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Sample records for breath-hold cine imaging

  1. Single-breath-hold 3-D CINE imaging of the left ventricle using Cartesian sampling.

    PubMed

    Wetzl, Jens; Schmidt, Michaela; Pontana, François; Longère, Benjamin; Lugauer, Felix; Maier, Andreas; Hornegger, Joachim; Forman, Christoph

    2017-05-26

    Our objectives were to evaluate a single-breath-hold approach for Cartesian 3-D CINE imaging of the left ventricle with a nearly isotropic resolution of [Formula: see text] and a breath-hold duration of [Formula: see text]19 s against a standard stack of 2-D CINE slices acquired in multiple breath-holds. Validation is performed with data sets from ten healthy volunteers. A Cartesian sampling pattern based on the spiral phyllotaxis and a compressed sensing reconstruction method are proposed to allow 3-D CINE imaging with high acceleration factors. The fully integrated reconstruction uses multiple graphics processing units to speed up the reconstruction. The 2-D CINE and 3-D CINE are compared based on ventricular function parameters, contrast-to-noise ratio and edge sharpness measurements. Visual comparisons of corresponding short-axis slices of 2-D and 3-D CINE show an excellent match, while 3-D CINE also allows reformatting to other orientations. Ventricular function parameters do not significantly differ from values based on 2-D CINE imaging. Reconstruction times are below 4 min. We demonstrate single-breath-hold 3-D CINE imaging in volunteers and three example patient cases, which features fast reconstruction and allows reformatting to arbitrary orientations.

  2. Assessment of voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold with CINE imaging for breast radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Estoesta, Reuben Patrick; Attwood, Lani; Naehrig, Diana; Claridge-Mackonis, Elizabeth; Odgers, David; Martin, Darren; Pham, Melissa; Toohey, Joanne; Carroll, Susan

    2017-10-01

    Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold (DIBH) techniques for breast cancer radiation therapy (RT) have reduced cardiac dose compared to Free Breathing (FB). Recently, a voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (vDIBH) technique was established using in-room lasers and skin tattoos to monitor breath-hold. An in-house quality assessment of positional reproducibility during RT delivery with vDIBH in patients with left-sided breast cancer was evaluated. The electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used in cinematographic (CINE) mode to capture a sequence of images during beam delivery. Weekly CINE images were retrospectively assessed for 20 left-sided breast cancer patients receiving RT in vDIBH, and compared with CINE images of 20 patients treated in FB. The intra-beam motion was assessed and the distance from the beam central axis (CA) to the internal chest wall (ICW) was measured on each CINE image. These were then compared to the planned distance on digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR). The maximum intra-beam motion for any one patient measurement was 0.30 cm for vDIBH and 0.20 cm for FB. The mean difference between the distance from the CA to ICW on DRR and the equivalent distance on CINE imaging (as treated) was 0.28 cm (SD 0.17) for vDIBH patients and 0.25 cm (SD 0.14) for FB patients (P = 0.458). The measured values were comparable for patients undergoing RT in vDIBH, and for those in FB. This quality assessment showed that using in-room lasers and skin tattoos to independently monitor breath-hold in vDIBH as detected by 'on-treatment' CINE imaging is safe and effective. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  3. Breath-hold MR cine angiography of coronary arteries in healthy volunteers: value of multiangle oblique imaging planes.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, H; Caputo, G R; Steffens, J C; O'Sullivan, M; Bourne, M W; Shimakawa, A; Foo, T K; Higgins, C B

    1994-09-01

    Breath-hold MR cine angiography was used to depict the coronary arteries in healthy volunteers. Multiangle oblique imaging planes were evaluated for feasibility in showing continuous segments of the proximal and middle portions of the left anterior descending and right coronary arteries. Eighteen healthy subjects were examined with a 1.5-T MR imager. Fat-suppressed fast gradient-echo images (TR = 9.8 msec, TE = 3.5 msec) were acquired with a 13-cm receive surface coil. A segmented k-space data acquisition was used to obtain images of the coronary arteries at several phases of the cardiac cycle within a single breath-hold. Multiangle double oblique images that were tangential and sequential to the epicardial surface of the left ventricle were used to show the left anterior descending artery, and oblique coronal images were used to show the right coronary artery. Images of consecutive slice locations were shown in a cine format, and the length of each major coronary artery that was continuously visualized was measured. The left main coronary artery, proximal left anterior descending artery, and right coronary artery were demonstrated in all subjects. The mid and distal portions of the left anterior descending artery and diagonal branches were visualized best on multiangle oblique imaging planes. Continuous segments (> 6 cm) of the left anterior descending artery and right coronary artery were imaged in 14 subjects (78%) and 12 subjects (67%), respectively. Cine display was useful for showing the continuity of the coronary arterial segments and also for distinguishing arteries from veins. Double oblique imaging planes were useful in showing long segments of left anterior descending and right coronary arteries on coronary MR angiograms. Further work is necessary to improve detection of the left circumflex artery.

  4. Compressed sensing reconstruction for undersampled breath-hold radial cine imaging with auxiliary free-breathing data.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seunghoon; Hong, Susie N; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Kwak, Yongjun; Goddu, Beth; Kissinger, Kraig V; Manning, Warren J; Tarokh, Vahid; Nezafat, Reza

    2014-01-01

    To improve compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction of accelerated breath-hold (BH) radial cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by exploiting auxiliary data acquired between different BHs. Cardiac function is usually assessed using segmented cine acquisitions over multiple BHs to cover the entire left ventricle (LV). Subjects are given a resting period between adjacent BHs, when conventionally no data are acquired and subjects rest in the scanner. In this study the resting periods between BHs were used to acquire additional free-breathing (FB) data, which are subsequently used to generate a sparsity constraint for each cardiac phase. Images reconstructed using the proposed sparsity constraint were compared with conventional CS using a composite image generated by averaging different cardiac phases. The efficacy of the proposed reconstruction was compared using indices of LV function and blood-myocardium sharpness. The proposed method provided accurate LV ejection fraction measurements for 33% and 20% sampled datasets compared with fully sampled reference images, and showed 14% and 11% higher blood-myocardium border sharpness scores compared to the conventional CS. The FB data acquired during resting periods can be efficiently used to improve the image quality of the undersampled BH data without increasing the total scan time. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Compressed Sensing Reconstruction for Undersampled Breath-Hold Radial Cine Imaging with Auxiliary Free-Breathing Data

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seunghoon; Hong, Susie N.; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Kwak, Yongjun; Goddu, Beth; Kissinger, Kraig V.; Manning, Warren J.; Tarokh, Vahid; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To improve compressed sensing reconstruction of accelerated breath-hold (BH) radial cine MRI by exploiting auxiliary data acquired between different BHs. Materials and Methods Cardiac function is usually assessed using segmented cine acquisitions over multiple BHs to cover the entire left ventricle (LV). Subjects are given a resting period between adjacent BHs, when conventionally no data is acquired and subjects rest in the scanner. In this study, the resting periods between BHs are utilized to acquire additional free-breathing (FB) data, which are subsequently used to generate a sparsity constraint for each cardiac phase. Images reconstructed using the proposed sparsity constraint were compared with conventional compressed sensing (CS) using a composite image generated by averaging different cardiac phases. The efficacy of the proposed reconstruction is compared using indices of LV function and blood-myocardium sharpness. Results The proposed method provides accurate LV ejection fraction measurements for 33% and 20% sampled data sets compared with fully-sampled reference images, and shows 14% and 11% higher blood-myocardium border sharpness scores compared to the conventional CS. Conclusion The FB data acquired during rest periods can be efficiently used to improve the image quality of the undersampled BH data without increasing the total scan time. PMID:23857797

  6. Evaluation of a motion artifacts removal approach on breath-hold cine-magnetic resonance images of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancur, Julián.; Simon, Antoine; Schnell, Frédéric; Donal, Erwan; Hernández, Alfredo; Garreau, Mireille

    2013-11-01

    The acquisition of ECG-gated cine magnetic resonance images of the heart is routinely performed in apnea in order to suppress the motion artifacts caused by breathing. However, many factors including the 2D nature of the acquisition and the use of di erent beats to acquire the multiple-view cine images, cause this kind of artifacts to appear. This paper presents the qualitative evaluation of a method aiming to remove motion artifacts in multipleview cine images acquired on patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy diagnosis. The approach uses iconic registration to reduce for in-plane artifacts in long-axis-view image stacks and in-plane and out-of-plane motion artifacts in sort-axis-view image stack. Four similarity measures were evaluated: the normalized correlation, the normalized mutual information, the sum of absolute voxel di erences and the Slomka metric proposed by Slomka et al. The qualitative evaluation assessed the misalignment of di erent anatomical structures of the left ventricle as follows: the misalignment of the interventricular septum and the lateral wall for short-axis-view acquisitions and the misalignment between the short-axis-view image and long-axis-view images. Results showed the correction using the normalized correlation as the most appropriated with an 80% of success.

  7. Nonrigid groupwise registration for motion estimation and compensation in compressed sensing reconstruction of breath-hold cardiac cine MRI.

    PubMed

    Royuela-del-Val, Javier; Cordero-Grande, Lucilio; Simmross-Wattenberg, Federico; Martín-Fernández, Marcos; Alberola-López, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Compressed sensing methods with motion estimation and compensation techniques have been proposed for the reconstruction of accelerated dynamic MRI. However, artifacts that naturally arise in compressed sensing reconstruction procedures hinder the estimation of motion from reconstructed images, especially at high acceleration factors. This work introduces a robust groupwise nonrigid motion estimation technique applied to the compressed sensing reconstruction of dynamic cardiac cine MRI sequences. A spatio-temporal regularized, groupwise, nonrigid registration method based on a B-splines deformation model and a least squares metric is used to estimate and to compensate the movement of the heart in breath-hold cine acquisitions and to obtain a quasistatic sequence with highly sparse representation in temporally transformed domains. Short axis in vivo datasets are used for validation, both original multicoil as well as DICOM data. Fully sampled data were retrospectively undersampled with various acceleration factors and reconstructions were compared with the two well-known methods k-t FOCUSS and MASTeR. The proposed method achieves higher signal to error ratio and structure similarity index for medium to high acceleration factors. Reconstruction methods based on groupwise registration show higher quality reconstructions for cardiac cine images than the pairwise counterparts tested. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Compressed sensing real-time cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance: accurate assessment of left ventricular function in a single-breath-hold.

    PubMed

    Kido, Tomoyuki; Kido, Teruhito; Nakamura, Masashi; Watanabe, Kouki; Schmidt, Michaela; Forman, Christoph; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2016-08-24

    Cardiovascular cine magnetic resonance (CMR) accelerated by compressed sensing (CS) is used to assess left ventricular (LV) function. However, it is difficult for prospective CS cine CMR to capture the complete end-diastolic phase, which can lead to underestimation of the end-diastolic volume (EDV), stroke volume (SV), and ejection fraction (EF), compared to retrospective standard cine CMR. This prospective study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic quality and accuracy of single-breath-hold full cardiac cycle CS cine CMR, acquired over two heart beats, to quantify LV volume in comparison to multi-breath-hold standard cine CMR. Eighty-one participants underwent standard segmented breath-hold cine and CS real-time cine CMR examinations to obtain a stack of eight contiguous short-axis images with same high spatial (1.7 × 1.7 mm(2)) and temporal resolution (41 ms). Two radiologists independently performed qualitative analysis of image quality (score, 1 [i.e., "nondiagnostic"] to 5 [i.e., "excellent"]) and quantitative analysis of the LV volume measurements. The total examination time was 113 ± 7 s for standard cine CMR and 24 ± 4 s for CS cine CMR (p < 0.0001). The CS cine image quality was slightly lower than standard cine (4.8 ± 0.5 for standard vs. 4.4 ± 0.5 for CS; p < 0.0001). However, all image quality scores for CS cine were above 4 (i.e., good). No significant differences existed between standard and CS cine MR for all quantitative LV measurements. The mean differences with 95 % confidence interval (CI), based on Bland-Altman analysis, were 1.3 mL (95 % CI, -14.6 - 17.2) for LV end-diastolic volume, 0.2 mL (95 % CI, -9.8 to10.3) for LV end-systolic volume, 1.1 mL (95 % CI, -10.5 to 12.7) for LV stroke volume, 1.0 g (95 % CI, -11.2 to 13.3) for LV mass, and 0.4 % (95 % CI, -4.8 - 5.6) for LV ejection fraction. The interobserver and intraobserver variability for CS cine MR ranged from -4.8 - 1.6 % and from -7.3 - 9.3

  9. Single breath hold 3D cardiac cine MRI using kat-ARC: preliminary results at 1.5T.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Daniel; Schiebler, Mark L; Lai, Peng; Wang, Kang; Vigen, Karl K; François, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    Validation of a new single breath-hold, three-dimensional, cine balanced steady-state free precession (3D cine bSSFP) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) sequence for left ventricular function. CMR examinations were performed on fifteen patients and three healthy volunteers on a clinical 1.5T scanner using a two-dimensional (2D) cine balanced SSFP CMR sequence (2D cine bSSFP) followed by an investigational 3D cine bSSFP pulse sequence acquired within a single breath hold. Left ventricular end diastolic volume (LVEDV), end systolic volume (LVESV), ejection fraction (LVEF), and myocardial mass were independently segmented on a workstation by two experienced radiologists. Blood pool to myocardial contrast was evaluated in consensus using a Likert scale. Bland-Altman analysis was used to compare these quantitative and nominal measurements for the two sequences. The average acquisition time was significantly shorter for the 3D cine bSSFP than for 2D cine bSSFP (0.36 ± 0.03 vs. 8.5 ± 2.3 min) p = 0.0002. Bland-Altman analyses [bias and (limits of agreement)] of the data derived from these two methods revealed that the LVEF 0.9% (-4.7, 6.4), LVEDV 4.9 ml (-23.0, 32.8), LVESV -0.2 ml (-22.4, 21.9), and myocardial mass -0.4 g (-23.8, 23.0) were not significantly different. There was excellent intraclass correlation for intra-observer variability (0.981, 0.989, 0.997, 0.985) and inter-observer variability (0.903, 0.954, 0.970, 0.842) for LVEF, LVEDV, LVESV, and myocardial mass respectively. 3D cine bSSFP allows for accurate single breath-hold volumetric cine CMR which enables substantial improvements in scanner time efficiency without sacrificing diagnostic accuracy.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Breath-Hold Divers with Cerebral Decompression Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Ryu; Kamouchi, Masahiro; Arakawa, Shuji; Furuta, Yoshihiko; Kanazawa, Yuka; Kitazono, Takanari

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of cerebral decompression sickness (DCS) is still unclear. We report 2 cases of breath-hold divers with cerebral DCS in whom magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated distinctive characteristics. One case presented right hemiparesthesia, diplopia, and gait disturbance after breath-hold diving into the sea at a depth of 20 m. Brain MRI with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence revealed multiple hyperintense lesions in the right frontal lobe, bilateral thalamus, pons, and right cerebellar hemisphere. The second case presented visual and gait disturbance after repetitive breath-hold diving into the sea. FLAIR imaging showed hyperintense areas in the bilateral occipito-parietal lobes. In both cases, diffusion-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient mapping revealed hyperintense areas in the lesions identified by FLAIR. Moreover, follow-up MRI showed attenuation of the FLAIR signal abnormalities. These findings are suggestive of transient hyperpermeability in the microvasculature as a possible cause of cerebral DCS. PMID:24575029

  11. Whole-heart cine MRI in a single breath-hold--a compressed sensing accelerated 3D acquisition technique for assessment of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Wech, T; Pickl, W; Tran-Gia, J; Ritter, C; Beer, M; Hahn, D; Köstler, H

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform functional MR imaging of the whole heart in a single breath-hold using an undersampled 3 D trajectory for data acquisition in combination with compressed sensing for image reconstruction. Measurements were performed using an SSFP sequence on a 3 T whole-body system equipped with a 32-channel body array coil. A 3 D radial stack-of-stars sampling scheme was utilized enabling efficient undersampling of the k-space and thereby accelerating data acquisition. Compressed sensing was applied for the reconstruction of the missing data. A validation study was performed based on a fully sampled dataset acquired by standard Cartesian cine imaging of 2 D slices on a healthy volunteer. The results were investigated with regard to systematic errors and resolution losses possibly introduced by the developed reconstruction. Subsequently, the proposed technique was applied for in-vivo functional cardiac imaging of the whole heart in a single breath-hold of 27  s. The developed technique was tested on three healthy volunteers to examine its reproducibility. By means of the results of the simulation (temporal resolution: 47  ms, spatial resolution: 1.4 × 1.4 × 8  mm, 3 D image matrix: 208 × 208 × 10), an overall acceleration factor of 10 has been found where the compressed sensing reconstructed image series shows only very low systematic errors and a slight in-plane resolution loss of 15 %. The results of the in-vivo study (temporal resolution: 40.5  ms, spatial resolution: 2.1 × 2.1 × 8  mm, 3 D image matrix: 224 × 224 × 12) performed with an acceleration factor of 10.7 confirm the overall good image quality of the presented technique for undersampled acquisitions. The combination of 3 D radial data acquisition and model-based compressed sensing reconstruction allows high acceleration factors enabling cardiac functional imaging of the whole heart within only one breath-hold. The

  12. Free-breathing radial volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination vs breath-hold cartesian volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination magnetic resonance imaging of the liver at 1.5T

    PubMed Central

    Yedururi, Sireesha; Kang, HyunSeon C; Wei, Wei; Wagner-Bartak, Nicolaus A; Marcal, Leonardo P; Stafford, R Jason; Willis, Brandy J; Szklaruk, Janio

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare breath-hold cartesian volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (cVIBE) and free-breathing radial VIBE (rVIBE) and determine whether rVIBE could replace cVIBE in routine liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS In this prospective study, 15 consecutive patients scheduled for routine MRI of the abdomen underwent pre- and post-contrast breath-hold cVIBE imaging (19 s acquisition time) and free-breathing rVIBE imaging (111 s acquisition time) on a 1.5T Siemens scanner. Three radiologists with 2, 4, and 8 years post-fellowship experience in abdominal imaging evaluated all images. The radiologists were blinded to the sequence types, which were presented in a random order for each patient. For each sequence, the radiologists scored the cVIBE and rVIBE images for liver edge sharpness, hepatic vessel clarity, presence of artifacts, lesion conspicuity, fat saturation, and overall image quality using a five-point scale. RESULTS Compared to rVIBE, cVIBE yielded significantly (P < 0.001) higher scores for liver edge sharpness (mean score, 3.87 vs 3.37), hepatic-vessel clarity (3.71 vs 3.18), artifacts (3.74 vs 3.06), lesion conspicuity (3.81 vs 3.2), and overall image quality (3.91 vs 3.24). cVIBE and rVIBE did not significantly differ in quality of fat saturation (4.12 vs 4.03, P = 0.17). The inter-observer variability with respect to differences between rVIBE and cVIBE scores was close to zero compared to random error and inter-patient variation. Quality of rVIBE images was rated as acceptable for all parameters. CONCLUSION rVIBE cannot replace cVIBE in routine liver MRI. At 1.5T, free-breathing rVIBE yields acceptable, although slightly inferior image quality compared to breath-hold cVIBE. PMID:27551341

  13. STATIC VS PROSPECTIVE GATED, NON-BREATH HOLD VOLUMETRIC MDCT IMAGING OF THE LUNGS

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Osama I.; Chon, Deokiee; Beck, Kenneth; McLennan, Geoffrey; Sieren, Jered; Reinhardt, Joseph; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives: We seek to establish lung imaging methods which provide for the ability to image the lung under dynamic, non-breath hold conditions while providing “virtual breath hold,” quantifiable volumetric image data sets. We use static, breath hold images as the gold standard for evaluating these virtual breath hold images in both a phantom and sheep. Materials and Methods: We have developed axial methods for gating image acquisition to multiple points in the respiratory cycle interleaved with incremental table stepping during multidetector-row CT (MDCT) scanning. Datasets are generated over multiple breaths, providing volume images representative of multiple points within a respiratory cycle. To determine the reproducibility and accuracy of the methods , 6 anesthetized sheep were studied by MDCT in non-gated and airway-pressure (Pawy)-gated modes where Pawy was 0, 7 and 15 cmH2O. Results: No significant differences were found between the coefficient of variation in air volume measured from repeated static scans (1.74±1.78%), gated scans: Inspiratory gated (1.2±0.44%) or expiratory-gated (1.39±0.98%), or between static (1.74±1.78%) and gated (1.39+/-0.98%) scanning at similar Pawy (p>0.1). Measured air volumes were larger from static vs. gated scans by 5.85±3.77% at 7cmH2O and 4.45±3.6% at 15cmHL2O Pawy (p<0.05) consistent with hysteresis. Differences between air volumes at 7 and 15 cmH2O measured from either static or gated scans or that delivered by a supersyringe were insignificant (p<0.05). Visual accuracy of 3D anatomic geometry was achieved, and landmark certainty was within 1mm across respiratory cycles. Conclusion: A method has been demonstrated which provides for accurate gating to respiratory signals during axial scanning. High resolution volumetric image datasets are achievable while the scanned subject is breathing.Images are quantitatively similar to breath hold images with differences likely explained by known P-V hysteresis

  14. SU-E-J-62: Breath Hold for Left-Sided Breast Cancer: Visually Monitored Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Amplitude Evaluated Using Real-Time Position Management

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, L; Quirk, S; Smith, WL; Yeung, R; Phan, T; Hudson, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We used Real-Time Position Management (RPM) to evaluate breath hold amplitude and variability when gating with a visually monitored deep inspiration breath hold technique (VM-DIBH) with retrospective cine image chest wall position verification. Methods: Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer were treated using VM-DIBH. Respiratory motion was passively collected once weekly using RPM with the marker block positioned at the xiphoid process. Cine images on the tangent medial field were acquired on fractions with RPM monitoring for retrospective verification of chest wall position during breath hold. The amplitude and duration of all breath holds on which treatment beams were delivered were extracted from the RPM traces. Breath hold position coverage was evaluated for symmetric RPM gating windows from ± 1 to 5 mm centered on the average breath hold amplitude of the first measured fraction as a baseline. Results: The average (range) breath hold amplitude and duration was 18 mm (3–36 mm) and 19 s (7–34 s). The average (range) of amplitude standard deviation per patient over all breath holds was 2.7 mm (1.2–5.7 mm). With the largest allowable RPM gating window (± 5 mm), 4 of 10 VM-DIBH patients would have had ≥ 10% of their breath hold positions excluded by RPM. Cine verification of the chest wall position during the medial tangent field showed that the chest wall was greater than 5 mm from the baseline in only 1 out of 4 excluded patients. Cine images verify the chest wall/breast position only, whether this variation is acceptable in terms of heart sparing is a subject of future investigation. Conclusion: VM-DIBH allows for greater breath hold amplitude variability than using a 5 mm gating window with RPM, while maintaining chest wall positioning accuracy within 5 mm for the majority of patients.

  15. Clinical Results of Image-Guided Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Borst, Gerben R.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Hollander, Suzanne den; Betgen, Anja; Remeijer, Peter; Giersbergen, Aline van; Russell, Nicola S.; Elkhuizen, Paula H.M.; Bartelink, Harry; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, cardiac dose reduction, and the influence of the setup error on the delivered dose for fluoroscopy-guided deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) irradiation using a cone-beam CT for irradiation of left-sided breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients treated according to the DIBH protocol were evaluated regarding dose to the ipsilateral breast (or thoracic wall), heart, (left ventricle [LV]and left anterior descending artery [LAD]), and lung. The DIBH treatment plan was compared to the free-breathing (FB) treatment planning and to the dose data in which setup error was taken into account (i.e., actual delivered dose). Results: The largest setup variability was observed in the direction perpendicular to the RT field ({mu} = -0.8 mm, {Sigma} = 2.9 mm, {sigma} = 2.0 mm). The mean (D{sub mean}) and maximum (D{sub max}) doses of the DIBH treatment plan was significantly lower compared with the FB treatment plan for the heart (34% and 25%, p < 0.001), LV (71% and 28%, p < 0.001), and LAD (52% and 39.8%, p < 0.001). For some patients, large differences were observed between the heart D{sub max} according to the DIBH treatment plan and the actual delivered dose (up to 71%), although D{sub max} was always smaller than the planned FB dose (mean group reduction = 29%, p < 0.001). Conclusion: The image-guided DIBH treatment protocol is a feasible irradiation method with small setup variability that significantly reduces the dose to the heart, LV, and LAD.

  16. Abdominal 4D flow MR imaging in a breath hold: combination of spiral sampling and dynamic compressed sensing for highly accelerated acquisition.

    PubMed

    Dyvorne, Hadrien; Knight-Greenfield, Ashley; Jajamovich, Guido; Besa, Cecilia; Cui, Yong; Stalder, Aurélien; Markl, Michael; Taouli, Bachir

    2015-04-01

    To develop a highly accelerated phase-contrast cardiac-gated volume flow measurement (four-dimensional [4D] flow) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique based on spiral sampling and dynamic compressed sensing and to compare this technique with established phase-contrast imaging techniques for the quantification of blood flow in abdominal vessels. This single-center prospective study was compliant with HIPAA and approved by the institutional review board. Ten subjects (nine men, one woman; mean age, 51 years; age range, 30-70 years) were enrolled. Seven patients had liver disease. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Two 4D flow acquisitions were performed in each subject, one with use of Cartesian sampling with respiratory tracking and the other with use of spiral sampling and a breath hold. Cartesian two-dimensional (2D) cine phase-contrast images were also acquired in the portal vein. Two observers independently assessed vessel conspicuity on phase-contrast three-dimensional angiograms. Quantitative flow parameters were measured by two independent observers in major abdominal vessels. Intertechnique concordance was quantified by using Bland-Altman and logistic regression analyses. There was moderate to substantial agreement in vessel conspicuity between 4D flow acquisitions in arteries and veins (κ = 0.71 and 0.61, respectively, for observer 1; κ = 0.71 and 0.44 for observer 2), whereas more artifacts were observed with spiral 4D flow (κ = 0.30 and 0.20). Quantitative measurements in abdominal vessels showed good equivalence between spiral and Cartesian 4D flow techniques (lower bound of the 95% confidence interval: 63%, 77%, 60%, and 64% for flow, area, average velocity, and peak velocity, respectively). For portal venous flow, spiral 4D flow was in better agreement with 2D cine phase-contrast flow (95% limits of agreement: -8.8 and 9.3 mL/sec, respectively) than was Cartesian 4D flow (95% limits of agreement: -10.6 and 14.6 m

  17. Abdominal 4D Flow MR Imaging in a Breath Hold: Combination of Spiral Sampling and Dynamic Compressed Sensing for Highly Accelerated Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Knight-Greenfield, Ashley; Jajamovich, Guido; Besa, Cecilia; Cui, Yong; Stalder, Aurélien; Markl, Michael; Taouli, Bachir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop a highly accelerated phase-contrast cardiac-gated volume flow measurement (four-dimensional [4D] flow) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique based on spiral sampling and dynamic compressed sensing and to compare this technique with established phase-contrast imaging techniques for the quantification of blood flow in abdominal vessels. Materials and Methods This single-center prospective study was compliant with HIPAA and approved by the institutional review board. Ten subjects (nine men, one woman; mean age, 51 years; age range, 30–70 years) were enrolled. Seven patients had liver disease. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Two 4D flow acquisitions were performed in each subject, one with use of Cartesian sampling with respiratory tracking and the other with use of spiral sampling and a breath hold. Cartesian two-dimensional (2D) cine phase-contrast images were also acquired in the portal vein. Two observers independently assessed vessel conspicuity on phase-contrast three-dimensional angiograms. Quantitative flow parameters were measured by two independent observers in major abdominal vessels. Intertechnique concordance was quantified by using Bland-Altman and logistic regression analyses. Results There was moderate to substantial agreement in vessel conspicuity between 4D flow acquisitions in arteries and veins (κ = 0.71 and 0.61, respectively, for observer 1; κ = 0.71 and 0.44 for observer 2), whereas more artifacts were observed with spiral 4D flow (κ = 0.30 and 0.20). Quantitative measurements in abdominal vessels showed good equivalence between spiral and Cartesian 4D flow techniques (lower bound of the 95% confidence interval: 63%, 77%, 60%, and 64% for flow, area, average velocity, and peak velocity, respectively). For portal venous flow, spiral 4D flow was in better agreement with 2D cine phase-contrast flow (95% limits of agreement: −8.8 and 9.3 mL/sec, respectively) than was Cartesian 4D flow (95

  18. Breath-hold black blood quantitative T1rho imaging of liver using single shot fast spin echo acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Queenie; Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Liver fibrosis is a key feature in most chronic liver diseases. T1rho magnetic resonance imaging is a potentially important technique for noninvasive diagnosis, severity grading, and therapy monitoring of liver fibrosis. However, it remains challenging to perform robust T1rho quantification of liver on human subjects. One major reason is that the presence of rich blood signal in liver can cause artificially high T1rho measurement and makes T1rho quantification susceptible to motion. Methods A pulse sequence based on single shot fast/turbo spin echo (SSFSE/SSTSE) acquisition, with theoretical analysis and simulation based on the extended phase graph (EPG) algorithm, was presented for breath-hold single slice quantitative T1rho imaging of liver with suppression of blood signal. The pulse sequence was evaluated in human subjects at 3.0 T with 500 Hz spinlock frequency and time-of-spinlock (TSL) 0, 10, 30 and 50 ms. Results Human scan demonstrated that the entire T1rho data sets with four spinlock time can be acquired within a single breath-hold of 10 seconds with black blood effect. T1rho quantification with suppression of blood signal results in significantly reduced T1rho value of liver compared to the results without blood suppression. Conclusions A signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficient pulse sequence was reported for T1rho quantification of liver. The black blood effect, together with a short breath-hold, mitigates the risk of quantification errors as would occur in the conventional methods. PMID:27190769

  19. Comparison between in-phase and opposed-phase T1-weighted breath-hold FLASH sequences for hepatic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rofsky, N.M.; Weinreb, J.C.; Ambrosino, M.M.; Safir, J.; Krinsky, G.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to compare in-phase (IP) and opposed-phase (OP) sequences for GRE breath-hold hepatic imaging. Non-contrast-enhanced IP and OP GRE breath-hold images were obtained in 104 consecutive patients referred for abdominal MRI at 1.0 T. For both sequences, the TR, FA, matrix, FOV, slice thickness, interslice gap, and measurements were kept constant. Images were compared quantitatively [liver/spleen and liver/lesion signal difference/noise ratio, (SD/N)] and qualitatively (artifacts, lesion detection and conspicuity, and intrahepatic anatomy). There was no statistically significant difference when comparing IP and OP sequences for liver/spleen and liver/lesion SD/N or for the qualitative parameters. In patients with fatty infiltration, the OP sequences yielded substantially lower values for liver/spleen and liver/lesion SD/N (0.9 and - 1.2, respectively) than the IP sequences (20 and 17, respectively). Furthermore, in several cases with fatty infiltration, many more lesions were identified using IP images. The use of IP and OP GRE sequences provides complementary diagnostic information. Focal liver lesions may be obscured in the setting of fatty infiltration if only OP sequences are employed. A complete assessment of the liver with MR should include both IP and OP imaging. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Breath holding spell

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as Riley-Day syndrome or Rett syndrome Iron deficiency anemia A family history of breath holding spells ( ... tests may be done to check for an iron deficiency. Other tests that may be done include: EKG ...

  1. Breath-Holding Spells

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Breath-Holding ... > For Parents > Breath-Holding Spells Print A A A What's ...

  2. Accuracy Evaluation of a 3-Dimensional Surface Imaging System for Guidance in Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Betgen, Anja; Honnef, Joeri; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Remeijer, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the applicability of 3-dimensional (3D) surface imaging for image guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold radiation therapy (DIBH-RT) for patients with left-sided breast cancer. For this purpose, setup data based on captured 3D surfaces was compared with setup data based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients treated with DIBH-RT after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) were included. Before the start of treatment, each patient underwent a breath-hold CT scan for planning purposes. During treatment, dose delivery was preceded by setup verification using CBCT of the left breast. 3D surfaces were captured by a surface imaging system concurrently with the CBCT scan. Retrospectively, surface registrations were performed for CBCT to CT and for a captured 3D surface to CT. The resulting setup errors were compared with linear regression analysis. For the differences between setup errors, group mean, systematic error, random error, and 95% limits of agreement were calculated. Furthermore, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. Results: Good correlation between setup errors was found: R{sup 2}=0.70, 0.90, 0.82 in left-right, craniocaudal, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. Systematic errors were {<=}0.17 cm in all directions. Random errors were {<=}0.15 cm. The limits of agreement were -0.34-0.48, -0.42-0.39, and -0.52-0.23 cm in left-right, craniocaudal, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. ROC analysis showed that a threshold between 0.4 and 0.8 cm corresponds to promising true positive rates (0.78-0.95) and false positive rates (0.12-0.28). Conclusions: The results support the application of 3D surface imaging for image guidance in DIBH-RT after BCS.

  3. Breath-hold imaging of the coronary arteries using Quiescent-Interval Slice-Selective (QISS) magnetic resonance angiography: pilot study at 1.5 Tesla and 3 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Robert R; Giri, S; Pursnani, A; Botelho, M P F; Li, W; Koktzoglou, I

    2015-11-23

    Coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is usually obtained with a free-breathing navigator-gated 3D acquisition. Our aim was to develop an alternative breath-hold approach that would allow the coronary arteries to be evaluated in a much shorter time and without risk of degradation by respiratory motion artifacts. For this purpose, we implemented a breath-hold, non-contrast-enhanced, quiescent-interval slice-selective (QISS) 2D technique. Sequence performance was compared at 1.5 and 3 Tesla using both radial and Cartesian k-space trajectories. The left coronary circulation was imaged in six healthy subjects and two patients with coronary artery disease. Breath-hold QISS was compared with T2-prepared 2D balanced steady-state free-precession (bSSFP) and free-breathing, navigator-gated 3D bSSFP. Approximately 10 2.1-mm thick slices were acquired in a single ~20-s breath-hold using two-shot QISS. QISS contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was 1.5-fold higher at 3 Tesla than at 1.5 Tesla. Cartesian QISS provided the best coronary-to-myocardium CNR, whereas radial QISS provided the sharpest coronary images. QISS image quality exceeded that of free-breathing 3D coronary MRA with few artifacts at either field strength. Compared with T2-prepared 2D bSSFP, multi-slice capability was not restricted by the specific absorption rate at 3 Tesla and pericardial fluid signal was better suppressed. In addition to depicting the coronary arteries, QISS could image intra-cardiac structures, pericardium, and the aortic root in arbitrary slice orientations. Breath-hold QISS is a simple, versatile, and time-efficient method for coronary MRA that provides excellent image quality at both 1.5 and 3 Tesla. Image quality exceeded that of free-breathing, navigator-gated 3D MRA in a much shorter scan time. QISS also allowed rapid multi-slice bright-blood, diastolic phase imaging of the heart, which may have complementary value to multi-phase cine imaging. We conclude that, with further clinical

  4. Colorectal hepatic metastases: detection with SPIO-enhanced breath-hold MR imaging--comparison of optimized sequences.

    PubMed

    Ward, Janice; Guthrie, J Ashley; Wilson, Daniel; Arnold, Paul; Lodge, J Peter; Toogood, Giles J; Wyatt, Judith I; Robinson, Philip J

    2003-09-01

    To compare the accuracy of four breath-hold magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequences to establish the most effective superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-enhanced sequence for detection of colorectal hepatic metastases. Thirty-one patients with colorectal hepatic metastases underwent T1-weighted gradient-echo (GRE) and T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) MR imaging before and after SPIO enhancement. Four sequences were optimized for lesion detection: T2-weighted FSE, multiecho data image combination (MEDIC), T2-weighted GRE with an 11-msec echo time (TE), and T2-weighted GRE with a 15-msec TE. Images were reviewed independently by three blinded observers. The accuracy of each sequence was measured by using alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic analysis. All results were correlated with findings at surgery, intraoperative ultrasonography, or histopathologic examination. Differences between the mean results of the three observers were measured by using the Student t test. Postcontrast T2-weighted GRE sequences were the most accurate and were significantly superior to postcontrast T2-weighted FSE and unenhanced sequences alone (P <.05). For all lesions that were malignant or smaller than 1 cm, respectively, mean accuracies of postcontrast sequences were 0.082 and 0.64 for T2-weighted FSE, 0.90 and 0.78 for MEDIC, 0.92 and 0.80 for GRE with an 11-msec TE, 0.93 and 0.82 for GRE with a 15-msec TE, and 0.81 and 0.62 for unenhanced sequences. Optimized SPIO-enhanced T2-weighted GRE combined with unenhanced T2-weighted FSE MR sequences were the most sensitive. Breath-hold FSE postcontrast sequences offer no improvement in sensitivity compared with unenhanced sequences alone.

  5. SU-F-207-13: Comparison of Four Dimensional Computed Tomography (4D CT) Versus Breath Hold Images to Determine Pulmonary Nodule Elasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Negahdar, M; Loo, B; Maxim, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Elasticity may distinguish malignant from benign pulmonary nodules. To compare determining of malignant pulmonary nodule (MPN) elasticity from four dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) images versus inhale/exhale breath-hold CT images. Methods: We analyzed phase 00 and 50 of 4D CT and deep inhale and natural exhale of breath-hold CT images of 30 MPN treated with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). The radius of the smallest MPN was 0.3 cm while the biggest one was 2.1 cm. An intensity based deformable image registration (DIR) workflow was applied to the 4D CT and breath-hold images to determine the volumes of the MPNs and a 1 cm ring of surrounding lung tissue (ring) in each state. Next, an elasticity parameter was derived by calculating the ratio of the volume changes of MPN (exhale:inhale or phase50:phase00) to that of a 1 cm ring of lung tissue surrounding the MPN. The proposed formulation of elasticity enables us to compare volume changes of two different MPN in two different locations of lung. Results: The calculated volume ratio of MPNs from 4D CT (phase50:phase00) and breath-hold images (exhale:inhale) was 1.00±0.23 and 0.95±0.11, respectively. It shows the stiffness of MPN and comparably bigger volume changes of MPN in breath-hold images because of the deeper degree of inhalation. The calculated elasticity of MPNs from 4D CT and breath-hold images was 1.12±0.22 and 1.23±0.26, respectively. For five patients who have had two MPN in their lung, calculated elasticity of tumor A and tumor B follows same trend in both 4D CT and breath-hold images. Conclusion: We showed that 4D CT and breath-hold images are comparable in the ability to calculate the elasticity of MPN. This study has been supported by Department of Defense LCRP 2011 #W81XWH-12-1-0286.

  6. Simulation of four-dimensional CT images from deformable registration between inhale and exhale breath-hold CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrut, David; Boldea, Vlad; Miguet, Serge; Ginestet, Chantal

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: We propose to simulate an artificial four-dimensional (4-D) CT image of the thorax during breathing. It is performed by deformable registration of two CT scans acquired at inhale and exhale breath-hold. Materials and methods: Breath-hold images were acquired with the ABC (Active Breathing Coordinator) system. Dense deformable registrations were performed. The method was a minimization of the sum of squared differences (SSD) using an approximated second-order gradient. Gaussian and linear-elastic vector field regularizations were compared. A new preprocessing step, called a priori lung density modification (APLDM), was proposed to take into account lung density changes due to inspiration. It consisted of modulating the lung densities in one image according to the densities in the other, in order to make them comparable. Simulated 4-D images were then built by vector field interpolation and image resampling of the two initial CT images. A variation in the lung density was taken into account to generate intermediate artificial CT images. The Jacobian of the deformation was used to compute voxel values in Hounsfield units. The accuracy of the deformable registration was assessed by the spatial correspondence of anatomic landmarks located by experts. Results: APLDM produced statistically significantly better results than the reference method (registration without APLDM preprocessing). The mean (and standard deviation) of distances between automatically found landmark positions and landmarks set by experts were 2.7(1.1) mm with APLDM, and 6.3(3.8) mm without. Interexpert variability was 2.3(1.2) mm. The differences between Gaussian and linear elastic regularizations were not statistically significant. In the second experiment using 4-D images, the mean difference between automatic and manual landmark positions for intermediate CT images was 2.6(2.0) mm. Conclusion: The generation of 4-D CT images by deformable registration of inhale and exhale CT images is

  7. Rapid acquisition of helium-3 and proton three-dimensional image sets of the human lung in a single breath-hold using compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Qing, Kun; Altes, Talissa A; Tustison, Nicholas J; Feng, Xue; Chen, Xiao; Mata, Jaime F; Miller, G Wilson; de Lange, Eduard E; Tobias, William A; Cates, Gordon D; Brookeman, James R; Mugler, John P

    2015-10-01

    To develop and validate a method for acquiring helium-3 ((3) He) and proton ((1) H) three-dimensional (3D) image sets of the human lung with isotropic spatial resolution within a 10-s breath-hold by using compressed sensing (CS) acceleration, and to assess the fidelity of undersampled images compared with fully sampled images. The undersampling scheme for CS acceleration was optimized and tested using (3) He ventilation data. Rapid 3D acquisition of both (3) He and (1) H data during one breath-hold was then implemented, based on a balanced steady-state free-precession pulse sequence, by random undersampling of k-space with reconstruction by means of minimizing the L1 norm and total variance. CS-reconstruction fidelity was evaluated quantitatively by comparing fully sampled and retrospectively undersampled image sets. Helium-3 and (1) H 3D image sets of the lung with isotropic 3.9-mm resolution were acquired during a single breath-hold in 12 s and 8 s using acceleration factors of 2 and 3, respectively. Comparison of fully sampled and retrospectively undersampled (3) He and (1) H images yielded mean absolute errors <10% and structural similarity indices >0.9. By randomly undersampling k-space and using CS reconstruction, high-quality (3) He and (1) H 3D image sets with isotropic 3.9-mm resolution can be acquired within an 8-s breath-hold. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Rapid Acquisition of Helium-3 and Proton 3D Image Sets of the Human Lung in a Single Breath-hold using Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Kun; Altes, Talissa A.; Tustison, Nicholas J.; Feng, Xue; Chen, Xiao; Mata, Jaime F.; Miller, G. Wilson; de Lange, Eduard E.; Tobias, William A.; Cates, Gordon D.; Brookeman, James R.; Mugler, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop and validate a method for acquiring helium-3 (3He) and proton (1H) three-dimensional (3D) image sets of the human lung with isotropic spatial resolution within a 10-s breath-hold by using compressed sensing (CS) acceleration, and to assess the fidelity of undersampled images compared to fully-sampled images. Methods The undersampling scheme for CS acceleration was optimized and tested using 3He ventilation data. Rapid 3D acquisition of both 3He and 1H data during one breath-hold was then implemented, based on a balanced steady-state free-precession pulse sequence, by random undersampling of k space with reconstruction via minimizing the L1 norm and total variance. CS-reconstruction fidelity was evaluated quantitatively by comparing fully-sampled and retrospectively-undersampled image sets. Results Helium-3 and 1H 3D image sets of the lung with isotropic 3.9-mm resolution were acquired during a single breath-hold in 12 s and 8 s using acceleration factors of 2 and 3, respectively. Comparison of fully-sampled and retrospectively-undersampled 3He and 1H images yielded mean absolute errors <10% and structural similarity indices >0.9. Conclusion By randomly undersampling k space and using CS reconstruction, high-quality 3He and 1H 3D image sets with isotropic 3.9-mm resolution can be acquired within an 8-s breath-hold. PMID:25335080

  9. SU-E-J-223: A BOLD Contrast Imaging Sequence to Evaluate Oxygenation Changes Due to Breath Holding for Breast Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, J; Chang, Z; Cai, J; Palta, M; Horton, J; Yin, F; Blitzblau, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a robust MRI sequence to measure BOLD breath hold induced contrast in context of breast radiotherapy. Methods: Two sequences were selected from prior studies as candidates to measure BOLD contrast attributable to breath holding within the breast: (1) T2* based Gradient Echo EPI (TR/TE = 500/41ms, flip angle = 60°), and (2) T2 based Single Shot Fast Spin Echo (SSFSE) (TR/TE = 3000/60ms). We enrolled ten women post-lumpectomy for breast cancer who were undergoing treatment planning for whole breast radiotherapy. Each session utilized a 1.5T GE MRI and 4 channel breast coil with the subject immobilized prone on a custom board. For each sequence, 1–3 planes of the lumpectomy breast were imaged continuously during a background measurement (1min) and intermittent breath holds (20–40s per breath hold, 3–5 holds per sequence). BOLD contrast was quantified as correlation of changes in per-pixel intensity with the breath hold schedule convolved with a hemodynamic response function. Subtle motion was corrected using a deformable registration algorithm. Correlation with breath-holding was considered significant if p<0.001. Results: The percentage of the breast ROI with positive BOLD contrast measured by the two sequences were in agreement with a correlation coefficient of R=0.72 (p=0.02). While both sequences demonstrated areas with strong BOLD response, the response was more systematic throughout the breast for the SSFSE (T2) sequence (% breast with response in the same direction: 51.2%±0.7% for T2* vs. 68.1%±16% for T2). In addition, the T2 sequence was less prone to magnetic susceptibility artifacts, especially in presence of seroma, and provided a more robust image with little distortion or artifacts. Conclusion: A T2 SSFSE sequence shows promise for measuring BOLD contrast in the context of breast radiotherapy utilizing a breath hold technique. Further study in a larger patient cohort is warranted to better refine this novel technique.

  10. Single breath-hold assessment of ventricular volumes using 32-channel coil technology and an extracellular contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Parish, Victoria; Hussain, Tarique; Beerbaum, Philip; Greil, Gerald; Nagel, Eike; Razavi, Reza; Schaeffter, Tobias; Uribe, Sergio

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a single breath-hold 3D cine balanced steady-state free precession (b-SSFP) sequence after gadolinium diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA) injection for volumetric cardiac assessment. Fifteen adult patients routinely referred for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) underwent quantitative ventricular volumetry on a clinical 1.5T MR-scanner using a 32-channel cardiac coil. A stack of 2D cine b-SSFP slices covering the ventricles was used as reference, followed by a single breath-hold 3D cine balanced SSFP protocol acquired before and after administration of Gd-DTPA. The acquisition was accelerated using SENSE in both phase encoding directions. Volumetric and contrast-to-noise data for each technique were assessed and compared. The 3D cine protocol was accomplished within one breath-hold (mean acquisition time 20 sec; spatial resolution 2.1 x 2.1 x 10 mm; temporal resolution 51 msec). The contrast-to-noise ratio between blood and myocardium was 234 determined for the multiple 2D cine data, and could be increased for the 3D acquisition from 136 (3D precontrast) to 203 (3D postcontrast) after injecting Gd-DTPA. In addition the endocardial definition was significantly improved in postcontrast 3D cine b-SSFP. There was no significant difference for left and right ventricular volumes between standard 2D and 3D postcontrast cine b-SSFP. However, Bland-Altman plots showed greater bias and scatter when comparing 2D with 3D cine b-SSFP without contrast. 3D cine b-SSFP imaging of the heart using 32 channel coil technology and spatial undersampling allows reliable volumetric assessment within a single breath-hold after application of Gd-DTPA. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Diagnosing Lung Nodules on Oncologic MR/PET Imaging: Comparison of Fast T1-Weighted Sequences and Influence of Image Acquisition in Inspiration and Expiration Breath-Hold

    PubMed Central

    Schwenzer, Nina F.; Seith, Ferdinand; Gatidis, Sergios; Brendle, Cornelia; Schmidt, Holger; Pfannenberg, Christina A.; laFougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Objective First, to investigate the diagnostic performance of fast T1-weighted sequences for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic magnetic resonance (MR)/positron emission tomography (PET). Second, to evaluate the influence of image acquisition in inspiration and expiration breath-hold on diagnostic performance. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the local Institutional Review Board. PET/CT and MR/PET of 44 cancer patients were evaluated by 2 readers. PET/CT included lung computed tomography (CT) scans in inspiration and expiration (CTin, CTex). MR/PET included Dixon sequence for attenuation correction and fast T1-weighted volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences (volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in inspiration [VIBEin], volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in expiration [VIBEex]). Diagnostic performance was analyzed for lesion-, lobe-, and size-dependence. Diagnostic confidence was evaluated (4-point Likert-scale; 1 = high). Jackknife alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis was performed. Results Seventy-six pulmonary lesions were evaluated. Lesion-based detection rates were: CTex, 77.6%; VIBEin, 53.3%; VIBEex, 51.3%; and Dixon, 22.4%. Lobe-based detection rates were: CTex, 89.6%; VIBEin, 58.3%; VIBEex, 60.4%; and Dixon, 31.3%. In contrast to CT, inspiration versus expiration did not alter diagnostic performance in VIBE sequences. Diagnostic confidence was best for VIBEin and CTex and decreased in VIBEex and Dixon (1.2 ± 0.6; 1.2 ± 0.7; 1.5 ± 0.9; 1.7 ± 1.1, respectively). The JAFROC figure-of-merit of Dixon was significantly lower. All patients with malignant lesions were identified by CTex, VIBEin, and VIBEex, while 3 patients were false-negative in Dixon. Conclusion Fast T1-weighted VIBE sequences allow for identification of patients with malignant pulmonary lesions. The Dixon sequence is not recommended for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic MR

  12. Breath-hold PET/CT-guided tumour ablation under general anaesthesia: accuracy of tumour image registration and projected ablation zone overlap.

    PubMed

    Shyn, P B; Tremblay-Paquet, S; Palmer, K; Tatli, S; Tuncali, K; Olubiyi, O I; Hata, N; Silverman, S G

    2017-03-01

    To assess single-breath-hold combined positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for accuracy of tumour image registration and projected ablation volume overlap in patients undergoing percutaneous PET/CT-guided tumour-ablation procedures under general anaesthesia. Eight patients underwent 12 PET/CT-guided tumour-ablation procedures to treat 20 tumours in the lung, liver, or adrenal gland. Using breath-hold PET/CT, the centre of the tumour was marked on each PET and CT acquisition by four readers to assess two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) spatial misregistration. Overlap of PET and CT projected ablation volumes were compared using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Interobserver differences were assessed with repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA). Technical success and local progression rates were noted. Mean tumour 2D PET/CT misregistrations were 1.02 mm (range 0.01-5.02), 1.89 (0.03-7.85), and 3.05 (0-10) in the x, y, and z planes. Mean 3D misregistration was 4.4 mm (0.36-10.74). Mean projected PET/CT ablation volume DSC was 0.72 (±0.19). No significant interobserver differences in 3D misregistration (p=0.73) or DSC (p=0.54) were observed. Technical success of ablations was 100%; one (5.3%) of 19 tumours progressed. Accurate spatial registration of tumours and substantial overlap of projected ablation volumes are achievable when comparing PET and CT acquisitions from single-breath-hold PET/CT. The results suggest that tumours visible only at PET could be accurately targeted and ablated using this technique. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Magnetic resonance coronary angiography with Vasovist: in-vivo T1 estimation to improve image quality of navigator and breath-hold techniques.

    PubMed

    Nassenstein, Kai; Waltering, Kai-Uwe; Kelle, Sebastian; Schlosser, Thomas; Breuckmann, Frank; Maderwald, Stefan; Hunold, Peter; Nagel, Eike; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to estimate T1 values of blood and myocardium after a single injection of Vasovist and to assess Vasovist for magnetic resonance coronary angiography (MRCA). For all exams 0.05 mmol/kg of Vasovist was injected. T1 values of blood and myocardium were estimated over 30 min after injection. Twelve volunteers were examined on a 1.5-T Siemens system using a SSFP sequence with incrementally increasing inversion times for T1-estimation and a breath-hold 3D IR-FLASH sequence for MRCA. Eleven examinations were performed on 1.5-T Philips system using the Look-Locker approach for T1 estimation and a whole-heart inversion-prepared, 3D SSFP sequence for MRCA. SNR, CNR and image quality were assessed. T1 values of blood (5 min: 230 ms vs. 30 min: 275 ms) and myocardium (5 min: 99 ms vs. 30 min: 130 ms) increased over time. Whereas the blood SNR (1 min: 23.6 vs. 30 min: 21.2) showed no significant differences, the blood-to-myocardium CNR (1 min: 18.1 vs. 30 min: 13.8) and the image quality (1 min: 2.9 vs. 30 min: 3.8) degraded over time. Due to long plasma half-time the T1-shortening effect of Vasovist remains effective over 30 min, which allows for multiple breath-hold or high-resolution MRCA.

  14. Registration and Summation of Respiratory-Gated or Breath-Hold PET Images Based on Deformation Estimation of Lung from CT Image

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Masayuki; Tamai, Yoshitaka; Sakohira, Atsushi; Suga, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Lung motion due to respiration causes image degradation in medical imaging, especially in nuclear medicine which requires long acquisition times. We have developed a method for image correction between the respiratory-gated (RG) PET images in different respiration phases or breath-hold (BH) PET images in an inconsistent respiration phase. In the method, the RG or BH-PET images in different respiration phases are deformed under two criteria: similarity of the image intensity distribution and smoothness of the estimated motion vector field (MVF). However, only these criteria may cause unnatural motion estimation of lung. In this paper, assuming the use of a PET-CT scanner, we add another criterion that is the similarity for the motion direction estimated from inhalation and exhalation CT images. The proposed method was first applied to a numerical phantom XCAT with tumors and then applied to BH-PET image data for seven patients. The resultant tumor contrasts and the estimated motion vector fields were compared with those obtained by our previous method. Through those experiments we confirmed that the proposed method can provide an improved and more stable image quality for both RG and BH-PET images. PMID:28096896

  15. MR imaging of focal lung lesions: elimination of flow and motion artifact by breath-hold ECG-gated and black-blood techniques on T2-weighted turbo SE and STIR sequences.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Y; Yokoyama, T; Tomiguchi, S; Takahashi, M; Ando, M

    1999-05-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion correction may result in better turbo spin-echo (SE) imaging of the lung. To compare breath-hold cardiac-gated black-blood T2-weighted turbo SE and turbo short-inversion-time inversion-recovery (STIR) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging pulse sequences with conventional breath-hold turbo SE and half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequences for lesion conspicuity of focal lung lesions, 42 patients with focal lung lesions were prospectively studied with MR imaging at 1.5 T. Helical computed tomography was used as a reference. In comparison with the conventional breath-hold turbo SE sequence, all black-blood sequences had fewer image artifacts arising from the heart and blood flow. The overall image quality for the black-blood turbo SE and turbo STIR sequences was superior to that for the breath-hold turbo SE and HASTE sequence (P < 0.01). Not only focal lung lesions but also surrounding inflammatory changes were clearly visualized with these two sequences. With the HASTE sequence, although several slices could be obtained in one breath-hold, both the tumor and vessels appeared blurred. We conclude that T2-weighted turbo SE and turbo STIR imaging of the lung with effective suppression of flow and motion artifacts provide high-quality images in patients with focal lung lesions.

  16. A comparison of a T1 weighted 3D gradient-echo sequence with three different parallel imaging reduction factors, breath hold and free breathing, using a 32 channel coil at 1.5 T. A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Herédia, V; Dale, B; Op de Campos, R; Ramalho, M; Burke, L B; Sams, C; de Toni, M; Semelka, R C

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether increasing temporal resolution with higher parallel imaging (PI) reduction factors (RF) in both breath-hold and free breathing approaches, using a non-contrast T1-weighted 3D gradient echo (GRE) sequence and a 32-channel phased array coil, permits diagnostic image quality, with potential application in patients unable to cooperate with breath-hold requirements. The 9 healthy subjects (5 females and 4 males; age range was 20-49, mean 36 yrs) were recruited. A 3D GRE MR imaging of the abdomen was performed on 1.5 T MR system using a 32-element phased-array torso coil with PI RFs of 2, 4 and 6, breath hold and free breathing. Two reviewers retrospectively qualitatively evaluated all sequences for image quality, extent of artifacts, including motion, truncation, aliasing, pixel graininess and signal heterogeneity. The results were compared using Wilcoxon signed rank and a Bonferroni adjustment was applied for multiple comparisons. Image quality and extent of artifacts were better with breath hold than with free breathing acquisitions. The rate of artifacts increased with higher RF. The best quality was acquired with breath hold sequence using RF=2. RF=4 had lower but diagnostic rates (P=.004). The severity of artifacts, mainly pixel graininess (P=.004), rendered sequences with RF=6 non-diagnostic. All sequences were non-diagnostic in free breathing acquisitions. Breath hold sequences with RF=2 had excellent quality and RF=4 had good quality and may be potentially used in partially cooperative patients. None of the sequences was considered diagnostic in free breathing acquisitions. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional Analysis and Intervention for Breath Holding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Lee; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A functional analysis of breath-holding episodes in a 7-year-old girl with severe mental retardation and Cornelia-de-Lange syndrome indicated that breath holding served an operant function, primarily to gain access to attention. Use of extinction, scheduled attention, and a picture card communication system decreased breath holding. (Author/SW)

  18. Functional Analysis and Intervention for Breath Holding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Lee; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A functional analysis of breath-holding episodes in a 7-year-old girl with severe mental retardation and Cornelia-de-Lange syndrome indicated that breath holding served an operant function, primarily to gain access to attention. Use of extinction, scheduled attention, and a picture card communication system decreased breath holding. (Author/SW)

  19. Evaluation of Free Breathing Versus Breath Hold Diffusion Weighted Imaging in Terms Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) and Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) Values for Solid Abdominal Organs

    PubMed Central

    Herek, Duygu; Karabulut, Nevzat; Kocyıgıt, Ali; Yagcı, Ahmet Baki

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Our aim was to compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of normal abdominal parenchymal organs and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements in the same patients with breath hold (BH) and free breathing (FB) diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Material/Methods Forty-eight patients underwent both BH and FB DWI. Spherical region of interest (ROI) was placed on the right hepatic lobe, spleen, pancreas, and renal cortices. ADC values were calculated for each organ on each sequence using an automated software. Image noise, defined as the standard deviation (SD) of the signal intensities in the most artifact-free area of the image background was measured by placing the largest possible ROI on either the left or the right side of the body outside the object in the recorded field of view. SNR was calculated using the formula: SNR=signal intensity (SI)(organ)/standard deviation (SD)(noise). Results There were no statistically significant differences in ADC values of the abdominal organs between BH and FB DWI sequences (p>0.05). There were statistically significant differences between SNR values of organs on BH and FB DWIs. SNRs were found to be better on FB DWI than BH DWI (p<0.001). Conclusions Free breathing DWI technique reduces image noise and increases SNR for abdominal examinations. Free breathing technique is therefore preferable to BH DWI in the evaluation of abdominal organs by DWI. PMID:27822326

  20. SU-E-J-55: End-To-End Effectiveness Analysis of 3D Surface Image Guided Voluntary Breath-Holding Radiotherapy for Left Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M; Feigenberg, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of using 3D-surface-image to guide breath-holding (BH) left-side breast treatment. Methods Two 3D surface image guided BH procedures were implemented and evaluated: normal-BH, taking BH at a comfortable level, and deep-inspiration-breath-holding (DIBH). A total of 20 patients (10 Normal-BH and 10 DIBH) were recruited. Patients received a BH evaluation using a commercialized 3D-surface- tracking-system (VisionRT, London, UK) to quantify the reproducibility of BH positions prior to CT scan. Tangential 3D/IMRT plans were conducted. Patients were initially setup under free-breathing (FB) condition using the FB surface obtained from the untaged CT to ensure a correct patient position. Patients were then guided to reach the planned BH position using the BH surface obtained from the BH CT. Action-levels were set at each phase of treatment process based on the information provided by the 3D-surface-tracking-system for proper interventions (eliminate/re-setup/ re-coaching). We reviewed the frequency of interventions to evaluate its effectiveness. The FB-CBCT and port-film were utilized to evaluate the accuracy of 3D-surface-guided setups. Results 25% of BH candidates with BH positioning uncertainty > 2mm are eliminated prior to CT scan. For >90% of fractions, based on the setup deltas from3D-surface-trackingsystem, adjustments of patient setup are needed after the initial-setup using laser. 3D-surface-guided-setup accuracy is comparable as CBCT. For the BH guidance, frequency of interventions (a re-coaching/re-setup) is 40%(Normal-BH)/91%(DIBH) of treatments for the first 5-fractions and then drops to 16%(Normal-BH)/46%(DIBH). The necessity of re-setup is highly patient-specific for Normal-BH but highly random among patients for DIBH. Overall, a −0.8±2.4 mm accuracy of the anterior pericardial shadow position was achieved. Conclusion 3D-surface-image technology provides effective intervention to the treatment process and ensures

  1. Anatomy, Variants, and Pathologies of the Superior Glenohumeral Ligament: Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Three-Dimensional Volumetric Interpolated Breath-Hold Examination Sequence and Conventional Magnetic Resonance Arthrography

    PubMed Central

    Ogul, Hayri; Karaca, Leyla; Can, Cahit Emre; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Tuncer, Kutsi; Topal, Murat; Okur, Aylin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to demonstrate magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography findings of anatomy, variants, and pathologic conditions of the superior glenohumeral ligament (SGHL). This review also demonstrates the applicability of a new MR arthrography sequence in the anterosuperior portion of the glenohumeral joint. The SGHL is a very important anatomical structure in the rotator interval that is responsible for stabilizing the long head of the biceps tendon. Therefore, a torn SGHL can result in pain and instability. Observation of the SGHL is difficult when using conventional MR imaging, because the ligament may be poorly visualized. Shoulder MR arthrography is the most accurately established imaging technique for identifying pathologies of the SGHL and associated structures. The use of three dimensional (3D) volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences produces thinner image slices and enables a higher in-plane resolution than conventional MR arthrography sequences. Therefore, shoulder MR arthrography using 3D VIBE sequences may contribute to evaluating of the smaller intraarticular structures such as the SGHL. PMID:25053912

  2. Anatomy, variants, and pathologies of the superior glenohumeral ligament: magnetic resonance imaging with three-dimensional volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination sequence and conventional magnetic resonance arthrography.

    PubMed

    Ogul, Hayri; Karaca, Leyla; Can, Cahit Emre; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Tuncer, Kutsi; Topal, Murat; Okur, Aylin; Kantarci, Mecit

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to demonstrate magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography findings of anatomy, variants, and pathologic conditions of the superior glenohumeral ligament (SGHL). This review also demonstrates the applicability of a new MR arthrography sequence in the anterosuperior portion of the glenohumeral joint. The SGHL is a very important anatomical structure in the rotator interval that is responsible for stabilizing the long head of the biceps tendon. Therefore, a torn SGHL can result in pain and instability. Observation of the SGHL is difficult when using conventional MR imaging, because the ligament may be poorly visualized. Shoulder MR arthrography is the most accurately established imaging technique for identifying pathologies of the SGHL and associated structures. The use of three dimensional (3D) volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences produces thinner image slices and enables a higher in-plane resolution than conventional MR arthrography sequences. Therefore, shoulder MR arthrography using 3D VIBE sequences may contribute to evaluating of the smaller intraarticular structures such as the SGHL.

  3. Magnitude of shift of tumor position as a function of moderated deep inspiration breath-hold: An analysis of pooled data of lung patients with active breath control in image-guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Muralidhar, K. R.; Murthy, P. Narayana; Mahadev, D. Shankar; Subramanyam, K.; Sudarshan, G.; Raju, A. Krishnam

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility and magnitude of shift of tumor position by using active breathing control and iView-GT for patients with lung cancer with moderate deep-inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) technique. Eight patients with 10 lung tumors were studied. CT scans were performed in the breath-holding phase. Moderate deep-inspiration breath-hold under spirometer-based monitoring system was used. Few important bony anatomic details were delineated by the radiation oncologist. To evaluate the interbreath-hold reproducibility of the tumor position, we compared the digital reconstruction radiographs (DRRs) from planning system with the DRRs from the iView-GT in the machine room. We measured the shift in x, y, and z directions. The reproducibility was defined as the difference between the bony landmarks from the DRR of the planning system and those from the DRR of the iView-GT. The maximum shift of the tumor position was 3.2 mm, 3.0 mm, and 2.9 mm in the longitudinal, lateral, and vertical directions. In conclusion, the moderated deep-inspiration breath-hold method using a spirometer is feasible, with relatively good reproducibility of the tumor position for image-guided radiotherapy in lung cancers. PMID:19893708

  4. Highly accelerated real-time cardiac cine MRI using k-t SPARSE-SENSE.

    PubMed

    Feng, Li; Srichai, Monvadi B; Lim, Ruth P; Harrison, Alexis; King, Wilson; Adluru, Ganesh; Dibella, Edward V R; Sodickson, Daniel K; Otazo, Ricardo; Kim, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    For patients with impaired breath-hold capacity and/or arrhythmias, real-time cine MRI may be more clinically useful than breath-hold cine MRI. However, commercially available real-time cine MRI methods using parallel imaging typically yield relatively poor spatio-temporal resolution due to their low image acquisition speed. We sought to achieve relatively high spatial resolution (∼2.5 × 2.5 mm(2)) and temporal resolution (∼40 ms), to produce high-quality real-time cine MR images that could be applied clinically for wall motion assessment and measurement of left ventricular function. In this work, we present an eightfold accelerated real-time cardiac cine MRI pulse sequence using a combination of compressed sensing and parallel imaging (k-t SPARSE-SENSE). Compared with reference, breath-hold cine MRI, our eightfold accelerated real-time cine MRI produced significantly worse qualitative grades (1-5 scale), but its image quality and temporal fidelity scores were above 3.0 (adequate) and artifacts and noise scores were below 3.0 (moderate), suggesting that acceptable diagnostic image quality can be achieved. Additionally, both eightfold accelerated real-time cine and breath-hold cine MRI yielded comparable left ventricular function measurements, with coefficient of variation <10% for left ventricular volumes. Our proposed eightfold accelerated real-time cine MRI with k-t SPARSE-SENSE is a promising modality for rapid imaging of myocardial function.

  5. Highly-Accelerated Real-Time Cardiac Cine MRI Using k-t SPARSE-SENSE

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Li; Srichai, Monvadi B.; Lim, Ruth P.; Harrison, Alexis; King, Wilson; Adluru, Ganesh; Dibella, Edward VR.; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Otazo, Ricardo; Kim, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    For patients with impaired breath-hold capacity and/or arrhythmias, real-time cine MRI may be more clinically useful than breath-hold cine MRI. However, commercially available real-time cine MRI methods using parallel imaging typically yield relatively poor spatio-temporal resolution due to their low image acquisition speed. We sought to achieve relatively high spatial resolution (~2.5mm × 2.5mm) and temporal resolution (~40ms), to produce high-quality real-time cine MR images that could be applied clinically for wall motion assessment and measurement of left ventricular (LV) function. In this work, we present an 8-fold accelerated real-time cardiac cine MRI pulse sequence using a combination of compressed sensing and parallel imaging (k-t SPARSE-SENSE). Compared with reference, breath-hold cine MRI, our 8-fold accelerated real-time cine MRI produced significantly worse qualitative grades (1–5 scale), but its image quality and temporal fidelity scores were above 3.0 (adequate) and artifacts and noise scores were below 3.0 (moderate), suggesting that acceptable diagnostic image quality can be achieved. Additionally, both 8-fold accelerated real-time cine and breath-hold cine MRI yielded comparable LV function measurements, with coefficient of variation < 10% for LV volumes. Our proposed 8-fold accelerated real-time cine MRI with k-t SPARSE-SENSE is a promising modality for rapid imaging of myocardial function. PMID:22887290

  6. Using surface imaging and visual coaching to improve the reproducibility and stability of deep-inspiration breath hold for left-breast-cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerviño, Laura I.; Gupta, Sonia; Rose, Mary A.; Yashar, Catheryn; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-11-01

    Late cardiac complications may arise after left-breast radiation therapy. Deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) allows reduction of the irradiated heart volume at the same time as it reduces tumor bed motion and increases lung sparing. In the present study, we have evaluated the improvement in reproducibility and stability of the DIBH for left-breast-cancer treatment when visual coaching is provided with the aid of 3D video surface imaging and video goggles. Five left-breast-cancer patients and fifteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform a series of DIBHs without and with visual coaching. Reproducibility and stability of DIBH were measured for each individual with and without visual coaching. The average reproducibility and stability changed from 2.1 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively, without visual feedback to 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm with visual feedback, showing a significant statistical difference (p < 0.001 for reproducibility, p < 0.01 for stability). Significant changes (>2 mm) in reproducibility and stability were observed in 35% and 15% of the subjects, respectively. The average chest wall excursion of the DIBH with respect to the free breathing preceding the DIBH was found to be 11.3 mm. The reproducibility and stability of the DIBH improve significantly from the visual coaching provided to the patient, especially in those patients with poor reproducibility and stability.

  7. Validation of 3D surface imaging in breath-hold radiotherapy for breast cancer: one central camera unit versus three camera units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Betgen, Anja; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine; Remeijer, Peter

    2013-03-01

    In this work we investigated the benefit of the use of two lateral camera units additional to a central camera unit for 3D surface imaging for image guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiotherapy by comparison with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Ten patients who received DIBH radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery were included. The performance of surface imaging using one and three camera units was compared to using CBCT for setup verification. Breast-surface registrations were performed for CBCT as well as for 3D surfaces, captured concurrently with CBCT, to planning CT. The resulting setup errors were compared with linear regression analysis. For the differences between setup errors an assessment of the group mean, systematic error, random error, and 95% limits of agreement was made. Correlations between derived surface-imaging [one camera unit;three camera units] and CBCT setup errors were: R2=[0.67;0.75], [0.76;0.87], [0.88;0.91] in left-right, cranio-caudal, and anterior-posterior direction, respectively. Group mean, systematic and random errors were slightly smaller (sub-millimeter differences) and the limits of agreement were 0.10 to 0.25cm tighter when using three camera units compared with one. For the majority of the data, the use of three camera units compared with one resulted in setup errors more similar to the CBCT derived setup errors for the craniocaudal and anterior-posterior directions (p<0.01, Wilcoxon-signed-ranks test). This study shows a better correlation and agreement between 3D surface imaging and CBCT when three camera units are used instead of one and further outlines the conditions under which the benefit of using three camera units is significant.

  8. Assessment of anatomic relation between pulmonary perfusion and morphology in pulmonary emphysema with breath-hold SPECT-CT fusion images.

    PubMed

    Suga, Kazuyoshi; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Iwanaga, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Noriko; Seto, Akiko; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2008-06-01

    Anatomic relation between pulmonary perfusion and morphology in pulmonary emphysema was assessed on deep-inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT fusion images. Subjects were 38 patients with pulmonary emphysema and 11 non-smoker controls, who successfully underwent DIBrH and non-BrH perfusion SPECT using a dual-headed SPECT system during the period between January 2004 and June 2006. DIBrH SPECT was three-dimensionally co-registered with DIBrH CT to comprehend the relationship between lung perfusion defects and CT low attenuation areas (LAA). By comparing the appearance of lung perfusion on DIBrH with non-BrH SPECT, the correlation with the rate constant for the alveolar-capillary transfer of carbon monoxide (DLCO/VA) was compared between perfusion abnormalities on these SPECTs and LAA on CT. DIBrH SPECT provided fairly uniform perfusion in controls, but significantly enhanced perfusion heterogeneity when compared with non-BrH SPECT in pulmonary emphysema patients (P < 0.001). The reliable DIBrH SPECT-CT fusion images confirmed more extended perfusion defects than LAA on CT in majority (73%) of patients. Perfusion abnormalities on DIBrH SPECT were more closely correlated with DLCO/VA than LAA on CT (P < 0.05). DIBrH SPECT identifies affected lungs with perfusion abnormality better than does non-BrH SPECT in pulmonary emphysema. DIBrH SPECT-CT fusion images are useful for more accurately localizing affected lungs than morphologic CT alone in this disease.

  9. Motion-Corrected Real-Time Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Heart: Initial Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Rahsepar, Amir Ali; Saybasili, Haris; Ghasemiesfe, Ahmadreza; Dolan, Ryan S; Shehata, Monda L; Botelho, Marcos P; Markl, Michael; Spottiswoode, Bruce; Collins, Jeremy D; Carr, James C

    2017-08-29

    Free-breathing real-time (RT) imaging can be used in patients with difficulty in breath-holding; however, RT cine imaging typically experiences poor image quality compared with segmented cine imaging because of low resolution. Here, we validate a novel unsupervised motion-corrected (MOCO) reconstruction technique for free-breathing RT cardiac images, called MOCO-RT. Motion-corrected RT uses elastic image registration to generate a single heartbeat of high-quality data from a free-breathing RT acquisition. Segmented balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) cine images and free-breathing RT images (Cartesian, TGRAPPA factor 4) were acquired with the same spatial/temporal resolution in 40 patients using clinical 1.5 T magnetic resonance scanners. The respiratory cycle was estimated using the reconstructed RT images, and nonrigid unsupervised motion correction was applied to eliminate breathing motion. Conventional segmented RT and MOCO-RT single-heartbeat cine images were analyzed to evaluate left ventricular (LV) function and volume measurements. Two radiologists scored images for overall image quality, artifact, noise, and wall motion abnormalities. Intraclass correlation coefficient was used to assess the reliability of MOCO-RT measurement. Intraclass correlation coefficient showed excellent reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient ≥ 0.95) of MOCO-RT with segmented cine in measuring LV function, mass, and volume. Comparison of the qualitative ratings indicated comparable image quality for MOCO-RT (4.80 ± 0.35) with segmented cine (4.45 ± 0.88, P = 0.215) and significantly higher than conventional RT techniques (3.51 ± 0.41, P < 0.001). Artifact and noise ratings for MOCO-RT (1.11 ± 0.26 and 1.08 ± 0.19) and segmented cine (1.51 ± 0.90, P = 0.088 and 1.23 ± 0.45, P = 0.182) were not different. Wall motion abnormality ratings were comparable among different techniques (P = 0.96). The MOCO-RT technique can be used to process conventional free

  10. Three-dimensional cardiac cine imaging using the kat ARC acceleration: Initial experience in clinical adult patients at 3T.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Shigeo; Yamada, Yoshitake; Tanimoto, Akihiro; Fujita, Jun; Sano, Motoaki; Fukuda, Keiichi; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Nozaki, Atsushi; Lai, Peng

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional cardiac cine imaging has demonstrated promising clinical 1.5-Tesla results; however, its application to 3T scanners has been limited because of the higher sensitivity to off-resonance artifacts. The aim of this study was to apply 3D cardiac cine imaging during a single breath hold in clinical patients on a 3T scanner using the kat ARC (k- and adaptive-t auto-calibrating reconstruction for Cartesian sampling) technique and to evaluate the interchangeability between 2D and 3D cine imaging for cardiac functional analysis and detection of abnormalities in regional wall motion. Following institutional review board approval, we obtained 2D cine images with an acceleration factor of two during multiple breath holds and 3D cine images with a net scan acceleration factor of 7.7 during a single breath hold in 20 patients using a 3T unit. Two readers independently evaluated the wall motion of the left ventricle (LV) using a 5-point scale, and the consistency in the detection of regional wall motion abnormality between 2D and 3D cine was analyzed by Cohen's kappa test. The LV volume was calculated at end-diastole and end-systole (LVEDV, LVESV); the ejection fraction (LVEF) and myocardial weight (LVmass) were also calculated. The relationship between functional parameters calculated for 2D and 3D cine images was analyzed using Pearson's correlation analysis. The bias and 95% limit of agreement (LA) were calculated using Bland-Altman plots. In addition, a qualitative evaluation of image quality was performed with regard to the myocardium-blood contrast, noise level and boundary definition. Despite slight degradation in image quality for 3D cine, excellent agreement was obtained for the detection of wall motion abnormalities between 2D and 3D cine images (κ=0.84 and 0.94 for each reader). Excellent correlations between the two imaging methods were shown for the evaluation of functional parameters (r>0.97). Slight differences in LVEDV, LVESV, LVEF and LVmass

  11. Cardiac dosimetric evaluation of deep inspiration breath-hold level variances using computed tomography scans generated from deformable image registration displacement vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Harry, Taylor; Rahn, Doug; Semenov, Denis; Gu, Xuejun; Yashar, Catheryn; Einck, John; Jiang, Steve; Cerviño, Laura

    2016-04-01

    There is a reduction in cardiac dose for left-sided breast radiotherapy during treatment with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) when compared with treatment with free breathing (FB). Various levels of DIBH may occur for different treatment fractions. Dosimetric effects due to this and other motions are a major component of uncertainty in radiotherapy in this setting. Recent developments in deformable registration techniques allow displacement vectors between various temporal and spatial patient representations to be digitally quantified. We propose a method to evaluate the dosimetric effect to the heart from variable reproducibility of DIBH by using deformable registration to create new anatomical computed tomography (CT) scans. From deformable registration, 3-dimensional deformation vectors are generated with FB and DIBH. The obtained deformation vectors are scaled to 75%, 90%, and 110% and are applied to the reference image to create new CT scans at these inspirational levels. The scans are then imported into the treatment planning system and dose calculations are performed. The average mean dose to the heart was 2.5 Gy (0.7 to 9.6 Gy) at FB, 1.2 Gy (0.6 to 3.8 Gy, p < 0.001) at 75% inspiration, 1.1 Gy (0.6 to 3.1 Gy, p = 0.004) at 90% inspiration, 1.0 Gy (0.6 to 3.0 Gy) at 100% inspiration or DIBH, and 1.0 Gy (0.6 to 2.8 Gy, p = 0.019) at 110% inspiration. The average mean dose to the left anterior descending artery (LAD) was 19.9 Gy (2.4 to 46.4 Gy), 8.6 Gy (2.0 to 43.8 Gy, p < 0.001), 7.2 Gy (1.9 to 40.1 Gy, p = 0.035), 6.5 Gy (1.8 to 34.7 Gy), and 5.3 Gy (1.5 to 31.5 Gy, p < 0.001), correspondingly. This novel method enables numerous anatomical situations to be mimicked and quantifies the dosimetric effect they have on a treatment plan.

  12. Cardiac dosimetric evaluation of deep inspiration breath-hold level variances using computed tomography scans generated from deformable image registration displacement vectors.

    PubMed

    Harry, Taylor; Rahn, Doug; Semenov, Denis; Gu, Xuejun; Yashar, Catheryn; Einck, John; Jiang, Steve; Cerviño, Laura

    2016-01-01

    There is a reduction in cardiac dose for left-sided breast radiotherapy during treatment with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) when compared with treatment with free breathing (FB). Various levels of DIBH may occur for different treatment fractions. Dosimetric effects due to this and other motions are a major component of uncertainty in radiotherapy in this setting. Recent developments in deformable registration techniques allow displacement vectors between various temporal and spatial patient representations to be digitally quantified. We propose a method to evaluate the dosimetric effect to the heart from variable reproducibility of DIBH by using deformable registration to create new anatomical computed tomography (CT) scans. From deformable registration, 3-dimensional deformation vectors are generated with FB and DIBH. The obtained deformation vectors are scaled to 75%, 90%, and 110% and are applied to the reference image to create new CT scans at these inspirational levels. The scans are then imported into the treatment planning system and dose calculations are performed. The average mean dose to the heart was 2.5Gy (0.7 to 9.6Gy) at FB, 1.2Gy (0.6 to 3.8Gy, p < 0.001) at 75% inspiration, 1.1Gy (0.6 to 3.1Gy, p = 0.004) at 90% inspiration, 1.0Gy (0.6 to 3.0Gy) at 100% inspiration or DIBH, and 1.0Gy (0.6 to 2.8Gy, p = 0.019) at 110% inspiration. The average mean dose to the left anterior descending artery (LAD) was 19.9Gy (2.4 to 46.4Gy), 8.6Gy (2.0 to 43.8Gy, p < 0.001), 7.2Gy (1.9 to 40.1Gy, p = 0.035), 6.5Gy (1.8 to 34.7Gy), and 5.3Gy (1.5 to 31.5Gy, p < 0.001), correspondingly. This novel method enables numerous anatomical situations to be mimicked and quantifies the dosimetric effect they have on a treatment plan. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Real-time cardiac MRI without triggering, gating, or breath holding.

    PubMed

    Brinegar, Cornelius; Wu, Yi-Jen L; Foley, Lesley M; Hitchens, T Kevin; Ye, Qing; Ho, Chien; Liang, Zhi-Pei

    2008-01-01

    State-of-the-art cardiac MRI can perform real-time 2D scans without cardiac triggering during a single breath hold; however, real-time cardiac MRI in rats is difficult due to the high heart rate (330 bpm) and presence of respiratory motion. These challenges are overcome by using a dynamic imaging method based on Partially Separable Function (PSF) theory with an acceleration factor of 256. This paper demonstrates that this method can be used in the study of transplanted rat hearts for both anatomical and perfusion applications. The study was carried out with a 200 microm in-plane resolution with a 17.2 msec temporal resolution, and the results show improved spatial resolution (2x) and reduced acquisition time (3x) relative to Electrocardiogram (ECG) triggered, respiratory gated cine imaging.

  14. Assessment of Left Ventricular Function and Mass on Free-Breathing Compressed Sensing Real-Time Cine Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kido, Tomoyuki; Kido, Teruhito; Nakamura, Masashi; Watanabe, Kouki; Schmidt, Michaela; Forman, Christoph; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2017-09-25

    Compressed sensing (CS) cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the advantage of being inherently insensitive to respiratory motion. This study compared the accuracy of free-breathing (FB) CS and breath-hold (BH) standard cine MRI for left ventricular (LV) volume assessment.Methods and Results:Sixty-three patients underwent cine MRI with both techniques. Both types of images were acquired in stacks of 8 short-axis slices (temporal/spatial resolution, 41 ms/1.7×1.7×6 mm(3)) and compared for ejection fraction, end-diastolic and systolic volumes, stroke volume, and LV mass. Both BH standard and FB CS cine MRI provided acceptable image quality for LV volumetric analysis (score ≥3) in all patients (4.7±0.5 and 3.7±0.5, respectively; P<0.0001) and had good agreement on LV functional assessment. LV mass, however, was slightly underestimated on FB CS cine MRI (median, IQR: BH standard, 83.8 mL, 64.7-102.7 mL; FB CS, 79.0 mL, 66.0-101.0 mL; P=0.0006). The total acquisition times for BH standard and FB CS cine MRI were 113±7 s and 24±4 s, respectively (P<0.0001). Despite underestimation of LV mass, FB CS cine MRI is a clinically useful alternative to BH standard cine MRI in patients with impaired BH capacity.

  15. Qualitative assessment of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography using breath-hold and non-breath-hold techniques in the portal venous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goo, Eun-Hoe; Kim, Sun-Ju; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Kim, Kwang-Choul; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the image quality in delineation of the portal venous systems with two different methods, breath-hold and non-breath-hold by using the 3D FLASH sequence. We used a 1.5 T system to obtain magnetic resonance(MR)images. Arterial and portal phase 3D FLASH images were obtained with breath-hold after a bolus injection of GD-DOTA. The detection of PVS on the MR angiograms was classified into three grades. First, the angiograms of the breath-hold method showed well the portal vein, the splenic vein and the superior mesenteric vein systems in 13 of 15 patients (86%) and the inferior mesenteric vein system in 6 of 15 patients (40%), Second, MR angiograms of the non-breath-hold method demonstrated the PVS and the SMV in 12 of 15 patients (80%) and the IMV in 5 of 15 patients (33%). Our study showed contrast-enhanced 3D FLASH MR angiography, together with the breath-hold technique, may provide reliable and accurate information on the portal venous system.

  16. The Physics of Breath-Hold Diving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilella, Vicente; Aguilella-Arzo, Marcelo

    1996-01-01

    Analyzes physical features of breath-hold diving. Considers the diver's descent and the initial surface dive and presents examples that show the diver's buoyancy equilibrium varying with depth, the driving force supplied by finning, and the effect of friction between the water and the diver. (Author/JRH)

  17. Determination of cardiac ejection fraction and left ventricular volume: contrast-enhanced ultrafast cine MR imaging vs IV digital subtraction ventriculography.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, K; Nakase, E; Haiyama, T; Takeo, K; Shimizu, K; Yamasaki, K; Kohno, K

    1993-05-01

    To assess the accuracy of contrast-enhanced, single breath-hold cine MR imaging in the calculation of left ventricular volume and ejection fraction, we compared values obtained by using this method with those obtained by using IV digital subtraction angiography (IV-DSA). All patients (n = 28) had conventional cine and contrast-enhanced ultrafast cine MR imaging. For ultrafast cine MR imaging, a phase-rewind gradient-echo (rewind-SMASH) sequence was used: TR, 8 msec (standard excitation and acquisition block of 6 msec with phase rewind pulse of 2 msec); TE, 3.2 msec; a 128 x 96 matrix (pile encode factor, 6; k-space segment, 16); a 200-mm field of view; and one excitation. Values for left ventricular volume and ejection fraction obtained with ultrafast cine MR imaging correlated well with those obtained with IV-DSA (end-diastolic volume, y = 0.986x - 7.79, r = .985; end-systolic volume, y = 0.863x + 0.71, r = .984; ejection fraction, y = 0.877x + 6.44, r = .887). In the calculation of left ventricular volume by the area-length method, manual tracing of the left ventricular cavity was more difficult when the conventional cine method was used than when the enhanced ultrafast cine method was used. Our results show that cardiac multiphase study with horizontal long-axis, first-pass, contrast-enhanced, single breath-hold, cine MR imaging is an accurate and highly reproducible method of evaluating left ventricular volume and ejection fraction.

  18. Rapid 3D imaging of the lower airway by MRI in patients with congenital heart disease: A retrospective comparison of delayed volume interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) to turbo spin echo (TSE).

    PubMed

    Goot, Benjamin H; Patel, Sonali; Fonseca, Brian

    2017-01-01

    When imaging the lower airway by MRI, the traditional technique turbo spin echo (TSE) results in high quality 2D images, however planning and acquisition times are lengthy. An alternative, delayed volume interpolated breath-holds examination (VIBE), is a 3D gradient echo technique that produces high spatial resolution imaging of the airway in one breath-hold. The objective of this study is to retrospectively evaluate the accuracy of lower airway measurements obtained by delayed VIBE when compared to TSE. Patients with congenital heart disease who underwent a cardiac MRI (CMR) that included a delayed VIBE sequence from 5/2008 to 9/2013 were included. Standard TSE imaging was performed and delayed VIBE was acquired 5 min after gadolinium contrast administration. Airway measurements were made on both sequences by two observers in a blinded fashion to the other observer and other technique. Intraclass correlations (ICC) were calculated to assess for agreement between both techniques and the observers. 29 studies met inclusion criteria with a mean patient age of 8.8 years (2 months to 63 years) and mean patient weight of 30.2 kg (3.5-110). All delayed VIBE and TSE sequences were found to be of diagnostic quality. Mean acquisition time was shorter for the delayed VIBE (13.1 seconds) than TSE (949.9 seconds). Overall there was very good agreement between the delayed VIBE and TSE measurements for both observers (ICC 0.78-0.94) with the exception of the distal right bronchus (ICC 0.67) The interobserver agreement was also excellent for both TSE (ICC 0.78-0.96) and VIBE (ICC 0.85-0.96). Delayed VIBE is rapid and at least as accurate as the alternative TSE imaging for assessment of the lower airway by MRI across a wide spectrum of patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Kidney motion during free breathing and breath hold for MR-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, Mette K.; van Vulpen, Marco; Barendrecht, Maurits M.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Intven, Martijn; Crijns, Sjoerd P. M.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Raaymakers, Bas W.

    2013-04-01

    Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma have a high complication rate due to the invasiveness of the treatment. With the MRI-linac it may be possible to treat renal tumours non-invasively with high-precision radiotherapy. This is expected to reduce complications. To deliver a static dose distribution, radiation gating will be used. In this study the reproducibility and efficiency of free breathing gating and a breath hold treatment of the kidney was investigated. For 15 patients with a renal lesion the kidney motion during 2 min of free breathing and 10 consecutive expiration breath holds was studied with 2D cine MRI. The variability in kidney expiration position and treatment efficiency for gating windows of 1 to 20 mm was measured for both breathing patterns. Additionally the time trend in free breathing and the variation in expiration breath hold kidney position with baseline shift correction was determined. In 80% of the patients the variation in expiration position during free breathing is smaller than 2 mm. No clinically relevant time trends were detected. The variation in expiration breath hold is for all patients larger than the free breathing expiration variation. Gating on free breathing is, for gating windows of 1 to 5 mm more efficient than breath hold without baseline correction. When applying a baseline correction to the breath hold it increases the treatment efficiency. The kidney position is more reproducible in expiration free breathing than non-guided expiration breath hold. For small gating windows it is also more time efficient. Since free breathing also seems more comfortable for the patients it is the preferred breathing pattern for MRI-Linac treatments of the kidney.

  20. Evaluation of highly accelerated real-time cardiac cine MRI in tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Elwin C; Kholmovski, Eugene G; Wilson, Brent D; DiBella, Edward V R; Dosdall, Derek J; Ranjan, Ravi; McGann, Christopher J; Kim, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated breath-hold cine MRI is considered to be the gold standard test for the assessment of cardiac function. However, it may fail in patients with arrhythmia, impaired breath-hold capacity and poor ECG gating. Although ungated real-time cine MRI may mitigate these problems, commercially available real-time cine MRI pulse sequences using parallel imaging typically yield relatively poor spatiotemporal resolution because of their low image acquisition efficiency. As an extension of our previous work, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic quality and accuracy of eight-fold-accelerated real-time cine MRI with compressed sensing (CS) for the quantification of cardiac function in tachycardia, where it is challenging for real-time cine MRI to provide sufficient spatiotemporal resolution. We evaluated the performances of eight-fold-accelerated cine MRI with CS, three-fold-accelerated real-time cine MRI with temporal generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (TGRAPPA) and ECG-gated breath-hold cine MRI in 21 large animals with tachycardia (mean heart rate, 104 beats per minute) at 3T. For each cine MRI method, two expert readers evaluated the diagnostic quality in four categories (image quality, temporal fidelity of wall motion, artifacts and apparent noise) using a Likert scale (1-5, worst to best). One reader evaluated the left ventricular functional parameters. The diagnostic quality scores were significantly different between the three cine pulse sequences, except for the artifact level between CS and TGRAPPA real-time cine MRI. Both ECG-gated breath-hold cine MRI and eight-fold accelerated real-time cine MRI yielded all four scores of ≥ 3.0 (acceptable), whereas three-fold-accelerated real-time cine MRI yielded all scores below 3.0, except for artifact (3.0). The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) measurements agreed better between ECG-gated cine MRI and eight-fold-accelerated real-time cine MRI

  1. Free-Breathing 3D Imaging of Right Ventricular Structure and Function Using Respiratory and Cardiac Self-Gated Cine MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanchun; Liu, Jing; Weinsaft, Jonathan; Spincemaille, Pascal; Nguyen, Thanh D.; Prince, Martin R.; Bao, Shanglian; Xie, Yaoqin; Wang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Providing a movie of the beating heart in a single prescribed plane, cine MRI has been widely used in clinical cardiac diagnosis, especially in the left ventricle (LV). Right ventricular (RV) morphology and function are also important for the diagnosis of cardiopulmonary diseases and serve as predictors for the long term outcome. The purpose of this study is to develop a self-gated free-breathing 3D imaging method for RV quantification and to evaluate its performance by comparing it with breath-hold 2D cine imaging in 7 healthy volunteers. Compared with 2D, the 3D RV functional measurements show a reduction of RV end-diastole volume (RVEDV) by 10%, increase of RV end-systole volume (RVESV) by 1.8%, reduction of RV systole volume (RVSV) by 21%, and reduction of RV ejection fraction (RVEF) by 12%. High correlations between the two techniques were found (RVEDV: 0.94; RVESV: 0.85; RVSV: 0.95; and RVEF: 0.89). Compared with 2D, the 3D image quality measurements show a small reduction in blood SNR, myocardium-blood CNR, myocardium contrast, and image sharpness. In conclusion, the proposed self-gated free-breathing 3D cardiac cine imaging technique provides comparable image quality and correlated functional measurements to those acquired with the multiple breath-hold 2D technique in RV. PMID:26185764

  2. Free-Breathing 3D Imaging of Right Ventricular Structure and Function Using Respiratory and Cardiac Self-Gated Cine MRI.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanchun; Liu, Jing; Weinsaft, Jonathan; Spincemaille, Pascal; Nguyen, Thanh D; Prince, Martin R; Bao, Shanglian; Xie, Yaoqin; Wang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Providing a movie of the beating heart in a single prescribed plane, cine MRI has been widely used in clinical cardiac diagnosis, especially in the left ventricle (LV). Right ventricular (RV) morphology and function are also important for the diagnosis of cardiopulmonary diseases and serve as predictors for the long term outcome. The purpose of this study is to develop a self-gated free-breathing 3D imaging method for RV quantification and to evaluate its performance by comparing it with breath-hold 2D cine imaging in 7 healthy volunteers. Compared with 2D, the 3D RV functional measurements show a reduction of RV end-diastole volume (RVEDV) by 10%, increase of RV end-systole volume (RVESV) by 1.8%, reduction of RV systole volume (RVSV) by 21%, and reduction of RV ejection fraction (RVEF) by 12%. High correlations between the two techniques were found (RVEDV: 0.94; RVESV: 0.85; RVSV: 0.95; and RVEF: 0.89). Compared with 2D, the 3D image quality measurements show a small reduction in blood SNR, myocardium-blood CNR, myocardium contrast, and image sharpness. In conclusion, the proposed self-gated free-breathing 3D cardiac cine imaging technique provides comparable image quality and correlated functional measurements to those acquired with the multiple breath-hold 2D technique in RV.

  3. Voluntary breath-holding for breast cancer radiotherapy is consistent and stable.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Ruth; James, Matthew; Bartlett, Frederick R; Kirby, Anna M; Donovan, Ellen M

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate breath-hold stability and constancy for a voluntary breath-hold (VBH) technique in a retrospective analysis. Movie loop sequences of electronic portal image data from multiple breath holds in a cohort of 19 patients were used to assess within and between breath-hold stability. In vivo dosimetry data based on electronic portal imaging (EPI) were analysed for 31 VBH patients plus a cohort of free-breathing (FB) patients to provide a reference. A phantom experiment simulated the impact on dose of FB, breath hold and unplanned release of breath hold. 165/174 (93%) movie loop data sets had no detectable displacement. For the remaining 12, median displacement = 1.5 mm and maximum displacement = 3 mm (one patient on one fraction). In vivo dosimetry data analysis showed a median dose difference measured to planned of -0.2% (VBH) and -0.1% (FB). Dose distribution evaluation (γ) pass rates were 84% (VBH) and 91% (FB) including the lung region; 93% and 96% with a lung override. Unplanned release of phantom breath-hold position changed median dose by ≤1% and degraded γ pass rates to 79-62%. Failing regions were mostly in the periphery of the treated volume. The data confirmed that multiple VBHs using visual monitoring are stable; in vivo dose verification via EPI was within expected and acceptable levels. These data provide further reassurance that VBH is a safe technique for cardiac sparing breast radiotherapy and support its rapid, widespread implementation.

  4. CAIPIRINHA-Dixon-TWIST (CDT)-volume-interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) for dynamic liver imaging: comparison of gadoterate meglumine, gadobutrol and gadoxetic acid.

    PubMed

    Budjan, Johannes; Ong, Melissa; Riffel, Philipp; Morelli, John N; Michaely, Henrik J; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Haneder, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    CAIPIRINHA-Dixon-TWIST (CDT)-VIBE is a robust method for abdominal magnetic resonance imaging providing both high spatial and high temporal resolution. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of different gadolinium based contrast agents (GBCA) on image quality (IQ) with CDT-VIBE. In this IRB-approved, retrospective, inter-individual comparison study, 86 patients scanned at 3T were included. Within 28s, 14 high-resolution 3D datasets were acquired using CDT-VIBE. 37 patients received 0.1mmol/kg gadoterate meglumine, 28 patients 0.1mmol/kg gadobutrol, and 19 patients 0.1mL/kg gadoxetic acid. Two blinded, board-certified radiologists assessed the image quality on a 5 point scale, as well as the number of hepatic arterial dominant (HAD) phases. Regardless of the GBCA utilized, CDT-VIBE resulted in good IQ in terms of best IQ achieved among all 14 datasets (gadobutrol 4.3, gadoterate meglumine 3.9, gadoxetic acid 3.7). With respect to worst IQ, the three groups showed statistically significant differences with gadobutrol receiving the highest rating (3.6) and gadoxetic acid the lowest (2.4) (gadoterate meglumine 3.0; 0.0014imaging with CDT-VIBE resulting in good image quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sports-related lung injury during breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Mijacika, Tanja; Dujic, Zeljko

    2016-12-01

    The number of people practising recreational breath-hold diving is constantly growing, thereby increasing the need for knowledge of the acute and chronic effects such a sport could have on the health of participants. Breath-hold diving is potentially dangerous, mainly because of associated extreme environmental factors such as increased hydrostatic pressure, hypoxia, hypercapnia, hypothermia and strenuous exercise.In this article we focus on the effects of breath-hold diving on pulmonary function. Respiratory symptoms have been reported in almost 25% of breath-hold divers after repetitive diving sessions. Acutely, repetitive breath-hold diving may result in increased transpulmonary capillary pressure, leading to noncardiogenic oedema and/or alveolar haemorrhage. Furthermore, during a breath-hold dive, the chest and lungs are compressed by the increasing pressure of water. Rapid changes in lung air volume during descent or ascent can result in a lung injury known as pulmonary barotrauma. Factors that may influence individual susceptibility to breath-hold diving-induced lung injury range from underlying pulmonary or cardiac dysfunction to genetic predisposition.According to the available data, breath-holding does not result in chronic lung injury. However, studies of large populations of breath-hold divers are necessary to firmly exclude long-term lung damage. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  6. Peak flow velocities in the ascending aorta—real-time phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging vs. cine magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Sohns, Jan M.; Kowallick, Johannes T.; Joseph, Arun A.; Merboldt, K. Dietmar; Voit, Dirk; Fasshauer, Martin; Staab, Wieland; Lotz, Joachim; Unterberg-Buchwald, Christina

    2015-01-01

    This prospective study of eight healthy volunteers evaluates peak flow velocities (PFV) in the ascending aorta using real-time phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in comparison to cine phase-contrast MRI and echocardiography. Flow measurements by echocardiography and cine phase-contrast MRI with breath-holding were performed according to clinical standards. Real-time phase-contrast MRI at 40 ms temporal resolution and 1.3 mm in-plane resolution was based on highly undersampled radial fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequences with image reconstruction by regularized nonlinear inversion (NLINV). Evaluations focused on the determination of PFV. Linear regressions and Bland-Altman plots were used for comparisons of methods. When averaged across subjects, real-time phase-contrast MRI resulted in PFV of 120±20 cm s−1 (mean ± SD) in comparison to 122±16 cm s−1 for cine MRI and 124±20 cm s−1 for echocardiography. The maximum deviations between real-time phase-contrast MRI and echocardiography ranged from –20 to +14 cm s−1 (cine MRI: –10 to +12 cm s−1). Thus, in general, real-time phase-contrast MRI of cardiac outflow revealed quantitative agreement with cine MRI and echocardiography. The advantages of real-time MRI are measurements during free breathing and access to individual cardiac cycles. PMID:26682138

  7. Peak flow velocities in the ascending aorta-real-time phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging vs. cine magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Sohns, Jan M; Kowallick, Johannes T; Joseph, Arun A; Merboldt, K Dietmar; Voit, Dirk; Fasshauer, Martin; Staab, Wieland; Frahm, Jens; Lotz, Joachim; Unterberg-Buchwald, Christina

    2015-10-01

    This prospective study of eight healthy volunteers evaluates peak flow velocities (PFV) in the ascending aorta using real-time phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in comparison to cine phase-contrast MRI and echocardiography. Flow measurements by echocardiography and cine phase-contrast MRI with breath-holding were performed according to clinical standards. Real-time phase-contrast MRI at 40 ms temporal resolution and 1.3 mm in-plane resolution was based on highly undersampled radial fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequences with image reconstruction by regularized nonlinear inversion (NLINV). Evaluations focused on the determination of PFV. Linear regressions and Bland-Altman plots were used for comparisons of methods. When averaged across subjects, real-time phase-contrast MRI resulted in PFV of 120±20 cm s(-1) (mean ± SD) in comparison to 122±16 cm s(-1) for cine MRI and 124±20 cm s(-1) for echocardiography. The maximum deviations between real-time phase-contrast MRI and echocardiography ranged from -20 to +14 cm s(-1) (cine MRI: -10 to +12 cm s(-1)). Thus, in general, real-time phase-contrast MRI of cardiac outflow revealed quantitative agreement with cine MRI and echocardiography. The advantages of real-time MRI are measurements during free breathing and access to individual cardiac cycles.

  8. CAIPIRINHA-Dixon-TWIST (CDT)-volume-interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE): a new technique for fast time-resolved dynamic 3-dimensional imaging of the abdomen with high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Michaely, Henrik J; Morelli, John N; Budjan, Johannes; Riffel, Philipp; Nickel, Dominik; Kroeker, Randall; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Attenberger, Ulrike I

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and image quality of a novel, highly accelerated T1-weighted sequence for time-resolved imaging of the abdomen during the first pass of contrast media transit using controlled aliasing in parallel imaging results in higher acceleration (CAIPIRINHA) under sampling, view-sharing techniques, and Dixon water-fat separation (CAIPRINHA-Dixon-time-resolved imaging with interleaved stochastic trajectories-volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination [CDT-VIBE]). In this retrospective, institutional review board-approved study, 47 patients (median age, 62 years; 25 men, 22 women) scanned on a 3.0-T magnetic resonance system (Skyra; Siemens) were included. The CDT-VIBE (repetition time/echo time1/echo time2, 4.1/1.33/2.56 milliseconds; acquisition time, 29 seconds) was used in place of the standard arterial phase acquisition and started 15 seconds after the injection of 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DOTA (Dotarem, Guerbet). Within 29 seconds, 14 high spatial resolution (1.2 × 1.2 × 3 mm) 3-dimensional data sets were acquired and reconstructed using view sharing (temporal resolution, 2.1 seconds). The CDT-VIBE images were evaluated independently by 2 blinded, experienced radiologists with regard to image quality and the number of hepatic arterial-dominant phases present on an ordinal 5-point scale (5, excellent; 1, nondiagnostic). Added diagnostic information with CDT-VIBE relative to portal venous phase VIBE was assessed. In all patients, CDT-VIBE measurements were successfully acquired. The image quality was diagnostic in 46 of the 47 patients. Both readers assessed the highest image quality present in the data sets with a median score of 4 (range, 3-5 for both readers; κ, 0.789) and the worst image quality with a median score of 3 (range, 1-4 for both readers; κ, 0.689). With a range between 1 and 8 (median, 5), hepatic arterial-dominant data sets (of the 14 acquired) were obtained in each case. There was an added diagnostic

  9. Piracetam in severe breath holding spells.

    PubMed

    Azam, Matloob; Bhatti, Nasera; Shahab, Naheed

    2008-01-01

    Breath holding spells (BHS) are apparently frightening events occurring in otherwise healthy children. Generally, no medical treatment is recommended and parental reassurance is believed to be enough, however, severe BHS can be very stressful for the parents and a pharmacological agent may be desired in some of these children. In this prospective study aim was to determine the usefulness of piracetam as prophylactic treatment for severe BHS. Children were recruited from Neurology Clinic in Children's Hospital, Islamabad between January 2002 to December 2004. Diagnosis of BHS was based on characteristic history and normal physical examination. Piracetam was prescribed to those children who were diagnosed as severe BHS in a dose ranging from 50-100 mg/kg/day. Iron supplements were added if hemoglobin was less than 10 gm%. Patients were seen at 2-4 weeks interval and follow-up was continued until 3 months after the cessation of drug therapy. Fifty-two children were enrolled in the study, 34 boys and 18 girls. Ages ranged from 4 weeks to 5 years with mean age of 17 months. In 81% of children, spells disappeared completely and in 9% frequency was reduced to less than one per month and of much lesser intensity. Prophylaxis was given for 3-6 months (mean 5) duration. Piracetam is an effective prophylactic treatment for severe BHS.

  10. Fetal cardiac cine imaging using highly accelerated dynamic MRI with retrospective motion correction and outlier rejection.

    PubMed

    van Amerom, Joshua F P; Lloyd, David F A; Price, Anthony N; Kuklisova Murgasova, Maria; Aljabar, Paul; Malik, Shaihan J; Lohezic, Maelene; Rutherford, Mary A; Pushparajah, Kuberan; Razavi, Reza; Hajnal, Joseph V

    2017-04-03

    Development of a MRI acquisition and reconstruction strategy to depict fetal cardiac anatomy in the presence of maternal and fetal motion. The proposed strategy involves i) acquisition and reconstruction of highly accelerated dynamic MRI, followed by image-based ii) cardiac synchronization, iii) motion correction, iv) outlier rejection, and finally v) cardiac cine reconstruction. Postprocessing entirely was automated, aside from a user-defined region of interest delineating the fetal heart. The method was evaluated in 30 mid- to late gestational age singleton pregnancies scanned without maternal breath-hold. The combination of complementary acquisition/reconstruction and correction/rejection steps in the pipeline served to improve the quality of the reconstructed 2D cine images, resulting in increased visibility of small, dynamic anatomical features. Artifact-free cine images successfully were produced in 36 of 39 acquired data sets; prolonged general fetal movements precluded processing of the remaining three data sets. The proposed method shows promise as a motion-tolerant framework to enable further detail in MRI studies of the fetal heart and great vessels. Processing data in image-space allowed for spatial and temporal operations to be applied to the fetal heart in isolation, separate from extraneous changes elsewhere in the field of view. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Considerable pancreatic tumor motion during breath-holding.

    PubMed

    Lens, Eelco; van der Horst, Astrid; Versteijne, Eva; Bel, Arjan; van Tienhoven, Geertjan

    2016-11-01

    Breath-holding (BH) is often used to reduce abdominal organ motion during radiotherapy. However, for inhale BH, abdominal tumor motion during BH has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to quantify tumor motion during inhale BH and tumor position variations between consecutive inhale BHs in pancreatic cancer patients. Twelve patients with intratumoral fiducials were included and asked to perform three consecutive 30-second inhale BHs on each of three measurement days. During BH, lateral fluoroscopic movies were obtained and a two-dimensional (2D) image correlation algorithm was used to track the fiducials and the diaphragm, yielding the tumor and diaphragm motion during each BH. The tumor position variation between consecutive BHs was obtained from the difference in initial tumor position between consecutive BHs on a single measurement day. We observed tumor motion during BH with a mean absolute maximum displacement over all BHs of 4.2 mm (range 1.0-11.0 mm) in inferior-superior (IS) direction and 2.7 mm (range 0.5-8.0 mm) in anterior-posterior (AP) direction. We found only a moderate correlation between tumor and diaphragm motion in the IS direction (Pearson's correlation coefficient |r|>0.6 in 45 of 76 BHs). The mean tumor position variation between consecutive BHs was 0.2 [standard deviation (SD) 1.7] mm in the inferior direction and 0.5 (SD 0.8) mm in the anterior direction. We observed substantial pancreatic tumor motion during BH as well as considerable position variation between consecutive BHs on a single day. We recommend further quantifying these uncertainties before introducing breath-hold during radiation treatment of pancreatic cancer patients. Also, the diaphragm cannot be used as a surrogate for pancreatic tumor motion.

  12. Acute effects of cannabis on breath-holding duration.

    PubMed

    Farris, Samantha G; Metrik, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Distress intolerance (an individual's perceived or actual inability to tolerate distressing psychological or physiological states) is associated with cannabis use. It is unknown whether a biobehavioral index of distress intolerance, breath-holding duration, is acutely influenced (increased or decreased) by cannabis. Such information may further inform understanding of the expression of psychological or physiological distress postcannabis use. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7%-3.0% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed duration of breath holding. Participants (n = 88; 65.9% male) were nontreatment-seeking frequent cannabis users who smoked placebo or active THC cigarette on two separate study days and completed a breath-holding task postsmoking. Controlling for baseline breath-holding duration and participant sex, THC produced significantly shorter breath-holding durations relative to placebo. There was a significant interaction of drug administration × frequency of cannabis use, such that THC decreased breath-holding time among less frequent but not among more frequent users. Findings indicate that cannabis may exacerbate distress intolerance (via shorter breath-holding durations). As compared to less frequent cannabis users, frequent users display tolerance to cannabis' acute effects including increased ability to tolerate respiratory distress when holding breath. Objective measures of distress intolerance are sensitive to contextual factors such as acute drug intoxication, and may inform the link between cannabis use and the expression of psychological distress. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Acute Effects of Cannabis on Breath-Holding Duration

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Samantha G.; Metrik, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Distress intolerance (an individual’s perceived or actual inability to tolerate distressing psychological or physiological states) is associated with cannabis use. It is unknown whether a bio-behavioral index of distress intolerance, breath-holding duration, is acutely influenced (increased or decreased) by cannabis. Such information may further inform understanding of the expression of psychological or physiological distress post-cannabis use. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7–3.0 % delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed duration of breath-holding. Participants (n = 88; 65.9% male) were non-treatment seeking frequent cannabis users who smoked placebo or active THC cigarette on two separate study days and completed breath-holding task. Controlling for baseline breath-holding duration and participant sex, THC produced significantly lower breath-holding durations relative to placebo. There was a significant interaction of drug administration x frequency of cannabis use, such that THC decreased breath-holding time among less frequent but not among more frequent users. Findings indicate that cannabis may be exacerbating distress intolerance (via breath-holding duration). As compared to less frequent cannabis users, frequent users display tolerance to cannabis’ acute effects including increased ability to tolerate respiratory distress when holding breath. Objective measures of distress intolerance are sensitive to contextual factors such as acute drug intoxication, and may inform the link between cannabis use and the expression of psychological distress. PMID:27454678

  14. Mean heart dose variation over a course of breath-holding breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dunkerley, Nicolle; Bartlett, Frederick R; Kirby, Anna M; Evans, Philip M; Donovan, Ellen M

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the work was to estimate the dose received by the heart throughout a course of breath-holding breast radiotherapy. 113 cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans were acquired for 20 patients treated within the HeartSpare 1A study, in which both an active breathing control (ABC) device and a voluntary breath-hold (VBH) method were used. Predicted mean heart doses were obtained from treatment plans. CBCT scans were imported into a treatment planning system, heart outlines defined, images registered to the CT planning scan and mean heart dose recorded. Two observers outlined two cases three times each to assess interobserver and intraobserver variation. There were no statistically significant differences between ABC and VBH heart dose data from CT planning scans, or in the CBCT-based estimates of heart dose, and no effect from the order of the breath-hold method. Variation in mean heart dose per fraction over the three imaged fractions was <6 cGy without setup correction, decreasing to 3.3 cGy with setup correction. If scaled to 15 fractions, all differences between predicted and estimated mean heart doses were <0.5 Gy and in 80% of cases, they were <0.25 Gy. Variation in mean heart dose was at an acceptable level over the duration of breath-holding radiotherapy and was well predicted by the planning system. Advances in knowledge: Mean heart dose was not adversely affected by fraction-to-fraction variations throughout a course of heart-sparing radiotherapy using two well-established breath-holding methods.

  15. Accelerated cardiac cine MRI using locally low rank and finite difference constraints.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xin; Lingala, Sajan Goud; Guo, Yi; Jao, Terrence; Usman, Muhammad; Prieto, Claudia; Nayak, Krishna S

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the potential value of combining multiple constraints for highly accelerated cardiac cine MRI. A locally low rank (LLR) constraint and a temporal finite difference (FD) constraint were combined to reconstruct cardiac cine data from highly undersampled measurements. Retrospectively undersampled 2D Cartesian reconstructions were quantitatively evaluated against fully-sampled data using normalized root mean square error, structural similarity index (SSIM) and high frequency error norm (HFEN). This method was also applied to 2D golden-angle radial real-time imaging to facilitate single breath-hold whole-heart cine (12 short-axis slices, 9-13s single breath hold). Reconstruction was compared against state-of-the-art constrained reconstruction methods: LLR, FD, and k-t SLR. At 10 to 60 spokes/frame, LLR+FD better preserved fine structures and depicted myocardial motion with reduced spatio-temporal blurring in comparison to existing methods. LLR yielded higher SSIM ranking than FD; FD had higher HFEN ranking than LLR. LLR+FD combined the complimentary advantages of the two, and ranked the highest in all metrics for all retrospective undersampled cases. Single breath-hold multi-slice cardiac cine with prospective undersampling was enabled with in-plane spatio-temporal resolutions of 2×2mm(2) and 40ms. Highly accelerated cardiac cine is enabled by the combination of 2D undersampling and the synergistic use of LLR and FD constraints. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. TH-C-12A-11: Target Correlation of a 3D Surface Surrogate for Left Breast Irradiation Using the Respiratory-Gated Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Rong, Y; Walston, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of 3D optical surface imaging as a new surrogate for respiratory motion gated deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique for left breast cancer patients. Methods: Patients with left-sided breast cancer after lumpectomy or mastectomy were selected as candidates for DIBH technique for their external beam radiation therapy. Treatment plans were created on both free breathing (FB) and DIBH CTs to determine whether DIBH was beneficial in reducing heart doses. The Real-time Position Management (RPM) system was used to acquire patient's breathing trace during DIBH CT acquisition and treatment delivery. The reference 3D surface models from FB and DIBH CTs were generated and transferred to the “AlignRT” system for patient positioning and real-time treatment monitoring. MV Cine images were acquired for each beam as quality assurance for intra-fractional position verification. The chest wall excursions measured on these images were used to define the actual target position during treatment, and to investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of RPM and AlignRT. Results: Reduction in heart dose can be achieved for left-sided breast patients using DIBH. Results showed that RPM has poor correlation with target position, as determined by the MV Cine imaging. This indicates that RPM may not be an adequate surrogate in defining the breath-hold level when used alone. Alternatively, the AlignRT surface imaging demonstrated a better correlation with the actual CW excursion during DIBH. Both the vertical and magnitude real-time deltas (RTDs) reported by AlignRT can be used as the gating parameter, with a recommend threshold of ±3 mm and 5 mm, respectively. Conclusion: 3D optical surface imaging serves as a superior target surrogate for the left breast treatment when compared to RPM. Working together with the realtime MV Cine imaging, they ensure accurate patient setup and dose delivery, while minimizing the imaging dose to patients.

  17. Evaluation of pulmonary function using single-breath-hold dual-energy computed tomography with xenon

    PubMed Central

    Kyoyama, Hiroyuki; Hirata, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Sakai, Kosuke; Saito, Yuriko; Mikami, Shintaro; Moriyama, Gaku; Yanagita, Hisami; Watanabe, Wataru; Otani, Katharina; Honda, Norinari; Uematsu, Kazutsugu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Xenon-enhanced dual-energy computed tomography (xenon-enhanced CT) can provide lung ventilation maps that may be useful for assessing structural and functional abnormalities of the lung. Xenon-enhanced CT has been performed using a multiple-breath-hold technique during xenon washout. We recently developed xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique to assess ventilation. We sought to evaluate whether xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique correlates with pulmonary function testing (PFT) results. Twenty-six patients, including 11 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, underwent xenon-enhanced CT and PFT. Three of the COPD patients underwent xenon-enhanced CT before and after bronchodilator treatment. Images from xenon-CT were obtained by dual-source CT during a breath-hold after a single vital-capacity inspiration of a xenon–oxygen gas mixture. Image postprocessing by 3-material decomposition generated conventional CT and xenon-enhanced images. Low-attenuation areas on xenon images matched low-attenuation areas on conventional CT in 21 cases but matched normal-attenuation areas in 5 cases. Volumes of Hounsfield unit (HU) histograms of xenon images correlated moderately and highly with vital capacity (VC) and total lung capacity (TLC), respectively (r = 0.68 and 0.85). Means and modes of histograms weakly correlated with VC (r = 0.39 and 0.38), moderately with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (r = 0.59 and 0.56), weakly with the ratio of FEV1 to FVC (r = 0.46 and 0.42), and moderately with the ratio of FEV1 to its predicted value (r = 0.64 and 0.60). Mode and volume of histograms increased in 2 COPD patients after the improvement of FEV1 with bronchodilators. Inhalation of xenon gas caused no adverse effects. Xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique depicted functional abnormalities not detectable on thin-slice CT. Mode, mean, and volume of HU histograms of xenon images

  18. 3D Late Gadolinium Enhancement in a Single Prolonged Breath-hold using Supplemental Oxygenation and Hyperventilation

    PubMed Central

    Roujol, Sébastien; Basha, Tamer A.; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Foppa, Murilo; Chan, Raymond H.; Kissinger, Kraig V.; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Manning, Warren J.; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of 3D single breath-hold late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) of the left ventricle (LV) using supplemental oxygen and hyperventilation and compressed-sensing acceleration. Methods: Breath-hold metrics (breath-hold duration, diaphragmatic/LV position drift, and maximum variation of RR interval) without and with supplemental oxygen and hyperventilation were assessed in healthy adult subjects using a real time single shot acquisition. Ten healthy subjects and 13 patients then underwent assessment of the proposed 3D breath-hold LGE acquisition (FOV=320×320×100 mm3, resolution=1.6×1.6×5.0 mm3, acceleration rate of 4) and a free breathing acquisition with right hemidiaphragm navigator (NAV) respiratory gating. Semi-quantitative grading of overall image quality, motion artifact, myocardial nulling, and diagnostic value was performed by consensus of two blinded observers. Results: Supplemental oxygenation and hyperventilation increased the breath-hold duration (35±11 s to 58±21 s, p<0.0125) without significant impact on diaphragmatic/LV position drift or maximum variation of RR interval (both p>0.01). LGE images were of similar quality when compared to free breathing acquisitions but with reduced total scan time (85±22 s to 35±6 s, p<0.001). Conclusions: Supplemental oxygenation and hyperventilation allow for prolonged breath-holding and enable single breath-hold 3D accelerated LGE with similar image quality as free breathing with NAV. PMID:24186772

  19. 3D late gadolinium enhancement in a single prolonged breath-hold using supplemental oxygenation and hyperventilation.

    PubMed

    Roujol, Sébastien; Basha, Tamer A; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Foppa, Murilo; Chan, Raymond H; Kissinger, Kraig V; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of three-dimensional (3D) single breath-hold late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) of the left ventricle (LV) using supplemental oxygen and hyperventilation and compressed-sensing acceleration. Breath-hold metrics [breath-hold duration, diaphragmatic/LV position drift, and maximum variation of R wave to R wave (RR) interval] without and with supplemental oxygen and hyperventilation were assessed in healthy adult subjects using a real-time single shot acquisition. Ten healthy subjects and 13 patients then underwent assessment of the proposed 3D breath-hold LGE acquisition (field of view = 320 × 320 × 100 mm(3) , resolution = 1.6 × 1.6 × 5.0 mm(3) , acceleration rate of 4) and a free-breathing acquisition with right hemidiaphragm navigator (NAV) respiratory gating. Semiquantitative grading of overall image quality, motion artifact, myocardial nulling, and diagnostic value was performed by consensus of two blinded observers. Supplemental oxygenation and hyperventilation increased the breath-hold duration (35 ± 11 s to 58 ± 21 s; P < 0.0125) without significant impact on diaphragmatic/LV position drift or maximum variation of RR interval (both P > 0.01). LGE images were of similar quality when compared with free-breathing acquisitions, but with reduced total scan time (85 ± 22 s to 35 ± 6 s; P < 0.001). Supplemental oxygenation and hyperventilation allow for prolonged breath-holding and enable single breath-hold 3D accelerated LGE with similar image quality as free breathing with NAV. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. 2D Free-breathing Dual Navigator-gated Cardiac Function Validated against the 2D Breath-hold Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Dana C.; Nezafat, Reza; Eggers, Holger; Stehning, Christian; Manning, Warren J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To develop and validate a free-breathing cardiac cine acquisition, with potential to simplify cardiac MR studies, provide registered slices and increase spatial resolution. Materials and Methods A 2D free-breathing (FB) navigator-gated cine radial acquisition for cardiac function was developed which used two navigators (one placed prior to the QRS, and another 500 ms after the QRS complex, after systole) to provide complete motion-compensated assessment of systole, without loss of end-diastole. Eleven subjects were studied. Results The 2D FB method provided results visually and quantitatively similar to the 2D breath-hold (BH) methods. Comparison of volumes measured with the free-breathing to those measured by standard 2D BH cine resulted in mean bias ± 2 standard deviations of 1.0 ml ± 13.7 ml, 1.1 ml ± 7.6 ml, 3.0 g ± 18.8 g, and 0.3 %± 2.5%, for end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, and left-ventricular mass, and ejection fraction, respectively. Slice misregistration was identified in 4 (36%) of the BH studies, but none (0%) of the FB studies. In subjects with slice misregistration, there was greater discordance in LV volume measurements (P<0.05 for end-diastolic mass). Conclusion The free-breathing cine acquisition provided results qualitatively and quantitatively similar to 2D breath-hold methods with improved slice registration. PMID:18777547

  1. Contrast-enhanced specific absorption rate-efficient 3D cardiac cine with respiratory-triggered radiofrequency gating.

    PubMed

    Henningsson, Markus; Chan, Raymond H; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois A; Razavi, Reza; Botnar, Rene M; Schaeffter, Tobias; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the use of radiofrequency (RF) gating in conjunction with a paramagnetic contrast agent to reduce the specific absorption rate (SAR) and increase the blood-myocardium contrast in balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) 3D cardiac cine. RF gating was implemented by synchronizing the RF-excitation with an external respiratory sensor (bellows), which could additionally be used for respiratory gating. For reference, respiratory-gated 3D cine images were acquired without RF gating. Free-breathing 3D cine images were acquired in eight healthy subjects before and after contrast injection (Gd-BOPTA) and compared to breath-hold 2D cine. RF-gated 3D cine reduced the SAR by nearly 40% without introducing significant artifacts while providing left ventricle (LV) measurements similar to those obtained with 2D cine. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was significantly higher for 3D cine compared to 2D cine, both before and after contrast injection; however, no statistically significant CNR increase was observed for the postcontrast 3D cine compared to the precontrast acquisitions. Respiratory-triggered RF gating significantly reduces SAR in 3D cine acquisitions, which may enable a more widespread clinical use of 3D cine. Furthermore, CNR of 3D bSSFP cine is higher than of 2D and administration of Gd-BOPTA does not improve the CNR of 3D cine. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Multiview 3-D Echocardiography Fusion with Breath-Hold Position Tracking Using an Optical Tracking System.

    PubMed

    Punithakumar, Kumaradevan; Hareendranathan, Abhilash R; McNulty, Alexander; Biamonte, Marina; He, Allen; Noga, Michelle; Boulanger, Pierre; Becher, Harald

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in echocardiography allow real-time 3-D dynamic image acquisition of the heart. However, one of the major limitations of 3-D echocardiography is the limited field of view, which results in an acquisition insufficient to cover the whole geometry of the heart. This study proposes the novel approach of fusing multiple 3-D echocardiography images using an optical tracking system that incorporates breath-hold position tracking to infer that the heart remains at the same position during different acquisitions. In six healthy male volunteers, 18 pairs of apical/parasternal 3-D ultrasound data sets were acquired during a single breath-hold as well as in subsequent breath-holds. The proposed method yielded a field of view improvement of 35.4 ± 12.5%. To improve the quality of the fused image, a wavelet-based fusion algorithm was developed that computes pixelwise likelihood values for overlapping voxels from multiple image views. The proposed wavelet-based fusion approach yielded significant improvement in contrast (66.46 ± 21.68%), contrast-to-noise ratio (49.92 ± 28.71%), signal-to-noise ratio (57.59 ± 47.85%) and feature count (13.06 ± 7.44%) in comparison to individual views.

  3. Real-time cardiac magnetic resonance cine imaging with sparse sampling and iterative reconstruction for left-ventricular measures: Comparison with gold-standard segmented steady-state free precession.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Gabriel C; Erthal, Fernanda; Sabioni, Leticia; Penna, Filipe; Strecker, Ralph; Schmidt, Michaela; Zenge, Michael O; Lima, Ronaldo de S L; Gottlieb, Ilan

    2017-05-01

    Segmented cine imaging with a steady-state free-precession sequence (Cine-SSFP) is currently the gold standard technique for measuring ventricular volumes and mass, but due to multi breath-hold (BH) requirements, it is prone to misalignment of consecutive slices, time consuming and dependent on respiratory capacity. Real-time cine avoids those limitations, but poor spatial and temporal resolution of conventional sequences has prevented its routine application. We sought to examine the accuracy and feasibility of a newly developed real-time sequence with aggressive under-sampling of k-space using sparse sampling and iterative reconstruction (Cine-RT). Stacks of short-axis cines were acquired covering both ventricles in a 1.5T system using gold standard Cine-SSFP and Cine-RT. Acquisition parameters for Cine-SSFP were: acquisition matrix of 224×196, temporal resolution of 39ms, retrospective gating, with an average of 8 heartbeats per slice and 1-2 slices/BH. For Cine-RT: acquisition matrix of 224×196, sparse sampling net acceleration factor of 11.3, temporal resolution of 41ms, prospective gating, real-time acquisition of 1 heart-beat/slice and all slices in one BH. LV contours were drawn at end diastole and systole to derive LV volumes and mass. Forty-one consecutive patients (15 male; 41±17years) in sinus rhythm were successfully included. All images from Cine-SSFP and Cine-RT were considered to have excellent quality. Cine-RT-derived LV volumes and mass were slightly underestimated but strongly correlated with gold standard Cine-SSFP. Inter- and intra-observer analysis presented similar results between both sequences. Cine-RT featuring sparse sampling and iterative reconstruction can achieve spatial and temporal resolution equivalent to Cine-SSFP, providing excellent image quality, with similar precision measurements and highly correlated and only slightly underestimated volume and mass values. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The physiology and pathophysiology of human breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Peter; Lundgren, Claes E G

    2009-01-01

    This is a brief overview of physiological reactions, limitations, and pathophysiological mechanisms associated with human breath-hold diving. Breath-hold duration and ability to withstand compression at depth are the two main challenges that have been overcome to an amazing degree as evidenced by the current world records in breath-hold duration at 10:12 min and depth of 214 m. The quest for even further performance enhancements continues among competitive breath-hold divers, even if absolute physiological limits are being approached as indicated by findings of pulmonary edema and alveolar hemorrhage postdive. However, a remarkable, and so far poorly understood, variation in individual disposition for such problems exists. Mortality connected with breath-hold diving is primarily concentrated to less well-trained recreational divers and competitive spearfishermen who fall victim to hypoxia. Particularly vulnerable are probably also individuals with preexisting cardiac problems and possibly, essentially healthy divers who may have suffered severe alternobaric vertigo as a complication to inadequate pressure equilibration of the middle ears. The specific topics discussed include the diving response and its expression by the cardiovascular system, which exhibits hypertension, bradycardia, oxygen conservation, arrhythmias, and contraction of the spleen. The respiratory system is challenged by compression of the lungs with barotrauma of descent, intrapulmonary hemorrhage, edema, and the effects of glossopharyngeal insufflation and exsufflation. Various mechanisms associated with hypoxia and loss of consciousness are discussed, including hyperventilation, ascent blackout, fasting, and excessive postexercise O(2) consumption. The potential for high nitrogen pressure in the lungs to cause decompression sickness and N(2) narcosis is also illuminated.

  5. Motion correction using coil arrays (MOCCA) for free-breathing cardiac cine MRI.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peng; Hong, Susie; Moghari, Mehdi H; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois; Kissinger, Kraig V; Hauser, Thomas H; Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza

    2011-08-01

    In this study, we present a motion correction technique using coil arrays (MOCCA) and evaluate its application in free-breathing respiratory self-gated cine MRI. Motion correction technique using coil arrays takes advantages of the fact that motion-induced changes in k-space signal are modulated by individual coil sensitivity profiles. In the proposed implementation of motion correction technique using coil arrays self-gating for free-breathing cine MRI, the k-space center line is acquired at the beginning of each k-space segment for each cardiac cycle with 4 repetitions. For each k-space segment, the k-space center line acquired immediately before was used to select one of the 4 acquired repetitions to be included in the final self-gated cine image by calculating the cross correlation between the k-space center line with a reference line. The proposed method was tested on a cohort of healthy adult subjects for subjective image quality and objective blood-myocardium border sharpness. The method was also tested on a cohort of patients to compare the left and right ventricular volumes and ejection fraction measurements with that of standard breath-hold cine MRI. Our data indicate that the proposed motion correction technique using coil arrays method provides significantly improved image quality and sharpness compared with free-breathing cine without respiratory self-gating and provides similar volume measurements compared with breath-hold cine MRI. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Motion Correction using Coil Arrays (MOCCA) for Free-Breathing Cardiac Cine MRI

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peng; Hong, Susie; Moghari, Mehdi H.; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois; Kissinger, Kraig V.; Hauser, Thomas H.; Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we present a motion compensation technique based on coil arrays (MOCCA) and evaluate its application in free-breathing respiratory self-gated cine MRI. MOCCA takes advantages of the fact that motion-induced changes in k-space signal are modulated by individual coil sensitivity profiles. In the proposed implementation of MOCCA self-gating for free-breathing cine MRI, the k-space center line is acquired at the beginning of each k-space segment for each cardiac cycle with 4 repetitions. For each k-space segment, the k-space center line acquired immediately before was used to select one of the 4 acquired repetitions to be included in the final self-gated cine image by calculating the cross-correlation between the k-space center line with a reference line. The proposed method was tested on a cohort of healthy adult subjects for subjective image quality and objective blood-myocardium border sharpness. The method was also tested on a cohort of patients to compare the left and right ventricular volumes and ejection fraction measurements with that of standard breath-hold cine MRI. Our data indicate that the proposed MOCCA method provides significantly improved image quality and sharpness compared to free-breathing cine without respiratory self-gating, and provides similar volume measurements compared with breath-hold cine MRI. PMID:21773986

  7. Evaluation of QT Dispersion in Children with Breath Holding Spells.

    PubMed

    Movahedian, Amir Hosein; Heidarzadeh Arani, Marzieh; Motaharizad, Davood; Mousavi, Gholam Abbas; Mosayebi, Ziba

    2016-01-01

    Breath holding spells (BHS) are common involuntary reflexes in infancy and early childhood. Differential diagnosis should embrace Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) and paroxysmal abnormalities of rhythm. The aim of this study was to compare QT dispersion (QTd) in children with breath holding spells and normal controls. QT dispersion and Corrected QT(QTc) dispersion were measured in 12 lead surface electrocardiograms in 56 patients with BHS and compared with healthy children of the same age referred to the clinic for regular checkup visits. The most common type of BHS was cyanotic (83.9%). Seven patients (12.5%) had pallid and two patients (3.5%) had mixed spells. There was a history of breath holding spells in 33.9% of the children. QT dispersion was 61.6± 22.5 and 47.1±18.8 ms in patient and control groups, respectively. QTc dispersion (QTcd) was 104 ± 29.6 and 71.9 ±18.2 ms, respectively. There was a significant difference between patient and control groups in terms of QTd and QTcd (P<0.001). QTd and QTcd were increased in children with BHS. Therefore, the evaluation of EKG for early diagnosis of rhythm abnormalities seems reasonable in these children.

  8. Self-Gated Free-Breathing 3D Coronary CINE Imaging with Simultaneous Water and Fat Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Nguyen, Thanh D.; Zhu, Yanchun; Spincemaille, Pascal; Prince, Martin R.; Weinsaft, Jonathan W.; Saloner, David; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a novel technique for acquiring 3-dimensional (3D) coronary CINE magnetic resonance images with both water and fat visualization during free breathing and without external respiratory or cardiac gating. The implemented multi-echo hybrid 3D radial balanced Steady-State Free Precession (SSFP) sequence has an efficient data acquisition and is robust against motion. The k-space center along the slice encoding direction was repeatedly acquired to derive both respiratory and cardiac self-gating signals without an increase in scan time, enabling a free-breathing acquisition. The multi-echo acquisition allowed image reconstruction with water-fat separation, providing improved visualization of the coronary artery lumen. Ten healthy subjects were imaged successfully at 1.5 T, achieving a spatial resolution of 1.0×1.0×3.0 mm3 and scan time of about 5 minutes. The proposed imaging technique provided coronary vessel depiction comparable to that obtained with conventional breath-hold imaging and navigator gated free-breathing imaging. PMID:24586682

  9. Compressed sensing cine imaging with high spatial or high temporal resolution for analysis of left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Juliane; Nensa, Felix; Schemuth, Haemi P; Maderwald, Stefan; Gratz, Marcel; Quick, Harald H; Schlosser, Thomas; Nassenstein, Kai

    2016-08-01

    To assess two compressed sensing cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences with high spatial or high temporal resolution in comparison to a reference steady-state free precession cine (SSFP) sequence for reliable quantification of left ventricular (LV) volumes. LV short axis stacks of two compressed sensing breath-hold cine sequences with high spatial resolution (SPARSE-SENSE HS: temporal resolution: 40 msec, in-plane resolution: 1.0 × 1.0 mm(2) ) and high temporal resolution (SPARSE-SENSE HT: temporal resolution: 11 msec, in-plane resolution: 1.7 × 1.7 mm(2) ) and of a reference cine SSFP sequence (standard SSFP: temporal resolution: 40 msec, in-plane resolution: 1.7 × 1.7 mm(2) ) were acquired in 16 healthy volunteers on a 1.5T MR system. LV parameters were analyzed semiautomatically twice by one reader and once by a second reader. The volumetric agreement between sequences was analyzed using paired t-test, Bland-Altman plots, and Passing-Bablock regression. Small differences were observed between standard SSFP and SPARSE-SENSE HS for stroke volume (SV; -7 ± 11 ml; P = 0.024), ejection fraction (EF; -2 ± 3%; P = 0.019), and myocardial mass (9 ± 9 g; P = 0.001), but not for end-diastolic volume (EDV; P = 0.079) and end-systolic volume (ESV; P = 0.266). No significant differences were observed between standard SSFP and SPARSE-SENSE HT regarding EDV (P = 0.956), SV (P = 0.088), and EF (P = 0.103), but for ESV (3 ± 5 ml; P = 0.039) and myocardial mass (8 ± 10 ml; P = 0.007). Bland-Altman analysis showed good agreement between the sequences (maximum bias ≤ -8%). Two compressed sensing cine sequences, one with high spatial resolution and one with high temporal resolution, showed good agreement with standard SSFP for LV volume assessment. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:366-374. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Technical Note: Measurement of common carotid artery lumen dynamics using black-blood MR cine imaging.

    PubMed

    Dai, Erpeng; Dong, Li; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Lyu; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Xihai; Wang, Jinnan; Yuan, Chun; Guo, Hua

    2017-03-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of measuring the common carotid artery (CCA) lumen dynamics using a black-blood cine (BB-cine) imaging method. Motion-sensitized driven-equilibrium (MSDE) prepared spoiled gradient sequence was used for the BB-cine imaging. CCAs of eleven healthy volunteers were studied using this method. Lumen dynamics, including lumen area evolution waveforms and distension values, were measured and evaluated by comparing this method with bright-blood cine (BrB-cine) imaging. Compared with the BrB-cine images, flow artifacts were effectively suppressed in the BB-cine images. BrB-cine images generally show larger lumen areas than BB-cine images. The lumen area waveforms and distension measurements from BB-cine imaging showed smaller variances among different subjects than BrB-cine imaging. The proposed BB-cine imaging technique can suppress the flow artifacts effectively and reduce the partial volume effects from the vessel wall. This might allow more accurate lumen dynamics measurements than traditional BrB-cine imaging, which may further be valuable for investigating biomechanical and functional properties of the cardiovascular system. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  11. Reduced breath holding index in patients with chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Akgün, Hakan; Taşdemir, Serdar; Ulaş, Ümit Hıdır; Alay, Semih; Çetiz, Ahmet; Yücel, Mehmet; Öz, Oğuzhan; Odabaşı, Zeki; Demirkaya, Şeref

    2015-09-01

    Migraine is a neurovascular disorder characterized by autonomic nervous system dysfunction and severe headache attacks. Studies have shown that changes in the intracranial vessels during migraine have an important role in the pathophysiology. Many studies have been conducted on the increased risk of stroke in patients with migraine, but insufficient data are available on the mechanism underlying the increase. This study aimed to evaluate basal cerebral blood flow velocity and vasomotor reactivity in patients with chronic migraine. We evaluated 38 patients with chronic migraine. Three of them were excluded because they had auras and four of them were excluded because of their use of medication that can affect cerebral blood flow velocity and breath holding index (beta or calcium channel blockers). Our study population consisted of 31 patients with chronic migraine without aura and 29 age- and gender-matched healthy individuals who were not taking any medication. The mean blood flow velocity and breath holding index were measured on both sides from the middle cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery, with temporal window insonation. The breath holding index for middle cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery was significantly lower in the migraine group compared to that of the control group (p < 0.05).The vasomotor reactivity indicates the dilatation potential of a vessel, and it is closely related to autoregulation. According to our results, the vasodilator response of cerebral arterioles to hypercapnia was lower in patients with chronic migraine. These findings showed the existence of impairments in the harmonic cerebral hemodynamic mechanisms in patients with chronic migraine. This finding also supports the existing idea of an increased risk of stroke in patients with chronic migraine due to impaired vasomotor reactivity.

  12. Energy cost and optimisation in breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Trassinelli, M

    2016-05-07

    We present a new model for calculating locomotion costs in breath-hold divers. Starting from basic mechanics principles, we calculate the work that the diver must provide through propulsion to counterbalance the action of drag, the buoyant force and weight during immersion. Compared to those in previous studies, the model presented here accurately analyses breath-hold divers which alternate active swimming with prolonged glides during the dive (as is the case in mammals). The energy cost of the dive is strongly dependent on these prolonged gliding phases. Here we investigate the length and impacts on energy cost of these glides with respect to the diver characteristics, and compare them with those observed in different breath-hold diving species. Taking into account the basal metabolic rate and chemical energy to propulsion transformation efficiency, we calculate optimal swim velocity and the corresponding total energy cost (including metabolic rate) and compare them with observations. Energy cost is minimised when the diver passes through neutral buoyancy conditions during the dive. This generally implies the presence of prolonged gliding phases in both ascent and descent, where the buoyancy (varying with depth) is best used against the drag, reducing energy cost. This is in agreement with past results (Miller et al., 2012; Sato et al., 2013) where, when the buoyant force is considered constant during the dive, the energy cost was minimised for neutral buoyancy. In particular, our model confirms the good physical adaption of dolphins for diving, compared to other breath-hold diving species which are mostly positively buoyant (penguins for example). The presence of prolonged glides implies a non-trivial dependency of optimal speed on maximal depth of the dive. This extends previous findings (Sato et al., 2010; Watanabe et al., 2011) which found no dependency of optimal speed on dive depth for particular conditions. The energy cost of the dive can be further

  13. Optical measures of changes in cerebral vascular tone during voluntary breath holding and a Sternberg memory task.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chin Hong; Low, Kathy A; Schneider-Garces, Nils; Zimmerman, Benjamin; Fletcher, Mark A; Maclin, Edward L; Chiarelli, Antonio M; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2016-07-01

    The human cerebral vasculature responds to changes in blood pressure and demands for oxygenation via cerebral autoregulation. Changes in cerebrovascular tone (vasoconstriction and vasodilation) also mediate the changes in blood flow measured by the BOLD fMRI signal. This cerebrovascular reactivity is known to vary with age. In two experiments, we demonstrate that cerebral pulse parameters measured using optical imaging can quantify changes in cerebral vascular tone, both globally and locally. In experiment 1, 51 older adults (age range=55-87) performed a voluntary breath-holding task while cerebral pulse amplitude measures were taken. We found significant pulse amplitude variations across breath-holding periods, indicating vasodilation during, and vasoconstriction after breath holding. The breath-holding index (BHI), a measure of cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) was derived and found to correlate with age. BHI was also correlated with performance in the Modified Mini-Mental Status Examination, even after controlling for age and education. In experiment 2, the same participants performed a Sternberg task, and changes in regional pulse amplitude between high (set-size 6) and low (set-size 2) task loads were compared. Only task-related areas in the fronto-parietal network (FPN) showed significant reduction in pulse amplitude, indicating vasodilation. Non-task-related areas such as the somatosensory and auditory cortices did not show such reductions. Taken together, these experiments suggest that optical pulse parameters can index changes in brain vascular tone both globally and locally, using both physiological and cognitive load manipulations.

  14. Decompression sickness in breath-hold divers: a review.

    PubMed

    Lemaitre, Frederic; Fahlman, Andreas; Gardette, Bernard; Kohshi, Kiyotaka

    2009-12-01

    Although it has been generally assumed that the risk of decompression sickness is virtually zero during a single breath-hold dive in humans, repeated dives may result in a cumulative increase in the tissue and blood nitrogen tension. Many species of marine mammals perform extensive foraging bouts with deep and long dives interspersed by a short surface interval, and some human divers regularly perform repeated dives to 30-40 m or a single dive to more than 200 m, all of which may result in nitrogen concentrations that elicit symptoms of decompression sickness. Neurological problems have been reported in humans after single or repeated dives and recent necropsy reports in stranded marine mammals were suggestive of decompression sickness-like symptoms. Modelling attempts have suggested that marine mammals may live permanently with elevated nitrogen concentrations and may be at risk when altering their dive behaviour. In humans, non-pathogenic bubbles have been recorded and symptoms of decompression sickness have been reported after repeated dives to modest depths. The mechanisms implicated in these accidents indicate that repeated breath-hold dives with short surface intervals are factors that predispose to decompression sickness. During deep diving, the effect of pulmonary shunts and/or lung collapse may play a major role in reducing the incidence of decompression sickness in humans and marine mammals.

  15. Essential Hypertension: Cardiovascular Response to Breath Hold Combined with Exercise.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, U; Urban, P; Koschate, J; Drescher, U; Pfister, R; Michels, G

    2015-07-01

    Essential hypertension (EH) is a widespread disease and might be prevalent in apnea divers and master athletes. Little is known about the influence of EH and the antihypertensive drugs (AHD) on cardiovascular reactions to combined breath hold (BH) and exercise. In this pilot study, healthy divers (HCON) were compared with treated hypertensive divers with regard to heart rate (HR) and mean blood-pressure (MAP) responses to BH, exercise and the combination of both. Ten subjects with EH and ten healthy divers were tested. 3 different 20 s stimuli were applied: BH combined with 30 W or 150 W and 150 W without BH. The time-charts during the stress intervals and during recovery were compared. Subjects treated with an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor showed higher changes for MAP values if breath hold was performed. HR responses were obviously changed if a β-blocker was part of the medication. One subject showed extreme MAP responses to all stimuli and conspicuous HR if BH was involved. The modulation of HR-/MAP-response in EH subjects depends on the mechanisms of antihypertensive agents. The combination of an ACE inhibitor and a β-blocker may give the best protection. It is recommended to include short apnea tests in the fitness-to-dive examination to individually predict potential endangerment.

  16. 2D free-breathing dual navigator-gated cardiac function validated against the 2D breath-hold acquisition.

    PubMed

    Peters, Dana C; Nezafat, Reza; Eggers, Holger; Stehning, Christian; Manning, Warren J

    2008-09-01

    To develop and validate a free-breathing cardiac cine acquisition, with potential to simplify cardiac MR studies, provide registered slices, and increase spatial resolution. A 2D free-breathing (FB) navigator-gated cine radial acquisition for cardiac function was developed that used two navigators (one placed prior to the QRS, and another 500 msec after the QRS complex, after systole) to provide complete motion-compensated assessment of systole, without loss of end-diastole. Eleven subjects were studied. The 2D FB method provided results visually and quantitatively similar to the 2D breath-hold (BH) methods. Comparison of volumes measured with FB to those measured by standard 2D BH cine resulted in mean bias+/-2 standard deviations of 1.0 mL+/-13.7 mL, 1.1 mL+/-7.6 mL, 3.0 g+/-18.8 g, and 0.3%+/-2.5%, for end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, left ventricular (LV) mass, and ejection fraction, respectively. Slice misregistration was identified in four (36%) of the BH studies, but none (0%) of the FB studies. In subjects with slice misregistration, there was greater discordance in LV volume measurements (P<0.05 for end-diastolic mass). The FB cine acquisition provided results qualitatively and quantitatively similar to 2D BH methods with improved slice registration. Copyright (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Intravenous Gadoxetate Disodium Administration Reduces Breath-holding Capacity in the Hepatic Arterial Phase: A Multi-Center Randomized Placebo-controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, Taylor R.; Motosugi, Utaroh; Middleton, Michael S.; Allen, Brian C.; Jaffe, Tracy A.; Miller, Chad M.; Reeder, Scott B.; Sirlin, Claude B.; Bashir, Mustafa R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine, in a multicenter double-blinded placebo-controlled trial, whether maximal hepatic arterial phase breath-holding duration is affected by gadoxetate disodium administration. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval was obtained for this prospective multi-institutional HIPAA-compliant study; written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. At three sites, a total of 44 volunteers underwent a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examination in which images were acquired before and dynamically after bolus injection of gadoxetate disodium, normal saline, and gadoterate meglumine, administered in random order in a single session. The technologist and volunteer were blinded to the agent. Arterial phase breath-holding duration was timed after each injection, and volunteers reported subjective symptoms. Heart rate (HR) and oxygen saturation were monitored. Images were independently analyzed for motion artifacts by three radiologists. Arterial phase breath-holding duration and motion artifacts after each agent were compared by using the Mann-Whitney U test and the McNemar test. Factors affecting the above outcomes were assessed by using a univariate, multivariable model. Results Arterial phase breath holds were shorter after gadoxetate disodium (mean, 32 seconds ± 19) than after saline (mean, 40 seconds ± 17; P <.001) or gadoterate meglumine (43 seconds ± 21, P < .001) administration. In 80% (35 of 44) of subjects, arterial phase breath holds were shorter after gadoxetate disodium than after both saline and gadoterate meglumine. Three (7%) of 44 volunteers had severe arterial phase motion artifacts after gadoxetate disodium administration, one (2%; P = .62) had them after gadoterate meglumine administration, and none (P = .25) had them after saline administration. HR and oxygen saturation changes were not significantly associated with contrast agent. Conclusion Maximal hepatic arterial phase breath-holding duration is reduced after

  18. Rapidly reversible myocardial edema in patients with acromegaly: assessment with ultrafast T2 mapping in a single-breath-hold MRI sequence.

    PubMed

    Gouya, Hervé; Vignaux, Olivier; Le Roux, Patrick; Chanson, Philippe; Bertherat, Jérome; Bertagna, Xavier; Legmann, Paul

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a single-breath-hold T2-mapping MRI sequence to evaluate the reversibility of myocardial edema in patients treated for acromegaly. Before and after treatment, 15 patients with acromegaly underwent myocardial T2 mapping with an experimental single-breath-hold black-blood fast spin-echo sequence. Myocardial T2 mapping with both a multiple-breath-hold fast spinecho sequence and the experimental sequence also was performed on 14 volunteers. T2 relaxation times were calculated with a standard linear least-squares fit applied to myocardial signal intensity. The T2 relaxation times of patients were compared with those of volunteers and correlated with levels of serum growth hormone and insulinlike growth factor 1. Left ventricular function and mass index were determined with cine MRI. T2 values before treatment were higher in patients (71 +/- 12 milliseconds) than in volunteers (55.9 +/- 3.6 milliseconds) (p = 0.0003). These T2 values in patients decreased soon after treatment (57.6 +/- 6.6 milliseconds, p = 0.0007). This reduction correlates with successful reduction of levels of serum growth hormone and insulinlike growth factor 1. In volunteers, myocardial T2 values did not vary significantly between the single-breath-hold sequence and the multiple-breath-hold fast spin-echo sequence. In patients, myocardial mass and left ventricular function did not differ significantly before and after treatment. Patients with acromegaly have increased myocardial T2 values, which decrease soon after treatment, reflecting reversible myocardial edema. T2 value is more sensitive than left ventricular mass index in the detection of early reversal of acromegalic cardiomyopathy. These results highlight the potential role of MRI in direct assessment of the tissular effects of growth hormone and insulinlike growth factor 1 and in evaluation of the efficacy of treatment.

  19. Alveolar gas composition and exchange during deep breath-hold diving and dry breath holds in elite divers.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, G; Costa, M; Ferrigno, M; Grassi, B; Marconi, C; Lundgren, C E; Cerretelli, P

    1991-02-01

    End tidal O2 and CO2 (PETCO2) pressures, expired volume, blood lactate concentration ([Lab]), and arterial blood O2 saturation [dry breath holds (BHs) only] were assessed in three elite breath-hold divers (ED) before and after deep dives and BH and in nine control subjects (C; BH only). After the dives (depth 40-70 m, duration 88-151 s), end-tidal O2 pressure decreased from approximately 140 Torr to a minimum of 30.6 Torr, PETCO2 increased from approximately 25 Torr to a maximum of 47.0 Torr, and expired volume (BTPS) ranged from 1.32 to 2.86 liters. Pulmonary O2 exchange was 455-1,006 ml. CO2 output approached zero. [Lab] increased from approximately 1.2 mM to at most 6.46 mM. Estimated power output during dives was 513-929 ml O2/min, i.e. approximately 20-30% of maximal O2 consumption. During BH, alveolar PO2 decreased from approximately 130 to less than 30 Torr in ED and from 125 to 45 Torr in C. PETCO2 increased from approximately 30 to approximately 50 Torr in both ED and C. Contrary to C, pulmonary O2 exchange in ED was less than resting O2 consumption, whereas CO2 output approached zero in both groups. [Lab] was unchanged. Arterial blood O2 saturation decreased more in ED than in C. ED are characterized by increased anaerobic metabolism likely due to the existence of a diving reflex.

  20. SU-E-T-450: How Important Is a Reproducible Breath Hold for DIBH Breast Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H; Wentworth, S; Sintay, B; Wiant, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) for left-sided breast cancer has been shown to reduce heart dose. Surface imaging helps to ensure accurate breast positioning, but does not guarantee a reproducible breath hold (BH) at DIBH treatments. We examine the effects of variable BH positions for DIBH treatments. Methods: Twenty-Five patients with free breathing (FB) and DIBH scans were reviewed. Four plans were created for each patient: 1) FB, 2) DIBH, 3) FB-DIBH – the DIBH plans were copied to the FB images and recalculated (image registration was based on breast tissue), and 4) P-DIBH – a partial BH with the heart shifted midway between the FB and DIBH positions. The FB-DIBH plans give “worst case” scenarios for surface imaging DIBH, where the breast is aligned by surface imaging but the patient is not holding their breath. Students t-tests were used to compare dose metrics. Results: The DIBH plans gave lower heart dose and comparable breast coverage versus FB in all cases. The FB-DIBH plans showed no significant difference versus FB plans for breast coverage, mean heart dose, or maximum heart dose (p >= 0.10). The mean heart dose differed between FB-DIBH and FB by < 2 Gy for all cases, the maximum heart dose differed by < 2 Gy for 21 cases. The P-DIBH plans showed significantly lower mean heart dose than FB (p = 0.01). The mean heart doses for the P-DIBH plans were < FB for 22 cases, the maximum dose < FB for 18 cases. Conclusions: A DIBH plan delivered to a FB patient set-up with surface imaging will yield similar dosimetry to a plan created and delivered FB. A DIBH plan delivered with even a partial BH can give reduced heart dose compared to FB techniques when the breast tissue is well aligned.

  1. Clinical experience using a video-guided spirometry system for deep inhalation breath-hold radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wensha; McKenzie, Elizabeth M; Burnison, Michele; Shiao, Stephen; Mirhadi, Amin; Hakimian, Behrooz; Reznik, Robert; Tuli, Richard; Sandler, Howard; Fraass, Benedick A

    2015-03-08

    The purpose was to report clinical experience of a video-guided spirometry system in applying deep inhalation breath-hold (DIBH) radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer, and to study the systematic and random uncertainties, intra- and interfraction motion and impact on cardiac dose associated with DIBH. The data from 28 left-sided breast cancer patients treated with spirometer-guided DIBH radiation were studied. Dosimetric comparisons between free-breathing (FB) and DIBH plans were performed. The distance between the heart and chest wall measured on the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) and MV portal images, dDRR(DIBH) and dport(DIBH), respectively, was compared as a measure of DIBH setup uncertainty. The difference (Δd) between dDRR(DIBH) and dport(DIBH) was defined as the systematic uncertainty. The standard deviation of Δd for each patient was defined as the random uncertainty. MV cine images during radiation were acquired. Affine registrations of the cine images acquired during one fraction and multiple fractions were performed to study the intra- and interfraction motion of the chest wall. The median chest wall motion was used as the metric for intra- and interfraction analysis. Breast motions in superior-inferior (SI) direction and "AP" (defined on the DRR or MV portal image as the direction perpendicular to the SI direction) are reported. Systematic and random uncertainties of 3.8 mm and 2mm, respectively, were found for this spirometer-guided DIBH treatment. MV cine analysis showed that intrafraction chest wall motions during DIBH were 0.3mm in "AP" and 0.6 mm in SI. The interfraction chest wall motions were 3.6 mm in "AP" and 3.4 mm in SI. Utilization of DIBH with this spirometry system led to a statistically significant reduction of cardiac dose relative to FB treatment. The DIBH using video-guided spirometry provided reproducible cardiac sparing with minimal intra- and interfraction chest wall motion, and thus is a valuable adjunct to modern

  2. Hemodynamic adjustments during breath-holding in trained divers.

    PubMed

    Costalat, Guillaume; Coquart, Jeremy; Castres, Ingrid; Tourny, Claire; Lemaitre, Frederic

    2013-10-01

    Voluntary breath-holding (BH) elicits several hemodynamic changes, but little is known about maximal static immersed-body BH. We hypothesized that the diving reflex would be strengthened with body immersion and would spare more oxygen than maximal dry static BH, resulting in a longer BH duration. Eleven trained breath-hold divers (BHDs) performed a maximal dry-body BH and a maximal immersed-body BH. Cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), heart rate (HR), left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), contractility index (CTI), and ventricular ejection time (VET) were continuously recorded by bio-impedancemetry (PhysioFlow PF-05). Arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) was assessed with a finger probe oximeter. In both conditions, BHDs presented a bi-phasic kinetic for CO and a tri-phasic kinetic for SV and HR. In the first phase of immersed-body BH and dry-body BH, results (mean ± SD) expressed as percentage changes from starting values showed decreased CO (55.9 ± 10.4 vs. 39.3 ± 16.8 %, respectively; p < 0.01 between conditions), due to drops in both SV (24.9 ± 16.2 vs. 9.0 ± 8.5 %, respectively; p < 0.05 between conditions) and HR (39.7 ± 16.7 vs. 33.6 ± 17.0 %, respectively; p < 0.01 between conditions). The second phase was marked by an overall stabilization of hemodynamic variables. In the third one, CO kept stabilizing due to increased SV (17.0 ± 20.2 vs. 10.9 ± 13.8 %, respectively; p < 0.05 between conditions) associated with a second HR drop (14.0 ± 10.0 vs. 12.7 ± 8.9 %, respectively; p < 0.01 between conditions). This study highlights similar time-course patterns for cardiodynamic variables during dry-body and immersed-body BH, although the phenomenon was more pronounced in the latter condition.

  3. The Ins and Outs of Breath Holding: Simple Demonstrations of Complex Respiratory Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skow, Rachel J.; Day, Trevor A.; Fuller, Jonathan E.; Bruce, Christina D.; Steinback, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    The physiology of breath holding is complex, and voluntary breath-hold duration is affected by many factors, including practice, psychology, respiratory chemoreflexes, and lung stretch. In this activity, we outline a number of simple laboratory activities or classroom demonstrations that illustrate the complexity of the integrative physiology…

  4. The Ins and Outs of Breath Holding: Simple Demonstrations of Complex Respiratory Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skow, Rachel J.; Day, Trevor A.; Fuller, Jonathan E.; Bruce, Christina D.; Steinback, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    The physiology of breath holding is complex, and voluntary breath-hold duration is affected by many factors, including practice, psychology, respiratory chemoreflexes, and lung stretch. In this activity, we outline a number of simple laboratory activities or classroom demonstrations that illustrate the complexity of the integrative physiology…

  5. Free-breathing steady-state free precession cine cardiac magnetic resonance with respiratory navigator gating.

    PubMed

    Moghari, Mehdi H; Komarlu, Rukmini; Annese, David; Geva, Tal; Powell, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    To develop and validate a respiratory motion compensation method for free-breathing cardiac cine imaging. A free-breathing navigator-gated cine steady-state free precession acquisition (Cine-Nav) was developed which preserves the equilibrium state of the net magnetization vector, maintains the high spatial and temporal resolutions of standard breath-hold (BH) acquisition, and images entire cardiac cycle. Cine image data is accepted only from cardiac cycles occurring entirely during end-expiration. Prospective validation was performed in 10 patients by obtaining in each three complete ventricular image stacks with different respiratory motion compensation approaches: (1) BH, (2) free-breathing with 3 signal averages (3AVG), and (3) free-breathing with Cine-Nav. The subjective image quality score (1 = worst, 4 = best) for Cine-Nav (3.8 ± 0.4) was significantly better than for 3AVG (2.2 ± 0.5, P = 0.002), and similar to BH (4.0 ± 0.0, P = 0.13). The blood-to-myocardium contrast ratio for Cine-Nav (6.3 ± 1.5) was similar to BH (5.9 ± 1.6, P = 0.52) and to 3AVG (5.6 ± 2.5, P = 0.43). There were no significant differences between Cine-Nav and BH for the ventricular volumes and mass. In contrast, there were significant differences between 3AVG and BH in all of these measurements but right ventricular mass. Free-breathing cine imaging with Cine-Nav yielded comparable image quality and ventricular measurements to BH, and was superior to 3AVG. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Alveolar gas composition before and after maximal breath-holds in competitive divers.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, P; Lundgren, C E G

    2006-01-01

    The urge to breathe, as stimulated by hypercapnia, is generally considered to cause a breath-hold diver to end the breath-hold, and pre-breath hold hyperventilation has been suggested to cause hypoxic loss of consciousness (LOC) due to the reduced urge to breathe. Competitors hyperventilate before "Static Apnea", yet only 10% surface with symptoms of hypoxia such as loss of motor control (LMC) or LOC. We hypothesized that the extensive hyperventilation would prevent hypercapnia even during prolonged breath-holding and we also recorded breaking-point end-tidal PO2 in humans. Nine breath-hold divers performed breath-holds of maximal duration according to their chosen "Static Apnea" procedure. They floated face down in a swimming pool (28 degrees C). The only non-standard procedure was that they exhaled into a sampling tube for end-expiratory air, before starting the breath-hold and before resuming breathing. Breath-hold duration was 284 +/- 25 (SD) seconds. End-tidal PCO2 was 18.9 +/- 2.0 mmHg before apnea and 38.3 +/- 4.7 mmHg at apnea termination. End-tidal PO2 was 131.7 +/- 2.7 mmHg before apnea and 26.9 +/- 7.5 mmHg at apnea termination. Two of the subjects showed LMC after exhaling into the sampling tube; their end-tidal PAO2 values were 19.6 and 21.0 mmHg, respectively. End-tidal CO2 was normocapnic or hypocapnic at the termination of breath-holds. These data suggest that the athletes rely primarily on the hypoxic stimuli, probably in interaction with CO2 stimuli to determine when to end breath-holds. The severity of hypoxia close to LOC was similar to that reported for acute hypobaric hypoxia in humans.

  7. SU-F-BRB-03: Quantifying Patient Motion During Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Using the ABC System with Simultaneous Surface Photogrammetry

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Y; Rahimi, A; Sawant, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Active breathing control (ABC) has been used to reduce treatment margin due to respiratory organ motion by enforcing temporary breath-holds. However, in practice, even if the ABC device indicates constant lung volume during breath-hold, the patient may still exhibit minor chest motion. Consequently, therapists are given a false sense of security that the patient is immobilized. This study aims at quantifying such motion during ABC breath-holds by monitoring the patient chest motion using a surface photogrammetry system, VisionRT. Methods: A female patient with breast cancer was selected to evaluate chest motion during ABC breath-holds. During the entire course of treatment, the patient’s chest surface was monitored by a surface photogrammetry system, VisionRT. Specifically, a user-defined region-of-interest (ROI) on the chest surface was selected for the system to track at a rate of ∼3Hz. The surface motion was estimated by rigid image registration between the current ROI image captured and a reference image. The translational and rotational displacements computed were saved in a log file. Results: A total of 20 fractions of radiation treatment were monitored by VisionRT. After removing noisy data, we obtained chest motion of 79 breath-hold sessions. Mean chest motion in AP direction during breath-holds is 1.31mm with 0.62mm standard deviation. Of the 79 sessions, the patient exhibited motion ranging from 0–1 mm (30 sessions), 1–2 mm (37 sessions), 2–3 mm (11 sessions) and >3 mm (1 session). Conclusion: Contrary to popular assumptions, the patient is not completely still during ABC breath-hold sessions. In this particular case studied, the patient exhibited chest motion over 2mm in 14 out of 79 breath-holds. Underestimating treatment margin for radiation therapy with ABC could reduce treatment effectiveness due to geometric miss or overdose of critical organs. The senior author receives research funding from NIH, VisionRT, Varian Medical Systems

  8. Free-breathing Sparse Sampling Cine MR Imaging with Iterative Reconstruction for the Assessment of Left Ventricular Function and Mass at 3.0 T.

    PubMed

    Sudarski, Sonja; Henzler, Thomas; Haubenreisser, Holger; Dösch, Christina; Zenge, Michael O; Schmidt, Michaela; Nadar, Mariappan S; Borggrefe, Martin; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Papavassiliu, Theano

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To prospectively evaluate the accuracy of left ventricle (LV) analysis with a two-dimensional real-time cine true fast imaging with steady-state precession (trueFISP) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequence featuring sparse data sampling with iterative reconstruction (SSIR) performed with and without breath-hold (BH) commands at 3.0 T. Materials and Methods Ten control subjects (mean age, 35 years; range, 25-56 years) and 60 patients scheduled to undergo a routine cardiac examination that included LV analysis (mean age, 58 years; range, 20-86 years) underwent a fully sampled segmented multiple BH cine sequence (standard of reference) and a prototype undersampled SSIR sequence performed during a single BH and during free breathing (non-BH imaging). Quantitative analysis of LV function and mass was performed. Linear regression, Bland-Altman analysis, and paired t testing were performed. Results Similar to the results in control subjects, analysis of the 60 patients showed excellent correlation with the standard of reference for single-BH SSIR (r = 0.93-0.99) and non-BH SSIR (r = 0.92-0.98) for LV ejection fraction (EF), volume, and mass (P < .0001 for all). Irrespective of breath holding, LV end-diastolic mass was overestimated with SSIR (standard of reference: 163.9 g ± 58.9, single-BH SSIR: 178.5 g ± 62.0 [P < .0001], non-BH SSIR: 175.3 g ± 63.7 [P < .0001]); the other parameters were not significantly different (EF: 49.3% ± 11.9 with standard of reference, 48.8% ± 11.8 with single-BH SSIR, 48.8% ± 11 with non-BH SSIR; P = .03 and P = .12, respectively). Bland-Altman analysis showed similar measurement errors for single-BH SSIR and non-BH SSIR when compared with standard of reference measurements for EF, volume, and mass. Conclusion Assessment of LV function with SSIR at 3.0 T is noninferior to the standard of reference irrespective of BH commands. LV mass, however, is overestimated with SSIR. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available

  9. SU-E-J-236: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Breath-Hold Lung Tumor Position Reproducibility Measured with 4D MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P; Greer, P; Lapuz, C; Ludbrook, J; Kim, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Audiovisual biofeedback breath-hold (AVBH) was employed to reproduce tumor position on inhale and exhale breath-holds for 4D tumor information. We hypothesize that lung tumor position will be more consistent using AVBH compared with conventional breath-hold (CBH). Methods: Lung tumor positions were determined for seven lung cancer patients (age: 25 – 74) during to two separate 3T MRI sessions. A breathhold training session was performed prior to the MRI sessions to allow patients to become comfortable with AVBH and their exhale and inhale target positions. CBH and AVBH 4D image datasets were obtained in the first MRI session (pre-treatment) and the second MRI session (midtreatment) within six weeks of the first session. Audio-instruction (MRI: Siemens Skyra) in CBH and verbal-instruction (radiographer) in AVBH were used. A radiation oncologist contoured the lung tumor using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems); tumor position was quantified as the centroid of the contoured tumor after rigid registration based on vertebral anatomy across two MRI sessions. CBH and AVBH were compared in terms of the reproducibility assessed via (1) the difference between the two exhale positions for the two sessions and the two inhale positions for the sessions. (2) The difference in amplitude (exhale to inhale) between the two sessions. Results: Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of two exhale (or inhale) lung tumor positions relative to each other by 33%, from 6.4±5.3 mm to 4.3±3.0 mm (p=0.005). Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of exhale and inhale amplitude by 66%, from 5.6±5.9 mm to 1.9±1.4 mm (p=0.005). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be utilized for improving the reproducibility of breath-hold lung tumor position. These results are advantageous towards achieving more accurate emerging radiation treatment planning methods, in addition to imaging and treatment modalities utilizing breath-hold

  10. Respiratory hypoalgesia? Breath-holding, but not respiratory phase modulates nociceptive flexion reflex and pain intensity.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Hassan; Van de Broek, Karlien; Plaghki, Léon; Vlaeyen, Johan W S; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2016-03-01

    Several observations suggest that respiratory phase (inhalation vs. exhalation) and post-inspiratory breath-holds could modulate pain and the nociceptive reflex. This experiment aimed to investigate the role of both mechanisms. Thirty-two healthy participants received supra-threshold electrocutaneous stimulations to elicit both the Nociceptive Flexion Reflex (NFR) and pain, either during spontaneous inhalations or exhalations, or during three types of instructed breath-holds: following exhalation, at mid-inhalation and at full-capacity inhalation. Whether the electrocutaneous stimulus was applied during inhalation or exhalation did not affect the NFR or pain. Self-reported pain was reduced and the NFR was increased during breath-holding compared to spontaneous breathing. Whereas the type of breath-hold did not impact on self-reported pain, breath-holds at full-capacity inhalation and following exhalation were associated with a lower NFR amplitude compared to breath-holds at mid-inhalation. The present findings confirm that breath-holding can modulate pain (sensitivity) and suggest that both attentional distraction and changes in vagal activity may underlie the observed effects.

  11. Two-dimensional sonographic cine imaging improves confidence in the initial evaluation of the fetal heart.

    PubMed

    Poole, Patricia Sims; Chung, Romy; Lacoursiere, Yvette; Palmieri, Carolina Rossi; Hull, Andrew; Engelkemier, Dawn; Rochelle, Michele; Trivedi, Neha; Pretorius, Dolores H

    2013-06-01

    Initial screening sonography of the fetal heart with static images is often inadequate, resulting in repeated imaging or failure to detect abnormalities. We hypothesized that the addition of short cine clips would reduce the need for repeated imaging. Two-dimensional (2D) static sonograms and short 2D cine clips of the 4-chamber view and left and right ventricular outflow tracts were obtained from 342 patients with gestational ages of greater than 16 weeks. A diagnostic radiologist and a perinatologist retrospectively reviewed the static and cine images independently and graded them as normal, abnormal, or suboptimal. A statistically significant increase in the number of structures called normal was seen when 2D cine clips were added to static imaging for both observers (P < .05); the radiologist called 86.5% normal with combined static and cine images versus 61.9% with static images alone, whereas the perinatologist recorded 68.1% as normal versus 58.8%, respectively. The radiologist called 77.8% of structures normal with cine images only versus 61.9% with static images only (P < .001), whereas the perinatologist called fewer structures normal with cine images alone (38.9%) versus static images alone (58.8%). The use of cine loops alone resulted in no significant increase in the ability to clear the heart as normal. The maternal body mass index was inversely associated with the ability to clear structures when 2D cine images were added to static images (P < .05). The addition of 2D cine clips to standard 2D static imaging of the fetal heart significantly improves the number of structures cleared as normal. Two-dimensional cine clips are easily obtained, add little time to a study, and require minimal archival space.

  12. Measuring vascular reactivity with resting-state blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal fluctuations: A potential alternative to the breath-holding challenge?

    PubMed

    Jahanian, Hesamoddin; Christen, Thomas; Moseley, Michael E; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Wright, Clinton B; Tamura, Manjula K; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of the ability of blood vessels to dilate and constrict, known as vascular reactivity, is often performed with breath-holding tasks that transiently raise arterial blood carbon dioxide (PaCO2) levels. However, following the proper commands for a breath-holding experiment may be difficult or impossible for many patients. In this study, we evaluated two approaches for obtaining vascular reactivity information using blood oxygenation level-dependent signal fluctuations obtained from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data: physiological fluctuation regression and coefficient of variation of the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signal. We studied a cohort of 28 older adults (69 ± 7 years) and found that six of them (21%) could not perform the breath-holding protocol, based on an objective comparison with an idealized respiratory waveform. In the subjects that could comply, we found a strong linear correlation between data extracted from spontaneous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signal fluctuations and the blood oxygenation level-dependent percentage signal change during breath-holding challenge ( R(2 )= 0.57 and 0.61 for resting-state physiological fluctuation regression and resting-state coefficient of variation methods, respectively). This technique may eliminate the need for subject cooperation, thus allowing the evaluation of vascular reactivity in a wider range of clinical and research conditions in which it may otherwise be impractical.

  13. New developments in imaging: Sonography, cine-CT, MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, R.J.; Higgins, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    The book can be conveniently subdivided into three sections: the first on magnetic resonance imaging the second on cine-computed tomography and the third on advances in ultrasound (US). The MR imaging section includes two chapters: the first on indications for MR in abdominal disease (a cookbook layout of indications for MR imaging versus CT) and the second on MR imaging of the heart. There are also chapters on MR imaging and US in the pelvis, contrast agent principles, and a chapter on imaging renal tumors. The third section, on US, contains chapters on the liver and gastrointenstinal disease, interventional US sonography during neurosurgery, state-of-the-art echocardiography. Doppler flow imaging, contrast media for sonography, endometrial sonography, and high-resolution US in the first trimester. The final chapter is presented as a scientific paper rather than as a chapter in a book and has no illustrations.

  14. Breath-Hold Target Localization With Simultaneous Kilovoltage/Megavoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Fast Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Blessing, Manuel; Stsepankou, Dzmitry; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Arns, Anna; Lohr, Frank; Hesser, Juergen; Wenz, Frederik

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated high-dose radiotherapy for small lung tumors has typically been based on stereotaxy. Cone-beam computed tomography and breath-hold techniques have provided a noninvasive basis for precise cranial and extracranial patient positioning. The cone-beam computed tomography acquisition time of 60 s, however, is beyond the breath-hold capacity of patients, resulting in respiratory motion artifacts. By combining megavoltage (MV) and kilovoltage (kV) photon sources (mounted perpendicularly on the linear accelerator) and accelerating the gantry rotation to the allowed limit, the data acquisition time could be reduced to 15 s. Methods and Materials: An Elekta Synergy 6-MV linear accelerator, with iViewGT as the MV- and XVI as the kV-imaging device, was used with a Catphan phantom and an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. Both image sources performed continuous image acquisition, passing an angle interval of 90{sup o} within 15 s. For reconstruction, filtered back projection on a graphics processor unit was used. It reconstructed 100 projections acquired to a 512 x 512 x 512 volume within 6 s. Results: The resolution in the Catphan phantom (CTP528 high-resolution module) was 3 lines/cm. The spatial accuracy was within 2-3 mm. The diameters of different tumor shapes in the thorax phantom were determined within an accuracy of 1.6 mm. The signal-to-noise ratio was 68% less than that with a 180{sup o}-kV scan. The dose generated to acquire the MV frames accumulated to 82.5 mGy, and the kV contribution was <6 mGy. Conclusion: The present results have shown that fast breath-hold, on-line volume imaging with a linear accelerator using simultaneous kV-MV cone-beam computed tomography is promising and can potentially be used for image-guided radiotherapy for lung cancer patients in the near future.

  15. A Technique for Generating Volumetric Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Harris, Wendy; Ren, Lei; Cai, Jing; Zhang, You; Chang, Zheng; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a techique to generate on-board volumetric cine-magnetic resonance imaging (VC-MRI) using patient prior images, motion modeling, and on-board 2-dimensional cine MRI. One phase of a 4-dimensional MRI acquired during patient simulation is used as patient prior images. Three major respiratory deformation patterns of the patient are extracted from 4-dimensional MRI based on principal-component analysis. The on-board VC-MRI at any instant is considered as a deformation of the prior MRI. The deformation field is represented as a linear combination of the 3 major deformation patterns. The coefficients of the deformation patterns are solved by the data fidelity constraint using the acquired on-board single 2-dimensional cine MRI. The method was evaluated using both digital extended-cardiac torso (XCAT) simulation of lung cancer patients and MRI data from 4 real liver cancer patients. The accuracy of the estimated VC-MRI was quantitatively evaluated using volume-percent-difference (VPD), center-of-mass-shift (COMS), and target tracking errors. Effects of acquisition orientation, region-of-interest (ROI) selection, patient breathing pattern change, and noise on the estimation accuracy were also evaluated. Image subtraction of ground-truth with estimated on-board VC-MRI shows fewer differences than image subtraction of ground-truth with prior image. Agreement between normalized profiles in the estimated and ground-truth VC-MRI was achieved with less than 6% error for both XCAT and patient data. Among all XCAT scenarios, the VPD between ground-truth and estimated lesion volumes was, on average, 8.43 ± 1.52% and the COMS was, on average, 0.93 ± 0.58 mm across all time steps for estimation based on the ROI region in the sagittal cine images. Matching to ROI in the sagittal view achieved better accuracy when there was substantial breathing pattern change. The technique was robust against noise levels up to SNR = 20. For

  16. Cardiac Repolarization Changes in the Children with Breath-Holding Spells

    PubMed Central

    Amoozgar, Hamid; Saleh, Fazl; Farhani, Nahal; Rafiei, Mohammad; Inaloo, Soroor; Asadipooya, Ali-Akbar

    2013-01-01

    Objective Breath-holding spells are known as benign attacks, frequencies of which decrease by the development of the autonomic nervous system. The present study aims to compare the electrocardiographic repolarization in children with breath-holding spells. Methods In this study, QT dispersion, QTc dispersion, T peak to T end dispersion, and P wave dispersion of the twelve-lead surface electrocardiography of fifty children who had breath-holding spells were measured and compared with normal children from April 2011 to August 2012. Findings Forty-four (88%) patients had cyanotic spells, while 6 (12%) had pallid spells. QTc dispersion was increased in the patients with breath-holding spells (148.2±33.1) compared to the healthy children (132±27.3) and the difference was statically significant (P = 0.01). Meanwhile, no statistically significant differences were observed between the patients and the control subjects regarding the other parameters (P > 0.05). Conclusion QTc dispersion was significantly increased in the patients with breath-holding spells compared to normal children and this is a sign of cardiac repolarization abnormality as well as the increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia in patients with breath-holding spells. PMID:24910749

  17. Detection of diminished response to cold pressor test in smokers: assessment using phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging of the coronary sinus.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shingo; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Yoon, Yeonyee E; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nagata, Motonori; Takase, Shinichi; Nakamori, Shiro; Ito, Masaaki; Sakuma, Hajime

    2014-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the reproducibility for measuring the cold pressor test (CPT)-induced myocardial blood flow (MBF) alteration using phase-contrast (PC) cine MRI, and to determine if this approach could detect altered MBF response to CPT in smokers. After obtaining informed consent, ten healthy male non-smokers (mean age: 28±5 years) and ten age-matched male smokers (smoking duration ≥5 years, mean age: 28±3 years) were examined in this institutional review board approved study. Breath-hold PC cine MR images of the coronary sinus were obtained with a 3T MR imager with 32 channel coils at rest and during a CPT performed after immersing one foot in ice water. MBF was calculated as coronary sinus flow divided by the left ventricular (LV) mass which was given as a total LV myocardial volume measured on cine MRI multiplied by the specific gravity (1.05 g/mL). In non-smokers, MBF was 0.86±0.25 mL/min/g at rest, with a significant increase to 1.20±0.36 mL/min/g seen during CPT (percentage change of MBF (∆MBF (%)); 39.2%±14.4%, p<0.001). Inter-study reproducibility for ∆MBF (%) measurements by different MR technologist was good, as indicated by the intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.93 and reproducibility coefficient of 10.5%. There was no significant difference between smokers and non-smokers for resting MBF (0.85±0.32 mL/min/g, p=0.91). However, ∆MBF (%) in smokers was significantly reduced (-4.0±32.2% vs. 39.2±14.4%, p=0.011). PC cine MRI can be used to reproducibly quantify MBF response to CPT and to detect impaired flow response in smokers. This MR approach may be useful for monitoring the sequential change of coronary blood flow in various potentially pathologic conditions and for investigating its relationship with cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Whole-heart magnetic resonance coronary angiography with multiple breath-holds and automatic breathing-level tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhara, Shigehide; Ninomiya, Ayako; Okada, Tomohisa; Kanao, Shotaro; Kamae, Toshikazu; Togashi, Kaori

    2010-05-01

    Whole-heart (WH) magnetic resonance coronary angiography (MRCA) studies are usually performed during free breathing while monitoring the position of the diaphragm with real-time motion correction. However, this results in a long scan time and the patient's breathing pattern may change, causing the study to be aborted. Alternatively, WH MRCA can be performed with multiple breath-holds (mBH). However, one problem in the mBH method is that patients cannot hold their breath at the same position every time, leading to image degradation. We have developed a new WH MRCA imaging method that employs both the mBH method and automatic breathing-level tracking to permit automatic tracking of the changes in breathing or breath-hold levels. Evaluation of its effects on WH MRCA image quality showed that this method can provide high-quality images within a shorter scan time. This proposed method is expected to be very useful in clinical WH MRCA studies.

  19. Respiration-correlated treatment delivery using feedback-guided breath hold: A technical study

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Christopher; Starkschall, George; Balter, Peter; Fitzpatrick, Mathew J.; Antolak, John A.; Tolani, Naresh; Prado, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory motion causes movement of internal structures in the thorax and abdomen, making accurate delivery of radiation therapy to tumors in those areas a challenge. To reduce the uncertainties caused by this motion, we have developed feedback-guided breath hold (FGBH), a novel delivery technique in which radiation is delivered only during a voluntary breath hold that is sustained for as long as the patient feels comfortable. Here we present the technical aspects of FGBH, which involve (1) fabricating the hardware so the respiratory trace can be displayed to the patient, (2) assembling a delay box to be used as a breath-hold detector, and (3) performing quality control tests to ensure that FGBH can be delivered accurately and safely. A commercial respiratory tracking system that uses an external fiducial to monitor abdominal wall motion generates and displays the breathing trace and specific positions in the breathing cycle where a breath hold needs to occur. Hardware was developed to present this display to the patient in the treatment position. Patients view the presentation either on a liquid crystal display or through a pair of virtual reality goggles. Using the respiratory trace as a visual aid, the patient performs a breath hold so that the position representing the location of a fiducial is held within a specified gating window. A delay box was fabricated to differentiate between gating signals received during free breathing and those received during breath hold, allowing radiation delivery only when the fiducial was within the breath-hold gating window. A quality control analysis of the gating delay box and the integrated system was performed to ensure that all of the hardware and components were ready for clinical use.

  20. Risk of Neurological Insult in Competitive Deep Breath-Hold Diving.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, Kay; Schöppenthau, Holger; Schipke, Jochen D

    2017-02-01

    It has been widely believed that tissue nitrogen uptake from the lungs during breath-hold diving would be insufficient to cause decompression stress in humans. With competitive free diving, however, diving depths have been ever increasing over the past decades. A case is presented of a competitive free-diving athlete who suffered stroke-like symptoms after surfacing from his last dive of a series of 3 deep breath-hold dives. A literature and Web search was performed to screen for similar cases of subjects with serious neurological symptoms after deep breath-hold dives. A previously healthy 31-y-old athlete experienced right-sided motor weakness and difficulty speaking immediately after surfacing from a breathhold dive to a depth of 100 m. He had performed 2 preceding breath-hold dives to that depth with surface intervals of only 15 min. The presentation of symptoms and neuroimaging findings supported a clinical diagnosis of stroke. Three more cases of neurological insults were retrieved by literature and Web search; in all cases the athletes presented with stroke-like symptoms after single breath-hold dives of depths exceeding 100 m. Two of these cases only had a short delay to recompression treatment and completely recovered from the insult. This report highlights the possibility of neurological insult, eg, stroke, due to cerebral arterial gas embolism as a consequence of decompression stress after deep breath-hold dives. Thus, stroke as a clinical presentation of cerebral arterial gas embolism should be considered another risk of extreme breath-hold diving.

  1. Cine viability magnetic resonance imaging of the heart without increased scan time.

    PubMed

    Hassanein, Azza S; Khalifa, Ayman M; Ibrahim, El-Sayed H

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides information about myocardial morphology, function, and viability from cine, tagged, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images, respectively. While the cine and tagged images are acquired in a time-resolved fashion, the LGE images are acquired at a single timeframe. The purpose of this work is to develop a method for generating cine LGE images without additional scan time. The motion field is extracted from the tagged images, and is then used to guide the deformation of the infarcted region from the acquired LGE image at the acquired timeframe to any other timeframe. Major techniques for motion estimation, including harmonic phase (HARP) and optical flow analysis, are tested in this work for motion estimation. The proposed method is tested on numerical phantom and images from four human subjects. The generated cine LGE images showed both viability and wall motion information in the same set of images without additional scan time or image misregistration problems. The band-pass optical flow analysis resulted in the most accurate motion estimation compared to other methods, especially HARP, which fails to track points at the myocardial boundary. Infarct transmurality from the generated images showed good agreement with myocardial strain, and wall thickening showed good agreement with that measured from conventional cine images. In conclusion, the developed technique allows for generating cine LGE images that enable simultaneous display of wall motion and viability information. The generated images could be useful for estimating myocardial contractility reserve and for treatment prognosis.

  2. Spirometer-controlled cine magnetic resonance imaging used to diagnose tracheobronchomalacia in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ciet, Pierluigi; Wielopolski, Piotr; Manniesing, Rashindra; Lever, Sandra; de Bruijne, Marleen; Morana, Giovanni; Muzzio, Pier Carlo; Lequin, Maarten H; Tiddens, Harm A W M

    2014-01-01

    Tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) is defined as an excessive collapse of the intrathoracic trachea. Bronchoscopy is the gold standard for diagnosing TBM; however it has major disadvantages, such as general anaesthesia. Cine computed tomography (CT) is a noninvasive alternative used to diagnose TBM, but its use in children is restricted by ionising radiation. Our aim was to evaluate the feasibility of spirometer-controlled cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an alternative to cine-CT in a retrospective study. 12 children with a mean age (range) of 12 years (7-17 years), suspected of having TBM, underwent cine-MRI. Static scans were acquired at end-inspiration and expiration covering the thorax using a three-dimensional spoiled gradient echo sequence. Three-dimensional dynamic scans were performed covering only the central airways. TBM was defined as a decrease of the trachea or bronchi diameter >50% at end-expiration in the static and dynamic scans. The success rate of the cine-MRI protocol was 92%. Cine-MRI was compared with bronchoscopy or chest CT in seven subjects. TBM was diagnosed by cine-MRI in seven (58%) out of 12 children and was confirmed by bronchoscopy or CT. In four patients, cine-MRI demonstrated tracheal narrowing that was not present in the static scans. Spirometer controlled cine-MRI is a promising technique to assess TBM in children and has the potential to replace bronchoscopy.

  3. Deep Inspiration Breath Hold-Based Radiation Therapy: A Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Knopf, Antje-Christin; Simeonova-Chergou, Anna; Wertz, Hansjörg; Stieler, Florian; Jahnke, Anika; Jahnke, Lennart; Fleckenstein, Jens; Vogel, Lena; Arns, Anna; Blessing, Manuel; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Several recent developments in linear accelerator-based radiation therapy (RT) such as fast multileaf collimators, accelerated intensity modulation paradigms like volumeric modulated arc therapy and flattening filter-free (FFF) high-dose-rate therapy have dramatically shortened the duration of treatment fractions. Deliverable photon dose distributions have approached physical complexity limits as a consequence of precise dose calculation algorithms and online 3-dimensional image guided patient positioning (image guided RT). Simultaneously, beam quality and treatment speed have continuously been improved in particle beam therapy, especially for scanned particle beams. Applying complex treatment plans with steep dose gradients requires strategies to mitigate and compensate for motion effects in general, particularly breathing motion. Intrafractional breathing-related motion results in uncertainties in dose delivery and thus in target coverage. As a consequence, generous margins have been used, which, in turn, increases exposure to organs at risk. Particle therapy, particularly with scanned beams, poses additional problems such as interplay effects and range uncertainties. Among advanced strategies to compensate breathing motion such as beam gating and tracking, deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) gating is particularly advantageous in several respects, not only for hypofractionated, high single-dose stereotactic body RT of lung, liver, and upper abdominal lesions but also for normofractionated treatment of thoracic tumors such as lung cancer, mediastinal lymphomas, and breast cancer. This review provides an in-depth discussion of the rationale and technical implementation of DIBH gating for hypofractionated and normofractionated RT of intrathoracic and upper abdominal tumors in photon and proton RT.

  4. Evaluation of pulmonary function using single-breath-hold dual-energy computed tomography with xenon: Results of a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kyoyama, Hiroyuki; Hirata, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Sakai, Kosuke; Saito, Yuriko; Mikami, Shintaro; Moriyama, Gaku; Yanagita, Hisami; Watanabe, Wataru; Otani, Katharina; Honda, Norinari; Uematsu, Kazutsugu

    2017-01-01

    Xenon-enhanced dual-energy computed tomography (xenon-enhanced CT) can provide lung ventilation maps that may be useful for assessing structural and functional abnormalities of the lung. Xenon-enhanced CT has been performed using a multiple-breath-hold technique during xenon washout. We recently developed xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique to assess ventilation. We sought to evaluate whether xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique correlates with pulmonary function testing (PFT) results.Twenty-six patients, including 11 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, underwent xenon-enhanced CT and PFT. Three of the COPD patients underwent xenon-enhanced CT before and after bronchodilator treatment. Images from xenon-CT were obtained by dual-source CT during a breath-hold after a single vital-capacity inspiration of a xenon-oxygen gas mixture. Image postprocessing by 3-material decomposition generated conventional CT and xenon-enhanced images.Low-attenuation areas on xenon images matched low-attenuation areas on conventional CT in 21 cases but matched normal-attenuation areas in 5 cases. Volumes of Hounsfield unit (HU) histograms of xenon images correlated moderately and highly with vital capacity (VC) and total lung capacity (TLC), respectively (r = 0.68 and 0.85). Means and modes of histograms weakly correlated with VC (r = 0.39 and 0.38), moderately with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (r = 0.59 and 0.56), weakly with the ratio of FEV1 to FVC (r = 0.46 and 0.42), and moderately with the ratio of FEV1 to its predicted value (r = 0.64 and 0.60). Mode and volume of histograms increased in 2 COPD patients after the improvement of FEV1 with bronchodilators. Inhalation of xenon gas caused no adverse effects.Xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique depicted functional abnormalities not detectable on thin-slice CT. Mode, mean, and volume of HU histograms of xenon images reflected

  5. The ins and outs of breath holding: simple demonstrations of complex respiratory physiology.

    PubMed

    Skow, Rachel J; Day, Trevor A; Fuller, Jonathan E; Bruce, Christina D; Steinback, Craig D

    2015-09-01

    The physiology of breath holding is complex, and voluntary breath-hold duration is affected by many factors, including practice, psychology, respiratory chemoreflexes, and lung stretch. In this activity, we outline a number of simple laboratory activities or classroom demonstrations that illustrate the complexity of the integrative physiology behind breath-hold duration. These activities require minimal equipment and are easily adapted to small-group demonstrations or a larger-group inquiry format where students can design a protocol and collect and analyze data from their classmates. Specifically, breath-hold duration is measured during a number of maneuvers, including after end expiration, end inspiration, voluntary prior hyperventilation, and inspired hyperoxia. Further activities illustrate the potential contribution of chemoreflexes through rebreathing and repeated rebreathing after a maximum breath hold. The outcome measures resulting from each intervention are easily visualized and plotted and can comprise a comprehensive data set to illustrate and discuss complex and integrated cardiorespiratory physiology. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  6. SU-E-T-177: Clinical Experience with Spirometer Guided Breath Hold Lung SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H; Manning, M; Sintay, B; Maurer, J; Hayes, L; Wiant, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Tumor motion in lung SBRT is typically managed by creating an internal target volume (ITV) based on 4D-CT information. Another option, which may reduce lung dose and imaging artifact, is to use a breath hold (BH) during simulation and delivery. Here we evaluate the reproducibility of tumor position at repeated BH using a newly released spirometry system. Methods: Three patients underwent multiple BH CT’s at simulation. All patients underwent a BH cone beam CT (CBCT) prior to each treatment. All image sets were registered to a patient’s first simulation CT based on local bony anatomy. The gross tumor volume (GTV), and the diaphragm or the apex of the lung were contoured on the first image set and expanded in 1 mm increments until the GTVs and diaphragms on all image sets were included inside an expanded structure. The GTV and diaphragm margins necessary to encompass the structures were recorded. Results: The first patient underwent 2 BH CT’s and fluoroscopy at simulation, the remaining patients underwent 3 BH CT’s at simulation. In all cases the GTV’s remained within 1 mm expansions and the diaphragms remained within 2 mm expansions on repeat scans. Each patient underwent 3 daily BH CBCT’s. In all cases the GTV’s remained within a 2 mm expansions, and the diaphragms (or lung apex in one case) remained within 2 mm expansions at daily BH imaging. Conclusions: These case studies demonstrate spirometry as an effective tool for limiting tumor motion (and imaging artifact) and facilitating reproducible tumor positioning over multiple set-ups and BH’s. This work was partially supported by Qfix.

  7. T2-weighted MRI of the uterus: fast spin echo vs. breath-hold fast spin echo.

    PubMed

    Ascher, S M; O'Malley, J; Semelka, R C; Patt, R H; Rajan, S; Thomasson, D

    1999-03-01

    This study compared one routine T2-weighted fast spin echo (T2FSE) sequence with a breath-hold T2FSE (BH T2FSE) sequence of the female pelvis for image quality, uterine anatomy, lesion detection, and signal intensity measurements. Thirty-two consecutive women (mean age 41.7 years) were imaged at 1.5 T with one high-resolution routine T2FSE sequence and one BH T2FSE sequence in the sagittal plane as part of comprehensive pelvic magnetic resonance imaging. The different image sets were rated separately for imaging characteristics (overall image quality, uterine anatomy definition, lesion detection, and free fluid conspicuity) and then compared side by side. The image sets were also compared for artifacts (ghosting, blurring, pulsatility, and chemical shift misregistration). Signal-to-noise (S/N) and signal difference-to-noise (SD/N) ratios were calculated for the different uterine zones, uterine abnormalities, free fluid, rectus abdominis muscle, and bladder. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were calculated for uterine abnormalities. Twenty-eight uterine abnormalities were detected in 20 patients and included leiomyomata (13 patients), adenomyosis (7 patients), benign endometrial polyps (6 patients), endometrial carcinoma (1 patient), and pregnancy (1 patient). BH T2FSE was superior or equivalent to T2FSE for overall image quality in 23/32 patients (71.8%), uterine anatomy definition in 19/32 patients (59.3%), and lesion detection in 13/20 patients (65%). BH T2FSE performed less well than T2FSE for free fluid conspicuity in 5/5 (100%) patients. BH T2FSE was equivalent to or less affected than T2FSE for ghosting artifact in 24/32 patients (75%) and blurring artifact in 29/32 patients (90.6%). Pulsatility and chemical shift artifacts were not problematic for either image set. S/N and SD/N were higher for all BH T2FSE determinations compared with T2FSE. For the endometrium, junctional zone, myometrium, and bladder, these differences were statistically significant. There

  8. The Utilization of an Insertable Cardiac Monitor in a Child With Pallid Breath-Holding Spells.

    PubMed

    Tejman-Yarden, Shai; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Goldshmit, Yuval; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Cicurel, Assi; Katz, Uriel; Mishali, David; Glikson, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Pacing can be a successful treatment for pallid breath-holding spells, primarily in individuals with severe bradycardia. We describe an 18-month-old girl experiencing severe pallid breath-holding spells in whom repeated electrocardiographic, Holter, and electroencephalographic monitoring tests were all normal. Using a subcutaneous insertable cardiac monitor, severe bradycardia was detected during one of this girl's episodes. This finding led to a pacemaker implantation. Subsequently, her breath-holding spells completely resolved. This child illustrates the ability of the insertable cardiac monitor to help and diagnose arrhythmias in children with unresolved clinical findings. The ability to implant it with a minimal scar makes it ideal for uncooperative individuals with relative few and unexpected episodes that are hard to diagnose. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hepatic shear wave elastography in children under free-breathing and breath-hold conditions.

    PubMed

    Jung, Caroline; Groth, Michael; Petersen, Kay Uwe; Hammel, Anna; Brinkert, Florian; Grabhorn, Enke; Weidemann, Sören Alexander; Busch, Jasmin; Adam, Gerhard; Herrmann, Jochen

    2017-06-20

    To compare hepatic 2D shear wave elastography (2D SWE) in children between free-breathing and breath-hold conditions, in terms of measurement agreement and time expenditure. A cohort of 57 children (12.7±4.3 years) who underwent standardized 2D SWE between May and October 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. Liver elastograms were obtained under free-breathing and breath-hold conditions and time expenditure was measured. Median stiffness, interquartile range (IQR), and IQR/median ratio were calculated based on 12, six, and three elastograms. Results were compared using Pearson correlation coefficient, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), Bland-Altman analysis, and Student's t. Median liver stiffness under free-breathing and breath-hold conditions correlated strongly (7.22±4.5kPa vs. 7.21±4.11kPa; r=0.97, P<0.001). Time to acquire 12 elastograms with free-breathing was lower than that with breath-holding (79.3±32.5sec vs. 143.7±51.8sec, P<0.001). Results for median liver stiffness based of 12, six, and three elastograms demonstrated very high agreement for free-breathing (ICC 0.993) and for breath-hold conditions (ICC 0.994). Hepatic 2D SWE performed with free-breathing yields results similar to the breath-hold condition. With a substantially lower time requirement, which can be further reduced by lowering the number of elastograms, the free-breathing technique may be suitable for infants and less cooperative children not capable of breath-holding. • Hepatic 2D SWE performed with free-breathing yields results similar to breath-hold condition. • Benefit of the free-breathing approach is the substantially lower time requirement. • Lowering the number of elastograms can further reduce time expenditure. • Free-breathing 2D SWE is suitable in children with suspected liver disease.

  10. Changes of autonomic nervous system function in patients with breath-holding spells treated with iron.

    PubMed

    Orii, Kenji E; Kato, Zenichiro; Osamu, Fukutomi; Funato, Michinori; Kubodera, Uniko; Inoue, Ryosuke; Shimozawa, Nobuyuki; Kondo, Naomi

    2002-05-01

    To evaluate the autonomic nervous system of patients with breath-holding spells after iron treatment, we attempted to determine whether a dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system reflexes exists in children with severe cyanotic breathholding spells. An electrocardiogram for each subject was recorded for 24 hours in the subject's home and parasympathetic activity was investigated by the fast Fourier transform method. Hematologic data and clinical symptoms of all three patients treated with iron improved and attacks of severe breath-holding spells disappeared. After iron treatment was started, the heart rate variability increased during sleep. It appears that supplementation of iron is effective in improving the dysregulation of autonomic nervous system reflexes.

  11. SU-C-19A-01: A Simple Deep Inspiration Breath Hold System

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, B; Kaznowski, L; Blackburn, J; Chu, K; Duelge, J; Baldwin, B; Valenti, M; Hunsader, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) Radiation therapy for left sided breast can reduce dose to the lungs and heart. The purpose of this work is to illustrate how to implement a simple method of DIBH for simulation and treatment using equipment readily available in most radiation oncology clinics. Methods: For simulation and treatment, a foam block is placed on the patient's abdomen or chest and a horizontal laser mounted on a movable slide is aimed at the center of the foam block. After a coaching session the block is marked at the average free breathing position and average DIBH position. The position of block relative to laser can be seen by the patient via prism glasses as well as the radiation therapists via a video camera system. Simulation CT scans and treatment delivery are performed under DIBH conditions. Imaging and treatment are performed by manually turning the beam on once the patient has achieved DIBH after being given verbal instructions. Results: Manually triggered imaging was used daily to verify DIBH reproducibility for all patients treated using this system. Sets of before and during port images were used to ensure patient position was appropriate for treatment. Results of the laser on block method were compared to a sister facility using surface mapping techniques for DIBH and the two methods were found to have clinically equivalent reproducibility. Conclusion: The laser and block system was found to be simple to implement and robust during patient treatment. This system can be created from readily available materials at low cost and provides adequate feedback to patient and therapists. During treatment images document the reproducibility of setup and give confidence to clinicians that this method is reproducible from day to day.

  12. Cine-magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of communication between middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts and cisterns.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, T; Taoka, T; Nikaido, Y; Shiomi, K; Fujimoto, T; Otsuka, H; Takeuchi, H

    1996-06-01

    Cine-magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations were performed in 10 patients with middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts to evaluate communication between the cysts and the normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space. Eight of 10 patients were evaluated by time of flight cine-MR imaging, and two by phase contrast cine-MR imaging. Two patients underwent membranectomy of the cysts, and were evaluated both pre- and postoperatively. Computed tomography cisternography was used to confirm communication between the cysts and the surrounding cisterns. Pulsatile fluid motion within the cysts was present in all patients. However, marked fluid motion and jet flow between the cysts and the surrounding cisterns were only observed in communicating cysts. In the two patients who underwent membranectomy, postoperative examination found greater fluid motion and jet flow not previously present. Cine-MR imaging demonstration of marked pulsatile fluid motion accompanied by jet flow suggests that a cyst communicates with the normal CSF space.

  13. Breath-Holding During Exhalation as a Simple Manipulation to Reduce Pain Perception.

    PubMed

    Reyes del Paso, Gustavo A; Muñoz Ladrón de Guevara, Cristina; Montoro, Casandra I

    2015-09-01

    Baroreceptor stimulation yields antinociceptive effects. In this study, baroreceptors were stimulated by a respiratory maneuver, with the effect of this manipulation on pain perception subsequently measured. Thirty-eight healthy participants were instructed to inhale slowly (control condition) and to hold the air in lungs after a deep inhalation (experimental condition). It was expected that breath-holding would increases blood pressure (BP) and thus stimulate the baroreceptors, which in turn would reduce pain perception. Pain was induced by pressure algometry on the nail of the left-index finger, at three different pressure intensities, and quantified by visual analogue scales. Heart rate (HR) and BP were continuously recorded. Pain perception was lower when pain pressure was administered during the breath-holding phase versus the slow inhalation phase, regardless of the pressure intensity. During breath-holding, a rapid increase in BP and decrease in HR were observed, demonstrating activation of the baroreceptor reflex. Pain perception is reduced when painful stimulation is applied during breath-holding immediately following a deep inhalation. These results suggest that a simple and easy-to-perform respiratory maneuver could be used to reduce acute pain perception. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Assessment of heart rate variability in breath holding children by 24 hour Holter monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Osman; Ciftel, Murat; Ozturk, Kezban; Kilic, Omer; Kahveci, Hasan; Laloğlu, Fuat; Ceylan, Ozben

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that the underlying pathophysiologic mechanism in children with breath holding may be generalised autonomic dysregulation. Thus, we performed cardiac rhythm and heart rate variability analyses using 24-hour Holter monitoring to evaluate the cardiac effects of autonomic dysregulation in children with breath-holding spells. We performed cardiac rhythm and heart rate analyses using 24-hour Holter monitors to evaluate the cardiac effects of autonomic dysregulation in children during a breath-holding spell. Our study group consisted of 68 children with breath-holding spells - 56 cyanotic type and 12 pallid type - and 39 healthy controls. Clinical and heart rate variability results were compared between each spell type - cyanotic or pallid - and the control group; significant differences (p<0.05) in standard deviation of all NN intervals, mean of the standard deviations of all NN intervals for all 5-minute segments, percentage of differences between adjacent RR intervals >50 ms, and square root of the mean of the sum of squares of the differences between adjacent NN intervals values were found between the pallid and cyanotic groups. Holter monitoring for 24 hours and heart rate variability parameters, particularly in children with pallid spells, are crucial for evaluation of cardiac rhythm changes.

  15. The Role of Cine Flow Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Chiari 0 Malformation.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, Kerem Mazhar; Oktay, Kadir; Cetinalp, Nuri Eralp; Gezercan, Yurdal; Erman, Tahsin

    2016-12-14

    The aim of this study was to define the role of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging in deciding the therapeutic strategy and underlying pathophysiology resulting in syrinx formation in patients with Chiari type 0 malformation. Seven patients admitted to our clinic with diagnosis of Chiari 0 malformations during the period January 2005 to July 2016 were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent a detailed preoperative neurological examination. The entire neuroaxis magnetic resonance imaging and phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging was obtained preoperatively and postoperatively. Seven patients (5 female and 2 male) cover the inclusion criteria of the Chiari type 0. All of the patients with Chiari type 0 malformation had absent cine flow at the craniovertebral junction except two patients. All these five patients underwent surgical interventions; suboccipital decompression and duraplasty. All of them showed both clinical and imaging improvements postoperatively. Cine flow magnetic resonance imaging appears to be a useful tool in the management of patients with Chiari 0 malformations. There was a good correlation between the clinical presentation and cine flow preoperatively, and between clinical improvement and cine flow postoperatively.

  16. Nonrigid registration method to assess reproducibility of breath-holding with ABC in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrut, David . E-mail: dsarrut@univ-lyon2.fr; Boldea, Vlad; Ayadi, Myriam; Badel, Jean-Noel; Ginestet, Chantal; Clippe, Sebastien; Carrie, Christian

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: To study the interfraction reproducibility of breath-holding using active breath control (ABC), and to develop computerized tools to evaluate three-dimensional (3D) intrathoracic motion in each patient. Methods and materials: Since June 2002, 11 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer enrolled in a Phase II trial have undergone four CT scans: one during free-breathing (reference) and three using ABC. Patients left the room between breath-hold scans. The patient's breath was held at the same predefined phase of the breathing cycle (about 70% of the vital capacity) using the ABC device, then patients received 3D-conformal radiotherapy. Automated computerized tools for breath-hold CT scans were developed to analyze lung and tumor interfraction residual motions with 3D nonrigid registration. Results: All patients but one were safely treated with ABC for 7 weeks. For 6 patients, the lung volume differences were <5%. The mean 3D displacement inside the lungs was between 2.3 mm (SD 1.4) and 4 mm (SD 3.3), and the gross tumor volume residual motion was 0.9 mm (SD 0.4) to 5.9 mm (SD 0.7). The residual motion was slightly greater in the inferior part of the lung than the superior. For 2 patients, we detected volume changes >300 cm{sup 3} and displacements >10 mm, probably owing to atelectasia and emphysema. One patient was excluded, and two others had incomplete data sets. Conclusion: Breath-holding with ABC was effective in 6 patients, and discrepancies were clinically accountable in 2. The proposed 3D nonrigid registration method allows for personalized evaluation of breath-holding reproducibility with ABC. It will be used to adapt the patient-specific internal margins.

  17. Immediate effects of breath holding maneuvers onto composition of exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Sukul, Pritam; Trefz, Phillip; Schubert, Jochen K; Miekisch, Wolfram

    2014-09-01

    Rapid concentration changes due to physiological or pathophysiological effects rather than appearance of unique disease biomarkers are important for clinical application of breath research. Simple maneuvers such as breath holding may significantly affect breath biomarker concentrations. In this study, exhaled volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations were assessed in real time before and after different breath holding maneuvers. Continuous breath-resolved measurements (PTR-ToF-MS-8000) were performed in 31 healthy human subjects in a side-stream sampling mode. After 1 min of tidal breathing participants held their breath for 10, 20, 40, 60 s and as long as possible. Afterwards they continued to breathe normally for another minute. VOC profiles could be monitored in real time by assigning online PTR-ToF-MS data to alveolar or inspired phases of breath. Sudden and profound changes of exhaled VOC concentrations were recorded after different breath holding maneuvers. VOC concentrations returned to base line levels 10-20 s after breath holding. Breath holding induced concentration changes depended on physico-chemical properties of the substances. When substance concentrations were normalized onto end-tidal CO2 content, variation of acetone concentrations decreased, whereas variations of isoprene concentrations were not affected. As the effects of breathing patterns on exhaled substance concentrations depend on individual substance properties, sampling procedures have to be validated for each compound by means of appropriate real-time analysis. Normalization of exhaled concentrations onto exhaled CO2 is only valid for substances having similar physico-chemical properties as CO2.

  18. Nonrigid registration method to assess reproducibility of breath-holding with ABC in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sarrut, David; Boldea, Vlad; Ayadi, Myriam; Badel, Jean-Noël; Ginestet, Chantal; Clippe, Sébastien; Carrie, Christian

    2005-02-01

    To study the interfraction reproducibility of breath-holding using active breath control (ABC), and to develop computerized tools to evaluate three-dimensional (3D) intrathoracic motion in each patient. Since June 2002, 11 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer enrolled in a Phase II trial have undergone four CT scans: one during free-breathing (reference) and three using ABC. Patients left the room between breath-hold scans. The patient's breath was held at the same predefined phase of the breathing cycle (about 70% of the vital capacity) using the ABC device, then patients received 3D-conformal radiotherapy. Automated computerized tools for breath-hold CT scans were developed to analyze lung and tumor interfraction residual motions with 3D nonrigid registration. All patients but one were safely treated with ABC for 7 weeks. For 6 patients, the lung volume differences were <5%. The mean 3D displacement inside the lungs was between 2.3 mm (SD 1.4) and 4 mm (SD 3.3), and the gross tumor volume residual motion was 0.9 mm (SD 0.4) to 5.9 mm (SD 0.7). The residual motion was slightly greater in the inferior part of the lung than the superior. For 2 patients, we detected volume changes >300 cm(3) and displacements >10 mm, probably owing to atelectasia and emphysema. One patient was excluded, and two others had incomplete data sets. Breath-holding with ABC was effective in 6 patients, and discrepancies were clinically accountable in 2. The proposed 3D nonrigid registration method allows for personalized evaluation of breath-holding reproducibility with ABC. It will be used to adapt the patient-specific internal margins.

  19. Application of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging in endoscopic aqueductoplasty.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoqiang; Zheng, Jiaping; Xiao, Qing; Liu, Yunsheng

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in endoscopic aqueductoplasty (EA) for patients with obstructive hydrocephalus. The clinical diagnosis of hydrocephalus caused by aqueduct obstruction in 23 patients was confirmed by phase-contrast cine MRI examination. The patients were treated with EA and MRI was repeated during the follow-up. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow velocity in the aqueduct was measured to determine whether the aqueduct was obstructed. The results of phase-contrast cine MRI examinations indicated that there was no CSF flow in the aqueduct for all patients prior to surgery. Aqueductoplasty was successfully performed in all patients. The results of phase-contrast cine MRI examinations performed a week after surgery demonstrated an average CSF flow velocity of 4.74±1.77 cm/sec. During the follow-up, intracranial hypertension recurred in two patients in whom CSF flow was not observed in the aqueduct by the phase-contrast cine MRI scan. Aqueduct re-occlusion was revealed by an endoscopic exploration. By measuring the CSF flow velocity, phase-contrast cine MRI accurately identifies aqueduct obstruction. Cine MRI is a nontraumatic, simple and reliable method for determining whether the aqueduct is successfully opened following aqueductoplasty.

  20. Treatment of Chronic Breath-Holding in an Adult with Severe Mental Retardation: A Clinical Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Derek D.; Martens, Brian K.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a clinical case study surrounding the behavioral assessment and operant treatment of, an adult with severe mental retardation who engaged in chronic breath-holding. In this clinical case, previous neurological and medical testing had ruled out biological bases for the individual's breath-holding. A functional behavioral assessment…

  1. Accuracy of Breath-hold CT in Treatment Planning for Lung Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Charles; Campeau, Marie-Pierre; Filion, Édith; Roberge, David; Bahig, Houda; Vu, Toni; Lambert, Louise; Boudam, Karim; Carrier, Jean-Francois

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study are (1) to measure concordance of tumor position on breath-hold (BH) computed tomography (CT) scans relative to the natural tumor path during free breathing (FB) and (2) to evaluate the benefits of the breathing monitoring device Abches (Apex Medical, Tokyo) for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) treatment planning. Methods: In 53 lung cancer patients treated with CyberKnife™ robotic radiosurgery system, FB four-dimensional computerized tomography (4DCT) and end-expiration (EE) BH CT images were obtained. Extent of natural tumor motion was assessed with rigid registration derived from end-inspiration (EI) and EE phases of the 4DCT. Tumor displacement in BH scans relative to the natural tumor path was measured relative to the EE 4DCT phase. Results: Mean tumor motion (+/- 1 SD) during natural FB was 1 ± 1 mm, 2 ± 2 mm, and 6 ± 6 mm in medio-lateral, anterior-posterior, and cranio-caudal directions, respectively. Tumor position on BH CT scan was closer to EE than EI 4DCT phase for 35/53 patients (66%). Difference of BH tumor position vs. EE state was 4 ± 3 mm. Gross tumor displacements perpendicular to natural tumor path were as great as 11 mm (anterior-posterior) and were seen with or without the breathing monitoring device. Conclusion: Tumor position during BH CT may not accurately correspond to positions observed on FB 4DCT. Hence, accurate and custom 4D analysis for each individual patient is recommended for treatment planning, especially those involving BH acquisitions. PMID:28003937

  2. Brain responses to emotional stimuli during breath holding and hypoxia: an approach based on the independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Menicucci, Danilo; Artoni, Fiorenzo; Bedini, Remo; Pingitore, Alessandro; Passera, Mirko; Landi, Alberto; L'Abbate, Antonio; Sebastiani, Laura; Gemignani, Angelo

    2014-11-01

    Voluntary breath holding represents a physiological model of hypoxia. It consists of two phases of oxygen saturation dynamics: an initial slow decrease (normoxic phase) followed by a rapid drop (hypoxic phase) during which transitory neurological symptoms as well as slight impairment of integrated cerebral functions, such as emotional processing, can occur. This study investigated how breath holding affects emotional processing. To this aim we characterized the modulation of event-related potentials (ERPs) evoked by emotional-laden pictures as a function of breath holding time course. We recorded ERPs during free breathing and breath holding performed in air by elite apnea divers. We modeled brain responses during free breathing with four independent components distributed over different brain areas derived by an approach based on the independent component analysis (ICASSO). We described ERP changes during breath holding by estimating amplitude scaling and time shifting of the same components (component adaptation analysis). Component 1 included the main EEG features of emotional processing, had a posterior localization and did not change during breath holding; component 2, localized over temporo-frontal regions, was present only in unpleasant stimuli responses and decreased during breath holding, with no differences between breath holding phases; component 3, localized on the fronto-central midline regions, showed phase-independent breath holding decreases; component 4, quite widespread but with frontal prevalence, decreased in parallel with the hypoxic trend. The spatial localization of these components was compatible with a set of processing modules that affects the automatic and intentional controls of attention. The reduction of unpleasant-related ERP components suggests that the evaluation of aversive and/or possibly dangerous situations might be altered during breath holding.

  3. SU-E-J-234: Application of a Breathing Motion Model to ViewRay Cine MR Images

    SciTech Connect

    O’Connell, D. P.; Thomas, D. H.; Dou, T. H.; Lamb, J. M.; Yang, L.; Low, D. A.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A respiratory motion model previously used to generate breathing-gated CT images was used with cine MR images. Accuracy and predictive ability of the in-plane models were evaluated. Methods: Sagittalplane cine MR images of a patient undergoing treatment on a ViewRay MRI/radiotherapy system were acquired before and during treatment. Images were acquired at 4 frames/second with 3.5 × 3.5 mm resolution and a slice thickness of 5 mm. The first cine frame was deformably registered to following frames. Superior/inferior component of the tumor centroid position was used as a breathing surrogate. Deformation vectors and surrogate measurements were used to determine motion model parameters. Model error was evaluated and subsequent treatment cines were predicted from breathing surrogate data. A simulated CT cine was created by generating breathing-gated volumetric images at 0.25 second intervals along the measured breathing trace, selecting a sagittal slice and downsampling to the resolution of the MR cines. A motion model was built using the first half of the simulated cine data. Model accuracy and error in predicting the remaining frames of the cine were evaluated. Results: Mean difference between model predicted and deformably registered lung tissue positions for the 28 second preview MR cine acquired before treatment was 0.81 +/− 0.30 mm. The model was used to predict two minutes of the subsequent treatment cine with a mean accuracy of 1.59 +/− 0.63 mm. Conclusion: Inplane motion models were built using MR cine images and evaluated for accuracy and ability to predict future respiratory motion from breathing surrogate measurements. Examination of long term predictive ability is ongoing. The technique was applied to simulated CT cines for further validation, and the authors are currently investigating use of in-plane models to update pre-existing volumetric motion models used for generation of breathing-gated CT planning images.

  4. Review of deep inspiration breath-hold techniques for the treatment of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Latty, Drew; Stuart, Kirsty E; Wang, Wei; Ahern, Verity

    2015-03-15

    Radiation treatment to the left breast is associated with increased cardiac morbidity and mortality. The deep inspiration breath-hold technique (DIBH) can decrease radiation dose delivered to the heart and this may facilitate the treatment of the internal mammary chain nodes. The aim of this review is to critically analyse the literature available in relation to breath-hold methods, implementation, utilisation, patient compliance, planning methods and treatment verification of the DIBH technique. Despite variation in the literature regarding the DIBH delivery method, patient coaching, visual feedback mechanisms and treatment verification, all methods of DIBH delivery reduce radiation dose to the heart. Further research is required to determine optimum protocols for patient training and treatment verification to ensure the technique is delivered successfully.

  5. Subacute and Chronic Left Ventricular Myocardial Scar: Accuracy of Texture Analysis on Nonenhanced Cine MR Images.

    PubMed

    Baessler, Bettina; Mannil, Manoj; Oebel, Sabrina; Maintz, David; Alkadhi, Hatem; Manka, Robert

    2017-08-23

    Purpose To test whether texture analysis (TA) allows for the diagnosis of subacute and chronic myocardial infarction (MI) on noncontrast material-enhanced cine cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) images. Materials and Methods In this retrospective, institutional review board-approved study, 120 patients who underwent cardiac MR imaging and showed large transmural (volume of enhancement on late gadolinium enhancement [LGE] images >20%, n = 72) or small (enhanced volume ≤20%, n = 48) subacute or chronic ischemic scars were included. Sixty patients with normal cardiac MR imaging findings served as control subjects. Regions of interest for TA encompassing the left ventricle were drawn by two blinded, independent readers on cine images in end systole by using a freely available software package. Stepwise dimension reduction and texture feature selection based on reproducibility, machine learning, and correlation analyses were performed for selecting features, enabling the diagnosis of MI on nonenhanced cine MR images by using LGE imaging as the standard of reference. Results Five independent texture features allowed for differentiation between ischemic scar and normal myocardium on cine MR images in both subgroups: Teta1, Perc.01, Variance, WavEnHH.s-3, and S(5,5)SumEntrp (in patients with large MI: all P values < .001; in patients with small MI: Teta1 and Perc.01, P < .001; Variance, P = .026; WavEnHH.s-3, P = .007; S[5,5]SumEntrp, P = .045). Multiple logistic regression models revealed that combining the features Teta1 and Perc.01 resulted in the highest accuracy for diagnosing large and small MI on cine MR images, with an area under the curve of 0.93 and 0.92, respectively. Conclusion This proof-of-concept study indicates that TA of nonenhanced cine MR images allows for the diagnosis of subacute and chronic MI with high accuracy. (©) RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  6. 3D Dose reconstruction: Banding artefacts in cine mode EPID images during VMAT delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, H. C.; Greer, P. B.

    2013-06-01

    Cine (continuous) mode images obtained during VMAT delivery are heavily degraded by banding artefacts. We have developed a method to reconstruct the pulse sequence (and hence dose deposited) from open field images. For clinical VMAT fields we have devised a frame averaging strategy that greatly improves image quality and dosimetric information for three-dimensional dose reconstruction.

  7. WHICH AIRWAY PRESSURE SHOULD BE APPLIED DURING BREATH-HOLD IN DOGS UNDERGOING THORACIC COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY?

    PubMed

    Guarracino, Alessandro; Lacitignola, Luca; Auriemma, Edoardo; De Monte, Valentina; Grasso, Salvatore; Crovace, Antonio; Staffieri, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    This randomized controlled trial study aimed to identify the optimal positive pressure (PP) level that can clear atelectasis while avoiding pulmonary hyperinflation during the breath-hold technique in dogs undergoing thoracic computed tomography (CT). Sixty dogs affected by mammary tumors undergoing thoracic CT for the screening of pulmonary metastases were randomly assigned to six groups with different levels of PP during the breath-hold technique: 0 (control), 5 (PP5), 8 (PP8), 10 (PP10), 12 (PP12), and 15 (PP15) cmH2 O. The percentage of atelectatic lung region was lower in the PP10 (3.7 ± 1.1%; P = 0.002), PP12 (3.4 ± 1.3%; P = 0.0001), and PP15 (2.8 ± 0.9%; P = 0.006) groups than in the control group (5.0 ± 2.3%), and the percentage of poorly aerated lung region was lower in the PP8 (15.1 ± 2.6%; P = 0.0009), PP10 (13.0 ± 2.0 %; P = 0.002), PP12 (13.0 ± 2.2 %; P = 0.0002), and PP15 (11.1 ± 1.9%; P = 0.0002) groups than in the control group (19.8 ± 5.0). The percentage of normally aerated lung region, however, was higher in the PP10 (79.7 ± 4.1%; P = 0.005), PP12 (79.8 ± 5.1%; P = 0.0002), and PP15 (80.2 ± 4.9%; P = 0.002) groups than in the control group (73.4 ± 6.6%). A PP of 10-12 cmH2 O during the breath-hold technique should be considered to improve lung aeration during a breath-hold technique in dogs undergoing thoracic CT.

  8. Underwater study of arterial blood pressure in breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Arne; L'abbate, Antonio; Passera, Mirko; Garbella, Erika; Benassi, Antonio; Bedini, Remo

    2009-11-01

    Knowledge regarding arterial blood pressure (ABP) values during breath-hold diving is scanty. It derives from a few reports of measurements performed at the water's surface, showing slight or no increase in ABP, and from a single study of two simulated deep breath-hold dives in a hyperbaric chamber. Simulated dives showed an increase in ABP to values considered life threatening by standard clinical criteria. For the first time, using a novel noninvasive subaquatic sphygmomanometer, we successfully measured ABP in 10 healthy elite breath-hold divers at a depth of 10 m of freshwater (mfw). ABP was measured in dry conditions, at the surface (head-out immersion), and twice at a depth of 10 mfw. Underwater measurements of ABP were obtained in all subjects. Each measurement lasted 50-60 s and was accomplished without any complications or diver discomfort. In the 10 subjects as a whole, mean ABP values were 124/93 mmHg at the surface and 123/94 mmHg at a depth of 10 mfw. No significant statistical differences were found when blood pressure measurements at the water surface were compared with breath-hold diving conditions at a depth of 10 mfw. No systolic blood pressure values >140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure values >115 mmHg were recorded. In conclusion, direct measurements of ABP during apnea diving showed no or only mild increases in ABP. However, our results cannot be extended over environmental conditions different from those of the present study.

  9. A survey of neurological decompression illness in commercial breath-hold divers (Ama) of Japan.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Hideki; Kohshi, Kiyotaka; Ishitake, Tatsuya; Wong, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    A survey was conducted in the northern district of Yamaguchi, Japan to determine the relationship between neurological diving accidents and risk factors among commercial breath-hold divers (Ama). A questionnaire was distributed to 381 Ama divers who are members of the Ama diving union. We sought information on their dive practices (depth of single dive, single dive time, surface interval, length of dive shifts, lunch break) and the presence or absence of medical problems, such as hypertension, cardiac arrhythmia, diabetic mellitus and other issues. Of the 381 Ama divers, 173 responded (45%): 29 were Funado (assisted-descent using weights) and 144 Cachido (unassisted) divers. Twelve had experienced strokelike symptoms during or after repetitive breath-hold diving; 11 were assisted and one unassisted (Funado vs. Cachido). Only two of 12 divers with neurological diving accidents had musculoskeletal symptoms. Neurological events were significantly correlated with dive depth, dive time, and surface interval; however, they were not related to medical history. Neurological diving accidents are more likely to happen among assisted Ama divers than unassisted ones. Repetitive breath-hold diving with a deep dive depth, long dive time, and short surface interval predisposes divers to decompression illness, which characteristically manifests as cerebral stroke.

  10. [Hemodynamic and respiratory changes in athletes during deep breath-hold diving].

    PubMed

    Gentile, C; La Scala, S

    2001-12-01

    The study analysed the hemodynamic and respiratory aspects of deep breath-hold diving. One male (59-year-old) and one female (32-year-old) subject were enrolled. They were both champion deep breath-hold divers. The dives were performed in the wet compartment of the hyperbaric chamber, first in thermoneutral (35 degrees C) and then cool (25 degrees C) water. The subjects were monitored using ECG recordings; percentage cannulation of the right radial artery using an aseptic technique. Stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) were measured using impedance cardiography (Bomed). Variations were observed in heart rhythm, cardiac output, arterial blood pressure and breathing. Both bradycardia and many hemodynamically effective dysrhythmias influenced CO, which showed a tendency to decrease in the diver in cool water. Changes in CO were caused by concomitant changes in HR as SV showed no significant variations. During breath-hold diving, a drop in intra-thoracic pressure is likely to enhance redistribution of blood from the periphery to the chest, which might distend the heart even more, contributing to dysrhythmogenesis. The observation that dysrhythmias were more frequent in cool water is in line with these concepts. Only two leading divers were recruited in this study and observed for hemodynamic and respiratory changes. However, these findings are in line with similar studies carried out by other authors.

  11. A simple method for displaying cine images on web-based teaching files.

    PubMed

    Yam, Chun-Shan; Levine, Deborah; Nishino, Mizuki; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Larson, Michael

    2005-02-01

    Our objective was to develop a simple method for displaying dynamic cine images on Web-based teaching files. We developed a simple method for displaying cine images on Web-based teaching files using an open-source utility, the Java applet. This interactive utility offers improved 3D visualizations compared with the traditional approach using thumbnail and static images. Because Java is a built-in component of common Web browsers and computer systems, no other software was required. We have used this applet successfully for more than 2 years in our Web-based teaching system, including in our teaching files and on our case-of-the-week page.

  12. Interfractional Dose Variations in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Breath-Hold for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shibuya, Keiko; Nakamura, Akira; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakata, Manabu; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the interfractional dose variations for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) combined with breath-hold (BH) at end-exhalation (EE) for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 10 consecutive patients with pancreatic cancer were enrolled. Each patient was fixed in the supine position on an individualized vacuum pillow with both arms raised. Computed tomography (CT) scans were performed before RT, and three additional scans were performed during the course of chemoradiotherapy using a conventional RT technique. The CT data were acquired under EE-BH conditions (BH-CT) using a visual feedback technique. The intensity-modulated RT plan, which used five 15-MV coplanar ports, was designed on the initial BH-CT set with a prescription dose of 39 Gy at 2.6 Gy/fraction. After rigid image registration between the initial and subsequent BH-CT scans, the dose distributions were recalculated on the subsequent BH-CT images under the same conditions as in planning. Changes in the dose-volume metrics of the gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV = GTV + 5 mm), stomach, and duodenum were evaluated. Results: For the GTV and clinical target volume (CTV), the 95th percentile of the interfractional variations in the maximal dose, mean dose, dose covering 95% volume of the region of structure, and percentage of the volume covered by the 90% isodose line were within {+-}3%. Although the volume covered by the 39 Gy isodose line for the stomach and duodenum did not exceed 0.1 mL at planning, the volume covered by the 39 Gy isodose line for these structures was up to 11.4 cm{sup 3} and 1.8 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Conclusions: Despite variations in the gastrointestinal state and abdominal wall position at EE, the GTV and CTV were mostly ensured at the planned dose, with the exception of 1 patient. Compared with the duodenum, large variations in the stomach volume receiving high-dose radiation were observed, which might be beyond the

  13. Fourier modeling of the BOLD response to a breath-hold task: Optimization and reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Joana; Jorge, João; Sousa, Inês; Vilela, Pedro; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2016-07-15

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) reflects the capacity of blood vessels to adjust their caliber in order to maintain a steady supply of brain perfusion, and it may provide a sensitive disease biomarker. Measurement of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response to a hypercapnia-inducing breath-hold (BH) task has been frequently used to map CVR noninvasively using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, the best modeling approach for the accurate quantification of CVR maps remains an open issue. Here, we compare and optimize Fourier models of the BOLD response to a BH task with a preparatory inspiration, and assess the test-retest reproducibility of the associated CVR measurements, in a group of 10 healthy volunteers studied over two fMRI sessions. Linear combinations of sine-cosine pairs at the BH task frequency and its successive harmonics were added sequentially in a nested models approach, and were compared in terms of the adjusted coefficient of determination and corresponding variance explained (VE) of the BOLD signal, as well as the number of voxels exhibiting significant BOLD responses, the estimated CVR values, and their test-retest reproducibility. The brain average VE increased significantly with the Fourier model order, up to the 3rd order. However, the number of responsive voxels increased significantly only up to the 2nd order, and started to decrease from the 3rd order onwards. Moreover, no significant relative underestimation of CVR values was observed beyond the 2nd order. Hence, the 2nd order model was concluded to be the optimal choice for the studied paradigm. This model also yielded the best test-retest reproducibility results, with intra-subject coefficients of variation of 12 and 16% and an intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.74. In conclusion, our results indicate that a Fourier series set consisting of a sine-cosine pair at the BH task frequency and its two harmonics is a suitable model for BOLD-fMRI CVR measurements

  14. The Influence of Age on Interaction between Breath-Holding Test and Single-Breath Carbon Dioxide Test

    PubMed Central

    Zabolotskikh, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of the study was to compare the breath-holding test and single-breath carbon dioxide test in evaluation of the peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity to carbon dioxide in healthy subjects of different age. Methods. The study involved 47 healthy volunteers between ages of 25 and 85 years. All participants were divided into 4 groups according to age: 25 to 44 years (n = 14), 45 to 60 years (n = 13), 60 to 75 years (n = 12), and older than 75 years (n = 8). Breath-holding test was performed in the morning before breakfast. The single-breath carbon dioxide (SB-CO2) test was performed the following day. Results. No correlation was found between age and duration of breath-holding (r = 0.13) and between age and peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity to CO2 (r = 0.07). In all age groups there were no significant differences in the mean values from the breath-holding test and peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity tests. In all groups there was a strong significant inverse correlation between breath-holding test and SB-CO2 test. Conclusion. A breath-holding test reflects the sensitivity of the peripheral chemoreflex to carbon dioxide in healthy elderly humans. Increasing age alone does not alter the peripheral ventilatory response to hypercapnia. PMID:28251147

  15. The Influence of Age on Interaction between Breath-Holding Test and Single-Breath Carbon Dioxide Test.

    PubMed

    Trembach, Nikita; Zabolotskikh, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of the study was to compare the breath-holding test and single-breath carbon dioxide test in evaluation of the peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity to carbon dioxide in healthy subjects of different age. Methods. The study involved 47 healthy volunteers between ages of 25 and 85 years. All participants were divided into 4 groups according to age: 25 to 44 years (n = 14), 45 to 60 years (n = 13), 60 to 75 years (n = 12), and older than 75 years (n = 8). Breath-holding test was performed in the morning before breakfast. The single-breath carbon dioxide (SB-CO2) test was performed the following day. Results. No correlation was found between age and duration of breath-holding (r = 0.13) and between age and peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity to CO2 (r = 0.07). In all age groups there were no significant differences in the mean values from the breath-holding test and peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity tests. In all groups there was a strong significant inverse correlation between breath-holding test and SB-CO2 test. Conclusion. A breath-holding test reflects the sensitivity of the peripheral chemoreflex to carbon dioxide in healthy elderly humans. Increasing age alone does not alter the peripheral ventilatory response to hypercapnia.

  16. Accelerated two-dimensional cine DENSE cardiovascular magnetic resonance using compressed sensing and parallel imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Yang, Yang; Cai, Xiaoying; Auger, Daniel A; Meyer, Craig H; Salerno, Michael; Epstein, Frederick H

    2016-06-14

    Cine Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) provides accurate quantitative imaging of cardiac mechanics with rapid displacement and strain analysis; however, image acquisition times are relatively long. Compressed sensing (CS) with parallel imaging (PI) can generally provide high-quality images recovered from data sampled below the Nyquist rate. The purposes of the present study were to develop CS-PI-accelerated acquisition and reconstruction methods for cine DENSE, to assess their accuracy for cardiac imaging using retrospective undersampling, and to demonstrate their feasibility for prospectively-accelerated 2D cine DENSE imaging in a single breathhold. An accelerated cine DENSE sequence with variable-density spiral k-space sampling and golden angle rotations through time was implemented. A CS method, Block LOw-rank Sparsity with Motion-guidance (BLOSM), was combined with sensitivity encoding (SENSE) for the reconstruction of under-sampled multi-coil spiral data. Seven healthy volunteers and 7 patients underwent 2D cine DENSE imaging with fully-sampled acquisitions (14-26 heartbeats in duration) and with prospectively rate-2 and rate-4 accelerated acquisitions (14 and 8 heartbeats in duration). Retrospectively- and prospectively-accelerated data were reconstructed using BLOSM-SENSE and SENSE. Image quality of retrospectively-undersampled data was quantified using the relative root mean square error (rRMSE). Myocardial displacement and circumferential strain were computed for functional assessment, and linear correlation and Bland-Altman analyses were used to compare accelerated acquisitions to fully-sampled reference datasets. For retrospectively-undersampled data, BLOSM-SENSE provided similar or lower rRMSE at rate-2 and lower rRMSE at rate-4 acceleration compared to SENSE (p < 0.05, ANOVA). Similarly, for retrospective undersampling, BLOSM-SENSE provided similar or better correlation with reference displacement and strain data at rate-2 and

  17. A feasibility study of treatment verification using EPID cine images for hypofractionated lung radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaoli; Lin, Tong; Jiang, Steve

    2009-09-01

    We propose a novel approach for potential online treatment verification using cine EPID (electronic portal imaging device) images for hypofractionated lung radiotherapy based on a machine learning algorithm. Hypofractionated radiotherapy requires high precision. It is essential to effectively monitor the target to ensure that the tumor is within the beam aperture. We modeled the treatment verification problem as a two-class classification problem and applied an artificial neural network (ANN) to classify the cine EPID images acquired during the treatment into corresponding classes—with the tumor inside or outside of the beam aperture. Training samples were generated for the ANN using digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) with artificially added shifts in the tumor location—to simulate cine EPID images with different tumor locations. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the dimensionality of the training samples and cine EPID images acquired during the treatment. The proposed treatment verification algorithm was tested on five hypofractionated lung patients in a retrospective fashion. On average, our proposed algorithm achieved a 98.0% classification accuracy, a 97.6% recall rate and a 99.7% precision rate. This work was first presented at the Seventh International Conference on Machine Learning and Applications, San Diego, CA, USA, 11-13 December 2008.

  18. Automatic segmentation of left ventricle in cardiac cine MRI images based on deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tian; Icke, Ilknur; Dogdas, Belma; Parimal, Sarayu; Sampath, Smita; Forbes, Joseph; Bagchi, Ansuman; Chin, Chih-Liang; Chen, Antong

    2017-02-01

    In developing treatment of cardiovascular diseases, short axis cine MRI has been used as a standard technique for understanding the global structural and functional characteristics of the heart, e.g. ventricle dimensions, stroke volume and ejection fraction. To conduct an accurate assessment, heart structures need to be segmented from the cine MRI images with high precision, which could be a laborious task when performed manually. Herein a fully automatic framework is proposed for the segmentation of the left ventricle from the slices of short axis cine MRI scans of porcine subjects using a deep learning approach. For training the deep learning models, which generally requires a large set of data, a public database of human cine MRI scans is used. Experiments on the 3150 cine slices of 7 porcine subjects have shown that when comparing the automatic and manual segmentations the mean slice-wise Dice coefficient is about 0.930, the point-to-curve error is 1.07 mm, and the mean slice-wise Hausdorff distance is around 3.70 mm, which demonstrates the accuracy and robustness of the proposed inter-species translational approach.

  19. Strain analysis in CRT candidates using the novel segment length in cine (SLICE) post-processing technique on standard CMR cine images.

    PubMed

    Zweerink, Alwin; Allaart, Cornelis P; Kuijer, Joost P A; Wu, LiNa; Beek, Aernout M; van de Ven, Peter M; Meine, Mathias; Croisille, Pierre; Clarysse, Patrick; van Rossum, Albert C; Nijveldt, Robin

    2017-06-27

    Although myocardial strain analysis is a potential tool to improve patient selection for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), there is currently no validated clinical approach to derive segmental strains. We evaluated the novel segment length in cine (SLICE) technique to derive segmental strains from standard cardiovascular MR (CMR) cine images in CRT candidates. Twenty-seven patients with left bundle branch block underwent CMR examination including cine imaging and myocardial tagging (CMR-TAG). SLICE was performed by measuring segment length between anatomical landmarks throughout all phases on short-axis cines. This measure of frame-to-frame segment length change was compared to CMR-TAG circumferential strain measurements. Subsequently, conventional markers of CRT response were calculated. Segmental strains showed good to excellent agreement between SLICE and CMR-TAG (septum strain, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.76; lateral wall strain, ICC 0.66). Conventional markers of CRT response also showed close agreement between both methods (ICC 0.61-0.78). Reproducibility of SLICE was excellent for intra-observer testing (all ICC ≥0.76) and good for interobserver testing (all ICC ≥0.61). The novel SLICE post-processing technique on standard CMR cine images offers both accurate and robust segmental strain measures compared to the 'gold standard' CMR-TAG technique, and has the advantage of being widely available. • Myocardial strain analysis could potentially improve patient selection for CRT. • Currently a well validated clinical approach to derive segmental strains is lacking. • The novel SLICE technique derives segmental strains from standard CMR cine images. • SLICE-derived strain markers of CRT response showed close agreement with CMR-TAG. • Future studies will focus on the prognostic value of SLICE in CRT candidates.

  20. Quantifying the Reproducibility of Heart Position During Treatment and Corresponding Delivered Heart Dose in Voluntary Deep Inhalation Breath Hold for Left Breast Cancer Patients Treated With External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Alyson; Shoushtari, Asal N.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Read, Paul W.; Wijesooriya, Krishni

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Voluntary deep inhalation breath hold (VDIBH) reduces heart dose during left breast irradiation. We present results of the first study performed to quantify reproducibility of breath hold using bony anatomy, heart position, and heart dose for VDIBH patients at treatment table. Methods and Materials: Data from 10 left breast cancer patients undergoing VDIBH whole-breast irradiation were analyzed. Two computed tomography (CT) scans, free breathing (FB) and VDIBH, were acquired to compare dose to critical structures. Pretreatment weekly kV orthogonal images and tangential ports were acquired. The displacement difference from spinal cord to sternum across the isocenter between coregistered planning Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (DRRs) and kV imaging of bony thorax is a measure of breath hold reproducibility. The difference between bony coregistration and heart coregistration was the measured heart shift if the patient is aligned to bony anatomy. Results: Percentage of dose reductions from FB to VDIBH: mean heart dose (48%, SD 19%, p = 0.002), mean LAD dose (43%, SD 19%, p = 0.008), and maximum left anterior descending (LAD) dose (60%, SD 22%, p = 0.008). Average breath hold reproducibility using bony anatomy across the isocenter along the anteroposterior (AP) plane from planning to treatment is 1 (range, 0-3; SD, 1) mm. Average heart shifts with respect to bony anatomy between different breath holds are 2 {+-} 3 mm inferior, 1 {+-} 2 mm right, and 1 {+-} 3 mm posterior. Percentage dose changes from planning to delivery: mean heart dose (7%, SD 6%); mean LAD dose, ((9%, SD 7%)S, and maximum LAD dose, (11%, SD 11%) SD 11%, p = 0.008). Conclusion: We observed excellent three-dimensional bony registration between planning and pretreatment imaging. Reduced delivered dose to heart and LAD is maintained throughout VDIBH treatment.

  1. Manifold learning based ECG-free free-breathing cardiac CINE MRI.

    PubMed

    Usman, Muhammad; Atkinson, David; Kolbitsch, Christoph; Schaeffter, Tobias; Prieto, Claudia

    2015-06-01

    To present and validate a manifold learning (ML)-based method that can estimate both cardiac and respiratory navigator signals from electrocardiogram (ECG)-free free-breathing cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data to achieve self-gated retrospective CINE reconstruction. In this work the use of the ML method is demonstrated for 2D cardiac CINE to achieve both cardiac and respiratory self-gating without the need of an external navigator or ECG signal. This is achieved by sequentially applying ML to two sets of retrospectively reconstructed real-time images with differing temporal resolutions. A 1D cardiac signal is estimated by applying ML to high temporal resolution real-time images reconstructed from the acquired data. Using the estimated cardiac signal, a 1D respiratory signal was obtained by applying the ML method to low temporal resolution images reconstructed from the same acquired data for each cardiac cycle. Data were acquired in five volunteers with a 2D golden angle radial trajectory in a balanced steady-state free precession (b-SSFP) acquisition. The accuracy of the estimated cardiac signal was calculated as the standard deviation of the temporal difference between the estimated signal and the recorded ECG. The correlation between the estimated respiratory signal and standard pencil beam navigator signal was evaluated. Gated CINE reconstructions (20 cardiac phases per cycle, temporal resolution ∼30 msec) using the estimated cardiac and respiratory signals were qualitatively compared against conventional ECG-gated breath-hold CINE acquisitions. Accurate cardiac signals were estimated with the proposed method, with an error standard deviation in comparison to ECG lower than 20 msec. Respiratory signals estimated with the proposed method achieved a mean cross-correlation of 94% with respect to standard pencil beam navigator signals. Good quality visual scores of 2.80 ± 0.45 (scores from 0, bad, to 4, excellent quality) were observed for the

  2. Evaluation of congenital heart disease by cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    SciTech Connect

    Feiglin, D.H.I.; Moodie, D.S.; O'Donnell, J.K.; Go, R.T.; Sterba, R.; MacIntyre, W.J.

    1985-05-01

    The authors studied 11 adult patients (pts) with atrial septal defect (ASD) and 4 adult pts with ventricular septal defect (VSD) using cine magnetic resonance. All studies were performed using a .6T superconducting magnet with ECG gating and electronic axial rotation when appropriate. Repeated multislice image with no change in physiologic delay of the spin echo pulse sequence, but varying the time by offsetting one slice at each imaging stage allowed for an N x N collection of data where N is the number of slices in one collection set and is equal to the number of sets collected. Algebraic manipulation of the T1 weighted images (TE=30mSec TRcine dynamic display. This technique provides multitime views of each slice and allows for greater appreciation of right atrial enlargement, right ventricular hypertrophy and dilation, and imaging of the atrial septum than does conventional MRI. Using this technique, the authors have identified both atrial and ventricular septal defects in all pts preoperatively and have noted an intact atrial septum following surgery. Standard MRI produced 4 false positive studies postoperatively because only 1 phase of the cardiac cycle was reviewed. Cine MRI allows better identification of septal defects than standard static acquisitions. The cine technique also provides better definition and delineation of right sided abnormalities which are maximized when viewed in a cardiac major axis obtained by electronic axial rotation.

  3. Analysis of 3-D Tongue Motion from Tagged and Cine Magnetic Resonance Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xing, Fangxu; Woo, Jonghye; Lee, Junghoon; Murano, Emi Z.; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Measuring tongue deformation and internal muscle motion during speech has been a challenging task because the tongue deforms in 3 dimensions, contains interdigitated muscles, and is largely hidden within the vocal tract. In this article, a new method is proposed to analyze tagged and cine magnetic resonance images of the tongue during…

  4. Analysis of 3-D Tongue Motion from Tagged and Cine Magnetic Resonance Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xing, Fangxu; Woo, Jonghye; Lee, Junghoon; Murano, Emi Z.; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Measuring tongue deformation and internal muscle motion during speech has been a challenging task because the tongue deforms in 3 dimensions, contains interdigitated muscles, and is largely hidden within the vocal tract. In this article, a new method is proposed to analyze tagged and cine magnetic resonance images of the tongue during…

  5. An evaluation of cine-mode 3D portal image dosimetry for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansbacher, W.; Swift, C.-L.; Greer, P. B.

    2010-11-01

    We investigated cine-mode portal imaging on a Varian Trilogy accelerator and found that the linearity and other dosimetric properties are sufficient for 3D dose reconstruction as used in patient-specific quality assurance for VMAT (RapidArc) treatments. We also evaluated the gantry angle label in the portal image file header as a surrogate for the true imaged angle. The precision is only just adequate for the 3D evaluation method chosen, as discrepancies of 2° were observed.

  6. Assessment of Bladder Motion for Clinical Radiotherapy Practice Using Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McBain, Catherine A.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Buckley, David L.; Sykes, Jonathan S.; Green, Melanie M.; Cowan, Richard A.; Hutchinson, Charles E.; Moore, Christopher J.; Price, Patricia M.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Organ motion is recognized as the principal source of inaccuracy in bladder radiotherapy (RT), but there is currently little information on intrafraction bladder motion. Methods and Materials: We used cine-magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) to study bladder motion relevant to intrafraction RT delivery. On two occasions, a 28 minute cine-MRI sequence was acquired from 10 bladder cancer patients and 5 control participants immediately after bladder emptying, after abstinence from drinking for the preceding hour. From the resulting cine sequences, bladder motion was subjectively assessed. To quantify bladder motion, the bladder was contoured in imaging volume sets at 0, 14, and 28 min to measure changes to bladder volumes, wall displacements, and center of gravity (COG) over time. Results: The dominant source of bladder motion during imaging was bladder filling (up to 101% volume increase); rectal and small bowel movements were transient, with minimal impact. Bladder volume changes were similar for all participants. However for bladder cancer patients, wall displacements were larger (up to 58 mm), less symmetrical, and more variable compared with nondiseased control bladders. Conclusions: Significant and individualized intrafraction bladder wall displacements may occur during bladder RT delivery. This important source of inaccuracy should be incorporated into treatment planning and verification.

  7. Functional imaging of murine hearts using accelerated self-gated UTE cine MRI.

    PubMed

    Motaal, Abdallah G; Noorman, Nils; de Graaf, Wolter L; Hoerr, Verena; Florack, Luc M J; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a fast protocol for ultra-short echo time (UTE) Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the beating murine heart. The sequence involves a self-gated UTE with golden-angle radial acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. The self-gated acquisition is performed asynchronously with the heartbeat, resulting in a randomly undersampled kt-space that facilitates compressed sensing reconstruction. The sequence was tested in 4 healthy rats and 4 rats with chronic myocardial infarction, approximately 2 months after surgery. As a control, a non-accelerated self-gated multi-slice FLASH sequence with an echo time (TE) of 2.76 ms, 4.5 signal averages, a matrix of 192 × 192, and an acquisition time of 2 min 34 s per slice was used to obtain Cine MRI with 15 frames per heartbeat. Non-accelerated UTE MRI was performed with TE = 0.29 ms, a reconstruction matrix of 192 × 192, and an acquisition time of 3 min 47 s per slice for 3.5 averages. Accelerated imaging with 2×, 4× and 5× undersampled kt-space data was performed with 1 min, 30 and 15 s acquisitions, respectively. UTE Cine images up to 5× undersampled kt-space data could be successfully reconstructed using a compressed sensing algorithm. In contrast to the FLASH Cine images, flow artifacts in the UTE images were nearly absent due to the short echo time, simplifying segmentation of the left ventricular (LV) lumen. LV functional parameters derived from the control and the accelerated Cine movies were statistically identical.

  8. Muscle characteristics in career breath-hold divers: effect of water temperature.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Bae; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Jae Cheol; Lutan, Rusli; Kim, Chang Keun

    2005-12-01

    In a previous study we reported that Korean female breath-hold divers (BHD) with life-long experience of diving in cold water (10-12 degrees C in winter and 25-27 degrees C in summer) had reduced muscle fiber size and increased capillary density. The hypothesis tested in the present study was whether prolonged habitual diving at a moderate water temperature (MWT, 29-30 degrees C all year round) similarly caused a reduction in muscle fiber size. The subjects were 14 Indonesian BHDs with long experience of diving at MWT, and a control group of 10 age-matched non-diving Indonesian men (CON), selected from the same tribe among which the BHDs lived. Muscle samples obtained from the middle portion of the vastus lateralis muscle were analyzed for muscle morphology by histochemical analysis and the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein by Western blotting. Muscle fiber type composition was identical in both groups, and no difference in cross-sectional area (CSA), VEGF protein, or capillarity between the BHD and the CON was observed. The present study demonstrated that prolonged habitual breath-hold diving at MWT does not cause any alteration in muscle fiber composition, fiber size, or capillarity.

  9. Correlational analysis of electroencephalographic and end-tidal carbon dioxide signals during breath-hold exercise.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Maria Sole; Vanello, Nicola; Giannoni, Alberto; Frijia, Francesca; Hartwig, Valentina; Maestri, Michelangelo; Bonanni, Enrica; Carnicelli, Luca; Positano, Vincenzo; Passino, Claudio; Emdin, Michele; Landini, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The central mechanism of breathing control is not totally understood. Several studies evaluated the correlation between electroencephalographic (EEG) power spectra and respiratory signals by performing resting state tasks or adopting hypercapnic/hypoxic stimuli. The observation of brain activity during voluntary breath hold tasks, might be an useful approach to highlight the areas involved in mechanism of breath regulation. Nevertheless, studies of brain activity with EEG could present some limitations due to presence of severe artifacts. When artifact rejection methods, as independent component analysis, cannot reliably clean EEG data, it is necessary to exclude noisy segments. In this study, global field power in the delta band and end-tidal CO2 were derived from EEG and CO2 signals respectively in 4 healthy subjects during a breath-hold task. The cross correlation function between the two signals was estimated taking into account the presence of missing samples. The statistical significance of the correlation coefficients at different time lags was assessed using surrogate data. Some simulations are introduced to evaluate the effect of missing data on the correlational analysis and their results are discussed. Results obtained on subjects show a significant correlation between changes in EEG power in the delta band and end-tidal CO2. Moreover, the changes in end-tidal CO2 were found to precede those of global field power. These results might help to better understand the cortical mechanisms involved in the control of breathing.

  10. Regulation of brain blood flow and oxygen delivery in elite breath-hold divers

    PubMed Central

    Willie, Christopher K; Ainslie, Philip N; Drvis, Ivan; MacLeod, David B; Bain, Anthony R; Madden, Dennis; Maslov, Petra Zubin; Dujic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    The roles of involuntary breathing movements (IBMs) and cerebral oxygen delivery in the tolerance to extreme hypoxemia displayed by elite breath-hold divers are unknown. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), arterial blood gases (ABGs), and cardiorespiratory metrics were measured during maximum dry apneas in elite breath-hold divers (n=17). To isolate the effects of apnea and IBM from the concurrent changes on ABG, end-tidal forcing (‘clamp') was then used to replicate an identical temporal pattern of decreasing arterial PO2 (PaO2) and increasing arterial PCO2 (PaCO2) while breathing. End-apnea PaO2 ranged from 23  to 37 mm Hg (30±7 mm Hg). Elevation in mean arterial pressure was greater during apnea than during clamp reaching +54±24% versus 34±26%, respectively; however, CBF increased similarly between apnea and clamp (93.6±28% and 83.4±38%, respectively). This latter observation indicates that during the overall apnea period IBM per se do not augment CBF and that the brain remains sufficiently protected against hypertension. Termination of apnea was not determined by reduced cerebral oxygen delivery; despite 40% to 50% reductions in arterial oxygen content, oxygen delivery was maintained by commensurately increased CBF. PMID:25370857

  11. Time course of carbon monoxide transfer factor after breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Prediletto, R; Fornai, E; Catapano, G; Carli, C; Garbella, E; Passera, M; Cialoni, D; Bedini, R; L'Abbate, A

    2009-01-01

    Breath-hold divers may experience haemoptysis during diving. Central pooling of blood as well as compression of pulmonary gas content can damage the integrity of the blood-gas barrier, resulting in alveolar hemorrhage. The single-breath carbon monoxide test (DL,CO) was used to investigate the blood-gas barrier following diving. The study population consisted of 30 divers recruited from a training course. DL,CO levels were measured before diving and at 2, 10 and 25 min after the last of a series of four dives to depths of 10, 15, 20 and 30 m. When compared to pre-diving values, DL,CO values increased significantly at 2 min following diving in all subjects except one. Thereafter values progressively decreased toward baseline at 10 and 25 min in all subjects but one, while in four divers DL,CO values decreased below baseline. The early but transient increase in DL,CO levels shortly after diving supports the persistence of capillary pooling of red blood cells following emersion. Persistence at 25 min of high DL,CO values in one subject could be attributed by lung CT to extravasation of blood into the alveoli. Early or late DL,CO values >10% below baseline values suggest the presence of pulmonary edema. The relatively high prevalence of DL,CO alterations found suggests caution on the safety of breath-hold diving activities.

  12. Presumed Arterial Gas Embolism After Breath-Hold Diving in Shallow Water.

    PubMed

    Harmsen, Stefani; Schramm, Dirk; Karenfort, Michael; Christaras, Andreas; Euler, Michael; Mayatepek, Ertan; Tibussek, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Dive-related injuries are relatively common, but almost exclusively occur in recreational or scuba diving. We report 2 children with acute central nervous system complications after breath-hold diving. A 12-year-old boy presented with unilateral leg weakness and paresthesia after diving beneath the water surface for a distance of ∼25 m. After ascent, he suddenly felt extreme thoracic pain that resolved spontaneously. Neurologic examination revealed right leg weakness and sensory deficits with a sensory level at T5. Spinal MRI revealed a nonenhancing T2-hyperintense lesion in the central cord at the level of T1/T2 suggesting a spinal cord edema. A few weeks later, a 13-year-old girl was admitted with acute dizziness, personality changes, confusion, and headache. Thirty minutes before, she had practiced diving beneath the water surface for a distance of ∼25 m. After stepping out, she felt sudden severe thoracic pain and lost consciousness. Shortly later she reported headache and vertigo, and numbness of the complete left side of her body. Neurologic examination revealed reduced sensibility to all modalities, a positive Romberg test, and vertigo. Cerebral MRI revealed no pathologic findings. Both children experienced a strikingly similar clinical course. The chronology of events strongly suggests that both patients were suffering from arterial gas embolism. This condition has been reported for the first time to occur in children after breath-hold diving beneath the water surface without glossopharyngeal insufflation.

  13. Semi-automatic segmentation of nonviable cardiac tissue using cine and delayed enhancement magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, Thomas P.; Xu, Ning; Setser, Randolph M.; White, Richard D.

    2003-05-01

    Post myocardial infarction, the identification and assessment of non-viable (necrotic) tissues is necessary for effective development of intervention strategies and treatment plans. Delayed Enhancement Magnetic Resonance (DEMR) imaging is a technique whereby non-viable cardiac tissue appears with increased signal intensity. Radiologists typically acquire these images in conjunction with other functional modalities (e.g., MR Cine), and use domain knowledge and experience to isolate the non-viable tissues. In this paper, we present a technique for automatically segmenting these tissues given the delineation of myocardial borders in the DEMR and in the End-systolic and End-diastolic MR Cine images. Briefly, we obtain a set of segmentations furnished by an expert and employ an artificial intelligence technique, Support Vector Machines (SVMs), to "learn" the segmentations based on features culled from the images. Using those features we then allow the SVM to predict the segmentations the expert would provide on previously unseen images.

  14. An Atypical Case of Taravana Syndrome in a Breath-Hold Underwater Fishing Champion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Foresta, Grazia; Strano, Giustino; Strano, Maria Teresa; Montalto, Francesca; Garbo, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Dysbaric accidents are usually referred to compressed air-supplied diving. Nonetheless, some cases of decompression illness are known to have occurred among breath-hold (BH) divers also, and they are reported in the medical literature. A male BH diver (57 years old), underwater fishing champion, presented neurological disorders as dizziness, sensory numbness, blurred vision, and left frontoparietal pain after many dives to a 30–35 meters sea water depth with short surface intervals. Symptoms spontaneously regressed and the patient came back home. The following morning, pain and neurological impairment occurred again and the diver went by himself to the hospital where he had a generalized tonic-clonic seizure and lost consciousness. A magnetic resonance imaging of the brain disclofsed a cortical T1-weighted hypointense area in the temporal region corresponding to infarction with partial hemorrhage. An early hyperbaric oxygen therapy led to prompt resolution of neurological findings. All clinical and imaging characteristics were referable to the Taravana diving syndrome, induced by repetitive prolonged deep BH dives. The reappearance of neurological signs after an uncommon 21-hour symptom-free interval may suggest an atypical case of Taravana syndrome. PMID:23970902

  15. Algebraic reconstruction technique for parallel imaging reconstruction of undersampled radial data: application to cardiac cine.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Chan, Cheong; Stockmann, Jason P; Tagare, Hemant; Adluru, Ganesh; Tam, Leo K; Galiana, Gigi; Constable, R Todd; Kozerke, Sebastian; Peters, Dana C

    2015-04-01

    To investigate algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) for parallel imaging reconstruction of radial data, applied to accelerated cardiac cine. A graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated ART reconstruction was implemented and applied to simulations, point spread functions and in 12 subjects imaged with radial cardiac cine acquisitions. Cine images were reconstructed with radial ART at multiple undersampling levels (192 Nr × Np  = 96 to 16). Images were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed for sharpness and artifacts, and compared to filtered back-projection, and conjugate gradient SENSE. Radial ART provided reduced artifacts and mainly preserved spatial resolution, for both simulations and in vivo data. Artifacts were qualitatively and quantitatively less with ART than filtered back-projection using 48, 32, and 24 Np , although filtered back-projection provided quantitatively sharper images at undersampling levels of 48-24 Np (all P < 0.05). Use of undersampled radial data for generating auto-calibrated coil-sensitivity profiles resulted in slightly reduced quality. ART was comparable to conjugate gradient SENSE. GPU-acceleration increased ART reconstruction speed 15-fold, with little impact on the images. GPU-accelerated ART is an alternative approach to image reconstruction for parallel radial MR imaging, providing reduced artifacts while mainly maintaining sharpness compared to filtered back-projection, as shown by its first application in cardiac studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) for parallel imaging reconstruction of undersampled radial data: Application to cardiac cine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu; Chan, Cheong; Stockmann, Jason P.; Tagare, Hemant; Adluru, Ganesh; Tam, Leo K.; Galiana, Gigi; Constable, R. Todd; Kozerke, Sebastian; Peters, Dana C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) for parallel imaging reconstruction of radial data, applied to accelerated cardiac cine. Methods A GPU-accelerated ART reconstruction was implemented and applied to simulations, point spread functions (PSF) and in twelve subjects imaged with radial cardiac cine acquisitions. Cine images were reconstructed with radial ART at multiple undersampling levels (192 Nr x Np = 96 to 16). Images were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed for sharpness and artifacts, and compared to filtered back-projection (FBP), and conjugate gradient SENSE (CG SENSE). Results Radial ART provided reduced artifacts and mainly preserved spatial resolution, for both simulations and in vivo data. Artifacts were qualitatively and quantitatively less with ART than FBP using 48, 32, and 24 Np, although FBP provided quantitatively sharper images at undersampling levels of 48-24 Np (all p<0.05). Use of undersampled radial data for generating auto-calibrated coil-sensitivity profiles resulted in slightly reduced quality. ART was comparable to CG SENSE. GPU-acceleration increased ART reconstruction speed 15-fold, with little impact on the images. Conclusion GPU-accelerated ART is an alternative approach to image reconstruction for parallel radial MR imaging, providing reduced artifacts while mainly maintaining sharpness compared to FBP, as shown by its first application in cardiac studies. PMID:24753213

  17. Real-time SPARSE-SENSE cardiac cine MR imaging: optimization of image reconstruction and sequence validation.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Juliane; Nensa, Felix; Bomas, Bettina; Schemuth, Haemi P; Maderwald, Stefan; Gratz, Marcel; Quick, Harald H; Schlosser, Thomas; Nassenstein, Kai

    2016-12-01

    Improved real-time cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) sequences have currently been introduced, but so far only limited practical experience exists. This study aimed at image reconstruction optimization and clinical validation of a new highly accelerated real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE sequence. Left ventricular (LV) short-axis stacks of a real-time free-breathing SPARSE-SENSE sequence with high spatiotemporal resolution and of a standard segmented cine SSFP sequence were acquired at 1.5 T in 11 volunteers and 15 patients. To determine the optimal iterations, all volunteers' SPARSE-SENSE images were reconstructed using 10-200 iterations, and contrast ratios, image entropies, and reconstruction times were assessed. Subsequently, the patients' SPARSE-SENSE images were reconstructed with the clinically optimal iterations. LV volumetric values were evaluated and compared between both sequences. Sufficient image quality and acceptable reconstruction times were achieved when using 80 iterations. Bland-Altman plots and Passing-Bablok regression showed good agreement for all volumetric parameters. 80 iterations are recommended for iterative SPARSE-SENSE image reconstruction in clinical routine. Real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE yielded comparable volumetric results as the current standard SSFP sequence. Due to its intrinsic low image acquisition times, real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE imaging with iterative image reconstruction seems to be an attractive alternative for LV function analysis. • A highly accelerated real-time CMR sequence using SPARSE-SENSE was evaluated. • SPARSE-SENSE allows free breathing in real-time cardiac cine imaging. • For clinically optimal SPARSE-SENSE image reconstruction, 80 iterations are recommended. • Real-time SPARSE-SENSE imaging yielded comparable volumetric results as the reference SSFP sequence. • The fast SPARSE-SENSE sequence is an attractive alternative to standard SSFP sequences.

  18. Accuracy and effectiveness of self-gating signals in free-breathing three-dimensional cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuo; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Yan-Chun; Yang, Jie; Xie, Yao-Qin; Fu, Nan; Wang, Yi; Gao, Song

    2016-12-01

    Conventional multiple breath-hold two-dimensional (2D) balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) presents many difficulties in cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recently, a self-gated free-breathing three-dimensional (3D) SSFP technique has been proposed as an alternative in many studies. However, the accuracy and effectiveness of self-gating signals have been barely studied before. Since self-gating signals are crucially important in image reconstruction, a systematic study of self-gating signals and comparison with external monitored signals are needed. Previously developed self-gated free-breathing 3D SSFP techniques are used on twenty-eight healthy volunteers. Both electrocardiographic (ECG) and respiratory bellow signals are also acquired during the scan as external signals. Self-gating signal and external signal are compared by trigger and gating window. Gating window is proposed to evaluate the accuracy and effectiveness of respiratory self-gating signal. Relative deviation of the trigger and root-mean-square-deviation of the cycle duration are calculated. A two-tailed paired t-test is used to identify the difference between self-gating and external signals. A Wilcoxon signed rank test is used to identify the difference between peak and valley self-gating triggers. The results demonstrate an excellent correlation (P = 0, R > 0.99) between self-gating and external triggers. Wilcoxon signed rank test shows that there is no significant difference between peak and valley self-gating triggers for both cardiac (H = 0, P > 0.10) and respiratory (H = 0, P > 0.44) motions. The difference between self-gating and externally monitored signals is not significant (two-tailed paired-sample t-test: H = 0, P > 0.90). The self-gating signals could demonstrate cardiac and respiratory motion accurately and effectively as ECG and respiratory bellow. The difference between the two methods is not significant and can be explained. Furthermore, few ECG trigger errors

  19. Myocardial strain assessment by cine cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using non-rigid registration.

    PubMed

    Tsadok, Yossi; Friedman, Zvi; Haluska, Brian A; Hoffmann, Rainer; Adam, Dan

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate a novel post-processing method for assessment of longitudinal mid-myocardial strain in standard cine cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging sequences. Cine CMR imaging and tagged cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (TMRI) were performed in 15 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and 15 healthy volunteers served as control group. A second group of 37 post-AMI patients underwent both cine CMR and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) CMR exams. Speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) was performed in 36 of these patients. Cine CMR, TMRI and STE were analyzed to obtain longitudinal strain. LGE-CMR datasets were analyzed to evaluate scar extent. Comparison of peak systolic strain (PSS) measured from CMR and TMRI yielded a strong correlation (r=0.86, p<0.001). PSS measured from CMR and STE correlated well (r=0.75, p<0.001). A cutoff longitudinal PSS value of -13.14% differentiated non-infarction from any infarcted myocardium, with a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 89% (area under curve (AUC) 0.95). PSS value of -9.39% differentiated non-transmural from transmural infarcted myocardium, with a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 67% (AUC 0.78). The present study showed a novel off-line post-processing method for segmental longitudinal strain analysis in mid-myocardium layer based on cine CMR data. The method was found to be highly correlated with strain measurements obtained by TMRI and STE. This tool allows accurate discrimination between different transmurality states of myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. High temporal resolution breathheld 3D FIESTA CINE imaging: validation of ventricular function in patients with chronic myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Rettmann, Dan W; Saranathan, Manojkumar; Wu, Katherine C; Azevedo, Clerio F; Bluemke, David A; Foo, Thomas K F

    2007-06-01

    To develop a gated single-breathhold, high temporal resolution three-dimensional (3D) CINE imaging technique and to evaluate its accuracy in volumetric and functional quantification in patients with chronic myocardial infarction. A 3D CINE steady-state free precession (SSFP) pulse sequence was developed incorporating variable temporal sampling of the low and high spatial frequency k-space data to reduce breathhold time and parallel imaging to increase temporal resolution. Reconstruction with retrospective interpolation enabled complete R-R interval coverage. Feasibility was assessed in eight patients with chronic myocardial infarction and ventricular functional values were compared to those of a 2D CINE acquisition. There was no significant difference between the 3D CINE and 2D CINE for end-diastolic volume (168 +/- 73 vs. 177 +/- 59 mL, respectively; P < 0.27), end-systolic volume (81 +/- 62 vs. 79 +/- 53 mL; P < 0.81), and ejection fraction (EF) measurements (55 +/- 14% vs. 58 +/- 14%; P < 0.14). The mean difference in EF was less than 2.5%. A wall motion assessment indicated a good agreement, with a weighted kappa value of 0.62. High temporal resolution 3D CINE SSFP imaging of the whole heart can be obtained in a single breathhold and yield ventricular function measurements similar to 2D CINE methods. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. High spatial and temporal resolution retrospective cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance from shortened free breathing real-time acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hui; Kellman, Peter; Larocca, Gina; Arai, Andrew E; Hansen, Michael S

    2013-11-14

    Cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is challenging in patients who cannot perform repeated breath holds. Real-time, free-breathing acquisition is an alternative, but image quality is typically inferior. There is a clinical need for techniques that achieve similar image quality to the segmented cine using a free breathing acquisition. Previously, high quality retrospectively gated cine images have been reconstructed from real-time acquisitions using parallel imaging and motion correction. These methods had limited clinical applicability due to lengthy acquisitions and volumetric measurements obtained with such methods have not previously been evaluated systematically. This study introduces a new retrospective reconstruction scheme for real-time cine imaging which aims to shorten the required acquisition. A real-time acquisition of 16-20s per acquired slice was inputted into a retrospective cine reconstruction algorithm, which employed non-rigid registration to remove respiratory motion and SPIRiT non-linear reconstruction with temporal regularization to fill in missing data. The algorithm was used to reconstruct cine loops with high spatial (1.3-1.8 × 1.8-2.1 mm²) and temporal resolution (retrospectively gated, 30 cardiac phases, temporal resolution 34.3 ± 9.1 ms). Validation was performed in 15 healthy volunteers using two different acquisition resolutions (256 × 144/192 × 128 matrix sizes). For each subject, 9 to 12 short axis and 3 long axis slices were imaged with both segmented and real-time acquisitions. The retrospectively reconstructed real-time cine images were compared to a traditional segmented breath-held acquisition in terms of image quality scores. Image quality scoring was performed by two experts using a scale between 1 and 5 (poor to good). For every subject, LAX and three SAX slices were selected and reviewed in the random order. The reviewers were blinded to the reconstruction approach and acquisition protocols and

  2. High spatial and temporal resolution retrospective cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance from shortened free breathing real-time acquisitions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is challenging in patients who cannot perform repeated breath holds. Real-time, free-breathing acquisition is an alternative, but image quality is typically inferior. There is a clinical need for techniques that achieve similar image quality to the segmented cine using a free breathing acquisition. Previously, high quality retrospectively gated cine images have been reconstructed from real-time acquisitions using parallel imaging and motion correction. These methods had limited clinical applicability due to lengthy acquisitions and volumetric measurements obtained with such methods have not previously been evaluated systematically. Methods This study introduces a new retrospective reconstruction scheme for real-time cine imaging which aims to shorten the required acquisition. A real-time acquisition of 16-20s per acquired slice was inputted into a retrospective cine reconstruction algorithm, which employed non-rigid registration to remove respiratory motion and SPIRiT non-linear reconstruction with temporal regularization to fill in missing data. The algorithm was used to reconstruct cine loops with high spatial (1.3-1.8 × 1.8-2.1 mm2) and temporal resolution (retrospectively gated, 30 cardiac phases, temporal resolution 34.3 ± 9.1 ms). Validation was performed in 15 healthy volunteers using two different acquisition resolutions (256 × 144/192 × 128 matrix sizes). For each subject, 9 to 12 short axis and 3 long axis slices were imaged with both segmented and real-time acquisitions. The retrospectively reconstructed real-time cine images were compared to a traditional segmented breath-held acquisition in terms of image quality scores. Image quality scoring was performed by two experts using a scale between 1 and 5 (poor to good). For every subject, LAX and three SAX slices were selected and reviewed in the random order. The reviewers were blinded to the reconstruction approach and

  3. Three-dimensional MRI-linac intra-fraction guidance using multiple orthogonal cine-MRI planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerre, Troels; Crijns, Sjoerd; Rosenschöld, Per Munck af; Aznar, Marianne; Specht, Lena; Larsen, Rasmus; Keall, Paul

    2013-07-01

    The introduction of integrated MRI-radiation therapy systems will offer live intra-fraction imaging. We propose a feasible low-latency multi-plane MRI-linac guidance strategy. In this work we demonstrate how interleaved acquired, orthogonal cine-MRI planes can be used for low-latency tracking of the 3D trajectory of a soft-tissue target structure. The proposed strategy relies on acquiring a pre-treatment 3D breath-hold scan, extracting a 3D target template and performing template matching between this 3D template and pairs of orthogonal 2D cine-MRI planes intersecting the target motion path. For a 60 s free-breathing series of orthogonal cine-MRI planes, we demonstrate that the method was capable of accurately tracking the respiration related 3D motion of the left kidney. Quantitative evaluation of the method using a dataset designed for this purpose revealed a translational error of 1.15 mm for a translation of 39.9 mm. We have demonstrated how interleaved acquired, orthogonal cine-MRI planes can be used for online tracking of soft-tissue target volumes.

  4. Three-dimensional MRI-linac intra-fraction guidance using multiple orthogonal cine-MRI planes.

    PubMed

    Bjerre, Troels; Crijns, Sjoerd; af Rosenschöld, Per Munck; Aznar, Marianne; Specht, Lena; Larsen, Rasmus; Keall, Paul

    2013-07-21

    The introduction of integrated MRI-radiation therapy systems will offer live intra-fraction imaging. We propose a feasible low-latency multi-plane MRI-linac guidance strategy. In this work we demonstrate how interleaved acquired, orthogonal cine-MRI planes can be used for low-latency tracking of the 3D trajectory of a soft-tissue target structure. The proposed strategy relies on acquiring a pre-treatment 3D breath-hold scan, extracting a 3D target template and performing template matching between this 3D template and pairs of orthogonal 2D cine-MRI planes intersecting the target motion path. For a 60 s free-breathing series of orthogonal cine-MRI planes, we demonstrate that the method was capable of accurately tracking the respiration related 3D motion of the left kidney. Quantitative evaluation of the method using a dataset designed for this purpose revealed a translational error of 1.15 mm for a translation of 39.9 mm. We have demonstrated how interleaved acquired, orthogonal cine-MRI planes can be used for online tracking of soft-tissue target volumes.

  5. Three-Dimensional Motion of Liver Tumors Using Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kirilova, Anna Lockwood, Gina; Choi, Perry; Bana, Neelufer; Haider, Masoom A.; Brock, Kristy K.; Eccles, Cynthia; Dawson, Laura A.

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To measure the three-dimensional motion of liver tumors using cine-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and compare it to the liver motion assessed using fluoroscopy. Methods and Materials: Liver and liver tumor motion were investigated in the first 36 patients with primary (n = 20) and metastatic (n = 16) liver cancer accrued to our Phase I stereotactic radiotherapy study. At simulation, all patients underwent anteroposterior fluoroscopy, and the maximal diaphragm excursion in the craniocaudal (CC) direction was observed. Cine-MRI using T{sub 2}-weighted single shot fast spin echo sequences were acquired in three orthogonal planes during free breathing through the centroid of the most dominant liver tumor. ImageJ software was used to measure the maximal motion of the tumor edges in each plane. The intra- and interobserver reproducibility was also quantified. Results: The average CC motion of the liver at fluoroscopy was 15 mm (range, 5-41). On cine-MRI, the average CC tumor motion was 15.5 mm (range, 6.9-35.4), the anteroposterior motion was 10 mm (range, 3.7-21.6), and the mediolateral motion was 7.5 mm (range, 3.8-14.8). The fluoroscopic CC diaphragm motion did not correlate well with the MRI CC tumor motion (r = 0.25). The mean intraobserver error was <2 mm in the CC, anteroposterior, and mediolateral directions, and 90% of measurements between observers were within 3 mm. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that cine-MRI can be used to directly assess liver tumor motion in three dimensions. Tumor motion did not correlate well with the diaphragm motion measured using kilovoltage fluoroscopy. The tumor motion data from cine-MRI can be used to facilitate individualized planning target volume margins to account for breathing motion.

  6. Three-dimensional motion of liver tumors using cine-magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kirilova, Anna; Lockwood, Gina; Choi, Perry; Bana, Neelufer; Haider, Masoom A; Brock, Kristy K; Eccles, Cynthia; Dawson, Laura A

    2008-07-15

    To measure the three-dimensional motion of liver tumors using cine-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and compare it to the liver motion assessed using fluoroscopy. Liver and liver tumor motion were investigated in the first 36 patients with primary (n = 20) and metastatic (n = 16) liver cancer accrued to our Phase I stereotactic radiotherapy study. At simulation, all patients underwent anteroposterior fluoroscopy, and the maximal diaphragm excursion in the craniocaudal (CC) direction was observed. Cine-MRI using T(2)-weighted single shot fast spin echo sequences were acquired in three orthogonal planes during free breathing through the centroid of the most dominant liver tumor. ImageJ software was used to measure the maximal motion of the tumor edges in each plane. The intra- and interobserver reproducibility was also quantified. The average CC motion of the liver at fluoroscopy was 15 mm (range, 5-41). On cine-MRI, the average CC tumor motion was 15.5 mm (range, 6.9-35.4), the anteroposterior motion was 10 mm (range, 3.7-21.6), and the mediolateral motion was 7.5 mm (range, 3.8-14.8). The fluoroscopic CC diaphragm motion did not correlate well with the MRI CC tumor motion (r = 0.25). The mean intraobserver error was <2 mm in the CC, anteroposterior, and mediolateral directions, and 90% of measurements between observers were within 3 mm. The results of our study have shown that cine-MRI can be used to directly assess liver tumor motion in three dimensions. Tumor motion did not correlate well with the diaphragm motion measured using kilovoltage fluoroscopy. The tumor motion data from cine-MRI can be used to facilitate individualized planning target volume margins to account for breathing motion.

  7. Imaging Three-Dimensional Myocardial Mechanics Using Navigator-gated Volumetric Spiral Cine DENSE MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xiaodong; Spottiswoode, Bruce S.; Meyer, Craig H.; Kramer, Christopher M.; Epstein, Frederick H.

    2010-01-01

    A navigator-gated 3D spiral cine displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) pulse sequence for imaging 3D myocardial mechanics was developed. In addition, previously-described 2D post-processing algorithms including phase unwrapping, tissue tracking, and strain tensor calculation for the left ventricle (LV) were extended to 3D. These 3D methods were evaluated in 5 healthy volunteers, using 2D cine DENSE and historical 3D myocardial tagging as reference standards. With an average scan time of 20.5 ± 5.7 minutes, 3D data sets with a matrix size of 128 × 128 × 22, voxel size of 2.8 × 2.8 × 5.0 mm3, and temporal resolution of 32 ms were obtained with displacement encoding in three orthogonal directions. Mean values for end-systolic mid-ventricular mid-wall radial, circumferential, and longitudinal strain were 0.33 ± 0.10, −0.17 ± 0.02, and −0.16 ± 0.02, respectively. Transmural strain gradients were detected in the radial and circumferential directions, reflecting high spatial resolution. Good agreement by linear correlation and Bland-Altman analysis was achieved when comparing normal strains measured by 2D and 3D cine DENSE. Also, the 3D strains, twist, and torsion results obtained by 3D cine DENSE were in good agreement with historical values measured by 3D myocardial tagging. PMID:20574967

  8. Laughter is not always funny: breath-holding spells in familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Maayan, Channa; Katz, Eliot; Begin, Michal; Yuvchev, Ivelin; Kharasch, Virginia S

    2015-02-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a genetic disease characterized by primary autonomic dysfunction including parasympathetic hypersensitivity. Breath-holding spells (BHS) are believed to be caused by autonomic dysregulation mediated via the vagus nerve and increased in patients with a family history of BHS. Details and understanding of its pathophysiology are lacking. In this retrospective study of patients with FD, the incidence of BHS was higher at 53.3%, compared with previous studies in normal children. Laughter as a precipitating factor for BHS has not been previously reported in FD and occurred in 10% of patients in this study. Lower lung volumes, chronic lung disease, chronic CO2 retention, and inadequate autonomic compensation occur in those with FD leading to a higher incidence and severity of BHS when crying or laughing. Thus, FD may be a good model for understanding manifestations of the autonomic nervous system dysfunction and contribute to our knowledge of BHS mechanisms.

  9. Breath holding duration as a measure of distress tolerance: examining its relation to measures of executive control.

    PubMed

    Sütterlin, Stefan; Schroijen, Mathias; Constantinou, Elena; Smets, Elyn; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    Recent research considers distress (in)tolerance as an essential component in the development of various forms of psychopathology. A behavioral task frequently used to assess distress tolerance is the breath holding task. Although breath holding time (BHT) has been associated with behavioral outcomes related to inhibitory control (e.g., smoking cessation), the relationship among breath holding and direct measures of executive control has not yet been thoroughly examined. The present study aims to assess (a) the BHT-task's test-retest reliability in a 1-year follow-up and (b) the relationship between a series of executive function tasks and breath holding duration. One hundred and thirteen students completed an initial BHT assessment, 58 of which also completed a series of executive function tasks [the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), the Parametric Go/No-Go task and the N-back memory updating task]. A subsample of these students (N = 34) repeated the breath holding task in a second session 1 year later. Test-retest reliability of the BHT-task over a 1-year period was high (r = 0.67, p < 0.001), but none of the executive function tasks was significantly associated with BHT. The rather moderate levels of unpleasantness induced by breath holding in our sample may suggest that other processes (physiological, motivational) besides distress tolerance influence BHT. Overall, the current findings do not support the assumption of active inhibitory control in the BHT-task in a healthy sample. Our findings suggest that individual differences (e.g., in interoceptive or anxiety sensitivity) should be taken into account when examining the validity of BHT as a measure of distress tolerance.

  10. Breath holding duration as a measure of distress tolerance: examining its relation to measures of executive control

    PubMed Central

    Sütterlin, Stefan; Schroijen, Mathias; Constantinou, Elena; Smets, Elyn; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    Recent research considers distress (in)tolerance as an essential component in the development of various forms of psychopathology. A behavioral task frequently used to assess distress tolerance is the breath holding task. Although breath holding time (BHT) has been associated with behavioral outcomes related to inhibitory control (e.g., smoking cessation), the relationship among breath holding and direct measures of executive control has not yet been thoroughly examined. The present study aims to assess (a) the BHT-task's test-retest reliability in a 1-year follow-up and (b) the relationship between a series of executive function tasks and breath holding duration. One hundred and thirteen students completed an initial BHT assessment, 58 of which also completed a series of executive function tasks [the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), the Parametric Go/No-Go task and the N-back memory updating task]. A subsample of these students (N = 34) repeated the breath holding task in a second session 1 year later. Test-retest reliability of the BHT-task over a 1-year period was high (r = 0.67, p < 0.001), but none of the executive function tasks was significantly associated with BHT. The rather moderate levels of unpleasantness induced by breath holding in our sample may suggest that other processes (physiological, motivational) besides distress tolerance influence BHT. Overall, the current findings do not support the assumption of active inhibitory control in the BHT-task in a healthy sample. Our findings suggest that individual differences (e.g., in interoceptive or anxiety sensitivity) should be taken into account when examining the validity of BHT as a measure of distress tolerance. PMID:23908639

  11. Effects of Piracetam on Pediatric Breath Holding Spells: A Randomized Double Blind Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    ABBASKHANIAN, Ali; EHTESHAMI, Sara; SAJJADI, Sadegh; REZAI, Mohammad Sadegh

    2012-01-01

    Objective Breath holding spells (BHS) are common paroxysmal non-epileptic events in the pediatric population which are very stressfull despite their harmless nature. There has been no specific treatment found for the spells yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of piracetam (2-oxo-l-pyrrolidine) on these children. Materials & Methods In this randomized double blind clinical trial study, 150 children with severe BHS referred to our pediatric outpatient service were enrolled from August 2011 to July 2012. The patients were randomized into two equal groups. One received 40mg/kg/day piracetam and the other group received placebo, twice daily. Patients were followed monthly for three months. The number of attacks/month before and after treatment were documented. Results Of the enrolled patients, 86 were boys. The mean age of the patients was 17 months (range, 6 to 24 months). In the piracetam group, 1 month after treatment an 81% response to treatment was found. In the placebo group, none of the patients had complete remission and 7% of the cases had partial remission. Overall, control of breath-holding spells was observed in 91% of the patients in the group taking piracetam as compared with 16% in the group taking placebo at the end of the study. There was no significant difference detected between the groups regarding the prevalence of drug side effects. Conclusion A significant difference was detected between piracetam and placebo in prevention and controlling BHS. Piracetam (40mg/kg/day) had a good effect on our patients. PMID:24665274

  12. Breath-holding ability of offshore workers inadequate to ensure escape from ditched helicopters.

    PubMed

    Cheung, S S; D'Eon, N J; Brooks, C J

    2001-10-01

    Following a helicopter ditching in water, the survival rate of individuals not mortally injured by the impact ranges from 50-85%. One possible cause for this low survival rate is that the crew and passengers cannot hold their breath underwater long enough to make the often difficult escape from an inverted and submerged helicopter. We investigated pulmonary function, breath-holding times in air (BHTa) and water (BHTw) of 228 students enrolled in offshore survival courses required to work in either the offshore petroleum industry or in military marine aviation. Comparisons were performed based on occupation, SCUBA experience, and smoking. In 25 degrees C pool water, the overall BHTw ranged from 5.4 to 120 s with a median of 37 s. Of the 228 subjects, 34% had a BHTw less than the 28 s required for the complete evacuation of a Super Puma helicopter under ideal conditions. No significant differences in BHTw were observed based on either smoking history (Non-Smoker, 41.5 +/- 21.6 s; Smoker, 37.2 +/- 20.2 s) or occupation (Novice, 37.5 +/- 21.1 s; Offshore, 40.5 +/- 21.1 s; Military, 45.2 +/- 20.9 s). However, SCUBA-trained individuals had a significantly longer BHT, (47.4 +/- 21.6 s) than non-SCUBA (37.6 +/- 20.6 s), as well as a greater force vital capacity (FVC), BHTa, and subjective comfort in water. It is concluded that the inability to breath-hold in emergency situations is a major contributor to the low survival rates of marine helicopter ditchings. Therefore, efforts must be made to both decrease escape times and to increase survival time underwater.

  13. Effect of breath holding on cerebrovascular hemodynamics in normal pregnancy and preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    van Veen, Teelkien R; Panerai, Ronney B; Haeri, Sina; Zeeman, Gerda G; Belfort, Michael A

    2015-04-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired autonomic function, which is hypothesized to cause cerebral hemodynamic abnormalities. Our aim was to test this hypothesis by estimating the difference in the cerebrovascular response to breath holding (BH; known to cause sympathetic stimulation) between women with preeclampsia and a group of normotensive controls. In a prospective cohort analysis, cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (BP, noninvasive arterial volume clamping), and end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) were simultaneously recorded during a 20-s breath hold maneuver. CBFV changes were broken down into standardized subcomponents describing the relative contributions of BP, cerebrovascular resistance index (CVRi), critical closing pressure (CrCP), and resistance area product (RAP). The area under the curve (AUC) was calculated for changes in relation to baseline values. A total of 25 preeclamptic (before treatment) and 25 normotensive women in the second half of pregnancy were enrolled, and, 21 patients in each group were included in the analysis. The increase in CBFV and EtCO2 was similar in both groups. However, the AUC for CVRi and RAP during BH was significantly different between the groups (3.05 ± 2.97 vs. -0.82 ± 4.98, P = 0.006 and 2.01 ± 4.49 vs. -2.02 ± 7.20, P = 0.037), indicating an early, transient increase in CVRi and RAP in the control group, which was absent in PE. BP had an equal contribution in both groups. Women with preeclampsia have an altered initial CVRi response to the BH maneuver. We propose that this is due to blunted sympathetic or myogenic cerebrovascular response in women with preeclampsia. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Brief airway obstructions during sleep in infants with breath-holding spells.

    PubMed

    Kahn, A; Rebuffat, E; Sottiaux, M; Muller, M F; Bochner, A; Grosswasser, J

    1990-08-01

    We investigated the possibility that infants with breath-holding spells have breathing disorders during sleep. Seventy-one breath holders with a median age of 14 weeks were selected from a well babies clinic because of their histories: 34 infants without loss of consciousness, and 37 with loss of consciousness (21 of the latter had had cyanotic spells, 14 pallid spells, and 2 combined cyanotic and pallid spells). For each breath holder, one control infant without a history of breath holding was chosen from the same clinic. All infants were healthy and had no known cause of disrupted breathing during sleep. Their histories indicated that the breath holders were covered with sweat during sleep (p = 0.005) or wakefulness (p = 0.006) significantly more often than were the control infants. The infants were studied during a one-night monitoring session, and the 142 sleep recordings were analyzed without knowledge of the history. The breath holders had significantly less nonrapid eye movement (stage III) sleep, more indeterminate sleep, more arousals, and more sleep-stage changes than the control infants had. Central apneas were evenly distributed in the two groups. Airway obstructions were found in 41 breath holders and six control infants; the obstruction lasted longer in the breath holders. The infants with airway obstruction during sleep snored more often (p = 0.023) and sweated more (p = 0.035) during sleep. The water evaporation rate, measured on the forehead with an evaporation meter, was significantly greater in the breath holders (p = 0.001). Ocular compression induced longer asystoles in the infants with pallid syncopes than in either those with cyanotic syncopes (p = 0.036) or those without loss of consciousness (p = 0.031). We conclude that the obstructed breathing during both wakefulness and sleep could be related to a common immature breathing control.

  15. Efficacy of non-breath-hold magnetic resonance cholangiography at midfield strength.

    PubMed

    Govil, S; Justus, A; Korah, I; Cherian, R; Chacko, A

    1999-12-01

    The efficacy of non-breath-hold magnetic resonance (MR) cholangiography at mid-field strength (0.5 Tesla) was evaluated for delineating biliary anatomy and the cause and extent of biliary obstruction. We performed 65 MR cholangiograms on a mid-field 0.5 Tesla MR unit and correlated them with contrast cholangiography and/or surgery. MR cholangiography was found to be both sensitive and specific in the detection of biliary obstruction and in the definition of its cause (sensitivity 98%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 85.7%, accuracy 98%). MR cholangiography accurately predicted the level of obstruction in 94 per cent of strictures. Normal caliber intra-hepatic biliary radicles were visualised in only 6 per cent of the MR cholangiograms. In contrast, 94 per cent of dilated intrahepatic biliary radicles were demonstrated. The confluence, and right and left hepatic ducts were visualized in 98 per cent; the gall bladder in 65 per cent; the cystic duct in 45 per cent and the cystic duct insertion in 25 per cent. The extrahepatic bile duct was seen in 82.7 per cent. A normal caliber pancreatic duct was seen in 18 per cent while a dilated pancreatic duct was seen in 86 per cent. The pancreatico-biliary junction was visualised in 7 per cent. Non-breath-hold MR cholangiography at midfield strength is a highly accurate method of evaluating the cause and level of biliary obstruction, comparable to high-field MR cholangiography. The spatial resolution however is inadequate for the detection of variations in biliary or pancreatic ductal anatomy when the ducts are of normal caliber.

  16. Deep-inspiration breath-hold kilovoltage cone-beam CT for setup of stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung tumors: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Dennis M; Ding, George X; Coffey, Charles W; Kirby, Wyndee; Hallahan, Dennis E; Malcolm, Arnold; Lu, Bo

    2007-04-01

    We report our initial experience with deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) cone-beam CT (CBCT) on the treatment table, using the kilovoltage imager integrated into our linear accelerator, for setting up patients for DIBH stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Nine patients with non-small cell lung cancer (seven stage I), were given 60Gy in three fractions. All nine patients could perform a DIBH for 35s. For each patient we used a diagnostic reference CT volume image acquired during a DIBH to design an SBRT plan consisting of 7-10 noncoplanar conformal beams. Four patients were setup by registering DIBH kilovoltage projection radiographs or megavoltage portal images on the treatment table to digitally reconstructed radiographs from the reference CT. Each of the last 14 fractions out of a total of 27 was setup by acquiring a CBCT volume image on the treatment table in three breath-holds. The CBCT and reference CT volume images were directly registered and the shift was calculated from the registration. The CBCT volume images contained excellent detail on soft tissue and bony anatomy for matching to the reference CT. Most importantly, the tumor was always clearly visible in the CBCT images, even when it was difficult or impossible to see in the radiographs or portal images. The accuracy of the CBCT method was confirmed by DIBH megavoltage portal imaging and each treatment beam was delivered during a DIBH. CBCT acquisition typically required five more minutes than radiograph acquisition but the overall setup time was often shorter using CBCT because repeat imaging was minimized. We conclude that for setting up SBRT treatments of lung tumors, DIBH CBCT is feasible, fast and may result in less variation among observers than using bony anatomy in orthogonal radiographs.

  17. Accelerated Phase-Contrast Cine MRI Using k-t SPARSE-SENSE

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daniel; Dyvorne, Hadrien A.; Otazo, Ricardo; Feng, Li; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Lee, Vivian S.

    2012-01-01

    Phase-contrast (PC) cine MRI is a promising method for assessment of pathologic hemodynamics, including cardiovascular and hepatoportal vascular dynamics, but its low data acquisition efficiency limits the achievable spatial and temporal resolutions within clinically acceptable breath-hold durations. We propose to accelerate PC cine MRI using an approach which combines compressed sensing and parallel imaging (k-t SPARSE-SENSE). We validated the proposed 6-fold accelerated PC cine MRI against 3-fold accelerated PC cine MRI with parallel imaging (generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions). With the programmable flow pump, we simulated a time varying waveform emulating hepatic blood flow. Normalized root mean square error between two sets of velocity measurements was 2.59%. In multiple blood vessels of 12 control subjects, two sets of mean velocity measurements were in good agreement (mean difference = –0.29 cm/s; lower and upper 95% limits of agreement = –5.26 and 4.67 cm/s, respectively). The mean phase noise, defined as the standard deviation of the phase in a homogeneous stationary region, was significantly lower for k-t SPARSE-SENSE than for generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (0.05 ± 0.01 vs. 0.19 ± 0.06 radians, respectively; P < 0.01). The proposed 6-fold accelerated PC cine MRI pulse sequence with k-t SPARSE-SENSE is a promising investigational method for rapid velocity measurement with relatively high spatial (1.7 mm × 1.7 mm) and temporal (~35 ms) resolutions. PMID:22083998

  18. Accelerated phase-contrast cine MRI using k-t SPARSE-SENSE.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daniel; Dyvorne, Hadrien A; Otazo, Ricardo; Feng, Li; Sodickson, Daniel K; Lee, Vivian S

    2012-04-01

    Phase-contrast (PC) cine MRI is a promising method for assessment of pathologic hemodynamics, including cardiovascular and hepatoportal vascular dynamics, but its low data acquisition efficiency limits the achievable spatial and temporal resolutions within clinically acceptable breath-hold durations. We propose to accelerate PC cine MRI using an approach which combines compressed sensing and parallel imaging (k-t SPARSE-SENSE). We validated the proposed 6-fold accelerated PC cine MRI against 3-fold accelerated PC cine MRI with parallel imaging (generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions). With the programmable flow pump, we simulated a time varying waveform emulating hepatic blood flow. Normalized root mean square error between two sets of velocity measurements was 2.59%. In multiple blood vessels of 12 control subjects, two sets of mean velocity measurements were in good agreement (mean difference = -0.29 cm/s; lower and upper 95% limits of agreement = -5.26 and 4.67 cm/s, respectively). The mean phase noise, defined as the standard deviation of the phase in a homogeneous stationary region, was significantly lower for k-t SPARSE-SENSE than for generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (0.05 ± 0.01 vs. 0.19 ± 0.06 radians, respectively; P < 0.01). The proposed 6-fold accelerated PC cine MRI pulse sequence with k-t SPARSE-SENSE is a promising investigational method for rapid velocity measurement with relatively high spatial (1.7 mm × 1.7 mm) and temporal (∼35 ms) resolutions.

  19. Accelerating cine-MR Imaging in Mouse Hearts Using Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Wech, Tobias; Lemke, Angela; Medway, Debra; Stork, Lee-Anne; Lygate, Craig A; Neubauer, Stefan; Köstler, Herbert; Schneider, Jürgen E

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To combine global cardiac function imaging with compressed sensing (CS) in order to reduce scan time and to validate this technique in normal mouse hearts and in a murine model of chronic myocardial infarction. Materials and Methods To determine the maximally achievable acceleration factor, fully acquired cine data, obtained in sham and chronically infarcted (MI) mouse hearts were 2–4-fold undersampled retrospectively, followed by CS reconstruction and blinded image segmentation. Subsequently, dedicated CS sampling schemes were implemented at a preclinical 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, and 2- and 3-fold undersampled cine data were acquired in normal mouse hearts with high temporal and spatial resolution. Results The retrospective analysis demonstrated that an undersampling factor of three is feasible without impairing accuracy of cardiac functional parameters. Dedicated CS sampling schemes applied prospectively to normal mouse hearts yielded comparable left-ventricular functional parameters, and intra- and interobserver variability between fully and 3-fold undersampled data. Conclusion This study introduces and validates an alternative means to speed up experimental cine-MRI without the need for expensive hardware. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2011. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21932360

  20. Water-fat separation imaging of the heart with standard magnetic resonance bSSFP CINE imaging.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, James W; Arnold-Anteraper, Sheeba

    2014-06-01

    To study balanced steady-state free precession CINE phase-sensitive water-fat separation imaging in four cardiac imaging planes to determine the necessary phase correction and image artifacts particular to this technique. Ten healthy volunteers and two subjects with known heart pathologies were studied with standard balanced steady-state free precession CINE imaging. Water-only and fat-only images were calculated using sign detection of the real part of the complex image after phase correction with constant and linear terms. Phase correction values were determined using both manual and automated methods. Differences in phase correction values between imaging planes, cardiac phases, coil elements, automated image reconstruction parameters as well as artifact scores between the automated and manual methods were studied with statistical tests. Water-fat separation performed well in the heart after constant and linear phase correction. Both constant (p = 0.8) and linear x (p = 1) and y (p = 1) phase correction values did not vary significantly across cardiac phases, but varied significantly among the coils (p < 0.001) and imaging planes (p < 0.001). False water-fat separation artifacts were most frequent in the chest/back and also were present at the mitral and aortic valves. Constant and linear phase correction is necessary to provide consistent results in standard imaging planes using a balanced steady-state free precession water-fat separation postprocessing algorithm applied to standard cardiac CINE imaging. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The value of cine nuclear magnetic resonance imaging for assessing regional ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Lotan, C S; Cranney, G B; Bouchard, A; Bittner, V; Pohost, G M

    1989-12-01

    Previous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging studies to assess left ventricular function have used multiple axial planes, which are compromised by partial volume effects and are time consuming to acquire and analyze. Accordingly, an imaging approach using cine NMR and planes aligned with the true cardiac axes of the left ventricle was developed in views comparable with left ventricular cineangiography. Cine NMR imaging was used to assess regional wall motion and was validated by comparison with biplane left ventricular cineangiography. Fifty-nine patients underwent cineangiographic and NMR studies within 72 h. A poor quality NMR study precluded analysis in 4. leaving a study group of 55 patients (mean age 58 +/- 12: 17 women). Cine NMR movie loops were acquired in two long-axis planes: 1) right anterior oblique plane, parallel to the septum, and 2) four chamber orthogonal plane, perpendicular to the septum (this view is comparable to the angiographic left anterior oblique view). To assess regional wall motion, the left ventricle in both cine NMR and cineangiographic images was divided into five segments and graded on a five point grading scale from 3 for normal through 0 for akinesia and -1 for dyskinesia. Regional wall thickening was used qualitatively to aid in the analysis of wall motion. For the 275 segments compared in the right anterior oblique view, agreement was within one grade in 263 (95.6%) of 275 segments, whereas absolute agreement was observed in 171 (62%) of 275 segments. In the left anterior oblique view, of 200 segments evaluated, agreement within one grade was achieved in 184 segments (92%) and agreement was complete in 132 (66%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Pulmonary vein imaging: comparison of 3D magnetic resonance angiography with 2D cine MRI for characterizing anatomy and size.

    PubMed

    Syed, Mushabbar A; Peters, Dana C; Rashid, Haroon; Arai, Andrew E

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary vein imaging is integral for planning atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. We tested the feasibility of quantifying pulmonary vein ostial diameter using two-dimensional cine cardiac magnetic resonance (2D cine CMR) and three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography (3D MRA). Nine patients with a history of atrial fibrillation and 20 normal volunteers underwent 2D cine CMR and contrast-enhanced 3D MRA of pulmonary veins on a 1.5 T scanner. Pulmonary vein ostial diameters were measured and pulmonary vein vessel border sharpness was graded qualitatively. Both techniques provided excellent pulmonary vein imaging; however, 3D MRA was faster to perform. The average difference between the systolic and diastolic pulmonary vein diameter was 2.5 mm (23.2%, p < 0.0001) in normal volunteers and 2.2 mm (16.9%, p < 0.0001) in atrial fibrillation patients. The ostial diameter measurements by 3D MRA were significantly larger than on 2D cine CMR. Additionally, the pulmonary vein borders appeared sharper with 2D cine CMR compared to 3D MRA. In conclusion, the 2D images can resolve differences in diameter across the cardiac cycle, while the 3D images provide high quality anatomical depiction but blur borders due to pulsatile motion. We suggest a protocol combining 2D cine CMR and 3D MRA for comprehensive evaluation of pulmonary veins.

  3. Total removal of unwanted harmonic peaks (TruHARP) MRI for single breath-hold high-resolution myocardial motion and strain quantification.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Harsh K; Prince, Jerry L; Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z

    2010-08-01

    Current MRI methods for myocardial motion and strain quantification have limited resolution because of Fourier space spectral peak interference. Methods have been proposed to remove this interference in order to improve resolution; however, these methods are clinically impractical due to the prolonged imaging times. In this paper, we propose total removal of unwanted harmonic peaks (TruHARP); a myocardial motion and strain quantification methodology that uses a novel single breath-hold MR image acquisition protocol. In post-processing, TruHARP separates the spectral peaks in the acquired images, enabling high-resolution motion and strain quantification. The impact of high resolution on calculated circumferential and radial strains is studied using realistic Monte Carlo simulations, and the improvement in strain maps is demonstrated in six human subjects.

  4. Accelerated three-dimensional cine phase contrast imaging using randomly undersampled echo planar imaging with compressed sensing reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Basha, Tamer A; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Nezafat, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to implement and evaluate an accelerated three-dimensional (3D) cine phase contrast MRI sequence by combining a randomly sampled 3D k-space acquisition sequence with an echo planar imaging (EPI) readout. An accelerated 3D cine phase contrast MRI sequence was implemented by combining EPI readout with randomly undersampled 3D k-space data suitable for compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction. The undersampled data were then reconstructed using low-dimensional structural self-learning and thresholding (LOST). 3D phase contrast MRI was acquired in 11 healthy adults using an overall acceleration of 7 (EPI factor of 3 and CS rate of 3). For comparison, a single two-dimensional (2D) cine phase contrast scan was also performed with sensitivity encoding (SENSE) rate 2 and approximately at the level of the pulmonary artery bifurcation. The stroke volume and mean velocity in both the ascending and descending aorta were measured and compared between two sequences using Bland-Altman plots. An average scan time of 3 min and 30 s, corresponding to an acceleration rate of 7, was achieved for 3D cine phase contrast scan with one direction flow encoding, voxel size of 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) , foot-head coverage of 6 cm and temporal resolution of 30 ms. The mean velocity and stroke volume in both the ascending and descending aorta were statistically equivalent between the proposed 3D sequence and the standard 2D cine phase contrast sequence. The combination of EPI with a randomly undersampled 3D k-space sampling sequence using LOST reconstruction allows a seven-fold reduction in scan time of 3D cine phase contrast MRI without compromising blood flow quantification.

  5. Single-breath breath-holding estimate of pulmonary blood flow in man: comparison with direct Fick cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, A H; Rozkovec, A; Papouchado, M; West, J; Laszlo, G

    1989-06-01

    1. Resting pulmonary blood flow (Q), using the uptake of the soluble inert gas Freon-22 and an indirect estimate of lung tissue volume, has been estimated during breath-holding (Qc) and compared with direct Fick cardiac output (Qf) in 16 patients with various cardiac disorders. 2. The effect of breath-hold time was investigated by comparing Qc estimated using 6 and 10 s of breath-holding in 17 patients. Repeatability was assessed by duplicate measurements of Qc in the patients and in six normal subjects. 3. Qc tended to overestimate Qf, the bias and error being 0.09 l/min and 0.59, respectively. The coefficient of repeatability for Qc in the patients was 0.75 l/min and in the normal subjects was 0.66 l/min. For Qf it was 0.72 l/min. There was no significant difference in Qc measured at the two breath-hold times. 4. The technique is simple to perform, and provides a rapid estimate of Q, monitoring acute and chronic changes in cardiac output in normal subjects and patients with cardiac disease.

  6. A size-based emphysema severity index: robust to the breath-hold-level variations and correlated with clinical parameters

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jeongeun; Lee, Minho; Lee, Sang Min; Oh, Sang Young; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Kim, Namkug; Seo, Joon Beom

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the power-law exponents (D) of emphysema hole-size distributions as a competent emphysema index. Robustness to extreme breath-hold-level variations and correlations with clinical parameters for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were investigated and compared to a conventional emphysema index (EI%). Patients and methods A total of 100 patients with COPD (97 males and three females of mean age 67±7.9 years) underwent multidetector row computed tomography scanning at full inspiration and full expiration. The diameters of the emphysematous holes were estimated and quantified with a fully automated algorithm. Power-law exponents (D) of emphysematous hole-size distribution were evaluated. Results The diameters followed a power-law distribution in all cases, suggesting the scale-free nature of emphysema. D of inspiratory and expiratory computed tomography of patients showed intraclass correlation coefficients >0.8, indicating statistically absolute agreement of different breath-hold levels. By contrast, the EI% failed to agree. Bland–Altman analysis also revealed the superior robustness of D to EI%. D also significantly correlated with clinical parameters such as airflow limitation, diffusion capacity, exercise capacity, and quality of life. Conclusion The D of emphysematous hole-size distribution is robust to breath-hold-level variations and sensitive to the severity of emphysema. This measurement may help rule out the confounding effects of variations in breath-hold levels. PMID:27536095

  7. Classifying geometric variability by dominant eigenmodes of deformation in regressing tumours during active breath-hold lung cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Ahmed M; Weiss, Elisabeth; Sleeman, William C; Hugo, Geoffrey D

    2012-01-21

    The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a lung tumour interfraction geometric variability classification scheme as a means to guide adaptive radiotherapy and improve measurement of treatment response. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to generate statistical shape models of the gross tumour volume (GTV) for 12 patients with weekly breath hold CT scans. Each eigenmode of the PCA model was classified as 'trending' or 'non-trending' depending on whether its contribution to the overall GTV variability included a time trend over the treatment course. Trending eigenmodes were used to reconstruct the original semi-automatically delineated GTVs into a reduced model containing only time trends. Reduced models were compared to the original GTVs by analyzing the reconstruction error in the GTV and position. Both retrospective (all weekly images) and prospective (only the first four weekly images) were evaluated. The average volume difference from the original GTV was 4.3% ± 2.4% for the trending model. The positional variability of the GTV over the treatment course, as measured by the standard deviation of the GTV centroid, was 1.9 ± 1.4 mm for the original GTVs, which was reduced to 1.2 ± 0.6 mm for the trending-only model. In 3/13 cases, the dominant eigenmode changed class between the prospective and retrospective models. The trending-only model preserved GTV and shape relative to the original GTVs, while reducing spurious positional variability. The classification scheme appears feasible for separating types of geometric variability by time trend.

  8. The effect of climbing Mount Everest on spleen contraction and increase in hemoglobin concentration during breath holding and exercise.

    PubMed

    Engan, Harald K; Lodin-Sundström, Angelica; Schagatay, Fanny; Schagatay, Erika

    2014-04-01

    Release of stored red blood cells resulting from spleen contraction improves human performance in various hypoxic situations. This study determined spleen volume resulting from two contraction-evoking stimuli: breath holding and exercise before and after altitude acclimatization during a Mount Everest ascent (8848 m). Eight climbers performed the following protocol before and after the climb: 5 min ambient air respiration at 1370 m during rest, 20 min oxygen respiration, 20 min ambient air respiration at 1370 m, three maximal-effort breath holds spaced by 2 min, 10 min ambient air respiration, 5 min of cycling at 100 W, and finally 10 min ambient air respiration. We measured spleen volume by ultrasound and capillary hemoglobin (HB) concentration after each exposure, and heart rate (HR) and arterial oxygen saturation (Sao2) continuously. Mean (SD) baseline spleen volume was unchanged at 213 (101) mL before and 206 (52) mL after the climb. Before the climb, spleen volume was reduced to 184 (83) mL after three breath holds, and after the climb three breath holds resulted in a spleen volume of 132 (26) mL (p=0.032). After exercise, the preclimb spleen volume was 186 (89) mL vs. 112 (389) mL) after the climb (p=0.003). Breath hold duration and cardiovascular responses were unchanged after the climb. We concluded that spleen contraction may be enhanced by altitude acclimatization, probably reflecting both the acclimatization to chronic hypoxic exposure and acute hypoxia during physical work.

  9. SU-E-J-33: Cardiac Movement in Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold for Left-Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M; Lee, S; Suh, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study was designed to investigate the displacement of heart using Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) CT data compared to free-breathing (FB) CT data and radiation exposure to heart. Methods: Treatment planning was performed on the computed tomography (CT) datasets of 20 patients who had received lumpectomy treatments. Heart, lung and both breasts were outlined. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy divided into 28 fractions. The dose distributions in all the plans were required to fulfill the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement specifications that include 100% coverage of the CTV with ≥ 95% of the prescribed dose and that the volume inside the CTV receiving > 107% of the prescribed dose should be minimized. Displacement of heart was measured by calculating the distance between center of heart and left breast. For the evaluation of radiation dose to heart, minimum, maximum and mean dose to heart were calculated. Results: The maximum and minimum left-right (LR) displacements of heart were 8.9 mm and 3 mm, respectively. The heart moved > 4 mm in the LR direction in 17 of the 20 patients. The distances between the heart and left breast ranged from 8.02–17.68 mm (mean, 12.23 mm) and 7.85–12.98 mm (mean, 8.97 mm) with DIBH CT and FB CT, respectively. The maximum doses to the heart were 3115 cGy and 4652 cGy for the DIBH and FB CT dataset, respectively. Conclusion: The present study has demonstrated that the DIBH technique could help to reduce the risk of radiation dose-induced cardiac toxicity by using movement of cardiac; away from radiation field. The DIBH technique could be used in an actual treatment room for a few minutes and could effectively reduce the cardiac dose when used with a sub-device or image acquisition standard to maintain consistent respiratory motion.

  10. Positional Reproducibility of Pancreatic Tumors Under End-Exhalation Breath-Hold Conditions Using a Visual Feedback Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shibuya, Keiko; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Akira; Nakata, Manabu; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To assess positional reproducibility of pancreatic tumors under end-exhalation (EE) breath-hold (BH) conditions with a visual feedback technique based on computed tomography (CT) images. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with pancreatic cancer were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved trial. All patients were placed in a supine position on an individualized vacuum pillow with both arms raised. At the time of CT scan, they held their breath at EE with the aid of video goggles displaying their abdominal displacement. Each three-consecutive helical CT data set was acquired four times (sessions 1-4; session 1 corresponded to the time of CT simulation). The point of interest within or in proximity to a gross tumor volume was defined based on certain structural features. The positional variations in point of interest and margin size required to cover positional variations were assessed. Results: The means {+-} standard deviations (SDs) of intrafraction positional variations were 0.0 {+-} 1.1, 0.1 {+-} 1.2, and 0.1 {+-} 1.0 mm in the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions, respectively (p = 0.726). The means {+-} SDs of interfraction positional variations were 0.3 {+-} 2.0, 0.8 {+-} 1.8, and 0.3 {+-} 1.8 mm in the LR, AP, and SI directions, respectively (p = 0.533). Population-based margin sizes required to cover 95th percentiles of the overall positional variations were 4.7, 5.3, and 4.9 mm in the LR, AP, and SI directions, respectively. Conclusions: A margin size of 5 mm was needed to cover the 95th percentiles of the overall positional variations under EE-BH conditions, using this noninvasive approach to motion management for pancreatic tumors.

  11. Three-dimensional MR Cholangiopancreatography in a Breath Hold with Sparsity-based Reconstruction of Highly Undersampled Data

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Ankur M.; Shanbhogue, Alampady; Babb, James S.; Bruno, Mary T.; Zhao, Tiejun; Raithel, Esther; Zenge, Michael O.; Li, Guobin; Otazo, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a three-dimensional breath-hold (BH) magnetic resonance (MR) cholangiopancreatographic protocol with sampling perfection with application-optimized contrast using different flip-angle evolutions (SPACE) acquisition and sparsity-based iterative reconstruction (SPARSE) of prospectively sampled 5% k-space data and to compare the results with conventional respiratory-triggered (RT) acquisition. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant prospective study was institutional review board approved. Twenty-nine patients underwent conventional RT SPACE and BH–accelerated SPACE acquisition with 5% k-space sampling at 3 T. Spatial resolution and other parameters were matched when possible. BH SPACE images were reconstructed by enforcing joint multicoil sparsity in the wavelet domain (SPARSE-SPACE). Two board-certified radiologists independently evaluated BH SPARSE-SPACE and RT SPACE images for image quality parameters in the pancreatic duct and common bile duct by using a five-point scale. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare BH SPARSE-SPACE and RT SPACE images. Results Acquisition time for BH SPARSE-SPACE was 20 seconds, which was significantly (P < .001) shorter than that for RT SPACE (mean ± standard deviation, 338.8 sec ± 69.1). Overall image quality scores were higher for BH SPARSE-SPACE than for RT SPACE images for both readers for the proximal, middle, and distal pancreatic duct, but the difference was not statistically significant (P > .05). For reader 1, distal common bile duct scores were significantly higher with BH SPARSE-SPACE acquisition (P = .036). More patients had acceptable or better overall image quality (scores ≥ 3) with BH SPARSE-SPACE than with RT SPACE acquisition, respectively, for the proximal (23 of 29 [79%] vs 22 of 29 [76%]), middle (22 of 29 [76%] vs 18 of 29 [62%]), and distal (20 of 29 [69%] vs 13 of 29 [45%]) pancreatic duct and the proximal (25 of 28 [89%] vs 22 of 28 [79%]) and distal (25 of 28 [89%] vs 24

  12. Transoral decompression evaluated by cine-mode magnetic resonance imaging: a case of basilar impression accompanied by Chiari malformation.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, T; Koshu, K; Ogawa, A; Yoshimoto, T

    1991-06-01

    Cine-mode magnetic resonance imaging provides simultaneous images of cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics. A patient with a basilar impression accompanied by a Chiari malformation and von Recklinghausen's disease who underwent transoral decompression is reported. Preoperative cine-mode magnetic resonance imaging visualized an associated obstruction of cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile flow at the level of the foramen magnum. Tonsilar herniation (Chiari I malformation) and hydrocephalus were also present. Postoperatively, the obstruction of cerebrospinal fluid flow was resolved concomitant with the correction of the cervicomedullary angulation. On the basis of observations made by magnetic resonance imaging, the surgical treatment of basilar impression accompanied by Chiari malformation is briefly discussed.

  13. Pseudo‐projection–driven, self‐gated cardiac cine imaging using cartesian golden step phase encoding

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liheng; Derbyshire, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate a novel two‐dimensional self‐gated imaging technique for free‐breathing cardiac cine MRI that is free of motion‐detection overhead and requires minimal planning for motion tracking. Methods Motion along the readout direction was extracted solely from normal Cartesian imaging readouts near ky = 0. During imaging, the readouts below a certain |ky| threshold were scaled in magnitude and filtered in time to form “pseudo‐projections,” enabling projection‐based motion tracking along readout without frequently acquiring the central phase encode. A discrete golden step phase encode scheme allowed the |ky| threshold to be freely set after the scan while maintaining uniform motion sampling. Results The pseudo‐projections stream displayed sufficient spatiotemporal resolution for both cardiac and respiratory tracking, allowing retrospective reconstruction of free‐breathing non‐electrocardiogram (ECG) cines. The technique was tested on healthy subjects, and the resultant image quality, measured by blood‐myocardium boundary sharpness, myocardial mass, and single‐slice ejection fraction was found to be comparable to standard breath‐hold ECG‐gated cines. Conclusion The use of pseudo‐projections for motion tracking was found feasible for cardiorespiratory self‐gated imaging. Despite some sensitivity to flow and eddy currents, the simplicity of acquisition makes the proposed technique a valuable tool for self‐gated cardiac imaging. Magn Reson Med 76:417–429, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID

  14. [The use of Pantogam syrup in treating small children's breath holding spells].

    PubMed

    Polskaya, A V; Chutko, L S; Jakovenko, E V

    To study the efficacy of pantogam syrup 10% (hopantenic acid) in the treatment of breath-holding spells (BHS). Sixty children, aged from 2 to 4 years, with BHS were studied. The evaluation of clinical manifestations and anxiety level was performed. Results of neurophysiological examination (long-term video-EEG-monitoring) were analyzed. Children were divided into 2 groups: main, in which the patients received pantogam syrup, and control group, in which only psychological methods were used. The results of the clinical and neurophysiological studies performed after the treatment, showed the clinical improvement in 73.3% of patients of the main group compared with similar data from the children in the control group (16.7%). The anxiety level significantly decreased after the neuroprotective therapy. A comparative analysis of electroencephalographic indicators demonstrated a significant (р<0.05) reduction in the power range of slow rhythms and manifestations of functional immaturity of the brain in patients of the main group. These results give evidence for the high efficacy of pantogam syrup in the treatment of children with BHS.

  15. Deep inspiration breath-hold technique guided by an opto- electronic system for extracranial stereotactic treatments.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Cristina; Catalano, Gianpiero; Baroni, Guido; Tagaste, Barbara; Riboldi, Marco; Spadea, Maria Francesca; Ciocca, Mario; Cambria, Raffaella; Serafini, Flavia; Orecchia, Roberto

    2013-07-08

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the intrapatient tumor position reproducibility in a deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique based on two infrared optical tracking systems, ExacTrac and ELITETM, in stereotactic treatment of lung and liver lesions. After a feasibility study, the technique was applied to 15 patients. Each patient, provided with a real-time visual feedback of external optical marker displacements, underwent a full DIBH, a free-breathing (FB), and three consecutive DIBH CT-scans centered on the lesion to evaluate the tumor position reproducibility. The mean reproducibility of tumor position during repeated DIBH was 0.5 ± 0.3 mm in laterolateral (LL), 1.0 ± 0.9 mm in anteroposterior (AP), and 1.4 ± 0.9 mm in craniocaudal (CC) direction for lung lesions, and 1.0 ± 0.6 mm in LL, 1.1 ± 0.5 mm in AP, and 1.2 ± 0.4 mm in CC direction for liver lesions. Intra- and interbreath-hold reproducibility during treatment, as determined by optical markers displacements, was below 1 mm and 3 mm, respectively, in all directions for all patients. Optically-guided DIBH technique provides a simple noninvasive method to minimize breathing motion for collaborative patients. For each patient, it is important to ensure that the tumor position is reproducible with respect to the external markers configuration.

  16. Development of a deep inspiration breath-hold system for radiotherapy utilizing a laser distance measurer.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Christer Andre; Skottner, Nils; Frengen, Jomar; Lund, Jo-Åsmund

    2017-01-01

    Deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) is a technique for treating left-sided breast cancer (LSBC). In modern radiotherapy, one of the main aims is to exclude the heart from the beam aperture with an individualized beam design for LSBC. A deep inhalation will raise the chest wall while the volume of the lungs increase, this will again push the heart away from the breast to be treated. There are a few commercial DIBH systems, both invasive and noninvasive. We present an alternative noninvasive DIBH system based upon an industrial laser distance measurer. This system can be installed in a treatment room at a low cost; it is very easy to use and requires limited amount of training for the personnel and the patient. The system is capable of measuring the position of the chest wall with high frequency and precision in real time. The patient views its breathing curve through video glasses, and gets instructions during the treatment session. The system is well tolerated by test subjects due to its noninvasiveness. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. Suffocation and respiratory responses to carbon dioxide and breath holding challenges in individuals with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Rassovsky, Yuri; Abrams, Kenneth; Kushner, Matt G

    2006-03-01

    Findings showing that individuals with panic disorder (PD) are prone to experience panic attacks when inhaling CO2-enriched air have given rise to the hypothesis that physiological systems underlying the experience of suffocation may be important in the etiology of PD. In this study, we tested several predictions stemming from this view. Forty individuals with PD and 32 controls underwent both a breath-holding challenge and a CO2 rebreathing challenge. A wide array of physiological and psychological responses, including continuous measurements of subjective suffocation, was recorded. Individuals with PD experienced elevated physiological reactivity to both challenges and greater levels of suffocation sensations during the rebreathing challenge. Furthermore, PD individuals who experienced a panic attack in response to the rebreathing challenge exhibited faster but shallower breathing during the challenge than did other PD individuals. Findings are consistent with theories linking PD to hypersensitive brain systems underlying the experience of suffocation. The possibility that subjective suffocation was in part mediated by peripheral interoceptive disturbances (vs. brainstem dysregulation) is discussed.

  18. Effects of dietary inorganic nitrate on static and dynamic breath-holding in humans.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Tomas A; Larsen, Filip J; Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie; Lindholm, Peter

    2013-01-15

    Inorganic nitrate has been shown to reduce oxygen cost during exercise. Since the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway is facilitated during hypoxia, we investigated the effects of dietary nitrate on oxygen consumption and cardiovascular responses during apnea. These variables were measured in two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover protocols at rest and ergometer exercise in competitive breath-hold divers. Subjects held their breath for predetermined times along with maximum effort apneas after two separate 3-day periods with supplementation of potassium nitrate/placebo. In contrast to our hypothesis, nitrate supplementation led to lower arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2), 77 ± 3%) compared to placebo (80 ± 2%) during static apnea, along with lower end-tidal fraction of oxygen (FETO(2)) after 4 min of apnea (nitrate 6.9 ± 0.4% vs. placebo 7.6 ± 0.4%). Maximum apnea duration was shorter after nitrate (329 ± 13 s) compared to placebo (344 ± 13 s). During cycle ergometry nitrate had no effect on SaO(2), FETO(2) or maximum apnea duration. The negative effects of inorganic nitrate during static apnea may be explained by an attenuated diving response. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Computer tomography guided lung biopsy using interactive breath-hold control: a randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Krag-Andersen, Shella; Naqibullah, Matiullah; Minddal, Valentina; Nørgaard, Annette; Naur, Therese Maria Henriette; Myschetzky, Peter Sand; Clementsen, Paul Frost

    2017-01-01

    Background Interactive breath-hold control (IBC) may improve the accuracy and decrease the complication rate of computed tomography (CT)-guided lung biopsy, but this presumption has not been proven in a randomized study. Methods Patients admitted for CT-guided lung biopsy were randomized to biopsy either with (N=201) or without (N=206) IBC. Biopsy accuracy, procedure time, radiation, and complications were compared in the two groups. Predictors for pneumothorax were analyzed. Results Procedures performed with the use of IBC (N=130) did not show higher biopsy accuracy (P=0.979) but were associated with a higher risk of pneumothorax (P=0.022) compared to procedures without the use of IBC (N=171). Overall, 50% of the biopsies were malignant, 13% were benign, and 33% were inconclusive (4% missing). Long needle time (P=0.037) and small nodule size (P=0.001) were predictors of pneumothorax. Conclusions The use of IBC for CT-guided lung biopsy was not an advantage for unselected patients in our care, since it did not improve the biopsy accuracy and the risk of pneumothorax was increased. PMID:28706921

  20. Modified ventilatory response characteristics to exercise in breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Roecker, Kai; Metzger, Jule; Scholz, Tobias; Tetzlaff, Kay; Sorichter, Stephan; Walterspacher, Stephan

    2014-09-01

    Specific adjustments to repeated extreme apnea are not fully known and understood. While a blunted ventilatory chemosensitivity to CO2 is described for elite breath-hold divers (BHDs) at rest, it is unclear whether specific adaptations affect their response to dynamic exercise. Eight elite BHDs with a previously validated decrease in CO2 chemosensitivity, 8 scuba divers (SCDs), and 8 matched control subjects were included in a study where markers of ventilatory response, Fowler's dead space, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), and blood lactate concentrations during cycle exercise were measured. Maximal power output did not differ between the groups, but lactate threshold (θL) appeared at a significantly lowered respiratory compensation point (RCP) and at a higher VO2 for the BHDs. End-tidal (petCO2) and estimated arterial pCO2 (paCO2) were significantly higher in BHDs at θL, the RCP, and maximum exhaustion. BHDs showed a significantly (P < .01) slower breathing pattern in relation to a given tidal volume at a specific work rate. In summary, BHDs presented signs of a metabolic shift from aerobic to anaerobic energy supply, decreased chemosensitivity during exercise, and a distinct ventilatory-response pattern during cycle exercise that differs from SCDs and controls.

  1. Verification of the linac isocenter for stereotactic radiosurgery using cine-EPID imaging and arc delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; O' Connor, Daryl J.; Greer, Peter B.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose:Verification of the mechanical isocenter position is required as part of comprehensive quality assurance programs for stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) treatments. Several techniques have been proposed for this purpose but each of them has certain drawbacks. In this paper, a new efficient and more comprehensive method using cine-EPID images has been introduced for automatic verification of the isocenter with sufficient accuracy for stereotactic applications. Methods: Using a circular collimator fixed to the gantry head to define the field, EPID images of a Winston-Lutz phantom were acquired in cine-imaging mode during 360 deg. gantry rotations. A robust matlab code was developed to analyze the data by finding the center of the field and the center of the ball bearing shadow in each image with sub-pixel accuracy. The distance between these two centers was determined for every image. The method was evaluated by comparison to results of a mechanical pointer and also by detection of a manual shift applied to the phantom position. The repeatability and reproducibility of the method were tested and it was also applied to detect couch and collimator wobble during rotation. Results:The accuracy of the algorithm was 0.03 {+-} 0.02 mm. The repeatability was less than 3 {mu}m and the reproducibility was less than 86 {mu}m. The time elapsed for the analysis of more than 100 cine images of Varian aS1000 and aS500 EPIDs were {approx}65 and 20 s, respectively. Processing of images taken in integrated mode took 0.1 s. The output of the analysis software is printable and shows the isocenter shifts as a function of angle in both in-plane and cross-plane directions. It gives warning messages where the shifts exceed the criteria for SRS/SRT and provides useful data for the necessary adjustments in the system including bearing system and/or room lasers. Conclusions: The comprehensive method introduced in this study uses cine-images, is highly accurate, fast, and

  2. Verification of the linac isocenter for stereotactic radiosurgery using cine-EPID imaging and arc delivery.

    PubMed

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; O'Connor, Daryl J; Greer, Peter B

    2011-07-01

    Verification of the mechanical isocenter position is required as part of comprehensive quality assurance programs for stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) treatments. Several techniques have been proposed for this purpose but each of them has certain drawbacks. In this paper, a new efficient and more comprehensive method using cine-EPID images has been introduced for automatic verification of the isocenter with sufficient accuracy for stereotactic applications. Using a circular collimator fixed to the gantry head to define the field, EPID images of a Winston-Lutz phantom were acquired in cine-imaging mode during 3600 gantry rotations. A robust MATLAB code was developed to analyze the data by finding the center of the field and the center of the ball bearing shadow in each image with sub-pixel accuracy. The distance between these two centers was determined for every image. The method was evaluated by comparison to results of a mechanical pointer and also by detection of a manual shift applied to the phantom position. The repeatability and reproducibility of the method were tested and it was also applied to detect couch and collimator wobble during rotation. The accuracy of the algorithm was 0.03 +/- 0.02 mm. The repeatability was less than 3 pm and the reproducibility was less than 86 microm. The time elapsed for the analysis of more than 100 cine images of Varian aS1000 and aS500 EPIDs were approximately 65 and 20 s, respectively. Processing of images taken in integrated mode took 0.1 s. The output of the analysis software is printable and shows the isocenter shifts as a function of angle in both in-plane and cross-plane directions. It gives warning messages where the shifts exceed the criteria for SRS/SRT and provides useful data for the necessary adjustments in the system including bearing system and/or room lasers. The comprehensive method introduced in this study uses cine-images, is highly accurate, fast, and independent of the observer. It tests

  3. Breath-hold single-photon emission tomography and computed tomography for predicting residual pulmonary function in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sudoh, Manabu; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Kaneda, Yoshikazu; Mitsutaka, Jinbo; Li, Tao-Sheng; Suga, Kazuyoshi; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2006-05-01

    We sought to evaluate the utility of integrated breath-hold single-photon emission tomography and computed tomography imaging compared with that of simple calculation with the lung segment-counting technique for predicting residual pulmonary function in patients undergoing surgical intervention for lung cancer. A prospective series of 22 patients undergoing anatomic lung resection for cancer were enrolled in this study. Postoperative residual forced expiratory volume in 1 second was predicted by measuring the radioactivity counts of the affected lobes or segments to be resected within the entire lungs by placement of regions of interest on single-photon emission tomography and computed tomography images. Residual forced expiratory volume in 1 second was also estimated by using the segment-counting technique. Both predicted values agreed well with postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second. Although the residual forced expiratory volume in 1 second predicted by means of single-photon emission tomography and computed tomography correlated well with that predicted by using segment counting, the values were significantly underestimated by the segment-counting technique in 4 outliers with severe emphysema. There were 2 patients with borderline pulmonary functional reserve whose residual forced expiratory volume in 1 second values were predicted more accurately by means of single-photon emission tomography and computed tomography than by using segment counting. Integrated breath-hold single-photon emission tomography and computed tomography images allow the accurate prediction of postoperative pulmonary function but without statistical superiority over the simple segment-counting technique. Further study of the usefulness of single-photon emission tomography and computed tomography in patients with severe emphysema and borderline lung function should prove valuable because the segment-counting technique underestimates pulmonary functional reserve in these

  4. SU-E-T-326: The Oxygen Saturation (SO2) and Breath-Holding Time Variation Applied Active Breathing Control (ABC)

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, G; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the oxygen saturation (SO2) and breath-holding time variation applied active breathing control (ABC) in radiotherapy of tumor. Methods: 24 volunteers were involved in our trials, and they all did breath-holding motion assisted by ELEKTA Active Breathing Coordinator 2.0 for 10 times respectively. And the patient monitor was used to observe the oxygen saturation (SO2) variation. The variation of SO2, and length of breath-holding time and the time for recovering to the initial value of SO2 were recorded and analyzed. Results: (1) The volunteers were divided into two groups according to the SO2 variation in breath-holding: A group, 14 cases whose SO2 reduction were more than 2% (initial value was 97% to 99%, while termination value was 91% to 96%); B group, 10 cases were less than 2% in breath-holding without inhaling oxygen. (2) The interfraction breath holding time varied from 8 to 20s for A group compared to the first breath-holding time, and for B group varied from 4 to 14s. (3) The breathing holding time of B group prolonged mean 8s, compared to A group. (4) The time for restoring to the initial value of SO2 was from 10s to 30s. And the breath-holding time shortened obviously for patients whose SO2 did not recover to normal. Conclusion: It is very obvious that the SO2 reduction in breath-holding associated with ABC for partial people. It is necessary to check the SO2 variation in breath training, and enough time should be given to recover SO2.

  5. Synchronization and Registration of Cine Magnetic Resonance and Dynamic Computed Tomography Images of the Heart.

    PubMed

    Betancur, Julian; Simon, Antoine; Langella, Bernard; Leclercq, Christophe; Hernandez, Alfredo; Garreau, Mireille

    2016-09-01

    The synchronization and registration of dynamic computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the heart is required to perform a combined analysis of their complementary information. We propose a novel method that synchronizes and registers intrapatient dynamic CT and cine-MRI short axis view (SAX). For the synchronization step, a normalized cross-correlation curve is computed from each image sequence to describe the global cardiac dynamics. The time axes of these curves are then warped using an adapted dynamic time warping (DTW) procedure. The adaptation constrains the time deformation to obtain a coherent warping function. The registration step then computes the rigid transformation that maximizes the multiimage normalized mutual information of DTW-synchronized images. The DTW synchronization and the multiimage registration were evaluated using dynamic CT and cine-SAX acquisitions from nine patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy. The distance between the end-systolic phases after DTW was used to evaluate the synchronization. Mean errors, expressed as a percentage of the RR-intervals, were 3.9% and 3.7% after adapted DTW synchronization against 10.8% and 11.3% after linear synchronization, for dynamic CT and cine-SAX, respectively. This suggests that the adapted DTW synchronization leads to a coherent warping of cardiac dynamics. The multiimage registration was evaluated using fiducial points. Compared to a monoimage and a two-image registration, the multiimage registration of DTW-synchronized images obtained the lowest mean fiducial error showing that the use of dynamic voxel intensity information improves the registration.

  6. Standardized cine-loop documentation in abdominal ultrasound facilitates offline image interpretation.

    PubMed

    Dormagen, Johann Baptist; Gaarder, Mario; Drolsum, Anders

    2015-01-01

    One of the main disadvantages of conventional ultrasound is its operator dependency, which might impede the reproducibility of the sonographic findings. A new approach with cine-loops and standardized scan protocols can overcome this drawback. To compare abdominal ultrasound findings of immediate bedside reading by performing radiologist with offline reading by a non-performing radiologist, using standardized cine-loop sequences. Over a 6-month period, three radiologists performed 140 dynamic ultrasound organ-based examinations in 43 consecutive outpatients. Examination protocols were standardized and included predefined probe position and sequences of short cine-loops of the liver, gallbladder, pancreas, kidneys, and urine bladder, covering the organs completely in two planes. After bedside examinations, the studies were reviewed and read out immediately by the performing radiologist. Image quality was registered from 1 (no diagnostic value) to 5 (excellent cine-loop quality). Offline reading was performed blinded by a radiologist who had not performed the examination. Bedside and offline reading were compared with each other and with consensus results. In 140 examinations, consensus reading revealed 21 cases with renal disorders, 17 cases with liver and bile pathology, and four cases with bladder pathology. Overall inter-observer agreement was 0.73 (95% CI 0.61-0.91), with lowest agreement for findings of the urine bladder (0.36) and highest agreement in liver examinations (0.90). Disagreements between the two readings were seen in nine kidneys, three bladder examinations, one pancreas and bile system examinations each, and in one liver, giving a total number of mismatches of 11%. Nearly all cases of mismatch were of minor clinical significance. The median image quality was 3 (range, 2-5) with most examinations deemed a quality of 3. Compared to consensus reading, overall accuracy was 96% for bedside reading and 94% for offline reading. Standardized cine

  7. Multiple breath-hold proton spectroscopy of human liver at 3T: Relaxation times and concentrations of glycogen, choline, and lipids.

    PubMed

    Weis, Jan; Kullberg, Joel; Ahlström, Håkan

    2017-04-17

    To evaluate the feasibility of an expiration multiple breath-hold (1) H-MRS technique to measure glycogen (Glycg), choline-containing compounds (CCC), and lipid relaxation times T1 , T2 , and their concentrations in normal human liver. Thirty healthy volunteers were recruited. Experiments were performed at 3T. Multiple expiration breath-hold single-voxel point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) technique was used for localization. Water-suppressed spectra were used for the estimation of Glycg, CCC, lipid methylene (CH2 )n relaxation times and concentrations. Residual water lines were removed by the Hankel Lanczos singular value decomposition filter. After phase correction and frequency alignment, spectra were averaged and processed by LCModel. Summed signals of Glycg resonances H2H4', H3, and H5 between 3.6 and 4 ppm were used to estimate their apparent relaxation times and concentration. Glycg, CCC, and lipid content were estimated from relaxation corrected spectral intensity ratios to unsuppressed water line. Relaxation times were measured for liver Glycg (T1 , 892 ± 126 msec; T2 , 13 ± 4 msec), CCC (T1 , 842 ± 75 msec; T2 , 50 ± 5 msec), lipid (CH2 )n (T1 , 402 ± 19 msec; T2 , 52 ± 3 msec), and water (T1 , 990 ± 89 msec; T2 , 30 ± 2 msec). Mean CCC and lipid concentrations of healthy liver were 7.8 ± 1.3 mM and 15.8 ± 23.6 mM, respectively. Glycg content was found lower in the morning (48 ± 21 mM) compared to the afternoon (145 ± 50 mM). Multiple breath-hold (1) H-MRS together with dedicated postprocessing is a feasible technique for the quantification of liver Glycg, CCC, and lipid relaxation times and concentrations. 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Comparison of Liver Tumor Motion With and Without Abdominal Compression Using Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Eccles, Cynthia L.; Patel, Ritesh; Simeonov, Anna K.; Lockwood, Gina; Haider, Masoom; Dawson, Laura A.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Abdominal compression (AC) can be used to reduce respiratory liver motion in patients undergoing liver stereotactic body radiotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to measure the changes in three-dimensional liver tumor motion with and without compression using cine-magnetic resonance imaging. Patients and Methods: A total of 60 patients treated as a part of an institutional research ethics board-approved liver stereotactic body radiotherapy protocol underwent cine T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging through the tumor centroid in the coronal and sagittal planes. A total of 240 cine-magnetic resonance imaging sequences acquired at one to three images each second for 30-60 s were evaluated using an in-house-developed template matching tool (based on the coefficient correlation) to measure the magnitude of the tumor motion. The average tumor edge displacements were used to determine the magnitude of changes in the caudal-cranial (CC) and anteroposterior (AP) directions, with and without AC. Results: The mean tumor motion without AC of 11.7 mm (range, 4.8-23.3) in the CC direction was reduced to 9.4 mm (range, 1.6-23.4) with AC. The tumor motion was reduced in both directions (CC and AP) in 52% of the patients and in a single direction (CC or AP) in 90% of the patients. The mean decrease in tumor motion with AC was 2.3 and 0.6 mm in the CC and AP direction, respectively. Increased motion occurred in one or more directions in 28% of patients. Clinically significant (>3 mm) decreases were observed in 40% and increases in <2% of patients in the CC direction. Conclusion: AC can significantly reduce three-dimensional liver tumor motion in most patients, although the magnitude of the reduction was smaller than previously reported.

  9. Quantification of esophageal tumor motion on cine-magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lever, Frederiek M; Lips, Irene M; Crijns, Sjoerd P M; Reerink, Onne; van Lier, Astrid L H M W; Moerland, Marinus A; van Vulpen, Marco; Meijer, Gert J

    2014-02-01

    To quantify the movement of esophageal tumors noninvasively on cine-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by use of a semiautomatic method to visualize tumor movement directly throughout multiple breathing cycles. Thirty-six patients with esophageal tumors underwent MRI. Tumors were located in the upper (8), middle (7), and lower (21) esophagus. Cine-MR images were collected in the coronal and sagittal plane during 60 seconds at a rate of 2 Hz. An adaptive correlation filter was used to automatically track a previously marked reference point. Tumor movement was measured in the craniocaudal (CC), left-right (LR), and anteroposterior (AP) directions and its relationship along the longitudinal axis of the esophagus was investigated. Tumor registration within the individual images was typically done at a millisecond time scale. The mean (SD) peak-to-peak displacements in the CC, AP, and LR directions were 13.3 (5.2) mm, 4.9 (2.5) mm, and 2.7 (1.2) mm, respectively. The bandwidth to cover 95% of excursions from the mean position (c95) was also calculated to exclude outliers caused by sporadic movements. The mean (SD) c95 values were 10.1 (3.8) mm, 3.7 (1.9) mm, and 2.0 (0.9) mm in the CC, AP, and LR dimensions. The end-exhale phase provided a stable position in the respiratory cycle, compared with more variety in the end-inhale phase. Furthermore, lower tumors showed more movement than did higher tumors in the CC and AP directions. Intrafraction tumor movement was highly variable between patients. Tumor position proved the most stable during the respiratory cycle in the end-exhale phase. A better understanding of tumor motion makes it possible to individualize radiation delivery strategies accordingly. Cine-MRI is a successful noninvasive modality to analyze motion for this purpose in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantification of Esophageal Tumor Motion on Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lever, Frederiek M.; Lips, Irene M.; Crijns, Sjoerd P.M.; Reerink, Onne; Lier, Astrid L.H.M.W. van; Moerland, Marinus A.; Vulpen, Marco van; Meijer, Gert J.

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To quantify the movement of esophageal tumors noninvasively on cine-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by use of a semiautomatic method to visualize tumor movement directly throughout multiple breathing cycles. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with esophageal tumors underwent MRI. Tumors were located in the upper (8), middle (7), and lower (21) esophagus. Cine-MR images were collected in the coronal and sagittal plane during 60 seconds at a rate of 2 Hz. An adaptive correlation filter was used to automatically track a previously marked reference point. Tumor movement was measured in the craniocaudal (CC), left–right (LR), and anteroposterior (AP) directions and its relationship along the longitudinal axis of the esophagus was investigated. Results: Tumor registration within the individual images was typically done at a millisecond time scale. The mean (SD) peak-to-peak displacements in the CC, AP, and LR directions were 13.3 (5.2) mm, 4.9 (2.5) mm, and 2.7 (1.2) mm, respectively. The bandwidth to cover 95% of excursions from the mean position (c95) was also calculated to exclude outliers caused by sporadic movements. The mean (SD) c95 values were 10.1 (3.8) mm, 3.7 (1.9) mm, and 2.0 (0.9) mm in the CC, AP, and LR dimensions. The end-exhale phase provided a stable position in the respiratory cycle, compared with more variety in the end-inhale phase. Furthermore, lower tumors showed more movement than did higher tumors in the CC and AP directions. Conclusions: Intrafraction tumor movement was highly variable between patients. Tumor position proved the most stable during the respiratory cycle in the end-exhale phase. A better understanding of tumor motion makes it possible to individualize radiation delivery strategies accordingly. Cine-MRI is a successful noninvasive modality to analyze motion for this purpose in the future.

  11. Pacemaker in complicated and refractory breath-holding spells: when to think about it?

    PubMed

    Sartori, Stefano; Nosadini, Margherita; Leoni, Loira; de Palma, Luca; Toldo, Irene; Milanesi, Ornella; Cerutti, Alessia; Suppiej, Agnese

    2015-01-01

    Breath-holding spells (BHS) are benign non-epileptic paroxysmal events of infancy, rarely occurring with high frequency and complicated by prolonged syncope, convulsions and even status epilepticus. In these cases response to medical treatment is often unsatisfactory. Pacemaker implantation is a possible therapeutic option, but its indications, efficacy and complications have not been clarified yet. To report a new case of BHS treated with pacemaker and to review its indications and efficacy in patients with severe BHS. We extensively searched the literature in PubMed on cardiac pacing in patients with BHS and we described a new case. A previously healthy boy presented at the age of 4 months with frequent BHS inconstantly associated to prolonged syncope and post-anoxic non-epileptic and epileptic seizures. Parental reassurance, iron supplementation and piracetam were ineffective. After cardiac pacing at the age of 16 months, BHS and their complications disappeared. We identified 47 patients with BHS treated with pacemaker in the literature. Based on the available data, in all patients asystole or marked bradycardia were documented during BHS or stimulating maneuvers; syncope complicated BHS in 100% of cases and post-anoxic convulsions in 78.3%. Medical treatment before pacing, when administered, was ineffective or poorly tolerated. After pacing, BHS complications disappeared in 86.4% of cases, and decreased in 13.6%. Technical problems with the device were reported in 25.7% of patients and mild medical complications in 11.4%. Pacemaker could be reasonably considered in subjects with frequent and severe BHS, poor response to medications, and demonstration of cardioinhibition during spells. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Caffeine challenge and breath-holding duration in patients with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Masdrakis, Vasilios G; Markianos, Manolis; Vaidakis, Nikolaos; Papakostas, Yiannis G; Oulis, Panagiotis

    2009-02-01

    Breath-holding (BH) has been used as a simple probe to increase endogenous carbon dioxide (CO2). In patients with Panic Disorder (PD), lower baseline BH duration is associated with caffeine-induced panic attacks. In this paper, we assessed BH duration in PD patients in relation to panic attacks induced by caffeine intake. BH duration and state anxiety were assessed in 40 PD patients (12 males), both at baseline and after a 400-mg caffeine challenge test. Patients panicking after caffeine administration (14 patients, 4 males) exhibited a significant reduction of their post-challenge BH duration, while no change of the BH duration was observed in non-panicking patients (26 patients, 8 males). Reduction in post-challenge BH duration was not related to higher anxiety levels--as reflected in the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-State Form scores--independently of the occurrence of a panic attack. Panickers exhibited significantly lower baseline BH duration, compared to non-panickers. Our findings indicate that in PD patients, caffeine-induced panic attacks are strongly associated with a significant reduction of BH duration at both pre- and post-challenge. Jointly, these findings suggest that in a subgroup of PD patients, sensitivity to endogenous CO2 accumulation may underlie both the lower BH durations and the caffeine-induced panic attacks. In this subgroup of PD patients, caffeine might exert its panicogenic properties through the exacerbation of patients' already pathological hypersensitivity to CO2 accumulation, as indicated by both the significant decrease of their BH duration at post-challenge and by their significantly lower baseline BH duration respectively.

  13. Nasal contribution to exhaled nitric oxide during exhalation against resistance or during breath holding

    PubMed Central

    Kharitonov, S. A.; Barnes, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) is increased in the exhaled air of patients with inflammation of the airways, suggesting that this may be a useful measurement to monitor inflammation in diseases such as asthma. However, there have been concerns that exhaled NO may be contaminated by the high concentrations of NO derived from the upper airways, and that this may account for differences in reported values of exhaled NO using different techniques. A study was performed, with argon as a tracer, to determine the extent of nasal contamination of exhaled NO using different expiratory manoeuvres. METHODS: Exhaled and nasal NO were measured by a chemiluminescence analyser. Argon (4.8%) was delivered continuously to the nose. Gas was sampled from the posterior oropharynx and argon and carbon dioxide were measured by mass spectrometry at the same time as NO. RESULTS: During a single expiration against a low resistance and during breath holding there was no evidence for nasal contamination, whereas during exhalation without resistance argon concentration in the oropharynx was increased from 0.91% (95% CI 0.84% to 0.98%) in ambient air to 1.28% (0.9% to 2.24%, p < 0.0001) during a single breath or 2.37% (2.29% to 2.51%, p < 0.0001) during tidal breathing. CONCLUSIONS: Collection of exhaled NO in a reservoir during tidal breathing is likely to be contaminated by NO derived from the nose and this may underestimate any increases in NO derived from the lower respiratory tract in inflammatory diseases. However, with slow expiration against a resistance and created back pressure to close the soft palate, there is no contamination of exhaled air which then reflects concentrations of NO in the lower airways. 


 PMID:9227721

  14. Nasal contribution to exhaled nitric oxide during exhalation against resistance or during breath holding.

    PubMed

    Kharitonov, S A; Barnes, P J

    1997-06-01

    The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) is increased in the exhaled air of patients with inflammation of the airways, suggesting that this may be a useful measurement to monitor inflammation in diseases such as asthma. However, there have been concerns that exhaled NO may be contaminated by the high concentrations of NO derived from the upper airways, and that this may account for differences in reported values of exhaled NO using different techniques. A study was performed, with argon as a tracer, to determine the extent of nasal contamination of exhaled NO using different expiratory manoeuvres. Exhaled and nasal NO were measured by a chemiluminescence analyser. Argon (4.8%) was delivered continuously to the nose. Gas was sampled from the posterior oropharynx and argon and carbon dioxide were measured by mass spectrometry at the same time as NO. During a single expiration against a low resistance and during breath holding there was no evidence for nasal contamination, whereas during exhalation without resistance argon concentration in the oropharynx was increased from 0.91% (95% CI 0.84% to 0.98%) in ambient air to 1.28% (0.9% to 2.24%, p < 0.0001) during a single breath or 2.37% (2.29% to 2.51%, p < 0.0001) during tidal breathing. Collection of exhaled NO in a reservoir during tidal breathing is likely to be contaminated by NO derived from the nose and this may underestimate any increases in NO derived from the lower respiratory tract in inflammatory diseases. However, with slow expiration against a resistance and created back pressure to close the soft palate, there is no contamination of exhaled air which then reflects concentrations of NO in the lower airways.

  15. Real-time automatic fiducial marker tracking in low contrast cine-MV images

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Wei-Yang; Lin, Shu-Fang; Yang, Sheng-Chang; Liou, Shu-Cheng; Nath, Ravinder; Liu Wu

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To develop a real-time automatic method for tracking implanted radiographic markers in low-contrast cine-MV patient images used in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods: Intrafraction motion tracking using radiotherapy beam-line MV images have gained some attention recently in IGRT because no additional imaging dose is introduced. However, MV images have much lower contrast than kV images, therefore a robust and automatic algorithm for marker detection in MV images is a prerequisite. Previous marker detection methods are all based on template matching or its derivatives. Template matching needs to match object shape that changes significantly for different implantation and projection angle. While these methods require a large number of templates to cover various situations, they are often forced to use a smaller number of templates to reduce the computation load because their methods all require exhaustive search in the region of interest. The authors solve this problem by synergetic use of modern but well-tested computer vision and artificial intelligence techniques; specifically the authors detect implanted markers utilizing discriminant analysis for initialization and use mean-shift feature space analysis for sequential tracking. This novel approach avoids exhaustive search by exploiting the temporal correlation between consecutive frames and makes it possible to perform more sophisticated detection at the beginning to improve the accuracy, followed by ultrafast sequential tracking after the initialization. The method was evaluated and validated using 1149 cine-MV images from two prostate IGRT patients and compared with manual marker detection results from six researchers. The average of the manual detection results is considered as the ground truth for comparisons. Results: The average root-mean-square errors of our real-time automatic tracking method from the ground truth are 1.9 and 2.1 pixels for the two patients (0.26 mm/pixel). The

  16. Real-time automatic fiducial marker tracking in low contrast cine-MV images.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Yang; Lin, Shu-Fang; Yang, Sheng-Chang; Liou, Shu-Cheng; Nath, Ravinder; Liu, Wu

    2013-01-01

    To develop a real-time automatic method for tracking implanted radiographic markers in low-contrast cine-MV patient images used in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Intrafraction motion tracking using radiotherapy beam-line MV images have gained some attention recently in IGRT because no additional imaging dose is introduced. However, MV images have much lower contrast than kV images, therefore a robust and automatic algorithm for marker detection in MV images is a prerequisite. Previous marker detection methods are all based on template matching or its derivatives. Template matching needs to match object shape that changes significantly for different implantation and projection angle. While these methods require a large number of templates to cover various situations, they are often forced to use a smaller number of templates to reduce the computation load because their methods all require exhaustive search in the region of interest. The authors solve this problem by synergetic use of modern but well-tested computer vision and artificial intelligence techniques; specifically the authors detect implanted markers utilizing discriminant analysis for initialization and use mean-shift feature space analysis for sequential tracking. This novel approach avoids exhaustive search by exploiting the temporal correlation between consecutive frames and makes it possible to perform more sophisticated detection at the beginning to improve the accuracy, followed by ultrafast sequential tracking after the initialization. The method was evaluated and validated using 1149 cine-MV images from two prostate IGRT patients and compared with manual marker detection results from six researchers. The average of the manual detection results is considered as the ground truth for comparisons. The average root-mean-square errors of our real-time automatic tracking method from the ground truth are 1.9 and 2.1 pixels for the two patients (0.26 mm/pixel). The standard deviations of the

  17. Three-dimensional deformable model for segmentation and tracking of anisotropic cine cardiac MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Alok; O'Donnell, Tom; Singh, Ajit

    1994-05-01

    MR imaging is increasingly being used as a method for analyzing and diagnosing cardiac function. Segmentation of heart chambers facilitates volume computation, as well as ventricular motion analysis. Successful techniques have been developed for segmentation of individual 2D slices. However 2D models limit the description of a 3D phenomenon to two dimensions and use only 2D constraints. The resulting model lacks interslice coherency, making interslice interpolation necessary. In addition, the model is more susceptible to corruption due to noise local to one or more slices. We present work towards an approach to segmenting cine MR images using a 3D deformable model with rigid and nonrigid components. Past approaches have used models without rigid components or used isotropic CT data. Our model adaptively subdivides the mesh in response to the forces extracted from image data. Additionally, the local mesh of the model encodes surface orientation to align the model with the desired edge directions, a crucial constraint for distinguishing close anatomical structures. The modified subdivision algorithm preserves orientation of the elements by vertex ordering. We present results of segmenting two multi-slice cardiac MR image series with interslice resolutions of 8 and 4 mm/slice, and intraslice resolution of 1mm/pixel. We also include work in progress on tracking multislice, multiphase cine cardiac MR sequences with 4mm interslice, and 1mm intraslice resolution.

  18. Fully automated segmentation of left ventricle using dual dynamic programming in cardiac cine MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Luan; Ling, Shan; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are becoming a leading cause of death all over the world. The cardiac function could be evaluated by global and regional parameters of left ventricle (LV) of the heart. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a fully automated scheme for segmentation of LV in short axis cardiac cine MR images. Our fully automated method consists of three major steps, i.e., LV localization, LV segmentation at end-diastolic phase, and LV segmentation propagation to the other phases. First, the maximum intensity projection image along the time phases of the midventricular slice, located at the center of the image, was calculated to locate the region of interest of LV. Based on the mean intensity of the roughly segmented blood pool in the midventricular slice at each phase, end-diastolic (ED) and end-systolic (ES) phases were determined. Second, the endocardial and epicardial boundaries of LV of each slice at ED phase were synchronously delineated by use of a dual dynamic programming technique. The external costs of the endocardial and epicardial boundaries were defined with the gradient values obtained from the original and enhanced images, respectively. Finally, with the advantages of the continuity of the boundaries of LV across adjacent phases, we propagated the LV segmentation from the ED phase to the other phases by use of dual dynamic programming technique. The preliminary results on 9 clinical cardiac cine MR cases show that the proposed method can obtain accurate segmentation of LV based on subjective evaluation.

  19. Treatment of cyanotic breath-holding spells with oral theophylline in a 10-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Garg, Meenal; Goraya, Jatinder S

    2015-06-01

    Cyanotic breath-holding spells are generally benign and resolve spontaneously by 4 to 5 years of age. Treatment with iron and other drugs has been employed in selected cases with very frequent and severe episodes. We describe a 10-year-old boy with recent-onset cyanotic breath-holding spells that were activity limiting. He was unable to participate in physical activities with his peers as any argument or emotional upset provoked these spells. Treatment with oral iron and piracetam was ineffective. However, treatment with oral theophylline produced dramatic amelioration of symptoms, and he was once again able to participate in play activities with his peers. We believe that general central nervous system stimulant and respirogenic effects of theophylline were instrumental in control of symptoms in our child. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Impact of beam angle choice on pencil beam scanning breath-hold proton therapy for lung lesions.

    PubMed

    Gorgisyan, Jenny; Perrin, Rosalind; Lomax, Antony J; Persson, Gitte F; Josipovic, Mirjana; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Weber, Damien C; Munck Af Rosenschold, Per

    2017-06-01

    The breath-hold technique inter alia has been suggested to mitigate the detrimental effect of motion on pencil beam scanned (PBS) proton therapy dose distributions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the robustness of incident proton beam angles to day-to-day anatomical variations in breath-hold. Single field PBS plans at five degrees increments in the transversal plane were made and water-equivalent path lengths (WEPLs) were derived on the planning breath-hold CT (BHCT) for 30 patients diagnosed with locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), early stage NSCLC or lung metastasis. Our treatment planning system was subsequently used to recalculate the plans and derive WEPL on a BHCT scan acquired at the end of the treatment. Changes to the V95%, D95 and mean target dose were evaluated. The difference in WEPL as a function of the beam angle was highly patient specific, with a median of 3.3 mm (range: 0.0-41.1 mm). Slightly larger WEPL differences were located around the lateral or lateral anterior/posterior beam angles. Linear models revealed that changes in dose were associated to the changes in WEPL and the tumor baseline shift (p < 0.05). WEPL changes and tumor baseline shift can serve as reasonable surrogates for dosimetric uncertainty of the target coverage and are well-suited for routine evaluation of plan robustness. The two lateral beam angles are not recommended to use for PBS proton therapy of lung cancer patients treated in breath-hold, due to the poor robustness for several of the patients evaluated.

  1. Development and application of a real-time monitoring and feedback system for deep inspiration breath hold based on external marker tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, Markus; Kontrisova, Kristina; Dieckmann, Karin; Bogner, Joachim; Poetter, Richard; Georg, Dietmar

    2006-08-15

    Respiration can cause tumor movements in thoracic regions of up to 3 cm. To minimize motion effects several approaches, such as gating and deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH), are still under development. The goal of our study was to develop and evaluate a noninvasive system for gated DIBH (GDIBH) based on external markers. DIBH monitoring was based on an infrared tracking system and an in-house-developed software. The in-house software provided the breathing curve in real time and was used as on-line information for a prototype of a feedback device. Reproducibility and stability of the breath holds were evaluated without and with feedback. Thirty-five patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) performed DIBH maneuvers after each treatment. For 16 patients dynamic imaging sequences on a multislice CT were used to determine the correlation between tumor and external markers. The relative reproducibility of DIBH maneuvers was improved with the feedback device (74.5%{+-}17.1% without versus 93.0%{+-}4.4% with feedback). The correlation between tumor and marker was good (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.83{+-}0.17). The regression slopes showed great intersubject variability but on average the internal margin in a DIBH treatment situation could be theoretically reduced by 3 mm with the feedback device. DIBH monitoring could be realized in a noninvasive manner through external marker tracking. We conclude that reduction of internal margins can be achieved with a feedback system but should be performed with great care due to the individual behavior of target motion.

  2. Development and application of a real-time monitoring and feedback system for deep inspiration breath hold based on external marker tracking.

    PubMed

    Stock, Markus; Kontrisova, Kristina; Dieckmann, Karin; Bogner, Joachim; Poetter, Richard; Georg, Dietmar

    2006-08-01

    Respiration can cause tumor movements in thoracic regions of up to 3 cm. To minimize motion effects several approaches, such as gating and deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH), are still under development. The goal of our study was to develop and evaluate a noninvasive system for gated DIBH (GDIBH) based on external markers. DIBH monitoring was based on an infrared tracking system and an in-house-developed software. The in-house software provided the breathing curve in real time and was used as on-line information for a prototype of a feedback device. Reproducibility and stability of the breath holds were evaluated without and with feedback. Thirty-five patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) performed DIBH maneuvers after each treatment. For 16 patients dynamic imaging sequences on a multislice CT were used to determine the correlation between tumor and external markers. The relative reproducibility of DIBH maneuvers was improved with the feedback device (74.5% +/- 17.1% without versus 93.0% +/- 4.4% with feedback). The correlation between tumor and marker was good (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.83 +/- 0.17). The regression slopes showed great intersubject variability but on average the internal margin in a DIBH treatment situation could be theoretically reduced by 3 mm with the feedback device. DIBH monitoring could be realized in a noninvasive manner through external marker tracking. We conclude that reduction of internal margins can be achieved with a feedback system but should be performed with great care due to the individual behavior of target motion.

  3. Double-blind, placebo-controlled trial on the effect of piracetam on breath-holding spells.

    PubMed

    Sawires, Happy; Botrous, Osama

    2012-07-01

    Breath-holding spells (BHS) are apparently frightening events occurring in otherwise healthy children.The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of piracetam in the treatment of breath-holding spells. Forty patients with BHS (who were classified into two groups)were involved in a double-blinded placebo-controlled prospective study. Piracetam was given to group A while group B received placebo. Patients were followed monthly for a total period of 4 months. The numbers of attacks/month before and monthly after treatment were documented, and the overall number of attacks/month after treatment was calculated in both groups. The median number of attacks/month before treatment in the two groups was 5.5 and 5,respectively, while after the first month of treatment, it was 2 and 5, respectively. The median overall number of attacks/month after treatment in both groups was 1 and 5, respectively.There was a significant decline of number of attacks after piracetam treatment compared to placebo (p value<0.001). There were no reported side effects of the piracetam throughout the study period. In conclusion, piracetam is a safe and effective drug for the treatment of breath-holding spells in children.

  4. Preliminary observations on the effect of hypoxic and hyperbaric stress on pulmonary gas exchange in breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Garbella, Erika; Piarulli, Andrea; Fornai, Edo; Pingitore, Alessandro; Prediletto, Renato

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate pulmonary alveolar-capillary membrane integrity and ventilation/perfusion mismatch after breath-hold diving. Pulmonary diffusing capacity to carbon monoxide (DLCO) and nitric oxide (DLNO), haemoglobin (Hb) and haematocrit (Hct) were measured in six elite divers before and at 2, 10 and 25 minutes after a maximal breath-hold dive to a depth of 10 metres' sea water. Compared to pre-dive, DLCO showed a slight increase at 2 minutes in five subjects and a tendency to decrease at 25 minutes (P < 0.001) in all subjects. DLNO showed an increase at 10 minutes in three divers and a slight decrease at 25 minutes in five subjects. There was a small but significant (P < 0.001) increase in Hb and Hct at 2 minutes, possibly affecting the DLCO measurements. An early but transient increase in DLCO in five divers may reflect the central shift in blood volume during a breath-hold dive. The late parallel decrease in DLCO and DLNO likely reflects alveolar-capillary distress (interstitial oedema). The DLNO increase in three subjects at 10 minutes may suggest ventilation/perfusion mismatch.

  5. Effect of complete denture wearing on deglutition time: a cine-magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Gokce, H S; Gokce, S M; Akin, E; Bulakbasi, N; Akyol, M

    2012-03-01

    Purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of complete denture wearing on deglutition time (DT), hyoid bone and larynx movements in edentulous patients with real-time balanced turbo field echo cine-magnetic resonance imaging. Subjects were examined by cine-magnetic resonance imaging in supine position during swallowing water. Two sets of images for 23 edentulous (with/without wearing complete dentures) and one for 23 dentulous patients were obtained. Radiographic outputs representing three consecutive deglutition stages (oral, pharyngeal and oesophageal) were provided to perform measurements. Deglutition time significantly increased when edentulous patients wore their dentures (mean 0·75 s increased to 1·17 s), whereas dentulous patients' DT was about 0·91 s (P ≤ 0.05). The duration of deglutition is crucial because prolonged pharyngeal transit times increases the risk of aspiration. Within the limitations of the study, complete denture wearing could increase the shortened DT of the edentulous patients. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Free breathing whole-heart 3D CINE MRI with self-gated Cartesian trajectory.

    PubMed

    Usman, M; Ruijsink, B; Nazir, M S; Cruz, G; Prieto, C

    2017-05-01

    To present a method that uses a novel free-running self-gated acquisition to achieve isotropic resolution in whole heart 3D Cartesian cardiac CINE MRI. 3D cardiac CINE MRI using navigator gating results in long acquisition times. Recently, several frameworks based on self-gated non-Cartesian trajectories have been proposed to accelerate this acquisition. However, non-Cartesian reconstructions are computationally expensive due to gridding, particularly in 3D. In this work, we propose a novel highly efficient self-gated Cartesian approach for 3D cardiac CINE MRI. Acquisition is performed using CArtesian trajectory with Spiral PRofile ordering and Tiny golden angle step for eddy current reduction (so called here CASPR-Tiger). Data is acquired continuously under free breathing (retrospective ECG gating, no preparation pulses interruption) for 4-5min and 4D whole-heart volumes (3D+cardiac phases) with isotropic spatial resolution are reconstructed from all available data using a soft gating technique combined with temporal total variation (TV) constrained iterative SENSE reconstruction. For data acquired on eight healthy subjects and three patients, the reconstructed images using the proposed method had good contrast and spatio-temporal variations, correctly recovering diastolic and systolic cardiac phases. Non-significant differences (P>0.05) were observed in cardiac functional measurements obtained with proposed 3D approach and gold standard 2D multi-slice breath-hold acquisition. The proposed approach enables isotropic 3D whole heart Cartesian cardiac CINE MRI in 4 to 5min free breathing acquisition. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Automatic detection of myocardial contours in cine-computed tomographic images

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, K.P.; Dove, E.L.; Stanford, W.; Chandran, K.B. . Dept. of Biomedical Engineering); McPherson, D.D.; Gotteiner, N.L.; Vonesh, M.J. . Dept. of Internal Medicine); Reed, J.E.; Rumberger, J.A. . Dept. of Cardiovascular Diseases)

    1994-06-01

    Quantitative evaluation of cardiac function from cardiac images requires the identification of the myocardial walls. This generally requires the clinician to view the image and interactively trace the contours. This method is susceptible to great variability that depends on the experience and knowledge of the particular operator tracing the contours. The particular imaging modality that is used may also add tracing difficulties. Cine-computed tomography (cine-CT) is an imaging modality capable of providing high quality cross-sectional images of the heart. CT images, however, are cluttered. To decrease this variability, investigators have developed computer-assisted or near-automatic techniques for tracing these contours. All of these techniques, however, require some operator intervention to confidently identify myocardial borders. The authors present a new algorithm that automatically finds the heart within the chest, and then proceeds to outline the myocardial contours. Information at each tomographic slice is used to estimate the contours at the next tomographic slice, thus allowing the algorithm to work in near-apical cross-sectional images where the myocardial borders are often difficult to identify. The algorithm does not require operator input and can be used in a batch mode to process large quantities of data. An evaluation and correction phase is included to allow an operator to view the results and selectively correct portions of contours. They tested the algorithm by automatically identifying the myocardial borders of 27 cardiac images obtained from three human subjects and quantitatively comparing these automatically determined borders with those traced by an experienced cardiologist.

  8. Development of ultrasound/endoscopy PACS (picture archiving and communication system) and investigation of compression method for cine images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Masakazu; Tsukui, Hideki

    2002-09-01

    ABSTRACT Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) is a system which connects imaging modalities, image archives, and image workstations to reduce film handling cost and improve hospital workflow. Handling diagnostic ultrasound and endoscopy images is challenging, because it produces large amount of data such as motion (cine) images of 30 frames per second, 640 x 480 in resolution, with 24-bit color. Also, it requires enough image quality for clinical review. We have developed PACS which is able to manage ultrasound and endoscopy cine images with above resolution and frame rate, and investigate suitable compression method and compression rate for clinical image review. Results show that clinicians require capability for frame-by-frame forward and backward review of cine images because they carefully look through motion images to find certain color patterns which may appear in one frame. In order to satisfy this quality, we have chosen motion JPEG, installed and confirmed that we could capture this specific pattern. As for acceptable image compression rate, we have performed subjective evaluation. No subjects could tell the difference between original non-compressed images and 1:10 lossy compressed JPEG images. One subject could tell the difference between original and 1:20 lossy compressed JPEG images although it is acceptable. Thus, ratios of 1:10 to 1:20 are acceptable to reduce data amount and cost while maintaining quality for clinical review.

  9. 3D tongue motion from tagged and cine MR images.

    PubMed

    Xing, Fangxu; Woo, Jonghye; Murano, Emi Z; Lee, Junghoon; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the deformation of the tongue during human speech is important for head and neck surgeons and speech and language scientists. Tagged magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used to image 2D motion, and data from multiple image planes can be combined via post-processing to yield estimates of 3D motion. However, lacking boundary information, this approach suffers from inaccurate estimates near the tongue surface. This paper describes a method that combines two sources of information to yield improved estimation of 3D tongue motion. The method uses the harmonic phase (HARP) algorithm to extract motion from tags and diffeomorphic demons to provide surface deformation. It then uses an incompressible deformation estimation algorithm to incorporate both sources of displacement information to form an estimate of the 3D whole tongue motion. Experimental results show that use of combined information improves motion estimation near the tongue surface, a problem that has previously been reported as problematic in HARP analysis, while preserving accurate internal motion estimates. Results on both normal and abnormal tongue motions are shown.

  10. Dosimetric investigation of breath-hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Kishimoto, Shun; Iwamura, Kohei; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Nakamura, Akira; Matsuo, Yukinori; Shibuya, Keiko; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: To experimentally investigate the effects of variations in respiratory motion during breath-holding (BH) at end-exhalation (EE) on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (BH-IMRT) dose distribution using a motor-driven base, films, and an ionization chamber. Methods: Measurements were performed on a linear accelerator, which has a 120-leaf independently moving multileaf collimator with 5-mm leaf width at the isocenter for the 20-cm central field. Polystyrene phantoms with dimensions of 40 x 40 x 10 cm were set on a motor-driven base. All gantry angles of seven IMRT plans (a total of 35 fields) were changed to zero, and doses were then delivered to a film placed at a depth of 4 cm and an ionization chamber at a depth of 5 cm in the phantom with a dose rate of 600 MU/min under the following conditions: pulsation from the abdominal aorta and baseline drift with speeds of 0.2 mm/s (BD{sub 0.2mm/s}) and 0.4 mm/s (BD{sub 0.4mm/s}). As a reference for comparison, doses were also delivered to the chamber and film under stationary conditions. Results: In chamber measurements, means {+-} standard deviations of the dose deviations between stationary and moving conditions were -0.52% {+-} 1.03% (range: -3.41-1.05%), -0.07% {+-} 1.21% (range: -1.88-4.31%), and 0.03% {+-} 1.70% (range: -2.70-6.41%) for pulsation, BD{sub 0.2mm/s}, and BD{sub 0.4mm/s}, respectively. The {gamma} passing rate ranged from 99.5% to 100.0%, even with the criterion of 2%/1 mm for pulsation pattern. In the case of BD{sub 0.4mm/s}, the {gamma} passing rate for four of 35 fields (11.4%) did not reach 90% with a criterion of 3%/3 mm. The differences in {gamma} passing rate between BD{sub 0.2mm/s} and BD{sub 0.4mm/s} were statistically significant for each criterion. Taking {gamma} passing rates of > 90% as acceptable with a criterion of 3%/3 mm, large differences were observed in the {gamma} passing rate between the baseline drift of {<=}5 mm and that of >5 mm (minimum {gamma} passing rate: 92.0% vs 82

  11. Deposition of Particles in the Alveolar Airways: Inhalation and Breath-Hold with Pharmaceutical Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Khajeh-Hosseini-Dalasm, Navvab; Longest, P. Worth

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that factors such as airway wall motion, inhalation waveform, and geometric complexity influence the deposition of aerosols in the alveolar airways. However, deposition fraction correlations are not available that account for these factors in determining alveolar deposition. The objective of this study was to generate a new space-filling model of the pulmonary acinus region and implement this model to develop correlations of aerosol deposition that can be used to predict the alveolar dose of inhaled pharmaceutical products. A series of acinar models was constructed containing different numbers of alveolar duct generations based on space-filling 14-hedron elements. Selected ventilation waveforms were quick-and-deep and slow-and-deep inhalation consistent with the use of most pharmaceutical aerosol inhalers. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were used to predict aerosol transport and deposition in the series of acinar models across various orientations with gravity where ventilation was driven by wall motion. Primary findings indicated that increasing the number of alveolar duct generations beyond 3 had a negligible impact on total acinar deposition, and total acinar deposition was not affected by gravity orientation angle. A characteristic model containing three alveolar duct generations (D3) was then used to develop correlations of aerosol deposition in the alveolar airways as a function of particle size and particle residence time in the geometry. An alveolar deposition parameter was determined in which deposition correlated with d2t over the first half of inhalation followed by correlation with dt2, where d is the aerodynamic diameter of the particles and t is the potential particle residence time in the alveolar model. Optimal breath-hold times to allow 95% deposition of inhaled 1, 2, and 3 μm particles once inside the alveolar region were approximately >10, 2.7, and 1.2 s, respectively. Coupling of the deposition

  12. Modeled risk of ischemic heart disease following left breast irradiation with deep inspiration breath hold.

    PubMed

    Eldredge-Hindy, Harriet B; Duffy, Danielle; Yamoah, Kosj; Simone, Nicole L; Skowronski, Jenna; Dicker, Adam P; Anne, Pramila R

    2015-01-01

    Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) dramatically reduces radiation dose to the heart during radiation therapy (RT) for left-sided breast cancer, but the subsequent risk of radiation-related ischemic heart disease (IHD) is unknown. Our primary objective was to quantify the risk of IHD following RT with DIBH using modeled risk estimates (MRE). Patients with stage 0-III left-sided breast cancer who received RT with DIBH were retrospectively studied. Computed tomography simulations were performed with DIBH and during free breathing (FB) for comparison of dosimetry. Patients were classified as high risk, at risk, or at optimal risk for IHD and baseline risk estimates for IHD were obtained from historic controls. The excess relative risk of IHD because of left breast RT was calculated using patient-specific dosimetry and an existing dose-effect model. MRE were determined from the sum of baseline risk estimates and excess risk. Between 2002 and 2011, 111 patients were treated using DIBH and 104 were available for analysis. MRE for 10-year risk of IHD with DIBH and FB were 3.25% (interquartile range [IQR], 1.20-3.44) and 3.64% (IQR, 1.43-3.81) (P < .0001), respectively. MRE for lifetime risk of IHD with DIBH and FB were 9.71% (IQR, 1.98-16.62) and 10.28% (IQR, 2.05-16.97) (P < .0001), respectively. MRE were significantly reduced by use of DIBH in all risk groups. The largest absolute risk reduction resulting from the DIBH technique was observed in patients at high risk for IHD. The median relative risk reduction in MRE resulting from DIBH was 11.4% (range, 0-32.0) and 6.4% (range, 0-23.4) at 10 years and throughout the patients' lifetime, respectively. After a median follow-up of 7.0 years (range, 1.3-11.2), the estimated 10-year freedom from IHD was 99.0% (95% confidence interval 93.4-99.8). RT with DIBH may provide breast cancer survivors a clinically significant reduction in the risk of IHD. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by

  13. Left ventricular volume measurements with free breathing respiratory self-gated 3-dimensional golden angle radial whole-heart cine imaging - Feasibility and reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Holst, Karen; Ugander, Martin; Sigfridsson, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    To develop and evaluate a free breathing respiratory self-gated isotropic resolution technique for left ventricular (LV) volume measurements. A 3D radial trajectory with double golden-angle ordering was used for free-running data acquisition during free breathing in 9 healthy volunteers. A respiratory self-gating signal was extracted from the center of k-space and used with the electrocardiogram to bin all data into 3 respiratory and 25 cardiac phases. 3D image volumes were reconstructed and the LV endocardial border was segmented. LV volume measurements and reproducibility from 3D free breathing cine were compared to conventional 2D breath-held cine. No difference was found between 3D free breathing cine and 2D breath-held cine with regards to LV ejection fraction, stroke volume, end-systolic volume and end-diastolic volume (P<0.05 for all). The test-retest differences did not differ between 3D free breathing cine and 2D breath-held cine (P<0.05 for all). 3D free breathing cine and conventional 2D breath-held cine showed similar values and test-retest repeatability for LV volumes in healthy volunteers. 3D free breathing cine enabled retrospective sorting and arbitrary angulation of isotropic data, and could correctly measure LV volumes during free breathing acquisition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 2D cine DENSE with low encoding frequencies accurately quantifies cardiac mechanics with improved image characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wehner, Gregory J; Grabau, Jonathan D; Suever, Jonathan D; Haggerty, Christopher M; Jing, Linyuan; Powell, David K; Hamlet, Sean M; Vandsburger, Moriel H; Zhong, Xiaodong; Fornwalt, Brandon K

    2015-11-04

    Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) encodes displacement into the phase of the magnetic resonance signal. The encoding frequency (ke) maps the measured phase to tissue displacement while the strength of the encoding gradients affects image quality. 2D cine DENSE studies have used a ke of 0.10 cycles/mm, which is high enough to remove an artifact-generating echo from k-space, provide high sensitivity to tissue displacements, and dephase the blood pool. However, through-plane dephasing can remove the unwanted echo and dephase the blood pool without relying on high ke. Additionally, the high sensitivity comes with the costs of increased phase wrapping and intra-voxel dephasing. We hypothesized that ke below 0.10 cycles/mm can be used to improve image characteristics and provide accurate measures of cardiac mechanics. Spiral cine DENSE images were obtained for 10 healthy subjects and 10 patients with a history of heart disease on a 3 T Siemens Trio. A mid-ventricular short-axis image was acquired with different ke: 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, and 0.10 cycles/mm. Peak twist, circumferential strain, and radial strain were compared between acquisitions employing different ke using Bland-Altman analyses and coefficients of variation. The percentage of wrapped pixels in the phase images at end-systole was calculated for each ke. The dephasing of the blood signal and signal to noise ratio (SNR) were also calculated and compared. Negligible differences were seen in strains and twist for all ke between 0.04 and 0.10 cycles/mm. These differences were of the same magnitude as inter-test differences. Specifically, the acquisitions with 0.04 cycles/mm accurately quantified cardiac mechanics and had zero phase wrapping. Compared to 0.10 cycles/mm, the acquisitions with 0.04 cycles/mm had 9 % greater SNR and negligible differences in blood pool dephasing. For 2D cine DENSE with through-plane dephasing, the encoding frequency can be lowered to 0.04

  15. Comparative assessment of liver tumor motion using cine-magnetic resonance imaging versus 4-dimensional computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Annemarie T; Apisarnthanarax, Smith; Yin, Lingshu; Zou, Wei; Rosen, Mark; Plastaras, John P; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Metz, James M; Teo, Boon-Keng

    2015-04-01

    To compare the extent of tumor motion between 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) and cine-MRI in patients with hepatic tumors treated with radiation therapy. Patients with liver tumors who underwent 4DCT and 2-dimensional biplanar cine-MRI scans during simulation were retrospectively reviewed to determine the extent of target motion in the superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and lateral directions. Cine-MRI was performed over 5 minutes. Tumor motion from MRI was determined by tracking the centroid of the gross tumor volume using deformable image registration. Motion estimates from 4DCT were performed by evaluation of the fiducial, residual contrast (or liver contour) positions in each CT phase. Sixteen patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (n=11), cholangiocarcinoma (n=3), and liver metastasis (n=2) were reviewed. Cine-MRI motion was larger than 4DCT for the superior-inferior direction in 50% of patients by a median of 3.0 mm (range, 1.5-7 mm), the anterior-posterior direction in 44% of patients by a median of 2.5 mm (range, 1-5.5 mm), and laterally in 63% of patients by a median of 1.1 mm (range, 0.2-4.5 mm). Cine-MRI frequently detects larger differences in hepatic intrafraction tumor motion when compared with 4DCT most notably in the superior-inferior direction, and may be useful when assessing the need for or treating without respiratory management, particularly in patients with unreliable 4DCT imaging. Margins wider than the internal target volume as defined by 4DCT were required to encompass nearly all the motion detected by cine-MRI for some of the patients in this study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Higher resolution cine imaging with compressed sensing for accelerated clinical left ventricular evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Aaron C W; Strugnell, Wendy; Riley, Robyn; Schmitt, Benjamin; Zenge, Michael; Schmidt, Michaela; Morris, Norman R; Hamilton-Craig, Christian

    2017-06-01

    To assess the clinical feasibility of a compressed sensing cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence of both high temporal and spatial resolution (CS_bSSFP) in comparison to a balanced steady-state free precession cine (bSSFP) sequence for reliable quantification of left ventricular (LV) volumes and mass. Segmented MRI cine images were acquired on a 1.5T scanner in 50 patients in the LV short-axis stack orientation using a retrospectively gated conventional bSSFP sequence (generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition [GRAPPA] acceleration factor 2), followed by a prospectively triggered CS_bSSFP sequence with net acceleration factor of 8. Image quality was assessed by published criteria. Comparison of sequences was made in LV volumes and mass, image quality score, quantitative regional myocardial wall motion, and imaging time using Pearson's correlation, Bland-Altman and paired 2-tailed Student's t-test. Differences (bSSFP minus CS_bSSFP, mean ± SD) and Pearson's correlations were 14.8 ± 16.3 (P = 0.31) and r = 0.98 (P < 0.0001) for end-diastolic volume (EDV), 8.4 ± 11.3 (P = 0.54) and r = 0.99 (P < 0.0001) for end-systolic volume (ESV), -0.4 ± 2.5 (P = 0.87) and r = 0.97 (P < 0.0001) for EF, and -0.9 ± 11.8 (P = 0.92) and r = 0.97 (P < 0.0001) for LV mass. Bland-Altman analyses [bias and (limits of agreement)] revealed strong agreement in LVEDV [8.7 ml, (-12.1, 29.6)], LVESV [4.3 ml, (-11.9, 20.6)], LVEF [-0.02%, (-5.37, 5.33)], and myocardial mass [-6.1 g, (-14.7, 26.9)]. Image quality was comparable with a similar mean score (P = 0.42), with a good correlation in image quality observed (r = 0.68, P < 0.0001). Quantitative regional myocardial wall motion demonstrated strong correlation between the sequences (r = 0.87, P < 0.0001). Imaging time was significantly shorter for the CS_bSSFP sequence (1.1 ± 0.5 versus 5.6 ± 1.6 min, P < 0.0001). The novel high

  17. A four-dimensional motion field atlas of the tongue from tagged and cine magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Fangxu; Prince, Jerry L.; Stone, Maureen; Wedeen, Van J.; El Fakhri, Georges; Woo, Jonghye

    2017-02-01

    Representation of human tongue motion using three-dimensional vector fields over time can be used to better understand tongue function during speech, swallowing, and other lingual behaviors. To characterize the inter-subject variability of the tongue's shape and motion of a population carrying out one of these functions it is desirable to build a statistical model of the four-dimensional (4D) tongue. In this paper, we propose a method to construct a spatio-temporal atlas of tongue motion using magnetic resonance (MR) images acquired from fourteen healthy human subjects. First, cine MR images revealing the anatomical features of the tongue are used to construct a 4D intensity image atlas. Second, tagged MR images acquired to capture internal motion are used to compute a dense motion field at each time frame using a phase-based motion tracking method. Third, motion fields from each subject are pulled back to the cine atlas space using the deformation fields computed during the cine atlas construction. Finally, a spatio-temporal motion field atlas is created to show a sequence of mean motion fields and their inter-subject variation. The quality of the atlas was evaluated by deforming cine images in the atlas space. Comparison between deformed and original cine images showed high correspondence. The proposed method provides a quantitative representation to observe the commonality and variability of the tongue motion field for the first time, and shows potential in evaluation of common properties such as strains and other tensors based on motion fields.

  18. Effects of Incentive Spirometry on Respiratory Motion in Healthy Subjects Using Cine Breathing Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akazawa, Tsutomu; Sakuma, Tsuyoshi; Nagaya, Shigeyuki; Sonoda, Masaru; Tanaka, Yuji; Katogi, Takehide; Nemoto, Tetsuharu; Minami, Shohei

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effectiveness of incentive spirometry on respiratory motion in healthy subjects using cine breathing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods Ten non-smoking healthy subjects without any history of respiratory disease were studied. Subjects were asked to perform pulmonary training using incentive spirometry every day for two weeks. To assess the effectiveness of this training, pulmonary function tests and cine breathing MRI were performed before starting pulmonary training and two weeks after its completion. Results After training, there were significant improvements in vital capacity (VC) from 3.58±0.8 L to 3.74±0.8 L and in %VC from 107.4±10.8 to 112.1±8.2. Significant changes were observed in the right diaphragm motion, right chest wall motion, and left chest wall motion, which were increased from 55.7±9.6 mm to 63.4±10.2 mm, from 15.6±6.1 mm to 23.4±10.4 mm, and from 16.3±7.6 mm to 22.0±9.8 mm, respectively. Conclusion Two weeks of training using incentive spirometry provided improvements in pulmonary function and respiratory motion, which suggested that incentive spirometry may be a useful preoperative modality for improving pulmonary function during the perioperative period. PMID:26161341

  19. Four-dimensional dose reconstruction through in vivo phase matching of cine images of electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jihyung; Jung, Jae Won; Kim, Jong Oh; Yi, Byong Yong; Yeo, Inhwan

    2016-07-01

    A method is proposed to reconstruct a four-dimensional (4D) dose distribution using phase matching of measured cine images to precalculated images of electronic portal imaging device (EPID). (1) A phantom, designed to simulate a tumor in lung (a polystyrene block with a 3 cm diameter embedded in cork), was placed on a sinusoidally moving platform with an amplitude of 1 cm and a period of 4 s. Ten-phase 4D computed tomography (CT) images of the phantom were acquired. A planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding a margin of 1 cm around the internal target volume of the tumor. (2) Three beams were designed, which included a static beam, a theoretical dynamic beam, and a planning-optimized dynamic beam (PODB). While the theoretical beam was made by manually programming a simplistic sliding leaf motion, the planning-optimized beam was obtained from treatment planning. From the three beams, three-dimensional (3D) doses on the phantom were calculated; 4D dose was calculated by means of the ten phase images (integrated over phases afterward); serving as "reference" images, phase-specific EPID dose images under the lung phantom were also calculated for each of the ten phases. (3) Cine EPID images were acquired while the beams were irradiated to the moving phantom. (4) Each cine image was phase-matched to a phase-specific CT image at which common irradiation occurred by intercomparing the cine image with the reference images. (5) Each cine image was used to reconstruct dose in the phase-matched CT image, and the reconstructed doses were summed over all phases. (6) The summation was compared with forwardly calculated 4D and 3D dose distributions. Accounting for realistic situations, intratreatment breathing irregularity was simulated by assuming an amplitude of 0.5 cm for the phantom during a portion of breathing trace in which the phase matching could not be performed. Intertreatment breathing irregularity between the time of treatment and the time of planning CT was

  20. The impact of cine EPID image acquisition frame rate on markerless soft-tissue tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, Stephen Rottmann, Joerg; Berbeco, Ross

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Although reduction of the cine electronic portal imaging device (EPID) acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor autotracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87 Hz with an amorphous silicon portal imager (AS1000, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The maximum frame rate of 12.87 Hz is imposed by the EPID. Low frame rate images were obtained by continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for autotracking. The difference between the programmed and autotracked positions of a Las Vegas phantom moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at 11 field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise are correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the autotracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29 Hz. Above 4.29 Hz, changes in errors were negligible withδ < 1.60 mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R = 0.94) and patient studies (R = 0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R −0.58 and −0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusions: Cine EPID

  1. Determination of ethane, pentane and isoprene in exhaled air--effects of breath-holding, flow rate and purified air.

    PubMed

    Lärstad, M A E; Torén, K; Bake, B; Olin, A-C

    2007-01-01

    Exhaled ethane, pentane and isoprene have been proposed as biomarkers of oxidative stress. The objectives were to explore whether ethane, pentane and isoprene are produced within the airways and to explore the effect of different sampling parameters on analyte concentrations. The flow dependency of the analyte concentrations, the concentrations in dead-space and alveolar air after breath-holding and the influence of inhaling purified air on analyte concentrations were investigated. The analytical method involved thermal desorption from sorbent tubes and gas chromatography. The studied group comprised 13 subjects with clinically stable asthma and 14 healthy controls. Ethane concentrations decreased slightly, but significantly, at higher flow rates in subjects with asthma (P = 0.0063) but not in healthy controls. Pentane levels were increased at higher flow rates both in healthy and asthmatic subjects (P = 0.022 and 0.0063 respectively). Isoprene levels were increased at higher flow rates, but only significantly in healthy subjects (P = 0.0034). After breath-holding, no significant changes in ethane levels were observed. Pentane and isoprene levels increased significantly after 20 s of breath-holding. Inhalation of purified air before exhalation resulted in a substantial decrease in ethane levels, a moderate decrease in pentane levels and an increase in isoprene levels. The major fractions of exhaled ethane, pentane and isoprene seem to be of systemic origin. There was, however, a tendency for ethane to be flow rate dependent in asthmatic subjects, although to a very limited extent, suggesting that small amounts of ethane may be formed in the airways.

  2. Feasibility of single breath-hold left ventricular function with 3 Tesla TSENSE acquisition and 3D modeling analysis

    PubMed Central

    Young, Alistair A; Cowan, Brett R; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Wintersperger, Bernd J

    2008-01-01

    Background A single breath-hold evaluation of ventricular function would allow assessment in cases where scan time or patient tolerance is limited. Spatiotemporal acceleration techniques such as TSENSE decrease cardiovascular MR acquisition time, but standard slice summation analysis requires enough short axis slices to cover the left ventricle (LV). By reducing the number of short axis slices, incorporating long axis slices, and applying a 3D model based analysis, it may be possible to obtain accurate LV mass and volumes. We evaluated LV volume, mass and ejection fraction at 3.0T using a 3D modeling analysis in 9 patients with a history of myocardial infarction and one healthy volunteer. Acquisition consisted of a standard short axis SSFP stack and a 15 heart-beat single breath-hold six slice multi-planar (4 short and 2 long axis) TSENSE SSFP protocol with an acceleration factor of R = 4. Results Differences (standard minus accelerated protocol mean ± s.d.) and coefficients of variation (s.d. of differences as a percentage of the average estimate) were 7.5 ± 9.6 mL and 6% for end-diastolic volume (p = 0.035), 0.4 ± 5.1 mL and 7% for end-systolic volume (p = NS), 7.1 ± 8.1 mL and 9% for stroke volume (p = 0.022), 2.2 ± 2.8% and 5% for ejection fraction (p = 0.035), and -7.1 ± 6.2 g and 4% for LV mass (p = 0.005), respectively. Intra- and inter-observer errors were similar for both protocols (p = NS for all measures). Conclusion These results suggest that clinically useful estimates of LV function can be obtained in a TSENSE accelerated single breath-hold reduced slice acquisition at 3T using 3D modeling analysis techniques. PMID:18495040

  3. Computerized method for measurement of displacement vectors of target positions on EPID cine images in stereotactic radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Anai, Shigeo; Yoshidome, Satoshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nomoto, Satoshi; Honda, Hiroshi; Onizuka, Yoshihiko; Terashima, Hiromi

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for measurement of displacement vectors of target position on electronic portal imaging device (EPID) cine images in a treatment without implanted markers. Our proposed method was based on a template matching technique with cross-correlation coefficient between a reference portal (RP) image and each consecutive portal (CP) image acquired by the EPID. EPID images with 512×384 pixels (pixel size:0.56 mm) were acquired in a cine mode at a sampling rate of 0.5 frame/sec by using an energy of 4, 6, or 10MV on linear accelerators. The displacement vector of the target on each cine image was determined from the position in which took the maximum cross-correlation value between the RP image and each CP image. We applied our method to EPID cine images of a lung phantom with a tumor model simulating respiratory motion, and 5 cases with a non-small cell lung cancer and one case of metastasis. For validation of our proposed method, displacement vectors of a target position calculated by our method were compared with those determined manually by two radiation oncologists. As a result, for lung phantom images, target displacements by our method correlated well with those by the oncologists (r=0.972 - 0.994). Correlation values for 4 cases ranged from 0.854 to 0.991, but the values for the other two cases were 0.609 and 0.644. This preliminary result suggested that our method may be useful for monitoring of displacement vectors of target positions without implanted markers in stereotactic radiotherapy.

  4. Detection and correction for EPID and gantry sag during arc delivery using cine EPID imaging.

    PubMed

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; O'Connor, Daryl J; McCowan, Peter M; McCurdy, Boyd M C; Greer, Peter B

    2012-02-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have been studied and used for pretreatment and in-vivo dosimetry applications for many years. The application of EPIDs for dosimetry in arc treatments requires accurate characterization of the mechanical sag of the EPID and gantry during rotation. Several studies have investigated the effects of gravity on the sag of these systems but each have limitations. In this study, an easy experiment setup and accurate algorithm have been introduced to characterize and correct for the effect of EPID and gantry sag during arc delivery. Three metallic ball bearings were used as markers in the beam: two of them fixed to the gantry head and the third positioned at the isocenter. EPID images were acquired during a 360° gantry rotation in cine imaging mode. The markers were tracked in EPID images and a robust in-house developed MATLAB code was used to analyse the images and find the EPID sag in three directions as well as the EPID + gantry sag by comparison to the reference gantry zero image. The algorithm results were then tested against independent methods. The method was applied to compare the effect in clockwise and counter clockwise gantry rotations and different source-to-detector distances (SDDs). The results were monitored for one linear accelerator over a course of 15 months and six other linear-accelerators from two treatment centers were also investigated using this method. The generalized shift patterns were derived from the data and used in an image registration algorithm to correct for the effect of the mechanical sag in the system. The Gamma evaluation (3%, 3 mm) technique was used to investigate the improvement in alignment of cine EPID images of a fixed field, by comparing both individual images and the sum of images in a series with the reference gantry zero image. The mechanical sag during gantry rotation was dependent on the gantry angle and was larger in the in-plane direction, although the patterns were not

  5. Detection and correction for EPID and gantry sag during arc delivery using cine EPID imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; O'Connor, Daryl J.; McCowan, Peter M.; McCurdy, Boyd M. C.; Greer, Peter B.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have been studied and used for pretreatment and in-vivo dosimetry applications for many years. The application of EPIDs for dosimetry in arc treatments requires accurate characterization of the mechanical sag of the EPID and gantry during rotation. Several studies have investigated the effects of gravity on the sag of these systems but each have limitations. In this study, an easy experiment setup and accurate algorithm have been introduced to characterize and correct for the effect of EPID and gantry sag during arc delivery. Methods: Three metallic ball bearings were used as markers in the beam: two of them fixed to the gantry head and the third positioned at the isocenter. EPID images were acquired during a 360 deg. gantry rotation in cine imaging mode. The markers were tracked in EPID images and a robust in-house developed MATLAB code was used to analyse the images and find the EPID sag in three directions as well as the EPID + gantry sag by comparison to the reference gantry zero image. The algorithm results were then tested against independent methods. The method was applied to compare the effect in clockwise and counter clockwise gantry rotations and different source-to-detector distances (SDDs). The results were monitored for one linear accelerator over a course of 15 months and six other linear-accelerators from two treatment centers were also investigated using this method. The generalized shift patterns were derived from the data and used in an image registration algorithm to correct for the effect of the mechanical sag in the system. The Gamma evaluation (3%, 3 mm) technique was used to investigate the improvement in alignment of cine EPID images of a fixed field, by comparing both individual images and the sum of images in a series with the reference gantry zero image. Results: The mechanical sag during gantry rotation was dependent on the gantry angle and was larger in the in-plane direction, although

  6. Retrospective reconstruction of cardiac cine images from golden-ratio radial MRI using one-dimensional navigators.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Martin; Herrmann, Karl-Heinz; Biermann, Judith; Reichenbach, Jurgen R

    2014-08-01

    To demonstrate radial golden-ratio-based cardiac cine imaging by using interspersed one-dimensional (1D) navigators. The 1D navigators were interspersed into the acquisition of radial spokes which were continuously rotated by an angle increment based on the golden-ratio. Performing correlation analysis between the 1D navigator projections, time points corresponding to the same cardiac motion phases were automatically identified and used to combine retrospectively golden-ratio rotated radial spokes from multiple data windows. Data windows were shifted consecutively for dynamic reconstruction of different cardiac motion frames. Experiments were performed during a single breathhold. By artificially reducing the amount of input data, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) as well as artifact level was evaluated for different breathhold durations. Analysis of the 1D navigator data provided a detailed correlation function revealing cardiac motion over time. Imaging results were comparable to images reconstructed based on a timely synchronized ECG. Cardiac cine images with a low artifact level and good image quality in terms of SNR and CNR were reconstructed from volunteer data achieving a CNR between the myocardium and the left ventricular cavity of 50 for the longest breathhold duration of 26 s. CNR maintained a value higher than 30 for acquisition times as low as 10 s. Combining radial golden-ratio-based imaging with an intrinsic navigator is a promising and robust method for performing high quality cardiac cine imaging. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Fast Determination of Flip Angle and T1 in Hyperpolarized Gas MRI During a Single Breath-Hold

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jianping; Ruan, Weiwei; Han, Yeqing; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-01-01

    MRI of hyperpolarized media, such as 129Xe and 3He, shows great potential for clinical applications. The optimal use of the available spin polarization requires accurate flip angle calibrations and T1 measurements. Traditional flip angle calibration methods are time-consuming and suffer from polarization losses during T1 relaxation. In this paper, we propose a method to simultaneously calibrate flip angles and measure T1 in vivo during a breath-hold time of less than 4 seconds. We demonstrate the accuracy, robustness and repeatability of this method and contrast it with traditional methods. By measuring the T1 of hyperpolarized gas, the oxygen pressure in vivo can be calibrated during the same breath hold. The results of the calibration have been applied in variable flip angle (VFA) scheme to obtain a stable steady-state transverse magnetization. Coupled with this method, the ultra-short TE (UTE) and constant VFA (CVFA) schemes are expected to give rise to new applications of hyperpolarized media. PMID:27169670

  8. Clinico-laboratory profile of breath-holding spells in children in Sohag University Hospital, Upper Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Sadek, Abdelrahim Abdrabou; Mohamed, Montaser Mohamed; Sharaf, El-Zahraa El-Said Ahmed; Magdy, Rofaida Mohamed; Allam, Ahmed Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Breath-holding spells (BHSs) are involuntary pauses of breathing, sometimes accompanied by loss of consciousness. They usually occur in response to an upsetting or surprising situation. Breath-holding spells are usually caused by either a change in the usual breathing pattern or a slowing of the heart rate. In some children, BHSs may be related to iron deficiency anemia. The aim of the work was to study the clinical and laboratory profile of BPHs in children presented to the Neuropediatric Clinic at Sohag University Hospital. Methods An observational prospective study was done at Sohag University Hospital over a period of one year on children diagnosed as having BHSs by clinical history and laboratory evaluation, including complete blood count (CBC), serum iron, serum ferritin, total iron binding capacity, and Electroencephalography (EEG). Results During the period of study (one year), we reviewed data of 32 children who had been diagnosed as having BHSs. We found that cyanotic spells (71.88%) predominated over pallid spells. There were positive family histories (31.25%) and consanguinity (53.135) in the studied patients. We found a high incidence of iron deficiency anemia (62.5%) in association with BHS. Abnormal EEGs were found in (65.63%) of studied children. Conclusion BHS is a common, important problem associated with iron deficiency anemia, which is, in turn, a common nutritional problem in our country. PMID:27279996

  9. Hypoxic syncope in a competitive breath-hold diver with elevation of the brain damage marker S100B.

    PubMed

    Linér, Mats H; Andersson, Johan P A

    2009-12-01

    Competitive breath-hold divers can accomplish previously unbelievable performances; e.g., the current world record for apnea during rest ("static apnea") is 11 min 35 s. However, whether such performances are associated with a risk for hypoxic brain damage has not been established. A breath-hold diver's competitive performance resulted in a loss of consciousness, after which he was subjected to a medical examination by the event physician. Blood samples were collected for analysis of the brain damage marker S100B in serum. The S100B in serum was 0.100 microg x L(-1) in the blood sample collected 15 min after the loss of consciousness. At 1 and 5 d after the incident it was 0.097 microg x L(-1) and 0.045 microg x L(-1) respectively. The elevated level of S100B, close to the upper reference limit (0.105 microg x L(-1)) indicates that the incident affected the integrity of the central nervous system. Even though this case does not establish that hypoxic brain damage is an inherent risk with loss of consciousness in competitive breathhold diving, the observation raises concerns. We suggest that it should be considered that repetitive exposures to prolonged apneas leading to severe hypoxia may be associated with negative long-term effects.

  10. Passive flooding of paranasal sinuses and middle ears as a method of equalisation in extreme breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Germonpré, Peter; Balestra, Costantino; Musimu, Patrick

    2011-06-01

    Breath-hold diving is both a recreational activity, performed by thousands of enthusiasts in Europe, and a high-performance competitive sport. Several 'disciplines' exist, of which the 'no-limits' category is the most spectacular: using a specially designed heavy 'sled,' divers descend to extreme depths on a cable, and then reascend using an inflatable balloon, on a single breath. The current world record for un-assisted descent stands at more than 200 m of depth. Equalising air pressure in the paranasal sinuses and middle-ear cavities is a necessity during descent to avoid barotraumas. However, this requires active insufflations of precious air, which is thus unavailable in the pulmonary system. The authors describe a diver who, by training, is capable of allowing passive flooding of the sinuses and middle ear with (sea) water during descent, by suppressing protective (parasympathetic) reflexes during this process. Using this technique, he performed a series of extreme-depth breath-hold dives in June 2005, descending to 209 m of sea water on one breath of air.

  11. Aortic valve area assessment: multidetector CT compared with cine MR imaging and transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Pouleur, Anne-Catherine; le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoît; Pasquet, Agnès; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J; Gerber, Bernhard L

    2007-09-01

    To prospectively compare the accuracy of multidetector computed tomographic (CT) measurements of the aortic valve area (AVA) with transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and cine magnetic resonance (MR) measurements of this area for preoperative examination of patients undergoing cardiac surgery, with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) as the reference standard. After giving informed consent for the institutional review board-approved study protocol, 48 patients (33 men, 15 women; mean age, 62 years+/-13 [standard deviation]) with (n=27) or without (n=21) aortic stenosis underwent multidetector CT, cine MR, TTE, and TEE before undergoing cardiac surgery. AVAs derived with manual planimetry by using cine short-axis multidetector CT, MR, and TEE images obtained through the aortic valve were compared among each other and with AVAs measured by using continuity equation TTE at regression and Bland-Altman analyses. The diagnostic accuracy of multidetector CT for detection of aortic stenosis was compared with that of TTE by using kappa statistics and receiver operating characteristic curves. Multidetector CT-derived AVA correlated highly with MR-derived (r=0.98, P<.001), TEE-derived (r=0.98, P<.001), and TTE-derived (r=0.96, P<.001) AVA. Multidetector CT planimetry AVAs (mean AVA+/-standard deviation, 2.5 cm2+/-1.7) were not significantly different from MR planimetry (2.4 cm2+/-1.8, P>.99) or TEE planimetery (2.5 cm2+/-1.7, P=.21) AVAs, but they were significantly larger than TTE-derived AVAs (2.0 cm2+/-1.5, P<.001). With TTE as the reference standard, multidetector CT correctly (kappa=0.88, P<.001) depicted all 21 normal, six of eight mildly stenotic (AVA>or=1.2 cm2 and <2.0 cm2), seven of eight moderately stenotic (AVA>or= 0.8 cm2 and <1.2 cm2), and 10 of 11 severely stenotic (AVA<0.8 cm2) valves. It also correctly depicted all 14 bicuspid valves identified with TEE, eight of which were missed with TTE. Multidetector CT enables accurate noninvasive assessment of the

  12. 3D cine magnetic resonance imaging of rat lung ARDS using gradient-modulated SWIFT with retrospective respiratory gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Lei, Jianxun; Utecht, Lynn; Garwood, Michael; Ingbar, David H.; Bhargava, Maneesh

    2015-03-01

    SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation (SWIFT) with gradient modulation and DC navigator retrospective gating is introduced as a 3D cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method for the lung. In anesthetized normal rats, the quasi-simultaneous excitation and acquisition in SWIFT enabled extremely high sensitivity to the fast-decaying parenchymal signals (TE=~4 μs), which are invisible with conventional MRI techniques. Respiratory motion information was extracted from DC navigator signals and the SWIFT data were reconstructed to 3D cine images with 16 respiratory phases. To test this technique's capabilities, rats exposed to > 95% O2 for 60 hours for induction of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), were imaged and compared with normal rat lungs (N=7 and 5 for ARDS and normal groups, respectively). SWIFT images showed lung tissue density differences along the gravity direction. In the cine SWIFT images, a parenchymal signal drop at the inhalation phase was consistently observed for both normal and ARDS rats due to lung inflation (i.e. decrease of the proton density), but the drop was less for ARDS rats. Depending on the respiratory phase and lung region, the lungs from the ARDS rats showed 1-24% higher parenchymal signal intensities relative to the normal rat lungs, likely due to accumulated extravascular water (EVLW). Those results demonstrate that SWIFT has high enough sensitivity for detecting the lung proton density changes due to gravity, different phases of respiration and accumulation of EVLW in the rat ARDS lungs.

  13. 3D Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Rat Lung ARDS using Gradient-modulated SWIFT with Retrospective Respiratory Gating.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Lei, Jianxun; Utecht, Lynn; Garwood, Michael; Ingbar, David; Bhargava, Maneesh

    2015-02-21

    SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation (SWIFT) with gradient modulation and DC navigator retrospective gating is introduced as a 3D cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method for the lung. The quasi-simultaneous excitation and acquisition in SWIFT enabled extremely high sensitivity to the fast-decaying parenchymal signals (TE=~4 μs), which are invisible with conventional MRI techniques. Based on respiratory motion information extracted from DC navigator signals, the SWIFT data were reconstructed to 3D cine images with 16 respiratory phases. To test the capability of the proposed technique, rats exposed to > 95% O2 for 60 hours for induction of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), were imaged and compared with normal rat lungs (N=7 and 5 for ARDS and normal group, respectively). SWIFT images showed lung tissue density difference along the gravity direction. In the cine SWIFT images, parenchymal signal drop at the inhalation phase was consistently observed for both normal and ARDS rats due to inflation of the lung (i.e. decrease of the proton density), but the drop was less for ARDS rats. Depending on the respiration phase and lung region, the lungs from the ARDS rats showed 1-24% higher parenchymal signal intensities relative to the normal rat lungs, which would be mainly from accumulation of extravascular water (EVLW). Those results demonstrate that SWIFT has high enough sensitivity for detecting the lung proton density changes due to gravity, different respiration phases and accumulation of EVLW in the rat ARDS lungs.

  14. Automatic image-driven segmentation of cardiac ventricles in cine anatomical MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocosco, Chris A.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Netsch, Thomas; Vonken, Evert-jan P. A.; Viergever, Max A.

    2005-08-01

    The automatic segmentation of the heart's two ventricles from dynamic ("cine") cardiac anatomical images, such as 3D+time short-axis MRI, is of significant clinical importance. Previously published automated methods have various disadvantages for routine clinical use. This work reports about a novel automatic segmentation method that is very fast, and robust against anatomical variability and image contrast variations. The method is mostly image-driven: it fully exploits the information provided by modern 4D (3D+time) balanced Fast Field Echo (bFFE) cardiac anatomical MRI, and makes only few and plausible assumptions about the images and the imaged heart. Specifically, the method does not need any geometrical shape models nor complex gray-level appearance models. The method simply uses the two ventricles' contraction-expansion cycle, as well as the ventricles' spatial coherence along the time dimension. The performance of the cardiac ventricles segmentation method was demonstrated through a qualitative visual validation on 32 clinical exams: no gross failures for the left-ventricle (right-ventricle) on 32 (30) of the exams were found. Also, a clinical validation of resulting quantitative cardiac functional parameters was performed against a manual quantification of 18 exams; the automatically computed Ejection Fraction (EF) correlated well to the manually computed one: linear regression with RMS=3.7% (RMS expressed in EF units).

  15. An initial study on the estimation of time-varying volumetric treatment images and 3D tumor localization from single MV cine EPID images

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Pankaj Mak, Raymond H.; Rottmann, Joerg; Bryant, Jonathan H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Berbeco, Ross I.; Lewis, John H.; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: In this work the authors develop and investigate the feasibility of a method to estimate time-varying volumetric images from individual MV cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images. Methods: The authors adopt a two-step approach to time-varying volumetric image estimation from a single cine EPID image. In the first step, a patient-specific motion model is constructed from 4DCT. In the second step, parameters in the motion model are tuned according to the information in the EPID image. The patient-specific motion model is based on a compact representation of lung motion represented in displacement vector fields (DVFs). DVFs are calculated through deformable image registration (DIR) of a reference 4DCT phase image (typically peak-exhale) to a set of 4DCT images corresponding to different phases of a breathing cycle. The salient characteristics in the DVFs are captured in a compact representation through principal component analysis (PCA). PCA decouples the spatial and temporal components of the DVFs. Spatial information is represented in eigenvectors and the temporal information is represented by eigen-coefficients. To generate a new volumetric image, the eigen-coefficients are updated via cost function optimization based on digitally reconstructed radiographs and projection images. The updated eigen-coefficients are then multiplied with the eigenvectors to obtain updated DVFs that, in turn, give the volumetric image corresponding to the cine EPID image. Results: The algorithm was tested on (1) Eight digital eXtended CArdiac-Torso phantom datasets based on different irregular patient breathing patterns and (2) patient cine EPID images acquired during SBRT treatments. The root-mean-squared tumor localization error is (0.73 ± 0.63 mm) for the XCAT data and (0.90 ± 0.65 mm) for the patient data. Conclusions: The authors introduced a novel method of estimating volumetric time-varying images from single cine EPID images and a PCA-based lung motion model

  16. An initial study on the estimation of time-varying volumetric treatment images and 3D tumor localization from single MV cine EPID images.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Pankaj; Li, Ruijiang; Mak, Raymond H; Rottmann, Joerg; Bryant, Jonathan H; Williams, Christopher L; Berbeco, Ross I; Lewis, John H

    2014-08-01

    In this work the authors develop and investigate the feasibility of a method to estimate time-varying volumetric images from individual MV cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images. The authors adopt a two-step approach to time-varying volumetric image estimation from a single cine EPID image. In the first step, a patient-specific motion model is constructed from 4DCT. In the second step, parameters in the motion model are tuned according to the information in the EPID image. The patient-specific motion model is based on a compact representation of lung motion represented in displacement vector fields (DVFs). DVFs are calculated through deformable image registration (DIR) of a reference 4DCT phase image (typically peak-exhale) to a set of 4DCT images corresponding to different phases of a breathing cycle. The salient characteristics in the DVFs are captured in a compact representation through principal component analysis (PCA). PCA decouples the spatial and temporal components of the DVFs. Spatial information is represented in eigenvectors and the temporal information is represented by eigen-coefficients. To generate a new volumetric image, the eigen-coefficients are updated via cost function optimization based on digitally reconstructed radiographs and projection images. The updated eigen-coefficients are then multiplied with the eigenvectors to obtain updated DVFs that, in turn, give the volumetric image corresponding to the cine EPID image. The algorithm was tested on (1) Eight digital eXtended CArdiac-Torso phantom datasets based on different irregular patient breathing patterns and (2) patient cine EPID images acquired during SBRT treatments. The root-mean-squared tumor localization error is (0.73 ± 0.63 mm) for the XCAT data and (0.90 ± 0.65 mm) for the patient data. The authors introduced a novel method of estimating volumetric time-varying images from single cine EPID images and a PCA-based lung motion model. This is the first method to estimate

  17. Validation of highly accelerated real-time cardiac cine MRI with radial k-space sampling and compressed sensing in patients at 1.5T and 3T.

    PubMed

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassan; Rahsepar, Amir A; Collins, Jeremy D; Bassett, Elwin; Isakova, Tamara; Block, Tobias; Adluru, Ganesh; DiBella, Edward V R; Lee, Daniel C; Carr, James C; Kim, Daniel

    2017-09-17

    To validate an optimal 12-fold accelerated real-time cine MRI pulse sequence with radial k-space sampling and compressed sensing (CS) in patients at 1.5T and 3T. We used two strategies to reduce image artifacts arising from gradient delays and eddy currents in radial k-space sampling with balanced steady-state free precession readout. We validated this pulse sequence against a standard breath-hold cine sequence in two patient cohorts: a myocardial infarction (n = 16) group at 1.5T and chronic kidney disease group (n = 18) at 3T. Two readers independently performed visual analysis of 68 cine sets in four categories (myocardial definition, temporal fidelity, artifact, noise) on a 5-point Likert scale (1 = nondiagnostic, 2 = poor, 3 = adequate or moderate, 4 = good, 5 = excellent). Another reader calculated left ventricular (LV) functional parameters, including ejection fraction. Compared with standard cine, real-time cine produced nonsignificantly different visually assessed scores, except for the following categories: 1) temporal fidelity scores were significantly lower (P = 0.013) for real-time cine at both field strengths, 2) artifacts scores were significantly higher (P = 0.013) for real-time cine at both field strengths, and 3) noise scores were significantly (P = 0.013) higher for real-time cine at 1.5T. Standard and real-time cine pulse sequences produced LV functional parameters that were in good agreement (e.g., absolute mean difference in ejection fraction <4%). This study demonstrates that an optimal 12-fold, accelerated, real-time cine MRI pulse sequence using radial k-space sampling and CS produces good to excellent visual scores and relatively accurate LV functional parameters in patients at 1.5T and 3T. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. SU-E-J-211: Design and Study of In-House Software Based Respiratory Motion Monitoring, Controlling and Breath-Hold Device for Gated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, Senthilkumar

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this present work was to fabricate an in-house software based respiratory monitoring, controlling and breath-hold device using computer software programme which guides the patient to have uniform breath hold in response to request during the gated radiotherapy. Methods: The respiratory controlling device consists of a computer, inhouse software, video goggles, a highly sensitive sensor for measurement of distance, mounting systems, a camera, a respiratory signal device, a speaker and a visual indicator. The computer is used to display the respiratory movements of the patient with digital as well as analogue respiration indicators during the respiration cycle, to control, breath-hold and analyze the respiratory movement using indigenously developed software. Results: Studies were conducted with anthropomophic phantoms by simulating the respiratory motion on phantoms and recording the respective movements using the respiratory monitoring device. The results show good agreement between the simulated and measured movements. Further studies were conducted for 60 cancer patients with several types of cancers in the thoracic region. The respiratory movement cycles for each fraction of radiotherapy treatment were recorded and compared. Alarm indications are provided in the system to indicate when the patient breathing movement exceeds the threshold level. This will help the patient to maintain uniform breath hold during the radiotherapy treatment. Our preliminary clinical test results indicate that our device is highly reliable and able to maintain the uniform respiratory motion and breathe hold during the entire course of gated radiotherapy treatment. Conclusion: An indigenous respiratory monitoring device to guide the patient to have uniform breath hold device was fabricated. The alarm feature and the visual waveform indicator in the system guide the patient to have normal respiration. The signal from the device can be connected to the radiation

  19. Poster - Thur Eve - 67: Clinical results of deep inspiration breath hold radiation treatment for the left breast patients.

    PubMed

    Jiang, R; Zhan, L; Gopaul, D; Osei, E

    2012-07-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy for left breast cancers increases local tumor control, but also increases the risk of radiation-induced cardiac disease. Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) can minimize dose to the heart for left breast patients where the heart is within the tangential field. In this study, we evaluated the dosimetric benefit of DIBH technique comparing to free breathing (FB) radiotherapy for left breast cancer patients. Five patients with left breast cancer treated with DIBH technique were selected randomly. The CT scans of breath hold (BH) and FB were taken for every DIBH patient. Standard clinical DIBH intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were generated with BH scan dataset using the Varian Eclipse TP system. The prescription dose is 4250 cGy in 16 fractions. The BH plan was copied to the FB scan dataset and shifted accordingly to have the same coverage for the breast tissue, and the dose was re-calculated. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the heart and lung; mean dose and maximum dose of the heart were calculated and compared from the BH and FB plans for every patient. The lung volume is increased during BH and hence the heart is moved out of the field, resulting in the lower heart maximum dose. The mean dose is almost less than 1 Gy for all BH plans. The average mean heart dose is 0.8 Gy for BH plan compared to 1.6 Gy for FB plan. Patients benefit significantly from DIBH technique due to the very low heart dose. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. High-resolution imaging of murine myocardial infarction with delayed-enhancement cine micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Nahrendorf, Matthias; Badea, Cristian; Hedlund, Laurence W; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Sosnovik, David E; Johnson, G Allan; Weissleder, Ralph

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of delayed-enhancement micro-computed tomography (microCT) imaging to quantify myocardial infarct size in experimental mouse models. A total of 20 mice were imaged 5 or 35 days after surgical ligation of the left coronary artery or sham surgery (n=6 or 7 per group). We utilized a prototype microCT that covers a three-dimensional (3D) volume with an isotropic spatial resolution of 100 microm. A series of image acquisitions were started after a 200 microl bolus of a high-molecular-weight blood pool CT agent to outline the ventricles. CT imaging was continuously performed over 60 min, while an intravenous constant infusion with iopamidol 370 was started at a dosage of 1 ml/h. Thirty minutes after the initiation of this infusion, signal intensity in Hounsfield units was significantly higher in the infarct than in the remote, uninjured myocardium. Cardiac morphology and motion were visualized with excellent contrast and in fine detail. In vivo CT determination of infarct size at the midventricular level was in good agreement with ex vivo staining with triphenyltetrazolium chloride [5 days post-myocardial infarction (MI): r(2)=0.86, P<0.01; 35 days post-MI: r(2)=0.92, P<0.01]. In addition, we detected significant left ventricular remodeling consisting of left ventricular dilation and decreased ejection fraction. 3D cine microCT reliably and rapidly quantifies infarct size and assesses murine anatomy and physiology after coronary ligation, despite the small size and fast movement of the mouse heart. This efficient imaging tool is a valuable addition to the current phenotyping armamentarium and will allow rapid testing of novel drugs and cell-based interventions in murine models.

  1. High Resolution Imaging of Murine Myocardial Infarction With Delayed Enhancement and Cine Micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Nahrendorf, Matthias; Badea, Cristian; Hedlund, Laurence W; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Sosnovik, David E.; Johnson, G Allan; Weissleder, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility of delayed enhancement µCT imaging to quantify myocardial infarct size in experimental mouse models. Methods and Results A total of 20 mice were imaged 5 or 35 days after surgical ligation of the left coronary artery, or sham surgery (n=6–7 per group). We utilized a prototype εCT which covers a 3D volume with an isotropic spatial resolution of 100 µm. A series of image acquisitions were started after a 200 µL bolus of a high molecular weight blood pool CT agent to outline the ventricles. CT imaging was continuously performed over 60 minutes, while an intravenous constant infusion with iopamidol 370 was started at a dosage of 1 mL/h. Thirty minutes after the initiation of this infusion, signal intensity in Hounsfild Units was significantly higher in the infarct than in the remote, uninjured myocardium. Cardiac morphology and motion was visualized with excellent contrast and in fine detail. In vivo CT determination of infarct extension and transmurality was in good agreement with ex vivo staining with triphenyltetrazolium chloride (5 days post MI: r2= 0.86, p < 0.01; 35 days post MI r2=0.92, p < 0.01). In addition, we detected significant left ventricular remodeling consisting of left ventricular dilation and decreased ejection fraction. Conclusion 3D cine µCT reliably and rapidly quantifies infarct size and assesses murine anatomy and physiology after coronary ligation, despite the small size and the fast movement of the mouse heart. This efficient imaging tool is a valuable addition to the current phenotyping armamentarium and will allow rapid testing of novel drugs and cell based interventions in murine models. PMID:17322414

  2. SU-E-J-140: Availability of Using Diaphragm Matching in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) at the Time in Breath-Holding SBRT for Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, D; Tsuda, S.; Ozawa, S; Ohno, Y.; Kimura, T.; Nagata, Y.; Nakashima, T.; Aita, M.; Ochi, Y.; Okumura, T.; Masuda, H.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: IGRT based on the bone matching may produce a larger target positioning error in terms of the reproducibility of the expiration breath hold. Therefore, the feasibility of the 3D image matching between planning CT image and pretreatment CBCT image based on the diaphragm matching was investigated. Methods: In fifteen-nine liver SBRT cases, Lipiodol, uptake after TACE was outlined as the marker of the tumor. The relative coordinate of the isocenter obtained by the contrast matching was defined as the reference coordinate. The target positioning difference between diaphragm matching and bone matching were evaluated by the relative coordinate of the isocenter from the reference coordinate obtained by each matching technique. In addition, we evaluated PTV margins by van Herk setup margin formula. Results: The target positioning error by the diaphragm matching and the bone matching was 1.31±0.83 and 3.10±2.80 mm in the cranial-caudal(C-C) direction, 1.04±0.95 and 1.62±1.02 mm in the anterior-posterior(A-P) direction, 0.93±1.19 and 1.12±0.94 mm in the left-right(L-R) direction, respectively. The positioning error by the diaphragm matching was significantly smaller than the bone matching in the C-C direction (p<0.05). The setup margin of diaphragm matching and bone matching that we had calculated based on van Herk margin formula was 4.5mm and 6.2mm(C-C), and 3.6mm and 6.3mm(A-P), and 2.6mm and 4.5mm(L-R), respectively. Conclusion: IGRT based on a diaphragm matching could be one alternative image matching technique for the positioning of the patients with liver tumor.

  3. Deep Inspiration Breath Hold [(18)F]FDG PET-CT on 4-rings scanners in evaluating lung lesions: evidences from a phantom and a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Caobelli, Federico; Puta, Erinda; Kaiser, Stefano Ren; Massetti, Valentina; Andreoli, Michela; Mostarda, Angelica; Soffientini, Alberto; Pizzocaro, Claudio; Guerra, Ugo Paolo

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the clinical feasibility of a Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) (18)F-FDG PET-CT acquisition in apnea and compare the results obtained between these acts of acquisition in apnea and in Free Breathing in the evaluation of lung lesions. A pre-clinical phantom study was performed to evaluate the shortest simulated DIBH time according to the minimum detectable lesion that can be detected by our ultrasound scanner. This study was conducted by changing acquisition time and sphere-to-background activity ratio values and by using radioactivity densities similar to those generally found in clinical examinations. In the clinical study, 25 patients with pulmonary lesions underwent a standard whole body (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan in free breathing followed by a 20s single thorax acquisition PET/CT in DIBH acquisition. The phantom study indicated that a 20-s acquisition time provides an accurate evaluation of smallest sphere shaped lesions. In the clinical study, PET-CT scans obtained in DIBH studies showed a significant reduction of misalignment between the PET and CT scan images and an increase of SUVmax compared to free breathing acquisitions. A correlation between the %BH-index and lesion displacement between PET and CT images in FB acquisition was demonstrated, significantly higher for lesions with a displacement>8mm. The single 20s acquisition of DIBH PET-CT is a feasible technique for lung lesion detection in the clinical setting. It only requires a minor increase in examination time without special patient training. 20s DIBH scan provided a more precise measurement of SUVmax, especially for lesions in the lower lung lobes which usually show greater displacement between PET and CT scan images in FB acquisition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  4. NOTE: Dosimetric evaluation of inspiration and expiration breath-hold for intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning of non-small cell lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Bilal A.; Bragg, Christopher M.; Lawless, Sarah E.; Hatton, Matthew Q. F.; Ireland, Rob H.

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare target coverage and lung tissue sparing between inspiration and expiration breath-hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a prospective study, seven NSCLC patients gave written consent to undergo both moderate deep inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold computed tomography (CT), which were used to generate five-field IMRT plans. Dose was calculated with a scatter and an inhomogeneity correction algorithm. The percentage of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV90), the volume of total lung receiving >= 10 Gy (V10) and >= 20 Gy (V20) and the mean lung dose (MLD) were compared by the Student's paired t-test. Compared with the expiration plans, the mean ± SD reductions for V10, V20 and MLD on the inspiration plans were 4.0 ± 3.7% (p = 0.031), 2.5 ± 2.3% (p = 0.028) and 1.1 ± 0.7 Gy (p = 0.007), respectively. Conversely, a mean difference of 1.1 ± 1.1% (p = 0.044) in PTV90 was demonstrated in favour of expiration. When using IMRT, inspiration breath-hold can reduce the dose to normal lung tissue while expiration breath-hold can improve the target coverage. The improved lung sparing at inspiration may outweigh the modest improvements in target coverage at expiration.

  5. Influence of Spatial Resolution in Three-dimensional Cine Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging on the Accuracy of Hemodynamic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Atsushi; Isoda, Haruo; Morita, Kento; Mori, Marika; Watanabe, Tomoya; Ishiguro, Kenta; Komori, Yoshiaki; Kosugi, Takafumi

    2017-10-10

    We aim to elucidate the effect of spatial resolution of three-dimensional cine phase contrast magnetic resonance (3D cine PC MR) imaging on the accuracy of the blood flow analysis, and examine the optimal setting for spatial resolution using flow phantoms. The flow phantom has five types of acrylic pipes that represent human blood vessels (inner diameters: 15, 12, 9, 6, and 3 mm). The pipes were fixed with 1% agarose containing 0.025 mol/L gadolinium contrast agent. A blood-mimicking fluid with human blood property values was circulated through the pipes at a steady flow. Magnetic resonance (MR) images (three-directional phase images with speed information and magnitude images for information of shape) were acquired using the 3-Tesla MR system and receiving coil. Temporal changes in spatially-averaged velocity and maximum velocity were calculated using hemodynamic analysis software. We calculated the error rates of the flow velocities based on the volume flow rates measured with a flowmeter and examined measurement accuracy. When the acrylic pipe was the size of the thoracicoabdominal or cervical artery and the ratio of pixel size for the pipe was set at 30% or lower, spatially-averaged velocity measurements were highly accurate. When the pixel size ratio was set at 10% or lower, maximum velocity could be measured with high accuracy. It was difficult to accurately measure maximum velocity of the 3-mm pipe, which was the size of an intracranial major artery, but the error for spatially-averaged velocity was 20% or less. Flow velocity measurement accuracy of 3D cine PC MR imaging for pipes with inner sizes equivalent to vessels in the cervical and thoracicoabdominal arteries is good. The flow velocity accuracy for the pipe with a 3-mm-diameter that is equivalent to major intracranial arteries is poor for maximum velocity, but it is relatively good for spatially-averaged velocity.

  6. Implementation of Feedback-Guided Voluntary Breath-Hold Gating for Cone Beam CT-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Yong; Vedam, Sastry; Chang, Joe Y.; Gao Song; Sadagopan, Ramaswamy; Bues, Martin; Balter, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze tumor position reproducibility of feedback-guided voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (FGBH) gating for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and materials: Thirteen early-stage lung cancer patients eligible for SBRT with tumor motion of >1cm were evaluated for FGBH-gated treatment. Multiple FGBH CTs were acquired at simulation, and single FGBH CBCTs were also acquired prior to each treatment. Simulation CTs and treatment CBCTs were analyzed to quantify reproducibility of tumor positions during FGBH. Benefits of FGBH gating compared to treatment during free breathing, as well treatment with gating at exhalation, were examined for lung sparing, motion margins, and reproducibility of gross tumor volume (GTV) position relative to nonmoving anatomy. Results: FGBH increased total lung volumes by 1.5 times compared to free breathing, resulting in a proportional drop in total lung volume receiving 10 Gy or more. Intra- and inter-FGBH reproducibility of GTV centroid positions at simulation were 1.0 {+-} 0.5 mm, 1.3 {+-} 1.0 mm, and 0.6 {+-} 0.4 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right lateral (LR) directions, respectively, compared to more than 1 cm of tumor motion at free breathing. During treatment, inter-FGBH reproducibility of the GTV centroid with respect to bony anatomy was 1.2 {+-} 0.7 mm, 1.5 {+-} 0.8 mm, and 1.0 {+-} 0.4 mm in the AP, SI, and LR directions. In addition, the quality of CBCTs was improved due to elimination of motion artifacts, making this technique attractive for poorly visualized tumors, even with small motion. Conclusions: The extent of tumor motion at normal respiration does not influence the reproducibility of the tumor position under breath hold conditions. FGBH-gated SBRT with CBCT can improve the reproducibility of GTV centroids, reduce required margins, and minimize dose to normal tissues in the treatment of mobile tumors.

  7. Long-term effects of frequent maximal breath-holding on the cardiac health of elite freedivers.

    PubMed

    Zelenkova, I; Chomahidze, P

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are commonly reported in freedivers during maximal voluntary breath-holds, but their influence on the cardiological status and their long-term effects on the cardiac health of these athletes have not been investigated. Here we present the results of a study on 32 healthy young men (mean age 32.6 ± 1.3 years) who were divided into two groups of 16 subjects. One group included 16 continuously training freedivers at the "high achievers in sports" level (DIVERS group). The CONTROL group included 16 healthy young men not involved in sports. The subjects were monitored using 24-h electrocardiogram (ECG), and echocardiological study (EchoCG) for all the subjects was performed. The mean heart rate in the DIVERS group was 69.5 ± 1.7 bpm compared with 70.9 ± 1.5 bpm in the CONTROL group. The minimal heart rate was 42.3 ± 1.0 bpm in the DIVERS group and 48.8 ± 1.7 bpm in the CONTROL group (P < 0.005). The maximal heart rate was 132.8 ± 4.6 bpm in the DIVERS group and 132.1 ± 2.9 bpm in the CONTROL group. ECG analysis revealed supraventricular arrhythmias in the DIVERS group: four of the DIVERS (25%) exhibited supraventricular couplets and triplets, three (19%) exhibited transient first- and second-degree AV blocks (Mobitz type 1) at night, and one (6%) exhibited a second-degree sinoatrial block at night. According to the echocardiogram, the DIVERS had slightly larger left ventricles (5.1 ± 1.33, P < 0.05) and left atriums (41.1 ± 12.7) compared with the CONTROL group without exceeding the normal values. The right ventricle volume (3.6 ± 0.69, P < 0.05) was somewhat above the upper normal value (up to 3.5 cm). In conclusion, freediving athletes exhibited changes in their cardiac status, most likely due to the regular exercise, that were not associated with regular maximal voluntary breath-holds. These changes are within the normal physiological values and do not limit their

  8. Variable flip angle balanced steady-state free precession for lower SAR or higher contrast cardiac cine imaging.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Subashini; Ennis, Daniel B

    2014-03-01

    Cardiac cine balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging uses a high flip angle (FA) to obtain high blood-myocardium signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR). Use of high FAs, however, results in substantially increased SAR. Our objective was to develop a variable FA bSSFP cardiac cine imaging technique with: (1) low SAR and blood-myocardium CNR similar to conventional constant FA bSSFP (CFA-bSSFP) or (2) increased blood-myocardium CNR compared to CFA-bSSFP with similar SAR. Variable FA bSSFP cardiac cine imaging was achieved using an asynchronous k-space acquisition, which is asynchronous to the cardiac cycle (aVFA-bSSFP). Bloch simulations and phantom experiments were performed to compare the signal, resolution, and frequency response of the variable FA bSSFP and CFA-bSSFP schemes. Ten volunteers were imaged with different aVFA-bSSFP and asynchronous CFA-bSSFP schemes and compared to conventional segmented CFA-bSSFP. The SAR of aVFA-bSSFP is significantly decreased by 36% compared to asynchronous CFA-bSSFP (1.9 ± 0.2 vs. 3.0 ± 0.2 W/kg, P <  10(-10)) for similar blood-myocardium CNR (34 ± 6 vs. 35 ± 9, P = 0.5). Alternately, the CNR of the aVFA-bSSFP is improved by 28% compared to asynchronous CFA-bSSFP (49 ± 9 vs. 38 ± 8, P <  10(-4)) with similar SAR (3.2 ± 0.5 vs. 3.3 ± 0.5 W/kg, P = 0.6). aVFA-bSSFP can be used for lower SAR or higher contrast cardiac cine imaging compared to the conventional segmented CFA-bSSFP imaging. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Evaluation of ventricular dysfunction using semi-automatic longitudinal strain analysis of four-chamber cine MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Masateru; Nagao, Michinobu; Kumazawa, Seiji; Yamasaki, Yuzo; Chishaki, Akiko S; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Honda, Hiroshi; Morishita, Junji

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate ventricular dysfunction using the longitudinal strain analysis in 4-chamber (4CH) cine MR imaging, and to investigate the agreement between the semi-automatic and manual measurements in the analysis. Fifty-two consecutive patients with ischemic, or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy and repaired tetralogy of Fallot who underwent cardiac MR examination incorporating cine MR imaging were retrospectively enrolled. The LV and RV longitudinal strain values were obtained by semi-automatically and manually. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the optimal cutoff of the minimum longitudinal strain value for the detection of patients with cardiac dysfunction. The correlations between manual and semi-automatic measurements for LV and RV walls were analyzed by Pearson coefficient analysis. ROC analysis demonstrated the optimal cut-off of the minimum longitudinal strain values (εL_min) for diagnoses the LV and RV dysfunction at a high accuracy (LV εL_min = -7.8 %: area under the curve, 0.89; sensitivity, 83 %; specificity, 91 %, RV εL_min = -15.7 %: area under the curve, 0.82; sensitivity, 92 %; specificity, 68 %). Excellent correlations between manual and semi-automatic measurements for LV and RV free wall were observed (LV, r = 0.97, p < 0.01; RV, r = 0.79, p < 0.01). Our semi-automatic longitudinal strain analysis in 4CH cine MR imaging can evaluate LV and RV dysfunction with simply and easy measurements. The strain analysis could have extensive application in cardiac imaging for various clinical cases.

  10. Monitoring tumor motion with on-line mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography imaging in a cine mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, Bodo; Gayou, Olivier; Parda, David S.; Miften, Moyed

    2008-02-01

    Accurate daily patient localization is becoming increasingly important in external-beam radiotherapy (RT). Mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) utilizing a therapy beam and an on-board electronic portal imager can be used to localize tumor volumes and verify the patient's position prior to treatment. MV-CBCT produces a static volumetric image and therefore can only account for inter-fractional changes. In this work, the feasibility of using the MV-CBCT raw data as a fluoroscopic series of portal images to monitor tumor changes due to e.g. respiratory motion was investigated. A method was developed to read and convert the CB raw data into a cine. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio on the MV-CB projection data, image post-processing with filtering techniques was investigated. Volumes of interest from the planning CT were projected onto the MV-cine. Because of the small exposure and the varying thickness of the patient depending on the projection angle, soft-tissue contrast was limited. Tumor visibility as a function of tumor size and projection angle was studied. The method was well suited in the upper chest, where motion of the tumor as well as of the diaphragm could be clearly seen. In the cases of patients with non-small cell lung cancer with medium or large tumor masses, we verified that the tumor mass was always located within the PTV despite respiratory motion. However for small tumors the method is less applicable, because the visibility of those targets becomes marginal. Evaluation of motion in non-superior-inferior directions might also be limited for small tumor masses. Viewing MV-CBCT data in a cine mode adds to the utility of MV-CBCT for verification of tumor motion and for deriving individualized treatment margins.

  11. Computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor on EPID cine images without implanted markers in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimura, H.; Egashira, Y.; Shioyama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Yoshidome, S.; Anai, S.; Nomoto, S.; Honda, H.; Toyofuku, F.; Higashida, Y.; Onizuka, Y.; Terashima, H.

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor in cine images on an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) without implanted markers during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Each tumor region was segmented in the first EPID cine image, i.e., reference portal image, based on a multiple-gray level thresholding technique and a region growing technique, and then the image including the tumor region was cropped as a 'tumor template' image. The tumor location was determined as the position in which the tumor template image took the maximum cross-correlation value within each consecutive portal image, which was acquired in cine mode on the EPID in treatment. EPID images with 512 × 384 pixels (pixel size: 0.56 mm) were acquired at a sampling rate of 0.5 frame s-1 by using energies of 4, 6 or 10 MV on linear accelerators. We applied our proposed method to EPID cine images (226 frames) of 12 clinical cases (ages: 51-83, mean: 72) with a non-small cell lung cancer. As a result, the average location error between tumor points obtained by our method and the manual method was 1.47 ± 0.60 mm. This preliminary study suggests that our method based on the tumor template matching technique might be feasible for tracking the location of a lung tumor without implanted markers in SBRT.

  12. Cardiac imaging with a high-speed Cine-CT Scanner: preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, M.J.; Higgins, C.B.; Farmer, D.; Boyd, D.P.

    1984-09-01

    CT scans were obtained with a Cine-CT Scanner that uses a rapidly moving focused electron beam. The 50-msec CT scans were obtained at two transverse levels simultaneously through the hearts of a series of four normal dogs and six patients, four with coronary artery disease and two with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Two scanning mode options were chosen. Myocardial wall thickening and motion were studied by obtaining ten 50-msec CT exposures during one heartbeat within less than one second (Cine-CT mode). Regional myocardial blood flow was assessed by obtaining approximately 20 scans at the same level of the left ventricle. These initial studies show the feasibility of defining regional and global myocardial contraction using the Cine-CT mode, and the considerable potential for measuring regional myocardial perfusion using the flow (dynamic) mode.

  13. SU-C-202-07: Protocol and Hardware for Improved Flood Field Calibration of TrueBeam FFF Cine Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, J; Faught, A; Yin, F

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Flattening filter free photon energies are commonly used for high dose treatments such as SBRT, where localization accuracy is essential. Often, MV cine imaging may be employed to verify correct localization. TrueBeam Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs) equipped with the 40×30cm{sup 2} Image Detection Unit (IDU) are prone to image saturation at the image center especially for higher dose rates. While saturation often does not occur for cine imaging during treatment because the beam is attenuated by the patient, the flood field calibration is affected when the standard calibration procedure is followed. Here we describe the hardware and protocol to achieve improved image quality for this model of TrueBeam EPID. Methods: A stainless steel filter of uniform thickness was designed to have sufficient attenuation to avoid panel saturation for both 6XFFF and 10XFFF at the maximum dose rates (1400 MU/min & 2400 MU/min, respectively). The cine imaging flood field calibration was then acquired with the filter in place for the FFF energies under the standard calibration geometry (SDD=150cm). Image quality during MV cine was assessed with & without the modified flood field calibration using a low contrast resolution phantom and an anthropomorphic phantom. Results: When the flood field is acquired using the standard procedure (no filter in place), a pixel gain artifact is clearly present in the image center (r=3cm for 10XFFF at 2400 MU/min) which appears similar to and may be mis-attributed to panel saturation in the subject image. The artifact obscured all low contrast inserts at the image center and was also visible on the anthropomorphic phantom. Using the filter for flood field calibration eliminated the artifact. Conclusion: Use of a modified flood field calibration procedure improves image quality for cine MV imaging with TrueBeams equipped with the 40×30cm{sup 2} IDU.

  14. The cardiac dose-sparing benefits of deep inspiration breath-hold in left breast irradiation: a systematic review

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, Lloyd M; Knight, Kellie A; Aarons, Yolanda K; Wasiak, Jason

    2015-03-15

    Despite technical advancements in breast radiation therapy, cardiac structures are still subject to significant levels of irradiation. As the use of adjuvant radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery continues to improve survival for early breast cancer patients, the associated radiation-induced cardiac toxicities become increasingly relevant. Our primary aim was to evaluate the cardiac-sparing benefits of the deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique. An electronic literature search of the PubMed database from 1966 to July 2014 was used to identify articles published in English relating to the dosimetric benefits of DIBH. Studies comparing the mean heart dose of DIBH and free breathing treatment plans for left breast cancer patients were eligible to be included in the review. Studies evaluating the reproducibility and stability of the DIBH technique were also reviewed. Ten studies provided data on the benefits of DIBH during left breast irradiation. From these studies, DIBH reduced the mean heart dose by up to 3.4 Gy when compared to a free breathing approach. Four studies reported that the DIBH technique was stable and reproducible on a daily basis. According to current estimates of the excess cardiac toxicity associated with radiation therapy, a 3.4 Gy reduction in mean heart dose is equivalent to a 13.6% reduction in the projected increase in risk of heart disease. DIBH is a reproducible and stable technique for left breast irradiation showing significant promise in reducing the late cardiac toxicities associated with radiation therapy.

  15. [Cerebral vasoreactivity: Concordance of breath holding test and acetazolamide injection in current practice: 20 cases of asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    De Bortoli, M; Maillet, A; Skopinski, S; Sassoust, G; Constans, J; Boulon, C

    2017-10-01

    Cerebral vasoreactivity (CVR) is the ability of the brain's vascular system to keep cerebral blood inflow stable. Impaired CVR is a risk marker of stroke in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. The gold standard to assess CVR with transcranial ultrasound is acetazolamide (ACTZ) injection. The breath holding test (BHT) might be easier to perform. CVR proved to be efficient in laboratory conditions but not in routine practice. To study the validity of BHT versus ACTZ in routine practice in a vascular exploration unit in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. Study of concordance of BHT and ACTZ, to assess CVR in patients consecutively explored on the same day. Eighteen patients with 20 carotid stenosis were included. The temporal window was missing in 20% of cases. Only 11 out of the 20 procedures were analyzed. Concordance was low between BHT and ACTZ to assess CVR (k=0.3714). BHT cannot replace ACTZ injection. It might be a first-step test so that ACTZ injection might be avoided if CVR is normal. Our present results must be confirmed by further study enrolling many more patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of low oxygen dead space ventilation and breath-holding test in evaluating cerebrovascular reactivity: A comparative observation.

    PubMed

    Ju, Ke-Ju; Zhong, Ling-Ling; Ni, Xiao-Yu; Xia, Lei; Xue, Liu-Jun; Cheng, Guan-Liang

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to explore the application prospect of low oxygen dead space ventilation (LODSV) in evaluating vasomotor reactivity (VMR) by comparison between LODSV and breath-holding test (BHT). Outpatient or inpatient patients who underwent transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) were enrolled into this study. These patients successively underwent BHT and LODSV. The cooperation degree, tolerance conditions and adverse reactions in patients were recorded, and VMR was calculated, compared and analyzed. Patients had poor cooperation during BHT. Except for compensatory tachypnea after BHT, patients basically had no adverse reaction. The main manifestations of patients undergoing LODSV were deepened breathing and accelerated frequency in the end of the ventilation, and increased heart rate and a slight decline in pulse oxygen that rapidly recovered after ventilation. The increase rate of blood flow velocity in patients undergoing LODSV was significantly higher than in BHT (P<0.001), and its calculated VMR value was approximately 15% higher than BHT (P<0.001). BHT revealed a monophasic curve that slightly descends and rapidly increases, and LODSV revealed a curve that descends for a short time and slowly increases with a platform. LODSV can effectively eliminate the affect of poor cooperation in patients, and avoid intolerance caused by hypoxia. Hence, VMR value is more accurate than that determined by BHT; and this can reflect the maximum reaction ability of the blood vessels. Therefore, this method has higher clinical application value.

  17. Quantification of lung tumor rotation with automated landmark extraction using orthogonal cine MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganelli, Chiara; Lee, Danny; Greer, Peter B.; Baroni, Guido; Riboldi, Marco; Keall, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The quantification of tumor motion in sites affected by respiratory motion is of primary importance to improve treatment accuracy. To account for motion, different studies analyzed the translational component only, without focusing on the rotational component, which was quantified in a few studies on the prostate with implanted markers. The aim of our study was to propose a tool able to quantify lung tumor rotation without the use of internal markers, thus providing accurate motion detection close to critical structures such as the heart or liver. Specifically, we propose the use of an automatic feature extraction method in combination with the acquisition of fast orthogonal cine MRI images of nine lung patients. As a preliminary test, we evaluated the performance of the feature extraction method by applying it on regions of interest around (i) the diaphragm and (ii) the tumor and comparing the estimated motion with that obtained by (i) the extraction of the diaphragm profile and (ii) the segmentation of the tumor, respectively. The results confirmed the capability of the proposed method in quantifying tumor motion. Then, a point-based rigid registration was applied to the extracted tumor features between all frames to account for rotation. The median lung rotation values were  -0.6   ±   2.3° and  -1.5   ±   2.7° in the sagittal and coronal planes respectively, confirming the need to account for tumor rotation along with translation to improve radiotherapy treatment.

  18. Quantitative analysis of the breath-holding half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo technique in abdominal MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    A consecutive series of 50 patients (28 males and 22 females) who underwent hepatic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from August to December 2011 were enrolled in this study. The appropriate parameters for abdominal MRI scans were determined by comparing the images (TE = 90 and 128 msec) produced using the half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) technique at different signal acquisition times. The patients consisted of 15 normal patients, 25 patients with a hepatoma and 10 patients with a hemangioma. The TE in a single patient was set to either 90 msec or 128 msec. This was followed by measurements using the four normal rendering methods of the biliary tract system and the background signal intensity using the maximal signal intensity techniques in the liver, spleen, pancreas, gallbladder, fat, muscles and hemangioma. The signal-to-noise and the contrast-to-noise ratios were obtained. The image quality was assessed subjectively, and the results were compared. The signal-to-noise and the contrast-to-noise ratios were significantly higher at TE = 128 msec than at TE = 90 when diseases of the liver, spleen, pancreas, gallbladder, and fat and muscles, hepatocellular carcinomas and hemangiomas, and rendering the hepatobiliary tract system based on the maximum signal intensity technique were involved (p < 0.05). In addition, the presence of artifacts, the image clarity and the overall image quality were excellent at TE = 128 msec (p < 0.05). In abdominal MRI, the breath-hold half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) was found to be effective in illustrating the abdominal organs for TE = 128 msec. Overall, the image quality at TE = 128 msec was better than that at TE = 90 msec due to the improved signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios. Overall, the HASTE technique for abdominal MRI based on a high-magnetic field (3.0 T) at a TE of 128 msec can provide useful data.

  19. Utility of cine MR urography of the urinary tract and comparison with static MR urography.

    PubMed

    Tsubota, Masako; Takahara, Taro; Nitatori, Toshiaki; Hachiya, Junichi

    2004-01-01

    MR urography using heavily T2-weighted images can depict the urinary tract without the need for contrast medium. However, this technique has potential problems with regard to evaluating the non-dilated ureter. We compared the efficacy of cine MR urography (C-MRU) with static MR urography (S-MRU). Twenty-two patients with suspected upper urinary tract disease underwent C-MRU. The final clinical diagnosis was compared with the diagnosis made using S-MRU and C-MRU, respectively. The sequence used was single-shot fast spin echo with a slice thickness of 50 mm, FOV of 45 cm, and 256x256 matrix. MR urography was obtained sequentially by 6 to 10 repetitions of single-shot scans with intermittent breath holding. S-MRU was used in the initial phase of this sequence, while C-MRU was used for the entire sequence. A final diagnosis was made based on 1) existence of stenosis, 2) rate of certainty of existence of stenosis, 3) etiology of stenosis. No statistically significant difference was observed between S-MRU and C-MRU, except in certainty of existence of stenosis, where C-MRU (average rate: 2.82 +/- 0.39) was significantly superior to S-MRU (2.41 +/- 0.73). C-MRU can improve the certainty of existence of urinary stenosis, and may be useful in excluding suspected stenoses in normal or undilated ureters.

  20. Breath-Holding Spells

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause kids to stop breathing and sometimes lose consciousness for up to a minute. In the most ... pose a choking hazard once your child regains consciousness roll your child over onto his or her ...

  1. Clinical Feasibility of Using an EPID in cine Mode for Image-Guided Verification of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Berbeco, Ross I.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To introduce a novel method for monitoring tumor location during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) while the treatment beam is on by using a conventional electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods and Materials: In our clinic, selected patients were treated under a phase I institutional review board-approved SBRT protocol for limited hepatic metastases from solid tumors. Before treatment planning multiple gold fiducial markers were implanted on the periphery of the tumor. During treatment the EPID was used in cine mode to collect the exit radiation and produce a sequence of images for each field. An in-house program was developed for calculating the location of the fiducials and their relative distance to the planned locations. Results: Three case studies illustrate the utility of the technique. Patient A exhibited a systematic shift of 4 mm during one of the treatment beams. Patient B showed an inferior drift of the target of approximately 1 cm from the time of setup to the end of the fraction. Patient C had a poor setup on the first day of treatment that was quantified and accounted for on subsequent treatment days. Conclusions: Target localization throughout each treatment beam can be quickly assessed with the presented technique. Treatment monitoring with an EPID in cine mode is shown to be a clinically feasible and useful tool.

  2. Mechanical indentation improves cerebral blood oxygenation signal quality of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) during breath holding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, William C.; Romero, Edwin; LaConte, Stephen M.; Rylander, Christopher G.

    2013-03-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a well-known technique for non-invasively measuring cerebral blood oxygenation, and many studies have demonstrated that fNIRS signals can be related to cognitive function. However, the fNIRS signal is attenuated by the skin, while scalp blood content has been reported to influence cerebral oxygenation measurements. Mechanical indentation has been shown to increase light transmission through soft tissues by causing interstitial water and blood flow away from the compressed region. To study the effects of indentation on fNIRS, a commercial fNIRS system with 16 emitter/detector pairs was used to measure cerebral blood oxygenation at 2 Hz. This device used diffuse reflectance at 730 nm and 850 nm to calculate deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin concentrations. A borosilicate glass hemisphere was epoxied over each sensor to function as both an indenter and a lens. After placing the indenter/sensor assembly on the forehead, a pair of plastic bands was placed on top of the fNIRS headband and strapped to the head to provide uniform pressure and tightened to approx. 15 N per strap. Cerebral blood oxygenation was recorded during a breath holding regime (15 second hold, 15 second rest, 6 cycles) in 4 human subjects both with and without the indenter array. Results showed that indentation increased raw signal intensity by 85 +/- 35%, and that indentation increased amplitude of hemoglobin changes during breath cycles by 313% +/- 105%. These results suggest that indentation improves sensing of cerebral blood oxygenation, and may potentially enable sensing of deeper brain tissues.

  3. Minimizing Late Effects for Patients With Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma: Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold, IMRT, or Both?

    SciTech Connect

    Aznar, Marianne C.; Maraldo, Maja V.; Schut, Deborah A.; Lundemann, Michael; Brodin, N Patrik; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Berthelsen, Anne K.; Specht, Lena; Petersen, Peter M.

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CD), lung cancer, and breast cancer. We investigated the risk for the development of CD and secondary lung, breast, and thyroid cancer after radiation therapy (RT) delivered with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) compared with free-breathing (FB) using 3-dimensional conformal RT (3DCRT) and intensity modulated RT (IMRT). The aim of this study was to determine which treatment modality best reduced the combined risk of life-threatening late effects in patients with mediastinal HL. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with early-stage mediastinal HL were eligible for the study. Treatment plans were calculated with both 3DCRT and IMRT on both DIBH and FB planning computed tomographic scans. We reported the estimated dose to the heart, lung, female breasts, and thyroid and calculated the estimated life years lost attributable to CD and to lung, breast, and thyroid cancer. Results: DIBH lowered the estimated dose to heart and lung regardless of delivery technique (P<.001). There was no significant difference between IMRT-FB and 3DCRT-DIBH in mean heart dose, heart V20Gy, and lung V20Gy. The mean breast dose was increased with IMRT regardless of breathing technique. Life years lost was lowest with DIBH and highest with FB. Conclusions: In this cohort, 3DCRT-DIBH resulted in lower estimated doses and lower lifetime excess risks than did IMRT-FB. Combining IMRT and DIBH could be beneficial for a subgroup of patients.

  4. Deep-inspiration breath-hold PET/CT of lung cancer: maximum standardized uptake value analysis of 108 patients.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Tsuyoshi; Ohtake, Eiji; Inoue, Tomio

    2008-08-01

    Our aim was to compare the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) between breath-hold (BH) PET/CT and free-breathing (FB) PET/CT. The features of phantom data were analyzed, after which a clinical study was performed. A total of 108 consecutive patients with lung cancer were examined using lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO)-based PET/CT. The patients were instructed to breathe freely during FB PET/CT. In BH PET/CT, the patients were instructed to hold their breath in the maximal inspiration position during the scout scan, for 10 s of the CT scan, and for as long as possible during the PET scan. BH time was recorded using a respiratory monitoring device. The %BH-index was defined as the percentage difference between SUVmax of FB PET and that of BH PET. Statistical analyses were performed using the following factors: %BH-index, age, body mass index, 18F-FDG dosage, blood glucose, BH time, lesion size, and location. The highest %BH-index was 223.2. %BH-index in the lower lung area was significantly higher than that in the upper lung area (51.8 +/- 49.5 vs. 16.9 +/- 25.6, respectively). Lesion volume and maximum diameter in the high-%BH-index group were significantly lower than those in the low-%BH-index group, with the use of a %BH-index cutoff value of 37.l. SUVmax of FB PET should not be taken as accurate, especially in the lower lung area and for small pulmonary lesions. BH PET/CT is expected to enable precise measurement of SUVmax and is thus recommended as part of the standard protocol for lung cancer.

  5. Mind-body relationships in elite apnea divers during breath holding: a study of autonomic responses to acute hypoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Laurino, Marco; Menicucci, Danilo; Mastorci, Francesca; Allegrini, Paolo; Piarulli, Andrea; Scilingo, Enzo P.; Bedini, Remo; Pingitore, Alessandro; Passera, Mirko; L'Abbate, Antonio; Gemignani, Angelo

    2011-01-01

    The mental control of ventilation with all associated phenomena, from relaxation to modulation of emotions, from cardiovascular to metabolic adaptations, constitutes a psychophysiological condition characterizing voluntary breath-holding (BH). BH induces several autonomic responses, involving both autonomic cardiovascular and cutaneous pathways, whose characterization is the main aim of this study. Electrocardiogram and skin conductance (SC) recordings were collected from 14 elite divers during three conditions: free breathing (FB), normoxic phase of BH (NPBH) and hypoxic phase of BH (HPBH). Thus, we compared a set of features describing signal dynamics between the three experimental conditions: from heart rate variability (HRV) features (in time and frequency-domains and by using nonlinear methods) to rate and shape of spontaneous SC responses (SCRs). The main result of the study rises by applying a Factor Analysis to the subset of features significantly changed in the two BH phases. Indeed, the Factor Analysis allowed to uncover the structure of latent factors which modeled the autonomic response: a factor describing the autonomic balance (AB), one the information increase rate (IIR), and a latter the central nervous system driver (CNSD). The BH did not disrupt the FB factorial structure, and only few features moved among factors. Factor Analysis indicates that during BH (1) only the SC described the emotional output, (2) the sympathetic tone on heart did not change, (3) the dynamics of interbeats intervals showed an increase of long-range correlation that anticipates the HPBH, followed by a drop to a random behavior. In conclusion, data show that the autonomic control on heart rate and SC are differentially modulated during BH, which could be related to a more pronounced effect on emotional control induced by the mental training to BH. PMID:22461774

  6. Investigation of dose homogeneity for loose helical tomotherapy delivery in the context of breath-hold radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bryan; Kron, Tomas; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2005-05-01

    Loose helical delivery is a potential solution to account for respiration-driven tumour motion in helical tomotherapy (HT). In this approach, a treatment is divided into a set of interlaced 'loose' helices commencing at different gantry angles. Each loose helix covers the entire target length in one gantry rotation during a single breath-hold. The dosimetric characteristics of loose helical delivery were investigated by delivering a 6 MV photon beam in a HT-like manner. Multiple scenarios of conventional 'tight' HT and loose helical deliveries were modelled in treatment planning software, and carried out experimentally with Kodak EDR2 film. The advantage of loose helical delivery lies in its ability to produce a more homogeneous dose distribution by eliminating the 'thread' effect—an inherent characteristic of HT, which results in dose modulations away from the axis of gantry rotation. However, loose helical delivery was also subjected to undesirable dose modulations in the direction of couch motion (termed 'beating' effect), when the ratio between the number of beam projections per gantry rotation (n) and pitch factor (p) was a non-integer. The magnitude of dose modulations decreased with an increasing n/p ratio. The results suggest that for the current HT unit (n = 51), dose modulations could be kept under 5% by selecting a pitch factor smaller than 7. A pitch factor of this magnitude should be able to treat a target up to 30 cm in length. Loose helical delivery should increase the total session time only by a factor of 2, while the planning time should stay the same since the total number of beam projections remains unchanged. Considering its dosimetric advantage and clinical practicality, loose helical delivery is a promising solution for the future HT treatments of respiration-driven targets.

  7. Right ventricular volume and mass determined by cine magnetic resonance imaging in HIV patients with possible right ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kjaer, Andreas; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Gerstoft, Jan; Hesse, Birger; Petersen, Claus Leth

    2006-01-01

    Impaired right ventricular (RV) function has been reported to occur in patients with HIV when studied by echocardiography. However, for accurate evaluation of RV function and morphology, first-pass radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) and cine magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) are methods of choice. Studies of RV involvement in patients with HIV are of interest since pulmonary hypertension is a known serious complication of HIV recognized with increasing frequency. The aim of the present study was to characterize cardiac function and geometry in patients with HIV and reduced right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF). To do so, we screened patients with RNV and performed an additional cine-MRI in those with reduced RVEF determined by RNV. Ninety patients with HIV were included. To evaluate the MRI measures exactly we included 18 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers to establish reference values. RNV showed in 13 of the 90 patients a reduced RVEF with a standard cutoff value for RVEF of 0.50. Six of these agreed to have an additional MRI investigation performed. These 6 patients with HIV had an RVEF measured by RNV between 0.41-0.49. Measured by MRI the range of RVEF was 0.47-0.55 with 3 below the lower 95% reference limit according to the control group (lower reference limit: 0.49). None of the 6 patients with HIV had dilated right ventricle and only 1 had a marginally increased right ventricular mass index of 43 g/m(2) (reference: <41 g/m(2)). With use of MRI, a few patients with HIV may have a marginally reduced RVEF but normal RV dimensions and mass. Thus, RV dysfunction does not seem to constitute a major clinical problem in this antivirally treated HIV population.

  8. Non-contrast-enhanced 3D MR portography within a breath-hold using compressed sensing acceleration: A prospective noninferiority study.

    PubMed

    Ono, Ayako; Arizono, Shigeki; Fujimoto, Koji; Akasaka, Thai; Yamashita, Rikiya; Furuta, Akihiro; Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Togashi, Kaori

    2017-07-05

    To evaluate images of non-contrast-enhanced 3D MR portography within a breath-hold (BH) using compressed sensing (CS) compared to standard respiratory-triggered (RT) sequences. Fifty-nine healthy volunteers underwent MR portography using two sequences of balanced steady-state free-precession (bSSFP) with time-spatial labeling inversion pulses (Time-SLIP): BH bSSFP-CS and RT bSSFP. Two radiologists independently scored the diagnostic acceptability to delineate the portal branches (MPV: main portal vein; RPV: right portal vein; LPV: left portal vein; RPPV: right posterior portal vein; and P4 and P8: portal branch of segment 4 and segment 8, respectively) and the overall image quality on a four-point scale. We assessed noninferiority of BH bSSFP-CS to RT bSSFP. For quantitative analysis, vessel-to-liver contrast (Cv-l) was calculated in MPV, RPV and LPV. BH bSSFP sequence was successfully performed with a 30-second acquisition time. The diagnostic acceptability scores of BH bSSFP-CS compared with RT bSSFP were statistically noninferior: MPV (95% CI for score difference of Reader 1 and Reader 2, respectively: [-0.16, 0.06], [-0.05, 0.02]), RPV ([-0.00, 0.11], [-0.01, 0.08]), LPV ([-0.03, 0.10], [-0.10, 0.03]), RPPV ([-0.03, 0.10], [-0.05, 0.05]), P4 ([-0.13, 0.34], [-0.28, 0.21]) and P8 ([-0.21, 0.11], [-0.25, -0.02]). However, the overall image quality of BH bSSFP-CS did not show noninferiority ([-0.61, -0.24], [-0.54, -0.17]). Cv-l values were significantly lower in BH bSSFP-CS (P<0.001). CS enabled non-contrast-enhanced 3D bSSFP MR portography to be performed within a BH while maintaining noninferior diagnostic acceptability compared to standard RT bSSFP MR portography. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of Surgical Evaluation of Additional Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Advanced Thymoma with Infiltration of Adjacent Structures: The Thoracic Surgeon's View.

    PubMed

    Ried, Michael; Hnevkovsky, Stefanie; Neu, Reiner; von Süßkind-Schwendi, Marietta; Götz, Andrea; Hamer, Okka W; Schalke, Berthold; Hofmann, Hans-Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Background Preoperative radiological assessment is important for clarification of surgical operability for advanced thymic tumors. Objective was to determine the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with cine sequences for evaluation of cardiovascular tumor invasion. Patients and Methods This prospective study included patients with advanced thymoma, who underwent surgical resection. All patients received preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan and cine MRI. Results Tumor infiltration was surgically confirmed in the pericardium (n = 12), myocardium (n = 1), superior caval vein (SCV; n = 3), and aorta (n = 2). A macroscopic complete resection was possible in 10 patients, whereas 2 patients with aortic or myocardial tumor invasion had R2 resection. The positive predictive value (PPV) was 50% for cine MRI compared with 0% for CT scan regarding myocardial tumor infiltration. The PPV for tumor infiltration of the aorta was 50%, with a higher sensitivity for the CT scan (100 vs. 50%). Infiltration of the SCV could be detected slightly better with cine MRI (PPV 75 vs. 66.7%). Conclusion Cine MRI seems to improve the accuracy of preoperative staging of advanced thymoma regarding infiltration of cardiovascular structures and supports the surgical approach.

  10. MR assessment of left ventricular function: quantitative comparison of fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) with fast gradient echo cine technique.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Stern, Jessica S; Mai, Vu M; Pierchala, Linda N; Edelman, Robert R; Prasad, Pottumarthi V

    2002-11-01

    To evaluate the agreement of fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) cine technique with segmented k-space fast gradient echo (GRE) cine technique when using them for assessment of cardiac function. Eleven MR cine studies were performed on six healthy volunteers and five patients, using FIESTA and fast GRE techniques. The quantitative measurements of ventricular function obtained from the two techniques were compared. The data analysis was performed by two observers independently. Compared to fast GRE cine technique, FIESTA cine technique consistently resulted in higher end-diastolic volume (10.2%) and end-systolic volume (21.6%), but lower myocardial mass of left ventricle (19.2%) and ejection fraction (9.9%). The stroke volume obtained from the two techniques was very close. The primary explanation for this variability is that the two techniques have different mechanisms on establishing signal contrast. Compared to fast GRE technique, FIESTA provides significantly different results when using it for assessment of left ventricular function. It is important to consider this difference in the assessment of cardiac function. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Decompression sickness in breath-hold diving, and its probable connection to the growth and dissolution of small arterial gas emboli.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Saul; Solano-Altamirano, J M

    2015-04-01

    We solved the Laplace equation for the radius of an arterial gas embolism (AGE), during and after breath-hold diving. We used a simple three-region diffusion model for the AGE, and applied our results to two types of breath-hold dives: single, very deep competitive-level dives and repetitive shallower breath-hold dives similar to those carried out by indigenous commercial pearl divers in the South Pacific. Because of the effect of surface tension, AGEs tend to dissolve in arterial blood when arteries remote from supersaturated tissue. However if, before fully dissolving, they reach the capillary beds that perfuse the brain and the inner ear, they may become inflated with inert gas that is transferred into them from these contiguous temporarily supersaturated tissues. By using simple kinetic models of cerebral and inner ear tissue, the nitrogen tissue partial pressures during and after the dive(s) were determined. These were used to theoretically calculate AGE growth and dissolution curves for AGEs lodged in capillaries of the brain and inner ear. From these curves it was found that both cerebral and inner ear decompression sickness are expected to occur occasionally in single competitive-level dives. It was also determined from these curves that for the commercial repetitive dives considered, the duration of the surface interval (the time interval separating individual repetitive dives from one another) was a key determinant, as to whether inner ear and/or cerebral decompression sickness arose. Our predictions both for single competitive-level and repetitive commercial breath-hold diving were consistent with what is known about the incidence of cerebral and inner ear decompression sickness in these forms of diving. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Real-time SPARSE-SENSE cine MR imaging in atrial fibrillation: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Juliane; Nensa, Felix; Schemuth, Haemi P; Maderwald, Stefan; Quick, Harald H; Schlosser, Thomas; Nassenstein, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) relies on correct ECG-gating, which is hindered in arrhythmia. Purpose To examine whether a prototype free-breathing real-time cine sequence using SPARSE-SENSE (SPARSE) improves left ventricular quantification in atrial fibrillation. Material and Methods On a 1.5T MR system left ventricular short-axis stacks were acquired of the SPARSE sequence and of a "reference" steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequence with arrhythmia rejection in 20 patients with atrial fibrillation. Two radiologists independently rated arrhythmia-caused artifact severity in both sequences using a 4-point scale. Coefficients of variation of myocardial signal intensity for both sequences were acquired. Volumetry was performed twice by one reader and once by another reader. Correlation between artifact severity and employed sequence was analyzed by modified Fisher's exact test. Coefficients of variation and volumetric data were compared by paired t-test and intraclass correlation. Results Median arrhythmia-caused artifact severity was 2 in both readers for SSFP and 0 (reader 1)/1 (reader 2) for SPARSE, being significantly lower in SPARSE ( P < 0.001). Mean coefficient of variance was significantly smaller in SPARSE (0.11 ± 0.04) compared to SSFP (0.22 ± 0.13, P = 0.003), which was interpreted as a hint for fewer artifacts in SPARSE. Only a small difference of 9 ± 15 mL was seen for end-systolic volume ( P = 0.019) between sequences, otherwise no significant difference was detected (end-diastolic volume, P = 0.200; stroke volume, P = 0.554; ejection fraction, P = 0.136; myocardial mass, P = 0.353). Intraclass correlation between sequences was good to excellent (range, 0.80-0.97). Conclusion Real-time MRI with SPARSE data sampling is promising in atrial fibrillation because it reduces arrhythmia-caused artifacts.

  13. Mean thoracic aortic wall thickness determination by cine MRI with steady-state free precession: validation with dark blood imaging.

    PubMed

    Mensel, Birger; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Schneider, Tobias; Quadrat, Alexander; Hegenscheid, Katrin

    2013-08-01

    To assess the validity and reliability of measuring mean aortic wall thickness (MAWT) of the ascending and descending aorta using cine steady-state free precession (SSFP) imaging compared to dark blood (DB) imaging. DB and SSFP images of the thoracic aorta acquired at 1.5 T in 50 volunteers (26 women, 24 men; mean age: 50.2 ± 13.1 years) were used. MAWT was calculated on DB and SSFP images for the ascending and descending aorta at the level of the right pulmonary artery by two independent observers. Validity was assessed using Bland-Altman analysis, Passing-Bablok regression, and Spearman correlation. Reliability was assessed using Bland-Altman analysis and intraclass coefficients (ICCs). The mean MAWT of the ascending aorta on DB and SSFP images was 1.89 ± 0.21 mm and 1.87 ± 0.20 mm. The measurements for the descending aorta were 1.60 ± 0.22 and 1.63 ± 0.20 mm, respectively. Comparison of DB and SSFP measurements revealed a mean bias of 1.3% (95% limits of agreement (LOA): -7.9, 10.5%) for the ascending and of -2.1% (LOA: -10.5, 6.3%) for the descending aorta. The corresponding regression equation was y = 0.042 + 0.960 × (r = 0.91; P < .0001) and y = 0.118 + 0.939 × (r = 0.95; P < .0001), respectively. Intra- and interobserver variability showed a mean bias of less than 2.0% and LOA of less than ±15.0%. ICCs were greater than or equal to 0.85. MAWT determination in the ascending and descending aorta using cine SSFP sequences is highly valid and reliable compared to DB imaging. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Fast cine-magnetic resonance imaging point tracking for prostate cancer radiation therapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, J.; Dang, K.; Fox, Chris D.; Chandra, S.; Gill, Suki; Kron, T.; Pham, D.; Foroudi, F.

    2014-03-01

    The analysis of intra-fraction organ motion is important for improving the precision of radiation therapy treatment delivery. One method to quantify this motion is for one or more observers to manually identify anatomic points of interest (POIs) on each slice of a cine-MRI sequence. However this is labour intensive and inter- and intra- observer variation can introduce uncertainty. In this paper a fast method for non-rigid registration based point tracking in cine-MRI sagittal and coronal series is described which identifies POIs in 0.98 seconds per sagittal slice and 1.35 seconds per coronal slice. The manual and automatic points were highly correlated (r>0.99, p<0.001) for all organs and the difference generally less than 1mm. For prostate planning peristalsis and rectal gas can result in unpredictable out of plane motion, suggesting the results may require manual verification.

  15. Hemodynamic Changes Following Visual Stimulation and Breath-holding Provide Evidence for an Uncoupling of Cerebral Blood Flow and Volume from Oxygen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Manus J.; Stevens, Robert D.; de Boorder, Michiel; Pekar, James J.; Hendrikse, Jeroen; van Zijl, Peter C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging is most commonly performed using the blood-oxygenation-level-depend (BOLD) approach, which is sensitive to changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). However, the precise mechanism by which neuronal activity elicits a hemodynamic response remains controversial. Here, separate visual stimulation (14s flashing checkerboard) and breath-hold (4s exhale + 14s breath-hold) experiments were performed in parallel on healthy volunteers using BOLD, CBV-weighted (CBVw) and CBF-weighted (CBFw) fMRI. Following visual stimulation, the BOLD signal persisted for 33±5s (n=9) and was bi-phasic with a negative component (undershoot), whereas CBV and CBF returned to baseline without an undershoot at 20±5s and 20±3s, respectively. Following breath-hold, the BOLD signal returned to baseline (23±7s) at the same time (p>0.05) as CBV (21±6s) and CBF (18±3s), without a post-stimulus undershoot. These data indicate that following visual activation, the BOLD undershoot is likely due to continued elevated CMRO2. Furthermore, persisting elevated CMRO2 is found when CBF and CBV have returned to baseline levels, providing evidence for an uncoupling of CBV and CBF responses from CMRO2 changes. Persisting elevated CMRO2 following elevated neuronal activity may be necessary to reverse neurotransmitter movements arising from excitatory postsynaptic currents. PMID:18797471

  16. Cine photography and video recording of anterior segment fluorescein angiography.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, R J; Ford, S M

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of apparatus and technique for carrying out cine photography and video recording of anterior segment fluorescein angiography. We found cine best for single-frame analysis and video tape recording less expensive. Images PMID:708682

  17. A novel diagnostic aid for intra-abdominal adhesion detection in cine-MR imaging: Pilot study and initial diagnostic impressions.

    PubMed

    Randall, David; Joosten, Frank; ten Broek, Richard; Gillott, Richard; Bardhan, Karna Dev; Strik, Chema; Prins, Wiesje; van Goor, Harry; Fenner, John

    2017-07-14

    A non-invasive diagnostic technique for abdominal adhesions is not currently available. Capture of abdominal motion due to respiration in cine-MRI has shown promise, but is difficult to interpret. This article explores the value of a complimentary diagnostic aid to facilitate the non-invasive detection of abdominal adhesions using cine-MRI. An image processing technique was developed to quantify the amount of sliding that occurs between the organs of the abdomen and the abdominal wall in sagittal cine-MRI slices. The technique produces a 'sheargram' which depicts the amount of sliding which has occurred over 1-3 respiratory cycles. A retrospective cohort of 52 patients, scanned for suspected adhesions, made 281 cine-MRI sagittal slices available for processing. The resulting sheargrams were reported by two operators and compared to expert clinical judgement of the cine-MRI scans. The sheargram matched clinical judgement in 84% of all sagittal slices and 93-96% of positive adhesions were identified on the sheargram. The sheargram displayed a slight skew towards sensitivity over specificity, with a high positive adhesion detection rate but at the expense of false positives. Good correlation between sheargram and absence/presence of inferred adhesions indicates quantification of sliding motion has potential to aid adhesion detection in cine-MRI. Advances in Knowledge: This is the first attempt to clinically evaluate a novel image processing technique quantifying the sliding motion of the abdominal contents against the abdominal wall. The results of this pilot study reveal its potential as a diagnostic aid for detection of abdominal adhesions.

  18. Quantitative Measurements on the Human Ascending Aortic Flow Using 2D Cine Phase-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokosawa, Suguru; Nakamura, Masanori; Wada, Shigeo; Isoda, Haruo; Takeda, Hiroyasu; Yamaguchi, Takami

    The flow in the human ascending aorta was quantified using two-dimensional (2D) cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The quality and reliability of the method were demonstrated with a specially designed phantom model; the flow rate determined with the MRI agreed well with that obtained with a measuring cylinder. The method was then used to measure the aortic blood flow of three healthy human volunteers. The velocity profiles at the supra-aortic valvular plane and ascending aortic plane (approximately 2 and 5cm distal to the aortic valve, respectively) were significantly different. At the peak of systole, the profile was almost axisymmetric at the supra-aortic valvular plane, while it was skewed towards the anterior side of the vessel at the ascending aorta. The Reynolds number, volume flow rate, and stroke volume were all within the normal physiological range. This study demonstrated that the 2D cine phase-contrast MRI technique can be used to provide detailed information on the flow velocity and configuration of a blood vessel, making it a promising tool for analyzing complex hemodynamics in the aorta.

  19. SU-E-T-361: Clinical Benefit of Automatic Beam Gating Mixed with Breath Hold in Radiation Therapy of Left Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J; Hill, G; Spiegel, J; Ye, J; Mehta, V

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical and dosimetric benefits of automatic gating of left breast mixed with breath-hold technique. Methods: Two Active Breathing Control systems, ABC2.0 and ABC3.0, were used during simulation and treatment delivery. The two systems are different such that ABC2.0 is a breath-hold system without beam control capability, while ABC3.0 has capability in both breath-hold and beam gating. At simulation, each patient was scanned twice: one with free breathing (FB) and one with breath hold through ABC. Treatment plan was generated on the CT with ABC. The same plan was also recalculated on the CT with FB. These two plans were compared to assess plan quality. For treatments with ABC2.0, beams with MU > 55 were manually split into multiple subfields. All subfields were identical and shared the total MU. For treatment with ABC3.0, beam splitting was unnecessary. Instead, treatment was delivered in gating mode mixed with breath-hold technique. Treatment delivery efficiency using the two systems was compared. Results: The prescribed dose was 50.4Gy at 1.8Gy/fraction. The maximum heart dose averaged over 10 patients was 46.0±2.5Gy and 24.5±12.2Gy for treatments with FB and with ABC respectively. The corresponding heart V10 was 13.2±3.6% and 1.0±1.6% respectively. The averaged MUs were 99.8±7.5 for LMT, 99.2±9.4 for LLT. For treatment with ABC2.0, normally the original beam was split into 2 subfields. The averaged total time to delivery all beams was 4.3±0.4min for treatments with ABC2.0 and 3.3±0.6min for treatments with ABC3.0 in gating mode. Conclusion: Treatment with ABC tremendously reduced heart dose. Compared to treatments with ABC2.0, gating with ABC3.0 reduced the total treatment time by 23%. Use of ABC3.0 improved the delivery efficiency, and eliminated the possibility of mistreatments. The latter may happen with ABC2.0 where beam is not terminated when breath signal falls outside of the treatment window.

  20. SU-C-210-04: Considerable Pancreatic Tumor Motion During Breath-Hold Measured Using Intratumoral Fiducials On Fluoroscopic Movies

    SciTech Connect

    Lens, E; Horst, A van der; Versteijne, E; Tienhoven, G van; Bel, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Using a breath hold (BH) technique during radiotherapy of pancreatic tumors is expected to reduce intra-fractional motion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tumor motion during BH. Methods: In this pilot study, we included 8 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients. All had 2– 4 intratumoral gold fiducials. Patients were asked to perform 3 consecutive 30-second end-inhale BHs on day 5, 10 and 15 of their three-week treatment. During BH, airflow through a mouthpiece was measured using a spirometer. Any inadvertent flow of air during BH was monitored for all patients. We measured tumor motion on lateral fluoroscopic movies (57 in total) made during BH. In each movie the fiducials as a group were tracked over time in superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) direction using 2-D image correlation between consecutive frames. We determined for each patient the range of intra-BH motion over all movies; we also determined the absolute means and standard deviations (SDs) for the entire patient group. Additionally, we investigated the relation between inadvertent airflow during BH and the intra-BH motion. Results: We found intra-BH tumor motion of up to 12.5 mm (range, 1.0–12.5 mm) in SI direction and up to 8.0 mm (range, 1.0–8.0 mm) in AP direction. The absolute mean motion over the patient population was 4.7 (SD: 3.0) mm and 2.8 (SD: 1.2) mm in the SI and AP direction, respectively. Patients were able to perform stable consecutive BHs; during only 20% of the movies we found very small airflows (≤ 65 ml). These were mostly stepwise in nature and could not explain the continuous tumor motions we observed. Conclusion: We found substantial (up to 12.5 mm) pancreatic tumor motion during BHs. We found minimal inadvertent airflow, seen only during a minority of BHs, and this did not explain the obtained results. This work was supported by the foundation Bergh in het Zadel through the Dutch Cancer Society (KWF Kankerbestrijding) project No. UVA 2011-5271.

  1. Impact of low signal intensity assessed by cine magnetic resonance imaging on detection of poorly viable myocardium in patients with prior myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ota, Shingo; Tanimoto, Takashi; Orii, Makoto; Hirata, Kumiko; Shiono, Yasutsugu; Shimamura, Kunihiro; Matsuo, Yoshiki; Yamano, Takashi; Ino, Yasushi; Kitabata, Hironori; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Kubo, Takashi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Imanishi, Toshio; Akasaka, Takashi

    2015-05-13

    Late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (LGE-MRI) has been established as a modality to detect myocardial infarction (MI). However, the use of gadolinium contrast is limited in patients with advanced renal dysfunction. Although the signal intensity (SI) of infarct area assessed by cine MRI is low in some patients with prior MI, the prevalence and clinical significance of low SI has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate how low SI assessed by cine MRI may relate to the myocardial viability in patients with prior MI. Fifty patients with prior MI underwent both cine MRI and LGE-MRI. The left ventricle was divided into 17 segments. The presence of low SI and the wall motion score (WMS) of each segment were assessed by cine MRI. The transmural extent of infarction was evaluated by LGE-MRI. LGE was detected in 329 of all 850 segments (39%). The low SI assessed by cine MRI was detected in 105 of 329 segments with LGE (32%). All segments with low SI had LGE. Of all 329 segments with LGE, the segments with low SI showed greater transmural extent of infarction (78 [72 - 84] % versus 53 [38 - 72] %, P < 0.01), thinner wall (4.0[3.1 - 4.8] mm versus 6.5 [5.2 - 8.1] mm, P < 0.01), and higher WMS (4.0 [4.0 - 4.0] versus 2.0 [2.0 - 3.0], P < 0.01). The low SI assessed by cine MRI may be effective for detecting poorly viable myocardium in patients with prior MI.

  2. Development and clinical evaluation of automatic fiducial detection for tumor tracking in cine megavoltage images during volumetric modulated arc therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Azcona, Juan Diego; Li Ruijiang; Mok, Edward; Hancock, Steven; Xing Lei

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Real-time tracking of implanted fiducials in cine megavoltage (MV) imaging during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery is complicated due to the inherent low contrast of MV images and potential blockage of dynamic leaves configurations. The purpose of this work is to develop a clinically practical autodetection algorithm for motion management during VMAT. Methods: The expected field-specific segments and the planned fiducial position from the Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) treatment planning system were projected onto the MV images. The fiducials were enhanced by applying a Laplacian of Gaussian filter in the spatial domain for each image, with a blob-shaped object as the impulse response. The search of implanted fiducials was then performed on a region of interest centered on the projection of the fiducial when it was within an open field including the case when it was close to the field edge or partially occluded by the leaves. A universal template formula was proposed for template matching and normalized cross correlation was employed for its simplicity and computational efficiency. The search region for every image was adaptively updated through a prediction model that employed the 3D position of the fiducial estimated from the localized positions in previous images. This prediction model allowed the actual fiducial position to be tracked dynamically and was used to initialize the search region. The artifacts caused by electronic interference during the acquisition were effectively removed. A score map was computed by combining both morphological information and image intensity. The pixel location with the highest score was selected as the detected fiducial position. The sets of cine MV images taken during treatment were analyzed with in-house developed software written in MATLAB (The Mathworks, Inc., Natick, MA). Five prostate patients were analyzed to assess the algorithm performance by measuring their positioning

  3. Development and clinical evaluation of automatic fiducial detection for tumor tracking in cine megavoltage images during volumetric modulated arc therapy

    PubMed Central

    Azcona, Juan Diego; Li, Ruijiang; Mok, Edward; Hancock, Steven; Xing, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time tracking of implanted fiducials in cine megavoltage (MV) imaging during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery is complicated due to the inherent low contrast of MV images and potential blockage of dynamic leaves configurations. The purpose of this work is to develop a clinically practical autodetection algorithm for motion management during VMAT. Methods: The expected field-specific segments and the planned fiducial position from the Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) treatment planning system were projected onto the MV images. The fiducials were enhanced by applying a Laplacian of Gaussian filter in the spatial domain for each image, with a blob-shaped object as the impulse response. The search of implanted fiducials was then performed on a region of interest centered on the projection of the fiducial when it was within an open field including the case when it was close to the field edge or partially occluded by the leaves. A universal template formula was proposed for template matching and normalized cross correlation was employed for its simplicity and computational efficiency. The search region for every image was adaptively updated through a prediction model that employed the 3D position of the fiducial estimated from the localized positions in previous images. This prediction model allowed the actual fiducial position to be tracked dynamically and was used to initialize the search region. The artifacts caused by electronic interference during the acquisition were effectively removed. A score map was computed by combining both morphological information and image intensity. The pixel location with the highest score was selected as the detected fiducial position. The sets of cine MV images taken during treatment were analyzed with in-house developed software written in MATLAB (The Mathworks, Inc., Natick, MA). Five prostate patients were analyzed to assess the algorithm performance by measuring their positioning

  4. MR imaging features of idiopathic thoracic spinal cord herniations using combined 3D-fiesta and 2D-PC Cine techniques.

    PubMed

    Ferré, J C; Carsin-Nicol, B; Hamlat, A; Carsin, M; Morandi, X

    2005-03-01

    Idiopathic thoracic spinal cord herniation (TISCH) is a rare cause of surgically treatable progressive myelopathy. The authors report 3 cases of TISCH diagnosed based on conventional T1- and T2-weighted Spin-Echo (SE) MR images in one case, and T1- and T2-weighted SE images combined with 3D-FIESTA (Fast Imaging Employing Steady state Acquisition) and 2D-Phase-Contrast Cine MR imaging in 2 cases. Conventional MRI findings usually provided the diagnosis. 3D-FIESTA images confirmed it, showing the herniated cord in the ventral epidural space. Moreover, in combination with 2D-Phase Contrast cine technique, it was a sensitive method to for the detection of associated pre- or postoperative cerebrospinal fluid spaces abnormalities.

  5. SU-E-J-112: The Impact of Cine EPID Image Acquisition Frame Rate On Markerless Soft-Tissue Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, S; Rottmann, J; Berbeco, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Although reduction of the cine EPID acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor auto-tracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87Hz on an AS1000 portal imager. Low frame rate images were obtained by continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for auto-tracking. The difference between the programmed and auto-tracked positions of a Las Vegas phantom moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at eleven field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise were correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the auto-tracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29Hz. Above 4.29Hz, changes in errors were negligible with δ<1.60mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R=0.94) and patient studies (R=0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R -0.58 and -0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusion: An image acquisition frame rate of at least 4.29Hz is recommended for cine EPID tracking. Motion blurring in images with frame rates below 4.39Hz can substantially reduce the

  6. Measurement of left ventricular dimensions with contrast-enhanced three-dimensional cine imaging facilitated by k-t SENSE

    PubMed Central

    Maredia, Neil; Kozerke, Sebastian; Larghat, Abdul; Abidin, Nik; Greenwood, John P; Boesiger, Peter; Plein, Sven

    2008-01-01

    Aim To compare three-dimensional (3D) k-t sensitivity encoded (k-t SENSE) cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), before and after contrast administration, against standard 2D imaging for the assessment of left ventricular volumes and mass. Method Twenty-six subjects (14 volunteers, 12 patients) underwent multiple breathhold 2D balanced turbo-field echo cine CMR in addition to k-t SENSE accelerated 3D imaging (acceleration factor 5; 5× k-t SENSE), performed before and after administration of a high-relaxivity gadolinium-based contrast agent (Gadobutrolum). k-t acceleration factors of 7 and 10 were also assessed in six volunteers. Left ventricular end diastolic volume (EDV), end systolic volume (ESV), mass, and ejection fraction (EF) were calculated for each method. Results There was at least moderate agreement between the EDV, ESV, mass and EF calculated by 2D and 3D 5× k-t SENSE methods before contrast (concordance coefficients 0.92, 0.95, 0.97, 0.92, respectively). Agreement improved following contrast (concordance coefficients 0.97, 0.99, 0.98, 0.93, respectively). The 3D method underestimated all parameters compared to 2D (mean bias pre-contrast 6.1 ml, 0.6 ml, 3.5 g, 2.0% respectively). 3D image quality scores were significantly poorer than 2D, showing a non-significant trend to improvement following contrast administration. Parameters derived with k-t acceleration factors of 7 and 10 showed poorer agreement with 2D values. Conclusion Left ventricular volumes and mass are reliably assessed using 3D 5× k-t SENSE accelerated CMR. Contrast administration further improves agreement between 5× k-t SENSE and 2D-derived measurements. k-t acceleration factors greater than 5, though feasible, produce poorer agreement with 2D values. PMID:18507849

  7. Application of the Karhunen-Loeve transform temporal image filter to reduce noise in real-time cardiac cine MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yu; Chung, Yiu-Cho; Raman, Subha V.; Simonetti, Orlando P.

    2009-06-01

    Real-time dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically sacrifices the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to achieve higher spatial and temporal resolution. Spatial and/or temporal filtering (e.g., low-pass filtering or averaging) of dynamic images improves the SNR at the expense of edge sharpness. We describe the application of a temporal filter for dynamic MR image series based on the Karhunen-Loeve transform (KLT) to remove random noise without blurring stationary or moving edges and requiring no training data. In this paper, we present several properties of this filter and their effects on filter performance, and propose an automatic way to find the filter cutoff based on the autocorrelation of the eigenimages. Numerical simulation and in vivo real-time cardiac cine MR image series spanning multiple cardiac cycles acquired using multi-channel sensitivity-encoded MRI, i.e., parallel imaging, are used to validate and demonstrate these properties. We found that in this application, the noise standard deviation was reduced to 42% of the original with no apparent image blurring by using the proposed filter cutoff. Greater noise reduction can be achieved by increasing the length of the image series. This advantage of KLT filtering provides flexibility in the form of another scan parameter to trade for SNR.

  8. Artifact-reduced two-dimensional cine steady state free precession for myocardial blood- oxygen-level-dependent imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangzhi; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A; Liu, Ying; Tang, Richard; Klein, Rachel; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Li, Debiao; Dharmakumar, Rohan

    2010-04-01

    To minimize image artifacts in long TR cardiac phase-resolved steady state free precession (SSFP) based blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) imaging. Nine healthy dogs (four male, five female, 20-25 kg) were studied in a clinical 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner to investigate the effect of temporal resolution, readout bandwidth, and motion compensation on long repetition time (TR) SSFP images. Breath-held 2D SSFP cine sequences with various temporal resolutions (10-204 ms), bandwidths (239-930 Hz/pixel), with and without first-order motion compensation were prescribed in the basal, mid-ventricular, and apical along the short axis. Preliminary myocardial BOLD studies in dogs with controllable coronary stenosis were performed to assess the benefits of artifact-reduction strategies. Shortening the readout time by means of increasing readout bandwidth had no observable reduction in image artifacts. However, increasing the temporal resolution in the presence of first-order motion compensation led to significant reduction in image artifacts. Preliminary studies demonstrated that BOLD signal changes can be reliably detected throughout the cardiac cycle. Artifact-reduction methods used in this study provide significant improvement in image quality compared with conventional long TR SSFP BOLD MRI. It is envisioned that the methods proposed here may enable reliable detection of myocardial oxygenation changes throughout the cardiac cycle with long TR SSFP-based myocardial BOLD MRI. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Monitoring ABC-assisted deep inspiration breath hold for left-sided breast radiotherapy with an optical tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Mittauer, Kathryn E.; Deraniyagala, Rohan; Li, Jonathan G.; Lu, Bo; Liu, Chihray; Samant, Sanjiv S.; Lightsey, Judith L.; Yan, Guanghua

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Recent knowledge on the effects of cardiac toxicity warrants greater precision for left-sided breast radiotherapy. Different breath-hold (BH) maneuvers (abdominal vs thoracic breathing) can lead to chest wall positional variations, even though the patient’s tidal volume remains consistent. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of using optical tracking for real-time quality control of active breathing coordinator (ABC)-assisted deep inspiration BH (DIBH). Methods: An in-house optical tracking system (OTS) was used to monitor ABC-assisted DIBH. The stability and localization accuracy of the OTS were assessed with a ball-bearing phantom. Seven patients with left-sided breast cancer were included. A free-breathing (FB) computed tomography (CT) scan and an ABC-assisted BH CT scan were acquired for each patient. The OTS tracked an infrared (IR) marker affixed over the patient’s xiphoid process to measure the positional variation of each individual BH. Using the BH within which the CT scan was performed as the reference, the authors quantified intra- and interfraction BH variations for each patient. To estimate the dosimetric impact of BH variations, the authors studied the positional correlation between the marker and the left breast using the FB CT and BH CT scans. The positional variations of 860 BHs as measured by the OTS were retrospectively incorporated into the original treatment plans to evaluate their dosimetric impact on breast and cardiac organs [heart and left anterior descending (LAD) artery]. Results: The stability and localization accuracy of the OTS was within 0.2 mm along each direction. The mean intrafraction variation among treatment BHs was less than 2.8 mm in all directions. Up to 12.6 mm anteroposterior undershoot, where the patient’s chest wall displacement of a BH is less than that of a reference BH, was observed with averages of 4.4, 3.6, and 0.1 mm in the anteroposterior, craniocaudal, and mediolateral directions

  10. Breath-hold and free-breathing F-18-FDG-PET/CT in malignant melanoma—detection of additional tumoral foci and effects on quantitative parameters

    PubMed Central

    Bärwolf, Robert; Zirnsak, Mariana; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract During PET/CT acquisition, respiratory motion generates artifacts in the form of breath-related blurring, which may impair lesion detectability and diagnostic accuracy. This observational study was undertaken to verify whether breath-hold F-18-FDG-PET/CT (bhPET) detects additional foci compared to free-breathing PET/CT (fbPET) in cases of malignant melanoma, and to assess the impact of breath-holding on standard uptake values (SUV) and metabolic isocontoured volume (mVic40). Thirty-four patients with melanoma were examined. BhPET and fbPET findings of 117 lesions were compared and correlated with standard contrast-enhanced (ce) CT and MRI for lesion verification. Quantitative parameters (SUVmax, SUVmean, and mVic40) were assessed for both methods and evaluated by linear regression and Spearman correlation. The impact of lesion size and time interval between investigations was analyzed. In 1 patient, a CT-confirmed liver metastasis was seen only on bhPET but not on fbPET. At bhPET, SUVmax, and SUVmean proved significantly higher and mVic40 significantly lower than at fbPET. The positive effect on SUVmax and SUVmean was more pronounced in smaller lesions, whereas the time interval between bhPET and fbPET did not influence SUV or mVic40. In our patient cohort, bhPET yielded significantly higher SUV and provided improved volumetric lesion definition, particularly of smaller lesions. Also one additional liver lesion was identified. Breath-hold PET/CT is technically feasible, and may become clinically useful when fine quantitative evaluations are needed. PMID:28079829

  11. Breath-hold [68Ga]DOTA-TOC PET/CT in neuroendocrine tumors: detection of additional lesions and effects on quantitative parameters.

    PubMed

    Zirnsak, Mariana; Bärwolf, Robert; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2016-11-08

    Respiratory motion during PET/CT acquisition generates artifacts in the form of breath-related blurring, which influences the lesion detectability and diagnostic accuracy. The goal of this study was to verify whether breath-hold [68Ga]DOTA-TOC PET/CT (bhPET) allows detection of additional foci compared to free-breathing PET/CT (fbPET), and to assess the impact of breath-holding on standard uptake values (SUV) and isocontoured volume (Vic40) in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NET). Patients with NET (n=39) were included in this study. BhPET and fbPET characteristics of 96 lesions were compared, and correlated with standard contrast-enhanced (ce) CT and MRI for lesion verification. Quantitative parameters SUV (max and mean) and Vic40 were assessed for both methods and evaluated by linear regression and Spearman's correlation. The impact of lesion size, localization and time interval between investigations was also analyzed. bhPET identified one additional metastasis not seen at fbPET but visible at ceMRI. Another additional bhPET focus did not have a morphological correlate. At bhPET, the SUVmax and SUVmean proved significantly higher and the Vic40 significantly lower than at fbPET. Lesion size, localization and time intervals did not impact significantly on SUV or Vic40. Currently, routine use of breath-hold [68Ga]DOTA-TOC PET/CT cannot be recommended as only one additional lesion was identified. Therefore, bhPET has currently no indication in patients with NET. If technical improvements regarding PET/CT scanner sensitivity are available, bhPET should be reevaluated in the future.

  12. Differentiation between acute and chronic myocardial infarction by means of texture analysis of late gadolinium enhancement and cine cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Larroza, Andrés; Materka, Andrzej; López-Lereu, María P; Monmeneu, José V; Bodí, Vicente; Moratal, David

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to differentiate acute from chronic myocardial infarction using machine learning techniques and texture features extracted from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The study group comprised 22 cases with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and 22 cases with chronic myocardial infarction (CMI). Cine and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) MRI were analyzed independently to differentiate AMI from CMI. A total of 279 texture features were extracted from predefined regions of interest (ROIs): the infarcted area on LGE MRI, and the entire myocardium on cine MRI. Classification performance was evaluated by a nested cross-validation approach combining a feature selection technique with three predictive models: random forest, support vector machine (SVM) with Gaussian Kernel, and SVM with polynomial kernel. The polynomial SVM yielded the best classification performance. Receiver operating characteristic curves provided area-under-the-curve (AUC) (mean±standard deviation) of 0.86±0.06 on LGE MRI using 72 features; AMI sensitivity=0.81±0.08 and specificity=0.84±0.09. On cine MRI, AUC=0.82±0.06 using 75 features; AMI sensitivity=0.79±0.10 and specificity=0.80±0.10. We concluded that texture analysis can be used for differentiation of AMI from CMI on cardiac LGE MRI, and also on standard cine sequences in which the infarction is visually imperceptible in most cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. SU-C-BRF-01: Correlation of DIBH Breath Hold Amplitude with Dosimetric Sparing of Heart and Left Anterior Descending Artery in Left Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taeho; Reardon, Kelli; Sukovich, Kaitlyn; Crandley, Edwin; Read, Paul; Krishni, Wijesooriya

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A 7.4% increase in major coronary events per 1 Gy increase in mean heart dose has been reported from the population-based analysis of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity following treatment of left sided breast cancer. Deep inhalation breath-hold (DIBH) is clinically utilized to reduce radiation dose to heart and left anterior descending artery (LAD). We investigated the correlation of dose sparing in heart and LAD with internal DIBH amplitude to develop a quantitative predictive model for expected dose to heart and LAD based on internal breath hold amplitude. Methods: A treatment planning study (Prescription Dose = 50 Gy) was performed on 50 left breast cancer patients underwent DIBH whole breast radiotherapy. Two CT datasets, free breathing (FB) and DIBH, were utilized for treatment planning and for determination of the internal anatomy DIBH amplitude (difference between sternum position at FB and DIBH). The heart and LAD dose between FB and DIBH plans was compared and dose to the heart and LAD as a function of breath hold amplitude was determined. Results: Average DIBH amplitude using internal anatomy was 13.9±4.2 mm. The DIBH amplitude-mean dose reduction correlation is 20%/5mm (0.3 Gy/5mm) for the heart and 18%/5mm (1.1 Gy/5mm) for LAD. The correlation with max dose reduction is 12%/5mm (3.8 Gy/5mm) for the heart and 16%/5mm (3.2 Gy/5mm) for LAD. We found that average dose reductions to LAD from 6.0±6.5 Gy to 2.0±1.6 Gy with DIBH (4.0 Gy reduction: -67%, p < 0.001) and average dose reduction to the heart from 1.3±0.7 Gy to 0.7±0.2 Gy with DIBH (0.6 Gy reduction: -46%, p < 0.001). That suggests using DIBH may reduce the risk of the major coronary event for left sided breast cancer patients. Conclusion: The correlation between breath hold amplitude and dosimetric sparing suggests that dose sparing linearly increases with internal DIBH amplitude.

  14. Relationship between coronary flow reserve evaluated by phase-contrast cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance and serum eicosapentaenoic acid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Long-term intake of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is associated with a low risk for cardiovascular disease. Phase-contrast cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (PC cine CMR) can assess coronary flow reserve (CFR). The present study investigates the relationship between CFR evaluated by PC cine CMR and the serum EPA. Methods We studied 127 patients (male, 116 (91%); mean age, 72.2 ± 7.4 years) with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). X-ray coronary angiography revealed no significant coronary arterial stenoses (defined as luminal diameter reduction ≥50% on quantitative coronary angiogram (QCA) analysis) in all study participants. Breath-hold PC cine CMR images of the coronary sinus (CS) were acquired to assess blood flow of the CS both at rest and during adenosine triphosphate (ATP) infusion. We calculated CFR as CS blood flow during ATP infusion divided by that at rest. Patients were allocated to groups according to whether they had high (n = 64, EPA ≥ 75.8 μg/mL) or low (n = 63, EPA < 75.8 μg/mL) median serum EPA. Results CFR was significantly lower in the low, than in the high EPA group (2.54 ± 1.00 vs. 2.91 ± 0.98, p = 0.038). Serum EPA positively correlated with CFR (R = 0.35, p < 0.001). We defined preserved CFR as > 2.5, which is the previously reported lower limit of normal flow reserve without obstructive CAD. Multivariate analysis revealed that EPA is an independent predictor of CFR > 2.5 (odds ratio, 1.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.00 – 1.02, p = 0.008). Conclusions The serum EPA is significantly correlated with CFR in CAD patients without significant coronary artery stenosis. PMID:24359564

  15. Functional measurements based on feature tracking of cine magnetic resonance images identify left ventricular segments with myocardial scar

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to perform a feature tracking analysis on cine magnetic resonance (MR) images to elucidate if functional measurements of the motion of the left ventricular wall may detect scar defined with gadolinium enhanced MR. Myocardial contraction can be measured in terms of the velocity, displacement and local deformation (strain) of a particular myocardial segment. Contraction of the myocardial wall will be reduced in the presence of scar and as a consequence of reduced myocardial blood flow. Methods Thirty patients (3 women and 27 men) were selected based on the presence or absence of extensive scar in the anteroseptal area of the left ventricle. The patients were investigated in stable clinical condition, 4-8 weeks post ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Seventeen had a scar area >75% in at least one anteroseptal segment (scar) and thirteen had scar area <1% (non-scar). Velocity, displacement and strain were calculated in the longitudinal direction, tangential to the endocardial outline, and in the radial direction, perpendicular to the tangent. Results In the scar patients, segments with scar showed lower functional measurements than remote segments. Radial measurements of velocity, displacement and strain performed better in terms of receiver-operator-characteristic curves (ROC) than the corresponding longitudinal measurements. The best area-under-curve was for radial strain, 0.89, where a cut-off value of 38.8% had 80% sensitivity and 86% specificity for the detection of a segment with scar area >50%. As a percentage of the mean, intraobserver variability was 16-14-26% for radial measurements of displacement-velocity-strain and corresponding interobserver variability was 13-12-18%. Conclusion Feature tracking analysis of cine-MR displays velocity, displacement and strain in the radial and longitudinal direction and may be used for the detection of transmural scar. The accuracy and

  16. Verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system using cine EPID images and a log file

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Hanazawa, Hideki; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Uehara, Takuya; Shibuya, Keiko

    2017-02-01

    A combined system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system, SyncTraX, was installed at our institution. The objectives of this study are to develop a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images and a log file and to verify this treatment in clinical cases. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy was performed using TrueBeam and the SyncTraX system. Cine EPID images and a log file were acquired for a phantom and three patients during the course of the treatment. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were created for each treatment beam using a planning CT set. The cine EPID images, log file, and DRRs were analysed using a developed software. For the phantom case, the accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated to verify the respiratory-gated radiotherapy. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate were calculated to evaluate the gating accuracy and set-up uncertainty in the superior–inferior (SI), anterior–posterior (AP), and left–right (LR) directions. The proposed method achieved high accuracy for the phantom verification. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker were  ⩽3 mm and  ±3 mm in the SI, AP, and LR directions. We proposed a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine EPID images and a log file and showed that this treatment is performed with high accuracy in clinical cases. This work was partly presented at the 58th Annual meeting of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. Effect of reduction of the pulse rates of fluoroscopy and CINE-acquisition on x-ray dose and angiographic image quality during invasive cardiovascular procedures.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Christopher T; Gadey, Gautam; Jeon, Cathy; Piemonte, Thomas; Waxman, Sergio; Resnic, Frederic

    2014-08-01

    Reducing digital pulse rates (PR) are known to reduce total energy during invasive cardiovascular procedures, which likely has benefits for patients and staff. Physicians may be reluctant to reduce these parameters because they fear a decline in image quality that could affect procedural outcomes. We sought to assess the effect of default rates of fluoroscopy (Fluoro) and CINE-acquisition (CINE) on total x-ray dose and image quality during invasive cardiovascular procedures. We retrospectively reviewed procedures done with 2 default PRs: a standard dose cohort (PR, 15 for Fluoro and CINE), and a reduced dose cohort (PR, 10 for Fluoro and CINE). Total x-ray dose, Fluoro time, and contrast use were compared between groups. A blinded angiographic image quality assessment was then performed using an objective 10-point angiographic quality score. There were no significant differences between cohorts for fluoroscopy time or contrast use. The reduced dose cohort has a significant reduction in mean total x-ray dose (PR 15, 1763.1 mGy; PR 10, 1179.1 mGy; P<0.0001). When adjusted for potential confounders, a 38% reduction in total x-ray dose was identified (P<0.0001). There was no difference in adjusted angiographic quality score between the cohorts (PR 15, 7.90; PR 10, 8.00; P=0.67), indicating no decline in image quality with PR reduction. Reducing default PRs during invasive cardiovascular procedures yields large and significant reductions in total x-ray energy with no decline in angiographic image quality. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system using cine EPID images and a log file.

    PubMed

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Hanazawa, Hideki; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Uehara, Takuya; Shibuya, Keiko

    2017-02-21

    A combined system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system, SyncTraX, was installed at our institution. The objectives of this study are to develop a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images and a log file and to verify this treatment in clinical cases. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy was performed using TrueBeam and the SyncTraX system. Cine EPID images and a log file were acquired for a phantom and three patients during the course of the treatment. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were created for each treatment beam using a planning CT set. The cine EPID images, log file, and DRRs were analysed using a developed software. For the phantom case, the accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated to verify the respiratory-gated radiotherapy. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate were calculated to evaluate the gating accuracy and set-up uncertainty in the superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), and left-right (LR) directions. The proposed method achieved high accuracy for the phantom verification. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker were  ⩽3 mm and  ±3 mm in the SI, AP, and LR directions. We proposed a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine EPID images and a log file and showed that this treatment is performed with high accuracy in clinical cases.

  19. Portal hypertension in patients with cirrhosis: indirect assessment of hepatic venous pressure gradient by measuring azygos flow with 2D-cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Gouya, Hervé; Grabar, Sophie; Vignaux, Olivier; Saade, Anastasia; Pol, Stanislas; Legmann, Paul; Sogni, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    To measure azygos, portal and aortic flow by two-dimensional cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (2D-cine PC MRI), and to compare the MRI values to hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) measurements, in patients with cirrhosis. Sixty-nine patients with cirrhosis were prospectively included. All patients underwent HVPG measurements, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and 2D-cine PC MRI measurements of azygos, portal and aortic blood flow. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to evaluate the correlation between the blood flow and HVPG. The performance of 2D-cine PC MRI to diagnose severe portal hypertension (HVPG ≥ 16 mmHg) was determined by receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis, and area under the curves (AUC) were compared. Azygos and aortic flow values were associated with HVPG in univariate linear regression model. Azygos flow (p < 10(-3)), aortic flow (p = 0.001), age (p = 0.001) and presence of varices (p < 10(-3)) were independently associated with HVPG. Azygos flow (AUC = 0.96 (95 % CI [0.91-1.00]) had significantly higher AUC than aortic (AUC = 0.64 (95 % CI [0.51-0.77]) or portal blood flow (AUC = 0.40 (95 % CI [0.25-0.54]). 2D-cine PC MRI is a promising technique to evaluate significant portal hypertension in patients with cirrhosis. • Noninvasive HVPG assessment can be performed with MRI azygos flow. • Azygos MRI flow is an easy-to-measure marker to detect significant portal hypertension. • MRI flow is more specific that varice grade to detect portal hypertension.

  20. Accuracy of Routine Treatment Planning 4-Dimensional and Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Computed Tomography Delineation of the Left Anterior Descending Artery in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    White, Benjamin M.; Vennarini, Sabina; Lin, Lilie; Freedman, Gary; Santhanam, Anand; Low, Daniel A.; Both, Stefan

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of radiation therapy treatment planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) CT to accurately contour the left anterior descending artery (LAD), a primary indicator of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity for patients undergoing radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Ten subjects were prospectively imaged with a cardiac-gated MRI protocol to determine cardiac motion effects, including the displacement of a region of interest comprising the LAD. A series of planar views were obtained and resampled to create a 3-dimensional (3D) volume. A 3D optical flow deformable image registration algorithm determined tissue displacement during the cardiac cycle. The measured motion was then used as a spatial boundary to characterize motion blurring of the radiologist-delineated LAD structure for a cohort of 10 consecutive patients enrolled prospectively on a breast study including 4DCT and DIBH scans. Coronary motion–induced blurring artifacts were quantified by applying an unsharp filter to accentuate the LAD structure despite the presence of motion blurring. The 4DCT maximum inhalation and exhalation respiratory phases were coregistered to determine the LAD displacement during tidal respiration, as visualized in 4DCT. Results: The average 90th percentile heart motion for the region of interest was 0.7 ± 0.1 mm (left–right [LR]), 1.3 ± 0.6 mm (superior–inferior [SI]), and 0.6 ± 0.2 mm (anterior–posterior [AP]) in the cardiac-gated MRI cohort. The average relative increase in the number of voxels comprising the LAD contour was 69.4% ± 4.5% for the DIBH. The LAD volume overestimation had the dosimetric impact of decreasing the reported mean LAD dose by 23% ± 9% on average in the DIBH. During tidal respiration the average relative LAD contour increase was 69.3% ± 5.9% and 67.9% ± 4.6% for inhalation and exhalation respiratory phases, respectively. The average 90th

  1. Exploratory analysis of nonlinear coupling between EEG global field power and end-tidal carbon dioxide in free breathing and breath-hold tasks.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Maria Sole; Valenza, Gaetano; Greco, Alberto; Giannoni, Alberto; Passino, Claudio; Emdin, Michele; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Vanello, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    Brain activations underlying control of breathing are not completely known. Furthermore, the coupling between neural and respiratory dynamics is usually estimated through linear correlation measures, thus totally disregarding possible underlying nonlinear interactions. To overcome these limitations, in this preliminary study we propose a nonlinear coupling analysis of simultaneous recordings of electroencephalographic (EEG) and respiratory signals at rest and after variation of carbon dioxide (CO2) level. Specifically, a CO2 increase was induced by a voluntary breath hold task. EEG global field power (GFP) in different frequency bands and end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2) were estimated in both conditions. The maximum information coefficient (MIC) and MIC-ρ2 (where ρ represents the Pearson's correlation coefficient) between the two signals were calculated to identify generic associations (i.e. linear and nonlinear correlations) and nonlinear correlations, respectively. With respect to a free breathing state, our results suggest that a breath hold state is characterized by an increased coupling between respiration activity and specific EEG oscillations, mainly involving linear and nonlinear interactions in the delta band (1-4 Hz), and prevalent nonlinear interactions in the alpha band (8-13 Hz).

  2. Exploratory analysis of nonlinear coupling between EEG global field power and end-tidal carbon dioxide in free breathing and breath-hold tasks.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Maria Sole; Valenza, Gaetano; Greco, Alberto; Giannoni, Alberto; Passino, Claudio; Emdin, Michele; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Vanello, Nicola; Morelli, Maria Sole; Valenza, Gaetano; Greco, Alberto; Giannoni, Alberto; Passino, Claudio; Emdin, Michele; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Vanello, Nicola; Morelli, Maria Sole; Passino, Claudio; Greco, Alberto; Vanello, Nicola; Valenza, Gaetano; Giannoni, Alberto; Emdin, Michele; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale

    2016-08-01

    Brain activations underlying control of breathing are not completely known. Furthermore, the coupling between neural and respiratory dynamics is usually estimated through linear correlation measures, thus totally disregarding possible underlying nonlinear interactions. To overcome these limitations, in this preliminary study we propose a nonlinear coupling analysis of simultaneous recordings of electroencephalographic (EEG) and respiratory signals at rest and after variation of carbon dioxide (CO2) level. Specifically, a CO2 increase was induced by a voluntary breath hold task. EEG global field power (GFP) in different frequency bands and end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2) were estimated in both conditions. The maximum information coefficient (MIC) and MIC-ρ(2) (where ρ represents the Pearson's correlation coefficient) between the two signals were calculated to identify generic associations (i.e. linear and nonlinear correlations) and nonlinear correlations, respectively. With respect to a free breathing state, our results suggest that a breath hold state is characterized by an increased coupling between respiration activity and specific EEG oscillations, mainly involving linear and nonlinear interactions in the delta band (1-4 Hz), and prevalent nonlinear interactions in the alpha band (8-13 Hz).

  3. Rapid pediatric cardiac assessment of flow and ventricular volume with compressed sensing parallel imaging volumetric cine phase-contrast MRI.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Albert; Lustig, Michael; Alley, Marcus T; Murphy, Mark; Chan, Frandics P; Herfkens, Robert J; Vasanawala, Shreyas S

    2012-03-01

    The quantification of cardiac flow and ventricular volumes is an essential goal of many congenital heart MRI examinations, often requiring acquisition of multiple 2D phase-contrast and bright-blood cine steady-state free precession (SSFP) planes. Scan acquisition, however, is lengthy and highly reliant on an imager who is well-versed in structural heart disease. Although it can also be lengthy, 3D time-resolved (4D) phase-contrast MRI yields global flow patterns and is simpler to perform. We therefore sought to accelerate 4D phase contrast and to determine whether equivalent flow and volume measurements could be extracted. Four-dimensional phase contrast was modified for higher acceleration with compressed sensing. Custom software was developed to process 4D phase-contrast images. We studied 29 patients referred for congenital cardiac MRI who underwent a routine clinical protocol, including cine short-axis stack SSFP and 2D phase contrast, followed by contrast-enhanced 4D phase contrast. To compare quantitative measurements, Bland-Altman analysis, paired Student t tests, and F tests were used. Ventricular end-diastolic, end-systolic, and stroke volumes obtained from 4D phase contrast and SSFP were well correlated (ρ = 0.91-0.95; r(2) = 0.83-0.90), with no statistically significant difference. Ejection fractions were well correlated in a subpopulation that underwent higher-resolution compressed-sensing 4D phase contrast (ρ = 0.88; r(2) = 0.77). Four-dimensional phase contrast and 2D phase contrast flow rates were also well correlated (ρ = 0.90; r(2) = 0.82). Excluding ventricles with valvular insufficiency, cardiac outputs derived from outlet valve flow and stroke volumes were more consistent by 4D phase contrast than by 2D phase contrast and SSFP. Combined parallel imaging and compressed sensing can be applied to 4D phase contrast. With custom software, flow and ventricular volumes may be extracted with comparable accuracy to SSFP and 2D phase contrast

  4. SU-F-303-11: Implementation and Applications of Rapid, SIFT-Based Cine MR Image Binning and Region Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, T; Wang, Y; Fischer-Valuck, B; Acharya, S; Kashani, R; Li, H; Yang, D; Zoberi, I; Thomas, M; Mutic, S; Li, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel and rapid, SIFT-based algorithm for assessing feature motion on cine MR images acquired during MRI-guided radiotherapy treatments. In particular, we apply SIFT descriptors toward both partitioning cine images into respiratory states and tracking regions across frames. Methods: Among a training set of images acquired during a fraction, we densely assign SIFT descriptors to pixels within the images. We cluster these descriptors across all frames in order to produce a dictionary of trackable features. Associating the best-matching descriptors at every frame among the training images to these features, we construct motion traces for the features. We use these traces to define respiratory bins for sorting images in order to facilitate robust pixel-by-pixel tracking. Instead of applying conventional methods for identifying pixel correspondences across frames we utilize a recently-developed algorithm that derives correspondences via a matching objective for SIFT descriptors. Results: We apply these methods to a collection of lung, abdominal, and breast patients. We evaluate the procedure for respiratory binning using target sites exhibiting high-amplitude motion among 20 lung and abdominal patients. In particular, we investigate whether these methods yield minimal variation between images within a bin by perturbing the resulting image distributions among bins. Moreover, we compare the motion between averaged images across respiratory states to 4DCT data for these patients. We evaluate the algorithm for obtaining pixel correspondences between frames by tracking contours among a set of breast patients. As an initial case, we track easily-identifiable edges of lumpectomy cavities that show minimal motion over treatment. Conclusions: These SIFT-based methods reliably extract motion information from cine MR images acquired during patient treatments. While we performed our analysis retrospectively, the algorithm lends itself to prospective motion

  5. Relationship between Class III malocclusion and hyoid bone displacement during swallowing: a cine-magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Hasan Suat; Gorgulu, Serkan; Karacay, Seniz; Akca, Eralp; Olmez, Huseyin

    2012-01-01

    Objective The displacement of the hyoid bone (HB) is a critical biomechanical component of the swallowing function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the swallowing-induced vertical and horizontal displacements of the HB in subjects with 2 different magnitudes of skeletal Class III malocclusion, by means of real-time, balanced turbo-field-echo (B-TFE) cine-magnetic resonance imaging. Methods The study population comprised 19 patients with mild skeletal Class III malocclusion, 16 with severe skeletal Class III malocclusion, and 20 with a skeletal Class I relationship. Before the commencement of the study, all subjects underwent cephalometric analysis to identify the nature of skeletal malformations. B-TFE images were obtained for the 4 consecutive stages of deglutition as each patient swallowed 10 mL of water, and the vertical and horizontal displacements of the HB were measured at each stage. Results At all stages of swallowing, the vertical position of the HB in the severe Class III malocclusion group was significantly lower than those in the mild Class III and Class I malocclusion groups. Similarly, the horizontal displacement of the HB was found to be significantly associated with the severity of malocclusion, i.e., the degree of Class III malocclusion, while the amount of anterior displacement of the HB decreased with an increase in the severity of the Class III deformity. Conclusions Our findings indicate the existence of a relationship between the magnitude of Class III malocclusion and HB displacement during swallowing. PMID:23112950

  6. Evaluation of template matching for tumor motion management with cine-MR images in lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiutao; Diwanji, Tejan; Mooney, Karen E.; Lin, Jolinta; Feigenberg, Steven; D’Souza, Warren D.; Mistry, Nilesh N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate determination of tumor position is crucial for successful application of motion compensated radiotherapy in lung cancer patients. This study tested the performance of an automated template matching algorithm in tracking the tumor position on cine-MR images by examining the tracking error and further comparing the tracking error to the interoperator variability of three human reviewers. Methods: Cine-MR images of 12 lung cancer patients were analyzed. Tumor positions were determined both automatically with template matching and manually by a radiation oncologist and two additional reviewers trained by the radiation oncologist. Performance of the automated template matching was compared against the ground truth established by the radiation oncologist. Additionally, the tracking error of template matching, defined as the difference in the tumor positions determined with template matching and the ground truth, was investigated and compared to the interoperator variability for all patients in the anterior-posterior (AP) and superior-inferior (SI) directions, respectively. Results: The median tracking error for ten out of the 12 patients studied in both the AP and SI directions was less than 1 pixel (= 1.95 mm). Furthermore, the median tracking error for seven patients in the AP direction and nine patients in the SI direction was less than half a pixel (= 0.975 mm). The median tracking error was positively correlated with the tumor motion magnitude in both the AP (R = 0.55, p = 0.06) and SI (R = 0.67, p = 0.02) directions. Also, a strong correlation was observed between tracking error and interoperator variability (y = 0.26 + 1.25x, R = 0.84, p < 0.001) with the latter larger. Conclusions: Results from this study indicate that the performance of template matching is comparable with or better than that of manual tumor localization. This study serves as preliminary investigations towards developing online motion tracking techniques for hybrid MRI

  7. Development and evaluation of a semiautomatic segmentation method for the estimation of LV parameters on cine MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Grinias, Elias; Pagonidis, Konstantin; Tziritas, George; Damilakis, John

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a semiautomatic method for left ventricular (LV) segmentation on cine MR images and subsequent estimation of cardiac parameters. The study group comprised cardiac MR examinations of 18 consecutive patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. The new method allowed the automatic detection of the LV endocardial and epicardial boundaries on each short-axis cine MR image using a Bayesian flooding segmentation algorithm and weighted least-squares B-splines minimization. Manual editing of the automatic contours could be performed for unsatisfactory segmentation results. The end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), ejection fraction (EF) and LV mass estimated by the new method were compared with the reference values obtained by manually tracing the LV cavity borders. The reproducibility of the new method was determined using data from two independent observers. The mean number of endocardial and epicardial outlines not requiring any manual adjustment was more than 80% and 76% of the total contour number per study, respectively. The mean segmentation time including the required manual corrections was 2.3 ± 0.7 min per patient. LV volumes estimated by the semiautomatic method were significantly lower than those by manual tracing (P < 0.05), whereas no difference was found for EF and LV mass (P > 0.05). LV indices estimated by the two methods were well correlated (r >= 0.80). The mean difference between manual and semiautomatic method for estimating EDV, ESV, EF and LV mass was 6.1 ± 7.2 ml, 3.0 ± 5.2 ml, -0.6 ± 4.3% and -6.2 ± 12.2 g, respectively. The intraobserver and interobserver variability associated with the semiautomatic determination of LV indices was 0.5-1.2% and 0.8-3.9%, respectively. The estimation of LV parameters with the new semiautomatic segmentation method is technically feasible, highly reproducible and time effective.

  8. Reproducibility of small animal cine and scar cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using a clinical 3.0 tesla system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the inter-study, inter-reader and intra-reader reproducibility of cardiac cine and scar imaging in rats using a clinical 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance (MR) system. Methods Thirty-three adult rats (Sprague–Dawley) were imaged 24 hours after surgical occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery using a 3.0 Tesla clinical MR scanner (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands) equipped with a dedicated 70 mm solenoid receive-only coil. Left-ventricular (LV) volumes, mass, ejection fraction and amount of myocardial scar tissue were measured. Intra-and inter-observer reproducibility was assessed in all animals. In addition, repeat MR exams were performed in 6 randomly chosen rats within 24 hours to assess inter-study reproducibility. Results The MR imaging protocol was successfully completed in 32 (97%) animals. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated high intra-reader reproducibility (mean bias%: LV end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), -1.7%; LV end-systolic volume (LVESV), -2.2%; LV ejection fraction (LVEF), 1.0%; LV mass, -2.7%; and scar mass, -1.2%) and high inter-reader reproducibility (mean bias%: LVEDV, 3.3%; LVESV, 6.2%; LVEF, -4.8%; LV mass, -1.9%; and scar mass, -1.8%). In addition, a high inter-study reproducibility was found (mean bias%: LVEDV, 0.1%; LVESV, -1.8%; LVEF, 1.0%; LV mass, -4.6%; and scar mass, -6.2%). Conclusions Cardiac MR imaging of rats yielded highly reproducible measurements of cardiac volumes/function and myocardial infarct size on a clinical 3.0 Tesla MR scanner system. Consequently, more widely available high field clinical MR scanners can be employed for small animal imaging of the heart e.g. when aiming at serial assessments during therapeutic intervention studies. PMID:24345214

  9. Self-Gated CINE MRI for Combined Contrast-Enhanced Imaging and Wall-Stiffness Measurements of Murine Aortic Atherosclerotic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    den Adel, Brigit; van der Graaf, Linda M.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Lamb, Hildo J.; Poelmann, Robert E.; van der Weerd, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Background High-resolution contrast-enhanced imaging of the murine atherosclerotic vessel wall is difficult due to unpredictable flow artifacts, motion of the thin artery wall and problems with flow suppression in the presence of a circulating contrast agent. Methods and Results We applied a 2D-FLASH retrospective-gated CINE MRI method at 9.4T to characterize atherosclerotic plaques and vessel wall distensibility in the aortic arch of aged ApoE−/− mice after injection of a contrast agent. The method enabled detection of contrast enhancement in atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic arch after I.V. injection of micelles and iron oxides resulting in reproducible plaque enhancement. Both contrast agents were taken up in the plaque, which was confirmed by histology. Additionally, the retrospective-gated CINE method provided images of the aortic wall throughout the cardiac cycle, from which the vessel wall distensibility could be calculated. Reduction in plaque size by statin treatment resulted in lower contrast enhancement and reduced wall stiffness. Conclusions The retrospective-gated CINE MRI provides a robust and simple way to detect and quantify contrast enhancement in atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic wall of ApoE−/− mice. From the same scan, plaque-related changes in stiffness of the aortic wall can be determined. In this mouse model, a correlation between vessel wall stiffness and atherosclerotic lesions was found. PMID:23472079

  10. Free-breathing black-blood CINE fast-spin echo imaging for measuring abdominal aortic wall distensibility: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jyh-Miin; Patterson, Andrew J.; Chao, Tzu-Cheng; Zhu, Chengcheng; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Mendes, Jason; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Gillard, Jonathan H.; Graves, Martin J.

    2017-05-01

    The paper reports a free-breathing black-blood CINE fast-spin echo (FSE) technique for measuring abdominal aortic wall motion. The free-breathing CINE FSE includes the following MR techniques: (1) variable-density sampling with fast iterative reconstruction; (2) inner-volume imaging; and (3) a blood-suppression preparation pulse. The proposed technique was evaluated in eight healthy subjects. The inner-volume imaging significantly reduced the intraluminal artifacts of respiratory motion (p  =  0.015). The quantitative measurements were a diameter of 16.3  ±  2.8 mm and wall distensibility of 2.0  ±  0.4 mm (12.5  ±  3.4%) and 0.7  ±  0.3 mm (4.1  ±  1.0%) for the anterior and posterior walls, respectively. The cyclic cross-sectional distensibility was 35  ±  15% greater in the systolic phase than in the diastolic phase. In conclusion, we developed a feasible CINE FSE method to measure the motion of the abdominal aortic wall, which will enable clinical scientists to study the elasticity of the abdominal aorta.

  11. Free-breathing black-blood CINE fast-spin echo imaging for measuring abdominal aortic wall distensibility: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jyh-Miin; Patterson, Andrew; Chao, Tzu-Cheng; Zhu, Chengcheng; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Mendes, Jason; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Gillard, Jonathan; Graves, Martin

    2017-03-22

    The paper reports a free-breathing black-blood CINE fast-spin echo (FSE) technique for measuring abdominal aortic wall motion. The free-breathing CINE FSE includes the following MR techniques: 1) variable-density sampling with fast iterative reconstruction; 2) inner-volume imaging; and 3) a blood-suppression preparation pulse. The proposed technique was evaluated in eight healthy subjects. The inner-volume imaging significantly reduced the intraluminal artifacts of respiratory motion (p = 0.015). The quantitative measurements were a diameter of 16.3 ± 2.8 mm and wall distensibility of 2.0 ± 0.4 mm (12.5 ± 3.4%) and 0.7 ± 0.3 mm (4.1 ± 1.0%) for the anterior and posterior walls, respectively. The cyclic cross-sectional distensibility was 35 ± 15% greater in the systolic phase than in the diastolic phase. In conclusion, we developed a feasible CINE FSE method to measure the motion of the abdominal aortic wall, which will enable clinical scientists to study the elasticity of the abdominal aorta.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstration of anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the left coronary sinus associated with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongmee; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Park, Jeong Euy

    2003-01-01

    Coronary MR angiography can be useful for noninvasive diagnosis of potentially life-threatening coronary artery anomalies. However, there has been no report to date on MR demonstration of acute myocardial infarction associated with right coronary artery anomaly. A 55-year-old man was admitted with chest pain. Catheter coronary angiography revealed an anomalous origin with compression in the proximal segment of right coronary artery. Breath-hold MR angiography using spiral acquisition technique showed that the right coronary artery originated from the left coronary sinus with a separate os. The proximal segment of the artery was compressed by right ventricle outflow tract during the diastolic phase of cine MR imaging. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging 5 minutes after Gd-DTPA injection showed hyperenhancement suggestive of acute myocardial infarction in the posteroinferior wall of the left ventricle.

  13. Motion management within two respiratory-gating windows: feasibility study of dual quasi-breath-hold technique in gated medical procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeho; Kim, Siyong; Park, Yang-Kyun; Youn, Kaylin K.; Keall, Paul; Lee, Rena

    2014-11-01

    A dual quasi-breath-hold (DQBH) technique is proposed for respiratory motion management (a hybrid technique combining breathing-guidance with breath-hold task in the middle). The aim of this study is to test a hypothesis that the DQBH biofeedback system improves both the capability of motion management and delivery efficiency. Fifteen healthy human subjects were recruited for two respiratory motion measurements (free breathing and DQBH biofeedback breathing for 15 min). In this study, the DQBH biofeedback system utilized the abdominal position obtained using an real-time position management (RPM) system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, USA) to audio-visually guide a human subject for 4 s breath-hold at EOI and 90% EOE (EOE90%) to improve delivery efficiency. We investigated the residual respiratory motion and the delivery efficiency (duty-cycle) of abdominal displacement within the gating window. The improvement of the abdominal motion reproducibility was evaluated in terms of cycle-to-cycle displacement variability, respiratory period and baseline drift. The DQBH biofeedback system improved the abdominal motion management capability compared to that with free breathing. With a phase based gating (mean ± std: 55  ±  5%), the averaged root mean square error (RMSE) of the abdominal displacement in the dual-gating windows decreased from 2.26 mm of free breathing to 1.16 mm of DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.007). The averaged RMSE of abdominal displacement over the entire respiratory cycles reduced from 2.23 mm of free breathing to 1.39 mm of DQBH biofeedback breathing in the dual-gating windows (p-value = 0.028). The averaged baseline drift dropped from 0.9 mm min-1 with free breathing to 0.09 mm min-1 with DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.048). The averaged duty-cycle with an 1 mm width of displacement bound increased from 15% of free breathing to 26% of DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.003). The study demonstrated that the DQBH biofeedback

  14. Effect of Maximal Apnoea Easy-Going and Struggle Phases on Subarachnoid Width and Pial Artery Pulsation in Elite Breath-Hold Divers

    PubMed Central

    Winklewski, Pawel J.; Barak, Otto; Madden, Dennis; Gruszecka, Agnieszka; Gruszecki, Marcin; Guminski, Wojciech; Kot, Jacek; Frydrychowski, Andrzej F.; Drvis, Ivan; Dujic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to assess changes in subarachnoid space width (sas-TQ), the marker of intracranial pressure (ICP), pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ) and cardiac contribution to blood pressure (BP), cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) and cc-TQ oscillations throughout the maximal breath hold in elite apnoea divers. Non-invasive assessment of sas-TQ and cc-TQ became possible due to recently developed method based on infrared radiation, called near-infrared transillumination/backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS). Methods The experimental group consisted of seven breath-hold divers (six men). During testing, each participant performed a single maximal end-inspiratory breath hold. Apnoea consisted of the easy-going and struggle phases (characterised by involuntary breathing movements (IBMs)). Heart rate (HR) was determined using a standard ECG. BP was assessed using the photoplethysmography method. SaO2 was monitored continuously with pulse oximetry. A pneumatic chest belt was used to register thoracic and abdominal movements. Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) was estimated by a 2-MHz transcranial Doppler ultrasonic probe. sas-TQ and cc-TQ were measured using NIR-T/BSS. Wavelet transform analysis was performed to assess cardiac contribution to BP, CBFV and cc-TQ oscillations. Results Mean BP and CBFV increased compared to baseline at the end of the easy phase and were further augmented by IBMs. cc-TQ increased compared to baseline at the end of the easy phase and remained stable during the IBMs. HR did not change significantly throughout the apnoea, although a trend toward a decrease during the easy phase and recovery during the IBMs was visible. Amplitudes of BP, CBFV and cc-TQ were augmented. sas-TQ and SaO2 decreased at the easy phase of apnoea and further decreased during the IBMs. Conclusions Apnoea increases intracranial pressure and pial artery pulsation. Pial artery pulsation seems to be stabilised by the IBMs. Cardiac contribution to BP, CBFV and

  15. A case study evaluating deep inspiration breath-hold and intensity-modulated radiotherapy to minimise long-term toxicity in a young patient with bulky mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Jonathan M; Crook, Sarah; Wan, Kenneth; Scott, Lucille; Foroudi, Farshad

    2017-03-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma, but late toxicities such as cardiovascular disease and second malignancy are a major concern. Our aim was to evaluate the potential of deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to reduce cardiac dose from mediastinal radiotherapy. A 24 year-old male with early-stage bulky mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma received involved-site radiotherapy as part of a combined modality programme. Simulation was performed in free breathing (FB) and DIBH. The target and organs at risk were contoured on both datasets. Free breathing-3D conformal (FB-3DCRT), DIBH-3DCRT, FB-IMRT and DIBH-IMRT were compared with respect to target coverage and doses to organs at risk. A 'butterfly' IMRT technique was used to minimise the low-dose bath. In our patient, both DIBH (regardless of mode of delivery) and IMRT (in both FB and DIBH) achieved reductions in mean heart dose. DIBH improved all lung parameters. IMRT reduced high dose (V20), but increased low dose (V5) to lung. DIBH-IMRT was chosen for treatment delivery. Advanced radiotherapy techniques have the potential to further optimise the therapeutic ratio in patients with mediastinal lymphoma. Benefits should be assessed on an individualised basis. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.

  16. Two-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) cine acquisition of fetal non-central nervous system abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shu-Huei; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Hung, Jeng-Hsiu

    2007-09-01

    To evaluate the value of two-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (2D FIESTA) cine MR with parallel imaging techniques in the diagnosis of fetal non-central nervous system (CNS) anomalies. A total of 28 pregnant women were referred for further MR evaluation on fetuses after abnormal sonographic results. A total of 33 fetal MR examinations were performed by a 1.5 T MR scanner with eight-channel phase-arrayed body coils. Single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE(R), GE) of three orthogonal planes and 2D FIESTA for cine fetal MR of three sagittal planes (midsagittal and 10 mm off midline on left and right) were routinely acquired. Additional planes on target organs with variable imaging frames were added if indicated. Nine of the 33 examinations (9/33; 27.3%) had motion artifacts obscuring the detail in SSFSE imaging; 2D FIESTA imaging provided motion-artifact-free imaging in all of them. Cine 2D FIESTA imaging provided additional information on the visceral peristalsis. The information helped in differentiating dilated gastrointestinal (GI) tract from other intraabdominal cystic lesions and in confirming the nature and level of GI tract obstruction. With sub-half-second temporal resolution of the 2D FIESTA sequences, fetal movement is no longer problematic. In addition to the anatomical information also provided by conventional SSFSE sequences, 2D FIESTA demonstrates information on motility and peristalsis of hollow organs and helps the diagnosis of fetal visceral anomalies. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Thigh muscle function in stroke patients revealed by velocity-encoded cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wen, Hongmei; Dou, Zulin; Finni, Taija; Havu, Marko; Kang, Zhuang; Cheng, Shumei; Sipilä, Sarianna; Sinha, Shantanu; Usenius, Jussi-Pekka; Cheng, Sulin

    2008-06-01

    Current methods of clinical assessment of muscle coordination and function after stroke do not provide information on deep muscles. The objective of this study was to examine how stroke affects both superficial and deep muscles' coordination and whether muscle function improves after rehabilitation. Muscle function, coordination, and activity of quadriceps femoris (QF) and hamstrings were evaluated in 10 stroke patients with mild hemiparesis and in 6 controls using velocity-encoded cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (VE-PC MRI), surface electromyography (sEMG), and maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque (MVC). At baseline, the peak muscle velocity of the rectus femoris (RF) and the ratio between the peak velocities of the RF and vasti were lower in the affected limb (AL) of stroke patients than in controls. Co-contraction of agonists and antagonists was higher in the AL than in controls. Muscle activity measured by sEMG showed similar behavior. After rehabilitation, the activity ratio of hamstrings and adductors to QF decreased slightly toward normal so there were no significant differences between the AL and controls. Impaired biarticular RF muscle function in stroke patients is the limiting factor during knee extension-flexion movements. After rehabilitation, improved functional performance was partly explained by the fact that the activities of the RF and vasti became more synchronized. VE-PC MRI can provide quantitative in vivo measurements of both superficial and deep muscles, and the information acquired after stroke can be utilized to render therapy more efficient and individually tailored.

  18. Automated classification of LV regional wall motion based on spatio-temporal profiles from cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, Juan; Garreau, Mireille; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Paredes, José Luis

    2013-11-01

    Assessment of the cardiac Left Ventricle (LV) wall motion is generally based on visual inspection or quantitative analysis of 2D+t sequences acquired in short-axis cardiac cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Most often, cardiac dynamic is globally analized from two particular phases of the cardiac cycle. In this paper, we propose an automated method to classify regional wall motion in LV function based on spatio-temporal pro les and Support Vector Machines (SVM). This approach allows to obtain a binary classi cation between normal and abnormal motion, without the need of pre-processing and by exploiting all the images of the cardiac cycle. In each short- axis MRI slice level (basal, median, and apical), the spatio-temporal pro les are extracted from the selection of a subset of diametrical lines crossing opposites LV segments. Initialized at end-diastole phase, the pro les are concatenated with their corresponding projections into the succesive temporal phases of the cardiac cycle. These pro les are associated to di erent types of information that derive from the image (gray levels), Fourier, Wavelet or Curvelet domains. The approach has been tested on a set of 14 abnormal and 6 healthy patients by using a leave-one-out cross validation and two kernel functions for SVM classi er. The best classi cation performance is yielded by using four-level db4 wavelet transform and SVM with a linear kernel. At each slice level the results provided a classi cation rate of 87.14% in apical level, 95.48% in median level and 93.65% in basal level.

  19. Deep inspiration breath hold with electromagnetic confirmation of chest wall position for adjuvant therapy of left-sided breast cancer: Technique and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Kathpal, Madeera; Tinnel, Brent; Sun, Kelly; Ninneman, Stephanie; Malmer, Cynthia; Wendt, Stacie; Buff, Sheena; Valentich, David; Gossweiler, Marisa; Macdonald, Dusten

    2016-01-01

    With most patients now living long after their breast cancer diagnosis, minimizing long-term side effects of breast cancer treatment, such as reducing late cardiac and pulmonary side effects of radiation therapy (RT), is particularly important. It is now possible to use an electromagnetic tracking system to allow real-time tracking of chest wall (CW) position during the delivery of RT. Here, we report our experience using electromagnetic surface transponders as an added measure of CW position during deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH). We conducted a single-institution institutional review board-approved retrospective review of 15 female left-sided breast cancer patients treated between July 2012 and June 2013 with conventional whole breast radiation. We compared daily port films with treatment planning digitally reconstructed radiographs to establish daily setup accuracy, then used Calypso tracings to compare the position of the CW during the daily port film with the position of the CW during that day's treatment to determine the reproducibility of the breath hold position. Finally, we created competing treatment plans not using DIBH and used a paired t test to compare mean heart (MH) and left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery dose between the 2 techniques. Mean total error (inter- and intrafraction) was dominated by interfraction error and was greatest in the longitudinal direction with a mean of 2.13 mm and 2 standard deviations of 8.2 mm. DIBH significantly reduced MH and LAD dose versus free breathing plans (MH, 1.26 Gy vs 2.84 Gy, P ≤ .001; LAD, 5.49 Gy vs 18.15 Gy, P ≤ .001). This study demonstrates that DIBH with electromagnetic confirmation of CW position is feasible, and allows potential improvement in the accurate delivery of adjuvant RT therapy for breast cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. SU-E-T-383: Evaluation of Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique for Post-Mastectomy Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Depauw, N; Patel, S; MacDonald, S; Lu, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Deep inspiration breath-hold techniques (DIBH) have been shown to carry significant dosimetric advantages in conventional radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of DIBH techniques for post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) using proton pencil beam scanning (PBS). Method: Ten PMRT patients, with or without breast implant, underwent two helical CT scans: one with free breathing and the other with deep inspiration breath-hold. A prescription of 50.4 Gy(RBE) to the whole chest wall and lymphatics (axillary, supraclavicular, and intramammary nodes) was considered. PBS plans were generated for each patient’s CT scan using Astroid, an in-house treatment planning system, with the institution conventional clinical PMRT parameters; that is, using a single en-face field with a spot size varying from 8 mm to 14 mm as a function of energy. Similar optimization parameters were used in both plans in order to ensure appropriate comparison. Results: Regardless of the technique (free breathing or DIBH), the generated plans were well within clinical acceptability. DIBH allowed for higher target coverage with better sparing of the cardiac structures. The lung doses were also slightly improved. While the use of DIBH techniques might be of interest, it is technically challenging as it would require a fast PBS delivery, as well as the synchronization of the beam delivery with a gating system, both of which are not currently available at the institution. Conclusion: DIBH techniques display some dosimetric advantages over free breathing treatment for PBS PMRT patients, which warrants further investigation. Plans will also be generated with smaller spot sizes (2.5 mm to 5.5 mm and 5 mm to 9 mm), corresponding to new generation machines, in order to further quantify the dosimetric advantages of DIBH as a function of spot size.

  1. [Quantitative Analysis of Wall Shear Stress for Human Carotid Bifurcation at Cardiac Phases by the Use of Phase Contrast Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Computational Fluid Dynamics Study].

    PubMed

    Saho, Tatsunori; Onishi, Hideo

    2015-12-01

    Detailed strategy for regional hemodynamics is significant for knowledge of plaque development on vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to derive relation between atherosclerosis and hemodynamics at human carotid bifurcation by the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and to provide more accurate hemodynamic information. Blood velocity datasets at common carotid artery were obtained by phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (PC cine MRI). Carotid bifurcation model was computed for systolic, mid-diastolic, and end-diastolic phase. Comparison of wall shear stress (WSS) was performed for each cardiac phase. PC cine MRI provided velocity measurement for common carotid artery with various cardiac phases. The blood velocity had acute variation from 0.21 m/s to 1.07 m/s at systolic phase. The variation of WSS during cardiac phase was presented at carotid bifurcation model. High shear stress area was observed at dividing wall for all cardiac phases. The systole-diastole WSS ratio was 10.15 at internal carotid side of bifurcation. And low shear stress (<0.5 Pa) was observed at internal carotid side of bifurcation. Bifurcation area represented low shear stress and changed significantly WSS. The specific area with significant change in shear stress and low shear stress had good agreement with predilection sites of atherosclerosis. The result suggested that hemodynamics was related to atherosclerosis, and CFD analysis with various cardiac phases that were provided by PC cine MRI was allowed to determine an accurate analysis condition. This led to the representation of hemodynamics in vivo.

  2. WE-D-BRA-03: Four-Dimensional Dose Reconstruction Through Retrospective Phase Determination Using Cine Images of Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, J; Jung, J; Yi, B; Kim, J; Yeo, I

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To test a method to reconstruct a four-dimensional (4D) dose distribution using the correlation of pre-calculated 4D electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images and measured cine-EPID images. Methods: 1. A phantom designed to simulate a tumor in lung (a polystyrene block with 3.0 cm diameter embedded in cork) was placed on a sinusoidally moving platform with 2 cm amplitude and 4 sec/cycle. Ten-phase 4D CT images were acquired for treatment planning and dose reconstruction. A 6MV photon beam was irradiated on the phantom with static (field size=5×8.5 cm{sup 2}) and dynamic fields (sliding windows, 10×10 cm{sup 2}, X1 MLC closing in parallel with the tumor movement). 2. 4D and 3D doses were calculated forwardly on PTV (1 cm margin). 3. Dose images on EPID under the fields were calculated for 10 phases. 4. Cine EPID images were acquired during irradiation. 5. Their acquisition times were correlated to the phases of the phantom at which irradiation occurred by inter-comparing calculated “reference” EPID images with measured images (2D gamma comparison). For the dynamic beam, the tumor was hidden under MLCs during a portion of irradiation time; the correlation performed when the tumor was visible was extrapolated. 6. Dose for each phase was reconstructed on the 4D CT images and summed over all phases. The summation was compared with forwardly calculated 4D and 3D dose distributions. Monte Carlo methods were used for all calculations. Results: For the open and dynamic beams, the 4D reconstructed doses showed the pass rates of 92.7 % and 100 %, respectively, at the isocenter plane given 3% / 3 mm criteria. The better agreement of the dynamic beam was from its dose gradient which blurred the otherwise sharp difference between forward and reconstructed doses. This also contributed slightly better agreement in DVH of PTV. Conclusion: The feasibility of 4D reconstruction was demonstrated.

  3. Systolic Myocardial Dysfunction in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Identification at MR Imaging with Cine Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes

    PubMed Central

    Ernande, Laura; Thibault, Hélène; Bergerot, Cyrille; Moulin, Phillippe; Wen, Han; Derumeaux, Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if cine displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) can help to identify and determine the patterns of subclinical myocardial systolic dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) when compared with cine DENSE in control patients. Materials and Methods: After obtaining approval from the institutional ethics committee and written informed consent from the patients, 37 patients with type 2 DM without overt heart disease and 23 age-matched control patients were prospectively included in the study. The patients underwent standard cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with two-dimensional cine DENSE acquisitions. Circumferential (Ecc) and radial (Err) systolic strains were measured on short-axis views at basal, mid, and apical left ventricular levels. Longitudinal strain (Ell) was measured on four- and two-chamber views. Statistical testing included the intraclass correlation coefficient and multiple linear regression analysis. Results: The intraobserver intraclass correlation coefficient values were 0.85, 0.95, and 0.90, and the interobserver intraclass correlation coefficient values were 0.79, 0.91 and 0.80 for Ecc, Err, and Ell, respectively. The left ventricular ejection fraction was in the reference range and similar between the groups, and the patients with DM showed a decrease in Ecc (−14.4% ± 1.6 vs −17.0% ± 1.6, P < .001), Err (36.2% ± 10.9 vs 44.4% ± 9.9, P = .006) and Ell (−12.9% ± 2.1 vs −15.5% ± 1.6, P < .001) compared with the control patients. Finally, DM was independently associated with Ecc (P < .001), Err (P = .05) and Ell (P = .01) after adjustment for age, sex, hypertension, body mass index, and left ventricular mass. Conclusion: Cine DENSE, a motion-encoding MR imaging technique for myocardial strain assessment with high spatial resolution, appears to be useful in the identification of subclinical myocardial dysfunction in patients with DM. © RSNA, 2012 Supplemental material: http

  4. Evaluation of aqueductal cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics with phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging in normal pediatric cases.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Mehmet; Sığırcı, Ahmet; Ünlü, Serkan

    This study aimed to determine differences according to age groups and gender in the parameters of aqueductal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in childhood using phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method. This prospective study included 47 boys and 36 girls for a total of 83 healthy children. The cases were divided into three groups depending on age as infants (1-12 months), children (12-120 months), and adolescents (120-204 months). To quantitatively evaluate CSF flow, images in the transverse plane were taken at the cerebral aqueduct level using the phase-contrast MR angiography technique in a 1.5-T MR unit. Peak and average velocity (cm/s), cranial direction, caudal direction and net volume (ml), and aqueduct area (mm(2)) were calculated. To assess differences between the groups, a one-way analysis of variance and least significant difference tests were used. A statistically significant difference was determined between children and adolescents in peak velocity and caudal direction volume (P=.012 and P=.039, respectively) and between infants and children in cranial direction volume (P=.036). Peak velocity, cranial direction, and net volume were higher in boys (P=.050, P=.016, and P=.029, respectively). There were no differences by age and gender in the aqueduct area. In conclusion, this study determined the normal values for the CSF flow parameters of velocity, volume, and aqueduct area using phase-contrast MRI in healthy children. Velocity and volume parameters varied according to age and sex and were not affected in the aqueductal area. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Right Ventricular Strain, Torsion, and Dyssynchrony in Healthy Subjects using 3D Spiral Cine DENSE Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Suever, Jonathan; Wehner, Gregory; Jing, Linyuan; Powell, David; Hamlet, Sean; Grabau, Jonathan; Mojsejenko, Dimitri; Andres, Kristin; Haggerty, Christopher; Fornwalt, Brandon

    2016-12-29

    Mechanics of the left ventricle (LV) are important indicators of cardiac function. The role of right ventricular (RV) mechanics is largely unknown due to the technical limitations of imaging its thin wall and complex geometry and motion. By combining 3D Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) with a post-processing pipeline that includes a local coordinate system, it is possible to quantify RV strain, torsion, and synchrony. In this study, we sought to characterize RV mechanics in 50 healthy individuals and compare these values to their LV counterparts. For each cardiac frame, 3D displacements were fit to continuous and differentiable radial basis functions, allowing for the computation of the 3D Cartesian Lagrangian strain tensor at any myocardial point. The geometry of the RV was extracted via a surface fit to manually delineated endocardial contours. Throughout the RV, a local coordinate system was used to transform from a Cartesian strain tensor to a polar strain tensor. It was then possible to compute peak RV torsion as well as peak longitudinal and circumferential strain. A comparable analysis was performed for the LV. Dyssynchrony was computed from the standard deviation of regional activation times. Global circumferential strain was comparable between the RV and LV (-18.0% for both) while longitudinal strain was greater in the RV (-18.1% vs. -15.7%). RV torsion was comparable to LV torsion (6.2 vs. 7.1 degrees, respectively). Regional activation times indicated that the RV contracted later but more synchronously than the LV. 3D spiral cine DENSE combined with a post-processing pipeline that includes a local coordinate system can resolve both the complex geometry and 3D motion of the RV.

  6. Assessment of pulmonary arterial pressure by velocity-encoded cine magnetic resonance imaging in children with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masaya; Kajino, Hiroki; Kajihama, Aya; Nakau, Kouichi; Murakami, Noboru; Azuma, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Velocity-encoded cine magnetic resonance imaging (VEC-MRI) has recently been reported as effective for assessing not only pulmonary blood flow (Qp) but also pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) in adults. However, there have been few reports on the usefulness of VEC-MRI for assessing PAP in children with congenital heart disease (CHD). We evaluated 34 children with CHD. Qp and systemic blood flows (Qs) were determined by cardiac catheterization and VEC-MRI. The right-to-left Qp ratio (R/L) was measured by pulmonary perfusion scintigraphy and VEC-MRI. The pulmonary-to-systemic blood pressure ratio (Pp/Ps) was determined by cardiac catheterization. The acceleration time (AcT), ejection time (ET), peak velocity (PV), acceleration volume (AcV), and maximal change in flow rate during ejection (MCFR) in the pulmonary arteries, which were standardized by body surface area, were determined by VEC-MRI. The children were divided into 2 groups according to Pp/Ps. The Qs, R/L ratio and Qp/Qs obtained by VEC-MRI strongly correlated with those obtained by catheterization and scintigraphy. No significant differences in AcT, ET, AcT/ET, PV, or AcV were observed between the 2 groups. However, a significant difference was observed in MCFR. Furthermore, a significant correlation was observed between the MCFR and Pp/Ps. This study clearly demonstrated that VEC-MRI is useful for assessing not only blood flow, but also PAP, by referring to MCFR in children.

  7. Initial effects of the tongue crib on tongue movements during deglutition: a Cine-Magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Sayin, M Ozgür; Akin, Erol; Karaçay, Seniz; Bulakbaşi, Nail

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the initial effects of a tongue crib on tongue movements during deglutition by using real time balanced turbo field echo (B-TFE) Cine-MR imaging. A total of 21 patients were evaluated in this study. The open-bite group (OBG) consisted of 11 patients (seven girls, four boys) who had a mean age of 11.09 +/- 2.02 years and a mean overbite of -5.14 +/- 1.83 mm. These patients were evaluated initially (T1) and while wearing a tongue crib (T2). A total of 10 patients (five girls, five boys) with a mean age of 14.5 +/- 2.6 years and with a mean overbite of 1.6 +/- 0.5 mm served as controls (CG), and only initial records were obtained from these patients. T2 was compared with T1 and CG. T1 was also compared with CG. We evaluated deglutition during three stages matching oral (1), pharyngeal (2), and esophageal (3) stages. Our results indicated that the tongue's tip positioned more posteriorly when the crib was in place (T2) compared with both T1 and CG; the anterior portion of the tongue's dorsum was at a lower position in T2 compared with both T1 and CG at stage 3; the midportion of the tongue's dorsum was at a lower position in T2 than in T1 and CG at stages 1 and 2. To compensate for the posterior position of the tongue's tip (caused by the tongue crib), adaptive changes occurred in the anterior and midportions of the dorsum of the tongue.

  8. How to perform and interpret cine MR enterography.

    PubMed

    Wnorowski, Amelia M; Guglielmo, Flavius F; Mitchell, Donald G

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography has become a fundamental tool for small bowel evaluation. Multiphasic cine imaging is a useful component of MR enterography evaluation because it provides functional information about bowel motility. Cine MR enterography can be used to evaluate for strictures and adhesions. Bowel motility evaluation has been shown to increase pathologic lesion detection in Crohn's disease and has been incorporated into disease activity scoring systems. Currently, cine MR enterography remains underutilized. The purpose of this article is to outline how to perform and interpret cine MR enterography. The authors describe how to perform a multiphasic balanced steady state free precession sequence using different MR systems and give practical advice on how to display and interpret the cine sequence. Sample cases illustrate how the cine sequence complements standard MR enterography evaluation with T2 -weighted, contrast-enhanced T1 -weighted, and diffusion-weighted imaging.

  9. Prospective Randomized Comparison of High-pitch CT at 80 kVp Under Free Breathing with Standard-pitch CT at 100 kVp Under Breath-Hold for Detection of Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Martini, K; Meier, A; Higashigaito, K; Saltybaeva, N; Alkadhi, H; Frauenfelder, T

    2016-11-01

    To prospectively compare high-pitch computed tomography (HPCT) under free breathing (FB) with standard-pitch CT (SPCT) under breath-hold (BH) for detection of pulmonary embolism (PE). One hundred consecutive patients (47 females; mean age 58.7 ± 16.6) randomly underwent HPCT-FB (n = 50) or SPCT-BH (n = 50). Radiation doses were documented. One reader measured pulmonary artery attenuation and noise; mean signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was calculated. Two readers assessed image quality, diagnostic confidence for detection of PE, motion artifacts, assessability of anatomical structures, and presence of transient interruption of contrast as sign of Valsalva maneuver. Inter-reader agreement was calculated. Radiation dose was significantly lower in HPCT compared to SPCT (2.68 ± 0.60 mGy vs 6.01 ± 2.26 mGy; P < .001). Mean pulmonary artery attenuation and image noise were significantly higher in HPCT (attenuation: 479 Hounsfield unit (HU) vs 343HU; P < .001; noise: 16 HU vs 10 HU; P < .001) whereas SNR was similar between groups (34 HU vs 38 HU; P = .258). HPCT had significantly higher diagnostic confidence for PE detection (P = .048), less cardiac and breathing artifacts (P < .001), better assessability of anatomical structures, and fewer cases of transient interruption of contrast (P < .001) compared to the SPCT. HPCT-FB allows for a significant reduction of breathing and motion artifacts compared to SPCT-BH. Diagnostic confidence, assessability of vascular and bronchial structures, as well as SNR are maintained. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics and morphology in Chiari I malformation with cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Shi; Wang, Xing; Fu, Chu-Hua; Wei, Lu-Qing; Zhou, Dai-Quan; Lin, Jiang-Kai

    2014-04-01

    To determine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics and morphology in Chiari I malformation (CMI) and assess the response to surgery of the posterior cranial fossa, we examined midsagittal imaging along with anterior cervical 2-3 (AC2-3), posterior cervical 2-3 (PC2-3), and aqueduct CSF flow hydrodynamics in axial imaging by using cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PCMR). We examined 52 patients with CMI, both with and without syringomyelia (SM), pre-/post-surgery, and compared them to 17 healthy volunteers. Statistical analyses included paired t-tests, independent-samples t-tests, binary logistic regression, and crosstab with MedCalc software. Patients with CMI had significantly shorter clivus length and larger tentorial angle than the healthy controls (P = 0.004, P = 0.019, respectively). The AC2-3 cranial/caudal peak velocity (PV), PC2-3 cranial/caudal PV and aqueduct cranial peak PV of patients with CMI were significantly lower than healthy volunteers pre-surgery (P = 0.034 AC2-3 cranial PV, P = 0.000002 AC2-3 caudal PV; P = 0.046 PC2-3 cranial PV, P = 0.015 PC2-3 caudal PV; P = 0.022 aqueduct cranial PV) and increased after surgery (P = 0.024 AC2-3 cranial PV, P = 0.002 AC2-3 caudal PV; P = 0.001 PC2-3 cranial PV, P = 0.032 PC2-3 caudal PV; P = 0.003 aqueduct cranial PV). The aqueduct caudal PV of patients with CMI was higher than that of healthy controls (P = 0.004) and decreased post-surgery (P = 0.012). Patients with pre-surgery PC2-3 cranial PV >2.63 cm/s and aqueduct cranial PV >2.13 cm/s, respectively, experienced primary symptom improvement after surgery. The innate bony dysontogenesis in patients with CMI contributes to tonsilar ectopia and exacerbates CSF flow obstruction. A pressure gradient that existed between SM and SAS supports the perivascular space theory that is used to explain SM formation. Our findings demonstrate that PCMR maybe a useful tool for predicting patient prognosis.

  11. Improved abdominal MRI in non-breath-holding children using a radial k-space sampling technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hyuk; Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung Eun; Lee, So Mi; Cho, Hyun Hae; Shin, Su Mi; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In One

    2015-06-01

    Radial k-space sampling techniques have been shown to reduce motion artifacts in adult abdominal MRI. To compare a T2-weighted radial k-space sampling MRI pulse sequence (BLADE) with standard respiratory-triggered T2-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) in pediatric abdominal imaging. Axial BLADE and respiratory-triggered turbo spin echo sequences were performed without fat suppression in 32 abdominal MR examinations in children. We retrospectively assessed overall image quality, the presence of respiratory, peristaltic and radial artifact, and lesion conspicuity. We evaluated signal uniformity of each sequence. BLADE showed improved overall image quality (3.35 ± 0.85 vs. 2.59 ± 0.59, P < 0.001), reduced respiratory motion artifact (0.51 ± 0.56 vs. 1.89 ± 0.68, P < 0.001), and improved lesion conspicuity (3.54 ± 0.88 vs. 2.92 ± 0.77, P = 0.006) compared to respiratory triggering turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences. The bowel motion artifact scores were similar for both sequences (1.65 ± 0.77 vs. 1.79 ± 0.74, P = 0.691). BLADE introduced a radial artifact that was not observed on the respiratory triggering-TSE images (1.10 ± 0.85 vs. 0, P < 0.001). BLADE was associated with diminished signal variation compared with respiratory triggering-TSE in the liver, spleen and air (P < 0.001). The radial k-space sampling technique improved the quality and reduced respiratory motion artifacts in young children compared with conventional respiratory-triggered turbo spin-echo sequences.

  12. Accurate estimation of global and regional cardiac function by retrospectively gated multidetector row computed tomography: comparison with cine magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Belge, Bénédicte; Coche, Emmanuel; Pasquet, Agnès; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J; Gerber, Bernhard L

    2006-07-01

    Retrospective reconstruction of ECG-gated images at different parts of the cardiac cycle allows the assessment of cardiac function by multi-detector row CT (MDCT) at the time of non-invasive coronary imaging. We compared the accuracy of such measurements by MDCT to cine magnetic resonance (MR). Forty patients underwent the assessment of global and regional cardiac function by 16-slice MDCT and cine MR. Left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes estimated by MDCT (134+/-51 and 67+/-56 ml) were similar to those by MR (137+/-57 and 70+/-60 ml, respectively; both P=NS) and strongly correlated (r=0.92 and r=0.95, respectively; both P<0.001). Consequently, LV ejection fractions by MDCT and MR were also similar (55+/-21 vs. 56+/-21%; P=NS) and highly correlated (r=0.95; P<0.001). Regional end-diastolic and end-systolic wall thicknesses by MDCT were highly correlated (r=0.84 and r=0.92, respectively; both P<0.001), but significantly lower than by MR (8.3+/-1.8 vs. 8.8+/-1.9 mm and 12.7+/-3.4 vs. 13.3+/-3.5 mm, respectively; both P<0.001). Values of regional wall thickening by MDCT and MR were similar (54+/-30 vs. 51+/-31%; P=NS) and also correlated well (r=0.91; P<0.001). Retrospectively gated MDCT can accurately estimate LV volumes, EF and regional LV wall thickening compared to cine MR.

  13. First report of image integration of cine-angiography with 3D electro-anatomical mapping of the right ventricle in postoperative tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Russo, Mario Salvatore; Righi, Daniela; Di Mambro, Corrado; Ruoppolo, Valentina; Silvetti, Massimo Stefano; Drago, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular tachycardia and, more rarely, sudden cardiac death are potential complications affecting the long-term outcome after Tetralogy of Fallot (ToF) repair. Intraventricular septal scar, fibro-fatty substitution around infundibular resection and patchy myocardial fibrosis may provide anatomical substrates of abnormal depolarization and repolarization causing reentrant ventricular arrhythmias. Recently, three-dimensional electro-anatomical mapping (3D EAM) has allowed to investigate the electro-anatomical status of the right ventricle. Radiation exposure during cardiac electrophysiological procedures is still a major concern. We report the first case of 3D mapping of the right ventricle in a postoperative ToF patient performed with a new module of the CARTO® 3 System-the CARTOUnivu™ Module-that combines, simultaneously, fluoroscopic images or cine-angiographic sequences with 3D cardiac mapping to allow real-time visualization of the electrocatheter during the 3D EAM reconstruction. The same volume, previously evaluated with cardiac MRI, was mapped. A perfect match of the diastolic edges of the RV obtained either by cine-loop acquisition during contrast fluoroscopy and by the 3D EAM, was observed. The fluoroscopy time for 3D EAM was 10 s. In conclusion, CARTOUnivu™ Module can integrate, in real time, fluoroscopic images/cine-angiography in virtual biplane view and the 3D EAM allowing a contextual visualization of position and movement of all electrocatheters. This can further increase the accuracy of the 3D EAM in very complex-operated congenital heart diseases, even decreasing radiation exposure.

  14. SIFT-based dense pixel tracking on 0.35 T cine-MR images acquired during image-guided radiation therapy with application to gating optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, Thomas R. E-mail: hli@radonc.wustl.edu; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin W.; Wang, Yuhe; Yang, Deshan; Mutic, Sasa; Li, H. Harold E-mail: hli@radonc.wustl.edu

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To first demonstrate the viability of applying an image processing technique for tracking regions on low-contrast cine-MR images acquired during image-guided radiation therapy, and then outline a scheme that uses tracking data for optimizing gating results in a patient-specific manner. Methods: A first-generation MR-IGRT system—treating patients since January 2014—integrates a 0.35 T MR scanner into an annular gantry consisting of three independent Co-60 sources. Obtaining adequate frame rates for capturing relevant patient motion across large fields-of-view currently requires coarse in-plane spatial resolution. This study initially (1) investigate the feasibility of rapidly tracking dense pixel correspondences across single, sagittal plane images (with both moderate signal-to-noise and spatial resolution) using a matching objective for highly descriptive vectors called scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) descriptors associated to all pixels that describe intensity gradients in local regions around each pixel. To more accurately track features, (2) harmonic analysis was then applied to all pixel trajectories within a region-of-interest across a short training period. In particular, the procedure adjusts the motion of outlying trajectories whose relative spectral power within a frequency bandwidth consistent with respiration (or another form of periodic motion) does not exceed a threshold value that is manually specified following the training period. To evaluate the tracking reliability after applying this correction, conventional metrics—including Dice similarity coefficients (DSCs), mean tracking errors (MTEs), and Hausdorff distances (HD)—were used to compare target segmentations obtained via tracking to manually delineated segmentations. Upon confirming the viability of this descriptor-based procedure for reliably tracking features, the study (3) outlines a scheme for optimizing gating parameters—including relative target position and a

  15. Strain Rate Tensor Estimation in Cine Cardiac MRI Based on Elastic Image Registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo Vegas; Vega, Antonio Tristán; Grande, Lucilio Cordero; de La Higuera, Pablo Casaseca; Fernández, Santiago Aja; Fernández, Marcos Martín; López, Carlos Alberola

    In this work we propose an alternative method to estimate and visualize the Strain Rate Tensor (SRT) in Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) when Phase Contrast MRI (PCMRI) and Tagged MRI (TMRI) are not available. This alternative is based on image processing techniques. Concretely, image registration algorithms are used to estimate the movement of the myocardium at each point. Additionally, a consistency checking method is presented to validate the accuracy of the estimates when no golden standard is available. Results prove that the consistency checking method provides an upper bound of the mean squared error of the estimate. Our experiments with real data show that the registration algorithm provides a useful deformation field to estimate the SRT fields. A classification between regional normal and dysfunctional contraction patterns, as compared with experts diagnosis, points out that the parameters extracted from the estimated SRT can represent these patterns. Additionally, a scheme for visualizing and analyzing the local behavior of the SRT field is presented.

  16. NOTE: Cardiac phase-specific shimming (CPSS) for SSFP MR cine imaging at 3 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubach, Miriam R.; Bornstedt, Axel; Hombach, Vinzenz; Merkle, Nico; Schär, Michael; Spiess, Jochen; Nienhaus, Gerd U.; Rasche, Volker

    2009-10-01

    The application of steady-state-free-precession (SSFP) techniques at 3 T systems is still limited by their sensitivity to magnetic field inhomogeneities. Especially during imaging of the heart, the arising signal voids and distortions in the myocardium currently often limit the diagnostic value of the resulting images. Dedicated shim systems providing higher order shimming capabilities have been applied to improve the field homogeneity across the heart. In this study, the potential benefit of applying a cardiac phase-specific shim (CPSS) was investigated. The cardiac phase dependence of the magnetic field distortions over the heart was assessed and the potential gain in field homogeneity by CPSS was evaluated. CPSS was successfully applied in volunteers and yielded significant improvement in the main magnetic field homogeneity over the entire cardiac cycle.

  17. Breath Holding Duration and Self-Reported Smoking Abstinence Intolerance as Predictors of Smoking Lapse Behavior in a Laboratory Analog Task

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Distress intolerance (DI) is elevated in smokers and confers increased risk for relapse following a quit attempt. Intolerance of respiratory distress and of nicotine withdrawal may be particularly relevant predictors of smoking cessation outcomes. However, no studies to date have examined the association between smoking relevant DI and smoking lapse behavior in a laboratory setting. The current study examined whether DI was associated with the risk of initiating smoking in a laboratory-based lapse analog task. Methods: This study is a secondary data analysis from a study of the impact of alcohol administration on smoking behavior. Ninety-six cigarette smokers completed measures of DI and a smoking lapse analog task. Breath holding (BH) duration and self-reported intolerance of smoking abstinence were analyzed as predictors of smoking initiation in a survival analysis model. Results: Shorter BH duration was associated with greater risk of smoking initiation, controlling for nicotine dependence, nicotine withdrawal symptoms, and demographics. Self-report measures of smoking abstinence DI were not associated with BH duration or time to smoking initiation when controlling for nicotine dependence severity. Conclusions: BH captures a domain of DI that is specifically associated with a higher risk of initiating smoking in this analog of smoking lapse. The prediction of smoking in an analog lapse task adds to the extant literature identifying an association between DI and smoking lapse and may enable further research to understand and address the mechanism through which BH affects smoking lapse risk. PMID:23132658

  18. Life years lost attributable to late effects after radiotherapy for early stage Hodgkin lymphoma: The impact of proton therapy and/or deep inspiration breath hold.

    PubMed

    Rechner, Laura Ann; Maraldo, Maja Vestmø; Vogelius, Ivan Richter; Zhu, Xiaorong Ronald; Dabaja, Bouthaina Shbib; Brodin, Nils Patrik; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Specht, Lena; Aznar, Marianne Camille

    2017-08-21

    Due to the long life expectancy after treatment, the risk of late effects after radiotherapy (RT) is of particular importance for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Both deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) and proton therapy have been shown to reduce the dose to normal tissues for mediastinal HL, but the impact of these techniques in combination is unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the life years lost (LYL) attributable to late effects after RT for mediastinal HL using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in free breathing (FB) and DIBH, and proton therapy in FB and DIBH. Plans for each technique were created for 22 patients with HL. Doses were extracted and the risk of late effects and LYL were estimated. We found that the use of DIBH, proton therapy, and the combination significantly reduced the LYL compared to IMRT in FB. The lowest LYL was found for proton therapy in DIBH. However, when IMRT in DIBH was compared to proton therapy in FB, no significant difference was found. Patient-specific plan comparisons should be used to select the optimal technique when comparing IMRT in DIBH and proton therapy in FB. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of nicotine withdrawal on panic-like response to breath holding: a placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover patch study.

    PubMed

    Cosci, Fiammetta; Bertoli, Giuly; Abrams, Kenneth

    2013-12-01

    Cigarette smoking may increase the likelihood of developing panic disorder. Periods of nicotine withdrawal, in particular, may promote panic in individuals high in anxiety sensitivity. We examined the importance of nicotine withdrawal in the occurrence of smoking and panic. We utilized a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized, crossover design. Fifty smokers underwent a breath-holding (BH) challenge after the transdermal administration of nicotine on one test day and a placebo on another test day. Physiological and psychological variables were assessed at baseline as well as directly before and after the challenges. Nicotine abstinence induced a decrease in heart rate and systolic blood pressure (BP) before the BH procedure (heart rate: 78.80 ± 11.43 under nicotine, 70.88 ± 10.83 under placebo; systolic BP: 124.90 ± 11.34 under nicotine, 121.18 ± 13.44 under placebo) and shorter BH duration relative to the nicotine patch condition. Nicotine abstinence did not, though, increase fear reactivity to the challenge. The findings for heart rate and BP are consistent with the stimulant properties of nicotine. The reduced capacity to maintain apnea under placebo might be due to carbon dioxide (CO2 ) hypersensitivity during periods of nicotine abstinence. The negative findings regarding fear reactivity might be due to BH being a relatively weak anxiogen. Future researchers are encouraged to employ CO2 -inhalation procedures to study the relationship between nicotine withdrawal and panic. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Breath-hold Multi-Echo Fast Spin-Echo Pulse Sequence for Accurate R2 Measurement in the Heart and Liver

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daniel; Jensen, Jens H.; Wu, Ed X.; Sheth, Sujit S.; Brittenham, Gary M.

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of proton transverse relaxation rates (R2) is a generally useful means for quantitative characterization of pathological changes in tissue with a variety of clinical applications. The most widely used R2 measurement method is the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence but its relatively long scan time requires respiratory gating for chest or body MRI, rendering this approach impractical for comprehensive assessment within a clinically acceptable examination time. The purpose of our study was to develop a breath-hold multi-echo fast spin-echo (FSE) sequence for accurate measurement of R2 in the liver and heart. Phantom experiments and studies of subjects in vivo were performed to compare the FSE data with the corresponding even-echo CPMG data. For pooled data, the R2 measurements were strongly correlated (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.99) and in excellent agreement (mean difference [CPMG-FSE] = 0.10 s−1; 95% limits of agreement were 1.98 and −1.78 s−1) between the two pulse sequences. PMID:19526516

  1. Enhancement of low-dosage cine-angiographic image sequences using a modified expectation maximization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Cheuk L.; Katsaggelos, Aggelos K.; Sahakian, Alan V.

    1992-11-01

    Clinical x-ray image sequences acquired through fluoroscopy systems may be corrupted by quantum mottle--a Poisson-distributed, signal-dependent noise that arises with a controlled x- ray dosage reduction in an attempt to lower the exposure to the patient and the medical staff. In this paper, an approach to temporally filter this sequence is presented. It relies on a joint estimation of the signal and the displacement field through a maximum likelihood approach. Implementation is done via a modified EM algorithm to facilitate a more tractable solution.

  2. Small bowel imaging of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Casciani, Emanuele; Vincentiis, Chiara De; Gualdi, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    The study of the small bowel (SB) has always been challenging both for clinicians and radiologist. It is a long and tortuous tube that can be affected by various pathologies whose signs and symptoms are usually non specific and can mimic other acute abdominal disorders. For these reasons, imaging plays a central role in the diagnosis of the different pathological conditions that can occur. They are important also in the management and follow up of chronic diseases. We expose and evaluate all the radiological methods that are now available for the study of the SB with particular emphasis on the technological improvement of cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These techniques have, infact, highly improved in terms of execution times (fast acquisitions images), patients discomfort and radiation dose, for CT, with consequent reduced biological risks. Moreover, the new post-processing options with multiplanar reconstruction and isotropic images have made significant changes in the evaluation of the exams. Especially MRI scans have been improved by the advent of new sequences, such as diffusion weighted imaging and cine-MRI, parallel imaging and breath-hold sequences and can provide excellent soft-tissue contrast without the use of ionizing radiations. PMID:26339463

  3. Cine CT for Attenuation Correction in Cardiac PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Alessio, Adam M.; Kohlmyer, Steve; Branch, Kelley; Chen, Grace; Caldwell, James; Kinahan, Paul

    2008-01-01

    In dual-modality PET/CT systems, the CT scan provides the attenuation map for PET attenuation correction. The current clinical practice of obtaining a single helical CT scan provides only a snapshot of the respiratory cycle, whereas PET occurs over multiple respiratory cycles. Misalignment of the attenuation map and emission image because of respiratory motion causes errors in the attenuation correction factors and artifacts in the attenuation-corrected PET image. To rectify this problem, we evaluated the use of cine CT, which acquires multiple low-dose CT images during a respiratory cycle. We evaluated the average and the intensity-maximum image of cine CT for cardiac PET attenuation correction. Methods Cine CT data and cardiac PET data were acquired from a cardiac phantom and from multiple patient studies. The conventional helical CT, cine CT, and PET data of an axially translating phantom were evaluated with and without respiratory motion. For the patient studies, we acquired 2 cine CT studies for each PET acquisition in a rest–stress 13N-ammonia protocol. Three readers visually evaluated the alignment of 74 attenuation image sets versus the corresponding emission image and determined whether the alignment provided acceptable or unacceptable attenuation-corrected PET images. Results In the phantom study, the attenuation correction from helical CT caused a major artifactual defect in the lateral wall on the PET image. The attenuation correction from the average and from the intensity-maximum cine CT images reduced the defect by 20% and 60%, respectively. In the patient studies, 77% of the cases using the average of the cine CT images had acceptable alignment and 88% of the cases using the intensity maximum of the cine CT images had acceptable alignment. Conclusion Cine CT offers an alternative to helical CT for compensating for respiratory motion in the attenuation correction of cardiac PET studies. Phantom studies suggest that the average and the intensity

  4. Correlation on cine MR imaging of size of adenoid and palatine tonsils with degree of upper airway motion in asymptomatic sedated children.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Lane F; Casper, Keith A; Chen, Bin

    2002-08-01

    The objective of this study was to use MR fluoroscopy to evaluate variations in size of the adenoid and palatine tonsils and the relationship between tonsil enlargement and airway motion dynamics in asymptomatic children during sleep. We performed sagittal midline cine MR imaging (fast gradient-echo series: TR/TE, 8.2/3.6 sec; flip angle, 80 degrees; slice thickness, 8 mm; 128 consecutive images; imaging time, 2 min; displayed in cine mode) in children referred for MR imaging of the brain who required sedation. The largest transverse diameter of the adenoids was recorded. A subjective impression was made as to whether the adenoids were enlarged or normal in size. Palatine tonsils were considered enlarged when a soft-tissue mass was identified on the midline cine images, and maximum diameter was recorded. Enlarged and nonenlarged adenoid and palatine tonsil groups were compared using motion parameters (chi-square or Fisher's exact test): mouth position (opened or closed); vertical motion (present, absent); nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, and hypopharyngeal motion (static patent, dynamic patent, intermittent collapsed, or static collapsed, and greatest change in size). We studied 148 subjects who had a mean age of 3.4 years. The adenoid tonsils were considered enlarged in 64 patients (43%), and the palatine tonsils were considered enlarged in 29 patients (20%). The mean size of the enlarged adenoid tonsils was 11.6 mm and of the nonenlarged adenoid tonsils was 6.2 mm. Enlarged adenoids correlated with the open mouth position (p = 0.0242) and increased dynamic motion of the oropharynx (p = 0.0413). A trend was also seen for increased dynamic motion of the nasopharynx (p = 0.0723). Enlarged palatine tonsils correlated with an increased frequency of dynamic motion of the oropharynx (p = 0.0006) and the nasopharynx (p = 0.0033) and a trend for increased frequency of the open mouth position (p = 0.0692). Large adenoid and palatine tonsil size affects breathing dynamics of

  5. Automatic generation of endocardial surface meshes with 1-to-1 correspondence from cine-MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yi; Teo, S.-K.; Lim, C. W.; Zhong, L.; Tan, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we develop an automatic method to generate a set of 4D 1-to-1 corresponding surface meshes of the left ventricle (LV) endocardial surface which are motion registered over the whole cardiac cycle. These 4D meshes have 1- to-1 point correspondence over the entire set, and is suitable for advanced computational processing, such as shape analysis, motion analysis and finite element modelling. The inputs to the method are the set of 3D LV endocardial surface meshes of the different frames/phases of the cardiac cycle. Each of these meshes is reconstructed independently from border-delineated MR images and they have no correspondence in terms of number of vertices/points and mesh connectivity. To generate point correspondence, the first frame of the LV mesh model is used as a template to be matched to the shape of the meshes in the subsequent phases. There are two stages in the mesh correspondence process: (1) a coarse matching phase, and (2) a fine matching phase. In the coarse matching phase, an initial rough matching between the template and the target is achieved using a radial basis function (RBF) morphing process. The feature points on the template and target meshes are automatically identified using a 16-segment nomenclature of the LV. In the fine matching phase, a progressive mesh projection process is used to conform the rough estimate to fit the exact shape of the target. In addition, an optimization-based smoothing process is used to achieve superior mesh quality and continuous point motion.

  6. Evaluation of Right Ventricular Myocardial Mechanics Using Velocity Vector Imaging of Cardiac MRI Cine Images in Transposition of the Great Arteries Following Atrial and Arterial Switch Operations.

    PubMed

    Thattaliyath, Bijoy D; Forsha, Daniel E; Stewart, Chad; Barker, Piers C A; Campbell, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine right and left ventricle deformation parameters in patients with transposition of the great arteries who had undergone atrial or arterial switch procedures. Patients with transposition are born with a systemic right ventricle. Historically, the atrial switch operation, in which the right ventricle remains the systemic ventricle, was performed. These patients have increased rates of morbidity and mortality. We used cardiac MRI with Velocity Vector Imaging analysis to characterize and compare ventricular myocardial deformation in patients who had an atrial switch or arterial switch operation. Patients with a history of these procedures, who had a clinically ordered cardiac MRI were included in the study. Consecutive 20 patients (75% male, 28.7 ± 1.8 years) who underwent atrial switch operation and 20 patients (60% male, 17.7 ± 1.9 years) who underwent arterial switch operation were included in the study. Four chamber and short-axis cine images were used to determine longitudinal and circumferential strain and strain rate using Vector Velocity Imaging software. Compared with the arterial switch group, the atrial switch group had decreased right ventricular ejection fraction and increased end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes, and no difference in left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes. The atrial switch group had decreased longitudinal and circumferential strain and strain rate. When compared with normal controls multiple strain parameters in the atrial switch group were reduced. Myocardial deformation analysis of transposition patients reveals a reduction of right ventricular function and decreased longitudinal and circumferential strain parameters in patients with an atrial switch operation compared with those with arterial switch operation. A better understanding of the mechanisms of right ventricle failure in transposition of great arteries may lead to improved therapies and adaptation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals

  7. Evaluation of Right Ventricular Myocardial Mechanics using Velocity Vector Imaging of Cardiac MRI Cine Images in Transposition of the Great Arteries Following Atrial and Arterial Switch Operations

    PubMed Central

    Thattaliyath, Bijoy D.; Forsha, Daniel E.; Stewart, Chad; Barker, Piers C.A.; Campbell, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to determine right and left ventricle deformation parameters in patients with transposition of the great arteries who had undergone atrial or arterial switch procedures. Setting Patients with transposition are born with a systemic right ventricle. Historically, the atrial switch operation, in which the right ventricle remains the systemic ventricle, was performed. These patients have increased rates of morbidity and mortality. We used cardiac MRI with Velocity Vector Imaging analysis to characterize and compare ventricular myocardial deformation in patients who had an atrial switch or arterial switch operation. Design Patients with a history of these procedures, who had a clinically ordered cardiac MRI were included in the study. Consecutive 20 patients (75% males, 28.7±1.8 years) who underwent atrial switch operation and 20 patients (60% males, 17.7±1.9 years) who underwent arterial switch operation were included in the study. Four chamber and short-axis cine images were used to determine longitudinal and circumferential strain and strain rate using Vector Velocity Imaging software. Results Compared to the arterial switch group, the atrial switch group had decreased right ventricular ejection fraction and increased end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes; and no difference in left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes. The atrial switch group had decreased longitudinal and circumferential strain and strain rate. When compared to normal controls multiple strain parameters in the atrial switch group were reduced. Conclusions Myocardial deformation analysis of transposition patients reveals a reduction of right ventricular function and decreased longitudinal and circumferential strain parameters in patients with an atrial switch operation compared to those with arterial switch operation. A better understanding of the mechanisms of RV failure in TGA may lead to improved therapies and adaptation. PMID:25655213

  8. A methodology to accurately quantify patellofemoral cartilage contact kinematics by combining 3D image shape registration and cine-PC MRI velocity data.

    PubMed

    Borotikar, Bhushan S; Sipprell, William H; Wible, Emily E; Sheehan, Frances T

    2012-04-05

    Patellofemoral osteoarthritis and its potential precursor patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) are common, costly, and debilitating diseases. PFPS has been shown to be associated with altered patellofemoral joint mechanics; however, an actual variation in joint contact stresses has not been established due to challenges in accurately quantifying in vivo contact kinematics (area and location). This study developed and validated a method for tracking dynamic, in vivo cartilage contact kinematics by combining three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, cine-phase contrast (CPC), multi-plane cine (MPC), and 3D high-resolution static imaging. CPC and MPC data were acquired from 12 healthy volunteers while they actively extended/flexed their knee within the MRI scanner. Since no gold standard exists for the quantification of in vivo dynamic cartilage contact kinematics, the accuracy of tracking a single point (patellar origin relative to the femur) represented the accuracy of tracking the kinematics of an entire surface. The accuracy was determined by the average absolute error between the PF kinematics derived through registration of MPC images to a static model and those derived through integration of the CPC velocity data. The accuracy ranged from 0.47 mm to 0.77 mm for the patella and femur and from 0.68 mm to 0.86 mm for the patellofemoral joint. For purely quantifying joint kinematics, CPC remains an analytically simpler and more accurate (accuracy <0.33 mm) technique. However, for application requiring the tracking of an entire surface, such as quantifying cartilage contact kinematics, this combined imaging approach produces accurate results with minimal operator intervention.

  9. SU-F-BRB-02: Towards Quantitative Clinical Decision On Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) Or Prone for Left-Sided Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H; Gao, Y; Liu, T; Gelblum, D; Ho, A; Powell, S; Tang, X; Xu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop quantitative clinical guidelines between supine Deep Inspiratory Breath Hold (DIBH) and prone free breathing treatments for breast patients, we applied 3D deformable phantoms to perform Monte Carlo simulation to predict corresponding Dose to the Organs at Risk (OARs). Methods: The RPI-adult female phantom (two selected cup sizes: A and D) was used to represent the female patient, and it was simulated using the MCNP6 Monte Carlo code. Doses to OARs were investigated for supine DIBH and prone treatments, considering two breast sizes. The fluence maps of the 6-MV opposed tangential fields were exported. In the Monte Carlo simulation, the fluence maps allow each simulated photon particle to be weighed in the final dose calculation. The relative error of all dose calculations was kept below 5% by simulating 3*10{sup 7} photons for each projection. Results: In terms of dosimetric accuracy, the RPI Adult Female phantom with cup size D in DIBH positioning matched with a DIBH treatment plan of the patient. Based on the simulation results, for cup size D phantom, prone positioning reduced the cardiac dose and the dose to other OARs, while cup size A phantom benefits more from DIBH positioning. Comparing simulation results for cup size A and D phantom, dose to OARs was generally higher for the large breast size due to increased scattering arising from a larger portion of the body in the primary beam. The lower dose that was registered for the heart in the large breast phantom in prone positioning was due to the increase of the distance between the heart and the primary beam when the breast was pendulous. Conclusion: Our 3D deformable phantom appears an excellent tool to predict dose to the OARs for the supine DIBH and prone positions, which might help quantitative clinical decisions. Further investigation will be conducted. National Institutes of Health R01EB015478.

  10. Deep inspiration breath-hold technique for left-sided breast cancer: An analysis of predictors for organ-at-risk sparing

    SciTech Connect

    Register, Steven; Takita, Cristiane; Reis, Isildinha; Zhao, Wei; Amestoy, William; Wright, Jean

    2015-04-01

    To identify anatomic and treatment characteristics that correlate with organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique to guide patient selection for this technique. Anatomic and treatment characteristics and radiation doses to OARs were compared between free-breathing and DIBH plans. Linear regression analysis was used to identify factors independently predicting for cardiac sparing. We identified 64 patients: 44 with intact breast and 20 postmastectomy. For changes measured directly on treatment planning scans, DIBH plans decreased heart-chest wall length (6.5 vs 5.0 cm, p < 0.001), and increased lung volume (1074.4 vs 1881.3 cm{sup 3}, p < 0.001), and for changes measured after fields are set, they decreased maximum heart depth (1.1 vs 0.3 cm, p < 0.001) and heart volume in field (HVIF) (9.1 vs 0.9 cm{sup 3}, p < 0.001). DIBH reduced the mean heart dose (3.4 vs 1.8 Gy, p < 0.001) and lung V{sub 20} (19.6% vs 15.3%, p < 0.001). Regression analysis found that only change in HVIF independently predicted for cardiac sparing. We identified patients in the bottom quartile of the dosimetric benefits seen with DIBH and categorized the cause of this “minimal benefit.” Overall, 29% of patients satisfied these criteria for minimal benefit with DIBH and the most common cause was favorable baseline anatomy. Only the reduction in HVIF predicted for reductions in mean heart dose; no specific anatomic surrogate for the dosimetric benefits of DIBH technique could be identified. Most patients have significant dosimetric benefit with DIBH, and this technique should be planned and evaluated for all patients receiving left-sided breast/chest wall radiation.

  11. Deep inspiration breath-hold produces a clinically meaningful reduction in ipsilateral lung dose during locoregional radiation therapy for some women with right-sided breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Conway, Jessica L; Conroy, Leigh; Harper, Lindsay; Scheifele, Marie; Li, Haocheng; Smith, Wendy L; Graham, Tannis; Phan, Tien; Olivotto, Ivo A

    The goal of the work described here was to determine whether deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) produces a clinically meaningful reduction in pulmonary dose compared with free breathing (FB) during locoregional radiation for right-sided breast cancer. Four-field, modified-wide tangent plans with full nodal coverage were developed for 30 consecutive patients on paired DIBH and FB CT scans. Nodes were contoured according to European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology guidelines. Plan metrics were compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank testing. In 21 patients (70%), there was a ≥5% reduction in ipsilateral lung V20Gy with DIBH compared with FB. The mean decrease in ipsilateral lung V20Gy was 7.8% (0%-20%, P < .001). The mean lung dose decreased on average by 3.4 Gy with DIBH (-0.2 to 9.1, P < .001). The mean reduction in liver volume receiving 50% of the prescribed dose was 42.3 cm(3) (0-178.9 cm(3), P < .001). DIBH reduced ipsilateral lung V20Gy by ≥5% in the majority of patients. For some patients, the volume of liver receiving a potentially toxic dose decreased with DIBH. DIBH should be available as a treatment strategy to reduce ipsilateral lung V20Gy prior to compromising internal mammary chain nodal coverage for patients with right-sided breast cancer during locoregional radiation therapy if the V20Gy on FB exceeds 30%. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Utility of Deep Inspiration Breath Hold for Left-Sided Breast Radiation Therapy in Preventing Early Cardiac Perfusion Defects: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Zagar, Timothy M; Kaidar-Person, Orit; Tang, Xiaoli; Jones, Ellen E; Matney, Jason; Das, Shiva K; Green, Rebecca L; Sheikh, Arif; Khandani, Amir H; McCartney, William H; Oldan, Jorge Daniel; Wong, Terence Z; Marks, Lawrence B

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate early cardiac single photon computed tomography (SPECT) findings after left breast/chest wall postoperative radiation therapy (RT) in the setting of deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH). We performed a prospective single-institution single-arm study of patients who were planned for tangential RT with DIBH to the left breast/chest wall (± internal mammary nodes). The DIBH was done by use of a controlled surface monitoring technique (AlignRT, Vision RT Ltd, London, UK). The RT was given with tangential fields and a heart block. Radiation-induced cardiac perfusion and wall motion changes were assessed by pre-RT and 6-month post-RT SPECT scans. A cumulative SPECT summed-rest score was used to quantify perfusion in predefined left ventricle segments. The incidence of wall motion abnormalities was assessed in each of these same segments. A total of 20 patients with normal pre-RT scans were studied; their median age was 56 years (range, 39-72 years). Seven (35%) patients also received irradiation to the left internal mammary chain, and 5 (25%) received an additional RT field to supraclavicular nodes. The median heart dose was 94 cGy (range, 56-200 cGy), and the median V25Gy was zero (range, 0-0.1). None of the patients had post-RT perfusion or wall motion abnormalities. Our results suggest that DIBH and conformal cardiac blocking for patients receiving tangential RT for left-sided breast cancer is an effective means to avoid early RT-associated cardiac perfusion defects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A comparative analysis of 3D conformal deep inspiratory–breath hold and free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Kelli A.; Read, Paul W.; Morris, Monica M.; Reardon, Michael A.; Geesey, Constance; Wijesooriya, Krishni

    2013-07-01

    Patients undergoing radiation for left-sided breast cancer have increased rates of coronary artery disease. Free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (FB-IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal deep inspiratory–breath hold (3D-DIBH) reduce cardiac irradiation. The purpose of this study is to compare the dose to organs at risk in FB-IMRT vs 3D-DIBH for patients with left-sided breast cancer. Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer had 2 computed tomography scans: free breathing and voluntary DIBH. Optimization of the IMRT plan was performed on the free-breathing scan using 6 noncoplanar tangential beams. The 3D-DIBH plan was optimized on the DIBH scan and used standard tangents. Mean volumes of the heart, the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), the total lung, and the right breast receiving 5% to 95% (5% increments) of the prescription dose were calculated. Mean volumes of the heart and the LAD were lower (p<0.05) in 3D-DIBH for volumes receiving 5% to 80% of the prescription dose for the heart and 5% for the LAD. Mean dose to the LAD and heart were lower in 3D-DIBH (p≤0.01). Mean volumes of the total lung were lower in FB-IMRT for dose levels 20% to 75% (p<0.05), but mean dose was not different. Mean volumes of the right breast were not different for any dose; however, mean dose was lower for 3D-DIBH (p = 0.04). 3D-DIBH is an alternative approach to FB-IMRT that provides a clinically equivalent treatment for patients with left-sided breast cancer while sparing organs at risk with increased ease of implementation.

  14. SU-E-J-32: Calypso(R) and Laser-Based Localization Systems Comparison for Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients Using Deep Inspiration Breath Hold

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, S; Kaurin, D; Sweeney, L; Kim, J; Fang, L; Tran, A; Holloway, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Our institution uses a manual laser-based system for primary localization and verification during radiation treatment of left-sided breast cancer patients using deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH). This primary system was compared with sternum-placed Calypso(R) beacons (Varian Medical Systems, CA). Only intact breast patients are considered for this analysis. Methods: During computed tomography (CT) simulation, patients have BB and Calypso(R) surface beacons positioned sternally and marked for free-breathing and DIBH CTs. During dosimetry planning, BB longitudinal displacement between free breathing and DIBH CT determines laser mark (BH mark) location. Calypso(R) beacon locations from the DIBH CT are entered at the Tracking Station. During Linac simulation and treatment, patients inhale until the cross-hair and/or lasers coincide with the BH Mark, which can be seen using our high quality cameras (Pelco, CA). Daily Calypso(R) displacement values (difference from the DIBH-CT-based plan) are recorded.The displacement mean and standard deviation was calculated for each patient (77 patients, 1845 sessions). An aggregate mean and standard deviation was calculated weighted by the number of patient fractions.Some patients were shifted based on MV ports. A second data set was calculated with Calypso(R) values corrected by these shifts. Results: Mean displacement values indicate agreement within 1±3mm, with improvement for shifted data (Table). Conclusion: Both unshifted and shifted data sets show the Calypso(R) system coincides with the laser system within 1±3mm, demonstrating either localization/verification system will Resultin similar clinical outcomes. Displacement value uncertainty unilaterally reduces when shifts are taken into account.

  15. Dosimetric Benefits of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Combined With the Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique in Patients With Mediastinal Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paumier, Amaury; Ghalibafian, Mithra; Gilmore, Jennifer; Beaudre, Anne; Blanchard, Pierre; El Nemr, Mohammed; Azoury, Farez; Al Hamokles, Hweej; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Girinsky, Theodore

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the additional benefits of using the deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in terms of the protection of organs at risk for patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma with mediastinal involvement were entered into the study. Two simulation computed tomography scans were performed for each patient: one using the free-breathing (FB) technique and the other using the DIBH technique with a dedicated spirometer. The clinical target volume, planning target volume (PTV), and organs at risk were determined on both computed tomography scans according to the guidelines of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. In both cases, 30 Gy in 15 fractions was prescribed. The dosimetric parameters retrieved for the statistical analysis were PTV coverage, mean heart dose, mean coronary artery dose, mean lung dose, and lung V20. Results: There were no significant differences in PTV coverage between the two techniques (FB vs. DIBH). The mean doses delivered to the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs were significantly reduced by 15% to 20% using DIBH compared with FB, and the lung V20 was reduced by almost one third. The dose reduction to organs at risk was greater for masses in the upper part of the mediastinum. IMRT with DIBH was partially implemented in 1 patient. This combination will be extended to other patients in the near future. Conclusions: Radiation exposure of the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's lymphoma was greatly reduced using DIBH with IMRT. The greatest benefit was obtained for tumors in the upper part of the mediastinum. The possibility of a wider use in clinical practice is currently under investigation in our department.

  16. Radiation-induced second malignancies after involved-node radiotherapy with deep-inspiration breath-hold technique for early stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: a dosimetric study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To estimate the risk of radiation induced second cancers after radiotherapy using deep-inspiration breath-hold (DI) technique with three-dimensional conformal (3DCRT) and volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) for patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL). Methods Early-stage HL with mediastinal and supraclavicular involvement was studied using an Alderson phantom. A whole body CT was performed and all tissues were delineated. The clinical target volumes and planning target volumes (PTV) were determined according to the German Hodgkin study group guidelines. Free-breathing (FB) technique and DI technique were simulated by different safety margins for the PTV definition. In both cases, 30 Gy in 15 fractions was prescribed. Second cancer risk was estimated for various tissues with a second cancer model including fractionation. Results When compared with FB-3DCRT, estimated relative life time attributable risk (LAR) of cancer induction after DI-3DCRT was 0.86, 0.76, 0.94 and 0.92 for breast, lung, esophagus and stomach, respectively. With DI-VMAT, the corresponding values were 2.05, 1.29, 1.01, 0.93, respectively. For breast cancer, the LAR observed with DI-VMAT was not substantially distinguishable from the LAR computed for mantle RT with an administered dose of 40 Gy. Conclusions This study suggests that DI may reduce the LAR of secondary cancers of all OARs and may be a valuable technique when using 3DCRT. Conversely, VMAT may increase substantially the LAR and should be cautiously implemented in clinical practice. PMID:24548307

  17. A comparative analysis of 3D conformal deep inspiratory-breath hold and free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Kelli A; Read, Paul W; Morris, Monica M; Reardon, Michael A; Geesey, Constance; Wijesooriya, Krishni

    2013-01-01

    Patients undergoing radiation for left-sided breast cancer have increased rates of coronary artery disease. Free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (FB-IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal deep inspiratory-breath hold (3D-DIBH) reduce cardiac irradiation. The purpose of this study is to compare the dose to organs at risk in FB-IMRT vs 3D-DIBH for patients with left-sided breast cancer. Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer had 2 computed tomography scans: free breathing and voluntary DIBH. Optimization of the IMRT plan was performed on the free-breathing scan using 6 noncoplanar tangential beams. The 3D-DIBH plan was optimized on the DIBH scan and used standard tangents. Mean volumes of the heart, the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), the total lung, and the right breast receiving 5% to 95% (5% increments) of the prescription dose were calculated. Mean volumes of the heart and the LAD were lower (p<0.05) in 3D-DIBH for volumes receiving 5% to 80% of the prescription dose for the heart and 5% for the LAD. Mean dose to the LAD and heart were lower in 3D-DIBH (p≤0.01). Mean volumes of the total lung were lower in FB-IMRT for dose levels 20% to 75% (p<0.05), but mean dose was not different. Mean volumes of the right breast were not different for any dose; however, mean dose was lower for 3D-DIBH (p = 0.04). 3D-DIBH is an alternative approach to FB-IMRT that provides a clinically equivalent treatment for patients with left-sided breast cancer while sparing organs at risk with increased ease of implementation.

  18. Reproducibility of The Abdominal and Chest Wall Position by Voluntary Breath-Hold Technique Using a Laser-Based Monitoring and Visual Feedback System

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Katsumasa . E-mail: nakam@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nomoto, Satoru; Ohga, Saiji; Toba, Takashi; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Anai, Shigeo; Terashima, Hiromi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The voluntary breath-hold (BH) technique is a simple method to control the respiration-related motion of a tumor during irradiation. However, the abdominal and chest wall position may not be accurately reproduced using the BH technique. The purpose of this study was to examine whether visual feedback can reduce the fluctuation in wall motion during BH using a new respiratory monitoring device. Methods and Materials: We developed a laser-based BH monitoring and visual feedback system. For this study, five healthy volunteers were enrolled. The volunteers, practicing abdominal breathing, performed shallow end-expiration BH (SEBH), shallow end-inspiration BH (SIBH), and deep end-inspiration BH (DIBH) with or without visual feedback. The abdominal and chest wall positions were measured at 80-ms intervals during BHs. Results: The fluctuation in the chest wall position was smaller than that of the abdominal wall position. The reproducibility of the wall position was improved by visual feedback. With a monitoring device, visual feedback reduced the mean deviation of the abdominal wall from 2.1 {+-} 1.3 mm to 1.5 {+-} 0.5 mm, 2.5 {+-} 1.9 mm to 1.1 {+-} 0.4 mm, and 6.6 {+-} 2.4 mm to 2.6 {+-} 1.4 mm in SEBH, SIBH, and DIBH, respectively. Conclusions: Volunteers can perform the BH maneuver in a highly reproducible fashion when informed about the position of the wall, although in the case of DIBH, the deviation in the wall position remained substantial.

  19. Purine metabolism in response to hypoxic conditions associated with breath-hold diving and exercise in erythrocytes and plasma from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    del Castillo Velasco-Martínez, Iris; Hernández-Camacho, Claudia J; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía C; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    In mammalian tissues under hypoxic conditions, ATP degradation results in accumulation of purine metabolites. During exercise, muscle energetic demand increases and oxygen consumption can exceed its supply. During breath-hold diving, oxygen supply is reduced and, although oxygen utilization is regulated by bradycardia (low heart rate) and peripheral vasoconstriction, tissues with low blood flow (ischemia) may become hypoxic. The goal of this study was to evaluate potential differences in the circulating levels of purine metabolism components between diving and exercise in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Blood samples were taken from captive dolphins following a swimming routine (n=8) and after a 2min dive (n=8). Activity of enzymes involved in purine metabolism (hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT), inosine monophosphate deshydrogenase (IMPDH), xanthine oxidase (XO), purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP)), and purine metabolite (hypoxanthine (HX), xanthine (X), uric acid (UA), inosine monophosphate (IMP), inosine, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), adenosine, adenosine monophosphate (AMP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine diphosphate (GDP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP)) concentrations were quantified in erythrocyte and plasma samples. Enzymatic activity and purine metabolite concentrations involved in purine synthesis and degradation, were not significantly different between diving and exercise. Plasma adenosine concentration was higher after diving than exercise (p=0.03); this may be related to dive-induced ischemia. In erythrocytes, HGPRT activity was higher after diving than exercise (p=0.007), suggesting an increased capacity for purine recycling and ATP synthesis from IMP in ischemic tissues of bottlenose dolphins during diving. Purine recycling and physiological adaptations may maintain the ATP concentrations in bottlenose dolphins after diving and exercise. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Significance of mechanical alterations in single ventricle patients on twisting and circumferential strain as determined by analysis of strain from gradient cine magnetic resonance imaging sequences.

    PubMed

    Truong, Uyen T; Li, Xiaokui; Broberg, Craig S; Houle, Helene; Schaal, Michael; Ashraf, Muhammad; Kilner, Philip; Sheehan, Florence H; Sable, Craig A; Ge, Shuping; Sahn, David J

    2010-05-15

    Preliminary speckle-tracking echocardiographic studies show that patients with single ventricles (SVs) have significantly decreased twisting and dyssynchrony of twisting. This could be related to abnormal cardiac looping, which leads to hearts that lack helical fiber patterns. The aim of this study was to analyze gradient cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using Velocity Vector Imaging to assess cardiac mechanics. Subjects were 38 patients (aged 8 to 37 years) with SVs of left ventricular (n = 30) and indeterminate (n = 8) type who underwent cardiac MRI. Controls were 14 normal children and adults. Gradient cine MRI sequences close to the apex were subjected to a Velocity Vector Imaging analysis program adapted for MRI. In the control group, mean circumferential strain was -18.02 +/- 7.31%, mean dispersion of peak circumferential strain was 44.23 +/- 37.14 ms, and average rotation was -7.7 +/- 1.38 degrees . The rotation values were negative, or counterclockwise. In patients with SVs, mean circumferential strain was -8.87 +/- 7.30%, mean dispersion of peak circumferential strain was 181.55 +/- 76.07 ms, and average rotation was -2.6 +/- 1.24 degrees (p <0.001). Mean dispersion of the peak of rotation in the control group was 39.6 +/- 22.8 ms, compared to 166.5 +/- 72.4 ms in patients with SVs. In conclusion, this study showed a dramatic decrease in apical rotation and circumferential strain in the SV group compared to the control group. Strain and rotation mechanics at the apex in patients with SVs showed marked dyssynchrony. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Age- and gender-specific differences in left and right ventricular cardiac function and mass determined by cine magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sandstede, J; Lipke, C; Beer, M; Hofmann, S; Pabst, T; Kenn, W; Neubauer, S; Hahn, D

    2000-01-01

    We examined possible age- and gender-specific differences in the function and mass of left (LV) and right (RV) ventricles in 36 healthy volunteers using cine gradient-recalled echo magnetic resonance imaging. Subjects were divided into four groups (nine men and nine women in each): men aged under 45 years (32 +/- 7), women aged under 45 (27 +/- 6), men aged over 45 (59 +/- 8), and women aged over 45 (57 +/- 9). Functional analysis of cardiac volume and mass and of LV wall motion was performed by manual segmentation of the endocardial and epicardial borders of the end-diastolic and end-systolic frame; both absolute and normalized (per square meter body surface area) values were evaluated. With age there was a significant decrease in both absolute and normalized LV and RV chamber volumes (EDV, ESV), while LV and RV masses remained unchanged. Gender-specific differences were found in cardiac mass and volume (for men and women, respectively: LV mass, 155 +/- 18 and 110 +/- 16 g; LV EDV, 118 +/- 27 and 96 +/- 21 ml; LV ESV, 40 +/- 13 and 29 +/- 9 ml; RV mass, 52 +/- 10 and 39 +/- 5 g; RV EDV, 131 +/- 28 and 100 +/- 23 ml; RV ESV, 53 +/- 17 and 33 +/- 15 ml). Normalization to body surface area eliminated differences in LV volumes but not those in LV mass, RV mass, or RV function. Functional parameters such as cardiac output and LV ejection fraction showed nonsignificant or only slight differences and were thus largely independent of age and gender. Intra- and interobserver variability ranged between 1.4% and 5.9% for all parameters. Cine magnetic resonance imaging thus shows age- and gender-specific differences in cardiac function, and therefore the evaluation of cardiac function in patients should consider age- and gender-matched normative values.

  2. SU-E-T-426: Dose Delivery Accuracy in Breast Field Junction for Free Breath and Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, D; Shekel, E; Levin, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to verify the accuracy of the dose distribution along the field junction in a half beam irradiation technique for breast cancer patients receiving radiation to the breast or chest wall (CW) and the supraclavicular LN region for both free breathing and deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) technique. Methods: We performed in vivo measurements for nine breast cancer patients receiving radiation to the breast/CW and to the supraclavicular LN region. Six patients were treated to the left breast/CW using DIBH technique and three patients were treated to the right breast/CW in free breath. We used five microMOSFET dosimeters: three located along the field junction, one located 1 cm above the junction and the fifth microMOSFET located 1 cm below the junction. We performed consecutive measurements over several days for each patient and compared the measurements to the TPS calculation (Eclipse, Varian™). Results: The calculated and measured doses along the junction were 0.97±0.08 Gy and 1.02±0.14 Gy, respectively. Above the junction calculated and measured doses were 0.91±0.08 Gy and 0.98±0.09 Gy respectively, and below the junction calculated and measured doses were 1.70±0.15 Gy and 1.61±0.09 Gy, respectively. All differences were not statistically significant. When comparing calculated and measured doses for DIBH patients only, there was still no statistically significant difference between values for all dosimeter locations. Analysis was done using the Mann-Whitney Rank-Sum Test. Conclusion: We found excellent correlation between calculated doses from the TPS and measured skin doses at the junction of several half beam fields. Even for the DIBH technique, where there is more potential for variance due to depth of breath, there is no over or underdose along the field junction. This correlation validates the TPS, as well an accurate, reproducible patient setup.

  3. SU-D-18A-06: Variation of Controlled Breath Hold From CT Simulation to Treatment and Its Dosimetric Impact for Left-Sided Breast Radiotherapy with a Real-Time Optical Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    Mittauer, K; Deraniyagala, R; Li, J; Lu, B; Liu, C; Lightsey, J; Yan, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Different breath-hold (BH) maneuvers (abdominal breathing vs. chest breathing) during CT simulation and treatment can lead to chest wall positional variation. The purpose of this study is to quantify the variation of active breathing control (ABC)-assisted BH and estimate its dosimetric impact for left-sided whole-breast radiotherapy with a real-time optical tracking system (OTS). Methods: Seven breast cancer patients were included. An in-house OTS tracked an infrared (IR) marker affixed over the xiphoid process of the patient at CT simulation and throughout the treatment course to measure BH variations. Correlation between the IR marker and the breast was studied for dosimetric purposes. The positional variations of 860 BHs were retrospectively incorporated into treatment plans to assess their dosimetric impact on breast and cardiac organs (heart and left anterior descending artery [LAD]). Results: The mean intrafraction variations were 2.8 mm, 2.7 mm, and 1.6 mm in the anteroposterior (AP), craniocaudal (CC), and mediolateral (ML) directions, respectively. Mean stability in any direction was within 1.5 mm. A general trend of BH undershoot at treatment relative to CT simulation was observed with an average of 4.4 mm, 3.6 mm, and 0.1 mm in the AP, CC, and ML directions, respectively. Undershoot up to 12.6 mm was observed for individual patients. The difference between the planned and delivered dose to breast targets was negligible. The average planned/delivered mean heart doses, mean LAD doses, and max LAD doses were 1.4/2.1, 7.4/15.7, and 18.6/31.0 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: Systematic undershoot was observed in ABC-assisted BHs from CT simulation to treatment. Its dosimetric impact on breast coverage was minimized with image guidance, but the benefits of cardiac organ sparing were degraded. A real-time tracking system can be used in junction with the ABC device to improve BH reproducibility.

  4. Obstructive sleep apnea screening by NIRS imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashefi, Feraydune; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Liu, Hanli

    2007-02-01

    This study aimed at determining cerebral hemodynamic parameters in human subjects during breath holding using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Breath holding serves as a method of simulation OSA (Obstructive Sleep Apnea). Data was acquired non-invasively from 40 subjects, twenty OSA sufferers (10 females, 10 males, age 20-70 years), and twenty normal volunteers (10 females, 10 males, age 20-65 years). Measurements were conducted using a LED Imager (LEDI) during breath holding. In comparing OSA subjects with controls during breath holding, a consistent increase or even a decrease in oxy- ([O IIHb]), deoxy- ([HHb]), total hemoglobin ([tHb]) concentrations, and tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO II) in the regional brain tissue were observed. The LEDI probe consists of 4 sources and 10 detectors serving as 4 sets of 1 source and 4 detectors each. A three wavelength (730, 805, and 850 nm) LED was used and the wavelengths were switched sequentially. The distance between sources and the source-detector separation were 2.5 cm. Data acquisition consisted of three segments, baseline for one minute, followed by a period of breath holding, and then 2 minutes of recovery time. The duration of the breath holding was subject-dependent. Our investigation proves that NIR spectroscopy could be used as a tool for detecting cerebral hemodynamics and also serves as a method of screening patients with OSA.

  5. High quality machine-robust image features: identification in nonsmall cell lung cancer computed tomography images.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Luke A; Krafft, Shane; Stingo, Francesco; Choi, Haesun; Martel, Mary K; Kry, Stephen F; Court, Laurence E

    2013-12-01

    For nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, quantitative image features extracted from computed tomography (CT) images can be used to improve tumor diagnosis, staging, and response assessment. For these findings to be clinically applied, image features need to have high intra and intermachine reproducibility. The objective of this study is to identify CT image features that are reproducible, nonredundant, and informative across multiple machines. Noncontrast-enhanced, test-retest CT image pairs were obtained from 56 NSCLC patients imaged on three CT machines from two institutions. Two machines ("M1" and "M2") used cine 4D-CT and one machine ("M3") used breath-hold helical 3D-CT. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were semiautonomously segmented then pruned by removing voxels with CT numbers less than a prescribed Hounsfield unit (HU) cutoff. Three hundred and twenty eight quantitative image features were extracted from each pruned GTV based on its geometry, intensity histogram, absolute gradient image, co-occurrence matrix, and run-length matrix. For each machine, features with concordance correlation coefficient values greater than 0.90 were considered reproducible. The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the Jaccard index (JI) were used to quantify reproducible feature set agreement between machines.