Science.gov

Sample records for brightness x-ray source

  1. High Brightness, Laser-Driven X-ray Source for Nanoscale Metrology and Femtosecond Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Siders, C W; Crane, J K; Semenov, V; Betts, S; Kozioziemski, B; Wharton, K; Wilks, S; Barbee, T; Stuart, B; Kim, D E; An, J; Barty, C

    2007-02-26

    This project developed and demonstrated a new, bright, ultrafast x-ray source based upon laser-driven K-alpha generation, which can produce an x-ray flux 10 to 100 times greater than current microfocus x-ray tubes. The short-pulse (sub-picosecond) duration of this x-ray source also makes it ideal for observing time-resolved dynamics of atomic motion in solids and thin films.

  2. Short Pulse High Brightness X-ray Production with the PLEIADES Thomson Scattering Source

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Barty, C P J; Betts, S M; Brown, W J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Kuba, J; LaSage, G P; Rosenzweig, J B; Slaughter, D R; Springer, P T; Tremaine, A M

    2003-07-01

    We describe PLEIADES, a compact, tunable, high-brightness, ultra-short pulse, Thomson x-ray source. The peak brightness of the source is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} photons/s/0.1% bandwidth/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}. Initial results are reported and compared to theoretical calculations.

  3. Quasiperiodic oscillations in bright galactic-bulge X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, F. K.; Shibazaki, N.; Alpar, M. A.; Shaham, J.

    1985-01-01

    Quasiperiodic oscillations with frequencies in the range 5-50 Hz have recently been discovered in X-rays from two bright galactic-bulge sources and Sco X-1. These sources are weakly magnetic neutron stars accreting from disks which the plasma is clumped. The interaction of the magnetosphere with clumps in the inner disk causes oscillations in the X-ray flux with many of the properties observed.

  4. Prospects for X-ray absorption with the super-bright light sources of the future.

    PubMed

    Norman, D

    2001-03-01

    The immense growth in applications of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been enabled by the widespread availability of intense tunable X-rays from synchrotron radiation sources. Recently, new concepts have been proposed for fourth-generation light sources, such as the SASE (self-amplified stimulated emission) X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) being pursued at Hamburg (TESLA) and Stanford (LCLS), and the recirculator ring (MARS) at Novosibirsk. These sources offer expected gains of many orders of magnitude in instantaneous brilliance, which will unlock opportunities for qualitatively different science. Examples of new or greatly expanded techniques in XAS could include Raman X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), pump-probe experiments, time-resolved XAFS and small-spot X-ray spectromicroscopy, although the limited tunability of the sources might not allow conventional XAFS measurements. Multi-photon X-ray absorption could become a new field of study. There should not be a collective stampede to these new sources, however, and it is likely that storage rings will continue to be necessary for most XAFS applications. The extreme brightness of these future light sources will present difficult challenges in instrumentation, especially detectors and sample containment. Practitioners will also have to exercise caution, because the intensity of the beam will surely destroy many samples and in some cases there will be so many photons absorbed per atom that XAFS will be impossible.

  5. Crystal spectroscopy of X-ray synchrotron source brightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens; Kjaer, Kristian

    1992-12-01

    Photon intensities in a monochromatic beam obtained by a horizontal Bragg reflection of synchrotron radiation by a monochromator crystal are compared for the three perfect crystals: silicon and germanium in symmetric (111) reflection and Diamond (C∗) in asymmetric (111) transmission geometry. Consistent results are obtained within relative bandwidths spanning a factor of 50 from Si(333) to Ge(111) and within a wavelength range form 0.4 Å to 1.6 Å. Results using a mosaic Be crystal within the same wavelength range depend in this work on a model of the mosaicity of the Be crystal. However, if the reflectivity of the Be crystal is determined experimentally for a few selected wavelengths, it is not necessary to invoke a mosaic model and a Be crystal may serve the purpose of characterizing the synchrotron beam as well as a perfect crystal. Thin diamond and beryllium crystals in transmission are particularly convenient for spectroscopy of very powerful beams from third generation synchrotron sources, because these low-Z elements absorb only a tiny fraction of the beam power.

  6. PLEIADES: High Peak Brightness, Subpicosecond Thomson Hard-X-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Kuba, J; Anderson, S G; Barty, C J; Betts, S M; Booth, R; Brown, W J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Harteman, F V; Le Sage, G P; Rosenzweig, J B; Tremaine, A M; Springer, P T

    2003-12-15

    The Picosecond Laser-Electron Inter-Action for the Dynamic Evaluation of Structures (PLEIADES) facility, is a unique, novel, tunable (10-200 keV), ultrafast (ps-fs), hard x-ray source that greatly extends the parameter range reached by existing 3rd generation sources, both in terms of x-ray energy range, pulse duration, and peak brightness at high energies. First light was observed at 70 keV early in 2003, and the experimental data agrees with 3D codes developed at LLNL. The x-rays are generated by the interaction of a 50 fs Fourier-transform-limited laser pulse produced by the TW-class FALCON CPA laser and a highly focused, relativistic (20-100 MeV), high brightness (1 nC, 0.3-5 ps, 5 mm.mrad, 0.2% energy spread) photo-electron bunch. The resulting x-ray brightness is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} ph/mm{sup 2}/s/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% BW. The beam is well-collimated (10 mrad divergence over the full spectrum, 1 mrad for a single color), and the source is a unique tool for time-resolved dynamic measurements in matter, including high-Z materials.

  7. Compact radiation sources for increased access to high brightness x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, Finn Henry

    The successful operation of the x-ray free electron lasers at LCLS and SACLA are a boon for science. The increase in brightness of 10 orders of magnitude over synchrotron sources as well as the sub-picosecond time profile of the x-rays are opening new avenues of research in fields ranging from biology to solid state physics. However, synchrotrons and free electron lasers that produce x-rays are expensive, with price tags that measured hundreds of millions. Further, the standard unit of measure for the scale of these sources is kilometers. The sheer size and prohibitive cost of these devices means that such sources are out of the reach of universities and smaller laboratories. The focus of this dissertation is in increasing access to x-ray sources by making them both smaller and, perhaps more importantly, cheaper. Current limitations to source size reduction are discussed which leads to the conclusion that smaller x-rays sources require short period undulators. In this context, two approaches to increasing access to x-rays are covered. The first is direct decrease in the period length of undulators through more advanced design and materials. This path begins with a discussion of the design and construction of a 9 mm period prototype. An analysis of the benefits of such a device, in reduced undulator and accelerator lengths at existing free electron lasers, is explored. And finally, the operation of the undulator in a realistic scenario is experimentally explored in a scaled experiment at optical frequencies. The second method for decreasing the period length of the light source is to replace the undulator with a laser, making an inverse Compton scattering source. The relationship between undulator radiation and the inverse Compton scattering process is examined, as well as the characteristics of the source itself. Lastly, as a demonstration of the function of the inverse Compton scattering source at Brookhaven National Laboratory as a diagnostic tool rather than an

  8. Multiwavelength Study of the Bright X-ray Source Population in the Interacting Galaxies NGC 5774/NGC 5775

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Kajal K.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Saripalli, Lakshmi; Gandhi, Poshak; Foellmi, Cedric; Gutierrez, Carlos M.; Lopez-Corredoira, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The X-ray source population in the field of the interacting pair of galaxies NGC 5774/5775 is reported. A total of 49 discrete sources are detected, including 12 ultraluminous X-ray source candidates with lum inosities above 10(exp 39)erg/s in the 0.5 - 8.0 keV X-ray band. Several of these latter are transient X-ray sources that fall below detect ion levels in one of two X-ray observations spaced 15 months apart. X-ray source positions are mapped onto optical and radio images to sear ch for potential counterparts. Eleven sources have optically-bright c ounterparts. Optical colors are used to differentiate these sources, which are mostly located outside the optical extent of the interacting galaxies, as potential globular clusters (3 sources) and quasars (5) . Follow-up optical spectroscopy confirms two of the latter are background quasars.

  9. High brightness--multiple beamlets source for patterned X-ray production

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ji, Qing; Barletta, William A.; Jiang, Ximan; Ji, Lili

    2009-10-27

    Techniques for controllably directing beamlets to a target substrate are disclosed. The beamlets may be either positive ions or electrons. It has been shown that beamlets may be produced with a diameter of 1 .mu.m, with inter-aperture spacings of 12 .mu.m. An array of such beamlets, may be used for maskless lithography. By step-wise movement of the beamlets relative to the target substrate, individual devices may be directly e-beam written. Ion beams may be directly written as well. Due to the high brightness of the beamlets from extraction from a multicusp source, exposure times for lithographic exposure are thought to be minimized. Alternatively, the beamlets may be electrons striking a high Z material for X-ray production, thereafter collimated to provide patterned X-ray exposures such as those used in CAT scans. Such a device may be used for remote detection of explosives.

  10. X-ray source brightness comparison: Rigaku rotating anode source vs. Kevex microfocus tube

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J A; Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B

    2010-03-17

    In 2007, we began to explore alternative x-ray sources for application to refraction-enhanced (phase contrast) x-ray radiography of cryogenic NIF ignition capsules containing frozen deuterium-tritium (D-T) ice layers. These radiographs are currently obtained using Kevex microfocus tubes as backlights, and for these sources the x-ray source size is approximately 5 {micro}m. As part of this exploration, we obtained refraction-enhanced radiographs of empty plastic capsules using the Janus laser facility at LLNL, demonstrating that even large ({approx} 100 {micro}m) sources can be utilized in refraction-enhanced radiography provided the source/sample distance is sufficiently large, and provided the final x-ray detector has sufficient spatial resolution. Essentially, in the current geometry, we rely on a small source to provide spatial resolution and on the source/sample distance to provide refraction contrast, but an equally useful alternative geometry is to use a large source and rely on fine detector spatial resolution to provide spatial resolution and on the sample/detector distance to provide refraction contrast.

  11. On the Nature of the Eclipsing Bright X-ray Source in the Circinus Galaxy Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; Wu, K.; Tennant, A. F.; Swartz, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    The X-ray spectrum and light curve of the bright source CG X-1 in the field of the Circinus galaxy are re-examined. Previous analyses have concluded that the source is an accreting black hole of about 50 solar masses although it was noted that the light curve resembles that of an AM Her-type system. Here we show that the light curve and orbital dynamics constrain the mass of the compact object to less than 30 solar masses and the mass of the companion to less than 1 solar mass. Combining the mass constraints with the observed X-ray flux, we show that an accreting object must either radiate anisotropically or strongly violate the Eddington limit. If the emission is beamed, then the companion star, which intercepts this flux during eclipse, will be driven out of thermal equilibrium and evaporate within approx. 103 yr. We find, therefore, that the observations are most consistent with the interpretation of CG X-1 as a bright, long-period, AM Her system in the Milky Way.

  12. Plasmon-enhanced photocathode for high brightness and high repetition rate x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, Aleksandr; Senft, Christoph; Thompson, K. F.; Feng, J.; Cabrini, S.; Schuck, P. J.; Padmore, Howard; Peppernick, Samuel J.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-02-11

    High brightness electron sources are at the heart of anew generation of x-ray sources based on the Free ElectronLaser (FEL) as well as in Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) sources.The source of electrons consists of a photoinjector, comprised of a laser-driven photocathode in a high gradient electric field produced by an rf cavity. The function of the rf cavity is to provide a field sufficient for acceleration of electrons to relativistic velocity over a small distance, thus minimizing effects of the space-charge. Even so, the dense electron beam required for high brightness suffers from a space charge field that chirps and reshapes the electron pulse increasing beam emittance and thus reducing the overall brightness. This emittance growth can be avoided if the initial distribution of electrons is pancake shaped, with a semicircular transverse intensity profile. In this case, the electron distribution develops under its space charge field from a pancake into a uniformly filled ellipsoidal beam. This condition, referred to as the blowout regime, requires ultrashort pulses less than 100 fs long and has been successfully demonstrated recently in a high gradient photoinjector.

  13. Using the Chandra Source-Finding Algorithm to Automatically Identify Solar X-ray Bright Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Tennant, A.; Cirtain, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This poster details a technique of bright point identification that is used to find sources in Chandra X-ray data. The algorithm, part of a program called LEXTRCT, searches for regions of a given size that are above a minimum signal to noise ratio. The algorithm allows selected pixels to be excluded from the source-finding, thus allowing exclusion of saturated pixels (from flares and/or active regions). For Chandra data the noise is determined by photon counting statistics, whereas solar telescopes typically integrate a flux. Thus the calculated signal-to-noise ratio is incorrect, but we find we can scale the number to get reasonable results. For example, Nakakubo and Hara (1998) find 297 bright points in a September 11, 1996 Yohkoh image; with judicious selection of signal-to-noise ratio, our algorithm finds 300 sources. To further assess the efficacy of the algorithm, we analyze a SOHO/EIT image (195 Angstroms) and compare results with those published in the literature (McIntosh and Gurman, 2005). Finally, we analyze three sets of data from Hinode, representing different parts of the decline to minimum of the solar cycle.

  14. Bright, low debris, ultrashort hard x-ray table top source using carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Suman; Kiran, P. Prem; Yang, K.; Rao, A. M.; Bhuyan, M. K.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2011-01-15

    We demonstrate that carbon nanotube coated surfaces produce two orders of magnitude brighter hard x-ray emission, in laser produced plasmas, than planar surfaces. It is accompanied by three orders of magnitude reduction in ion debris which is also low Z and nontoxic. The increased emission is a direct consequence of the enhancement in local fields and is via the simple and well known 'lightning rod' effect. We propose that this carbon nanotube hard x-ray source is a simple, inexpensive, and high repetition rate hard x-ray point source for a variety of applications in imaging, lithography, microscopy, and material processing.

  15. Bright x-ray stainless steel K-shell source development at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, M. J.; Fournier, K. B.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Hohenberger, M.; Moody, J.; Patterson, J. R.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-06-01

    High x-ray conversion efficiency (XRCE) K-shell sources are being developed for high energy density experiments for use as backlighters and for the testing of materials exposed to high x-ray fluxes and fluences. Recently, sources with high XRCE in the K-shell x-ray energy range of iron and nickel were investigated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The x-ray conversion efficiency in the 5-9 keV spectral range was determined to be 6.8% ± 0.3%. These targets were 4.1 mm diameter, 4 mm tall hollow epoxy tubes having a 50 μm thick wall supporting a tube of 3 to 3.5 μm thick stainless steel. The NIF laser deposited ˜460 kJ of 3ω light into the target in a 140 TW, 3.3 ns square pulse. The absolute x-ray emission of the source was measured by two calibrated Dante x-ray spectrometers. Time resolved images filtered for the Fe K-shell were recorded to follow the heating of the target. Time integrated high-resolution spectra were recorded in the K-shell range.

  16. Bright x-ray stainless steel K-shell source development at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    May, M. J.; Fournier, K. B.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Moody, J.; Patterson, J. R.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Hohenberger, M.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-06-15

    High x-ray conversion efficiency (XRCE) K-shell sources are being developed for high energy density experiments for use as backlighters and for the testing of materials exposed to high x-ray fluxes and fluences. Recently, sources with high XRCE in the K-shell x-ray energy range of iron and nickel were investigated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The x-ray conversion efficiency in the 5–9 keV spectral range was determined to be 6.8% ± 0.3%. These targets were 4.1 mm diameter, 4 mm tall hollow epoxy tubes having a 50 μm thick wall supporting a tube of 3 to 3.5 μm thick stainless steel. The NIF laser deposited ∼460 kJ of 3ω light into the target in a 140 TW, 3.3 ns square pulse. The absolute x-ray emission of the source was measured by two calibrated Dante x-ray spectrometers. Time resolved images filtered for the Fe K-shell were recorded to follow the heating of the target. Time integrated high-resolution spectra were recorded in the K-shell range.

  17. A XMM-Newton Observation of Nova LMC 1995, a Bright Supersoft X-ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orio, Marina; Hartmann, Wouter; Still, Martin; Greiner, Jochen

    2003-01-01

    Nova LMC 1995, previously detected during 1995-1998 with ROSAT, was observed again as a luminous supersoft X-ray source with XMM-Newton in December of 2000. This nova offers the possibility to observe the spectrum of a hot white dwarf, burning hydrogen in a shell and not obscured by a wind or by nebular emission like in other supersoft X-ray sources. Notwithstanding uncertainties in the calibration of the EPIC instruments at energy E<0.5 keV, using atmospheric models in Non Local Thermonuclear Equilibrium we derived an effective temperature in the range 400,000-450,000 K, a bolometric luminosity Lbolabout equal to 2.3 times 10 sup37 erg s sup-l, and we verified that the abundance of carbon is not significantly enhanced in the X-rays emitting shell. The RGS grating spectra do not show emission lines (originated in a nebula or a wind) observed for some other supersoft X-ray sources. The crowded atmospheric absorption lines of the white dwarf cannot be not resolved. There is no hard component (expected from a wind, a surrounding nebula or an accretion disk), with no counts above the background at E>0.6 keV, and an upper limit Fx,hard = 10 sup-14 erg s sup-l cm sup-2 to the X-ray flux above this energy. The background corrected count rate measured by the EPIC instruments was variable on time scales of minutes and hours, but without the flares or sudden obscuration observed for other novae. The power spectrum shows a peak at 5.25 hours, possibly due to a modulation with the orbital period. We also briefly discuss the scenarios in which this nova may become a type Ia supernova progenitor.

  18. Increasing X-Ray Brightness of HBL Source 1ES 1727+650

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapanadze, Bidzina

    2017-02-01

    The nearby TeV-detected HBL object 1ES 1727+502 (1Zw 187, z=0.055) has been targeted 111 times by X-ray Telescope (XRT) onboard Swift since 2010 April 2. During this monitoring, the 0.3-10 keV count rate varied by a factor of 17.4 (see http://www.swift.psu.edu/monitoring/source.php?source=QSOB1727+502) and showed a prolonged X-ray flaring activity during 2015 March - 2016 February, revealed mainly via the Target of Opportunity observations performed in the framework of our request of different urgencies (Request Number 6571, 6606, 6717, 6809, 6927, 7322, 7355, 7379, 7390, 7404, 7430, 7441, 7516, 7565; see Kapanadze et al. 2015, Atel #8224, #7342).

  19. High Brightness X-Ray Source for Directed Energy and Holographic Imaging Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-31

    for lensless electron microscopy . 2 24 4 II. MICROHOLOGRAPHY WITH VISIBLE RADIATION A. Camera Design Figure (1) is a schematic of the microholographic... Microscopy with ’ lensless ’ Fourier-Transform Holograms and Correlative Source-Effect Compensation", Optique des Rayons X et Microanalyse (Hermann, Paris, 1966...development of a powerful new means of visualization, three- dimensional ’x-ray microholography.1 Importontly, unlike electron microscopy . which

  20. Plasmon-enhanced photocathode for high brightness and high repetition rate x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, A; Senft, C; Thompson, K F; Feng, J; Cabrini, S; Schuck, P J; Padmore, H A; Peppernick, S J; Hess, W P

    2013-02-15

    In this Letter, we report on the efficient generation of electrons from metals using multiphoton photoemission by use of nanostructured plasmonic surfaces to trap, localize, and enhance optical fields. The plasmonic surface increases absorption over normal metals by more than an order of magnitude, and due to the localization of fields, this results in over 6 orders of magnitude increase in effective nonlinear quantum yield. We demonstrate that the achieved quantum yield is high enough for use in rf photoinjectors operating as electron sources for MHz repetition rate x-ray free electron lasers.

  1. Investigation of high-temperature bright plasma X-ray sources produced in 5-MA X-pinch experiments.

    PubMed

    Sinars, D B; McBride, R D; Pikuz, S A; Shelkovenko, T A; Wenger, D F; Cuneo, M E; Yu, E P; Chittenden, J P; Harding, E C; Hansen, S B; Peyton, B P; Ampleford, D J; Jennings, C A

    2012-10-12

    Using solid, machined X-pinch targets driven by currents rising from 0 to 5-6 MA in 60 ns, we observed bright spots of 5-9-keV continuum radiation from 5±2-μm diameter regions. The >6-keV radiation is emitted in about 0.4 ns, and the bright spots are roughly 75 times brighter than the bright spots measured at 1 MA. A total x-ray power of 10 TW peak and yields of 165±20 kJ were emitted from a 3-mm height. The 3-5-keV continuum radiation had a 50-90-GW peak power and 0.15-0.35-kJ yield. The continuum is plausibly from a 1275±75-eV blackbody or alternatively from a 3500±500-eV bremsstrahlung source.

  2. Ultraluminous X-ray Sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrika, S.; Sholukhova, O.; Abolmasov, P.

    2008-12-01

    We discuss a new type of X-ray sources discovered in galaxies -- ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). They are of two order of magnitude brighter in X-rays than the brightest Galactic black holes. Two mod- els of ULXs are discussed: "intermediate mass" black holes, 100 - 10000 solar masses, with standard accretion disks, and "stellar mass" black holes with su- percritical accretion disks like that in the Galactic object SS 433. A study of gas nebulae surrounding these objects gives us a new important information on the central sources. The observed X-ray radiation of ULXs is not enough to power their nebulae. To understand both spectra and power of the nebulae one needs a powerful UV source. The ULXs must be such bright in UV range as they are in X-rays. Spectroscopy of gas filaments surrounding SS 433 proves that the intrinsic face-on luminosity of the supercritical accretion disk in the far UV region to be "sim; 10^40 erg/s. We expect that observations of ULXs with the WSO-UV Observatory, measurements their UV fluxes and spectral slopes solve the problem of ULXs between the two known models of these sources.

  3. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory: A high-brightness soft x-ray synchrotron-radiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.; Robinson, A.L.

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source, a third-generation national synchrotron-radiation facility now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is scheduled to begin serving qualified users across a broad spectrum of research areas in the spring of 1993. Based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized to operate at 1.5 GeV, the ALS will have 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) and 24 high-quality bend-magnet ports. The short pulse width (30--50 ns) will be ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will generate high-brightness soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from below 20 eV to above 2 keV. Wigglers and bend magnets will extend the spectrum by generating high fluxes of hard x-rays to photon energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in which XUV radiation is used to study matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. X-ray Analysis of the Bright Source in the Supernova Remnant G350.0-2.0 Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpova, A.; Shternin, P.; Zyuzin, D.; Danilenko, A.; Shibanov, Yu

    2016-11-01

    We present results of the analysis of the XMM-Newton data on the bright source 1RXS J172653.4-382157 in the field of the supernova remnant G350.0-2.0. Its spectrum is well described by power law plus thermal component (blackbody or neutron star atmosphere) model. Therefore the source can be a rotation powered pulsar. Alternatively, it can be a cataclysmic variable star since its spectrum is equally well fitted by the two-temperature optically thin thermal plasma model. No periodic pulsations and flux time variability were found. The upper limit on the pulsed fraction of 27% cannot help to state whether the source is a pulsar or a cataclysmic variable. A faint source was detected in the XMM-Newton optical/UV monitor image and found in the GSC-II catalog and ESO Hα and optical/near infrared broadband sky survey images on the X-ray position of J172653.4-382157. Its spectral energy distribution favors the cataclysmic variable interpretation. Further optical and X-ray observations are needed to confirm this.

  5. A High X-ray Brightness State of HBL Source 1ES 0033+595

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapanadze, Bidzina

    2015-09-01

    The TeV-detected HBL object of unknown redshift 1ES 0033+595 has been observed six times with X-ray Telecope onboard Swift satellite (Swift-XRT) since 2015 August 30 on the basis of our Target of Opportunity (ToO) requests of low and medium urgencies (see https://www.swift.psu.edu/secure/toop/summary.php).

  6. The Origin of Bright X-Ray Sources in Multiple Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, V V; Eggleton, P P

    2009-04-23

    Luminous X-ray stars are very often found in visual double or multiple stars. Binaries with periods of a few days possess the highest degree of coronal X-ray activity among regular, non-relativistic stars. But the orbital periods in visual double stars are too large for any direct interaction between the companions to take place. We suggest that most of the strongest X-ray components in resolved binaries are yet-undiscovered short-period binaries, and that a few are merged remnants of such binaries. The omnipresence of short-period active stars, e.g. of BY-Dra-type binaries, in multiple systems is explained via the dynamical evolution of triple stars with large mutual inclinations. The dynamical perturbation on the inner pair pumps up the eccentricity in a cyclic manner, a phenomenon known as Kozai cycling. At times of close periapsis, tidal friction reduces the angular momentum of the binary, causing it to shrink. When the orbital period of the inner pair drops to a few days, fast surface rotation of the companions is driven by tidal forces, boosting activity by a few orders of magnitude. If the period drops still further, a merger may take place leaving a rapidly-rotating active dwarf with only a distant companion.

  7. Metal nanoplasmas as bright sources of hard X-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, P P; Taneja, P; Ayyub, P; Sandhu, A S; Kumar, G Ravindra

    2003-03-21

    We report significant enhancements in light coupling to intense-laser-created solid plasmas via surface plasmon and "lightning rod" effects. We demonstrate this in metal nanoparticle-coated solid targets irradiated with 100 fs, 806 nm laser pulses, focused to intensities approximately 10(14)-10(15) W cm(-2). Our experiments show a 13-fold enhancement in hard x-ray yield (10-200 keV) emitted by copper nanoparticle plasmas formed at the focal volume. A simple model explains the observed enhancement quantitatively and provides pointers to the design of structured surfaces for maximizing such emissions.

  8. Laser-heated X-ray flashlamp brightness measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.L.; Campbell, E.M.; Hagelstein, P.; Halsey, W.; Kauffman, R.L.; Koppel, L.; Phillion, D.; Price, R.; Toor, A.

    1983-12-01

    The authors present measurements of the X-ray emission characteristics of laser-irradiated flashlamp foils which are candidates to produce by resonant photoexcitation a population inversion in either a neon or fluorine lasant gas. Using the Shiva 1.06 ..mu.. laser, the authors heated Fe, Cr, and Ni foils to study the brightness and centroid energies of X-ray lines stemming from L-M transitions. Results indicate that appropriately bright and uniform sources can be produced.

  9. High-brightness table-top hard X-ray source driven by sub-100-femtosecond mid-infrared pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisshaupt, Jannick; Juvé, Vincent; Holtz, Marcel; Ku, Shinan; Woerner, Michael; Elsaesser, Thomas; Ališauskas, Skirmantas; Pugžlys, Audrius; Baltuška, Andrius

    2014-12-01

    Ultrafast structural dynamics in the condensed phase represents a key topic of current physics, chemistry and materials science. Femtosecond hard X-ray pulses are important structure probes that have been applied in time-resolved X-ray absorption and diffraction. Optical pump/X-ray probe schemes with compact laser-driven table-top sources have allowed for tiny changes of diffracted intensity to be measured with X-ray photon statistics, which has set the ultimate sensitivity limit. To address the strong quest for a higher X-ray flux, here we present the first hard X-ray plasma source driven by intense mid-infrared sub-100-fs pulses at 3.9 μm. The comparably long optical period allows for accelerating electrons from the Cu target to very high kinetic energies and for generating a characteristic Kα flux of 109 photons per pulse, 25 times more than with our 800 nm driver. Theoretical simulations account for the experimental results in a wide range of driving fields and predict a further enhancement of X-ray flux.

  10. On the Nature of the Bright Short-Period X-ray Source in the Circinus Galaxy Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Wu, Kinwah; Swartz, Douglas A.; Ghosh, Kajal K.

    2003-01-01

    The spectrum and light curve of the bright X-ray source CG X-1 in the field of the Circinus galaxy are re-examined. Previous analyses have concluded that the source is an accreting black hole of mass approx. greater than 50 solar masses although it was noted that the light curve resembles that of an AM Her system. Here we show that the short period and an assumed main sequence companion constrain the mass of the companion to less than 1 solar mass. Further a possible eclipse seen during one of the Chandra observations and a subsequent XMM-Newton observation constrains the mass of the compact object to less than 60 solar masses. If such a system lies in the Circinus galaxy, then the accreting object must either radiate anisotropically or strongly violate the Eddington limit. Even if the emission is beamed, then the companion star which intercepts this flux during eclipse will be driven out of thermal equilibrium and evaporate within approx. 10(exp 3) yr. We find that the observations cannot rule out an AM Her system in the Milky Way and that such a system can account for the variations seen in the light curve.

  11. On the Nature of the Bright Short-Period X-Ray Source in the Circinus Galaxy Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Wu, Kinwah; Tennant, Allyn F.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Ghosh, Kajal K.

    2004-01-01

    The spectrum and light curve of the bright X-ray source CG X-1 in the field of the Circinus galaxy are reexamined. Previous analyses have concluded that the source is an accreting black hole of mass > or approx. 50 solar masses although it has been noted that the light curve resembles that of an AM Herculis system. Here we show that the short period and an assumed main-sequence companion constrain the mass of the companion to less than 1 solar mass. Furthermore, a possible eclipse seen during one of the Chandra observations and a subsequent XMM-Newton observation constrain the mass of the compact object to less than 60 solar masses. If such a system lies in the Circinus galaxy, then the accreting object must either radiate anisotropically or strongly violate the Eddington limit. Even if the emission is beamed, then the companion star that intercepts this flux during eclipse will be driven out of thermal equilibrium and evaporate within approx. 10(exp 3) yr. We find that the observations cannot rule out an AM Herculis system in the Milky Way and that such a system can account for the variations seen in the light curve.

  12. Detection of x ray sources in PROS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deponte, J.; Primini, F. A.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of detecting discrete sources in x-ray images has much in common with the problem of automatic source detection at other wavelengths. In all cases, one searches for positive brightness enhancements exceeding a certain threshold, which appear consistent with what one expects for a point source, in the presence of a (possibly) spatially variable background. Multidimensional point spread functions (e.g., dependent on detector position and photon energy) are also common. At the same time, the problem in x-ray astronomy has some unique aspects. For example, for typical x-ray exposures in current or recent observatories, the number of available pixels far exceeds the number of actual x-ray events, so Poisson, rather than Gaussian statistics apply. Further, extended cosmic x-ray sources are common, and one often desires to detect point sources in the vicinity or even within bright, diffuse x-ray emission. Finally, support structures in x-ray detectors often cast sharp shadows in x-ray images making it necessary to detect sources in a region of rapidly varying exposure. We have developed a source detection package within the IRAF/PROS environment which attempts to deal with some of the problems of x-ray source detection. We have patterned our package after the successful Einstein Observatory x-ray source detection programs. However, we have attempted to improve the flexibility and accessibility of the functions and to provide a graphical front-end for the user. Our philosophy has been to use standard IRAF tasks whenever possible for image manipulation and to separate general functions from mission-specific ones. We will report on the current status of the package and discuss future developments, including simulation tasks, to allow the user to assess detection efficiency and source significance, tasks to determine source intensity, and alternative detection algorithms.

  13. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  14. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  15. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Stone, Gary F.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Chornenky, Victor I.

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  16. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  17. Developing a bright 17 keV x-ray source for probing high-energy-density states of matter at high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S.; Maddox, B. R.; Barrios, M. A.; Benedetti, R.; Braun, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Remington, B. A.; Hohenberger, M.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-04-15

    A set of experiments were performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to develop and optimize a bright, 17 keV x-ray backlighter probe using laser-irradiated Nb foils. High-resolution one-dimensional imaging was achieved using a 15 μm wide slit in a Ta substrate to aperture the Nb He{sub α} x-rays onto an open-aperture, time integrated camera. To optimize the x-ray source for imaging applications, the effect of laser pulse shape and spatial profile on the target was investigated. Two laser pulse shapes were used—a “prepulse” shape that included a 3 ns, low-intensity laser foot preceding the high-energy 2 ns square main laser drive, and a pulse without the laser foot. The laser spatial profile was varied by the use of continuous phase plates (CPPs) on a pair of shots compared to beams at best focus, without CPPs. A comprehensive set of common diagnostics allowed for a direct comparison of imaging resolution, total x-ray conversion efficiency, and x-ray spectrum between shots. The use of CPPs was seen to reduce the high-energy tail of the x-ray spectrum, whereas the laser pulse shape had little effect on the high-energy tail. The measured imaging resolution was comparably high for all combinations of laser parameters, but a higher x-ray flux was achieved without phase plates. This increased flux was the result of smaller laser spot sizes, which allowed us to arrange the laser focal spots from multiple beams and produce an x-ray source which was more localized behind the slit aperture. Our experiments are a first demonstration of point-projection geometry imaging at NIF at the energies (>10 keV) necessary for imaging denser, higher-Z targets than have previously been investigated.

  18. CELESTIAL X-RAY SOURCES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    sources, (4) the physical conditions in the pulsating x-ray source in the Crab Nebula , and (5) miscellaneous related topics. A bibliography of all work performed under the contract is given. (Author)

  19. Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-04-20

    A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

  20. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  1. X-ray-selected AGNs near bright galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocke, John T.; Schneider, Peter; Morris, Simon L.; Gioia, Isabella M.; Maccacaro, Tommaso

    1987-01-01

    Among the numerous low-redshift low-luminosity X-ray sources discovered with the Einstein Observatory, ten AGNs were identified that are projected within three optical diameters of bright (V less than 18) foreground galaxies. These AGNs near galaxies have significantly higher redshifts than the sample as a whole. This discovery is interpreted in terms of gravitational 'microlensing' in which stars in the foreground galaxy have significantly brightened the X-ray emission from these higher redshift AGNs, allowing their detection. It is suggested that microlensing may be responsible for a significant alteration of the inherent QSO luminosity function.

  2. Bright end of the luminosity function of high-mass X-ray binaries: contributions of hard, soft and supersoft sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, S.; Khabibullin, I.

    2017-04-01

    Using a spectral analysis of bright Chandra X-ray sources located in 27 nearby galaxies and maps of star-formation rate (SFR) and interstellar medium surface densities for these galaxies, we constructed the intrinsic X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of luminous high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), taking into account absorption effects and the diversity of HMXB spectra. The XLF per unit SFR can be described by a power-law dN/dlog LX,unabs ≈ 2.0(LX,unabs/1039 erg s-1)-0.6 (M⊙ yr-1)-1 from LX,unabs = 1038 to 1040.5 erg s-1, where LX,unabs is the unabsorbed luminosity at 0.25-8 keV. The intrinsic number of luminous HMXBs per unit SFR is a factor of ∼2.3 larger than the observed number reported before. The intrinsic XLF is composed of hard, soft and supersoft sources (defined here as those with the 0.25-2 keV to 0.25-8 keV flux ratio of <0.6, 0.6-0.95 and >0.95, respectively) in ∼ 2:1:1 proportion. We also constructed the intrinsic HMXB XLF in the soft X-ray band (0.25-2 keV). Here, the numbers of hard, soft and supersoft sources prove to be nearly equal. The cumulative present-day 0.25-2 keV emissivity of HMXBs with luminosities between 1038 and 1040.5 erg s-1 is ∼5 × 1039 erg s-1(M⊙ yr-1)-1, which may be relevant for studying the X-ray preheating of the early Universe.

  3. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J; Mancuso, Christopher A; Hogle, Craig W; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L; Dorney, Kevin M; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G; Fullerton, Eric E; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M; Milošević, Dejan B; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C

    2015-11-17

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform.

  4. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D.; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J.; Mancuso, Christopher A.; Hogle, Craig W.; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L.; Dorney, Kevin M.; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Milošević, Dejan B.; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A.; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform. PMID:26534992

  5. The advanced light source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory—A high-brightness soft x-ray synchrotron-radiation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlachter, Alfred S.; Robinson, Arthur L.

    1990-12-01

    The Advanced Light Source, a third-generation national synchrotron-radiation facility now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is scheduled to begin serving qualified users across a broad spectrum of research areas in the spring of 1993. Based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized to operate at 1.5 GeV, the ALS will have 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) and 24 high-quality bend-magnet ports. The short pulse width (30-50 ns) will be ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will generate high-brightness soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from below 10 eV to above 2 keV. Wigglers and bend magnets will extend the spectrum by generating high fluxes of hard x-rays to photon energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in which XUV radiation is used to study matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets.

  6. Understanding Bright 13 keV Kr K-shell X-ray Sources at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, M. J.; Colvin, J. D.; Kemp, G. E.; Fournier, K. B.; Scott, H.; Patel, M.; Barrios, Widmann; Widmann, K.

    2015-11-01

    High x-ray conversion efficiency (CE) K-shell Kr sources are being investigated for High Energy Density experiments. These sources are 4.1 mm in diameter 4.4 mm tall hollow epoxy tubes having a 40 μm thick wall holding either 1.2 or 1.5 atm of Kr gas. The CE of K-shell Kr is dependent upon the peak electron temperature in the radiating plasma. In the NIF experiments, the available energy heats the source to Te = 6-7 keV, well below the temperature of Te ~25 keV needed to optimize the Kr CE. The CE is a steep function of the peak electron temperature. A spatially averaged electron temperature can be estimated from measured He(α) and Ly(α) line ratios. Some disagreement has been observed in the simulated and measured line ratios for some of these K-shell sources. Disagreements have been observed between the simulated and measured line ratios for some of these K-shell sources. To help understand this issue, Kr gas pipes have been shot with 3 ω light at ?750 kJ at ~210, ~140 TW and ~120 TW power levels with 3.7, 5.2 and 6.7 ns pulses, respectively. The power and pulse length scaling of the measured CE and K-shell line ratios and their comparison to simulations will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspic

  7. Lightweight Target Generates Bright, Energetic X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A

    2006-01-25

    Radiography with x rays is a long-established method to see inside objects, from human limbs to weapon parts. Livermore scientists have a continuing need for powerful x rays for such applications as backlighting, or illuminating, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments and imaging still or exploding materials for the nation's Stockpile Stewardship Program. X-radiography is one of the prime diagnostics for ICF experiments because it captures the fine detail needed to determine what happens to nearly microscopic targets when they are compressed by laser light. For example, Livermore scientists participating in the National Ignition Facility's (NIF's) 18-month-long Early Light experimental campaign, which ended in 2004, used x rays to examine hydrodynamic instabilities in jets of plasma. In these experiments, one laser beam irradiated a solid target of titanium, causing it to form a high-temperature plasma that generated x rays of about 4.65 kiloelectronvolts (keV). These x rays backlit a jet of plasma formed when two other laser beams hit a plastic ablator and sent a shock to an aluminum washer. Livermore physicist Kevin Fournier of the Physics and Advanced Technologies Directorate leads a team that is working to increase the efficiency of converting laser energy into x rays so the resulting images provide more information about the object being illuminated. The main characteristics of x-ray sources are energy and brightness. ''As experimental targets get larger and as compression of the targets increases, the backlighter sources must be brighter and more energetic'', says Fournier. The more energetic the x rays, the further they penetrate an object. The brighter the source--that is, the more photons it has--the clearer the image. historically, researchers have used solid targets such as thin metal foils to generate x rays. however, when photon energies are greater than a few kiloelectronvolts, the conversion efficiency of solid targets is only a fraction of 1

  8. Focused X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

    1990-08-21

    Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

  9. Focused X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary I.; Maccagno, Pierre

    1990-01-01

    An intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator.

  10. Compact x-ray source and panel

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayon, Stephen E.

    2008-02-12

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  11. PROFFIT: Analysis of X-ray surface-brightness profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    PROFFIT analyzes X-ray surface-brightness profiles for data from any X-ray instrument. It can extract surface-brightness profiles in circular or elliptical annuli, using constant or logarithmic bin size, from the image centroid, the surface-brightness peak, or any user-given center, and provides surface-brightness profiles in any circular or elliptical sectors. It offers background map support to extract background profiles, can excise areas using SAO DS9-compatible (ascl:0003.002) region files to exclude point sources, provides fitting with a number of built-in models, including the popular beta model, double beta, cusp beta, power law, and projected broken power law, uses chi-squared or C statistic, and can fit on the surface-brightness or counts data. It has a command-line interface similar to HEASOFT’s XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) package, provides interactive help with a description of all the commands, and results can be saved in FITS, ROOT or TXT format.

  12. HEAO 1 high-energy X-ray observations of three bright transient X-ray sources H1705-250 (Nova Ophiuchi), H1743-322, and H1833-077 (Scutum X-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, B. A.; Levine, A. M.; Lang, F. L.; Primini, F. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1984-01-01

    The bright X-ray transients H1705-250 (Nova Ophiuchi) and H1743-322 in the energy range 12-180 keV were observed, and the presence of high-energy spectral components was revealed. On the basis of X-ray spectra in the 1-10 keV range, transients are classified as 'soft' (kT = 4 keV) or 'hard' (kT = 17 keV); and both H1705-250 and H1743-322 should be in the 'soft' category. Data have been reexamined for the archetypal 'soft' transient A0600-00 taken by the SAS 3 satellite, but no evidence is found there for a high-energy spectral component. Thus consideration of a wider X-ray energy range makes the 'hard'/'soft' distinction between X-ray transients much less clear.

  13. Tunable X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Boyce, James R [Williamsburg, VA

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  14. Low-luminosity X-ray sources and the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, R.

    2014-07-01

    We make a new determination of the hard-band (2-10 keV) X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of relative low-luminosity Galactic X-ray sources based on a source sample derived from the XMM Slew Survey (XSS). The source population is comprised of coronally-active late-type stars and binaries with hard-band X-ray luminosities in the range 10^{28-32} erg s^{-1} and cataclysmic variables (magnetic and non-magnetic) with X-ray luminosities spanning the range 10^{30-34} erg s^{-1}. We use this new estimate of the XLF, to predict the 2-10 keV X-ray source counts on the Galactic Plane at faint fluxes and show that the result is fully consistent with the available observational constraints. Similarly the predicted surface brightness, both in the full 2-10 keV band and in a restricted 6-10 keV bandpass, due to the integrated emission of faint unresolved Galactic sources, is well matched to the observed intensity of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). We find that the coronally-active sources make the dominant contribution to both the faint Galactic X-ray source counts and the GRXE.

  15. EX56a study of extended X-ray emission around isolated galaxies EX56b identification and spectra of bright X-ray sources at high galactic latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Daniel A.

    1987-01-01

    The EXOSAT observations confirmed the identification and extended nature of PKS 2345-35. It gave a good 2 to 10 keV X-ray spectrum and a detailed spatial profile indicating asymmetry of the structure. In the high galactic latitidue investigation, the BL Lac object identified with the HEAO-1 source 1430+423 was detected, and the first X-ray spectrum was obtained. Several simulataneous observations of H0323+022 were obtained over a broad range of electromagnetic spectrum. Studies of luminous active galactic nuclei have given significant information on the spectrum of the quasar PKS 0558-504. In a study of Southern sky cataclysmic variables, the EXOSAT was used to determine the X-ray spectrum and search for periodicities in two objects. Studies of complete identifications have revealed that X-ray sources in two high galactic latitude fields are stars, and therefore are to be excluded from the Piccinotti extragalactic sample. Only one Piccinotti source remains to be identified.

  16. A search for rapidly modulated emission in bright X-ray sources using the HEAO A-1 data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbank, William M.

    1987-01-01

    A search was performed in the HEAO A-1 Data Base (located at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C.) for evidence of rapidly-rotating neutron stars that could be sources of coherent gravitational radiation. A new data analysis algorithm, which was developed, is described. The algorithm was applied to data from observations of Cyg X-2, Cyg X-3, and 1820-30. Upper limits on pulse fraction were derived and reported.

  17. Compact Stellar X-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, Walter H. G.; van der Klis, Michiel

    2006-04-01

    1. Accreting neutron stars and black holes: a decade of discoveries D. Psaltis; 2. Rapid X-ray variability M. van der Klis; 3. New views of thermonuclear bursts T. Strohmayer and L. Bildsten; 4. Black hole binaries J. McClintock and R. Remillard; 5. Optical, ultraviolet and infrared observations of X-ray binaries P. Charles and M. Coe; 6. Fast X-ray transients and X-ray flashes J. Heise and J. in 't Zand; 7. Isolated neutron stars V. Kaspi, M. Roberts and A. Harding; 8. Globular cluster X-ray sources F. Verbunt and W. Lewin; 9. Jets from X-ray binaries R. Fender; 10. X-Rays from cataclysmic variables E. Kuulkers, A. Norton, A. Schwope and B. Warner; 11. Super soft sources P. Kahabka and E. van den Heuvel; 12. Compact stellar X-ray sources in normal galaxies G. Fabbiano and N. White; 13. Accretion in compact binaries A. King; 14. Soft gamma repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars: magnetar candidates P. Woods and C. Thompson; 15. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts, their afterglows, and their host galaxies K. Hurley, R. Sari and S. Djorgovski; 16. Formation and evolution of compact stellar X-ray sources T. Tauris and E. van den Heuvel.

  18. Compact Stellar X-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, Walter; van der Klis, Michiel

    2010-11-01

    1. Accreting neutron stars and black holes: a decade of discoveries D. Psaltis; 2. Rapid X-ray variability M. van der Klis; 3. New views of thermonuclear bursts T. Strohmayer and L. Bildsten; 4. Black hole binaries J. McClintock and R. Remillard; 5. Optical, ultraviolet and infrared observations of X-ray binaries P. Charles and M. Coe; 6. Fast X-ray transients and X-ray flashes J. Heise and J. in 't Zand; 7. Isolated neutron stars V. Kaspi, M. Roberts and A. Harding; 8. Globular cluster X-ray sources F. Verbunt and W. Lewin; 9. Jets from X-ray binaries R. Fender; 10. X-Rays from cataclysmic variables E. Kuulkers, A. Norton, A. Schwope and B. Warner; 11. Super soft sources P. Kahabka and E. van den Heuvel; 12. Compact stellar X-ray sources in normal galaxies G. Fabbiano and N. White; 13. Accretion in compact binaries A. King; 14. Soft gamma repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars: magnetar candidates P. Woods and C. Thompson; 15. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts, their afterglows, and their host galaxies K. Hurley, R. Sari and S. Djorgovski; 16. Formation and evolution of compact stellar X-ray sources T. Tauris and E. van den Heuvel.

  19. Fast microtomography using bright monochromatic x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, J. W.; Lee, J. S.; Park, S. J.; Chang, S.; Pyo, J.; Kwon, N.; Kim, J.; Kohmura, Y.; Nishino, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Ishikawa, T.

    2012-09-15

    A fast microtomography system for high-resolution high-speed imaging has been developed using bright monochromatic x-rays at the BL29XU beamline of SPring-8. The shortest scan time for microtomography we attained was 0.25 s in 1.25 {mu}m effective pixel size by combining the bright monochromatic x-rays, a fast rotating sample stage, and a high performance x-ray imaging detector. The feasibility of the tomography system was successfully demonstrated by visualization of rising bubbles in a viscous liquid, an interesting issue in multiphase flow physics. This system also provides a high spatial (a measurable feature size of 300 nm) or a very high temporal (9.8 {mu}s) resolution in radiographs.

  20. THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    King, Andrew

    2011-05-10

    There have been several recent claims of black hole binaries in globular clusters. I show that these candidate systems could instead be ultracompact X-ray binaries (UCXBs) in which a neutron star accretes from a white dwarf. They would represent a slightly earlier evolutionary stage of known globular cluster UCXBs such as 4U 1820-30, with white dwarf masses {approx}0.2 M{sub sun} and orbital periods below 5 minutes. Accretion is slightly super-Eddington and makes these systems ultraluminous sources with rather mild beaming factors b {approx} 0.3. Their theoretical luminosity function flattens slightly just above L{sub Edd} and then steepens at {approx}3L{sub Edd}. It predicts of order two detections in elliptical galaxies such as NGC 4472, as observed. The very bright X-ray source HLX-1 lies off the plane of its host S0a galaxy. If this is an indication of globular cluster membership, it could conceivably be a more extreme example of a UCXB with white dwarf mass M{sub 2} {approx_equal} 0.34 M{sub sun}. The beaming here is tighter (b {approx} (2.5-9) x 10{sup -3}), but the system's distance of 95 Mpc easily eliminates any need to invoke improbable alignment of the beam for detection. If its position instead indicates membership of a satellite dwarf galaxy, HLX-1 could have a much higher accretor mass {approx}1000 M{sub sun}

  1. Exotic X-ray Sources from Intermediate Energy Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chouffani, K.; Wells, D.; Harmon, F.; Jones, J.L.; Lancaster, G.

    2003-08-26

    High intensity x-ray beams are used in a wide variety of applications in solid-state physics, medicine, biology and material sciences. Synchrotron radiation (SR) is currently the primary, high-quality x-ray source that satisfies both brilliance and tunability. The high cost, large size and low x-ray energies of SR facilities, however, are serious limitations. Alternatively, 'novel' x-ray sources are now possible due to new small linear accelerator (LINAC) technology, such as improved beam emittance, low background, sub-Picosecond beam pulses, high beam stability and higher repetition rate. These sources all stem from processes that produce Radiation from relativistic Electron beams in (crystalline) Periodic Structures (REPS), or the periodic 'structure' of laser light. REPS x-ray sources are serious candidates for bright, compact, portable, monochromatic, and tunable x-ray sources with varying degrees of polarization and coherence. Despite the discovery and early research into these sources over the past 25 years, these sources are still in their infancy. Experimental and theoretical research are still urgently needed to answer fundamental questions about the practical and ultimate limits of their brightness, mono-chromaticity etc. We present experimental results and theoretical comparisons for three exotic REPS sources. These are Laser-Compton Scattering (LCS), Channeling Radiation (CR) and Parametric X-Radiation (PXR)

  2. Optically Levitated Targets as a Source for High Brightness X-rays and a Platform for Mass-Limited Laser-interaction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giltrap, Samuel; Stuart, Nick; Robinson, Tim; Armstrong, Chris; Hicks, George; Eardley, Sam; Gumbrell, Ed; Smith, Roland

    2016-10-01

    Here we report on the development of an optical levitation based x-ray and proton source, motivated by the requirement for a debris free, high spatial resolution, and low EMP source for x-ray radiography and proton production. Research at Imperial College has led to the development of a feedback controlled optical levitation trap which is capable of holding both solid (Glass beads) and liquid (silicon based oil) micro-targets ( 3-10um). The optical levitation trap has been successfully fielded in a high-intensity laser interaction experiment at Imperial College London and at the Vulcan Petawatt Laser system at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). Here we report on the results from that RAL run including; an x-ray source size of 10-15um with very good spherical symmetry when compared to wire targets, secondly very low EMP signal from isolated levitated targets (9 times less RF signal than a comparable wire target). At Imperial College we were also able to record an x-ray energy spectrum which produced an electron temperature of 0.48KeV, and performed interferometry of a shock evolving into a blast wave off an optically levitated droplet which allowed us to infer the electron density within the shock front.

  3. Optical Variability of X-Ray Bright Southern Symbiotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedrick, C.; Sokoloski, J.

    2004-12-01

    We performed weekly B- and V-band observations of four X-ray bright southern symbiotic binary stars -- CD-43 14304, Hen 3-1591, LMC S63, and SMC LN 358 -- using the 1.3-m telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). We began optical monitoring in August 2003 for two of the objects (LMC S63 and SMC LN 358) and in January 2004 for the other two objects (CD-43 14304 and Hen 3-1591). None of the four survey objects experienced a major outburst during the monitoring period. We did, however, detect small-amplitude ( 0.1 mag) optical variability on a time scale of tens of days, for the first time, in each of the four systems. Both the structure and amplitude of the variations are roughly the same in the B band and V band in all of the symbiotics in our sample except one (LMC S63), and is most consistent with the idea that the week-time-scale variability originates with the hot component (most likely an accreting white dwarf) rather than the red giant. We compare the variability properties of our small sample of X-ray-bright symbiotic stars to those of samples of both X-ray-bright and X-ray-dim symbiotic stars from the database of the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO).

  4. Final Report on DTRA Basic Research Project #BRCALL08-Per3-C-2-0006 "High-Z Non-Equilibrium Physics and Bright X-ray Sources with New Laser Targets"

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, Jeffrey D.

    2016-06-01

    This project had two major goals. Final Goal: obtain spectrally resolved, absolutely calibrated x-ray emission data from uniquely uniform mm-scale near-critical-density high-Z plasmas not in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) to benchmark modern detailed atomic physics models. Scientific significance: advance understanding of non-LTE atomic physics. Intermediate Goal: develop new nano-fabrication techniques to make suitable laser targets that form the required highly uniform non-LTE plasmas when illuminated by high-intensity laser light. Scientific significance: advance understanding of nano-science. The new knowledge will allow us to make x-ray sources that are bright at the photon energies of most interest for testing radiation hardening technologies, the spectral energy range where current x-ray sources are weak. All project goals were met.

  5. Two XTE A01 Projects: A Multifrequency Study of Circinus X-1 and a Search for Microsecond Variability From Bright Galactic X-Ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jernigan, Garrett

    1998-01-01

    This final report describes the research of a single common portion of the above-named two projects, conducted by G. Jernigan, i.e., the theory for a new method, a variation of a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, for determining the fastest variability present in an X-ray source. The current phase involves testing the newly developed code on real example sources (CYG X1). Unfortunately, there are no calibration sources for testing the code, which therefore required the development of an X-ray source simulation code. The goal is to evaluate the sensitivity of the code for the detection of a range of different types of variability (bursts, pulsations, etc.).

  6. Globular cluster x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Pooley, David

    2010-04-20

    Globular clusters and x-ray astronomy have a long and fruitful history. Uhuru and OSO-7 revealed highly luminous (> 10(36) ergs(-1)) x-ray sources in globular clusters, and Einstein and ROSAT revealed a larger population of low-luminosity (< 10(33) ergs(-1)) x-ray sources. It was realized early on that the high-luminosity sources were low-mass x-ray binaries in outburst and that they were orders of magnitude more abundant per unit mass in globular clusters than in the rest of the galaxy. However, the low-luminosity sources proved difficult to classify. Many ideas were put forth--low-mass x-ray binaries in quiescence (qLMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), active main-sequence binaries (ABs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs)--but secure identifications were scarce. In ROSAT observations of 55 clusters, about 25 low-luminosity sources were found. Chandra has now observed over 80 Galactic globular clusters, and these observations have revealed over 1,500 x-ray sources. The superb angular resolution has allowed for many counterpart identifications, providing clues to the nature of this population. It is a heterogeneous mix of qLMXBs, CVs, ABs, and MSPs, and it has been shown that the qLMXBs and CVs are both, in part, overabundant like the luminous LMXBs. The number of x-ray sources in a cluster correlates very well with its encounter frequency. This points to dynamical formation scenarios for the x-ray sources and shows them to be excellent tracers of the complicated internal dynamics. The relation between the encounter frequency and the number of x-ray sources has been used to suggest that we have misunderstood the dynamical states of globular clusters.

  7. First results from the high-brightness x-ray spectroscopy beamline at ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, R.C.C.; Ng, W.; Jones, G.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goal of high brightness at the sample for use in the X-ray Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy (XAMS) science, surface and interface science, biology and x-ray optical development programs at ALS. X-ray absorption and time of flight photo emission measurements in 2 - 5 keV photon energy in argon along with the flux, resolution, spot size and stability of the beamline will be discussed. Prospects for future XAMS measurements will also be presented.

  8. Bright X-Ray Transients in M31: 2004 July XMM-Newton Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudolyubov, Sergey; Priedhorsky, William; Cordova, France

    2006-07-01

    We present the results of X-ray observations of four bright transients sources detected in the 2004 July XMM-Newton observations of the central bulge of M31. Two X-ray sources, XMMU J004315.5+412440 and XMMU J004144.7+411110, were discovered for the first time. Two other sources, CXOM31 J004309.9+412332 and CXOM31 J004241.8+411635, were previously detected by Chandra. The properties of the sources suggest their identification with accreting binary systems in M31. The X-ray spectra and variability of two sources, XMMU J004144.7+411110 and CXOM31 J004241.8+411635, are similar to that of the Galactic black hole transients. The X-ray source XMMU J004315.5+412440 demonstrates a dramatic decline of the X-ray flux on a timescale of three days and a remarkable flaring behavior on a timescale of tens of minutes. The X-ray data on XMMU J004315.5+412440 and CXOM31 J004309.9+412332 suggest that they can be either black hole or neutron star systems. Combining the results of 2000-2004 XMM-Newton observations of M31, we estimate the total rate of the bright transient outbursts in the central region of M31 to be 6-12 yr-1, in agreement with previous studies.

  9. SPECTRAL SURVEY OF X-RAY BRIGHT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FROM THE ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, Elizabeth; Markowitz, Alex; Rothschild, Richard

    2011-03-15

    Using long-term monitoring data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), we have selected 23 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with sufficient brightness and overall observation time to derive broadband X-ray spectra from 3 to {approx}>100 keV. Our sample includes mainly radio-quiet Seyferts, as well as seven radio-loud sources. Given the longevity of the RXTE mission, the greater part of our data is spread out over more than a decade, providing truly long-term average spectra and eliminating inconsistencies arising from variability. We present long-term average values of absorption, Fe line parameters, Compton reflection strengths, and photon indices, as well as fluxes and luminosities for the hard and very hard energy bands, 2-10 keV and 20-100 keV, respectively. We find tentative evidence for high-energy rollovers in three of our objects. We improve upon previous surveys of the very hard X-ray energy band in terms of accuracy and sensitivity, particularly with respect to confirming and quantifying the Compton reflection component. This survey is meant to provide a baseline for future analysis with respect to the long-term averages for these sources and to cement the legacy of RXTE, and especially its High Energy X-ray Timing Experiment, as a contributor to AGN spectral science.

  10. The X-ray spectral evolution and radio-X-ray correlation in radiatively efficient black-hole sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ai-Jun; Wu, Qingwen; Cao, Xiao-Feng

    2016-02-01

    We explore X-ray spectral evolution and radio-X-ray correlation simultaneously for four X-ray binaries (XRBs). We find that hard X-ray photon indices, Γ, are anti- and positively correlated to X-ray fluxes when the X-ray flux, F 3-9keV, is below and above a critical flux, F X,crit, which may be regulated by ADAF and disk-corona respectively. We find that the data points with anti-correlation of Γ-F 3-9keV follow the universal radio-X-ray correlation of F R ~ F X b (b ~ 0.5-0.7), while the data points with positive X-ray spectral evolution follow a steeper radio-X-ray correlation (b ~ 1.4, the so-called `outliers track'). The bright active galactic nuclei (AGNs) share similar X-ray spectral evolution and radio-X-ray correlation as XRBs in `outliers' track, and we present a new fundamental plane of log L R=1.59+0.28 -0.22 log L X-0.22+0.19 -0.20 log M BH-28.97+0.45 -0.45 for these radiatively efficient BH sources.

  11. Magnetic properties of X-ray bright points. [in sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.; Krieger, A. S.; Harvey, J. W.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    Using high-resolution Kitt Peak National Observatory magnetograms and sequences of simultaneous S-054 soft X-ray solar images, the properties of X-ray bright points (XBP) and ephemeral active regions (ER) are compared. All XBP appear on the magnetograms as bipolar features, except for very recently emerged or old and decayed XBP. The separation of the magnetic bipoles is found to increase with the age of the XBP, with an average emergence growth rate of 2.2 plus or minus 0.4 km per sec. The total magnetic flux in a typical XBP living about 8 hr is found to be about two times ten to the nineteenth power Mx. A proportionality is found between XBP lifetime and total magnetic flux, equivalent to about ten to the twentieth power Mx per day of lifetime.

  12. Stellar kinematics of X-ray bright massive elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyskova, N.; Churazov, E.; Moiseev, A.; Sil'chenko, O.; Zhuravleva, I.

    2014-07-01

    We discuss a simple and fast method for estimating masses of early-type galaxies from optical data and compare the results with X-ray derived masses. The optical method relies only on the most basic observables such as the surface brightness I(R) and the line-of-sight velocity dispersion σp(R) profiles and provides an anisotropy-independent estimate of the galaxy circular speed Vc. The mass-anisotropy degeneracy is effectively overcome by evaluating Vc at a characteristic radius Rsweet defined from local properties of observed profiles. The sweet radius Rsweet is expected to lie close to R2, where I(R) ∝ R-2, and not far from the effective radius Reff. We apply the method to a sample of five X-ray bright elliptical galaxies observed with the 6 m telescope BTA-6 in Russia. We then compare the optical Vc estimate with the X-ray derived value, and discuss possible constraints on the non-thermal pressure in the hot gas and configuration of stellar orbits. We find that the average ratio of the optical Vc estimate to the X-ray one is equal to ≈0.98 with 11 per cent scatter, i.e. there is no evidence for the large non-thermal pressure contribution in the gas at ˜Rsweet. From analysis of the Lick indices Hβ, Mgb, Fe5270 and Fe5335, we calculate the mass of the stellar component within the sweet radius. We conclude that a typical dark matter fraction inside Rsweet in the sample galaxies is ˜60 per cent for the Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) and ˜75 per cent for the Kroupa IMF.

  13. X-ray source for mammography

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

  14. X-ray source for mammography

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.

    1994-12-20

    An x-ray source is described utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms. 6 figures.

  15. Spectra of cosmic x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, S.S.; Mccray, R.

    1982-02-01

    X-ray measurements provide the most direct probes of astrophysical environments with temperatures exceeding one million K. Progress in experimental research utilizing dispersive techniques (e.g., Bragg and grating spectroscopy) is considerably slower than that in areas utilizing photometric techniques, because of the relative inefficiency of the former for the weak X-ray signals from celestial sources. As a result, the term spectroscopy as applied to X-ray astronomy has traditionally satisfied a much less restrictive definition (in terms of resolving power) than it has in other wavebands. Until quite recently, resolving powers of order unity were perfectly respectable, and still provide (in most cases) the most useful spectroscopic data. In the broadest sense, X-ray photometric measurements are spectroscopic, insofar as they represent samples of the overall electromagnetic continua of celestial objects.

  16. The Ophiuchus cluster - A bright X-ray cluster of galaxies at low galactic latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, M. D.; Bradt, H. V.; Doxsey, R. E.; Marshall, F. E.; Schwartz, D. A.; Margon, B.

    1981-01-01

    The discovery of an extended X-ray source identified with a cluster of galaxies at low galactic latitude is reported. The source, designated the Ophiuchus cluster, was detected near 4U 1708-23 with the HEAO 1 Scanning Modulation Collimator, and identified with the cluster on the basis of extended X-ray size and positional coincidence on the ESO/SRC (J) plate of the region. An X-ray flux density in the region 2-10 keV of approximately 25 microJ was measured, along with an X-ray luminosity of 1.6 x 10 to the 45th ergs/sec and an X-ray core radius of approximately 4 arcmin (0.2 Mpc) for an assumed isothermal sphere surface brightness distribution. The X-ray spectrum in the range 2-10 keV obtained with the HEAO 1 A-2 instrument is well fit by a thermal bremsstrahlung model with kT = 8 keV and a 6.7-keV iron line of equivalent width 450 eV. The steep-spectrum radio source MSH 17-203 also appears to be associated with the cluster, which is the closest and brightest representative of the class of X-ray clusters with a dominant central galaxy.

  17. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    1998-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  18. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    2000-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  19. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  20. X-ray Optics for BES Light Source Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Dennis; Padmore, Howard; Lessner, Eliane

    2013-03-27

    Each new generation of synchrotron radiation sources has delivered an increase in average brightness 2 to 3 orders of magnitude over the previous generation. The next evolution toward diffraction-limited storage rings will deliver another 3 orders of magnitude increase. For ultrafast experiments, free electron lasers (FELs) deliver 10 orders of magnitude higher peak brightness than storage rings. Our ability to utilize these ultrabright sources, however, is limited by our ability to focus, monochromate, and manipulate these beams with X-ray optics. X-ray optics technology unfortunately lags behind source technology and limits our ability to maximally utilize even today’s X-ray sources. With ever more powerful X-ray sources on the horizon, a new generation of X-ray optics must be developed that will allow us to fully utilize these beams of unprecedented brightness. The increasing brightness of X-ray sources will enable a new generation of measurements that could have revolutionary impact across a broad area of science, if optical systems necessary for transporting and analyzing X-rays can be perfected. The high coherent flux will facilitate new science utilizing techniques in imaging, dynamics, and ultrahigh-resolution spectroscopy. For example, zone-plate-based hard X-ray microscopes are presently used to look deeply into materials, but today’s resolution and contrast are restricted by limitations of the current lithography used to manufacture nanodiffractive optics. The large penetration length, combined in principle with very high spatial resolution, is an ideal probe of hierarchically ordered mesoscale materials, if zone-plate focusing systems can be improved. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) probes a wide range of excitations in materials, from charge-transfer processes to the very soft excitations that cause the collective phenomena in correlated electronic systems. However, although RIXS can probe high-energy excitations, the most exciting and

  1. Miniaturized, High-Speed, Modulated X-Ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Kenyon, Steve; Spartana, Nick

    2013-01-01

    A low-cost, miniature x-ray source has been developed that can be modulated in intensity from completely off to full intensity on nanosecond timescales. This modulated x-ray source (MXS) has no filaments and is extremely rugged. The energy level of the MXS is adjustable from 0 to more than 100 keV. It can be used as the core of many new devices, providing the first practical, arbitrarily time-variable source of x-rays. The high-speed switching capability and miniature size make possible many new technologies including x-ray-based communication, compact time-resolved x-ray diffraction, novel x-ray fluorescence instruments, and low- and precise-dose medical x-rays. To make x-rays, the usual method is to accelerate electrons into a target material held at a high potential. When the electrons stop in the target, x-rays are produced with a spectrum that is a function of the target material and the energy to which the electrons are accelerated. Most commonly, the electrons come from a hot filament. In the MXS, the electrons start off as optically driven photoelectrons. The modulation of the x-rays is then tied to the modulation of the light that drives the photoelectron source. Much of the recent development has consisted of creating a photoelectrically-driven electron source that is robust, low in cost, and offers high intensity. For robustness, metal photocathodes were adopted, including aluminum and magnesium. Ultraviolet light from 255- to 350-nm LEDs (light emitting diodes) stimulated the photoemissions from these photocathodes with an efficiency that is maximized at the low-wavelength end (255 nm) to a value of roughly 10(exp -4). The MXS units now have much higher brightness, are much smaller, and are made using a number of commercially available components, making them extremely inexpensive. In the latest MXS design, UV efficiency is addressed by using a high-gain electron multiplier. The photocathode is vapor-deposited onto the input cone of a Burle Magnum

  2. Globular cluster X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooley, D.

    We know from observations that globular clusters are very efficient catalysts in forming unusual binary systems, such as low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs), with formation rates per unit mass exceeding those in the Galactic disk by orders of magnitude. The high stellar densities in globular clusters trigger various dynamical interactions: exchange encounters, direct collisions, destruction of binaries, and tidal capture. This binary population is, in turn, critical to the stabilization of globular clusters against gravitational collapse; the long-term stability of a cluster is thought to depend on tapping into the gravitational binding energy of such close binaries. I will present an overview of the current state of globular cluster X-ray observations, as well as our work on deep Chandra observations of M4, where we reach some of the lowest X-ray luminosities in any globular cluster (comparable to the deep observations of 47 Tuc and NGC 6397). One of M4 X-ray sources previously classified as a white dwarf binary is likely a neutron star binary, and another X-ray source is a sub-subgiant, the nature of which is still unclear. skip=3pt

  3. Sub-Picosecond, High Flux, Thomson X-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    James Boyce; David Douglas; Hiroyuki Toyokawa; Winthrop J. Brown; Fred Hartemann

    2003-05-12

    With the advent of high average power FELs, the idea of using such a device to produce x-rays via the Thomson scattering process is appealing, if sufficient flux and/or brightness can be generated. Such x-rays are produced simultaneously with FEL light, offering unprecedented opportunities for pump-probe studies. We discuss non-invasive modifications to the Jefferson Lab's FEL that would meet the criteria of high flux, sub-picosecond, x-ray source. One allows proof-of-principle experiments, is relatively inexpensive, but is not conducive as a ''User-facility.'' Another is a User facility configuration but requires FEL facility modifications. For all sources, we present Thomson scattering flux calculations and potential applications.

  4. Compact Laser-Compton X-ray Source Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Po-Chun

    The state-of-the-art X-ray source based on inverse-Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam produced by an X-band RF accelerator and a high-intensity laser pulse generated by chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) has been carried out by our research team at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This system is called "Compact Laser-Compton X-ray Source". The applications include nuclear resonance fluorescence, medical imaging and therapy, and nuclear waste imaging and assay. One of the key factors in this system is how we know the interaction happened in the vacuum chamber, which is the spectrometer of electron beams. The other key factor is the interaction after the spectrometer, which is the outgoing X-ray. In this thesis, the work in the simulation for the result of the interaction between electrons and the laser, the calibration of spectrometer, and laser focus characterization are discussed.

  5. High-brightness beamline for x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, R.C.C.; Jones, G.; Lindle, D.W.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goals of high energy resolution, high flux, and high brightness at the sample. When completed later this year, it will be the first ALS monochromatic hard x-ray beamline, and its brightness will be an order of magnitude higher than presently available in this energy range. In addition, it will provide flux and resolution comparable to any other beamline now in operation. To achieve these goals, two technical improvements, relative to existing x-ray beamlines, were incorporated. First, a somewhat novel optical design for x-rays, in which matched toroidal mirrors are positioned before and after the double-crystal monochromator, was adopted. This configuration allows for high resolution by passing a collimated beam through the monochromator, and for high brightness by focusing the ALS source on the sample with unit magnification. Second, a new {open_quotes}Cowan type{close_quotes} double-crystal monochromator based on the design used at NSLS beamline X-24A was developed. The measured mechanical precision of this new monochromator shows significant improvement over existing designs, without using positional feedback available with piezoelectric devices. Such precision is essential because of the high brightness of the radiation and the long distance (12 m) from the source (sample) to the collimating (focusing) mirror. This combination of features will provide a bright, high resolution, and stable x-ray beam for use in the x-ray spectroscopy program at the ALS.

  6. Luminous Binary Supersoft X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiStefano, Rosanne; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This grant was for the study of Luminous Supersoft X-Ray Sources (SSSs). During the first year a number of projects were completed and new projects were started. The projects include: 1) Time variability of SSSs 2) SSSs in M31; 3) Binary evolution scenarios; and 4) Acquiring new data.

  7. High duty cycle inverse Compton scattering X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovodenko, A.; Agustsson, R.; Babzien, M.; Campese, T.; Fedurin, M.; Murokh, A.; Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Rosenzweig, J.; Sakai, Y.; Shaftan, T.; Swinson, C.

    2016-12-01

    Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) is an emerging compact X-ray source technology, where the small source size and high spectral brightness are of interest for multitude of applications. However, to satisfy the practical flux requirements, a high-repetition-rate ICS system needs to be developed. To this end, this paper reports the experimental demonstration of a high peak brightness ICS source operating in a burst mode at 40 MHz. A pulse train interaction has been achieved by recirculating a picosecond CO2 laser pulse inside an active optical cavity synchronized to the electron beam. The pulse train ICS performance has been characterized at 5- and 15- pulses per train and compared to a single pulse operation under the same operating conditions. With the observed near-linear X-ray photon yield gain due to recirculation, as well as noticeably higher operational reliability, the burst-mode ICS offers a great potential for practical scalability towards high duty cycles.

  8. Coordinated observations of X-ray bright BL lacertae objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous multifrequency observations of the BL Lac object Mkn421 covering radio through X-ray wavelengths were performed. Composite multifrequency spectra of the central nonthermal component were obtained at the two epochs after subtracting the optical and infrared light of the underlying galaxy. Physical parameters of Mkn421 are discussed in terms of the synchrotron self-Compton model. Taking the spectral turnover between infrared and radio for synchrotrom self absorption, the radio emmision originates in a more extended region than the infrared to X-ray emission, the source size of which should be less than .01 milliarcseconds. Relativistic beaming is required if the angular size is smaller than a few times .001 milliarcseconds. A possible explanation of the spectral change during the two epochs is also discussed.

  9. ALFT's Soft X-Ray Source Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panarella, Emilio

    2002-11-01

    ALFT (www.alft.com) was funded by the Federal and Provincial governments of Canada in 1987 to pursue the objective of making soft X-ray sources for microlithography.For 15 years ALFT has successfully pursued this objective. Recently, the company has found that its sources can complement the synchrotron as provider of soft X-rays for applications that range from biotechnology to nanotechnology.A beam from the Canadian Synchrotron (CLS) will deliver 10^13 photons/sec in a collimated output, whereas the weakest of ALFT's sources delivers an average of 10^15 photons/sec, two orders of magnitude higher than the synchrotron, albeit in the 4 pi direction. The most powerful of ALFT's sources delivers pulses carrying an average of 10^16 photons/sec, with peak flux of 10^24 photons/sec, again in the 4 pi.The proprietary technology of ALFT rests not only on the electron bombardment concept of X-ray production but also, by using a special plasma (the Vacuum Spark), on the pinch phenomenon, thus obtaining better efficiency than conventional sources. By discharging a simple condenser in a very low inductance circuit, a metallic plasma is generated in a vacuum vessel between two electrodes, where plasma pinch and micropinch phenomena raise the plasma temperature and density to values that lead to large soft X-ray production.The talk will present an overview of the VSX soft X-ray source development, examining first the physics of the vacuum spark, then the extendibility to higher power outputs, and then to the engineering issues that have been solved leading to the first product, the VSX 400, a machine that delivers 400 mW of soft X-rays, and to the VSX Z10, a prototype machine that delivers 10 W of X-rays.The recent visits to the CLS and follow-up discussions that are leading towards the placement of one VSX 400 machine in Saskatoon will also reported.

  10. Optical candidates for two X-ray sources.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brucato, R. J.; Kristian, J.

    1972-01-01

    Suggestion of the bright stars X Per and HD 77581 as possible candidates for the X-ray sources 2U 0352+30 and 2U 0900-40 respectively. The first is an active, rapidly rotating Be star which is losing mass. The second is similar to BD+34.3815 deg, a likely candidate for Cyg X-1, in spectral type and in the possibility that it may be a short-period binary.

  11. LIGHT SOURCE: A simulation study of Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chuan-Xiang; Li, Ren-Kai; Huang, Wen-Hui; Chen, Huai-Bi; Du, Ying-Chao; Du, Qiang; Du, Tai-Bin; He, Xiao-Zhong; Hua, Jian-Fei; Lin, Yu-Zhen; Qian, Hou-Jun; Shi, Jia-Ru; Xiang, Dao; Yan, Li-Xin; Yu, Pei-Cheng

    2009-06-01

    Thomson scattering X-ray sources are compact and affordable facilities that produce short duration, high brightness X-ray pulses enabling new experimental capacities in ultra-fast science studies, and also medical and industrial applications. Such a facility has been built at the Accelerator Laboratory of Tsinghua University, and upgrade is in progress. In this paper, we present a proposed layout of the upgrade with design parameters by simulation, aiming at high X-ray pulses flux and brightness, and also enabling advanced dynamics studies and applications of the electron beam. Design and construction status of main subsystems are also presented.

  12. High repetition rate laser produced soft x-ray source for ultrafast x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements.

    PubMed

    Fourmaux, S; Lecherbourg, L; Harmand, M; Servol, M; Kieffer, J C

    2007-11-01

    Recent progress in high intensity ultrafast laser systems provides the opportunity to produce laser plasma x-ray sources exhibiting broad spectrum and high average x-ray flux that are well adapted to x-ray absorption measurements. In this paper, the development of a laser based x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) beamline exhibiting high repetition rate by using the Advanced Laser Light Source (ALLS) facility 100 Hz laser system (100 mJ, 35 fs at 800 nm) is presented. This system is based on a broadband tantalum solid target soft x-ray source and a grazing incidence grating spectrometer in the 1-5 nm wavelength range. To demonstrate the high potential of this laser based XANES technique in condensed matter physics, material science, or biology, measurements realized with several samples are presented: VO2 vanadium L edge, Si3N4 nitrogen K edge, and BPDA/PPD polyimide carbon K edge. The characteristics of this laser based beamline are discussed in terms of brightness, signal to noise ratio, and compared to conventional synchrotron broadband x-ray sources which allow achieving similar measurements. Apart from the very compact size and the relative low cost, the main advantages of such a laser based soft x-ray source are the picosecond pulse duration and the perfect synchronization between this x-ray probe and a laser pulse excitation which open the way to the realization of time resolved x-ray absorption measurements with picosecond range time resolution to study the dynamics of ultrafast processes and phase transition.

  13. Luminous Binary Supersoft X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); DiStefano, Rosanne

    2003-01-01

    We have made remarkable progress in the study of luminous supersoft X-ray sources during the past year. We have begun to discover a population of ultraluminous SSSs (e.g., in NGC 300 [Kong & Di Stefano 20031 as well as in Ml0l [Di Stefano & Kong 2003]), which may be accreting intermediate-mass (50-100 solar mass) black holes. This work follows from an algorithm we have developed (Di Stefano & Kong 2003) to identify SSSs in external galaxies, selecting them from among each galaxy s total population of X-ray sources. We have applied the algorithm to approximately one dozen galaxies and will make it public after it has been published in its entirety. Through our own application of the algorithm, we have discovered SSSs in every galaxy, mapping their spatial distribution, to obtain important clues to their fundamental natures. We have discovered that there is a large population of X-ray sources which are slightly hotter (100-250 eV) than standard SSSs. Some of these may be accreting BHs with masses between roughly 50 anf 100 solar masses. To explore this possibility, we are working on theoretical models for the formation and evolution of such systems (Di Stefano 2003).

  14. Tabletop Ultrabright Kiloelectronvolt X-Ray Sources from Xe and Kr Hollow Atom States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, Poopalasingam

    Albert Einstein, the father of relativity, once said, "Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better". Today available higher resolution tabletop tool to look deep into matters and living thing is an x-ray source. Although the available tabletop x-rays sources of the 20th century, such as the ones used for medical or dental x-rays are tremendously useful for medical diagnostics and industry, a major disadvantage is that they have low quality skillful brightness, which limits its resolution and accuracy. In the other hand, x-ray free-electrons laser (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation sources provided extreme bright x-rays. However, number of applications of XFEL and synchrotron such as medical and industrials, has been hampered by their size, complexity, and cost. This has set a goal of demonstrating x-ray source with enough brightness for potential applications in an often-called tabletop compact x-ray source that could be operated in university laboratory or hospitals. We have developed two tabletop ultrabright keV x-ray sources, one from a Xe hollow-atom states and the other one from Kr hollow-atom stares with a unique characteristic that makes them complementary to currently-available extreme-light sources; XFEL, and synchrotron x-ray source. Upgraded tabletop ultra-fast KrF* pump-laser interacts with target rare-gas clusters and produces hollow-atom states, which later coherently collapse to the empty inner-shell and thereby generate keV x-ray radiation. The KrF* pump-laser beam is self-focused and forms a self-channel to guide the generated x-ray radiation in the direction of the pump-laser beam to produce directed x-ray beam. Xe (M) x-ray source operates at 1.2-1.6 nm wavelength while the Kr(L) x-ray source operates in 600-800 pm wavelength. System is mounted upon 3 optical-tables (5´x12´) with two KrF amplifiers at a repetition rate of 0.1 Hz. A lower bound for brightness value for both Xe and Kr x-ray sources is 1026 photons s-1mm-2

  15. Chandra Discovery of Intervening, Local and Intrinsic Highly Ionized Absorption in an extremely bright high resolution X-ray spectrum of an Extragalactic Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicastro, F.; Elvis, M.; Fang, T.; Mathur, S.; Siemiginowska, A.; Zezas, A.

    2003-03-01

    In this contribution we present the brightest high resolution X-ray spectrum ever taken for an extragalactic source. Following our ToO request, Chandra observed the blazar Mkn 421 (z=0.03) during an exceptionally high-luminosity flare. The observation lasted about 100 ks, during which the source reached a flux level of > 0.1 Crab in the 0.5-2 keV band This allowed us to collect 4.2 million counts in the 1st-order ACIS-LETG spectrum of Mkn 421, and more than 3000 counts per resolution elements at the rest frame wavelength of the OVII Kα resonant transitions (21.6 Å). A forest of very weak (EW=3.1-10 mÅ) resonant absorption lines is detected from the rest frame wavelength of the OVII Kα all the way down to the position of the OVII Kα line at the source redshift. We identify these lines as due to: (a) Local Group Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) absorption, (b) intervening WHIM absorption at redshifts z=0.01 (associated with faint H Lyα absorption) and z=0.025, and (c) intrinsic source absorption. The strongest of these systems is associated with the local WHIM first discovered along the line of sight to PKS 2155-304 (Nicastro et al., 2002, 2003), and now observed (always with consistent gas properties) along all the lines of sight for which Chandra high resolution spectra with sufficient signal to noise ratio are available. The faintest systems (probing OVII column densities as low as 1015 cm-2) are those identified as due to the two intervening WHIM systems. If both these identification are correct this discovery implies a number of intervening OVII WHIM systems per unit redshift of dN/dz(NOVII>1015) = 75, about 3-4 times larger than the corresponding number estimated for OVI systems in the local Universe (down to OVI EW of 60 mÅ). The WHIM baryon fraction implied depends slightly on the ionization correction applied, and ranges between 40 % and 60 % of the total baryons at z<2, so confirming hydrodynamical simulation predictions and accounting for all of

  16. Short X-ray pulses from third-generation light sources.

    PubMed

    Stepanov, A G; Hauri, C P

    2016-01-01

    High-brightness X-ray radiation produced by third-generation synchrotron light sources (TGLS) has been used for numerous time-resolved investigations in many different scientific fields. The typical time duration of X-ray pulses delivered by these large-scale machines is about 50-100 ps. A growing number of time-resolved studies would benefit from X-ray pulses with two or three orders of magnitude shorter duration. Here, techniques explored in the past for shorter X-ray pulse emission at TGLS are reviewed and the perspective towards the realisation of picosecond and sub-picosecond X-ray pulses are discussed.

  17. ELECTRON INJECTORS FOR NEXT GENERATION X-RAY SOURCES.

    SciTech Connect

    BLUEM,H.; BEN-ZVI,I.; SRINIVASAN-RAO,T.; ET AL.

    2004-08-02

    Next generation x-ray sources require very high-brightness electron beams that are typically at or beyond the present state-of-the-art, and thus place stringent and demanding requirements upon the electron injector parameters. No one electron source concept is suitable for all the diverse applications envisaged, which have operating characteristics ranging from high-average-current, quasi-CW, to high-peak-current, single-pulse electron beams. Advanced Energy Systems, in collaboration with various partners, is developing several electron injector concepts for these x-ray source applications. The performance and design characteristics of five specific RF injectors, spanning ''L'' to ''X''-band, normal-conducting to superconducting, and low repetition rate to CW, which are presently in various stages of design, construction or testing, is described. We also discuss the status and schedule of each with respect to testing.

  18. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; ...

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also presentmore » data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.« less

  19. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  20. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  1. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  2. Plasma x-ray radiation source.

    PubMed

    Popkov, N F; Kargin, V I; Ryaslov, E A; Pikar', A S

    1995-01-01

    This paper gives the results of studies on a plasma x-ray source, which enables one to obtain a 2.5-krad radiation dose per pulse over an area of 100 cm2 in the quantum energy range from 20 to 500 keV. Pulse duration is 100 ns. Spectral radiation distributions from a diode under various operation conditions of a plasma are obtained. A Marx generator served as an initial energy source of 120 kJ with a discharge time of T/4 = 10-6 s. A short electromagnetic pulse (10-7 s) was shaped using plasma erosion opening switches.

  3. High-energy Neutrino Flares from X-Ray Bright and Dark Tidal Disruption Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senno, Nicholas; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter

    2017-03-01

    X-ray and γ-ray observations by the Swift satellite revealed that a fraction of tidal disruption events (TDEs) have relativistic jets. Jetted TDEs have been considered to be potential sources of very-high-energy cosmic-rays and neutrinos. In this work, using semi-analytical methods, we calculate neutrino spectra of X-ray bright TDEs with powerful jets and dark TDEs with possible choked jets, respectively. We estimate their neutrino fluxes and find that non-detection would give us an upper limit on the baryon loading of the jet luminosity contained in cosmic-rays ξ cr ≲ 20–50 for Sw J1644+57. We show that X-ray bright TDEs make a sub-dominant (≲5%–10%) contribution to IceCube’s diffuse neutrino flux, and study possible contributions of X-ray dark TDEs given that particles are accelerated in choked jets or disk winds. We discuss future prospects for multi-messenger searches of the brightest TDEs.

  4. Hard X-Ray Footprint Source Sized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Kontar, E. P.

    2010-01-01

    RHESSI has detected compact hard (25 - 100 keV) X-ray sources that are <4 arcseconds (FWHM) in extent for certain flares (Dennis and Pernak (2009). These sources are believed to be at magnetic loop footpoints that are known from observations at other wavelengths to be very small. Flare ribbons seen in the W with TRACE, for example, are approx. 1 arcsecond in width, and white light flares show structure at the approx. 1 arcsecond level. However, Kontar and Jeffrey (2010) have shown that the measured extent should be >6 arcseconds, even if the X-ray emitting thick-target source is point-like. This is because of the strong albedo contribution in the measured energy range for a source located at the expected altitude of 1 Mm near the top of the chromosphere. This discrepancy between observations and model predictions may indicate that the source altitude is significantly lower than assumed or that the RHESSI image reconstruction procedures are not sensitive to the more diffuse albedo patch in the presence of a strong compact source. Results will be presented exploring the latter possibility using the Pixon image reconstruction procedure and other methods based on visibilities.

  5. Analysis of x-ray spectrum obtained in electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T.S.; Sunil Sunny, C.

    2006-03-15

    The analysis of the x-ray spectrum obtained in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) x-ray source is carried out. Assuming single-particle motion, the electron acceleration and its final energy are calculated for TE{sub 111} cylindrical cavity field and uniform external dc magnetic field. In the calculation, initial coordinates of 40 000 electrons were uniformly selected over the central plane of the cavity using random number generator. The final energy of each electron when it hits the wall is stored and the electron energy distribution is obtained. Using the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle transport code version 4A, the geometry of the ECR x-ray source is modeled. The x-ray energy spectrum is calculated for the geometry model and the numerically calculated electron energy distribution. The calculated x-ray spectrum is compared with the experimentally measured x-ray spectrum.

  6. Are the Galactic-bulge X-ray sources magnetized?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundt, W.; Ozel, M. E.; Ercan, E. N.

    1987-01-01

    This paper attempts to demonstrate that a better understanding of Galactic-bulge X-ray sources can be achieved if their magnetic moments are assumed to have the same values as those of young pulsars. It is argued that most of the matter leaving the inner edge of the accretion disk can reach the neutron star's surface in the form of massive clumps in quasi-Keplerian orbits. As a result, most of the accretion flow covers a broad equatorial belt rather than the polar caps, and the star shines as an almost unpulsed source. The liberation of half of the accretion power before the surface is reached can lead to the reported UHE pulses and bright infrared bursts. Spasmodic accretion is discussed as a model for gamma-ray bursts, and the observed low-energy X-ray absorption features are considered as an indication of strong magnetic fields shifted to lower energies during super-Eddington outbursts.

  7. Hard X-ray Sources for the Mexican Synchrotron Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Herrera, Juan

    2016-10-01

    One of the principal tasks for the design of the Mexican synchrotron was to define the storage ring energy. The main criteria for choosing the energy come from studying the electromagnetic spectrum that can be obtained from the synchrotron, because the energy range of the spectrum that can be obtained will determine the applications available to the users of the future light source. Since there is a public demand of hard X-rays for the experiments in the synchrotron community users from Mexico, in this work we studied the emission spectra from some hard X-ray sources which could be the best options for the parameters of the present Mexican synchrotron design. The calculations of the flux and the brightness for one Bending Magnet and four Insertion Devices are presented; specifically, for a Superconducting Bending Magnet (SBM), a Superconducting Wiggler (SCW), an In Vacuum Short Period Undulator (IV-SPU), a Superconducting Undulator (SCU) and for a Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulator (CPMU). Two commonly available synchrotron radiation programs were used for the computation (XOP and SRW). From the results, it can be concluded that the particle beam energy from the current design is enough to have one or more sources of hard X-rays. Furthermore, a wide range of hard X-ray region can be covered by the analyzed sources, and the choice of each type should be based on the specific characteristics of the X-ray beam to perform the experiments at the involved beamline. This work was done within the project Fomix Conacyt-Morelos ”Plan Estrategico para la construccion y operación de un Sincrotron en Morelos” (224392).

  8. A search for X-ray polarization in cosmic X-ray sources. [binary X-ray sources and supernovae remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, J. P.; Long, K. S.; Novick, R.

    1983-01-01

    Fifteen strong X-ray sources were observed by the X-ray polarimeters on board the OSO-8 satellite from 1975 to 1978. The final results of this search for X-ray polarization in cosmic sources are presented in the form of upper limits for the ten sources which are discussed elsewhere. These limits in all cases are consistent with a thermal origin for the X-ray emission.

  9. Exploring Cosmic X-ray Source Polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, Jean Hebb; Jahodal, K.; Kallman, T. R.; Kaaret, P.

    2008-01-01

    Cosmic X-ray sources are expected to be polarized, either because of their asymmetry and the role of scattering in their emission or the role of magnetic fields. Polarization at other wavelengths has been useful. X-ray polarization will provide a new handle on black hole parameters, in particular the spin, on accretion flows and outflows, on neutron star spin orientations and emission mechanisms, on the quantum mechanical effects of super-strong magnetic fields of magnetars, and on the structure of supernovae shocks. The proposed Gravity and Extreme Magnetism SMEX (GEMS) will use high efficiency polarimeters behind thin foil mirrors. The statistical sensitivity and control of systematics will allow measurement of polarization fractions as small as 1% from many galactic and extragalactic sources. Targets which should be polarized at the level that GEMS can easily measure include stellar black holes, Seyfert galaxies and quasars, blazars, rotation-powered and accretion-powered pulsars, magnetars, shell supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae. The polarimeters are Time Projection Chambers that allow reconstruction of images of photoelectron tracks for 2-10 keV Xrays. They can be deep without sacrificing modulation. These polarimeters do not image the sky, but the telescope point spread function and detector collimation allow structure to be resolved at the 10 arcmin level. Rotation of the spacecraft is not needed for the signal measurement in the Time Projection Chambers, but provides for measurement and correction of systematic errors. It also allows a small Bragg reflection soft X-ray experiment to be included that can be used for isolated neutron stars and blazars.

  10. Advanced High Brilliance X-Ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Walter M.

    1998-01-01

    The possibility to dramatically increase the efficiency of laboratory based protein structure measurements through the use of polycapillary X-ray optics was investigated. This project initiated April 1, 1993 and concluded December 31, 1996 (including a no cost extension from June 31, 1996). This is a final report of the project. The basis for the project is the ability to collect X-rays from divergent electron bombardment laboratory X-ray sources and redirect them into quasiparallel or convergent (focused) beams. For example, a 0.1 radian (approx. 6 deg) portion of a divergent beam collected by a polycapillary collimator and transformed into a quasiparallel beam of 3 millradian (0.2 deg) could give a gain of 6(exp 2)/0.2(exp 2) x T for the intensity of a diffracted beam from a crystal with a 0.2 deg diffraction width. T is the transmission efficiency of the polycapillary diffraction optic, and for T=0.5, the gain would be 36/0.04 x O.5=45. In practice, the effective collection angle will depend on the source spot size, the input focal length of the optic (usually limited by the source spot-to-window distance on the x-ray tube) and the size of the crystal relative to the output diameter of the optic. The transmission efficiency, T, depends on the characteristics (fractional open area, surface roughness, shape and channel diameter) of the polycapillary optic and is typically in the range 0.2-0.4. These effects could substantially reduce the expected efficiency gain. During the course of this study, the possibility to use a weakly focused beam (0.5 deg convergence) was suggested which could give an additional 10-20 X efficiency gain for small samples . Weakly focused beams from double focusing mirrors are frequently used for macromolecular crystallography studies. Furthermore the crystals are typically oscillated by as much as 2 deg during each X-ray exposure in order to increase the reciprocal space (number of crystal planes) sampled and use of a slightly convergent

  11. Small-animal tomography with a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, D. H.; Lundström, U.; Westermark, U.; Takman, P. A. C.; Burvall, A.; Arsenian Henriksson, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray tomography of small animals is an important tool for medical research. For high-resolution x-ray imaging of few-cm-thick samples such as, e.g., mice, high-brightness x-ray sources with energies in the few-10-keV range are required. In this paper we perform the first small-animal imaging and tomography experiments using liquid-metal-jet-anode x-ray sources. This type of source shows promise to increase the brightness of microfocus x-ray systems, but present sources are typically optimized for an energy of 9 keV. Here we describe the details of a high-brightness 24-keV electron-impact laboratory microfocus x-ray source based on continuous operation of a heated liquid-In/Ga-jet anode. The source normally operates with 40 W of electron-beam power focused onto the metal jet, producing a 7×7 μm2 FWHM x-ray spot. The peak spectral brightness is 4 × 109 photons / ( s × mm2 × mrad2 × 0.1%BW) at the 24.2 keV In Kα line. We use the new In/Ga source and an existing Ga/In/Sn source for high-resolution imaging and tomography of mice.

  12. A bright attosecond x-ray pulse train generation in a double-laser-driven cone target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Xiang; Yu, Tong-Pu; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Luo, Wen; Yin, Yan

    2016-06-01

    By using full three-dimensional particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate the generation of a high-brightness attosecond x-ray pulse train in a double-laser-driven cone target. The scheme makes use of two lasers: the first high-intensity laser with a laser peak intensity 1.37 × 1020 W/cm2 irradiates the cone and produces overdense attosecond electron bunches; the second counterpropagating weakly relativistic laser with a laser peak intensity 4.932 × 1017 W/cm2 interacts with the produced electron bunches and a bright x-ray pulse train is generated by Thomson backscattering of the second laser off the attosecond electron bunches. It is shown that the photon flux rises by 5 times using the cone target as compared with a normal channel. Meanwhile, the x-ray peak brightness increases significantly from 1.4 × 1021/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1 keV) to 6.0 × 1021/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1 keV), which is much higher than that of the Thomson x-ray source generated from traditional accelerators. We also discuss the influence of the laser and target parameters on the x-ray pulse properties. This compact bright x-ray source may have diverse applications, e.g., the study of electric dynamics and harmonics emission in the atomic scale.

  13. The Integrated X-Ray Spectrum of Galactic Populations of Luminous Supersoft X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiStefano, R.; Becker, C. M.; Fabbiano, G.

    1996-01-01

    We compute the composite X-ray spectrum of a population of unresolved SSS's in a spiral galaxy such as our own or M31. The sources are meant to represent the total underlying population corresponding to all sources which have bolometric luminosities in the range of 10(exp 37) - 10(exp 38) ergs/s and kT on the order of tens of eV. These include close-binary supersoft sources, symbiotic novae, and planetary nebulae, for example. In order to determine whether the associated X-ray signal would be detectable, we also 'seed' the galaxy with other types of X-ray sources, specifically low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB's) and high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXB's). We find that the total spectrum due to SSS's, LMXB's, and HMXB's exhibits a soft peak which owes its presence to the SSS population. Preliminary indications are that this soft peak may be observable.

  14. Nanomaterial-based x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Matthew T.; Parmee, R. J.; Milne, William I.

    2016-02-01

    Following the recent global excitement and investment in the emerging, and rapidly growing, classes of one and two-dimensional nanomaterials, we here present a perspective on one of the viable applications of such materials: field electron emission based x-ray sources. These devices, which have a notable history in medicine, security, industry and research, to date have almost exclusively incorporated thermionic electron sources. Since the middle of the last century, field emission based cathodes were demonstrated, but it is only recently that they have become practicable. We outline some of the technological achievements of the past two decades, and describe a number of the seminal contributions. We explore the foremost market hurdles hindering their roll-out and broader industrial adoption and summarise the recent progress in miniaturised, pulsed and multi-source devices.

  15. A NAIVE BAYES SOURCE CLASSIFIER FOR X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Broos, Patrick S.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Povich, Matthew S.

    2011-05-01

    The Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP) provides a sensitive X-ray survey of a nearby starburst region over >1 deg{sup 2} in extent. Thousands of faint X-ray sources are found, many concentrated into rich young stellar clusters. However, significant contamination from unrelated Galactic and extragalactic sources is present in the X-ray catalog. We describe the use of a naive Bayes classifier to assign membership probabilities to individual sources, based on source location, X-ray properties, and visual/infrared properties. For the particular membership decision rule adopted, 75% of CCCP sources are classified as members, 11% are classified as contaminants, and 14% remain unclassified. The resulting sample of stars likely to be Carina members is used in several other studies, which appear in this special issue devoted to the CCCP.

  16. X-ray bursters and the X-ray sources of the galactic bulge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.; Joss, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Type 1 X-ray bursts, optical, infrared, and radio properties of the galactic bulge sources, are discussed. It was proven that these burst sources are neutron stars in low mass, close binary stellar systems. Several burst sources are found in globular clusters with high central densities. Optical type 1 X-ray bursts were observed from three sources. Type 2 X-ray bursts, observed from the Rapid Burster, are due to an accretion instability which converts gravitational potential energy into heat and radiation, which makes them of a fundamentally different nature from Type 1 bursts.

  17. First results from the high-brightness x-ray spectroscopy beamline 9. 3.1 at ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, W.; Jones, G.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1995-10-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range. This beamline is designed to achieve the goal of high brightness at the sample for use in the X-ray Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy (XAMS) science, surface and interface science, biology, and x-ray optical development programs at ALS. X-ray absorption and time of flight photoemission measurements in 2 - 5 keV photon energy along with the flux, resolution, spot size and stability of the beamline will be discussed. Prospects for future XAMS measurements will also be presented.

  18. X-Ray Scattering Applications Using Pulsed X-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, B.C.

    1999-05-23

    Pulsed x-ray sources have been used in transient structural phenomena investigations for over fifty years; however, until the advent of synchrotrons sources and the development of table-top picosecond lasers, general access to ligh temporal resolution x-ray diffraction was relatively limited. Advances in diffraction techniques, sample excitation schemes, and detector systems, in addition to IncEased access to pulsed sources, have ld tO what is now a diverse and growing array of pulsed-source measurement applications. A survey of time-resolved investigations using pulsed x-ray sources is presented and research opportunities using both present and planned pulsed x-ray sources are discussed.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW MID-INFRARED ULTRAFAST LASER SOURCES FOR COMPACT COHERENT X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling Backus

    2012-05-14

    In this project, we proposed to develop laser based mid-infrared lasers as a potentially robust and reliable source of ultrafast pulses in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, and to apply this light source to generating bright, coherent, femtosecond-to-attosecond x-ray beams.

  20. Studies on x-ray and UV emissions in electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T. S.

    2008-02-15

    A novel electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source is constructed based on the ECR technique. In this paper, the possibility of using the ECR x-ray source for producing UV rays by optimizing the plasma parameters is explored. X-ray and UV emissions from the ECR x-ray source are carried out for argon, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} plasma. The x-ray spectral and dose measurements are carried with NaI(Tl) based spectrometer and dosimeter, respectively. For UV measurement, a quartz window arrangement is made at the exit port and the UV intensity is measured at 5 cm from the quartz plate using UV meter. The x-ray and UV emissions are carried out for different microwave power levels and gas pressures. The x-ray emission is observed in the pressure range {<=}10{sup -5} Torr, whereas the UV emission is found to be negligible for the gas pressures <10{sup -5} Torr and it starts increasing in the pressure range between 10{sup -5} and 10{sup -3} Torr. At high-pressure range, collision frequency of electron-atom is large which leads to the higher UV flux. At low pressure, the electron-atom collision frequency is low and hence the electrons reach high energy and by hitting the cavity wall produces higher x-ray flux. By choosing proper experimental conditions and plasma gas species, the same source can be used as either an x-ray source or an UV source.

  1. A new technique for measuring the polarization from celestial X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Robert A.; Minamitani, Takahisa; Ramsey, Brian D.

    1993-09-01

    The detection of polarized X-rays from cosmic X-ray sources will give useful information about the magnetic fields and matter surrounding these sources. Up to now only one experiment, OSO-8, has measured the degree of polarization from a cosmic X-ray source. In the past we demonstrated a novel new technique using an intensified camera coupled to a gas-filled proportional counter which can be used to measure X-ray polarization by imaging the tracks of photoelectrons ejected when X-rays are absorbed in the detector volume. These tracks contain information about the location of the X-ray interaction point and its polarization. In the lab we have obtained modulation factors of about 30 percent for 60 keV polarized X-rays. Here we discuss preliminary work done towards building a large-area hard X-ray imaging polarimeter which will be able to measure X-ray polarization from bright cosmic X-ray sources at energies between 40 keV and 100 keV.

  2. High duty cycle inverse Compton scattering X-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Ovodenko, A.; Agustsson, R.; Babzien, M.; Campese, T.; Fedurin, M.; Murokh, A.; Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Rosenzweig, J.; Sakai, Y.; Shaftan, T.; Swinson, C.

    2016-12-22

    Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) is an emerging compact X-ray source technology, where the small source size and high spectral brightness are of interest for multitude of applications. However, to satisfy the practical flux requirements, a high-repetition-rate ICS system needs to be developed. To this end, this article reports the experimental demonstration of a high peak brightness ICS source operating in a burst mode at 40 MHz. A pulse train interaction has been achieved by recirculating a picosecond CO2 laser pulse inside an active optical cavity synchronized to the electron beam. The pulse train ICS performance has been characterized at 5- and 15- pulses per train and compared to a single pulse operation under the same operating conditions. Lastly, with the observed near-linear X-ray photon yield gain due to recirculation, as well as noticeably higher operational reliability, the burst-mode ICS offers a great potential for practical scalability towards high duty cycles.

  3. High duty cycle inverse Compton scattering X-ray source

    DOE PAGES

    Ovodenko, A.; Agustsson, R.; Babzien, M.; ...

    2016-12-22

    Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) is an emerging compact X-ray source technology, where the small source size and high spectral brightness are of interest for multitude of applications. However, to satisfy the practical flux requirements, a high-repetition-rate ICS system needs to be developed. To this end, this article reports the experimental demonstration of a high peak brightness ICS source operating in a burst mode at 40 MHz. A pulse train interaction has been achieved by recirculating a picosecond CO2 laser pulse inside an active optical cavity synchronized to the electron beam. The pulse train ICS performance has been characterized at 5-more » and 15- pulses per train and compared to a single pulse operation under the same operating conditions. Lastly, with the observed near-linear X-ray photon yield gain due to recirculation, as well as noticeably higher operational reliability, the burst-mode ICS offers a great potential for practical scalability towards high duty cycles.« less

  4. LUX - A recirculating linac-based ultrafast X-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, J.N.; Barletta, W.A.; DeSantis, S.; Doolittle, L.; Fawley, W.M.; Green, M.A.; Heimann, P.; Leone, S.R.; Lidia, S.; Li, D.; Parmigiani, F.; Ratti, A.; Robinson, K.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Wan, W.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Wolski, A.; Zholents, A.

    2003-08-01

    We describe the design of a proposed source of ultra-fast synchrotron radiation x-ray pulses based on a recirculating superconducting linac, with an integrated array of ultrafast laser systems. The source produces x-ray pulses with duration of 10-50 fs at a 10 kHz repetition rate, with tunability from EUV to hard x-ray regimes, and optimized for the study of ultra-fast dynamics. A high-brightness rf photocathode provides electron bunches. An injector linac accelerates the beam to the 100 MeV range, and is followed by four passes through a 700 MeV recirculating linac. Ultrafast hard x-ray pulses are obtained by a combination of electron bunch manipulation, transverse temporal correlation of the electrons, and x-ray pulse compression. EUV and soft x-ray pulses as short as 10 fs are generated in a harmonic-cascade free electron laser scheme.

  5. Stereoscopic observations of a solar flare hard X-ray source in the high corona

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, S.R.; Mctiernan, J.; Loran, J.; Fenimore, E.E.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Laros, J.G. Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM )

    1992-05-01

    The vertical structure of the impulsive and gradual hard X-ray sources in high coronae and the characteristics of the impulsive soft X-ray emission are investigated on the basis of PVE, ICE, and GOES observations of the energetic flare on February 16, 1984. The average photon spectra observed by these instruments during the impulsive and gradual hard X-ray bursts are summarized. A comparison of these unocculted and partially occulted spectra shows that the sources of the impulsive hard X-ray (greater than about 25 keV) and impulsive soft X-ray (2-5 keV) emissions in this flare extended to coronal altitudes greater than about 200,000 km above the photosphere. At about 100 keV, the ratio of the coronal source brightness to the total source brightness was 0.001 during the impulsive phase and less than about 0.01 during the gradual hard X-ray burst. The sources of the gradual hard X-ray burst and gradual soft X-ray burst were almost completely occulted, indicating that these sources were located at heights less than 200,000 km above the photosphere. 47 refs.

  6. Luminous Binary Supersoft X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiStefano, Rosanne; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    This has been a remarkably productive year. We have completed an algorithm to select SSSs in external galaxies which have been observed by Chandru or XMM-Newton. By applying this algorithm to new data, we have discovered an extension of the class of SSSs to sources that are somewhat harder (100 - 300 eV, instead of tens of eV), but which are nevertheless much softer than canonical X-ray sources. We have completed a study of SSSs in M31 and have also considered several other galaxies. From these studies, some population characteristics are beginning to emerge; these provide clues to the natures of the systems. We have considered ultraluminous SSSs in M1O1 and NGC 300. It is possible that these may correspond to accreting intermediate-mass black holes, rather than accreting white dwarfs. We have also studied individual systems, such as CAL 83, and have followed up on additional sources in fields we have studied, such as in the galaxy NGC 1313. NASA has released a press release on some of our work.

  7. The X-ray surface brightness of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. L.; Long, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    The first X-ray images of Kepler's supernova remnant (SN Ophiuchi 1604) are presented, and consequences for SNR models are discussed. Observations made with the Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter and High Resolution Imager show the remnant to be circular, with a strong shell brighter in the north than in the south. A flux of 1.2 x 10 to the -10th ergs/sq cm per sec was measured in the 0.15-4.5 keV region, which corresponds to an X-ray luminosity of 1.0 x 10 to the 36th ergs/sec at a distance of 5 kpc and an interstellar medium density of 2.8 x 10 to the 21st/sq cm. The X-ray observations do not allow the determination of whether the SNR is in the adiabatic or free expansion phase, but in either case it is shown that the mean ISM density must be greater than about 0.1/cu cm. In addition, the density of the X-ray emitting gas must be high, and its electron temperature must be fairly low. The high ISM densities derived for Kepler's SNR and other SNRs thus suggest an atypical ISM, possibly influenced by mass lost from the pre-supernova star.

  8. Luminous Binary Supersoft X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); DiStefano, Roseanne

    2005-01-01

    One of the key accomplishments of the two preceding years was our development of an algorithm to select SSSs in external galaxies which have been observed by Chandra or XMM-Newton. By applying this algorithm to data from a number of galaxies, we discovered an extension of the class of SSSs to sources that are somewhat harder (100 - 300 eV, instead of tens of eV), but which are nevertheless much softer than canonical X-ray sources. We call these new sources quasisoft sources (QSSs). During this past year, we have built on and extended this work. We have (1) continued to identify SSSs and QSSs in external galaxies, (2) worked on models for the sources and find that black hole models seem promising for a subset of them, and (3) have studied individual systems, especially M101-ULX1. This special system has been observed as an SSS in its high &ate, with a luminosity in excess of 10(exp 41) erg/s. It has also been observed as a QSS when it is less luminous, and as a hard source in its low state. It is one of the best candidates to be an accreting intermediate-mass black hole. We have several papers in preparation. Below we list papers which are complete, including only new work and papers whose status has changed (e.g., been accepted for publication) since our last report. In addition, our work on QSSs has received some publicity. It was the subject of a Chandra press release and was picked up by several media outlets.

  9. Bright X-ray arcs and the emergence of solar magnetic flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Broussard, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    The Skylab S-056 and S-082A experiments and ground-based magnetograms have been used to study the role of bright X-ray arcs and the emergence of solar magnetic flux in the McMath region 12476. The S-056 X-ray images show a system of one or sometimes two bright arcs within a diffuse emitting region. The arcs seem to directly connect regions of opposite magnetic polarity in the photosphere. Magnetograms suggest the possible emergence of a magnetic flux. The width of the main arc is approximately 6 arcsec when most clearly defined, and the length is approximately 30-50 arcsec. Although the arc system is observed to vary in brightness over a period exceeding 24 hours, it remains fixed in orientation. The temperature of the main arc is approximately 3 x 10 to the 6th K. It is suggested that merging magnetic fields may provide the primary energy source, perhaps accompanied by resistive heating from a force-free current.

  10. THE EFFECT OF STARBURST METALLICITY ON BRIGHT X-RAY BINARY FORMATION PATHWAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, T.; Kalogera, V.; Sepinsky, J. F.; Prestwich, A.; Zezas, A.; Gallagher, J. S.

    2010-12-20

    We investigate the characteristics of young (<20 Myr) and bright (L{sub X} > 1 x 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}) high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and find the population to be strongly metallicity dependent. We separate the model populations among two distinct formation pathways: (1) systems undergoing active Roche lobe overflow (RLO) and (2) wind accretion systems with donors in the (super)giant stage, which we find to dominate the HMXB population. We find metallicity to primarily affect the number of systems which move through each formation pathway, rather than the observable parameters of systems which move through each individual pathway. We discuss the most important model parameters affecting the HMXB population at both low and high metallicities. Using these results, we show that (1) the population of ultra-luminous X-ray sources can be consistently described by very bright HMXBs which undergo stable RLO with mild super-Eddington accretion and (2) the HMXB population of the bright starburst galaxy NGC 1569 is likely dominated by one extremely metal-poor starburst cluster.

  11. Low-luminosity X-ray sources and the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, R. S.

    2014-11-01

    Using the XMM-Newton slew survey, we construct a hard-band selected sample of low-luminosity Galactic X-ray sources. Two source populations are represented, namely coronally active stars and binaries (ASBs) and cataclysmic variables (CVs), with X-ray luminosities collectively spanning the range 1028-34 erg s-1 (2-10 keV). We derive the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and volume emissivity of each population. Scaled to the local stellar mass density, the latter is found to be 1.08 ± 0.16 × 1028 and 2.5 ± 0.6 × 10^{27} {erg s}^{-1} M_{{⊙}}^{-1}, for the ASBs and CVs, respectively, which in total is a factor of 2 higher than previous estimates. We employ the new XLFs to predict the X-ray source counts on the Galactic plane at l = 28.5° and show that the result is consistent with current observational constraints. The X-ray emission of faint, unresolved ASBs and CVs can account for a substantial fraction of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). We discuss a model in which ˜80 per cent of the 6-10 keV GRXE intensity is produced in this way, with the remainder attributable to X-ray scattering in the interstellar medium and/or young Galactic source populations. Much of the hard X-ray emission attributed to the ASBs is likely to be produced during flaring episodes.

  12. X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for extended X-ray sources

    DOEpatents

    Bitter, Manfred L.; Fraenkel, Ben; Gorman, James L.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Roquemore, A. Lane; Stodiek, Wolfgang; von Goeler, Schweickhard E.

    2001-01-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokomak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters using the imaging properties for Bragg angles near 45. For a Bragg angle of 45.degree., the spherical crystal focuses a bundle of near parallel X-rays (the cross section of which is determined by the cross section of the crystal) from the plasma to a point on a detector, with parallel rays inclined to the main plain of diffraction focused to different points on the detector. Thus, it is possible to radially image the plasma X-ray emission in different wavelengths simultaneously with a single crystal.

  13. The Interaction of Radio Sources and X-ray-Emitting Gas in Cluster Cooling Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, Elizabeth L.

    2001-10-01

    Recent Chandra observations of cooling flow clusters containing central radio sources reveal an anti-correlation between radio and X-ray emission. Abell 2052 is one such cluster that exhibits this morphology. The cD galaxy at the center of Abell 2052 is host to the powerful radio source 3C 317. "Holes" in the X-ray emission are coincident with the radio lobes which are surrounded by bright "shells" of X-ray emission. Heating by central radio sources has been proposed as one solution to the "missing gas" in cooling flows -- there is a lack of gas detected in the X-ray at temperatures at or below approximately 1 keV. However, the gas surrounding the radio source in Abell 2052 is cool. The data are consistent with the radio source displacing and compressing, and at the same time being confined by, the X-ray gas. The compression of the X-ray shells appears to have been relatively gentle and, at most, slightly transonic. The pressure in the X-ray gas (the shells and surrounding cooler gas) is approximately an order of magnitude higher than the minimum pressure derived for the radio source, suggesting that an additional source of pressure is needed to support the radio plasma. The compression of the X-ray shells has speeded up the cooling of the shells, and optical emission line filaments are found coincident with the brightest regions of the shells.

  14. Spectral and Temporal Characteristics of X-Ray-Bright Stars in the Pleiades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagne, Marc; Caillault, Jean-Pierre; Stauffer, John R.

    1995-01-01

    We follow up our deep ROSAT imaging survey of the Pleiades (Stauffer et al. 1994) with an analysis of the spectral and temporal characteristics of the X-ray-bright stars in the Pleiades. Raymond & Smith (1977) one and two-temperature models have been used to fit the position-sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) pulse-height spectra of the dozen or so brightest sources associated with late-type Pleiades members. The best-fit temperatures suggest hot coronal temperatures for K, M, and rapidly rotating G stars, and cooler temperatures for F and slowly rotating G stars. In order to probe the many less X-ray-luminous stars, we have generated composite spectra by combining net counts from all Pleiades members according to spectral type and rotational velocity. Model fits to the composite spectra confirm the trend seen in the individual spectral fits. Particularly interesting is the apparent dependence of coronal temperature on L(sub x)/L(sub bol). A hardness-ratio analysis also confirms some of these trends. The PSPC data have also revealed a dozen or so strong X-ray flares with peak X-ray luminosities in excess of approx. 10(exp 30) ergs/sec. We have modeled the brightest of these flares with a simple quasi-static cooling loop model. The peak temperature and emission measure and the inferred electron density and plasma volume suggest a very large scale flaring event. The PSPC data were collected over a period of approx. 18 months, allowing us to search for source variability on timescales ranging from less than a day (in the case of flares) to more than a year between individual exposures. On approximately year-long timescales, roughly 25% of the late-type stars are variable. Since the Pleiades was also intensively monitored by the imaging instruments on the Einstein Observatory, we have examined X-ray luminosity variations on the 10 yr timescale between Einstein and ROSAT and find that up to 40% of the late-type stars are X-ray variable. Since there is only marginal

  15. Water-window flash x-ray production from linear plasma x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Sagae, Michiaki; Toriyabe, Hiroyuki; Awaji, Wataru; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu

    2000-12-01

    The fundamental study on a high-intensity flash water-window x-ray generator is describe. This flash x-ray generator was improved in order to increase the x-ray intensity and to produce high-intensity characteristic x-rays by forming the linear plasma x-ray source. The generator consists of a high-voltage power supply, a polarity-inversion ignitron pulse generator, an oil-diffusion pump, and a radiation tube with a capillary. High-voltage condenser of 0.2 (mu) F in the pulse generator is charged up to 20 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser are discharged to the capillary in the tube after closing the ignitron. In the present work, the chamber is evacuated by the pump with a pressure of about 1 mPa, and the titanium anode and cathode electrodes are employed to produce L-series characteristic x-rays in the water-window range. The diameter and the length of the ferrite capillary are 2.0 and 30 mm, respectively, and both the cathode voltage and the discharge current displayed damped oscillations. The peak values of the voltage and current increased when the charging voltage was increased, and their maximum values were -11.2 kV and 4.4 kA, respectively. The pulse durations of the water- windows x-rays were nearly equivalent to those of the damped oscillations in the voltage and current, and their values were less than 15 microsecond(s) . In the spectrum measurement, we observed water-window x-rays.

  16. All-laser-driven Thomson X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umstadter, Donald P.

    2015-10-01

    We discuss the development of a new generation of accelerator-based hard X-ray sources driven exclusively by laser light. High-intensity laser pulses serve the dual roles: first, accelerating electrons by laser-driven plasma wakefields, and second, generating X-rays by inverse Compton scattering. Such all-laser-driven X-rays have recently been demonstrated to be energetic, tunable, relatively narrow in bandwidth, short pulsed and well collimated. Such characteristics, especially from a compact source, are highly advantageous for numerous advanced X-ray applications - in metrology, biomedicine, materials, ultrafast phenomena, radiology and fundamental physics.

  17. Multilayers for next generation x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bajt, S; Chapman, H N; Spiller, E; Hau-Riege, S; Alameda, J; Nelson, A J; Walton, C C; Kjornrattanawanich, B; Aquila, A; Dollar, F; Gullikson, E; Tarrio, C

    2007-05-04

    Multilayers are artificially layered structures that can be used to create optics and optical elements for a broad range of x-ray wavelengths, or can be optimized for other applications. The development of next generation x-ray sources (synchrotrons and x-ray free electron lasers) requires advances in x-ray optics. Newly developed multilayer-based mirrors and optical elements enabled efficient band-pass filtering, focusing and time resolved measurements in recent FLASH (Free Electron LASer in Hamburg) experiments. These experiments are providing invaluable feedback on the response of the multilayer structures to high intensity, short pulsed x-ray sources. This information is crucial to design optics for future x-ray free electron lasers and to benchmark computer codes that simulate damage processes.

  18. Polarimeter for Low Energy X-ray Astrophysical Sources (PLEXAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Stephen S.; Pierce, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Polarimeter for Low Energy X-ray Astrophysical Sources (PLEXAS) is an astrophysics mission concept for measuring the polarization of X-ray sources at low energies below the C-K band (less than 277 eV). PLEXAS uses the concept of variations in the reflectivity of a multilayered X-ray telescope as a function of the orientation of an X-rays polarization vector with respect to the reflecting surface of the optic. By selecting an appropriate multilayer, and rotating the X-ray telescope while pointing to a source, there will be a modulation in the source intensity, as measured at the focus of the telescope, which is proportional to the degree of polarization in the source.

  19. Short-term temporal variations of X-ray bright points. [on sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolte, J. T.; Solodyna, C. V.; Gerassimenko, M.

    1979-01-01

    Skylab S-054 data have been used to examine the flux from X-ray bright points with approximately 90 s time resolution. There is evidence of a steady heating input, similar to one reported for active region loops. Also observed are impulsive brightenings of bright points and rapid decays which are consistent with a sudden turn-off of the steady heating.

  20. The birthplaces of active regions and X-ray bright points. [on sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.; Fritzova-Svestkova, L.; Svestka, Z.

    1979-01-01

    A comparison of soft X-ray pictures of the Sun (S-054 experiment of Skylab) with K-line spectroheliograms (Mount Wilson) shows that the X-ray bright points tend to emerge randomly throughout the Ca network pattern. However, all those bright points that developed into active regions emerged at the boundaries of network cells. This suggests that the magnetic flux of active regions comes from greater depths in the convection zone that the shallow flux that gives rise to the random emergence of bright points.

  1. The X-ray eclipse geometry of the super-soft X-ray source CAL 87

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, T.; Lopes de Oliveira, R.

    2014-09-01

    We explore XMM-Newton observations of the eclipsing super-soft X-ray source CAL 87 in order to map the accretion structures of the system. Indirect imaging techniques were applied in X-ray light curves to provide eclipse maps. The surface brightness distribution exhibits an extended and symmetric emission, and a feature is revealed from the hardest X-rays that is likely due to a bright spot. A rate of P-dot =(+6±2)×10{sup −10} for changes in the orbital period of the system was derived from the eclipses. There is no significant variation of the emission lines even during eclipses, arguing that the lines are formed in an extended region. The continuum emission dominates the decrease in flux that is observed during eclipses. The O VIII Lyα line reveals a broadening velocity that is estimated to be 365{sub −69}{sup +65} km s{sup –1} (at 1σ), marginal evidence for asymmetry in its profile, and sometimes shows evidence of double-peaked emission. Together, the results support that the wind-driven mass transfer scenario is running in CAL 87.

  2. Chandra X-Ray Observations of the Hydra A Cluster: An Interaction between the Radio Source and the X-Ray-emitting Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, B. R.; Wise, M.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; David, L. P.; Sarazin, C. L.; Bautz, M.; Markevitch, M.; Vikhlinin, A.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.; Harris, D. E.

    2000-05-01

    We present Chandra X-ray observations of the Hydra A cluster of galaxies, and we report the discovery of structure in the central 80 kpc of the cluster's X-ray-emitting gas. The most remarkable structures are depressions in the X-ray surface brightness, ~25-35 kpc in diameter, that are coincident with Hydra A's radio lobes. The depressions are nearly devoid of X-ray-emitting gas, and there is no evidence for shock-heated gas surrounding the radio lobes. We suggest that the gas within the surface brightness depressions was displaced as the radio lobes expanded subsonically, leaving cavities in the hot atmosphere. The gas temperature declines from 4 keV at 70 kpc to 3 keV in the inner 20 kpc of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), and the cooling time of the gas is ~600 Myr in the inner 10 kpc. These properties are consistent with the presence of an ~34 Msolar yr-1 cooling flow within a 70 kpc radius. Bright X-ray emission is present in the BCG surrounding a recently accreted disk of nebular emission and young stars. The star formation rate is commensurate with the cooling rate of the hot gas within the volume of the disk, although the sink for the material that may be cooling at larger radii remains elusive. A bright, unresolved X-ray source is present in the BCG's nucleus, coincident with the radio core. Its X-ray spectrum is consistent with a power law absorbed by a foreground NH~=4×1022 cm-2 column of hydrogen. This column is roughly consistent with the hydrogen column seen in absorption toward the <~24 pc diameter VLBA radio source. Apart from the point source, no evidence for excess X-ray absorption above the Galactic column is found.

  3. Preliminary designs for X-ray source modifications for the Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray calibration facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to develop preliminary designs for modifications to the X-ray source of the MSFC X-Ray Calibration Facility. Recommendations are made regarding: (1) the production of an unpolarized X-ray beam, (2) modification of the source to provide characteristic X-rays with energies up to 40 keV, and (3) addition of the capability to calibrate instruments in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength region.

  4. Attenuation of supersoft X-ray sources by circumstellar material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, M. T. B.; Gilfanov, M.

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have suggested the possibility of significantly obscuring supersoft X-ray sources in relatively modest amounts of local matter lost from the binaries themselves. If correct, then this would have explained the paucity of observed supersoft X-ray sources and would have significance for the search for single-degenerate Type Ia supernova progenitors. We point out that earlier studies of circumbinary obscuration ignored photoionizations of the gas by the emission from the supersoft X-ray source. We revisit the problem using a full, self-consistent calculation of the ionization state of the circumbinary material photoionized by the radiation of the central source. Our results show that the circumstellar mass-loss rates required for obscuration of supersoft X-ray sources is about an order of magnitude larger than those reported in earlier studies, for comparable model parameters. While this does not entirely rule out the possibility of circumstellar material obscuring supersoft X-ray sources, it makes it unlikely that this effect alone can account for the majority of the missing supersoft X-ray sources. We discuss the observational appearance of hypothetical obscured nuclear-burning white dwarfs and show that they have signatures making them distinct from photoionized nebulae around supersoft X-ray sources imbedded in the low-density interstellar medium.

  5. Tomography of human trabecular bone with a laser-wakefield driven x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, J. M.; Wood, J. C.; Lopes, N. C.; Poder, K.; Abel, R. L.; Alatabi, S.; Bryant, J. S. J.; Jin, A.; Kneip, S.; Mecseki, K.; Parker, S.; Symes, D. R.; Sandholzer, M. A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.

    2016-01-01

    A laser-wakefield driven x-ray source is used for the radiography of human bone. The betatron motion of accelerated electrons generates x-rays which are hard (critical energy {{E}\\text{crit}}>30 keV), have small source size (<3 μm) and high average brightness. The x-rays are generated from a helium gas cell which is near-instantly replenishable, and thus the average photon flux is limited by the repetition rate of the driving laser rather than the breakdown of the x-ray source. A tomograph of a human bone sample was recorded with a resolution down to 50 μm. The photon flux was sufficiently high that a radiograph could be taken with each laser shot, and the fact that x-ray beams were produced on 97% of shots minimised failed shots and facilitated full micro-computed tomography in a reasonable time scale of several hours, limited only by the laser repetition rate. The x-ray imaging beamline length (not including the laser) is shorter than that of a synchrotron source due to the high accelerating fields and small source size. Hence this interesting laboratory-based source may one day bridge the gap between small microfocus x-ray tubes and large synchrotron facilities.

  6. X-ray spectra from three cosmic sources.

    PubMed

    Grader, R J; Hill, R W; Seward, F D; Toor, A

    1966-06-10

    Three cosmic x-ray sources have been observed from a water-launched rocket carrying two x-ray detectors to an altitude of 200 kilometers. The x-ray spectra, measured in the photon energy range between I and 40 kiloelectron volts, are all different. The sources in order of hardness of spectra are Cyg XR-1, Tau XR-1, and Sco XR-1. The intensity of Sco XR-J decreased at low photon energies. The differences in spectra might source mechanisms.

  7. Compact Laser-Compton X-ray Source at LLNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yoonwoo; Marsh, Roark; Gibson, David; Anderson, Gerald; Barty, Christopher; Tajima, Toshiki

    2016-10-01

    The scaling of laser-Compton X-ray and gamma-ray sources is dependent upon high-current, low-emittance accelerator operation and implementation of efficient laser-electron interaction architectures. Laser-Compton X-rays have been produced using the unique compact X-band linear accelerator at LLNL operated in a novel multibunch mode, and results agree extremely well with modeling predictions. An Andor X-ray CCD camera and image plates have been calibrated and used to characterize the 30 keV laser-Compton X-ray beam. The X-ray source size and the effect of scintillator blur have been measured. K-edge absorption measurements using thin metallic foils confirm the production of narrow energy spread X-rays and results validate X-ray image simulations. Future plans for medically relevant imaging will be discussed with facility upgrades to enable 250 keV X-ray production. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. X-ray plasma source design simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cerjan, C.

    1993-07-01

    The optimization of soft x-ray production from a laser-produced plasma for lithographic applications is discussed in the context of recent experiments by R. Kauffman et al. which indicate that a conversion efficiency of 0.01 can be obtained with Sn targets at modest laser intensity. Computer simulations of the experiments delineate the critical phenomena underlying these high conversion efficiencies, especially the role of hydrodynamic expansion and radiative emission. Qualitative features of the experiments are reproduced including the transition from one-dimensional to two-dimensional flow. The quantitative discrepancy is ascribed to incorrect initiation of the ablating plasma and to inadequate atomic transition rate evaluation.

  9. Bright Points and Subflares in UV Lines and in X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rovira, M.; Schmieder, B.; Demoulin, P.; Simnett, G. M.; Hagyard, M. J.; Reichmann, E.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1998-01-01

    We have analysed an active region which was observed in Halpha (MSDP), UV lines (SMM/UVSP), and in X rays (SMM/HXIS). In this active region there were only a few subflares and many small bright points visible in UV and in X rays. Using an extrapolation based on the Fourier transform we have computed magnetic field lines connecting different photospheric magnetic polarities from ground-based magnetograms. Along the magnetic inversion lines we find 2 different zones: 1. a high shear region (less than 70 degrees) where subflares occur 2. a low shear region along the magnetic inversion line where UV bright points are observed.

  10. A Multi-Wavelength Study of the X-Ray Sources in the NGC 5018

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Kajal K.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Wu, Kinwah; Saripalli, Lakshmi

    2004-01-01

    The E3 giant elliptical galaxy NGC-5018 was observed with the cxo X-ray Observatory's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer for 30-h on 14 April 2001. Results of analysis of these X-ray data as well as of complementary optical, infrared, and radio data are reported. Seven X-ray point sources, including the nucleus, were detected. If they are intrinsic to NGC-5018, then all six non-nuclear sources have luminosities exceeding 10(exp 39)-ergl in the 0.5-8.0-keV energy band; placing them in the class of Ultra- luminous X-ray sources. Comparison of X-ray source positions to archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (hst/WFPC2) images reveal four of the six non-nuclear sources are spatially--coincident with bright, M$(sub V)LA -8.6 mag, objects. These four objects have optical magnitudes and (V-I) colors consistent with globular clusters in NGC-5018. However, one of these objects was observed to vary by siml mag in both V and I between observations taken 28 July 1997 and 04 Feb 1999 indicating this source is a background active galactic nucleus (AGN). The nature of the other three optically-bright objects cannot be determined from the available optical data but all have X-ray-to-optical flux ratios consistent with background AGNs. Strong, unpolarized, radio emission has been detected from another of the optically-bright counterparts. It displays an inverted radio spectrum and is the most absorbed of the seven sources in the X-ray band. It, too, is most readily explained as a background AGN, though alternative explanations cannot be ruled out. Extended X-ray emission is detected within a siml5 arcsec radius of the galaxy center at a luminosity of sim lO(exp 40)-ergl in the X-ray band. Its thermal X-ray spectrum (kT sim0.4-keV) and its spatial coincidence with strong H(alpha) emission are consistent with a hot gas origin. The nucleus itself is a weak X-ray source, LA-5 times 10(exp 39)-ergl, but displays a radio spectrum typical of AGN.

  11. X-Ray Sources in the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Draco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonbas, E.; Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.; Dhuga, K. S.; Hare, J.; Volkov, I.

    2016-04-01

    We present the spectral analysis of an 87 ks XMM-Newton observation of Draco, a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Of the approximately 35 robust X-ray source detections, we focus our attention on the brightest of these sources, for which we report X-ray and multiwavelength parameters. While most of the sources exhibit properties consistent with active galactic nuclei, few of them possess the characteristics of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and cataclysmic variable (CVs). Our analysis places constraints on the population of X-ray sources with LX > 3 × 1033 erg s-1 in Draco, suggesting that there are no actively accreting black hole and neutron star binaries. However, we find four sources that could be quiescent state LMXBs/CVs associated with Draco. We also place constraints on the central black hole luminosity and on a dark matter decay signal around 3.5 keV.

  12. X-ray bursters and the X-ray sources of the galactic bulge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.; Joss, P. C.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt is made to distill from observational and theoretical information on the galactic bulge X-ray sources in general, and on the X-ray burst sources in particular, those aspects which seem to have the greatest relevance to the understanding of these sources. Galactic bulge sources appear to be collapsed objects of roughly solar mass, in most cases neutron stars, which are accreting matter from low-mass stellar companions. Type I bursts seem to result from thermonuclear flashes in the surface layers of some of these neutron stars, while the type II bursts from the Rapid Burster are almost certainly due to an instability in the accretion flow onto a neutron star. It is concluded that the studies cited offer a new and powerful observational handle on the fundamental properties of neutron stars and of the interacting binary systems in which they are often contained.

  13. Miniaturized High-Speed Modulated X-Ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith C. (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor); Kenyon, Steven J. (Inventor); Spartana, Nick Salvatore (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A miniaturized high-speed modulated X-ray source (MXS) device and a method for rapidly and arbitrarily varying with time the output X-ray photon intensities and energies. The MXS device includes an ultraviolet emitter that emits ultraviolet light, a photocathode operably coupled to the ultraviolet light-emitting diode that emits electrons, an electron multiplier operably coupled to the photocathode that multiplies incident electrons, and an anode operably coupled to the electron multiplier that is configured to produce X-rays. The method for modulating MXS includes modulating an intensity of an ultraviolet emitter to emit ultraviolet light, generating electrons in response to the ultraviolet light, multiplying the electrons to become more electrons, and producing X-rays by an anode that includes a target material configured to produce X-rays in response to impact of the more electrons.

  14. Simulation tools for analyzer-based x-ray phase contrast imaging system with a conventional x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caudevilla, Oriol; Zhou, Wei; Stoupin, Stanislav; Verman, Boris; Brankov, J. G.

    2016-09-01

    Analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging (ABI) belongs to a broader family of phase-contrast (PC) X-ray imaging modalities. Unlike the conventional X-ray radiography, which measures only X-ray absorption, in PC imaging one can also measures the X-rays deflection induced by the object refractive properties. It has been shown that refraction imaging provides better contrast when imaging the soft tissue, which is of great interest in medical imaging applications. In this paper, we introduce a simulation tool specifically designed to simulate the analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging system with a conventional polychromatic X-ray source. By utilizing ray tracing and basic physical principles of diffraction theory our simulation tool can predicting the X-ray beam profile shape, the energy content, the total throughput (photon count) at the detector. In addition we can evaluate imaging system point-spread function for various system configurations.

  15. Quasisoft X-ray Sources: their physical natures revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, Rosanne; Primini, Francis A.; Guo, Jincheng; Liu, Jifeng

    2016-04-01

    Quasisoft X-ray sources (QSSs) have been the Mona Lisa of X-ray sources. They have remained enigmatic, even though we have known of their existence and basic properties for more than a decade. QSSs have X-ray luminosities greater than 10^{36} erg/s, but emit few or no photons above 2 keV. They were discovered in external galaxies during searches for softer sources, supersoft X-ray sources (SSSs). Every external galaxy contains QSSs, but it has been challenging to find any in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds. Recent work, however, reveals that a significant fraction of QSSs may be black holes. We review what is known about QSSs to date, because this obscure class of objects may at last to be ready for "prime time'', capable of identifying BHs in a wide range of Galactic environments.

  16. ANS hard X-ray experiment development program. [emission from X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsignault, D.; Gursky, H.; Frank, R.; Kubierschky, K.; Austin, G.; Paganetti, R.; Bawdekar, V.

    1974-01-01

    The hard X-ray (HXX) experiment is one of three experiments included in the Dutch Astronomical Netherlands Satellite, which was launched into orbit on 30 August 1974. The overall objective of the HXX experiment is the detailed study of the emission from known X-ray sources over the energy range 1.5-30keV. The instrument is capable of the following measurements: (1) spectral content over the full energy range with an energy resolution of approximately 20% and time resolution down to 4 seconds; (2) source time variability down to 4 milliseconds; (3) silicon emission lines at 1.86 and 2.00keV; (4) source location to a limit of one arc minute in ecliptic latitude; and (5) spatial structure with angular resolution of the arc minutes. Scientific aspects of experiment, engineering design and implementation of the experiment, and program history are included.

  17. X-ray plasma source design simulations.

    PubMed

    Cerjan, C

    1993-12-01

    The optimization of soft x-ray production from a laser-produced plasma for lithographic applications is discussed in the context of recent experiments by Kauffman et al. [Appl. Opt. 32, 6897 (1993)], which indicate that a conversion efficiency of 0.01 can be obtained with Sn targets at modest laser intensity. Computer simulations of the experiments delineate the critical phenomena underlying these high conversion efficiencies, especially the role of hydrodynamic expansion and radiative emission. Qualitative features of the experiments are reproduced, including the transition from one-dimensional to two-dimensional flow. The quantitative discrepancy is ascribed to incorrect initiation of the ablating plasma and to inadequate atomic transition rate evaluation.

  18. Ultra-bright, ultra-broadband hard x-ray driven by laser-produced energetic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yin; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Wenpeng; Ji, Liangliang; Zhang, Lingang; Xu, Jiancai; Yu, Yahong; Zhao, Xueyan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Yi, Longqing; Xu, Tongjun; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-09-15

    We propose a new method of obtaining a compact ultra-bright, ultra-broadband hard X-ray source. This X-ray source has a high peak brightness in the order of 10{sup 22} photons/(s mm{sup 2} mrad{sup 2} 0.1\\%BW), an ultrashort duration (10 fs), and a broadband spectrum (flat distribution from 0.1 MeV to 4 MeV), and thus has wide-ranging potential applications, such as in ultrafast Laue diffraction experiments. In our scheme, laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) provide driven electron beams. A foil target is placed oblique to the beam direction so that the target normal sheath field (TNSF) is used to provide a bending force. Using this TNSF-kick scheme, we can fully utilize the advantages of current LPAs, including their high charge, high energy, and low emittance.

  19. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources

    ScienceCinema

    Falcone, Roger

    2016-07-12

    July 15, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  20. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Falcone, Roger

    2008-07-18

    July 15, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  1. ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES IN ARP 147

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaport, S.; Steinhorn, B.; Levine, A.; Pooley, D. E-mail: aml@space.mit.ed

    2010-10-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory was used to image the collisional ring galaxy Arp 147 for 42 ks. We detect nine X-ray sources with luminosities in the range of (1.4-7) x 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} (assuming that the sources emit isotropically) in or near the blue knots of star formation associated with the ring. A source with an X-ray luminosity of 1.4 x 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} is detected in the nuclear region of the intruder galaxy. X-ray sources associated with a foreground star and a background quasar are used to improve the registration of the X-ray image with respect to Hubble Space Telescope (HST) high-resolution optical images. The intruder galaxy, which apparently contained little gas before the collision, shows no X-ray sources other than the one in the nuclear bulge which may be a poorly fed supermassive black hole. These observations confirm the conventional wisdom that collisions of gas-rich galaxies trigger large rates of star formation which, in turn, generate substantial numbers of X-ray sources, some of which have luminosities above the Eddington limit for accreting stellar-mass black holes (i.e., ultraluminous X-ray sources, 'ULXs'). We also utilize archival Spitzer and Galex data to help constrain the current star formation rate in Arp 147 to {approx}7 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. All of these results, coupled with binary evolution models for ULXs, allow us to tentatively conclude that the most intense star formation may have ended some 15 Myr in the past.

  2. Thermometric- and Acoustic-Based Beam Power Monitor for Ultra-Bright X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bentsen, Gregory; /Rochester U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A design for an average beam power monitor for ultra-bright X-ray sources is proposed that makes simultaneous use of calorimetry and radiation acoustics. Radiation incident on a solid target will induce heating and ultrasonic vibrations, both of which may be measured to give a fairly precise value of the beam power. The monitor is intended for measuring ultra-bright Free-Electron Laser (FEL) X-ray beams, for which traditional monitoring technologies such as photo-diodes or scintillators are unsuitable. The monitor consists of a Boron Carbide (B{sub 4}C) target designed to absorb most of the incident beam's energy. Resistance temperature detectors (RTD) and piezoelectric actuators are mounted on the outward faces of the target to measure the temperature changes and ultrasonic vibrations induced by the incident beam. The design was tested using an optical pulsed beam (780 nm, 120 and 360 Hz) from a Ti:sapphire oscillator at several energies between 0.8 and 2.6 mJ. The RTDs measured an increase in temperature of about 10 K over a period of several minutes. The piezoelectric sensors recorded ringing acoustic oscillations at 580 {+-} 40 kHz. Most importantly, the amplitude of the acoustic signals was observed to scale linearly with beam power up to 2 mJ of pulse energy. Above this pulse energy, the vibrational signals became nonlinear. Several causes for this nonlinearity are discussed, including amplifier saturation and piezoelectric saturation. Despite this nonlinearity, these measurements demonstrate the feasibility of such a beam power measurement device. The advantage of two distinct measurements (acoustic and thermometric) provides a useful method of calibration that is unavailable to current LCLS diagnostics tools.

  3. The light curve of a transient X-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaluzienski, L. J.; Holt, S. S.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Eadie, G.; Pounds, K. A.; Ricketts, M. J.; Watson, M.

    1975-01-01

    The Ariel-5 satellite has monitored the X-ray light curve of A1524-62 almost continuously from 40 days prior to maximum light until its disappearance below the effective experimental sensitivity. The source exhibited maximum light on Dec. 4, 1974, at a level of 0.9 the apparent magnitude of the Crab Nebula in the energy band 3-6 keV. Although similar to previously reported transient sources with a decay time constant of about 2 months, the source exhibited an extended, variable preflare on-state of about 1 month at a level of greater than 0.1 maximum light. The four bright (greater than 0.2 of the Crab Nebula) transient sources observed during the first half-year of Ariel-5 operation are indicative of a galactic disk distribution, a luminosity at maximum in excess of 10 to the 37-th power ergs/sec, a frequency of occurrence which may be as high as 100/yr, and a median decay time which is less than 1 month.

  4. M31 Globular Cluster X-Ray Sources: XMM-Newton and Chandra Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudolyubov, Sergey; Priedhorsky, William

    2004-12-01

    We present the results of an M31 globular cluster (GC) X-ray source survey, based on the data of XMM-Newton and Chandra observations covering ~6100 arcmin2 of M31. We detected 43 X-ray sources coincident with GC candidates from various optical surveys. The inferred isotropic X-ray luminosities of GC sources lie between ~1035 and ~1039 ergs s-1 in the 0.3-10 keV energy band. The spectral properties of the 31 brightest sources in our sample were found to be similar to those of the low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) located in the bulge and the GCs of the Milky Way. The spectral distribution of the M31 GC X-ray sources is consistent with that derived for the bulge of M31 and other nearby galaxies of different morphological type. Several sources demonstrate a correlation between the level of X-ray flux and the hardness of their energy spectrum reminiscent of the Galactic Z and atoll sources. We found that ~80% of the M31 GC sources with multiple flux measurements available show significant variability on timescales from days to years. The X-ray source RX J0043.2+4127, coincident with GC Bo 163, has been found to show recurrent transient outbursts with peak luminosities of ~1038 ergs s-1. Several sources in our sample show significant variability on a timescale of individual observations, ranging from aperiodic fluctuations to regular dipping. The X-ray luminosity function of GC sources is found to be significantly different from that of the point sources in the bulge and disk of M31. The luminosity distribution of M31 GC sources has ~10 times higher peak luminosity and a much higher fraction of bright sources than the Milky Way GC distribution. Six persistent sources in our sample (or ~14% of the total number) have luminosities exceeding 1038 ergs s-1 during all observations, and three other sources occasionally exceed that luminosity level. Our observations indicate that GC sources make the dominant contribution to the bright source counts in the areas of M31 covered by

  5. New hard X-ray sources observed with HEAO-A2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, F. E.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Pravdo, S. H.; Rothschild, R. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1978-01-01

    A search for new hard X-ray sources using data from the first complete view of the sky with the HEAO-A2 experiment discovered 47 new sources, detected 7 sources recently discovered with other experiments, and significantly reduced the size of the error boxes for 6 previously known sources. Intensities and error boxes are given for each of these sources; identifications are suggested when an error contains an object similar to known X-ray sources. The new identifications consist of seven Type 1 Seyfert galaxies, including two whose Seyfert characteristics were discovered due to their location in an X-ray error box; one intermediate Seyfert galaxy; three Abell clusters; five N-galaxies; two bursting radio sources; and an additional three nearby galaxies with bright nuclei and narrow emission lines.

  6. Transient X-Ray Sources in the Magellanic-type Galaxy NGC 4449

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jithesh, V.; Wang, Zhongxiang

    2017-02-01

    We report the identification of seven transient X-ray sources in the nearby Magellanic-type galaxy NGC 4449 using archival multi-epoch X-ray observations conducted with the Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Swift telescopes over the years 2001–2013. Among them, two sources are classified as supersoft X-ray sources (SSSs) because of their soft X-ray color; the rest of the sources are X-ray binaries (XRBs). Transient SSSs’ spectra can be fitted with a blackbody of effective temperature ∼80–105 eV, and luminosities were ≃ {10}37{--}{10}38 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 in 0.3–8 keV. These properties are consistent with the widely accepted model for SSSs, an accreting white dwarf with steady nuclear burning on its surface, and the SSS emission has also been observed in many post-nova systems. Detailed analysis of one sufficiently bright SSS revealed strong short-term variability, possibly showing a 2.3-hr periodic modulation, and long-term variability, detectable over 23 years with different X-ray telescopes before the year 2003. The X-ray properties of four other transients are consistent with neutron star or black hole binaries in their hard state, whereas the remaining source is most likely an XRB with a quasi-soft X-ray spectrum. Analysis of archival Hubble Space Telescope image data was also conducted, and multiple massive stars were found as possible counterparts. We conclude that the X-ray transient properties in NGC 4449 are similar to those in other Magellanic-type galaxies.

  7. Simultaneous radio and X-ray observations of the X-ray burst source MXB 1636-53

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. M.; Duldig, M. L.; Haynes, R. F.; Simons, L. W.; Murdin, P.; Hoffman, J. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Wheaton, W. A.; Doty, J.

    1979-01-01

    On June 17, 1977, the X-ray burst source MXB 1636-53 was simultaneously monitored for about 4 hr with the Parkes 64-m radio telescope at a frequency of 14.7 GHz and the SAS 3 X-ray satellite (1.3-12 keV). One X-ray burst was observed; an upper limit (2 sigmas) of 200 mJy is reported for any radio burst coincident with the X-ray event. During the X-ray burst the radio/X-ray time-integrated flux ratio was no more than 375 with a 90 percent confidence. An upper limit (2 sigmas) of 22 mJy was determined for any steady 14.7-GHz source coincident with the X-ray position.

  8. X-rays beware: the deepest Chandra catalogue of point sources in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vulic, N.; Gallagher, S. C.; Barmby, P.

    2016-10-01

    This study represents the most sensitive Chandra X-ray point source catalogue of M31. Using 133 publicly available Chandra ACIS-I/S observations totalling ˜1 Ms, we detected 795 X-ray sources in the bulge, north-east, and south-west fields of M31, covering an area of ≈0.6 deg2, to a limiting unabsorbed 0.5-8.0 keV luminosity of ˜1034 erg s-1. In the inner bulge, where exposure is approximately constant, X-ray fluxes represent average values because they were determined from many observations over a long period of time. Similarly, our catalogue is more complete in the bulge fields since monitoring allowed more transient sources to be detected. The catalogue was cross-correlated with a previous XMM-Newton catalogue of M31's D25 isophote consisting of 1948 X-ray sources, with only 979 within the field of view of our survey. We found 387 (49 per cent) of our Chandra sources (352 or 44 per cent unique sources) matched to within 5 arcsec of 352 XMM-Newton sources. Combining this result with matching done to previous Chandra X-ray sources we detected 259. new sources in our catalogue. We created X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) in the soft (0.5-2.0 keV) and hard (2.0-8.0 keV) bands that are the most sensitive for any large galaxy based on our detection limits. Completeness-corrected XLFs show a break around ≈1.3 × 1037 erg s-1, consistent with previous work. As in past surveys, we find that the bulge XLFs are flatter than the disc, indicating a lack of bright high-mass X-ray binaries in the disc and an aging population of low-mass X-ray binaries in the bulge.

  9. X-ray grating interferometry with a liquid-metal-jet source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thüring, T.; Zhou, T.; Lundström, U.; Burvall, A.; Rutishauser, S.; David, C.; Hertz, H. M.; Stampanoni, M.

    2013-08-01

    A liquid-metal-jet X-ray tube is used in an X-ray phase-contrast microscope based on a Talbot type grating interferometer. With a focal spot size in the range of a few microns and a photon flux of ˜1012 photons/s×sr, the brightness of such a source is approximately one order of magnitude higher than for a conventional microfocus source. For comparison, a standard microfocus source was used with the same grating interferometer, showing significantly increased visibility for the liquid-metal-jet arrangement. Together with the increased flux, this results in improved signal-to-noise ratio.

  10. The Interaction of Radio Sources and X-Ray-Emitting Gas in Cooling Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, E. L.

    Recent observations of the interactions between radio sources and the X-ray-emitting gas in cooling flows in the cores of clusters of galaxies are reviewed. The radio sources inflate bubbles in the X-ray gas, which then rise buoyantly outward in the clusters transporting energy to the intracluster medium (ICM). The bright rims of gas around the radio bubbles are cool, rather than hot, and do not show signs of being strongly shocked. Energy deposited into the ICM over the lifetime of a cluster through several outbursts of a radio source helps to account for at least some of the gas that is missing in cooling flows at low temperatures.

  11. TRANSIENT X-RAY SOURCE POPULATION IN THE MAGELLANIC-TYPE GALAXY NGC 55

    SciTech Connect

    Jithesh, V.; Wang, Zhongxiang

    2016-04-10

    We present the spectral and temporal properties of 15 candidate transient X-ray sources detected in archival XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the nearby Magellanic-type, SB(s)m galaxy NGC 55. Based on an X-ray color classification scheme, the majority of the sources may be identified as X-ray binaries (XRBs), and six sources are soft, including a likely supernova remnant. We perform a detailed spectral and variability analysis of the data for two bright candidate XRBs. Both sources displayed strong short-term X-ray variability, and their X-ray spectra and hardness ratios are consistent with those of XRBs. These results, combined with their high X-ray luminosities (∼10{sup 38} erg s{sup −1}), strongly suggest that they are black hole (BH) binaries. Seven less luminous sources have spectral properties consistent with those of neutron star or BH XRBs in both normal and high-rate accretion modes, but one of them is the likely counterpart to a background galaxy (because of positional coincidence). From our spectral analysis, we find that the six soft sources are candidate super soft sources (SSSs) with dominant emission in the soft (0.3–2 keV) X-ray band. Archival Hubble Space Telescope optical images for seven sources are available, and the data suggest that most of them are likely to be high-mass XRBs. Our analysis has revealed the heterogeneous nature of the transient population in NGC 55 (six high-mass XRBs, one low-mass XRBs, six SSSs, one active galactic nucleus), helping establish the similarity of the X-ray properties of this galaxy to those of other Magellanic-type galaxies.

  12. Generation of bright attosecond x-ray pulse trains via Thomson scattering from laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Luo, W; Yu, T P; Chen, M; Song, Y M; Zhu, Z C; Ma, Y Y; Zhuo, H B

    2014-12-29

    Generation of attosecond x-ray pulse attracts more and more attention within the advanced light source user community due to its potentially wide applications. Here we propose an all-optical scheme to generate bright, attosecond hard x-ray pulse trains by Thomson backscattering of similarly structured electron beams produced in a vacuum channel by a tightly focused laser pulse. Design parameters for a proof-of-concept experiment are presented and demonstrated by using a particle-in-cell code and a four-dimensional laser-Compton scattering simulation code to model both the laser-based electron acceleration and Thomson scattering processes. Trains of 200 attosecond duration hard x-ray pulses holding stable longitudinal spacing with photon energies approaching 50 keV and maximum achievable peak brightness up to 1020 photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1%BW for each micro-bunch are observed. The suggested physical scheme for attosecond x-ray pulse trains generation may directly access the fastest time scales relevant to electron dynamics in atoms, molecules and materials.

  13. Ionization nebulae surrounding supersoft X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, S.; Chiang, E.; Kallman, T.; Malina, R.

    1994-01-01

    In this work we carry out a theoretical investigation of a new type of astrophysical gaseous nebula, viz., ionized regions surrounding supersoft X-ray sources. Supersoft X-ray sources, many of which have characteristic luminosities of approximately 10(exp 37)-(10(exp 38) ergs/s and effective temperatures of approximately 4 x 10(exp 5) K, were first discovered with the Einstein Observatory. These sources have now been shown to constitute a distinct class of X-ray source and are being found in substantial numbers with ROSAT. We predict that these sources should be surrounded by regions of ionized hydrogen and helium with properties that are distinct from other astrophysical gaseous nebulae. We present caluations of the ionization and temperature structure of these ionization nebulae, as well as the expected optical line fluxes. The ionization profiles for both hydrogen and helium exhibit substantially more gradual transitions from the ionized to the unionized state than is the case for conventional H II regions. The calculated optical line intensitites are presented as absolute fluxes from sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud and as fractions of the central source luminosity. We find, in particular, that (O III) lambda 5008 and He II lambda 4686 are especially prominent in these ionization nebulae as compared to other astrophysical nebulae. We propose that searches for supersoft X-rays via their characteristic optical lines may reveal sources in regions where the soft X-rays are nearly completely absorbed by the interstellar medium.

  14. Chandra Resolves Cosmic X-ray Glow and Finds Mysterious New Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    -energy X-ray background, showing that it arose in very faraway galaxies with extremely bright cores, called quasars or Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). The Chandra team sampled a region of the sky about one-fifth the angular area of a full moon and resolved about 80 percent of the more-energetic X-ray background into discrete sources. Stretched across the entire sky, this would account for approximately 70 million sources, most of which would be identified with galaxies. Their analysis confirms that a significant fraction of the X-ray background cannot be due to diffuse radiation from hot, intergalactic gas. Combined X-ray and optical observations showed that nearly one third of the sources are galaxies whose cores are very bright in X rays yet emit virtually no optical light from the core. The observation suggests that these "veiled galactic nuclei" galaxies may number in the tens of millions over the whole sky. They almost certainly harbor a massive black hole at their core that produces X rays as the gas is pulled toward it at nearly the speed of light. Their bright X-ray cores place these galaxies in the AGN family. Because these numerous AGN are bright in X rays, but optically dim, the Chandra observation implies that optical surveys of AGN are very incomplete. A second new class of objects, comprising approximately one-third of the background, is assumed to be "ultra-faint galaxies." Mushotzky said that these sources may emit little or no optical light, either because the dust around the galaxy blocks the light totally or because the optical light is eventually absorbed by relatively cool gas during its long journey across the universe. In the latter scenario, Mushotzky said that these sources would have a redshift of 6 or higher, meaning that they are well over 14 billion light years away and thus the earliest, most distant objects ever identified. "This is a very exciting discovery," said Dr. Alan Bunner, Director of NASA's Structure and Evolution of the universe

  15. Assembling x-ray sources by carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessa, V.; Lucci, M.; Toschi, F.; Orlanducci, S.; Tamburri, E.; Terranova, M. L.; Ciorba, A.; Rossi, M.; Hampai, D.; Cappuccio, G.

    2007-05-01

    By the use of a chemical vapour deposition technique a series of metal wires (W, Ta, Steel ) with differently shaped tips have been coated by arrays of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT). The field emission properties of the SWNT deposits have been measured by a home made apparatus working in medium vacuum (10 -6- 10 -7 mbar) and the SWNT-coated wires have been used to fabricate tiny electron sources for X-ray tubes. To check the efficiency of the nanotube coated wires for X-ray generation has, a prototype X-ray tube has been designed and fabricated. The X-ray tube works at pressures about 10 -6 mbar. The target ( Al film) is disposed on a hole in the stainless steel sheath: this configuration makes unnecessary the usual Be window and moreover allows us to use low accelerating potentials (< 6 kV).

  16. Compact Optical Counterparts of Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Lian; Feng, Hua; Grisé, Fabien; Kaaret, Philip

    2011-08-01

    Using archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging data, we report the multiband photometric properties of 13 ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) that have a unique compact optical counterpart. Both magnitude and color variation are detected at timescales of days to years. The optical color, variability, and X-ray to optical flux ratio indicate that the optical emission of most ULXs is dominated by X-ray reprocessing on the disk, similar to that of low-mass X-ray binaries. For most sources, the optical spectrum is a power law, F νvpropνα with α in the range 1.0-2.0 and the optically emitting region has a size on the order of 1012 cm. Exceptions are NGC 2403 X-1 and M83 IXO 82, which show optical spectra consistent with direct emission from a standard thin disk, M101 ULX-1 and M81 ULS1, which have X-ray to optical flux ratios more similar to high-mass X-ray binaries, and IC 342 X-1, in which the optical light may be dominated by the companion star. Inconsistent extinction between the optical counterpart of NGC 5204 X-1 and the nearby optical nebulae suggests that they may be unrelated.

  17. Advanced X-Ray Sources Ensure Safe Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Ames Research Center awarded inXitu Inc. (formerly Microwave Power Technology), of Mountain View, California, an SBIR contract to develop a new design of electron optics for forming and focusing electron beams that is applicable to a broad class of vacuum electron devices. This technology offers an inherently rugged and more efficient X-ray source for material analysis; a compact and rugged X-ray source for smaller rovers on future Mars missions; and electron beam sources to reduce undesirable emissions from small, widely distributed pollution sources; and remediation of polluted sites.

  18. High Energy X-Ray Source Generation by Short Pulse High Intensity Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H-S; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Phillips, T W; Goldsack, T; Clark, E; Eagleton, R; Edwards, R

    2003-09-02

    We are studying the feasibility of utilizing K{alpha} x-ray sources in the range of 20 to 100 keV as a backlighters for imaging various stages of implosions and high areal density planar samples driven by the NIF laser facility. The hard x-ray K{alpha} sources are created by relativistic electron plasma interactions in the target material after a radiation by short pulse high intensity lasers. In order to understand K{alpha} source characteristics such as production efficiency and brightness as a function of laser parameters, we have performed experiments using the 10 J, 100 fs JanUSP laser. We utilized single-photon counting spectroscopy and x-ray imaging diagnostics to characterize the K{alpha} source. We find that the K{alpha} conversion efficiency from the laser energy at 22 keV is {approx} 3 x 10{sup -4}.

  19. X-ray source safety shutter

    DOEpatents

    Robinet, McLouis

    1977-05-31

    An apparatus is provided for controlling the activation of a high energy radiation source having a shutter. The apparatus includes magnets and magnetically responsive switches appropriately placed and interconnected so that only with the shutter and other parts of the source in proper position can safe emission of radiation out an open shutter occur.

  20. Bright Points and Subflares in Ultraviolet Lines and X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rovira, M.; Schmieder, B.; Demoulin, P.; Simnett, G. M.; Hagyard, M. J.; Reichmann, E.; Reichmann, E.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1999-01-01

    We have analyzed an active region which was observed in H.alpha (Multichannel Subtractive Double Pass Spectrograph), in UV lines (SMM/UVSP), and in X-rays (SMM/HXIS). In this active region there were only a few subflares and many small bright points visible in UV and in X-rays. Using an extrapolation based on the Fourier transform, we have computed magnetic field lines connecting different photospheric magnetic polarities from ground-based magnetograms. Along the magnetic inversion lines we find two different zones: (1) a high-shear region (> 70 deg) where subflares occur, and (2) a low-shear region along the magnetic inversion line where UV bright points are observed. In these latter regions the magnetic topology is complex with a mixture of polarities. According to the velocity field observed in the Si IV lamda.1402 line and the extrapolation of the magnetic field, we notice that each UV bright point is consistent with emission from low-rising loops with downflows at both ends. We notice some hard X-ray emissions above the bright-point regions with temperatures up to 8 x 10(exp 6) K, which suggests some induced reconnection due to continuous emergence of new flux. This reconnection is also enhanced by neighboring subflares.

  1. Proposal to DOE Basic Energy Sciences: Ultrafast X-ray science facility at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenlein, Robert W.; Falcone, Roger W.; Abela, R.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Belkacem, A.; Berrah, N.; Bozek, J.; Bressler, C.; Cavalleri, A.; Chergui, M.; Glover, T.E.; Heimann, P.A.; Hepburn, J.; Larsson, J.; Lee, R.W.; McCusker, J.; Padmore, H.A.; Pattison, P.; Pratt, S.T.; Shank, C.V.; Wark, J.; Chang, Z.; Robin, D.W.; Schlueter, R.D.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2001-12-12

    We propose to develop a true user facility for ultrafast x-ray science at the Advanced Light Source. This facility will be unique in the world, and will fill a critical need for the growing ultrafast x-ray research community. The development of this facility builds upon the expertise from long-standing research efforts in ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and the development of femtosecond x-ray sources and techniques at both the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at U.C. Berkeley. In particular, the technical feasibility of a femtosecond x-ray beamline at the ALS has already been demonstrated, and existing ultrafast laser technology will enable such a beamline to operate near the practical limit for femtosecond x-ray flux and brightness from a 3rd generation synchrotron.

  2. Ultrafast X-ray Science at the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, Kelly J.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-09-30

    The ultrafast, high brightness x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) sources of the future have the potential to revolutionize the study of time dependent phenomena in the natural sciences. These linear accelerator (linac) sources will generate femtosecond (fs) x-ray pulses with peak flux comparable to conventional lasers, and far exceeding all other x-ray sources. The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has pioneered the development of linac science and technology for decades, and since 2000 SLAC and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) have focused on the development of linac based ultrafast electron and x-ray sources. This development effort has led to the creation of a new x-ray source, called the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS), which became operational in 2003 [1]. The SPPS represents the first step toward the world's first hard x-ray free electron laser (XFEL), the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), due to begin operation at SLAC in 2009. The SPPS relies on the same linac-based acceleration and electron bunch compression schemes that will be used at the LCLS to generate ultrashort, ultrahigh peak brightness electron bunches [2]. This involves creating an energy chirp on the electron bunch during acceleration and subsequent compression of the bunch in a series of energy-dispersive magnetic chicanes to create 80 fs electron pulses. The SPPS has provided an excellent opportunity to demonstrate the viability of these electron bunch compression schemes and to pursue goals relevant to the utilization and validation of XFEL light sources.

  3. Towards a Table-Top Laser Driven XUV/X-Ray Source

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-27

    applications, including bright x-ray and Extreme ultraviolet radiation (EUV or XUV) sources. The investigation was carried out in two phases. In the...of emission enhancement. The study also revealed that this laser-driven source of radiation has a small source size, short duration, and high photon...experimentally demonstrated. The study revealed that these advanced micro-engineered targets not only enhance the total number of electrons and their

  4. Generation of bright isolated attosecond soft X-ray pulses driven by multicycle midinfrared lasers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Chang; Mancuso, Christopher; Hernández-García, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Galloway, Ben; Popmintchev, Dimitar; Huang, Pei-Chi; Walker, Barry; Plaja, Luis; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Becker, Andreas; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2014-06-10

    High harmonic generation driven by femtosecond lasers makes it possible to capture the fastest dynamics in molecules and materials. However, to date the shortest subfemtosecond (attosecond, 10(-18) s) pulses have been produced only in the extreme UV region of the spectrum below 100 eV, which limits the range of materials and molecular systems that can be explored. Here we experimentally demonstrate a remarkable convergence of physics: when midinfrared lasers are used to drive high harmonic generation, the conditions for optimal bright, soft X-ray generation naturally coincide with the generation of isolated attosecond pulses. The temporal window over which phase matching occurs shrinks rapidly with increasing driving laser wavelength, to the extent that bright isolated attosecond pulses are the norm for 2-µm driving lasers. Harnessing this realization, we experimentally demonstrate the generation of isolated soft X-ray attosecond pulses at photon energies up to 180 eV for the first time, to our knowledge, with a transform limit of 35 attoseconds (as), and a predicted linear chirp of 300 as. Most surprisingly, advanced theory shows that in contrast with as pulse generation in the extreme UV, long-duration, 10-cycle, driving laser pulses are required to generate isolated soft X-ray bursts efficiently, to mitigate group velocity walk-off between the laser and the X-ray fields that otherwise limit the conversion efficiency. Our work demonstrates a clear and straightforward approach for robustly generating bright isolated attosecond pulses of electromagnetic radiation throughout the soft X-ray region of the spectrum.

  5. Generation of bright isolated attosecond soft X-ray pulses driven by multicycle midinfrared lasers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Chang; Mancuso, Christopher; Hernández-García, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Galloway, Ben; Popmintchev, Dimitar; Huang, Pei-Chi; Walker, Barry; Plaja, Luis; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A.; Becker, Andreas; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2014-01-01

    High harmonic generation driven by femtosecond lasers makes it possible to capture the fastest dynamics in molecules and materials. However, to date the shortest subfemtosecond (attosecond, 10−18 s) pulses have been produced only in the extreme UV region of the spectrum below 100 eV, which limits the range of materials and molecular systems that can be explored. Here we experimentally demonstrate a remarkable convergence of physics: when midinfrared lasers are used to drive high harmonic generation, the conditions for optimal bright, soft X-ray generation naturally coincide with the generation of isolated attosecond pulses. The temporal window over which phase matching occurs shrinks rapidly with increasing driving laser wavelength, to the extent that bright isolated attosecond pulses are the norm for 2-µm driving lasers. Harnessing this realization, we experimentally demonstrate the generation of isolated soft X-ray attosecond pulses at photon energies up to 180 eV for the first time, to our knowledge, with a transform limit of 35 attoseconds (as), and a predicted linear chirp of 300 as. Most surprisingly, advanced theory shows that in contrast with as pulse generation in the extreme UV, long-duration, 10-cycle, driving laser pulses are required to generate isolated soft X-ray bursts efficiently, to mitigate group velocity walk-off between the laser and the X-ray fields that otherwise limit the conversion efficiency. Our work demonstrates a clear and straightforward approach for robustly generating bright isolated attosecond pulses of electromagnetic radiation throughout the soft X-ray region of the spectrum. PMID:24850866

  6. X-Ray Sources in the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy DRACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonbas, E.; Dhuga, K.; Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.

    2016-06-01

    We present the results of a spectral analysis of X - ray sources in Draco, a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy recently observed by XMM-Newton. While most of the sources exhibit properties consistent with AGN, few of them possess characteristics of LMXBs and CVs. We also discuss the possibility of the existence of a central IMBH in Draco.

  7. Two very luminous variable X-ray sources in M82

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collura, A.; Reale, Fabio; Schulman, Eric; Bregman, Joel N.

    1994-01-01

    We report on a variability study of X-ray sources in the starburst galaxy M82, based on ROSAT and Einstein High-Resolution Imager observations. In particular, we concentrate our analysis on two bright sources which exhibit significant variability. The brightest source in M82 is located in the central core of the galaxy, is variable within individual ROSAT observations, and indication are that it might have varied between the Einstein and the ROSAT observations. It is the most luminous X-ray binary candidate yet known. The other source is located outside the crowded central region and was very bright in the Einstein observation, but was not detected by ROSAT, despite the larger effective area of the instrument and the much longer exposure. The detection of variability poses strong constraints on the X-ray luminosity of individual components of the X-ray sources. Even if both sources are radiating at the Eddington limit, their mass would be at least several solar masses, making them candidates for extragalactic black holes.

  8. X-ray Counterparts of Infrared Faint Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartel, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    Infrared Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are radio sources with extremely faint or even absent infrared emission in deep Spitzer Surveys. Models of their spectral energy distributions, the ratios of radio to infrared flux densities and their steep radio spectra strongly suggest that IFRS are AGN at high redshifts (2X-ray background. The identification of X-ray counterparts of IFRS is considered to be the smoking gun for this hypothesis. We propose to observe 8 IFRS using 30ks pointed observations. X-ray detections of IFRS with different ratios of radio-to-infrared fluxes, will constrain the class-specific SED.

  9. Movable anode x-ray source with enhanced anode cooling

    DOEpatents

    Bird, Charles R.; Rockett, Paul D.

    1987-01-01

    An x-ray source having a cathode and a disc-shaped anode with a peripheral surface at constant radius from the anode axis opposed to the cathode. The anode has stub axle sections rotatably carried in heat conducting bearing plates which are mounted by thermoelectric coolers to bellows which normally bias the bearing plates to a retracted position spaced from opposing anode side faces. The bellows cooperate with the x-ray source mounting structure for forming closed passages for heat transport fluid. Flow of such fluid under pressure expands the bellows and brings the bearing plates into heat conducting contact with the anode side faces. A worm gear is mounted on a shaft and engages serrations in the anode periphery for rotating the anode when flow of coolant is terminated between x-ray emission events.

  10. Movable anode x-ray source with enhanced anode cooling

    DOEpatents

    Bird, C.R.; Rockett, P.D.

    1987-08-04

    An x-ray source is disclosed having a cathode and a disc-shaped anode with a peripheral surface at constant radius from the anode axis opposed to the cathode. The anode has stub axle sections rotatably carried in heat conducting bearing plates which are mounted by thermoelectric coolers to bellows which normally bias the bearing plates to a retracted position spaced from opposing anode side faces. The bellows cooperate with the x-ray source mounting structure for forming closed passages for heat transport fluid. Flow of such fluid under pressure expands the bellows and brings the bearing plates into heat conducting contact with the anode side faces. A worm gear is mounted on a shaft and engages serrations in the anode periphery for rotating the anode when flow of coolant is terminated between x-ray emission events. 5 figs.

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF GALACTIC BULGE SURVEY X-RAY SOURCES WITH TYCHO-2 STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, Robert I.; Britt, C. T.; Wright, N. J.; Jonker, P. G.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M. A. P.; Maccarone, T. J.; Greiss, S.; Nelemans, G.

    2012-12-20

    We identify 69 X-ray sources discovered by the Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) that are coincident with or very close to bright stars in the Tycho-2 catalog. Additionally, two other GBS sources are resolved binary companions to Tycho-2 stars where both components are separately detected in X-rays. Most of these are likely to be real matches, but we identify nine objects with large and significant X-ray-to-optical offsets as either detections of resolved binary companions or chance alignments. We collate known spectral types for these objects, and also examine Two Micron All Sky Survey colors, variability information from the All-Sky Automated Survey, and X-ray hardness ratios for the brightest objects. Nearly a third of the stars are found to be optically variable, divided roughly evenly between irregular variations and periodic modulations. All fall among the softest objects identified by the GBS. The sample forms a very mixed selection, ranging in spectral class from O9 to M3. In some cases, the X-ray emission appears consistent with normal coronal emission from late-type stars, or wind emission from early-types, but the sample also includes one known Algol, one W UMa system, two Be stars, and several X-ray bright objects likely to be coronally active stars or binaries. Surprisingly, a substantial fraction of the spectroscopically classified, non-coincidental sample (12 out of 38 objects) have late B or A type counterparts. Many of these exhibit redder near-IR colors than expected for their spectral type and/or variability, and it is likely that the X-rays originate from a late-type companion star in most or all of these objects.

  12. Pinch plasma source for x-ray microscopy with nanosecond exposure time.

    PubMed

    Lebert, R; Neff, W; Rothweiler, D

    1996-01-01

    The strong demand for bright, compact, and inexpensive sources for x-ray microscopy has stimulated the development of flash x-ray sources. In this paper, the requirements for such a source are analyzed under boundary conditions given by the concept of an imaging x-ray microscope using mirror condenser and Fresnel zone plates for high-resolution imaging. It is found that the Lyman-α (1s-2p) line of hydrogen-like nitrogen (N VII) at λ = 2.48 nm emitted from a nonequilibrium plasma of about 200 eV temperature and 1020 cm-3 electron density is best suited. These conditions are achieved in medium-current pinch-plasma devices. Using detailed numerical simulation of the physical processes of such a device, optimization criteria for the integrated spectral brightness (ISB) are found. Measurements of the ISB confirm these optimization criteria. The results show that the spectral emission characteristics of an optimized pinch plasma souce are compatible with the demands of the mentioned x-ray microscopy concept. These emission characteristics are compared with laser-produced plasma sources. Using the optimized source with an ISB exceeding 0.6 μJ/(μm2 sr) in a 10-20 ns pulse, wet biological samples are imaged with about 0.1 μm lateral resolution.

  13. Galactic bulge X-ray burst sources from disrupted globular clusters?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Hertz, P.

    1985-01-01

    The origin of the bright galactic bulge X-ray sources, or GX sources, is unclear despite intensive study for the past 15 years. It is suggested that the fact that many (or most) of the GX sources are X-ray burst sources (GXRBS) and are otherwise apparently identical to the luminous X-ray sources found in globular cluster cores implies that they too may have a globular cluster origin. The possibility that the compact X-ray binaries found in globulars are ejected is constrained by observations of CVs in and out of clusters. The GXRBS are instead hypothesized to have been formed by capture processes in globular clusters which have now largely been disrupted by repeated tidal stripping and shocking in the galactic plane. A statistical analysis of the 12 GXRBS which have precise positions from Einstein and/or optical (or radio) observations indicate that it is probably significant that a bright, of less than about 19, G or K star is found within the error circle (3 arcmin radius) in four cases. These may be surviving giants in a disrupted globular cluster core. Implications for globular cluster evolution and the GXRBS themselves are discussed.

  14. SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF γ-RAY BRIGHT RADIO GALAXIES: ORIGIN OF THE X-RAY EMISSION AND BROADBAND MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Fukazawa, Yasushi; Itoh, Ryosuke; Tokuda, Shin'ya; Finke, Justin; Stawarz, Łukasz; Tanaka, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-10

    We performed a systematic X-ray study of eight nearby γ-ray bright radio galaxies with Suzaku in order to understand the origins of their X-ray emissions. The Suzaku spectra for five of those have been presented previously, while the remaining three (M87, PKS 0625–354, and 3C 78) are presented here for the first time. Based on the Fe-K line strength, X-ray variability, and X-ray power-law photon indices, and using additional information on the [O III] line emission, we argue for a jet origin of the observed X-ray emission in these three sources. We also analyzed five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) GeV gamma-ray data on PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 to understand these sources within the blazar paradigm. We found significant γ-ray variability in the former object. Overall, we note that the Suzaku spectra for both PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 are rather soft, while the LAT spectra are unusually hard when compared with other γ-ray detected low-power (FR I) radio galaxies. We demonstrate that the constructed broadband spectral energy distributions of PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 are well described by a one-zone synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton model. The results of the modeling indicate lower bulk Lorentz factors compared to those typically found in other BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects, but consistent with the values inferred from modeling other LAT-detected FR I radio galaxies. Interestingly, the modeling also implies very high peak (∼10{sup 16} Hz) synchrotron frequencies in the two analyzed sources, contrary to previously suggested scenarios for Fanaroff-Riley (FR) type I/BL Lac unification. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of the FR I/BL Lac unification schemes.

  15. Special issue on compact x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, Simon; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Rosenzweig, James

    2014-04-01

    Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics is delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue on compact x-ray sources, to appear in the winter of 2014, and invites you to submit a paper. The potential for high-brilliance x- and gamma-ray sources driven by advanced, compact accelerators has gained increasing attention in recent years. These novel sources—sometimes dubbed 'fifth generation sources'—will build on the revolutionary advance of the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL). New radiation sources of this type have widespread applications, including in ultra-fast imaging, diagnostic and therapeutic medicine, and studies of matter under extreme conditions. Rapid advances in compact accelerators and in FEL techniques make this an opportune moment to consider the opportunities which could be realized by bringing these two fields together. Further, the successful development of compact radiation sources driven by compact accelerators will be a significant milestone on the road to the development of high-gradient colliders able to operate at the frontiers of particle physics. Thus the time is right to publish a peer-reviewed collection of contributions concerning the state-of-the-art in: advanced and novel acceleration techniques; sophisticated physics at the frontier of FELs; and the underlying and enabling techniques of high brightness electron beam physics. Interdisciplinary research connecting two or more of these fields is also increasingly represented, as exemplified by entirely new concepts such as plasma based electron beam sources, and coherent imaging with fs-class electron beams. We hope that in producing this special edition of Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (iopscience.iop.org/0953-4075/) we may help further a challenging mission and ongoing intellectual adventure: the harnessing of newly emergent, compact advanced accelerators to the creation of new, agile light sources with unprecedented capabilities

  16. X-RAY SOURCES IN THE DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY DRACO

    SciTech Connect

    Sonbas, E.; Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.; Dhuga, K. S.; Hare, J.; Volkov, I.

    2016-04-10

    We present the spectral analysis of an 87 ks XMM-Newton observation of Draco, a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Of the approximately 35 robust X-ray source detections, we focus our attention on the brightest of these sources, for which we report X-ray and multiwavelength parameters. While most of the sources exhibit properties consistent with active galactic nuclei, few of them possess the characteristics of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and cataclysmic variable (CVs). Our analysis places constraints on the population of X-ray sources with L{sub X} > 3 × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup −1} in Draco, suggesting that there are no actively accreting black hole and neutron star binaries. However, we find four sources that could be quiescent state LMXBs/CVs associated with Draco. We also place constraints on the central black hole luminosity and on a dark matter decay signal around 3.5 keV.

  17. Soft x-ray spectromicroscopy development for materials science at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, T.; Padmore, H.; Ade, H.; Hitchcock, A.P.; Rightor, E.G.; Tonner, B.P.

    1996-08-01

    Several third generation synchrotron radiation facilities are now operational and the high brightness of these photon sources offers new opportunities for x-ray microscopy. Well developed synchrotron radiation spectroscopy techniques are being applied in new instruments capable of imaging the surface of a material with a spatial resolution smaller than one micron. There are two aspects to this. One is to further the field of surface science by exploring the effects of spatial variations across a surface on a scale not previously accessible to x-ray measurements. The other is to open up new analytical techniques in materials science using x-rays, on a spatial scale comparable to that of the processes or devices to be studied. The development of the spectromicroscopy program at the Advanced Light Source will employ a variety of instruments, some are already operational. Their development and use will be discussed, and recent results will be presented to illustrate their capabilities.

  18. Laser-based microfocused x-ray source for mammography: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Krol, A; Ikhlef, A; Kieffer, J C; Bassano, D A; Chamberlain, C C; Jiang, Z; Pépin, H; Prasad, S C

    1997-05-01

    A laser-produced plasma (LPP) x-ray source with possible application in mammography was created by focusing a laser beam on a Mo target. A Table-Top-Terawatt (TTT) laser operating at 1 J energy per pulse was employed. A dual pulse technique was used. Maximum energy transfer (approximately 10%) from laser light to hot electrons was reached at a 150 ps delay between pulses and the conversion efficiency (hard x-ray yield/laser energy input) was approximately 2 x 10(-4). The created LPP x-ray source is characterized by a very small focal spot size (tens of microns), Gaussian brightness distribution, and a very short pulse duration (a few ps). The spectral distribution of the generated x rays was measured. Images of the focal spot, using a pinhole camera, and images of a resolution pattern and a mammographic phantom were obtained. The LPP focal spot modulation transfer function for different magnification factors was calculated. We have shown that the LPP source in conjunction with a spherically bent, high throughput, crystal monochromator in a fixed-exit Rowland circle configuration can be used to created a narrow band tunable mammography system. Tunability to a specific patient breast tissue thickness and density would allow one to significantly improve contrast and resolution (exceeding 20 lp/mm) while lowering the exposure up to 50% for thicker breasts. The prospects for the LPP x-ray source for mammographic application are discussed.

  19. Electrodynamics of relativistic electron beam x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niknejadi, Pardis

    Probing matter at atomic scales provides invaluable information about its structure; as a result interest in sources of x-rays and gamma-rays with high spectral resolution, low angular divergence and small source size has been on the rise. Explorations in this domain require x-ray or gamma-ray sources with high brightness. In the past decade, relativistic electron sources such as synchrotron rings and free electron lasers have proven to be the best technology available for the production of such beams. We1 start with an introduction to the physics of radiation and provide a summary of the theoretical grounds this work is based on. This dissertation is dedicated to different aspects of both fundamental processes of radiation in relativistic electron sources, and critical control and diagnostics that are required for the operation of these sources. Therefore this work is broken into two main parts. In the first part, the electron source that is currently set up at University of Hawai`i at Manoa will be introduced in detail. This source has unique capabilities as it is an inverse-Compton scattering (ICS) source that uses a free electron laser (FEL) with pulses of picosecond duration at ˜ 3 GHz rate for production of a coherent/semi-coherent x-ray beam by means of an optical cavity. After introducing the essential elements of the system and what was achieved prior to this work, we will focus on the requirements for achieving an optimum electron beam matched for the operation of the system which is the main focus of part I of this dissertation. The transport beam line of our system is unique and complex. For this reason, a simulation module has been developed for the study and delivery of an optimal beam. We will discuss the capabilities of this system and its compatibility with other elements that were already installed on the beam line. Finally, we will present results and experimental data as well as guidelines for future operation of the system when the microwave

  20. X-ray bright points and high-speed wind streams: A preliminary analysis from Yohkoh and Ulysses data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poletto, Giannina; Suess, Steven T.; Khan, J. I.; Uchida, Y.; Hiei, E.; Neugebauer, M.; Goldstein, B. E.; Strong, K. T.; Harvey, K. L.

    1994-01-01

    The following aspect of the solar wind mass flux, and of its variation, is examined: whether coronal plumes might be responsible for the long-term variability of the mass flux in high-speed streams emanating from coronal holes. The assumption that plumes are rooted in coronal bright points (BP's) is made. The behavior of X-ray BP's, imaged by the Yohkoh soft X-ray telescope (SXT), during a seven month period when Ulysses experiments observed a series of recurrent high-speed streams, is analyzed. If plumes/BP's are sources of the wind mass flux, changes in the coronal hole BP density to mimic changes of the mass flux in high-speed streams are expected. SOHO will have the capability of measuring the solar wind speed/density at small heliocentric distances while simultaneously observing coronal BP's and coronal plumes.

  1. Some remarks about x-ray burst sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, W.H.G.

    1984-05-26

    The properties of X-ray burst sources (XRB) have recently been reviewed in great detail by Lewin and Joss (1983). Here, I will only mention some of the salient features, and I will then discuss some recent developments and some remaining problems.

  2. Compact X-ray Light Source Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Evans, James E.; Terminello, Louis J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Manke, Kristin L.; Plata, Charity

    2012-12-01

    This report, produced jointly by EMSL and FCSD, is the result of a workshop held in September 2011 that examined the utility of a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) in addressing many scientific challenges critical to advancing energy science and technology.

  3. X-ray Emission from the Sombrero Galaxy: Discrete Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Spitler, Lee R.; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Di Stefano, Rosanne; Tang, Shikui; Wang, Q. Daniel; Gilfanov, Marat; Revnivtsev, Mikhail

    2010-10-01

    We present a study of discrete X-ray sources in and around the bulge-dominated, massive Sa galaxy, Sombrero (M104), based on new and archival Chandra observations with a total exposure of ~200 ks. With a detection limit of L X ≈ 1037 erg s-1 and a field of view covering a galactocentric radius of ~30 kpc (11farcm5), 383 sources are detected. Cross-correlation with Spitler et al.'s catalog of Sombrero globular clusters (GCs) identified from HST/ACS observations reveals 41 X-ray sources in GCs, presumably low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Metal-rich GCs are found to have a higher probability of hosting these LMXBs, a trend similar to that found in elliptical galaxies. On the other hand, the four most luminous GC LMXBs, with apparently super-Eddington luminosities for an accreting neutron star, are found in metal-poor GCs. We quantify the differential luminosity functions (LFs) for both the detected GC and field LMXBs, whose power-law indices (~1.1 for the GC-LF and ~1.6 for field-LF) are consistent with previous studies for elliptical galaxies. With precise sky positions of the GCs without a detected X-ray source, we further quantify, through a fluctuation analysis, the GC-LF at fainter luminosities down to 1035 erg s-1. The derived index rules out a faint-end slope flatter than 1.1 at a 2σ significance, contrary to recent findings in several elliptical galaxies and the bulge of M31. On the other hand, the 2-6 keV unresolved emission places a tight constraint on the field LF, implying a flattened index of ~1.0 below 1037 erg s-1. We also detect 101 sources in the halo of Sombrero. The presence of these sources cannot be interpreted as galactic LMXBs whose spatial distribution empirically follows the starlight. Their number is also higher than the expected number of cosmic active galactic nuclei (52 ± 11 [1σ]) whose surface density is constrained by deep X-ray surveys. We suggest that either the cosmic X-ray background is unusually high in the direction of

  4. Multiband Diagnostics of Unidentified 1FGL Sources with Suzaku and Swift X-Ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Maeda, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Nakamori, T.; Tahara, M.

    2013-10-01

    We have analyzed all the archival X-ray data of 134 unidentified (unID) gamma-ray sources listed in the first Fermi/LAT (1FGL) catalog and subsequently followed up by the Swift/XRT. We constructed the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from radio to gamma-rays for each X-ray source detected, and tried to pick up unique objects that display anomalous spectral signatures. In these analyses, we target all the 1FGL unID sources, using updated data from the second Fermi/LAT (2FGL) catalog on the Large Area Telescope (LAT) position and spectra. We found several potentially interesting objects, particularly three sources, 1FGL J0022.2-1850, 1FGL J0038.0+1236, and 1FGL J0157.0-5259, which were then more deeply observed with Suzaku as a part of an AO-7 program in 2012. We successfully detected an X-ray counterpart for each source whose X-ray spectra were well fitted by a single power-law function. The positional coincidence with a bright radio counterpart (currently identified as an active galactic nucleus, AGN) in the 2FGL error circles suggests these sources are definitely the X-ray emission from the same AGN, but their SEDs show a wide variety of behavior. In particular, the SED of 1FGL J0038.0+1236 is not easily explained by conventional emission models of blazars. The source 1FGL J0022.2-1850 may be in a transition state between a low-frequency peaked and a high-frequency peaked BL Lac object, and 1FGL J0157.0-5259 could be a rare kind of extreme blazar. We discuss the possible nature of these three sources observed with Suzaku, together with the X-ray identification results and SEDs of all 134 sources observed with the Swift/XRT.

  5. Seeing Red and Shooting Blanks: A Study of Red Quasars and Blank Field X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    One type of "Blank Field X-ray Source" is now being seen in deep Chandra and XMM-Newton surveys. These are the newly dubbed "XBONGs" (X-ray Bright, Optically Normal Galaxies). The study of the brighter counterparts from ROSAT and XMM- Newton serendipitous surveys is therefore of renewed interest and topicality. We continue to define the properties of the ROSAT sample which is the basis of this grant. We expect to publish the SEDs of these sources soon.

  6. X-ray Observations of the Bright Old Nova V603 Aquilae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, K.; Orio, M.

    2004-01-01

    We report on our Chandra and RXTE observations of the bright old nova, V603 Aql, performed in 2001 April, supplemented by our analysis of archival X-ray data on this object. We find that the RXTE data are contaminated by the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission. After accounting for this effect, we find a high level of aperiodic variability in the RXTE data, at a level consistent with the uncontaminated Chandra data. The Chandra HETG spectrum clearly originates in a multi-temperature plasma. We constrain the possible emission measure distribution of the plasma through a combination of global and local fits. The X-ray luminosity and the spectral shape of V603 Aql resemble those of SS Cyg in transition between quiescence and outburst. The fact that the X-ray flux variability is only weakly energy dependent can be interpreted by supposing that the variability is due to changes in the maximum temperature of the plasma. The plasma density is likely to be high, and the emission region is likely to be compact. Finally, the apparent overabundance of Ne is consistent with V603 Aql being a young system.

  7. NuSTAR Observations of Bright X-ray Flares from Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vievering, Juliana; Glesener, Lindsay; Grefenstette, Brian; Smith, David

    2016-05-01

    Bright x-ray flares are observed to occur on young stellar objects (YSOs) and are presumed to be driven by similar processes as those seen on our sun. Observations of the flaring activity of YSOs can add to our understanding of the early lives of stars and the development of planetary systems. In particular, x-ray observations of these stellar flares are essential for probing the youngest stars, as these stars are most obscured by dense molecular clouds. One such cloud complex of YSOs, rho Ophiuchi, has been a past target for soft x-ray (SXR) missions, including Chandra and XMM-Newton. However, the energy ranges covered by these missions drop off prior to the hard x-ray (HXR) regime, where the crossover to a dominant nonthermal component could be observed. Whether or not this nonthermal emission is strong enough to be observed could then be an indicator of how large an influence these flares have on the surrounding protoplanetary disk. To begin investigating this HXR emission, two 50ks observations of rho Ophiuchi have been taken with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), which is optimized over the energy range of 3-79 keV. Multiple stellar flares have been identified in the observations; here we present the preliminary analysis, including light curves and spectra, of the brightest of these flaring events. We explore the implications of the data for flaring activity of YSOs and compare the results to typical flaring activity of the sun.

  8. ROSAT X-ray sources embedded in the rho Ophiuchi cloud core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova, Sophie; Montmerle, Thierry; Feigelson, Eric D.; Andre, Philippe

    1995-02-01

    indistinguishable from that of X-ray-detected visile T Tauri stars. We estimate a total X-ray luminosity Lx, Oph approximately equal to or greater than 6 x 10 32 ergs/s from approximately equal to 200 X-ray sources in the cloud core, down to Lbol approximately 0.1 solar luminosity or Mstar approximately 0.3 solar mass. We discuss several consequences of in situ irradiation of molecular clouds by X-rays from embedded YSOs. These X-rays must partially ionize the inner regions of circumstellar disk coronae, possibly playing an important role in coupling magnetic ionize the fields and wind or bipolar outflows. Photon-stimulated deportion of large molecules by YSO X-rays may be partly responsible for the bright 12 micrometer halos seen in some molecular clouds. X-ray emission exceeds cosmic-ray ionization as the principal source of ionization in molecular cloud cores, it may play an important role as a feedback agent in the self-regulation of star formation.

  9. 21 CFR 872.1800 - Extraoral source x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Extraoral source x-ray system. 872.1800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1800 Extraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An extraoral source x-ray system is an AC-powered device that produces x-rays and is intended...

  10. 21 CFR 872.1800 - Extraoral source x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extraoral source x-ray system. 872.1800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1800 Extraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An extraoral source x-ray system is an AC-powered device that produces x-rays and is intended...

  11. 21 CFR 872.1810 - Intraoral source x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Intraoral source x-ray system. 872.1810 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1810 Intraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An intraoral source x-ray system is an electrically powered device that produces x-rays and...

  12. 21 CFR 872.1800 - Extraoral source x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Extraoral source x-ray system. 872.1800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1800 Extraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An extraoral source x-ray system is an AC-powered device that produces x-rays and is intended...

  13. 21 CFR 872.1810 - Intraoral source x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Intraoral source x-ray system. 872.1810 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1810 Intraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An intraoral source x-ray system is an electrically powered device that produces x-rays and...

  14. 21 CFR 872.1800 - Extraoral source x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Extraoral source x-ray system. 872.1800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1800 Extraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An extraoral source x-ray system is an AC-powered device that produces x-rays and is intended...

  15. 21 CFR 872.1810 - Intraoral source x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Intraoral source x-ray system. 872.1810 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1810 Intraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An intraoral source x-ray system is an electrically powered device that produces x-rays and...

  16. 21 CFR 872.1810 - Intraoral source x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraoral source x-ray system. 872.1810 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1810 Intraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An intraoral source x-ray system is an electrically powered device that produces x-rays and...

  17. 21 CFR 872.1800 - Extraoral source x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Extraoral source x-ray system. 872.1800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1800 Extraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An extraoral source x-ray system is an AC-powered device that produces x-rays and is intended...

  18. 21 CFR 872.1810 - Intraoral source x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intraoral source x-ray system. 872.1810 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1810 Intraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An intraoral source x-ray system is an electrically powered device that produces x-rays and...

  19. Chandra ACIS Survey of X-Ray Point Sources in Nearby Galaxies. II. X-Ray Luminosity Functions and Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Song; Qiu, Yanli; Liu, Jifeng; Bregman, Joel N.

    2016-09-01

    Based on the recently completed Chandra/ACIS survey of X-ray point sources in nearby galaxies, we study the X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) for X-ray point sources in different types of galaxies and the statistical properties of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). Uniform procedures are developed to compute the detection threshold, to estimate the foreground/background contamination, and to calculate the XLFs for individual galaxies and groups of galaxies, resulting in an XLF library of 343 galaxies of different types. With the large number of surveyed galaxies, we have studied the XLFs and ULX properties across different host galaxy types, and confirm with good statistics that the XLF slope flattens from lenticular (α ˜ 1.50 ± 0.07) to elliptical (˜1.21 ± 0.02), to spirals (˜0.80 ± 0.02), to peculiars (˜0.55 ± 0.30), and to irregulars (˜0.26 ± 0.10). The XLF break dividing the neutron star and black hole binaries is also confirmed, albeit at quite different break luminosities for different types of galaxies. A radial dependency is found for ellipticals, with a flatter XLF slope for sources located between D 25 and 2D 25, suggesting the XLF slopes in the outer region of early-type galaxies are dominated by low-mass X-ray binaries in globular clusters. This study shows that the ULX rate in early-type galaxies is 0.24 ± 0.05 ULXs per surveyed galaxy, on a 5σ confidence level. The XLF for ULXs in late-type galaxies extends smoothly until it drops abruptly around 4 × 1040 erg s-1, and this break may suggest a mild boundary between the stellar black hole population possibly including 30 M ⊙ black holes with super-Eddington radiation and intermediate mass black holes.

  20. LIGHT SOURCE: TW Laser system for Thomson scattering X-ray light source at Tsinghua University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Li-Xm; Du, Ying-Chao; Du, Qiang; Li, Ren-Kai; Hua, Jian-Fei; Huang, Wen-Hui; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2009-06-01

    A TW (Tera Watt) laser system based on Ti:sapphire mainly for the Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray light source (TTX) is being built. Both UV (ultraviolet) laser pulse for driving the photocathode radio-frequency (RF) gun and the IR (infrared) laser pulse as the electron-beam-scattered-light are provided by the system. Efforts have also been made in laser pulse shaping and laser beam transport to optimize the high-brightness electron beam production by the photocathode RF gun.

  1. High-energy X-ray spectra of five sources.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, G. R.; Mcclintock, J. E.; Gerassimenko, M.; Lewin , W. H. G.

    1973-01-01

    On October 15-16, 1970, we carried out balloon X-ray observations from Australia at energies above 15 keV. We present the high-energy X-ray spectra of three sources discovered by us, GX 301-2, GX 304-1, and GX 1 + 4. The data suggest that these high-energy sources correspond to the sources 2U 1223-62, 2U 1258-61, and 2U 1728-24 respectively. We also present the spectra for two additional sources, GX 5-1 (2U 1757-25) and GX 3 + 1 (2U 1744-26). The average intensity of the highly variable source GX 301-2 was observed to be as great as Tau X-1 in the energy range 15-50 keV.

  2. Seeing Red and Shooting Blanks: Study of Red Quasars and Blank X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A major paper describing the technique and providing a list of 'blanks' was published in the Astrophysical Journal (abstract below). The results revealed a fascinating trove of novel X-ray sources: high redshift clusters of galaxies found efficiently; X-ray absorbed, optically clean AGN, which may be the bright prototypes of Chandra Deep Survey sources; and several with a still unknown nature. Recent XMM-Newton results confirm the existence of this class of X-ray source with much refined positions. During the first year of this project we have made a major discovery. The second 'blanks' X-ray source observed with Chandra was found to be extended. Using Chandra data and ground-based R and K band imaging we estimated this to be a high redshift cluster of galaxies with z approx. 0.85. Spectroscopy agrees with this estimate (z=0.89). This success shows that our method of hunting down 'blank' field X-ray sources is a highly efficient method of finding the otherwise elusive high redshift clusters. With extensive follow-up we should be able to use 'blanks' to make cosmological tests. The paper is now in press in the Astrophysical Journal (abstract below.) The other Chandra source is point-like, showing that there are a variety of 'blank' source types. Other follow-up observations with XMM-Newton, and (newly approved in cycle 2) with Chandra are eagerly awaited. A follow-up paper uses a large amount of supporting data for the remaining blanks. A combination of ROSAT, Chandra and ground based data convincingly identified one of the blanks as a Ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX) in a spiral galaxy (abstract below). This program resulted in 3 refereed papers in major journals, 4 conference proceedings and a significant fraction of the PhD thesis of Dr. Ilaria Cagnoni. Details of the publications are given.

  3. What is the nature of the high energy X-ray sources in the galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuturilo, Sophie; Tomsick, John; Clavel, Maica; Lansbury, George B.

    2017-01-01

    Finding sources of high energy “hard” X-rays allow us to probe the most extreme conditions in the Universe. Such sources include accreting black holes and neutron stars, where we find the strongest gravitational and magnetic fields, as well as pulsars and supernova remnants, where particles are accelerated to produce the hard X-rays. Over the past decade, the INTEGRAL satellite ahs been discovering new high energy sources, and this has allowed us to understand the population of bright hard X-ray sources. Over the past few years, the NuSTAR satellite, with much better sensitivity than INTEGRAL, has been allowing us to find even more hard X-ray sources, and we will present results from studies of sources discovered in the NuSTAR serendipitous source survey. We analyzed seven different potential sources looking for counterparts using NuSTAR, Chandra and ground based optical/NIR observations. Of the seven, two have confirmed counterparts and five need either an optical/NIR detection or further spectroscopy.

  4. Automatic classification of time-variable X-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Kitty K.; Farrell, Sean; Murphy, Tara; Gaensler, B. M.

    2014-05-01

    To maximize the discovery potential of future synoptic surveys, especially in the field of transient science, it will be necessary to use automatic classification to identify some of the astronomical sources. The data mining technique of supervised classification is suitable for this problem. Here, we present a supervised learning method to automatically classify variable X-ray sources in the Second XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalog (2XMMi-DR2). Random Forest is our classifier of choice since it is one of the most accurate learning algorithms available. Our training set consists of 873 variable sources and their features are derived from time series, spectra, and other multi-wavelength contextual information. The 10 fold cross validation accuracy of the training data is ∼97% on a 7 class data set. We applied the trained classification model to 411 unknown variable 2XMM sources to produce a probabilistically classified catalog. Using the classification margin and the Random Forest derived outlier measure, we identified 12 anomalous sources, of which 2XMM J180658.7–500250 appears to be the most unusual source in the sample. Its X-ray spectra is suggestive of a ultraluminous X-ray source but its variability makes it highly unusual. Machine-learned classification and anomaly detection will facilitate scientific discoveries in the era of all-sky surveys.

  5. Observations of galactic X-ray sources by OSO-7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markert, T. H.; Canizares, C. R.; Clark, G. W.; Hearn, D. R.; Li, F. K.; Sprott, G. F.; Winkler, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    We present the MIT data from the OSO-7 satellite for observations of the galactic plane between 1971 and 1974. A number of sources discovered in the MIT all-sky survey are described in detail: MX 0049 + 59, MX 0836 - 42, MX 1353 - 64, MX 1406 - 61, MX 1418 - 61, MX 1709 - 40, and MX 1608 - 52 (the persistent source suggested to be associated with the X-ray burst source XB 1608 - 52). Upper limits to the X-ray emission from a number of interesting objects are also derived. General results describing all of our observations of galactic sources are presented. Specifically, we display the number-intensity diagrams, luminosity functions, and color-color diagrams for all of the sources we detected. The data are divided between disk and bulge populations, and the characteristics of the two groups are contrasted. Finally, the concept of X-ray source populations and the relationship of globular cluster sources and burst sources to the disk and bulge populations are discussed.

  6. Demonstration of a low electromagnetic pulse laser-driven argon gas jet x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugland, N. L.; Aurand, B.; Brown, C. G.; Constantin, C. G.; Everson, E. T.; Glenzer, S. H.; Schaeffer, D. B.; Tauschwitz, A.; Niemann, C.

    2012-07-01

    Laser-produced plasmas are often used as bright x-ray backlighters for time-resolved plasma diagnostics, but such backlighters simultaneously generate damaging electromagnetic pulse (EMP). A laser-driven Ar gas jet x-ray source has been measured with magnetic flux B-dot probes to produce 20 times ±37% less integrated EMP in the 0.5-2.5 GHz band than a solid chlorinated plastic foil, while retaining 85% of the laser to ≈3 keV x-ray conversion efficiency. These results are important for future backlighter development, since tailoring target density may provide a way to reduce EMP even as laser power increases.

  7. The X-ray source population of IC 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilgard, Roy; Placek, Ben; Prestwich, Andrea

    2009-09-01

    The Local Group dwarf galaxy IC 10 is the nearest starburst to the Milky Way. Its proximity and low metallicity make it an ideal candidate for the study of high-mass X-ray binaries in quiescence. IC 10 presents an unique case for studying a complete sample of such objects, something made difficult in the Milky Way by absorption in the Galactic disc and in other galaxies by their distances.We present results from a set of Chandra/ACIS-S imaging observations of IC 10, including spectra, lightcurves, X-ray colors, and X-ray luminosity functions. The XLF is steeper than for the more luminous HMXBs observed in other galaxies, thus implying that the ``universal'' luminosity function for HMXBs does not extend below 1e36 erg/s. We also present initial results from a search for optical counterparts to the X-ray sources using archival HST/ACS observations. Approximately 10% of the sources have strong optical counterpart candidates, all of which appear to be high-mass stars.

  8. The X-ray Source Population of IC 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placek, Ben; Kilgard, R. E.; Prestwich, A. H.

    2010-01-01

    The Local Group dwarf galaxy IC 10 is the nearest starburst to the Milky Way. Its proximity and low metallicity make it an ideal candidate for the study of high-mass X-ray binaries in quiescence.  IC 10 presents an unique case for studying a complete sample of such objects, something made difficult in the Milky Way by absorption in the Galactic disc and in other galaxies by their distances. We present results from a set of Chandra/ACIS-S imaging observations of IC 10, including spectra, X-ray colors, and X-ray luminosity functions. The XLF is steeper than for the more luminous HMXBs observed in other galaxies, thus implying that the "universal" luminosity function for HMXBs does not extend below 1e36 erg/s.  We also present initial results from a search for optical counterparts to the X-ray sources using archival HST/ACS observations.  Approximately 15% of the sources have strong optical counterpart candidates, all of which appear to be high-mass stars.

  9. Compton-backscattering x-ray source for coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, L.N.

    1992-12-01

    An X-ray source utilizing Compton-backscattered (CB) photons in a 75-MeV electron storage ring containing an infrared FEL is proposed for producing 33.17-keV X-rays (Iodine K-edge) for coronary angiography. The X-ray intensity into a 4-mrad cone is computed as 7.21 {times} 10{sup 14}/sec for a 500-mA electron beam colliding with 0.2-J/bunch, 3.22-{mu}m photons from an in-ring IR-FEL at the 353.21-MHz rate of a SLAC-PEP 500-kW RF system. The resultant average flux at the patient is 6.4 {times} 10{sup 7} photons/pixel/4-msec aver a 12-cm diameter circle at 3-m from the interaction point for the 0.5 {times}0.5-mm{sup 2} pixel size of the present Si(Li) array of the BNL-SMERF Angiography Facility. This flux is 2.1 times larger than obtains at SMERF at a comparable source-to-patient distance and over an area sufficient to encompass the entire coronary region. However, the X-Ray energy spread due to kinematics alone is 2.63-keV, a factor of 35 larger then SMERF, and presents the major difficulty for the digital subtraction angiography method (DSA) envisioned.

  10. Compton-backscattering x-ray source for coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, L.N.

    1992-01-01

    An X-ray source utilizing Compton-backscattered (CB) photons in a 75-MeV electron storage ring containing an infrared FEL is proposed for producing 33.17-keV X-rays (Iodine K-edge) for coronary angiography. The X-ray intensity into a 4-mrad cone is computed as 7.21 [times] 10[sup 14]/sec for a 500-mA electron beam colliding with 0.2-J/bunch, 3.22-[mu]m photons from an in-ring IR-FEL at the 353.21-MHz rate of a SLAC-PEP 500-kW RF system. The resultant average flux at the patient is 6.4 [times] 10[sup 7] photons/pixel/4-msec aver a 12-cm diameter circle at 3-m from the interaction point for the 0.5 [times]0.5-mm[sup 2] pixel size of the present Si(Li) array of the BNL-SMERF Angiography Facility. This flux is 2.1 times larger than obtains at SMERF at a comparable source-to-patient distance and over an area sufficient to encompass the entire coronary region. However, the X-Ray energy spread due to kinematics alone is 2.63-keV, a factor of 35 larger then SMERF, and presents the major difficulty for the digital subtraction angiography method (DSA) envisioned.

  11. The correspondence between X-ray bright points and evolving magnetic features in the quiet sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, D. F.; Martin, S. F.; Moses, D.; Harvey, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    The results of a study of X-ray bright points (XBPs) and small-scale evolving magnetic structures are presented. X-ray images obtained during rocket flights, full-disk magnetograms, and time-lapse magnetograms of multiple fields make up the coordinated data set. XBPs were found to be more frequently associated with pre-existing magnetic features of opposite polarity which appeared to be cancelling than with new or emerging flux regions. Most of the XBPs appeared to correspond to opposite polarity magnetic features which were converging towards each other, and some of which had not yet begun cancelling. It is suggested that most XBPs are created when converging flow brings together oppositely directed field lines. This leads to reconnection and heating in the low corona of the newly-formed loops.

  12. At-wavelength metrology of x-ray optics at Diamond Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Sutter, John; Alcock, Simon G.; Sawhney, Kawal

    2014-09-01

    Modern, third-generation synchrotron radiation sources provide coherent and extremely bright beams of X-ray radiation. The successful exploitation of such beams depends to a significant extent on imperfections and misalignment of the optics employed on the beamlines. This issue becomes even more critical with the increasing use of active optics, and the desire to achieve diffraction-limited and coherence-preserving X-ray beams. In recent years, significant progress has been made to improve optic testing and optimization techniques, especially those using X-rays for so-called atwavelength metrology. These in-situ and at-wavelength metrology methods can be used not only to optimize the performance of X-ray optics, but also to correct and minimize the collective distortions of upstream beamline optics, including monochromators, and transmission windows. An overview of at-wavelength metrology techniques implemented at Diamond Light Source is presented, including grating interferometry and X-ray near-field speckle based techniques. Representative examples of the application of these techniques are also given, including in-situ and atwavelength calibration and optimization of: active, piezo bimorph mirrors; Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors; and refractive optics such as compound refractive lenses.

  13. Unveiling the X-ray point source population of the Young Massive Cluster Westerlund 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. S.; Muno, M. P.; Negueruela, I.; Dougherty, S. M.; Crowther, P. A.; Goodwin, S. P.; de Grijs, R.

    2008-01-01

    Aims:We investigate the nature of the X-ray point source population within the Young Massive Cluster Westerlund 1. Methods: Chandra observations of 18 ks and 42 ks were used to determine the X-ray properties of emitters within Wd 1, while a comprehensive multiwavelength dataset was employed to constrain their nature. Results: We find X-ray emission from a multitude of different stellar sources within Wd 1, including both evolved high mass and low mass pre-MS stars. We attribute the X-ray emission from the high mass component to both single stars and colliding wind binaries on the basis of their observed flux and spectral properties, with binaries being systematically harder and more luminous than single stars. We are able to infer a high binary fraction for both WN (10/16) and WC stars (7/8), resulting in a combined Wolf Rayet binary fraction of ⪆70%. These represent the most stringent limits currently placed on the binary fraction of very massive (>45 M⊙) stars. We place the first observational constraints on X-ray emission from stars transitioning between the Main Sequence and Wolf Rayet phases, finding that both hot (B hypergiants) and cool (yellow hypergiants and red supergiants) spectral types appear to be intrinsically X-ray faint. The B[e] star W9 is found to be X-ray bright and shows similarities to both the X-ray binary SS433 and the Luminous Blue Variable η Carinae. Globally, we find the point source population to be systematically fainter than those found in younger massive star forming regions such as NGC 3603 and R136/30 Doradus, consistent with a loss of the most massive stars to SNe and a reduction in emissivity from the low mass pre-Main Sequence stars. No unambiguous evidence for X-ray emission due to accretion onto relativistic objects of any mass is found, although the current data do not exclude the presence of either a High Mass X-ray Binary or an Intermediate Mass Black Hole accreting at a low rate. Finally, we suggest the progenitor mass

  14. Einstein observations of extended galactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, F. D.

    1979-01-01

    Features of the X-ray pictures taken aboard the space observatory are presented. Imaging proportional counter pictures in three broad X-ray energy ranges were obtained. The X-ray spectrum of supernova remnants is described.

  15. X-RAY OUTFLOWS AND SUPER-EDDINGTON ACCRETION IN THE ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE HOLMBERG IX X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Miller, J. M.; Reis, R. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Roberts, T. P.; Middleton, M. J.

    2013-08-10

    Studies of X-ray continuum emission and flux variability have not conclusively revealed the nature of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) at the high-luminosity end of the distribution (those with L{sub X} {>=} 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}). These are of particular interest because the luminosity requires either super-Eddington accretion onto a black hole of mass {approx}10 M{sub Sun} or more standard accretion onto an intermediate-mass black hole. Super-Eddington accretion models predict strong outflowing winds, making atomic absorption lines a key diagnostic of the nature of extreme ULXs. To search for such features, we have undertaken a long, 500 ks observing campaign on Holmberg IX X-1 with Suzaku. This is the most sensitive data set in the iron K bandpass for a bright, isolated ULX to date, yet we find no statistically significant atomic features in either emission or absorption; any undetected narrow features must have equivalent widths less than 15-20 eV at 99% confidence. These limits are far below the {approx}>150 eV lines expected if observed trends between mass inflow and outflow rates extend into the super-Eddington regime and in fact rule out the line strengths observed from disk winds in a variety of sub-Eddington black holes. We therefore cannot be viewing the central regions of Holmberg IX X-1 through any substantial column of material, ruling out models of spherical super-Eddington accretion. If Holmberg IX X-1 is a super-Eddington source, any associated outflow must have an anisotropic geometry. Finally, the lack of iron emission suggests that the stellar companion cannot be launching a strong wind and that Holmberg IX X-1 must primarily accrete via Roche-lobe overflow.

  16. The Einstein objective grating spectrometer survey of galactic binary X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrtilek, S. D.; Mcclintock, J. E.; Seward, F. D.; Kahn, S. M.; Wargelin, B. J.

    1991-01-01

    The results of observations of 22 bright Galactic X-ray point sources are presented, and the most reliable measurements to date of X-ray column densities to these sources are derived. The results are consistent with the idea that some of the objects have a component of column density intrinsic to the source in addition to an interstellar component. The K-edge absorption due to oxygen is clearly detected in 10 of the sources and the Fe L and Ne K edges are detected in a few. The spectra probably reflect emission originating in a collisionally excited region combined with emission from a photoionized region excited directly by the central source.

  17. Note: Studies on x-ray production in electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source based on ridged cylindrical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Selvakumaran, T. S.; Baskaran, R.

    2012-02-15

    A ridged cylindrical cavity has been designed using MICROWAVE STUDIO programme and it is used in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) x-ray source. The experimental parameters of the source are optimized for maximizing the x-ray output, and an x-ray dose rate of {approx}1000 {mu}Sv/h was observed at 20 cm from the port, for 500 W of microwave power without using any target. With the molybdenum target located at optimum position of the ridged cavity, the dose rate is found to be increased only by 10%. In order to understand the experimental observation, the electric field pattern of the cavity with the target placed at various radial distances is studied. In this note, the experimental and theoretical studies on ECR x-ray source using the ridged cylindrical cavity are presented.

  18. High-Energy Density science with an ultra-bright x-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    This talk will review recent progress in high-energy density physics using the world's brightest x-ray source, the Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC's free electron x-ray laser. These experiments investigate laser-driven matter in extreme conditions where powerful x-ray scattering and imaging techniques have been applied to resolve ionic interactions at atomic (Ångstrom) scale lengths and to visualize the formation of dense plasma states. Major research areas include dynamic compression experiments of solid targets to determine structural properties and to discover and characterize phase transitions at mega-bar pressures. A second area studies extreme fields produced by high-intensity radiation where fundamental questions of laboratory plasmas can be related to cosmological phenomena. Each of these areas takes advantage of the unique properties of the LCLS x-ray beam. They include small foci for achieving high intensity or high spatial resolution, high photon flux for dynamic structure factor measurements in single shots, and high spectral bandwidth to resolve plasmon (Langmuir) waves or ion acoustic waves in dense plasmas. We will further describe new developments of ultrafast pump-probe technique at high repetition rates. These include studies on dense cryogenic hydrogen that have begun providing fundamental insights into the physical properties of matter in extreme conditions that are important for astrophysics, fusion experiments and generation of radiation sources. This work was supported by DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under FWP 100182.

  19. The Polarimeter for Relativistic Astrophysical X-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahoda, Keith; Kallman, Timothy R.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Angelini, Lorella; Black, J. Kevin; Hill, Joanne E.; Jaeger, Theodore; Kaaret, Philip E.; Markwardt, Craig B.; Okajima, Takashi; Petre, Robert; Schnittman, Jeremy; Soong, Yang; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Tamagawa, Toru; Tawara, Yuzuru

    2016-07-01

    The Polarimeter for Relativistic Astrophysical X-ray Sources (PRAXyS) is one of three Small Explorer (SMEX) missions selected by NASA for Phase A study, with a launch date in 2020. The PRAXyS Observatory exploits grazing incidence X-ray mirrors and Time Projection Chamber Polarimeters capable of measuring the linear polarization of cosmic X-ray sources in the 2-10 keV band. PRAXyS combines well-characterized instruments with spacecraft rotation to ensure low systematic errors. The PRAXyS payload is developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Iowa, and RIKEN (JAXA) collaborating on the Polarimeter Assembly. The LEOStar-2 spacecraft bus is developed by Orbital ATK, which also supplies the extendable optical bench that enables the Observatory to be compatible with a Pegasus class launch vehicle. A nine month primary mission will provide sensitive observations of multiple black hole and neutron star sources, where theory predicts polarization is a strong diagnostic, as well as exploratory observations of other high energy sources. The primary mission data will be released to the community rapidly and a Guest Observer extended mission will be vigorously proposed.

  20. The Polarimeter for Relativistic Astrophysical X-ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahoda, Keith; Kallman, Timothy R.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Angelini, Lorella; Black, J. Kevin; Hill, Joanne E.; Jaeger, Theodore; Kaaret, Phillip E.; Markwardt, Craig B.; Okajima, Takashi; Petre, Robert; Schnittman, Jeremy; Soong, Yang; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Tamagawa, Toru; Tawara, Yuzuru

    2016-01-01

    The Polarimeter for Relativistic Astrophysical X-ray Sources (PRAXyS) is one of three Small Explorer (SMEX) missions selected by NASA for Phase A study, with a launch date in 2020. The PRAXyS Observatory exploits grazing incidence X-ray mirrors and Time Projection Chamber Polarimeters capable of measuring the linear polarization of cosmic X-ray sources in the 2-10 keV band. PRAXyS combines well-characterized instruments with spacecraft rotation to ensure low systematic errors. The PRAXyS payload is developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Iowa, and RIKEN (JAXA) collaborating on the Polarimeter Assembly. The LEOStar-2 spacecraft bus is developed by Orbital ATK, which also supplies the extendable optical bench that enables the Observatory to be compatible with a Pegasus class launch vehicle. A nine month primary mission will provide sensitive observations of multiple black hole and neutron star sources, where theory predicts polarization is a strong diagnostic, as well as exploratory observations of other high energy sources. The primary mission data will be released to the community rapidly and a Guest Observer extended mission will be vigorously proposed.

  1. X-ray source motion along the loop in two solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zongjun

    2013-08-01

    We explore the 3-8 keV X-ray source motion along the loop legs in two solar flares observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) on August 12 and November 28, 2002. Firstly, an artificial loop is constructed to have an outline with a fixed width wide enough to cover the X-ray sources at an energy band between 3-60 keV and at various times. Secondly, RHESSI images are reconstructed at 15 energy bands with an 8 s integration window but 1 s cadence. Thirdly, the X-ray source motions are traced from the brightness distribution along the flare loop. We find that these two events tend to start as a single source at 3-8 keV around the loop top, and then separate into two which move downward along the loop legs. These two almost reach the feet of the loop at the hard X-ray (i.e. at 25-50 keV) peak. After that, the two sources move back upward to the loop top and merge together at the same position where they began. The typical timescale is about ˜70 s, and the maximum speed can reach 1000 km s-1. Such a downward-to-upward motion along the loop is rarely seen in the observations, and it seems to be consistent with the density evolution at the loop top, first decreasing after heating and then increasing due to evaporation.

  2. [Soft X-ray reflectometer with laser produced plasma source].

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Ni, Qi-liang; Cao, Ji-hong

    2005-03-01

    A soft X-ray reflectometor with laser-produced plasma source developed in the authorial lab is presented for the measurements of efficiencies of gratings, transmission of filter and reflectance of multilayer coatings. The reflectometer is composed of a soft X-ray laser-produced plasma source, a grazing incidence monochromator with a constant deviation angle, a vacuum chamber, a sample table, a photo-electronic unit and a computer controlling unit. The working wavelength is from 8 to 30 nm and the maximum sample size is 130 mm long by 120 mm wide by 120 mm high. In order to test the performances of the reflectometer, the reflectivity of multilayer coatings was obtained by using this device. The measured results agree well with the theoretical calculation. The reproducibility of measured reflectance is +/-0.6%.

  3. Kinematics of Compton backscattering x-ray source for angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, L.N.

    1992-05-01

    Calculations of X-Ray production rates, energy spread, and spectrum of Compton-backscattered photons from a Free Electron Laser on an electron beam in a low energy (136-MeV) compact (8.5-m circumference) storage ring indicate that an X-Ray intensity of 34.6 10{sup 7} X-Ray photons per 0.5-mm {times} 0.5-mm pixel for Coronary Angiography near the 33.169-keV iodine K-absorption edge can be achieved in a 4-msec pulse within a scattering cone of 1-mrad half angle. This intensity, at 10-m from the photon-electron interaction point to the patient is about a factor of 10 larger than presently achieved from a 4.5-T superconducting wiggler source in the NSLS 2.5-GeV storage ring and over an area about 5 times larger. The 2.2-keV energy spread of the Compton-backscattered beam is, however, much larger than the 70-eV spread presently attained form the wiggler source and use of a monochromator. The beam spot at the 10-m interaction point-to-patient distance is 20-mm diameter; larger spots are attainable at larger distances but with a corresponding reduction in X-Ray flux. Such a facility could be an inexpensive clinical alternative to present methods of non-invasive Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA), small enough to be deployed in an urban medical center, and could have other medical, industrial and aerospace applications. Problems with the Compton backscattering source include laser beam heating of the mirror in the FEL oscillator optical cavity, achieving a large enough X-Ray beam spot at the patient, and obtaining radiation damping of the transverse oscillations and longitudinal emittance dilution of the storage ring electron beam resulting from photon-electron collisions without going to higher electron energy where the X-Ray energy spread becomes excessive for DSA. 38 refs.

  4. The XMM-Newton Bright Survey sample of absorbed quasars: X-ray and accretion properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballo, L.; Severgnini, P.; Della Ceca, R.; Caccianiga, A.; Vignali, C.; Carrera, F. J.; Corral, A.; Mateos, S.

    2014-11-01

    Although absorbed quasars are extremely important for our understanding of the energetics of the Universe, the main physical parameters of their central engines are still poorly known. In this work, we present and study a complete sample of 14 quasars (QSOs) that are absorbed in the X-rays (column density NH > 4 × 1021 cm-2 and X-ray luminosity L 2-10 keV > 1044 ergs-1; XQSO2) belonging to the XMM-Newton Bright Serendipitous Survey (XBS). From the analysis of their ultraviolet-to-mid-infrared spectral energy distribution, we can separate the nuclear emission from the host galaxy contribution, obtaining a measurement of the fundamental nuclear parameters, like the mass of the central supermassive black hole and the value of Eddington ratio, λ Edd. Comparing the properties of XQSO2s with those previously obtained for the X-ray unabsorbed QSOs in the XBS, we do not find any evidence that the two samples are drawn from different populations. In particular, the two samples span the same range in Eddington ratios, up to λ Edd ˜ 0.5; this implies that our XQSO2s populate the `forbidden region' in the so-called `effective Eddington limit paradigm'. A combination of low grain abundance, presence of stars inwards of the absorber, and/or anisotropy of the disc emission can explain this result.

  5. Concurrence of monoenergetic electron beams and bright X-rays from an evolving laser-plasma bubble

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wenchao; Chen, Liming; Li, Dazhang; Zhang, Lu; Hafz, Nasr A. M.; Dunn, James; Ma, Yong; Huang, Kai; Su, Luning; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Desktop laser plasma acceleration has proven to be able to generate gigaelectronvolt-level quasi-monoenergetic electron beams. Moreover, such electron beams can oscillate transversely (wiggling motion) in the laser-produced plasma bubble/channel and emit collimated ultrashort X-ray flashes known as betatron radiation with photon energy ranging from kiloelectronvolts to megaelectronvolts. This implies that usually one cannot obtain bright betatron X-rays and high-quality electron beams with low emittance and small energy spread simultaneously in the same accelerating wave bucket. Here, we report the first (to our knowledge) experimental observation of two distinct electron bunches in a single laser shot, one featured with quasi-monoenergetic spectrum and another with continuous spectrum along with large emittance. The latter is able to generate high-flux betatron X-rays. Such is observed only when the laser self-guiding is extended over 4 mm at a fixed plasma density (4 × 1018 cm−3). Numerical simulation reveals that two bunches of electrons are injected at different stages due to the bubble evolution. The first bunch is injected at the beginning to form a stable quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, whereas the second one is injected later due to the oscillation of the bubble size as a result of the change of the laser spot size during the propagation. Due to the inherent temporal synchronization, this unique electron–photon source can be ideal for pump–probe applications with femtosecond time resolution. PMID:24711405

  6. Concurrence of monoenergetic electron beams and bright X-rays from an evolving laser-plasma bubble.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenchao; Chen, Liming; Li, Dazhang; Zhang, Lu; Hafz, Nasr A M; Dunn, James; Ma, Yong; Huang, Kai; Su, Luning; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-04-22

    Desktop laser plasma acceleration has proven to be able to generate gigaelectronvolt-level quasi-monoenergetic electron beams. Moreover, such electron beams can oscillate transversely (wiggling motion) in the laser-produced plasma bubble/channel and emit collimated ultrashort X-ray flashes known as betatron radiation with photon energy ranging from kiloelectronvolts to megaelectronvolts. This implies that usually one cannot obtain bright betatron X-rays and high-quality electron beams with low emittance and small energy spread simultaneously in the same accelerating wave bucket. Here, we report the first (to our knowledge) experimental observation of two distinct electron bunches in a single laser shot, one featured with quasi-monoenergetic spectrum and another with continuous spectrum along with large emittance. The latter is able to generate high-flux betatron X-rays. Such is observed only when the laser self-guiding is extended over 4 mm at a fixed plasma density (4 × 10(18) cm(-3)). Numerical simulation reveals that two bunches of electrons are injected at different stages due to the bubble evolution. The first bunch is injected at the beginning to form a stable quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, whereas the second one is injected later due to the oscillation of the bubble size as a result of the change of the laser spot size during the propagation. Due to the inherent temporal synchronization, this unique electron-photon source can be ideal for pump-probe applications with femtosecond time resolution.

  7. An XMM-Newton search for X-ray sources in the Fornax dwarf galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucita, A. A.; Manni, L.; De Paolis, F.; Vetrugno, D.; Ingrosso, G.

    2013-02-01

    We report the results of a deep archive XMM-Newton observation of the Fornax spheroidal galaxy that we analyzed with the aim of fully characterizing the X-ray source population (in most of the cases likely to be background active galactic nuclei) detected towards the target. A cross correlation with the available databases allowed us to find a source that may be associated with a variable star belonging to the galaxy. We also searched for X-ray sources in the vicinity of the Fornax globular clusters GC 3 and GC 4 and found two sources probably associated with the respective clusters. The deep X-ray observation was also suitable for the search of the intermediate-mass black hole (of mass ≃ 104 M⊙) expected to be hosted in the center of the galaxy. In the case of Fornax, this search is extremely difficult since the galaxy centroid of gravity is poorly constrained because of the large asymmetry observed in the optical surface brightness. Since we cannot firmly establish the existence of an X-ray counterpart of the putative black hole, we put constraints only on the accretion parameters. In particular, we found that the corresponding upper limit on the accretion efficiency, with respect to the Eddington luminosity, is as low as a few 10-5.

  8. Ultra-Luminous X-ray Sources in the Collisional Ring Galaxy NGC 922

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestwich, Andrea H.; Galache, J.; Kalogara, V.; Linden, T.; Kilgard, R.; Zezas, A.; Wolter, A.; Trinchieri, G.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new Chandra observation of the nearby collisional ring galaxy NGC 922. NGC 922 is undergoing a violent burst of star formation as density waves are driven through the disk as a result of the collision. It is similar to the famous Cartwheel galaxy, except that the metallicity is somewhat higher and star formation rate lower. Our primary science goal is to determine whether a low metallicty environment is required to form the most luminous X-ray sources (Lx>1E40 ergs s-1). We find a total of 14 bright X-ray sources, 7 of which are ULX ((Lx>1E39 ergs s-1). One source has Lx 1E40 ergs/s. The X-ray sources are associated with the H-alpha ring. However, they are NOT associated with the brightest H-alpha patches, suggesting that the ULX phase starts >1 x 1E7 years after the starburst. Like the Cartwheel, the X-ray luminosity function of NGC 922 has a slope close to that of the “cannonical” HMXB slope of Gilfanov et al 2004. We conclude that NGC 922 is forming ULX as efficiently as the Cartwheel (after allowing for the difference in the star formation rate). We do not see a strong metallicity effect.

  9. H-alpha macrospicules - Identification with EUV macrospicules and with flares in X-ray bright points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Tang, F.; Bohlin, J. D.; Golub, L.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents observational evidence that two newly observed transient solar phenomena, EUV macrospicules and X-ray bright-point flares, are closely related. Time-lapse H-alpha filtergram observations of the limb in quiet regions show small surgelike eruptions called H-alpha macrospicules. From the similarity of H-alpha macrospicules and EUV macrospicules, and from comparison of simultaneous H-alpha and He II 304 A observations, we conclude that H-alpha macrospicules are EUV macrospicules viewed in H-alpha, although most EUV macrospicules are too faint in H-alpha to appear on H-alpha filtergrams of normal exposure. From comparison of simultaneous X-ray and H-alpha observations of flares in X-ray bright points situated on the limb, we show that flares in X-ray bright points often produce H-alpha macrospicules.

  10. Searches for correlated X-ray and radio emission from X-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. M.; Catura, R. C.; Lamb, P. A.; White, N. E.; Sanford, P. W.; Hoffman, J. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Jernigan, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    The NRAO Green Bank interferometer has been used to monitor MXB 1730-335 and MXB 1837+05 during periods when 68 X-ray bursts were detected by X-ray observations. No significant radio emission was detected from these objects, or from MXB 1820-30 and MXB 1906+00, which emitted no bursts throughout the simultaneous observations. The data place upper limits on radio emission from these objects in the 2695 and 8085 MHz bands.

  11. Ultraluminous X-ray sources - three exciting years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachetti, M.

    2015-09-01

    Ultraluminous X-ray sources are off-nuclear extragalactic sources with (apparent) luminosities exceeding the Eddington limit for a stellar-mass black hole. This naturally suggests an association with the elusive class of intermediate-mass black holes, or with super-Eddington accreting black holes. As it turns out, this peculiar class of sources is actually a variegated zoo, including both classes of accreting black holes mentioned above and, rather unexpectedly, neutron stars. In this talk I will overview the astrophysical properties of these objects, and give an update on the many breakthroughs appeared in the literature in the last three years.

  12. Inductive Voltage Adder Driven X-Ray Sources for Hydrodynamic Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, V.; Cordova, S.; Droemer, D.; Gustwiller, J.; Hunt, E.; Johnson, D.L.; MacLeod, G.; Maenchen, John; Menge, P.; Molina, I.; Oliver, B; Olson, C.; Rosenthal, S; Rovang, D.; Smith, I.; Welch, D.; Woo, L.

    1999-06-17

    Inductive Voltage Adder (IVA) accelerators were developed to provide high-current (100s of kA) power pulses at high voltage (up to 20 MV) using robust modular components. This architecture simultaneously resolves problems found in conventional pulsed and linear induction accelerators. A variety of high-brightness pulsed x-ray radiographic sources are needed from sub-megavolt to 16-MeV endpoints with greater source brightness (dose/spot) than presently available. We are applying IVA systems to produce very intense (up to 75 TW/cm{sup 2}) electron beams for these flash radiographic applications. The accelerator electromagnetic pulse is converted to a directed electron beam at the end of a self-magnetically insulated vacuum transmission line. The cantilevered cathode threading the accelerator cavities terminates in a small (1-mm diameter) needle, producing the electron beam which is transported to a grounded bremsstrahlung converter within a strong ({approximately}50-T) axial magnetic field. These systems produce mm-sized stable electron beams, yielding very intense x-ray sources. Detailed simulations of the electron beam generation, transport, and target interaction are presented along with scaling laws for the radiation production and x-ray spot size. Experimental studies confirm these simulations and show this reliable, compact, and inexpensive technology scales to 1000-R doses a meter from a mm-diameter source in 50 ns.

  13. Detecting edges in the X-ray surface brightness of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, J. S.; Fabian, A. C.; Russell, H. R.; Walker, S. A.; Blundell, K. M.

    2016-08-01

    The effects of many physical processes in the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters imprint themselves in X-ray surface brightness images. It is therefore important to choose optimal methods for extracting information from and enhancing the interpretability of such images. We describe in detail a gradient filtering edge detection method that we previously applied to images of the Centaurus cluster of galaxies. The Gaussian gradient filter measures the gradient in the surface brightness distribution on particular spatial scales. We apply this filter on different scales to Chandra X-ray observatory images of two clusters with active galactic nucleus feedback, the Perseus cluster and M 87, and a merging system, A 3667. By combining filtered images on different scales using radial filters spectacular images of the edges in a cluster are produced. We describe how to assess the significance of features in filtered images. We find the gradient filtering technique to have significant advantages for detecting many kinds of features compared to other analysis techniques, such as unsharp masking. Filtering cluster images in this way in a hard energy band allows shocks to be detected.

  14. Simultaneous X-ray and optical observations of the flaring X-ray source, Aquila A-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, C. S.; Charles, P. A.

    1979-01-01

    During the summer of 1978 the recurrent transient X-ray source, Aquila X-1, underwent its first major outburst in two years. The results of extensive observations at X-ray and optical wavelengths throughout this event, which lasted for approximately two months are presented. The peak X-ray luminosity was approximately 1.3 times that of the Crab and exhibited spectral dependent flickering on timescales approximately 5 minutes. The observations are interpreted in terms of a standard accretion disk model withparticular emphasis on the similarities to Sco X-1 and other dward X-ray systems, although the transient nature of the system remains unexplained. It was found that Aquila X-1 can be described adequately by the semi-detached Roche lobe model and yields a mass ratio of less than or approximate to 3.5.

  15. Note: Construction of x-ray scattering and x-ray absorption fine structure beamline at the Pohang Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ik-Jae; Yu, Chung-Jong; Yun, Young-Duck; Lee, Chae-Soon; Seo, In Deuk; Kim, Hyo-Yun; Lee, Woul-Woo; Chae, Keun Hwa

    2010-02-15

    A new hard x-ray beamline, 10B KIST-PAL beamline (BL10B), has been designed and constructed at the Pohang Light Source (PLS) in Korea. The beamline, operated by Pohang Accelerator Laboratory-Korean Institute of Science and Technology consortium, is dedicated to x-ray scattering (XRS) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) experiments. X rays with photon energies from 4.0 to 16.0 keV are delivered to the experimental station passing a collimating mirror, a fixed-exit double-crystal Si(111) monochromator, and a toroidal mirror. Basic experimental equipments for XAFS measurement, a high resolution diffractometry, an image plate detector system, and a hot stage have been prepared for the station. From our initial commissioning and performance testing of the beamline, it is observed that BL10B beamline can perform XRS and XAFS measurements successfully.

  16. Real world issues for the new soft x-ray synchrotron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, B.M.

    1991-05-01

    A new generation of synchrotron radiation light sources covering the VUV, soft x-ray and hard x-ray spectral regions is under construction in several countries. They are designed specifically to use periodic magnetic undulators and low-emittance electron or positron beams to produce high-brightness near-diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation beams. An introduction to the properties of undulator radiation is followed by a discussion of some of the challenges to be faced at the new facilities. Examples of predicted undulator output from the Advanced Light Source, a third generation 1--2 GeV storage ring optimized for undulator use, are used to highlight differences from present synchrotron radiation sources, including high beam power, partial coherence, harmonics, and other unusual spectral and angular properties of undulator radiation. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  17. An ultraluminous X-ray source powered by an accreting neutron star.

    PubMed

    Bachetti, M; Harrison, F A; Walton, D J; Grefenstette, B W; Chakrabarty, D; Fürst, F; Barret, D; Beloborodov, A; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Fabian, A C; Hailey, C J; Hornschemeier, A; Kaspi, V; Kulkarni, S R; Maccarone, T; Miller, J M; Rana, V; Stern, D; Tendulkar, S P; Tomsick, J; Webb, N A; Zhang, W W

    2014-10-09

    The majority of ultraluminous X-ray sources are point sources that are spatially offset from the nuclei of nearby galaxies and whose X-ray luminosities exceed the theoretical maximum for spherical infall (the Eddington limit) onto stellar-mass black holes. Their X-ray luminosities in the 0.5-10 kiloelectronvolt energy band range from 10(39) to 10(41) ergs per second. Because higher masses imply less extreme ratios of the luminosity to the isotropic Eddington limit, theoretical models have focused on black hole rather than neutron star systems. The most challenging sources to explain are those at the luminous end of the range (more than 10(40) ergs per second), which require black hole masses of 50-100 times the solar value or significant departures from the standard thin disk accretion that powers bright Galactic X-ray binaries, or both. Here we report broadband X-ray observations of the nuclear region of the galaxy M82 that reveal pulsations with an average period of 1.37 seconds and a 2.5-day sinusoidal modulation. The pulsations result from the rotation of a magnetized neutron star, and the modulation arises from its binary orbit. The pulsed flux alone corresponds to an X-ray luminosity in the 3-30 kiloelectronvolt range of 4.9 × 10(39) ergs per second. The pulsating source is spatially coincident with a variable source that can reach an X-ray luminosity in the 0.3-10 kiloelectronvolt range of 1.8 × 10(40) ergs per second. This association implies a luminosity of about 100 times the Eddington limit for a 1.4-solar-mass object, or more than ten times brighter than any known accreting pulsar. This implies that neutron stars may not be rare in the ultraluminous X-ray population, and it challenges physical models for the accretion of matter onto magnetized compact objects.

  18. Studies of hard X-ray source variability using BATSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, W. S.; Harmon, B. A.; Pendleton, G. N.; Finger, M. H.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Rubin, B. C.; Wilson, R. B.

    1993-01-01

    The BATSE large-area detectors on the Compton Observatory can be used to monitor the variability of X-ray and gamma-ray sources on timescales longer than a few hours using the earth occultation technique. Spectral information is collected in 16 channels covering the energy range from about 25 to 2000 keV. Approximately 20 of the strongest sources are currently being monitored on a daily basis as part of standard BATSE operations. We discuss observations of the Crab Nebula, Cen A, and the Galactic center as examples of the current BATSE capabilities.

  19. Near-infrared spectroscopy of faint discrete X-ray point sources constituting the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morihana, Kumiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Dubath, Pierre; Yoshida, Tessei; Suzuki, Kensuke; Ebisawa, Ken

    2016-08-01

    The Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) is an apparently extended X-ray emission along the Galactic plane. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by a hard continuum with a strong Fe K emission feature in the 6-7 keV band. A substantial fraction (˜80%) of the GRXE in the Fe band was resolved into point sources by deep Chandra imaging observations; thus GRXE is mostly composed of dim Galactic X-ray point sources, at least in this energy band. To investigate the populations of these dim X-ray point sources, we carried out near-infrared (NIR) follow-up spectroscopic observations in two deep Chandra fields located in the Galactic plane at (l, b) = (0.1°, -1.4°) and (28.5°, 0.0°) using NTT/SofI and Subaru/MOIRCS. We obtained well-exposed NIR spectra from 65 objects and found that there are three main classes of Galactic sources based on the X-ray color and NIR spectral features: those having (A) hard X-ray spectra and NIR emission features such as H I (Brγ), He I, and He II (2 objects), (B) soft X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (46 objects), and (C) hard X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (17 objects). From these features, we argue that class A sources are cataclysmic variables (CVs), and class B sources are late-type stars with enhanced coronal activity, which is in agreement with current knowledge. Class C sources possibly belong to a new group of objects, which has been poorly studied so far. We argue that the candidate sources for class C are the binary systems hosting white dwarfs and late-type companions with very low accretion rates. It is likely that this newly recognized class of sources contribute to a non-negligible fraction of the GRXE, especially in the Fe K band.

  20. X-Ray Counterparts of Puzzling Gev-Tev Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargaltsev, Oleg

    2014-09-01

    We propose to look for X-ray counterparts of the extended TeV source HESS J1616-508 that may also have been detected with Fermi at GeV energies. The nature of the source and the connection between the TeV source and the nearby GeV sources are unknown. It has been suggested that it may be a relic plerion powered by the offset PSR J1617-5055, but a deep Chandra observation of this pulsar and its wind nebula has not confirmed this hypothesis. To understand the nature of this long-standing "dark accelerator", we propose to observe the GeV sources (which could be young pulsars) and another nearby young pulsar (J1614-5048) to check whether or not they could supply relativistic particles and power the TeV source. We will also explore the nature of the GeV sources.

  1. The derived population of luminous supersoft X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Di Stefano, R.STEFANO; Rappaport, S.

    1994-01-01

    The existence of a new class of astrophysical object, luminous supersoft X-ray sources, has been established through ROSAT satellite observations and analysis during the past approximately 3 yr. Because most of the radiation emitted by supersoft sources spans a range of wavelengths readily absorbed by interstellar gas, a substantial fraction of these sources may not be detectable with present satellite instrumentation. It is therefore important to derive a reliable estimate of the underlying population, based on the approximately 30 sources that have been observed to date. The work reported here combines the observational results with a theoretical analysis, to obtain an estimate of the total number of sources likely to be present in M31, the Magellanic Clouds, and in our own Galaxy. We find that in M31, where approximately 15 supersoft sources have been identified and roughly an equal number of sources are being investigated as supersoft candidates, there are likely to be approximately 2500 active supersoft sources at the present time. In our own Galaxy, where about four supersoft sources have been detected in the Galactic plane, there are likely to be approximately 1000 active sources. Similarly, with about six and about four (nonforeground) sources observed in the Large (LMC) and Small Magellanic Clouds (SMC), respectively, there should be approximately 30 supersoft sources in the LMC, and approximately 20 in the SMC. The likely uncertainties in the numbers quoted above, and the properties of observable sources relative to those of the total underlying population, are also derived in detail. These results can be scaled to estimate the numbers of supersoft sources likely to be present in other galaxies. The results reported here on the underlying population of supersoft X-ray sources are in good agreement with the results of a prior population synthesis study of the white dwarf accretor model for luminous supersoft X-ray sources. It should be emphasized, however

  2. Uhuru observations of 4U 1608-52 - The 'steady' X-ray source associated with the X-ray burst source in Norma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, H.; Chaisson, L. J.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Matilsky, T. A.

    1976-01-01

    Data are presented for the X-ray source 4U 1608-52, summarizing its light curve, location, and spectral parameters. Evidence is presented showing that this source is the 'steady' X-ray counterpart of the X-ray burst source in Norma. The spectrum of the 'steady' source is compared with the spectrum observed during two bursts, and it is noted that there is substantially more low-energy absorption during the bursts. The 'steady' source spectral data are used to examine the optical data, and it is concluded that if the X-ray spectrum is thermal, then a globular-cluster counterpart probably would have been detected (whereas none has been). Further X-ray and optical observations are suggested for this source, since an optical identification may be central in determining whether all X-ray bursts have a common origin and if this origin requires a globular-cluster environment.

  3. Development of a Laser-Produced Plasma X-ray source for Phase-Contrast Radiography of DT Ice layers

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N; Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B; Landen, O L; Koch, J A

    2008-07-21

    Refraction enhanced x-ray phase contrast imaging is crucial for characterization of deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer roughness in optically opaque inertial confinement fusion capsules. To observe the time development of DT ice roughness over {approx} second timescales, we need a bright x-ray source that can produce an image faster than the evolution of the ice surface roughness. A laser produced plasma x-ray source is one of the candidates that can meet this requirement. We performed experiments at the Janus laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and assessed the characteristics of the laser produced plasma x-ray source as a potential backlight for in situ target characterization.

  4. First Search for an X-Ray-Optical Reverberation Signal in an Ultraluminous X-Ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Trippe, Margaret L.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Gandhi, Poshak

    2016-01-01

    Using simultaneous optical (VLT/FORS2) and X-ray (XMM-Newton) data of NGC 5408, we present the first ever attempt to search for a reverberation signal in an ultraluminous X-ray source (NGC 5408 X-1). The idea is similar to active galactic nucleus broad line reverberation mapping where a lag measurement between the X-ray and the optical flux combined with a Keplerian velocity estimate should enable us to weigh the central compact object. We find that although NGC 5408 X-1's X-rays are variable on a timescale of a few hundred seconds (rms of 9.0 +/- 0.5%), the optical emission does not show any statistically significant variations. We set a 3s upper limit on the rms optical variability of 3.3%. The ratio of the X-ray to the optical variability is an indicator of X-ray reprocessing efficiency. In X-ray binaries, this ratio is roughly 5. Assuming a similar ratio for NGC 5408 X-1, the expected rms optical variability is approximately equal to 2%, which is still a factor of roughly two lower than what was possible with the VLT observations in this study. We find marginal evidence (3 sigma) for optical variability on an approximately 24 hr timescale. Our results demonstrate that such measurements can be made, but photometric conditions, low sky background levels, and longer simultaneous observations will be required to reach optical variability levels similar to those of X-ray binaries.

  5. Flash x-ray sources powered by Blumlein pulsers: review and prospect for x rays with 100-ps switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davanloo, Farzin; Collins, Carl B., Jr.; Agee, Forrest J.

    2002-11-01

    The flash x-ray systems developed at the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) center around two critical subassemblies: (1) a Blumlein pulsed power source, and (2) an x-ray diode properly designed and matched to the pulse forming line. The pulse generator consists of either a single or several traxial Blumleins. For multiple lines, Blumleins are stacked in series at one end and charged in parallel and synchronously commutated with a single switching element at the other end. Extensive characterizations of these Blumlein pulsers have been performed over the past several years. Results indicate that they are capable of producing high power waveforms with risetimes and repetition rates in the range of 0.1-50 ns and 1-300 Hz, respectively, using a conventional thyratron, spark gap, or photoconductive switch. Blumlein pulsers switched by a thyratron or a spark gap have been used to drive x-ray diode loads with different characteristics and discharge geometries and high dose rates of x-rays with pulse durations in the range 3-20 ns have been obtained. In this report the technology and characteristics of these Blumlein based flash x-ray devices are reviewed. Prospects for producing ultra-fast x-ray pulses utilizing photoconductively-switched Blumlein devices are discussed.

  6. Measuring the Radius of a Neutron Star; Origin of High X-Ray Luminosities in Optically Passive Galaxies; Resolving the Source of X-Rays in IC 1613"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.

    1998-01-01

    This recently expired grant has supported the work of the PI, his students, and his collaborators on a variety of ROSAT projects over the past three years. Annual reports have summarized much of the work accomplished; here we provide a brief review of the work resulting from this effort, and a summary of the personnel who have benefited from its support. A high resolution ROSAT HRI X-ray image of the Local Group dwarf IC1613 revealed that the principal source of X-ray emission in this direction arises in a background cluster of galaxies, as first suggested by Eskridge (1995). In addition, however, we found a bright X-ray source coincident with the only known supernova remnant in this galaxy, S # 8. Extensive ground-based follow-up observations in the radio and optical regimes were conducted. We confirmed the nonthermal radio spectral index of the source and measured its extent to be approx. 3 sec at 20 cm. Imaging spectrophotometric observations taken with the multi-pupil spectrograph of the Special Astrophysical Observatory in the FSU allowed us to determine the density and velocity distribution of the gas in the remnant. The simultaneous presence of luminous X-ray and optical emission suggests a relatively young remnant in which the outward-moving shock has recently encountered dense material. Many of this object's properties are similar to those of the brightest optical remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud, N49. Another potential source of X-rays in this galaxy which featured prominently in our original proposal, an Oxygen Wolf-Rayet star with a large surrounding wind-blown bubble, was not detected.

  7. The Lack of Halo Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.

    2006-01-01

    The premise that Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) exist beyond the optical extent of nearby galaxies is investigated. A published catalog containing 41 ULX candidates located between 1 and approx. 3 times the standard D-{25} isophotal radius of their putative host galaxies is examined. Twenty-one of these sources have spectroscopically-confirmed distances. All 21 are background objects giving a 95\\% probability that at least 37 of the 41 candidates are background sources. Thirty-nine of the 41 sources have X-ray-to-optical flux ratios, -1.61.6.) The uniform spatial distribution of the sample is also consistent with a background population. This evidence suggests that ULXs rarely, if at all, exist beyond the distribution of luminous matter in nearby galaxies and, as a consequence, there is no correlation between the population of ULXs and halo objects such as old globular clusters or Population III remnants.

  8. Real-Time Observation of Laser Heated Metals with High Brightness Monochromatic X-Ray Techniques at Present and Their Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daido, H.; Shobu, T.; Yamada, T.; Yamashita, S.; Sugihara, K.; Nishimura, A.; Muramatsu, T.

    We present the x-ray techniques for characterizing laser heated metals for welding and cutting techniques. At present, with an undulator (70 keV) as well as bending magnet (30 keV) sources at SPring-8 as a probe source, CW 300 W Ytterbium fiber laser irradiates an Aluminum slab as a sample. Simultaneously the x-ray beam probes the sample for real time observation of a molten pool. We observe the convection indicated by the motion of tungsten based particles as a tracer in the molten pool. During the cooling phase, the molten metal is solidified with residual stresses which are affected by the heating and convection processes. In this experiment the time and space resolution are ˜milli-second and several tens of μm, respectively. On the other hand, microscopic short transient phenomena also play a significant role for the quality of a solidified material. For this purpose, we need high energy short pulse x-ray sources. We try to discuss on the capability and limitation of present x-ray sources and the prospect of an ultra high brightness x-ray source as a complementary source for full characterization of the laser heated and cooling processes of metals.

  9. Flat Field Anomalies in an X-ray CCD Camera Measured Using a Manson X-ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Haugh and M. B. Schneider

    2008-10-31

    The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a diagnostic used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the position of the X-rays produced by lasers hitting a gold foil target. The intensity distribution taken by the SXI camera during a NIF shot is used to determine how accurately NIF can aim laser beams. This is critical to proper NIF operation. Imagers are located at the top and the bottom of the NIF target chamber. The CCD chip is an X-ray sensitive silicon sensor, with a large format array (2k x 2k), 24 μm square pixels, and 15 μm thick. A multi-anode Manson X-ray source, operating up to 10kV and 10W, was used to characterize and calibrate the imagers. The output beam is heavily filtered to narrow the spectral beam width, giving a typical resolution E/ΔE≈10. The X-ray beam intensity was measured using an absolute photodiode that has accuracy better than 1% up to the Si K edge and better than 5% at higher energies. The X-ray beam provides full CCD illumination and is flat, within ±1% maximum to minimum. The spectral efficiency was measured at 10 energy bands ranging from 930 eV to 8470 eV. We observed an energy dependent pixel sensitivity variation that showed continuous change over a large portion of the CCD. The maximum sensitivity variation occurred at 8470 eV. The geometric pattern did not change at lower energies, but the maximum contrast decreased and was not observable below 4 keV. We were also able to observe debris, damage, and surface defects on the CCD chip. The Manson source is a powerful tool for characterizing the imaging errors of an X-ray CCD imager. These errors are quite different from those found in a visible CCD imager.

  10. The faint X-ray sources in and out of omega Centauri: X-ray observations and optical identifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cool, Adrienne M.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Bailyn, Charles D.; Callanan, Paul J.; Hertz, Paul

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of an observation of the globular cluster omega Cen (NGC 5139) with the Einstein high-resolution imager (HRI). Of the five low-luminosity X-ray sources toward omega Cen which were first identified with the Einstein imaging proportional counter (IPC) (Hertz and Grindlay 1983a, b), two are detected in the Einstein HRI observation: IPC sources A and D. These detections provide source positions accurate to 3 sec-4 sec; the positions are confirmed in a ROSAT HRI observation reported here. Using CCD photometry and spectroscopy, we have identified both sources as foreground dwarf M stars with emission lines (dMe). The chance projection of two Mde stars within approximately 13 min of the center of omega Cen is not extraordinary, given the space density of these stellar coronal X-ray sources. We discuss the possible nature of the three as yet unidentified IPC sources toward omega Cen, and consider the constraints that the Einstein observations place on the total population of X-ray sources in this cluster. The integrated luminosity from faint X-ray sources in omega Cen appears to be low relative to both the old open cluster M67 and the post-core-collapse globular, NGC 6397.

  11. Ionization Nebulae Surrounding CAL 83 and Other Supersoft X-ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remillard, R. A.; Rappaport, S.; Macri, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of an optical search for ionized gaseous nebulae surrounding luminous, "supersoft" X-ray sources in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. This relatively new and mysterious X-ray class has characteristic luminosities approximately 10(exp 37) - 10(exp 38) ergs/s with effective temperatures in the range of 2 - 6 x 10(exp 5) K. The presence of a large flux of UV and soft X-ray photons from these objects has led to predictions of bright optical emission lines from the local interstellar medium. One such object, CAL 83 in the LMC, was known to have an associated nebula, and we quantify here the asymmetry and luminosity of this remarkable nebula. Deep images were made using narrowband filters to isolate the emission lines of H.alpha and [O III] (lamda5007). In these emission lines, the nebula is detected out to distances as far as 25 pc from the central object, and the integrated luminosity in each line is of order approximately 100 solar luminosity. Model calculations of such nebulae for chemical abundances characteristic of the LMC indicate that approximately 1% of the X-ray luminosity of the central source is reprocessed into the nebular H.alpha and [O III] lamda5007 emission lines, from which we conclude that the time-averaged X-ray luminosity of the central source, CAL 83, is greater than 3 x 10(exp 37) ergs/s. The bright inner nebula contains approximately 150 solar mass within 7.5 pc of CAL 83, which clearly indicates that the nebular material has its origin in the interstellar medium. In sharp contrast, there were null detections for nebulae associated with nine other luminous, supersoft X-ray sources in the LMC and SMC, with upper limits for the [O III] luminosity that are a factor of approximately 10 below that for CAL 83. For eight of these latter sources, we conclude that either their time-averaged luminosity is substantially below that of CAL 83, or that the local interstellar medium is much less dense. The latter effect may be

  12. Ionization nebulae surrounding CAL 83 and other supersoft X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remillard, R. A.; Rappaport, S.; Macri, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of an optical search for ionized gaseous nebulae surrounding luminous, 'supersoft' X-ray sources in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. This relatively new and mysterious X-ray class has characteristic luminosities approximately 10(exp 37)-10(exp 38) ergs/s with effective temperatures in the range of 2-6 x 10(exp 5) K. The presence of a large flux of UV and soft X-ray photons from these objects has led to predictions of bright optical emission lines from the local interstellar medium. One such object, CAL 83 in the LMC, was known to have an associated nebula, and we quantify here the asymmetry and luminosity of this remarkable nebula. Deep images were made using narowband filters to isolate the emission lines of H alpha and (O III) (lambda 5007). In these emission lines, the nebula is detected out to distances as far as 25 pc from the central object, and the integrated luminositu in each line is of order approximately 100 solar luminosity. Model calculations of such nebulae for chemical abundances characteristic of the LMC indicate that approximately 1% of the X-ray luminosity of the central source is reprocessed into the nebular H-alpha and (O III) lambda 5007 emission lines, from which we conclude that the time-averaged X-ray luminosity of the central source, CAL 83, is greater than 3 x 10(exp 37) ergs/s. The bright inner nebula contains approximately 150 solar mass within 7.5 pc of CAL 83, which clearly indicates that the nebular material has its origin in the interstelar medium. In sharp contrast, there were null detections for nebulae associated with nine other luminous, supersoft X-ray sources in the LMC and SMC, with upper limits for the (O III) luminosity that are a factor of approximately 10 below that for CAL 83. For eight of these latter sources, we conclude that either their time-averaged luminosity is substantially below that of CAL 83, or that the local interstellar medium is much less dense. The latter effect may be enhanced

  13. A computational study of x-ray emission from high-Z x-ray sources on the National Ignition Facility laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, Jeffrey D.; Fournier, Kevin B.; Kane, Jave; Langer, Steven; May, Mark J.; Scott, Howard A.

    2011-12-01

    We have begun to use 350-500 kJ of 1/3-micron laser light from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser to create millimeter-scale, bright multi-keV x-ray sources. In the first set of shots we achieved 15%-18% x-ray conversion efficiency into Xe M-shell (˜1.5-2.5 keV), Ar K-shell (˜3 keV) and Xe L-shell (˜4-5.5 keV) emission (Fournier et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 082701, 2010), in good agreement with the emission modeled using a 2D radiation-hydrodynamics code incorporating a modern Detailed Configuration Accounting atomic model in non-LTE (Colvin et al., Phys. Plasmas, 17, 073111, 2010). In this paper we first briefly review details of the computational model and comparisons of the simulations with the Ar/Xe NIF data. We then discuss a computational study showing sensitivity of the x-ray emission to various beam illumination details (beam configuration, pointing, peak power, pulse shape, etc.) and target parameters (size, initial density, etc.), and finally make some predictions of how the x-ray conversion efficiency expected from NIF shots scales with atomic number of the emitting plasma.

  14. A Computational Study of X-ray Emissions from High-Z X-ray Sources on the National Ignition Facility Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, Jeffrey; Fournier, Kevin; Kane, Jave; May, Mark

    2010-11-01

    We have begun to use 350-500 kJ of 1/3-micron laser light from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser to create millimeter-scale, bright multi-keV x-ray sources. In the first set of shots we achieved 15% -18% x-ray conversion efficiency into Xe M-shell (˜1.5-2.5 keV), Ar K-shell (˜3 keV) and Xe L-shell (˜4-5.5 keV) emission (Fournier et al., Phys. Plasmas July 2010), in good agreement with the emission modeled using a 2D radiation-hydrodynamics code incorporating a modern Detailed Configuration Accounting atomic model in non-LTE (Colvin et al., Phys. Plasmas, July 2010). In this presentation we first briefly review details of the computational model and comparisons of the simulations with the Ar/Xe NIF data. We then discuss a computational study showing sensitivity of the x-ray emission to various beam illumination details (beam configuration, pointing, peak power, pulse shape, etc.) and target parameters (size, initial density, etc.), and finally make some predictions of how the x-ray conversion efficiency expected from NIF shots scales with atomic number of the emitting plasma.

  15. Two Eclipsing Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources in M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, R.; Soria, R.

    2016-11-01

    We present the discovery, from archival Chandra and XMM-Newton data, of X-ray eclipses in two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), located in the same region of the galaxy M51: CXOM51 J132940.0+471237 (ULX-1, for simplicity) and CXOM51 J132939.5+471244 (ULX-2). Three eclipses were detected for ULX-1 and two for ULX-2. The presence of eclipses puts strong constraints on the viewing angle, suggesting that both ULXs are seen almost edge-on and are certainly not beamed toward us. Despite the similar viewing angles and luminosities ({L}{{X}}≈ 2× {10}39 erg s-1 in the 0.3-8 keV band for both sources), their X-ray properties are different. ULX-1 has a soft spectrum, well fitted by Comptonization emission from a medium with electron temperature {{kT}}e≈ 1 {keV}. ULX-2 is harder, well fitted by a slim disk with {{kT}}{in}≈ 1.5-1.8 keV and normalization consistent with a ˜10 M ⊙ black hole. ULX-1 has a significant contribution from multi-temperature thermal-plasma emission ({L}{{X},{mekal}}≈ 2× {10}38 erg s-1). About 10% of this emission remains visible during the eclipses, proving that the emitting gas comes from a region slightly more extended than the size of the donor star. From the sequence and duration of the Chandra observations in and out of eclipse, we constrain the binary period of ULX-1 to be either ≈ 6.3 days, or ≈12.5-13 days. If the donor star fills its Roche lobe (a plausible assumption for ULXs), both cases require an evolved donor, most likely a blue supergiant, given the young age of the stellar population in that Galactic environment.

  16. The HEAO A-1 X-ray source catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, K. S.; Meekins, J. F.; Yentis, D. J.; Smathers, H. W.; Mcnutt, D. P.; Bleach, R. D.; Friedman, H.; Byram, E. T.; Chubb, T. A.; Meidav, M.

    1984-01-01

    The catalog of X-ray sources detected during the NRL Large Area Sky Survey (LASS) with the HEAO 1 satellite is presented. The catalog is derived from the first six months of data from HEAO 1 and includes sources detected during one full scan. Positions and intensities for a total of 842 different sources are included, with a limiting flux of 250 nJy at 5 keV. The catalog is more than 90 percent complete at a flux level equivalent to 1.5 microjoules at 5 keV for a Crab-like spectrum. Cross-references with published literature are provided and coincidental identifications are proposed for some of the sources which have been never studied before. A cross-sectional line drawing of the sensor module of HEAO I is also provided.

  17. Picosecond x-ray diagnostics for third and fourth generation synchrotron sources

    SciTech Connect

    DeCamp, Matthew

    2016-03-30

    In the DOE-EPSCoR State/National Laboratory partnership grant ``Picosecond x-ray diagnostics for third and fourth generation synchrotron sources'' Dr. DeCamp set forth a partnership between the University of Delaware and Argonne National Laboratory. This proposal aimed to design and implement a series of experiments utilizing, or improving upon, existing time-domain hard x-ray spectroscopies at a third generation synchrotron source. Specifically, the PI put forth three experimental projects to be explored in the grant cycle: 1) implementing a picosecond ``x-ray Bragg switch'' using a laser excited nano-structured metallic film, 2) designing a robust x-ray optical delay stage for x-ray pump-probe studies at a hard x-ray synchrotron source, and 3) building/installing a laser based x-ray source at the Advanced Photon Source for two-color x-ray pump-probe studies.

  18. X-ray reverberations and the giant X-ray bursts. [short duration pulse in plasma cloud surrounding X-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canizares, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that the shape and spectral evolution of the giant X-ray bursts from the source 3U 1820-30 can be explained by Compton scattering of a short, intense X-ray pulse in a cloud surrounding the source. Pulse shapes due to Thomson scattering of an X-ray burst in an electron cloud were calculated for the (1) optically thin case on the assumption of one scattering per photon, (2) intermediate case with optical depth of about unity, and (3) optically thick case where the process is regarded as diffusion of photons through a uniform sphere. For the intermediate case, the effects of the reverberation were determined explicitly by Monte Carlo calculation. For an optical depth of 3, square pulse duration of 2 sec, characteristic cloud radius of 70,000 km, characteristic cloud density of 4 times 10 to the 14th per cu cm, and temperature of 5-30 keV, the calculations give a reasonably accurate description of X-ray bursts from 3U 1820-30. The scattering model does not imply the existence of a supermassive, central black hole.

  19. Prospects for compact high-intensity laser synchrotron x-ray and gamma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1996-11-01

    A laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam behaves like a virtual wiggler of an extremely short period equal to half of the laser wavelength. This approach opens a route to relatively compact, high-brightness x-ray sources alternative or complementary to conventional synchrotron light sources. Although not new, the laser synchrotron source (LSS) concept is still waiting for a convincing demonstration. Available at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), a high-brightness electron beam and the high-power CO{sub 2} laser may be used as prototype LSS brick stones. In a feasible demonstration experiment, 10-GW, 100-ps CO{sub 2} laser beam will be brought to a head-on collision with a 10-ps, 0.5-nC, 50 MeV electron bunch. Flashes of collimated 4.7 keV (2.6 {angstrom}) x-rays of 10-ps pulse duration, with a flux of {approximately} 10{sup 19} photons/sec, will be produced via linear Compton backscattering. The x-ray spectrum is tunable proportionally to the e-beam energy. A rational short-term extension of the proposed experiment would be further enhancement of the x-ray flux to the 10{sup 22} photons/sec level, after the ongoing ATF CO{sub 2} laser upgrade to 5 TW peak power and electron bunch shortening to 3 ps is realized. In the future, exploiting the promising approach of a high-gradient laser wake field accelerator, a compact ``table-top`` LSS of monochromatic gamma radiation may become feasible.

  20. Prospects for compact high-intensity laser synchrotron x-ray and gamma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1997-01-01

    A laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam behaves like a virtual wiggler of an extremely short period equal to half of the laser wavelength. This approach opens a route to relatively compact, high- brightness x-ray sources alternative or complementary to conventional synchrotron light sources. Although not new, the laser synchrotron source (LSS) concept is still waiting for a convincing demonstration. Available at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), a high- brightness electron beam and the high-power C0{sub 2} laser may be used as prototype LSS brick stones. In a feasible demonstration experiment, 10 GW, 100 ps C0{sub 2} laser beam will be brought to a head-on collision with a 10 ps, 0.5 nC, 50 MeV electron bunch. Flashes of collimated 4.7 keV (2.6 A) x-rays of 10-ps pulse duration, with a flux of {approximately}10{sup 19} photons/sec, will be produced via linear Compton backscattering. The x-ray spectra is tunable proportionally to the e- beam energy. A rational short-term extension of the proposed experiment would be further enhancement of the x-ray flux to the 10{sup 22} photon/sec level, after the ongoing ATF C0{sub 2} laser upgrade to 5 TW peak power and electron bunch shortening to 3 ps is realized. In the future, exploiting the promising approach of a high-gradient laser wake field accelerator, a compact ``table- top`` LSS of monochromatic gamma radiation may become feasible.

  1. Prospects for compact high-intensity laser synchrotron x-ray and gamma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.

    1997-03-01

    A laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam behaves like a virtual wiggler of an extremely short period equal to half of the laser wavelength. This approach opens a route to relatively compact, high-brightness x-ray sources alternative or complementary to conventional synchrotron light sources. Although not new, the laser synchrotron source (LSS) concept is still waiting for a convincing demonstration. Available at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), a high-brightness electron beam and the high-power CO2 laser may be used for prototype LSS demonstration. In a feasible demonstration experiment, 10-GW, 100-ps CO2 laser beam will be brought to a head-on collision with a 10-ps, 0.5-nC, 50 MeV electron bunch. Flashes of collimated 4.7 keV (2.6 Å) x-rays of 10-ps pulse duration, with a flux of ˜1019photons/sec, will be produced via linear Compton backscattering. The x-ray spectrum is tunable proportionally to the e-beam energy. A rational short-term extension of the proposed experiment would be further enhancement of the x-ray flux to the 1022 photons/sec level, after the ongoing ATF CO2 laser upgrade to 5 TW peak power and electron bunch shortening to 3 ps is realized. In the future, exploiting the promising approach of a high-gradient laser wake field accelerator, a compact "table-top" LSS of monochromatic gamma radiation may become feasible.

  2. Bright betatronlike x rays from radiation pressure acceleration of a mass-limited foil target.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tong-Pu; Pukhov, Alexander; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Feng; Shvets, Gennady

    2013-01-25

    By using multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we study the electromagnetic emission from radiation pressure acceleration of ultrathin mass-limited foils. When a circularly polarized laser pulse irradiates the foil, the laser radiation pressure pushes the foil forward as a whole. The outer wings of the pulse continue to propagate and act as a natural undulator. Electrons move together with ions longitudinally but oscillate around the latter transversely, forming a self-organized helical electron bunch. When the electron oscillation frequency coincides with the laser frequency as witnessed by the electron, betatronlike resonance occurs. The emitted x rays by the resonant electrons have high brightness, short durations, and broad band ranges which may have diverse applications.

  3. Rapidly Rotating, X-Ray Bright Stars in the Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Mason, Elena; Boyd, Patricia; Smith, Krista Lynne; Gelino, Dawn M.

    2016-11-01

    We present Kepler light curves and optical spectroscopy of twenty X-ray bright stars located in the Kepler field of view. The stars, spectral type F-K, show evidence for rapid rotation including chromospheric activity 100 times or more above the Sun at maximum and flaring behavior in their light curves. Eighteen of our objects appear to be (sub)giants and may belong to the class of FK Com variables, which are evolved rapidly spinning single stars with no excretion disk and high levels of chromospheric activity. Such stars are rare and are likely the result of W UMa binary mergers, a process believed to produce the FK Com class of variable and their descendants. The FK Com stage, including the presence of an excretion disk, is short lived but leads to longer-lived stages consisting of single, rapidly rotating evolved (sub)giants with high levels of stellar activity.

  4. Formation and evolution of luminous supersoft X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, S.; Di Stefano, R.; Smith, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    Luminous supersoft X-ray sources, with characteristic luminosities of approximately 10(exp 38) ergs/s and temperatures, kT, of approximately 35 eV, have been established as a new and distinct class of X-ray source through recent Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT) observations. Several possible physical models have been proposed for these sources. One promising scenario (van den Heuvel et al. 1992) involves mass transfer, which is unstable on a thermal timescale, from a main-sequence or subgiant donor star onto the surface of a white dwarf. For a narrow range of accretion rates, steady nuclear burning of the accreted matter can take place. This process can provide the high luminosities and the correct range of temperatures observed in the supersoft sources. However, given the limited range of mass transfer rates that are consistent with this phenomenon, it is far from obvious that a sufficient population of such systems exists in galaxies such as our own, M31, and the Magellanic Clouds, in order to account for the large number of supersoft sources which can be inferred from present observations. This work addresses the population question in detail, through a Monte Carlo simulation of the formation and evolution of such systems, which starts with zero-age primordial binaries. In order to evolve into close binary systems which contain a white dwarf component and a companion transferring mass at a rate within the requisite narrow range, a binary system must undergo a specific progression of evolutionary steps. We find that a sufficient subset of our initial binaries evolve to become systems with the requisite properties, so that they can account for the population of supersoft sources that is inferred from observations. In particular, we find that there should be more than 1000 systems in the Galaxy today with properties that very closely match those of the observed supersoft sources. From our models, we find expected luminosities, white dwarf effective temperatures, and

  5. Compton Scattering and Its Applications: The PLEIADES Femtosecond X-ray Source at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Brown, W J; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P J; Betts, S M; Booth, R; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Kuba, J; Rupp, B; Tremaine, A M; Springer, P T

    2003-05-01

    Remarkable developments in critical technologies including terawatt-class lasers using chirped-pulse amplification, high brightness photoinjectors, high-gradient accelerators, and superconducting linacs make it possible to design and operate compact, tunable, subpicosecond Compton scattering x-ray sources with a wide variety of applications. In such novel radiation sources, the collision between a femtosecond laser pulse and a low emittance relativistic electron bunch in a small ({micro}m{sup 3}) interaction volume produces Doppler-upshifted scattered photons with unique characteristics: the energy is tunable in the 5-500 keV range, the angular divergence of the beam is small (mrad), and the pulses are ultrashort (10 fs - 10 ps). Two main paths are currently being followed in laboratories worldwide: high peak brightness, using ultrahigh intensity femtosecond lasers at modest repetition rates, and high average brightness, using superconducting linac and high average power laser technology at MHz repetition rates. Targeted applications range from x-ray protein crystallography and high contrast medical imaging to femtosecond pump-probe and diffraction experiments. More exotic uses of such sources include the {gamma}-{gamma} collider, NIF backlighting, nonlinear Compton scattering, and high-field QED. Theoretical considerations and experimental results will be discussed within this context.

  6. Electron Beam Production and Characterization for the PLEIADES Thomson X-ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W J; Hartemann, F V; Tremaine, A M; Springer, P T; Le Sage, G P; Barty, C P J; Rosenzweig, J B; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D B; Gibson, D J; Slaughter, D R; Anderson, S

    2002-10-14

    We report on the performance of an S-band RF photocathode electron gun and accelerator for operation with the PLEIADES Thomson x-ray source at LLNL. Simulations of beam production, transport, and focus are presented. It is shown that a 1 ps, 500 pC electron bunch with a normalized emittance of less than 5 {pi}mm-mrad can be delivered to the interaction point. Initial electron measurements are presented. Calculations of expected x-ray flux are also performed, demonstrating an expected peak spectral brightness of 10{sup 20} photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% bandwidth. Effects of RF phase jitter are also presented, and planned phase measurements and control methods are discussed.

  7. Attosecond Thomson-scattering x-ray source driven by laser-based electron acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W.; Zhuo, H. B.; Ma, Y. Y.; Song, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. C.; Yu, T. P.; Yu, M. Y.

    2013-10-01

    The possibility of producing attosecond x-rays through Thomson scattering of laser light off laser-driven relativistic electron beams is investigated. For a ≤200-as, tens-MeV electron bunch produced with laser ponderomotive-force acceleration in a plasma wire, exceeding 106 photons/s in the form of ˜160 as pulses in the range of 3-300 keV are predicted, with a peak brightness of ≥5 × 1020 photons/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1% bandwidth). Our study suggests that the physical scheme discussed in this work can be used for an ultrafast (attosecond) x-ray source, which is the most beneficial for time-resolved atomic physics, dubbed "attosecond physics."

  8. Population of post-nova supersoft X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soraisam, Monika D.; Gilfanov, Marat; Wolf, William M.; Bildsten, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Novae undergo a supersoft X-ray phase of varying duration after the optical outburst. Such transient post-nova supersoft X-ray sources (SSSs) are the majority of the observed SSSs in M31. In this paper, we use the post-nova evolutionary models of Wolf et al. to compute the expected population of post-nova SSSs in M31. We predict that depending on the assumptions about the white dwarf (WD) mass distribution in novae, at any instant there are about 250-600 post-nova SSSs in M31 with (unabsorbed) 0.2-1.0 keV luminosity Lx ≥ 1036 erg s-1. Their combined unabsorbed luminosity is of the order of ˜1039 erg s-1. Their luminosity distribution shows significant steepening around log (Lx) ˜ 37.7-38 and becomes zero at Lx ≈ 2 × 1038 erg s-1, the maximum Lx achieved in the post-nova evolutionary tracks. Their effective temperature distribution has a roughly power-law shape with differential slope of ≈4-6 up to the maximum temperature of Teff ≈ 1.5 × 106 K. We compare our predictions with the results of the XMM-Newton monitoring of the central field of M31 between 2006 and 2009. The predicted number of post-nova SSSs exceeds the observed number by a factor of ≈2-5, depending on the assumed WD mass distribution in novae. This is good agreement, considering the number and magnitude of uncertainties involved in calculations of the post-nova evolutionary models and their X-ray output. Furthermore, only a moderate circumstellar absorption, with hydrogen column density of the order of ˜1021 cm-2, will remove the discrepancy.

  9. Two-dimensional X-ray focusing by off-axis grazing incidence phase Fresnel zone plate on the laboratory X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, Maxim; Fakhrtdinov, Rashid; Irzhak, Dmitry; Firsov, Alexander; Firsov, Anatoly; Svintsov, Alexander; Erko, Alexey; Roshchupkin, Dmitry

    2017-02-01

    The results of studying a two-dimensional X-ray focusing by an off-axis grazing incidence phase Fresnel zone plate on the laboratory X-ray source are presented. This optics enables obtaining a focal spot of 2 μm on the laboratory X-ray source with a focusing efficiency of 30% at a high signal/noise ratio.

  10. Supersoft X-ray source CAL 83 in an optical-high, X-ray off state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, .; Schwarz, R.; Sala, G.; Ness, J.-U.; Mennickent, R.

    2008-01-01

    Between Dec. 20 and 27, 2007, the optical (B&R) brightness of CAL 83 jumped up by 0.5 mag, and stayed at that level since then. With the anti- correlation in mind of optical and X-ray flux as indicated by MACHO data and earlier Chandra and XMM observations (Greiner & DiStefano 2002, A&A 387, 944), we performed a 4.7 ksec Swift ToO observation on January 2, 2008, between 0:00--6:00 UT. As expected, we find no X-ray emission from CAL 83, with a 2-sigma upper limit of 6.1*10-4 cts/s in the <1.0 keV band.

  11. Laser-driven x-ray and neutron source development for industrial applications of plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, C. M.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Rusby, D. R.; Armstrong, C.; Alejo, A.; Wilson, L. A.; Clarke, R.; Ahmed, H.; Butler, N. M. H.; Haddock, D.; Higginson, A.; McClymont, A.; Murphy, C.; Notley, M.; Oliver, P.; Allott, R.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Kar, S.; McKenna, P.; Neely, D.

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed beams of energetic x-rays and neutrons from intense laser interactions with solid foils are promising for applications where bright, small emission area sources, capable of multi-modal delivery are ideal. Possible end users of laser-driven multi-modal sources are those requiring advanced non-destructive inspection techniques in industry sectors of high value commerce such as aerospace, nuclear and advanced manufacturing. We report on experimental work that demonstrates multi-modal operation of high power laser-solid interactions for neutron and x-ray beam generation. Measurements and Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations show that neutron yield is increased by a factor ~2 when a 1 mm copper foil is placed behind a 2 mm lithium foil, compared to using a 2 cm block of lithium only. We explore x-ray generation with a 10 picosecond drive pulse in order to tailor the spectral content for radiography with medium density alloy metals. The impact of using  >1 ps pulse duration on laser-accelerated electron beam generation and transport is discussed alongside the optimisation of subsequent bremsstrahlung emission in thin, high atomic number target foils. X-ray spectra are deconvolved from spectrometer measurements and simulation data generated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. We also demonstrate the unique capability of laser-driven x-rays in being able to deliver single pulse high spatial resolution projection imaging of thick metallic objects. Active detector radiographic imaging of industrially relevant sample objects with a 10 ps drive pulse is presented for the first time, demonstrating that features of 200 μm size are resolved when projected at high magnification.

  12. Requirements for dynamical differential phase contrast x-ray imaging with a laboratory source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macindoe, David; Kitchen, Marcus J.; Irvine, Sarah C.; Fouras, Andreas; Morgan, Kaye S.

    2016-12-01

    X-ray phase contrast enables weakly-attenuating structures to be imaged, with bright synchrotron sources adding the ability to capture time sequences and analyse sample dynamics. Here, we describe the translation of dynamical differential phase contrast imaging from the synchrotron to a compact x-ray source, in order to achieve this kind of time sequence imaging in the laboratory. We formulate broadly-applicable set-up guidelines for the single-grid, single-exposure imaging technique using a divergent source, exploring the experimental factors that restrict set-up size, imaging sensitivity and sample size. Experimental images are presented using the single-grid phase contrast technique with a steel attenuation grid and a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source, enabling exposure times as short as 0.5 s for dynamic imaging. Differential phase contrast images were retrieved from phantoms, incorporating noise filtering to improve the low-count images encountered when imaging dynamics using short exposures.

  13. Observations of X-ray transient source GS2023+338 with the TTM coded mask telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, H. C.; in 't Zand, J. J. M.; Skinner, G. K.; Borozdin, K. N.; Gil'Fanov, M. R.; Siuniaev, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    TTM observations in which the bright X-ray transient source GS2023+338 (=V404 Cyg) in the period June-August 1989 are reported. The observed spectral structure can be modeled using a model of a power-law source with a photon index of about 1.5, surrounded by partially ionized material. The observed X-rays consist of a component from the power-law source and those reflected (down-scattered) by the partially ionized material. Varying the clumpy structure or changing the ionization state of the circumstellar matter will cause the low-energy absorption to fluctuate.

  14. Development of x-ray sources using PW laser systems at APRI GIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Taek; Lee, Kyoung Hwan; Yun, Hyeok; Kim, I. Jong; Kim, Chul Min; Pae, Ki Hong; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Sung Ku; Yu, Tae Jun; Sebban, Stéphane; Tissandier, Fabien; Gautier, Julien; Depresseux, Adrien; Nejdl, Jaroslav; Kozlová, Michaela; Jeong, Tae Moon; Nam, Chang Hee

    2013-09-01

    A PW Ti:Sapphire laser with 30-J energy and 30-fs pulse duration has been developed at GIST and applied to generate x-rays and energetic charged particles. We present the status and plan of developing ultrashort x-ray sources and their applications. We successfully demonstrated x-ray lasers and their applications to high-resolution imaging. In addition, we plan to generate high flux x-ray/gamma-ray sources using the PW laser.

  15. Modification of the TASMIP x-ray spectral model for the simulation of microfocus x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sisniega, A.; Vaquero, J. J.; Desco, M.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The availability of accurate and simple models for the estimation of x-ray spectra is of great importance for system simulation, optimization, or inclusion of photon energy information into data processing. There is a variety of publicly available tools for estimation of x-ray spectra in radiology and mammography. However, most of these models cannot be used directly for modeling microfocus x-ray sources due to differences in inherent filtration, energy range and/or anode material. For this reason the authors propose in this work a new model for the simulation of microfocus spectra based on existing models for mammography and radiology, modified to compensate for the effects of inherent filtration and energy range. Methods: The authors used the radiology and mammography versions of an existing empirical model [tungsten anode spectral model interpolating polynomials (TASMIP)] as the basis of the microfocus model. First, the authors estimated the inherent filtration included in the radiology model by comparing the shape of the spectra with spectra from the mammography model. Afterwards, the authors built a unified spectra dataset by combining both models and, finally, they estimated the parameters of the new version of TASMIP for microfocus sources by calibrating against experimental exposure data from a microfocus x-ray source. The model was validated by comparing estimated and experimental exposure and attenuation data for different attenuating materials and x-ray beam peak energy values, using two different x-ray tubes. Results: Inherent filtration for the radiology spectra from TASMIP was found to be equivalent to 1.68 mm Al, as compared to spectra obtained from the mammography model. To match the experimentally measured exposure data the combined dataset required to apply a negative filtration of about 0.21 mm Al and an anode roughness of 0.003 mm W. The validation of the model against real acquired data showed errors in exposure and attenuation in

  16. LIGHT SOURCE: Spot size diagnostics for flash radiographic X-ray sources at LAPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng-Gang; Li, Qin; Shi, Jin-Shui; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2009-06-01

    Spot size is one of the parameters to characterize the performance of a radiographic X-ray source. It determines the degree of blurring due to magnification directly. In recent years, a variety of measurement methods have been used to diagnose X-ray spot size at Laboratory of Accelerator Physics and Application (LAPA). Computer simulations and experiments showed that using a rolled-edge to measure the spot size are more accurate, and the intensity distribution of X-ray source was obtained by a device with a square aperture. Experimental and simulation results on a flash X-ray source at our laboratory are presented and discussed in this paper. In addition, a new method for time resolved diagnostics of X-ray spot size is introduced too.

  17. Novae as a Class of Transient X-ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, K.; Orio, M.; Valle, M. Della

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by the recently discovered class of faint (10(exp 34)-10(exp 35) ergs/s) X-ray transients in the Galactic Center region, we investigate the 2-10 keV properties of classical and recurrent novae. Existing data are consistent with the idea that all classical novae are transient X-ray sources with durations of months to years and peak luminosities in the 10(exp 34)-10(exp 35)ergs/s range. This makes classical novae a viable candidate class for the faint Galactic Center transients. We estimate the rate of classical novae within a 15 arcmin radius region centered on the Galactic Center (roughly the field of view of XMM-Newton observations centered on Sgr A*) to be approx.0.1 per year. Therefore, it is plausible that some of the Galactic Center transients that have been announced to date are unrecognized classical novae. The continuing monitoring of the Galactic Center region carried out by Chandra and XMM-Newton may therefore provide a new method to detect classical novae in this crowded and obscured region, an

  18. Chilled disks in ultraluminous X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, Roberto; Kuncic, Zdenka; Gonçalves, Anabela C.

    2007-04-01

    The "soft-excess" component fitted to the X-ray spectra of many ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) remains a controversial finding, which may reveal fundamental information either on the black hole (BH) mass or on the state of the accretion flow. In the simplest model, it was explained as thermal emission from a cool accretion disk around an intermediate-mass BH (about 1000 solar masses). We argue that this scenario is highly implausible, and discuss and compare the two most likely alternatives. 1) The soft-excess does come from a cool disk; however, the temperature is low not because of a high BH mass but because most of the accretion power is drained from the inner disk via magnetic torques, and channelled into jets and outflows ("chilled disk" scenario). Using a phenomenological model, we infer that ULXs contain BHs of about 50 solar masses accreting gas at about 10 times their Eddington rate. 2) The soft excess is in fact a soft deficit, if the power-law continuum is properly fitted. Such broad absorption features are caused by smeared absorption lines in fast, highly ionized outflows. This scenario has already been successfully applied to the soft excess in AGN. If so, this spectral feature reveals details of disk outflows,but is unrelated to the BH mass.

  19. Carbon nanotube based X-ray sources: Applications in pre-clinical and medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yueh Z.; Burk, Laurel; Wang, Ko-Han; Cao, Guohua; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2011-08-01

    Field emission offers an alternate method of electron production for Bremsstrahlung based X-ray tubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) serve as very effective field emitters, allowing them to serve as electron sources for X-ray sources, with specific advantages over traditional thermionic tubes. CNT derived X-ray sources can create X-ray pulses of any duration and frequency, gate the X-ray pulse to any source and allow the placement of many sources in close proximity.We have constructed a number of micro-CT systems based on CNT X-ray sources for applications in small animal imaging, specifically focused on the imaging of the heart and lungs. This paper offers a review of the pre-clinical applications of the CNT based micro-CT that we have developed. We also discuss some of the current and potential clinical applications of the CNT X-ray sources.

  20. X-RAY SPECTRAL CUTOFF AND THE LACK OF HARD X-RAY EMISSION FROM TWO ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES M81 X-6 AND HOLMBERG IX X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Dewangan, G. C.; Misra, R.; Jithesh, V.; Ravikumar, C. D.

    2013-07-10

    We present broadband X-ray spectral study of two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), M81 X-6 and Holmberg IX X-1, based on Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations. We perform joint broadband spectral analysis of the brightest sources in the field, i.e., the two ULXs and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in M81, and demonstrate that the X-ray spectra of the ULXs cut off at energies {approx}> 3 keV with negligible contribution at high energies in the Suzaku HXD/PIN band. The 90% upper limit on the 10-30 keV band luminosity of an underlying broadband power-law component is 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1} for M81 X-6 and 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} for Holmberg IX X-1. These limits are more than an order of magnitude lower than the bolometric (0.1-30 keV) luminosity of 6.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} for M81 X-6 and 1.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} for Holmberg IX X-1. Our results confirm earlier indications of spectral cutoffs inferred from the XMM-Newton observations of bright ULXs and show that there is not an additional high-energy power-law component contributing significantly to the X-ray emission. The spectral form of the two ULXs are very different from those of Galactic black hole X-ray binaries (BHBs) or AGNs. This implies that the ULXs are neither simply scaled-up versions of stellar-mass BHBs nor scaled-down versions of AGNs.

  1. EUV microscopy using a lab-scale x-ray laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleiner, Davide; Staub, Felix; Balmer, Juerg E.

    2011-09-01

    High brightness extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light sources for laboratory operation are needed in nano-fabrication and actinic ("at-wavelength") mask inspection. Mask inspection in next generation lithography is crucial for high volume manufacturing. Plasma-based EUV sources have the required compactness. However, their incoherent emission lacks the brightness for fast and high contrast imaging. The X-ray laser is instead characterized by a remarkable brightness in a compact footprint facility. We evaluated a simple two-mirror optical setup for EUV microscopy illuminated with the BeAGLE X-ray laser system at the University of Berne. Single-shot acquisitions were sufficient to obtain high-contrast images of a Siemens star sample at diffraction-limit. Single-shot operation makes the overall acquisition speed limited by the laser repetition rate only. A reference calculation shows how-fast could be actinic inspection. The contrast was enhanced one order of magnitude by means of image processing. For a modest magnification (12x) no significant third-order aberrations were observed, even when tilting the spherical mirror-pair. For high magnification a Schwarzschild design is considered. The latter compensates astigmatism and coma with a mirror-pair per each element (condenser/magnifier), but introduces twice as many reflections as in the evaluated two-concave setup. Hence a compromise between aberration correction and enhancement of illumination must be found case by case.

  2. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella; ...

    2015-04-21

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a newmore » generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced.« less

  3. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella; Carron, Sebastian; Dragone, Angelo; Freytag, Dietrich; Haller, Gunther; Hart, Philip; Hasi, Jasmine; Herbst, Ryan; Herrmann, Sven; Kenney, Chris; Markovic, Bojan; Nishimura, Kurtis; Osier, Shawn; Pines, Jack; Reese, Benjamin; Segal, Julie; Tomada, Astrid; Weaver, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a new generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced. PMID:25931071

  4. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella; Carron, Sebastian; Dragone, Angelo; Freytag, Dietrich; Haller, Gunther; Hart, Philip; Hasi, Jasmine; Herbst, Ryan; Herrmann, Sven; Kenney, Chris; Markovic, Bojan; Nishimura, Kurtis; Osier, Shawn; Pines, Jack; Reese, Benjamin; Segal, Julie; Tomada, Astrid; Weaver, Matt

    2015-04-21

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a new generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced.

  5. Flash X-Ray (FXR) Accelerator Optimization Electronic Time-Resolved Measurement of X-Ray Source Size

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P

    2005-07-21

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating various approaches to minimize the x-ray source size on the Flash X-Ray (FXR) linear induction accelerator in order to improve x-ray flux and increase resolution for hydrodynamic radiography experiments. In order to effectively gauge improvements to final x-ray source size, a fast, robust, and accurate system for measuring the spot size is required. Timely feedback on x-ray source size allows new and improved accelerator tunes to be deployed and optimized within the limited run-time constraints of a production facility with a busy experimental schedule; in addition, time-resolved measurement capability allows the investigation of not only the time-averaged source size, but also the evolution of the source size, centroid position, and x-ray dose throughout the 70 ns beam pulse. Combined with time-resolved measurements of electron beam parameters such as emittance, energy, and current, key limiting factors can be identified, modeled, and optimized for the best possible spot size. Roll-bar techniques are a widely used method for x-ray source size measurement, and have been the method of choice at FXR for many years. A thick bar of tungsten or other dense metal with a sharp edge is inserted into the path of the x-ray beam so as to heavily attenuate the lower half of the beam, resulting in a half-light, half-dark image as seen downstream of the roll-bar; by measuring the width of the transition from light to dark across the edge of the roll-bar, the source size can be deduced. For many years, film has been the imaging medium of choice for roll-bar measurements thanks to its high resolution, linear response, and excellent contrast ratio. Film measurements, however, are fairly cumbersome and require considerable setup and analysis time; moreover, with the continuing trend towards all-electronic measurement systems, film is becoming increasingly difficult and expensive to procure. Here, we shall

  6. Seeing Red and Shooting Blanks: A Study of Red Quasars And Blank Field X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2003-01-01

    The primary source catalog of 'blanks' (bright ROSAT sources with no optical counterparts) has been published in the Astrophysical Journal. The first follow-up paper has also been published. This paper used a combination of ROSAT, Chandra and ground based data to convincingly identify one of the blanks as a Ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX) in a spiral galaxy. A paper detailing optical and near-IR imaging observations of the remaining sources is underway.

  7. Synchrotron x-ray sources and new opportunities in the soil and environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, D. ); Anderson, S. ); Mattigod, S. )

    1990-07-01

    This report contains the following papers: characteristics of the advanced photon source and comparison with existing synchrotron facilities; x-ray absorption spectroscopy: EXAFS and XANES -- A versatile tool to study the atomic and electronic structure of materials; applications of x-ray spectroscopy and anomalous scattering experiments in the soil and environmental sciences; X-ray fluorescence microprobe and microtomography.

  8. Investigating radial wire array Z pinches as a compact x-ray source on the Saturn generator

    DOE PAGES

    Ampleford, David J.; Bland, S. N.; Jennings, Christopher A.; ...

    2015-08-27

    Radial wire array z pinches, where wires are positioned radially outward from a central cathode to a concentric anode, can act as a compact bright x-ray source that could potentially be used to drive a hohlraum. Experiments were performed on the 7-MA Saturn generator using radial wire arrays. These experiments studied a number of potential risks in scaling radial wire arrays up from the 1-MA level, where they have been shown to be a promising compact X-ray source. Data indicates that at 7 MA, radial wire arrays can radiate ~9 TW with 10-ns full-width at half-maximum from a compact pinch.

  9. Soft x-ray undulator for the Siam Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rugmai, S.; Dasri, T.; Prawanta, S.; Siriwattanapaitoon, S.; Kwankasem, A.; Sooksrimuang, V.; Chachai, W.; Suradet, N.; Juthong, N.; Tancharakorn, S.

    2007-01-19

    An undulator for production of intense soft x-rays has been designed for the Siam Photon Source. The construction of the undulator has been completed. It is now being characterized and prepared for installation. The device, named U60, is a pure permanent magnet planar undulator, consisting of 41 magnetic periods, with 60 mm period length. Utilization of the undulator radiation in the photon energy range of 30 - 900 eV is expected. The design studies of the magnetic structure, including investigation of perturbations arising from the magnetic field of the device, their effects on the SPS storage ring and compensation schemes are described. A magnetic measurement system has been constructed for magnetic characterization of the device. Partial results of magnetic measurements are presented.

  10. 20-100 keV K(alpha) X-Ray Source Generation by Short Pulse High Intensity Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H-S; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Phillips, T W; Goldsack, T

    2003-08-22

    We are studying the feasibility of utilizing K{alpha} x-ray sources in the range of 20 to 100 keV as a backlighters for imaging various stages of implosions and high areal density planar samples driven by the NIF laser facility. The hard x-ray K{alpha} sources are created by relativistic electron plasma interactions in the target material after a radiation by short pulse high intensity lasers. In order to understand K{alpha} source characteristics such as production efficiency and brightness as a function of laser parameters, we have performed experiments using the 10 J, 100 fs JanUSP laser. We utilized single-photon counting spectroscopy and x-ray imaging diagnostics to characterize the K{alpha} source. We find that the K{alpha} conversion efficiency from the laser energy is {approx} 3 x 10{sup -4}.

  11. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Optically Bright Planets using the Chandra Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, P. G.; Elsner, R. F.

    2005-01-01

    Since its launch in July 1999, Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) has observed several planets (Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn) and 6 comets. At 0.5 arc-second spatial resolution, ACIS detects individual x-ray photons with good quantum efficiency (25% at 0.6 KeV) and energy resolution (20% FWHM at 0.6 KeV). However, the ACIS CCDs are also sensitive to optical and near-infrared light, which is absorbed by optical blocking filters (OBFs) that eliminate optical contamination from all but the brightest extended sources, e.g., planets. .Jupiter at opposition subseconds approx.45 arc-seconds (90 CCD pixels.) Since Chandra is incapable of tracking a moving target, the planet takes 10 - 20 kiloseconds to move across the most sensitive ACIS CCD, after which the observatory must be re-pointed. Meanwhile, the OBF covering that CCD adds an opt,ical signal equivalent to approx.110 eV to each pixel that lies within thc outline of the Jovian disk. This has three consequences: (1) the observatory must be pointed away from Jupiter while CCD bias maps are constructed; (2) most x-rays from within the optical image will be misidentified as charged-particle background and ignored; and (3) those x-rays that are reported will bc assigned anomalously high energies. The same also applies to thc other planets, but is less serious since they are either dimmer at optical wavelengths, or they show less apparent motion across the sky, permitting reduced CCD exposure times: the optical contamination from Saturn acids approx.15 eV per pixel, and from Mars and Venus approx.31 eV. After analyzing a series of short .Jupiter observations in December 2000, ACIS parameters were optimized for the February 2003 opposition. CCD bias maps were constructed while Chandra pointed away from Jupiter, and the subsequent observations employed on-board software to ignore any pixel that contained less charge than that expected from optical leakage. In addition, ACIS was commanded to report 5 x 5

  12. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mascali, David Castro, Giuseppe; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Gammino, Santo; Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József; Romano, Francesco Paolo; Torrisi, Giuseppe

    2016-02-15

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed “on-line” during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.

  13. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, David; Castro, Giuseppe; Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József; Caliri, Claudia; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Romano, Francesco Paolo; Torrisi, Giuseppe; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed "on-line" during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.

  14. Flat Field Anomalies in an X-Ray CCD Camera Measured Using a Manson X-Ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Haugh

    2008-03-01

    The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a diagnostic used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the position of the X-rays produced by lasers hitting a gold foil target. It determines how accurately NIF can point the laser beams and is critical to proper NIF operation. Imagers are located at the top and the bottom of the NIF target chamber. The CCD chip is an X-ray sensitive silicon sensor, with a large format array (2k x 2k), 24 μm square pixels, and 15 μm thick. A multi-anode Manson X-ray source, operating up to 10kV and 2mA, was used to characterize and calibrate the imagers. The output beam is heavily filtered to narrow the spectral beam width, giving a typical resolution E/ΔE≈12. The X-ray beam intensity was measured using an absolute photodiode that has accuracy better than 1% up to the Si K edge and better than 5% at higher energies. The X-ray beam provides full CCD illumination and is flat, within ±1.5% maximum to minimum. The spectral efficiency was measured at 10 energy bands ranging from 930 eV to 8470 eV. The efficiency pattern follows the properties of Si. The maximum quantum efficiency is 0.71. We observed an energy dependent pixel sensitivity variation that showed continuous change over a large portion of the CCD. The maximum sensitivity variation was >8% at 8470 eV. The geometric pattern did not change at lower energies, but the maximum contrast decreased and was less than the measurement uncertainty below 4 keV. We were also able to observe debris on the CCD chip. The debris showed maximum contrast at the lowest energy used, 930 eV, and disappeared by 4 keV. The Manson source is a powerful tool for characterizing the imaging errors of an X-ray CCD imager. These errors are quite different from those found in a visible CCD imager.

  15. Classification of X-ray sources in the XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalog: Objects of special interest

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Dacheng; Webb, Natalie A.; Barret, Didier

    2014-01-01

    We analyze 18 sources that showed interesting properties of periodicity, very soft spectra, and/or large long-term variability in X-rays in our project of classification of sources from the 2XMMi-DR3 catalog, but were poorly studied in the literature, in order to investigate their nature. Two hard sources show X-ray periodicities of ∼1.62 hr (2XMM J165334.4–414423) and ∼2.1 hr (2XMM J133135.2–315541) and are probably magnetic cataclysmic variables. One source, 2XMM J123103.2+110648, is an active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidate showing very soft X-ray spectra (kT ∼ 0.1 keV) and exhibiting an intermittent ∼3.8 hr quasi-periodic oscillation. There are six other very soft sources (with kT < 0.2 keV), which might be in other galaxies with luminosities between ∼10{sup 38}-10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1}. They probably represent a diverse group that might include objects such as ultrasoft AGNs and cool thermal disk emission from accreting intermediate-mass black holes. Six highly variable sources with harder spectra are probably in nearby galaxies with luminosities above 10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1} and thus are great candidates for extragalactic X-ray binaries. One of them (2XMMi J004211.2+410429, in M31) is probably a new-born persistent source, having been X-ray bright and hard in 0.3-10 keV for at least four years since it was discovered entering an outburst in 2007. Three highly variable hard sources appear at low galactic latitudes and have maximum luminosities below ∼10{sup 34} erg s{sup –1} if they are in our Galaxy. Thus, they are great candidates for cataclysmic variables or very faint X-ray transients harboring a black hole or neutron star. Our interpretations of these sources can be tested with future long-term X-ray monitoring and multi-wavelength observations.

  16. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Bright Galactic X-Ray Binaries in Crowded Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, Eric W.; Margon, Bruce; Wachter, Stefanie; Anderson, Scott F.

    1996-01-01

    We report high spatial resolution HST imagery and photometry of three well-studied, intense Galactic X-ray binaries, X2129+470, CAL 87, and GX 17+2. All three sources exhibit important anomalies that are not readily interpreted by conventional models. Each source also lies in a severely crowded field, and in all cases the anomalies would be removed if much of the light observed from the ground in fact came from a nearby, thus far unresolved superposed companion. For V1727 Cyg (X2129+470), we find no such companion. We also present an HST FOS spectrum and broadband photometry which is consistent with a single, normal star. The supersoft LMC X-ray source CAL 87 was already known from ground-based work to have a companion separated by O.9 minutes from the optical counterpart; our HST images clearly resolve these objects and yield the discovery of an even closer, somewhat fainter additional companion. Our photometry indicates that contamination is not severe outside eclipse, where the companions only contribute 20% of the light in V, but during eclipse more than half of the V light comes from the companions. The previously determined spectral type of the CAL 87 secondary may need to be reevaluated due to this significant contamination, with consequences on inferences of the mass of the components. We find no companions to NP Ser (= X1813-14, = GX 17+2). However, for this object we point out a small but possibly significant astrometric discrepancy between the position of the optical object and that of the radio source which is the basis for the identification. This discrepancy needs to be clarified.

  17. Generation of Bright, Spatially Coherent Soft X-Ray High Harmonics in a Hollow Waveguide Using Two-Color Synthesized Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Cheng; Stein, Gregory J.; Hong, Kyung-Han; Lin, C. D.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the efficient generation of low-divergence high-order harmonics driven by waveform-optimized laser pulses in a gas-filled hollow waveguide. The drive waveform is obtained by synthesizing two-color laser pulses, optimized such that highest harmonic yields are emitted from each atom. Optimization of the gas pressure and waveguide configuration has enabled us to produce bright and spatially coherent harmonics extending from the extreme ultraviolet to soft x rays. Our study on the interplay among waveguide mode, atomic dispersion, and plasma effect uncovers how dynamic phase matching is accomplished and how an optimized waveform is maintained when optimal waveguide parameters (radius and length) and gas pressure are identified. Our analysis should help laboratory development in the generation of high-flux bright coherent soft x rays as tabletop light sources for applications.

  18. Medical imaging using a laser-wakefield driven x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Jason; Wood, Jonathan; Lopes, Nelson; Poder, Kristjan; Kamperidis, Christos; Alatabi, Saleh; Bryant, Jonathan; Kneip, Stefan; Mecseki, Katalin; Norris, Dominic; Teboul, Lydia; Westerburg, Henrik; Abel, Richard; Jin, Andi; Symes, Dan; Mangles, Stuart; Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2016-10-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators driven by high-intensity laser pulses are a proven centimetre-scale source of GeV electron beams. One of the proposed uses for these accelerators is the driving of compact hard x-ray synchrotron light sources. Such sources have been shown to be bright, have small source size and high photon energy, and are therefore interesting for imaging applications. By doubling the focal length at the Astra-Gemini laser facility of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK, we have significantly improved the average betatron x-ray flux compared to previous experiments. This fact, coupled to the stability of the radiation source, facilitated the acquisition of full 3D tomograms of hard bone tissue and soft mouse neonates, the latter requiring the recording of over 500 successive radiographs. Such multimodal performance is unprecedented in the betatron field and indicates the usefulness of these sources in clinical imaging applications, scalable to very high photon flux without compromising source size or photon energy.

  19. King's College laser plasma x-ray source design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnaimi, Radhwan; Adjei, Daniel; Alatabi, Saleh; Appuhamilage, Indika Arachchi; Michette, Alan

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work is to design and build a source for a range of applications, with optimized multilayer structures in order to use the source output as efficiently as possible. The source is built around a Nd:YAG laser with fundamental wavelength 1064 nm, frequency doubled 532 nm (green) and tripled 355 nm, with a pulse length of about 800 ps and a repetition rate up to 50 Hz. The target material is Mylar (C10H8O4) tape, which is cheap, readily available and has many benefits as explained in this article. A versatile cubic target chamber and a set of computer controlled stage motors are used to allow positioning of the X-ray emission point. A range of measures is used to protect delicate components and optics, including a glass slide between the focusing lens and the target to prevent the lens being coated with debris. A low pressure gas (typically 3-6 mbar) is used inside the chamber as collision of atomic size debris particles with gas molecules reduces their kinetic energy and consequently their adhesion to the surrounding surfaces. The gas used is typically helium or nitrogen, the latter also acting as a spectral filter. Finally, the chamber is continually pumped to ensure that more than 70% of the debris particles are pumped out of the chamber.

  20. Performance of the Cygnus X-ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, John R.; Carlson, Randolph; Fulton, Robert D.; Altes, R.; Carboni, V.; Chavez, Jacob R.; Corcoran, P.; Coulter, William L.; Douglas, J.; Droemer, D.; Gibson, William A.; Helvin, Thomas B.; Henderson, David J.; Johnson, David L.; Maenchen, John E.; Mitton, Charlas V.; Molina, Isidro; Nishimoto, H.; Ormond, Eugene C.; Ortega, Paul A.; Quicksilver, Robert J.; Ridlon, Rae N.; Rose, Evan A.; Scholfield, David W.; Smith, I.; Valerio, Antonio R.; White, R.

    2002-12-01

    Cygnus is a radiographic x-ray source developed for support of the Sub-Critical Experiments Program at the Nevada Test Site. Major requirements for this application are: a dramatically reduced spot size as compared to both Government Laboratory and existing commercial alternatives, layout flexibility, and reliability. Cygnus incorporates proven pulsed power technology (Marx Generator, Pulse Forming Line, Water Transmission Line, and Inductive Voltage Adder sub-components) to drive a high voltage vacuum diode. In the case of Cygnus, a relatively new approach (the rod pinch diode [1]) is employed to achieve a small source diameter. Design specifications are: 2.25 MeV endpoint energy, < 1 mm source diameter, and >3 rads dose at 1 meter. The pulsed power and system architecture design plan has been previously presented [2]. The first set of Cygnus shots were geared to verification of electrical parameters and, therefore, used a large area diode configuration offering increased shot rate as compared to that of the rod pinch diode. In this paper we present results of initial rod pinch operation in terms of electrical and radiation parameters.

  1. RXTE/ASM and Swift/BAT observations of spectral transitions in bright X-ray binaries in 2005-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Yu, Wen-Fei; Yan, Zhen

    2011-04-01

    We have studied X-ray spectral state transitions that can be seen in the long-term monitoring light curves of bright X-ray binaries from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) onboard Swift during a period of five years from 2005 to 2010. We have applied a program to automatically identify the hard-to-soft (H-S) spectral state transitions in the bright X-ray binaries monitored by the ASM and the BAT. In total, we identified 128 hard-to-soft transitions, of which 59 occurred after 2008. We also determined the transition fluxes and the peak fluxes of the following soft states, updated the measurements of the luminosity corresponding to the H-S transition and the peak luminosity of the following soft state in about 30 bright persistent and transient black hole and neutron star binaries following Yu & Yan, and found the luminosity correlation and the luminosity range of spectral transitions in data between 2008-2010 are about the same as those derived from data before 2008. This further strengthens the idea that the luminosity at which the H-S spectral transition occurs in the Galactic X-ray binaries is determined by non-stationary accretion parameters such as the rate-of-change of the mass accretion rate rather than the mass accretion rate itself. The correlation is also found to hold in data of individual sources 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53.

  2. Seeing Red and Shooting Blanks: A Study of Red Quasars and Blank Field X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have identified a population of 'blank field sources' (or 'blanks') among the ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite) bright unidentified X-ray sources with faint optical counterparts. The extreme X-ray over optical flux ratio of blank field sources is not compatible with the main classes of X-ray emitters except for extreme BL Lacertae objects at fx/fv is equal to or less than 35. From the analysis of ROSAT archival data we found evidence for only three sources, out of 16, needing absorption in excess of the Galactic value and no indication of variability. We also found evidence for an extended nature for only one of the five blanks with a serendipitous HRI (High Resolution Imager) detection; this source (1WGA J1226.9+3332) was confirmed as a z=0.89 cluster of galaxies. Palomar images reveal the presence of a red (O - E is equal to or greater than 2) counterpart in the X-ray error circle for six blanks. The identification process brought to the discovery of another high z cluster of galaxies, one (possibly extreme) BL Lac and two apparently normal type 1 AGNs (Active Galactic Nuclei). These AGNs, together with four more AGN-like objects seem to form a well defined group: they present type 1 X-ray spectra but red Palomar counterparts. We discuss the possible explanations for the discrepancy between the X-ray and optical data, among which: a suppressed big blue bump emission, an extreme dust to gas (approximately 40 - 60 the Galactic ratio) ratio value and a high redshift (z is greater than or equal to 3.5) QSO (Quasi-Stellar Object) nature. These AGN-like blanks seem to be the bright (and easier to study) analogs of the sources which are being found in deep Chandra observations. Five more blanks have a still an unknown nature.

  3. X-ray QPOs from the Ultra-luminous X-ray Source in M82: Evidence Against Beaming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2003-01-01

    We report the discovery with the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) CCD cameras onboard XMM-Newton of a 54 mHz quasiperiodic oscillation (QPO) in the greater than 2 keV X-ray flux from the ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX) X41.4+60 in the starburst galaxy M82. This is the first detection of a QPO in the X-ray flux from an extra-Galactic ULX, and confirms that the source is a compact object. The QPO is detected in the combined PN and MOS data at the approx. 6sigma level, and separately at lower significances in both the PN and MOS instruments. It had a centroid frequency of 54.3 +/- 0.9 mHz, a coherence Q is identical with nu(sub 0)/Delta nu(sub fwhm) is approx. 5, and an amplitude (rms) in the 2 - 10 keV band of 8.5%. Below about 0.2 Hz the power spectrum can be described by a power-law with index approx. 1, and integrated amplitude (rms) of 13.5%. The X-ray spectrum requires a curving continuum, with a disk-blackbody (diskbb) at T = 3.1 keV providing an acceptable, but not unique, fit. A broad Fe line centered at 6.55 keV is required in all fits, but the equivalent width (EW) of the line is sensitive to the choice of continuum model. There is no evidence of a reflection component. The implied bolometric luminosity is approx. 4 - 5 x 10(exp 40) ergs/s. Data from several archival Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) pointings at M82 also show evidence for QPOs in the 50 - 100 mHz frequency range. Several Galactic black hole candidates (BHCs), including GRS 1915+105, GRO J1655-40, and XTE 1550-564, show QPOs in the same frequency range as the 50 - 100 mHz QPOs in X41.4+60, which at first glance suggests a possible connection with such objects. However, strong, narrow QPOs provide solid evidence for disk emission, and thus present enormous theoretical difficulties for models which rely on either geometrically or relativistically beamed emission to account for the high X-ray luminosities. We discuss the implications of our findings for models of the ULX sources.

  4. The X-ray Source Population of M33 as seen by XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofali, Kristen; Williams, Benjamin F.; Wold, Brian; Haberl, Frank; Blair, William P.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Kuntz, K. D.; Long, Knox S.; Pannuti, Thomas; Pietsch, Wolfgang; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Winkler, P. Frank

    2015-01-01

    We present results from the deepest survey of M33 with XMM-Newton to date. The survey consists of 8 overlapping EPIC fields covering an area beyond the D25 isophote down to a limiting sensitivity of L(0.2-4.5 keV) > 4e+34 erg/s. This larger field of view coupled with the higher soft sensitivity of XMM-Newton provides an excellent complement to the Chandra ACIS Survey of M33 (ChASeM33). Comparison of our source catalog with the Chandra survey allows us to identify variable sources as well as previously undetected soft sources. Our coverage of the full M33 disk reveals many new sources including SNRs previously undetected in X-rays. The radial coverage extends far enough to provide high-quality background statistics, including a radial density distribution of bright sources which suggests that roughly 15% of sources with L > 3.6e+35 erg/s are likely to be associated with M33. The accurate background statistics allow us to perform a simultaneous fit of our background and observed luminosity functions, which yields a slope consistent with the presence of a significant population of HMXBs. The combined XMM-Newton and Chandra data will allow the most detailed study of the X-ray population of a late-type spiral possible with currently-available facilities. We will show preliminary work in studying new HMXB candidates using HST.

  5. Laser-wakefield accelerators as hard x-ray sources for 3D medical imaging of human bone.

    PubMed

    Cole, J M; Wood, J C; Lopes, N C; Poder, K; Abel, R L; Alatabi, S; Bryant, J S J; Jin, A; Kneip, S; Mecseki, K; Symes, D R; Mangles, S P D; Najmudin, Z

    2015-08-18

    A bright μm-sized source of hard synchrotron x-rays (critical energy Ecrit > 30 keV) based on the betatron oscillations of laser wakefield accelerated electrons has been developed. The potential of this source for medical imaging was demonstrated by performing micro-computed tomography of a human femoral trabecular bone sample, allowing full 3D reconstruction to a resolution below 50 μm. The use of a 1 cm long wakefield accelerator means that the length of the beamline (excluding the laser) is dominated by the x-ray imaging distances rather than the electron acceleration distances. The source possesses high peak brightness, which allows each image to be recorded with a single exposure and reduces the time required for a full tomographic scan. These properties make this an interesting laboratory source for many tomographic imaging applications.

  6. Laser-wakefield accelerators as hard x-ray sources for 3D medical imaging of human bone

    PubMed Central

    Cole, J. M.; Wood, J. C.; Lopes, N. C.; Poder, K.; Abel, R. L.; Alatabi, S.; Bryant, J. S. J.; Jin, A.; Kneip, S.; Mecseki, K.; Symes, D. R.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.

    2015-01-01

    A bright μm-sized source of hard synchrotron x-rays (critical energy Ecrit > 30 keV) based on the betatron oscillations of laser wakefield accelerated electrons has been developed. The potential of this source for medical imaging was demonstrated by performing micro-computed tomography of a human femoral trabecular bone sample, allowing full 3D reconstruction to a resolution below 50 μm. The use of a 1 cm long wakefield accelerator means that the length of the beamline (excluding the laser) is dominated by the x-ray imaging distances rather than the electron acceleration distances. The source possesses high peak brightness, which allows each image to be recorded with a single exposure and reduces the time required for a full tomographic scan. These properties make this an interesting laboratory source for many tomographic imaging applications. PMID:26283308

  7. A proposal for a collecting mirror assembly for large divergence x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Ichimaru, Satoshi; Hatayama, Masatoshi; Ohchi, Tadayuki; Oku, Satoshi

    2014-11-01

    We propose a new type of collecting mirror assembly (CMA) for x rays, which will enable us to build a powerful optical system for collecting x rays from large divergence sources. The CMA consists of several mirror sections connected in series. The angle of each section is designed so that the x rays reflected from it are parallel to the x rays directly incident on the following sections. A simplified CMA structure is designed and applied to the Al-Kα emission line. It is estimated that by using the CMA the number of x rays detected could be increased by a factor of about 2.5.

  8. Observation of soft X-rays from extended sources. [such as Perseus star cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catura, R. C.; Acton, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    Efforts were directed toward surveying several supernova remnants for the emission of soft X-rays. Rather than attempt to detect such faint X-ray emission, the program was redirected to observe the spectrum and angular structure of the extended X-ray source in the Perseus cluster of galaxies and the super-nova remnant Puppis A. An attempt was made to detect X-ray line emission from Puppis A with a Bragg crystal spectrometer. Observations provide evidence for the presence of X-ray line emission in the spectrum of Puppis A near .65 keV.

  9. Can AGN and galaxy clusters explain the surface brightness fluctuations of the cosmic X-ray background?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodzig, Alexander; Gilfanov, Marat; Hütsi, Gert; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2017-04-01

    Fluctuations of the surface brightness of cosmic X-ray background (CXB) carry unique information about faint and low-luminosity source populations, which is inaccessible for conventional large-scale structure (LSS) studies based on resolved sources. We used XBOOTES (5ks deep Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-I maps of the ∼ 9 deg2 Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey) to conduct the most accurate measurement to date of the power spectrum of fluctuations of the unresolved CXB on the angular scales of 3 arcsec-17 arcmin. We find that at sub-arcmin angular scales, the power spectrum is consistent with the active galactic nucleus (AGN) shot noise, without much need for any significant contribution from their one-halo term. This is consistent with the theoretical expectation that low-luminosity AGN reside alone in their dark matter haloes. However, at larger angular scales, we detect a significant LSS signal above the AGN shot noise. Its power spectrum, obtained after subtracting the AGN shot noise, follows a power law with the slope of -0.8 ± 0.1 and its amplitude is much larger than what can be plausibly explained by the two-halo term of AGN. We demonstrate that the detected LSS signal is produced by unresolved clusters and groups of galaxies. For the flux limit of the XBOOTES survey, their flux-weighted mean redshift equals ∼ 0.3, and the mean temperature of their intracluster medium (ICM), ≈ 1.4 keV, corresponds to the mass of M500 ∼ 1013.5 M⊙. The power spectrum of CXB fluctuations carries information about the redshift distribution of these objects and the spatial structure of their ICM on the linear scales of up to ∼Mpc, i.e. of the order of the virial radius.

  10. The light curve of a transient X-ray source. [the aeriel satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaluzienski, L. J.; Holt, S. S.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Eadie, G.; Pounds, K. A.; Ricketts, M. J.; Watson, M.

    1975-01-01

    The Ariel-V satellite monitored the X-ray light curve of A1524-62 almost continuously from 40 days prior to maximum light until its disappearance below the effective experimental sensitivity. The source exhibited maximum light on approximately 4 December 1974, at a level of 0.9 the apparent magnitude of the Crab Nebula in the energy band 3-6 keV. Although similar to previously reported transient sources with a decay time constant of approximately 2 months, the source exhibited an extended, variable pre-flare on-state of about 1 month at a level of greater than approximately 0.1 maximum light. The four bright (greater than 0.2 of the Crab Nebula) transient sources observed during the first half-year of Ariel-V operation are indicative of a galactic disk distribution, and a luminosity at maximum in excess of 10 to the 37th power ergs/sec.

  11. A Chandra X-Ray Study of NGC 1068 IL the Luminous X-Ray Source Population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David A.; Wilson, Andrew S.

    2003-01-01

    We present an analysis of the compact X-ray source population in the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068, imaged with a approx. 50 ks Chandra observation. We find a total of 84 compact sources on the S3 chip, of which 66 are located within the 25.0 B-mag/arcsec isophote of the galactic disk of NGC 1068. Spectra have been obtained for the 21 sources with at least 50 counts and modeled with both multicolor disk blackbody and power-law models. The power-law model provides the better description of the spectrum for 18 of these sources. For fainter sources, the spectral index has been estimated from the hardness ratio. Five sources have 0.4 - 8 keV intrinsic luminosities greater than 10(exp 39)ergs/ s, assuming that their emission is isotropic and that they are associated with NGC 1068. We refer to these sources as intermediate-luminosity X-ray objects (ISOs). If these five sources are X-ray binaries accreting with luminosities that are both sub-Eddington and isotropic, then the implied source masses are approx greater than 7 solar mass, and so they are inferred to be black holes. Most of the spectrally modeled sources have spectral shapes similar to Galactic black hole candidates. However, the brightest compact source in NGC 1068 has a spectrum that is much harder than that found in Galactic black hole candidates and other ISOs. The brightest source also shows large amplitude variability on both short-term and long-term timescales, with the count rate possibly decreasing by a factor of 2 in approx. 2 ks during our Chundra observation, and the source flux decreasing by a factor of 5 between our observation and the grating observations taken just over 9 months later. The ratio of the number of sources with luminosities greater than 2.1 x 10(exp 38) ergs/s in the 0.4 - 8 keV band to the rate of massive (greater than 5 solar mass) star formation is the same, to within a factor of 2, for NGC 1068, the Antennae, NGC 5194 (the main galaxy in M51), and the Circinus galaxy. This suggests

  12. 2XMM ultraluminous X-ray source candidates in nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, D. J.; Roberts, T. P.; Mateos, S.; Heard, V.

    2011-09-01

    Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are some of the most enigmatic X-ray bright sources known to date. It is generally accepted that they cannot host black holes as large as those associated with active galaxies, but they appear to be significantly more luminous than their better understood Galactic X-ray binary (XRB) cousins, while displaying an intriguing combination of differences and similarities with them. Through studying large, representative samples of these sources we may hope to enhance our understanding of them. To this end, we derive a large catalogue of 650 X-ray detections of 470 ULX candidates, located in 238 nearby galaxies, by cross-correlating the 2XMM Serendipitous Survey with the Third Reference Catalogue of Bright Galaxies. The presented dedicated catalogue offers a significant improvement over those previously published in terms of both the number and the contribution of background contaminants, e.g. distant quasars, which we estimate to be at most 24 per cent, but more likely ˜17 per cent. To undertake population studies, we define a 'complete' sub-sample of sources compiled from observations of galaxies with sensitivity limits below 1039 erg s-1. The luminosity function of this sample is consistent with a simple power law of form N(>LX) ∝ L-0.96 ± 0.11X. Although we do not find any statistical requirement for a cut-off luminosity of Lc˜ 1040 erg s-1, as has been reported previously, we are not able to rule out its presence. Also, we find that the number of ULXs per unit galaxy mass, Su, decreases with increasing galaxy mass for ULXs associated with spiral galaxies, and is well modelled with a power law of form Su ∝ M-0.64 ± 0.07. This is in broad agreement with previous results, and is likely to be a consequence of the decrease in specific star formation and increase in metallicity with increasing spiral galaxy mass. Su is consistent with being constant with galaxy mass for sources associated with elliptical galaxies, implying this

  13. X-ray imaging detectors for synchrotron and XFEL sources

    PubMed Central

    Hatsui, Takaki; Graafsma, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Current trends for X-ray imaging detectors based on hybrid and monolithic detector technologies are reviewed. Hybrid detectors with photon-counting pixels have proven to be very powerful tools at synchrotrons. Recent developments continue to improve their performance, especially for higher spatial resolution at higher count rates with higher frame rates. Recent developments for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) experiments provide high-frame-rate integrating detectors with both high sensitivity and high peak signal. Similar performance improvements are sought in monolithic detectors. The monolithic approach also offers a lower noise floor, which is required for the detection of soft X-ray photons. The link between technology development and detector performance is described briefly in the context of potential future capabilities for X-ray imaging detectors. PMID:25995846

  14. The prospects for soft x-ray contact microscopy using laser plasmas as an x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Stead, A.D.; Page, A.M.; Ford, T.W.

    1995-12-31

    Since its invention, a major concern of those using a microscope has been to improve the resolution without the introduction of artifacts. While light microscopy carries little risk of the introduction of artifacts, because the preparative techniques are often minimal, the resolution is somewhat limited. The advent of the electron microscope offered greatly improved resolution but since biological specimens require extensive preparation, the possibility of causing structural damage to the specimen is also increased. The ideal technique for structural studies of biological specimens would enable hydrated material to be examined without any preparation and with a resolution equal to that of electron microscopy. Soft x-ray microscopy certainly enables living material to be examined and whilst the resolution does not equal that of electron microscopy it exceeds that attainable by light microscopy. This paper briefly reviews the limitations of light and electron microscopy for the biologist and considers the various ways that soft x-rays might be used to image hydrated biological material. Consideration is given to the different sources that have been used for soft x-ray microscopy and the relative merits of laser-plasma sources are discussed.

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF THE X-RAY THERMAL DOMINANT STATE IN AN ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE IN M82

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Hua; Kaaret, Philip

    2010-04-01

    The thermal dominant state in black hole binaries (BHBs) is well understood but rarely seen in ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). Using simultaneous observations of M82 with Chandra and XMM-Newton, we report the first likely identification of the thermal dominant state in a ULX based on the disappearance of X-ray oscillations, low timing noise, and a spectrum dominated by multicolor disk emission with luminosity varying to the fourth power of the disk temperature. This indicates that ULXs are similar to Galactic BHBs. The brightest X-ray spectrum can be fitted with a relativistic disk model with either a highly super-Eddington (L {sub disk}/L {sub Edd} = 160) non-rotating black hole (BH) or a close to Eddington (L {sub disk}/L {sub Edd} {approx} 2) rapidly rotating BH. The latter interpretation is preferred, due to the absence of such highly super-Eddington states in Galactic BHs and active galactic nuclei, and suggests that the ULX in M82 contains a BH of 200-800 solar masses with nearly maximal spin. On long timescales, the source normally stays at a relatively low flux level with a regular 62-day orbital modulation and occasionally exhibits irregular flaring activity. These thermal dominant states are observed during outbursts.

  16. Use of electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source for nondestructive testing application

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T.S.

    2006-03-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) technique is being used for generating x rays in the low-energy region (<150 keV). Recently, the source is used for the calibration of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) badges. In order to qualify the ECR x-ray source for imaging application, the source should give uniform flux over the area under study. Lead collimation arrangement is made to get uniform flux. The flux profile is measured using a teletector at different distance from the port and uniform field region of 10x10 cm{sup 2} has been marked at 20 cm from the x-ray exit port. A digital-to-analog converter (DAC) circuit pack is used for examining the source performance. The required dose for nondestructive testing examination has been estimated using a hospital x-ray machine and it is found to be 0.05 mSv. Our source experimental parameters are tuned and the DAC circuit pack was exposed for nearly 7 min to get the required dose value. The ECR x-ray source operating parameters are argon pressure: 10{sup -5} Torr, microwave power: 350 W, and coil current: 0 A. The effective energy of the x-ray spectrum is nearly 40 keV. The x-ray images obtained from ECR x-ray source and hospital medical radiography machine are compared. It is found that the image obtained from ECR x-ray source is suitable for NDT application.

  17. The XXL Survey. VI. The 1000 brightest X-ray point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotopoulou, S.; Pacaud, F.; Paltani, S.; Ranalli, P.; Ramos-Ceja, M. E.; Faccioli, L.; Plionis, M.; Adami, C.; Bongiorno, A.; Brusa, M.; Chiappetti, L.; Desai, S.; Elyiv, A.; Lidman, C.; Melnyk, O.; Pierre, M.; Piconcelli, E.; Vignali, C.; Alis, S.; Ardila, F.; Arnouts, S.; Baldry, I.; Bremer, M.; Eckert, D.; Guennou, L.; Horellou, C.; Iovino, A.; Koulouridis, E.; Liske, J.; Maurogordato, S.; Menanteau, F.; Mohr, J. J.; Owers, M.; Poggianti, B.; Pompei, E.; Sadibekova, T.; Stanford, A.; Tuffs, R.; Willis, J.

    2016-06-01

    Context. X-ray extragalactic surveys are ideal laboratories for the study of the evolution and clustering of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Usually, a combination of deep and wide surveys is necessary to create a complete picture of the population. Deep X-ray surveys provide the faint population at high redshift, while wide surveys provide the rare bright sources. Nevertheless, very wide area surveys often lack the ancillary information available for modern deep surveys. The XXL survey spans two fields of a combined 50 deg2 observed for more than 6Ms with XMM-Newton, occupying the parameter space that lies between deep surveys and very wide area surveys; at the same time it benefits from a wealth of ancillary data. Aims: This paper marks the first release of the XXL point source catalogue including four optical photometry bands and redshift estimates. Our sample is selected in the 2 - 10 keV energy band with the goal of providing a sizable sample useful for AGN studies. The limiting flux is F2 - 10 keV = 4.8 × 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2. Methods: We use both public and proprietary data sets to identify the counterparts of the X-ray point-like sources by means of a likelihood ratio test. We improve upon the photometric redshift determination for AGN by applying a Random Forest classification trained to identify for each object the optimal photometric redshift category (passive, star forming, starburst, AGN, quasi-stellar objects (QSO)). Additionally, we assign a probability to each source that indicates whether it might be a star or an outlier. We apply Bayesian analysis to model the X-ray spectra assuming a power-law model with the presence of an absorbing medium. Results: We find that the average unabsorbed photon index is ⟨Γ⟩ = 1.85 ± 0.40 while the average hydrogen column density is log ⟨NH⟩ = 21.07 ± 1.2 cm-2. We find no trend of Γ or NH with redshift and a fraction of 26% absorbed sources (log NH> 22) consistent with the literature on bright sources (log

  18. Observation of the X-ray source Sco X-1 from Skylab. [radiant flux density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    An attempt to observe the discrete X-ray source Sco X-1 on 20 September 1973 between 0856 and 0920 UT is reported. Data obtained with the ATM/S-056 X-ray event analyzer, in particular the flux observed with the 1.71 to 4.96 KeV counter, is analyzed. No photographic image of the source was obtained because Sco X-1 was outside the field of view of the X-ray telescope.

  19. Exploring the overabundance of ultraluminous X-ray sources in metal- and dust-poor local Lyman break analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu-Zych, Antara; Lehmer, Bret; Fragos, Tassos; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Zezas, Andreas; Yukita, Mihoko; Ptak, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We have studied high mass X-ray binary (HMXB) populations within two low-metallicity, starburst galaxies, Haro 11 and VV 114. These galaxies serve as analogs to high-redshift (z > 2) Lyman break galaxies, and within the larger sample of Lyman break analogs (LBAs) are sufficiently nearby (< 87 Mpc) to be spatially-resolved by Chandra. Previous studies of the X-ray emission in LBAs have found that the 2-10 keV luminosity per star formation rate (SFR) in these galaxies is elevated, potentially because of their low metallicities (12+log[O/H]=8.3-8.4). Theoretically, the progenitors of XRBs forming in lower metallicity environments lose less mass from stellar winds over their lifetimes, producing more massive compact objects (i.e., neutron stars and black holes), and thus resulting in more numerous and luminous HMXBs per SFR. In this talk, I present our in-depth study of the only two LBAs that have spatially-resolved 2-10 keV emission with Chandra to present the bright end of the X-ray luminosity distribution of HMXBs (LX>1039 erg s-1 ultraluminous X-ray sources, ULXs) in these low-metallicity galaxies, based on 8 detected ULXs. Comparing with the star-forming galaxy X-ray luminosity function (XLF), Haro 11 and VV 114 host ~4 times more LX>1040 erg s-1 sources than expected given their SFRs. We simulate the effects of source blending from crowded lower luminosity HMXBs using the star-forming galaxy XLF and then vary the XLF normalizations and bright-end slopes until we reproduce the observed point source luminosity distributions. Based on this analysis, we find that these LBAs have a shallower bright end slope than the standard XLF.

  20. Photon-in photon-out hard X-ray spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Zhu, Diling; Kroll, Thomas; Chollet, Mathieu; Feng, Yiping; Glownia, James M.; Kern, Jan; Lemke, Henrik T.; Nordlund, Dennis; Robert, Aymeric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Bergmann, Uwe

    2015-04-15

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) have opened unprecedented possibilities to study the structure and dynamics of matter at an atomic level and ultra-fast timescale. Many of the techniques routinely used at storage ring facilities are being adapted for experiments conducted at FELs. In order to take full advantage of these new sources several challenges have to be overcome. They are related to the very different source characteristics and its resulting impact on sample delivery, X-ray optics, X-ray detection and data acquisition. Here it is described how photon-in photon-out hard X-ray spectroscopy techniques can be applied to study the electronic structure and its dynamics of transition metal systems with ultra-bright and ultra-short FEL X-ray pulses. In particular, some of the experimental details that are different compared with synchrotron-based setups are discussed and illustrated by recent measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

  1. Photon-in photon-out hard X-ray spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Zhu, Diling; ...

    2015-04-15

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) have opened unprecedented possibilities to study the structure and dynamics of matter at an atomic level and ultra-fast timescale. Many of the techniques routinely used at storage ring facilities are being adapted for experiments conducted at FELs. In order to take full advantage of these new sources several challenges have to be overcome. They are related to the very different source characteristics and its resulting impact on sample delivery, X-ray optics, X-ray detection and data acquisition. Here it is described how photon-in photon-out hard X-ray spectroscopy techniques can be applied to study the electronic structure andmore » its dynamics of transition metal systems with ultra-bright and ultra-short FEL X-ray pulses. In particular, some of the experimental details that are different compared with synchrotron-based setups are discussed and illustrated by recent measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source.« less

  2. Hard X-ray phase-contrast imaging with the Compact Light Source based on inverse Compton X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Bech, Martin; Bunk, Oliver; David, Christian; Ruth, Ronald; Rifkin, Jeff; Loewen, Rod; Feidenhans’l, Robert; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2009-01-01

    The first imaging results obtained from a small-size synchrotron are reported. The newly developed Compact Light Source produces inverse Compton X-rays at the intersection point of the counter propagating laser and electron beam. The small size of the intersection point gives a highly coherent cone beam with a few milliradian angular divergence and a few percent energy spread. These specifications make the Compact Light Source ideal for a recently developed grating-based differential phase-contrast imaging method. PMID:19096173

  3. A SEARCH FOR HYPERLUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES IN THE XMM-NEWTON SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotukhin, I.; Webb, N. A.; Godet, O.; Barret, D.; Bachetti, M.

    2016-02-01

    We present a new method to identify luminous off-nuclear X-ray sources in the outskirts of galaxies from large public redshift surveys, distinguishing them from foreground and background interlopers. Using the 3XMM-DR5 catalog of X-ray sources and the SDSS DR12 spectroscopic sample of galaxies, with the help of this off-nuclear cross-matching technique, we selected 98 sources with inferred X-ray luminosities in the range 10{sup 41} < L{sub X} < 10{sup 44} erg s{sup −1}, compatible with hyperluminous X-ray objects (HLX). To validate the method, we verify that it allowed us to recover known HLX candidates such as ESO 243–49 HLX–1 and M82 X–1. From a statistical study, we conservatively estimate that up to 71 ± 11 of these sources may be foreground- or background sources, statistically leaving at least 16 that are likely to be HLXs, thus providing support for the existence of the HLX population. We identify two good HLX candidates and using other publicly available data sets, in particular the VLA FIRST in radio, UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey in the near-infrared, GALEX in the ultraviolet and Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope Megacam archive in the optical, we present evidence that these objects are unlikely to be foreground or background X-ray objects of conventional types, e.g., active galactic nuclei, BL Lac objects, Galactic X-ray binaries, or nearby stars. However, additional dedicated X-ray and optical observations are needed to confirm their association with the assumed host galaxies and thus secure their HLX classification.

  4. A Search for Hyperluminous X-Ray Sources in the XMM-Newton Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotukhin, I.; Webb, N. A.; Godet, O.; Bachetti, M.; Barret, D.

    2016-02-01

    We present a new method to identify luminous off-nuclear X-ray sources in the outskirts of galaxies from large public redshift surveys, distinguishing them from foreground and background interlopers. Using the 3XMM-DR5 catalog of X-ray sources and the SDSS DR12 spectroscopic sample of galaxies, with the help of this off-nuclear cross-matching technique, we selected 98 sources with inferred X-ray luminosities in the range 1041 < LX < 1044 erg s-1, compatible with hyperluminous X-ray objects (HLX). To validate the method, we verify that it allowed us to recover known HLX candidates such as ESO 243-49 HLX-1 and M82 X-1. From a statistical study, we conservatively estimate that up to 71 ± 11 of these sources may be foreground- or background sources, statistically leaving at least 16 that are likely to be HLXs, thus providing support for the existence of the HLX population. We identify two good HLX candidates and using other publicly available data sets, in particular the VLA FIRST in radio, UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey in the near-infrared, GALEX in the ultraviolet and Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Megacam archive in the optical, we present evidence that these objects are unlikely to be foreground or background X-ray objects of conventional types, e.g., active galactic nuclei, BL Lac objects, Galactic X-ray binaries, or nearby stars. However, additional dedicated X-ray and optical observations are needed to confirm their association with the assumed host galaxies and thus secure their HLX classification.

  5. Conceptual Design of Dielectric Accelerating Structures for Intense Neutron and Monochromatic X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Blanovsky, Anatoly

    2004-12-07

    Bright compact photon sources, which utilize electron beam interaction with periodic structures, may benefit a broad range of medical, industrial and scientific applications. A class of dielectric-loaded periodic structures for hard and soft X-ray production has been proposed that would provide a high accelerating gradient when excited by an external RF and/or primary electron beam. Target-distributed accelerators (TDA), in which an additional electric field compensates for lost beam energy in internal targets, have been shown to provide the necessary means to drive a high flux subcritical reactor (HFSR) for nuclear waste transmutation. The TDA may also be suitable for positron and nuclear isomer production, X-ray lithography and monochromatic computer tomography. One of the early assumptions of the theory of dielectric wake-field acceleration was that, in electrodynamics, the vector potential was proportional to the scalar potential. The analysis takes into consideration a wide range of TDA design aspects including the wave model of observed phenomena, a layered compound separated by a Van der Waals gap and a compact energy source based on fission electric cells (FEC) with a multistage collector. The FEC is a high-voltage power source that directly converts the kinetic energy of the fission fragments into electrical potential of about 2MV.

  6. X-ray follow-up observations of unidentified VHE {gamma}-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Puehlhofer, Gerd

    2008-12-24

    A large fraction of the recently discovered Galactic Very High Energy (VHE) source population remains unidentified to date. VHE {gamma}-ray emission traces high energy particles in these sources, but for example in case of hadronic processes also the gas density at the emission site. Moreover, the particles have sufficiently long lifetimes to be able to escape from their acceleration sites. Therefore, the {gamma}-ray sources or at least the areas of maximum surface brightness are in many cases spatially offset from the actual accelerators. A promising way to identify the objects in which the particles are accelerated seems to be to search for emission signatures of the acceleration process (like emission from shock-heated plasma). Also the particles themselves (through primary or secondary synchrotron emission) can be traced in lower wavebands. Those signatures are best visible in the X-ray band, and current X-ray observatories are well suited to conduct such follow-up observations. Some aspects of the current status of these investigations are reviewed.

  7. Characterization of a pulsed x-ray source for fluorescent lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankespoor, S. C.; Derenzo, S. E.; Moses, W. W.; Rossington, C. S.; Ito, M.; Oba, K.

    1994-08-01

    To search for new, fast, inorganic scintillators, we have developed a bench-top pulsed x-ray source for determining fluorescent lifetimes and wavelengths of compounds in crystal or powdered form. This source uses a light-excited x-ray tube which produces x-rays when light from a laser diode strikes its photocathode. The x-ray tube has a tungsten anode, a beryllium exit window, a 30 kV maximum tube bias, and a 50 mu A maximum average cathode current. The laser produces 3 x 10(sup 7) photons at 650 nm per approximately 100 ps pulse, with up to 10(sup 7) pulses/sec. The time spread for the laser diode, x-ray tube, and a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube is less than 120 ps fwhm. The mean x-ray energy at tube biases of 20, 25, and 30 kV is 9.4, 10.3, and 11.1 keV, respectively. We measured 140, 230, and 330 x-ray photons per laser diode pulse per steradian, at tube biases of 20, 25, and 30 kV, respectively. Background x-rays due to dark current occur at a rate of 1 x 10(sup 6) and 3 x 10(sup 6) photons/sec/steradian at biases of 25 and 30 kV, respectively. Data characterizing the x-ray output with an aluminum filter in the x-ray beam are also presented.

  8. A case for ZnO nanowire field emitter arrays in advanced x-ray source applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Vance S.; Bergkvist, Magnus; Chen, Daokun; Chen, Jun; Huang, Mengbing

    2016-09-01

    Reviewing current efforts in X-ray source miniaturization reveals a broad spectrum of applications: Portable and/or remote nondestructive evaluation, high throughput protein crystallography, invasive radiotherapy, monitoring fluid flow and particulate generation in situ, and portable radiography devices for battle-front or large scale disaster triage scenarios. For the most part, all of these applications are being addressed with a top-down approach aimed at improving portability, weight and size. That is, the existing system or a critical sub-component is shrunk in some manner in order to miniaturize the overall package. In parallel to top-down x-ray source miniaturization, more recent efforts leverage field emission and semiconductor device fabrication techniques to achieve small scale x-ray sources via a bottom-up approach where phenomena effective at a micro/nanoscale are coordinated for macro-scale effect. The bottom-up approach holds potential to address all the applications previously mentioned but its entitlement extends into new applications with much more ground-breaking potential. One such bottom-up application is the distributed x-ray source platform. In the medical space, using an array of microscale x-ray sources instead of a single source promises significant reductions in patient dose as well as smaller feature detectability and fewer image artifacts. Cold cathode field emitters are ideal for this application because they can be gated electrostatically or via photonic excitation, they do not generate excessive heat like other common electron emitters, they have higher brightness and they are relatively compact. This document describes how ZnO nanowire field emitter arrays are well suited for distributed x-ray source applications because they hold promise in each of the following critical areas: emission stability, simple scalable fabrication, performance, radiation resistance and photonic coupling.

  9. The Radiation Dose Determination of the Pulsed X-ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloichikova, I.; Stuchebrov, S.; Zhaksybayeva, G.; Wagner, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper the radiation dose measurement technique of the pulsed X-ray source RAP-160-5 is described. The dose rate measurement results from the pulsed X-ray beams at the different distance between the pulsed X-ray source focus and the detector obtained with the help of the thermoluminescent detectors DTL-02, the universal dosimeter UNIDOS E equipped with the plane-parallel ionization chamber type 23342, the dosimeter-radiometer DKS-96 and the radiation dosimeter AT 1123 are demonstrated. The recommendations for the dosimetry measurements of the pulsed X-ray generator RAP-160-5 under different radiation conditions are proposed.

  10. Infrared identification of hard X-ray sources in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebot Gómez-Morán, A.; Motch, C.; Pineau, F.-X.; Carrera, F. J.; Pakull, M. W.; Riddick, F.

    2015-09-01

    The nature of the low- to intermediate-luminosity (LX ˜ 1032-34 erg s-1) source population revealed in hard band (2-10 keV) X-ray surveys of the Galactic plane is poorly understood. To overcome such problem, we cross-correlated the XMM-Newton 3XMM-DR4 survey with the infrared Two Micron All Sky Survey and Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire catalogues. We identified reliable X-ray-infrared associations for 690 sources. We selected 173 sources having hard X-ray spectra, typical of hard X-ray high-mass stars (kT > 5 keV), and 517 sources having soft X-ray spectra, typical of active coronae. About 18 per cent of the soft sources are classified in the literature: ˜91 per cent as stars, with a minor fraction of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. Roughly 15 per cent of the hard sources are classified in the literature: ˜68 per cent as high-mass X-ray stars single or in binary systems (WR, Be and high-mass X-ray binaries - HMXBs), with a small fraction of G and B stars. We carried out infrared spectroscopic pilot observations at the William Herschel Telescope for five hard X-ray sources. Three of them are high-mass stars with spectral types WN7-8h, Ofpe/WN9 and Be, and LX ˜ 1032-1033erg s-1. One source is a colliding-wind binary, while another source is a colliding-wind binary or a supergiant fast X-ray transient in quiescence. The Be star is a likely γ-Cas system. The nature of the other two X-ray sources is uncertain. The distribution of hard X-ray sources in the parameter space made of X-ray hardness ratio, infrared colours and X-ray-to-infrared flux ratio suggests that many of the unidentified sources are new γ-Cas analogues, WRs and low LX HMXBs. However, the nature of the X-ray population with Ks ≥ 11 and average X-ray-to-infrared flux ratio remains unconstrained.

  11. U-shape rotating anti-cathode compact X-ray generator: 20 times stronger than the commercially available X-ray source.

    PubMed

    Sakabe, N; Sakabe, K; Ohsawa, S; Sakai, T; Kobayakawa, H; Sugimura, T; Ikeda, M; Tawada, M; Watanabe, N; Sasaki, K; Wakatsuki, M

    2013-11-01

    A new type of U-shape anti-cathode X-ray generator in which the inner surface of a cylindrical target is irradiated by an electron beam has been made by modifying a conventional rotating anti-cathode X-ray generator whose brightness in the catalog is 12 kW mm(-2). The target material (Cu), target radius (50 mm) and rotating speed (6,000 r.p.m.) were not changed in this modification. A brightness of 52 kW mm(-2) was obtained by this U-shape-type X-ray generator. This means that the brightness of the new type is 4.3 times greater than that of the old unmodified one. Furthermore, the new-type X-ray generator yielded a brightness of 129 kW mm(-2) by adding a carbon coating on the Cu target. This means an overall increase of brightness of ten times. The original generator has the highest brightness in the generators of the same class (having a radius of 50 mm and rotation speed of 6,000 r.p.m.). Observations showed that Cu Kα counts at vertical incidence of the electron beam onto the surface of the new target, which is initially optically smooth, decrease as the surface is roughened by a severe thermal stress caused by strong electron beam exposure. Further observation reveals, however, that oblique incidence of the electron beam onto the roughened surface drastically increased the X-ray output and amounts to twice as much as that from a smooth surface at vertical incidence. Thus, at the present stage, an overall increase of brightness has been realised at a level 20 times stronger than that of the original commercially offered X-ray generator that we modified.

  12. Dynamic radiography using a carbon-nanotube-based field-emission x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.; Zhang, J.; Lee, Y.Z.; Gao, B.; Dike, S.; Lin, W.; Lu, J.P.; Zhou, O.

    2004-10-01

    We report a dynamic radiography system with a carbon nanotube based field-emission microfocus x-ray source. The system can readily generate x-ray radiation with continuous variation of temporal resolution as short as nanoseconds. Its potential applications for dynamic x-ray imaging are demonstrated. The performance characteristics of this compact and versatile system are promising for noninvasive imaging in biomedical research and industrial inspection.

  13. Flash imaging of fine structures of cellular organelles by contact x-ray microscopy with a high intensity laser plasma x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kado, Masataka; Ishino, Masahiko; Kishimoto, Maki; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Yasuda, Keiko; Kinjo, Yasuhito; Shinohara, Kunio

    2011-09-01

    X-ray flash imaging by contact microscopy with a highly intense laser-plasma x-ray source was achieved for the observation of wet biological cells. The exposure time to obtain a single x-ray image was about 600 ps as determined by the pulse duration of the driving laser pulse. The x-ray flash imaging makes it possible to capture an x-ray image of living biological cells without any artificial treatment such as staining, fixation, freezing, and so on. The biological cells were cultivated directly on the surface of the silicon nitride membranes, which are used for the x-ray microscope. Before exposing the cells to x-rays they were observed by a conventional fluorescent microscope as reference, since the fluorescent microscopes can visualize specific organelles stained with fluorescent dye. Comparing the x-ray images with the fluorescent images of the exact same cells, each cellular organelle observed in the x-ray images was identified one by one and actin filaments and mitochondria were clearly identified in the x-ray images.

  14. Mass concentrations associated with extended X-ray sources in the core of the Coma cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vikhlinin, A.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.

    1994-01-01

    Using a deep (approx. 20,200 s) ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) image we have examined the central region of the Coma cluster. Two extended regions of enhanced X-ray emission are found, centered at the positions of the brightest elliptical galaxies in the cluster: NGC 4874 and NGC 4889. Spectral analysis of the sources reveals no evidence of any difference between the spectra of these sources and that of the surrounding cluster emission. We assume that the enhancement in the X-ray surface brightness results from gas density enhancements and also that the underlying mass concentrations lie either at the cluster center or 1 core radius out of the center (420 kpc). With these assumptions, we derive total masses of 1.2 x 10(exp 13) - 1.6 x 10(exp 13), and 0.9 x 10(exp 13) - 1.8 x 10(exp 13) Solar mass within 2 min (80 kpc) of NGC 4874 and NGC 4889, respectively, assuming a Hubble constant H(sub 0) = 50 km/s/Mpc. Corresponding mass-to-light ratios for the galaxies are 30-40 and 25-50 in solar units, increasing at larger radii and approaching the values derived for the entire cluster at distances of more than approximately 150 kpc from the galaxies.

  15. Spectral unfolds of PITHON Flash X-ray source.

    SciTech Connect

    Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Riordan, John C.

    2007-11-01

    Using a differential absorption spectrometer we obtained experimental spectral information for the PITHON Flash X-ray Machine located in San Leandro, California at L-3 Communications. Spectral information we obtained pertained to the 200 keV to 800 keV endpoint operation of PITHON. We also obtained data on the temporal behavior of high energy and low energy spectral content.

  16. Course Manual for Machine Sources of X Rays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Drug Administration (DHEW), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Radiological Health.

    This is the first of a series of three instructor manuals in x-ray science and engineering and is produced as part of a project of Oregon State University's Bureau of Radiological Health. This manual, and the two companion manuals, have been tested in courses at Oregon State. These materials have been designed to serve as models for teaching and…

  17. X-ray dose reduction by adaptive source equalization and electronic region-of-interest control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burion, Steve; Sandman, Anne; Bechtel, Kate; Solomon, Edward; Funk, Tobias

    2011-03-01

    Radiation dose is particularly a concern in pediatric cardiac fluoroscopy procedures, which account for 7% of all cardiac procedures performed. The Scanning-Beam Digital X-ray (SBDX) fluoroscopy system has already demonstrated reduced dose in adult patients owing to its high-DQE photon-counting detector, reduced detected scatter, and the elimination of the anti-scatter grid. Here we show that the unique flexible illumination platform of the SBDX system will enable further dose area product reduction, which we are currently developing for pediatric patients, but which will ultimately benefit all patients. The SBDX system has a small-area detector array and a large-area X-ray source with up to 9,000 individually-controlled X-ray focal spots. Each focal spot illuminates a small fraction of the full field of view. To acquire a frame, each focal spot is activated for a fixed number of 1-microsecond periods. Dose reduction is made possible by reducing the number of activations of some of the X-ray focal spots during each frame time. This can be done dynamically to reduce the exposure in areas of low patient attenuation, such as the lung field. This spatially-adaptive illumination also reduces the dynamic range in the full image, which is visually pleasing. Dose can also be reduced by the user selecting a region of interest (ROI) where full image quality is to be maintained. Outside the ROI, the number of activations of each X-ray focal spot is reduced and the image gain is correspondingly increased to maintain consistent image brightness. Dose reduction is dependent on the size of the ROI and the desired image quality outside the ROI. We have developed simulation software that is based on real data and can simulate the performance of the equalization and ROI filtration. This software represents a first step toward real-time implementation of these dose-reduction methods. Our simulations have shown that dose area product reductions of 40% are possible using equalization

  18. Determination of the mass of globular cluster X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Hertz, P.; Steiner, J. E.; Murray, S. S.; Lightman, A. P.

    1984-01-01

    The precise positions of the luminous X-ray sources in eight globular clusters have been measured with the Einstein X-Ray Observatory. When combined with similarly precise measurements of the dynamical centers and core radii of the globular clusters, the distribution of the X-ray source mass is determined to be in the range 0.9-1.9 solar mass. The X-ray source positions and the detailed optical studies indicate that (1) the sources are probably all of similar mass, (2) the gravitational potentials in these high-central density clusters are relatively smooth and isothermal, and (3) the X-ray sources are compact binaries and are probably formed by tidal capture.

  19. Observations of low luminosity X-ray sources in Vela-Puppis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Erlemitsos, P. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a study of the X-ray emission from a small portion of the galactic plane near galactic longitude 260 deg are presented. This region contains at least six low luminosity X-ray sources within approximately 10 deg. of PSRO833-45, which is near the center of the Gum Nebula. The X-ray source associated with the Vela pulsar, 4U0833-45, is observed at twice its 4U catalogue intensity. The lack of X-ray pulsations at the pulsar period, the non thermal power law spectrum, and models of the X-ray come from an extended source approximately 1 deg in radius. The observation of a high temperature spectrum in a field of view containing only Puppis A among known sources has led to the discovery of a new OSO-8 source, OSO752-39. Other spectra from this region are discussed.

  20. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Chen, Jun; Li, Ziping; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng

    2015-12-14

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18–20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.

  1. The spatial, spectral and polarization properties of solar flare X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.

    2014-12-01

    X-rays are a valuable diagnostic tool for the study of high energy accelerated electrons. Bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by, and directly related to, high energy electrons accelerated during a flare, provide a powerful diagnostic tool for determining both the properties of the accelerated electron distribution, and of the flaring coronal and chromospheric plasmas. This thesis is specifically concerned with the study of spatial, spectral and polarization properties of solar flare X-ray sources via both modelling and X-ray observations using the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Firstly, a new model is presented, accounting for finite temperature, pitch angle scattering and initial pitch angle injection. This is developed to accurately infer the properties of the acceleration region from the observations of dense coronal X-ray sources. Moreover, examining how the spatial properties of dense coronal X-ray sources change in time, interesting trends in length, width, position, number density and thermal pressure are found and the possible causes for such changes are discussed. Further analysis of data in combination with the modelling of X-ray transport in the photosphere, allows changes in X-ray source positions and sizes due to the X-ray albedo effect to be deduced. Finally, it is shown, for the first time, how the presence of a photospheric X-ray albedo component produces a spatially resolvable polarization pattern across a hard X-ray (HXR) source. It is demonstrated how changes in the degree and direction of polarization across a single HXR source can be used to determine the anisotropy of the radiating electron distribution.

  2. A Search for the X-ray Counterpart of the Unidentified Gamma-ray Source 3EG J2020+4017 (2CG078+2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin; Swartz, Douglas A.; Carraminana, Alberto; Carrasco, Luis; Kaplan, David L.; Becker, Werner; Elsner, Ronald F.; Kanbach, Gottfried; ODell, Stephen L.; Tennant, Allyn F.

    2006-01-01

    We report observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory of a field in the gamma-Cygni supernova remnant (SNR78.2+2.1) centered on the cataloged location of the unidentified, bright gamma-ray source 3EG J2020+4017. In this search for an X-ray counterpart to the gamma-ray source, we detected 30 X-ray sources. Of these, we found 17 strong-candidate counterparts in optical (visible through near-infrared) cataloged and an additional 3 through our optical observations. Based upon colors and (for several objects) optical spectra, nearly all the optically identified objects appear to be reddened main-sequence stars: None of the X-ray sources with an optical counterpart is a plausible X-ray counterpart to 3EG J2020+4017-if that gamma-ray source is a spin-powered pulsar. Many of the 10 X-ray sources lacking optical counterparts are likely (extragalactic) active galactic nuclei, based upon the sky density of such sources. Although one of the 10 optically unidentified X-ray sources could be the gamma-ray source, there is no auxiliary evidence supporting such an identification

  3. GSFC Contributions to the NATO X-ray Astronomy Institute, Erice, July 1979. [X-ray spectra of supernova remants, galactic X-ray sources, active galactic nuclei, and clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of X-ray astronomical spectroscopy in general is presented and results obtained by HEAO 1 and 2 as well as earlier spacecraft are examined. Particular emphasis is given to the spectra of supernova remnants; galactic binary X-ray sources, cataclysmic variables, bulges, pulsars, and stars; the active nuclei of Seyfert 1 galaxy, BL Lac, and quasars; the diffuse X-ray background; and galactic clusters.

  4. Environmental Effects on PAHs and VSGs in X-ray-bright Dusty Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Hidehiro; Kitayama, Tetsu; Okada, Yoko; Onaka, Takashi; Sakon, Itsuki; Tajiri, Yuka

    2006-05-01

    Elliptical galaxies provide dust with a unique environment, i.e. old stellar radiation fields without active star formation and interstellar media (ISM) mostly dominated by hot plasma. Small particles such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and very small grains (VSGs) are expected to be easily destroyed through sputtering by plasma ions. However, in our GO1 program, we have detected PAH emission features and prominent VSG mid-IR excess from X-ray-bright dusty elliptical galaxies. The observed IRS/SL spectra are quite unusual; the usually strong features at 6.2, 7.7, and 8.6 micron are very faint in contrast to prominent features at 11.3 and/or 12.7 micron. A naive interpretation is that the dominant emitters are neutral PAHs. We propose IRS/SL&LL observations of 18 nearby elliptical galaxies with properties similar to the GO1 galaxies, which include IRS/LL observations of the GO1 galaxies; we did not observe them with the IRS/LL. The IRS spectra are ideal to study the environmental effects on PAHs and VSGs; the IRS/SL is well matched to study overall properties of PAHs, while the IRS/LL is crucial to discuss the ionization state of PAHs and the properties of VSGs. Detection of aforementioned unusual PAH features as well as the 16-18 micron plateaus would lay strong constraints on the ionization state of the PAHs and thus their origins. If the results really support the dominance of neutral PAHs, we may have to relinquish a commonly-believed picture that dust and plasma are well mixed in the interstellar space. Then how are the dust spatially separated from the plasma? Detection of prominent mid-IR excess would reasonably explain efficient interaction of the dust with the plasma. Then, how do we sustain the hot plasma against the effective radiative cooling via a dust channel? Observational results with the large sample would give a great impact on the understanding of the dust and plasma physics and the evolutionary history of the ISM of the elliptical

  5. Source effects in analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging with conventional sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hoennicke, M. G.; Manica, J.; Mazzaro, I.; Cusatis, C.; Huang, X.-R.

    2012-11-15

    Several recent papers have shown the implementation of analyzer based X-ray phase contrast imaging (ABI) with conventional X-ray sources. The high flux is always a requirement to make the technique useful for bio-medical applications. Here, we present and discuss three important parameters, which need to be taken into account, when searching for the high flux ABI: anisotropic magnification, double image, and source size spread due to intrinsic dispersive diffraction by asymmetrically cut crystals. These parameters, if not well optimized, may cause important features in the acquired images which can mislead the interpretation. A few ways to minimize these effects are implemented and discussed, including some experimental results.

  6. Source effects in analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging with conventional sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hönnicke, M. G.; Manica, J.; Mazzaro, I.; Cusatis, C.; Huang, X.-R.

    2012-11-01

    Several recent papers have shown the implementation of analyzer based X-ray phase contrast imaging (ABI) with conventional X-ray sources. The high flux is always a requirement to make the technique useful for bio-medical applications. Here, we present and discuss three important parameters, which need to be taken into account, when searching for the high flux ABI: anisotropic magnification, double image, and source size spread due to intrinsic dispersive diffraction by asymmetrically cut crystals. These parameters, if not well optimized, may cause important features in the acquired images which can mislead the interpretation. A few ways to minimize these effects are implemented and discussed, including some experimental results.

  7. Picosecond soft-x-ray pulses from a high-intensity laser-plasma source.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, J F; Chaker, M; Kieffer, J C

    1996-07-15

    We report time-resolved spectroscopic analysis of laser-produced plasma x-ray sources. Plasmas produced by a 400-fs 1-TW tabletop laser are characterized with a transmission grating spectrometer coupled to a soft-x-ray streak camera. Soft-x-ray radiation in the 1-6-nm range with durations of 2-7 ps is observed for copper and tantalum plasmas. The effect of incident laser energy on the x-ray pulse duration is also investigated.

  8. X-ray phase-contrast tomosynthesis of a human ex vivo breast slice with an inverse Compton x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggl, E.; Schleede, S.; Bech, M.; Achterhold, K.; Grandl, S.; Sztrókay, A.; Hellerhoff, K.; Mayr, D.; Loewen, R.; Ruth, R. D.; Reiser, M. F.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2016-12-01

    While the performance of conventional x-ray tube sources often suffers from the broad polychromatic spectrum, synchrotrons that could provide highly brilliant x-rays are restricted to large research facilities and impose high investment and maintenance costs. Lately, a new type of compact synchrotron sources has been investigated. These compact light sources (CLS) based on inverse Compton scattering provide quasi-monochromatic hard x-rays. The flux and brilliance yielded by a CLS currently lie between x-ray tube sources and third-generation synchrotrons. The relatively large partially coherent x-ray beam is well suited for the investigation of preclinical applications of grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field imaging. Here we present the first grating-based multimodal tomosynthesis images of a human breast slice acquired at a CLS to investigate the possibilities of improved breast cancer diagnostics.

  9. PLEIADES: a picosecond Compton scattering x-ray source for advanced backlighting and time-resolved material studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D J; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P; Betts, S M; Booth, R; Brown, W J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Hartemann, F V; Kuba, J; Le Sage, G P; Tremaine, A M; Springer, P T; Rosenzweig, J B

    2003-10-20

    The PLEIADES (Picosecond Laser-Electron Inter-Action for the Dynamical Evaluation of Structures) facility has produced first light at 70 keV. This milestone offers a new opportunity to develop laser-driven, compact, tunable x-ray sources for critical applications such as diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility and time-resolved material studies. The electron beam was focused to 50 {micro}m rms, at 57 MeV, with 260 C of charge, a relative energy spread of 0.2%, and a normalized emittance of 5 mm mrad horizontally and 13 mm mrad vertically. The scattered 820-nm laser pulse had an energy of 180 mJ and a duration of 54 fs. Initial x-rays were captured with a cooled charge-coupled device using a Cesium Iodide scintillator; the peak photon energy was approximately 78 keV, with a total x-ray flux of 1.3 x 10{sup 6} photons/shot, and the observed angular distribution found to agree very well with three-dimensional codes. Simple K-edge radiography of a tantalum foil showed good agreement with the theoretical divergence-angle dependence of the x-ray energy. Optimization of the x-ray dose is currently underway, with the goal of reaching 10{sup 8} photons per shot and a peak brightness approaching 10{sup 20} photons/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/s/0.1%bandwidth.

  10. On the black hole masses in ultra-luminous X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xin-Lin

    2015-05-01

    Ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are off-nuclear X-ray sources in nearby galaxies with X-ray luminosities ⩾ 1039 erg s-1. The measurement of the black hole (BH) masses of ULXs is a long-standing problem. Here we estimate BH masses in a sample of ULXs with XMM-Newton observations using two different mass indicators, the X-ray photon index and X-ray variability amplitude based on the correlations established for active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The BH masses estimated from the two methods are compared and discussed. We find that some extreme high-luminosity (LX > 5 ×1040 erg s-1) ULXs contain the BH of 104-105 M⊙ . The results from X-ray variability amplitude are in conflict with those from X-ray photon indices for ULXs with lower luminosities. This suggests that these ULXs generally accrete at rates different from those of X-ray luminous AGNs, or they have different power spectral densities of X-ray variability. We conclude that most of ULXs accrete at super-Eddington rate, thus harbor stellar-mass BH.

  11. CHANDRA ACIS Survey of X-Ray Point Sources: The Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Song; Liu, Jifeng; Qiu, Yanli; Bai, Yu; Yang, Huiqin; Guo, Jincheng; Zhang, Peng

    2016-06-01

    The Chandra archival data is a valuable resource for various studies on different X-ray astronomy topics. In this paper, we utilize this wealth of information and present a uniformly processed data set, which can be used to address a wide range of scientific questions. The data analysis procedures are applied to 10,029 Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer observations, which produces 363,530 source detections belonging to 217,828 distinct X-ray sources. This number is twice the size of the Chandra Source Catalog (Version 1.1). The catalogs in this paper provide abundant estimates of the detected X-ray source properties, including source positions, counts, colors, fluxes, luminosities, variability statistics, etc. Cross-correlation of these objects with galaxies shows that 17,828 sources are located within the D 25 isophotes of 1110 galaxies, and 7504 sources are located between the D 25 and 2D 25 isophotes of 910 galaxies. Contamination analysis with the log N-log S relation indicates that 51.3% of objects within 2D 25 isophotes are truly relevant to galaxies, and the “net” source fraction increases to 58.9%, 67.3%, and 69.1% for sources with luminosities above 1037, 1038, and 1039 erg s-1, respectively. Among the possible scientific uses of this catalog, we discuss the possibility of studying intra-observation variability, inter-observation variability, and supersoft sources (SSSs). About 17,092 detected sources above 10 counts are classified as variable in individual observation with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) criterion (P K-S < 0.01). There are 99,647 sources observed more than once and 11,843 sources observed 10 times or more, offering us a wealth of data with which to explore the long-term variability. There are 1638 individual objects (˜2350 detections) classified as SSSs. As a quite interesting subclass, detailed studies on X-ray spectra and optical spectroscopic follow-up are needed to categorize these SSSs and pinpoint their properties. In addition

  12. A simulation of X-ray shielding for a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin Yong; Won, Mi-Sook; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Choi, Seyong; Ok, Jung-Woo; Choi, Jeong-Sik; Kim, Byoung-Chul

    2014-02-15

    It is generally assumed that large amounts of x-rays are emitted from the ion source of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) instrument. The total amount of x-rays should be strictly limited to avoid the extra heat load to the cryostat of the superconducting ECR ion source, since they are partly absorbed by the cold mass into the cryostat. A simulation of x-ray shielding was carried out to determine the effective thickness of the x-ray shield needed via the use of Geant4. X-ray spectra of the 10 GHz Nanogan ECR ion source were measured as a function of the thickness variation in the x-ray shield. The experimental results were compared with Geant4 results to verify the effectiveness of the x-ray shield. Based on the validity in the case of the 10 GHz ECR ion source, the x-ray shielding results are presented by assuming the spectral temperature of the 28 GHz ECR ion source.

  13. The radio structure source of X-ray-selected BL Lacertae objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, Eric S.; Stocke, John T.

    1993-01-01

    Arcsecond-size radio structure for a complete sample of 14 X-ray-selected BL Lac objects (XBLs) from the Einstein Extended Medium-Sensitivity Survey is presented. Most objects possess radio morphologies which are similar to those of nearby Fanaroff-Riley type 1 (FR 1) radio galaxies once the effects of surface brightness dimming and beam dilution as a function of redshift are taken into account. In order to test the beamed FR 1 hypothesis for BL Lac objects, the core and extended power levels are determined for these sources and compared with samples of radio-selected BL Lac objects (RBLs) and FR 1 from galaxies from the literature. RBLs and XBLs are found to possess extended (and thus unbeamed) power levels and the largest angular sizes similar to those of the FR 1 galaxies both supporting the beaming hypothesis and a common parent population for XBLs and RBLs.

  14. Studies of Supersoft X-ray Sources (SSS) and Quasisoft X-ray Sources (QSS) in the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pun, Chun-Shing J.; Li, K.; Kong, A. K. H.; DiStefano, R.

    2010-03-01

    Quasisoft X-ray sources (QSSs) are luminous (L > 1036 erg s-1, kT between 120eV and 350eV) X-ray sources emitting few or no photons at energy above 2 keV yet clearly emitting at above 1.1 keV. While their spectra are harder than luminous supersoft X-ray sources (SSSs), which have characteristic temperatures of tens of eV, QSSs are significantly softer than most canonical X-ray sources. They have been identified in elliptical galaxies, spiral galaxies (in both spiral arms and halos), and globular clusters. We report here on the progress of a comprehensive and systematic search of SSSs and QSSs in the Milky Way and in the Magellanic Clouds using archival X-ray data. Our focus is to conduct an optimized search to identify all candidates in order to differentiate between the different natures of SSSs and QSSs. The candidates collected would be checked for counterparts in other wavelengths, which could possibly help us to determine the fundamental nature of these sources, including the properties, if present, of the accretors and the accretion disks. This work is supported by a Hong Kong SAR Research Grants Council General Research Fund and by a NASA ADP grant.

  15. High Resolution X-Ray Astronomy with the Chandra Observatory Stellar Point Sources and Extended Gaseous Emission of Cen Chandra X-Ray Observations of Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Woo

    2000-02-01

    I will introduce the Chandra Observatory and new results obtained during the Chandra OAC phase. These include the newly discovered X-ray jet in PKS 0637-752; X-ray jet, characteristics of point sources and extended emission in Cen A; and contact discontinuities and merger evidence of A2142.

  16. Dust-grain scattering of X-rays observed during the lunar occultation of a transient X-ray source near the Galactic center

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuda, K.; Takeshima, T.; Kii, T.; Kawai, N. Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako )

    1990-04-01

    Extended X-ray emission surrounding point X-ray sources has been detected in the energy band 1-10 keV during lunar occultation observations of the Galactic center region. These extended X-rays are most likely due to X-ray scattering by interstellar dust grains. The spatial size and the intensity of the extended emission around the transient X-ray source GS 1741.2-2859/1741.6-2849 have been studied extensively. The spatial size is consistent with the typical grain size of about 0.06 micron. The intensity is used to obtain the energy dependence of the scattering optical depth to the source, which suggests the existence of iron in the grains. The ratio of the iron column density contained in the grains to the hydrogen column density of the neutral gas is roughly consistent with the cosmic abundance of iron. 30 refs.

  17. Shielded radiography with a laser-driven MeV-energy X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shouyuan; Golovin, Grigory; Miller, Cameron; Haden, Daniel; Banerjee, Sudeep; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Baozhen; Clarke, Shaun; Pozzi, Sara; Umstadter, Donald

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of experimental and numerical-simulation studies of shielded radiography using narrowband MeV-energy X-rays from a compact all-laser-driven inverse-Compton-scattering X-ray light source. This recently developed X-ray light source is based on a laser-wakefield accelerator with ultra-high-field gradient (GeV/cm). We demonstrate experimentally high-quality radiographic imaging (image contrast of 0.4 and signal-to-noise ratio of 2:1) of a target composed of 8-mm thick depleted uranium shielded by 80-mm thick steel, using a 6-MeV X-ray beam with a spread of 45% (FWHM) and 107 photons in a single shot. The corresponding dose of the X-ray pulse measured in front of the target is ∼100 nGy/pulse. Simulations performed using the Monte-Carlo code MCNPX accurately reproduce the experimental results. These simulations also demonstrate that the narrow bandwidth of the Compton X-ray source operating at 6 and 9 MeV leads to a reduction of deposited dose as compared to broadband bremsstrahlung sources with the same end-point energy. The X-ray beam's inherently low-divergence angle (∼mrad) is advantageous and effective for interrogation at standoff distance. These results demonstrate significant benefits of all-laser driven Compton X-rays for shielded radiography.

  18. Optimal focusing for a linac-based hard x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Krafft, G.; Talman, R.

    2011-03-28

    In spite of having a small average beam current limit, a linac can have features that make it attractive as an x-ray source: high energy, ultralow emittance and energy spread, and flexible beamline optics. Unlike a storage ring, in which an (undulator) radiation source is necessarily short and positioned at an electron beam waist, in a linac the undulator can be long and the electron beam can be adjusted to have a (virtual) waist far downstream toward the x-ray target. Using a planned CEBAF beamline as an example, this paper shows that a factor of 2000 in beam current can be overcome to produce a monochromatic hard x-ray source comparable with, or even exceeding, the performance of an x-ray line at a third generation storage ring. Optimal electron beam focusing conditions for x-ray flux density and brilliance are derived, and are verified by simulations using the SRW code.

  19. Electrospinning jets as X-ray sources at atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorný, P.; Mikeš, P.; Lukáš, D.

    2010-11-01

    Electrospinning jets producing nanofibres from a polymer solution by electrical forces are fine cylindrical electrodes that create extremely high electric-field strength in their vicinity at atmospheric conditions. However, this quality of electrospinning is only scarcely investigated, and the interactions of the electric fields generated by them with ambient gases are nearly unknown. Here we report on the discovery that electrospinning jets generate X-ray beams up to energies of 20 keV at atmospheric conditions. The X-ray nature of the detected radiation is incontrovertibly proved by a spectroscopic experiment. We hypothesize how the field strength increases to gigantic values in the vicinity of charged electrospinning jets, as a consequence of counterion condensation, to accelerate charged particles, at a short distance, comparable with their mean path at atmospheric pressure, up to kinetic energies that give rise to the detection of X-rays. The experimental set-up designed by us for the generation and detection of high-energy electromagnetic radiation from electrospinning is extremely simple.

  20. Near-infrared Counterparts of Chandra X-ray Sources Toward the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWitt, Curtis; Bandyopadhyay, Reba M.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Blum, Robert; Olsen, Knut; Sellgren, Kris; Sarajedini, Ata

    2010-10-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory has now discovered nearly 10,000 X-ray point sources in the 2° × 0fdg8 region around the Galactic Center. The sources are likely to be a population of accreting binaries in the Galactic Center, but little else is known of their nature. We obtained JHKs imaging of the 17' × 17' region around Sgr A*, an area containing 4339 of these X-ray sources, with the ISPI camera on the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) 4 m telescope. We cross-correlate the Chandra and ISPI catalogs to find potential IR counterparts to the X-ray sources. The extreme IR source crowding in the field means that it is not possible to establish the authenticity of the matches with astrometry and photometry alone. We find 2137 IR/X-ray astrometrically matched sources: statistically, we estimate that our catalog contains 289 ± 13 true matches to soft X-ray sources and 154 ± 39 matches to hard X-ray sources. However, the fraction of true counterparts to candidate counterparts for hard sources is just 11%, compared to 60% for soft sources, making hard source NIR matches particularly challenging for spectroscopic follow-up. We calculate a color-magnitude diagram (CMD) for the matches to hard X-ray sources, and find regions where significant numbers of the IR matches are real. We use their CMD positions to place limits on the absolute Ks -band magnitudes of the potential NIR counterparts to hard X-ray sources. We find regions of the counterpart CMD with 9 ± 3 likely Wolf-Rayet/supergiant binaries (with four spectroscopically confirmed in the literature) as well as 44 ± 13 candidates that could consist of either main-sequence high mass X-ray binaries or red giants with an accreting compact companion. In order to aid spectroscopic follow-up, we sort the candidate counterpart catalog on the basis of IR and X-ray properties to determine which source characteristics increase the probability of a true match. We find a set of 98 IR matches to hard X-ray sources

  1. In-situ X-ray diffraction system using sources and detectors at fixed angular positions

    DOEpatents

    Gibson, David M.; Gibson, Walter M.; Huang, Huapeng

    2007-06-26

    An x-ray diffraction technique for measuring a known characteristic of a sample of a material in an in-situ state. The technique includes using an x-ray source for emitting substantially divergent x-ray radiation--with a collimating optic disposed with respect to the fixed source for producing a substantially parallel beam of x-ray radiation by receiving and redirecting the divergent paths of the divergent x-ray radiation. A first x-ray detector collects radiation diffracted from the sample; wherein the source and detector are fixed, during operation thereof, in position relative to each other and in at least one dimension relative to the sample according to a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample. A second x-ray detector may be fixed relative to the first x-ray detector according to the a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample, especially in a phase monitoring embodiment of the present invention.

  2. The second ROSAT All-Sky Survey source catalogue: the deepest X-ray All-Sky Survey before eROSITA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boller, T.; Freyberg, M.; Truemper, J.

    2014-07-01

    We present the second ROSAT all-sky survey source catalogue (RASS2, (Boller, Freyberg, Truemper 2014, submitted)). The RASS2 is an extension of the ROSAT Bright Source Catalogue (BSC) and the ROSAT Faint Source Catalogue (FSC). The total number of sources in the second RASS catalogue is 124489. The extensions include (i) the supply of new user data products, i.e., X-ray images, X-ray spectra, and X-ray light curves, (ii) a visual screening of each individual detection, (iii) an improved detection algorithm compared to the SASS II processing. This results into an as most as reliable and as most as complete catalogue of point sources detected during the ROSAT Survey observations. We discuss for the first time the intra-day timing and spectral properties of the second RASS catalogue. We find new highly variable sources and we discuss their timing properties. Power law fits have been applied which allows to determine X-ray fluxes, X-ray absorbing columns, and X-ray photon indices. We give access to the second RASS catalogue and the associated data products via a web-interface to allow the community to perform further scientific exploration. The RASS2 catalogue provides the deepest X-ray All-Sky Survey before eROSITA data will become available.

  3. Novel multi-beam X-ray source for vacuum electronics enabled medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neculaes, V. Bogdan

    2013-10-01

    For almost 100 of years, commercial medical X-ray applications have relied heavily on X-ray tube architectures based on the vacuum electronics design developed by William Coolidge at the beginning of the twentieth century. Typically, the Coolidge design employs one hot tungsten filament as the electron source; the output of the tube is one X-ray beam. This X-ray source architecture is the state of the art in today's commercial medical imaging applications, such as Computed Tomography. Recently, GE Global Research has demonstrated the most dramatic extension of the Coolidge vacuum tube design for Computed Tomography (CT) in almost a century: a multi-beam X-ray source containing thirty two cathodes emitting up to 1000 mA, in a cathode grounded - anode at potential architecture (anode up to 140 kV). This talk will present the challenges of the X-ray multi-beam vacuum source design - space charge electron gun design, beam focusing to compression ratios needed in CT medical imaging applications (image resolution is critically dependent on how well the electron beam is focused in vacuum X-ray tubes), electron emitter choice to fit the aggressive beam current requirements, novel electronics for beam control and focusing, high voltage and vacuum solutions, as well as vacuum chamber design to sustain the considerable G forces typically encountered on a CT gantry (an X-ray vacuum tube typically rotates on the CT gantry at less than 0.5 s per revolution). Consideration will be given to various electron emitter technologies available for this application - tungsten emitters, dispenser cathodes and carbon nano tubes (CNT) - and their tradeoffs. The medical benefits potentially enabled by this unique vacuum multi-beam X-ray source are: X-ray dose reduction, reduction of image artifacts and improved image resolution. This work was funded in part by NIH grant R01EB006837.

  4. RXTE all-sky slew survey. Catalog of X-ray sources at |b|>10o

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revnivtsev, M.; Sazonov, S.; Jahoda, K.; Gilfanov, M.

    2004-05-01

    We report results of a serendipitous hard X-ray (3-20 keV), nearly all-sky (|b|>10o) survey based on RXTE/PCA observations performed during satellite reorientations in 1996-2002. The survey is 80% (90%) complete to a 4σ limiting flux of ≈ 1.8 (2.5) × 10-11 erg s-1 cm-2 in the 3-20 keV band. The achieved sensitivity in the 3-8 keV and 8-20 keV subbands is similar to and an order of magnitude higher than that of the previously record HEAO-1 A1 and HEAO-1 A4 all-sky surveys, respectively. A combined 7× 103 sq deg area of the sky is sampled to flux levels below 10-11 erg s-1 cm-2 (3-20 keV). In total 294 sources are detected and localized to better than 1 deg. 236 (80%) of these can be confidently associated with a known astrophysical object; another 22 likely result from the superposition of 2 or 3 closely located known sources. 35 detected sources remain unidentified, although for 12 of these we report a likely soft X-ray counterpart from the ROSAT all-sky survey bright source catalog. Of the reliably identified sources, 63 have local origin (Milky Way, LMC or SMC), 64 are clusters of galaxies and 100 are active galactic nuclei (AGN). The fact that the unidentified X-ray sources have hard spectra suggests that the majority of them are AGN, including highly obscured ones (NH>1023 cm-2). For the first time we present a log N-log S diagram for extragalactic sources above 4× 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2 at 8-20 keV. Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/418/927

  5. High brightness electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1995-07-01

    High energy physics accelerators and free electron lasers put increased demands on the electron beam sources. This paper describes the present research on attaining intense bright electron beams using photoinjectors. Recent results from the experimental programs will be given. The performance advantages and difficulties presently faced by researchers will be discussed, and the following topics will be covered. Progress has been made in photocathode materials, both in lifetime and quantum efficiency. Cesium telluride has demonstrated significantly longer lifetimes than cesium antimonide at 10{sup {minus}8} torr. However, the laser system is more difficult because cesium telluride requires quadrupled YLF instead of the doubled YLF required for cesium antimonide. The difficulty in using photoinjectors is primarily the drive laser, in particular the amplitude stability. Finally, emittance measurements of photoinjector systems can be complicated by the non-thermal nature of the electron beam. An example of the difficulty in measuring beam emittance is given.

  6. Identification of Hard X-ray Sources in Galactic Globular Clusters: Simbol-X Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servillat, M.

    2009-05-01

    Globular clusters harbour an excess of X-ray sources compared to the number of X-ray sources in the Galactic plane. It has been proposed that many of these X-ray sources are cataclysmic variables that have an intermediate magnetic field, i.e. intermediate polars, which remains to be confirmed and understood. We present here several methods to identify intermediate polars in globular clusters from multiwavelength analysis. First, we report on XMM-Newton, Chandra and HST observations of the very dense Galactic globular cluster NGC 2808. By comparing UV and X-ray properties of the cataclysmic variable candidates, the fraction of intermediate polars in this cluster can be estimated. We also present the optical spectra of two cataclysmic variables in the globular cluster M 22. The HeII (4868 Å) emission line in these spectra could be related to the presence of a magnetic field in these objects. Simulations of Simbol-X observations indicate that the angular resolution is sufficient to study X-ray sources in the core of close, less dense globular clusters, such as M 22. The sensitivity of Simbol-X in an extended energy band up to 80 keV will allow us to discriminate between hard X-ray sources (such as magnetic cataclysmic variables) and soft X-ray sources (such as chromospherically active binaries).

  7. Ultraluminous X-Ray Source Correlations with Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Soria, Roberto

    2009-09-01

    Maps of low-inclination nearby galaxies in Sloan Digitized Sky Survey u - g, g - r, and r - i colors are used to determine whether ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are predominantly associated with star-forming regions of their host galaxies. An empirical selection criterion is derived from colors of H II regions in M 81 and M 101 that differentiates between the young, blue stellar component and the older disk and bulge population. This criterion is applied to a sample of 58 galaxies of Hubble type S0 and later and verified through an application of Fisher's linear discriminant analysis. It is found that 60% (49%) of ULXs in optically bright environments are within regions blueward of their host galaxy's H II regions compared to only 27% (0%) of a control sample according to the empirical (Fisher) criterion. This is an excess of 3σ above the 32% (27%) expected if the ULXs were randomly distributed within their galactic hosts. This indicates a ULX preference for young, lsim10 Myr, OB associations. However, none of the ULX environments have the morphology and optical brightness suggestive of a massive young super-star cluster though several are in extended or crowded star-forming (blue) environments that may contain clusters unresolved by Sloan imaging. Ten of the 12 ULX candidates with estimated X-ray luminosities in excess of 3 × 1039 erg s-1 are equally divided among the group of ULX environments redward of H II regions and the group of optically faint regions. This likely indicates that the brightest ULXs turn on at a time somewhat later than typical of H II regions; say 10-20 Myr after star formation has ended. This would be consistent with the onset of an accretion phase as the donor star ascends the giant branch if the donor is an lsim20 M sun star.

  8. X-ray phase-contrast tomography with a compact laser-driven synchrotron source.

    PubMed

    Eggl, Elena; Schleede, Simone; Bech, Martin; Achterhold, Klaus; Loewen, Roderick; Ruth, Ronald D; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-05-05

    Between X-ray tubes and large-scale synchrotron sources, a large gap in performance exists with respect to the monochromaticity and brilliance of the X-ray beam. However, due to their size and cost, large-scale synchrotrons are not available for more routine applications in small and medium-sized academic or industrial laboratories. This gap could be closed by laser-driven compact synchrotron light sources (CLS), which use an infrared (IR) laser cavity in combination with a small electron storage ring. Hard X-rays are produced through the process of inverse Compton scattering upon the intersection of the electron bunch with the focused laser beam. The produced X-ray beam is intrinsically monochromatic and highly collimated. This makes a CLS well-suited for applications of more advanced--and more challenging--X-ray imaging approaches, such as X-ray multimodal tomography. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first results of a first successful demonstration experiment in which a monochromatic X-ray beam from a CLS was used for multimodal, i.e., phase-, dark-field, and attenuation-contrast, X-ray tomography. We show results from a fluid phantom with different liquids and a biomedical application example in the form of a multimodal CT scan of a small animal (mouse, ex vivo). The results highlight particularly that quantitative multimodal CT has become feasible with laser-driven CLS, and that the results outperform more conventional approaches.

  9. Identification of Supersoft X-ray Sources and Quasisoft X-ray Sources in the Magellanic Clouds Using XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Tsz Ho; Li, K. L.; Pun, C. S. J.; Di Stefano, R.; Kong, A. K. H.

    2011-05-01

    Supersoft X-ray Sources (SSSs) and Quasisoft X-ray Sources (QSSs), collectively known as Very Soft Sources (VSSs), are observationally defined as X-ray sources having no or little emission above 1 keV together with energy spectra exhibiting characteristic temperature of tens of eV and roughly between 175 to 350 keV respectively. A systematic search in the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) was done using public archival data of the XMM-Newton observatory spanning from year 2000 to 2009. The VSSs candidates were identified using an automated source selection program based on hardness ratio criteria defined by count rates in three different energy bands (0.1-1.1 keV, 1.1-2.0 keV, 2.0-7.0 keV). Potential sources were checked for optical (USNO-B1.0) and infrared (2MASS) counterparts using automatic catalogue-querying scripts in order to verify their identity and to screen out foreground stars. The algorithm is effective in recovering previously identified VSSs in the MCs. Moreover, it enables us to investigate long-term X-Ray variability of these sources by comparing multiple data sets and serves as a tool for discovering new VSS candidates in other sky regions. This project is supported by the General Research Fund HKU704709P of the Hong Kong SAR government.

  10. Stability of mass transfer from massive giants: double black hole binary formation and ultraluminous X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovskii, K.; Ivanova, N.; Belczynski, K.; Van, K. X.

    2017-02-01

    Mass transfer in binaries with massive donors and compact companions, when the donors rapidly evolve after their main sequence, determines the formation rates of merging double stellar-mass black hole (BH) binaries formed outside clusters. This mass transfer was previously postulated to be unstable and was expected to lead to a common envelope event. The common envelope event then ends with either the merger of the two stars or formation of a binary that eventually may become a merging double BH. We revisit the stability of this mass transfer and find an unanticipated third outcome: for a large range of binary orbital separations, this mass transfer is stable. This newly found stability allows us to reconcile the empirical rate obtained by LIGO, 9-240 Gpc-3 yr-1, with the theoretical rate for double BH binary mergers predicted by population synthesis studies by excluding a channel that predicts a merger rate above 1000 Gpc-3 yr-1. Furthermore, the stability of the mass transfer leads to the formation of ultraluminous X-ray sources. The theoretically predicted formation rates of bright ultraluminous X-ray sources powered by a stellar-mass BH are high enough to explain the number of observed bright ultraluminous X-ray sources.

  11. Atomic physics with hard X-rays from high brilliance synchrotron light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, S.; Gemmell, D.

    1996-08-01

    A century after the discovery of x rays, the experimental capability for studying atomic structure and dynamics with hard, bright synchrotron radiation is increasing remarkably. Tempting opportunities arise for experiments on many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interaction processes, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. Some of these possibilities are surveyed in general terms.

  12. Researches on stability of microfocus electron-impact x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-tian; Liu, Jun-Biao; Zhao, Wei-xia; Niu, Geng; Han, Li

    2016-10-01

    A microfocus electron-impact X-ray source with micro-beam was introduced in this paper. The tungsten cathode electrogun is used as emitting system, and the focusing system is consists of two magnetic solenoid lenses, it is effective, light and handy. The matching problems between emitting system focusing system are studied on the microfocus X-ray source. The current of the first focusing lens and the second focusing lens is 0.8A and 1.64A at the voltage of 90kV respectively, and the filament current is 2.5A. Under the condition, the micro-beam spot X-ray is gained. The test results of stability showed that the X-ray source have a excellent stability, X-ray intensity of which is 110.6+/-0.03μSr/hr, target current of which is 185.5+/-1.5μA, and the target temperature of which is 96.5+/-0.5°C.The resolution of micro-focus X-ray source is about 4μm by the analysis of JIMA, which meet the application requirement of microfocus X-ray source.

  13. Evidence For Quasi-Periodic X-ray Dips From An Ultraluminous X-ray Source: Implications for the Binary Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    We report results from long-term (approx.1240 days) X-ray (0.3-8.0 keV) monitoring of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5408 X-1 with the Swift/X-Ray Telescope. Here we expand on earlier work by Strohmayer (2009) who used only a part of the present data set. Our primary results are: (1) the discovery of sharp, quasi-periodic, energy-independent dips in the X-ray intensity that recur on average every 243 days, (2) the detection of an energy dependent (variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy), quasi-sinusoidal X-ray modulation with a period of 112.6 +/- 4 days, the amplitude of which weakens during the second half of the light curve, and (3) spectral evidence for an increase in photoelectric absorption during the last continuous segment of the data. We interpret the X-ray modulations within the context of binary motion in analogy to that seen in high-inclination accreting X-ray binaries. If correct, this implies that NGC 5408 X-1 is in a binary with an orbital period of 243 +/- 23 days, in contrast to the 115.5 day quasi-sinusoidal period previously reported by Strohmayer (2009). We discuss the overall X-ray modulation within the framework of accretion via Roche-lobe overflow of the donor star. In addition, if the X-ray modulation is caused by vertically structured obscuring material in the accretion disk, this would imply a high value for the inclination of the orbit. A comparison with estimates from accreting X-ray binaries suggests an inclination > or approx.70deg. We note that, in principle, a precessing accretion disk could also produce the observed X-ray modulations.

  14. Probing cluster potentials through gravitational lensing of background X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refregier, A.; Loeb, A.

    1996-01-01

    The gravitational lensing effect of a foreground galaxy cluster, on the number count statistics of background X-ray sources, was examined. The lensing produces a deficit in the number of resolved sources in a ring close to the critical radius of the cluster. The cluster lens can be used as a natural telescope to study the faint end of the (log N)-(log S) relation for the sources which account for the X-ray background.

  15. The X-ray spectral evolution of the ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luangtip, Wasutep; Roberts, Timothy P.; Done, Chris

    2016-08-01

    We present a new analysis of X-ray spectra of the archetypal ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) Holmberg IX X-1 obtained by the Swift, XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observatories. This ULX is a persistent source, with a typical luminosity of ˜1040 erg s-1, that varied by a factor of 4-5 over eight years. We find that its spectra tend to evolve from relatively flat or two-component spectra in the medium energy band (1-6 keV), at lower luminosities, to a spectrum that is distinctly curved and disc-like at the highest luminosities, with the peak energy in the curved spectrum tending to decrease with increased luminosity. We argue that the spectral evolution of the ULX can be explained by super-Eddington accretion models, where in this case we view the ULX down the evacuated funnel along its rotation axis, bounded by its massive radiatively driven wind. The spectral changes then originate in enhanced geometric beaming as the accretion rate increases and wind funnel narrows, causing the scattered flux from the central regions of the supercritical flow to brighten faster than the isotropic thermal emission from the wind, and so the curved hard spectral component to dominate at the highest luminosities. The wind also Compton down-scatters photons at the edge of the funnel, resulting in the peak energy of the spectrum decreasing. We also confirm that Holmberg IX X-1 displays spectral degeneracy with luminosity, and suggest that the observed differences are naturally explained by precession of the black hole rotation axis for the suggested wind geometry.

  16. Observation of Actin Filaments in Leydig Cells with a Contact-type Soft X-ray Microscope with Laser Plasma X-ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kado, Masataka; Ishino, Masahiko; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Yasuda, Keiko; Kishimoto, Maki; Nishikino, Masaharu; Kinjo, Yasuhito; Shinohara, Kunio

    Actin filaments in Leydig cells from mouse testes have been observed with a contact-type soft x-ray microscope with laser plasma x-ray source. The Leydig cells were fixed with paraformaldehyde, stained with Phalloidin, and observed with a confocal laser microscope prior to the observation with x-ray microscope. Obtained images by both of the confocal laser microscopy and the x-ray microscopy were directly compared and revealed that not only position of actin filaments but also the shapes can be identified each other. The actin filaments in the x-ray images were clearly recognized and their structures were obtained in more detail compared to those in the confocal laser microscope images.

  17. Ultrafast time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of ferrioxalate photolysis with a laser plasma X-ray source and microcalorimeter array

    DOE PAGES

    O’Neil, Galen C.; Miaja-Avila, Luis; Joe, Young Il; ...

    2017-02-17

    The detailed pathways of photoactivity on ultrafast time scales are a topic of contemporary interest. Using a tabletop apparatus based on a laser plasma X-ray source and an array of cryogenic microcalorimeter X-ray detectors, we measured a transient X-ray absorption spectrum during the ferrioxalate photoreduction reaction. With these high-efficiency detectors, we observe the Fe K edge move to lower energies and the amplitude of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure reduce, consistent with a photoreduction mechanism in which electron transfer precedes disassociation. We provide quantitative limits on the Fe–O bond length change. Lastly, we review potential improvements to our measurementmore » technique, highlighting the future potential of tabletop X-ray science using microcalorimeter sensors.« less

  18. Motionless phase stepping in X-ray phase contrast imaging with a compact source

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Houxun; Chen, Lei; Bennett, Eric E.; Adamo, Nick M.; Gomella, Andrew A.; DeLuca, Alexa M.; Patel, Ajay; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Wen, Han

    2013-01-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging offers a way to visualize the internal structures of an object without the need to deposit significant radiation, and thereby alleviate the main concern in X-ray diagnostic imaging procedures today. Grating-based differential phase contrast imaging techniques are compatible with compact X-ray sources, which is a key requirement for the majority of clinical X-ray modalities. However, these methods are substantially limited by the need for mechanical phase stepping. We describe an electromagnetic phase-stepping method that eliminates mechanical motion, thus removing the constraints in speed, accuracy, and flexibility. The method is broadly applicable to both projection and tomography imaging modes. The transition from mechanical to electromagnetic scanning should greatly facilitate the translation of X-ray phase contrast techniques into mainstream applications. PMID:24218599

  19. Dynamic Ultra-Bright X-ray Laser Scattering from Isochorically Heated Cryogenic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Luke; High Energy Density Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Recent x-ray scattering experiments performed at the MEC end-station of the LCLS, have demonstrated novel plasma measurements of the electron temperature, pressure, and density by simultaneous high-resolution angularly and spectrally resolved x-ray scattering from shock-compressed materials in the warm dense regime. Such measurements provide the structural properties relating the microscopic quantities in terms of thermodynamic properties using first-principles calculations. These studies have led us on a path where we create conditions with increasing temperatures and pressures to explore the high-energy density phase space. Specifically, we have begun experiments on hot and dense hydrogen plasmas producing energetic proton beams that find applications in fusion research and astrophysical phenomena. For our experiments with the 25 TW short pulse laser we apply repetition rates and pulse widths with a good match to the LCLS x-ray beam capabilities allowing pump-probe experiments with ultrahigh temporal resolution with very high data throughput with shot rates of up to 5 Hz. In this talk we will discuss our recent measurements that have resolved the ultrafast structural response of hydrogen to intense heating.

  20. Tunable High Brightness Semiconductor Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2015-0066 TUNABLE HIGH BRIGHTNESS SEMICONDUCTOR SOURCES Robert Bedford, Saima Husaini, Charles Reyner, and Tuoc Dang...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) May 2015 Final 5 November 2010 – 1 February 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE TUNABLE HIGH BRIGHTNESS SEMICONDUCTOR SOURCES 5a...included within the Tunable High Brightness Semiconductor Sources work unit includes several technology advancements. First, theoretical advances in mid

  1. The Faintest X-Ray Sources from z = 0 TO 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, L. L.; Barger, A. J.; Hasinger, G.

    2012-03-01

    We use the new 4 Ms exposure of the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) field obtained with the Chandra X-ray satellite to investigate the properties of the faintest X-ray sources over a wide range of redshifts. We use an optimized averaging procedure to investigate the weighted mean X-ray fluxes of optically selected sources in the CDF-S over the redshift range z = 0-8 and down to 0.5-2 keV fluxes as low as 5 × 10-19 erg cm-2 s-1. None of the samples of sources at high redshifts (z > 5) show any significant flux, and at z = 6.5 we place an upper limit on the X-ray luminosity of 4 × 1041 erg s-1 in the rest-frame 3.75-15 keV band for the sample of Bouwens et al. This is consistent with any X-ray production in the galaxies being solely due to star formation. At lower redshifts, we find significant weighted mean X-ray fluxes in many samples of sources over the redshift range z = 0-4. We use these to argue that (1) the relation between star formation and X-ray production remains invariant over this redshift range, (2) X-ray sources below the direct detection threshold in the CDF-S are primarily star forming, and (3) there is full consistency between UV and X-ray estimations of the star formation history. Based in part on data obtained from the Multimission Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute (MAST). STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  2. Design and characterization of a pulsed x ray source for fluorescent lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankespoor, S. C.

    1993-12-01

    To search for new, fast, inorganic scintillators, the author and his colleagues have developed a bench-top pulsed x-ray source for determining fluorescent lifetimes and wavelengths of compounds in crystal or powdered form. This source uses a light-excited x-ray tube which produces x-rays when light from a laser diode strikes its photocathode. The x-ray tube has a tungsten anode, a beryllium exit window, a 30 kV maximum tube bias, and a 50 HA maximum average cathode current. The laser produces 3 x 10(exp 7) photons at 650 nm per approximately 100 ps pulse, with up to 10(exp 7) pulses/sec. The time spread for the laser diode, x-ray tube, and a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube is less than 120 ps fwhm. The mean x-ray photon energy, at tube biases of 20, 25, and 30 kV, is 9.4, 10.3, and 11.1 keV, respectively. They measured 140, 230, and 330 x-ray photons per laser diode pulse per steradian at tube biases of 20, 25, and 30 kV, respectively. Background x-rays due to dark current occur at a rate of 1 x 10(exp 6) and 3 x 10(exp 6) photons/sec/steradian at tube biases of 25 and 30 kV, respectively. Data characterizing the x-ray output with an aluminum filter in the x-ray beam are also presented.

  3. Design and characterization of a pulsed x-ray source for fluorescent lifetime measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Blankespoor, S.C. |

    1993-12-01

    To search for new, fast, inorganic scintillators, the author and his colleagues have developed a bench-top pulsed x-ray source for determining fluorescent lifetimes and wavelengths of compounds in crystal or powdered form. This source uses a light-excited x-ray tube which produces x-rays when light from a laser diode strikes its photocathode. The x-ray tube has a tungsten anode, a beryllium exit window, a 30 kV maximum tube bias, and a 50 HA maximum average cathode current. The laser produces 3 {times} 10{sup 7} photons at 650 nm per {approximately}100 ps pulse, with up to 10{sup 7} pulses/sec. The time spread for the laser diode, x-ray tube, and a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube is less than 120 ps fwhm. The mean x-ray photon energy, at tube biases of 20, 25, and 30 kV, is 9.4, 10.3, and 11.1 keV, respectively. They measured 140, 230, and 330 x-ray photons per laser diode pulse per steradian at tube biases of 20, 25, and 30 kV, respectively. Background x-rays due to dark current occur at a rate of 1 {times} 10{sup 6} and 3 {times} 10{sup 6} photons/sec/steradian at tube biases of 25 and 30 kV, respectively. Data characterizing the x-ray output with an aluminum filter in the x-ray beam are also presented.

  4. Discovery and Characterization of Gravitationally Lensed X-ray Sources in the CLASH Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasha, Imad; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Santos, Felipe A.

    2017-01-01

    We present the discovery of ~20 gravitationally lensed X-ray sources in the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) survey, a sample of massive clusters of galaxies between z ~ 0.2-0.9 observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). By combining CLASH imaging with Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of the same clusters, we select those sources in the HST images which are gravitationally lensed X-ray sources behind the clusters. Of those discovered sources, we determine various properties including source redshifts and magnifications, as well as performing X-ray spectral fits to determine source fluxes and luminosities. Prior to this study, only four lensed X-ray sources behind clusters have been found, thus to the best of our knowledge, our program is the first to systematically categorize lensed X-ray sources behind galaxy clusters.This work was supported by the SAO REU program, which is funded in part by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no. 1262851, and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  5. Prospects for using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, R.A.; Farrell, W.; Ma, Q.

    1997-09-01

    Third-generation, high-intensity, x-ray synchrotron radiation sources are capable of producing high heat-flux x-ray beams. In many applications finding ways to handle these powers is viewed as a burden. However, there are some technological applications where the deep penetration length of the x-rays may find beneficial uses as a volumetric heat source. In this paper the authors discuss the prospects for using high power x-rays for volumetric heating and report some recent experimental results. The particular applications they focus on are welding and surface heat treatment. The radiation source is an undulator at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Results of preliminary tests on aluminum, aluminum metal matrix composites, and steel will be presented.

  6. Development of a 1 {mu}s, 40 Hz, x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Shope, S.L.; Jojola, J.M.; Prestwich, K.R.

    1993-07-01

    We are developing a 1 cm diameter, 1{mu}s, 300 keV, 1 kA repetitive pulsed electron beam diode to be used in a linear x-ray source. The diode is required to operate from a single pulse mode up to 40 Hz. A single pulse, double x-ray source has been developed and tested. Each source produces a 1 {mu}s electron beam with voltages up to 300 keV, 1 kA for each of the two sources. The electron beams impinge on 5 mil tantalum converters to make the x-rays. The x-rays are produced in field emission diodes powered by a single PPT, a pulsed transformer and a capacitive pulse forming network (PFN).

  7. A miniature metal-ceramic x-ray source for spacecraft instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Koppel, L N; Marshall, J R

    1998-04-01

    Definitive mineralogical identification of materials with x-ray diffraction and fluorescence on remote planetary probes requires the development of a rugged miniature x-ray source that complies with the mass, power, thermal, and electrical management constraints imposed by space missions. Conventional x-ray tubes are generally fragile, glass-envelope designs with heat-sensitive seals. They are too brittle and bulky for planetary missions, and usually require cumbersome and power-consuming cooling systems. Here we describe the development of a novel, rugged miniature x-ray source employing a ceramic BeO substrate upon which a metal target material is deposited. Conventional thermionic emission and high-voltage acceleration of electrons to strike the metal target material produce an x-ray yield comparable to conventional x-ray tubes. Thermal management of the x-ray source is achieved with the excellent heat transport properties of the BeO target substrate coupled with a passive heatpipe.

  8. Quasimonochromatic x-ray computed tomography by the balanced filter method using a conventional x-ray source.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masatoshi

    2004-12-01

    A quasimonochromatic x-ray computed tomography (CT) system utilizing balanced filters has recently been developed for acquiring quantitative CT images. This system consisted of basic components such as a conventional x-ray generator for radiography, a stage for mounting and rotating objects, and an x-ray line sensor camera. Metallic sheets of Er and Yb were used as the balanced filters for obtaining quasimonochromatic incident x rays that include the characteristic lines of the W Kalpha doublet from a tungsten target. The mean energy and energy width of the quasimonochromatic x rays were determined to be 59.0 and 1.9 keV, respectively, from x-ray spectroscopic measurements using a high-purity Ge detector. The usefulness of the present x-ray CT system was demonstrated by obtaining spatial distributions of the linear attenuation coefficients of three selected samples--a 20 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom, a 3.5 cm diameter aluminum rod, and a human head phantom. The results clearly indicate that this apparatus is surprisingly effective for estimating the distribution of the linear attenuation coefficients without any correction of the beam-hardening effect. Thus, implementing the balanced filter method on an x-ray CT scanner has promise in producing highly quantitative CT images.

  9. A Compact X-Ray Source in the Radio Pulsar-wind Nebula G141.2+5.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a 50 ks Chandra observation of the recently discovered radio object G141.2+5.0, presumed to be a pulsar-wind nebula. We find a moderately bright unresolved X-ray source that we designate CXOU J033712.8 615302 coincident with the central peak radio emission. An absorbed power-law fit to the 241 counts describes the data well, with absorbing column {N}H=6.7(4.0,9.7)× {10}21 cm-2 and photon index {{Γ }}=1.8(1.4,2.2). For a distance of 4 kpc, the unabsorbed luminosity between 0.5 and 8 keV is {1.7}-0.3+0.4× {10}32 erg s-1 (90% confidence intervals). Both LX and Γ are quite typical of pulsars in PWNe. No extended emission is seen; we estimate a conservative 3σ upper limit to the surface brightness of any X-ray PWN near the point source to be 3× {10}-17 erg cm-2 s-1 arcsec-2 between 0.5 and 8 keV, assuming the same spectrum as the point source; for a nebula of diameter 13\\prime\\prime , the flux limit is 6% of the flux of the point source. The steep radio spectrum of the PWN (α ˜ -0.7), if continued to the X-ray without a break, predicts {L}{{X}} {{(nebula)}}˜ 1× {10}33 erg s-1, so additional spectral steepening between radio and X-rays is required, as is true of all known PWNe. The high Galactic latitude gives a z-distance of 350 pc above the Galactic plane, quite unusual for a Population I object.

  10. Optical synchronization system for femtosecond X-ray sources

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B [El Cerrito, CA; Holzwarth, Ronald [Munich, DE

    2011-12-13

    Femtosecond pump/probe experiments using short X-Ray and optical pulses require precise synchronization between 100 meter-10 km separated lasers in a various experiments. For stabilization in the hundred femtosecond range a CW laser is amplitude modulated at 1-10 GHz, the signal retroreflected from the far end, and the relative phase used to correct the transit time with various implementations. For the sub-10 fsec range the laser frequency itself is upshifted 55 MHz with an acousto-optical modulator, retroreflected, upshifted again and phase compared at the sending end to a 110 MHz reference. Initial experiments indicate less than 1 fsec timing jitter. To lock lasers in the sub-10 fs range two single-frequency lasers separated by several teraHertz will be lock to a master modelocked fiber laser, transmit the two frequencies over fiber, and lock two comb lines of a slave laser to these frequencies, thus synchronizing the two modelocked laser envelopes.

  11. Long Duration Multi-hohlraum X-ray Sources for Eagle Nebula Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Jave; Heeter, Robert; Martinez, David; Casner, Alexis; Villette, Bruno; Mancini, Roberto; Pound, Marc

    2013-10-01

    A novel foam-filled multi-hohlraum long-duration x-ray source has been demonstrated at the Omega EP laser and used to obtain L-band spectra of photoionized Ti. A larger scale version of the source will be used in the Science on NIF Eagle Nebula experiments studying dynamic evolution of distinctive pillar and cometary structures in star-forming clouds, where the long duration and directionality of photoionizing radiation from nearby stars generates new classes of flows and instabilities. At NIF, a target representing an astrophysical molecular cloud will be placed several mm from an x-ray source lasting 40-100 ns. At EP, three hohlraums were illuminated in sequence with 3.3 kJ pulses lasting 6 ns, or 4.3 kJ pulses lasting 10 ns, generating 18 or 30 ns of x-ray output at 90-100 eV color temperature. Performance of the source was validated using the μ DMX and VSG spectrometers, ASBO VISAR, and x-ray pinhole imagery. The HYDRA code suggests the EP-scale source can also be shot at NIF with at least 10 kJ per hohlraum. The multi-hohlraum source concept has potential further application to hard x-ray sources, soft x-ray backlighters, and nonlinear ablative hydrodynamics. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. J. Kane supported by DOE OFES grant HEDLP LAB 11-583.

  12. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources or Fiat Lux: what's under the dome and watching atoms with x-rays (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Falcone, Roger

    2008-07-15

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  13. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources or Fiat Lux: what's under the dome and watching atoms with x-rays (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Falcone, Roger

    2016-07-12

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  14. CHANDRA AND HST STUDIES OF THE X-RAY SOURCES IN GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER M92

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ting-Ni; Kong, Albert K. H.; Verbunt, Frank; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Anderson, Scott F.; Pooley, David

    2011-08-01

    We present the analysis of two observations of M92 taken with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We combined the two data sets with a total exposure of {approx}52 ks. With the combined observation, we detected 10 X-ray sources inside the half-mass radius (1.'02), five of which are inside the core radius (0.'26) of M92. The luminosities of the 10 sources are roughly within the range of 10{sup 30}-10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1} assuming cluster memberships. The background estimation suggests 7-8 cluster members and 2-3 background galaxies in M92. We identified the 10 sources by using Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys observations of M92. Based on the X-ray and optical characteristics, we classified 4-5 possible candidates for cataclysmic variables within the half-mass radius. We discussed the possible formation mechanisms of the X-ray sources in M92 by comparing the predicted X-ray source number and observational results. Under the assumption that the number of X-ray sources scales with the encounter rate and the mass of the globular cluster, we expected eight X-ray sources formed from dynamical interactions and four from primordial binaries inside M92, which is consistent with the background estimation and comparable with the observational results. We therefore suggest that the X-ray sources in M92 may be contributed from both dynamical origin and primordial binaries.

  15. Clocking femtosecond X rays.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, A L; Fritz, D M; Lee, S H; Bucksbaum, P H; Reis, D A; Rudati, J; Mills, D M; Fuoss, P H; Stephenson, G B; Kao, C C; Siddons, D P; Lowney, D P; Macphee, A G; Weinstein, D; Falcone, R W; Pahl, R; Als-Nielsen, J; Blome, C; Düsterer, S; Ischebeck, R; Schlarb, H; Schulte-Schrepping, H; Tschentscher, Th; Schneider, J; Hignette, O; Sette, F; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Chapman, H N; Lee, R W; Hansen, T N; Synnergren, O; Larsson, J; Techert, S; Sheppard, J; Wark, J S; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; van der Spoel, D; Timneanu, N; Hajdu, J; Akre, R A; Bong, E; Emma, P; Krejcik, P; Arthur, J; Brennan, S; Gaffney, K J; Lindenberg, A M; Luening, K; Hastings, J B

    2005-03-25

    Linear-accelerator-based sources will revolutionize ultrafast x-ray science due to their unprecedented brightness and short pulse duration. However, time-resolved studies at the resolution of the x-ray pulse duration are hampered by the inability to precisely synchronize an external laser to the accelerator. At the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source at the Stanford Linear-Accelerator Center we solved this problem by measuring the arrival time of each high energy electron bunch with electro-optic sampling. This measurement indirectly determined the arrival time of each x-ray pulse relative to an external pump laser pulse with a time resolution of better than 60 fs rms.

  16. Localization of the X-ray source in the globular cluster G1 with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, A. K. H.; Heinke, C. O.; di Stefano, R.; Cohn, H. N.; Lugger, P. M.; Barmby, P.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Primini, F. A.

    2010-09-01

    We report the most accurate X-ray position of the X-ray source in the giant globular cluster G1 in M31 by using the Chandra X-ray Observatory, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). G1 is clearly detected with Chandra and by cross-registering with HST and CFHT images, we derive a 1σ error radius of 0.15arcsec, significantly smaller than the previous measurement by XMM-Newton. We conclude that the X-ray emission of G1 is likely to come from within the core radius of the cluster. We have considered a number of possibilities for the origin of the X-ray emission but can rule all but two scenarios out: it could be due to either accretion on to a central intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) or an ordinary low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). Based on the X-ray luminosity and the Bondi accretion rate, an IMBH accreting from the cluster gas seems unlikely and we suggest that the X-rays are due to accretion from a companion. Alternatively, the probability that a 1.5 Msolar cluster LMXB lies within the 95 per cent X-ray error circle is about 0.7. Therefore we cannot rule out a single LMXB as the origin of the X-ray emission. While we cannot distinguish between different models with current observations, future high-resolution and high-sensitivity radio imaging observations will reveal whether there is an IMBH at the centre of G1.

  17. X-RAY EMISSION FROM HESS J1731-347/SNR G353.6-0.7 AND CENTRAL COMPACT SOURCE XMMS J173203-344518

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, W. W.; Li, Z.; Leahy, D. A.; Yang, J.; Lu, D.; Yang, X. J.; Yamazaki, R. E-mail: wtian@ucalgary.c

    2010-04-01

    We present new results of the HESS J1731-347/SNR G353.6-0.7 system from XMM-Newton and Suzaku X-ray observations and Delinha CO observations. We discover extended hard X-rays coincident with the bright, extended TeV source HESS J1731-347 and the shell of the radio supernova remnant (SNR). We find that spatially resolved X-ray spectra can generally be characterized by an absorbed power-law model, with a photon index of {approx}2, typical of non-thermal emission. A bright X-ray compact source, XMMS J173203-344518, is also detected near the center of the SNR. We find no evidence of a radio counterpart or an extended X-ray morphology for this source, making it unlikely to be a pulsar wind nebular (PWN). The spectrum of the source can be well fitted by an absorbed blackbody with a temperature of {approx}0.5 keV plus a power-law tail with a photon index of {approx}5, reminiscent of the X-ray emission of a magnetar. CO observations toward the inner part of the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) source reveal a bright cloud component at -20 +- 4 km s{sup -1}, which is likely located at the same distance of {approx}3.2 kpc as the SNR. Based on the probable association between the X-ray and gamma-ray emissions and likely association between the CO cloud and the SNR, we argue that the extended TeV emission originates from the interaction between the SNR shock and the adjacent CO clouds rather than from a PWN.

  18. High-throughput real-time x-ray microtomography at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Carlo, Francesco; Albee, Paul B.; Chu, Yong S.; Mancini, Derrick C.; Tieman, Brian; Wang, Steve Y.

    2002-01-01

    It is now possible for large volumes of synchrotron- radiation-generated micro-tomography data to be produced at gigabyte-per-minute rates, especially when using currently available CCD cameras at a high-brightness source, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Recent improvements in the speed of our detectors and stages, combined with increased photon flux supplied by a newly installed double multilayer monochromator, allow us to achieve these data rates on a bending magnet beamline. Previously, most x-ray microtomography experiments have produced data at comparatively lower rates, and often the data were analyzed after the experiment. The time needed to generate complete data sets meant putting off analysis to the completion of a run, thus preventing the user from evaluating the usefulness of a data set and consequently impairing decision making during data acquisition as to how to proceed. Thus, the ability to provide to a tomography user a fully reconstructed data set in few minutes is one of the major problems to be solved when dealing with high-throughput x- ray tomography. This is due to the complexity of the data analysis that involves data preprocessing, sinogram generation, 3D reconstruction, and rendering. At the APS, we have developed systems and techniques to address this issue. We present a method that uses a cluster-based, parallel- computing system based on the Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard. Among the advantages of this approach are the portability, ease-of-use, and low cost of the system. The combination of high-speed, online analysis with high- throughput acquisition allows us to acquire and reconstruct a 512x512x512-voxel sample with a few microns resolution in less than ten minutes.

  19. [Experimental investigation of laser plasma soft X-ray source with gas target].

    PubMed

    Ni, Qi-liang; Gong, Yan; Lin, Jing-quan; Chen, Bo; Cao, Jian-lin

    2003-02-01

    This paper describes a debris-free laser plasma soft X-ray source with a gas target, which has high operating frequency and can produce strong soft X-ray radiation. The valve of this light source is drived by a piezoelectrical ceramic whose operating frequency is up to 400 Hz. In comparison with laser plasma soft X-ray sources using metal target, the light source is debris-free. And it has higher operating frequency than gas target soft X-ray sources whose nozzle is controlled by a solenoid valve. A channel electron multiplier (CEM) operating in analog mode is used to detect the soft X-ray generated by the laser plasma source, and the CEM's output is fed to to a charge-sensitive preamplifier for further amplification purpose. Output charges from the CEM are proportional to the amplitude of the preamplifier's output voltage. Spectra of CO2, Xe and Kr at 8-14 nm wavelength which can be used for soft X-ray projection lithography are measured. The spectrum for CO2 consists of separate spectral lines originate mainly from the transitions in Li-like and Be-like ions. The Xe spectrum originating mainly from 4d-5f, 4d-4f, 4d-6p and 4d-5p transitions in multiply charged xenon ions. The spectrum for Kr consists of separate spectral lines and continuous broad spectra originating mainly from the transitions in Cu-, Ni-, Co- and Fe-like ions.

  20. Observations of low-luminosity X-ray sources in Vela-Puppis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented for a study of the X-ray emission from a small portion of the galactic plane near galactic longitude 260 deg. This region contains at least six low-luminosity X-ray sources within about 10 deg of PSR 0833-45, which is near the center of the Gum nebula. The X-ray source 4U 0833-45, associated with the Vela pulsar, is observed at twice its 4U catalog intensity. The lack of X-ray pulsations at the pulsar period (greater than 99% nonpulsed), the nonthermal power-law spectrum, and models of the X-ray source distribution in this region suggest that a large fraction of the X-rays come from an extended source about 1 deg of arc in radius. The observation of a high-temperature (effective temperature at least 100 million K) spectrum in a field of view containing only Puppis A among known sources has led to the discovery of new OSO 8 source, OS 0752-39. Other spectra from this region are discussed.

  1. Miniature, low-power X-ray tube using a microchannel electron generator electron source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Wm. Timothy (Inventor); Kelliher, Warren C. (Inventor); Hershyn, William (Inventor); DeLong, David P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of the invention provide a novel, low-power X-ray tube and X-ray generating system. Embodiments of the invention use a multichannel electron generator as the electron source, thereby increasing reliability and decreasing power consumption of the X-ray tube. Unlike tubes using a conventional filament that must be heated by a current power source, embodiments of the invention require only a voltage power source, use very little current, and have no cooling requirements. The microchannel electron generator comprises one or more microchannel plates (MCPs), Each MCP comprises a honeycomb assembly of a plurality of annular components, which may be stacked to increase electron intensity. The multichannel electron generator used enables directional control of electron flow. In addition, the multichannel electron generator used is more robust than conventional filaments, making the resulting X-ray tube very shock and vibration resistant.

  2. Quantitative X-ray phase-contrast microtomography from a compact laser-driven betatron source

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, J.; Schleede, S.; Khrennikov, K.; Bech, M.; Thibault, P.; Heigoldt, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Karsch, S.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to a brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present a phase-contrast microtomogram of a biological sample using betatron X-rays. Comprehensive source characterization enables the reconstruction of absolute electron densities. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential for filling the large performance gap between synchrotron- and current X-ray tube-based sources. PMID:26189811

  3. A wide-beam X-ray source suitable for diffraction enhanced imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang H.; Bourham, Mohamed A.; Michael Doster, J.

    2006-10-01

    Research in diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI), using a synchrotron source with an X-ray flux of 1.4×10 12 ph/mm 2/s, has shown strong potential in obtaining high-resolution images as compared to conventional radiographs. This research investigates the feasibility of developing a large area circular X-ray source with fluxes comparable to a synchrotron source. The source should be capable of integration into a compact system with peak powers not to exceed 200 kW to be feasible for use in a major medical facility, industrial complex or screening facility (such as cargo or airport). A computational study of a circular concentric filament wide-beam area X-ray source has been investigated in this research. The design features are based on generating electrons from three concentric circular filaments to provide an area electron flux, with a 60 kV accelerating potential and a beam current of up to 3 A. The X-ray target is a grounded stationary oxygen-free copper target with a layer of molybdenum. This target feature differs from standard rotating X-ray targets in conventional X-ray systems. Studies of electron trajectories and their distribution on the target were conducted using the SIMION 3D code. Heat loading and thermal management were studied using heat transfer modules from the coupled FEMLAB multi-physics and MATLAB codes. The Monte Carlo code MCNP 5 was used to obtain the X-ray flux and energy distribution for aluminum and beryllium windows. This computational study shows that this target configuration generates X-rays with photon flux comparable to synchrotron source and sufficient for DEI applications. The maximum target temperature rise is 1357 K after 70 s when cooling the back of the target to liquid nitrogen temperature using cold finger contact, and 325 K for an invaded target, in which liquid nitrogen circulates inside the target.

  4. The soft x-ray instrument for materials studies at the linac coherent light source x-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Rowen, M.; Holmes, M.; Messerschmidt, M.; Moeller, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, S.; Coffee, R.; Hays, G.; Heimann, P.; Krupin, O.; Soufli, R.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Hau-Riege, S.; Kelez, N.; Beye, M.; Gerken, N.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Wurth, W.; and others

    2012-04-15

    The soft x-ray materials science instrument is the second operational beamline at the linac coherent light source x-ray free electron laser. The instrument operates with a photon energy range of 480-2000 eV and features a grating monochromator as well as bendable refocusing mirrors. A broad range of experimental stations may be installed to study diverse scientific topics such as: ultrafast chemistry, surface science, highly correlated electron systems, matter under extreme conditions, and laboratory astrophysics. Preliminary commissioning results are presented including the first soft x-ray single-shot energy spectrum from a free electron laser.

  5. X-Ray Sources and High-Throughput Data Collection Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, Gyorgy

    2012-03-15

    X-ray diffraction experiments on protein crystals are at the core of the structure determination process. An overview of X-ray sources and data collection methods to support structure-based drug design (SBDD) efforts is presented in this chapter. First, methods of generating and manipulating X-rays for the purpose of protein crystallography, as well as the components of the diffraction experiment setup are discussed. SBDD requires the determination of numerous protein-ligand complex structures in a timely manner, and the second part of this chapter describes how to perform diffraction experiments efficiently on a large number of crystals, including crystal screening and data collection.

  6. Satellite Observations of Rapidly Varying Cosmic X-ray Sources. Ph.D. Thesis - Catholic Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, G. S.

    1979-01-01

    The X-ray source data obtained with the high energy celestial X-ray detector on the Orbiting Solar Observatory -8 are presented. The results from the 1977 Crab observation show nonstatistical fluctuations in the pulsed emission and in the structure of the integrated pulse profile which cannot be attributed to any known systematic effect. The Hercules observations presented here provide information on three different aspects of the pulsed X-ray emission: the variation of pulsed flux as a function of the time from the beginning of the ON-state, the variation of pulsed flux as a function of binary phase, and the energy spectrum of the pulse emission.

  7. X-ray holographic microscopy experiments at the Brookhaven synchrotron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.; Iarocci, M.; Kenney, J.; Kirz, J.; Rarback, H.

    1983-01-01

    Soft x-ray holographic microscopy is discussed from an experimental point of view. Three series of measurements have been carried out using the Brookhaven 750 MeV storage ring as an x-ray source. Young slits fringes, Gabor (in line) holograms and various data pertaining to the soft x-ray performance of photographic plates are reported. The measurements are discussed in terms of the technique for recording them and the experimental limitations in effect. Some discussion is also given of the issues involved in reconstruction using visible light.

  8. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays. II. Faint Sources Detected with XMM-Newton and Chandra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunez, N. E.; Luna, G. J. M.; Pillitteri, I.; Mukai, K.

    2014-01-01

    We report the detection from four symbiotic stars that were not known to be X-ray sources. These four object show a ß-type X-ray spectrum, that is, their spectra can be modeled with an absorbed optically thin thermal emission with temperatures of a few million degrees. Photometric series obtained with the Optical Monitor on board XMM-Newton from V2416 Sgr and NSV 25735 support the proposed scenario where the X-ray emission is produced in a shock-heated region inside the symbiotic nebulae.

  9. X-ray sources and high-throughput data collection methods.

    PubMed

    Snell, Gyorgy

    2012-01-01

    X-ray diffraction experiments on protein crystals are at the core of the structure determination process. An overview of X-ray sources and data collection methods to support structure-based drug design (SBDD) efforts is presented in this chapter. First, methods of generating and manipulating X-rays for the purpose of protein crystallography, as well as the components of the diffraction experiment setup are discussed. SBDD requires the determination of numerous protein-ligand complex structures in a timely manner, and the second part of this chapter describes how to perform diffraction experiments efficiently on a large number of crystals, including crystal screening and data collection.

  10. Calibration of a time-resolved hard-x-ray detector using radioactive sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Regan, S. P.; Romanofsky, M. H.

    2016-11-01

    A four-channel, time-resolved, hard x-ray detector (HXRD) has been operating at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics for more than a decade. The slope temperature of the hot-electron population in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments is inferred by recording the hard x-ray radiation generated in the interaction of the electrons with the target. Measuring the energy deposited by hot electrons requires an absolute calibration of the hard x-ray detector. A novel method to obtain an absolute calibration of the HXRD using single photons from radioactive sources was developed, which uses a thermoelectrically cooled, low-noise, charge-sensitive amplifier.

  11. Development of a Novel Tunable X-Ray Source for the RPI-LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Danon; R.C. Block

    2004-11-30

    This document summarizes the results of a three year effort to develop a parametric x-ray (PXR) source. The emphasis of this research was to demonstrate production of high yield monoenergetic x-rays. Production of PXR is accomplished by placing a crystal in a relativistic electron beam. The process was first demonstrated in 1985 in Russia. Numerous papers were written about the characteristics of PXR from both experimental and theoretical perspectives. The advantage of PXR over other monoenergetic x-ray sources is that it is produced at large angle relative to the electron beam and at high intensity. None of the previous work described in the literature capitalized on this effect to study what is required in order to generate an effective monoenergetic x-ray source that can be used for practical applications. The work summarized here describes the process done in order to optimize the PXR production process by selecting an appropriate crystal and the optimal conditions. The research focused on production of 18 keV x-rays which are suitable for mammography however the results are not limited to this application or energy range. We are the first group to demonstrate x-ray imaging using PXR. Such sources can improve current medical imaging modalities. More research is required in order to design a prototype of a compact source.

  12. X-ray sources in regions of star formation. II - The pre-main-sequence G star HDE 283572

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, F. M.; Brown, A.; Linsky, J. L.; Rydgren, A. E.; Vrba, F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports the detection of HDE 283572, a ninth-magnitude G star 8 arcmin south of RY Tau, as a bright X-ray source. The observations reveal this object to be a fairly massive (about 2 solar masses) pre-main-sequence star associated with the Taurus-Auriga star formation complex. It exhibits few of the characteristics of the classical T Tauri stars and is a good example of a 'naked' T Tauri star. The star is a mid-G subgiant, of about three solar radii and rotates with a period of 1.5 d. The coronal and chromospheric surface fluxes are similar to those of the most active late type stars (excluding T Tauri stars). The X-ray and UV lines most likely arise in different atmospheric structures. Radiative losses are some 1000 times the quiet solar value and compare favorably with those of T Tauri stars.

  13. a High-Density Electron Beam and Quad-Scan Measurements at Pleiades Thomson X-Ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, J. K.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Anderson, S. G.; Tremaine, A. M.

    2007-09-01

    A recent development of the photo-cathode injector technology has greatly enhanced the beam quality necessary for the creation of high density/high brightness electron beam sources. In the Thomson backscattering x-ray experiment, there is an immense need for under 20 micron electron beam spot at the interaction point with a high-intensity laser in order to produce a large x-ray flux. This has been demonstrated successfully at PLEIADES in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. For this Thomson backscattering experiment, we employed an asymmetric triplet, high remanence permanent-magnet quads to produce smaller electron beams. Utilizing highly efficient optical transition radiation (OTR) beam spot imaging technique and varying electron focal spot sizes enabled a quadrupole scan at the interaction zone. Comparisons between Twiss parameters obtained upstream to those parameter values deduced from PMQ scan will be presented in this report.

  14. a High-Density Electron Beam and Quad-Scan Measurements at Pleiades Thomson X-Ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, J. K.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Anderson, S. G.; Tremaine, A. M.

    A recent development of the photo-cathode injector technology has greatly enhanced the beam quality necessary for the creation of high density/high brightness electron beam sources. In the Thomson backscattering x-ray experiment, there is an immense need for under 20 micron electron beam spot at the interaction point with a high-intensity laser in order to produce a large x-ray flux. This has been demonstrated successfully at PLEIADES in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. For this Thomson backscattering experiment, we employed an asymmetric triplet, high remanence permanent-magnet quads to produce smaller electron beams. Utilizing highly efficient optical transition radiation (OTR) beam spot imaging technique and varying electron focal spot sizes enabled a quadrupole scan at the interaction zone. Comparisons between Twiss parameters obtained upstream to those parameter values deduced from PMQ scan will be presented in this report.

  15. [Development of soft X-ray and vacuum ultraviolet spectrum sources].

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Ni, Qi-liang; Cao, Jian-lin; Li, Fu-tian; Chen, Xing-dan

    2005-03-01

    The soft X-ray and vacuum ultraviolet sources developed in CIOMP are presented. The wall-stabilized argon arc source with spectrum stability and repeatability of +/-0.3% is applied to the calibration of spectrum intensity distribution of the vacuum ultraviolet instruments as an absolute standard source. The Penning source, duobplasma source and hollow cathode source are able to produce atomic and ionic line spectra as a wavelength standard source, which covers a few nanometers to several tens nanometers with spectrum radiation stability and repeatability of +/-1.0%. In particular, the low debris laser produced plasma source with liquid aerosol spray target recently developed can emit stronger soft X-ray for soft X-ray lithography and metrology, which has a transfer efficiency as high as 0.75%/2pi x sr/2% bandwidth.

  16. Derivation of total filtration thickness for diagnostic x-ray source assembly.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Michiharu; Katoh, Yoh

    2016-08-21

    The method defined by the IEC 60522 for determining the inherent filtration of an x-ray source device is applicable only for a limited range of tube voltage. Because the users cannot legally remove the x-ray movable diaphragm of the x-ray source device, total filtration, which is the sum of the additional filtration diaphragm movable for specific filtration and x-ray, cannot be measured. We develop a method for simply obtaining the total filtration for different tube voltage values. Total filtration can be estimated from a ratio R' of the air kerma [Formula: see text], which is measured with an Al plate with thickness T, and [Formula: see text] measured without an Al plate. The conditions of the target material of the x-ray source device are then entered into the Report 78 Spectrum Processor to calculate the air kerma K x and K x+T for Al thicknesses x and (x  +  T), respectively, to obtain R. The minimum value of x, which is the difference between the R and R', is the total filtration of the x-ray source device. The total filtration calculated using the industrial x-ray source device was within  ±1% in the 40-120 kV range. This method can calculate the total filtration using air kerma measurements with and without the Al plate. Therefore, the load on the x-ray tube can be reduced, and preparation of multiple Al plates is not necessary. Furthermore, for the 40-120 kV tube voltage range, the user can easily measure the total filtration.

  17. Derivation of total filtration thickness for diagnostic x-ray source assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Michiharu; Katoh, Yoh

    2016-08-01

    The method defined by the IEC 60522 for determining the inherent filtration of an x-ray source device is applicable only for a limited range of tube voltage. Because the users cannot legally remove the x-ray movable diaphragm of the x-ray source device, total filtration, which is the sum of the additional filtration diaphragm movable for specific filtration and x-ray, cannot be measured. We develop a method for simply obtaining the total filtration for different tube voltage values. Total filtration can be estimated from a ratio R‧ of the air kerma Kx+T\\prime , which is measured with an Al plate with thickness T, and Kx\\prime measured without an Al plate. The conditions of the target material of the x-ray source device are then entered into the Report 78 Spectrum Processor to calculate the air kerma K x and K x+T for Al thicknesses x and (x  +  T), respectively, to obtain R. The minimum value of x, which is the difference between the R and R‧, is the total filtration of the x-ray source device. The total filtration calculated using the industrial x-ray source device was within  ±1% in the 40-120 kV range. This method can calculate the total filtration using air kerma measurements with and without the Al plate. Therefore, the load on the x-ray tube can be reduced, and preparation of multiple Al plates is not necessary. Furthermore, for the 40-120 kV tube voltage range, the user can easily measure the total filtration.

  18. An accreting pulsar with extreme properties drives an ultraluminous x-ray source in NGC 5907

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, Gian Luca; Belfiore, Andrea; Stella, Luigi; Esposito, Paolo; Casella, Piergiorgio; De Luca, Andrea; Marelli, Martino; Papitto, Alessandro; Perri, Matteo; Puccetti, Simonetta; Castillo, Guillermo A. Rodríguez; Salvetti, David; Tiengo, Andrea; Zampieri, Luca; D’Agostino, Daniele; Greiner, Jochen; Haberl, Frank; Novara, Giovanni; Salvaterra, Ruben; Turolla, Roberto; Watson, Mike; Wilms, Joern; Wolter, Anna

    2017-02-01

    Ultraluminous x-ray sources (ULXs) in nearby galaxies shine brighter than any x-ray source in our Galaxy. ULXs are usually modeled as stellar-mass black holes (BHs) accreting at very high rates or intermediate-mass BHs. We present observations showing that NGC 5907 ULX is instead an x-ray accreting neutron star (NS) with a spin period evolving from 1.43 seconds in 2003 to 1.13 seconds in 2014. It has an isotropic peak luminosity of ~1000 times the Eddington limit for a NS at 17.1 megaparsec. Standard accretion models fail to explain its luminosity, even assuming beamed emission, but a strong multipolar magnetic field can describe its properties. These findings suggest that other extreme ULXs (x-ray luminosity ≥ 1041 erg second‑1) might harbor NSs.

  19. Multimodal hard X-ray imaging of a mammography phantom at a compact synchrotron light source.

    PubMed

    Schleede, Simone; Bech, Martin; Achterhold, Klaus; Potdevin, Guillaume; Gifford, Martin; Loewen, Rod; Limborg, Cecile; Ruth, Ronald; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-01

    The Compact Light Source is a miniature synchrotron producing X-rays at the interaction point of a counter-propagating laser pulse and electron bunch through the process of inverse Compton scattering. The small transverse size of the luminous region yields a highly coherent beam with an angular divergence of a few milliradians. The intrinsic monochromaticity and coherence of the produced X-rays can be exploited in high-sensitivity differential phase-contrast imaging with a grating-based interferometer. Here, the first multimodal X-ray imaging experiments at the Compact Light Source at a clinically compatible X-ray energy of 21 keV are reported. Dose-compatible measurements of a mammography phantom clearly demonstrate an increase in contrast attainable through differential phase and dark-field imaging over conventional attenuation-based projections.

  20. Beyond crystallography: Diffractive imaging using coherent x-ray light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, J.; Ishikawa, T.; Robinson, I. K.; Murnane, M. M.

    2015-04-30

    X-ray crystallography has been central to the development of many fields of science over the past century. It has now matured to a point that as long as good-quality crystals are available, their atomic structure can be routinely determined in three dimensions. However, many samples in physics, chemistry, materials science, nanoscience, geology, and biology are noncrystalline, and thus their three-dimensional structures are not accessible by traditional x-ray crystallography. Overcoming this hurdle has required the development of new coherent imaging methods to harness new coherent x-ray light sources. Here we review the revolutionary advances that are transforming x-ray sources and imaging in the 21st century.

  1. An accreting pulsar with extreme properties drives an ultraluminous x-ray source in NGC 5907.

    PubMed

    Israel, Gian Luca; Belfiore, Andrea; Stella, Luigi; Esposito, Paolo; Casella, Piergiorgio; De Luca, Andrea; Marelli, Martino; Papitto, Alessandro; Perri, Matteo; Puccetti, Simonetta; Castillo, Guillermo A Rodríguez; Salvetti, David; Tiengo, Andrea; Zampieri, Luca; D'Agostino, Daniele; Greiner, Jochen; Haberl, Frank; Novara, Giovanni; Salvaterra, Ruben; Turolla, Roberto; Watson, Mike; Wilms, Joern; Wolter, Anna

    2017-02-24

    Ultraluminous x-ray sources (ULXs) in nearby galaxies shine brighter than any x-ray source in our Galaxy. ULXs are usually modeled as stellar-mass black holes (BHs) accreting at very high rates or intermediate-mass BHs. We present observations showing that NGC 5907 ULX is instead an x-ray accreting neutron star (NS) with a spin period evolving from 1.43 seconds in 2003 to 1.13 seconds in 2014. It has an isotropic peak luminosity of [Formula: see text]1000 times the Eddington limit for a NS at 17.1 megaparsec. Standard accretion models fail to explain its luminosity, even assuming beamed emission, but a strong multipolar magnetic field can describe its properties. These findings suggest that other extreme ULXs (x-ray luminosity [Formula: see text] 10(41) erg second[Formula: see text]) might harbor NSs.

  2. X-ray sources in regions of star formation. I - The naked T Tauri stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, F. M.

    1986-01-01

    Einstein X-ray observations of regions of active star formation in Taurus, Ophiuchus, and Corona Australis show a greatly enhanced surface density of stellar X-ray sources over that seen in other parts of the sky. Many of the X-ray sources are identified with low-mass, pre-main-sequence stars which are not classical T Tauri stars. The X-ray, photometric, and spectroscopic data for these stars are discussed. Seven early K stars in Oph and CrA are likely to be 1-solar-mass post-T Tauri stars with ages of 10-million yr. The late K stars in Taurus are not post-T Tauri, but 'naked' T Tauri stars, which are coeval with the T Tauri stars, differing mainly in the lack of a circumstellar envelope.

  3. Laboratory source based full-field x-ray microscopy at 9 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Fella, C.; Balles, A.; Wiest, W.; Zabler, S.; Hanke, R.

    2016-01-28

    In the past decade, hard x-ray transmission microscopy experienced tremendous developments. With the avail-ability of efficient Fresnel zone plates, even set-ups utilizing laboratory sources were developed [1]. In order to improve the performance of these x-ray microscopes, novel approaches to fabricate optical elements [2] and brighter x-ray tubes [3] are promising candidates. We are currently building a laboratory transmission x-ray microscope for 9.25 keV, using an electron impact liquid-metal-jet anode source. Up to now, the further elements of our setup are: a polycapillary condenser, a tungsten zone plate, and a scintillator which is optically coupled to a CMOS camera. However, further variations in terms of optical elements are intended. Here we present the current status of our work, as well as first experimental results.

  4. Spatially Extended 21 cm Signal from Strongly Clustered Uv and X-Ray Sources in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyungjin; Xu, Hao; Norman, Michael L.; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Wise, John H.

    2015-03-01

    We present our prediction for the local 21 cm differential brightness temperature (δTb) from a set of strongly clustered sources of Population III (Pop III) and II (Pop II) objects in the early universe, by a numerical simulation of their formation and radiative feedback. These objects are located inside a highly biased environment, which is a rare, high-density peak (“Rarepeak”) extending to ∼7 comoving Mpc. We study the impact of ultraviolet and X-ray photons on the intergalactic medium (IGM) and the resulting δTb, when Pop III stars are assumed to emit X-ray photons by forming X-ray binaries very efficiently. We parameterize the rest-frame spectral energy distribution of X-ray photons, which regulates X-ray photon-trapping, IGM-heating, secondary Lyα pumping and the resulting morphology of δTb. A combination of emission (δTb > 0) and absorption (δTb < 0) regions appears in varying amplitudes and angular scales. The boost of the signal by the high-density environment (δ ∼ 0.64) and on a relatively large scale combines to make Rarepeak a discernible, spatially extended (θ ∼ 10‧) object for 21 cm observation at 13 ≲ z ≲ 17, which is found to be detectable as a single object by SKA with integration time of ∼1000 hr. Power spectrum analysis by some of the SKA precursors (Low Frequency Array, Murchison Widefield Array, Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization) of such rare peaks is found to be difficult due to the rarity of these peaks, and the contribution only by these rare peaks to the total power spectrum remains subdominant compared to that by all astrophysical sources.

  5. The impact of the in-orbit background and the X-ray source intensity on the centroiding accuracy of the Swift X-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, R. M.; Hutchinson, I. B.; Hill, J.; Cheruvu, C.; Abbey, A. F.; Short, A. D. T.

    2002-11-01

    The optical components of the Swift Gamma Ray Burst Explorer X-ray Telescope (XRT), consisting of the JET-X spare flight mirror and a charge coupled device of the type used in the EPIC program, were used in a re-calibration study carried out at the Panter facility, which is part of the Max Plank Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. The objective of this study was to check the focal length and the off axis performance of the mirrors and to show that the half energy width (HEW) of the on-axis point spread function (PSF) was of the order of 16arcsec at 1.5keV (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 488 (2002) 543; SPIE 4140 (2000) 64) and that a centroiding accuracy better that 1arcsec could be achieved within the 4arcmin sampling area designated by the Burst Alert Telescope (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 488 (2002) 543). The centroiding accuracy of the Swift XRT's optical components was tested as a function of distance from the focus and off axis position of the PSF (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 488 (2002) 543). The presence of background events in the image frame introduced errors in the centroiding process, making the choice of centroiding algorithm important (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 488 (2002) 543). Since the objective of Swift is to rapidly investigate the X-ray afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts the possibility of detecting a bright source with intensity greater than 25 Crab could not be excluded and therefore the impact of a saturated PSF core on the centroiding accuracy was investigated by experimental methods.

  6. Chandra X-Ray Observations of the Two Brightest Unidentified High Galactic Latitude Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, C. C.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Sokolovsky, K. V.; Giroletti, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present Chandra ACIS-I X-ray observations of 0FGL J1311.9-3419 and 0FGL J1653.4-0200, the two brightest high Galactic latitude (absolute value (beta) >10 deg) gamma-ray sources from the three-month Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) bright source list that are still unidentified. Both were also detected previously by EGRET, and despite dedicated multi-wavelength follow-up, they are still not associated with established classes of gamma-ray emitters like pulsars or radio-loud active galactic nuclei. X-ray sources found in the ACIS-I fields of view are cataloged, and their basic properties are determined. These are discussed as candidate counterparts to 0FGL J1311.9-3419 and 0FGL J1653.4-0200, with particular emphasis on the brightest of the 9 and 13 Chandra sources detected within the respective Fermi-LAT 95% confidence regions. Further follow-up studies, including optical photometric and spectroscopic observations, are necessary to identify these X-ray candidate counterparts in order to ultimately reveal the nature of these enigmatic gamma-ray objects.

  7. The structure of the coronal soft X-ray source associated with the dark filament disappearance of 1991 September 28 using the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcallister, Alan; Uchida, Yutaka; Tsuneta, Saku; Strong, Keith T.; Acton, Loren W.; Hiei, Eijiro; Bruner, Marilyn E.; Watanabe, Takashi; Shibata, Kazunari

    1992-01-01

    The structure of the coronal soft X-ray source associated with the dark filament disappearance on September 28, 1991, observed with the Soft X-ray Telescope, is examined as a possible example of the 'eruption-reconnection' model of filament disappearance. The results suggest, however, that this model may not fit. There is a strong possibility that much of the dark filament mass remains in the heated unwinding axial field.

  8. The SPARX Project: R & D Activity Towards X-Rays FEL Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Alesini, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Bertolucci, S.; Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Castellano, M.; Clozza, A.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Esposito, A.; Ferrario, M.; Filippetto, D.; Fusco, V.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Incurvati, M.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Migliorati, M.; /Frascati /ENEA, Frascati /INFN, Milan /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome2 /Milan Polytechnic /UCLA /SLAC

    2005-08-05

    SPARX is an evolutionary project proposed by a collaboration among ENEA-INFN-CNR-Universita di Roma Tor Vergata aiming at the construction of a FELSASE X-ray source in the Tor Vergata Campus. The first phase of the SPARX project, funded by Government Agencies, will be focused on R&D activity on critical components and techniques for future X-ray facilities as described in this paper.

  9. X-ray phase imaging with a laboratory source using selective reflection from a mirror.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Paganin, David M

    2013-04-22

    A novel approach for hard x-ray phase contrast imaging with a laboratory source is reported. The technique is based on total external reflection from the edge of a mirror, aligned to intercept only half of the incident beam. The mirror edge thus produces two beams. The refraction x-rays undergo when interacting with a sample placed before the mirror, causes relative intensity variations between direct and reflected beams. Quantitative phase contrast and pure absorption imaging are demonstrated using this method.

  10. Development of grating-based x-ray Talbot interferometry at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Marathe, Shashidhara; Xiao Xianghui; Wojcik, Michael J.; Divan, Ralu; Butler, Leslie G.; Ham, Kyungmin; Fezzaa, Kamel; Erdmann, Mark; Wen, Han H.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Macrander, Albert T.; De Carlo, Francesco; Mancini, Derrick C.; Assoufid, Lahsen

    2012-07-31

    We report on the ongoing effort to develop hard x-ray Talbot interferometry at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory, USA. We describe the design of the interferometer and preliminary results obtained at 25 keV using a feather and a phantom sample lithographically fabricated of gold. We mention the future developmental goals and applications of this technique as a metrology tool for x-ray optics and beam wavefront characterization.

  11. Full characterization of a laser-produced keV x-ray betatron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, F.; Phuoc, K. Ta; Shah, R.; Corde, S.; Fitour, R.; Tafzi, A.; Burgy, F.; Douillet, D.; Lefrou, T.; Rousse, A.

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents the complete characterization of a kilo-electron-volt laser-based x-ray source. The main parameters of the electron motion (amplitude of oscillations and initial energy) in the laser wakefield have been investigated using three independent methods relying on spectral and spatial properties of this betatron x-ray source. First we will show studies on the spectral correlation between electrons and x-rays that is analyzed using a numerical code to calculate the expected photon spectra from the experimentally measured electron spectra. High-resolution x-ray spectrometers have been used to characterize the x-ray spectra within 0.8-3 keV and to show that the betatron oscillations lie within 1 µm. Then we observed Fresnel edge diffraction of the x-ray beam. The observed diffraction at the center energy of 4 keV agrees with the Gaussian incoherent source profile of full width half maximum <5 µm, meaning that the amplitude of the betatron oscillations is less than 2.5 µm. Finally, by measuring the far field spatial profile of the radiation, we have been able to characterize the electron's trajectories inside the plasma accelerator structure with a resolution better than 0.5 µm.

  12. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Radley, Ian; Bievenue, Thomas J.; Burdett Jr., John H.; Gallagher, Brian W.; Shakshober, Stuart M.; Chen, Zewu; Moore, Michael D.

    2007-04-24

    An x-ray source assembly (2700) and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode (2125) having a source spot upon which electrons (2120) impinge and a control system (2715/2720) for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure (2710) notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  13. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Radley, Ian; Bievenue, Thomas J.; Burdett, John H.; Gallagher, Brian W.; Shakshober, Stuart M.; Chen, Zewu; Moore, Michael D.

    2008-06-08

    An x-ray source assembly and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode having a source spot upon which electrons impinge and a control system for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  14. A Compact Soft X-Ray Microscope using an Electrode-less Z-Pinch Source

    PubMed Central

    Silterra, J; Holber, W

    2009-01-01

    Soft X-rays (< 1Kev) are of medical interest both for imaging and microdosimetry applications. X-ray sources at this low energy present a technological challenge. Synchrotrons, while very powerful and flexible, are enormously expensive national research facilities. Conventional X-ray sources based on electron bombardment can be compact and inexpensive, but low x-ray production efficiencies at low electron energies restrict this approach to very low power applications. Laser-based sources tend to be expensive and unreliable. Energetiq Technology, Inc. (Woburn, MA, USA) markets a 92 eV, 10W(2pi sr) electrode-less Z-pinch source developed for advanced semiconductor lithography. A modified version of this commercial product has produced 400 mW at 430 eV (2pi sr), appropriate for water window soft X-ray microscopy. The US NIH has funded Energetiq to design and construct a demonstration microscope using this source, coupled to a condenser optic, as the illumination system. The design of the condenser optic matches the unique characteristics of the source to the illumination requirements of the microscope, which is otherwise a conventional design. A separate program is underway to develop a microbeam system, in conjunction with the RARAF facility at Columbia University, NY, USA. The objective is to develop a focused, sub-micron beam capable of delivering > 1 Gy/second to the nucleus of a living cell. While most facilities of this type are coupled to a large and expensive particle accelerator, the Z-pinch X-ray source enables a compact, stand-alone design suitable to a small laboratory. The major technical issues in this system involve development of suitable focusing X-ray optics. Current status of these programs will be reported. PMID:20198115

  15. Characteristics of a molybdenum X-pinch X-ray source as a probe source for X-ray diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zucchini, F.; Chauvin, C.; Combes, P.; Sol, D.; Loyen, A.; Roques, B.; Grunenwald, J.; Bland, S. N.

    2015-03-15

    X-ray emission from a molybdenum X-pinch has been investigated as a potential probe for the high pressure states made in dynamic compression experiments. Studies were performed on a novel 300 kA, 400 ns generator which coupled the load directly to a low inductance capacitor and switch combination. The X-pinch load consisted of 4 crossed molybdenum wires of 13 μm diameter, crossed at an angle of 62°. The load height was 10 mm. An initial x-ray burst generated at the wire crossing point, radiated in the soft x-ray range (hυ < 10 keV). This was followed, 2–5 ns later, by at least one harder x-ray burst (hυ > 10 keV) whose power ranged from 1 to 7 MW. Time integrated spectral measurements showed that the harder bursts were dominated by K-alpha emission; though, a lower level, wide band continuum up to at least 30 keV was also present. Initial tests demonstrated that the source was capable of driving Laue diffraction experiments, probing uncompressed samples of LiF and aluminium.

  16. Laboratory-size three-dimensional x-ray microscope with Wolter type I mirror optics and an electron-impact water window x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsuka, Shinji; Ohba, Akira; Onoda, Shinobu; Nakamoto, Katsuhiro; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Miyoshi, Motosuke; Soda, Keita; Hamakubo, Takao

    2014-09-01

    We constructed a laboratory-size three-dimensional water window x-ray microscope that combines wide-field transmission x-ray microscopy with tomographic reconstruction techniques, and observed bio-medical samples to evaluate its applicability to life science research fields. It consists of a condenser and an objective grazing incidence Wolter type I mirror, an electron-impact type oxygen Kα x-ray source, and a back-illuminated CCD for x-ray imaging. A spatial resolution limit of around 1.0 line pairs per micrometer was obtained for two-dimensional transmission images, and 1-μm scale three-dimensional fine structures were resolved.

  17. Laboratory-size three-dimensional x-ray microscope with Wolter type I mirror optics and an electron-impact water window x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsuka, Shinji; Ohba, Akira; Onoda, Shinobu; Nakamoto, Katsuhiro; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Miyoshi, Motosuke; Soda, Keita; Hamakubo, Takao

    2014-09-15

    We constructed a laboratory-size three-dimensional water window x-ray microscope that combines wide-field transmission x-ray microscopy with tomographic reconstruction techniques, and observed bio-medical samples to evaluate its applicability to life science research fields. It consists of a condenser and an objective grazing incidence Wolter type I mirror, an electron-impact type oxygen Kα x-ray source, and a back-illuminated CCD for x-ray imaging. A spatial resolution limit of around 1.0 line pairs per micrometer was obtained for two-dimensional transmission images, and 1-μm scale three-dimensional fine structures were resolved.

  18. Chandra Studies of Unidentified X-ray Sources in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Hideyuki

    2010-09-01

    We propose to study a complete X-ray sample in the luminosity range of > 10^34 erg s^-1 in the Galactic bulge, consisting of 11 unidentified sources detected in the ROSAT All Sky Survey. Our goal is to obtain a clear picture about X-ray populations in the bulge, by utilizing the excellent Chandra position accuracy leading to unique optical identification together with the X-ray spectral properties. This is a new step toward understanding the formation history of the bulge. Furthermore, because the luminosity range we observe corresponds to a ``missing link'' region ever studied for a neutron star or blackhole X-ray binary, our results are also unique to test accretion disk theories at intermediate mass accretion rates.

  19. Chandra Studies of Unidentified X-ray Sources in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Hideyuki

    2013-09-01

    We propose to study a complete X-ray sample in the luminosity range of > 10^34 erg s^-1 in the Galactic bulge, including 5 unidentified sources detected in the ROSAT All Sky Survey. Our goal is to obtain a clear picture about X-ray populations in the bulge, by utilizing the excellent Chandra position accuracy leading to unique optical identification together with the X-ray spectral properties. This is a new step toward understanding the formation history of the bulge. Furthermore, because the luminosity range we observe corresponds to a ``missing link'' region ever studied for a neutron star or blackhole X-ray binary, our results are also unique to test accretion disk theories at intermediate mass accretion rates.

  20. Initial feasibility study of a dedicated synchrotron radiation light source for ultrafast X-ray science

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, John N.; DeSantis, S.; Hartman, N.; Heimann, P.; LaFever, R.; Li, D.; Padmore, H.; Rimmer, R.; Robinson, K.; Schoenlein, R.; Tanabe, J.; Wang, S.; Zholents, A.; Kairan, D.

    2001-10-26

    We present an initial feasibility summary of a femtosecond synchrotron radiation x-ray source based on a flat-beam rf gun and a recirculating superconducting linac that provides beam to an array of undulators and bend magnets. Optical pulse durations of < 100 fs are obtained by a combination of electron pulse compression, transverse temporal correlation of the electrons, and x-ray pulse compression. After an introduction and initial scientific motivation, we cover the following aspects of the design: layout and lattice, ultra-fast x-ray pulse production, flat electron-beam production, the rf gun, rf systems, cryogenic systems, collective effects, photon production, and synchronization of x-ray and laser pulses. We conclude with a summary of issues and areas of development that remain to be addressed.

  1. Soft x-ray source for nanostructure imaging using femtosecond-laser-irradiated clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Y.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T.; Kando, M.; Kotaki, H.; Daito, I.; Ma, J.; Chen, L. M.; Homma, T.; Kawase, K.; Kameshima, T.; Kawachi, T.; Daido, H.; Kimura, T.; Tajima, T.; Kato, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2008-03-01

    The intense soft x-ray light source using the supersonic expansion of the mixed gas of He and CO2, when irradiated by a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulse, is observed to enhance the radiation of soft x-rays from the CO2 clusters. Using this soft x-ray emissions, nanostructure images of 100-nm-thick Mo foils in a wide field of view (mm2 scale) with high spatial resolution (800nm ) are obtained with high dynamic range LiF crystal detectors. The local inhomogeneities of soft x-ray absorption by the nanometer-thick foils is measured with an accuracy of less than ±3%.

  2. Soft x-ray source for nanostructure imaging using femtosecond-laser-irradiated clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Y.; Kando, M.; Kotaki, H.; Daito, I.; Ma, J.; Chen, L. M.; Homma, T.; Kawase, K.; Kameshima, T.; Kawachi, T.; Daido, H.; Kimura, T.; Tajima, T.; Kato, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T.

    2008-03-24

    The intense soft x-ray light source using the supersonic expansion of the mixed gas of He and CO{sub 2}, when irradiated by a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulse, is observed to enhance the radiation of soft x-rays from the CO{sub 2} clusters. Using this soft x-ray emissions, nanostructure images of 100-nm-thick Mo foils in a wide field of view (mm{sup 2} scale) with high spatial resolution (800 nm) are obtained with high dynamic range LiF crystal detectors. The local inhomogeneities of soft x-ray absorption by the nanometer-thick foils is measured with an accuracy of less than {+-}3%.

  3. Near-infrared counterparts of ultraluminous X-ray sources - towards dynamical mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heida, Marianne; Jonker, Peter G; Torres, Manuel; Kool, Erik; Servillat, Mathieu; Roberts, Tim P; Groot, Paul J; Walton, Dom; Moon, Dae-Sik; Harrison, Fiona

    2014-08-01

    Are ultraluminous X-ray sources powered by stellar or intermediate mass black holes? To answer this question we need reliable mass measurements of these systems. The best way to do this would be to measure the radial velocity curves of the companion stars and thus derive the mass functions for these black holes. This has proven to be very difficult for ULXs because the optical light from these systems is dominated by the accretion disc. However, some ULXs may have red supergiant donor stars, that are intrinsically bright in the near-infrared and may enable us to measure their radial velocity curves in that part of the spectrum. We have conducted a survey of nearby ULXs to search for near-infrared counterparts. Of our 62 targets, 11 have a counterpart that could potentially be a red supergiant (Heida et al. 2014). I will present results of this survey and initial results of our NIR spectroscopic follow-up of several of the sources where we detected a NIR counterpart.

  4. Upgrade of X-band thermionic cathode RF gun for Compton scattering X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Fumito; Natsui, Takuya; Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Hashimoto, Eiko; Lee, KiWoo; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Higo, Toshiyasu; Fukuda, Shigeki; Akemoto, Mitsuo

    2009-09-01

    A Compton scattering X-ray source consisting of an X-band (11.424 GHz) electron linear accelerator (linac) and Q-switched Nd: YAG laser is currently under development at the University of Tokyo. Monochromatic X-rays are required for a variety of medical and biological applications. The X-ray source produces monochromatic X-rays via collision between a 35-MeV multi-bunch (104 bunches in a 1 μs RF pulse) electron beam and 1.4 J/10 ns (532 nm) Nd: YAG laser pulse. The linac uses an X-band 3.5-cell thermionic cathode RF gun and an alpha magnet as an injector. Until now, electron beam generation (2 MeV, 1 pC/bunch at the exit of the injector), beam acceleration, and X-ray generation have been verified. In order to increase X-ray energy and intensity, we have completed the design and construction of a new RF gun with relevant modifications in some structures. In this paper, we describe the details of the concepts of designing a new RF gun and discuss future works.

  5. Monochromators for small cross-section x-ray beams from high heat flux synchrotron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, G.; Riemer, B.; Khounsary, A.

    1996-10-01

    For some x-ray experiments, only a fraction of the intense central cone of x-rays generated by high-power undulator sources can be used; the x-ray source emittance is larger than the useful emittance for the experiment. For example with microfocusing optics, or for coherence experiments, x-ray beams with cross sections less than 0.1 mm{sup 2} are desirable. With such small beams, the total thermal load is small even though the heat flux density is high. Analyses indicate that under these conditions, rather simple crystal cooling techniques can be used. We illustrate the advantages of a small beam monochromator, with a simple x-ray monochromator optimized for x-ray microdiffraction. This monochromator is designed to achieve negligible distortion when subjected to a narrow (0.1 mm wide) beam from an APS undulator operating at 100 mA. It also allows for rapid and repeatable energy scans and rapid cycling between monochromatic and white beam conditions.

  6. Chandra Observation of the X-ray Source Population of NGC 6946

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Schlegel, E. M.; Hwang, U.; Petre, R.

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of a study of discrete X-ray sources in NGC 6946 using a deep Chandra ACIS observation. Based on the slope of the log N-log S distribution and the general correlation of sources with the spiral arms, we infer that the overall discrete source sample in NGC 6946 is dominated by high mass X-ray binaries, in contrast to the source distributions in M31 and the Milky Way. This is consistent with the higher star formation rate in NGC 6946 than in those galaxies. We find that the strong X-ray sources in the region of the galactic center do not correlate in detail with images of the region in the near-IR, although one of them may be coincident with the galactic center. The non-central ultra-luminous X-ray source in NGC 6946, previously identified with a supernova remnant, has an X-ray spectrum and luminosity that is inconsistent with either a traditional pulsar wind nebula or a blast wave remnant.

  7. Classifying X-ray Sources from the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, Robert

    2012-09-01

    The completion of the Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) by Chandra in AO-13 identified 400 new X-ray sources (on top of the 1200 already known), many of which are expected to have accessible optical counterparts. Wide-field variability studies can be an extremely powerful tool to classify these sources. In two nights with the new NOAO DECam we can obtain lightcurves of ALL of the optically accessible objects, together with another 400 GBS sources from earlier AOs, and about 1700 additional fainter objects from the Chandra Source Catalog. We therefore propose a joint Archival-NOAO study to obtain these lightcurves, use them to classify the X-ray sources, and pick out ellipsoidal variations and eclipses from the many quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries predicted to be accessible.

  8. The X-Ray Binary Population of the Nearby Dwarf Starburst Galaxy IC 10: Variable and Transient X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laycock, Silas; Cappallo, Rigel; Williams, Benjamin F.; Prestwich, Andrea; Binder, Breanna; Christodoulou, Dimitris M.

    2017-02-01

    We have monitored the Cassiopeia dwarf galaxy (IC 10) in a series of 10 Chandra ACIS-S observations to capture its variable and transient X-ray source population, which is expected to be dominated by High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs). We present a sample of 21 X-ray sources that are variable between observations at the 3σ level, from a catalog of 110 unique point sources. We find four transients (flux variability ratio greater than 10) and a further eight objects with ratios >5. The observations span the years 2003–2010 and reach a limiting luminosity of >1035 erg s‑1, providing sensitivity to X-ray binaries in IC 10 as well as flare stars in the foreground Milky Way. The nature of the variable sources is investigated from light curves, X-ray spectra, energy quantiles, and optical counterparts. The purpose of this study is to discover the composition of the X-ray binary population in a young starburst environment. IC 10 provides a sharp contrast in stellar population age (<10 My) when compared to the Magellanic Clouds (40–200 My) where most of the known HMXBs reside. We find 10 strong HMXB candidates, 2 probable background Active Galactic Nuclei, 4 foreground flare-stars or active binaries, and 5 not yet classifiable sources. Complete classification of the sample requires optical spectroscopy for radial velocity analysis and deeper X-ray observations to obtain higher S/N spectra and search for pulsations. A catalog and supporting data set are provided.

  9. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of the supersoft X-ray source RX J0439.8-6809

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Teeseling, Andre

    1997-07-01

    Observationally, supersoft X-ray sources are classified as near-Eddington stellar objects with almost all emission at energies < 0.5 keV. Only 13 supersoft X-ray sources have been optically identified, and of these 11 turn out to be binaries, probably with a shell-burning accreting white dwarf. We have recently identified RX J0439.8-6809 with a V=21.63, very blue star in the LMC. A 3sigma upper limit to the peak-to-peak optical variability is 0.07 mag. Of all optically identified supersoft X-ray sources, RX J0439.8-6809 has the lowest optical-to-X-ray flux ratio. The nature of RX J0439.8-6809 is still unknown. It might be the hottest known pre-white dwarf, suffering a late helium shell flash. Alternatively, RX J0439.8-6809 could be an accreting binary, in which case it might be the first known double-degenerate supersoft X-ray source with a predicted orbital period of only a few minutes. An ultraviolet spectrum is essential to distinguish between these two spectacular possibilities, and to bridge the gap between the X-ray and optical observations. Such a spectrum can only be obtained with the HST STIS. Therefore, we propose to obtain two ultraviolet spectra, which will test the assumption that the optical spectrum is the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the soft X-ray component, which will determine the spectral energy distribution, and which may provide the first direct evidence for accretion in this source by detecting an excess in the ultraviolet or ultraviolet emission lines like N V Lambda 1240.

  10. X-ray Studies of Unidentified Galactic TeV Gamma-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Puehlhofer, Gerd

    2009-05-11

    Many of the recently discovered Galactic TeV sources remain unidentified to date. A large fraction of the sources is possibly associated with relic pulsar wind nebula (PWN) systems. One key question here is the maximum energy (beyond TeV) attained in the compact PWNe. Hard X-ray emission can trace those particles, but current non-focussing X-ray instruments above 10 keV have difficulties to deconvolve the hard pulsar spectrum from its surrounding nebula.Some of the new TeV sources are also expected to originate from middle-aged and possibly even from old supernova remnants (SNR). But no compelling case for such an identification has been found yet. In established young TeV-emitting SNRs, X-ray imaging above 10 keV could help to disentangle the leptonic from the hadronic emission component in the TeV shells, if secondary electrons produced in hadronic collisions can be effectively detected. As SNRs get older, the high energy electron component is expected to fade away. This may allow to verify the picture through X-ray spectral evolution of the source population.Starting from the lessons we have learned so far from X-ray follow-up observations of unidentified TeV sources, prospects for Simbol-X to resolve open questions in this field will be discussed.

  11. X-ray Studies of Unidentified Galactic TeV Gamma-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pühlhofer, Gerd

    2009-05-01

    Many of the recently discovered Galactic TeV sources remain unidentified to date. A large fraction of the sources is possibly associated with relic pulsar wind nebula (PWN) systems. One key question here is the maximum energy (beyond TeV) attained in the compact PWNe. Hard X-ray emission can trace those particles, but current non-focussing X-ray instruments above 10 keV have difficulties to deconvolve the hard pulsar spectrum from its surrounding nebula. Some of the new TeV sources are also expected to originate from middle-aged and possibly even from old supernova remnants (SNR). But no compelling case for such an identification has been found yet. In established young TeV-emitting SNRs, X-ray imaging above 10 keV could help to disentangle the leptonic from the hadronic emission component in the TeV shells, if secondary electrons produced in hadronic collisions can be effectively detected. As SNRs get older, the high energy electron component is expected to fade away. This may allow to verify the picture through X-ray spectral evolution of the source population. Starting from the lessons we have learned so far from X-ray follow-up observations of unidentified TeV sources, prospects for Simbol-X to resolve open questions in this field will be discussed.

  12. XMM-Newton reveals extreme winds in ultraluminous X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, C.; Middleton, M.; Fabian, A.

    2016-06-01

    Ultraluminous X-ray sources are extragalactic, off-nucleus, point sources with X-ray luminosities above 10^{39} erg/s, thought to be powered by accretion onto compact objects. Viable solutions include accretion onto neutron stars with strong magnetic fields, stellar-mass black holes at or in excess of the Eddington limit or intermediate-mass black holes. The lack of sufficient energy resolution in previous analyses has prevented an unambiguous identification of any emission or absorption lines in the X-ray band, thereby precluding a detailed analysis of the accretion flow. In this talk, I will show the discovery of rest-frame emission and blueshifted (˜0.2c) absorption lines arising from highly ionized gas in the deep high-resolution XMM-Newton spectra of two ultraluminous X-ray sources. The blueshifted absorption lines occurs in a fast outflowing gas, whereas the emission lines originate in slow-moving gas around the source. The compact object is therefore surrounded by powerful winds with an outflow velocity of about 0.2c as predicted by models of hyper-accreting black holes. Further, deep, XMM-Newton observations will reveal powerful winds in many other ultraluminous X-ray sources and provide important hints to estimate the energetics of the wind, the geometry of the system, and the black hole masses.

  13. Probing the Evolving X-ray Sources of Accreting Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Dan

    2013-04-01

    Material spiralling into black holes powers some of the most luminous objects we see in the Unviverse; AGN and galactic black hole binaries. X-rays are emitted from a corona of energetic particles around the black hole and are seen to reflect off of the accretion disc. As well as being impressive objects in their own right, the black holes in AGN can emit such large amounts of energy that they are important in governing the growth of galaxies and clusters. Through detailed analysis of the observed reflection features in the X-ray spectrum and the variability of the detected emission showing reverberation time lags between the directly observed continuum and the reflection, it is possible to detect the emission from material right down to the innermost stable orbit around the black hole. Comparing these observations to the results of general relativistic ray tracing simulations allows them to be analysed in the context of the geometry of the X-ray emitting region and it has been possible to constrain the locations of the X-ray sources in a number of AGN including 1H 0707-495, IRAS 13224-3809 and MCG-6-30-15. With high quality data from long X-ray observations of these sources, it has, for the first time, been possible to follow the evolution of the coronal X-ray source as the luminosity of the source goes up and down. We are able to find evidence that the size and other properties of the X-ray source changes on the timescale of a few hours, giving rise to the extreme variability seen in these sources with the source increasing in size as the luminosity increases. Such detailed analysis of observations (both of spectra and variability) and studies of how the X-ray source is changing is paving the way to the science that will be possible with the next generation of X-ray instruments (NuStar and Astro-H) and will allow us to understand the processes at work in the innermost regions of accretion black holes, releasing energy from the accretion flow to power some of the

  14. Line x-ray source for diffraction enhanced imaging in clinical and industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoqin

    Mammography is one type of imaging modalities that uses a low-dose x-ray or other radiation sources for examination of breasts. It plays a central role in early detection of breast cancers. The material similarity of tumor-cell and health cell, breast implants surgery and other factors, make the breast cancers hard to visualize and detect. Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), first proposed and investigated by D. Chapman is a new x-ray radiographic imaging modality using monochromatic x-rays from a synchrotron source, which produced images of thick absorbing objects that are almost completely free of scatter. It shows dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging when applied to the same phantom. The contrast is based not only on attenuation but also on the refraction and diffraction properties of the sample. This imaging method may improve image quality of mammography, other medical applications, industrial radiography for non-destructive testing and x-ray computed tomography. However, the size, and cost, of a synchrotron source limits the application of the new modality to be applicable at clinical levels. This research investigates the feasibility of a designed line x-ray source to produce intensity compatible to synchrotron sources. It is composed of a 2-cm in length tungsten filament, installed on a carbon steel filament cup (backing plate), as the cathode and a stationary oxygen-free copper anode with molybdenum coating on the front surface serves as the target. Characteristic properties of the line x-ray source were computationally studied and the prototype was experimentally investigated. SIMIION code was used to computationally study the electron trajectories emanating from the filament towards the molybdenum target. A Faraday cup on the prototype device, proof-of-principle, was used to measure the distribution of electrons on the target, which compares favorably to computational results. The intensities of characteristic x-ray for molybdenum

  15. Analysis of coronal and chromospheric hard X-ray sources in an eruptive solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimovets, Ivan; Golovin, Dmitry; Livshits, Moisey; Vybornov, Vadim; Sadykov, Viacheslav; Mitrofanov, Igor

    We have analyzed hard X-ray emission of an eruptive solar flare on 3 November 2010. The entire flare region was observed by the STEREO-B spacecraft. This gave us an information that chromospheric footpoints of flare magnetic loops were behind the east solar limb for an earth observer. Hard X-ray emission from the entire flare region was detected by the High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND) onboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft while hard X-rays from the coronal part of the flare region were detected by the RHESSI. This rare situation has allowed us to investigate both coronal and chromospheric sources of hard X-ray emission separately. Flare impulsive phase was accompanied by eruption of a magnetic flux rope and formation of a plasmoid detected by the AIA/SDO in the EUV range. Two coronal hard X-ray sources (S_{1} and S_{2}) were detected by the RHESSI. The upper source S_{1} coincided with the plasmoid and the lower source S_{2} was near the tops of the underlying flare loops that is in accordance with the standard model of eruptive flares. Imaging spectroscopy with the RHESSI has allowed to measure energetic spectra of hard X-ray emission from the S_{1} and S_{2} sources. At the impulsive phase peak they have power-law shape above ≈ 15 keV with spectral slopes gamma_{S_{1}}=3.46 ± 1.58 and gamma_{S_{2}}=4.64 ± 0.12. Subtracting spatially integrated spectrum of coronal hard X-ray emission measured by the RHESSI from the spectrum measured by the HEND we found spectrum of hard X-rays emitted from the footpoints of the flare loops (source S_{0}). This spectrum has a power-law shape with gamma_{S_{0}}=2.21 ± 0.57. It is shown that it is not possible to explain the measured spectra of the S_{2} and S_{0} sources in frames of the thin and thick target models respectively if we assume that electrons were accelerated in the energy release site situated below the plasmoid and above the flare loops as suggested by the standard flare model. To resolve the contradiction

  16. Phase-contrast and magnification radiography at diagnostic X-ray energies using a pseudo-microfocus X-ray source

    PubMed Central

    Robson, K J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the use of conventional diagnostic X-ray tubes for applications in which specialist microfocus sources are normally required. Methods: A conventional diagnostic X-ray tube was used in conjunction with a range of apertures to investigate improvements in spatial resolution using a line-pairs test object. Phase-contrast effects were investigated by varying source-to-object and object-to-receptor distances using a 2-French catheter as a clinically realistic test object. Results: For magnification radiography using a computed radiography receptor and conventional X-ray tube with a 1-mm nominal focus size, the limiting spatial resolution was improved from 3.55 line-pairs per millimetre, for a conventional contact image, to 5.6 line-pairs per millimetre, for a ×2 magnified view with a 250-µm aperture. For inline phase-contrast radiography, phase contrast enhancement of a 2-French catheter was demonstrated, and the expected trends with variations in source-to-object and object-to-receptor distances were found. Images of a neonatal phantom demonstrated a subtle improvement in visibility of a superimposed 1-French catheter simulating a percutaneously inserted central catheter for no increase in patient radiation dose. Conclusion: Spatial resolution improvement and visible phase contrast can be produced in clinically relevant objects using a pseudo-microfocus geometry at X-ray energies in the normal diagnostic range, using conventional diagnostic X-ray tubes and image receptors. The disadvantages of the proposal are the large distances required to produce phase contrast and limitations imposed by the resulting tube loading. Advances in knowledge: It is possible to use conventional diagnostic X-ray equipment in applications that normally require microfocus X-ray sources. This presents some possibilities for clinical applications. PMID:24779409

  17. SIGMA discovery of a transient hard X-ray source in the galactic center region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, M.; Goldwurm, A.; Paul, J.; Denis, M.; Borrel, V.; Bouchet, L.; Roques, J. P.; Jourdain, E.; Trudolyubov, S.; Gilfanov, M.; Churazov, E.; Sunyaev, R.; Khavenson, N.; Dyachkov, A.; Novikov, B.; Chulkov, I.

    1996-09-01

    A new X-ray transient source, GRS 1730-312 (=KS 1730-312), was discovered by the hard X-ray/soft γ-ray coded mask telescope SIGMA/GRANAT in the Galactic Center region during observations performed in September 1994. The flare started on September 22 and lasted approximately 3days, during which the source became the brightest object of the region at energies above 35keV. The average 35-200keV spectrum can be described by a power law with photon index of -2.5 or by a thermal bremsstrahlung model with kT_e_=~70keV. SIGMA data have been found consistent with the spectral shape and with the spectral evolution observed by the TTM/Mir-Kvant telescope at lower energies. This new source belongs to the population of hard X-ray sources already detected by SIGMA in the direction of the Galactic Bulge region.

  18. Developing small vacuum spark as an x-ray source for calibration of an x-ray focusing crystal spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Ghomeishi, Mostafa; Karami, Mohammad; Adikan, Faisal Rafiq Mahamd

    2012-10-01

    A new technique of x-ray focusing crystal spectrometers' calibration is the desired result. For this purpose the spectrometer is designed to register radiated copper Kα and Kβ lines by using a flat α-quartz crystal. This experiment uses pre-breakdown x-ray emissions in low vacuum of about 2.5-3 mbar. At this pressure the pinch will not form so the plasma will not radiate. The anode material is copper and the capacity of the capacitor bank is 22.6 nF. This experiment designed and mounted a repetitive triggering system to save the operator time making hundreds of shots. This emission amount is good for calibration and geometrical adjustment of an optical crystal x-ray focusing spectrometer.

  19. Efficient multi-keV x-ray source generated by nanosecond laser pulse irradiated multi-layer thin foils target

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Shao-yong; Hu, Guang-yue Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian; Miao, Wen-yong; Yuan, Yong-teng; Zhan, Xia-yu; Hou, Li-fei; Jiang, Shao-en; Ding, Yong-kun

    2014-04-15

    A new target configuration is proposed to generate efficient multi-keV x-ray source using multiple thin foils as x-ray emitters. The target was constructed with several layers of thin foils, which were placed with a specific, optimized spacing. The thin foils are burned though one by one by a nanosecond-long laser pulse, which produced a very large, hot, underdense plasma. One-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations show that the emission region and the multi-keV x-ray flux generated by multi-layer thin foil target are similar to that of the low-density gas or foam target, which is currently a bright multi-keV x-ray source generated by laser heating. Detailed analysis of a range of foil thicknesses showed that a layer-thickness of 0.1 μm is thin enough to generate an efficient multi-keV x-ray source. Additionally, this type of target can be easily manufactured, compared with the complex techniques for fabrication of low-density foam targets. Our preliminary experimental results also verified that the size of multi-keV x-ray emission region could be enhanced significantly by using a multi-layer Ti thin foil target.

  20. Ultrafast Time-Resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Ferrioxalate Photolysis with a Laser Plasma X-ray Source and Microcalorimeter Array.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Galen C; Miaja-Avila, Luis; Joe, Young Il; Alpert, Bradley K; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Sagar, D M; Doriese, William; Fowler, Joseph W; Fullagar, Wilfred K; Chen, Ning; Hilton, Gene C; Jimenez, Ralph; Ravel, Bruce; Reintsema, Carl D; Schmidt, Dan R; Silverman, Kevin L; Swetz, Daniel S; Uhlig, Jens; Ullom, Joel N

    2017-03-02

    The detailed pathways of photoactivity on ultrafast time scales are a topic of contemporary interest. Using a tabletop apparatus based on a laser plasma X-ray source and an array of cryogenic microcalorimeter X-ray detectors, we measured a transient X-ray absorption spectrum during the ferrioxalate photoreduction reaction. With these high-efficiency detectors, we observe the Fe K edge move to lower energies and the amplitude of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure reduce, consistent with a photoreduction mechanism in which electron transfer precedes disassociation. These results are compared to previously published transient X-ray absorption measurements on the same reaction and found to be consistent with the results from Ogi et al. and inconsistent with the results of Chen et al. ( Ogi , Y. ; et al. Struct. Dyn. 2015 , 2 , 034901 ; Chen , J. ; Zhang , H. ; Tomov , I. V. ; Ding , X. ; Rentzepis , P. M. Chem. Phys. Lett. 2007 , 437 , 50 - 55 ). We provide quantitative limits on the Fe-O bond length change. Finally, we review potential improvements to our measurement technique, highlighting the future potential of tabletop X-ray science using microcalorimeter sensors.

  1. Development of a microfocus x-ray tube with multiple excitation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Maeo, Shuji; Kraemer, Markus; Taniguchi, Kazuo

    2009-03-15

    A microfocus x-ray tube with multiple targets and an electron gun with a focal spot size of 10 {mu}m in diameter has been developed. The electron gun contains a LaB{sub 6} cathode and an Einzel lens. The x-ray tube can be operated at 50 W (50 kV, 1 mA) and has three targets, namely, Cr, W, and Rh on the anode that can be selected completely by moving the anode position. A focal spot size of 10 {mu}m in diameter can be achieved at 0.5 mA current. As demonstration of the usability of a multiexcitation x-ray tube, the fluorescence x-rays have been measured using a powder specimen mixed of TiO{sub 2}, Co, and Zr of the same quantity. The differences of excitation efficiency have clearly appeared according to the change in excitation source. From the results discussed here, it can be expected that the presented x-ray tube will be a powerful tool in microx-ray fluorescence spectrometers and various x-ray instruments.

  2. A POPULATION OF ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES WITH AN ACCRETING NEUTRON STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yong; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2015-04-01

    Most ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are believed to be X-ray binary systems, but previous observational and theoretical studies tend to prefer a black hole rather than a neutron star (NS) accretor. The recent discovery of 1.37 s pulsations from the ULX M82 X-2 has established its nature as a magnetized NS. In this work we model the formation history of NS ULXs in an M82- or Milky Way (MW)-like Galaxy, by use of both binary population synthesis and detailed binary evolution calculations. We find that the birth rate is around 10{sup −4} yr{sup −1} for the incipient X-ray binaries in both cases. We demonstrate the distribution of the ULX population in the donor mass–orbital period plane. Our results suggest that, compared with black hole X-ray binaries, NS X-ray binaries may significantly contribute to the ULX population, and high-mass and intermediate-mass X-ray binaries dominate the NS ULX population in M82- and MW-like Galaxies, respectively.

  3. Observation of spatial and temporal variations in X-ray bright point emergence patterns. [at solar surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.; Krieger, A. S.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of X-ray bright points (XBP) over a six-month interval in 1973 show significant variations in both the number density of XBP as a function of heliographic longitude and in the full-sun average number of XBP from one rotation to the next. The observed increases in XBP emergence are estimated to be equivalent to several large active regions emerging per day for several months. The number of XBP emerging at high latitudes varies in phase with the low-latitude variation and reaches a maximum approximately simultaneous with a major outbreak of active regions. The quantity of magnetic flux emerging in the form of XBP at high latitudes alone is estimated to be as large as the contribution from all active regions.

  4. SU Lyncis, a Hard X-Ray Bright M Giant: Clues Point to a Large Hidden Population of Symbiotic Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, K.; Luna, G. J. M.; Cusumano, G.; Segreto, A.; Munari, U.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Lucy, A. B.; Nelson, T.; Nunez, N. E.

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic star surveys have traditionally relied almost exclusively on low resolution optical spectroscopy. However, we can obtain amore reliable estimate of their total Galactic population by using all available signatures of the symbiotic phenomenon. Here we report the discovery of a hard X-ray source, 4PBC J0642.9+5528, in the Swift hard X-ray all-sky survey, and identify it with a poorly studied red giant, SU Lyn, using pointed Swift observations and ground-based optical spectroscopy. The X-ray spectrum, the optical to UV spectrum, and the rapid UV variability of SU Lyn are all consistent with our interpretation that it is a symbiotic star containing an accreting white dwarf. The symbiotic nature of SU Lyn went unnoticed until now, because it does not exhibit emission lines strong enough to be obvious in low resolution spectra. We argue that symbiotic stars without shell-burning have weak emission lines, and that the current lists of symbiotic stars are biased in favour of shell-burning systems. We conclude that the true population of symbiotic stars has been underestimated, potentially by a large factor.

  5. SU Lyncis, a hard X-ray bright M giant: clues point to a large hidden population of symbiotic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, K.; Luna, G. J. M.; Cusumano, G.; Segreto, A.; Munari, U.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Lucy, A. B.; Nelson, T.; Nuñez, N. E.

    2016-09-01

    Symbiotic star surveys have traditionally relied almost exclusively on low resolution optical spectroscopy. However, we can obtain a more reliable estimate of their total Galactic population by using all available signatures of the symbiotic phenomenon. Here we report the discovery of a hard X-ray source, 4PBC J0642.9+5528, in the Swift hard X-ray all-sky survey, and identify it with a poorly studied red giant, SU Lyn, using pointed Swift observations and ground-based optical spectroscopy. The X-ray spectrum, the optical to UV spectrum, and the rapid UV variability of SU Lyn are all consistent with our interpretation that it is a symbiotic star containing an accreting white dwarf. The symbiotic nature of SU Lyn went unnoticed until now, because it does not exhibit emission lines strong enough to be obvious in low resolution spectra. We argue that symbiotic stars without shell-burning have weak emission lines, and that the current lists of symbiotic stars are biased in favour of shell-burning systems. We conclude that the true population of symbiotic stars has been underestimated, potentially by a large factor.

  6. X-ray source considerations in operation of digital detector arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Terrence; Wendt, Scott

    2014-02-18

    Digital Detector Arrays (DDA) are increasingly replacing film in radiography applications. Standards exist for characterizing the performance of these detectors, and for using them in specific inspections. We have observed that the selection of the x-ray source to use with these detectors can also have a significant influence on the performance. We look at differences between standard, and micro-focus x-ray tubes, and end-window vs. side-window micro-focus tubes. We find that for best results, one must calibrate the DDA for the source settings used during an inspection. This is particularly true for variable-focus sources.

  7. Microfocus x-ray imaging of traceable pointlike {sup 22}Na sources for quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, T.; Oda, K.; Sato, Y.; Ito, H.; Masuda, S.; Yamada, T.; Matsumoto, M.; Murayama, H.; Takei, H.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to propose a microfocus x-ray imaging technique for observing the internal structure of small radioactive sources and evaluating geometrical errors quantitatively, and to apply this technique to traceable pointlike {sup 22}Na sources, which were designed for positron emission tomography calibration, for the purpose of quality control of the pointlike sources. Methods: A microfocus x-ray imaging system with a focus size of 0.001 mm was used to obtain projection x-ray images and x-ray CT images of five pointlike source samples, which were manufactured during 2009-2012. The obtained projection and tomographic images were used to observe the internal structure and evaluate geometrical errors quantitatively. Monte Carlo simulation was used to evaluate the effect of possible geometrical errors on the intensity and uniformity of 0.511 MeV annihilation photon pairs emitted from the sources. Results: Geometrical errors were evaluated with sufficient precision using projection x-ray images. CT images were used for observing the internal structure intuitively. As a result, four of the five examined samples were within the tolerance to maintain the total uncertainty below {+-}0.5%, given the source radioactivity; however, one sample was found to be defective. Conclusions: This quality control procedure is crucial and offers an important basis for using the pointlike {sup 22}Na source as a basic calibration tool. The microfocus x-ray imaging approach is a promising technique for visual and quantitative evaluation of the internal geometry of small radioactive sources.

  8. The Nature of the mHz X-ray QPOs from the Ultraluminous X-ray Source M82 X-1: Timing-Spectral (anti)-correlation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranga Reddy Pasham, Dheeraj; Strohmayer, T. E.

    2013-04-01

    We have analyzed all archival XMM-Newton observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1 in order to search for a correlation between its mHz quasiperiodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and energy spectral power-law index. These quantities are known to correlate in stellar mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibiting so-called Type-C QPOs. The detection of a similar relation in M82 X-1 would strengthen the identification of its mHz QPOs as Type-C and thus enable more reliable mass estimates by scaling of the QPO frequencies in X-1 to those of Type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass. We used surface brightness modeling to estimate the count rates produced by X-1 and a nearby (5'') bright source that can contribute substantial flux in XMM-Newton's 15'' (HPD) beam. We thus identify the observations in which M82 X-1 is at least as bright as the nearby source. In these observations we detect mHz QPOs with centroid frequencies spanning the range from 36 mHz to 210 mHz (the lowest and the highest yet reported from X-1). We model the 3-10 keV spectrum and find that the power-law index changes significantly from 1.7 - 2.2 during these observations. With all observations included we find evidence for an anti-correlation between the centroid frequency of the mHz QPOs and the power-law index. The value of the Pearson's correlation coefficient is -0.95. While such an anti-correlation is observed in StMBHs at high Type-C QPO frequencies (5-15 Hz), the frequency range over which it holds in StMBHs is significantly smaller (factor of 1-3) than the QPO range now reported here for X-1, which varies over a factor of 5.8 (36-210 mHz). However, we note that the correlation hinges on the observation with the lowest inferred energy spectral index and for which the fitted count rate ratio of X-1 to the nearby source is 1.1. So the implied anti-correlation needs to be confirmed with either less ``contaminated" observations or higher angular resolution spectral measurements made in tandem

  9. Analysis of Off-Nuclear X-Ray Sources in Galaxy NGC 4945

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Sarah M.; /MIT /SLAC

    2006-09-11

    Recently, X-ray astronomy has been used to investigate objects such as galaxies, clusters of galaxies, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), quasars, starburst superbubbles of hot gas, X-ray binary systems, stars, supernova remnants, and interstellar and intergalactic material. By studying the x-ray emission patterns of these objects, we can gain a greater understanding of their structure and evolution. We analyze X-ray emission from the galaxy NGC 4945 using data taken by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The Chandra Interactive Analysis of Observations (CIAO) software package was used to extract and fit energy spectra and to extract light curves for the brightest off-nuclear sources in two different observations of NGC 4945 (January, 2000 and May, 2004). A majority of sources were closely fit by both absorbed power law and absorbed bremsstrahlung models, with a significantly poorer {chi}{sup 2}/dof for the absorbed blackbody model, and most sources had little variability. This indicates that the sources are accreting binary systems with either a neutron star or black hole as the compact object. The calculated luminosities were about 10{sup 38} erg/s, which implies that the mass of the accreting object is close to 10 solar masses and must be a black hole.

  10. Spectral variability in hard X-rays and discovery of a 13,5 years period in bright quasar 3C273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchanda, R.

    SPECTRAL VARIABILITY IN HARD X-RAYS AND DISCOVERY OF A 13.5 YEARS PERIOD IN BRIGHT QUASAR 3C273. R. K. Manchanda Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai-400005, India. ravi@tifr.res.in/Fax:+91-22-2152110 Among the large variety of active galactic nuclei, 3C 273 is the nearest quasi stellar object. The source has been studied in details in various energy bands and shows a large variety of morphological features. In the X-ray energy range 2-20 keV, the spectrum follows a power law with a spectral index of -1.5, however, the observed value of the spectral index in the 20-120 keV band shows a large variation. In the case of old archival data, the derived spectral index has a value between 1.5 and 2.2 while, the recent data from OSSE experiment showed a flat spectrum with index 0.8. Thus, to fit the GeV fluxes from the source, a break in the spectrum around 1 MeV has been proposed. In this paper we report the balloon-borne hard X-ray observations of 3C273 made with LASE instrument on Nov. 20, 1998 as a part of our continuing programme of balloon borne hard X-ray observations in the 20-200 keV band using high sensitivity Large Area Scintillation counter Experiment. Our data clearly show a steep spectrum in the 20-200 keV with spectral index a = -2.26+ 0.07 and its extrapolation can fit the GeV data. The presence of steep power law index is in complete contrast to earlier observation from OSSE. From a comparison with the available archival data of the source we have discovered that 50 keV flux from the source, shows very strong modulation with a period of about 13.5 years and which is also present at 100 keV and in the spectral index to a lesser degree. We discuss the periodicity in terms of precessing source geometry.

  11. Identification of the Hard X-Ray Source Dominating the E > 25 keV Emission of the Nearby Galaxy M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukita, M.; Ptak, A.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Wik, D.; Maccarone, T. J.; Pottschmidt, K.; Zezas, A.; Antoniou, V.; Ballhausen, R.; Lehmer, B. D.; Lien, A.; Williams, B.; Baganoff, F.; Boyd, P. T.; Enoto, T.; Kennea, J.; Page, K. L.; Choi, Y.

    2017-03-01

    We report the identification of a bright hard X-ray source dominating the M31 bulge above 25 keV from a simultaneous NuSTAR–Swift observation. We find that this source is the counterpart to Swift J0042.6+4112, which was previously detected in the Swift BAT All-sky Hard X-ray Survey. This Swift BAT source had been suggested to be the combined emission from a number of point sources; our new observations have identified a single X-ray source from 0.5 to 50 keV as the counterpart for the first time. In the 0.5–10 keV band, the source had been classified as an X-ray Binary candidate in various Chandra and XMM-Newton studies; however, since it was not clearly associated with Swift J0042.6+4112, the previous E < 10 keV observations did not generate much attention. This source has a spectrum with a soft X-ray excess (kT ∼ 0.2 keV) plus a hard spectrum with a power law of {{Γ }}∼ 1 and a cutoff around 15–20 keV, typical of the spectral characteristics of accreting pulsars. Unfortunately, any potential pulsation was undetected in the NuSTAR data, possibly due to insufficient photon statistics. The existing deep HST images exclude high-mass (>3 {M}ȯ ) donors at the location of this source. The best interpretation for the nature of this source is an X-ray pulsar with an intermediate-mass (<3 {M}ȯ ) companion or a symbiotic X-ray binary. We discuss other possibilities in more detail.

  12. On the origin of two unidentified radio/X-ray sources discovered with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Federico; Combi, Jorge A.; Medina, María C.; Romero, Gustavo E.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: We aim at clarifying the nature of the emission of two spatially related unidentified X-ray sources detected with XMM-Newton telescope at intermediate-low Galactic latitude Methods: We use the imaging and spectral capabilities of XMM-Newton to study the X-ray properties of these two sources. In addition, we complement our study with radio data obtained at different frequencies to analyze a possible physical association between the sources. Results: Observations reveal a point-like source aligned with elongated diffuse emission. The X-ray spectra of these sources is best-fitted by an absorbed power law with photon index Γ ~ 1.7 for the point-like source and ~2.0 for the extended source. Both sources show nonthermal radio-continuum counterparts that might indicate a physical association. In addition, from the available data, we did not detect variability on the point-like source in several timescales. Two possible scenarios are analyzed: one Galactic and one extra-Galactic. First, based on HI line absorption, assuming a Galactic origin, we infer a distance upper bound of ≲2 kpc, which poses a constraint on the height over the Galactic plane of ≲200 pc and on the linear size of the system of ≲2.3 pc. In this case, the X-ray luminosities are ≳1032 erg s-1 and ≳7.5 × 1032 erg s-1, for the point-like and extended sources, respectively. Second, an extra-Galactic nature is discussed, where the point-like source might be the core of a radio galaxy and the extended source its lobe. In this case, we compare derived fluxes, spectral indices, and spatial correlation with those typical from the radio galaxy population, showing the feasibility of this alternative astrophysical scenario. Conclusions: From the available observational evidence, we suggest that the most promising scenario to explain the nature of these sources is a system consisting of a one-sided radio galaxy, where the point-like source is an active galactic nucleus and the extended source

  13. A waveguide electron cyclotron resonance source of X-ray emission for low-dose introscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeichev, K. F.; Ionidi, V. Yu.; Karfidov, D. M.; Lukina, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    It is shown that a "point" target in a conventional evacuated waveguide in the magnetic field of a mirror trap formed by two disk magnets axially magnetized in the direction perpendicular to the electric field vector represents a source of X-ray bremsstrahlung of electrons accelerated in an ECR discharge with a broad range of photon energies up to 0.8 MeV. The dosage rate of the source is ˜1 R/h. The source fed from a conventional microwave oven has small dimensions and a low weight. It is easy-to-use and is suitable as a laboratory tool, in particular, in radiobiology and introscopy. After passing through the object, X-ray emission is recorded by a digital camera with the help of a highly sensitive X-ray fluorescent screen, which converts it into an optical image.

  14. Observations of the X-ray burst source MXB 1636-53

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Doty, J.

    1977-01-01

    X-ray bursts have been observed from MXB 1636-53, almost certainly associated with the strong steady X-ray source 2S 1636-536 (Norma X-1, 3U 1636-53). The steady source was observed in January 1977 at roughly half the intensity reported in the 3U catalog and showed about 15% variability on a time scale of hours. The spectra of the X-ray bursts are well fitted by blackbody radiation whose temperature rises rapidly to a maximum of approximately 28 million K and then cools slowly. If the source is at a distance of 10 kpc, the radius of the projected burst emission region is about 10 km, similar to the size of a neutron star.

  15. Closed source experimental system for soft x-ray spectroscopy of radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Modin, A.; Butorin, S. M.; Vegelius, J.; Olsson, A.; Englund, C.-J.; Andersson, J.; Werme, L.; Nordgren, J.; Kaeaembre, T.; Skarnemark, G.; Burakov, B. E.

    2008-09-15

    An instrumental and experimental setup for soft x-ray spectroscopy meeting the requirements of a closed source for radioactivity is described. The system consists of a vacuum sealed cell containing the sample, mounted on a tubing system to ensure compatibility with most standard manipulators. The soft x rays penetrate a thin x-ray window separating the interior of the cell from the vacuum in the experimental chamber. Our first results for single crystal PuO{sub 2} confirm the feasibility of experiments using the setup. The results are consistent with results of first principles calculations and previously recorded spectra obtained using a standard open source setup. The results show that the closed source experimental system can be used to collect valuable experimental data from radioactive materials.

  16. Development of a stationary chest tomosynthesis system using carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Jing

    X-ray imaging system has shown its usefulness for providing quick and easy access of imaging in both clinic settings and emergency situations. It greatly improves the workflow in hospitals. However, the conventional radiography systems, lacks 3D information in the images. The tissue overlapping issue in the 2D projection image result in low sensitivity and specificity. Both computed tomography and digital tomosynthesis, the two conventional 3D imaging modalities, requires a complex gantry to mechanically translate the x-ray source to various positions. Over the past decade, our research group has developed a carbon nanotube (CNT) based x-ray source technology. The CNT x-ray sources allows compacting multiple x-ray sources into a single x-ray tube. Each individual x-ray source in the source array can be electronically switched. This technology allows development of stationary tomographic imaging modalities without any complex mechanical gantries. The goal of this work is to develop a stationary digital chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) system, and implement it for a clinical trial. The feasibility of s-DCT was investigated. It is found that the CNT source array can provide sufficient x-ray output for chest imaging. Phantom images have shown comparable image qualities as conventional DCT. The s-DBT system was then used to study the effects of source array configurations and tomosynthesis image quality, and the feasibility of a physiological gated s-DCT. Using physical measures for spatial resolution, the 2D source configuration was shown to have improved depth resolution and comparable in-plane resolution. The prospective gated tomosynthesis images have shown substantially reduction of image blur associated with lung motions. The system was also used to investigate the feasibility of using s-DCT as a diagnosis and monitoring tools for cystic fibrosis patients. A new scatter reduction methods for s-DCT was also studied. Finally, a s-DCT system was constructed by

  17. On the Nature of X-ray Surface Brightness Fluctuations in M87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo, P.; Churazov, E.; Zhuravleva, I.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.

    2016-02-01

    X-ray images of galaxy clusters and gas-rich elliptical galaxies show a wealth of small-scale features that reflect fluctuations in density and/or temperature of the intracluster medium. In this paper we study these fluctuations in M87/Virgo to establish whether sound waves/shocks, bubbles, or uplifted cold gas dominate the structure. We exploit the strong dependence of the emissivity on density and temperature in different energy bands to distinguish between these processes. Using simulations we demonstrate that our analysis recovers the leading type of fluctuation even in the presence of projection effects and temperature gradients. We confirm the isobaric nature of cool filaments of gas entrained by buoyantly rising bubbles, extending to 7‧ to the east and southwest, and the adiabatic nature of the weak shocks at 40″ and 3‧ from the center. For features of ˜5-10 kpc, we show that the central 4‧ × 4‧ region is dominated by cool structures in pressure equilibrium with the ambient hotter gas while up to 30% of the variance in this region can be ascribed to adiabatic fluctuations. The remaining part of the central 14‧ × 14‧ region, excluding the arms and shocks described above, is dominated by apparently isothermal fluctuations (bubbles) with a possible admixture (at the level of ˜30%) of adiabatic (sound waves) and by isobaric structures. Larger features, of about 30 kpc, show a stronger contribution from isobaric fluctuations. The results broadly agree with a model based on feedback from an active galactic nucleus mediated by bubbles of relativistic plasma.

  18. ON THE NATURE OF X-RAY SURFACE BRIGHTNESS FLUCTUATIONS IN M87

    SciTech Connect

    Arévalo, P.; Churazov, E.; Zhuravleva, I.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.

    2016-02-10

    X-ray images of galaxy clusters and gas-rich elliptical galaxies show a wealth of small-scale features that reflect fluctuations in density and/or temperature of the intracluster medium. In this paper we study these fluctuations in M87/Virgo to establish whether sound waves/shocks, bubbles, or uplifted cold gas dominate the structure. We exploit the strong dependence of the emissivity on density and temperature in different energy bands to distinguish between these processes. Using simulations we demonstrate that our analysis recovers the leading type of fluctuation even in the presence of projection effects and temperature gradients. We confirm the isobaric nature of cool filaments of gas entrained by buoyantly rising bubbles, extending to 7′ to the east and southwest, and the adiabatic nature of the weak shocks at 40″ and 3′ from the center. For features of ∼5–10 kpc, we show that the central 4′ × 4′ region is dominated by cool structures in pressure equilibrium with the ambient hotter gas while up to 30% of the variance in this region can be ascribed to adiabatic fluctuations. The remaining part of the central 14′ × 14′ region, excluding the arms and shocks described above, is dominated by apparently isothermal fluctuations (bubbles) with a possible admixture (at the level of ∼30%) of adiabatic (sound waves) and by isobaric structures. Larger features, of about 30 kpc, show a stronger contribution from isobaric fluctuations. The results broadly agree with a model based on feedback from an active galactic nucleus mediated by bubbles of relativistic plasma.

  19. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm R.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1995-01-01

    A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

  20. ON THE NATURE OF HARD X-RAY EXTRAGALACTIC SOURCES OBSERVED WITH XMM-NEWTON

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Bailon, E.; Huerta, E. M.; Krongold, Y.; Chavushyan, V.; Schartel, N.; Santos-Lleo, M.

    2012-03-15

    Over the last decade, X-ray surveys have provided outstanding new results due to the lack of the common selection effects present at other wavelengths. Here, we have selected a sample of unidentified sources from the XMM-Newton Slew Survey Catalog, likely to be extragalactic. Five of them were observed with the XMM-Newton observatory. In this work, we present the results of the spectral analysis of these objects in the X-ray and optical bands. Only three of them had useful spectroscopic X-ray data, and follow up observations were carried out in the optical range to determine their coordinates, classific