients with node-positive breast cancer who were enrolled in the Adjuvant Lapatinib and/or Trastuzumab Treatment Optimization phase III adjuvant trial and subjected to BCS. The primary objective of the present study was to examine the effect of RNI on disease-free survival (DFS). A multivariable cox regression analysis adjusted for number of positive lymph nodes, tumor size, grade, age, hormone receptors status, presence of macrometastatis, treatment arm, and chemotherapy timing was carried out to investigate the relationship between RNI and DFS. One thousand six hundred sixty-four HER2-positive breast cancer patients were included, of whom 878 (52.8%) had received RNI to the axillary, supraclavicular, and/or internal mammary lymph nodes. Patients in the RNI group had higher nodal burden and more frequently had tumors larger than 2 cm. At a median follow-up of 4.5 years, DFS was 84.3% in the RNI group and 88.3% in the non-RNI group. No differences in regional recurrence (0.9 % vs 0.6 %) or in overall survival (93.6% vs 95.3%) were observed between the two groups. After adjustment in multivariable analysis, there was no statistically significant association between RNI and DFS (hazard ratio = 0.96, 95% confidence interval = 0.71 to 1.29). Our analysis did not demonstrate a DFS benefit of RNI in HER2-positive, node-positive patients treated with adjuvant HER2-targeted therapy. The benefit of RNI in HER2-positive breast cancer needs further testing within randomized clinical trials.

  17. The Effect of Biofeedback Therapy on Anorectal Function After the Reversal of Temporary Stoma When Administered During the Temporary Stoma Period in Rectal Cancer Patients With Sphincter-Saving Surgery: The Interim Report of a Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Gun; Yoo, Ri Na; Cho, Hyeon-Min

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the effect of biofeedback therapy (BFT) on anorectal function after stoma closure when administered during the interval of temporary stoma after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer.Impaired anorectal function is common after lower anterior resections, though no specific treatment options are currently available to prevent this adverse outcome.Fifty-six patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy after sphincter-preserving surgery with temporary stoma were randomized into 2 groups: group 1 (received BFT during the temporary stoma period) and group 2 (did not receive BFT). To evaluate anorectal function, anorectal manometry was performed in all patients and subjective symptoms were evaluated using the Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score. The present study is a report at 6 months after rectal resection.Forty-seven patients, including 21 in group 1 and 26 in group 2, were evaluated by anorectal manometry. Twelve patients (57.1%) in group 1 and 13 patients (50%) in group 2 were scored above 9 points of Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score, which is the reference value for fecal incontinence (P = 0.770). With time, there was a significant difference (P = 0.002) in the change of mean resting pressure according to time sequence between the BFT and control groups.BFT during the temporary stoma interval had no effect on preventing anorectal dysfunction after temporary stoma reversal at 6 months after rectal resection. However, BFT might be helpful for maintaining resting anal sphincter tone (NCT01661829).

  18. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the genes ATM, GSTP1, SOD2, TGFB1, XPD and XRCC1 with risk of severe erythema after breast conserving radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To examine the association of polymorphisms in ATM (codon 158), GSTP1 (codon 105), SOD2 (codon 16), TGFB1 (position −509), XPD (codon 751), and XRCC1 (codon 399) with the risk of severe erythema after breast conserving radiotherapy. Methods and materials Retrospective analysis of 83 breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving radiotherapy. A total dose of 50.4 Gy was administered, applying 1.8 Gy/fraction within 42 days. Erythema was evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score. DNA was extracted from blood samples and polymorphisms were determined using either the Polymerase Chain Reaction based Restriction-Fragment-Length-Polymorphism (PCR-RFL) technique or Matrix-Assisted-Laser-Desorption/Ionization –Time-Of-Flight-Mass-Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF). Relative excess heterozygosity (REH) was investigated to check compatibility of genotype frequencies with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). In addition, p-values from the standard exact HWE lack of fit test were calculated using 100,000 permutations. HWE analyses were performed using R. Results Fifty-six percent (46/83) of all patients developed erythema of grade 2 or 3, with this risk being higher for patients with large breast volume (odds ratio, OR = 2.55, 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.03–6.31, p = 0.041). No significant association between SNPs and risk of erythema was found when all patients were considered. However, in patients with small breast volume the TGFB1 SNP was associated with erythema (p = 0.028), whereas the SNP in XPD showed an association in patients with large breast volume (p = 0.046). A risk score based on all risk alleles was neither significant in all patients nor in patients with small or large breast volume. Risk alleles of most SNPs were different compared to a previously identified risk profile for fibrosis. Conclusions The genetic risk profile for erythema appears to be different for patients with small and larger

  19. 24 CFR 35.820 - Interim controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... completion of the risk assessment. In units in which a child of less than 6 years of age moves in after the completion of the risk assessment, interim controls shall be completed no later than 90 days after the move... property, interim controls shall be completed no later than 12 months after completion of the...

  20. 24 CFR 35.820 - Interim controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... completion of the risk assessment. In units in which a child of less than 6 years of age moves in after the completion of the risk assessment, interim controls shall be completed no later than 90 days after the move... property, interim controls shall be completed no later than 12 months after completion of the...

  1. 24 CFR 35.820 - Interim controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... completion of the risk assessment. In units in which a child of less than 6 years of age moves in after the completion of the risk assessment, interim controls shall be completed no later than 90 days after the move... property, interim controls shall be completed no later than 12 months after completion of the...

  2. 24 CFR 35.820 - Interim controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... completion of the risk assessment. In units in which a child of less than 6 years of age moves in after the completion of the risk assessment, interim controls shall be completed no later than 90 days after the move... property, interim controls shall be completed no later than 12 months after completion of the...

  3. 45 CFR 1623.6 - Interim funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interim funding. 1623.6 Section 1623.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION SUSPENSION PROCEDURES § 1623.6 Interim funding. (a) Pending the completion of suspension proceedings under this part...

  4. 45 CFR 1623.6 - Interim funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Interim funding. 1623.6 Section 1623.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION SUSPENSION PROCEDURES § 1623.6 Interim funding. (a) Pending the completion of suspension proceedings under this part...

  5. 45 CFR 1623.6 - Interim funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interim funding. 1623.6 Section 1623.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION SUSPENSION PROCEDURES § 1623.6 Interim funding. (a) Pending the completion of suspension proceedings under this part...

  6. 45 CFR 1623.6 - Interim funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interim funding. 1623.6 Section 1623.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION SUSPENSION PROCEDURES § 1623.6 Interim funding. (a) Pending the completion of suspension proceedings under this part...

  7. 45 CFR 1623.6 - Interim funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interim funding. 1623.6 Section 1623.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION SUSPENSION PROCEDURES § 1623.6 Interim funding. (a) Pending the completion of suspension proceedings under this part...

  8. 7 CFR 15a.71 - Interim procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Procedures (Interim) § 15a.71 Interim procedures. For the purposes of... a consolidated procedural regulation applicable to title IX and other civil rights authorities administered by the Department, the procedural provisions applicable to title VI of the Civil Rights Act of...

  9. 39 CFR 952.6 - Interim impounding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interim impounding. 952.6 Section 952.6 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO FALSE REPRESENTATION AND LOTTERY ORDERS § 952.6 Interim impounding. In preparation for or during the pendency of...

  10. Locating Interim Assessments within Teachers' Assessment Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggan, Matthew; Olah, Leslie Nabors

    2011-01-01

    Promising research on the teaching and learning impact of classroom-embedded formative assessment has spawned interest in a broader array of assessment tools and practices, including interim assessment. Although researchers have begun to explore the impact of interim assessments in the classroom, like other assessment tools and practices, they…

  11. 20 CFR 410.234 - Interim provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interim provisions. 410.234 Section 410.234 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV... Evidence § 410.234 Interim provisions. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of this subpart, a...

  12. Vet Centers. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-08-04

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is amending its medical regulation that governs Vet Center services. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (the 2013 Act) requires Vet Centers to provide readjustment counseling services to broader groups of veterans, members of the Armed Forces, including a member of a reserve component of the Armed Forces, and family members of such veterans and members. This interim final rule amends regulatory criteria to conform to the 2013 Act, to include new and revised definitions.

  13. Fusion Breeder Program interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.; Lee, J.D.; Neef, W.

    1982-06-11

    This interim report for the FY82 Fusion Breeder Program covers work performed during the scoping phase of the study, December, 1981-February 1982. The goals for the FY82 study are the identification and development of a reference blanket concept using the fission suppression concept and the definition of a development plan to further the fusion breeder application. The context of the study is the tandem mirror reactor, but emphasis is placed upon blanket engineering. A tokamak driver and blanket concept will be selected and studied in more detail during FY83.

  14. Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia syndrome presenting with neutrophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after breast-conserving therapy.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Sahoko; Jinta, Torahiko; Chohnabayashi, Naohiko; Fujie, Toshihide; Sumi, Yuki; Inase, Naohiko

    2012-03-20

    A 61-year-old female presented with a dry cough and fever 4 months after tangential radiation therapy (RT) following conserving surgery for breast cancer. Chest radiography and CT demonstrated consolidation with air bronchogram outside the irradiated area. Neutrophil granulocytes were abundant in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) (39.6% of total cells), and transbronchial lung biopsy revealed organising pneumonia (OP) histologically. Antibiotic therapy had no effect, but corticosteroid therapy brought about clinical improvement. Her condition was diagnosed as bronchiolitis obliterans OP (BOOP) syndrome. Lymphocytic BALF has been identified as a characteristic of BOOP syndrome induced after RT for breast cancer. The BALF in this case, however, was neutrophilic. In our analysis of differential cell counts in the BALF of 24 patients with BOOP syndrome, the BALF was neutrophilic (>5%) in 16 (76%) cases, and the neutrophilia was severe in some of those patients.

  15. Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia syndrome presenting with neutrophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after breast-conserving therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Sahoko; Jinta, Torahiko; Chohnabayashi, Naohiko; Fujie, Toshihide; Sumi, Yuki; Inase, Naohiko

    2012-01-01

    A 61-year-old female presented with a dry cough and fever 4 months after tangential radiation therapy (RT) following conserving surgery for breast cancer. Chest radiography and CT demonstrated consolidation with air bronchogram outside the irradiated area. Neutrophil granulocytes were abundant in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) (39.6% of total cells), and transbronchial lung biopsy revealed organising pneumonia (OP) histologically. Antibiotic therapy had no effect, but corticosteroid therapy brought about clinical improvement. Her condition was diagnosed as bronchiolitis obliterans OP (BOOP) syndrome. Lymphocytic BALF has been identified as a characteristic of BOOP syndrome induced after RT for breast cancer. The BALF in this case, however, was neutrophilic. In our analysis of differential cell counts in the BALF of 24 patients with BOOP syndrome, the BALF was neutrophilic (>5%) in 16 (76%) cases, and the neutrophilia was severe in some of those patients. PMID:22605699

  16. Solid waste burial grounds interim safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, G.H.

    1994-10-01

    This Interim Safety Analysis document supports the authorization basis for the interim operation and restrictions on interim operations for the near-surface land disposal of solid waste in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. The Solid Waste Burial Grounds Interim Safety Basis supports the upgrade progress for the safety analysis report and the technical safety requirements for the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. Accident safety analysis scenarios have been analyzed based on the significant events identified in the preliminary hazards analysis. The interim safety analysis provides an evaluation of the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds to determine if the radiological and hazardous material exposures will be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint to the worker, the onsite personnel, the public, and the environment.

  17. Feasibility Evaluation of Radioimmunoguided Surgery of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Ananth; Reilly, Raymond M.; Holloway, Claire M. B.; Caldwell, Curtis B.

    2012-01-01

    Breast-conserving surgery involves completely excising the tumour while limiting the amount of normal tissue removed, which is technically challenging to achieve, especially given the limited intraoperative guidance available to the surgeon. This study evaluates the feasibility of radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) to guide the detection and delineation of tumours intraoperatively. The 3D point-response function of a commercial gamma-ray-detecting probe (GDP) was determined as a function of radionuclide (131I, 111In, 99mTc), energy-window threshold, and collimator length (0.0–3.0-cm). This function was used to calculate the minimum detectable tumour volumes (MDTVs) and the minimum tumour-to-background activity concentration ratio (T:B) for effective delineation of a breast tumour model. The GDP had larger MDTVs and a higher minimum required T:B for tumour delineation with 131I than with 111In or 99mTc. It was shown that for 111In there was a benefit to using a collimator length of 0.5-cm. For the model used, the minimum required T:B required for effective tumour delineation was 5.2 ± 0.4. RIGS has the potential to significantly improve the accuracy of breast-conserving surgery; however, before these benefits can be realized, novel radiopharmaceuticals need to be developed that have a higher specificity for cancerous tissue in vivo than what is currently available. PMID:22518303

  18. Supraclavicular failure after breast-conserving therapy in patients with four or more positive axillary lymph nodes when prophylactic supraclavicular irradiation is omitted.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Yasushi; Kataoka, Masaaki; Semba, Takatoshi; Uwatsu, Kotaro; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Inoue, Takeshi; Sakai, Shinya; Aono, Shoji; Takahashi, Tadaaki; Oda, Shogo

    2009-06-01

    The incidence of supraclavicular metastasis as the initial failure and the failure patterns in patients with four or more positive axillary lymph nodes (PALNs) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) without prophylactic supraclavicular irradiation were investigated. Between 1991 and 2002, a total of 48 women with four or more PALNs underwent BCT without prophylactic supraclavicular irradiation (33 patients with 4-9 PALNs; 15 patients with > or =10 PALNs). The median follow-up time was 50 months. Among the patients with 4-9 PALNs, 3% had isolated supraclavicular metastasis as the initial failure, and 30% had distant metastasis as the initial failure. Among patients with > or =10 PALNs, 7% had isolated supraclavicular metastasis as the initial failure, and 40% had distant metastasis as the initial failure. The 4-year isolated supraclavicular failure rates were 5% for all patients, 3% for patients with 4-9 PALNs, and 8% for patients with >/=10 PALNs. In patients who had undergone BCT and had had four or more PALNs, the major failure pattern was distant failure with or without locoregional failure; isolated supraclavicular failure as the initial failure comprised a less common failure pattern. Omission of prophylactic supraclavicular irradiation may be acceptable for this subset of patients.

  19. Monomorphic Epithelial Proliferations of the Breast: A Possible Precursor Lesion Associated With Ipsilateral Breast Failure After Breast Conserving Therapy in Patients With Negative Lumpectomy Margins

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Neal S.; Kestin, Larry L.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-03-01

    Background: It is generally believed that ipsilateral breast failures (IBFs) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) develop from incompletely eradicated carcinoma. We previously suggested that monomorphic epithelial proliferations (MEPs) in the breast may be a pool of partially transformed clones from which breast carcinomas can arise and that radiation therapy (RT) may also reduce the risk of IBF by eradicating MEPs. We examined salvage mastectomy specimens in patients experiencing an IBF to define the relationship between MEPs and IBFs and an additional potential mechanism for IBF risk reduction by RT. Methods and Materials: The location, number, and distribution of radiation changes and MEPs relative to 51 IBFs were mapped in salvage mastectomy specimens from BCT patients with adequately excised, initial carcinomas (negative lumpectomy margins). Results: All 51 salvage mastectomies had diffuse, late radiation changes. None had active fibrocystic lesions. MEPs were predominantly located in the immediate vicinity of the IBFs. A mean of 39% of MEP cases were located within the IBF, 46% were located within 2 cm of the IBF, and 14% were 2-3 cm from the IBF. Conclusions: MEPs appear to be a pool of partially transformed precursor lesions that can give rise to ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive carcinomas (CAs). Many IBFs may arise from MEPs that reemerge after RT. Radiation may also reduce IBF risk after BCT (including in patients with negative margins) by primarily eradicating MEPs.

  20. Long-Term Outcome in Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Treated With Breast-Conserving Therapy: Implications for Optimal Follow-up Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Wilkinson, J. Ben; Kestin, Larry L.; Ye Hong; Goldstein, Neal S.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To determine 20-year rates of local control and outcome-associated factors for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: All DCIS cases receiving BCT between 1980 and 1993 were reviewed. Patient demographics and pathologic factors were analyzed for effect on outcomes, including ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and survival. Results: One hundred forty-five cases were evaluated; the median follow-up time was 19.3 years. IBTR developed in 25 patients, for 5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-year actuarial rates of 9.9%, 12.2%, 13.7%, and 17.5%, respectively. One third of IBTRs were elsewhere failures, and 68% of IBTRs occurred <10 years after diagnosis. Young age and cancerization of lobules predicted for IBTR at <10 years, and increased slide involvement and atypical ductal hyperplasia were associated with IBTR at later time points. Conclusions: Patients with DCIS treated with BCT have excellent long-term rates of local control. Predictors of IBTR vary over time, and the risk of recurrence seems highest within 10 to 12 years after diagnosis.

  1. A comparison of quality of life and satisfaction of women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving therapy vs. mastectomy in southern China.

    PubMed

    He, Z-Y; Tong, Q; Wu, S-G; Li, F-Y; Lin, H-X; Guan, X-X

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the quality of life (QoL) and overall satisfaction with treatment of women with stage T1-2N0M0 breast cancer treated with breast conserving therapy (BCT) or mastectomy (MAS) in southern China. Functional assessment of cancer therapy-breast, traditional Chinese version 4 (FACT-B), was administered to 180 patients with stage T1-2N0M0 breast cancer (82 BCT and 98 MAS) treated between July 2000 and July 2008. The two groups differed in tumor pathology and how axillary lymph nodes were treated (sentinel node biopsy vs. dissection), while other disease and socioeconomic characteristics were similar. The median follow-up after completion of radiotherapy was 60 months in the BCT group, and 65 months in the MAS group. The scores of the physical, functional, and emotional domains and breast-specific concerns of FACT-B were not significantly different between the groups. The social domain score of the BCT group was significantly greater than those of the MAS group. Patients who underwent BCT did not report better QoL than those who received MAS, but BCT patients experienced easier social adjustment.

  2. Molecular clonality determination of ipsilateral recurrence of invasive breast carcinomas after breast-conserving therapy: comparison with clinical and biologic factors.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Neal S; Vicini, Frank A; Hunter, Susan; Odish, Eva; Forbes, Suzy; Kraus, Daniel; Kestin, Larry L

    2005-05-01

    We established clonality relationships between invasive ipsilateral breast failures (IBFs; local recurrences) and initial invasive carcinomas using a molecular polymerase chain reaction loss of heterozygosity (LOH) assay for 26 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy for invasive carcinoma with no distant metastases (DMs) before the IBE LOH was +/- 50% allelic loss. Eighteen IBFs (69%) were related clonally to initial carcinomas; 8 (31%) were clonally distinct, second primary carcinomas. IBFs and initial invasive carcinomas were morphologically similar in 6 (75%) of 8 clonally different cases. Clinical IBF classification and molecular assay results differed in 11 cases (42%). The mean intervals to IBF were 4.7 years in related and 8.7 years in different cases (P = .013). In 6 patients, DMs developed; 5 had related IBFs. In related IBF cases, the mean increase in fractional allelic loss (FAL) of IBFs associated with DMs was 18.9% compared with 7.6% in cases unassociated with DMs (P = .004). Molecular assays can accurately establish the clonality of most IBFs. Morphologic comparison and clinical IBF classification are unreliable methods of determining clonality. Clonally related IBFs occurred sooner than clonally different IBFs. Patients with clonally related IBFs are the main pool in which DMs occur Not all clonally related IBFs have the same DM association; those with large FAL gains were associated with DMs. Molecular clonality assays may provide a reliable means of identifying patients who might benefit from systemic chemotherapy at the time of IBF.

  3. Enhancing patterns of breast cancer on preoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and resection margin in breast conserving therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ok Hwa; Kim, Suk Jung; Lee, Jung Sun

    2016-02-17

    The association between enhancing patterns of preoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and resection margins after BCS has not been studied in detail before. We investigated the association between surgical outcomes and enhancing patterns observed on DCE-MRI. 269 enhancing patterns on DCE-MRI scans were selected, and subdivided into the following groups: (1) a single mass-like enhancement, (2) a single non-mass-like enhancement (NME), (3) mass-like enhancing breast cancer with other mass-like enhancing lesions, and (4) mass-like enhancing breast cancer with additional NMEs. Associations between enhancing patterns on DCE-MRI and re-excision rate, size of specimen, and ratio of tumor/specimen were evaluated retrospectively. The conversion rate from breast conserving therapy (BCT) to mastectomy as a result of MRI findings was 13.4%, re-excision rate during BCT was 8.2% and excision rate of another suspicious lesion was 7.4%. The single NME group had the highest re-excision rate after BCT (22.2%) (p = 0.02). The ratio of tumor/specimen (p = 0.61) and mean specimen size (p = 0.38) were not influenced by enhancement patterns. The false positive rate and positive predictive values of using DCE-MRI for defining the extension of breast cancer was 22.2% and 71.4%, respectively. Enhancement patterns on DCE- MRI, especially NME, could increase re-excision rates.

  4. Chest wall leiomyosarcoma after breast-conservative therapy for early-stage breast cancer in a young woman with Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    PubMed

    Henry, Eve; Villalobos, Victor; Million, Lynn; Jensen, Kristin C; West, Robert; Ganjoo, Kristen; Lebensohn, Alexandra; Ford, James M; Telli, Melinda L

    2012-08-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is one of the most penetrant forms of familial cancer susceptibility syndromes, characterized by early age at tumor onset and a wide spectrum of malignant tumors. Identifying LFS in patients with cancer is clinically imperative because they have an increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation and are more likely to develop radiation-induced secondary malignancies. This case report describes a young woman whose initial presentation of LFS was early-onset breast cancer and whose treatment of this primary malignancy with breast conservation likely resulted in a secondary malignancy arising in her radiation field. As seen in this case, most breast cancers in patients with LFS exhibit a triple-positive phenotype (estrogen receptor-positive/progesterone receptor-positive/HER2-positive). Although this patient met classic LFS criteria based on age and personal and family history of cancer, the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast and Ovarian Cancer endorse genetic screening for TP53 mutations in a subset of patients with early-onset breast cancer, even in the absence of a suggestive family history, because of the potential for de novo TP53 mutations.

  5. In the Modern Treatment Era, Is Breast Conservation Equivalent to Mastectomy in Women Younger Than 40 Years of Age? A Multi-Institution Study.

    PubMed

    Frandsen, Jonathan; Ly, David; Cannon, George; Suneja, Gita; Matsen, Cindy; Gaffney, David K; Wright, Melissa; Kokeny, Kristine E; Poppe, Matthew M

    2015-12-01

    Mastectomy is often recommended for women ≤40 years of age with breast cancer, as young women were under-represented in the landmark trials comparing breast conservation therapy (BCT) to mastectomy. We hypothesized that, in the modern treatment era, BCT and mastectomy result in equivalent local control rates in young women. Breast cancer cases arising between 1975 and 2013 in women ≤40 years old were collected from the tumor registries of 2 large healthcare systems in Utah. Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyze freedom from locoregional recurrence (FFLR), overall survival (OS), and relapse-free survival (RFS). This analysis identified 853 BCT candidates. A comparison of BCT to mastectomy after 2000 showed FFLR, RFS, and OS were all similar. Rate for FFLR at 10 years was 94.9% versus 92.1% for BCT and mastectomy, respectively (P=.57). For women whose cancer was diagnosed after 2000, who received BCT, FFLR and RFS rates were improved compared to those whose cancer was diagnosed prior to 2000 (P<.05), whereas OS (P=.46) rates were similar. Among those who underwent mastectomy, FFLR, OS, and RFS were significantly improved (P<.05) with diagnosis after 2000. FFLR rates for young women, ≤40 years of age, have significantly improved for BCT and mastectomy over time. If patients were treated after 2000, BCT appears to be safe and equivalent to mastectomy at 10 years in terms of FFLR, OS, and RFS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Survival Outcomes in T1–2 Breast Cancer Patients Who Receive Breast-Conserving Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jaegyu; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Sanghwa; Kim, Jee Ye; Park, Seho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on survival outcomes for breast cancer. Methods A total of 954 patients who had T1–2 breast cancer and received breast-conserving therapy (BCT) between 2007 and 2010 were enrolled. We divided the patients according to whether they received preoperative MRI or not. Survival outcomes, including locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS), were analyzed. Results Preoperative MRI was performed in 743 of 954 patients. Clinicopathological features were not significantly different between patients with and without preoperative MRI. In the univariate analyses, larger tumors were marginally associated with poor LRRFS compared to smaller tumors (hazard ratio [HR], 3.22; p=0.053). Tumor size, histologic grade, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), hormonal therapy, and adjuvant chemotherapy status were associated with RFS. Larger tumor size, higher histologic grade, lack of ER and PR expression, and no hormonal therapy were associated with decreased OS. Tumor size was associated with LRRFS in the multivariate analyses (HR, 4.19; p=0.048). However, preoperative MRI was not significantly associated with LRRFS, RFS, or OS in either univariate or multivariate analyses. Conclusion Preoperative MRI did not influence survival outcomes in T1–2 breast cancer patients who underwent BCT. Routine use of preoperative MRI in T1–2 breast cancer may not translate into longer RFS and OS. PMID:28053631

  7. Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Survival Outcomes in T1-2 Breast Cancer Patients Who Receive Breast-Conserving Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jaegyu; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Sanghwa; Kim, Jee Ye; Park, Seho; Kim, Seung Il

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on survival outcomes for breast cancer. A total of 954 patients who had T1-2 breast cancer and received breast-conserving therapy (BCT) between 2007 and 2010 were enrolled. We divided the patients according to whether they received preoperative MRI or not. Survival outcomes, including locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS), were analyzed. Preoperative MRI was performed in 743 of 954 patients. Clinicopathological features were not significantly different between patients with and without preoperative MRI. In the univariate analyses, larger tumors were marginally associated with poor LRRFS compared to smaller tumors (hazard ratio [HR], 3.22; p=0.053). Tumor size, histologic grade, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), hormonal therapy, and adjuvant chemotherapy status were associated with RFS. Larger tumor size, higher histologic grade, lack of ER and PR expression, and no hormonal therapy were associated with decreased OS. Tumor size was associated with LRRFS in the multivariate analyses (HR, 4.19; p=0.048). However, preoperative MRI was not significantly associated with LRRFS, RFS, or OS in either univariate or multivariate analyses. Preoperative MRI did not influence survival outcomes in T1-2 breast cancer patients who underwent BCT. Routine use of preoperative MRI in T1-2 breast cancer may not translate into longer RFS and OS.

  8. 13 CFR 120.890 - Source of interim financing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Source of interim financing. 120... Development Company Loan Program (504) Interim Financing § 120.890 Source of interim financing. A Project may use interim financing for all Project costs except the Borrower's contribution. Any source (including...

  9. 40 CFR 270.73 - Termination of interim status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Termination of interim status. 270.73... (CONTINUED) EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM Interim Status § 270.73 Termination of interim status. Interim status terminates when: (a) Final administrative disposition of...

  10. 46 CFR 309.101 - Amendment of interim binders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Amendment of interim binders. 309.101 Section 309.101... INSURANCE § 309.101 Amendment of interim binders. The interim binder for a vessel whose stated valuation is... after the attachment of the insurance under the interim binder to which such valuation...

  11. 40 CFR 270.71 - Operation during interim status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operation during interim status. 270... (CONTINUED) EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM Interim Status § 270.71 Operation during interim status. (a) During the interim status period the facility shall not: (1)...

  12. 49 CFR 106.35 - Interim final rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interim final rule. 106.35 Section 106.35... PHMSA Rulemaking Documents § 106.35 Interim final rule. An interim final rule is issued without first... requirements and their effective date. PHMSA may issue an interim final rule if it finds, for good cause,...

  13. 33 CFR 1.05-45 - Interim rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interim rule. 1.05-45 Section 1... PROVISIONS Rulemaking § 1.05-45 Interim rule. (a) An interim rule may be issued when it is in the public... example, an interim rule may be issued in instances when normal procedures for notice and comment prior...

  14. The value of latissimus dorsi flap with implant reconstruction for total mastectomy after conservative breast cancer surgery recurrence.

    PubMed

    Garusi, Cristina; Lohsiriwat, Visnu; Brenelli, Fabricio; Galimberti, Viviana Enrica; De Lorenzi, Francesca; Rietjens, Mario; Rossetto, Fabio; Petit, Jean Yves

    2011-04-01

    Total mastectomy is usually indicated after breast conservative treatment cancer recurrence. Breast reconstruction in this group can be performed with many options. We did 63 latissimus dorsi flap with implants reconstructions between 2001-2007. All of them were performed in breast cancer recurrence cases after breast conservative treatment and preceded for total mastectomy. The patient age range from 31 to 71 years old (50.1 ± 7.3 years). The follow-up was 36.5 ± 14.9 months (22-141 months). Neither flap loss nor significant major donor-site complication was recorded. The capsular contraction Baker's grade III was observed in 2 cases (3.1%). The rest were grade I-II and there was no grade IV contracture. We purpose that LD flap with implant can be performed in irradiated breast with low capsular contracture rate. It is suitable in total mastectomy reconstruction after conservative breast cancer surgery recurrence.

  15. Endoscopy Assisted Oncoplastic Breast Surgery (EAOBS).

    PubMed

    Soybir, Gürsel; Fukuma, Eisuke

    2015-04-01

    Endoscopic oncoplastic breast surgery represents a minimal invasive approach with the aim of both removing cancer safely and also restoring the breast image. It has less noticeable scar, excellent cosmetic outcomes, high patient satisfaction rate and recently reported relatively long term safety. Operative techniques for both endoscopic breast conserving surgery and endoscopic nipple/areola/skin sparing mastectomy have been described in detail. Two different working planes in which one of them is subcutaneous and the other one is sub-mammary planes are being used during the surgery. Surgical techniqe needs some instruments such as endoscopic retractor, light guided specific mammary retractor, wound protector and bipolar scissor. Endoscopic breast retractors provide magnified visualization and extensive posterior dissection facility. Tunneling method and hydrodissection simplify the technique in the subcutaneous field. Oncoplastic reconstruction techniques are also applied after the tumor resection by endoscopic method. Complication rates of endoscopic breast surgery are similar to open breast surgery rates. Quite succesful local recurrence, distant metastasis and overall survival rates have been declared. However it looks reasonable to wait for the results with longer follow-up before having a judgement about oncologic efficiency and safety of the endoscopic breast cancer surgery.

  16. Endoscopy Assisted Oncoplastic Breast Surgery (EAOBS)

    PubMed Central

    Soybir, Gürsel; Fukuma, Eisuke

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic oncoplastic breast surgery represents a minimal invasive approach with the aim of both removing cancer safely and also restoring the breast image. It has less noticeable scar, excellent cosmetic outcomes, high patient satisfaction rate and recently reported relatively long term safety. Operative techniques for both endoscopic breast conserving surgery and endoscopic nipple/areola/skin sparing mastectomy have been described in detail. Two different working planes in which one of them is subcutaneous and the other one is sub-mammary planes are being used during the surgery. Surgical techniqe needs some instruments such as endoscopic retractor, light guided specific mammary retractor, wound protector and bipolar scissor. Endoscopic breast retractors provide magnified visualization and extensive posterior dissection facility. Tunneling method and hydrodissection simplify the technique in the subcutaneous field. Oncoplastic reconstruction techniques are also applied after the tumor resection by endoscopic method. Complication rates of endoscopic breast surgery are similar to open breast surgery rates. Quite succesful local recurrence, distant metastasis and overall survival rates have been declared. However it looks reasonable to wait for the results with longer follow-up before having a judgement about oncologic efficiency and safety of the endoscopic breast cancer surgery.

  17. DOE UST interim subsurface barrier technologies workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1992-09-01

    This document contains information which was presented at a workshop regarding interim subsurface barrier technologies that could be used for underground storage tanks, particularly the tank 241-C-106 at the Hanford Reservation.

  18. Interim Policy for Evaluation of Stereoisomeric Pesticides

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    An interim approach for determining data requirements for non-racemic mixtures of stereoisomeric pesticides. These data are needed in order to assess the risk posed to ecosystems and drinking water sources by these mixtures.

  19. 40 CFR 180.319 - Interim tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.319 Interim... pesticide chemicals in or on the following raw agricultural commodities: Substances Uses Tolerance in...

  20. Interim Prosthesis Options for Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Siadat, Hakimeh; Alikhasi, Marzieh; Beyabanaki, Elaheh

    2016-01-24

    Dental implants have become a popular treatment modality for replacing missing teeth. In this regard, the importance of restoring patients with function during the implant healing period has grown in recent decades. Esthetic concerns, especially in the anterior region of the maxilla, should also be considered until the definitive restoration is delivered. Another indication for such restorations is maintenance of the space required for esthetic and functional definitive restorations in cases where the implant site is surrounded by natural teeth. Numerous articles have described different types of interim prostheses and their fabrication techniques. This article aims to briefly discuss all types of implant-related interim prostheses by different classification including provisional timing (before implant placement, after implant placement in unloading and loading periods), materials, and techniques used for making the restorations, the type of interim prosthesis retention, and definitive restoration. Furthermore, the abutment torque for such restorations and methods for transferring the soft tissue from interim to definitive prostheses are addressed.

  1. Clinical Factors Associated With Seroma Volume Reduction in Breast-Conserving Therapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tzu-I J.; Elkhuizen, Paula H.M.; Minkema, Danny; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Mourik, Anke M. van; Cassee, Jorien; Hurkmans, Coen; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To correlate clinical factors with seroma volume and reduction; and to determine whether cone-beam CT (CBCT) could be used clinically to monitor seroma reduction. Patients and Methods: This investigation included 102 women from five institutions with stage T1-2 breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Two CT scans were acquired: the planning CT (CT1) and a second CT (CT2) during radiotherapy (RT). Seroma was contoured on all scans, and correlations between seroma characteristics and clinical factors were investigated by univariate and multivariate analyses. In a substudy, 10 of the 102 patients received multiple CBCT scans during RT. Seroma were contoured by two observers in the substudy. Fifteen time points at which CT and CBCT were performed within 2 days were identified. The levels of correlation in seroma contours between CBCT and CT and between the two observers were examined. Results: The mean relative seroma reduction from CT1 to CT2 was 54% (p < 0.001). A significant inverse relationship was found between relative seroma reduction per week and number of RT fractions given by univariate and multivariate analyses (p = 0.01, 0.03). The mean difference in contoured seroma volumes between CT and CBCT was 12% (3.3 cm{sup 3}). When assessing the relative difference in seroma contours between Observer 1 and Observer 2, an interobserver difference of 12% was demonstrated. Neither discrepancy was clinically significant. Conclusions: Radiotherapy seems to hinder seroma reduction. Volume discrepancies between CBCT and CT were minor, with low interobserver variation, indicating that CBCT might be useful in monitoring seroma reduction.

  2. Management of the Axilla in T1-2 Breast Cancer Patients with Macrometastatic Sentinel Node Involvement Who Underwent Breast-Conserving Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kuru, Bekir; Yuruker, Savas; Sullu, Yurdanur; Gursel, Bilge; Ozen, Necati

    2017-09-25

    The aims of our study were to determine the incidence of axillary recurrence and arm morbidity in T1-2 invasive breast cancer patients with macrometastases on the sentinel lymph node (SLN) who underwent breast-conserving therapy (BCT), with or without axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). One hundred and nine T1-2 invasive breast cancer patients with macrometastases on the SLN who underwent BCT in our institution were included in the study. Patients with 1-2 positive SLN and without extra nodal extension (ENE) on the SLN did not undergo ALND (SLN-only group) and patients with ENE or patients who had >2 metastatic nodes underwent level I, II ALND (ALND group). The SLN-only group received radiotherapy to three axillary levels, the supraclavicular fossa, and ± mammaria interna. ALND group received radiotherapy to axillary level III, the supraclavicular fossa, and ± mammaria interna. The incidence of axillary recurrence and arm morbidity were investigated. Of the 109 patients, 18 patients with >2 metastatic SLNs and 10 with ENE on the SLN underwent ALND and 81 patients underwent SLN only. Median follow-up time was 37 months (3-77). There was no axillary recurrence in SLN-only group. However, in the ALND group 1 patient had developed axillary metastasis. There were 2 objective lymphoedema and 3 arm-shoulder restriction cases in the SLN-only group, and 2 and 3 in the ALND group, respectively. Axillary dissection could safely be omitted in patients with 1-2 macrometastatic SLN and without ENE who undergo BCT and axillary radiotherapy.

  3. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for HER2+ breast cancers: A feasibility study evaluating BNCT for potential role in breast conservation therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Peter Anthony

    A novel Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) regimen for the treatment of HER2+ breast cancers has been proposed as an alternative to whole breast irradiation for breast conservation therapy patients. The proposed therapy regimen is based on the assumed production of boron delivery agents that would be synthesized from compounds of Trastuzumab (Herceptin ®) and oligomeric phosphate diesters (OPDs). The combination of the anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody and the high boron loading capability of OPDs has led to the assumption that boron could be delivered to the HER2+ cancer cells at Tumor to Healthy Tissue ratios (T:H) of up to 35:1 and boron concentrations above 50 μg/g. This significantly increased boron delivery efficiency has opened new BNCT possibilities. This proof of concept study examined treatment parameters derived as the results in previous efforts in the context of patient-specific geometry and compared calculated dose results to those observed during actual patient therapy. These results were based on dose calculations performed with a set of calculated Kerma coefficients derived from tissues specific to the regions of interest for breast cancer. A comparison was made of the dose to the tumor region, the patient's skin, and the peripheral organs. The results of this study demonstrated that, given the performance of the proposed boron delivery agent, the BNCT treatment regimen is feasible. The feasibility is based on the findings that the equivalent dose could be delivered to the treatment volume with less dose to the skin and peripheral organs. This is anticipated to improve the treatment outcomes by maintaining local control of tumor cells while reducing dose to healthy tissues.

  4. The clinical characteristics and non-steroidal treatment for radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia syndrome after breast-conserving therapy.

    PubMed

    Ogo, Etsuyo; Komaki, Ritsuko; Abe, Toshi; Uchida, Masafumi; Fujimoto, Kiminori; Suzuki, Gen; Tsuji, Chiyoko; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Etou, Hidehiro; Hattori, Chikayuki; Watanabe, Yuko; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2010-10-01

    A rare and unique occurrence of radiation-induced pulmonary injury was observed outside the tangential field for early breast cancer treatment. The findings appeared to be idiopathic and were termed radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) syndrome. The goal of this study was to report and determine the incidence, analyze the characteristics of the pulmonary lesions on the images and also investigate the treatment methods. A retrospective analysis was conducted of 616 consecutive patients that underwent breast-conserving therapy (BCT) from January 1992 to December 2008. The patients were observed at least one year after radiotherapy for BCT. Radiotherapy was administered by 4 MV photons in all patients. The patients underwent chest X-rays periodically. If the BOOP syndrome was found, chest computed tomography (CT) were conducted to identify the characteristics of the pulmonary lesion outside the radiation field. The incidence of the radiation-induced BOOP syndrome was 12 patients (1.9%). Six of them had fever and cough, 6 had no symptoms. The pulmonary lesions were classified into four patterns on chest CT. Progression of the pulmonary lesions observed on chest X-ray were classified into three patterns. BOOP syndrome appeared within 5.6 months after radiotherapy and completely disappeared within 12 months after its onset. Their clinical conditions were not severe and these pulmonary lesions disappeared gradually without use of steroids in our institution. There was no death caused by BOOP syndrome. Although the incidence of BOOP syndrome and its associated prognosis are not significant, this clinical condition must be carefully followed using diagnositic imaging in order to not over administer steroids. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical Outcome of Breast Conservation Therapy for Breast Cancer in Hong Kong: Prognostic Impact of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence and 2005 St. Gallen Risk Categories

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, T.-K. . E-mail: tkokyau@gmail.com; Soong, Inda S.; Chan, K.; Chan, M.; Cheung, P.; Lau, H.W.; Chang, Amy T.Y.; Lee, Anne W.M.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of breast conservation therapy (BCT) for invasive breast cancers in our predominantly Chinese population. Methods and Materials: Clinical outcomes of 412 T1-2 invasive breast cancers treated by wide local excision and external radiotherapy from 1994 to 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. Only 7% lesions were first detected by mammograms. Adjuvant tamoxifen and chemotherapy were added in 74% and 45% patients, respectively. Results: The median follow-up was 5.4 years. The 5-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rate, distant failure-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival were 4%, 92%, 96%, and 98%, respectively. The 5-year distant failure-free survival for the low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk categories (2005 St. Gallen) were 98%, 91%, and 80%, respectively (p 0.0003). Cosmetic results were good to excellent in more than 90% of the assessable patients. Grade 3 histology (hazard ratio [HR], 4.461; 95% CI, 1.216-16.360; p = 0.024), age (HR, 0.915; 95% CI, 0.846-0.990; p = 0.027), and close/positive final margins (HR, 3.499; 95% CI, 1.141-10.729; p = 0.028) were significant independent risk factors for IBTR. Both St. Gallen risk categories (p = 0.003) and IBTR (HR, 5.885; 95% CI, 2.494-13.889; p < 0.0005) were independent prognostic factors for distant failure-free survival. Conclusions: Despite the low percentage of mammographically detected lesions, the overall clinical outcome of BCT for invasive breast cancers in the Chinese population is comparable to the Western series. The 2005 St. Gallen risk category is a promising clinical tool, but further validation by large studies is warranted.

  6. Using nodal ratios to predict risk of regional recurrences in patients treated with breast conservation therapy with 4 or more positive lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Castrucci, William; Lannin, Donald; Haffty, Bruce G; Higgins, Susan A; Moran, Meena S

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The value of nodal ratios (NRs) as a prognostic variable in breast cancer is continually being demonstrated. The purpose of this study was to use NR in patients with ≥4+ nodes to assess a correlation of NR with regional (lymph node) recurrence. Methods. Inclusion criteria was ≥8 nodes dissected with ≥4+ nodes after breast conservation therapy. Of 1060 patients treated from 1975 to 2003 who had a minimum of 8 nodes dissected, 273 were node+; 56 patients had ≥4+ involved nodes and were the focus of this study. Nodal ratios were calculated for each patient and grouped into 3 categories: high (≥70%), intermediate (40%-69%) and low (<40%). Each nodal ratio was correlated with patterns of local, regional, and distant failures and OS. Results. Outcomes for the entire cohort were BRFS-83%, NRFS-93%, DMFS-61%, and OS 63% at 10 yrs. The OS, DMFS, and NRFS correlated with N2 (4-9 nodes+) versus N3 (≥10+) status but did not correlate with BRFS, as expected. When evaluating NR, 18 pts had high NR (>70%). Only 3 patients experienced nodal recurrences, all within previously radiated supraclavicular fields. All 3 in-field regional failures occurred in the N3 group of patients with NR >70%. All were treated with a single AP field prescribed to a dose of 46 Gy at a standard depth of 3 cm. Conclusions. In this group of N2/N3 patients treated with BCT, we were able to identify patients at high risk for regional failures as those with high NR of >70% and ≥10+ nodes. While these findings need to be reproduced in larger datasets, this group of patients with NR of >70% in 4 or more positive axillary lymph nodes may benefit from meticulous targeting of regional nodes, dose escalation, and/or more intensive systemic therapies.

  7. Using Nodal Ratios to Predict Risk of Regional Recurrences in Patients Treated with Breast Conservation Therapy with 4 or More Positive Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Castrucci, William; Lannin, Donald; Haffty, Bruce G.; Higgins, Susan A.; Moran, Meena S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The value of nodal ratios (NRs) as a prognostic variable in breast cancer is continually being demonstrated. The purpose of this study was to use NR in patients with ≥4+ nodes to assess a correlation of NR with regional (lymph node) recurrence. Methods. Inclusion criteria was ≥8 nodes dissected with ≥4+ nodes after breast conservation therapy. Of 1060 patients treated from 1975 to 2003 who had a minimum of 8 nodes dissected, 273 were node+; 56 patients had ≥4+ involved nodes and were the focus of this study. Nodal ratios were calculated for each patient and grouped into 3 categories: high (≥70%), intermediate (40%–69%) and low (<40%). Each nodal ratio was correlated with patterns of local, regional, and distant failures and OS. Results. Outcomes for the entire cohort were BRFS-83%, NRFS-93%, DMFS-61%, and OS 63% at 10 yrs. The OS, DMFS, and NRFS correlated with N2 (4–9 nodes+) versus N3 (≥10+) status but did not correlate with BRFS, as expected. When evaluating NR, 18 pts had high NR (>70%). Only 3 patients experienced nodal recurrences, all within previously radiated supraclavicular fields. All 3 in-field regional failures occurred in the N3 group of patients with NR >70%. All were treated with a single AP field prescribed to a dose of 46 Gy at a standard depth of 3 cm. Conclusions. In this group of N2/N3 patients treated with BCT, we were able to identify patients at high risk for regional failures as those with high NR of >70% and ≥10+ nodes. While these findings need to be reproduced in larger datasets, this group of patients with NR of >70% in 4 or more positive axillary lymph nodes may benefit from meticulous targeting of regional nodes, dose escalation, and/or more intensive systemic therapies. PMID:22084784

  8. Aesthetic result after breast-conserving therapy is associated with quality of life several years after treatment. Swedish women evaluated with BCCT.core and BREAST-Q™.

    PubMed

    Dahlbäck, Cecilia; Ullmark, Jenny Heiman; Rehn, Martin; Ringberg, Anita; Manjer, Jonas

    2017-08-01

    A gold standard for evaluation of aesthetic outcome after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) is still lacking. The BCCT.core software has been developed to assess aesthetic result in a standardised way. We aimed to study how the result of BCCT.core after BCT is associated with quality of life, measured with the BREAST-Q™, a validated questionnaire. Women eligible for BCT were consecutively recruited between February 1st 2008 and January 31st 2012 (n = 653). Photographs of 310 women, taken one year after BCT, were evaluated using the BCCT.core software. The postoperative BCT module of the BREAST-Q™ questionnaire was administered by mail and 348 questionnaires were returned (median 5.5 years after BCT). In all, 216 women had both BCCT.core results and completed BREAST-Q™ questionnaires available. The results from the BCCT.core evaluation were: excellent n = 49 (15.8%); good n = 178 (57.4%); fair n = 73 (23.5%); poor n = 10 (3.2%). The median BREAST-Q™ score for satisfaction with breasts was 66 [interquartile range (IQR) 57-80] and for psychosocial well-being 82 (IQR 61-100). Poor/fair results on BCCT.core were associated with Q-scores below median for both satisfaction with breasts [odds ratio (OR) 3.4 (confidence interval (CI) 1.7-6.8)] as well as for psychosocial well-being [OR 2.2 (CI 1.1-4.2)]. A statistically significant association between BCCT.core results one year after BCT and quality of life ratings using BREAST-Q™ several years later is shown in this study. This implies that the BCCT.core may be valuable in BCT follow-up and used as a standardised instrument in the evaluation of aesthetic results.

  9. Comparisons of Oncologic Outcomes between Triple-Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) and Non-TNBC among Patients Treated with Breast-Conserving Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sanghwa; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Jee Ye; Ryu, Jegyu; Park, Seho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The optimum local surgical strategy regarding breast-conserving therapy (BCT) for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is controversial. To investigate whether BCT is appropriate for patients with TNBC, we evaluated the clinical outcomes of BCT in women with TNBC compared to those of women without TNBC, using a large, single-center cohort. Materials and Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 1533 women (TNBC n=321; non-TNBC n=1212) who underwent BCT for primary breast cancer between 2000 and 2010. Clinicopathological characteristics, locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results Tumors from the TNBC group had a higher T stage (T2 37.4% vs. 21.0%, p<0.001), a lower N stage (N0 86.9% vs. 75.5%, p<0.001), and a higher histologic grade (Grade III 66.8% vs. 15.4%, p<0.001) than the non-TNBC group. There were no differences in 5-year LRFS rates between the TNBC and non-TNBC groups (98.7% vs. 97.8%, p=0.63). The non-TNBC group showed a slightly better 5-year OS than the TNBC group; however, the difference was not significant (96.2% vs. 97.3%, p=0.72). In multivariate analyses, TNBC was not associated with poor clinical outcomes in terms of LRFS and OS [hazard ratio (HR) for LRFS=0.37, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.10–1.31; HR for OS=1.03, 95% CI: 0.31–3.39]. Conclusion TNBC patients who underwent BCT showed non-inferior locoregional recurrence compared to non-TNBC patients with BCT. Thus, BCT is an acceptable surgical approach in patients with TNBC. PMID:27401651

  10. Quality of Online Information to Support Patient Decision-Making in Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Jordan G.; Tucholka, Jennifer L.; Steffens, Nicole M.; Neuman, Heather B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer patients commonly use the internet as an information resource. Our objective was to evaluate the quality of online information available to support patients facing a decision for breast surgery. Methods Breast cancer surgery-related queries were performed (Google and Bing), and reviewed for content pertinent to breast cancer surgery. The DISCERN instrument was used to evaluate websites’ structural components that influence publication reliability and ability of information to support treatment decision-making. Scores of 4/5 were considered “good”. Results 45 unique websites were identified. Websites satisfied a median 5/9 content questions. Commonly omitted topics included: having a choice between breast conservation and mastectomy (67%) and potential for 2nd surgery to obtain negative margins after breast conservation (60%). Websites had a median DISCERN score of 2.9 (range 2.0–4.5). Websites achieved higher scores on structural criteria (median 3.6 [2.1–4.7]), with 24% rated as “good”. Scores on supporting decision-making questions were lower (2.6 [1.3–4.4]), with only 7% scoring “good”. Conclusion Although numerous breast cancer-related websites exist, most do a poor job providing women with essential information necessary to actively participate in decision-making for breast cancer surgery. Providing easily-accessible, high-quality online information has the potential to significantly improve patients’ experiences with decision-making. PMID:26417898

  11. Quality of online information to support patient decision-making in breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Jordan G; Tucholka, Jennifer L; Steffens, Nicole M; Neuman, Heather B

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer patients commonly use the internet as an information resource. Our objective was to evaluate the quality of online information available to support patients facing a decision for breast surgery. Breast cancer surgery-related queries were performed (Google and Bing), and reviewed for content pertinent to breast cancer surgery. The DISCERN instrument was used to evaluate websites' structural components that influence publication reliability and ability of information to support treatment decision-making. Scores of 4/5 were considered "good." 45 unique websites were identified. Websites satisfied a median 5/9 content questions. Commonly omitted topics included: having a choice between breast conservation and mastectomy (67%) and potential for 2nd surgery to obtain negative margins after breast conservation (60%). Websites had a median DISCERN score of 2.9 (range 2.0-4.5). Websites achieved higher scores on structural criteria (median 3.6 [2.1-4.7]), with 24% rated as "good." Scores on supporting decision-making questions were lower (2.6 [1.3-4.4]), with only 7% scoring "good." Although numerous breast cancer-related websites exist, most do a poor job providing women with essential information necessary to actively participate in decision-making for breast cancer surgery. Providing easily- accessible, high-quality online information has the potential to significantly improve patients' experiences with decision-making. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Comparison of Bayesian interim analysis and classical interim analysis in group sequential design].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lingling; Zhan, Zhiying; Tan, Xuhui

    2015-11-01

    To explore the differences between the Bayesian interim analysis and the classical interim analysis. To compare the means of two independent samples between control and treatment, superior hypothesis test was established. In line with the data requirements for group sequential design, Type Iota error of Bayesian interim analysis based on various prior distributions, Power, Average Sample Size and Average Stage were estimated in the interim analysis. In the Pocock and O' Brien & Fleming designs, the Type Iota errors in the Bayesian interim analysis based on the skeptical prior distribution and the handicap prior distribution were controlled at around 0.05. When the powers of these two classical designs were both 80%, Bayesian powers of the skeptical prior distribution and the handicap prior distribution were markedly lower. The powers of the non-informative prior distribution and the enthusiastic prior distribution were distinctly higher than 80%. In the Bayesian interim analysis based on the skeptical prior distribution and the handicap Prior distribution, the Type Iota errors can be well controlled. Bayesian interim analyses using these two prior distributions, compared with the analysis adopting the O' Brien & Fleming method, can markedly increase the possibility of ending the clinical trials ahead of time. The Bayesian interim analyses based on these two distributions do not have practical value for group sequential design of the Pocock method.

  13. Immediate provisionalization with a CAD/CAM interim abutment and crown: a guided soft tissue healing technique.

    PubMed

    Proussaefs, Periklis

    2015-02-01

    A technique is described in which a single interim abutment and crown were fabricated in advance and placed the day of dental implant surgery. The contours of the interim crown were identical to the contours of a tentatively designed definitive prosthesis and allowed the tissue to heal and obtain contours that accommodated the contours of the definitive prosthesis. After osseointegration was established, a definitive impression was made with a custom computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing impression coping. The definitive prosthesis then was fabricated.

  14. Methods Data Qualification Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. Sam Alessi; Tami Grimmett; Leng Vang; Dave McGrath

    2010-09-01

    The overall goal of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) is to maintain data provenance for all NGNP data including the Methods component of NGNP data. Multiple means are available to access data stored in NDMAS. A web portal environment allows users to access data, view the results of qualification tests and view graphs and charts of various attributes of the data. NDMAS also has methods for the management of the data output from VHTR simulation models and data generated from experiments designed to verify and validate the simulation codes. These simulation models represent the outcome of mathematical representation of VHTR components and systems. The methods data management approaches described herein will handle data that arise from experiment, simulation, and external sources for the main purpose of facilitating parameter estimation and model verification and validation (V&V). A model integration environment entitled ModelCenter is used to automate the storing of data from simulation model runs to the NDMAS repository. This approach does not adversely change the why computational scientists conduct their work. The method is to be used mainly to store the results of model runs that need to be preserved for auditing purposes or for display to the NDMAS web portal. This interim report demonstrates the currently development of NDMAS for Methods data and discusses data and its qualification that is currently part of NDMAS.

  15. Interim endodontic therapy for alveolar socket bone regeneration of infected hopeless teeth prior to implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Rass, Marwan Abou

    2010-01-01

    patients' dental care. When treated, these hopeless teeth served many preventive, biologic, and esthetic functions. The infections of the alveolar sockets were eliminated, the alveolar bone defects were repaired through normal bone regeneration, and sockets anatomies were maintained or restored. Furthermore, the patients were spared maxillary sinus surgery and the possible complications resulting from major GBR and GTR procedures. In summary, the interim treatment facilitated tooth extraction and immediate implant placement.

  16. Decision-Making in Breast Cancer Surgery: Where Do Patients Go for Information?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hank; Cohen, Almog; Mandeli, John; Weltz, Christina; Port, Elisa R

    2016-05-01

    Patient decision-making regarding breast cancer surgery is multifactorial, and patients derive information on surgical treatment options from a variety of sources which may have an impact on choice of surgery. We investigated the role of different information sources in patient decision-making regarding breast cancer surgery. Two hundred and sixty-eight patients with breast cancer, eligible for breast-conserving therapy were surveyed in the immediate preoperative period, and clinical data were also collected. This survey evaluated the scope and features of patient-driven research regarding their ultimate choice of surgical treatment. The two most common sources of information used by patients were written material from surgeons (199/268-74%) and the Internet (184/268-69%). There was a trend for women who chose bilateral mastectomy to use the Internet more frequently than those choosing unilateral mastectomy (P = 0.056). Number of surgeons consulted, genetic testing, and MRI were significant predictors of patient choice of mastectomy over breast-conserving therapy. Multivariate analysis showed that the number of surgeons consulted (P < 0.001) and genetic testing (P < 0.001) were independent predictors of choosing mastectomy, whereas MRI was not. In conclusions, understanding factors driving patient decision-making may promote more effective education for patients requiring breast cancer surgery.

  17. Margin status and the risk of local recurrence in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy.

    PubMed

    Russo, Andrea L; Arvold, Nils D; Niemierko, Andrzej; Wong, Nathan; Wong, Julia S; Bellon, Jennifer R; Punglia, Rinaa S; Golshan, Mehra; Troyan, Susan L; Brock, Jane E; Harris, Jay R

    2013-07-01

    We sought to assess whether a close surgical margin (>0 and <2 mm) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) confers an increased risk of local recurrence (LR) compared with a widely negative margin (≥2 mm). We studied 906 women with early-stage invasive breast cancer treated with BCT between January 1998 and October 2006; 91 % received adjuvant systemic therapy. Margins were coded as: (1) widely negative (n = 729), (2) close (n = 85), or (3) close (n = 84)/positive (n = 8) but having no additional tissue to remove according to the surgeon. Cumulative incidence of LR and distant failure (DF) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Gray's competing-risk regression assessed the effect of margin status on LR and Cox proportional hazards regression assessed the effect on DF, controlling for biologic subtype, age, and number of positive lymph nodes (LNs). Three hundred seventy-seven patients (41.6 %) underwent surgical re-excision, of which 63.5 % had no residual disease. With a median follow-up of 87.5 months, the 5-year cumulative incidence of LR was 2.5 %. The 5-year cumulative incidence of LR by margin status was 2.3 % (95 % CI 1.4-3.8 %) for widely negative, 0 % for close, and 6.4 % (95 % CI 2.7-14.6 %) for no additional tissue, p = 0.3. On multivariate analysis, margin status was not associated with LR; however, triple-negative subtype (AHR 3.7; 95 % CI 1.6-8.8; p = 0.003) and increasing number of positive LNs (AHR 1.6; 95 % CI 1.1-2.3; p = 0.025) were associated. In an era of routine adjuvant systemic therapy, close surgical margins and maximally resected close/positive margins were not associated with an increased risk of LR compared to widely negative margins. Additional studies are needed to confirm this finding.

  18. Basal Subtype of Invasive Breast Cancer Is Associated With a Higher Risk of True Recurrence After Conventional Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Nguyen, Paul L.; Sreedhara, Meera; Freer, Phoebe E.; Georgian-Smith, Dianne; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Wong, Julia S.; Harris, Jay R.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether breast cancer subtype is associated with patterns of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), either true recurrence (TR) or elsewhere local recurrence (ELR), among women with pT1-T2 invasive breast cancer (IBC) who receive breast-conserving therapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: From Jan 1998 to Dec 2003, 1,223 women with pT1-T2N0-3 IBC were treated with BCT (lumpectomy plus whole-breast radiation). Ninety percent of patients received adjuvant systemic therapy, but none received trastuzumab. Biologic cancer subtypes were approximated by determining estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), progesterone receptor-positive (PR+), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive (HER-2+) expression, classified as luminal A (ER+ or PR+ and HER-2 negative [HER-2-]), luminal B (ER+ or PR+ and HER-2+), HER-2 (ER- and PR- and HER-2+), and basal (ER- and PR- and HER-2- ) subtypes. Imaging, pathology, and operative reports were reviewed by two physicians independently, including an attending breast radiologist. Readers were blinded to subtype and outcome. TR was defined as IBTR within the same quadrant and within 3 cm of the primary tumor. All others were defined as ELR. Results: At a median follow-up of 70 months, 24 patients developed IBTR (5-year cumulative incidence of 1.6%), including 15 TR and 9 ELR patients. At 5 years, basal (4.4%) and HER-2 (9%) subtypes had a significantly higher incidence of TR than luminal B (1.2%) and luminal A (0.2%) subtypes (p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, basal subtype (hazard ratio [HR], 4.8, p = 0.01), younger age at diagnosis (HR, 0.97; p = 0.05), and increasing tumor size (HR, 2.1; p = 0.04) were independent predictors of TR. Only younger age (HR, 0.95; p = 0.01) significantly predicted for ELR. Conclusions: Basal and HER-2 subtypes are significantly associated with higher rates of TR among women with pT1-T2 IBC after BCT. Younger age predicts for both TR and ELR. Strategies to reduce TR in basal

  19. Evaluation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor as a Prognostic Marker for Local Relapse in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Meena S.; Yang Qifeng; Goyal, Sharad; Harris, Lyndsay; Chung, Gina; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important protein involved in the process of angiogenesis that has been found to correlate with relapse-free and overall survival in breast cancer, predominantly in locally advanced and metastatic disease. A paucity of data is available on the prognostic implications of VEGF in early-stage breast cancer; specifically, its prognostic value for local relapse after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) is largely unknown. The purpose of our study was to assess VEGF expression in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with BCT and to correlate the clinical and pathologic features and outcomes with overexpression of VEGF. Methods and Materials: After obtaining institutional review board approval, the paraffin specimens of 368 patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with BCT between 1975 and 2005 were constructed into tissue microarrays with twofold redundancy. The tissue microarrays were stained for VEGF and read by a trained pathologist, who was unaware of the clinical details, as positive or negative according the standard guidelines. The clinical and pathologic data, long-term outcomes, and results of VEGF staining were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 6.5 years. VEGF expression was positive in 56 (15%) of the 368 patients. Although VEGF expression did not correlate with age at diagnosis, tumor size, nodal status, histologic type, family history, estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor status, or HER-2 status, a trend was seen toward increased VEGF expression in the black cohort (26% black vs. 13% white, p = .068). Within the margin-negative cohort, VEGF did not predict for local relapse-free survival (RFS) (96% vs. 95%), nodal RFS (100% vs. 100%), distant metastasis-free survival (91% vs. 92%), overall survival (92% vs. 97%), respectively (all p >.05). Subset analysis revealed that VEGF was highly predictive of local RFS in node-positive, margin

  20. Video-assisted breast surgery: reconstruction after resection of more than 33% of the breast.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Koji; Shimizu, Kazuo

    2006-12-01

    Improvements in reconstructive mammoplasty methods have made it possible to resect more of the mammary gland while achieving good esthetic results in breast-conserving surgery. We report the esthetic results of extended wide resection of the breast with reconstruction procedures. Breast-conserving surgery was performed using a video-assisted breast surgery (VABS) technique. Breast reconstruction was simultaneously performed using the following three methods: mobilization of the remnant mammary gland, transplantation of the lateral tissue flap, and filling with an absorbent synthetic fiber mesh or cotton. The cosmetic results were evaluated with an original five-item-by-four-step scoring system: ABNSW-assessing asymmetry, breast shape, nipple shape, skin condition, and wound scar. From December 2001 through March 2006, we performed endoscopic VABS in 130 patients with breast diseases. The candidates were 29 patients with breast cancer who required resection of more than 33% of the mammary gland because of ductal carcinoma in situ (1 patient), multiple cancers (6 patients), widely extended lesions (20 patients), and lesions after preoperative systemic therapy (2 patients). Twenty-one patients underwent resection of 33% to 50% of the breast, and 8 underwent resection of more than 50% of the breast. All surgical margins were negative on examination of permanent histological preparations. The original shape of the breast was preserved. There was no local recurrence after follow-up times of 33 months (maximum) and 19 months (average). The newly devised reconstruction methods with VABS can markedly increase the mammary gland resection volume while achieving a good esthetic outcome, ensuring a precise disease-free surgical margin, and expanding the indications for breast-conserving therapy.

  1. Towards intraoperative assessment of tumor margins in breast surgery using optical coherence elastography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Brendan F.; Wijesinghe, Philip; Allen, Wes M.; Chin, Lixin; Latham, Bruce; Saunders, Christobel M.; Sampson, David D.

    2016-03-01

    Surgical excision of tumor is a critical factor in the management of breast cancer. The most common surgical procedure is breast-conserving surgery. The surgeon's goal is to remove the tumor and a rim of healthy tissue surrounding the tumor: the surgical margin. A major issue in breast-conserving surgery is the absence of a reliable tool to guide the surgeon in intraoperatively assessing the margin. A number of techniques have been proposed; however, the re-excision rate remains high and has been reported to be in the range 30-60%. New tools are needed to address this issue. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) shows promise as a tool for intraoperative tumor margin assessment in breast-conserving surgery. Further advances towards clinical translation are limited by long scan times and small fields of view. In particular, scanning over sufficient areas to assess the entire margin in an intraoperative timeframe has not been shown to be feasible. Here, we present a protocol allowing ~75% of the surgical margins to be assessed within 30 minutes. To achieve this, we have incorporated a 65 mm-diameter (internal), wide-aperture annular piezoelectric transducer, allowing the entire surface of the excised tumor mass to be automatically imaged in an OCT mosaic comprised of 10 × 10 mm tiles. As OCT is effective in identifying adipose tissue, our protocol uses the wide-field OCT to selectively guide subsequent local OCE scanning to regions of solid tissue which often present low contrast in OCT images. We present promising examples from freshly excised human breast tissue.

  2. EMCS Retrofit Analysis - Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, R.C.; Salsbury, T.I.; Bell, G.C.; Huang, Y.J.; Sezgen, A.O.; Mazzucchi, R.; Romberger, J.

    1999-03-01

    This report presents the interim results of analyses carried out in the Phillip Burton Federal Building in San Francisco from 1996 to 1998. The building is the site of a major demonstration of the BACnet communication protocol. The energy management and control systems (EMCS) in the building were retrofitted with BACnet compatible controllers in order to integrate certain existing systems on one common network. In this respect, the project has been a success. Interoperability of control equipment from different manufacturers has been demonstrated in a real world environment. Besides demonstrating interoperability, the retrofits carried out in the building were also intended to enhance control strategies and capabilities, and to produce energy savings. This report presents analyses of the energy usage of HVAC systems in the building, control performance, and the reaction of the building operators. The report does not present an evaluation of the performance capabilities of the BACnet protocol. A monitoring system was installed in the building that parallels many of the EMCS sensors and data were archived over a three-year period. The authors defined pre-retrofit and post-retrofit periods and analyzed the corresponding data to establish the changes in building performance resulting from the retrofit activities. The authors also used whole-building energy simulation (DOE-2) as a tool for evaluating the effect of the retrofit changes. The results of the simulation were compared with the monitored data. Changes in operator behavior were assessed qualitatively with questionnaires. The report summarizes the findings of the analyses and makes several recommendations as to how to achieve better performance. They maintain that the full potential of the EMCS and associated systems is not being realized. The reasons for this are discussed along with possible ways of addressing this problem. They also describe a number of new technologies that could benefit systems of the type

  3. CMM Interim Check Design of Experiments (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Montano, Joshua Daniel

    2015-07-29

    Coordinate Measuring Machines (CMM) are widely used in industry, throughout the Nuclear Weapons Complex and at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to verify part conformance to design definition. Calibration cycles for CMMs at LANL are predominantly one year in length and include a weekly interim check to reduce risk. The CMM interim check makes use of Renishaw’s Machine Checking Gauge which is an off-the-shelf product simulates a large sphere within a CMM’s measurement volume and allows for error estimation. As verification on the interim check process a design of experiments investigation was proposed to test a couple of key factors (location and inspector). The results from the two-factor factorial experiment proved that location influenced results more than the inspector or interaction.

  4. Design review report FFTF interim storage cask

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, P.L.

    1995-01-03

    Final Design Review Report for the FFTF Interim Storage Cask. The Interim Storage Cask (ISC) will be used for long term above ground dry storage of FFTF irradiated fuel in Core Component Containers (CCC)s. The CCC has been designed and will house assemblies that have been sodium washed in the IEM Cell. The Solid Waste Cask (SWC) will transfer a full CCC from the IEM Cell to the RSB Cask Loading Station where the ISC will be located to receive it. Once the loaded ISC has been sealed at the RSB Cask Loading Station, it will be transferred by facility crane to the DSWC Transporter. After the ISC has been transferred to the Interim Storage Area (ISA), which is yet to be designed, a mobile crane will be used to place the ISC in its final storage location.

  5. Transuranic storage and assay facility interim safety basis

    SciTech Connect

    Porten, D.R., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-12

    The Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility (TRUSAF) Interim Safety Basis document provides the authorization basis for the interim operation and restriction on interim operations for the TRUSAF. The TRUSAF ISB demonstrates that the TRUSAF can be operated safely, protecting the workers, the public, and the environment. The previous safety analysis document TRUSAF Hazards Identification and Evaluation (WHC 1987) is superseded by this document.

  6. 5 CFR 772.102 - Interim personnel actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... 7701(b)(2)(A)(i), determines that granting interim relief is not appropriate; (e) An interim personnel... administrative judge granting interim relief under 5 U.S.C. 7701(b)(2)(A) and a petition for review of the initial decision is filed (or will be filed) with the full Board under 5 U.S.C. 7701(e)(1)(A), the agency...

  7. 5 CFR 531.414 - Interim within-grade increase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interim within-grade increase. 531.414... UNDER THE GENERAL SCHEDULE Within-Grade Increases § 531.414 Interim within-grade increase. (a) An interim within-grade increase shall be granted to an employee who has: (1) Appealed a negative within...

  8. 200 Area Interim Storage Area Technical Safety Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    CARRELL, R.D.

    2000-03-15

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area Technical Safety Requirements define administrative controls and design features required to ensure safe operation during receipt and storage of canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. This document is based on the 200 Area Interim Storage Area, Annex D, Final Safety Analysis Report which contains information specific to the 200 Area Interim Storage Area.

  9. 12 CFR 541.19 - Interim state savings association.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interim state savings association. 541.19... REGULATIONS AFFECTING FEDERAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS § 541.19 Interim state savings association. The term interim state savings association means a savings association, other than a Federal savings association...

  10. 12 CFR 541.18 - Interim Federal savings association.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interim Federal savings association. 541.18... REGULATIONS AFFECTING FEDERAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS § 541.18 Interim Federal savings association. The term interim Federal savings association means a Federal savings association chartered by the Office under...

  11. 41 CFR 101-29.204 - Interim Federal specification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Interim Federal specification. 101-29.204 Section 101-29.204 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... PRODUCT DESCRIPTIONS 29.2-Definitions § 101-29.204 Interim Federal specification. An interim Federal...

  12. 41 CFR 101-29.204 - Interim Federal specification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Interim Federal specification. 101-29.204 Section 101-29.204 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... PRODUCT DESCRIPTIONS 29.2-Definitions § 101-29.204 Interim Federal specification. An interim Federal...

  13. 41 CFR 101-29.206 - Interim Federal standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Interim Federal standard. 101-29.206 Section 101-29.206 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... DESCRIPTIONS 29.2-Definitions § 101-29.206 Interim Federal standard. An interim Federal standard is a potential...

  14. 41 CFR 101-29.206 - Interim Federal standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Interim Federal standard. 101-29.206 Section 101-29.206 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... DESCRIPTIONS 29.2-Definitions § 101-29.206 Interim Federal standard. An interim Federal standard is a potential...

  15. 46 CFR 309.101 - Amendment of interim binders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Amendment of interim binders. 309.101 Section 309.101... INSURANCE § 309.101 Amendment of interim binders. The interim binder for a vessel whose stated valuation is established pursuant to this part shall be deemed to have been amended on the first day of the...

  16. 13 CFR 120.890 - Source of interim financing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... experience or qualifications, SBA may require the interim loan to be managed by a third party such as a bank....890 Section 120.890 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Development Company Loan Program (504) Interim Financing § 120.890 Source of interim financing. A Project may...

  17. 18 CFR 385.1113 - Interim relief (Rule 1113).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interim relief (Rule... Under the NGPA § 385.1113 Interim relief (Rule 1113). (a) The petitioner may at any time file a request for interim relief in a proceeding under this subpart, setting forth the legal and factual basis for...

  18. 24 CFR 115.203 - Interim certification procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interim certification procedures... Certification of Substantially Equivalent Agencies § 115.203 Interim certification procedures. (a) Upon receipt of a request for interim certification filed under § 115.202, the Assistant Secretary may...

  19. 10 CFR 205.288 - Interim and ancillary orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interim and ancillary orders. 205.288 Section 205.288... Distribution of Refunds § 205.288 Interim and ancillary orders. The Director of the Office of Hearings and Appeals or his designee may issue any interim or ancillary orders, or make any rulings or...

  20. 47 CFR 51.611 - Interim wholesale rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interim wholesale rates. 51.611 Section 51.611... Resale § 51.611 Interim wholesale rates. (a) If a state commission cannot, based on the information... commission may elect to establish an interim wholesale rate as described in paragraph (b) of this section....

  1. An Approach for Evaluating the Technical Quality of Interim Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ying; Marion, Scott; Perie, Marianne; Gong, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Increasing numbers of schools and districts have expressed interest in interim assessment systems to prepare for summative assessments and to improve teaching and learning. However, with so many commercial interim assessments available, schools and districts are struggling to determine which interim assessment is most appropriate to their needs.…

  2. 5 CFR 1209.11 - Duration of stay; interim compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Duration of stay; interim compliance... WHISTLEBLOWING Stay Requests § 1209.11 Duration of stay; interim compliance. (a) Duration of stay. A stay becomes...) Interim compliance. An agency must immediately comply with an order granting a stay request. Although...

  3. 40 CFR 270.70 - Qualifying for interim status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Qualifying for interim status. 270.70... (CONTINUED) EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM Interim Status § 270.70 Qualifying for interim status. (a) Any person who owns or operates an “existing HWM facility” or a...

  4. 40 CFR 66.23 - Interim recalculation of penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interim recalculation of penalty. 66... Penalties § 66.23 Interim recalculation of penalty. (a) The Administrator, upon concluding that a previously... respond in accordance with the provisions of § 66.51. The decision to accept the interim calculation or...

  5. 42 CFR 417.570 - Interim per capita payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interim per capita payments. 417.570 Section 417... PREPAYMENT PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.570 Interim per capita payments. (a) Principle of payment. (1) CMS makes monthly advance payments equivalent to the HMO's or CMP's interim per capita rate...

  6. 49 CFR 37.193 - Interim service requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interim service requirements. 37.193 Section 37... WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.193 Interim service requirements. (a) Until... of accessible OTRBs, the operator shall meet the following interim service requirements:...

  7. 24 CFR 115.202 - Request for interim certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Request for interim certification... Certification of Substantially Equivalent Agencies § 115.202 Request for interim certification. (a) A request for interim certification under this subpart shall be filed with the Assistant Secretary by the...

  8. 40 CFR 270.72 - Changes during interim status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Changes during interim status. 270.72... (CONTINUED) EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM Interim Status § 270.72 Changes during interim status. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b), the owner or operator of...

  9. 5 CFR 772.102 - Interim personnel actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interim personnel actions. 772.102 Section 772.102 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) INTERIM RELIEF General § 772.102 Interim personnel actions. When an employee or...

  10. 5 CFR 772.102 - Interim personnel actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interim personnel actions. 772.102 Section 772.102 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) INTERIM RELIEF General § 772.102 Interim personnel actions. When an employee or...

  11. 5 CFR 772.102 - Interim personnel actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interim personnel actions. 772.102 Section 772.102 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) INTERIM RELIEF General § 772.102 Interim personnel actions. When an employee or...

  12. 5 CFR 772.102 - Interim personnel actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interim personnel actions. 772.102 Section 772.102 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) INTERIM RELIEF General § 772.102 Interim personnel actions. When an employee...

  13. Mastotrainer new version: realistic simulator for training in breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Zucca-Matthes, G; Lebovic, Gail; Lyra, Marcos

    2017-02-01

    The "Mastotrainer" was introduced as a new concept of simulators for use in surgical training. Simulators of this type are critical as the use of cadavers is limited or prohibited in some countries. The Mastotrainer has proved very useful in training various surgical techniques, with the first version of the simulator being focused on breast augmentation and reconstruction following mastectomy. This current project explores use of a new version of the surgical simulator that can facilitate a broader spectrum of procedures in the training of breast surgeons as well as plastic and reconstructive surgeons in order to achieve better outcomes. With this new version of the mastotrainer, larger and ptotic breasts provides hands-on training for preoperative markings, various mammaplasty techniques, including breast conserving surgery, reconstructive lumpectomy and oncoplastic procedures. It is valuable for training oncologic, aesthetic and/or reconstructive breast surgeries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Robotic surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Robot-assisted surgery; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery; Laparoscopic surgery with robotic assistance ... Robotic surgery is similar to laparoscopic surgery. It can be performed through smaller cuts than open surgery. ...

  15. Interim Control Module Extraction Strut Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Chris

    1999-01-01

    The Interim Control Module is a propulsion and attitude control module for the International Space Station developed to serve as a replacement for the Russian Service Module in the event that Russia does not deliver the hardware as expected. The hardware was developed through a joint NASA/Naval Research Laboratory program and is based on a Department of Defense payload. This paper discusses the development and testing of the Extraction Strut hardware that will be used to assist in removing the Interim Control Module from the Shuttle's payload bay.

  16. Interim Land Use Control Implementation Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applegate, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    This Interim Land Use Control Implementation Plan (LUCIP) has been prepared to inform current and potential future users of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Contractors Road Heavy Equipment (CRHE) Area (SWMU 055; "the Site") of institutional controls that have been implemented at the Site1. Although there are no current unacceptable risks to human health or the environment associated with the CRHE Area, an interim institutional land use control (LUC) is necessary to prevent human health exposure to volatile organic compound (VOC)-affected groundwater at the Site. Controls will include periodic inspection, condition certification, and agency notification.

  17. Is a higher boost dose of radiation necessary after breast-conserving therapy for patients with breast cancer with final close or positive margins?

    PubMed

    Sadek, Betro T; Homayounfar, Gelareh; Abi Raad, Rita F; Niemierko, Andrzej; Shenouda, Mina N; Keruakous, Amany R; Specht, Michelle C; Taghian, Alphonse G

    2015-11-01

    To determine rates of loco-regional recurrence (LRR), distant failure and overall survival for patients with breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy (BCT) with a close or positive surgical margin (C/PM) treated with standard dose boost radiation compared with a higher boost of radiation. We retrospectively studied 1476 patients with T1-T3 invasive breast cancer treated with BCT between 1992 and 2009. Median age was 57 years. Patients were divided into three groups: Group I included 1197 patients (81 %) with negative margins who received a standard boost (median 60 Gy) total dose to the lumpectomy cavity; Group II included 116 patients (8 %) with C/PM who received a standard boost (median 60 Gy); and Group III included 163 patients (11 %) with C/PM who received a higher boost (median 68 Gy). Biological subtypes (e.g., ER, PR, HER2/neu) were available for 858 patients (58 %) and were also assessed for any relationship to LRR rate. The Kaplan-Meier, Cox-regression, and log-rank tests were used to estimate rates of LRR and the significance of risk factors. Median follow-up was 8.6 years. The overall 5- and 10-year cumulative incidences of LRR were 2.1 % (95 % CI 0.8-2.1 %) and 4.5 % (95 % CI 3.4-6.0 %), respectively. The 5- and 10-year cumulative incidences of LRR for Group I (negative margins + standard boost) were 1.9 and 4.4 %; for Group II (C/PM + standard boost) were 3.9 and 7.0 %; and for Group III (C/PM + higher boost) were 2.9 and 3.8 %, respectively. No statistically significant differences in LRR rates were found among the three groups (p = 0.4). Similar results were obtained for distant failure (p = 0.3) and overall survival (p = 0.4). On multivariate analysis, tumor grade (p = 0.03), systemic-therapy (p = 0.005), node positivity (p = 0.05), young age (p = 0.001), and biological subtype (p = 0.04) were statistically significantly associated with higher LRR. Higher boost dose and margin positivity were not

  18. Interim Report - Grant AFOSR-85-0065.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-30

    Option 065 Drafting Plotter 1 7475A 6 Pen Graphics Plotter Vendor: Imagen Corporation $ 11,266 1 Model 8/300 Laser Printer System, 512Kbytes memory 1... Imagen 8/300 Laser Printer 3 Interim Report Grant No. AFOSR-85-0065 was equivalent to the Versatec plotter for small plots and better for text output

  19. 40 CFR 94.12 - Interim provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interim provisions. 94.12 Section 94.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... engines subject to 40 CFR part 1042. Similarly, beginning model year 2014, engines with maximum engine...

  20. 340 waste handling facility interim safety basis

    SciTech Connect

    VAIL, T.S.

    1999-04-01

    This document presents an interim safety basis for the 340 Waste Handling Facility classifying the 340 Facility as a Hazard Category 3 facility. The hazard analysis quantifies the operating safety envelop for this facility and demonstrates that the facility can be operated without a significant threat to onsite or offsite people.

  1. 24 CFR 7.44 - Interim relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Interim relief. 7.44 Section 7.44 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICY, PROCEDURES AND PROGRAMS Equal Employment Opportunity Without Regard to Race...

  2. 24 CFR 7.44 - Interim relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Interim relief. 7.44 Section 7.44 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICY, PROCEDURES AND PROGRAMS Equal Employment Opportunity Without Regard to Race...

  3. 24 CFR 7.44 - Interim relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Interim relief. 7.44 Section 7.44 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICY, PROCEDURES AND PROGRAMS Equal Employment Opportunity Without Regard to Race...

  4. 24 CFR 7.44 - Interim relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Interim relief. 7.44 Section 7.44 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICY, PROCEDURES AND PROGRAMS Equal Employment Opportunity Without Regard to Race...

  5. 24 CFR 7.44 - Interim relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interim relief. 7.44 Section 7.44 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICY, PROCEDURES AND PROGRAMS Equal Employment Opportunity Without Regard to Race...

  6. 19 CFR 356.18 - Interim sanctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Interim sanctions. 356.18 Section 356.18 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PROCEDURES AND RULES FOR IMPLEMENTING ARTICLE 1904 OF THE NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT Violation of a Protective Order or a...

  7. Interim Guidelines Growing Longleaf Seedlings in Containers

    Treesearch

    James P. Barnett; Mark J. Hainds; George A. Hernandez

    2002-01-01

    These interim guidelines are designed for producers and users of longleaf pine container stock. They are not meant to exclude any container product. The seedling specifications listed in the preferred category are attainable by the grower and will result in excellent field sur vival and early height growth.

  8. 15 CFR 908.5 - Interim reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SUBMITTING REPORTS ON WEATHER MODIFICATION ACTIVITIES § 908.5 Interim reports. (a) Any person engaged in a weather modification project or activity in the United States on January 1 in any year shall submit to the... actual modification activities took place; (2) Number of days on which weather modification activities...

  9. Automotive Mechanics Occupational Performance Survey. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borcher, Sidney D.; Leiter, Paul B.

    The purpose of this federally-funded interim report is to present the results of a task inventory analysis survey of automotive mechanics completed by project staff within the Instructional Systems Design Program at the Center for Vocational and Technical Education. Intended for use in curriculum development for vocational education programs in…

  10. Adult Career Advocates Training Project. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Marilyn D.

    The first year's activities of the Adult Career Advocates Project are described in this interim report, a national study of what counseling services are available for out-of-school youth and adults. Focus is on administrative structure, programming, staffing, and funding of the 353 centers identified as providing career and educational guidance to…

  11. Disposal facility data for the interim performance

    SciTech Connect

    Eiholzer, C.R.

    1995-05-15

    The purpose of this report is to identify and provide information on the waste package and disposal facility concepts to be used for the low-level waste tank interim performance assessment. Current concepts for the low-level waste form, canister, and the disposal facility will be used for the interim performance assessment. The concept for the waste form consists of vitrified glass cullet in a sulfur polymer cement matrix material. The waste form will be contained in a 2 {times} 2 {times} 8 meter carbon steel container. Two disposal facility concepts will be used for the interim performance assessment. These facility concepts are based on a preliminary disposal facility concept developed for estimating costs for a disposal options configuration study. These disposal concepts are based on vault type structures. None of the concepts given in this report have been approved by a Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) decision board. These concepts will only be used in th interim performance assessment. Future performance assessments will be based on approved designs.

  12. 15 CFR 908.5 - Interim reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interim reports. 908.5 Section 908.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC...., carbon dioxide, sodium chloride, urea, silver iodide). (c) The totals for the items in paragraph (b) of...

  13. 15 CFR 908.5 - Interim reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interim reports. 908.5 Section 908.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Comm