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Sample records for breath measured blood

  1. Comparison of spectroscopically measured tissue alcohol concentration to blood and breath alcohol measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridder, Trent D.; Ver Steeg, Benjamin J.; Laaksonen, Bentley D.

    2009-09-01

    Alcohol testing is an expanding area of interest due to the impacts of alcohol abuse that extend well beyond drunk driving. However, existing approaches such as blood and urine assays are hampered in some testing environments by biohazard risks. A noninvasive, in vivo spectroscopic technique offers a promising alternative, as no body fluids are required. The purpose of this work is to report the results of a 36-subject clinical study designed to characterize tissue alcohol measured using near-infrared spectroscopy relative to venous blood, capillary blood, and breath alcohol. Comparison of blood and breath alcohol concentrations demonstrated significant differences in alcohol concentration [root mean square of 9.0 to 13.5 mg/dL] that were attributable to both assay accuracy and precision as well as alcohol pharmacokinetics. A first-order kinetic model was used to estimate the contribution of alcohol pharmacokinetics to the differences in concentration observed between the blood, breath, and tissue assays. All pair-wise combinations of alcohol assays were investigated, and the fraction of the alcohol concentration variance explained by pharmacokinetics ranged from 41.0% to 83.5%. Accounting for pharmacokinetic concentration differences, the accuracy and precision of the spectroscopic tissue assay were found to be comparable to those of the blood and breath assays.

  2. The Impact of Resonance Frequency Breathing on Measures of Heart Rate Variability, Blood Pressure, and Mood.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Patrick R; Austin, Tara; DeBarros, Andrea; Brown, Tracy

    2017-01-01

    Heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB) significantly improves heart rate variability (HRV). Breathing at resonance frequency (RF, approximately 6 breaths/min) constitutes a key part of HRVB training and is hypothesized to be a pathway through which biofeedback improves HRV. No studies to date, however, have experimentally examined whether RF breathing impacts measures of HRV. The present study addressed this question by comparing three groups: the RF group breathed at their determined RF for 15 min; the RF + 1 group breathed at 1 breath/min higher than their determined RF for 15 min; and the third group sat quietly for 15 min. After this 15-min period, all groups participated in the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task (PASAT) for 8 min, and then sat quietly during a 10-min recovery period. HRV, blood pressure, and mood were measured throughout the experiment. Groups were not significantly different on any of the measures at baseline. After the breathing exercise, the RF group reported higher positive mood than the other two groups and a significantly higher LF/HF HRV ratio relative to the control group, a key goal in HRVB training (p < 0.05). Additionally, the RF group showed lower systolic blood pressure during the PASAT and during the recovery period relative to the control group, with the RF + 1 group not being significantly different from either group (p < 0.05). Overall, RF breathing appears to play an important role in the positive effect HRVB has on measures of HRV.

  3. The Impact of Resonance Frequency Breathing on Measures of Heart Rate Variability, Blood Pressure, and Mood

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Patrick R.; Austin, Tara; DeBarros, Andrea; Brown, Tracy

    2017-01-01

    Heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB) significantly improves heart rate variability (HRV). Breathing at resonance frequency (RF, approximately 6 breaths/min) constitutes a key part of HRVB training and is hypothesized to be a pathway through which biofeedback improves HRV. No studies to date, however, have experimentally examined whether RF breathing impacts measures of HRV. The present study addressed this question by comparing three groups: the RF group breathed at their determined RF for 15 min; the RF + 1 group breathed at 1 breath/min higher than their determined RF for 15 min; and the third group sat quietly for 15 min. After this 15-min period, all groups participated in the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task (PASAT) for 8 min, and then sat quietly during a 10-min recovery period. HRV, blood pressure, and mood were measured throughout the experiment. Groups were not significantly different on any of the measures at baseline. After the breathing exercise, the RF group reported higher positive mood than the other two groups and a significantly higher LF/HF HRV ratio relative to the control group, a key goal in HRVB training (p < 0.05). Additionally, the RF group showed lower systolic blood pressure during the PASAT and during the recovery period relative to the control group, with the RF + 1 group not being significantly different from either group (p < 0.05). Overall, RF breathing appears to play an important role in the positive effect HRVB has on measures of HRV. PMID:28890890

  4. Comparison of internal dose measures of solvents in breath, blood and urine and genotoxic changes in aircraft maintenance personnel.

    PubMed

    Lemasters, G K; Lockey, J E; Olsen, D M; Selevan, S G; Tabor, M W; Livingston, G K; New, G R

    1999-02-01

    Solvents and fuels are in widespread use both in civilian and military populations. 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA), xylene, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) and methylene chloride are found in a variety of compounds including degreasing agents, paints, coatings, pesticides and paint strippers. Toluene and xylene are also found in fuels, which are complex mixtures of hundreds of agents. The purpose of this investigation was twofold. The first was to determine the optimum medium to measure internal dose of solvents comparing blood, urine and breath. The second was to determine if low level exposures were associated with genotoxic changes after a short-term exposure of fifteen or thirty weeks. To accomplish the first goal a pilot study was initiated involving eight volunteers who worked in aircraft maintenance including sheet metal, painting and assembly mechanic jobs. Industrial hygiene measurements were evaluated over 30 working days. Breath, blood and a 24-hour urine sample were collected twice to compare internal dose parameters. To achieve the second goal, 58 newly hired subjects were monitored prior to exposure and over 30 weeks to determine if there were genotoxic changes as a result of solvent and/or fuel exposure as measured by sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and micronuclei (MN). Exposure groups included workers involved in sheet metal (fuel cell) activities, painting, fueling operations and flight line. Results of the pilot study demonstrated that industrial hygiene air samples and internal breath measures taken on the same day were highly correlated for measuring TCA (r = 0.93) and toluene (r = 0.90) but was not as well correlated for the other compounds. Breath measures were more sensitive for measuring low level exposure than were either analytes in blood or 24-hour urine samples; these latter two measures were usually below the limit of detection. A small but statistically significant increase in the frequency of SCEs occurred after 30 weeks of

  5. Laser speckle contrast imaging of blood flow from anesthetized mice: correcting drifts in measurements due to breathing movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Gesse E. C.; Ribeiro, Márcio A. C.; Campos, Juliane C.; Ferreira, Julio C. B.

    2015-06-01

    Background: Laser speckle contrast imaging allows non-invasive assessment of cutaneous blood flow. Although the technique is attractive to measure a quantity related to the skin blood flow (SBF) in anesthetized animal models, movements from breathing can mask the SBF signal. As a consequence, the measurement is overestimated because a variable amount of a DC component due to the breathing movements is added to the SBF signal. Objective: To evaluate a method for estimating the background level of the SBF signal, rejecting artefacts from breathing. Methods: A baseline correction method used for accurate DNA sequencing was evaluated, based on estimating the background level of a signal in small temporal sliding-windows. The method was applied to evaluate a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia. SBF signals from hindlimbs of anesthetized C57BL/6 mice (n=13) were registered. The mean SBF (Fi and Fc from ischemic and control hindlimbs) were computed from the registers and from the corresponding estimated background levels (Fib and Fcb from ischemic and control hindlimbs). Results: The mean values of the percentages (a measure of ischemia) MI = (Fi/Fc).100 and MIb = (Fib/Fcb).100 were computed to be 30+/-4% and 23+/-3% respectively (mean +/- SE). Evidences of statistical differences between both, ischemic and control hindlimbs, were obtained (p<0.05, paired student-t). The mean error [(MI-MIb)/MIb].100 obtained was 45+/-14% (mean+/-SE). Conclusion: The recovery of a corrupted SBF signal by breathing artefacts is feasible, allowing more accurate measurements.

  6. A Negative Correlation Between Blood Glucose and Acetone Measured in Healthy and Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Patient Breath.

    PubMed

    Rydosz, Artur

    2015-07-01

    Exhaled acetone analysis has long been recognized as a supplementary tool for diagnosis and monitoring diabetes, especially type 1 diabetes. It is essential, therefore to determine the relationship between exhaled acetone concentration and glucose in blood. Usually, a direct linear correlation between this both compounds has been expected. However, in some cases we can observe a reverse correlation. When blood glucose was increasing, breath acetone declined. The breath analysis as a supplementary tool for diagnosing and monitoring diabetes makes sense only in case of utilization of portable analyzers. This need has created a market for gas sensors. However, commercially available acetone gas sensors are developed for measuring samples at several tens part per million. The exhaled acetone concentration was measured using commercial acetone gas sensor (TGS 822, 823 Figaro, Arlington Heights, IL, USA Inc) with micropreconcentrator in low temperature cofired ceramics. The reference analyzer-mass spectrometry (HPR-20 QIC, Hiden Analytical, Warrington, UK) was used. Twenty-two healthy volunteers with no history of any respiratory disease participated in the research, as did 31 patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Respectively, 3 healthy volunteer and 5 type 1 diabetes mellitus subjects with reverse trend were selected. The linear fitting coefficient various from 0.1139 to 0.9573. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the correlation between blood glucose concentrations and under different conditions, for example, insulin levels, as well as correlate the results with clinical tests, for example, Hb1Ac. It is well known that the concentration of acetone is strongly influenced by diet, insulin treatment, and so on. Therefore, much more complex analysis with long-term measurements are required. Thus, presented results should be regarded as tentative, and validation studies with the analysis of clinical test and in a large number of patients, including control groups

  7. Development of a statistical model for predicting the ethanol content of blood from measurements on saliva or breath samples.

    PubMed

    Ruz, J; Linares, P; Luque de Castro, M D; Caridad, J M; Valcarcel, M

    1989-01-01

    Blood, saliva and breath samples from a population of males and females subjected to the intake of preselected amounts of ethanol, whilst in different physical conditions (at rest, after physical exertion, on an empty stomach and after eating), were analysed by automatic methods employing immobilized (blood) or dissolved (saliva) enzymes and a breathanalyser. Treatment of the results obtained enabled the development of a statistical model for prediction of the ethanol concentration in blood at a given time from the ethanol concentration in saliva or breath obtained at a later time.

  8. Deconvolving an Estimate of Breath Measured Blood Alcohol Concentration from Biosensor Collected Transdermal Ethanol Data£

    PubMed Central

    Dumett, M; Rosen, G; Sabat, J; Shaman, A; Tempelman, L; Wang, C; Swift, RM

    2008-01-01

    Biosensor measurement of transdermal alcohol oncentration in perspiration exhibits significant variance from subject to subject and device to device. Short duration data collected in a controlled clinical setting is used to calibrate a forward model for ethanol transport from the blood to the sensor. The calibrated model is then used to invert transdermal signals collected in the field (short or long duration) to obtain an estimate for breath measured blood alcohol concentration. A distributed parameter model for the forward transport of ethanol from the blood through the skin and its processing by the sensor is developed. Model calibration is formulated as a nonlinear least squares fit to data. The fit model is then used as part of a spline based scheme in the form of a regularized, non-negatively constrained linear deconvolution. Fully discrete, steepest descent based schemes for solving the resulting optimization problems are developed. The adjoint method is used to accurately and efficiently compute requisite gradients. Efficacy is demonstrated on subject field data. PMID:19255617

  9. Breathing-control lowers blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Grossman, E; Grossman, A; Schein, M H; Zimlichman, R; Gavish, B

    2001-04-01

    We hypothesise that routinely applied short sessions of slow and regular breathing can lower blood pressure (BP). Using a new technology BIM (Breathe with Interactive Music), hypertensive patients were guided towards slow and regular breathing. The present study evaluates the efficacy of the BIM in lowering BP. We studied 33 patients (23M/10F), aged 25-75 years, with uncontrolled BP. Patients were randomised into either active treatment with the BIM (n = 18) or a control treatment with a Walkman (n = 15). Treatment at home included either musically-guided breathing exercises with the BIM or listening to quiet music played by a Walkman for 10 min daily for 8 weeks. BP and heart rate were measured both at the clinic and at home with an Omron IC BP monitor. Clinic BP levels were measured at baseline, and after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment. Home BP measurements were taken daily, morning and evening, throughout the study. The two groups were matched by initial BP, age, gender, body mass index and medication status. The BP change at the clinic was -7.5/-4.0 mm Hg in the active treatment group, vs -2.9/-1.5 mm Hg in the control group (P = 0.001 for systolic BP). Analysis of home-measured data showed an average BP change of -5.0/-2.7 mm Hg in the active treatment group and -1.2/+0.9 mm Hg in the control group. Ten out of 18 (56%) were defined as responders in the active treatment group but only two out of 14 (14%) in the control group (P = 0.02). Thus, breathing exercise guided by the BIM device for 10 min daily is an effective non-pharmacological modality to reduce BP.

  10. Measuring vascular reactivity with resting-state blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal fluctuations: A potential alternative to the breath-holding challenge?

    PubMed

    Jahanian, Hesamoddin; Christen, Thomas; Moseley, Michael E; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Wright, Clinton B; Tamura, Manjula K; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of the ability of blood vessels to dilate and constrict, known as vascular reactivity, is often performed with breath-holding tasks that transiently raise arterial blood carbon dioxide (PaCO2) levels. However, following the proper commands for a breath-holding experiment may be difficult or impossible for many patients. In this study, we evaluated two approaches for obtaining vascular reactivity information using blood oxygenation level-dependent signal fluctuations obtained from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data: physiological fluctuation regression and coefficient of variation of the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signal. We studied a cohort of 28 older adults (69 ± 7 years) and found that six of them (21%) could not perform the breath-holding protocol, based on an objective comparison with an idealized respiratory waveform. In the subjects that could comply, we found a strong linear correlation between data extracted from spontaneous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signal fluctuations and the blood oxygenation level-dependent percentage signal change during breath-holding challenge ( R(2 )= 0.57 and 0.61 for resting-state physiological fluctuation regression and resting-state coefficient of variation methods, respectively). This technique may eliminate the need for subject cooperation, thus allowing the evaluation of vascular reactivity in a wider range of clinical and research conditions in which it may otherwise be impractical.

  11. Free-breathing black-blood CINE fast-spin echo imaging for measuring abdominal aortic wall distensibility: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jyh-Miin; Patterson, Andrew J.; Chao, Tzu-Cheng; Zhu, Chengcheng; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Mendes, Jason; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Gillard, Jonathan H.; Graves, Martin J.

    2017-05-01

    The paper reports a free-breathing black-blood CINE fast-spin echo (FSE) technique for measuring abdominal aortic wall motion. The free-breathing CINE FSE includes the following MR techniques: (1) variable-density sampling with fast iterative reconstruction; (2) inner-volume imaging; and (3) a blood-suppression preparation pulse. The proposed technique was evaluated in eight healthy subjects. The inner-volume imaging significantly reduced the intraluminal artifacts of respiratory motion (p  =  0.015). The quantitative measurements were a diameter of 16.3  ±  2.8 mm and wall distensibility of 2.0  ±  0.4 mm (12.5  ±  3.4%) and 0.7  ±  0.3 mm (4.1  ±  1.0%) for the anterior and posterior walls, respectively. The cyclic cross-sectional distensibility was 35  ±  15% greater in the systolic phase than in the diastolic phase. In conclusion, we developed a feasible CINE FSE method to measure the motion of the abdominal aortic wall, which will enable clinical scientists to study the elasticity of the abdominal aorta.

  12. Free-breathing black-blood CINE fast-spin echo imaging for measuring abdominal aortic wall distensibility: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jyh-Miin; Patterson, Andrew; Chao, Tzu-Cheng; Zhu, Chengcheng; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Mendes, Jason; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Gillard, Jonathan; Graves, Martin

    2017-03-22

    The paper reports a free-breathing black-blood CINE fast-spin echo (FSE) technique for measuring abdominal aortic wall motion. The free-breathing CINE FSE includes the following MR techniques: 1) variable-density sampling with fast iterative reconstruction; 2) inner-volume imaging; and 3) a blood-suppression preparation pulse. The proposed technique was evaluated in eight healthy subjects. The inner-volume imaging significantly reduced the intraluminal artifacts of respiratory motion (p = 0.015). The quantitative measurements were a diameter of 16.3 ± 2.8 mm and wall distensibility of 2.0 ± 0.4 mm (12.5 ± 3.4%) and 0.7 ± 0.3 mm (4.1 ± 1.0%) for the anterior and posterior walls, respectively. The cyclic cross-sectional distensibility was 35 ± 15% greater in the systolic phase than in the diastolic phase. In conclusion, we developed a feasible CINE FSE method to measure the motion of the abdominal aortic wall, which will enable clinical scientists to study the elasticity of the abdominal aorta.

  13. Breathing detection with a portable impedance measurement system: first measurements.

    PubMed

    Cordes, Axel; Foussier, Jerome; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    For monitoring the health status of individuals, detection of breathing and heart activity is important. From an electrical point of view, it is known that breathing and heart activity change the electrical impedance distribution in the human body over the time due to ventilation (high impedance) and blood shifts (low impedance). Thus, it is possible to detect both important vital parameters by measuring the impedance of the thorax or the region around lung and heart. For some measurement scenarios it is also essential to detect these parameters contactless. For instance, monitoring bus drivers health could help to limit accidents, but directly connected systems limit the drivers free moving space. One measurement technology for measuring the impedance changes in the chest without cables is the magnetic impedance tomography (MIT). This article describes a portable measurement system we developed for this scenario that allows to measure breathing contactless. Furthermore, first measurements with five volunteers were performed and analyzed.

  14. Breath measurements as volatile organic compound biomarkers.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, L; Buckley, T; Pellizzari, E; Gordon, S

    1996-01-01

    A brief review of the uses of breath analysis in studies of environmental exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is provided. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's large-scale Total Exposure Assessment Methodology Studies have measured concentrations of 32 target VOCs in the exhaled breath of about 800 residents of various U.S. cities. Since the previous 12-hr integrated personal air exposures to the same chemicals were also measured, the relation between exposure and body burden is illuminated. Another major use of the breath measurements has been to detect unmeasured pathways of exposure; the major impact of active smoking on exposure to benzene and styrene was detected in this way. Following the earlier field studies, a series of chamber studies have provided estimates of several important physiological parameters. Among these are the fraction, f, of the inhaled chemical that is exhaled under steady-state conditions and the residence times. tau i in several body compartments, which may be associated with the blood (or liver), organs, muscle, and fat. Most of the targeted VOCs appear to have similar residence times of a few minutes, 30 min, several hours, and several days in the respective tissue groups. Knowledge of these parameters can be helpful in estimating body burden from exposure or vice versa and in planning environmental studies, particularly in setting times to monitor breath in studies of the variation with time of body burden. Improvements in breath methods have made it possible to study short-term peak exposure situations such as filling a gas tank or taking a shower in contaminated water. PMID:8933027

  15. Breath measurements as volatile organic compound biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wallace, L; Buckley, T; Pellizzari, E; Gordon, S

    1996-10-01

    A brief review of the uses of breath analysis in studies of environmental exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is provided. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's large-scale Total Exposure Assessment Methodology Studies have measured concentrations of 32 target VOCs in the exhaled breath of about 800 residents of various U.S. cities. Since the previous 12-hr integrated personal air exposures to the same chemicals were also measured, the relation between exposure and body burden is illuminated. Another major use of the breath measurements has been to detect unmeasured pathways of exposure; the major impact of active smoking on exposure to benzene and styrene was detected in this way. Following the earlier field studies, a series of chamber studies have provided estimates of several important physiological parameters. Among these are the fraction, f, of the inhaled chemical that is exhaled under steady-state conditions and the residence times. tau i in several body compartments, which may be associated with the blood (or liver), organs, muscle, and fat. Most of the targeted VOCs appear to have similar residence times of a few minutes, 30 min, several hours, and several days in the respective tissue groups. Knowledge of these parameters can be helpful in estimating body burden from exposure or vice versa and in planning environmental studies, particularly in setting times to monitor breath in studies of the variation with time of body burden. Improvements in breath methods have made it possible to study short-term peak exposure situations such as filling a gas tank or taking a shower in contaminated water.

  16. Breath-by-breath measurement of particle deposition in the lung of spontaneously breathing rats.

    PubMed

    Karrasch, S; Eder, G; Bolle, I; Tsuda, A; Schulz, H

    2009-10-01

    A number of deposition models for humans, as well as experimental animals, have been described. However, no breath-by-breath deposition measurement in rats has been reported to date. The objective of this study is to determine lung deposition of micrometer-sized particles as a function of breathing parameters in the adult rat lung. A new aerosol photometry system was designed to measure deposition of nonhygroscopic, 2-mum sebacate particles in anesthetized, intubated, and spontaneously breathing 90-day-old Wistar-Kyoto rats placed in a size-adjusted body plethysmograph box. Instrumental dead space of the system was minimized down to 310 microl (i.e., approximately 20% of respiratory dead space). The system allows continuous monitoring of particle concentration in the respired volume. Breathing parameters, such as respiratory rate (f), tidal volume (Vt), as well as inspiration/expiration times, were also monitored at different levels of anesthesia. The results showed that Vt typically varied between 1.5 and 4.0 ml for regular breathing and between 4.0 and 10.0 ml for single-sigh breaths; f ranged from 40 to 200 breaths/min. Corresponding deposition values varied between 5 and 50%, depending on breath-by-breath breathing patterns. The best fit of deposition (D) was achieved by a bilinear function of Vt and f and found to be D = 11.0 - 0.09.f + 3.75.Vt. We conclude that our approach provides more realistic conditions for the measurement of deposition than conventional models using ventilated animals and allows us to analyze the correlation between breath-specific deposition and spontaneous breathing patterns.

  17. Breath ammonia measurement in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Kearney, David J; Hubbard, Todd; Putnam, David

    2002-11-01

    Our aim was to define the utility of breath ammonia measurement in assessing Helicobacter pylori infection. Volunteers breathed into a device containing three fiberoptic NH3 sensors at baseline and after ingesting 300 mg of urea. Breath ammonia levels were compared to the [14C]urea breath test. Thirteen subjects were tested. Before urea ingestion, H. pylori-positive subjects had significantly lower breath ammonia levels than negative subjects (mean +/- SD, 0.04 ppm +/- 0.09 vs 0.49 ppm +/- 0.24, P = 0.002) and had a significantly greater increases in breath ammonia after urea ingestion (range 198-1,494% vs 6-98%). One H. pylori-positive subject underwent treatment and breath ammonia levels shifted from the pattern seen in positive subjects to that seen in negative subjects. In conclusion, breath ammonia measurement for H. Pylori-positive and negative subjects showed distinct patterns. Breath ammonia measurement may be feasible as a diagnostic test for H. pylori.

  18. Trichloroethene levels in human blood and exhaled breath from controlled inhalation exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Pleil, J D; Fisher, J W; Lindstrom, A B

    1998-01-01

    The organic constituents of exhaled human breath are representative of bloodborne concentrations through gas exchange in the blood/breath interface in the lungs. The presence of specific compounds can be an indicator of recent exposure or represent a biological response of the subject. For volatile organic compounds, sampling and analysis of breath is preferred to direct measurement from blood samples because breath collection is noninvasive, potentially infectious waste is avoided, the sample supply is essentially limitless, and the measurement of gas-phase analytes is much simpler in a gas matrix rather than in a complex biological tissue such as blood. However, to assess the distribution of a contaminant in the body requires a reasonable estimate of the blood level. We have investigated the use of noninvasive breath measurements as a surrogate for blood measurements for (high) occupational levels of trichloroethene in a controlled exposure experiment. Subjects were placed in an exposure chamber for 24 hr; they were exposed to 100 parts per million by volume trichloroethene for the initial 4 hr and to purified air for the remaining 20 hr. Matched breath and blood samples were collected periodically during the experiment. We modeled the resulting concentration data with respect to their time course and assessed the blood/breath relationship during the exposure (uptake) period and during the postexposure (elimination) period. Estimates for peak blood levels, compartmental distribution, and time constants were calculated from breath data and compared to direct blood measurements to assess the validity of the breath measurement methodology. Blood/breath partition coefficients were studied during both uptake and elimination. At equilibrium conditions at the end of the exposure, we could predict actual blood levels using breath elimination curve calculations and a literature value partition coefficient with a mean ratio of calculated:measured of 0.98 and standard error

  19. Activity-adjusted 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure and cardiac remodeling in children with sleep disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Amin, Raouf; Somers, Virend K; McConnell, Keith; Willging, Paul; Myer, Charles; Sherman, Marc; McPhail, Gary; Morgenthal, Ashley; Fenchel, Matthew; Bean, Judy; Kimball, Thomas; Daniels, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Questions remain as to whether pediatric sleep disordered breathing increases the risk for elevated blood pressure and blood pressure-dependent cardiac remodeling. We tested the hypothesis that activity-adjusted morning blood pressure surge, blood pressure load, and diurnal and nocturnal blood pressure are significantly higher in children with sleep disordered breathing than in healthy controls and that these blood pressure parameters relate to left ventricular remodeling. 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure parameters were compared between groups. The associations between blood pressure and left ventricular relative wall thickness and mass were measured. 140 children met the inclusion criteria. In children with apnea hypopnea index <5 per hour, a significant difference from controls was the morning blood surge. Significant increases in blood pressure surge, blood pressure load, and in 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure were evident in those whom the apnea hypopnea index exceeded 5 per hour. Sleep disordered breathing and body mass index had similar effect on blood pressure parameters except for nocturnal diastolic blood pressure, where sleep disordered breathing had a significantly greater effect than body mass index. Diurnal and nocturnal systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and mean arterial blood pressure predicted the changes in left ventricular relative wall thickness. Therefore, sleep disordered breathing in children who are otherwise healthy is independently associated with an increase in morning blood pressure surge, blood pressure load, and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure. The association between left ventricular remodeling and 24-hour blood pressure highlights the role of sleep disordered breathing in increasing cardiovascular morbidity.

  20. Comparison of breath gases, including acetone, with blood glucose and blood ketones in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Blaikie, Tom P J; Edge, Julie A; Hancock, Gus; Lunn, Daniel; Megson, Clare; Peverall, Rob; Richmond, Graham; Ritchie, Grant A D; Taylor, David

    2014-11-25

    Previous studies have suggested that breath gases may be related to simultaneous blood glucose and blood ketone levels in adults with type 2 and type 1 diabetes. The aims of this study were to investigate these relationships in children and young people with type 1 diabetes in order to assess the efficacy of a simple breath test as a non-invasive means of diabetes management. Gases were collected in breath bags and measurements were compared with capillary blood glucose and ketone levels taken at the same time on a single visit to a routine hospital clinic in 113 subjects (59 male, age 7 years 11 months-18 years 3 months) with type 1 diabetes. The patients were well-controlled with relatively low concentrations of the blood ketone measured (β hydroxybutyrate, 0-0.4 mmol l(-1)). Breath acetone levels were found to increase with blood β hydroxybutyrate levels and a significant relationship was found between the two (Spearman's rank correlation ρ = 0.364, p < 10(-4)). A weak positive relationship was found between blood glucose and breath acetone (ρ = 0.16, p = 0.1), but led to the conclusion that single breath measurements of acetone do not provide a good measure of blood glucose levels in this cohort. This result suggests a potential to develop breath gas analysis to provide an alternative to blood testing for ketone measurement, for example to assist with the management of type 1 diabetes.

  1. Fast and accurate exhaled breath ammonia measurement.

    PubMed

    Solga, Steven F; Mudalel, Matthew L; Spacek, Lisa A; Risby, Terence H

    2014-06-11

    This exhaled breath ammonia method uses a fast and highly sensitive spectroscopic method known as quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) that uses a quantum cascade based laser. The monitor is coupled to a sampler that measures mouth pressure and carbon dioxide. The system is temperature controlled and specifically designed to address the reactivity of this compound. The sampler provides immediate feedback to the subject and the technician on the quality of the breath effort. Together with the quick response time of the monitor, this system is capable of accurately measuring exhaled breath ammonia representative of deep lung systemic levels. Because the system is easy to use and produces real time results, it has enabled experiments to identify factors that influence measurements. For example, mouth rinse and oral pH reproducibly and significantly affect results and therefore must be controlled. Temperature and mode of breathing are other examples. As our understanding of these factors evolves, error is reduced, and clinical studies become more meaningful. This system is very reliable and individual measurements are inexpensive. The sampler is relatively inexpensive and quite portable, but the monitor is neither. This limits options for some clinical studies and provides rational for future innovations.

  2. Fast and Accurate Exhaled Breath Ammonia Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Solga, Steven F.; Mudalel, Matthew L.; Spacek, Lisa A.; Risby, Terence H.

    2014-01-01

    This exhaled breath ammonia method uses a fast and highly sensitive spectroscopic method known as quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) that uses a quantum cascade based laser. The monitor is coupled to a sampler that measures mouth pressure and carbon dioxide. The system is temperature controlled and specifically designed to address the reactivity of this compound. The sampler provides immediate feedback to the subject and the technician on the quality of the breath effort. Together with the quick response time of the monitor, this system is capable of accurately measuring exhaled breath ammonia representative of deep lung systemic levels. Because the system is easy to use and produces real time results, it has enabled experiments to identify factors that influence measurements. For example, mouth rinse and oral pH reproducibly and significantly affect results and therefore must be controlled. Temperature and mode of breathing are other examples. As our understanding of these factors evolves, error is reduced, and clinical studies become more meaningful. This system is very reliable and individual measurements are inexpensive. The sampler is relatively inexpensive and quite portable, but the monitor is neither. This limits options for some clinical studies and provides rational for future innovations. PMID:24962141

  3. Interactions between breathing rate and low-frequency fluctuations in blood pressure and cardiac intervals.

    PubMed

    Horsman, H M; Peebles, K C; Tzeng, Y C

    2015-10-01

    Evidence derived from spontaneous measures of cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) suggests that slow breathing at 6 breaths/min augments BRS. However, increases in BRS associated with slow breathing may simply reflect the frequency-dependent nature of the baroreflex rather than the modulation of baroreflex function by changes in breathing rate per se. To test this hypothesis we employed a crossover study design (n = 14) wherein breathing rate and systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) oscillation induced via the application of oscillating lower body negative pressure (OLBNP) were independently varied at fixed frequencies. Breathing rate was controlled at 6 or 10 breaths/min with the aid of a metronome, and SAP oscillations were driven at 0.06 Hz and 0.1 Hz using OLBNP. The magnitudes of SAP and R-R interval (cardiac period) oscillations were quantified using power spectral analysis, and the transfer function gain between SAP and R-R interval was used to estimate BRS. Linear mixed-effects models were used to examine the main effects and interactions between breathing rate and OLBNP frequency. There was no statistical interaction between breathing and OLBNP frequency (P = 0.59), indicating that the effect of breathing rate on BRS did not differ according to OLBNP frequency (and vice versa). Additionally, there was no main effect for breathing rate (P = 0.28). However, we observed a significant main effect for OLBNP frequency (P = 0.01) consistent with the frequency-dependent nature of baroreflex. These findings suggest that increases in spectral indices of BRS reflect the frequency dependence of the baroreflex and are not due to slow breathing per se. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Blood and breath levels of selected volatile organic compounds in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    King, Julian; Klieber, Martin; Unterkofler, Karl; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Baumann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (GC-MS) was used to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds in the blood and breath of healthy individuals. Blood and breath volatiles were preconcentrated using headspace solid phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) and needle trap devices (NTDs), respectively. The study involved a group of 28 healthy test subjects and resulted in the quantification of a total of 74 compounds in both types of samples. The concentrations of the species under study varied between 0.01 and 6700 nmol L−1 in blood and between 0.02 and 2500 ppb in exhaled air. Limits of detection (LOD) ranged from 0.01 to 270 nmol L−1 for blood compounds and from 0.01 to 0.7 ppb for breath species. Relative standard deviations for both measurement regimes varied from 1.5 to 14%. The predominant chemical classes among the compounds quantified were hydrocarbons (24), ketones (10), terpenes (8), heterocyclic compounds (7) and aromatic compounds (7). Twelve analytes were found to be highly present in both blood and exhaled air (with incidence rates higher than 80%) and for 32 species significant differences (Wilcoxon signed-rank test) between room air and exhaled breath were observed. By comparing blood, room air and breath levels in parallel, a tentative classification of volatiles into endogenous and exogenous compounds can be achieved. PMID:23435188

  5. Measurement of breath acetone concentrations by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Storer, Malina; Dummer, Jack; Lunt, Helen; Scotter, Jenny; McCartin, Fiona; Cook, Julie; Swanney, Maureen; Kendall, Deborah; Logan, Florence; Epton, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Selected ion flow tube-mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) can measure volatile compounds in breath on-line in real time and has the potential to provide accurate breath tests for a number of inflammatory, infectious and metabolic diseases, including diabetes. Breath concentrations of acetone in type 2 diabetic subjects undertaking a long-term dietary modification programme were studied. Acetone concentrations in the breath of 38 subjects with type 2 diabetes were determined by SIFT-MS. Anthropomorphic measurements, dietary intake and medication use were recorded. Blood was analysed for beta hydroxybutyrate (a ketone body), HbA1c (glycated haemoglobin) and glucose using point-of-care capillary (fingerprick) testing. All subjects were able to undertake breath manoeuvres suitable for analysis. Breath acetone varied between 160 and 862 ppb (median 337 ppb) and was significantly higher in men (median 480 ppb versus 296 ppb, p = 0.01). In this cross-sectional study, no association was observed between breath acetone and either dietary macronutrients or point-of-care capillary blood tests. Breath analysis by SIFT-MS offers a rapid, reproducible and easily performed measurement of acetone concentration in ambulatory patients with type 2 diabetes. The high inter-individual variability in breath acetone concentration may limit its usefulness in cross-sectional studies. Breath acetone may nevertheless be useful for monitoring metabolic changes in longitudinal metabolic studies, in a variety of clinical and research settings.

  6. Mass spectrometric investigations to obtain the first direct comparisons of endogenous breath and blood volatile organic compound concentrations in healthy volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, Margaret E.; Clutton-Brock, Tom H.; Green, Stuart; O'Hehir, Shane; Mayhew, Chris A.

    2009-03-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in breath could be clinically useful for the early detection and diagnosis of diseases, physiological disorders and therapeutic monitoring. However, it is crucial to compare the reliability and precision of breath measurements with those from blood if endogenous VOCs on breath are to be used as biomarkers. Few studies have been undertaken to investigate this, none of which relate to endogenous VOCs in freely breathing subjects. Here we establish the reliability and precision of breath measurements to determine endogenous VOC concentrations in comparison to blood measurements in order to assess the viability of using breath measurements for potential diagnostic and screening purposes. Acetone and isoprene concentration levels in the breath, radial arterial blood and peripheral venous blood and in vivo arterial blood/breath ratios for freely breathing subjects have been determined using mass spectrometric techniques. Mean (range) breath concentrations in parts per billion by volume are 1090 (515-2335) for acetone and 465 (308-702) for isoprene. The mean (range) blood concentrations are: for acetone in radial arterial blood 26 (10-73) [mu]mol/l and in peripheral venous blood 18 (9-39) [mu]mol/l; for isoprene in radial arterial blood 6.8 (3.7-11) [mu]mol/l and in peripheral venous blood 14 (5.5-30) [mu]mol/l. Arterial blood/breath ratios mean (range) are 580 (320-860) for acetone and 0.38 (0.19-0.58) for isoprene. An important finding is that the coefficients of repeatability as a percentage of mean are less than 30% in breath but greater than 70% in blood. This study suggests that breath VOC measurements could provide a more consistent measure for investigating underlying physiological function or pathology than single blood measurements.

  7. Analysis of inflammatory cytokines in human blood, breath ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A change in the expression of cytokines in human biological media indicates an inflammatory response to external stressors and reflects an early step along the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) for various health endpoints. To characterize and interpret this inflammatory response, methodology was developed for measuring a suite of 10 different cytokines in human blood, exhaled breath condensate (EBC), and urine using an electrochemiluminescent multiplex Th1/Th2 cytokine immunoassay platform. Measurement distributions and correlations for eight interleukins (IL) (1β, 2, 4, 5, 8, 10, 12p70 and 13), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were evaluated using 90 blood plasma, 77 EBC, and 400 urine samples collected from nominally healthy adults subjects in North Carolina in 2008-2012. The in vivo results show that there is sufficient sensitivity for characterizing all 10 cytokines at levels of 0.05-0.10 ρg/ml with a dynamic range up to 100 ng/ml across all three of these biological media. The measured in vivo results also show that the duplicate analysis of blood, EBC and urine samples have average estimated fold ranges of 2.21, 3.49, and 2.50, respectively, which are similar to the mean estimated fold range (2.88) for the lowest concentration (0.610ρg/ml) from a series of spiked control samples; the cytokine method can be used for all three biological media. Nine out of the 10 cytokines measured in EBC were highly correlated within one a

  8. Single-breath breath-holding estimate of pulmonary blood flow in man: comparison with direct Fick cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, A H; Rozkovec, A; Papouchado, M; West, J; Laszlo, G

    1989-06-01

    1. Resting pulmonary blood flow (Q), using the uptake of the soluble inert gas Freon-22 and an indirect estimate of lung tissue volume, has been estimated during breath-holding (Qc) and compared with direct Fick cardiac output (Qf) in 16 patients with various cardiac disorders. 2. The effect of breath-hold time was investigated by comparing Qc estimated using 6 and 10 s of breath-holding in 17 patients. Repeatability was assessed by duplicate measurements of Qc in the patients and in six normal subjects. 3. Qc tended to overestimate Qf, the bias and error being 0.09 l/min and 0.59, respectively. The coefficient of repeatability for Qc in the patients was 0.75 l/min and in the normal subjects was 0.66 l/min. For Qf it was 0.72 l/min. There was no significant difference in Qc measured at the two breath-hold times. 4. The technique is simple to perform, and provides a rapid estimate of Q, monitoring acute and chronic changes in cardiac output in normal subjects and patients with cardiac disease.

  9. Application of LaserBreath-001 for breath acetone measurement in subjects with diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhennan; Sun, Meixiu; Chen, Zhuying; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2016-11-01

    Breath acetone is a promising biomarker of diabetes mellitus. With an integrated standalone, on-site cavity ringdown breath acetone analyzer, LaserBreath-001, we tested breath samples from 23 type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients, 312 type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients, 52 healthy subjects. In the cross-sectional studies, the obtained breath acetone concentrations were higher in the diabetic subjects compared with those in the control group. No correlation between breath acetone and simultaneous BG was observed in the T1D, T2D, and healthy subjects. A moderate positive correlation between the mean individual breath acetone concentrations and the mean individual BG levels was observed in the 20 T1D patients without ketoacidosis. In a longitudinal study, the breath acetone concentrations in a T1D patient with ketoacidosis decreased significantly and remained stable during the 5-day hospitalization. The results from a relatively large number of subjects tested indicate that an elevated mean breath acetone concentration exists in diabetic patients in general. Although many physiological parameters affect breath acetone concentrations, fast (<1 min) and on site breath acetone measurement can be used for diabetic screening and management under a specifically controlled condition.

  10. Effects of ankle exercise combined with deep breathing on blood flow velocity in the femoral vein.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh-Yun; Jung, Do-Young; Kim, Young; Cho, Sang-Hyun; Yi, Chung-Hwi

    2003-01-01

    Ankle exercises are commonly used to facilitate venous return in the lower extremity and to prevent deep vein thrombosis. Moreover, the respiratory cycle affects venous return. This study examined the effects of ankle exercise combined with deep breathing on the blood flow velocity in the femoral vein. Twenty healthy males (mean age 21.3 years), who had no medical history of lower extremity disease, were recruited for this study. The blood flow velocity in the femoral vein was measured while performing four exercise protocols: quiet breathing while resting (QR), deep breathing (DB), ankle exercise with quiet breathing (AQB), and ankle exercising combined with deep breathing (ADB). Using a Doppler ultrasound with an 8 MHz probe, peak blood flow velocities were collected for a 20 second period at the start of the inspiration phase in each protocol, three times. There were statistically significant differences in the peak blood flow velocity in the femoral vein with the four protocols (p lt 0.001). The mean (SD) peak blood flow velocity in the femoral vein was as follows: QR 10.1 (4.2) cm/sec, DB 15.5 (3.9) cm/sec, AQB 20.7 (6.6) cm/sec, and ADB 26.5 (9.4) cm/sec. Post hoc analyses revealed significant differences between each of the four protocols (p(adj) lt 0.01). The mean peak blood flow velocity in the femoral vein was greatest with the ADB protocol, which implies that the ADB protocol may be useful to prevent the blood stasis in patients at risk of deep vein thrombosis.

  11. Slow breathing training reduces resting blood pressure and the pressure responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Jones, C U; Sangthong, B; Pachirat, O; Jones, D A

    2015-01-01

    Slow breathing training reduces resting blood pressure, probably by modifying central autonomic control, but evidence for this is lacking. The pressor response to static handgrip exercise is a measure of autonomic control and the aim of this study was to determine whether slow breathing training modulates the pressor responses to exercise of untrained muscles. Twenty hypertensive patients trained for 8 weeks, 10 with unloaded slow breathing (Unloaded) and 10 breathing against an inspiratory load of 20 cm H(2)O (Loaded). Ten subjects were untrained controls. Subjects performed a 2 min handgrip pressor test (30 % MVC) pre- and post-training, and blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were measured before the contraction, at the end and following 2 min recovery. Resting systolic (sBP) and HR were reduced as a result of training, as reported previously. After training there was both a smaller pressor response to hand grip exercise and a more rapid recovery of sBP and HR compared to pre-training. There were no changes in the Controls and no differences between the Unloaded and Loaded groups. Combining the two training groups, the sBP response to handgrip exercise after training was reduced by 10 mm Hg (95 % CI: -7, -13) and HR by 5 bpm (95 % CI: -4, -6), all p<0.05. These results are consistent with slow breathing training modifying central mechanisms regulating cardiovascular function.

  12. Increased Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity in Children with Mild Sleep-Disordered Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Catherine M.; Hogan, Alexandra M.; Onugha, Nwanneka; Harrison, Dawn; Cooper, Sara; McGrigor, Victoria J.; Datta, Avijit; Kirkham, Fenella J.

    2007-01-01

    polysomnography. Weight, height, and head circumference were measured in all of the children. BMI and occipitofrontal circumference z scores were computed. Resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure were obtained. Both sleep-disordered breathing children and the age- and BMI-similar controls were assessed using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF), Neuropsychological Test Battery for Children (NEPSY) visual attention and visuomotor integration, and IQ assessment (Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence Version III). Transcranial Doppler was performed using a TL2-64b 2-MHz pulsed Doppler device between 2 PM and 7 PM in all of the patients and the majority of controls while awake. Time-averaged mean of the maximal cerebral blood flow velocities was measured in the left and right middle cerebral artery and the higher used for analysis. Results Twenty-one snoring children had an apnea/hypopnea index <5, consistent with mild sleep-disordered breathing below the conventional threshold for surgical intervention. Compared with 17 nonsnoring controls, these children had significantly raised middle cerebral artery blood flow velocities. There was no correlation between cerebral blood flow velocities and BMI or systolic or diastolic blood pressure indices. Exploratory analyses did not reveal any significant associations with apnea/hypopnea index, apnea index, hypopnea index, mean pulse oxygen saturation, lowest pulse oxygen saturation, accumulated time at pulse oxygen saturation <90%, or respiratory arousals when examined in separate bivariate correlations or in aggregate when entered simultaneously. Similarly, there was no significant association between cerebral blood flow velocities and parental estimation of child’s exposure to sleep-disordered breathing. However, it is important to note that whereas the sleep-disordered breathing group did not exhibit significant hypoxia at the time of study, it was unclear to what extent this may have been a

  13. Measurement of nitric oxide in human exhaled breath

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, S.M.; Spicer, C.W.; Ollison, W.M.

    1997-12-31

    This project was initiated to confirm the reliability of nitric oxide (NO) measurement in the breath matrix, using two different analytical techniques - ozone and luminol chemiluminescence - and to corroborate literature reports of elevated breath NO values. To measure peak oral and nasal NO levels, subjects performed slow vital capacity and breath holding maneuvers directly into the monitors through the mouth and the nose, respectively. Additional measurements were made using normal breathing techniques. Initial interferent tests indicate that measured NO signals are real and are not confounded by measurement artifacts. Similar results were obtained using the two independent analytical methods in dry or humid air. The NO signal was unaffected by maximum concentrations of potential breath interferents, such as sulfur compounds and alkenes. The measured breath NO concentrations were greater than typical room air levels and differed significantly with the breathing technique used. During these tests room air averaged 4-5 ppb NO. Peak oral NO levels were 4.3 {+-} 1.5 ppb during a slow vital capacity maneuver and 8.0 {+-} 5.0 ppb during a breath holding maneuver. By contrast, higher peak nasal NO levels were measured for both slow vital capacity (17.8 {+-} 7.8 ppb) and breath holding maneuvers (45.4 {+-} 29.5 ppb).

  14. Underwater study of arterial blood pressure in breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Arne; L'abbate, Antonio; Passera, Mirko; Garbella, Erika; Benassi, Antonio; Bedini, Remo

    2009-11-01

    Knowledge regarding arterial blood pressure (ABP) values during breath-hold diving is scanty. It derives from a few reports of measurements performed at the water's surface, showing slight or no increase in ABP, and from a single study of two simulated deep breath-hold dives in a hyperbaric chamber. Simulated dives showed an increase in ABP to values considered life threatening by standard clinical criteria. For the first time, using a novel noninvasive subaquatic sphygmomanometer, we successfully measured ABP in 10 healthy elite breath-hold divers at a depth of 10 m of freshwater (mfw). ABP was measured in dry conditions, at the surface (head-out immersion), and twice at a depth of 10 mfw. Underwater measurements of ABP were obtained in all subjects. Each measurement lasted 50-60 s and was accomplished without any complications or diver discomfort. In the 10 subjects as a whole, mean ABP values were 124/93 mmHg at the surface and 123/94 mmHg at a depth of 10 mfw. No significant statistical differences were found when blood pressure measurements at the water surface were compared with breath-hold diving conditions at a depth of 10 mfw. No systolic blood pressure values >140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure values >115 mmHg were recorded. In conclusion, direct measurements of ABP during apnea diving showed no or only mild increases in ABP. However, our results cannot be extended over environmental conditions different from those of the present study.

  15. Effects of weightlifting and breathing technique on blood pressure and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Lepley, Adam S; Hatzel, Brian M

    2010-08-01

    Weight training is a method commonly used to increase strength. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effect of breathing technique during weight training on heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP). After completing a health history questionnaire, 30 subjects (16 men: 21.25 +/- 1.21 years, 180.26 +/- 2.36 cm, 84.31 +/- 19.32 kg; and 14 women: 21.29 +/- 2.37 years, 170.08 +/- 2.15 cm, 137.36 +/- 62.31 kg) were familiarized and tested for an estimated 1 repetition maximum, on the chest press and leg press lifts using each of the 2 breathing techniques, hold breath (HB), and controlled breathing. Lifts were examined using each breathing technique with 1 set of 10 repetitions on separate days. Data were collected during the push phase on average of 3.72 times per set and again at 1 and 5 minutes post lift. Resting, during lift (peak, average); 1-minute and 5-minute post lift BP; and HR values were measured using the NIBP100A noninvasive BP system (Biopac Systems, Inc), for both breathing technique within each lift. The HB technique posted higher but statistically insignificant (p < 0.05) values for systolic BP (p = 0.420), diastolic BP (p = 0.531), and HR (p = 0.713) than the controlled breath technique. The HB technique used in this investigation produced minimal elevations in HR and BP and appears to be safe when performing the chest press and leg press lifts at a moderate resistance. Education on proper weight training techniques can help limit unwanted risks during these exercises.

  16. An analysis of estimation of pulmonary blood flow by the single-breath method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.

    1986-01-01

    The single-breath method represents a simple noninvasive technique for the assessment of capillary blood flow across the lung. However, this method has not gained widespread acceptance, because its accuracy is still being questioned. A rigorous procedure is described for estimating pulmonary blood flow (PBF) using data obtained with the aid of the single-breath method. Attention is given to the minimization of data-processing errors in the presence of measurement errors and to questions regarding a correction for possible loss of CO2 in the lung tissue. It is pointed out that the estimations are based on the exact solution of the underlying differential equations which describe the dynamics of gas exchange in the lung. The reported study demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining highly reliable estimates of PBF from expiratory data in the presence of random measurement errors.

  17. An analysis of estimation of pulmonary blood flow by the single-breath method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.

    1986-01-01

    The single-breath method represents a simple noninvasive technique for the assessment of capillary blood flow across the lung. However, this method has not gained widespread acceptance, because its accuracy is still being questioned. A rigorous procedure is described for estimating pulmonary blood flow (PBF) using data obtained with the aid of the single-breath method. Attention is given to the minimization of data-processing errors in the presence of measurement errors and to questions regarding a correction for possible loss of CO2 in the lung tissue. It is pointed out that the estimations are based on the exact solution of the underlying differential equations which describe the dynamics of gas exchange in the lung. The reported study demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining highly reliable estimates of PBF from expiratory data in the presence of random measurement errors.

  18. [The influence of six alcoholic beverages on ethanol concentration in the blood and breath].

    PubMed

    Hey, Henrik; Haslund-Vinding, Peter

    2006-01-30

    We investigated the area under the curve (AUC) as a measure of the bioavailability of ethanol in healthy volunteers drinking six alcoholic beverages of different types. Furthermore, we investigated the correlation between the ethanol concentration in the blood and the breath test. Twelve healthy volunteers (seven females, five males) consumed six drinks of different types in a crossover design after a six-hour fast. The men ingested 36 g of ethanol and the women 24 g. Venous blood was obtained for determination of serum ethanol and glucose concentration at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 180 minutes postdosing, and at the same time a breath alcohol test was done using an alcoholometer. The AUC of ethanol differed significantly between pure ethanol and the three beverages red wine, sparkling wine and Smirnoff Ice (p < 0.01). The glucose and insulin concentrations increased by factors of 2 and 4, respectively, 60 minutes after drinking beer or Smirnoff Ice, respectively (p < 0.05). We found a high correlation between the ethanol concentration in the blood and the breath test, r 2 = 0.77, r = 0.87 (p < 0.005). Using the blood alcohol concentration as a "gold standard", we found that the risk of obtaining a false- positive breath test was 1% at the legal limit for driving in Denmark (0.5%). Conversely, 59% of the participants with a blood alcohol level > or = 0.5% showed a negative (false negative). This investigation shows that the type of alcoholic beverage consumed determines the amount of alcohol absorbed. Furthermore, the different drinks caused different changes in the glucose and insulin concentrations, which might be important in connection with alcohol-induced disturbances in carbohydrate metabolism (e.g., hypo- and hyperglycaemia). Our data indicate that the alcoholometer breath test was an acceptable screening method to estimate the blood alcohol level and to measure the amount of ethanol ingested. However, for evidental purposes during prosecution of drunk drivers

  19. Regulation of brain blood flow and oxygen delivery in elite breath-hold divers

    PubMed Central

    Willie, Christopher K; Ainslie, Philip N; Drvis, Ivan; MacLeod, David B; Bain, Anthony R; Madden, Dennis; Maslov, Petra Zubin; Dujic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    The roles of involuntary breathing movements (IBMs) and cerebral oxygen delivery in the tolerance to extreme hypoxemia displayed by elite breath-hold divers are unknown. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), arterial blood gases (ABGs), and cardiorespiratory metrics were measured during maximum dry apneas in elite breath-hold divers (n=17). To isolate the effects of apnea and IBM from the concurrent changes on ABG, end-tidal forcing (‘clamp') was then used to replicate an identical temporal pattern of decreasing arterial PO2 (PaO2) and increasing arterial PCO2 (PaCO2) while breathing. End-apnea PaO2 ranged from 23  to 37 mm Hg (30±7 mm Hg). Elevation in mean arterial pressure was greater during apnea than during clamp reaching +54±24% versus 34±26%, respectively; however, CBF increased similarly between apnea and clamp (93.6±28% and 83.4±38%, respectively). This latter observation indicates that during the overall apnea period IBM per se do not augment CBF and that the brain remains sufficiently protected against hypertension. Termination of apnea was not determined by reduced cerebral oxygen delivery; despite 40% to 50% reductions in arterial oxygen content, oxygen delivery was maintained by commensurately increased CBF. PMID:25370857

  20. Measuring the exhaled breath of a manikin and human subjects.

    PubMed

    Xu, C; Nielsen, P V; Gong, G; Liu, L; Jensen, R L

    2015-04-01

    Due to scarcity of accurate information and available data of actual human breathing, this investigation focuses on characterizing the breathing dynamic process based on the measurement of healthy human subjects. The similarities and differences between one breathing thermal manikin and the human subjects, including geometry and breathing functions, were thoroughly studied. As expected, actual human breathing is more complicated than that of the manikin in terms of airflow fluctuations, individual differences, and exhaled flow directions. The simplification of manikin mouth structure could result in overestimated exhaled velocity and contaminant concentration. Furthermore, actual human breathing appears to be relatively stable and reproducible for an individual person in several conditions and is also accompanied by some uncertainties simultaneously. The averaged values are used to analyze the overall characteristics of actual human breathing. There are different characteristics of the exhaled breath between male and female subjects with or without wearing a nose clip. The experimental results obtained from the measurement of human subjects may be helpful for manikin specification or validation and accuracy assessment of CFD simulations.

  1. From blood to breath: New horizons for esophageal cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Yazbeck, Roger; Jaenisch, Simone E; Watson, David I

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is a lethal cancer encompassing adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma sub-types. The global incidence of esophageal cancer is increasing world-wide, associated with the increased prevalence of associated risk factors. The asymptomatic nature of disease often leads to late diagnosis and five-year survival rates of less than 15%. Current diagnostic tools are restricted to invasive and costly endoscopy and biopsy for histopathology. Minimally and non-invasive biomarkers of esophageal cancer are needed to facilitate earlier detection and better clinical management of patients. This paper summarises recent insights into the development and clinical validation of esophageal cancer biomarkers, focussing on circulating markers in the blood, and the emerging area of breath and odorant biomarkers. PMID:28028355

  2. MEASUREMENT METHOD FOR VOLATILE METABOLIC BIOMARKERS IN EXHALED BREATH CONDENSATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is developing biomarker methodology to interpret spot biological measurements and their linkage to previous environmental pollutants exposures for individuals. This work explores the use of a promising biological media, exhaled breath condensate (EBC), which contains trapped...

  3. Towards PIV measurements around the breathing zones of two Thermal Breathing Manikins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srikar, Kaligotla; Glauser, Mark

    2006-11-01

    This work includes the transport processes in indoor environments for assessing personal exposure in connection with human health. Airflow within indoor spaces, around human bodies in ventilated spaces and within the human airways is complex due to the vast range of length and velocity scales. Breathing zones of two thermal breathing manikins seated around a table are studied in a cubicle (6 ft X 8 ft X 8 ft). To quantify the facility with the simple table geometry/ventilation system and to provide a quality Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) flow field database for the computational validation, measurements are made in a cubicle configuration without manikins. Stereo PIV flow field measurements are acquired near the floor inlet vent, continuing up to and at various locations around and above the table. Future work will include PIV measurements utilizing two breathing manikins seated around the table to study two body interaction problems. These measurements of the airflow will be made with the manikins breathing in phase and 180 out of phase.

  4. Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Variability during Yoga-Based Alternate Nostril Breathing Practice and Breath Awareness

    PubMed Central

    Telles, Shirley; Sharma, Sachin Kumar; Balkrishna, Acharya

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous research has shown a reduction in blood pressure (BP) immediately after the practice of alternate nostril yoga breathing (ANYB) in normal healthy male volunteers and in hypertensive patients of both sexes. The BP during ANYB has not been recorded. Material/Methods Participants were 26 male volunteers (group mean age ±SD, 23.8±3.5 years). We assessed (1) heart rate variability, (2) non-invasive arterial BP, and (3) respiration rate, during (a) ANYB and (b) breath awareness (BAW) sessions. Each session was 25 minutes. We performed assessments at 3 time points: Pre (5 minutes), during (15 minutes; for ANYB or BAW) and Post (5 minutes). A naïve-to-yoga control group (n=15 males, mean age ±SD 26.1±4.0 years) were assessed while seated quietly for 25 minutes. Results During ANYB there was a significant decrease (repeated measures ANOVA) in systolic BP and respiration rate; while RMSSD (the square root of the mean of the sum of squares of differences between adjacent NN intervals) and NN50 (the number of interval differences of successive normal to normal intervals greater than 50 ms) significantly increased. During BAW respiration rate decreased. In contrast, respiration rate increased during the control state. ANYB and BAW were significantly different (2-factor ANOVA) in RMSSD and respiration rate. BAW and control were different with respect to respiration rate. Conclusions The results suggest that vagal activity increased during and after ANYB, which could have contributed to the decrease in BP and changes in the HRV. PMID:25408140

  5. Measuring breath acetone for monitoring fat loss: Review.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joseph C

    2015-12-01

    Endogenous acetone production is a by-product of the fat metabolism process. Because of its small size, acetone appears in exhaled breath. Historically, endogenous acetone has been measured in exhaled breath to monitor ketosis in healthy and diabetic subjects. Recently, breath acetone concentration (BrAce) has been shown to correlate with the rate of fat loss in healthy individuals. In this review, the measurement of breath acetone in healthy subjects is evaluated for its utility in predicting fat loss and its sensitivity to changes in physiologic parameters. BrAce can range from 1 ppm in healthy non-dieting subjects to 1,250 ppm in diabetic ketoacidosis. A strong correlation exists between increased BrAce and the rate of fat loss. Multiple metabolic and respiratory factors affect the measurement of BrAce. BrAce is most affected by changes in the following factors (in descending order): dietary macronutrient composition, caloric restriction, exercise, pulmonary factors, and other assorted factors that increase fat metabolism or inhibit acetone metabolism. Pulmonary factors affecting acetone exchange in the lung should be controlled to optimize the breath sample for measurement. When biologic factors are controlled, BrAce measurement provides a non-invasive tool for monitoring the rate of fat loss in healthy subjects. © 2015 The Authors Obesity published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Obesity Society (TOS).

  6. Measuring breath acetone for monitoring fat loss: Review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Endogenous acetone production is a by‐product of the fat metabolism process. Because of its small size, acetone appears in exhaled breath. Historically, endogenous acetone has been measured in exhaled breath to monitor ketosis in healthy and diabetic subjects. Recently, breath acetone concentration (BrAce) has been shown to correlate with the rate of fat loss in healthy individuals. In this review, the measurement of breath acetone in healthy subjects is evaluated for its utility in predicting fat loss and its sensitivity to changes in physiologic parameters. Results BrAce can range from 1 ppm in healthy non‐dieting subjects to 1,250 ppm in diabetic ketoacidosis. A strong correlation exists between increased BrAce and the rate of fat loss. Multiple metabolic and respiratory factors affect the measurement of BrAce. BrAce is most affected by changes in the following factors (in descending order): dietary macronutrient composition, caloric restriction, exercise, pulmonary factors, and other assorted factors that increase fat metabolism or inhibit acetone metabolism. Pulmonary factors affecting acetone exchange in the lung should be controlled to optimize the breath sample for measurement. Conclusions When biologic factors are controlled, BrAce measurement provides a non‐invasive tool for monitoring the rate of fat loss in healthy subjects. PMID:26524104

  7. Measuring breathing patterns and respiratory movements with the respiratory movement measuring instrument.

    PubMed

    Hagman, Carina; Janson, Christer; Malinovschi, Andrei; Hedenström, Hans; Emtner, Margareta

    2016-09-01

    The respiratory movement measuring instrument (RMMI) is a laser-based non-invasive technique to measure breathing patterns and respiratory movements (RMs). Little knowledge is known about the ability of the RMMI to measure breathing patterns and the correlation between RMs and breathing volumes. One aim was to investigate whether the RMMI could discriminate between normal versus abdominal versus high costal breathing patterns in different body positions. A second aim was to determine the correlation between RMs and breathing volumes in different body positions. Twenty adult, healthy subjects (10 women) were included in the study. The RMMI was used to study the above-mentioned breathing patterns in supine, sitting and standing positions. A subgroup of 12 subjects (6 women) simultaneously performed measurements of breathing volumes while RMs were recorded. The RMMI was able to discriminate between different breathing patterns in different body positions (P<0·001). The upper thoracic contribution to RMs in the sitting position was 47% for natural breathing, 32% for abdominal breathing and 64% for high costal breathing; similar results were found in the supine and standing positions. A strong correlation was observed between RMs as measured by the RMMI and different breathing volumes in all three body positions (Spearman's rho 0·86-1·00). The RMMI can be used to measure and analyse different breathing patterns in different body positions, and the correlation between measured RMs and breathing volumes is strong. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Multi-window PIV measurements around a breathing manikin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marr, David

    2005-11-01

    The presented work includes multi-scale measurements via a stereo article Image Velocimetry (PIV) system to view a pair of two-component windows of dissimilar scale using a varied focal length. These measurements are taken in the breathing zone of an isothermal breathing manikin (from mouth) in an environmental chamber of average office cubicle dimensions without ventilation and are analogous to an oscillatory jet. From these phase-averaged measurements, we can extract information concerning length scales, turbulence quantities and low dimensional information in order to both determine correlation between data at different length scales as well as continuing research in exposure assessment for the indoor environment. In this talk we will present these turbulence quantities and interpret their influence on the breathing zone. While the largest scale is that of the room itself, we find that the relevant spatial scales associated with the breathing zone are much lower in magnitude. In future experiments, we will expand the multi window PIV technique to include PIV window configured to obtain scales of order the cubicle simultaneously with those of the breathing zone. This will aid in our understanding of the combined impact of these multiple scales on occupant exposure in the indoor environment.

  9. The Measurement of Ammonia in Human Breath and its Potential in Clinical Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Brannelly, N T; Hamilton-Shield, J P; Killard, A J

    2016-11-01

    Ammonia is an important component of metabolism and is involved in many physiological processes. During normal physiology, levels of blood ammonia are between 11 and 50 µM. Elevated blood ammonia levels are associated with a variety of pathological conditions such as liver and kidney dysfunction, Reye's syndrome and a variety of inborn errors of metabolism including urea cycle disorders (UCD), organic acidaemias and hyperinsulinism/hyperammonaemia syndrome in which ammonia may reach levels in excess of 1 mM. It is highly neurotoxic and so effective measurement is critical for assessing and monitoring disease severity and treatment. Ammonia is also a potential biomarker in exercise physiology and studies of drug metabolism. Current ammonia testing is based on blood sampling, which is inconvenient and can be subject to significant analytical errors due to the quality of the sample draw, its handling and preparation for analysis. Blood ammonia is in gaseous equilibrium with the lungs. Recent research has demonstrated the potential use of breath ammonia as a non-invasive means of measuring systemic ammonia. This requires measurement of ammonia in real breath samples with associated temperature, humidity and gas characteristics at concentrations between 50 and several thousand parts per billion. This review explores the diagnostic applications of ammonia measurement and the impact that the move from blood to breath analysis could have on how these processes and diseases are studied and managed.

  10. Reactivity of retinal blood flow to 100% oxygen breathing after lipopolysaccharide administration in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kolodjaschna, Julia; Berisha, Fatmire; Lasta, Michael; Polska, Elzbieta; Fuchsjäger-Mayrl, Gabriele; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2008-08-01

    Administration of low doses of Escherichia coli endotoxin (LPS) to humans enables the study of inflammatory mechanisms. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the retinal vascular reactivity after LPS infusion. In a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over study, 18 healthy male volunteers received 20 IU/kg LPS or placebo as an intravenous bolus infusion. Outcome parameters were measured at baseline and 4h after LPS/placebo administration. At baseline and at 4h after administration a short period of 100% oxygen inhalation was used to assess retinal vasoreactivity to this stimulus. Perimacular white blood cell velocity, density and flux were assessed with the blue-field entoptic technique, retinal branch arterial and venous diameters were measured with a retinal vessel analyzer and red blood cell velocity in retinal branch veins was measured with laser Doppler velocimetry. LPS is associated with peripheral blood leukocytosis and increased white blood cell density in ocular microvessels (p<0.001). In addition, retinal arterial (p=0.02) and venous (p<0.01) diameters were increased. All retinal hemodynamic parameters showed a decrease during 100% oxygen breathing. This decrease was significantly blunted by LPS for all retinal outcome parameters except venous diameter (p=0.04 for white blood cell velocity, p=0.0002 for white blood cell density, p<0.0001 for white blood cell flux, p=0.01 for arterial diameter, p=0.02 for red blood cell velocity and p=0.006 for red blood cell flux). These data indicate that LPS-induced inflammation induces vascular dysregulation in the retina. This may provide a link between inflammation and vascular dysregulation. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether this model may be suitable to study inflammation induced vascular dysregulation in the eye.

  11. Point of care monitoring of hemodialysis patients with a breath ammonia measurement device based on printed polyaniline nanoparticle sensors.

    PubMed

    Hibbard, Troy; Crowley, Karl; Kelly, Frank; Ward, Frank; Holian, John; Watson, Alan; Killard, Anthony J

    2013-12-17

    A device for measuring human breath ammonia was developed based on a single use, disposable, inkjet printed ammonia sensor fabricated using polyaniline nanoparticles. The device was optimized for sampling ammonia in human breath samples by addressing issues such as variations in breath sample volume, flow rate, sources of oral ammonia, temperature and humidity. The resulting system was capable of measuring ammonia in breath from 40 to 2993 ppbv (r(2 )= 0.99, n = 3) as correlated with photoacoustic laser spectroscopy and correlation in normal human breath samples yielded a slope of 0.93 and a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.9705 (p < 0.05, n = 11). Measurement of ammonia in the breath of patients with end-stage kidney disease demonstrated its significant reduction following dialysis, while also correlating well with blood urea nitrogen (BUN) (r = 0.61, p < 0.01, n = 96). Excellent intraindividual correlations were demonstrated between breath ammonia and BUN (0.86 to 0.96), which demonstrates the possibility of using low cost point of care breath ammonia systems as a noninvasive means of monitoring kidney dysfunction and treatment.

  12. What is the real utility of breath ammonia concentration measurements in medicine and physiology?

    PubMed

    Spanel, Patrik; Smith, David

    2017-10-03

    Much effort continues to be devoted to the development of devices to analyse breath ammonia with the anticipation that breath ammonia analyses will be useful in clinical practice. In this perspective we refer to the analytical techniques that have been used to measure breath ammonia, focusing on selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, of which we have special knowledge and understanding. From the collected data obtained using the different techniques, we exam the origins of mouth- and nose-exhaled ammonia and conclude that mouth-exhaled ammonia is always elevated above a concentration that would be equilibrated with blood ammonia and is largely produced by the action of enzymes on salivary urea. Support to this conclusion is given by the reasonable correlation between blood urea concentration and mouth-exhaled ammonia concentration. Further, it is discussed that nose-exhaled ammonia largely originates at the alveolar interface and so its concentration more closely relates to the expected alveolar blood ammonia concentration. Ingestion of proteins results in increased blood/saliva urea and ultimately mouth-exhaled ammonia as does the generation of urease by H.pylori infection. It is also concluded that when mouth-exhaled ammonia is elevated then it may be due to either abnormally high blood urea, a high pH of the saliva/mouth/airways mucosa, poor oral hygiene or a combinations of these.   . © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  13. Design of a breath analysis system for diabetes screening and blood glucose level prediction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ke; Zhang, David; Wu, Darong; Wei, Hua; Lu, Guangming

    2014-11-01

    It has been reported that concentrations of several biomarkers in diabetics' breath show significant difference from those in healthy people's breath. Concentrations of some biomarkers are also correlated with the blood glucose levels (BGLs) of diabetics. Therefore, it is possible to screen for diabetes and predict BGLs by analyzing one's breath. In this paper, we describe the design of a novel breath analysis system for this purpose. The system uses carefully selected chemical sensors to detect biomarkers in breath. Common interferential factors, including humidity and the ratio of alveolar air in breath, are compensated or handled in the algorithm. Considering the intersubject variance of the components in breath, we build subject-specific prediction models to improve the accuracy of BGL prediction. A total of 295 breath samples from healthy subjects and 279 samples from diabetic subjects were collected to evaluate the performance of the system. The sensitivity and specificity of diabetes screening are 91.51% and 90.77%, respectively. The mean relative absolute error for BGL prediction is 21.7%. Experiments show that the system is effective and that the strategies adopted in the system can improve its accuracy. The system potentially provides a noninvasive and convenient method for diabetes screening and BGL monitoring as an adjunct to the standard criteria.

  14. Measurement of oxygen consumption in children undergoing cardiac catheterization: comparison between mass spectrometry and the breath-by-breath method.

    PubMed

    Guo, Long; Cui, Yong; Pharis, Scott; Walsh, Mark; Atallah, Joseph; Tan, Meng-Wei; Rutledge, Jennifer; Coe, J Y; Adatia, Ian

    2014-06-01

    Accurate measurement of oxygen consumption (VO2) is important to precise calculation of blood flow using the Fick equation. This study aimed to validate the breath-by-breath method (BBBM) of measuring oxygen consumption VO2 compared with respiratory mass spectroscopy (MS) for intubated children during cardiac catheterization. The study used MS and BBBM to measure VO2 continuously and simultaneously for 10 min in consecutive anesthetized children undergoing cardiac catheterization who were intubated with a cuffed endotracheal tube, ventilated mechanically, and hemodynamically stable, with normal body temperature. From 26 patients, 520 data points were obtained. The mean VO2 was 94.5 ml/min (95 % confidence interval [CI] 65.7-123.3 ml/min) as measured by MS and 91.4 ml/min (95 % CI 64.9-117.9 ml/min) as measured by BBBM. The mean difference in VO2 measurements between MS and BBBM (3.1 ml/min; 95 % CI -1.7 to +7.9 ml/min) was not significant (p = 0.19). The MS and BBBM VO2 measurements were highly correlated (R (2) = 0.98; P < 0.0001). Bland-Altman analysis showed good correspondence between MS and BBBM, with a mean difference of -3.01 and 95 % limits of agreement ranging from -26.2 to +20.0. The mean VO2 indexed to body surface area did not differ significantly between MS and BBBM (3.4 ml/min m(2); 95 % CI -1.4 to 8.2; p = 0.162). The mean difference and limits of agreement were -3.8 ml/min m(2) (range, -19.9 to 26.7). Both MS and BBBM may be used to measure VO2 in anesthetized intubated children undergoing cardiac catheterization. The two methods demonstrated excellent agreement. However, BBBM may be more suited to clinical use with children.

  15. Lung function measurement with multiple-breath-helium washout system.

    PubMed

    Wang, J-Y; Suddards, M E; Mellor, C J; Owers-Bradley, J R

    2013-04-01

    Multiple-breath-washout (MBW) measurements are regarded as a sensitive technique which can reflect the ventilation inhomogeneity of respiratory airways. Typically nitrogen is used as the tracer gas and is washed out by pure oxygen in multiple-breath-nitrogen washout (MBNW) tests. In this study, instead of using nitrogen, (4)He is used as the tracer gas with smaller gas density which may be able to reach deeper into our lungs in a given time and the helium washout results may be more sensitive to the ventilation inhomogeneity in small airways. A multiple-breath-helium-washout (MBHW) system developed for the lung function study is also presented. Quartz tuning forks with a resonance frequency of 32,768Hz have been used for detecting the change of the respiratory gas density. The resonance frequency of the quartz tuning fork decreases linearly with increasing density of the surrounding gas. Knowing the CO2 concentration from the infrared carbon dioxide detector, the helium concentration can be determined. Results from 14 volunteers (3 mild asthmatics, 4 tobacco smokers, 1 with asthma history, 1 with COPD history, 5 normal) have shown that mild asthmatics have higher ventilation inhomogeneity in either conducting or acinar airways (or both). A feature has been found in washout curve of single breaths from 4 tobacco smokers with different length of smoking history which may indicate the early stage of respiratory ventilation inhomogeneity in acinar airways. Copyright © 2012 IPEM. All rights reserved.

  16. Blood and breath profiles of volatile organic compounds in patients with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath shows great potential as a non-invasive method for assessing hemodialysis efficiency. In this work we aim at identifying and quantifying of a wide range of VOCs characterizing uremic breath and blood, with a particular focus on species responding to the dialysis treatment. Methods Gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection coupled with solid-phase microextraction as pre-concentration method. Results A total of 60 VOCs were reliably identified and quantified in blood and breath of CKD patients. Excluding contaminants, six compounds (isoprene, dimethyl sulfide, methyl propyl sulfide, allyl methyl sulfide, thiophene and benzene) changed their blood and breath levels during the hemodialysis treatment. Conclusions Uremic breath and blood patterns were found to be notably affected by the contaminants from the extracorporeal circuits and hospital room air. Consequently, patient exposure to a wide spectrum of volatile species (hydrocarbons, aldehydes, ketones, aromatics, heterocyclic compounds) is expected during hemodialysis. Whereas highly volatile pollutants were relatively quickly removed from blood by exhalation, more soluble ones were retained and contributed to the uremic syndrome. At least two of the species observed (cyclohexanone and 2-propenal) are uremic toxins. Perhaps other volatile substances reported within this study may be toxic and have negative impact on human body functions. Further studies are required to investigate if VOCs responding to HD treatment could be used as markers for monitoring hemodialysis efficiency. PMID:24607025

  17. How Ecosystems Breathe: Measuring Respiration of Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTammany, M. E.

    2005-05-01

    Curriculum for general ecology labs often uses in-lab exercises and computer simulations to demonstrate ecological principles rather than experimental field projects. In addition, ecosystem processes can be difficult to incorporate into general ecology labs because the techniques require sophisticated equipment or complex field designs. As an alternative to in-lab projects, I have integrated field measurement of soil respiration into my general ecology lab to teach students aspects of experimental design (sampling, replication, error, etc.) and to demonstrate how organism-level processes operate beyond single organisms in nature and are influenced by environmental conditions. In a program laden with biomedical interests, analogies between organisms and ecosystems are quite appealing to students. Students in my general ecology course complete a 2-week field project in which they measure soil respiration inside a dark microcosm chamber. We use 10% KOH to trap evolved CO2 and titrate unreacted KOH in lab using 1N HCl. The protocol is simple, only requires some chemicals, and can be used in many different habitats (including flower beds on campus) quite easily. Potential experiments could involve varying environmental conditions, such as soil moisture, nutrient availability, gaseous environment, carbon supply, or temperature, to affect soil respiration rate.

  18. [Measuring blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Estrada Reventos, Dolors; Pujol Navarro, Ester

    2008-09-01

    High blood pressure is one of the main factors which lead to cardiovascular cerebral-vascular and kidney diseases; therefore, nursing professionals should have enough basic knowledge to enable them to carry out a precocious diagnosis and correct follow-up procedures. Although students in nursing schools are taught how to correctly measure blood pressure, often this teaching does not meet the recommendations provided by different national and international guidelines. Thus it is important to know how to use the correct methodology to measure blood pressure.

  19. Analysis of ketone bodies in exhaled breath and blood of ten healthy Japanese at OGTT using a portable gas chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Tanda, Naoko; Hinokio, Yoshinori; Washio, Jumpei; Takahashi, Nobuhiro; Koseki, Takeyoshi

    2014-11-24

    Ketone bodies including acetone are disease biomarkers for diabetes that sometimes causes severe ketoacidosis. The present study was undertaken to clarify the significance of exhaled acetone and plasma ketone bodies at bedside in a clinical setting. The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed in 10 healthy Japanese volunteers (five females and five males). Exhaled breath acetone and volatile sulfide compounds (VSCs) in mouth air were measured simultaneously with blood sampling during the OGTT using a portable gas chromatograph equipped with an In2O3 thick-film type gas sensor and a VSC monitor. Acetone, β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB) and acetoacetate (AcAc) in blood plasma as well as glucose and insulin were examined. Oral conditions were examined based on the Community Periodontal Index (CPI) by one dentist. In addition, the same type of analysis was applied to two uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus patients hospitalized at Tohoku University Hospital. Exhaled acetone was measured at the same time as blood withdrawal in the morning before breakfast and at night before bed at the beginning, the middle, and the end of hospitalization. All volunteers showed normal OGTT patterns with no ketonuria and periodontitis; however, there were significant correlations between breath acetone and plasma β-ΟΗΒ and between breath acetone and plasma AcAc under fasting conditions. Breath acetone of the type 2 diabetes mellitus patients showed positive correlations with plasma glucose when the level of plasma glucose tended to decrease during hospitalization. In spite of a very limited number of cases, our results support the idea that exhaled breath acetone may be related to plasma β-OHB and AcAc, which reflect glucose metabolism in the body.

  20. 75 FR 11624 - Highway Safety Programs; Conforming Products List of Evidential Breath Alcohol Measurement Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... Evidential Breath Alcohol Measurement Devices AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, DOT... Evidential Breath Alcohol Measurement Devices (58 FR 48705). DATES: Effective Date: March 11, 2010. FOR... Administration (NHTSA) published the Standards for Devices to Measure Breath Alcohol (38 FR 30459). A Qualified...

  1. The effects of progressive muscular relaxation and breathing control technique on blood pressure during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Aalami, Mahboobeh; Jafarnejad, Farzaneh; ModarresGharavi, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are the main cause of maternal and fetal mortality; however, they have no definite effective treatment. The researchers aimed to study the effects of progressive muscular relaxation and breathing control technique on blood pressure (BP) during pregnancy. This three-group clinical trial was conducted in Mashhad health centers and governmental hospitals. Sixty pregnant (after 20 weeks of gestational age) women with systolic BP ≥ 135 mmHg or diastolic BP ≥ 85 mmHg were assigned to three groups. Progressive muscular relaxation and breathing control exercises were administered to the two experimental groups once a week in person and in the rest of the days by instructions given on a CD for 4 weeks. BP was checked before and after the interventions. BP was measured before and after 15 min subjects' waiting without any especial intervention in the control group. After 4 weeks of intervention, the systolic (by a mean of 131.3 to 117.2, P = 0.001 and by a mean of 131.05 to 120.5, P = 0.004, respectively) and diastolic (by a mean of 79.2 to 72.3, P = 0.001 and by a mean of 80.1 to 76.5, P = 0.047, respectively) BPs were significantly decreased in progressive muscular relaxation and breathing control groups, but they were not statistically significant in the control group. The interventions were effective on decreasing systolic and diastolic BP to normal range after 4 weeks in both the groups. The effects of both the interventions were more obvious on systolic BP compared to diastolic BP.

  2. The effects of progressive muscular relaxation and breathing control technique on blood pressure during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Aalami, Mahboobeh; Jafarnejad, Farzaneh; ModarresGharavi, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are the main cause of maternal and fetal mortality; however, they have no definite effective treatment. The researchers aimed to study the effects of progressive muscular relaxation and breathing control technique on blood pressure (BP) during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: This three-group clinical trial was conducted in Mashhad health centers and governmental hospitals. Sixty pregnant (after 20 weeks of gestational age) women with systolic BP ≥ 135 mmHg or diastolic BP ≥ 85 mmHg were assigned to three groups. Progressive muscular relaxation and breathing control exercises were administered to the two experimental groups once a week in person and in the rest of the days by instructions given on a CD for 4 weeks. BP was checked before and after the interventions. BP was measured before and after 15 min subjects' waiting without any especial intervention in the control group. Results: After 4 weeks of intervention, the systolic (by a mean of 131.3 to 117.2, P = 0.001 and by a mean of 131.05 to 120.5, P = 0.004, respectively) and diastolic (by a mean of 79.2 to 72.3, P = 0.001 and by a mean of 80.1 to 76.5, P = 0.047, respectively) BPs were significantly decreased in progressive muscular relaxation and breathing control groups, but they were not statistically significant in the control group. Conclusions: The interventions were effective on decreasing systolic and diastolic BP to normal range after 4 weeks in both the groups. The effects of both the interventions were more obvious on systolic BP compared to diastolic BP. PMID:27186213

  3. Tissue gas and blood analyses of human subjects breathing 80% argon and 20% oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horrigan, D. J.; Wells, C. H.; Guest, M. M.; Hart, G. B.; Goodpasture, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Eight human volunteers, individually studied in a hyperbaric chamber, breathed: (1) air at 1 ATA; (2) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min; (3) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (4) 100% O2 at 1 ATA for 30 min; (5) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (6) 100% O2 at 2 ATA for 60 min; and (7) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min. Oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon tensions were measured in muscle and subcutaneous tissue by mass spectroscopic analyses. Venous blood obtained at regular intervals was analyzed for coagulation and fibrinolytic factors. Inert gas narcosis was not observed. After breathing argon for 30 min, muscle argon tensions were almost three times the subcutaneous tensions. Argon wash-in mirrored nitrogen wash-out. Argon wash-in and wash-out had no effect on tissue PO2 or PCO2. Coagulation and fibrinolytic changes usually associated with vascular bubbles were absent.

  4. Tissue gas and blood analyses of human subjects breathing 80% argon and 20% oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horrigan, D. J.; Wells, C. H.; Guest, M. M.; Hart, G. B.; Goodpasture, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Eight human volunteers, individually studied in a hyperbaric chamber, breathed: (1) air at 1 ATA; (2) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min; (3) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (4) 100% O2 at 1 ATA for 30 min; (5) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (6) 100% O2 at 2 ATA for 60 min; and (7) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min. Oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon tensions were measured in muscle and subcutaneous tissue by mass spectroscopic analyses. Venous blood obtained at regular intervals was analyzed for coagulation and fibrinolytic factors. Inert gas narcosis was not observed. After breathing argon for 30 min, muscle argon tensions were almost three times the subcutaneous tensions. Argon wash-in mirrored nitrogen wash-out. Argon wash-in and wash-out had no effect on tissue PO2 or PCO2. Coagulation and fibrinolytic changes usually associated with vascular bubbles were absent.

  5. Heart rate and blood pressure responses during hypoxic cycles of a 3-week intermittent hypoxia breathing program in patients at risk for or with mild COPD.

    PubMed

    Faulhaber, Martin; Gatterer, Hannes; Haider, Thomas; Linser, Tobias; Netzer, Nikolaus; Burtscher, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide information on heart rate and blood pressure responses during a 3-week intermittent hypoxia breathing program in COPD patients. Sixteen participants with COPD symptoms were randomly assigned to a hypoxia or control group and completed a 3-week intermittent hypoxia breathing program (five sessions per week, each consisting of three to five breathing cycles, each cycle lasting 3-5 minutes with 3-minute breaks between cycles). During the breathing cycles, the hypoxia group received hypoxic air (inspired fraction of oxygen 15%-12%), whereas the control group received normal air (sham hypoxia). During the breaks, all participants breathed normoxic room air. Arterial oxygen saturation, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate were measured during the normoxic and hypoxic/sham hypoxic periods. For each breathing cycle, changes from normoxia to hypoxia/sham hypoxia were calculated, and changes were averaged for each of the 15 sessions and for each week. Changes in arterial oxygen saturation were significantly different between groups in the course of the 3 weeks (two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures), with post hoc differences in weeks 1, 2, and 3. During the course of the intermittent hypoxia application, no between-group differences were detected for blood pressure or rate pressure product values. Changes in heart rate were significantly different between groups in the course of the 3 weeks (two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures), with post hoc differences only in week 3. Averages over all 15 sessions were significantly higher in the hypoxia group for heart rate and rate pressure product, and tended to be increased for systolic blood pressure. The applied intermittent hypoxia breathing program resulted in specific and moderate heart rate and blood pressure responses, and did not provoke a progressive increase in blood pressure during the hypoxic cycles in the course of the application.

  6. Measurement of Ethanol in Gaseous Breath Using a Miniature Gas Chromatograph

    PubMed Central

    Morey, Timothy E.; Booth, Matthew M.; Prather, Robert A.; Nixon, Sara J.; Boissoneault, Jeff; Melker, Richard J.; Goldberger, Bruce A.; Wohltjen, Hank; Dennis, Donn M.

    2011-01-01

    We designed and built a novel, miniature gas chromatograph (mGC) to use exhaled breath to estimate blood ethanol concentrations that may offer GC quality sensitivity and specificity, but with portability, reduced size, and decreased cost. We hypothesized that the mGC would accurately estimate the serum ethanol concentration using exhaled breath. Human subjects (n = 8) were dosed with ethanol employing the Widmark criteria, targeting a blood concentration of 0.08 g/dL. Serum and breath samples were collected concurrently over an hour. Ethanol concentrations in serum were measured using a CLIA-approved laboratory. Ethanol concentrations in conventional breath were assayed using a calibrated mGC or Intoxilyzer 400PA. Data were analyzed using Bland-Altman analysis using serum concentrations as a “gold standard”. For the mGC, the regression line (correlation coefficient), bias, and 95% limits of agreement were y = 1.013x − 0.009 (r = 0.91), −0.008 g/dL, and −0.031 to 0.016 g/dL, respectively, for 30 specimens. For the Intoxilyzer 400PA, the regression line (correlation coefficient), bias, and 95% limits of agreement were y = 0.599x + 0.008 (r = 0.86), −0.024 g/dL, and −0.049 to 0.002 g/dL, respectively, for 71 specimens with a large magnitude effect. We concluded that the mGC, using exhaled breath, performed well to estimate the serum ethanol concentrations. PMID:21439148

  7. Automated Blood Pressure Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Vital-2 unit pictured is a semi-automatic device that permits highly accurate blood pressure measurement, even by untrained personnel. Developed by Meditron Instrument Corporation, Milford, New Hampshire, it is based in part on NASA technology found in a similar system designed for automatic monitoring of astronauts' blood pressure. Vital-2 is an advancement over the familiar arm cuff, dial and bulb apparatus customarily used for blood pressure checks. In that method, the physician squeezes the bulb to inflate the arm cuff, which restricts the flow of blood through the arteries. As he eases the pressure on the arm, he listens, through a stethoscope, to the sounds of resumed blood flow as the arteries expand and contract. Taking dial readings related to sound changes, he gets the systolic (contracting) and diastolic (expanding) blood pressure measurements. The accuracy of the method depends on the physician's skill in interpreting the sounds. Hospitals sometimes employ a more accurate procedure, but it is "invasive," involving insertion of a catheter in the artery.

  8. Assessment of propofol concentrations in human breath and blood by means of HS-SPME-GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Miekisch, Wolfram; Fuchs, Patricia; Kamysek, Svend; Neumann, Christine; Schubert, Jochen K

    2008-09-01

    Breath analysis could offer a non-invasive means of drug monitoring if adequate analytical methods and robust correlations between drug concentrations in breath and blood can be established. We therefore applied headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) to assess breath and blood concentrations of the intravenous drug propofol in patients under anesthesia or sedation. Arterial, central- and peripheral-venous blood and alveolar breath samples were drawn in parallel from 16 mechanically ventilated patients. In addition, six patients undergoing lung resection were investigated. Substances were preconcentrated by means of HS-SPME, separated by GC and identified by MS. Propofol detection limits were 0.006 nmol/L in breath and 72.20 nmol/L in blood, the quantitation limits were 0.009 nmol/L and 75.89 nmol/L (end tidal breath/blood). Intraday precision was 8-11%, recovery 97-103%. Propofol concentrations were 0.04-0.5 nmol/L in breath and 2-120 micromol/L in blood. Only arterial propofol concentrations showed a correlation with concentrations in breath. Impaired ventilation/perfusion ratios in patients under lung resection resulted in changes of correlation coefficients. Reliable and precise analytical methods such as HS-SPME-GC-MS represent basic requirements if breath analysis is to be set up for non-invasive monitoring of intravenous drugs and control of anesthesia.

  9. What is the optimal anesthetic protocol for measurements of cerebral autoregulation in spontaneously breathing mice?

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenghui; Schuler, Beat; Vogel, Olga; Arras, Margarete; Vogel, Johannes

    2010-12-01

    Autoregulation, an important feature of the cerebral circulation, is affected in many diseases. Since genetically modified mice are a fundamental tool in biomedical research, including neuro(bio)logy also in this specie measurements of cerebral autoregulation (CA) are mandatory. However, this requires anesthesia that unfortunately significantly impacts cerebral perfusion and consequently might distort CA measurements directly or by altering arterial pCO(2). The latter can be avoided by artificial ventilation but requires several control measurements of blood gases, each consuming at least 100 μl of blood or 5% of a mouse's blood volume. To avoid such diagnostic hemorrhage, we systematically analyzed the effect of different common anesthetic protocols used for rodents in spontaneously breathing mice on CA measured with Laser speckle perfusion imaging. Halothane, Isoflurane and Pentobarbital abrogated CA and Ketamin/Xylazine as well as Chloralose had a moderate reproducibility. In contrast, the rather rarely used anesthetic Ethomidate applied in low doses combined with local anesthetics had the best reproducibility. Although with this anesthesia the lower CA limit was lower than with Ketamin/Xylazine and Chloralose as reported in the handful of papers so far dealing with CA in mice, we suggest Ethomidate as the anesthetic of choice for CA measurements in spontaneously breathing mice.

  10. Suction against resistance: a new breathing technique to significantly improve the blood flow ratio of the superior and inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Gutzeit, Andreas; Roos, Justus E; Hergan, Klaus; von Weymarn, Constantin; Wälti, Stephan; Reischauer, Carolin; Froehlich, Johannes M

    2014-12-01

    Optimal contrast within the pulmonary artery is achieved by the maximum amount of contrast-enhanced blood flowing through the superior vena cava (SVC), while minimum amounts of non-contrasted blood should originate from the inferior vena cava (IVC). This study aims to clarify whether "suction against resistance" might optimise this ratio. Phase-contrast pulse sequences on a 1.5T MRI magnet were used for flow quantification (mean flow (mL/s), stroke volume (Vol) in the SVC and IVC in volunteers. Different breathing manoeuvers were analysed repeatedly: free breathing; inspiration; expiration; suction against resistance, and Valsalva. To standardise breathing commands, volunteers performed suction and Valsalva manoeuvers with an MR-compatible manometer. Suction against resistance was associated with a significant drop of the IVC/SVC flow quotient (1.63 [range 1.3-2.0] p < 0.05 at -10 mmHg and 1.48 [1.1-1.9] p < 0.01 at -20 mmHg) corresponding to increased blood flow from SVC and diminished flow originating from the IVC. The remaining breathing commands (free breathing 2.2; inspiration 2.4; expiration 2.4; Valsalva 10 mmHg 2.3; Valsalva 20 mmHg 2.6; and Valsalva 30 mmHg 2.2) showed no differences (p > 0.05). Suction against resistance caused a significant drop in the IVC/SVC quotient. Theoretically, this breathing manoeuver might significantly improve the enhancement characteristics of CT angiography. Suction provokes reduction in blood flow in the inferior vena cava. Ratio between the inferior and superior vena cava blood flow diminished during suction. Manometer used during breathing standardises MR phase-contrast blood flow measurements.

  11. MMP-8, MMP-9 and Neutrophil Elastase in Peripheral Blood and Exhaled Breath Condensate in COPD.

    PubMed

    Sng, JieHao Joshua; Prazakova, Silvie; Thomas, Paul S; Herbert, Cristan

    2017-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by progressive and irreversible airflow limitation associated with chronic inflammation involving cytokines and metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMP-8, MMP-9 and neutrophil elastase (NE) are known to be implicated in COPD but the factors influencing activation and suppression remain unclear. This study aimed to compare MMP-8, MMP-9 and NE in the peripheral blood of COPD patients and controls and to likewise assess exhaled breath condensate (EBC) for these MMPs. Peripheral blood micro(mi)RNA139-5p levels, which may regulate MMPs in COPD, were also measured. Blood and EBC were collected from COPD patients (stable and during exacerbations) and healthy controls. Expression of mRNA for MMP-8, MMP-9, NE and miRNA-139-5p expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was measured using qRT-PCR. MMP-8, MMP-9 and NE protein in plasma as well as MMP-8 and MMP-9 protein in EBC were analysed by enzyme-linked immunoassays. PBMCs from COPD patients showed greater expression of mRNA for MMP-8 (p = 0.0004), MMP-9 (p = 0.0023) and NE (p = 0.0019). PBMC expression of mRNA for NE was significantly higher in COPD exacerbations compared to stable cases (p < 0.05). Expression of mRNA for MMP-9 and NE correlated negatively with spirometry in patients (p < 0.05). Plasma from COPD patients showed greater levels of protein for MMP-8 (p = 0.003), MMP-9 (p = 0.046) and NE (p = 0.018). MMP-8 protein levels were lower in the EBC of COPD patients (p < 0.0001). In PBMCs, enhanced expression of mRNA for MMP-9 and NE is associated with COPD and may correlate with disease severity and exacerbations.

  12. Analysis of inflammatory cytokines in human blood, breath condensate, and urine using a multiplex immunoassay platform.

    PubMed

    Stiegel, Matthew A; Pleil, Joachim D; Sobus, Jon R; Morgan, Marsha K; Madden, Michael C

    2015-02-01

    A change in the expression of cytokines in human biological media indicates an inflammatory response to external stressors and reflects an early step along the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) for various health endpoints. To characterize and interpret this inflammatory response, methodology was developed for measuring a suite of 10 different cytokines in human blood, exhaled breath condensate (EBC), and urine using an electrochemiluminescent multiplex Th1/Th2 cytokine immunoassay platform. Measurement distributions and correlations for eight interleukins (IL) (1β, 2, 4, 5, 8, 10, 12p70 and 13), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were evaluated using 90 blood plasma, 77 EBC, and 400 urine samples collected from nominally healthy adults subjects in North Carolina in 2008-2012. The in vivo results show that there is sufficient sensitivity for characterizing all 10 cytokines at levels of 0.05-0.10 ρg/ml with a dynamic range up to 100 ng/ml across all three of these biological media. The measured in vivo results also show that the duplicate analysis of blood, EBC and urine samples have average estimated fold ranges of 2.21, 3.49, and 2.50, respectively, which are similar to the mean estimated fold range (2.88) for the lowest concentration (0.610 ρg/ml) from a series of spiked control samples; the cytokine method can be used for all three biological media. Nine out of the 10 cytokines measured in EBC were highly correlated within one another with Spearman ρ coefficients ranging from 0.679 to 0.852, while the cytokines measured in blood had a mix of negative and positive correlations, ranging from -0.620 to 0.836. Almost all correlations between EBC and blood were positive. This work also represents the first successful within- and between-person evaluation of ultra trace-level inflammatory markers in blood, EBC, and urine.

  13. Sleep-disordered breathing and arterial blood flow steal represent linked therapeutic targets in cerebral ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Barlinn, Kristian; Alexandrov, Andrei V

    2011-02-01

    The pathogenic link between sleep-disordered breathing and early neurological deterioration in acute ischaemic stroke patients is now a subject of clinical investigations. Vasomotor reactivity and intracranial blood flow steal in response to changing vasodilatory stimuli like carbon dioxide play a pivotal role in clinical deterioration with reversed Robin Hood syndrome. A mechanical ventilatory correction in selected acute stroke patients might have a beneficial effect on sleep-disordered breathing and brain perfusion. This is a novel therapeutic target and the missing link in the pathogenesis of early neurological deterioration and stroke recurrence. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2011 World Stroke Organization.

  14. Breath-hold black blood quantitative T1rho imaging of liver using single shot fast spin echo acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Queenie; Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Liver fibrosis is a key feature in most chronic liver diseases. T1rho magnetic resonance imaging is a potentially important technique for noninvasive diagnosis, severity grading, and therapy monitoring of liver fibrosis. However, it remains challenging to perform robust T1rho quantification of liver on human subjects. One major reason is that the presence of rich blood signal in liver can cause artificially high T1rho measurement and makes T1rho quantification susceptible to motion. Methods A pulse sequence based on single shot fast/turbo spin echo (SSFSE/SSTSE) acquisition, with theoretical analysis and simulation based on the extended phase graph (EPG) algorithm, was presented for breath-hold single slice quantitative T1rho imaging of liver with suppression of blood signal. The pulse sequence was evaluated in human subjects at 3.0 T with 500 Hz spinlock frequency and time-of-spinlock (TSL) 0, 10, 30 and 50 ms. Results Human scan demonstrated that the entire T1rho data sets with four spinlock time can be acquired within a single breath-hold of 10 seconds with black blood effect. T1rho quantification with suppression of blood signal results in significantly reduced T1rho value of liver compared to the results without blood suppression. Conclusions A signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficient pulse sequence was reported for T1rho quantification of liver. The black blood effect, together with a short breath-hold, mitigates the risk of quantification errors as would occur in the conventional methods. PMID:27190769

  15. Relationships between sleep-disordered breathing and blood pressure and excessive daytime sleepiness among truck drivers.

    PubMed

    Cui, Renzhe; Tanigawa, Takeshi; Sakurai, Susumu; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2006-08-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing is a risk factor for hypertension, cardiovascular disease and accidents in the general population, but little is known about this correlation among professional truck drivers. To examine the relationships of sleep-disordered breathing with blood pressure levels and excessive daytime sleepiness among truck drivers, we conducted a population-based cross-sectional study of 1,313 subjects aged 20-69 years registered in the Japanese Trucking Association. The 3% oxygen desaturation index was selected as an indicator of sleep-disordered breathing, representing the number of desaturation events per hour of recording time in which blood oxygen fell by > or = 3% by overnight pulse oximetry. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale was used to estimate excessive daytime sleepiness. There were significant positive associations between the 3% oxygen desaturation index levels and both diastolic blood pressure levels and Epworth Sleepiness Scale scores. The multivariate odds ratio of hypertension was 2.0 (1.1-3.6) for a 3% oxygen desaturation index of > or = 15 in reference with a 3% oxygen desaturation index of <5. This association was more evident among those aged > or = 40 years and overweight subjects. Further, the multivariate odds ratio of an Epworth Sleepiness Scale of > or = 11 was 2.3 (1.1-4.9) for a 3% oxygen desaturation index of > or =15 in reference with a 3% oxygen desaturation index of <5. This association was more evident among those aged > or =40 years. The associations of sleep-disordered breathing severity with diastolic blood pressure levels and excessive daytime sleepiness suggest the need for sleep-disordered breathing screening among truck drivers for prevention of hypertension and potential traffic accidents.

  16. Automated optical measurements of human torso surface movements during breathing.

    PubMed

    Saumarez, R C

    1986-02-01

    An automated light-sectioning system has been developed for continuously measuring the movements of the torso surface during breathing. The body is illuminated with planes of light of a known geometry, and the body is visualized with television cameras. The perceived angles at which the television scan detected the planes projected onto the body are encoded digitally and stored continuously on magnetic tape. Subsequently the geometry of the torso can be reconstructed at 80-ms intervals enabling the detailed pattern of movements and volume displacement over the torso surface to be determined. Displacements of 0.5 mm over the torso surface can be resolved, and respired volume can be measured to within 10% over the range of the vital capacity.

  17. Effects of slow and regular breathing exercise on cardiopulmonary coupling and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengbo; Wang, Buqing; Wu, Hao; Chai, Xiaoke; Wang, Weidong; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2017-02-01

    Investigation of the interaction between cardiovascular variables and respiration provides a quantitative and noninvasive approach to assess the autonomic control of cardiovascular function. The aim of this paper is to investigate the changes of cardiopulmonary coupling (CPC), blood pressure (BP) and pulse transit time (PTT) during a stepwise-paced breathing (SPB) procedure (spontaneous breathing followed by paced breathing at 14, 12.5, 11, 9.5, 8 and 7 breaths per minute, 3 min each) and gain insights into the characteristics of slow breathing exercises. RR interval, respiration, BP and PTT are collected during the SPB procedure (48 healthy subjects, 27 ± 6 years). CPC is assessed through investigating both the phase and amplitude dynamics between the respiration-induced components from RR interval and respiration by the approach of ensemble empirical mode decomposition. It was found that even though the phase synchronization and amplitude oscillation of CPC were both enhanced by the SPB procedure, phase coupling does not increase monotonically along with the amplitude oscillation during the whole procedure. Meanwhile, BP was reduced significantly by the SPB procedure (SBP: from 122.0 ± 13.4 to 114.2 ± 14.9 mmHg, p < 0.001, DBP: from 82.2 ± 8.6 to 77.0 ± 9.8 mmHg, p < 0.001, PTT: from 172.8 ± 20.1 to 176.8 ± 19.2 ms, p < 0.001). Our results demonstrate that the SPB procedure can reduce BP and lengthen PTT significantly. Compared with amplitude dynamics, phase dynamics is a different marker for CPC analysis in reflecting cardiorespiratory coherence during slow breathing exercise. Our study provides a methodology to practice slow breathing exercise, including the setting of target breathing rate, change of CPC and the importance of regular breathing. The applications and usability of the study results have also been discussed.

  18. Automated system for measurement of mechanics of breathing.

    PubMed

    Watson, H; Landa, J; Sackner, M A

    1975-01-01

    We describe a complete automated system for measurement of total respiratory resistance and compliance, and of pulmonary resistance and compliance in humans and anesthetized animals. The device for testing the chest-lung system consists of a sinusoidal pump with a stroke adjustable from 20 ml to 600 ml over a cycling frequency of 0.3 to 30 Hz. Pressure and flow or volume are inputted into an analog network for wave shaping, then to an arithmetic unit composed of sample-and-hold amplifiers, peak, minimum and zero detecting circuits, an analog division circuit, and a digital logic processor. The computer takes the peak-to-peak amplitude of one of two sinusoidal inputs at 0.3 to 10 Hz and the corresponding amplitude of the other input in the presence of a.c. noise and d.c. shifts, divides one into the other, and displays an answer on a digital voltmeter. In addition, the analog output is displayed on the cathode-ray tube of a storage oscilloscope. Plots of total resistance and pulmonary resistance are recorded as a function of lung volume in both humans inspiring voluntarily as well as anesthetized dogs inflated by positive pressure from the test apparatus. Total and pulmonary dynamic compliance, as a function of breathing frequency, can only be measured by the computer if a symmetrical waveform is presented to it. This cannot be achieved in spontaneously breathing subjects but is accomplished in apneic animals by producing sinusoidal oscillations from the test apparatus. Our on-line method for measurement of total respiratory resistance is now used in the Clinical Pulmonary Laboratory for experimental work, and we are in the process of obtaining values in normal subjects.

  19. Ethylene and ammonia traces measurements from the patients' breath with renal failure via LPAS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, C.; Dutu, D. C. A.; Cernat, R.; Matei, C.; Bratu, A. M.; Banita, S.; Dumitras, D. C.

    2011-11-01

    The application of laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) for fast and precise measurements of breath biomarkers has opened up new promises for monitoring and diagnostics in recent years, especially because breath test is a non-invasive method, safe, rapid and acceptable to patients. Our study involved assessment of breath ethylene and breath ammonia levels in patients with renal failure receiving haemodialysis (HD) treatment. Breath samples from healthy subjects and from patients with renal failure were collected using chemically inert aluminized bags and were subsequently analyzed using the LPAS technique. We have found out that the composition of exhaled breath in patients with renal failure contains not only ethylene, but also ammonia and gives valuable information for determining efficacy and endpoint of HD. Analysis of ethylene and ammonia traces from the human breath may provide insight into severity of oxidative stress and metabolic disturbances and may ensure optimal therapy and prevention of pathology at patients on continuous HD.

  20. Mechanical indentation improves cerebral blood oxygenation signal quality of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) during breath holding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, William C.; Romero, Edwin; LaConte, Stephen M.; Rylander, Christopher G.

    2013-03-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a well-known technique for non-invasively measuring cerebral blood oxygenation, and many studies have demonstrated that fNIRS signals can be related to cognitive function. However, the fNIRS signal is attenuated by the skin, while scalp blood content has been reported to influence cerebral oxygenation measurements. Mechanical indentation has been shown to increase light transmission through soft tissues by causing interstitial water and blood flow away from the compressed region. To study the effects of indentation on fNIRS, a commercial fNIRS system with 16 emitter/detector pairs was used to measure cerebral blood oxygenation at 2 Hz. This device used diffuse reflectance at 730 nm and 850 nm to calculate deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin concentrations. A borosilicate glass hemisphere was epoxied over each sensor to function as both an indenter and a lens. After placing the indenter/sensor assembly on the forehead, a pair of plastic bands was placed on top of the fNIRS headband and strapped to the head to provide uniform pressure and tightened to approx. 15 N per strap. Cerebral blood oxygenation was recorded during a breath holding regime (15 second hold, 15 second rest, 6 cycles) in 4 human subjects both with and without the indenter array. Results showed that indentation increased raw signal intensity by 85 +/- 35%, and that indentation increased amplitude of hemoglobin changes during breath cycles by 313% +/- 105%. These results suggest that indentation improves sensing of cerebral blood oxygenation, and may potentially enable sensing of deeper brain tissues.

  1. Noninvasive measurement of plasma glucose from exhaled breath in healthy and type 1 diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Minh, Timothy D C; Oliver, Stacy R; Ngo, Jerry; Flores, Rebecca; Midyett, Jason; Meinardi, Simone; Carlson, Matthew K; Rowland, F Sherwood; Blake, Donald R; Galassetti, Pietro R

    2011-06-01

    Effective management of diabetes mellitus, affecting tens of millions of patients, requires frequent assessment of plasma glucose. Patient compliance for sufficient testing is often reduced by the unpleasantness of current methodologies, which require blood samples and often cause pain and skin callusing. We propose that the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath can be used as a novel, alternative, noninvasive means to monitor glycemia in these patients. Seventeen healthy (9 females and 8 males, 28.0 ± 1.0 yr) and eight type 1 diabetic (T1DM) volunteers (5 females and 3 males, 25.8 ± 1.7 yr) were enrolled in a 240-min triphasic intravenous dextrose infusion protocol (baseline, hyperglycemia, euglycemia-hyperinsulinemia). In T1DM patients, insulin was also administered (using differing protocols on 2 repeated visits to separate the effects of insulinemia on breath composition). Exhaled breath and room air samples were collected at 12 time points, and concentrations of ~100 VOCs were determined by gas chromatography and matched with direct plasma glucose measurements. Standard least squares regression was used on several subsets of exhaled gases to generate multilinear models to predict plasma glucose for each subject. Plasma glucose estimates based on two groups of four gases each (cluster A: acetone, methyl nitrate, ethanol, and ethyl benzene; cluster B: 2-pentyl nitrate, propane, methanol, and acetone) displayed very strong correlations with glucose concentrations (0.883 and 0.869 for clusters A and B, respectively) across nearly 300 measurements. Our study demonstrates the feasibility to accurately predict glycemia through exhaled breath analysis over a broad range of clinically relevant concentrations in both healthy and T1DM subjects.

  2. Blood (Breath) Alcohol Concentration Rates of College Football Fans on Game Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glassman, Tavis; Braun, Robert; Reindl, Diana M.; Whewell, Aubrey

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the Blood (breath) Alcohol Concentration (BrAC) rates of college football fans on game day. Researchers employed a time-series study design, collecting data at home football games at a large university in the Midwest. Participants included 536 individuals (64.4% male) ages 18-83 (M = 28.44, SD = 12.32).…

  3. Blood (Breath) Alcohol Concentration Rates of College Football Fans on Game Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glassman, Tavis; Braun, Robert; Reindl, Diana M.; Whewell, Aubrey

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the Blood (breath) Alcohol Concentration (BrAC) rates of college football fans on game day. Researchers employed a time-series study design, collecting data at home football games at a large university in the Midwest. Participants included 536 individuals (64.4% male) ages 18-83 (M = 28.44, SD = 12.32).…

  4. Breath Tests for Determining Alcohol in the Blood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovell, William S.

    1972-01-01

    Scientific, legal, and legislative roles in the interaction of science and society are examined in the context of the use of technical measures related to intoxication. The case is examined in detail as a model of the way in which the relationship is regulated. (AL)

  5. Pulse oximetry-derived pleth variability index can predict dexmedetomidine-induced changes in blood pressure in spontaneously breathing patients.

    PubMed

    Sato, Makoto; Kunisawa, Takayuki; Kurosawa, Atsushi; Sasakawa, Tomoki

    2016-11-01

    Hypertension or hypotension in patients receiving continuous infusions of dexmedetomidine (DEX) is often due to changes in vascular resistance caused by α2 receptor stimulation. We investigated whether baseline perfusion index (PI) and pleth variability index (PVI), derived from pulse oximetry readings, could predict DEX-induced changes in the hemodynamic status in spontaneously breathing patients. Observational study. Operating room. Patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists performance status 1 or 2) scheduled to undergo lower extremity or abdominal procedures under regional anesthesia were approached. The PI and PVI were set as baseline upon arrival in theater and were then measured at 2.5-minute intervals. Upon attaining stable hemodynamic status under spontaneous breathing, intravenous administration of DEX was initiated at 6 μg kg(-1) h(-1) for 10minutes, followed by continuous infusion at 0.6 μg kg(-1) h(-1). Blood pressure, heart rate, PI, and PVI were measured. Hypertension was defined as an increase in systolic blood pressure (SBP) >15% and hypotension as a decrease in SBP <15% from baseline. Baseline PI and PVI correlated with the degree of change in SBP. The maximum percentage increase as well as the maximum percentage of decrease in SBP from baseline correlated with baseline PI (r=0.418 [P=.005] and r=0.507 [P<.001], respectively) and PVI (r=-0.658 [P<.001] and r=-0.438 [P=.003], respectively). PVI <15 identified DEX-induced hypertension (sensitivity 94%, specificity 85%) and PVI >16 identified DEX-induced hypotension (sensitivity 83%, specificity 64%). PVI may predict DEX-induced changes in blood pressure in spontaneously breathing patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Phase Diagram and Breathing Dynamics of Red Blood Cell Motion in Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Prosenjit; Yazdani, Alireza

    2011-11-01

    We present phase diagrams of red blood cell dynamics in shear flow using three-dimensional numerical simulations. By considering a wide range of shear rate and interior-to-exterior fluid viscosity ratio, it is shown that the cell dynamics is often more complex than the well-known tank-treading, tumbling and swinging motion, and is characterized by an extreme variation of the cell shape. We identify such complex shape dynamics as `breathing' dynamics. During the breathing motion, the cell either completely aligns with the flow direction and the membrane folds inward forming two cusps, or, it undergoes large swinging motion while deep, crater-like dimples periodically emerge and disappear. At lower bending rigidity, the breathing motion occurs over a wider range of shear rates, and is often characterized by the emergence of a quad-concave shape. The effect of the breathing dynamics on the tank-treading-to-tumbling transition is illustrated by detailed phase diagrams which appear to be more complex and richer than those of vesicles. In a remarkable departure from classical theory of nondeformable cells, we find that there exists a critical viscosity ratio below which the transition is dependent on shear rate only. Supported by NSF.

  7. Optical measures of changes in cerebral vascular tone during voluntary breath holding and a Sternberg memory task.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chin Hong; Low, Kathy A; Schneider-Garces, Nils; Zimmerman, Benjamin; Fletcher, Mark A; Maclin, Edward L; Chiarelli, Antonio M; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2016-07-01

    The human cerebral vasculature responds to changes in blood pressure and demands for oxygenation via cerebral autoregulation. Changes in cerebrovascular tone (vasoconstriction and vasodilation) also mediate the changes in blood flow measured by the BOLD fMRI signal. This cerebrovascular reactivity is known to vary with age. In two experiments, we demonstrate that cerebral pulse parameters measured using optical imaging can quantify changes in cerebral vascular tone, both globally and locally. In experiment 1, 51 older adults (age range=55-87) performed a voluntary breath-holding task while cerebral pulse amplitude measures were taken. We found significant pulse amplitude variations across breath-holding periods, indicating vasodilation during, and vasoconstriction after breath holding. The breath-holding index (BHI), a measure of cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) was derived and found to correlate with age. BHI was also correlated with performance in the Modified Mini-Mental Status Examination, even after controlling for age and education. In experiment 2, the same participants performed a Sternberg task, and changes in regional pulse amplitude between high (set-size 6) and low (set-size 2) task loads were compared. Only task-related areas in the fronto-parietal network (FPN) showed significant reduction in pulse amplitude, indicating vasodilation. Non-task-related areas such as the somatosensory and auditory cortices did not show such reductions. Taken together, these experiments suggest that optical pulse parameters can index changes in brain vascular tone both globally and locally, using both physiological and cognitive load manipulations.

  8. Measuring airway exchange of endogenous acetone using a single-exhalation breathing maneuver.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joseph C; Lamm, Wayne J E; Hlastala, Michael P

    2006-03-01

    Exhaled acetone is measured to estimate exposure or monitor diabetes and congestive heart failure. Interpreting this measurement depends critically on where acetone exchanges in the lung. Health professionals assume exhaled acetone originates from alveolar gas exchange, but experimental data and theoretical predictions suggest that acetone comes predominantly from airway gas exchange. We measured endogenous acetone in the exhaled breath to evaluate acetone exchange in the lung. The acetone concentration in the exhalate of healthy human subjects was measured dynamically with a quadrupole mass spectrometer and was plotted against exhaled volume. Each subject performed a series of breathing maneuvers in which the steady exhaled flow rate was the only variable. Acetone phase III had a positive slope (0.054+/-0.016 liter-1) that was statistically independent of flow rate. Exhaled acetone concentration was normalized by acetone concentration in the alveolar air, as estimated by isothermal rebreathing. Acetone concentration in the rebreathed breath ranged from 0.8 to 2.0 parts per million. Normalized end-exhaled acetone concentration was dependent on flow and was 0.79+/-0.04 and 0.85+/-0.04 for the slow and fast exhalation rates, respectively. A mathematical model of airway and alveolar gas exchange was used to evaluate acetone transport in the lung. By doubling the connective tissue (epithelium+mucosal tissue) thickness, this model predicted accurately (R2=0.94+/-0.05) the experimentally measured expirograms and demonstrated that most acetone exchange occurred in the airways of the lung. Therefore, assays using exhaled acetone measurements need to be reevaluated because they may underestimate blood levels.

  9. A Modified Carbon Monoxide Breath Test for Measuring Erythrocyte Lifespan in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yong-Jian; Zhang, Hou-De; Ji, Yong-Qiang; Zhu, Guo-Liang; Huang, Jia-Liang; Du, Li-Tao; Cao, Ping; Zang, De-Yue; Du, Ji-Hui; Li, Rong; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    This study was to develop a CO breath test for RBC lifespan estimation of small animals. The ribavirin induced hemolysis rabbit models were placed individually in a closed rebreath cage and air samples were collected for measurement of CO concentration. RBC lifespan was calculated from accumulated CO, blood volume, and hemoglobin concentration data. RBC lifespan was determined in the same animals with the standard biotin-labeling method. RBC lifespan data obtained by the CO breath test method for control (CON, 49.0 ± 5.9 d) rabbits, rabbits given 10 mg/kg·d−1 of ribavirin (RIB10, 31.0 ± 4.0 d), and rabbits given 20 mg/kg·d−1 of ribavirin (RIB20, 25.0 ± 2.9 d) were statistically similar (all p > 0.05) to and linearly correlated (r = 0.96, p < 0.01) with the RBC lifespan data obtained for the same rabbits by the standard biotin-labeling method (CON, 51.0 ± 2.7 d; RIB10, 33.0 ± 1.3 d; and RIB20, 27.0 ± 0.8 d). The CO breath test method takes less than 3 h to complete, whereas the standard method requires at least several weeks. In conclusion, the CO breath test method provides a simple and rapid means of estimating RBC lifespan and is feasible for use with small animal models. PMID:27294128

  10. Sleep-disordered breathing is associated with blood pressure and carotid arterial stiffness in obese children.

    PubMed

    Tagetti, Angela; Bonafini, Sara; Zaffanello, Marco; Benetti, Maria V; Vedove, Francesco Dalle; Gasperi, Emma; Cavarzere, Paolo; Gaudino, Rossella; Piacentini, Giorgio; Minuz, Pietro; Maffeis, Claudio; Antoniazzi, Franco; Fava, Cristiano

    2017-01-01

    Both sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and high blood pressure (BP) occur more frequently among obese children than among normal weight children, and this may be due to endothelial dysfunction and worsened arterial stiffness. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible association between SDB and BP, and the possible role of endothelial function and local and systemic arterial stiffness in a sample of obese children asymptomatic for sleep disturbances. Thirty-nine obese children were included in the study. Children underwent overnight limited channel polysomnography, and the vascular measurements included the following: office and 24-h ambulatory BP; brachial flow-mediated dilatation, carotid intima-media thickness and carotid distensibility measured using ultrasound; and systemic arterial stiffness index measured using digital volume pulse analysis. Significant correlations between different BP measurements (both office and ambulatory BP monitoring and estimated by Z score) and SDB were found, including correlations involving the respiratory disturbance index, the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), the number of desaturations per hour and the mean peripheral saturation (r ranging between 0.330 and 0.474). Carotid distensibility was correlated with the AHI (r = -0.367; P = 0.030) and with the mean oxygen saturation (r = 0.401; P = 0.017). In contrast, there was no relationship among flow-mediated dilatation, stiffness index, carotid intima-media thickness and all the tested respiratory markers. In the multivariate analysis, the supine Z SBP remained independently associated with the number of desaturations per hour and the AHI, even after correction for carotid distensibility and BMI. Our data suggest that in obese children asymptomatic for sleep respiratory problems, SDB might worsen BP, in part, through an increase in arterial stiffness.

  11. Blood pressure measurement

    MedlinePlus

    ... have this problem. High blood pressure is often discovered during a visit to the provider for another ... to develop high blood pressure. If you have diabetes, heart disease, or kidney problems, or if you ...

  12. Influence of the oropharyngeal microflora on the measurement of exhaled breath hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Thompson, D G; O'Brien, J D; Hardie, J M

    1986-10-01

    We investigated the possible contribution made by oropharyngeal microfloral fermentation of ingested carbohydrate to the generation of the early, transient exhaled breath hydrogen rise seen after carbohydrate ingestion. Ten subjects ate or were sham fed carbohydrate-containing meals with and without prior chlorhexidine mouthwash during serial collection of exhaled breath and mouth hydrogen samples. Meal ingestion and sham feeding both induced significant (p less than 0.01) elevations of breath and mouth hydrogen that were virtually abolished by prior chlorhexidine mouthwash. In 7 subjects, delivery of the meal directly into the stomach via an orogastric tube did not cause a breath or mouth hydrogen rise. Oral contents incubated anaerobically in vitro with carbohydrate generated hydrogen that was again inhibited by chlorhexidine. These studies indicate that fermentation of ingested carbohydrate by oropharyngeal bacteria can contribute significantly to measured breath hydrogen values soon after meal ingestion, and may introduce avoidable error into the interpretation of serial breath hydrogen data.

  13. An Acute Bout of a Controlled Breathing Frequency Lowers Sympathetic Neural Outflow but not Blood Pressure in Healthy Normotensive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    MCCLAIN, SHANNON L.; BROOKS, ALEXA M.; JARVIS, SARA S.

    2017-01-01

    Controlled or paced breathing is often used as a stress reduction technique but the impact on blood pressure (BP) and sympathetic outflow have not been consistently reported. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a controlled breathing (12 breaths/min, CB) rate would be similar to an individual’s spontaneous breathing (SB) rate. Secondly, would a CB rate of 12 breaths/min alter heart rate (HR), BP, and indices of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). Twenty-one subjects (10 women, 11 men) performed two trials: SB, where the subject chose a comfortable breathing rate; and CB, where the subject breathed at a pace of 12 breaths/min. Each trial was 6 min during which respiratory waveforms, HR, BP (systolic, SBP; diastolic, DBP), and MSNA were recorded. During CB, the 6 min average breathing frequency (14±4 vs 12±1 breaths/min, P<0.05 for SB and CB, respectively), MSNA burst frequency (18±12 vs 14±10 bursts/min, P<0.01) and MSNA burst incidence (28±19 vs 21± 6 bursts/100 heart beats, P<0.01) were significantly lower than during SB. HR (66±9 vs 67±9 beats/min, P<0.05) was higher during CB. SBP (120±13 vs 121±15 mmHg, P=0.741), DBP (56±8 vs 57±9 mmHg, P=0.768), and MSNA total activity (166±94 vs 145±102 a.u./min, P=0.145) were not different between the breathing conditions. In conclusion, an acute reduction in breathing frequency such as that observed during CB elicited a decrease in indices of MSNA (burst frequency and incidence) with no change in BP. PMID:28344733

  14. An Acute Bout of a Controlled Breathing Frequency Lowers Sympathetic Neural Outflow but not Blood Pressure in Healthy Normotensive Subjects.

    PubMed

    McClain, Shannon L; Brooks, Alexa M; Jarvis, Sara S

    2017-01-01

    Controlled or paced breathing is often used as a stress reduction technique but the impact on blood pressure (BP) and sympathetic outflow have not been consistently reported. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a controlled breathing (12 breaths/min, CB) rate would be similar to an individual's spontaneous breathing (SB) rate. Secondly, would a CB rate of 12 breaths/min alter heart rate (HR), BP, and indices of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). Twenty-one subjects (10 women, 11 men) performed two trials: SB, where the subject chose a comfortable breathing rate; and CB, where the subject breathed at a pace of 12 breaths/min. Each trial was 6 min during which respiratory waveforms, HR, BP (systolic, SBP; diastolic, DBP), and MSNA were recorded. During CB, the 6 min average breathing frequency (14±4 vs 12±1 breaths/min, P<0.05 for SB and CB, respectively), MSNA burst frequency (18±12 vs 14±10 bursts/min, P<0.01) and MSNA burst incidence (28±19 vs 21± 6 bursts/100 heart beats, P<0.01) were significantly lower than during SB. HR (66±9 vs 67±9 beats/min, P<0.05) was higher during CB. SBP (120±13 vs 121±15 mmHg, P=0.741), DBP (56±8 vs 57±9 mmHg, P=0.768), and MSNA total activity (166±94 vs 145±102 a.u./min, P=0.145) were not different between the breathing conditions. In conclusion, an acute reduction in breathing frequency such as that observed during CB elicited a decrease in indices of MSNA (burst frequency and incidence) with no change in BP.

  15. Personal exposure to volatile organic compounds. I. Direct measurements in breathing-zone air, drinking water, food, and exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Wallace, L A; Pellizzari, E; Hartwell, T; Rosenzweig, M; Erickson, M; Sparacino, C; Zelon, H

    1984-10-01

    A pilot study to test methods of estimating personal exposures to toxic substances and corresponding body burdens was carried out between July and December 1980. Individual exposures to about a dozen volatile organic compounds in air and drinking water were measured for nine volunteers in Bayonne and Elizabeth, New Jersey, and for three volunteers in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina during three 3-day visits over the 6-month period. Breath samples were also collected from all subjects on each visit. Composite food samples were collected in each locality. Sampling and analytical methods for air, water, food, and breath were evaluated and found generally capable of detecting concentrations as low as 1 microgram/m3 in air and breath, and 1 ng/g in water and food. About 230 personal air samples, 170 drinking water samples, 66 breath samples, and 4 food samples (16 composites) were analyzed for the target chemicals. Ten compounds were present in air and eight were transmitted mainly through that medium. The two target trihalomethanes (chloroform and bromodichloromethane) were predominantly transmitted through water and beverages. Food appeared to be a minor route of exposure, except possibly for trichloroethylene in margarine. Seven compounds were present in more than half of the breath samples. Diurnal and seasonal variations were noted in air and water concentrations of some compounds, with summer levels generally higher. For some chemicals, weekday air exposures were significantly higher than weekend exposures. Some, but not all, of the potentially occupationally exposed individuals had significantly higher workplace exposures to several chemicals. Distributions of air exposures were closer to log normal than normal for most chemicals. Several chemicals were highly correlated with each other in personal air samples, indicating possible common sources of exposure.

  16. A simple model implementation to measure breath by breath the VO2 and VCO2 by the indirect calorimetry technique.

    PubMed

    Cadena, M; Sacristan, E; Infante, O; Rodriguez, F; Escalante, B; Pérez, P; Azpiroz, J

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a discrete random time series modeling for the VO2 and VCO2 measurement in the indirect calorimetry technique (ICT). Mathematical equations are developed in order to establish clear differences between the breath-by-breath and mixing chamber measurement based calorimeters. This simple model offers not only a physiological ICT definition approach but also defines the idea of VO2 and VCO2 short-term variability information for research. The preliminary results show a new physiological information when a computer oriented algorithm model implementation was applied to a data acquisition system in order to obtain the power spectrum analysis from a typical observation subject submitted to the clino-ortho maneuver.

  17. Estimating breathing movements of the chest and abdominal wall using a simple, newly developed breathing movement-measuring device.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Hideo

    2014-07-01

    The 3-dimensional (3D) distances of specific points on the chest and abdominal wall are useful for assessing the characteristics of breathing movement. This study aimed to determine whether the 3D distances on the chest and abdominal wall during deep breathing (DB) could be estimated using a newly developed breathing movement-measuring device (BMMD). Breathing movement distances on the chest (bilateral third and eighth ribs) and abdomen (upper abdomen) of 10 healthy young males were measured using a pen-sized mechanical BMMD and a 3D motion analysis system during DB. DB was controlled and based on the distances targeted by the BMMD (ie, 1, 2, and 3 cm), which was placed on the observation points and fixed on a tripod. Simultaneously, the 3D distances of reflective markers on the observation points were measured. The obtained data were statistically analyzed using a paired t test, repeated measures analysis of variance with multiple comparisons tests, and linear regression with mixed effects. All the BMMD distances were less than the 3D distances. The differences between the 3D and BMMD distances on the chest and abdomen, except for the left lower chest (eighth rib), were significantly greater at a target distance of 3 cm than that of 1 cm. The coefficients of determination ranged from 0.98 to 0.99. Linear regression equations provided adequate estimates of the 3D distances of markers on the chest and abdominal wall during DB. The results suggest that this BMMD is useful for quantitatively assessing DB movement of the chest and abdominal wall in healthy young males. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  18. Rapid shallow breathing

    MedlinePlus

    Tachypnea; Breathing - rapid and shallow; Fast shallow breathing; Respiratory rate - rapid and shallow ... Shallow, rapid breathing has many possible medical causes, including: Asthma Blood clot in an artery in the lung Choking ...

  19. Analysis of heart rate variability and skin blood flow oscillations under deep controlled breathing.

    PubMed

    Krasnikov, Gennady V; Tyurina, Miglena Y; Tankanag, Arina V; Piskunova, Galina M; Chemeris, Nikolai K

    2013-02-01

    The effect of deep breathing controlled in both rate (0.25, 0.16, 0.1, 0.07, 0.05 and 0.03 Hz) and amplitude on the heart rate variability (HRV) and respiration-dependent oscillations of forearm/finger skin blood flow (SBF) has been studied in 29 young healthy volunteers. The influence of sympathovagal balance on the respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) amplitude and respiratory SBF oscillations has been studied. The subjects with predominant parasympathetic tonus had statistically significant higher RSA amplitudes in the breathing rate region of 0.03-0.07 Hz than the subjects with predominant sympathetic tonus. In the finger-cushion zone, having a well-developed sympathetic vascular innervations, the amplitudes of respiratory SBF oscillations at breathing rates 0.05 and 0.07 Hz were higher in the group of subjects with predominant parasympathetic tonus. In the forearm skin, where the density of sympathetic innervations is low comparatively to that in the finger skin, no statistically significant differences in the amplitude of respiratory SBF oscillations were found concerning the two groups of subjects.

  20. Influence of obligatory mouth breathing, during realistic activities, on voice measures.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, M Preeti; Erickson-Levendoski, Elizabeth

    2012-11-01

    Low humidity environments and mouth breathing may contribute to superficial vocal fold dehydration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of obligatory mouth breathing, during daily activities in low- and high-humidity environments, on voice measures. The activities included 15 minutes of obligatory mouth breathing alone, during loud reading and during exercise. The effects of mouth breathing and humidity were compared in subjects who either reported or did not report vocal worsening after heavy voice use. Prospective, between-group, repeated-measures design. Sixty-three healthy adults with normal respiratory function and perceptually normal voice participated in this study. Thirty-one subjects reported symptoms of voice worsening with heavy voice use. Thirty-two subjects who did not report these symptoms participated as controls. Phonation threshold pressure and perceived phonatory effort were measured at baseline and after each obligatory mouth breathing challenge. Ambient humidity was set to either low or high humidity. Obligatory mouth breathing in loud reading and exercise significantly increased phonation threshold pressure when compared with mouth breathing alone. This increase in phonation threshold pressure was observed at low and high humidity, in both subject groups. There were no significant effects for perceived phonatory effort. Obligatory mouth breathing during loud reading and exercise negatively impact phonation threshold pressure. Future investigations that include longer challenge durations, and subjects with voice disorders, are needed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms for increases in phonation threshold pressure. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Measurement of functional residual capacity by modified multiple breath nitrogen washout for spontaneously breathing and mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Brewer, L M; Orr, J A; Sherman, M R; Fulcher, E H; Markewitz, B A

    2011-11-01

    There is a need for a bedside functional residual capacity (FRC) measurement method that performs well in intensive care patients during many modes of ventilation including controlled, assisted, spontaneous, and mixed. We developed a modified multiple breath nitrogen washout method for FRC measurement that relies on end-tidal gas fractions and alveolar tidal volume measurements as inputs but does not require the traditional measurements of volume of nitrogen or oxygen. Using end-tidal measurements, not volume, reduces errors from signal synchronization. This study was designed to assess the accuracy, precision, and repeatability of the proposed FRC system in subjects with variable ventilation patterns including some spontaneous effort. The accuracy and precision of measurements were assessed by comparing the novel N₂ washout FRC values to the gold standard, body plethysmography, in 20 spontaneously breathing volunteers. Repeatability was assessed by comparing subsequent measurements in 20 intensive care patients whose lungs were under controlled and assisted mechanical ventilation. Compared with body plethysmography, the accuracy (mean bias) of the novel method was -0.004 litre and precision [1 standard deviation (sd)] was 0.209 litre [mean (sd)] [-0.1 (5.9)% of body plethysmography]. The difference between repeated measurements was 0.009 (0.15) litre [mean (sd)] [0.4 (6.4)%]. The coefficient of repeatability was 0.31 litre (12.7%). The modified multiple breath nitrogen washout method for FRC measurement provides improved precision and equivalent accuracy and repeatability compared with existing methods during ventilation with variable ventilation patterns. Further study of the novel N₂ washout method is needed.

  2. Personal exposure to volatile organic compounds. I. Direct measurements in breathing-zone air, drinking water, food, and exhaled breath

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, L.A.; Pellizzari, E.; Hartwell, T.; Rosenzweig, M.; Erickson, M.; Sparacino, C.; Zelon, H.

    1984-10-01

    A pilot study to test methods of estimating personal exposures to toxic substances and corresponding body burdens was carried out between July and December 1980. Individual exposures to about a dozen volatile organic compounds in air and drinking water were measured for volunteers in New Jersey and North Carolina. Breath samples were also collected from all subjects. About 230 personal air samples, 170 drinking water samples, 66 breath samples, and 4 food samples (16 composites) were analyzed for the target chemicals. Ten compounds were present in air and eight were transmitted mainly through that medium. Chloroform and bromodichloromethane were predominantly transmitted through water and beverages. Food appeared to be a miner route of exposure, except possibly for trichloroethylene in margarine. Seven compounds were present in more than half of the breath samples. Diurnal and seasonal variations were noted in air and water concentrations of some compounds. Some, but not all, of the potentially occupationally exposed individuals had significantly higher workplace exposures to several chemicals. Distributions of air exposures were closer to log normal than normal for most chemicals. Several chemicals were highly correlated with each other in personal air samples, indicating possible common sources of exposures. Compounds detected included benzene, chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons, chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons, halogens and vinyl chloride.

  3. MEASUREMENTS OF AIR POLLUTANT BIOMARKERS WITH EXHALED BREATH TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has appeal as a noninvasive surrogate sample for lung-derived fluid. Additionally, EBC can be collected multiple times over the course of a study, unlike many other lung sampling techniques which can be performed fewer times. However validat...

  4. MEASUREMENTS OF AIR POLLUTANT BIOMARKERS WITH EXHALED BREATH TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has appeal as a noninvasive surrogate sample for lung-derived fluid. Additionally, EBC can be collected multiple times over the course of a study, unlike many other lung sampling techniques which can be performed fewer times. However validat...

  5. Paper-based analytical devices for electrochemical study of the breathing process of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiang-Yun; Wu, Ling-Ling; Pan, Zhong-Qin; Shi, Chuan-Guo; Bao, Ning; Gu, Hai-Ying

    2015-04-01

    Herein we utilized the filter paper to physically trap red blood cells (RBC) to observe the breathing process of red blood cells based on the permeability of the filter paper. By integrating double-sided conductive carbon tape as the working electrodes, the device could be applied to monitor electrochemical responses of RBC for up to hundreds of minutes. The differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) peak currents increased under oxygen while decreased under nitrogen, indicating that RBC could take in and release oxygen. Further studies demonstrated that the RBC suspension could more effectively take in oxygen than the solution of hemoglobin and the supernatant of RBC, suggesting the natural advantage of RBC on oxygen transportation. This study implied that simple paper-based analytical devices might be effectively applied in the study of gas-participating reactions and biochemical detections.

  6. Metabolic analyzer. [for measuring metabolic rate and breathing dynamics of human beings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, J. A.; Perry, C. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An apparatus is described for the measurement of metabolic rate and breathing dynamics in which inhaled and exhaled breath are sensed by sealed, piston-displacement type spirometers. These spirometers electrically measure the volume of inhaled and exhaled breath. A mass spectrometer analyzes simultaneously for oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen and water vapor. Computation circuits are responsive to the outputs of the spirometers, mass spectrometer, temperature, pressure and timing signals and compute oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, minute volume and respiratory exchange ratio. A selective indicator provides for read-out of these data at predetermined cyclic intervals.

  7. [Development of blood cell measurement].

    PubMed

    Okada, T

    2000-10-01

    Automated blood cell analyzers used in hematology laboratories are required to measure many specimens rapidly and efficiency has been realized through increasing the measurement parameters and throughput volume in one instrument. In the period of 1950's through the early part of 1960's, only red blood cells and white blood cells could be counted. In 1965, Technicon Corporation developed an instrument which can measure the number of blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrit and calculate corpuscular constants simultaneously. Thereafter, the methodologies for simultaneous platelet measurement and precise determination of blood cell distribution have been developed. Then, the development of new reagents has achieved three part differentials in the distribution of white blood cells. Thanks to this development, microscopic white blood cell differentials has been replaced by blood cell analyzers in screening tests. Though blood cell analyzers may be further improved by expanding of the number of parameters available for simultaneous measurements, meeting social needs in the new era will not be possible without the creation and realization of new concepts employing new technologies such as IT (Information Technology).

  8. Synergetic use of thermal and visible imaging techniques for contactless and unobtrusive breathing measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Meng-Han; Zhai, Guang-Tao; Li, Duo; Fan, Ye-Zhao; Chen, Xiao-Hui; Yang, Xiao-Kang

    2017-03-01

    We present a dual-mode imaging system operating on visible and long-wave infrared wavelengths for achieving the noncontact and nonobtrusive measurements of breathing rate and pattern, no matter whether the subjects use the nose and mouth simultaneously, alternately, or individually when they breathe. The improved classifiers in tandem with the biological characteristics outperformed the custom cascade classifiers using the Viola-Jones algorithm for the cross-spectrum detection of face and nose as well as mouth. In terms of breathing rate estimation, the results obtained by this system were verified to be consistent with those measured by reference method via the Bland-Altman plot with 95% limits of agreement from -2.998 to 2.391 and linear correlation analysis with a correlation coefficient of 0.971, indicating that this method was acceptable for the quantitative analysis of breathing. In addition, the breathing waveforms extracted by the dual-mode imaging system were basically the same as the corresponding standard breathing sequences. Since the validation experiments were conducted under challenging conditions, such as the significant positional and abrupt physiological variations, we stated that this dual-mode imaging system utilizing the respective advantages of RGB and thermal cameras was a promising breathing measurement tool for residential care and clinical applications.

  9. Relationship between heart rate variability, blood pressure and arterial wall properties during air and oxygen breathing in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Graff, Beata; Szyndler, Anna; Czechowicz, Krzysztof; Kucharska, Wiesława; Graff, Grzegorz; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Laurent, Stephane; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies reported that normobaric hyperoxia influences heart rate, arterial pressure, cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance, but the mechanisms underlying these changes are still not fully understood. Several factors are considered including degeneration of endothelium-derived nitric oxide by reactive oxygen species, the impact of oxygen-free radicals on tissues and alterations of autonomic nervous system function. Recently, new devices for the detailed non-invasive assessment of large and small arteries have been developed. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess heart rate variability (HRV) as a potential indicator of autonomic balance and its relation to blood pressure and vascular properties during medical air (MAB) and 100% oxygen breathing (OXB) in healthy volunteers. In 12 healthy subjects we assessed heart rate and blood pressure variability, baroreflex sensitivity, respiratory frequency, common carotid artery diameter and its wall distensibility, as well as changes in the digital artery pulse waveform, stroke index and systemic vascular resistance during MAB and OXB. Mean and systolic blood pressure have increased significantly while digital pulse amplitude and carotid artery diameter were significantly lower during hyperoxia. Heart rate variability measures did not differ during MAB and OXB. However, the correlations between spectral HRV components and those hemodynamic parameters which have changed due to hyperoxia varied substantially during MAB (correlated significantly) and OXB (no significant correlations were noted). Our findings suggest that autonomic nervous system might not be the main mediator of the cardiovascular changes during 100% oxygen breathing in healthy subjects. It seems that the direct vascular responses are initial consequences of hyperoxia and other cardiovascular parameter alterations are secondary to them. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Breath acidification in adolescent runners exposed to atmospheric pollution: A prospective, repeated measures observational study

    PubMed Central

    Ferdinands, Jill M; Crawford, Carol A Gotway; Greenwald, Roby; Van Sickle, David; Hunter, Eric; Teague, W Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Background Vigorous outdoors exercise during an episode of air pollution might cause airway inflammation. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of vigorous outdoor exercise during peak smog season on breath pH, a biomarker of airway inflammation, in adolescent athletes. Methods We measured breath pH both pre- and post-exercise on ten days during peak smog season in 16 high school athletes engaged in daily long-distance running in a downwind suburb of Atlanta. The association of post-exercise breath pH with ambient ozone and particulate matter concentrations was tested with linear regression. Results We collected 144 pre-exercise and 146 post-exercise breath samples from 16 runners (mean age 14.9 years, 56% male). Median pre-exercise breath pH was 7.58 (interquartile range: 6.90 to 7.86) and did not change significantly after exercise. We observed no significant association between ambient ozone or particulate matter and post-exercise breath pH. However both pre- and post-exercise breath pH were strikingly low in these athletes when compared to a control sample of 14 relatively sedentary healthy adults and to published values of breath pH in healthy subjects. Conclusion Although we did not observe an acute effect of air pollution exposure during exercise on breath pH, breath pH was surprisingly low in this sample of otherwise healthy long-distance runners. We speculate that repetitive vigorous exercise may induce airway acidification. PMID:18328105

  11. [13C]glucose breath testing provides a noninvasive measure of insulin resistance: calibration analyses against clamp studies.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Maysa; Jangorbhani, Morteza; Schuette, Sally; Considine, Robert V; Chisholm, Robin L; Mather, Kieren J

    2014-02-01

    Exhaled (13)CO2 following ingestion of [(13)C]glucose with a standard oral glucose tolerance load correlates with blood glucose values but is determined by tissue glucose uptake. Therefore exhaled (13)CO2 may also be a surrogate measure of the whole-body glucose disposal rate (GDR) measured by the gold standard hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. Subjects from across the glycemia range were studied on 2 consecutive days under fasting conditions. On Day 1, a 75-g oral glucose load spiked with [(13)C]glucose was administered. On Day 2, a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp was performed. Correlations between breath parameters and clamp-derived GDR were evaluated, and calibration analyses were performed to evaluate the precision of breath parameter predictions of clamp measures. Correlations of breath parameters with GDR and GDR per kilogram of fat-free mass (GDRffm) ranged from 0.54 to 0.61 and 0.54 to 0.66, respectively (all P<0.001). In calibration analyses the root mean square error for breath parameters predicting GDR and GDRffm ranged from 2.32 to 2.46 and from 3.23 to 3.51, respectively. Cross-validation prediction error (CVPE) estimates were 2.35-2.51 (GDR) and 3.29-3.57 (GDRffm). Prediction precision of breath enrichment at 180 min predicting GDR (CVPE=2.35) was superior to that for inverse insulin (2.68) and the Matsuda Index (2.51) but inferior to that for the log of homeostasis model assessment (2.21) and Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (2.29) (all P<10(-5)). Similar patterns were seen for predictions of GDRffm. (13)CO2 appearance in exhaled breath following a standard oral glucose load with added [(13)C]glucose provides a valid surrogate index of clamp-derived measures of whole-body insulin resistance, with good accuracy and precision. This noninvasive breath test-based approach can provide a useful measure of whole-body insulin resistance in physiologic and epidemiologic studies.

  12. Wash-out of ambient air contaminations for breath measurements.

    PubMed

    Maurer, F; Wolf, A; Fink, T; Rittershofer, B; Heim, N; Volk, T; Baumbach, J I; Kreuer, S

    2014-06-01

    In breath analysis, ambient air contaminations are ubiquitous and difficult to eliminate. This study was designed to investigate the reduction of ambient air background by a lung wash-out with synthetic air. The reduction of the initial ambient air volatile organic compound (VOC) intensity was investigated in the breath of 20 volunteers inhaling synthetic air via a sealed full face mask in comparison to inhaling ambient air. Over a period of 30 minutes, breath analysis was conducted using ion mobility spectrometry coupled to a multi-capillary column. A total of 68 VOCs were identified for inhaling ambient air or inhaling synthetic air. By treatment with synthetic air, 39 VOCs decreased in intensity, whereas 29 increased in comparison to inhaling ambient air. In total, seven VOCs were significantly reduced (P-value < 0.05). A complete wash-out of VOCs in this setting was not observed, whereby a statistically significant reduction up to 65% as for terpinolene was achieved. Our setting successfully demonstrated a reduction of ambient air contaminations from the airways by a lung wash-out with synthetic air.

  13. Stable isotopes in breath, blood, feces and feathers can indicate intra-individual changes in the diet of migratory songbirds.

    PubMed

    Podlesak, David W; McWilliams, Scott R; Hatch, Kent A

    2005-02-01

    We used stable isotopes of C in breath, blood, feces and feathers to identify intra-individual changes in diet and the timescale of diet changes in free-living songbirds at a stopover site. Because accurate interpretation of differences between the delta13C of breath, plasma, and red blood cells (RBCs) relative to diet requires knowing the turnover rate of C within them, we determined the rate of change of C in breath, plasma and RBCs for yellow-rumped warblers (Dendroica coronata). Half-lives of C in breath, plasma, and RBCs were 4.4+/-2.1 h, 24.8+/-12.3 h and 10.9+/-3.2 days, respectively, for yellow-rumped warblers. delta13C of breath, plasma, RBCs and feces from wild-caught golden-crowned kinglets (Regulus satrapa), ruby-crowned kinglets (R. calendula) and gray catbirds (Dumetella carolinensis) indicated that they had maintained an isotopically consistent diet for an extended period of time. However, delta13C of breath and plasma indicated that white-throated sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis) had recently expanded their diet to include a C4 dietary component. Likewise, delta13C of breath, plasma, RBCs and feces indicated that some wild-caught yellow-rumped warblers had consumed foods with a more enriched protein signature prior to their arrival on Block Island, and since arrival, they had consumed mostly northern bayberry (Myrica pensylvanica). Therefore, comparisons of the delta13C of breath, plasma, RBCs, feces and feathers from individual songbirds can indicate changes in diet and provide an estimate of the timescale of the diet change.

  14. Breathing measurement reduces false-negative classification of tachypneic preextubation trial failures.

    PubMed

    DeHaven, C B; Kirton, O C; Morgan, J P; Hart, A M; Shatz, D V; Civetta, J M

    1996-06-01

    There is increased awareness of imposed work of breathing contributing to apparent ventilatory dependency. This study evaluates the impact of tachypnea as an indicator of ventilatory failure during a room air-5 cm H2O continuous positive airway pressure, spontaneous breathing, preextubation trial when associated with increased imposed work of breathing. Prospective, descriptive, 1-yr data collection. University hospital trauma intensive care unit (ICU). Mechanically ventilated trauma ICU patients surviving to discharge. Patients were weaned to minimal mechanical ventilator support and underwent a 20-min room air-continuous positive airway pressure preextubation trial (FIO2 = 0.21, continuous positive airway pressure = 5 cm H2O [0.5 kPa]). When passed (PaO2 >/= 55 torr [>/= 7.3 kPa], PaCO2 /= 7.35, respiratory rate breaths/min), extubation followed. If patients failed due to hypoxia, ventilatory support resumed. If tachypnea was the reason for failure, work of breathing was measured. If patient work of breathing was breathing was > 1.1 joule/L, imposed work of breathing was measured, and if residual "physiologic" work of breathing (patient work of breathing minus imposed work of breathing) was 30 breaths/min. Of these, 97 were successfully extubated despite tachypnea ranging from 32 to 56 breaths/min, when combined with either a patient work of breathing breathing breaths/min. Some of the stimulus for the tachypnea was possibly due to increased imposed work of

  15. Polysomnographic findings are associated with cephalometric measurements in mouth-breathing children.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Maria Ligia; Machado, Marco Antonio Cardoso; de Carvalho, Luciane Bizari Coin; Zancanella, Edilson; Santos, Gianni Mara Silva; do Prado, Lucila Bizari Fernandes; do Prado, Gilmar Fernandes

    2009-12-15

    Children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy and those with an abnormal craniofacial morphology are predisposed to having sleep disordered breathing; many of these children are mouth breathers. The aim of this study was to determine whether an association exists between polysomnographic findings and cephalometric measures in mouth-breathing children. Twenty-seven children (15 mouth-breathing children and 12 nose-breathing children [control subjects]), aged 7 to 14 years, took part in the study. Polysomnographic variables included sleep efficiency, sleep latency, apnea-hypopnea index, oxygen saturation, arousal index, number of periodic limb movements in sleep, and snoring. Cephalometric measures included maxilla and mandible position, occlusal and mandibular plane inclination, incisor position, pharyngeal airway space width, and hyoid bone position. As compared with nose-breathing children, mouth breathers were more likely to snore (p < 0.001) and to have an apnea-hypopnea index greater than 1 (p = 0.02). Mouth-breathing children were also more likely to have a retruded mandible, more inclined occlusal and mandibular planes, a smaller airway space, and a smaller superior pharyngeal airway space (p < 0.01). The apnea-hypopnea index increased as the posterior airway space decreased (p = 0.05). Our study showed an association between polysomnographic data and cephalometric measures in mouth-breathing children. Snoring was the most important variable associated with abnormal craniofacial morphology. Orthodontists should send any mouth-breathing child for an evaluation of sleep if they find that the child has a small superior pharyngeal airway space or an increased ANB (the relationship between the maxilla and mandible), NS.PIO (occlusal plane inclination in relationship to the skull base), or NS.GoGn (the mandibular plane inclination in relation to the skull base), indicating that the child has a steeper mandibular plane.

  16. Laser 3-D measuring system and real-time visual feedback for teaching and correcting breathing.

    PubMed

    Povšič, Klemen; Fležar, Matjaž; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2012-03-01

    We present a novel method for real-time 3-D body-shape measurement during breathing based on the laser multiple-line triangulation principle. The laser projector illuminates the measured surface with a pattern of 33 equally inclined light planes. Simultaneously, the camera records the distorted light pattern from a different viewpoint. The acquired images are transferred to a personal computer, where the 3-D surface reconstruction, shape analysis, and display are performed in real time. The measured surface displacements are displayed with a color palette, which enables visual feedback to the patient while breathing is being taught. The measuring range is approximately 400×600×500 mm in width, height, and depth, respectively, and the accuracy of the calibrated apparatus is ±0.7 mm. The system was evaluated by means of its capability to distinguish between different breathing patterns. The accuracy of the measured volumes of chest-wall deformation during breathing was verified using standard methods of volume measurements. The results show that the presented 3-D measuring system with visual feedback has great potential as a diagnostic and training assistance tool when monitoring and evaluating the breathing pattern, because it offers a simple and effective method of graphical communication with the patient. © 2012 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  17. Extra intestinal influences on exhaled breath hydrogen measurements during the investigation of gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Thompson, D G; Binfield, P; De Belder, A; O'Brien, J; Warren, S; Wilson, M

    1985-12-01

    During the clinical investigation of patients with gastrointestinal disease by exhaled breath hydrogen measurement, the occurrence of inexplicable variations in recorded hydrogen values led to a search for extra intestinal factors which were capable of adversely influencing breath hydrogen concentration and impairing the diagnostic accuracy of the test. Serial breath samples were collected from normal subjects under a variety of conditions which might occur during routine clinical study, including, hyperventilation, exercise, cigarette smoking, and carbohydrate ingestion. Breath hydrogen concentrations were consistently reduced by hyperventilation (p less than 0.01) and exercise (p less than 0.05). Cigarette smoking, in contrast, caused a marked rise in measured breath hydrogen (p less than 0.01), as did oral carbohydrate (p less than 0.05). Prior bactericidal mouthwash abolished this carbohydrate associated rise, suggesting that the hydrogen was the result of fermentation by oropharyngeal bacteria. Because, in all instances, the changes in breath hydrogen were of sufficient magnitude to interfere with data interpretation, it is recommended that these factors are eliminated, whenever possible, from conditions of study.

  18. Socioeconomic disparities in indoor air, breath, and blood perchloroethylene level among adult and child residents of buildings with or without a dry cleaner.

    PubMed

    Storm, Jan E; Mazor, Kimberly A; Shost, Stephen J; Serle, Janet; Aldous, Kenneth M; Blount, Benjamin C

    2013-04-01

    In many cities, dry cleaners using perchloroethylene are frequently located in multifamily residential buildings and often cause elevated indoor air levels of perchloroethylene throughout the building. To assess individual perchloroethylene exposures associated with co-located dry cleaners, we measured perchloroethylene in residential indoor air, and in blood and breath of adults and children residing in buildings with a dry cleaner as part of the New York City (NYC) Perc Project. We also measured perchloroethylene in indoor air, and in blood and breath of residents of buildings without a dry cleaner for comparison. Here, we evaluate whether an environmental disparity in perchloroethylene exposures is present. Study participants are stratified by residential building type (dry cleaner or reference) and socioeconomic characteristics (race/ethnicity and income); measures of perchloroethylene exposure are examined; and, the influence of stratified variables and other factors on perchloroethylene exposure is assessed using multivariate regression. All measures of perchloroethylene exposure for residents of buildings with a dry cleaner indicated a socioeconomic disparity. Mean indoor air perchloroethylene levels were about five times higher in minority (82.5 ug/m(3)) than in non-minority (16.5 ug/m(3)) households, and about six times higher in low-income (105.5 ug/m(3)) than in high income (17.8 ug/m(3)) households. Mean blood perchloroethylene levels in minority children (0.27 ng/mL) and adults (0.46 ng/mL) were about two and three times higher than in non-minority children (0.12 ng/mL) and adults (0.15 ng/mL), respectively. Mean blood perchloroethylene levels in low income children (0.34 ng/mL) and adults (0.62 ng/mL) were about three and four times higher than in high income children (0.11 ng/mL) and adults (0.14 ng/mL), respectively. A less marked socioeconomic disparity was observed in perchloroethylene breath levels with minority and low income residents having

  19. Quantitative evaluation of the orofacial morphology: anthropometric measurements in healthy and mouth-breathing children.

    PubMed

    Cattoni, Débora Martins; Fernandes, Fernanda Dreux Miranda; Di Francesco, Renata Cantisani; De Latorre, Maria Do Rosário Dias Oliveira

    2009-11-01

    The anthropometric orofacial measurements of mouth-breathing children were compared to those of children with no history of speech-language disorders, according to age. 100 children participated, both males and females, with ages ranging from 7 to 11 years and 11 months, leukoderm, in mixed dentition period, with a mouth-breathing diagnosis. The control group was comprised of 254 children, of both sexes, with ages ranging from 7 to 11 years and 11 months, leukoderm, in mixed dentition period, with no history of speech-language disorders. The control group did not demonstrate any mouth-breathing. The children were submitted to anthropometric assessment and the orofacial measurements obtained were upper lip, lower lip, philtrum, upper face, middle face, lower face, and sides of the face. The instrument used was the electronic digital sliding caliper Starrett Series 727. There was statistically significant difference between the majority of the orofacial measurements of mouth-breathing children and the measurements of children with no history of speech-language disorders. Some orofacial measurements were different in the studied populations. The possibility of comparing orofacial measurements of children with and without mouth-breathing behavior allows the clinician to determine normal and altered structures of the orofacial morphology. The main advantages of the anthropometry are its noninvasive nature, its technological simplicity, low cost and objective analysis. The anthropometric procedures also have clinical applications in myofunctional assessment and therapy.

  20. CONTROLLED METHYL TERTIARY BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) EXPOSURE TO HUMANS THROUGH DERMAL, INGESTION, AND INHALATION ROUTES AND THE RESULTANT BIOMARKER TERTIARY BUTYL ALCOHOL (TBA) AS MEASURED IN EXHALED BREATH AND VENOUS BLOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements provide an estimate of the fraction of carbon in a sample that is biogenic. In September 1997 during SCOS97 a series of 3-h canister samples of ambient air were collected at the Azusa air monitoring station during morning and afternoon periods. ...

  1. Indicator Dilution Measurements of Lung Volumes and Alveolar Air Exchange During Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Hechtman, Herbert B.; Reid, Michael H.; Dorn, Barry C.; Weisel, Richard D.

    1973-01-01

    A new triple tracer indicator dilution technique has been used to measure alveolar ventilation as well as air and tissue volumes in the lungs of experimental animals and man. The tracers indocyanine green, [121I]antipyrine and xenon-133 were rapidly injected into the right atrium, while sampling was carried out from a peripheral artery. Blood flow and tissue volumes were obtained by classical analysis of the indocyanine green and antipyrine concentration-time curves. A double exit-port, constant air flow model was used to analyze the xenon curves, because ventilatory loss led to incomplete recovery of the gas tracer in effluent blood. Uniform ventilation and perfusion were assumed. This analysis permitted calculation of alveolar ventilation (V̇AXe) and functional residual capacity (FRCXe) during normal breathing. In control studies, V̇AXe was similar to V̇Aco2, obtained with the steady-state CO2 method (r = 0.87), while in critically ill patients the xenon measurement was significantly lower, averaging 54% of V̇Aco2. In theory, underestimates in V̇AXe and decrease in the ratio V̇AXe/V̇Aco2 relate to nonuniformity in regional ventilation and perfusion. The effect is greatest for the slightly soluble gas, xenon. The significant inverse correlation between V̇AXe/V̇Aco2 and the physiologic shunt is consistent with this postulate. FRCXe was similar to the predicted FRC in animals but was 76% of the helium measured FRC in patients. FRCXe was significantly lower than the xenon measured air volumes during breath-holding when nonuniformity of ventilation was not operative. Lung tissue volumes in animals were 83% of gravimetric lung weights, while in patients the volumes were much lower than predicted. Nonhomogeneous lung function, including failure to perfuse the entire capillary bed, with resultant incomplete penetration of tracers into all segments of lung air and tissue, may explain these findings. The resultant errors can be significant in sick patients, and

  2. [Effects of xenon and krypton-containing breathing mixtures on clinical and biochemical blood indices in animals].

    PubMed

    Kussmaul', A R; Bogacheva, M A; Shkurat, T P; Pavlov, B N

    2007-01-01

    Effects of 24-hr breathing air mixtures containing xenon (XBM) and krypton (KBM) were compared in terms of hormonal status, and blood biochemical indices and morphology in laboratory animals. Some changes observed in blood and hormone indices could be a nonspecific adaptive response. Hence, we should elicit whether these effects are quickly reversible or long. For several indices krypton was a more favorable factor than xenon. However, some of its effects invite to delve into effects of different krypton concentrations on organism.

  3. Blood Pressure Self-Measurement.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Blood pressure self-measurement has been used extensively as part of several clinical processes including in the home monitoring setting for mitigating white coat effect and gaining more detailed insights into the blood pressure variability of patients over time. Self-measurement of BP is also being used as part of telemonitoring and telemedicine processes, as well as in the waiting rooms and self-measurement rooms of general practice clinics, specialized hospital department's outpatient clinics, and in other types of care facilitates and institutions.The aim of this review is to provide an overview of where, when, and how blood pressure self-measurement is being used, which official clinical guidelines and procedures are available for its implementation, as well as the opportunities and challenges that are related to its use.

  4. Endovascular blood flow measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khe, A. K.; Cherevko, A. A.; Chupakhin, A. P.; Krivoshapkin, A. L.; Orlov, K. Yu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper an endovascular measurement system used for intraoperative cerebral blood flow monitoring is described. The system is based on a Volcano ComboMap Pressure and Flow System extended with analogue-to-digital converter and PC laptop. A series of measurements performed in patients with cerebrovascular pathologies allows us to introduce “velocity-pressure” and “flow rate-energy flow rate” diagrams as important characteristics of the blood flow. The measurement system presented here can be used as an additional instrument in neurosurgery for assessment and monitoring of the operation procedure. Clinical data obtained with the system are used for construction of mathematical models and patient-specific simulations. The monitoring of the blood flow parameters during endovascular interventions was approved by the Ethics Committee at the Meshalkin Novosibirsk Research Institute of Circulation Pathology and included in certain surgical protocols for pre-, intra- and postoperative examinations.

  5. A mind you can count on: validating breath counting as a behavioral measure of mindfulness.

    PubMed

    Levinson, Daniel B; Stoll, Eli L; Kindy, Sonam D; Merry, Hillary L; Davidson, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Mindfulness practice of present moment awareness promises many benefits, but has eluded rigorous behavioral measurement. To date, research has relied on self-reported mindfulness or heterogeneous mindfulness trainings to infer skillful mindfulness practice and its effects. In four independent studies with over 400 total participants, we present the first construct validation of a behavioral measure of mindfulness, breath counting. We found it was reliable, correlated with self-reported mindfulness, differentiated long-term meditators from age-matched controls, and was distinct from sustained attention and working memory measures. In addition, we employed breath counting to test the nomological network of mindfulness. As theorized, we found skill in breath counting associated with more meta-awareness, less mind wandering, better mood, and greater non-attachment (i.e., less attentional capture by distractors formerly paired with reward). We also found in a randomized online training study that 4 weeks of breath counting training improved mindfulness and decreased mind wandering relative to working memory training and no training controls. Together, these findings provide the first evidence for breath counting as a behavioral measure of mindfulness.

  6. A mind you can count on: validating breath counting as a behavioral measure of mindfulness

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, Daniel B.; Stoll, Eli L.; Kindy, Sonam D.; Merry, Hillary L.; Davidson, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Mindfulness practice of present moment awareness promises many benefits, but has eluded rigorous behavioral measurement. To date, research has relied on self-reported mindfulness or heterogeneous mindfulness trainings to infer skillful mindfulness practice and its effects. In four independent studies with over 400 total participants, we present the first construct validation of a behavioral measure of mindfulness, breath counting. We found it was reliable, correlated with self-reported mindfulness, differentiated long-term meditators from age-matched controls, and was distinct from sustained attention and working memory measures. In addition, we employed breath counting to test the nomological network of mindfulness. As theorized, we found skill in breath counting associated with more meta-awareness, less mind wandering, better mood, and greater non-attachment (i.e., less attentional capture by distractors formerly paired with reward). We also found in a randomized online training study that 4 weeks of breath counting training improved mindfulness and decreased mind wandering relative to working memory training and no training controls. Together, these findings provide the first evidence for breath counting as a behavioral measure of mindfulness. PMID:25386148

  7. Feasibility of intercostal blood flow measurement by echo-Doppler technique in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    de Bisschop, Claire; Montaudon, Michel; Glénet, Stéphane; Guénard, Hervé

    2015-10-02

    Intercostal artery blood flow supplies the external and internal intercostal muscles, which are inspiratory and expiratory muscles. Intercostal blood flow measured by the echo-Doppler (ED) technique has not previously been reported in humans. This study describes the feasibility of this measurement during free and loaded breathing in healthy subjects. Systolic, diastolic and mean blood flows were measured in the eighth dorsal intercostal space during free and loaded breathing using the ED technique. Flows were calculated as the product of the artery intraluminal surface and blood velocity. Ten healthy subjects (42 ± 13·6 years) were included. Integrated electromyogram (iEMG), arterial pressure, cardiac frequency and breathing pattern were also recorded. Mean blood flows were 3·5 ± 1·2 ml min(-1) at rest, 6 ± 2·6 ml min(-1) while breathing through a combined inspiratory and expiratory resistance and 4·0 ± 1·3 ml min(-1) 1 min after unloading. Diastolic blood flow was about one-third the systolic blood flow. The changes in blood flows were consistent with those in iEMG. No change in mean blood flow was observed between inspiration and expiration, suggesting a balance in the perfusion of external and internal muscles during breathing. In conclusion, ED is a feasible technique for non-invasive, real-time measurement of intercostal blood flow in humans. In healthy subjects, mean blood flow appeared tightly matched to iEMG activity. This technique may provide a way to assess the vascular adaptations induced by diseases in which respiratory work is increased or cardiac blood flow altered.

  8. Direct measurement of ammonia in simulated human breath using an inkjet-printed polyaniline nanoparticle sensor.

    PubMed

    Hibbard, Troy; Crowley, Karl; Killard, Anthony J

    2013-05-24

    A sensor fabricated from the inkjet-printed deposition of polyaniline nanoparticles onto a screen-printed silver interdigitated electrode was developed for the detection of ammonia in simulated human breath samples. Impedance analysis showed that exposure to ammonia gas could be measured at 962 Hz at which changes in resistance dominate due to the deprotonation of the polymer film. Sensors required minimal calibration and demonstrated excellent intra-electrode baseline drift (≤1.67%). Gases typically present in breath did not interfere with the sensor. Temperature and humidity were shown to have characteristic impedimetric and temporal effects on the sensor that could be distinguished from the response to ammonia. While impedance responses to ammonia could be detected from a single simulated breath, quantification was improved after the cumulative measurement of multiple breaths. The measurement of ammonia after 16 simulated breaths was linear in the range of 40-2175 ppbv (27-1514 μg m(-3)) (r(2)=0.9963) with a theoretical limit of detection of 6.2 ppbv (4.1 μg m(-3)) (SN(-1)=3).

  9. Measuring exhaled nitric oxide in infants during tidal breathing: methodological issues.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Peter J; Turner, Stephen W; Mutch, Raewyn C; Stick, Stephen M

    2004-01-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) may provide a tool for identifying infants at risk of developing allergic disease in childhood. In infants there is no standardized collection technique; however, the easiest method is to measure FENO during tidal breathing. In this study we investigated various methodological issues for tidal breathing (TB) FENO in infants. These included the effect of ambient NO, oral or nasal breathing, sedation, and tidal expiratory flow. Furthermore, we compared TB FENO in 88 infants with and without wheeze. Ambient NO greater than 5 ppb significantly affected FENO. There was no significant difference between NO levels measured during either oral or nasal breathing; however, there was a significant difference between levels collected from infants before and after sedation (P < 0.001). Tidal breathing FENO decreased with increasing tidal flows (P < 0.001) and increased with age (P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in mixed expired NO between healthy and wheezy children, but children with doctor-diagnosed eczema had significantly raised levels (P = 0.014). There seem to be important methodological limitations for measuring FENO in infants during TB. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Accuracy of Oxygen Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Elimination Measurements in 2 Breath-by-Breath Devices.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Craig D; Kheir, John N; Walsh, Brian K; Mehta, Nilesh M

    2017-04-01

    Although accurate quantification of oxygen consumption (V̇O2 ) and carbon dioxide elimination (V̇CO2 ) provides important insights into a patient's nutritional and hemodynamic status, few devices exist to accurately measure these parameters in children. Therefore, we assessed the accuracy and agreement of 2 devices currently on the market using a pediatric in vitro model of gas exchange. We utilized a Huszczuk simulation model, which simulates oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production using gas dilution, to examine the accuracy of two FDA-cleared respiratory modules (E-COVX and E-sCAiOVX-00). V̇O2 and V̇CO2 were set at 20, 40, 60, and 100 mL/min, ranges typical for infant and pediatric patients. Bland-Altman analysis was used to calculate the bias and limits of agreement of each device relative to simulated values for V̇O2 and V̇CO2 . The E-COVX mean percentage bias (limits of agreement) was -26.3% (-36.1 to -16.6%) and -39.3% (-47.5 to -31.1%) for V̇O2 and V̇CO2 , respectively. The mean bias (limits of agreement) for the E-aCAiOVX-00 was -0.5% (-13.3 to 12.3%) and -6.0% (-13.8 to 1.7%) for V̇O2 and V̇CO2 , respectively. The E-COVX demonstrated bias and limits of agreement that were not clinically acceptable; therefore, application of this module to pediatric patients would not be recommended. The new module, E-sCAiOVX, demonstrated acceptable bias and limits of agreement for the V̇O2 and V̇CO2 in the range 40-100 mL/min (which corresponds to patients in the range of ∼5-16 kg). Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  11. Application of Novel Method to Measure Endogenous VOCs in Exhaled Breath Condensate Before and After Exposure to Diesel Exhaust

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polar volatile organic compounds (PVOCs) such as aldehydes, ketones, and alcohols are byproducts of normal human metabolism and are present in exhaled breath and blood. Environmental exposures, individual activities, and disease states can perturb normal metabolic processes and ...

  12. Application of Novel Method to Measure Endogenous VOCs in Exhaled Breath Condensate Before and After Exposure to Diesel Exhaust

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polar volatile organic compounds (PVOCs) such as aldehydes, ketones, and alcohols are byproducts of normal human metabolism and are present in exhaled breath and blood. Environmental exposures, individual activities, and disease states can perturb normal metabolic processes and ...

  13. Measurement of ammonia in human breath with a liquid-film conductivity sensor.

    PubMed

    Toda, Kei; Li, Jianzhong; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2006-10-15

    Measurement of breath NH3 is of interest in clinical applications as it can be used as a measure of kidney/liver functions as well as halitosis. We have developed a liquid-film conductivity sensor to measure NH3 in human breath. A film of dilute H2SO4 is formed on the top of two metal capillary tubes placed in a concentric annular arrangement. The tube exterior has been specially treated to render it hydrophilic. As breath passes over the sensor tip, the film collects NH3 and the solution conductivity (measured by the concentric capillaries functioning as electrodes) decreases accordingly. This initial rate of conductivity decrease was determined to be the best metric (most rapid and least dependent on breath pCO2) for ammonia, relative to time to attain complete neutralization (conductivity minimum) or the final rate of conductivity increase as more ammonia dissolves after neutralization. The absorbing solution composition was optimized so that CO2 does not interfere. Both dynamic measurement using mask sampling and offline balloon sampling were performed. Ammonia readily absorbs on surfaces when significant concentrations of water vapor are present. As such, memory effects are common when analyzing human breath for ammonia. This problem was successfully eliminated. The results from this sensor agreed well with data obtained by a solution-phase fluorometric technique using a porous membrane diffusion scrubber and o-phthalaldehyde derivatization chemistry. For breath CO2 measurement, the applicability of a similar sensor that relies on a NaOH film was also demonstrated.

  14. Measurement of retinal blood velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, Leonard W., Jr.; Chou, Nee-Yin

    2006-02-01

    A fundus camera was modified to illuminate the retina of a rabbit model with low power laser light in order to obtain laser speckle images. A fast-exposure charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was used to capture laser speckle images of the retina. Image acquisition was synchronized with the arterial pulses of the rabbit to ensure that all images are obtained at the same point in the cardiac cycle. The rabbits were sedated and a speculum was inserted to prevent the eyelid from closing. Both albino (New Zealand; pigmented (Dutch belted) rabbits were used in the study. The rabbit retina is almost avascular. The measurements are obtained for choroidal tissue as well as retinal tissue. Because the retina is in a region of high metabolism, blood velocity is strongly affected by blood oxygen saturation. Measurements of blood velocity obtained over a wide range of O II saturations (58%-100%) showed that blood velocity increases with decreasing O II saturation. For most experiments, the left eye of the rabbit was used for laser measurements whereas the right eye served as a control. No observable difference between pre- and post-experimented eye was noted. Histological examinations of retinal tissue subjected to repeated laser measurements showed no indication of tissue damage.

  15. Cavity-Enhanced Near-Infrared Laser Absorption Spectrometer for the Measurement of Acetonitrile in Breath.

    PubMed

    Gianella, Michele; Ritchie, Grant A D

    2015-07-07

    Elevated concentrations of acetonitrile have been found in the exhaled breath of patients with cystic fibrosis1 and may indicate the severity of their condition or the presence of an accompanying bacterial infection of the airways. There is therefore interest in detecting acetonitrile in exhaled breath. For this purpose, a cavity-enhanced laser absorption spectrometer (λ = 1.65 μm) with a preconcentration stage was built and is described here. The spectrometer has a limit of detection of 72 ppbv and 114 ppbv of acetonitrile in nitrogen and breath, respectively, with a measurement duration of just under 5 min. The preconcentration stage, which employs a carbon molecular sieve and an adsorption/thermal desorption cycle, can increase the acetonitrile concentration by up to a factor 93, thus, lowering the overall limit of detection to approximately 1 ppbv. The suitability of the system for acetonitrile measurements in breath is demonstrated with breath samples taken from the authors, which yielded acetonitrile concentrations of 23 ± 3 ppbv and 29 ± 3 ppbv, respectively.

  16. Measurement of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath as collected in evacuated electropolished canisters.

    PubMed

    Pleil, J D; Lindstrom, A B

    1995-03-24

    A set of three complementary analytical methods were developed specifically for exhaled breath as collected in evacuated stainless steel canisters using gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric detection. The first is a screening method to quantify the carbon dioxide component (generally at 4-5% concentration), the second method measures the very volatile high-level endogenous compounds [e.g. acetone and isoprene at 500-1000 parts per billion by volume (ppbv), methanol, ethanol, dimethylsulfide at 2-10 ppbv], and the third method is designed to measure trace-level environmental contaminants and other endogenous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (sub-ppbv) in breath. The canister-based sample format allows all three methods to be applied to each individual sample for complete constituent characterization. Application of these methods is shown to be useful in the following ways: analysis of CO2 levels indicates the approximate quantity of alveolar breath collected (as opposed to whole breath) in a sample; levels of major endogenous compounds are shown to be influenced by physical activities and subsequent recovery periods; and environmental exposures to xenobiotic VOCs can be characterized by assessment of post-exposure breath elimination curves. The instrumentation and methodology are described and example chromatograms and quantitative data plots demonstrating the utility of the methods are presented.

  17. Measurement of Whole-Body CO2 Production in Birds Using Real-Time Laser-Derived Measurements of Hydrogen (δ(2)H) and Oxygen (δ(18)O) Isotope Concentrations in Water Vapor from Breath.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, G W; Guglielmo, C G; Hobson, K A

    2015-01-01

    The doubly labeled water (DLW) method is commonly used to measure energy expenditure in free-living wildlife and humans. However, DLW studies involving animals typically require three blood samples, which can affect behavior and well-being. Moreover, measurement of H (δ(2)H) and O (δ(18)O) isotope concentrations in H2O derived from blood using conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry is technically demanding, time-consuming, and often expensive. A novel technique that would avoid these constraints is the real-time measurement of δ(2)H and δ(18)O in the H2O vapor of exhaled breath using cavity ring-down (CRD) spectrometry, provided that δ(2)H and δ(18)O from body H2O and breath were well correlated. Here, we conducted a validation study with CRD spectrometry involving five zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), five brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater), and five European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), where we compared δ(2)H, δ(18)O, and rCO2 (rate of CO2 production) estimates from breath with those from blood. Isotope concentrations from blood were validated by comparing dilution-space estimates with measurements of total body water (TBW) obtained from quantitative magnetic resonance. Isotope dilution-space estimates from δ(2)H and δ(18)O values in the blood were similar to and strongly correlated with TBW measurements (R(2) = 0.99). The (2)H and (18)O (ppm) in breath and blood were also highly correlated (R(2) = 0.99 and 0.98, respectively); however, isotope concentrations in breath were always less enriched than those in blood and slightly higher than expected, given assumed fractionation values between blood and breath. Overall, rCO2 measurements from breath were strongly correlated with those from the blood (R(2) = 0.90). We suggest that this technique will find wide application in studies of animal and human energetics in the field and laboratory. We also provide suggestions for ways this technique could be further improved.

  18. Prediction of pharmacologically induced baroreflex sensitivity from local time and frequency domain indices of R-R interval and systolic blood pressure signals obtained during deep breathing.

    PubMed

    Arica, Sami; Firat Ince, N; Bozkurt, Abdi; Tewfik, Ahmed H; Birand, Ahmet

    2011-07-01

    Pharmacological measurement of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is widely accepted and used in clinical practice. Following the introduction of pharmacologically induced BRS (p-BRS), alternative assessment methods eliminating the use of drugs were in the center of interest of the cardiovascular research community. In this study we investigated whether p-BRS using phenylephrine injection can be predicted from non-pharmacological time and frequency domain indices computed from electrocardiogram (ECG) and blood pressure (BP) data acquired during deep breathing. In this scheme, ECG and BP data were recorded from 16 subjects in a two-phase experiment. In the first phase the subjects performed irregular deep breaths and in the second phase the subjects received phenylephrine injection. From the first phase of the experiment, a large pool of predictors describing the local characteristic of beat-to-beat interval tachogram (RR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were extracted in time and frequency domains. A subset of these indices was selected using twelve subjects with an exhaustive search fused with a leave one subject out cross validation procedure. The selected indices were used to predict the p-BRS on the remaining four test subjects. A multivariate regression was used in all prediction steps. The algorithm achieved best prediction accuracy with only two features extracted from the deep breathing data, one from the frequency and the other from the time domain. The normalized L2-norm error was computed as 22.9% and the correlation coefficient was 0.97 (p=0.03). These results suggest that the p-BRS can be estimated from non-pharmacological indices computed from ECG and invasive BP data related to deep breathing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sildenafil, nifedipine and acetazolamide do not allow for blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses during exercise while breathing 100% oxygen.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Jonathan E; Friedman, Jonathan M; Futral, Joel E; Goodman, Randall D; Lovering, Andrew T

    2014-12-01

    Blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVAs) is known to increase in healthy humans during exercise while breathing room air, but is prevented or significantly reduced during exercise while breathing 100% O2, potentially due to vasoconstriction of IPAVAs. Thus, pharmacological interventions that target known pathways regulating the cardiopulmonary circulation may be able to prevent the hyperoxia-induced reduction in IPAVA blood flow (Q̇ IPAVA ) during exercise. In nine healthy human subjects, we investigated the effects of sildenafil (100 mg p.o.), nifedipine (20 mg p.o.) and acetazolamide (250 mg p.o. three times a day for 3 days) on Q̇ IPAVA at rest and during cycle ergometer exercise at 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250 W, while breathing room air (normoxia) and 100% O2 (hyperoxia). Transthoracic saline contrast echocardiography and a 0-5 bubble scoring system were used to detect and assess Q̇ IPAVA qualitatively; ultrasound was used to assess the blood flow velocity oftricuspid regurgitation and the left ventricular outflow tract blood flow to calculate pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) and cardiac output, respectively. Without drugs, bubble scores increased significantly to ≥2 at 150 W in normoxia and to ≤2 at 200 W in hyperoxia. Only nifedipine consistently increased cardiac output at rest and during low-intensity exercise in normoxia and hyperoxia. However, there was no detectable effect of any drug on Q̇ IPAVA ; specifically, bubble scores were the same during exercise in either normoxia or hyperoxia. Accordingly, the reduction in Q̇ IPAVA during exercise while breathing 100% O2 is likely not to be due to the independent pharmacological mechanisms of action associated with sildenafil, nifedipine or acetazolamide.

  20. [Influence of breathing at negative pressure on redistribution of local blood volumes in anti-orthostatic load in cats].

    PubMed

    Baranov, V M; Tikhonov, M A; Kotov, A N; Donina, Zh A; Pogodin, M A; Lavrova, I N

    2000-01-01

    To improve methods of offsetting the hemodynamic shifts in microgravity, applicability of breathing at negative pressure (BNP, pressure relief by -5.0 cm of water column) during inspiration and expiration was assessed in acute experiments with unconscious cats tilted head-down (-30 degrees). Direct measurement of pressure in v. cava superior and v. jugularis externa using a catheter revealed a concurrent significant (p < 0.05) growth of the parameter which should be considered a sign of impeded venous outflow from the craniocervical vessels. BNP added to the sucking effect of the thoracic cavity (the siphoning effect) and led to more massive venous outflow from cephalic vessels as evidenced by pressure drop in the jugular vein and v. cava superior to the values determined in the basic horizontal position. However, BNP did not significantly alter arterial hemodynamics, respiration pattern or gas exchange. Data of the investigation attest effectiveness of this method of moderating blood flow to the cat's head during HDT and possibility to apply it in the zero-g environment.

  1. [Ambulatory measurement of blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Mallion, J M; Tremel, F; Siché, J P; Azzouzi, L; Baguet, J P

    1995-12-09

    The advent of new techniques has greatly contributed to the development of ambulatory measurement as a noninvasive method for evaluating blood pressure. The technique implies use of a validated and reliable standardized apparatus. The operator must strictly comply with operating procedures, which must also be explained to the patient. Ambulatory measurement can be meaningful only if the results are compatible with reference values, which have now been established, and if the causes of possible error can be recognized and interpreted. Ambulatory blood pressure measurement has greatly improved our knowledge of physiological and pathological variations over the circadian cycle including day/night variability and the effects of psychosensorial stimulation. Diagnostic indications are clearly identified and include borderline hypertension suspected but not identified after about 3 months, the white coat effect, severe hypertension when modifications in the circadian cycle are suspected, paroxysmal hypertension, suspected pheochromocytoma, and gravid hypertension or an inversion of the circadian cycle possibly preceding an episode of eclampsia. There are also a certain number of particular indications in patients with degenerative or primary conditions affecting their autonomy. The true prognostic value of these recordings was recognized several years ago and has been confirmed by clinical trials. For example, the white blouse effect has no significant implication in terms or predicting less favourable morbidity or mortality. Finally, ambulatory blood pressure measurement has been definitively shown to be a valid method for evaluating the therapeutic effect of an anti-hypertensive drug in a given patient, especially when resting levels are questioned. For therapeutic trials, ambulatory measurements serve as a reference to evaluate the effect of treatment on the circadian cycle. Peak/dip levels can thus be determined in comparison with the residual effect of the drug. A

  2. Blood pressure regulation, autonomic control and sleep disordered breathing in children.

    PubMed

    Nisbet, Lauren C; Yiallourou, Stephanie R; Walter, Lisa M; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2014-04-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) ranges in severity from primary snoring (PS) to obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). In adults, SDB is associated with adverse cardiovascular consequences which are mediated, in part, by autonomic dysfunction. Although SDB is common in children, fewer paediatric studies have investigated these cardiovascular effects. Initial research focused on those with OSA, indeed children with PS were occasionally utilised as the comparison control group. However, it is essential to understand the ramifications of this disorder in all its severities, as currently the milder forms of SDB are often untreated. Methodologies used to assess autonomic function in children with SDB include blood pressure (BP), BP variability, baroreflex sensitivity, heart rate variability, peripheral arterial tonometry and catecholamine assays. The aim of this review was to summarise the findings of paediatric studies to date and explore the relationship between autonomic dysfunction and SDB in children, paying particular attention to the roles of disease severity and/or age. This review found evidence of autonomic dysfunction in children with SDB during both wakefulness and sleep. BP dysregulation, elevated generalised sympathetic activity and impairment of autonomic reflexes occur in school-aged children and adolescents with SDB. The adverse effects of SDB seem somewhat less in young children, although more studies are needed. There is mounting evidence that the cardiovascular and autonomic consequences of SDB are not limited to those with OSA, but are also evident in children with PS. The severity of disease and age of onset of autonomic consequences may be important guides for the treatment of SDB.

  3. Measurement of exhaled nitric oxide in young children during tidal breathing through a facemask.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Peter Fleng; Klug, Bent; Valerius, Niels Henrik

    2005-05-01

    Measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) offers a non-invasive means for assessment of airway inflammation. The currently available methods are difficult to apply in preschool children. We evaluated four methods potentially applicable for eNO measurement during tidal breathing in young children. eNO was assessed during tidal breathing in 24 children, 2-7 yr old, using a facemask which separated nasal and oral airflow. Facemasks with and without a one-way valve allowing exhalation through the nose were used. Expiratory flow control was not attempted. Measurements of eNO were performed both on-line and off-line. In 11 children, 8-12 yr old, measurements were compared with the standard single breath on-line method. eNO was significantly lower applying the one-way valve in on-line and off-line measurements in comparison with measurements without the valve [4.6 and 3.9 parts per billion (ppb) vs. 6.9 ppb and 6.5 ppb]. The mean within subject coefficient of variation (CV) was significantly lower in on-line measurements with the one-way valve (9.6%) compared with the other three methods (18.8, 27.7 and 29.3% respectively). Measurements with a facemask fitted with a one-way valve yielded similar eNO levels as the standard single breath method (7.0 ppb vs. 6.9 ppb) and reproducibility (9.8% vs. 7.1%). In conclusion, reproducible measurements of eNO can be obtained without control of expiration flow using a facemask fitted with a one-way valve on the nasal compartment. The likely explanation to this is that the one-way valve reduces the admixture of nasal NO, thereby improving the reliability of eNO measurements. Copyright 2005 Blackwell Munksgaard

  4. Additional Value of CH₄ Measurement in a Combined (13)C/H₂ Lactose Malabsorption Breath Test: A Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Houben, Els; De Preter, Vicky; Billen, Jaak; Van Ranst, Marc; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-09-07

    The lactose hydrogen breath test is a commonly used, non-invasive method for the detection of lactose malabsorption and is based on an abnormal increase in breath hydrogen (H₂) excretion after an oral dose of lactose. We use a combined (13)C/H₂ lactose breath test that measures breath (13)CO₂ as a measure of lactose digestion in addition to H₂ and that has a better sensitivity and specificity than the standard test. The present retrospective study evaluated the results of 1051 (13)C/H₂ lactose breath tests to assess the impact on the diagnostic accuracy of measuring breath CH₄ in addition to H₂ and (13)CO₂. Based on the (13)C/H₂ breath test, 314 patients were diagnosed with lactase deficiency, 138 with lactose malabsorption or small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), and 599 with normal lactose digestion. Additional measurement of CH₄ further improved the accuracy of the test as 16% subjects with normal lactose digestion and no H₂-excretion were found to excrete CH₄. These subjects should have been classified as subjects with lactose malabsorption or SIBO. In conclusion, measuring CH₄-concentrations has an added value to the (13)C/H₂ breath test to identify methanogenic subjects with lactose malabsorption or SIBO.

  5. Peak Expiratory Flow, Breath Rate and Blood Pressure in Adults with Changes in Particulate Matter Air Pollution during the Beijing Olympics: A Panel Study

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Lina; Deng, Furong; Tian, Lili; Li, Yanli; Swanson, Mya; Ying, Jingjing; Browne, Richard W; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Bonner, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to examine whether changes in short-term exposures to particulate matter are associated with changes in lung function, breath rate, and blood pressure among healthy adults and whether smoking status modifies the association. Methods We took advantage of the artificially controlled changes in air pollution levels that occurred during the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, China and conducted a panel study of 201 Beijing residents. Data were collected before, during, and after the Olympics, respectively. Linear mixed-effects models and generalized estimating equation models were used to compare measurements of peak expiratory flow, breath rate, blood pressure across the three time points. Results The mean values of peak expiratory flow were 346.0 L/min, 399.3 L/min, and 364.1 L/min over the three study periods. Peak expiratory flow levels increased in 78% of the participants when comparing the during- and pre- Olympics time points, while peak expiratory flow levels decreased in 80% of participants for the post- and during-Olympic periods comparison. In subgroup analyses comparing the during -Olympic to pre-Olympic time points, we found a larger percentage change in peak expiratory flow (+17%) among female, younger and non-smoking participants than among male, elderly and smoking participants (+12%). The percentage of participants with a fast breath rate (>20/min) changed from 9.7%, to 4.9%, to 30.1% among females, and from 7.9%, to 2.6%, to 27.3% among males over the three time points respectively. The changes on blood pressure over the three study periods were not very clear, although there is an increase in diastolic pressure and a decrease in pulse pressure among males during the games. Conclusions The results suggest that exposure to different air pollution levels has significant effects on respiratory function. Smoking, age and gender appear to modify participants’ biological response to changes in air quality. PMID:24906062

  6. Correlation between gastric transit time measured by video capsule endoscopy and gastric emptying determined by the continuous real-time 13C breath test (BreathID system).

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Takashi; Inamori, Masahiko; Endo, Hiroki; Matsuura, Mizue; Uchiyama, Shiori; Yamada, Eiji; Sekino, Yusuke; Sakai, Eiji; Higurashi, Takuma; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Akimoto, Keiko; Iida, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Koide, Tomoko; Shibata, Wataru; Ida, Tomonori; Kusakabe, Akihiko; Gotoh, Eiji; Nakajima, Atsushi; Maeda, Shin

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the possible existence of a correlation between the gastric transit time (GTT) measured by video capsule endoscopy (VCE) and the parameters of gastric emptying determined using 13C breath test (BreathID system). Eight healthy male volunteers participated in this randomized, two-way crossover study. The subjects were randomly assigned to undergo VCE using the PillCam SB capsule endoscopy system or the 13C breath test for 4 hours after a test meal (400 kcal per 400 mL) containing 100 mg of 13C acetic acid administered after overnight fasting. The VCE images were analyzed and the GTT was determined using the proprietary RAPID software. The parameters, namely T lag, T 1/2 and GEC were calculated using the Oridion Research Software (β version). The GTT measured by VCE and the parameters of gastric emptying were compared statistically. No significant correlation was observed between the GTT and T lag (p = 0.5263), T 1/2 (p = 0.4100) or GEC (p = 0.2410), as determined by calculation of the Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. GTT measured by VCE cannot serve as asubstitute for the gastric emptying time measured bythe 13C breath test.

  7. Environmental and occupational exposure to benzene by analysis of breath and blood.

    PubMed Central

    Perbellini, L; Faccini, G B; Pasini, F; Cazzoli, F; Pistoia, S; Rosellini, R; Valsecchi, M; Brugnone, F

    1988-01-01

    Benzene exposure of chemical workers was studied, during the entire workshift, by continuous monitoring of workplace benzene concentration, and 16 hours after the end of the workshift by the measurement of alveolar and blood benzene concentrations and excretion of urinary phenol. Exposure of hospital staff was studied by measuring benzene concentrations in the alveolar and blood samples collected during the hospital workshift. Instantaneous environmental air samples were also collected, at the moment of the biological sampling, for all the subjects tested. A group of 34 chemical workers showed an eight hour exposure to benzene, as a geometric mean, of 1.12 micrograms/l which corresponded, 16 hours after the end of the workshift, to a geometric mean benzene concentration of 70 ng/l in the alveolar air and 597 ng/l in the blood. Another group of 27 chemical workers (group A) turned out to be exposed to an indeterminable eight hour exposure to benzene that corresponded, the morning after, to a geometric mean benzene concentration of 28 ng/l in the alveolar air and 256 ng/l in the blood. The group of hospital staff (group B) had a benzene concentration of 14 ng/l in the alveolar air and 269 ng/l in the blood. Instantaneous environmental samples showed that in the infirmaries the geometric mean benzene concentration was 58 ng/l during the examination of the 34 chemical workers, 36 ng/l during the examination of the 27 chemical workers (group A), and 5 ng/l during the examination of the 19 subjects of the hospital staff (group B). Statistical analysis showed that the alveolar and blood benzene concentrations in the 34 workers exposed to 1.12 microgram/l of benzene differed significantly from those in groups A and B. It was found, moreover, that the alveolar and blood benzene concentrations were higher in the smokers in groups A and B but not in the smokers in the group of 34 chemical workers. The slope of the linear correlation between the alveolar and the instantaneous

  8. Breath holding duration as a measure of distress tolerance: examining its relation to measures of executive control.

    PubMed

    Sütterlin, Stefan; Schroijen, Mathias; Constantinou, Elena; Smets, Elyn; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    Recent research considers distress (in)tolerance as an essential component in the development of various forms of psychopathology. A behavioral task frequently used to assess distress tolerance is the breath holding task. Although breath holding time (BHT) has been associated with behavioral outcomes related to inhibitory control (e.g., smoking cessation), the relationship among breath holding and direct measures of executive control has not yet been thoroughly examined. The present study aims to assess (a) the BHT-task's test-retest reliability in a 1-year follow-up and (b) the relationship between a series of executive function tasks and breath holding duration. One hundred and thirteen students completed an initial BHT assessment, 58 of which also completed a series of executive function tasks [the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), the Parametric Go/No-Go task and the N-back memory updating task]. A subsample of these students (N = 34) repeated the breath holding task in a second session 1 year later. Test-retest reliability of the BHT-task over a 1-year period was high (r = 0.67, p < 0.001), but none of the executive function tasks was significantly associated with BHT. The rather moderate levels of unpleasantness induced by breath holding in our sample may suggest that other processes (physiological, motivational) besides distress tolerance influence BHT. Overall, the current findings do not support the assumption of active inhibitory control in the BHT-task in a healthy sample. Our findings suggest that individual differences (e.g., in interoceptive or anxiety sensitivity) should be taken into account when examining the validity of BHT as a measure of distress tolerance.

  9. Breath holding duration as a measure of distress tolerance: examining its relation to measures of executive control

    PubMed Central

    Sütterlin, Stefan; Schroijen, Mathias; Constantinou, Elena; Smets, Elyn; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    Recent research considers distress (in)tolerance as an essential component in the development of various forms of psychopathology. A behavioral task frequently used to assess distress tolerance is the breath holding task. Although breath holding time (BHT) has been associated with behavioral outcomes related to inhibitory control (e.g., smoking cessation), the relationship among breath holding and direct measures of executive control has not yet been thoroughly examined. The present study aims to assess (a) the BHT-task's test-retest reliability in a 1-year follow-up and (b) the relationship between a series of executive function tasks and breath holding duration. One hundred and thirteen students completed an initial BHT assessment, 58 of which also completed a series of executive function tasks [the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), the Parametric Go/No-Go task and the N-back memory updating task]. A subsample of these students (N = 34) repeated the breath holding task in a second session 1 year later. Test-retest reliability of the BHT-task over a 1-year period was high (r = 0.67, p < 0.001), but none of the executive function tasks was significantly associated with BHT. The rather moderate levels of unpleasantness induced by breath holding in our sample may suggest that other processes (physiological, motivational) besides distress tolerance influence BHT. Overall, the current findings do not support the assumption of active inhibitory control in the BHT-task in a healthy sample. Our findings suggest that individual differences (e.g., in interoceptive or anxiety sensitivity) should be taken into account when examining the validity of BHT as a measure of distress tolerance. PMID:23908639

  10. Electromagnetic inductance plethysmography is well suited to measure tidal breathing in infants.

    PubMed

    Bentsen, Mariann H L; Eriksen, Morten; Olsen, Merete S; Markestad, Trond; Halvorsen, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Reliable, accurate and noninvasive methods for measuring lung function in infants are desirable. Electromagnetic inductance plethysmography has been used to perform infant spirometry and VoluSense Pediatrics (VSP) (VoluSense, Bergen, Norway) represents an updated version of this technique. We aimed to examine its accuracy compared to a validated system measuring airflow via a facemask using an ultrasonic flowmeter. We tested 30 infants with postmenstrual ages between 36 to 43 weeks and weights from 2.3 to 4.8 kg, applying both methods simultaneously and applying VSP alone. Agreement between the methods was calculated using Bland-Altman analyses and we also estimated the effect of applying the mask. Mean differences for all breathing parameters were within ±5.5% and limits of agreement between the two methods were acceptable, except perhaps for peak tidal expiratory flow (PTEF). Application of the facemask significantly increased tidal volume, minute ventilation, PTEF, the ratio of inspiratory to expiratory time and the ratio of expiratory flow at 50% of expired volume to PTEF. VSP accurately measured tidal breathing parameters and seems well suited for tidal breathing measurements in infants under treatment with equipment that precludes the use of a facemask.

  11. A new method for measuring lung deposition efficiency of airborne nanoparticles in a single breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsson, Jonas K. F.; Hedlund, Johan; Kumlin, John; Wollmer, Per; Löndahl, Jakob

    2016-11-01

    Assessment of respiratory tract deposition of nanoparticles is a key link to understanding their health impacts. An instrument was developed to measure respiratory tract deposition of nanoparticles in a single breath. Monodisperse nanoparticles are generated, inhaled and sampled from a determined volumetric lung depth after a controlled residence time in the lung. The instrument was characterized for sensitivity to inter-subject variability, particle size (22, 50, 75 and 100 nm) and breath-holding time (3-20 s) in a group of seven healthy subjects. The measured particle recovery had an inter-subject variability 26-50 times larger than the measurement uncertainty and the results for various particle sizes and breath-holding times were in accordance with the theory for Brownian diffusion and values calculated from the Multiple-Path Particle Dosimetry model. The recovery was found to be determined by residence time and particle size, while respiratory flow-rate had minor importance in the studied range 1-10 L/s. The instrument will be used to investigate deposition of nanoparticles in patients with respiratory disease. The fast and precise measurement allows for both diagnostic applications, where the disease may be identified based on particle recovery, and for studies with controlled delivery of aerosol-based nanomedicine to specific regions of the lungs.

  12. Electromagnetic inductance plethysmography is well suited to measure tidal breathing in infants

    PubMed Central

    Eriksen, Morten; Olsen, Merete S.; Markestad, Trond; Halvorsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Reliable, accurate and noninvasive methods for measuring lung function in infants are desirable. Electromagnetic inductance plethysmography has been used to perform infant spirometry and VoluSense Pediatrics (VSP) (VoluSense, Bergen, Norway) represents an updated version of this technique. We aimed to examine its accuracy compared to a validated system measuring airflow via a facemask using an ultrasonic flowmeter. We tested 30 infants with postmenstrual ages between 36 to 43 weeks and weights from 2.3 to 4.8 kg, applying both methods simultaneously and applying VSP alone. Agreement between the methods was calculated using Bland–Altman analyses and we also estimated the effect of applying the mask. Mean differences for all breathing parameters were within ±5.5% and limits of agreement between the two methods were acceptable, except perhaps for peak tidal expiratory flow (PTEF). Application of the facemask significantly increased tidal volume, minute ventilation, PTEF, the ratio of inspiratory to expiratory time and the ratio of expiratory flow at 50% of expired volume to PTEF. VSP accurately measured tidal breathing parameters and seems well suited for tidal breathing measurements in infants under treatment with equipment that precludes the use of a facemask. PMID:28053968

  13. A new method for measuring lung deposition efficiency of airborne nanoparticles in a single breath

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, Jonas K. F.; Hedlund, Johan; Kumlin, John; Wollmer, Per; Löndahl, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of respiratory tract deposition of nanoparticles is a key link to understanding their health impacts. An instrument was developed to measure respiratory tract deposition of nanoparticles in a single breath. Monodisperse nanoparticles are generated, inhaled and sampled from a determined volumetric lung depth after a controlled residence time in the lung. The instrument was characterized for sensitivity to inter-subject variability, particle size (22, 50, 75 and 100 nm) and breath-holding time (3–20 s) in a group of seven healthy subjects. The measured particle recovery had an inter-subject variability 26–50 times larger than the measurement uncertainty and the results for various particle sizes and breath-holding times were in accordance with the theory for Brownian diffusion and values calculated from the Multiple-Path Particle Dosimetry model. The recovery was found to be determined by residence time and particle size, while respiratory flow-rate had minor importance in the studied range 1–10 L/s. The instrument will be used to investigate deposition of nanoparticles in patients with respiratory disease. The fast and precise measurement allows for both diagnostic applications, where the disease may be identified based on particle recovery, and for studies with controlled delivery of aerosol-based nanomedicine to specific regions of the lungs. PMID:27819335

  14. Automatic blood pressure measuring system (M092)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolte, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The Blood Pressure Measuring System is described. It measures blood pressure by the noninvasive Korotkoff sound technique on a continual basis as physical stress is imposed during experiment M092, Lower Body Negative Pressure, and experiment M171, Metabolic Activity.

  15. Automatic blood pressure measuring system (M092)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolte, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The Blood Pressure Measuring System is described. It measures blood pressure by the noninvasive Korotkoff sound technique on a continual basis as physical stress is imposed during experiment M092, Lower Body Negative Pressure, and experiment M171, Metabolic Activity.

  16. Breath air measurement using wide-band frequency tuning IR laser photo-acoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistenev, Yury V.; Borisov, Alexey V.; Kuzmin, Dmitry A.; Bulanova, Anna A.; Boyko, Andrey A.; Kostyukova, Nadezhda Y.; Karapuzikov, Alexey A.

    2016-03-01

    The results of measuring of biomarkers in breath air of patients with broncho-pulmonary diseases using wide-band frequency tuning IR laser photo-acoustic spectroscopy and the methods of data mining are presented. We will discuss experimental equipment and various methods of intellectual analysis of the experimental spectra in context of above task. The work was carried out with partial financial support of the FCPIR contract No 14.578.21.0082 (ID RFMEFI57814X0082).

  17. Simultaneous NO and CO(2) measurement in human breath with a single IV-VI mid-infrared laser.

    PubMed

    Roller, C; Namjou, K; Jeffers, J; Potter, W; McCann, P J; Grego, J

    2002-01-15

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) system equipped with a IV-VI mid-IR laser operating near 5.2>mu;m was used to measure exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) simultaneously in human breath over a single exhalation. Breath was sampled in real time, and eNO levels were measured from seven volunteers, two steroid-naive asthmatics and five nonasthmatics. Measured CO(2) levels were used as an internal standard to verify correct breath collection and calculate eNO values. Calculated eNO concentrations agreed well with reported values for asthmatic and nonasthmatic individuals.

  18. The association of annual air pollution exposure with blood pressure among patients with sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Te; Lee, Kang-Yun; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Wu, Dean; Juang, Jer-Nan; Chuang, Kai-Jen

    2016-02-01

    While sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), high blood pressure (BP) and air pollution exposure have separately been associated with increased risk of cardiopulmonary mortality, the association linking air pollution exposure to BP among patients with sleep-disordered breathing is still unclear. We collected 3762 participants' data from the Taipei Medical University Hospital's Sleep Center and air pollution data from the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration. Associations of 1-year mean criteria air pollutants [particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters ≤10 μm (PM10), particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3)] with systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) were investigated by generalized additive models. After controlling for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), temperature and relative humidity, we observed that increases in air pollution levels were associated with decreased SBP and increased DBP. We also found that patients with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥30 showed a stronger BP response to increased levels of air pollution exposure than those with AHI<30. Stronger effects of air pollution exposure on BP were found in overweight participants than in participants with normal BMI. We concluded that annual exposure to air pollution was associated with change of BP among patients with sleep-disordered breathing. The association between annual air pollution exposure and BP could be modified by AHI and BMI.

  19. Measuring tidal breathing parameters using a volumetric vest in neonates with and without lung disease.

    PubMed

    Olden, C; Symes, E; Seddon, P

    2010-11-01

    Lung function measurement is difficult in unsedated infants; tidal breathing parameters are a useful non-invasive surrogate, but even these measurements cause disturbance from applying a facemask. We investigated a novel volumetric vest system (FloRight), which measures volume changes of the respiratory system from changes in the magnetic fields induced by current-carrying coils around the entire chest and abdomen. Using a facemask and ultrasonic flowmeter as comparator, we assessed the validity and repeatability of tidal breathing parameters measured by FloRight in 10 healthy newborn infants during natural sleep. We also assessed the effect of a facemask on tidal volume and tidal expiratory flow parameters. To assess the ability of the FloRight system to detect disease, we compared the healthy infants with 11 infants suffering from bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Tidal parameters with the FloRight vest corresponded closely with facemask measurements. Mean difference, mask minus vest, for tidal volume was 0.096 ml (P < 0.05), with limits of agreement +4.5 to -4.3 ml. Coefficient of repeatability was similar for mask and vest measurements. Tidal volume measured by FloRight with mask in place (20.6 ml) was significantly higher than without mask (16.1 ml), but tidal expiratory flow parameters were not altered. FloRight measurements of tidal parameters were markedly different between the two groups of infants, with tidal volume per Kg significantly higher and tidal expiratory flow parameters significantly lower. Our findings suggest that the FloRight system is able to measure tidal breathing parameters accurately, in healthy newborn infants, without prior calibration on the infant. It appears to have at least sufficient sensitivity to detect severe respiratory disease.

  20. A New Differential Pressure Flow Meter for Measurement of Human Breath Flow: Simulation and Experimental Investigation.

    PubMed

    Bridgeman, Devon; Tsow, Francis; Xian, Xiaojun; Forzani, Erica

    2016-03-01

    The development and performance characterization of a new differential pressure-based flow meter for human breath measurements is presented in this article. The device, called a "Confined Pitot Tube," is comprised of a pipe with an elliptically shaped expansion cavity located in the pipe center, and an elliptical disk inside the expansion cavity. The elliptical disk, named Pitot Tube, is exchangeable, and has different diameters, which are smaller than the diameter of the elliptical cavity. The gap between the disk and the cavity allows the flow of human breath to pass through. The disk causes an obstruction in the flow inside the pipe, but the elliptical cavity provides an expansion for the flow to circulate around the disk, decreasing the overall flow resistance. We characterize the new sensor flow experimentally and theoretically, using Comsol Multiphysics(®) software with laminar and turbulent models. We also validate the sensor, using inhalation and exhalation tests and a reference method.

  1. Improvement of sleep-disordered breathing in children is associated with a reduction in overnight blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Vlahandonis, Anna; Nixon, Gillian M; Davey, Margot J; Walter, Lisa M; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2013-12-01

    Childhood sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is associated with elevated blood pressure (BP); however, little is known about the long-term outcomes in this population. We aimed to assess long-term changes in overnight BP in children with SDB. Forty children with previously diagnosed SDB and 20 nonsnoring control participants underwent repeat overnight polysomnography (PSG) with continuous BP measurement 4years after the original diagnosis. At follow-up, children aged 11-16years were categorized into 2 groups of resolved (absence of snoring and obstructive apnea-hypopnea index [OAHI]⩽1) or unresolved (continued to snore or had an OAHI >1) SDB. There were no group differences in age, sex, or body mass index (BMI) z score. OAHI was lower at follow-up (P<.05) in both the resolved (n=18) and unresolved (n=22) groups. BP was elevated during wake and sleep in both SDB groups compared to the control group at baseline (P<.01 for all), but it decreased by 5-15mmHg at follow-up during sleep for both SDB groups (P<.05 for all). BP during wake was unchanged in the SDB groups at follow-up but increased in the control group (P<.05). At follow-up, BP did not differ between the control group and the SDB groups during wake or sleep. Improved oxygen saturation (SpO2) during sleep was a significant predictor of a reduction in BP. SDB improved over the 4-year follow-up and both resolved and unresolved groups exhibited a significant reduction in BP during sleep, with levels similar to the control group. Our study highlights the fact that even small improvements can improve the cardiovascular effects of SDB. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [The effectiveness of measurement of nasal resistance in patients with sleep disordered breathing].

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Kumiko; Yasuda, Kyo; Kawano, Masako; Satoh, Makoto

    2009-06-01

    Nasal breathing disorder has been associated with the condition and treatment of sleep disordered breathing (SDB). In the current study, we investigated the utility of measurement of nasal resistance in patients with SDB. We examined the relationship between nasal symptoms and nasal resistance in 219 patients, and how the results affected the administration of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in 34 SDB patients. Total nasal resistance was not significantly different between patients who were divided into two groups: those with nasal symptoms, and those without. The left-right ratio of nasal flow in the group with nasal symptoms was higher than in the group without nasal symptoms (p < 0.01). The mean percentage of nCPAP use was not significantly different between two groups divided by total nasal resistance. The mean percentage of nCPAP use > or = 4 hours was lower in the group in which total nasal resistance was more than 0.25Pa/cm3/sec (p < 0.05). The left-right ratio of nasal flow does not affect nCPAP use. We conclude that measurement of nasal resistance for confirming nasal breathing disorder is effective in patients with SDB, whether a patient complains of nasal symptoms or not.

  3. A medical cloud-based platform for respiration rate measurement and hierarchical classification of breath disorders.

    PubMed

    Fekr, Atena Roshan; Janidarmian, Majid; Radecka, Katarzyna; Zilic, Zeljko

    2014-06-24

    The measurement of human respiratory signals is crucial in cyberbiological systems. A disordered breathing pattern can be the first symptom of different physiological, mechanical, or psychological dysfunctions. Therefore, a real-time monitoring of the respiration patterns, as well as respiration rate is a critical need in medical applications. There are several methods for respiration rate measurement. However, despite their accuracy, these methods are expensive and could not be integrated in a body sensor network. In this work, we present a real-time cloud-based platform for both monitoring the respiration rate and breath pattern classification, remotely. The proposed system is designed particularly for patients with breathing problems (e.g., respiratory complications after surgery) or sleep disorders. Our system includes calibrated accelerometer sensor, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) and cloud-computing model. We also suggest a procedure to improve the accuracy of respiration rate for patients at rest positions. The overall error in the respiration rate calculation is obtained 0.53% considering SPR-BTA spirometer as the reference. Five types of respiration disorders, Bradapnea, Tachypnea, Cheyn-stokes, Kaussmal, and Biot's breathing are classified based on hierarchical Support Vector Machine (SVM) with seven different features. We have evaluated the performance of the proposed classification while it is individualized to every subject (case 1) as well as considering all subjects (case 2). Since the selection of kernel function is a key factor to decide SVM's performance, in this paper three different kernel functions are evaluated. The experiments are conducted with 11 subjects and the average accuracy of 94.52% for case 1 and the accuracy of 81.29% for case 2 are achieved based on Radial Basis Function (RBF). Finally, a performance evaluation has been done for normal and impaired subjects considering sensitivity, specificity and G-mean parameters of different kernel

  4. A Medical Cloud-Based Platform for Respiration Rate Measurement and Hierarchical Classification of Breath Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fekr, Atena Roshan; Janidarmian, Majid; Radecka, Katarzyna; Zilic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of human respiratory signals is crucial in cyberbiological systems. A disordered breathing pattern can be the first symptom of different physiological, mechanical, or psychological dysfunctions. Therefore, a real-time monitoring of the respiration patterns, as well as respiration rate is a critical need in medical applications. There are several methods for respiration rate measurement. However, despite their accuracy, these methods are expensive and could not be integrated in a body sensor network. In this work, we present a real-time cloud-based platform for both monitoring the respiration rate and breath pattern classification, remotely. The proposed system is designed particularly for patients with breathing problems (e.g., respiratory complications after surgery) or sleep disorders. Our system includes calibrated accelerometer sensor, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) and cloud-computing model. We also suggest a procedure to improve the accuracy of respiration rate for patients at rest positions. The overall error in the respiration rate calculation is obtained 0.53% considering SPR-BTA spirometer as the reference. Five types of respiration disorders, Bradapnea, Tachypnea, Cheyn-stokes, Kaussmal, and Biot's breathing are classified based on hierarchical Support Vector Machine (SVM) with seven different features. We have evaluated the performance of the proposed classification while it is individualized to every subject (case 1) as well as considering all subjects (case 2). Since the selection of kernel function is a key factor to decide SVM's performance, in this paper three different kernel functions are evaluated. The experiments are conducted with 11 subjects and the average accuracy of 94.52% for case 1 and the accuracy of 81.29% for case 2 are achieved based on Radial Basis Function (RBF). Finally, a performance evaluation has been done for normal and impaired subjects considering sensitivity, specificity and G-mean parameters of different kernel

  5. Delayed brachial artery dilation response and increased resting blood flow velocity in young children with mild sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Anna; van den Heuvel, Cameron; Pamula, Yvonne; Martin, James; Lushington, Kurt; Baumert, Mathias; Willoughby, Scott; Gent, Roger; Couper, Jenny; Kennedy, Declan

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether the vascular dysfunction perceived in adults with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) was also evident in children with snoring referred for evaluation of clinically suspected SDB. This study compared flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), measured at the brachial artery, at rest and during hyperaemic stress between children who snore [n = 23; mean standard deviation (SD) age = 7.51 (1.3) years] and healthy, non-snoring children [n = 11; age = 8.0 (1.3) years]. Children with suspected obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and healthy non-snoring controls underwent overnight polysomnography (PSG). Using standard techniques, non-invasive FMD and brachial arterial blood flow velocity during rest and hyperaemia were subsequently measured by ultrasound imaging Resting and hyperaemic velocity time integral (area under the curve of mean systolic velocity × ejection time), maximal dilation response (highest percentage difference from baseline diameter) and the time taken to reach maximal dilation were calculated. Children awaiting adenotonsillectomy compared to healthy non-snoring control children had higher velocity time integrals at rest (14 ± 3 m vs. 20 ± 8 m, p < 0.01) and during hyperaemic stress (56 ± 6m vs. 63 ± 13m, p < 0.01) despite having only mild SDB on polysomnographic assessment. Lower nadir oxygen saturation values during non-rapid eye movement sleep were negatively associated with higher resting (r = -0.58, p <0.001) and hyperaemic (r = -0.36, p < 0.05) velocity time integrals. Maximal FMD dilatation response was not significantly different between snoring and non-snoring groups, but the estimated time to reach maximal dilation was significantly delayed in children who snored (60.7 ± 28.4 vs. 39.2 ± 13.2 s, p < 0.05). Children with mild SDB showed increased blood flow velocity at rest and during hyperaemic stress suggesting altered cardiovascular and

  6. Registration pipeline for pulmonary free-breathing 1H MRI ventilation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fumin; Capaldi, Dante P. I.; Di Cesare, Robert; Fenster, Aaron; Parraga, Grace

    2017-03-01

    Objectives: Our aim was to develop a clinically-practical and physiologically-relevant approach for regional structure-function measurements of the lung using Fourier decomposition of free-breathing pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging (FDMRI). Methods: Ten patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease provided written informed consent to a study protocol approved by Health Canada and completed pulmonary function tests, 1H/hyperpolarized noble gas and free-breathing pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during a single 2-hour visit. Free-breathing 1H MRI was simultaneously segmented using a multi-region coupled continuous max-flow approach by exploring primal/dual analysis and convex optimization techniques. The segmented free-breathing 1H MRI lung was registered using deformable registration approach that was developed using dual and convex optimization methods to compensate for respiratory/cardiac motion. Fourier decomposition of the co-registered lung was used to generate pulmonary functional information that was quantified as ventilation-defect-percent (VDP). The pipeline was implemented on a GPU for speed-up. Lung segmentation accuracy was measured by comparing algorithm and manual lung masks using Dice-similarity-coefficient (DSC). FD-VDP was compared to 3He-VDP using Pearson correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman analysis. The reproducibility of our algorithm was measured using coefficient of variation (CoV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for DSC and FD-VDP. Results: The pipeline yielded a whole lung DSC of 95.7+/-1.7% and FD-VDP that were correlated with 3He-VDP (r = 0.81, p = 0.004). CoV (ICC) were 0.4% (0.98) and 4.1% (0.98) for whole lung DSC and FD-VDP, respectively. The proposed approach requires 45 min for parallel implementation with minimal user interaction. Conclusion: The proposed approach provides a clinically-practical pipeline to generate regional pulmonary structure-function measurements using free-breathing

  7. Episodic breathing in alligators: role of sensory feedback.

    PubMed

    Douse, M A; Mitchell, G S

    1992-01-01

    The episodic breathing pattern in many reptiles consists of two or more clustered breaths separated by variable non-ventilatory periods. This pattern is commonly postulated to result from oscillations in lung and/or blood PO2 or PCO2 via chemoreceptor feedback. We tested this hypothesis by monitoring breathing pattern in: (1) awake, undisturbed alligators and (2) sedated alligators (approx. 25 mg/kg pentobarbital, i.p.; 3 days prior to data collection). In sedated alligators, measurements were made: (1) before and after bilateral cervical vagotomy, a procedure that removes peripheral arterial chemoreceptors, CO2-sensitive intrapulmonary chemoreceptors and pulmonary stretch receptors (n = 6); and (2) during unidirectional ventilation (UDV) at high flow rates (greater than 2 L/min), thereby minimizing oscillations in lung and blood PO2 and PCO2 (n = 6). Measurements on sedated alligators were made at 30 and 20 degrees C in each of these conditions. In awake, undisturbed alligators, breathing was typically episodic with 2-7 breaths/cluster, although the pattern was easily altered (increased breaths/cluster) by even seemingly minor disturbances. In sedated alligators, episodic breathing was still evident after vagotomy, but only at increased inspired CO2; at 5% CO2 four of six alligators exhibited episodic breathing consisting of 2-3 breaths/cluster interspersed with occasional single breaths. An episodic breathing pattern was also evident during UDV; at low levels of CO2, 2-4 breaths/cluster interspersed with occasional single breaths were evident in four alligators, while two had 6-8 breaths/cluster. Increasing CO2 in the UDV gas stream generally increased the number of breaths/cluster. After vagotomy, all six alligators could manifest an episodic breathing pattern during UDV in at least one CO2 condition (greater than 2 breaths/cluster interspersed with occasional single breaths). The episodic breathing pattern was very labile, sometimes changing to single breaths

  8. Cuff for Blood-Vessel Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.

    1982-01-01

    Pressure within blood vessel is measured by new cufflike device without penetration of vessel. Device continuously monitors blood pressure for up to 6 months or longer without harming vessel. Is especially useful for vessels smaller than 4 or 5 millimeters in diameter. Invasive methods damage vessel wall, disturb blood flow, and cause clotting. They do not always give reliable pressure measurements over prolonged periods.

  9. Cuff for Blood-Vessel Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.

    1982-01-01

    Pressure within blood vessel is measured by new cufflike device without penetration of vessel. Device continuously monitors blood pressure for up to 6 months or longer without harming vessel. Is especially useful for vessels smaller than 4 or 5 millimeters in diameter. Invasive methods damage vessel wall, disturb blood flow, and cause clotting. They do not always give reliable pressure measurements over prolonged periods.

  10. Phase diagram and breathing dynamics of a single red blood cell and a biconcave capsule in dilute shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Alireza Z. K.; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2011-08-01

    We present phase diagrams of the single red blood cell and biconcave capsule dynamics in dilute suspension using three-dimensional numerical simulations. The computational geometry replicates an in vitro linear shear flow apparatus. Our model includes all essential properties of the cell membrane, namely, the resistance against shear deformation, area dilatation, and bending, as well as the viscosity difference between the cell interior and suspending fluids. By considering a wide range of shear rate and interior-to-exterior fluid viscosity ratio, it is shown that the cell dynamics is often more complex than the well-known tank-treading, tumbling, and swinging motion and is characterized by an extreme variation of the cell shape. As a result, it is often difficult to clearly establish whether the cell is swinging or tumbling. Identifying such complex shape dynamics, termed here as “breathing” dynamics, is the focus of this article. During the breathing motion at moderate bending rigidity, the cell either completely aligns with the flow direction and the membrane folds inward, forming two cusps, or it undergoes large swinging motion while deep, craterlike dimples periodically emerge and disappear. At lower bending rigidity, the breathing motion occurs over a wider range of shear rates, and is often characterized by the emergence of a quad-concave shape. The effect of the breathing dynamics on the tank-treading-to-tumbling transition is illustrated by detailed phase diagrams which appear to be more complex and richer than those of vesicles. In a remarkable departure from the vesicle dynamics, and from the classical theory of nondeformable cells, we find that there exists a critical viscosity ratio below which the transition is independent of the viscosity ratio, and dependent on shear rate only. Further, unlike the reduced-order models, the present simulations do not predict any intermittent dynamics of the red blood cells.

  11. Technical and practical issues for tidal breathing measurements of nasal nitric oxide in children.

    PubMed

    Beydon, Nicole; Chambellan, Arnaud; Alberti, Corinne; de Blic, Jacques; Clément, Annick; Escudier, Estelle; Le Bourgeois, Muriel

    2015-12-01

    To promote early screening of patients with suspected Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD), nasal nitric oxide (nNO) measurements during tidal breathing (TB) have been developed for children unable to ensure velum closure (VC) during breath hold or expiration against resistance. To investigate technical and practical issues related to TB-nNO methods in children referred for suspected or asserted PCD, we recorded, in a prospective multicenter study, TB-nNO (calculated as the mean of 5 peaks, 10 or 30 sec during tidal breathing) and VC-nNO when available. We studied 142 children (PCD diagnosis asserted in 47, excluded in 39). Nasal NO values were significantly different according to methods, VC-nNO being higher than TB-nNO (TB-nNO 5 peaks higher than mean of 10 or 30 sec). Specificity (90-94%) and sensitivity (86-97%) were similar between TB-nNO and VC-nNO methods. Age was more correlated with VC-nNO than with TB-nNO. TB-nNO could differ between the two nostrils by more than 10% (or 10 ppb when nNO absolute value lower 100 ppb) in 32-43% of the tested children, according to the different tidal breathing values, and was reproducible in the long term but influenced by ambient NO. Despite TB-nNO values being lower than VC-nNO, TB-nNO was found to be as discriminant for PCD, and probably more discriminant in children less than 8 years old, as the VC method. These results were obtained using the chemiluminescence technique which allows an easier assessment of relevant factors such as nasal permeability and ambient NO than the electrochemical technique. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. In-Ear Audio Wearable: Measurement of Heart and Breathing Rates for Health and Safety Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Martin, Alexis; Voix, Jeremie

    2017-06-27

    This paper examines the integration of a non-invasive vital sign monitoring feature into the workers' hearing protection devices (HPDs) by using a microphone positioned within the earcanal under the HPD. 25 test-subjects were asked to breathe at various rhythms and intensities and these realistic sound events were recorded in the earcanal. Digital signal processing algorithms were then developed to assess heart and breathing rates. Finally, to test the robustness of theses algorithms in noisy work environments, industrial noise was added to the in-ear recorded signals and an adaptive denoising filter was used. The developed algorithms show an absolute mean error of 4.3 beats per minute (BPM) and 2.7 cycles per minute (CPM). The mean difference estimate are -0.44 BPM with a limit of agreement (LoA) interval of -14.3 to 13.4 BPM and 2.40 CPM with a LoA interval of -2.62 to 7.48 CPM. Excellent denoising is achieved with the adaptive filter, able to cope with ambient sound pressure levels of up to 110 dB SPL, resulting in a small error for heart rate detection, but a much larger error for breathing rate detection. Extraction of the heart and breathing rates from an acoustical measurement in the occluded earcanal under an HPD is possible and can even be conducted in the presence of a high level of ambient noise. This proof of concept enables the development of a wide range of non-invasive health and safety monitoring audio wearables for industrial workplaces and life-critical applications where HPDs are used.

  13. Electrocardiogram-Based Sleep Spectrogram Measures of Sleep Stability and Glucose Disposal in Sleep Disordered Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Pogach, Melanie S.; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Thomas, Neil; Thomas, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is independently associated with insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Experimental sleep fragmentation has been shown to impair insulin sensitivity. Conventional electroencephalogram (EEG)-based sleep-quality measures have been inconsistently associated with indices of glucose metabolism. This analysis explored associations between glucose metabolism and an EEG-independent measure of sleep quality, the sleep spectrogram, which maps coupled oscillations of heart-rate variability and electrocardiogram (ECG)-derived respiration. The method allows improved characterization of the quality of stage 2 non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: N/A. Participants: Nondiabetic subjects with and without SDB (n = 118) underwent the frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIVGTT) and a full-montage polysomnogram. The sleep spectrogram was generated from ECG collected during polysomnography. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Standard polysomnographic stages (stages 1, 2, 3+4, and rapid eye movement [REM]) were not associated with the disposition index (DI) derived from the FSIVGTT. In contrast, spectrographic high-frequency coupling (a marker of stable or “effective” sleep) duration was associated with increased, and very-low-frequency coupling (a marker of wake/REM/transitions) associated with reduced DI. This relationship was noted after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, slow wave sleep, total sleep time, stage 1, the arousal index, and the apnea-hypopnea index. Conclusions: ECG-derived sleep-spectrogram measures of sleep quality are associated with alterations in glucose-insulin homeostasis. This alternate mode of estimating sleep quality could improve our understanding of sleep and sleep-breathing effects on glucose metabolism. Citation: Pogach MS; Punjabi NM; Thomas N; Thomas RJ. Electrocardiogram-based sleep

  14. H2S concentrations in the arterial blood during H2S administration in relation to its toxicity and effects on breathing

    PubMed Central

    Klingerman, Candice M.; Trushin, Neil; Prokopczyk, Bogdan

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to establish in spontaneously breathing urethane-anesthetized rats, the relationship between the concentrations of H2S transported in the blood and the corresponding clinical manifestations, i.e., breathing stimulation and inhibition, during and following infusion of NaHS at increasing rates. The gaseous concentration of H2S (CgH2S, one-third of the total soluble form) was computed from the continuous determination of H2S partial pressure in the alveolar gas, while H2S, both dissolved and combined to hemoglobin, was measured at specific time points by sulfide complexation with monobromobimane (CMBBH2S). We found that using a potent reducing agent in vitro, H2S added to the whole blood had little interaction with the plasma proteins, as sulfide appeared to be primarily combined and then oxidized by hemoglobin. In vivo, H2S was undetectable in the blood in its soluble form in baseline conditions, while CMBBH2S averaged 0.7 ± 0.5 μM. During NaHS infusion, H2S was primarily present in nonsoluble form in the arterial blood: CMBBH2S was about 50 times higher than CgH2S at the lowest levels of exposure and 5 or 6 times at the levels wherein fatal apnea occurred. CgH2S averaged only 1.1 ± 0.7 μM when breathing increased, corresponding to a CMBBH2S of 11.1 ± 5.4 μM. Apnea occurred at CgH2S above 5.1 μM and CMBBH2S above 25.4 μM. At the cessation of exposure, CMBBH2S remained elevated, at about 3 times above baseline for at least 15 min. These data provide a frame of reference for studying the putative effects of endogenous H2S and for testing antidotes against its deadly effects. PMID:23904109

  15. Pulmonary Hypertension in Lambs Transfused with Stored Blood is Prevented by Breathing Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Baron, David M.; Yu, Binglan; Lei, Chong; Bagchi, Aranya; Beloiartsev, Arkadi; Stowell, Christopher P.; Steinbicker, Andrea U.; Malhotra, Rajeev; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Zapol, Warren M.

    2012-01-01

    Background During extended storage, erythrocytes undergo functional changes. These changes reduce the viability of erythrocytes leading to release of oxyhemoglobin, a potent scavenger of nitric oxide. We hypothesized that transfusion of ovine packed erythrocytes (PRBC) stored for prolonged periods would induce pulmonary vasoconstriction in lambs, and that reduced vascular nitric oxide concentrations would increase this vasoconstrictor effect. Methods We developed a model of autologous stored blood transfusion in lambs (n=36). Leukoreduced blood was stored for either 2 days (fresh PRBC) or 40 days (stored PRBC). Fresh or stored PRBC were transfused into donors instrumented for awake hemodynamic measurements. Hemodynamic effects of PRBC transfusion were also studied after infusion of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl-ester (25 mg/kg) or during inhalation of nitric oxide (80 ppm). Results Cell-free hemoglobin levels were higher in the supernatant of stored PRBC than in supernatant of fresh PRBC (Mean±SD, 148±20 versus 41±13 mg/dl, respectively, P<0.001). Pulmonary artery pressure during transfusion of stored PRBC transiently increased from 13±1 to 18±1 mmHg (P<0.001) and was associated with increased plasma hemoglobin concentrations. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl-ester potentiated the increase in pulmonary arterial pressure induced by transfusing stored PRBC, whereas inhalation of nitric oxide prevented the vasoconstrictor response. Conclusions Our results suggest that patients with reduced vascular nitric oxide levels due to endothelial dysfunction may be more susceptible to adverse effects of transfusing blood stored for prolonged periods. These patients might benefit from transfusion of fresh PRBC, when available, or inhaled nitric oxide supplementation to prevent the pulmonary hypertension associated with transfusion of stored PRBC. PMID:22293717

  16. 129Xe chemical shift in human blood and pulmonary blood oxygenation measurement in humans using hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR

    PubMed Central

    Norquay, Graham; Leung, General; Stewart, Neil J.; Wolber, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the dependency of the 129Xe‐red blood cell (RBC) chemical shift on blood oxygenation, and to use this relation for noninvasive measurement of pulmonary blood oxygenation in vivo with hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR. Methods Hyperpolarized 129Xe was equilibrated with blood samples of varying oxygenation in vitro, and NMR was performed at 1.5 T and 3 T. Dynamic in vivo NMR during breath hold apnea was performed at 3 T on two healthy volunteers following inhalation of hyperpolarized 129Xe. Results The 129Xe chemical shift in RBCs was found to increase nonlinearly with blood oxygenation at 1.5 T and 3 T. During breath hold apnea, the 129Xe chemical shift in RBCs exhibited a periodic time modulation and showed a net decrease in chemical shift of ∼1 ppm over a 35 s breath hold, corresponding to a decrease of 7–10 % in RBC oxygenation. The 129Xe‐RBC signal amplitude showed a modulation with the same frequency as the 129Xe‐RBC chemical shift. Conclusion The feasibility of using the 129Xe‐RBC chemical shift to measure pulmonary blood oxygenation in vivo has been demonstrated. Correlation between 129Xe‐RBC signal and 129Xe‐RBC chemical shift modulations in the lung warrants further investigation, with the aim to better quantify temporal blood oxygenation changes in the cardiopulmonary vascular circuit. Magn Reson Med 77:1399–1408, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:27062652

  17. (129) Xe chemical shift in human blood and pulmonary blood oxygenation measurement in humans using hyperpolarized (129) Xe NMR.

    PubMed

    Norquay, Graham; Leung, General; Stewart, Neil J; Wolber, Jan; Wild, Jim M

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the dependency of the (129) Xe-red blood cell (RBC) chemical shift on blood oxygenation, and to use this relation for noninvasive measurement of pulmonary blood oxygenation in vivo with hyperpolarized (129) Xe NMR. Hyperpolarized (129) Xe was equilibrated with blood samples of varying oxygenation in vitro, and NMR was performed at 1.5 T and 3 T. Dynamic in vivo NMR during breath hold apnea was performed at 3 T on two healthy volunteers following inhalation of hyperpolarized (129) Xe. The (129) Xe chemical shift in RBCs was found to increase nonlinearly with blood oxygenation at 1.5 T and 3 T. During breath hold apnea, the (129) Xe chemical shift in RBCs exhibited a periodic time modulation and showed a net decrease in chemical shift of ∼1 ppm over a 35 s breath hold, corresponding to a decrease of 7-10 % in RBC oxygenation. The (129) Xe-RBC signal amplitude showed a modulation with the same frequency as the (129) Xe-RBC chemical shift. The feasibility of using the (129) Xe-RBC chemical shift to measure pulmonary blood oxygenation in vivo has been demonstrated. Correlation between (129) Xe-RBC signal and (129) Xe-RBC chemical shift modulations in the lung warrants further investigation, with the aim to better quantify temporal blood oxygenation changes in the cardiopulmonary vascular circuit. Magn Reson Med 77:1399-1408, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. Indirect Blood Pressure Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hum, L.; Cole, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Design and performance of a blood pressure recording device for pediatric use are reported. A strain gage transducer with a copper-beryllium strip as force sensing element is used to monitor skin movements and to convert them into electrical signals proportional to those displacements. Experimental tests with this device in recording of force developed above the left femoral artery of a dog accurately produced a blood pressure curve.

  19. Indirect Blood Pressure Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hum, L.; Cole, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Design and performance of a blood pressure recording device for pediatric use are reported. A strain gage transducer with a copper-beryllium strip as force sensing element is used to monitor skin movements and to convert them into electrical signals proportional to those displacements. Experimental tests with this device in recording of force developed above the left femoral artery of a dog accurately produced a blood pressure curve.

  20. Blood pressure measurement--an overview.

    PubMed

    Dieterle, Thomas

    2012-01-27

    Arterial hypertension continues to represent the leading cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. Diagnosis and therapy of arterial hypertension require adequate blood pressure measurements. Blood pressure is affected by constitutional and environmental factors as well as the measurement procedure itself, inducing substantial uncertainty with regard to adequate diagnosis and control of arterial hypertension. Therefore, current guidelines recommend that the diagnosis of arterial hypertension should not be solely based on conventional blood pressure measurements in the physician's office or in the hospital, but also on out-of-office ambulatory or home blood pressure measurements using clinically validated semi-automated or automated blood pressure measurement devices. Despite the enormous progress in the field of arterial hypertension, many aspects of blood pressure measurement require further intensive investigation, for example blood pressure measurement in special populations and distinct clinical situations, as well as the applicability and validation of novel measurement approaches and devices. This article provides an overview of current methods and trends in the field of non-invasive blood pressure measurement, an update on current clinical guidelines and an overview of blood pressure measurement in special populations.

  1. Left ventricular volume measurements with free breathing respiratory self-gated 3-dimensional golden angle radial whole-heart cine imaging - Feasibility and reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Holst, Karen; Ugander, Martin; Sigfridsson, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    To develop and evaluate a free breathing respiratory self-gated isotropic resolution technique for left ventricular (LV) volume measurements. A 3D radial trajectory with double golden-angle ordering was used for free-running data acquisition during free breathing in 9 healthy volunteers. A respiratory self-gating signal was extracted from the center of k-space and used with the electrocardiogram to bin all data into 3 respiratory and 25 cardiac phases. 3D image volumes were reconstructed and the LV endocardial border was segmented. LV volume measurements and reproducibility from 3D free breathing cine were compared to conventional 2D breath-held cine. No difference was found between 3D free breathing cine and 2D breath-held cine with regards to LV ejection fraction, stroke volume, end-systolic volume and end-diastolic volume (P<0.05 for all). The test-retest differences did not differ between 3D free breathing cine and 2D breath-held cine (P<0.05 for all). 3D free breathing cine and conventional 2D breath-held cine showed similar values and test-retest repeatability for LV volumes in healthy volunteers. 3D free breathing cine enabled retrospective sorting and arbitrary angulation of isotropic data, and could correctly measure LV volumes during free breathing acquisition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fabrication of prototype for measuring the exhaled breath temperature (EBT) to support detection of asthma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnawan, A. A.; Mariati; Fahrudin, A.; Assegaf, A.

    2017-05-01

    Recently, EBT has been proven as the marker of airways inflammation like asthma and proposed as the non-invasive tool. Although EBT device has already been made but this device is rarely used for patients in Indonesia. The aim of this study is to develop a prototype which accurately measures EBT and is comfortably used by patients including children. This prototype was made using SHT11 as a sensor of EBT which is integrated on a thermal flask 0.5L. This flask filled up patient breath and the temperature of air breath was measured. The EBT of twelve healthy samples and seven samples with asthma was examined using this prototype, the measurement was done within three minutes for all of them. The test results of EBT on healthy samples obtained the median is 33.9°C within of 33.0°C - 34.7°C and EBT on asthma samples obtained median is 35.0°C within the range 34.9°C - 36.0°C.

  3. Peak expiratory flow, breath rate and blood pressure in adults with changes in particulate matter air pollution during the Beijing Olympics: a panel study.

    PubMed

    Mu, Lina; Deng, Furong; Tian, Lili; Li, Yanli; Swanson, Mya; Ying, Jingjing; Browne, Richard W; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Bonner, Matthew R

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to examine whether changes in short-term exposures to particulate matter are associated with changes in lung function, breath rate, and blood pressure among healthy adults and whether smoking status modifies the association. We took advantage of the artificially controlled changes in air pollution levels that occurred during the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, China and conducted a panel study of 201 Beijing residents. Data were collected before, during, and after the Olympics, respectively. Linear mixed-effect models and generalized estimating equation models were used to compare measurements of peak expiratory flow, breath rate and blood pressure across three time points. The mean values of peak expiratory flow were 346.0 L/min, 399.3 L/min, and 364.1L/min over the three study periods. Peak expiratory flow levels increased in 78% of the participants when comparing the during- with pre- Olympics time points, while peak expiratory flow levels decreased in 80% of participants for the post- and during-Olympic periods comparison. In subgroup analyses comparing the during-Olympic to pre-Olympic time points, we found a larger percentage change in peak expiratory flow (+17%) among female, younger and non-smoking participants than among male, elderly and smoking participants (+12%). The percentage of participants with a fast breath rate (>20/min) changed from 9.7% to 4.9% to 30.1% among females, and from 7.9% to 2.6% to 27.3% among males over the three time points. The changes in blood pressure over the three study periods were not very clear, although there is an increase in diastolic pressure and a decrease in pulse pressure among males during the games. The results suggest that exposure to different air pollution levels has significant effects on respiratory function. Smoking, age and gender appear to modify participants' biological response to changes in air quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Simultaneous measurement of breathing rate and heart rate using a microbend multimode fiber optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhihao; Lau, Doreen; Teo, Ju Teng; Ng, Soon Huat; Yang, Xiufeng; Kei, Pin Lin

    2014-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate the feasibility of using a highly sensitive microbend multimode fiber optic sensor for simultaneous measurement of breathing rate (BR) and heart rate (HR). The sensing system consists of a transceiver, microbend multimode fiber, and a computer. The transceiver is comprised of an optical transmitter, an optical receiver, and circuits for data communication with the computer via Bluetooth. Comparative experiments conducted between the sensor and predicate commercial physiologic devices showed an accuracy of ±2 bpm for both BR and HR measurement. Our preliminary study of simultaneous measurement of BR and HR in a clinical trial conducted on 11 healthy subjects during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also showed very good agreement with measurements obtained from conventional MR-compatible devices.

  5. Palpatory Method of Measuring Diastolic Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Dinesh; Bhaskaran, M

    2010-01-01

    Background: Most common method for measuring blood pressure is palpatory but only systolic pressure can be measured with this method. In this study we are describing palpatory method of measuring diastolic blood pressure as well. Patients & Methods: We have studied in 200 patients and compared systolic as well as diastolic blood pressures with two methods, auscutatory and palpatory. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured by one of the authors with new palpatory method and noted down. Then an independent observer, who was blinded to the palpatory method's values, measured blood pressure by auscultatory method and noted down. The values were compared in term of range and percentage. Results: The difference were analysed and found that 102 (51%) patients had systolic and diastolic blood pressure measured by palpatory method, within ± 2 mmHg of auscutatory method, 37 (19%) patients had within ± 4 mmHg, 52 (25%) patients had same readings as with auscutatory method, and in 9 (0.5%) patients it could not be measured. Conclusion: The palpatory method would be very useful where frequent blood pressure measurement are being done manually like in wards, in busy OPD, patient on treadmill and also whenever stethoscope is not available. The blood pressure can be measured in noisy environment too. PMID:21547184

  6. Development of a deep inspiration breath-hold system for radiotherapy utilizing a laser distance measurer.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Christer Andre; Skottner, Nils; Frengen, Jomar; Lund, Jo-Åsmund

    2017-01-01

    Deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) is a technique for treating left-sided breast cancer (LSBC). In modern radiotherapy, one of the main aims is to exclude the heart from the beam aperture with an individualized beam design for LSBC. A deep inhalation will raise the chest wall while the volume of the lungs increase, this will again push the heart away from the breast to be treated. There are a few commercial DIBH systems, both invasive and noninvasive. We present an alternative noninvasive DIBH system based upon an industrial laser distance measurer. This system can be installed in a treatment room at a low cost; it is very easy to use and requires limited amount of training for the personnel and the patient. The system is capable of measuring the position of the chest wall with high frequency and precision in real time. The patient views its breathing curve through video glasses, and gets instructions during the treatment session. The system is well tolerated by test subjects due to its noninvasiveness. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. [Effects of breathing high concentrations of oxygen on changes in blood indices during bicycle exercise].

    PubMed

    Nagata, A; Yoshida, M; Fuke, T; Miyazato, I; Shiba, K

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine effects of hyperoxic gas mixtures on changes of blood indices during bicycle exercise of human. Oxygen-enriched gases (30% O2) were inspired during the ramp load exercise of 25 watt/min. Changes of blood indices were analyzed with Sequential Multiple Analyzer with the computer (SMAC). The improvement of exercise performance were discussed about relationship between function of hyperoxic gas and physiological mechanism. Three experimental conditions were set as follows (I) 30% O2 +N2 gases balance, (II) air (21% O2), and (III) 30% O2 +2% CO2 +N2 gases balance. Arterial blood were sampled from the radial artery of the forearm in order to analyze following items; 1) pH level, PaO2, PaCO2, and HCO3 of these blood gases, 2) Blood sugar, TG, and F-CH of the blood contents, 3) red blood corpuscle, white blood corpuscle, Hb, and Ht values, 4) LDH, CK, GOT, and GPT of the blood enzymes, 5) TP, ALB, Na, K, Ca and Cl of the electric ions. In the case of inspiring hyperoxic gases, the recovery rate of blood indices increased after this ramp load exercise remarkably, and the whole exercise metabolism were removed from acidosis tendency to alkalosis value of the resting condition significantly. At hyperoxic experimental conditions, the blood sugar and oxygen consumption were much more decreased than these at normal oxygen content one during both states of exercise and recovery times. These data of the blood indices would support strongly to the hypothesis that improvement of oxygen delivery should be depended upon the enhanced performance with the hyperoxic gases. There might be effects of the hyperoxia on the cellular metabolism and on function of the vascular muscle during those aerobic exercise.

  8. Measuring Time-Averaged Blood Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Neil S.

    1988-01-01

    Device measures time-averaged component of absolute blood pressure in artery. Includes compliant cuff around artery and external monitoring unit. Ceramic construction in monitoring unit suppresses ebb and flow of pressure-transmitting fluid in sensor chamber. Transducer measures only static component of blood pressure.

  9. Measuring Time-Averaged Blood Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Neil S.

    1988-01-01

    Device measures time-averaged component of absolute blood pressure in artery. Includes compliant cuff around artery and external monitoring unit. Ceramic construction in monitoring unit suppresses ebb and flow of pressure-transmitting fluid in sensor chamber. Transducer measures only static component of blood pressure.

  10. Automatic blood pressure measuring system (M091)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The Leg Volume Measuring System is used to measure leg calf girth changes that occur during exposure to lower body negative pressure as a result of pooling of blood and other fluids in the lower extremities.

  11. Automatic blood pressure measuring system (M091)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The Leg Volume Measuring System is used to measure leg calf girth changes that occur during exposure to lower body negative pressure as a result of pooling of blood and other fluids in the lower extremities.

  12. Pancreatic islet blood flow and its measurement.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Leif; Barbu, Andreea; Bodin, Birgitta; Drott, Carl Johan; Espes, Daniel; Gao, Xiang; Grapensparr, Liza; Källskog, Örjan; Lau, Joey; Liljebäck, Hanna; Palm, Fredrik; Quach, My; Sandberg, Monica; Strömberg, Victoria; Ullsten, Sara; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic islets are richly vascularized, and islet blood vessels are uniquely adapted to maintain and support the internal milieu of the islets favoring normal endocrine function. Islet blood flow is normally very high compared with that to the exocrine pancreas and is autonomously regulated through complex interactions between the nervous system, metabolites from insulin secreting β-cells, endothelium-derived mediators, and hormones. The islet blood flow is normally coupled to the needs for insulin release and is usually disturbed during glucose intolerance and overt diabetes. The present review provides a brief background on islet vascular function and especially focuses on available techniques to measure islet blood perfusion. The gold standard for islet blood flow measurements in experimental animals is the microsphere technique, and its advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. In humans there are still no methods to measure islet blood flow selectively, but new developments in radiological techniques hold great hopes for the future.

  13. Pancreatic islet blood flow and its measurement

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Leif; Barbu, Andreea; Bodin, Birgitta; Drott, Carl Johan; Espes, Daniel; Gao, Xiang; Grapensparr, Liza; Källskog, Örjan; Lau, Joey; Liljebäck, Hanna; Palm, Fredrik; Quach, My; Sandberg, Monica; Strömberg, Victoria; Ullsten, Sara; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islets are richly vascularized, and islet blood vessels are uniquely adapted to maintain and support the internal milieu of the islets favoring normal endocrine function. Islet blood flow is normally very high compared with that to the exocrine pancreas and is autonomously regulated through complex interactions between the nervous system, metabolites from insulin secreting β-cells, endothelium-derived mediators, and hormones. The islet blood flow is normally coupled to the needs for insulin release and is usually disturbed during glucose intolerance and overt diabetes. The present review provides a brief background on islet vascular function and especially focuses on available techniques to measure islet blood perfusion. The gold standard for islet blood flow measurements in experimental animals is the microsphere technique, and its advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. In humans there are still no methods to measure islet blood flow selectively, but new developments in radiological techniques hold great hopes for the future. PMID:27124642

  14. The effect of flow trigger on rapid shallow breathing index measured through the ventilator.

    PubMed

    Kheir, Fayez; Myers, Leann; Desai, Neeraj R; Simeone, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    The rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has the best predictive value to assess readiness for weaning from mechanical ventilation. At many institutions, this index is conveniently measured without disconnecting the patient from the ventilator, but this method may be inaccurate. Because modern ventilators have a base flow in the flow trigger mode that may provide a substantial help to the patient, we hypothesized that the RSBI is significantly decreased when measured through the ventilator with flow trigger even without continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and pressure support (PS). The RSBI was calculated using the values of minute ventilation and respiratory rate obtained either through the digital display of the ventilator or from a digital ventilometer. The RSBI was measured using 3 different methods: method 1, CPAP and PS both 0 cm H2O with flow trigger; method 2, CPAP and PS both 0 cm H2O without flow trigger; and method 3, using digital ventilometer. A total of 165 measurements per method were obtained in 80 adult patients in the medical intensive care unit (MICU). The RSBI (breaths/min/L) values were 70.2 ± 26.5 with method 1, 85.4 ± 30.3 with method 2, and 80.1 ± 30.3 with method 3. The RSBI was significantly decreased using mechanical ventilation with flow trigger as compared with mechanical ventilation without flow trigger (P < .0001) or digital ventilometer (P < .0001). When method 1 was compared with methods 2 and 3, the RSBI decreased by 17% and 12%, respectively. The RSBI measurement is significantly decreased by the base flow delivered through modern ventilators in the flow trigger mode. If RSBI is measured through the ventilator in the flow trigger mode, the difference should be considered when using RSBI to assess readiness for weaning from mechanical ventilation. © The Author(s) 2013.

  15. Effects of intravenous terbutaline on heart rate, arterial pressure and blood gases in anesthetized horses breathing air.

    PubMed

    Arcaro, Isla; Fischer, Berit L; Lascola, Kara M; Clark-Price, Stuart C

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of intravenous (IV) administration of terbutaline on PaO2, PaCO2, pH, heart rate (HR) and arterial pressures in healthy, laterally recumbent horses breathing ambient air under total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA). Prospective experimental study. Eight healthy adult horses were enrolled. Six horses, four mares and two geldings weighing 433-624 kg, completed the study. Horses were sedated with xylazine (1.0 mg kg(-1)) IV for placement of arterial and venous catheters. Anesthesia was induced with midazolam (0.1 mg kg(-1)) and ketamine (2.2 mg kg(-1)) IV and maintained with an IV infusion of guaifenesin (50 mg mL(-1)), ketamine (2 mg mL(-1)) and xylazine (0.5 mg mL(-1)) at 1.9 ± 0.3 mL kg(-1) hour(-1). Horses were in left lateral recumbency and breathed air spontaneously. Arterial blood was collected for pH and blood gas analysis during xylazine sedation, 15 minutes after induction of anesthesia, immediately before and 5, 15 and 30 minutes after administration of terbutaline (2 μg kg(-1)), and when the horse was standing after recovery from anesthesia. HR, systolic (SAP), mean (MAP) and diastolic (DAP) arterial pressures were recorded at 5 minute intervals during anesthesia. Normal data were analyzed with anova and non-normal data were analyzed with a Friedman test with a p < 0.05 considered significant. The mean PaO2 decreased from baseline to <60 mmHg (8.0 kPa) during anesthesia (p < 0.0001) and did not improve after administration of terbutaline. After terbutaline administration, HR increased (p = 0.002), and SAP, MAP and DAP decreased (p < 0.001) with the greatest changes occurring immediately after terbutaline administration. Terbutaline (2 μg kg(-1)) IV did not improve PaO2 and was associated with adverse cardiovascular effects during TIVA in healthy, laterally recumbent horses breathing air. Copyright © 2016 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier

  16. The Effect of Breathing Elevated CO2 Gas Mixtures on Tracking Performance, Blood Pressure, and Subjective Tolerance at 1Gz

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    subjects. The following is a collection of those comments. Mlen breathing the air mixture six subjects reported no problem and one subject reported an...complained of being short of breath ; the remainirg five subjects reported no problems with 100% 0 2* During the exposure to 2.5% CO2 , one subject...more difficult to breathe than breathing ambient air. The remaining five reported no problems . Using 3.5% CO2, one subject aborted after being on the

  17. Principles and techniques of blood pressure measurement

    PubMed Central

    Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Pickering, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Although the mercury sphygmomanometer is widely regarded as the “gold standard” for office blood pressure measurement, the ban on use of mercury devices continues to diminish their role in office and hospital settings. To date, mercury devices have largely been phased out in US hospitals. This has led to the proliferation of non-mercury devices and has changed (probably for ever) the preferable modality of blood pressure measurement in clinic and hospital settings. In this article, the basic techniques of blood pressure measurement and the technical issues associated with measurements in clinical practice are discussed. The devices currently available for hospital and clinic measurements and their important sources of error are presented. Practical advice is given on how the different devices and measurement techniques should be used. Blood pressure measurements in different circumstances and in special populations such as infants, children, pregnant women, elderly persons, and obese subjects are discussed. PMID:20937442

  18. Using the noninvasive (13)C-sucrose breath test to measure intestinal sucrase activity in swine.

    PubMed

    Terry, Robyn; van Wettere, William H E J; Whittaker, Alexandra L; Herde, Paul J; Howarth, Gordon S

    2012-12-01

    The sucrose breath test (SBT) is a simple noninvasive technique used currently to determine intestinal absorptive function in humans and rodents. However, to date, the test has not been adapted for use in swine. During weaning, intestinal sucrase activity in piglets temporarily declines in response to stressors and is commonly used as a marker of the intestinal response to weaning. Here we assessed the sucrose dose needed for using the SBT in piglets. Six randomly allocated piglets were orogastrically gavaged with (13)C-labeled sucrose at a dose of 2 g/kg; breath samples were collected for measurement of (13)CO2 on days 0 (approximately 17 h after weaning), 5, and 10 after weaning. The resultant SBT value (cumulative dose at 90 min) was decreased by 46% on day 5 after weaning relative to baseline levels, consistent with temporal changes in gastrointestinal sucrase activity associated with weaning. We conclude that a sucrose dose of 2 g/kg is satisfactory to conduct SBT studies in piglets. With further development, the SBT may provide a new tool to noninvasively monitor digestive function in weaned piglets, to assess the effects of nutritional strategies on intestinal health, and as an indicator of gut integrity and function in swine models of human gastrointestinal disease.

  19. Using the Noninvasive 13C-Sucrose Breath Test to Measure Intestinal Sucrase Activity in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Robyn; van Wettere, William HEJ; Whittaker, Alexandra L; Herde, Paul J; Howarth, Gordon S

    2012-01-01

    The sucrose breath test (SBT) is a simple noninvasive technique used currently to determine intestinal absorptive function in humans and rodents. However, to date, the test has not been adapted for use in swine. During weaning, intestinal sucrase activity in piglets temporarily declines in response to stressors and is commonly used as a marker of the intestinal response to weaning. Here we assessed the sucrose dose needed for using the SBT in piglets. Six randomly allocated piglets were orogastrically gavaged with 13C-labeled sucrose at a dose of 2 g/kg; breath samples were collected for measurement of 13CO2 on days 0 (approximately 17 h after weaning), 5, and 10 after weaning. The resultant SBT value (cumulative dose at 90 min) was decreased by 46% on day 5 after weaning relative to baseline levels, consistent with temporal changes in gastrointestinal sucrase activity associated with weaning. We conclude that a sucrose dose of 2 g/kg is satisfactory to conduct SBT studies in piglets. With further development, the SBT may provide a new tool to noninvasively monitor digestive function in weaned piglets, to assess the effects of nutritional strategies on intestinal health, and as an indicator of gut integrity and function in swine models of human gastrointestinal disease. PMID:23561884

  20. A New Differential Pressure Flow Meter for Measurement of Human Breath Flow: Simulation and Experimental Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Bridgeman, Devon; Tsow, Francis; Xian, Xiaojun; Forzani, Erica

    2016-01-01

    The development and performance characterization of a new differential pressure-based flow meter for human breath measurements is presented in this article. The device, called a “Confined Pitot Tube,” is comprised of a pipe with an elliptically shaped expansion cavity located in the pipe center, and an elliptical disk inside the expansion cavity. The elliptical disk, named Pitot Tube, is exchangeable, and has different diameters, which are smaller than the diameter of the elliptical cavity. The gap between the disk and the cavity allows the flow of human breath to pass through. The disk causes an obstruction in the flow inside the pipe, but the elliptical cavity provides an expansion for the flow to circulate around the disk, decreasing the overall flow resistance. We characterize the new sensor flow experimentally and theoretically, using Comsol Multiphysics® software with laminar and turbulent models. We also validate the sensor, using inhalation and exhalation tests and a reference method. PMID:27818521

  1. Development of a questionnaire for measuring health-related quality of life among children and adolescents with mouth breathing.

    PubMed

    Leal, Rossana B; Gomes, Monalisa C; Granville-Garcia, Ana F; Goes, Paulo S A; de Menezes, Valdenice A

    2015-01-01

    Mouth breathing can exert an influence on quality of life and should be evaluated within a multidimensional context. However, there is no specific questionnaire to measure the impact of mouth breathing on quality of life. To develop and validate a questionnaire for measuring the impact of mouth breathing on quality of life among children and adolescents. Thirty-six items were evaluated by six health care professionals, one parent and one child with mouth breathing. After a qualitative evaluation, a modified set of 32 items was developed. The modified Mouth Breather Quality of Life (MBQoL) questionnaire was submitted to a pretest with a sample of 30 children and adolescents diagnosed with mouth breathing to evaluate comprehension, the order of the items, and the form of administration. The MBQoL questionnaire was then administered to 60 children and adolescents (30 mouth breathers and 30 nose breathers) for the evaluation of construct validity, internal consistency, and reproducibility. All the participants answered the questionnaire, and 50% of each group answered the questionnaire a second time after a 1-week interval (test-retest). Higher MBQoL scores (which indicated poorer quality of life) were significantly associated with mouth breathing. The Cronbach α coefficient for the items of the questionnaire was 0.88, and the Spearman correlation coefficient for test-retest reliability demonstrated that the questionnaire was reproducible (r = 0.993; p < 0.01). Through this validation study, the MBQoL questionnaire demonstrated a good performance in the evaluation of the quality of life of children and adolescents with mouth breathing and may be a useful tool in clinical studies as well as public health programs. However, further studies are needed to establish its applicability in other populations with respiration disorders.

  2. Accurate, reproducible measurement of blood pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, N R; Chockalingam, A; Fodor, J G; McKay, D W

    1990-01-01

    The diagnosis of mild hypertension and the treatment of hypertension require accurate measurement of blood pressure. Blood pressure readings are altered by various factors that influence the patient, the techniques used and the accuracy of the sphygmomanometer. The variability of readings can be reduced if informed patients prepare in advance by emptying their bladder and bowel, by avoiding over-the-counter vasoactive drugs the day of measurement and by avoiding exposure to cold, caffeine consumption, smoking and physical exertion within half an hour before measurement. The use of standardized techniques to measure blood pressure will help to avoid large systematic errors. Poor technique can account for differences in readings of more than 15 mm Hg and ultimately misdiagnosis. Most of the recommended procedures are simple and, when routinely incorporated into clinical practice, require little additional time. The equipment must be appropriate and in good condition. Physicians should have a suitable selection of cuff sizes readily available; the use of the correct cuff size is essential to minimize systematic errors in blood pressure measurement. Semiannual calibration of aneroid sphygmomanometers and annual inspection of mercury sphygmomanometers and blood pressure cuffs are recommended. We review the methods recommended for measuring blood pressure and discuss the factors known to produce large differences in blood pressure readings. PMID:2192791

  3. Implanted Blood-Pressure-Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischell, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    Arterial pressure compared with ambient bodily-fluid pressure. Implanted apparatus, capable of measuring blood pressure of patient, includes differential-pressure transducer connected to pressure sensor positioned in major artery. Electrical signal is function of differential pressure between blood-pressure sensor and reference-pressure sensor transmitted through skin of patient to recorder or indicator.

  4. Bad Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Bad Breath KidsHealth > For Kids > Bad Breath A A ... visit your dentist or doctor . continue What Causes Bad Breath? Here are three common causes of bad ...

  5. Transcutaneous measurement of volume blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, R. E.; Mcleod, F. D.; Miller, C. W.; Histand, M. B.; Wells, M. K.

    1974-01-01

    Blood flow velocity measurements, using Doppler velocimeter, are described. The ability to measure blood velocity using ultrasound is derived from the Doppler effect; the change in frequency which occurs when sound is reflected or transmitted from a moving target. When ultrasound of the appropriate frequency is transmitted through a moving blood stream, the blood cells act as point scatterers of ultrasonic energy. If this scattered ultrasonic energy is detected, it is found to be shifted in frequency according to the velocity of the blood cells, nu, the frequency of the incident sound, f sub o, the speed of sound in the medium, c, and the angle between the sound beam and the velocity vector, o. The relation describing this effect is known as the Doppler equation. Delta f = 2 f sub o x nu x cos alpha/c. The theoretical and experimental methods are evaluated.

  6. Bymixer provides on-line calibration of measurement of CO2 volume exhaled per breath.

    PubMed

    Breen, P H; Serina, E R

    1997-01-01

    The measurement of CO2 volume exhaled per breath (VCO2.br) can be determined during anesthesia by the multiplication and integration of tidal flow (V) and PCO2. During side-stream capnometry, PCO2 must be advanced in time by transport delay (TD), the time to suction gas through the sampling tube. During ventilation, TD can vary due to sample line connection internal volume or flow rate changes. To determine correct TD and measure accurate VCO2.br during actual ventilation. TD can be iteratively adjusted (TDADJ) until VCO2-br/tidal volume equals PCO2 measured in a mixed expired gas collection (PECO2) (J Appl. Physiol. 72:2029-2035, 1992). However. PECO2 is difficult to measure during anesthesia because CO2 is absorbed in the circle circuit. Accordingly, we implemented a bypass flow-mixing chamber device (bymixer) that was interposed in the expiration limb of the circle circuit and accurately measured PECO2 over a wide range of conditions of ventilation of a test lung-metabolic chamber (regression slope = 1.01: R2 = 0.99). The bymixer response (time constant) varied from 18.1 +/- 0.03 sec (12.5 l/min ventilation) to 66.7 +/- 0.9 sec (2.5 l/min). Bymixer PECO2 was used to correctly determine TDADJ (without interrupting respiration) to enable accurate measurement of VCO2.br over widely changing expiratory flow patterns.

  7. Working meeting on blood pressure measurement: suggestions for measuring blood pressure to use in populations surveys.

    PubMed

    2003-11-01

    As part of the Pan American Hypertension Initiative (PAHI), the Pan American Health Organization and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health of the United States of America conducted a working meeting to discuss blood pressure (BP) measurement methods used in various hypertension prevalence surveys and clinical trials, with the objective of developing a BP measurement protocol for use in hypertension prevalence surveys in the Americas. No such common protocol has existed in the Americas, so it has been difficult to compare hypertension prevention and intervention strategies. This piece describes a proposed standard method for measuring blood pressure for use in population surveys in the Region of the Americas. The piece covers: considerations for developing a common blood pressure measurement protocol, critical issues in measuring blood pressure in national surveys, minimum procedures for blood pressure measurement during surveillance, and quality assessment of blood pressure.

  8. Measurement of acetaldehyde in exhaled breath using a laser absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamat, Pratyuma C.; Roller, Chad B.; Namjou, Khosrow; Jeffers, James D.; Faramarzalian, Ali; Salas, Rodolfo; McCann, Patrick J.

    2007-07-01

    A high-resolution liquid-nitrogen-free mid-infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) system was used to perform real-time measurement of acetaldehyde concentrations in human exhaled breath following ingestion of an alcoholic beverage. Acetaldehyde absorption features were measured near 5.79 μm (1727 cm-1) using a IV-VI semiconductor laser, a 100 m long path optical gas cell, and second- harmonic detection coupled with wavelength modulation. Acetaldehyde levels were measured with a minimum detection limit of 80 ppb for 5 s integration time. The variations in exhaled acetaldehyde levels over time were analyzed prior to and following ingestion of two different amounts of white wine. A method to calibrate acetaldehyde measurements internally using water vapor absorption lines was investigated to eliminate the need for system calibration with gas standards. The potential of a TDLAS system to be used as a noninvasive clinical tool for measurements of large volatile compounds with possible applications in cancer detection is demonstrated.

  9. Measurement of acetaldehyde in exhaled breath using a laser absorption spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Pratyuma C; Roller, Chad B; Namjou, Khosrow; Jeffers, James D; Faramarzalian, Ali; Salas, Rodolfo; McCann, Patrick J

    2007-07-01

    A high-resolution liquid-nitrogen-free mid-infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) system was used to perform real-time measurement of acetaldehyde concentrations in human exhaled breath following ingestion of an alcoholic beverage. Acetaldehyde absorption features were measured near 5.79 mum (1727 cm(-1)) using a IV-VI semiconductor laser, a 100 m long path optical gas cell, and second- harmonic detection coupled with wavelength modulation. Acetaldehyde levels were measured with a minimum detection limit of 80 ppb for 5 s integration time. The variations in exhaled acetaldehyde levels over time were analyzed prior to and following ingestion of two different amounts of white wine. A method to calibrate acetaldehyde measurements internally using water vapor absorption lines was investigated to eliminate the need for system calibration with gas standards. The potential of a TDLAS system to be used as a noninvasive clinical tool for measurements of large volatile compounds with possible applications in cancer detection is demonstrated.

  10. Reproducibility of hypocapnic cerebrovascular reactivity measurements using BOLD fMRI in combination with a paced deep breathing task.

    PubMed

    Sousa, I; Vilela, P; Figueiredo, P

    2014-09-01

    It has recently been proposed that hypocapnic cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) can be assessed by measuring the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response to paced deep breathing (PDB) tasks inducing mild hypocapnia and vasoconstriction. In this work, we aim to assess the test-retest reproducibility and inter-subject variability of BOLD CVR measurements obtained using a PDB task and different methods to analyse the associated BOLD signal. The respiratory protocol consisted of alternating 40s of PDB with normal free breathing; expired CO2 pressure levels (PETCO2) were continuously monitored. CVR was quantified using either a timecourse curve analysis (TCA) approach, where the magnitude of response peaks is emphasized, or general linear modelling (GLM) including optimisation of the BOLD response latencies. The GLM fit was carried out using two types of response regressors: one that was computed as the convolution of PETCO2 traces with a gamma function and another that consisted of the convolution of PDB paradigm blocks with a physiological model of the respiratory response. Haemodynamic response latencies were optimised either on a voxel basis or for the whole imaging region. We found that the GLM method based on PDB task or PETCO2 traces and voxelwise optimisation of response latencies provided the most reproducible measures of CVR. For the average grey matter CVR, the inter-subject coefficient of variation (CVinter) / intra-subject coefficient of variation (CVintra) / intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) were 20%/8%/0.8 and 27%/8%/0.9, using the task and PETCO2 timecourses, respectively. In terms of the spatial reproducibility, the group mean (±standard deviation) of the spatial ICC (ICCspatial) was 1.04±0.23 and 1.02±0.26, for the task and PETCO2 timecourses, respectively. These results indicate generally good reproducibility of the hypocapnic CVR maps obtained using the proposed PDB task and analysis methodology. This suggests that such protocol

  11. Retinal blood flow during hyperoxia in humans revisited: concerted results using different measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Barbara; Polska, Elzbieta; Dorner, Guido; Polak, Kaija; Findl, Oliver; Mayrl, Gabriele Fuchsjäger; Eichler, Hans-Georg; Wolzt, Michael; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2002-07-01

    Retinal vasculature shows pronounced vasoconstriction in response to hyperoxia, which appears to be related to the constant oxygen demand of the retina. However, the exact amount of blood flow reduction and the exact time course of this phenomenon are still a matter of debate. We set out to investigate the retinal response to hyperoxia using innovative techniques for the assessment of retinal hemodynamics. In a total of 48 healthy volunteers we studied the effect of 100% O(2) breathing on retinal blood flow using two methods. Red blood cell movement in larger retinal veins was quantified with combined laser Doppler velocimetry and retinal vessel size measurement. Retinal white blood cell movement was quantified with the blue field entoptic technique. The time course of retinal vasoconstriction in response to hyperoxia was assessed by continuous vessel size determination using the Zeiss retinal vessel analyzer. The response to hyperoxia as measured with combined laser Doppler velocimetry and vessel size measurement was almost twice as high as that observed with the blue field technique. Vasoconstriction in response to 100% O(2) breathing occurred within the first 5 min and no counterregulatory or adaptive mechanisms were observed. Based on these results we hypothesize that hyperoxia-induced vasoconstriction differentially affects red and white blood cell movement in the human retina. This hypothesis is based on the complex interactions between red and white blood cells in microcirculation, which have been described in detail for other vascular beds.

  12. Gastric emptying of a liquid nutrient meal in the critically ill: relationship between scintigraphic and carbon breath test measurement.

    PubMed

    Chapman, M J; Besanko, L K; Burgstad, C M; Fraser, R J; Bellon, M; O'Connor, S; Russo, A; Jones, K L; Lange, K; Nguyen, N Q; Bartholomeusz, F; Chatterton, B; Horowitz, M

    2011-10-01

    It is assumed that delayed gastric emptying (GE) occurs frequently in critical illness; however, the prevalence of slow GE has not previously been assessed using scintigraphy. Furthermore, breath tests could potentially provide a convenient method of quantifying GE, but have not been validated in this setting. The aims of this study were to (i) determine the prevalence of delayed GE in unselected, critically ill patients and (ii) evaluate the relationships between GE as measured by scintigraphy and carbon breath test. Prospective observational study. Mixed medical/surgical intensive care unit. 25 unselected, mechanically ventilated patients (age 66 years (49-72); and 14 healthy subjects (age 62 years (19-84)). GE was measured using scintigraphy and (14)C-breath test. A test meal of 100 ml Ensure (standard liquid feed) labelled with (14)C octanoic acid and (99m)Technetium sulphur colloid was placed in the stomach via a nasogastric tube. Gastric 'meal' retention (scintigraphy) at 60, 120, 180 and 240 min, breath test t(50) (BTt(50)), and GE coefficient were determined. Of the 24 patients with scintigraphic data, GE was delayed at 120 min in 12 (50%). Breath tests correlated well with scintigraphy in both patients and healthy subjects (% retention at 120 min vs BTt(50); r(2)=0.57 healthy; r(2)=0.56 patients; p≤0.002 for both). GE of liquid nutrient is delayed in approximately 50% of critically ill patients. Breath tests correlate well with scintigraphy and are a valid method of GE measurement in this group.

  13. Shortness of Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... with blood clots in the legs or pelvis (deep venous thrombosis), debilitating medical conditions, immobility, or inherited ... it hard for a person to take a deep breath, which usually results in retention of carbon ...

  14. Serial measurements of the rapid-shallow-breathing index as a predictor of weaning outcome in elderly medical patients.

    PubMed

    Krieger, B P; Isber, J; Breitenbucher, A; Throop, G; Ershowsky, P

    1997-10-01

    To determine the usefulness of serial measurements of the rapid-shallow-breathing index (f/VT) as a predictor for successfully weaning elderly medical patients from mechanical ventilator support using a threshold value (< or =130) derived specifically for this population. Prospective observational study using parameters suggested from retrospective analysis. Medical ICUs of a university-affiliated private teaching hospital. Using data obtained from a retrospective analysis of 10 medical patients > or =70 years old who had failed weaning, 49 additional medical patients older than 70 years were studied prospectively. Standard weaning parameters were determined using a hand-held spirometer. Respiratory rate (f, breaths/min) and tidal volume (VT, liters) were measured at the beginning of a spontaneous breathing trial and hourly thereafter for up to 5 h using the same hand-held spirometer. Retrospective analysis showed that the published threshold value for f/VT (< or =105) had poor predictability for weaning success when measured at the beginning of the weaning trial. In the 9 of 10 patients who failed to wean in the retrospective review, the f/VT increased to > 130 as the trial progressed over 2 to 3 h. Using an f/VT < or =130 as the threshold value for prospectively predicting successful weaning, the diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value increased from 84%, 92%, 57%, 87%, and 67%, respectively, when measured at the beginning of the weaning trial to 92%, 93%, 89%, 97%, and 80%, respectively, when measured 3 h later. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for f/VT also improved from 0.81 to 0.93. Serial measurements of the rapid-shallow-breathing index in medical elderly patients during a period of spontaneous breathing can accurately predict the ability to be successfully weaned from mechanical ventilator support.

  15. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure in children with sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Amin, Raouf S; Carroll, John L; Jeffries, Jenny L; Grone, Charles; Bean, Judy A; Chini, Barbara; Bokulic, Ronald; Daniels, Stephen R

    2004-04-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea causes intermittent elevation of systemic blood pressure (BP) during sleep. To determine whether obstructive apnea in children has a tonic effect on diurnal BP, 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure was obtained from 60 children with mean age of 10.8 +/- 3.5 years. Thirty-nine children had obstructive apnea and 21 had primary snoring. Children with obstructive apnea had significantly greater mean BP variability during wakefulness and sleep, a higher night-to-day systolic BP, and a smaller nocturnal dipping of mean BP. Variability of mean arterial pressure during wakefulness was predicted by the desaturation, body mass, and arousal indices, whereas variability during sleep was predicted by apnea-hypopnea and body mass indices. Nocturnal BP dipping was predicted by the desaturation index. There were no significant differences in systolic, diastolic, or mean arterial BP during sleep between the groups. Diastolic BP during wakefulness was significantly different between the groups and correlated negatively with apnea-hypopnea index. We conclude that obstructive apnea in children is associated with 24-hour BP dysregulation and that, independent of obesity, the frequency of obstructive apnea, oxygen desaturation, and arousal contributes to abnormal BP control.

  16. Phase Synchronization of Hemodynamic Variables at Rest and after Deep Breathing Measured during the Course of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Papousek, Ilona; Roessler, Andreas; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut; Lang, Uwe; Kolovetsiou-Kreiner, Vassiliki

    2013-01-01

    Background The autonomic nervous system plays a central role in the functioning of systems critical for the homeostasis maintenance. However, its role in the cardiovascular adaptation to pregnancy-related demands is poorly understood. We explored the maternal cardiovascular systems throughout pregnancy to quantify pregnancy-related autonomic nervous system adaptations. Methodology Continuous monitoring of heart rate (R-R interval; derived from the 3-lead electrocardiography), blood pressure, and thoracic impedance was carried out in thirty-six women at six time-points throughout pregnancy. In order to quantify in addition to the longitudinal effects on baseline levels throughout gestation the immediate adaptive heart rate and blood pressure changes at each time point, a simple reflex test, deep breathing, was applied. Consequently, heart rate variability and blood pressure variability in the low (LF) and high (HF) frequency range, respiration and baroreceptor sensitivity were analyzed in resting conditions and after deep breathing. The adjustment of the rhythms of the R-R interval, blood pressure and respiration partitioned for the sympathetic and the parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system were quantified by the phase synchronization index γ, which has been adopted from the analysis of weakly coupled chaotic oscillators. Results Heart rate and LF/HF ratio increased throughout pregnancy and these effects were accompanied by a continuous loss of baroreceptor sensitivity. The increases in heart rate and LF/HF ratio levels were associated with an increasing decline in the ability to flexibly respond to additional demands (i.e., diminished adaptive responses to deep breathing). The phase synchronization index γ showed that the observed effects could be explained by a decreased coupling of respiration and the cardiovascular system (HF components of heart rate and blood pressure). Conclusions/Significance The findings suggest that during the course of

  17. Ultrasonic Blood Flow Measurement in Haemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, D.; Papadimitriou, M.; Kulatilake, A. E.

    1970-01-01

    A 5-megacycle Doppler flow meter, calibrated in-vitro, was found to give a linear response to blood flow in the ranges commonly encountered in haemodialysis. With this, blood flow through artificial kidneys could be measured simply and with a clinically acceptable error. The method is safe, as blood lines do not have to be punctured or disconnected and hence there is no risk of introducing infection. Besides its value as a research tool the flow meter is useful in evaluating new artificial kidneys. Suitably modified it could form the basis of an arterial flow alarm system. PMID:5416812

  18. The relation between spirometric measurements and arterial blood gas analysis in patients with chronic airflow obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shibel, Elaine M.; Moser, Kenneth M.

    1970-01-01

    Spirometric studies and arterial blood gas analyses were statistically evaluated in 75 patients with chronic airways obstruction to determine whether any spirometric parameters can predict arterial blood gas status. Radioactive lung scans, both ventilation (using 133Xe gas) and perfusion (using 131I-MAA), were performed in selected patients. In all 75 patients as one group, no spirometric parameter correlated with resting arterial blood gases. Comparing spirometric values with arterial blood studies during exercise, 5% carbon dioxide breathing and 100% oxygen breathing revealed no consistently predictive correlation coefficients. Ventilation and perfusion lung scanning revealed that in patients whose ventilation/perfusion (V̇/Q) `match' was good, arterial blood gases approached normal, while hypoxaemia and/or hypercapnia were present when V̇/Q relationships were disturbed. Spirometry measures static and dynamic lung volumes, reflecting the mechanical and structural status of the lung-bellows system. Arterial blood gas status is conditioned by severe factors, including V̇/Q relationship, and can be determined accurately only by measurement in each individual patient. Images PMID:5489184

  19. Use of short-term breath measures to estimate daily methane production by cattle.

    PubMed

    Velazco, J I; Mayer, D G; Zimmerman, S; Hegarty, R S

    2016-01-01

    Methods to measure enteric methane (CH4) emissions from individual ruminants in their production environment are required to validate emission inventories and verify mitigation claims. Estimates of daily methane production (DMP) based on consolidated short-term emission measurements are developing, but method verification is required. Two cattle experiments were undertaken to test the hypothesis that DMP estimated by averaging multiple short-term breath measures of methane emission rate did not differ from DMP measured in respiration chambers (RC). Short-term emission rates were obtained from a GreenFeed Emissions Monitoring (GEM) unit, which measured emission rate while cattle consumed a dispensed supplement. In experiment 1 (Expt. 1), four non-lactating cattle (LW=518 kg) were adapted for 18 days then measured for six consecutive periods. Each period consisted of 2 days of ad libitum intake and GEM emission measurement followed by 1 day in the RC. A prototype GEM unit releasing water as an attractant (GEM water) was also evaluated in Expt. 1. Experiment 2 (Expt. 2) was a larger study based on similar design with 10 cattle (LW=365 kg), adapted for 21 days and GEM measurement was extended to 3 days in each of the six periods. In Expt. 1, there was no difference in DMP estimated by the GEM unit relative to the RC (209.7 v. 215.1 g CH(4)/day) and no difference between these methods in methane yield (MY, 22.7 v. 23.7 g CH(4)/kg of dry matter intake, DMI). In Expt. 2, the correlation between GEM and RC measures of DMP and MY were assessed using 95% confidence intervals, with no difference in DMP or MY between methods and high correlations between GEM and RC measures for DMP (r=0.85; 215 v. 198 g CH(4)/day SEM=3.0) and for MY (r=0.60; 23.8 v. 22.1 g CH(4)/kg DMI SEM=0.42). When data from both experiments was combined neither DMP nor MY differed between GEM- and RC-based measures (P>0.05). GEM water-based estimates of DMP and MY were lower than RC and GEM (P<0

  20. Biological monitoring techniques for human exposure to industrial chemicals. Analysis of human fat, skin, nails, hair, blood, urine, and breath

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon, L.; Umana, M.; Bursey, J.; Gutknecht, W.; Handy, R.; Hyldburg, P.; Michael, L.; Moseley, A.; Raymer, J.; Smith, D.

    1986-01-01

    Biological monitoring techniques for human exposure to industrial chemicals are detailed in this book which surveys and evaluates methods and procedures to identify and quantitative chemical constituents in human tissues and body fluids, including fat, skin, nails, hair, blood, urine, and breath. The book details attempts to determine 1) the feasibility of correlating preferred methods with specific tissues or fluids and/or with readily identifiable chemical characteristics, and 2) which biological matrices serve as the best indicators of past or present exposure to chemical constituents of concern. The methods studied have been evaluated of their ease and rapidly, as well as cost, accuracy and precision. Target compounds studied were those inorganic and organic chemicals basically of current or previous concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Information provided for the methods evaluated includes sections regarding various types of instrumentation and sample preparation. Sections on method/analyte correlation suggest physical or chemical properties which might be used to predict the applicability of a given analytical method to the analysis of that chemical in a specific biological matrix.

  1. The effect of equipment dead space on multiple breath washout measures

    PubMed Central

    Benseler, Anouk; Stanojevic S, Sanja; Jensen, Renee; Gustafsson, Per; Ratjen, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Background & Objective Multiple Breath Washout (MBW) systems are designed to minimize equipment dead space volume (Vd). Animal and infant studies have demonstrated the impact of increased Vd on MBW measurements. In this study we investigate the effect of Vd of a N2MBW system affects MBW measurements in preschool children. Methods N2MBW measurements were performed in healthy adults under standard conditions; Vd was added to match the relationship between Vd and lung volumes observed in preschool children. Subsequently, subjects were measured on a SF6MBW system under standard conditions, and with Vd added to match that of the N2MBW system. Healthy preschool children and children with cystic fibrosis were tested on both the N2MBW and SF6MBW in random order on the same day. A correction equation was derived based on the adult experiments and tested on the preschool data. Results Increasing the Vd of the N2MBW system resulted in a higher Lung Clearance Index (LCI). A strong non-linear relationship between N2LCI and the Vd/Vt was observed. When the Vd was equivalent between systems, LCI measured by the SF6MBW system was similar to that measured by the N2MBW. LCI was higher on the N2MBW than the SF6MBW in preschool children. Correcting for the equipment Vd of the N2MBW resulted in better agreement. Conclusions Equipment Vd affects LCI measurements, especially in young children where Vd is large relative to lung volumes. PMID:25605535

  2. Bilirubin production in healthy term infants as measured by carbon monoxide in breath.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D K; Vreman, H J; Oh, W; Fanaroff, A A; Wright, L L; Lemons, J A; Verter, J; Shankaran, S; Tyson, J E; Korones, S B

    1994-10-01

    To describe total bilirubin production in healthy term infants, we measured the end-tidal breath CO, corrected for ambient CO (ETCOc), with an automated sampler and electrochemical (EC) CO instrument. For infants of mothers with a negative Coombs' test, the ETCOc was 1.3 +/- 0.7 microL/L (n = 397) and the serum bilirubin on day 3 postpartum was 73 +/- 35 mg/L (n = 381). In contrast, the ETCOc for infants with ABO or Rh incompatibility, a positive direct Coombs' test, and bilirubin > 130 mg/L (n = 9) was significantly higher, 1.8 +/- 0.8 microL/L, than for those who had a positive Coombs' test result but whose bilirubin was < or = 130 mg/L (n = 12), 1.0 +/- 0.5 microL/L (P < 0.05). At 2 to 8 h postpartum seven term babies from mothers with insulin-dependent diabetes had ETCOc of 1.8 +/- 0.7 microL/L, significantly higher than that in the other term infants [1.3 +/- 0.7 microL/L (n = 390), P < 0.04]. Their bilirubin concentration at 72 +/- 12 h was also higher: 121 +/- 45 mg/L (n = 7) vs 73 +/- 34 mg/L (n = 374; P = 0.03). We conclude that ETCOc measurements may be helpful in understanding the mechanisms of jaundice in healthy term infants in a variety of conditions.

  3. Clinical utility of breath ammonia for evaluation of ammonia physiology in healthy and cirrhotic adults.

    PubMed

    Spacek, Lisa A; Mudalel, Matthew; Tittel, Frank; Risby, Terence H; Solga, Steven F

    2015-12-14

    Blood ammonia is routinely used in clinical settings to assess systemic ammonia in hepatic encephalopathy and urea cycle disorders. Despite its drawbacks, blood measurement is often used as a comparator in breath studies because it is a standard clinical test. We sought to evaluate sources of measurement error and potential clinical utility of breath ammonia compared to blood ammonia. We measured breath ammonia in real time by quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectrometry and blood ammonia in 10 healthy and 10 cirrhotic participants. Each participant contributed 5 breath samples and blood for ammonia measurement within 1 h. We calculated the coefficient of variation (CV) for 5 breath ammonia values, reported medians of healthy and cirrhotic participants, and used scatterplots to display breath and blood ammonia. For healthy participants, mean age was 22 years (±4), 70% were men, and body mass index (BMI) was 27 (±5). For cirrhotic participants, mean age was 61 years (±8), 60% were men, and BMI was 31 (±7). Median blood ammonia for healthy participants was within normal range, 10 μmol L(-1) (interquartile range (IQR), 3-18) versus 46 μmol L(-1) (IQR, 23-66) for cirrhotic participants. Median breath ammonia was 379 pmol mL(-1) CO2 (IQR, 265-765) for healthy versus 350 pmol mL(-1) CO2 (IQR, 180-1013) for cirrhotic participants. CV was 17  ±  6%. There remains an important unmet need in the evaluation of systemic ammonia, and breath measurement continues to demonstrate promise to fulfill this need. Given the many differences between breath and blood ammonia measurement, we examined biological explanations for our findings in healthy and cirrhotic participants. We conclude that based upon these preliminary data breath may offer clinically important information this is not provided by blood ammonia.

  4. Clinical utility of breath ammonia for evaluation of ammonia physiology in healthy and cirrhotic adults

    PubMed Central

    Spacek, Lisa A; Mudalel, Matthew; Tittel, Frank; Risby, Terence H; Solga, Steven F

    2016-01-01

    Blood ammonia is routinely used in clinical settings to assess systemic ammonia in hepatic encephalopathy and urea cycle disorders. Despite its drawbacks, blood measurement is often used as a comparator in breath studies because it is a standard clinical test. We sought to evaluate sources of measurement error and potential clinical utility of breath ammonia compared to blood ammonia. We measured breath ammonia in real time by quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectrometry and blood ammonia in 10 healthy and 10 cirrhotic participants. Each participant contributed 5 breath samples and blood for ammonia measurement within 1 h. We calculated the coefficient of variation (CV) for 5 breath ammonia values, reported medians of healthy and cirrhotic participants, and used scatterplots to display breath and blood ammonia. For healthy participants, mean age was 22 years (±4), 70% were men, and body mass index (BMI) was 27 (±5). For cirrhotic participants, mean age was 61 years (±8), 60% were men, and BMI was 31 (±7). Median blood ammonia for healthy participants was within normal range, 10 μmol L−1 (interquartile range (IQR), 3–18) versus 46 μmol L−1 (IQR, 23–66) for cirrhotic participants. Median breath ammonia was 379 pmol mL−1 CO2 (IQR, 265–765) for healthy versus 350 pmol mL−1 CO2 (IQR, 180–1013) for cirrhotic participants. CV was 17 ± 6%. There remains an important unmet need in the evaluation of systemic ammonia, and breath measurement continues to demonstrate promise to fulfill this need. Given the many differences between breath and blood ammonia measurement, we examined biological explanations for our findings in healthy and cirrhotic participants. We conclude that based upon these preliminary data breath may offer clinically important information this is not provided by blood ammonia. PMID:26658550

  5. [Measuring the electricity frequency properties of blood].

    PubMed

    Huang, Hua; Hu, Maoqing; Chen, Huaiqing; Yuan, Zirun; Tong, Shan; Luo, An

    2005-04-01

    In order to understand the electricity frequency specialties of blood, we have developed a wide frequency electricity characteristic testing system and used it to test the amplitude frequency property and phase frequency property of the blood in different states and constituents at 1 Hz to 20 MHz. Further analysis on the results of tests helped us know some important properties of blood at even more microcosmic levels from a new angle. Meanwhile, some problems and considerations on the improvement of the electricity model of biotic tissue and blood were pointed out. (1) From 1 Hz to 5 KHz, the impedance of blood descended 99%. (2) Simple equivalent circuit of resistance and capacitance must be used in series equivalent but not in usual parallel connection equivalent. (3) Experiment indicated, equivalent circuits of blood need more analysis, because simple equivalent circuit of resistance and capacitance is liable to gross error. (4) When the three element model is used for measuring the resistance of inside liquid, capacitance of cell membrane and the resistance of outside liquid of blood, the three testing frequencies must be very similar.

  6. ENHANCED CONCENTRATION AND ANALYSIS METHOD FOR MEASURING WATER SOLUABLE ENDOGENOUS COMPOUNDS IN HUMAN BREATH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exhaled human breath analysis has become a standard technique for assessing exposure to exogenous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trihalomethanes from water chlorination; aromatics, hydrocarbons, and oxygenates from fuels usage; and various chlorinated solvents from i...

  7. ENHANCED CONCENTRATION AND ANALYSIS METHOD FOR MEASURING WATER SOLUABLE ENDOGENOUS COMPOUNDS IN HUMAN BREATH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exhaled human breath analysis has become a standard technique for assessing exposure to exogenous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trihalomethanes from water chlorination; aromatics, hydrocarbons, and oxygenates from fuels usage; and various chlorinated solvents from i...

  8. The indigenous Sea Gypsy divers of Thailand's west coast: measurement of carbon monoxide in the breathing air.

    PubMed

    Gold, D; Geater, A; Aiyarak, S; Juengpraert, W

    1999-07-01

    Approximately 400 indigenous divers live and work on Thailand's west coast. They dive with surface supplied air from primitive compressor units mounted on open boats which measure from seven to 11 meters in length. It was suspected that carbon monoxide was present in the breathing air of at least the gasoline-driven compressor units. To determine the presence of carbon monoxide gas in the breathing air, compressed air from the compressor was pumped through the diver air supply hose through a plenum (monitoring) chamber established on the boat. After a compressor warm-up of 15 minutes, the diving air was measured with the boat at eight different bearings to the wind, each 45 degrees apart at intervals of five minutes. Three of the four gasoline-driven compressor units tested showed presence of carbon monoxide in the breathing air. One diesel-driven unit showed a very low concentration of carbon monoxide (3-4 ppm) and six diesel-driven units showed no detectable carbon monoxide. Although not tested, diesel exhaust emissions could also enter the breathing air by the same route. A locally made modification to the compressor air intake was designed and successfully tested on one gasoline-driven compressor unit. An information sheet on the hazards of carbon monoxide as well as on the modification has been developed for distribution among the villages.

  9. Standardised exhaled breath collection for the measurement of exhaled volatile organic compounds by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Exhaled breath volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis for airway disease monitoring is promising. However, contrary to nitric oxide the method for exhaled breath collection has not yet been standardized and the effects of expiratory flow and breath-hold have not been sufficiently studied. These manoeuvres may also reveal the origin of exhaled compounds. Methods 15 healthy volunteers (34 ± 7 years) participated in the study. Subjects inhaled through their nose and exhaled immediately at two different flows (5 L/min and 10 L/min) into methylated polyethylene bags. In addition, the effect of a 20 s breath-hold following inhalation to total lung capacity was studied. The samples were analyzed for ethanol and acetone levels immediately using proton-transfer-reaction mass-spectrometer (PTR-MS, Logan Research, UK). Results Ethanol levels were negatively affected by expiratory flow rate (232.70 ± 33.50 ppb vs. 202.30 ± 27.28 ppb at 5 L/min and 10 L/min, respectively, p < 0.05), but remained unchanged following the breath hold (242.50 ± 34.53 vs. 237.90 ± 35.86 ppb, without and with breath hold, respectively, p = 0.11). On the contrary, acetone levels were increased following breath hold (1.50 ± 0.18 ppm) compared to the baseline levels (1.38 ± 0.15 ppm), but were not affected by expiratory flow (1.40 ± 0.14 ppm vs. 1.49 ± 0.14 ppm, 5 L/min vs. 10 L/min, respectively, p = 0.14). The diet had no significant effects on the gasses levels which showed good inter and intra session reproducibility. Conclusions Exhalation parameters such as expiratory flow and breath-hold may affect VOC levels significantly; therefore standardisation of exhaled VOC measurements is mandatory. Our preliminary results suggest a different origin in the respiratory tract for these two gasses. PMID:23837867

  10. Objective measurement of compliance during oral appliance therapy for sleep-disordered breathing

    PubMed Central

    Vanderveken, Olivier M; Dieltjens, Marijke; Wouters, Kristien; De Backer, Wilfried A; Van de Heyning, Paul H; Braem, Marc J

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral appliance (OA) therapy is increasingly prescribed as a non-continuous positive airway pressure treatment modality for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). Although OA therapy is reported to be efficacious for the treatment of SDB, data on compliance remain limited to self-report. Methods In this 3-month prospective clinical trial, the main outcome was to assess the safety and feasibility of an objective measurement of compliance during OA therapy using an embedded microsensor thermometer with on-chip integrated readout electronics in 51 consecutive patients with an established diagnosis of SDB (AHI 18.0±11.9/h; age 47±10 y; BMI 26.6±4.0 kg/m2; men/women: 31/20). Patients were unaware of the purpose of the study. Results No microsensor-related adverse events were recorded. In addition, no problems were encountered during the readout of the compliance data. Out of 51 microsensors, one had a technical defect and was lost to follow-up. In this study, the overall objective mean rate of OA use was 6.6±1.3 h per day with a regular OA users’ rate of 82% at the 3-month follow-up. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between objective and self-reported OA compliance data in this study. Measurement of the objective OA compliance allowed us to calculate the mean disease alleviation (MDA) as the product of objective compliance and therapeutic efficacy. MDA serves as a measure of the overall therapeutic effectiveness, and turned out to be 51.1%. Conclusions The results illustrate the safety and feasibility of objective measurement of OA compliance. The objective measurement of OA compliance allows for calculation of the MDA. PMID:22993169

  11. Laboratory and field evaluation of a SAW microsensor array for measuring perchloroethylene in breath.

    PubMed

    Groves, William A; Achutan, Chandran

    2004-12-01

    This article describes the laboratory and field performance evaluation of a small prototype instrument employing an array of six polymer-coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors and a thermal desorption preconcentration unit for rapid analysis of perchloroethylene in breath. Laboratory calibrations were performed using breath samples spiked with perchloroethylene to prepare calibration standards spanning a concentration range of 0.1-10 ppm. A sample volume of 250 mL was preconcentrated on 40 mg of Tenax GR at a flow rate of 100 mL/min, followed by a dry air purge and thermal desorption at a temperature of 200 degrees C. The resulting pulse of vapor was passed over the sensor array at a flow rate of 20 mL/min and sensor responses were recorded and displayed using a laptop computer. The total time per analysis was 4.5 min. SAW sensor responses were linear, and the instrument's limit of detection was estimated to be 50 ppb based on the criterion that four of the six sensors show a detectable response. Field performance was evaluated at a commercial dry-cleaning operation by comparing prototype instrument results for breath samples with those of a portable gas chromatograph (NIOSH 3704). Four breath samples were collected from a single subject over the course of the workday and analyzed using the portable gas chromatograph (GC) and SAW instruments. An additional seven spiked breath samples were prepared and analyzed so that a broader range of perchloroethylene concentrations could be examined. Linear regression analysis showed excellent agreement between prototype instrument and portable GC breath sample results with a correlation coefficient of 0.99 and a slope of 1.04. The average error for the prototype instrument over a perchloroethylene breath concentration range of 0.9-7.2 ppm was 2.6% relative to the portable GC. These results demonstrate the field capabilities of SAW microsensor arrays for rapid analysis of organic vapors in breath.

  12. Breath hydrogen reflects canine intestinal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Perman, J A; Waters, L A; Harrison, M R; Yee, E S; Heldt, G P

    1981-09-01

    The relationship between breath hydrogen excretion and intestinal ischemia was investigated in nine mechanically ventilated dogs under pentobarbital anesthesia. An ileal segment was isolated in situ, ligated at each end, and insufflated with hydrogen. Expired air was collected at intervals. Blood volume was reduced 30% by three successive equivalent hemorrhages 10 min apart. Local bowel ischemia was produced by clamping the blood supply to the isolated segment for 10 min. Graded hemorrhage produced step-wise reductions in breath hydrogen concentration, to 77 +/- 13, 66 +/- 15, and 35 +/- 8% (mean +/- S.E.) of baseline after the first, second, and third hemorrhages, respectively. These reductions correlated highly (r = 0.84; P less than 0.01) with declines in mean aortic blood pressure. Occlusion of blood supply caused a significant (P less than 0.025) decrease in breath hydrogen concentration and excretion to 39 +/- 14% of baseline. Termination of occlusion was followed within 2 min by a 7-fold increase in breath H2 concentration above the original baseline, probably reflecting reactive hyperemia. Breath hydrogen measurements appear to reflect functional (hemorrhagic shock-induced) and mechanical (vascular occlusion induced) enteric ischemia in dogs.

  13. Measurement of Human Blood and Plasma Volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Szalkay, H. G. H.

    1987-01-01

    Report reviews techniques for measuring blood-plasma volume in humans. Common technique of using radioactive iodine isotope to label plasma albumin involves unwarranted risks from low-level radiation. Report emphasizes techniques using Evans-blue-dye (T-1824) labeling of albumin, hematocrit or hemoglobin/hematocrit measurements, or blood densitometry. In Evans-blue-dye technique, plasma volume determined from decrease in dye concentration occurring after small amount of dye solution injected into circulatory system. Subjection of Evans blue dye to test for carcinogenicity gave negative results.

  14. Measuring sickle cell morphology during blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kviatkovsky, Inna; Zeidan, Adel; Yeheskely-Hayon, Daniella; Shabad, Eveline L; Dann, Eldad J; Yelin, Dvir

    2017-03-01

    During a sickle cell crisis in sickle cell anemia patients, deoxygenated red blood cells may change their mechanical properties and block small blood vessels, causing pain, local tissue damage, and possibly organ failure. Measuring the structural and morphological changes in sickle cells is important for understanding the factors contributing to vessel blockage and for developing an effective treatment. In this work, we image blood cells from sickle cell anemia patients using spectrally encoded flow cytometry, and analyze the interference patterns between reflections from the cell membranes. Using a numerical simulation for calculating the interference pattern obtained from a model of a red blood cell, we propose an analytical expression for the three-dimensional shape of characteristic sickle cells and compare our results to a previously suggested model. Our imaging approach offers new means for analyzing the morphology of sickle cells, and could be useful for studying their unique physiological and biomechanical properties.

  15. Measurement Challenges at Low Blood Lead Levels.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Kathleen L; Cheng, Po-Yung; Jarrett, Jeffery M; Makhmudov, Amir; Vance, Kathryn; Ward, Cynthia D; Jones, Robert L; Mortensen, Mary E

    2017-08-01

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) adopted its Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention recommendation to use a population-based reference value to identify children and environments associated with lead hazards. The current reference value of 5 μg/dL is calculated as the 97.5th percentile of the distribution of blood lead levels (BLLs) in children 1 to 5 years old from 2007 to 2010 NHANES data. We calculated and updated selected percentiles, including the 97.5th percentile, by using NHANES 2011 to 2014 blood lead data and examined demographic characteristics of children whose blood lead was ≥90th percentile value. The 97.5th percentile BLL of 3.48 µg/dL highlighted analytical laboratory and clinical interpretation challenges of blood lead measurements ≤5 μg/dL. Review of 5 years of results for target blood lead values <11 µg/dL for US clinical laboratories participating in the CDC's voluntary Lead and Multi-Element Proficiency quality assurance program showed 40% unable to quantify and reported a nondetectable result at a target blood lead value of 1.48 µg/dL, compared with 5.5% at a target BLL of 4.60 µg/dL. We describe actions taken at the CDC's Environmental Health Laboratory in the National Center for Environmental Health, which measures blood lead for NHANES, to improve analytical accuracy and precision and to reduce external lead contamination during blood collection and analysis. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Multiplex analysis inflammatory cytokines in human blood, breath condensate, and urine matrices

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientific evidence suggests that inflammation is associated with human health effects and health endpoints, yet most studies have focused on human populations that are already considered “unhealthy”.  As such, it is pertinent to measure inflammatory biomarkers in human biologica...

  17. Multiplex analysis inflammatory cytokines in human blood, breath condensate, and urine matrices

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientific evidence suggests that inflammation is associated with human health effects and health endpoints, yet most studies have focused on human populations that are already considered “unhealthy”.  As such, it is pertinent to measure inflammatory biomarkers in human biologica...

  18. Hemodynamic Changes Following Visual Stimulation and Breath-holding Provide Evidence for an Uncoupling of Cerebral Blood Flow and Volume from Oxygen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Manus J.; Stevens, Robert D.; de Boorder, Michiel; Pekar, James J.; Hendrikse, Jeroen; van Zijl, Peter C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging is most commonly performed using the blood-oxygenation-level-depend (BOLD) approach, which is sensitive to changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). However, the precise mechanism by which neuronal activity elicits a hemodynamic response remains controversial. Here, separate visual stimulation (14s flashing checkerboard) and breath-hold (4s exhale + 14s breath-hold) experiments were performed in parallel on healthy volunteers using BOLD, CBV-weighted (CBVw) and CBF-weighted (CBFw) fMRI. Following visual stimulation, the BOLD signal persisted for 33±5s (n=9) and was bi-phasic with a negative component (undershoot), whereas CBV and CBF returned to baseline without an undershoot at 20±5s and 20±3s, respectively. Following breath-hold, the BOLD signal returned to baseline (23±7s) at the same time (p>0.05) as CBV (21±6s) and CBF (18±3s), without a post-stimulus undershoot. These data indicate that following visual activation, the BOLD undershoot is likely due to continued elevated CMRO2. Furthermore, persisting elevated CMRO2 is found when CBF and CBV have returned to baseline levels, providing evidence for an uncoupling of CBV and CBF responses from CMRO2 changes. Persisting elevated CMRO2 following elevated neuronal activity may be necessary to reverse neurotransmitter movements arising from excitatory postsynaptic currents. PMID:18797471

  19. Exhaled breath temperature measurement and asthma control in children prescribed inhaled corticosteroids: A cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Hamill, Laura; Ferris, Kathryn; Kapande, Kirsty; McConaghy, Laura; Douglas, Isobel; McGovern, Vincent; Shields, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Exhaled breath temperature (EBT) reflects airways (both eosinophilic and neutrophilic) inflammation in asthma and thus may aid the management of children with asthma that are treated with anti-inflammatory drugs. A new EBT monitor has become available that is cheap and easy to use and may be a suitable monitoring device for airways inflammation. Little is known about how EBT relates to asthma treatment decisions, disease control, lung function, or other non-invasive measures of airways inflammation, such as exhaled nitric oxide (ENO). To determine the relationships between EBT and asthma treatment decision, current control, pulmonary function, and ENO. Cross-sectional prospective study on 159 children aged 5-16 years attending a pediatric respiratory clinic. EBT was compared with the clinician's decision regarding treatment (decrease, no change, increase), asthma control assessment (controlled, partial, uncontrolled), level of current treatment (according to British Thoracic Society guideline, BTS step), ENO, and spirometry. EBT measurement was feasible in the majority of children (25 of 159 could not perform the test) and correlated weakly with age (R = 0.33, P = <0.01). EBT did not differ significantly between the three clinician decision groups (P = 0.42), the three asthma control assessment groups (P = 0.9), or the current asthma treatment BTS step (P = 0.57). EBT measurement was not related to measures of asthma control determined at the clinic. The routine intermittent monitoring of EBT in children prescribed inhaled corticosteroids who attend asthma clinics cannot be recommended for adjusting anti-inflammatory asthma therapy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Consensus statement for inert gas washout measurement using multiple- and single- breath tests.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Paul D; Latzin, Philipp; Verbanck, Sylvia; Hall, Graham L; Horsley, Alexander; Gappa, Monika; Thamrin, Cindy; Arets, Hubertus G M; Aurora, Paul; Fuchs, Susanne I; King, Gregory G; Lum, Sooky; Macleod, Kenneth; Paiva, Manuel; Pillow, Jane J; Ranganathan, Sarath; Ranganathan, Sarah; Ratjen, Felix; Singer, Florian; Sonnappa, Samatha; Stocks, Janet; Subbarao, Padmaja; Thompson, Bruce R; Gustafsson, Per M

    2013-03-01

    Inert gas washout tests, performed using the single- or multiple-breath washout technique, were first described over 60 years ago. As measures of ventilation distribution inhomogeneity, they offer complementary information to standard lung function tests, such as spirometry, as well as improved feasibility across wider age ranges and improved sensitivity in the detection of early lung damage. These benefits have led to a resurgence of interest in these techniques from manufacturers, clinicians and researchers, yet detailed guidelines for washout equipment specifications, test performance and analysis are lacking. This manuscript provides recommendations about these aspects, applicable to both the paediatric and adult testing environment, whilst outlining the important principles that are essential for the reader to understand. These recommendations are evidence based, where possible, but in many places represent expert opinion from a working group with a large collective experience in the techniques discussed. Finally, the important issues that remain unanswered are highlighted. By addressing these important issues and directing future research, the hope is to facilitate the incorporation of these promising tests into routine clinical practice.

  1. Empty alcohol containers and breath alcohol analysis measures of alcohol consumption at a college volleyball championship.

    PubMed

    Podstawski, Robert; Wesołowska, Elżbieta; Choszcz, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    This article provides information on the amount of alcohol consumed by students during college sports events. It examines the relationship between alcohol consumption and the rank of the match, sex of the players (male vs. female league), and sex of the spectators. The study was carried out during an interdepartmental volleyball championship (cup system) at the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn (Poland), which included 16 matches (in both male and female leagues). The research sample consisted of 2,683 students between ages 19 and 24 years (including 1,768 men and 915 women) who came to cheer on their peers at the matches. Two objective measurements of alcohol consumption were used: (a) the number of empty alcohol packages left behind by the spectators at the sports facilities after each match and (b) breath alcohol analysis tests given to volunteering spectators after each match (in which 323 persons consented to participate). Male league games were accompanied by more alcohol consumption than were female league games, and male spectators drank more than female spectators. The most drinking occurred among men watching the male league, and the least amount of drinking occurred among women watching the female league. Alcohol intoxication increased with the rank of the match mostly among men watching the male league. The sex of players and spectators seems to be a mediating factor in the relationship between the rank of a match and the amount of alcohol consumed.

  2. Measurement of the biotransfer and time constant of radon from ingested water by human breath analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.L.; Hess, C.T.

    1992-01-01

    Forty-one tests were performed on 38 volunteers to measure elimination rates of (222)Rn in expired breath. Participants ranged from ages 9 to 85 y, with 16 males and 22 females. The levels of physical activity of the subjects ranged from very inactive to marathon level. Calibration of the flow-through scintillation cell was accomplished using a medical ventilator and (222)Rn reservoir for 5-15 L/min flow rates. The authors found a wide range of percent elimination (12-68%) in 30 min. The percent elimination has a mild correlation with the predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s and with time passed since eating. Their observations of bio-retention half-times range from 17-400 min. The whole-body dose calculations yield a mean of 2.70 + or - 3.43 nGy/Bq, and the stomach dose calculations yield a mean of 276 + or - 186 nGy/Bq. These means range beyond those previously reported. (Copyright (c) 1992 Health Physics Society.)

  3. Cognitive flexibility during breath alcohol plateau is associated with previous drinking measures

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Ben; Nixon, Sara Jo

    2013-01-01

    Although the biphasic effects of acute alcohol during ascending and descending Breath Alcohol Concentrations (BrACs) are well described, the plateau period between peak and steadily descending BrACs is generally unrecognized and under-studied by researchers. Naturalistic examinations indicate such periods persist for substantial intervals, with a time frame of onset suggesting BrAC plateaus may co-occur with potentially risky behaviors (e.g., driving). The current pilot study examined neurocognitive performance during this period. Participants were healthy, community-residing moderate drinkers (n= 18). In the first phase of the study, the Digit Symbol Substitution and Trail Making Tasks were administered during BrAC plateau (M = 62 mg/dL). BrACs were negatively correlated with Digit Symbol performance but unrelated to other tasks. In contrast, performance on a derived Trail Making measure of set-shifting was positively associated with the maximum alcohol doses consumed in the preceding 6 months. Phase 2 analyses demonstrated that relationships between previous alcohol experience and cognitive performance were absent among individuals receiving placebo beverages. Taken together, these data suggest a relationship worthy of investigation between previous drinking experiences and cognitive flexibility during the plateau phase. PMID:23597416

  4. Cognitive flexibility during breath alcohol plateau is associated with previous drinking measures.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ben; Nixon, Sara Jo

    2013-06-01

    Although the biphasic effects of acute alcohol during ascending and descending Breath Alcohol Concentrations (BrACs) are well described, the plateau period between peak and steadily descending BrACs is generally unrecognized and under-studied by researchers. Naturalistic examinations indicate such periods persist for substantial intervals, with a time frame of onset suggesting BrAC plateaus may co-occur with potentially risky behaviors (e.g., driving). The current pilot study examined neurocognitive performance during this period. Participants were healthy, community-residing moderate drinkers (n = 18). In the first phase of the study, the Digit Symbol Substitution and Trail Making Tasks were administered during BrAC plateau (M = 62 mg/dL). BrACs were negatively correlated with Digit Symbol performance but unrelated to other tasks. In contrast, performance on a derived Trail Making measure of set-shifting was positively associated with the maximum alcohol doses consumed in the preceding 6 months. Phase 2 analyses demonstrated that relationships between previous alcohol experience and cognitive performance were absent among individuals receiving placebo beverages. Taken together, these data suggest a relationship worthy of investigation between previous drinking experiences and cognitive flexibility during the plateau phase.

  5. Personal exposures, indoor-outdoor relationships, and breath levels of toxic air pollutants measured for 355 persons in New Jersey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Lance A.; Pellizzari, Edo D.; Hartwell, Ty D.; Sparacino, Charles M.; Sheldon, Linda S.; Zelon, Harvey

    EPA's TEAM Study has measured exposures to 20 volatile organic compounds in personal air, outdoor air, drinking water and the breath of 355 persons in NJ, in the fall of 1981. The NJ residents were selected by a probability sampling scheme to represent 128,000 inhabitants of Elizabeth and Bayonne. Participants carried a personal monitor to collect two 12-h air samples and gave a breath sample at the end of the day. Two consecutive 12-h outdoor air samples were also collected on identical Tenax cartridges in the back yards of 90 of the participants. About 3000 samples were collected, of which 1000 were quality control samples. Eleven compounds were often present in air. Personal exposures were consistently higher than outdoor concentrations for these chemicals, and were sometimes ten times the outdoor concentrations. Indoor sources appeared responsible for much of the difference. Breath concentrations also usually exceed outdoor concentrations, and correlated more strongly with personal exposures than with outdoor concentrations. Some activities (smoking, driving, visiting dry cleaners or service stations) and occupations (chemical, paint and plastics plants) were associated with significantly elevated exposures and breath levels for certain toxic chemicals.

  6. Self-measurement of blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Although experience is still limited and more research is needed, the World Hypertension League recommends self-measurement of blood pressure in selected patients as an additional source of information to the practising physician, and as a way of encouraging patients to participate more actively in the therapeutic regimen. PMID:3260828

  7. Reliable noninvasive measurement of blood gases

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Edward V.; Robinson, Mark R.; Haaland, David M.; Alam, Mary K.

    1994-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for, preferably, determining noninvasively and in vivo at least two of the five blood gas parameters (i.e., pH, PCO.sub.2, [HCO.sub.3.sup.- ], PO.sub.2, and O.sub.2 sat.) in a human. The non-invasive method includes the steps of: generating light at three or more different wavelengths in the range of 500 nm to 2500 nm; irradiating blood containing tissue; measuring the intensities of the wavelengths emerging from the blood containing tissue to obtain a set of at least three spectral intensities v. wavelengths; and determining the unknown values of at least two of pH, [HCO.sub.3.sup.- ], PCO.sub.2 and a measure of oxygen concentration. The determined values are within the physiological ranges observed in blood containing tissue. The method also includes the steps of providing calibration samples, determining if the spectral intensities v. wavelengths from the tissue represents an outlier, and determining if any of the calibration samples represents an outlier. The determination of the unknown values is performed by at least one multivariate algorithm using two or more variables and at least one calibration model. Preferably, there is a separate calibration for each blood gas parameter being determined. The method can be utilized in a pulse mode and can also be used invasively. The apparatus includes a tissue positioning device, a source, at least one detector, electronics, a microprocessor, memory, and apparatus for indicating the determined values.

  8. Confounders of auscultatory blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Baker, R H; Ende, J

    1995-04-01

    The appropriate use of any test requires the clinician to appreciate that test's limitations. By recognizing the potential confounders of the auscultatory assessment of blood pressure, the clinician minimizes the likelihood of enacting therapeutic decisions based on inaccurate data. When approaching the treatment of a hypertensive patient, several points should be kept in mind. First, the measurement of persistent and severe hypertension in a patient receiving treatment who describes symptoms of orthostatic hypotension with apparently adequate standing blood pressure or who lacks corroborating retinal, echocardiographic, or electrocardiographic signs of hypertension should raise the concern of pseudohypertension or a white-coat response. Similarly, when one finds a normal or near-normal systolic blood pressure in a patient with a clinical picture consistent with severe hypertension, one should make a directed effort to look for an unrecognized auscultatory gap. Second, marked discrepancies in measurements as obtained by different operators or in different settings should raise concern of the white-coat response or methodologic errors by one operator, such as undercuffing, excessive pressure on the head of the stethoscope, rapid deflation of the cuff, or use of different arms. In treating hypertension in even the minimally obese patient, a special point must be made that an adequate size cuff be used for all blood pressure determinations. Third, when blood pressure is determined with the patient in any but the satndardized back-and-arm-supported seated position described above, the clinician should acknowledge the possibility that the position may alter the patient's classification. Fourth, the diagnosis and management of hypertension requires multiple measurements of blood pressure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Method for measuring lead concentrations in blood

    DOEpatents

    Nogar, Nicholas S.

    2001-01-01

    Method for measuring lead concentrations in blood. The present invention includes the use of resonant laser ablation to analyze .ltoreq.1 .mu.L (or equivalent mass) samples of blood for lead content. A typical finger prick, for example, yields about 10 .mu.L. Solid samples may also readily be analyzed by resonant laser ablation. The sample is placed on a lead-free, electrically conducting substrate and irradiated with a single, focused laser beam which simultaneously vaporizes, atomizes, and resonantly ionizes an analyte of interest in a sample. The ions are then sorted, collected and detected using a mass spectrometer.

  10. Effects of an Inspiratory Impedance Threshold Device on Blood Pressure and Short Term Survival in Spontaneously Breathing Hypovolemic Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    intubation, and ventilation during the preparatory phase have been described earlier.5 Propofol anesthesia (Propotol®, Abbott, North Chicago, IL) was... propofol to 50g/kg/min. This dose was adjusted to target respiratory rate of 25—35 breaths/min and oxygen saturation above 90%, breathing room air. Once...received 400ml of intravenous normal saline solution at the rate of 60ml/min. The arterial catheter was removed 15min later and propofol infusion was also

  11. Rapid orocecal transit time in obese children measured by hydrogen breath test.

    PubMed

    Rerksuppaphol, Sanguansak; Rerksuppaphol, Lakkana

    2012-12-01

    Gastrointestinal motility may correlate with an unusual nutritional status, such as obesity. The orocecal transit time (OCTT) is one parameter of GI motility. The primary objective of the present study was to compare OCTT in obese and non-obese children; secondary objectives were to assess the correlation between OCTT and body mass index (BMI) or appetite score. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 44 children. Twenty-one obese and 18 non-obese children were included in the final analysis. Demographic data and anthropometric parameters were collected. The breath hydrogen test (BHT) using lactulose was performed to determine OCTT. Appetite score using visual analog scale was measured at the beginning and end of the present study. The difference between these scores was attributed as an increase of appetite. Student t-test and Chi-square test were employed to compare the differences between groups. Pearson's correlation was used to measure the correlation between parameters. Mean OCTT in obese children was significantly faster than in non-obese children (70.0 versus 81.1 min, respectively; p-value = 0.005). The increases of appetite score during study were not significantly different between obese and non-obese children (4.3 vs. 2.9; p-value = 0.19). OCTT was significantly associated with BMI in the inverse manner (r = -0.51; p-value = 0.001), but was not significantly correlated with the appetite score (r = -0.24; p-value = 0.15). OCTT in obese children was faster than in non-obese children. OCTT was moderately inversely correlated with the BMI, and had a trend to negative correlation with the appetite score, though without reaching a significant value.

  12. Sleep-disordered breathing children: Measurement of nasal nitric oxide and fractional exhaled nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Zou, Y; Mai, F; Zhang, X; Liu, Y; Lin, X

    2016-03-01

    To assess the clinical significance of nasal nitric oxide (nNO) and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) concentrations in children with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). Enrolled in this study were 30 children with SDB and 15 healthy children. The nNO and FeNO concentrations were measured noninvasively using a NIOX MINO system (Aerocrine AB, Solna, Sweden). SPSS statistics 20.0 software (IBM SPSS statistics 20.0, Armonk, NY, USA) was used to analyze the data. The median (25th and 75th percentiles) nNO concentration of SDB children measured in parts per billion (ppb) was 111.0 (44.0; 349.0) ppb; FeNO concentration of SDB children was 12.0 (9.8; 14.0) ppb. The nNO concentration of healthy children was 52.0 (22.0; 139.0) ppb; FeNO concentration of healthy children was 12.0 (10.0; 16.0) ppb. Compared to healthy children, nNO concentration was significantly higher in children with SDB (Z = -2.215, P = 0.027). Correlation analysis showed that SDB children's nNO concentration directly correlated with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI; r = 0.429, P = 0.018), and inversely correlated with nadir oxygen saturation (SaO2; r = -0.482, P = 0.007). No other polysomnographic parameters significantly correlated with nNO concentration. Our data suggest that nNO concentration might be useful for diagnosis and evaluation of disease severity in SDB children. Furthermore, these results suggest that nNO concentration has a greater prognostic value than FeNO concentration.

  13. Principles and techniques of blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Thomas G

    2002-05-01

    The gold standard for clinical blood pressure measurement continues to be readings taken by a physician using a mercury sphygmomanometer, but this is changing as mercury is gradually being phased out. The oscillometric technique, which primarily detects mean arterial pressure, is increasingly popular for use in electronic devices. Other methods include ultrasound (used mainly to detect systolic pressure) and the finger cuff method of Penaz, which can record beat-to-beat pressure noninvasively from the finger. The preferred location of measurement is the upper arm, but errors may occur because of changes in the position of the arm. Other technical sources of error include inappropriate cuff size and too rapid deflation of the cuff. Clinic readings may be unrepresentative of the patient's true blood pressure because of the white coat effect, which is defined as the difference between the clinic readings and the average daytime blood pressure. Patients with elevated clinic pressure and normal daytime pressure are said to have white coat hypertension. There are three commonly used methods for measuring blood pressure for clinical purposes: clinic readings, self-monitoring by the patient at home, and 24-hour ambulatory readings. Self-monitoring is growing rapidly in popularity and is generally carried out using electronic devices that work on the oscillometric technique. Although standard validation protocols exist, many devices on the market have not been tested for accuracy. Such devices can record blood pressure from the upper arm, wrist, or finger, but the arm is preferred. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory monitoring has been found to be the best predictor of cardiovascular risk in the individual patient and is the only technique that can describe the diurnal rhythm of blood pressure accurately. Ambulatory monitoring is mainly used for diagnosing hypertension, whereas self-monitoring is used for following the response to treatment. Different techniques of blood pressure

  14. Blood pressure measurement using finger cuff.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Choi, E; Jeong, H; Kim, K; Park, J

    2005-01-01

    Many research groups have studied blood pressure measurement in finger artery because of its convenience. But, low accuracy prohibits many hypertension patients from using this device. So, we suggest measurement algorithm that measure systolic and diastolic blood pressure in finger artery. And we also develop calibration method that decreases the error from difference of finger circumference by subjects. We apply our methods for 90 subjects (age form 20 to 49, 55 male, 35 female) to test feasibility of our method by AAMI SP10 standard. The mean difference of our system is ±4.7mmHg for systolic pressure, ±4.2mmHg for systolic pressure. It proved that the feasibility of our method is clinically acceptable.(under ±5mmHg).

  15. Breathing difficulty

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary disease (COPD), such as chronic bronchitis or emphysema Other lung disease Pneumonia Pulmonary hypertension Problems with ... of breath; Breathlessness; Difficulty breathing; Dyspnea Images Lungs Emphysema References Kraft M. Approach to the patient with ...

  16. Breathing Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... getting enough air. Sometimes you can have mild breathing problems because of a stuffy nose or intense ... panic attacks Allergies If you often have trouble breathing, it is important to find out the cause.

  17. From breathing to respiration.

    PubMed

    Fitting, Jean-William

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of breathing remained an enigma for a long time. The Hippocratic school described breathing patterns but did not associate breathing with the lungs. Empedocles and Plato postulated that breathing was linked to the passage of air through pores of the skin. This was refuted by Aristotle who believed that the role of breathing was to cool the heart. In Alexandria, breakthroughs were accomplished in the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. Later, Galen proposed an accurate description of the respiratory muscles and the mechanics of breathing. However, his heart-lung model was hampered by the traditional view of two non-communicating vascular systems - veins and arteries. After a period of stagnation in the Middle Ages, knowledge progressed with the discovery of pulmonary circulation. The comprehension of the purpose of breathing progressed by steps thanks to Boyle and Mayow among others, and culminated with the contribution of Priestley and the discovery of oxygen by Lavoisier. Only then was breathing recognized as fulfilling the purpose of respiration, or gas exchange. A century later, a controversy emerged concerning the active or passive transfer of oxygen from alveoli to the blood. August and Marie Krogh settled the dispute, showing that passive diffusion was sufficient to meet the oxygen needs.

  18. Modern approaches to blood pressure measurement

    PubMed Central

    Staessen, J.; O'Brien, E.; Thijs, L.; Fagard, R.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Blood pressure (BP) is usually measured by conventional sphygmomanometry. Although apparently simple, this procedure is fraught with many potential sources of error. This review focuses on two alternative techniques of BP measurement: ambulatory monitoring and self measurement.
REVIEW—BP values obtained by ambulatory monitoring or self measurement are characterised by high reproducibility, are not subject to digit preference or observer bias, and minimise the transient rise of the blood pressure in response to the surroundings of the clinic or the presence of the observer, the so called white coat effect. For ambulatory monitoring, the upper limits of systolic/diastolic normotension in adults include 130/80 mm Hg for the 24 hour BP and 135/85 and 120/70 mm Hg for the daytime BP and night time BP, respectively. For the the self measured BP these thresholds include 135/85 mm Hg. Automated BP measurement is most useful to identify patients with white coat hypertension. Whether or not white coat hypertension predisposes to sustained hypertension remains debated. However, outcome is better correlated with the ambulatory BP than with the conventional BP. In patients with white coat hypertension, antihypertensive drugs lower the BP in the clinic, but not the ambulatory BP, and also do not improve prognosis. Ambulatory BP monitoring is also better than conventional BP measurement in assessing the effects of treatment. Ambulatory BP monitoring is necessary to diagnose nocturnal hypertension and is especially indicated in patients with borderline hypertension, elderly patients, pregnant women, patients with treatment resistant hypertension, and also in patients with symptoms suggestive of hypotension.
CONCLUSIONS—The newer techniques of BP measurement are now well established in clinical research, for diagnosis in clinical practice, and will increasingly make their appearance in occupational and environmental medicine.


Keywords: ambulatory blood

  19. How Mechanical Ventilation Measurement, Cutoff and Duration Affect Rapid Shallow Breathing Index Accuracy: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Elaine Cristina; Lago, Alessandra Fabiane; Silva, Elaine Caetano; de Almeida, Marcelo Barros; Basile-Filho, Anibal; Gastaldi, Ada Clarice

    2017-01-01

    Background Decreased accuracy of the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) can stem from 1) the method used to obtain this index, 2) duration of mechanical ventilation (MV), and 3) the established cutoff point. The objective was to evaluate the values of RSBI determined by three different methods, using distinct MV times and cutoff points. Methods This prospective study included 40 subjects. Before extubation, three different methods were employed to measure RSBI: pressure support ventilator (PSV) (PSV = 5 - 8 cm H2O; positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) = 5 cm H2O) (RSBI_MIN), automatic tube compensation (ATC) (PSV = 0, PEEP = 5 cm H2O, and 100% tube compensation) (RSBI_ATC), and disconnected MV (RSBI_SP). The results were analyzed according to the MV period (less than or over 72 h) and to the outcome of extubation (< 72 h, successful and failed; > 72 h successful and failed). The accuracy of each method was determined at different cutoff points (105, 78, and 50 cycles/min/L). Results The RSBI_MIN, RSBI_ATC, and RSBI_SP values in the group < 72 h were 38 ± 18, 45 ± 26 and 55 ± 22; in the group > 72 h, RSBI_SP value was higher than those of RSBI_ATC and RSBI_MIN (78 ± 29, 51 ± 19 and 39 ± 14) (P < 0.001). For patients with MV > 72 h who failed in removing MV, the RSBI_SP was higher (93 ± 28, 58 ± 18 and 41 ± 10) (P < 0.000), with greater accuracy at cutoff of 78. Conclusion RSBI_SP associated with cutoff point < 78 cycles/min/L seems to be the best strategy to identify failed extubation in subjects with MV for over 72 h. PMID:28270888

  20. Multiple breath inert gas washout as a measure of ventilation distribution in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Aurora, P; Gustafsson, P; Bush, A; Lindblad, A; Oliver, C; Wallis, C E; Stocks, J

    2004-12-01

    Multiple breath inert gas washout (MBW) has been suggested as a tool for detecting early cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. A study was undertaken to compare the relative sensitivity of MBW and spirometry for detecting abnormal lung function in school age children with CF and to compare MBW results obtained from healthy children in the UK with those recently reported from Sweden. Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and maximal expiratory flow when 25% of forced vital capacity remains to be expired (MEF25) were compared with the lung clearance index (LCI) derived from sulphur hexafluoride MBW in 22 children with CF aged 6-16 years and in 33 healthy controls. LCI was higher in children with CF than in healthy controls (mean difference 5.1 (95% CI of difference 4.1 to 6.1) and FEV1 and MEF25 z-scores were lower (mean difference -2.3 (95% CI -2.9 to -1.7) and -1.8 (95% CI -2.4 to -1.3), respectively; p<0.001 for all). There was a significant negative correlation between LCI and FEV1 (r2 = 0.62) and MEF25 (r2 = 0.46). However, while normal (> or =-1.96 z-scores) FEV1 and MEF25 results were seen in 11 (50%) and 12 (53%) children with CF, respectively, all but one of these children had an abnormally increased LCI. LCI was repeatable in both groups (within subject CV for three measurements 6% for CF and 5% for healthy children). In healthy subjects LCI was independent of age and virtually identical in the British and Swedish children (mean difference 0.1 (95% CI -0.1 to 0.4), p = 0.38) MBW is reproducible between laboratories, generates normal ranges which are constant over childhood, and is more frequently abnormal than spirometry in children with CF.

  1. Effect of respiratory pattern on automated clinical blood pressure measurement: an observational study with normotensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Herakova, Natalia; Nwobodo, Nnenna Harmony Nzeribe; Wang, Ying; Chen, Fei; Zheng, Dingchang

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported that deep breathing could reduce blood pressures (BP) in general. It is also known that BP is decreased during inhalation and increased during exhalation. Therefore, the measured BPs could be potentially different during deep breathing with different lengths of inhalation and exhalation. This study aimed to quantitatively investigate the effect of different respiratory patterns on BPs. Forty healthy subjects (20 males and 20 females, aged from 18 to 60 years) were recruited. Systolic and diastolic BPs (SBP and DBP) were measured using a clinically validated automated BP device. There were two repeated measurement sessions for each subject. Within each session, eight BP measurements were performed, including 4 measurements during deep breathing with different respiratory patterns (Pattern 1: 4.5 s vs 4.5 s; Patter 2: 6 s vs 2 s; Pattern 3: 2 s vs 6 s; and Pattern 4: 1.5 s vs 1.5 s, respectively for the durations of inhalation and exhalation) and additional 4 measurements from 1 min after the four different respiratory patterns. At the beginning and end of the two repeated measurement sessions, there were two baseline BP measurements under resting condition. The key experimental results showed that overall automated SBP significantly decreased by 3.7 ± 5.7 mmHg, 3.9 ± 5.2 mmHg, 1.7 ± 5.9 mmHg and 3.3 ± 5.3 mmHg during deep breathing, respectively for Patterns 1, 2, 3 and 4 (all p < 0.001 except p < 0.05 for Pattern 3). Similarly, the automated DBPs during deep breathing in pattern 1, 2 and 4 decreased by 3.7 ± 5.0 mmHg, 3.7 ± 4.9 mmHg and 4.6 ± 3.9 mmHg respectively (all p < 0.001, except in Pattern 3 with a decrease of 1.0 ± 4.3 mmHg, p = 0.14). Correspondingly, after deep breathing, automated BPs recovered back to normal with no significant difference in comparison with baseline BP (all p > 0.05, except for SBP in Pattern 4). In summary, this study has quantitatively

  2. Lamaze Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Lothian, Judith A.

    2011-01-01

    Lamaze breathing historically is considered the hallmark of Lamaze preparation for childbirth. This column discusses breathing in the larger context of contemporary Lamaze. Controlled breathing enhances relaxation and decreases perception of pain. It is one of many comfort strategies taught in Lamaze classes. In restricted birthing environments, breathing may be the only nonpharmacological comfort strategy available to women. Conscious breathing and relaxation, especially in combination with a wide variety of comfort strategies, can help women avoid unnecessary medical intervention and have a safe, healthy birth. PMID:22379360

  3. Study of the correlations between fractional exhaled nitric oxide in exhaled breath and atopic status, blood eosinophils, FCER2 mutation, and asthma control in Vietnamese children

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Thi-Bich, Hanh; Duong-Thi-Ly, Huong; Thom, Vu Thi; Pham-Thi-Hong, Nhung; Dinh, Long Doan; Le-Thi-Minh, Huong; Craig, Timothy John; Duong-Quy, Sy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) is a biomarker of airway inflammation in asthma. The measurement of FENO is utilized to assist in the diagnosis and treatment of children with asthma, especially for those treated with inhaled corticosteroids. Objectives The aims of this study were to evaluate the correlations between FENO and atopic status, blood eosinophil levels, FCER2 mutation, and asthma control in Vietnamese children. Subjects and methods This was a prospective and descriptive study approved by the local Ethical Board. All children with uncontrolled asthma, seen in the National Hospital of Pediatrics (Hanoi, Vietnam), were included. Exhaled breath FENO, blood eosinophils, skin prick test, total IgE, asthma control test (ACT), and FCER2 gene polymorphism were performed at inclusion. They were followed up at 3 months to evaluate clinical status, FENO levels, and ACT. Results Forty-two children with uncontrolled asthma with a mean age of 10±3 years (6–16 years) were included. The male/female ratio was 2.5/1. The mean FENO levels were 26±25 ppb. FENO was significantly higher in patients with a positive skin prick test for respiratory allergens (P<0.05). FENO was significantly correlated with blood eosinophil levels (r=0.5217; P=0.0004). Five of the 32 subjects (15.6%) had a mutation of FCER2 gene (rs28364072 SNP). In this group, the levels of FENO were highest (37±10 ppb; P<0.05). The levels of FENO were significantly decreased after 3 months of treatment (17±8 ppb vs 26±25 ppb; P<0.05). Significant correlations between inhaled corticosteroid doses and FENO levels occurred at 1 and 3 months (r=0.415, P=0.007; r=0.396, P=0.010; respectively). There were no correlations between FENO levels, ACT, and daily use of salbutamol. After 3 months, asthma remained uncontrolled in 22.2% of children. Conclusion The measurement of FENO levels is a useful and feasible tool to predict clinical, biological, and asthma control in Vietnamese children. PMID

  4. A breathing thorax phantom with independently programmable 6D tumour motion for dosimetric measurements in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steidl, P.; Richter, D.; Schuy, C.; Schubert, E.; Haberer, Th; Durante, M.; Bert, C.

    2012-04-01

    Irradiation of moving targets using a scanned ion beam can cause clinically intolerable under- and overdosages within the target volume due to the interplay effect. Several motion mitigation techniques such as gating, beam tracking and rescanning are currently investigated to overcome this restriction. To enable detailed experimental studies of potential mitigation techniques a complex thorax phantom was developed. The phantom consists of an artificial thorax with ribs to introduce density changes. The contraction of the thorax can be controlled by a stepping motor. A robotic driven detector head positioned inside the thorax mimics e.g. a lung tumour. The detector head comprises 20 ionization chambers and 5 radiographic films for target dose measurements. The phantom’s breathing as well as the 6D tumour motion (3D translation, 3D rotation) can be programmed independently and adjusted online. This flexibility allows studying the dosimetric effects of correlation mismatches between internal and external motions, irregular breathing, or baseline drifts to name a few. Commercial motion detection systems, e.g. VisionRT or Anzai belt, can be mounted as they would be mounted in a patient case. They are used to control the 4D treatment delivery and to generate data for 4D dose calculation. To evaluate the phantom’s properties, measurements addressing reproducibility, stability, temporal behaviour and performance of dedicated breathing manoeuvres were performed. In addition, initial dosimetric tests for treatment with a scanned carbon beam are reported.

  5. A breathing thorax phantom with independently programmable 6D tumour motion for dosimetric measurements in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Steidl, P; Richter, D; Schuy, C; Schubert, E; Haberer, Th; Durante, M; Bert, C

    2012-04-21

    Irradiation of moving targets using a scanned ion beam can cause clinically intolerable under- and overdosages within the target volume due to the interplay effect. Several motion mitigation techniques such as gating, beam tracking and rescanning are currently investigated to overcome this restriction. To enable detailed experimental studies of potential mitigation techniques a complex thorax phantom was developed. The phantom consists of an artificial thorax with ribs to introduce density changes. The contraction of the thorax can be controlled by a stepping motor. A robotic driven detector head positioned inside the thorax mimics e.g. a lung tumour. The detector head comprises 20 ionization chambers and 5 radiographic films for target dose measurements. The phantom's breathing as well as the 6D tumour motion (3D translation, 3D rotation) can be programmed independently and adjusted online. This flexibility allows studying the dosimetric effects of correlation mismatches between internal and external motions, irregular breathing, or baseline drifts to name a few. Commercial motion detection systems, e.g. VisionRT or Anzai belt, can be mounted as they would be mounted in a patient case. They are used to control the 4D treatment delivery and to generate data for 4D dose calculation. To evaluate the phantom's properties, measurements addressing reproducibility, stability, temporal behaviour and performance of dedicated breathing manoeuvres were performed. In addition, initial dosimetric tests for treatment with a scanned carbon beam are reported.

  6. Principles of Blood Pressure Measurement - Current Techniques, Office vs Ambulatory Blood Pressure Measurement.

    PubMed

    Vischer, Annina S; Burkard, Thilo

    2016-07-15

    Blood pressure measurement has a long history and a crucial role in clinical medicine. Manual measurement using a mercury sphygmomanometer and a stethoscope remains the Gold Standard. However, this technique is technically demanding and commonly leads to faulty values. Automatic devices have helped to improve and simplify the technical aspects, but a standardised procedure of obtaining comparable measurements remains problematic and may therefore limit their validity in clinical practice. This underlines the importance of less error-prone measurement methods such as ambulatory or home blood pressure measurements and automated office blood pressure measurements. These techniques may help to uncover patients with otherwise unrecognised or overestimated arterial hypertension. Additionally these techniques may yield a better prognostic value.

  7. Spatial distribution of airway wall displacements during breathing and bronchoconstriction measured by ultrasound elastography using finite element image registration.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Brian C; Lutchen, Kenneth R; Barbone, Paul E

    2017-03-01

    With every breath, the airways within the lungs are strained. This periodic stretching is thought to play an important role in determining airway caliber in health and disease. Particularly, deep breaths can mitigate excessive airway narrowing in healthy subjects, but this beneficial effect is absent in asthmatics, perhaps due to an inability to stretch the airway smooth muscle (ASM) embedded within an airway wall. The heterogeneous composition throughout an airway wall likely modulates the strain felt by the ASM but the magnitude of ASM strain is difficult to measure directly. In this study, we optimized a finite element image registration method to measure the spatial distribution of displacements and strains throughout an airway wall during pressure inflation within the physiological breathing range before and after induced narrowing with acetylcholine (ACh). The method was shown to be repeatable, and displacements estimated from different image sequences of the same deformation agreed to within 5.3μm (0.77%). We found the magnitude and spatial distribution of displacements were radially and longitudinally heterogeneous. The region in the middle layer of the airway experienced the largest radial strain due to a transmural pressure (Ptm) increase simulating tidal breathing and a deep inspiration (DI), while the region containing the ASM (i.e., closest to the lumen) strained least. During induced narrowing with ACh, we observed temporal longitudinal heterogeneity of the airway wall. After constriction, the displacements and strain are much smaller than the relaxed airway and the pattern of strains changed, suggesting the airway stiffened heterogeneously. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. 21 CFR 864.5950 - Blood volume measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood volume measuring device. 864.5950 Section... § 864.5950 Blood volume measuring device. (a) Identification. A blood volume measuring device is a..., and total blood volume. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  9. 21 CFR 864.5950 - Blood volume measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood volume measuring device. 864.5950 Section... § 864.5950 Blood volume measuring device. (a) Identification. A blood volume measuring device is a..., and total blood volume. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  10. 21 CFR 864.5950 - Blood volume measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood volume measuring device. 864.5950 Section... § 864.5950 Blood volume measuring device. (a) Identification. A blood volume measuring device is a..., and total blood volume. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  11. 21 CFR 864.5950 - Blood volume measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood volume measuring device. 864.5950 Section... § 864.5950 Blood volume measuring device. (a) Identification. A blood volume measuring device is a..., and total blood volume. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  12. The impedance threshold device (ITD-7)--a new device for combat casualty care to augment circulation and blood pressure in hypotensive spontaneously breathing warfighters.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Don; Convertino, Vic; Idris, Ahamed; Smith, Stephen; Lindstrom, David; Parquette, Brent; Aufderheide, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Inspiration through -7cm H2O resistance results in an increase in venous blood flow back to the heart and a subsequent increase in cardiac output and blood pressure in hypotensive animals and patients. Breathing through the impedance threshold device with 7cm H2O resistance (ITD-7) also reduces intracranial pressure with each inspiration, thereby providing greater blood flow to the brain. A new device called an ITD-7 was developed to exploit these physiological mechanisms to buy time in hypotensive War Fighters when other therapies are not readily available. Animal and clinical data with the ITD-7 demonstrate the potential value and limitations of this new non-invasive approach to enhancing circulation.

  13. Factors Influencing Continuous Breath Signal in Intubated and Mechanically-Ventilated Intensive Care Unit Patients Measured by an Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jan Hendrik; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Colombo, Camilla; Sterk, Peter J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Bos, Lieuwe D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Continuous breath analysis by electronic nose (eNose) technology in the intensive care unit (ICU) may be useful in monitoring (patho) physiological changes. However, the application of breath monitoring in a non-controlled clinical setting introduces noise into the data. We hypothesized that the sensor signal is influenced by: (1) humidity in the side-stream; (2) patient-ventilator disconnections and the nebulization of medication; and (3) changes in ventilator settings and the amount of exhaled CO2. We aimed to explore whether the aforementioned factors introduce noise into the signal, and discuss several approaches to reduce this noise. Methods: Study in mechanically-ventilated ICU patients. Exhaled breath was monitored using a continuous eNose with metal oxide sensors. Linear (mixed) models were used to study hypothesized associations. Results: In total, 1251 h of eNose data were collected. First, the initial 15 min of the signal was discarded. There was a negative association between humidity and Sensor 1 (Fixed-effect β: −0.05 ± 0.002) and a positive association with Sensors 2–4 (Fixed-effect β: 0.12 ± 0.001); the signal was corrected for this noise. Outliers were most likely due to noise and therefore removed. Sensor values were positively associated with end-tidal CO2, tidal volume and the pressure variables. The signal was corrected for changes in these ventilator variables after which the associations disappeared. Conclusion: Variations in humidity, ventilator disconnections, nebulization of medication and changes of ventilator settings indeed influenced exhaled breath signals measured in ventilated patients by continuous eNose analysis. We discussed several approaches to reduce the effects of these noise inducing variables. PMID:27556467

  14. Sensitivity and specificity of an abbreviated 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test for measurement of pancreatic exocrine function

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Viola; Wolfram, Kristina U; Rosien, Ulrich; Layer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background A modified 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test (13C -MTGT) detects moderate pancreatic exocrine insufficiency noninvasively and reliably, but it requires prolonged breath sampling (6 hours (hr)). Objective We aimed to investigate whether 13C -MTGT can be abbreviated, to optimize clinical usability. Methods We analyzed the 13C-MTGT of 200 consecutive patients, retrospectively. Cumulative 1–5 hr 13C-exhalation values were compared with the standard parameter (6-hr cumulative 13C-exhalation). We determined the sensitivity and specificity of shortened breath sampling periods, by comparison with the normal values from 10 healthy volunteers, whom also underwent a secretin test to quantitate pancreatic secretion. Moreover, we evaluated the influence of gastric emptying (GE), using a 13C-octanoic acid breath test in a subset (N = 117). Results The 1–5 hr cumulative 13C-exhalation tests correlated highly and significantly with the standard parameter (p < 0.0001). Sensitivity for detection of impaired lipolysis was high (≥77%), but the specificity was low (≥38%) for the early measurements. Both parameters were high after 4 hrs (88% and 94%, respectively) and 5 hrs (98% and 91%, respectively). Multivariate linear correlation analysis confirmed that GE strongly influenced early postprandial 13C-exhalation during the 13C-MTGT. Conclusion Shortening of the 13C -MTGT from 6 to 4 hrs of duration was associated with similar diagnostic accuracy, yet increased clinical usability. The influence of GE on early postprandial results of the 13C-MTGT precluded further abbreviation of the test. PMID:25083286

  15. Multiple breath inert gas washout as a measure of ventilation distribution in children with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Aurora, P; Gustafsson, P; Bush, A; Lindblad, A; Oliver, C; Wallis, C; Stocks, J

    2004-01-01

    Background: Multiple breath inert gas washout (MBW) has been suggested as a tool for detecting early cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. A study was undertaken to compare the relative sensitivity of MBW and spirometry for detecting abnormal lung function in school age children with CF and to compare MBW results obtained from healthy children in the UK with those recently reported from Sweden. Methods: Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and maximal expiratory flow when 25% of forced vital capacity remains to be expired (MEF25) were compared with the lung clearance index (LCI) derived from sulphur hexafluoride MBW in 22 children with CF aged 6–16 years and in 33 healthy controls. Results: LCI was higher in children with CF than in healthy controls (mean difference 5.1 (95% CI of difference 4.1 to 6.1) and FEV1 and MEF25 z-scores were lower (mean difference –2.3 (95% CI –2.9 to –1.7) and –1.8 (95% CI –2.4 to –1.3), respectively; p<0.001 for all). There was a significant negative correlation between LCI and FEV1 (r2 = 0.62) and MEF25 (r2 = 0.46). However, while normal (⩾–1.96 z-scores) FEV1 and MEF25 results were seen in 11 (50%) and 12 (53%) children with CF, respectively, all but one of these children had an abnormally increased LCI. LCI was repeatable in both groups (within subject CV for three measurements 6% for CF and 5% for healthy children). In healthy subjects LCI was independent of age and virtually identical in the British and Swedish children (mean difference 0.1 (95% CI –0.1 to 0.4), p = 0.38) Conclusions: MBW is reproducible between laboratories, generates normal ranges which are constant over childhood, and is more frequently abnormal than spirometry in children with CF. PMID:15563707

  16. Fiber optic sensors for measuring angular position and rotational speed. [air breathing engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Two optical sensors, a 360 deg rotary encoder and a tachometer, were built for operation with the light source and detectors located remotely from the sensors. The source and detectors were coupled to the passive sensing heads through 3.65 meter fiber optic cables. The rotary encoder and tachometer were subjected to limited environmental testing. They were installed on an air breathing engine during recent altitude tests. Over 100 hours of engine operation were accumulated without any failure of either device.

  17. Measurement of Liver Blood Flow: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Stansby, G. P.; Hobbs, K. E. F.; Hawkes, D. J.; Colchester, A. C. F.

    1991-01-01

    The study of hepatic haemodynamics is of importance in understanding both hepatic physiology and disease processes as well as assessing the effects of portosystemic shunting and liver transplantation. The liver has the most complicated circulation of any organ and many physiological and pathological processes can affect it1,2. This review surveys the methods available for assessing liver blood flow, examines the different parameters being measured and outlines problems of applicability and interpretation for each technique. The classification of these techniques is to some extent arbitrary and several so called “different” methods may share certain common principles. The methods reviewed have been classified into two groups (Table 1): those primarily reflecting flow through discrete vessels or to the whole organ and those used to assess local microcirculatory blood flow. All techniques have their advantages and disadvantages and in some situations a combination may provide the most information. In addition, because of the many factors affecting liver blood flow and sinusoidal perfusion, readings in a single subject may vary depending on positioning, recent food intake, anxiety, anaesthesia and drug therapy. This must be borne in mind if different studies are to be meaningfully compared. PMID:1931785

  18. Selective optogenetic stimulation of the retrotrapezoid nucleus in sleeping rats activates breathing without changing blood pressure or causing arousal or sighs

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Peter G. R.; Kanbar, Roy; Viar, Kenneth E.; Stornetta, Ruth L.

    2015-01-01

    Combined optogenetic activation of the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN; a CO2/proton-activated brainstem nucleus) with nearby catecholaminergic neurons (C1 and A5), or selective C1 neuron stimulation, increases blood pressure (BP) and breathing, causes arousal from non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep, and triggers sighs. Here we wished to determine which of these physiological responses are elicited when RTN neurons are selectively activated. The left rostral RTN and nearby A5 neurons were transduced with channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2+) using a lentiviral vector. Very few C1 cells were transduced. BP, breathing, EEG, and neck EMG were monitored. During non-REM sleep, photostimulation of ChR2+ neurons (20s, 2-20 Hz) instantly increased V̇e without changing BP (13 rats). V̇e and BP were unaffected by light in nine control (ChR2−) rats. Photostimulation produced no sighs and caused arousal (EEG desynchronization) more frequently in ChR2+ than ChR2− rats (62 ± 5% of trials vs. 25 ± 2%; P < 0.0001). Six ChR2+ rats then received spinal injections of a saporin-based toxin that spared RTN neurons but destroyed surrounding catecholaminergic neurons. Photostimulation of the ChR2+ neurons produced the same ventilatory stimulation before and after lesion, but arousal was no longer elicited. Overall (all ChR2+ rats combined), ΔV̇e correlated with the number of ChR2+ RTN neurons whereas arousal probability correlated with the number of ChR2+ catecholaminergic neurons. In conclusion, RTN neurons activate breathing powerfully and, unlike the C1 cells, have minimal effects on BP and have a weak arousal capability at best. A5 neuron stimulation produces little effect on breathing and BP but does appear to facilitate arousal. PMID:25858492

  19. Cognition, temperament, and cerebral blood flow velocity in toddlers and preschool children with sleep-disordered breathing or behavioral insomnia of childhood.

    PubMed

    Spooner, Rachael; Lushington, Kurt; Keage, Hannah A D; Blunden, Sarah; Kennedy, J Declan; Schembri, Mark; Wabnitz, David; Martin, A James; Kohler, Mark J

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive decrements, problematic behaviors, and increased cerebral blood flow velocities (CBFVs) have been reported in children aged 3-7 years with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). Whether similar impairments exist in younger children or those with behavioral insomnia of childhood (BIC) remains unclear. This study aimed to compare cognition and temperament in children aged 1-5 years with SDB or BIC to healthy control children, and to investigate whether cognitive or behavioral deficits associated with sleep problems are related to changes in CBFV. Toddlers and preschool-aged children (12-67 months) who had been referred for the clinical evaluation of SDB (n = 20) or BIC (n = 13) and a comparative sample of non-snoring healthy sleepers (controls; n = 77) were recruited from the community. Children underwent cognitive assessment (Mullen's Scale of Early Learning) and measurement of resting bilateral CBFV in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) using Transcranial Doppler. Parents completed temperament scales (Early Childhood or Childhood Behavior Questionnaire), a sleep problem questionnaire (Pediatric Sleep Problem Survey Instrument) and performed home-based pediatric sleep monitoring (Actigraphy and Sleep Diary). SDB children demonstrated impaired receptive skills, more hyperactive and energetic temperaments, and higher bilateral CBFV than controls and children with BIC. Logistic regression analyses indicated that impaired cognition, temperamental difficulties, and increased CBFV are independently associated with SDB. During early childhood, problematic temperaments, cognitive deficits, and altered cerebrovascular functioning are associated with SDB but not BIC. CBFV does not appear to mediate these daytime deficits and instead may be an independent outcome of SDB. The findings support the need for an early intervention in pediatric SDB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Hypoxemia (Low Blood Oxygen)

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms Hypoxemia (low blood oxygen) By Mayo Clinic Staff Hypoxemia is a below-normal level of oxygen in your blood, specifically in the arteries. Hypoxemia ... of breath. Hypoxemia is determined by measuring the oxygen level in a blood sample taken from an ...

  1. Blood Gas Analyzer Accuracy of Glucose Measurements.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yafen; Wanderer, Jonathan; Nichols, James H; Klonoff, David; Rice, Mark J

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the comparability of glucose levels measured with blood gas analyzers (BGAs) and by central laboratories (CLs). Glucose measurements obtained between June 1, 2007, and March 1, 2016, at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center were reviewed. The agreement between CL and BGA results were assessed using Bland-Altman, consensus error grid (CEG), and surveillance error grid (SEG) analyses. We further analyzed the BGAs' performance against the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 2014 draft guidance and 2016 final guidance for blood glucose monitoring and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 15197:2013 standard. We analyzed 2671 paired glucose measurements, including 50 pairs of hypoglycemic values (1.9%). Bland-Altman analysis yielded a mean bias of -3.1 mg/dL, with 98.1% of paired values meeting the 95% limits of agreement. In the hypoglycemic range, the mean bias was -0.8 mg/dL, with 100% of paired values meeting the 95% limits of agreement. When using CEG analysis, 99.9% of the paired values fell within the no risk zone. Similar results were found using SEG analysis. For the FDA 2014 draft guidance, our data did not meet the target compliance rate. For the FDA 2016 final guidance, our data partially met the target compliance rate. For the ISO standard, our data met the target compliance rate. In this study, the agreement for glucose measurement between common BGAs and CL instruments met the ISO 2013 standard. However, BGA accuracy did not meet the stricter requirements of the FDA 2014 draft guidance or 2016 final guidance. Fortunately, plotting these results on either the CEG or the SEG revealed no results in either the great or extreme clinical risk zones. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Automatic Blood Pressure Measurements During Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Charles S.

    1985-01-01

    Microprocessor circuits and a computer algorithm for automatically measuring blood pressure during ambulatory monitoring and exercise stress testing have been under development at SRI International. A system that records ECG, Korotkov sound, and arm cuff pressure for off-line calculation of blood pressure has been delivered to NASA, and an LSLE physiological monitoring system that performs the algorithm calculations in real-time is being constructed. The algorithm measures the time between the R-wave peaks and the corresponding Korotkov sound on-set (RK-interval). Since the curve of RK-interval versus cuff pressure during deflation is predictable and slowly varying, windows can be set around the curve to eliminate false Korotkov sound detections that result from noise. The slope of this curve, which will generally decrease during exercise, is the inverse of the systolic slope of the brachial artery pulse. In measurements taken during treadmill stress testing, the changes in slopes of subjects with coronary artery disease were markedly different from the changes in slopes of healthy subjects. Measurements of slope and O2 consumption were also made before and after ten days of bed rest during NASA/Ames Research Center bed rest studies. Typically, the maximum rate of O2 consumption during the post-bed rest test is less than the maximum rate during the pre-bed rest test. The post-bed rest slope changes differ from the pre-bed rest slope changes, and the differences are highly correlated with the drop in the maximum rate of O2 consumption. We speculate that the differences between pre- and post-bed rest slopes are due to a drop in heart contractility.

  3. Automatic Blood Pressure Measurements During Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Charles S.

    1985-01-01

    Microprocessor circuits and a computer algorithm for automatically measuring blood pressure during ambulatory monitoring and exercise stress testing have been under development at SRI International. A system that records ECG, Korotkov sound, and arm cuff pressure for off-line calculation of blood pressure has been delivered to NASA, and an LSLE physiological monitoring system that performs the algorithm calculations in real-time is being constructed. The algorithm measures the time between the R-wave peaks and the corresponding Korotkov sound on-set (RK-interval). Since the curve of RK-interval versus cuff pressure during deflation is predictable and slowly varying, windows can be set around the curve to eliminate false Korotkov sound detections that result from noise. The slope of this curve, which will generally decrease during exercise, is the inverse of the systolic slope of the brachial artery pulse. In measurements taken during treadmill stress testing, the changes in slopes of subjects with coronary artery disease were markedly different from the changes in slopes of healthy subjects. Measurements of slope and O2 consumption were also made before and after ten days of bed rest during NASA/Ames Research Center bed rest studies. Typically, the maximum rate of O2 consumption during the post-bed rest test is less than the maximum rate during the pre-bed rest test. The post-bed rest slope changes differ from the pre-bed rest slope changes, and the differences are highly correlated with the drop in the maximum rate of O2 consumption. We speculate that the differences between pre- and post-bed rest slopes are due to a drop in heart contractility.

  4. Measuring Ventilatory Activity with Structured Light Plethysmography (SLP) Reduces Instrumental Observer Effect and Preserves Tidal Breathing Variability in Healthy and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Niérat, Marie-Cécile; Dubé, Bruno-Pierre; Llontop, Claudia; Bellocq, Agnès; Layachi Ben Mohamed, Lila; Rivals, Isabelle; Straus, Christian; Similowski, Thomas; Laveneziana, Pierantonio

    2017-01-01

    The use of a mouthpiece to measure ventilatory flow with a pneumotachograph (PNT) introduces a major perturbation to breathing (“instrumental/observer effect”) and suffices to modify the respiratory behavior. Structured light plethysmography (SLP) is a non-contact method of assessment of breathing pattern during tidal breathing. Firstly, we validated the SLP measurements by comparing timing components of the ventilatory pattern obtained by SLP vs. PNT under the same condition; secondly, we compared SLP to SLP+PNT measurements of breathing pattern to evaluate the disruption of breathing pattern and breathing variability in healthy and COPD subjects. Measurements were taken during tidal breathing with SLP alone and SLP+PNT recording in 30 COPD and healthy subjects. Measurements included: respiratory frequency (Rf), inspiratory, expiratory, and total breath time/duration (Ti, Te, and Tt). Passing-Bablok regression analysis was used to evaluate the interchangeability of timing components of the ventilatory pattern (Rf, Ti, Te, and Tt) between measurements performed under the following experimental conditions: SLP vs. PNT, SLP+PNT vs. SLP, and SLP+PNT vs. PNT. The variability of different ventilatory variables was assessed through their coefficients of variation (CVs). In healthy: according to Passing-Bablok regression, Rf, TI, TE and TT were interchangeable between measurements obtained under the three experimental conditions (SLP vs. PNT, SLP+PNT vs. SLP, and SLP+PNT vs. PNT). All the CVs describing “traditional” ventilatory variables (Rf, Ti, Te, Ti/Te, and Ti/Tt) were significantly smaller in SLP+PNT condition. This was not the case for more “specific” SLP-derived variables. In COPD: according to Passing-Bablok regression, Rf, TI, TE, and TT were interchangeable between measurements obtained under SLP vs. PNT and SLP+PNT vs. PNT, whereas only Rf, TE, and TT were interchangeable between measurements obtained under SLP+PNT vs. SLP. However, most discrete

  5. Comparison of respiratory function during TIVA (romifidine, ketamine, midazolam) and isoflurane anaesthesia in spontaneously breathing ponies Part I: blood gas analysis and cardiorespiratory variables.

    PubMed

    Steblaj, Barbara; Schauvliege, Stijn; Pavlidou, Kiriaki; Gasthuys, Frank; Savvas, Ioannis; Duchateau, Luc; Kowalczyk, Lidia; Kowalczk, Lidia; Moens, Yves

    2014-11-01

    To compare pulmonary function and gas exchange in ponies during maintenance of anaesthesia with isoflurane or by a total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) technique. Experimental, cross-over study. Six healthy ponies weighing mean 286 (range 233-388) ± SD 61 kg, age 13 (9-16) ± 3 years. The ponies were anaesthetized twice, a minimum of two weeks apart. Following sedation with romifidine [80 μg kg(-1) intravenously (IV)], anaesthesia was induced IV with midazolam (0.06 mg kg(-1)) and ketamine (2.5 mg kg(-1), then maintained either with inhaled isoflurane (Fe'Iso = 1.1 vol%) (T-ISO) or an IV infusion of romifidine (120 μg kg(-1) hour(-1)), midazolam (0.09 mg kg(-1) hour(-1) IV) and ketamine (3.3 mg kg(-1) hour(-1)) (T-TIVA). Ponies were placed in lateral recumbency. Breathing was spontaneous and Fi'O(2) 60%. After an instrumentation/stabilisation period of 30 minutes, arterial and mixed venous blood samples were taken simultaneously every 10 minutes for 60 minutes and analysed immediately. Oxygen extraction ratio (O(2)ER) and venous admixture were calculated. Tidal volume (TV), minute volume (MV), respiratory rate (f(R)), packed cell volume (PCV), arterial blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were measured and recorded. Data were analysed with mixed model anova (α = 0.05). Treatments were compared overall and at two selected time points (T30 and T60) using Bonferroni correction. Arterial and mixed venous partial pressures of O(2) and CO(2), and TV were significantly lower and MV and f(R) were higher in T-TIVA compared to T-ISO. Venous admixture did not differ between treatments. O(2) R was significantly higher in T-TIVA. Mean arterial pressure was higher and HR was lower in T-TIVA compared to T-ISO. Whilst arterial CO(2) was within an acceptable range during both protocols, the impairment of oxygenation was more pronounced with the T-TIVA evidenced by lower arterial and venous oxygen partial pressures. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American

  6. A headset-mounted mini sampler for measuring exposure to welding aerosol in the breathing zone.

    PubMed

    Lidén, Göran; Surakka, Jouni

    2009-03-01

    There is a need for a small personal aerosol sampler for measuring occupational exposure to airborne particles in the breathing zone. Existing aerosol samplers are too large to be mounted inside modern welder's protective equipment without disturbing the worker. A headset-mounted mini sampler has been developed to fill this gap with focus on manganese exposure. This mini sampler is easy to use and can be mounted inside modern, slimline welder's face shield. The mini sampler is based on a commercially available 13-mm filter holder that has been modified to incorporate an inlet nozzle made of aluminium. The nominal flow rate of the mini sampler is 0.75 l min(-1). The mini sampler is to be worn mounted on a headset, modified from professional microphone headsets. Several aspects related to using the mini sampler have been tested by personal and static sampling at five workplaces and in the laboratory. Four headset models were tested for their suitability as a sampler holder, of which three models were accepted by the welders. The sampling bias of the mini sampler versus the IOM sampler and the open-face 25-mm filter holder, respectively, depends on the size distribution of the sampled aerosol. At the lowest encountered mass concentration ratio of the open-face 25-mm filter holder to the IOM sampler (0.65), the sampling bias of the mini sampler versus the IOM sampler is approximately -26% and versus the open-face 25-mm filter holder is approximately +12%. For manganese, the negative root mean square (RMS) sampling bias of the mini sampler versus the IOM sampler is -0.046 and versus the open-face 25-mm filter holder is non-significant. Both these biases are statistically non-significant. The mini sampler can therefore be employed for determining welders' occupational exposure to manganese. The pressure drop across the filter can become excessive due to the small filtration area. Compared to the Casella Apex pump, the SKC AirChek2000 pump was generally found to be able

  7. Stakeholder-Engaged Measure Development for Pediatric Obstructive Sleep-Disordered Breathing: The Obstructive Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Adenotonsillectomy Knowledge Scale for Parents.

    PubMed

    Links, Anne R; Tunkel, David E; Boss, Emily F

    2017-01-01

    Parental decision making about adenotonsillectomy (AT) for obstructive sleep-disordered breathing (oSDB) is associated with decisional conflict that may be alleviated with improved knowledge about symptoms and treatments. To develop a measure of parental knowledge about oSDB and AT. A sequential design was used for scale development. A prototype measure containing 9 oSDB and AT themes and 85 items was administered in survey format via an online platform. Participants included 19 clinician experts (otolaryngologists and pediatricians) and 13 laymen (parents of children who snore or do not snore, and other adults). Quantitative and qualitative responses were used to modify the measure and create the knowledge scale. Content validity of the scale was established through expert feedback and evaluation. Criterion validity was established with t test comparisons of experts with laymen. Reliability of the responses was assessed with Cronbach α testing. An 85-item prototype measure and 39-item modified measure were evaluated for consensus/approval and psychometric integrity. Of 45 potential participants, 32 individuals (71%) responded to the prototype scale. Respondents included 19 clinician experts (59%) (otolaryngologists and pediatricians) and 13 laymen (41%) (parents of children who snore [n = 8] or do not snore [n = 2] and other adults [n = 3]); demographic data were not collected. Content analysis and qualitative feedback were largely rated positively: 27 respondents (84%) stated that the measure was a good evaluation of knowledge, 30 respondents (94%) commented that the items were clear, and 31 individuals (97%) approved of its organization, although there were several suggestions for rewording and/or addition of response options. Experts identified themes most important for assessing oSDB (symptoms) and AT (experiences: risks and benefits) knowledge. These qualitative comments were used to modify the scale, and items were eliminated if more than 2 were

  8. 21 CFR 870.1130 - Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. 870... Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. (a) Identification. A noninvasive blood pressure measurement... three pressures can be derived through the use of tranducers placed on the surface of the body....

  9. Experimental measurement of breath exit velocity and expirated bloodstain patterns produced under different exhalation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, P H; Laffra, A M; Hoogendorp, N K; Taylor, M C; Jermy, M C

    2017-02-02

    In an attempt to obtain a deeper understanding of the factors which determine the characteristics of expirated bloodstain patterns, the mechanism of formation of airborne droplets was studied. Hot wire anemometry measured air velocity, 25 mm from the lips, for 31 individuals spitting, coughing and blowing. Expirated stains were produced by the same mechanisms performed by one individual with different volumes of a synthetic blood substitute in their mouth. The atomization of the liquid at the lips was captured with high-speed video, and the resulting stain patterns were captured on paper targets. Peak air velocities varied for blowing (6 to 64 m/s), spitting (1 to 64 m/s) and coughing (1 to 47 m/s), with mean values of 12 m/s (blowing), 7 m/s (spitting) and 4 m/s (coughing). There was a large (55-65%) variation between individuals in air velocity produced, as well as variation between trials for a single individual (25-35%). Spitting and blowing involved similar lip shapes. Blowing had a longer duration of airflow, though it is not the duration but the peak velocity at the beginning of the air motion which appears to control the atomization of blood in the mouth and thus stain formation. Spitting could project quantities of drops at least 1600 mm. Coughing had a shorter range of near 500 mm, with a few droplets travelling further. All mechanisms could spread drops over an angle >45°. Spitting was the most effective for projecting drops of blood from the mouth, due to its combination of chest motion and mouth shape producing strong air velocities. No unique method was found of inferring the physical action (spitting, coughing or blowing) from characteristics of the pattern, except possibly distance travelled. Diameter range in expirated bloodstains varied from very small (<1 mm) in a dense formation to several millimetres. No unique method was found of discriminating expirated patterns from gunshot or impact patterns on stain shape alone. Only 20% of the

  10. MR imaging of focal lung lesions: elimination of flow and motion artifact by breath-hold ECG-gated and black-blood techniques on T2-weighted turbo SE and STIR sequences.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Y; Yokoyama, T; Tomiguchi, S; Takahashi, M; Ando, M

    1999-05-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion correction may result in better turbo spin-echo (SE) imaging of the lung. To compare breath-hold cardiac-gated black-blood T2-weighted turbo SE and turbo short-inversion-time inversion-recovery (STIR) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging pulse sequences with conventional breath-hold turbo SE and half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequences for lesion conspicuity of focal lung lesions, 42 patients with focal lung lesions were prospectively studied with MR imaging at 1.5 T. Helical computed tomography was used as a reference. In comparison with the conventional breath-hold turbo SE sequence, all black-blood sequences had fewer image artifacts arising from the heart and blood flow. The overall image quality for the black-blood turbo SE and turbo STIR sequences was superior to that for the breath-hold turbo SE and HASTE sequence (P < 0.01). Not only focal lung lesions but also surrounding inflammatory changes were clearly visualized with these two sequences. With the HASTE sequence, although several slices could be obtained in one breath-hold, both the tumor and vessels appeared blurred. We conclude that T2-weighted turbo SE and turbo STIR imaging of the lung with effective suppression of flow and motion artifacts provide high-quality images in patients with focal lung lesions.

  11. Unilateral focal lesions in the rostrolateral medulla influence chemosensitivity and breathing measured during wakefulness, sleep, and exercise

    PubMed Central

    Morrell, M; Heywood, P; Moosavi, S; Guz, A; Stevens, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The rostrolateral medulla (RLM) has been identified in animals as an important site of chemosensitivity; in humans such site(s) have not been defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the physiological implications of unilateral lesions in the lower brainstem on the control of breathing.
METHODS—In 15 patients breathing was measured awake at rest, asleep, during exercise, and during CO2 stimulation. The lesions were located clinically and by MRI; in nine patients they involved the RLM (RLM group), in six they were in the pons, cerebellum, or medial medulla (Non-RLM group). All RLM group patients, and three non-RLM group patients had ipsilateral Horner's syndrome.
RESULTS—Six of the RLM group had a ventilatory sensitivity to inhaled CO2 (V̇/PET CO2) below normal (group A: V̇/PET CO2, mean, 0.87; range 0.3-1.4 l.min-1/mm Hg). It was normal in all of the non-RLM group (group B: V̇/PET CO2, mean, 3.0; range, 2.6-3.9 min-1/mmHg). There was no significant difference in breathing between groups during relaxed wakefulness (V̇, group A: 7.44 (SD 2.5) l.min-1; group B: 6.02 (SD 1.3) l.min-1; PET CO2, group A: 41.0 (SD 4.2) mm g; group B: 38.3 (SD2.0) mm Hg) or during exercise (V̇/V̇O2: group A: 21 (SD 6.0) l.min-1/l.min-1; group B: 24 (SD 7.3) l.min-1/l.min-1). During sleep, all group A had fragmented sleep compared with only one patient in group B (group A: arousals, range 13 to >60 events/hour); moreover, in group A there was a high incidence of obstructive sleep apnoea associated with hypoxaemia.
CONCLUSION—Patients with unilateral RLM lesions require monitoring during sleep to diagnose any sleep apnoea. The finding that unilateral RLM lesions reduce ventilatory sensitivity to inhaled CO2 is consistent with animal studies. The reduced chemosensitivity had a minimal effect on breathing awake at rest or during exercise.

 PMID:10519871

  12. Validation of a laboratory method of measuring postpartum blood loss.

    PubMed

    Chua, S; Ho, L M; Vanaja, K; Nordstrom, L; Roy, A C; Arulkumaran, S

    1998-01-01

    Laboratory methods give more accurate measurement of blood loss in the postpartum period than visual estimation. In order to evaluate a laboratory method used to quantify blood loss postpartum, blood lost at gynecological operations was collected in a measuring bottle. The measured amount of blood (50-1,000 ml) was then poured onto absorbent paper towels and sanitary pads, in order to mimic conditions when measuring blood loss in clinical trials in the postpartum period. The amount of blood absorbed onto the absorbent paper and sanitary pads was measured by a rapid method of automatic extraction and photometric measurement of alkaline hematin. The study shows that the method provides a reliable and accurate means of measuring blood loss. The error in each case was less than 10% with an intraclass correlation coefficient of almost 1.

  13. Measurement Adherence in the Blood Pressure Self-Measurement Room

    PubMed Central

    Buus, Niels Henrik; Jespersen, Bente; Ahrendt, Peter; Bertelsen, Olav W.; Toftegaard, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: Patients with hypertension or receiving blood pressure (BP)-lowering treatment are often required to self-measure their BP in a dedicated self-measurement room before consultation. Current praxis does not guarantee valid measurements, possibly leading to misdiagnoses or inappropriate antihypertensive medication. The aim of this study was to investigate patients' ability to correctly self-report and follow recommendations. Patients and Methods: We used a context-aware system to gather information on BP measurements and relevant context parameters. Patients were not informed that the system automatically collected behavior data and were instructed to self-report their measurements on a paper sheet as usual. We then compared the automatically recorded data with the self-reported data in order to detect any nonadherent reporting behavior. Also, we investigated the patients' ability to adhere to the measurement recommendations. Results: We found that (1) a third of all 113 participating patients failed to self-report measured BP data correctly and (2) none of the 642 measurements obtained adhered fully to the recommendations. Conclusions: Results indicate that context-aware technology may be useful for accurately modeling aspects of nonadherent patient behavior. This may be used to inform staff of the validity of the measurement and pinpoint patients in need of additional training or to design better aids to assist the patients. The developed system is generally applicable to other self-measurement environments, including the home setting and remote outpatient clinics, as it is built using telemedicine technology and thus well suited for remote monitoring and diagnosis. PMID:23631589

  14. Continuous measurement of oxygen tensions in the air-breathing organ of Pacific tarpon (Megalops cyprinoides) in relation to aquatic hypoxia and exercise.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Roger S; Farrell, Anthony P; Christian, Keith; Clark, Timothy D; Bennett, Michael B; Wells, Rufus M G; Baldwin, John

    2007-07-01

    The Pacific tarpon is an elopomorph teleost fish with an air-breathing organ (ABO) derived from a physostomous gas bladder. Oxygen partial pressure (PO(2)) in the ABO was measured on juveniles (238 g) with fiber-optic sensors during exposure to selected aquatic PO(2) and swimming speeds. At slow speed (0.65 BL s(-1)), progressive aquatic hypoxia triggered the first breath at a mean PO(2) of 8.3 kPa. Below this, opercular movements declined sharply and visibly ceased in most fish below 6 kPa. At aquatic PO(2) of 6.1 kPa and swimming slowly, mean air-breathing frequency was 0.73 min(-1), ABO PO(2) was 10.9 kPa, breath volume was 23.8 ml kg(-1), rate of oxygen uptake from the ABO was 1.19 ml kg(-1) min(-1), and oxygen uptake per breath was 2.32 ml kg(-1). At the fastest experimental speed (2.4 BL s(-1)) at 6.1 kPa, ABO oxygen uptake increased to about 1.90 ml kg(-1) min(-1), through a variable combination of breathing frequency and oxygen uptake per breath. In normoxic water, tarpon rarely breathed air and apparently closed down ABO perfusion, indicated by a drop in ABO oxygen uptake rate to about 1% of that in hypoxic water. This occurred at a wide range of ABO PO(2) (1.7-26.4 kPa), suggesting that oxygen level in the ABO was not regulated by intrinsic receptors.

  15. 21 CFR 870.1130 - Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. 870.1130 Section 870.1130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. (a) Identification. A noninvasive blood pressure...

  16. 21 CFR 870.1130 - Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. 870.1130 Section 870.1130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. (a) Identification. A noninvasive blood pressure...

  17. 21 CFR 870.1130 - Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. 870.1130 Section 870.1130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. (a) Identification. A noninvasive blood pressure...

  18. 21 CFR 870.1130 - Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. 870.1130 Section 870.1130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. (a) Identification. A noninvasive blood pressure...

  19. Previous blood pressure measurement and associated factors in student adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Marina Gabriella Pereira de Andrada; Farah, Breno Quintella; de Barros, Mauro Virgilio Gomes; Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify prevalence of previous blood pressure measurement and analyze some associated factors in adolescents. Methods This cross-sectional study included 6,077 adolescents aged 14 to 19 years. Demographic characteristics included (sex, age, period of study, region of residence, work, skin color, and economic) status, history of blood pressure measurement within last 12 months, local of blood pressure measurement, and reading obtained. To assess associations between previous blood pressure measurement with demographic characteristics and high blood pressure we used descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis. Results Out of the adolescents, 56.8% reported no blood pressure measurement within the last 12 months. The health centers and the physician’s office were most mentioned places for blood pressure measurement (28.3% and 36.9%, respectively). Boys (odds ratio of 1.64 95%CI: 1.46-1.84) aged 14 to 16 years (odds ratio of 1.12; 95%CI: 1.01-1.25), whose economic status was unfavorable (odds ratio of 1.48; 95%CI: 1.32-1.67) were significantly associated with no blood pressure measurement. Working was a protective factor for was not blood pressure measurement (odds ratio of 0.84; 95%CI: 0.73-0.97). Conclusion Most of adolescents did not have their blood pressure measured within the last 12 months. Boys aged 14 to 16 years and those with unfavorable economic status had higher chance of not having their blood pressure measured. PMID:26466061

  20. Continuous measurement of multiple inert and respiratory gas exchange in an anaesthetic breathing system by continuous indirect calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Stuart-Andrews, Christopher; Peyton, Philip; Humphries, Craig; Robinson, Gavin; Lithgow, Brian

    2009-02-01

    A method was tested which permits continuous monitoring from a breathing system of the rate of uptake of multiple gas species, such as occurs in patients during inhalational anaesthesia. The method is an indirect calorimetry technique which uses fresh gas rotameters for control, regulation and measurement of the gas flows into the system, with continuous sampling of mixed exhaust gas, and frequent automated recalibration to maintain accuracy. Its accuracy was tested in 16 patients undergoing pre-cardiopulmonary bypass coronary artery surgery, breathing mixtures of oxygen/air and sevoflurane with/without nitrous oxide, by comparison with the reverse Fick method. Overall mean bias [95% confidence interval (CI)] of rate of uptake was 17.9 [7.3 to 28.5] ml min(-1) for oxygen, 0.04 [-0.42 to 0.50] ml min(-1) for sevoflurane, 10.9 [-16.1 to 37.8] for CO(2), and 8.8 [-14.8 to 32.4] ml min(-1) for nitrous oxide where present. The method proved to be accurate and precise, and allows continuous monitoring of exchange of multiple gases using standard gas analysis devices.

  1. Breath Activity Monitoring With Wearable UWB Radars: Measurement and Analysis of the Pulses Reflected by the Human Body.

    PubMed

    Pittella, Erika; Pisa, Stefano; Cavagnaro, Marta

    2016-07-01

    Measurements of ultrawideband (UWB) pulses reflected by the human body are conducted to evidence the differences in the received signal time behaviors due to respiration phases, and to experimentally verify previously obtained numerical results on the body's organs responsible for pulse reflection. Two experimental setups are used. The first one is based on a commercially available impulse radar system integrated on a single chip, while the second one implements an indirect time-domain reflectometry technique using a vector network analyzer controlled by a LabVIEW virtual instrument running on a laptop. When the UWB source is placed close to the human body, a small reflection due to the lung boundaries is present in the received pulse well distanced in time from the reflection due to the air-skin interface; this reflection proved to be linked to the different respiration phases. The changes in the reflected pulse could be used to detect, through wearable radar systems, lung movements associated with the breath activity. The development of a wearable radar system is of great importance because it allows the breath activity sensing without interfering with the subject daily activities.

  2. Assessment of the reproducibility of the lactulose H2 breath test as a measure of mouth to caecum transit time.

    PubMed Central

    La Brooy, S J; Male, P J; Beavis, A K; Misiewicz, J J

    1983-01-01

    The lactulose H2 breath test is in use as a simple non-invasive measurement of mouth to caecum transit time, but its reproducibility has never been assessed. We have examined the reproducibility of mouth to caecum transit time in 21 normal subjects using lactulose 10, 15, and 20 g; seven subjects being studied with 10 g and 12 each with 15 and 20 g doses. Transit time decreased with increasing doses of lactulose although the differences were not significant between or within (n = 5) individuals. Variation in transit times between individuals was considerable with all doses of lactulose (mean coefficient of variation of 18.5, 29.7 and 28.3% with 10, 15, and 20 g respectively). The addition of lactulose to a liquid meal containing carbohydrate, fat, and protein decreased the coefficient of variation to less than 10% in four subjects studied. The lactulose H2 breath test could be made more reproducible by including a liquid meal. PMID:6618268

  3. Blood Pressure Measurement: Clinic, Home, Ambulatory, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Drawz, Paul E.; Abdalla, Mohamed; Rahman, Mahboob

    2014-01-01

    Blood pressure has traditionally been measured in the clinic setting using the auscultory method and a mercury sphygmomanometer. Technological advances have led to improvements in measuring clinic blood pressure and allowed for measuring blood pressures outside the clinic. This review outlines various methods for evaluating blood pressure and the clinical utility of each type of measurement. Home blood pressures and 24 hour ambulatory blood pressures have improved our ability to evaluate risk for target organ damage and hypertension related morbidity and mortality. Measuring home blood pressures may lead to more active participation in health care by patients and has the potential to improve blood pressure control. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring enables the measuring nighttime blood pressures and diurnal changes, which may be the most accurate predictors of risk associated with elevated blood pressure. Additionally, reducing nighttime blood pressure is feasible and may be an important component of effective antihypertensive therapy. Finally, estimating central aortic pressures and pulse wave velocity are two of the newer methods for assessing blood pressure and hypertension related target organ damage. PMID:22521624

  4. Single-breath clinical imaging of hyperpolarized (129)Xe in the airspaces, barrier, and red blood cells using an interleaved 3D radial 1-point Dixon acquisition.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, S Sivaram; Robertson, Scott H; Freeman, Matthew S; He, Mu; Kelly, Kevin T; Roos, Justus E; Rackley, Craig R; Foster, W Michael; McAdams, H Page; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2016-04-01

    We sought to develop and test a clinically feasible 1-point Dixon, three-dimensional (3D) radial acquisition strategy to create isotropic 3D MR images of (129)Xe in the airspaces, barrier, and red blood cells (RBCs) in a single breath. The approach was evaluated in healthy volunteers and subjects with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). A calibration scan determined the echo time at which (129)Xe in RBCs and barrier were 90° out of phase. At this TE, interleaved dissolved and gas-phase images were acquired using a 3D radial acquisition and were reconstructed separately using the NUFFT algorithm. The dissolved-phase image was phase-shifted to cast RBC and barrier signal into the real and imaginary channels such that the image-derived RBC:barrier ratio matched that from spectroscopy. The RBC and barrier images were further corrected for regional field inhomogeneity using a phase map created from the gas-phase (129)Xe image. Healthy volunteers exhibited largely uniform (129)Xe-barrier and (129)Xe-RBC images. By contrast, (129)Xe-RBC images in IPF subjects exhibited significant signal voids. These voids correlated qualitatively with regions of fibrosis visible on CT. This study illustrates the feasibility of acquiring single-breath, 3D isotropic images of (129)Xe in the airspaces, barrier, and RBCs using a 1-point Dixon 3D radial acquisition. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Aging attenuates the coronary blood flow response to cold air breathing and isometric handgrip in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Muller, Matthew D; Gao, Zhaohui; Mast, Jessica L; Blaha, Cheryl A; Drew, Rachel C; Leuenberger, Urs A; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2012-04-15

    The purpose of this echocardiography study was to measure peak coronary blood flow velocity (CBV(peak)) and left ventricular function (via tissue Doppler imaging) during separate and combined bouts of cold air inhalation (-14 ± 3°C) and isometric handgrip (30% maximum voluntary contraction). Thirteen young adults and thirteen older adults volunteered to participate in this study and underwent echocardiographic examination in the left lateral position. Cold air inhalation was 5 min in duration, and isometric handgrip (grip protocol) was 2 min in duration; a combined stimulus (cold + grip protocol) and a cold pressor test (hand in 1°C water) were also performed. Heart rate, blood pressure, O(2) saturation, and inspired air temperature were monitored on a beat-by-beat basis. The rate-pressure product (RPP) was used as an index of myocardial O(2) demand, and CBV(peak) was used as an index of myocardial O(2) supply. The RPP response to the grip protocol was significantly blunted in older subjects (Δ1,964 ± 396 beats·min(-1)·mmHg) compared with young subjects (Δ3,898 ± 452 beats·min(-1)·mmHg), and the change in CBV(peak) was also blunted (Δ6.3 ± 1.2 vs. 11.2 ± 2.0 cm/s). Paired t-tests showed that older subjects had a greater change in the RPP during the cold + grip protocol [Δ2,697 ± 391 beats·min(-1)·mmHg compared with the grip protocol alone (Δ2,115 ± 375 beats·min(-1)·mmHg)]. An accentuated RPP response to the cold + grip protocol (compared with the grip protocol alone) without a concomitant increase in CBV(peak) may suggest a dissociation between the O(2) supply and demand in the coronary circulation. In conclusion, older adults have blunted coronary blood flow responses to isometric exercise.

  6. Bad Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... and soda poor dental hygiene (say: HI-jeen), meaning not brushing and flossing regularly smoking and other tobacco use Poor oral hygiene leads to bad breath because when food particles are left in your mouth, they can rot ...

  7. Bad Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... for lunch. But certain strong-smelling foods like onions and garlic can cause bad breath. So can ... leave behind strong smells, like cabbage, garlic, raw onions, and coffee. If you’re trying to lose ...

  8. Breath odor

    MedlinePlus

    ... drain their stomach. The breath may have an ammonia-like odor (also described as urine-like or " ... Is there a specific odor (such as fish, ammonia, fruit, feces, or alcohol)? Have you recently eaten ...

  9. [An integrated system of blood pressure measurement with bluetooth communication].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Jing; Sun, Hongyang; Xu, Zuyang; Chai, Xinyu

    2012-07-01

    The development of the integrated blood pressure system with bluetooth communication function is introduced. Experimental results show that the system can complete blood pressure measurement and data transmission wireless effectively, which can be used in m-Health in future.

  10. Free-breathing 3D whole-heart black-blood imaging with motion sensitized driven equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Subashini; Hu, Peng; Kissinger, Kraig V; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois; Schmidt, Ehud J; Kozerke, Sebastian; Nezafat, Reza

    2012-08-01

    To assess the efficacy and robustness of motion sensitized driven equilibrium (MSDE) for blood suppression in volumetric 3D whole-heart cardiac MR. To investigate the efficacy of MSDE on blood suppression and myocardial signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss on different imaging sequences, seven healthy adult subjects were imaged using 3D electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered MSDE-prep T(1) -weighted turbo spin echo (TSE), and spoiled gradient echo (GRE), after optimization of MSDE parameters in a pilot study of five subjects. Imaging artifacts, myocardial and blood SNR were assessed. Subsequently, the feasibility of isotropic spatial resolution MSDE-prep black-blood was assessed in six subjects. Finally, 15 patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease were recruited to be imaged using a conventional multislice 2D double inversion recovery (DIR) TSE imaging sequence and a 3D MSDE-prep spoiled GRE. The MSDE-prep yielded significant blood suppression (75%-92%), enabling a volumetric 3D black-blood assessment of the whole heart with significantly improved visualization of the chamber walls. The MSDE-prep also allowed successful acquisition of black-blood images with isotropic spatial resolution. In the patient study, 3D black-blood MSDE-prep and DIR resulted in similar blood suppression in left ventricle and right ventricle walls but the MSDE-prep had superior myocardial signal and wall sharpness. MSDE-prep allows volumetric black-blood imaging of the heart. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Observer error in blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, P D; Johnson, D L

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment undertaken to determine observer error in measuring blood pressure by the auscultatory method. A microcomputer was used to display a simulated mercury manometer and play back tape-recorded Korotkoff sounds synchronized with the fall of the mercury column. Each observer's readings were entered into the computer, which displayed a histogram of all readings taken up to that point and thus showed the variation among observers. The procedure, which could easily be adapted for use in teaching, was used to test 311 observers drawn from physicians, nurses, medical students, nursing students and others at nine health care institutions in Ottawa. The results showed a strong bias for even-digit readings and standard deviations of roughly 5 to 6 mm Hg. The standard deviation for the systolic readings was somewhat smaller for the physicians as a group than for the nurses (3.5 v. 5.9 mm Hg). However, the standard deviations for the diastolic readings were roughly equal for these two groups (approximately 5.5 mm Hg). Images Fig. 1 PMID:3756693

  12. Oscillometric blood pressure measurement: progress and problems.

    PubMed

    van Montfrans, G A

    2001-12-01

    Oscillometric blood pressure measurement has become very popular, but although a number of devices have now passed both the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation and British Hypertension Society criteria, complacency with the state of the technique is as yet premature. In individual subjects, a substantial number of readings may deviate more than a clinically relevant 5 mmHg in devices that have earned a British Hypertension Society grade A rating. The marketing of pressure-wave-simulating devices is a welcome development as monitors can now be tested for reproducibility; an intra-device standard deviation of less than 2 mmHg has been proposed as the limit. Authors suggest that these simulators are currently better suited to intra- than between-device testing since they are not yet fully confident that the simulated waveforms are indistinguishable from the man-made pressure waves. Simulators should, however, be incorporated into our standard validation protocols in order eventually to obviate the human, fallible, factor in the validation protocols. The currently employed maximal amplitude algorithm has many drawbacks as the parameter identification points for systolic and diastolic pressure depend on many factors, for example pulse pressure, heart rate and arterial stiffness. These errors have now been demonstrated in clinical studies. Modern pattern recognition algorithms are being constructed but have not yet produced convincing results. As repeatedly stated, the development of a more robust and more widely applicable algorithm than the maximal amplitude approach should be allocated a high priority.

  13. The effect of an increased intake of vegetables and fruit on weight loss, blood pressure and antioxidant defense in subjects with sleep related breathing disorders.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, M; Blomhoff, R; Holme, I; Tonstad, S

    2007-11-01

    To assess the effect of an increased consumption of vegetables and fruit on body weight, risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and antioxidant defense in obese patients with sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD). Randomized, controlled trial of an intervention to increase the intake of vegetables to 400 g/day and fruit to 300 g/day. Dietary intake was calculated from a food frequency questionnaire. Antioxidant status was assessed with the ferric-reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. Plasma carotenoids were biomarkers for the intake of vegetables and fruit. A hospital clinic preventing risk factors for CVD. Subjects were 103 men and 35 women with a body mass index of 36.7+/-5.8 kg/m(2) of which 57 (86%) in the control and 68 (94%) in the intervention group completed the study. Group-based behavioral program during 3 months. The mean between group differences in body weight was -2.0% (95% CI -3.6, -0.5), P<0.0001. The mean between group difference in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) was -7.1 mm Hg (95% CI: -11.6, -2.6), P=0.0022 and -3.9 mm Hg (95% CI: -7.0, -0.9), P=0.0120, respectively. The mean change in daily intake of vegetables and fruit was 12 g (95% CI: -33, 57) and -4 g (95% CI: -79, 71) versus 245 g (95% CI: 194, 296) and 248 g (95% CI: 176, 320) in the control and intervention groups, respectively. This was reflected in higher concentrations of alpha-carotene and beta-carotene. No change in FRAP was seen. In a multiple regression analysis the change in intake of vegetables was a significant contributor (R(adj)(2)=0.073 (95% CI: 0.019, 0.214)) to the change in weight. Targeted dietary advice to increase the intake of vegetables and fruit among subjects with SRBD contributed to weight reduction and reduced systolic and diastolic BP, but had no effect on antioxidant defense measured with FRAP.

  14. THE UNIQUE VALUE OF BREATH BIOMARKERS FOR ESTIMATING PHARMACOKINETIC RATE CONSTANTS AND BODY BURDEN FROM ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detection of breath odor is the oldest of the medical diagnostic techniques, blood and urine biomarker measurements are the current "gold standard" for modern exposure and health assessments. Of late, it has been recognized that collecting exhaled breath is an attractiv...

  15. THE UNIQUE VALUE OF BREATH BIOMARKERS FOR ESTIMATING PHARMACOKINETIC RATE CONSTANTS AND BODY BURDEN FROM ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detection of breath odor is the oldest of the medical diagnostic techniques, blood and urine biomarker measurements are the current "gold standard" for modern exposure and health assessments. Of late, it has been recognized that collecting exhaled breath is an attractiv...

  16. Effect of nocturnal blood pressure measurement on sleep and blood pressure during sleep.

    PubMed

    Middeke, M

    1996-01-01

    Nocturnal hypertension is of diagnostic interest and has important prognostic and therapeutic implications. Nighttime blood pressure can easily be measured using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). However, during nocturnal ambulatory blood pressure measurement pump noise, tactile stimuli and pressure produced by cuff inflation may alter the quality of sleep and subsequently influence the physiological fall of night time blood pressure. Eight studies were performed to determine whether non-invasive automated blood pressure monitoring during day and/or night provokes alert reaction, arousal, sleep disturbances and changes in blood pressure and/or heart rate. From these studies it can be concluded: 1) Nighttime blood pressure can be evaluated properly using ABPM. 2) Nocturnal blood pressure is not overestimated by ABPM. 3) ABPM does not induce an alarm reaction and a blood pressure rise when monitored with a silently operating recorder. 4) Sleep is often disturbed by blood pressure measurement without provoking a blood pressure increase. 5) In older patients blood pressure measurement and age-related alterations in sleep quality may influence each other. A patient's protocol has to be carried out and sleep quality should be recorded to provide a proper interpretation of nocturnal blood pressure behavior. ABPM is an important and valuable method to record nocturnal blood pressure for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  17. Indirect blood pressure measurement: a need to reassess.

    PubMed

    Anderson, F D; Cunningham, S G; Maloney, J P

    1993-07-01

    Indirect blood pressure measurement is the assessment tool used most frequently in epidemiological studies and hypertension management in the population at large. To review indirect blood pressure measurement within the context of nursing practice. Nurses are not following recommended American Heart Association measurement guidelines. A national program of certification in indirect blood pressure measurement, similar to that of basic and advanced cardiac life support, is needed. An initial approach to evaluating present practice is also suggested.

  18. [Measurement of blood pressure variability and the clinical value].

    PubMed

    Kékes, Ede; Kiss, István

    2014-10-19

    Authors have collected and analyzed literature data on blood pressure variability. They present the methods of blood pressure variability measurement, clinical value and relationships with target organ damages and risk of presence of cardiovascular events. They collect data about the prognostic value of blood pressure variability and the effects of different antihypertensive drugs on blood pressure variability. They underline that in addition to reduction of blood pressure to target value, it is essential to influence blood pressure fluctuation and decrease blood pressure variability, because blood pressure fluctuation presents a major threat for the hypertensive subjects. Data from national studies are also presented. They welcome that measurement of blood pressure variability has been included in international guidelines.

  19. Breath Sound Intensity during Tidal Breathing in COPD Patients.

    PubMed

    Ishimatsu, Akiko; Nakano, Hiroshi; Nogami, Hiroko; Yoshida, Makoto; Iwanaga, Tomoaki; Hoshino, Tomoaki

    2015-01-01

    There is a discrepancy in the intensity of breath sounds in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients between subjective studies, which have reported a diminished intensity, and objective studies using airflow-standardized measurements, which have not demonstrated a diminished intensity. We herein evaluated the breath sound intensity in COPD patients during tidal breathing in order to obtain clinically relevant results. The subjects included 20 stable COPD patients and 20 normal controls. Microphones were attached to six sites on the chest wall, and breath sounds at the chest wall and airflow in the mouth were measured during resting tidal and deep tidal breathing. The octave-band power values of the breath sounds were subsequently calculated. 1. During resting breathing, the intensity of breath sounds during both inspiration and expiration was significantly greater in the COPD group than in the control group; the difference was prominent at higher frequency bands (>400 Hz). In addition, the power of the high frequency bands tended to be positively correlated with the CT visual emphysema scores but not the forced expiratory volume in one second, The airflow during resting breathing did not differ between the two groups. 2. During deep breathing, the intensity of inspiratory breath sounds at the dominant frequency band (200-400 Hz) was diminished over the upper and middle lung fields in the COPD group compared to that observed in the control group, while the intensity during expiration was not. The airflow during deep breathing was lower in the COPD group than in the control group. In the present study, the breath sound intensity in the COPD patients was diminished during deep inspiration due to a reduced airflow and increased during both resting inspiration and expiration.

  20. Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow Using Fluorescently Labeled Red Blood Cells1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Kornfield, Tess E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Blood flow is a useful indicator of the metabolic state of the retina. However, accurate measurement of retinal blood flow is difficult to achieve in practice. Most existing optical techniques used for measuring blood flow require complex assumptions and calculations. We describe here a simple and direct method for calculating absolute blood flow in vessels of all sizes in the rat retina. The method relies on ultrafast confocal line scans to track the passage of fluorescently labeled red blood cells (fRBCs). The accuracy of the blood flow measurements was verified by (1) comparing blood flow calculated independently using either flux or velocity combined with diameter measurements, (2) measuring total retinal blood flow in arterioles and venules, (3) measuring blood flow at vessel branch points, and (4) measuring changes in blood flow in response to hyperoxic and hypercapnic challenge. Confocal line scans oriented parallel and diagonal to vessels were used to compute fRBC velocity and to examine velocity profiles across the width of vessels. We demonstrate that these methods provide accurate measures of absolute blood flow and velocity in retinal vessels of all sizes. PMID:26082942

  1. Decreased pulmonary vascular resistance during nasal breathing: modulation by endogenous nitric oxide from the paranasal sinuses.

    PubMed

    Settergren, G; Angdin, M; Astudillo, R; Gelinder, S; Liska, J; Lundberg, J O; Weitzberg, E

    1998-07-01

    Nitric oxide is present in high concentration in the human nasal airways. During inspiration through the nose a bolus is transported to the lungs. In a randomized cross-over study the effect of two different patterns of breathing, nasal breathing and mouth breathing, was evaluated in 10 patients (mean age 65 years), breathing room air the morning of the first post-operative day after open heart surgery. Nasal breathing is defined as inspiration through the nose and expiration through the mouth, whilst mouth breathing is the converse of this: inspiration through the mouth and expiration through the nose. Pressure in the pulmonary artery and left atrium or pulmonary artery wedge was measured together with thermodilution cardiac output and arterial and mixed venous oxygenation and acid-base parameters. Pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI), venous admixture and alveolar-arterial gradient were calculated. Nasal breathing resulted in a lower PVRI, 256 dyn s cm-5 cm-2 vs. 287 (P < 0.01). The oxygen and carbon dioxide tension and pH of arterial and mixed venous blood, venous admixture and the alveolar-arterial gradient remained unchanged. The decreased level of PVRI during nasal breathing compared to that during mouth breathing supports the notion, that endogenous nitric oxide acts as an airborne messenger to modulate the pulmonary vascular tone during normal breathing.

  2. Breathing exercises for dysfunctional breathing/hyperventilation syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Barker, Nicola J; Jones, Mandy; O'Connell, Neil E; Everard, Mark L

    2013-12-18

    Dysfunctional breathing is described as chronic or recurrent changes in breathing pattern causing respiratory and non-respiratory symptoms. It is an umbrella term that encompasses hyperventilation syndrome and vocal cord dysfunction. Dysfunctional breathing affects 10% of the general population. Symptoms include dyspnoea, chest tightness, sighing and chest pain which arise secondary to alterations in respiratory pattern and rate. Little is known about dysfunctional breathing in children. Preliminary data suggest 5.3% or more of children with asthma have dysfunctional breathing and that, unlike in adults, it is associated with poorer asthma control. It is not known what proportion of the general paediatric population is affected. Breathing training is recommended as a first-line treatment for adults with dysfunctional breathing (with or without asthma) but no similar recommendations are available for the management of children. As such, breathing retraining is adapted from adult regimens based on the age and ability of the child. To determine whether breathing retraining in children with dysfunctional breathing has beneficial effects as measured by quality of life indices.To determine whether there are any adverse effects of breathing retraining in young people with dysfunctional breathing. We identified trials for consideration using both electronic and manual search strategies. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE. We searched the National Research Register (NRR) Archive, Health Services Research Projects in Progress (HSRProj), Current Controlled Trials register (incorporating the metaRegister of Controlled Trials and the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN) to identify research in progress and unpublished research. The latest search was undertaken in October 2013. We planned to include randomised, quasi-randomised or cluster-randomised controlled trials. We excluded observational studies, case studies and studies utilising a cross

  3. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions. PMID:27446707

  4. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler.

    PubMed

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions.

  5. The use of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy for rapid measurements of the delta13C of animal breath for physiological and ecological studies.

    PubMed

    Engel, Sophia; Lease, Hilary M; McDowell, Nate G; Corbett, Alyssa H; Wolf, Blair O

    2009-05-01

    In this study we introduce the use of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) as a technique for making measurements of the delta13C of animal 'breath' in near real time. The carbon isotope ratios (delta13C) of breath CO2 trace the carbon source of the materials being metabolized, which can provide insight into the use of specific food resources, e.g. those derived from plants using C3 versus C4 or CAM photosynthetic pathways. For physiological studies, labeled substrates and breath analyses provide direct evidence of specific physiological (e.g. fermentative digestion) or enzymatic (e.g. sucrase activity) processes. Although potentially very informative, this approach has rarely been taken in animal physiological or ecological research. In this study we quantify the utilization of different plant resources (photosynthetic types--C3 or C4) in arthropod herbivores by measuring the delta13C of their 'breath' and comparing it with bulk tissue values. We show that breath delta13C values are highly correlated with bulk tissues and for insect herbivores reflect their dietary guild, in our case C3-specialists, C4-specialists, or generalists. TDLAS has a number of advantages that will make it an important tool for physiologists, ecologists and behaviorists: it is non-invasive, fast, very sensitive, accurate, works on animals of a wide range of body sizes, per-sample costs are small, and it is potentially field-deployable. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Practice healthy coping techniques, such as muscle relaxation, deep breathing or meditation. Getting regular physical activity and ... blood pressure at home. Practice relaxation or slow, deep breathing. Practice taking deep, slow breaths to help ...

  7. Measuring blood delivery to solitary pulmonary nodules using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zhifeng; Shen, Li; Gao, Ling; Ford, James C.; Makedon, Fillia S.; Pearlman, Justin D.

    2006-03-01

    With perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI), perfusion describes the amount of blood passing through a block of tissue in a certain period of time. In pMRI, the tissue having more blood passing through will show higher intensity value as more contrast-labeled blood arrives. Perfusion reflects the delivery of essential nutrients to a block of tissue, and is an important parameter for the tissue status. Considering solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN), perfusion differences between malignant and benign nodules have been studied by different techniques. Much effort has been put into its characterization. In this paper, we proposed and implemented extraction of the SPN time intensity profile to measure blood delivery to solitary pulmonary nodules, describing their perfusion effects. In this method, a SPN time intensity profile is created based on intensity values of the solitary pulmonary nodule in lung pMRI images over time. This method has two steps: nodule tracking and profile clustering. Nodule tracking aligns the solitary pulmonary nodule in pMRI images taken at different time points, dealing with nodule movement resulted from breathing and body movement. Profile clustering implements segmentation of the nodule region and extraction of the time intensity profile of a solitary pulmonary nodule. SPN time intensity profiles reflect patterns of blood delivery to solitary pulmonary nodules, giving us a description of perfusion effect and indirect evidence of tumor angiogenesis. Analysis on SPN time intensity profiles will help the diagnosis of malignant nodules for early lung cancer detection.

  8. How to breathe when you are short of breath

    MedlinePlus

    Pursed lip breathing; COPD - pursed lip breathing; Emphysema - pursed lip breathing; Chronic bronchitis - pursed lip breathing; Pulmonary fibrosis - pursed lip breathing; Interstitial lung disease - pursed lip breathing; Hypoxia - pursed lip breathing; ...

  9. Laser Doppler anemometer signal processing for blood flow velocity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Borozdova, M A; Fedosov, I V; Tuchin, V V

    2015-03-31

    A new method for analysing the signal in a laser Doppler anemometer based on the differential scheme is proposed, which provides the flow velocity measurement in strongly scattering liquids, particularly, blood. A laser Doppler anemometer intended for measuring the absolute blood flow velocity in animal and human near-surface arterioles and venules is developed. The laser Doppler anemometer signal structure is experimentally studied for measuring the flow velocity in optically inhomogeneous media, such as blood and suspensions of scattering particles. The results of measuring the whole and diluted blood flow velocity in channels with a rectangular cross section are presented. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  10. Application of implicit attitude measures to the blood donation context.

    PubMed

    Warfel, Regina M; France, Christopher R; France, Janis L

    2012-02-01

    Past blood donation research has relied on explicit (self-report) measures to understand blood donation motivations, but has not yet considered the inherent implicit or automatic processing involved in decision-making. This study addresses this limitation by introducing and validating two novel implicit measures of blood donation attitudes. Healthy young adults (n = 253) performed both image and word versions of a Single Target Implicit Association Test (ST-IAT) and then completed self-report measures of blood donation attitudes, blood and needle fears, social desirability, and donation intention. These results affirmed the validity of the blood donation ST-IATs in at least three ways. First, as expected, nondonors demonstrated more negative implicit donation attitudes than donors. Second, the implicit measures were significantly related in expected directions with explicit measures of donation attitudes as well as blood and needle fears. Finally, implicit donation attitudes were significantly related to donation intention, and the Image ST-IAT (but not the Word ST-IAT) significantly enhanced prediction of donation intention over and above needle fears and marginally enhanced prediction over and above blood fears. Image and word versions of the blood donation ST-IAT offer a valid method of assessing underlying automatic attitudes toward blood donation. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  11. Comparative measurements of total body water in healthy volunteers by online breath deuterium measurement and other near-subject methods2

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David; Engel, Barbara; Diskin, Ann M; Španěl, Patrik; Davies, Simon J

    2008-01-01

    Background We developed a new near-subject approach, using flowing afterglow-mass spectrometry (FA-MS) and deuterium dilution, which enables the immediate measurement of total body water (TBW) from single exhalations. Objectives The objectives were to show the efficacy of the new FA-MS method in measuring TBW in healthy subjects and to compare these measurements with values derived from multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis, skinfold-thickness (SFT) measurements, and both recent and historical published regression equations. Design After baseline measurement of breath deuterium abundance, 24 healthy subjects ingested 0.3 g D2O/kg body wt. A second breath sample was taken after 3 h to measure the increase in deuterium, from which TBW was calculated. Bioelectrical impedance analysis was carried out with a multifrequency analyzer, and SFT was measured by a single trained observer. Methods were compared with the use of Pearson’s correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman analyses. Results TBW measures obtained by all methods were highly correlated (r = 0.95-0.98, P < 0.001), especially those between FA-MS, SFT measurement, and recent regression equations. The mean values obtained were within 2% of those published for age-matched control subjects and varied by 1-6% when all methods were compared. Systematic bias was greatest when FA-MS was compared with bioelectrical impedance analysis, which tended to underestimate TBW in smaller, female subjects. No bias related to subject size was observed in a comparison of FA-MS with SFT measurement or with more recent regression equations. Conclusions FA-MS is a simple and effective new approach to TBW measurement in healthy subjects. The difficulty of using population-derived equations to estimate TBW in individual subjects is emphasized. PMID:12450896

  12. Effect of measuring ambulatory blood pressure on sleep and on blood pressure during sleep.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, R. J.; Jenkins, N. E.; Stradling, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess whether recording of ambulatory blood pressure at night causes arousal from sleep and a change in the continuous blood pressure recorded simultaneously. DESIGN--Repeated measurement of blood pressure with two ambulatory blood pressure machines (Oxford Medical ABP and A&D TM2420) during continuous measurement of beat to beat blood pressure and continuous electroencephalography. SETTING--Sleep research laboratory. SUBJECTS--Six normal subjects. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--The duration of electroencephalographic arousal and the beat to beat changes in blood pressure produced by the measurement of ambulatory blood pressure; the size of any changes that this arousal and change in blood pressure produced in the blood pressure recorded by the ambulatory machine. RESULTS--Both ambulatory blood pressure machines caused arousal from sleep: the mean duration of arousal was 16 seconds (95% range 0-202) with the ABP and 8 seconds (0-73) with the TM2420. Both also caused a rise in beat to beat blood pressure. During non-rapid eye movement sleep, this rise led to the ABP machine overestimating the true systolic blood pressure during sleep by a mean of 10 (SD 14.8) mm Hg and the TM2420 by a mean of 6.3 (8.2) mm Hg. On average, diastolic pressure was not changed, but measurements in individual subjects changed by up to 23 mm Hg. These changes varied in size among subjects and stages of sleep and were seen after measurements that did not cause any electroencephalographic arousal. CONCLUSIONS--Ambulatory blood pressure machines cause appreciable arousal from sleep and therefore alter the blood pressure that they are trying to record. This effect should be taken into account when recordings of blood pressure at night are interpreted in clinical work and epidemiological research. PMID:8167489

  13. Measurement of arterial and capillary blood oxygen tension

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, J. H.

    1966-01-01

    An oxygen electrode system, supplied as an attachment to the Radiometer Astrup micro equipment for blood pH determination (AME I), has been investigated. Determination of blood oxygen tension using this electrode system has been compared with tension measurements using an established Bishop type oxygen electrode and satisfactory agreement was found. The storage of blood for routine estimation of oxygen tension has been investigated. Capillary blood oxygen tension has been measured and compared with that of simultaneously taken arterial blood samples. PMID:5929338

  14. Breathing exercises for dysfunctional breathing/hyperventilation syndrome in adults.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mandy; Harvey, Alex; Marston, Louise; O'Connell, Neil E

    2013-05-31

    Dysfunctional breathing/hyperventilation syndrome (DB/HVS) is a respiratory disorder, psychologically or physiologically based, involving breathing too deeply and/or too rapidly (hyperventilation) or erratic breathing interspersed with breath-holding or sighing (DB). DB/HVS can result in significant patient morbidity and an array of symptoms including breathlessness, chest tightness, dizziness, tremor and paraesthesia. DB/HVS has an estimated prevalence of 9.5% in the general adult population, however, there is little consensus regarding the most effective management of this patient group. (1) To determine whether breathing exercises in patients with DB/HVS have beneficial effects as measured by quality of life indices (2) To determine whether there are any adverse effects of breathing exercises in patients with DB/HVS SEARCH METHODS: We identified trials for consideration using both electronic and manual search strategies. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and four other databases. The latest search was in February 2013. We planned to include randomised, quasi-randomised or cluster randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in which breathing exercises, or a combined intervention including breathing exercises as a key component, were compared with either no treatment or another therapy that did not include breathing exercises in patients with DB/HVS. Observational studies, case studies and studies utilising a cross-over design were not eligible for inclusion.We considered any type of breathing exercise for inclusion in this review, such as breathing control, diaphragmatic breathing, yoga breathing, Buteyko breathing, biofeedback-guided breathing modification, yawn/sigh suppression. Programs where exercises were either supervised or unsupervised were eligible as were relaxation techniques and acute-episode management, as long as it was clear that breathing exercises were a key component of the intervention.We excluded any intervention without breathing exercises or

  15. [Measurement and analysis of absorption spectrum of human blood].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Min; Xin, Yu-Jun; Wang, Le-Xin; Zhu, Wei-Hua; Zheng, Min; Guo, Xin

    2008-01-01

    The present paper puts forward a method of disease diagnosis by using the technology of spectrum analysis of human blood serum. The generation mechanism of absorption spectrum is explained and the absorption spectra of the normal blood serum and the sick blood serum are listed from the experiments of absorption spectrometry. Though the value of absorbency of the sick blood serum is almost equal to that of the normal blood serum in the most absorption spectra, there are some differences around 278 nm in the absorption spectrum. The absorbency of the blood serum with hyperglycemia is greater than that of the normal blood serum at 285 nm in the spectrum, and besides, there comes a peak shift of absorption with hyperglycemia. In the absorption spectrum of the blood serum with hypercholesterolemia, there is a clear absorption peak at 414 nm. However there is not any peak at that wavelength in the absorption spectrum of the normal blood serum. Through comparing the characters of the spectrum, we can judge if the blood sample is or not, and this blood analysis is a new method for the diagnosis of disease. Compared with other methods of blood measurements, the method of absorption spectrum analysis of blood serum presented in this paper, is more convenient for measurement, simpler for analysis, and easier to popularize.

  16. Reliable noninvasive measurement of blood gases

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Edward V.; Robinson, Mark R.; Haaland, David M.; Alam, Mary K.

    1997-05-20

    This invention relates to methods and apparatus for, preferably, determining non-invasively and in vivo at least two of the five blood gas parameters (i.e., pH, [HCO.sub.3.sup.- ], PCO.sub.2, PO.sub.2, and O.sub.2 sat.) in a human.

  17. Blood pressure measurement and display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farkas, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    System is described that employs solid state circuitry to transmit visual display of patient's blood pressure. Response of sphygmomanometer cuff and microphone provide input signals. Signals and their amplitudes, from turn-on time to turn-off time, are continuously fed to data transmitter which transmits to display device.

  18. Metabolic breath analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, C. L.

    1971-01-01

    Instrument measures metabolic breathing rate and dynamics of human beings in atmospheres ranging from normal air to 100 percent oxygen at ambient pressures from 14.7 to 3.0 psia. Measurements are made at rest or performing tasks up to maximum physical capacity under either zero or normal gravity.

  19. Sleep-disordered breathing in children with cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, Suhail; Kantor, Paul F; Chadha, Neil K; Tirado, Yamilet; James, Adrian L; Narang, Indra

    2014-06-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a rare condition in children that is associated with high mortality. Although sleep-disordered breathing is prevalent, its frequency and patterns in children with cardiomyopathy are unknown. To evaluate the frequency and patterns of sleep-disordered breathing and their relationship to cardiac function in children with primary cardiomyopathy. This study comprised a prospective, uncontrolled case series. Children with cardiomyopathy completed a sleep questionnaire, overnight polysomnography, blood pressure monitoring, otolaryngological assessment, and transthoracic echocardiography at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada. Twenty-one patients (17 males) were recruited. The median age of the patients was 10.7 years, and the median body mass index z score was 0.8. Sleep-disordered breathing was observed in 10 (48%) of 21 patients. Significant central sleep apnea was the main finding in 5 (24%) of 21 of the cohort and in 50% of the sleep-disordered breathing population. The left ventricular end diastolic volume index was greater in children with central sleep apnea than in children without sleep-disordered breathing (P = 0.03). There were significant correlations between the central apnea-hypopnea index and both left ventricular end diastolic and end systolic volume indexes (Spearman's r = 0.55, P = 0.01; Spearman's r = 0.47, P = 0.03, respectively). Snoring, sleep architecture, blood pressure, and otolaryngological findings were not significantly different between children with sleep-disordered breathing versus those without sleep-disordered breathing. Sleep-disordered breathing is common in children with cardiomyopathy. In our present study, 24% of participants exhibited primarily central sleep apnea. The severity of cardiac dysfunction, as measured by left ventricular end diastolic volume index and left ventricular end systolic volume index, is associated with central sleep apnea. Longitudinal research is necessary to better characterize

  20. Hydrogen breath test in schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Douwes, A C; Schaap, C; van der Klei-van Moorsel, J M

    1985-04-01

    The frequency of negative hydrogen breath tests due to colonic bacterial flora which are unable to produce hydrogen was determined after oral lactulose challenge in 98 healthy Dutch schoolchildren. There was a negative result in 9.2%. The probability of a false normal lactose breath test (1:77) was calculated from these results together with those from a separate group of children with lactose malabsorption (also determined by hydrogen breath test). A study of siblings and mothers of subjects with a negative breath test did not show familial clustering of this condition. Faecal incubation tests with various sugars showed an increase in breath hydrogen greater than 100 parts per million in those with a positive breath test while subjects with a negative breath test also had a negative faecal incubation test. The frequency of a false negative hydrogen breath test was higher than previously reported, but this does not affect the superiority of this method of testing over the conventional blood glucose determination.

  1. Respiratory modulation of oscillometric cuff pressure pulses and Korotkoff sounds during clinical blood pressure measurement in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Chen, Diliang; Chen, Fei; Murray, Alan; Zheng, Dingchang

    2016-05-10

    Accurate blood pressure (BP) measurement depends on the reliability of oscillometric cuff pressure pulses (OscP) and Korotkoff sounds (KorS) for automated oscillometric and manual techniques. It has been widely accepted that respiration is one of the main factors affecting BP measurement. However, little is known about how respiration affects the signals from which BP measurement is obtained. The aim was to quantify the modulation effect of respiration on oscillometric pulses and KorS during clinical BP measurement. Systolic and diastolic BPs were measured manually from 40 healthy subjects (from 23 to 65 years old) under normal and regular deep breathing. The following signals were digitally recorded during linear cuff deflation: chest motion from a magnetometer to obtain reference respiration, cuff pressure from an electronic pressure sensor to derive OscP, and KorS from a digital stethoscope. The effects of respiration on both OscP and KorS were determined from changes in their amplitude associated with respiration between systole and diastole. These changes were normalized to the mean signal amplitude of OscP and KorS to derive the respiratory modulation depth. Reference respiration frequency, and the frequencies derived from the amplitude modulation of OscP and KorS were also calculated and compared. Respiratory modulation depth was 14 and 40 % for OscP and KorS respectively under normal breathing condition, with significant increases (both p < 0.05) to 16 and 49 % with deeper breathing. There was no statistically significant difference between the reference respiration frequency and those derived from the oscillometric and Korotkoff signals (both p > 0.05) during deep breathing, and for the oscillometric signal during normal breathing (p > 0.05). Our study confirmed and quantified the respiratory modulation effect on the oscillometric pulses and KorS during clinical BP measurement, with increased modulation depth under regular deeper breathing.

  2. Is man able to breathe once a minute for an hour?: the effect of yoga respiration on blood gases.

    PubMed

    Miyamura, Miharu; Nishimura, Kinya; Ishida, Koji; Katayama, Keisho; Shimaoka, Midori; Hiruta, Shuichi

    2002-06-01

    The ventilatory response to hypercapnia and arterial blood gases during ujjai respiration of once per minute for an hour were determined in a professional hatha yogi. The results suggest that lower chemosensitivity to hypercapnia in yoga practitioners may be due to an adaptation to low arterial pH and high PaCO2 for long periods.

  3. Breath acetone to monitor life style interventions in field conditions: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Samudrala, Devasena; Lammers, Gerwen; Mandon, Julien; Blanchet, Lionel; Schreuder, Tim H A; Hopman, Maria T; Harren, Frans J M; Tappy, Luc; Cristescu, Simona M

    2014-04-01

    To assess whether breath acetone concentration can be used to monitor the effects of a prolonged physical activity on whole body lipolysis and hepatic ketogenesis in field conditions. Twenty-three non-diabetic, 11 type 1 diabetic, and 17 type 2 diabetic subjects provided breath and blood samples for this study. Samples were collected during the International Four Days Marches, in the Netherlands. For each participant, breath acetone concentration was measured using proton transfer reaction ion trap mass spectrometry, before and after a 30-50 km walk on four consecutive days. Blood non-esterified free fatty acid (NEFA), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BOHB), and glucose concentrations were measured after walking. Breath acetone concentration was significantly higher after than before walking, and was positively correlated with blood NEFA and BOHB concentrations. The effect of walking on breath acetone concentration was repeatedly observed on all four consecutive days. Breath acetone concentrations were higher in type 1 diabetic subjects and lower in type 2 diabetic subjects than in control subjects. Breath acetone can be used to monitor hepatic ketogenesis during walking under field conditions. It may, therefore, provide real-time information on fat burning, which may be of use for monitoring the lifestyle interventions. Copyright © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  4. Reproducibility study for free-breathing measurements of pyruvate metabolism using hyperpolarized (13) C in the heart.

    PubMed

    Lau, Angus Z; Chen, Albert P; Barry, Jennifer; Graham, John J; Dominguez-Viqueira, William; Ghugre, Nilesh R; Wright, Graham A; Cunningham, Charles H

    2013-04-01

    Spatially resolved images of hyperpolarized (13) C substrates and their downstream products provide insight into real-time metabolic processes occurring in vivo. Recently, hyperpolarized (13) C pyruvate has been used to characterize in vivo cardiac metabolism in the rat and pig, but accurate and reproducible measurements remain challenging due to the limited period available for imaging as well as physiological motion. In this article, time-resolved cardiac- and respiratory-gated images of [1-(13) C] pyruvate, [1-(13) C] lactate, and (13) C bicarbonate in the heart are acquired without the need for a breathhold. The robustness of these free-breathing measurements is demonstrated using the time-resolved data to produce a normalized metric of pyruvate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase activity in the heart. The values obtained are reproducible in a controlled metabolic state. In a 60-min ischemia/reperfusion model, significant differences in hyperpolarized bicarbonate and lactate, normalized using the left ventricular pyruvate signal, were detected between scans performed at baseline and 45 min after reperfusion. The sequence is anticipated to improve quantitative measurements of cardiac metabolism, leading to feasible validation studies using fewer subjects, and potentially improved diagnosis, serial monitoring, and treatment of cardiac disease in patients.

  5. The stable isotope ketoisocaproic acid breath test as a measure of hepatic decarboxylation capacity: a quantitative analysis in normal subjects after oral and intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Berthold, Heiner K; Giesen, Thomas A H; Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna

    2009-10-01

    There is no generally accepted kinetic evaluation method for the stable isotope [(13)C]ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) breath test. Differences found in the results between women and men are contradictory. Oral and intravenous breath tests using 1 mg/kg stable isotope-labelled KIC were performed in healthy male and female volunteers. A power exponential function was fitted to the mass spectrometric data of breath (13)CO(2) enrichment, allowing mathematical analysis of time-to-peak-excretion, half-excretion time, percent label recovery and parameters describing the shape of the curve. Body composition was determined using bioelectrical impedance analysis. After oral administration, total label recovery after 3 h was about 22% and was not different between men (n=7) and women (n=8). The time to maximal label excretion was 0.67 +/- 0.12 h in men and 0.9 +/- 0.32 h in women (P=0.028) and the excretion curve showed an initially slower rise in women compared with men. Adjusting for lean body mass or body water abrogated the sex differences. Total label recovery after intravenous administration was about 9%, suggesting that the substrate was rapidly catabolized in the muscle compartment after intravenous administration. The modified power exponential function described allows standardized estimates of the KIC breath test results. When corrected for body composition, there are no differences in breath test results between men and women. The comparison between oral and intravenous results provides robust evidence that the KIC breath test measures predominantly hepatic and not muscle decarboxylation and is thus a highly specific liver function test.

  6. Characterisation of breathing and associated central autonomic dysfunction in the Rett disorder

    PubMed Central

    Julu, P; Kerr, A; Apartopoulos, F; Al-Rawas, S; Engerstrom, I; Engerstrom, L; Jamal, G; Hansen, S

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To investigate breathing rhythm and brain stem autonomic control in patients with Rett disorder.
SETTING—Two university teaching hospitals in the United Kingdom and the Rett Centre, Sweden.
PATIENTS—56 female patients with Rett disorder, aged 2-35 years; 11 controls aged 5-28 years.
DESIGN—One hour recordings of breathing movement, blood pressure, ECG R-R interval, heart rate, transcutaneous blood gases, cardiac vagal tone, and cardiac sensitivity to baroreflex measured on-line with synchronous EEG and video. Breathing rhythms were analysed in 47cases.
RESULTS—Respiratory rhythm was normal during sleep and abnormal in the waking state. Forced and apneustic breathing were prominent among 5-10 year olds, and Valsalva breathing in the over 18 year olds, who were also most likely to breathe normally. Inadequate breathing peaked among 10-18 year olds. Inadequate and exaggerated breathing was associated with vacant spells. Resting cardiac vagal tone and cardiac sensitivity to baroreflex were reduced.
CONCLUSIONS—Labile respiratory rhythms and poor integrative inhibition in Rett disorder suggest brain immaturity. Linking this to an early monoaminergic defect suggests possible targets for the MECP2 gene in clinical intervention. Exaggerated and inadequate autonomic responses may contribute to sudden death.

 PMID:11420195

  7. Measuring blood oxygenation of pulsatile arteries using photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Yu, Tianhao; Li, Lin; Chai, Xinyu; Zhou, Chuanqing

    2016-10-01

    Heart pumps blood through the blood vessels to provide body with oxygen and nutrients. As the result, the blood flow, volume and oxygenation in arteries has a pulsatile nature. Measuring these pulsatile parameters enables more precise monitoring of oxygen metabolic rate and is thus valuable for researches and clinical applications. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a proven label-free method for in vivo measuring blood oxygenation at single blood vessel level. However, studies using PAM to observe the pulsatile nature of blood oxygenation in arteries were not reported. In this paper, we use optical-resolution PAM (OR-PAM) technology to study the blood oxygenation dynamics of pulsatile arteries. First, the ability of our OR-PAM system to accurately reflect the change of optical absorption in imaged objects is demonstrated in a phantom study. Then the system is used to image exposed cortical blood vessels of cat. The pulsatile nature of blood volume and oxygenation in arteries is clearly reflected in photoacoustic (PA) signals, whereas it's not observable in veins. By using a multi-wavelength laser, the dynamics of the blood oxygenation of pulsatile arteries in cardiac cycles can be measured, based on the spectroscopic method.

  8. Clinical estimation of mouth breathing.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Sachiko; Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Gunjigake, Kaori

    2009-11-01

    Breathing mode was objectively determined by monitoring airflow through the mouth, measuring nasal resistance and lip-seal function, and collecting information via questionnaire on the patient's etiology and symptoms of mouth breathing. The expiratory airflow through the mouth was detected with a carbon dioxide sensor for 30 minutes at rest. Fifteen men and 19 women volunteers (mean age, 22.4 +/- 2.5 years) were classified as nasal breathers, complete mouth breathers, or partial mouth breathers based on the mean duration of mouth breathing. Nasal resistance, lip-sealing function, and the subjective symptoms of mouth breathing ascertained by questionnaire were statistically compared by using 1-way and 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the chi-square test in the breathing groups. Nasal resistance was significantly (P <0.05) greater for the mouth breathers than for the nasal breathers, and significantly (P <0.05) greater for the partial mouth breathers than for the complete mouth breathers. There were no significant differences in the subjective responses to questions about mouth breathing among the 3 groups. Detecting airflow by carbon dioxide sensor can discriminate breathing mode. Degree of nasal resistance and subjective symptoms of mouth breathing do not accurately predict breathing mode.

  9. Quantitative blood flux measurement using MUSIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Siavash; Qin, Jia; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to quantify red blood cell (RBC) flow through capillary loops and microvessels using optical microangiography (OMAG). Current existing methods of capillary flow quantification either require a very long scanning time (~few minutes) or a large acquisition number per location (+100 scans per location) to form a highresolution spectral estimation. We utilize a model-based super-resolution spectral estimation technique based on principle of orthogonality to quantify moving RBCs within a voxel. The scanning protocol required for our method is very similar to 3D ultrahigh sensitive OMAG that requires few scans per location (8) and can be performed in few seconds that makes it applicable for in vivo experiments. This method is analogous to power Doppler in ultrasonography and estimates the number of red blood cells passing through the beam as opposed to the velocity of the particles. The technique is tested both qualitatively and quantitatively by using OMAG to image microcirculation within mouse ear flap in vivo.

  10. Measurement of blood glucose: comparison between different types of specimens.

    PubMed

    Carstensen, Bendix; Lindström, J; Sundvall, J; Borch-Johnsen, K; Tuomilehto, J

    2008-03-01

    To provide conversion formulae between measurements based on different specimens in use in epidemiological studies and clinical practice, and to evaluate the relative precision for the different methods. The current guidelines emphasize the use of venous plasma for determining glucose concentration. Nevertheless, the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines provide cut-off points for different specimens for the determination of the glucose concentration in circulating blood (venous plasma, whole blood, serum and capillary blood). There is a lack of data about the comparability between the values obtained by using different specimens. Eleven different combinations of specimens and methods of measurement of blood glucose were used in 294 blood samples from 74 subjects. The methods were grouped by the specimen used for analysis (venous plasma, whole blood, serum and capillary blood). The result of the analysis is a set of linear equations allowing conversion of the result from one specimen or method to another. Furthermore, it was estimated how much of the variation for each method can be attributed to laboratory variance. Measurements based on capillary blood had a very large variability compared with other methods. Measurements based on venous whole blood tended to give results 0.5 mmol/L lower than other methods. Our data indicate that the current diagnostic cut-off points, as recommended by WHO for non-plasma specimens, are not fully compatible and may differ as much as 0.5 mmol/L between specimens.

  11. BREATH MEASUREMENT AND MODELS TO ASSESS VOC DERMAL ABSORPTION IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dermal exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water results from environmental contamination of surface, ground-, and drinking waters. This exposure occurs both in occupational and residential settings. Compartmental models incorporating body burden measurements have ...

  12. BREATH MEASUREMENT AND MODELS TO ASSESS VOC DERMAL ABSORPTION IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dermal exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water results from environmental contamination of surface, ground-, and drinking waters. This exposure occurs both in occupational and residential settings. Compartmental models incorporating body burden measurements have ...

  13. Deep-breathing exercises reduce atelectasis and improve pulmonary function after coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Westerdahl, Elisabeth; Lindmark, Birgitta; Eriksson, Tomas; Friberg, Orjan; Hedenstierna, Göran; Tenling, Arne

    2005-11-01

    To investigate the effects of deep-breathing exercises on pulmonary function, atelectasis, and arterial blood gas levels after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. In a prospective, randomized trial, patients performing deep-breathing exercises (n = 48) were compared to a control group (n = 42) who performed no breathing exercises postoperatively. Patient management was similar in the groups in terms of assessment, positioning, and mobility. The patients in the deep-breathing group were instructed to perform breathing exercises hourly during daytime for the first 4 postoperative days. The exercises consisted of 30 slow, deep breaths performed with a positive expiratory pressure blow-bottle device (+ 10 cm H(2)O). Spirometric measurements, spiral CT (three transverse levels), arterial blood gas analysis, and scoring of subjective experience of the breathing exercises were performed on the fourth postoperative day. Atelectasis was only half the size in the deep-breathing group compared to the control group, amounting to 2.6 +/- 2.2% vs 4.7 +/- 5.7% (p = 0.045) at the basal level and 0.1 +/- 0.2% vs 0.3 +/- 0.5% (mean +/- SD) [p = 0.01] at the apical level. Compared to the control subjects, the patients in the deep-breathing group had a significantly smaller reduction in FVC (to 71 +/- 12%, vs 64 +/- 13% of the preoperative values; p = 0.01) and FEV(1) (to 71 +/- 11%, vs 65 +/- 13% of the preoperative values; p = 0.01). Arterial oxygen tension, carbon dioxide tension, fever, or length of ICU or hospital stay did not differ between the groups. In the deep-breathing group, 72% of the patients experienced a subjective benefit from the exercises. Patients performing deep-breathing exercises after CABG surgery had significantly smaller atelectatic areas and better pulmonary function on the fourth postoperative day compared to a control group performing no exercises.

  14. The effect of gas exchange on multiple-breath nitrogen washout measures of ventilation inhomogeneity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Dharmakumara, Mahesh; Prisk, G Kim; Royce, Simon G; Tawhai, Merryn; Thompson, Bruce R

    2014-11-01

    Inert-gas washout measurements using oxygen, in the lungs of small animals, are complicated by the continuous process of oxygen consumption (V̇o2). The multiple-breath nitrogen washout (MBNW) technique uses the alveolar slope to determine measures of ventilation inhomogeneity in the acinar (Sacin) and conducting (Scond) airway regions, as well as overall inhomogeneity, as determined by the lung clearance index (LCI). We hypothesized that measured ventilation inhomogeneity in the mouse lung while it is alive is in fact an artifact due to the high V̇o2 in proportion to alveolar gas volume (Va), and not ventilation inhomogeneity per se. In seven male C57BL/6 mice, MBNW was performed alive and postmortem to derive measures with and without the effect of gas exchange, respectively. These results were compared with those obtained from an asymmetric multibranch point mathematical model of the mouse lung. There was no statistical difference in Sacin and LCI between alive and postmortem results (Sacin alive = 0.311 ± 0.043 ml(-1) and Sacin postmortem = 0.338 ± 0.032 ml(-1), LCI alive = 7.0 ± 0.1 and LCI postmortem = 7.0 ± 0.1). However, there was a significant decrease in Scond from 0.086 ± 0.005 ml(-1) alive to 0.006 ± 0.002 ml(-1) postmortem (P < 0.01). Model simulations replicated these results. Furthermore, in the model, as V̇o2 increased, so did the alveolar slope. These findings suggests that the MBNW measurement of Scond in the mouse lung is confounded by the effect of gas exchange, a result of the high V̇o2-to-Va ratio in this small animal, and not due to inhomogeneity within the airways.

  15. Automated measurement of retinal blood vessel tortuosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vinayak; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Abramoff, Michael D.

    2010-03-01

    Abnormalities in the vascular pattern of the retina are associated with retinal diseases and are also risk factors for systemic diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases. The three-dimensional retinal vascular pattern is mostly formed congenitally, but is then modified over life, in response to aging, vessel wall dystrophies and long term changes in blood flow and pressure. A characteristic of the vascular pattern that is appreciated by clinicians is vascular tortuosity, i.e. how curved or kinked a blood vessel, either vein or artery, appears along its course. We developed a new quantitative metric for vascular tortuosity, based on the vessel's angle of curvature, length of the curved vessel over its chord length (arc to chord ratio), number of curvature sign changes, and combined these into a unidimensional metric, Tortuosity Index (TI). In comparison to other published methods this method can estimate appropriate TI for vessels with constant curvature sign and vessels with equal arc to chord ratios, as well. We applied this method to a dataset of 15 digital fundus images of 8 patients with Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), and to the other publically available dataset of 60 fundus images of normal cases and patients with hypertensive retinopathy, of which the arterial and venous tortuosities have also been graded by masked experts (ophthalmologists). The method produced exactly the same rank-ordered list of vessel tortuosity (TI) values as obtained by averaging the tortuosity grading given by 3 ophthalmologists for FSHD dataset and a list of TI values with high ranking correlation with the ophthalmologist's grading for the other dataset. Our results show that TI has potential to detect and evaluate abnormal retinal vascular structure in early diagnosis and prognosis of retinopathies.

  16. Measurement of the Raman scattering cross section of the breathing mode in KDP and DKDP crystals.

    PubMed

    Demos, Stavros G; Raman, Rajesh N; Yang, Steven T; Negres, Raluca A; Schaffers, Kathleen I; Henesian, Mark A

    2011-10-10

    The spontaneous Raman scattering cross sections of the main peaks (related to the A1 vibrational mode) in rapid and conventional grown potassium dihydrogen phosphate and deuterated crystals are measured at 532 nm, 355 nm, and 266 nm. The measurement involves the use of the Raman line of water centered at 3400 cm-1 as a reference to obtain relative values of the cross sections which are subsequently normalized against the known absolute value for water as a function of excitation wavelength. This measurement enables the estimation of the transverse stimulated Raman scattering gain of these nonlinear optical materials in various configurations suitable for frequency conversion and beam control in high-power, large-aperture laser systems.

  17. Evaluation of measurement data from a sensor system for breath control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Rolf; Keller, Hubert B.; Conrad, Thorsten; Peter, Jens

    2017-03-01

    Binary ethanol-H2 gas samples were measured by an innovative mobile sensor system for the alcohol control in the respiratory air. The measurements were performed by a gas sensor operated by cyclic variation of the working temperature at the sensor head. The evaluation of the data, using an updated version of the evaluation procedure ProSens, results in a very good substance identification and concentration determination of the components of the gas mixture. The relative analysis errors were in all cases less than 9%.

  18. Inter-test reproducibility of the lung clearance index measured by multiple breath washout.

    PubMed

    Oude Engberink, Esther; Ratjen, Felix; Davis, Stephanie D; Retsch-Bogart, George; Amin, Reshma; Stanojevic, Sanja

    2017-10-01

    The lung clearance index (LCI) has strong intra-test repeatability; however, the inter-test reproducibility of the LCI is poorly defined.The aim of the present study was to define a physiologically meaningful change in LCI in preschool children, which discriminates changes associated with disease progression from biological variability.Repeated LCI measurements from a longitudinal cohort study of children with cystic fibrosis and age-matched controls were collected to define the inter-visit reproducibility of the LCI. Absolute change, the coefficient of variation, Bland-Altman limits of agreement, the coefficient of repeatability, intra-class correlation coefficient, and percentage changes were calculated.LCI measurements (n=505) from 71 healthy and 77 cystic fibrosis participants (aged 2.6-6 years) were analysed. LCI variability was proportional to its magnitude, such that reproducibility defined by absolute changes is biased. A physiologically relevant change for quarterly LCI measurements in health was defined as exceeding ±15%. In clinically stable cystic fibrosis participants, the threshold was higher (±25%); however, for measurements made 24 h apart, the threshold was similar to that observed in health (±17%).A percentage change in LCI greater than ±15% in preschool children can be considered physiologically relevant and greater than the biological variability of the test. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  19. Outdoor, indoor, and human breath content measurements of ammonia by tunable diode laser spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalenko, Konstantin L.; Nadezhdinskii, Alexander I.

    1996-10-01

    Trace contents of ammonia in outdoor, indoor and exhaled air were measured on the base of high resolution absorption spectra. Tunable diode laser system developed for this purpose possesses approximately one second time constant, approximately 200 cm3 sample volume, 5 ppb sensitivity. The calibration of unit was based on measurements of relative intensities of sQ(3,1)...sQ(3,3) absorption lines of v2s and following calculation on the base of a priori data on strength and broadening coefficients of detected lines. Measured indoor contents of ammonia was in 5-10 times higher than outdoor contents. Approximately two times drop in NH3 room content after 6 p.m. was detected. Obtained behavior of ammonia content in respiration right after the smoking demonstrates that the removing of ammonia from lungs has the ventilation character. Measured contents of NH3 in human respiration was ranged between 120 and 220 ppb. The absence of ammonia content differences from respiration of smoking and non smoking persons demonstrates that the accumulation of NH3 by human organism seems to be rather negligible for a short time exposure, e.g. like smoking.

  20. The Blood Donation Ambivalence Survey: measuring conflicting attitudes about giving blood.

    PubMed

    Fox, K R; Himawan, L K; France, C R

    2017-05-18

    This study was designed to develop and conduct initial validation testing for a novel measure of ambivalence about donating blood. Previous studies of living organ, bone marrow and stem cell donors have identified donation-related ambivalence as a predictor of decisions about donation and post-donation outcomes. Ambivalence about blood donation has not received the same attention. In Study 1, a sample of young adults (N = 396) were administered test items of ambivalence, and exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) were performed to identify the Blood Donation Ambivalence Survey. In Study 2, a separate sample of young adults (N = 241) completed the Blood Donation Ambivalence Survey in addition to questionnaires assessing known predictors of blood donation. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses indicated a two-factor structure reflecting commitment to donating blood and indecision about giving blood. The commitment subscale was positively related to known predictors of increased donation behaviour (e.g. donation intention, self-efficacy), whereas the indecision subscale was positively related to known predictors of decreased donation behaviour (e.g. donation anxiety, negative affect). Furthermore, a history of blood donation was associated with greater commitment and less indecision. The present findings provide strong initial support for the reliability and validity of a novel measure of blood donor ambivalence. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  1. Usage of four-phase high-resolution rhinomanometry and measurement of nasal resistance in sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Toh, Song-Tar; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Guilleminault, Christian

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the ease of use of four-phase high-resolution rhinomanometry (HRR), a new way of measuring nasal resistance, in measuring change in nasal resistance from supine to inclined position in a clinical sleep laboratory setting, and to correlate findings with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) tolerance. Retrospective review of clinical charts. Forty successively seen Caucasian subjects diagnosed with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) with complete charts were analyzed. Using four-phase HRR and acoustic rhinometry, nasal resistance and minimal cross-sectional area of the nasal cavity were objectively measured with the patient in the supine position and repeated in the inclined position (30° from the horizontal plane), respectively. From the supine to inclined position, reduction in total nasal resistance was observed in 87.5% (35 out of 40). There was a mean reduction of nasal resistance by 37.1 ± 21.6%. Five (12.5%) out of 40 subjects showed no change or mild increase in nasal resistance. Subjects with nasal resistance unresponsive to the inclined position change tended to have difficulty using nasal CPAP based on downloaded compliance card data. Four-phase HRR and acoustic rhinometry are tests that can be easily performed by sleep specialists to characterize nasal resistance in SDB patients and determine changes in resistance with positional changes. In this study, we found that patients who did not demonstrate a decrease in nasal resistance with inclined position were more likely to be noncompliant with nasal CPAP. These measurements may help us objectively identify patients who might have trouble tolerating nasal CPAP. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Hypoxemia with air breathing periods in U.S. NAVY Treatment Table 6.

    PubMed

    Weaver, L K; Churchill, S K

    2006-01-01

    Air breathing is used to lessen hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) toxicity. Hypoxemia could occur during hyperbaric air breathing in patients with lung dysfunction, although this has not been previously reported. We report two cases of hypoxemia during air breathing with two patients treated with the US Navy Table 6. Patient 1 was an 11-year-old male with cerebral gas embolism (during cardiac transplantation), patient 2 was a 66-year-old female with cerebral gas embolism from a central venous catheter accident. Both were mechanically ventilated. We monitored arterial blood gas (ABG) during therapy. In both patients, ABG measurements showed hypoxia during the first air breathing period at 1.9 atm abs (192.5 kPa). If patients require > or = 40% inspired oxygen before HBO2 therapy, oxygenation monitoring is advisable during air breathing periods, especially at lower chamber pressures (< or = 2.0 atm abs).

  3. Nonadherence to Recommended Guidelines for Blood Pressure Measurement.

    PubMed

    Levy, Jack; Gerber, Linda M; Wu, Xian; Mann, Samuel J

    2016-11-01

    Accuracy of blood pressure readings, both in the physician's office and at home, is crucial in properly managing hypertension. Few studies have investigated adherence to measurement guidelines. This study focused on two important aspects of blood pressure measurement: waiting time before measurement and number of readings taken. A total of 103 patients completed self-report questionnaires about office and home blood pressure measurements, with 77% reporting that physician measurements were obtained without waiting, and 56% reporting that only one reading was obtained. The proportions were even higher when measured by a nurse/technician, 96% and 81%, respectively. Home readings were taken without waiting by 60%, and 40% reported taking only a single reading. Most patients received no measurement instructions. Nonadherence to measurement guidelines is common, and may be affecting the validity of readings obtained both in physicians' offices and at home, with significant and potentially harmful effects on treatment decisions.

  4. Optoacoustic measurements of human placenta and umbilical blood oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanovskaya, T. N.; Petrov, I. Y.; Petrov, Y.; Patrikeeva, S. L.; Ahmed, M. S.; Hankins, G. D. V.; Prough, D. S.; Esenaliev, R. O.

    2016-03-01

    Adequate oxygenation is essential for normal embryogenesis and fetal growth. Perturbations in the intrauterine oxidative environment during pregnancy are associated with several pathophysiological disorders such as pregnancy loss, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. We proposed to use optoacoustic technology for monitoring placental and fetal umbilical blood oxygenation. In this work, we studied optoacoustic monitoring of oxygenation in placenta and umbilical cord blood ex vivo using technique of placenta perfusion. We used a medical grade, nearinfrared, tunable, optoacoustic system developed and built for oxygenation monitoring in blood vessels and in tissues. First, we calibrated the system for cord blood oxygenation measurements by using a CO-Oximeter (gold standard). Then we performed validation in cord blood circulating through the catheters localized on the fetal side of an isolated placental lobule. Finally, the oxygenation measurements were performed in the perfused placental tissue. To increase or decrease blood oxygenation, we used infusion of a gas mixture of 95% O2 + 5% CO2 and 95% N2 + 5% CO2, respectively. In placental tissue, up to four cycles of changes in oxygenation were performed. The optoacoustically measured oxygenation in circulating cord blood and in placental lobule closely correlated with the actual oxygenation data measured by CO-Oximeter. We plan to further test the placental and cord blood oxygenation monitoring with optoacoustics in animal and clinical studies.

  5. Breath ketone testing: a new biomarker for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of diabetic ketosis.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yue; Gao, Zhaohua; Liu, Yong; Cheng, Yan; Yu, Mengxiao; Zhao, Lingling; Duan, Yixiang; Liu, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Acetone, β -hydroxybutyric acid, and acetoacetic acid are three types of ketone body that may be found in the breath, blood, and urine. Detecting altered concentrations of ketones in the breath, blood, and urine is crucial for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic ketosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the advantages of different detection methods for ketones, and to establish whether detection of the concentration of ketones in the breath is an effective and practical technique. We measured the concentrations of acetone in the breath using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and β -hydroxybutyrate in fingertip blood collected from 99 patients with diabetes assigned to groups 1 (-), 2 (±), 3 (+), 4 (++), or 5 (+++) according to urinary ketone concentrations. There were strong relationships between fasting blood glucose, age, and diabetic ketosis. Exhaled acetone concentration significantly correlated with concentrations of fasting blood glucose, ketones in the blood and urine, LDL-C, creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen. Breath testing for ketones has a high sensitivity and specificity and appears to be a noninvasive, convenient, and repeatable method for the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of diabetic ketosis.

  6. Breath Ketone Testing: A New Biomarker for Diagnosis and Therapeutic Monitoring of Diabetic Ketosis

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yue; Gao, Zhaohua; Liu, Yong; Cheng, Yan; Yu, Mengxiao; Zhao, Lingling

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acetone, β-hydroxybutyric acid, and acetoacetic acid are three types of ketone body that may be found in the breath, blood, and urine. Detecting altered concentrations of ketones in the breath, blood, and urine is crucial for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic ketosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the advantages of different detection methods for ketones, and to establish whether detection of the concentration of ketones in the breath is an effective and practical technique. Methods. We measured the concentrations of acetone in the breath using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and β-hydroxybutyrate in fingertip blood collected from 99 patients with diabetes assigned to groups 1 (−), 2 (±), 3 (+), 4 (++), or 5 (+++) according to urinary ketone concentrations. Results. There were strong relationships between fasting blood glucose, age, and diabetic ketosis. Exhaled acetone concentration significantly correlated with concentrations of fasting blood glucose, ketones in the blood and urine, LDL-C, creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen. Conclusions. Breath testing for ketones has a high sensitivity and specificity and appears to be a noninvasive, convenient, and repeatable method for the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of diabetic ketosis. PMID:24900994

  7. Slow breathing as a means to improve orthostatic tolerance: a randomized sham-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Lewis, Nia C S; Sikken, Elisabeth L G; Thomas, Kate N; Ainslie, Philip N

    2013-07-15

    Endogenous oscillations in blood pressure (BP) and cerebral blood flow have been associated with improved orthostatic tolerance. Although slow breathing induces such responses, it has not been tested as a therapeutic strategy to improve orthostatic tolerance. With the use of a randomized, crossover sham-controlled design, we tested the hypothesis that breathing at six breaths/min (vs. spontaneous breathing) would improve orthostatic tolerance via inducing oscillations in mean arterial BP (MAP) and cerebral blood flow. Sixteen healthy participants (aged 25 ± 4 yr; mean ± SD) had continuous beat-to-beat measurements of middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAv), BP (finometer), heart rate (ECG), and end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure during an incremental orthostatic stress test to presyncope by combining head-up tilt with incremental lower-body negative pressure. Tolerance time to presyncope was improved (+15%) with slow breathing compared with spontaneous breathing (29.2 ± 5.4 vs. 33.7 ± 6.0 min; P < 0.01). The improved tolerance was reflected in elevations in low-frequency (LF; 0.07-0.2 Hz) oscillations of MAP and mean MCAv, improved metrics of dynamic cerebrovascular control (increased LF phase and reduced LF gain), and a reduced rate of decline for MCAv (-0.60 ± 0.27 vs. -0.99 ± 0.51 cm·s(-1)·min(-1); P < 0.01) and MAP (-0.50 ± 0.37 vs. -1.03 ± 0.80 mmHg/min; P = 0.01 vs. spontaneous breathing) across time from baseline to presyncope. Our findings show that orthostatic tolerance can be improved within healthy individuals with a simple, nonpharmacological breathing strategy. The mechanisms underlying this improvement are likely mediated via the generation of negative intrathoracic pressure during slow and deep breathing and the related beneficial impact on cerebrovascular and autonomic function.

  8. Viscosity measurements on very small capillary blood samples.

    PubMed

    Eugster, M; Häusler, K; Reinhart, W H

    2007-01-01

    Viscosity measurements on very small capillary blood samples could be of considerable clinical interest. We have developed an oscillating viscometer for very small volumes, which consists of a glass capillary containing 7 mul of blood, which is part of an oscillating torsional resonator. The damping of the sinusoidal oscillations depends on the density and viscosity of the fluid, which allows blood viscosity measurements. The instrument was first evaluated in comparison with a standard blood viscometer (Contraves LS 30). Blood from healthy volunteers anticoagulated with EDTA was adjusted to hematocrit levels of 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60%, respectively. A strong correlation was found between hematocrit and oscillating viscosity (y=0.17x-2.05, r=0.969, p<0.0001) and between oscillating and conventional high shear viscosity (y=1.11x-0.62, r=0.971, p<0.0001). Blood viscosity measured in venous or capillary blood of normal subjects was similar (p=0.63). Bedside viscosity measurements on capillary blood drawn from a finger prick during routine blood glucose measurements in patients with diabetes mellitus showed lower blood viscosity than controls (3.62+/-0.87 vs 4.79+/-0.59 mPa.s, p=0.0007), which is in contrast to earlier publications, and may be explained by the lower hematocrit in our diabetic patients (34.7+/-6.0% vs. 43.1+/-1.9%, p<0.0001). Blood viscosity was independent of the actual glucose level (range 3-17 mmol/l). Capillary blood anticoagulated with EDTA was drawn by heel prick from 23 newborns. Blood viscosity was higher (5.66 +/-2.47 mPa.s) than in adult controls (see above), which could be explained by the dependence on the higher hematocrit (46.4 +/-8.6%). We conclude that viscosity measurements can be made on very small samples such as capillary blood from diabetic patients or newborn babies with this new oscillating viscometer. It remains to be determined if such new informations have clinical implications.

  9. Improved oxygenation during standing performance of deep breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure after cardiac surgery: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Henrik; Faager, Gun; Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2015-09-01

    Breathing exercises after cardiac surgery are often performed in a sitting position. It is unknown whether oxygenation would be better in the standing position. The aim of this study was to evaluate oxygenation and subjective breathing ability during sitting vs standing performance of deep breathing exercises on the second day after cardiac surgery. Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (n = 189) were randomized to sitting (controls) or standing. Both groups performed 3 × 10 deep breaths with a positive expiratory pressure device. Peripheral oxygen saturation was measured before, directly after, and 15 min after the intervention. Subjective breathing ability, blood pressure, heart rate, and pain were assessed. Oxygenation improved significantly in the standing group compared with controls directly after the breathing exercises (p < 0.001) and after 15 min rest (p = 0.027). The standing group reported better deep breathing ability compared with controls (p = 0.004). A slightly increased heart rate was found in the standing group (p = 0.047). After cardiac surgery, breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure, performed in a standing position, significantly improved oxygenation and subjective breathing ability compared with sitting performance. Performance of breathing exercises in the standing position is feasible and could be a valuable treatment for patients with postoperative hypoxaemia.

  10. How Cities Breathe: Ground-Referenced, Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging Precursor Measurements To Space-Based Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifer, Ira; Tratt, David; Quattrochi, Dale; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Buchwitz, Michael; Burrows, John

    2013-01-01

    the complex and often aerosol laden, humid, urban microclimates, atmospheric transport and profile monitoring, spatial resolution, temporal cycles (diurnal and seasonal which involve interactions with the surrounding environment diurnal and seasonal cycles) and representative measurement approaches given traffic realities. Promising approaches incorporate contemporaneous airborne remote sensing and in situ measurements, nocturnal surface surveys, with ground station measurement

  11. Theory and practice of manual blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Cork, Alison

    This article outlines the process of taking a manual blood pressure measurement. The author suggests that it is a skill that nursing students should be using in clinical practice rather than relying on automated monitors.

  12. Detection and measurement of retinal blood vessel pulsatile motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Frost, Shaun; Vignarajan, Janardhan; An, Dong; Tay-Kearney, Mei-Ling; Kanagasingam, Yogi

    2016-03-01

    Retinal photography is a non-invasive and well-accepted clinical diagnosis of ocular diseases. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of retinal images is crucial in ocular diseases related clinical application. Pulsatile properties caused by cardiac rhythm, such as spontaneous venous pulsation (SVP) and pulsatile motion of small arterioles, can be visualized by dynamic retinal imaging techniques and provide clinical significance. In this paper, we aim at vessel pulsatile motion detection and measurement. We proposed a novel approach for pulsatile motion measurement of retinal blood vessels by applying retinal image registration, blood vessel detection and blood vessel motion detection and measurement on infrared retinal image sequences. The performance of the proposed methods was evaluated on 8 image sequences with 240 images. A preliminary result has demonstrated the good performance of the method for blood vessel pulsatile motion observation and measurement.

  13. Measurement of limb blood flow by electrical impedance plethysmography.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, J. M.; Swain, I. D.; Shakespeare, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Limb blood flow has been measured in 72 individuals by the noninvasive technique of electrical impedance plethysmography. Venous occlusion was not used. Blood flow was measured in 230 limbs in which 195 limbs were either in normal individuals or the clinically normal limbs of patients (normal limbs). Thirty-five limbs were clinically abnormal. Measurements on limbs with clinical abnormalities showed that blood flow values often fell within the limits of the normal range. However 3 cases of known vascular injury and 2 cases studied after hand surgery under tourniquet showed lowered blood flow values by comparison with the unaffected limb. A simultaneously recorded range of cardiac output and stroke volume measurements gave similar results to those obtained in a previous, unconnected study. Images Fig. 1 PMID:4004047

  14. Automated analysis of blood pressure measurements (Korotkov sound)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. P.; Hoffler, G. W.; Wolthuis, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Automatic system for noninvasive measurements of arterial blood pressure is described. System uses Korotkov sound processor logic ratios to identify Korotkov sounds. Schematic diagram of system is provided to show components and method of operation.

  15. Spectrophotometric measurement of carboxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin in blood.

    PubMed

    Rodkey, F L; Hill, T A; Pitts, L L; Robertson, R F

    1979-08-01

    This paper describes separate spectrophotometric procedures for rapidly measuring carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and methemoglobin (MetHb) in blood. Absorbance measurements are made in the Soret region at a blood dilution near 1000-fold. For COHb estimation, the diluent contains sodium hydrosulfite, providing the two-component system COHb--Hb for absorbance measurements at 420 and 432 nm. The NA2S2O4 effectively prevents dissociation of COHb by oxygen. For MetHb estimation, the diluent contains KCN and carbon monoxide, providing the two-component system COHb--CNMetHb. Absorbance measurements are made at 420 nm, before and after addiely analyzed for the total of all MetHb forms present. Each procedure requires about 3 muL of blood and can be applied to human or animal blood. Results obtained by the present methods are in satisfactory agreement with currently accepted procedures, which require much larger samples or more elaborate equipment.

  16. New principle for measuring arterial blood oxygenation, enabling motion-robust remote monitoring

    PubMed Central

    van Gastel, Mark; Stuijk, Sander; de Haan, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Finger-oximeters are ubiquitously used for patient monitoring in hospitals worldwide. Recently, remote measurement of arterial blood oxygenation (SpO2) with a camera has been demonstrated. Both contact and remote measurements, however, require the subject to remain static for accurate SpO2 values. This is due to the use of the common ratio-of-ratios measurement principle that measures the relative pulsatility at different wavelengths. Since the amplitudes are small, they are easily corrupted by motion-induced variations. We introduce a new principle that allows accurate remote measurements even during significant subject motion. We demonstrate the main advantage of the principle, i.e. that the optimal signature remains the same even when the SNR of the PPG signal drops significantly due to motion or limited measurement area. The evaluation uses recordings with breath-holding events, which induce hypoxemia in healthy moving subjects. The events lead to clinically relevant SpO2 levels in the range 80–100%. The new principle is shown to greatly outperform current remote ratio-of-ratios based methods. The mean-absolute SpO2-error (MAE) is about 2 percentage-points during head movements, where the benchmark method shows a MAE of 24 percentage-points. Consequently, we claim ours to be the first method to reliably measure SpO2 remotely during significant subject motion. PMID:27924930

  17. Dynamic response of the Initial Systolic Time Interval to a breathing stimulus measured with impedance cardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijer, Jan H.; Hoekstra, Femke; Habers, Esther; Verdaasdonk, Ruud M.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2010-04-01

    The Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI) is a measure for the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. The present study reports about the dynamic response of ISTI to a Valsalva manoeuvre. This response was investigated in 22 young healthy volunteers, having different levels of training in sports. The time course of the ISTI during the Valsalva manoeuvre was found to follow a distinct pattern and to be analogous to the course of the Pre-Ejection Period (PEP), also obtained from ECG and ICG signals, reported earlier. The recordings show a definite influence of the Frank-Starling mechanism and are to some extent consistent with reports on the time course of sympathetic activation. The highly trained subjects showed an ISTI that was systematically longer at all moments of the manoeuvre.

  18. Using quantitative breath sound measurements to predict lung function following resection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Predicting postoperative lung function is important for estimating the risk of complications and long-term disability after pulmonary resection. We investigated the capability of vibration response imaging (VRI) as an alternative to lung scintigraphy for prediction of postoperative lung function in patients with intrathoracic malignancies. Methods Eighty-five patients with intrathoracic malignancies, considered candidates for lung resection, were prospectively studied. The projected postoperative (ppo) lung function was calculated using: perfusion scintigraphy, ventilation scintigraphy, and VRI. Two sets of assessments made: one for lobectomy and one for pneumonectomy. Clinical concordance was defined as both methods agreeing that either a patient was or was not a surgical candidate based on a ppoFEV1% and ppoDLCO% > 40%. Results Limits of agreement between scintigraphy and VRI for ppo following lobectomy were -16.47% to 15.08% (mean difference = -0.70%;95%CI = -2.51% to 1.12%) and for pneumonectomy were -23.79% to 19.04% (mean difference = -2.38%;95%CI = -4.69% to -0.07%). Clinical concordance between VRI and scintigraphy was 73% for pneumonectomy and 98% for lobectomy. For patients who had surgery and postoperative lung function testing (n = 31), ppoFEV1% using scintigraphic methods correlated with measured postoperative values better than projections using VRI, (adjusted R2 = 0.32 scintigraphy; 0.20 VRI), however the difference between methods failed to reach statistical significance. Limits of agreement between measured FEV1% postoperatively and ppoFEV1% based on perfusion scintigraphy were -16.86% to 23.73% (mean difference = 3.44%;95%CI = -0.29% to 7.16%); based on VRI were -19.56% to 28.99% (mean difference = 4.72%;95%CI = 0.27% to 9.17%). Conclusions Further investigation of VRI as an alternative to lung scintigraphy for prediction of postoperative lung function is warranted. PMID:20939900

  19. Using quantitative breath sound measurements to predict lung function following resection.

    PubMed

    Morice, Rodolfo C; Jimenez, Carlos A; Eapen, Georgie A; Mehran, Reza J; Keus, Leendert; Ost, David

    2010-10-12

    Predicting postoperative lung function is important for estimating the risk of complications and long-term disability after pulmonary resection. We investigated the capability of vibration response imaging (VRI) as an alternative to lung scintigraphy for prediction of postoperative lung function in patients with intrathoracic malignancies. Eighty-five patients with intrathoracic malignancies, considered candidates for lung resection, were prospectively studied. The projected postoperative (ppo) lung function was calculated using: perfusion scintigraphy, ventilation scintigraphy, and VRI. Two sets of assessments made: one for lobectomy and one for pneumonectomy. Clinical concordance was defined as both methods agreeing that either a patient was or was not a surgical candidate based on a ppoFEV1% and ppoDLCO% > 40%. Limits of agreement between scintigraphy and VRI for ppo following lobectomy were -16.47% to 15.08% (mean difference = -0.70%;95%CI = -2.51% to 1.12%) and for pneumonectomy were -23.79% to 19.04% (mean difference = -2.38%;95%CI = -4.69% to -0.07%). Clinical concordance between VRI and scintigraphy was 73% for pneumonectomy and 98% for lobectomy. For patients who had surgery and postoperative lung function testing (n = 31), ppoFEV1% using scintigraphic methods correlated with measured postoperative values better than projections using VRI, (adjusted R2 = 0.32 scintigraphy; 0.20 VRI), however the difference between methods failed to reach statistical significance. Limits of agreement between measured FEV1% postoperatively and ppoFEV1% based on perfusion scintigraphy were -16.86% to 23.73% (mean difference = 3.44%;95%CI = -0.29% to 7.16%); based on VRI were -19.56% to 28.99% (mean difference = 4.72%;95%CI = 0.27% to 9.17%). Further investigation of VRI as an alternative to lung scintigraphy for prediction of postoperative lung function is warranted.

  20. Micro-PIV measurements of blood flow in extraembryonic blood vessels of chicken embryos.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Yeop; Ji, Ho Seong; Lee, Sang Joon

    2007-10-01

    The hemodynamic characteristics of blood flow are important in the diagnosis of circulatory diseases, since such diseases are related to wall shear stress of cardiovascular vessels. In chicken embryos at early stages of development, it is possible to directly visualize blood flow inside blood vessels. We therefore employed a micro-PIV technique to assess blood flow in extraembryonic venous and arterial blood vessels of chicken embryos, using red blood cells (RBCs) as tracers and obtaining flow images of RBCs using a high-speed CMOS camera. The mean velocity field showed non-Newtonian flow characteristics. The blood flow in two venous vessels merged smoothly into the Y-shaped downstream vein without any flow separation or secondary flow. Vorticity was high in the inner regions, where the radius of curvature varied greatly. A periodic variation of temporally resolved velocity signals, due to beating of the heart, was observed in arterial blood vessels. The pulsating frequency was obtained by fast Fourier transform analysis using the measured velocity data. The measurement technique used here was useful in analyzing the hemodynamic characteristics of in vivo blood flow in chicken embryos.

  1. 21 CFR 862.3050 - Breath-alcohol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Breath-alcohol test system. 862.3050 Section 862....3050 Breath-alcohol test system. (a) Identification. A breath-alcohol test system is a device intened to measure alcohol in the human breath. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  2. 21 CFR 862.3050 - Breath-alcohol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Breath-alcohol test system. 862.3050 Section 862....3050 Breath-alcohol test system. (a) Identification. A breath-alcohol test system is a device intened to measure alcohol in the human breath. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  3. 21 CFR 862.3050 - Breath-alcohol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Breath-alcohol test system. 862.3050 Section 862....3050 Breath-alcohol test system. (a) Identification. A breath-alcohol test system is a device intened to measure alcohol in the human breath. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  4. Simultaneous measurement of red blood cell aggregation and whole blood coagulation using high-frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kweon-Ho; Yeom, Eunseop; Ha, Hojin; Lee, Sang Joon

    2012-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the feasibility of using high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) for simultaneous monitoring of blood coagulation and red blood cell (RBC) aggregation. Using a 35-MHz ultrasound scanner, ultrasound speckle data were acquired from whole blood samples of three experimental groups of rats, including 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS)-treated, noncoagulation and normal control groups. The variations of blood echogenicity, the shape parameters of probability distribution of speckle intensity (skewness and kurtosis) and the correlation coefficient between two consecutive speckle data were calculated as a function of time starting from immediately after taking blood. The blood echogenicity increases rapidly to plateaus at the early stage of measurement for all the experimental groups caused by the formation of RBC aggregates. The DIDS-treated group exhibits the lowest echogenicity level due to the inhibitory effect of DIDS on RBC aggregation. The correlation analysis between consecutive speckle patterns seems to be useful to examine the variation of blood fluidity and the progress of clot formation. Whole blood coagulation is observed to be accelerated by DIDS treatment. In addition, the results of skewness and kurtosis analysis indicated that RBC aggregates may be disrupted during blood coagulation. The present study suggests that HFUS has good potential for simultaneous monitoring of RBC aggregation and blood coagulation to examine the relationship between them. Copyright © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Measurement of elastic properties of blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Ilic, D; Moix, T; Lambercy, O; Sache, L; Bleuler, H; Ohta, M; Augsburger, L

    2005-01-01

    This paper is related to the measurements of the modulus of elasticity of an artery by studying the deformations due to the inflation of an angioplasty balloon catheter used for Interventional Radiology (IR) procedures. Various types of balloons are studied in order to characterize and compare their behaviors at the time of inflation. A test bench, consisting of an angioplasty balloon, a Polyvinyl alcohol model and an actuator used to inflate a balloon, is developed for the realization of the experiments. The pressure-volume curve during the inflation of a balloon is observed. Elasticity modulus are derived with an analytical model of the measurement system. The results are then analyzed and compared to existing data from literature.

  6. Speed of blood withdrawal and accurate measurement of oxygen content in mixed venous blood.

    PubMed

    Jaschke, Katie; Brown, Dianna; Clark, Alicia; Doull, Sarah; English, Ashley; Hoover, Nicole; Jones, Philip; Klamm, David; Odom, Chung; Primrose, Brenna; Sollars, Kristin; Ebberts, Marci

    2014-11-01

    Measurement of mixed venous oxygen saturation helps determine whether cardiac output and oxygen delivery are sufficient for metabolic needs. As recommended by the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses guideline, blood samples for determining mixed venous oxygen saturation are obtained by slowly, in 1 to 2 minutes, withdrawing 1.5 mL of blood from the distal port of the pulmonary artery catheter. In theory, the negative force of rapid withdrawal could pull oxygenated blood from the pulmonary capillary bed, causing falsely elevated saturation values. To determine if the speed of withdrawal affects oxygen content in blood samples used to measure mixed venous oxygen saturation. The sample consisted of heart failure patients with pulmonary artery catheters admitted to a cardiac intensive care unit. A prospective, randomized, 2 × 2 crossover design was used to compare mixed venous oxygen saturation in blood samples obtained quickly or slowly. A total of 50 sets of saturation values were analyzed. Each set included 1 blood sample obtained slowly, in 1 to 2 minutes, and 1 obtained rapidly, in 5 seconds. The mean difference in saturation values between the fast and the slow groups was -0.3 (CI, -1.5 to 0.8; P = .55), indicating that no meaningful systematic bias is attributable to fast withdrawal of blood. Rapid blood sampling does not falsely elevate measurements of mixed venous oxygen saturation. ©2014 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  7. Consciously controlled breathing decreases the high-frequency component of heart rate variability by inhibiting cardiac parasympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Konosuke; Maruyama, Ryoko

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the beat-to-beat alterations in heart rate, comprises sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activities of the heart. HRV analysis is used to quantify cardiac autonomic regulation. Since respiration could be a confounding factor in HRV evaluation, some studies recommend consciously controlled breathing to standardize the method. However, it remains unclear whether controlled breathing affects HRV measurement. We compared the effects of controlled breathing on HRV with those of spontaneous breathing. In 20 healthy volunteers, we measured respiratory frequency (f), tidal volume, and blood pressure (BP) and recorded electrocardiograms during spontaneous breathing (14.8 ± 0.7 breaths/min) and controlled breathing at 15 (0.25 Hz) and 6 (0.10 Hz) breaths/min. Compared to spontaneous breathing, controlled breathing at 0.25 Hz showed a higher heart rate and a lower high-frequency (HF) component, an index of parasympathetic nerve activity, although the f was the same. During controlled breathing at 0.10 Hz, the ratio of the low frequency (LF) to HF components (LF/HF), an index of sympathetic nerve activity, increased greatly and HF decreased, while heart rate and BP remained almost unchanged. Thus, controlled breathing at 0.25 Hz, which requires mental concentration, might inhibit parasympathetic nerve activity. During controlled breathing at 0.10 Hz, LF/HF increases because some HF subcomponents are synchronized with f and probably move into the LF band. This increment leads to misinterpretation of the true autonomic nervous regulation. We recommend that the respiratory pattern of participants should be evaluated before spectral HRV analysis to correctly understand changes in autonomic nervous regulation.

  8. Can volatile compounds in exhaled breath be used to monitor control in diabetes mellitus?

    PubMed

    Smith, David; Spaněl, Patrik; Fryer, Anthony A; Hanna, Fahmy; Ferns, Gordon A A

    2011-06-01

    Although it has been known for centuries that there are compounds in exhaled breath that are altered in disease, it is only in the last few decades that it has been possible to measure them with sufficient accuracy and precision to make them clinically useful. The clinical utility of breath analysis has also been limited by the practical difficulties of collecting representative breath samples, free from contaminants. More recent methods of breath analysis have allowed real-time analysis of breath, eliminating the need for sample collection, and therefore potentially allowing the rapid feedback of results to patient and clinician. One possible future application of breath analysis may be the monitoring of metabolic control in patients with diabetes mellitus. This perspective article provides an overview of the studies of breath analysis in diabetes, focusing on the breath metabolites; acetone, isoprene and also methyl nitrate that have previously been reported to be altered in diabetes, highlighting the factors that may potentially confound their interpretation. Specific attention is given to selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) and proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), because they are techniques that have been developed specifically for the absolute quantification of breath metabolites in real time, although reference is made to some of the alternative techniques, including sensors and optical devices. Whilst breath analysis, using SIFT-MS, PTR-MS and other sensitive techniques, can potentially be used for the non-invasive monitoring of metabolic conditions that may include diabetes mellitus, further work is required in terms of the clinical and analytical validation. Furthermore, it is unclear at present what breath metabolites should be monitored and what factors may confound their interpretation. Although a non-invasive method of monitoring glycaemic control is clearly desirable, it will be important to demonstrate its analytical

  9. Measurement of neopterin, TGF-β1 and ACE in the exhaled breath condensate of patients with sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzai, Hasib; Cameron, Barbara; Chui, Jeanie; Lloyd, Andrew; Wakefield, Denis; Thomas, Paul S

    2013-12-01

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is a non-invasive method of sampling airway lining fluids in respiratory diseases. This may be useful in identifying exhaled biomarkers of granulomatous inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis in patients with sarcoidosis. The aim of this pilot study was to identify markers of granulomatous airway inflammation and disease activity including neopterin, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in EBC. EBC was collected from 16 patients with sarcoidosis and 22 healthy control subjects. EBC neopterin, and active-TGF-β1 were measured by ELISA. EBC-ACE activity was measured using a colorimetric assay. EBC neopterin was detectable in 3/20 controls and 7/16 patients with sarcoidosis. Patients with sarcoidosis had greater mean neopterin levels compared to control subjects (0.57 ± 0.45 nmol l(-1) versus 0.41 ± 0.22 nmol l(-1), p = 0.04). TGF-β1 was detectable in the EBC of all subjects and concentrations were higher in patients with sarcoidosis compared with controls (115.5 ± 79.6 pg mol(-1) versus 82.3 ± 16.2 pg mol(-1), p = 0.048). There was no difference in EBC ACE activity, which was only detectable in 3/20 healthy controls and 2/16 patients (p = 0.91). EBC markers of granulomatous inflammation are detectable at greater levels in patients with sarcoidosis compared to healthy controls subjects. Larger studies and development of sensitive assays are warranted to examine the disease correlates and predictive utility of these markers.

  10. Measurement of retinal blood flow in the rat by combining Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography with fundus imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Vietauer, Martin; Knopf, Corinna; Fürnsinn, Clemens; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Reitsamer, Herbert; Gröschl, Martin; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Vilser, Walthard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-10-01

    A wide variety of ocular diseases are associated with abnormalities in ocular circulation. As such, there is considerable interest in techniques for quantifying retinal blood flow, among which Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) may be the most promising. We present an approach to measure retinal blood flow in the rat using a new optical system that combines the measurement of blood flow velocities via Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and the measurement of vessel diameters using a fundus camera-based technique. Relying on fundus images for extraction of retinal vessel diameters instead of OCT images improves the reliability of the technique. The system was operated with an 841-nm superluminescent diode and a charge-coupled device camera that could be operated at a line rate of 20 kHz. We show that the system is capable of quantifying the response of 100% oxygen breathing on the retinal blood flow. In six rats, we observed a decrease in retinal vessel diameters of 13.2% and a decrease in retinal blood velocity of 42.6%, leading to a decrease in retinal blood flow of 56.7%. Furthermore, in four rats, the response of retinal blood flow during stimulation with diffuse flicker light was assessed. Retinal vessel diameter and blood velocity increased by 3.4% and 28.1%, respectively, leading to a relative increase in blood flow of 36.2%;. The presented technique shows much promise to quantify early changes in retinal blood flow during provocation with various stimuli in rodent models of ocular diseases in rats.

  11. Measurement of retinal blood flow in the rat by combining Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography with fundus imaging.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, René M; Vietauer, Martin; Knopf, Corinna; Fürnsinn, Clemens; Leitgeb, Rainer A; Reitsamer, Herbert; Gröschl, Martin; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Vilser, Walthard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of ocular diseases are associated with abnormalities in ocular circulation. As such, there is considerable interest in techniques for quantifying retinal blood flow, among which Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) may be the most promising. We present an approach to measure retinal blood flow in the rat using a new optical system that combines the measurement of blood flow velocities via Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and the measurement of vessel diameters using a fundus camera-based technique. Relying on fundus images for extraction of retinal vessel diameters instead of OCT images improves the reliability of the technique. The system was operated with an 841-nm superluminescent diode and a charge-coupled device camera that could be operated at a line rate of 20 kHz. We show that the system is capable of quantifying the response of 100% oxygen breathing on the retinal blood flow. In six rats, we observed a decrease in retinal vessel diameters of 13.2% and a decrease in retinal blood velocity of 42.6%, leading to a decrease in retinal blood flow of 56.7%. Furthermore, in four rats, the response of retinal blood flow during stimulation with diffuse flicker light was assessed. Retinal vessel diameter and blood velocity increased by 3.4% and 28.1%, respectively, leading to a relative increase in blood flow of 36.2%. The presented technique shows much promise to quantify early changes in retinal blood flow during provocation with various stimuli in rodent models of ocular diseases in rats.

  12. The air we breathe: three vital respiratory gases and the red blood cell: oxygen, nitric oxide, and carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Dzik, Walter H

    2011-04-01

    Three vital respiratory gases-oxygen (O(2)), nitric oxide (NO), and carbon dioxide (CO(2))-intersect at the level of the human red blood cell (RBC). In addition to hemoglobin (Hb)'s central role in O(2) transport, interaction of Hb with the Band 3 metabolon balances RBC energy flow. 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate enhances O(2) transport across the placenta and plays an important role in regulating RBC plasticity. NO is a key mediator of hypoxic vasodilation, but the precise role of RBC Hb remains controversial. In addition to established theories that depend on RBC uptake, delivery, and discharge of NO or its metabolites, an alternative hypothesis based on RBC permeability is suggested. NO depletion by free Hb may account for several clinical features seen during intravascular hemolysis or during deliberate infusion of Hb solutions used as RBC substitutes. CO(2) released by tissues triggers oxygen release through a series of well-coordinated reactions centered on the Band 3 metabolon. While RBC carbonic anhydrase and the Band 3 anion exchanger are central to this process, there is surprisingly little research on the kinetics of CO(2) clearance by transfusion. The three RBC gases are directly related to the three principal gases of Earth's atmosphere. Human fossil fuel consumption dumps 90 million metric tons of carbon into the atmosphere annually. Increasing CO(2) levels are linked to global warming, melting Arctic ice, rising sea levels, and climate instability. Just as individual cells depend on balance of the three vital gases, so too will their balance determine survival of life on Earth.

  13. Shot-noise limited Faraday rotation spectroscopy for detection of nitric oxide isotopes in breath, urine, and blood.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin; Nikodem, Michal; Zhang, Eric; Cikach, Frank; Barnes, Jarrod; Comhair, Suzy; Dweik, Raed A; Kao, Christina; Wysocki, Gerard

    2015-03-13

    Measurement of NO and/or its metabolites in the various body compartments has transformed our understanding of biology. The inability of the current NO measurement methods to account for naturally occurring and experimental NO isotopes, however, has prevented the scientific community from fully understating NO metabolism in vivo. Here we present a mid-IR Faraday rotation spectrometer (FRS) for detection of NO isotopes. The instrument utilizes a novel dual modulation/demodulation (DM) FRS method which exhibits noise performance at only 2 times the fundamental quantum shot-noise level and provides the record sensitivity in its class. This is achieved with a system that is fully autonomous, robust, transportable, and does not require cryogenic cooling. The DM-FRS enables continuous monitoring of nitric oxide isotopes with the detection limits of 3.72 ppbv/Hz(1/2) to(14)NO and 0.53 ppbv/Hz(1/2) to(15)NO using only 45 cm active optical path. This DM-FRS measurement method can be used to improve the performance of conventional FRS sensors targeting other radical species. The feasibility of the instrument to perform measurements relevant to studies of NO metabolism in humans is demonstrated.

  14. Shot-noise Limited Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy for Detection of Nitric Oxide Isotopes in Breath, Urine, and Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Nikodem, Michal; Zhang, Eric; Cikach, Frank; Barnes, Jarrod; Comhair, Suzy; Dweik, Raed A.; Kao, Christina; Wysocki, Gerard

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of NO and/or its metabolites in the various body compartments has transformed our understanding of biology. The inability of the current NO measurement methods to account for naturally occurring and experimental NO isotopes, however, has prevented the scientific community from fully understating NO metabolism in vivo. Here we present a mid-IR Faraday rotation spectrometer (FRS) for detection of NO isotopes. The instrument utilizes a novel dual modulation/demodulation (DM) FRS method which exhibits noise performance at only 2 times the fundamental quantum shot-noise level and provides the record sensitivity in its class. This is achieved with a system that is fully autonomous, robust, transportable, and does not require cryogenic cooling. The DM-FRS enables continuous monitoring of nitric oxide isotopes with the detection limits of 3.72 ppbv/Hz1/2 to14NO and 0.53 ppbv/Hz1/2 to15NO using only 45 cm active optical path. This DM-FRS measurement method can be used to improve the performance of conventional FRS sensors targeting other radical species. The feasibility of the instrument to perform measurements relevant to studies of NO metabolism in humans is demonstrated.

  15. Shot-noise Limited Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy for Detection of Nitric Oxide Isotopes in Breath, Urine, and Blood

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yin; Nikodem, Michal; Zhang, Eric; Cikach, Frank; Barnes, Jarrod; Comhair, Suzy; Dweik, Raed A.; Kao, Christina; Wysocki, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of NO and/or its metabolites in the various body compartments has transformed our understanding of biology. The inability of the current NO measurement methods to account for naturally occurring and experimental NO isotopes, however, has prevented the scientific community from fully understating NO metabolism in vivo. Here we present a mid-IR Faraday rotation spectrometer (FRS) for detection of NO isotopes. The instrument utilizes a novel dual modulation/demodulation (DM) FRS method which exhibits noise performance at only 2 times the fundamental quantum shot-noise level and provides the record sensitivity in its class. This is achieved with a system that is fully autonomous, robust, transportable, and does not require cryogenic cooling. The DM-FRS enables continuous monitoring of nitric oxide isotopes with the detection limits of 3.72 ppbv/Hz1/2 to14NO and 0.53 ppbv/Hz1/2 to15NO using only 45 cm active optical path. This DM-FRS measurement method can be used to improve the performance of conventional FRS sensors targeting other radical species. The feasibility of the instrument to perform measurements relevant to studies of NO metabolism in humans is demonstrated. PMID:25767064

  16. [Evaluating parachute-drop stress by measuring blood lipids].

    PubMed

    Bleich, A; Grinshpoon, A; Solomon, Z; Mikulincer, M; Isaacs, J; Kotler, M

    1991-03-15

    An attempt to evaluate parachute-drop related stress by determining the blood lipid profile (cholesterol, LDL, HDL, apo-A, apo-B, and triglycerides) is reported. Measurements were made on starting the parachute course, just before the first jump, and just after the third jump. On these 3 occasions 38 combat troops answered psychological questionnaires and 30 of them gave blood samples. While there were significant fluctuations in level of all blood lipids and their apoproteins, they could not be correlated selectively with presumed levels of stress. The well-known difficulties in field studies in controlling crucial factors such as the exact timing of the measurements and food intake (specific diet or fasting) make questionable the use of biochemical markers in measuring stress under the conditions of our study. It is possible that the high rate of refusal to give blood samples biased the findings.

  17. Fluid-filled blood pressure measurement systems.

    PubMed

    Li, J K; van Brummelen, A G; Noordergraaf, A

    1976-05-01

    The performance of catheter-manometer systems for the measurement of pulsatile pressure has been evaluated by both experimental techniques and theoretical considerations. The former approach has shown, on occasion, multiple maxima in the amplitude response. The latter has been approached in a variety of ways, ranging from extreme lumping to application of transmission line theory while employing different configurations in the system's representation. Multiple maxima have also been seen, The present paper identifies the sources of the differences found and compares the relative merits of various theoretical approaches. It introduces the compliance of the system as a figure of merit and provides a simple first-order approximation formula for evaluation of the quality of a system. Damping and impedance matching to improve the system's frequency response were studied. It was found that they were not needed in a very stiff or a very compliant system, nor should one worry about the representation of such a system.

  18. Timing of blood pressure measurement related to caffeine consumption.

    PubMed

    Mort, Jane R; Kruse, Heather R

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether patients should wait 30 minutes after caffeine consumption to have their blood pressure measured. Literature was obtained by searching MEDLINE (1980-September 2007), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1980-September 2007), and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (1994-September 2007). Search terms included caffeine and blood pressure. Literature was also obtained from citations in relevant articles. Articles that examined caffeine's acute effect on blood pressure were reviewed, with additional focus on caffeine tolerance and hypertensive status. Caffeine appears to affect blood pressure through adenosine receptor inhibition and an increased release of select neurotransmitters. Caffeine levels peak 30-120 minutes after oral intake and caffeine's half-life is 3-6 hours. The effect of caffeine on blood pressure has been examined for decades, with variable results depending on factors such as population examined (eg, hypertensive status, physical stressors, age) and study design (eg, acute effects, chronic ingestion, retrospective epidemiologic review). Caffeine tolerance diminishes the acute effect of caffeine on blood pressure, and hypertensive individuals are more susceptible to blood pressure changes. Reviews of caffeine's acute effect on blood pressure indicate changes of 3-15 mm Hg systolic and 4-13 mm Hg diastolic. Typically, blood pressure changes occur within 30 minutes, peak in 1-2 hours, and may persist for more than 4 hours. Having a patient abstain from caffeine for 30 minutes prior to blood pressure monitoring is not adequate to avoid caffeine's potential effects. An alternative approach to blood pressure monitoring would be to ask the patient about recent caffeine consumption and interpret the blood pressure reading based on this information. In addition, healthcare practitioners should provide education regarding caffeine's effects.

  19. Measurement and Comparison of Organic Compound Concentrations in Plasma, Whole Blood, and Dried Blood Spot Samples.

    PubMed

    Batterman, Stuart A; Chernyak, Sergey; Su, Feng-Chiao

    2016-01-01

    The preferred sampling medium for measuring human exposures of persistent organic compounds (POPs) is blood, and relevant sample types include whole blood, plasma, and dried blood spots (DBS). Because information regarding the performance and comparability of measurements across these sample types is limited, it is difficult to compare across studies. This study evaluates the performance of POP measurements in plasma, whole blood and DBS, and presents the distribution coefficients needed to convert concentrations among the three sample types. Blood samples were collected from adult volunteers, along with demographic and smoking information, and analyzed by GC/MS for organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and brominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Regression models were used to evaluate the relationships between the sample types and possible effects of personal covariates. Distribution coefficients also were calculated using physically-based models. Across all compounds, concentrations in plasma were consistently the highest; concentrations in whole blood and DBS samples were comparable. Distribution coefficients for plasma to whole blood concentrations ranged from 1.74 to 2.26 for pesticides/CHCs, averaged 1.69 ± 0.06 for the PCBs, and averaged 1.65 ± 0.03 for the PBDEs. Regression models closely fit most chemicals (R (2) > 0.80), and whole blood and DBS samples generally showed very good agreement. Distribution coefficients estimated using biologically-based models were near one and did not explain the observed distribution. Among the study population, median concentrations of several pesticides/CHCs and PBDEs exceeded levels reported in the 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, while levels of other OCPs and PBDEs were comparable or lower. Race and smoking status appeared to slightly affect plasma/blood concentration ratios for several POPs. The experimentally

  20. Effects of breathing patterns and light exercise on linear and nonlinear heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Weippert, Matthias; Behrens, Kristin; Rieger, Annika; Kumar, Mohit; Behrens, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Despite their use in cardiac risk stratification, the physiological meaning of nonlinear heart rate variability (HRV) measures is not well understood. The aim of this study was to elucidate effects of breathing frequency, tidal volume, and light exercise on nonlinear HRV and to determine associations with traditional HRV indices. R-R intervals, blood pressure, minute ventilation, breathing frequency, and respiratory gas concentrations were measured in 24 healthy male volunteers during 7 conditions: voluntary breathing at rest, and metronome guided breathing (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 Hz) during rest, and cycling, respectively. The effect of physical load was significant for heart rate (HR; p < 0.001) and traditional HRV indices SDNN, RMSSD, lnLFP, and lnHFP (p < 0.01 for all). It approached significance for sample entropy (SampEn) and correlation dimension (D2) (p < 0.1 for both), while HRV detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) measures DFAα1 and DFAα2 were not affected by load condition. Breathing did not affect HR but affected all traditional HRV measures. D2 was not affected by breathing; DFAα1 was moderately affected by breathing; and DFAα2, approximate entropy (ApEn), and SampEn were strongly affected by breathing. DFAα1 was strongly increased, whereas DFAα2, ApEn, and SampEn were decreased by slow breathing. No interaction effect of load and breathing pattern was evident. Correlations to traditional HRV indices were modest (r from -0.14 to -0.67, p < 0.05 to <0.01). In conclusion, while light exercise does not significantly affect short-time HRV nonlinear indices, respiratory activity has to be considered as a potential contributor at rest and during light dynamic exercise.

  1. Changes in breath trihalomethane levels resulting from household water-use activities.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sydney M; Brinkman, Marielle C; Ashley, David L; Blount, Benjamin C; Lyu, Christopher; Masters, John; Singer, Philip C

    2006-04-01

    Common household water-use activities such as showering, bathing, drinking, and washing clothes or dishes are potentially important contributors to individual exposure to trihalomethanes (THMs), the major class of disinfection by-products of water treated with chlorine. Previous studies have focused on showering or bathing activities. In this study, we selected 12 common water-use activities and determined which may lead to the greatest THM exposures and result in the greatest increase in the internal dose. Seven subjects performed the various water-use activities in two residences served by water utilities with relatively high and moderate total THM levels. To maintain a consistent exposure environment, the activities, exposure times, air exchange rates, water flows, water temperatures, and extraneous THM emissions to the indoor air were carefully controlled. Water, indoor air, blood, and exhaled-breath samples were collected during each exposure session for each activity, in accordance with a strict, well-defined protocol. Although showering (for 10 min) and bathing (for 14 min), as well as machine washing of clothes and opening mechanical dishwashers at the end of the cycle, resulted in substantial increases in indoor air chloroform concentrations, only showering and bathing caused significant increases in the breath chloroform levels. In the case of bromodichloromethane (BDCM), only bathing yielded a significantly higher air level in relation to the preexposure concentration. For chloroform from showering, strong correlations were observed for indoor air and exhaled breath, blood and exhaled breath, indoor air and blood, and tap water and blood. Only water and breath, and blood and breath were significantly associated for chloroform from bathing. For BDCM, significant correlations were obtained for blood and air, and blood and water from showering. Neither dibromochloromethane nor bromoform gave measurable breath concentrations for any of the activities

  2. Automated office blood pressure measurement in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Martin G.; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Dawes, Martin; Godwin, Marshall

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide FPs with detailed knowledge of automated office blood pressure (AOBP) measurement, its potential role in primary care, and its proper use in the diagnosis and management of hypertension. Sources of information Comprehensive monitoring and collection of scientific articles on AOBP by the authors since its introduction. Main message Automated office blood pressure measurement maintains a role for blood pressure (BP) readings taken in the office setting. Clinical research studies have reported a substantially stronger relationship between awake ambulatory BP measurement and AOBP measurement compared with manual BP recorded during routine visits to the patient’s physician. Automated office blood pressure measurement produces mean BP values comparable to awake ambulatory BP and home BP values. Compared with routine manual office BP measurement, AOBP correlates more strongly with awake ambulatory BP measurement, shows less digit preference, is more consistent from visit to visit, is similar both within and outside of the physician’s office, virtually eliminates office-induced hypertension, and is associated with less masked hypertension. It is estimated that more than 25% of Canadian primary care physicians are now using AOBP measurement in their office practices. The use of AOBP to diagnose hypertension has been recommended by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program since 2010. Conclusion There is now sufficient evidence to incorporate AOBP measurement into primary care as an alternative to manual BP measurement. PMID:24522674

  3. Can the single-breath helium dilution method predict lung volumes as measured by whole-body plethysmography?*

    PubMed Central

    Coertjens, Patrícia Chaves; Knorst, Marli Maria; Dumke, Anelise; Pasqualoto, Adriane Schmidt; Riboldi, João; Barreto, Sérgio Saldanha Menna

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare TLC and RV values obtained by the single-breath helium dilution (SBHD) method with those obtained by whole-body plethysmography (WBP) in patients with normal lung function, patients with obstructive lung disease (OLD), and patients with restrictive lung disease (RLD), varying in severity, and to devise equations to estimate the SBHD results. METHODS: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study involving 169 individuals, of whom 93 and 49 presented with OLD and RLD, respectively, the remaining 27 having normal lung function. All patients underwent spirometry and lung volume measurement by both methods. RESULTS: TLC and RV were higher by WBP than by SBHD. The discrepancy between the methods was more pronounced in the OLD group, correlating with the severity of airflow obstruction. In the OLD group, the correlation coefficient of the comparison between the two methods was 0.57 and 0.56 for TLC and RV, respectively (p < 0.001 for both). We used regression equations, adjusted for the groups studied, in order to predict the WBP values of TLC and RV, using the corresponding SBHD values. It was possible to create regression equations to predict differences in TLC and RV between the two methods only for the OLD group. The TLC and RV equations were, respectively, ∆TLCWBP-SBHD in L = 5.264 − 0.060 × FEV1/FVC (r2 = 0.33; adjusted r2 = 0.32) and ∆RVWBP-SBHD in L = 4.862 − 0.055 × FEV1/FVC (r2 = 0.31; adjusted r2 = 0.30). CONCLUSIONS: The correction of TLC and RV results obtained by SBHD can improve the accuracy of this method for assessing lung volumes in patients with OLD. However, additional studies are needed in order to validate these equations. PMID:24473761

  4. EXHALED BREATH ANALYSIS FOR HUMAN EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exhaled breath collection and analysis has historically been used in environmental research studies to characterize exposures to volatile organic compounds. The use of this approach is based on the fact that many compounds present in blood are reflected in the breath, and that...

  5. EXHALED BREATH ANALYSIS FOR HUMAN EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exhaled breath collection and analysis has historically been used in environmental research studies to characterize exposures to volatile organic compounds. The use of this approach is based on the fact that many compounds present in blood are reflected in the breath, and that...

  6. Finger temperature controller for non-invasive blood glucose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiqin; Ting, Choon Meng; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2010-11-01

    Blood glucose level is an important parameter for doctors to diagnose and treat diabetes. The Near-Infra-Red (NIR) spectroscopy method is the most promising approach and this involves measurement on the body skin. However it is noted that the skin temperature does fluctuate with the environmental and physiological conditions and we found that temperature has important influences on the glucose measurement. In-vitro and in-vivo investigations on the temperature influence on blood glucose measurement have been carried out. The in-vitro results show that water temperature has significant influence on water absorption. Since 90% of blood components are water, skin temperature of measurement site has significant influence on blood glucose measurement. Also the skin temperature is related to the blood volume, blood volume inside capillary vessels changes with skin temperature. In this paper the relationship of skin temperature and signal from the skin and inside tissue was studied at different finger temperatures. Our OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test) trials results show the laser signals follow the skin temperature trend and the correlation of signal and skin temperature is much stronger than the correlation of signal and glucose concentration. A finger heater device is designed to heat and maintain the skin temperature of measurement site. The heater is controlled by an electronic circuit according to the skin temperature sensed by a thermocouple that is put close to the measurement site. In vivo trials were carried out and the results show that the skin temperature significantly influences the signal fluctuations caused by pulsate blood and the average signal value.

  7. User procedure for self-measurement of blood pressure. First International Consensus Conference on Self Blood Pressure Measurement.

    PubMed

    Mengden, T; Chamontin, B; Phong Chau, N; Luis Palma Gamiz, J; Chanudet, X

    2000-04-01

    To review the medical literature regarding the methodology of self-measurement of blood pressure and to provide some practical recommendations regarding protocol and procedure for measurement, documentation and analysis of data, choice and provision of devices and education of patients and physicians. Technical recommendations regarding measurement of blood pressure do not differ from usual guidelines. Frequency of measurement remains a matter of discussion. At the beginning of the self-measurements of blood pressure and during the titration phase, there should be a 7-day measurement period with two measurement of blood pressure each morning and two measurements in the evening at pre-stipulated times. For long-term observation, a minimum measurement period of 1 week per quarter is required. The minimum number of measurements performed during each period should be a total of 12 readings recorded within seven working days. Depending on individual needs (e.g. poor compliance) or for pharmacologic studies, a higher frequency of readings could be used. Owing to the lack of reliability of patients' diaries, the use of printer-equipped or memory-equipped devices is advocated. All the recorded data, except those obtained on the first day, must be used for analysis. Self-measurement of blood pressure should be performed with validated fully automated devices using a brachial cuff. The preference should be given to apparatus offering the possibility of storing and transmitting measurements. Wrist apparatus should be used with caution due to the risk of measurement errors if it is used inappropriately. A manual device should be considered for patients suffering from irregular cardiac rhythms and patients with large or small arm circumferences, since automated devices have not been validated for use in these situations. Reimbursement of hypertensive patients using validated devices should be considered, so long as they are adequately trained and supervised. In a therapeutic

  8. A comparison of breath- and blood-alcohol test results from real-life policing situations: a one-year study of data from the Central Hessian police district in Germany.

    PubMed

    Roiu, Immanuel; Birngruber, Christoph G; Spencer, Victoria C; Wollersen, Heike; Dettmeyer, Reinhard; Verhoff, Marcel A

    2013-10-10

    So far, studies investigating the comparability of breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) with blood alcohol concentration (BAC) have focused on the accuracy of BrAC testing instruments. The presented study, conducted with cases from the district of the Middle Hessian Police Headquarters, is to the best of our knowledge the first to compare both methods under real-life conditions in normal policing situations. For a 1-year period, alcohol-impaired drunk-driving suspects, who were by criminal procedure required to give a blood sample, were offered a voluntary, additional BrAC test with a "Dräger Alcotest 7110 Evidential". The BrAC test was to be administered as soon as possible after the suspect had been apprehended, without, however, delaying the collection of the blood sample. Ninety-two cases could be included in our study. In 30 cases, a blood sample was not taken; in 11 cases, a BrAC test could not be performed. In the remaining 51 cases, we found the following pairings of BrAC and BAC results: BrAC≥0.55 mg/l and BAC≥1.1‰ (n=39); 0.25 mg/l≤BrAC<0.55 mg/l and 0.5‰≤BAC<1.1‰ (n=5); BrAC≥0.55 mg/l and BAC<1.1‰ (n=4); BrAC<0.55 mg/l and BAC≥1.1‰ (n=3). The mean value for the conversion factor, Q, was 2.12‰l/mg. In accord with numerous other studies, our study results would suggest a value of 2.1‰ l/mg to German legislature as a new statutory value for Q. In borderline cases, of which there were already 7 in our study with 51 cases, suspects could benefit both from a BrAC test or a BAC test, with the benefit lastly depending more on early testing time than on the test method used. Our results support the call for the earliest possible measurement of alcohol concentration values after a drunk driving offense was committed. In some situations, this can probably only be accomplished with BrAC testing. A supplementary blood sample and BAC testing could compensate for the known weaknesses of BrAC testing. Thus, the complementary use of both methods

  9. Exhaled breath volatile organic and inorganic compound composition in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Schönermarck, Ulf; Dengler, Christina; Gmeinwieser, Annegret; Praun, Siegfried; Schelling, Gustav; Fischereder, Michael; Boulesteix, Anne-Laure; Dolch, Michael E

    2016-09-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are characterized by uremia and increased oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of hemodialysis on breath ammonia and volatile oxidative stress parameters. Breath analysis was performed in 18 ESRD patients prior, during, and 30 minutes after a hemodialysis session. Parameters of hemodialysis efficiency and oxidative stress (lipid peroxides, total antioxidative capacity, myeloperoxidase, and malondialdehyde) were measured in blood at the beginning, after 30 minutes, and at the end of the dialysis session. 11 healthy volunteers with normal renal function served as a control group. Ion-molecule reaction mass spectrometry was used for breath-gas analysis. Initial elevated concentrations of breath ammonia decreased during hemodialysis and correlated with serum urea levels (r2 = 0.74), whereas isoprene concentrations increased. Breath concentrations of malondialdehyde and pentane (MDA-P) were significantly elevated in ESRD patients (p < 0.01). Within the blood, a significant decrease of malondialdehyde was notable during hemodialysis treatment, whereas levels of lipid peroxides and myeloperoxidase increased. Exhaled breath of patients with ESRD on regular hemodialysis treatment is characterized by an increase in ammonia and MDA-P. The efficient decrease of breath ammonia and its close correlation to serum urea during hemodialysis suggests its possible use as a noninvasive marker to monitor dialysis efficacy.

  10. Breathing and Relaxation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... level is often dependent on his or her breathing pattern. Therefore, people with chronic lung conditions may ...

  11. Deep breathing after surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000440.htm Deep breathing after surgery To use the sharing features on ... way to do so is by doing deep breathing exercises. Deep breathing keeps your lungs well-inflated ...

  12. Blood oxygenation level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging during carbogen breathing: differentiation between prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia and correlation with vessel maturity.

    PubMed

    Di, Ningning; Mao, Ning; Cheng, Wenna; Pang, Haopeng; Ren, Yan; Wang, Ning; Liu, Xinjiang; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can evaluate tumor maturity and preoperatively differentiate prostate cancer (PCa) from benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). BOLD MRI based on transverse relaxation time*-weighted echo planar imaging was performed to assess PCa (19) and BPH (22) responses to carbogen (95% O2 and 5% CO2). The average signal values of PCa and BPH before and after carbogen breathing and the relative increased signal values were computed, respectively. The endothelial-cell marker, CD31, and the pericyte marker, α-smooth muscle actin (mature vessels), were detected with immunofluorescence, and were assessed by microvessel density (MVD) and microvessel pericyte density (MPD). The microvessel pericyte coverage index (MPI) was used to evaluate the degree of vascular maturity. The changed signal from BOLD MRI was correlated with MVD, MPD, and MPI. After inhaling carbogen, both PCa and BPH showed an increased signal, but a lower slope was found in PCa than that in BPH (P<0.05). PCa had a higher MPD and MVD but a lower MPI than BPH. The increased signal intensity was positively correlated with MPI in PCa and that in BPH (r=0.616, P=0.011; r=0.658, P=0.002); however, there was no correlation between the increased signal intensity and MPD or MVD in PCa than that in BPH (P>0.05). Our results confirmed that the increased signal values induced by BOLD MRI well differentiated PCa from BPH and had a positive correlation with vessel maturity in both of them. BOLD MRI can be utilized as a surrogate marker for the noninvasive assessment of the degree of vessel maturity.

  13. Plasticity in breathing and arterial blood pressure following acute intermittent hypercapnic hypoxia in infant rat pups with a partial loss of 5-HT neurons.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Jennifer; Cummings, Kevin J

    2015-11-15

    The role of serotonin (5-HT) neurons in cardiovascular responses to acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) has not been studied in the neonatal period. We hypothesized that a partial loss of 5-HT neurons would reduce arterial blood pressure (BP) at rest, increase the fall in BP during hypoxia, and reduce the long-term facilitation of breathing (vLTF) and BP following AIH. We exposed 2-wk-old, 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine-treated and controls to AIH (10% O2; n = 13 control, 14 treated), acute intermittent hypercapnia (5% CO2; n = 12 and 11), or acute intermittent hypercapnic hypoxia (AIHH; 10% O2, 5% CO2; n = 15 and 17). We gave five 5-min challenges of AIH and acute intermittent hypercapnia, and twenty ∼20-s challenges of AIHH to mimic sleep apnea. Systolic BP (sBP), diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, heart rate (HR), ventilation (V̇e), and metabolic rate (V̇o2) were continuously monitored. 5,7-Dihydroxytryptamine induced an ∼35% loss of 5-HT neurons from the medullary raphe. Compared with controls, pups deficient in 5-HT neurons had reduced resting sBP (∼6 mmHg), mean arterial pressure (∼5 mmHg), and HR (56 beats/min), and experienced a reduced drop in BP during hypoxia. AIHH induced vLTF in both groups, reflected in increased V̇e and V̇e/V̇o2, and decreased arterial Pco2. The sBP of pups deficient in 5-HT neurons, but not controls, was increased 1 h following AIHH. Our data suggest that a relatively small loss of 5-HT neurons compromises resting BP and HR, but has no influence on ventilatory plasticity induced by AIHH. AIHH may be useful for reversing cardiorespiratory defects related to partial 5-HT system dysfunction.

  14. Development/verification of methods for measurement of exhaled breath and environmental e-vapor product aerosol.

    PubMed

    Oldham, Michael J; Wagner, Karl A; Gene Gilman, I; Beach, James B; Liu, Jianmin; Rostami, Ali A; Sarkar, Mohamadi A

    2017-04-01

    Concerns have been raised about the potential health effects of potential bystander exposure to exhaled aerosols from e-vapor products (EVPs). An exhaled breath collection system (EBS) was developed and analytical methods were verified for collection and analysis of exhaled breath from users of EVPs. Analytical methods were adapted and verified for collection of environmental air samples during EVP use in an exposure chamber. Analysis of constituents in exhaled breath focused on nicotine, propylene glycol, and glycerin (because these are reported as the major constituents in EVPs) and selected carbonyl compounds (acetaldehyde, acrolein, and formaldehyde). Analysis of environmental samples included nicotine, propylene glycol, glycerin, 12 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), 15 carbonyl compounds and 4 metals. The EBS and analytical methods used were found to be suitable for collection and analysis of the target constituents in exhaled breath. Environmental sampling for background levels of VOCs and carbonyl compounds found only acetone, acetaldehyde, benzene, ethylbenzene, formaldehyde, isoprene, methyl ethyl ketone, hexaldehyde, propionaldehyde, and toluene above the limit of quantification in some samples. None of the targeted metals were detected. Background levels of VOCs and carbonyl compounds were consistent with levels previously reported for ambient air.

  15. Factors influencing validation of ambulatory blood pressure measuring devices.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, E; Atkins, N; Staessen, J

    1995-11-01

    With the introduction of 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring into clinical practice a vast market for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring devices has been created. To satisfy this market manufacturers are producing an array of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring devices. There is no obligation on manufacturers to have such devices validated independently, even though two national protocols, one from the British Hypertension Society (BHS) and the other from the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI), call for independent validation and state the means of doing so. However, many factors can influence the validation procedure. They include compliance to the protocol being employed; the accuracy of the standard; establishing precisely the model being validated; the influences of blood pressure level, age and exercise on device accuracy; the provisions necessary for special populations, such as pregnant women, the elderly and children; the influence of oscillometric versus Korotkoff sound detection and electrocardiographic gating on comparative measurements; the assessment of performance as distinct from accuracy; and the relevance of general factors, such as the algorithm being employed and computer compatibility. Forty-three ambulatory blood pressure monitoring devices have been marketed for ambulatory blood pressure measurement and of those only 18 have been validated according to either the BHS or the AAMI protocol. The influence of the factors listed above on the validation studies of those devices will be considered and the relevance of validation procedures to the clinical use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring devices will be discussed.

  16. Clinical value of blood glucose measurement in pet rabbits.

    PubMed

    Harcourt-Brown, F M; Harcourt-Brown, S F

    2012-06-30

    Blood glucose was measured with a portable glucose meter in 907 rabbits, including 238 clinically healthy ones. Blood glucose concentrations ranged from 1.2 to 30.1 mmol/l. Diabetes mellitus was not encountered. No significant effect of sex or sedation was found. Hypoglycaemia was seen in 16 rabbits including one with an insulinoma. There was a significant relationship between blood glucose, food intake, signs of stress and severity of clinical disease. Rabbits showing signs of stress had higher blood glucose than rabbits with no signs and rabbits that were totally anorexic had higher blood glucose values than those that were eating normally or those with reduced food intake. Severe hyperglycaemia (>20 mmol/l) was associated with conditions with a poor prognosis. Rabbits with confirmed intestinal obstruction had a mean blood glucose of 24.7 mmol/l (n=18). This was significantly higher than the rabbits with confirmed gut stasis, which had a mean value of 8.5 mmol/l (n=51). The conclusion of the study was that blood glucose is a measurable parameter that can be used to assess the severity of a rabbit's condition and help to differentiate between gut stasis and intestinal obstruction in rabbits that are anorexic.

  17. Blood oxyhemoglobin saturation measurements by blue-green spectral shift.

    PubMed

    Denninghoff, Kurt R; Chipman, Russell A; Hillman, Lloyd W

    2007-01-01

    Previous work describing a resilient method for measuring oxyhemoglobin saturation using the blue-green spectral shift was performed using cell free hemoglobin solutions. Hemoglobin solution and whole blood sample spectra measured under similar conditions in a spectrophotometer are used here to begin evaluating the impact of cellular scattering on this method. The blue-green spectral shift with changing oxyhemoglobin saturation was preserved in these blood samples and the blue-green spectral shift was relatively unaffected by physiological changes in blood pH (6.6, 7.1, and 7.4), path length through blood (100 and 200 microm), and blood hematocrit (19 to 48%). The packaging of hemoglobin in red blood cells leads to a decreased apparent path length through hemoglobin, and an overall decrease in scattering loss with increasing wavelength from 450 to 850 nm. The negative slope of the scattering loss in the 476 to 516-nm range leads to a +3.0 nm shift in the oxyhemoglobin saturation calibration line when the blue-green spectral minimum in these blood samples was compared to cell free hemoglobin. Further research is needed to fully evaluate the blue green spectral shift method in cellular systems including in vivo testing.

  18. Direct measurement of capillary blood pressure in the human lip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, S. E.; Tucker, B. J.; Aratow, M.; Crenshaw, A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, we developed and tested a new procedure for measuring microcirculatory blood pressures above heart level in humans. Capillary and postcapillary venule blood pressures were measured directly in 13 human subjects by use of the servonulling micropressure technique adapted for micropuncture of lip capillaries. Pressure waveforms were recorded in 40 separate capillary vessels and 14 separate postcapillary venules over periods ranging from 5 to 64 s. Localization and determination of capillary and postcapillary vessels were ascertained anatomically before pressure measurements. Capillary pressure was 33.2 +/- 1.5 (SE) mm Hg in lips of subjects seated upright. Repeated micropunctures of the same vessel gave an average coefficient of variation of 0.072. Postcapillary venule pressure was 18.9 +/- 1.6 mm Hg. This procedure produces a direct and reproducible means of measuring microvascular blood pressures in a vascular bed above heart level in humans.

  19. Direct measurement of capillary blood pressure in the human lip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, S. E.; Tucker, B. J.; Aratow, M.; Crenshaw, A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, we developed and tested a new procedure for measuring microcirculatory blood pressures above heart level in humans. Capillary and postcapillary venule blood pressures were measured directly in 13 human subjects by use of the servonulling micropressure technique adapted for micropuncture of lip capillaries. Pressure waveforms were recorded in 40 separate capillary vessels and 14 separate postcapillary venules over periods ranging from 5 to 64 s. Localization and determination of capillary and postcapillary vessels were ascertained anatomically before pressure measurements. Capillary pressure was 33.2 +/- 1.5 (SE) mm Hg in lips of subjects seated upright. Repeated micropunctures of the same vessel gave an average coefficient of variation of 0.072. Postcapillary venule pressure was 18.9 +/- 1.6 mm Hg. This procedure produces a direct and reproducible means of measuring microvascular blood pressures in a vascular bed above heart level in humans.

  20. Home blood pressure measurement in elderly patients with cognitive impairment: comparison of agreement between relative-measured blood pressure and automated blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Plichart, Matthieu; Seux, Marie-Laure; Caillard, Laure; Chaussade, Edouard; Vidal, Jean-Sébastien; Boully, Clémence; Hanon, Olivier

    2013-08-01

    Home blood pressure measurement (HBPM) is recommended by guidelines for hypertension management. However, this method might be difficult to use in elderly individuals with cognitive disorders. Our aim was to assess the agreement and the feasibility of HBPM by a relative as compared with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in elderly patients with dementia. Sixty outpatients with dementia aged 75 years and older with office hypertension (≥140/90 mmHg) were subjected successively to HBPM by a trained relative and 24-h ABPM. The order of the two methods was randomized. Current guidelines' thresholds for the diagnosis of hypertension were used. The mean (SD) age of the patients was 80.8 (6.1) years (55% women) and the mean (SD) mini-mental state examination score was 20.1 (6.9). The feasibility of relative-HBPM was very high, with a 97% success rate (defined by ≥12/18 measurements reported). The blood pressure measurements were highly correlated between the two methods (r=0.75 and 0.64 for systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, respectively; P<0.001 for both). The agreement between the methods for the diagnosis of sustained hypertension and white-coat hypertension was excellent (overall agreement, 92%; κ coefficient, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.61-0.93). Similar results were found for daytime-ABPM. In cognitively impaired elderly patients, HBPM by a relative using an automated device was a good alternative to 24-h ABPM.

  1. Automatic noninvasive measurement of systolic blood pressure using photoplethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Nitzan, Meir; Patron, Amikam; Glik, Zehava; Weiss, Abraham T

    2009-01-01

    Background Automatic measurement of arterial blood pressure is important, but the available commercial automatic blood pressure meters, mostly based on oscillometry, are of low accuracy. Methods In this study, we present a cuff-based technique for automatic measurement of systolic blood pressure, based on photoplethysmographic signals measured simultaneously in fingers of both hands. After inflating the pressure cuff to a level above systolic blood pressure in a relatively slow rate, it is slowly deflated. The cuff pressure for which the photoplethysmographic signal reappeared during the deflation of the pressure-cuff was taken as the systolic blood pressure. The algorithm for the detection of the photoplethysmographic signal involves: (1) determination of the time-segments in which the photoplethysmographic signal distal to the cuff is expected to appear, utilizing the photoplethysmographic signal in the free hand, and (2) discrimination between random fluctuations and photoplethysmographic pattern. The detected pulses in the time-segments were identified as photoplethysmographic pulses if they met two criteria, based on the pulse waveform and on the correlation between the signal in each segment and the signal in the two neighboring segments. Results Comparison of the photoplethysmographic-based automatic technique to sphygmomanometry, the reference standard, shows that the standard deviation of their differences was 3.7 mmHg. For subjects with systolic blood pressure above 130 mmHg the standard deviation was even lower, 2.9 mmHg. These values are much lower than the 8 mmHg value imposed by AAMI standard for automatic blood pressure meters. Conclusion The photoplethysmographic-based technique for automatic measurement of systolic blood pressure, and the algorithm which was presented in this study, seems to be accurate. PMID:19857254

  2. Characterizing pulmonary blood flow distribution measured using arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Henderson, A Cortney; Prisk, G Kim; Levin, David L; Hopkins, Susan R; Buxton, Richard B

    2009-12-01

    The arterial spin labeling (ASL) method provides images in which, ideally, the signal intensity of each image voxel is proportional to the local perfusion. For studies of pulmonary perfusion, the relative dispersion (RD, standard deviation/mean) of the ASL signal across a lung section is used as a reliable measure of flow heterogeneity. However, the RD of the ASL signals within the lung may systematically differ from the true RD of perfusion because the ASL image also includes signals from larger vessels, which can reflect the blood volume rather than blood flow if the vessels are filled with tagged blood during the imaging time. Theoretical studies suggest that the pulmonary vasculature exhibits a lognormal distribution for blood flow and thus an appropriate measure of heterogeneity is the geometric standard deviation (GSD). To test whether the ASL signal exhibits a lognormal distribution for pulmonary blood flow, determine whether larger vessels play an important role in the distribution, and extract physiologically relevant measures of heterogeneity from the ASL signal, we quantified the ASL signal before and after an intervention (head-down tilt) in six subjects. The distribution of ASL signal was better characterized by a lognormal distribution than a normal distribution, reducing the mean squared error by 72% (p < 0.005). Head-down tilt significantly reduced the lognormal scale parameter (p = 0.01) but not the shape parameter or GSD. The RD increased post-tilt and remained significantly elevated (by 17%, p < 0.05). Test case results and mathematical simulations suggest that RD is more sensitive than the GSD to ASL signal from tagged blood in larger vessels, a probable explanation of the change in RD without a statistically significant change in GSD. This suggests that the GSD is a useful measure of pulmonary blood flow heterogeneity with the advantage of being less affected by the ASL signal from tagged blood in larger vessels.

  3. Measuring Arterial Blood Pressure. A Self-Contained Instructional Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Chris Ellen

    This self-contained instructional module is designed to help adult caregivers learn how to measure arterial blood pressure in the home. The module includes the following parts: objectives; pretest (with answers); four sections of instructional material covering (1) equipment, (2) cuff placement and locating the brachial artery, (3) measuring blood…

  4. A Portable Real-Time Ringdown Breath Acetone Analyzer: Toward Potential Diabetic Screening and Management

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chenyu; Sun, Meixiu; Wang, Zhennan; Chen, Zhuying; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2016-01-01

    Breath analysis has been considered a suitable tool to evaluate diseases of the respiratory system and those that involve metabolic changes, such as diabetes. Breath acetone has long been known as a biomarker for diabetes. However, the results from published data by far have been inconclusive regarding whether breath acetone is a reliable index of diabetic screening. Large variations exist among the results of different studies because there has been no “best-practice method” for breath-acetone measurements as a result of technical problems of sampling and analysis. In this mini-review, we update the current status of our development of a laser-based breath acetone analyzer toward real-time, one-line diabetic screening and a point-of-care instrument for diabetic management. An integrated standalone breath acetone analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique has been developed. The instrument was validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The linear fittings suggest that the obtained acetone concentrations via both methods are consistent. Breath samples from each individual subject under various conditions in total, 1257 breath samples were taken from 22 Type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients, 312 Type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients, which is one of the largest numbers of T2D subjects ever used in a single study, and 52 non-diabetic healthy subjects. Simultaneous blood glucose (BG) levels were also tested using a standard diabetic management BG meter. The mean breath acetone concentrations were determined to be 4.9 ± 16 ppm (22 T1D), and 1.5 ± 1.3 ppm (312 T2D), which are about 4.5 and 1.4 times of the one in the 42 non-diabetic healthy subjects, 1.1 ± 0.5 ppm, respectively. A preliminary quantitative correlation (R = 0.56, p < 0.05) between the mean individual breath acetone concentration and the mean individual BG levels does exist in 20 T1D subjects with no ketoacidosis. No direct correlation is observed in T1D subjects, T

  5. Analysis of Exhaled Breath for Disease Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amann, Anton; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen; Buszewski, Bogusław; Ligor, Tomasz; Jezierski, Tadeusz; Pleil, Joachim; Risby, Terence

    2014-06-01

    Breath analysis is a young field of research with great clinical potential. As a result of this interest, researchers have developed new analytical techniques that permit real-time analysis of exhaled breath with breath-to-breath resolution in addition to the conventional central laboratory methods using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Breath tests are based on endogenously produced volatiles, metabolites of ingested precursors, metabolites produced by bacteria in the gut or the airways, or volatiles appearing after environmental exposure. The composition of exhaled breath may contain valuable information for patients presenting with asthma, renal and liver diseases, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory lung disease, or metabolic disorders. In addition, oxidative stress status may be monitored via volatile products of lipid peroxidation. Measurement of enzyme activity provides phenotypic information important in personalized medicine, whereas breath measurements provide insight into perturbations of the human exposome and can be interpreted as preclinical signals of adverse outcome pathways.

  6. Analysis of exhaled breath for disease detection.

    PubMed

    Amann, Anton; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen; Buszewski, Bogusław; Ligor, Tomasz; Jezierski, Tadeusz; Pleil, Joachim; Risby, Terence

    2014-01-01

    Breath analysis is a young field of research with great clinical potential. As a result of this interest, researchers have developed new analytical techniques that permit real-time analysis of exhaled breath with breath-to-breath resolution in addition to the conventional central laboratory methods using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Breath tests are based on endogenously produced volatiles, metabolites of ingested precursors, metabolites produced by bacteria in the gut or the airways, or volatiles appearing after environmental exposure. The composition of exhaled breath may contain valuable information for patients presenting with asthma, renal and liver diseases, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory lung disease, or metabolic disorders. In addition, oxidative stress status may be monitored via volatile products of lipid peroxidation. Measurement of enzyme activity provides phenotypic information important in personalized medicine, whereas breath measurements provide insight into perturbations of the human exposome and can be interpreted as preclinical signals of adverse outcome pathways.

  7. A website for blood pressure measuring devices: dableducational.com.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Eoin

    2003-08-01

    Consumers are faced with an ever-increasing array of blood pressure measuring devices, whether for use in clinical areas or for use by individuals anxious to measure their own blood pressure. Validation protocols that allow for independent evaluation of blood pressure measuring devices are available, and some of the devices on the market have been evaluated according to these protocols. The results of such evaluations have been published periodically in medical journals. However, such surveys are not readily available to the public and to health care authorities with responsibility for purchasing blood pressure measuring equipment for use in clinical medicine, and because of the necessarily lengthy publication process they are no longer up-to-date at the time of publication. Moreover, the results of published validation studies are often flawed because of protocol violations and the conclusions may not be valid. These considerations have been the stimulus for the establishment of an independent non-profit website, which will provide quarterly updates on the accuracy and performance of blood pressure measuring devices on the market as well as an expert assessment of the validation procedures on which recommendations are based. The ethos of the website is primarily educational and it is hoped that it will serve as a forum for the provision of much-needed information that will ultimately improve the management of hypertension. The website is due to be launched shortly and this paper outlines the general principles that have governed its establishment and the facilities that it will provide.

  8. Measurement of directed blood flow by laser speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Evan R.; Thompson, Oliver B.; Andrews, Michael K.

    2011-03-01

    Recent success in reconciling laser Doppler and speckle measurements of dermal perfusion by the use of multi-exposure speckle has prompted an investigation of speckle effects arising from directed blood flow which might be expected in the small blood vessels of the eye. Unlike dermal scatter, the blood in retinal vessels is surrounded by few small and stationary scatterers able to assist the return of light energy by large-angle scatter. Returning light is expected to come from multiple small angle scatter from the large red blood cells which dominate the fluid. This work compares speckle measurements on highly scattering skin, with measurements on flow in a retinal phantom consisting of a glass capillary which is itself immersed in an index matching fluid to provide a flat air-phantom interface. Brownian motion dominated measurements when small easily levitated scatters were used, and flow was undetectable. With whole-blood, Brownian motion was small and directed flows in the expected region of tens of mm/s were detectable. The nominal flow speed relates to the known pump rate; within the capillary the flow will have a profile reducing toward the walls. The pulsatile effects on laser speckle contrast in the retina are discussed with preliminary multi-exposure measurements on retinal vessels using a fundus camera. Differences between the multiple exposure curves and power spectra of perfused tissue and ordered flow are discussed.

  9. Longitudinal measurements of total body water and body composition in healthy volunteers by online breath deuterium measurement and other near-subject methods.

    PubMed

    Engel, Barbara; Spanel, Patrik; Smith, David; Diskin, Ann; Davies, Simon J

    2004-01-01

    Rapid quantification of breath deuterium abundance by flowing afterglow mass spectrometry (FA-MS) enables accurate measurement of total body water (TBW), which combined with other techniques such as bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and anthropometrics enables near-subject assessment of body composition. This study assessed the comparative reproducibility and inter-relationship of these methods in healthy subjects over 12 months. Detailed bedside composition was performed in 22 subjects, (10 male) aged 28-79 with body mass index (BMI) ranging from 21-38 at baseline and again at one year. Techniques included FA-MS deuterium dilution, BIA, skin-fold thickness (SFT) and soft tissue ultrasound measurement of fat and muscle depth. Short-term reproducibility for each method was established. Within and between technique comparisons of measurement were made from Pearson's linear regression, coefficient of variation (CV) and Bland-Altman analysis. Weight and TBW estimated by FA-MS, BIA and SFT at baseline and one year later were highly correlated (R(2) = 0.96-0.98), slope 1.02-1.03, CV = 4.5-11.6%. Systematic errors between the different methods in determining TBW were effectively identical at baseline and after one year. There was a tendency for subjects to gain weight during the study period, due to an increase, predominantly in younger women, of body water (FA-MS and SFT) and loss of upper body fat (ultrasound). BIA was relatively insensitive to these changes. It is concluded that over a 12-month period, TBW determined by FA-MS deuterium breath analysis has reproducibility similar to conventional weighing. The stability of between method errors would suggest that these techniques might be used in conjunction with each other in the longitudinal determination of body composition and so detect relatively subtle changes. The value of including an absolute determinant of TBW by FA-MS that is independent of the need to employ population derived equations, appears to be of

  10. TR-BREATH: Time-Reversal Breathing Rate Estimation and Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Han, Yi; Chen, Yan; Lai, Hung-Quoc; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Beibei; Liu, K J Ray

    2017-04-28

    In this paper, we introduce TR-BREATH, a timereversal (TR) based contact-free breathing monitoring system. It is capable of breathing detection and multi-person breathing rate estimation within a short period of time using off-the-shelf WiFi devices. The proposed system exploits the channel state information (CSI) to capture the miniature variations in the environment caused by breathing. To magnify the CSI variations, TRBREATH projects CSIs into the TR resonating strength (TRRS) feature space and analyzes the TRRS by the Root-MUSIC and affinity propagation algorithms. Extensive experiment results indoor demonstrate a perfect detection rate of breathing. With only 10 seconds of measurement, a mean accuracy of 99% can be obtained for single-person breathing rate estimation under the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) scenario. Furthermore, it achieves a mean accuracy of 98:65% in breathing rate estimation for a dozen people under the line-of-sight (LOS) scenario and a mean accuracy of 98:07% in breathing rate estimation of 9 people under the NLOS scenario, both with 63 seconds of measurement. Moreover, TR-BREATH can estimate the number of people with an error around 1. We also demonstrate that TR-BREATH is robust against packet loss and motions. With the prevailing of WiFi, TR-BREATH can be applied for in-home and real-time breathing monitoring.

  11. Blood pressure self-measurement in the obstetric waiting room.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Stefan; Kamper, Christina H; Toftegaard, Thomas S; Bertelsen, Olav W

    2013-11-01

    Pregnant diabetic patients are often required to self-measure their blood pressure in the waiting room before consultation. Currently used blood pressure devices do not guarantee valid measurements when used unsupervised. This could lead to misdiagnosis and treatment error. The aim of this study was to investigate current use of blood pressure self-measurement in the waiting room in order to identify challenges that could influence the resulting data quality. Also, we wanted to investigate the potential for addressing these challenges with e-health and telemedicine technology. We observed 81 pregnant diabetics' ability to correctly self-measure in the waiting room during a 4-week observational descriptive study. Specifically, we investigated the level of patient adherence to six recommendations with which patients are instructed to comply in order to obtain a reliable blood pressure reading. We found that the patients did not adhere to given instructions when performing blood pressure self-measurement in the waiting room. None of the 81 patients adhered to all six investigated recommendations, while around a quarter adhered to five out of six of the recommendations. The majority followed four or fewer of the recommendations. Results indicate that unsupervised self-measurement of blood pressure is not a reliable method. Thus, there is a need for increased staff presence and patient training or, alternatively, for introducing improved technology support. This could include context-aware patient adherence aids and clinical decision support systems for automatically validating self-measured data based on e-health and telemedicine technology.

  12. Occlusion spectroscopy as a new paradigm for noninvasive blood measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fine, Ilya; Fikhte, Boris; Shvartsman, Leonid D.

    2001-06-01

    We prove experimentally that RBC aggregation is among the major factors affecting time evolution of light transmission in both the normal situation of pulsatile blood flow and the situation of over-systolic vessel occlusion. Optical transmissions of tissue in vivo have been measured in red/near-infrared region. Sudden blood flow cessation causes the light transmission rising. For certain wavelengths range this growth becomes non-monotonic. The correspondence between in vivo measurements and the theoretical simulations is reached if we attribute the transmission growth to the change of average size of scatterers. The most important blood parameters such as hemoglobin, glucose, oxygen saturation, etc., influence the transmission growth following over-systolic occlusion and, therefore, may be extracted from the detailed analysis of the time evolution of optical transmission. It forms a basis for new kind of non-invasive measurements, i.e., occlusion spectroscopy. The results of in vivo clinical trials are presented for glucose and hemoglobin.

  13. Blood viscosity measurement: an integral method using Doppler ultrasonic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaud, P.; Bensalah, A.

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this work is to present a new indirect and noninvasive method for the measurement of the Newtonian blood viscosity. Based on an integral form of the axial Navier-Stokes equation, this method is particularly suited for in vivo investigations using ultrasonic arterial blood velocity profiles. Its main advantage is that it is applicable to periodic as well as non periodic flows. Moreover it does not require classical filtering methods enhancing signal to noise ratio of the physiological signals. This method only requires the knowledge of the velocimetric data measured inside a spatially and temporally optimized zone of the Doppler velocity profiles. The results obtained using numerical simulation as well as in vitro or in vivo experiments prove the effectiveness of the method. It is then well adapted to the clinical environment as a systematic quasi on-line method for the measurement of the blood viscosity.

  14. Accuracy of Blood Loss Measurement during Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Doctorvaladan, Sahar V.; Jelks, Andrea T.; Hsieh, Eric W.; Thurer, Robert L.; Zakowski, Mark I.; Lagrew, David C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aims to compare the accuracy of visual, quantitative gravimetric, and colorimetric methods used to determine blood loss during cesarean delivery procedures employing a hemoglobin extraction assay as the reference standard. Study Design In 50 patients having cesarean deliveries blood loss determined by assays of hemoglobin content on surgical sponges and in suction canisters was compared with obstetricians' visual estimates, a quantitative gravimetric method, and the blood loss determined by a novel colorimetric system. Agreement between the reference assay and other measures was evaluated by the Bland–Altman method. Results Compared with the blood loss measured by the reference assay (470 ± 296 mL), the colorimetric system (572 ± 334 mL) was more accurate than either visual estimation (928 ± 261 mL) or gravimetric measurement (822 ± 489 mL). The correlation between the assay method and the colorimetric system was more predictive (standardized coefficient = 0.951, adjusted R2 = 0.902) than either visual estimation (standardized coefficient = 0.700, adjusted R2 = 00.479) or the gravimetric determination (standardized coefficient = 0.564, adjusted R2 = 0.304). Conclusion During cesarean delivery, measuring blood loss using colorimetric image analysis is superior to visual estimation and a gravimetric method. Implementation of colorimetric analysis may enhance the ability of management protocols to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:28497007

  15. Accuracy of Blood Loss Measurement during Cesarean Delivery.

    PubMed

    Doctorvaladan, Sahar V; Jelks, Andrea T; Hsieh, Eric W; Thurer, Robert L; Zakowski, Mark I; Lagrew, David C

    2017-04-01

    Objective This study aims to compare the accuracy of visual, quantitative gravimetric, and colorimetric methods used to determine blood loss during cesarean delivery procedures employing a hemoglobin extraction assay as the reference standard. Study Design In 50 patients having cesarean deliveries blood loss determined by assays of hemoglobin content on surgical sponges and in suction canisters was compared with obstetricians' visual estimates, a quantitative gravimetric method, and the blood loss determined by a novel colorimetric system. Agreement between the reference assay and other measures was evaluated by the Bland-Altman method. Results Compared with the blood loss measured by the reference assay (470 ± 296 mL), the colorimetric system (572 ± 334 mL) was more accurate than either visual estimation (928 ± 261 mL) or gravimetric measurement (822 ± 489 mL). The correlation between the assay method and the colorimetric system was more predictive (standardized coefficient = 0.951, adjusted R(2) = 0.902) than either visual estimation (standardized coefficient = 0.700, adjusted R(2) = 00.479) or the gravimetric determination (standardized coefficient = 0.564, adjusted R(2) = 0.304). Conclusion During cesarean delivery, measuring blood loss using colorimetric image analysis is superior to visual estimation and a gravimetric method. Implementation of colorimetric analysis may enhance the ability of management protocols to improve clinical outcomes.

  16. Noninvasive blood pressure measurement scheme based on optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianxuan; Yuan, Xueguang; Zhang, Yangan

    2016-10-01

    Optical fiber sensing has many advantages, such as volume small, light quality, low loss, strong in anti-jamming. Since the invention of the optical fiber sensing technology in 1977, optical fiber sensing technology has been applied in the military, national defense, aerospace, industrial, medical and other fields in recent years, and made a great contribution to parameter measurement in the environment under the limited condition .With the rapid development of computer, network system, the intelligent optical fiber sensing technology, the sensor technology, the combination of computer and communication technology , the detection, diagnosis and analysis can be automatically and efficiently completed. In this work, we proposed a noninvasive blood pressure detection and analysis scheme which uses optical fiber sensor. Optical fiber sensing system mainly includes the light source, optical fiber, optical detector, optical modulator, the signal processing module and so on. wavelength optical signals were led into the optical fiber sensor and the signals reflected by the human body surface were detected. By comparing actual testing data with the data got by traditional way to measure the blood pressure we can establish models for predicting the blood pressure and achieve noninvasive blood pressure measurement by using spectrum analysis technology. Blood pressure measurement method based on optical fiber sensing system is faster and more convenient than traditional way, and it can get accurate analysis results in a shorter period of time than before, so it can efficiently reduce the time cost and manpower cost.

  17. Photoacoustic measurements of red blood cell oxygen saturation in blood bags in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Ruben N.; Bagga, Karan; Douplik, Alexandre; Acker, Jason P.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2017-03-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a critical component of the health care services. RBCs are stored in blood bags in hypothermic temperatures for a maximum of 6 weeks post donation. During this in vitro storage period, RBCs have been documented to undergo changes in structure and function due to mechanical and biochemical stress. Currently, there are no assessment methods that monitor the quality of RBCs within blood bags stored for transfusion. Conventional assessment methods require the extraction of samples, consequently voiding the sterility of the blood bags and potentially rendering them unfit for transfusions. It is hypothesized that photoacoustic (PA) technology can provide a rapid and non-invasive indication of RBC quality. In this study, a novel PA setup was developed for the acquisition of oxygen saturation (SO2) of two blood bags in situ. These measurements were taken throughout the lifespan of the blood bags (42 days) and compared against the clinical gold standard method of the blood gas analyzer (BGA). SO2 values of the blood bags increased monotonically throughout the storage period. A strong correlation between PA SO2 and BGA SO2 was found, however, PA values were on average 3.5% lower. Both techniques found the bags to increase by an SO2 of approximately 20%, and measured very similar rates of SO2 change. Future work will be focused on determining the cause of discrepancy between SO2 values acquired from PA versus BGA, as well as establishing links between the measured SO2 increase and other changes in RBC in situ.

  18. Chemical kinetics measurements on the reaction between blood and ozone.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Franco; Gentilini, Luigi

    2005-07-01

    The pseudofirst-order ozonization rate constant of whole bovine blood has been measured in comparison to that of free haemin. The free prosthetic group haemin (which has also the central iron atom in the oxidized form) shows k values in the range of 0.20-0.03 s(-1) while the haeme groups inside haemoglobin protein and contained in the whole blood sample show slightly lower k values, just in the range of 0.10-0.02 s(-1). It has been found that ozone even with whole blood reacts specifically with haemoglobin of the red cells because it is adsorbed selectively on the iron atoms of the haeme prosthetic groups of haemoglobin. The absorption implies the oxidation of the central iron atom of the haeme groups with formation of methaemoglobin followed by an oxidative fission of the haeme rings. The other blood components do not exert any significant protection to the reaction between ozone and haemoglobin, which appear extremely specific and selective like the reaction between CO or HCN and haemoglobin. By analogy with the behaviour of these other gases ozone may be classified as a blood poison. The results of this work are discussed in the frame of the risks connected to the ozonotherapy and autohaemotherapy involving the blood ozonization of human or animal subjects and the re-injection of ozonized blood into the bodies.

  19. NEW METHODOLOGY FOR IDENTIFYING POTENTIAL HUMAN BIOMARKERS BY COLLECTION AND CONCENTRATION OF EXHALED BREATH CONDENSATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In many studies of human exposure, the measurement of pollutant chemicals in the environment (air, water, food, soil, etc.) is being supplemented by their additional measurement in biological media such as human breath, blood, and urine. This allows an unambiguous confirmation...

  20. NEW METHODOLOGY FOR IDENTIFYING POTENTIAL HUMAN BIOMARKERS BY COLLECTION AND CONCENTRATION OF EXHALED BREATH CONDENSATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In many studies of human exposure, the measurement of pollutant chemicals in the environment (air, water, food, soil, etc.) is being supplemented by their additional measurement in biological media such as human breath, blood, and urine. This allows an unambiguous confirmation...

  1. Neutrophil aggregation measured in whole blood by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, S.I.; Sklar, L.A. Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1991-03-15

    Flow cytometry has enabled measurement of the kinetics of formyl peptide stimulated neutrophil aggregation and its dependence on the CD11b/CD18 adhesion molecule. The authors are currently measuring aggregation of neutrophils in whole blood using flow cytometry. Fresh whole blood samples were kept at 4C and stained with LDS-751 a vital nucleic stain. Cytometric detection of neutrophil aggregation in whole blood at 37C was achieved by thresholding on LDS-751 fluorescence and then gating on forward and right angle light scatter. Aggregation was up to 10 times more efficient in whole blood than in purified cells, despite the fact that the number of CD11b/CD18 sites was upregulated 5-10 fold in elutriated neutrophil preparations. The time course of whole blood aggregation was often irreversible as compared to elutriated cells. Aggregation was only partially blocked by preincubation with concentrations of antibody to the CD18 integrin effective in blocking aggregation in elutriated cells. Further study is needed to distinguish between the contributions of other cell types, as well as the activity and number of CD11b/CD18 adhesive sites on the kinetics and efficiency of neutrophil collisions in whole blood.

  2. Methods for blood flow measurements using ultrasound contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2003-10-01

    Blood flow measurements using ultrasound contrast agents are being investigated for myocardial perfusion and more recently in other organ systems. The methods are based largely on the relative increase in echogenicity due to the concentration of bubbles present in the ultrasound beam. In the simplest form, regional differences in blood volume can be inferred but the possibility exists to extract perfusion from the transit of contrast agent through tissue. Perfusion measurements rely on determining the flux of blood through a tissue volume and as such require knowledge of the fractional blood volume (FBV), i.e., ml blood/g tissue and the rate of exchange, commonly measured as the mean transit time (MTT). This presentation will discuss methods of determining each of these values and their combination to estimate tissue perfusion. Underlying principles of indicator-dilution theory will be provided in the context of ultrasound contrast agents. Current methods for determining MTT will include imaging of the intravenous bolus, in-plane contrast disruption with interval and real-time contrast recovery imaging, and control of contrast agent flow using arterial disruption (contrast interruption). The advantages and limitations of the methods will be examined along with current applications. [Work supported in part by NIH.

  3. Error in noninvasive spectrophotometric measurement of blood hemoglobin concentration under conditions of blood loss.

    PubMed

    Naftalovich, Rotem; Naftalovich, Daniel

    2011-10-01

    This paper discusses a current misinterpretation between different parameters of hemoglobin concentration measurement and its amplification under conditions of blood loss. The paper details the distinction between microcirculatory hematocrit and the hematocrit of the macrocirculation to analyze clinical use of real-time patient hemoglobin concentration measurement by noninvasive point-of-care devices such as the Rainbow Pulse CO-Oximetry™ (Masimo Corp., Irvine, CA). The hemoglobin concentration or hematocrit values have clinical significance such as for diagnosing anemia or as indicators to when a blood transfusion is needed. The device infers hemoglobin concentration from spectrophotometry of the fingertip and therefore the measured absorption is due to hemoglobin present in capillaries as well as in larger vessels, and the device accordingly reports the hemoglobin concentration as 'total hemoglobin' in a proprietary SpHb parameter. SpHb and macro hemoglobin concentration are different parameters. However, the numerical resemblance of SpHb values to values of macro hemoglobin concentrations, combined with the widely used unspecified term "Hb" in the medical setting, suggests that SpHb values are often interpreted by the clinician as macro hematocrit values. The claim of this paper is that under conditions of blood loss the portion of the SpHb total hemoglobin measure that is contributed from microcirculation increases, due to the decrease of macro hematocrit while microcirculatory hematocrit remains constant when above a critical value. The device is calibrated from phlembotomy drawn blood (from a vein in the arm), which is the gold standard in blood collection, and hence this changing contribution of microcirculatory hemoglobin to the SpHb value would distort the gap between macro hemoglobin and total hemoglobin, SpHb. The hypothesis is that if clinicians indeed interpret the SpHb values as macro hemoglobin values then there is an unreported discrepancy between

  4. Adhesion of volatile propofol to breathing circuit tubing.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Dominik; Maurer, Felix; Trautner, Katharina; Fink, Tobias; Hüppe, Tobias; Sessler, Daniel I; Baumbach, Jörg Ingo; Volk, Thomas; Kreuer, Sascha

    2017-08-21

    Propofol in exhaled breath can be measured and may provide a real-time estimate of plasma concentration. However, propofol is absorbed in plastic tubing, thus estimates may fail to reflect lung/blood concentration if expired gas is not extracted directly from the endotracheal tube. We evaluated exhaled propofol in five ventilated ICU patients who were sedated with propofol. Exhaled propofol was measured once per minute using ion mobility spectrometry. Exhaled air was sampled directly from the endotracheal tube and at the ventilator end of the expiratory side of the anesthetic circuit. The circuit was disconnected from the patient and propofol was washed out with a separate clean ventilator. Propofol molecules, which discharged from the expiratory portion of the breathing circuit, were measured for up to 60 h. We also determined whether propofol passes through the plastic of breathing circuits. A total of 984 data pairs (presented as median values, with 95% confidence interval), consisting of both concentrations were collected. The concentration of propofol sampled near the patient was always substantially higher, at 10.4 [10.25-10.55] versus 5.73 [5.66-5.88] ppb (p < 0.001). The reduction in concentration over the breathing circuit tubing was 4.58 [4.48-4.68] ppb, 3.46 [3.21-3.73] in the first hour, 4.05 [3.77-4.34] in the second hour, and 4.01 [3.36-4.40] in the third hour. Out-gassing propofol from the breathing circuit remained at 2.8 ppb after 60 h of washing out. Diffusion through the plastic was not observed. Volatile propofol binds or adsorbs to the plastic of a breathing circuit with saturation kinetics. The bond is reversible so propofol can be washed out from the plastic. Our data confirm earlier findings that accurate measurements of volatile propofol require exhaled air to be sampled as close as possible to the patient.

  5. Kidney motion during free breathing and breath hold for MR-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, Mette K.; van Vulpen, Marco; Barendrecht, Maurits M.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Intven, Martijn; Crijns, Sjoerd P. M.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Raaymakers, Bas W.

    2013-04-01

    Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma have a high complication rate due to the invasiveness of the treatment. With the MRI-linac it may be possible to treat renal tumours non-invasively with high-precision radiotherapy. This is expected to reduce complications. To deliver a static dose distribution, radiation gating will be used. In this study the reproducibility and efficiency of free breathing gating and a breath hold treatment of the kidney was investigated. For 15 patients with a renal lesion the kidney motion during 2 min of free breathing and 10 consecutive expiration breath holds was studied with 2D cine MRI. The variability in kidney expiration position and treatment efficiency for gating windows of 1 to 20 mm was measured for both breathing patterns. Additionally the time trend in free breathing and the variation in expiration breath hold kidney position with baseline shift correction was determined. In 80% of the patients the variation in expiration position during free breathing is smaller than 2 mm. No clinically relevant time trends were detected. The variation in expiration breath hold is for all patients larger than the free breathing expiration variation. Gating on free breathing is, for gating windows of 1 to 5 mm more efficient than breath hold without baseline correction. When applying a baseline correction to the breath hold it increases the treatment efficiency. The kidney position is more reproducible in expiration free breathing than non-guided expiration breath hold. For small gating windows it is also more time efficient. Since free breathing also seems more comfortable for the patients it is the preferred breathing pattern for MRI-Linac treatments of the kidney.

  6. SU-E-J-236: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Breath-Hold Lung Tumor Position Reproducibility Measured with 4D MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P; Greer, P; Lapuz, C; Ludbrook, J; Kim, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Audiovisual biofeedback breath-hold (AVBH) was employed to reproduce tumor position on inhale and exhale breath-holds for 4D tumor information. We hypothesize that lung tumor position will be more consistent using AVBH compared with conventional breath-hold (CBH). Methods: Lung tumor positions were determined for seven lung cancer patients (age: 25 – 74) during to two separate 3T MRI sessions. A breathhold training session was performed prior to the MRI sessions to allow patients to become comfortable with AVBH and their exhale and inhale target positions. CBH and AVBH 4D image datasets were obtained in the first MRI session (pre-treatment) and the second MRI session (midtreatment) within six weeks of the first session. Audio-instruction (MRI: Siemens Skyra) in CBH and verbal-instruction (radiographer) in AVBH were used. A radiation oncologist contoured the lung tumor using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems); tumor position was quantified as the centroid of the contoured tumor after rigid registration based on vertebral anatomy across two MRI sessions. CBH and AVBH were compared in terms of the reproducibility assessed via (1) the difference between the two exhale positions for the two sessions and the two inhale positions for the sessions. (2) The difference in amplitude (exhale to inhale) between the two sessions. Results: Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of two exhale (or inhale) lung tumor positions relative to each other by 33%, from 6.4±5.3 mm to 4.3±3.0 mm (p=0.005). Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of exhale and inhale amplitude by 66%, from 5.6±5.9 mm to 1.9±1.4 mm (p=0.005). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be utilized for improving the reproducibility of breath-hold lung tumor position. These results are advantageous towards achieving more accurate emerging radiation treatment planning methods, in addition to imaging and treatment modalities utilizing breath

  7. 21 CFR 864.5950 - Blood volume measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood volume measuring device. 864.5950 Section 864.5950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  8. Magnetic plethysmograph transducers for local blood pulse wave velocity measurement.

    PubMed

    Nabeel, P M; Joseph, Jayaraj; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2014-01-01

    We present the design of magnetic plethysmograph (MPG) transducers for detection of blood pulse waveform and evaluation of local pulse wave velocity (PWV), for potential use in cuffless blood pressure (BP) monitoring. The sensors utilize a Hall effect magnetic field sensor to capture the blood pulse waveform. A strap based design is performed to enable reliable capture of large number of cardiac cycles with relative ease. The ability of the transducer to consistently detect the blood pulse is verified by in-vivo trials on few volunteers. A duality of such transducers is utilized to capture the local PWV at the carotid artery. The pulse transit time (PTT) between the two detected pulse waveforms, measured along a small section of the carotid artery, was evaluated using automated algorithms to ensure consistency of measurements. The correlation between the measured values of local PWV and BP was also investigated. The developed transducers provide a reliable, easy modality for detecting pulse waveform on superficial arteries. Such transducers, used for measurement of local PWV, could potentially be utilized for cuffless, continuous evaluation of BP at various superficial arterial sites.

  9. Slow Breathing and Hypoxic Challenge: Cardiorespiratory Consequences and Their Central Neural Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Critchley, Hugo D.; Nicotra, Alessia; Chiesa, Patrizia A.; Nagai, Yoko; Gray, Marcus A.; Minati, Ludovico; Bernardi, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Controlled slow breathing (at 6/min, a rate frequently adopted during yoga practice) can benefit cardiovascular function, including responses to hypoxia. We tested the neural substrates of cardiorespiratory control in humans during volitional controlled breathing and hypoxic challenge using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty healthy volunteers were scanned during paced (slow and normal rate) breathing and during spontaneous breathing of normoxic and hypoxic (13% inspired O2) air. Cardiovascular and respiratory measures were acquired concurrently, including beat-to-beat blood pressure from a subset of participants (N = 7). Slow breathing was associated with increased tidal ventilatory volume. Induced hypoxia raised heart rate and suppressed heart rate variability. Within the brain, slow breathing activated dorsal pons, periaqueductal grey matter, cerebellum, hypothalamus, thalamus and lateral and anterior insular cortices. Blocks of hypoxia activated mid pons, bilateral amygdalae, anterior insular and occipitotemporal cortices. Interaction between slow breathing and hypoxia was expressed in ventral striatal and frontal polar activity. Across conditions, within brainstem, dorsal medullary and pontine activity correlated with tidal volume and inversely with heart rate. Activity in rostroventral medulla correlated with beat-to-beat blood pressure and heart rate variability. Widespread insula and striatal activity tracked decreases in heart rate, while subregions of insular cortex correlated with momentary increases in tidal volume. Our findings define slow breathing effects on central and cardiovascular responses to hypoxic challenge. They highlight the recruitment of discrete brainstem nuclei to cardiorespiratory control, and the engagement of corticostriatal circuitry in support of physiological responses that accompany breathing regulation during hypoxic challenge. PMID:25973923

  10. Slow breathing and hypoxic challenge: cardiorespiratory consequences and their central neural substrates.

    PubMed

    Critchley, Hugo D; Nicotra, Alessia; Chiesa, Patrizia A; Nagai, Yoko; Gray, Marcus A; Minati, Ludovico; Bernardi, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Controlled slow breathing (at 6/min, a rate frequently adopted during yoga practice) can benefit cardiovascular function, including responses to hypoxia. We tested the neural substrates of cardiorespiratory control in humans during volitional controlled breathing and hypoxic challenge using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty healthy volunteers were scanned during paced (slow and normal rate) breathing and during spontaneous breathing of normoxic and hypoxic (13% inspired O2) air. Cardiovascular and respiratory measures were acquired concurrently, including beat-to-beat blood pressure from a subset of participants (N = 7). Slow breathing was associated with increased tidal ventilatory volume. Induced hypoxia raised heart rate and suppressed heart rate variability. Within the brain, slow breathing activated dorsal pons, periaqueductal grey matter, cerebellum, hypothalamus, thalamus and lateral and anterior insular cortices. Blocks of hypoxia activated mid pons, bilateral amygdalae, anterior insular and occipitotemporal cortices. Interaction between slow breathing and hypoxia was expressed in ventral striatal and frontal polar activity. Across conditions, within brainstem, dorsal medullary and pontine activity correlated with tidal volume and inversely with heart rate. Activity in rostroventral medulla correlated with beat-to-beat blood pressure and heart rate variability. Widespread insula and striatal activity tracked decreases in heart rate, while subregions of insular cortex correlated with momentary increases in tidal volume. Our findings define slow breathing effects on central and cardiovascular responses to hypoxic challenge. They highlight the recruitment of discrete brainstem nuclei to cardiorespiratory control, and the engagement of corticostriatal circuitry in support of physiological responses that accompany breathing regulation during hypoxic challenge.

  11. Measurement of ultrasonic properties of muscle and blood biological phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, R.; Téllez, A.; Leija, L.; Vera, A.

    2010-01-01

    Oncology hyperthermia refers to an artificial elevation of temperature in biological tissue to remove tumor cells. This temperature increase is reached by applying ultrasound or electromagnetic waves. Working with biological tissues implies a high effort; furthermore, biological material changes its properties with time. Also, it is necessary a knowledge of the handling of biological material and a specialized infrastructure. For these reasons, for some years our research laboratory has dedicated part of its researches to develop mimicking materials to emulate muscle and other tissue ultrasonic properties. A blood phantom was developed in our laboratory for its use in the transit time flow measurement (blood flow). The properties of interest for the muscle and for the blood phantoms are ultrasonic attenuation and ultrasound velocity. This work refers to the phantom prepa