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Sample records for bright late-time fermi

  1. GRB 090926A AND BRIGHT LATE-TIME FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.; Vetere, L.; Kennea, J. A.; Maxham, A.; Zhang, B. B.; Zhang, B.; Schady, P.; Holland, S. T.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Oates, S. R.; De Pasquale, M.; Page, K. L.

    2010-07-20

    GRB 090926A was detected by both the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope (LAT) instruments on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Swift follow-up observations began {approx}13 hr after the initial trigger. The optical afterglow was detected for nearly 23 days post trigger, placing it in the long-lived category. The afterglow is of particular interest due to its brightness at late times, as well as the presence of optical flares at T0+10{sup 5} s and later, which may indicate late-time central engine activity. The LAT has detected a total of 16 gamma-ray bursts; nine of these bursts, including GRB 090926A, also have been observed by Swift. Of the nine Swift-observed LAT bursts, six were detected by UVOT, with five of the bursts having bright, long-lived optical afterglows. In comparison, Swift has been operating for five years and has detected nearly 500 bursts, but has only seen {approx}30% of bursts with optical afterglows that live longer than 10{sup 5} s. We have calculated the predicted gamma-ray fluence, as would have been seen by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board Swift, of the LAT bursts to determine whether this high percentage of long-lived optical afterglows is unique, when compared to BAT-triggered bursts. We find that, with the exception of the short burst GRB 090510A, the predicted BAT fluences indicate that the LAT bursts are more energetic than 88% of all Swift bursts and also have brighter than average X-ray and optical afterglows.

  2. General physical properties of bright Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Tavecchio, F.; Foschini, L.; Ghirlanda, G.; Maraschi, L.; Celotti, A.

    2010-02-01

    We studied all blazars of known redshift detected by the Fermi satellite during its first 3-month survey. For the majority of them, pointed Swift observations ensure a good multiwavelength coverage, enabling us to reliably construct their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We model the SEDs using a one-zone leptonic model and study the distributions of the derived interesting physical parameters as a function of the observed γ-ray luminosity. We confirm previous findings concerning the relation of the physical parameters with source luminosity which are at the origin of the blazar sequence. The SEDs allow to estimate the luminosity of the accretion disc for the majority of broad emitting line blazars, while for the lineless BL Lac objects in the sample upper limits can be derived. We find a positive correlation between the jet power and the luminosity of the accretion disc in broad-line blazars. In these objects, we argue that the jet must be proton dominated, and that the total jet power is of the same order of (or slightly larger than) the disc luminosity. We discuss two alternative scenarios to explain this result.

  3. Analysis of the Spectral Energy Distributions of Fermi bright blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparrini, D.; Cutini, S.; Colafrancesco, S.; Giommi, P.; Raino, S.

    2010-03-26

    Blazars are a small fraction of all extragalactic sources but, unlike other objects, they are strong emitters across the entire electromagnetic spectrum. In this study we have conducted a detailed investigation of the broad-band spectral properties of the gamma-ray selected blazars of the Fermi LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). By combining the accurately estimated Fermi gamma-ray spectra with Swift, radio, NIR-Optical and hard-X/gamma-ray data, collected within three months of the LBAS data taking period, we were able to assemble high-quality and quasi-simultaneous Spectral Energy Distributions (SED) for 48 LBAS blazars. Here we show the procedure for the multi wavelength analysis.

  4. Three millisecond pulsars in FERMI LAT unassociated bright sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Camilo, F.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Çelik, Ö.; Wolff, M. T.; Cheung, C. C.; Kerr, M.; Pennucci, T.; DeCesar, M. E.; Cognard, I.; Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W.; Freire, P. C. C.; Grove, J. E.; Abdo, A. A.; Desvignes, G.; Donato, D.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Guillemot, L.; Gwon, C.; Harding, A. K.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Michelson, P. F.; Parent, D.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Romani, R. W.; Smith, D. A.; Theureau, G.; Thompson, D. J.; Weltevrede, P.; Wood, K. S.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-12-23

    We searched for radio pulsars in 25 of the non-variable, unassociated sources in the Fermi LAT Bright Source List with the Green Bank Telescope at 820 MHz. Here, we report the discovery of three radio and γ-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from a high Galactic latitude subset of these sources. All of the pulsars are in binary systems, which would have made them virtually impossible to detect in blind γ-ray pulsation searches. They seem to be relatively normal, nearby (≤2 kpc) MSPs. These observations, in combination with the Fermi detection of γ-rays from other known radio MSPs, imply that most, if not all, radio MSPs are efficient γ-ray producers. The γ-ray spectra of the pulsars are power law in nature with exponential cutoffs at a few GeV, as has been found with most other pulsars. The MSPs have all been detected as X-ray point sources. Finally, their soft X-ray luminosities of ~1030-1031 erg s–1 are typical of the rare radio MSPs seen in X-rays.

  5. Three Millisecond Pulsars in Fermi LAT Unassociated Bright Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Camilo, F.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Celik, O.; Wolff, M. T.; Cheung, C. C.; Kerr, M.; Pennucci, T.; DeCesar, M. E.; Cognard, I.; Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W.; Freire, P. C. C.; Grove, J. E.; Abdo, A. A.; Desvignes, G.; Donato, D.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Guillemot, L.; Gwon, C.; Johnston, S.; Harding, A. K.; Thompson, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    We searched for radio pulsars in 25 of the non-variable, unassociated sources in the Fermi LAT Bright Source List with the Green Bank Telescope at 820 MHz. We report the discovery of three radio and gamma-ray millisecond pulsar (MSPs) from a high Galactic latitude subset of these sources. All of the pulsars are in binary systems, which would have made them virtually impossible to detect in blind gamma-ray pulsation searches. They seem to be relatively normal, nearby (<= 2 kpc) MSPs. These observations, in combination with the Fermi detection of gamma-rays from other known radio MSPs, imply that most, if not all, radio MSPs are efficient gamma-ray producers. The gamma-ray spectra of the pulsars are power law in nature with exponential cutoffs at a few Ge V, as has been found with most other pulsars. The MSPs have all been detected as X-ray point sources. Their soft X-ray luminosities of approx 10(exp 30) - 10(exp 31) erg/s are typical of the rare radio MSPs seen in X-rays.

  6. Three millisecond pulsars in FERMI LAT unassociated bright sources

    DOE PAGES

    Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Camilo, F.; ...

    2010-12-23

    We searched for radio pulsars in 25 of the non-variable, unassociated sources in the Fermi LAT Bright Source List with the Green Bank Telescope at 820 MHz. Here, we report the discovery of three radio and γ-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from a high Galactic latitude subset of these sources. All of the pulsars are in binary systems, which would have made them virtually impossible to detect in blind γ-ray pulsation searches. They seem to be relatively normal, nearby (≤2 kpc) MSPs. These observations, in combination with the Fermi detection of γ-rays from other known radio MSPs, imply that most, ifmore » not all, radio MSPs are efficient γ-ray producers. The γ-ray spectra of the pulsars are power law in nature with exponential cutoffs at a few GeV, as has been found with most other pulsars. The MSPs have all been detected as X-ray point sources. Finally, their soft X-ray luminosities of ~1030-1031 erg s–1 are typical of the rare radio MSPs seen in X-rays.« less

  7. Three Millisecond Pulsars in Fermi LAT Unassociated Bright Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Camilo, F.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Celik, O.; Wolff, M. T.; Cheung, C. C.; Kerr, M.; Pennucci, T.; DeCesar, M. E.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We searched for radio pulsars in 25 of the non-variable, unassociated sources in the Fermi LAT Bright Source List with the Green Bank Telescope at 820 MHz. We report the discovery of three radio and gamma-ray millisecond pulsar (MSPs) from a high Galactic latitude subset of these sources. All of the pulsars are in binary systems, which would have made them virtually impossible to detect in blind gamma-ray pulsation searches. They seem to be relatively normal, nearby (<= 2 kpc) MSPs. These observations, in combination with the Fermi detection of gamma-rays from other known radio MSPs, imply that most, if not all, radio MSPs are efficient gamma-ray producers. The gamma-ray spectra of the pulsars are power law in nature with exponential cutoffs at a few Ge V, as has been found with most other pulsars. The MSPs have all been detected as X-ray point sources. Their soft X-ray luminosities of approx 10(exp 30) - 10(exp 31) erg/s are typical of the rare radio MSPs seen in X-rays.

  8. Three Millisecond Pulsars in Fermi LAT Unassociated Bright Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Camilo, F.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Çelik, Ö.; Wolff, M. T.; Cheung, C. C.; Kerr, M.; Pennucci, T.; DeCesar, M. E.; Cognard, I.; Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W.; Freire, P. C. C.; Grove, J. E.; Abdo, A. A.; Desvignes, G.; Donato, D.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Guillemot, L.; Gwon, C.; Harding, A. K.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Michelson, P. F.; Parent, D.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Romani, R. W.; Smith, D. A.; Theureau, G.; Thompson, D. J.; Weltevrede, P.; Wood, K. S.; Ziegler, M.

    2011-01-01

    We searched for radio pulsars in 25 of the non-variable, unassociated sources in the Fermi LAT Bright Source List with the Green Bank Telescope at 820 MHz. We report the discovery of three radio and γ-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from a high Galactic latitude subset of these sources. All of the pulsars are in binary systems, which would have made them virtually impossible to detect in blind γ-ray pulsation searches. They seem to be relatively normal, nearby (<=2 kpc) MSPs. These observations, in combination with the Fermi detection of γ-rays from other known radio MSPs, imply that most, if not all, radio MSPs are efficient γ-ray producers. The γ-ray spectra of the pulsars are power law in nature with exponential cutoffs at a few GeV, as has been found with most other pulsars. The MSPs have all been detected as X-ray point sources. Their soft X-ray luminosities of ~1030-1031 erg s-1 are typical of the rare radio MSPs seen in X-rays.

  9. THREE MILLISECOND PULSARS IN FERMI LAT UNASSOCIATED BRIGHT SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Wolff, M. T.; Grove, J. E.; Camilo, F.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Celik, Oe.; DeCesar, M. E.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Cheung, C. C.; Abdo, A. A.; Kerr, M.; Pennucci, T.; Cognard, I.; Freire, P. C. C.; Desvignes, G.; Donato, D. E-mail: Paul.Ray@nrl.navy.mil

    2011-01-20

    We searched for radio pulsars in 25 of the non-variable, unassociated sources in the Fermi LAT Bright Source List with the Green Bank Telescope at 820 MHz. We report the discovery of three radio and {gamma}-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from a high Galactic latitude subset of these sources. All of the pulsars are in binary systems, which would have made them virtually impossible to detect in blind {gamma}-ray pulsation searches. They seem to be relatively normal, nearby ({<=}2 kpc) MSPs. These observations, in combination with the Fermi detection of {gamma}-rays from other known radio MSPs, imply that most, if not all, radio MSPs are efficient {gamma}-ray producers. The {gamma}-ray spectra of the pulsars are power law in nature with exponential cutoffs at a few GeV, as has been found with most other pulsars. The MSPs have all been detected as X-ray point sources. Their soft X-ray luminosities of {approx}10{sup 30}-10{sup 31} erg s{sup -1} are typical of the rare radio MSPs seen in X-rays.

  10. The Spectral Energy Distribution of Fermi Bright Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Agudo, I.; Ajello, M.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Arkharov, A. A.; Axelsson, M.; Bach, U.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Benitiez, E.; Berdyugin, A.; Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Marshall, F.; Scargle, J. D.; Thompson, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    We have conducted a detailed investigation of the broadband spectral properties of the gamma-ray selected blazars of the Fermi LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). By combining our accurately estimated Fermi gamma-ray spectra with Swift, radio, infra-red, optical, and other hard X-ray /gamma-ray data, collected within 3 months of the LBAS data taking period, we were able to assemble high-quality and quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distributions (SED) for 48 LBAS blazars. The SED of these gamma-ray sources is similar to that of blazars discovered at other wavelengths, clearly showing, in the usual log v-log v Fv representation, the typical broadband spectral signatures normally attributed to a combination of low-energy synchrotron radiation followed by inverse Compton emission of one or more components. We have used these SED to characterize the peak intensity of both the low- and the high-energy components. The results have been used to derive empirical relationships that estimate the position of the two peaks from the broadband colors (i.e., the radio to optical, alpha(sub ro) , and optical to X-ray, alpha(sub ox), spectral slopes) and from the gamma-ray spectral index. Our data show that the synchrotron peak frequency (v(sup S) (sub peak)) is positioned between 10(exp 12.5) and 10(exp 14) Hz in broad-lined flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and between 10(exp 13) and 10(exp 17) Hz in featureless BL Lacertae objects. We find that the gamma-ray spectral slope is strongly correlated with the synchrotron peak energy and with the X-ray spectral index, as expected at first order in synchrotron-inverse Compton scenarios. However, simple homogeneous, one-zone, synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) models cannot explain most of our SED, especially in the case of FSRQs and low energy peaked (LBL) BL Lacs. More complex models involving external Compton radiation or multiple SSC components are required to reproduce the overall SED and the observed spectral variability. While more than

  11. The Spectral Energy Distribution of Fermi bright blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Agudo, I.; Ajello, M.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Arkharov, A. A.; Axelsson, M.; Bach, U.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Benitez, E.; Berdyugin, A.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Boettcher, M.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Burrows, D.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Calzoletti, L.; Cameron, R. A.; Capalbi, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carosati, D.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chaty, S.; Chekhtman, A.; Chen, W. P.; Chiang, J.; Chincarini, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Costamante, L.; Cutini, S.; D'ammando, F.; Deitrick, R.; D'Elia, V.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Donnarumma, I.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dultzin, D.; Dumora, D.; Falcone, A.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Forné, E.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fuhrmann, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gómez, J. L.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giuliani, A.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Gronwall, C.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gurwell, M. A.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Healey, S. E.; Heidt, J.; Hiriart, D.; Horan, D.; Hoversten, E. A.; Hughes, R. E.; Itoh, R.; Jackson, M. S.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Jorstad, S. G.; Kadler, M.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kennea, J.; Kerr, M.; Kimeridze, G.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocian, M. L.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Koptelova, E.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Kovalev, Yu. A.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larionov, V. M.; Latronico, L.; Leto, P.; Lindfors, E.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Marchegiani, P.; Marscher, A. P.; Marshall, F.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nestoras, I.; Nilsson, K.; Nizhelsky, N. A.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Ojha, R.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Osborne, J.; Ozaki, M.; Pacciani, L.; Padovani, P.; Pagani, C.; Page, K.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pasanen, M.; Pavlidou, V.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Perri, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piranomonte, S.; Piron, F.; Pittori, C.; Porter, T. A.; Puccetti, S.; Rahoui, F.; Rainò, S.; Raiteri, C.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Richards, J. L.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Ros, J. A.; Roth, M.; Roustazadeh, P.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F. -W.; Sadun, A.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz; Scargle, J. D.; Sellerholm, A.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Sigua, L. A.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J. -L.; Stevenson, M.; Stratta, G.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Takalo, L. O.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vasileiou, V.; Verrecchia, F.; Vilchez, N.; Villata, M.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Zensus, J. A.; Zhekanis, G. V.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-05-13

    We have conducted a detailed investigation of the broadband spectral properties of the γ-ray selected blazars of the Fermi LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). By combining our accurately estimated Fermi γ-ray spectra with Swift, radio, infra-red, optical, and other hard X-ray/γ-ray data, collected within 3 months of the LBAS data taking period, we were able to assemble high-quality and quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distributions (SED) for 48 LBAS blazars. The SED of these γ-ray sources is similar to that of blazars discovered at other wavelengths, clearly showing, in the usual log ν-log ν F ν representation, the typical broadband spectral signatures normally attributed to a combination of low-energy synchrotron radiation followed by inverse Compton emission of one or more components. Here, we have used these SED to characterize the peak intensity of both the low- and the high-energy components. The results have been used to derive empirical relationships that estimate the position of the two peaks from the broadband colors (i.e., the radio to optical, αro, and optical to X-ray, αox, spectral slopes) and from the γ-ray spectral index. Our data show that the synchrotron peak frequency (ν S peak) is positioned between 1012.5 and 1014.5 Hz in broad-lined flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and between 1013 and 1017 Hz in featureless BL Lacertae objects. We find that the γ-ray spectral slope is strongly correlated with the synchrotron peak energy and with the X-ray spectral index, as expected at first order in synchrotron-inverse Compton scenarios. However, simple homogeneous, one-zone, synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) models cannot explain most of our SED, especially in the case of FSRQs and low energy peaked (LBL) BL Lacs. More complex models involving external Compton radiation or multiple SSC components are required to reproduce the overall SED and the

  12. The Spectral Energy Distribution of Fermi Bright Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Agudo, I.; Ajello, M.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Arkharov, A. A.; Axelsson, M.; Bach, U.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We have conducted a detailed investigation of the broadband spectral properties of the gamma-ray selected blazars of the Fermi LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). By combining our accurately estimated Fermi gamma-ray spectra with Swift, radio, infra-red, optical, and other hard X-ray /gamma-ray data, collected within 3 months of the LBAS data taking period, we were able to assemble high-quality and quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distributions (SED) for 48 LBAS blazars. The SED of these gamma-ray sources is similar to that of blazars discovered at other wavelengths, clearly showing, in the usual log v-log v Fv representation, the typical broadband spectral signatures normally attributed to a combination of low-energy synchrotron radiation followed by inverse Compton emission of one or more components. We have used these SED to characterize the peak intensity of both the low- and the high-energy components. The results have been used to derive empirical relationships that estimate the position of the two peaks from the broadband colors (i.e., the radio to optical, alpha(sub ro) , and optical to X-ray, alpha(sub ox), spectral slopes) and from the gamma-ray spectral index. Our data show that the synchrotron peak frequency (v(sup S) (sub peak)) is positioned between 10(exp 12.5) and 10(exp 14) Hz in broad-lined flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and between 10(exp 13) and 10(exp 17) Hz in featureless BL Lacertae objects. We find that the gamma-ray spectral slope is strongly correlated with the synchrotron peak energy and with the X-ray spectral index, as expected at first order in synchrotron-inverse Compton scenarios. However, simple homogeneous, one-zone, synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) models cannot explain most of our SED, especially in the case of FSRQs and low energy peaked (LBL) BL Lacs. More complex models involving external Compton radiation or multiple SSC components are required to reproduce the overall SED and the observed spectral variability. While more than

  13. The Spectral Energy Distribution of Fermi bright blazars

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Agudo, I.; ...

    2010-05-13

    We have conducted a detailed investigation of the broadband spectral properties of the γ-ray selected blazars of the Fermi LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). By combining our accurately estimated Fermi γ-ray spectra with Swift, radio, infra-red, optical, and other hard X-ray/γ-ray data, collected within 3 months of the LBAS data taking period, we were able to assemble high-quality and quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distributions (SED) for 48 LBAS blazars. The SED of these γ-ray sources is similar to that of blazars discovered at other wavelengths, clearly showing, in the usual log ν-log ν F ν representation, the typical broadband spectral signaturesmore » normally attributed to a combination of low-energy synchrotron radiation followed by inverse Compton emission of one or more components. Here, we have used these SED to characterize the peak intensity of both the low- and the high-energy components. The results have been used to derive empirical relationships that estimate the position of the two peaks from the broadband colors (i.e., the radio to optical, αro, and optical to X-ray, αox, spectral slopes) and from the γ-ray spectral index. Our data show that the synchrotron peak frequency (ν S peak) is positioned between 1012.5 and 1014.5 Hz in broad-lined flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and between 1013 and 1017 Hz in featureless BL Lacertae objects. We find that the γ-ray spectral slope is strongly correlated with the synchrotron peak energy and with the X-ray spectral index, as expected at first order in synchrotron-inverse Compton scenarios. However, simple homogeneous, one-zone, synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) models cannot explain most of our SED, especially in the case of FSRQs and low energy peaked (LBL) BL Lacs. More complex models involving external Compton radiation or multiple SSC components are required to reproduce the overall SED and the observed spectral variability. While more than 50% of known radio bright high energy peaked (HBL

  14. Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright Gamma-ray Source List

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D.L.; Barbiellini, Guido; Bastieri, Denis; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G.F.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, Thompson H.; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the {gamma}-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than {approx}10{sigma}) {gamma}-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) {gamma}-ray sources in the early mission data.

  15. Fermi view of the bright long GRB 090926A

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, Takeshi

    2010-10-15

    GRB 090926A is one of the brightest long burst detected by the GBM and LAT instruments on Fermi. More than 200 photons above 100 MeV and more than 30 photons above 1 GeV with the highest energy events up to {approx}20 GeV are observed after the GBM trigger (T0). The GeV emission delayed by 3 s from the onset against the low energy emission, as seen in other LAT GRBs. A sharp pulse around T0+10 s was coincidently observed by both GBM and LAT, and thus the pulse should not be due to the external shock. The spectrum exhibits an extra component against a canonical Band function from T0+3.3 to T0+21.6 s.

  16. Dark-bright solitons in a superfluid Bose-Fermi mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tylutki, Marek; Recati, Alessio; Dalfovo, Franco; Stringari, Sandro

    2016-05-01

    The recent experimental realisation of Bose-Fermi superfluid mixtures of dilute ultracold atomic gases has opened new perspectives in the study of quantum many-body systems. Depending on the values of the scattering lengths and the amount of bosons and fermions, a uniform Bose-Fermi mixture is predicted to exhibit a fully mixed phase, a fully separated phase or, in addition, a purely fermionic phase coexisting with a mixed phase. The occurrence of this intermediate configuration has interesting consequences when the system is nonuniform. In this work we theoretically investigate the case of solitonic solutions of coupled Bogoliubov-de Gennes and Gross-Pitaevskii equations for the fermionic and bosonic components, respectively. We show that, in the partially separated phase, a dark soliton in Fermi superfluid is accompanied by a broad bosonic component in the soliton, forming a dark-bright soliton which keeps full spatial coherence.

  17. GRB090510: a short bright and hard GRB detected by Fermi

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, F. de

    2010-03-26

    On 2009 May 10, 00:22:59 UT (T{sub 0}) the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) triggered and located the short and very bright GRB090510. For the first time, this hard GRB, with an Epeak of few MeV, also triggered independently the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Swift detected this GRB and the accurate position provided by the Swift/UVOT made possible a spectroscopic redshift measurement of z = 0.903 with VLT/FORS2. This short GRB exhibits new features for this kind of events such an extra component (power-law) at high energies and a long lasting (few minutes) emission observed by the LAT. These observations allow the derivation of very important physical parameters such as the minimum value of the bulk Lorentz factor and they put some unprecedent limits on the dependence of the speed of photons on their energy.

  18. VERITAS OBSERVATIONS OF SIX BRIGHT, HARD-SPECTRUM FERMI-LAT BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bouvier, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Benbow, W.; Boettcher, M.; Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Cui, W.; Duke, C.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A. E-mail: pafortin@cfa.harvard.edu; Collaboration: VERITAS Collaboration; and others

    2012-11-10

    We report on VERITAS very high energy (VHE; E {>=} 100 GeV) observations of six blazars selected from the Fermi Large Area Telescope First Source Catalog (1FGL). The gamma-ray emission from 1FGL sources was extrapolated up to the VHE band, taking gamma-ray absorption by the extragalactic background light into account. This allowed the selection of six bright, hard-spectrum blazars that were good candidate TeV emitters. Spectroscopic redshift measurements were attempted with the Keck Telescope for the targets without Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic data. No VHE emission is detected during the observations of the six sources described here. Corresponding TeV upper limits are presented, along with contemporaneous Fermi observations and non-concurrent Swift UVOT and X-Ray Telescope data. The blazar broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are assembled and modeled with a single-zone synchrotron self-Compton model. The SED built for each of the six blazars shows a synchrotron peak bordering between the intermediate- and high-spectrum-peak classifications, with four of the six resulting in particle-dominated emission regions.

  19. VERITAS Observations of Six Bright, Hard-Spectrum Fermi-LAT Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    E. Aliu; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Boettcher, M.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We report on VERITAS very-high-energy (VHE; E >= 100 GeV) observations of six blazars selected from the Fermi Large Area Telescope First Source Catalog (1FGL). The gamma-ray emission from 1FGL sources was extrapolated up to the VHE band, taking gamma-ray absorption by the extragalactic background light into account. This allowed the selection of six bright, hard-spectrum blazars that were good candidate TeV emitters. Spectroscopic redshift measurements were attempted with the Keck Telescope for the targets without Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic data. No VHE emission is detected during the observations of the six sources described here. Corresponding TeV upper limits are presented, along with contemporaneous Fermi observations and non-concurrent Swift UVOT and XRT data. The blazar broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are assembled and modeled with a single-zone synchrotron self-Compton model. The SED built for each of the six blazars show a synchrotron peak bordering between the intermediate- and high-spectrum-peak classifications, with four of the six resulting in particle-dominated emission region.

  20. VERITAS Observations of Six Bright, Hard-Spectrum Fermi-LAT Blazars

    DOE PAGES

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; ...

    2012-10-25

    In this paper, we report on VERITAS very high energy (VHE; E ≥ 100 GeV) observations of six blazars selected from the Fermi Large Area Telescope First Source Catalog (1FGL). The gamma-ray emission from 1FGL sources was extrapolated up to the VHE band, taking gamma-ray absorption by the extragalactic background light into account. This allowed the selection of six bright, hard-spectrum blazars that were good candidate TeV emitters. Spectroscopic redshift measurements were attempted with the Keck Telescope for the targets without Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic data. No VHE emission is detected during the observations of the six sources describedmore » here. Corresponding TeV upper limits are presented, along with contemporaneous Fermi observations and non-concurrent Swift UVOT and X-Ray Telescope data. The blazar broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are assembled and modeled with a single-zone synchrotron self-Compton model. Finally, the SED built for each of the six blazars shows a synchrotron peak bordering between the intermediate- and high-spectrum-peak classifications, with four of the six resulting in particle-dominated emission regions.« less

  1. VERITAS Observations of Six Bright, Hard-Spectrum Fermi-LAT Blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Böttcher, M.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Dumm, J.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Godambe, S.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Huan, H.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lee, K.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; Majumdar, P.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nelson, T.; de Bhróithe, A. O’Faoláin; Ong, R. A.; Orr, M.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Saxon, D. B.; Sembroski, G. H.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tešić, G.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Tsurusaki, K.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Vivier, M.; Wakely, S. P.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Welsing, R.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.; Fortin, P.; Horan, D.; Fumagalli, M.; Kaplan, K.; Prochaska, J. X.

    2012-10-25

    In this paper, we report on VERITAS very high energy (VHE; E ≥ 100 GeV) observations of six blazars selected from the Fermi Large Area Telescope First Source Catalog (1FGL). The gamma-ray emission from 1FGL sources was extrapolated up to the VHE band, taking gamma-ray absorption by the extragalactic background light into account. This allowed the selection of six bright, hard-spectrum blazars that were good candidate TeV emitters. Spectroscopic redshift measurements were attempted with the Keck Telescope for the targets without Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic data. No VHE emission is detected during the observations of the six sources described here. Corresponding TeV upper limits are presented, along with contemporaneous Fermi observations and non-concurrent Swift UVOT and X-Ray Telescope data. The blazar broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are assembled and modeled with a single-zone synchrotron self-Compton model. Finally, the SED built for each of the six blazars shows a synchrotron peak bordering between the intermediate- and high-spectrum-peak classifications, with four of the six resulting in particle-dominated emission regions.

  2. Spectral properties of bright Fermi-detected blazars in the gamma-ray band

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.

    2010-01-28

    We investigated the gamma-ray energy spectra of bright blazars of the LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS) using Fermi-LAT data. Spectral properties (hardness, curvature, and variability) established using a data set accumulated over 6 months of operation are presented and discussed for different blazar classes and subclasses: flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), low-synchrotron peaked BLLacs (LSP-BLLacs), intermediate-synchrotron peaked BLLacs (ISP-BLLacs), and high-synchrotron peaked BLLacs (HSP-BLLacs). Furthermore, the distribution of photon index (Γ, obtained from a power-law fit above 100 MeV) is found to correlate strongly with blazar subclass. The change in spectral index from that averaged over the 6 months observingmore » period is < 0.2-0.3 when the flux varies by about an order of magnitude, with a tendency toward harder spectra when the flux is brighter for FSRQs and LSP-BLLacs. A strong departure from a single power-law spectrum appears to be a common feature for FSRQs. Finally, we present this feature for some high-luminosity LSP-BLLacs, and a small number of ISP-BLLacs. It is absent in all LBAS HSP-BLLacs. For 3C 454.3 and AO 0235+164, the two brightest FSRQ source and LSP-BLLac source, respectively, a broken power law (BPL) gives the most acceptable of power law, BPL, and curved forms. The consequences of these findings are discussed.« less

  3. MILAGRO OBSERVATIONS OF MULTI-TeV EMISSION FROM GALACTIC SOURCES IN THE FERMI BRIGHT SOURCE LIST

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Linnemann, J. T.; Allen, B. T.; Chen, C.; Aune, T.; Berley, D.; Goodman, J. A.; Christopher, G. E.; Kolterman, B. E.; Mincer, A. I.; Nemethy, P.; DeYoung, T.; Dingus, B. L.; Hoffman, C. M.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Gonzalez, M. M.; Hays, E.; McEnery, J. E.; Huentemeyer, P. H.; Morgan, T.

    2009-08-01

    We present the result of a search of the Milagro sky map for spatial correlations with sources from a subset of the recent Fermi Bright Source List (BSL). The BSL consists of the 205 most significant sources detected above 100 MeV by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We select sources based on their categorization in the BSL, taking all confirmed or possible Galactic sources in the field of view of Milagro. Of the 34 Fermi sources selected, 14 are observed by Milagro at a significance of 3 standard deviations or more. We conduct this search with a new analysis which employs newly optimized gamma-hadron separation and utilizes the full eight-year Milagro data set. Milagro is sensitive to gamma rays with energy from 1 to 100 TeV with a peak sensitivity from 10 to 50 TeV depending on the source spectrum and declination. These results extend the observation of these sources far above the Fermi energy band. With the new analysis and additional data, multi-TeV emission is definitively observed associated with the Fermi pulsar, J2229.0+6114, in the Boomerang pulsar wind nebula (PWN). Furthermore, an extended region of multi-TeV emission is associated with the Fermi pulsar, J0634.0+1745, the Geminga pulsar.

  4. GAMMA-RAY LIGHT CURVES AND VARIABILITY OF BRIGHT FERMI-DETECTED BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Antolini, E.; Bonamente, E.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P. E-mail: stefano.ciprini@pg.infn.i E-mail: stefan@astro.su.s E-mail: stefan@astro.su.s E-mail: sarac@slac.stanford.ed

    2010-10-10

    This paper presents light curves as well as the first systematic characterization of variability of the 106 objects in the high-confidence Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). Weekly light curves of this sample, obtained during the first 11 months of the Fermi survey (2008 August 4-2009 July 4), are tested for variability and their properties are quantified through autocorrelation function and structure function analysis. For the brightest sources, 3 or 4 day binned light curves are extracted in order to determine power density spectra (PDSs) and to fit the temporal structure of major flares. More than 50% of the sources are found to be variable with high significance, where high states do not exceed 1/4 of the total observation range. Variation amplitudes are larger for flat spectrum radio quasars and low/intermediate synchrotron frequency peaked BL Lac objects. Autocorrelation timescales derived from weekly light curves vary from four to a dozen of weeks. Variable sources of the sample have weekly and 3-4 day bin light curves that can be described by 1/f {sup {alpha}} PDS, and show two kinds of gamma-ray variability: (1) rather constant baseline with sporadic flaring activity characterized by flatter PDS slopes resembling flickering and red noise with occasional intermittence and (2)-measured for a few blazars showing strong activity-complex and structured temporal profiles characterized by long-term memory and steeper PDS slopes, reflecting a random walk underlying mechanism. The average slope of the PDS of the brightest 22 FSRQs and of the 6 brightest BL Lacs is 1.5 and 1.7, respectively. The study of temporal profiles of well-resolved flares observed in the 10 brightest LBAS sources shows that they generally have symmetric profiles and that their total duration vary between 10 and 100 days. Results presented here can assist in source class recognition for unidentified sources and can serve as reference for more detailed analysis of the

  5. Gamma-Ray Light Curves And Variability Of Bright Fermi -Detected Blazars

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.

    2010-09-22

    This paper presents light curves as well as the first systematic characterization of variability of the 106 objects in the high-confidence Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). Weekly light curves of this sample, obtained during the first 11 months of the Fermi survey (2008 August 4-2009 July 4), are tested for variability and their properties are quantified through autocorrelation function and structure function analysis. For the brightest sources, 3 or 4 day binned light curves are extracted in order to determine power density spectra (PDSs) and to fit the temporal structure of major flares. More than 50% ofmore » the sources are found to be variable with high significance, where high states do not exceed 1/4 of the total observation range. Variation amplitudes are larger for flat spectrum radio quasars and low/intermediate synchrotron frequency peaked BL Lac objects. Autocorrelation timescales derived from weekly light curves vary from four to a dozen of weeks. Variable sources of the sample have weekly and 3-4 day bin light curves that can be described by 1/f α PDS, and show two kinds of gamma-ray variability: (1) rather constant baseline with sporadic flaring activity characterized by flatter PDS slopes resembling flickering and red noise with occasional intermittence and (2)—measured for a few blazars showing strong activity—complex and structured temporal profiles characterized by long-term memory and steeper PDS slopes, reflecting a random walk underlying mechanism. The average slope of the PDS of the brightest 22 FSRQs and of the 6 brightest BL Lacs is 1.5 and 1.7, respectively. The study of temporal profiles of well-resolved flares observed in the 10 brightest LBAS sources shows that they generally have symmetric profiles and that their total duration vary between 10 and 100 days. Results presented here can assist in source class recognition for unidentified sources and can serve as reference for more detailed analysis of the

  6. Gamma-Ray Light Curves And Variability Of Bright Fermi -Detected Blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.

    2010-09-22

    This paper presents light curves as well as the first systematic characterization of variability of the 106 objects in the high-confidence Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). Weekly light curves of this sample, obtained during the first 11 months of the Fermi survey (2008 August 4-2009 July 4), are tested for variability and their properties are quantified through autocorrelation function and structure function analysis. For the brightest sources, 3 or 4 day binned light curves are extracted in order to determine power density spectra (PDSs) and to fit the temporal structure of major flares. More than 50% of the sources are found to be variable with high significance, where high states do not exceed 1/4 of the total observation range. Variation amplitudes are larger for flat spectrum radio quasars and low/intermediate synchrotron frequency peaked BL Lac objects. Autocorrelation timescales derived from weekly light curves vary from four to a dozen of weeks. Variable sources of the sample have weekly and 3-4 day bin light curves that can be described by 1/f α PDS, and show two kinds of gamma-ray variability: (1) rather constant baseline with sporadic flaring activity characterized by flatter PDS slopes resembling flickering and red noise with occasional intermittence and (2)—measured for a few blazars showing strong activity—complex and structured temporal profiles characterized by long-term memory and steeper PDS slopes, reflecting a random walk underlying mechanism. The average slope of the PDS of the brightest 22 FSRQs and of the 6 brightest BL Lacs is 1.5 and 1.7, respectively. The study of temporal profiles of well-resolved flares observed in the 10 brightest LBAS sources shows that they generally have symmetric profiles and that their total duration vary between 10 and 100 days. Results presented here can assist in source class recognition for unidentified sources and can serve as reference for more detailed analysis of the

  7. Fermi/Large Area Telescope Bright Gamma-Ray Source List

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D. L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Battelino, M.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G. F.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Costamante, L.; Cutini, S.; Davis, D. S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Luca, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Dormody, M.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hartman, R. C.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Healey, S. E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kocian, M. L.; Komin, N.; Kuehn, F.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Marelli, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Poupard, L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sellerholm, A.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Shrader, C.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J.-L.; Stephens, T. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Van Etten, A.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Watters, K.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.; Fermi/LAT Collaboration

    2009-07-01

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the γ-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than ~10σ) γ-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) γ-ray sources in the early mission data.

  8. FERMI/LARGE AREA TELESCOPE BRIGHT GAMMA-RAY SOURCE LIST

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Battelino, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bignami, G. F.; Bonamente, E. E-mail: jean.ballet@cea.fr E-mail: David.J.Thompson@nasa.gov

    2009-07-15

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the {gamma}-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than {approx}10{sigma}) {gamma}-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) {gamma}-ray sources in the early mission data.

  9. Time Resolved Studies of Bright Short Gamma Ray Bursts in the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, E.; Connaughton, V.; Preece, R.; Goldstein, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present preliminary results on using a Bayesian Block representation of Fermi GBM data to select intervals for time resolved analysis of short GRBs. Additionally, we search for possible precursor and extended emission in short GRBs.

  10. MASTER: bright OT discovered during Fermi trigger 512353690/GRB170328A inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbovskoy, E.; Lipunov, V.; Buckley, D.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Gress, O.; Tiurina, N.; Balanutsa, P.; Kornilov, V.; Vladimirov, V.

    2017-03-01

    MASTER-SAAO auto-detection system ( Lipunov et al., "MASTER Global Robotic Net", Advances in Astronomy, 2010, 30L ) discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 18h 45m 46.55s -35d 28m 47.6s on 2017-03-28.06645 UT during Fermi trigger 512353690(GRB170328A) inspection https://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/other/512353690.fermi (trigger time is 17/03/28 00:28:05.53UT).

  11. MASTER discovery: blue bright OT during FERMI 496473540 (GRB160925A) inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gress, O.; Lipunov, V.; Buckley, D.; Tiurina, N.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Kornilov, V.; Vladimirov, V.; Shumkov, V.; Pogrosheva, T.; Rebolo Lopez, R.; Serra Ricart, M.; Podesta, R.; Levato, H.; Potter, S.; Lodieu, N.; Saffe, C.; Lopez, C.; Podesta, F.

    2016-09-01

    MASTER-SAAO auto-detection system ( Lipunov et al., "MASTER Global Robotic Net", Advances in Astronomy, 2010, 30L ) discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 22h 28m 17.90s -14d 56m 57.4s on 2016-09-25.75053 UT during automatically inspection of Fermi trigger 496473540 ( http://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/other/496473540.fermi ). The OT unfiltered magnitude is (limit 19.7m).

  12. CHARACTERIZING THE OPTICAL VARIABILITY OF BRIGHT BLAZARS: VARIABILITY-BASED SELECTION OF FERMI ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, John J.; Anderson, Scott F.; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Becker, Andrew C.; Davenport, James R. A.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Burnett, T. H.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Plotkin, Richard M.; Sesar, Branimir; Stuart, J. Scott

    2012-11-20

    We investigate the use of optical photometric variability to select and identify blazars in large-scale time-domain surveys, in part to aid in the identification of blazar counterparts to the {approx}30% of {gamma}-ray sources in the Fermi 2FGL catalog still lacking reliable associations. Using data from the optical LINEAR asteroid survey, we characterize the optical variability of blazars by fitting a damped random walk model to individual light curves with two main model parameters, the characteristic timescales of variability {tau}, and driving amplitudes on short timescales {sigma}-circumflex. Imposing cuts on minimum {tau} and {sigma}-circumflex allows for blazar selection with high efficiency E and completeness C. To test the efficacy of this approach, we apply this method to optically variable LINEAR objects that fall within the several-arcminute error ellipses of {gamma}-ray sources in the Fermi 2FGL catalog. Despite the extreme stellar contamination at the shallow depth of the LINEAR survey, we are able to recover previously associated optical counterparts to Fermi active galactic nuclei with E {>=} 88% and C = 88% in Fermi 95% confidence error ellipses having semimajor axis r < 8'. We find that the suggested radio counterpart to Fermi source 2FGL J1649.6+5238 has optical variability consistent with other {gamma}-ray blazars and is likely to be the {gamma}-ray source. Our results suggest that the variability of the non-thermal jet emission in blazars is stochastic in nature, with unique variability properties due to the effects of relativistic beaming. After correcting for beaming, we estimate that the characteristic timescale of blazar variability is {approx}3 years in the rest frame of the jet, in contrast with the {approx}320 day disk flux timescale observed in quasars. The variability-based selection method presented will be useful for blazar identification in time-domain optical surveys and is also a probe of jet physics.

  13. Characterizing the Optical Variability of Bright Blazars: Variability-based Selection of Fermi Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, John J.; Anderson, Scott F.; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Becker, Andrew C.; Burnett, T. H.; Davenport, James R. A.; Ivezić, Željko; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Plotkin, Richard M.; Sesar, Branimir; Stuart, J. Scott

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the use of optical photometric variability to select and identify blazars in large-scale time-domain surveys, in part to aid in the identification of blazar counterparts to the ~30% of γ-ray sources in the Fermi 2FGL catalog still lacking reliable associations. Using data from the optical LINEAR asteroid survey, we characterize the optical variability of blazars by fitting a damped random walk model to individual light curves with two main model parameters, the characteristic timescales of variability τ, and driving amplitudes on short timescales \\hat{\\sigma }. Imposing cuts on minimum τ and \\hat{\\sigma } allows for blazar selection with high efficiency E and completeness C. To test the efficacy of this approach, we apply this method to optically variable LINEAR objects that fall within the several-arcminute error ellipses of γ-ray sources in the Fermi 2FGL catalog. Despite the extreme stellar contamination at the shallow depth of the LINEAR survey, we are able to recover previously associated optical counterparts to Fermi active galactic nuclei with E >= 88% and C = 88% in Fermi 95% confidence error ellipses having semimajor axis r < 8'. We find that the suggested radio counterpart to Fermi source 2FGL J1649.6+5238 has optical variability consistent with other γ-ray blazars and is likely to be the γ-ray source. Our results suggest that the variability of the non-thermal jet emission in blazars is stochastic in nature, with unique variability properties due to the effects of relativistic beaming. After correcting for beaming, we estimate that the characteristic timescale of blazar variability is ~3 years in the rest frame of the jet, in contrast with the ~320 day disk flux timescale observed in quasars. The variability-based selection method presented will be useful for blazar identification in time-domain optical surveys and is also a probe of jet physics.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Fermi bright blazars (Fuhrmann+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, L.; Larsson, S.; Chiang, J.; Angelakis, E.; Zensus, J. A.; Nestoras, I.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Ungerechts, H.; Sievers, A.; Pavlidou, V.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Pearson, T. J.

    2015-02-01

    The present study is focusing on the sources observed at radio bands by the F-GAMMA monitoring programme. With a total of about 90 AGN/blazars ever observed since 2007 January, these sources constitute a sample of well known, frequently active and bright blazars (δ>-30°) for detailed studies of the most prominent behaviour of the brightest γ-ray-loud blazars. (1 data file).

  15. Detection of cm to sub-mm band radio and gamma-ray correlated variability in Fermi bright blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, Lars; Larsson, S.; Chiang, J.; Angelakis, E.; Zensus, A.; F-GAMMA Team; Fermi Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The exact location of the gamma-ray emitting region in blazars is still controversial. In order to attack this problem we performed a detailed statistical cross-correlation analysis between radio (cm/mm/sub-mm wavelengths, F-GAMMA program) and gamma-ray 3.5 year light curves of 54 Fermi bright blazars. In this talk, the main results of this analysis are highlighted including the first significant detection of multi-band radio/gamma-ray correlations using a stacking analysis. The radio bands are usually lagging the gamma rays with average time delays (source frame) ranging between 76+/-23 and 7+/-9 days, systematically decreasing from cm to mm/sub-mm bands following a power-law frequency dependence. The latter is in good agreement with synchrotron self-absorption dominated opacity effects, whereas a (positive) time lag of 12+/-8 days at 3 mm strongly suggests that the bulk gamma-ray production region is usually located within or even upstream of the innermost mm core region of these sources. Based on our findings we finally demonstrate that the gamma-ray emitting region of quasar 3C 454.3 is located at a distance of > 0.8-1.6 pc from the central supermassive black hole, i.e. at the outer edge of the Broad Line Region or beyond.

  16. Fermi Large Area Telescope detection of bright γ-ray outbursts from the peculiar quasar 4C +21.35

    DOE PAGES

    Tanaka, Y. T.; Stawarz, Ł.; Thompson, D. J.; ...

    2011-04-29

    In this study, we report on the two-year-long Fermi-Large Area Telescope observation of the peculiar blazar 4C +21.35 (PKS 1222+216). This source was in a quiescent state from the start of the science operations of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in 2008 August until 2009 September, and then became more active, with gradually increasing flux and some moderately bright flares. In 2010 April and June, 4C +21.35 underwent a very strong GeV outburst composed of several major flares characterized by rise and decay timescales of the order of a day. During the outburst, the GeV spectra of 4C +21.35 displayedmore » a broken power-law form with spectral breaks observed near 1-3 GeV photon energies. We demonstrate that, at least during the major flares, the jet in 4C +21.35 carried a total kinetic luminosity comparable to the total accretion power available to feed the outflow. We also discuss the origin of the break observed in the flaring spectra of 4C +21.35. We show that, in principle, a model involving annihilation of the GeV photons on the He II Lyman recombination continuum and line emission of "broad-line region" clouds may account for such. However, we also discuss the additional constraint provided by the detection of 4C +21.35 at 0.07-0.4 TeV energies by the MAGIC telescope, which coincided with one of the GeV flares of the source. We argue that there are reasons to believe that the lesssim TeV emission of 4C +21.35 (as well as the GeV emission of the source, if co-spatial) is not likely to be produced inside the broad-line region zone of highest ionization (~1017 cm from the nucleus), but instead originates further away from the active center, namely, around the characteristic scale of the hot dusty torus surrounding the 4C +21.35 nucleus (~1019 cm).« less

  17. Late-time spectroscopy of Type Iax Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Ryan J.; Jha, Saurabh W.; Pan, Yen-Chen; Zheng, Wei Kang; Bildsten, Lars; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Kasen, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    We examine the late-time (t ≳ 200 d after peak brightness) spectra of Type Iax supernovae (SNe Iax), a low-luminosity, low-energy class of thermonuclear stellar explosions observationally similar to, but distinct from, Type Ia supernovae. We present new spectra of SN 2014dt, resulting in the most complete late-time spectral sequence of an SN Iax. At late times, SNe Iax have generally similar spectra, all with a similar continuum shape and strong forbidden-line emission. However, there is also significant diversity where some SN Iax spectra display narrow P-Cygni features from permitted lines and a continuum indicative of a photosphere at late times in addition to strong narrow (FWHM < 3500 km s-1) forbidden lines, others have no obvious P-Cygni features, strong broad (FWHM > 6000 km s-1) forbidden lines, and weak narrow forbidden lines, and some SNe Iax have spectra intermediate to these two varieties. We find that SNe Iax with strong broad forbidden lines are more luminous and have higher velocity ejecta at peak brightness. We estimate blackbody and kinematic radii of the late-time photosphere, finding the latter significantly larger than the former. We propose a two-component model that solves this discrepancy and explains the diversity of the late-time spectra of SNe Iax. In this model, the broad forbidden lines originate from the SN ejecta, while the photosphere, P-Cygni lines, and narrow forbidden lines originate from a wind launched from the remnant of the progenitor white dwarf and is driven by the radioactive decay of newly synthesized material left in the remnant. The relative strength of the two components accounts for the diversity of late-time SN Iax spectra. This model also solves the puzzle of a long-lived photosphere and the slow late-time decline of SNe Iax.

  18. Detection of significant cm to sub-mm band radio and γ-ray correlated variability in Fermi bright blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, L.; Larsson, S.; Chiang, J.; Angelakis, E.; Zensus, J. A.; Nestoras, I.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Ungerechts, H.; Sievers, A.; Pavlidou, V.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Pearson, T. J.

    2014-07-01

    The exact location of the γ-ray emitting region in blazars is still controversial. In order to attack this problem we present first results of a cross-correlation analysis between radio (11 cm to 0.8 mm wavelength, F-GAMMA programme) and γ-ray (0.1-300 GeV) ˜3.5 yr light curves of 54 Fermi-bright blazars. We perform a source stacking analysis and estimate significances and chance correlations using mixed source correlations. Our results reveal: (i) the first highly significant multiband radio and γ-ray correlations (radio lagging γ rays) when averaging over the whole sample, (ii) average time delays (source frame: 76 ± 23 to 7 ± 9 d), systematically decreasing from cm to mm/sub-mm bands with a frequency dependence τr, γ(ν) ∝ ν-1, in good agreement with jet opacity dominated by synchrotron self-absorption, (iii) a bulk γ-ray production region typically located within/upstream of the 3 mm core region (τ3mm, γ = 12 ± 8 d), (iv) mean distances between the region of γ-ray peak emission and the radio `τ = 1 photosphere' decreasing from 9.8 ± 3.0 pc (11 cm) to 0.9 ± 1.1 pc (2 mm) and 1.4 ± 0.8 pc (0.8 mm), (v) 3 mm/γ-ray correlations in nine individual sources at a significance level where one is expected by chance (probability: 4 × 10-6), (vi) opacity and `time lag core shift' estimates for quasar 3C 454.3 providing a lower limit for the distance of the bulk γ-ray production region from the supermassive black hole (SMBH) of ˜0.8-1.6 pc, i.e. at the outer edge of the broad-line region (BLR) or beyond. A 3 mm τ = 1 surface at ˜2-3 pc from the jet base (i.e. well outside the `canonical BLR') finally suggests that BLR material extends to several parsec distances from the SMBH.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Fermi/LAT bright gamma-ray source list (0FGL) (Abdo+, 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D. L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Battelino, M.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G. F.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Costamante, L.; Cutini, S.; Davis, D. S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de, Luca A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Dormody, M.; Do Couto, E. Silva E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hartman, R. C.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Healey, S. E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knodlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kocian, M. L.; Komin, N.; Kuehn, F.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Marelli, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Poupard, L.; Raino, S.; Rando, R.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sellerholm, A.; Sgro, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Shrader, C.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J.-L.; Stephens, T. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D.J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Van Etten, A.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Watters, K.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2009-11-01

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the γ-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than ~10σ) γ-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) γ-ray sources in the early mission data. (1 data file).

  20. Fermi-LAT detection of a very bright Gamma-ray Onset from the Galactic Nova ASASSN-16ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kwan-Lok; Chomiuk, Laura; Strader, Jay

    2016-11-01

    We report the detection of gamma-ray emission from ASASSN-16ma, spectroscopically classified as a classical nova (ATel #9669 and ATel #9678). Because of the close proximity to TCP J18102829-2729590 (separated from ASAS-SN 16ma by 2.5 degrees), ASASSN-16ma is under our Fermi ToO monitoring triggered for TCP J18102829-2729590 since 2016-10-25 (ATel #9699).

  1. Fermi LAT detection of a bright GeV gamma-ray flare from the FSRQ 3C 345

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano; Buson, Sara

    2017-06-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed high-level gamma-ray activity from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar 3C 345 (also known as B2 1641+39, S4 1641+39, OS 368, 3FGL J1642.9+3950), with VLBI coordinates (J2000.0), R.A.: 250.745041 deg, Dec.: 39.810276 deg (Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880).

  2. Cut-off characterisation of energy spectra of bright fermi sources: Current instrument limits and future possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romoli, C.; Taylor, A. M.; Aharonian, F.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper some of the brightest GeV sources observed by the Fermi-LAT were analysed, focusing on their spectral cut-off region. The sources chosen for this investigation were the brightest blazar flares of 3C 454.3 and 3C 279 and the Vela pulsar with a reanalysis with the latest Fermi-LAT software. For the study of the spectral cut-off we first explored the Vela pulsar spectrum, whose statistics in the time interval of the 3FGL catalog allowed strong constraints to be obtained on the parameters. We subsequently performed a new analysis of the flaring blazar SEDs. For these sources we obtained constraints on the cut-off parameters under the assumption that their underlying spectral distribution is described by a power-law with a stretched exponential cut-off. We then highlighted the significant potential improvements on such constraints by observations with next generation ground based Cherenkov telescopes, represented in our study by the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Adopting currently available simulations for this future observatory, we demonstrate the considerable improvement in cut-off constraints achievable by observations with this new instrument when compared with that achievable by satellite observations.

  3. Fermi Large Area Telescope detection of bright γ-ray outbursts from the peculiar quasar 4C +21.35

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Y. T.; Stawarz, Ł.; Thompson, D. J.; D'Ammando, F.; Fegan, S. J.; Lott, B.; Wood, D. L.; Cheung, C. C.; Finke, J.; Buson, S.; Escande, L.; Saito, S.; Ohno, M.; Takahashi, T.; Donato, D.; Chiang, J.; Giroletti, M.; Schinzel, F. K.; Iafrate, G.; Longo, F.; Ciprini, S.

    2011-04-29

    In this study, we report on the two-year-long Fermi-Large Area Telescope observation of the peculiar blazar 4C +21.35 (PKS 1222+216). This source was in a quiescent state from the start of the science operations of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in 2008 August until 2009 September, and then became more active, with gradually increasing flux and some moderately bright flares. In 2010 April and June, 4C +21.35 underwent a very strong GeV outburst composed of several major flares characterized by rise and decay timescales of the order of a day. During the outburst, the GeV spectra of 4C +21.35 displayed a broken power-law form with spectral breaks observed near 1-3 GeV photon energies. We demonstrate that, at least during the major flares, the jet in 4C +21.35 carried a total kinetic luminosity comparable to the total accretion power available to feed the outflow. We also discuss the origin of the break observed in the flaring spectra of 4C +21.35. We show that, in principle, a model involving annihilation of the GeV photons on the He II Lyman recombination continuum and line emission of "broad-line region" clouds may account for such. However, we also discuss the additional constraint provided by the detection of 4C +21.35 at 0.07-0.4 TeV energies by the MAGIC telescope, which coincided with one of the GeV flares of the source. We argue that there are reasons to believe that the lesssim TeV emission of 4C +21.35 (as well as the GeV emission of the source, if co-spatial) is not likely to be produced inside the broad-line region zone of highest ionization (~1017 cm from the nucleus), but instead originates further away from the active center, namely, around the characteristic scale of the hot dusty torus surrounding the 4C +21.35 nucleus (~1019 cm).

  4. Detection of significant cm to sub-mm band radio and  γ-ray correlated variability in Fermi bright blazars

    DOE PAGES

    Fuhrmann, L.; Larsson, S.; Chiang, J.; ...

    2014-05-12

    The exact location of the γ-ray emitting region in blazars is still controversial. In order to attack this problem we present first results of a cross-correlation analysis between radio (11 cm to 0.8 mm wavelength, F-GAMMA programme) and γ-ray (0.1–300 GeV) ~3.5 yr light curves of 54 Fermi-bright blazars. We perform a source stacking analysis and estimate significances and chance correlations using mixed source correlations. These results reveal: (i) the first highly significant multiband radio and γ-ray correlations (radio lagging γ rays) when averaging over the whole sample, (ii) average time delays (source frame: 76 ± 23 to 7 ±more » 9 d), systematically decreasing from cm to mm/sub-mm bands with a frequency dependence τr, γ(ν) ∝ ν-1, in good agreement with jet opacity dominated by synchrotron self-absorption, (iii) a bulk γ-ray production region typically located within/upstream of the 3 mm core region (τ3mm, γ = 12 ± 8 d), (iv) mean distances between the region of γ-ray peak emission and the radio ‘τ = 1 photosphere’ decreasing from 9.8 ± 3.0 pc (11 cm) to 0.9 ± 1.1 pc (2 mm) and 1.4 ± 0.8 pc (0.8 mm), (v) 3 mm/γ-ray correlations in nine individual sources at a significance level where one is expected by chance (probability: 4 × 10-6), (vi) opacity and ‘time lag core shift’ estimates for quasar 3C 454.3 providing a lower limit for the distance of the bulk γ-ray production region from the supermassive black hole (SMBH) of ~0.8–1.6 pc, i.e. at the outer edge of the broad-line region (BLR) or beyond. A 3 mm τ = 1 surface at ~2–3 pc from the jet base (i.e. well outside the ‘canonical BLR’) finally suggests that BLR material extends to several parsec distances from the SMBH.« less

  5. Detection of significant cm to sub-mm band radio and  γ-ray correlated variability in Fermi bright blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrmann, L.; Larsson, S.; Chiang, J.; Angelakis, E.; Zensus, J. A.; Nestoras, I.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Ungerechts, H.; Sievers, A.; Pavlidou, V.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Pearson, T. J.

    2014-05-12

    The exact location of the γ-ray emitting region in blazars is still controversial. In order to attack this problem we present first results of a cross-correlation analysis between radio (11 cm to 0.8 mm wavelength, F-GAMMA programme) and γ-ray (0.1–300 GeV) ~3.5 yr light curves of 54 Fermi-bright blazars. We perform a source stacking analysis and estimate significances and chance correlations using mixed source correlations. These results reveal: (i) the first highly significant multiband radio and γ-ray correlations (radio lagging γ rays) when averaging over the whole sample, (ii) average time delays (source frame: 76 ± 23 to 7 ± 9 d), systematically decreasing from cm to mm/sub-mm bands with a frequency dependence τr, γ(ν) ∝ ν-1, in good agreement with jet opacity dominated by synchrotron self-absorption, (iii) a bulk γ-ray production region typically located within/upstream of the 3 mm core region (τ3mm, γ = 12 ± 8 d), (iv) mean distances between the region of γ-ray peak emission and the radio ‘τ = 1 photosphere’ decreasing from 9.8 ± 3.0 pc (11 cm) to 0.9 ± 1.1 pc (2 mm) and 1.4 ± 0.8 pc (0.8 mm), (v) 3 mm/γ-ray correlations in nine individual sources at a significance level where one is expected by chance (probability: 4 × 10-6), (vi) opacity and ‘time lag core shift’ estimates for quasar 3C 454.3 providing a lower limit for the distance of the bulk γ-ray production region from the supermassive black hole (SMBH) of ~0.8–1.6 pc, i.e. at the outer edge of the broad-line region (BLR) or beyond. A 3 mm τ = 1 surface at ~2–3 pc from the jet base (i.e. well outside the ‘canonical BLR’) finally suggests that BLR material extends to several parsec distances from the SMBH.

  6. Late-time cosmological phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the potential galaxy formation and large scale structure problems of objects existing at high redshifts (Z approx. greater than 5), structures existing on scales of 100 M pc as well as velocity flows on such scales, and minimal microwave anisotropies ((Delta)T/T) (approx. less than 10(exp -5)) can be solved if the seeds needed to generate structure form in a vacuum phase transition after decoupling. It is argued that the basic physics of such a phase transition is no more exotic than that utilized in the more traditional GUT scale phase transitions, and that, just as in the GUT case, significant random Gaussian fluctuations and/or topological defects can form. Scale lengths of approx. 100 M pc for large scale structure as well as approx. 1 M pc for galaxy formation occur naturally. Possible support for new physics that might be associated with such a late-time transition comes from the preliminary results of the SAGE solar neutrino experiment, implying neutrino flavor mixing with values similar to those required for a late-time transition. It is also noted that a see-saw model for the neutrino masses might also imply a tau neutrino mass that is an ideal hot dark matter candidate. However, in general either hot or cold dark matter can be consistent with a late-time transition.

  7. Late-time cosmological phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1990-11-01

    It is shown that the potential galaxy formation and large-scale structure problems of objects existing at high redshifts (Z {approx gt} 5), structures existing on scales of 100M pc as well as velocity flows on such scales, and minimal microwave anisotropies ({Delta}T/T) {approx lt} 10{sup {minus}5} can be solved if the seeds needed to generate structure form in a vacuum phase transition after decoupling. It is argued that the basic physics of such a phase transition is no more exotic than that utilized in the more traditional GUT scale phase transitions, and that, just as in the GUT case, significant random gaussian fluctuations and/or topological defects can form. Scale lengths of {approximately}100M pc for large-scale structure as well as {approximately}1 M pc for galaxy formation occur naturally. Possible support for new physics that might be associated with such a late-time transition comes from the preliminary results of the SAGE solar neutrino experiment, implying neutrino flavor mixing with values similar to those required for a late-time transition. It is also noted that a see-saw model for the neutrino masses might also imply a tau neutrino mass that is an ideal hot dark matter candidate. However, in general either hot or cold dark matter can be consistent with a late-time transition. 47 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Calculated late time spectra of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Axelrod, T.S.

    1987-10-30

    We consider here the nebular phase spectra of supernovae whose late time luminosity is provided by the radioactive decay of /sup 56/Ni and /sup 56/Co synthesized in the explosion. A broad variety of supernovae are known or suspected to fall in this category. This includes all SNIa and SNIb, and at least some SNII, in particular SN1987a. At sufficiently late times the expanding supernova becomes basically nebular in character due to its decreasing optical depth. The spectra produced during this stage contain information on the density and abundance structure of the entire supernova, as opposed to spectra near maximum light which are affected only by the outermost layers. A numerical model for nebular spectrum formation is therefore potentially very valuable for answering currently outstanding questions about the post-explosion supernova structure. As an example, we can hope to determine the degree of mixing which occurs between the layers of the ''onion-skin'' abundance structure predicted by current one dimensional explosion calculations. In the sections which follow, such a numerical model is briefly described and then applied to SN1972e, a typical SNIa, SN1985f, an SNIb, and finally to SN1987a. In the case of SN1987a predicted spectra are presented for the wavelength range from 1 to 100 microns at a time 300 days after explosion. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Impact vaporization: Late time phenomena from experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.; Gault, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    While simple airflow produced by the outward movement of the ejecta curtain can be scaled to large dimensions, the interaction between an impact-vaporized component and the ejecta curtain is more complicated. The goal of these experiments was to examine such interaction in a real system involving crater growth, ejection of material, two phased mixtures of gas and dust, and strong pressure gradients. The results will be complemented by theoretical studies at laboratory scales in order to separate the various parameters for planetary scale processes. These experiments prompt, however, the following conclusions that may have relevance at broader scales. First, under near vacuum or low atmospheric pressures, an expanding vapor cloud scours the surrounding surface in advance of arriving ejecta. Second, the effect of early-time vaporization is relatively unimportant at late-times. Third, the overpressure created within the crater cavity by significant vaporization results in increased cratering efficiency and larger aspect ratios.

  10. SN2009ip at Very Late Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigley, Andrew Christopher; Graham, Melissa Lynn

    2016-01-01

    The 2012 eruption of SN 2009ip resembled a Type IIn supernovae, dominated by emission from interaction of the ejecta with circumstellar material, but the question remains: was the 2012 outburst of SN 2009ip truly the terminal explosion of a massive star? We present time series photometric and spectroscopic data for the transient SN2009ip from 260 to 1026 days after the peak of its 2012 outburst. These data were collected at the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network and Keck Observatory. We will show that SN 2009ip continues to decline linearly in brightness at very late epochs, analyze the evolution in flux and asymmetry of the Balmer emission lines, and investigate the geometry of the circumstellar material from the progenitor star system and the true nature of SN 2009ip.

  11. Bright gamma-ray flares of the quasars 3C 279 and PKS 1222+216 observed at the highest energies with Fermi-LAT and VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errando, Manel

    2014-08-01

    Flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) are the most powerful sources continuously detected at gamma-ray energies, with luminosities exceeding 1048 erg s-1. The high-energy emission of quasars peaks in the MeV-GeV band, and only a few episodic detections have been reported at very high energies (VHE, E>100 GeV). We will present the first results from an observing campaign on the FSRQ 3C 279 in April 2014 during the brightest gamma-ray outburst ever recorded for this object, with flux exceeding the historic 1991 flare seen by EGRET. Observations include simultaneous coverage with the Fermi-LAT satellite and the VERITAS ground-based array spanning four decades in energy from 100 MeV to 1 TeV with unprecedented sensitivity. We will also report on the detection of persistent VHE emission from the quasar PKS 1222+216 over a week-long period in March 2014. These observations present strong challenges to current models of energy dissipation in relativistic jets. The implications of the absence/presence of VHE emission in connection with flaring activity in the MeV-GeV regime will be discussed, especially concerning the role of ambient photon fields in the radiation mechanisms, and the size and location of the gamma-ray emission region.

  12. MAGIC Upper Limits for Two Milagro-detected Bright Fermi Sources in the Region of SNR G65.1+0.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksić, J.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Backes, M.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Bordas, P.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Bose, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Camara, M.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, M.; De Sabata, F.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Errando, M.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Hadasch, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Jogler, T.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Kranich, D.; Krause, J.; La Barbera, A.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Orito, R.; Oya, I.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Pasanen, M.; Pauss, F.; Pegna, R. G.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puchades, N.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rissi, M.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Struebig, J. C.; Suric, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Torres, D. F.; Vankov, H.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.

    2010-12-01

    We report on the observation of the region around supernova remnant G65.1+0.6 with the stand-alone MAGIC-I telescope. This region hosts the two bright GeV gamma-ray sources 1FGL J1954.3+2836 and 1FGL J1958.6+2845. They are identified as GeV pulsars and both have a possible counterpart detected at about 35 TeV by the Milagro observatory. MAGIC collected 25.5 hr of good quality data and found no significant emission in the range around 1 TeV. We therefore report differential flux upper limits, assuming the emission to be point-like (<=0fdg1) or within a radius of 0fdg3. In the point-like scenario, the flux limits around 1 TeV are at the level of 3% and 2% of the Crab Nebula flux for the two sources, respectively. This implies that the Milagro emission is either extended over a much larger area than our point-spread function or it must be peaked at energies beyond 1 TeV, resulting in a photon index harder than 2.2 in the TeV band.

  13. The Evolution of Late-Time Optical Emission from SN 1986J

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Fesen, Robert A.; Leibundgut, Bruno; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2008-09-01

    We present late-time optical images and spectra of the Type IIn supernova SN 1986J. HST ACS/WFC images obtained in 2003 February show it to be still relatively bright, with mF606W = 21.4 and mF814W = 20.0 mag. Compared to 1994 December HST WFPC2 images, SN 1986J shows a decline of only lesssim1 mag in brightness over 8 years. Ground-based spectra taken in 1989, 1991, and 2007 show a 50% decline in Hα emission between 1989 and 1991, and an order of magnitude drop between 1991 and 2007, along with the disappearance of He I line emissions during the period 1991-2007. The object's [O I] λλ6300, 6364, [O II] λλ7319, 7330 and [O III] λλ4959, 5007 emission lines show two prominent peaks near -1000 and -3500 km s-1, with the more blueshifted component declining significantly in strength between 1991 and 2007. The observed spectral evolution suggests two different origins for SN 1986J's late-time optical emission: dense, shock-heated circumstellar material, which gave rise to the initially bright Hα, He I, and [N II] λ5755 lines, and reverse-shock-heated O-rich ejecta on the facing expanding hemisphere, dominated by two large clumps generating two blueshifted emission peaks in the [O I], [O II], and [O III] lines.

  14. Late-time attractor for the cubic nonlinear wave equation

    SciTech Connect

    Szpak, Nikodem

    2010-08-15

    We apply our recently developed scaling technique for obtaining late-time asymptotics to the cubic nonlinear wave equation and explain the appearance and approach to the two-parameter attractor found recently by Bizon and Zenginoglu.

  15. 2D CFT partition functions at late times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Ethan; Gur-Ari, Guy

    2017-08-01

    We consider the late time behavior of the analytically continued partition function Z( β + it) Z( β - it) in holographic 2 d CFTs. This is a probe of information loss in such theories and in their holographic duals. We show that each Virasoro character decays in time, and so information is not restored at the level of individual characters. We identify a universal decaying contribution at late times, and conjecture that it describes the behavior of generic chaotic 2 d CFTs out to times that are exponentially large in the central charge. It was recently suggested that at sufficiently late times one expects a crossover to random matrix behavior. We estimate an upper bound on the crossover time, which suggests that the decay is followed by a parametrically long period of late time growth. Finally, we discuss gravitationally-motivated integrable theories and show how information is restored at late times by a series of characters. This hints at a possible bulk mechanism, where information is restored by an infinite sum over non-perturbative saddles.

  16. LATE-TIME OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 080319B: JET BREAK, HOST GALAXY, AND ACCOMPANYING SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Tanvir, N. R.; O'Brien, P. T.; Wiersema, K.; Starling, R. L. C.; Rol, E.; Levan, A. J.; Svensson, K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Granot, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Fynbo, J.; Hjorth, J.; Curran, P. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Genet, F.

    2010-12-10

    The Swift-discovered GRB 080319B was by far the most distant source ever observed at naked-eye brightness, reaching a peak apparent magnitude of 5.3 at a redshift of z = 0.937. We present our late-time optical (Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini, and Very Large Telescope) and X-ray (Chandra) observations, which confirm that an achromatic break occurred in the power-law afterglow light curve at {approx}11 days post-burst. This most likely indicates that the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow was collimated, which for a uniform jet would imply a total energy in the jet E{sub jet} {approx}> 10{sup 52} erg. Our observations also show a late-time excess of red light, which is well explained if the GRB was accompanied by a supernova (SN), similar to those seen in some other long-duration GRBs. The latest observations are dominated by light from the host and show that the GRB took place in a faint dwarf galaxy (r(AB) {approx} 27.0, rest frame M{sub B} {approx} -17.2). This galaxy is small even by the standards of other GRB hosts, which is suggestive of a low-metallicity environment. Intriguingly, the properties of this extreme event-a small host and bright SN-are entirely typical of the very low luminosity bursts such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218.

  17. Analysis of late-time light curves of Type IIb, Ib and Ic supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Johnson, V.; Clocchiatti, A.

    2015-06-01

    The shape of the light-curve peak of radioactive-powered core-collapse `stripped-envelope' supernovae constrains the ejecta mass, nickel mass and kinetic energy by the brightness and diffusion time for a given opacity and observed expansion velocity. Late-time light curves give constraints on the ejecta mass and energy, given the gamma-ray opacity. Previous work has shown that the principal light-curve peaks for SN IIb with small amounts of hydrogen and for hydrogen/helium-deficient SN Ib/c are often rather similar near maximum light, suggesting similar ejecta masses and kinetic energies, but that late-time light curves show a wide dispersion, suggesting a dispersion in ejecta masses and kinetic energies. It was also shown that SN IIb and SN Ib/c can have very similar late-time light curves, but different ejecta velocities demanding significantly different ejecta masses and kinetic energies. We revisit these topics by collecting and analysing well-sampled single-band and quasi-bolometric light curves from the literature. We find that the late-time light curves of stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae are heterogeneous. We also show that the observed properties, the photospheric velocity at peak, the rise time and the late decay time, can be used to determine the mean opacity appropriate to the peak. The opacity determined in this way is considerably smaller than common estimates. We discuss how the small effective opacity may result from recombination and asymmetries in the ejecta.

  18. Late time observations of candidate high-z GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlon, Davide; Gaensler, Bryan; Murphy, Tara; Hancock, Paul; Ghirlanda, Giancarlo; Salvaterra, Ruben; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero

    2014-04-01

    This is a targeted proposal to detect late time radio afterglow of a sample of potentially high redshift gamma ray bursts (GRBs). Our targets have been selected from detections of the the last two years by the Swift/BAT telescope. Radio observations play a crucial role in determining the energetics of the GRB explosion, and will therefore directly point towards exceptional progenitors.

  19. Minimal microwave anisotrophy from perturbations induced at late times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Andrew H.; Stebbins, Albert; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1994-01-01

    Aside from primordial gravitational instability of the cosmological fluid, various mechanisms have been proposed to generate large-scale structure at relatively late times, including, e.g., 'late-time' cosmological phase transitions. In these scenarios, it is envisioned that the universe is nearly homogeneous at the times of last scattering and that perturbations grow rapidly sometimes after the primordial plasma recombines. On this basis, it was suggested that large inhomogeneities could be generated while leaving relatively little imprint on the cosmic microwave background (MBR) anisotropy. In this paper, we calculate the minimal anisotropies possible in any 'late-time' scenario for structure formation, given the level of inhomogeneity observed at present. Since the growth of the inhomogeneity involves time-varying gravitational fields, these scenarios inevitably generate significant MBR anisotropy via the Sachs-Wolfe effect. Moreover, we show that the large-angle MBR anisotropy produced by the rapid post-recombination growth of inhomogeneity is generally greater than that produced by the same inhomogeneity growth via gravitational instability. In 'realistic' scenarios one can decrease the anisotropy compared to models with primordial adiabatic fluctuations, but only on very small angular scales. The value of any particular measure of the anisotropy can be made small in late-time models, but only by making the time-dependence of the gravitational field sufficiently 'pathological'.

  20. MASTER: bright OT during Fermi trigger inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumkov, V.; Lipunov, V.; Budnev, N.; Gress, O.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tiurina, N.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Vlasenko, D.; Vladimirov, V.; Kuvshinov, D.; Chazov, V.; Gorbunov, I.; Zimnuhov, D.

    2017-10-01

    MASTER-Tunka auto-detection system ( Lipunov et al., "MASTER Global Robotic Net", Advances in Astronomy, 2010, 30L ) discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 06h 20m 10.45s +54d 46m 57.8s on 2017-09-28.56648 UT. The OT magnitude in unfiltered is 16.1m (limit 18.2m).

  1. Remembering Fermi

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, James

    2005-03-30

    A combination of the discovery of nuclear fission and the circumstances of the 2nd World War brought Enrico Fermi to Chicago, where he led the team that produced the first controlled, self-sustained nuclear chain reaction. Following the war in 1945 Chancellor Hutchins, William Zachariasen, and Walter Bartky convinced Fermi to accept a professorship at the University of Chicago, where the Institute for Nuclear Studies was established. Fermi served as the leading figure in surely the greatest collection of scientists the world has ever seen. Fermi's tenure at Chicago was cut short by his death in 1954. My talk will concentrate on the years 1945-54. Examples of his research notebooks, his speeches, his teaching, and his correspondence will be discussed.

  2. Domain wall formation in late-time phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Wang, Yun

    1992-01-01

    We examine domain wall formulation in late time phase transitions. We find that in the invisible axion domain wall phenomenon, thermal effects alone are insufficient to drive different parts of the disconnected vacuum manifold. This suggests that domain walls do not form unless either there is some supplemental (but perhaps not unreasonable) dynamics to localize the scalar field responsible for the phase transition to the low temperature maximum (to an extraordinary precision) before the onset of the phase transition, or there is some non-thermal mechanism to produce large fluctuations in the scalar field. The fact that domain wall production is not a robust prediction of late time transitions may suggest future directions in model building.

  3. Swift and Fermi Observations of X-Ray Flares: The Case of Late Internal Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troja, E.; Piro, L.; Vasileiou, V.; Omodei, N.; Burgess, J. M.; Cutini, S.; Connaughton, V.; McEnery, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer a unique broadband view of their afterglow emission, spanning more than 10 decades in energy. We present the sample of X-ray flares observed by both Swift and Fermi during the first three years of Fermi operations. While bright in the X-ray band, X-ray flares are often undetected at lower (optical), and higher (MeV to GeV) energies. We show that this disfavors synchrotron self-Compton processes as the origin of the observed X-ray emission. We compare the broadband properties of X-ray flares with the standard late internal shock model, and find that in this scenario, X-ray flares can be produced by a late-time relativistic (gamma greater than 50) outflow at radii R approximately 10(exp 13) - 10(exp 14) cm. This conclusion holds only if the variability timescale is significantly shorter than the observed flare duration, and implies that X-ray flares can directly probe the activity of the GRB central engine.

  4. Swift and Fermi Observations of X-Ray Flares: The Case of Late Internal Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troja, E.; Piro, L.; Vasileiou, V.; Omodei, N.; Burgess, J. M.; Cutini, S.; Connaughton, V.; McEnery, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer a unique broadband view of their afterglow emission, spanning more than 10 decades in energy. We present the sample of X-ray flares observed by both Swift and Fermi during the first three years of Fermi operations. While bright in the X-ray band, X-ray flares are often undetected at lower (optical), and higher (MeV to GeV) energies. We show that this disfavors synchrotron self-Compton processes as the origin of the observed X-ray emission. We compare the broadband properties of X-ray flares with the standard late internal shock model, and find that in this scenario, X-ray flares can be produced by a late-time relativistic (gamma greater than 50) outflow at radii R approximately 10(exp 13) - 10(exp 14) cm. This conclusion holds only if the variability timescale is significantly shorter than the observed flare duration, and implies that X-ray flares can directly probe the activity of the GRB central engine.

  5. SWIFT AND FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF X-RAY FLARES: THE CASE OF LATE INTERNAL SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Troja, E.; Piro, L.; Vasileiou, V.; Burgess, J. M.; Connaughton, V.; Cutini, S.; McEnery, J. E. E-mail: luigi.piro@iaps.inaf.it

    2015-04-10

    Simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer a unique broadband view of their afterglow emission, spanning more than 10 decades in energy. We present the sample of X-ray flares observed by both Swift and Fermi during the first three years of Fermi operations. While bright in the X-ray band, X-ray flares are often undetected at lower (optical), and higher (MeV to GeV) energies. We show that this disfavors synchrotron self-Compton processes as the origin of the observed X-ray emission. We compare the broadband properties of X-ray flares with the standard late internal shock model, and find that in this scenario, X-ray flares can be produced by a late-time relativistic (Γ > 50) outflow at radii R ∼ 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} cm. This conclusion holds only if the variability timescale is significantly shorter than the observed flare duration, and implies that X-ray flares can directly probe the activity of the GRB central engine.

  6. Swift AND Fermi observations of x-ray flares: The case of late internal shock

    DOE PAGES

    Troja, Eleonora; Piro, Luigi; Vasileiou, Vlasios; ...

    2015-04-07

    Simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer a unique broadband view of their afterglow emission, spanning more than 10 decades in energy. We present the sample of X-ray flares observed by both Swift and Fermi during the first three years of Fermi operations. While bright in the X-ray band, X-ray flares are often undetected at lower (optical), and higher (MeV to GeV) energies. We show that this disfavors synchrotron self-Compton processes as the origin of the observed X-ray emission. We compare the broadband properties of X-ray flares with the standard late internal shock model, and find thatmore » in this scenario, X-ray flares can be produced by a late-time relativistic (Γ > 50) outflow at radii R ~ 1013-1014 cm. As a result, this conclusion holds only if the variability timescale is significantly shorter than the observed flare duration, and implies that X-ray flares can directly probe the activity of the GRB central engine.« less

  7. Late time observations of candidate high-z GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlon, Davide; Gaensler, Bryan; Murphy, Tara; Hancock, Paul; Ghirlanda, Giancarlo; Salvaterra, Ruben; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero

    2014-04-01

    This is a discovery (NAPA) proposal to detect the late time radio afterglow of candidates high redshift gamma ray bursts (GRBs). Our selection criteria (no redshift information at the time of the request, type of trigger, high-energy flux and duration) are based on information immediately available through the Swift/BAT telescope and ground based telescopes. Radio observations play a crucial role in determining the energetics of the GRB explosion, and will therefore directly point towards exceptional progenitors.

  8. Late time solution for interacting scalar in accelerating spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopec, Tomislav

    2015-11-01

    We consider stochastic inflation in an interacting scalar field in spatially homogeneous accelerating space-times with a constant principal slow roll parameter ε. We show that, if the scalar potential is scale invariant (which is the case when scalar contains quartic self-interaction and couples non-minimally to gravity), the late-time solution on accelerating FLRW spaces can be described by a probability distribution function (PDF) ρ which is a function of φ/H only, where φ=φ( x-vector ) is the scalar field and H=H(t) denotes the Hubble parameter. We give explicit late-time solutions for ρarrow ρ{sub ∞}(φ/H), and thereby find the order ε corrections to the Starobinsky-Yokoyama result. This PDF can then be used to calculate e.g. various n-point functions of the (self-interacting) scalar field, which are valid at late times in arbitrary accelerating space-times with ε= constant.

  9. The Late-time Afterglow of the Extremely Energetic Short Burst GRB 090510 Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guelbenzu, A. Nicuesa; Klose, S.; Kruehler, T.; Greiner, J.; Rossi, A.; Kann, D. A.; Olivares, F.; Rau, A.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Elliott, J.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Context. The Swift discovery of the short burst GRB 090510 has raised considerable attention mainly because of two reasons: first, it had a bright optical afterglow, and second it is among the most energetic events detected so far within the entire GRB population (long plus short). The afterglow of GRB 090510 was observed with Swift/UVOT and Swift/XRT and evidence of a jet break around 1.5 ks after the burst has been reported in the literature, implying that after this break the optical and X-ray light curve should fade with the same decay slope. Aims. As noted by several authors, the post-break decay slope seen in the UVOT data is much shallower than the steep decay in the X-ray band, pointing to a (theoretically hard to understand) excess of optical flux at late times. We assess here the validity of this peculiar behavior. Methods. We reduced and analyzed new afterglow light-curve data obtained with the multichannel imager GROND. These additional g'r'i'z' data were then combined with the UVOT and XRT data to study the behavior of the afterglow at late times more stringently. Results. Based on the densely sampled data set obtained with GROND, we find that the optical afterglow of GRB 090510 did indeed enter a steep decay phase starting around 22 ks after the burst. During this time the GROND optical light curve is achromatic, and its slope is identical to the slope of the X-ray data. In combination with the UVOT data this implies that a second break must have occurred in the optical light curve around 22 ks post burst, which, however, has no obvious counterpart in the X-ray band, contradicting the interpretation that this could be another jet break. Conclusions. The GROND data provide the missing piece of evidence that the optical afterglow of GRB 090510 did follow a post-jet break evolution at late times. The break seen in the optical light curve around 22 ks in combination with its missing counterpart in the X-ray band could be due to the passage of the

  10. Hot Dust! Late-Time Infrared Emission From Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Ori; Skrutskie, M. F.; Chevalier, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    Supernovae light curves typically peak and fade in the course of several months. Some supernovae , however, exhibit late-time infrared emission that in some cases can last for several years. These supernovae tend to be of the Type IIn subclass, which is defined by narrow hydrogen and helium emission lines arising from a dense, pre-existing circumstellar medium excited by the supernova radiation. Such a late-time ``IR excess'' with respect to the optical blackbody counterpart typically indicates the presence of warm dust. The origin and heating mechanism of the dust is not, however, always well constrained. In this talk, I will explore several scenarios that explain the observed late-time emission. In particular, I will discuss the case of the Type IIn SN 2005ip, which has displayed an ``IR excess'' for over 3 years. The results allow us to interpret the progenitor system and better understand the late stages of stellar evolution. Much of the data used for this analysis were obtained with TripleSpec, a medium-resolution near-infrared spectrograph located at Apache Point Observatory, NM, and FanCam, a JHK imager located at Fan Mountain Observatory, just outside of Charlottesville, VA. These two instruments were designed, fabricated, built, and commissioned by our instrumentation group at the University of Virginia. I will also spend some time discussing these instruments. I would like to thank the following for financial support of this work throughout my graduate career: NASA GSRP, NSF AAG-0607737, Spitzer PID 50256, Achievement Reward for College Scientists (ARCS), and the Virginia Space Grant Consortium.

  11. Late-time Constraints on the Fates of Supernova Impostors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Transients showing circumstellar interactions, low luminosities and low expansion velocities are generally considered to be non-terminal outbursts. Two main classes of such transients are 'supernova impostors', whose progenitors are massive stars (>20 solar masses) and may be extra-galactic analogs of Eta Car's eruptions, and SN 2008S-like transients, which have lower-mass (~10 solar masses), dust-obscured progenitors. We present late-time Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the archetypal 'supernova impostor', SN 1997bs, as well as the prototypes of the SN 2008S class of transients, SN 2008S and NGC 300 2008-OT1. All of these objects have faded below their progenitor luminosities in all bands for which comparisons are possible. We show that it is difficult to reconcile the late-time observations with models where surviving stars are obscured by either ejected shells or thick, dusty winds. Although some supernova impostors, such as SN 1954J, are clearly non-fatal, our results suggest that many of these weak stellar transients with circumstellar interactions may actually be low energy supernovae.

  12. Late-Time Follow-up of ASAS-SN Tidal Disruption Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren-Son Holoien, Thomas; ASAS-SN Team

    2017-01-01

    Humanity should have a continuous record of the sky, and for the past 3.5 years, the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") has been working to provide that record. ASAS-SN is a long-term project to monitor the entire sky with a rapid cadence using a global array of small telescopes in both hemispheres, searching for new bright transients that can be studied in detail by the world's astronomers. By focusing only on the brightest objects, ASAS-SN limits its discoveries to only those that can be studied in the greatest detail, and it is unique among professional surveys in this respect. While the primary goal of ASAS-SN is a complete survey of bright, nearby supernovae, ASAS-SN also finds many other interesting transients. ASAS-SN has discovered 3 of the brightest tidal disruption events (TDEs) ever found at optical wavelengths, and we have performed extensive follow-up studies of these objects since discovery. I will present the results of late-time follow-up studies of the ASAS-SN TDEs and discuss the deeper insight into TDE physics that can be gained from this work.

  13. Asphericity in supernova explosions from late-time spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Keiichi; Kawabata, Koji; Mazzali, Paolo A; Tanaka, Masaomi; Valenti, Stefano; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Hattori, Takashi; Deng, Jinsong; Pian, Elena; Taubenberger, Stefan; Iye, Masanori; Matheson, Thomas; Filippenko, Alexei V; Aoki, Kentaro; Kosugi, George; Ohyama, Youichi; Sasaki, Toshiyuki; Takata, Tadafumi

    2008-02-29

    Core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) are the explosions that announce the death of massive stars. Some CC-SNe are linked to long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and are highly aspherical. One important question is to what extent asphericity is common to all CC-SNe. Here we present late-time spectra for a number of CC-SNe from stripped-envelope stars and use them to explore any asphericity generated in the inner part of the exploding star, near the site of collapse. A range of oxygen emission-line profiles is observed, including a high incidence of double-peaked profiles, a distinct signature of an aspherical explosion. Our results suggest that all CC-SNe from stripped-envelope stars are aspherical explosions and that SNe accompanied by GRBs exhibit the highest degree of asphericity.

  14. Late time CMB anisotropies constrain mini-charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Burrage, C.; Redondo, J.; Ringwald, A.; Jaeckel, J. E-mail: joerg.jaeckel@durham.ac.uk E-mail: andreas.ringwald@desy.de

    2009-11-01

    Observations of the temperature anisotropies induced as light from the CMB passes through large scale structures in the late universe are a sensitive probe of the interactions of photons in such environments. In extensions of the Standard Model which give rise to mini-charged particles, photons propagating through transverse magnetic fields can be lost to pair production of such particles. Such a decrement in the photon flux would occur as photons from the CMB traverse the magnetic fields of galaxy clusters. Therefore late time CMB anisotropies can be used to constrain the properties of mini-charged particles. We outline how this test is constructed, and present new constraints on mini-charged particles from observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the Coma cluster.

  15. Late time cosmic acceleration from natural infrared cutoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorji, Mohammad Ali

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, inspired by the ultraviolet deformation of the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker geometry in loop quantum cosmology, we formulate an infrared-modified cosmological model. We obtain the associated deformed Friedmann and Raychaudhuri equations and we show that the late time cosmic acceleration can be addressed by the infrared corrections. As a particular example, we applied the setup to the case of matter dominated universe. This model has the same number of parameters as ΛCDM, but a dynamical dark energy generates in the matter dominated era at the late time. According to our model, as the universe expands, the energy density of the cold dark matter dilutes and when the Hubble parameter approaches to its minimum, the infrared effects dominate such that the effective equation of state parameter smoothly changes from weff = 0 to weff = - 2. Interestingly and nontrivially, the unstable de Sitter phase with weff = - 1 is corresponding to Ωm =Ωd = 0.5 and the universe crosses the phantom divide from the quintessence phase with weff > - 1 and Ωm >Ωd to the phantom phase with weff < - 1 and Ωm <Ωd which shows that the model is observationally viable. The results show that the universe finally ends up in a big rip singularity for a finite time proportional to the inverse of the minimum of the Hubble parameter. Moreover, we consider the dynamical stability of the model and we show that the universe starts from the matter dominated era at the past attractor with weff = 0 and ends up in a future attractor at the big rip with weff = - 2.

  16. Late Time Decays and the r-Process Abundance Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelmar, Rebeka

    2014-09-01

    The r-process is the rapid capture of neutrons creating unstable neutron rich nuclei. This process is very quick, lasting only a couple of seconds. Afterwards those nuclei decay to stability over much longer timescales. We wrote a computer program to model the ways that nuclei created by the r-process decay back to stability using theoretical and experimental values for the probabilities that a given nuclei would beta decay, beta delayed neutron emit, alpha decay, and beta delayed fission. We then compared the resulting elemental abundances to abundance patterns from metal poor halo stars. We also examined the ratios of thorium 232 to uranium 238 and uranium 235 to uranium 238. We found the thorium to uranium ratio to be particularly sensitive to how late-time fission is included. The r-process is the rapid capture of neutrons creating unstable neutron rich nuclei. This process is very quick, lasting only a couple of seconds. Afterwards those nuclei decay to stability over much longer timescales. We wrote a computer program to model the ways that nuclei created by the r-process decay back to stability using theoretical and experimental values for the probabilities that a given nuclei would beta decay, beta delayed neutron emit, alpha decay, and beta delayed fission. We then compared the resulting elemental abundances to abundance patterns from metal poor halo stars. We also examined the ratios of thorium 232 to uranium 238 and uranium 235 to uranium 238. We found the thorium to uranium ratio to be particularly sensitive to how late-time fission is included. Department of Energy Office of Science Contract DE-FG02-05ER41398.

  17. Bright Enceladus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-14

    Saturn moon Enceladus reflects sunlight brightly while the planet and its rings fill the background in this view from NASA Cassini spacecraft. Enceladus is one of the most reflective bodies in the solar system.

  18. Signatures of the late time core-collapse supernova environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Luke Forrest

    The hot and dense proto-neutron star (PNS) born subsequent to core-collapse in a type II supernova explosion is an intense source of neutrinos of all flavors. It emits the 3 - 5 × 1053 ergs of gravitational binding energy gained during collapse as neutrino radiation on a time scale of tens of seconds as it contracts, becomes increasingly neutron-rich and cools. While the supernova explosion mechanism and associated accretion of material is expected to influence the neutrino emission at early time (i.e. t ≲ 1 s post bounce) the late time neutrino signal is shaped by the properties of the PNS, such as the nuclear equation of state (EoS), neutrino opacities in dense matter, and other microphysical properties that affect the cooling timescale by influencing either neutrino diffusion or convection. Detection of significant numbers of late time supernova neutrinos will provide a direct window into the properties of nuclear matter and neutron stars, if the neutrino signal can be modeled accurately. The average emitted neutrino energies also strongly affect nucleosynthesis in the neutrino driven wind, neutrino induced nucleosynthesis further out in the star, and the patterns of neutrino oscillations outside of the PNS. This thesis examines a number of aspects of this environment. First, the equations of spherically symmetric general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics are discussed, a new code for calculating neutrino transport in PNSs is described, and first results from this code are presented. It is found that the NDW is neutron rich for at least a few seconds, in contrast to other recent work. This change in the expected wind electron fraction is traced to the correct treatment of the nucleon dispersion relations in an interacting medium and turns out to be influenced by the sub-nuclear density symmetry energy. Late time convection in PNSs is also studied. It is found that the density dependence of the symmetry energy may affect the duration of

  19. Late time phenomena of single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, An-Der

    The development of single mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability, consists of three different stages, described as the linear, free fall and terminal velocity regimes. This instability and its three regimes have been studied in detail [49]. The central result of this thesis is the discovery of a fourth regime of oscillatory or nonuniform behavior after an apparent terminal velocity has been reached, especially for fluids whose density contrast is not too large. This result is based on numerical investigation by the Front Tracking method. The discovery documented here requires a modification to common beliefs regarding the late time evolution of a single mode disturbance. After a short time period of spike (bubble) pseudo terminal velocity plateau, the velocity resumes its increase reaches a new peak, and then decreases. The overall velocity development is sensitive to the Atwood number of the fluids. We show a relation between the spike (bubble) velocity and the tip curvature evolution. A linear relation between the spike (bubble) velocity and a pressure difference at the tips is also found. This pressure difference is the difference between the pressure at the spike (bubble) tip and the ambient pressure at the tip. The pressure difference reflects the pressure gradient at the tip. Numerical evidence shows that the pressure difference is strongly correlated to the spike (bubble) velocity development. The purpose of this work is to report these newly observed phenomena.

  20. Enrico Fermi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen Ning

    2013-05-01

    Enrico Fermi was, of all the great physicists of the 20th century, among the most respected and admired. He was respected and admired because of his contributions to both theoretical and experimental physics, because of his leadership in discovering for mankind a powerful new source of energy, and above all, because of his personal character. He was always reliable and trustworthy. He had both of his feet on the ground all the time. He had great strength, but never threw his weight around. He did not play to the gallery. He did not practise one-up-manship. He exemplified, I always believe, the perfect Confucian gentleman...

  1. Long-duration Superluminous Supernovae at Late Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerkstrand, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Inserra, C.; Nicholl, M.; Chen, T.-W.; Krühler, T.; Sollerman, J.; Taubenberger, S.; Gal-Yam, A.; Kankare, E.; Maguire, K.; Fraser, M.; Valenti, S.; Sullivan, M.; Cartier, R.; Young, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    Nebular-phase observations and spectral models of Type Ic superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) are presented. LSQ14an and SN 2015bn both display late-time spectra similar to galaxy-subtracted spectra of SN 2007bi, and the class shows strong similarity with broad-lined SNe Ic such as SN 1998bw. Near-infrared observations of SN 2015bn show a strong Ca ii triplet, O i 9263, O i 1.13 μm, and Mg i 1.50 μm, but no distinct He, Si, or S emission. The high Ca ii NIR/[Ca ii] 7291, 7323 ratio of ∼2 indicates a high electron density of {n}e≳ {10}8 cm‑3. Spectral models of oxygen-zone emission are investigated to put constraints on the emitting region. Models require M({{O}} - {zone})≳ 10 M⊙ to produce enough [O i] 6300, 6364 luminosity, irrespective of the powering situation and the density. The high oxygen-zone mass, supported by high estimated magnesium masses, points to explosions of massive CO cores, requiring {M}{ZAMS}≳ 40 {M}ȯ . Collisions of pair-instability pulsations do not provide enough mass to account for the emission. [O ii] and [O iii] lines emerge naturally in many models, which strengthens the identification of broad [O ii] 7320, 7330, [O iii] 4363, and [O iii] 4959, 5007 in some spectra. A small filling factor f≲ 0.01 for the O/Mg zone is needed to produce enough luminosity in Mg i] 4571, Mg i 1.504 μm, and O i recombination lines, which shows that the ejecta is clumped. We review the constraints from the nebular spectral modeling in the context of the various scenarios proposed for SLSNe.

  2. LATE-TIME SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS OF THE STRONGLY INTERACTING TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PTF11kx

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Nugent, Peter E.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Sullivan, Mark; Howell, D. Andrew; Pan, Yen-Chen; Hook, Isobel M.

    2013-08-01

    PTF11kx was a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) that showed time-variable absorption features, including saturated Ca II H and K lines that weakened and eventually went into emission. The strength of the emission component of H{alpha} gradually increased, implying that the SN was undergoing significant interaction with its circumstellar medium (CSM). These features, and many others, were blueshifted slightly and showed a P-Cygni profile, likely indicating that the CSM was directly related to, and probably previously ejected by, the progenitor system itself. These and other observations led Dilday et al. to conclude that PTF11kx came from a symbiotic nova progenitor like RS Oph. In this work we extend the spectral coverage of PTF11kx to 124-680 rest-frame days past maximum brightness. The late-time spectra of PTF11kx are dominated by H{alpha} emission (with widths of full width at half-maximum intensity Almost-Equal-To 2000 km s{sup -1}), strong Ca II emission features ({approx}10,000 km s{sup -1} wide), and a blue 'quasi-continuum' due to many overlapping narrow lines of Fe II. Emission from oxygen, He I, and Balmer lines higher than H{alpha} is weak or completely absent at all epochs, leading to large observed H{alpha}/H{beta} intensity ratios. The H{alpha} emission appears to increase in strength with time for {approx}1 yr, but it subsequently decreases significantly along with the Ca II emission. Our latest spectrum also indicates the possibility of newly formed dust in the system as evidenced by a slight decrease in the red wing of H{alpha}. During the same epochs, multiple narrow emission features from the CSM temporally vary in strength. The weakening of the H{alpha} and Ca II emission at late times is possible evidence that the SN ejecta have overtaken the majority of the CSM and agrees with models of other strongly interacting SNe Ia. The varying narrow emission features, on the other hand, may indicate that the CSM is clumpy or consists of multiple thin shells.

  3. Swift AND Fermi observations of x-ray flares: The case of late internal shock

    SciTech Connect

    Troja, Eleonora; Piro, Luigi; Vasileiou, Vlasios; Burgess, J. M.; Cutini, S.; Connaughton, V.; McEnery, J. E.

    2015-04-07

    Simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer a unique broadband view of their afterglow emission, spanning more than 10 decades in energy. We present the sample of X-ray flares observed by both Swift and Fermi during the first three years of Fermi operations. While bright in the X-ray band, X-ray flares are often undetected at lower (optical), and higher (MeV to GeV) energies. We show that this disfavors synchrotron self-Compton processes as the origin of the observed X-ray emission. We compare the broadband properties of X-ray flares with the standard late internal shock model, and find that in this scenario, X-ray flares can be produced by a late-time relativistic (Γ > 50) outflow at radii R ~ 1013-1014 cm. As a result, this conclusion holds only if the variability timescale is significantly shorter than the observed flare duration, and implies that X-ray flares can directly probe the activity of the GRB central engine.

  4. Fermi LAT Stacking Analysis of Swift Localized GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kocevski, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Schaal, M.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; von Kienlin, A.; Werner, M.; Wood, K. S.

    2016-05-01

    We perform a comprehensive stacking analysis of data collected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) of γ-ray bursts (GRBs) localized by the Swift spacecraft, which were not detected by the LAT but which fell within the instrument’s field of view at the time of trigger. We examine a total of 79 GRBs by comparing the observed counts over a range of time intervals to that expected from designated background orbits, as well as by using a joint likelihood technique to model the expected distribution of stacked counts. We find strong evidence for subthreshold emission at MeV to GeV energies using both techniques. This observed excess is detected during intervals that include and exceed the durations typically characterizing the prompt emission observed at keV energies and lasts at least 2700 s after the co-aligned burst trigger. By utilizing a novel cumulative likelihood analysis, we find that although a burst’s prompt γ-ray and afterglow X-ray flux both correlate with the strength of the subthreshold emission, the X-ray afterglow flux measured by Swift’s X-ray Telescope at 11 hr post trigger correlates far more significantly. Overall, the extended nature of the subthreshold emission and its connection to the burst’s afterglow brightness lend further support to the external forward shock origin of the late-time emission detected by the LAT. These results suggest that the extended high-energy emission observed by the LAT may be a relatively common feature but remains undetected in a majority of bursts owing to instrumental threshold effects.

  5. Fermi LAT Stacking Analysis of Swift Localized GRBs

    DOE PAGES

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Anderson, B.; ...

    2016-05-05

    In this paper, we perform a comprehensive stacking analysis of data collected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) of γ-ray bursts (GRBs) localized by the Swift spacecraft, which were not detected by the LAT but which fell within the instrument's field of view at the time of trigger. We examine a total of 79 GRBs by comparing the observed counts over a range of time intervals to that expected from designated background orbits, as well as by using a joint likelihood technique to model the expected distribution of stacked counts. We find strong evidence for subthreshold emission at MeVmore » to GeV energies using both techniques. This observed excess is detected during intervals that include and exceed the durations typically characterizing the prompt emission observed at keV energies and lasts at least 2700 s after the co-aligned burst trigger. By utilizing a novel cumulative likelihood analysis, we find that although a burst's prompt γ-ray and afterglow X-ray flux both correlate with the strength of the subthreshold emission, the X-ray afterglow flux measured by Swift's X-ray Telescope at 11 hr post trigger correlates far more significantly. Overall, the extended nature of the subthreshold emission and its connection to the burst's afterglow brightness lend further support to the external forward shock origin of the late-time emission detected by the LAT. Finally, these results suggest that the extended high-energy emission observed by the LAT may be a relatively common feature but remains undetected in a majority of bursts owing to instrumental threshold effects.« less

  6. Fermi Pulsar Analysis

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation illustrates how analysis of Fermi data reveals new pulsars. Fermi's LAT records the precise arrival time and approximate direction of the gamma rays it detects, but to identify a pul...

  7. Late time behavior of false vacuum decay: possible implications for cosmology and metastable inflating states.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Lawrence M; Dent, James

    2008-05-02

    We describe here how the late time behavior of the quantum mechanical decay of unstable states, which is predicted to deviate from an exponential form, may have important cosmological implications. It may increase the likelihood of eternal inflation and may enhance the likelihood of observing a small vacuum energy at late times versus possible late time decay into a large negative energy (anti-de Sitter space) vacuum state. Open questions include the following: How can internal observations made impact upon the wave function of the Universe and hence upon its decay characteristics?

  8. Late-time decay of coupled electromagnetic and gravitational perturbations outside an extremal charged black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sela, Orr

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we employ the results of a previous paper on the late-time decay of scalar-field perturbations of an extreme Reissner-Nordstrom black hole, in order to find the late-time decay of coupled electromagnetic and gravitational perturbations of this black hole. We explicitly write the late-time tails of Moncrief's gauge invariant variables and of the perturbations of the metric tensor and the electromagnetic field tensor in the Regge-Wheeler gauge. We discuss some of the consequences of the results and relations to previous works.

  9. The late time structure of high density contrast, single mode Richtmyer-Meshkov flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. J. R.

    2016-07-01

    We study the late time flow structure of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. Recent numerical work [F. J. Cherne et al. "On shock driven jetting of liquid from non-sinusoidal surfaces into a vacuum," J. Appl. Phys. 118, 185901 (2015)] has suggested a self-similar collapse of the development of this instability at late times, independent of the initial surface profile. Using the form of collapse suggested, we derive an analytic expression for the mass-velocity relation in the spikes, and a global theory for the late time flow structure. We compare these results with fluid dynamical simulation.

  10. Late Time Behavior of False Vacuum Decay: Possible Implications for Cosmology and Metastable Inflating States

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Lawrence M.; Dent, James

    2008-05-02

    We describe here how the late time behavior of the quantum mechanical decay of unstable states, which is predicted to deviate from an exponential form, may have important cosmological implications. It may increase the likelihood of eternal inflation and may enhance the likelihood of observing a small vacuum energy at late times versus possible late time decay into a large negative energy (anti-de Sitter space) vacuum state. Open questions include the following: How can internal observations made impact upon the wave function of the Universe and hence upon its decay characteristics?.

  11. Open EFTs, IR effects & late-time resummations: systematic corrections in stochastic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, C. P.; Holman, R.; Tasinato, G.

    2016-01-01

    Though simple inflationary models describe the CMB well, their corrections are often plagued by infrared effects that obstruct a reliable calculation of late-time behaviour. We adapt to cosmology tools designed to address similar issues in other physical systems with the goal of making reliable late-time inflationary predictions. The main such tool is Open EFTs which reduce in the inflationary case to Stochastic Inflation plus calculable corrections. We apply this to a simple inflationary model that is complicated enough to have dangerous IR behaviour yet simple enough to allow the inference of late-time behaviour. We find corrections to standard Stochastic Inflationary predictions for the noise and drift, and we find these corrections ensure the IR finiteness of both these quantities. The late-time probability distribution, {P}(φ ) , for super-Hubble field fluctuations are obtained as functions of the noise and drift and so these too are IR finite. We compare our results to other methods (such as large- N models) and find they agree when these models are reliable. In all cases we can explore in detail we find IR secular effects describe the slow accumulation of small perturbations to give a big effect: a significant distortion of the late-time probability distribution for the field. But the energy density associated with this is only of order H 4 at late times and so does not generate a dramatic gravitational back-reaction.

  12. Open EFTs, IR effects & late-time resummations: systematic corrections in stochastic inflation

    DOE PAGES

    Burgess, C. P.; Holman, R.; Tasinato, G.

    2016-01-26

    Though simple inflationary models describe the CMB well, their corrections are often plagued by infrared effects that obstruct a reliable calculation of late-time behaviour. Here we adapt to cosmology tools designed to address similar issues in other physical systems with the goal of making reliable late-time inflationary predictions. The main such tool is Open EFTs which reduce in the inflationary case to Stochastic Inflation plus calculable corrections. We apply this to a simple inflationary model that is complicated enough to have dangerous IR behaviour yet simple enough to allow the inference of late-time behaviour. We find corrections to standard Stochasticmore » Inflationary predictions for the noise and drift, and we find these corrections ensure the IR finiteness of both these quantities. The late-time probability distribution, P(Φ), for super-Hubble field fluctuations are obtained as functions of the noise and drift and so these too are IR finite. We compare our results to other methods (such as large-N models) and find they agree when these models are reliable. In all cases we can explore in detail we find IR secular effects describe the slow accumulation of small perturbations to give a big effect: a significant distortion of the late-time probability distribution for the field. But the energy density associated with this is only of order H4 at late times and so does not generate a dramatic gravitational back-reaction.« less

  13. Open EFTs, IR effects & late-time resummations: systematic corrections in stochastic inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, C. P.; Holman, R.; Tasinato, G.

    2016-01-26

    Though simple inflationary models describe the CMB well, their corrections are often plagued by infrared effects that obstruct a reliable calculation of late-time behaviour. Here we adapt to cosmology tools designed to address similar issues in other physical systems with the goal of making reliable late-time inflationary predictions. The main such tool is Open EFTs which reduce in the inflationary case to Stochastic Inflation plus calculable corrections. We apply this to a simple inflationary model that is complicated enough to have dangerous IR behaviour yet simple enough to allow the inference of late-time behaviour. We find corrections to standard Stochastic Inflationary predictions for the noise and drift, and we find these corrections ensure the IR finiteness of both these quantities. The late-time probability distribution, P(Φ), for super-Hubble field fluctuations are obtained as functions of the noise and drift and so these too are IR finite. We compare our results to other methods (such as large-N models) and find they agree when these models are reliable. In all cases we can explore in detail we find IR secular effects describe the slow accumulation of small perturbations to give a big effect: a significant distortion of the late-time probability distribution for the field. But the energy density associated with this is only of order H4 at late times and so does not generate a dramatic gravitational back-reaction.

  14. The Transition of a Type IIL Supernova into a Supernova Remnant: Late-time Observations of SN 2013by

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, C. S.; Milisavljevic, D.; Margutti, R.; Fesen, R. A.; Patnaude, D.; Parker, S.

    2017-10-01

    We present early-time Swift and Chandra X-ray data along with late-time optical and near-infrared observations of SN 2013by, a Type IIL supernova (SN) that occurred in the nearby spiral galaxy ESO 138‑G10 (D ∼ 14.8 Mpc). Optical and NIR photometry and spectroscopy follow the late-time evolution of the SN from days +89 to +457 post maximum brightness. The optical spectra and X-ray light curves are consistent with the picture of an SN having prolonged interaction with circumstellar material (CSM) that accelerates the transition from SN to supernova remnant (SNR). Specifically, we find SN 2013by’s Hα profile exhibits significant broadening (∼10,000 km s‑1) on day +457, the likely consequence of high-velocity, H-rich material being excited by a reverse shock. A relatively flat X-ray light curve is observed that cannot be modeled using Inverse Compton scattering processes alone, but requires an additional energy source most likely originating from the SN-CSM interaction. In addition, we see the first overtone of CO emission near 2.3 μm on day +152, signaling the formation of molecules and dust in the SN ejecta and is the first time CO has been detected in a Type IIL SN. We compare SN 2013by with Type IIP SNe, whose spectra show the rarely observed SN-to-SNR transition in varying degrees and conclude that Type IIL SNe may enter the remnant phase at earlier epochs than their Type IIP counterparts.

  15. Homogeneous Atomic Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Yan, Zhenjie; Patel, Parth B.; Hadzibabic, Zoran; Yefsah, Tarik; Struck, Julian; Zwierlein, Martin W.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the creation of homogeneous Fermi gases of ultracold atoms in a uniform potential. In the momentum distribution of a spin-polarized gas, we observe the emergence of the Fermi surface and the saturated occupation of one particle per momentum state: the striking consequence of Pauli blocking in momentum space for a degenerate gas. Cooling a spin-balanced Fermi gas at unitarity, we create homogeneous superfluids and observe spatially uniform pair condensates. For thermodynamic measurements, we introduce a hybrid potential that is harmonic in one dimension and uniform in the other two. The spatially resolved compressibility reveals the superfluid transition in a spin-balanced Fermi gas, saturation in a fully polarized Fermi gas, and strong attraction in the polaronic regime of a partially polarized Fermi gas.

  16. Fermi LAT detection of X8.2 solar flare of September 10, 2017

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Francesco; Pesce-Rollins, Melissa

    2017-09-01

    On 10 September 2017 the Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, observed bright gamma-ray emission from the X8.2 class solar flare that erupted from the Solar AR 12673.

  17. Central Engine of Late-time X-Ray Flares with Internal Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Hui-Jun; Gu, Wei-Min; Hou, Shu-Jin; Liu, Tong; Lin, Da-Bin; Yi, Tuan; Liang, En-Wei; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2016-12-01

    This work focuses on a sample of seven extremely late-time X-ray flares with peak time {t}{{p}}\\gt {10}4 {{s}}, among which two flares can be confirmed as the late-time activity of central engine. The main purpose is to investigate the mechanism of such late-time flares based on the internal origin assumption. In the hyper-accreting black hole (BH) scenario, we study the possibility of two well-known mechanisms acting as the central engine to power such X-ray flares, i.e., the neutrino-antineutrino annihilation and the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) process. Our results show that the annihilation luminosity is far below the observational data. Thus, the annihilation mechanism cannot account for such late-time flares. For the BZ process, if the role of outflows is taken into consideration, the inflow mass rate near the horizon will be quite low such that the magnetic field will probably be too weak to power the observed X-ray flares. We therefore argue that, for the late-time flares with internal origin, the central engine is unlikely to be associated with BHs. On the contrary, a fast rotating neutron star with strong bipolar magnetic fields may be responsible for such flares.

  18. Aspects of late-time evolution in mimetic F(R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate how to describe in an unified way early and late-time acceleration in the context of mimetic F(R) gravity. As we show, an exponential F(R) gravity model has appealing features, with regard to unification and we perform an analysis of the late-time evolution. The resulting picture is interesting since in the mimetic case, certain pathologies of some ordinary F(R) models are remedied in a consistent way, owing to the presence of the mimetic potential and the Lagrange multiplier. We quantify the late-time evolution analysis by studying the scaled dark energy density, the dark energy equation of state and the total effective equation of state, and as we show the late-time evolution is crucially affected by the functional form of the F(R) gravity. It is intriguing that the most appealing case corresponds to the exponential F(R) gravity which unifies late- and early-time acceleration. Finally, we study the behavior of the effective gravitational constant and the growth factor, and as we show, significant differences between the mimetic and ordinary F(R) exponential model are spotted in the growth factor.

  19. Simple estimation of late-time response for radar target identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonpoonga, Akkarat; Chomdee, Pongsathorn; Burintramart, Santana; Akkaraekthalin, Prayoot

    2017-06-01

    This paper proposes a conceptual technique for the simple estimation of the late-time response for radar target identification without a priori knowledge of the target geometry or orientation. In the proposed technique, the cross correlation between the backscattering response and transmitted wave is performed. Peaks will occur in the cross-correlation output when the transmitted wave is aligned with the same features in the received backscattering response. The commencement of the late-time response corresponds with the peak resulting from a superimposed pattern between the transmitted wave and late-time response. The matrix pencil method was exploited in order to extract the poles from the received backscattering response. Several simulations were performed to evaluate the performance of the proposed estimation technique. The simulation results confirmed the superiority of the proposed approach. In the special case of the transmission with a monocycle pulse, the commencement of the late-time response can be automatically selected from the third peak of the resulting cross-correlation output.

  20. SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE POWERED BY MAGNETARS: LATE-TIME LIGHT CURVES AND HARD EMISSION LEAKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S. Q.; Wang, L. J.; Dai, Z. G.; Wu, X. F.

    2015-01-20

    Recently, research performed by two groups has revealed that the magnetar spin-down energy injection model with full energy trapping can explain the early-time light curves of SN 2010gx, SN 2013dg, LSQ12dlf, SSS120810, and CSS121015 but fails to fit the late-time light curves of these superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). These results imply that the original magnetar-powered model is challenged in explaining these SLSNe. Our paper aims to simultaneously explain both the early- and late-time data/upper limits by considering the leakage of hard emissions. We incorporate quantitatively the leakage effect into the original magnetar-powered model and derive a new semianalytical equation. Comparing the light curves reproduced by our revised magnetar-powered model with the observed data and/or upper limits of these five SLSNe, we found that the late-time light curves reproduced by our semianalytical equation are in good agreement with the late-time observed data and/or upper limits of SN 2010gx, CSS121015, SN 2013dg, and LSQ12dlf and the late-time excess of SSS120810, indicating that the magnetar-powered model might be responsible for these SLSNe and that the gamma-ray and X-ray leakages are unavoidable when the hard photons were down-Comptonized to softer photons. To determine the details of the leakage effect and unveil the nature of SLSNe, more high-quality bolometric light curves and spectra of SLSNe are required.

  1. Progressive redshifts in the late-time spectra of Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, C. S.; Fesen, R. A.; Parrent, J. T.

    2016-10-01

    We examine the evolution of late-time, optical nebular features of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using a sample consisting of 160 spectra of 27 normal SNe Ia taken from the literature as well as unpublished spectra of SN 2008Q and ASASSN-14lp. Particular attention was given to nebular features between 4000 and 6000 Å in terms of temporal changes in width and central wavelength. Analysis of the prominent late-time 4700 Å feature shows a progressive central wavelength shift from ˜4600 Å to longer wavelengths out to at least day +300 for our entire sample. We find no evidence for the feature's redward shift slowing or halting at an [Fe III] blend centroid ˜4700 Å as has been proposed. The width of this feature also steadily increases with a FWHM ˜170 Å at day +100 growing to 200 Å or more by day +350. Two weaker adjacent features at around 4850 and 5000 Å exhibit similar redshifts to that of the 4700 Å feature but show no change in width until very late times. We discuss possible causes for the observed redshifts of these late-time optical features including contribution from [Co II] emission at early nebular epochs and the emergence of additional features at later times. We conclude that the ubiquitous redshift of these common late-time SN Ia spectral features is not mainly due to a decrease in line velocities of forbidden Fe emissions, but the result of decreasing line velocities and opacity of permitted Fe absorption lines.

  2. Quantum phases of Fermi-Fermi mixtures in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskin, M.; Sá de Melo, C. A. R.

    2008-07-01

    The ground-state phase diagram of Fermi-Fermi mixtures in optical lattices is analyzed as a function of interaction strength, population imbalance, filling fraction, and tunneling parameters. It is shown that population imbalanced Fermi-Fermi mixtures reduce to strongly interacting Bose-Fermi mixtures in the molecular limit, in sharp contrast to homogeneous or harmonically trapped systems, where the resulting Bose-Fermi mixture is weakly interacting. Furthermore, insulating phases are found in optical lattices of Fermi-Fermi mixtures in addition to the standard phase-separated or coexisting superfluid-excess-fermion phases found in homogeneous systems. The insulating states can be a molecular Bose-Mott insulator (BMI), a Fermi-Pauli insulator (FPI), a phase-separated BMI-FPI mixture, or a Bose-Fermi checkerboard.

  3. On the source of the late-time infrared luminosity of SN 1998S and other Type II supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzo, M.; Meikle, W. P. S.; Fassia, A.; Geballe, T.; Lundqvist, P.; Chugai, N. N.; Sollerman, J.

    2004-08-01

    We present late-time near-infrared (NIR) and optical observations of the Type IIn SN 1998S. The NIR photometry spans 333-1242 d after explosion, while the NIR and optical spectra cover 333-1191 and 305-1093 d, respectively. The NIR photometry extends to the M' band (4.7 μm), making SN 1998S only the second ever supernova for which such a long IR wavelength has been detected. The shape and evolution of the Hα and HeI 1.083-μm line profiles indicate a powerful interaction with a progenitor wind, as well as providing evidence of dust condensation within the ejecta. The latest optical spectrum suggests that the wind had been flowing for at least 430 yr. The intensity and rise of the HK continuum towards longer wavelengths together with the relatively bright L' and M' magnitudes show that the NIR emission was due to hot dust newly formed in the ejecta and/or pre-existing dust in the progenitor circumstellar medium (CSM). The NIR spectral energy distribution (SED) at about 1 yr is well described by a single-temperature blackbody spectrum at about 1200 K. The temperature declines over subsequent epochs. After ~2 yr, the blackbody matches are less successful, probably indicating an increasing range of temperatures in the emission regions. Fits to the SEDs achieved with blackbodies weighted with λ-1 or λ-2 emissivity are almost always less successful. Possible origins for the NIR emission are considered. Significant radioactive heating of ejecta dust is ruled out, as is shock/X-ray-precursor heating of CSM dust. More plausible sources are (a) an IR echo from CSM dust driven by the ultraviolet/optical peak luminosity, and (b) emission from newly-condensed dust which formed within a cool, dense shell produced by the ejecta shock/CSM interaction. We argue that the evidence favours the condensing dust hypothesis, although an IR echo is not ruled out. Within the condensing-dust scenario, the IR luminosity indicates the presence of at least 10-3 Msolar of dust in the ejecta

  4. Chandra and Swift Observations of Unidentified Fermi-LAT Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, Davide; Cheung, T.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-03-01

    In the last year we targeted some of the unidentified Fermi-LAT objects (UFOs) at high Galactic latitude with Chandra and Swift in order to determine the basic properties (positions, fluxes, hardness ratios) of all X-ray sources within the Fermi-LAT localization circles. These satellites enable us to detect the X-ray conterparts with a flux limit that is at least an order of magnitude lower than achieved in extant RASS data and to further follow-up at other wavelengths, with the ultimate goal to reveal the nature of these enigmatic gamma-ray sources. Here we present the results obtained with 5 Chandra pointings of high Galactic latitude UFOs in the Fermi-LAT 3-months bright source list. The association of detected X-ray sources within the improved 11-months Fermi-LAT localization circles with available optical and radio observations is discussed.

  5. Fermi, Szilard and Trinity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Herbert L.

    1974-01-01

    The final installment of the author's recollections of his work with physicists Enrico Fermi, Leo Szilard and others in developing the first controlled nuclear chain reaction and in preparing the test explosion of the first atomic bomb. (GS)

  6. Fermi at Six Months

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    An overview of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's first 6 months in operation is provided. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, formerly called GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy rage 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. It contains a Large Area Telescope capable of viewing the entire sky every 3 hours and a Gamma-ray Burst Monitor for viewing the entire unocculted sky. Since its launch on June 11, 2008 Fermi has provided information on pulsars, gamma ray bursts, relativistic jets, the active galactic nucleus, and a globular star cluster. This presentation describes Fermi's development, mission, instruments and recent findings.

  7. Fermi Galactic Center Zoom

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation zooms into an image of the Milky Way, shown in visible light, and superimposes a gamma-ray map of the galactic center from NASA's Fermi. Raw data transitions to a view with all known...

  8. Fermi, Szilard and Trinity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Herbert L.

    1974-01-01

    The final installment of the author's recollections of his work with physicists Enrico Fermi, Leo Szilard and others in developing the first controlled nuclear chain reaction and in preparing the test explosion of the first atomic bomb. (GS)

  9. Primordial inhomogeneities in the expanding universe. II - General features of spherical models at late times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, D. W.; Silk, J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper studies the density profile that forms around a spherically symmetric bound central core immersed in a homogeneous-background k = 0 or k = -1 Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model, with zero pressure. Although the density profile in the linearized regime is almost arbitrary, in the nonlinear regime certain universal features of the density profile are obtained that are independent of the details of the initial conditions. The formation of 'halos' ('holes') with densities greater than (less than) the average cosmological density is discussed. It is shown that in most regions 'halos' form, and universal values are obtained for the slope of the ln (density)-ln (radius) profile in those 'halos' at late times, independently of the shape of the initial density profile. Restrictions are derived on where it is possible for 'holes' to exist at late times and on how such 'holes' must have evolved.

  10. After the Fall: Late-Time Spectroscopy of Type IIP Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Pickett, Stephanie; Wheeler, J. Craig; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Vinkó, József; Marion, G. H.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Chornock, Ryan; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Foley, Ryan J.; Graham, Melissa L.; Kelly, Patrick L.; Matheson, Thomas; Shields, Joseph C.

    2017-05-01

    Herein we analyse late-time (post-plateau; 103 < t < 1229 d) optical spectra of low-redshift (z < 0.016), hydrogen-rich Type IIP supernovae (SNe IIP). Our newly constructed sample contains 91 nebular spectra of 38 SNe IIP, which is the largest data set of its kind ever analysed in one study, and many of the objects have complementary photometric data. The strongest and most robust result we find is that the luminosities of all spectral features (except those of helium) tend to be higher in objects with steeper late-time V-band decline rates. A steep late-time V-band slope likely arises from less efficient trapping of γ-rays and positrons, which could be caused by multidimensional effects such as clumping of the ejecta or asphericity of the explosion itself. Furthermore, if γ-rays and positrons can escape more easily, then so can photons via the observed emission lines, leading to more luminous spectral features. It is also shown that SNe IIP with larger progenitor stars have ejecta with a more physically extended oxygen layer that is well-mixed with the hydrogen layer. In addition, we find a subset of objects with evidence for asymmetric 56Ni ejection, likely bipolar in shape. We also compare our observations to theoretical late-time spectral models of SNe IIP from two separate groups and find moderate-to-good agreement with both sets of models. Our SNe IIP spectra are consistent with models of 12-15 M⊙ progenitor stars having relatively low metallicity (Z ≤ 0.01).

  11. Viability of an arctan model of f (R ) gravity for late-time cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Koushik; Panda, Sukanta; Patel, Avani

    2016-07-01

    f (R ) modification of Einstein's gravity is an interesting possibility to explain the late-time acceleration of the Universe. In this work we explore the cosmological viability of one such f (R ) modification proposed by Kruglov [Phys. Rev. D 89, 064004 (2014)]. We show that the model violates fifth-force constraints. The model is also plagued with the issue of a curvature singularity in a spherically collapsing object, where the effective scalar field reaches the point of diverging scalar curvature.

  12. After the Fall: Late-Time Spectroscopy of Type IIP Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Pickett, Stephanie; Craig Wheeler, J.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Vinkó, József; Marion, G. H.; Bradley Cenko, S.; Chornock, Ryan; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Foley, Ryan J.; Graham, Melissa L.; Kelly, Patrick L.; Matheson, Thomas; Shields, Joseph C.

    2017-01-01

    Herein we analyse late-time (post-plateau; 103 < t < 1229 d) optical spectra of low-redshift (z < 0.016), hydrogen-rich Type IIP supernovae (SNe IIP). Our newly constructed sample contains 91 nebular spectra of 38 SNe IIP, which is the largest dataset of its kind ever analysed in one study, and many of the objects have complementary photometric data. The strongest and most robust result we find is that the luminosities of all spectral features (except those of helium) tend to be higher in objects with steeper late-time V-band decline rates. A steep late-time V-band slope likely arises from less efficient trapping of γ-rays and positrons, which could be caused by multidimensional effects such as clumping of the ejecta or asphericity of the explosion itself. Furthermore, if γ-rays and positrons can escape more easily, then so can photons via the observed emission lines, leading to more luminous spectral features. It is also shown that SNe IIP with larger progenitor stars have ejecta with a more physically extended oxygen layer that is well-mixed with the hydrogen layer. In addition, we find a subset of objects with evidence for asymmetric 56Ni ejection, likely bipolar in shape. We also compare our observations to theoretical late-time spectral models of SNe IIP from two separate groups and find moderate-to-good agreement with both sets of models. Our SNe IIP spectra are consistent with models of 12-15 M⊙ progenitor stars having relatively low metallicity (Z ≤ 0.01).

  13. On the late-time cosmology of a condensed scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalee, Amir

    2016-04-01

    We study the late-time cosmology of a scalar field with a kinetic term non-minimally coupled to gravity. It is demonstrated that the scalar field dominate the radiation matter and the cold dark matter (CDM). Moreover, we show that eventually the scalar field will be condensed and results in an accelerated expansion. The metric perturbations around the condensed phase of the scalar field are investigated and it has been shown that the ghost instability and gradient instability do not exist.

  14. Progressive Red Shifts in the Late-Time Spectra of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Christine; Fesen, Robert; Parrent, Jerod

    2017-01-01

    We examine the evolution of late-time, optical nebular features of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using a sample consisting of 160 spectra of 27 normal SNe Ia taken from the literature as well as unpublished spectra of SN 2008Q and ASASSN-14lp. Particular attention is given to nebular features between 4000-6000 Ang in terms of temporal changes in width and central wavelength. Analysis of the prominent late-time 4700 Ang feature shows a progressive central wavelength shift from ˜4600 Ang to longer wavelengths out to at least day +300 for our entire sample. We find no evidence for the feature’s red-ward shift slowing or halting at an [Fe III] blend centroid ˜4700 Ang as has been proposed. Two weaker adjacent features at around 4850 and 5000 Ang exhibit similar red shifts to that of the 4700 Ang feature. We conclude that the ubiquitous red shift of these common late-time SN Ia spectral features is not mainly due to a decrease in line velocities of forbidden Fe emissions, but the result of decreasing line velocities and opacity of permitted Fe absorption lines.

  15. Electroosmotic fluid motion and late-time solute transport at non-negligible zeta potentials

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Griffiths; R. H. Nilson

    1999-12-01

    Analytical and numerical methods are employed to determine the electric potential, fluid velocity and late-time solute distribution for electroosmotic flow in a tube and channel when the zeta potential is not small. The electric potential and fluid velocity are in general obtained by numerical means. In addition, new analytical solutions are presented for the velocity in a tube and channel in the extremes of large and small Debye layer thickness. The electroosmotic fluid velocity is used to analyze late-time transport of a neutral non-reacting solute. Zeroth and first-order solutions describing axial variation of the solute concentration are determined analytically. The resulting expressions contain eigenvalues representing the dispersion and skewness of the axial concentration profiles. These eigenvalues and the functions describing transverse variation of the concentration field are determined numerically using a shooting technique. Results are presented for both tube and channel geometries over a wide range of the normalized Debye layer thickness and zeta potential. Simple analytical approximations to the eigenvalues are also provided for the limiting cases of large and small values of the Debye layer thickness. The methodology developed here for electroosmotic flow is also applied to the Taylor problem of late-time transport and dispersion in pressure-driven flows.

  16. FermiGrid

    SciTech Connect

    Yocum, D.R.; Berman, E.; Canal, P.; Chadwick, K.; Hesselroth, T.; Garzoglio, G.; Levshina, T.; Sergeev, V.; Sfiligoi, I.; Sharma, N.; Timm, S.; /Fermilab

    2007-05-01

    As one of the founding members of the Open Science Grid Consortium (OSG), Fermilab enables coherent access to its production resources through the Grid infrastructure system called FermiGrid. This system successfully provides for centrally managed grid services, opportunistic resource access, development of OSG Interfaces for Fermilab, and an interface to the Fermilab dCache system. FermiGrid supports virtual organizations (VOs) including high energy physics experiments (USCMS, MINOS, D0, CDF, ILC), astrophysics experiments (SDSS, Auger, DES), biology experiments (GADU, Nanohub) and educational activities.

  17. Searching for the Expelled Hydrogen Envelope in Type I Supernovae via Late-Time Hα Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinko, J.; Pooley, D.; Silverman, J. M.; Wheeler, J. C.; Szalai, T.; Kelly, P.; MacQueen, P.; Marion, G. H.; Sárneczky, K.

    2017-03-01

    We report the first results from our long-term observational survey aimed at discovering late-time interaction between the ejecta of hydrogen-poor Type I supernovae (SNe I) and the hydrogen-rich envelope expelled from the progenitor star several decades/centuries before explosion. The expelled envelope, moving with a velocity of ∼10–100 km s‑1, is expected to be caught up by the fast-moving SN ejecta several years/decades after explosion, depending on the history of the mass-loss process acting in the progenitor star prior to explosion. The collision between the SN ejecta and the circumstellar envelope results in net emission in the Balmer lines, especially Hα. We look for signs of late-time Hα emission in older SNe Ia/Ibc/IIb with hydrogen-poor ejecta via narrowband imaging. Continuum-subtracted Hα emission has been detected for 13 point sources: 9 SN Ibc, 1 SN IIb, and 3 SN Ia events. Thirty-eight SN sites were observed on at least two epochs, from which three objects (SN 1985F, SN 2005kl, and SN 2012fh) showed significant temporal variation in the strength of their Hα emission in our Direct Imaging Auxiliary Functions Instrument (DIAFI) data. This suggests that the variable emission is probably not due to nearby H ii regions unassociated with the SN and hence is an important additional hint that ejecta–circumstellar medium interaction may take place in these systems. Moreover, we successfully detected the late-time Hα emission from the Type Ib SN 2014C, which was recently discovered as a strongly interacting SN in various (radio, infrared, optical, and X-ray) bands.

  18. Clues to the Nature of SN 2009ip from Photometric and Spectroscopic Evolution to Late Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, M. L.; Sand, D. J.; Valenti, S.; Howell, D. A.; Parrent, J.; Halford, M.; Zaritsky, D.; Bianco, F.; Rest, A.; Dilday, B.

    2014-06-01

    We present time series photometric and spectroscopic data for the transient SN 2009ip from the start of its outburst in 2012 September until 2013 November. These data were collected primarily with the new robotic capabilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, a specialized facility for time domain astrophysics, and includes supporting high-resolution spectroscopy from the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope, Kitt Peak National Observatory, and Gemini Observatory. Based on our nightly photometric monitoring, we interpret the strength and timing of fluctuations in the light curve as interactions between fast-moving ejecta and an inhomogeneous circumstellar material (CSM) produced by past eruptions of this massive luminous blue variable (LBV) star. Our time series of spectroscopy in 2012 reveals that, as the continuum and narrow Hα flux from CSM interactions declines, the broad component of Hα persists with supernova (SN)-like velocities that are not typically seen in LBVs or SN impostor events. At late times, we find that SN 2009ip continues to decline slowly, at <~ 0.01 mag day-1, with small fluctuations in slope similar to Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) or SN impostors but no further LBV-like activity. The late-time spectrum features broad calcium lines similar to both late-time SNe and SN impostors. In general, we find that the photometric and spectroscopic evolution of SN 2009ip is more similar to SNe IIn than either continued eruptions of an LBV star or SN impostors but we cannot rule out a nonterminal explosion. In this context, we discuss the implications for episodic mass loss during the late stages of massive star evolution.

  19. Clues to the nature of SN 2009ip from photometric and spectroscopic evolution to late times

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, M. L.; Sand, D. J.; Valenti, S.; Howell, D. A.; Parrent, J.; Halford, M.; Zaritsky, D.; Bianco, F.; Rest, A.; Dilday, B.

    2014-06-01

    We present time series photometric and spectroscopic data for the transient SN 2009ip from the start of its outburst in 2012 September until 2013 November. These data were collected primarily with the new robotic capabilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, a specialized facility for time domain astrophysics, and includes supporting high-resolution spectroscopy from the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope, Kitt Peak National Observatory, and Gemini Observatory. Based on our nightly photometric monitoring, we interpret the strength and timing of fluctuations in the light curve as interactions between fast-moving ejecta and an inhomogeneous circumstellar material (CSM) produced by past eruptions of this massive luminous blue variable (LBV) star. Our time series of spectroscopy in 2012 reveals that, as the continuum and narrow Hα flux from CSM interactions declines, the broad component of Hα persists with supernova (SN)-like velocities that are not typically seen in LBVs or SN impostor events. At late times, we find that SN 2009ip continues to decline slowly, at ≲ 0.01 mag day{sup –1}, with small fluctuations in slope similar to Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) or SN impostors but no further LBV-like activity. The late-time spectrum features broad calcium lines similar to both late-time SNe and SN impostors. In general, we find that the photometric and spectroscopic evolution of SN 2009ip is more similar to SNe IIn than either continued eruptions of an LBV star or SN impostors but we cannot rule out a nonterminal explosion. In this context, we discuss the implications for episodic mass loss during the late stages of massive star evolution.

  20. High-redshift Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Tagliaferri, G.; Foschini, L.; Ghirlanda, G.; Tavecchio, F.; Della Ceca, R.; Haardt, F.; Volonteri, M.; Gehrels, N.

    2011-02-01

    With the release of the first-year Fermi catalogue, the number of blazars detected above 100 MeV lying at high redshift has been largely increased. There are 28 blazars at z > 2 in the `clean' sample. All of them are flat spectrum radio quasars. We study and model their overall spectral energy distribution in order to find the physical parameters of the jet-emitting region, and for all of them, we estimate their black hole masses and accretion rates. We then compare the jet with the accretion disc properties, setting these sources in the broader context of all the other bright γ-ray or hard X-ray blazars. We confirm that the jet power correlates with the accretion luminosity. We find that the high-energy emission peak shifts to smaller frequencies as the observed luminosity increases, according to the blazar sequence, making the hard X-ray band the most suitable for searching the most-luminous and distant blazars.

  1. Charges and currents in quantum spin chains: late-time dynamics and spontaneous currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagotti, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    We review the structure of the conservation laws in noninteracting spin chains and unveil a formal expression for the corresponding currents. We briefly discuss how interactions affect the picture. In the second part, we explore the effects of a localized defect. We show that the emergence of spontaneous currents near the defect undermines any description of the late-time dynamics by means of a stationary state in a finite chain. In particular, the diagonal ensemble does not work. Finally, we provide numerical evidence that simple generic localized defects are not sufficient to induce thermalization.

  2. Transient and late time attractor tachyon dark energy: Can we distinguish it from quintessence?

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Amna; Sami, M.; Sen, A. A.

    2009-06-15

    The string inspired tachyon field can serve as a candidate of dark energy. Its equation of state parameter w varies from 0 to -1. In the case of tachyon field potential V({phi}){yields}0 slower (faster) than 1/{phi}{sup 2} at infinity, dark energy (dark matter) is a late time attractor. We investigate the tachyon dark energy models under the assumption that w is close to -1. We find that all the models exhibit unique behavior around the present epoch which is exactly the same as that of the thawing quintessence.

  3. Late time cosmological phase transitions 1: Particle physics models and cosmic evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Hill, Christopher T.; Watkins, Richard

    1991-01-01

    We described a natural particle physics basis for late-time phase transitions in the universe. Such a transition can seed the formation of large-scale structure while leaving a minimal imprint upon the microwave background anisotropy. The key ingredient is an ultra-light pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson with an astronomically large (O(kpc-Mpc)) Compton wavelength. We analyze the cosmological signatures of and constraints upon a wide class of scenarios which do not involve domain walls. In addition to seeding structure, coherent ultra-light bosons may also provide unclustered dark matter in a spatially flat universe, omega sub phi approx. = 1.

  4. Fermi LAT Stacking Analysis of Swift Localized GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kocevski, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Schaal, M.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Kienlin, A. von; Werner, M.; Wood, K. S.

    2016-05-05

    In this paper, we perform a comprehensive stacking analysis of data collected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) of γ-ray bursts (GRBs) localized by the Swift spacecraft, which were not detected by the LAT but which fell within the instrument's field of view at the time of trigger. We examine a total of 79 GRBs by comparing the observed counts over a range of time intervals to that expected from designated background orbits, as well as by using a joint likelihood technique to model the expected distribution of stacked counts. We find strong evidence for subthreshold emission at MeV to GeV energies using both techniques. This observed excess is detected during intervals that include and exceed the durations typically characterizing the prompt emission observed at keV energies and lasts at least 2700 s after the co-aligned burst trigger. By utilizing a novel cumulative likelihood analysis, we find that although a burst's prompt γ-ray and afterglow X-ray flux both correlate with the strength of the subthreshold emission, the X-ray afterglow flux measured by Swift's X-ray Telescope at 11 hr post trigger correlates far more significantly. Overall, the extended nature of the subthreshold emission and its connection to the burst's afterglow brightness lend further support to the external forward shock origin of the late-time emission detected by the LAT. Finally, these results suggest that the extended high-energy emission observed by the LAT may be a relatively common feature but remains undetected in a majority of bursts owing to instrumental threshold effects.

  5. Fermi Large Area Telescope First Source Catalog

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; ...

    2010-05-25

    Here, we present a catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), during the first 11 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. The First Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL) contains 1451 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. Source detection was based on the average flux over the 11 month period, and the threshold likelihood Test Statistic is 25, corresponding to a significance of just over 4σ. The 1FGL catalog includes source location regions,more » defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and power-law spectral fits as well as flux measurements in five energy bands for each source. In addition, monthly light curves are provided. Using a protocol defined before launch we have tested for several populations of gamma-ray sources among the sources in the catalog. For individual LAT-detected sources we provide firm identifications or plausible associations with sources in other astronomical catalogs. Identifications are based on correlated variability with counterparts at other wavelengths, or on spin or orbital periodicity. For the catalogs and association criteria that we have selected, 630 of the sources are unassociated. In conclusion, care was taken to characterize the sensitivity of the results to the model of interstellar diffuse gamma-ray emission used to model the bright foreground, with the result that 161 sources at low Galactic latitudes and toward bright local interstellar clouds are flagged as having properties that are strongly dependent on the model or as potentially being due to incorrectly modeled structure in the Galactic diffuse emission.« less

  6. Fermi Large Area Telescope First Source Catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Belli, F.; Berenji, B.; Bisello, D.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Campana, R.; Canadas, B.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Cillis, A. N.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Davis, D. S.; DeKlotz, M.; den Hartog, P. R.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Luca, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Dormody, M.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Fabiani, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Healey, S. E.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Iafrate, G.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Landriu, D.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S. -H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lionetto, A. M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Marangelli, B.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, E.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakajima, H.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Poupard, L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ripken, J.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Sadrozinski, H. F. -W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Scolieri, G.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J. -L.; Stephens, T. E.; Striani, E.; Strickman, M. S.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinebra, F.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Van Etten, A.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Watters, K.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-05-25

    Here, we present a catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), during the first 11 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. The First Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL) contains 1451 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. Source detection was based on the average flux over the 11 month period, and the threshold likelihood Test Statistic is 25, corresponding to a significance of just over 4σ. The 1FGL catalog includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and power-law spectral fits as well as flux measurements in five energy bands for each source. In addition, monthly light curves are provided. Using a protocol defined before launch we have tested for several populations of gamma-ray sources among the sources in the catalog. For individual LAT-detected sources we provide firm identifications or plausible associations with sources in other astronomical catalogs. Identifications are based on correlated variability with counterparts at other wavelengths, or on spin or orbital periodicity. For the catalogs and association criteria that we have selected, 630 of the sources are unassociated. In conclusion, care was taken to characterize the sensitivity of the results to the model of interstellar diffuse gamma-ray emission used to model the bright foreground, with the result that 161 sources at low Galactic latitudes and toward bright local interstellar clouds are flagged as having properties that are strongly dependent on the model or as potentially being due to incorrectly modeled structure in the Galactic diffuse emission.

  7. Fermi Large Area Telescope First Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Belli, F.; Berenji, B.; Bisello, D.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Campana, R.; Canadas, B.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Cillis, A. N.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Davis, D. S.; DeKlotz, M.; den Hartog, P. R.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Luca, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Dormody, M.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Fabiani, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Healey, S. E.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Iafrate, G.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Landriu, D.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lionetto, A. M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Marangelli, B.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, E.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakajima, H.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Poupard, L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ripken, J.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Scolieri, G.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J.-L.; Stephens, T. E.; Striani, E.; Strickman, M. S.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinebra, F.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Van Etten, A.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Watters, K.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2010-06-01

    We present a catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), during the first 11 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. The First Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL) contains 1451 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. Source detection was based on the average flux over the 11 month period, and the threshold likelihood Test Statistic is 25, corresponding to a significance of just over 4σ. The 1FGL catalog includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and power-law spectral fits as well as flux measurements in five energy bands for each source. In addition, monthly light curves are provided. Using a protocol defined before launch we have tested for several populations of gamma-ray sources among the sources in the catalog. For individual LAT-detected sources we provide firm identifications or plausible associations with sources in other astronomical catalogs. Identifications are based on correlated variability with counterparts at other wavelengths, or on spin or orbital periodicity. For the catalogs and association criteria that we have selected, 630 of the sources are unassociated. Care was taken to characterize the sensitivity of the results to the model of interstellar diffuse gamma-ray emission used to model the bright foreground, with the result that 161 sources at low Galactic latitudes and toward bright local interstellar clouds are flagged as having properties that are strongly dependent on the model or as potentially being due to incorrectly modeled structure in the Galactic diffuse emission.

  8. Fermi TGF detection map

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Fermi’s Gamma-ray Burst Monitor detected 130 TGFs from August 2008 to the end of 2010. Thanks to instrument tweaks, the team has been able to improve the detection rate to several TGFs per week. ...

  9. On the late-time behavior of Virasoro blocks and a classification of semiclassical saddles

    DOE PAGES

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared

    2017-04-12

    Recent work has demonstrated that black hole thermodynamics and information loss/restoration in AdS3/CFT2 can be derived almost entirely from the behavior of the Virasoro conformal blocks at large central charge, with relatively little dependence on the precise details of the CFT spectrum or OPE coefficients. Here, we elaborate on the non-perturbative behavior of Virasoro blocks by classifying all ‘saddles’ that can contribute for arbitrary values of external and internal operator dimensions in the semiclassical large central charge limit. The leading saddles, which determine the naive semiclassical behavior of the Virasoro blocks, all decay exponentially at late times, and at amore » rate that is independent of internal operator dimensions. Consequently, the semiclassical contribution of a finite number of high-energy states cannot resolve a well-known version of the information loss problem in AdS3. Furthermore, we identify two infinite classes of sub-leading saddles, and one of these classes does not decay at late times.« less

  10. Unifying inflation with late-time acceleration by a BIonic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehri, Alireza; Rahaman, Farook; Setare, Mohammad Reza; Pradhan, Anirudh; Capozziello, Salvatore; Sardar, Iftikar Hossain

    2015-07-01

    We propose a cosmological model that unifies inflation, deceleration and acceleration phases of expansion history by a BIonic system. At the beginning, there are k black fundamental strings that transited to the BIon configuration at a given corresponding point. Here, two coupled universes, brane and antibrane, are created interacting each other through a wormhole and inflate. With decreasing temperature, the energy of this wormhole flows into the universe branes and leads to inflation. After a short time, the wormhole evaporates, the inflation ends and a deceleration epoch starts. By approaching the brane and antibrane universes together, a tachyon is born, grows and causes the creation of a new wormhole. At this time, the brane and antibrane universes result connected again and the late-time acceleration era of the universe begins. We compare our model with previous unified phantom models and observational data obtaining some cosmological parameters like temperature in terms of time. We also find that deceleration parameter is negative during inflation and late-time acceleration epochs, while it is positive during the deceleration era. This means that the model is consistent, in principle, with cosmological observations.

  11. Investigating SNe Ia progenitor diversity through late-time IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, Tiara

    2016-01-01

    Late-time spectra of SNe Ia show numerous strong emission features of iron and cobalt throughout the NIR. As the spectrum ages, the cobalt features fade as is expected from the decay of 56Co to 56Fe. The strong 1.64 μm [Fe II] feature is sensitive to the central density of the white dwarf just prior to the thermonuclear runaway of C in the core because of electron capture in the early stages of burning, which increases as a function of density. The line profile is dependent on the extent of mixing during any deflagration burning in addition to asymmetries in the distribution of burning products or an off-center ignition. Normalization of a time-series of spectra to the 1.64 μm line allows separation of features produced by stable versus unstable isotopes of iron group elements. Evolution of the width of this feature probes the strength and morphology of magnetic fields in the expanding ejecta. Results of this technique are shown for SN 2005df, with observations spanning 200-400 days past the explosion. A sample of these late-time spectroscopic observations in the NIR of SNe Ia will provide insight into the natural variety of these objects, improving our understanding of the underlying physical processes and their usability in cosmology.

  12. Late-time quantum backreaction of a very light nonminimally coupled scalar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavan, Dražen; Prokopec, Tomislav; Takahashi, Tomo

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the backreaction of the quantum fluctuations of a very light (m ≲Htoday) nonminimally coupled spectator scalar field on the expansion dynamics of the Universe. The one-loop expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor of these fluctuations, as a measure of the backreaction, is computed throughout the expansion history from the early inflationary universe until the onset of recent acceleration today. We show that, when the nonminimal coupling ξ to Ricci curvature is negative (ξc=1 /6 corresponding to conformal coupling), the quantum backreaction grows exponentially during inflation, such that it can grow large enough rather quickly (within a few hundred e -foldings) to survive until late time and constitute a contribution of the cosmological constant type of the right magnitude to appreciably alter the expansion dynamics. The unique feature of this model is in that, under rather generic assumptions, inflation provides a natural explanation for the initial conditions needed to explain the late-time accelerated expansion of the Universe, making it a particularly attractive model of dark energy.

  13. Dust Signatures from Late-time Infrared and Optical Observations of SN 1998S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzo, M.; Meikle, W. P. S.; Fassia, A.; Geballe, T.; Lundqvist, P.; Chugai, N. N.; Sollerman, J.

    2005-12-01

    We present late-time IR (1-5 µm) and optical observations of the type IIn SN 1998S up to about 1200 days post-explosion. The shape and evolution of the Hα and He I 1.083 µm line profiles indicate a powerful interaction with a massive progenitor wind and provide evidence of dust condensation within the ejecta. 1.5-2.5 µm spectra and HKL'M' photometry reveal strong IR emission due to hot dust in the ejecta and/or circumstellar medium (CSM). For the origin of the IR emission we favour dust condensation (at least 10^{-3} M_{sun}) in a cool dense shell (CDS) as the main IR source but do not rule out a contribution from the CSM. The late-time evolution of the intrinsic (K-L') colour of type II supernovae (SNe) may be a potentially useful tool for determining the presence or absence of a massive CSM around their progenitors.

  14. Late-time quadrupolar gravitational wave power in de Sitter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazboun, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    We have calculated the power emitted by a binary system in a cosmological context modeled by a stress energy source on a de Sitter background. The calculation is based on the quadrupole formula for late-time gravitational waves in de Sitter space put forward by Ashtekar, Bonga and Kesavan. There is little reason to expect, a priori, that the projection operator usually used to find the transverse-traceless components of a tensor in asymptotically flat spaces will accurately characterize the physical degrees of freedom in an asymptotically de Sitter spacetime. Instead we use the differential recipe that is true in general, but cumbersome to solve explicitly. The solution presented is based on a conformally transformed version of the quadrupole moment from a Minkowski spacetime for a stable circular binary. A process for calculating the late time power is presented, which coincides with future null infinity. Progress on time dependent results will also be presented. We will discuss the physicality of these results and compare it to other results for gravitational waves in de Sitter space, including recent results on gravitational wave memory.

  15. Interaction quenches of Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, Goetz S.

    2009-12-15

    It is shown that the jump in the momentum distribution of Fermi gases evolves smoothly for small and intermediate times once an interaction between the fermions is suddenly switched on. The jump does not vanish abruptly. The loci in momentum space where the jumps occur are those of the noninteracting Fermi sea. No relaxation of the Fermi surface geometry takes place.

  16. Brightness of Moonlight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garstang, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Measurement of the brightness of moonlight by comparison with lamp-light from a low wattage light bulb is an elementary project in astronomy which illustrates scientific principles for the freshman level. Two methods used for the comparison (shadow brightness method and grease spot method) are explained, with suggestions and expected answers. (DH)

  17. The late-time dynamics of the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaprabhu, P.; Dimonte, Guy; Woodward, P.; Fryer, C.; Rockefeller, G.; Muthuraman, K.; Lin, P.-H.; Jayaraj, J.

    2012-07-01

    We report on numerical simulations of the detailed evolution of the single mode Rayleigh-Taylor [Lord Rayleigh, Scientific Papers II (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1900), p. 200; G. I. Taylor, "The instability of liquid surfaces when accelerated in a direction perpendicular to their plane," Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 201, 192 (1950), 10.1098/rspa.1950.0052; S. Chandrasekhar, Hydrodynamic and Hydromagnetic Stability (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1961)] instability to late times and high aspect ratios. In contrast to established potential flow models that predict a terminal velocity and a constant Froude number at low Atwood numbers, we observe a complex sequence of events that can be summarized in four stages: I. Exponential growth of imposed perturbations, II. Saturation to terminal velocity, III. Reacceleration to a higher Froude number, and IV. Chaotic mixing. The observed reacceleration away from the Froude number predicted by potential flow theory is attributed to the appearance of secondary Kelvin-Helmholtz structures, and described with a modification to the potential flow model proposed by Betti and Sanz [R. Betti and J. Sanz, "Bubble acceleration in the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability," Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 205002 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.205002]. The secondary KH instability is in turn sensitive to several parameters, and can be suppressed at large Atwood numbers, as well as viscosity (physical or numerical), with the bubble/spike velocity in each case reverting to the potential flow value. Our simulations delineate the change in dynamics of the primary and secondary instabilities due to changes in these flow parameters. When the flow is allowed to evolve to late times, further instability is observed, resulting in chaotic mixing which is quantified here. The increased atomic mixing due to small-scale structures results in a dramatic drop in the late-time Froude number. Spike behavior resembles bubbles at low A, while for large A

  18. Late-time evolution of a self-interacting scalar field in the spacetime of a dilaton black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Moderski, Rafal; Rogatko, Marek

    2001-08-15

    We investigate the late-time tails of self-interacting (massive) scalar fields in the spacetime of a dilaton black hole. Following the no hair theorem we examine the mechanism by which self-interacting scalar hair decays. We reveal that the intermediate asymptotic behavior of the considered field perturbations is dominated by an oscillatory inverse power-law decaying tail. The numerical simulations show that at very late time, massive self-interacting scalar hair decays slower than any power law.

  19. Late-time structure of the Bunch-Davies de Sitter wavefunction

    SciTech Connect

    Anninos, Dionysios; Anous, Tarek; Freedman, Daniel Z.; Konstantinidis, George

    2015-11-30

    We examine the late time behavior of the Bunch-Davies wavefunction for interacting light fields in a de Sitter background. We use perturbative techniques developed in the framework of AdS/CFT, and analytically continue to compute tree and loop level contributions to the Bunch-Davies wavefunction. We consider self-interacting scalars of general mass, but focus especially on the massless and conformally coupled cases. We show that certain contributions grow logarithmically in conformal time both at tree and loop level. We also consider gauge fields and gravitons. The four-dimensional Fefferman-Graham expansion of classical asymptotically de Sitter solutions is used to show that the wavefunction contains no logarithmic growth in the pure graviton sector at tree level. Finally, assuming a holographic relation between the wavefunction and the partition function of a conformal field theory, we interpret the logarithmic growths in the language of conformal field theory.

  20. Late-time structure of the Bunch-Davies de Sitter wavefunction

    SciTech Connect

    Anninos, Dionysios; Freedman, Daniel Z.; Konstantinidis, George; Anous, Tarek E-mail: tanous@mit.edu E-mail: cgcoss@stanford.edu

    2015-11-01

    We examine the late time behavior of the Bunch-Davies wavefunction for interacting light fields in a de Sitter background. We use perturbative techniques developed in the framework of AdS/CFT, and analytically continue to compute tree and loop level contributions to the Bunch-Davies wavefunction. We consider self-interacting scalars of general mass, but focus especially on the massless and conformally coupled cases. We show that certain contributions grow logarithmically in conformal time both at tree and loop level. We also consider gauge fields and gravitons. The four-dimensional Fefferman-Graham expansion of classical asymptotically de Sitter solutions is used to show that the wavefunction contains no logarithmic growth in the pure graviton sector at tree level. Finally, assuming a holographic relation between the wavefunction and the partition function of a conformal field theory, we interpret the logarithmic growths in the language of conformal field theory.

  1. Note about late-time wave tails on a dynamical background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizoń, Piotr; Rostworowski, Andrzej

    2010-04-01

    Consider a spherically symmetric spacetime generated by a self-gravitating massless scalar field ϕ and let ψ be a test (nonspherical) massless scalar field propagating on this dynamical background. Gundlach, Price, and Pullin [Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ0556-2821 49, 890 (1994).10.1103/PhysRevD.49.890] computed numerically the late-time tails for different multipoles of the field ψ and suggested that solutions with compactly supported initial data decay in accord with Price’s law as t-(2ℓ+3) at timelike infinity. We show that in the case of the time-dependent background dispersing to Minkowski spacetime Price’s law holds only for ℓ=0 while for each ℓ≥1 the tail decays as t-(2ℓ+2).

  2. Experimental investigation of late time Rayleigh-Taylor mixing at high Atwood number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchandra, Prasoon; Mikhaeil, Mark; Ranjan, Devesh

    2016-11-01

    Dynamics of late time, high Reynolds number (Re >20000) Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing is studied using statistically steady experiments performed in a multi-layer gas tunnel. The density ratio of air and air-Helium mixture used in the present experiment results in an Atwood number 0.73. Three types of diagnostics - back-lit visualization, hot-wire anemometry and stereo particle image velocimetry (S-PIV) - are employed to obtain mixing width, velocity and density fields, with S-PIV employed for the first time for such experimental conditions. Velocity and density statistics, and their correlations (u', v', w',ρ' ,ρ'v') are presented. Calculations of probability density functions (p.d.f.s) and energy spectra are made to provide further insight into the flow physics. Energy budget of the flow is also discussed.

  3. The phenomenological status of late time phase transition models after cosmic background radiation anisotropy measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Xiaochun; Schramm, David N.

    1994-01-01

    Some relatively model-independent results for structure formation via late time phase transitions (LTPT) are discussed. In particular, generic LTPT power spectra are presented. The implication of the recent Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) detection of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) anisotropy at large angular scales (greater than or approximately equal to 7 deg) and the tight upper limits from small angular scales (approximately 1 deg) to LTPT models are discussed. Special attention is focused on the observational constraints and possible non-Gaussian signatures of CBR temperature anisotropies from LTPT and other non-Gaussian models. It is shown that while LTPT have been seriously constrained by the recent data, viable models do remain which provide more power on the 100-200 Mpc scales than do more traditional primordial Gaussian density fluctuation models. Tests for such models are presented, including possible anisotropies on angular scales less than 8 min.

  4. Late-time particle emission from laser-produced graphite plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Polek, M.

    2011-09-01

    We report a late-time ''fireworks-like'' particle emission from laser-produced graphite plasma during its evolution. Plasmas were produced using graphite targets excited with 1064 nm Nd: yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser in vacuum. The time evolution of graphite plasma was investigated using fast gated imaging and visible emission spectroscopy. The emission dynamics of plasma is rapidly changing with time and the delayed firework-like emission from the graphite target followed a black-body curve. Our studies indicated that such firework-like emission is strongly depended on target material properties and explained due to material spallation caused by overheating the trapped gases through thermal diffusion along the layer structures of graphite.

  5. Early inflation to late-time acceleration in f(G) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Malay Krishna; Sarkar, Kaushik; Modak, B.

    2016-09-01

    We present some solutions in Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetime in the modified theory of gravity with a general Gauss-Bonnet (GB) term f(G) and R2 including an ideal fluid. We present evolution of the universe introducing an ansatz without a prior choice of f(G) in one approach, while in other class of model, the solutions are obtained assuming few simple forms of f(G). Some of the solutions show early inflationary expansion, further in one solution the fluctuation of the deceleration parameter q is evident at the end of inflation. In all cases, late-time transition to accelerating universe at redshift z ˜ 0.7 is realizable.

  6. Late time acceleration in a non-commutative model of modified cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekolkalami, B.; Atazadeh, K.; Vakili, B.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the effects of non-commutativity between the position-position, position-momentum and momentum-momentum of a phase space corresponding to a modified cosmological model. We show that the existence of such non-commutativity results in a Moyal Poisson algebra between the phase space variables in which the product law between the functions is of the kind of an α-deformed product. We then transform the variables in such a way that the Poisson brackets between the dynamical variables take the form of a usual Poisson bracket but this time with a noncommutative structure. For a power law expression for the function of the Ricci scalar with which the action of the gravity model is modified, the exact solutions in the commutative and noncommutative cases are presented and compared. In terms of these solutions we address the issue of the late time acceleration in cosmic evolution.

  7. Modeling of Late-Time Low Atwood Rayleigh-Taylor Experiments at OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy, T.; Malamud, G.; Elgin, L.; Huntington, C. M.; Trantham, M. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; Shvarts, D.; Drake, R. P.

    2016-10-01

    Numerical simulations have shown a reacceleration phase of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) at low Atwood numbers, during which the bubble and spike Froude numbers deviate from their expected asymptotic values. Currently, there is no experimental validation of those results. Therefore, we propose a new HEDP experiment for late-time evolution of low Atwood number RTI. In this work, we present numerical simulations of our experimental RTI system. We compare our results to spike and bubble velocities provided by potential theory and buoyancy-drag models. Additionally, we identify aspects of the low Atwood RTI system that will influence experimental outcomes. Supported by the U.S. DOE, through NNSA Grants DE-NA0002956 (SSAA) and DE-NA0002719 (NLUF), by the LLE under DE-NA0001944, and by the LLNL under subcontract B614207 to DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Leaky Fermi accelerators.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kushal; Gelfreich, Vassili; Rom-Kedar, Vered; Turaev, Dmitry

    2015-06-01

    A Fermi accelerator is a billiard with oscillating walls. A leaky accelerator interacts with an environment of an ideal gas at equilibrium by exchange of particles through a small hole on its boundary. Such interaction may heat the gas: we estimate the net energy flow through the hole under the assumption that the particles inside the billiard do not collide with each other and remain in the accelerator for a sufficiently long time. The heat production is found to depend strongly on the type of Fermi accelerator. An ergodic accelerator, i.e., one that has a single ergodic component, produces a weaker energy flow than a multicomponent accelerator. Specifically, in the ergodic case the energy gain is independent of the hole size, whereas in the multicomponent case the energy flow may be significantly increased by shrinking the hole size.

  9. Extracting the late-time kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munshi, D.; Iliev, I. T.; Dixon, K. L.; Coles, P.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a novel technique to separate the late-time, post-reionization component of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ) effect from the contribution to it from a (poorly understood and probably patchy) reionization history. The kSZ effect is one of the most promising probe of the missing baryons in the Universe. We study the possibility of reconstructing it in three dimensions (3D), using future spectroscopic surveys such as the Euclid survey. By reconstructing a 3D template from galaxy density and peculiar velocity fields from spectroscopic surveys we cross-correlate the estimator against CMB maps. The resulting cross-correlation can help us to map out the kSZ contribution to CMB in 3D as a function of redshift thereby extending previous results which use tomographic reconstruction. This allows the separation of the late-time effect from the contribution owing to reionization. By construction, it avoids contamination from foregrounds, primary CMB, tSZ effect as well as from star-forming galaxies. Due to a high number density of galaxies the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for such cross-correlational studies is higher, compared to the studies involving CMB power-spectrum analysis. Using a spherical Bessel-Fourier (sFB) transform we introduce a pair of 3D power spectra: C^{allel }_ℓ (k) and C^{perp }_ℓ (k) that can be used for this purpose. We find that in a future spectroscopic survey with near all-sky coverage and a survey depth of z ≈ 1, reconstruction of C^{perp }_ℓ (k) can be achieved in a few radial wave bands k ≈ (0.01-0.5 h- 1 Mpc) with a S/N ratio of up to O(10) for angular harmonics in the range ℓ = (200-2000).

  10. Dynamical supersymmetry breaking and late-time R symmetry breaking as the origin of cosmic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Kai; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2016-10-01

    Spontaneously broken supersymmetry (SUSY) and a vanishingly small cosmological constant imply that R symmetry must be spontaneously broken at low energies. Based on this observation, we suppose that, in the sector responsible for low-energy R symmetry breaking, a discrete R symmetry remains preserved at high energies and only becomes dynamically broken at relatively late times in the cosmological evolution, i.e., after the dynamical breaking of SUSY. Prior to R symmetry breaking, the Universe is then bound to be in a quasi-de Sitter phase—which offers a dynamical explanation for the occurrence of cosmic inflation. This scenario yields a new perspective on the interplay between SUSY breaking and inflation, which neatly fits into the paradigm of high-scale SUSY: inflation is driven by the SUSY-breaking vacuum energy density, while the chiral field responsible for SUSY breaking, the Polonyi field, serves as the inflaton. Because R symmetry is broken only after inflation, slow-roll inflation is not spoiled by otherwise dangerous gravitational corrections in supergravity. We illustrate our idea by means of a concrete example, in which both SUSY and R symmetry are broken by strong gauge dynamics and in which late-time R symmetry breaking is triggered by a small inflaton field value. In this model, the scales of inflation and SUSY breaking are unified, the inflationary predictions are similar to those of F-term hybrid inflation in supergravity, reheating proceeds via gravitino decay at temperatures consistent with thermal leptogenesis, and the sparticle mass spectrum follows from pure gravity mediation. Dark matter consists of thermally produced winos with a mass in the TeV range.

  11. Bright Patches on Ariel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-05

    Distinct bright patches are visible on Ariel, the brightest of Uranus five largest satellites. NASA Voyager 2 obtained this image Jan. 22, 1986, from a distance of 2.52 million kilometers 1.56 million miles.

  12. Bright Lights, Green City

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-07-28

    Two extremely bright stars illuminate a greenish mist in this image from the new GLIMPSE360 survey from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope. The fog is comprised of hydrogen and carbon compounds called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  13. Beyond Bright Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-30

    The tiny moon Pandora appears beyond the bright disk of Saturn rings in this image taken by NASA Cassini spacecraft. Pandora orbits outside the F ring and, in this image, is farther from Cassini than the rings are.

  14. [Bright light therapy].

    PubMed

    Poirrier, R; Cambron, L

    2007-01-01

    Bright light therapy is a treatment that emerged in the eighties of the last century. It can be used in different pathologies such as seasonal affective disorders, major depressions, and many disorders of the wake-sleep rhythm, whether they are of primary or secondary origin. Important progress made at the basic neuroscience levels, allows today a sound understanding of the bright light mode of action. Moreover, the main indications are now the subject of consensus reports and meta-analyses which show good levels of evidence-based medicine. Bright light therapy constitutes a first choice indication in seasonal affective disorder. It is also perfectly possible to prescribe bright light therapy in the major depression disorders. It has been demonstrated that the effect size is the same as with antidepressants of reference. It is admitted nowadays that bright light therapy may be at least, an adjunct to pharmacotherapy, in order to accelerate the antidepressant effect onset, or to prolong this effect after withdrawal of the drug. Bright light therapy can also be viewed as an alternative to the pharmacological approach especially when this one is impossible, not tolerated or not accepted by the patient. The contraindications are rare.

  15. Chiral non-Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, Shouvik; Lee, Sung-Sik

    2014-07-01

    A non-Fermi liquid state without time-reversal and parity symmetries arises when a chiral Fermi surface is coupled with a soft collective mode in two space dimensions. The full Fermi surface is described by a direct sum of chiral patch theories, which are decoupled from each other in the low-energy limit. Each patch includes low-energy excitations near a set of points on the Fermi surface with a common tangent vector. General patch theories are classified by the local shape of the Fermi surface, the dispersion of the critical boson, and the symmetry group, which form the data for distinct universality classes. We prove that a large class of chiral non-Fermi liquid states exists as stable critical states of matter. For this, we use a renormalization group scheme where low-energy excitations of the Fermi surface are interpreted as a collection of (1+1)-dimensional chiral fermions with a continuous flavor labeling the momentum along the Fermi surface. Due to chirality, the Wilsonian effective action is strictly UV finite. This allows one to extract the exact scaling exponents although the theories flow to strongly interacting field theories at low energies. In general, the low-energy effective theory of the full Fermi surface includes patch theories of more than one universality classes. As a result, physical responses include multiple universal components at low temperatures. We also point out that, in quantum field theories with extended Fermi surface, a noncommutative structure naturally emerges between a coordinate and a momentum which are orthogonal to each other. We show that the invalidity of patch description for Fermi liquid states is tied with the presence of UV/IR mixing associated with the emergent noncommutativity. On the other hand, UV/IR mixing is suppressed in non-Fermi liquid states due to UV insensitivity, and the patch description is valid.

  16. The First FERMI-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; hide

    2013-01-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy great than (20 MeV) gamma-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above approximately 20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  17. The first Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray burst catalog

    DOE PAGES

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; ...

    2013-10-23

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (gsim 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above ~20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi andmore » processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. Here, we summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.« less

  18. The First FERMI-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burgess, J. Michael; Buson, S.; Byrne, D.; Caliandro, G. A.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Guiriec, S.; McEnery, J. E.; Nemmen, R.; Perkins, J. S.; Racusin, J. L.; Thompson, D. J.; Kouveliotou, C.

    2013-01-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy great than (20 MeV) gamma-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above approximately 20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  19. THE FIRST FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bloom, E. D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Brandt, T. J.; Bouvier, A. E-mail: giacomov@slac.stanford.edu; and others

    2013-11-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (∼> 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above ∼20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  20. The First Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burgess, J. Michael; Buson, S.; Byrne, D.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Dingus, B. L.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Goldstein, A.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Gruber, D.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Kawano, T.; Kippen, R. M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McBreen, S.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Pelassa, V.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Preece, R.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Rau, A.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Romoli, C.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sonbas, E.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tierney, D.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Tronconi, V.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Xiong, S.; Yang, Z.

    2013-11-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (gsim 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above ~20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  1. LATE-TIME LIGHT CURVES OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, Masaaki; Meixner, Margaret; Panagia, Nino; Fabbri, Joanna; Barlow, Michael J.; Wesson, Roger; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Andrews, Jennifer E.; Gallagher, Joseph S.; Sugerman, Ben E. K.; Ercolano, Barbara; Welch, Douglas E-mail: otsuka@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2012-01-01

    We present BVRIJHK-band photometry of six core-collapse supernovae, SNe 1999bw, 2002hh, 2003gd, 2004et, 2005cs, and 2006bc, measured at late epochs (>2 yr) based on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the Gemini North, and WIYN telescopes. We also show the JHK light curves of supernova impostor SN 2008S up to day 575 because it was serendipitously in our SN 2002hh field of view. Of our 43 HST observations in total, 36 observations are successful in detecting the light from the SNe alone and measuring magnitudes of all the targets. HST observations show a resolved scattered light echo around SN 2003gd at day 1520 and around SN 2002hh at day 1717. Our Gemini and WIYN observations detected SNe 2002hh and 2004et as well. Combining our data with previously published data, we show VRIJHK-band light curves and estimate decline magnitude rates at each band in four different phases. Our prior work on these light curves and other data indicate that dust is forming in our targets from days {approx}300 to 400, supporting SN dust formation theory. In this paper we focus on other physical properties derived from late-time light curves. We estimate {sup 56}Ni masses for our targets (0.5-14 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M{sub Sun }) from the bolometric light curve of each of days {approx}150-300 using SN 1987A as a standard (7.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M{sub Sun }). The flattening or sometimes increasing fluxes in the late-time light curves of SNe 2002hh, 2003gd, 2004et, and 2006bc indicate the presence of light echoes. We estimate the circumstellar hydrogen density of the material causing the light echo and find that SN 2002hh is surrounded by relatively dense materials (n(H) >400 cm{sup -3}) and SNe 2003gd and 2004et have densities more typical of the interstellar medium ({approx}1 cm{sup -3}). We analyze the sample as a whole in the context of physical properties derived in prior work. The {sup 56}Ni mass appears well correlated with progenitor mass with a slope of 0

  2. Late-time Light Curves of Type II Supernovae: Physical Properties of Supernovae and Their Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Masaaki; Meixner, Margaret; Panagia, Nino; Fabbri, Joanna; Barlow, Michael J.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Gallagher, Joseph S.; Sugerman, Ben E. K.; Wesson, Roger; Andrews, Jennifer E.; Ercolano, Barbara; Welch, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    We present BVRIJHK-band photometry of six core-collapse supernovae, SNe 1999bw, 2002hh, 2003gd, 2004et, 2005cs, and 2006bc, measured at late epochs (>2 yr) based on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the Gemini North, and WIYN telescopes. We also show the JHK light curves of supernova impostor SN 2008S up to day 575 because it was serendipitously in our SN 2002hh field of view. Of our 43 HST observations in total, 36 observations are successful in detecting the light from the SNe alone and measuring magnitudes of all the targets. HST observations show a resolved scattered light echo around SN 2003gd at day 1520 and around SN 2002hh at day 1717. Our Gemini and WIYN observations detected SNe 2002hh and 2004et as well. Combining our data with previously published data, we show VRIJHK-band light curves and estimate decline magnitude rates at each band in four different phases. Our prior work on these light curves and other data indicate that dust is forming in our targets from days ~300 to 400, supporting SN dust formation theory. In this paper we focus on other physical properties derived from late-time light curves. We estimate 56Ni masses for our targets (0.5-14 × 10-2 M ⊙) from the bolometric light curve of each of days ~150-300 using SN 1987A as a standard (7.5 × 10-2 M ⊙). The flattening or sometimes increasing fluxes in the late-time light curves of SNe 2002hh, 2003gd, 2004et, and 2006bc indicate the presence of light echoes. We estimate the circumstellar hydrogen density of the material causing the light echo and find that SN 2002hh is surrounded by relatively dense materials (n(H) >400 cm-3) and SNe 2003gd and 2004et have densities more typical of the interstellar medium (~1 cm-3). We analyze the sample as a whole in the context of physical properties derived in prior work. The 56Ni mass appears well correlated with progenitor mass with a slope of 0.31 × 10-2, supporting the previous work by Maeda et al., who focus on more massive Type II SNe. The

  3. Universal nodal Fermi velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.J.; Yoshida, T.; Lanzara, A.; Bogdanov, P.V.; Kellar, S.A.; Shen, K.M.; Yang, W.L.; Ronning, F.; Sasagawa, T.; Kakeshita, T.; Noda, T.; Eisaki, H.; Uchida, S.; Lin, C.T.; Zhou, F.; Xiong, J.W.; Ti, W.X.; Zhao, Z.X.; Fujimori, A.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z.-X.

    2003-05-27

    The physical properties of cuprate superconductors vary dramatically as a function of doping, evolving from antiferromagnetic insulator to superconductors, and to normal metal upon doping. They also vary among different families of compounds, most prominent being the superconducting transition temperature (Tc), which ranges from 38 K for optimally-doped (La2-xSrx)CuO4 (x=0.15) to 135 K for Hg2Ba2Ca2Cu3O10. Such dramatic changes with doping and material family have been observed in transport properties, optical response, magnetic excitation spectra, the superconducting condensation energy and superfluid density. All these seem to imply that the underlying microscopic quantities of cup rates are generally non-universal. This paper presents a striking exception by providing experimental evidence that the nodal Fermi velocity, a quantity that governs the low-energy quasiparticle dynamics along the (0,0)-(p,p) direction where the d-wave superconducting gap is zero in cuprate superconductors , is actually universal. This conclusion is based on extensive measurements from a wide range of doping, and from five families of hole-doped cuprates whose maximum Tc varies by a factor of three or more. The invariance of the nodal Fermi velocity all the way to the Mott insulator boundary clearly signals the breakdown of the conventional Fermi liquid theory where the metal-insulator transition is realized by the divergence of the effective mass near the insulator boundary. A possible way to understand this behavior is the nanoscale phase separation where doped holes tend to create a preferred local environment so that the behavior of the individual hole is more or less the same for low energy dynamics

  4. Berry Fermi liquid theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing-Yuan; Son, Dam Thanh

    2017-02-01

    We develop an extension of the Landau Fermi liquid theory to systems of interacting fermions with non-trivial Berry curvature. We propose a kinetic equation and a constitutive relation for the electromagnetic current that together encode the linear response of such systems to external electromagnetic perturbations, to leading and next-to-leading orders in the expansion over the frequency and wave number of the perturbations. We analyze the Feynman diagrams in a large class of interacting quantum field theories and show that, after summing up all orders in perturbation theory, the current-current correlator exactly matches with the result obtained from the kinetic theory.

  5. Wormholes versus black holes: quasinormal ringing at early and late times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoplya, R. A.; Zhidenko, A.

    2016-12-01

    Recently it has been argued that the phantom thin-shell wormholes matched with the Schwarzschild space-time near the Schwarzschild radius ring like Schwarzschild black holes at early times, but differently at late times [1]. Here we consider perturbations of the wormhole which was constructed without thin-shells: the Bronnikov-Ellis wormhole supported by the phantom matter and electromagnetic field. This wormhole solution is known to be stable under specific equation of state of the phantom matter. We show that if one does not use the above thin-shell matching, the wormhole, depending on the values of its parameters, either rings as the black hole at all times or rings differently also at all times. The wormhole's spectrum, investigated here, posses a number of distinctive features. In the final part we have considered general properties of scattering around arbitrary rotating traversable wormholes. We have found that symmetric and non-symmetric (with respect to the throat) wormholes are qualitatively different in this respect: first, superradiance is allowed only if for those non-symmetric wormholes for which the asymptotic values of the rotation parameters are different on both sides from the throat. Second, the symmetric wormholes cannot mimic effectively the ringing of a black hole at a few various dominant multipoles at the same time, so that the future observations of various events should easily tell the symmetric wormhole from a black hole.

  6. Late-time behaviour of the tilted Bianchi type VIh models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervik, S.; van den Hoogen, R. J.; Lim, W. C.; Coley, A. A.

    2007-08-01

    We study tilted perfect fluid cosmological models with a constant equation of state parameter in spatially homogeneous models of Bianchi type VIh using dynamical systems methods and numerical experimentation, with an emphasis on their future asymptotic evolution. We determine all of the equilibrium points of the type VIh state space (which correspond to exact self-similar solutions of the Einstein equations, some of which are new), and their stability is investigated. We find that there are vacuum plane-wave solutions that act as future attractors. In the parameter space, a 'loophole' is shown to exist in which there are no stable equilibrium points. We then show that a Hopf-bifurcation can occur resulting in a stable closed orbit (which we refer to as the Mussel attractor) corresponding to points both inside the loophole and points just outside the loophole; in the former case the closed curves act as late-time attractors while in the latter case these attracting curves will co-exist with attracting equilibrium points. In the special Bianchi type III case, centre manifold theory is required to determine the future attractors. Comprehensive numerical experiments are carried out to complement and confirm the analytical results presented. We note that the Bianchi type VIh case is of particular interest in that it contains many different subcases which exhibit many of the different possible future asymptotic behaviours of Bianchi cosmological models.

  7. Optical and ultraviolet spectroscopic analysis of SN 2011fe at late times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, Brian; Baron, E.; Parrent, Jerod T.; Thomas, R. C.; Branch, David; Nugent, Peter E.; Hauschildt, Peter H.; Foley, Ryan J.; Wright, Darryl E.; Pan, Yen-Chen; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Maeda, Keiichi; Shivvers, Isaac; Kelly, Patrick L.; Cohen, Daniel P.; Rest, Armin; Kasen, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    We present optical spectra of the nearby Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe at 100, 205, 311, 349 and 578 d post-maximum light, as well as an ultraviolet (UV) spectrum obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope at 360 d post-maximum light. We compare these observations with synthetic spectra produced with the radiative transfer code phoenix. The day +100 spectrum can be well fitted with models that neglect collisional and radiative data for forbidden lines. Curiously, including these data and recomputing the fit yields a quite similar spectrum, but with different combinations of lines forming some of the stronger features. At day +205 and later epochs, forbidden lines dominate much of the optical spectrum formation; however, our results indicate that recombination, not collisional excitation, is the most influential physical process driving spectrum formation at these late times. Consequently, our synthetic optical and UV spectra at all epochs presented here are formed almost exclusively through recombination-driven fluorescence. Furthermore, our models suggest that the UV spectrum even as late as day +360 is optically thick and consists of permitted lines from several iron-peak species. These results indicate that the transition to the 'nebular' phase in Type Ia supernovae is complex and highly wavelength dependent.

  8. Late time optical spectra from the /sup 56/Ni model for Type I supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Axelrod, T.S.

    1980-07-01

    The hypothesis that the optical luminosity of Type I supernovae results from the radioactive decay of /sup 56/Ni synthesized and ejected by the explosion has been investigated by numerical simulation of the optical spectrum resulting from a homologously expanding shell composed initially of pure /sup 56/Ni core. This model, which neglects the effects of material external to the /sup 56/Ni core, is expected to provide a reasonable representation of the supernova at late times when the star is nearly transparent to optical photons. The numerical simulation determines the temperature, ionization state, and non-LTE level populations which result from energy deposition by the radioactive decay products of /sup 56/Ni and /sup 56/Co. The optical spectrum includes the effects of both allowed and forbidden lines. The optical spectra resulting from the simulation are found to be sensitive to the mass and ejection velocity of the /sup 56/Ni shell. A range of these parameters has been found which results in good agreement with the observed spectra of SN1972e over a considerable range of time. In particular, evidence for the expected decaying abundance of /sup 56/Co has been found in the spectra of SN1972e. These results are used to assess the validity of the /sup 56/Ni model and set limits on the mass and explosion mechanism of the Type I progenitor. The possibilities for improvement of the numerical model are discussed and future atomic data requirements defined.

  9. A late time accelerated FRW model with scalar and vector fields via Noether symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, Babak

    2014-11-01

    We study the evolution of a three-dimensional minisuperspace cosmological model by the Noether symmetry approach. The phase space variables turn out to correspond to the scale factor of a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) model, a scalar field with potential function V (ϕ) with which the gravity part of the action is minimally coupled and a vector field of its kinetic energy is coupled with the scalar field by a coupling function f (ϕ). Then, the Noether symmetry of such a cosmological model is investigated by utilizing the behavior of the corresponding Lagrangian under the infinitesimal generator of the desired symmetry. We explicitly calculate the form of the coupling function between the scalar and the vector fields and also the scalar field potential function for which such symmetry exists. Finally, by means of the corresponding Noether current, we integrate the equations of motion and obtain exact solutions for the scale factor, scalar and vector fields. It is shown that the resulting cosmology is an accelerated expansion universe for which its expansion is due to the presence of the vector field in the early times, while the scalar field is responsible of its late time expansion.

  10. Optical and ultraviolet spectroscopic analysis of SN 2011fe at late times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, Brian; Baron, E.; Parrent, Jerod T.; Thomas, R. C.; Branch, David; Nugent, Peter E.; Hauschildt, Peter H.; Foley, Ryan J.; Wright, Darryl E.; Pan, Yen-Chen; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Maeda, Keiichi; Shivvers, Isaac; Kelly, Patrick L.; Cohen, Daniel P.; Rest, Armin; Kasen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We present optical spectra of the nearby Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe at 100, 205, 311, 349, and 578 days post-maximum light, as well as an ultraviolet (UV) spectrum obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope at 360 days post-maximum light. We compare these observations with synthetic spectra produced with the radiative transfer code PHOENIX. The day +100 spectrum can be well fit with models which neglect collisional and radiative data for forbidden lines. Curiously, including these data and recomputing the fit yields a quite similar spectrum, but with different combinations of lines forming some of the stronger features. At day +205 and later epochs, forbidden lines dominate much of the optical spectrum formation; however, our results indicate that recombination, not collisional excitation, is the most influential physical process driving spectrum formation at these late times. Consequently, our synthetic optical and UV spectra at all epochs presented here are formed almost exclusively through recombination-driven fluorescence. Furthermore, our models suggest that the UV spectrum even as late as day +360 is optically thick and consists of permitted lines from several iron-peak species. These results indicate that the transition to the "nebular" phase in Type Ia supernovae is complex and highly wavelength-dependent.

  11. Optical and ultraviolet spectroscopic analysis of SN 2011fe at late times

    DOE PAGES

    Friesen, Brian; Baron, E.; Parrent, Jerod T.; ...

    2017-02-27

    This paper presents optical spectra of the nearby Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe at 100, 205, 311, 349 and 578 d post-maximum light, as well as an ultraviolet (UV) spectrum obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope at 360 d post-maximum light. We compare these observations with synthetic spectra produced with the radiative transfer code PHOENIX. The day +100 spectrum can be well fitted with models that neglect collisional and radiative data for forbidden lines. Curiously, including these data and recomputing the fit yields a quite similar spectrum, but with different combinations of lines forming some of the stronger features. Atmore » day +205 and later epochs, forbidden lines dominate much of the optical spectrum formation; however, our results indicate that recombination, not collisional excitation, is the most influential physical process driving spectrum formation at these late times. Consequently, our synthetic optical and UV spectra at all epochs presented here are formed almost exclusively through recombinationdriven fluorescence. Furthermore, our models suggest that the UV spectrum even as late as day +360 is optically thick and consists of permitted lines from several iron-peak species. These results indicate that the transition to the 'nebular' phase in Type Ia supernovae is complex and highly wavelength dependent.« less

  12. Late-time Domain Growth in the Compressible Triangular Ising Net

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Meng; Landau, David

    2012-02-01

    We perform large scale Monte Carlo simulations of the long-tme domain growth behavior in a compressible, triangular Ising net. Unlike previous work,ootnotetextMitchell and DP Landau, PRL 97, 025701 (2006) our model has no bond angle interactions or lattice mismatch. The system is quenched below the critical temperature from a homogenous disordered state to an ordered phase where multiple domains coexist. We include an elastic energy part in the Hamiltonian to adjust the rigidity of the model. Theory expects the domain size R(t) grows as a power law R(t)=A+Bt^n, where t is the time after the quench. For the rigid model we find the late-time domain size growth factor n has Lifshitz-Slozov value of 13. For weak flexible models, we get slight reduction from 13. For the strongly flexible model, we get a bimodal distribution of bond lengths and a dramatically reduced value of n, which has similar behavior as the mismatch model.ootnotetextIbid.

  13. Modified gravity theories on a nutshell: Inflation, bounce and late-time evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojiri, S.; Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2017-06-01

    We systematically review some standard issues and also the latest developments of modified gravity in cosmology, emphasizing on inflation, bouncing cosmology and late-time acceleration era. Particularly, we present the formalism of standard modified gravity theory representatives, like F(R) , F(G) and F(T) gravity theories, but also several alternative theoretical proposals which appeared in the literature during the last decade. We emphasize on the formalism developed for these theories and we explain how these theories can be considered as viable descriptions for our Universe. Using these theories, we present how a viable inflationary era can be produced in the context of these theories, with the viability being justified if compatibility with the latest observational data is achieved. Also we demonstrate how bouncing cosmologies can actually be described by these theories. Moreover, we systematically discuss several qualitative features of the dark energy era by using the modified gravity formalism, and also we critically discuss how a unified description of inflation with dark energy era can be described by solely using the modified gravity framework. Finally, we also discuss some astrophysical solutions in the context of modified gravity, and several qualitative features of these solutions. The aim of this review is to gather the different modified gravity techniques and form a virtual modified gravity ;toolbox;, which will contain all the necessary information on inflation, dark energy and bouncing cosmologies in the context of the various forms of modified gravity.

  14. Beyond-one-loop quantum gravity action yielding both inflation and late-time acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizalde, E.; Odintsov, S. D.; Sebastiani, L.; Myrzakulov, R.

    2017-08-01

    A unified description of early-time inflation with the current cosmic acceleration is achieved by means of a new theory that uses a quadratic model of gravity, with the inclusion of an exponential F (R)-gravity contribution for dark energy. High-curvature corrections of the theory come from higher-derivative quantum gravity and yield an effective action that goes beyond the one-loop approximation. It is shown that, in this theory, viable inflation emerges in a natural way, leading to a spectral index and tensor-to-scalar ratio that are in perfect agreement with the most reliable Planck results. At low energy, late-time accelerated expansion takes place. As exponential gravity, for dark energy, must be stabilized during the matter and radiation eras, we introduce a curing term in order to avoid nonphysical singularities in the effective equation of state parameter. The results of our analysis are confirmed by accurate numerical simulations, which show that our model does fit the most recent cosmological data for dark energy very precisely.

  15. New physics of metals: fermi surfaces without Fermi liquids.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, P W

    1995-01-01

    I relate the historic successes, and present difficulties, of the renormalized quasiparticle theory of metals ("AGD" or Fermi liquid theory). I then describe the best-understood example of a non-Fermi liquid, the normal metallic state of the cuprate superconductors. PMID:11607559

  16. Ther FERMI FEL project at TRIESTE

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.P.; Bulfone, D.; Cargnello, F.

    1995-12-31

    The goal of the FERMI project - Free Electron Radiation and Matching Instrumentation - is to construct a new user facility for FEL radiation beams covering a broad spectral range (2-250 {mu}m) to complement the high brightness VUV/Soft-Xray radiation available from the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility at Trieste. A unique feature of the project will be the possibility of carrying out {open_quote}pump-probe{close_quote} experiments using synchronized radiation beams from FERMI and ELETTRA on the same sample. The project was launched at a meeting with Italian FEL experts held in Trieste on the 18th November 1994, chaired by C. Rubbia, as a collaboration between Sincrotrone Trieste, ENEA (Frascati), INFN (Frascati) and the University of Naples (Department of Electronic Engineering). The facility will make use of an existing linac, that forms part of the ELETTRA injection system, and a hall into which the beam can be extracted. In addition, for the first phase of the project equipment will be used from the suspended INFN/ENEA {open_quote}SURF{close_quote} FEL experiment, including the undulator, beam transport magnets and optical cavity. In this first International FEL Conference report on the project, we summarize the main features of the project, concentrating in particular on the most recent activities, including: results of measurements of the linac beam in the FEL mode of operation, further studies of the electron beam transport system including possibilities for bunch length manipulations, and further numerical calculations of the FEL performance.

  17. THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Meegan, Charles; Lichti, Giselher; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Von Kienlin, Andreas; Steinle, Helmut; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, Robert; Wilson, Robert B.; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; McBreen, Sheila

    2009-09-01

    The Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) will significantly augment the science return from the Fermi Observatory in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The primary objective of GBM is to extend the energy range over which bursts are observed downward from the energy range of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi into the hard X-ray range where extensive previous data sets exist. A secondary objective is to compute burst locations onboard to allow re-orienting the spacecraft so that the LAT can observe delayed emission from bright bursts. GBM uses an array of 12 sodium iodide scintillators and two bismuth germanate scintillators to detect gamma rays from {approx}8 keV to {approx}40 MeV over the full unocculted sky. The onboard trigger threshold is {approx}0.7 photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} (50-300 keV, 1 s peak). GBM generates onboard triggers for {approx}250 GRBs per year.

  18. Bringing isolated dark matter out of isolation: Late-time reheating and indirect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickcek, Adrienne L.; Sinha, Kuver; Watson, Scott

    2016-09-01

    In standard cosmology, the growth of structure becomes significant following matter-radiation equality. In nonthermal histories, where an effectively matter-dominated phase occurs due to scalar oscillations prior to big bang nucleosynthesis, a new scale at smaller wavelengths appears in the matter power spectrum. Density perturbations that enter the horizon during the early matter-dominated era (EMDE) grow linearly with the scale factor prior to the onset of radiation domination, which leads to enhanced inhomogeneity on small scales if dark matter (DM) thermally and kinetically decouples during the EMDE. The microhalos that form from these enhanced perturbations significantly boost the self-annihilation rate for dark matter. This has important implications for indirect detection experiments: the larger annihilation rate may result in observable signals from dark matter candidates that are usually deemed untestable. As a proof of principle, we consider binos in heavy supersymmetry with an intermediate extended Higgs sector and all other superpartners decoupled. We find that these isolated binos, which lie under the neutrino floor, can account for the dark matter relic density and decouple from the standard model early enough to preserve the enhanced small-scale inhomogeneity generated during the EMDE. If early forming microhalos survive as subhalos within larger microhalos, the resulting boost to the annihilation rate for bino dark matter near the pseudoscalar resonance exceeds the upper limit established by Fermi-LAT's observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. These DM candidates motivate the N -body simulations required to eliminate uncertainties in the microhalos' internal structure by exemplifying how an EMDE can enable Fermi-LAT to probe isolated dark matter.

  19. Late-time flux evolution of magnetars SGR 1627-41 and Swift J1822.3-1606

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Hongjun

    2013-10-01

    The flux relaxations of magnetars post-outburst are of great interest as they permit detailed studies of magnetars and their environments. One model that can explain the flux relaxation is crustal cooling. In the model, heat is deposited after an energetic event in the crust and emitted at the surface. A significant amount of heat can propagate deeper inside, heating the core/crust boundary and changing the shape of the light curve at late times. Therefore, studying the flux relaxation at late times may provides a new opportunity to study the extreme environment near the core. We propose XMM-Newton observations to study the late-time flux evolution of two magnetars, SGR 1627-41 and Swift J1822.3- 1606 to test the crustal cooling model and infer physical properties of the magnetars.

  20. Conformal Fermi Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Liang; Pajer, Enrico; Schmidt, Fabian E-mail: Enrico.pajer@gmail.com

    2015-11-01

    Fermi Normal Coordinates (FNC) are a useful frame for isolating the locally observable, physical effects of a long-wavelength spacetime perturbation. Their cosmological application, however, is hampered by the fact that they are only valid on scales much smaller than the horizon. We introduce a generalization that we call Conformal Fermi Coordinates (CFC). CFC preserve all the advantages of FNC, but in addition are valid outside the horizon. They allow us to calculate the coupling of long- and short-wavelength modes on all scales larger than the sound horizon of the cosmological fluid, starting from the epoch of inflation until today, by removing the complications of the second order Einstein equations to a large extent, and eliminating all gauge ambiguities. As an application, we present a calculation of the effect of long-wavelength tensor modes on small scale density fluctuations. We recover previous results, but clarify the physical content of the individual contributions in terms of locally measurable effects and ''projection'' terms.

  1. Bright Spokes, Dark Shadow

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-06

    Bright spokes and the shadow of a moon grace Saturn B ring in this NASA Cassini spacecraft image. Spokes are radial markings scientists continue to study, and they can be seen here stretching from the far left to upper right of the image.

  2. High Brightness OLED Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Spindler, Jeffrey; Kondakova, Marina; Boroson, Michael; Hamer, John

    2016-05-25

    In this work we describe the technology developments behind our current and future generations of high brightness OLED lighting panels. We have developed white and amber OLEDs with excellent performance based on the stacking approach. Current products achieve 40-60 lm/W, while future developments focus on achieving 80 lm/W or higher.

  3. A Bright Shining Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurowitz, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Sometimes students come up with crazy ideas. When this author first started teaching at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Virginia five years ago, she had a sophomore share such an idea with her. He wanted to put solar panels on the school's roof as a way to reduce the school's carbon footprint and set a bright clean…

  4. Bright Fireball Over Georgia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A camera in Cartersville, Ga., captured this view of a bright fireball over Georgia on the night of Mar. 7, 2012, at approx. 10:19:11 EST. The meteor was first recorded at an altitude of 51.5 miles...

  5. A Bright Shining Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurowitz, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Sometimes students come up with crazy ideas. When this author first started teaching at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Virginia five years ago, she had a sophomore share such an idea with her. He wanted to put solar panels on the school's roof as a way to reduce the school's carbon footprint and set a bright clean…

  6. Thermonuclear Supernovae: Probing Magnetic Fields by Positrons and Late-time IR Line Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penney, R.; Hoeflich, P.

    2014-11-01

    We show the importance of γ and positron transport for the formation of late-time spectra in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The goal is to study the imprint of magnetic fields (B) on late-time IR line profiles, particularly the [Fe II] feature at 1.644 μm, which becomes prominent two to three months after the explosion. As a benchmark, we use the explosion of a Chandrasekhar mass (M Ch) white dwarf (WD) and, specifically, a delayed detonation model that can reproduce the light curves and spectra for a Branch-normal SN Ia. We assume WDs with initial magnetic surface fields between 1 and 109 G. We discuss large-scale dipole and small-scale magnetic fields. We show that positron transport effects must be taken into account for the interpretation of emission features starting at about one to two years after maximum light, depending on the size of B. The [Fe II] line profile and its evolution with time can be understood in terms of the overall energy input by radioactive decay and the transition from a γ-ray to a positron-dominated regime. We find that the [Fe II] line at 1.644 μm can be used to analyze the overall chemical and density structure of the exploding WD up to day 200 without considering B. At later times, positron transport and magnetic field effects become important. After about day 300, the line profile allows one to probe the size of the B-field. The profile becomes sensitive to the morphology of B at about day 500. In the presence of a large-scale dipole field, a broad line is produced in M Ch mass explosions that may appear flat-topped or rounded depending on the inclination at which the SN is observed. Small or no directional dependence of the spectra is found for small-scale B. We note that narrow-line profiles require central 56Ni as shown in our previous studies. Persistent broad-line, flat-topped profiles require high-density burning, which is the signature of a WD close to M Ch. Good time coverage is required to separate the effects of optical

  7. Bright Streak on Amalthea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    These two images of Jupiter's small, irregularly shaped moon Amalthea, obtained by the camera onboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft in August 1999(left) and November 1999 (right), form a 'stereo pair' that helps scientists determine this moon's shape and the topography of its surface features. Features as small as 3.8 kilometers (2.4 miles) across can be resolved in these images, making them among the highest-resolution images ever taken of Amalthea.

    The large impact crater visible in both images, near the right-hand edge of Amalthea's disk, is about 40 kilometers (about 29 miles) across; two ridges, tall enough to cast shadows, extend from the top of the crater in a V-shape reminiscent of a 'rabbit ears' television antenna. To the left of these ridges, in the top center portion of Amalthea's disk, is a second large impact crater similar in size to the first crater. To the left of this second crater is a linear 'streak' of relatively bright material about 50 kilometers (31 miles) long. In previous spacecraft images of Amalthea taken from other viewing directions, this bright feature was thought to be a small, round, bright 'spot' and was given the name Ida. These new images reveal for the first time that Ida is actually a long, linear 'streak.' This bright streak may represent material ejected during the formation of the adjacent impact crater, or it may just mark the crest of a local ridge. Other patches of relatively bright material can be seen elsewhere on Amalthea's disk, although none of these other bright spots has Ida's linear shape.

    In both images, sunlight is coming from the left and north is approximately up. Note that the north pole of Amalthea is missing in the right-hand image (it was cut off by the edge of the camera frame). The bright streak, Ida, is on the side of the moon that faces permanently away from Jupiter, and the crater near the right-hand edge of the disk is in the center of Amalthea's leading side (the side of the moon that 'leads

  8. Bright Streak on Amalthea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    These two images of Jupiter's small, irregularly shaped moon Amalthea, obtained by the camera onboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft in August 1999(left) and November 1999 (right), form a 'stereo pair' that helps scientists determine this moon's shape and the topography of its surface features. Features as small as 3.8 kilometers (2.4 miles) across can be resolved in these images, making them among the highest-resolution images ever taken of Amalthea.

    The large impact crater visible in both images, near the right-hand edge of Amalthea's disk, is about 40 kilometers (about 29 miles) across; two ridges, tall enough to cast shadows, extend from the top of the crater in a V-shape reminiscent of a 'rabbit ears' television antenna. To the left of these ridges, in the top center portion of Amalthea's disk, is a second large impact crater similar in size to the first crater. To the left of this second crater is a linear 'streak' of relatively bright material about 50 kilometers (31 miles) long. In previous spacecraft images of Amalthea taken from other viewing directions, this bright feature was thought to be a small, round, bright 'spot' and was given the name Ida. These new images reveal for the first time that Ida is actually a long, linear 'streak.' This bright streak may represent material ejected during the formation of the adjacent impact crater, or it may just mark the crest of a local ridge. Other patches of relatively bright material can be seen elsewhere on Amalthea's disk, although none of these other bright spots has Ida's linear shape.

    In both images, sunlight is coming from the left and north is approximately up. Note that the north pole of Amalthea is missing in the right-hand image (it was cut off by the edge of the camera frame). The bright streak, Ida, is on the side of the moon that faces permanently away from Jupiter, and the crater near the right-hand edge of the disk is in the center of Amalthea's leading side (the side of the moon that 'leads

  9. Late-time spectra and type Ia supernova models: New clues from the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Kirshner, R. P.; Phillips, M. M.; Challis, P. M.; Schmidt, B. P.; Filippenko, A. V.; Wheeler, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Calculated late-time spectra of two classical hydrodynamical models for Type Ia supernovae (deflagration model W7 of Nomoto, Thielemann, & Yokoi, and delayed detonation model DD4 of Woosley & Weaver) are compared with observations of SN 1992A and other spectroscopically normal SNe Ia. An important new piece of information is provided by observations done with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) which cover the ultraviolet range at the nebular phase of a SN Ia: SN 1992A in NGC 1380. For the first time a picture of SN Ia emission from the ultraviolet through the optical is obtained at these phases. Predictions of the classical model (W7 and DD4) are compared with the observed spectrum of SN 1992A and with the optical spectra of SN 1989M in NGC 4579 and SN 1990N in NGC 4639 at similar epochs. The absolute B and V magnitudes of the models are also estimated at these late phases. Taken at face value the nebular spectra of these 'classical' models are more consistent with the long extragalactic distance scale, pointing to distances to NGC 4579 around 21 +/- 3 Mpc and a slightly larger distance, 22 +/- 3 Mpc, to NGC 4639, on the back side of the Virgo Cluster. However, the calculated Fe(+3) luminosity as predicted from the models exceeds the observed limit from the HST data of SN 1992A. Other differences in the ratios of the line intensities between calculated and observed spectra, show some disagreement with the observed spectra at the nebular phases. They may not be the best choice for spectroscopically normal SNe Ia, and their use as an independent calibration of the extragalactic distance scale should be viewed with caution.

  10. Late-time quadratic growth in single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tie; Livescu, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    The growth of the two-dimensional single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) at low Atwood number (A=0.04) is investigated using Direct Numerical Simulations. The main result of the paper is that, at long times and sufficiently high Reynolds numbers, the bubble acceleration becomes stationary, indicating mean quadratic growth. This is contrary to the general belief that single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability reaches a constant bubble velocity at long times. At unity Schmidt number, the development of the instability is strongly influenced by the perturbation Reynolds number, defined as Rep≡λsqrt[Agλ/(1+A)]/ν. Thus, the instability undergoes different growth stages at low and high Rep. A new stage, chaotic development, was found at sufficiently high Rep values, after the reacceleration stage. During the chaotic stage, the instability experiences seemingly random acceleration and deceleration phases, as a result of complex vortical motions, with strong dependence on the initial perturbation shape (i.e., wavelength, amplitude, and diffusion thickness). Nevertheless, our results show that the mean acceleration of the bubble front becomes constant at late times, with little influence from the initial shape of the interface. As Rep is lowered to small values, the later instability stages, chaotic development, reacceleration, potential flow growth, and even the exponential growth described by linear stability theory, are subsequently no longer reached. Therefore, the results suggest a minimum Reynolds number and a minimum development time necessary to achieve all stages of single-mode RTI development, requirements which were not satisfied in the previous studies of single-mode RTI.

  11. The late-time light curve of the Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriadis, G.; Sullivan, M.; Kerzendorf, W.; Ruiter, A. J.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Taubenberger, S.; Doran, G. B.; Gal-Yam, A.; Laher, R. R.; Maguire, K.; Nugent, P.; Ofek, E. O.; Surace, J.

    2017-07-01

    We present late-time optical R-band imaging data from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) for the nearby Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe. The stacked PTF light curve provides densely sampled coverage down to R ≃ 22 mag over 200-620 d past explosion. Combining with literature data, we estimate the pseudo-bolometric light curve for this event from 200 to 1600 d after explosion, and constrain the likely near-infrared (Near-IR) contribution. This light curve shows a smooth decline consistent with radioactive decay, except over ˜450 to ˜600 d where the light curve appears to decrease faster than expected based on the radioactive isotopes presumed to be present, before flattening at around 600 d. We model the 200-1600 d pseudo-bolometric light curve with the luminosity generated by the radioactive decay chains of 56Ni, 57Ni and 55Co, and find it is not consistent with models that have full positron trapping and no infrared catastrophe (IRC); some additional energy escape other than optical/near-IR photons is required. However, the light curve is consistent with models that allow for positron escape (reaching 75 per cent by day 500) and/or an IRC (with 85 per cent of the flux emerging in non-optical wavelengths by day 600). The presence of the 57Ni decay chain is robustly detected, but the 55Co decay chain is not formally required, with an upper mass limit estimated at 0.014 M⊙. The measurement of the 57Ni/56Ni mass ratio is subject to significant systematic uncertainties, but all of our fits require a high ratio >0.031 (>1.3 in solar abundances).

  12. LATE-TIME RADIO EMISSION FROM X-RAY-SELECTED TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, Geoffrey C.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Metzger, Brian D.

    2013-02-15

    We present new observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array of seven X-ray-selected tidal disruption events (TDEs). The radio observations were carried out between 9 and 22 years after the initial X-ray discovery, and thus probe the late-time formation of relativistic jets and jet interactions with the interstellar medium in these systems. We detect a compact radio source in the nucleus of the galaxy IC 3599 and a compact radio source that is a possible counterpart to RX J1420.4+5334. We find no radio counterparts for five other sources with flux density upper limits between 51 and 200 {mu}Jy (3{sigma}). If the detections truly represent late radio emission associated with a TDE, then our results suggest that a fraction, {approx}> 10%, of X-ray-detected TDEs are accompanied by relativistic jets. We explore several models for producing late radio emission, including interaction of the jet with gas in the circumnuclear environment (blast wave model), and emission from the core of the jet itself. Upper limits on the radio flux density from archival observations suggest that the jet formation may have been delayed for years after the TDE, possibly triggered by the accretion rate dropping below a critical threshold of {approx}10{sup -2}-10{sup -3} M-dot {sub Edd}. The non-detections are also consistent with this scenario; deeper radio observations can determine whether relativistic jets are present in these systems. The emission from RX J1420.4+5334 is also consistent with the predictions of the blast wave model; however, the radio emission from IC 3599 is substantially underluminous, and its spectral slope is too flat, relative to the blast wave model expectations. Future radio monitoring of IC 3599 and RX J1420.4+5334 will help to better constrain the nature of the jets in these systems.

  13. Late-time spectra and type Ia supernova models: New clues from the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Kirshner, R. P.; Phillips, M. M.; Challis, P. M.; Schmidt, B. P.; Filippenko, A. V.; Wheeler, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Calculated late-time spectra of two classical hydrodynamical models for Type Ia supernovae (deflagration model W7 of Nomoto, Thielemann, & Yokoi, and delayed detonation model DD4 of Woosley & Weaver) are compared with observations of SN 1992A and other spectroscopically normal SNe Ia. An important new piece of information is provided by observations done with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) which cover the ultraviolet range at the nebular phase of a SN Ia: SN 1992A in NGC 1380. For the first time a picture of SN Ia emission from the ultraviolet through the optical is obtained at these phases. Predictions of the classical model (W7 and DD4) are compared with the observed spectrum of SN 1992A and with the optical spectra of SN 1989M in NGC 4579 and SN 1990N in NGC 4639 at similar epochs. The absolute B and V magnitudes of the models are also estimated at these late phases. Taken at face value the nebular spectra of these 'classical' models are more consistent with the long extragalactic distance scale, pointing to distances to NGC 4579 around 21 +/- 3 Mpc and a slightly larger distance, 22 +/- 3 Mpc, to NGC 4639, on the back side of the Virgo Cluster. However, the calculated Fe(+3) luminosity as predicted from the models exceeds the observed limit from the HST data of SN 1992A. Other differences in the ratios of the line intensities between calculated and observed spectra, show some disagreement with the observed spectra at the nebular phases. They may not be the best choice for spectroscopically normal SNe Ia, and their use as an independent calibration of the extragalactic distance scale should be viewed with caution.

  14. The Fermi Paradox Is Neither Fermi's Nor a Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Robert H.

    2015-03-01

    The so-called Fermi paradox claims that if technological life existed anywhere else, we would see evidence of its visits to Earth-and since we do not, such life does not exist, or some special explanation is needed. Enrico Fermi, however, never published anything on this topic. On the one occasion he is known to have mentioned it, he asked 'where is everybody?'- apparently suggesting that we don't see extraterrestrials on Earth because interstellar travel may not be feasible, but not suggesting that intelligent extraterrestrial life does not exist, or suggesting its absence is paradoxical. The claim 'they are not here; therefore they do not exist' was first published by Michael Hart, claiming that interstellar travel and colonization of the galaxy would be inevitable if intelligent extraterrestrial life existed, and taking its absence here as proof that it does not exist anywhere. The Fermi paradox appears to originate in Hart's argument, not Fermi's question. Clarifying the origin of these ideas is important, because the Fermi paradox is seen by some as an authoritative objection to searching for evidence of extraterrestrial intelligence-cited in the U. S. Congress as a reason for killing NASA's SETI program on one occasion-but evidence indicates that it misrepresents Fermi's views, misappropriates his authority, deprives the actual authors of credit, and is not a valid paradox. Keywords: Astrobiology, SETI, Fermi paradox, extraterrestrial life

  15. Late-time Kerr tails: generic and non-generic initial data sets, 'up' modes, and superposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burko, Lior M.; Khanna, Gaurav

    2011-01-01

    Three interrelated questions concerning Kerr spacetime late-time scalar-field tails are considered numerically, specifically the evolutions of generic and non-generic initial data sets, the excitation of 'up' modes, and the resolution of an apparent paradox related to the superposition principle. We propose to generalize the Barack-Ori formula for the decay rate of any tail multipole given a generic initial data set, to the contribution of any initial multipole mode. Our proposal leads to a much simpler expression for the late-time power-law index. Specifically, we propose that the late-time decay rate of a kinematically allowed Yellm spherical harmonic multipole moment because of an initial Y_{\\ell ^{\\prime } m} multipole is independent of the azimuthal number m and is given by t-n, where n = ell' + ell + 1 for ell < ell' and n = ell' + ell + 3 for ell >= ell'. We also show explicitly that the angular symmetry group of a multipole does not determine its late-time decay rate.

  16. Anisotropic non-Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, Shouvik; Lee, Sung-Sik

    2016-11-01

    We study non-Fermi-liquid states that arise at the quantum critical points associated with the spin density wave (SDW) and charge density wave (CDW) transitions in metals with twofold rotational symmetry. We use the dimensional regularization scheme, where a one-dimensional Fermi surface is embedded in (3 -ɛ ) -dimensional momentum space. In three dimensions, quasilocal marginal Fermi liquids arise both at the SDW and CDW critical points: the speed of the collective mode along the ordering wave vector is logarithmically renormalized to zero compared to that of Fermi velocity. Below three dimensions, however, the SDW and CDW critical points exhibit drastically different behaviors. At the SDW critical point, a stable anisotropic non-Fermi-liquid state is realized for small ɛ , where not only time but also different spatial coordinates develop distinct anomalous dimensions. The non-Fermi liquid exhibits an emergent algebraic nesting as the patches of Fermi surface are deformed into a universal power-law shape near the hot spots. Due to the anisotropic scaling, the energy of incoherent spin fluctuations disperse with different power laws in different momentum directions. At the CDW critical point, on the other hand, the perturbative expansion breaks down immediately below three dimensions as the interaction renormalizes the speed of charge fluctuations to zero within a finite renormalization group scale through a two-loop effect. The difference originates from the fact that the vertex correction antiscreens the coupling at the SDW critical point whereas it screens at the CDW critical point.

  17. Understanding Black Hole Mass Assembly via Accretion and Mergers at Late Times in Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulier, Andrea; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Lackner, Claire N.; Cen, Renyue

    2015-02-01

    Accretion is thought to primarily contribute to the mass accumulation history of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) throughout cosmic time. While this may be true at high redshifts, at lower redshifts and for the most massive black holes (BHs) mergers themselves might add significantly to the mass budget. We explore this in two disparate environments—a massive cluster and a void region. We evolve SMBHs from 4 > z > 0 using merger trees derived from hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of these two regions, scaled to the observed value of the stellar mass fraction to account for overcooling. Mass gains from gas accretion proportional to bulge growth and BH-BH mergers are tracked, as are BHs that remain "orbiting" due to insufficient dynamical friction in a merger remnant, as well as those that are ejected due to gravitational recoil. We find that gas accretion remains the dominant source of mass accumulation in almost all SMBHs; mergers contribute 2.5% ± 0.1% for all SMBHs in the cluster and 1.0% ± 0.1% in the void since z = 4. However, mergers are significant for massive SMBHs. The fraction of mass accumulated from mergers for central BHs generally increases for larger values of the host bulge mass: in the void, the fraction is 2% at M *, bul = 1010 M ⊙, increasing to 4% at M *, bul >~ 1011 M ⊙, and in the cluster it is 4% at M *, bul = 1010 M ⊙ and 23% at 1012 M ⊙. We also find that the total mass in orbiting SMBHs is negligible in the void, but significant in the cluster, in which a potentially detectable 40% of SMBHs and ≈8% of the total SMBH mass (where the total includes central, orbiting, and ejected SMBHs) is found orbiting at z = 0. The existence of orbiting and ejected SMBHs requires modification of the Soltan argument. We estimate this correction to the integrated accreted mass density of SMBHs to be in the range 6%-21%, with a mean value of 11% ± 3%. Quantifying the growth due to mergers at these late times, we calculate the total energy

  18. UNDERSTANDING BLACK HOLE MASS ASSEMBLY VIA ACCRETION AND MERGERS AT LATE TIMES IN COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kulier, Andrea; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Lackner, Claire N.; Cen, Renyue; Natarajan, Priyamvada

    2015-02-01

    %. Quantifying the growth due to mergers at these late times, we calculate the total energy output and strain from gravitational waves emitted by merging SMBHs, and obtain a signal potentially detectable by pulsar timing arrays.

  19. LATE-TIME CIRCUMSTELLAR INTERACTION IN A SPITZER SELECTED SAMPLE OF TYPE IIn SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Ori D.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Skrutskie, Michael F.

    2013-07-01

    Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) are a rare (<10%) subclass of core-collapse SNe that exhibit relatively narrow emission lines from a dense, pre-existing circumstellar medium (CSM). In 2009, a warm Spitzer Space Telescope survey observed 30 SNe IIn discovered in 2003-2008 and detected 10 SNe at distances out to 175 Mpc with unreported late-time infrared emission, in some cases more than 5 yr post-discovery. For this single epoch of data, the warm-dust parameters suggest the presence of a radiative heating source consisting of optical and X-ray emission continuously generated by ongoing CSM interaction. Here we present multi-wavelength follow-up observations of this sample of 10 SNe IIn and the well-studied Type IIn SN 2010jl. A recent epoch of Spitzer observations reveals ongoing mid-infrared emission from nine of the SNe in this sample. We also detect three of the SNe in archival Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer data, in addition to SNe 1987A, 2004dj, and 2008iy. For at least five of the SNe in the sample, optical and/or X-ray emission confirms the presence of radiative emission from ongoing CSM interaction. The two Spitzer nondetections are consistent with the forward shock overrunning and destroying the dust shell, a result that places upper limits on the dust-shell size. The optical and infrared observations confirm the radiative heating model and constrain a number of model parameters, including progenitor mass-loss characteristics. All of the SNe in this sample experienced an outburst on the order of tens to hundreds of years prior to the SN explosion followed by periods of less intense mass loss. Although all evidence points to massive progenitors, the variation in the data highlights the diversity in SN IIn progenitor evolution. While these observations do not identify a particular progenitor system, they demonstrate that future, coordinated, multi-wavelength campaigns can constrain theoretical mass-loss models.

  20. Observing Modes of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrara, Elizabeth C.; McEnery, J.; Fermi Mission Team

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST) is a low-earth orbiting mission supporting two science instruments, the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM), a near-all-sky detector in the 8 keV to 30 MeV range, and the Large Area Telescope (LAT), a wide field pair-conversion detector sensitive in the 20 MeV to 300 GeV range. The dominant observing mode of Fermi is a sky survey in which the observatory will be rocked about the orbital plane to provide almost uniform coverage of the entire sky every three hours. This results in continuous monitoring of all sources on timescales greater than 3 hours, guaranteeing gamma-ray data for a wide range of studies. Fermi is also capable of performing pointed observations which may be useful for studies of very bright, rapidly variable sources that benefit from more densely sampled observations, such as gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows. However, pointed observations will have a detrimental effect on coverage of the rest of the sky, which may hurt multiwavelength campaigns and uniformity of time monitoring studies. We describe these observational modes of Fermi and how they are affected by multiple operational constraints such as data generation rate and downlink, sun avoidance, and Earth avoidance. We show how the pointing profile of the observatory affects the LAT sky exposure, and discuss the relative merits of different observing strategies for various science objectives.

  1. Bright Solar Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    A bright solar flare is captured by the EIT 195Å instrument on 1998 May 2. A solar flare (a sudden, rapid, and intense variation in brightness) occurs when magnetic energy that has built up in the solar atmosphere is suddenly released, launching material outward at millions of km per hour. The Sun’s magnetic fields tend to restrain each other and force the buildup of tremendous energy, like twisting rubber bands, so much that they eventually break. At some point, the magnetic lines of force merge and cancel in a process known as magnetic reconnection, causing plasma to forcefully escape from the Sun. Credit: NASA/GSFC/SOHO/ESA To learn more go to the SOHO website: sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/home.html To learn more about NASA's Sun Earth Day go here: sunearthday.nasa.gov/2010/index.php

  2. Little Bright Spot

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-01-12

    A bright spot can be seen on the left side of Rhea in this image. The spot is the crater Inktomi, named for a Lakota spider spirit. Inktomi is believed to be the youngest feature on Rhea (949 miles or 1527 kilometers across). The relative youth of the feature is evident by its brightness. Material that is newly excavated from below the moon's surface and tossed across the surface by a cratering event, appears bright. But as the newly exposed surface is subjected to the harsh space environment, it darkens. This is one technique scientists use to date features on surfaces. This view looks toward the trailing hemisphere of Rhea. North on Rhea is up and rotated 21 degrees to the left. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on July 29, 2013. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 1.0 million miles (1.6 million kilometers) fro http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18300

  3. Bright field illumination system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Edward D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A Bright Field Illumination system for inspecting a range of characteristically different kinds of defects, depressions, and ridges in a selected material surface. The system has an illumination source placed near a first focus of an elliptical reflector. In addition, a camera facing the inspected area is placed near the illumination source and the first focus. The second focus of the elliptical reflector is located at a distance approximately twice the elliptical reflector's distance above the inspected surface. The elliptical reflector directs the light from the source onto the inspected surface. Due to the shape of the elliptical reflector, light that is specularly reflected from the inspected surface is directed into the camera is which located at the position of the reflected second focus of the ellipse. This system creates a brightly lighted background field against which damage sites appear as high contrast dark objects which can be easily detected by a person or an automated inspection system. In addition, the Bright Field Illumination system and method can be used in combination with a vision inspection system providing for multiplexed illumination and data handling of multiple kinds of surface characteristics including abrupt and gradual surface variations and differences between measured characteristics of different kinds and prior instruments.

  4. The Statistical Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, C.

    In this paper is provided the statistical generalization of the Fermi paradox. The statistics of habitable planets may be based on a set of ten (and possibly more) astrobiological requirements first pointed out by Stephen H. Dole in his book Habitable planets for man (1964). The statistical generalization of the original and by now too simplistic Dole equation is provided by replacing a product of ten positive numbers by the product of ten positive random variables. This is denoted the SEH, an acronym standing for “Statistical Equation for Habitables”. The proof in this paper is based on the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) of Statistics, stating that the sum of any number of independent random variables, each of which may be ARBITRARILY distributed, approaches a Gaussian (i.e. normal) random variable (Lyapunov form of the CLT). It is then shown that: 1. The new random variable NHab, yielding the number of habitables (i.e. habitable planets) in the Galaxy, follows the log- normal distribution. By construction, the mean value of this log-normal distribution is the total number of habitable planets as given by the statistical Dole equation. 2. The ten (or more) astrobiological factors are now positive random variables. The probability distribution of each random variable may be arbitrary. The CLT in the so-called Lyapunov or Lindeberg forms (that both do not assume the factors to be identically distributed) allows for that. In other words, the CLT "translates" into the SEH by allowing an arbitrary probability distribution for each factor. This is both astrobiologically realistic and useful for any further investigations. 3. By applying the SEH it is shown that the (average) distance between any two nearby habitable planets in the Galaxy may be shown to be inversely proportional to the cubic root of NHab. This distance is denoted by new random variable D. The relevant probability density function is derived, which was named the "Maccone distribution" by Paul Davies in

  5. The fermi paradox is neither Fermi's nor a paradox.

    PubMed

    Gray, Robert H

    2015-03-01

    The so-called Fermi paradox claims that if technological life existed anywhere else, we would see evidence of its visits to Earth--and since we do not, such life does not exist, or some special explanation is needed. Enrico Fermi, however, never published anything on this topic. On the one occasion he is known to have mentioned it, he asked "Where is everybody?"--apparently suggesting that we do not see extraterrestrials on Earth because interstellar travel may not be feasible, but not suggesting that intelligent extraterrestrial life does not exist or suggesting its absence is paradoxical. The claim "they are not here; therefore they do not exist" was first published by Michael Hart, claiming that interstellar travel and colonization of the Galaxy would be inevitable if intelligent extraterrestrial life existed, and taking its absence here as proof that it does not exist anywhere. The Fermi paradox appears to originate in Hart's argument, not Fermi's question. Clarifying the origin of these ideas is important, because the Fermi paradox is seen by some as an authoritative objection to searching for evidence of extraterrestrial intelligence--cited in the U.S. Congress as a reason for killing NASA's SETI program on one occasion. But evidence indicates that it misrepresents Fermi's views, misappropriates his authority, deprives the actual authors of credit, and is not a valid paradox.

  6. The First Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF) Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Michael; Connaughton, Valerie; Stanbro, Matthew; Zhang, Binbin; Bhat, Narayana; Fishman, Gerald; Roberts, Oliver; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; McBreen, Shelia; Grove, Eric; Chekhtman, Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    We present summary results from the first catalog of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Space Telescope. The catalog reports parameters for over 2700 TGFs. Since the launch of Fermi in 2008 the TGF detection sensitivity of GBM has been improved several times, both in the flight software and in ground analysis. Starting in 2010 July individual photons were downloaded for portions of the orbits, enabling an off-line search that found weaker and shorter TGFs. Since 2012 November 26 this telemetry mode has been extended to continuous coverage. The TGF sample is reliable, with cosmic rays rejected using data both from Fermi GBM and from the Large Area Telescope on Fermi. The online catalog include times (UTC and solar), spacecraft geographic positions, durations, count intensities and Bayesian Block durations. The catalog includes separate tables for bright TGFs detected by the flight software and for Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs).

  7. Kiloamp high-brightness beams

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.

    1987-01-01

    Brightness preservation of high-current relativistic electron beams under two different types of transport is discussed. Recent progress in improving the brightness of laser-guided beams in the Advanced Test Accelerator is reviewed. A strategy for the preservation of the brightness of space-charge-dominated beams in a solenoidal transport system is presented.

  8. Fermi's New Pulsar Detection Technique

    NASA Image and Video Library

    To locate a pulsar in Fermi LAT data requires knowledge of the object’s sky position, its pulse period, and how the pulse rate slows over time. Computers check many different combinations of posi...

  9. The Fermi LAT Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Roger W.

    2011-08-01

    The Large Area Telescope on the Fermi satellite is an impressive pulsar discovery machine, with over 75 pulse detections and counting. The populations of radio-selected, γ-selected and millisecond pulsars are now large enough to display observational patterns in the light curves and luminosities. These patterns are starting to teach us about the physics of the emission zone, which seems dominated by open field lines near the speed of light cylinder. The sample also provides initial inferences about the pulsar population. Apparently a large fraction of neutron stars have a young energetic γ-ray emitting phase, making these objects a good probe of massive star evolution. The long-lived millisecond γ-ray pulsars are even more ubiquitous and may produce a significant fraction of the γ-ray background. In any event, it is clear that the present LAT pulsar sample is dominated by nearby objects, and there is every expectation that the number, and quality, of pulsar detections will increase in years to come.

  10. Quantum Oscillations from Fermi Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereg-Barnea, Tamar; Refael, Gil; Franz, Marcel; Weber, Heidi; Seradjeh, Babak

    2009-03-01

    Recent experiments[1] in a variety of High Tc superconductors revel 1/B oscillations in the vortex-liquid state. The period of oscillations in underdoped samples is short and can be translated, via the Onsager relation to an area in k-space which makes up a few percents of the Brillouin zone. Quantum oscillations are usually thought of as arising from closed orbits in momentum space along the Fermi surface and are used to measure the Fermi vector. Thus, the observation of quantum oscillations in the cuprates seems to be at odds with the observation of Fermi arcs in ARPES experiments[2] due to their fragmented Fermi surface topology. In this talk we show that quantum oscillations can arise from a partially gapped Fermi surface. We adopt a phenomenological model of arcs which terminate at a regime with a superconducting gap of d-wave symmetry to describe the pseudo gap phase. Without invoking any additional order, quantization of energy is found well below the gap maximum. Semiclassically the quantization condition arises from closed orbits in real-space. When translated to momentum space, the area enclosed by the orbits is much smaller than that of the full Fermi surface. [1]N. Doiron-Leyaraud et al. nature 447, 565 (2007) [2]Kanigel et al. Nature Physics 2 447 (2006)

  11. GROND observations of Fermi J1717-5156

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Arne; Schady, Patricia; Greiner, Jochen

    2012-04-01

    We observed the location of the potential counterpart to the new Gamma-ray Transient Fermi J1717-5156 (Schinzel et al., ATel #4023; Massaro et al., ATel #4029) simultaneously in g'r'i'z'JHK with GROND (Greiner et al. 2008, PASP, 120, 405) at the 2.2m MPI/ESO telescope in La Silla. Observations started on April 11th 09:39 UT and had an exposure of approx 16min. At the position of the suggested VLBI (PMN J1717-5155) and WISE (WISE J171734.65-515532.0) counterpart we find a bright optical near-IR source.

  12. Low surface brightness galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhulst, J. M.; Deblok, W. J. G.; Mcgaugh, S. S.; Bothun, G. D.

    1993-01-01

    A program to investigate the properties of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies involving surface photometry in U, B, V, R, I, and H-alpha, HI imaging with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and the very large array (VLA) and spectrophotometry of H2 regions in LSB galaxies is underway. The goal is to verify the idea that LSB galaxies have low star formation rates because the local gas density falls below the critical density for star formation, and to study the stellar population and abundances in LSB galaxies. Such information should help understanding the evolutionary history of LSB galaxies. Some preliminary results are reported.

  13. Bright Loops at 171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    STEREO was able to capture bright loops in exquisite detail as they were arcing above an active region (May 26, 2007) over an 18 hour period. What we are actually seeing are charged particles spinning along magnetic field lines that extend above the Sun's surface. Active regions are areas of intense magnetic activity and often the source of solar storms. In fact, the clip ends with a flourish in which a small coronal mass ejection (CME) blows out into space. This is from the STEREO Ahead spacecraft at the 171 Angstroms wavelength in extreme ultraviolet light.

  14. Large, Bright Wind Ripples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-397, 20 June 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows large, relatively bright ripples of windblown sediment in the Sinus Sabaeus region south of Schiaparelli Basin. The surrounding substrate is thickly mantled by very dark material, possibly windblown silt that settled out of the atmosphere. The picture is located near 7.1oS, 343.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  15. Large Bright Ripples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    3 February 2004 Wind is the chief agent of change on Mars today. Wind blows dust and it can move coarser sediment such as sand and silt. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows bright ripples or small dunes on the floors of troughs northeast of Isidis Planitia near 31.1oN, 244.6oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide; sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  16. HI Surface brightness mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pen, Ue-Li; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Peterson, Jeff; Bandura, Kevin

    2008-04-01

    We propose to scan the 2dF survey field with Parkes multibeam in driftscan mode to make a map to cross correlate with galaxy redshifts. This allows a statistical detection of HI large scale structure out to z=0.15. In this cross correlation, the HI in ALL galaxies contributes, not only the bright ones, which significantly boosts the sensitivity. The proposed 40 hours on the fields result in a forecasted 20 sigma detection. The survey volume is 10 million cubic megaparsec, which contain 10^15 solar masses of hydrogen.

  17. Bright Loops at 171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    STEREO was able to capture bright loops in exquisite detail as they were arcing above an active region (May 26, 2007) over an 18 hour period. What we are actually seeing are charged particles spinning along magnetic field lines that extend above the Sun's surface. Active regions are areas of intense magnetic activity and often the source of solar storms. In fact, the clip ends with a flourish in which a small coronal mass ejection (CME) blows out into space. This is from the STEREO Ahead spacecraft at the 171 Angstroms wavelength in extreme ultraviolet light.

  18. Unifying phantom inflation with late-time acceleration: scalar phantom-non-phantom transition model and generalized holographic dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.

    2006-08-01

    The unifying approach to early-time and late-time universe based on phantom cosmology is proposed. We consider gravity-scalar system which contains usual potential and scalar coupling function in front of kinetic term. As a result, the possibility of phantom-non-phantom transition appears in such a way that universe could have effectively phantom equation of state at early time as well as at late time. In fact, the oscillating universe may have several phantom and non-phantom phases. Role in each of two phase and can be absorbed into the redefinition of the scalar field. Right on the transition point, however, the factor cannot be absorbed into the redefinition and play the role to connect two phases smoothly. Holographic dark energy where infrared cutoff is identified with combination of FRW parameters: Hubble constant, particle and future horizons, cosmological constant and universe life-time (if finite). Depending on the specific choice of the model the number of interesting effects occur: the possibility to solve the coincidence problem, crossing of phantom divide and unification of early-time inflationary and late-time accelerating phantom universe. The bound for holographic entropy which decreases in phantom era is also discussed.

  19. Ultra wide band detection of on body concealed weapons using the out of plane polarized late time response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmer, Stuart; Andrews, David; Bowring, Nicholas; Rezgui, Nacer; Southgate, Matthew

    2009-09-01

    A method of detecting concealed handguns and knives, both on and off body, has been developed. The method utilizes aspect-independent natural, complex resonances (poles) excited by illuminating the target with frequency swept, ultrawide band microwaves in the range 0.5 - 18 GHz. These natural resonances manifest as a Late Time Response (LTR) that extends significantly (~ 5 ns) beyond the direct reflections from the human body (the Early Time Response) and are of the form of a superposition of exponentially decaying sinusoidal waveforms. Two handguns are examined, both on the human body and in isolation, by the established methodology of applying the Generalised-Pencil-Of-Function to the late time response data of the target. These poles allow the weapon to be effectively classified. Out of plane polarized (cross-polarized) scattered response is used here as this gives improved discrimination between the early and late time responses. Determination of the presence or absence of particular weapons concealed under clothing, on the human body, is demonstrated. A novel bow-tie slot antenna is described which has good pulse and frequency response over the range 0.3-1 GHz and which is suitable for excitation of the fundamental natural resonances.

  20. The Fermi blazar sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Righi, C.; Costamante, L.; Tavecchio, F.

    2017-07-01

    We revisit the blazar sequence exploiting the complete, flux-limited sample of blazars with known redshift detected by the Fermi satellite after 4 yr of operations (the 3LAC sample). We divide the sources into γ-ray luminosity bins, collect all the archival data for all blazars, and construct their spectral energy distribution (SED). We describe the average SED of blazars in the same luminosity bin through a simple phenomenological function consisting of two broken power laws connecting with a power law describing the radio emission. We do that separately for BL Lacs and for flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and also for all blazars together. The main results are: (i) FSRQs display approximately the same SED as the luminosity increases, but the relative importance of the high-energy peak increases; (ii) as a consequence, the X-ray spectra of FSRQs become harder for larger luminosities; (iii) BL Lacs indeed form a sequence: they become redder (i.e. smaller peak frequencies) with increasing luminosities, with a softer γ-ray slope and a larger dominance of the high-energy peak; (iv) for all blazars (BL Lacs+FSRQs), these properties become more prominent, as the highest luminosity bin is populated mostly by FSRQs and the lowest luminosity bin mostly by BL Lacs. This agrees with the original blazar sequence, although BL Lacs never have an average γ-ray slope as hard as found in the original sequence. (v) At high luminosities, a large fraction of FSRQs show signs of thermal emission from the accretion disc, contributing to the optical-UV (ultraviolet).

  1. LATE-TIME DETECTIONS OF THE X-RAY AFTERGLOW OF GRB 060729 WITH CHANDRA-THE LATEST DETECTIONS EVER OF AN X-RAY AFTERGLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Grupe, Dirk; Burrows, David N.; Wu Xuefeng; Wang Xiangyu; Garmire, Gordon; Nousek, John A.; Zhang Bing; Liang Enwei; Gehrels, Neil; Ricker, George R.; Bautz, Marshall W.

    2010-03-10

    We report on five Chandra observations of the X-ray afterglow of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) 060729 performed between 2007 March and 2008 May. In all five observations, the afterglow is clearly detected. The last Chandra pointing was performed on 2008 May 4, 642 days after the burst-the latest detection of a GRB X-ray afterglow ever. A reanalysis of the Swift XRT light curve together with the three detections by Chandra in 2007 reveals a break at {approx}1.0 Ms after the burst with a slight steepening of the decay slope from alpha = 1.32 to 1.61. This break coincides with a significant hardening of the X-ray spectrum, consistent with a cooling break in the wind medium scenario, in which the cooling frequency of the afterglow crosses the X-ray band. The last two Chandra observations in 2007 December and 2008 May provide evidence for another break at about one year after the burst. If interpreted as a jet break, this late-time break implies a jet half-opening angle of {approx}14{sup 0} for a wind medium. Alternatively, this final break may have a spectral origin, in which case no jet break has been observed and the half-opening angle of the jet of GRB 060729 must be larger than {approx}15{sup 0} for a wind medium. We compare the X-ray afterglow of GRB 060729 in a wind environment with other bright X-ray afterglows, in particular GRBs 061121 and 080319B, and discuss why the X-ray afterglow of GRB 060729 is such an exceptionally long-lasting event.

  2. High brightness electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1995-07-01

    High energy physics accelerators and free electron lasers put increased demands on the electron beam sources. This paper describes the present research on attaining intense bright electron beams using photoinjectors. Recent results from the experimental programs will be given. The performance advantages and difficulties presently faced by researchers will be discussed, and the following topics will be covered. Progress has been made in photocathode materials, both in lifetime and quantum efficiency. Cesium telluride has demonstrated significantly longer lifetimes than cesium antimonide at 10{sup {minus}8} torr. However, the laser system is more difficult because cesium telluride requires quadrupled YLF instead of the doubled YLF required for cesium antimonide. The difficulty in using photoinjectors is primarily the drive laser, in particular the amplitude stability. Finally, emittance measurements of photoinjector systems can be complicated by the non-thermal nature of the electron beam. An example of the difficulty in measuring beam emittance is given.

  3. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, Richard L.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Young, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  4. High brightness electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.; Carlsten, B.E.; Young, L.M.

    1992-12-31

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electrons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electrons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  5. Light Echoes and Late-Time Emissions of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, Dina

    2016-05-01

    Type Ia supernovae have many applications in astronomy, yet with fundamental properties still not fully understood, new methods for investigating the environment of a supernova need to be developed. A light echo is produced from the scattering of light from a bright source and can be used to analyze the dust in the vicinity of the supernova and learn invaluable information about the source. These techniques can put constraints on explosion and progenitor models. Although light echo detections from Type Ia supernovae are rare, with only seven total extragalactic detections, this could be due to the lack of thorough late-epoch monitoring. Since key information is determined from even a single light echo detection, light echo searches should be undertaken in the future to supplement our understanding of supernovae. As part of our collaborative campaign for studying the emission of supernovae at late epochs, we have added two light echoes to a small sample size of Type Ia supernova light echo detections: SN 2009ig in NGC 1015 and a dual echo from SN 2007af in NGC 5584. Both echoes were observed with the Hubble Space Telescope and allow for the most detailed images of Type Ia supernova light echoes to date. Three filters (F555W, F814W, and F350LP) captured the echoes obtained with the Wide Field Camera 3, and since both host galaxies were imaged as part of the same observing program, these cases will be the best comparable light echo pairs. We also further investigate the light echoes from SN 2006X in NGC 4321 and SN 1998bu in NGC 3368 from Hubble Space Telescope archival images. Analyses performed on the images gives crucial insight into the dusty environment of the host galaxy and the surroundings of the supernova. The outer echo from SN 2007af was created from an interstellar dust sheet located ~800 pc in front of the supernova, while the inner echo could be from interstellar or circumstellar origin. A circumstellar light echo could imply a single degenerate

  6. The Fermiac or Fermi's Trolley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coccetti, F.

    2016-03-01

    The Fermiac, known also as Fermi's trolley or Monte Carlo trolley, is an analog computer used to determine the change in time of the neutron population in a nuclear device, via the Monte Carlo method. It was invented by Enrico Fermi and constructed by Percy King at Los Alamos in 1947, and used for about two years. A replica of the Fermiac was built at INFN mechanical workshops of Bologna in 2015, on behalf of the Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche "Enrico Fermi", thanks to the original drawings made available by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This reproduction of the Fermiac was put in use, and a simulation was developed.

  7. Apparent Explosion Moments from Rg Waves Recorded on SPE: Implications for the Late-Time Damage Source Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, H. J.; Larmat, C. S.; Rougier, E.

    2016-12-01

    Seismic moments for chemical shots making up Phase I of the Source Physics Experiments (SPE) are estimated from 6 Hz Rg waves under the assumption that the shots are pure explosions. These apparent explosion moments are compared to moments determined using the Reduced Displacement Potential (RDP) method applied to free field data. LIDAR/photogrammetry observations, strong ground motions on the free surface near ground zero, and moment tensor inversion results are evidence in support of the fourth shot SPE-4P being essentially a pure explosion. The apparent moment for SPE-4P is 9 × 1010 Nm in good agreement with the RDP moment 8 × 1010 Nm. In stark contrast, apparent moments for the first three shots are three to four times smaller than RDP moments. Data show that spallation occurred on these shots, as well as permanent deformations detected with ground-based LIDAR. As such, the source medium suffered late-time damage. The late-time damage source model predicts destructive interference between Rg waves radiated by explosion and damage sources, which reduces amplitudes and explains why apparent moments are smaller than RDP moments based on compressional energy emitted directly from the source. SPE-5 was conducted at roughly the same yield-scaled burial depth as SPE-2 and -3, but with five times the yield. As such, the damage source model predicts less reduction of apparent moment. At this writing, preliminary results from Rg interferometry and RDP moments confirm this prediction. SPE-6 is scheduled for the fall of 2016, and it should have the strongest damage source of all SPE shots. The damage model predicts that the polarity of Rg waves could be reversed. Realization of this prediction will be strong confirmation of the late-time damage source model. This abstract has a Los Alamos National Laboratory Unlimited Release Number LA-UR-16-25709.

  8. Bright Comet ISON

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Comet ISON shines brightly in this image taken on the morning of 19 Nov. 2013. This is a 10-second exposure taken with the Marshall Space Flight Center 20" telescope in New Mexico. The camera there is black and white, but the smaller field of view allows for a better "zoom in" on the comet's coma, which is essentially the head of the comet. Credit: NASA/MSFC/MEO/Cameron McCarty -------- More details on Comet ISON: Comet ISON began its trip from the Oort cloud region of our solar system and is now travelling toward the sun. The comet will reach its closest approach to the sun on Thanksgiving Day -- 28 Nov 2013 -- skimming just 730,000 miles above the sun's surface. If it comes around the sun without breaking up, the comet will be visible in the Northern Hemisphere with the naked eye, and from what we see now, ISON is predicted to be a particularly bright and beautiful comet. Catalogued as C/2012 S1, Comet ISON was first spotted 585 million miles away in September 2012. This is ISON's very first trip around the sun, which means it is still made of pristine matter from the earliest days of the solar system’s formation, its top layers never having been lost by a trip near the sun. Comet ISON is, like all comets, a dirty snowball made up of dust and frozen gases like water, ammonia, methane and carbon dioxide -- some of the fundamental building blocks that scientists believe led to the formation of the planets 4.5 billion years ago. NASA has been using a vast fleet of spacecraft, instruments, and space- and Earth-based telescope, in order to learn more about this time capsule from when the solar system first formed. The journey along the way for such a sun-grazing comet can be dangerous. A giant ejection of solar material from the sun could rip its tail off. Before it reaches Mars -- at some 230 million miles away from the sun -- the radiation of the sun begins to boil its water, the first step toward breaking apart. And, if it survives all this, the intense radiation

  9. DETECTION OF BROAD Hα EMISSION LINES IN THE LATE-TIME SPECTRA OF A HYDROGEN-POOR SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lin; Masci, F.; Quimby, R.; Ofek, E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Leloudas, G.; Cia, A. de; Yaron, O.; Mazzali, P.; Perley, D.; Cenko, S. B.; Cao, Y.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, P. E.; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    iPTF13ehe is a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z = 0.3434, with a slow-evolving light curve and spectral features similar to SN2007bi. It rises in 83–148 days to reach a peak bolometric luminosity of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup −1}, then decays slowly at 0.015 mag day{sup −1}. The measured ejecta velocity is ∼ 13,000 km s{sup −1}. The inferred explosion characteristics, such as the ejecta mass (70–220 M{sub ⊙}), and the total radiative and kinetic energy (E{sub rad} ∼ 10{sup 51} erg, E{sub kin} ∼ 2 × 10{sup 53} erg), are typical of slow-evolving H-poor SLSN events. However, the late-time spectrum taken at +251 days (rest, post-peak) reveals a Balmer Hα emission feature with broad and narrow components, which has never been detected before among other H-poor SLSNe. The broad component has a velocity width of ∼4500 km s{sup −1} and a ∼300 km s{sup −1} blueward shift relative to the narrow component. We interpret this broad Hα emission with a luminosity of ∼2 × 10{sup 41} erg s{sup −1} as resulting from the interaction between the supernova ejecta and a discrete H-rich shell, located at a distance of ∼4 × 10{sup 16} cm from the explosion site. This interaction causes the rest-frame r-band LC to brighten at late times. The fact that the late-time spectra are not completely absorbed by the shock-ionized H-shell implies that its Thomson scattering optical depth is likely ≤1, thus setting upper limits on the shell mass ≤30 M{sub ⊙}. Of the existing models, a Pulsational Pair Instability supernova model can naturally explain the observed 30 M{sub ⊙} H-shell, ejected from a progenitor star with an initial mass of (95–150) M{sub ⊙} about 40 years ago. We estimate that at least ∼15% of all SLSNe-I may have late-time Balmer emission lines.

  10. Detection of Broad Hα Emission Lines in the Late-time Spectra of a Hydrogen-poor Superluminous Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lin; Quimby, R.; Ofek, E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Mazzali, P.; Perley, D.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Leloudas, G.; de Cia, A.; Masci, F.; Cenko, S. B.; Cao, Y.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, P. E.; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, P. R.; Yaron, O.

    2015-12-01

    iPTF13ehe is a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z = 0.3434, with a slow-evolving light curve and spectral features similar to SN2007bi. It rises in 83-148 days to reach a peak bolometric luminosity of ˜1.3 × 1044 erg s-1, then decays slowly at 0.015 mag day-1. The measured ejecta velocity is ˜ 13,000 km s-1. The inferred explosion characteristics, such as the ejecta mass (70-220 M⊙), and the total radiative and kinetic energy (Erad ˜ 1051 erg, Ekin ˜ 2 × 1053 erg), are typical of slow-evolving H-poor SLSN events. However, the late-time spectrum taken at +251 days (rest, post-peak) reveals a Balmer Hα emission feature with broad and narrow components, which has never been detected before among other H-poor SLSNe. The broad component has a velocity width of ˜4500 km s-1 and a ˜300 km s-1 blueward shift relative to the narrow component. We interpret this broad Hα emission with a luminosity of ˜2 × 1041 erg s-1 as resulting from the interaction between the supernova ejecta and a discrete H-rich shell, located at a distance of ˜4 × 1016 cm from the explosion site. This interaction causes the rest-frame r-band LC to brighten at late times. The fact that the late-time spectra are not completely absorbed by the shock-ionized H-shell implies that its Thomson scattering optical depth is likely ≤1, thus setting upper limits on the shell mass ≤30 M⊙. Of the existing models, a Pulsational Pair Instability supernova model can naturally explain the observed 30 M⊙ H-shell, ejected from a progenitor star with an initial mass of (95-150) M⊙ about 40 years ago. We estimate that at least ˜15% of all SLSNe-I may have late-time Balmer emission lines.

  11. A new method for probing the late-time dynamics in the Lorentzian type IIB matrix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Takehiro; Ito, Yuta; Nishimura, Jun; Tsuchiya, Asato

    2017-08-01

    The type IIB matrix model has been investigated as a possible nonperturbative formulation of superstring theory. In particular, it was found by Monte Carlo simulation of the Lorentzian version that the 9D rotational symmetry of the spatial matrices is broken spontaneously to the 3D one after some "critical time". In this paper we develop a new simulation method based on the effective theory for the submatrices corresponding to the late time. Using this method, one can obtain the results for N× N matrices by simulating matrices typically of the size O(√{N}). We confirm the validity of this method and demonstrate its usefulness in simplified models.

  12. Detection of Broad Hα Emission Lines in the Late-Time Spectra of a Hydrogen-Poor Superluminous Supernova

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Lin; Quimby, R.; Ofek, E.; ...

    2015-11-23

    iPTF13ehe is a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z = 0.3434, with a slow-evolving light curve and spectral features similar to SN2007bi. It rises in 83–148 days to reach a peak bolometric luminosity of ~1.3 × 1044 erg s-1, then decays slowly at 0.015 mag day-1. The measured ejecta velocity is ~ 13,000 km s-1. The inferred explosion characteristics, such as the ejecta mass (70–220 M⊙), and the total radiative and kinetic energy (Erad ~ 1051 erg, Ekin ~ 2 × 1053 erg), are typical of slow-evolving H-poor SLSN events. However, the late-time spectrum taken at +251 days (rest, post-peak)more » reveals a Balmer Hα emission feature with broad and narrow components, which has never been detected before among other H-poor SLSNe. The broad component has a velocity width of ~4500 km s-1 and a ~300 km s-1 blueward shift relative to the narrow component. In this paper, we interpret this broad Hα emission with a luminosity of ~2 × 1041 erg s-1 as resulting from the interaction between the supernova ejecta and a discrete H-rich shell, located at a distance of ~4 × 1016 cm from the explosion site. This interaction causes the rest-frame r-band LC to brighten at late times. The fact that the late-time spectra are not completely absorbed by the shock-ionized H-shell implies that its Thomson scattering optical depth is likely ≤1, thus setting upper limits on the shell mass ≤30 M⊙. Of the existing models, a Pulsational Pair Instability supernova model can naturally explain the observed 30 M⊙ H-shell, ejected from a progenitor star with an initial mass of (95–150) M⊙ about 40 years ago. Finally, we estimate that at least ~15% of all SLSNe-I may have late-time Balmer emission lines.« less

  13. Detection of Broad Hα Emission Lines in the Late-Time Spectra of a Hydrogen-Poor Superluminous Supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lin; Quimby, R.; Ofek, E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Mazzali, P.; Perley, D.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Leloudas, G.; Cia, A. de; Masci, F.; Cenko, S. B.; Cao, Y.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, P. E.; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, P. R.; Yaron, O.

    2015-11-23

    iPTF13ehe is a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z = 0.3434, with a slow-evolving light curve and spectral features similar to SN2007bi. It rises in 83–148 days to reach a peak bolometric luminosity of ~1.3 × 1044 erg s-1, then decays slowly at 0.015 mag day-1. The measured ejecta velocity is ~ 13,000 km s-1. The inferred explosion characteristics, such as the ejecta mass (70–220 M), and the total radiative and kinetic energy (Erad ~ 1051 erg, Ekin ~ 2 × 1053 erg), are typical of slow-evolving H-poor SLSN events. However, the late-time spectrum taken at +251 days (rest, post-peak) reveals a Balmer Hα emission feature with broad and narrow components, which has never been detected before among other H-poor SLSNe. The broad component has a velocity width of ~4500 km s-1 and a ~300 km s-1 blueward shift relative to the narrow component. In this paper, we interpret this broad Hα emission with a luminosity of ~2 × 1041 erg s-1 as resulting from the interaction between the supernova ejecta and a discrete H-rich shell, located at a distance of ~4 × 1016 cm from the explosion site. This interaction causes the rest-frame r-band LC to brighten at late times. The fact that the late-time spectra are not completely absorbed by the shock-ionized H-shell implies that its Thomson scattering optical depth is likely ≤1, thus setting upper limits on the shell mass ≤30 M. Of the existing models, a Pulsational Pair Instability supernova model can naturally explain the observed 30 M H-shell, ejected from a progenitor star with an initial mass of (95–150) M about 40 years ago. Finally, we estimate that at least ~15% of all SLSNe-I may have late-time Balmer emission lines.

  14. Fermi Finds Youthful Pulsar Among Ancient Stars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    In three years, NASA's Fermi has detected more than 100 gamma-ray pulsars, but something new has appeared. Among a type of pulsar with ages typically numbering a billion years or more, Fermi has fo...

  15. How Bright Is the Sun?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berr, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    Presents a sequence of activities designed to allow eighth grade students to deal with one of the fundamental relationships that govern energy distribution. Activities guide students to measure light bulb brightness, discover the inverse square law, compare light bulb light to candle light, and measure sun brightness. (two references) (MCO)

  16. Bright Basin on Tethys

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-27

    With the expanded range of colors visible to Cassini's cameras, differences in materials and their textures become apparent that are subtle or unseen in natural color views. Here, the giant impact basin Odysseus on Saturn's moon Tethys stands out brightly from the rest of the illuminated icy crescent. This distinct coloration may result from differences in either the composition or structure of the terrain exposed by the giant impact. Odysseus (280 miles, or 450 kilometers, across) is one of the largest impact craters on Saturn's icy moons, and may have significantly altered the geologic history of Tethys. Tethys' dark side (at right) is faintly illuminated by reflected light from Saturn. Images taken using ultraviolet, green and infrared spectral filters were combined to create this color view. North on Tethys (660 miles or 1,062 kilometers across) is up in this view. The view was acquired on May 9, 2015 at a distance of approximately 186,000 miles (300,000 kilometers) from Tethys. Image scale is 1.1 mile (1.8 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18329

  17. CCC and the Fermi paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurzadyan, V. G.; Penrose, R.

    2016-01-01

    Within the scheme of conformal cyclic cosmology (CCC), information can be transmitted from aeon to aeon. Accordingly, the "Fermi paradox" and the SETI programme --of communication by remote civilizations-- may be examined from a novel perspective: such information could, in principle, be encoded in the cosmic microwave background. The current empirical status of CCC is also discussed.

  18. Economics and the Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosek, W. R.

    A resolution of the Fermi paradox is proposed using common economic assumptions that should apply to all intelligent, planet-bound civilizations. It is argued that seemingly rational decisions about resource allocation will lead all civilizations to forego the commitment to interstellar exploration and colonization. Consequently humans have not, and will not, be visited by them and humans will not visit other civilizations.

  19. A Student's View of Fermi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Jerome

    2010-02-01

    This talk will provide recollections of Fermi and the lively environment he created at the University of Chicago from the perspective of a student who had the great privilege of taking of his courses and becoming a member of his research group. The period to be covered is 1951 to 1954. )

  20. Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Fermi’s Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the spacecraft’s main scientificinstrument. This animation shows a gamma ray (purple) entering the LAT,where it is converted into an electron (red) and a...

  1. Fermi's β-DECAY Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen Ning

    2013-05-01

    Throughout his lifetime Enrico Fermi (1901-1954) had considered his 1934 β-decay theory as his most important contribution to theoretical physics. E. Segrè (1905-1989) had vividly written about an episode at the inception of that paper:1...

  2. Fermi GBM Early Trigger Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Paciesas, Bill; Meegan, Charles

    2009-05-25

    Since the launch of the Fermi observatory on June 11 2008, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has seen approximately 250 triggers of which about 150 were cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). GBM operates dozens of trigger algorithms covering various energy bands and timescales and is therefore sensitive to a wide variety of phenomena, both astrophysical and not.

  3. Archimedean-type force in a cosmic dark fluid. I. Exact solutions for the late-time accelerated expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakin, Alexander B.; Bochkarev, Vladimir V.

    2011-01-01

    We establish a new self-consistent model in order to explain from a unified viewpoint two key features of the cosmological evolution: the inflation in the early Universe and the late-time accelerated expansion. The key element of this new model is the Archimedean-type coupling of the dark matter with dark energy, which form the so-called cosmic dark fluid. We suppose that dark matter particles immersed into the dark energy reservoir are affected by the force proportional to the four-gradient of the dark energy pressure. The Archimedean-type coupling is shown to play a role of effective energy-momentum redistributor between the dark matter and the dark energy components of the dark fluid, thus providing the Universe evolution to be a quasiperiodic and/or multistage process. In the first part of the work we discuss a theoretical base and new exact solutions of the model master equations. Special attention is focused on the exact solutions, for which the scale factor is presented by the anti-Gaussian function: these solutions describe the late-time acceleration and are characterized by a nonsingular behavior in the early Universe. The second part contains qualitative and numerical analysis of the master equations; we focus there on the solutions describing a multi-inflationary Universe.

  4. STEM education and Fermi problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holubova, Renata

    2017-01-01

    One of the research areas of Physics education is the study of the educational process. Investigations in this area are aimed for example on the teaching and learning process and its results. The conception of STEM education (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) is discussed - it is one possible approach to the preparation of the curriculum and the focus on the educational process at basic and secondary schools. At schools in the Czech Republic STEM is much more realized by the application of interdisciplinary relations between subjects Physics-Nature-Technique. In both conceptions the aim is to support pupils' creativity, critical thinking, cross-curricular links. In this context the possibility of using Fermi problems in teaching Physics was discussed (as an interdisciplinary and constructivist activity). The aim of our research was the analysis of Fermi problems solving strategies, the ability of pupils to solve Fermi problems. The outcome of our analysis was to find out methods and teaching strategies which are important to use in teaching - how to solve qualitative and interdisciplinary tasks in physics. In this paper the theoretical basis of STEM education and Fermi problems will be presented. The outcome of our findings based on the research activities will be discussed so as our experiences from 10 years of Fermi problems competition that takes place at the Science Faculty, Palacky University in Olomouc. Changes in competencies of solving tasks by our students (from the point of view in terms of modern, activating teaching methods recommended by theory of Physics education and other science subjects) will be identified.

  5. Hunting for treasures among the Fermi unassociated sources: A multiwavelength approach

    SciTech Connect

    Acero, F.; Ojha, R.; Edwards, P. G.; Blanchard, J.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Thompson, D. J.

    2013-12-20

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has been detecting a wealth of sources where the multiwavelength counterpart is either inconclusive or missing altogether. We present a combination of factors that can be used to identify multiwavelength counterparts to these Fermi unassociated sources. This approach was used to select and investigate seven bright, high-latitude unassociated sources with radio, UV, X-ray, and γ-ray observations. As a result, four of these sources are candidates to be active galactic nuclei, and one to be a pulsar, while two do not fit easily into these known categories of sources. The latter pair of extraordinary sources might reveal a new category subclass or a new type of γ-ray emitter. These results altogether demonstrate the power of a multiwavelength approach to illuminate the nature of unassociated Fermi sources.

  6. Go with the (Bright) Flow

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-18

    NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter observes many slopes in the middle latitudes of Mars showing icy flows or glaciers. The region shown here, in the south-facing slope of a crater, is unusual because the flows have bright highlights. The color and brightness variations are likely due to surface coatings of bright dust and dark sand. There is no evidence that these flows are currently active, but they may have been active only millions of years ago. These flows may well contain ice today in their interiors, as confirmed in places by the subsurface radar experiment on MRO. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21953

  7. Singular F(R) cosmology unifying early- and late-time acceleration with matter and radiation domination era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-06-01

    We present some cosmological models which unify the late- and early-time acceleration eras with the radiation and the matter domination era, and we realize the cosmological models by using the theoretical framework of F(R) gravity. Particularly, the first model unifies the late- and early-time acceleration with the matter domination era, and the second model unifies all the evolution eras of our Universe. The two models are described in the same way at early and late times, and only the intermediate stages of the evolution have some differences. Each cosmological model contains two Type IV singularities which are chosen to occur one at the end of the inflationary era and one at the end of the matter domination era. The cosmological models at early times are approximately identical to the R 2 inflation model, so these describe a slow-roll inflationary era which ends when the slow-roll parameters become of order one. The inflationary era is followed by the radiation era and after that the matter domination era follows, which lasts until the second Type IV singularity, and then the late-time acceleration era follows. The models have two appealing features: firstly they produce a nearly scale invariant power spectrum of primordial curvature perturbations and a scalar-to-tensor ratio which are compatible with the most recent observational data and secondly, it seems that the deceleration-acceleration transition is crucially affected by the presence of the second Type IV singularity which occurs at the end of the matter domination era. As we demonstrate, the Hubble horizon at early times shrinks, as expected for an initially accelerating Universe, then during the matter domination era, it expands and finally after the Type IV singularity, the Hubble horizon starts to shrink again, during the late-time acceleration era. Intriguingly enough, the deceleration-acceleration transition, occurs after the second Type IV singularity. In addition, we investigate which F(R) gravity

  8. Using GRB 080723B to cross-calibrate Fermi/GBM and INTEGRAL

    SciTech Connect

    Kienlin, A. von; Briggs, M. S.; Connoughton, V.; Preece, R. D.; McBreen, S.; Sazonov, Sergey; Tsygankov, Sergey; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.

    2009-05-25

    On July 23, 2008 GRB 080723B, a bright GRB lasting about 105 s was detected by the INTEGRAL burst alert system. This burst was also detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray burst monitor. At this time no Fermi/GBM GCN notices were distributed to the public because Fermi was still in commissioning phase. The simultaneous detection of a bright GRB by both satellites gives us the opportunity to cross-calibrate the GBM with the already well-calibrated instruments on-board INTEGRAL, the Spectrometer SPI and the Imager IBIS. Time-resolved spectroscopy of this long and structured GRB is of special importance because Fermi was slewing during the GRB was still ongoing. In this paper we present a first and still preliminary analysis of the GBM spectra and compare them to those obtained by SPI for the same selection of time intervals. A more accurate cross-calibration will be forthcoming when the improved in-flight calibration of GBM is available and the corresponding data and responses can be reprocessed.

  9. Topological non-Fermi liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Qi, Yong-Hui; Wu, Yue-Liang; Zhang, Yun-Long

    2017-06-01

    The (2 +1 )-dimensional non-Fermi liquid (NFL) has a dual description in the (3 +1 )-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) spacetime. We begin with a dyonic Reissner-Nordstrom (RN) black brane background, and consider the bulk Dirac fermion field coupled with the background U (1 ) gauge field, as well an intrinsic axial gauge field which is induced by chiral anomaly. The axial gauge field is effectively induced from the topological term in the bulk, which would lead to nontrivial effects on the boundary NFL. We study these effects through calculating the retarded Green's functions of the dual NFL holographically, in both analytical and numerical approaches. We also obtain correlation functions in the low frequency limit at zero and finite temperatures, as well as the dispersion spectrum of the Dirac cones, Fermi arc of the surface states, which can be related with the experiment.

  10. Fermi resonance in optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Chang-Hwan; Yu, Hyeon-Hye; Lee, Ji-Won; Kim, Chil-Min

    2015-04-01

    Fermi resonance is a phenomenon of quantum mechanical superposition, which most often occurs between normal and overtone modes in molecular systems that are nearly coincident in energy. We find that scarred resonances in deformed dielectric microcavities are the very phenomenon of Fermi resonance, that is, a pair of quasinormal modes interact with each other due to coupling and a pair of resonances are generated through an avoided resonance crossing. Then the quantum number difference of a pair of quasinormal modes, which is a consequence of quantum mechanical superposition, equals periodic orbits, whereby the resonances are localized on the periodic orbits. We derive the relation between the quantum number difference and the periodic orbits and confirm it in an elliptic, a rectangular, and a stadium-shaped dielectric microcavity.

  11. Determination of late-time Gamma-Ray (60Co) sensitivity of single diffusion Lot 2N2222A transistors.

    SciTech Connect

    DePriest, Kendall Russell; Kajder, Karen C.; Peters, Curtis D.

    2008-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has embarked on a program to develop a methodology to use damage relations techniques (alternative experimental facilities, modeling, and simulation) to understand the time-dependent effects in transistors (and integrated circuits) caused by neutron irradiations in the Sandia Pulse Reactor-III (SPR-III) facility. The development of these damage equivalence techniques is necessary since SPR-III was shutdown in late 2006. As part of this effort, the late time {gamma}-ray sensitivity of a single diffusion lot of 2N2222A transistors has been characterized using one of the {sup 60}Co irradiation cells at the SNL Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF). This report summarizes the results of the experiments performed at the GIF.

  12. A Multiwavelength Study of the Relativistic Tidal Disruption Candidate Swift J2058.4+0516 at Late Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Levan, Andrew J.; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Horesh, Assaf; Brown, Gregory C.; Dolan, Stephen; Wiersema, Klaas; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Greiner, Jochen; O'Brien, Paul T.; Page, Kim L.; Rau, Arne; Tanvir, Nial R.

    2015-05-01

    We report a multiwavelength (X-ray, ultraviolet/optical/infrared (UVOIR), radio) analysis of the relativistic tidal disruption event (TDE) candidate Sw J2058+05 from 3 months to 3 yr post-discovery in order to study its properties and compare its behavior with that of Sw J1644+57. Our main results are as follows: (1) The long-term X-ray light curve of Sw J2058+05 shows a remarkably similar trend to that of Sw J1644+57. After a prolonged power-law decay, the X-ray flux drops off rapidly by a factor of ≳160 within a span of Δt/t≤slant 0.95 . Associating this sudden decline with the transition from super-Eddington to sub-Eddington accretion, we estimate the black hole mass to be in the range of 104-6 M⊙ . (2) We detect rapid (≲500 s) X-ray variability before the drop-off, suggesting that, even at late times, the X-rays originate from close to the black hole (ruling out a forward-shock origin). (3) We confirm using Hubble Space Telescope and Very Long Baseline Array astrometry that the location of the source coincides with the galaxy’s center to within ≲400 pc (in projection). (4) We modeled Sw J2058+05's UVOIR spectral energy distribution with a single-temperature blackbody and find that while the radius remains more or less constant at a value of 63.4 ± 4.5 AU (˜ {{10}15} cm) at all times during the outburst, the blackbody temperature drops significantly from ˜30,000 K at early times to a value of ˜15,000 K at late times (before the X-ray drop-off). Our results strengthen Sw J2058+05's interpretation as a TDE similar to Sw J1644+57.

  13. Hydrogen-poor Superluminous Supernovae with Late-time Hα Emission: Three Events From the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lin; Lunnan, R.; Perley, D. A.; Gal-Yam, A.; Yaron, O.; Roy, R.; Quimby, R.; Sollerman, J.; Fremling, C.; Leloudas, G.; Cenko, S. B.; Vreeswijk, P.; Graham, M. L.; Howell, D. A.; De Cia, A.; Ofek, E. O.; Nugent, P.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Masci, F.; McCully, C.; Rebbapragada, U. D.; Woźniak, P.

    2017-10-01

    We present observations of two new hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSN-I), iPTF15esb and iPTF16bad, showing late-time Hα emission with line luminosities of (1{--}3)× {10}41 erg s‑1 and velocity widths of (4000–6000) km s‑1. Including the previously published iPTF13ehe, this makes up a total of three such events to date. iPTF13ehe is one of the most luminous and the slowest evolving SLSNe-I, whereas the other two are less luminous and fast decliners. We interpret this as a result of the ejecta running into a neutral H-shell located at a radius of ∼1016 cm. This implies that violent mass loss must have occurred several decades before the supernova explosion. Such a short time interval suggests that eruptive mass loss could be common shortly before core collapse, and more importantly helium is unlikely to be completely stripped off the progenitor and could be present in the ejecta. It is a mystery why helium features are not detected, even though nonthermal energy sources, capable of ionizing He, may exist as suggested by the O ii absorption series in the early-time spectra. Our late-time spectra (+240 days) appear to have intrinsically lower [O i] 6300 Å luminosities than that of SN2015bn and SN2007bi, which is possibly an indication of less oxygen (<10 M ⊙). The blueshifted Hα emission relative to the hosts for all three events may be in tension with the binary model proposed for iPTF13ehe. Finally, iPTF15esb has a peculiar light curve (LC) with three peaks separated from one another by ∼22 days. The LC undulation is stronger in bluer bands. One possible explanation is ejecta-circumstellar medium interaction.

  14. Fermi Timing and Synchronization System

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R.; Staples, J.; Doolittle, L.; Byrd, J.; Ratti, A.; Kaertner, F.X.; Kim, J.; Chen, J.; Ilday, F.O.; Ludwig, F.; Winter, A.; Ferianis, M.; Danailov, M.; D'Auria, G.

    2006-07-19

    The Fermi FEL will depend critically on precise timing of its RF, laser and diagnostic subsystems. The timing subsystem to coordinate these functions will need to reliably maintain sub-100fs synchronicity between distant points up to 300m apart in the Fermi facility. The technology to do this is not commercially available, and has not been experimentally demonstrated in a working facility. Therefore, new technology must be developed to meet these needs. Two approaches have been researched by different groups working with the Fermi staff. At MIT, a pulse transmission scheme has been developed for synchronization of RF and laser devices. And at LBL, a CW transmission scheme has been developed for RF and laser synchronization. These respective schemes have advantages and disadvantages that will become better understood in coming years. This document presents the work done by both teams, and suggests a possible system design which integrates them both. The integrated system design provides an example of how choices can be made between the different approaches without significantly changing the basic infrastructure of the system. Overall system issues common to any synchronization scheme are also discussed.

  15. Enrico Fermi and the Dolomites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battimelli, Giovanni; de Angelis, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    Summer vacations in the Dolomites were a tradition among the professors of the Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences at the University of Roma since the end of the XIX century. Beyond the academic walls, people like Tullio Levi-Civita, Federigo Enriques and Ugo Amaldi sr., together with their families, were meeting friends and colleagues in Cortina, San Vito, Dobbiaco, Vigo di Fassa and Selva, enjoying trekking together with scientific discussions. The tradition was transmitted to the next generations, in particular in the first half of the XX century, and the group of via Panisperna was directly connected: Edoardo Amaldi, the son of the mathematician Ugo sr., rented at least during two summers, in 1925 and in 1949, and in the winter of 1960, a house in San Vito di Cadore, and almost every year in the Dolomites; Enrico Fermi was a frequent guest. Many important steps in modern physics, in particular the development of the Fermi-Dirac statistics and the Fermi theory of beta decay, are related to scientific discussions held in the region of the Dolomites.

  16. Fermi/Non-Fermi Mixing in SU(N) Kondo Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Taro; Ozaki, Sho

    2017-08-01

    We apply conformal field theory analysis to the k-channel SU(N) Kondo system, and find a peculiar behavior in the cases N > k > 1, which we call Fermi/non-Fermi mixing: The low temperature scaling is described as the Fermi liquid, while the zero temperature infrared fixed point exhibits the non-Fermi liquid signature. We also show that the Wilson ratio is no longer universal for the cases N > k > 1. The deviation from the universal value of the Wilson ratio could be used as an experimental signal of the Fermi/non-Fermi mixing.

  17. Landau Theory of Helical Fermi Liquids.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Rex; Maciejko, Joseph

    2015-08-07

    We construct a phenomenological Landau theory for the two-dimensional helical Fermi liquid found on the surface of a three-dimensional time-reversal invariant topological insulator. In the presence of rotation symmetry, interactions between quasiparticles are described by ten independent Landau parameters per angular momentum channel, by contrast with the two (symmetric and antisymmetric) Landau parameters for a conventional spin-degenerate Fermi liquid. We project quasiparticle states onto the Fermi surface and obtain an effectively spinless, projected Landau theory with a single projected Landau parameter per angular momentum channel that captures the spin-momentum locking or nontrivial Berry phase of the Fermi surface. As a result of this nontrivial Berry phase, projection to the Fermi surface can increase or lower the angular momentum of the quasiparticle interactions. We derive equilibrium properties, criteria for Fermi surface instabilities, and collective mode dispersions in terms of the projected Landau parameters. We briefly discuss experimental means of measuring projected Landau parameters.

  18. Pulsar Timing with the Fermi LAT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    Pulsar Timing with the Fermi LAT Paul S. Ray∗, Matthew Kerr†, Damien Parent∗∗ and the Fermi PSC‡ ∗Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW...Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA ‡Fermi Pulsar Search Consortium Abstract. We present an overview of precise pulsar timing using data from the Large...unbinned photon data. In addition to determining the spindown behavior of the pulsars and detecting glitches and timing noise, such timing analyses al

  19. The first Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray burst catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burgess, J. Michael; Buson, S.; Byrne, D.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Dingus, B. L.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Goldstein, A.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Gruber, D.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Kawano, T.; Kippen, R. M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S. -H.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McBreen, S.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Pelassa, V.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Preece, R.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Rau, A.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Romoli, C.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sonbas, E.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tierney, D.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Tronconi, V.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Horst, A. J. van der; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Xiong, S.; Yang, Z.

    2013-10-23

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (gsim 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above ~20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. Here, we summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  20. First Light on GRBs with Fermi

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-04

    two months later, in early August 2008, shortly before being renamed after Enrico Fermi . In these 16 months, <∼ 1 GRB per month was detected with the...ar X iv :1 00 8. 08 54 v1 [ as tr o- ph .H E ] 4 A ug 2 01 0 First Light on GRBs with Fermi Charles D. Dermer on behalf of the Fermi ...Collaboration Code 7653, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20375-5352 USA Abstract. Fermi LAT (Large Area Telescope) and GBM

  1. SLAC All Access: Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Romani, Roger

    2013-05-31

    Three hundred and fifty miles overhead, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope silently glides through space. From this serene vantage point, the satellite's instruments watch the fiercest processes in the universe unfold. Pulsars spin up to 700 times a second, sweeping powerful beams of gamma-ray light through the cosmos. The hyperactive cores of distant galaxies spew bright jets of plasma. Far beyond, something mysterious explodes with unfathomable power, sending energy waves crashing through the universe. Stanford professor and KIPAC member Roger W. Romani talks about this orbiting telescope, the most advanced ever to view the sky in gamma rays, a form of light at the highest end of the energy spectrum that's created in the hottest regions of the universe.

  2. SLAC All Access: Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    ScienceCinema

    Romani, Roger

    2016-07-12

    Three hundred and fifty miles overhead, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope silently glides through space. From this serene vantage point, the satellite's instruments watch the fiercest processes in the universe unfold. Pulsars spin up to 700 times a second, sweeping powerful beams of gamma-ray light through the cosmos. The hyperactive cores of distant galaxies spew bright jets of plasma. Far beyond, something mysterious explodes with unfathomable power, sending energy waves crashing through the universe. Stanford professor and KIPAC member Roger W. Romani talks about this orbiting telescope, the most advanced ever to view the sky in gamma rays, a form of light at the highest end of the energy spectrum that's created in the hottest regions of the universe.

  3. Eta Carinae's first full orbit in the Fermi era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, Olaf; Reitberger, Klaus; Reimer, Anita; Takahashi, Hiromitsu

    2015-08-01

    Eta Carinae, the so-far only colliding wind binary system shining brightly at high-energy gamma-rays, has been observed over the first complete orbit since launch of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. This allows us to compare the spatial, temporal and spectral characteristics of the gamma-ray emission to earlier studies and confront predictions about anticipated observational signatures when concluding the full orbit and entering into the next. By analyzing 2024 days of LAT data we were able to improve the spatial association between the nominal location of eta Carinae and the observed gamma-ray location, confirming the two-component spectrum, as well as the spectro-variability seen predominatly above 10 GeV. The observed source characteristics strengthens the case that eta Car remains unique for the otherwise elusive class of gamma-ray sources whose emission can be related to a colliding stellar wind scenario.

  4. Early and late time VLT spectroscopy of SN 2001el - progenitor constraints for a type Ia supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattila, S.; Lundqvist, P.; Sollerman, J.; Kozma, C.; Baron, E.; Fransson, C.; Leibundgut, B.; Nomoto, K.

    2005-11-01

    We present early time high-resolution (VLT/UVES) and late time low-resolution (VLT/FORS) optical spectra of the normal type Ia supernova, SN 2001el. The high-resolution spectra were obtained 9 and 2 days before (B-band) maximum light. This was in order to allow the detection of narrow hydrogen and/or helium emission lines from the circumstellar medium of the supernova. No such lines were detected in our data. We therefore use these spectra together with photoionisation models to derive upper limits of 9×10-6 {M}_⊙ yr-1 and 5×10-5 {M}_⊙ yr-1 for the mass loss rate from the progenitor system of SN 2001el assuming velocities of 10 km s-1 and 50 km s-1, respectively, for a wind extending to outside at least a few × 1015 cm away from the supernova explosion site. So far, these are the best Hα based upper limits obtained for a type Ia supernova, and exclude a symbiotic star in the upper mass loss rate regime (so called Mira type stars) from being the progenitor of SN 2001el. The low-resolution spectrum was obtained in the nebular phase of the supernova, 400 days after the maximum light, to search for any hydrogen rich gas originating from the supernova progenitor system. However, we see no signs of Balmer lines in our spectrum. Therefore, we model the late time spectra to derive an upper limit of 0.03 M⊙ for solar abundance material present at velocities lower than 1000 km s-1 within the supernova explosion site. According to numerical simulations of Marietta et al. (2000) this is less than the expected mass lost by a subgiant, red giant or a main-sequence secondary star at a small binary separation as a result of the SN explosion. Our data therefore exclude these scenarios as the progenitor of SN 2001el. Finally, we discuss the origin of high velocity Ca II lines previously observed in a few type Ia supernovae before the maximum light. We see both the Ca II IR triplet and the H&K lines in our earliest (-9 days) spectrum at a very high velocity of up to 34 000

  5. Intermediate accelerated solutions as generic late-time attractors in a modified Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cid, Antonella; Leon, Genly; Leyva, Yoelsy E-mail: genly.leon@ucv.cl

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we investigate the evolution of a Jordan-Brans-Dicke scalar field, Φ, with a power-law potential in the presence of a second scalar field, φ, with an exponential potential, in both the Jordan and the Einstein frames. We present the relation of our model with the induced gravity model with power-law potential and the integrability of this kind of models is discussed when the quintessence field φ is massless, and has a small velocity. The fact that for some fine-tuned values of the parameters we may get some integrable cosmological models, makes our choice of potentials very interesting. We prove that in Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory, the de Sitter solution is not a natural attractor. Instead, we show that the attractor in the Jordan frame corresponds to an ''intermediate accelerated'' solution of the form a(t) ≅ e{sup α{sub 1} t{sup p{sup {sub 1}}}}, as t → ∞ where α{sub 1} > 0 and 0 < p{sub 1} < 1, for a wide range of parameters. Furthermore, when we work in the Einstein frame we get that the attractor is also an ''intermediate accelerated'' solution of the form a(t) ≅ e{sup α{sub 2} tp{sub 2}} as t → ∞ where α{sub 2} > 0 and 0late-time attractor is linked with the exact solution found for the induced gravity model. In this example the ''intermediate accelerated'' solution does not exist, and the attractor solution has

  6. Bioterrorism and the Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Joshua

    2013-04-01

    We proffer a contemporary solution to the so-called Fermi Paradox, which is concerned with conflict between Copernicanism and the apparent paucity of evidence for intelligent alien civilizations. In particular, we argue that every community of organisms that reaches its space-faring age will (1) almost immediately use its rocket-building computers to reverse-engineer its genetic chemistry and (2) self-destruct when some individual uses said technology to design an omnicidal pathogen. We discuss some of the possible approaches to prevention with regard to Homo sapiens' vulnerability to bioterrorism, particularly on a short-term basis.

  7. Intrinsic Correlations for Flaring Blazars Detected by Fermi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J. H.; Yang, J. H.; Xiao, H. B.; Lin, C.; Constantin, D.; Luo, G. Y.; Pei, Z. Y.; Hao, J. M.; Mao, Y. W.

    2017-02-01

    Blazars are an extreme subclass of active galactic nuclei. Their rapid variability, luminous brightness, superluminal motion, and high and variable polarization are probably due to a beaming effect. However, this beaming factor (or Doppler factor) is very difficult to measure. Currently, a good way to estimate it is to use the timescale of their radio flares. In this Letter, we use multiwavelength data and Doppler factors reported in the literature for a sample of 86 flaring blazars detected by Fermi to compute their intrinsic multiwavelength data and intrinsic spectral energy distributions and investigate the correlations among observed and intrinsic data. Quite interestingly, intrinsic data show a positive correlation between luminosity and peak frequency, in contrast with the behavior of observed data, and a tighter correlation between γ-ray luminosity and the lower-energy ones. For flaring blazars detected by Fermi, we conclude that (1) observed emissions are strongly beamed; (2) the anti-correlation between luminosity and peak frequency from the observed data is an apparent result, the correlation between intrinsic data being positive; and (3) intrinsic γ-ray luminosity is strongly correlated with other intrinsic luminosities.

  8. High brightness picosecond electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Merano, M.; Collin, S.; Renucci, P.; Gatri, M.; Sonderegger, S.; Crottini, A.; Ganiere, J.D.; Deveaud, B.

    2005-08-15

    We have developed a high brightness picosecond electron gun. We have used it to replace the thermionic electron gun of a commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM) in order to perform time-resolved cathodoluminescence experiments. Picosecond electron pulses are produced, at a repetition rate of 80.7 MHz, by femtosecond mode-locked laser pulses focused on a metal photocathode. This system has a normalized axial brightness of 93 A/cm{sup 2} sr kV, allowing for a spatial resolution of 50 nm in the secondary electron imaging mode of the SEM. The temporal width of the electron pulse is 12 ps.

  9. In Situ Mosaic Brightness Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Lorre, Jean J.

    2012-01-01

    In situ missions typically have pointable, mast-mounted cameras, which are capable of taking panoramic mosaics comprised of many individual frames. These frames are mosaicked together. While the mosaic software applies radiometric correction to the images, in many cases brightness/contrast seams still exist between frames. This is largely due to errors in the radiometric correction, and the absence of correction for photometric effects in the mosaic processing chain. The software analyzes the overlaps between adjacent frames in the mosaic and determines correction factors for each image in an attempt to reduce or eliminate these brightness seams.

  10. Absolute brightness of fluorescent microspheres.

    PubMed

    Finger, Isaac; Phillips, Scott; Mobley, Elizabeth; Tucker, Robert; Hess, Henry

    2009-02-07

    The absolute brightness of fluorescent particles, such as dye-containing nano- and microspheres or quantum dots, is a critical design parameter for many applications relying on fluorescence detection. The absolute brightness, defined as the ratio of radiant intensity of emission to illumination intensity of excitation, of nile-red fluorescent microspheres with a 1 micrometre diameter is measured to be 4.2 +/- 1 x 10(-16) m(2)/sr, and the implications for the design of kinesin motor protein-powered "smart dust" devices and the remote detection of fluorescence are discussed.

  11. Atypical late-time singular regimes accurately diagnosed in stagnation-point-type solutions of 3D Euler flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulungye, Rachel M.; Lucas, Dan; Bustamante, Miguel D.

    2016-02-01

    We revisit, both numerically and analytically, the finite-time blowup of the infinite-energy solution of 3D Euler equations of stagnation-point-type introduced by Gibbon et al. (1999). By employing the method of mapping to regular systems, presented in Bustamante (2011) and extended to the symmetry-plane case by Mulungye et al. (2015), we establish a curious property of this solution that was not observed in early studies: before but near singularity time, the blowup goes from a fast transient to a slower regime that is well resolved spectrally, even at mid-resolutions of $512^2.$ This late-time regime has an atypical spectrum: it is Gaussian rather than exponential in the wavenumbers. The analyticity-strip width decays to zero in a finite time, albeit so slowly that it remains well above the collocation-point scale for all simulation times $t < T^* - 10^{-9000}$, where $T^*$ is the singularity time. Reaching such a proximity to singularity time is not possible in the original temporal variable, because floating point double precision ($\\approx 10^{-16}$) creates a `machine-epsilon' barrier. Due to this limitation on the \\emph{original} independent variable, the mapped variables now provide an improved assessment of the relevant blowup quantities, crucially with acceptable accuracy at an unprecedented closeness to the singularity time: $T^*- t \\approx 10^{-140}.$

  12. ON THE LATE-TIME SPECTRAL SOFTENING FOUND IN X-RAY AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuan-Zhu; Liang, En-Wei; Lu, Zu-Jia; Zhao, Yinan; Shao, Lang

    2016-02-20

    Strong spectral softening has been revealed in the late X-ray afterglows of some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The scenario of X-ray scattering around the circumburst dusty medium has been supported by previous works due to its overall successful prediction of both the temporal and spectral evolution of some X-ray afterglows. To further investigate the observed feature of spectral softening we now systematically search the X-ray afterglows detected by the X-ray telescope aboard Swift and collect 12 GRBs with significant late-time spectral softening. We find that dust scattering could be the dominant radiative mechanism for these X-ray afterglows regarding their temporal and spectral features. For some well-observed bursts with high-quality data, the time-resolved spectra could be well-produced within the scattering scenario by taking into account the X-ray absorption from the circumburst medium. We also find that during spectral softening the power-law index in the high-energy end of the spectra does not vary much. The spectral softening is mainly manifested by the spectral peak energy continually moving to the soft end.

  13. Nested-Fermi-liquid theory

    SciTech Connect

    Virosztek, A.; Ruvalds, J. )

    1990-09-01

    The susceptibility and quasiparticle self-energy are found to exhibit anomalous behavior in nested-Fermi-liquid (NFL) systems that have nearly parallel sections of the Fermi surface. Electron-electron scattering yields damping much stronger than the conventional electron-gas result and predicts a linear temperature variation of the resistivity. The susceptibility {chi}{sub NFL}{sup {prime}{prime}}({bold q},{omega}) for nested fermions is calculated at {bold q}{approx equal}{bold Q}, where {bold Q} is a typical nesting wave vector. The NFL susceptibility is linear in frequency up to a crossover region near {omega}{approx equal}4{ital T} where a saturation to a constant value occurs. The above features, as well as various theoretical constraints, are highly sensitive to the strength of the electron-electron coupling and to the degree of nesting. The relevance of the NFL results to superconducting oxides is briefly examined, with emphasis on the resistivity and the photoemission data, which supports the calculated damping {Gamma}({omega}{gt}{ital T}){approx equal}{alpha}{omega} with an intermediate on-site Coulomb coupling.

  14. Optical polarization of gamma-ray bright blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, Dmitry; Angelakis, E.; Balokovic, M.; Fuhrmann, L.; Hovatta, T.; Katarzyski, K.; Khodade, P.; King, O.; Kus, A.; Kylafis, N.; Myserlis, I.; Panopoulou, G.; Papadakis, I.; Papamastorakis, I.; Pavlidou, V.; Pazderska, B.; Pazderski, E.; Pearson, T.; Rajarshi, C.; Ramaprakash, A.; Readhead, A.; Reig, P.; Rouneq, R.; Tassis, K.; Zensus, A.

    2014-07-01

    We report about first results of the RoboPol project. RoboPol is a large-sample, high-cadence, polarimetric monitoring program of blazars in optical wavelengths, using a camera specifically constructed for this project, mounted at the University of Crete's Skinakas Observatory 1.3 m telescope. The analysis of RoboPol data is conducted in conjunction with Fermi LAT gamma-ray data, and multifrequency radio data from the OVRO (Caltech), F-GAMMA (MPIfR), and Torun (NCU) monitoring programs. Using carefully selected samples of gamma-ray bright and weak blazars we investigate a connection between their optical polarization behaviour and variability properties in gamma. We examine a relationship of gamma flares with polarization angle rotations relying on robust statistical criteria. We analyse also the optical polarization variability itself in order to establish some restrictions on physical models of blazars jets.

  15. Bright Beginnings. WWC Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Bright Beginnings is an early childhood curriculum, based in part on High/Scope[R] and Creative Curriculum[R], with an additional emphasis on literacy skills. The curriculum consists of nine thematic units designed to enhance children's cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development, and each unit includes concept maps, literacy lessons,…

  16. Network based sky Brightness Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Dan; Pulvermacher, R.; Davis, D. R.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed and are currently testing an autonomous 2 channel photometer designed to measure the night sky brightness in the visual wavelengths over a multi-year campaign. The photometer uses a robust silicon sensor filtered with Hoya CM500 glass. The Sky brightness is measured every minute at two elevation angles typically zenith and 20 degrees to monitor brightness and transparency. The Sky Brightness monitor consists of two units, the remote photometer and a network interface. Currently these devices use 2.4 Ghz transceivers with a free space range of 100 meters. The remote unit is battery powered with day time recharging using a solar panel. Data received by the network interface transmits data via standard POP Email protocol. A second version is under development for radio sensitive areas using an optical fiber for data transmission. We will present the current comparison with the National Park Service sky monitoring camera. We will also discuss the calibration methods used for standardization and temperature compensation. This system is expected to be deployed in the next year and be operated by the International Dark Sky Association SKYMONITOR project.

  17. Bright Spot Locations on Ceres

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-10

    This map of Ceres, made from images taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft, shows the locations of about 130 bright areas across the dwarf planet's surface, highlighted in blue. Most of these bright areas are associated with craters. Three insets zoom in on a few areas of interest. Occator Crater, containing the brightest area on Ceres, is shown at top left; Oxo Crater, the second-brightest feature on Ceres, is at top right. In a paper published in the Dec. 10, 2015, issue the journal Nature, Dawn mission scientists identify what they believe to be diffuse hazes at both Occator and Oxo. They believe the hazes appear when the sun shines on these craters, possibly from the sublimation of ice. A typical Ceres crater with bright material that does not appear to have remaining ice is shown at bottom. The bright material in this crater and others appears to originate from mineral salts that may have once been mixed with water ice, but dried up over time, scientists wrote in the same paper. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20183

  18. Superfluid Thomas—Fermi approximation for trapped fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, E. S.; Capuzzi, P.; Szybisz, L.

    2009-02-01

    We present a generalization of fermionic fluiddynamics to the case of two trapped fermion species with a contact interaction. Within a mean field approximation, we derive coupled equations of motion for the particle densities, particle currents, and anomalous pair density. For an inhomogeneous system, the equilibrium situation with vanishing currents is described by a generalized Thomas-Fermi relation that includes the superfluid gap, together with a new nonlocal gap equation that replaces the usual BCS one. These equations are numericaly solved resorting to a local density approximation (LDA). Density and gap profiles are analyzed in terms of the scattering length, revealing that the current frame can exhibit microscopic details of quantum origin that are frequently absent in more macroscopic scenarios.

  19. Characterizing the Optical Variability of Bright Blazars: Variability-Based Selection of Fermi Active Galactic Nuclei

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-20

    within ±10◦ of the ecliptic plane and ∼200 elsewhere. SE11 extracted sources from LINEAR imaging using fixed- aperture photometry and recalibrated the...full recali- brated LINEAR catalog. Checks on the recalibrated photometry by SE11 show that the median mLINEAR − mSDSS residual per field has a...and errors from the photometry . A cut of χ2/dof > 3 leaves 188,745 objects composing the Variable LINEAR catalog we use hereafter, each typically

  20. Fermi surface of YBCO by DHVA

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.L.; Fowler, C.M.; Freeman, B.L.; Hults, W.L.; King, J.C.; Mueller, F.M.

    1991-01-01

    These proceedings demonstrate how far scientist have come in the last four years of high temperature superconductivity. Knowledge of the energy bands and Fermi surfaces from experiment has come rather late. Photoemission, first showed proof of the validity of the energy band calculations. Positron annihilation, presented by West, after a rough start, is now giving evidence of the Fermi surface. Both of these techniques involve electronic excitations and hence, although they show the Fermi surface, do not put as severe a constraint on various models for superconductivity as does the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) effect. This is a true measurement of the electronic ground state in an applied magnetic field where the frequency of oscillatory magnetization yields extremal cross-sectional areas of the Fermi surface. The authors have already reported some of their Fermi surface work at two conferences but present here discussion of several more important aspects of the work. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Cooling and thermometry of atomic Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofrio, R.

    2016-11-01

    We review the status of cooling techniques aimed at achieving the deepest quantum degeneracy for atomic Fermi gases. We first discuss some physics motivations, providing a quantitative assessment of the need for deep quantum degeneracy in relevant physics cases, such as the search for unconventional superfluid states. Attention is then focused on the most widespread technique to reach deep quantum degeneracy for Fermi systems, sympathetic cooling of Bose - Fermi mixtures, organizing the discussion according to the specific species involved. Various proposals to circumvent some of the limitations on achieving the deepest Fermi degeneracy, and their experimental realizations, are then reviewed. Finally, we discuss the extension of these techniques to optical lattices and the implementation of precision thermometry crucial to the understanding of the phase diagram of classical and quantum phase transitions in Fermi gases.

  2. CONSECUTIVE BRIGHT PULSES IN THE VELA PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Palfreyman, Jim L.; Dickey, John M.; Hotan, Claire E.; Hotan, Aidan W.; Young, Timothy G.

    2011-07-01

    We report on the discovery of consecutive bright radio pulses from the Vela pulsar, a new phenomenon that may lead to a greater understanding of the pulsar emission mechanism. This results from a total of 345 hr worth of observations of the Vela pulsar using the University of Tasmania's 26 m radio telescope to study the frequency and statistics of abnormally bright pulses and sub-pulses. The bright pulses show a tendency to appear consecutively. The observations found two groups of six consecutive bright pulses and many groups of two to five bright pulses in a row. The strong radio emission process that produces the six bright pulses lasts between 0.4 and 0.6 s. The numbers of bright pulses in sequence far exceed what would be expected if individual bright pulses were independent random events. Consecutive bright pulses must be generated by an emission process that is long lived relative to the rotation period of the neutron star.

  3. The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    ScienceCinema

    Isabelle Grenier

    2016-07-12

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008.  In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

  4. The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Isabelle Grenier

    2009-04-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008.  In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

  5. The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Grenier, Isabelle

    2009-04-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008. In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

  6. Fermi-LAT detection of the first GeV gamma-ray flare from the BL Lac object ON 246 (S3 1227+25)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutini, Sara; Gasparrini, Dario

    2015-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed for the first time on daily timescales gamma-ray outburst activity from a source positionally consistent with the bright optically peaked BL Lac object ON 246, also known as 3FGL J1230.3+2519.

  7. Fermi surface measurements of lutetium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johanson, W. R.; Crabtree, G. W.; Schmidt, F. A.

    1982-03-01

    We report de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) measurements of the Fermi surface of lutetium at temperatures down to 0.3 K and in fields up to 150 kG in the (101¯0) and (112¯0) planes. Lutetium, having a filled 4f shell, serves as a nonmagnetic prototype of the structurally similar (hcp), trivalent, heavy rare earths from Gd to Tm. No complete frequency branches were observed, indicating that there are no closed pieces of surface. We observed all but one orbit predicted by relativistic-augmented-plane wave (RAPW) calculations of Keeton and Loucks, and the data support a geometry that is in good qualitative agreement with the existence of nested open electron and hole sheets.

  8. Fermi surface measurements of lutetium

    SciTech Connect

    Johanson, W.R.; Crabtree, G.W.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1982-03-01

    We report de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) measurements of the Fermi surface of lutetium at temperatures down to 0.3 K and in fields up to 150 kG in the (1010) and (1120) planes. Lutetium, having a filled 4f shell, serves as a nonmagnetic prototype of the structurally similar (hcp), trivalent, heavy rare earths from Gd to Tm. No complete frequency branches were observed, indicating that there are no closed pieces of surface. We observed all but one orbit predicted by relativistic-augmented-plane wave (RAPW) calculations of Keeton and Loucks, and the data support a geometry that is in good qualitative agreement with the existence of nested open electron and hole sheets.

  9. Fermi surface measurements of lutetium

    SciTech Connect

    Johanson, W.R.; Crabtree, G.W.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1982-01-01

    We report de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) measurements of the Fermi surface of Lutetium at temperatures down to .3K and in fields up to 150 kG in the (1010) and (1120) planes. Lutetium, having a filled 4f shell, serves as a non-magnetic prototype of the structurally similar (hcp), trivalent, heavy rare-earths from Gd to Tm. No complete frequency branches were observed, indicating that there are no closed pieces of surface. We observed all but one orbit predicted by relativistic-augmented-plane wave (RAPW) calculations of Keeton and Loucks, and the data support a geometry that is in good qualitative agreement with the existence of nested open electron and hole sheets.

  10. Deformation quantization of fermi fields

    SciTech Connect

    Galaviz, I. Garcia-Compean, H. Przanowski, M. Turrubiates, F.J.

    2008-04-15

    Deformation quantization for any Grassmann scalar free field is described via the Weyl-Wigner-Moyal formalism. The Stratonovich-Weyl quantizer, the Moyal *-product and the Wigner functional are obtained by extending the formalism proposed recently in [I. Galaviz, H. Garcia-Compean, M. Przanowski, F.J. Turrubiates, Weyl-Wigner-Moyal Formalism for Fermi Classical Systems, arXiv:hep-th/0612245] to the fermionic systems of infinite number of degrees of freedom. In particular, this formalism is applied to quantize the Dirac free field. It is observed that the use of suitable oscillator variables facilitates considerably the procedure. The Stratonovich-Weyl quantizer, the Moyal *-product, the Wigner functional, the normal ordering operator, and finally, the Dirac propagator have been found with the use of these variables.

  11. Holographic thermalization, stability of anti-de sitter space, and the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam paradox.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Venkat; Buchel, Alex; Green, Stephen R; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L

    2014-08-15

    For a real massless scalar field in general relativity with a negative cosmological constant, we uncover a large class of spherically symmetric initial conditions that are close to anti-de Sitter space (AdS) but whose numerical evolution does not result in black hole formation. According to the AdS/conformal field theory (CFT) dictionary, these bulk solutions are dual to states of a strongly interacting boundary CFT that fail to thermalize at late times. Furthermore, as these states are not stationary, they define dynamical CFT configurations that do not equilibrate. We develop a two-time-scale perturbative formalism that captures both direct and inverse cascades of energy and agrees with our fully nonlinear evolutions in the appropriate regime. We also show that this formalism admits a large class of quasiperiodic solutions. Finally, we demonstrate a striking parallel between the dynamics of AdS and the classic Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-Tsingou problem.

  12. Holographic Thermalization, Stability of Anti-de Sitter Space, and the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Venkat; Buchel, Alex; Green, Stephen R.; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.

    2014-08-01

    For a real massless scalar field in general relativity with a negative cosmological constant, we uncover a large class of spherically symmetric initial conditions that are close to anti-de Sitter space (AdS) but whose numerical evolution does not result in black hole formation. According to the AdS/conformal field theory (CFT) dictionary, these bulk solutions are dual to states of a strongly interacting boundary CFT that fail to thermalize at late times. Furthermore, as these states are not stationary, they define dynamical CFT configurations that do not equilibrate. We develop a two-time-scale perturbative formalism that captures both direct and inverse cascades of energy and agrees with our fully nonlinear evolutions in the appropriate regime. We also show that this formalism admits a large class of quasiperiodic solutions. Finally, we demonstrate a striking parallel between the dynamics of AdS and the classic Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-Tsingou problem.

  13. Hořava-Lifshitz quantum cosmology in the presence of Chaplygin gas: Exact solutions and the late-time acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shababi, Homa; Pedram, Pouria

    In this paper, we obtain new exact solutions and first-order late-time solutions for the generalized Chaplygin gas Hořava-Lifshitz quantum cosmology with the equation-of-state p = -Aρ-α. Based on the Schutz formalism, we use the matter degree of freedom to recover the notion of time in quantum domain. This enables us to study time evolution of wave functions (wave packets) as well as their corresponding classical solutions. In particular, for α = 0, we obtain new exact classical and quantum mechanical solutions for various gravitational cases which are valid for both early and late times. For α = 1/3 and α = 1 (the standard Chaplygin gas), and up to the first-order approximation, we solve the corresponding Schrödinger-Wheeler-DeWitt equation and find the late-time solutions in the classical and quantum domains. Also, we study the accelerating behavior of solutions at the late times and we compare the results with solutions raised from general relativity.

  14. The 2-Year Checkup on 10 SNe IIn Discovered by Spitzer to Exhibit Late-Time (is greater than 100 Day) IR Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Ori Dosovitz; Chevalier, R. A.; Skrutskie, A. V.; Filippenko, A. V.; Silverman, J. M.; Ganeshalingam, M.

    2012-01-01

    Two years ago, a warm Spitzer survey of sixty-eight SNe IIn identified between the years 1998-2008 discovered 10 events with unreported late-time infrared (IR) excesses, in some cases more than 5 years post-explosion. These data nearly double the database of existing mid-IR observations of SNe IIn and offer important clues regarding the SN circumstellar.

  15. High-Brightness Injector Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lewellen, John W.

    2004-12-07

    There are many aspects to the successful conception, design, fabrication, and operation of high-brightness electron beam sources. Accurate and efficient modeling of the injector are critical to all phases of the process, from evaluating initial ideas to successful diagnosis of problems during routine operation. The basic modeling tasks will vary from design to design, according to the basic nature of the injector (dc, rf, hybrid, etc.), the type of cathode used (thermionic, photo, field emitter, etc.), and 'macro' factors such as average beam current and duty factor, as well as the usual list of desired beam properties. The injector designer must be at least aware of, if not proficient at addressing, the multitude of issues that arise from these considerations; and, as high-brightness injectors continue to move out of the laboratory, the number of such issues will continue to expand.

  16. High-brightness injector modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewellen, J. W.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2004-01-01

    There are many aspects to the successful conception, design, fabrication, and operation of high-brightness electron beam sources. Accurate and efficient modeling of the injector are critical to all phases of the process, from evaluating initial ideas to successful diagnosis of problems during routine operation. The basic modeling tasks will vary from design to design, according to the basic nature of the injector (dc, rf, hybrid, etc.), the type of cathode used (thermionic, photo, field emitter, etc.), and 'macro' factors such as average beam current and duty factor, as well as the usual list of desired beam properties. The injector designer must be at least aware of, if not proficient at addressing, the multitude of issues that arise from these considerations; and, as high-brightness injectors continue to move out of the laboratory, the number of such issues will continue to expand.

  17. Brightness-equalized quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung Jun; Zahid, Mohammad U.; Le, Phuong; Ma, Liang; Entenberg, David; Harney, Allison S.; Condeelis, John; Smith, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    As molecular labels for cells and tissues, fluorescent probes have shaped our understanding of biological structures and processes. However, their capacity for quantitative analysis is limited because photon emission rates from multicolour fluorophores are dissimilar, unstable and often unpredictable, which obscures correlations between measured fluorescence and molecular concentration. Here we introduce a new class of light-emitting quantum dots with tunable and equalized fluorescence brightness across a broad range of colours. The key feature is independent tunability of emission wavelength, extinction coefficient and quantum yield through distinct structural domains in the nanocrystal. Precise tuning eliminates a 100-fold red-to-green brightness mismatch of size-tuned quantum dots at the ensemble and single-particle levels, which substantially improves quantitative imaging accuracy in biological tissue. We anticipate that these materials engineering principles will vastly expand the optical engineering landscape of fluorescent probes, facilitate quantitative multicolour imaging in living tissue and improve colour tuning in light-emitting devices. PMID:26437175

  18. Low-brightness quantum radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2015-05-01

    One of the major scientific thrusts from recent years has been to try to harness quantum phenomena to dramatically increase the performance of a wide variety of classical information processing devices. These advances in quantum information science have had a considerable impact on the development of standoff sensors such as quantum radar. In this paper we analyze the theoretical performance of low-brightness quantum radar that uses entangled photon states. We use the detection error probability as a measure of sensing performance and the interception error probability as a measure of stealthiness. We compare the performance of quantum radar against a coherent light sensor (such as lidar) and classical radar. In particular, we restrict our analysis to the performance of low-brightness standoff sensors operating in a noisy environment. We show that, compared to the two classical standoff sensing devices, quantum radar is stealthier, more resilient to jamming, and more accurate for the detection of low reflectivity targets.

  19. Brightness-equalized quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung Jun; Zahid, Mohammad U; Le, Phuong; Ma, Liang; Entenberg, David; Harney, Allison S; Condeelis, John; Smith, Andrew M

    2015-10-05

    As molecular labels for cells and tissues, fluorescent probes have shaped our understanding of biological structures and processes. However, their capacity for quantitative analysis is limited because photon emission rates from multicolour fluorophores are dissimilar, unstable and often unpredictable, which obscures correlations between measured fluorescence and molecular concentration. Here we introduce a new class of light-emitting quantum dots with tunable and equalized fluorescence brightness across a broad range of colours. The key feature is independent tunability of emission wavelength, extinction coefficient and quantum yield through distinct structural domains in the nanocrystal. Precise tuning eliminates a 100-fold red-to-green brightness mismatch of size-tuned quantum dots at the ensemble and single-particle levels, which substantially improves quantitative imaging accuracy in biological tissue. We anticipate that these materials engineering principles will vastly expand the optical engineering landscape of fluorescent probes, facilitate quantitative multicolour imaging in living tissue and improve colour tuning in light-emitting devices.

  20. Fermi-LAT gamma ray detections of classical novae V1369 centauri 2013 and V5668 Sagittarii 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, C. C.; Jean, P.; Shore, S. N.; Stawarz, Ł.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Knödlseder, J.; Starrfield, S.; Wood, D. L.; Desiante, R.; Longo, F.; Pivato, G.; Wood, K. S.

    2016-07-27

    Here, we report the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) detections of high-energy (>100 MeV) γ-ray emission from two recent optically bright classical novae, V1369 Centauri 2013 and V5668 Sagittarii 2015. Furthermore, at early times, Fermi target-of-opportunity observations prompted by their optical discoveries provided enhanced LAT exposure that enabled the detections of γ-ray onsets beginning ~2 days after their first optical peaks. Significant γ-ray emission was found extending to 39–55 days after their initial LAT detections, with systematically fainter and longer-duration emission compared to previous γ-ray-detected classical novae. These novae were distinguished by multiple bright optical peaks that encompassed the time spans of the observed γ-rays. Finally, we discussed the γ-ray light curves and spectra of the two novae are presented along with representative hadronic and leptonic models, and comparisons with other novae detected by the LAT.

  1. Bright tunable ultraviolet squeezed light.

    PubMed

    Bell, A S; Riis, E; Ferguson, A I

    1997-04-15

    We have produced bright tunable squeezed light by second-harmonic generation in a singly resonant cavity. We have investigated the effect of input coupling and fundamental power on the squeezing. Up to 400 mW of continuous-wave mode-locked tunable squeezed light was produced at wavelengths as short as 389 nm, and more than 1.5 dB of squeezing was inferred.

  2. Iapetus Bright and Dark Terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Saturn's outermost large moon, Iapetus, has a bright, heavily cratered icy terrain and a dark terrain, as shown in this Voyager 2 image taken on August 22, 1981. Amazingly, the dark material covers precisely the side of Iapetus that leads in the direction of orbital motion around Saturn (except for the poles), whereas the bright material occurs on the trailing hemisphere and at the poles. The bright terrain is made of dirty ice, and the dark terrain is surfaced by carbonaceous molecules, according to measurements made with Earth-based telescopes. Iapetus' dark hemisphere has been likened to tar or asphalt and is so dark that no details within this terrain were visible to Voyager 2. The bright icy hemisphere, likened to dirty snow, shows many large impact craters. The closest approach by Voyager 2 to Iapetus was a relatively distant 600,000 miles, so that our best images, such as this, have a resolution of about 12 miles. The dark material is made of organic substances, probably including poisonous cyano compounds such as frozen hydrogen cyanide polymers. Though we know a little about the dark terrain's chemical nature, we do not understand its origin. Two theories have been developed, but neither is fully satisfactory--(1) the dark material may be organic dust knocked off the small neighboring satellite Phoebe and 'painted' onto the leading side of Iapetus as the dust spirals toward Saturn and Iapetus hurtles through the tenuous dust cloud, or (2) the dark material may be made of icy-cold carbonaceous 'cryovolcanic' lavas that were erupted from Iapetus' interior and then blackened by solar radiation, charged particles, and cosmic rays. A determination of the actual cause, as well as discovery of any other geologic features smaller than 12 miles across, awaits the Cassini Saturn orbiter to arrive in 2004.

  3. Iapetus Bright and Dark Terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Saturn's outermost large moon, Iapetus, has a bright, heavily cratered icy terrain and a dark terrain, as shown in this Voyager 2 image taken on August 22, 1981. Amazingly, the dark material covers precisely the side of Iapetus that leads in the direction of orbital motion around Saturn (except for the poles), whereas the bright material occurs on the trailing hemisphere and at the poles. The bright terrain is made of dirty ice, and the dark terrain is surfaced by carbonaceous molecules, according to measurements made with Earth-based telescopes. Iapetus' dark hemisphere has been likened to tar or asphalt and is so dark that no details within this terrain were visible to Voyager 2. The bright icy hemisphere, likened to dirty snow, shows many large impact craters. The closest approach by Voyager 2 to Iapetus was a relatively distant 600,000 miles, so that our best images, such as this, have a resolution of about 12 miles. The dark material is made of organic substances, probably including poisonous cyano compounds such as frozen hydrogen cyanide polymers. Though we know a little about the dark terrain's chemical nature, we do not understand its origin. Two theories have been developed, but neither is fully satisfactory--(1) the dark material may be organic dust knocked off the small neighboring satellite Phoebe and 'painted' onto the leading side of Iapetus as the dust spirals toward Saturn and Iapetus hurtles through the tenuous dust cloud, or (2) the dark material may be made of icy-cold carbonaceous 'cryovolcanic' lavas that were erupted from Iapetus' interior and then blackened by solar radiation, charged particles, and cosmic rays. A determination of the actual cause, as well as discovery of any other geologic features smaller than 12 miles across, awaits the Cassini Saturn orbiter to arrive in 2004.

  4. The First Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF) Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Stanbro, M.; Zhang, B.; Bhat, N.; Fishman, G. J.; Roberts, O.; Fitzpatrick, G.; McBreen, S.; Grove, J. E.; Chekhtman, A.

    2014-12-01

    We present summary results from the first catalog of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Space Telescope. The catalog is expected to contain about 2600 TGFs and will be released both online, to conveniently provide the community with TGF parameters, and as a publication. Since the launch of Fermi in 2008 the TGF detection sensitivity of GBM has been improved several times, both in the flight software and in ground analysis. Starting in 2010 July individual photons were downloaded for portions of the orbits, enabling an off-line search that found weaker and shorter TGFs. Since 2012 November 26 this telemetry mode has been extended to continuous coverage -- in the first year of this data mode 841 TGFs were detected. The TGF sample is reliable, with cosmic rays rejected using data both from Fermi GBM and from the Large Area Telescope on Fermi. The online catalog will include times (UTC and solar), spacecraft geographic positions, durations, count intensities and other parameters (e.g., see the Bayesian Block analysis by O. Roberts). There will be separate tables for bright TGFs detected by the flight software and Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs).

  5. LSST Site: Sky Brightness Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Jamison; Claver, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is an upcoming robotic survey telescope. At the telescope site on Cerro Pachon in Chile there are currently three photodiodes and a Canon camera with a fisheye lens, and both the photodiodes and Canon monitor the night sky continuously. The NIST-calibrated photodiodes directly measure the flux from the sky, and the sky brightness can also be obtained from the Canon images via digital aperture photometry. Organizing and combining the two data sets gives nightly information of the development of sky brightness across a swath of the electromagnetic spectrum, from blue to near infrared light, and this is useful for accurately predicting the performance of the LSST. It also provides data for models of moonlight and twilight sky brightness. Code to accomplish this organization and combination was successfully written in Python, but due to the backlog of data not all of the nights were processed by the end of the summer.Burke was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  6. Fermi detection of delayed GeV emission from the short gamma-ray burst 081024B

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.

    2010-03-03

    Here, we report on the detailed analysis of the high-energy extended emission from the short gamma-ray burst (GRB) 081024B detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Historically, this represents the first clear detection of temporal extended emission from a short GRB. Furthermore, the light curve observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor lasts approximately 0.8 s whereas the emission in the Fermi Large Area Telescope lasts for about 3 s. Evidence of longer lasting high-energy emission associated with long bursts has been already reported by previous experiments. These observations, together with the earlier reported study of the bright short GRBmore » 090510, indicate similarities in the high-energy emission of short and long GRBs and open the path to new interpretations.« less

  7. Fermi-liquid theory for unconventional superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Sauls, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    Fermi liquid theory is used to generate the Ginzburg-Landau free energy functionals for unconventional superconductors belonging to various representations. The parameters defining the GL functional depend on Fermi surface anisotropy, impurity scattering and the symmetry class of the pairing interaction. As applications the author considers the basic models for the multiple superconducting phases of UPt{sub 3}. An important prediction of the leading order Fermi liquid theory for the two-dimensional representations of the hexagonal symmetry group is that the zero-field equilibrium state exhibits spontaneously broken time-reversal symmetry.

  8. Quantum oscillations from inside the Fermi sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Hridis K.

    2017-02-01

    Quantum oscillations are conventionally understood to arise from the Fermi level; hence, they are considered to be a proof of the existence of an underlying Fermi surface. In this article we show that in certain situations quantum oscillations can also arise from inside the Fermi sea. We establish this analytically, supporting it with numerical calculations. Possible scenarios where such unusual behavior can occur are pointed out. In particular, in strongly particle-hole asymmetric insulators, models of which have been recently used in the context of the topological Kondo insulator SmB6, we show that the oscillations arise from inside the filled band, and are not related to the gap.

  9. Quantum chaos on a critical Fermi surface.

    PubMed

    Patel, Aavishkar A; Sachdev, Subir

    2017-02-21

    We compute parameters characterizing many-body quantum chaos for a critical Fermi surface without quasiparticle excitations. We examine a theory of [Formula: see text] species of fermions at nonzero density coupled to a [Formula: see text] gauge field in two spatial dimensions and determine the Lyapunov rate and the butterfly velocity in an extended random-phase approximation. The thermal diffusivity is found to be universally related to these chaos parameters; i.e., the relationship is independent of [Formula: see text], the gauge-coupling constant, the Fermi velocity, the Fermi surface curvature, and high-energy details.

  10. Quantum chaos on a critical Fermi surface

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Aavishkar A.

    2017-01-01

    We compute parameters characterizing many-body quantum chaos for a critical Fermi surface without quasiparticle excitations. We examine a theory of N species of fermions at nonzero density coupled to a U(1) gauge field in two spatial dimensions and determine the Lyapunov rate and the butterfly velocity in an extended random-phase approximation. The thermal diffusivity is found to be universally related to these chaos parameters; i.e., the relationship is independent of N, the gauge-coupling constant, the Fermi velocity, the Fermi surface curvature, and high-energy details. PMID:28174270

  11. Quantum Mechanical Models Of The Fermi Shuttle

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, James

    2011-06-01

    The Fermi shuttle is a mechanism in which high energy electrons are produced in an atomic collision by multiple collisions with a target and a projectile atom. It is normally explained purely classically in terms of the electron's orbits prescribed in the collision. Common calculations to predict the Fermi shuttle use semi-classical methods, but these methods still rely on classical orbits. In reality such collisions belong to the realm of quantum mechanics, however. In this paper we discuss several purely quantum mechanical calculations which can produce the Fermi shuttle. Being quantum mechanical in nature, these calculations produce these features by wave interference, rather than by classical orbits.

  12. Identifying Unidentified Fermi-LAT Objects (UFOs) at High-Latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Chi Teddy

    2009-09-01

    We propose a Chandra study of 8 high Galactic latitude gamma-ray sources in the Fermi-LAT bright source list. These sources are currently unidentified, i.e., they are not clearly associated with established classes of gamma-ray emitters like blazars and pulsars. The proposed observations will determine the basic properties (fluxes, positions, hardness ratio/spectra) of all X-ray sources down to a 0.3-10 keV flux limit of 1.5e-14 erg/cm2/s within the Fermi-LAT localization circles. This will enable further follow-up at other wavelengths, with the ultimate goal to reveal the nature of these enigmatic gamma-ray sources.

  13. Fermi large area telescope observations of blazar 3C 279 occultations by the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Chiang, J.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ciprini, S.; Cecchi, C.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheung, C. C. E-mail: phdmitry@stanford.edu; and others

    2014-04-01

    Observations of occultations of bright γ-ray sources by the Sun may reveal predicted pair halos around blazars and/or new physics, such as, e.g., hypothetical light dark matter particles—axions. We use Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope (Fermi) data to analyze four occultations of blazar 3C 279 by the Sun on October 8 each year from 2008 to 2011. A combined analysis of the observations of these occultations allows a point-like source at the position of 3C 279 to be detected with significance of ≈3σ, but does not reveal any significant excess over the flux expected from the quiescent Sun. The likelihood ratio test rules out complete transparency of the Sun to the blazar γ-ray emission at a 3σ confidence level.

  14. Fermi-LAT Gamma-ray Bursts and Insight from Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith L.

    2011-01-01

    A new revolution in GRB observation and theory has begun over the last 3 years since the launch of the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope. The new window into high energy gamma-rays opened by the Fermi-LAT is providing insight into prompt emission mechanisms and possibly also afterglow physics. The LAT detected GRBs appear to be a new unique subset of extremely energetic and bright bursts. In this talk I will discuss the context and recent discoveries from these LAT GRBs and the large database of broadband observations collected by Swift over the last 7 years and how through comparisons between the Swift, GBM, and LAT GRB samples, we can learn about the unique characteristics and relationships between each population.

  15. High-brightness rf linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The issue of high brightness and its ramifications in linacs driven by radio-frequency fields is discussed. A history of the RF linacs is reviewed briefly. Some current applications are then examined that are driving progress in RF linacs. The physics affecting the brightness of RF linacs is then discussed, followed by the economic feasibility of higher brightness machines. (LEW)

  16. Fermi Proves Supernova Remnants Make Cosmic Rays

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The husks of exploded stars produce some of the fastest particles in the cosmos. New findings by NASA's Fermi show that two supernova remnants accelerate protons to near the speed of light. The pro...

  17. Finite element schemes for Fermi equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadzadeh, M.; Beilina, L.; Naseer, M.; Standar, C.

    2017-07-01

    A priori error estimates are derived for the streamline diffusion (SD) finite element methods for the Fermi pencil-beam equation. Two-dimensional numerical examples confirm our theoretical investigations.

  18. Fermi: physicist with a capital F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobal, Marina

    2016-12-01

    Enrico Fermi - one of the great physicists of the 21st century - was a beacon for every Italian student of physics. This is wonderfully captured in The Pope of Physics by Gino Segrè and Bettina Hoerlin.

  19. Fermi Sees Antimatter-Hurling Thunderstorms

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected beams of antimatter launched by thunderstorms. Acting like enormous particle accelerators, the storms can emit gamma-ray flashes, called TGFs, an...

  20. Fermi discovers giant bubbles in Milky Way

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Using data from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, scientists have recently discovered a gigantic, mysterious structure in our galaxy. This feature looks like a pair of bubbles extending above...

  1. Fermi Surface of the Most Dilute Superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiao; Zhu, Zengwei; Fauqué, Benoît; Behnia, Kamran

    2013-04-01

    The origin of superconductivity in bulk SrTiO3 is a mystery since the nonmonotonous variation of the critical transition with carrier concentration defies the expectations of the crudest version of the BCS theory. Here, employing the Nernst effect, an extremely sensitive probe of tiny bulk Fermi surfaces, we show that, down to concentrations as low as 5.5×1017cm-3, the system has both a sharp Fermi surface and a superconducting ground state. The most dilute superconductor currently known therefore has a metallic normal state with a Fermi energy as little as 1.1 meV on top of a band gap as large as 3 eV. The occurrence of a superconducting instability in an extremely small, single-component, and barely anisotropic Fermi surface implies strong constraints for the identification of the pairing mechanism.

  2. Fermi's Conundrum: Proliferation and Closed Societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teller, Wendy; Westfall, Catherine

    2007-04-01

    On January 1, 1946 Emily Taft Douglas, a freshman Representative at Large for Illinois, sent a letter to Enrico Fermi. She wanted to know whether, if atomic energy was used for peaceful purposes, it might be possible to clandestinely divert some material for bombs. Douglas first learned about the bomb not quite five months before when Hiroshima was bombed. Even though she was not a scientist she identified a key problem of the nuclear age. Fermi responded with requirements to allow peaceful uses of atomic energy and still outlaw nuclear weapons. First, free interchange of information between people was required, and second, people who reported possible violations had to be protected. Fermi had lived in Mussolini's Italy and worked under the war time secrecy restrictions of the Manhattan Project. He was not optimistic that these conditions could be met. This paper discusses how Douglas came to recognize the proliferation issue and what led Fermi to his solution and his pessimism about its practicality.

  3. A fast algorithm for finding point sources in the Fermi data stream: FermiFAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asvathaman, Asha; Omand, Conor; Barton, Alistair; Heyl, Jeremy S.

    2017-04-01

    We present a new and efficient algorithm for finding point sources in the photon event data stream from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, FermiFAST. The key advantage of FermiFAST is that it constructs a catalogue of potential sources very fast by arranging the photon data in a hierarchical data structure. Using this structure, FermiFAST rapidly finds the photons that could have originated from a potential gamma-ray source. It calculates a likelihood ratio for the contribution of the potential source using the angular distribution of the photons within the region of interest. It can find within a few minutes the most significant half of the Fermi Third Point Source catalogue (3FGL) with nearly 80 per cent purity from the 4 yr of data used to construct the catalogue. If a higher purity sample is desirable, one can achieve a sample that includes the most significant third of the Fermi 3FGL with only 5 per cent of the sources unassociated with Fermi sources. Outside the Galactic plane, all but eight of the 580 FermiFAST detections are associated with 3FGL sources. And of these eight, six yield significant detections of greater than 5σ when a further binned likelihood analysis is performed. This software allows for rapid exploration of the Fermi data, simulation of the source detection to calculate the selection function of various sources and the errors in the obtained parameters of the sources detected.

  4. BKGE: Fermi-LAT Background Estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileiou, Vlasios

    2014-11-01

    The Fermi-LAT Background Estimator (BKGE) is a publicly available open-source tool that can estimate the expected background of the Fermi-LAT for any observational conguration and duration. It produces results in the form of text files, ROOT files, gtlike source-model files (for LAT maximum likelihood analyses), and PHA I/II FITS files (for RMFit/XSpec spectral fitting analyses). Its core is written in C++ and its user interface in Python.

  5. First Light on GRBs with Fermi

    SciTech Connect

    Dermer, Charles D.

    2010-10-15

    Fermi LAT (Large Area Telescope) and GBM (Gamma ray Burst Monitor) observations of GRBs are briefly reviewed, keeping in mind EGRET expectations. Using {gamma}{gamma} constraints on outflow Lorentz factors, leptonic models are pitted against hadronic models, and found to be energetically favored. Interpretation of the Fermi data on GRBs helps establish whether GRBs accelerate cosmic rays, including those reaching {approx_equal}10{sup 20} eV.

  6. Fermi Sees the Gamma Ray Sky

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    This view of the gamma-ray sky constructed from one year of Fermi LAT observations is the best view of the extreme universe to date. The map shows the rate at which the LAT detects gamma rays with energies above 300 million electron volts -- about 120 million times the energy of visible light -- from different sky directions. Brighter colors equal higher rates. Credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration Full story: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/GLAST/news/first_year.html

  7. Understanding and Using the Fermi Science Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asercion, Joseph; Fermi Science Support Center

    2017-01-01

    The Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC) provides information, documentation, and tools for the analysis of Fermi science data, including both the Large-Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Source and binary versions of the Fermi Science Tools can be downloaded from the FSSC website, and are supported on multiple platforms. An overview document, the Cicerone, provides details of the Fermi mission, the science instruments and their response functions, the science data preparation and analysis process, and interpretation of the results. Analysis Threads and a reference manual available on the FSSC website provide the user with step-by-step instructions for many different types of data analysis: point source analysis - generating maps, spectra, and light curves, pulsar timing analysis, source identification, and the use of python for scripting customized analysis chains. We present an overview of the structure of the Fermi science tools and documentation, and how to acquire them. We also provide examples of standard analyses, including tips and tricks for improving Fermi science analysis.

  8. Understanding and Using the Fermi Science Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asercion, Joseph; Fermi Science Support Center Team

    2016-01-01

    The Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC) provides information, documentation, and tools for the analysis of Fermi science data, including both the Large-Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Source and binary versions of the Fermi Science Tools can be downloaded from the FSSC website, and are supported on multiple platforms. An overview document, the Cicerone, provides details of the Fermi mission, the science instruments and their response functions, the science data preparation and analysis process, and interpretation of the results. Analysis Threads and a reference manual available on the FSSC website provide the user with step-by-step instructions for many different types of data analysis: point source analysis - generating maps, spectra, and light curves, pulsar timing analysis, source identification, and the use of python for scripting customized analysis chains. We present an overview of the structure of the Fermi science tools and documentation, and how to acquire them. We also provide examples of standard analyses, including tips and tricks for improving Fermi science analysis.

  9. Photometric monitoring of bright supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, D. Yu.; Pavlyuk, N. N.; Volkov, I. M.; Shugarov, S. Yu.

    2014-03-01

    The program of CCD photometric monitoring of bright supernovae (SNe) is carried out at 0.4 — 1.0 meter telescopes of the Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and Stará Lesná Observatory since 1998. We have observed more than 250 SNe of different types. We present the results of observations of SNe Ia 2003du, 2009nr and 2011fe, type IIb SNe 2008ax, 2011dh, type II SNe 2004ek and 2005kd and discuss physical parameters of the explosions. %

  10. Exceptionally bright, compact starburst nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Margon, B.; Anderson, S.F.; Mateo, M.; Fich, M.; Massey, P.

    1988-11-01

    Observations are reported of a remarkably bright (V about 13) starburst nucleus, 0833 + 652, which has been detected at radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray wavelengths. Despite an observed flux at each of these wavelengths which is comparable to that of NGC 7714, often considered the 'prototypical' example of the starburst phenomenon, 0833 + 652 appears to be a previously uncataloged object. Its ease of detectability throughout the electromagnetic spectrum should make it useful for a variety of problems in the study of compact emission-line galaxies. 30 references.

  11. High brightness beams and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the present research on attaining intense bright electron beams. Thermionic systems are briefly covered. Recent and past results from the photoinjector programs are given. The performance advantages and difficulties presently faced by researchers using photoinjectors is discussed. The progress that has been made in photocathode materials, both in lifetime and quantum efficiency, is covered. Finally, a discussion of emittance measurements of photoinjector systems and how the measurement is complicated by the non-thermal nature of the electron beam is presented.

  12. Fermi-LAT Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Gehrels, Cornelis

    2013-01-01

    The observations of the exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A by the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provide constraints on the nature of these unique astrophysical sources. GRB 130427A had the largest fluence, highest-energy photon (95 GeV), longest gamma-ray duration (20 hours), and one of the largest isotropic energy releases ever observed from a GRB. Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the nonthermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock.

  13. Swift and Fermi observations of the early afterglow of the short gamma-ray burst 090510

    SciTech Connect

    De Pasquale, M.

    2010-01-14

    Here, we present the observations of GRB090510 performed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope and the Swift observatory. In a GeV range, we detected a bright, short burst that shows an extended emission. Furthermore, its optical emission initially rises, a feature so far observed only in long bursts, while the X-ray flux shows an initial shallow decrease, followed by a steeper decay. This exceptional behavior enables us to investigate the physical properties of the gamma-ray burst outflow, poorly known in short bursts. Here, we discuss internal and external shock models for the broadband energy emission of this object.

  14. Fermi-LAT Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A

    DOE PAGES

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; ...

    2013-11-21

    The Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provide constraints on the nature of these unique astrophysical sources using the observations of the exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A. We found that GRB 130427A had the largest fluence, highest-energy photon (95 GeV), longest γ-ray duration (20 hours), and one of the largest isotropic energy releases ever observed from a GRB. Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the nonthermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock.

  15. FERMI Observations of Gamma -Ray Emission From the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwoo, W. B.; Baldini, I.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Gehrels, N.; Hays, E.; Thompson, D. J.; McEnery, J. E.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the detection of high-energy ? -ray emission from the Moon during the first 24 months of observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). This emission comes from particle cascades produced by cosmicray (CR) nuclei and electrons interacting with the lunar surface. The differential spectrum of the Moon is soft and can be described as a log-parabolic function with an effective cutoff at 2-3 GeV, while the average integral flux measured with the LAT from the beginning of observations in 2008 August to the end of 2010 August is F(greater than100 MeV) = (1.04 plus or minus 0.01 [statistical error] plus or minus 0.1 [systematic error]) × 10(sup -6) cm(sup -2) s(sup -1). This flux is about a factor 2-3 higher than that observed between 1991 and 1994 by the EGRET experiment on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, F(greater than100 MeV)˜5×10(sup -7) cm(sup -2) s(sup -1), when solar activity was relatively high. The higher gamma -ray flux measured by Fermi is consistent with the deep solar minimum conditions during the first 24 months of the mission, which reduced effects of heliospheric modulation, and thus increased the heliospheric flux of Galactic CRs. A detailed comparison of the light curve with McMurdo Neutron Monitor rates suggests a correlation of the trends. The Moon and the Sun are so far the only known bright emitters of gamma-rays with fast celestial motion. Their paths across the sky are projected onto the Galactic center and high Galactic latitudes as well as onto other areas crowded with high-energy gamma-ray sources. Analysis of the lunar and solar emission may thus be important for studies of weak and transient sources near the ecliptic.

  16. On the Evolution of the Late-time Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of the Outburst of the Recurrent Nova RS Ophiuchi (2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, V. A. R. M.; Bode, M. F.; Williams, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    We modelled the late-time Hubble Space Telescope imaging of RS Ophiuchi with models from Ribeiro et al. (2009), which at the time due to the unknown availability of simultaneous ground-based spectroscopy left some open questions as to the evolution of the expanding nebular from the early to the late time observations. Initial emission line identifications suggest that no forbidden lines are present in the spectra and that the emission lines arising in the region of the WFPC2 F502N images are due to N II and He I + Fe II. The best model fit to the spectrum is one where the outer faster moving material expands linearly with time while the inner over-density material either suffered some deceleration or did not change in physical size. The origin of this inner over-density requires further exploration.

  17. Upgrading Fermi Without Traveling to Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has received an upgrade that increased its sensitivity by a whopping 40% and nobody had to travel to space to make it happen! The difference instead stems from remarkable improvement to the software used to analyze Fermi-LATs data, and it has resulted in a new high-energy map of our sky.Animation (click to watch!) comparing the Pass 7 to the Pass 8 Fermi-LAT analysis, in a region in the constellation Carina. Pass 8 provides more accurate directions for incoming gamma rays, so more of them fall closer to their sources, creating taller spikes and a sharper image. [NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration]Pass 8Fermi-LAT has been surveying the whole sky since August 2008. It detects gamma-ray photons by converting them into electron-positron pairs and tracking the paths of these charged particles. But differentiating this signal from the charged cosmic rays that also pass through the detector with a flux that can be 10,000 times larger! is a challenging process. Making this distinction and rebuilding the path of the original gamma ray relies on complex analysis software.Pass 8 is a complete reprocessing of all data collected by Fermi-LAT. The software has gone through many revisions before now, but this is the first revision that has taken into account all of the experience that the Fermi team has gained operating the LAT in its orbital environment.The improvements made in Pass 8 include better background rejection of misclassified charged particles, improvements to the point spread function and effective area of the detector, and an extension of the effective energy range from below 100 MeV to beyond a few hundred GeV. The changes made in Pass 8 have increased the sensitivity of Fermi-LAT by an astonishing 40%.Map of the High-Energy SkySky map of the sources in the 2FHL catalog, classified by their most likely association. Click for a better look! [Ackermann et al. 2016]The first result from the

  18. Limb displacement and brightness seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emilio, Marcelo; Cunnyngham, Ian; Kuhn, Jeff; Mehret, Leandro; Bush, Rock; Scholl, Isabelle

    2015-08-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) abord the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has been used to obtain the most sensitive spectrally resolved observation of individual p-modes at the extreme solar limb. Such oscillation observations of the limb displacement and brightness for some spatial and temporal regimes are even competitive in signal-to-noise to full-disk doppler measurements of the p-mode spectrum. Limb measurements of 5-min p-modes, while having many similarities to full-disk doppler observations, have significantly different sensitivities to the solar rotation and the 5-min mode solar atmospheric structure. These may provide information about the solar structure which is complementary to full-disk measurements. In this work we present results from Individual spherical harmonic p-modes that were detected around solar limb with amplitudes at the micro-arcsecond level.

  19. Bright diode laser light source.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Erkki; Hernberg, Rolf

    2006-05-20

    A simplified multiwavelength prototype of an axially symmetric diode laser device based on stacks made of single emitters has been made, and the performance of the device has been demonstrated experimentally. The results verify that kilowatt-level light power can be focused into a circular spot with a 1/e2 diameter of 360 microm, a focal length of 100 mm, and a numerical aperture of 0.24, thus producing an average power density in excess of 10 kW/mm2 and a brightness of 6x10(10) W m-2 sr-1. The experiments also predict that it will be possible to increase these values to more than 60 kW/mm2 and 3x10(11) W m-2 sr-1.

  20. How Bright Can Supernovae Get?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Supernovae enormous explosions associated with the end of a stars life come in a variety of types with different origins. A new study has examined how the brightest supernovae in the Universe are produced, and what limits might be set on their brightness.Ultra-Luminous ObservationsRecent observations have revealed many ultra-luminous supernovae, which haveenergies that challenge our abilities to explain them usingcurrent supernova models. An especially extreme example is the 2015 discovery of the supernova ASASSN-15lh, which shone with a peak luminosity of ~2*1045 erg/s, nearly a trillion times brighter than the Sun. ASASSN-15lh radiated a whopping ~2*1052 erg in the first four months after its detection.How could a supernova that bright be produced? To explore the answer to that question, Tuguldur Sukhbold and Stan Woosley at University of California, Santa Cruz, have examined the different sources that could produce supernovae and calculated upper limits on the potential luminosities ofeach of these supernova varieties.Explosive ModelsSukhbold and Woosley explore multiple different models for core-collapse supernova explosions, including:Prompt explosionA stars core collapses and immediately explodes.Pair instabilityElectron/positron pair production at a massive stars center leads to core collapse. For high masses, radioactivity can contribute to delayed energy output.Colliding shellsPreviously expelled shells of material around a star collide after the initial explosion, providing additional energy release.MagnetarThe collapsing star forms a magnetar a rapidly rotating neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field at its core, which then dumps energy into the supernova ejecta, further brightening the explosion.They then apply these models to different types of stars.Setting the LimitThe authors show that the light curve of ASASSN-15lh (plotted in orange) can be described by a model (black curve) in which a magnetar with an initial spin period of 0.7 ms

  1. Understanding and Using the Fermi Science Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asercion, Joseph; Fermi Science Support Center

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC) provides information, documentation, and tools for the analysis of Fermi science data, including both the Large-Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Source and binary versions of the Fermi Science Tools can be downloaded from the FSSC website, and are supported on multiple platforms. An overview document, the Cicerone, provides details of the Fermi mission, the science instruments and their response functions, the science data preparation and analysis process, and interpretation of the results. Analysis Threads provide the user with step-by-step instructions for many different types of data analysis: point source analysis - generating maps, spectra, and light curves, pulsar timing analysis, source identification, and the use of python for scripting customized analysis chains. The reference manual gives details of the options available for each tool. We present an overview of the structure of the Fermi science tools and documentation, and how to acquire them. We also provide information on recent updates incorporated in the Science Tools as well as upcoming changes that will be included in the upcoming release of the Science Tools in early 2015.

  2. Night sky brightness measurement at PERMATApintar observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhar, A. D.; Gopir, G.; Kamil, W. M. A. Wan Mohd; Mohamad, N. S.; Azmi, N. Che

    2016-11-01

    One of the quality parameter of an astronomical site testing is sky brightness. We measure the night sky brightness over PERMATApintar Observatory to obtain the first preliminary sky brightness reading. The measurement is done by using an Unihedron Sky Quality Meter (SQM-LU) with a position pointing zenith. Six measurements have been done during the period of January to March 2016. The measurement is taken between approximately 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. on each of the night. The best (darken) night sky brightness reading is 19.54 mag/arcsec2 obtained on March 11th, 2016. The preliminary average reading of sky brightness is 17.20 mag/arcsec2. Comparison with previous similar measurement for the same type of area (suburban area) shows that our data is within the range of the sky brightness for suburban area, which is 19.5 to 20.7 mag/arcsec2.

  3. Static Magnetic Response of Non-Fermi-Liquid Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing-Yuan

    2017-09-01

    We consider the response of the density of a fermion ensemble to an applied weak static magnetic field. It is known that, for a noninteracting Fermi gas, this response is fully characterized by the Fermi volume and the Berry curvature on the Fermi surface. Here we show the same result holds for interacting fermions, including a Fermi liquid and a non-Fermi liquid, to all orders in perturbation theory. Our result relies only on the assumption of a well-defined Fermi surface and the general analytic properties of quantum field theory, and is completely model independent.

  4. Quantum communication with macroscopically bright nonclassical states.

    PubMed

    Usenko, Vladyslav C; Ruppert, Laszlo; Filip, Radim

    2015-11-30

    We analyze homodyne detection of macroscopically bright multimode nonclassical states of light and propose their application in quantum communication. We observe that the homodyne detection is sensitive to a mode-matching of the bright light to the highly intense local oscillator. Unmatched bright modes of light result in additional noise which technically limits detection of Gaussian entanglement at macroscopic level. When the mode-matching is sufficient, we show that multimode quantum key distribution with bright beams is feasible. It finally merges the quantum communication with classical optical technology of visible beams of light.

  5. Quantum chaos on a critical Fermi surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Aavishkar A.; Sachdev, Subir

    2017-02-01

    We compute parameters characterizing many-body quantum chaos for a critical Fermi surface without quasiparticle excitations. We examine a theory of NN species of fermions at nonzero density coupled to a U(1)U(1) gauge field in two spatial dimensions and determine the Lyapunov rate and the butterfly velocity in an extended random-phase approximation. The thermal diffusivity is found to be universally related to these chaos parameters; i.e., the relationship is independent of NN, the gauge-coupling constant, the Fermi velocity, the Fermi surface curvature, and high-energy details.

  6. Topology of Fermi surfaces and anomaly inflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adem, Alejandro; Camarena, Omar Antolín; Semenoff, Gordon W.; Sheinbaum, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    We derive a rigorous classification of topologically stable Fermi surfaces of non-interacting, discrete translation-invariant systems from electronic band theory, adiabatic evolution and their topological interpretations. For systems on an infinite crystal it is shown that there can only be topologically unstable Fermi surfaces. For systems on a half- space and with a gapped bulk, our derivation naturally yields a K -theory classification. Given the d - 1-dimensional surface Brillouin zone X s of a d-dimensional half-space, our result implies that different classes of globally stable Fermi surfaces belong in K -1 (Xs) for systems with only discrete translation-invariance. This result has a chiral anomaly inflow interpretation, as it reduces to the spectral flow for d = 2. Through equivariant homotopy methods we extend these results for symmetry classes AI, AII, C and D and discuss their corresponding anomaly inflow interpretation.

  7. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, T. A.; Staar, P.; Mishra, V.; Chatterjee, U.; Campuzano, J. C.; Scalapino, D. J.

    2016-06-01

    In the traditional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and -k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. Here we report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. In contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin-fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability.

  8. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dave; McEnery, Julie

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Gamma Ray Astronomy as enhanced by the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope and Radio Astronomy as a synergistic relationship. Gamma rays often represent a significant part of the energy budget of a source; therefore, gamma-ray studies can be critical to understanding physical processes in such sources. Radio observations offer timing and spatial resolutions vastly superior to anything possible with gamma-ray telescopes; therefore radio is often the key to understanding source structure. Gamma-ray and radio observations can complement each other, making a great team. It reviews the Fermi Guest Investigator (GI) program, and calls for more cooperative work that involves Fermi and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a system of ten radio telescopes.

  9. Renormalization group flow for noncommutative Fermi liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Jimenez, Sendic; Garcia-Compean, Hugo; Wu Yongshi

    2011-06-15

    Some recent studies of the AdS/CFT correspondence for condensed matter systems involve the Fermi liquid theory as a boundary field theory. Adding B-flux to the boundary D-branes leads in a certain limit to the noncommutative Fermi liquid, which calls for a field theory description of its critical behavior. As a preliminary step to more general consideration, the modification of the Landau's Fermi liquid theory due to noncommutativity of spatial coordinates is studied in this paper. We carry out the renormalization of interactions at tree level and one loop in a weakly coupled fermion system in two spatial dimensions. Channels ZS, ZS' and BCS are discussed in detail. It is shown that while the Gaussian fixed-point remains unchanged, the BCS instability is modified due to the space noncommutativity.

  10. Pseudogap-generated a coexistence of Fermi arcs and Fermi pockets in cuprate superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huaisong; Gao, Deheng; Feng, Shiping

    2017-03-01

    One of the most intriguing puzzle is why there is a coexistence of Fermi arcs and Fermi pockets in the pseudogap phase of cuprate superconductors? This puzzle is calling for an explanation. Based on the t - J model in the fermion-spin representation, the coexistence of the Fermi arcs and Fermi pockets in cuprate superconductors is studied by taking into account the pseudogap effect. It is shown that the pseudogap induces an energy band splitting, and then the poles of the electron Green's function at zero energy form two contours in momentum space, however, the electron spectral weight on these two contours around the antinodal region is gapped out by the pseudogap, leaving behind the low-energy electron spectral weight only located at the disconnected segments around the nodal region. In particular, the tips of these disconnected segments converge on the hot spots to form the closed Fermi pockets, generating a coexistence of the Fermi arcs and Fermi pockets. Moreover, the single-particle coherent weight is directly related to the pseudogap, and grows linearly with doping. The calculated result of the overall dispersion of the electron excitations is in qualitative agreement with the experimental data. The theory also predicts that the pseudogap-induced peak-dip-hump structure in the electron spectrum is absent from the hot-spot directions.

  11. Fermi-Walker transport and Thomas precession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor Lambare, Justo

    2017-07-01

    An exact derivation of the Thomas precession formula is presented based on the Fermi-Walker transport equation. Given that the Thomas precession effect is not a particularly intuitive phenomenon, such that when discovered in 1925 it took by surprise even experts in relativity theory, Einstein included, an alternative perspective can be useful at an intermediate level for physics students. The existing literature linking the Thomas precession to Fermi-Walker transport use geometric algebra as mathematical tool. Here the mathematics is kept within the limits of the usual vector and tensor algebra commonly used in special relativity theory at a level appropriate for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students.

  12. Information-driven societies and Fermi's paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampton, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Fermi's paradox is founded on the idea that one or more Galactic extraterrestrial civilizations (ETCs) existed long ago and sustained exploration for millions of years, but in spite of their advanced knowledge, they could not find a way to explore the Galaxy other than with fleets of starships or self replicating probes. Here, I question this second assumption: if advanced technology generally allows long-distance remote sensing, and if ETCs were motivated by gaining information rather than conquest or commerce, then such voyages would be unnecessary, thereby resolving Fermi's paradox.

  13. Supernova Remnants with Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caragiulo, M.; Di Venere, L.

    2017-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on-board the Fermi satellite, proved to be, after 8 years of data taking, an excellent instrument to detect and observe Supernova Remnants (SNRs) in a range of energies running from few hundred MeV up to few hundred GeV. It provides essential information on physical processes that occur at the source, involving both accelerated leptons and hadrons, in order to understand the mechanisms responsible for the primary Cosmic Ray (CR) acceleration. We show the latest results in the observation of Galactic SNRs by Fermi-LAT.

  14. Fermi Spots a Record Flare from Blazar

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-10

    Blazar 3C 279's historic gamma-ray flare can be seen in this image from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on NASA's Fermi satellite. Gamma rays with energies from 100 million to 100 billion electron volts (eV) are shown; for comparison, visible light has energies between 2 and 3 eV. The image spans 150 degrees, is shown in a stereographic projection, and represents an exposure from June 11 at 00:28 UT to June 17 at 08:17 UT. Credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration

  15. Adaptive superconductivity on a reconstructed Fermi surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voo, Khee-Kyun

    2017-10-01

    This paper discusses the adaptation of a superconducting order to a reconstructed Fermi surface (FS), in the ground state of a t-J model for a hole doped two-dimensional square lattice. It is found that while a nonmagnetic ground state always has a dx2-y2 wave superconducting order, an antiferromagnetic ground state that has a FS destructed at the dx2-y2 wave antinodal regions may disfavor a dx2-y2 wave superconducting order. The superconductivity may adapt to the remnant FS by spontaneously reducing its symmetry, and these adapted superconducting states have fully gapped Fermi levels. Relevance with the underdoped superconducting cuprates is discussed.

  16. MASTER: OT detection during Fermi trigger inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E.; Lipunov, V.; Buckley, D.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tiurina, N.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Kornilov, V.; Chazov, V.; Vlasenko, D.; Vladimirov, V.; Gress, O.; Ivanov, K.; Potter, S.; Gabovich, A.

    2016-11-01

    During inspection of Fermi trigger 501261070 ( (Ra,Dec)=47.190,-47.210; GRB_ERROR_radius=3.27deg, GRB_TIME=2016/11/19 15:11:06.40UT http://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/other/501261070.fermi ) MASTER-SAAO auto-detection system ( Lipunov et al., "MASTER Global Robotic Net", Advances in Astronomy, 2010, 30L ) discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 03h 22m 52.70s -48d 29m 10.9s on 2016-11-19 21:17:17.878UT with unfiltered m_OT=17.8 (mlim=19.7).

  17. The discovery of new AGN candidates within the field of Fermi unassociated γ-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujinaga, Yoshitaka; Niinuma, Kotaro; Kimura, Atsushi; Fujisawa, Kenta; Oyama, Tomoaki; Mizuno, Syota; Kono, Yusuke; Takemura, Shinji; Sawada-Satoh, Satoko; Akutagawa, Kengo; Sugiyama, Koichiro; Motogi, Kazuhito; Fukuzaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we report on the discovery of 26 new radio sources located within positional error range of unassociated γ-ray sources listed in the Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog (2FGL catalog) by very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations. To search for new γ-ray AGN candidates, we conducted e-VLBI observations for 845 radio sources located in the field of 149 Fermi unassociated γ-ray sources at high galactic latitude, using the Japanese VLBI Network (JVN) at 8.4 GHz with a noise level of approximately 2 mJy. As a result of our JVN observations, we detected 29 VLBI sources having a brightness temperature of TB > 106 K within positional error of 28 γ-ray sources in the 2FGL catalog. These high brightness temperatures imply that the newly detected sources are possibly GeV γ-ray AGNs, such as most of 2FGL sources, which have already been classified as AGNs. Also, precise radio coordinates make it possible to identify the multiwavelength counterparts to the newly detected VLBI sources. Their color-color diagrams derived from Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer photometric data of these sources imply that eight out of all sources we detected would be classified as γ-ray blazars.

  18. SEARCHES FOR MILLISECOND PULSAR CANDIDATES AMONG THE UNIDENTIFIED FERMI OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, C. Y.; Park, S. M.; Hu, C. P.; Lin, L. C. C.; Li, K. L.; Kong, A. K. H.; Jin, Ruolan; Yen, T.-C.; Tam, P. H. T.; Takata, J.; Cheng, K. S.; Kim, Chunglee

    2015-08-10

    Here we report the results of searching millisecond pulsar (MSP) candidates from the Fermi LAT second source catalog (2FGL). Seven unassociated γ-ray sources in this catalog are identified as promising MSP candidates based on their γ-ray properties. Through the X-ray analysis, we have detected possible X-ray counterparts, localized to an arcsecond accuracy. We have systematically estimated their X-ray fluxes and compared them with the corresponding γ-ray fluxes. The X-ray to γ-ray flux ratios for 2FGL J1653.6-0159 and 2FGL J1946.4-5402 are comparable with the typical value for pulsars. For 2FGL J1625.2-0020, 2FGL J1653.6-0159, and 2FGL J1946.4-5402, their candidate X-ray counterparts are bright enough to perform a detailed spectral and temporal analysis to discriminate their thermal/non-thermal nature and search for the periodic signal. We have also searched for possible optical/IR counterparts at the X-ray positions. For the optical/IR source coincident with the brightest X-ray object associated with 2FGL J1120.0-2204, its spectral energy distribution is comparable with a late-type star. Evidence for the variability has also been found by examining its optical light curve. All the aforementioned 2FGL sources resemble a pulsar in one or more aspects, making them promising targets for follow-up investigations.

  19. TIME-DEPENDENT STOCHASTIC ACCELERATION MODEL FOR FERMI BUBBLES

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Kento; Asano, Katsuaki; Terasawa, Toshio E-mail: asanok@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2015-12-01

    We study stochastic acceleration models for the Fermi bubbles. Turbulence is excited just behind the shock front via Kelvin–Helmholtz, Rayleigh–Taylor, or Richtmyer–Meshkov instabilities, and plasma particles are continuously accelerated by the interaction with the turbulence. The turbulence gradually decays as it goes away from the shock fronts. Adopting a phenomenological model for the stochastic acceleration, we explicitly solve the temporal evolution of the particle energy distribution in the turbulence. Our results show that the spatial distribution of high-energy particles is different from those for a steady solution. We also show that the contribution of electrons that escaped from the acceleration regions significantly softens the photon spectrum. The photon spectrum and surface brightness profile are reproduced by our models. If the escape efficiency is very high, the radio flux from the escaped low-energy electrons can be comparable to that of the WMAP haze. We also demonstrate hadronic models with the stochastic acceleration, but they are unlikely in the viewpoint of the energy budget.

  20. Fermi Observations of short-hard GRB 090510

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Masanori; Fermi LAT Collaboration; Fermi GBM Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    GRB 090510 is a bright, short-hard Gamma-ray Burst (GRB), which triggered both Large Area Telescope (LAT) and Gamma-ray Busrt Monitor (GBM) onboard Fermi. This is the first GeV short GRB with known redshift. The delayed onset and long-lived behavior of the high energy photon of the LAT were also seen by this GRB as well as many other LAT GRBs. A broad-band spectroscopy by the LAT and GBM revealed an additional spectral component against to the traditional Band function, which is the first evidence of the extra component from short GRB. A 31 GeV photon, the highest energy photon from short GRB was detected 0.83 s after the onset of the GRB. This enables us to set the largest lower limit on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow for any GRBs assuming that the LAT 31 GeV photon is associated with the narrow spike observed with the GBM. The delayed emission of the LAT 31 GeV photon supports Lorentz invariance, and disfavors quantum-gravity theories in which a postulated granularity of space-time on a very small scale alters the speed of light, giving it a linear dependence on photon-energy.

  1. The Nature of the Most Extreme Cosmic Explosions: Broadband Studies of Fermi LAT GRB Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Lauren; Troja, E.

    2014-01-01

    In the five years since its launch, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has revealed a population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that are among the most energetic explosions ever observed. While typical GRB afterglows are observed from radio to X-rays, afterglows of Fermi LAT GRBs are detected up to GeV energies, challenging our understanding of GRB emission mechanisms and central engines. There are now a significant number of LAT-detected GRBs with multi-wavelength afterglow data and measured redshifts that allow us to investigate potential correlations between this high-energy (> 100 MeV) emission and the afterglow parameters and determine if any particular conditions (e.g., weak magnetic field or low density medium) must be met by the progenitor system in order to generate the bright GeV emission. We developed an afterglow fitting code to model and fit the broadband afterglow data in counts space, allowing us to directly test the model predictions on the observed data. The uncertainties in our results were derived using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis, which allows us to uncover degeneracies between the physical parameters of the explosion. Here we present the preliminary results of our study of the population of Fermi LAT-detected GRBs.

  2. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF) Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanbro, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Roberts, O.; McBreen, S.; Bhat, N.; Fitzpatrick, G.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from the catalog of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The first release, in January 2015, provided data on 2700 TGFs. Updates are extending the catalog at a rate of ~800 TGFs per year. The TGF sample is reliable, with cosmic rays rejected using data both from Fermi GBM and from the Large Area Telescope on Fermi. The online catalog include times (UTC and solar), spacecraft geographic positions, durations, count intensities and other Bayesian Block durations. The catalog includes separate tables for bright TGFs detected by the flight software and for Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs). In January 2016 additional data will be released online from correlating these TGFs with sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). Maps of sferics in the vicinity of each TGF will be provided, as will the locations and times of sferics found to be associated with TGFs.

  3. Large optical conductivity of Dirac semimetal Fermi arc surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Li-kun; Song, Justin C. W.

    2017-08-01

    Fermi arc surface states, a hallmark of topological Dirac semimetals, can host carriers that exhibit unusual dynamics distinct from that of their parent bulk. Here we find that Fermi arc carriers in intrinsic Dirac semimetals possess a strong and anisotropic light-matter interaction. This is characterized by a large Fermi arc optical conductivity when light is polarized transverse to the Fermi arc; when light is polarized along the Fermi arc, Fermi arc optical conductivity is significantly muted. The large surface spectral weight is locked to the wide separation between Dirac nodes and persists as a large Drude weight of Fermi arc carriers when the system is doped. As a result, large and anisotropic Fermi arc conductivity provides a novel means of optically interrogating the topological surfaces states of Dirac semimetals.

  4. Enrico: Python package to simplify Fermi-LAT analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, David; Deil, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Enrico analyzes Fermi data. It produces spectra (model fit and flux points), maps and lightcurves for a target by editing a config file and running a python script which executes the Fermi science tool chain.

  5. Spatial Brightness Perception of Trichromatic Stimuli

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, Michael P.; Houser, Kevin W.

    2012-11-16

    An experiment was conducted to examine the effect of tuning optical radiation on brightness perception for younger (18-25 years of age) and older (50 years of age or older) observers. Participants made forced-choice evaluations of the brightness of a full factorial of stimulus pairs selected from two groups of four metameric stimuli. The large-field stimuli were created by systematically varying either the red or the blue primary of an RGB LED mixture. The results indicate that light stimuli of equal illuminance and chromaticity do not appear equally bright to either younger or older subjects. The rank-order of brightness is not predicted by any current model of human vision or theory of brightness perception including Scotopic to Photopic or Cirtopic to Photopic ratio theory, prime color theory, correlated color temperature, V(λ)-based photometry, color quality metrics, linear brightness models, or color appearance models. Age may affect brightness perception when short-wavelength primaries are used, especially those with a peak wavelength shorter than 450 nm. The results suggest further development of metrics to predict brightness perception is warranted, and that including age as a variable in predictive models may be valuable.

  6. Bright Star Astrometry with URAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, N.

    2015-10-01

    The U.S. Naval Observatory Robotic Astrometric Telescope (URAT) is observing the northern sky since April 2012 for an astrometric survey. Multiple overlaps per year are performed in a single bandpass (680-750 nm) using the "redlens" 20 cm aperture astrograph and a mosaic of large CCDs. Besides the regular, deep survey to magnitude 18.5, short exposures with an objective grating are taken to access stars as bright as 3rd magnitude. A brief overview of the program, observing and reductions is given. Positions on the 8 to 20 mas level are obtained of 66,202 Hipparcos stars at current epochs. These are compared to the Hipparcos Catalog to investigate its accuracy. About 20% of the observed Hipparcos stars are found to have inconsistent positions with the Hipparcos Catalog prediction on the 3 sigma level or over (about 75 mas or more discrepant position offsets). Some stars are now seen at an arcsec (or 25 sigma) off their Hipparcos Catalog predicted position.

  7. Brightness alteration with interweaving contours

    PubMed Central

    Roncato, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Chromatic induction is observed whenever the perceived colour of a target surface shifts towards the hue of a neighbouring surface. Some vivid manifestations may be seen in a white background where thin coloured lines have been drawn (assimilation) or when lines of different colours are collinear (neon effect) or adjacent (watercolour) to each other. This study examines a particular colour induction that manifests in concomitance with an opposite effect of colour saturation (or anti-spread). The two phenomena can be observed when a repetitive pattern is drawn in which outline thin contours intercept wider contours or surfaces, colour spreading appear to fill the surface occupied by surfaces or thick lines whereas the background traversed by thin lines is seen as brighter or filled of a saturated white. These phenomena were first observed by Bozzi (1975) and Kanizsa (1979) in figural conditions that did not allow them to document their conjunction. Here we illustrate various manifestations of this twofold phenomenon and compare its effects with the known effects of brightness and colour induction. Some conjectures on the nature of these effects are discussed. PMID:23483806

  8. Brightness alteration with interweaving contours.

    PubMed

    Roncato, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Chromatic induction is observed whenever the perceived colour of a target surface shifts towards the hue of a neighbouring surface. Some vivid manifestations may be seen in a white background where thin coloured lines have been drawn (assimilation) or when lines of different colours are collinear (neon effect) or adjacent (watercolour) to each other. This study examines a particular colour induction that manifests in concomitance with an opposite effect of colour saturation (or anti-spread). The two phenomena can be observed when a repetitive pattern is drawn in which outline thin contours intercept wider contours or surfaces, colour spreading appear to fill the surface occupied by surfaces or thick lines whereas the background traversed by thin lines is seen as brighter or filled of a saturated white. These phenomena were first observed by Bozzi (1975) and Kanizsa (1979) in figural conditions that did not allow them to document their conjunction. Here we illustrate various manifestations of this twofold phenomenon and compare its effects with the known effects of brightness and colour induction. Some conjectures on the nature of these effects are discussed.

  9. Cortical processing of a brightness illusion

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Anna Wang; Lu, Haidong D.; Hung, Chou P.

    2005-01-01

    Several brightness illusions indicate that borders can affect the perception of surfaces dramatically. In the Cornsweet illusion, two equiluminant surfaces appear to be different in brightness because of the contrast border between them. Here, we report the existence of cells in monkey visual cortex that respond to such an “illusory” brightness. We find that luminance responsive cells are located in color-activated regions (cytochrome oxidase blobs and bridges) of primary visual cortex (V1), whereas Cornsweet responsive cells are found preferentially in the color-activated regions (thin stripes) of second visual area (V2). This colocalization of brightness and color processing within V1 and V2 suggests a segregation of contour and surface processing in early visual pathways and a hierarchy of brightness information processing from V1 to V2 in monkeys. PMID:15738406

  10. Superfluid regimes in degenerate atomic Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Shlyapnikov, G.V.

    2005-05-05

    We give a brief overview of recent studies of quantum degenerate regimes in ultracold Fermi gases. The attention is focused on the regime of Bose-Einstein condensation of weakly bound molecules of fermionic atoms, formed at a large positive scattering length for the interspecies atom-atom interaction. We analyze remarkable collisional stability of these molecules and draw prospects for future studies.

  11. Fermi large area telescope second source catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G. F.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Campana, R.; Cañadas, B.; Cannon, A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chipaux, R.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; Davis, D. S.; de Angelis, A.; DeCesar, M. E.; DeKlotz, M.; De Luca, A.; den Hartog, P. R.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Digel, S. W.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Enoto, T.; Escande, L.; Fabiani, D.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Iafrate, G.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. E.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Landriu, D.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lionetto, A. M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, E.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Rousseau, R.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F. -W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sbarra, C.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Shrader, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, T. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinebra, F.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Etten, A.; Van Klaveren, B.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.; Zimmer, S.

    2012-03-28

    Here, we present the second catalog of high-energy γ-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. Furthermore, we provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. Finally, the 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely γ-ray-producing source classes.

  12. Fermi's Motion Produces a Study in Spirograph

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Final still from Fermi video [bit.ly/Y2K4LN]. Credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration ----- NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope orbits our planet every 95 minutes, building up increasingly deeper views of the universe with every circuit. Its wide-eyed Large Area Telescope (LAT) sweeps across the entire sky every three hours, capturing the highest-energy form of light -- gamma rays -- from sources across the universe. These range from supermassive black holes billions of light-years away to intriguing objects in our own galaxy, such as X-ray binaries, supernova remnants and pulsars. Now a Fermi scientist has transformed LAT data of a famous pulsar into a mesmerizing movie that visually encapsulates the spacecraft's complex motion. Click here to continue reading: 1.usa.gov/WhYwCU NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  13. Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E; Bonnell, J.; Cannon, A.; Celik O.; Corbet, R.; Davis, D. S.; DeCesar, M. E.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Johnson, T. E.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E; Perkins, J. S.; Racusin, J. L; Scargle, J. D.; Stephens, T. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24-month period. The Second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in 5 energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 11eV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely gamma-ray-producing source classes.

  14. Automatic Cloud Bursting under FermiCloud

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hao; Shangping, Ren; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Timm, Steven; Bernabeu, Gerard; Kim, Hyun Woo; Chadwick, Keith; Jang, Haengjin; Noh, Seo-Young

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing is changing the infrastructure upon which scientific computing depends from supercomputers and distributed computing clusters to a more elastic cloud-based structure. The service-oriented focus and elasticity of clouds can not only facilitate technology needs of emerging business but also shorten response time and reduce operational costs of traditional scientific applications. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is currently in the process of building its own private cloud, FermiCloud, which allows the existing grid infrastructure to use dynamically provisioned resources on FermiCloud to accommodate increased but dynamic computation demand from scientists in the domains of High Energy Physics (HEP) and other research areas. Cloud infrastructure also allows to increase a private cloud’s resource capacity through “bursting” by borrowing or renting resources from other community or commercial clouds when needed. This paper introduces a joint project on building a cloud federation to support HEP applications between Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Korea Institution of Science and Technology Information, with technical contributions from the Illinois Institute of Technology. In particular, this paper presents two recent accomplishments of the joint project: (a) cloud bursting automation and (b) load balancer. Automatic cloud bursting allows computer resources to be dynamically reconfigured to meet users’ demands. The load balance algorithm which the cloud bursting depends on decides when and where new resources need to be allocated. Our preliminary prototyping and experiments have shown promising success, yet, they also have opened new challenges to be studied

  15. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Gu, Genda

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scattering creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.

  16. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    DOE PAGES

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; ...

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scatteringmore » creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.« less

  17. SU (N ) Fermi liquid at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chi-Ho; Yip, S.-K.

    2017-03-01

    We consider the thermodynamic potential Ω of an N component Fermi gas with a short-range interaction obeying SU (N ) symmetry. We analyze especially the nonanalytic part of Ω in the temperature T at low T . We examine the temperature range where one can observe this T4lnT contribution and discuss how it can be extracted experimentally.

  18. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE SECOND SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, P. L.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Antolini, E.; Bonamente, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Belfiore, A.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Bignami, G. F. E-mail: Gino.Tosti@pg.infn.it E-mail: tburnett@u.washington.edu; and others

    2012-04-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy {gamma}-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely {gamma}-ray-producing source classes.

  19. Radio core dominance of Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Zhi-Yuan; Fan, Jun-Hui; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Yi-Hai; Cai, Wei; Xiao, Hu-Bing; Lin, Chao; Yang, Jiang-He

    2016-07-01

    During the first 4 years of mission, Fermi/LAT detected 1444 blazars (3FGL) (Ackermann et al. in Astrophys. J. 810:14, 2015). Fermi/LAT observations of blazars indicate that Fermi blazars are luminous and strongly variable with variability time scales, for some cases, as short as hours. Those observations suggest a strong beaming effect in Fermi/LAT blazars. In the present work, we will investigate the beaming effect in Fermi/LAT blazars using a core-dominance parameter, R = S_{core}/ S_{ext.}, where S_{core} is the core emission, while S_{ext.} is the extended emission. We compiled 1335 blazars with available core-dominance parameter, out of which 169 blazars have γ-ray emission (from 3FGL). We compared the core-dominance parameters, log R, between the 169 Fermi-detected blazars (FDBs) and the rest non-Fermi-detected blazars (non-FDBs), and we found that the averaged values are < log Rrangle = 0.99±0.87 for FDBs and < log Rrangle = -0.62±1.15 for the non-FDBs. A K-S test shows that the probability for the two distributions of FDBs and non-FDBs to come from the same parent distribution is near zero (P =9.12×10^{-52}). Secondly, we also investigated the variability index (V.I.) in the γ-ray band for FDBs, and we found V.I.=(0.12 ±0.07) log R+(2.25±0.10), suggesting that a source with larger log R has larger V.I. value. Thirdly, we compared the mean values of radio spectral index for FDBs and non-FDBs, and we obtained < α_{radio}rangle =0.06±0.35 for FDBs and < α_{radio}rangle =0.57±0.46 for non-FDBs. If γ-rays are composed of two components like radio emission (core and extended components), then we can expect a correlation between log R and the γ-ray spectral index. When we used the radio core-dominance parameter, log R, to investigate the relationship, we found that the spectral index for the core component is α_{γ}|_{core} = 1.11 (a photon spectral index of α_{γ}^{ph}|_{core} = 2.11) and that for the extended component is α_{γ}|_{ext.} = 0

  20. FermiGrid - experience and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, K.; Berman, E.; Canal, P.; Hesselroth, T.; Garzoglio, G.; Levshina, T.; Sergeev, V.; Sfiligoi, I.; Timm, S.; Yocum, D.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    Fermilab supports a scientific program that includes experiments and scientists located across the globe. In order to better serve this community, Fermilab has placed its production computer resources in a Campus Grid infrastructure called 'FermiGrid'. The FermiGrid infrastructure allows the large experiments at Fermilab to have priority access to their own resources, enables sharing of these resources in an opportunistic fashion, and movement of work (jobs, data) between the Campus Grid and National Grids such as Open Science Grid and the WLCG. FermiGrid resources support multiple Virtual Organizations (VOs), including VOs from the Open Science Grid (OSG), EGEE and the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid Collaboration (WLCG). Fermilab also makes leading contributions to the Open Science Grid in the areas of accounting, batch computing, grid security, job management, resource selection, site infrastructure, storage management, and VO services. Through the FermiGrid interfaces, authenticated and authorized VOs and individuals may access our core grid services, the 10,000+ Fermilab resident CPUs, near-petabyte (including CMS) online disk pools and the multi-petabyte Fermilab Mass Storage System. These core grid services include a site wide Globus gatekeeper, VO management services for several VOs, Fermilab site authorization services, grid user mapping services, as well as job accounting and monitoring, resource selection and data movement services. Access to these services is via standard and well-supported grid interfaces. We will report on the user experience of using the FermiGrid campus infrastructure interfaced to a national cyberinfrastructure--the successes and the problems.

  1. FermiGrid—experience and future plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, K.; Berman, E.; Canal, P.; Hesselroth, T.; Garzoglio, G.; Levshina, T.; Sergeev, V.; Sfiligoi, I.; Sharma, N.; Timm, S.; Yocum, D. R.

    2008-07-01

    Fermilab supports a scientific program that includes experiments and scientists located across the globe. In order to better serve this community, Fermilab has placed its production computer resources in a Campus Grid infrastructure called 'FermiGrid'. The FermiGrid infrastructure allows the large experiments at Fermilab to have priority access to their own resources, enables sharing of these resources in an opportunistic fashion, and movement of work (jobs, data) between the Campus Grid and National Grids such as Open Science Grid (OSG) and the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid Collaboration (WLCG). FermiGrid resources support multiple Virtual Organizations (VOs), including VOs from the OSG, EGEE, and the WLCG. Fermilab also makes leading contributions to the Open Science Grid in the areas of accounting, batch computing, grid security, job management, resource selection, site infrastructure, storage management, and VO services. Through the FermiGrid interfaces, authenticated and authorized VOs and individuals may access our core grid services, the 10,000+ Fermilab resident CPUs, near-petabyte (including CMS) online disk pools and the multi-petabyte Fermilab Mass Storage System. These core grid services include a site wide Globus gatekeeper, VO management services for several VOs, Fermilab site authorization services, grid user mapping services, as well as job accounting and monitoring, resource selection and data movement services. Access to these services is via standard and well-supported grid interfaces. We will report on the user experience of using the FermiGrid campus infrastructure interfaced to a national cyberinfrastructure - the successes and the problems.

  2. Bright Sparks of Our Future!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riordan, Naoimh

    2016-04-01

    My name is Naoimh Riordan and I am the Vice Principal of Rockboro Primary School in Cork City, South of Ireland. I am a full time class primary teacher and I teach 4th class, my students are aged between 9-10 years. My passion for education has developed over the years and grown towards STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) subjects. I believe these subjects are the way forward for our future. My passion and beliefs are driven by the unique after school programme that I have developed. It is titled "Sparks" coming from the term Bright Sparks. "Sparks" is an after school programme with a difference where the STEM subjects are concentrated on through lessons such as Science, Veterinary Science Computer Animation /Coding, Eco engineering, Robotics, Magical Maths, Chess and Creative Writing. All these subjects are taught through activity based learning and are one-hour long each week for a ten-week term. "Sparks" is fully inclusive and non-selective which gives all students of any level of ability an opportunity to engage into these subjects. "Sparks" is open to all primary students in County Cork. The "Sparks" after school programme is taught by tutors from the different Universities and Colleges in Cork City. It works very well because the tutor brings their knowledge, skills and specialised equipment from their respective universities and in turn the tutor gains invaluable teaching practise, can trial a pilot programme in a chosen STEM subject and gain an insight into what works in the physical classroom.

  3. Bright Streaks and Dark Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The south polar region of Mars is covered every year by a layer of carbon dioxide ice. In a region called the 'cryptic terrain,' the ice is translucent and sunlight can penetrate through the ice to warm the surface below.

    The ice layer sublimates (evaporates) from the bottom. The dark fans of dust seen in this image come from the surface below the layer of ice, carried to the top by gas venting from below. The translucent ice is 'visible' by virtue of the effect it has on the tone of the surface below, which would otherwise have the same color and reflectivity as the fans.

    Bright streaks in this image are fresh frost. The CRISM team has identified the composition of these streaks to be carbon dioxide.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003113_0940 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 26-Mar-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.8 degrees latitude, 106.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 244.9 km (153.0 miles). At this distance the image scale is 49.0 cm/pixel (with 2 x 2 binning) so objects 147 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 50 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:20 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 79 degrees, thus the sun was about 11 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 207.6 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  4. Bright Streaks and Dark Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The south polar region of Mars is covered every year by a layer of carbon dioxide ice. In a region called the 'cryptic terrain,' the ice is translucent and sunlight can penetrate through the ice to warm the surface below.

    The ice layer sublimates (evaporates) from the bottom. The dark fans of dust seen in this image come from the surface below the layer of ice, carried to the top by gas venting from below. The translucent ice is 'visible' by virtue of the effect it has on the tone of the surface below, which would otherwise have the same color and reflectivity as the fans.

    Bright streaks in this image are fresh frost. The CRISM team has identified the composition of these streaks to be carbon dioxide.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003113_0940 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 26-Mar-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.8 degrees latitude, 106.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 244.9 km (153.0 miles). At this distance the image scale is 49.0 cm/pixel (with 2 x 2 binning) so objects 147 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 50 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:20 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 79 degrees, thus the sun was about 11 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 207.6 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  5. Continuous transitions between composite Fermi liquid and Landau Fermi liquid: A route to fractionalized Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkeshli, Maissam; McGreevy, John

    2012-08-01

    One of the most successful theories of a non-Fermi-liquid metallic state is the composite Fermi-liquid (CFL) theory of the half-filled Landau level. In this paper, we study continuous quantum phase transitions out of the CFL state and into a Landau Fermi liquid, in the limit of no disorder and fixed particle number. This transition can be induced by tuning the bandwidth of the Landau level relative to the interaction energy, for instance through an externally applied periodic potential. We find a transition to the Landau Fermi liquid through a gapless Mott insulator with a Fermi surface of neutral fermionic excitations. In the presence of spatial symmetries, we also find a direct continuous transition between the CFL and the Landau Fermi liquid. The transitions have a number of characteristic observable signatures, including the presence of two crossover temperature scales, resistivity jumps, and vanishing compressibility. When the composite fermions are paired instead, our results imply quantum critical points between various non-Abelian topological states, including the ν=1/2 Moore-Read Pfaffian [Ising × U(1) topological order], a version of the Kitaev B phase (Ising topological order), and paired electronic superconductors. To study such transitions, we use a projective construction of the CFL, which goes beyond the conventional framework of flux attachment to include a broader set of quantum fluctuations. These considerations suggest a possible route to fractionalized Mott insulators by starting with fractional quantum Hall states and tuning the Landau-level bandwidth.

  6. Fermi and Non-Fermi Liquid Behavior in Quantum Impurity Systems: Conserving Slave Boson Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroha, Johann; Woelfle, Peter

    1998-12-01

    The question of Fermi liquid vs. non-Fermi liquid behavior induced by strong correlations is one of the prominent problems in metallic local moment systems. As standard models for such systems, the SU(N)× SU(M) Anderson impurity models exhibit both Fermi liquid and non-Fermi liquid behavior, depending on their symmetry. Taking the Anderson model as an example, these lectures first give an introduction to the auxiliary boson method to describe correlated systems governed by a strong, short-range electronic repulsion. It is then shown how to include the relevant low-lying excitations (coherent spin flip and charge fluctuation processes), while preserving the local gauge symmetry of the model. This amounts to a conserving T-matrix approximation (CTMA). We prove a cancellation theorem showing that the CTMA incorporates all leading and subleading infrared singularities at any given order in a self-consistent loop expansion of the free energy. As a result, the CTMA recovers the correct infrared behavior of the auxiliary particle propagators, indicating that it correctly describes both the Fermi and the non-Fermi liquid regimes of the Anderson model.

  7. Disentangling the Origin and Heating Mechanism of Supernova Dust: Late-Time Spitzer Spectroscopy of the Type IIn SN 2005ip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Ori D.; Chevalier, Roger A.; Dwek, Eli; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Sugerman, Ben E. K.; Leisenring, Jarron M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents late-time near-infrared and Spitzer mid-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of warm dust in the Type IIn SN 2005ip in NGC 2906. The spectra show evidence for two dust components with different temperatures. Spanning the peak of the thermal emission, these observations provide strong constraints on the dust mass, temperature, and luminosity, which serve as critical diagnostics for disentangling the origin and heating mechanism of each component. The results suggest the warmer dust has a mass of approx. 5 x 10(exp -4) Solar Mass and originates from newly formed dust in the ejecta, continuously heated by the circumstellar interaction. By contrast, the cooler component likely originates from a circumstellar shock echo that forms from the heating of a large, pre-existing dust shell approx. 0.01 - 0.05 Solar Mass by the late-time circumstellar interaction. The progenitor wind velocity derived from the blue edge of the He I 1.083 micro P Cygni profile indicates a progenitor eruption likely formed this dust shell approx.100 years prior to the supernova explosion, which is consistent with a Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) progenitor star. Subject

  8. First light from the Vela pulsar with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Razzano, M.

    2009-04-08

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, launched in June 2008, is an international space mission entirely devoted to the study of the high-energy gamma rays from the Universe. The main instrument aboard Fermi is the Large Area Telescope (LAT), a pair conversion telescope equipped with the state-of-the art in gamma-ray detectors technology. Thanks to its large field of view and effective area, combined with its excellent timing capability, Fermi-LAT is a perfect instrument for probing physics of gamma-ray emission in pulsars. LAT is expected to discover tens of new pulsars, both radio-loud and radio-quiet (Geminga-like). Moreover, LAT will observe with unprecedented statistics the brightest pulsars, investigating the details of magnetospheric emission. The first two months of the mission have been focused on the commissioning and first light, during which the LAT firmly detected the six previously known EGRET gamma-ray pulsars. One of the main sources of interest during our first light observations has been the Vela pulsar, the brightest persistent source in the whole gamma-ray sky. Thanks to its brightness, the Vela pulsar is an ideal candidate for calibrating the LAT and testing its performance. In addition, observations of Vela will help answer many questions related to the physics of pulsar emission processes. We present here some recent results obtained by the LAT on the Vela pulsar, using high-quality timing solutions provided by radio observations carried out within the Fermi pulsar radio timing campaign.

  9. Brightness of the solar F-corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Mann, Ingrid

    1998-06-01

    We discuss our present knowledge about the brightness of the solar F-corona in the wavelength range from the visible to the middle infrared. From the general trend of the observational data, the F-corona is regarded as the continuous extension of the zodiacal light at smaller elongation of the line of sight. A contribution of thermal emission from dust is indicated by the increasing F-coronal brightness in comparison to the solar spectrum towards longer wavelength. As compared with the F-coronal brightness, the polarization and color in the visible regime are not well determined due to the high sensitivity of these quantities to the observational accuracy. Aside from observational problems, our present interpretation of the F-coronal brightness is also limited due to ambiguities in the inversion of the line of sight integral. Nevertheless, the measurements and model calculations of the brightness can be used to deduce some physical properties of dust grains. We show that the hump of the near-infrared brightness at 4 solar radii, which was sometimes observed in the corona, is related rather to the physical properties of dust grains along the line of sight than to the existence of a dust ring as previously discussed. We also show that the appearance or disappearance of the near-infrared peak in the coronal brightness cannot be described in any periodic cycle for each wavelength range.

  10. Galaxy Selection and the Surface Brightness Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGaugh, Stacy S.; Bothun, Gregory D.; Schombert, James M.

    1995-08-01

    Optical surveys for galaxies are biased against the inclusion of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. Disney [Nature, 263,573(1976)] suggested that the constancy of disk central surface brightness noticed by Freeman [ApJ, 160,811(1970)] was not a physical result, but instead was an artifact of sample selection. Since LSB galaxies do exist, the pertinent and still controversial issue is if these newly discovered galaxies constitute a significant percentage of the general galaxy population. In this paper, we address this issue by determining the space density of galaxies as a function of disk central surface brightness. Using the physically reasonable assumption (which is motivated by the data) that central surface brightness is independent of disk scale length, we arrive at a distribution which is roughly flat (i.e., approximately equal numbers of galaxies at each surface brightness) faintwards of the Freeman (1970) value. Brightwards of this, we find a sharp decline in the distribution which is analogous to the turn down in the luminosity function at L^*^. An intrinsically sharply peaked "Freeman law" distribution can be completely ruled out, and no Gaussian distribution can fit the data. Low surface brightness galaxies (those with central surface brightness fainter than 22 B mag arcsec^-2^) comprise >~ 1/2 the general galaxy population, so a representative sample of galaxies at z = 0 does not really exist at present since past surveys have been insensitive to this component of the general galaxy population.

  11. The FERMI @ Elettra Technical Optimization Study: General Layoutand Parameters and Physics Studies of Longitudinal Space Charge, theSpreader, the Injector, and Preliminary FEL Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, John; Corlett, John; Doolittle, Larry; Fawley, William; Lidia, Steven; Penn, Gregory; Ratti, Alex; Staples, John; Wilcox,Russell; Wurtele, Jonathan; Zholents, Alexander

    2005-09-01

    The FERMI {at} Elettra facility will make use of the existing GeV linac at Sincrotrone Elettra, which will become available for dedicated FEL applications following the completion of construction of a new injector booster complex for the storage ring. With a new rf photocathode injector, and some additional accelerating sections, this linac will be capable of providing high brightness bunches at 1.2 GeV and up to 50 Hz repetition rates.

  12. Just How Bright Is a Laser?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Baak, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Attempts to quantify the subjective sensation of brightness of the spot projected by a helium-neon laser and compares this with conventional sources of light. Provides an exercise in using the blackbody radiation formulas. (JRH)

  13. Dark Lakes on a Bright Landscape

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-23

    Ultracold hydrocarbon lakes and seas dark shapes near the north pole of Saturn moon Titan can be seen embedded in some kind of bright surface material in this infrared mosaic from NASA Cassini mission.

  14. Just How Bright Is a Laser?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Baak, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Attempts to quantify the subjective sensation of brightness of the spot projected by a helium-neon laser and compares this with conventional sources of light. Provides an exercise in using the blackbody radiation formulas. (JRH)

  15. New Observations of Subarcsecond Photospheric Bright Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, T. E.; Schrijver, C. J.; Shine, R. A.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.; Scharmer, G.

    1995-01-01

    We have used an interference filter centered at 4305 A within the bandhead of the CH radical (the 'G band') and real-time image selection at the Swedish Vacuum Solar Telescope on La Palma to produce very high contrast images of subarcsecond photospheric bright points at all locations on the solar disk. During the 6 day period of 1993 September 15-20 we observed active region NOAA 7581 from its appearance on the East limb to a near-disk-center position on September 20. A total of 1804 bright points were selected for analysis from the disk center image using feature extraction image processing techniques. The measured Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) distribution of the bright points in the image is lognormal with a modal value of 220 km (0 sec .30) and an average value of 250 km (0 sec .35). The smallest measured bright point diameter is 120 km (0 sec .17) and the largest is 600 km (O sec .69). Approximately 60% of the measured bright points are circular (eccentricity approx. 1.0), the average eccentricity is 1.5, and the maximum eccentricity corresponding to filigree in the image is 6.5. The peak contrast of the measured bright points is normally distributed. The contrast distribution variance is much greater than the measurement accuracy, indicating a large spread in intrinsic bright-point contrast. When referenced to an averaged 'quiet-Sun' area in the image, the modal contrast is 29% and the maximum value is 75%; when referenced to an average intergranular lane brightness in the image, the distribution has a modal value of 61% and a maximum of 119%. The bin-averaged contrast of G-band bright points is constant across the entire measured size range. The measured area of the bright points, corrected for pixelation and selection effects, covers about 1.8% of the total image area. Large pores and micropores occupy an additional 2% of the image area, implying a total area fraction of magnetic proxy features in the image of 3.8%. We discuss the implications of this

  16. New Observations of Subarcsecond Photospheric Bright Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, T. E.; Schrijver, C. J.; Shine, R. A.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.; Scharmer, G.

    1995-01-01

    We have used an interference filter centered at 4305 A within the bandhead of the CH radical (the 'G band') and real-time image selection at the Swedish Vacuum Solar Telescope on La Palma to produce very high contrast images of subarcsecond photospheric bright points at all locations on the solar disk. During the 6 day period of 15-20 Sept. 1993 we observed active region NOAA 7581 from its appearance on the East limb to a near-disk-center position on 20 Sept. A total of 1804 bright points were selected for analysis from the disk center image using feature extraction image processing techniques. The measured FWHM distribution of the bright points in the image is lognormal with a modal value of 220 km (0.30 sec) and an average value of 250 km (0.35 sec). The smallest measured bright point diameter is 120 km (0.17 sec) and the largest is 600 km (O.69 sec). Approximately 60% of the measured bright points are circular (eccentricity approx. 1.0), the average eccentricity is 1.5, and the maximum eccentricity corresponding to filigree in the image is 6.5. The peak contrast of the measured bright points is normally distributed. The contrast distribution variance is much greater than the measurement accuracy, indicating a large spread in intrinsic bright-point contrast. When referenced to an averaged 'quiet-Sun' area in the image, the modal contrast is 29% and the maximum value is 75%; when referenced to an average intergranular lane brightness in the image, the distribution has a modal value of 61% and a maximum of 119%. The bin-averaged contrast of G-band bright points is constant across the entire measured size range. The measured area of the bright points, corrected for pixelation and selection effects, covers about 1.8% of the total image area. Large pores and micropores occupy an additional 2% of the image area, implying a total area fraction of magnetic proxy features in the image of 3.8%. We discuss the implications of this area fraction measurement in the context of

  17. Unconventional Fermi surface in an insulating state

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Neil; Tan, B. S.; Hsu, Y. -T.; Zeng, B.; Hatnean, M. Ciomaga; Zhu, Z.; Hartstein, M.; Kiourlappou, M.; Srivastava, A.; Johannes, M. D.; Murphy, T. P.; Park, J. -H.; Balicas, L.; Lonzarich, G. G.; Balakrishnan, G.; Sebastian, Suchitra E.

    2015-07-17

    Insulators occur in more than one guise; a recent finding was a class of topological insulators, which host a conducting surface juxtaposed with an insulating bulk. Here, we report the observation of an unusual insulating state with an electrically insulating bulk that simultaneously yields bulk quantum oscillations with characteristics of an unconventional Fermi liquid. We present quantum oscillation measurements of magnetic torque in high-purity single crystals of the Kondo insulator SmB6, which reveal quantum oscillation frequencies characteristic of a large three-dimensional conduction electron Fermi surface similar to the metallic rare earth hexaborides such as PrB6 and LaB6. As a result, the quantum oscillation amplitude strongly increases at low temperatures, appearing strikingly at variance with conventional metallic behavior.

  18. High energy neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles.

    PubMed

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Razzaque, Soebur

    2012-06-01

    Recently the Fermi-LAT data have revealed two gamma-ray emitting bubble-shaped structures at the Galactic center. If the observed gamma rays have hadronic origin (collisions of accelerated protons), the bubbles must emit high energy neutrinos as well. This new, Galactic, neutrino flux should trace the gamma-ray emission in spectrum and spatial extent. Its highest energy part, above 20-50 TeV, is observable at a kilometer-scale detector in the northern hemisphere, such as the planned KM3NeT, while interesting constraints on it could be obtained by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The detection or exclusion of neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles will discriminate between hadronic and leptonic models, thus bringing unique information on the still mysterious origin of these objects and on the time scale of their formation.

  19. Fermionic sound in Bose-Fermi mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, Andrey; Bradlyn, Barry

    2014-03-01

    Sound waves emerge as a result of spontaneously broken symmetry- translational in the case of solids and normal fluids and U(1) phase symmetry in the case of superfluids. Collective modes like these, which result from the breaking of conventional symmetries, usually have bosonic statistics. We explore the consequences of a subtle fermionic symmetry that appears in Bose-Fermi mixtures when both species have equal mass. In particular, we predict the existence of a novel fermionic collective excitation and comment on its properties. We show that this mode persists in the presence of a trapping potential and contact interaction. We describe the fate of these excitations when there is a small mass difference between the two particle species. Lastly, we discuss the possibility of observing this mode in experiments, for example in trapped 174 Yb-173 Yb Bose-Fermi mixtures.

  20. Unconventional Fermi surface in an insulating state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, B. S.; Hsu, Y.-T.; Zeng, B.; Hatnean, M. Ciomaga; Harrison, N.; Zhu, Z.; Hartstein, M.; Kiourlappou, M.; Srivastava, A.; Johannes, M. D.; Murphy, T. P.; Park, J.-H.; Balicas, L.; Lonzarich, G. G.; Balakrishnan, G.; Sebastian, Suchitra E.

    2015-07-01

    Insulators occur in more than one guise; a recent finding was a class of topological insulators, which host a conducting surface juxtaposed with an insulating bulk. Here, we report the observation of an unusual insulating state with an electrically insulating bulk that simultaneously yields bulk quantum oscillations with characteristics of an unconventional Fermi liquid. We present quantum oscillation measurements of magnetic torque in high-purity single crystals of the Kondo insulator SmB6, which reveal quantum oscillation frequencies characteristic of a large three-dimensional conduction electron Fermi surface similar to the metallic rare earth hexaborides such as PrB6 and LaB6. The quantum oscillation amplitude strongly increases at low temperatures, appearing strikingly at variance with conventional metallic behavior.

  1. Probing Magnetized Turbulence in the Fermi Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Kelsey; Hales, Christopher A.; Su, Meng

    2017-01-01

    Fermi-LAT observations have revealed giant, sharply defined gamma-ray structures emanating from the Galactic center known as the Fermi bubbles. They extend ~50 degrees (~8.5 kpc) above and below the plane of the Milky Way. Their origin is uncertain but thought to be related to an energetic event such as accretion onto Sgr A* or a burst of nuclear star formation. We analyzed archival radio measurements of Faraday rotation toward extragalactic sources and detected a signature of the bubbles at the shock boundary to the Galactic halo. To confirm these preliminary findings we performed new radio observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA). We discuss the findings of our observations, the shock energetics of the bubbles and their implications for nuclear Galactic activity.

  2. Stokes paradox in electronic Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Andrew

    2017-03-01

    The Stokes paradox is the statement that in a viscous two-dimensional fluid, the "linear response" problem of fluid flow around an obstacle is ill posed. We present a simple consequence of this paradox in the hydrodynamic regime of a Fermi liquid of electrons in two-dimensional metals. Using hydrodynamics and kinetic theory, we estimate the contribution of a single cylindrical obstacle to the global electrical resistance of a material, within linear response. Momentum relaxation, present in any realistic electron liquid, resolves the classical paradox. Nonetheless, this paradox imprints itself in the resistance, which can be parametrically larger than predicted by Ohmic transport theory. We find a remarkably rich set of behaviors, depending on whether or not the quasiparticle dynamics in the Fermi liquid should be treated as diffusive, hydrodynamic, or ballistic on the length scale of the obstacle. We argue that all three types of behavior are observable in present day experiments.

  3. High Energy Neutrinos from the Fermi Bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Razzaque, Soebur

    2012-06-01

    Recently the Fermi-LAT data have revealed two gamma-ray emitting bubble-shaped structures at the Galactic center. If the observed gamma rays have hadronic origin (collisions of accelerated protons), the bubbles must emit high energy neutrinos as well. This new, Galactic, neutrino flux should trace the gamma-ray emission in spectrum and spatial extent. Its highest energy part, above 20–50 TeV, is observable at a kilometer-scale detector in the northern hemisphere, such as the planned KM3NeT, while interesting constraints on it could be obtained by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The detection or exclusion of neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles will discriminate between hadronic and leptonic models, thus bringing unique information on the still mysterious origin of these objects and on the time scale of their formation.

  4. Fermi energy instability in resonant tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claro, Francisco; Inkoferer, Jutta; Obermeir, Gustav

    2001-03-01

    In resonant tunneling two different instabilities may arise induced by the electron-electron interaction, depending on whether the conduction channel is at the emitter Fermi energy, or at the bottom of the emitter Fermi sea. The latter leads to a well understood multistable regime in the device characteristics. The former was found in the past for the case when a magnetic field is present in the direction of the current flow*. We shall show that the external field is not required, and that actually the instability can take place in the presence of zero, one and two dimensional quantum wells. Supported in part by FONDECYT 1990425 and Catedra Presidencial en Ciencias *P.Orellana, E.Anda and F.Claro, Phys.Rev.Lett. 79, 1118 (1997)

  5. Magnetar Observations with Fermi/GBM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Fermi Observatory was launched June 11, 2009; the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) began normal operations on July 14, about a month after launch, when the trigger algorithms were enabled. In the first year of operations we recorded emission from four magnetar sources; of these, only one was an old magnetar: SGR 1806+20. The other three detections were: SGR J0501+4516, newly discovered with Swift and extensively monitored with both Swift and GBM, SGR J1550-5418, a source originally classified as an Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) and a very recently discovered new source, SGR 0418+5729. I report below on the current status of the analyses efforts of the GBM data.

  6. Luttinger theorem and imbalanced Fermi systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieri, Pierbiagio; Strinati, Giancarlo Calvanese

    2017-04-01

    The proof of the Luttinger theorem, which was originally given for a normal Fermi liquid with equal spin populations formally described by the exact many-body theory at zero temperature, is here extended to an approximate theory given in terms of a "conserving" approximation also with spin imbalanced populations. The need for this extended proof, whose underlying assumptions are here spelled out in detail, stems from the recent interest in superfluid trapped Fermi atoms with attractive inter-particle interaction, for which the difference between two spin populations can be made large enough that superfluidity is destroyed and the system remains normal even at zero temperature. In this context, we will demonstrate the validity of the Luttinger theorem separately for the two spin populations for any "Φ-derivable" approximation, and illustrate it in particular for the self-consistent t-matrix approximation.

  7. Operation of FERMI FELs for users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svandrlik, M.

    2015-05-01

    The FERMI seeded free electron laser facility, located at the Elettra laboratory in Trieste (Italy), has been operated for user experiments in the past years using the first FEL line, FEL-1, covering the VUV - EVU spectral range (100 - 20 nm). After the conclusion of the commissioning for the soft-X ray FEL line, FEL-2, the facility is now ready to provide the scientific community with intense FEL pulses (<10 μJ) characterized by a high degree of coherence and spectral stability in the whole range from 100 nm down to 4 nm. We report about the recent achievement of FERMI FELs and our experience with operations for user requiring specific FEL configurations.

  8. Achieving Peak Brightness in an Atom Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Robins, N.P.; Figl, C.; Haine, S.A.; Morrison, A.K.; Jeppesen, M.; Hope, J.J.; Close, J.D.

    2006-04-14

    In this Letter we present experimental results and a simple analytic theory on the first continuous (long pulse) Raman atom laser. We analyze the flux and brightness of a generic two state atom laser with an analytic model that shows excellent agreement with our experiments. We show that, for the same source size, the brightness achievable with a Raman atom laser is at least 3 orders of magnitude greater than achievable in any other demonstrated continuously outcoupled atom laser.

  9. Apparent brightness distribution of GRB host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagoly, Zsolt; Racz, Istvan; Gyorgy Balazs, Lajos; Toth, Viktor; Horvath, Istvan

    2015-08-01

    We studied the relationship between the Swift GRB data and the optical brightness of the host galaxy measured by the Keck telescope. We calculated the unbiased distribution of the host's optical brightness by making use the survival analysis. Based on the sample obtained from merging the Swift GRB table and the Keck optical data we studied also the dependence of this distribution on the GRB's data.

  10. Observations and diagnostics in high brightness beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianchi, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bisesto, F.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.

    2016-09-01

    The brightness is a figure of merit largely used in the light sources, like FEL (Free Electron Lasers), but it is also fundamental in several other applications, as for instance Compton backscattering sources, beam driven plasma accelerators and THz sources. Advanced diagnostics are essential tools in the development of high brightness beams. 6D electron beam diagnostics will be reviewed with emphasis on emittance measurement.

  11. The analogy between stereo depth and brightness.

    PubMed

    Brookes, A; Stevens, K A

    1989-01-01

    Apparent depth in stereograms exhibits various simultaneous-contrast and induction effects analogous to those reported in the luminance domain. This behavior suggests that stereo depth, like brightness, is reconstructed, ie recovered from higher-order spatial derivatives or differences of the original signal. The extent to which depth is analogous to brightness is examined. There are similarities in terms of contrast effects but dissimilarities in terms of the lateral inhibition effects traditionally attributed to underlying spatial-differentiation operators.

  12. Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G. F.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Campana, R.; Cañadas, B.; Cannon, A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chipaux, R.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; Davis, D. S.; de Angelis, A.; DeCesar, M. E.; DeKlotz, M.; De Luca, A.; den Hartog, P. R.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Digel, S. W.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Enoto, T.; Escande, L.; Fabiani, D.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Iafrate, G.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. E.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Landriu, D.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lionetto, A. M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, E.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Rousseau, R.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sbarra, C.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Shrader, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, T. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinebra, F.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Etten, A.; Van Klaveren, B.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.; Zimmer, S.

    2012-04-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy γ-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely γ-ray-producing source classes. We dedicate this paper to the memory of our colleague Patrick Nolan, who died on 2011 November 6. His career spanned much of the history of high-energy astronomy from space and his work on the Large Area Telescope (LAT) began nearly 20 years ago when it was just a concept. Pat was a central member in the operation of the LAT collaboration and he is greatly missed.

  13. Fermi large area telescope second source catalog

    DOE PAGES

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; ...

    2012-03-28

    Here, we present the second catalog of high-energy γ-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are fluxmore » measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. Furthermore, we provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. Finally, the 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely γ-ray-producing source classes.« less

  14. "Permanence" - An Adaptationist Solution to Fermi's Paradox?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirkovic, Milan M.

    A new solution of Fermi's paradox sketched by SF writer Karl Schroeder in his 2002. novel Permanence is investigated. It is argued that this solution is tightly connected with adaptationism - a widely discussed working hypothesis in evolutionary biology. Schroeder's hypothesis has important ramifications for astrobiology, SETI projects, and future studies. Its weaknesses should be explored without succumbing to the emotional reactions often accompanying adaptationist explanations.

  15. Ideas by Szilard, physics by Fermi

    SciTech Connect

    Lanouette, W.

    1992-12-01

    An excerpt from William Lanouette's book Genius in the shadows: A biography of Leo Szilard, the man behind the bomb (with Bela Silard). This article covers Szilard's life from early 1933, when he first began contemplating fleeing Germany, to the first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction on December 2, 1942, and includes a description of his partnership with Enrico Fermi. Part of a series of articles in this magazine commemorating the 50th anniversary of the first controlled chain reaction.

  16. FERMI-LAT Observations of Galatic Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Observatory observations of Galactic Transients. LAT all-sky monitoring is producing spectacular results for the GeV transient sky: (1) New blazars and unidentified transients (2) Probing the jet of the Cygnus X-3 microquasar (3) Discovery of gamma rays from V407 Cygni nova (4) Fast high-energy gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula.

  17. HIGH-FREQUENCY RADIO PROPERTIES OF SOURCES IN THE FERMI-LAT 1 YEAR POINT SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Mahony, Elizabeth K.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Murphy, Tara; Ekers, Ronald D.; Edwards, Philip G.; Massardi, Marcella

    2010-08-01

    The high-frequency radio sky, like the gamma-ray sky surveyed by the Fermi satellite, is dominated by flat spectrum radio quasars and BL Lac objects at bright flux levels. To investigate the relationship between radio and gamma-ray emission in extragalactic sources, we have cross-matched the Australia Telescope 20 GHz survey catalog (AT20G) with the Fermi-LAT 1 year Point Source Catalog (1FGL). The 6.0 sr of sky covered by both catalogs ({delta} < 0{sup 0}, |b|>1.{sup 0}5) contains 5890 AT20G radio sources and 604 1FGL gamma-ray sources. The AT20G source positions are accurate to within {approx}1 arcsec and, after excluding known Galactic sources, 43% of Fermi 1FGL sources have an AT20G source within the 95% Fermi confidence ellipse. Monte Carlo tests imply that at least 95% of these matches are genuine associations. Only five gamma-ray sources (1% of the Fermi catalog) have more than one AT20G counterpart in the Fermi error box. The AT20G matches also generally support the active galactic nucleus (AGN) associations in the First LAT AGN Catalog. We find a trend of increasing gamma-ray flux density with 20 GHz radio flux density. The Fermi detection rate of AT20G sources is close to 100% for the brightest 20 GHz sources, decreasing to 20% at 1 Jy, and to roughly 1% at 100 mJy. Eight of the matched AT20G sources have no association listed in 1FGL and are presented here as potential gamma-ray AGNs for the first time. We also identify an alternative AGN counterpart to one 1FGL source. The percentage of Fermi sources with AT20G detections decreases toward the Galactic plane, suggesting that the 1FGL catalog contains at least 50 Galactic gamma-ray sources in the southern hemisphere that are yet to be identified.

  18. Is highly overdoped LSCO a Fermi liquid?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Nathan; Hall, Jesse; Dabkowski, Antoni; Zhang, Hao; Wei, J. Y. T.; Timusk, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    According to Fermi liquid theory the ac resistivity of a metal at low temperatures should follow ρ =A' (ω2 + b(πT) 2) +ρ0 , where the coefficient b = 4 for electron-electron umklapp scattering. However, if resonant elastic electron-impurity scattering is predominant then b ~ 1 as shown by Chubukov and Maslov. A search for the ideal Fermi liquid behavior has revealed 7 known cases where b can be determined, all of which show b < 2 . 5 . Notably, not a single case approaches b = 4 as expected for a Fermi liquid. Highly overdoped La1.65Sr0.35CuO4 (LSCO), which is far beyond the superconducting dome, shows T2 resistivity at low temperature and provides another system where the nature of the scattering mechanism can be studied by optical spectroscopy. We will present our far-infrared measurements of the ab-plane of epitaxial LSCO grown by pulsed laser-ablated deposition on a substrate of SrTiO4. The authors would like to thank NSERC, CFI-OIT and CIFAR for support.

  19. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea

    DOE PAGES

    Maier, Thomas A.; Staar, Peter; Mishra, V.; ...

    2016-06-17

    In the traditional Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and -k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. In this paper, wemore » report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. Finally, in contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin–fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability.« less

  20. A Probabilistic Analysis of the Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonides, Evan; Terzian, Yervant

    2016-06-01

    The Fermi paradox uses an appeal to the mediocrity principle to make it seem counterintuitive that humanity has not been contacted by extraterrestrial intelligence. A numerical, statistical analysis was conducted to determine whether this apparent loneliness is, in fact, unexpected. An inequality was derived to relate the frequency of life arising and developing technology on a suitable planet in the galaxy; the average length of time since the first broadcast of such a civilization; and a constant term. An analysis of the sphere reached thus far by human communication was also conducted, considering our local neighborhood and planets of particular interest. These analyses both conclude that the Fermi paradox is not, in fact, unexpected. By the mediocrity principle and numerical modeling, it is actually unlikely that the Earth would have been reached by extraterrestrial communication at this point. We predict that under 1% of the galaxy has been reached at all thus far, and we do not anticipate to be reached until approximately 50% of stars/planets have been reached. We offer a prediction that we should not expect this until at least 1,500 years in the future. Thus the Fermi paradox is not a shocking observation- or lack thereof- and humanity may very well be contacted within our species’ lifespan (we can begin to expect to be contacted 1,500 years in the future).

  1. The Sustainability Solution To The Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haqq-Misra, J. D.; Baum, S. D.

    No present observations suggest a technologically advanced extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI) has spread through the galaxy. However, under commonplace assumptions about galactic civilization formation and expansion, this absence of observation is highly unlikely. This improbability is the heart of the Fermi Paradox. The Fermi Paradox leads some to conclude that humans have the only advanced civilization in this galaxy, either because civilization formation is very rare or because intelligent civilizations inevitably destroy themselves. In this paper, we argue that this conclusion is premature by introducing the “Sustainability Solution” to the Fermi Paradox, which questions the Paradox's assumption of faster ( e.g. exponential) civilization growth. Drawing on insights from the sustainability of human civilization on Earth, we propose that faster-growth may not be sustainable on the galactic scale. If this is the case, then there may exist ETI that have not expanded throughout the galaxy or have done so but collapsed. These possibilities have implications for both searches for ETI and for human civilization management.

  2. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea

    PubMed Central

    Maier, T. A; Staar, P.; Mishra, V.; Chatterjee, U.; Campuzano, J. C.; Scalapino, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    In the traditional Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and −k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. Here we report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. In contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin–fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability. PMID:27312569

  3. Fermi/GBM Results of Magnetars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, chryssa

    2011-01-01

    Magnetars are magnetically powered rotating neutron stars with extreme magnetic fields (over 10(exp 14) Gauss). They were discovered in the X- and gamma-rays where they predominantly emit their radiation. Very few sources (roughly 18) have been found since their discovery in 1987. NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was launched June 11,2009; since then the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) recorded emission from four magnetar sources. Two of these were brand new sources, SGR J0501 +4516, discovered with Swift and extensively monitored with Swift and GBM, SGR J0418+5729, discovered with GBM and the Interplanetary Network (IPN). A third was SGR Jl550-5418, a source originally classified as an Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP IEI547.0-5408), but exhibiting a very prolific outburst with over 400 events recorded in January 2009. In my talk I will give a short history of magnetars and describe how this, once relatively esoteric field, has emerged as a link between several astrophysical areas including Gamma-Ray Bursts. Finally, I will describe the exciting new results of Fermi in this field and the current status of our knowledge of the magnetar population properties and magnetic fields.

  4. Cinema, Fermi problems and general education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthimiou, C. J.; Llewellyn, R. A.

    2007-05-01

    During the past few years the authors have developed a new approach to the teaching of physical science, a general education course typically found in the curricula of nearly every college and university. This approach, called Physics in Films (Efthimiou and Llewellyn 2006 Phys. Teach. 44 28-33), uses scenes from popular films to illustrate physical principles and has excited student interest and improved student performance. A similar approach at the senior/high-school level, nicknamed Hollywood Physics, has been developed by Chandler (2006 Phys. Teach. 44 290-2 2002 Phys. Teach. 40 420-4). The two approaches may be considered complementary as they target different student groups. The analyses of many of the scenes in Physics in Films are a direct application of Fermi calculations—estimates and approximations designed to make solutions of complex and seemingly intractable problems understandable to the student non-specialist. The intent of this paper is to provide instructors with examples they can use to develop skill in recognizing Fermi problems and making Fermi calculations in their own courses.

  5. Fermi's Motion Produces a Study in Spirograph

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    The LAT's sensitivity to gamma rays is greatest in the center of its wide field of view and decreases toward the edge. LAT scientists regard the effective limit of the instrument's field of view to be 78.5 degrees (red circle) from its center. View a video of this here: bit.ly/Y2K4LN. Credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration ----- NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope orbits our planet every 95 minutes, building up increasingly deeper views of the universe with every circuit. Its wide-eyed Large Area Telescope (LAT) sweeps across the entire sky every three hours, capturing the highest-energy form of light -- gamma rays -- from sources across the universe. These range from supermassive black holes billions of light-years away to intriguing objects in our own galaxy, such as X-ray binaries, supernova remnants and pulsars. Now a Fermi scientist has transformed LAT data of a famous pulsar into a mesmerizing movie that visually encapsulates the spacecraft's complex motion. Click here to continue reading: 1.usa.gov/WhYwCU NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  6. Signatures of an annular Fermi sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Insun; Liu, Yang; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Baldwin, K. W.; Shayegan, M.; Winkler, R.

    2017-01-01

    The concept of a Fermi surface, the constant-energy surface containing all the occupied electron states in momentum, or wave-vector (k ) , space plays a key role in determining electronic properties of conductors. In two-dimensional (2D) carrier systems, the Fermi surface becomes a contour which, in the simplest case, encircles the occupied states. In this case, the area enclosed by the contour, which we refer to as the Fermi sea (FS), is a simple disk. Here we report the observation of an FS with a new topology, namely, an FS in the shape of an annulus. Such an FS is expected in a variety of 2D systems where the energy band dispersion supports a ring of extrema at finite k , but its experimental observation has been elusive. Our study provides (1) theoretical evidence for the presence of an annular FS in 2D hole systems confined to wide GaAs quantum wells and (2) experimental signatures of the onset of its occupation as an abrupt rise in the sample resistance, accompanied by a sudden appearance of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations at an unexpectedly high frequency whose value does not simply correspond to the (negligible) density of holes contained within the annular FS.

  7. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Thomas A.; Staar, Peter; Mishra, V.; Chatterjee, Utpal; Campuzano, J. C.; Scalapino, Douglas J.

    2016-06-17

    In the traditional Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and -k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. In this paper, we report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. Finally, in contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin–fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability.

  8. Coalescing binary systems of compact objects to (post) sup 5/2 -Newtonian order: Late-time evolution and gravitational radiation emission

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    The late-time evolution of binary systems of compact objects (neutron stars or black holes) is studied using the Damour-Derueele (post){sup 5/2}-Newtonian equations of motion with relativistic corrections of all orders up to and including radiation reaction. Using the method of close orbital elements from celestial mechanics, the author evolves the orbits to separations of r {approx} 2 m, where m is the total mass, at which point the (post){sup 5/2}-Newtonian approximation breaks down. With the orbits as input, he calculates the gravitational waveform and luminosity using a post-Newtonian formalism of Wagoner and Will. Results are obtained for systems containing various combinations of compact objects, for various values of the mass ratio m{sub 1}/m{sub 2}, and forg various initial values of the orbital eccentricity.

  9. Is the great attractor really a great wall?. [late-time cosmological phase transition producing coherent velocity caused by relic domain wall repulsive effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Albert; Turner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the cosmological consequences of a late-time phase transition which produces light domain walls are discussed. The observed peculiar velocity field of the universe and the observed isotropy of the microwave backgroud radiation severely constrain the wall surface density in such as scenario: G(omega) less than about 0.0001 H0 (H0 is the present value of the Hubble parameter). The most interesting consequence of such a phase transition is the possibility that the local, coherent streaming motion of about 600 km/s reported by Dressler et al (1987) could be explained by the repulsive effect of a relic domain wall within the Hubble volume provided that G(omega)/H0 = 0.0001.

  10. Late Time Multi-Wavelength Observations of Swift J1644+5734: A Luminous Optical/IR Bump and Quiescent X-Ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Brown, G. C.; Metzger, B.D.; Page, K. L.; Cenko, S. B.; O'Brien, P. T.; Lyman, J. D.; Wiersema, K.; Stanway, E. R.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present late time multi-wavelength observations of Swift J1644+57, suggested to be a relativistic tidal disruption flare (TDF). Our observations extend to greater than 4 years from discovery and show that 1.4 years after outburst the relativistic jet switched off on a timescale less than tens of days, corresponding to a power-law decay faster than t (sup -70). Beyond this point weak X-rays continue to be detected at an approximately constant luminosity of L (sub X) approximately equal to 5 times 10 (sup 42) ergs per second and are marginally inconsistent with a continuing decay of t (sup minus 5 divided by 3), similar to that seen prior to the switch-off. Host photometry enables us to infer a black hole mass of M (mass) (sub BH (black hole) equal to 3 times 10 (sup 6) the mass of the sun, consistent with the late time X-ray luminosity arising from sub-Eddington accretion onto the black hole in the form of either an unusually optically faint active galactic nucleus or a slowly varying phase of the transient. Optical/IR observations show a clear bump in the light curve at timescales of 30 to 50 days, with a peak magnitude (corrected for host galaxy extinction) of M (sub R) approximately equal to minus 22 to minus 23. The luminosity of the bump is significantly higher than seen in other, nonrelativisticTDFs and does not match any re-brightening seen at X-ray or radio wavelengths. Its luminosity, light curve shape, and spectrum are broadly similar to those seen in superluminous supervnovae, although subject to large uncertainties in the correction of the significant host extinction. We discuss these observations in the context of both TDF and massive star origins for Swift J1644+5734 and other candidate relativistic tidal flares.

  11. Late-time cosmological evolution of a general class of f(R,T) gravity with minimal curvature-matter coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Hamid; Ziaie, Amir Hadi

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we study the late-time cosmological solutions of f(R,T)=g(R)+h(-T) models assuming that the conservation of the energy-momentum tensor ( EMT) is violated. We perform our analysis through constructing an autonomous dynamical system for the equations of motion. We study the stability properties of solutions via considering linear perturbations about the related equilibrium points. Moreover, we parameterize the Lagrangian by introducing the parameters m( r) and n( s). These parameters which are constructed out of the functions g(R) and h(-T) play the main role in finding the late-time behavior of the solutions. We find that there exist, in general, three classes of solutions; all models with n>0 include a proper transition from a prolonged matter era to a de Sitter solution. Models with -0.51, for at least a root of equation n(s)=s-1, include an unphysical dark energy solution preceding an improper matter era. Finally, for n<-1/2 there is a transient accelerated expansion era with -1/2

  12. Radio monitoring of NGC 7469: late-time radio evolution of SN 2000ft and the circumnuclear starburst in NGC 7469

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Alberdi, A.; Colina, L.; Torrelles, J. M.; Panagia, N.; Wilson, A.; Kankare, E.; Mattila, S.

    2009-11-01

    We present the results of an eight-year long monitoring of the radio emission from the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) NGC 7469, using 8.4 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) observations at 0.3 arcsec resolution. Our monitoring shows that the late-time evolution of the radio supernova (RSN) SN 2000ft follows a decline very similar to that displayed at earlier times of its optically thin phase. The late-time radio emission of SN 2000ft is, therefore, still being powered by its interaction with the pre-SN stellar wind, and not with the interstellar medium (ISM). Indeed, the ram pressure of the pre-SN wind is ρwv2w ~ 7.6 × 10-9dyncm-2, at a SN age of t ~ 2127 d, which is significantly larger than the expected pressure of the ISM around SN 2000ft. At this age, the SN shock has reached a distance rsh ~ 0.06 pc, and our observations are probing the interaction of the SN with dense material that was ejected by the pre-SN star about 5820yr prior to its explosion. From our VLA monitoring, we estimate that the swept-up mass by the SN shock after about six years of expansion is Msw ~ 0.29Msolar, assuming an average expansion speed of the SN of 104km s-1. We also searched for recently exploded core-collapse SNe in our VLA images. Apart from SN 2000ft (Sν ~ 1760μJy at its peak, corresponding to 1.1 × 1028ergs-1Hz-1), we found no evidence for any other RSN more luminous than ~6.0 × 1026ergs-1Hz-1, which suggests that no other Type IIn SN has exploded since 2000 in the circumnuclear starburst of NGC 7469.

  13. On the use of late-time peaks of residence time distributions for the characterization of hierarchically nested groundwater flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Zhi; Wörman, Anders; Bresciani, Etienne; Wan, Li; Wang, Xu-Sheng; Jiang, Xiao-Wei

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies on the characterization of hierarchically nested groundwater flow systems have mainly been based on the spatial distribution analyses of groundwater pathways. In this paper, by considering the discrete nature of the temporal behavior induced by different hierarchical flow systems, a new approach is proposed. The core of this approach is to use the critical residence times defined by the late-time peaks of residence time distributions (RTDs) to divide the groundwater flow field into local, intermediate and regional systems as described by Tóth (1963). We first introduce Tóthian basins of a 2D cross section and a 3D domain as synthetic test cases. The feasibility of the approach is demonstrated by comparing the partitioning results given by the dividing streamlines associated with internal stagnation points in the 2D Tóthian basin and by the hydraulic connections between recharge and discharge zones in the 3D Tóthian basin. Then, the Dosit River Watershed in Northwestern China is introduced as a field case study. Using the calibrated 3D groundwater flow model, one distinct late-time peak is identified from the RTD and indicates that the Dosit River Watershed can generally be regarded as a two-order nested flow structure with local and regional flow systems. This approach can be used to identify the volumes occupied by different orders of flow systems in 3D, and therefore opens up a new perspective in the study of the 3D nature of basin-scale groundwater flow.

  14. Late Time Multi-wavelength Observations of Swift J1644+5734: A Luminous Optical/IR Bump and Quiescent X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Brown, G. C.; Metzger, B. D.; Page, K. L.; Cenko, S. B.; O'Brien, P. T.; Lyman, J. D.; Wiersema, K.; Stanway, E. R.; Fruchter, A. S.; Perley, D. A.; Bloom, J. S.

    2016-03-01

    We present late time multi-wavelength observations of Swift J1644+57, suggested to be a relativistic tidal disruption flare (TDF). Our observations extend to >4 years from discovery and show that 1.4 years after outburst the relativistic jet switched off on a timescale less than tens of days, corresponding to a power-law decay faster than t-70. Beyond this point weak X-rays continue to be detected at an approximately constant luminosity of LX ˜ 5 × 1042 erg s-1 and are marginally inconsistent with a continuing decay of t-5/3, similar to that seen prior to the switch-off. Host photometry enables us to infer a black hole mass of MBH = 3 × 106 M⊙, consistent with the late time X-ray luminosity arising from sub-Eddington accretion onto the black hole in the form of either an unusually optically faint active galactic nucleus or a slowly varying phase of the transient. Optical/IR observations show a clear bump in the light curve at timescales of 30-50 days, with a peak magnitude (corrected for host galaxy extinction) of MR ˜ -22 to -23. The luminosity of the bump is significantly higher than seen in other, non-relativistic TDFs and does not match any re-brightening seen at X-ray or radio wavelengths. Its luminosity, light curve shape, and spectrum are broadly similar to those seen in superluminous supervnovae, although subject to large uncertainties in the correction of the significant host extinction. We discuss these observations in the context of both TDF and massive star origins for Swift J1644+5734 and other candidate relativistic tidal flares.

  15. LATE TIME MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF SWIFT J1644+5734: A LUMINOUS OPTICAL/IR BUMP AND QUIESCENT X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Levan, A. J.; Brown, G. C.; Lyman, J. D.; Stanway, E. R.; Tanvir, N. R.; Page, K. L.; O’Brien, P. T.; Wiersema, K.; Metzger, B. D.; Cenko, S. B.; Fruchter, A. S.; Perley, D. A.; Bloom, J. S.

    2016-03-01

    We present late time multi-wavelength observations of Swift J1644+57, suggested to be a relativistic tidal disruption flare (TDF). Our observations extend to >4 years from discovery and show that 1.4 years after outburst the relativistic jet switched off on a timescale less than tens of days, corresponding to a power-law decay faster than t{sup −70}. Beyond this point weak X-rays continue to be detected at an approximately constant luminosity of L{sub X} ∼ 5 × 10{sup 42} erg s{sup −1} and are marginally inconsistent with a continuing decay of t{sup −5/3}, similar to that seen prior to the switch-off. Host photometry enables us to infer a black hole mass of M{sub BH} = 3 × 10{sup 6} M{sub ⊙}, consistent with the late time X-ray luminosity arising from sub-Eddington accretion onto the black hole in the form of either an unusually optically faint active galactic nucleus or a slowly varying phase of the transient. Optical/IR observations show a clear bump in the light curve at timescales of 30–50 days, with a peak magnitude (corrected for host galaxy extinction) of M{sub R} ∼ −22 to −23. The luminosity of the bump is significantly higher than seen in other, non-relativistic TDFs and does not match any re-brightening seen at X-ray or radio wavelengths. Its luminosity, light curve shape, and spectrum are broadly similar to those seen in superluminous supervnovae, although subject to large uncertainties in the correction of the significant host extinction. We discuss these observations in the context of both TDF and massive star origins for Swift J1644+5734 and other candidate relativistic tidal flares.

  16. Red-emission phosphor's brightness deterioration by x-ray and brightness recovery phenomenon by heating.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masaaki; Chida, Koichi; Inaba, Yohei; Kobayashi, Ryota; Zuguchi, Masayuki

    2017-06-26

    There are no feasible real-time and direct skin dosimeters for interventional radiology. One would be available if there were x-ray phosphors that had no brightness change caused by x-ray irradiation, but the emission of the Y2O3:Eu, (Y, Gd, Eu)BO3, and YVO4:Eu phosphors investigated in our previous study was reduced by x-ray irradiation. We found that the brightness of those phosphors recovered, and the purpose of this study is to investigate their recovery phenomena. It is expected that more kinds of phosphors could be used in x-ray dosimeters if the brightness changes caused by x-rays are elucidated and prevented. Three kinds of phosphors-Y2O3:Eu, (Y, Gd, Eu)BO3, and YVO4:Eu-were irradiated by x-rays (2 Gy) to reduce their brightness. After the irradiation, brightness changes occurring at room temperature and at 80 °C were investigated. The irradiation reduced the brightness of all the phosphors by 5%-10%, but the brightness of each recovered immediately both at room temperature and at 80 °C. The recovery at 80 °C was faster than that at room temperature, and at both temperatures the recovered brightness remained at 95%-98% of the brightness before the x-ray irradiation. The brightness recovery phenomena of Y2O3:Eu, (Y, Gd, Eu)BO3, and YVO4:Eu phosphors occurring after brightness deterioration due to x-ray irradiation were found to be more significant at 80 °C than at room temperature. More kinds of phosphors could be used in x-ray scintillation dosimeters if the reasons for the brightness changes caused by x-rays were elucidated.

  17. Energy-exchange collisions of dark-bright-bright vector solitons.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, R; Manikandan, N; Aravinthan, K

    2015-12-01

    We find a dark component guiding the practically interesting bright-bright vector one-soliton to two different parametric domains giving rise to different physical situations by constructing a more general form of three-component dark-bright-bright mixed vector one-soliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with nine free real parameters. Moreover our main investigation of the collision dynamics of such mixed vector solitons by constructing the multisoliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with the help of Hirota technique reveals that the dark-bright-bright vector two-soliton supports energy-exchange collision dynamics. In particular the dark component preserves its initial form and the energy-exchange collision property of the bright-bright vector two-soliton solution of the Manakov model during collision. In addition the interactions between bound state dark-bright-bright vector solitons reveal oscillations in their amplitudes. A similar kind of breathing effect was also experimentally observed in the Bose-Einstein condensates. Some possible ways are theoretically suggested not only to control this breathing effect but also to manage the beating, bouncing, jumping, and attraction effects in the collision dynamics of dark-bright-bright vector solitons. The role of multiple free parameters in our solution is examined to define polarization vector, envelope speed, envelope width, envelope amplitude, grayness, and complex modulation of our solution. It is interesting to note that the polarization vector of our mixed vector one-soliton evolves in sphere or hyperboloid depending upon the initial parametric choices.

  18. The Monster Next Door: Fermi-LAT Observations of Supernova Remnant N132D in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Daniel; Hays, Elizabeth; Acero, Fabio; Slane, Patrick; Hughes, John; Plucinsky, Paul; Fermi-LAT Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Supernova remnant (SNR) N132D, located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, represents a unique opportunity for the study of γ-ray emission from shock accelerated cosmic rays (CRs) in another galaxy since it stands as the first and only extra-Galactic SNR detected in γ-rays. N132D is bright in the X-ray, infrared and radio bands, as well as being detected in TeV energy γ-rays, and hence, characterizing its emission in the Fermi-LAT band allows us to build a very complete picture of the properties of the system and its progenitor, and help us understand CR acceleration in SNRs.

  19. Near-IR Imaging Polarimetry toward a Bright-rimmed Cloud: Magnetic Field in SFO 74

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji; Miao, Jingqi; Tamura, Motohide; Sato, Yaeko; Kwon, Jungmi; Watanabe, Makoto; Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagayama, Takahiro; Sato, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    We have made near-infrared (JHK s) imaging polarimetry of a bright-rimmed cloud (SFO 74). The polarization vector maps clearly show that the magnetic field in the layer just behind the bright rim is running along the rim, quite different from its ambient magnetic field. The direction of the magnetic field just behind the tip rim is almost perpendicular to that of the incident UV radiation, and the magnetic field configuration appears to be symmetric as a whole with respect to the cloud symmetry axis. We estimated the column and number densities in the two regions (just inside and far inside the tip rim) and then derived the magnetic field strength, applying the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The estimated magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim, ~90 μG, is stronger than that far inside, ~30 μG. This suggests that the magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim is enhanced by the UV-radiation-induced shock. The shock increases the density within the top layer around the tip and thus increases the strength of the magnetic field. The magnetic pressure seems to be comparable to the turbulent one just inside the tip rim, implying a significant contribution of the magnetic field to the total internal pressure. The mass-to-flux ratio was estimated to be close to the critical value just inside the tip rim. We speculate that the flat-topped bright rim of SFO 74 could be formed by the magnetic field effect.

  20. FERMI&Elettra Accelerator Technical Optimization Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M.; Craievich, P.; Di Mitri, S.; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.; Wang, D.; Warnock, R.; /SLAC

    2007-04-30

    This chapter describes the accelerator physics aspects, the engineering considerations and the choice of parameters that led to the accelerator design of the FERMI Free-Electron-Laser. The accelerator (also called the ''electron beam delivery system'') covers the region from the exit of the injector to the entrance of the first FEL undulator. The considerations that led to the proposed configuration were made on the basis of a study that explored various options and performance limits. This work follows previous studies of x-ray FEL facilities (SLAC LCLS [1], DESY XFEL [2], PAL XFEL [3], MIT [4], BESSY FEL [5], LBNL LUX [6], Daresbury 4GLS [7]) and integrates many of the ideas that were developed there. Several issues specific to harmonic cascade FELs, and that had not yet been comprehensively studied, were also encountered and tackled. A particularly difficult issue was the need to meet the requirement for high peak current and small slice energy spread, as the specification for the ratio of these two parameters (that defines the peak brightness of the electron beam) is almost a factor of two higher than that of the LCLS's SASE FEL. Another challenging aspect was the demand to produce an electron beam with as uniform as possible peak current and energy distributions along the bunch, a condition that was met by introducing novel beam dynamics techniques. Part of the challenge was due to the fact that there were no readily available computational tools to carry out reliable calculations, and these had to be developed. Most of the information reported in this study is available in the form of scientific publications, and is partly reproduced here for the convenience of the reader.

  1. FERMI&Elettra Accelerator Technical Optimization FinalReport

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M.; Craievich, P.; Di Mitri, S.; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.; Wang, D.; Warnock, R.

    2006-07-01

    This report describes the accelerator physics aspects, theengineering considerations and the choice of parameters that led to theaccelerator design of the FERMI Free-Electron-Laser. The accelerator(also called the "electron beam delivery system") covers the region fromthe exit of the injector to the entrance of the first FEL undulator. Theconsiderations that led to the proposed configuration were made on thebasis of a study that explored various options and performance limits.This work follows previous studies of x-ray FEL facilities (SLAC LCLS[1], DESY XFEL [2], PAL XFEL [3], MIT [4], BESSY FEL[5], LBNL LUX [6],Daresbury 4GLS [7]) and integrates many of the ideas that were developedthere. Several issues specific to harmonic cascade FELs, and that had notyet been comprehensively studied, were also encountered and tackled. Aparticularly difficult issue was the need to meet the requirement forhigh peak current and small slice energy spread, as the specification forthe ratio of these two parameters (that defines the peak brightness ofthe electron beam) is almost a factor of two higher than that of theLCLS's SASE FEL. Another challenging aspect was the demand to produce anelectron beam with as uniform as possible peak current and energydistributions along the bunch, a condition that was met by introducingnovel beam dynamics techniques. Part of the challenge was due to the factthat there were no readily available computational tools to carry outreliable calculations, and these had to be developed. Most of theinformation reported in this study is available in the form of scientificpublications, and is partly reproduced here for the convenience of thereader.

  2. Observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud with Fermi

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; ...

    2010-03-18

    Context. The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is to date the only normal external galaxy that has been detected in high-energy gamma rays. High-energy gamma rays trace particle acceleration processes and gamma-ray observations allow the nature and sites of acceleration to be studied. Aims. We characterise the distribution and sources of cosmic rays in the LMC from analysis of gamma-ray observations. Methods. We analyse 11 months of continuous sky-survey observations obtained with the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope and compare it to tracers of the interstellar medium and models of the gamma-ray sources in the LMC. Results.more » The LMC is detected at 33σ significance. The integrated >100 MeV photon flux of the LMC amounts to (2.6 ± 0.2) × 10-7 ph cm-2 s-1 which corresponds to an energy flux of (1.6 ± 0.1) × 10-10 erg cm-2 s-1, with additional systematic uncertainties of 16%. The analysis reveals the massive star forming region 30 Doradus as a bright source of gamma-ray emission in the LMC in addition to fainter emission regions found in the northern part of the galaxy. The gamma-ray emission from the LMC shows very little correlation with gas density and is rather correlated to tracers of massive star forming regions. The close confinement of gamma-ray emission to star forming regions suggests a relatively short GeV cosmic-ray proton diffusion length. In conclusion, the close correlation between cosmic-ray density and massive star tracers supports the idea that cosmic rays are accelerated in massive star forming regions as a result of the large amounts of kinetic energy that are input by the stellar winds and supernova explosions of massive stars into the interstellar medium.« less

  3. Microwave Brightness Temperatures of Tilted Convective Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Ye; Haferman, Jeffrey L.; Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.

    1998-01-01

    Aircraft and ground-based radar data from the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled-Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) show that convective systems are not always vertical. Instead, many are tilted from vertical. Satellite passive microwave radiometers observe the atmosphere at a viewing angle. For example, the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) on Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites and the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) on the TRMM satellite have an incident angle of about 50deg. Thus, the brightness temperature measured from one direction of tilt may be different than that viewed from the opposite direction due to the different optical depth. This paper presents the investigation of passive microwave brightness temperatures of tilted convective systems. To account for the effect of tilt, a 3-D backward Monte Carlo radiative transfer model has been applied to a simple tilted cloud model and a dynamically evolving cloud model to derive the brightness temperature. The radiative transfer results indicate that brightness temperature varies when the viewing angle changes because of the different optical depth. The tilt increases the displacements between high 19 GHz brightness temperature (Tb(sub 19)) due to liquid emission from lower level of cloud and the low 85 GHz brightness temperature (Tb(sub 85)) due to ice scattering from upper level of cloud. As the resolution degrades, the difference of brightness temperature due to the change of viewing angle decreases dramatically. The dislocation between Tb(sub 19) and Tb(sub 85), however, remains prominent.

  4. The Sky Brightness Data Archive (SBDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craine, Eric R.; Craine, Erin M.; Craine, Brian L.

    2011-05-01

    Although many astronomers have long been sensitive to issues of light pollution and deteriorating sky quality it is only in recent years that such interest has extended to other groups including, among others, ecologists, health professionals, and urban planners. Issues of light pollution and loss of dark skies are starting to appear in the scientific literature in the context of health and behavior impacts on both human and animal life. Nonetheless, a common deficiency in most such studies is the absence of historical or baseline data against which to compare sky brightness trends and temporal changes. To address this deficiency we have begun to collect a variety of types of quantitative sky brightness data for insertion in an international sky brightness archive that can be accessed for research projects which are dependent upon an understanding of the nature of local light pollution issues. To aid this process we have developed a mobile sky brightness meter which automatically logs sky brightness and observation location. The device can be stationary for long periods of time or can be easily transported for continuous sky brightness measurement from ground vehicles, boats, or aircraft. The sampling rate is typically about 0.25Hz. We present here examples of different modes of sky brightness measurement, various means of displaying and analyzing such data, ways to interpret natural astronomical phenomena apparent in the data, and suggest a number of complementary scientific projects that may capture the interest of both professional and amateur scientists. Finally, we discuss the status of the archive and ways that potential contributors may submit their observations for publication in the archive.

  5. Fermi arcs vs. fermi pockets in electron-doped perovskite iridates

    SciTech Connect

    He, Junfeng; Hafiz, H.; Mion, Thomas R.; Hogan, T.; Dhital, C.; Chen, X.; Lin, Qisen; Hashimoto, M.; Lu, D. H.; Zhang, Y.; Markiewicz, R. S.; Bansil, A.; Wilson, S. D.; He, Rui -Hua

    2015-02-23

    We report on an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study of bulk electron-doped perovskite iridate, (Sr1-xLax)₃Ir₂O₇. Fermi surface pockets are observed with a total electron count in keeping with that expected from La substitution. Depending on the energy and polarization of the incident photons, these pockets show up in the form of disconnected “Fermi arcs”, reminiscent of those reported recently in surface electron-doped Sr₂IrO₄. Our observed spectral variation is consistent with the coexistence of an electronic supermodulation with structural distortion in the system.

  6. Fermi arcs vs. fermi pockets in electron-doped perovskite iridates

    DOE PAGES

    He, Junfeng; Hafiz, H.; Mion, Thomas R.; ...

    2015-02-23

    We report on an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study of bulk electron-doped perovskite iridate, (Sr1-xLax)₃Ir₂O₇. Fermi surface pockets are observed with a total electron count in keeping with that expected from La substitution. Depending on the energy and polarization of the incident photons, these pockets show up in the form of disconnected “Fermi arcs”, reminiscent of those reported recently in surface electron-doped Sr₂IrO₄. Our observed spectral variation is consistent with the coexistence of an electronic supermodulation with structural distortion in the system.

  7. [Analysis of spectral intensity of fermi resonance of molecules].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yong-heng; Gao, Shu-qin; Li, Zhan-long; Cao, Biao; Li, Zuo-wei

    2010-01-01

    Raman spectra of liquid carbon disulfide (CS) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) were measured. And the spectral intensity was analyzed using the J. F. Bertran theory and the group theory. The rule about Fermi resonance was obtained from the Raman spectra of carbon disulfide (CS) and carbon tetrachloride (CCL4): (1) The energy can transfer between a fundamental and an overtone frequency about Fermi resonance; the two spectra have the same intensity. The spectral intensity of the two spectra was equal (R=1) about Fermi resonance, when the difference between fundamental of Fermi resonance and overtone of Fermi resonance was very small. (2) The intensity of overtone is stronger than that of fundamental's. (3) The spectrum of Fermi resonance was observed, but the fundamental frequency was not. This article has very good reference value for the assignments in the molecular structure and the research of contents.

  8. Probing the Contact Locally in a Trapped Unitary Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Rabin; Sagi, Yoav; Drake, Tara; Jin, Deborah

    2013-03-01

    The inherent density inhomogeneity of a trapped gas can complicate interpretation of experiments and can wash out sharp features. This is especially important for a Fermi gas, where interaction effects as well as the local Fermi energy, or Fermi momentum, depend on the density. We report on experiments that use optical pumping with shaped light beams to spatially select the center part of a trapped gas for probing. This technique is compatible with momentum resolved measurements. For a weakly interacting Fermi gas of 40K atoms, we present measurements of the momentum distribution that reveal for the first time a sharp Fermi surface. We then apply this technique to a strongly interacting Fermi gas at the Feshbach resonance, where we measured the temperature dependence of the Tan's contact locally in the trapped gas.

  9. Solar Cycle 23 in Coronal Bright Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattarov, Isroil; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Karachik, Nina V.; Sherdanov, Chori T.; Tillaboev, A. M.

    2010-04-01

    We describe an automatic routine to identify coronal bright points (CBPs) and apply this routine to SOHO/EIT observations taken in the 195 Å spectral range during solar cycle 23. We examine the total number of CBPs and its change in the course of this solar cycle. Unlike some other recent studies, we do find a modest ≈30% decrease in the number of CBPs associated with maximum of sunspot activity. Using the maximum brightness of CBPs as a criterion, we separate them on two categories: dim CBPs, associated with areas of a quiet Sun, and bright CBPs, associated with an active Sun. We find that the number of dim coronal bright points decreases at the maximum of sunspot cycle, while the number of bright CBPs increases. The latitudinal distributions suggest that dim CBPs are distributed uniformly over the solar disk. Active Sun CBPs exhibit a well-defined two-hump latitudinal profile suggestive of enhanced production of this type of CBPs in sunspot activity belts. Finally, we investigate the relative role of two mechanisms in cycle variations of CBP number, and conclude that a change in fraction of solar surface occupied by the quiet Sun’s magnetic field is the primary cause, with the visibility effect playing a secondary role.

  10. Analytic heating rate of neutron star merger ejecta derived from Fermi's theory of beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotokezaka, Kenta; Sari, Re'em; Piran, Tsvi

    2017-06-01

    Macronovae (kilonovae) that arise in binary neutron star mergers are powered by radioactive beta decay of hundreds of r-process nuclides. We derive, using Fermi's theory of beta decay, an analytic estimate of the nuclear heating rate. We show that the heating rate evolves as a power law ranging between t-6/5 and t-4/3. The overall magnitude of the heating rate is determined by the mean values of nuclear quantities, e.g. the nuclear matrix elements of beta decay. These values are specified by using nuclear experimental data. We discuss the role of higher order beta transitions and the robustness of the power law. The robust and simple form of the heating rate suggests that observations of the late-time bolometric light curve ∝ t-4/3 would be direct evidence of a r-process driven macronova. Such observations could also enable us to estimate the total amount of r-process nuclei produced in the merger.

  11. Note on Generalized Fermi-Dirac Function and Its Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Zhigang; Zejda, Ladislav; Däppen, Werner

    2000-04-01

    Generalized Fermi-Dirac function and its derivatives are important in evaluating the thermodynamic functions of partially degenerate electrons in hot stellar plasmas. Because of the nature of the Fermi-Dirac functions, analytic expressions are only available for certain extreme cases, and regular numeric methods fail when degeneracy and temperature are relatively high (but not high enough to use approximative formulae). In this paper, recursion relations of the generalized Fermi-Dirac function are discussed, and an effective numerical method to evaluate the derivatives of the generalized Fermi-Dirac function is given, following the Aparicio (1998) scheme. Finally, accuracy and domain of reliability of some popular analytic approximations are investigated.

  12. Mass Enhancement Factor and Fermi Surface in YCo 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shingo; Harima, Hisatomo

    1998-08-01

    An FLAPW electronic structure and Fermi surfaces are calculated for YCo2.Mass enhancement factor is also calculated based on the Fermi liquid theory.Investigations are performed by treating the Fermi energy as a parameteraccording to a previous study.Reasonable mass enhancement is obtained by assuming the Fermi liquidtheory resulting in a reasonable range of values of Udd for Co-d electrons.The same calculation for CeCo2 reveals that CeCo2 is a differentmagnetic system.

  13. Nonlocal Poisson-Fermi model for ionic solvent.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dexuan; Liu, Jinn-Liang; Eisenberg, Bob

    2016-07-01

    We propose a nonlocal Poisson-Fermi model for ionic solvent that includes ion size effects and polarization correlations among water molecules in the calculation of electrostatic potential. It includes the previous Poisson-Fermi models as special cases, and its solution is the convolution of a solution of the corresponding nonlocal Poisson dielectric model with a Yukawa-like kernel function. The Fermi distribution is shown to be a set of optimal ionic concentration functions in the sense of minimizing an electrostatic potential free energy. Numerical results are reported to show the difference between a Poisson-Fermi solution and a corresponding Poisson solution.

  14. Fermi surface and electron correlation effects of ferromagnetic iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, J.; Hoinkis, M.; Rotenberg, Eli; Blaha, P.; Claessen, R.

    2005-10-01

    The electronic band structure of bulk ferromagnetic iron is explored by angle-resolved photoemission for electron correlation effects. Fermi surface cross sections as well as band maps are contrasted with density functional calculations. The Fermi vectors and band parameters obtained from photoemission and their prediction from band theory are analyzed in detail. Generally good agreement is found for the Fermi surface. A bandwidth reduction for shallow bands of ˜30% is observed. Additional strong quasiparticle renormalization effects are found near the Fermi level, leading to a considerable mass enhancement. The role of electronic correlation effects and the electronic coupling to magnetic excitations is discussed in view of the experimental results.

  15. Stability and single-particle properties of bosonized Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houghton, A.; Kwon, H.-J.; Marston, J. B.

    1994-07-01

    We study the stability and single-particle properties of Fermi liquids in spatial dimensions greater than one via bosonization. For smooth nonsingular Fermi-liquid interactions we obtain Shankar's renormalization-group flows to second order in the BCS coupling and reproduce well-known results for quasiparticle lifetimes. We demonstrate by explicit calculation that spin-charge separation does not occur when the Fermi-liquid interactions are regular. We also explore the relationship between quantized bosonic excitations and zero-sound modes and present a concise derivation of both the spin and the charge collective-mode equations. Finally we discuss some aspects of singular Fermi-liquid interactions.

  16. Nonlocal Poisson-Fermi model for ionic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Dexuan; Liu, Jinn-Liang; Eisenberg, Bob

    2016-07-01

    We propose a nonlocal Poisson-Fermi model for ionic solvent that includes ion size effects and polarization correlations among water molecules in the calculation of electrostatic potential. It includes the previous Poisson-Fermi models as special cases, and its solution is the convolution of a solution of the corresponding nonlocal Poisson dielectric model with a Yukawa-like kernel function. The Fermi distribution is shown to be a set of optimal ionic concentration functions in the sense of minimizing an electrostatic potential free energy. Numerical results are reported to show the difference between a Poisson-Fermi solution and a corresponding Poisson solution.

  17. Probing the EBL evolution at high redshifts using 22 GRBs detected with the Fermi-LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitbhai Desai, Abhishek; Ajello, Marco; Omodei, Nicola; Hartmann, Dieter; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The extragalactic background light (EBL) is the collective emission of all the stars and galaxies over the history of the universe. The most efficient method to study the EBL is through the imprint it leaves via photon-photon annihilation in the spectra of distant gamma-ray sources. Here we present a combined analysis of a sample of 22 Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) detected by Fermi Large Area Telescope. GRBs are short-lived, bright, high-energy sources detected up to very high redshifts. This allows us to probe the EBL at much higher redshifts than before. We report the first constrain on the EBL when the Universe was one fourth of its present age (z=1.8). This will be discussed in the context of the generation of the UV-optical background and the star-formation activity of the Universe.

  18. Gamma-ray Emission of the Earth's Upper Atmosphere in Geographical Coordinates with Fermi-LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madlee, S.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Digel, S.; Ruffolo, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Earth is extremely bright in gamma rays as viewed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). This gamma-ray emission of the Earth is produced by the interactions of cosmic rays (CRs), high-energy particles in space, with the Earth's upper atmosphere. Here we analyze the Earth's photons in the geographical coordinate system (latitude and longitude) from 58 months of data, using the latest version of the LAT event selection (Pass 8). Preliminary results of our analysis, which are the gamma-ray intensity maps of the Earth at energies from 1 to 10 GeV, will be presented. This study provides a better understanding of the geomagnetic field, the Earth's upper atmosphere, and CRs. This project is partially supported by the Thailand Research Fund (Grant TRG5880173 and RTA5980003).

  19. Multiwavelength Study of Fermi-LAT blazars Variability and Radiation Production Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britto, R. J.; Bottacini, E.; Böttcher, M.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Buson, S.; Lott, B.; Marais, J. P.; Meintjes, P. J.; Razzaque, S.; van Soelen, B.

    2016-12-01

    Quasars constitute a subclass of radio-loud active galactic nuclei that release a tremendous amount of non-thermal radiation through a pair of twin jets. When one of these jets is aligned close to the direction of the Earth, the object is then called a blazar. A consistent monitoring of these sources can help to unveil physical mechanisms at the origin of the radiation production that spreads throughout the whole electromagnetic spectrum, from radio waves to γ rays. The goal of this paper is to report some current works being undertaken in term of both spectral studies and time domain analyses of bright blazars which are observed with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope and by South Africa-based optical telescopes. In particular, we present our recent and current studies on blazars 3C 454.3 and NVSS J141922-083830 respectively.

  20. Plasmonic EIT-like switching in bright-dark-bright plasmon resonators.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junxue; Wang, Pei; Chen, Chuncong; Lu, Yonghua; Ming, Hai; Zhan, Qiwen

    2011-03-28

    In this paper we report the study of the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-like transmission in the bright-dark-bright plasmon resonators. It is demonstrated that the interferences between the dark plasmons excited by two bright plasmon resonators can be controlled by the incident light polarization. The constructive interference strengthens the coupling between the bright and dark resonators, leading to a more prominent EIT-like transparency window of the metamaterial. In contrary, destructive interference suppresses the coupling between the bright and dark resonators, destroying the interference pathway that forms the EIT-like transmission. Based on this observation, the plasmonic EIT switching can be realized by changing the polarization of incident light. This phenomenon may find applications in optical switching and plasmon-based information processing.

  1. A selective deficit in the appreciation and recognition of brightness: brightness agnosia?

    PubMed

    Nijboer, Tanja C W; Nys, Gudrun M S; van der Smagt, Maarten J; de Haan, Edward H F

    2009-01-01

    We report a patient with extensive brain damage in the right hemisphere who demonstrated a severe impairment in the appreciation of brightness. Acuity, contrast sensitivity as well as luminance discrimination were normal, suggesting her brightness impairment is not a mere consequence of low-level sensory impairments. The patient was not able to indicate the darker or the lighter of two grey squares, even though she was able to see that they differed. In addition, she could not indicate whether the lights in a room were switched on or off, nor was she able to differentiate between normal greyscale images and inverted greyscale images. As the patient recognised objects, colours, and shapes correctly, the impairment is specific for brightness. As low-level, sensory processing is normal, this specific deficit in the recognition and appreciation of brightness appears to be of a higher, cognitive level, the level of semantic knowledge. This appears to be the first report of 'brightness agnosia'.

  2. Brightness Discrimination in Budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus)

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Olle; Karlsson, Sandra; Kelber, Almut

    2013-01-01

    Birds have excellent spatial acuity and colour vision compared to other vertebrates while spatial contrast sensitivity is relatively poor for unknown reasons. Contrast sensitivity describes the detection of gratings of varying spatial frequency. It is unclear whether bird brightness discrimination between large uniform fields is poor as well. Here we show that budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) need a Michelson contrast of 0.09 to discriminate between large spatially separated achromatic fields in bright light conditions. This is similar to the peak contrast sensitivity of 10.2 (0.098 Michelson contrast) for achromatic grating stimuli established in earlier studies. The brightness discrimination threshold described in Weber fractions is 0.18, which is modest compared to other vertebrates. PMID:23349946

  3. Fermi Large Area Telescope third source catalog

    DOE PAGES

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; ...

    2015-06-12

    Here, we present the third Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) source catalog (3FGL) of sources in the 100 MeV–300 GeV range. Based on the first 4 yr of science data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission, it is the deepest yet in this energy range. Relative to the Second Fermi LAT catalog, the 3FGL catalog incorporates twice as much data, as well as a number of analysis improvements, including improved calibrations at the event reconstruction level, an updated model for Galactic diffuse γ-ray emission, a refined procedure for source detection, and improved methods for associating LAT sources with potential counterparts at other wavelengths. The 3FGL catalog includes 3033 sources abovemore » $$4\\sigma $$ significance, with source location regions, spectral properties, and monthly light curves for each. Of these, 78 are flagged as potentially being due to imperfections in the model for Galactic diffuse emission. Twenty-five sources are modeled explicitly as spatially extended, and overall 238 sources are considered as identified based on angular extent or correlated variability (periodic or otherwise) observed at other wavelengths. For 1010 sources we have not found plausible counterparts at other wavelengths. More than 1100 of the identified or associated sources are active galaxies of the blazar class; several other classes of non-blazar active galaxies are also represented in the 3FGL. Pulsars represent the largest Galactic source class. As a result, from source counts of Galactic sources we estimate that the contribution of unresolved sources to the Galactic diffuse emission is ~3% at 1 GeV.« less

  4. Dark Dunes Over-riding Bright Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Some martian sand dunes may be more active than others. In this picture, wind has caused the dark and somewhat crescent-shaped dunes to advance toward the lower left. While their movement cannot actually be seen in this April 1998snapshot, the location of their steepest slopes--their slip faces--on their southwestern sides indicates the direction of movement. Oddly, these dark dunes have moved across and partly cover sets of smaller, bright ridges that also formed by wind action.

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image illustrates an intriguing martian 'find.' Strangely, the two dune types have different shapes and a different relative brightness. There are two explanations for the relationship seen here, and neither can be distinguished as 'the answer'--(1) it is possible that the brighter dunes are old and cemented, and represent some ancient wind activity, whereas the dark dunes are modern and are marching across the older, 'fossilized' dune forms, or (2) the bright dunes are composed of grains that are much larger or more dense than those that compose the dark dunes. In the latter scenario, the bright dunes move more slowly and are over-taken by the dark dunes because their grains are harder to transport. An interpretation involving larger or denser grains is consistent with the small size and even-spacing of the bright dunes, as well, but usually on Earth such features occur on the surfaces of larger, finer-grained dunes, not under them. The actual composition of either the bright or dark materials are unknown. This example is located on the floor of an impact crater in western Arabia Terra at 10.7oN, 351.0oW. The picture is illuminated from the right.

  5. Metastability in spin-polarized Fermi gases.

    PubMed

    Liao, Y A; Revelle, M; Paprotta, T; Rittner, A S C; Li, Wenhui; Partridge, G B; Hulet, R G

    2011-09-30

    We study the role of particle transport and evaporation on the phase separation of an ultracold, spin-polarized atomic Fermi gas. We show that the previously observed deformation of the superfluid paired core is a result of evaporative depolarization of the superfluid due to a combination of enhanced evaporation at the center of the trap and the inhibition of spin transport at the normal-superfluid phase boundary. These factors contribute to a nonequilibrium jump in the chemical potentials at the phase boundary. Once formed, the deformed state is highly metastable, persisting for times of up to 2 s.

  6. Emergent physics: Fermi-point scenario.

    PubMed

    Volovik, Grigory

    2008-08-28

    The Fermi-point scenario of emergent gravity has the following consequences: gravity emerges together with fermionic and bosonic matter; emergent fermionic matter consists of massless Weyl fermions; emergent bosonic matter consists of gauge fields; Lorentz symmetry persists well above the Planck energy; space-time is naturally four dimensional; the Universe is naturally flat; the cosmological constant is naturally small or zero; the underlying physics is based on discrete symmetries; 'quantum gravity' cannot be obtained by quantization of Einstein equations; and there is no contradiction between quantum mechanics and gravity, etc.

  7. Optical Observations Of Fermi LAT Monitored Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Kyle; Carini, M. T.

    2009-01-01

    For the past 8 years the Bell Observatory at Western Kentucky University has been conducting R band monitoring of the variability of approximately 50 Blazars. A subset of these objects are being routinely observed with the LAT instrument on-board the Fermi Space Telescope. Adding the Robotically Controlled Telescope (RCT) at Kitt Peak National Observatory and observations with the AZT-11 telescope at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (CRAO), we are intensively monitoring the Blazars on the Lat monitoring list. We present the results of our long term monitoring of the LAT monitored Blazars, as well as the recent contemporaneous optical R band observations we have obtained of the LAT Blazars.

  8. Bragg spectroscopy of strongly interacting Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingham, M. G.; Fenech, K.; Peppler, T.; Hoinka, S.; Dyke, P.; Hannaford, P.; Vale, C. J.

    2016-10-01

    This article provides an overview of recent developments and emerging topics in the study of two-component Fermi gases using Bragg spectroscopy. Bragg scattering is achieved by exposing a gas to two intersecting laser beams with a slight frequency difference and measuring the momentum transferred to the atoms. By varying the Bragg laser detuning, it is possible to measure either the density or spin response functions which characterize the basic excitations present in the gas. Specifically, one can measure properties such as the dynamic and static structure factors, Tan's universal contact parameter and observe signatures for the onset of pair condensation locally within a gas.

  9. Fermi-LAT Observations of Galactic Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the observations of Galactic transients by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope. The LAT is producing spectacular results for the GeV transient sky, some of which are shown and reviewed. Some of the results in the GeV range that are discussed in this presentation are: (1) New blazars and unidentified transients (2) the jet of the Cygnus X-3 microquasar (3) gamma rays from V407 Cygni nova (4) Fast high-energy gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula

  10. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma Flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Fishman, G. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Kippen, R. M.; vonKienlin, A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Smith, D. M.; Holzworth, R.

    2010-01-01

    In its first two years of operation, the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has observed 79 Terrestrial Gamma Flashes (TGFs). The thick Bismuth Germanate (BGO) detectors are excellent for TGF spectroscopy, having a high probability of recording the full energy of an incident photon, spanning a broad energy range from 150 keV to 40 MeV, and recording a large number of photons per TGF. Correlations between GBM TGF triggers and lightning sferics detected with the World-Wide Lightning Location Network indicate that TGFs and lightning are simultaneous to within tens of microseconds.

  11. Fermi GBM transient searches with ADWO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagoly, Z.; Szécsi, D.; Balázs, L. G.; Csabai, I.; Dobos, L.; Horváth, I.; Lichtenberger, J.; Tóth, L. V.

    2017-07-01

    We present the method called Automatized Detector Weight Optimization (ADWO). This method searches for non-triggered, short-duration transients in the data-set of the Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor. The data of all available detectors and energy channels are combined. Therefore, ADWO is ideal to search for electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave events. We present the successful identification of all short-duration gamma-ray bursts, as well as that of the possible electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave transients GW150914 and LVT151012.

  12. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma Flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Fishman, G. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Kippen, R. M.; vonKienlin, A.; Dwyer, J. R.; hide

    2010-01-01

    In its first two years of operation, the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has observed 79 Terrestrial Gamma Flashes (TGFs). The thick Bismuth Germanate (BGO) detectors are excellent for TGF spectroscopy, having a high probability of recording the full energy of an incident photon, spanning a broad energy range from 150 keV to 40 MeV, and recording a large number of photons per TGF. Correlations between GBM TGF triggers and lightning sferics detected with the World-Wide Lightning Location Network indicate that TGFs and lightning are simultaneous to within tens of microseconds.

  13. Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie E.; Michelson, Peter F.; Paclesas, William S.; Ritz, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, launched in June 2008, is an observatory designed to survey the high-energy gamma-ray sky. The primary instrument, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), provides observations from 20 MeV to greater than 300 GeV. A second instrument, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), provides observations of transients from less than 10 keV to 40 MeV. We describe the design and performance of the instruments and their subsystems, the spacecraft and the ground system.

  14. Fermi GBM: Highlights from the First Year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma ray Burst Monitor is an all-sky instrument sensitive to photons from about 8 keV to 40 MeV. I will summarize highlights from the first year, including triggered observations of gamma ray bursts, soft gamma ray repeaters, and terrestrial gamma flashes, and observations in the continuous data of X-ray binaries and accreting X-ray pulsars. GBM provides complementary observations to Swift/BAT, observing many of the same sources, but over a wider energy range.

  15. Dark solitons in a superfluid Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Antezza, Mauro; Dalfovo, Franco; Stringari, Sandro; Pitaevskii, Lev P.

    2007-10-15

    We investigate the behavior of dark solitons in a superfluid Fermi gas along the BCS-BEC crossover by solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations and looking for real and odd solutions for the order parameter. We show that in the resonance unitary region, where the scattering length is large, the density profile of the soliton has a deep minimum, differently from what happens in the BCS regime. The superfluid gap is found to be significantly quenched by the presence of the soliton due to the occurrence of Andreev fermionic bound states localized near the nodal plane of the order parameter.

  16. Lifetime of Feshbach dimers in a Fermi-Fermi mixture of 6Li and 40K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jag, M.; Cetina, M.; Lous, R. S.; Grimm, R.; Levinsen, J.; Petrov, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    We present a joint experimental and theoretical investigation of the lifetime of weakly bound dimers formed near narrow interspecies Feshbach resonances in mass-imbalanced Fermi-Fermi systems, considering the specific example of a mixture of 6Li and 40K atoms. Our work addresses the central question of the increase in the stability of the dimers resulting from Pauli suppression of collisional losses, which is a well-known effect in mass-balanced fermionic systems near broad resonances. We present measurements of the spontaneous dissociation of dimers in dilute samples, and of the collisional losses in dense samples arising from both dimer-dimer processes and from atom-dimer processes. We find that all loss processes are suppressed close to the Feshbach resonance. Our general theoretical approach for fermionic mixtures near narrow Feshbach resonances provides predictions for the suppression of collisional decay as a function of the detuning from resonance, and we find excellent agreement with the experimental benchmarks provided by our 40K-6Li system. We finally present model calculations for other Feshbach-resonant Fermi-Fermi systems, which are of interest for experiments in the near future.

  17. Richard Bright and his neurological studies.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2009-01-01

    Richard Bright was one of the famous triumvirate of Guy's Hospital physicians in the Victorian era. Remembered for his account of glomerulonephritis (Bright's disease) he also made many important and original contributions to medicine and neurology. These included his work on cortical epileptogenesis, descriptions of simple partial (Jacksonian) seizures, infantile convulsions, and a variety of nervous diseases. Most notable were his reports of neurological studies including papers on traumatic tetanus, syringomyelia, arteries of the brain, contractures of spinal origin, tumours of the base of the brain, and narcolepsy. His career and these contributions are outlined.

  18. Diagnostics for high-brightness beams

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Special techniques are required for beam diagnostics on high-brightness particle beams. Examples of high-brightness beams include low-emittance proton linacs (either pulsed or CW), electron linacs suitable for free-electron-laser applications, and future linear colliders. Non-interceptive and minimally-interceptive techniques for measuring beam current, position, profile, and transverse and longitudinal emittance will be reviewed. Included will be stripline, wire scanner, laser neutralization, beam-beam scattering, interceptive microgratings, spontaneous emission, optical transition radiation, and other techniques. 24 refs.

  19. Comet brightness parameters: Definition, determination, and correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meisel, D. D.; Morris, C. S.

    1976-01-01

    The power-law definition of comet brightness is reviewed and possible systematic influences are discussed that can affect the derivation of m sub o and n values from visual magnitude estimates. A rationale for the Bobrovnikoff aperture correction method is given and it is demonstrated that the Beyer extrafocal method leads to large systematic effects which if uncorrected by an instrumental relationship result in values significantly higher than those derived according to the Bobrovnikoff guidelines. A series of visual brightness parameter sets are presented which have been reduced to the same photometric system. Recommendations are given to insure that future observations are reduced to the same system.

  20. Kinematics of Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardullo, A.; Pizzella, A.; Corsini, E. M.; Bertola, F.

    2008-10-01

    We analyzed the kinematic of 12 low surface-brightness (LSB) galaxies to study the correlation between the disk circular velocity V_{c} and the central velocity dispersion of the spheroidal component σ_{0}. This relation has been claimed to be either the same power-law relation tep{buy} or a different linear one tep{piz} with respect to high surface-brightness (HSB) galaxies. We confirm here that LSB and HSB galaxies follow two different linear V_{c}-σ_{0} relations.

  1. Implications of plasma beam instabilities for the statistics of the Fermi hard gamma-ray blazars and the origin of the extragalactic gamma-ray background

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Avery E.; Pfrommer, Christoph; Puchwein, Ewald; Chang, Philip

    2014-08-01

    Fermi has been instrumental in constraining the luminosity function and redshift evolution of gamma-ray bright BL Lac objects, a subpopulation of blazars with almost featureless optical spectra. This includes limits on the spectrum and anisotropy of the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGRB), redshift distribution of nearby Fermi active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the construction of a logN-log S relation. Based on these, it has been argued that the evolution of the gamma-ray bright BL Lac population must be much less dramatic than that of other AGNs. However, critical to such claims is the assumption that inverse Compton cascades reprocess emission above a TeV into the Fermi energy range, substantially enhancing the strength of the observed limits. Here we demonstrate that in the absence of such a process, due, e.g., to the presence of virulent plasma beam instabilities that preempt the cascade, a population of TeV-bright BL Lac objects that evolve similarly to quasars is consistent with the population of hard gamma-ray BL Lac objects observed by Fermi. Specifically, we show that a simple model for the properties and luminosity function is simultaneously able to reproduce their logN-log S relation, local redshift distribution, and contribution to the EGRB and its anisotropy without any free parameters. Insofar as the naturalness of a picture in which the hard gamma-ray BL Lac population exhibits the strong redshift evolution observed in other tracers of the cosmological history of accretion onto halos is desirable, this lends support for the absence of the inverse Compton cascades and the existence of the beam plasma instabilities.

  2. Constraints on dark matter annihilation in clusters of galaxies with the Fermi large area telescope

    DOE PAGES

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; ...

    2010-05-20

    Nearby clusters and groups of galaxies are potentially bright sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission resulting from the pair-annihilation of dark matter particles. However, no significant gamma-ray emission has been detected so far from clusters in the first 11 months of observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We interpret this non-detection in terms of constraints on dark matter particle properties. In particular for leptonic annihilation final states and particle masses greater than ~ 200 GeV, gamma-ray emission from inverse Compton scattering of CMB photons is expected to dominate the dark matter annihilation signal from clusters, and our gamma-ray limits excludemore » large regions of the parameter space that would give a good fit to the recent anomalous Pamela and Fermi-LAT electron-positron measurements. We also present constraints on the annihilation of more standard dark matter candidates, such as the lightest neutralino of supersymmetric models. The constraints are particularly strong when including the fact that clusters are known to contain substructure at least on galaxy scales, increasing the expected gamma-ray flux by a factor of ~ 5 over a smooth-halo assumption. Here, we also explore the effect of uncertainties in cluster dark matter density profiles, finding a systematic uncertainty in the constraints of roughly a factor of two, but similar overall conclusions. Finally, in this work, we focus on deriving limits on dark matter models; a more general consideration of the Fermi-LAT data on clusters and clusters as gamma-ray sources is forthcoming.« less

  3. Constraints on dark matter annihilation in clusters of galaxies with the Fermi large area telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Angelis, A. de; Palma, F. de; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Edmonds, Y.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jeltema, T. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S. -H; Garde, M. Llena; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Panetta, J. H.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Profumo, S.; Rainò, S.; Razzano, M.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Sadrozinski, H. F. -W; Sander, A.; Scargle, J. D.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J. -L; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Usher, T. L.; Vasileiou, V.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-05-20

    Nearby clusters and groups of galaxies are potentially bright sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission resulting from the pair-annihilation of dark matter particles. However, no significant gamma-ray emission has been detected so far from clusters in the first 11 months of observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We interpret this non-detection in terms of constraints on dark matter particle properties. In particular for leptonic annihilation final states and particle masses greater than ~ 200 GeV, gamma-ray emission from inverse Compton scattering of CMB photons is expected to dominate the dark matter annihilation signal from clusters, and our gamma-ray limits exclude large regions of the parameter space that would give a good fit to the recent anomalous Pamela and Fermi-LAT electron-positron measurements. We also present constraints on the annihilation of more standard dark matter candidates, such as the lightest neutralino of supersymmetric models. The constraints are particularly strong when including the fact that clusters are known to contain substructure at least on galaxy scales, increasing the expected gamma-ray flux by a factor of ~ 5 over a smooth-halo assumption. Here, we also explore the effect of uncertainties in cluster dark matter density profiles, finding a systematic uncertainty in the constraints of roughly a factor of two, but similar overall conclusions. Finally, in this work, we focus on deriving limits on dark matter models; a more general consideration of the Fermi-LAT data on clusters and clusters as gamma-ray sources is forthcoming.

  4. Non-Condon nonequilibrium Fermi's golden rule rates from the linearized semiclassical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiang; Geva, Eitan

    2016-08-01

    The nonequilibrium Fermi's golden rule describes the transition between a photoexcited bright donor electronic state and a dark acceptor electronic state, when the nuclear degrees of freedom start out in a nonequilibrium state. In a previous paper [X. Sun and E. Geva, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 12, 2926 (2016)], we proposed a new expression for the nonequilibrium Fermi's golden rule within the framework of the linearized semiclassical approximation and based on the Condon approximation, according to which the electronic coupling between donor and acceptor is assumed constant. In this paper we propose a more general expression, which is applicable to the case of non-Condon electronic coupling. We test the accuracy of the new non-Condon nonequilibrium Fermi's golden rule linearized semiclassical expression on a model where the donor and acceptor potential energy surfaces are parabolic and identical except for shifts in the equilibrium energy and geometry, and the coupling between them is linear in the nuclear coordinates. Since non-Condon effects may or may not give rise to conical intersections, both possibilities are examined by considering the following: (1) A modified Garg-Onuchic-Ambegaokar model for charge transfer in the condensed phase, where the donor-acceptor coupling is linear in the primary-mode coordinate, and for which non-Condon effects do not give rise to a conical intersection; (2) the linear vibronic coupling model for electronic transitions in gas phase molecules, where non-Condon effects give rise to conical intersections. We also present a comprehensive comparison between the linearized semiclassical expression and a progression of more approximate expressions, in both normal and inverted regions, and over a wide range of initial nonequilibrium states, temperatures, and frictions.

  5. The Fermi blazars' divide based on the diagnostic of the SEDs peak frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramacere, A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Giommi, P.; Mazziotta, N.; Monte, C.

    2010-03-01

    We have studied the quasi-simultaneous Spectral Energy Distributions (SED) of 48 LBAS blazars, detected within the three months of the LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS) data taking period, combining Fermi and Swift data with radio NIR-Optical and hard- X/gamma-ray data. Using these quasi-simultaneous SEDs, sampling both the low and the high energy peak of the blazars broad band emission, we were able to apply a diagnostic tool based on the estimate of the peak frequencies of the synchrotron (S) and Inverse Compton (IC) components. Our analysis shows a Fermi blazar's divide based on the peak frequencies of the SED. The robust result is that the Synchrotron Self Compton (SSC) region divides in two the νpS-γpSSC plane. Objects within or below this region, radiating likely via the SSC process, are high-frequency-peaked BL Lac object (HBL), or low/intermediate-frequency-peaked BL Lac object (LBL/IBL). All of the IBLs/LBLs within or below the SSC region are not Compton dominated. The objects lying above the SSC region, radiating likely via the External radiation Compton (ERC) process, are Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars and IBLs/LBLs. All of the IBLs/LBLs in the ERC region show a significant Compton dominance.

  6. Constraints on Lorentz invariance violation from Fermi -Large Area Telescope observations of gamma-ray bursts

    DOE PAGES

    Vasileiou, V.; Jacholkowska, A.; Piron, F.; ...

    2013-06-04

    For this research, we analyze the MeV/GeV emission from four bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope to produce robust, stringent constraints on a dependence of the speed of light in vacuo on the photon energy (vacuum dispersion), a form of Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) allowed by some quantum gravity (QG) theories. First, we use three different and complementary techniques to constrain the total degree of dispersion observed in the data. Additionally, using a maximally conservative set of assumptions on possible source-intrinsic, spectral-evolution effects, we constrain any vacuum dispersion solely attributed to LIV. We then derivemore » limits on the QG energy scale (the energy scale where LIV-inducing QG effects become strong, EQG) and the coefficients of the Standard Model Extension. For the subluminal case (where high-energy photons propagate more slowly than lower-energy photons) and without taking into account any source-intrinsic dispersion, our most stringent limits (at 95% C.L.) are obtained from GRB 090510 and are EQG,1 > 7.6 times the Planck energy (EPl) and EQG,2 > 1.3 × 1011 GeV for linear and quadratic leading-order LIV-induced vacuum dispersion, respectively. In conclusion, these limits improve the latest constraints by Fermi and H.E.S.S. by a factor of ~2 . Our results disfavor any class of models requiring EQG,1 ≲ EPl .« less

  7. Consequences of energy conservation violation: late time solutions of Λ (T) CDM subclass of f(R,T) gravity using dynamical system approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Hamid; Ziaie, Amir Hadi

    2017-05-01

    Very recently, Josset and Perez (Phys. Rev. Lett. 118:021102, 2017) have shown that a violation of the energy-momentum tensor ( EMT) could result in an accelerated expansion state via the appearance of an effective cosmological constant, in the context of unimodular gravity. Inspired by this outcome, in this paper we investigate cosmological consequences of a violation of the EMT conservation in a particular class of f(R,T) gravity when only the pressure-less fluid is present. In this respect, we focus on the late time solutions of models of the type f(R,T)=R+β Λ (-T). As the first task, we study the solutions when the conservation of EMT is respected, and then we proceed with those in which violation occurs. We have found, provided that the EMT conservation is violated, that there generally exist two accelerated expansion solutions of which the stability properties depend on the underlying model. More exactly, we obtain a dark energy solution for which the effective equation of state depends on the model parameters and a de Sitter solution. We present a method to parametrize the Λ (-T) function, which is useful in a dynamical system approach and has been employed in the model. Also, we discuss the cosmological solutions for models with Λ (-T)=8π G(-T)^{α } in the presence of ultra-relativistic matter.

  8. Fermi LAT Observations of LS 5039

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; /more authors..

    2012-03-29

    The first results from observations of the high-mass X-ray binary LS 5039 using the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope data between 2008 August and 2009 June are presented. Our results indicate variability that is consistent with the binary period, with the emission being modulated with a period of 3.903 {+-} 0.005 days; the first detection of this modulation at GeV energies. The light curve is characterized by a broad peak around superior conjunction in agreement with inverse Compton scattering models. The spectrum is represented by a power law with an exponential cutoff, yielding an overall flux (100 MeV-300 GeV) of 4.9 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 1.8(syst) x 10{sup -7} photon cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a cutoff at 2.1 {+-} 0.3(stat) {+-} 1.1(syst) GeV and photon index {Gamma} = 1.9 {+-} 0.1(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst). The spectrum is observed to vary with orbital phase, specifically between inferior and superior conjunction. We suggest that the presence of a cutoff in the spectrum may be indicative of magnetospheric emission similar to the emission seen in many pulsars by Fermi.

  9. Fermi Liquid Instabilities in the Spin Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Congjun; Sun, Kai; Fradkin, Eduardo; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-16

    We study the Fermi surface instabilities of the Pomeranchuk type in the spin triplet channel with high orbital partial waves (F{sub l}{sup a} (l > 0)). The ordered phases are classified into two classes, dubbed the {alpha} and {beta}-phases by analogy to the superfluid {sup 3}He-A and B-phases. The Fermi surfaces in the {alpha}-phases exhibit spontaneous anisotropic distortions, while those in the {beta}-phases remain circular or spherical with topologically non-trivial spin configurations in momentum space. In the {alpha}-phase, the Goldstone modes in the density channel exhibit anisotropic overdamping. The Goldstone modes in the spin channel have nearly isotropic underdamped dispersion relation at small propagating wavevectors. Due to the coupling to the Goldstone modes, the spin wave spectrum develops resonance peaks in both the {alpha} and {beta}-phases, which can be detected in inelastic neutron scattering experiments. In the p-wave channel {beta}-phase, a chiral ground state inhomogeneity is spontaneously generated due to a Lifshitz-like instability in the originally nonchiral systems. Possible experiments to detect these phases are discussed.

  10. FERMI/LAT Observations of LS 5039

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; ...

    2009-10-30

    The first results from observations of the high-mass X-ray binary LS 5039 using the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope data between 2008 August and 2009 June are presented. In this report, our results indicate variability that is consistent with the binary period, with the emission being modulated with a period of 3.903 ± 0.005 days; the first detection of this modulation at GeV energies. The light curve is characterized by a broad peak around superior conjunction in agreement with inverse Compton scattering models. The spectrum is represented by a power law with an exponential cutoff, yielding an overall flux (100 MeV-300more » GeV) of 4.9 ± 0.5(stat) ± 1.8(syst) ×10–7 photon cm–2 s–1, with a cutoff at 2.1 ± 0.3(stat) ± 1.1(syst) GeV and photon index Γ = 1.9 ± 0.1(stat) ± 0.3(syst). The spectrum is observed to vary with orbital phase, specifically between inferior and superior conjunction. Lastly, we suggest that the presence of a cutoff in the spectrum may be indicative of magnetospheric emission similar to the emission seen in many pulsars by Fermi.« less

  11. Spectral functions in ultracold Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, William; Randeria, Mohit

    2011-03-01

    We study the fermion spectral function in the superfluid state across the BEC-BCS crossover and in the normal Fermi liquid phase in highly imbalanced Fermi gases. We focus on features that can be measured in momentum-resolved radio frequency spectroscopy experiments. We go beyond mean field theory and include the effects of Gaussian order parameter fluctuations in a manner that gives excellent agreement with asymptotically exact results for the T = 0 equation of state in the BEC and BCS limits, as well as quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) results near unitarity. We show that sharp Bogoliubov quasiparticles, with a substantial coherent spectral weight, exist near unitarity. We argue that this is true generally even beyond the Gaussian approximation. In addition, quasiparticle scattering and interaction with collective modes produces incoherent spectral weight. We show that the dispersion is strongly renormalized at unitarity with its minimum shifted up from its mean field value √{ 2 mμ } and compare our results with existing QMC data. We discuss how the spectral function changes qualitatively compared with its mean field form as 1 / (kF a) increases and the chemical potential changes sign. Supported by NSF-DMR 0706203 and ARO W911NF-08-1-0338.

  12. Density functional theory for atomic Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ping Nang; Pilati, Sebastiano; Troyer, Matthias; Dai, Xi

    2012-08-01

    The interplay between interaction and inhomogeneity for electrons in solids generates many interesting phenomena, including insulating and metallic behaviour, magnetism, superconductivity, quantum criticality and more exotic phases. Many of the same phenomena appear in ultracold fermionic atoms in optical lattices, which provide clean, controlled and tunable `quantum simulators' to explore the intriguing physics of fermionic systems. Although density functional theory (DFT) is widely used to calculate material properties, it has not yet been applied to cold atomic gases in optical lattices. Here we present a new density functional for short-range interactions (as opposed to Coulomb interactions of electrons), which renders DFT suitable for atomic Fermi gases. This grants us access to an extensive toolset, previously developed for materials simulations, to calculate the static and dynamic properties of atomic Fermi gases in optical lattices and external potentials. Ultracold atom quantum simulators can in turn be used to explore limitations of DFT functionals, and to further improve hybrid functionals, thus forming a bridge between materials simulations and atomic physics.

  13. Orientifolding of the ABJ Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Kazumi

    2016-03-01

    The grand partition functions of ABJ theory can be factorized into even and odd parts under the reflection of fermion coordinate in the Fermi gas approach. In some cases, the even/odd part of ABJ grand partition function is equal to that of {N}=5O(n)× USp({n}^') theory, hence it is natural to think of the even/odd projection of grand partition function as an orientifolding of ABJ Fermi gas system. By a systematic WKB analysis, we determine the coefficients in the perturbative part of grand potential of such orientifold ABJ theory. We also find the exact form of the first few "half-instanton" corrections coming from the twisted sector of the reflection of fermion coordinate. For the Chern-Simons level k = 2 ,4 ,8 we find closed form expressions of the grand partition functions of orientifold ABJ theory, and for k = 2 , 4 we prove the functional relations among the grand partition functions conjectured in arXiv:1410.7658.

  14. Fermi's Paradox - The Last Challenge For Copernicanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirkovic, M. M.

    2009-06-01

    We review Fermi's paradox (or the "Great Silence" problem), not only arguably the oldest and crucial problem for the Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence (SETI), but also a conundrum of profound scientific, philosophical and cultural importance. By a simple analysis of observation selection effects, the correct resolution of Fermi's paradox is certain to tell us something about the future of humanity. Already more than three quarters of century old puzzle -- and a quarter of century since the last major review paper in the field by G. David Brin -- has generated many ingenious discussions and hypotheses. We analyze the often tacit methodological assumptions built in various answers to this puzzle and attempt a new classification of the numerous solutions proposed in an already huge literature on the subject. Finally, we consider the ramifications of various classes of hypotheses for the practical SETI projects. Somewhat paradoxically, it seems that the class of (neo)catastrophic hypotheses gives, on the balance, the strongest justification to optimism regarding our current and near-future SETI efforts.

  15. Fermi Surface Nesting in UGe_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Allen, J. W.; Denlinger, J. D.; Rossnagel, Kai; Huxley, A. D.; Flouquet, J.

    2004-03-01

    UGe2 is of high current interest in connection with the possible role of ferromagnetic fluctuations in its pressure induced superconductivity, for which the Fermi surface (FS) is thought to be important. The band structure and FS contours of a single crystal have been measured using resonant angle-resolved photoemission near the U 5d to 5f edge. The measured dominant large sheet Fermi surface contour shows good agreement with magneto-oscillatory orbit frequencies, but with a much simpler diamond-like shape as compared to LDA and LDA+U band calculations. The measured FS topology is suggestive of a possible diagonal nesting condition different than previously proposed for SCDW models of the ferromagnetic transition(s) in UGe2 and allows assessment of FS topology-driven models of the ferromagnetic superconductor phase diagram.(e.g. K.G. Sandeman et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 167005 (2003). Supported by the U.S. NSF at U. Mich. (DMR-03-02825) and by the DOE at the Advanced Light Source (DE-AC03-76SF00098).

  16. Fermi level stabilization energy in cadmium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Speaks, D. T.; Mayer, M. A.; Yu, K. M.; Mao, S. S.; Haller, E. E.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-04-08

    We have studied the effects of high concentrations of native point defects on the electrical and optical properties of CdO. The defects were introduced by irradiation with high energy He+, Ne+, Ar+ and C+ ions. Increasing the irradiation damage with particles heavier than He+ increases the electron concentration until a saturation level of 5x1020 cm-3 is reached. In contrast, due to the ionic character and hence strong dynamic annealing of CdO, irradiation with much lighter He+ stabilizes the electron concentration at a much lower level of 1.7x1020 cm-3. A large shift of the optical absorption edge with increasing electron concentration in irradiated samples is explained by the Burstein-Moss shift corrected for electron-electron and electron-ion interactions. The saturation of the electron concentration and the optical absorption edge energy are consistent with a defect induced stabilization of the Fermi energy at 1 eV above the conduction band edge. The result is in a good agreement with previously determined Fermi level pinning energies on CdO surfaces. The results indicate that CdO shares many similarities with InN, as both materials exhibit extremely large electron affinities and an unprecedented propensity for n-type conductivity.

  17. Blue Fermi flat spectrum radio quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Tavecchio, F.; Foschini, L.; Sbarrato, T.; Ghirlanda, G.; Maraschi, L.

    2012-09-01

    Many blazars detected by the Fermi satellite, observed spectroscopically in the optical, are line-less, and have been classified as BL Lac objects. Optical-ultraviolet (UV) photometry of nearly 100 of them allowed us to determine the redshift for a handful of objects and redshift upper limits in the great majority. A few of these are candidates to be 'blue quasars', namely flat spectrum radio quasars whose broad emission lines are hidden by an overwhelming synchrotron emission peaking in the UV. This implies that the emitting electrons have high energies. In turn, this requires relatively weak radiative cooling, a condition that can be met if the main radiative dissipation of the jet power occurs outside the broad-line region. We confirm this hypothesis by studying and modelling the spectral energy distributions of the four 'blue quasars' recently discovered. Furthermore, we discuss the distribution of Fermi blazars in the γ-ray spectral index-γ-ray luminosity plane, and argue that 'blue quasars' objects are a minority within the blazar populations.

  18. Massive Fermi gas in the expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautner, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    The behavior of a decoupled ideal Fermi gas in a homogeneously expanding three-dimensional volume is investigated, starting from an equilibrium spectrum. In case the gas is massless and/or completely degenerate, the spectrum of the gas can be described by an effective temperature and/or an effective chemical potential, both of which scale down with the volume expansion. In contrast, the spectrum of a decoupled massive and non-degenerate gas can only be described by an effective temperature if there are strong enough self-interactions such as to maintain an equilibrium distribution. Assuming perpetual equilibration, we study a decoupled gas which is relativistic at decoupling and then is red-shifted until it becomes non-relativistic. We find expressions for the effective temperature and effective chemical potential which allow us to calculate the final spectrum for arbitrary initial conditions. This calculation is enabled by a new expansion of the Fermi-Dirac integral, which is for our purpose superior to the well-known Sommerfeld expansion. We also compute the behavior of the phase space density under expansion and compare it to the case of real temperature and real chemical potential. Using our results for the degenerate case, we also obtain the mean relic velocity of the recently proposed non-thermal cosmic neutrino background.

  19. Fermi Acceleration in Magnetic Reconnection Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Kowal, G.; Lazarian, A.

    2014-09-01

    The mechanisms that accelerate cosmic relativistic particles are not fully understood yet. A variety of processes has been investigated and the acceleration in magnetic reconnection sites has lately gained increasing attention from researchers not only for its potential importance in the solar system, but also beyond it, in astrophysical environments like compact stellar sources, AGNs and GRBs, and even in diffusive magnetized media as the interstellar medium (ISM) and the intergalactic medium (IGM). In this talk we review this process and, supported by three-dimensional MHD simulations with the injection of thousands of test particles, we show that they can be efficiently accelerated by magnetic reconnection through a first-order Fermi process within large scale magnetic current sheets, even in a collisional fluid (contrary to what was previously believed), especially when local turbulence is present which makes reconnection fast, the acceleration layer thicker and the overall process naturally three-dimensional. Tests of particle acceleration in pure MHD turbulent environments (i.e., without the presence of large scale current sheets), on the other hand, indicate that the dominant acceleration process is a second-order Fermi.

  20. The First Fermi LAT Supernova Remnant Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen, J. M.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Iafrate, G.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Laffon, H.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Reposeur, T.; Rousseau, R.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schmid, J.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Wells, B.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yassine, M.; den Hartog, P. R.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-05-01

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidates falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, we demonstrate the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. We model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.