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Sample records for bright galactic x-ray

  1. Quasiperiodic oscillations in bright galactic-bulge X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, F. K.; Shibazaki, N.; Alpar, M. A.; Shaham, J.

    1985-01-01

    Quasiperiodic oscillations with frequencies in the range 5-50 Hz have recently been discovered in X-rays from two bright galactic-bulge sources and Sco X-1. These sources are weakly magnetic neutron stars accreting from disks which the plasma is clumped. The interaction of the magnetosphere with clumps in the inner disk causes oscillations in the X-ray flux with many of the properties observed.

  2. SPECTRAL SURVEY OF X-RAY BRIGHT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FROM THE ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, Elizabeth; Markowitz, Alex; Rothschild, Richard

    2011-03-15

    Using long-term monitoring data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), we have selected 23 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with sufficient brightness and overall observation time to derive broadband X-ray spectra from 3 to {approx}>100 keV. Our sample includes mainly radio-quiet Seyferts, as well as seven radio-loud sources. Given the longevity of the RXTE mission, the greater part of our data is spread out over more than a decade, providing truly long-term average spectra and eliminating inconsistencies arising from variability. We present long-term average values of absorption, Fe line parameters, Compton reflection strengths, and photon indices, as well as fluxes and luminosities for the hard and very hard energy bands, 2-10 keV and 20-100 keV, respectively. We find tentative evidence for high-energy rollovers in three of our objects. We improve upon previous surveys of the very hard X-ray energy band in terms of accuracy and sensitivity, particularly with respect to confirming and quantifying the Compton reflection component. This survey is meant to provide a baseline for future analysis with respect to the long-term averages for these sources and to cement the legacy of RXTE, and especially its High Energy X-ray Timing Experiment, as a contributor to AGN spectral science.

  3. The Ophiuchus cluster - A bright X-ray cluster of galaxies at low galactic latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, M. D.; Bradt, H. V.; Doxsey, R. E.; Marshall, F. E.; Schwartz, D. A.; Margon, B.

    1981-01-01

    The discovery of an extended X-ray source identified with a cluster of galaxies at low galactic latitude is reported. The source, designated the Ophiuchus cluster, was detected near 4U 1708-23 with the HEAO 1 Scanning Modulation Collimator, and identified with the cluster on the basis of extended X-ray size and positional coincidence on the ESO/SRC (J) plate of the region. An X-ray flux density in the region 2-10 keV of approximately 25 microJ was measured, along with an X-ray luminosity of 1.6 x 10 to the 45th ergs/sec and an X-ray core radius of approximately 4 arcmin (0.2 Mpc) for an assumed isothermal sphere surface brightness distribution. The X-ray spectrum in the range 2-10 keV obtained with the HEAO 1 A-2 instrument is well fit by a thermal bremsstrahlung model with kT = 8 keV and a 6.7-keV iron line of equivalent width 450 eV. The steep-spectrum radio source MSH 17-203 also appears to be associated with the cluster, which is the closest and brightest representative of the class of X-ray clusters with a dominant central galaxy.

  4. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Bright Galactic X-Ray Binaries in Crowded Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, Eric W.; Margon, Bruce; Wachter, Stefanie; Anderson, Scott F.

    1996-01-01

    We report high spatial resolution HST imagery and photometry of three well-studied, intense Galactic X-ray binaries, X2129+470, CAL 87, and GX 17+2. All three sources exhibit important anomalies that are not readily interpreted by conventional models. Each source also lies in a severely crowded field, and in all cases the anomalies would be removed if much of the light observed from the ground in fact came from a nearby, thus far unresolved superposed companion. For V1727 Cyg (X2129+470), we find no such companion. We also present an HST FOS spectrum and broadband photometry which is consistent with a single, normal star. The supersoft LMC X-ray source CAL 87 was already known from ground-based work to have a companion separated by O.9 minutes from the optical counterpart; our HST images clearly resolve these objects and yield the discovery of an even closer, somewhat fainter additional companion. Our photometry indicates that contamination is not severe outside eclipse, where the companions only contribute 20% of the light in V, but during eclipse more than half of the V light comes from the companions. The previously determined spectral type of the CAL 87 secondary may need to be reevaluated due to this significant contamination, with consequences on inferences of the mass of the components. We find no companions to NP Ser (= X1813-14, = GX 17+2). However, for this object we point out a small but possibly significant astrometric discrepancy between the position of the optical object and that of the radio source which is the basis for the identification. This discrepancy needs to be clarified.

  5. IMPACT OF SUPERNOVA AND COSMIC-RAY DRIVING ON THE SURFACE BRIGHTNESS OF THE GALACTIC HALO IN SOFT X-RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Girichidis, Philipp; Gatto, Andrea; Naab, Thorsten; Walch, Stefanie; Wünsch, Richard; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Baczynski, Christian; Clark, Paul C.

    2015-11-10

    The halo of the Milky Way contains a hot plasma with a surface brightness in soft X-rays of the order 10{sup −12} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} deg{sup −2}. The origin of this gas is unclear, but so far numerical models of galactic star formation have failed to reproduce such a large surface brightness by several orders of magnitude. In this paper, we analyze simulations of the turbulent, magnetized, multi-phase interstellar medium including thermal feedback by supernova explosions as well as cosmic-ray feedback. We include a time-dependent chemical network, self-shielding by gas and dust, and self-gravity. Pure thermal feedback alone is sufficient to produce the observed surface brightness, although it is very sensitive to the supernova rate. Cosmic rays suppress this sensitivity and reduce the surface brightness because they drive cooler outflows. Self-gravity has by far the largest effect because it accumulates the diffuse gas in the disk in dense clumps and filaments, so that supernovae exploding in voids can eject a large amount of hot gas into the halo. This can boost the surface brightness by several orders of magnitude. Although our simulations do not reach a steady state, all simulations produce surface brightness values of the same order of magnitude as the observations, with the exact value depending sensitively on the simulation parameters. We conclude that star formation feedback alone is sufficient to explain the origin of the hot halo gas, but measurements of the surface brightness alone do not provide useful diagnostics for the study of galactic star formation.

  6. Low-luminosity X-ray sources and the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, R.

    2014-07-01

    We make a new determination of the hard-band (2-10 keV) X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of relative low-luminosity Galactic X-ray sources based on a source sample derived from the XMM Slew Survey (XSS). The source population is comprised of coronally-active late-type stars and binaries with hard-band X-ray luminosities in the range 10^{28-32} erg s^{-1} and cataclysmic variables (magnetic and non-magnetic) with X-ray luminosities spanning the range 10^{30-34} erg s^{-1}. We use this new estimate of the XLF, to predict the 2-10 keV X-ray source counts on the Galactic Plane at faint fluxes and show that the result is fully consistent with the available observational constraints. Similarly the predicted surface brightness, both in the full 2-10 keV band and in a restricted 6-10 keV bandpass, due to the integrated emission of faint unresolved Galactic sources, is well matched to the observed intensity of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). We find that the coronally-active sources make the dominant contribution to both the faint Galactic X-ray source counts and the GRXE.

  7. EX56a study of extended X-ray emission around isolated galaxies EX56b identification and spectra of bright X-ray sources at high galactic latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Daniel A.

    1987-01-01

    The EXOSAT observations confirmed the identification and extended nature of PKS 2345-35. It gave a good 2 to 10 keV X-ray spectrum and a detailed spatial profile indicating asymmetry of the structure. In the high galactic latitidue investigation, the BL Lac object identified with the HEAO-1 source 1430+423 was detected, and the first X-ray spectrum was obtained. Several simulataneous observations of H0323+022 were obtained over a broad range of electromagnetic spectrum. Studies of luminous active galactic nuclei have given significant information on the spectrum of the quasar PKS 0558-504. In a study of Southern sky cataclysmic variables, the EXOSAT was used to determine the X-ray spectrum and search for periodicities in two objects. Studies of complete identifications have revealed that X-ray sources in two high galactic latitude fields are stars, and therefore are to be excluded from the Piccinotti extragalactic sample. Only one Piccinotti source remains to be identified.

  8. Apollo galactic X-ray astronomy observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, I.; Trombka, J.; Schmadebeck, R.; Gorenstein, P.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1971-01-01

    The galactic X-ray observations are a detailed study of the temporal behavior of pulsating X-ray sources. NASA's first X-ray astronomy satellite Uhuru (Explorer 42) has recently discovered fast time variability of pulsations in the output from several sources. The variability occurs on a time scale of minutes, seconds, or less, implying that the emitting regions are very small in size, much smaller than the sun, although they are emitting about a thousand times more power. Fast time variability may provide the clue that is needed to understand the mechanisms which drive pulsating sources. The Apollo observations record the emission from several objects continuously for a period of about an hour. The spacecraft can be pointed at the source for the entire time. On the other hand, Uhuru can observe only for about a minute or two per sighting. Consequently, Apollo has the capability for determining whether periodicities exist in the 10-1000 second range.

  9. Diffuse X-rays from the galactic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    An anisotropic feature of the diffuse hard X-ray background that tracks the concentration of interstellar hydrogen in the plane of the galaxy is reported. This feature supports a model of galactic X-ray emission by subrelativistic cosmic rays via a bremsstrahlung process. The measurement was carried out on August 9, 1971, using two multianode multilayer gas proportional counters onboard Aerobee 170 flight 13.08. A schematic diagram of the detectors is shown. This type of construction and the appropriate utilization of the signals from the many anodes result in a low detector background, a perequisite before undertaking a measurement of possible small variations in the brightness of the X-ray sky.

  10. X-Ray Reprocessing in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2004-01-01

    This is the final report for research entitled "X-ray reprocessing in active galactic nuclei," into X-ray absorption and emission in various classes of active galaxy via X-ray spectral signatures. The fundamental goal of the research was to use these signatures as probes of the central engine structure and circumnuclear environment of active galactic nuclei. The most important accomplishment supported by this grant involved the detailed analysis and interpretation of the XMM data for the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15. This work was performed by Drs. Christopher Reynolds and Mitchell Begelman in collaboration with Dr. Jorn Wilms (University of Tubingen, Germany; PI of the XMM observation) and other European scientists. With XMM we obtained medium resolution X-ray spectra of unprecedented quality for this Seyfert galaxy. Modeling the X-ray spectrum within the framework of accretion disk reflection models produced the first evidence for energy extraction from the spin of a black hole. Specifically, we found that the extreme gravitational redshifts required to explain the X-ray spectrum suggests that the bulk of the energy dissipation is concentrated very close to the black hole, in contrast with the expectations of any pure accretion disk model. In a second paper we addressed the low- energy spectral complexity and used RXTE specta to pin down the high-energy spectral index, thus firming up our initial interpretation. Additionally, we carried out detailed spectral and variability analyses of a number of Seyfert and radio galaxies (e.g., NGC 5548 and 3C 111) and developed general techniques that will be useful in performing X-ray reverberation mapping of accretion disks in AGN, once adequate data becomes available. A list of papers supported by this research is included.

  11. Are the Galactic-bulge X-ray sources magnetized?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundt, W.; Ozel, M. E.; Ercan, E. N.

    1987-01-01

    This paper attempts to demonstrate that a better understanding of Galactic-bulge X-ray sources can be achieved if their magnetic moments are assumed to have the same values as those of young pulsars. It is argued that most of the matter leaving the inner edge of the accretion disk can reach the neutron star's surface in the form of massive clumps in quasi-Keplerian orbits. As a result, most of the accretion flow covers a broad equatorial belt rather than the polar caps, and the star shines as an almost unpulsed source. The liberation of half of the accretion power before the surface is reached can lead to the reported UHE pulses and bright infrared bursts. Spasmodic accretion is discussed as a model for gamma-ray bursts, and the observed low-energy X-ray absorption features are considered as an indication of strong magnetic fields shifted to lower energies during super-Eddington outbursts.

  12. Laser-heated X-ray flashlamp brightness measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.L.; Campbell, E.M.; Hagelstein, P.; Halsey, W.; Kauffman, R.L.; Koppel, L.; Phillion, D.; Price, R.; Toor, A.

    1983-12-01

    The authors present measurements of the X-ray emission characteristics of laser-irradiated flashlamp foils which are candidates to produce by resonant photoexcitation a population inversion in either a neon or fluorine lasant gas. Using the Shiva 1.06 ..mu.. laser, the authors heated Fe, Cr, and Ni foils to study the brightness and centroid energies of X-ray lines stemming from L-M transitions. Results indicate that appropriately bright and uniform sources can be produced.

  13. [C ii] emission from galactic nuclei in the presence of X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, W. D.; Pineda, J. L.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The luminosity of [C ii] is used as a probe of the star formation rate in galaxies, but the correlation breaks down in some active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Models of the [C ii] emission from galactic nuclei do not include the influence of X-rays on the carbon ionization balance, which may be a factor in reducing the [C ii] luminosity. Aims: We aim to determine the properties of the ionized carbon and its distribution among highly ionized states in the interstellar gas in galactic nuclei under the influence of X-ray sources. We calculate the [C ii] luminosity in galactic nuclei under the influence of bright sources of soft X-rays. Methods: We solve the balance equation of the ionization states of carbon as a function of X-ray flux, electron, atomic hydrogen, and molecular hydrogen density. These are input to models of [C ii] emission from the interstellar medium (ISM) in galactic nuclei representing conditions in the Galactic central molecular zone and a higher density AGN model. The behavior of the [C ii] luminosity is calculated as a function of the X-ray luminosity. We also solve the distribution of the ionization states of oxygen and nitrogen in highly ionized regions. Results: We find that the dense warm ionized medium (WIM) and dense photon dominated regions (PDRs) dominate the [C ii] emission when no X-rays are present. The X-rays in galactic nuclei can affect strongly the C+ abundance in the WIM, converting some fraction to C2+ and higher ionization states and thus reducing its [C ii] luminosity. For an X-ray luminosity L(X-ray) ≳ 1043 erg s-1 the [C ii] luminosity can be suppressed by a factor of a few, and for very strong sources, L(X-ray) >1044 erg s-1 such as found for many AGNs, the [C ii] luminosity is significantly depressed. Comparison of the model with several extragalactic sources shows that the [C ii] to far-infrared ratio declines for L(X-ray) ≳ 1043 erg s-1, in reasonable agreement with our model. Conclusions: We conclude that X-rays

  14. Two XTE A01 Projects: A Multifrequency Study of Circinus X-1 and a Search for Microsecond Variability From Bright Galactic X-Ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jernigan, Garrett

    1998-01-01

    This final report describes the research of a single common portion of the above-named two projects, conducted by G. Jernigan, i.e., the theory for a new method, a variation of a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, for determining the fastest variability present in an X-ray source. The current phase involves testing the newly developed code on real example sources (CYG X1). Unfortunately, there are no calibration sources for testing the code, which therefore required the development of an X-ray source simulation code. The goal is to evaluate the sensitivity of the code for the detection of a range of different types of variability (bursts, pulsations, etc.).

  15. Low-luminosity X-ray sources and the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, R. S.

    2014-11-01

    Using the XMM-Newton slew survey, we construct a hard-band selected sample of low-luminosity Galactic X-ray sources. Two source populations are represented, namely coronally active stars and binaries (ASBs) and cataclysmic variables (CVs), with X-ray luminosities collectively spanning the range 1028-34 erg s-1 (2-10 keV). We derive the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and volume emissivity of each population. Scaled to the local stellar mass density, the latter is found to be 1.08 ± 0.16 × 1028 and 2.5 ± 0.6 × 10^{27} {erg s}^{-1} M_{{⊙}}^{-1}, for the ASBs and CVs, respectively, which in total is a factor of 2 higher than previous estimates. We employ the new XLFs to predict the X-ray source counts on the Galactic plane at l = 28.5° and show that the result is consistent with current observational constraints. The X-ray emission of faint, unresolved ASBs and CVs can account for a substantial fraction of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). We discuss a model in which ˜80 per cent of the 6-10 keV GRXE intensity is produced in this way, with the remainder attributable to X-ray scattering in the interstellar medium and/or young Galactic source populations. Much of the hard X-ray emission attributed to the ASBs is likely to be produced during flaring episodes.

  16. X-ray bursters and the X-ray sources of the galactic bulge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.; Joss, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Type 1 X-ray bursts, optical, infrared, and radio properties of the galactic bulge sources, are discussed. It was proven that these burst sources are neutron stars in low mass, close binary stellar systems. Several burst sources are found in globular clusters with high central densities. Optical type 1 X-ray bursts were observed from three sources. Type 2 X-ray bursts, observed from the Rapid Burster, are due to an accretion instability which converts gravitational potential energy into heat and radiation, which makes them of a fundamentally different nature from Type 1 bursts.

  17. Anticorrelation of Variability Amplitude with X-Ray Luminosity for Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Gang; Abramowicz, Marek A.

    1996-07-01

    The bright-spot model for the short-term X-ray variability of active galactic nuclei predicts that, statistically, sources with larger luminosities should have smaller variability amplitudes. This quantitatively agrees with the analysis of the observational data from 12 high-quality EXOSAT long looks performed by Lawrence & Papadakis.

  18. Fast microtomography using bright monochromatic x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, J. W.; Lee, J. S.; Park, S. J.; Chang, S.; Pyo, J.; Kwon, N.; Kim, J.; Kohmura, Y.; Nishino, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Ishikawa, T.

    2012-09-15

    A fast microtomography system for high-resolution high-speed imaging has been developed using bright monochromatic x-rays at the BL29XU beamline of SPring-8. The shortest scan time for microtomography we attained was 0.25 s in 1.25 {mu}m effective pixel size by combining the bright monochromatic x-rays, a fast rotating sample stage, and a high performance x-ray imaging detector. The feasibility of the tomography system was successfully demonstrated by visualization of rising bubbles in a viscous liquid, an interesting issue in multiphase flow physics. This system also provides a high spatial (a measurable feature size of 300 nm) or a very high temporal (9.8 {mu}s) resolution in radiographs.

  19. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J; Mancuso, Christopher A; Hogle, Craig W; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L; Dorney, Kevin M; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G; Fullerton, Eric E; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M; Milošević, Dejan B; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C

    2015-11-17

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform.

  20. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D.; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J.; Mancuso, Christopher A.; Hogle, Craig W.; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L.; Dorney, Kevin M.; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Milošević, Dejan B.; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A.; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform. PMID:26534992

  1. Optical Variability of X-Ray Bright Southern Symbiotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedrick, C.; Sokoloski, J.

    2004-12-01

    We performed weekly B- and V-band observations of four X-ray bright southern symbiotic binary stars -- CD-43 14304, Hen 3-1591, LMC S63, and SMC LN 358 -- using the 1.3-m telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). We began optical monitoring in August 2003 for two of the objects (LMC S63 and SMC LN 358) and in January 2004 for the other two objects (CD-43 14304 and Hen 3-1591). None of the four survey objects experienced a major outburst during the monitoring period. We did, however, detect small-amplitude ( 0.1 mag) optical variability on a time scale of tens of days, for the first time, in each of the four systems. Both the structure and amplitude of the variations are roughly the same in the B band and V band in all of the symbiotics in our sample except one (LMC S63), and is most consistent with the idea that the week-time-scale variability originates with the hot component (most likely an accreting white dwarf) rather than the red giant. We compare the variability properties of our small sample of X-ray-bright symbiotic stars to those of samples of both X-ray-bright and X-ray-dim symbiotic stars from the database of the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO).

  2. X-ray-selected AGNs near bright galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocke, John T.; Schneider, Peter; Morris, Simon L.; Gioia, Isabella M.; Maccacaro, Tommaso

    1987-01-01

    Among the numerous low-redshift low-luminosity X-ray sources discovered with the Einstein Observatory, ten AGNs were identified that are projected within three optical diameters of bright (V less than 18) foreground galaxies. These AGNs near galaxies have significantly higher redshifts than the sample as a whole. This discovery is interpreted in terms of gravitational 'microlensing' in which stars in the foreground galaxy have significantly brightened the X-ray emission from these higher redshift AGNs, allowing their detection. It is suggested that microlensing may be responsible for a significant alteration of the inherent QSO luminosity function.

  3. Bright X-Ray Transients in M31: 2004 July XMM-Newton Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudolyubov, Sergey; Priedhorsky, William; Cordova, France

    2006-07-01

    We present the results of X-ray observations of four bright transients sources detected in the 2004 July XMM-Newton observations of the central bulge of M31. Two X-ray sources, XMMU J004315.5+412440 and XMMU J004144.7+411110, were discovered for the first time. Two other sources, CXOM31 J004309.9+412332 and CXOM31 J004241.8+411635, were previously detected by Chandra. The properties of the sources suggest their identification with accreting binary systems in M31. The X-ray spectra and variability of two sources, XMMU J004144.7+411110 and CXOM31 J004241.8+411635, are similar to that of the Galactic black hole transients. The X-ray source XMMU J004315.5+412440 demonstrates a dramatic decline of the X-ray flux on a timescale of three days and a remarkable flaring behavior on a timescale of tens of minutes. The X-ray data on XMMU J004315.5+412440 and CXOM31 J004309.9+412332 suggest that they can be either black hole or neutron star systems. Combining the results of 2000-2004 XMM-Newton observations of M31, we estimate the total rate of the bright transient outbursts in the central region of M31 to be 6-12 yr-1, in agreement with previous studies.

  4. Lightweight Target Generates Bright, Energetic X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A

    2006-01-25

    Radiography with x rays is a long-established method to see inside objects, from human limbs to weapon parts. Livermore scientists have a continuing need for powerful x rays for such applications as backlighting, or illuminating, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments and imaging still or exploding materials for the nation's Stockpile Stewardship Program. X-radiography is one of the prime diagnostics for ICF experiments because it captures the fine detail needed to determine what happens to nearly microscopic targets when they are compressed by laser light. For example, Livermore scientists participating in the National Ignition Facility's (NIF's) 18-month-long Early Light experimental campaign, which ended in 2004, used x rays to examine hydrodynamic instabilities in jets of plasma. In these experiments, one laser beam irradiated a solid target of titanium, causing it to form a high-temperature plasma that generated x rays of about 4.65 kiloelectronvolts (keV). These x rays backlit a jet of plasma formed when two other laser beams hit a plastic ablator and sent a shock to an aluminum washer. Livermore physicist Kevin Fournier of the Physics and Advanced Technologies Directorate leads a team that is working to increase the efficiency of converting laser energy into x rays so the resulting images provide more information about the object being illuminated. The main characteristics of x-ray sources are energy and brightness. ''As experimental targets get larger and as compression of the targets increases, the backlighter sources must be brighter and more energetic'', says Fournier. The more energetic the x rays, the further they penetrate an object. The brighter the source--that is, the more photons it has--the clearer the image. historically, researchers have used solid targets such as thin metal foils to generate x rays. however, when photon energies are greater than a few kiloelectronvolts, the conversion efficiency of solid targets is only a fraction of 1

  5. X-ray bursters and the X-ray sources of the galactic bulge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.; Joss, P. C.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt is made to distill from observational and theoretical information on the galactic bulge X-ray sources in general, and on the X-ray burst sources in particular, those aspects which seem to have the greatest relevance to the understanding of these sources. Galactic bulge sources appear to be collapsed objects of roughly solar mass, in most cases neutron stars, which are accreting matter from low-mass stellar companions. Type I bursts seem to result from thermonuclear flashes in the surface layers of some of these neutron stars, while the type II bursts from the Rapid Burster are almost certainly due to an instability in the accretion flow onto a neutron star. It is concluded that the studies cited offer a new and powerful observational handle on the fundamental properties of neutron stars and of the interacting binary systems in which they are often contained.

  6. Galactic X-ray emission from pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    The contribution of pulsars to the gamma-ray flux from the galactic plane is examined using data from the most recent pulsar surveys. It is assumed that pulsar gamma-rays are produced by curvature radiation from relativistic particles above the polar cap and attenuated by pair production in the strong magnetic and electric fields. Assuming that all pulsars produce gamma-rays in this way, their luminosities can be predicted as a function of period and magnetic field strength. Using the distribution of pulsars in the galaxy as determined from data on 328 pulsars detected in three surveys, the local gamma-ray production spectrum, the longitude profile, and the latitude profile of pulsar gamma-ray flux are calculated. The largest sources of uncertainty in the size of the pulsar contribution are the value of the mean interstellar electron density, the turnover in the pulsar radio luminosity function, and the average pulsar magnetic field strength. A present estimate is that pulsars contribute from 15 to 20 % of the total flux of gamma-rays from the galactic plane.

  7. PROFFIT: Analysis of X-ray surface-brightness profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    PROFFIT analyzes X-ray surface-brightness profiles for data from any X-ray instrument. It can extract surface-brightness profiles in circular or elliptical annuli, using constant or logarithmic bin size, from the image centroid, the surface-brightness peak, or any user-given center, and provides surface-brightness profiles in any circular or elliptical sectors. It offers background map support to extract background profiles, can excise areas using SAO DS9-compatible (ascl:0003.002) region files to exclude point sources, provides fitting with a number of built-in models, including the popular beta model, double beta, cusp beta, power law, and projected broken power law, uses chi-squared or C statistic, and can fit on the surface-brightness or counts data. It has a command-line interface similar to HEASOFT’s XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) package, provides interactive help with a description of all the commands, and results can be saved in FITS, ROOT or TXT format.

  8. THE GALACTIC BULGE SURVEY: OUTLINE AND X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jonker, P. G.; Bassa, C. G.; Torres, M. A. P.; In't Zand, J. J. M.; Ratti, E. M.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.; Maccarone, T. J.; Dieball, A.; Hynes, R. I.; Clem, J.; Mikles, V. J.; Britt, C. T.; Gossen, L.; Collazzi, A. C.; Greiss, S.; Wijnands, R.; Mendez, M.; Rea, N.; Kuulkers, E.

    2011-06-01

    We introduce the Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) and we provide the Chandra source list for the region that has been observed to date. Among the goals of the GBS are constraining the neutron star (NS) equation of state and the black hole (BH) mass distribution via the identification of eclipsing NS and BH low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). The latter goal will, in addition, be obtained by significantly enlarging the number of BH systems for which a BH mass can be derived. Further goals include constraining X-ray binary formation scenarios, in particular the common envelope phase and the occurrence of kicks, via source-type number counts and an investigation of the spatial distribution of X-ray binaries, respectively. The GBS targets two strips of 6{sup 0} x 1{sup 0} (12 deg{sup 2} in total), one above (1{sup 0} < b < 2{sup 0}) and one below (-2{sup 0} < b < -1{sup 0}) the Galactic plane in the direction of the Galactic center at both X-ray and optical wavelengths. By avoiding the Galactic plane (-1{sup 0} < b < 1{sup 0}) we limit the influence of extinction on the X-ray and optical emission but still sample relatively large number densities of sources. The survey is designed such that a large fraction of the X-ray sources can be identified from their optical spectra. The X-ray survey, by design, covers a large area on the sky while the depth is shallow using 2 ks per Chandra pointing. In this way we maximize the predicted number ratio of (quiescent) LMXBs to cataclysmic variables. The survey is approximately homogeneous in depth to a 0.5-10 keV flux of 7.7 x 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. So far, we have covered about two-thirds (8.3 deg{sup 2}) of the projected survey area with Chandra providing over 1200 unique X-ray sources. We discuss the characteristics and the variability of the brightest of these sources.

  9. Extended X-ray Objects in the Galactic Bulge Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Brandon

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this project was to locate extended X-ray objects in the galactic bulge. Data was taken from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and analyzed using vtpdetect, a program that scans for overdensities of photons in FITS files. The regions flagged by the program were further investigated to determine whether the sources were real extended objects. The original list of detected sources was narrowed down to 7 candidates which are now being further analyzed to determine what specifically the objects are. For this poster I will describe the elimination process for each flagged object and discuss future analysis techniques to determine the identity of the remaining candidates.

  10. Magnetic properties of X-ray bright points. [in sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.; Krieger, A. S.; Harvey, J. W.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    Using high-resolution Kitt Peak National Observatory magnetograms and sequences of simultaneous S-054 soft X-ray solar images, the properties of X-ray bright points (XBP) and ephemeral active regions (ER) are compared. All XBP appear on the magnetograms as bipolar features, except for very recently emerged or old and decayed XBP. The separation of the magnetic bipoles is found to increase with the age of the XBP, with an average emergence growth rate of 2.2 plus or minus 0.4 km per sec. The total magnetic flux in a typical XBP living about 8 hr is found to be about two times ten to the nineteenth power Mx. A proportionality is found between XBP lifetime and total magnetic flux, equivalent to about ten to the twentieth power Mx per day of lifetime.

  11. Stellar kinematics of X-ray bright massive elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyskova, N.; Churazov, E.; Moiseev, A.; Sil'chenko, O.; Zhuravleva, I.

    2014-07-01

    We discuss a simple and fast method for estimating masses of early-type galaxies from optical data and compare the results with X-ray derived masses. The optical method relies only on the most basic observables such as the surface brightness I(R) and the line-of-sight velocity dispersion σp(R) profiles and provides an anisotropy-independent estimate of the galaxy circular speed Vc. The mass-anisotropy degeneracy is effectively overcome by evaluating Vc at a characteristic radius Rsweet defined from local properties of observed profiles. The sweet radius Rsweet is expected to lie close to R2, where I(R) ∝ R-2, and not far from the effective radius Reff. We apply the method to a sample of five X-ray bright elliptical galaxies observed with the 6 m telescope BTA-6 in Russia. We then compare the optical Vc estimate with the X-ray derived value, and discuss possible constraints on the non-thermal pressure in the hot gas and configuration of stellar orbits. We find that the average ratio of the optical Vc estimate to the X-ray one is equal to ≈0.98 with 11 per cent scatter, i.e. there is no evidence for the large non-thermal pressure contribution in the gas at ˜Rsweet. From analysis of the Lick indices Hβ, Mgb, Fe5270 and Fe5335, we calculate the mass of the stellar component within the sweet radius. We conclude that a typical dark matter fraction inside Rsweet in the sample galaxies is ˜60 per cent for the Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) and ˜75 per cent for the Kroupa IMF.

  12. Stellar contributions to the hard X-ray galactic ridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worrall, S. M.; Marshall, F. E.

    1982-01-01

    The number density of serendipitous sources in galactic plane Einstein Observatory IPC fields are compared with predictions based on the intensity of the HEAO-1 A2 unresolved hrd X-ray galactic ridge emission. It is concluded that theoretically predicted X-ray source populations of luminosity 8 x 10 to the 32nd power to 3 x 10 to the 34th power ergs s have 2 KeV to 10 KeV local surface densities of less than approximately .0008 L(32) pc/2 and are unlikely to be the dominant contributors to the hard X-ray ridge. An estimate for Be/neutron star binary systems, such as X Persei, gives a 2 keV to 10 keV local surface density of approximately 26 x 10 to the -5 power L(32) pc/2. Stellar systems of low luminosity, are more likely contributors. Both RS CVn and cataclysmic variable systems contribute 43% + or - 18% of the ridge. A more sensitive measurement of the ridge's hard X-ray spectrum should reveal Fe-line emission. We speculate that dM stars are further major contributors.

  13. Galactic Starburst NGC 3603 from X-Rays to Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffat, A. F. J.; Corcoran, M. F.; Stevens, I. R.; Skalkowski, G.; Marchenko, S. V.; Muecke, A.; Ptak, A.; Koribalski, B. S.; Brenneman, L.; Mushotzky, R.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NGC 3603 is the most massive and luminous visible starburst region in the Galaxy. We present the first Chandra/ACIS-I X-ray image and spectra of this dense, exotic object, accompanied by deep cm-wavelength ATCA radio image at similar or less than 1 inch spatial resolution, and HST/ground-based optical data. At the S/N greater than 3 level, Chandra detects several hundred X-ray point sources (compared to the 3 distinct sources seen by ROSAT). At least 40 of these sources are definitely associated with optically identified cluster O and WR type members, but most are not. A diffuse X-ray component is also seen out to approximately 2 feet (4 pc) form the center, probably arising mainly from the large number of merging/colliding hot stellar winds and/or numerous faint cluster sources. The point-source X-ray fluxes generally increase with increasing bolometric brightnesses of the member O/WR stars, but with very large scatter. Some exceptionally bright stellar X-ray sources may be colliding wind binaries. The radio image shows (1) two resolved sources, one definitely non-thermal, in the cluster core near where the X-ray/optically brightest stars with the strongest stellar winds are located, (2) emission from all three known proplyd-like objects (with thermal and non-thermal components, and (3) many thermal sources in the peripheral regions of triggered star-formation. Overall, NGC 3603 appears to be a somewhat younger and hotter, scaled-down version of typical starbursts found in other galaxies.

  14. Characterizing the X-Ray Spectrum of the Galactic Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this project is to determine the spectrum of the Galactic halo's soft X-ray emission. These photons are emitted by hot, diffuse gas hundreds to thousands of parsecs from the Galactic plane. Thus, the emission is weak, can be confused with locally produced photons, and must be distinguished from noise. My co-I has made significant progress on determining the background. I have been working on a complementary aspect of the project: computer simulations of the hot gas in the local and distant regions.

  15. Unwrapping the X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are complex phenomena. At the heart of an AGN is a relativistic accretion disk around a spinning supermassive black hole (SMBH) with an X-ray emitting corona and, sometimes, a relativistic jet. On larger scales, the outer accretion disk and molecular torus act as the reservoirs of gas for the continuing AGN activity. And on all scales from the black hole outwards, powerful winds are seen that probably affect the evolution of the host galaxy as well as regulate the feeding of the AGN itself. In this review article, we discuss how X-ray spectroscopy can be used to study each of these components. We highlight how recent measurements of the high-energy cutoff in the X-ray continuum by NuSTAR are pushing us to conclude that X-ray coronae are radiatively-compact and have electron temperatures regulated by electron-positron pair production. We show that the predominance of rapidly-rotating objects in current surveys of SMBH spin is entirely unsurprising once one accounts for the observational selection bias resulting from the spin-dependence of the radiative efficiency. We review recent progress in our understanding of fast (v˜ (0.1-0.3)c, highly-ionized (mainly visible in Fe XXV and Fe XXVI lines), high-column density winds that may dominate quasar-mode galactic feedback. Finally, we end with a brief look forward to the promise of Astro-H and future X-ray spectropolarimeters.

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF A POPULATION OF X-RAY-EMITTING MASSIVE STARS IN THE GALACTIC PLANE

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Gemma E.; Gaensler, B. M.; Kaplan, David L.; Posselt, Bettina; Slane, Patrick O.; Murray, Stephen S.; Drake, Jeremy J.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Hong, Jaesub; Lee, Julia C.; Mauerhan, Jon C.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Brogan, Crystal L.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Drew, Janet E.; Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Steeghs, Danny T. H.; Van Kerkwijk, Marten H.

    2011-02-01

    We present X-ray, infrared, optical, and radio observations of four previously unidentified Galactic plane X-ray sources: AX J163252-4746, AX J184738-0156, AX J144701-5919, and AX J144547-5931. Detection of each source with the Chandra X-ray Observatory has provided sub-arcsecond localizations, which we use to identify bright infrared counterparts to all four objects. Infrared and optical spectroscopy of these counterparts demonstrate that all four X-ray sources are extremely massive stars, with spectral classifications: Ofpe/WN9 (AX J163252-4746), WN7 (AX J184738-0156 = WR121a), WN7-8h (AX J144701-5919), and OIf{sup +} (AX J144547-5931). AX J163252-4746 and AX J184738-0156 are both luminous, hard, X-ray emitters with strong Fe XXV emission lines in their X-ray spectra at {approx}6.7 keV. The multi-wavelength properties of AX J163252-4746 and AX J184738-0156 are not consistent with isolated massive stars or accretion onto a compact companion; we conclude that their X-ray emission is most likely generated in a colliding-wind binary (CWB) system. For both AX J144701-5919 and AX J144547-5931, the X-ray emission is an order of magnitude less luminous and with a softer spectrum. These properties are consistent with a CWB interpretation for these two sources also, but other mechanisms for the generation of X-rays cannot be excluded. There are many other as yet unidentified X-ray sources in the Galactic plane, with X-ray properties similar to those seen for AX J163252-4746, AX J184738-0156, AX J144701-5919, and AX J144547-5931. This may indicate a substantial population of X-ray-emitting massive stars and CWBs in the Milky Way.

  17. Galactic bulge X-ray burst sources from disrupted globular clusters?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Hertz, P.

    1985-01-01

    The origin of the bright galactic bulge X-ray sources, or GX sources, is unclear despite intensive study for the past 15 years. It is suggested that the fact that many (or most) of the GX sources are X-ray burst sources (GXRBS) and are otherwise apparently identical to the luminous X-ray sources found in globular cluster cores implies that they too may have a globular cluster origin. The possibility that the compact X-ray binaries found in globulars are ejected is constrained by observations of CVs in and out of clusters. The GXRBS are instead hypothesized to have been formed by capture processes in globular clusters which have now largely been disrupted by repeated tidal stripping and shocking in the galactic plane. A statistical analysis of the 12 GXRBS which have precise positions from Einstein and/or optical (or radio) observations indicate that it is probably significant that a bright, of less than about 19, G or K star is found within the error circle (3 arcmin radius) in four cases. These may be surviving giants in a disrupted globular cluster core. Implications for globular cluster evolution and the GXRBS themselves are discussed.

  18. Probing the Galactic center with X-ray polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, F.; Karas, V.; Kunneriath, D.; Muleri, F.; Soffitta, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Galactic center (GC) holds the closest-to-Earth supermassive black hole (SMBH), which makes it the best laboratory to study the close environment of extremely massive compact objects. Polarimetry is sensitive to geometry of the source, which makes it a particularly suitable technique to probe the medium surrounding the GC SMBH. The detection of hard X-ray spectra and prominent iron Kα fluorescence features coincident with localized gas clouds (e.g. Sgr B2, Sgr C) is known for nearly twenty years now and is commonly associated with a past outburst of the SMBH whose radiation is reprocessing onto the so-called ``reflection nebulae''. Since scattering leads to polarization, the re-emitted signal from the giant molecular clouds in the first 100 pc of the GC is expected to be polarized. X-ray polarization measurement is thus particularly adapted to probe the origin of the diffuse X-ray emission from the GC reflection nebulae and reveal the past activity of the central SMBH. In this research note, we summarize the results from past and current polarimetric simulations in order to show how a future X-ray polarimeter equipped with imaging detectors could improve our understanding of high-energy astrophysics.

  19. Observations of galactic X-ray sources by OSO-7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markert, T. H.; Canizares, C. R.; Clark, G. W.; Hearn, D. R.; Li, F. K.; Sprott, G. F.; Winkler, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    We present the MIT data from the OSO-7 satellite for observations of the galactic plane between 1971 and 1974. A number of sources discovered in the MIT all-sky survey are described in detail: MX 0049 + 59, MX 0836 - 42, MX 1353 - 64, MX 1406 - 61, MX 1418 - 61, MX 1709 - 40, and MX 1608 - 52 (the persistent source suggested to be associated with the X-ray burst source XB 1608 - 52). Upper limits to the X-ray emission from a number of interesting objects are also derived. General results describing all of our observations of galactic sources are presented. Specifically, we display the number-intensity diagrams, luminosity functions, and color-color diagrams for all of the sources we detected. The data are divided between disk and bulge populations, and the characteristics of the two groups are contrasted. Finally, the concept of X-ray source populations and the relationship of globular cluster sources and burst sources to the disk and bulge populations are discussed.

  20. X-ray spectroscopic and timing studies of galactic black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jon Matthew

    In rare cases, optical observations of Galactic binary star systems which are bright in the X-ray portion of the electromagnetic spectrum dynamically constrain the mass of one component to be well above theoretical limits for a neutron star. These systems—and systems with similar X-ray properties—are classified as black hole binaries. In this thesis, I report on observations of black hole binaries made with satellite observatories in the X-ray band. The region closest to the black hole is revealed in X-rays due to the viscous heating of matter that is accreted from the companion star. X-ray observations of these systems may therefore reveal General Relativistic effects. A fundamental and testable prediction of General Relativity is that matter may orbit more closely around black holes with significant angular momentum. I have investigated the possibility of black hole “spin” and the geometry of accretion flows in these systems using X-ray continuum spectroscopy, fast variability studies, and the shape of iron fluorescent emission lines in this band. I present evidence for black hole spin in XTE J1550-564, XTE J1650- 500, and XTE J1748-248. Spin is not required by high- resolution spectral analysis of the archetypical Galactic black hole—Cygnus X-1—but a thermal accretion disk plus hot corona geometry is confirmed. Studies of XTE J1118+480 and GRS 1758-258 at low X-ray luminosity reveal that models for radiatively-inefficient accretion do not satisfactorily describe the geometry in these systems. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)/

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF GALACTIC BULGE SURVEY X-RAY SOURCES WITH TYCHO-2 STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, Robert I.; Britt, C. T.; Wright, N. J.; Jonker, P. G.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M. A. P.; Maccarone, T. J.; Greiss, S.; Nelemans, G.

    2012-12-20

    We identify 69 X-ray sources discovered by the Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) that are coincident with or very close to bright stars in the Tycho-2 catalog. Additionally, two other GBS sources are resolved binary companions to Tycho-2 stars where both components are separately detected in X-rays. Most of these are likely to be real matches, but we identify nine objects with large and significant X-ray-to-optical offsets as either detections of resolved binary companions or chance alignments. We collate known spectral types for these objects, and also examine Two Micron All Sky Survey colors, variability information from the All-Sky Automated Survey, and X-ray hardness ratios for the brightest objects. Nearly a third of the stars are found to be optically variable, divided roughly evenly between irregular variations and periodic modulations. All fall among the softest objects identified by the GBS. The sample forms a very mixed selection, ranging in spectral class from O9 to M3. In some cases, the X-ray emission appears consistent with normal coronal emission from late-type stars, or wind emission from early-types, but the sample also includes one known Algol, one W UMa system, two Be stars, and several X-ray bright objects likely to be coronally active stars or binaries. Surprisingly, a substantial fraction of the spectroscopically classified, non-coincidental sample (12 out of 38 objects) have late B or A type counterparts. Many of these exhibit redder near-IR colors than expected for their spectral type and/or variability, and it is likely that the X-rays originate from a late-type companion star in most or all of these objects.

  2. The X-ray nova GRS 1739-278 near the Galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borozdin, K. N.; Revnivtsev, M. G.; Trudolyubov, S. P.; Aleksandrovich, N. L.; Sunyaev, R. A.; Skinner, G. K.

    1998-07-01

    The soft X-ray nova GRS 1739-278 flared up in 1996 near the Galactic center. We present the observations of this interesting source, a black-hole candidate, with the instruments on board the Mir-Kvant module and the RXTE satellite. The TTM data allow the spectrum of the X-ray nova to be studied during the rise in its brightness. The source's spectrum in this period is satisfactorily described by a power law with a gradually increasing index. The RXTE spectra after the source passed its maximum brightness have the appearance that is typical of the high and very high states of black-hole candidates; they are described by a two-component model. The broad-band spectra of the source are discussed in terms of the processes that proceed near an accreting black hole in a binary system.

  3. X-ray Observations of the Bright Old Nova V603 Aquilae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, K.; Orio, M.

    2004-01-01

    We report on our Chandra and RXTE observations of the bright old nova, V603 Aql, performed in 2001 April, supplemented by our analysis of archival X-ray data on this object. We find that the RXTE data are contaminated by the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission. After accounting for this effect, we find a high level of aperiodic variability in the RXTE data, at a level consistent with the uncontaminated Chandra data. The Chandra HETG spectrum clearly originates in a multi-temperature plasma. We constrain the possible emission measure distribution of the plasma through a combination of global and local fits. The X-ray luminosity and the spectral shape of V603 Aql resemble those of SS Cyg in transition between quiescence and outburst. The fact that the X-ray flux variability is only weakly energy dependent can be interpreted by supposing that the variability is due to changes in the maximum temperature of the plasma. The plasma density is likely to be high, and the emission region is likely to be compact. Finally, the apparent overabundance of Ne is consistent with V603 Aql being a young system.

  4. Radio and X-ray Observations of the Galactic Supernova Remnant G156.2+5.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannuti, Thomas; Allen, G. E.; Fite, N. D.; Grimes, C. K.; Goff, E. J.; Murray, T. M.

    2010-01-01

    We present a broadband X-ray spectral study of the northwestern rim of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G156.2+5.7 (RX J04591+5147). This SNR belongs to the class of sources which feature a significant non-thermal component to their observed X-ray emission. Recent X-ray observations of G156.2+5.7 have established that the non-thermal X-ray emission is broadly localized to the northwestern region of the SNR (where a radio bright rim is observed) but a true understanding of the physical process responsible for this emission has remained elusive. To investigate a possible synchrotron origin for this emission, we are analyzing archival X-ray observations made of this northwestern rim with XMM-Newton and RXTE as well as radio observation made with the 21-Meter Morehead State University Radio Telescope and Space Tracking Antenna. Initial results will be presented and discussed.

  5. Einstein observations of extended galactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, F. D.

    1979-01-01

    Features of the X-ray pictures taken aboard the space observatory are presented. Imaging proportional counter pictures in three broad X-ray energy ranges were obtained. The X-ray spectrum of supernova remnants is described.

  6. High Brightness, Laser-Driven X-ray Source for Nanoscale Metrology and Femtosecond Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Siders, C W; Crane, J K; Semenov, V; Betts, S; Kozioziemski, B; Wharton, K; Wilks, S; Barbee, T; Stuart, B; Kim, D E; An, J; Barty, C

    2007-02-26

    This project developed and demonstrated a new, bright, ultrafast x-ray source based upon laser-driven K-alpha generation, which can produce an x-ray flux 10 to 100 times greater than current microfocus x-ray tubes. The short-pulse (sub-picosecond) duration of this x-ray source also makes it ideal for observing time-resolved dynamics of atomic motion in solids and thin films.

  7. The Einstein objective grating spectrometer survey of galactic binary X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrtilek, S. D.; Mcclintock, J. E.; Seward, F. D.; Kahn, S. M.; Wargelin, B. J.

    1991-01-01

    The results of observations of 22 bright Galactic X-ray point sources are presented, and the most reliable measurements to date of X-ray column densities to these sources are derived. The results are consistent with the idea that some of the objects have a component of column density intrinsic to the source in addition to an interstellar component. The K-edge absorption due to oxygen is clearly detected in 10 of the sources and the Fe L and Ne K edges are detected in a few. The spectra probably reflect emission originating in a collisionally excited region combined with emission from a photoionized region excited directly by the central source.

  8. GSFC Contributions to the NATO X-ray Astronomy Institute, Erice, July 1979. [X-ray spectra of supernova remants, galactic X-ray sources, active galactic nuclei, and clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of X-ray astronomical spectroscopy in general is presented and results obtained by HEAO 1 and 2 as well as earlier spacecraft are examined. Particular emphasis is given to the spectra of supernova remnants; galactic binary X-ray sources, cataclysmic variables, bulges, pulsars, and stars; the active nuclei of Seyfert 1 galaxy, BL Lac, and quasars; the diffuse X-ray background; and galactic clusters.

  9. X-ray emission from the galactic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleach, R. D.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Schwartz, D. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    A search was made of a diffuse component of X-rays 1.5 keV associated with an interarm region of the galaxy at galactic longitudes in the vicinity of 60 deg. A statistically significant excess associated with a narrow disk component was detected. The angular extent of this component has a most probable value of 2 deg and may be as large as 7 deg at 90% confidence. The best fit spectrum yields an intensity of 2.9 photons 1/(cm2-sec-ster) over the 2 to 10 keV range. The 3 sigma upper limit to any emission (e.g. iron line) in a 1.5 keV band centered at 7 keV from galactic latitudes h or = 3.5 deg is .3 photons 1/(cm2-sec-ster). Several possible emission models are discussed, with the most likely candidate being a population of unresolvable low luminosity discrete sources.

  10. Near-infrared spectroscopy of faint discrete X-ray point sources constituting the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morihana, Kumiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Dubath, Pierre; Yoshida, Tessei; Suzuki, Kensuke; Ebisawa, Ken

    2016-08-01

    The Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) is an apparently extended X-ray emission along the Galactic plane. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by a hard continuum with a strong Fe K emission feature in the 6-7 keV band. A substantial fraction (˜80%) of the GRXE in the Fe band was resolved into point sources by deep Chandra imaging observations; thus GRXE is mostly composed of dim Galactic X-ray point sources, at least in this energy band. To investigate the populations of these dim X-ray point sources, we carried out near-infrared (NIR) follow-up spectroscopic observations in two deep Chandra fields located in the Galactic plane at (l, b) = (0.1°, -1.4°) and (28.5°, 0.0°) using NTT/SofI and Subaru/MOIRCS. We obtained well-exposed NIR spectra from 65 objects and found that there are three main classes of Galactic sources based on the X-ray color and NIR spectral features: those having (A) hard X-ray spectra and NIR emission features such as H I (Brγ), He I, and He II (2 objects), (B) soft X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (46 objects), and (C) hard X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (17 objects). From these features, we argue that class A sources are cataclysmic variables (CVs), and class B sources are late-type stars with enhanced coronal activity, which is in agreement with current knowledge. Class C sources possibly belong to a new group of objects, which has been poorly studied so far. We argue that the candidate sources for class C are the binary systems hosting white dwarfs and late-type companions with very low accretion rates. It is likely that this newly recognized class of sources contribute to a non-negligible fraction of the GRXE, especially in the Fe K band.

  11. Detecting edges in the X-ray surface brightness of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, J. S.; Fabian, A. C.; Russell, H. R.; Walker, S. A.; Blundell, K. M.

    2016-08-01

    The effects of many physical processes in the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters imprint themselves in X-ray surface brightness images. It is therefore important to choose optimal methods for extracting information from and enhancing the interpretability of such images. We describe in detail a gradient filtering edge detection method that we previously applied to images of the Centaurus cluster of galaxies. The Gaussian gradient filter measures the gradient in the surface brightness distribution on particular spatial scales. We apply this filter on different scales to Chandra X-ray observatory images of two clusters with active galactic nucleus feedback, the Perseus cluster and M 87, and a merging system, A 3667. By combining filtered images on different scales using radial filters spectacular images of the edges in a cluster are produced. We describe how to assess the significance of features in filtered images. We find the gradient filtering technique to have significant advantages for detecting many kinds of features compared to other analysis techniques, such as unsharp masking. Filtering cluster images in this way in a hard energy band allows shocks to be detected.

  12. High-Frequency X-Ray Oscillations and X-Ray Spectral Evolution in Galactic Black Hole Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remillard, R. A.; Morgan, E. H.; Muno, M.

    2002-12-01

    There are now 5 Galactic black hole candidates that have exhibited quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) in X-rays in the range of 67 to 300 Hz. The rms amplitudes are near 1 % of the average flux, and in two cases there are significant changes in the QPO frequency. The short timescales and origin in X-rays suggest that these QPOs signify inner accretion disk oscillations rooted in General Relativity, but the particular mechanism is uncertain. For two of these cases, GRO J1655-40 and GRS 1915+105, we trace the conditions under which these QPOs appear in terms of the division of luminosity between the X-ray components due to the accretion disk and the hard X-ray power law. In this context, the fast QPOs are most likely to occur when there is high luminosity in both the disk and the X-ray power-law component. On the other hand, the QPOs are not seen when the X-ray spectrum resembles either a pure disk or a dominant power-law component associated with a radio jet. The results imply a closer kinship for these QPOs than might be concluded from considerations of the gross shape of the X-ray spectrum.

  13. Effects of Galactic absorption on soft X-ray surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamorani, G.; Gioia, I. M.; Maccacaro, T.; Wolter, A.

    1988-01-01

    A bias in the spectral distribution of X-ray sources detected in X-ray surveys is discussed which is due to the combination of the intrinsic characteristics of X-ray telescopes and the effects of low-energy photoelectric absorption within the Galaxy. A statistical method for obtaining information on the average spectrum of X-ray sources detected in well-defined surveys is presented. This method can be applied to surveys performed with X-ray telescopes working at relatively soft X-ray energies, such as Einstein, Exosat, and Rosat.

  14. The Integrated X-Ray Spectrum of Galactic Populations of Luminous Supersoft X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiStefano, R.; Becker, C. M.; Fabbiano, G.

    1996-01-01

    We compute the composite X-ray spectrum of a population of unresolved SSS's in a spiral galaxy such as our own or M31. The sources are meant to represent the total underlying population corresponding to all sources which have bolometric luminosities in the range of 10(exp 37) - 10(exp 38) ergs/s and kT on the order of tens of eV. These include close-binary supersoft sources, symbiotic novae, and planetary nebulae, for example. In order to determine whether the associated X-ray signal would be detectable, we also 'seed' the galaxy with other types of X-ray sources, specifically low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB's) and high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXB's). We find that the total spectrum due to SSS's, LMXB's, and HMXB's exhibits a soft peak which owes its presence to the SSS population. Preliminary indications are that this soft peak may be observable.

  15. The Active Galactic Nuclei Population through the eyes of X-ray surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civano, Francesca M.

    2015-08-01

    For more than 30 years, X-ray surveys have provided a unique and powerful tool to find and study accreting super- massive black holes (SMBHs) in the distant Universe. In the past decade alone, dozens of surveys in the 0.5-10 keV band with XMM-Newton and Chandra have covered a wide range in area and X-ray flux, corresponding to a similarly wide range in luminosity and redshift. The luminosity function of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) has thus been sampled over three decades or more in X-ray luminosity and up to redshifts z=5, defining the evolution of unobscured and obscured (up to column densities of 1023 cm-2) sources and reaching fainter luminosities than optical surveys. The advent of the NuSTAR telescope, with its 3-20 keV energy range, allows us to now complement the "soft" surveys, providing the ability to characterize the whole population, including highly obscured sources.Moreover, the availability of extremely deep multiwavelength data (from radio to UV) for most of the X-ray surveys allows a full understanding of the relationship between the nuclear engine and its host up to very high redshift, not only when the engine is obscured but also when it is bright and shining.In this talk, I will present the XMM-Newton, Chandra and NuSTAR surveys in the 2deg2 of the COSMOS field, focusing on new results from the 4.6 Ms Chandra COSMOS Legacy survey. This new sample includes more than 4000 X-ray detected sources with multiwavelength information, including photometric redshifts for 97% of the sample, and a spectroscopic completeness of 40%. I will present the properties of the detected Chandra sources, in particular those at high redshift, and I will highlight the connection to the NuSTAR detected ones, including the discovery of a new Compton Thick AGN.

  16. The X-ray surface brightness of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. L.; Long, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    The first X-ray images of Kepler's supernova remnant (SN Ophiuchi 1604) are presented, and consequences for SNR models are discussed. Observations made with the Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter and High Resolution Imager show the remnant to be circular, with a strong shell brighter in the north than in the south. A flux of 1.2 x 10 to the -10th ergs/sq cm per sec was measured in the 0.15-4.5 keV region, which corresponds to an X-ray luminosity of 1.0 x 10 to the 36th ergs/sec at a distance of 5 kpc and an interstellar medium density of 2.8 x 10 to the 21st/sq cm. The X-ray observations do not allow the determination of whether the SNR is in the adiabatic or free expansion phase, but in either case it is shown that the mean ISM density must be greater than about 0.1/cu cm. In addition, the density of the X-ray emitting gas must be high, and its electron temperature must be fairly low. The high ISM densities derived for Kepler's SNR and other SNRs thus suggest an atypical ISM, possibly influenced by mass lost from the pre-supernova star.

  17. THE X-RAY SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF GALACTIC BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES TOWARD QUIESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, Richard M.; Gallo, Elena; Jonker, Peter G.

    2013-08-10

    Most transient black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs) spend the bulk of their time in a quiescent state, where they accrete matter from their companion star at highly sub-Eddington luminosities (we define quiescence here as a normalized Eddington ratio l{sub x} = L{sub 0.5-10{sub keV}}/L{sub Edd} < 10{sup -5}). Here, we present Chandra X-ray imaging spectroscopy for three BHXB systems (H 1743-322, MAXI J1659-152, and XTE J1752-223) as they fade into quiescence following an outburst. Multiple X-ray observations were taken within one month of each other, allowing us to track each individual system's X-ray spectral evolution during its decay. We compare these three systems to other BHXB systems. We confirm that quiescent BHXBs have softer X-ray spectra than low-hard-state BHXBs, and that quiescent BHXB spectral properties show no dependence on the binary system's orbital parameters. However, the observed anti-correlation between X-ray photon index ({Gamma}) and l{sub x} in the low-hard state does not continue once a BHXB enters quiescence. Instead, {Gamma} plateaus to an average ({Gamma}) = 2.08 {+-} 0.07 by the time l{sub x} reaches {approx}10{sup -5}. l{sub x} {approx} 10{sup -5} is thus an observationally motivated upper limit for the beginning of the quiescent spectral state. Our results are discussed in the context of different accretion flow models and across the black hole mass scale.

  18. Coordinated observations of X-ray bright BL lacertae objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous multifrequency observations of the BL Lac object Mkn421 covering radio through X-ray wavelengths were performed. Composite multifrequency spectra of the central nonthermal component were obtained at the two epochs after subtracting the optical and infrared light of the underlying galaxy. Physical parameters of Mkn421 are discussed in terms of the synchrotron self-Compton model. Taking the spectral turnover between infrared and radio for synchrotrom self absorption, the radio emmision originates in a more extended region than the infrared to X-ray emission, the source size of which should be less than .01 milliarcseconds. Relativistic beaming is required if the angular size is smaller than a few times .001 milliarcseconds. A possible explanation of the spectral change during the two epochs is also discussed.

  19. X-Ray Outbursts of ESO 243-49 HLX-1: Comparison with Galactic Low-mass X-Ray Binary Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhen; Zhang, Wenda; Soria, Roberto; Altamirano, Diego; Yu, Wenfei

    2015-09-01

    We studied the outburst properties of the hyper-luminous X-ray source ESO 243-49 HLX-1, using the full set of Swift monitoring observations. We quantified the increase in the waiting time, recurrence time, and e-folding rise timescale along the outburst sequence, and the corresponding decrease in outburst duration, total radiated energy, and e-folding decay timescale, which confirms previous findings. HLX-1 spends less and less time in outburst and more and more time in quiescence, but its peak luminosity remains approximately constant. We compared the HLX-1 outburst properties with those of bright Galactic low-mass X-ray binary transients (LMXBTs). Our spectral analysis strengthens the similarity between state transitions in HLX-1 and those in Galactic LMXBTs. We also found that HLX-1 follows the nearly linear correlations between the hard-to-soft state transition luminosity and the peak luminosity, and between the rate of change of X-ray luminosity during the rise phase and the peak luminosity, which indicates that the occurrence of the hard-to-soft state transition of HLX-1 is similar to those of Galactic LMXBTs during outbursts. We found that HLX-1 does not follow the correlations between total radiated energy and peak luminosity, and between total radiated energy and e-folding rise/decay timescales we had previously identified in Galactic LMXBTs. HLX-1 would follow those correlations if the distance were several hundreds of kiloparsecs. However, invoking a much closer distance for HLX-1 is not a viable solution to this problem, as it introduces other, more serious inconsistencies with the observations.

  20. Dominance of magnetic cataclysmic variables in the resolved Galactic ridge X-ray emission of the limiting window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, JaeSub

    2012-12-01

    The diffuse appearance of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission has been puzzling since its discovery due to the lack of compelling theories for sustainable hot diffuse X-ray emission in the Galactic plane. Recently, Revnivtsev et al. claimed that ˜90 per cent of the 6.5-7.1 keV X-ray flux from a small section of a low-extinction region at 1°.4 south of the Galactic Centre has been resolved to discrete sources with LX, 2-10 keV ≳4×10-16 erg s-1 cm-2, using ultradeep (1 Ms) observations made by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. They also concluded that coronally active stars such as active binaries (ABs) contribute ˜60 per cent of the resolved flux. However, our recent discovery of a large population of magnetic cataclysmic variables (MCVs) in the same region suggests their significant role in the resolved hard X-ray flux. In addition, deep X-ray surveys of other several Galactic bulge fields over the past decade have indicated that MCVs are likely the major contributor in the hard X-ray emission above 2-3 keV. To solve this mystery, we have conducted an independent in-depth analysis of discrete X-ray sources in the low-extinction region. The total fraction of the 6.5-7.1 keV flux we can confidently claim as resolved is ˜70-80 per cent, which largely agrees with Revnivtsev et al., but leaves some room for diffuse components. However, despite the various attempts, we consistently find that the resolved hard X-ray flux above 3 keV is dominated by relatively bright, hard X-ray sources such as MCVs, whereas the contribution from relatively faint, soft sources such as ABs is below 20 per cent. We describe in detail our analysis procedure in order to elucidate possible origins of the discrepancy.

  1. THE ORIGIN OF THE HOT GAS IN THE GALACTIC HALO: TESTING GALACTIC FOUNTAIN MODELS' X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, David B.; Shelton, Robin L.; Kwak, Kyujin; Hill, Alex S.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2015-02-20

    We test the X-ray emission predictions of galactic fountain models against XMM-Newton measurements of the emission from the Milky Way's hot halo. These measurements are from 110 sight lines, spanning the full range of Galactic longitudes. We find that a magnetohydrodynamical simulation of a supernova-driven interstellar medium, which features a flow of hot gas from the disk to the halo, reproduces the temperature but significantly underpredicts the 0.5-2.0 keV surface brightness of the halo (by two orders of magnitude, if we compare the median predicted and observed values). This is true for versions of the model with and without an interstellar magnetic field. We consider different reasons for the discrepancy between the model predictions and the observations. We find that taking into account overionization in cooled halo plasma, which could in principle boost the predicted X-ray emission, is unlikely in practice to bring the predictions in line with the observations. We also find that including thermal conduction, which would tend to increase the surface brightnesses of interfaces between hot and cold gas, would not overcome the surface brightness shortfall. However, charge exchange emission from such interfaces, not included in the current model, may be significant. The faintness of the model may also be due to the lack of cosmic ray driving, meaning that the model may underestimate the amount of material transported from the disk to the halo. In addition, an extended hot halo of accreted material may be important, by supplying hot electrons that could boost the emission of the material driven out from the disk. Additional model predictions are needed to test the relative importance of these processes in explaining the observed halo emission.

  2. Spectral Diagnostics of Galactic and Stellar X-Ray Emission from Charge Exchange Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargelin, B.

    2003-01-01

    The proposed research uses the electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to study the X-ray emission from charge-exchange recombination of highly charged ions with neutral gases. The resulting data fill a void in the existing experimental and theoretical data and are needed to explain all or part of the observed X-ray emission from the Galactic Ridge, solar and stellar winds, the Galactic Center, supernova ejecta, and photoionized nebulae.

  3. Short Pulse High Brightness X-ray Production with the PLEIADES Thomson Scattering Source

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Barty, C P J; Betts, S M; Brown, W J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Kuba, J; LaSage, G P; Rosenzweig, J B; Slaughter, D R; Springer, P T; Tremaine, A M

    2003-07-01

    We describe PLEIADES, a compact, tunable, high-brightness, ultra-short pulse, Thomson x-ray source. The peak brightness of the source is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} photons/s/0.1% bandwidth/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}. Initial results are reported and compared to theoretical calculations.

  4. Short-term temporal variations of X-ray bright points. [on sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolte, J. T.; Solodyna, C. V.; Gerassimenko, M.

    1979-01-01

    Skylab S-054 data have been used to examine the flux from X-ray bright points with approximately 90 s time resolution. There is evidence of a steady heating input, similar to one reported for active region loops. Also observed are impulsive brightenings of bright points and rapid decays which are consistent with a sudden turn-off of the steady heating.

  5. The birthplaces of active regions and X-ray bright points. [on sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.; Fritzova-Svestkova, L.; Svestka, Z.

    1979-01-01

    A comparison of soft X-ray pictures of the Sun (S-054 experiment of Skylab) with K-line spectroheliograms (Mount Wilson) shows that the X-ray bright points tend to emerge randomly throughout the Ca network pattern. However, all those bright points that developed into active regions emerged at the boundaries of network cells. This suggests that the magnetic flux of active regions comes from greater depths in the convection zone that the shallow flux that gives rise to the random emergence of bright points.

  6. Star Factory Near Galactic Center Bathed In High-Energy X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-06-01

    Near the crowded core of the Milky Way galaxy, where stars shine so brightly and plentifully that planets there would never experience nighttime, astronomers have found a new phenomenon: a cauldron of 60-million-degree gas enveloping a cluster of young stars. Professor Farhad Zadeh of Northwestern University and his collaborators used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to trace the gas around the Arches cluster, a well-studied region of star formation that is home to some of our Galaxy's largest and youngest stars. "This is the first time we have seen a young cluster of stars surrounded by such a halo of high-energy X-rays," said Zadeh in a press conference at the American Astronomical Society in Pasadena, CA. "This supports theoretical predictions that stellar winds from massive stars can collide with each other and generate very hot gas." Massive stars, newborn stars, and stellar winds have long been known to emit X-rays. The Chandra results are significant because they identify this new type of mechanism of colliding winds to generate X-rays as energetic as those seen in distant starburst galaxies, which are known for their furious pace of star production. The Arches cluster is about 26,000 light years from Earth and only about 1 to 2 million years old. It is also less than 100 light years from what is thought to be a supermassive black hole in the center of our Galaxy. The cluster contains 150 hot, young stars, known as "O" stars, concentrated within a diameter of one light year, making it the most compact cluster known in the Milky Way galaxy. The density of stars makes the region in and around the Arches cluster a microcosm of what is likely occurring in starburst galaxies. "The Arches cluster is one of the best 'local' analogues of starburst galaxies-- the most prodigious stellar nurseries known," said Casey Law of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. "Yet the Arches cluster is in our backyard, not millions of light years away." The Arches Cluster

  7. First results from the high-brightness x-ray spectroscopy beamline at ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, R.C.C.; Ng, W.; Jones, G.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goal of high brightness at the sample for use in the X-ray Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy (XAMS) science, surface and interface science, biology and x-ray optical development programs at ALS. X-ray absorption and time of flight photo emission measurements in 2 - 5 keV photon energy in argon along with the flux, resolution, spot size and stability of the beamline will be discussed. Prospects for future XAMS measurements will also be presented.

  8. Outflowing X-ray corona in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junxian; Liu, Teng; Yang, Huan; Zhu, Feifan; Zhou, Youyuan

    2015-08-01

    Hard X-ray emission in radio-quiet AGNs is believed to be produced via inverse Compton scattering by hot and compact corona near the super massive black hole. However the origin and physical properties of the coronae, including geometry, kinematics and dynamics, yet remain poorly known. Taking [OIV] 25.89um emission line as an isotropic indicator of AGN's intrinsic luminosity, we compare the intrinsic corona X-ray emission between Seyfert 1 and Compton-thin Seyfert 2 galaxies, which are viewed at different inclinations according to the unification scheme. We find that Seyfert 1 galaxies are brighter in "absorption-corrected" 2-10 keV emission by a factor of ~2.8, comparing with Compton-thin Seyfert 2 galaxies. The Seyfert 1 and Compton-thin Seyfert 2 galaxies follow a statistically identical correlation between the absorption-corrected 2-10 keV luminosity and the SWIFT BAT 14-195 keV luminosity, indicating that our absorption correction to the 2-10 keV flux is sufficient. The difference between the two populations thus can not be attributed to X-ray absorption, and instead implies an intrinsic anisotropy in the corona X-ray emission. This striking anisotropy of X-ray emission can be explained by a bipolar outflowing corona with a bulk velocity of ~0.3-0.5c. This would provide a natural link between the so-called coronae and weak jets in these systems. We also show that how this study would affect our understanding to the nature of mid-infrared emission in AGNs and the properties of dusty torus. Furthermore, such anisotropy implies that, contrary to previous understanding based on the assumption of isotropic corona emission, hard X-ray AGN surveys are biased against type 2 AGNs even after absorption-correction, and careful correction for this effect is required to measure the obscured fraction from X-ray surveys. Other interesting consequences of this discovery will also be discussed.

  9. Population synthesis of classical low-mass X-ray binaries in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Haaften, L. M.; Nelemans, G.; Voss, R.; van der Sluys, M. V.; Toonen, S.

    2015-07-01

    Aims: We model the present-day population of classical low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with neutron star accretors, which have hydrogen-rich donor stars. Their population is compared with that of hydrogen-deficient LMXBs, known as ultracompact X-ray binaries (UCXBs). We model the observable LMXB population and compare it to observations. We model the Galactic Bulge because it contains a well-observed population and it is the target of the Galactic Bulge Survey. Methods: We combine the binary population synthesis code SeBa with detailed LMXB evolutionary tracks to model the size and properties of the present-day LMXB population in the Galactic Bulge. Whether sources are persistent or transient, and what their instantaneous X-ray luminosities are, is predicted using the thermal-viscous disk instability model. Results: We find a population of ~2.1 × 103 LMXBs with neutron star accretors. Of these about 15-40 are expected to be persistent (depending on model assumptions), with luminosities higher than 1035 erg s-1. About 7-20 transient sources are expected to be in outburst at any given time. Within a factor of two these numbers are consistent with the observed population of bright LMXBs in the Bulge. This gives credence to our prediction of the existence of a population of ~1.6 × 103 LMXBs with low donor masses that have gone through the period minimum, and have present-day mass transfer rates below 10-11 M⊙ yr-1. Conclusions: Even though the observed population of hydrogen-rich LMXBs in the Bulge is larger than the observed population of (hydrogen-deficient) UCXBs, the latter have a higher formation rate. While UCXBs may dominate the total LMXB population at the present time, the majority would be very faint or may have become detached and produced millisecond radio pulsars. In that case UCXBs would contribute significantly more to the formation of millisecond radio pulsars than hydrogen-rich LMXBs.

  10. Bright Points and Subflares in UV Lines and in X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rovira, M.; Schmieder, B.; Demoulin, P.; Simnett, G. M.; Hagyard, M. J.; Reichmann, E.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1998-01-01

    We have analysed an active region which was observed in Halpha (MSDP), UV lines (SMM/UVSP), and in X rays (SMM/HXIS). In this active region there were only a few subflares and many small bright points visible in UV and in X rays. Using an extrapolation based on the Fourier transform we have computed magnetic field lines connecting different photospheric magnetic polarities from ground-based magnetograms. Along the magnetic inversion lines we find 2 different zones: 1. a high shear region (less than 70 degrees) where subflares occur 2. a low shear region along the magnetic inversion line where UV bright points are observed.

  11. The Peculiar Galactic Center Neutron Star X-Ray Binary XMM J174457-2850.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degenaar, N.; Wijnands, R.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Altamirano, D.; Kennea, J.; Gehrels, N.; Haggard, D.; Ponti, G.

    2014-01-01

    The recent discovery of a milli-second radio pulsar experiencing an accretion outburst similar to those seen in low mass X-ray binaries, has opened up a new opportunity to investigate the evolutionary link between these two different neutron star manifestations. The remarkable X-ray variability and hard X-ray spectrum of this object can potentially serve as a template to search for other X-ray binary radio pulsar transitional objects. Here we demonstrate that the transient X-ray source XMM J174457-2850.3 near the Galactic center displays similar X-ray properties. We report on the detection of an energetic thermonuclear burst with an estimated duration of 2 hr and a radiated energy output of 5E40 erg, which unambiguously demonstrates that the source harbors an accreting neutron star. It has a quiescent X-ray luminosity of Lx5E32 ergs and exhibits occasional accretion outbursts during which it brightens to Lx1E35-1E36 ergs for a few weeks (2-10 keV). However, the source often lingers in between outburst and quiescence at Lx1E33-1E34 ergs. This unusual X-ray flux behavior and its relatively hard X-ray spectrum, a power law with an index of 1.4, could possibly be explained in terms of the interaction between the accretion flow and the magnetic field of the neutron star.

  12. Cosmological evolution of supermassive black holes in galactic centers unveiled by hard X-ray observations.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    We review the current understanding of the cosmological evolution of supermassive black holes in galactic centers elucidated by X-ray surveys of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Hard X-ray observations at energies above 2 keV are the most efficient and complete tools to find "obscured" AGNs, which are dominant populations among all AGNs. Combinations of surveys with various flux limits and survey area have enabled us to determine the space number density and obscuration properties of AGNs as a function of luminosity and redshift. The results have essentially solved the origin of the X-ray background in the energy band below ∼10 keV. The downsizing (or anti-hierarchical) evolution that more luminous AGNs have the space-density peak at higher redshifts has been discovered, challenging theories of galaxy and black hole formation. Finally, we summarize unresolved issues on AGN evolution and prospects for future X-ray missions.

  13. Cosmological evolution of supermassive black holes in galactic centers unveiled by hard X-ray observations

    PubMed Central

    UEDA, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    We review the current understanding of the cosmological evolution of supermassive black holes in galactic centers elucidated by X-ray surveys of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Hard X-ray observations at energies above 2 keV are the most efficient and complete tools to find “obscured” AGNs, which are dominant populations among all AGNs. Combinations of surveys with various flux limits and survey area have enabled us to determine the space number density and obscuration properties of AGNs as a function of luminosity and redshift. The results have essentially solved the origin of the X-ray background in the energy band below ∼10 keV. The downsizing (or anti-hierarchical) evolution that more luminous AGNs have the space-density peak at higher redshifts has been discovered, challenging theories of galaxy and black hole formation. Finally, we summarize unresolved issues on AGN evolution and prospects for future X-ray missions. PMID:25971656

  14. Sigma observations of the low mass X-ray binaries of the galactic bulge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldwurm, A.; Denis, M.; Paul, J.; Faisse, S.; Roques, J. P.; Bouchet, L.; Vedrenne, G.; Mandrou, P.; Sunyaev, R.; Churazov, E.

    1995-01-01

    The soft gamma-ray telescope (35-1300 keV) SIGMA aboard the high energy GRANAT space observatory has been monitoring the Galactic Bulge region for more than 2000 h of effective time since March 1990. In the resulting average 35-75 keV image we detected ten sources at a level of greater than 5 standard deviations, 6 of which can be identified with low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB). Among them, one is the 1993 X-ray nova in Ophiuchus (GRS 1726-249), one is an X-ray pulsar (GX 1+4), two are associated with X-ray bursters (GX 354-0 and A 1742-294) and two with bursting X-ray binaries in the globular clusters Terzan 2 and Terzan 1. Their spectral and long term variability behavior as measured by SIGMMA are presented and discussed.

  15. Spectral Diagnostics of Galactic and Stellar X-Ray Emission from Charge Exchange Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargelin, B.

    2002-01-01

    The proposed research uses the electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study X-ray emission from charge-exchange recombination of highly charged ions with neutral gases. The resulting data fill a void in existing experimental and theoretical understanding of this atomic physics process, and are needed to explain all or part of the observed X-ray emission from the soft X-ray background, stellar winds, the Galactic Center, supernova ejecta, and photoionized nebulae. Progress made during the first year of the grant is described, as is work planned for the second year.

  16. Identification of Hard X-ray Sources in Galactic Globular Clusters: Simbol-X Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servillat, M.

    2009-05-01

    Globular clusters harbour an excess of X-ray sources compared to the number of X-ray sources in the Galactic plane. It has been proposed that many of these X-ray sources are cataclysmic variables that have an intermediate magnetic field, i.e. intermediate polars, which remains to be confirmed and understood. We present here several methods to identify intermediate polars in globular clusters from multiwavelength analysis. First, we report on XMM-Newton, Chandra and HST observations of the very dense Galactic globular cluster NGC 2808. By comparing UV and X-ray properties of the cataclysmic variable candidates, the fraction of intermediate polars in this cluster can be estimated. We also present the optical spectra of two cataclysmic variables in the globular cluster M 22. The HeII (4868 Å) emission line in these spectra could be related to the presence of a magnetic field in these objects. Simulations of Simbol-X observations indicate that the angular resolution is sufficient to study X-ray sources in the core of close, less dense globular clusters, such as M 22. The sensitivity of Simbol-X in an extended energy band up to 80 keV will allow us to discriminate between hard X-ray sources (such as magnetic cataclysmic variables) and soft X-ray sources (such as chromospherically active binaries).

  17. High-brightness beamline for x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, R.C.C.; Jones, G.; Lindle, D.W.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goals of high energy resolution, high flux, and high brightness at the sample. When completed later this year, it will be the first ALS monochromatic hard x-ray beamline, and its brightness will be an order of magnitude higher than presently available in this energy range. In addition, it will provide flux and resolution comparable to any other beamline now in operation. To achieve these goals, two technical improvements, relative to existing x-ray beamlines, were incorporated. First, a somewhat novel optical design for x-rays, in which matched toroidal mirrors are positioned before and after the double-crystal monochromator, was adopted. This configuration allows for high resolution by passing a collimated beam through the monochromator, and for high brightness by focusing the ALS source on the sample with unit magnification. Second, a new {open_quotes}Cowan type{close_quotes} double-crystal monochromator based on the design used at NSLS beamline X-24A was developed. The measured mechanical precision of this new monochromator shows significant improvement over existing designs, without using positional feedback available with piezoelectric devices. Such precision is essential because of the high brightness of the radiation and the long distance (12 m) from the source (sample) to the collimating (focusing) mirror. This combination of features will provide a bright, high resolution, and stable x-ray beam for use in the x-ray spectroscopy program at the ALS.

  18. Prospects for X-ray absorption with the super-bright light sources of the future.

    PubMed

    Norman, D

    2001-03-01

    The immense growth in applications of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been enabled by the widespread availability of intense tunable X-rays from synchrotron radiation sources. Recently, new concepts have been proposed for fourth-generation light sources, such as the SASE (self-amplified stimulated emission) X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) being pursued at Hamburg (TESLA) and Stanford (LCLS), and the recirculator ring (MARS) at Novosibirsk. These sources offer expected gains of many orders of magnitude in instantaneous brilliance, which will unlock opportunities for qualitatively different science. Examples of new or greatly expanded techniques in XAS could include Raman X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), pump-probe experiments, time-resolved XAFS and small-spot X-ray spectromicroscopy, although the limited tunability of the sources might not allow conventional XAFS measurements. Multi-photon X-ray absorption could become a new field of study. There should not be a collective stampede to these new sources, however, and it is likely that storage rings will continue to be necessary for most XAFS applications. The extreme brightness of these future light sources will present difficult challenges in instrumentation, especially detectors and sample containment. Practitioners will also have to exercise caution, because the intensity of the beam will surely destroy many samples and in some cases there will be so many photons absorbed per atom that XAFS will be impossible.

  19. LoCuSS: A DYNAMICAL ANALYSIS OF X-RAY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN LOCAL CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, C. P.; Pereira, M. J.; Egami, E.; Sanderson, A. J. R.; Smith, G. P.; Babul, A.; Edge, A. C.; Finoguenov, A.; Moran, S. M.; Okabe, N.

    2012-08-01

    We present a study of the distribution of X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in a representative sample of 26 massive clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.30, combining Chandra observations sensitive to X-ray point sources of luminosity L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} at the cluster redshift with extensive and highly complete spectroscopy of cluster members down to {approx}M*{sub K} + 2. In total we identify 48 X-ray AGNs among the cluster members, with luminosities 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41}-1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. Based on these identifications, we estimate that 0.73% {+-} 0.14% of cluster galaxies brighter than M{sub K} = -23.1 (M*{sub K} + 1.5) host an X-ray AGN with L{sub X} > 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. In the stacked caustic diagram that shows (v{sub los} - (v))/{sigma}{sub v} versus r{sub proj}/r{sub 500}, the X-ray AGN appear to preferentially lie along the caustics, suggestive of an infalling population. They also appear to avoid the region with lowest cluster-centric radii and relative velocities (r{sub proj} < 0.4r{sub 500}; |v - (v)|/{sigma}{sub v} < 0.8), which is dominated by the virialized population of galaxies accreted earliest into the clusters. The line-of-sight velocity histogram of the X-ray AGN shows a relatively flat distribution, and is inconsistent with the Gaussian distribution expected for a virialized population at 98.9% confidence. Moreover, the velocity dispersion of the 48 X-ray AGNs is 1.51 times that of the overall cluster population, which is consistent with the {radical}2 ratio expected by simple energetic arguments when comparing infalling versus virialized populations. This kinematic segregation is significant at the 4.66{sigma} level. When splitting the X-ray AGN sample into two according to X-ray or infrared (IR) luminosity, both X-ray bright (L{sub X} > 10{sup 42}) and IR-bright (L{sub TIR} > 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} L{sub Sun }) subsamples show higher velocity dispersions than their X-ray

  20. Soft X-Ray Observations of the Galactic Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Robin; Kuntz, K. D.

    2003-01-01

    In this project, my co-I (K.D. Kuntz) and I plan to extract the soft X-ray spectrum emitted by the hot gas along a high latitude line of sight. We plan to subtract off the local component (garnered from other observations) in order to isolate the halo component. We then plan to combine this spectral information with the ultraviolet resonance line emission produced by slightly cooler gas along the line of sight and use the two observations as a constraint on models. My co-I, K.D., Kuntz has been working on the determination of the instrumental background. I have not yet drawn any of the funds for this project. I have just moved from J h s Hopkins University to the University of Georgia and anticipate finishing the project while at the University of Georgia.

  1. X-ray and infrared diagnostics of nearby active galactic nuclei with MAXI and AKARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Naoki; Kawamuro, Taiki; Oyabu, Shinki; Nakagawa, Takao; Baba, Shunsuke; Yano, Kenichi; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Toba, Yoshiki

    2016-12-01

    Nearby active galactic nuclei were diagnosed in the X-ray and mid-to-far infrared wavelengths with Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) and the Japanese infrared observatory AKARI, respectively. One hundred of the X-ray sources listed in the second release of the MAXI all-sky X-ray source catalog are currently identified as non-blazar-type active galactic nuclei. These include 95 Seyfert galaxies and 5 quasars, and they are composed of 73 type-1 and 27 type-2 objects. The AKARI all-sky survey point source catalog was searched for their mid- and far-infrared counterparts at 9, 18, and 90 μm. As a result, 69 Seyfert galaxies in the MAXI catalog (48 type-1 and 21 type-2) were found to be detected with AKARI. The X-ray (3-4 keV and 4-10 keV) and infrared luminosities of these objects were investigated, together with their color information. Adopting the canonical photon index, Γ = 1.9, of the intrinsic X-ray spectrum of the Seyfert galaxies, the X-ray hardness ratio between the 3-4 and 4-10 keV ranges derived with MAXI was roughly converted into the absorption column density. After the X-ray luminosity was corrected for absorption from the estimated column density, the well-known X-ray-to-infrared luminosity correlation was confirmed, at least in the Compton-thin regime. In contrast, NGC 1365, the only Compton-thick object in the MAXI catalog, was found to deviate from the correlation toward a significantly lower X-ray luminosity by nearly an order of magnitude. It was verified that the relation between the X-ray hardness below 10 keV and X-ray-to-infrared color acts as an effective tool to pick up Compton-thick objects. The difference in the infrared colors between the type-1 and type-2 Seyfert galaxies and its physical implication on the classification and unification of active galactic nuclei are briefly discussed.

  2. GALACTIC ULTRACOMPACT X-RAY BINARIES: DISK STABILITY AND EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Heinke, C. O.; Ivanova, N.; Engel, M. C.; Pavlovskii, K.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Gladstone, J. C.; Cartwright, T. F.

    2013-05-10

    We study the mass-transfer rates and disk stability conditions of ultracompact X-ray binaries (UCXBs) using empirical time-averaged X-ray luminosities from Paper I and compiled information from the literature. The majority of UCXBs are consistent with evolutionary tracks for white dwarf donors. Three UCXBs with orbital periods longer than 40 minutes have mass-transfer rates above 10{sup -10} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, inconsistent with white dwarf donor tracks. We show that if helium star donors can retain their initial high entropy, they can explain the observed mass-transfer rates of these UCXBs. Several UCXBs show persistent luminosities apparently below the disk instability limit for irradiated He accretion disks. We point out that a predominantly C and/or O disk (as observed in the optical spectra of several) lowers the disk instability limit, explaining this disagreement. The orbital period and low time-averaged mass-transfer rate of 2S 0918-549 provide evidence that the donor star is a low-entropy C/O white dwarf, consistent with optical spectra. We combine existing information to constrain the masses of the donors in 4U 1916-053 (0.064 {+-} 0.010 M{sub Sun }) and 4U 1626-67 (<0.036 M{sub Sun} for a 1.4 M{sub Sun} neutron star). We show that 4U 1626-67 is indeed persistent, and not undergoing a transient outburst, leaving He star models as the best explanation for the donor.

  3. PLEIADES: High Peak Brightness, Subpicosecond Thomson Hard-X-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Kuba, J; Anderson, S G; Barty, C J; Betts, S M; Booth, R; Brown, W J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Harteman, F V; Le Sage, G P; Rosenzweig, J B; Tremaine, A M; Springer, P T

    2003-12-15

    The Picosecond Laser-Electron Inter-Action for the Dynamic Evaluation of Structures (PLEIADES) facility, is a unique, novel, tunable (10-200 keV), ultrafast (ps-fs), hard x-ray source that greatly extends the parameter range reached by existing 3rd generation sources, both in terms of x-ray energy range, pulse duration, and peak brightness at high energies. First light was observed at 70 keV early in 2003, and the experimental data agrees with 3D codes developed at LLNL. The x-rays are generated by the interaction of a 50 fs Fourier-transform-limited laser pulse produced by the TW-class FALCON CPA laser and a highly focused, relativistic (20-100 MeV), high brightness (1 nC, 0.3-5 ps, 5 mm.mrad, 0.2% energy spread) photo-electron bunch. The resulting x-ray brightness is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} ph/mm{sup 2}/s/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% BW. The beam is well-collimated (10 mrad divergence over the full spectrum, 1 mrad for a single color), and the source is a unique tool for time-resolved dynamic measurements in matter, including high-Z materials.

  4. A COMPARISON OF X-RAY AND MID-INFRARED SELECTION OF OBSCURED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Eckart, Megan E.; Harrison, Fiona A.; McGreer, Ian D.; Helfand, David J.; Stern, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We compare the relative merits of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selection at X-ray and mid-infrared wavelengths using data from moderately deep fields observed by both Chandra and Spitzer. The X-ray-selected AGN sample and associated photometric and spectroscopic optical follow-up are drawn from a subset of fields studied as part of the Serendipitous Extragalactic X-ray Source Identification (SEXSI) program. Mid-infrared data in these fields are derived from targeted and archival Spitzer imaging, and mid-infrared AGN selection is accomplished primarily through application of the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) color-color AGN 'wedge' selection technique. Nearly all X-ray sources in these fields which exhibit clear spectroscopic signatures of AGN activity have mid-infrared colors consistent with IRAC AGN selection. These are predominantly the most luminous X-ray sources. X-ray sources that lack high-ionization and/or broad lines in their optical spectra are far less likely to be selected as AGNs by mid-infrared color selection techniques. The fraction of X-ray sources identified as AGNs in the mid-infrared increases monotonically as the X-ray luminosity increases. Conversely, only 22% of mid-infrared-selected AGNs are detected at X-ray energies in the moderately deep ((t{sub exp}) approx 100 ks) SEXSI Chandra data. We hypothesize that IRAC sources with AGN colors that lack X-ray detections are predominantly high-luminosity AGNs that are obscured and/or lie at high redshift. A stacking analysis of X-ray-undetected sources shows that objects in the mid-infrared AGN selection wedge have average X-ray fluxes in the 2-8 keV band 3 times higher than sources that fall outside the wedge. Their X-ray spectra are also harder. The hardness ratio of the wedge-selected stack is consistent with moderate intrinsic obscuration, but is not suggestive of a highly obscured, Compton-thick source population. It is evident from this comparative study that in order to create a complete

  5. Chandra X-Ray Observations of the Two Brightest Unidentified High Galactic Latitude Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, C. C.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Sokolovsky, K. V.; Giroletti, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present Chandra ACIS-I X-ray observations of 0FGL J1311.9-3419 and 0FGL J1653.4-0200, the two brightest high Galactic latitude (absolute value (beta) >10 deg) gamma-ray sources from the three-month Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) bright source list that are still unidentified. Both were also detected previously by EGRET, and despite dedicated multi-wavelength follow-up, they are still not associated with established classes of gamma-ray emitters like pulsars or radio-loud active galactic nuclei. X-ray sources found in the ACIS-I fields of view are cataloged, and their basic properties are determined. These are discussed as candidate counterparts to 0FGL J1311.9-3419 and 0FGL J1653.4-0200, with particular emphasis on the brightest of the 9 and 13 Chandra sources detected within the respective Fermi-LAT 95% confidence regions. Further follow-up studies, including optical photometric and spectroscopic observations, are necessary to identify these X-ray candidate counterparts in order to ultimately reveal the nature of these enigmatic gamma-ray objects.

  6. ASCA Observation of an "X-Ray Shadow" in the Galactic Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Sangwook; Ebisawa, Ken

    2001-01-01

    The diffuse X-ray background (DXB) emission near the Galactic plane (l,b approximately 25.6 degrees, 0.78 degrees) has been observed with ASCA (Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics). The observed region is toward a Galactic molecular cloud which was recently reported to cast a deep X-ray shadow in the 0.5 - 2.0 keV band DXB. The selection of this particular region is intended to provide a constraint on the spatial distribution of the DXB emission along the line of sight: i.e., the molecular cloud is optically thick at <2 keV and so the bulk of the observed soft X-rays must originate in the foreground of the cloud, which is at approximately 3 kpc from the Sun. In the 0.8 - 9.0 keV band, the observed spectrum is primarily from multiple components of thermal plasmas. We here report a detection of soft X-ray (0.5 - 2 keV) emission from an approximately 10(exp 7) K thermal plasma. Comparisons with the ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite) data suggest that this soft X-ray emission is absorbed by N(sub H) = 1 - 3 x 10(exp 21) cm(exp -2), which implies a path-length through the soft X-ray emitting regions of approximately less than 1 kpc from the Sun.

  7. Analysis of nearly simultaneous X-ray and optical observations of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, James Raymond

    Rosemary Hill optical and EINSTEIN X-ray observations of a sample of 36 active galactic nuclei (AGN) were reduced and analyzed. Seventy-two X-ray observations of these sources were reduced, nineteen of which yielded spectral information. Of these spectral observations, significant hydrogen column densities above the galactic value were required for nine of the eleven sources which were observed more than once by EINSTEIN. Correlations between the X-ray and optical luminosities were investigated using the Jefferys method of least squares. This method allows for errors in both variables. The results indicate a strong correlation between the X-ray and optical luminosities for the entire sample. Division of the sample into groups with similar optical variability characteristics show that the less violently violent variable AGN are more highly correlated than the violently variable blazars. Infrared and radio observations were combined with the X-ray and optical observations of six AGN. These sources were modelled in terms of the synchrotron-self-Compton model. The turnover frequency falls between the infrared and radio data and reliable estimates of this parameter are difficult to estimate. Therefore the results were found as a function of the turnover frequency. Four sources required relativistic bulk motion or beaming. Multifrequency spectra made at different times for one individual source, 0235+164, required different amounts of beaming to satisfy the X-ray observations. Sizes of the emitting regions for the sources modelled ranged from 0.5 parsec to 1.0 parsec.

  8. Chandra Discovers the X-ray Signature of a Powerful Wind from a Galactic Microquasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-11-01

    profiles have been observed for over one hundred years. "When you see a P Cygni profile, you immediately know the object you are observing is producing a powerful outflow," Brandt says. Chandra is the first X-ray observatory capable of capturing data of sufficiently high resolution to reveal an X-ray P Cygni profile. Brandt and Schulz say their discovery occurred because they were able to use Chandra continuously for one-third of a day to observe Circinus X-1, plus its signal in X rays is generally very bright, partly because it is relatively nearby in our own Galaxy. P Cygni lines at ultraviolet or optical wavelengths had not been previously seen from Circinus X-1 because a large amount of dust in the galactic plane lies between Earth and this system and this dust is an efficient absorber of ultraviolet and optical light. However, the energetic X rays created by Circinus X-1 could easily penetrate through the obscuring dust and gas--similar to the way medical X-rays on Earth can penetrate through people's bodies. "We were hoping to detect some kind of X-ray line emission from the accreting neutron star in Circinus X-1, but it caught us totally by surprise to observe a complex emission structure like a P Cygni profile in high-energy X rays." schulz says. "This detection clearly marks a new area in X-ray astrophysics, where we will be able to study dynamical structures in the universe like we currently do at ultraviolet or optical wavelengths." Brandt and Schulz used two of Chandra's instruments, known together as the High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS), to detect the X rays and produce a high-resolution X-ray spectrum of Circinus X-1. This spectrum is analogous to the rainbow we can see at optical wavelengths. "Chandra's X-ray spectrum is 50 times more detailed than previous X-ray observatories could obtain," Schulz says. First, the super-fine transmission gratings acted like a prism to separate the X-rays into discrete energy bands. Then, the Advanced

  9. The X-ray luminosity function of active galactic nuclei in the redshift interval z=3-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakis, A.; Aird, J.; Buchner, J.; Salvato, M.; Menzel, M.-L.; Brandt, W. N.; McGreer, I. D.; Dwelly, T.; Mountrichas, G.; Koki, C.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Hsu, L.-T.; Merloni, A.; Liu, Z.; Nandra, K.; Ross, N. P.

    2015-10-01

    We combine deep X-ray survey data from the Chandra observatory and the wide-area/shallow XMM-XXL field to estimate the active galactic nuclei (AGN) X-ray luminosity function in the redshift range z = 3-5. The sample consists of nearly 340 sources with either photometric (212) or spectroscopic (128) redshift in the above range. The combination of deep and shallow survey fields also provides a luminosity baseline of three orders of magnitude, LX(2-10 keV) ≈ 1043-1046 erg s- 1 at z > 3. We follow a Bayesian approach to determine the binned AGN space density and explore their evolution in a model-independent way. Our methodology properly accounts for Poisson errors in the determination of X-ray fluxes and uncertainties in photometric redshift estimates. We demonstrate that the latter is essential for unbiased measurement of space densities. We find that the AGN X-ray luminosity function evolves strongly between the redshift intervals z = 3-4 and z = 4-5. There is also suggestive evidence that the amplitude of this evolution is luminosity dependent. The space density of AGN with LX(2-10 keV) < 1045 erg s- 1 drops by a factor of 5 between the redshift intervals above, while the evolution of brighter AGN appears to be milder. Comparison of our X-ray luminosity function with that of ultraviolet (UV)/optical selected quasi-stellar objects at similar redshifts shows broad agreement at bright luminosities, LX(2-10 keV) > 1045 erg s- 1. At fainter luminosities X-ray surveys measure higher AGN space densities. The faint-end slope of UV/optical luminosity functions, however, is steeper than for X-ray selected AGN. This implies that the Type I AGN fraction increases with decreasing luminosity at z > 3, opposite to trends established at lower redshift. We also assess the significance of AGN in keeping the hydrogen ionized at high redshift. Our X-ray luminosity function yields ionizing photon rate densities that are insufficient to keep the Universe ionized at redshift z > 4. A

  10. Chandra Studies of Unidentified X-ray Sources in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Hideyuki

    2010-09-01

    We propose to study a complete X-ray sample in the luminosity range of > 10^34 erg s^-1 in the Galactic bulge, consisting of 11 unidentified sources detected in the ROSAT All Sky Survey. Our goal is to obtain a clear picture about X-ray populations in the bulge, by utilizing the excellent Chandra position accuracy leading to unique optical identification together with the X-ray spectral properties. This is a new step toward understanding the formation history of the bulge. Furthermore, because the luminosity range we observe corresponds to a ``missing link'' region ever studied for a neutron star or blackhole X-ray binary, our results are also unique to test accretion disk theories at intermediate mass accretion rates.

  11. Chandra Studies of Unidentified X-ray Sources in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Hideyuki

    2013-09-01

    We propose to study a complete X-ray sample in the luminosity range of > 10^34 erg s^-1 in the Galactic bulge, including 5 unidentified sources detected in the ROSAT All Sky Survey. Our goal is to obtain a clear picture about X-ray populations in the bulge, by utilizing the excellent Chandra position accuracy leading to unique optical identification together with the X-ray spectral properties. This is a new step toward understanding the formation history of the bulge. Furthermore, because the luminosity range we observe corresponds to a ``missing link'' region ever studied for a neutron star or blackhole X-ray binary, our results are also unique to test accretion disk theories at intermediate mass accretion rates.

  12. The prospects of X-ray polarimetry for Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goosmann, René W.

    2016-08-01

    Polarimetry at optical and other wavelength continues to play an important role in our struggle to develop (super-)unification schemes for active galactic nuclei (AGN). Therefore, radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN are important targets for the future small and medium-size X-ray polarimetry missions that are currently under phase A study at NASA and ESA. After briefly pointing out the detection principle of polarization imaging in the soft X-ray band, I am going to review the prospects of X-ray polarimetry for our understanding of AGN ejection (winds and blazar jets) and accretion flows (accretion disk and corona). The X-ray polarimetry signal between 2 and 8 keV is going to give us important new constraints on the geometry of the central engine as well as on the acceleration effects in AGN jets, in particular when combined with spectral and/or polarization information at other wavelengths.

  13. X-ray refelection from photoionized media in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zycki, Piotr T.; Krolik, Julian H.; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Kallman, Timothy R.

    1994-01-01

    We calculate the spectrum of X-ray radiation and reprocessed by a partly ionized optically thick medium in an active galactic nucleus. We self-consistently calculate the ionization balance and thermal balance in the medium along with the distribution of X-ray intensity with optical depth. In addition to absorption or scattering of the incident X-rays, we also compute the spectrum of X-rays emitted by the material, including lines, edges, and bremsstrahlung. The albedo of the medium depends primarily on the X-ray ionization parameter (ratio of incident flux to gas density, zeta(sub Chi), and secondarily on the UV flux generated by dissipation inside the disk; we locate the critical range of zeta(sub Chi) over which the albedo increases from small to nearly unity. While the continuum reflection is very weak below 10 keV when zeta(sub Chi) is small, significnat fluxes are emitted in atomic lines and edges in this energy range. In the limit of large zeta(sub Chi), the albedo below 10 keV increases, but reflection in this band is never gray: some photoelectric absorption remains up to rather large values of zeta(sub Chi), while at still higher values, inverse Compton scattering amplifies the soft X-ray flux. These features are sufficiently sharp that current and near-future X-ray experiments should permit diagnostic measures of zeta(sub Chi).

  14. SIGMA discovery of a transient hard X-ray source in the galactic center region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, M.; Goldwurm, A.; Paul, J.; Denis, M.; Borrel, V.; Bouchet, L.; Roques, J. P.; Jourdain, E.; Trudolyubov, S.; Gilfanov, M.; Churazov, E.; Sunyaev, R.; Khavenson, N.; Dyachkov, A.; Novikov, B.; Chulkov, I.

    1996-09-01

    A new X-ray transient source, GRS 1730-312 (=KS 1730-312), was discovered by the hard X-ray/soft γ-ray coded mask telescope SIGMA/GRANAT in the Galactic Center region during observations performed in September 1994. The flare started on September 22 and lasted approximately 3days, during which the source became the brightest object of the region at energies above 35keV. The average 35-200keV spectrum can be described by a power law with photon index of -2.5 or by a thermal bremsstrahlung model with kT_e_=~70keV. SIGMA data have been found consistent with the spectral shape and with the spectral evolution observed by the TTM/Mir-Kvant telescope at lower energies. This new source belongs to the population of hard X-ray sources already detected by SIGMA in the direction of the Galactic Bulge region.

  15. An X-ray and Infrared Hunt for New Candidate Galactic OB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povich, Matthew S.; Alexander, Michael J.; Busk, Heather; Hanes, Richard J.; Feigelson, Eric; McSwain, M. Virginia; Townsley, Leisa K.

    2016-01-01

    Most young, massive OB stars produce X-ray emission through a variety of wind-driven shock processes, and individual massive stars are detectable out to several kpc distances in the Galactic plane using high-resolution imaging observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We have developed a technique to identify known and new candidate OB stars by fitting model stellar atmospheres to the broadband infrared spectral energy distributions of X-ray-identified stars. Using this technique, we identified 94 candidate O- and early B-type stars in the Carina Nebula and an additional 98 candidates in 11 other Galactic Massive Star-Forming Regions. Visible-light and near-infrared follow-up spectroscopy of these candidates is ongoing, and initial results indicate that a majority of candidate massive stars will be spectroscopically confirmed as OB stars.

  16. Near-infrared Counterparts of Chandra X-ray Sources Toward the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWitt, Curtis; Bandyopadhyay, Reba M.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Blum, Robert; Olsen, Knut; Sellgren, Kris; Sarajedini, Ata

    2010-10-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory has now discovered nearly 10,000 X-ray point sources in the 2° × 0fdg8 region around the Galactic Center. The sources are likely to be a population of accreting binaries in the Galactic Center, but little else is known of their nature. We obtained JHKs imaging of the 17' × 17' region around Sgr A*, an area containing 4339 of these X-ray sources, with the ISPI camera on the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) 4 m telescope. We cross-correlate the Chandra and ISPI catalogs to find potential IR counterparts to the X-ray sources. The extreme IR source crowding in the field means that it is not possible to establish the authenticity of the matches with astrometry and photometry alone. We find 2137 IR/X-ray astrometrically matched sources: statistically, we estimate that our catalog contains 289 ± 13 true matches to soft X-ray sources and 154 ± 39 matches to hard X-ray sources. However, the fraction of true counterparts to candidate counterparts for hard sources is just 11%, compared to 60% for soft sources, making hard source NIR matches particularly challenging for spectroscopic follow-up. We calculate a color-magnitude diagram (CMD) for the matches to hard X-ray sources, and find regions where significant numbers of the IR matches are real. We use their CMD positions to place limits on the absolute Ks -band magnitudes of the potential NIR counterparts to hard X-ray sources. We find regions of the counterpart CMD with 9 ± 3 likely Wolf-Rayet/supergiant binaries (with four spectroscopically confirmed in the literature) as well as 44 ± 13 candidates that could consist of either main-sequence high mass X-ray binaries or red giants with an accreting compact companion. In order to aid spectroscopic follow-up, we sort the candidate counterpart catalog on the basis of IR and X-ray properties to determine which source characteristics increase the probability of a true match. We find a set of 98 IR matches to hard X-ray sources

  17. Bright Points and Subflares in Ultraviolet Lines and X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rovira, M.; Schmieder, B.; Demoulin, P.; Simnett, G. M.; Hagyard, M. J.; Reichmann, E.; Reichmann, E.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1999-01-01

    We have analyzed an active region which was observed in H.alpha (Multichannel Subtractive Double Pass Spectrograph), in UV lines (SMM/UVSP), and in X-rays (SMM/HXIS). In this active region there were only a few subflares and many small bright points visible in UV and in X-rays. Using an extrapolation based on the Fourier transform, we have computed magnetic field lines connecting different photospheric magnetic polarities from ground-based magnetograms. Along the magnetic inversion lines we find two different zones: (1) a high-shear region (> 70 deg) where subflares occur, and (2) a low-shear region along the magnetic inversion line where UV bright points are observed. In these latter regions the magnetic topology is complex with a mixture of polarities. According to the velocity field observed in the Si IV lamda.1402 line and the extrapolation of the magnetic field, we notice that each UV bright point is consistent with emission from low-rising loops with downflows at both ends. We notice some hard X-ray emissions above the bright-point regions with temperatures up to 8 x 10(exp 6) K, which suggests some induced reconnection due to continuous emergence of new flux. This reconnection is also enhanced by neighboring subflares.

  18. Analysis of nearly simultaneous x-ray and optical observations of active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Rosemary Hill optical and EINSTEIN X-ray observations of a sample of 36 galactic nuclei (AGN) were reduced and analyzed. Seventy-two x-ray observations of these sources were reduced, nineteen of which yielded spectral information. Of these spectra observations, significant hydrogen column densities above the galactic value were required for nine of the active galactic nuclei. X-ray variability was detected in eight of the eleven sources which were observed more than once by EINSTEIN. Correlations between the x-ray and optical luminosities were investigated using the Jefferys method of least squares. This method allows for errors in both variables. The results indicate a strong correlation between the x-ray and optical luminosities for the entire sample. Division of the sample into groups with similar optical variability characteristics show that the less violently violent variable AGN are more highly correlated than the violently variable blazars. Infrared and radio observations were combined with the x-ray and optical observations of six AGN. These sources were modelled in terms of the synchrotron-self-Compton model. The turnover frequency falls between the infrared and radio data and reliable estimates of this parameter are difficult to estimate. Therefore the results were found as a function of the turnover frequency. Four sources required relativistic bulk motion or beaming. Multifrequency spectra made at different times for one individual source, 0235+164, required different amounts of beaming to satisfy the x-ray observations. Sizes of the emitting regions for the sources modelled ranged from 0.5 parsec to 1.0 parsec.

  19. Generation of bright isolated attosecond soft X-ray pulses driven by multicycle midinfrared lasers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Chang; Mancuso, Christopher; Hernández-García, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Galloway, Ben; Popmintchev, Dimitar; Huang, Pei-Chi; Walker, Barry; Plaja, Luis; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Becker, Andreas; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2014-06-10

    High harmonic generation driven by femtosecond lasers makes it possible to capture the fastest dynamics in molecules and materials. However, to date the shortest subfemtosecond (attosecond, 10(-18) s) pulses have been produced only in the extreme UV region of the spectrum below 100 eV, which limits the range of materials and molecular systems that can be explored. Here we experimentally demonstrate a remarkable convergence of physics: when midinfrared lasers are used to drive high harmonic generation, the conditions for optimal bright, soft X-ray generation naturally coincide with the generation of isolated attosecond pulses. The temporal window over which phase matching occurs shrinks rapidly with increasing driving laser wavelength, to the extent that bright isolated attosecond pulses are the norm for 2-µm driving lasers. Harnessing this realization, we experimentally demonstrate the generation of isolated soft X-ray attosecond pulses at photon energies up to 180 eV for the first time, to our knowledge, with a transform limit of 35 attoseconds (as), and a predicted linear chirp of 300 as. Most surprisingly, advanced theory shows that in contrast with as pulse generation in the extreme UV, long-duration, 10-cycle, driving laser pulses are required to generate isolated soft X-ray bursts efficiently, to mitigate group velocity walk-off between the laser and the X-ray fields that otherwise limit the conversion efficiency. Our work demonstrates a clear and straightforward approach for robustly generating bright isolated attosecond pulses of electromagnetic radiation throughout the soft X-ray region of the spectrum.

  20. Generation of bright isolated attosecond soft X-ray pulses driven by multicycle midinfrared lasers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Chang; Mancuso, Christopher; Hernández-García, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Galloway, Ben; Popmintchev, Dimitar; Huang, Pei-Chi; Walker, Barry; Plaja, Luis; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A.; Becker, Andreas; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2014-01-01

    High harmonic generation driven by femtosecond lasers makes it possible to capture the fastest dynamics in molecules and materials. However, to date the shortest subfemtosecond (attosecond, 10−18 s) pulses have been produced only in the extreme UV region of the spectrum below 100 eV, which limits the range of materials and molecular systems that can be explored. Here we experimentally demonstrate a remarkable convergence of physics: when midinfrared lasers are used to drive high harmonic generation, the conditions for optimal bright, soft X-ray generation naturally coincide with the generation of isolated attosecond pulses. The temporal window over which phase matching occurs shrinks rapidly with increasing driving laser wavelength, to the extent that bright isolated attosecond pulses are the norm for 2-µm driving lasers. Harnessing this realization, we experimentally demonstrate the generation of isolated soft X-ray attosecond pulses at photon energies up to 180 eV for the first time, to our knowledge, with a transform limit of 35 attoseconds (as), and a predicted linear chirp of 300 as. Most surprisingly, advanced theory shows that in contrast with as pulse generation in the extreme UV, long-duration, 10-cycle, driving laser pulses are required to generate isolated soft X-ray bursts efficiently, to mitigate group velocity walk-off between the laser and the X-ray fields that otherwise limit the conversion efficiency. Our work demonstrates a clear and straightforward approach for robustly generating bright isolated attosecond pulses of electromagnetic radiation throughout the soft X-ray region of the spectrum. PMID:24850866

  1. High-energy Neutrino Flares from X-Ray Bright and Dark Tidal Disruption Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senno, Nicholas; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter

    2017-03-01

    X-ray and γ-ray observations by the Swift satellite revealed that a fraction of tidal disruption events (TDEs) have relativistic jets. Jetted TDEs have been considered to be potential sources of very-high-energy cosmic-rays and neutrinos. In this work, using semi-analytical methods, we calculate neutrino spectra of X-ray bright TDEs with powerful jets and dark TDEs with possible choked jets, respectively. We estimate their neutrino fluxes and find that non-detection would give us an upper limit on the baryon loading of the jet luminosity contained in cosmic-rays ξ cr ≲ 20–50 for Sw J1644+57. We show that X-ray bright TDEs make a sub-dominant (≲5%–10%) contribution to IceCube’s diffuse neutrino flux, and study possible contributions of X-ray dark TDEs given that particles are accelerated in choked jets or disk winds. We discuss future prospects for multi-messenger searches of the brightest TDEs.

  2. The Peculiar Galactic Center Neutron Star X-Ray Binary XMM J174457-2850.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenaar, N.; Wijnands, R.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Altamirano, D.; Kennea, J.; Gehrels, N.; Haggard, D.; Ponti, G.

    2014-09-01

    The recent discovery of a millisecond radio pulsar experiencing an accretion outburst similar to those seen in low mass X-ray binaries, has opened up a new opportunity to investigate the evolutionary link between these two different neutron star manifestations. The remarkable X-ray variability and hard X-ray spectrum of this object can potentially serve as a template to search for other X-ray binary/radio pulsar transitional objects. Here we demonstrate that the transient X-ray source XMM J174457-2850.3 near the Galactic center displays similar X-ray properties. We report on the detection of an energetic thermonuclear burst with an estimated duration of sime2 hr and a radiated energy output of ~= 5 × 1040 erg, which unambiguously demonstrates that the source harbors an accreting neutron star. It has a quiescent X-ray luminosity of L X ~= 5 × 1032(D/6.5 kpc)2 erg s-1 and exhibits occasional accretion outbursts during which it brightens to L X ~= 1035-1036(D/6.5 kpc)2 erg s-1 for a few weeks (2-10 keV). However, the source often lingers in between outburst and quiescence at L X ~= 1033-1034(D/6.5 kpc)2 erg s-1. This peculiar X-ray flux behavior and its relatively hard X-ray spectrum, a power law with an index of Γ ~= 1.4, could possibly be explained in terms of the interaction between the accretion flow and the magnetic field of the neutron star.

  3. Dust-grain scattering of X-rays observed during the lunar occultation of a transient X-ray source near the Galactic center

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuda, K.; Takeshima, T.; Kii, T.; Kawai, N. Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako )

    1990-04-01

    Extended X-ray emission surrounding point X-ray sources has been detected in the energy band 1-10 keV during lunar occultation observations of the Galactic center region. These extended X-rays are most likely due to X-ray scattering by interstellar dust grains. The spatial size and the intensity of the extended emission around the transient X-ray source GS 1741.2-2859/1741.6-2849 have been studied extensively. The spatial size is consistent with the typical grain size of about 0.06 micron. The intensity is used to obtain the energy dependence of the scattering optical depth to the source, which suggests the existence of iron in the grains. The ratio of the iron column density contained in the grains to the hydrogen column density of the neutral gas is roughly consistent with the cosmic abundance of iron. 30 refs.

  4. Variability of Optical Counterparts to X-ray Selected Sources in the Galactic Bulge Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christopher; Hynes, Robert I.; Jonker, Peter; Torres, Manuel; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Britt, Christopher; Steeghs, Danny; Galactic Bulge Survey Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a wide-field, multi-wavelength survey of new X-ray sources in the Galactic Bulge detected with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The goals of the GBS are to test binary population models by uncovering quiescent Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries (LMXB), and to identify suitable systems for follow-up mass determination using multi-wavelength observations. This follow-up is essential to better determine black hole and neutron star mass distributions. We present preliminary results from the southernmost portion of the GBS positioned 1.5-2.0 degrees below the Galactic Center which contains 424 unique X-ray sources. The optical photometry presented here were acquired using the DECam imager and the previous Mosaic-II imager on the 4m Blanco telescope at Cerro-Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). We combine photometry with optical spectroscopy from several different telescopes to help characterize the detected X-ray sources. To accomplish this goal, we analyze the light curve morphology and the spectroscopic features of the optical counterparts to classify these binary systems. I will describe the technique for determining the correct optical counterpart within the error circle using image subtraction and report on the statistics of the sample. I will then summarize the candidate LMXBs we have identified so far and highlight other interesting sources. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-0908789 and by NASA through Chandra Award Number AR3-14002X issued by the Chandra X-ray Observatory Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for and on behalf of the National Aeronautics Space Administration under contract NAS8-03060. We also acknowledge support from a Graduate Student Research Award administered by the Louisiana Space Grant Consortium (LaSPACE).

  5. A multi-frequency study of an X ray selected sample of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossan, Bruce Alan

    1992-01-01

    The LASS (Large Area Sky Survey) experiment, which flew aboard the HEAO-1 spacecraft, carried out a 2-20 keV survey of the sky during 1977-1978. The X-ray sources from this survey make up the LASS catalog (Wood et al. 1979). Optical counterparts have been identified for greater than 86 percent of the LASS sources above a flux of approx. 0.95 microns (mu)Jy Q 5 keV (Remillard 1992b). The LASS error boxes, along with the more precise positions from the Modulation Collimator (MC) X-ray experiment (also aboard HEAO-1), subsequent X-ray imaging, and optical search techniques were all used to identify the LASS sources. From these identifications, a high-latitude (absolute value of b greater than 20 deg.), flux limited (greater than or equal to 0.95 (mu)Jy) sample of 96 emission line Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) have been selected for study. The sample is referred to as the LMA (for the LASS/MC identified sample of AGN). The objective of this work is to produce multi-frequency spectra of this sample of objects, in order to determine and interpret the statistical properties of the sample over nearly the full range of observable wavelengths. Data were obtained for as much of the radio through hard X-ray (less than 20 keV) spectrum as possible for each object in the LMA. Radio, near infrared, and other measurements were taken from the literature, far IR fluxes were extracted from co-added observations from IRAS, UV spectra were obtained from the IUE archives, and original observations were performed (with the help of collaborators) in the radio, near IR, optical, UV, and X-ray to fulfill this goal. Correlation studies of the continuum bands found poor correlations of X-ray and radio flux, good correlations for 12 and 26 micron flux with X-ray flux, excellent correlations for optical and near IR fluxes with X-rays, and poor correlations of UV and X-ray fluxes. Correlation studies of the line and X-ray continuum flux yield a good correlation between the flux of (OIII), the

  6. Copernicus observations of a number of galactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culhane, J. L.; Mason, K. O.; Sanford, P. W.; White, N. E.

    1976-01-01

    The Copernicus satellite was launched on 21 August 1972. The main experiment on board is the University of Princeton UV telescope. In addition a cosmic X-ray package of somewhat modest aperture was provided by the Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL) of University College London. Following a brief description of the instrument, a list of galactic sources observed during the year is presented. Although the X-ray detection aperture is small, the ability to point the satellite for long periods of time with high accuracy makes Copernicus an ideal vehicle for the study of variable sources.

  7. On the origin of power-law X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosman, I.; Shaham, J.; Shaviv, G.

    1984-01-01

    In the present analytical model for a power law X-ray continuum production in active galactic nuclei, the dissipation of turbulent energy flux above the accretion disk forms an optically thin transition layer with an inverted temperature gradient. The emitted thermal radiation has a power law spectrum in the 0.1-100 keV range, with a photon energy spectral index gamma of about 0.4-1.0. Thermal X-ray contribution from the layer is 5-10 percent of the total disk luminosity. The gamma value of 0.75 is suggested as a 'natural' power law index for Seyfert galaxies and QSOs.

  8. X-Ray Emission from Active Galactic Nuclei with Intermediate-Mass Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, G. C.; Mathur, S.; Griffiths, R. E.; Rao, A. R.

    2008-12-01

    We present a systematic X-ray study of eight active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with intermediate-mass black holes (MBH ~ 8-95 × 104 M⊙) based on 12 XMM-Newton observations. The sample includes the two prototype AGNs in this class—NGC 4395 and POX 52 and six other AGNs discovered with the Sloan Digitized Sky Survey. These AGNs show some of the strongest X-ray variability, with the normalized excess variances being the largest and the power density break timescales being the shortest observed among radio-quiet AGNs. The excess-variance-luminosity correlation appears to depend on both the BH mass and the Eddington luminosity ratio. The break timescale-black hole mass relations for AGN with IMBHs are consistent with that observed for massive AGNs. We find that the FWHM of the Hβ/Hα line is uncorrelated with the BH mass, but shows strong anticorrelation with the Eddington luminosity ratio. Four AGNs show clear evidence for soft X-ray excess emission (kTin ~ 150-200 eV). X-ray spectra of three other AGNs are consistent with the presence of the soft excess emission. NGC 4395 with lowest L/LEdd lacks the soft excess emission. Evidently small black mass is not the primary driver of strong soft X-ray excess emission from AGNs. The X-ray spectral properties and optical-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions of these AGNs are similar to those of Seyfert 1 galaxies. The observed X-ray/UV properties of AGNs with IMBHs are consistent with these AGNs being low-mass extensions of more massive AGNs, those with high Eddington luminosity ratio looking more like narrow-line Seyfert 1 s and those with low L/LEdd looking more like broad-line Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  9. Long-term X-Ray Variability of Typical Active Galactic Nuclei in the Distant Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G.; Brandt, W. N.; Luo, B.; Xue, Y. Q.; Bauer, F. E.; Sun, M. Y.; Kim, S.; Schulze, S.; Zheng, X. C.; Paolillo, M.; Shemmer, O.; Liu, T.; Schneider, D. P.; Vignali, C.; Vito, F.; Wang, J.-X.

    2016-11-01

    We perform long-term (≈15 years, observed-frame) X-ray variability analyses of the 68 brightest radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the 6 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South survey; the majority are in the redshift range of 0.6-3.1, providing access to penetrating rest-frame X-rays up to ≈10-30 keV. Of the 68 sources, 24 are optical spectral type I AGNs, and the rest (44) are type II AGNs. The timescales probed in this work are among the longest for X-ray variability studies of distant AGNs. Photometric analyses reveal widespread photon flux variability: 90% of AGNs are variable above a 95% confidence level, including many X-ray obscured AGNs and several optically classified type II quasars. We characterize the intrinsic X-ray luminosity ({L}{{X}}) and absorption ({N}{{H}}) variability via spectral fitting. Most (74%) sources show {L}{{X}} variability; the variability amplitudes are generally smaller for quasars. A Compton-thick candidate AGN shows variability of its high-energy X-ray flux, indicating the size of reflecting material to be ≲0.3 pc. {L}{{X}} variability is also detected in a broad absorption line quasar. The {N}{{H}} variability amplitude for our sample appears to rise as time separation increases. About 16% of sources show {N}{{H}} variability. One source transitions from an X-ray unobscured to obscured state, while its optical classification remains type I; this behavior indicates the X-ray eclipsing material is not large enough to obscure the whole broad-line region.

  10. NuSTAR Hard X-Ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region I: Hard X-Ray Morphology and Spectroscopy of the Diffuse Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Krivonos, Roman; Hong, Jaesub; Ponti, Gabriele; Bauer, Franz; Perez, Kerstin; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Tomsick, John A.; Alexander, David M.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barret, Didier; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E.; Canipe, Alicia M.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hornstrup, Allan; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason E.; Luu, Vy; Madsen, Kristen K.; Mao, Peter H.; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Perri, Matteo; Pivovaroff, Michael J.; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Stern, Daniel; Westergaard, Niels J.; Zhang, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We present the first sub-arcminute images of the Galactic Center above 10 keV, obtained with NuSTAR. NuSTAR resolves the hard X-ray source IGR J17456-2901 into non-thermal X-ray filaments, molecular clouds, point sources, and a previously unknown central component of hard X-ray emission (CHXE). NuSTAR detects four non-thermal X-ray filaments, extending the detection of their power-law spectra with Γ ˜ 1.3-2.3 up to ˜50 keV. A morphological and spectral study of the filaments suggests that their origin may be heterogeneous, where previous studies suggested a common origin in young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). NuSTAR detects non-thermal X-ray continuum emission spatially correlated with the 6.4 keV Fe Kα fluorescence line emission associated with two Sgr A molecular clouds: MC1 and the Bridge. Broadband X-ray spectral analysis with a Monte-Carlo based X-ray reflection model self-consistently determined their intrinsic column density (˜1023 cm-2), primary X-ray spectra (power-laws with Γ ˜ 2) and set a lower limit of the X-ray luminosity of Sgr A* flare illuminating the Sgr A clouds to LX ≳ 1038 erg s-1. Above ˜20 keV, hard X-ray emission in the central 10 pc region around Sgr A* consists of the candidate PWN G359.95-0.04 and the CHXE, possibly resulting from an unresolved population of massive CVs with white dwarf masses MWD ˜ 0.9 M⊙. Spectral energy distribution analysis suggests that G359.95-0.04 is likely the hard X-ray counterpart of the ultra-high gamma-ray source HESS J1745-290, strongly favoring a leptonic origin of the GC TeV emission.

  11. INTEGRAL/IBIS nine-year Galactic hard X-ray survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivonos, R.; Tsygankov, S.; Lutovinov, A.; Revnivtsev, M.; Churazov, E.; Sunyaev, R.

    2012-09-01

    Context. The INTEGRAL observatory operating in a hard X-ray/gamma domain has gathered a large observational data set over nine years starting in 2003. Most of the observing time was dedicated to the Galactic source population study, making possible the deepest Galactic survey in hard X-rays ever compiled. Aims: We aim to perform a Galactic survey that can be used as the basis of Galactic source population studies, and perform mapping of the Milky Way in hard X-rays over the maximum exposure available at |b| < 17.5°. Methods: We used sky reconstruction algorithms especially developed for the high quality imaging of INTEGRAL/IBIS data. Results: We present sky images, sensitivity maps, and catalogs of detected sources in the three energy bands 17 - 60, 17 - 35, and 35 - 80 keV in the Galactic plane at |b| < 17.5°. The total number of sources in the reference 17 - 60 keV band includes 402 objects exceeding a 4.7σ detection threshold on the nine-year time-averaged map. Among the identified sources with known and tentatively identified natures, 253 are Galactic objects (108 low-mass X-ray binaries, 82 high-mass X-ray binaries, 36 cataclysmic variables, and 27 are of other types), and 115 are extragalactic objects, including 112 active galactic nuclei and 3 galaxy clusters. The sample of Galactic sources with S/N > 4.7σ has an identification completeness of ~92%, which is valuable for population studies. Since the survey is based on the nine-year sky maps, it is optimized for persistent sources and may be biased against finding transients. Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data centre funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Spain), Czech Republic, and Poland, and with the participation of Russia and the USA.Table 3 (Catalog) is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  12. Compact radiation sources for increased access to high brightness x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, Finn Henry

    The successful operation of the x-ray free electron lasers at LCLS and SACLA are a boon for science. The increase in brightness of 10 orders of magnitude over synchrotron sources as well as the sub-picosecond time profile of the x-rays are opening new avenues of research in fields ranging from biology to solid state physics. However, synchrotrons and free electron lasers that produce x-rays are expensive, with price tags that measured hundreds of millions. Further, the standard unit of measure for the scale of these sources is kilometers. The sheer size and prohibitive cost of these devices means that such sources are out of the reach of universities and smaller laboratories. The focus of this dissertation is in increasing access to x-ray sources by making them both smaller and, perhaps more importantly, cheaper. Current limitations to source size reduction are discussed which leads to the conclusion that smaller x-rays sources require short period undulators. In this context, two approaches to increasing access to x-rays are covered. The first is direct decrease in the period length of undulators through more advanced design and materials. This path begins with a discussion of the design and construction of a 9 mm period prototype. An analysis of the benefits of such a device, in reduced undulator and accelerator lengths at existing free electron lasers, is explored. And finally, the operation of the undulator in a realistic scenario is experimentally explored in a scaled experiment at optical frequencies. The second method for decreasing the period length of the light source is to replace the undulator with a laser, making an inverse Compton scattering source. The relationship between undulator radiation and the inverse Compton scattering process is examined, as well as the characteristics of the source itself. Lastly, as a demonstration of the function of the inverse Compton scattering source at Brookhaven National Laboratory as a diagnostic tool rather than an

  13. NuSTAR Observations of Bright X-ray Flares from Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vievering, Juliana; Glesener, Lindsay; Grefenstette, Brian; Smith, David

    2016-05-01

    Bright x-ray flares are observed to occur on young stellar objects (YSOs) and are presumed to be driven by similar processes as those seen on our sun. Observations of the flaring activity of YSOs can add to our understanding of the early lives of stars and the development of planetary systems. In particular, x-ray observations of these stellar flares are essential for probing the youngest stars, as these stars are most obscured by dense molecular clouds. One such cloud complex of YSOs, rho Ophiuchi, has been a past target for soft x-ray (SXR) missions, including Chandra and XMM-Newton. However, the energy ranges covered by these missions drop off prior to the hard x-ray (HXR) regime, where the crossover to a dominant nonthermal component could be observed. Whether or not this nonthermal emission is strong enough to be observed could then be an indicator of how large an influence these flares have on the surrounding protoplanetary disk. To begin investigating this HXR emission, two 50ks observations of rho Ophiuchi have been taken with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), which is optimized over the energy range of 3-79 keV. Multiple stellar flares have been identified in the observations; here we present the preliminary analysis, including light curves and spectra, of the brightest of these flaring events. We explore the implications of the data for flaring activity of YSOs and compare the results to typical flaring activity of the sun.

  14. Classifying X-ray Sources from the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, Robert

    2012-09-01

    The completion of the Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) by Chandra in AO-13 identified 400 new X-ray sources (on top of the 1200 already known), many of which are expected to have accessible optical counterparts. Wide-field variability studies can be an extremely powerful tool to classify these sources. In two nights with the new NOAO DECam we can obtain lightcurves of ALL of the optically accessible objects, together with another 400 GBS sources from earlier AOs, and about 1700 additional fainter objects from the Chandra Source Catalog. We therefore propose a joint Archival-NOAO study to obtain these lightcurves, use them to classify the X-ray sources, and pick out ellipsoidal variations and eclipses from the many quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries predicted to be accessible.

  15. Modeling the thermal X-ray emission around the Galactic center from colliding stellar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Christopher Michael Post; Wang, Daniel; Cuadra, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    The Galactic center is a hotbed of astrophysical activity. Powering these processes is the injection of wind material from ˜30 massive Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars orbiting within 12" of the super-massive black hole (SMBH). Hydrodynamic simulations of such colliding and accreting winds produce a complex density and temperature structure of cold wind material shocking with the ambient medium, creating a large reservoir of hot, X-ray-emitting gas. A Chandra X-ray Visionary Program that observed the Galactic center for 3 Ms resolved this diffuse emission. This work computes the X-ray emission from these hydrodynamic simulations of the WR winds with the aim of reproducing the Chandra observations, amid exploring a variety of SMBH feedback mechanisms. The success of the model is the spectrum from the 2"-5" ring around the SMBH matches the shape of the observed spectrum very well. This naturally explains that the hot gas comes from colliding WR winds, and that the winds speeds of these stars are in general well constrained. The model flux in this ring and over the ±6" images of 4-9keV is ˜2.2× lower than the observations, with stronger feedback mechanisms leading to weaker X-ray emission since more hot, X-ray-emitting gas is cleared from the spherical r < 12" simulation volume. Possible improvements to rectify this flux discrepancy are increasing the mass loss rates of the WRs and/or adding more gas into the simulation, such as from the O stars and their winds, so the adiabatic WR shocks occur closer to their stars, thereby becoming brighter in X-rays.

  16. Exploring the Geometry of Circumnuclear Material in Active Galactic Nuclei through X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, Elizabeth

    I have studied the X-ray spectral properties of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in order to gain a better understanding of the nature of the circumnuclear material surrounding the central black hole in these objects. From the RXTE archive I constructed two survey samples of broad band X-ray spectra. The first was a bright sample of 23 AGN that had high quality spectra up to at least 100 keV, which provided constraints on the high energy rollover expected by models of inverse Comptonization of low energy photons. The average lower limit to Eroll was ˜225 keV for the majority of objects, implying a coronal electron temperature of kB Te ≳ 75 keV for these models. The second sample was an expanded survey of ˜100 AGN for which spectral parameters could be well-determined. I compared Fe line equivalent widths with measured Compton reflection hump strengths and found that on average ˜40% of the Fe line emission comes from reflection off Compton-thick material, with the remainder likely arising in isotropic emission from Compton-thin gas. In the full sample, the distributions of photon indices for Seyfert 1's and 2's were consistent with the idea that Seyferts share a common central engine, however the distributions of Compton reflection hump strengths did not support the classical picture of absorption by a torus and reflection off a Compton-thick disk with type depending only on inclination angle. I have concluded that a more complex reflecting geometry such as a combined disk and torus or clumpy torus is likely a more accurate picture of the Compton-thick material. I have performed additional analyses of individual objects. An occultation event in Cen A, discovered through RXTE monitoring, revealed the clumpy nature of its torus and placed constraints on the amount of material in the vicinity of the black hole in this object. A Suzaku long-look observation of MCG-2-58-22 provided constraints on the location of Fe line emitting material to ≳ 1200RS, likely associated

  17. Reflection nebulae in the Galactic center: soft X-ray imaging polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, F.; Muleri, F.; Soffitta, P.; Karas, V.; Kunneriath, D.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The origin of irradiation and fluorescence of the 6.4 keV bright giant molecular clouds surrounding Sgr A∗, the central supermassive black hole of our Galaxy, remains enigmatic despite numerous attempts to decipher it with spectroscopic and timing analyses. Aims: Testing the theory of a past active period of Sgr A∗ requires opening a new observational window: X-ray polarimetry. In this paper, we aim to show how modern imaging polarimeters could revolutionize our understanding of the Galactic center (GC). Methods: Through Monte Carlo modeling, we produced a 4-8 keV polarization map of the GC. We focused on the polarimetric signature produced by Sgr B1, Sgr B2, G0.11-0.11, Bridge E, Bridge D, Bridge B2, MC2, MC1, Sgr C3, Sgr C2, and Sgr C1. We estimated the resulting polarization that arises from these scattering targets, included polarized flux dilution by the diffuse plasma emission detected toward the GC, and simulated the polarization map that modern polarimetric detectors would obtain assuming the performances of a mission prototype. Results: The eleven reflection nebulae we investigated present a variety of polarization signatures, ranging from nearly unpolarized to highly polarized (~77%) fluxes. Their polarization position angle is found to be normal to the scattering plane, as expected from previous studies. A major improvement in our simulation is the addition of a diffuse, unpolarized plasma emission that strongly affects soft X-ray polarized fluxes. The dilution factor is in the range 50%-70%, making the observation of the Bridge structure unlikely even in the context of modern polarimetry. The best targets are the Sgr B and Sgr C complexes and the G0.11-0.11 cloud, arranged in the order of decreasing detectability. Conclusions: An exploratory observation of a few hundred kilo-seconds of the Sgr B complex would allow a significant detection of the polarization and be sufficient to derive indications of the primary radiation source. A more

  18. High brightness--multiple beamlets source for patterned X-ray production

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ji, Qing; Barletta, William A.; Jiang, Ximan; Ji, Lili

    2009-10-27

    Techniques for controllably directing beamlets to a target substrate are disclosed. The beamlets may be either positive ions or electrons. It has been shown that beamlets may be produced with a diameter of 1 .mu.m, with inter-aperture spacings of 12 .mu.m. An array of such beamlets, may be used for maskless lithography. By step-wise movement of the beamlets relative to the target substrate, individual devices may be directly e-beam written. Ion beams may be directly written as well. Due to the high brightness of the beamlets from extraction from a multicusp source, exposure times for lithographic exposure are thought to be minimized. Alternatively, the beamlets may be electrons striking a high Z material for X-ray production, thereafter collimated to provide patterned X-ray exposures such as those used in CAT scans. Such a device may be used for remote detection of explosives.

  19. The correspondence between X-ray bright points and evolving magnetic features in the quiet sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, D. F.; Martin, S. F.; Moses, D.; Harvey, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    The results of a study of X-ray bright points (XBPs) and small-scale evolving magnetic structures are presented. X-ray images obtained during rocket flights, full-disk magnetograms, and time-lapse magnetograms of multiple fields make up the coordinated data set. XBPs were found to be more frequently associated with pre-existing magnetic features of opposite polarity which appeared to be cancelling than with new or emerging flux regions. Most of the XBPs appeared to correspond to opposite polarity magnetic features which were converging towards each other, and some of which had not yet begun cancelling. It is suggested that most XBPs are created when converging flow brings together oppositely directed field lines. This leads to reconnection and heating in the low corona of the newly-formed loops.

  20. Constraining black hole masses in low-accreting active galactic nuclei using X-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, I.; Gliozzi, M.; Hughes, C.; Titarchuk, L.

    2014-09-01

    In a recent work we demonstrated that a novel X-ray scaling method, originally introduced for Galactic black holes (BHs), can be reliably extended to estimate the mass of supermassive BHs accreting at a moderate to high level. Here we investigate the limits of applicability of this method to low-accreting active galactic nuclei (AGN), using a control sample with good-quality X-ray data and dynamically measured mass. For low-accreting AGN (LX/LEdd ≤ 10-4), because the basic assumption that the photon index positively correlates with the accretion rate no longer holds the X-ray scaling method cannot be used. Nevertheless, the inverse correlation in the Γ-LX/LEdd diagram, found in several low-accreting BHs and confirmed by this sample, can be used to constrain MBH within a factor of ˜10 from the dynamically determined values. We provide a simple recipe to determine MBH using solely X-ray spectral data, which can be used as a sanity check for MBH determination based on indirect optical methods.

  1. Hard X-ray Point Sources Detected in the NuSTAR Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hailey, Chuck

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) has surveyed the Galactic Center and Norma region with total exposure of approximately 2 Msec and 50 pointings. Hard X-ray spectroscopy with NuSTAR is a powerful tool to identify sources previously discovered by Chandra, and thus perform comparative population studies in the Galactic Center and Norma region. The NuSTAR survey, with a depth ranging from 20 to 40 ksec, detected dozens of point source above 10 keV including three known X-ray transients (GRS 1741-2853, AXJ1745.6-2901 and CXOGC J174540.0-29005) during their outbursts in 2013. Some of the NuSTAR point sources exhibit remarkably hard X-ray spectra extending beyond 40 keV, indicating that they are either hot intermediate polars with temperatures greater than 50 keV or X-ray binaries with either a neutron star or black hole. We will present our spectral and timing analysis of the NuSTAR sources as well as results of IR counterpart searches.

  2. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF THE X-RAY TIME-DELAY TRANSFER FUNCTION IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Legg, E.; Miller, L.; Turner, T. J.; Giustini, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Kraemer, S. B.

    2012-11-20

    The origin of the observed time lags, in nearby active galactic nuclei (AGNs), between hard and soft X-ray photons is investigated using new XMM-Newton data for the narrow-line Seyfert I galaxy Ark 564 and existing data for 1H 0707-495 and NGC 4051. These AGNs have highly variable X-ray light curves that contain frequent, high peaks of emission. The averaged light curve of the peaks is directly measured from the time series, and it is shown that (1) peaks occur at the same time, within the measurement uncertainties, at all X-ray energies, and (2) there exists a substantial tail of excess emission at hard X-ray energies, which is delayed with respect to the time of the main peak, and is particularly prominent in Ark 564. Observation (1) rules out that the observed lags are caused by Comptonization time delays and disfavors a simple model of propagating fluctuations on the accretion disk. Observation (2) is consistent with time lags caused by Compton-scattering reverberation from material a few thousand light-seconds from the primary X-ray source. The power spectral density and the frequency-dependent phase lags of the peak light curves are consistent with those of the full time series. There is evidence for non-stationarity in the Ark 564 time series in both the Fourier and peaks analyses. A sharp 'negative' lag (variations at hard photon energies lead soft photon energies) observed in Ark 564 appears to be generated by the shape of the hard-band transfer function and does not arise from soft-band reflection of X-rays. These results reinforce the evidence for the existence of X-ray reverberation in type I AGN, which requires that these AGNs are significantly affected by scattering from circumnuclear material a few tens or hundreds of gravitational radii in extent.

  3. A NEW COSMOLOGICAL DISTANCE MEASURE USING ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS X-RAY VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Franca, Fabio La; Bianchi, Stefano; Branchini, Enzo; Matt, Giorgio; Ponti, Gabriele

    2014-05-20

    We report the discovery of a luminosity distance estimator using active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We combine the correlation between the X-ray variability amplitude and the black hole (BH) mass with the single-epoch spectra BH mass estimates which depend on the AGN luminosity and the line width emitted by the broad-line region. We demonstrate that significant correlations do exist that allow one to predict the AGN (optical or X-ray) luminosity as a function of the AGN X-ray variability and either the Hβ or the Paβ line widths. In the best case, when the Paβ is used, the relationship has an intrinsic dispersion of ∼0.6 dex. Although intrinsically more disperse than supernovae Ia, this relation constitutes an alternative distance indicator potentially able to probe, in an independent way, the expansion history of the universe. With respect to this, we show that the new mission concept Athena should be able to measure the X-ray variability of hundreds of AGNs and then constrain the distance modulus with uncertainties of 0.1 mag up to z ∼ 0.6. We also discuss how our estimator has the prospect of becoming a cosmological probe even more sensitive than the current supernovae Ia samples by using a new dedicated wide-field X-ray telescope able to measure the variability of thousands of AGNs.

  4. Ultraviolet and X-ray variability of active galactic nuclei with Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buisson, D. J. K.; Lohfink, A. M.; Alston, W. N.; Fabian, A. C.

    2017-01-01

    We analyse a sample of 21 active galactic nuclei using data from the Swift satellite to study the variability properties of the population in the X-ray, UV and optical band. We find that the variable part of the UV-optical emission has a spectrum consistent with a power law, with an average index of -2.21 ± 0.13, as would be expected from central illumination of a thin disc (index of -7/3). We also calculate the slope of a power law from UV to X-ray variable emission, αOX, Var; the average for this sample is αOX, Var = -1.06 ± 0.04. The anticorrelation of αOX with the UV luminosity, LUV, previously found in the average emission is also present in the variable part: αOX, Var = ( - 0.177 ± 0.083)log (Lν, Var(2500 Å)) + (3.88 ± 2.33). Correlated variability between the emission in X-rays and UV is detected significantly for 9 of the 21 sources. All these cases are consistent with the UV lagging the X-rays, as would be seen if the correlated UV variations were produced by the reprocessing of X-ray emission. The observed UV lags are tentatively longer than expected for a standard thin disc.

  5. X-ray Studies of Unidentified Galactic TeV Gamma-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Puehlhofer, Gerd

    2009-05-11

    Many of the recently discovered Galactic TeV sources remain unidentified to date. A large fraction of the sources is possibly associated with relic pulsar wind nebula (PWN) systems. One key question here is the maximum energy (beyond TeV) attained in the compact PWNe. Hard X-ray emission can trace those particles, but current non-focussing X-ray instruments above 10 keV have difficulties to deconvolve the hard pulsar spectrum from its surrounding nebula.Some of the new TeV sources are also expected to originate from middle-aged and possibly even from old supernova remnants (SNR). But no compelling case for such an identification has been found yet. In established young TeV-emitting SNRs, X-ray imaging above 10 keV could help to disentangle the leptonic from the hadronic emission component in the TeV shells, if secondary electrons produced in hadronic collisions can be effectively detected. As SNRs get older, the high energy electron component is expected to fade away. This may allow to verify the picture through X-ray spectral evolution of the source population.Starting from the lessons we have learned so far from X-ray follow-up observations of unidentified TeV sources, prospects for Simbol-X to resolve open questions in this field will be discussed.

  6. X-ray Studies of Unidentified Galactic TeV Gamma-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pühlhofer, Gerd

    2009-05-01

    Many of the recently discovered Galactic TeV sources remain unidentified to date. A large fraction of the sources is possibly associated with relic pulsar wind nebula (PWN) systems. One key question here is the maximum energy (beyond TeV) attained in the compact PWNe. Hard X-ray emission can trace those particles, but current non-focussing X-ray instruments above 10 keV have difficulties to deconvolve the hard pulsar spectrum from its surrounding nebula. Some of the new TeV sources are also expected to originate from middle-aged and possibly even from old supernova remnants (SNR). But no compelling case for such an identification has been found yet. In established young TeV-emitting SNRs, X-ray imaging above 10 keV could help to disentangle the leptonic from the hadronic emission component in the TeV shells, if secondary electrons produced in hadronic collisions can be effectively detected. As SNRs get older, the high energy electron component is expected to fade away. This may allow to verify the picture through X-ray spectral evolution of the source population. Starting from the lessons we have learned so far from X-ray follow-up observations of unidentified TeV sources, prospects for Simbol-X to resolve open questions in this field will be discussed.

  7. Galactic Winds and the X-ray Luminous Bulges of Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcots, Eric M.; Kaczmarek, J.

    2010-01-01

    Galactic winds are typically associated with galaxies that host AGN or are undergoing vigorous star formation. The discovery of the overpressurized hot gas in the bulge of NGC 3631 inspired the investigation of several more normal, quiescent spiral galaxies_all with an X-ray luminous bulge. The sample was studied with the WIYN 3.5m. We present the results of an integral field unit study of the kinematics of ionized and neutral gas in the bulges of spiral galaxies and discuss the frequency of galactic winds amongst "normal” early-type spirals.

  8. The dependence of gamma-ray burst X-ray column densities on the model for Galactic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcodia, R.; Campana, S.; Salvaterra, R.

    2016-05-01

    We study the X-ray absorption of a complete sample of 99 bright Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In recent years, a strong correlation has been found between the intrinsic X-ray absorbing column density (NH(z)) and the redshift. This absorption excess in high-z GRBs is now thought to be due to the overlooked contribution of the absorption along the intergalactic medium (IGM), by means of both intervening objects and the diffuse warm-hot intergalactic medium along the line of sight. In this work we neglect the absorption along the IGM, because our purpose is to study the eventual effect of a radical change in the Galactic absorption model on the NH(z) distribution. Therefore, we derive the intrinsic absorbing column densities using two different Galactic absorption models: the Leiden Argentine Bonn HI survey and the more recent model that includes molecular hydrogen. We find that if, on the one hand, the new Galactic model considerably affects the single column density values, on the other hand, there is no drastic change in the distribution as a whole. It becomes clear that the contribution of Galactic column densities alone, no matter how improved, is not sufficient to change the observed general trend and it has to be considered as a second order correction. The cosmological increase of NH(z) as a function of redshift persists and, to explain the observed distribution, it is necessary to include the contribution of both the diffuse intergalactic medium and the intervening systems along the line of sight of the GRBs.

  9. Bright X-ray arcs and the emergence of solar magnetic flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Broussard, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    The Skylab S-056 and S-082A experiments and ground-based magnetograms have been used to study the role of bright X-ray arcs and the emergence of solar magnetic flux in the McMath region 12476. The S-056 X-ray images show a system of one or sometimes two bright arcs within a diffuse emitting region. The arcs seem to directly connect regions of opposite magnetic polarity in the photosphere. Magnetograms suggest the possible emergence of a magnetic flux. The width of the main arc is approximately 6 arcsec when most clearly defined, and the length is approximately 30-50 arcsec. Although the arc system is observed to vary in brightness over a period exceeding 24 hours, it remains fixed in orientation. The temperature of the main arc is approximately 3 x 10 to the 6th K. It is suggested that merging magnetic fields may provide the primary energy source, perhaps accompanied by resistive heating from a force-free current.

  10. THE EFFECT OF STARBURST METALLICITY ON BRIGHT X-RAY BINARY FORMATION PATHWAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, T.; Kalogera, V.; Sepinsky, J. F.; Prestwich, A.; Zezas, A.; Gallagher, J. S.

    2010-12-20

    We investigate the characteristics of young (<20 Myr) and bright (L{sub X} > 1 x 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}) high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and find the population to be strongly metallicity dependent. We separate the model populations among two distinct formation pathways: (1) systems undergoing active Roche lobe overflow (RLO) and (2) wind accretion systems with donors in the (super)giant stage, which we find to dominate the HMXB population. We find metallicity to primarily affect the number of systems which move through each formation pathway, rather than the observable parameters of systems which move through each individual pathway. We discuss the most important model parameters affecting the HMXB population at both low and high metallicities. Using these results, we show that (1) the population of ultra-luminous X-ray sources can be consistently described by very bright HMXBs which undergo stable RLO with mild super-Eddington accretion and (2) the HMXB population of the bright starburst galaxy NGC 1569 is likely dominated by one extremely metal-poor starburst cluster.

  11. Multiwavelength Study of the Bright X-ray Source Population in the Interacting Galaxies NGC 5774/NGC 5775

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Kajal K.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Saripalli, Lakshmi; Gandhi, Poshak; Foellmi, Cedric; Gutierrez, Carlos M.; Lopez-Corredoira, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The X-ray source population in the field of the interacting pair of galaxies NGC 5774/5775 is reported. A total of 49 discrete sources are detected, including 12 ultraluminous X-ray source candidates with lum inosities above 10(exp 39)erg/s in the 0.5 - 8.0 keV X-ray band. Several of these latter are transient X-ray sources that fall below detect ion levels in one of two X-ray observations spaced 15 months apart. X-ray source positions are mapped onto optical and radio images to sear ch for potential counterparts. Eleven sources have optically-bright c ounterparts. Optical colors are used to differentiate these sources, which are mostly located outside the optical extent of the interacting galaxies, as potential globular clusters (3 sources) and quasars (5) . Follow-up optical spectroscopy confirms two of the latter are background quasars.

  12. Ionized Absorbers in Active Galactic Nuclei and Very Steap Soft X-Ray Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiore, Fabrizio; White, Nicholas (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Steep soft X-ray (0.1-2 keV) quasars share several unusual properties: narrow Balmer lines, strong Fe II emission, large and fast X-ray variability, and a rather steep 2-10 keV spectrum. These intriguing objects have been suggested to be the analogues of Galactic black hole candidates in the high, soft state. We present here results from ASCA observations for two of these quasars: NAB 0205 + 024 and PG 1244 + 026. Both objects show similar variations (factor of approximately 2 in 10 ks), despite a factor of approximately 10 difference in the 0.5-10 keV luminosity (7.3 x 10(exp 43) erg/s for PG 1244 + 026 and 6.4 x 10(exp 44) erg/s for NAB 0205 + 024, assuming isotropic emission, H(sub 0) = 50.0 and q(sub 0) = 0.0). The X-ray continuum of the two quasars flattens by 0.5-1 going from the 0.1-2 keV band towards higher energies, strengthening recent results on another half-dozen steep soft X-ray active galactic nuclei. PG 1244 + 026 shows a significant feature in the '1-keV' region, which can be described either as a broad emission line centered at 0.95 keV (quasar frame) or as edge or line absorption at 1.17 (1.22) keV. The line emission could be a result of reflection from a highly ionized accretion disc, in line with the view that steep soft X-ray quasars are emitting close to the Eddington luminosity. Photoelectric edge absorption or resonant line absorption could be produced by gas outflowing at a large velocity (0.3-0.6 c).

  13. A CANDIDATE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS WITH A PURE SOFT THERMAL X-RAY SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Terashima, Yuichi; Kamizasa, Naoya; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Kubota, Aya; Ueda, Yoshihiro

    2012-06-20

    We report the discovery of a candidate active galactic nucleus (AGN), 2XMM J123103.2+110648 at z = 0.13, with an X-ray spectrum represented purely by soft thermal emission reminiscent of Galactic black hole (BH) binaries in the disk-dominated state. This object was found in the second XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalog as a highly variable X-ray source. In three separate observations, its X-ray spectrum can be represented either by a multicolor disk blackbody model with an inner temperature of kT{sub in} Almost-Equal-To 0.16-0.21 keV or a Wien spectrum Comptonized by an optically thick plasma with kT Almost-Equal-To 0.14-0.18 keV. The soft X-ray luminosity in the 0.5-2 keV band is estimated to be (1.6-3.8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. Hard emission above {approx}2 keV is not detected. The ratio of the soft to hard emission is the strongest among AGNs observed thus far. Spectra selected in high/low-flux time intervals are examined in order to study spectral variability. In the second observation with the highest signal-to-noise ratio, the low-energy (below 0.7 keV) spectral regime flattens when the flux is high, while the shape of the high-energy part (1-1.7 keV) remains unchanged. This behavior is qualitatively consistent with being caused by strong Comptonization. Both the strong soft excess and spectral change consistent with Comptonization in the X-ray spectrum imply that the Eddington ratio is large, which requires a small BH mass (smaller than {approx}10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }).

  14. The XMM-Newton Bright Survey sample of absorbed quasars: X-ray and accretion properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballo, L.; Severgnini, P.; Della Ceca, R.; Caccianiga, A.; Vignali, C.; Carrera, F. J.; Corral, A.; Mateos, S.

    2014-11-01

    Although absorbed quasars are extremely important for our understanding of the energetics of the Universe, the main physical parameters of their central engines are still poorly known. In this work, we present and study a complete sample of 14 quasars (QSOs) that are absorbed in the X-rays (column density NH > 4 × 1021 cm-2 and X-ray luminosity L 2-10 keV > 1044 ergs-1; XQSO2) belonging to the XMM-Newton Bright Serendipitous Survey (XBS). From the analysis of their ultraviolet-to-mid-infrared spectral energy distribution, we can separate the nuclear emission from the host galaxy contribution, obtaining a measurement of the fundamental nuclear parameters, like the mass of the central supermassive black hole and the value of Eddington ratio, λ Edd. Comparing the properties of XQSO2s with those previously obtained for the X-ray unabsorbed QSOs in the XBS, we do not find any evidence that the two samples are drawn from different populations. In particular, the two samples span the same range in Eddington ratios, up to λ Edd ˜ 0.5; this implies that our XQSO2s populate the `forbidden region' in the so-called `effective Eddington limit paradigm'. A combination of low grain abundance, presence of stars inwards of the absorber, and/or anisotropy of the disc emission can explain this result.

  15. WATCHDOG: A COMPREHENSIVE ALL-SKY DATABASE OF GALACTIC BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Tetarenko, B. E.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Heinke, C. O.; Gladstone, J. C.

    2016-02-15

    With the advent of more sensitive all-sky instruments, the transient universe is being probed in greater depth than ever before. Taking advantage of available resources, we have established a comprehensive database of black hole (and black hole candidate) X-ray binary (BHXB) activity between 1996 and 2015 as revealed by all-sky instruments, scanning surveys, and select narrow-field X-ray instruments on board the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, Monitor of All-Sky X-ray Image, Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, and Swift telescopes; the Whole-sky Alberta Time-resolved Comprehensive black-Hole Database Of the Galaxy or WATCHDOG. Over the past two decades, we have detected 132 transient outbursts, tracked and classified behavior occurring in 47 transient and 10 persistently accreting BHs, and performed a statistical study on a number of outburst properties across the Galactic population. We find that outbursts undergone by BHXBs that do not reach the thermally dominant accretion state make up a substantial fraction (∼40%) of the Galactic transient BHXB outburst sample over the past ∼20 years. Our findings suggest that this “hard-only” behavior, observed in transient and persistently accreting BHXBs, is neither a rare nor recent phenomenon and may be indicative of an underlying physical process, relatively common among binary BHs, involving the mass-transfer rate onto the BH remaining at a low level rather than increasing as the outburst evolves. We discuss how the larger number of these “hard-only” outbursts and detected outbursts in general have significant implications for both the luminosity function and mass-transfer history of the Galactic BHXB population.

  16. Origin of X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Emission from the Galactic Central Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshov, D. O.; Cheng, K.-S.; Dogiel, V. A.; Ko, C. M.

    2017-02-01

    We study a possible connection between different non-thermal emissions from the inner few parsecs of the Galaxy. We analyze the origin of the gamma-ray source 2FGL J1745.6‑2858 (or 3FGL J1745.6‑2859c) in the Galactic Center (GC) and the diffuse hard X-ray component recently found by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, as well as the radio emission and processes of hydrogen ionization from this area. We assume that a source in the GC injected energetic particles with power-law spectrum into the surrounding medium in the past or continues to inject until now. The energetic particles may be protons, electrons, or a combination of both. These particles diffuse to the surrounding medium and interact with gas, magnetic field, and background photons to produce non-thermal emissions. We study the spectral and spatial features of the hard X-ray emission and gamma-ray emission by the particles from the central source. Our goal is to examine whether the hard X-ray and gamma-ray emissions have a common origin. Our estimations show that, in the case of pure hadronic models, the expected flux of hard X-ray emission is too low. Despite the fact that protons can produce a non-zero contribution in gamma-ray emission, it is unlikely that they and their secondary electrons can make a significant contribution in hard X-ray flux. In the case of pure leptonic models, it is possible to reproduce both X-ray and gamma-ray emissions for both transient and continuous supply models. However, in the case of the continuous supply model, the ionization rate of molecular hydrogen may significantly exceed the observed value.

  17. Spectral and Temporal Characteristics of X-Ray-Bright Stars in the Pleiades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagne, Marc; Caillault, Jean-Pierre; Stauffer, John R.

    1995-01-01

    We follow up our deep ROSAT imaging survey of the Pleiades (Stauffer et al. 1994) with an analysis of the spectral and temporal characteristics of the X-ray-bright stars in the Pleiades. Raymond & Smith (1977) one and two-temperature models have been used to fit the position-sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) pulse-height spectra of the dozen or so brightest sources associated with late-type Pleiades members. The best-fit temperatures suggest hot coronal temperatures for K, M, and rapidly rotating G stars, and cooler temperatures for F and slowly rotating G stars. In order to probe the many less X-ray-luminous stars, we have generated composite spectra by combining net counts from all Pleiades members according to spectral type and rotational velocity. Model fits to the composite spectra confirm the trend seen in the individual spectral fits. Particularly interesting is the apparent dependence of coronal temperature on L(sub x)/L(sub bol). A hardness-ratio analysis also confirms some of these trends. The PSPC data have also revealed a dozen or so strong X-ray flares with peak X-ray luminosities in excess of approx. 10(exp 30) ergs/sec. We have modeled the brightest of these flares with a simple quasi-static cooling loop model. The peak temperature and emission measure and the inferred electron density and plasma volume suggest a very large scale flaring event. The PSPC data were collected over a period of approx. 18 months, allowing us to search for source variability on timescales ranging from less than a day (in the case of flares) to more than a year between individual exposures. On approximately year-long timescales, roughly 25% of the late-type stars are variable. Since the Pleiades was also intensively monitored by the imaging instruments on the Einstein Observatory, we have examined X-ray luminosity variations on the 10 yr timescale between Einstein and ROSAT and find that up to 40% of the late-type stars are X-ray variable. Since there is only marginal

  18. H-alpha macrospicules - Identification with EUV macrospicules and with flares in X-ray bright points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Tang, F.; Bohlin, J. D.; Golub, L.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents observational evidence that two newly observed transient solar phenomena, EUV macrospicules and X-ray bright-point flares, are closely related. Time-lapse H-alpha filtergram observations of the limb in quiet regions show small surgelike eruptions called H-alpha macrospicules. From the similarity of H-alpha macrospicules and EUV macrospicules, and from comparison of simultaneous H-alpha and He II 304 A observations, we conclude that H-alpha macrospicules are EUV macrospicules viewed in H-alpha, although most EUV macrospicules are too faint in H-alpha to appear on H-alpha filtergrams of normal exposure. From comparison of simultaneous X-ray and H-alpha observations of flares in X-ray bright points situated on the limb, we show that flares in X-ray bright points often produce H-alpha macrospicules.

  19. X-Ray Constraints on Accretion and Starburst Processes in Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, Andrew Francis

    The results of X-ray observations of a sample of nearby low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGN), low-ionization nuclear emission line regions (LINERs), and starburst galaxies are presented. In general the 0.4-10.0 keV spectra of this heterogenous sample are fit well by a two-component model consisting of an optically-thin plasma with a temperature of ~0.7 keV and a power-law model with a photon index of ~1.7. Both the hot gas component and the hard, possibly nonthermal, X-ray emission appear to be common features of galaxies showing signs of nuclear activity. The spectrum of the hard component (roughly in the 2-10 keV bandpass) is most consistent with AGN, which are postulated to be accreting supermassive blackholes. X-ray binaries that are probably accreting blackhole candidates also appear to contribute significantly to the hard, and possibly to a lesser extent, the soft X-ray emission. Very hot (T~108 K) gas in a 'superwind' may also be contributing to the hard flux in some cases, probably concentrated in the nuclear regions of the galaxies. Another possible contributor to the featureless X-ray continuum may be inverse-Compton scattering of infrared photons, but the contribution of this component is sensitive to model assumptions. The soft emission appears to be supernovae-heated interstellar medium (ISM). In some cases, the SN-heating is actually in the form of a superwind, in which case ~90% of the X-ray emitting gas is 'swept-up' ISM and the remainder is (cooling) superwind emission out in the disks of the galaxies. Very low absolutes abundances are observed, but the uncertainties are large. Relative abundances are more secure and suggest that Fe is underabundant relative to α-process elements. The low relative Fe abundance may be due to enrichment by Type-II supernovae and∨ dust depletion, but non-equilibrium ionization may also be playing a part. Future observations by X-ray telescopes with high spatial and spectral resolution and improved

  20. X-ray Emission from the Star Clusters Near the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Law, C.; Fruscione, A.

    2001-09-01

    The detection of two thermal X-ray sources from an extraordinarily compact massive star cluster, the Arches cluster (G0.12-0.02), is reported. This cluster is embedded within a bath of diffuse X-ray emission extending beyond the edge of the cluster to at least 90''×60'' (3.6 pc × 2.4 pc). The diffuse emission beyond the boundary of the cluster is discussed in the context of combined shocked stellar winds escaping from the cluster. The presence of such a high velocity wind flow has implications for other dense systems of mass-losing hot stars such as the IRS 16 at the Galactic center. IRS 16 consists of a number of hot mass-losing stars which could produce an X-ray emitting high cluster wind flow with a velocity of ≈1000 km s-1 as predicted by Canto et al. and detected in the Arches cluster. The interaction of such a hot cluster wind flow with Sgr A* may affect the mass accretion rate. We also present the distribution of the 6.4 keV emission from the Arches cluster as well as discuss the relationship between the X-ray filaments at the edge of the nonthermal radio filaments of the Arc.

  1. A SEARCH FOR FAST X-RAY VARIABILITY FROM ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI USING SWIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Pryal, Matthew; Falcone, Abe; Stroh, Michael

    2015-03-20

    Blazars are a class of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) known for their very rapid variabilty in the high energy regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Despite this known fast variability, X-ray observations have generally not revealed variability in blazars with rate doubling or halving timescales less than approximately 15 minutes. Since its launch, the Swift X-ray Telescope has obtained 0.2–10 keV X-ray data on 143 AGNs, including blazars, through intense target of opportunity observations that can be analyzed in a multiwavelength context and used to model jet parameters, particularly during flare states. We have analyzed this broad Swift data set in a search for short timescale variability in blazars that could limit the size of the emission region in the blazar jet. While we do find several low-significance possible flares with potential indications of rapid variability, we find no strong evidence for rapid (<15 minutes) doubling or halving times in flares in the soft X-ray energy band for the AGNs analyzed.

  2. On the Nature of the Eclipsing Bright X-ray Source in the Circinus Galaxy Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; Wu, K.; Tennant, A. F.; Swartz, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    The X-ray spectrum and light curve of the bright source CG X-1 in the field of the Circinus galaxy are re-examined. Previous analyses have concluded that the source is an accreting black hole of about 50 solar masses although it was noted that the light curve resembles that of an AM Her-type system. Here we show that the light curve and orbital dynamics constrain the mass of the compact object to less than 30 solar masses and the mass of the companion to less than 1 solar mass. Combining the mass constraints with the observed X-ray flux, we show that an accreting object must either radiate anisotropically or strongly violate the Eddington limit. If the emission is beamed, then the companion star, which intercepts this flux during eclipse, will be driven out of thermal equilibrium and evaporate within approx. 103 yr. We find, therefore, that the observations are most consistent with the interpretation of CG X-1 as a bright, long-period, AM Her system in the Milky Way.

  3. Chandra Deep X-ray Observation of a Typical Galactic Plane Region and Near-Infrared Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebisawa, K.; Tsujimoto, M.; Paizis, A.; Hamaguichi, K.; Bamba, A.; Cutri, R.; Kaneda, H.; Maeda, Y.; Sato, G.; Senda, A.

    2004-01-01

    Using the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer Imaging array (ACIS-I), we have carried out a deep hard X-ray observation of the Galactic plane region at (l,b) approx. (28.5 deg,0.0 deg), where no discrete X-ray source has been reported previously. We have detected 274 new point X-ray sources (4 sigma confidence) as well as strong Galactic diffuse emission within two partidly overlapping ACIS-I fields (approx. 250 sq arcmin in total). The point source sensitivity was approx. 3 x 10(exp -15)ergs/s/sq cm in the hard X-ray band (2-10 keV and approx. 2 x 10(exp -16) ergs/s/sq cm in the soft band (0.5-2 keV). Sum of all the detected point source fluxes account for only approx. 10 % of the total X-ray fluxes in the field of view. In order to explain the total X-ray fluxes by a superposition of fainter point sources, an extremely rapid increase of the source population is required below our sensitivity limit, which is hardly reconciled with any source distribution in the Galactic plane. Therefore, we conclude that X-ray emission from the Galactic plane has truly diffuse origin. Only 26 point sources were detected both in the soft and hard bands, indicating that there are two distinct classes of the X-ray sources distinguished by the spectral hardness ratio. Surface number density of the hard sources is only slightly higher than observed at the high Galactic latitude regions, strongly suggesting that majority of the hard X-ray sources are active galaxies seen through the Galactic plane. Following the Chandra observation, we have performed a near-infrared (NIR) survey with SOFI at ESO/NTT to identify these new X-ray sources. Since the Galactic plane is opaque in NIR, we did not see the background extragalactic sources in NIR. In fact, only 22 % of the hard sources had NIR counterparts which are most likely to be Galactic origin. Composite X-ray energy spectrum of those hard X-ray sources having NIR counterparts exhibits a narrow approx. 6.7 keV iron emission line, which

  4. X-ray sources in the general direction of the galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, P. J.; Bleach, R. D.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    Spectra were measured in the range 1.5 to 35 keV from six low galactic latitude sources near the direction of the galactic center and were found to be generally consistent with thermal emission and, as a rule, to be depleted of low energy photons. An interpretation of the latter observation based on interstellar absorption places these sources toward the central region of the galaxy and sets their X-ray luminosity at or = 10 to the 38th power ergs/sec for each. The extended source 2U 1743-29 was observed in near coincidence with the galactic center; the observation supports a power law spectrum and rejects a blackbody interpretation of the emission from this source.

  5. The Discovery of X-ray Emission from Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Back in 1974 the UHURU catalog (3U) had been published with many UHGLS - unidentified high galactic latitude sources. Identifications were hampered by the square degree sized error boxes (positional uncertainties). Could these explain the cosmic X-ray background? Could UHGLS be "X-ray galaxies"? Only three active galaxies (AGNs) had been found as X-ray sources: 3C273, Cen A and NGC 4151, while others had upper limits. What was the difference between X-ray and non-X-ray AGNs? It turned out that the slightly better positioning capability and slightly deeper sensitivity of the Ariel V Sky Survey Instrument (SSI), launched in October 1974, were just enough to show that the UHGLS were Seyfert galaxies. And I was lucky enough that I'd joined the Leicester X-ray group and had taken on the UHGLS for my PhD thesis, with Ken Pounds as my supervisor. With the SSI we made a catalog of high latitude sources, the "2A" catalog, including about a dozen known Seyfert galaxies (lowish luminosity nearby AGNs) and, with Mike Penston and Martin Ward, we went on to identify many of them with both newly discovered normal broad emission line AGNs and a few new "narrow emission line galaxies", or NELGs, as we called them. We are now convinced that it is summation of many obscured NELGs that produce the flat spectrum of the X-ray background, and we are still searching for them in Chandra deep surveys and at higher energies with NuSTAR. There was an obvious connection between the X-ray obscuration and the optical reddening, which must lie outside the region emitting the broad optical spectral lines. Andy Lawrence and I, following a clue from Bill Keel, put this together into what we now call the Unified Scheme for AGN structure. This idea of a flattened torus obscuring the inner regions of the AGN was so dramatically confirmed a few years later -- by Ski Antonucci and Joe Miller's discovery of polarized broad emission lines in NGC1068 -- that the precursor papers became irrelevant. But Ariel

  6. A search for X-ray pulsations from the galactic center. [SAS-3 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordova, F. A.; Garmire, G. P.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1978-01-01

    Data from the SAS-3 satellite were used in a search for X-ray pulsations from the direction of the galactic center. No periodic X-ray behavior was detected in the frequency interval 0.6 Hz to 0.0006 Hz and energy range 2.5 - 35 keV. For periods less than 60 sec, the upper limit to the amplitude of any pulsation in the 2.5 - 10 keV band is approximately .0017 cts/sq cm/s. This corresponds to a pulsed fraction of approximately 1.3 percent of the total GCX flux. Somewhat higher limits apply for longer periods and for energies greater than 10 keV.

  7. X-ray observations of Galactic H.E.S.S. sources: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puehlhofer, G.; Eger, P.; Sasaki, M.; Gottschall, D.; Capasso, M.; H. E. S. S. Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    X-ray diagnostics of TeV sources continues to be an important tool to identify the nature of newly detected sources as well as to pinpoint the physics processes that are at work in these highly energetic objects. The contribution aims at giving a review of recent studies that we have performed on TeV sources with H.E.S.S. and XMM-Newton and also other X-ray facilities. Here, we will mainly focus on Galactic objects such as gamma-ray binaries, pulsar wind nebulae, and supernova remnants (SNRs). Particular emphasis will be given to SNR studies, including recently identified SNRs such as HESS J1731-347 and HESS J1534-571 as well as a revisit of RX J1713.7-3946.

  8. RXTE/ASM and Swift/BAT observations of spectral transitions in bright X-ray binaries in 2005-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Yu, Wen-Fei; Yan, Zhen

    2011-04-01

    We have studied X-ray spectral state transitions that can be seen in the long-term monitoring light curves of bright X-ray binaries from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) onboard Swift during a period of five years from 2005 to 2010. We have applied a program to automatically identify the hard-to-soft (H-S) spectral state transitions in the bright X-ray binaries monitored by the ASM and the BAT. In total, we identified 128 hard-to-soft transitions, of which 59 occurred after 2008. We also determined the transition fluxes and the peak fluxes of the following soft states, updated the measurements of the luminosity corresponding to the H-S transition and the peak luminosity of the following soft state in about 30 bright persistent and transient black hole and neutron star binaries following Yu & Yan, and found the luminosity correlation and the luminosity range of spectral transitions in data between 2008-2010 are about the same as those derived from data before 2008. This further strengthens the idea that the luminosity at which the H-S spectral transition occurs in the Galactic X-ray binaries is determined by non-stationary accretion parameters such as the rate-of-change of the mass accretion rate rather than the mass accretion rate itself. The correlation is also found to hold in data of individual sources 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53.

  9. A bright attosecond x-ray pulse train generation in a double-laser-driven cone target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Xiang; Yu, Tong-Pu; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Luo, Wen; Yin, Yan

    2016-06-01

    By using full three-dimensional particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate the generation of a high-brightness attosecond x-ray pulse train in a double-laser-driven cone target. The scheme makes use of two lasers: the first high-intensity laser with a laser peak intensity 1.37 × 1020 W/cm2 irradiates the cone and produces overdense attosecond electron bunches; the second counterpropagating weakly relativistic laser with a laser peak intensity 4.932 × 1017 W/cm2 interacts with the produced electron bunches and a bright x-ray pulse train is generated by Thomson backscattering of the second laser off the attosecond electron bunches. It is shown that the photon flux rises by 5 times using the cone target as compared with a normal channel. Meanwhile, the x-ray peak brightness increases significantly from 1.4 × 1021/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1 keV) to 6.0 × 1021/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1 keV), which is much higher than that of the Thomson x-ray source generated from traditional accelerators. We also discuss the influence of the laser and target parameters on the x-ray pulse properties. This compact bright x-ray source may have diverse applications, e.g., the study of electric dynamics and harmonics emission in the atomic scale.

  10. NuSTAR HARD X-RAY SURVEY OF THE GALACTIC CENTER REGION. I. HARD X-RAY MORPHOLOGY AND SPECTROSCOPY OF THE DIFFUSE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Perez, Kerstin; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Canipe, Alicia M.; Krivonos, Roman; Tomsick, John A.; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Hong, Jaesub; Ponti, Gabriele; Bauer, Franz; Alexander, David M.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barret, Didier; Christensen, Finn E.; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; and others

    2015-12-01

    We present the first sub-arcminute images of the Galactic Center above 10 keV, obtained with NuSTAR. NuSTAR resolves the hard X-ray source IGR J17456–2901 into non-thermal X-ray filaments, molecular clouds, point sources, and a previously unknown central component of hard X-ray emission (CHXE). NuSTAR detects four non-thermal X-ray filaments, extending the detection of their power-law spectra with Γ ∼ 1.3–2.3 up to ∼50 keV. A morphological and spectral study of the filaments suggests that their origin may be heterogeneous, where previous studies suggested a common origin in young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). NuSTAR detects non-thermal X-ray continuum emission spatially correlated with the 6.4 keV Fe Kα fluorescence line emission associated with two Sgr A molecular clouds: MC1 and the Bridge. Broadband X-ray spectral analysis with a Monte-Carlo based X-ray reflection model self-consistently determined their intrinsic column density (∼10{sup 23} cm{sup −2}), primary X-ray spectra (power-laws with Γ ∼ 2) and set a lower limit of the X-ray luminosity of Sgr A* flare illuminating the Sgr A clouds to L{sub X} ≳ 10{sup 38} erg s{sup −1}. Above ∼20 keV, hard X-ray emission in the central 10 pc region around Sgr A* consists of the candidate PWN G359.95–0.04 and the CHXE, possibly resulting from an unresolved population of massive CVs with white dwarf masses M{sub WD} ∼ 0.9 M{sub ⊙}. Spectral energy distribution analysis suggests that G359.95–0.04 is likely the hard X-ray counterpart of the ultra-high gamma-ray source HESS J1745–290, strongly favoring a leptonic origin of the GC TeV emission.

  11. Piecing together the X-ray background: bolometric corrections for active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, R. V.; Fabian, A. C.

    2007-11-01

    The X-ray background can be used to constrain the accretion history of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in active galactic nuclei (AGN), with the SMBH mass density related to the energy density due to accretion. A knowledge of the hard X-ray bolometric correction, κ2-10keV, is a vital input into these studies, as it allows us to constrain the parameters of the accretion responsible for SMBH growth. Earlier studies assumed a constant bolometric correction for all AGN, and more recent work has suggested accounting for a dependence on AGN luminosity. Until recently, the variations in the disc emission in the ultraviolet (UV) have not been taken into account in this calculation; we show that such variations are important by construction of optical-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions for 54 AGN. In particular, we use Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) UV and X-ray data from the literature to constrain the disc emission as well as possible. We find evidence for very significant spread in the bolometric corrections, with no simple dependence on luminosity being evident. Populations of AGN such as narrow-line Seyfert 1 nuclei, radio-loud and X-ray-weak AGN may have bolometric corrections which differ systematically from the rest of the AGN population. We identify other sources of uncertainty including intrinsic extinction in the optical-UV, X-ray and UV variability and uncertainties in SMBH mass estimates. Our results suggest a more well-defined relationship between the bolometric correction and Eddington ratio in AGN, with a transitional region at an Eddington ratio of ~0.1, below which the bolometric correction is typically 15-25, and above which it is typically 40-70. We consider the potential-implied parallels with the low/hard and high/soft states in Galactic black hole (GBH) accretion, and present bolometric corrections for the GBH binary GX 339-4 for comparison. Our findings reinforce previous studies proposing a multistate description of AGN

  12. X-ray color analysis of the spectra of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Netzer, Hagai; Turner, T. J.; George, Ian M.

    1994-01-01

    The identification and detection of X-ray absorption and emission features depends on the resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the observation, the understanding of the instrument response, and the Galactic line-of-sight absorption. Since many of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) data sets are limited in their S/N and full modeling of the physical conditions is rather complicated, we suggest a new analysis method based on 'X-ray colors.' The two sets of X-ray colors, defined for low (ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC)) and medium (Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT)) and ASCA Solid-State Imaging Spectrometers (SIS) resolution experiments, are used to separate regions of different physical conditions in a two-dimensional color-color plane. They are similar but superior to previous methods using the X-ray 'hardness ratio' in being able to reveal more of the physical properties of the source. We illustrate the use of such diagrams by studying a number of AGNs suspected of showing absorption features. A sample of 14 AGNs observed by the ROSAT PSPC is presented which includes several objects with suspected 'warm absorbers' along the line-of-sight to the nucleus, several others exhibiting intrinsic continuum variations, and a number of control objects thought to be featureless. Our new observations show, for the first time, the color variation as a function of time for three of the Seyfert 1 sources: NGC 4051, Mrk 335, and Mrk 766. The variations suggest that in two sources we are witnessing real changes in continuum shape, while one (NGC 4051) is consistent with having a warm absorber. Four of the objects observed by BBXRT are reanalyzed using our X-ray colors. Out of these, we discuss in detail the case of NGC 4151 and show that the color-color analysis agrees very well with previous, detailed spectral fitting methods. In particular, we confirm that the observed BBXRT observation of this source is not consistent with the warm absorber

  13. Origin of the Galactic Diffuse X-Ray Emission: Iron K-shell Line Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Uchiyama, Hideki; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Koyama, Katsuji

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports detailed K-shell line profiles of iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) of the Galactic Center X-ray Emission (GCXE), Galactic Bulge X-ray Emission (GBXE), Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE), magnetic Cataclysmic Variables (mCVs), non-magnetic Cataclysmic Variables (non-mCVs), and coronally Active Binaries (ABs). For the study of the origin of the GCXE, GBXE, and GRXE, the spectral analysis is focused on equivalent widths of the Fe i-Kα, Fe xxv-Heα, and Fe xxvi-Lyα lines. The global spectrum of the GBXE is reproduced by a combination of the mCVs, non-mCVs, and ABs spectra. On the other hand, the GRXE spectrum shows significant data excesses at the Fe i-Kα and Fe xxv-Heα line energies. This means that additional components other than mCVs, non-mCVs, and ABs are required, which have symbiotic phenomena of cold gas and very high-temperature plasma. The GCXE spectrum shows larger excesses than those found in the GRXE spectrum at all the K-shell lines of iron and nickel. Among them the largest ones are the Fe i-Kα, Fe xxv-Heα, Fe xxvi-Lyα, and Fe xxvi-Lyβ lines. Together with the fact that the scale heights of the Fe i-Kα, Fe xxv-Heα, and Fe xxvi-Lyα lines are similar to that of the central molecular zone (CMZ), the excess components would be related to high-energy activity in the extreme envelopment of the CMZ.

  14. Exploring the active galactic nuclei population with extreme X-ray-to-optical flux ratios (fx/fo > 50)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Ceca, R.; Carrera, F. J.; Caccianiga, A.; Severgnini, P.; Ballo, L.; Braito, V.; Corral, A.; Del Moro, A.; Mateos, S.; Ruiz, A.; Watson, M. G.

    2015-03-01

    The cosmic history of the growth of supermassive black holes in galactic centres parallels that of star formation in the Universe. However, an important fraction of this growth occurs inconspicuously in obscured objects, where ultraviolet/optical/near-infrared emission is heavily obscured by dust. Since the X-ray flux is less attenuated, a high X-ray-to-optical flux ratio (fx/fo) is expected to be an efficient tool to find out these obscured accreting sources. We explore here via optical spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and infrared photometry the most extreme cases of this population (those with fx/fo > 50, EXO50 sources hereafter), using a well-defined sample of seven X-ray sources extracted from the 2XMM catalogue. Five EXO50 sources (˜70 per cent of the sample) in the bright flux regime explored by our survey (f(2-10 keV) ≥ 1.5 × 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1) are associated with obscured AGN (NH > 1022 cm-2), spanning a redshift range between 0.75 and 1 and characterized by 2-10 keV intrinsic luminosities in the QSO regime (e.g. well in excess to 1044 erg s-1). We did not find compelling evidence of Compton thick active galacic nuclei (AGN). Overall, the EXO50 type 2 QSOs do not seem to be different from standard X-ray-selected type 2 QSOs in terms of nuclear absorption; a very high AGN/host galaxy ratio seems to play a major role in explaining their extreme properties. Interestingly, three out of five EXO50 type 2 QSO objects can be classified as extreme dust-obscured galaxies (EDOGs, f24 μm/fR ≥ 2000), suggesting that a very high AGN/host ratios (along with the large amount of dust absorption) could be the natural explanation also for a part of the EDOG population. The remaining two EXO50 sources are classified as BL Lac objects, having rather extreme properties, and which are good candidates for TeV emission.

  15. Ensemble X-ray variability of active galactic nuclei at intermediate and long time lags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagnetti, Fausto; Middei, Riccardo

    2016-08-01

    We present a variability analysis for a sample of 2700 active galactic nuclei extracted from the latest release of the XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalogue. The structure function of this sample increases up to rest-frame time lags of about 5 years. Moreover, comparing observations performed by the XMM-Newton and ROSAT satellites, we are able to extend the X-ray structure function to 20 years rest-frame, showing a further increase of variability without any evidence of a plateau. Our results are compared with similar analyses in the optical band, and discussed in relation to the physical sizes of the emitting regions.

  16. First results from the high-brightness x-ray spectroscopy beamline 9. 3.1 at ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, W.; Jones, G.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1995-10-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range. This beamline is designed to achieve the goal of high brightness at the sample for use in the X-ray Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy (XAMS) science, surface and interface science, biology, and x-ray optical development programs at ALS. X-ray absorption and time of flight photoemission measurements in 2 - 5 keV photon energy along with the flux, resolution, spot size and stability of the beamline will be discussed. Prospects for future XAMS measurements will also be presented.

  17. Plasmon-enhanced photocathode for high brightness and high repetition rate x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, Aleksandr; Senft, Christoph; Thompson, K. F.; Feng, J.; Cabrini, S.; Schuck, P. J.; Padmore, Howard; Peppernick, Samuel J.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-02-11

    High brightness electron sources are at the heart of anew generation of x-ray sources based on the Free ElectronLaser (FEL) as well as in Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) sources.The source of electrons consists of a photoinjector, comprised of a laser-driven photocathode in a high gradient electric field produced by an rf cavity. The function of the rf cavity is to provide a field sufficient for acceleration of electrons to relativistic velocity over a small distance, thus minimizing effects of the space-charge. Even so, the dense electron beam required for high brightness suffers from a space charge field that chirps and reshapes the electron pulse increasing beam emittance and thus reducing the overall brightness. This emittance growth can be avoided if the initial distribution of electrons is pancake shaped, with a semicircular transverse intensity profile. In this case, the electron distribution develops under its space charge field from a pancake into a uniformly filled ellipsoidal beam. This condition, referred to as the blowout regime, requires ultrashort pulses less than 100 fs long and has been successfully demonstrated recently in a high gradient photoinjector.

  18. Can AGN and galaxy clusters explain the surface brightness fluctuations of the cosmic X-ray background?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodzig, Alexander; Gilfanov, Marat; Hütsi, Gert; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2017-04-01

    Fluctuations of the surface brightness of cosmic X-ray background (CXB) carry unique information about faint and low-luminosity source populations, which is inaccessible for conventional large-scale structure (LSS) studies based on resolved sources. We used XBOOTES (5ks deep Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-I maps of the ∼ 9 deg2 Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey) to conduct the most accurate measurement to date of the power spectrum of fluctuations of the unresolved CXB on the angular scales of 3 arcsec-17 arcmin. We find that at sub-arcmin angular scales, the power spectrum is consistent with the active galactic nucleus (AGN) shot noise, without much need for any significant contribution from their one-halo term. This is consistent with the theoretical expectation that low-luminosity AGN reside alone in their dark matter haloes. However, at larger angular scales, we detect a significant LSS signal above the AGN shot noise. Its power spectrum, obtained after subtracting the AGN shot noise, follows a power law with the slope of -0.8 ± 0.1 and its amplitude is much larger than what can be plausibly explained by the two-halo term of AGN. We demonstrate that the detected LSS signal is produced by unresolved clusters and groups of galaxies. For the flux limit of the XBOOTES survey, their flux-weighted mean redshift equals ∼ 0.3, and the mean temperature of their intracluster medium (ICM), ≈ 1.4 keV, corresponds to the mass of M500 ∼ 1013.5 M⊙. The power spectrum of CXB fluctuations carries information about the redshift distribution of these objects and the spatial structure of their ICM on the linear scales of up to ∼Mpc, i.e. of the order of the virial radius.

  19. Bright betatronlike x rays from radiation pressure acceleration of a mass-limited foil target.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tong-Pu; Pukhov, Alexander; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Feng; Shvets, Gennady

    2013-01-25

    By using multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we study the electromagnetic emission from radiation pressure acceleration of ultrathin mass-limited foils. When a circularly polarized laser pulse irradiates the foil, the laser radiation pressure pushes the foil forward as a whole. The outer wings of the pulse continue to propagate and act as a natural undulator. Electrons move together with ions longitudinally but oscillate around the latter transversely, forming a self-organized helical electron bunch. When the electron oscillation frequency coincides with the laser frequency as witnessed by the electron, betatronlike resonance occurs. The emitted x rays by the resonant electrons have high brightness, short durations, and broad band ranges which may have diverse applications.

  20. Rapidly Rotating, X-Ray Bright Stars in the Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Mason, Elena; Boyd, Patricia; Smith, Krista Lynne; Gelino, Dawn M.

    2016-11-01

    We present Kepler light curves and optical spectroscopy of twenty X-ray bright stars located in the Kepler field of view. The stars, spectral type F-K, show evidence for rapid rotation including chromospheric activity 100 times or more above the Sun at maximum and flaring behavior in their light curves. Eighteen of our objects appear to be (sub)giants and may belong to the class of FK Com variables, which are evolved rapidly spinning single stars with no excretion disk and high levels of chromospheric activity. Such stars are rare and are likely the result of W UMa binary mergers, a process believed to produce the FK Com class of variable and their descendants. The FK Com stage, including the presence of an excretion disk, is short lived but leads to longer-lived stages consisting of single, rapidly rotating evolved (sub)giants with high levels of stellar activity.

  1. Evidence for Intermediate Polars as the origin of the Galactic Center hard X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hailey, Charles James; NuSTAR Galactic Plane Survey Working Group

    2016-01-01

    Recently, NuSTAR has discovered an unresolved hard (20-40 keV) X-ray emission within the central 10 pc of the Galaxy, possibly indicating a large population of intermediate polars (IPs). Chandra and XMM-Newton measurements of both point sources and diffuse emission in the surrounding ~50 pc imply a population of magnetic CVs with white dwarf mass ~ 0.5 M⊙. We present NuSTAR broad-band (3-79 keV) spectroscopy of two nearby IPs (TV Columbae and IGR J17303-0601) as well as our investigation of various spectral models and previous X-ray observations. We argue that the observations of both the inner 10 pc and the surrounding 50 pc can be accounted for by IPs with mean white dwarf mass ~ 0.9 M⊙. We find that the lower mass derived by Chandra and XMM-Newton is an artifact of narrow energy band fitting, and the spectral features associated with these measurements naturally arise in a heavier IP population. We also discuss implications for the X-ray emission and source population in the Galactic ridge and bulge.

  2. Spectral evolution of active galactic nuclei: A unified description of the X-ray and gamma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiter, D.; Boldt, E.

    1982-01-01

    A model for spectral evolution is presented whereby active galactic nuclei (AGN) of the type observed individually emerge from an earlier stage at z approx = 4 in which they are the thermal X-ray sources responsible for most of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB). The conjecture is pursued that these precursor objects are initially supermassive Schwarzschild black holes with accretion disks radiating near the Eddington luminosity limit. It is noted that after approx. 10 to the 8th power years these central black holes are spun-up to a canonical Kerr equilibrium state (A/M = 0.998; Thorne 1974) and shown how they then can lead to spectral evolution involving non-thermal emission extending to gamma rays, at the expense of reduced thermal disk radiation. That major portion of the CXB remaining after the contribution of usual AGN are considered, while a superposition of AGN sources at z 1 can account for the gamma ray background. Extensive X-ray measurements carried out with the HEAO 1 and 2 missions as well as gamma ray and optical data are shown to compare favorably with principal features of this model.

  3. Thermometric- and Acoustic-Based Beam Power Monitor for Ultra-Bright X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bentsen, Gregory; /Rochester U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A design for an average beam power monitor for ultra-bright X-ray sources is proposed that makes simultaneous use of calorimetry and radiation acoustics. Radiation incident on a solid target will induce heating and ultrasonic vibrations, both of which may be measured to give a fairly precise value of the beam power. The monitor is intended for measuring ultra-bright Free-Electron Laser (FEL) X-ray beams, for which traditional monitoring technologies such as photo-diodes or scintillators are unsuitable. The monitor consists of a Boron Carbide (B{sub 4}C) target designed to absorb most of the incident beam's energy. Resistance temperature detectors (RTD) and piezoelectric actuators are mounted on the outward faces of the target to measure the temperature changes and ultrasonic vibrations induced by the incident beam. The design was tested using an optical pulsed beam (780 nm, 120 and 360 Hz) from a Ti:sapphire oscillator at several energies between 0.8 and 2.6 mJ. The RTDs measured an increase in temperature of about 10 K over a period of several minutes. The piezoelectric sensors recorded ringing acoustic oscillations at 580 {+-} 40 kHz. Most importantly, the amplitude of the acoustic signals was observed to scale linearly with beam power up to 2 mJ of pulse energy. Above this pulse energy, the vibrational signals became nonlinear. Several causes for this nonlinearity are discussed, including amplifier saturation and piezoelectric saturation. Despite this nonlinearity, these measurements demonstrate the feasibility of such a beam power measurement device. The advantage of two distinct measurements (acoustic and thermometric) provides a useful method of calibration that is unavailable to current LCLS diagnostics tools.

  4. HCO emission toward the X-ray reflexion nebula Sgr B2 in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijos Abendaño, Jairo

    The Galactic Center (GC) with its relative proximity (˜8.5 Kpc) is an excellent laboratory to study physical processes in a galactic nucleus with an incomparable high angular resolution. The GC hosts a supermassive black hole, Sgr A*, with a mass of ˜4×10(6) M⊙. The interstellar medium in the GC reveal a harsh environment since it is affected by large scale shocks, star formation activity and high energy phenomena. Furthermore, time-variability of X-ray emission is observed toward the molecular cloud complexes of Sgr A and Sgr B2 located in the GC. To explain this time-variability the X-ray reflection nebula scenario has been proposed. This scenario suggests that an enhanced activity of Sgr A* occurred ˜100 years ago, generating a huge X-ray flare that illuminated both cloud complexes in the GC. It is believed that HCO increases its abundance in Photo-Dominated Regions (PDRs) and X-ray Dominated Regions (XDRs). Furthermore, the Fe Kalpha line at 6.4 keV is an excellent tracer of XDRs. This line is produced by fluorescence when X-rays and/or high energy particles (>7.1 keV) interact with neutral or partially ionized iron atoms. The Sgr B2 complex hosts a large amount of regions with ionized hydrogen (HII regions) by UV radiation from nearby stars. These HII regions should illuminate a large number of PDRs in the environment of Sgr B2. Thus, the Sgr B2 complex is unique since PDRs and XDRs can clearly be resolved with the angular resolutions achieved by using actual single dish radio telescopes. HCO observations at 3 mm wavelengths were obtained with the IRAM 30 meter telescope at Pico Veleta (Spain) in 2006. The general aim of this work is to study the spatial distribution of the HCO(1-0) emission toward a 36x32 pc(2) region of the Sgr B2 complex in order to disentangle if this molecule is preferentially synthesized toward PDRs or/and XDRs. We found a good correlation between the HCO(1-0) emission and the Fe Kalpha line emission rather than the emission from

  5. The X-ray properties of five galactic supernova remnants detected by the Spitzer glimpse survey

    SciTech Connect

    Pannuti, Thomas G.; Moffitt, William P.; Rho, Jeonghee; Heinke, Craig O. E-mail: w.moffitt@moreheadstate.edu E-mail: heinke@ualberta.ca

    2014-03-01

    We present a study of the X-ray properties of five Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs)—Kes 17 (G304.6+0.1), G311.5–0.3, G346.6–0.2, CTB 37A (G348.5+0.1), and G348.5–0.0—that were detected in the infrared by Reach et al. in an analysis of data from the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) that was conducted by the Spitzer Space Telescope. We present and analyze archival ASCA observations of Kes 17, G311.5–0.3, and G346.6–0.2, archival XMM-Newton observations of Kes 17, CTB 37A, and G348.5–0.0, and an archival Chandra observation of CTB 37A. All of the SNRs are clearly detected in the X-ray except possibly G348.5–0.0. Our study reveals that the four detected SNRs all feature center-filled X-ray morphologies and that the observed emission from these sources is thermal in all cases. We argue that these SNRs should be classified as mixed-morphology SNRs (MM SNRs); our study strengthens the correlation between MM SNRs and SNRs interacting with molecular clouds and suggests that the origin of MM SNRs may be due to the interactions between these SNRs and adjacent clouds. Our ASCA analysis of G311.5–0.3 reveals for the first time X-ray emission from this SNR: the X-ray emission is center-filled within the radio and infrared shells and thermal in nature (kT ∼ 0.98 keV), thus motivating its classification as an MM SNR. We find considerable spectral variations in the properties associated with the plasmas of the other X-ray-detected SNRs, such as a possible overabundance of magnesium in the plasma of Kes 17. Our new results also include the first detailed spatially resolved spectroscopic study of CTB 37A using Chandra as well as a spectroscopic study of the discrete X-ray source CXOU J171428.5–383601, which may be a neutron star associated with CTB 37A. Finally, we also estimate such properties as electron density n{sub e} , radiative age t {sub rad} and swept-up mass M{sub X} for each of the four X-ray-detected SNRs. Each

  6. Dynamics and X-ray emission of a galactic superwind interacting with disk and halo gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suchkov, Anatoly A.; Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Leitherner, Claus

    1994-01-01

    There is a general agreement that the conspicuous extranuclear X-ray, optical-line, and radio-contiuum emission of starbursts is associated with powerful galactic superwinds blowing from their centers. However, despite the significant advances in observational studies of superwinds, there is no consensus on the nature of the emitting material and even on the emission mechanisms themselves. This is to a great extent a consequence of a poor understanding of dynamical processes in the starburst superwind regions. To address this issue, we have conducted two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of galactic superwinds. While previous similar studies have used a single (disk) component to represent the ISM of the starburst galaxy, we analyze the interaction of the wind with a two-component disk-halo ambient interstellar medium and argue that this two-component representation is crucial for adequate modeling of starbursts. The emphasis of this study is on the geometry and structure of the wind region and the X-ray emission arising in the wind material and the shocked gas in the disk and the halo of the galaxy. The simulation results have shown that a clear-cut bipolar wind can easily develop under a range of very different conditions. On the other hand, a complex 'filamentary' structure associated with the entrained dense disk material is found to arise within the hot bubble blown out by the wind. The flow pattern within the bubble is dominated equally by the central biconic outflow and a system of whirling motions r elated to the origin and development of the 'filaments'. The filament parameters make them a good candidate for optical-emission-line filamentary gas observed in starburst halos. We find that the history of mass and energy deposition in the starburst region of the galaxy is crucial for wind dynamics. A 'mild' early wind, which arises as a result of the cumulative effect of stellar winds from massive stars, produces a bipolar vertical cavity in the disk and

  7. Ensemble X-ray variability of active galactic nuclei. II. Excess variance and updated structure function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagnetti, F.; Middei, R.; Antonucci, M.; Paolillo, M.; Serafinelli, R.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Most investigations of the X-ray variability of active galactic nuclei (AGN) have been concentrated on the detailed analyses of individual, nearby sources. A relatively small number of studies have treated the ensemble behaviour of the more general AGN population in wider regions of the luminosity-redshift plane. Aims: We want to determine the ensemble variability properties of a rich AGN sample, called Multi-Epoch XMM Serendipitous AGN Sample (MEXSAS), extracted from the fifth release of the XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue (XMMSSC-DR5), with redshift between ~0.1 and ~5, and X-ray luminosities in the 0.5-4.5 keV band between ~1042 erg/s and ~1047 erg/s. Methods: We urge caution on the use of the normalised excess variance (NXS), noting that it may lead to underestimate variability if used improperly. We use the structure function (SF), updating our previous analysis for a smaller sample. We propose a correction to the NXS variability estimator, taking account of the light curve duration in the rest frame on the basis of the knowledge of the variability behaviour gained by SF studies. Results: We find an ensemble increase of the X-ray variability with the rest-frame time lag τ, given by SF ∝ τ0.12. We confirm an inverse dependence on the X-ray luminosity, approximately as SF ∝ LX-0.19. We analyse the SF in different X-ray bands, finding a dependence of the variability on the frequency as SF ∝ ν-0.15, corresponding to a so-called softer when brighter trend. In turn, this dependence allows us to parametrically correct the variability estimated in observer-frame bands to that in the rest frame, resulting in a moderate (≲15%) shift upwards (V-correction). Conclusions: Ensemble X-ray variability of AGNs is best described by the structure function. An improper use of the normalised excess variance may lead to an underestimate of the intrinsic variability, so that appropriate corrections to the data or the models must be applied to prevent

  8. The Galactic Population of Low- and Intermediate-Mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfahl, Eric; Rappaport, Saul; Podsiadlowski, Philipp

    2003-11-01

    We present the first study that combines binary population synthesis in the Galactic disk and detailed evolutionary calculations of low- and intermediate-mass X-ray binaries (L/IMXBs). Our approach allows us to follow completely the formation of incipient L/IMXBs and their evolution through the mass-transfer phase to the point when they become binary millisecond pulsars (BMPs). We show that the formation probability of IMXBs with initial donor masses of 1.5-4Msolar is typically >~5 times higher than that of standard LMXBs with initial donor masses of less than 1.5Msolar. Since IMXBs evolve to resemble observed LMXBs, we suggest that the majority of the observed systems may have descended from IMXBs. Distributions at the current epoch of the orbital periods, donor masses, and mass accretion rates of L/IMXBs have been computed, as have orbital-period distributions of BMPs. This is a major step forward over previous theoretical population studies of L/IMXBs that utilized only crude representations of the binary evolution through the X-ray phase. Several significant discrepancies between the theoretical and observed distributions are discussed. We find that the total number of luminous (LX>1036ergss-1) X-ray sources at the current epoch and the period distribution of BMPs are very sensitive to the parameters in the analytic formula describing the common-envelope phase that precedes the formation of the neutron star. The orbital-period distribution of observed BMPs strongly favors cases in which the common envelope is more easily ejected. However, this leads to an approximately hundred-fold overproduction of the theoretical number of luminous X-ray sources relative to the total observed number of LMXBs. As noted by several groups prior to our study, X-ray irradiation of the donor star may result in a dramatic reduction in the X-ray active lifetime of L/IMXBs, and we suggest that irradiation may resolve the overproduction problem as well as the long-standing BMP

  9. X-ray polarization fluctuations induced by cloud eclipses in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, F.; Dovčiak, M.

    2015-01-01

    Context. A fraction of active galactic nuclei (AGN) show dramatic X-ray spectral changes on the day-to-week time scales associated with variation in the line of sight of the cold absorber. Aims: We intend to model the polarization fluctuations arising from an obscuration event, thereby offering a method of determining whether flux variations are due to occultation or extreme intrinsic emission variability. Methods: Undertaking 1-100 keV polarimetric simulations with the Monte Carlo code Stokes, we simulated the journey of a variety of cold gas clouds in front of an extended primary source. We varied the hydrogen column density nH and size of the absorber, as well as the initial polarization state of the emitting source, to cover a wide range of scenarios. Results: Simulations indicate that different results are expected according to the initial polarization of the extended continuum source. For unpolarized primary fluxes, large (~50°) variations of the polarization position angle ψ are expected before and after an occultation event, which is associated with very low residual polarization degrees (P ≪ 1%). In the case of an emitting disk with intrinsic, position-independent polarization, and for a given range of parameters, X-ray eclipses significantly alter the observed polarization spectra, with most of the variations seen in ψ. Finally, non-uniformly polarized emitting regions produce very distinctive polarization variations due to the successive covering and uncovering of different portions of the disk. Plotted against time, variations in P and ψ form detectable P Cygni type profiles that are distinctive signatures of non-axisymmetric emission. Conclusions: We find that X-ray polarimetry is particularly adapted to probing X-ray eclipses due to Compton-thin and Compton-thick gas clouds. Polarization measurements would distinguish between intrinsic intensity fluctuations and external eclipsing events, constrain the geometry of the covering medium, and test

  10. Evidence for Intermediate Polars as the Origin of the Galactic Center Hard X-ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya; Perez, Kerstin; Canipe, Alicia M.; Hong, Jaesub; Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Fornasini, Francesca; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Nynka, Melania; Rahoui, Farid; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, William W.

    2016-08-01

    Recently, unresolved hard (20-40 keV) X-ray emission has been discovered within the central 10 pc of the Galaxy, possibly indicating a large population of intermediate polars (IPs). Chandra and XMM-Newton measurements in the surrounding ˜50 pc imply a much lighter population of IPs with < {M}{{WD}}> ≈ 0.5{M}⊙ . Here we use broadband NuSTAR observations of two IPs: TV Columbae, which has a fairly typical but widely varying reported mass of {M}{{WD}}≈ 0.5-1.0{M}⊙ , and IGR J17303-0601, with a heavy reported mass of {M}{{WD}}≈ 1.0-1.2{M}⊙ . We investigate how varying spectral models and observed energy ranges influences estimated white dwarf mass. Observations of the inner 10 pc can be accounted for by IPs with < {M}{{WD}}> ≈ 0.9{M}⊙ , consistent with that of the CV population in general and the X-ray observed field IPs in particular. The lower mass derived by Chandra and XMM-Newton appears to be an artifact of narrow energy-band fitting. To explain the (unresolved) central hard X-ray emission (CHXE) by IPs requires an X-ray (2-8 keV) luminosity function (XLF) extending down to at least 5 × 1031 erg s-1. The CHXE XLF, if extended to the surrounding ˜50 pc observed by Chandra and XMM-Newton, requires that at least ˜20%-40% of the ˜9000 point sources are IPs. If the XLF extends just a factor of a few lower in luminosity, then the vast majority of these sources are IPs. This is in contrast to recent observations of the Galactic ridge, where the bulk of the 2-8 keV emission is ascribed to non-magnetic CVs.

  11. Hot galactic winds constrained by the X-ray luminosities of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Dong; Thompson, Todd A.; Murray, Norman; Quataert, Eliot E-mail: thompson@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2014-04-01

    Galactic superwinds may be driven by very hot outflows generated by overlapping supernovae within the host galaxy. We use the Chevalier and Clegg (CC85) wind model and the observed correlation between X-ray luminosities of galaxies and their star formation rates (SFRs) to constrain the mass-loss rates ( M-dot {sub hot}) across a wide range of SFRs, from dwarf starbursts to ultraluminous infrared galaxies. We show that for fixed thermalization and mass-loading efficiencies, the X-ray luminosity of the hot wind scales as L{sub X} ∝SFR{sup 2}, significantly steeper than is observed for star-forming galaxies: L{sub X} ∝SFR. Using this difference, we constrain the mass-loading and thermalization efficiency of hot galactic winds. For reasonable values of the thermalization efficiency (≲ 1) and for SFR ≳ 10 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} we find that M-dot {sub hot}/SFR≲ 1, which is significantly lower than required by integrated constraints on the efficiency of stellar feedback in galaxies and potentially too low to explain observations of winds from rapidly star-forming galaxies. In addition, we highlight the fact that heavily mass-loaded winds cannot be described by the adiabatic CC85 model because they become strongly radiative.

  12. THE FIRST HARD X-RAY POWER SPECTRAL DENSITY FUNCTIONS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, T. Taro; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2013-06-10

    We present results of our power spectral density (PSD) analysis of 30 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using the 58 month light curves from Swift's Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) in the 14-150 keV band. PSDs were fit using a Monte Carlo based algorithm to take into account windowing effects and measurement error. All but one source were found to be fit very well using an unbroken power law with a slope of {approx} - 1, consistent at low frequencies with previous studies in the 2-10 keV band, with no evidence of a break in the PSD. For five of the highest signal-to-noise ratio sources, we tested the energy dependence of the PSD and found no significant difference in the PSD at different energies. Unlike previous studies of X-ray variability in AGNs, we do not find any significant correlations between the hard X-ray variability and different properties of the AGN including luminosity and black hole mass. The lack of break frequencies and correlations seem to indicate that AGNs are similar to the high state of Galactic black holes.

  13. Origin of the Galactic Diffuse X-ray Emission: Iron K-Shell Line Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Uchiyama, Hideki; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Koyama, Katsuji

    2017-01-01

    An unresolved X-ray emission extends along the Galactic plane, so-called the Galactic diffuse X-ray emission (GDXE). The characteristic feature is three K-shell lines of Fe at 6.4, 6.7, and 6.9 keV. Recently, superposition of faint point sources, such as Cataclysmic variables (CVs) and Active binaries (ABs) is thought to be a major origin, although it is under debate which sub-class mostly contribute. We re-analyzed the Suzaku archive data and constructed spectral models of ABs, magnetic CVs (mCVs), and non-magnetic CVs (non-mCVs). The GBXE is explained by combination of those models; non-mCVs and ABs mainly contribute while mCVs account for ~10% or less of the 5-10 keV flux. On the other hand, the GCXE and GRXE spectra cannot be represented by any combination of the point sources, indicating another origin would be required.

  14. The search for low-luminosity high-mass X-ray binaries and the study of X-ray populations in the Galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornasini, Francesca; Tomsick, John; Bodaghee, Arash; Rahoui, Farid; Krivonos, Roman; Corral-Santana, Jesus; An, Hongjun; Bauer, Franz E.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Stern, Daniel; NuSTAR Galactic Plane Survey Team

    2016-01-01

    High-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), which consist of a neutron star (NS) or black hole (BH) accreting material from a massive stellar companion, provide valuable insights into the evolution of massive stars and the merger rates of NS/NS, NS/BH, and BH/BH binaries whose gravitational wave signatures will soon be detectable by facilities such as Advanced-LIGO. INTEGRAL discoveries of new classes of lower-luminosity HMXBs, some highly obscured and some showing extreme transient activity, as well as the recent discovery of the very quiescent and only known Be-BH binary, have considerably changed our understanding of clumping in massive stellar winds and the relative importance of different binary evolutionary channels. In order to better characterize the low-luminosity HMXB population, we have performed a survey of a square degree region in the direction of the Norma spiral arm with Chandra and NuSTAR. These surveys, combined with optical and infrared spectroscopic follow-up of the counterparts of hard X-ray sources, have yielded three HMXB candidates to date. Future radial-velocity follow-up of these candidates, as well as other Be HMXB candidates from the NuSTAR serendipitous survey, will help determine whether these sources truly are HMXBs and, if so, constrain the mass of the compact object in these systems. If confirmed, these HMXB candidates could extend our measurement of the HMXB luminosity function by about two orders of magnitude and provide important constraints on massive binary evolutionary models. In addition, the colliding wind binaries and pulsar wind nebulae discovered in the Norma X-ray survey will help shed light on other aspects of massive stellar evolution and massive stellar remnants. Finally, these surveys provide the opportunity to compare the hard X-ray populations in the Galactic disk and the Galactic Center. While the dominant hard X-ray populations in both of these Galactic regions appear to be cataclysmic variables (CVs), those in the Norma

  15. Feedback from Mass Outflows in Nearby Active Galactic Nuclei. I. Ultraviolet and X-Ray Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.

    2012-07-01

    We present an investigation into the impact of feedback from outflowing UV and X-ray absorbers in nearby (z < 0.04) active galactic nuclei (AGNs). From studies of the kinematics, physical conditions, and variability of the absorbers in the literature, we calculate the possible ranges in the total mass outflow rate (\\dot{M}_{out}) and kinetic luminosity (L KE) for each AGN, summed over all of its absorbers. These calculations make use of values (or limits) for the radial locations of the absorbers determined from variability, excited-state absorption, and other considerations. From a sample of 10 Seyfert 1 galaxies with detailed photoionization models for their absorbers, we find that 7 have sufficient constraints on the absorber locations to determine \\dot{M}_{out} and L KE. For the low-luminosity AGN NGC 4395, these values are low, although we do not have sufficient constraints on the X-ray absorbers to make definitive conclusions. At least five of the six Seyfert 1s with moderate bolometric luminosities (L bol = 1043 - 1045 erg s-1) have mass outflow rates that are 10-1000 times the mass accretion rates needed to generate their observed luminosities, indicating that most of the mass outflow originates from outside the inner accretion disk. Three of these (NGC 4051, NGC 3516, and NGC 3783) have L KE in the range 0.5%-5% L bol, which is the range typically required by feedback models for efficient self-regulation of black hole and galactic bulge growth. At least two of the other three (NGC 5548, NGC 4151, and NGC 7469) have L KE >~ 0.1%L bol, although these values may increase if radial locations can be determined for more of the absorbers. We conclude that the outflowing UV and X-ray absorbers in moderate-luminosity AGNs have the potential to deliver significant feedback to their environments.

  16. X-ray Weekly Monitoring of the Galactic Center Sgr A* with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yoshitomo; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Hayashi, Takayuki; Iizuka, Ryo; Saitoh, Takayuki; Murakami, Hiroshi

    A small gas cloud, G2, is on an orbit almost straight into the supermassive blackhole Sgr A* by spring 2014. This event gives us a rare opportunity to test the mass feeding onto the blackhole by a gas. To catch a possible rise of the mass accretion from the cloud, we have been performing the bi-week monitoring of Sgr A* in autumn and spring in the 2013 fiscal year. The key feature of Suzaku is the high-sensitivity wide-band X-ray spectroscopy all in one observatory. It is characterized by a large effective area combined with low background and good energy resolution, in particular a good line spread function in the low-energy range. Since the desired flare events associated with the G2 approach is a transient event, the large effective area is critical and powerful tools to hunt them. The first monitoring in 2013 autumn was successfully made. The X-rays from Sgr A* and its nearby emission were clearly resolved from the bright transient source AX J1745.6-2901. No very large flare from Sgr A*was found during the monitoring. We also may report the X-ray properties of two serendipitous sources, the neutron star binary AX J1745.6-2901 and a magnetar SGR J1745-29.

  17. Exploring a New Population of Compact Objects: X-ray and IR Observations of the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Reba M.; Gosling, Andrew J.; Eikenberry, Stephen E.; Muno, Michael P.; Blundell, Katherine M.; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Mikles, Valerie J.; Dewitt, Curtis

    2008-10-01

    I describe the IR and X-ray observational campaign we have undertaken for the purpose of determining the nature of the faint discrete X-ray source population discovered by Chandra in the Galactic Center (GC). Data obtained for this project includes a deep Chandra survey of the Galactic Bulge; deep, high resolution IR imaging from VLT/ISAAC, CTIO/ISPI, and the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) and IR spectroscopy from VLT/ISAAC and IRTF/SpeX. By cross-correlating the GC X-ray imaging from Chandra with our IR surveys, we identify candidate counterparts to the X-ray sources via astrometry. Using a detailed IR extinction map, we are deriving magnitudes and colors for all the candidates. Having thus established a target list, we will use the multi-object IR spectrograph FLAMINGOS-2 on Gemini-South to carry out a spectroscopic survey of the candidate counterparts, to search for emission line signatures which are a hallmark of accreting binaries. By determining the nature of these X-ray sources, this FLAMINGOS-2 Galactic Center Survey will have a dramatic impact on our knowledge of the Galactic accreting binary population.

  18. X-ray filament with a strong 6.7-keV line in the Galactic center region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Shigeo; Shimizu, Miku; Nakashima, Shinya; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Koyama, Katsuji

    2014-12-01

    An elongated X-ray source with a strong K-shell line from He-like iron (Fe XXVI) is found at (RA, Dec)J2000.0 = (17h44m00{s.}0, - 29°13'40{^''.}9) in the Galactic center region. The position coincides with the X-ray thread, G359.55+0.16, which is aligned with the radio non-thermal filament. The X-ray spectrum is well fitted with an absorbed thin thermal plasma (apec) model. The best-fitting temperature, metal abundance, and column density are 4.1^{+2.7}_{-1.8} keV, 0.58^{+0.41}_{-0.32} solar, and 6.1^{+2.5}_{-1.3} × 10^{22} cm-2, respectively. These values are similar to those of the largely extended Galactic center X-ray emission.

  19. Using the Chandra Source-Finding Algorithm to Automatically Identify Solar X-ray Bright Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Tennant, A.; Cirtain, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This poster details a technique of bright point identification that is used to find sources in Chandra X-ray data. The algorithm, part of a program called LEXTRCT, searches for regions of a given size that are above a minimum signal to noise ratio. The algorithm allows selected pixels to be excluded from the source-finding, thus allowing exclusion of saturated pixels (from flares and/or active regions). For Chandra data the noise is determined by photon counting statistics, whereas solar telescopes typically integrate a flux. Thus the calculated signal-to-noise ratio is incorrect, but we find we can scale the number to get reasonable results. For example, Nakakubo and Hara (1998) find 297 bright points in a September 11, 1996 Yohkoh image; with judicious selection of signal-to-noise ratio, our algorithm finds 300 sources. To further assess the efficacy of the algorithm, we analyze a SOHO/EIT image (195 Angstroms) and compare results with those published in the literature (McIntosh and Gurman, 2005). Finally, we analyze three sets of data from Hinode, representing different parts of the decline to minimum of the solar cycle.

  20. Ionization of H_2 by X-Rays in the Central Molecular Zone of the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notani, Masahiro; Oka, Takeshi

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies of the Galactic center using the infrared spectrum of H_3^+ have revealed a high ionization rate of H_2 on the order of ζ ˜ 3×10^{-15} s^{-1} in wide regions of the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), a region with a radius of ˜ 150 pc at the Galactic center. So far we have ascribed this ionization rate, which is an order of magnitude higher than in the Galactic disk, to cosmic rays because of a high density of supernova remnants in the CMZ. In view of the abundant intense X-ray sources from 1 keV to several 10 keV in the region, however, there may be a significant ionization by X-rays also. We estimate the ionization rate due to X-rays based on the large scale ART-P X-ray map of the Galactic center region. The calculations proceed in two steps. First we allow for the attenuation of the observed X-rays by the foreground gas to obtain the original intensities of the X-ray sources. We then use the corrected X-ray flux to calculate ionization rates of H_2 in the CMZ. The calculation is also related to the heating of the gas by X-rays. Discussion of the details of calculations and the results will be presented. Oka, T., Geballe, T. R., Goto, M., Usuda, T., and McCall, B. J. 2005, ApJ, 632 882 Geballe, T. R., and Oka, T. 2010, ApJ, 709 L70. Pavlinskii, M. N., Grebenev, S. A., and Syunyaev, R. A. 1992, Sov. Astron. Lett., 18 116. Morrison, R. and McCammon, D. 1983, ApJ, 270 119.

  1. Active galactic nucleus X-ray variability in the XMM-COSMOS survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzuisi, G.; Ponti, G.; Salvato, M.; Brusa, M.; Nandra, P. K.; Merloni, A.; Rosario, D.; Hasinger, G.; Sanders, D.; Cappelluti, N.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Bongiorno, A.; Lusso, E.; Steinhardt, C.; Silverman, J.; Schramm, M.; Trump, J.; and others

    2014-02-01

    We used the observations carried out by XMM in the COSMOS field over 3.5 yr to study the long term variability of a large sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) (638 sources) in a wide range of redshifts (0.1 < z < 3.5) and X-ray luminosities (10{sup 41} < L {sub 0.5-10} <10{sup 45.5}). Both a simple statistical method to assess the significance of variability and the Normalized Excess Variance (σ{sub rms}{sup 2}) parameter were used to obtain a quantitative measurement of the variability. Variability is found to be prevalent in most AGNs, whenever we have good statistics to measure it, and no significant differences between type 1 and type 2 AGNs were found. A flat (slope –0.23 ± 0.03) anti-correlation between σ{sub rms}{sup 2} and X-ray luminosity is found when all significantly variable sources are considered together. When divided into three redshift bins, the anti-correlation becomes stronger and evolving with z, with higher redshift AGNs being more variable. We prove, however, that this effect is due to the pre-selection of variable sources: when considering all of the sources with an available σ{sub rms}{sup 2} measurement, the evolution in redshift disappears. For the first time, we were also able to study long term X-ray variability as a function of M {sub BH} and Eddington ratio for a large sample of AGNs spanning a wide range of redshifts. An anti-correlation between σ{sub rms}{sup 2} and M {sub BH} is found, with the same slope of anti-correlation between σ{sub rms}{sup 2} and X-ray luminosity, suggesting that the latter may be a by-product of the former. No clear correlation is found between σ{sub rms}{sup 2} and the Eddington ratio in our sample. Finally, no correlation is found between the X-ray σ{sub rms}{sup 2} and optical variability.

  2. Soft X-Ray Excess from Shocked Accreting Plasma in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Hendry, Douglas; Clark, Peter; Tombesi, Francesco; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel theoretical model to describe the physical identity of the soft X-ray excess that is ubiquitously detected in many Seyfert galaxies, by considering a steady-state, axisymmetric plasma accretion within the innermost stable circular orbit around a black hole (BH) accretion disk. We extend our earlier theoretical investigations on general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic accretion, which implied that the accreting plasma can develop into a standing shock under suitable physical conditions, causing the downstream flow to be sufficiently hot due to shock compression. We perform numerical calculations to examine, for sets of fiducial plasma parameters, the physical nature of fast magnetohydrodynamic shocks under strong gravity for different BH spins. We show that thermal seed photons from the standard accretion disk can be effectively Compton up-scattered by the energized sub-relativistic electrons in the hot downstream plasma to produce the soft excess feature in X-rays. As a case study, we construct a three-parameter Comptonization model of inclination angle θ obs, disk photon temperature kT in, and downstream electron energy kT e to calculate the predicted spectra in comparison with a 60 ks XMM-Newton/EPIC-pn spectrum of a typical radio-quiet Seyfert 1 active galactic nucleus, Ark 120. Our χ 2-analyses demonstrate that the model is plausible for successfully describing data for both non-spinning and spinning BHs with derived ranges of 61.3 keV ≲ kT e ≲ 144.3 keV, 21.6 eV ≲ kT in ≲ 34.0 eV, and 17.°5 ≲ θ obs ≲ 42.°6, indicating a compact Comptonizing region of three to four gravitational radii that resembles the putative X-ray coronae.

  3. An X-ray spectral model for clumpy tori in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Li, Xiaobo E-mail: lixb@ihep.ac.cn

    2014-05-20

    We construct an X-ray spectral model for the clumpy torus in an active galactic nucleus (AGN) using Geant4, which includes the physical processes of the photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, Rayleigh scattering, γ conversion, fluorescence line, and Auger process. Since the electrons in the torus are expected to be bounded instead of free, the deviation of the scattering cross section from the Klein-Nishina cross section has also been included, which changes the X-ray spectra by up to 25% below 10 keV. We have investigated the effect of the clumpiness parameters on the reflection spectra and the strength of the fluorescent line Fe Kα. The volume filling factor of the clouds in the clumpy torus only slightly influences the reflection spectra, however, the total column density and the number of clouds along the line of sight significantly change the shapes and amplitudes of the reflection spectra. The effect of column density is similar to the case of a smooth torus, while a small number of clouds along the line of sight will smooth out the anisotropy of the reflection spectra and the fluorescent line Fe Kα. The smoothing effect is mild in the low column density case (N {sub H} = 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}), whereas it is much more evident in the high column density case (N {sub H} = 10{sup 25} cm{sup –2}). Our model provides a quantitative tool for the spectral analysis of the clumpy torus. We suggest that the joint fits of the broad band spectral energy distributions of AGNs (from X-ray to infrared) should better constrain the structure of the torus.

  4. LOW-MASS ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI WITH RAPID X-RAY VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Luis C.; Kim, Minjin

    2016-04-10

    We present a detailed study of the optical spectroscopic properties of 12 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with candidate low-mass black holes (BHs) selected by Kamizasa et al. through rapid X-ray variability. The high-quality, echellette Magellan spectra reveal broad Hα emission in all the sources, allowing us to estimate robust virial BH masses and Eddington ratios for this unique sample. We confirm that the sample contains low-mass BHs accreting at high rates: the median M{sub BH} = 1.2 × 10{sup 6} M{sub ⊙} and median L{sub bol}/L{sub Edd} = 0.44. The sample follows the M{sub BH}–σ{sub *} relation, within the considerable scatter typical of pseudobulges, the probable hosts of these low-mass AGNs. Various lines of evidence suggest that ongoing star formation is prevalent in these systems. We propose a new strategy to estimate star formation rates in AGNs hosted by low-mass, low-metallicity galaxies, based on modification of an existing method using the strength of [O ii] λ3727, [O iii] λ5007, and X-rays.

  5. On the X-Ray Low- and High-Velocity Outflows in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, J. M.; Tombesi, F.

    2012-01-01

    An exploration of the relationship between bolometric luminosity and outflow velocity for two classes of X-ray outflows in a large sample of active galactic nuclei has been performed. We find that line radiation pressure could be one physical mechanism that might accelerate the gas we observe in warm absorber, v approx. 100-1000 km/s, and on comparable but less stringent grounds the ultrafast outflows, v approx. 0.03-0.3c. If comparable with the escape velocity of the system, the first is naturally located at distances of the dusty torus, '" I pc, and the second at subparsec scales, approx.0.01 pc, in accordance with large set of observational evidence existing in the literature. The presentation of this relationship might give us key clues for our understanding of the different physical mechanisms acting in the centre of galaxies, the feedback process and its impact on the evolution of the host galaxy.

  6. Determining the Galactic Halo's Emission Measure from UV and X-Ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Shijun; Shelton, Robin L.; Henley, David B.

    2009-07-01

    We analyze a pair of Suzaku shadowing observations in order to determine the X-ray spectrum of the Galaxy's gaseous halo. Our data consist of an observation toward an absorbing filament in the southern Galactic hemisphere and an observation toward an unobscured region adjacent to the filament. We simultaneously fit the spectra with models having halo, local, and extragalactic components. The intrinsic intensities of the halo O VII triplet and O VIII Ly α emission lines are 9.98+1.10 -1.99 LU (line unit; photons cm-2 s-1 sr-1) and 2.66+0.37 -0.30 LU, respectively. These results imply the existence of hot gas with a temperature of ~106.0 K to ~107.0 K in the Galactic halo. Meanwhile, FUSE O VI observations for the same directions and SPEAR C IV observations for a nearby direction indicate the existence of hot halo gas at temperatures of ~105.0 K to ~106.0 K. This collection of data implies that the hot gas in the Galactic halo is not isothermal, but its temperature spans a relatively wide range from ~105.0 K to ~107.0 K. We therefore construct a differential emission measure (DEM) model for the halo's hot gas, consisting of two components. In each, dEM/dlog T is assumed to follow a power-law function of the temperature and the gas is assumed to be in collisional ionizational equilibrium. The low-temperature component (LTC) of the broken power-law DEM model covers the temperature range of 104.80-106.02 K with a slope of 0.30 and the high-temperature component (HTC) covers the temperature range of 106.02-107.02 K with a slope of -2.21. We compare our observations with predictions from models for hot gas in the halo. The observed spatial distribution of gas with temperatures in the range of our HTC is smoother than that of the LTC. We thus suggest that two types of sources contribute to our broken power-law model. We find that a simple model in which hot gas accretes onto the Galactic halo and cools radiatively cannot explain both the observed UV and X-ray portions of

  7. The origin of Black-Hole Spin in Galactic Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragos, Tassos; McClintock, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    Galactic field low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), like the ones for which black hole (BH) spin measurements are available, are believed to form in situ via the evolution of isolated binaries. In the standard formation channel, these systems survived a common envelope phase, after which the remaining helium core of the primary star and the subsequently formed BH are not expected to be highly spinning. However, the measured spins of BHs in LMXBs cover the whole range of spin parameters from a*~0 to a*1. In this talk I propose that the BH spin in LMXBs is acquired through accretion onto the BH during its long stable accretion phase. In order to test this hypothesis, I calculated extensive grids of binary evolutionary sequences in which a BH accretes matter from a close companion. For each evolutionary sequence, I examined whether, at any point in time, the calculated binary properties are in agreement with their observationally inferred counterparts of observed Galactic LMXBs with BH spin measurements. Mass-transfer sequences that simultaneously satisfy all observational constraints represent possible progenitors of the considered LMXBs and thus give estimates of the amount of matter that the BH has accreted since the onset of Roche-Lobe overflow. I find that in all Galactic LMXBs with measured BH spin, the origin of the spin can be accounted by the accreted matter. Furthermore, based on this hypothesis, I derive limits on the maximum spin that a BH can have depending on the orbital period of the binary it resides in, and give predictions on the maximum possible BH spin of Galactic LMXBs where a BH spin measurement is not yet available. Finally I will discuss the implication that our findings have on the birth black hole mass distribution.

  8. Removing Spectral Diagnostics of Galactic and Stellar X-Ray Emission from Charged Exchange Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargelin, Brad

    2004-01-01

    Our research uses the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to study X-ray emission from the charge exchange (CX) of highly charged ions with neutral gases. The resulting data help to fill a void in existing experimental and theoretical understanding of this atomic physics process, and are needed to explain all or part of the observed X-ray emission from the soft X-ray background, stellar winds, the Galactic Center and Galactic Ridge, supernova ejecta, and photoionized nebulae. Appreciation of the astrophysical relevance of our work continues to grow with the publication of roughly a dozen papers in the past four years describing Chandra and XMM observations of geocoronal and heliospheric CX emission, the temporal variation of such emission and correlation with X-ray emission enhancements observed by ROSAT, the theoretical spatial distribution of that emission, and CX emission around other stars. A similar number of papers were also published during that time describing CX emission from planets and comets. We expect that the launch of ASTRSE2, with its second-generation XRS microcalo- (with 6-eV resolution), will reveal even more clearly the contributions of CX to astrophysical emission. In our EBIT work we collected CX spectra from such ions as H-like and He-like Ne, Ar, and Fe. Our early measurements were made with a high-purity Ge detector, but during the second year we began operation of the first-generation XRS microcalorimeter (a twin of the XRS on ASTRO-E) and greatly improved the resolution of our measurements from roughly 150 eV (FWHM) with the Ge detectors to 10 eV with the XRS. We found that saturation of the XRS counting apparatus, which we described in our proposal as a potential concern, is not a problem for studying CX. During the course of our research, we expanded the number of injection gases permitted by the LLNL safety team, purchased and eventually operated an atomic H source, and clearly demonstrated the

  9. An Einstein survey of the 1 keV soft X-ray background in the Galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, John M.; Caillault, Jean-Pierre

    1994-01-01

    We have analyzed 56 Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) observations within +/- 3 deg of the Galactic plane in order to determine the low-latitude soft X-ray background flux in the 0.56-1.73 keV band. Any detected X-ray point source which fell within our regions of study was removed from the image, enabling us to present maps of the background flux as a function of Galactic latitude along 18 meridians. These maps reveal considerable structure to the background in the Galactic plane on an angular scale of approximately 1 deg. Our results are compared with those of an earlier study of the 1 keV X-ray background along l = 25 deg by Kahn & Caillault. The double-peaked structure they found is not discernible in our results, possibly because of the presence of solar backscattered flux in their data. A model which takes into account contributions to the background by extragalactic and stellar sources, the distribution of both atomic and molecular absorbing material with the Galaxy, the energy dependence of the cross section for absorption of X-rays, and the energy dependence of the detector has been constructed and fitted to these new data to derive constraints on the scale height, temperature, and volume emissivity of the unaccounted-for X-ray-emitting material. The results of this model along l = 25 deg are roughly similar to those of the model of Kahn & Caillault along the same meridian.

  10. Joint ROSAT-Compton GRO observations of the X-ray bright Seyfert galaxy IC 4329A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madejski, G. M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Turner, T. J.; Done, C.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Hartman, R. C.; Gehrels, N.; Connors, A.; Fabian, A. C.; Nandra, K.

    1995-01-01

    We report a simultaneous ROSAT and Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) observation of the X-ray-bright Seyfert galaxy IC 4329A. For the GRO Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) detector, we also present the sum of the data for this and earlier observations. The overall spectrum is very well described as a power law with an energy spectral index of approximately 1 absorbed at low energies plus a strong Compton reflection component, typical for Seyfert 1 galaxies. The low energy absorption can be well described by a sum of a neutral column density of approximately 3 x 10(exp 21)sq cm, most of which is associated with the edge-on galactic disk of IC 4329A, plus an edgelike feature at approximately 700 eV; this feature implies either complex absorption (due to additional ionized material, or due to a partial covering), or a soft excess. The data only weakly constrain the presence of a high-energy cutoff in the underlying power law; they are compatible with an exponential cutoff at any energy E(sub c) approximately greater than 100 keV. The relative steepness of the OSSE data, with the power-law energy index of 1.6 +/- 0.2, can be accounted for entirely by the contribution of the high-energy tail of the reflection component when E(sub c) approaches infinity. (We find that the definite cutoff at an energy E(sub c)approximately 130 keV suggested in the recently published analysis of the OSSE data for this subject is due to a data reduction error.) Including nonsimultaneous Ginga observations with 2 keV fluxes matching well that of ROSAT gives us likely broad-band X-ray/gamma-ray spectra of the object from approximately 0.1 keV up to several hundred keV. We also report the ROSAT spectrum of the companion object to the Seyfert galaxy, the elliptical galaxy IC 4329.

  11. MS 1603.6 + 2600, an unusual X-ray selected binary system at high Galactic latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Simon L.; Liebert, James; Stocke, John T.; Gioia, Isabella M.; Schild, Rudy E.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of an eclipsing binary system at Galactic latitude 47 deg, found as a serendipitous X-ray source in the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey, is described. The object has X-ray flux 1.1 x 10 to the -12th ergs/sq cm s (0.3-3.5 keV) and mean magnitude R = 19.4. An orbital period of 111 minutes is found. The problem discussed is whether the system has a white dwarf or neutron star primary, in the end preferring the neutron star primary model. If the system has either optical or X-ray luminosities typical of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB), it must be at a very large distance (30-80 kpc). Blueshifted He I absorption is seen, indicating cool outflowing material, similar to that seen in the LMXB AC 211 in the globular cluster M15.

  12. Flares from Galactic Centre pulsars: a new class of X-ray transients?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannios, Dimitrios; Lorimer, Duncan R.

    2016-06-01

    Despite intensive searches, the only pulsar within 0.1 pc of the central black hole in our Galaxy, Sgr A*, is a radio-loud magnetar. Since magnetars are rare among the Galactic neutron star population, and a large number of massive stars are already known in this region, the Galactic Centre (GC) should harbour a large number of neutron stars. Population syntheses suggest several thousand neutron stars may be present in the GC. Many of these could be highly energetic millisecond pulsars which are also proposed to be responsible for the GC gamma-ray excess. We propose that the presence of a neutron star within 0.03 pc from Sgr A* can be revealed by the shock interactions with the disc around the central black hole. As we demonstrate, these interactions result in observable transient non-thermal X-ray and gamma-ray emission over time-scales of months, provided that the spin-down luminosity of the neutron star is Lsd ˜ 1035 erg s-1. Current limits on the population of normal and millisecond pulsars in the GC region suggest that a number of such pulsars are present with such luminosities.

  13. CAN WE REPRODUCE THE X-RAY BACKGROUND SPECTRAL SHAPE USING LOCAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI?

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, Ranjan V.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Gandhi, Poshak

    2013-06-20

    The X-ray background (XRB) is due to the aggregate of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), which peak in activity at z {approx} 1 and is often modeled as the sum of different proportions of unabsorbed, moderately, and heavily absorbed AGN. We present the summed spectrum of a complete sample of local AGN (the Northern Galactic Cap of the 58 month Swift/BAT catalog, z < 0.2) using 0.4-200 keV data and directly determine the different proportions of unabsorbed, moderately and heavily absorbed AGN that make up the summed spectrum. This stacked low redshift AGN spectrum is remarkably similar in shape to the XRB spectrum (when shifted to z {approx} 1), but the observed proportions of different absorption populations differ from most XRB synthesis models. AGN with Compton-thick absorption account for only {approx}12% of the sample, but produce a significant contribution to the overall spectrum. We confirm that Compton reflection is more prominent in moderately absorbed AGN and that the photon index differs intrinsically between unabsorbed and absorbed AGN. The AGN in our sample account for only {approx}1% of the XRB intensity. The reproduction of the XRB spectral shape suggests that strong evolution in individual AGN properties is not required between z {approx} 0 and 1.

  14. Population synthesis of ultracompact X-ray binaries in the Galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Haaften, L. M.; Nelemans, G.; Voss, R.; Toonen, S.; Portegies Zwart, S. F.; Yungelson, L. R.; van der Sluys, M. V.

    2013-04-01

    Aims: We model the present-day number and properties of ultracompact X-ray binaries (UCXBs) in the Galactic bulge. The main objective is to compare the results to the known UCXB population as well as to data from the Galactic Bulge Survey, in order to learn about the formation of UCXBs and their evolution, such as the onset of mass transfer and late-time behavior. Methods: The binary population synthesis code SeBa and detailed stellar evolutionary tracks have been used to model the UCXB population in the Bulge. The luminosity behavior of UCXBs has been predicted using long-term X-ray observations of the known UCXBs as well as the thermal-viscous disk instability model. Results: In our model, the majority of UCXBs initially have a helium burning star donor. Of the white dwarf donors, most have helium composition. In the absence of a mechanism that destroys old UCXBs, we predict (0.2-1.9) × 105 UCXBs in the Galactic bulge, depending on assumptions, mostly at orbital periods longer than 60 min (a large number of long-period systems also follows from the observed short-period UCXB population). About 5-50 UCXBs should be brighter than 1035 ergs-1, mostly persistent sources with orbital periods shorter than about 30 min and with degenerate helium and carbon-oxygen donors. This is about one order of magnitude more than the observed number of (probably) three. Conclusions: This overprediction of short-period UCXBs by roughly one order of magnitude implies that fewer systems are formed, or that a super-Eddington mass transfer rate is more difficult to survive than we assumed. The very small number of observed long-period UCXBs with respect to short-period UCXBs, the surprisingly high luminosity of the observed UCXBs with orbital periods around 50 min, and the properties of the PSR J1719-1438 system all point to much faster UCXB evolution than expected from angular momentum loss via gravitational wave radiation alone. Old UCXBs, if they still exist, probably have orbital

  15. Detailed optical studies of the galactic supersoft X-ray source QR And (RX J0019.8 +2156)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deufel, B.; Barwig, H.; Šimić , D.; Wolf, S.; Drory, N.

    1999-03-01

    We present high-speed long term photometric observations from 1992 to 1996 \\em(UBVRI), as well as recently obtained (1997) spectrophotometric and high resolution spectroscopic studies of the bright galactic supersoft X-ray source RX J0019.8 +2156. Our photometry reveals a highly variable object. The shortest observed quasi-periodic variations are humps with a period of ~1.8 h. The timings of the main minimum are not exactly regular and occur on average around phase phi = 0.0. With our new data set we calculated an update of the orbital period. Our simultaneous spectroscopic and spectrophotometric studies from 1997 give an even more detailed insight: blue and red shifted satellite lines at He Ii λ 4686 and at the strong Balmer lines, which are interpreted as high velocity outflows, can clearly be detected. We also present for the first time an analysis of this supersoft source by means of Doppler tomography. The lines of He Ii (lambda lambda 4542, 4686), H_α and H_β show no emission from an accretion disk. These emission lines originate in regions within the binary system with very low velocities. The spatial origin of the emitting material is not quite clear and will be investigated in a follow-up paper. Based on observations at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center, Calar Alto, Spain and at the Wendelstein Observatory, Germany

  16. On the Nature of X-ray Surface Brightness Fluctuations in M87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo, P.; Churazov, E.; Zhuravleva, I.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.

    2016-02-01

    X-ray images of galaxy clusters and gas-rich elliptical galaxies show a wealth of small-scale features that reflect fluctuations in density and/or temperature of the intracluster medium. In this paper we study these fluctuations in M87/Virgo to establish whether sound waves/shocks, bubbles, or uplifted cold gas dominate the structure. We exploit the strong dependence of the emissivity on density and temperature in different energy bands to distinguish between these processes. Using simulations we demonstrate that our analysis recovers the leading type of fluctuation even in the presence of projection effects and temperature gradients. We confirm the isobaric nature of cool filaments of gas entrained by buoyantly rising bubbles, extending to 7‧ to the east and southwest, and the adiabatic nature of the weak shocks at 40″ and 3‧ from the center. For features of ˜5-10 kpc, we show that the central 4‧ × 4‧ region is dominated by cool structures in pressure equilibrium with the ambient hotter gas while up to 30% of the variance in this region can be ascribed to adiabatic fluctuations. The remaining part of the central 14‧ × 14‧ region, excluding the arms and shocks described above, is dominated by apparently isothermal fluctuations (bubbles) with a possible admixture (at the level of ˜30%) of adiabatic (sound waves) and by isobaric structures. Larger features, of about 30 kpc, show a stronger contribution from isobaric fluctuations. The results broadly agree with a model based on feedback from an active galactic nucleus mediated by bubbles of relativistic plasma.

  17. ON THE NATURE OF X-RAY SURFACE BRIGHTNESS FLUCTUATIONS IN M87

    SciTech Connect

    Arévalo, P.; Churazov, E.; Zhuravleva, I.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.

    2016-02-10

    X-ray images of galaxy clusters and gas-rich elliptical galaxies show a wealth of small-scale features that reflect fluctuations in density and/or temperature of the intracluster medium. In this paper we study these fluctuations in M87/Virgo to establish whether sound waves/shocks, bubbles, or uplifted cold gas dominate the structure. We exploit the strong dependence of the emissivity on density and temperature in different energy bands to distinguish between these processes. Using simulations we demonstrate that our analysis recovers the leading type of fluctuation even in the presence of projection effects and temperature gradients. We confirm the isobaric nature of cool filaments of gas entrained by buoyantly rising bubbles, extending to 7′ to the east and southwest, and the adiabatic nature of the weak shocks at 40″ and 3′ from the center. For features of ∼5–10 kpc, we show that the central 4′ × 4′ region is dominated by cool structures in pressure equilibrium with the ambient hotter gas while up to 30% of the variance in this region can be ascribed to adiabatic fluctuations. The remaining part of the central 14′ × 14′ region, excluding the arms and shocks described above, is dominated by apparently isothermal fluctuations (bubbles) with a possible admixture (at the level of ∼30%) of adiabatic (sound waves) and by isobaric structures. Larger features, of about 30 kpc, show a stronger contribution from isobaric fluctuations. The results broadly agree with a model based on feedback from an active galactic nucleus mediated by bubbles of relativistic plasma.

  18. THE ORIGIN OF BLACK HOLE SPIN IN GALACTIC LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fragos, T.; McClintock, J. E.

    2015-02-10

    Galactic field black hole (BH) low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) are believed to form in situ via the evolution of isolated binaries. In the standard formation channel, these systems survived a common envelope phase, after which the remaining helium core of the primary star and the subsequently formed BH are not expected to be highly spinning. However, the measured spins of BHs in LMXBs cover the whole range of spin parameters. We propose here that the BH spin in LMXBs is acquired through accretion onto the BH after its formation. In order to test this hypothesis, we calculated extensive grids of detailed binary mass-transfer sequences. For each sequence, we examined whether, at any point in time, the calculated binary properties are in agreement with their observationally inferred counterparts of 16 Galactic LMXBs. The ''successful'' sequences give estimates of the mass that the BH has accreted since the onset of Roche-Lobe overflow. We find that in all Galactic LMXBs with measured BH spin, the origin of the spin can be accounted for by the accreted matter, and we make predictions about the maximum BH spin in LMXBs where no measurement is yet available. Furthermore, we derive limits on the maximum spin that any BH can have depending on current properties of the binary it resides in. Finally we discuss the implication that our findings have on the BH birth-mass distribution, which is shifted by ∼1.5 M {sub ☉} toward lower masses, compared to the currently observed one.

  19. Galactic Soft X-ray Emission Revealed with Spectroscopic Study of Absorption and Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Takei, Y.; Hagihara, T.; Yoshino, T.; Wang, Q. D.; Yao, Y.; McCammon, D.

    2010-03-01

    Spectroscopic study of Oxygen emission/absorption lines is a new tool to investigate the nature of the soft X-ray background. We investigated the emission spectra of 14 fields obtained by Suzaku, and detected OVII and OVIII lines separately. There is an almost isotropic OVII line emission with 2 LU intensity. As the attenuation length in the Galactic plane for that energy is short, that OVII emission should arise within 300 pc of our neighborhood. In comparison with the estimated emission measure for the local bubble, the most plausible origin of this component is the solar wind charge exchange with local interstellar materials. Another component presented from the correlation between the OVII and OVIII line intensity is a thermal emission with an apparent temperature of 0.2 keV with a field-to-field fluctuation of 10% in temperature, while the intensity varies about a factor of 4. By the combination analysis of the emission and the absorption spectra, we can investigate the density and the scale length of intervening plasma separately. We analyzed the Chanrdra grating spectra of LMC X-3 and PKS 2155-304, and emission spectra toward the line of sight by Suzaku. In both cases, the combined analysis showed that the hot plasma is not iso-thermal nor uniform. Assuming an exponential disk distribution, the thickness of the disk is as large as a few kpc. It suggests that there is a thick hot disk or hot halo surrounding our Galaxy, which is similar to X-ray hot haloes around several spiral galaxies.

  20. X-ray flares reveal mass and angular momentum of the Galactic Center black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschenbach, B.; Grosso, N.; Porquet, D.; Predehl, P.

    2004-04-01

    We have analysed the light curve of the two brightest X-ray flares from the Galactic Center black hole, one flare observed by XMM-Newton on October 3, 2002 (Porquet et al. \\cite{P2003}), and the other flare observed by Chandra on October 26, 2000 (Baganoff et al. \\cite{B2001}). The power density spectra show five distinct peaks at periods of ˜100 s, 219 s, 700 s, 1150 s, and 2250 s common to both observations within their estimated measurement uncertainties. The power density spectrum of the recently reported infrared flare of June 16, 2003 (Genzel et al. \\cite{Ge2003}) shows distinct peaks at two, if not three, periods (including the 1008 ± 120 s infrared period), which are consistent with the X-ray periods. The remaining two periods could not be covered by the infrared measurements. Each period can be identified with one of the characteristic gravitational cyclic modes associated with accretion disks, i.e. either Lense-Thirring precession, Kepler orbital motion and the vertical and radial epicyclic oscillation modes, in such a way that a consistent value for the black hole mass of MBH = 2.72 +0.12-0.19× 10 6 M⊙ and the angular momentum a = 0.9939 +0.0026-0.0074 is obtained. The available data on MBH derived from studies of the orbital motion of the S2 (S0-2) star (Schödel et al. \\cite{S2002}; Ghez et al. \\cite{Gh2003}) agree with our findings. Finally we discuss some implications of the fairly high value for the angular momentum.

  1. X-ray Emission from the Sombrero Galaxy: A Galactic-scale Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Lal, Dharam V.; Di Stefano, Rosanne; Spitler, Lee R.; Tang, Shikui; Wang, Q. Daniel; Gilfanov, Marat; Revnivtsev, Mikhail

    2011-04-01

    Based on new and archival Chandra observations of the Sombrero galaxy (M 104 = NGC 4594), we study the X-ray emission from its nucleus and the extended X-ray emission in and around its massive stellar bulge. We find that the 0.3-8 keV luminosity of the nucleus appears constant at ~2.4 × 1040 erg s-1, or ~10-7 of its Eddington luminosity, on three epochs between 1999 December and 2008 April, but drops by a factor of two in the 2008 November observation. The 2-6 keV unresolved emission from the bulge region closely follows the K-band starlight and most likely arises from unresolved stellar sources. At lower energies, however, the unresolved emission reaches a galactocentric radius of at least 23 kpc, significantly beyond the extent of the starlight, clearly indicating the presence of diffuse hot gas. We isolate the emission of the gas by properly accounting for the emission from unresolved stellar sources, predominantly cataclysmic variables and coronally active binaries, whose quasi-universal X-ray emissivity was recently established. We find a gas temperature of ~0.6 keV with little variation across the field of view, except for a lower temperature of ~0.3 keV along the stellar disk. The metal abundance is not well constrained due to the limited counting statistics, but is consistent with metal enrichment by Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We measure a total intrinsic 0.3-2 keV luminosity of ~2 × 1039 erg s-1, which corresponds to only 1% of the available energy input by SNe Ia in the bulge, but is comparable to the prediction by the latest galaxy formation models for disk galaxies as massive as Sombrero. However, such numerical models do not fully account for internal feedback processes, such as nuclear feedback and stellar feedback, against accretion from the intergalactic medium. On the other hand, we find no evidence for either the nucleus or the very modest star-forming activities in the disk to be a dominant heating source for the diffuse gas. We also show

  2. Generation of bright attosecond x-ray pulse trains via Thomson scattering from laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Luo, W; Yu, T P; Chen, M; Song, Y M; Zhu, Z C; Ma, Y Y; Zhuo, H B

    2014-12-29

    Generation of attosecond x-ray pulse attracts more and more attention within the advanced light source user community due to its potentially wide applications. Here we propose an all-optical scheme to generate bright, attosecond hard x-ray pulse trains by Thomson backscattering of similarly structured electron beams produced in a vacuum channel by a tightly focused laser pulse. Design parameters for a proof-of-concept experiment are presented and demonstrated by using a particle-in-cell code and a four-dimensional laser-Compton scattering simulation code to model both the laser-based electron acceleration and Thomson scattering processes. Trains of 200 attosecond duration hard x-ray pulses holding stable longitudinal spacing with photon energies approaching 50 keV and maximum achievable peak brightness up to 1020 photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1%BW for each micro-bunch are observed. The suggested physical scheme for attosecond x-ray pulse trains generation may directly access the fastest time scales relevant to electron dynamics in atoms, molecules and materials.

  3. Bright, low debris, ultrashort hard x-ray table top source using carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Suman; Kiran, P. Prem; Yang, K.; Rao, A. M.; Bhuyan, M. K.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2011-01-15

    We demonstrate that carbon nanotube coated surfaces produce two orders of magnitude brighter hard x-ray emission, in laser produced plasmas, than planar surfaces. It is accompanied by three orders of magnitude reduction in ion debris which is also low Z and nontoxic. The increased emission is a direct consequence of the enhancement in local fields and is via the simple and well known 'lightning rod' effect. We propose that this carbon nanotube hard x-ray source is a simple, inexpensive, and high repetition rate hard x-ray point source for a variety of applications in imaging, lithography, microscopy, and material processing.

  4. Ultra-bright, ultra-broadband hard x-ray driven by laser-produced energetic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yin; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Wenpeng; Ji, Liangliang; Zhang, Lingang; Xu, Jiancai; Yu, Yahong; Zhao, Xueyan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Yi, Longqing; Xu, Tongjun; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-09-15

    We propose a new method of obtaining a compact ultra-bright, ultra-broadband hard X-ray source. This X-ray source has a high peak brightness in the order of 10{sup 22} photons/(s mm{sup 2} mrad{sup 2} 0.1\\%BW), an ultrashort duration (10 fs), and a broadband spectrum (flat distribution from 0.1 MeV to 4 MeV), and thus has wide-ranging potential applications, such as in ultrafast Laue diffraction experiments. In our scheme, laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) provide driven electron beams. A foil target is placed oblique to the beam direction so that the target normal sheath field (TNSF) is used to provide a bending force. Using this TNSF-kick scheme, we can fully utilize the advantages of current LPAs, including their high charge, high energy, and low emittance.

  5. The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. Optical Counterparts to the X-ray Sources in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalski, A.; Kowalczyk, K.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Ulaczyk, K.; Skowron, J.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.

    2012-06-01

    We present a sample of 209 variable objects - very likely optical counterparts to the X-ray sources detected in the direction of the Galactic center by the Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) carried out with the Chandra satellite. The variable sources were found in the databases of the OGLE long term survey monitoring regularly the Galactic bulge since 1992. The counterpart candidates were searched based on the X-ray source position in the radius of 3.9 arcsec. Optical light curves of the candidates comprise a full variety of variability types: spotted stars, pulsating red giants (potentially secondary stars of symbiotic variables), cataclysmic variables, eclipsing binary systems, irregular non-periodic objects including an AGN (GRS 1734-292). Additionally, we find that positions of 19 non-variable stars brighter than 16.5 mag in the OGLE databases are so well aligned with the X-ray positions (<0.75 arcsec) that these objects are also likely optical counterparts to the GBS X-ray sources. We provide the OGLE astrometric and photometric information for all selected objects and their preliminary classifications. Photometry of the candidates is available from the OGLE Internet archive.

  6. The subarcsecond mid-infrared view of local active galactic nuclei - II. The mid-infrared-X-ray correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, D.; Gandhi, P.; Hönig, S. F.; Smette, A.; Duschl, W. J.

    2015-11-01

    We present an updated mid-infrared (MIR) versus X-ray correlation for the local active galactic nuclei (AGN) population based on the high angular resolution 12 and 18μm continuum fluxes from the AGN subarcsecond MIR atlas and 2-10 keV and 14-195 keV data collected from the literature. We isolate a sample of 152 objects with reliable AGN nature and multi-epoch X-ray data and minimal MIR contribution from star formation. Although the sample is not homogeneous or complete, we show that our results are unlikely to be affected by significant biases. The MIR-X-ray correlation is nearly linear and within a factor of 2 independent of the AGN type and the wavebands used. The observed scatter is <0.4 dex. A possible flattening of the correlation slope at the highest luminosities probed (˜1045 erg s-1) towards low MIR luminosities for a given X-ray luminosity is indicated but not significant. Unobscured objects have, on average, an MIR-X-ray ratio that is only ≤0.15 dex higher than that of obscured objects. Objects with intermediate X-ray column densities (22 < log NH < 23) actually show the highest MIR-X-ray ratio on average. Radio-loud objects show a higher mean MIR-X-ray ratio at low luminosities while the ratio is lower than average at high luminosities. This may be explained by synchrotron emission from the jet contributing to the MIR at low luminosities and additional X-ray emission at high luminosities. True Seyfert 2 candidates do not show any deviation from the general behaviour suggesting that they possess a dusty obscurer as in other AGN. Double AGN also do not deviate. Finally, we show that the MIR-X-ray correlation can be used to investigate the AGN nature of uncertain objects. Specifically, we give equations that allow us to determine the intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosities and column densities for objects with complex X-ray properties to within 0.34 dex. These techniques are applied to the uncertain objects of the remaining AGN MIR atlas, demonstrating the

  7. Bright x-ray stainless steel K-shell source development at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, M. J.; Fournier, K. B.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Hohenberger, M.; Moody, J.; Patterson, J. R.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-06-01

    High x-ray conversion efficiency (XRCE) K-shell sources are being developed for high energy density experiments for use as backlighters and for the testing of materials exposed to high x-ray fluxes and fluences. Recently, sources with high XRCE in the K-shell x-ray energy range of iron and nickel were investigated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The x-ray conversion efficiency in the 5-9 keV spectral range was determined to be 6.8% ± 0.3%. These targets were 4.1 mm diameter, 4 mm tall hollow epoxy tubes having a 50 μm thick wall supporting a tube of 3 to 3.5 μm thick stainless steel. The NIF laser deposited ˜460 kJ of 3ω light into the target in a 140 TW, 3.3 ns square pulse. The absolute x-ray emission of the source was measured by two calibrated Dante x-ray spectrometers. Time resolved images filtered for the Fe K-shell were recorded to follow the heating of the target. Time integrated high-resolution spectra were recorded in the K-shell range.

  8. Bright x-ray stainless steel K-shell source development at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    May, M. J.; Fournier, K. B.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Moody, J.; Patterson, J. R.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Hohenberger, M.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-06-15

    High x-ray conversion efficiency (XRCE) K-shell sources are being developed for high energy density experiments for use as backlighters and for the testing of materials exposed to high x-ray fluxes and fluences. Recently, sources with high XRCE in the K-shell x-ray energy range of iron and nickel were investigated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The x-ray conversion efficiency in the 5–9 keV spectral range was determined to be 6.8% ± 0.3%. These targets were 4.1 mm diameter, 4 mm tall hollow epoxy tubes having a 50 μm thick wall supporting a tube of 3 to 3.5 μm thick stainless steel. The NIF laser deposited ∼460 kJ of 3ω light into the target in a 140 TW, 3.3 ns square pulse. The absolute x-ray emission of the source was measured by two calibrated Dante x-ray spectrometers. Time resolved images filtered for the Fe K-shell were recorded to follow the heating of the target. Time integrated high-resolution spectra were recorded in the K-shell range.

  9. X-RAY SOURCES AND THEIR OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS IN THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER M12 (NGC 6218)

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, T.-N.; Kong, Albert K. H.; Bassa, Cees; Verbunt, Frank; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Anderson, Scott F.; Pooley, David

    2009-11-01

    We study a Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-S observation of the Galactic globular cluster M12. With a 26 ks exposure time, we detect six X-ray sources inside the half-mass radius (2.'16) of which two are inside the core radius (0.'72) of the cluster. If we assume that these sources are all associated with globular cluster M12, the luminosity L {sub X} among these sources between 0.3 and 7.0 keV varies roughly from 10{sup 30} to 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1}. For identification, we also analyzed the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) data and identified the optical counterparts to five X-ray sources inside the HST ACS field of view. According to the X-ray and optical features, we found 2-5 candidate active binaries (ABs) or cataclysmic variables (CVs) and 0-3 background galaxies within the HST ACS field of view. Based on the assumption that the number of X-ray sources scales with the encounter rate and the mass of the globular cluster, we expect two X-ray sources inside M12, and the expectation is consistent with our observational results. Therefore, the existence of identified X-ray sources (possible CVs or ABs) in M12 suggests the primordial origin of X-ray sources in globular clusters which is in agreement with previous studies.

  10. Examining molecular clouds in the Galactic Centre region using X-ray reflection spectra simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, M.; Chernyakova, M.; Terrier, R.; Goldwurm, A.

    2016-12-01

    In the centre of our Galaxy lies a supermassive black hole, identified with the radio source Sagittarius A⋆. This black hole has an estimated mass of around 4 million solar masses. Although Sagittarius A⋆ is quite dim in terms of total radiated energy, having a luminosity that is a factor of 1010 lower than its Eddington luminosity, there is now compelling evidence that this source was far brighter in the past. Evidence derived from the detection of reflected X-ray emission from the giant molecular clouds in the Galactic Centre region. However, the interpretation of the reflected emission spectra cannot be done correctly without detailed modelling of the reflection process. Attempts to do so can lead to an incorrect interpretation of the data. In this paper, we present the results of a Monte Carlo simulation code we developed in order to fully model the complex processes involved in the emerging reflection spectra. The simulated spectra can be compared to real data in order to derive model parameters and constrain the past activity of the black hole. In particular, we apply our code to observations of Sagittarius B2, in order to constrain the position and density of the cloud and the incident luminosity of the central source. The results of the code have been adapted to be used in XSPEC by a large community of astronomers.

  11. X-ray flux variability of active galactic nuclei observed using NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Priyanka; Stalin, C. S.; Rakshit, Suvendu

    2017-04-01

    We present results of a systematic study of flux variability on hourly time-scales in a large sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the 3-79 keV band using data from Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array. Our sample consists of four BL Lac objects (BL Lacs), three flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) 24 Seyfert 1, 42 Seyfert 2 and eight narrow line Seyfert 1 (NLSy1) galaxies. We find that in the 3-79 keV band, about 65 per cent of the sources in our sample show significant variations on hourly time-scales. Using the Mann-Whitney U-test and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, we find no difference in the variability behaviour between Seyfert 1 and 2 galaxies. The blazar sources (FSRQs and BL Lacs) in our sample are more variable than Seyfert galaxies that include Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 in the soft (3-10 keV), hard (10-79 keV) and total (3-79 keV) bands. NLSy1 galaxies show the highest duty cycle of variability (87 per cent), followed by BL Lacs (82 per cent), Seyfert galaxies (56 per cent) and FSRQs (23 per cent). We obtained flux doubling/halving time in the hard X-ray band less than 10 min in 11 sources. The flux variations between the hard and soft bands in all the sources in our sample are consistent with zero lag.

  12. Hard-X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei in the INTEGRAL complete sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, M.; Bassani, L.; Malizia, A.; Stephen, J. B.; Bird, A. J.; Bazzano, A.; Ubertini, P.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we present the hard-X-ray spectral analysis of a complete sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by INTEGRAL/IBIS. In conjunction with IBIS spectra, we make use of Swift/BAT data, with the aim of cross-calibrating the two instruments, studying source variability and constraining some important spectral parameters. We find that flux variability is present in at least 14 per cent of the sample, while spectral variability is found only in one object. There is general good agreement between BAT and IBIS spectra, despite a systematic mismatch of about 22 per cent in normalization. When fitted with a simple power-law model, type 1 and type 2 sources appear to have very similar average photon indices, suggesting that they are powered by the same mechanism. As expected, we also find that a simple power law does not always describe the data sufficiently well, thus indicating a certain degree of spectral complexity, which can be ascribed to features like a high energy cut-off and/or a reflection component. Fixing the reflection to be 0, 1 or 2, we find that our sample covers quite a large range in photon indices as well as cut-off energies; however, the spread is due only to a small number of objects, while the majority of the AGNs lie within well-defined boundaries of photon index (1 ≤ Γ ≤ 2) and cut-off energy (30 ≤ Ecut ≤ 300 keV).

  13. A combined optical and X-ray study of unobscured type 1 active galactic nuclei - II. Relation between X-ray emission and optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chichuan; Ward, Martin; Done, Chris

    2012-06-01

    In this second paper in a series of three, we study the properties of the various emission features and underlying continuum in the optical spectra of type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by using the unobscured hard X-ray emission as a diagnostic. We introduce the use of the 'correlation spectrum technique' (CST) for the first time. We use this to show the strength of the correlation between the hard X-ray luminosity and each wavelength of the optical spectrum. This shows that for broad-line Seyfert 1 galaxies all the strong emission lines (the broad component of Hα and Hβ, [Ne III] λλ3869/3967, [O I] λλ6300/6364, [O II] λλ3726/3729 and [O III] λλ4959/5007) and the optical underlying continuum all strongly correlate with the hard X-ray emission. In contrast, the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies show a stronger correlation in the optical continuum but a weaker correlation in the lines. A cross-correlation with luminosity between the various Balmer line components and the broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED) components shows that the best correlation exists between the hard X-ray component and the broad component (BC) of the Balmer lines. Such a correlation is weaker for the intermediate (IC) and narrow components, which supports the view that the broad-line region (BLR) has the closest link with the AGN's compact X-ray emission. The equivalent widths of the Balmer line IC and BC are found to correlate with ?, ?, Balmer line full width at half-maximum (FWHM) and black hole mass. There is a non-linear dependence of the Balmer line IC and BC luminosities with ? and L5100, which suggests that a second-order factor such as the intermediate-line region (ILR) and BLR covering factors affect the Balmer line component luminosities. The Balmer decrement is found to decrease from ˜5 in the line core to ˜2 in the extended wings, with mean decrements of 2.1 in the BLR and 4.8 in the ILR. This suggests different physical conditions in these regions, such as

  14. Environmental Effects on PAHs and VSGs in X-ray-bright Dusty Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Hidehiro; Kitayama, Tetsu; Okada, Yoko; Onaka, Takashi; Sakon, Itsuki; Tajiri, Yuka

    2006-05-01

    Elliptical galaxies provide dust with a unique environment, i.e. old stellar radiation fields without active star formation and interstellar media (ISM) mostly dominated by hot plasma. Small particles such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and very small grains (VSGs) are expected to be easily destroyed through sputtering by plasma ions. However, in our GO1 program, we have detected PAH emission features and prominent VSG mid-IR excess from X-ray-bright dusty elliptical galaxies. The observed IRS/SL spectra are quite unusual; the usually strong features at 6.2, 7.7, and 8.6 micron are very faint in contrast to prominent features at 11.3 and/or 12.7 micron. A naive interpretation is that the dominant emitters are neutral PAHs. We propose IRS/SL&LL observations of 18 nearby elliptical galaxies with properties similar to the GO1 galaxies, which include IRS/LL observations of the GO1 galaxies; we did not observe them with the IRS/LL. The IRS spectra are ideal to study the environmental effects on PAHs and VSGs; the IRS/SL is well matched to study overall properties of PAHs, while the IRS/LL is crucial to discuss the ionization state of PAHs and the properties of VSGs. Detection of aforementioned unusual PAH features as well as the 16-18 micron plateaus would lay strong constraints on the ionization state of the PAHs and thus their origins. If the results really support the dominance of neutral PAHs, we may have to relinquish a commonly-believed picture that dust and plasma are well mixed in the interstellar space. Then how are the dust spatially separated from the plasma? Detection of prominent mid-IR excess would reasonably explain efficient interaction of the dust with the plasma. Then, how do we sustain the hot plasma against the effective radiative cooling via a dust channel? Observational results with the large sample would give a great impact on the understanding of the dust and plasma physics and the evolutionary history of the ISM of the elliptical

  15. Scale heights and equivalent widths of the iron K-shell lines in the Galactic diffuse X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Shigeo; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Uchiyama, Hideki; Koyama, Katsuji

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the analysis of the X-ray spectra of the Galactic diffuse X-ray emission (GDXE) in the Suzaku archive. The fluxes of the Fe I Kα (6.4 keV), Fe XXV Heα (6.7 keV), and Fe XXVI Lyα (6.97 keV) lines are separately determined. From the latitude distributions, we confirm that the GDXE is decomposed into the Galactic center (GCXE), the Galactic bulge (GBXE) and the Galactic ridge (GRXE) X-ray emissions. The scale heights (SHs) of the Fe XXV Heα line of the GCXE, GBXE, and GRXE are determined to be ˜40, ˜310, and ˜140 pc, while those of the Fe I Kα line are ˜30, ˜160, and ˜70 pc, respectively. The mean equivalent widths (EWs) of the sum of the Fe XXV Heα and Fe XXVI Lyα lines are ˜750 eV, ˜600 eV, and ˜550 eV, while those of the Fe I Kα line are ˜150 eV, ˜60 eV, and ˜100 eV for the GCXE, GBXE, and GRXE, respectively. The origin of the GBXE, GRXE, and GCXE is separately discussed based on the new results of the SHs and EWs, in comparison with those of the cataclysmic variables, active binaries and coronal active stars.

  16. The Path to Buried Treasure: Paving the Way to the FLAMINGOS-2 Galactic Center Survey with IR and X-ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Reba M.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Dewitt, Curtis; Gosling, Andrew J.; Muno, Michael P.

    2008-05-01

    I describe the IR and X-ray campaign we have undertaken to determine the nature of the faint discrete X-ray source population discovered by Chandra in the Galactic Center. These results will provide the input to the FLAMINGOS-2 Galactic Center Survey (F2GCS). With FLAMINGOS-2's multi-object IR spectrograph we will obtain 1000s of IR spectra of candidate X-ray source counterparts, allowing us to efficiently identify the nature of these sources, and thus dramatically increase the number of known X-ray binaries and CVs in the Milky Way.

  17. An Expanding Plasma Model for the X-ray/radio knots in KPC-scale Jets of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahayanathan, S.; Misra, R.; Kembhavi, A. K.; Kaul, C. L.

    2003-03-01

    We model the observed X-ray/radio knots in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) as isotropically expanding spherical plasma clouds fed continously by non-thermal electrons. The time-dependent electron distribution and the emitted photon spectrum are computed using the standard kinetic equation considering synchrotron, adiabatic and inverse Compton cooling processes. We use this model to study the knots of 1136 - 135 and 1150 + 497, recenly observed by Chandra. 29

  18. X-ray bright points and high-speed wind streams: A preliminary analysis from Yohkoh and Ulysses data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poletto, Giannina; Suess, Steven T.; Khan, J. I.; Uchida, Y.; Hiei, E.; Neugebauer, M.; Goldstein, B. E.; Strong, K. T.; Harvey, K. L.

    1994-01-01

    The following aspect of the solar wind mass flux, and of its variation, is examined: whether coronal plumes might be responsible for the long-term variability of the mass flux in high-speed streams emanating from coronal holes. The assumption that plumes are rooted in coronal bright points (BP's) is made. The behavior of X-ray BP's, imaged by the Yohkoh soft X-ray telescope (SXT), during a seven month period when Ulysses experiments observed a series of recurrent high-speed streams, is analyzed. If plumes/BP's are sources of the wind mass flux, changes in the coronal hole BP density to mimic changes of the mass flux in high-speed streams are expected. SOHO will have the capability of measuring the solar wind speed/density at small heliocentric distances while simultaneously observing coronal BP's and coronal plumes.

  19. X-ray source brightness comparison: Rigaku rotating anode source vs. Kevex microfocus tube

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J A; Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B

    2010-03-17

    In 2007, we began to explore alternative x-ray sources for application to refraction-enhanced (phase contrast) x-ray radiography of cryogenic NIF ignition capsules containing frozen deuterium-tritium (D-T) ice layers. These radiographs are currently obtained using Kevex microfocus tubes as backlights, and for these sources the x-ray source size is approximately 5 {micro}m. As part of this exploration, we obtained refraction-enhanced radiographs of empty plastic capsules using the Janus laser facility at LLNL, demonstrating that even large ({approx} 100 {micro}m) sources can be utilized in refraction-enhanced radiography provided the source/sample distance is sufficiently large, and provided the final x-ray detector has sufficient spatial resolution. Essentially, in the current geometry, we rely on a small source to provide spatial resolution and on the source/sample distance to provide refraction contrast, but an equally useful alternative geometry is to use a large source and rely on fine detector spatial resolution to provide spatial resolution and on the sample/detector distance to provide refraction contrast.

  20. A High X-ray Brightness State of HBL Source 1ES 0033+595

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapanadze, Bidzina

    2015-09-01

    The TeV-detected HBL object of unknown redshift 1ES 0033+595 has been observed six times with X-ray Telecope onboard Swift satellite (Swift-XRT) since 2015 August 30 on the basis of our Target of Opportunity (ToO) requests of low and medium urgencies (see https://www.swift.psu.edu/secure/toop/summary.php).

  1. High-Energy Density science with an ultra-bright x-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    This talk will review recent progress in high-energy density physics using the world's brightest x-ray source, the Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC's free electron x-ray laser. These experiments investigate laser-driven matter in extreme conditions where powerful x-ray scattering and imaging techniques have been applied to resolve ionic interactions at atomic (Ångstrom) scale lengths and to visualize the formation of dense plasma states. Major research areas include dynamic compression experiments of solid targets to determine structural properties and to discover and characterize phase transitions at mega-bar pressures. A second area studies extreme fields produced by high-intensity radiation where fundamental questions of laboratory plasmas can be related to cosmological phenomena. Each of these areas takes advantage of the unique properties of the LCLS x-ray beam. They include small foci for achieving high intensity or high spatial resolution, high photon flux for dynamic structure factor measurements in single shots, and high spectral bandwidth to resolve plasmon (Langmuir) waves or ion acoustic waves in dense plasmas. We will further describe new developments of ultrafast pump-probe technique at high repetition rates. These include studies on dense cryogenic hydrogen that have begun providing fundamental insights into the physical properties of matter in extreme conditions that are important for astrophysics, fusion experiments and generation of radiation sources. This work was supported by DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under FWP 100182.

  2. Inverse Compton Origin of the Hard X-ray and Soft gamma-ray Emission from the Galactic Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Troy A.; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Strong, Andrew W.; Orlando, Elena; Bouchet, Laurent

    2008-09-30

    A recent re-determination of the non-thermal component of the hard X-ray to soft {gamma}-ray emission from the Galactic ridge, using the SPI instrument on the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) Observatory, is shown to be well reproduced as inverse-Compton emission from the interstellar medium. Both cosmic-ray primary electrons and secondary electrons and positrons contribute to the emission. The prediction uses the GALPROP model and includes a new calculation of the interstellar radiation field. This may solve a long-standing mystery of the origin of this emission, and potentially opens a new window on Galactic cosmic rays.

  3. SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF γ-RAY BRIGHT RADIO GALAXIES: ORIGIN OF THE X-RAY EMISSION AND BROADBAND MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Fukazawa, Yasushi; Itoh, Ryosuke; Tokuda, Shin'ya; Finke, Justin; Stawarz, Łukasz; Tanaka, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-10

    We performed a systematic X-ray study of eight nearby γ-ray bright radio galaxies with Suzaku in order to understand the origins of their X-ray emissions. The Suzaku spectra for five of those have been presented previously, while the remaining three (M87, PKS 0625–354, and 3C 78) are presented here for the first time. Based on the Fe-K line strength, X-ray variability, and X-ray power-law photon indices, and using additional information on the [O III] line emission, we argue for a jet origin of the observed X-ray emission in these three sources. We also analyzed five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) GeV gamma-ray data on PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 to understand these sources within the blazar paradigm. We found significant γ-ray variability in the former object. Overall, we note that the Suzaku spectra for both PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 are rather soft, while the LAT spectra are unusually hard when compared with other γ-ray detected low-power (FR I) radio galaxies. We demonstrate that the constructed broadband spectral energy distributions of PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 are well described by a one-zone synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton model. The results of the modeling indicate lower bulk Lorentz factors compared to those typically found in other BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects, but consistent with the values inferred from modeling other LAT-detected FR I radio galaxies. Interestingly, the modeling also implies very high peak (∼10{sup 16} Hz) synchrotron frequencies in the two analyzed sources, contrary to previously suggested scenarios for Fanaroff-Riley (FR) type I/BL Lac unification. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of the FR I/BL Lac unification schemes.

  4. MEASURING X-RAY VARIABILITY IN FAINT/SPARSELY SAMPLED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Allevato, V.; Paolillo, M.; Papadakis, I.; Pinto, C.

    2013-07-01

    We study the statistical properties of the normalized excess variance of variability process characterized by a ''red-noise'' power spectral density (PSD), as in the case of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We perform Monte Carlo simulations of light curves, assuming both a continuous and a sparse sampling pattern and various signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns). We show that the normalized excess variance is a biased estimate of the variance even in the case of continuously sampled light curves. The bias depends on the PSD slope and on the sampling pattern, but not on the S/N. We provide a simple formula to account for the bias, which yields unbiased estimates with an accuracy better than 15%. We show that the normalized excess variance estimates based on single light curves (especially for sparse sampling and S/N < 3) are highly uncertain (even if corrected for bias) and we propose instead the use of an ''ensemble estimate'', based on multiple light curves of the same object, or on the use of light curves of many objects. These estimates have symmetric distributions, known errors, and can also be corrected for biases. We use our results to estimate the ability to measure the intrinsic source variability in current data, and show that they could also be useful in the planning of the observing strategy of future surveys such as those provided by X-ray missions studying distant and/or faint AGN populations and, more in general, in the estimation of the variability amplitude of sources that will result from future surveys such as Pan-STARRS and LSST.

  5. FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF GALACTIC INTERMEDIATE/LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yong; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2015-08-10

    We investigate the formation and evolutionary sequences of Galactic intermediate- and low-mass X-ray binaries (I/LMXBs) by combining binary population synthesis (BPS) and detailed stellar evolutionary calculations. Using an updated BPS code we compute the evolution of massive binaries that leads to the formation of incipient I/LMXBs and present their distribution in the initial donor mass versus initial orbital period diagram. We then follow the evolution of the I/LMXBs until the formation of binary millisecond pulsars (BMSPs). We find that the birthrate of the I/LMXB population is in the range of 9 × 10{sup −6}–3.4 × 10{sup −5} yr{sup −1}, compatible with that of BMSPs that are thought to descend from I/LMXBs. We show that during the evolution of I/LMXBs they are likely to be observed as relatively compact binaries with orbital periods ≲1 day and donor masses ≲0.3M{sub ⊙}. The resultant BMSPs have orbital periods ranging from less than 1 day to a few hundred days. These features are consistent with observations of LMXBs and BMSPs. We also confirm the discrepancies between theoretical predictions and observations mentioned in the literature, that is, the theoretical average mass transfer rates (∼10{sup −10} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}) of LMXBs are considerably lower than observed, and the number of BMSPs with orbital periods ∼0.1–10 days is severely underestimated. These discrepancies imply that something is missing in the modeling of LMXBs, which is likely to be related to the mechanisms of the orbital angular momentum loss.

  6. Investigation of high-temperature bright plasma X-ray sources produced in 5-MA X-pinch experiments.

    PubMed

    Sinars, D B; McBride, R D; Pikuz, S A; Shelkovenko, T A; Wenger, D F; Cuneo, M E; Yu, E P; Chittenden, J P; Harding, E C; Hansen, S B; Peyton, B P; Ampleford, D J; Jennings, C A

    2012-10-12

    Using solid, machined X-pinch targets driven by currents rising from 0 to 5-6 MA in 60 ns, we observed bright spots of 5-9-keV continuum radiation from 5±2-μm diameter regions. The >6-keV radiation is emitted in about 0.4 ns, and the bright spots are roughly 75 times brighter than the bright spots measured at 1 MA. A total x-ray power of 10 TW peak and yields of 165±20 kJ were emitted from a 3-mm height. The 3-5-keV continuum radiation had a 50-90-GW peak power and 0.15-0.35-kJ yield. The continuum is plausibly from a 1275±75-eV blackbody or alternatively from a 3500±500-eV bremsstrahlung source.

  7. A XMM-Newton Observation of Nova LMC 1995, a Bright Supersoft X-ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orio, Marina; Hartmann, Wouter; Still, Martin; Greiner, Jochen

    2003-01-01

    Nova LMC 1995, previously detected during 1995-1998 with ROSAT, was observed again as a luminous supersoft X-ray source with XMM-Newton in December of 2000. This nova offers the possibility to observe the spectrum of a hot white dwarf, burning hydrogen in a shell and not obscured by a wind or by nebular emission like in other supersoft X-ray sources. Notwithstanding uncertainties in the calibration of the EPIC instruments at energy E<0.5 keV, using atmospheric models in Non Local Thermonuclear Equilibrium we derived an effective temperature in the range 400,000-450,000 K, a bolometric luminosity Lbolabout equal to 2.3 times 10 sup37 erg s sup-l, and we verified that the abundance of carbon is not significantly enhanced in the X-rays emitting shell. The RGS grating spectra do not show emission lines (originated in a nebula or a wind) observed for some other supersoft X-ray sources. The crowded atmospheric absorption lines of the white dwarf cannot be not resolved. There is no hard component (expected from a wind, a surrounding nebula or an accretion disk), with no counts above the background at E>0.6 keV, and an upper limit Fx,hard = 10 sup-14 erg s sup-l cm sup-2 to the X-ray flux above this energy. The background corrected count rate measured by the EPIC instruments was variable on time scales of minutes and hours, but without the flares or sudden obscuration observed for other novae. The power spectrum shows a peak at 5.25 hours, possibly due to a modulation with the orbital period. We also briefly discuss the scenarios in which this nova may become a type Ia supernova progenitor.

  8. SU Lyncis, a Hard X-Ray Bright M Giant: Clues Point to a Large Hidden Population of Symbiotic Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, K.; Luna, G. J. M.; Cusumano, G.; Segreto, A.; Munari, U.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Lucy, A. B.; Nelson, T.; Nunez, N. E.

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic star surveys have traditionally relied almost exclusively on low resolution optical spectroscopy. However, we can obtain amore reliable estimate of their total Galactic population by using all available signatures of the symbiotic phenomenon. Here we report the discovery of a hard X-ray source, 4PBC J0642.9+5528, in the Swift hard X-ray all-sky survey, and identify it with a poorly studied red giant, SU Lyn, using pointed Swift observations and ground-based optical spectroscopy. The X-ray spectrum, the optical to UV spectrum, and the rapid UV variability of SU Lyn are all consistent with our interpretation that it is a symbiotic star containing an accreting white dwarf. The symbiotic nature of SU Lyn went unnoticed until now, because it does not exhibit emission lines strong enough to be obvious in low resolution spectra. We argue that symbiotic stars without shell-burning have weak emission lines, and that the current lists of symbiotic stars are biased in favour of shell-burning systems. We conclude that the true population of symbiotic stars has been underestimated, potentially by a large factor.

  9. SU Lyncis, a hard X-ray bright M giant: clues point to a large hidden population of symbiotic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, K.; Luna, G. J. M.; Cusumano, G.; Segreto, A.; Munari, U.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Lucy, A. B.; Nelson, T.; Nuñez, N. E.

    2016-09-01

    Symbiotic star surveys have traditionally relied almost exclusively on low resolution optical spectroscopy. However, we can obtain a more reliable estimate of their total Galactic population by using all available signatures of the symbiotic phenomenon. Here we report the discovery of a hard X-ray source, 4PBC J0642.9+5528, in the Swift hard X-ray all-sky survey, and identify it with a poorly studied red giant, SU Lyn, using pointed Swift observations and ground-based optical spectroscopy. The X-ray spectrum, the optical to UV spectrum, and the rapid UV variability of SU Lyn are all consistent with our interpretation that it is a symbiotic star containing an accreting white dwarf. The symbiotic nature of SU Lyn went unnoticed until now, because it does not exhibit emission lines strong enough to be obvious in low resolution spectra. We argue that symbiotic stars without shell-burning have weak emission lines, and that the current lists of symbiotic stars are biased in favour of shell-burning systems. We conclude that the true population of symbiotic stars has been underestimated, potentially by a large factor.

  10. Increasing X-Ray Brightness of HBL Source 1ES 1727+650

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapanadze, Bidzina

    2017-02-01

    The nearby TeV-detected HBL object 1ES 1727+502 (1Zw 187, z=0.055) has been targeted 111 times by X-ray Telescope (XRT) onboard Swift since 2010 April 2. During this monitoring, the 0.3-10 keV count rate varied by a factor of 17.4 (see http://www.swift.psu.edu/monitoring/source.php?source=QSOB1727+502) and showed a prolonged X-ray flaring activity during 2015 March - 2016 February, revealed mainly via the Target of Opportunity observations performed in the framework of our request of different urgencies (Request Number 6571, 6606, 6717, 6809, 6927, 7322, 7355, 7379, 7390, 7404, 7430, 7441, 7516, 7565; see Kapanadze et al. 2015, Atel #8224, #7342).

  11. High Brightness X-Ray Source for Directed Energy and Holographic Imaging Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-31

    for lensless electron microscopy . 2 24 4 II. MICROHOLOGRAPHY WITH VISIBLE RADIATION A. Camera Design Figure (1) is a schematic of the microholographic... Microscopy with ’ lensless ’ Fourier-Transform Holograms and Correlative Source-Effect Compensation", Optique des Rayons X et Microanalyse (Hermann, Paris, 1966...development of a powerful new means of visualization, three- dimensional ’x-ray microholography.1 Importontly, unlike electron microscopy . which

  12. The Origin of Bright X-Ray Sources in Multiple Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, V V; Eggleton, P P

    2009-04-23

    Luminous X-ray stars are very often found in visual double or multiple stars. Binaries with periods of a few days possess the highest degree of coronal X-ray activity among regular, non-relativistic stars. But the orbital periods in visual double stars are too large for any direct interaction between the companions to take place. We suggest that most of the strongest X-ray components in resolved binaries are yet-undiscovered short-period binaries, and that a few are merged remnants of such binaries. The omnipresence of short-period active stars, e.g. of BY-Dra-type binaries, in multiple systems is explained via the dynamical evolution of triple stars with large mutual inclinations. The dynamical perturbation on the inner pair pumps up the eccentricity in a cyclic manner, a phenomenon known as Kozai cycling. At times of close periapsis, tidal friction reduces the angular momentum of the binary, causing it to shrink. When the orbital period of the inner pair drops to a few days, fast surface rotation of the companions is driven by tidal forces, boosting activity by a few orders of magnitude. If the period drops still further, a merger may take place leaving a rapidly-rotating active dwarf with only a distant companion.

  13. Dynamic Ultra-Bright X-ray Laser Scattering from Isochorically Heated Cryogenic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Luke; High Energy Density Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Recent x-ray scattering experiments performed at the MEC end-station of the LCLS, have demonstrated novel plasma measurements of the electron temperature, pressure, and density by simultaneous high-resolution angularly and spectrally resolved x-ray scattering from shock-compressed materials in the warm dense regime. Such measurements provide the structural properties relating the microscopic quantities in terms of thermodynamic properties using first-principles calculations. These studies have led us on a path where we create conditions with increasing temperatures and pressures to explore the high-energy density phase space. Specifically, we have begun experiments on hot and dense hydrogen plasmas producing energetic proton beams that find applications in fusion research and astrophysical phenomena. For our experiments with the 25 TW short pulse laser we apply repetition rates and pulse widths with a good match to the LCLS x-ray beam capabilities allowing pump-probe experiments with ultrahigh temporal resolution with very high data throughput with shot rates of up to 5 Hz. In this talk we will discuss our recent measurements that have resolved the ultrafast structural response of hydrogen to intense heating.

  14. Modelling the thermal X-ray emission around the Galactic Centre from colliding Wolf-Rayet winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Christopher M. P.; Wang, Q. Daniel; Cuadra, Jorge

    2017-02-01

    The Galactic Centre is a hotbed of astrophysical activity, with the injection of wind material from ˜30 massive Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars orbiting within 12 arcsec of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) playing an important role. Hydrodynamic simulations of such colliding and accreting winds produce a complex density and temperature structure of cold wind material shocking with the ambient medium, creating a large reservoir of hot, X-ray-emitting gas. This work aims to confront the 3 Ms of Chandra X-ray Visionary Program observations of this diffuse emission by computing the X-ray emission from these hydrodynamic simulations of the colliding WR winds, amid exploring a variety of SMBH feedback mechanisms. The major success of the model is that it reproduces the spectral shape from the 2-5 arcsec ring around the SMBH, where most of the stellar wind material that is ultimately captured by Sgr A* is shock-heated and thermalized. This naturally explains that the hot gas comes from colliding WR winds, and that the wind speeds of these stars are, in general, well constrained. The flux level of these spectra, as well as 12 × 12-arcsec2 images of 4-9 keV, shows that the X-ray flux is tied to the SMBH feedback strength; stronger feedback clears out more hot gas, thereby decreasing the thermal X-ray emission. The model in which Sgr A* produced an intermediate-strength outflow during the last few centuries best matches the observations to within about 10 per cent, showing that SMBH feedback is required to interpret the X-ray emission in this region.

  15. Modelling the thermal X-ray emission around the Galactic center from colliding Wolf-Rayet winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post Russell, Christopher Michael; Wang, Q. Daniel; Cuadra, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    The Galactic center is a hotbed of astrophysical activity, with the injection of wind material from ˜30 massive Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars orbiting within 12" of the super-massive black hole (SMBH) playing an important role. Hydrodynamic simulations of such colliding and accreting winds produce a complex density and temperature structure of cold wind material shocking with the ambient medium, creating a large reservoir of hot, X-ray-emitting gas. This work aims to confront the 3Ms of Chandra X-ray Visionary Program (XVP) observations of this diffuse emission by computing the X-ray emission from these hydrodynamic simulations of the colliding WR winds, amid exploring a variety of SMBH feedback mechanisms. The major success of the model is that it reproduces the spectral shape from the 2"-5" ring around the SMBH, where most of the stellar wind material that is ultimately captured by Sgr A* is shock-heated and thermalized. This naturally explains that the hot gas comes from colliding WR winds, and that the wind speeds of these stars are in general well constrained. The flux level of these spectra, as well as 12"x12" images of 4-9 keV, show the X-ray flux is tied to the SMBH feedback strength; stronger feedback clears out more hot gas, thereby decreasing the thermal X-ray emission. The model in which Sgr A* produced an intermediate-strength outflow during the last few centuries best matches the observations to within about 10%, showing SMBH feedback is required to interpret the X-ray emission in this region.

  16. Modelling the thermal X-ray emission around the Galactic centre from colliding Wolf-Rayet winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Christopher M. P.; Wang, Q. Daniel; Cuadra, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    The Galactic centre is a hotbed of astrophysical activity, with the injection of wind material from ~30 massive Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars orbiting within 12'' of the super-massive black hole (SMBH) playing an important role. Hydrodynamic simulations of such colliding and accreting winds produce a complex density and temperature structure of cold wind material shocking with the ambient medium, creating a large reservoir of hot, X-ray-emitting gas. This work aims to confront the 3Ms of Chandra X-ray Visionary Program (XVP) observations of this diffuse emission by computing the X-ray emission from these hydrodynamic simulations of the colliding WR winds, amid exploring a variety of SMBH feedback mechanisms. The major success of the model is that it reproduces the spectral shape from the 2''-5'' ring around the SMBH, where most of the stellar wind material that is ultimately captured by Sgr A* is shock-heated and thermalised. This naturally explains that the hot gas comes from colliding WR winds, and that the wind speeds of these stars are in general well constrained. The flux level of these spectra, as well as 12''×12'' images of 4-9 keV, show the X-ray flux is tied to the SMBH feedback strength; stronger feedback clears out more hot gas, thereby decreasing the thermal X-ray emission. The model in which Sgr A* produced an intermediate-strength outflow during the last few centuries best matches the observations to within about 10%, showing SMBH feedback is required to interpret the X-ray emission in this region.

  17. Concurrence of monoenergetic electron beams and bright X-rays from an evolving laser-plasma bubble

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wenchao; Chen, Liming; Li, Dazhang; Zhang, Lu; Hafz, Nasr A. M.; Dunn, James; Ma, Yong; Huang, Kai; Su, Luning; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Desktop laser plasma acceleration has proven to be able to generate gigaelectronvolt-level quasi-monoenergetic electron beams. Moreover, such electron beams can oscillate transversely (wiggling motion) in the laser-produced plasma bubble/channel and emit collimated ultrashort X-ray flashes known as betatron radiation with photon energy ranging from kiloelectronvolts to megaelectronvolts. This implies that usually one cannot obtain bright betatron X-rays and high-quality electron beams with low emittance and small energy spread simultaneously in the same accelerating wave bucket. Here, we report the first (to our knowledge) experimental observation of two distinct electron bunches in a single laser shot, one featured with quasi-monoenergetic spectrum and another with continuous spectrum along with large emittance. The latter is able to generate high-flux betatron X-rays. Such is observed only when the laser self-guiding is extended over 4 mm at a fixed plasma density (4 × 1018 cm−3). Numerical simulation reveals that two bunches of electrons are injected at different stages due to the bubble evolution. The first bunch is injected at the beginning to form a stable quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, whereas the second one is injected later due to the oscillation of the bubble size as a result of the change of the laser spot size during the propagation. Due to the inherent temporal synchronization, this unique electron–photon source can be ideal for pump–probe applications with femtosecond time resolution. PMID:24711405

  18. Concurrence of monoenergetic electron beams and bright X-rays from an evolving laser-plasma bubble.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenchao; Chen, Liming; Li, Dazhang; Zhang, Lu; Hafz, Nasr A M; Dunn, James; Ma, Yong; Huang, Kai; Su, Luning; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-04-22

    Desktop laser plasma acceleration has proven to be able to generate gigaelectronvolt-level quasi-monoenergetic electron beams. Moreover, such electron beams can oscillate transversely (wiggling motion) in the laser-produced plasma bubble/channel and emit collimated ultrashort X-ray flashes known as betatron radiation with photon energy ranging from kiloelectronvolts to megaelectronvolts. This implies that usually one cannot obtain bright betatron X-rays and high-quality electron beams with low emittance and small energy spread simultaneously in the same accelerating wave bucket. Here, we report the first (to our knowledge) experimental observation of two distinct electron bunches in a single laser shot, one featured with quasi-monoenergetic spectrum and another with continuous spectrum along with large emittance. The latter is able to generate high-flux betatron X-rays. Such is observed only when the laser self-guiding is extended over 4 mm at a fixed plasma density (4 × 10(18) cm(-3)). Numerical simulation reveals that two bunches of electrons are injected at different stages due to the bubble evolution. The first bunch is injected at the beginning to form a stable quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, whereas the second one is injected later due to the oscillation of the bubble size as a result of the change of the laser spot size during the propagation. Due to the inherent temporal synchronization, this unique electron-photon source can be ideal for pump-probe applications with femtosecond time resolution.

  19. Prospects of 3D mapping of the Galactic Centre clouds with X-ray polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, F.; Karas, V.; Kunneriath, D.; Muleri, F.

    2014-07-01

    Despite past panchromatic observations of the innermost part of the Milky Way, the overall structure of the Galactic Centre (GC) remains enigmatic in terms of geometry. In this paper, we aim to show how polarimetry can probe the three-dimensional position of the molecular material in the central ˜100 pc of the GC. We investigate a model where the central supermassive black hole Sgr A* is radiatively coupled to a fragmented circumnuclear disc (CND), an elliptical twisted ring representative of the central molecular zone (CMZ), and the two main, bright molecular clouds Sgr B2 and Sgr C. 8-35 keV integrated polarization mapping reveals that Sgr B2 and Sgr C, situated at the two sides of the CMZ, present the highest polarization degrees (66.5 and 47.8 per cent, respectively), both associated with a polarization position angle ψ = 90° (normal to the scattering plane). The CND shows a lower polarization degree, 1.0 per cent with ψ = -20.5°, tracing the inclination of the CND with respect to the Galactic plane. The CMZ polarization is spatially variable. We also consider a range of spatial locations for Sgr A* and the reprocessing media, and investigate how the modelled three-dimensional geometry influences the resulting GC polarization. The two reflection nebulae are found to always produce high polarization degrees (≫10 per cent). We show that a 500 ks observation with a broad-band polarimeter could constrain the location and the morphology of the scattering material with respect to the emitting source, revealing the past activity of Sgr A*.

  20. HEAO 1 high-energy X-ray observations of three bright transient X-ray sources H1705-250 (Nova Ophiuchi), H1743-322, and H1833-077 (Scutum X-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, B. A.; Levine, A. M.; Lang, F. L.; Primini, F. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1984-01-01

    The bright X-ray transients H1705-250 (Nova Ophiuchi) and H1743-322 in the energy range 12-180 keV were observed, and the presence of high-energy spectral components was revealed. On the basis of X-ray spectra in the 1-10 keV range, transients are classified as 'soft' (kT = 4 keV) or 'hard' (kT = 17 keV); and both H1705-250 and H1743-322 should be in the 'soft' category. Data have been reexamined for the archetypal 'soft' transient A0600-00 taken by the SAS 3 satellite, but no evidence is found there for a high-energy spectral component. Thus consideration of a wider X-ray energy range makes the 'hard'/'soft' distinction between X-ray transients much less clear.

  1. CHANDRA AND HST STUDIES OF THE X-RAY SOURCES IN GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER M92

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ting-Ni; Kong, Albert K. H.; Verbunt, Frank; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Anderson, Scott F.; Pooley, David

    2011-08-01

    We present the analysis of two observations of M92 taken with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We combined the two data sets with a total exposure of {approx}52 ks. With the combined observation, we detected 10 X-ray sources inside the half-mass radius (1.'02), five of which are inside the core radius (0.'26) of M92. The luminosities of the 10 sources are roughly within the range of 10{sup 30}-10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1} assuming cluster memberships. The background estimation suggests 7-8 cluster members and 2-3 background galaxies in M92. We identified the 10 sources by using Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys observations of M92. Based on the X-ray and optical characteristics, we classified 4-5 possible candidates for cataclysmic variables within the half-mass radius. We discussed the possible formation mechanisms of the X-ray sources in M92 by comparing the predicted X-ray source number and observational results. Under the assumption that the number of X-ray sources scales with the encounter rate and the mass of the globular cluster, we expected eight X-ray sources formed from dynamical interactions and four from primordial binaries inside M92, which is consistent with the background estimation and comparable with the observational results. We therefore suggest that the X-ray sources in M92 may be contributed from both dynamical origin and primordial binaries.

  2. Rapid X-ray flaring from the direction of the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Centre.

    PubMed

    Baganoff, F K; Bautz, M W; Brandt, W N; Chartas, G; Feigelson, E D; Garmire, G P; Maeda, Y; Morris, M; Ricker, G R; Townsley, L K; Walter, F

    2001-09-06

    The nuclei of most galaxies are now believed to harbour supermassive black holes. The motions of stars in the central few light years of our Milky Way Galaxy indicate the presence of a dark object with a mass of about 2.6 x 106 solar masses (refs 2, 3). This object is spatially coincident with the compact radio source Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) at the dynamical centre of the Galaxy, and the radio emission is thought to be powered by the gravitational potential energy released by matter as it accretes onto a supermassive black hole. Sgr A* is, however, much fainter than expected at all wavelengths, especially in X-rays, which has cast some doubt on this model. The first strong evidence for X-ray emission was found only recently. Here we report the discovery of rapid X-ray flaring from the direction of Sgr A*, which, together with the previously reported steady X-ray emission, provides compelling evidence that the emission is coming from the accretion of gas onto a supermassive black hole at the Galactic Centre.

  3. Metal nanoplasmas as bright sources of hard X-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, P P; Taneja, P; Ayyub, P; Sandhu, A S; Kumar, G Ravindra

    2003-03-21

    We report significant enhancements in light coupling to intense-laser-created solid plasmas via surface plasmon and "lightning rod" effects. We demonstrate this in metal nanoparticle-coated solid targets irradiated with 100 fs, 806 nm laser pulses, focused to intensities approximately 10(14)-10(15) W cm(-2). Our experiments show a 13-fold enhancement in hard x-ray yield (10-200 keV) emitted by copper nanoparticle plasmas formed at the focal volume. A simple model explains the observed enhancement quantitatively and provides pointers to the design of structured surfaces for maximizing such emissions.

  4. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Optically Bright Planets using the Chandra Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, P. G.; Elsner, R. F.

    2005-01-01

    Since its launch in July 1999, Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) has observed several planets (Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn) and 6 comets. At 0.5 arc-second spatial resolution, ACIS detects individual x-ray photons with good quantum efficiency (25% at 0.6 KeV) and energy resolution (20% FWHM at 0.6 KeV). However, the ACIS CCDs are also sensitive to optical and near-infrared light, which is absorbed by optical blocking filters (OBFs) that eliminate optical contamination from all but the brightest extended sources, e.g., planets. .Jupiter at opposition subseconds approx.45 arc-seconds (90 CCD pixels.) Since Chandra is incapable of tracking a moving target, the planet takes 10 - 20 kiloseconds to move across the most sensitive ACIS CCD, after which the observatory must be re-pointed. Meanwhile, the OBF covering that CCD adds an opt,ical signal equivalent to approx.110 eV to each pixel that lies within thc outline of the Jovian disk. This has three consequences: (1) the observatory must be pointed away from Jupiter while CCD bias maps are constructed; (2) most x-rays from within the optical image will be misidentified as charged-particle background and ignored; and (3) those x-rays that are reported will bc assigned anomalously high energies. The same also applies to thc other planets, but is less serious since they are either dimmer at optical wavelengths, or they show less apparent motion across the sky, permitting reduced CCD exposure times: the optical contamination from Saturn acids approx.15 eV per pixel, and from Mars and Venus approx.31 eV. After analyzing a series of short .Jupiter observations in December 2000, ACIS parameters were optimized for the February 2003 opposition. CCD bias maps were constructed while Chandra pointed away from Jupiter, and the subsequent observations employed on-board software to ignore any pixel that contained less charge than that expected from optical leakage. In addition, ACIS was commanded to report 5 x 5

  5. Plasmon-enhanced photocathode for high brightness and high repetition rate x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, A; Senft, C; Thompson, K F; Feng, J; Cabrini, S; Schuck, P J; Padmore, H A; Peppernick, S J; Hess, W P

    2013-02-15

    In this Letter, we report on the efficient generation of electrons from metals using multiphoton photoemission by use of nanostructured plasmonic surfaces to trap, localize, and enhance optical fields. The plasmonic surface increases absorption over normal metals by more than an order of magnitude, and due to the localization of fields, this results in over 6 orders of magnitude increase in effective nonlinear quantum yield. We demonstrate that the achieved quantum yield is high enough for use in rf photoinjectors operating as electron sources for MHz repetition rate x-ray free electron lasers.

  6. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory: A high-brightness soft x-ray synchrotron-radiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.; Robinson, A.L.

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source, a third-generation national synchrotron-radiation facility now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is scheduled to begin serving qualified users across a broad spectrum of research areas in the spring of 1993. Based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized to operate at 1.5 GeV, the ALS will have 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) and 24 high-quality bend-magnet ports. The short pulse width (30--50 ns) will be ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will generate high-brightness soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from below 20 eV to above 2 keV. Wigglers and bend magnets will extend the spectrum by generating high fluxes of hard x-rays to photon energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in which XUV radiation is used to study matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Galactic Supernova Remnant Puppis A with the XMM-Newton RGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Mori, Koji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Petre, Robert; Yamada, Shinya; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Konami, Saori; Tamagawa, Toru

    2012-01-01

    We present high-resolution X-ray spectra of cloud-shock interaction regions in the eastern and northern rims of the Galactic supernova remnant Puppis A, using the Reflection Grating Spectrometer onboard the XMM-Newton satellite. A number of emission lines including K(alpha) triplets of He-like N, O , and Ne are clearly resolved for the first time. Intensity ratios of forbidden to resonance lines in the triplets are found to be higher than predictions by thermal emission models having plausible plasma parameters. The anomalous line ratios cannot be reproduced by effects of resonance scattering, recombination, or inner-shell ionization processes, but could be explained by charge-exchange emission that should arise at interfaces between the cold/warm clouds and the hot plasma. Our observations thus provide observational support for charge-exchange X-ray emission in supernova remnants.

  8. Disk-jet coupling in the Galactic black hole X-ray binary MAXI J1836-194

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    There is a universal connection between the accretion and ejection phenomena that are observed in black holes across the mass scale. Quantifying this relationship is the first step in understanding how jets are launched, accelerated and collimated. X-ray binaries are ideal systems to study this relationship, as they evolve on human timescales. In outburst, their luminosities increase by several orders of magnitude, with the thermal X-ray emission from the accretion disk and the radio emission from the relativistic jets undergoing dramatic, coupled changes. We present the results of our multiwavelength radio through to X-ray observations of the Galactic black hole candidate X-ray binary MAXI J1836-194 during its 2011 outburst. We find that this system has a near face-on accretion disk with the jet, that is pointed almost directly towards us, accounting for ~6% of the total energy output of the system early in the outburst. We observed the frequency of the transition from optically thick to optically thin synchrotron emission in the jet spectrum evolve by ~3 orders of magnitude as the jet gradually switches on and off on a timescale of a few weeks. This evolution does not appear to follow the expected positive relation with source luminosity. Instead the jet break shifted to higher frequencies as the source luminosity decreased and is likely coupled to the accretion flow in a more complex way. We find the region where the jet is accelerated up to relativistic speeds occurs at much larger distances from the black hole than previously thought and does not scale with the inner radius of the accretion disk. Our simultaneous, high cadence observations provide an unprecedented insight into the accretion processes occurring during an outburst, allowing us to observe the compact jet evolve and the corresponding changes within the accretion regime. This has implications for the launching of jets on all scales, from X-ray binaries to their larger-scale analogues, AGN.

  9. INSIGHT INTO ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS AND HOST GALAXY CO-EVOLUTION FROM HARD X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Zhou, X. L.; Wei, J. Y.

    2013-05-10

    We study the issue of active galactic nucleus (AGN) and host co-evolution by focusing on the correlation between the hard X-ray emission from central AGNs and the stellar populations of the host galaxies. Focusing on galaxies with strong H{alpha} line emission (EW(H{alpha}) > 5 A), both X-ray and optical spectral analyses are performed on 67 (partially) obscured AGNs that are selected from the XMM-Newton 2XMMi/SDSS-DR7 catalog originally cross-matched by Pineau et al. The sample allows us to study central AGN activity and host galaxy activity directly and simultaneously in individual objects. Combining the spectral analysis in both bands reveals that the older the stellar population of the host galaxy, the harder the X-ray emission will be, which was missed in our previous study where ROSAT hardness ratios were used. By excluding the contamination from host galaxies and from jet beaming emission, the correlation indicates that Compton cooling in the accretion disk corona decreases with the mean age of the stellar population. We argue that this correlation is related to the correlation of L/L{sub Edd} with the host stellar population. In addition, the [O I]/H{alpha} and [S II]/H{alpha} narrow-line ratios are identified to correlate with the spectral slope in hard X-rays, which can be inferred from the currently proposed evolution of the X-ray emission because of the confirmed tight correlations between the two line ratios and stellar population age.

  10. Spectral variability in hard X-rays and discovery of a 13,5 years period in bright quasar 3C273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchanda, R.

    SPECTRAL VARIABILITY IN HARD X-RAYS AND DISCOVERY OF A 13.5 YEARS PERIOD IN BRIGHT QUASAR 3C273. R. K. Manchanda Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai-400005, India. ravi@tifr.res.in/Fax:+91-22-2152110 Among the large variety of active galactic nuclei, 3C 273 is the nearest quasi stellar object. The source has been studied in details in various energy bands and shows a large variety of morphological features. In the X-ray energy range 2-20 keV, the spectrum follows a power law with a spectral index of -1.5, however, the observed value of the spectral index in the 20-120 keV band shows a large variation. In the case of old archival data, the derived spectral index has a value between 1.5 and 2.2 while, the recent data from OSSE experiment showed a flat spectrum with index 0.8. Thus, to fit the GeV fluxes from the source, a break in the spectrum around 1 MeV has been proposed. In this paper we report the balloon-borne hard X-ray observations of 3C273 made with LASE instrument on Nov. 20, 1998 as a part of our continuing programme of balloon borne hard X-ray observations in the 20-200 keV band using high sensitivity Large Area Scintillation counter Experiment. Our data clearly show a steep spectrum in the 20-200 keV with spectral index a = -2.26+ 0.07 and its extrapolation can fit the GeV data. The presence of steep power law index is in complete contrast to earlier observation from OSSE. From a comparison with the available archival data of the source we have discovered that 50 keV flux from the source, shows very strong modulation with a period of about 13.5 years and which is also present at 100 keV and in the spectral index to a lesser degree. We discuss the periodicity in terms of precessing source geometry.

  11. On the Hard X-ray Emission Detected from the Northwestern Rim of the Galactic Supernova Remnant G156.2+5.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannuti, Thomas; Allen, G. E.; Moffitt, W. P.; Grimes, C.; Lackey-Stewart, A.; Hughes, A.; Young, K. H.

    2013-06-01

    The Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G156.2+5.7 has been proposed to be a member of the class of Galactic SNRs that feature a significant hard component to their observed X-ray emission: prior X-ray observations have suggested that this X-ray emission is localized to the center and northwestern rim of this SNR. Recently, it has been argued that the observed hard X-ray emission detected from this SNR (specifically from the northwestern rim of the SNR) actually originates from a background cluster of galaxies seen in projection toward this rim. Therefore, it would appear that this SNR does not produce a significant amount of hard X-ray emission after all and its classification as a hard X-ray emitting SNR is misguided. To investigate the true nature of the observed X-ray emission, we have conducted a joint spectral analysis of ROSAT, ASCA and RXTE observations of this northwestern rim: we find an excess of hard X-ray emission beyond that expected from models for the emission from the background cluster and the diffuse X-ray background. We investigate whether this excess is produced by other background sources seen in the RXTE field of view or if the excess is produced by the SNR itself. Our spectral analysis and our initial results will be presented and discussed.

  12. STRUCTURE AND MORPHOLOGY OF X-RAY-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS HOSTS AT 1 < z < 3 IN THE CANDELS-COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Lulu; Chen, Yang; Li, Jinrong; Lv, Xuanyi; Kong, Xu; Fang, Guanwen; Knudsen, Kirsten K.

    2014-03-20

    We analyze morphologies of the host galaxies of 35 X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z ∼ 2 in the Cosmic Evolution Survey field using Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 imaging taken from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey. We build a control sample of 350 galaxies in total by selecting 10 non-active galaxies drawn from the same field with a similar stellar mass and redshift for each AGN host. By performing two-dimensional fitting with GALFIT on the surface brightness profile, we find that the distribution of the Sérsic index (n) of AGN hosts does not show a statistical difference from that of the control sample. We measure the nonparametric morphological parameters (the asymmetry index A, the Gini coefficient G, the concentration index C, and the M {sub 20} index) based on point-source-subtracted images. All the distributions of these morphological parameters of AGN hosts are consistent with those of the control sample. We finally investigate the fraction of distorted morphologies in both samples by visual classification. Only ∼15% of the AGN hosts have highly distorted morphologies, possibly due to a major merger or interaction. We find there is no significant difference in the distortion fractions between the AGN host sample and control sample. We conclude that the morphologies of X-ray-selected AGN hosts are similar to those of non-active galaxies and most AGN activity is not triggered by a major merger.

  13. Anomalous X-ray galactic signal from 7.1 keV spin-3/2 dark matter decay

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Sukanta; Goyal, Ashok; Kumar, Sanjeev E-mail: agoyal45@yahoo.com

    2016-02-01

    In order to explain the recently reported peak at 3.55 keV in the galactic X-ray spectrum, we propose a simple model. In this model, the Standard Model is extended by including a neutral spin-3/2 vector-like fermion that transforms like a singlet under SM gauge group. This 7.1 keV spin-3/2 fermion is considered to comprise a portion of the observed dark matter. Its decay into a neutrino and a photon with decay life commensurate with the observed data, fits the relic dark matter density and obeys the astrophysical constraints from the supernova cooling.

  14. Hard X-ray imaging survey of the Galactic plane with the Caltech gamma-ray imaging payload GRIP-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbel, S.; Cook, W. R.; Harrison, F. A.; Prince, T. A.; Schindler, S. M.; Wang, S.

    1997-01-01

    In a two-day balloon flight during October 1995, the Caltech coded aperture gamma ray imaging payload (GRIP-2) imaged various fields in the Galactic plane and center in the 25 to 600 keV energy band. The large phoswich detector, the 15 deg field of view, the 30 arcmin angular resolution and 6 arcmin point source localization capability of GRIP-2 provides the possibility of surveying the accreting binary population of the Galaxy at high energy. The instrument is described and preliminary imaging results are reported on. The capabilities of this instrument for hard X-ray/gamma ray imaging are demonstrated.

  15. Ultraluminous X-ray Sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrika, S.; Sholukhova, O.; Abolmasov, P.

    2008-12-01

    We discuss a new type of X-ray sources discovered in galaxies -- ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). They are of two order of magnitude brighter in X-rays than the brightest Galactic black holes. Two mod- els of ULXs are discussed: "intermediate mass" black holes, 100 - 10000 solar masses, with standard accretion disks, and "stellar mass" black holes with su- percritical accretion disks like that in the Galactic object SS 433. A study of gas nebulae surrounding these objects gives us a new important information on the central sources. The observed X-ray radiation of ULXs is not enough to power their nebulae. To understand both spectra and power of the nebulae one needs a powerful UV source. The ULXs must be such bright in UV range as they are in X-rays. Spectroscopy of gas filaments surrounding SS 433 proves that the intrinsic face-on luminosity of the supercritical accretion disk in the far UV region to be "sim; 10^40 erg/s. We expect that observations of ULXs with the WSO-UV Observatory, measurements their UV fluxes and spectral slopes solve the problem of ULXs between the two known models of these sources.

  16. X-ray variability in Galactic high-mass black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, Magnus

    The stars of the night sky can to the naked eye appear to be steady and unchanging, apart from the twinkling created by air moving in the atmosphere. However, when viewed in X-rays, the sky is far from constant, with detectable changes occurring on very short timescales. Black hole X-ray binaries are strong sources of X-rays. These systems contain a star and a black hole in orbit around each other. As matter from the companion star is accreted by the black hole, large amounts of gravitational energy are released, giving rise to strong X-ray emission. The accretion flow close to a black hole is characterized by strong gravity, high-energy radiation and variability on timescales down to milliseconds. These systems allow us to probe physics under conditions we cannot recreate in a laboratory, and provide some of the strongest observational indications of the existence of black holes. Temporal analysis is a powerful diagnostic of the geometry and physical processes of this environment. The bulk of this thesis concerns studies of the rapid variability of perhaps the most well-known of all black hole binaries: Cygnus X-1. By tapping into the large amount of archival data available, a systematic study of the variability, in the form of the power spectrum, is conducted. The results show that timing studies can indeed give valuable information on the emission mechanisms and accretion geometry. Tying characteristic frequencies to effects predicted by general relativity directly gives information about the parameters of the compact object. Using these results, the past evolution of the binary system is studied. In addition, results from temporal analysis of the possible black hole binary Cygnus X-3 are presented. The study of X-ray variability covers timescales from years to seconds, and shows that while temporal analysis provides clues to this complex system, it does not provide immediate insight into the accretion geometry, or the nature of the compact object

  17. Large-Amplitude X-ray Outbursts from Galactic Nuclei: A Systematic Study Using ROSAT Archival Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donley, J.; Brandt, W. N.; Eracleous, Michael; Boller, Th.

    2001-05-01

    We present the results from a study designed to detect extragalactic large-amplitude X-ray outbursts using ROSAT archival data. Such outbursts are known to decay over a period of months to years, to have maximum X-ray luminosities of order 1043 to 1044 erg/s, and to often have very soft spectra. As such they are excellent ROSAT targets. By comparing different ROSAT observations, we have identified all galactic nuclei that (1) were in outburst during the six-month ROSAT All-Sky Survey and that (2) then faded by a minimum factor of 20 to low or undetectable count rates in later pointed ROSAT observations. The systematic nature of this study has allowed us to place the first reliable constraints on the number of such outbursts that occur in the Universe. We discuss these constraints and their implications for future missions such as MAXI and Lobster-eye X-ray telescopes. We also discuss possible mechanisms for the outbursts, the most likely of which is the tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole.

  18. Optical counterparts of ROSAT X-ray sources in two selected fields at low vs. high Galactic latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, J.; Richter, G. A.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The optical identification of large number of X-ray sources such as those from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey is challenging with conventional spectroscopic follow-up observations. Aims: We investigate two ROSAT All-Sky Survey fields of size 10°× 10° each, one at galactic latitude b = 83° (26 Com), the other at b = -5° (γ Sge), in order to optically identify the majority of sources. Methods: We used optical variability, among other more standard methods, as a means of identifying a large number of ROSAT All-Sky Survey sources. All objects fainter than about 12 mag and brighter than about 17 mag, in or near the error circle of the ROSAT positions, were tested for optical variability on hundreds of archival plates of the Sonneberg field patrol. Results: The present paper contains probable optical identifications of altogether 256 of the 370 ROSAT sources analysed. In particular, we found 126 active galactic nuclei (some of them may be misclassified cataclysmic variables, CVs), 17 likely clusters of galaxies, 16 eruptive double stars (mostly CVs), 43 chromospherically active stars, 65 stars brighter than about 13 mag, 7 UV Cet stars, 3 semiregular resp. slow irregular variable stars of late spectral type, 2 DA white dwarfs, 1 Am star, 1 supernova remnant and 1 planetary nebula. As expected, nearly all active galactic nuclei are found in the high-galactic latitude field, while the majority of CVs is located at low galactic latitudes. We identify in total 72 new variable objects. Conclusions: X-ray emission is, expectedly, tightly correlated with optical variability, and thus our new method for optically identifying X-ray sources is demonstrated to be feasible. Given the large number of optical plates used, this method was most likely not more efficient than e.g. optical spectroscopy. However, it required no telescope time, only access to archival data. Full Tables 1, 2, 8, and 9, are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  19. X-ray Analysis of the Bright Source in the Supernova Remnant G350.0-2.0 Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpova, A.; Shternin, P.; Zyuzin, D.; Danilenko, A.; Shibanov, Yu

    2016-11-01

    We present results of the analysis of the XMM-Newton data on the bright source 1RXS J172653.4-382157 in the field of the supernova remnant G350.0-2.0. Its spectrum is well described by power law plus thermal component (blackbody or neutron star atmosphere) model. Therefore the source can be a rotation powered pulsar. Alternatively, it can be a cataclysmic variable star since its spectrum is equally well fitted by the two-temperature optically thin thermal plasma model. No periodic pulsations and flux time variability were found. The upper limit on the pulsed fraction of 27% cannot help to state whether the source is a pulsar or a cataclysmic variable. A faint source was detected in the XMM-Newton optical/UV monitor image and found in the GSC-II catalog and ESO Hα and optical/near infrared broadband sky survey images on the X-ray position of J172653.4-382157. Its spectral energy distribution favors the cataclysmic variable interpretation. Further optical and X-ray observations are needed to confirm this.

  20. VARIABILITY AND SPECTRAL MODELING OF THE HARD X-RAY EMISSION OF GX 339-4 IN A BRIGHT LOW/HARD STATE

    SciTech Connect

    Droulans, R.; Belmont, R.; Malzac, J.; Jourdain, E.

    2010-07-10

    We study the high-energy emission of the Galactic black hole candidate GX 339-4 using INTEGRAL/SPI and simultaneous RXTE/PCA data. By the end of 2007 January, when it reached its peak luminosity in hard X-rays, the source was in a bright hard state. The SPectrometer on INTEGRAL (SPI) data from this period show a good signal-to-noise ratio, allowing a detailed study of the spectral energy distribution up to several hundred keV. As a main result, we report on the detection of a variable hard spectral feature ({>=}150 keV) which represents a significant excess with respect to the cutoff power-law shape of the spectrum. The SPI data suggest that the intensity of this feature is positively correlated with the 25-50 keV luminosity of the source and the associated variability timescale is shorter than 7 hr. The simultaneous Proportional Counter Array data, however, show no significant change in the spectral shape, indicating that the source is not undergoing a canonical state transition. We analyzed the broadband spectra in the lights of several physical models, assuming different heating mechanisms and properties of the Comptonizing plasma. For the first time, we performed quantitative model fitting with the new versatile Comptonization code BELM, accounting self-consistently for the presence of a magnetic field. We show that a magnetized medium subject to pure non-thermal electron acceleration provides a framework for a physically consistent interpretation of the observed 4-500 keV emission. Moreover, we find that the spectral variability might be triggered by the variations of only one physical parameter, namely the magnetic field strength. Therefore, it appears that the magnetic field is likely to be a key parameter in the production of the Comptonized hard X-ray emission.

  1. Observation of spatial and temporal variations in X-ray bright point emergence patterns. [at solar surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.; Krieger, A. S.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of X-ray bright points (XBP) over a six-month interval in 1973 show significant variations in both the number density of XBP as a function of heliographic longitude and in the full-sun average number of XBP from one rotation to the next. The observed increases in XBP emergence are estimated to be equivalent to several large active regions emerging per day for several months. The number of XBP emerging at high latitudes varies in phase with the low-latitude variation and reaches a maximum approximately simultaneous with a major outbreak of active regions. The quantity of magnetic flux emerging in the form of XBP at high latitudes alone is estimated to be as large as the contribution from all active regions.

  2. Identifying four INTEGRAL sources in the Galactic plane via VLT/optical and XMM-Newton/X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahoui, Farid; Tomsick, John. A.; Krivonos, Roman

    2017-02-01

    We report on FORS2 (FOcal Reducer/low dispersion Spectrograph 2) spectroscopy aiming at the identification of four Galactic plane sources discovered by INTEGRAL, IGR J18088-2741, IGR J18381-0924, IGR J17164-3803, and IGR J19173+0747, complemented by XMM-Newton spectroscopy for IGR J18381-0924. The presence of broad H I and He I emission lines and a flat Balmer decrement Hα/Hβ show that IGR J18088-2741 is a cataclysmic variable located beyond 8 kpc. For IGR J18381-0924, the detection of redshifted Hα and O I emission signatures and the absence of narrow forbidden emission lines point towards a low-luminosity Seyfert 1.9 nature at z = 0.031 ± 0.002. Its XMM-Newton spectrum, best fitted by an absorbed Γ = 1.19 ± 0.07 power law combined with a z=0.026_{-0.008}^{+0.016} redshifted iron emission feature, is in agreement with this classification. The likely IGR J17164-3803 optical counterpart is an M2 III star at 3-4 kpc which, based on the X-ray spectrum of the source, is the companion of a white dwarf in an X-ray faint symbiotic system. Finally, we challenge the accepted identification of IGR J19173+0747 as a high-mass X-ray binary. Indeed, the USNO optical counterpart is actually a blend of two objects located at the most likely 3 kpc distance, both lying within the error circle of the Swift position. The first is a cataclysmic variable, which we argue is the real nature of IGR J19173+0747. However, we cannot rule out the second one which we identify as an F3 V star which, if associated with IGR J19173+0747, likely belongs to a quiescent X-ray binary.

  3. THE LONGEST TIMESCALE X-RAY VARIABILITY REVEALS EVIDENCE FOR ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE HIGH ACCRETION STATE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Youhong

    2011-01-01

    The All Sky Monitor (ASM) on board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer has continuously monitored a number of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with similar sampling rates for 14 years, from 1996 January to 2009 December. Utilizing the archival ASM data of 27 AGNs, we calculate the normalized excess variances of the 300-day binned X-ray light curves on the longest timescale (between 300 days and 14 years) explored so far. The observed variance appears to be independent of AGN black-hole mass and bolometric luminosity. According to the scaling relation of black-hole mass (and bolometric luminosity) from galactic black hole X-ray binaries (GBHs) to AGNs, the break timescales that correspond to the break frequencies detected in the power spectral density (PSD) of our AGNs are larger than the binsize (300 days) of the ASM light curves. As a result, the singly broken power-law (soft-state) PSD predicts the variance to be independent of mass and luminosity. Nevertheless, the doubly broken power-law (hard-state) PSD predicts, with the widely accepted ratio of the two break frequencies, that the variance increases with increasing mass and decreases with increasing luminosity. Therefore, the independence of the observed variance on mass and luminosity suggests that AGNs should have soft-state PSDs. Taking into account the scaling of the break timescale with mass and luminosity synchronously, the observed variances are also more consistent with the soft-state than the hard-state PSD predictions. With the averaged variance of AGNs and the soft-state PSD assumption, we obtain a universal PSD amplitude of 0.030 {+-} 0.022. By analogy with the GBH PSDs in the high/soft state, the longest timescale variability supports the standpoint that AGNs are scaled-up GBHs in the high accretion state, as already implied by the direct PSD analysis.

  4. Scientific Drivers for X-Ray Polarimetry Observations of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshtipour, Banafsheh; Krawczynski, Henric

    2017-01-01

    Although photons cannot escape the gravitational field of a black hole, we can observe the emission from matter spiraling into the black hole forming an accretion disk. X-ray observations are particularly suited to explore the inner structure of the accretion flows onto astrophysical stellar mass and supermassive black holes. In this talk, I will present results from general relativistic ray tracing simulations demonstrating the scientific promise of spectropolarimetric observations of AGNs. Combining timing, spectral, and polarimetric information will allow us to reveal the physical properties of accretion disks and their coronas. I will discuss the potential of X-ray observations for distinguishing between different corona models based on simulations of coronas with different physical properties and in the presence of different sources of seed photons including thermal, cyclotron, and synchrotron seed photons.

  5. High-mass X-ray binary populations. 1: Galactic modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, William W.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1995-01-01

    Modern stellar evolutionary tracks are used to calculate the evolution of a very large number of massive binary star systems (M(sub tot) greater than or = 15 solar mass) which cover a wide range of total masses, mass ratios, and starting separations. Each binary is evolved accounting for mass and angular momentum loss through the supernova of the primary to the X-ray binary phase. Using the observed rate of star formation in our Galaxy and the properties of massive binaries, we calculate the expected high-mass X-ray binary (HMXRB) population in the Galaxy. We test various massive binary evolutionary scenarios by comparing the resulting HMXRB predictions with the X-ray observations. A major goal of this study is the determination of the fraction of matter lost from the system during the Roche lobe overflow phase. Curiously, we find that the total numbers of observable HMXRBs are nearly independent of this assumed mass-loss fraction, with any of the values tested here giving acceptable agreement between predicted and observed numbers. However, comparison of the period distribution of our HMXRB models with the observed period distribution does reveal a distinction among the various models. As a result of this comparison, we conclude that approximately 70% of the overflow matter is lost from a massive binary system during mass transfer in the Roche lobe overflow phase. We compare models constructed assuming that all X-ray emission is due to accretion onto the compact object from the donor star's wind with models that incorporate a simplified disk accretion scheme. By comparing the results of these models with observations, we conclude that the formation of disks in HMXRBs must be relatively common. We also calculate the rate of formation of double degenerate binaries, high velocity detached compact objects, and Thorne-Zytkow objects.

  6. Active Galactic Nuclei, Quasars, BL Lac Objects and X-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2005-01-01

    The XMM COSMOS survey is producing the large surface density of X-ray sources anticipated. The first batch of approx. 200 sources is being studied in relation to the large scale structure derived from deep optical/near-IR imaging from Subaru and CFHT. The photometric redshifts from the opt/IR imaging program allow a first look at structure vs. redshift, identifying high z clusters. A consortium of SAO, U. Arizona and the Carnegie Institute of Washington (Pasadena) has started a large program using the 6.5meter Magellan telescopes in Chile with the prime objective of identifying the XMM X-ray sources in the COSMOS field. The first series of observing runs using the new IMACS multi-slit spectrograph on Magellan will take place in January and February of 2005. Some 300 spectra per field will be taken, including 70%-80% of the XMM sources in each field. The four first fields cover the center of the COSMOS field. A VLT consortium is set to obtain bulk redshifts of the field galaxies. The added accuracy of the spectroscopic redshifts over the photo-z's will allow much lower density structures to be seen, voids and filaments. The association of X-ray selected AGNs, and quasars with these filaments, is a major motivation for our studies. Comparison to the deep VLA radio data now becoming available is about to begin.

  7. The Galactic distribution of X-ray binaries and its implications for compact object formation and natal kicks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, Serena; Igoshev, Andrei P.; Nelemans, Gijs

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the imprints that different models for black hole (BH) and neutron star (NS) formation have on the Galactic distribution of X-ray binaries (XRBs) which contain these objects. We find that the root mean square of the height above the Galactic plane of BH- and NS-XRBs is a powerful proxy to discriminate among different formation scenarios, and that binary evolution following the BH/NS formation does not significantly affect the Galactic distributions of the binaries. We find that a population model in which at least some BHs receive a (relatively) high natal kick fits the observed BH-XRBs best. For the NS case, we find that a high NK distribution, consistent with the one derived from the measurement of pulsar proper motion, is the most preferable. We also analyse the simple method we previously used to estimate the minimal peculiar velocity of an individual BH-XRB at birth. We find that this method may be less reliable in the bulge of the Galaxy for certain models of the Galactic potential, but that our estimate is excellent for most of the BH-XRBs.

  8. Radio and X-ray Observations of the Northwestern Rim of the Galactic Supernova Remnant G156.2+5.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannuti, Thomas; Allen, G. E.; Goff, E. J.; Fite, N. D.; Grimes, C. K.; Murray, T. M.

    2010-03-01

    We present a broadband X-ray spectral study of the northwestern rim of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G156.2+5.7. This SNR is a member of the class of sources which feature a significant non-thermal component to their observed X-ray emission. Recent X-ray observations have established that the non-thermal X-ray emission is broadly localized to the northwestern portion of the SNR but a true understanding of the process responsible for this emission has yet to be achieved. To investigate a possible synchrotron origin for this emission, we are analyzing archival X-ray observations made of this northwestern rim with XMM-Newton and RXTE as well as radio observations made with the 21-Meter Morehead State University Radio Telescope and Space Tracking Antenna. Initial results will be presented and discussed.

  9. X-ray variability of 104 active galactic nuclei. XMM-Newton power-spectrum density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Martin, Omaira; Vaughan, Simon; de la Cierva, Juan

    2012-09-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN), powered by accretion onto supermassive black holes (SMBHs), are thought to be scaled up versions of Galactic black hole X-ray binaries (BH-XRBs). In the past few years evidence of such correspondence include similarities in the broadband shape of the X-ray variability power spectra, with characteristic bend times-cales scaling with mass. We have characterized the X-ray temporal properties of a sample of AGN to study the connection among different classes of AGN and their connection with BH-XRBs. We have performed a uniform analysis of the power spectrum densities (PSDs) of 104 nearby (z<0.4) AGN using 209 XMM-Newton/pn observations (Gonzalez-Martin & Vaughan 2012, A&A accepted). Among the entire sample, ~70% show significant variability in at least one of the three bands tested. A high percentage of low-luminosity AGN do not show any significant variability (~90% of LINERs). The PSD of the majority of the variable AGN was well described by a simple power-law with a mean index of ~2. In 15 sources we found that the bending power law model was preferred with a mean slope of 2.8 and a mean bend frequency of nu(break) = 2x 10E-04 Hz. Only KUG 1031+398 (RE J1034+396) shows evidence for quasi-periodic oscillations. The "fundamental plane" relating variability timescale, black hole mass, and luminosity is studied using the new X-ray timing results presented here together with a compilation of the previously detected timescales from the literature. Both quantitative (i.e. scaling with BH mass) and qualitative (overall PSD shapes) found in this sample of AGN are in agreement with the expectations for the SMBHs and BH-XRBs being the same phenomenon scaled-up with the size of the BH. The steep PSD slopes above the high frequency bend bear a closer resemblance to those of the "soft/thermal dominated" BH- XRB states than other states.

  10. Chemical and Physical Parameters from X-Ray High-resolution Spectra of the Galactic Nova V959 Mon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peretz, U.; Orio, M.; Behar, E.; Bianchini, A.; Gallagher, J.; Rauch, T.; Tofflemire, B.; Zemko, P.

    2016-09-01

    Two observations of V959 Mon done using the Chandra X-ray gratings during the late outburst phases (2012 September and December) offer extraordinary insight into the physics and chemistry of this Galactic ONe nova. The X-ray flux was 1.7 × 10-11 erg cm-2 s-1 and 8.6 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1, respectively, at the two epochs. The first result, coupled with electron density diagnostics and compared with published optical and ultraviolet observations, indicates that most likely in 2012 September, the X-rays originated from a very small fraction of the ejecta, concentrated in very dense clumps. We obtained a fairly good fit to the September spectrum with a model of plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium with two components; one at a temperature of 0.78 keV, associated with flat-topped and asymmetrical emission lines, blueshifted by ≃710-930 km s-1 the other one at a temperature of 4.5 keV, mostly contributing to the high-energy continuum. However, we cannot rule out a range of plasma temperatures between these two extremes; we also modeled the spectrum as a static cooling flow, but the available models and the data quality are not adequate yet to differentiate between the two-component fit and a smoothly varying temperature structure. In December, the central white dwarf (WD) became visible in X-rays. We estimate an effective temperature of ≃680,000 K, consistent with a WD mass ≥slant 1.1 M ⊙. The WD flux is modulated with the orbital period, indicating high inclination, and two quasi-periodic modulations with hour timescales were also observed. No hot plasma component with a temperature above 0.5 keV was observed in December, and the blueshifted component cooled to kT ≃ 0.45 keV. Additionally, new emission lines due to a much cooler plasma appeared, which were not observed two months earlier. We estimate abundances and yields of elements in the nova wind that cannot be measured in the optical spectra and confirm the high Ne abundance previously derived

  11. Hidden Gems: A Multiwavelength Survey of X-ray Sources in Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, David C.; Dhuga, K.; Parke, W.; Eskandarian, A.

    2010-01-01

    Quiescent low mass X-ray binaries (qLMXBs) in Milky Way globular clusters (MWGCs) are an excellent diagnostic tool for studying several fundamental questions in astrophysics, including the nature of the equation of state (EoS) of neutron stars (NSs), the mechanism of binary system formation, the internal dynamics of compact stellar systems and the accretion process. Due to their accurately known distances and reddening/NH measures, the luminosity of GC XBs can be calculated far more precisely than that of XBs found in the field. The 12(13) luminous (L>1x1036 erg/s) XBs in MWGCs have been known for several (many) years but qLMXBs in MWGCs have only recently begun to be identified thanks to the advances in sensitivity and spatial resolution of the Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories. While low luminosity XB searches of MWGCs using these two great observatories now constitute an active field of research, there remain dozens of MWGCs for which the most sensitive previous X-ray observation is that of the ROSAT all-sky survey (RASS; hereafter RASS-MWGCs). For many RASS-MWGCs, the lower sensitivity threshold of the qLMXB population can be reached with relatively short exposures of the X-ray Telescope on-board the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Observatory (Swift). I will discuss a systematic survey of unobserved nearby MWGCs, with Swift, which is creating a pathway to identifying their qLMXB populations, allowing follow-up observations with larger observatories. I will present statistics of the candidate qLMXBs identified in the Swift observing campaign, discuss follow-up measurements with XMM-Newton and Chandra and present prospects for answering vital questions about both the evolution of GCs and neutron stars themselves.

  12. Catalogue of Galactic globular-cluster surface-brightness profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trager, S. C.; King, Ivan R.; Djorgovski, S.

    1995-01-01

    We present a catalogue of surface-brightness profiles (SBPs) of 125 Galactic globular clusters, the largest such collection ever gathered. The SPBs are constructed from generally inhomogeneous data, but are based heavily on the Berkeley Global Cluster Survey of Djorgovski & King. All but four of the SBPs have photometric zero points. We derive central surface brightness, King-model concentrations, core radii, half-light, and other fraction-of-light radii where data permit, and we briefly discuss their use.

  13. Experimental investigation of bright spots in broadband, gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barrios, M. A.; Suter, L. J.; Glenn, S.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Collins, G. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Izumi, N.; Ma, T.; Scott, H.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; Kyrala, G. A.

    2013-07-15

    Bright spots in the hot spot intensity profile of gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Opt. Eng. 443, (2004)] are observed. X-ray images of cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium (DT) and tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) ice capsules, and gas filled plastic shell capsules (Symcap) were recorded along the hohlraum symmetry axis. Heterogeneous mixing of ablator material and fuel into the hot spot (i.e., hot-spot mix) by hydrodynamic instabilities causes the bright spots. Hot-spot mix increases the radiative cooling of the hot spot. Fourier analysis of the x-ray images is used to quantify the evolution of bright spots in both x- and k-space. Bright spot images were azimuthally binned to characterize bright spot location relative to known isolated defects on the capsule surface. A strong correlation is observed between bright spot location and the fill tube for both Symcap and cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets, indicating the fill tube is a significant seed for the ablation front instability causing hot-spot mix. The fill tube is the predominant seed for Symcaps, while other capsule non-uniformities are dominant seeds for the cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets. A comparison of the bright spot power observed for Si- and Ge-doped ablator targets shows heterogeneous mix in Symcap targets is mostly material from the doped ablator layer.

  14. Discovery of the third transient X-ray binary in the galactic globular cluster Terzan 5

    SciTech Connect

    Bahramian, Arash; Heinke, Craig O.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Gladstone, Jeanette C.; Altamirano, Diego; Wijnands, Rudy; Homan, Jeroen; Linares, Manuel; Degenaar, Nathalie

    2014-01-10

    We report and study the outburst of a new transient X-ray binary (XRB) in Terzan 5, the third detected in this globular cluster, Swift J174805.3-244637 or Terzan 5 X-3. We find clear spectral hardening in Swift/XRT data during the outburst rise to the hard state, thanks to our early coverage (starting at L{sub X} ∼ 4 × 10{sup 34} erg s{sup –1}) of the outburst. This hardening appears to be due to the decline in relative strength of a soft thermal component from the surface of the neutron star (NS) during the rise. We identify a Type I X-ray burst in Swift/XRT data with a long (16 s) decay time, indicative of hydrogen burning on the surface of the NS. We use Swift/BAT, MAXI/GSC, Chandra/ACIS, and Swift/XRT data to study the spectral changes during the outburst, identifying a clear hard-to-soft state transition. We use a Chandra/ACIS observation during outburst to identify the transient's position. Seven archival Chandra/ACIS observations show evidence for variations in Terzan 5 X-3's nonthermal component but not the thermal component during quiescence. The inferred long-term time-averaged mass accretion rate, from the quiescent thermal luminosity, suggests that if this outburst is typical and only slow cooling processes are active in the NS core, such outbursts should recur every ∼10 yr.

  15. Discovery of the Third Transient X-Ray Binary in the Galactic Globular Cluster Terzan 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahramian, Arash; Heinke, Craig O.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Altamirano, Diego; Wijnands, Rudy; Homan, Jeroen; Linares, Manuel; Pooley, David; Degenaar, Nathalie; Gladstone, Jeanette C.

    2014-01-01

    We report and study the outburst of a new transient X-ray binary (XRB) in Terzan 5, the third detected in this globular cluster, Swift J174805.3-244637 or Terzan 5 X-3. We find clear spectral hardening in Swift/XRT data during the outburst rise to the hard state, thanks to our early coverage (starting at LX ~ 4 × 1034 erg s-1) of the outburst. This hardening appears to be due to the decline in relative strength of a soft thermal component from the surface of the neutron star (NS) during the rise. We identify a Type I X-ray burst in Swift/XRT data with a long (16 s) decay time, indicative of hydrogen burning on the surface of the NS. We use Swift/BAT, MAXI/GSC, Chandra/ACIS, and Swift/XRT data to study the spectral changes during the outburst, identifying a clear hard-to-soft state transition. We use a Chandra/ACIS observation during outburst to identify the transient's position. Seven archival Chandra/ACIS observations show evidence for variations in Terzan 5 X-3's nonthermal component but not the thermal component during quiescence. The inferred long-term time-averaged mass accretion rate, from the quiescent thermal luminosity, suggests that if this outburst is typical and only slow cooling processes are active in the NS core, such outbursts should recur every ~10 yr.

  16. A laboratory 8 keV transmission full-field x-ray microscope with a polycapillary as condenser for bright and dark field imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbach, S. Wilhein, T.; Kanngießer, B.; Malzer, W.; Stiel, H.

    2015-08-15

    This article introduces a laboratory setup of a transmission full-field x-ray microscope at 8 keV photon energy. The microscope operates in bright and dark field imaging mode with a maximum field of view of 50 μm. Since the illumination geometry determines whether the sample is illuminated homogeneously and moreover, if different imaging methods can be applied, the condenser optic is one of the most significant parts. With a new type of x-ray condenser, a polycapillary optic, we realized bright field imaging and for the first time dark field imaging at 8 keV photon energy in a laboratory setup. A detector limited spatial resolution of 210 nm is measured on x-ray images of Siemens star test patterns.

  17. A laboratory 8 keV transmission full-field x-ray microscope with a polycapillary as condenser for bright and dark field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumbach, S.; Kanngießer, B.; Malzer, W.; Stiel, H.; Wilhein, T.

    2015-08-01

    This article introduces a laboratory setup of a transmission full-field x-ray microscope at 8 keV photon energy. The microscope operates in bright and dark field imaging mode with a maximum field of view of 50 μm. Since the illumination geometry determines whether the sample is illuminated homogeneously and moreover, if different imaging methods can be applied, the condenser optic is one of the most significant parts. With a new type of x-ray condenser, a polycapillary optic, we realized bright field imaging and for the first time dark field imaging at 8 keV photon energy in a laboratory setup. A detector limited spatial resolution of 210 nm is measured on x-ray images of Siemens star test patterns.

  18. X-Ray Timing and Spectral Observations of Galactic Black Hole Candidate XTE J1550--564 During Outburst

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, Kaice T

    2002-12-11

    Soft X-ray transients (SXTs), a sub-class of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), provide a unique opportunity to test General Relativity and to probe fundamental physics under conditions terrestrially unattainable. SXT outbursts are of great interest because they allow the study of LMXBs under a wide range of accretion rates. The majority of known SXTs contain black holes, therefore SXT outbursts are key to understanding accretion physics around black holes and in active galactic nuclei, which are thought to contain supermassive, M {approx} 10{sup 6} - 10{sup 10} M{circle_dot}, where M{circle_dot} is one solar mass, central compact objects. These compact objects are most likely black holes, which exhibit, on a much larger scale, accretion physics similar to that around black holes in SXTs. In this work, the timing and spectral properties of the SXT and microquasar XTE J1550-564 during outburst are studied. Observations made by the Unconventional Stellar Aspect (USA) Experiment on board the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS) are emphasized. USA data show a low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (LFQPO) with a centroid frequency that tends to increase with increasing USA flux and a fractional rms amplitude which is correlated with the USA hardness ratio (4-16 keV/1-4 keV). Several high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) were detected by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), during periods where the LFQPO is seen to be weakening or not detectable at all. The evolution of the USA hardness ratio with time and source flux is examined. The hardness-intensity diagram shows counterclockwise cyclical evolution and possibly indicates the presence of two independent accretion flows: a geometrically thin, optically thick accretion disk and a hot sub-Keplerian flow.

  19. Scientists Find X Rays from Stellar Winds That May Play Significant Role in Galactic Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    Colorful star-forming regions that have captivated stargazers since the advent of the telescope 400 years ago contain gas thousands of times more energetic than previously recognized, powered by colliding stellar winds. This multimillion-degree gas radiated as X rays is one of the long-sought sources of energy and elements in the Milky Way galaxy's interstellar medium. A team led by Leisa Townsley, a senior research associate in astronomy and astrophysics at Penn State University, uncovered this wind phenomenon in the Rosette Nebula, a stellar nursery. With the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the team found that the most massive stars in the nebula produce winds that slam into each other, create violent shocks, and infuse the region with 6-million-degree gas. The findings are presented in Washington, D.C., today at a conference entitled "Two Years of Science with Chandra." "A ghostly glow of diffuse X-ray emission pervades the Rosette Nebula and perhaps many other similar star-forming regions throughout the Galaxy," said Townsley. "We now have a new view of the engine lighting the beautiful Rosette Nebula and new evidence for how the interstellar medium may be energized." Townsley and her colleagues created a striking X-ray panorama of the Rosette Molecular Cloud from four images with Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer. This is a swath of the sky nearly 100 light years across sprayed with hundreds of X-ray-emitting young stars. In one corner of the Rosette Molecular Cloud lies the Rosette Nebula, called an "H II region" because the hydrogen gas there has been stripped of its electrons due to the strong ultraviolet radiation from its young stars. This region, about 5,000 light years away in the constellation Monoceros, the Unicorn, has long been a favorite among amateur astronomers. The wispy, colorful display is visible with small telescopes. The Chandra survey reveals, for the first time, 6-million-degree gas at the center of the Rosette Nebula, occupying a

  20. Active Galactic Nucleus Obscuration from Winds: From Dusty Infrared-Driven to Warm and X-Ray Photoionized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorodnitsyn, Anton V.; Kallman, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    We present calculations of active galactic nucleus winds at approx.parsec scales along with the associated obscuration. We take into account the pressure of infrared radiation on dust grains and the interaction of X-rays from a central black hole with hot and cold plasma. Infrared radiation (IR) is incorporated in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations adopting the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We find that in the range of X-ray luminosities L = 0.05-0.6 L(sub Edd), the Compton-thick part of the flow (aka torus) has an opening angle of approximately 72deg - 75deg regardless of the luminosity. At L > or approx. 0.1, the outflowing dusty wind provides the obscuration with IR pressure playing a major role. The global flow consists of two phases: the cold flow at inclinations (theta) > or approx.70deg and a hot, ionized wind of lower density at lower inclinations. The dynamical pressure of the hot wind is important in shaping the denser IR-supported flow. At luminosities < or = 0.1 L(sub Edd) episodes of outflow are followed by extended periods when the wind switches to slow accretion. Key words: acceleration of particles . galaxies: active . hydrodynamics . methods: numerical Online-only material: color figures

  1. Interaction of ultraviolet and X-ray radiation with gamma rays produced by a jet in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zbyszewska, Magda

    1994-01-01

    Recent observations by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory give evidence for the existence of a type of blazar with strong gamma-ray emission. Data obtained by EGRET for the quasar 3C 279 show a spectrum between 100 MeV and 10 GeV. Photons of such energies should interact with the X-rays and produce positron/electron pairs. If the optical depth against pair production for the gamma rays is large (tau(gamma gamma) greater than 1), the gamma-ray spectrum should be affected. The importance of this process has been pointed out by, e.g., Maraschi, Ghisellini, & Celotti (1992). Several works (e.g., Dermer 1993; Zbyszewska 1993; Sikora, Begelman, & Rees 1993) concerning gamma-ray radiation from quasar 3C 279 have proposed a model in which the gamma rays are produced via interaction between a moving cloud of relativistic electrons and external soft photons. The presence of gamma rays in active galactic nuclei spectra gives constraints on the localization and the luminosity of the medium which produces ultraviolet/X-ray photons. We investigate what conditions should be fulfilled in the above model to avoid the absorption of the gamma rays due to pair production.

  2. SCATTERED X-RAYS IN OBSCURED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR GEOMETRICAL STRUCTURE AND EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Noguchi, Kazuhisa; Terashima, Yuichi; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Ishino, Yukiko; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Koss, Michael

    2010-03-01

    We construct a new sample of 32 obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the Second XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue to investigate their multiwavelength properties in relation to the 'scattering fraction', the ratio of the soft X-ray flux to the absorption-corrected direct emission. The sample covers a broad range of the scattering fraction ({approx}0.1%-10%). A quarter of the 32 AGNs have a very low scattering fraction (<= 0.5%), which suggests that they are buried in a geometrically thick torus with a very small opening angle. We investigate correlations between the scattering fraction and multiwavelength properties. We find that AGNs with a small scattering fraction tend to have low [O III]lambda5007/X-ray luminosity ratios. This result agrees with the expectation that the extent of the narrow-line region is small because of the small opening angle of the torus. There is no significant correlation between scattering fraction and far-infrared luminosity. This implies that a scale height of the torus is not primarily determined by starburst activity. We also compare scattering fraction with black hole mass or Eddington ratio and find a weak anti-correlation between the Eddington ratio and scattering fraction. This implies that more rapidly growing supermassive black holes tend to have thicker tori.

  3. HARD X-RAY LAGS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: TESTING THE DISTANT REVERBERATION HYPOTHESIS WITH NGC 6814

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Zoghbi, A.; Reynolds, C. S.; Cackett, E. M.; Uttley, P.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Miller, J. M.; Reis, R. C.

    2013-11-10

    We present an X-ray spectral and temporal analysis of the variable active galaxy NGC 6814, observed with Suzaku during 2011 November. Remarkably, the X-ray spectrum shows no evidence for the soft excess commonly observed amongst other active galaxies, despite its relatively low level of obscuration, and is dominated across the whole Suzaku bandpass by the intrinsic powerlaw-like continuum. Despite this, we clearly detect the presence of a low-frequency hard lag of ∼1600 s between the 0.5-2.0 and 2.0-5.0 keV energy bands at greater than 6σ significance, similar to those reported in the literature for a variety of other active galactic nuclei (AGNs). At these energies, any additional emission from, e.g., a very weak, undetected soft excess, or from distant reflection must contribute less than 3% of the observed countrates (at 90% confidence). Given the lack of any significant continuum emission component other than the powerlaw, we can rule out models that invoke distant reprocessing for the observed lag behavior, which must instead be associated with this continuum emission. These results are fully consistent with a propagating fluctuation origin for the low-frequency hard lags, and with the interpretation of the high-frequency soft lags—a common feature seen in the highest quality AGN data with strong soft excesses—as reverberation from the inner accretion disk.

  4. The hard X-ray luminosity function of high-redshift (3 < z ≲ 5) active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vito, F.; Gilli, R.; Vignali, C.; Comastri, A.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Iwasawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    We present the hard-band (2-10 keV) X-ray luminosity function (HXLF) of 0.5-2 keV band selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshift. We have assembled a sample of 141 AGN at 3 < z ≲ 5 from X-ray surveys of different size and depth, in order to sample different regions in the LX - z plane. The HXLF is fitted in the range log LX ˜ 43-45 with standard analytical evolutionary models through a maximum likelihood procedure. The evolution of the HXLF is well described by a pure density evolution, with the AGN space density declining by a factor of ˜10 from z = 3 to 5. A luminosity-dependent density evolution model, which, normally, best represents the HXLF evolution at lower redshift, is also consistent with the data, but a larger sample of low-luminosity (log LX < 44), high-redshift AGN is necessary to constrain this model. We also estimated the intrinsic fraction of AGN obscured by a column density log NH ≥ 23 to be 0.54 ± 0.05, with no strong dependence on luminosity. This fraction is higher than the value in the Local Universe, suggesting an evolution of the luminous (LX > 1044 erg s-1) obscured AGN fraction from z = 0 to z > 3.

  5. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS OBSCURATION FROM WINDS: FROM DUSTY INFRARED-DRIVEN TO WARM AND X-RAY PHOTOIONIZED

    SciTech Connect

    Dorodnitsyn, A.; Kallman, T.

    2012-12-10

    We present calculations of active galactic nucleus winds at {approx}parsec scales along with the associated obscuration. We take into account the pressure of infrared radiation on dust grains and the interaction of X-rays from a central black hole with hot and cold plasma. Infrared radiation (IR) is incorporated in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations adopting the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We find that in the range of X-ray luminosities L = 0.05-0.6 L{sub Edd}, the Compton-thick part of the flow (aka torus) has an opening angle of approximately 72 Degree-Sign -75 Degree-Sign regardless of the luminosity. At L {approx}> 0.1, the outflowing dusty wind provides the obscuration with IR pressure playing a major role. The global flow consists of two phases: the cold flow at inclinations {theta} {approx}> 70 Degree-Sign and a hot, ionized wind of lower density at lower inclinations. The dynamical pressure of the hot wind is important in shaping the denser IR-supported flow. At luminosities {<=}0.1 L{sub Edd} episodes of outflow are followed by extended periods when the wind switches to slow accretion.

  6. Dependence of coronal X-ray emission on spot-induced brightness variations in cool main sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, S.; Pizzolato, N.; Guinan, E. F.; Rodonò, M.

    2003-11-01

    The maximum amplitude (Amax) of spot-induced brightness variations from long-term V-band photometry and the ratio LX/Lbol between X-ray and bolometric luminosities are suitable indicators of the level of magnetic activity in the photosphere and in the corona of late-type stars, respectively. By using these activity indicators we investigate the dependence of coronal X-ray emission on the level of photospheric starspot activity in a homogeneous sample of low mass main sequence field and cluster stars of different ages (IC 2602, IC 4665, IC 2391, alpha Persei, Pleiades and Hyades). First, the activity-rotation connection at the photospheric level is re-analysed, as well as its dependence on spectral type and age. The upper envelope of Amax increases monotonically with decreasing rotational period (P) and Rossby number (R0) showing a break around 1.1 d that separates two rotation regimes where the starspot activity shows different behaviours. The Amax-P and Amax-R0 relations are fitted with linear, exponential and power laws to look for the function which best represents the trend of the data. The highest values of Amax are found among K-type stars and at the ages of alpha Persei and Pleiades. We also analyse the activity-rotation connection at the coronal level as well as its dependence on spectral type. The level of X-ray emission increases with increasing rotation rate up to a saturation level. The rotational period at which saturation occurs is colour-dependent and increases with advancing spectral type. Also the LX/Lbol-P and LX/Lbol-R0 relations are fitted with linear, exponential and power laws to look for the best fitting function. Among the fastest rotating stars (P<=0.3 d) there is evidence of super-saturation. Also the highest values of LXLbol are found among K-type stars. Finally, the photospheric-coronal activity connection is investigated by using for the first time the largest ever sample of light curve amplitudes as indicators of the magnetic filling

  7. On the Nature of the Bright Short-Period X-ray Source in the Circinus Galaxy Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Wu, Kinwah; Swartz, Douglas A.; Ghosh, Kajal K.

    2003-01-01

    The spectrum and light curve of the bright X-ray source CG X-1 in the field of the Circinus galaxy are re-examined. Previous analyses have concluded that the source is an accreting black hole of mass approx. greater than 50 solar masses although it was noted that the light curve resembles that of an AM Her system. Here we show that the short period and an assumed main sequence companion constrain the mass of the companion to less than 1 solar mass. Further a possible eclipse seen during one of the Chandra observations and a subsequent XMM-Newton observation constrains the mass of the compact object to less than 60 solar masses. If such a system lies in the Circinus galaxy, then the accreting object must either radiate anisotropically or strongly violate the Eddington limit. Even if the emission is beamed, then the companion star which intercepts this flux during eclipse will be driven out of thermal equilibrium and evaporate within approx. 10(exp 3) yr. We find that the observations cannot rule out an AM Her system in the Milky Way and that such a system can account for the variations seen in the light curve.

  8. On the Nature of the Bright Short-Period X-Ray Source in the Circinus Galaxy Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Wu, Kinwah; Tennant, Allyn F.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Ghosh, Kajal K.

    2004-01-01

    The spectrum and light curve of the bright X-ray source CG X-1 in the field of the Circinus galaxy are reexamined. Previous analyses have concluded that the source is an accreting black hole of mass > or approx. 50 solar masses although it has been noted that the light curve resembles that of an AM Herculis system. Here we show that the short period and an assumed main-sequence companion constrain the mass of the companion to less than 1 solar mass. Furthermore, a possible eclipse seen during one of the Chandra observations and a subsequent XMM-Newton observation constrain the mass of the compact object to less than 60 solar masses. If such a system lies in the Circinus galaxy, then the accreting object must either radiate anisotropically or strongly violate the Eddington limit. Even if the emission is beamed, then the companion star that intercepts this flux during eclipse will be driven out of thermal equilibrium and evaporate within approx. 10(exp 3) yr. We find that the observations cannot rule out an AM Herculis system in the Milky Way and that such a system can account for the variations seen in the light curve.

  9. NuSTAR J163433-4738.7: A Fast X-Ray Transient in the Galactic Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsick, John A.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Rahoui, Farid; Assef, Roberto J.; Bauer, Franz E.; Bodaghee, Arash; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Fornasini, Francesca M.; Grindlay, Jonathan; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Krivonos, Roman; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    During hard X-ray observations of the Norma spiral arm region by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) in 2013 February, a new transient source, NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, was detected at a significance level of 8sigma in the 3-10 keV bandpass. The source is consistent with having a constant NuSTAR count rate over a period of 40 ks and is also detected simultaneously by Swift at lower significance. The source is not significantly detected by NuSTAR, Swift, or Chandra in the days before or weeks after the discovery of the transient, indicating that the strong X-ray activity lasted between approx. 0.5 and 1.5 days. Near-infrared imaging observations were carried out before and after the X-ray activity, but we are not able to identify the counterpart. The combined NuSTAR and Swift energy spectrum is consistent with a power law with a photon index of Gamma = 4.1(+1.5/-1.0) (90% confidence errors), a blackbody with kT = 1.2+/-0.3 keV, or a Bremsstrahlung model with kT = 3.0(+2.1/-1.2) keV. The reduced-?2 values for the three models are not significantly different, ranging from 1.23 to 1.44 for 8 degrees of freedom. The spectrum is strongly absorbed with NH = (2.8(+2.3/-1.4) × 10(exp23) cm(exp-2), (9(+15 /-7) ) × 10(exp22) cm(exp-2), and (1.7(+1.7/-0.9)) × 10(exp23) cm(exp-2), for the power-law, blackbody, and Bremsstrahlung models, respectively. Although the high column density could be due to material local to the source, it is consistent with absorption from interstellar material along the line of sight at a distance of 11 kpc, which would indicate an X-ray luminosity greater than 10(exp34) erg s(exp-1). Although we do not reach a definitive determination of the nature of NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, we suggest that it may be an unusually bright active binary or a magnetar.

  10. NuSTAR J163433-4738.7: A fast X-ray transient in the galactic plane

    SciTech Connect

    Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Fornasini, Francesca M.; Krivonos, Roman; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Hailey, Charles J.; Rahoui, Farid; Assef, Roberto J.; Bauer, Franz E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Grindlay, Jonathan; Harrison, Fiona A.; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2014-04-10

    During hard X-ray observations of the Norma spiral arm region by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) in 2013 February, a new transient source, NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, was detected at a significance level of 8σ in the 3-10 keV bandpass. The source is consistent with having a constant NuSTAR count rate over a period of 40 ks and is also detected simultaneously by Swift at lower significance. The source is not significantly detected by NuSTAR, Swift, or Chandra in the days before or weeks after the discovery of the transient, indicating that the strong X-ray activity lasted between ∼0.5 and 1.5 days. Near-infrared imaging observations were carried out before and after the X-ray activity, but we are not able to identify the counterpart. The combined NuSTAR and Swift energy spectrum is consistent with a power law with a photon index of Γ=4.1{sub −1.0}{sup +1.5} (90% confidence errors), a blackbody with kT = 1.2 ± 0.3 keV, or a Bremsstrahlung model with kT=3.0{sub −1.2}{sup +2.1} keV. The reduced-χ{sup 2} values for the three models are not significantly different, ranging from 1.23 to 1.44 for 8 degrees of freedom. The spectrum is strongly absorbed with N{sub H}=(2.8{sub −1.4}{sup +2.3})×10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}, (9{sub −7}{sup +15})×10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}, and (1.7{sub −0.9}{sup +1.7})×10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}, for the power-law, blackbody, and Bremsstrahlung models, respectively. Although the high column density could be due to material local to the source, it is consistent with absorption from interstellar material along the line of sight at a distance of 11 kpc, which would indicate an X-ray luminosity >10{sup 34} erg s{sup –1}. Although we do not reach a definitive determination of the nature of NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, we suggest that it may be an unusually bright active binary or a magnetar.

  11. The Global Implications of the Hard X-Ray Excess in Type 1 Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatum, M.; Turner, J.; Miller, L.; Reeves, J.

    2014-07-01

    The Suzaku observations of 1H 0419-577 and PDS 456 revealed a marked excess of flux above 10 keV, dubbed a 'hard excess'. In both sources, the high PIN-band flux was explained by the presence of a Compton-thick absorber covering > 70% of the continuum source. These results motivated an exploratory study of the hard excess phenomenon in the local type 1 AGN population, using the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). We selected all type 1 AGN, including intermediates up to type 1.9, from the 58-month BAT catalog. To understand the sample properties, we required simultaneous medium (2-10 keV) and hard X-ray (>10 keV) data. Therefore, we cross-correlated those selected sources with the Suzaku archive. From our sample, we extracted the observed energy density fluxes for the 2-10 keV and 15-50 keV bandpasses to determine the hardness ratio, Flux(15-50)/Flux(2-10), and extracted the equivalent width of the narrow core of Fe K alpha emission for each observation. We found that a partial-covering, Compton-thick absorber model is the most consistent with the observational result. In this talk, we discuss our methodology, the observational finding, and the location of the Compton-thick gas and its relationship to the optical broad-line region.

  12. Developing a bright 17 keV x-ray source for probing high-energy-density states of matter at high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S.; Maddox, B. R.; Barrios, M. A.; Benedetti, R.; Braun, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Remington, B. A.; Hohenberger, M.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-04-15

    A set of experiments were performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to develop and optimize a bright, 17 keV x-ray backlighter probe using laser-irradiated Nb foils. High-resolution one-dimensional imaging was achieved using a 15 μm wide slit in a Ta substrate to aperture the Nb He{sub α} x-rays onto an open-aperture, time integrated camera. To optimize the x-ray source for imaging applications, the effect of laser pulse shape and spatial profile on the target was investigated. Two laser pulse shapes were used—a “prepulse” shape that included a 3 ns, low-intensity laser foot preceding the high-energy 2 ns square main laser drive, and a pulse without the laser foot. The laser spatial profile was varied by the use of continuous phase plates (CPPs) on a pair of shots compared to beams at best focus, without CPPs. A comprehensive set of common diagnostics allowed for a direct comparison of imaging resolution, total x-ray conversion efficiency, and x-ray spectrum between shots. The use of CPPs was seen to reduce the high-energy tail of the x-ray spectrum, whereas the laser pulse shape had little effect on the high-energy tail. The measured imaging resolution was comparably high for all combinations of laser parameters, but a higher x-ray flux was achieved without phase plates. This increased flux was the result of smaller laser spot sizes, which allowed us to arrange the laser focal spots from multiple beams and produce an x-ray source which was more localized behind the slit aperture. Our experiments are a first demonstration of point-projection geometry imaging at NIF at the energies (>10 keV) necessary for imaging denser, higher-Z targets than have previously been investigated.

  13. The USA experiment on the Argos Satellite: A low cost instrument for timing x-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, K.S.; Fritz, G.; Hertz, P.; Johnson, W.N.; Lovelette, M.N.; Wolff, M.T. ); Bloom, E.; Godfrey, G.; Hanson, J.; Michelson, P.; Taylor, R.; Wen, H. )

    1994-07-05

    The Unconventional Stellar Aspect (USA) experiment to be launched in September 1995 on the Advanced Research and Global Observations Satellite (ARGOS) is a low-cost, quick---yet scientifically ambitious---x-ray timing experiment. It is designed for the dual purpose of scientific research in x-ray timing and time resolved spectroscopy and also for exploration of applications of x-ray sensor technology. Bright galactic x-ray binaries are used simultaneously for both scientific and applied objectives.

  14. XMM-NEWTON MEASUREMENT OF THE GALACTIC HALO X-RAY EMISSION USING A COMPACT SHADOWING CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, David B.; Shelton, Robin L.; Cumbee, Renata S.; Stancil, Phillip C.

    2015-02-01

    Observations of interstellar clouds that cast shadows in the soft X-ray background can be used to separate the background Galactic halo emission from the local emission due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) and/or the Local Bubble (LB). We present an XMM-Newton observation of a shadowing cloud, G225.60–66.40, that is sufficiently compact that the on- and off-shadow spectra can be extracted from a single field of view (unlike previous shadowing observations of the halo with CCD-resolution spectrometers, which consisted of separate on- and off-shadow pointings). We analyzed the spectra using a variety of foreground models: one representing LB emission, and two representing SWCX emission. We found that the resulting halo model parameters (temperature T {sub h} ≈ 2 × 10{sup 6} K, emission measure E{sub h}≈4×10{sup −3} cm{sup −6} pc) were not sensitive to the foreground model used. This is likely due to the relative faintness of the foreground emission in this observation. However, the data do favor the existence of a foreground. The halo parameters derived from this observation are in good agreement with those from previous shadowing observations, and from an XMM-Newton survey of the Galactic halo emission. This supports the conclusion that the latter results are not subject to systematic errors, and can confidently be used to test models of the halo emission.

  15. Hard X-ray observations of the region from the galactic center to Centaurus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, D. D.; Webber, W. R.; Damle, S. V.

    1974-01-01

    A balloon flight from Parana, Argentina, was conducted to observe emissions from discrete or extended sources in the southern sky. The sources observed include GX 304-1, Nor X-2, GX 340+0, GX 354-5, a possibly composite source near the galactic center, and the nova-like source (2U1543-47) in the Lupus-Norma region which has been reported previously only in satellite observations. Data concerning the possibility of line emission near 0.5 MeV from different regions of the southern sky are also presented.

  16. Real-Time Observation of Laser Heated Metals with High Brightness Monochromatic X-Ray Techniques at Present and Their Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daido, H.; Shobu, T.; Yamada, T.; Yamashita, S.; Sugihara, K.; Nishimura, A.; Muramatsu, T.

    We present the x-ray techniques for characterizing laser heated metals for welding and cutting techniques. At present, with an undulator (70 keV) as well as bending magnet (30 keV) sources at SPring-8 as a probe source, CW 300 W Ytterbium fiber laser irradiates an Aluminum slab as a sample. Simultaneously the x-ray beam probes the sample for real time observation of a molten pool. We observe the convection indicated by the motion of tungsten based particles as a tracer in the molten pool. During the cooling phase, the molten metal is solidified with residual stresses which are affected by the heating and convection processes. In this experiment the time and space resolution are ˜milli-second and several tens of μm, respectively. On the other hand, microscopic short transient phenomena also play a significant role for the quality of a solidified material. For this purpose, we need high energy short pulse x-ray sources. We try to discuss on the capability and limitation of present x-ray sources and the prospect of an ultra high brightness x-ray source as a complementary source for full characterization of the laser heated and cooling processes of metals.

  17. High-brightness table-top hard X-ray source driven by sub-100-femtosecond mid-infrared pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisshaupt, Jannick; Juvé, Vincent; Holtz, Marcel; Ku, Shinan; Woerner, Michael; Elsaesser, Thomas; Ališauskas, Skirmantas; Pugžlys, Audrius; Baltuška, Andrius

    2014-12-01

    Ultrafast structural dynamics in the condensed phase represents a key topic of current physics, chemistry and materials science. Femtosecond hard X-ray pulses are important structure probes that have been applied in time-resolved X-ray absorption and diffraction. Optical pump/X-ray probe schemes with compact laser-driven table-top sources have allowed for tiny changes of diffracted intensity to be measured with X-ray photon statistics, which has set the ultimate sensitivity limit. To address the strong quest for a higher X-ray flux, here we present the first hard X-ray plasma source driven by intense mid-infrared sub-100-fs pulses at 3.9 μm. The comparably long optical period allows for accelerating electrons from the Cu target to very high kinetic energies and for generating a characteristic Kα flux of 109 photons per pulse, 25 times more than with our 800 nm driver. Theoretical simulations account for the experimental results in a wide range of driving fields and predict a further enhancement of X-ray flux.

  18. Black hole mass estimation from X-ray variability measurements in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolajuk, M.; Papadakis, I. E.; Czerny, B.

    2004-05-01

    We propose a new method of estimation of the black hole masses in active galactic nuclei (AGN) based on the normalized excess variance, σ2nxs. We derive a relation between σ2nxs, the length of the observation, T, the light-curve bin size, Δt, and the black hole mass, assuming that (i) the power spectrum above the high-frequency break, νbf, has a slope of -2, (ii) the high-frequency break scales with black hole mass, (iii) the power-spectrum amplitude (in frequency-power space) is universal and (iv) σ2nxs is calculated from observations of length T < 1/νbf. Values of black hole masses in AGN obtained with this method are consistent with estimates based on other techniques such as reverberation mapping or the MBH-stellar velocity dispersion relation. The method is formally equivalent to methods based on power spectrum scaling with mass, but the use of σ2nxs has the big advantage of being applicable to relatively low-quality data.

  19. The X-ray spectral evolution and radio-X-ray correlation in radiatively efficient black-hole sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ai-Jun; Wu, Qingwen; Cao, Xiao-Feng

    2016-02-01

    We explore X-ray spectral evolution and radio-X-ray correlation simultaneously for four X-ray binaries (XRBs). We find that hard X-ray photon indices, Γ, are anti- and positively correlated to X-ray fluxes when the X-ray flux, F 3-9keV, is below and above a critical flux, F X,crit, which may be regulated by ADAF and disk-corona respectively. We find that the data points with anti-correlation of Γ-F 3-9keV follow the universal radio-X-ray correlation of F R ~ F X b (b ~ 0.5-0.7), while the data points with positive X-ray spectral evolution follow a steeper radio-X-ray correlation (b ~ 1.4, the so-called `outliers track'). The bright active galactic nuclei (AGNs) share similar X-ray spectral evolution and radio-X-ray correlation as XRBs in `outliers' track, and we present a new fundamental plane of log L R=1.59+0.28 -0.22 log L X-0.22+0.19 -0.20 log M BH-28.97+0.45 -0.45 for these radiatively efficient BH sources.

  20. Generation of Bright, Spatially Coherent Soft X-Ray High Harmonics in a Hollow Waveguide Using Two-Color Synthesized Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Cheng; Stein, Gregory J.; Hong, Kyung-Han; Lin, C. D.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the efficient generation of low-divergence high-order harmonics driven by waveform-optimized laser pulses in a gas-filled hollow waveguide. The drive waveform is obtained by synthesizing two-color laser pulses, optimized such that highest harmonic yields are emitted from each atom. Optimization of the gas pressure and waveguide configuration has enabled us to produce bright and spatially coherent harmonics extending from the extreme ultraviolet to soft x rays. Our study on the interplay among waveguide mode, atomic dispersion, and plasma effect uncovers how dynamic phase matching is accomplished and how an optimized waveform is maintained when optimal waveguide parameters (radius and length) and gas pressure are identified. Our analysis should help laboratory development in the generation of high-flux bright coherent soft x rays as tabletop light sources for applications.

  1. Investigating the Physics of Hard X-ray Outbursts from the Galactic Center Supermassive Black Hole Sagittarius A* with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuo; NuSTAR Galactic Plane Survey Working Group

    2016-01-01

    The Galactic center supermassive black hole (SMBH) Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) is remarkably underluminous with a bolometric luminosity about 10-9 times its Eddington luminosity. It is the closest SMBH and thus an ideal target for investigation of galactic nuclei and their activity cycles. This goal can be fulfilled by studying its current, past and possible future outbursts. Its current X-ray quiescent state, with a luminosity of LX ~ 1033 erg s-1, is punctuated by X-ray flares up to a few times 1035 erg s-1, whose origin is poorly understood. With 638.6 ks NuSTAR observation of Sgr A*, I collected nine X-ray flares which are detected up to 79 keV, and studied their timing behavior using the Bayesian block analysis. The broadband (3-79 keV) spectroscopic studies show that the X-ray flares can have a range of photon indexes, which can be explained by the magnetic reconnection scenario. During the flares, Sgr A* is still orders of magnitudes lower than its Eddington luminosity. Whether it has ever experienced more substantial increases in activity as observed in low-luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei is still under discussion. Indication of such past activity of Sgr A* has come from the Galactic center molecular clouds (GCMCs). I use the hard X-ray emission from Sgr B2, the densest GCMC, to constrain the past Sgr A* X-ray outburst, resulting in LX~5×1038 erg s-1 with a photon index of Γ=2.2±0.4. I also discovered different timing variability from different cloud substructures, which can further constrain the past Sgr A* outburst and the cloud structure. Future giant outburst from Sgr A* could be triggered by dust/gas infall. Although the G2 infall event has not caused any increased X-ray activity from Sgr A*, there has been evidence that it caused flare behavior changes. Ongoing hard X-ray monitoring of Sgr A* will address this remaining puzzle.

  2. X-RAY EJECTA KINEMATICS OF THE GALACTIC CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA REMNANT G292.0+1.8

    SciTech Connect

    Bhalerao, Jayant; Park, Sangwook; Dewey, Daniel; Hughes, John P.; Mori, Koji; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-02-10

    We report on the results from the analysis of our 114 ks Chandra High Energy Transmision Grating Spectrometer observation of the Galactic core-collapse supernova remnant G292.0+1.8. To probe the three-dimensional structure of the clumpy X-ray emitting ejecta material in this remnant, we measured Doppler shifts in emission lines from metal-rich ejecta knots projected at different radial distances from the expansion center. We estimate radial velocities of ejecta knots in the range of –2300 ≲ v{sub r}  ≲ 1400 km s{sup –1}. The distribution of ejecta knots in velocity versus projected-radius space suggests an expanding ejecta shell with a projected angular thickness of ∼90'' (corresponding to ∼3 pc at d = 6 kpc). Based on this geometrical distribution of the ejecta knots, we estimate the location of the reverse shock approximately at the distance of ∼4 pc from the center of the supernova remnant, putting it in close proximity to the outer boundary of the radio pulsar wind nebula. Based on our observed remnant dynamics and the standard explosion energy of 10{sup 51} erg, we estimate the total ejecta mass to be ≲8 M {sub ☉}, and we propose an upper limit of ≲35 M {sub ☉} on the progenitor's mass.

  3. Discovery of X-Ray-Emitting O-Ne-Mg-Rich Ejecta in the Galactic Supernova Remnant Puppis A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Park, Sangwook; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    We report on the discovery of X-ray-emitting O-Ne-Mg-rich ejecta in the middle-aged Galactic O-rich supernova remnant Puppis A with Chandra and XMM-Newton. We use line ratios to identify a low-ionization filament running parallel to the northeastern edge of the remnant that requires super-solar abundances, particularly for O, Ne, and Mg, which we interpret to be from O-Ne-Mg-rich ejecta. Abundance ratios of Ne/O, Mg/O, and Fe/O are measured to be [approx]2, [approx]2, and <0.3 times the solar values. Our spatially resolved spectral analysis from the northeastern rim to the western rim otherwise reveals sub-solar abundances consistent with those in the interstellar medium. The filament is coincident with several optically emitting O-rich knots with high velocities. If these are physically related, the filament would be a peculiar fragment of ejecta. On the other hand, the morphology of the filament suggests that it may trace ejecta heated by a shock reflected strongly off the dense ambient clouds near the northeastern rim.

  4. X-Ray Ejecta Kinematics of the Galactic Core-Collapse Supernova Remnant G292.0+1.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalerao, Jayant; Park, Sangwook; Dewey, Daniel; Hughes, John P.; Mori, Koji; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-02-01

    We report on the results from the analysis of our 114 ks Chandra High Energy Transmision Grating Spectrometer observation of the Galactic core-collapse supernova remnant G292.0+1.8. To probe the three-dimensional structure of the clumpy X-ray emitting ejecta material in this remnant, we measured Doppler shifts in emission lines from metal-rich ejecta knots projected at different radial distances from the expansion center. We estimate radial velocities of ejecta knots in the range of -2300 lsim vr lsim 1400 km s-1. The distribution of ejecta knots in velocity versus projected-radius space suggests an expanding ejecta shell with a projected angular thickness of ~90'' (corresponding to ~3 pc at d = 6 kpc). Based on this geometrical distribution of the ejecta knots, we estimate the location of the reverse shock approximately at the distance of ~4 pc from the center of the supernova remnant, putting it in close proximity to the outer boundary of the radio pulsar wind nebula. Based on our observed remnant dynamics and the standard explosion energy of 1051 erg, we estimate the total ejecta mass to be lsim8 M ⊙, and we propose an upper limit of lsim35 M ⊙ on the progenitor's mass.

  5. Dielectronic recombination measurements of iron M-shell ions motivated by active galactic nuclei X-ray absorption features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukic, V. D.; Schnell, M.; Savin, D. W.; Brandau, C.; Schmidt, E. W.; Bohm, S.; Muller, A.; Schippers, S.; Lestinsky, M.; Sprenger, F.; Wolf, A.; Altun, Z.; Badnell, N. R.

    2008-07-01

    XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) show rich spectra of X-ray absorption lines. These observations have detected a broad unresolved transition array (UTA) between 15-17 A. This is attributed to inner-shell photoexcitation of M-shell iron ions. Modeling these UTA features is currently limited by uncertainties in the low-temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) data for M-shell iron. In order to resolve this issue, and to provide reliable iron M-shell DR data for plasma modeling, we are carrying out a series of laboratory measurements using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) at the Max-Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Currently, laboratory measurements of low temperature DR can only be performed at storage rings. We use the DR data obtained at TSR, to calculate rate coefficients for plasma modeling and to benchmark theoretical DR calculations. At temperatures where these ions are predicted to form in photoionized gas, we find a significant discrepancy between our experimental results and previously recommended DR rate coefficients. Here we report our recent experimental results for DR of Mg-like Fe XV forming Al-like Fe XIV.

  6. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY-EMITTING O-Ne-Mg-RICH EJECTA IN THE GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT PUPPIS A

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuda, Satoru; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Park, Sangwook; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2010-05-10

    We report on the discovery of X-ray-emitting O-Ne-Mg-rich ejecta in the middle-aged Galactic O-rich supernova remnant Puppis A with Chandra and XMM-Newton. We use line ratios to identify a low-ionization filament running parallel to the northeastern edge of the remnant that requires super-solar abundances, particularly for O, Ne, and Mg, which we interpret to be from O-Ne-Mg-rich ejecta. Abundance ratios of Ne/O, Mg/O, and Fe/O are measured to be {approx}2, {approx}2, and <0.3 times the solar values. Our spatially resolved spectral analysis from the northeastern rim to the western rim otherwise reveals sub-solar abundances consistent with those in the interstellar medium. The filament is coincident with several optically emitting O-rich knots with high velocities. If these are physically related, the filament would be a peculiar fragment of ejecta. On the other hand, the morphology of the filament suggests that it may trace ejecta heated by a shock reflected strongly off the dense ambient clouds near the northeastern rim.

  7. The advanced light source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory—A high-brightness soft x-ray synchrotron-radiation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlachter, Alfred S.; Robinson, Arthur L.

    1990-12-01

    The Advanced Light Source, a third-generation national synchrotron-radiation facility now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is scheduled to begin serving qualified users across a broad spectrum of research areas in the spring of 1993. Based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized to operate at 1.5 GeV, the ALS will have 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) and 24 high-quality bend-magnet ports. The short pulse width (30-50 ns) will be ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will generate high-brightness soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from below 10 eV to above 2 keV. Wigglers and bend magnets will extend the spectrum by generating high fluxes of hard x-rays to photon energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in which XUV radiation is used to study matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets.

  8. Very old and very young compact objects: X-ray studies of galactic globular clusters and recent core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooley, David Aaron

    2003-09-01

    This thesis comprises the results of two distinct areas of research, namely, X-ray studies of Galactic globular clusters and X-ray studies of recent core collapse supernovae. My analyses of the Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of the globular clusters NGC 6752 and NGC 6440 revealed as many low- luminosity X-ray sources as was in the entire census of globular cluster sources with the previous best X-ray imaging instrument, Röntgensatellit. In the observation of NGC 6752, I detect 6 X-ray sources within the 10''.5 core radius and 13 more within the 115' half-mass radius down to a limiting luminosity of Lx ≈ 1030 ergs s -1 for cluster sources. Based on a reanalysis of archival data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Australia Telescope Compact Array, I make 12 optical identifications and one radio identification. Based on X- ray and optical properties of the identifications, I find 10 likely cataclysmic variables (CVs), 1 3 likely RS CVn or BY Dra systems, and 1 or 2 possible background objects. Of the 7 sources for which no optical identifications were made, one was detected in the archival radio data, and another was found to be a millisecond pulsar. Of the remaining sources, I expect that ˜2 4 are background objects and that the rest are either CVs or millisecond pulsars whose radio emission has not been detected. These and other Chandra results on globular clusters indicate that the dozens of CVs per cluster expected by theoretical arguments are being found. Based upon X-ray luminosities and colors, I conclude that there are 4 5 likely quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries and that most of the other sources are cataclysmic variables. I compare these results to Chandra results from other globular clusters and find the X-ray luminosity functions differ among the clusters. Observations of the Type II-P (plateau) Supernova (SN) 1999em and Type IIn (narrow emission line) SN 1998S have enabled estimation of the profile of the SN ejecta, the structure of the

  9. SUZAKU X-RAY FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF SEVEN UNASSOCIATED FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES AT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Maeda, K.; Makiya, R.; Totani, T.; Cheung, C. C.; Stawarz, L.; Guillemot, L.; Freire, P. C. C.; Cognard, I.

    2012-03-01

    We report on our second-year campaign of X-ray follow-up observations of unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) {gamma}-ray sources at high Galactic latitudes (|b| > 10 Degree-Sign ) using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer on board the Suzaku X-ray Observatory. In this second year of the project, seven new targets were selected from the First Fermi-LAT Catalog, and studied with 20-40 ks effective Suzaku exposures. We detected an X-ray point source coincident with the position of the recently discovered millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J2302+4442 within the 95% confidence error circle of 1FGL J2302.8+4443. The X-ray spectrum of the detected counterpart was well fit by a blackbody model with temperature of kT {approx_equal} 0.3 keV, consistent with an origin of the observed X-ray photons from the surface of a rotating magnetized neutron star. For four other targets that were also recently identified with a normal pulsar (1FGL J0106.7+4853) and MSPs (1FGL J1312.6+0048, J1902.0-5110, and J2043.2+1709), only upper limits in the 0.5-10 keV band were obtained at the flux levels of {approx_equal} 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. A weak X-ray source was found in the field of 1FGL J1739.4+8717, but its association with the variable {gamma}-ray emitter could not be confirmed with the available Suzaku data alone. For the remaining Fermi-LAT object 1FGL J1743.8-7620 no X-ray source was detected within the LAT 95% error ellipse. We briefly discuss the general properties of the observed high Galactic-latitude Fermi-LAT objects by comparing their multiwavelength properties with those of known blazars and MSPs.

  10. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li + ion beam-driven hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R. J.; Moats, A. R.; Leeper, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for inertial confinement fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li+ ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The unfold operator (UFO) code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time-resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. The UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies (⩽100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time-history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum.

  11. Bright end of the luminosity function of high-mass X-ray binaries: contributions of hard, soft and supersoft sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, S.; Khabibullin, I.

    2017-04-01

    Using a spectral analysis of bright Chandra X-ray sources located in 27 nearby galaxies and maps of star-formation rate (SFR) and interstellar medium surface densities for these galaxies, we constructed the intrinsic X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of luminous high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), taking into account absorption effects and the diversity of HMXB spectra. The XLF per unit SFR can be described by a power-law dN/dlog LX,unabs ≈ 2.0(LX,unabs/1039 erg s-1)-0.6 (M⊙ yr-1)-1 from LX,unabs = 1038 to 1040.5 erg s-1, where LX,unabs is the unabsorbed luminosity at 0.25-8 keV. The intrinsic number of luminous HMXBs per unit SFR is a factor of ∼2.3 larger than the observed number reported before. The intrinsic XLF is composed of hard, soft and supersoft sources (defined here as those with the 0.25-2 keV to 0.25-8 keV flux ratio of <0.6, 0.6-0.95 and >0.95, respectively) in ∼ 2:1:1 proportion. We also constructed the intrinsic HMXB XLF in the soft X-ray band (0.25-2 keV). Here, the numbers of hard, soft and supersoft sources prove to be nearly equal. The cumulative present-day 0.25-2 keV emissivity of HMXBs with luminosities between 1038 and 1040.5 erg s-1 is ∼5 × 1039 erg s-1(M⊙ yr-1)-1, which may be relevant for studying the X-ray preheating of the early Universe.

  12. Search for TeV Gamma-ray Emission from GRB 100621A, an extremely bright GRB in X-rays, with H.E.S.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Anton, G.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; O'C. Drury, L.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Naumann, C. L.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P. T.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Raue, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tam, P. H. T.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2014-05-01

    The long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 100621A, at the time the brightest X-ray transient ever detected by Swift-XRT in the 0.3-10 keV range, has been observed with the H.E.S.S. imaging air Cherenkov telescope array, sensitive to gamma radiation in the very-high-energy (VHE, >100 GeV) regime. Due to its relatively small redshift of z ~ 0.5, the favourable position in the southern sky and the relatively short follow-up time (<700 s after the satellite trigger) of the H.E.S.S. observations, this GRB could be within the sensitivity reach of the H.E.S.S. instrument. The analysis of the H.E.S.S. data shows no indication of emission and yields an integral flux upper limit above ~380 GeV of 4.2 × 10-12 cm-2 s-1 (95% confidence level), assuming a simple Band function extension model. A comparison to a spectral-temporal model, normalised to the prompt flux at sub-MeV energies, constraints the existence of a temporally extended and strong additional hard power law, as has been observed in the other bright X-ray GRB 130427A. A comparison between the H.E.S.S. upper limit and the contemporaneous energy output in X-rays constrains the ratio between the X-ray and VHE gamma-ray fluxes to be greater than 0.4. This value is an important quantity for modelling the afterglow and can constrain leptonic emission scenarios, where leptons are responsible for the X-ray emission and might produce VHE gamma rays.

  13. A complete sample of bright Swift Gamma-ray bursts: X-ray afterglow luminosity and its correlation with the prompt emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Avanzo, P.; Salvaterra, R.; Sbarufatti, B.; Nava, L.; Melandri, A.; Bernardini, M. G.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; Fugazza, D.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Parola, V. La; Perri, M.; Vergani, S. D.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2012-09-01

    We investigate whether there is any correlation between the X-ray afterglow luminosity and the prompt emission properties of a carefully selected sub-sample of bright Swift long Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) nearly complete in redshift (˜90 per cent). Being free of selection effects (except flux limit), this sample provides the possibility to compare the rest frame physical properties of GRB prompt and afterglow emission in an unbiased way. The afterglow X-ray luminosities are computed at four different rest frame times (5 min, 1 h, 11 h and 24 h after trigger) and compared with the prompt emission isotropic energy Eiso, the isotropic peak luminosity Liso and the rest frame peak energy Epeak. We find that the rest frame afterglow X-ray luminosity do correlate with these prompt emission quantities, but the significance of each correlation decreases over time. This result is in agreement with the idea that the GRB X-ray light curve can be described as the result of a combination of different components whose relative contribution and weight change with time, with the prompt and afterglow emission dominating at early and late time, respectively. In particular, we found evidence that the plateau and the shallow decay phase often observed in GRB X-ray light curves are powered by activity from the central engine. The existence of the LX - Eiso correlation at late times (trf≥11h) suggests a similar radiative efficiency among different bursts with on average about 6 per cent of the total kinetic energy powering the prompt emission.

  14. Galaxies in X-ray Selected Clusters and Groups in Dark Energy Survey Data: Stellar Mass Growth of Bright Central Galaxies Since z~1.2

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Y.; Miller, C.; McKay, T.; ...

    2016-01-10

    Using the science verification data of the Dark Energy Survey for a new sample of 106 X-ray selected clusters and groups, we study the stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies (BCGs) since redshift z ~ 1.2. Compared with the expectation in a semi-analytical model applied to the Millennium Simulation, the observed BCGs become under-massive/under-luminous with decreasing redshift. We incorporate the uncertainties associated with cluster mass, redshift, and BCG stellar mass measurements into analysis of a redshift-dependent BCG-cluster mass relation.

  15. The man behind the curtain: X-rays drive the UV through NIR variability in the 2013 active galactic nucleus outburst in NGC 2617

    SciTech Connect

    Shappee, B. J.; Kochanek, C. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; De Rosa, G.; Mathur, S.; Zu, Y.; Peterson, B. M.; Pogge, R. W.; Jencson, J.; Holoien, T.W-S.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Adams, S.; Prieto, J. L.; Grupe, D.; Komossa, S.; Im, M.; Brimacombe, J.; Campillay, A.; and others

    2014-06-10

    After the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae discovered a significant brightening of the inner region of NGC 2617, we began a ∼70 day photometric and spectroscopic monitoring campaign from the X-ray through near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths. We report that NGC 2617 went through a dramatic outburst, during which its X-ray flux increased by over an order of magnitude followed by an increase of its optical/ultraviolet (UV) continuum flux by almost an order of magnitude. NGC 2617, classified as a Seyfert 1.8 galaxy in 2003, is now a Seyfert 1 due to the appearance of broad optical emission lines and a continuum blue bump. Such 'changing look active galactic nuclei (AGNs)' are rare and provide us with important insights about AGN physics. Based on the Hβ line width and the radius-luminosity relation, we estimate the mass of central black hole (BH) to be (4 ± 1) × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}. When we cross-correlate the light curves, we find that the disk emission lags the X-rays, with the lag becoming longer as we move from the UV (2-3 days) to the NIR (6-9 days). Also, the NIR is more heavily temporally smoothed than the UV. This can largely be explained by a simple model of a thermally emitting thin disk around a BH of the estimated mass that is illuminated by the observed, variable X-ray fluxes.

  16. Discovery of X-Ray Emission from the Galactic Supernova Remnant G32.8-0.1 with Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamba, Aya; Terada, Yukikatsu; Hewitt, John; Petre, Robert; Angelini, Lorella; Safi-Harb, Samar; Zhou, Ping; Bocchino, Fabrizio; Sawada, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    We present the first dedicated X-ray study of the supernova remnant (SNR) G32.8-0.1 (Kes 78) with Suzaku. X-ray emission from the whole SNR shell has been detected for the first time. The X-ray morphology is well correlated with the emission from the radio shell, while anti-correlated with the molecular cloud found in the SNR field. The X-ray spectrum shows not only conventional low-temperature (kT approximately 0.6 kiloelectronvolts) thermal emission in a nonequilibrium ionization state, but also a very high-temperature (approximately 3.4 kiloelectronvolts) component with a very low ionization timescale (approximately 2.7 times 10 (sup 9) per cubic centimeter per second), or a hard nonthermal component with a photon index Gamma approximately equal to 2.3. The average density of the low-temperature plasma is rather low, of the order of 10 (sup -3) - 10 (sup -2) per cubic centimeter, implying that this SNR is expanding into a low-density cavity. We discuss the X-ray emission of the SNR, also detected in teraelectronvolts with H.E.S.S. (High Energy Stereoscopic System), together with multi-wavelength studies of the remnant and other gamma-ray emitting SNRs, such as W28 and RCW 86. Analysis of a time-variable source, 2XMM J185114.3-000004, found in the northern part of the SNR, is also reported for the first time. Rapid time variability and a heavily absorbed hard-X-ray spectrum suggest that this source could be a new supergiant fast X-ray transient.

  17. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT G32.8-0.1 WITH SUZAKU

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Aya; Sawada, Makoto; Terada, Yukikatsu; Hewitt, John; Petre, Robert; Angelini, Lorella; Safi-Harb, Samar; Zhou, Ping; Bocchino, Fabrizio

    2016-02-10

    We present the first dedicated X-ray study of the supernova remnant (SNR) G32.8−0.1 (Kes 78) with Suzaku. X-ray emission from the whole SNR shell has been detected for the first time. The X-ray morphology is well correlated with the emission from the radio shell, while anti-correlated with the molecular cloud found in the SNR field. The X-ray spectrum shows not only conventional low-temperature (kT ∼ 0.6 keV) thermal emission in a non-equilibrium ionization state, but also a very high-temperature (kT ∼ 3.4 keV) component with a very low ionization timescale (∼2.7 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −3} s), or a hard nonthermal component with a photon index Γ ∼ 2.3. The average density of the low-temperature plasma is rather low, of the order of 10{sup −3}–10{sup −2} cm{sup −3}, implying that this SNR is expanding into a low-density cavity. We discuss the X-ray emission of the SNR, also detected in TeV with H.E.S.S., together with multi-wavelength studies of the remnant and other gamma-ray emitting SNRs, such as W28 and RCW 86. Analysis of a time-variable source, 2XMM J185114.3−000004, found in the northern part of the SNR, is also reported for the first time. Rapid time variability and a heavily absorbed hard-X-ray spectrum suggest that this source could be a new supergiant fast X-ray transient.

  18. Research and development of an electron beam focusing system for a high-brightness X-ray generator.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Takeshi; Ohsawa, Satoshi; Sakabe, Noriyoshi; Sugimura, Takashi; Ikeda, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    A new type of rotating anticathode X-ray generator, where an electron beam of up to 60 keV irradiates the inner surface of a U-shaped Cu anticathode, has achieved a beam brilliance of 130 kW mm(-2) (at 2.3 kW). A higher-flux electron beam is expected from simulation by optimizing the geometry of a combined-function-type magnet instead of the fringing field of the bending magnet. In order to minimize the size of the X-ray source the electron beam has been focused over a short distance by a new combined-function bending magnet, whose geometrical shape was determined by simulation using the Opera-3D, General Particle Tracer and CST-STUDIO codes. The result of the simulation clearly shows that the role of combined functions in both the bending and the steering magnets is important for focusing the beam to a small size. FWHM sizes of the beam are predicted by simulation to be 0.45 mm (horizontal) and 0.05 mm (vertical) for a 120 keV/75 mA beam, of which the effective brilliance is about 500 kW mm(-2) on the supposition of a two-dimensional Gaussian distribution. High-power tests have begun using a high-voltage 120 kV/75 mA power supply for the X-ray generator instead of 60 kV/100 mA. The beam focus size on the target will be verified in the experiments.

  19. Caliste-SO, a CdTe based spectrometer for bright solar event observations in hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meuris, A.; Limousin, O.; Gevin, O.; Blondel, C.; Martignac, J.; Vassal, M.-C.; Soufflet, F.; Fiant, N.; Bednarzik, M.; Stutz, S.; Grimm, O.; Commichau, V.

    2015-07-01

    Caliste-SO is a CdTe hybrid detector designed to be used as a spectrometer for a hard X-ray Fourier telescope. The imaging technique was implemented in the Yohkoh satellite in 1991 and the RHESSI satellite in 2002 to achieve arc-second angular resolution images of solar flares with spectroscopic capabilities. The next generation of such instruments will be the Spectrometer Telescope Imaging X-rays (STIX) on-board the Solar Orbiter mission adopted by the European Space Agency in 2011 for launch in 2017. The design and performance of Caliste-SO allows both high spectral resolution and high count rate measurements from 4 to 150 keV with limited demands on spacecraft resources such as mass, power and volume (critical for interplanetary missions). The paper reports on the flight production of the Caliste-SO devices for STIX, describing the test facilities built-up in Switzerland and France. It illustrates some results obtained with the first production samples that will be mounted in the STIX engineering model.

  20. Comparison of Spitzer/IRAC Galactic Center Mid-IR Survey Results with X-ray and Radio Emission Due to High-Energy Processes in the Central 100 Parsecs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Arendt, R. A.; Smith, R.; Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Stolovy, S.; Law, C.; Smith, H. A.; Moseley, Harvey; Ramirez, S.; Karr, J.

    2006-01-01

    We compare the results of a small region from our 3.6 - 8.0 micron Spitzer/IRAC imaging survey of 2 x 1.5 deg around the Galactic Center with x-ray and radio emission due to high energy processes. The region we studied covers 100 x 100 parsecs, and was chosen to include a rich collection of sources, including Sgr A* and the bright Sgr AWest infrared/radio source complex, the non-thermal radio filaments and the thermal: radio arches. In a 40 x 40 parsec subset of that region we also make a preliminary analysis of the correlation between approx.2300 x-ray sources identified by Muno et al. (2003) and 20,000 infrared sources from our survey. We also investigate the correlation between infrared and radio emission in the large-scale structures including the thermal radio arches and non-thermal radio filaments. We set constrictions on the synchrotron spectrum observed at radio and millimeter wavelengths extrapolated to 8 micons, and set limits on the midinfrared variability of Sgr A* during and after the coordinated multi-wavelength observing campaign in September 2004.

  1. EXTINCTION AND DISTANCE TO ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSARS FROM X-RAY SCATTERING HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Van Kerkwijk, M. H. E-mail: mhvk@astro.utoronto.c

    2010-02-10

    We analyze the X-ray scattering halos around three Galactic Anomalous X-ray Pulsars in order to constrain the distance and the optical extinction of each source. We obtain surface brightness distributions from EPIC-pn data obtained with XMM-Newton, compare the profiles of different sources, and fit them with a model based on the standard theory of X-ray scattering by dust grains, both for a uniform distribution of dust along the line of sight, and for dust distributions constrained by previous measurements. Somewhat surprisingly, we find that for all three sources, the uniform distribution reproduces the observed surface brightness as well as or better than the distributions that are informed by previous constraints. Nevertheless, the inferred total dust columns are robust, and serve to confirm that previous measurements based on interstellar edges in high-resolution X-ray spectra and on modeling of broadband X-ray spectra were reliable. Specifically, we find A{sub V} {approx_equal} 4, 6, and 8 mag for 4U 0142+61, 1E 1048.1 - 5937, and 1RXS J170849.0 - 400910, respectively. For 1E 1048.1 - 5937, this is well in excess of the extinction expected toward an H I bubble along the line of sight, thus casting further doubt on the suggested association with the source.

  2. GREEN BANK TELESCOPE AND SWIFT X-RAY TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE GALACTIC CENTER RADIO MAGNETAR SGR J1745–2900

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Ryan S.; Archibald, Robert F.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Scholz, Paul

    2015-06-20

    We present results from eight months of Green Bank Telescope 8.7 GHz observations and nearly 18 months of Swift X-ray telescope observations of the radio magnetar SGR J1745–2900. We tracked the radio and X-ray flux density, polarization properties, profile evolution, rotation, and single-pulse behavior. We identified two main periods of activity. The first is characterized by approximately 5.5 months of relatively stable evolution in radio flux density, rotation, and profile shape, while in the second these properties varied substantially. Specifically, a third profile component emerged and the radio flux also became more variable. The single pulse properties also changed, most notably with a larger fraction of pulses with pulse widths ∼5–20 ms in the erratic state. Bright single pulses are well described by a log-normal energy distribution at low energies, but with an excess at high energies. The 2–10 keV flux decayed steadily since the initial X-ray outburst, while the radio flux remained stable to within ∼20% during the stable state. A joint pulsar timing analysis of the radio and X-ray data shows a level of timing noise unprecedented in a radio magnetar, though during the time covered by the radio data alone the timing noise was at a level similar to that observed in other radio magnetars. While SGR J1745–2900 is similar to other radio magnetars in many regards, it differs by having experienced a period of relative stability in the radio that now appears to have ended, while the X-ray properties evolved independently.

  3. Radio and X-ray observations of the gamma-ray bright quasar PKS 0528+134

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Yun Fei; Marscher, Alan P.; Aller, Hugh D.; Aller, Margo F.; Terasranta, Harri; Valtaoja, Esko

    1994-01-01

    We present a study of the z = 2.07 quasar PKS 0528+134, which has been detected as an extraordinarily luminous gamma-ray source. Its radio properties are highly variable in both total and polarized flux density. Milliarcsecond-scale maps from global very long base interferometry (VLBI) experiments, an X-ray spectrum from ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) observations, and light curves in total flux density and polarization are used to investigate the geometry, radiation mechanism, and physical environment of the emission region in the source. The VLBI images reveal a bent jet extending toward the northeast on parsec scales, with less intense knots of emission appearing on the opposite side of the brightest spot. The position of the core usually found in such sources is unclear. The polarization angle is stable despite strong variability in polarized flux density and indicates that the magnetic field is aligned with the jet axis as defined by our 8.4 GHz image. The ROSAT X-ray flux density of PKS 0528+134 in 1991 March is measured to be 1.6 micro Jy at 1 keV, with a very steep spectral (`energy') index sigma(sub x) approximately equal to 2.2. The X-ray observations reveal the presence of cold gas along the line of sight significantly in excess of that present in the Galaxy. A strong radio flare began within two months of the first observation of a high flux of gamma-rays from PKS 0528+134 by Hunter et al. Using the geometry and spectral chacateristics determined by our VLBI observations, a synchrotron self-Compton calculation indicates that relativistic bulk motion is required in PKS 0528+134, with an estimated Doppler beaming factor delta approximately greater than 4.3, similar to the value delta approximately greater than 7 required to explain the low optical depth of the gamma-rays to photon-photon pair production. We suggest that the core activity of PKS 0528+134 is sporadic in nature, with the nonthermal outburst starting in 1991 representing

  4. Non-abelian dark matter solutions for Galactic gamma-ray excess and Perseus 3.5 keV X-ray line

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Kingman; Huang, Wei-Chih; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming

    2015-05-26

    We attempt to explain simultaneously the Galactic center gamma-ray excess and the 3.5 keV X-ray line from the Perseus cluster based on a class of non-abelian SU(2) DM models, in which the dark matter and an excited state comprise a “dark” SU(2) doublet. The non-abelian group kinetically mixes with the standard model gauge group via dimensions-5 operators. The dark matter particles annihilate into standard model fermions, followed by fragmentation and bremsstrahlung, and thus producing a continuous spectrum of gamma-rays. On the other hand, the dark matter particles can annihilate into a pair of excited states, each of which decays back into the dark matter particle and an X-ray photon, which has an energy equal to the mass difference between the dark matter and the excited state, which is set to be 3.5 keV. The large hierarchy between the required X-ray and γ-ray annihilation cross-sections can be achieved by a very small kinetic mixing between the SM and dark sector, which effectively suppresses the annihilation into the standard model fermions but not into the excited state.

  5. Observations of the Non-Thermal X-ray Emission from the Galactic Supernova Remnant G347.3-0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pannuti, Thomas G.; Allen, Glenn E.

    2002-01-01

    G347.3-0.5 (ALEX J1713.7-3946) is a member of the new class of shell-type Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) that feature non-thermal components to their X-ray emission. We have analyzed the X-ray spectrum of this SNR over a broad energy range (0.5 to 30 key) using archived data from observations made with two satellites, the R6ntgensatellit (ROSA I) and the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), along with data from our own observations made with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Using a combination of the models EQUIL and SRCUT to fit thermal and non-thermal emission, respectively, from this SNR, we find evidence for a modest thermal component to G347.30.5's diffuse emission with a corresponding energy of kT approx. = 1.4 key. We also obtain an estimate of 70 Texas for the maximum energy of the cosmic-ray electrons that, have been accelerated by this SNR.

  6. Non-abelian dark matter solutions for Galactic gamma-ray excess and Perseus 3.5 keV X-ray line

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Kingman; Huang, Wei-Chih; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming E-mail: wei-chih.huang@ucl.ac.uk

    2015-05-01

    We attempt to explain simultaneously the Galactic center gamma-ray excess and the 3.5 keV X-ray line from the Perseus cluster based on a class of non-abelian SU(2) DM models, in which the dark matter and an excited state comprise a ''dark'' SU(2) doublet. The non-abelian group kinetically mixes with the standard model gauge group via dimensions-5 operators. The dark matter particles annihilate into standard model fermions, followed by fragmentation and bremsstrahlung, and thus producing a continuous spectrum of gamma-rays. On the other hand, the dark matter particles can annihilate into a pair of excited states, each of which decays back into the dark matter particle and an X-ray photon, which has an energy equal to the mass difference between the dark matter and the excited state, which is set to be 3.5 keV. The large hierarchy between the required X-ray and γ-ray annihilation cross-sections can be achieved by a very small kinetic mixing between the SM and dark sector, which effectively suppresses the annihilation into the standard model fermions but not into the excited state.

  7. Toward the standard population synthesis model of the X-ray background: Evolution of X-ray luminosity and absorption functions of active galactic nuclei including Compton-thick populations

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masayuki; Hasinger, Günther; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Watson, Michael G.

    2014-05-10

    We present the most up to date X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and absorption function of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over the redshift range from 0 to 5, utilizing the largest, highly complete sample ever available obtained from surveys performed with Swift/BAT, MAXI, ASCA, XMM-Newton, Chandra, and ROSAT. The combined sample, including that of the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey, consists of 4039 detections in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and/or hard (>2 keV) band. We utilize a maximum likelihood method to reproduce the count rate versus redshift distribution for each survey, by taking into account the evolution of the absorbed fraction, the contribution from Compton-thick (CTK) AGNs, and broadband spectra of AGNs, including reflection components from tori based on the luminosity- and redshift-dependent unified scheme. We find that the shape of the XLF at z ∼ 1-3 is significantly different from that in the local universe, for which the luminosity-dependent density evolution model gives much better description than the luminosity and density evolution model. These results establish the standard population synthesis model of the X-ray background (XRB), which well reproduces the source counts, the observed fractions of CTK AGNs, and the spectrum of the hard XRB. The number ratio of CTK AGNs to the absorbed Compton-thin (CTN) AGNs is constrained to be ≈0.5-1.6 to produce the 20-50 keV XRB intensity within present uncertainties, by assuming that they follow the same evolution as CTN AGNs. The growth history of supermassive black holes is discussed based on the new AGN bolometric luminosity function.

  8. An observation of the Galactic center hard X-ray source, 1E 1740.7-2942, with the Caltech coded-aperture telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heindl, William A.; Cook, Walter R.; Grunsfeld, John M.; Palmer, David M.; Prince, Thomas A.; Schindler, Stephen M.; Stone, Edward C.

    1993-01-01

    The Galactic center region hard X-ray source IE 1740.7-2942 has been observed with the Caltech Gamma-Ray Imaging Payload (GRIP) from Alice Springs, Australia, on 1988 April 12 and on 1989 April 3 and 4. We report here results from the 1989 measurements based on 14 hr of observation of the Galactic center region. The observations showed IE 1740.7-2942 to be in its normal state, having a spectrum between 35 and 200 keV characterized by a power law with an exponent of -2.2 +/- 0.3 and flux at 100 keV of (7.0 +/- 0.7) x 10 exp -5 sq cm s keV. No flux was detected above 200 keV. A search for time variability in the spectrum of IE 1740.7-2942 on one hour time scales showed no evidence for variability.

  9. On R-W1 as A Diagnostic to Discover Obscured Active Galactic Nuclei in Wide-area X-Ray Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Civano, Francesca; Brusa, Marcella; Stern, Daniel; Glikman, Eilat; Gallagher, Sarah; Urry, C. Meg; Cales, Sabrina; Cappelluti, Nico; Cardamone, Carolin; Comastri, Andrea; Farrah, Duncan; Greene, Jenny E.; Komossa, S.; Merloni, Andrea; Mroczkowski, Tony; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Richards, Gordon; Salvato, Mara; Schawinski, Kevin; Treister, Ezequiel

    2016-02-01

    Capitalizing on the all-sky coverage of WISE and the 35% and 50% sky coverage from Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Pan-STARRS, respectively, we explore the efficacy of mR (optical) - {m}3.4μ {{m}} (mid-infrared), hereafter R-W1, as a color diagnostic to identify obscured supermassive black hole accretion in wide-area X-ray surveys. We use the ˜16.5 deg2 Stripe 82 X-ray survey data as a test bed to compare R-W1 with R - K, an oft-used obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) selection criterion, and examine where different classes of objects lie in this parameter space. Most stars follow a well-defined path in R - K versus R-W1 space. We demonstrate that optically normal galaxies hosting X-ray AGNs at redshifts 0.5\\lt z\\lt 1 can be recovered with an R-W1\\gt 4 color cut, while they typically are not selected as AGNs based on their W1-W2 colors. Additionally, different observed X-ray luminosity bins favor different regions in R-W1 parameter space: moderate-luminosity AGNs (1043 erg {{{s}}}-1\\lt {L}0.5-10{keV}\\lt {10}44 erg s-1) tend to have red colors, while the highest-luminosity AGNs ({L}0.5-10{keV}\\gt {10}45 erg s-1) have bluer colors; higher spectroscopic completeness of the Stripe 82X sample is needed to determine whether this is a selection effect or an intrinsic property. Finally, we parameterize X-ray obscuration of Stripe 82X AGNs by calculating their hardness ratios (HRs) and find no clear trends between HR and optical reddening. Our results will help inform best-effort practices in following up obscured AGN candidates in current and future wide-area, shallow X-ray surveys, including the all-sky eROSITA mission.

  10. X-ray astronomical spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of the X-ray spectroscopy of celestial X-ray sources, ranging from nearby stars to distant quasars, is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of such spectroscopy as a useful and unique tool in the elucidation of the physical parameters of the sources. The spectroscopic analysis of degenerate and nondegenerate stellar systems, galactic clusters and active galactic nuclei, and supernova remnants is discussed.

  11. The condensation of the corona for the correlation between the hard X-ray photon index Γ and the reflection scaling factor ℜ in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Erlin; Liu, B. F.

    2017-01-01

    Observationally, it is found that there is a strong correlation between the hard X-ray photon index Γ and the Compton reflection scaling factor ℜ in active galactic nuclei. In this paper, we propose that the Γ - ℜ correlation can be explained within the framework of the condensation of the hot corona onto the cold accretion disc around a supermassive black hole. In the model, it is presumed that, initially, a vertically extended hot gas (corona) is supplied to the central supermassive black hole by capturing the interstellar medium and stellar wind. In this scenario, when the initial mass accretion rate dot{M}/ dot{M}_Edd gtrsim 0.01, at a critical radius rd, part of the hot gas begins to condense onto the equatorial disc plane of the black hole, forming an inner cold accretion disc. Then the matter is accreted in the form of the disc-corona structure extending down to the innermost stable circular orbits of the black hole. The size of the inner disc is determined by the initial mass accretion rate. With the increase of the initial mass accretion rate, the size of the inner disc increases, which results in both the increase of the Compton reflection scaling factor ℜ and the increase of the hard X-ray photon index Γ. By comparing with a sample of Seyfert galaxies with well-fitted X-ray spectra, it is found that our model can roughly explain the observations. Finally, we discuss the possibility to apply our model to high mass X-ray binaries, which are believed to be fueled by the hot wind from the companion star.

  12. X-RAY OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURE OF A BLACK HOLE ACCRETION DISK IN AN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS RX J1633+4718

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, W.; Liu, B. F.; Zhou, H.; Wang, T. G.

    2010-11-01

    We report the discovery of a luminous ultra-soft X-ray excess in a radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy, RX J1633+4718, from archival ROSAT observations. The thermal temperature of this emission, when fitted with a blackbody, is as low as 32.5{sup +8.0}{sub -6.0} eV. This is in remarkable contrast to the canonical temperatures of {approx}0.1-0.2 keV found hitherto for the soft X-ray excess in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and is interestingly close to the maximum temperature predicted for a postulated accretion disk in this object. If this emission is indeed blackbody in nature, the derived luminosity (3.5{sup +3.3}{sub -1.5} x 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) infers a compact emitting area with a size ({approx}5 x 10{sup 12} cm or 0.33 AU in radius) that is comparable to several times the Schwarzschild radius of a black hole (BH) at the mass estimated for this AGN ({approx}3 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun}). In fact, this ultra-steep X-ray emission can be well fitted as the (Compton scattered) Wien tail of the multi-temperature blackbody emission from an optically thick accretion disk, whose inferred parameters (BH mass and accretion rate) are in good agreement with independent estimates using the optical emission-line spectrum. We thus consider this feature as a signature of the long-sought X-ray radiation directly from a disk around a supermassive BH, presenting observational evidence for a BH accretion disk in the AGN. Future observations with better data quality, together with improved independent measurements of the BH mass, may constrain the spin of the BH.

  13. NuSTAR Observations of the Compton-thick Active Galactic Nucleus and Ultraluminous X-Ray Source Candidate in NGC 5643

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annuar, A.; Gandhi, P.; Alexander, D. M.; Lansbury, G. B.; Arévalo, P.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Baloković, M.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Brightman, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Del Moro, A.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Hickox, R. C.; Matt, G.; Puccetti, S.; Ricci, C.; Rigby, J. R.; Stern, D.; Walton, D. J.; Zappacosta, L.; Zhang, W.

    2015-12-01

    We present two Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observations of the local Seyfert 2 active galactic nucleus (AGN) and an ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) candidate in NGC 5643. Together with archival data from Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Swift-BAT, we perform a high-quality broadband spectral analysis of the AGN over two decades in energy (˜0.5-100 keV). Previous X-ray observations suggested that the AGN is obscured by a Compton-thick (CT) column of obscuring gas along our line of sight. However, the lack of high-quality ≳10 keV observations, together with the presence of a nearby X-ray luminous source, NGC 5643 X-1, have left significant uncertainties in the characterization of the nuclear spectrum. NuSTAR now enables the AGN and NGC 5643 X-1 to be separately resolved above 10 keV for the first time and allows a direct measurement of the absorbing column density toward the nucleus. The new data show that the nucleus is indeed obscured by a CT column of NH ≳ 5 × 1024 cm-2. The range of 2-10 keV absorption-corrected luminosity inferred from the best-fitting models is L2-10,int = (0.8-1.7) × 1042 erg s-1, consistent with that predicted from multiwavelength intrinsic luminosity indicators. In addition, we also study the NuSTAR data for NGC 5643 X-1 and show that it exhibits evidence of a spectral cutoff at energy E ˜ 10 keV, similar to that seen in other ULXs observed by NuSTAR. Along with the evidence for significant X-ray luminosity variations in the 3-8 keV band from 2003 to 2014, our results further strengthen the ULX classification of NGC 5643 X-1.

  14. An unexpected drop in the magnetic field of the X-ray pulsar V0332+53 after the bright outburst occurred in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusumano, G.; La Parola, V.; D'Aì, A.; Segreto, A.; Tagliaferri, G.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.

    2016-07-01

    How the accreted mass settling on the surface of a neutron star affects the topology of the magnetic field and how the secular evolution of the binary system depends on the magnetic field change is still an open issue. We report evidence for a clear drop in the observed magnetic field in the accreting pulsar V0332+53 after undergoing a bright 3-month long X-ray outburst. We determine the field from the position of the fundamental cyclotron line in its X-ray spectrum and relate it to the luminosity. For equal levels of luminosity, in the declining phase we measure a systematically lower value of the cyclotron line energy with respect to the rising phase. This results in a drop of ˜1.7 × 1011 G of the observed field between the onset and the end of the outburst. The settling of the accreted plasma on to the polar cap seems to induce a distortion of the magnetic field lines weakening their intensity along the accretion columns. Therefore, the dissipation rate of the magnetic field could be much faster than previously estimated, unless the field is able to restore its original configuration on a time-scale comparable with the outbursts recurrence time.

  15. Understanding Bright 13 keV Kr K-shell X-ray Sources at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, M. J.; Colvin, J. D.; Kemp, G. E.; Fournier, K. B.; Scott, H.; Patel, M.; Barrios, Widmann; Widmann, K.

    2015-11-01

    High x-ray conversion efficiency (CE) K-shell Kr sources are being investigated for High Energy Density experiments. These sources are 4.1 mm in diameter 4.4 mm tall hollow epoxy tubes having a 40 μm thick wall holding either 1.2 or 1.5 atm of Kr gas. The CE of K-shell Kr is dependent upon the peak electron temperature in the radiating plasma. In the NIF experiments, the available energy heats the source to Te = 6-7 keV, well below the temperature of Te ~25 keV needed to optimize the Kr CE. The CE is a steep function of the peak electron temperature. A spatially averaged electron temperature can be estimated from measured He(α) and Ly(α) line ratios. Some disagreement has been observed in the simulated and measured line ratios for some of these K-shell sources. Disagreements have been observed between the simulated and measured line ratios for some of these K-shell sources. To help understand this issue, Kr gas pipes have been shot with 3 ω light at ?750 kJ at ~210, ~140 TW and ~120 TW power levels with 3.7, 5.2 and 6.7 ns pulses, respectively. The power and pulse length scaling of the measured CE and K-shell line ratios and their comparison to simulations will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspic

  16. Observations of the vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray brightness profiles of Fe, Ni, and Ge in magnetically confined fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    May, M J; Finkenthal, M; Moos, H W; Fournier, K B; Goldstein, W H; Mattioli, M; Pacella, D; Mazzitelli, G; Leigheb, M; Gabellieri, L

    2001-09-01

    The spatial brightness profiles of emission lines for the K-like through He-like ionization states of Fe, Ge, and Ni have been measured during a set of experiments in which Fe and Ge were introduced into FTU tokamak plasmas by using the laser blowoff technique. Nickel was an intrinsic impurity observed during these experiments that was sputtered from the inconel limiter. The brightness profiles were measured by spatially scanable, photometrically calibrated vaccum ultraviolet and x-ray spectrometers that covered the 1 to 1700 A region. Simulations of these profiles and the time evolution of the laser blowoffs were performed with the MIST transport code using several sets of atomic physics compilations [ADPAK (originally in MIST), Arnaud and Raymond (AR92), Arnaud and Rothenflug (AR85), Mazzotta et al., and Mattioli (an extension to Mazzotta)]. The goal was to determine which set of available rates could best simulate the measured spatial brightness profiles and the charge state balance in the plasma. The Mazzotta et al. (for Fe and Ni), the Mattioli (for Ge), and the AR92 (for Fe only) rates adequately simulated the He-, Li-, Be-, Na-, Mg-like ionization states. The F- to B-like charge states could not be simulated by these compilations unless the relevant dielectronic rates were multiplied by a factor of 2. The ADPAK rates could not adequately predict any of the charge states of Fe, Ge, or Ni.

  17. Generating high-brightness and coherent soft x-ray pulses in the water window with a seeded free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kaishang; Feng, Chao; Deng, Haixiao; Wang, Dong

    2017-01-01

    We propose a new scheme to generate high-brightness and temporal coherent soft x-ray radiation in a seeded free-electron laser. The proposed scheme is based on the coherent harmonic generation (CHG) and superradiant principles. A CHG scheme is first used to generate a coherent signal at ultrahigh harmonics of the seed. This coherent signal is then amplified by a series of chicane-undulator modules via the fresh bunch and superradiant processes in the following radiator. Using a representative of a realistic set of parameters, three-dimensional simulations have been carried out and the simulations results demonstrated that 10 GW-level ultrashort (˜20 fs ) coherent radiation pulses in the water window can be achieved by using a 1.6 GeV electron beam based on the proposed technique.

  18. Gamma-Ray Blazar BL Lacertae at historic high brightness in millimeter, X-ray and far-infrared bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrle, Ann E.; Grupe, Dirk; Gurwell, Mark; Jorstad, Svetlana; Marscher, Alan

    2012-11-01

    We report on the current unprecedented brightness of BL Lacertae (2200+420) as observed by the Submillimeter Array (SMA), Swift, and the Herschel Space Observatory. Prompted by the reports of historic flaring at centimeter and millimeter bands by the F-GAMMA program (ATEL 4349.), we began Target of Opportunity monitoring in late October 2012 with the Submillimeter Array, Swift, and the Herschel Observatory.

  19. A NEW PERSPECTIVE OF THE RADIO BRIGHT ZONE AT THE GALACTIC CENTER: FEEDBACK FROM NUCLEAR ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jun-Hui; Morris, Mark R.; Goss, W. M.

    2016-02-01

    New observations of Sgr A have been carried out with the Jansky VLA in the B and C arrays using the broadband (2 GHz) continuum mode at 5.5 GHz. The field of view covers the central 13′ (30 pc) region of the radio-bright zone at the Galactic center. Using the multi-scale and multi-frequency-synthesis (MS-MFS) algorithms in CASA, we have imaged Sgr A with a resolution of 1″, achieving an rms noise of 8 μJy beam{sup −1}, and a dynamic range of 100,000:1. Both previously known and newly identified radio features in this region are revealed, including numerous filamentary sources. The radio continuum image is compared with Chandra X-ray images, with a CN emission-line image obtained with the Submillimeter Array and with detailed Paschen-α images obtained with Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS. We discuss several prominent features in the radio image. The “Sgr A west Wings” extend 2′ (5 pc) from the NW and SE tips of the Sgr A west H ii region (the “Mini-spiral”) to positions located 2.9 and 2.4 arcmin to the northwest and southeast of Sgr A*, respectively. The NW wing, along with several other prominent features, including the previously identified “NW Streamers,” form an elongated radio lobe (NW lobe), oriented nearly perpendicular to the Galactic plane. This radio lobe, with a size of 6.′3 × 3.′2 (14.4 pc × 7.3 pc), has a known X-ray counterpart. In the outer region of the NW lobe, a row of three thermally emitting rings is observed. A field containing numerous amorphous radio blobs extends for a distance of ∼2 arcmin beyond the tip of the SE wing; these newly recognized features coincide with the SE X-ray lobe. Most of the amorphous radio blobs in the NW and SE lobes have Paschen-α counterparts. We propose that they have been produced by shock interaction of ambient gas concentrations with a collimated nuclear wind or an outflow that originated from within the circumnuclear disk (CND). We also discuss the possibility that the ionized

  20. A New Perspective of the Radio Bright Zone at The Galactic Center: Feedback from Nuclear Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun-Hui; Morris, Mark R.; Goss, W. M.

    2016-02-01

    New observations of Sgr A have been carried out with the Jansky VLA in the B and C arrays using the broadband (2 GHz) continuum mode at 5.5 GHz. The field of view covers the central 13‧ (30 pc) region of the radio-bright zone at the Galactic center. Using the multi-scale and multi-frequency-synthesis (MS-MFS) algorithms in CASA, we have imaged Sgr A with a resolution of 1″, achieving an rms noise of 8 μJy beam-1, and a dynamic range of 100,000:1. Both previously known and newly identified radio features in this region are revealed, including numerous filamentary sources. The radio continuum image is compared with Chandra X-ray images, with a CN emission-line image obtained with the Submillimeter Array and with detailed Paschen-α images obtained with Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS. We discuss several prominent features in the radio image. The “Sgr A west Wings” extend 2‧ (5 pc) from the NW and SE tips of the Sgr A west H ii region (the “Mini-spiral”) to positions located 2.9 and 2.4 arcmin to the northwest and southeast of Sgr A*, respectively. The NW wing, along with several other prominent features, including the previously identified “NW Streamers,” form an elongated radio lobe (NW lobe), oriented nearly perpendicular to the Galactic plane. This radio lobe, with a size of 6.‧3 × 3.‧2 (14.4 pc × 7.3 pc), has a known X-ray counterpart. In the outer region of the NW lobe, a row of three thermally emitting rings is observed. A field containing numerous amorphous radio blobs extends for a distance of ˜2 arcmin beyond the tip of the SE wing; these newly recognized features coincide with the SE X-ray lobe. Most of the amorphous radio blobs in the NW and SE lobes have Paschen-α counterparts. We propose that they have been produced by shock interaction of ambient gas concentrations with a collimated nuclear wind or an outflow that originated from within the circumnuclear disk (CND). We also discuss the possibility that the ionized wind or

  1. Shedding Light on the Compton-thick Active Galactic Nucleus in the Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxy UGC 5101 with Broadband X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Saeko; Tanimoto, Atsushi; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Terashima, Yuichi; Ricci, Claudio

    2017-02-01

    We report the broadband X-ray spectra of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) UGC 5101 in the 0.25–100 keV band observed with the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and Chandra. A Compton-thick active galactic nucleus (AGN) obscured with a hydrogen column density of ≈ 1.3× {10}24 cm‑2 is detected above 10 keV. A spectral fit with a numerical torus model favors a large half-opening angle of the torus, > 41°, suggesting that the covering fraction of material heavily obscuring the X-ray source is moderate. The intrinsic 2–10 keV luminosity is determined to be ≈ 1.4× {10}43 erg s‑1, which is ≈ 2.5 times larger than the previous estimate using only data below 10 keV with a simple spectral model. We find that UGC 5101 shows the ratio between the [O iv] 26 μm line and 2–10 keV luminosities similar to those of normal Seyfert galaxies, along with other ULIRGs observed with NuSTAR, indicating that a significant portion of local ULIRGs are not really “X-ray faint” with respect to the flux of forbidden lines originating from the narrow-line region. We propose a possible scenario that (1) the AGN in UGC 5101 is surrounded not only by Compton-thick matter located close to the equatorial plane but also by Compton-thin ({N}{{H}}∼ {10}21 cm‑2) matter in the torus-hole region and (2) it is accreting at a high Eddington rate with a steep UV to X-ray spectral energy distribution. Nevertheless, we argue that AGNs in many ULIRGs do not look extraordinary (i.e., extremely X-ray faint), as suggested by recent works, compared with normal Seyferts.

  2. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS OBSCURATION FROM WINDS: FROM DUSTY INFRARED-DRIVEN TO WARM AND X-RAY PHOTOIONIZED

    PubMed Central

    Dorodnitsyn, A.; Kallman, T.

    2016-01-01

    We present calculations of AGN winds at ~parsec scales, along with the associated obscuration. We take into account the pressure of infrared radiation on dust grains and the interaction of X-rays from a central black hole with hot and cold plasma. Infrared radiation (IR) is incorporated in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations adopting the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We find that in the range of X-ray luminosities L=0.05 – 0.6Ledd, the Compton-thick part of the flow (aka torus) has an opening angle of approximately 72° – 75° regardless of the luminosity. At L ≳ 0.1 the outflowing dusty wind provides the obscuration with IR pressure playing a major role. The global flow consists of two phases: the cold flow at inclinations θ ≳ 70° and a hot, ionized wind of lower density at lower inclinations. The dynamical pressure of the hot wind is important in shaping the denser IR supported flow. At luminosities ≤0.1Ledd episodes of outflow are followed by extended periods when the wind switches to slow accretion. PMID:27642184

  3. X ray timing observations and gravitational physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelson, Peter F.; Wood, Kent S.

    1989-01-01

    Photon-rich x ray observations on bright compact galactic sources will make it possible to detect many fast processes that may occur in these systems on millisecond and submillisecond timescales. Many of these processes are of direct relevance to gravitational physics because they arise in regions of strong gravity near neutron stars and black holes where the dynamical timescales for compact objects of stellar mass are milliseconds. To date, such observations have been limited by the detector area and telemetry rates available. However, instruments such as the proposed X ray Large Array (XLA) would achieve collecting areas of about 100 sq m. This instrument has been described elsewhere (Wood and Michelson 1988) and was the subject of a recent prephase A feasibility study at Marshall Space Flight Center. Observations with an XLA class instrument will directly impact five primary areas of astrophysics research: the attempt to detect gravitational radiation, the study of black holes, the physics of mass accretion onto compact objects, the structure of neutron stars and nuclear matter, and the characterization of dark matter in the universe. Those observations are discussed that are most directly relevant to gravitational physics: the search for millisecond x ray pulsars that are potential sources of continuous gravitational radiation; and the use of x ray timing observations to probe the physical conditions in extreme relativistic regions of space near black holes, both stellar-sized and supermassive.

  4. Clocking femtosecond X rays.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, A L; Fritz, D M; Lee, S H; Bucksbaum, P H; Reis, D A; Rudati, J; Mills, D M; Fuoss, P H; Stephenson, G B; Kao, C C; Siddons, D P; Lowney, D P; Macphee, A G; Weinstein, D; Falcone, R W; Pahl, R; Als-Nielsen, J; Blome, C; Düsterer, S; Ischebeck, R; Schlarb, H; Schulte-Schrepping, H; Tschentscher, Th; Schneider, J; Hignette, O; Sette, F; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Chapman, H N; Lee, R W; Hansen, T N; Synnergren, O; Larsson, J; Techert, S; Sheppard, J; Wark, J S; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; van der Spoel, D; Timneanu, N; Hajdu, J; Akre, R A; Bong, E; Emma, P; Krejcik, P; Arthur, J; Brennan, S; Gaffney, K J; Lindenberg, A M; Luening, K; Hastings, J B

    2005-03-25

    Linear-accelerator-based sources will revolutionize ultrafast x-ray science due to their unprecedented brightness and short pulse duration. However, time-resolved studies at the resolution of the x-ray pulse duration are hampered by the inability to precisely synchronize an external laser to the accelerator. At the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source at the Stanford Linear-Accelerator Center we solved this problem by measuring the arrival time of each high energy electron bunch with electro-optic sampling. This measurement indirectly determined the arrival time of each x-ray pulse relative to an external pump laser pulse with a time resolution of better than 60 fs rms.

  5. CHANDRA X-RAY AND HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING OF OPTICALLY SELECTED KILOPARSEC-SCALE BINARY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. I. NATURE OF THE NUCLEAR IONIZING SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin; Civano, Francesca; Shen, Yue; Green, Paul; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2013-01-10

    Kiloparsec-scale binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) signal active supermassive black hole (SMBH) pairs in merging galaxies. Despite their significance, unambiguously confirmed cases remain scarce and most have been discovered serendipitously. In a previous systematic search, we optically identified four kpc-scale binary AGNs from candidates selected with double-peaked narrow emission lines at z = 0.1-0.2. Here, we present Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging of these four systems. We critically examine and confirm the binary-AGN scenario for two of the four targets, by combining high angular resolution X-ray imaging spectroscopy with Chandra ACIS-S, better nuclear position constraints from WFC3 F105W imaging, and direct starburst estimates from WFC3 F336W imaging; for the other two targets, the existing data are still consistent with the binary-AGN scenario, but we cannot rule out the possibility of only one AGN ionizing gas in both merging galaxies. We find tentative evidence for a systematically smaller X-ray-to-[O III] luminosity ratio and/or higher Compton-thick fraction in optically selected kpc-scale binary AGNs than in single AGNs, possibly caused by a higher nuclear gas column due to mergers and/or a viewing angle bias related to the double-peak narrow-line selection. While our result lends some further support to the general approach of optically identifying kpc-scale binary AGNs, it also highlights the challenge and ambiguity of X-ray confirmation.

  6. High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of a Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nucleus: The Structure and Dynamics of M81*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, A. J.; Nowak, M. A.; Markoff, S.; Marshall, H. L.; Canizares, C. R.

    2007-11-01

    We present Chandra HETGS observations of the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN) of M81. The HETGS is unique in providing high-resolution spectroscopy of the central 1" of M81, including the iron K bandpass. The continuum is a power law of photon index Γ=1.8, similar to that seen in highly luminous AGNs. Highly ionized emission lines, characteristic of gas at temperatures of T=106-108 K, are detected. Many of these thermal lines are velocity broadened, with a FWHM of approximately 1500 km s-1. A separate thermal component is associated with a 2557 km s-1 redshifted Fe XXVI emission line, characteristic of gas at temperatures T=107.4-108 K. Neutral Fe, Ar, and Si Kα fluorescence lines indicate the presence of cold, dense material. The Si Kα fluorescence line is velocity broadened, with a FWHM of 1200 km s-1. If the fluorescence lines are produced by reflection from cold, Compton thick material, then the line strengths are not compatible with solar abundances, instead favoring enhanced Ar and Si abundances with respect to the Fe abundance. The Fe Kα line is narrow, with no evidence of a thin disk extending inside 55rg (where rg=GM/c2 is the gravitational radius for a black hole of mass M). We show that a simple spectral model used to represent the expectations from a radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) describes the X-ray data well, while in a companion paper we will show that jet models with parameters similar to fits of hard state X-ray binaries describe both the X-ray and broadband (radio/optical) spectra. The HETGS spectra we present here offer an unprecedented view of the inner workings of a low-luminosity accretion flow, and thus can quantitatively constrain theoretical accretion flow models of LLAGNs such as M81*.

  7. BROADBAND X-RAY SPECTRA OF TWO LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI NGC 1566 AND NGC 4941 OBSERVED WITH SUZAKU

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamuro, Taiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Tazaki, Fumie; Terashima, Yuichi

    2013-06-20

    We report the first broadband X-ray spectra of the low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs), NGC 1566 (type 1.5) and NGC 4941 (type 2), observed with Suzaku and Swift/BAT covering the 0.5-195 keV band. Both targets have hard X-ray luminosities of {approx}10{sup 41-42} erg s{sup -1} in the 15-55 keV band. The spectra of the nucleus are well reproduced by a sum of partially or fully covered transmitted emission and its reflection from the accretion disk, reprocessed emission from the torus accompanied by a strong narrow iron-K{alpha} line, and a scattered component (for NGC 4941). We do not significantly detect a broad iron-K{alpha} line from the inner accretion disk in both targets, and obtain an upper limit on the corresponding solid angle of {Omega}/2{pi} < 0.3 in NGC 1566. The reflection strength from the torus is moderate, {Omega}/2{pi}=0.45{sup +0.13}{sub -0.10} in NGC 1566 and {Omega}/2{pi}=0.64{sup +0.69}{sub -0.27} in NGC 4941. Comparison of the equivalent width of the narrow iron-K{alpha} line with a model prediction based on a simple torus geometry constrains its half-opening angle to be {theta}{sub oa} {approx_equal} 60 Degree-Sign -70 Degree-Sign in NGC 4941. These results agree with the obscured AGN fraction obtained from hard X-ray and mid-infrared selected samples at similar luminosities. Our results support the implication that the averaged covering fraction of AGN tori is peaked at L {approx} 10{sup 42-43} erg s{sup -1} but decreases toward lower luminosities.

  8. The NuSTAR Extragalactic Surveys: The Number Counts of Active Galactic Nuclei and the Resolved Fraction of the Cosmic X-Ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, F. A.; Aird, J.; Civano, F.; Lansbury, G.; Mullaney, J. R.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Alexander, D. M.; Stern, D.; Ajello, M.; Barret, D.; Bauer, F. E.; Baloković, M.; Brandt, W. N.; Brightman, M.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W. W.; Del Moro, A.; Forster, K.; Gandhi, P.; Giommi, P.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Hickox, R. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Kitaguchi, T.; Koglin, J.; Luo, B.; Madsen, K. K.; Mao, P. H.; Miyasaka, H.; Mori, K.; Perri, M.; Pivovaroff, M.; Puccetti, S.; Rana, V.; Treister, E.; Walton, D.; Westergaard, N. J.; Wik, D.; Zappacosta, L.; Zhang, W. W.; Zoglauer, A.

    2016-11-01

    We present the 3-8 keV and 8-24 keV number counts of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) identified in the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) extragalactic surveys. NuSTAR has now resolved 33%-39% of the X-ray background in the 8-24 keV band, directly identifying AGNs with obscuring columns up to ˜ {10}25 {{cm}}-2. In the softer 3-8 keV band the number counts are in general agreement with those measured by XMM-Newton and Chandra over the flux range 5× {10}-15 ≲ S(3-8 keV)/{erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2 ≲ {10}-12 probed by NuSTAR. In the hard 8-24 keV band NuSTAR probes fluxes over the range 2× {10}-14 ≲ S(8-24 keV)/{erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2 ≲ {10}-12, a factor ˜100 fainter than previous measurements. The 8-24 keV number counts match predictions from AGN population synthesis models, directly confirming the existence of a population of obscured and/or hard X-ray sources inferred from the shape of the integrated cosmic X-ray background. The measured NuSTAR counts lie significantly above simple extrapolation with a Euclidian slope to low flux of the Swift/BAT 15-55 keV number counts measured at higher fluxes (S(15-55 keV) ≳ 10-11 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2), reflecting the evolution of the AGN population between the Swift/BAT local (z\\lt 0.1) sample and NuSTAR’s z˜ 1 sample. CXB synthesis models, which account for AGN evolution, lie above the Swift/BAT measurements, suggesting that they do not fully capture the evolution of obscured AGNs at low redshifts.

  9. Broadband X-Ray Spectra of Two Low-luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei NGC 1566 and NGC 4941 Observed with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamuro, Taiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Tazaki, Fumie; Terashima, Yuichi

    2013-06-01

    We report the first broadband X-ray spectra of the low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs), NGC 1566 (type 1.5) and NGC 4941 (type 2), observed with Suzaku and Swift/BAT covering the 0.5-195 keV band. Both targets have hard X-ray luminosities of ~1041-42 erg s-1 in the 15-55 keV band. The spectra of the nucleus are well reproduced by a sum of partially or fully covered transmitted emission and its reflection from the accretion disk, reprocessed emission from the torus accompanied by a strong narrow iron-Kα line, and a scattered component (for NGC 4941). We do not significantly detect a broad iron-Kα line from the inner accretion disk in both targets, and obtain an upper limit on the corresponding solid angle of Ω/2π < 0.3 in NGC 1566. The reflection strength from the torus is moderate, \\Omega /2\\pi =0.45^{+0.13}_{-0.10} in NGC 1566 and \\Omega /2\\pi =0.64^{+0.69}_{-0.27} in NGC 4941. Comparison of the equivalent width of the narrow iron-Kα line with a model prediction based on a simple torus geometry constrains its half-opening angle to be θoa ~= 60°-70° in NGC 4941. These results agree with the obscured AGN fraction obtained from hard X-ray and mid-infrared selected samples at similar luminosities. Our results support the implication that the averaged covering fraction of AGN tori is peaked at L ~ 1042-43 erg s-1 but decreases toward lower luminosities.

  10. Soft versus hard X-ray emission in active galactic nuclei: partial-covering and warm-plus-cold absorber models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, M. T.; Barcons, X.

    1996-09-01

    We analyse the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) hardness ratio and the 0.5-2-keV to 2-10-keV flux ratio of 65 active galactic nuclei (AGN) for which there are both ROSAT archival observations available and 2-10-keV fluxes, mostly from the HEAO-1 MC-LASS survey. We conclude that the simplest spectral model for the AGN that can accommodate the variety of X-ray colours obtained is a standard power law (with energy spectral index alpha~0.9) plus a ~0.1-keV blackbody, both of which are partially absorbed. In our sample, type 1 AGN require an absorbing column around 10^22 cm^-2 with covering fractions between 20 and 100 per cent, while type 2 AGN display larger columns and ~100 per cent coverage. This simple model also provides a good link between soft and hard AGN X-ray luminosity functions and source counts. We also consider a warm absorber as an alternative model to partial covering and find that the presence of gas in two phases (ionized and neutral) is required.

  11. Revealing the Detailed Structure of the Galactic Core-Collapse Supernova Remnant G292.0+1.8 with X-Ray Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalerao, Jayant; Park, Sangwook; Schenck, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    We present our results on the adaptive-mesh mapping of the chemical composition and thermodynamic parameters of the Galactic core-collapse supernova remnant G292.0+1.8 using our deep Chandra observation. Our maps cover the entire supernova remnant and show the detailed spatial distributions of the metal-rich ejecta, circumstellar medium, and the X-ray pulsar wind nebula-dominated regions. Our results suggest radial and azimuthal variations in the ejecta composition and the thermodynamic parameters, underscoring the rich and complex nature of this text book type supernova remnant. Combining our results from this study and our previous work on the ejecta radial velocity distribution (derived from our Chandra HETG data), we discuss the three dimensional structure of the remnant. Some implications on the nature of the progenitor star and explosion scenarios are discussed.

  12. A physical model for the X-ray time lags of narrow-line Seyfert type 1 active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Emma; Done, Chris

    2014-08-01

    We study the origin of the soft X-ray excess seen in the `simple' narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy PG1244+026 using all available spectral-timing information. This object shows the now ubiquitous switch between soft leading the hard band on long time-scales, to the opposite behaviour on short time-scales. This is interpreted as a combination of intrinsic fluctuations propagating down through the accretion flow giving the soft lead, together with reflection of the hard X-rays giving the soft lag. We build a full model of the spectral and time variability including both propagation and reflection, and compare our model with the observed power spectra, coherence, covariance, lag-frequency and lag-energy spectra. We compare models based on a separate soft excess component with those based on reflection-dominated soft emission. Reflection-dominated spectra have difficulty reproducing the soft lead at low frequency since reflection will always lag. They also suffer from high coherence and nearly identical hard- and soft-band power spectra in disagreement with the observations. This is a direct result of the power-law and reflection components both contributing to the hard and soft energy bands, and the small radii over which the relativistically smeared reflection is produced allowing too much high-frequency power to be transmitted into the soft band. Conversely, we find the separate soft excess models (where the inner disc radius is >6Rg) have difficulty reproducing the soft lag at high frequency, as reflected flux does not contribute enough signal to overwhelm the soft lead. However, reflection should also be accompanied by reprocessing and this should add to the soft excess at low energies. This model can quantitatively reproduce the switch from soft lead to soft lag seen in the data and reproduces well the observed power spectra and other timing features which reflection-dominated models cannot.

  13. Accretion Disk Spectra of the Ultra-luminous X-ray Sources in Nearby Spiral Galaxies and Galactic Superluminal Jet Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor); Ebisawa, Ken; Zycki, Piotr; Kubota, Aya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Watarai, Ken-ya

    2003-01-01

    Ultra-luminous Compact X-ray Sources (ULXs) in nearby spiral galaxies and Galactic superluminal jet sources share the common spectral characteristic that they have unusually high disk temperatures which cannot be explained in the framework of the standard optically thick accretion disk in the Schwarzschild metric. On the other hand, the standard accretion disk around the Kerr black hole might explain the observed high disk temperature, as the inner radius of the Kerr disk gets smaller and the disk temperature can be consequently higher. However, we point out that the observable Kerr disk spectra becomes significantly harder than Schwarzschild disk spectra only when the disk is highly inclined. This is because the emission from the innermost part of the accretion disk is Doppler-boosted for an edge-on Kerr disk, while hardly seen for a face-on disk. The Galactic superluminal jet sources are known to be highly inclined systems, thus their energy spectra may be explained with the standard Kerr disk with known black hole masses. For ULXs, on the other hand, the standard Kerr disk model seems implausible, since it is highly unlikely that their accretion disks are preferentially inclined, and, if edge-on Kerr disk model is applied, the black hole mass becomes unreasonably large (greater than or approximately equal to 300 Solar Mass). Instead, the slim disk (advection dominated optically thick disk) model is likely to explain the observed super- Eddington luminosities, hard energy spectra, and spectral variations of ULXs. We suggest that ULXs are accreting black holes with a few tens of solar mass, which is not unexpected from the standard stellar evolution scenario, and their X-ray emission is from the slim disk shining at super-Eddington luminosities.

  14. NuSTAR OBSERVATIONS OF THE COMPTON-THICK ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS AND ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE CANDIDATE IN NGC 5643

    SciTech Connect

    Annuar, A.; Gandhi, P.; Alexander, D. M.; Lansbury, G. B.; Moro, A. Del; Arévalo, P.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Baloković, M.; Brightman, M.; Harrison, F. A.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Brandt, W. N.; Christensen, F. E.; Hailey, C. J.; Hickox, R. C.; Matt, G.; Puccetti, S.; Ricci, C.; and others

    2015-12-10

    We present two Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observations of the local Seyfert 2 active galactic nucleus (AGN) and an ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) candidate in NGC 5643. Together with archival data from Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Swift-BAT, we perform a high-quality broadband spectral analysis of the AGN over two decades in energy (∼0.5–100 keV). Previous X-ray observations suggested that the AGN is obscured by a Compton-thick (CT) column of obscuring gas along our line of sight. However, the lack of high-quality ≳10 keV observations, together with the presence of a nearby X-ray luminous source, NGC 5643 X–1, have left significant uncertainties in the characterization of the nuclear spectrum. NuSTAR now enables the AGN and NGC 5643 X–1 to be separately resolved above 10 keV for the first time and allows a direct measurement of the absorbing column density toward the nucleus. The new data show that the nucleus is indeed obscured by a CT column of N{sub H} ≳ 5 × 10{sup 24} cm{sup −2}. The range of 2–10 keV absorption-corrected luminosity inferred from the best-fitting models is L{sub 2–10,int} = (0.8–1.7) × 10{sup 42} erg s{sup −1}, consistent with that predicted from multiwavelength intrinsic luminosity indicators. In addition, we also study the NuSTAR data for NGC 5643 X–1 and show that it exhibits evidence of a spectral cutoff at energy E ∼ 10 keV, similar to that seen in other ULXs observed by NuSTAR. Along with the evidence for significant X-ray luminosity variations in the 3–8 keV band from 2003 to 2014, our results further strengthen the ULX classification of NGC 5643 X–1.

  15. Suzaku Observations of Moderately Obscured (Compton-thin) Active Galactic Nuclei Selected by Swift/BAT Hard X-ray Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamuro, Taiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Tazaki, Fumie; Ricci, Claudio; Terashima, Yuichi

    2016-07-01

    We report the results obtained by a systematic, broadband (0.5-150 keV) X-ray spectral analysis of moderately obscured (Compton-thin, 22≤slant {log}{N}{{H}}\\lt 24) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) observed with Suzaku and Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). Our sample consists of 45 local AGNs at z\\lt 0.1 with {log}{L}14-195{keV}\\gt 42 detected in the Swift/BAT 70-month survey, whose Suzaku archival data are available as of 2015 December. All spectra are uniformly fit with a baseline model composed of an absorbed cutoff power-law component, reflected emission accompanied by a narrow fluorescent iron-Kα line from cold matter (torus), and scattered emission. The main results based on the above analysis are as follows. (1) The photon index is correlated with Eddington ratio, but not with luminosity or black hole mass. (2) The ratio of the luminosity of the iron-Kα line to the X-ray luminosity an indicator of the covering fraction of the torus, shows significant anticorrelation with luminosity. (3) The averaged reflection strength derived from stacked spectra above 14 keV is larger in less luminous ({log}{L}10-50{keV}≤slant 43.3, R={1.04}-0.19+0.17) or highly obscured ({log}{N}{{H}}\\gt 23, R={1.03}-0.17+0.15) AGNs than in more luminous ({log}{L}10-50{keV}\\gt 43.3, R={0.46}-0.09+0.08) or lightly obscured ({log}{N}{{H}}≤slant 23, R={0.59}-0.10+0.09) objects. (4) The ratio of the luminosity of the [{{O}} {{IV}}] 25.89 μm line to the X-ray luminosity is significantly smaller in AGNs with lower soft X-ray scattering fractions, suggesting that the former luminosity underestimates the intrinsic power of an AGN buried in a torus of small opening angle.

  16. Advanced X-Ray Timing Array Mission: Conceptual Spacecraft Design Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. C.; Johnson, L.; Thomas, H. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Baysinger, M.; Maples, C. D.; Fabisinski, L.L.; Hornsby, L.; Thompson, K. S.; Miernik, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced X-Ray Timing Array (AXTAR) is a mission concept for submillisecond timing of bright galactic x-ray sources. The two science instruments are the Large Area Timing Array (LATA) (a collimated instrument with 2-50-keV coverage and over 3 square meters of effective area) and a Sky Monitor (SM), which acts as a trigger for pointed observations of x-ray transients. The spacecraft conceptual design team developed two spacecraft concepts that will enable the AXTAR mission: A minimal configuration to be launched on a Taurus II and a larger configuration to be launched on a Falcon 9 or similar vehicle.

  17. Cluster of galaxies & Cosmology - X-ray analysis of fossil group RXJ1720.1+2360

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozada, Monica

    2012-09-01

    We present the results on the X-ray analysis of fossil group of galaxies RXJ1720.1+2360. Fossil Groups are systems associated to extended emission in X-rays with one single central elliptical galaxy surrounded by very faint companions. This unusual lack of bright galaxies in the group is presumably due to galactic cannibalism. In this study we present for the first time the imaging and spectral analysis of the XMM-Newton data of RXJ1720.1+2360. This work is part of a systematic study to determine the X-ray properties of fossil groups.

  18. NON-THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE NORTHWESTERN RIM OF THE GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT G266.2-1.2 (RX J0852.0-4622)

    SciTech Connect

    Pannuti, Thomas G.; Agrawal, Rashika; Allen, Glenn E.; Filipovic, Miroslav D.; De Horta, Ain; Stupar, Milorad E-mail: gea@space.mit.ed E-mail: a.dehorta@uws.edu.a E-mail: agar01@ipfw.ed

    2010-10-01

    We present a detailed spatially resolved spectroscopic analysis of two observations (with a total integration time of 73280 s) made of the X-ray-luminous northwestern rim complex of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G266.2-1.2 (RX J0852.0-4622) with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. G266.2-1.2 is a member of a class of Galactic SNRs which feature X-ray spectra dominated by non-thermal emission: in the cases of these SNRs, the emission is believed to have a synchrotron origin and studies of the X-ray spectra of these SNRs can lend insight into how SNRs accelerate cosmic-ray particles. The Chandra observations have clearly revealed fine structure in this rim complex (including a remarkably well-defined leading shock) and the spectra of these features are dominated by non-thermal emission. We have measured the length scales of the upstream structures at eight positions along the rim and derive lengths of 0.02-0.08 pc (assuming a distance of 750 pc to G266.2-1.2). We have also extracted spectra from seven regions in the rim complex (as sampled by the ACIS-S2, -S3, and -S4 chips) and fit these spectra with such models as a simple power law as well as the synchrotron models SRCUT and SRESC. We have constrained our fits to the latter two models using estimates for the flux densities of these filaments at 1 GHz as determined from radio observations of this rim complex made with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Statistically acceptable fits to all seven regions are derived using each model: differences in the fit parameters (such as photon index and cutoff frequency) are seen in different regions, which may indicate variations in shock conditions and the maximum energies of the cosmic-ray electrons accelerated at each region. Finally, we estimate the maximum energy of cosmic-ray electrons accelerated along this rim complex to be approximately 40 TeV (corresponding to one of the regions of the leading shock structure assuming a magnetic field strength of 10 {mu}G). We

  19. Non-thermal X-ray Emission from the Northwestern Rim of the Galactic Supernova Remnant G266.2-1.2 (RX J0852.0-4622)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannuti, Thomas G.; Allen, Glenn E.; Filipović, Miroslav D.; De Horta, Ain; Stupar, Milorad; Agrawal, Rashika

    2010-10-01

    We present a detailed spatially resolved spectroscopic analysis of two observations (with a total integration time of 73280 s) made of the X-ray-luminous northwestern rim complex of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G266.2-1.2 (RX J0852.0-4622) with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. G266.2-1.2 is a member of a class of Galactic SNRs which feature X-ray spectra dominated by non-thermal emission: in the cases of these SNRs, the emission is believed to have a synchrotron origin and studies of the X-ray spectra of these SNRs can lend insight into how SNRs accelerate cosmic-ray particles. The Chandra observations have clearly revealed fine structure in this rim complex (including a remarkably well-defined leading shock) and the spectra of these features are dominated by non-thermal emission. We have measured the length scales of the upstream structures at eight positions along the rim and derive lengths of 0.02-0.08 pc (assuming a distance of 750 pc to G266.2-1.2). We have also extracted spectra from seven regions in the rim complex (as sampled by the ACIS-S2, -S3, and -S4 chips) and fit these spectra with such models as a simple power law as well as the synchrotron models SRCUT and SRESC. We have constrained our fits to the latter two models using estimates for the flux densities of these filaments at 1 GHz as determined from radio observations of this rim complex made with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Statistically acceptable fits to all seven regions are derived using each model: differences in the fit parameters (such as photon index and cutoff frequency) are seen in different regions, which may indicate variations in shock conditions and the maximum energies of the cosmic-ray electrons accelerated at each region. Finally, we estimate the maximum energy of cosmic-ray electrons accelerated along this rim complex to be approximately 40 TeV (corresponding to one of the regions of the leading shock structure assuming a magnetic field strength of 10 μG). We

  20. Jets, hotspots and lobes: what X-ray observations tell us about extra-galactic radio sources.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, Martin J

    2005-12-15

    The brightest and most numerous discrete radio sources in the sky, radio galaxies and quasars, are powered by twin jets of plasma which emerge at relativistic speeds from very small regions at the centre of large elliptical galaxies, powered by mass infall on to supermassive black holes. The jets can carry material out to very large distances (millions of light years) where it forms balloon-like lobes. Until recently it has been impossible to make definite statements about the energy or the nature of the matter supplied by the jets, or the dynamics of the lobes as they expand into the external medium. This has meant that crucial questions about the generation of radio sources and their effect on their environment have gone unanswered. The situation has been revolutionized by the launch at the start of this decade of a new generation of X-ray observatories, Chandra and XMM-Newton. In this article, I explain why observations with these instruments have made such a difference, what we have learned as a result and why the community remains divided on some important features of the interpretation of the data.

  1. Galaxies in X-Ray Selected Clusters and Groups in Dark Energy Survey Data. I. Stellar Mass Growth of Bright Central Galaxies since z~1.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Miller, C.; McKay, T.; Rooney, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Romer, A. K.; Perfecto, R.; Song, J.; Desai, S.; Mohr, J.; Wilcox, H.; Bermeo-Hernandez, A.; Jeltema, T.; Hollowood, D.; Bacon, D.; Capozzi, D.; Collins, C.; Das, R.; Gerdes, D.; Hennig, C.; Hilton, M.; Hoyle, B.; Kay, S.; Liddle, A.; Mann, R. G.; Mehrtens, N.; Nichol, R. C.; Papovich, C.; Sahlén, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Stott, J.; Viana, P. T.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Banerji, M.; Bauer, A. H.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Castander, F. J.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Cunha, C. E.; Eifler, T. F.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, Paul; Miquel, R.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla, I.; Smith, R. C.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tucker, D.; Vikram, V.; da Costa, L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Using the science verification data of the Dark Energy Survey for a new sample of 106 X-ray selected clusters and groups, we study the stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies (BCGs) since redshift z ~ 1.2. Compared with the expectation in a semi-analytical model applied to the Millennium Simulation, the observed BCGs become under-massive/under-luminous with decreasing redshift. We incorporate the uncertainties associated with cluster mass, redshift, and BCG stellar mass measurements into an analysis of a redshift-dependent BCG-cluster mass relation, m*∝ (M200/{1.5×10}14M⊙})0.24+/-0.08 (1+z)-0.19+/- 0.34, and compare the observed relation to the model prediction. We estimate the average growth rate since z = 1.0 for BCGs hosted by clusters of M200,z = 1013.8 M⊙ at z = 1.0: m*,BCG appears to have grown by 0.13 ± 0.11 dex, in tension at the ˜2.5σ significance level with the 0.40 dex growth rate expected from the semi-analytic model. We show that the build-up of extended intracluster light after z = 1.0 may alleviate this tension in BCG growth rates.

  2. Extended hard-X-ray emission in the inner few parsecs of the Galaxy.

    PubMed

    Perez, Kerstin; Hailey, Charles J; Bauer, Franz E; Krivonos, Roman A; Mori, Kaya; Baganoff, Frederick K; Barrière, Nicolas M; Boggs, Steven E; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Grefenstette, Brian W; Grindlay, Jonathan E; Harrison, Fiona A; Hong, Jaesub; Madsen, Kristin K; Nynka, Melania; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A; Wik, Daniel R; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, William W; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2015-04-30

    The Galactic Centre hosts a puzzling stellar population in its inner few parsecs, with a high abundance of surprisingly young, relatively massive stars bound within the deep potential well of the central supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A* (ref. 1). Previous studies suggest that the population of objects emitting soft X-rays (less than 10 kiloelectronvolts) within the surrounding hundreds of parsecs, as well as the population responsible for unresolved X-ray emission extending along the Galactic plane, is dominated by accreting white dwarf systems. Observations of diffuse hard-X-ray (more than 10 kiloelectronvolts) emission in the inner 10 parsecs, however, have been hampered by the limited spatial resolution of previous instruments. Here we report the presence of a distinct hard-X-ray component within the central 4 × 8 parsecs, as revealed by subarcminute-resolution images in the 20-40 kiloelectronvolt range. This emission is more sharply peaked towards the Galactic Centre than is the surface brightness of the soft-X-ray population. This could indicate a significantly more massive population of accreting white dwarfs, large populations of low-mass X-ray binaries or millisecond pulsars, or particle outflows interacting with the surrounding radiation field, dense molecular material or magnetic fields. However, all these interpretations pose significant challenges to our understanding of stellar evolution, binary formation, and cosmic-ray production in the Galactic Centre.

  3. A Chandra Observation of the Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxy IRAS 19254-7245 (The Superantennae): X-Ray Emission from the Compton-Thick Active Galactic Nucleus and the Diffuse Starburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jia, Jianjun; Ptak, Andrew; Heckman, Timothy M.; Braito, Valentina; Reeves, James

    2012-01-01

    We present a Chandra observation of IRAS 19254-7245, a nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxy also known as the Superantennae. The high spatial resolution of Chandra allows us to disentangle for the first time the diffuse starburst (SB) emission from the embedded Compton-thick active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the southern nucleus. No AGN activity is detected in the northern nucleus. The 2-10 keV spectrum of the AGN emission is fitted by a flat power law (TAU = 1.3) and an He-like Fe Kalpha line with equivalent width 1.5 keV, consistent with previous observations. The Fe K line profile could be resolved as a blend of a neutral 6.4 keV line and an ionized 6.7 keV (He-like) or 6.9 keV (H-like) line. Variability of the neutral line is detected compared with the previous XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations, demonstrating the compact size of the iron line emission. The spectrum of the galaxy-scale extended emission excluding the AGN and other bright point sources is fitted with a thermal component with a best-fit kT of approximately 0.8 keV. The 2-10 keV luminosity of the extended emission is about one order of magnitude lower than that of the AGN. The basic physical and structural properties of the extended emission are fully consistent with a galactic wind being driven by the SB. A candidate ultraluminous X-ray source is detected 8 south of the southern nucleus. The 0.3 - 10 keV luminosity of this off-nuclear point source is approximately 6 x 10(exp 40) erg per second if the emission is isotropic and the source is associated with the Superantennae.

  4. A Chandra Observation of the Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxy IRAS 19254-7245 (THE SUPERANTENNAE): X-Ray Emission From the Compton-Thick Active Galactic Nucleus and the Diffuse Starburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jia, Jianjun; Ptak, Andrew Francis; Heckman, Timothy M.; Braito, Valantina; Reeves, James

    2012-01-01

    We present a Chandra observation of IRAS 19254-7245, a nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxy also known as the Superantennae. The high spatial resolution of Chandra allows us to disentangle for the first time the diffuse starburst (SB) emission from the embedded Compton-thick active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the southern nucleus. No AGN activity is detected in the northern nucleus. The 2-10 keV spectrum of the AGN emission is fitted by a flat power law (G = 1.3) and an He-like Fe Ka line with equivalent width 1.5 keV, consistent with previous observations. The Fe Ka line profile could be resolved as a blend of a neutral 6.4 keV line and an ionized 6.7 keV (He-like) or 6.9 keV (H-like) line. Variability of the neutral line is detected compared with the previous XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations, demonstrating the compact size of the iron line emission. The spectrum of the galaxy-scale extended emission excluding the AGN and other bright point sources is fitted with a thermal component with a best-fit kT of 0.8 keV. The 2-10 keV luminosity of the extended emission is about one order of magnitude lower than that of the AGN. The basic physical and structural properties of the extended emission are fully consistent with a galactic wind being driven by the SB. A candidate ultraluminous X-ray source is detected 8 south of the southern nucleus. The 0.3-10 keV luminosity of this off-nuclear point source is 6 × 1040 erg s-1 if the emission is isotropic and the source is associated with the Superantennae.

  5. X-Ray Kinematics of the Galactic Core-Collapse Supernova Remnant G292.0+1.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sangwook; Bhalerao, J.; Dewey, D.; Hughes, J. P.; Slane, P. O.; Burrows, D. N.; Lee, J.; Mori, K.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the results from the preliminary analysis of our 120 ks Chandra HETGS observation of the Galactic core-collapse supernova remnant (SNR) G292.0+1.8. To probe the 3D distribution of the metal-rich ejecta features, we measured Doppler shifts in emission lines from ejecta knots projected at a range of distances from the SNR center using high resolution HETGS spectroscopy. We estimate radial velocities of v ~ -2200 - +1300 km/s. Their overall distribution in the velocity-position space suggests an expanding shell of ejecta. We qualitatively estimate the locations of the reverse shock and contact discontinuity based on this distribution. The reverse shock in G292.0+1.8 appears to be at ~130" from the SNR center, which is close to the outer boundary of the radio pulsar wind nebula.

  6. Radiative efficiency of hot accretion flow and the radio/X-ray correlation in X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Fu-Guo

    2016-02-01

    Significant progresses have been made since the discovery of hot accretion flow, a theory successfully applied to the low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs) and black hole (BH) X-ray binaries (BHBs) in their hard states. Motivated by these updates, we re-investigate the radiative efficiency of hot accretion flow. We find that, the brightest regime of hot accretion flow shows a distinctive property, i.e. it has a constant efficiency independent of accretion rates, similar to the standard thin disk. For less bright regime, the efficiency has a steep positive correlation with the accretion rate, while for faint regime typical of advection-dominated accretion flow, the correlation is shadower. This result can naturally explain the observed two distinctive correlations between radio and X-ray luminosities in black hole X-ray binaries. The key difference in systems with distinctive correlations could be the viscous parameter, which determines the critical luminosity of different accretion modes.

  7. Chandra X-Ray and Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Optically Selected Kiloparsec-scale Binary Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Host Galaxy Morphology and AGN Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, Jinyi; Liu, Xin; Ho, Luis C.; Shen, Yue; Peng, Chien Y.; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2016-05-01

    Binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) provide clues to how gas-rich mergers trigger and fuel AGNs and how supermassive black hole (SMBH) pairs evolve in a gas-rich environment. While significant effort has been invested in their identification, the detailed properties of binary AGNs and their host galaxies are still poorly constrained. In a companion paper, we examined the nature of ionizing sources in the double nuclei of four kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs with redshifts between 0.1 and 0.2. Here, we present their host galaxy morphology based on F336W (U-band) and F105W (Y-band) images taken by the Wide Field Camera 3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. Our targets have double-peaked narrow emission lines and were confirmed to host binary AGNs with follow-up observations. We find that kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs occur in galaxy mergers with diverse morphological types. There are three major mergers with intermediate morphologies and a minor merger with a dominant disk component. We estimate the masses of the SMBHs from their host bulge stellar masses and obtain Eddington ratios for each AGN. Compared with a representative control sample drawn at the same redshift and stellar mass, the AGN luminosities and Eddington ratios of our binary AGNs are similar to those of single AGNs. The U - Y color maps indicate that clumpy star-forming regions could significantly affect the X-ray detection of binary AGNs, e.g., the hardness ratio. Considering the weak X-ray emission in AGNs triggered in merger systems, we suggest that samples of X-ray-selected AGNs may be biased against gas-rich mergers. Based, in part, on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program number GO 12363.

  8. Surprise Discovery of an X-Ray Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Accreting, supermassive black holes that reside at galactic centers can power enormous jets, bright enough to be observed from vast distances away. The recent discovery of such a jet in X-ray wavelengths, without an apparent radio counterpart, has interesting implications for our understanding of how these distant behemoths shine.An Excess of X-RaysQuasar B3 0727+409 was serendipitously discovered to host an X-ray jet when a group of scientists, led by Aurora Simionescu (Institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency), was examining Chandra observations of another object.The Chandra data reveal bright, compact, extended emission from the core of quasar B3 0727+409, with a projected length of ~100 kpc. There also appears to be further X-ray emission at a distance of ~280 kpc, which Simionescu and collaborators speculate may be the terminal hotspot of the jet.The quasar is located at a redshift of z=2.5 which makes this jet one of only a few high-redshift X-ray jets known to date. But what makes it especially intriguing is that, though the authors searched through both recent and archival radio observations of the quasar, the only radio counterpart they could find was a small feature close to the quasar core (which may be a knot in the jet). Unlike what is typical of quasar jets, there was no significant additional radio emission coinciding with the rest of the X-ray jet.Making Jets ShineX-ray-to-radio flux ratio vs. redshift, for X-ray quasar jets detected with Chandra. B3 0727+409 is shown in red (with and without the radio knot). The curves represent inverse-Compton scattering models with different magnetic field strengths. [Simionescu et al. 2016]What does this mean? To answer this, we must consider one of the outstanding questions about quasar jets: what radiation processes dominate their emission? One process possibly contributing to the X-ray emission is inverse-Compton scattering of low-energy cosmic microwave

  9. Final Report on DTRA Basic Research Project #BRCALL08-Per3-C-2-0006 "High-Z Non-Equilibrium Physics and Bright X-ray Sources with New Laser Targets"

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, Jeffrey D.

    2016-06-01

    This project had two major goals. Final Goal: obtain spectrally resolved, absolutely calibrated x-ray emission data from uniquely uniform mm-scale near-critical-density high-Z plasmas not in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) to benchmark modern detailed atomic physics models. Scientific significance: advance understanding of non-LTE atomic physics. Intermediate Goal: develop new nano-fabrication techniques to make suitable laser targets that form the required highly uniform non-LTE plasmas when illuminated by high-intensity laser light. Scientific significance: advance understanding of nano-science. The new knowledge will allow us to make x-ray sources that are bright at the photon energies of most interest for testing radiation hardening technologies, the spectral energy range where current x-ray sources are weak. All project goals were met.

  10. The NuSTAR X-ray spectrum of the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus in NGC 7213

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursini, F.; Marinucci, A.; Matt, G.; Bianchi, S.; Tortosa, A.; Stern, D.; Arévalo, P.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Bauer, F. E.; Fabian, A. C.; Harrison, F. A.; Lohfink, A. M.; Reynolds, C. S.; Walton, D. J.

    2015-09-01

    We present an analysis of the 3-79 keV NuSTAR spectrum of the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus NGC 7213. In agreement with past observations, we find a lower limit to the high-energy cut-off of Ec > 140 keV, no evidence for a Compton-reflected continuum and the presence of an iron K α complex, possibly produced in the broad-line region. From the application of the MYTORUS model, we find that the line-emitting material is consistent with the absence of a significant Compton reflection if arising from a Compton-thin torus of gas with a column density of 5.0^{+2.0}_{-1.6}× 10^{23} cm-2. We report variability of the equivalent width of the iron lines on the time-scale of years using archival observations from XMM-Newton, Chandra and Suzaku. This analysis suggests a possible contribution from dusty gas. A fit with a Comptonization model indicates the presence of a hot corona with a temperature kTe > 40 keV and an optical depth τ ≲ 1, assuming a spherical geometry.

  11. Optically bright active galactic nuclei in the ROSAT-Faint source catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véron-Cetty, M.-P.; Balayan, S. K.; Mickaelian, A. M.; Mujica, R.; Chavushyan, V.; Hakopian, S. A.; Engels, D.; Véron, P.; Zickgraf, F.-J.; Voges, W.; Xu, D.-W.

    2004-02-01

    To build a large, optically bright, X-ray selected AGN sample we have correlated the ROSAT-FSC catalogue of X-ray sources with the USNO catalogue limited to objects brighter than O=16.5 and then with the APS database. Each of the 3212 coincidences was classified using the slitless Hamburg spectra. 493 objects were found to be extended and 2719 starlike. Using both the extended objects and the galaxies known from published catalogues we built up a sample of 185 galaxies with O_APS<17.0 mag, which are high-probability counterparts of RASS-FSC X-ray sources. 130 galaxies have a redshift from the literature and for another 34 we obtained new spectra. The fraction of Seyfert galaxies in this sample is 20%. To select a corresponding sample of 144 high-probability counterparts among the starlike sources we searched for very blue objects in an APS-based color-magnitude diagram. Forty-one were already known AGN and for another 91 objects we obtained new spectra, yielding 42 new AGN, increasing their number in the sample to 83. This confirms that surveys of bright QSOs are still significantly incomplete. On the other hand we find that, at a flux limit of 0.02 count s-1 and at this magnitude, only 40% of all QSOs are detected by ROSAT. Tables 2, 3 and 4 are only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  12. A measurement of interstellar polarization and an estimation of Galactic extinction for the direction of the X-ray black hole binary V404 Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Kawabata, Koji S.; Uemura, Makoto; Watanabe, Makoto; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Kanda, Yuka; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Moritani, Yuki; Nakaoka, Tatsuya; Kawabata, Miho; Shiki, Kensei; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Oasa, Yumiko; Takahashi, Jun

    2017-02-01

    V404 Cygni is a well-known candidate for the black hole binary thought to have relativistic jets. It showed extreme outbursts in 2015 June, characterized by a large amplitude and short time variation of flux in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. Not only disk emission but also synchrotron radiation from the relativistic jets was suggested by radio observations. However, it is difficult to measure the accurate spectral shape in the optical/near-infrared band because there are uncertainties of interstellar extinction. To estimate the extinction value for V404 Cygni, we performed photopolarimetric and spectroscopic observations of V404 Cygni and nearby field stars. Here, we estimate the Galactic extinction using interstellar polarization based on the observation that the origin of the optical polarization is the interstellar medium, and investigate the properties of interstellar polarization around V404 Cygni. We found a good correlation between the color excess and polarization degree in the field stars. We also confirmed that the wavelength dependence of the polarization degree in the highly polarized field stars was similar to that of V404 Cygni. Using the highly polarized field stars, we estimated the color excess for the (B - V) color and the extinction in the V band to be E(B - V) = 1.2 ± 0.2 and 3.0 < A(V) < 3.6, respectively. A tendency for a bluer peak of polarization (λmax < 5500 Å) was commonly seen in the highly polarized field stars, suggesting that the dust grains toward this region are generally smaller than the Galactic average. The corrected spectral energy distribution of V404 Cygni in the near-infrared and optical bands in our results indicated a spectral break between 2.5 × 1014 Hz and 3.7 × 1014 Hz, which might originate in the synchrotron self-absorption.

  13. Chandra X-Ray Observations of the Hydra A Cluster: An Interaction between the Radio Source and the X-Ray-emitting Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, B. R.; Wise, M.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; David, L. P.; Sarazin, C. L.; Bautz, M.; Markevitch, M.; Vikhlinin, A.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.; Harris, D. E.

    2000-05-01

    We present Chandra X-ray observations of the Hydra A cluster of galaxies, and we report the discovery of structure in the central 80 kpc of the cluster's X-ray-emitting gas. The most remarkable structures are depressions in the X-ray surface brightness, ~25-35 kpc in diameter, that are coincident with Hydra A's radio lobes. The depressions are nearly devoid of X-ray-emitting gas, and there is no evidence for shock-heated gas surrounding the radio lobes. We suggest that the gas within the surface brightness depressions was displaced as the radio lobes expanded subsonically, leaving cavities in the hot atmosphere. The gas temperature declines from 4 keV at 70 kpc to 3 keV in the inner 20 kpc of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), and the cooling time of the gas is ~600 Myr in the inner 10 kpc. These properties are consistent with the presence of an ~34 Msolar yr-1 cooling flow within a 70 kpc radius. Bright X-ray emission is present in the BCG surrounding a recently accreted disk of nebular emission and young stars. The star formation rate is commensurate with the cooling rate of the hot gas within the volume of the disk, although the sink for the material that may be cooling at larger radii remains elusive. A bright, unresolved X-ray source is present in the BCG's nucleus, coincident with the radio core. Its X-ray spectrum is consistent with a power law absorbed by a foreground NH~=4×1022 cm-2 column of hydrogen. This column is roughly consistent with the hydrogen column seen in absorption toward the <~24 pc diameter VLBA radio source. Apart from the point source, no evidence for excess X-ray absorption above the Galactic column is found.

  14. AN X-RAY SPECTRAL MODEL OF REPROCESSING BY SMOOTH AND CLUMPY MOLECULAR TORI IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI WITH THE MONACO FRAMEWORK

    SciTech Connect

    Furui, Shun’ya; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Ohno, Masanori; Hayashi, Kazuma; Odaka, Hirokazu; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro

    2016-02-20

    We construct an X-ray spectral model of reprocessing by a torus in an active galactic nucleus (AGN) with the Monte Carlo simulation framework MONACO. Two torus geometries of smooth and clumpy cases are considered and compared. In order to reproduce a Compton shoulder accurately, MONACO includes not only free electron scattering but also bound electron scattering. Raman and Rayleigh scattering are also treated, and scattering cross sections dependent on chemical states of hydrogen and helium are included. Doppler broadening by turbulence velocity can be implemented. Our model gives results consistent with other available models, such as MYTorus, except for differences due to different physical parameters and assumptions. We studied the dependence on torus parameters for a Compton shoulder, and found that a intensity ratio of a Compton shoulder to the line core mainly depends on column density, inclination angle, and metal abundance. For instance, an increase of metal abundance makes a Compton shoulder relatively weak. Also, the shape of a Compton shoulder depends on the column density. Furthermore, these dependences become different between smooth and clumpy cases. Then, we discuss the possibility of ASTRO-H/SXS spectroscopy of Compton shoulders in AGN reflection spectra.

  15. Constraining MHD Disk-Winds with X-ray Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Tombesi, F.; Shrader, C. R.; Kazanas, D.; Contopoulos, J.; Behar, E.

    2014-01-01

    From the state-of-the-art spectroscopic observations of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) the robust features of absorption lines (e.g. most notably by H/He-like ions), called warm absorbers (WAs), have been often detected in soft X-rays (< 2 keV). While the identified WAs are often mildly blueshifted to yield line-of-sight velocities up to ~100-3,000 km/sec in typical X-ray-bright Seyfert 1 AGNs, a fraction of Seyfert galaxies such as PG 1211+143 exhibits even faster absorbers (v/ 0.1-0.2) called ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) whose physical condition is much more extreme compared with the WAs. Motivated by these recent X-ray data we show that the magnetically- driven accretion-disk wind model is a plausible scenario to explain the characteristic property of these X-ray absorbers. As a preliminary case study we demonstrate that the wind model parameters (e.g. viewing angle and wind density) can be constrained by data from PG 1211+143 at a statistically significant level with chi-squared spectral analysis. Our wind models can thus be implemented into the standard analysis package, XSPEC, as a table spectrum model for general analysis of X-ray absorbers.

  16. Lobster-Eye X-Ray Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Hudec, R.; Pina, L.; Marsikova, V.; Inneman, A.

    2010-07-15

    We report on technical and astrophysical aspects of Lobster-Eye wide-field X-ray telescopes expected to monitor the sky with high sensitivity and angular resolution of order of 1 arcmin. They will contribute essentially to study of various astrophysical objects such as AGN, SNe, Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), X-ray flashes (XRFs), galactic binary sources, stars, CVs, X-ray novae, various transient sources, etc.

  17. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE KINETIC POWER AND BOLOMETRIC LUMINOSITY OF JETS: LIMITATION FROM BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES, ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI, AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Renyi; Hou, Shujin; Xie, Fu-Guo E-mail: fgxie@shao.ac.cn

    2014-01-01

    The correlation between the kinetic power P {sub jet} and intrinsic bolometric luminosity L {sub jet} of jets may reveal the underlying jet physics in various black hole systems. Based on the recent work by Nemmen et al., we re-investigate this correlation with additional sources of black hole X-ray binaries (BXBs) in hard/quiescent states and low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). The new sample includes 29 sets of data from 7 BXBs and 20 LLAGNs, with P {sub jet} and L {sub jet} being derived from spectral modeling of the quasi-simultaneous multi-band spectra under the accretion jet scenario. Compared to previous works, the range of luminosity is now enlarged to more than 20 decades, i.e., from ∼10{sup 31} erg s{sup –1} to ∼10{sup 52} erg s{sup –1}, which allows for better constraining of the correlation. One notable result is that the jets in BXBs and LLAGNs almost follow the same P {sub jet}-L {sub jet} correlation that was obtained from blazars and gamma-ray bursts. The slope indices we derived are 1.03 ± 0.01 for the whole sample, 0.85 ± 0.06 for the BXB subsample, 0.71 ± 0.11 for the LLAGN subsample, and 1.01 ± 0.05 for the LLAGN-blazar subsample, respectively. The correlation index around unit implies the independence of jet efficiency on the luminosity or kinetic power. Our results may further support the hypothesis that similar physical processes exist in the jets of various black hole systems.

  18. The host galaxies of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei to z = 2.5: Structure, star formation, and their relationships from CANDELS and Herschel/PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario, D. J.; McIntosh, D. H.; van der Wel, A.; Kartaltepe, J.; Lang, P.; Santini, P.; Wuyts, S.; Lutz, D.; Rafelski, M.; Villforth, C.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Bell, E. F.; Berta, S.; Brandt, W. N.; Conselice, C. J.; Dekel, A.; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Genzel, R.; Grogin, N. A.; Kocevski, D. D.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Koo, D. C.; Lotz, J. M.; Magnelli, B.; Maiolino, R.; Mozena, M.; Mullaney, J. R.; Papovich, C. J.; Popesso, P.; Tacconi, L. J.; Trump, J. R.; Avadhuta, S.; Bassett, R.; Bell, A.; Bernyk, M.; Bournaud, F.; Cassata, P.; Cheung, E.; Croton, D.; Donley, J.; DeGroot, L.; Guedes, J.; Hathi, N.; Herrington, J.; Hilton, M.; Lai, K.; Lani, C.; Martig, M.; McGrath, E.; Mutch, S.; Mortlock, A.; McPartland, C.; O'Leary, E.; Peth, M.; Pillepich, A.; Poole, G.; Snyder, D.; Straughn, A.; Telford, O.; Tonini, C.; Wandro, P.

    2015-01-01

    We study the relationship between the structure and star formation rate (SFR) of X-ray selected low and moderate luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the two Chandra Deep Fields, using Hubble Space Telescope imaging from the Cosmic Assembly Near Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and deep far-infrared maps from the PEP+GOODS-Herschel survey. We derive detailed distributions of structural parameters and FIR luminosities from carefully constructed control samples of galaxies, which we then compare to those of the AGNs. At z ~ 1, AGNs show slightly diskier light profiles than massive inactive (non-AGN) galaxies, as well as modestly higher levels of gross galaxy disturbance (as measured by visual signatures of interactions and clumpy structure). In contrast, at z ~ 2, AGNs show similar levels of galaxy disturbance as inactive galaxies, but display a red central light enhancement, which may arise from a more pronounced bulge in AGN hosts or extinguished nuclear light. We undertake a number of tests of both these alternatives, but our results do not strongly favor one interpretation over the other. The mean SFR and its distribution among AGNs and inactive galaxies are similar at z> 1.5. At z< 1, however, clear and significant enhancements are seen in the SFRs of AGNs with bulge-dominated light profiles. These trends suggest an evolution in the relation between nuclear activity and host properties with redshift, towards a minor role for mergers and interactions at z> 1.5. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Beryllium and boron constraints on an early Galactic bright phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Brian D.; Schramm, David N.; Truran, James W.

    1993-01-01

    The recent observations of Be and B in metal-deficient halo dwarfs are used to constrain a 'bright phase' of enhanced cosmic-ray flux in the early Galaxy. Assuming that this Be and B arises from cosmic-ray spallation in the early Galaxy, limits are placed on the intensity of the early (Population II) cosmic-ray flux relative to the present (Population I) flux. A simple estimate of bounds on the flux ratio is 1 - 40. This upper bound would restrict galaxies like our own from producing neutrino fluxes that would be detectable in any currently proposed detectors. It is found that the relative enhancement of the early flux varies inversely with the relative time of enhancement. It is noted that associated gamma-ray production via pp - pi sup 0 pp may be a significant contribution to the gamma-ray background above 100 MeV.

  20. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  1. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  2. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  3. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  4. Astronomers Go Behind The Milky Way To Solve X-Ray Mystery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    Through layers of gas and dust that stretch for more than 30,000 light years, astronomers using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have taken a long, hard look at the plane of the Milky Way galaxy and found that its X-ray glow comes from hot and diffuse gas. The findings, published in the August 10 issue of Science, help to settle a long-standing mystery about the source of the X-ray emission from the galactic plane. Scientists have debated whether the Milky Way plane's X-ray emission was diffuse light or from individual stars. Armed with Chandra, an international team led Dr. Ken Ebisawa of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD zoomed in on a tiny region of the galactic plane in the constellation Scutum. "The point sources we saw in the galactic plane were actually active galaxies with bright cores millions of light years behind our galaxy," said Ebisawa. "The number of these sources is consistent with the expected number of extragalactic sources in the background sky. We saw few additional point sources within our Galaxy." The observation marks the deepest X-ray look at the so-called "zone of avoidance" -- a region of space behind which no optical observation has ever been taken because thick dust and gas in the spiral arms of the Milky Way galaxy block out visible radiation. Infrared, radio, and X-rays, however, can penetrate this dust and gas. Detection of diffuse X rays emanating from the Galactic plane, what we call the "Milky Way" in visible light, indicates the presence of plasma gas with temperatures of tens of millions of degrees Celsius. Smoothed X-ray Image of the Galactic Plane Smoothed X-ray Image of the Galactic Plane Gas this hot would escape the gravitational confines of the Milky Way galaxy under normal circumstances. The fact that it still lingers within the Galactic plane is the next mystery to solve. One possibility, suggested by Ebisawa is that hot plasma may be confined to the Milky Way by magnetic fields. The Chandra observation

  5. Waiting in the Wings: Reflected X-ray Emission from the Homunculus Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Gull, T.; Davidson, K.; Petre, R.; Hillier, D. J.; Smith, N.; Damineli, A.; Morse, J. A.; Walborn, N. R.

    2004-01-01

    We report the first detection of X-ray emission associated with the Homunculus Nebula which surrounds the supermassive star eta Carinae. The emission is characterized by a temperature in excess of 100 MK, and is consistent with scattering of the time-delayed X-ray flux associated with the star. The nebular emission is bright in the northwestern lobe and near the central regions of the Homunculus, and fainter in the southeastern lobe. We also report the detection of an unusually broad Fe K fluorescent line, which may indicate fluorescent scattering off the wind of a companion star or some other high velocity outflow. The X-ray Homunculus is the nearest member of the small class of Galactic X-ray reflection nebulae, and the only one in which both the emitting and reflecting sources are distinguishable.

  6. Optically Levitated Targets as a Source for High Brightness X-rays and a Platform for Mass-Limited Laser-interaction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giltrap, Samuel; Stuart, Nick; Robinson, Tim; Armstrong, Chris; Hicks, George; Eardley, Sam; Gumbrell, Ed; Smith, Roland

    2016-10-01

    Here we report on the development of an optical levitation based x-ray and proton source, motivated by the requirement for a debris free, high spatial resolution, and low EMP source for x-ray radiography and proton production. Research at Imperial College has led to the development of a feedback controlled optical levitation trap which is capable of holding both solid (Glass beads) and liquid (silicon based oil) micro-targets ( 3-10um). The optical levitation trap has been successfully fielded in a high-intensity laser interaction experiment at Imperial College London and at the Vulcan Petawatt Laser system at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). Here we report on the results from that RAL run including; an x-ray source size of 10-15um with very good spherical symmetry when compared to wire targets, secondly very low EMP signal from isolated levitated targets (9 times less RF signal than a comparable wire target). At Imperial College we were also able to record an x-ray energy spectrum which produced an electron temperature of 0.48KeV, and performed interferometry of a shock evolving into a blast wave off an optically levitated droplet which allowed us to infer the electron density within the shock front.

  7. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li{sup +} ion beam-driven hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for inertial confinement fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li{sup +} ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The unfold operator (UFO) code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time-resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. The UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies ({le}100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time{endash}history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li{sup +} ion beam-driven hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J.

    1996-07-01

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for Inertial Confinement Fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li{sup +} ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The UFO unfold code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time- resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies ({le} 100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time-history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum.

  9. A Correlation between the Intrinsic Brightness and Average Decay Rate of Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Afterglow Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racusin, J. L.; Oates, S. R.; de Pasquale, M.; Kocevski, D.

    2016-07-01

    We present a correlation between the average temporal decay ({α }{{X},{avg},\\gt 200{{s}}}) and early-time luminosity ({L}{{X},200{{s}}}) of X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts as observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. Both quantities are measured relative to a rest-frame time of 200 s after the γ-ray trigger. The luminosity-average decay correlation does not depend on specific temporal behavior and contains one scale-independent quantity minimizing the role of selection effects. This is a complementary correlation to that discovered by Oates et al. in the optical light curves observed by the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope. The correlation indicates that, on average, more luminous X-ray afterglows decay faster than less luminous ones, indicating some relative mechanism for energy dissipation. The X-ray and optical correlations are entirely consistent once corrections are applied and contamination is removed. We explore the possible biases introduced by different light-curve morphologies and observational selection effects, and how either geometrical effects or intrinsic properties of the central engine and jet could explain the observed correlation.

  10. Weak soft X-ray excesses need not result from the high-frequency tail of the optical/ultraviolet bump in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czerny, Bozena; Zycki, Piotr T.

    1994-01-01

    The broad-band ROSAT/EXOSAT X-ray spectra of six Seyfert 1 galaxies are fitted by a model consisting of a direct power law and a component due to reflection/reprocessing from a partially ionized, optically thick medium. The reflected spectrum contains emission features from various elements in the soft X-ray range. In all objects but one (Mrk 335), the fit is satisfactory, and no additional soft X-ray excess is required by the data. This means that in most sources there is no need for the thermal 'big blue bumps' to extend into soft X-rays, and the soft X-ray excesses reported previously can be explained by reflection/reprocessing. Satisfactory fits are obtained for a medium ionized by a source radiating at less than or approximately 15% of the Eddington rate. The fits require that the reflection is enhanced relative to an isotropically emitting source above a flat disk. The necessary high effectiveness of reflection in the soft X-ray band requires strong soft thermal flux dominating over hard X-rays.

  11. Applications of soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C.H.

    1993-08-01

    The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft x-ray lasers provide unique advantages for novel applications. Imaging of biological specimens using x-ray lasers has been demonstrated by several groups. Other applications to fields such as chemistry, material science, plasma diagnostics, and lithography are beginning to emerge. We review the current status of soft x-ray lasers from the perspective of applications, and present an overview of the applications currently being developed.

  12. X-rays from the youngest stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    1994-01-01

    The X-ray properties of classical and weak-lined T Tauri stars are briefly reviewed, emphasizing recent results from the ROSAT satellite and prospects for ASCA. The interpretation of the high level of T Tauri X-rays as enhanced solar-type magnetic activity is discussed and criticized. The census of X-ray emitters is significantly increasing estimates of galactic star formation efficiency, and X-ray emission may be important for self-regulation of star formation. ASCA images will detect star formation regions out to several kiloparsecs and will study the magnetically heated plasma around T Tauri stars. However, images will often suffer from crowding effects.

  13. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Tennant, Allyn; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Girogio; Kaspi, Vicky; Coppi, Paolo; Wu, Kinwah; Siegmund, Oswald

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful - yet inexpensive - dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --- particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsiz:e the important physical and astrophysical questions such as mission would address.

  14. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Giorgio; Kaspi, Victoria; Tennant, Allyn; Coppi, Paolo; Wu, Kinwah; Siegmund, Oswald

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful---yet inexpensive---dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsize the important physical and astrophysical questions such a mission would address.

  15. X-ray emission from galaxies and the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabian, A. C.

    1981-01-01

    The study of X-ray emission from normal galaxies began with the launch of the Einstein Observatory in 1978. Galaxies of all Hubble types and point sources are discussed. It is concluded that statistical studies of bright Galactic sources, which relate to their evolution, are reliant upon the discovery of sources in many galaxies. It is also concluded that a substantial future increase (the Virgo cluster galaxies) requires a telescope system with better than arcminute resolution and a sensitivity better than 10 x that of Einstein.

  16. Apollo 15 X-ray fluorescence experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, I.; Trombka, J.; Gerard, J.; Schmadebeck, R.; Lowman, P.; Blodgett, H.; Yin, L.; Eller, E.; Lamothe, R.; Gorenstein, P.

    1971-01-01

    The X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, carried in the SIM bay of the command service module was employed principally for compositional mapping of the lunar surface while in lunar orbit, and secondarily, for X-ray astronomical observations during the trans-earth coast. The lunar surface measurements involved observations of the intensity and characteristics energy distribution of the secondary or fluorescent X-rays produced by the interaction of solar X-rays with the lunar surface. The astronomical observations consisted of relatively long periods of measurements of X-rays from pre-selected galactic sources such as Cyg-X-1 and Sco X-1 as well as from the galactic poles.

  17. X-ray spectroscopy of photoionized plasmas in astrophysics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunieda, H.

    Among astrophysical objects, active galactic nuclei (AGN) are good examples of photoionized plasmas illuminated by central bright sources. X-rays emerging from such plasmas are observed by ASCA. In soft X-rays, emission lines are observed from He-like Ca, Ar, S, Si, and Mg, whose ionization temperature are much higher than the electron temperature. From some Sy I's, an absorption feature due to O VII/O VIII was found, which suggests it ionized (warm) absorber. Such a warm absorber has been identified by emission lines seen by EUVE. A common spectral feature of Sy I's is the iron K emission line. ASCA discovered broad line feature due to gravitational and Doppler effects of reprocessor on the accretion disk around a massive black hole.

  18. PROPERTIES OF GALAXIES HOSTING X-RAY-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE CL1604 SUPERCLUSTER AT z = 0.9

    SciTech Connect

    Kocevski, Dale D.; Lubin, Lori M.; Lemaux, Brian C.; Gal, Roy R.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Lin, Robin; Squires, Gordon K.

    2009-08-01

    Recent galaxy evolution models suggest that feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) may be responsible for suppressing star formation in their host galaxies and the subsequent migration of these systems onto the red sequence. To investigate the role of AGNs in driving the evolution of their hosts, we have carried out a study of the environments and optical properties of galaxies harboring X-ray luminous AGNs in the Cl1604 supercluster at z {approx} 0.9. Making use of Chandra, HST/ACS and Keck/DEIMOS observations, we examine the integrated colors, morphologies, and spectral properties of nine moderate-luminosity (L {sub X} {approx} 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}) type 2 Seyferts detected in the Cl1604 complex. We find that the AGNs are predominantly hosted by luminous spheroids and/or bulge-dominated galaxies which have colors that place them in the valley between the blue cloud and red sequence in color-magnitude space, consistent with predictions that AGN hosts should constitute a transition population. Half of the hosts have bluer overall colors as a result of blue resolved cores in otherwise red spheroids and a majority show signs of recent or pending interactions. We also find a substantial number exhibit strong Balmer absorption features indicative of post-starburst galaxies, despite the fact that we detect narrow [O II] emission lines in all of the host spectra. If the [O II] lines are due in part to AGN emission, as we suspect, then this result implies that a significant fraction of these galaxies (44%) have experienced an enhanced level of star formation within the last {approx}1 Gyr which was rapidly suppressed. Furthermore we observe that the hosts galaxies tend to avoid the densest regions of the supercluster and are instead located in intermediate density environments, such as the infall region of a massive cluster or in poorer systems undergoing assembly. Overall we find that the properties of the nine host galaxies are generally consistent with a

  19. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm R.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1995-01-01

    A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

  20. Constraining the layout of circumnuclear clouds with respect to the supermassive black hole in the Galactic center: outlook of X-ray polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, F.; Karas, V.; Kunneriath, D.; Muleri, F.

    2014-07-01

    Despite past panchromatic observations of the innermost part of the Milky Way, the overall structure of the Galactic Center (GC) remains enigmatic in terms of geometry. Here we aim to show how polarimetry can probe the three-dimensional position of the molecular material in the central 100 pc of the GC. We investigate a model where the central supermassive black hole Sgr A^* is radiatively coupled to a fragmented circumnuclear disc (CND), an elliptical twisted ring representative of the central molecular zone (CMZ), and the two main, bright molecular clouds Sgr B2 and Sgr C. Results indicate that Sgr B2 and Sgr C, situated at the two sides of the CMZ, present the highest polarization degrees (66.5% and 47.8% respectively), both associated with a polarization position angle ψ = 90° (normal to the scattering plane). We also consider a range of spatial locations for Sgr A^* and the reprocessing media, and investigate how the modeled three-dimensional geometry influences the resulting GC polarization. The two reflection nebulae are found to always produce high polarization degrees (≫ 10%) and are thus prime targets for polarization measurement. We show that a 500 ks observation with a broadband polarimeter could constrain the location and the morphology of the scattering material with respect to the emitting source.

  1. GIANT H II REGIONS IN M101. I. X-RAY ANALYSIS OF HOT GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Wei; Chen Yang; Feng Li; Chu, You-Hua; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Wang, Q. Daniel; Li Jiangtao

    2012-11-20

    We performed a Chandra X-ray study of three giant H II regions (GHRs), NGC 5461, NGC 5462, and NGC 5471, in the spiral galaxy M101. The X-ray spectra of the three GHRs all contain a prominent thermal component with a temperature of {approx}0.2 keV. In NGC 5461, the spatial distribution of the soft (<1.5 keV) X-ray emission is generally in agreement with the extent of H1105, the most luminous H II region therein, but extends beyond its southern boundary, which could be attributed to outflows from the star cloud between H1105 and H1098. In NGC 5462, the X-ray emission is displaced from the H II regions and a ridge of blue stars; the H{alpha} filaments extending from the ridge of star cloud to the diffuse X-rays suggest that hot gas outflows have occurred. The X-rays from NGC 5471 are concentrated at the B-knot, a 'hypernova remnant' candidate. Assuming a Sedov-Taylor evolution, the derived explosion energy, on the order of 10{sup 52} erg, is consistent with a hypernova origin. In addition, a bright source in the field of NGC 5462 has been identified as a background active galactic nucleus, instead of a black hole X-ray binary in M101.

  2. X-Ray Mosaic of Milky Way Taken by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) has made a sturning, high-energy panorama of the central regions of our Milky Way galaxy. The findings are an important step toward understanding the most active area of the Milky Way as well as other galaxies throughout the universe. This 400 by 900-light-year mosaic of several CXO images reveals hundreds of white dwarf stars, neutron stars, and black holes bathed in an incandescent fog of miltimillion-degree gas. The diffuse x-ray emission seems to be related to the turmoil and density of matter in the inner Milky Way. Stars are forming there at a much more rapid rate than in the galactic 'suburbs.' Many of the most massive stars in the galaxy are located in the galactic center and are furiously boiling off their outer layers in searing stellar winds. Supernova explosions are far more common in the region and send shock waves booming through the inner galaxy. The super massive black hole at the center of the galaxy is located inside the bright white patch in the center of the image. The colors indicate x-ray energy bands-red (low), green (medial), and blue (high). A supernova occurs when a massive star has used up its nuclear fuel and the pressure drops in the central core of the star. The matter in the core is crushed by gravity to higher and higher densities, and temperatures reach billions of degrees. Under these extreme conditions, nuclear reactions occur violently and catastrophically reversing the collapse. A thermonuclear shock wave races through the now expanding stellar debris, fusing lighter elements into heavier ones and producing a brilliant visual outburst. (Photo credit: NASA/UMass/D. Wang et al)

  3. CUBIC - A non-dispersive Diffuse X-ray Background spectrometer. [Cosmic Unresolved X-ray Background Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, David N.; Skinner, Mark A.; Antunes, Alexander J. D.; Catalano, Mark A.; Cocklin, Eric J.; Engel, Leland G.; Entingh, Timothy J.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Green, Roland; Kelly, Douglas A.

    1992-01-01

    The Cosmic Unresolved X-ray Background Instrument using CCDs (CUBIC) is designed to obtain spectral observations of the Diffuse X-ray Background (DXRB) with moderate spectral resolution over the energy range 0.2-10 keV, using mechanically-collimated CCDs. At this time, it is the only planned satellite payload devoted to the study of the spectrum of the DXRB. Over the anticipated 3 year lifetime of the satellite, CUBIC will be able to study up to 50 percent of the sky with 5 x 5 deg spatial resolution for the subkilovolt Galactic diffuse background, and with 10 x 10 deg spatial resolution for the extragalactic diffuse background above 2 keV. CUBIC will obtain high quality nondispersive spectra of soft X-ray emission from the interstellar medium, supernova remnants, and some bright sources, and will make a sensitive seach for line emission or other features in the extragalactic cosmic X-ray background from 2-10 keV.

  4. X-ray shout echoing through space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-01-01

    observatories around the world were pointing their instruments at this mysterious source in the sky, named GRB 031203, in the attempt to decipher its nature. Also ESA's X-ray observatory, XMM-Newton, joined the hunt and observed the source in detail, using its on-board European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC). The fading X-ray emission from GRB 031203 - called the `afterglow' - is clearly seen in XMM-Newton's images. But much more stunning are the two rings, centred on the afterglow, which appear to expand thousand times faster than the speed of light. Dr. Simon Vaughan, of the University of Leicester, United Kingdom, leads an international team of scientists studying GRB 031203. He explains that these rings are what astronomers call an `echo'. They form when the X-rays from the distant gamma-ray burst shine on a layer of dust in our own Galaxy. "The dust scatters some of the X-rays, causing XMM-Newton to observe these rings, much in the same way as fog scatters the light from a car's headlights," said Vaughan. Although the afterglow is the brightest feature seen in XMM-Newton's images, the expanding echo is much more spectacular. "It is like a shout in a cathedral," Vaughan said. "The shout of the gamma-ray burst is louder, but the Galactic reverberation, seen as the rings, is much more beautiful." The rings seem to expand because the X-rays scattered by dust farther from the direction of GRB 031203 take longer to reach us than those hitting the dust closer to the line of sight. However, nothing can move faster than light. "This is precisely what we expect because of the finite speed of light," said Vaughan. "The rate of expansion that we see is just a visual effect." He and his colleagues explain that we see two rings because there are two thin sheets of dust between the source of the gamma-ray burst and Earth, one closer to us creating the wider ring and one further away where the smaller ring is formed. Since they know precisely at what speed the X-ray light travels in space

  5. Rapid and Bright Stellar-mass Binary Black Hole Mergers in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartos, Imre; Kocsis, Bence; Haiman, Zoltán; Márka, Szabolcs

    2017-02-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) found direct evidence for double black hole binaries emitting gravitational waves. Galactic nuclei are expected to harbor the densest population of stellar-mass black holes. A significant fraction (∼ 30 % ) of these black holes can reside in binaries. We examine the fate of the black hole binaries in active galactic nuclei, which get trapped in the inner region of the accretion disk around the central supermassive black hole. We show that binary black holes can migrate into and then rapidly merge within the disk well within a Salpeter time. The binaries may also accrete a significant amount of gas from the disk, well above the Eddington rate. This could lead to detectable X-ray or gamma-ray emission, but would require hyper-Eddington accretion with a few percent radiative efficiency, comparable to thin disks. We discuss implications for gravitational-wave observations and black hole population studies. We estimate that Advanced LIGO may detect ∼20 such gas-induced binary mergers per year.

  6. X-Ray Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapline, George; Wood, Lowell

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the prospects of generating coherent x rays using high-power lasers and indentifies problem areas in their development. Indicates possible applications for coherent x rays in the fields of chemistry, biology, and crystallography. (GS)

  7. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  8. Bone x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... not being scanned. Alternative Names X-ray - bone Images Skeleton Skeletal spine Osteogenic sarcoma - x-ray References ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  9. X-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... think you might be pregnant. Alternative Names Radiography Images X-ray X-ray References Geleijns J, Tack ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  10. Extremity x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... sensitive to the risks of an x-ray. Images X-ray References Kelly DM. Congenital anomalies of ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  11. X-Ray Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-20

    Radiographic Image Acquisition & Processing Software for Security Markets. Used in operation of commercial x-ray scanners and manipulation of x-ray images for emergency responders including State, Local, Federal, and US Military bomb technicians and analysts.

  12. Sinus x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Paranasal sinus radiography; X-ray - sinuses ... sinus x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department. Or the x-ray may be taken ... Brown J, Rout J. ENT, neck, and dental radiology. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH Schaefer- ...

  13. Hand x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  14. A SOUTHERN SKY AND GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY FOR BRIGHT KUIPER BELT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, Scott S.; Udalski, Andrzej; Kubiak, Marcin; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz; Poleski, Radoslaw; Soszynski, Igor; Szymanski, Michal K.; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof; Trujillo, Chadwick

    2011-10-15

    About 2500 deg{sup 2} of sky south of declination -25{sup 0} and/or near the Galactic Plane were surveyed for bright outer solar system objects. This survey is one of the first large-scale southern sky and Galactic Plane surveys to detect dwarf planets and other bright Kuiper Belt Objects in the trans-Neptunian region. The survey was able to obtain a limiting R-band magnitude of 21.6. In all, 18 outer solar system objects were detected, including Pluto which was detected near the Galactic center using optimal image subtraction techniques to remove the high stellar density background. Fourteen of the detections were previously unknown trans-Neptunian objects, demonstrating that the southern sky had not been well searched to date for bright outer solar system objects. Assuming moderate albedos, several of the new discoveries from this survey could be in hydrostatic equilibrium and thus could be considered dwarf planets. Combining this survey with previous surveys from the northern hemisphere suggests that the Kuiper Belt is nearly complete to around 21st magnitude in the R band. All the main dynamical classes in the Kuiper Belt are occupied by at least one dwarf-planet-sized object. The 3:2 Neptune resonance, which is the innermost well-populated Neptune resonance, has several large objects while the main outer Neptune resonances such as the 5:3, 7:4, 2:1, and 5:2 do not appear to have any large objects. This indicates that the outer resonances are either significantly depleted in objects relative to the 3:2 resonance or have a significantly different assortment of objects than the 3:2 resonance. For the largest objects (H < 4.5 mag), the scattered disk population appears to have a few times more objects than the main Kuiper Belt (MKB) population, while the Sedna population could be several times more than that of the MKB.

  15. A Southern Sky and Galactic Plane Survey for Bright Kuiper Belt Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Scott S.; Udalski, Andrzej; Trujillo, Chadwick; Kubiak, Marcin; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz; Poleski, Radoslaw; Soszynski, Igor; Szymański, Michal K.; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof

    2011-10-01

    About 2500 deg2 of sky south of declination -25° and/or near the Galactic Plane were surveyed for bright outer solar system objects. This survey is one of the first large-scale southern sky and Galactic Plane surveys to detect dwarf planets and other bright Kuiper Belt Objects in the trans-Neptunian region. The survey was able to obtain a limiting R-band magnitude of 21.6. In all, 18 outer solar system objects were detected, including Pluto which was detected near the Galactic center using optimal image subtraction techniques to remove the high stellar density background. Fourteen of the detections were previously unknown trans-Neptunian objects, demonstrating that the southern sky had not been well searched to date for bright outer solar system objects. Assuming moderate albedos, several of the new discoveries from this survey could be in hydrostatic equilibrium and thus could be considered dwarf planets. Combining this survey with previous surveys from the northern hemisphere suggests that the Kuiper Belt is nearly complete to around 21st magnitude in the R band. All the main dynamical classes in the Kuiper Belt are occupied by at least one dwarf-planet-sized object. The 3:2 Neptune resonance, which is the innermost well-populated Neptune resonance, has several large objects while the main outer Neptune resonances such as the 5:3, 7:4, 2:1, and 5:2 do not appear to have any large objects. This indicates that the outer resonances are either significantly depleted in objects relative to the 3:2 resonance or have a significantly different assortment of objects than the 3:2 resonance. For the largest objects (H < 4.5 mag), the scattered disk population appears to have a few times more objects than the main Kuiper Belt (MKB) population, while the Sedna population could be several times more than that of the MKB.

  16. Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-04-20

    A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

  17. A Multi-Wavelength Study of the X-Ray Sources in the NGC 5018

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Kajal K.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Wu, Kinwah; Saripalli, Lakshmi

    2004-01-01

    The E3 giant elliptical galaxy NGC-5018 was observed with the cxo X-ray Observatory's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer for 30-h on 14 April 2001. Results of analysis of these X-ray data as well as of complementary optical, infrared, and radio data are reported. Seven X-ray point sources, including the nucleus, were detected. If they are intrinsic to NGC-5018, then all six non-nuclear sources have luminosities exceeding 10(exp 39)-ergl in the 0.5-8.0-keV energy band; placing them in the class of Ultra- luminous X-ray sources. Comparison of X-ray source positions to archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (hst/WFPC2) images reveal four of the six non-nuclear sources are spatially--coincident with bright, M$(sub V)LA -8.6 mag, objects. These four objects have optical magnitudes and (V-I) colors consistent with globular clusters in NGC-5018. However, one of these objects was observed to vary by siml mag in both V and I between observations taken 28 July 1997 and 04 Feb 1999 indicating this source is a background active galactic nucleus (AGN). The nature of the other three optically-bright objects cannot be determined from the available optical data but all have X-ray-to-optical flux ratios consistent with background AGNs. Strong, unpolarized, radio emission has been detected from another of the optically-bright counterparts. It displays an inverted radio spectrum and is the most absorbed of the seven sources in the X-ray band. It, too, is most readily explained as a background AGN, though alternative explanations cannot be ruled out. Extended X-ray emission is detected within a siml5 arcsec radius of the galaxy center at a luminosity of sim lO(exp 40)-ergl in the X-ray band. Its thermal X-ray spectrum (kT sim0.4-keV) and its spatial coincidence with strong H(alpha) emission are consistent with a hot gas origin. The nucleus itself is a weak X-ray source, LA-5 times 10(exp 39)-ergl, but displays a radio spectrum typical of AGN.

  18. A soft X-ray image of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Aschenbach, B.; Hasinger, G.; Pfeffermann, E.; Snowden, S. L.

    1991-01-01

    A soft X-ray image of the moon obtained by the Roentgen Observatory Satellite ROSAT clearly shows a sunlit crescent, demonstrating that the moon's X-ray luminosity arises from backscattering of solar X-rays. The moon's optically dark side is also X-ray dark, and casts a distinct shadow on the diffuse cosmic X-ray background. Unexpectedly, the dark side seems to emit X-rays at a level about one percent of that of the bright side; this emission very probably results from energetic solar-wind electrons striking the moon's surface.

  19. THE GALACTIC O-STAR SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY (GOSSS). II. BRIGHT SOUTHERN STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Sota, A.; Apellániz, J. Maíz; Alfaro, E. J.; Barbá, R. H.; Arias, J. I.; Walborn, N. R.; Gamen, R. C.

    2014-03-01

    We present the second installment of GOSSS, a massive spectroscopic survey of Galactic O stars, based on new homogeneous, high signal-to-noise ratio, R ∼ 2500 digital observations from both hemispheres selected from the Galactic O-Star Catalog (GOSC). In this paper we include bright stars and other objects drawn mostly from the first version of GOSC, all of them south of δ = –20°, for a total number of 258 O stars. We also revise the northern sample of Paper I to provide the full list of spectroscopically classified Galactic O stars complete to B = 8, bringing the total number of published GOSSS stars to 448. Extensive sequences of exceptional objects are given, including the early Of/WN, O Iafpe, Ofc, ON/OC, Onfp, Of?p, and Oe types, as well as double/triple-lined spectroscopic binaries. The new spectral subtype O9.2 is also discussed. The magnitude and spatial distributions of the observed sample are analyzed. We also present new results from OWN, a multi-epoch high-resolution spectroscopic survey coordinated with GOSSS that is assembling the largest sample of Galactic spectroscopic massive binaries ever attained. The OWN data combined with additional information on spectroscopic and visual binaries from the literature indicate that only a very small fraction (if any) of the stars with masses above 15-20 M {sub ☉} are born as single systems. In the future we will publish the rest of the GOSSS survey, which is expected to include over 1000 Galactic O stars.

  20. The Discovery of an Evolving Dust Scattered X-ray Halo Around GRB 031203

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, S.; Willingale, R.; OBrien, P. T.; Osborne, J. P.; Reeves, J. N.; Levan, A. J.; Watson, M. G.; Tedds, J. A.; Watson, D.; Santos-Lleo, M.

    2003-01-01

    We report the first detection of a time-dependent, dust-scattered X-ray halo around a gamma-ray burst. GRB3 031203 was observed by XMM-Newton starting six hours after the burst. The halo appeared as concentric ring-like structures centered on the GRB location. The radii of these structures increased with time as t(sup 1/2), consistent with small-angle X-ray scattering caused by a large column of dust along the line of sight to a cosmologically distant GRB. The rings are due to dust concentrated in two distinct slabs in the Galaxy located at distances of 880 and 1390 pc, consistent with known Galactic features. The halo brightness implies an initial soft X-ray pulse consistent with the observed GRB.

  1. Low-Luminosity AGN As Analogues of Galactic Black Holes in the Low/Hard State: Evidence from X-Ray Timing of NGC 4258

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, A.; Uttley, P.

    2005-01-01

    We present a broadband power spectral density function (PSD) measured from extensive RXTE monitoring data of the low-luminosity AGN NGC 4258, which has an accurate, maser-determined black hole mass of (3.9 plus or minus 0.1) x 10(exp 7) solar mass. We constrain the PSD break time scale to be greater than 4.5 d at greater than 90% confidence, which appears to rule out the possibility that NGC 4258 is an analogue of black hole X-ray binaries (BHXRBs) in the high/soft state. In this sense, the PSD of NGC 4258 is different to that of some more-luminous Seyferts, which appear similar to the PSDs of high/soft state X-ray binaries. This result supports previous analogies between LLAGN and X-ray binaries in the low/hard state based on spectral energy distributions, indicating that the AGN/BHXRB analogy is valid across a broad range of accretion rates.

  2. Interstellar dust grain composition from high-resolution X-ray absorption edge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrales, Lia

    2016-06-01

    X-ray light is sufficient to excite electrons from n=1 (K-shell) and n=2 (L-shell) energy levels of neutral interstellar metals, causing a sharp increase in the absorption cross-section. Near the ionization energy, the shape of the photoelectric absorption edge depends strongly on whether the atom is isolated or bound in molecules or minerals (dust). With high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, we can directly measure the state of metals and the mineral composition of dust in the interstellar medium. In addition, the scattering contribution to the X-ray extinction cross-section can be used to gauge grain size, shape, and filling factor. In order to fully take advantage of major advances in high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, lab measurements of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) from suspected interstellar minerals are required. Optical constants derived from the absorption measurements can be used with Mie scattering or anomalous diffraction theory in order to model the full extinction cross-sections from the interstellar medium. Much like quasar spectra are used to probe other intergalactic gas, absorption spectroscopy of Galactic X-ray binaries and bright stars will yield key insights to the mineralogy and evolution of dust grains in the Milky Way.

  3. Supermassive Black Holes, AGN Feedback, and Hot X-ray Coronae in Early Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, William R.; Anderson, Michael E.; Churazov, Eugene; Nulsen, Paul; Jones, Christine; Kraft, Ralph P.

    2016-06-01

    We present the analysis of a sample of more than 200 nearby, early type galaxies observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We exclude resolved point sources, and model the emission from both unresolved X-ray binaries and CVs and ABs to derive the residual thermal emission from the hot atmosphere around each galaxy. We compute the X-ray luminosity of the central supermassive black hole (SMBH). Using galaxy velocity dispersion (or stellar mass) as a proxy for SMBH mass, we derive the Eddington ratios for these low luminosity AGN. We present the X-ray luminosity and gas temperature of the hot coronae as a function of stellar mass (a proxy for dark matter halo mass) and central velocity dispersion to look for anomalously X-ray bright gaseous coronae and to determine the stellar (or halo) mass, below which galactic winds may be important. For hot coronae with X-ray cavities, we derive the "mechanical" power of SMBHs and compare these to their radiative luminosities.

  4. Black Hole Mass Determination Using X-ray Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Insuk

    Supermassive black holes are located at the center of basically every galaxy and their mass appears to be tightly correlated with several galaxy properties, suggesting that black hole and galaxy growths are linked together. Determining the mass of black holes provides crucial information on the galaxy evolution and indeed significant progress has been achieved thanks to optically-based methods. However, since these methods are limited by several factors including absorption and galaxy contamination, it is important to develop and test alternative methods that use different energy bands to constrain the black hole mass. In a recent work we demonstrated that a novel X-ray scaling method, originally introduced for stellar mass black holes, can be reliably extended to estimate the mass of highly-accreting supermassive black holes. Here we investigate the limits of applicability of this method to low-accreting black holes, using a control sample of low-luminosity active galactic nuclei with good-quality X-ray data and with dynamically measured black hole masses. We find the threshold value of the accretion rate for which the X-ray scaling method can still be used. Below this threshold, we provide a simple recipe to constrain the black hole mass based on the inverse correlation between X-ray spectral properties and accretion rate, which was found in several low-accreting black holes and confirmed by our sample. Then, we extend the X-ray scaling method to ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), which are off-nuclear, point-like X-ray sources, whose nature is still debated. Their high X-ray brightness can be equally well explained by stellar mass black holes accreting at extreme rates or by intermediate mass black holes accreting at regular rates, therefore, constraining their mass may shed light on one of the outstanding questions of high energy astrophysics. Currently, no direct optically-based methods can dynamically determine the mass of ULXs, making X-ray methods the only

  5. Trajectories of bright stars at the Galactic Center as a tool to evaluate a graviton mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Alexander; Jovanović, Predrag; Borka, Dusko; Jovanović, Vesna Borka

    2016-10-01

    Scientists worked in Saint-Petersburg (Petrograd, Leningrad) played the extremely important role in creation of scientific school and development of general relativity in Russia. Very recently LIGO collaboration discovered gravitational waves [1] predicted 100 years ago by A. Einstein. In the papers reporting about this discovery, the joint LIGO & VIRGO team presented an upper limit on graviton mass such as mg < 1.2 × 10-22eV [1, 2]. The authors concluded that their observational data do not show violations of classical general relativity because the graviton mass limit is very small. We show that an analysis of bright star trajectories could bound graviton mass with a comparable accuracy with accuracies reached with gravitational wave interferometers and expected with forthcoming pulsar timing observations for gravitational wave detection. This analysis gives an opportunity to treat observations of bright stars near the Galactic Center as a tool for an evaluation specific parameters of the black hole and also to obtain constraints on the fundamental gravity law such as a modifications of Newton gravity law in a weak field approximation. In that way, based on a potential reconstruction at the Galactic Center we give a bounds on a graviton mass.

  6. Hard X-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Past hard X-ray and lower energy satellite instruments are reviewed and it is shown that observation above 20 keV and up to hundreds of keV can provide much valuable information on the astrophysics of cosmic sources. To calculate possible sensitivities of future arrays, the efficiencies of a one-atmosphere inch gas counter (the HEAO-1 A-2 xenon filled HED3) and a 3 mm phoswich scintillator (the HEAO-1 A-4 Na1 LED1) were compared. Above 15 keV, the scintillator was more efficient. In a similar comparison, the sensitivity of germanium detectors did not differ much from that of the scintillators, except at high energies where the sensitivity would remain flat and not rise with loss of efficiency. Questions to be addressed concerning the physics of active galaxies and the diffuse radiation background, black holes, radio pulsars, X-ray pulsars, and galactic clusters are examined.

  7. Solar x ray astronomy rocket program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The dynamics were studied of the solar corona through the imaging of large scale coronal structures with AS&E High Resolution Soft X ray Imaging Solar Sounding Rocket Payload. The proposal for this program outlined a plan of research based on the construction of a high sensitivity X ray telescope from the optical and electronic components of the previous flight of this payload (36.038CS). Specifically, the X ray sensitive CCD camera was to be placed in the prime focus of the grazing incidence X ray mirror. The improved quantum efficiency of the CCD detector (over the film which had previously been used) allows quantitative measurements of temperature and emission measure in regions of low x ray emission such as helmet streamers beyond 1.2 solar radii or coronal holes. Furthermore, the improved sensitivity of the CCD allows short exposures of bright objects to study unexplored temporal regimes of active region loop evolution.

  8. Einstein Observations of Galactic supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the observations of Galactic supernova remnants with the imaging detectors of the Einstein Observatory. X-ray surface brightness contours of 47 remnants are shown together with gray-scale pictures. Count rates for these remnants have been derived and are listed for the HRI, IPC, and MPC detectors.

  9. Detection of x ray sources in PROS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deponte, J.; Primini, F. A.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of detecting discrete sources in x-ray images has much in common with the problem of automatic source detection at other wavelengths. In all cases, one searches for positive brightness enhancements exceeding a certain threshold, which appear consistent with what one expects for a point source, in the presence of a (possibly) spatially variable background. Multidimensional point spread functions (e.g., dependent on detector position and photon energy) are also common. At the same time, the problem in x-ray astronomy has some unique aspects. For example, for typical x-ray exposures in current or recent observatories, the number of available pixels far exceeds the number of actual x-ray events, so Poisson, rather than Gaussian statistics apply. Further, extended cosmic x-ray sources are common, and one often desires to detect point sources in the vicinity or even within bright, diffuse x-ray emission. Finally, support structures in x-ray detectors often cast sharp shadows in x-ray images making it necessary to detect sources in a region of rapidly varying exposure. We have developed a source detection package within the IRAF/PROS environment which attempts to deal with some of the problems of x-ray source detection. We have patterned our package after the successful Einstein Observatory x-ray source detection programs. However, we have attempted to improve the flexibility and accessibility of the functions and to provide a graphical front-end for the user. Our philosophy has been to use standard IRAF tasks whenever possible for image manipulation and to separate general functions from mission-specific ones. We will report on the current status of the package and discuss future developments, including simulation tasks, to allow the user to assess detection efficiency and source significance, tasks to determine source intensity, and alternative detection algorithms.

  10. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  11. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  12. The Hard X-Ray Sky: Recent Observational Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.

    2010-01-01

    The last fifty years have witnessed the birth, development, and maturation to full potential of hard X-ray astrophysics. The primary force driving the history of the field has been the development of space-based instrumentation optimized for getting the maximum science out of observations of high-energy photons from astrophysical sources. Hard X-ray telescopes are leading research in areas such as galactic diffuse emission, galactic transients, and active galactic nuclei.

  13. The Hard X-ray Sky: Recent Observational Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrels, Neil

    2009-05-11

    The last fifty years have witnessed the birth, development, and maturation to full potential of hard X-ray astrophysics. The primary force driving the history of the field has been the development of space-based instrumentation optimized for getting the maximum science out of observations of high-energy photons from astrophysical sources. Hard X-ray telescopes are leading research in areas such as galactic diffuse emission, galactic transients, and active galactic nuclei.

  14. Chandra Resolves Cosmic X-ray Glow and Finds Mysterious New Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    -energy X-ray background, showing that it arose in very faraway galaxies with extremely bright cores, called quasars or Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). The Chandra team sampled a region of the sky about one-fifth the angular area of a full moon and resolved about 80 percent of the more-energetic X-ray background into discrete sources. Stretched across the entire sky, this would account for approximately 70 million sources, most of which would be identified with galaxies. Their analysis confirms that a significant fraction of the X-ray background cannot be due to diffuse radiation from hot, intergalactic gas. Combined X-ray and optical observations showed that nearly one third of the sources are galaxies whose cores are very bright in X rays yet emit virtually no optical light from the core. The observation suggests that these "veiled galactic nuclei" galaxies may number in the tens of millions over the whole sky. They almost certainly harbor a massive black hole at their core that produces X rays as the gas is pulled toward it at nearly the speed of light. Their bright X-ray cores place these galaxies in the AGN family. Because these numerous AGN are bright in X rays, but optically dim, the Chandra observation implies that optical surveys of AGN are very incomplete. A second new class of objects, comprising approximately one-third of the background, is assumed to be "ultra-faint galaxies." Mushotzky said that these sources may emit little or no optical light, either because the dust around the galaxy blocks the light totally or because the optical light is eventually absorbed by relatively cool gas during its long journey across the universe. In the latter scenario, Mushotzky said that these sources would have a redshift of 6 or higher, meaning that they are well over 14 billion light years away and thus the earliest, most distant objects ever identified. "This is a very exciting discovery," said Dr. Alan Bunner, Director of NASA's Structure and Evolution of the universe

  15. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  16. Modeling the Redshift Evolution of the Normal Galaxy X-Ray Luminosity Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tremmel, M.; Fragos, T.; Lehmer, B. D.; Tzanavaris, P.; Belczynski, K.; Kalogera, V.; Basu-Zych, A. R.; Farr, W. M.; Hornschemeier, A.; Jenkins, L.; Ptak, A.; Zezas, A.

    2013-01-01

    Emission from X-ray binaries (XRBs) is a major component of the total X-ray luminosity of normal galaxies, so X-ray studies of high-redshift galaxies allow us to probe the formation and evolution of XRBs on very long timescales (approximately 10 Gyr). In this paper, we present results from large-scale population synthesis models of binary populations in galaxies from z = 0 to approximately 20. We use as input into our modeling the Millennium II Cosmological Simulation and the updated semi-analytic galaxy catalog by Guo et al. to self-consistently account for the star formation history (SFH) and metallicity evolution of each galaxy. We run a grid of 192 models, varying all the parameters known from previous studies to affect the evolution of XRBs. We use our models and observationally derived prescriptions for hot gas emission to create theoretical galaxy X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) for several redshift bins. Models with low common envelope efficiencies, a 50% twins mass ratio distribution, a steeper initial mass function exponent, and high stellar wind mass-loss rates best match observational results from Tzanavaris & Georgantopoulos, though they significantly underproduce bright early-type and very bright (L(sub x) greater than 10(exp 41)) late-type galaxies. These discrepancies are likely caused by uncertainties in hot gas emission and SFHs, active galactic nucleus contamination, and a lack of dynamically formed low-mass XRBs. In our highest likelihood models, we find that hot gas emission dominates the emission for most bright galaxies. We also find that the evolution of the normal galaxy X-ray luminosity density out to z = 4 is driven largely by XRBs in galaxies with X-ray luminosities between 10(exp 40) and 10(exp 41) erg s(exp -1).

  17. MODELING THE REDSHIFT EVOLUTION OF THE NORMAL GALAXY X-RAY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Tremmel, M.; Fragos, T.; Zezas, A.; Lehmer, B. D.; Tzanavaris, P.; Belczynski, K.; Kalogera, V.; Farr, W. M.; Basu-Zych, A. R.; Hornschemeier, A.; Jenkins, L.; Ptak, A.

    2013-03-20

    Emission from X-ray binaries (XRBs) is a major component of the total X-ray luminosity of normal galaxies, so X-ray studies of high-redshift galaxies allow us to probe the formation and evolution of XRBs on very long timescales ({approx}10 Gyr). In this paper, we present results from large-scale population synthesis models of binary populations in galaxies from z = 0 to {approx}20. We use as input into our modeling the Millennium II Cosmological Simulation and the updated semi-analytic galaxy catalog by Guo et al. to self-consistently account for the star formation history (SFH) and metallicity evolution of each galaxy. We run a grid of 192 models, varying all the parameters known from previous studies to affect the evolution of XRBs. We use our models and observationally derived prescriptions for hot gas emission to create theoretical galaxy X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) for several redshift bins. Models with low common envelope efficiencies, a 50% twins mass ratio distribution, a steeper initial mass function exponent, and high stellar wind mass-loss rates best match observational results from Tzanavaris and Georgantopoulos, though they significantly underproduce bright early-type and very bright (L{sub x} > 10{sup 41}) late-type galaxies. These discrepancies are likely caused by uncertainties in hot gas emission and SFHs, active galactic nucleus contamination, and a lack of dynamically formed low-mass XRBs. In our highest likelihood models, we find that hot gas emission dominates the emission for most bright galaxies. We also find that the evolution of the normal galaxy X-ray luminosity density out to z = 4 is driven largely by XRBs in galaxies with X-ray luminosities between 10{sup 40} and 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1}.

  18. Chandra Discovery of Intervening, Local and Intrinsic Highly Ionized Absorption in an extremely bright high resolution X-ray spectrum of an Extragalactic Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicastro, F.; Elvis, M.; Fang, T.; Mathur, S.; Siemiginowska, A.; Zezas, A.

    2003-03-01

    In this contribution we present the brightest high resolution X-ray spectrum ever taken for an extragalactic source. Following our ToO request, Chandra observed the blazar Mkn 421 (z=0.03) during an exceptionally high-luminosity flare. The observation lasted about 100 ks, during which the source reached a flux level of > 0.1 Crab in the 0.5-2 keV band This allowed us to collect 4.2 million counts in the 1st-order ACIS-LETG spectrum of Mkn 421, and more than 3000 counts per resolution elements at the rest frame wavelength of the OVII Kα resonant transitions (21.6 Å). A forest of very weak (EW=3.1-10 mÅ) resonant absorption lines is detected from the rest frame wavelength of the OVII Kα all the way down to the position of the OVII Kα line at the source redshift. We identify these lines as due to: (a) Local Group Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) absorption, (b) intervening WHIM absorption at redshifts z=0.01 (associated with faint H Lyα absorption) and z=0.025, and (c) intrinsic source absorption. The strongest of these systems is associated with the local WHIM first discovered along the line of sight to PKS 2155-304 (Nicastro et al., 2002, 2003), and now observed (always with consistent gas properties) along all the lines of sight for which Chandra high resolution spectra with sufficient signal to noise ratio are available. The faintest systems (probing OVII column densities as low as 1015 cm-2) are those identified as due to the two intervening WHIM systems. If both these identification are correct this discovery implies a number of intervening OVII WHIM systems per unit redshift of dN/dz(NOVII>1015) = 75, about 3-4 times larger than the corresponding number estimated for OVI systems in the local Universe (down to OVI EW of 60 mÅ). The WHIM baryon fraction implied depends slightly on the ionization correction applied, and ranges between 40 % and 60 % of the total baryons at z<2, so confirming hydrodynamical simulation predictions and accounting for all of

  19. TRANSIENT X-RAY SOURCE POPULATION IN THE MAGELLANIC-TYPE GALAXY NGC 55

    SciTech Connect

    Jithesh, V.; Wang, Zhongxiang

    2016-04-10

    We present the spectral and temporal properties of 15 candidate transient X-ray sources detected in archival XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the nearby Magellanic-type, SB(s)m galaxy NGC 55. Based on an X-ray color classification scheme, the majority of the sources may be identified as X-ray binaries (XRBs), and six sources are soft, including a likely supernova remnant. We perform a detailed spectral and variability analysis of the data for two bright candidate XRBs. Both sources displayed strong short-term X-ray variability, and their X-ray spectra and hardness ratios are consistent with those of XRBs. These results, combined with their high X-ray luminosities (∼10{sup 38} erg s{sup −1}), strongly suggest that they are black hole (BH) binaries. Seven less luminous sources have spectral properties consistent with those of neutron star or BH XRBs in both normal and high-rate accretion modes, but one of them is the likely counterpart to a background galaxy (because of positional coincidence). From our spectral analysis, we find that the six soft sources are candidate super soft sources (SSSs) with dominant emission in the soft (0.3–2 keV) X-ray band. Archival Hubble Space Telescope optical images for seven sources are available, and the data suggest that most of them are likely to be high-mass XRBs. Our analysis has revealed the heterogeneous nature of the transient population in NGC 55 (six high-mass XRBs, one low-mass XRBs, six SSSs, one active galactic nucleus), helping establish the similarity of the X-ray properties of this galaxy to those of other Magellanic-type galaxies.

  20. Chandra X-Ray Observations of the Spiral Galaxy M81

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Ghosh, Kajal K.; McCollough, Michael L.; Pannuti, Thomas G.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Wu, Kinwah

    2003-01-01

    A Chandra X-Ray Observatory ACIS-S imaging observation is used to study the population of X-ray sources in the nearby Sab galaxy M81 (NGC 3031). A total of 177 sources are detected with 124 located within the D(sub 25) isophote to a limiting X-ray luminosity of approx. 3 x 10(exp 36) ergs/s. Source positions, count rates, luminosities in the 0.3-8.0 keV band, limiting optical magnitudes, and potential counterpart identifications are tabulated. Spectral and timing analysis of the 36 brightest sources are reported including the low luminosity active galactic nucleus, SN 1993J, and the Einstein-discovered ultraluminous X-ray source X6. The nucleus accounts for approx. 86%, or 5 x 10(exp 40) ergs/s, of the total X-ray emission from M81. Its spectrum is well fitted by an absorbed power law with photon index 1.98 +/- 0.08, consistent with previous observations (average index 1.9). SN 1993J has softened and faded since its discovery. At an age of 2594 days, SN 1993J displayed a complex thermal spectrum from a reverse shock rich in Fe L and highly ionized Mg, Si, and S but lacking O. A hard X-ray component, emitted by a forward shock, is also present. X6 is spatially coincident with a stellar object with optical brightness and colors consistent with an O9-B1 main-sequence star. It is also coincident with a weak radio source with a flux density of approx. 95 microJy at lambda = 3.6 cm. The continuum-dominated X-ray spectrum of X6 is most closely reproduced by a blackbody disk model suggesting the X-ray source is an approx. 18 solar mass object accreting at nearly its Eddington limit.

  1. The Very Local Universe in X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ptak, A.

    2011-01-01

    There are many open questions in X-ray observations of the Galactic neighborhood and nearby galaxies, such as the properties of the hot ISM and accreting sources, the X-ray/star-formation rate correlation and how the X-ray luminosity function of starburst galaxies. We discuss how these would be addressed by very wide-area (> 100 sq. deg.) X-ray surveys and upcoming X-ray missions. In particular planned NuStar observations of the Galaxy and nearby galaxies will be highlighted.

  2. X-Ray Properties of Lyman Break Galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field North Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nandra, K.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Arnaud, K.; Steidel, C. C.; Adelberger, K. L.; Gardner, J. P.; Teplitz, H. I.; Windhorst, R. A.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We describe the X-ray properties of a large sample of z approximately 3 Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) in the region of the Hubble Deep Field North, derived from the 1 Ms public Chandra observation. Of our sample of 148 LBGs, four are detected individually. This immediately gives a measure of the bright AGN (active galactic nuclei) fraction in these galaxies of approximately 3 per cent, which is in agreement with that derived from the UV (ultraviolet) spectra. The X-ray color of the detected sources indicates that they are probably moderately obscured. Stacking of the remainder shows a significant detection (6 sigma) with an average luminosity of 3.5 x 10(exp 41) erg/s per galaxy in the rest frame 2-10 keV band. We have also studied a comparison sample of 95 z approximately 1 "Balmer Break" galaxies. Eight of these are detected directly, with at least two clear AGN based on their high X-ray luminosity and very hard X-ray spectra respectively. The remainder are of relatively low luminosity (< 10(exp 42) erg/s, and the X-rays could arise from either AGN or rapid star-formation. The X-ray colors and evidence from other wavebands favor the latter interpretation. Excluding the clear AGN, we deduce a mean X-ray luminosity of 6.6 x 10(exp 40) erg/s, a factor approximately 5 lower than the LBGs. The average ratio of the UV and X-ray luminosities of these star forming galaxies L(sub UV)/L (sub X), however, is approximately the same at z = 1 as it is at z = 3. This scaling implies that the X-ray emission follows the current star formation rate, as measured by the UV luminosity. We use our results to constrain the star formation rate at z approximately 3 from an X-ray perspective. Assuming the locally established correlation between X-ray and far-IR (infrared) luminosity, the average inferred star formation rate in each Lyman break galaxy is found to be approximately 60 solar mass/yr, in excellent agreement with the extinction-corrected UV estimates. This provides an external

  3. X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... of gray. For some types of X-ray tests, a contrast medium — such as iodine or barium — is introduced into your body to provide greater detail on the images. X-ray technology is used to examine many parts of the ...

  4. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight Recently posted: Anal Cancer Facet Joint Block Video: Lung Cancer Screening Video: Upper GI Tract X-ray Video: ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  5. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  6. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Stearns, Daniel S.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  7. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-rays are a form of high energy electromagnetic radiation. The x-rays penetrate the body to form ... for detecting cavities, unless the decay is very advanced and deep. Many ... The amount of radiation given off during the procedure is less than ...

  8. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  9. X-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John M.

    1976-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing coherent secondary x-rays that are controlled as to direction by illuminating a mixture of high z and low z gases with an intense burst of primary x-rays. The primary x-rays are produced with a laser activated plasma, and these x-rays strip off the electrons of the high z atoms in the lasing medium, while the low z atoms retain their electrons. The neutral atoms transfer electrons to highly excited states of the highly striped high z ions giving an inverted population which produces the desired coherent x-rays. In one embodiment, a laser, light beam provides a laser spark that produces the intense burst of coherent x-rays that illuminates the mixture of high z and low z gases, whereby the high z atoms are stripped while the low z ones are not, giving the desired mixture of highly ionized and neutral atoms. To this end, the laser spark is produced by injecting a laser light beam, or a plurality of beams, into a first gas in a cylindrical container having an adjacent second gas layer co-axial therewith, the laser producing a plasma and the intense primary x-rays in the first gas, and the second gas containing the high and low atomic number elements for receiving the primary x-rays, whereupon the secondary x-rays are produced therein by stripping desired ions in a neutral gas and transfer of electrons to highly excited states of the stripped ions from the unionized atoms. Means for magnetically confining and stabilizing the plasma are disclosed for controlling the direction of the x-rays.

  10. X-rays from Saturn Pose Puzzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    The first clear detection of X-rays from the giant, gaseous planet Saturn has been made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. Chandra's image shows that the X-rays are concentrated near Saturn's equator, a surprising result since Jupiter's X-ray emission is mainly concentrated near the poles. Existing theories cannot easily explain the intensity or distribution of Saturn's X-rays. Chandra observed Saturn for about 20 hours in April of 2003. The spectrum, or distribution with energy of the X-rays, was found to be very similar to that of X-rays from the Sun. "This indicates that Saturn's X-ray emission is due to the scattering of solar X-rays by Saturn's atmosphere," said Jan-Uwe Ness, of the University of Hamburg in Germany and lead author of a paper discussing the Saturn results in an upcoming issue of Astronomy & Astrophysics. "It's a puzzle, since the intensity of Saturn's X-rays requires that Saturn reflects X-rays fifty times more efficiently than the Moon." The observed 90 megawatts of X-ray power from Saturn's equatorial region is roughly consistent with previous observations of the X-radiation from Jupiter's equatorial region. This suggests that both giant, gaseous planets reflect solar X-rays at unexpectedly high rates. Further observations of Jupiter will be needed to test this possibility. The weak X-radiation from Saturn's south-polar region presents another puzzle (the north pole was blocked by Saturn's rings during this observation). Saturn's magnetic field, like that of Jupiter, is strongest near the poles. X-radiation from Jupiter is brightest at the poles because of auroral activity due to the enhanced interaction of high-energy particles from the Sun with its magnetic field. Since spectacular ultraviolet polar auroras have been observed to occur on Saturn, Ness and colleagues expected that Saturn's south pole might be bright in X-rays. It is not clear whether the auroral mechanism does not produce X-rays on Saturn, or for some reason concentrates

  11. Seeing Red and Shooting Blanks: A Study of Red Quasars and Blank Field X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have identified a population of 'blank field sources' (or 'blanks') among the ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite) bright unidentified X-ray sources with faint optical counterparts. The extreme X-ray over optical flux ratio of blank field sources is not compatible with the main classes of X-ray emitters except for extreme BL Lacertae objects at fx/fv is equal to or less than 35. From the analysis of ROSAT archival data we found evidence for only three sources, out of 16, needing absorption in excess of the Galactic value and no indication of variability. We also found evidence for an extended nature for only one of the five blanks with a serendipitous HRI (High Resolution Imager) detection; this source (1WGA J1226.9+3332) was confirmed as a z=0.89 cluster of galaxies. Palomar images reveal the presence of a red (O - E is equal to or greater than 2) counterpart in the X-ray error circle for six blanks. The identification process brought to the discovery of another high z cluster of galaxies, one (possibly extreme) BL Lac and two apparently normal type 1 AGNs (Active Galactic Nuclei). These AGNs, together with four more AGN-like objects seem to form a well defined group: they present type 1 X-ray spectra but red Palomar counterparts. We discuss the possible explanations for the discrepancy between the X-ray and optical data, among which: a suppressed big blue bump emission, an extreme dust to gas (approximately 40 - 60 the Galactic ratio) ratio value and a high redshift (z is greater than or equal to 3.5) QSO (Quasi-Stellar Object) nature. These AGN-like blanks seem to be the bright (and easier to study) analogs of the sources which are being found in deep Chandra observations. Five more blanks have a still an unknown nature.

  12. The Fermi-GBM Three-year X-Ray Burst Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenke, P. A.; Linares, M.; Connaughton, V.; Beklen, E.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M. H.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.

    2016-08-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is an all-sky gamma-ray monitor well known in the gamma-ray burst (GRB) community. Although GBM excels in detecting the hard, bright extragalactic GRBs, its sensitivity above 8 keV and its all-sky view make it an excellent instrument for the detection of rare, short-lived Galactic transients. In 2010 March, we initiated a systematic search for transients using GBM data. We conclude this phase of the search by presenting a three-year catalog of 1084 X-ray bursts. Using spectral analysis, location, and spatial distributions we classified the 1084 events into 752 thermonuclear X-ray bursts, 267 transient events from accretion flares and X-ray pulses, and 65 untriggered gamma-ray bursts. All thermonuclear bursts have peak blackbody temperatures broadly consistent with photospheric radius expansion (PRE) bursts. We find an average rate of 1.4 PRE bursts per day, integrated over all Galactic bursters within about 10 kpc. These include 33 and 10 bursts from the ultra-compact X-ray binaries 4U 0614+09 and 2S 0918-549, respectively. We discuss these recurrence times and estimate the total mass ejected by PRE bursts in our Galaxy.

  13. X-RAY SPECTRAL CUTOFF AND THE LACK OF HARD X-RAY EMISSION FROM TWO ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES M81 X-6 AND HOLMBERG IX X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Dewangan, G. C.; Misra, R.; Jithesh, V.; Ravikumar, C. D.

    2013-07-10

    We present broadband X-ray spectral study of two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), M81 X-6 and Holmberg IX X-1, based on Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations. We perform joint broadband spectral analysis of the brightest sources in the field, i.e., the two ULXs and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in M81, and demonstrate that the X-ray spectra of the ULXs cut off at energies {approx}> 3 keV with negligible contribution at high energies in the Suzaku HXD/PIN band. The 90% upper limit on the 10-30 keV band luminosity of an underlying broadband power-law component is 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1} for M81 X-6 and 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} for Holmberg IX X-1. These limits are more than an order of magnitude lower than the bolometric (0.1-30 keV) luminosity of 6.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} for M81 X-6 and 1.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} for Holmberg IX X-1. Our results confirm earlier indications of spectral cutoffs inferred from the XMM-Newton observations of bright ULXs and show that there is not an additional high-energy power-law component contributing significantly to the X-ray emission. The spectral form of the two ULXs are very different from those of Galactic black hole X-ray binaries (BHBs) or AGNs. This implies that the ULXs are neither simply scaled-up versions of stellar-mass BHBs nor scaled-down versions of AGNs.

  14. X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  15. CXOGBS J173620.2-293338: A candidate symbiotic X-ray binary associated with a bulge carbon star

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, Robert I.; Britt, C. T.; Johnson, C. B.; Torres, M. A. P.; Jonker, P. G.; Heinke, C. O.; Maccarone, T. J.; Mikles, V. J.; Knigge, C.; Greiss, S.; Steeghs, D.; Nelemans, G.; Bandyopadhyay, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    The Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a wide but shallow X-ray survey of regions above and below the Plane in the Galactic Bulge. It was performed using the Chandra X-ray Observatory's ACIS camera. The survey is primarily designed to find and classify low luminosity X-ray binaries. The combination of the X-ray depth of the survey and the accessibility of optical and infrared counterparts makes this survey ideally suited to identification of new symbiotic X-ray binaries (SyXBs) in the Bulge. We consider the specific case of the X-ray source CXOGBS J173620.2-293338. It is coincident to within 1 arcsec with a very red star, showing a carbon star spectrum and irregular variability in the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment data. We classify the star as a late C-R type carbon star based on its spectral features, photometric properties, and variability characteristics, although a low-luminosity C-N type cannot be ruled out. The brightness of the star implies it is located in the Bulge, and its photometric properties are overall consistent with the Bulge carbon star population. Given the rarity of carbon stars in the Bulge, we estimate the probability of such a close chance alignment of any GBS source with a carbon star to be ≲ 10{sup –3}, suggesting that this is likely to be a real match. If the X-ray source is indeed associated with the carbon star, then the X-ray luminosity is around 9 × 10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1}. Its characteristics are consistent with a low luminosity SyXB, or possibly a low accretion rate white dwarf symbiotic.

  16. An x-ray study of luminous infrared galaxies observed with ASCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misaki, K.; Iwasawa, K.; Taniguchi, Y.; Terashima, Y.; Kunieda, H.; Watarai, H.

    The discovery of ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) has provided a clue to an evolutionary connection between starburst and active galactic nuclei. The IRAS color is suggested to be a possible trace of the evolution. We present the results of ASCA observations of two ULIRGs, IRAS20551-4250 and IRAS23128-5919, which are southern 100 μm bright galaxies with LIR ~ 1012Lsolar. Both are mergers and have a ``warm'' IRAS color (25μm100μm >= 0.15). The ASCA spectrum of IRAS20551-4250 can be characterized by two components, one of which is a soft thermal component (kT ~ 0.3keV) and the other is a hard power-law component absorbed by a column density of 1022 cm-2. The observed X-ray luminosity is ~ 2.5 × 1042 ergs/s in the rest frame 2-10keV band (assuming H0 = 50 km/s/Mpc). IRAS23128-5919 also shows a hard spectrum (LX ~ 3 × 1042 ergs/s), but thermal emission is not as clear as that in IRAS20551-4250. Since these targets are similar in infrared luminosity as well as in hard X-rays but not in soft X-rays, LIR would be associated with hard X-rays. In addition to these results, we here compare X-ray properties of ULIRGs with IR properties.

  17. FINDING FOSSIL GROUPS: OPTICAL IDENTIFICATION AND X-RAY CONFIRMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Eric D.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Dupke, Renato A.; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Proctor, Robert N.; Lopes de Oliveira, Raimundo; Garmire, Gordon P.; Koester, Benjamin P.; McKay, Timothy A.

    2012-03-10

    We report the discovery of 12 new fossil groups (FGs) of galaxies, systems dominated by a single giant elliptical galaxy and cluster-scale gravitational potential, but lacking the population of bright galaxies typically seen in galaxy clusters. These FGs, selected from the maxBCG optical cluster catalog, were detected in snapshot observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We detail the highly successful selection method, with an 80% success rate in identifying 12 FGs from our target sample of 15 candidates. For 11 of the systems, we determine the X-ray luminosity, temperature, and hydrostatic mass, which do not deviate significantly from expectations for normal systems, spanning a range typical of rich groups and poor clusters of galaxies. A small number of detected FGs are morphologically irregular, possibly due to past mergers, interaction of the intra-group medium with a central active galactic nucleus (AGN), or superposition of multiple massive halos. Two-thirds of the X-ray-detected FGs exhibit X-ray emission associated with the central brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), although we are unable to distinguish between AGN and extended thermal galaxy emission using the current data. This sample representing a large increase in the number of known FGs, will be invaluable for future planned observations to determine FG temperature, gas density, metal abundance, and mass distributions, and to compare to normal (non-fossil) systems. Finally, the presence of a population of galaxy-poor systems may bias mass function determinations that measure richness from galaxy counts. When used to constrain power spectrum normalization and {Omega}{sub m}, these biased mass functions may in turn bias these results.

  18. M31 Globular Cluster X-Ray Sources: XMM-Newton and Chandra Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudolyubov, Sergey; Priedhorsky, William

    2004-12-01

    We present the results of an M31 globular cluster (GC) X-ray source survey, based on the data of XMM-Newton and Chandra observations covering ~6100 arcmin2 of M31. We detected 43 X-ray sources coincident with GC candidates from various optical surveys. The inferred isotropic X-ray luminosities of GC sources lie between ~1035 and ~1039 ergs s-1 in the 0.3-10 keV energy band. The spectral properties of the 31 brightest sources in our sample were found to be similar to those of the low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) located in the bulge and the GCs of the Milky Way. The spectral distribution of the M31 GC X-ray sources is consistent with that derived for the bulge of M31 and other nearby galaxies of different morphological type. Several sources demonstrate a correlation between the level of X-ray flux and the hardness of their energy spectrum reminiscent of the Galactic Z and atoll sources. We found that ~80% of the M31 GC sources with multiple flux measurements available show significant variability on timescales from days to years. The X-ray source RX J0043.2+4127, coincident with GC Bo 163, has been found to show recurrent transient outbursts with peak luminosities of ~1038 ergs s-1. Several sources in our sample show significant variability on a timescale of individual observations, ranging from aperiodic fluctuations to regular dipping. The X-ray luminosity function of GC sources is found to be significantly different from that of the point sources in the bulge and disk of M31. The luminosity distribution of M31 GC sources has ~10 times higher peak luminosity and a much higher fraction of bright sources than the Milky Way GC distribution. Six persistent sources in our sample (or ~14% of the total number) have luminosities exceeding 1038 ergs s-1 during all observations, and three other sources occasionally exceed that luminosity level. Our observations indicate that GC sources make the dominant contribution to the bright source counts in the areas of M31 covered by

  19. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  20. X-ray superbubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, W.

    1983-01-01

    Four regions of the galaxy, the Cygnus Superbubble, the Eta Carina complex, the Orion/Eridanus complex, and the Gum Nebula, are discussed as examples of collective effects in the interstellar medium. All four regions share certain features, indicating a common structure. The selection effects which determine the observable X-ray properties of the superbubbles are discussed, and it is demonstrated that only a very few more in our Galaxy can be detected in X rays. X-ray observation of extragalactic superbubbles is shown to be possible but requires the capabilities of a large, high quality, AXAF class observatory.

  1. The X-ray surface brightness profiles of hot galaxy clusters up to vec z ~ 0.8: Evidence for self-similarity and constraints on Omega0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, M.; Aghanim, N.; Neumann, D. M.

    2002-07-01

    We study the surface brightness profiles of a sample of 25 distant (0.3 3.5 keV ) clusters, observed with ROSAT, with published temperatures from ASCA. For both open and flat cosmological models, the derived emission measure profiles are scaled according to the self-similar model of cluster formation. We use the standard scaling relations of cluster properties with redshift and temperature, with the empirical slope of the Mgas-T relation derived by Neumann & Arnaud (\\cite{neumann01}). Using a chi 2 test, we perform a quantitative comparison of the scaled emission measure profiles of distant clusters with a local reference profile derived from the sample of 15 hot nearby clusters compiled by Neumann & Arnaud (1999), which were found to obey self-similarity. This comparison allows us to both check the validity of the self-similar model across the redshift range 0.04-0.8, and to constrain the cosmological parameters. For a low-density flat universe, the scaled distant cluster data were found to be consistent, both in shape and normalisation, with the local reference profile. It indicates that hot clusters constitute a homologous family up to high redshifts, and gives support to the standard picture of structure formation for the dark matter component. Because of the intrinsic regularity in the hot cluster population, the scaled profiles can be used as distance indicators, the correct cosmology being the one for which the various profiles at different redshifts coincide. The intrinsic limitations of the method, in particular possible systematic errors and biases related to the model uncertainties, are discussed. Using the standard evolution model, the present data allow us to put a tight constraint on Omo for a flat Universe: Omo =0.40+0.15-0.12 at 90% confidence level (statistical errors only). The critical model (Omo =1) was excluded at the 98% confidence level. Consistently, the observed evolution of the normalisation of the LX-T relation was found

  2. HX-POL - A Balloon-Bourne Hard X-Ray Polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczynski, H.; De Geronimo, G.; Garson, A., III, Martin, J.; Li, Q.; Beilicke, M,; Dowkontt, P.; Lee, K.; Wulf, E.; Kurfess, J.; Novikova, E.; Baring, M.G.; Harding, A.K.; Grindlay, J.; Hong, J.S.

    2009-12-09

    We report on the design and estimated performance of a balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter called HX-POL. The experiment uses a combination of Si and Cadmium Zinc Telluride detectors to measure the polarization of 50 keV-400 keV X-rays from cosmic sources through the dependence of the angular distribution of Compton scattered photons on the polarization direction. On a one-day balloon flight, HX-POL would allow us to measure the polarization of bright Crab-like sources for polarization degrees well below 10%. On a longer (15-30 day) flight from Australia or Antarctica, HX-POL would be be able to measure the polarization of bright galactic X-ray sources down to polarization degrees of a few percent. Hard X-ray polarization measurements provide unique venues for the study of particle acceleration processes by compact objects and relativistic outflows. In this paper, we discuss the overall instrument design and performance. Furthermore, we present results from laboratory tests of the Si and CZT detectors.

  3. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  4. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... The test is done in a hospital radiology department or in the health care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  5. X ray opacity in cluster cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Michael W.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1993-01-01

    We have calculated the emergent x-ray properties for a set of spherically symmetric, steady-state cluster cooling flow models including the effects of radiative transfer. Opacity due to resonant x-ray lines, photoelectric absorption, and electron scattering have been included in these calculations, and homogeneous and inhomogeneous gas distributions were considered. The effects of photoionization opacity are small for both types of models. In contrast, resonant line optical depths can be quite high in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous models. The presence of turbulence in the gas can significantly lower the line opacity. We find that integrated x-ray spectra for the flow cooling now are only slightly affected by radiative transfer effects. However x-ray line surface brightness profiles can be dramatically affected by radiative transfer. Line profiles are also strongly affected by transfer effects. The combined effects of opacity and inflow cause many of the lines in optically thick models to be asymmetrical.

  6. Unveiling the Intrinsic X-Ray Properties of Broad Absorption Line Quasars with a Relatively Unbiased Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, Leah K.; Dai, Xinyu; Leighly, Karen M.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Shankar, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    There is growing evidence of a higher intrinsic fraction of broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs) than that obtained in optical surveys, on which most previous X-ray studies of BALQSOs have focused. Here we present Chandra observations of 18 BALQSOs at z ~ 2, selected from a near-infrared (Two Micron All Sky Survey) sample, where the BALQSO fraction is likely to be close to the intrinsic fraction. We measure photon indices using the stacked spectra of the optically faint (i - Ks >= 2.3 mag) and optically bright (i - Ks < 2.3 mag) samples to be Γ ~= 1.5-2.1. We constrain their intrinsic column density by modeling the X-ray fractional hardness ratio, finding a mean column density of 3.5 × 1022 cm-2 assuming neutral absorption. We incorporate Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical measurements (rest frame UV) to study the broadband spectral index between the X-ray and UV bands, and compare this to a large sample of normal quasars. We estimate that the optically faint BALQSOs are X-ray weaker than the optically bright ones, and the entire sample of BALQSOs are intrinsically X-ray weak when compared to normal active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Correcting for magnification of X-ray emission via gravitational lensing by the central black hole viewed at large inclination angles makes these BALQSOs even more intrinsically X-ray weak. Finally, we estimate AGN kinetic feedback efficiencies of a few percent for an X-ray wind of 0.3c in high-ionization BALQSOs. Combined with energy carried by low-ionization BALQSOs and UV winds, the total kinetic energy in BALQSOs can be sufficient to provide AGN kinetic feedback required to explain the co-evolution between black holes and host galaxies.

  7. Globular cluster x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Pooley, David

    2010-04-20

    Globular clusters and x-ray astronomy have a long and fruitful history. Uhuru and OSO-7 revealed highly luminous (> 10(36) ergs(-1)) x-ray sources in globular clusters, and Einstein and ROSAT revealed a larger population of low-luminosity (< 10(33) ergs(-1)) x-ray sources. It was realized early on that the high-luminosity sources were low-mass x-ray binaries in outburst and that they were orders of magnitude more abundant per unit mass in globular clusters than in the rest of the galaxy. However, the low-luminosity sources proved difficult to classify. Many ideas were put forth--low-mass x-ray binaries in quiescence (qLMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), active main-sequence binaries (ABs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs)--but secure identifications were scarce. In ROSAT observations of 55 clusters, about 25 low-luminosity sources were found. Chandra has now observed over 80 Galactic globular clusters, and these observations have revealed over 1,500 x-ray sources. The superb angular resolution has allowed for many counterpart identifications, providing clues to the nature of this population. It is a heterogeneous mix of qLMXBs, CVs, ABs, and MSPs, and it has been shown that the qLMXBs and CVs are both, in part, overabundant like the luminous LMXBs. The number of x-ray sources in a cluster correlates very well with its encounter frequency. This points to dynamical formation scenarios for the x-ray sources and shows them to be excellent tracers of the complicated internal dynamics. The relation between the encounter frequency and the number of x-ray sources has been used to suggest that we have misunderstood the dynamical states of globular clusters.

  8. Unveiling the X-ray/UV properties of disk winds in active galactic nuclei using broad and mini-broad absorption line quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustini, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of the uniform analysis of 46 XMM-Newton observations of six BAL and seven mini-BAL QSOs belonging to the Palomar-Green Quasar catalogue. Moderate-quality X-ray spectroscopy was performed with the EPIC-pn, and allowed to characterise the general source spectral shape to be complex, significantly deviating from a power law emission. A simple power law analysis in different energy bands strongly suggests absorption to be more significant than reflection in shaping the spectra. If allowing for the absorbing gas to be either partially covering the continuum emission source or to be ionised, large column densities of the order of 1022-1024 cm-2 are inferred. When the statistics was high enough, virtually every source was found to vary in spectral shape on various time scales, from years to hours. All in all these observational results are compatible with radiation driven accretion disk winds shaping the spectra of these intriguing cosmic sources.

  9. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003381.htm X-ray - skeleton To use the sharing features on this page, ... ray views may be uncomfortable. If the whole skeleton is being imaged, the test usually takes 1 ...

  10. Observations of X-ray jets with the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Ishido, Yoshinori; Acton, Loren W.; Strong, Keith T.; Hirayama, Tadashi; Uchida, Yutaka; Mcallister, Alan H.; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Tsuneta, Saku; Shimizu, Toshifumi

    1992-01-01

    The features of the multiple X-ray jets in the solar corona, revealed by the time series of the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope images are described. The typical size of a jet was from 5 x 10 exp 3 to 4 x 10 exp 5 km, the translational velocity was 30-300 km/s, and the corresponding kinetic energy was estimated to be from 10 exp 25 to 10 exp 28 erg. Many of the jets were found to be associated with flares in X-ray bright points, emerging flux regions, or active regions, and they sometimes occurred several times from the same X-ray feature. One of the jets associated with a flaring bright point was identified as being an H-alpha surge.

  11. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    This final report covers the period 1 January 1985 - 31 March 1992. It is divided into the following sections: the soft x-ray background; proportional counter and filter calibrations; sounding rocket flight preparations; new sounding rocket payload: x-ray calorimeter; and theoretical studies. Staff, publications, conference proceedings, invited talks, contributed talks, colloquia and seminars, public service lectures, and Ph. D. theses are listed.

  12. X-Ray Detector Simulations - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tina, Adrienne

    2015-08-20

    The free-electron laser at LCLS produces X-Rays that are used in several facilities. This light source is so bright and quick that we are capable of producing movies of objects like proteins. But making these movies would not be possible without a device that can detect the X-Rays and produce images. We need X-Ray cameras. The challenges LCLS faces include the X-Rays’ high repetition rate of 120 Hz, short pulses that can reach 200 femto-seconds, and extreme peak brightness. We need detectors that are compatible with this light source, but before they can be used in the facilities, they must first be characterized. My project was to do just that, by making a computer simulation program. My presentation discusses the individual detectors I simulated, the details of my program, and how my project will help determine which detector is most useful for a specific experiment.

  13. X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, Walter H. G.; van Paradijs, Jan; van den Heuvel, Edward Peter Jacobus

    1997-01-01

    Preface; 1. The properties of X-ray binaries, N. E. White, F. Nagase and A. N. Parmar; 2. Optical and ultraviolet observations of X-ray binaries J. van Paradijs and J. E. McClintock; 3. Black-hole binaries Y. Tanaka and W. H. G. Lewin; 4. X-ray bursts Walter H. G. Lewin, Jan Van Paradijs and Ronald E. Taam; 5. Millisecond pulsars D. Bhattacharya; 6. Rapid aperiodic variability in binaries M. van der Klis; 7. Radio properties of X-ray binaries R. M. Hjellming and X. Han; 8. Cataclysmic variable stars France Anne-Dominic Córdova; 9. Normal galaxies and their X-ray binary populations G. Fabbiano; 10. Accretion in close binaries Andrew King; 11. Formation and evolution of neutron stars and black holes in binaries F. Verbunt and E. P. J. van den Heuvel; 12. The magnetic fields of neutron stars and their evolution D. Bhattacharya and G. Srinivasan; 13. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts K. Hurley; 14. A catalogue of X-ray binaries Jan van Paradijs; 15. A compilation of cataclysmic binaries with known or suspected orbital periods Hans Ritter and Ulrich Kolb; References; Index.

  14. X-ray jets in microquasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, S.

    2003-03-01

    Large scale moving relativistic X-ray jets have been recently discovered around the microquasar XTE J1550--564 (Corbel et al. 2002, Sci., 298, 196). They have been observed over a timescale of at least four years. The broadband spectra of the jets are consistent with synchrotron emission from high energy (up to 10 TeV) particles accelerated in shocks, possibly during the interaction of the jets with the interstellar medium. XTE J1550-564 offers a unique opportunity to study the dynamical evolution of relativistic jets on time scales inaccessible for active galactic nuclei jets, with implications for our understanding of relativistic jets from Galactic x-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei. New results from the continuing multiwavelength campaign, as well as a comparison with other jet producing system, will be shown during this presentation.

  15. RESOLVED COMPANIONS OF CEPHEIDS: TESTING THE CANDIDATES WITH X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Nancy Remage; Pillitteri, Ignazio; Wolk, Scott; Karovska, Margarita; Tingle, Evan; Guinan, Edward; Engle, Scott; Bond, Howard E.; Schaefer, Gail H.; Mason, Brian D. E-mail: heb11@psu.edu

    2016-04-15

    We have made XMM-Newton observations of 14 Galactic Cepheids that have candidate resolved (≥5″) companion stars based on our earlier HST Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging survey. Main-sequence stars that are young enough to be physical companions of Cepheids are expected to be strong X-ray producers in contrast to field stars. XMM-Newton exposures were set to detect essentially all companions hotter than spectral type M0 (corresponding to 0.5 M{sub ⊙}). The large majority of our candidate companions were not detected in X-rays, and hence are not confirmed as young companions. One resolved candidate (S Nor #4) was unambiguously detected, but the Cepheid is a member of a populous cluster. For this reason, it is likely that S Nor #4 is a cluster member rather than a gravitationally bound companion. Two further Cepheids (S Mus and R Cru) have X-ray emission that might be produced by either the Cepheid or the candidate resolved companion. A subsequent Chandra observation of S Mus shows that the X-rays are at the location of the Cepheid/spectroscopic binary. R Cru and also V659 Cen (also X-ray bright) have possible companions closer than 5″ (the limit for this study) which are the likely sources of X-rays. One final X-ray detection (V473 Lyr) has no known optical companion, so the prime suspect is the Cepheid itself. It is a unique Cepheid with a variable amplitude. The 14 stars that we observed with XMM constitute 36% of the 39 Cepheids found to have candidate companions in our HST/WFC3 optical survey. No young probable binary companions were found with separations of ≥5″ or 4000 au.

  16. Resolved Companions of Cepheids: Testing the Candidates with X-Ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Nancy Remage; Pillitteri, Ignazio; Wolk, Scott; Karovska, Margarita; Tingle, Evan; Guinan, Edward; Engle, Scott; Bond, Howard E.; Schaefer, Gail H.; Mason, Brian D.

    2016-04-01

    We have made XMM-Newton observations of 14 Galactic Cepheids that have candidate resolved (≥5″) companion stars based on our earlier HST Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging survey. Main-sequence stars that are young enough to be physical companions of Cepheids are expected to be strong X-ray producers in contrast to field stars. XMM-Newton exposures were set to detect essentially all companions hotter than spectral type M0 (corresponding to 0.5 M⊙). The large majority of our candidate companions were not detected in X-rays, and hence are not confirmed as young companions. One resolved candidate (S Nor #4) was unambiguously detected, but the Cepheid is a member of a populous cluster. For this reason, it is likely that S Nor #4 is a cluster member rather than a gravitationally bound companion. Two further Cepheids (S Mus and R Cru) have X-ray emission that might be produced by either the Cepheid or the candidate resolved companion. A subsequent Chandra observation of S Mus shows that the X-rays are at the location of the Cepheid/spectroscopic binary. R Cru and also V659 Cen (also X-ray bright) have possible companions closer than 5″ (the limit for this study) which are the likely sources of X-rays. One final X-ray detection (V473 Lyr) has no known optical companion, so the prime suspect is the Cepheid itself. It is a unique Cepheid with a variable amplitude. The 14 stars that we observed with XMM constitute 36% of the 39 Cepheids found to have candidate companions in our HST/WFC3 optical survey. No young probable binary companions were found with separations of ≥5″ or 4000 au. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and the USA (NASA).

  17. Structure formation in a mixed dark matter model with decaying sterile neutrino: the 3.5 keV X-ray line and the Galactic substructure

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Akira; Kamada, Ayuki E-mail: ayuki.kamada@ucr.edu

    2016-01-01

    We perform a set of cosmological simulations of structure formation in a mixed dark matter (MDM) model. Our model is motivated by the recently identified 3.5 keV X-ray line, which can be explained by the decay of non-resonantly pr