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Sample records for brighton centre brighton

  1. 1. Photocopy of photograph (from illustration in booklet Homecoming, Brighton, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of photograph (from illustration in booklet Homecoming, Brighton, 1907) Photographer unknown, ca. 1907 WEST (FRONT) ELEVATION - John D. Appleton House, 325 South Grand River Avenue, Brighton, Livingston County, MI

  2. LGBT Youth from Brighton to Jerusalem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Jess

    2009-01-01

    Allsorts Youth Project works with lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGBT) young people in Brighton and Hove. It provides a safe drop-in space and one-to-one support. It also enables LGBT young people to learn new skills and participate in a wide range of volunteering opportunities including delivering homophobia awareness workshops to their peers.

  3. 'MMR talk' and vaccination choices: an ethnographic study in Brighton.

    PubMed

    Poltorak, Mike; Leach, Melissa; Fairhead, James; Cassell, Jackie

    2005-08-01

    In the context of the high-profile controversy that has unfolded in the UK around the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine and its possible adverse effects, this paper explores how parents in Brighton, southern England, are thinking about MMR for their own children. Research focusing on parents' engagement with MMR has been dominated by analysis of the proximate influences on their choices, and in particular scientific and media information, which have led health policy to focus on information and education campaigns. This paper reports ethnographic work including narratives by mothers in Brighton. Our work questions such reasoning in showing how wider personal and social issues shape parents' immunisation actions. The narratives by mothers show how practices around MMR are shaped by personal histories, by birth experiences and related feelings of control, by family health histories, by their readings of their child's health and particular strengths and vulnerabilities, by particular engagements with health services, by processes building or undermining confidence, and by friendships and conversations with others, which are themselves shaped by wider social differences and transformations. Although many see vaccination as a personal decision which must respond to the particularities of a child's immune system, 'MMR talk', which affirms these conceptualisations, has become a social phenomenon in itself. These perspectives suggest ways in which people's engagements with MMR reflect wider changes in their relations with science and the state.

  4. From a Whisper to a Scream: The Campaign for Education in Brighton & Hove

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmond, Nadia; Pettitt, Aidan

    2016-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of the creation and first two years of the Campaign for Education in Brighton and Hove. It makes a case for grass-roots responses to the various neo-liberal policy initiatives undermining all phases of public education. This article was written prior to publication of the White Paper, Educational Excellence…

  5. The Brighton Collaboration Viral Vector Vaccines Safety Working Group (V3SWG).

    PubMed

    Chen, Robert T; Carbery, Baevin; Mac, Lisa; Berns, Kenneth I; Chapman, Louisa; Condit, Richard C; Excler, Jean-Louis; Gurwith, Marc; Hendry, Michael; Khan, Arifa S; Khuri-Bulos, Najwa; Klug, Bettina; Robertson, James S; Seligman, Stephen J; Sheets, Rebecca; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant viral vectors provide an effective means for heterologous antigen expression in vivo and thus represent promising platforms for developing novel vaccines against human pathogens from Ebola to tuberculosis. An increasing number of candidate viral vector vaccines are entering human clinical trials. The Brighton Collaboration Viral Vector Vaccines Safety Working Group (V3SWG) was formed to improve our ability to anticipate potential safety issues and meaningfully assess or interpret safety data, thereby facilitating greater public acceptance when licensed.

  6. Diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome and validation of Brighton criteria.

    PubMed

    Fokke, Christiaan; van den Berg, Bianca; Drenthen, Judith; Walgaard, Christa; van Doorn, Pieter Antoon; Jacobs, Bart Casper

    2014-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is an acute polyradiculoneuropathy with a variable clinical presentation. Accurate diagnostic criteria are essential for patient care and research, including clinical trials and vaccine safety studies. Several diagnostic criteria for Guillain-Barré syndrome have been proposed, including the recent set by the Brighton Collaboration. In the present study we describe in detail the key diagnostic features required to meet these Brighton criteria in a study population of 494 adult patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome, previously included in therapeutic and observational studies. The patients had a median age of 53 years (interquartile range 36-66 years) and males slightly predominated (56%). All patients developed bilateral limb weakness which generally involved both upper and lower extremities. The weakness remained restricted to the legs in 6% and to the arms in 1% of the patients. Decreased reflexes in paretic arms or legs were found initially in 91% of patients and in all patients during follow-up. Ten (2%) patients however showed persistence of normal reflexes in paretic arms. Disease nadir was reached within 2 weeks in 80%, within 4 weeks in 97% and within 6 weeks in all patients. A monophasic disease course occurred in 95% of patients, of whom 10% had a treatment-related fluctuation. A clinical deterioration after 8 weeks of onset of weakness occurred in 23 (5%) patients. Cerebrospinal fluid was examined in 474 (96%) patients. A mild pleocytosis (5 to 50 cells/μl) was found in 15%, and none had more than 50 cells/μl. An increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration was found only in 64% of patients, highly dependent on the timing of the lumbar puncture after onset of weakness (49% at the first day to 88% after 2 weeks). Nerve electrophysiology was compatible with the presence of a neuropathy in 99% of patients, but only 59% fulfilled the current criteria for a distinct subtype of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Patients with a

  7. Health in the urban environment: a qualitative review of the Brighton and Hove WHO Healthy City Program.

    PubMed

    Hall, Caroline; Davies, John Kenneth; Sherriff, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    Phase IV of the WHO European Region's Healthy Cities Program ended in December 2008. This article presents the findings from a recently completed review of Brighton and Hove's Healthy City Program which aimed to scope whether added value had accrued from the city's role as a WHO Healthy City during phase IV. In contrast to most other evaluations of healthy cities, this review adopted a qualitative approach representing an appraisal of the Brighton and Hove Healthy City Program from the internal viewpoint of its local stakeholders. In addition to documentary analysis and a facilitated workshop, a series of in-depth interviews (N = 27) were conducted with stakeholders from the Brighton and Hove Healthy City Partnership representing each of the sectors reflected in the Local Strategic Partnership (public, statutory, elected, community and voluntary, neighborhood and communities, business). The key findings of the review are presented in a way which reflects the three key areas of the review including (1) the healthy cities approach, (2) participation in phase IV of the WHO Healthy Cities Program, and (3) the Brighton and Hove Healthy City Partnership. These findings are discussed, and recommendations for action at local, national, and European levels are proposed. In particular, we argue that there is an urgent need to develop a suitable monitoring and evaluation system for the WHO Healthy Cities Program with appropriate indicators that are meaningful and relevant to local stakeholders. Moreover, it would be important for any such system to capitalize on the benefits that qualitative methodologies can offer alongside more traditional quantitative indicators.

  8. Applicability, reliability, sensitivity, and specificity of six Brighton Collaboration standardized case definitions for adverse events following immunization.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Katrin S; Magnus, Manya; Ball, Robert; Halsey, Neal; Shadomy, Sean; Farley, Thomas A

    2008-11-25

    We evaluated the applicability, reliability, sensitivity, and specificity of six standardized case definitions for adverse events following immunization (AEFI) (for fever, generalized convulsive seizure, hypotonic-hyporesponsive episode, intussusception, nodule, and persistent crying) developed by the Brighton Collaboration using the U.S. Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). The evaluation included: (a) the development of codified search strings using standardized coding terminology, and (b) for sensitivity and specificity analyses, the development of a "gold standard" for case determination by clinical expert reviews, and its comparison against the application of the definitions to VAERS reports by nonclinicians. Application of the case definitions in an automated approach proved to be valid, feasible, and unlikely to miss confirmed cases of the reported clinical event. The definitions had variable but generally high sensitivity and specificity compared to clinician review, which in itself yielded inconsistent case determination. The study demonstrated the need for the developed standardized definitions for AEFI and their usefulness in passive surveillance.

  9. An investigation into the feasibility of designing a framework for the quantitative evaluation of the Clinical Librarian service at an NHS Trust in Brighton, UK.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Archana; Roper, Tom

    2014-12-01

    This feature presents research undertaken by Archana Deshmukh for her MA dissertation at the University of Brighton. She worked closely with Tom Roper, the Clinical Librarian at Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, in a project to explore the feasibility of applying quantitative measures to evaluate the Clinical Librarian service. The investigation used an innovative participatory approach and the findings showed that although an exclusively quantitative approach to evaluation is not feasible, using a mixed methods approach is a way forward. Agreed outputs and outcomes could be embedded in a marketing plan, and the resulting framework could provide evidence to demonstrate overall impact. Archana graduated in July 2014, gaining a Distinction in the MA in Information Studies, and she is currently looking for work in the health information sector.

  10. Small particle aerosol inoculation of cowpox Brighton Red in rhesus monkeys results in a severe respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Hammoud, Dima A.; Lackemeyer, Matthew G.; Yellayi, Srikanth; Solomon, Jeffrey; Bohannon, Jordan K.; Janosko, Krisztina B.; Jett, Catherine; Cooper, Kurt; Blaney, Joseph E.; Jahrling, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) inoculation of nonhuman primates (NHPs) has been suggested as an alternate model for smallpox (Kramski et al., 2010, PLoS One, 5, e10412). Previously, we have demonstrated that intrabronchial inoculation of CPXV-Brighton Red (CPXV-BR) into cynomolgus monkeys resulted in a disease that shared many similarities to smallpox; however, severe respiratory tract disease was observed (Smith et al., 2011, J. Gen. Virol). Here we describe the course of disease after small particle aerosol exposure of rhesus monkeys using computed tomography (CT) to monitor respiratory disease progression. Subjects developed a severe respiratory disease that was uniformly lethal at 5.7 log10 PFU of CPXV-BR. CT indicated changes in lung architecture that correlated with changes in peripheral blood monocytes and peripheral oxygen saturation. While the small particle aerosol inoculation route does not accurately mimic human smallpox, the data suggest that CT can be used as a tool to monitor real-time disease progression for evaluation of animal models for human diseases. PMID:25776759

  11. Small particle aerosol inoculation of cowpox Brighton Red in rhesus monkeys results in a severe respiratory disease

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Reed F.; Hammoud, Dima A.; Lackemeyer, Matthew G.; Yellayi, Srikanth; Solomon, Jeffrey; Bohannon, Jordan K.; Janosko, Krisztina B.; Jett, Catherine; Cooper, Kurt; Blaney, Joseph E.; Jahrling, Peter B.

    2015-07-15

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) inoculation of nonhuman primates (NHPs) has been suggested as an alternate model for smallpox (Kramski et al., 2010, PLoS One, 5, e10412). Previously, we have demonstrated that intrabronchial inoculation of CPXV-Brighton Red (CPXV-BR) into cynomolgus monkeys resulted in a disease that shared many similarities to smallpox; however, severe respiratory tract disease was observed (Smith et al., 2011, J. Gen. Virol.). Here we describe the course of disease after small particle aerosol exposure of rhesus monkeys using computed tomography (CT) to monitor respiratory disease progression. Subjects developed a severe respiratory disease that was uniformly lethal at 5.7 log{sub 10} PFU of CPXV-BR. CT indicated changes in lung architecture that correlated with changes in peripheral blood monocytes and peripheral oxygen saturation. While the small particle aerosol inoculation route does not accurately mimic human smallpox, the data suggest that CT can be used as a tool to monitor real-time disease progression for evaluation of animal models for human diseases. - Highlights: • Small particle aerosol exposure of rhesus results in a severe respiratory disease. • CT findings correlated with peripheral oxygen saturation and monocyte increases. • Virus dissemination was limited and mainly confined to the respiratory tract. • CT provides insight into pathogenesis to aid development of animal models of disease.

  12. International Health and Tropical Medicine 08: Proceedings of a Residential Meeting of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 17-19 September 2008, Brighton, UK.

    PubMed

    Newport, Melanie J; Lang, Trudie

    2009-11-01

    The Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene held a residential meeting from 17-19 September 2008. Over 250 delegates from a diverse range of backgrounds and experience convened in Brighton, UK for three days of talks and discussions on a wide variety of themes. Topics ranged from tropical and neglected infectious diseases through to other disorders that whilst not traditionally associated with low income countries pose an increasing challenge; chronic diseases, mental health disorders and problems arising from conflict and poverty combined. The meeting represented the change in focus at RSTMH from tropical infectious diseases towards global health in its broadest sense.

  13. Exposure of rhesus monkeys to cowpox virus Brighton Red by large-particle aerosol droplets results in an upper respiratory tract disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Reed F; Hammoud, Dima A; Perry, Donna L; Solomon, Jeffrey; Moore, Ian N; Lackemeyer, Matthew G; Bohannon, Jordan K; Sayre, Philip J; Minai, Mahnaz; Papaneri, Amy B; Hagen, Katie R; Janosko, Krisztina B; Jett, Catherine; Cooper, Kurt; Blaney, Joseph E; Jahrling, Peter B

    2016-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that small-particle (0.5-3.0 µm) aerosol infection of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with cowpox virus (CPXV)-Brighton Red (BR) results in fulminant respiratory tract disease characterized by severe lung parenchymal pathology but only limited systemic virus dissemination and limited classic epidermal pox-like lesion development (Johnson et al., 2015). Based on these results, and to further develop CPXV as an improved model of human smallpox, we evaluated a novel large-particle aerosol (7.0-9.0 µm) exposure of rhesus monkeys to CPXV-BR and monitored for respiratory tract disease by serial computed tomography (CT). As expected, the upper respiratory tract and large airways were the major sites of virus-induced pathology following large-particle aerosol exposure. Large-particle aerosol CPXV exposure of rhesus macaques resulted in severe upper airway and large airway pathology with limited systemic dissemination.

  14. Health assessment for MacGillis and Gibbs Company/Bell Lumber and Pole Company, New Brighton, Minnesota, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MND006192694. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-05

    The MacGillis and Gibbs (M G) Company and the Bell Lumber and Pole (BL P) Company currently operate separate, but adjacent, wood treating facilities in New Brighton, Minnesota. The surficial aquifer under the MG/BLP site is contaminated with organic chemicals such as pentachlorophenol, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and metals such as arsenic and chromium. Residents in the immediate vicinity of the site who have ingested/currently ingest water from private wells that take water from the surficial aquifer may have been/be exposed to these contaminants. Based on the information and data reviewed, the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) concludes that the chemical contamination attributable to MG/BLP site poses an indeterminate public health hazard.

  15. Land-Use Analysis and Simulated Effects of Land-Use Change and Aggregate Mining on Groundwater Flow in the South Platte River Valley, Brighton to Fort Lupton, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnold, L.R.; Mladinich, C.S.; Langer, W.H.; Daniels, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Land use in the South Platte River valley between the cities of Brighton and Fort Lupton, Colo., is undergoing change as urban areas expand, and the extent of aggregate mining in the Brighton-Fort Lupton area is increasing as the demand for aggregate grows in response to urban development. To improve understanding of land-use change and the potential effects of land-use change and aggregate mining on groundwater flow, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the cities of Brighton and Fort Lupton, analyzed socioeconomic and land-use trends and constructed a numerical groundwater flow model of the South Platte alluvial aquifer in the Brighton-Fort Lupton area. The numerical groundwater flow model was used to simulate (1) steady-state hydrologic effects of predicted land-use conditions in 2020 and 2040, (2) transient cumulative hydrologic effects of the potential extent of reclaimed aggregate pits in 2020 and 2040, (3) transient hydrologic effects of actively dewatered aggregate pits, and (4) effects of different hypothetical pit spacings and configurations on groundwater levels. The SLEUTH (Slope, Land cover, Exclusion, Urbanization, Transportation, and Hillshade) urban-growth modeling program was used to predict the extent of urban area in 2020 and 2040. Wetlands in the Brighton-Fort Lupton area were mapped as part of the study, and mapped wetland locations and areas of riparian herbaceous vegetation previously mapped by the Colorado Division of Wildlife were compared to simulation results to indicate areas where wetlands or riparian herbaceous vegetation might be affected by groundwater-level changes resulting from land-use change or aggregate mining. Analysis of land-use conditions in 1957, 1977, and 2000 indicated that the general distribution of irrigated land and non-irrigated land remained similar from 1957 to 2000, but both land uses decreased as urban area increased. Urban area increased about 165 percent from 1957 to 1977 and about 56 percent from

  16. Estimation of uncertainty in the sampling and analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from contaminated soil in Brighton, UK.

    PubMed

    Zhou, John L; Siddiqui, Ertan; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan

    2014-11-01

    The heterogeneity of environmental samples is increasingly recognised, yet rarely examined in organic contamination investigations. In this study soil samples from an ex-landfill site in Brighton, UK were analysed for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination by using a balanced sampling protocol. The analytical technique of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was found to be fit for purpose by the use of duplicate samples and the statistical analysis of variances, as well as of certified reference materials. The sampling uncertainty was found to significantly overweigh the analytical uncertainty, by a factor of 3 and 6 for PCBs and PAHs, respectively. The soil samples showed a general trend of PCB concentration that was under the recommended target level of 20 ng/g dry weight. It is possible that one site alongside the main road may exceed the 20 ng/g target level, after taking into consideration the overall measurement uncertainty (70.8%). The PAH contamination was more severe, with seven sites potentially exceeding the effect-range medium concentrations. The soil samples with relatively high PCB and PAH concentrations were all taken from the grass verge, which also had the highest soil organic carbon content. The measurement uncertainty which was largely due to sampling can be reduced by sampling at a high resolution spacing of 17 m, which is recommended in future field investigations of soil organic contamination.

  17. International Conference on Energy Storage, Brighton, Sussex, England, April 29-May 1, 1981, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Current developmental, experimental, and production prototype energy storage systems are surveyed, with an emphasis on European programs and products. Attention is given to chemical, thermochemical/heat pump combinations, and reversible reaction heat storage methods. Applications of zeolite, hydrogenated cyclohexane, and fluidized media are examined, as are thermal storage options for industry and utilities. Phase change materials in bulk, encapsulated, and sodium acetate forms are reviewed, particularly for solar energy thermal storage. The compatibility of construction materials with latent heat storage is discussed. Battery systems for transport vehicles, load leveling, and storage of solar and wind-derived electricity are described. Aquifer storage is explored, together with underground pumped hydro and compressed air energy storage, a two-basin tidal power scheme, and kinetic energy rings such as flywheels.

  18. Building Pedagogic Excellence: Learning and Teaching Fellowships within Communities of Practice at the University of Brighton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jennie

    2010-01-01

    Can a system of teaching awards which is essentially one of rewards and recognition serve the dual purpose of enhancing learning and teaching, if the function of such a system does not go beyond the first stage of reward to the second stage of development? Institution-led teaching fellowships that focus on pedagogic research, and operate within…

  19. Conference Proceedings: 2nd European Conference of Rehabilitation International; Disability in the Family. (Brighton, England, September 18-21, 1978)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal Association for Disability and Rehabilitation, London (England).

    The conference proceedings of the 2nd European Conference of Rehabilitation International (1978) on the theme disability in the family contains the agenda and approximately 80 papers. National presentations consider the theme in papers by representatives of Finland, Hungary, Belgium, The Netherlands, Portugal, Hong Kong, India, The German…

  20. 76 FR 14061 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ..., Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations) (hereinafter referred to as ``The Tribes..., Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations). Multiple lines of evidence, including treaties, Acts of Congress... and the Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa...

  1. 75 FR 36110 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-24

    ... (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations); and Thlopthlocco Tribal Town, Oklahoma... Oklahoma; Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations);...

  2. Indicators of Performance. Papers Presented at the Annual Conference of the Society for Research into Higher Education (15th, Brighton, England, December 19-20, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billing, David, Ed.

    Thirty-two papers on performance indicators are presented based on the conference themes of performance of the higher education system at the national level, institutional evaluation, and assessment of staff and students. Papers and authors include the following: "Higher Education Systems at National Level" (A. Thompson); "The CNAA…

  3. What's Your Story?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanistreet, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The Brighton Unemployed Centre Families Project, a community centre run by the unemployed for the unemployed, unwaged and low-waged, has run periodic creative writing classes for 15 years. The centre's creative writing scheme, Salt and Vinegar, gives centre users an opportunity to write about their lives and to develop their writing skills. The…

  4. 78 FR 25469 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of South Alabama Center for Archaeological Studies...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ..., Hollywood & Tampa Reservations)); The Muscogee (Creek) Nation; The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; Thlopthlocco... Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations)); The Muscogee..., Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations)); The Muscogee (Creek) Nation; The...

  5. 78 FR 22288 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The Florida Department of State, Division of Historical Resources...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... (previously listed as the Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa... (previously listed as the Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa... Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations)). Pursuant to...

  6. 78 FR 22289 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The Florida Department of State, Division of Historical Resources...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations)). The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma was..., Hollywood & Tampa Reservations)) and The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma. Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the... Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations)) and The Seminole...

  7. 76 FR 2712 - Sara Lee Corporation, Master Data, Cash Applications, Deductions, Collections, Call Center...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ...Systems, The Brighton Group, TraSys, VIP Staffing, Workforce Temps, Earth City, MO; Sara Lee Corporation..., Payroll, and Employee Master Data Departments, Earth City, Missouri. The Department's notice was published..., Snelling Staffing, TekSystems, The Brighton Group, TraSys, VIP Staffing, and Workforce Temps, Earth...

  8. Left panel of panoramic overview of Beaver River Bridge and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Left panel of panoramic overview of Beaver River Bridge and New Brighton, looking NE from Patterson Heights, abuts PA-511-2 - Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railway, Beaver River Bridge, Spanning Beaver River along line of Second Avenue, New Brighton, Beaver County, PA

  9. Right panel of panoramic overview of Beaver River Bridge and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Right panel of panoramic overview of Beaver River Bridge and New Brighton, looking SE from Patternson Heights, abuts PA-511-1. - Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railway, Beaver River Bridge, Spanning Beaver River along line of Second Avenue, New Brighton, Beaver County, PA

  10. 32 CFR 732.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... incarcerating jurisdiction is responsible for care required after arrest. (d) Designated Uniformed Services..., telephone (301) 338-3693. (ii) Alston-Brighton Aid and Health Group, Inc., Brighton Marine Public Health... Service facilities listed in § 732.11(d). (h) Inactive duty training. Duty prescribed for Reserves by...

  11. 32 CFR 732.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... incarcerating jurisdiction is responsible for care required after arrest. (d) Designated Uniformed Services..., telephone (301) 338-3693. (ii) Alston-Brighton Aid and Health Group, Inc., Brighton Marine Public Health... Service facilities listed in § 732.11(d). (h) Inactive duty training. Duty prescribed for Reserves by...

  12. 32 CFR 732.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... incarcerating jurisdiction is responsible for care required after arrest. (d) Designated Uniformed Services..., telephone (301) 338-3693. (ii) Alston-Brighton Aid and Health Group, Inc., Brighton Marine Public Health... Service facilities listed in § 732.11(d). (h) Inactive duty training. Duty prescribed for Reserves by...

  13. 32 CFR 732.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... incarcerating jurisdiction is responsible for care required after arrest. (d) Designated Uniformed Services..., telephone (301) 338-3693. (ii) Alston-Brighton Aid and Health Group, Inc., Brighton Marine Public Health... Service facilities listed in § 732.11(d). (h) Inactive duty training. Duty prescribed for Reserves by...

  14. SETI-3: the Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence. A selection of papers from 1987-1990 Symposia of the International Academy of Astronautics held during the 38th-41st Congress (Brighton, Bangalore, Malaga, Dresden) of the International Astronautical Federation.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    This special issue of Acta Astronautica is a compilation of selected papers presented at Review Meetings on SETI at the 1987-1990 International Academy of Astronautics Congresses. Papers are drawn from seven areas: bioastronomical context, SETI technology, SETI searches, radio frequency interferences, possibilities for newer instrumentation, interdisciplinary connections, and public relations. Two papers presented at the Pesek Lecture are included.

  15. 4. BURLINGTON DITCH/SAND CREEK INTERSECTION The Burlington Ditch is being ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. BURLINGTON DITCH/SAND CREEK INTERSECTION The Burlington Ditch is being siphoned below Sand Creek - Burlington Ditch, South Platte River Drainage Area, Water District No. 2, Division No. 1, Brighton, Adams County, CO

  16. TUC delegates told that 'scroungers' image fuels crime.

    PubMed

    2012-09-19

    Hate crimes against people with disabilities are being fuelled by public perceptions that many are 'benefit scroungers', Trades Union Congress delegates heard at their annual conference in Brighton last week.

  17. Perspective view of east face, looking due south, with train ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of east face, looking due south, with train on bridge. - Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railway, Beaver River Bridge, Spanning Beaver River along line of Second Avenue, New Brighton, Beaver County, PA

  18. Detail view of fixed end of northernmost truss span. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of fixed end of northernmost truss span. - Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railway, Beaver River Bridge, Spanning Beaver River along line of Second Avenue, New Brighton, Beaver County, PA

  19. Interior view of fixed end of northernmost truss span, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of fixed end of northernmost truss span, looking due south. - Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railway, Beaver River Bridge, Spanning Beaver River along line of Second Avenue, New Brighton, Beaver County, PA

  20. The National Shipbuilding Research Program. Strategies and Demonstrations for the Reduction of Government Regulations Related to Commercial Shipbuilding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    Baltimore, Maryland Date: October 2-5. 1996 Location: Marriot Marquis Hotel , New York City Date: October 15-19,1997 Location: Westin Hotel , Ottawa...Manufacturers Association RNLI - Royal National Lifeboat Institute Date April 30,1996 May 1-2,1996 Location: Brighton Metropole Hotel , Brighton, UK Contact...Continental Hotel , Rio de Janeiro Contact Mrs. Melissa Nellis, Tel: (713)578-7171, Fax: (713)578-0589. Title: The 1996 USMSA Safety Seminar Sponsor: United

  1. Chalcogenide centred gold complexes.

    PubMed

    Gimeno, M Concepción; Laguna, Antonio

    2008-09-01

    Chalcogenide-centred gold complexes are an important class of compounds in which a central chalcogen is surrounded by several gold atoms or gold and other metals. They have special characteristics such as unusual geometries, electron deficiency and properties such as luminescence or non-linear optical properties. The best known species are the trinuclear [E(AuPR3)3]+, 'oxonium' type species, that have high synthetic applicability, not only in other chalcogen-centred species, but in many other organometallic derivatives. The aurophilic interactions play an important role in the stability, preference for a particular geometry and luminescence properties in this type of derivatives (critical review, 117 references).

  2. Lidar Calibration Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Freudenthaler, Volker; Nicolae, Doina; Mona, Lucia; Belegante, Livio; D'Amico, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the newly established Lidar Calibration Centre, a distributed infrastructure in Europe, whose goal is to offer services for complete characterization and calibration of lidars and ceilometers. Mobile reference lidars, laboratories for testing and characterization of optics and electronics, facilities for inspection and debugging of instruments, as well as for training in good practices are open to users from the scientific community, operational services and private sector. The Lidar Calibration Centre offers support for trans-national access through the EC HORIZON2020 project ACTRIS-2.

  3. Winnipeg Centre Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

    The Winnipeg Centre Project is a field-based, work-study program that attempts to create more appropriate education for the inner-city child. Sponsored by the Planning and Research Branch of the Department of Colleges and Universities Affairs and administered by Brandon University in consultation with the Winnipeg School Division, the project is…

  4. Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Molly; Gunton, Ric

    2000-01-01

    Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre (Ontario) has added year-round outdoor education facilities and programs to help support its summer camp for disadvantaged children. Schools, youth centers, religious groups, and athletic teams conduct their own programs, collaborate with staff, or use staff-developed programs emphasizing adventure education and personal…

  5. Implementing Responsibility Centre Budgeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vonasek, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Recently, institutes of higher education (universities) have shown a renewed interest in organisational structures and operating methodologies that generate productivity and innovation; responsibility centre budgeting (RCB) is one such process. This paper describes the underlying principles constituting RCB, its origin and structural elements, and…

  6. Wycheproof Education Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetnam and Godfrey, Melbourne (Australia).

    The Wycheproof township in New South Wales (Australia) is the regional center for a grain farming community. The Wycheproof Education Centre was formed by the merger of a separate primary and secondary school (on one site with existing buildings), into a single governing body that is educationally structured into junior, middle, and senior…

  7. Discovering a Discovery Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullagh, John; Stewart, James; Greenwood, Julian

    2007-01-01

    There has recently been a growth in the popularity of "science centres" and this development provides an excellent opportunity to support the primary science curriculum. Their use is therefore well worth including within initial teacher education courses. Hence, undergraduate student teachers at Stranmillis University College Belfast may…

  8. The Iranian Documentation Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, John F.

    The purpose of the Iranian Documentation Centr (Irandoc) was to collect that portion of the world's literature which was pertinent to Iran's research interests, to organize that material, and to promote its use by Iranian researchers. Stated more succinctly, Irandoc's purpose was to obtain ready access to the world's scientific literature in order…

  9. SPOT4 Management Centre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrune, Yves; Labbe, X.; Roussel, A.; Vielcanet, P.

    1994-01-01

    In the context of the CNES SPOT4 program CISI is particularly responsible for the development of the SPOT4 Management Centre, part of the SPOT4 ground control system located at CNES Toulouse (France) designed to provide simultaneous control over two satellites. The main operational activities are timed to synchronize with satellite visibilities (ten usable passes per day). The automatic capability of this system is achieved through agenda services (sequence of operations as defined and planned by operator). Therefore, the SPOT4 Management Centre offers limited, efficient and secure human interventions for supervision and decision making. This paper emphasizes the main system characteristics as degree of automation, level of dependability and system parameterization.

  10. Elderly Care Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagiman, Aliani; Haja Bava Mohidin, Hazrina; Ismail, Alice Sabrina

    2016-02-01

    The demand for elderly centre has increased tremendously abreast with the world demographic change as the number of senior citizens rose in the 21st century. This has become one of the most crucial problems of today's era. As the world progress into modernity, more and more people are occupied with daily work causing the senior citizens to lose the care that they actually need. This paper seeks to elucidate the best possible design of an elderly care centre with new approach in order to provide the best service for them by analysing their needs and suitable activities that could elevate their quality of life. All these findings will then be incorporated into design solutions so as to enhance the living environment for the elderly especially in Malaysian context.

  11. [The primary healthcare centres].

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Antonio; Maciocco, Gavino

    2014-04-01

    The central attributes of primary care are: first contact (accessibility), longitudinality (person- focused preventive and curative care overtime), patient-oriented comprehensiveness and coordination (including navigation towards secondary and tertiary care). Besides taking care of the needs of the individuals, primary health care teams are also looking at the community, especially when addressing social determinants of health. The rationale for the benefits for primary care for health has been found in: 1) greater access to needed services; 2) better quality of care; 3) a greater focus on prevention; 4) early management of health problems; 5) organizing and delivering high quality care for chronic non-communicable diseases. This paper describes the role of primary healthcare centres in strengthening community primary services and in reducing health inequalities. Furthemore, the experiences of Regional Health Services from Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna are discussed, with a brief overview of the literature.

  12. Should "Teacher Centred Teaching" Replace "Student Centred Learning"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Patrick D.

    2008-01-01

    Mission statements of most HEIs across the UK support "student centred learning". In this paper, it is suggested that "teacher centred teaching" should also have a major role to play, improving the quality of the learning experience in higher education. Students are extremely diverse in their skills, weaknesses, and learning…

  13. An observation of the effects of paraffin paste on nasal epistaxis balloons.

    PubMed

    Ong, C C; Odutoye, T

    1996-01-01

    There have been many conflicting reports on the effects of paraffin paste on rubber nasal balloons used in the treatment of epistaxis. We set up a bench top experiment to observe the effects of paraffin paste (Vaseline) on three types of commonly used nasal balloons, namely Brighton balloons, Simpson balloons and Foley catheters whilst simulating their use in clinical practice. Our observations show that paraffin paste damages the rubber balloons of Foley catheter and causes them to rupture within seventy-two hours. Brighton and Simpson balloons did not rupture during the five days of our study. We conclude that Brighton and Simpson epistaxis balloons are better designed to withstand rupture when used in conjunction with paraffin paste.

  14. CMCC Data Distribution Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisio, Giovanni; Fiore, Sandro; Negro, A.

    2010-05-01

    The CMCC Data Distribution Centre (DDC) is the primary entry point (web gateway) to the CMCC. It is a Data Grid Portal providing a ubiquitous and pervasive way to ease data publishing, climate metadata search, datasets discovery, metadata annotation, data access, data aggregation, sub-setting, etc. The grid portal security model includes the use of HTTPS protocol for secure communication with the client (based on X509v3 certificates that must be loaded into the browser) and secure cookies to establish and maintain user sessions. The CMCC DDC is now in a pre-production phase and it is currently used only by internal users (CMCC researchers and climate scientists). The most important component already available in the CMCC DDC is the Search Engine which allows users to perform, through web interfaces, distributed search and discovery activities by introducing one or more of the following search criteria: horizontal extent (which can be specified by interacting with a geographic map), vertical extent, temporal extent, keywords, topics, creation date, etc. By means of this page the user submits the first step of the query process on the metadata DB, then, she can choose one or more datasets retrieving and displaying the complete XML metadata description (from the browser). This way, the second step of the query process is carried out by accessing to a specific XML document of the metadata DB. Finally, through the web interface, the user can access to and download (partially or totally) the data stored on the storage device accessing to OPeNDAP servers and to other available grid storage interfaces. Requests concerning datasets stored in deep storage will be served asynchronously.

  15. RTEMS CENTRE - Support and Maintenance CENTRE to RTEMS Operating System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, H.; Constantino, A.; Mota, M.; Freitas, D.; Zulianello, M.

    2007-08-01

    Real Time Operating System for Multiprocessor Systems (RTEMS) CENTRE is a project under the ESA-Portugal Task Force aiming to develop a support and maintenance centre to RTEMS operating system. The project can be summarized in two main streams, first one related to design, development, maintenance and integration of tools to augment and sustain RTEMS operating system and second stream linked to the creation of technical competences with a support site to RTEMS operating system in Europe. RTEMS CENTRE intends to minimize the cost of the incorporation/integration of airborne and space applications in this Real Time Operating System. The centre started officially in the 15th of November 2006 and is currently in the study definition and system engineering phase.

  16. Minister unveils new nanotech centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumé, Belle

    2009-06-01

    Three new nanotechnology research centres are to be set up in France as part of a €70m government plan to help French companies in the sector. Researchers at the new centres, which will be located in Grenoble, Saclay (near Paris) and Toulouse, will be encouraged to collaborate with industry to develop new nanotech-based products. Dubbed NANO-INNOV, the new plan includes €46m for two new buildings at Saclay, with the rest being used to buy new equipment at the three centres and to fund grant proposals from staff to the French National Research Agency (ANR).

  17. The digital eczema centre utrecht.

    PubMed

    van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; van Veelen, Carien; Hover, Maaike; Eland-de Kok, Petra; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla; Sonnevelt, Gert-Jan; Mensing, Geert; Pasmans, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    The University Medical Centre Utrecht (UMC Utrecht) has developed an eczema portal that combines e-consulting, monitoring and self-management training by a dermatology nurse online for patients and parents of young children with atopic dermatitis (AD). Patient satisfaction with the portal was high. It could be extended to become a Digital Eczema Centre for multidisciplinary collaboration between health-care providers from different locations and the patient. Before starting the construction of the Digital Eczema Centre, the feasibility was examined by carrying out a business case analysis. The purposes, strength and weaknesses showed that the Digital Eczema Centre offered opportunities to improve care for patients with AD. The financial analysis resulted in a medium/best case scenario with a positive result of euro50-240,000 over a period of five years. We expect that the Digital Eczema Centre will increase the accessibility and quality of care. The web-based patient record and the digital chain-of-care promote the involvement of patients, parents and multidisciplinary teams as well as the continuity and coordination of care.

  18. Person-centred reflective practice.

    PubMed

    Devenny, Bob; Duffy, Kathleen

    Person-centred health and person-centred care have gained prominence across the UK following the publication of reports on public inquiries exploring failings in care. Self-awareness and participation in reflective practice are recognised as vital to supporting the person-centred agenda. This article presents an education framework for reflective practice, developed and used in one NHS board in Scotland, and based on the tenets of the clinical pastoral education movement. Providing an insight into the usefulness of a spiritual component in the reflective process, the framework provides an opportunity for nurses and other healthcare professionals to examine the spiritual dimensions of patient encounters, their own values and beliefs, and the effect these may have on their practice.

  19. Rapid Service/Prediction Centre

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    respect to the 05 C04 system of the IERS Earth Orientation Centre (EOC) at the Paris Observatory by way of a robust linear estimator. Statistical...of each individual data point. The software computes the spline coefficients for every data point, which are then used to interpolate the Earth ...between daily rapid solutions at each daily solution epoch for 2008 and the Earth orientation parameters available in 05 C04 series produced in March 2009

  20. National Centre for Radio Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    India's National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA), located on the Pune University Campus, is part of the TATA INSTITUTE OF FUNDAMENTAL RESEARCH. At Khodad, 80 km from Pune, NCRA has set up the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), the world's largest telescope operating at meter wavelengths. GMRT consists of 30 fully steerable dishes of 45 m diameter, spread over a 25 km area. Another meter...

  1. 76 FR 58409 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... under the criteria of section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning... Hall, 260 Broadway, New York, NY 10007. Monroe Town of Pittsford (11- December 2, 2010; The Honorable William A. May 24, 2011 360429 02-0382P). December 9, 2010; Carpenter, Supervisor, The Brighton- Town...

  2. Auditing and Evaluating University-Community Engagement: Lessons from a UK Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Angie; Northmore, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The growing importance of community and public engagement activities in universities has led to an increasing emphasis on auditing and evaluating university-community partnerships. However, the development of effective audit and evaluation tools is still at a formative stage. This article presents a case study of the University of Brighton's…

  3. Research Leadership for the Community-Engaged University: Key Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Angie; Church, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    In Great Britain, attempts to broaden university-community engagement have taken significant steps in recent years. A wide variety of community-engagement structures and activities are now emerging. This paper uses one innovative example--University of Brighton's Community-University Partnership Program--to describe the opportunities and probe the…

  4. 77 FR 37321 - Safety Zone, Barrel Recovery, Lake Superior; Duluth, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Barrel Recovery, Lake Superior; Duluth, MN... in the 1960's in a portion of Lake Superior approximately between Stoney Point and Brighton Beach... munitions waste materials dumped offshore in a portion of Lake Superior approximately 50 years ago....

  5. Recent advances in thin-layer chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Dallas, F.A.A.; Read, H.; Ruane, R.J.; Wilson, I.D.

    1988-01-01

    This book is a collection of proceedings from the 1987 Chromatographic Society International Symposium on Thin-Layer Chromatography in Brighton. The book is divided into four sections: Instrumentation, Radio-Thin-Layer Chromatography, Sorbents and Modifiers, and Applications. References date from the 1970s to the mid-1980s. Compounds and subject indexes are included.

  6. 4. O'BRIAN CANAL/SECOND CREEK INTERSECTION Second Creek is in the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. O'BRIAN CANAL/SECOND CREEK INTERSECTION Second Creek is in the foreground; the O'Brian Canal is in the background; vicinity of East 112th Avenue and Potomac Road in Adams County - O'Brian Canal, South Platte River Drainage Area Northest of Denver, Brighton, Adams County, CO

  7. 1. O'BRIAN CANAL/BURLINGTON DITCH BIFURCATION POINT The Burlington Ditch is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. O'BRIAN CANAL/BURLINGTON DITCH BIFURCATION POINT The Burlington Ditch is being diverted to the left; the O'Brian Canal being diverted to the right - O'Brian Canal, South Platte River Drainage Area Northest of Denver, Brighton, Adams County, CO

  8. 2. O'BRIAN CANAL/BURLINGTON DITCH BIFURCATION POINT The Burlington Ditch is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. O'BRIAN CANAL/BURLINGTON DITCH BIFURCATION POINT The Burlington Ditch is in the foreground; the O'Brian Canal is in the background - O'Brian Canal, South Platte River Drainage Area Northest of Denver, Brighton, Adams County, CO

  9. LIFE CYCLE IMPACT ASSESSMENT WORKSHOP SUMMARY - MIDPOINTS VERSUS ENDPOINTS: THE SACRIFICES AND BENEFITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    On 5/25-26/2000 in Brighton, England, the third international workshop was held under the umbrella of UNEP addressing issues in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA). The workshop provided a forum for experts to discuss midpoint vs. endpoint modeling. Midpoints are considered to be...

  10. Growing through Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Barbara J.

    "Growing through Literature" is a curriculum using Joan M. and Erik H. Erikson's theory of the Life Cycle as a structure for selecting and teaching literature to inner-city high school students at Brighton High School in Massachusetts. The program consists of four component parts: Journals, Selected Stories, Discussion, and…

  11. 76 FR 10328 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Vestas Nacelles America, Inc. (Wind Turbine Nacelles, Hubs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... manufacturing and warehousing of wind turbine nacelles, hubs, blades and towers at the Vestas Nacelles America... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Vestas Nacelles America, Inc. (Wind Turbine Nacelles, Hubs, Blades and Towers), Brighton, Denver, Pueblo, and Windsor, CO Pursuant to...

  12. 78 FR 55057 - Authorization of Production Activity, Foreign-Trade Subzone 123E, Vestas Nacelles America, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Authorization of Production Activity, Foreign-Trade Subzone 123E, Vestas Nacelles America, Inc., (Wind Turbines), Brighton, Denver, Pueblo, and Windsor, Colorado On May 3,...

  13. From Answer Garden to Answer Jungle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dron, Jon; Mitchell, Richard; Siviter, Phil

    1998-01-01

    The use of Usenet newsgroups in a computing and information systems classroom at the University of Brighton showed how Internet-based learning systems can encourage rapid evolution so that resources adapt to learners' needs. Although not always used as intended, and including off-topic distractions, newsgroups did accommodate learning styles and…

  14. 75 FR 67770 - Sara Lee Corporation Including On-Site Leased Workers From EDS, Hewitt Packard, Sapphire...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... Technology, Select Staffing, TekSystems, the Brighton Group, Trasys, VIP Staffing, and Workforce Temps, Earth... and Earth City, Missouri locations of the subject firm are eligible to be included in this..., Earth City, Missouri. The amended notice applicable to TA-W-71,499, TA-W-71,499A, and TA- W-71,499B...

  15. EPA SITE DEMONSTRATION OF BIOTROL AQUEOUS TREATMENT SYSTEM.

    EPA Science Inventory

    BioTrol's pilot scale, fixed-film biological system wa evaluated, under the EPA's SITE program, for its effectiveness at removing pentachlorophenol from groundwater. The demonstration wasa performed in the summer of 1989 at a wood preserving site in New Brighton, Minnesota. The ...

  16. 75 FR 5283 - Foreign-Trade Zone 123 - Denver, Colorado, Application for Subzone, Vestas Nacelles America, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... Nacelles America, Inc. (Wind Turbine Nacelles, Hubs, Blades and Towers), Brighton, Denver, Pueblo, and...) located at 100 Tower Drive, Pueblo; and, Site 4 - warehouse wind turbine components (119,983 sq.ft./5.6... would include manufacturing, testing, packaging and warehousing of wind turbines and related parts...

  17. 78 FR 31517 - Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Vestas Nacelles America, Inc.; Subzone 123E (Wind...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... Proposed Production Activity; Vestas Nacelles America, Inc.; Subzone 123E (Wind Turbines); Brighton, Denver... wind turbines and related products (nacelles, hubs, blades, and towers) under FTZ procedures using... during customs entry procedures that apply to wind turbines, nacelles, hubs, blades, and towers (free,...

  18. You Live, You Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biesta, Gert

    2008-01-01

    The Learning Lives project, a four-year study into the learning biographies and trajectories of adults, was conducted by a team of researchers from the universities of Stirling, Exeter, Brighton and Leeds as part of the Teaching and Learning Research Programme (TLRP) of the Economic and Social Research Council, and has just been completed. Whereas…

  19. View of plate girder spans at north end, looking west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of plate girder spans at north end, looking west from beneath state route 18 bridge (which lies along previous alignment of Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railway). - Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railway, Beaver River Bridge, Spanning Beaver River along line of Second Avenue, New Brighton, Beaver County, PA

  20. Evidence for parallel elongated structures in the mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, G. W.; Brosnahan, J. W.; Walden, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    The physical cause of partial reflection from the mesosphere is of interest. Data are presented from an image-forming radar at Brighton, Colorado, that suggest that some of the radar scattering is caused by parallel elongated structures lying almost directly overhead. Possible physical sources for such structures include gravity waves and roll vortices.

  1. Sustainability by Design: A Reflection on the Suitability of Pedagogic Practice in Design and Engineering Courses in the Teaching of Sustainable Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Richard; Childs, Peter; Hamilton, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Courses in product design are offered within the United Kingdom at the University of Brighton and the University of Sussex and in both cases are run within engineering departments alongside traditional engineering courses. This paper outlines some of the intrinsic pedagogic practices that are employed by these, and other, design courses. It…

  2. Universities and Education in the Post-Recession Economy: Report of a Seminar Organised by Universities UK. Seminar Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Conor

    2010-01-01

    Universities UK organised a seminar in Brighton in April 2010, bringing together vice-chancellors, researchers and policymakers to take a close look at the implications of the global and national economic crisis for both the UK economy and higher education. It also examined the changing nature of student demand in a post-recession economy. This…

  3. Getting to Yes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Dennis O.

    This report describes a problem-solving approach to grievance settling and negotiations developed in the Brighton, Michigan, school district and inspired by the book, "Getting To Yes," by Roger Fisher and William Ury. In this approach teachers and administrators come to the table not with fixed positions but with problems both sides want…

  4. Computation of Non-Isentropic Internal Flows with Variable Density

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    development has been focused on the aerothermodynamics aspects of the code. Development of the reactive flow facilities ( chemistry , kinetics) should now...Journal, Vol 27, NO 9, Pages 1167-1174, September 1989. 5 HUGHES, W. F., and BRIGHTON, J. A.; "Fluid Dynamics", Schaum Pub. Co., New 0 York, 1967. 6

  5. "I 'See' Trayvon Martin": What Teachers Can Learn from the Tragic Death of a Young Black Male

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Bettina L.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this article is to examine the racially hostile environment of U.S. public schooling towards Black males. Drawing on the work of Foucault ("Discipline and punish. The birth of the prison," Penguin Books, London, 1977; "Michel Foucault: beyond structuralism and hermeneutics," The Harvester Press, Brighton, 1982)…

  6. Learning by Doing: Teaching Research Methods through Student Participation in a Commissioned Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winn, Sandra

    1995-01-01

    For five years, a University of Brighton (England) social policy and administration program has incorporated a student research project into a required research methods course. The sponsored research project places considerable emphasis on student contributions to the research. These features are discussed in the context of one project, a patient…

  7. Enlisting Excel--Again

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parramore, Keith

    2009-01-01

    In Volume 26, Number 2, we reported on a group case study run for level 3 mathematics students at the University of Brighton. At the core of the study was a quadratic assignment problem, and we reported on attempts by students to use Excel to solve the problem, and on the attendant difficulties. We provided an elegant solution. In this article, we…

  8. Urban Teacher Education in Partnership: An Inquiry Stance Sustains Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stairs, Andrea J.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between Brighton High School (BHS) and Boston College (BC) spans several decades. Professors from multiple departments at the university--not only teacher educators but professors of psychology, measurement, and arts and sciences--have walked, as regular parts of the school community, the halls of the gothic-style high school…

  9. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.

    PubMed

    Evans, Roger

    2014-11-04

    The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control was set up in 2005 to strengthen Europe's defences against infectious diseases. The centre is an independent agency of the European Union and is based in Stockholm, Sweden.

  10. The DEMETER Science Mission Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagoutte, D.; Brochot, J. Y.; de Carvalho, D.; Elie, F.; Harivelo, F.; Hobara, Y.; Madrias, L.; Parrot, M.; Pinçon, J. L.; Berthelier, J. J.; Peschard, D.; Seran, E.; Gangloff, M.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Lebreton, J. P.; Stverak, S.; Travnicek, P.; Grygorczuk, J.; Slominski, J.; Wronowski, R.; Barbier, S.; Bernard, P.; Gaboriaud, A.; Wallut, J. M.

    2006-04-01

    The DEMETER Scientific Mission Centre (SMC) has been developed and is operated by the Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l'Environnement (LPCE). The SMC commands the instruments of the scientific payload, collects and distributes DEMETER data and associated products to the DEMETER international community. The SMC has been designed to maximize scientific return and to reduce development and exploitation costs for the DEMETER project. This paper describes the SMC's data processing system, data server and methods of payload operation, and presents associated hardware and software architectures.

  11. Perceptual centres in speech - an acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Sophie Kerttu

    Perceptual centres, or P-centres, represent the perceptual moments of occurrence of acoustic signals - the 'beat' of a sound. P-centres underlie the perception and production of rhythm in perceptually regular speech sequences. P-centres have been modelled both in speech and non speech (music) domains. The three aims of this thesis were toatest out current P-centre models to determine which best accounted for the experimental data bto identify a candidate parameter to map P-centres onto (a local approach) as opposed to the previous global models which rely upon the whole signal to determine the P-centre the final aim was to develop a model of P-centre location which could be applied to speech and non speech signals. The first aim was investigated by a series of experiments in which a) speech from different speakers was investigated to determine whether different models could account for variation between speakers b) whether rendering the amplitude time plot of a speech signal affects the P-centre of the signal c) whether increasing the amplitude at the offset of a speech signal alters P-centres in the production and perception of speech. The second aim was carried out by a) manipulating the rise time of different speech signals to determine whether the P-centre was affected, and whether the type of speech sound ramped affected the P-centre shift b) manipulating the rise time and decay time of a synthetic vowel to determine whether the onset alteration was had more affect on P-centre than the offset manipulation c) and whether the duration of a vowel affected the P-centre, if other attributes (amplitude, spectral contents) were held constant. The third aim - modelling P-centres - was based on these results. The Frequency dependent Amplitude Increase Model of P-centre location (FAIM) was developed using a modelling protocol, the APU GammaTone Filterbank and the speech from different speakers. The P-centres of the stimuli corpus were highly predicted by attributes of

  12. Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, G.; Potukuchi, P.; Roy, A.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne is collaborating with the Nuclear Science Centre (NSC), New Delhi, to develop a new type of superconducting accelerating structure for low-velocity heavy ions. A copper model has been evaluated and tests on the niobium prototype are currently in progress. Some technical details of this project are described in the Superconducting Linac Development section of this report. All funding for the prototype has come from the NSC, and they have also stationed two staff members at ATLAS for the past two years to gain experience and work on this project. Additional NSC personnel visited ATLAS for extended periods during 1994 for electronics and cryogenics experience and training. Two NSC staff members are scheduled to spend several months at ANL during 1995 to continue tests and developments of the prototype resonators and to initiate fabrication of the production models for their linac project.

  13. The International Centre for Theoretical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Faheem

    2008-07-01

    This talk traces in brief the genesis of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, as one of Prof. Abdus Salam's major achievements. It outlines why Salam felt the necessity for establishing such a centre to help physicists in the developing world. It situates the founding of the Centre within Salam's broader vision of the causes of underdevelopment and of science as an engine for scientific, technological, economic and social development. The talk reviews the successes and failures of the ICTP and gives a brief overall view of the current status of the Centre.

  14. The Press Research Centre, 1956-1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press Research Centre, Krakow (Poland).

    In 1956, the Press Research Centre was established in Cracow, Poland by a group of journalists and publishers, for the purpose of instituting press research that would have practical applications. The aims of the Centre were to conduct studies on the history of the Polish press, the contemporary press, press readership, and editorial techniques.…

  15. The Irish Centre for Talented Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilheany, Sheila

    2005-01-01

    Conducting potency tests on penicillin, discussing rocket technology with a NASA astronaut, analysing animal bone fragments from medieval times, these are just some of the activities which occupy the time of students at The Irish Centre for Talented Youth. The Centre identifies young students with exceptional academic ability and then provides…

  16. The European standards of Haemophilia Centres

    PubMed Central

    Giangrande, Paul; Calizzani, Gabriele; Menichini, Ivana; Candura, Fabio; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Makris, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The European haemophilia community of professionals and patients has agreed on the principles of haemophilia care to address comprehensive optimal delivery of care which is nowadays scattered throughout Europe. Many of the health facilities call themselves Haemophilia Centres despite their variation in size, expertise and services provided. Only a small number of countries have Haemophilia Centre accreditation systems in place. Methods In the framework of the European Haemophilia Network project, following an inclusive process of stakeholder involvement, the European Guidelines for the certification of haemophilia centres have been developed in order to set quality standards for European Haemophilia Centres and criteria for their certification. Results The Guidelines define the standards and criteria for the designation of two levels of care delivery: European Haemophilia Treatment Centres, providing local routine care, and European Haemophilia Comprehensive Care Centres, providing specialised and multi-disciplinary care and functioning as tertiary referral centres. Additionally, they define standards about general requirements, patient care, provision of an advisory service and establishment of network of clinical and specialised services. Conclusions The implementation of the European Guidelines for the certification of Haemophilia Centres will contribute to the reduction of health inequalities through the standardisation of quality of care in European Union Member States and could represent a model to be taken into consideration for other rare disease groups. PMID:24922293

  17. Promotion in Call Centres: Opportunities and Determinants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorjup, Maria Tatiana; Valverde, Mireia; Ryan, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the quality of jobs in call centres by focusing on the opportunities for promotion in this sector. More specifically, the research questions focus on discovering whether promotion is common practise in the call centre sector and on identifying the factors that affect this.…

  18. The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Nicholas M.; Schade, D.; Astronomy Data Centre, Canadian

    2011-01-01

    The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC) is the world's largest astronomical data center, holding over 0.5 Petabytes of information, and serving nearly 3000 astronomers worldwide. Its current data collections include BLAST, CFHT, CGPS, FUSE, Gemini, HST, JCMT, MACHO, MOST, and numerous other archives and services. It provides extensive data archiving, curation, and processing expertise, via projects such as MegaPipe, and enables substantial day-to-day collaboration between resident astronomers and computer specialists. It is a stable, powerful, persistent, and properly supported environment for the storage and processing of large volumes of data, a condition that is now absolutely vital for their science potential to be exploited by the community. Through initiatives such as the Common Archive Observation Model (CAOM), the Canadian Virtual Observatory (CVO), and the Canadian Advanced Network for Astronomical Research (CANFAR), the CADC is at the global forefront of advancing astronomical research through improved data services. The CAOM aims to provide homogeneous data access, and hence viable interoperability between a potentially unlimited number of different data collections, at many wavelengths. It is active in the definition of numerous emerging standards within the International Virtual Observatory, and several datasets are already available. The CANFAR project is an initiative to make cloud computing for storage and data-intensive processing available to the community. It does this via a Virtual Machine environment that is equivalent to managing a local desktop. Several groups are already processing science data. CADC is also at the forefront of advanced astronomical data analysis, driven by the science requirements of astronomers both locally and further afield. The emergence of 'Astroinformatics' promises to provide not only utility items like object classifications, but to directly enable new science by accessing previously undiscovered or intractable

  19. Big Surveys, Big Data Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, D.

    2016-06-01

    Well-designed astronomical surveys are powerful and have consistently been keystones of scientific progress. The Byurakan Surveys using a Schmidt telescope with an objective prism produced a list of about 3000 UV-excess Markarian galaxies but these objects have stimulated an enormous amount of further study and appear in over 16,000 publications. The CFHT Legacy Surveys used a wide-field imager to cover thousands of square degrees and those surveys are mentioned in over 1100 publications since 2002. Both ground and space-based astronomy have been increasing their investments in survey work. Survey instrumentation strives toward fair samples and large sky coverage and therefore strives to produce massive datasets. Thus we are faced with the "big data" problem in astronomy. Survey datasets require specialized approaches to data management. Big data places additional challenging requirements for data management. If the term "big data" is defined as data collections that are too large to move then there are profound implications for the infrastructure that supports big data science. The current model of data centres is obsolete. In the era of big data the central problem is how to create architectures that effectively manage the relationship between data collections, networks, processing capabilities, and software, given the science requirements of the projects that need to be executed. A stand alone data silo cannot support big data science. I'll describe the current efforts of the Canadian community to deal with this situation and our successes and failures. I'll talk about how we are planning in the next decade to try to create a workable and adaptable solution to support big data science.

  20. Review of CERN Data Centre Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, P.; Bell, T.; van Eldik, J.; McCance, G.; Panzer-Steindel, B.; Coelho dos Santos, M.; Traylen and, S.; Schwickerath, U.

    2012-12-01

    The CERN Data Centre is reviewing strategies for optimizing the use of the existing infrastructure and expanding to a new data centre by studying how other large sites are being operated. Over the past six months, CERN has been investigating modern and widely-used tools and procedures used for virtualisation, clouds and fabric management in order to reduce operational effort, increase agility and support unattended remote data centres. This paper gives the details on the project's motivations, current status and areas for future investigation.

  1. Planetary Radars Operating Centre PROC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catallo, C.; Flamini, E.; Seu, R.; Alberti, G.

    2007-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using Ground Penetrating Radars (GPR) plays an important role in Italy. Numerous scientific international space programs are currently carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Three important experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry), provided by ASI either as contribution to ESA programs either within a NASA/ASI joint venture framework, are now operating: MARSIS on-board Mars Express, SHARAD on-board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft. In order to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation three Italian dedicated operational centers have been realized, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD ( Processing Altimetry Data). Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution. Although they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). PROC is conceived in order to include the three operational centers, namely SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD, either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view. The Planetary Radar Processing Center shall be conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs. Therefore, scalability, easy use and management shall be the design drivers. The paper describes how PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. Furthermore, in the frame of

  2. Towards Human-Centred Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannon, Liam J.

    The field of HCI has evolved and expanded dramatically since its origin in the early 1980’s. The HCI community embraces a large community of researchers and practitioners around the world, from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds in the human and social sciences, engineering and informatics, and more recently, the arts and design disciplines. This kaleidoscope of cultures and disciplines as seen at INTERACT Conferences provides a rich pool of resources for examining our field. Applications are increasingly exploring our full range of sensory modalities, and merging the digital and physical worlds. WiFi has opened up a huge design space for mobile applications. A focus on usability of products and services has been complemented by an emphasis on engagement, enjoyment and experience. With the advent of ubiquitous computing, and the emergence of “The Internet of Things”, new kinds of more open infrastructures make possible radically new kinds of applications. The sources of innovation have also broadened, to include human and social actors outside of the computing and design organizations. The question is to what extent is our mainstream thinking in the HCI field ready for the challenges of this Brave New World? Do the technological and social innovations that we see emerging require us to re-shape, or even, re-create, our field, or is it a case of a more gradual evolution and development of that which we already know? In this closing Keynote, I will provide a perspective on the evolution and development of the HCI field, looking backwards as well as forwards, in order to determine what are some of the changes of significance in the field. This “broad-brush” approach to what I term “ human-centred design” will be complemented by the examination of specific projects and applications, to help anchor some of the discussion. Areas such as user-centred design, participatory design, computer-supported cooperative work and learning, and interaction design, in

  3. Identity Theft: A Study in Contact Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, Iain; Weir, George R. S.

    This paper explores the recent phenomenon of identity theft. In particular, it examines the contact centre environment as a mechanism for this to occur. Through a survey that was conducted amongst forty-five contact centre workers in the Glasgow area we determined that contact centres can and do provide a mechanism for identity theft. Specifically, we found a particularly high incidence of agents who had previously dealt with phone calls that they considered suspicious. Furthermore, there are agents within such environments who have previously been offered money in exchange for customers' details, or who know of fellow workers who received such offers. Lastly, we identify specific practices within contact centres that may contribute to the likelihood of identity theft.

  4. Perspectives on recycling centres and future developments.

    PubMed

    Engkvist, I-L; Eklund, J; Krook, J; Björkman, M; Sundin, E

    2016-11-01

    The overall aim of this paper is to draw combined, all-embracing conclusions based on a long-term multidisciplinary research programme on recycling centres in Sweden, focussing on working conditions, environment and system performance. A second aim is to give recommendations for their development of new and existing recycling centres and to discuss implications for the future design and organisation. Several opportunities for improvement of recycling centres were identified, such as design, layout, ease with which users could sort their waste, the work environment, conflicting needs and goals within the industry, and industrialisation. Combining all results from the research, which consisted of different disciplinary aspects, made it possible to analyse and elucidate their interrelations. Waste sorting quality was recognized as the most prominent improvement field in the recycling centre system. The research identified the importance of involving stakeholders with different perspectives when planning a recycling centre in order to get functionality and high performance. Practical proposals of how to plan and build recycling centres are given in a detailed checklist.

  5. The Imperial College Thermophysical Properties Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, S.; Cole, W. A.; Craven, R.; de Reuck, K. M.; Trengove, R. D.; Wakeham, W. A.

    1986-07-01

    The IUPAC Thermodynamic Tables Project Centre in London has at its disposal considerable expertise on the production and utilization of high-accuracy equations of state which represent the thermodynamic properties of substances. For some years they have been content to propagate this information by the traditional method of book production, but the increasing use of the computer in industry for process design has shown that an additional method was needed. The setting up of the IUPAC Transport Properties Project Centre, also at Imperial College, whose products would also be in demand by industry, afforded the occasion for a new look at the problem. The solution has been to set up the Imperial College Thermophysical Properties Data Centre, which embraces the two IUPAC Project Centres, and for it to establish a link with the existing Physical Properties Data Service of the Institution of Chemical Engineers, thus providing for the dissemination of the available information without involving the Centres in problems such as those of marketing and advertising. This paper outlines the activities of the Centres and discusses the problems in bringing their products to the attention of industry in suitable form.

  6. CMS centres worldwide: A new collaborative infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Lucas; Gottschalk, Erik; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Experiment at the LHC is establishing a global network of inter-connected 'CMS Centres' for controls, operations and monitoring. These support: (1) CMS data quality monitoring, detector calibrations, and analysis; and (2) computing operations for the processing, storage and distribution of CMS data. We describe the infrastructure, computing, software, and communications systems required to create an effective and affordable CMS Centre. We present our highly successful operations experiences with the major CMS Centres at CERN, Fermilab, and DESY during the LHC first beam data-taking and cosmic ray commissioning work. The status of the various centres already operating or under construction in Asia, Europe, Russia, South America, and the USA is also described. We emphasise the collaborative communications aspects. For example, virtual co-location of experts in CMS Centres Worldwide is achieved using high-quality permanently-running 'telepresence' video links. Generic Web-based tools have been developed and deployed for monitoring, control, display management and outreach.

  7. Optimizing Data Centre Energy and Environmental Costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikema, David Hendrik

    Data centres use an estimated 2% of US electrical power which accounts for much of their total cost of ownership. This consumption continues to grow, further straining power grids attempting to integrate more renewable energy. This dissertation focuses on assessing and reducing data centre environmental and financial costs. Emissions of projects undertaken to lower the data centre environmental footprints can be assessed and the emission reduction projects compared using an ISO-14064-2-compliant greenhouse gas reduction protocol outlined herein. I was closely involved with the development of the protocol. Full lifecycle analysis and verifying that projects exceed business-as-usual expectations are addressed, and a test project is described. Consuming power when it is low cost or when renewable energy is available can be used to reduce the financial and environmental costs of computing. Adaptation based on the power price showed 10--50% potential savings in typical cases, and local renewable energy use could be increased by 10--80%. Allowing a fraction of high-priority tasks to proceed unimpeded still allows significant savings. Power grid operators use mechanisms called ancillary services to address variation and system failures, paying organizations to alter power consumption on request. By bidding to offer these services, data centres may be able to lower their energy costs while reducing their environmental impact. If providing contingency reserves which require only infrequent action, savings of up to 12% were seen in simulations. Greater power cost savings are possible for those ceding more control to the power grid operator. Coordinating multiple data centres adds overhead, and altering at which data centre requests are processed based on changes in the financial or environmental costs of power is likely to increase this overhead. Tests of virtual machine migrations showed that in some cases there was no visible increase in power use while in others power use

  8. Bureaucracy, professionalization and school centred innovation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Paul

    1990-03-01

    This paper examines an attempt to promote a school centred innovation strategy within a highly centralized educational system. The School Based Curriculum Project Scheme, which was introduced into Hong Kong in 1988, is analysed in terms of a professional-bureaucratic dichotomy. It is argued that the operational details of the scheme are designed to satisfy a range of bureaucratic concerns and these are not conducive to promoting the professional work ethic which is required for school centred innovation. Finally the paper identifies the implications which arise for policies designed to promote curriculum innovation.

  9. Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory as Cultural Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Farmanyan, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    NAS RA V. Ambartsumian Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory is presented as a cultural centre for Armenia and the Armenian nation in general. Besides being scientific and educational centre, the Observatory is famous for its unique architectural ensemble, rich botanical garden and world of birds, as well as it is one of the most frequently visited sightseeing of Armenia. In recent years, the Observatory has also taken the initiative of the coordination of the Cultural Astronomy in Armenia and in this field, unites the astronomers, historians, archaeologists, ethnographers, culturologists, literary critics, linguists, art historians and other experts.

  10. Writing Centre Tutoring Sessions: Addressing Students' Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winder, Roger; Kathpalia, Sujata S.; Koo, Swit Ling

    2016-01-01

    The guiding principle behind university writing centres is to focus on the process of writing rather than the finished product, prioritising higher order concerns related to organisation and argumentation of texts rather than lower order concerns of grammar and punctuation. Using survey-based data, this paper examines students' concerns regarding…

  11. Person-Centred (Deictic) Expressions and Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, R. Peter; Garcia-Perez, Rosa M.; Lee, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    We employed semi-structured tests to determine whether children with autism produce and comprehend deictic (person-centred) expressions such as "this"/"tilde" "here"/"there" and "come"/"go", and whether they understand atypical non-verbal gestural deixis in the form of directed head-nods to indicate location. In Study 1, most participants…

  12. Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) draws up, proposes and conducts France's space policy. Its role is to develop the uses of space, to meet the civilian and military needs of public bodies and of the scientific community, and to foster the development and dissemination of new applications, designed to create wealth and jobs....

  13. Crystallographic Data Centre Services and Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambridge Univ. (England). Chemical Lab.

    The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre is concerned with the retrieval, evaluation, synthesis, and dissemination of structural data based on diffraction methods. The source of input is almost entirely primary journals. Bibliographic information and numeric data on crystal and molecular structures are on magnetic tapes. The bibliographic file…

  14. Examining Whiteness in a Children's Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Verity; Watson, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    This article utilises critical whiteness theory to explore the ethnic discourses observed in a children's centre in South London. Whilst critical whiteness has been used as a framework to understand race, racism and multiculturalism in a number of settings, including education, there are few studies that have sought to understand ethnicity in…

  15. Visiting a science centre: what's on offer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Ian

    1990-09-01

    Science centres are a valuable resource, used more frequently by family groups and primary school parties than by secondary schools. The importance of affective learning, involving attitude changes, is stressed. Provided the right approach is used, accompanying adults can help children get the most out of a visit.

  16. Cactus: The Centres of a Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    2009-01-01

    This is the first of two articles which describe how to use "JavaSketchPad" to explore the centres of a triangle. This introductory exercise is suggested in the GSP "Workshop Guide". Students can use "JavaSketchPad Interactive Geometry" (JSP) at home at no cost. They are likely to impress their parents with their enthusiasm for geometry and all…

  17. Oo-Za-We-Kwun Centre Incorporated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findlay, P. R.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Centre is described as being designed to help native people participate more effectively in a modern Canadian environment. The residential family program includes a five-week Life Skills course followed by a two-year transfer of learning period during which counseling, paid employment, and community activities are available. (Author/MS)

  18. Industry Restructuring: Extracts from Centre Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, William C., Ed.

    This document contains excerpts from material previously published by Australia's TAFE (Technical and Further Education) National Centre for Research and Development on the subjects of industry restructuring, the reasons for restructuring, revising curricula, and providing a service to business and industry. Its contents are "Industry…

  19. Self Assessment and Student-Centred Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Betty

    2012-01-01

    This paper seeks to show how self assessment facilitates student-centred learning (SCL) and fills a gap in the literature. Two groups of students were selected from a single class in a tertiary educational institution. The control group of 25 was selected randomly by the tossing of an unbiased coin (heads = control group). They were trained in the…

  20. In the Field: The Canadian Ecology Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magee, Clare

    2000-01-01

    The Canadian Ecology Centre (Ontario) offers year-round residential and day programs in outdoor and environmental education for secondary students, field placement and internship opportunities for college students, and ecotourism programs, while providing employment and tax revenues to the local community. Dubbed consensus environmentalism, the…

  1. Centring the Subject in Order to Educate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, R. Scott

    2007-01-01

    It is important for educators to recognise that the various calls to decentre the subject--or self--should not be interpreted as necessarily requiring the removal of the subject altogether. Through the individualism of the Enlightenment the self was centred. This highly individualistic notion of the sovereign self has now been decentred especially…

  2. Myanmar: The Community Learning Centre Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middelborg, Jorn; Duvieusart, Baudouin, Ed.

    A community learning centre (CLC) is a local educational institution outside the formal education system, usually set up and managed by local people. CLCs were first introduced in Myanmar in 1994, and by 2001 there were 71 CLCs in 11 townships. The townships are characterized by remoteness, landlessness, unemployment, dependency on one cash crop,…

  3. Early Childhood Centre Administrator Certification. Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, E. Elaine

    This document presents the process for obtaining certification for the position of early childhood centre administrator (ECCA) in Nova Scotia, Canada. Following an introduction describing the development of the process and its pilot testing, Chapter 1 of the document details the four-step process: (1) application, including training in the ECCA…

  4. Collaborating at a distance: operations centres, tools, and trends

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, Erik E.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Successful operation of the LHC and its experiments is crucial to the future of the worldwide high-energy physics program. Remote operations and monitoring centres have been established for the CMS experiment in several locations around the world. The development of remote centres began with the LHC{at}FNAL ROC and has evolved into a unified approach with distributed centres that are collectively referred to as 'CMS Centres Worldwide'. An overview of the development of remote centres for CMS will be presented, along with a synopsis of collaborative tools that are used in these centres today and trends in the development of remote operations capabilities for high-energy physics.

  5. User-Centred Design Using Gamestorming.

    PubMed

    Currie, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    User-centered design (UX) is becoming a standard in software engineering and has tremendous potential in healthcare. The purpose of this tutorial will be to demonstrate and provide participants with practice in user-centred design methods that involve 'Gamestorming', a form of brainstorming where 'the rules of life are temporarily suspended'. Participants will learn and apply gamestorming methods including persona development via empathy mapping and methods to translate artefacts derived from participatory design sessions into functional and design requirements.

  6. [Accidental intracerebral penetration of a nasal hemostatic probe].

    PubMed

    Adam, J C; Mauchaufee, J C; Potard, G; L'Azou, D

    1999-04-01

    We report a case of inadvertent intracerebral introduction of a haemostatic device (Brighton tube) inserted into a nasal cavity for control of epistaxis in a patient with major craniofacial trauma. This complication remained unrecognized in the unconscious patient until the subsequent CT-scan control. In unconscious patients with a major facial trauma, intranasal haemostatic probes should be inserted under direct visual control by a ENT specialist and their position checked by digital palpation of the inflated cuffs behind the soft palate.

  7. Distributed Surface Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    potential improvement in air defense for the armada, the SSC would be capable of plunging deeper into A2AD environments. In addition to the new ...Environment. http://www.brighton-webs.co.uk/distributions/triangular. British Broadcasting Company. 2014, May 08. BBC News Asia . http://www.bbc.com... news /world- asia -pacific-13748349. Cavas, Christopher P. 2014, January 19. Navy, Pentagon battle over LCS future. www.navytimes.com/article/20140109

  8. A Framework for Seamless Interoperation of Heterogeneous Distributed Software Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Behavior Models, Proceedings of the European Conference on Artificial Intelligence ECAI-98, Workshop on Spatial and Temporal Reasoning, Brighton...appropriate technique, based on artificial intelligence and statistics, re- components can be selected from a repository. However, duces the design space...Projects, such as Agent TCL [8], etc., based on the principles of intelligent agents have imbibed the notion of the quality of service and related

  9. Yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Roger E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess those published cases of yellow fever (YF) vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease that meet the Brighton Collaboration criteria and to assess the safety of YF vaccine with respect to viscerotropic disease. Literature search Ten electronic databases were searched with no restriction of date or language and reference lists of retrieved articles. Methods All abstracts and titles were independently read by two reviewers and data independently entered by two reviewers. Results All serious adverse events that met the Brighton Classification criteria were associated with first YF vaccinations. Sixty-two published cases (35 died) met the Brighton Collaboration viscerotropic criteria, with 32 from the US, six from Brazil, five from Peru, three from Spain, two from the People’s Republic of China, one each from Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Ecuador, France, Germany, Ireland, New Zealand, Portugal, and the UK, and four with no country stated. Two cases met both the viscerotropic and YF vaccine-associated neurologic disease criteria. Seventy cases proposed by authors as viscerotropic disease did not meet any Brighton Collaboration viscerotropic level of diagnostic certainty or any YF vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease causality criteria (37 died). Conclusion Viscerotropic disease is rare in the published literature and in pharmacovigilance databases. All published cases were from developing countries. Because the symptoms are usually very severe and life threatening, it is unlikely that cases would not come to medical attention (but might not be published). Because viscerotropic disease has a highly predictable pathologic course, it is likely that viscerotropic disease post-YF vaccine occurs in low-income countries with the same incidence as in developing countries. YF vaccine is a very safe vaccine that likely confers lifelong immunity. PMID:27784992

  10. Get up, Stand up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melia, Ed

    2009-01-01

    Ignorance about dyslexia meant a miserable school experience for Barrie Hughes. He was in his 50s when he found the courage to stand up in front of a classroom of learners and admit he couldn't read. Barrie, who is now 59 and works for the parks department of Brighton and Hove Council, only began to learn how to read words in the last three years…

  11. Improving communication between emergency department staff.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kate

    2014-05-01

    During redevelopment of the emergency department at the Royal Sussex County Hospital, Brighton, it was deemed vital that its internal communication system should be as effective as possible. An audit of staff perceptions of the existing communication system and a relevant literature review were undertaken, therefore, to inform a proposal for the development of a new online system. This article describes the development and implementation of the system.

  12. Using New Technologies: A Technology Transfer Guidebook. Version 02.00. 08

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    In a June 1992 IEEE Spectrum article, Capers Jones (1992) recounted aCASEWorld conference presentation by Chuck House, a former executive of Hewlett...Addison-Wesley. Implementation Management Accelerating Change Workshop. Brighton, Colorado: IMA, Inc. Associates 1992 Jones, Capers CASE’s Missing...Technology, Stan Przybylinski and Priscilla J. Fowler, eds., Santa Barbara , California (November 15-16, 1987):63-66. CASE Consulting Group. CASE Outlook

  13. Wide Area Recovery and Resiliency Program (WARRP) Mile High Challenge After Action Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Nurses are available through call center 24/7, remote site at Lowry Base, relationships with other poison control centers throughout the nation, also...National Disaster Recovery Framework Speaker: Mr. Martin McNeese, Federal Emergency Management Agency Region VIII 1345 – 1400 Break 1400– 1445 Topic...FEMA Martinez Rebecca City of Brighton McDermott Heather Adams County OEM McNeese Martin FEMA McSherry Tim Jefferson County IMT Midgley Mike

  14. Biological Effects of Nonionizing Electromagnetic Radiation. Volume IV. Number 3.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    Res. concerned with nerve terminal stimulation and trans- mitter release. Synaptosomes (pinched-off pre- synaptic terminals of neurons) will be...frequency stimulator will be TRICAL FIELDS. Brighton, C. T.; Frleden- developed. This project is part of a broader pro- berg, L. B.; Glack, J.; Jiminez...mechanical design to provide service, training, and research in bio- To further develop and stimulate biomedical re- medical electronics. The major

  15. Canadian Educational Development Centre Websites: More Ebb than Flow?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines information portrayed on Canadian educational development (ED) centre websites and, in particular, whether information that corresponds to questions compiled from a literature search of ED centre practices is readily available from centre websites. This study phase is part of a larger national study of Canadian educational…

  16. Centre of the Cell: Science Comes to Life

    PubMed Central

    Balkwill, Frances; Chambers, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Centre of the Cell is a unique biomedical science education centre, a widening participation and outreach project in London’s East End. This article describes Centre of the Cell’s first five years of operation, the evolution of the project in response to audience demand, and the impact of siting a major public engagement project within a research laboratory. PMID:26340279

  17. Centre-Based Child Care Quality in Urban Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishimine, Karin; Wilson, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the quality of childcare centres in urban Australian communities designated according to different bands of Centre Location Demographics (CLD). Childcare centres were assessed using the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale- Revised Edition (ECERS-R) and the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Extension (ECERS-E).…

  18. Assessment of functional incontinence in disabled living centres.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Viv

    Disabled Living is part of the network of disabled living centres throughout Britain. These centres enable anyone to try out equipment that may help them with everyday activities of living. The centres are staffed by occupational therapists, physiotherapists, nurses, information providers, administration staff and volunteers.

  19. Chart-confirmed guillain-barre syndrome after 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccination among the Medicare population, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Polakowski, Laura L; Sandhu, Sukhminder K; Martin, David B; Ball, Robert; Macurdy, Thomas E; Franks, Riley L; Gibbs, Jonathan M; Kropp, Garner F; Avagyan, Armen; Kelman, Jeffrey A; Worrall, Christopher M; Sun, Guoying; Kliman, Rebecca E; Burwen, Dale R

    2013-09-15

    Given the increased risk of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) found with the 1976 swine influenza vaccine, both active surveillance and end-of-season analyses on chart-confirmed cases were performed across multiple US vaccine safety monitoring systems, including the Medicare system, to evaluate the association of GBS after 2009 monovalent H1N1 influenza vaccination. Medically reviewed cases consisted of H1N1-vaccinated Medicare beneficiaries who were hospitalized for GBS. These cases were then classified by using Brighton Collaboration diagnostic criteria. Thirty-one persons had Brighton level 1, 2, or 3 GBS or Fisher Syndrome, with symptom onset 1-119 days after vaccination. Self-controlled risk interval analyses estimated GBS risk within the 6-week period immediately following H1N1 vaccination compared with a later control period, with additional adjustment for seasonality. Our results showed an elevated risk of GBS with 2009 monovalent H1N1 vaccination (incidence rate ratio = 2.41, 95% confidence interval: 1.14, 5.11; attributable risk = 2.84 per million doses administered, 95% confidence interval: 0.21, 5.48). This observed risk was slightly higher than that seen with previous seasonal influenza vaccines; however, additional results that used a stricter case definition (Brighton level 1 or 2) were not statistically significant, and our ability to account for preceding respiratory/gastrointestinal illness was limited. Furthermore, the observed risk was substantially lower than that seen with the 1976 swine influenza vaccine.

  20. A Kids' "Care-Van." Hospital's mobile health program provides screenings for neighborhood children.

    PubMed

    Paine, B

    1994-10-01

    Last year Franciscan Children's Hospital & Rehabilitation Center in Boston launched a "Kids' Care-Van" in an attempt to better serve the children of its community. That community, the city's Allston-Brighton neighborhood, is the home of many immigrants and minority group members, people likely to face economic, cultural, and linguistic barriers when seeking healthcare. A survey showed that neighborhood children especially needed better access to the Women, Infants and Children program (WIC), health education, and dental care. The Kids' Care-Van regularly tours Allston-Brighton, making stops at schools, Head Start programs, day care centers, a youth club, and the local YMCA. At those stops children are given medical and dental screenings; if needed, referrals are made to other healthcare sources. Parents, children, and adolescents are also given information about prevention and wellness. To date, 2,500 neighborhood children have been served. Approximately 70 percent have been found to be in urgent need of dental care, a serious problem because many Allston-Brighton parents cannot afford to pay for such care. Few Boston dentists accept Medicaid payment, and there are no other state or federal resources. The van program's manager is currently negotiating with area universities and lobbying local members of the State legislature in hopes of getting some assistance.

  1. The "Magic" of Tutorial Centres in Hong Kong: An Analysis of Media Marketing and Pedagogy in a Tutorial Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Why do more than three-quarters of Hong Kong's senior secondary students flock to tutorial centres like moths to light? What is the "magic" that is driving the popularity of the tutorial centre enterprise? Indeed, looking at the ongoing boom of tutorial centres in Hong Kong (there are almost 1,000 of them), it is difficult not to ask…

  2. Human-centred approaches in slipperiness measurement

    PubMed Central

    Grönqvist, Raoul; Abeysekera, John; Gard, Gunvor; Hsiang, Simon M.; Leamon, Tom B.; Newman, Dava J.; Gielo-Perczak, Krystyna; Lockhart, Thurmon E.; Pai, Clive Y.-C.

    2010-01-01

    A number of human-centred methodologies—subjective, objective, and combined—are used for slipperiness measurement. They comprise a variety of approaches from biomechanically-oriented experiments to psychophysical tests and subjective evaluations. The objective of this paper is to review some of the research done in the field, including such topics as awareness and perception of slipperiness, postural and balance control, rating scales for balance, adaptation to slippery conditions, measurement of unexpected movements, kinematics of slipping, and protective movements during falling. The role of human factors in slips and falls will be discussed. Strengths and weaknesses of human-centred approaches in relation to mechanical slip test methodologies are considered. Current friction-based criteria and thresholds for walking without slipping are reviewed for a number of work tasks. These include activities such as walking on a level or an inclined surface, running, stopping and jumping, as well as stair ascent and descent, manual exertion (pushing and pulling, load carrying, lifting) and particular concerns of the elderly and mobility disabled persons. Some future directions for slipperiness measurement and research in the field of slips and falls are outlined. Human-centred approaches for slipperiness measurement do have many applications. First, they are utilized to develop research hypotheses and models to predict workplace risks caused by slipping. Second, they are important alternatives to apparatus-based friction measurements and are used to validate such methodologies. Third, they are used as practical tools for evaluating and monitoring slip resistance properties of foot wear, anti-skid devices and floor surfaces. PMID:11794763

  3. Hunting for hardware changes in data centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho dos Santos, M.; Steers, I.; Szebenyi, I.; Xafi, A.; Barring, O.; Bonfillou, E.

    2012-12-01

    With many servers and server parts the environment of warehouse sized data centres is increasingly complex. Server life-cycle management and hardware failures are responsible for frequent changes that need to be managed. To manage these changes better a project codenamed “hardware hound” focusing on hardware failure trending and hardware inventory has been started at CERN. By creating and using a hardware oriented data set - the inventory - with detailed information on servers and their parts as well as tracking changes to this inventory, the project aims at, for example, being able to discover trends in hardware failure rates.

  4. WISB: Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, John

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology promises to create high-impact solutions to challenges in the areas of biotechnology, human/animal health, the environment, energy, materials and food security. Equally, synthetic biologists create tools and strategies that have the potential to help us answer important fundamental questions in biology. Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology (WISB) pursues both of these mutually complementary ‘build to apply’ and ‘build to understand’ approaches. This is reflected in our research structure, in which a core theme on predictive biosystems engineering develops underpinning understanding as well as next-generation experimental/theoretical tools, and these are then incorporated into three applied themes in which we engineer biosynthetic pathways, microbial communities and microbial effector systems in plants. WISB takes a comprehensive approach to training, education and outreach. For example, WISB is a partner in the EPSRC/BBSRC-funded U.K. Doctoral Training Centre in synthetic biology, we have developed a new undergraduate module in the subject, and we have established five WISB Research Career Development Fellowships to support young group leaders. Research in Ethical, Legal and Societal Aspects (ELSA) of synthetic biology is embedded in our centre activities. WISB has been highly proactive in building an international research and training network that includes partners in Barcelona, Boston, Copenhagen, Madrid, Marburg, São Paulo, Tartu and Valencia. PMID:27284024

  5. KNMI Data Centre: Easy access for all

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Vegte, John; Som de Cerff, Wim; Plieger, Maarten; de Vreede, Ernst; Sluiter, Raymond; Willem Noteboom, Jan; van der Neut, Ian; Verhoef, Hans; van Versendaal, Robert; van Binnendijk, Martin; Kalle, Henk; Knopper, Arthur; Spit, Jasper; Mastop, Joeri; Klos, Olaf; Calis, Gijs; Ha, Siu-Siu; van Moosel, Wim; Klein Ikkink, Henk-Jan; Tosun, Tuncay

    2013-04-01

    KNMI is the Dutch institute for weather, climate research and seismology. It disseminates weather information to the public at large, the government, aviation and the shipping industry in the interest of safety, the economy and a sustainable environment. To gain insight into long-term developments KNMI conducts research on climate change. Making the knowledge, data and information on hand at KNMI accessible is one core activity. A huge part of the KNMI information is from numerical models, insitu sensor networks and remote sensing satellites. This digital collection is mostly internal only available and is a collection of non searchable , non standardized file formats, lacking documentation and has no references to scientific publications. With the KNMI Data Centre (KDC) project these issues are tackled. In the project a user driven development approach with SCRUM was chosen to get maximum user involvement in a relative short development timeframe. Building on open standards and proven open source technology (which includes in-house developed software like ADAGUC WMS and Portal) resulted in a first release in December 2012 This presentation will focus on the aspects of KDC relating to its technical challenges, the development strategy and the initial usage results of the data centre.

  6. Spherical tokamaks with plasma centre-post

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Celso

    2013-10-01

    The metal centre-post (MCP) in tokamaks is a structure which carries the total toroidal field current and also houses the Ohmic heating solenoid in conventional or low aspect ratio (Spherical)(ST) tokamaks. The MCP and solenoid are critical components for producing the toroidal field and for the limited Ohmic flux in STs. Constraints for a ST reactor related to these limitations lead to a minimum plasma aspect ratio of 1.4 which reduces the benefit of operation at higher betas in a more compact ST reactor. Replacing the MCP is of great interest for reactor-based ST studies since the device is simplified, compactness increased, and maintenance reduced. An experiment to show the feasibility of using a plasma centre-post (PCP) is being currently under construction and involves a high level of complexity. A preliminary study of a very simple PCP, which is ECR(Electron Cyclotron Resonance)-assisted and which includes an innovative fuelling system based on pellet injection, has recently been reported. This is highly suitable for an ultra-low aspect ratio tokamak (ULART) device. Advances on this PCP ECR-assisted concept within a ULART and the associated fuelling system are presented here, and will include the field topology for the PCP ECR-assisted scheme, pellet ablation modeling, and a possible global equilibrium simulation. VIE-ITCR, IAEA-CRP contr.17592, National Instruments-Costa Rica.

  7. Sofia University GNSS Analysis Centre (SUGAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonov, Tzvetan; Sidorov, Dmitry; Teferle, Norman; Guerova, Guergana; Egova, Evgenia; Vassileva, Keranka; Milev, Ivo; Milev, Georgi

    2015-04-01

    The Sofia University GNSS Analysis Centre (SUGAC, suada.phys.uni-sofia.bg) is a new analysis centre established via collaboration between the Department of Meteorology and Geophysics of Sofia University, the IPOS - BuliPOS GNSS network in Bulgaria and the University of Luxembourg. In April 2014, the first processing campaign took place. One year GNSS data from 7 stations of the BuliPOS network are processed in collaboration with the University of Luxembourg. Tropospheric products (Zenith Total Delay and gradients) with 5 min temporal resolution are obtained using the NAPEOS software, developed by ESA. The tropospheric products from this campaign will be used for validation of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model as well as for case studies during intense precipitation events and fog. In this work the WRF model validation for Bulgaria will be presented. Future work will be the establishment of autonomous near real-time processing of the regional ground-based GNSS network in Southeast Europe in support of the EUMETNET E-GVAP and COST ES1206 "Advanced Global Navigation Satellite Systems for Severe Weather Events and Climate" projects.

  8. Temporal variation in major trauma admissions

    PubMed Central

    Kieffer, WKM; Michalik, DV; Gallagher, K; McFadyen, I; Bernard, J; Rogers, BA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Trauma is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. Since the inception of the trauma networks, little is known of the temporal pattern of trauma admissions. Methods Trauma Audit and Research Network data for 1 April 2011 to 31 March 2013 were collated from two large major trauma centres (MTCs) in the South East of England: Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust (BSUH) and St George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (SGU). The number of admissions and the injury severity score by time of admission, by weekdays versus weekend and by month/season were analysed. Results There were 1,223 admissions at BSUH and 1,241 at SGU. There was significant variation by time of admission; there were more admissions in the afternoons (BSUH p<0.001) and evenings (SGU p<0.001). There were proportionally more admissions at the weekends than on weekdays (BSUH p<0.001, SGU p=0.028). There was significant seasonal variation in admissions at BSUH (p<0.001) with more admissions in summer and autumn. No significant seasonal variation was observed at SGU (p=0.543). Conclusions The temporal patterns observed were different for each MTC with important implications for resource planning of trauma care. This study identified differing needs for different MTCs and resource planning should be individualised to the network. PMID:26741676

  9. Service Delivery to Parents with an Intellectual Disability: Family-Centred or Professionally Centred?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Catherine M.; Mildon, Robyn L.; Matthews, Jan M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Studies support the use of family-centred practices in service delivery to families where a parent has an intellectual disability. This paper examines the importance of such practices to parents. Materials and Methods: Interview responses from 32 parents with intellectual disability were coded by two independent raters as reflecting…

  10. The Curriculum Development Centre of Malaysia. Studies of Curriculum Development Centres in Asia 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oon-Chye, Yeoh; And Others

    The Curriculum Development Centre (CDC) of Malaysia became an operating agency in January 1973 and became a division of the Malaysia Ministry of Education in May 1974. Its establishment was the culmination of over a decade of curriculum development efforts by the Ministry of Education. The CDC was an outgrowth of both the First and Second Malaysia…

  11. Systematic Assessment of Game-Centred Approach Practices--The Game-Centred Approach Assessment Scaffold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Background: Game-centred approaches (GCA) have been promoted as a more meaningful way to teach games and sports due to their connections with constructivist learning principles. However, the implementation is dependant on the teacher implementing it rather than just the model. There has been little research into what it means to use a GCA well and…

  12. The obtaining relative position of lunar centre masses and centre of the figure in selenocentric catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedjev, Yu. A.; Valeev, S. G.; Rizvanov, N. G.; Mikeev, R. R.; Varaksina, N. Yu.

    2010-05-01

    The relative position of lunar center masses relative to center of the figure in Kazan and Kiev selenocentric catalogues was customized. The expansions by spherical harmonics N=5 degree and order of the lunar function h(λ, β) with using the package ASNI USTU were executed. Module of the expansion of the local area to surfaces to full sphere was used. The parameters of cosmic missions are given for comparison (SAI; Bills, Ferrari). The normalized coefficients from expansions for eight sources hypsometric information are obtained: - Clementine (N=40), - Kazan (N=5), - Kiev (N=5), - SAI (N=10; Chuikova (1975)), - Bills, Ferrari, - Каguуа (Selena, Japan mission), - ULCN (The Uuified Lunaz Control Network 2005). The displacements of the lunar centre figure relative to lunar centre of the masses were defined from equations (Chuikova (1975)). The results of the obtaining relative position of the lunar centre masses and centre of the figure in Kazan selenocentric catalogue give good agreement with modern cosmic mission data.

  13. Children's Centre "3 in 1 - together"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gancheva, Hristina

    2013-04-01

    "There are only two ways to life your live. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle." Albert Einstein Children's Centre "3 in 1" is an extracurricular unit linked to the High School of Zlatartitsa, St. Cyril and St. Methodius, accomplished with the help of the municipality and many volunteers from the local community. With its activity it forms in children patriotic spirit, love for nature, active citizenship, and an impulse for a healthy life through communication with nature, saving the traditions and history, insurance of equality of the kids of the local five ethnicities and participation in activities in the sphere of science, art, sport and tourism. The educational work is mainly directed towards kids with difficulties with communication, hyperactivity, aggression, problems in their families, or those deprived of parental care. For a few years in the Children's Centre there have been clubs of interests: "Gardeners" - kids cultivate a garden. They plow, dig, plant, put in, irrigate and weed under the watch of Ms Stafka Nikolova, parents, and volunteers of the local community. The ecologically clean products - vegetables and fruits, kids use to cook delicious meals, sell, or give away. Weeds are also utilized; they are making herbarium out of them. "Cooks" - "What to have for lunch, when mom is out?". One can learn a lot of wonderful recipes from the club "Cooks". Products are own made, raised with love. In 2010, on the on the annual traditional holiday of the garden soup in Zlataritsa, the little cooks won third prize for making a delicious vegetable soup. On the same day, the 26 years old Nadezhda Savova, Cultural and Social Anthropology PhD in Princeton, founded the second community bakery in Bulgaria in Children's Centre "3 in1". Nadezhda Savova was declared traveler of 2012 by National Geographic. After the baking house in Gabrovo and Zlataritsa, Nadezhda also founded such projects in Sofia, Varna and Ruse

  14. Initial experience with an Underwater Manifold Centre

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, J.M.

    1984-10-01

    In July 1983 comingled production from the first two completed wells of the Shell/Esso Underwater Manifold Centre (the UMC), reached the Cormorant Alpha platform. This moment was the culmination of design and development effort which had begun as early as the spring of 1975. But being both the largest subsea system to become operational in the North Sea, and the first designed to the production of several subsea wells, whilst injecting into others, how would the UMC continue to perform. This paper details the operational experience gained to date with the UMC, tracing its brief history since it was first powered up in September 1982 to the present. This is discussed in the main body of the paper under the headings: Commissioning Experience; Operating Experience; Reliability and Maintenance.

  15. PRICE: primitive centred schemes for hyperbolic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toro, E. F.; Siviglia, A.

    2003-08-01

    We present first- and higher-order non-oscillatory primitive (PRI) centred (CE) numerical schemes for solving systems of hyperbolic partial differential equations written in primitive (or non-conservative) form. Non-conservative systems arise in a variety of fields of application and they are adopted in that form for numerical convenience, or more importantly, because they do not posses a known conservative form; in the latter case there is no option but to apply non-conservative methods. In addition we have chosen a centred, as distinct from upwind, philosophy. This is because the systems we are ultimately interested in (e.g. mud flows, multiphase flows) are exceedingly complicated and the eigenstructure is difficult, or very costly or simply impossible to obtain. We derive six new basic schemes and then we study two ways of extending the most successful of these to produce second-order non-oscillatory methods. We have used the MUSCL-Hancock and the ADER approaches. In the ADER approach we have used two ways of dealing with linear reconstructions so as to avoid spurious oscillations: the ADER TVD scheme and ADER with ENO reconstruction. Extensive numerical experiments suggest that all the schemes are very satisfactory, with the ADER/ENO scheme being perhaps the most promising, first for dealing with source terms and secondly, because higher-order extensions (greater than two) are possible. Work currently in progress includes the application of some of these ideas to solve the mud flow equations. The schemes presented are generic and can be applied to any hyperbolic system in non-conservative form and for which solutions include smooth parts, contact discontinuities and weak shocks. The advantage of the schemes presented over upwind-based methods is simplicity and efficiency, and will be fully realized for hyperbolic systems in which the provision of upwind information is very costly or is not available.

  16. Distant Operational Care Centre: Design Project Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this project is to outline the design of the Distant Operational Care Centre (DOCC), a modular medical facility to maintain human health and performance in space, that is adaptable to a range of remote human habitats. The purpose of this project is to outline a design, not to go into a complete technical specification of a medical facility for space. This project involves a process to produce a concise set of requirements, addressing the fundamental problems and issues regarding all aspects of a space medical facility for the future. The ideas presented here are at a high level, based on existing, researched, and hypothetical technologies. Given the long development times for space exploration, the outlined concepts from this project embodies a collection of identified problems, and corresponding proposed solutions and ideas, ready to contribute to future space exploration efforts. In order to provide a solid extrapolation and speculation in the context of the future of space medicine, the extent of this project's vision is roughly within the next two decades. The Distant Operational Care Centre (DOCC) is a modular medical facility for space. That is, its function is to maintain human health and performance in space environments, through prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Furthermore, the DOCC must be adaptable to meet the environmental requirements of different remote human habitats, and support a high quality of human performance. To meet a diverse range of remote human habitats, the DOCC concentrates on a core medical capability that can then be adapted. Adaptation would make use of the DOCC's functional modularity, providing the ability to replace, add, and modify core functions of the DOCC by updating hardware, operations, and procedures. Some of the challenges to be addressed by this project include what constitutes the core medical capability in terms of hardware, operations, and procedures, and how DOCC can be adapted to different remote

  17. Common Myna Roosts Are Not Recruitment Centres

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Manaswini; Arvind, Chiti; Lakshman, Abhilash; Vidya, T. N. C.

    2014-01-01

    We studied communal roosting in the Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis) in the light of the recruitment centre hypothesis and predation at the roost. The number and sizes of flocks departing from and arriving at focal roosts were recorded over a two year period. We also recorded the sizes and behaviour of foraging flocks. We found that flock sizes of birds departing from roosts at sunrise were larger than those at the feeding site, suggesting that there was no recruitment from the roosts. Flocks entering the roosts during sunset were larger on average than those leaving the following sunrise, suggesting no consolidation of flocks in the morning. Flocks entering the roosts at sunset were also larger on average than those that had left that sunrise, although there was no recruitment at the feeding site. There was no effect of group size on the proportion of time spent feeding. Contrary to expectation, single birds showed lower apparent vigilance than birds that foraged in pairs or groups, possibly due to scrounging tactics being used in the presence of feeding companions. Thus, the recruitment centre hypothesis did not hold in our study population of mynas. Predation at dawn and dusk were also not important to communal roosting: predators near the roosts did not result in larger flocks, and resulted in larger durations of arrival/departure contrary to expectation. Since flock sizes were smallest at the feeding site and larger in the evening than in the morning, but did not coincide with predator activity, information transfer unrelated to food (such as breeding opportunities) may possibly give rise to the evening aggregations. PMID:25122467

  18. The Centre of Mass of a Triangular Plate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slusarenko, Viktor; Rojas, Roberto; Fuster, Gonzalo

    2008-01-01

    We present a derivation for the coordinates of the centre of mass--or centre of gravity--of a homogeneous triangular plate by using scaling and symmetry. We scale the triangular plate by a factor of 2 and divide its area into four plates identical to the original. By symmetry, we assert that the centre of mass of two identical masses lies at the…

  19. Complex Modelling Scheme Of An Additive Manufacturing Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Liliana Georgeta

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a modelling scheme sustaining the development of an additive manufacturing research centre model and its processes. This modelling is performed using IDEF0, the resulting model process representing the basic processes required in developing such a centre in any university. While the activities presented in this study are those recommended in general, changes may occur in specific existing situations in a research centre.

  20. Reaction centres: the structure and evolution of biological solar power.

    PubMed

    Heathcote, Peter; Fyfe, Paul K; Jones, Michael R

    2002-02-01

    Reaction centres are complexes of pigment and protein that convert the electromagnetic energy of sunlight into chemical potential energy. They are found in plants, algae and a variety of bacterial species, and vary greatly in their composition and complexity. New structural information has highlighted features that are common to the different types of reaction centre and has provided insights into some of the key differences between reaction centres from different sources. New ideas have also emerged on how contemporary reaction centres might have evolved and on the possible origin of the first chlorophyll-protein complexes to harness the power of sunlight.

  1. The development and operation of Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre`s summer scholarship programme

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.V.; MacDonald, N.B.; Thornborrow, C.; Brough, C.M.

    1994-12-31

    Between 1987 and 1994, more than 100 students in a broad range of disciplines worked as summer scholars at Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre. Many of these students have since taken their parallel computing skills into graduate work and industry, and over a quarter of EPCC`s technical staff are alumni of the Programme. This report describes the evolution and present operation of the Summer Scholarship Programme, and its costs and benefits.

  2. ACTRIS Data Centre: An atmospheric data portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myhre, C. Lund; Fahre Vik, A.; Logna, R.; Torseth, K.; Linné, H.; O'Connor, E.

    2012-04-01

    ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network) is a European Project aiming at integrating European ground-based stations equipped with advanced instrumentation for studying aerosols, clouds, and short-lived gas-phase species. The ACTRIS activities result in improved atmospheric measurements data made at more than 60 European sites, from numerous instruments and includes variables measured by ground based in situ and remote sensing technologies. Core variables are in situ aerosol optical, physical and chemical properties, short-lived trace gases (volatile organic carbon and nitrogen oxides), aerosol scattering and extinction profiles, and cloud properties. The ACTRIS data centre (ACTRIS DC) is giving free and open access to all data resulting from the activities of the infrastructure network, complemented with data from other relevant networks and data bases. The overall goal is to facilitate scientists and other user groups access to atmospheric observational data, and to provide mature products for analysis and interpretation of atmospheric composition change. The ACTRIS DC aims at substantially increasing the number of high-quality data by providing long-term observational data relevant to climate and air quality research produced with standardized or comparable procedures throughout the network. The backbone of the ACTRIS DC is the three core data bases: - EARLINET Data Base hosting aerosol lidar data from more than 30 European sites - EBAS hosting ground based atmospheric in situ data from more than 1000 sites globally - Cloudnet hosting remote sensing cloud data and products from 5 European sites Furthermore, a joint portal is developed combining information from various data sources to gain new information not presently available from standalone databases or networks. The data centre will provide tools and services to facilitate the use of measurements for broad user communities. Higher level and integrated products will be

  3. Dynamics of Gas Near the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, A.; Binney, J.

    1994-10-01

    We simulate the flow of gas in the Binney et al. model of the bar at the centre of the Milky Way. We argue that the flow of a clumpy interstellar medium is most realistically simulated by a sticky-particle scheme, and investigate two such schemes. In both schemes orbits close to the cusped orbit rapidly become depopulated. This depopulation places a lower limit on the pattern speed since it implies that in the (1, v) plane the cusped orbit lies significantly inside the peak of the Hi terminal-velocity envelope at 1 20. We find that the size of the central molecular disc and the magnitudes of the observed forbidden velocities constrain the eccentricity of the Galactic bar to values similar to that arbitrarily assumed by Binney et al. We study the accretion by the nuclear disc of matter shed by dying bulge stars. We estimate that mass loss by the bulge can replenish the Hi in the nuclear disc within two bar rotation periods, in good agreement with the predictions of the simulations. When accretion of gas from the bulge is included, fine-scale irregular structure persists in the nuclear disc. This structure gives rise to features in longitude-velocity plots which depend significantly on viewing angle, and consequently give rise to asymmetries in longitude. These asymmetries are, however, much less pronounced than those in the observational plots. We conclude that the addition of hydrodynamics to the Binney et al. model does not resolve some important discrepancies between theory and observation. The model's basic idea does, however, have high a priori probability and has enjoyed some significant successes, while a number of potentially important physical processes - most notably the self-gravity of interstellar gas - are neglected in the present simulations. In view of the deficiencies of our simulations and interesting parallels we do observe between simulated and observational longitude-velocity plots, we believe it would be premature to reject the Binney et al

  4. The young centre of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uggerhøj, U. I.; Mikkelsen, R. E.; Faye, J.

    2016-05-01

    We treat, as an illustrative example of gravitational time dilation in relativity, the observation that the centre of the Earth is younger than the surface by an appreciable amount. Richard Feynman first made this insightful point and presented an estimate of the size of the effect in a talk; a transcription was later published in which the time difference is quoted as ‘one or two days’. However, a back-of-the-envelope calculation shows that the result is in fact a few years. In this paper we present this estimate alongside a more elaborate analysis yielding a difference of two and a half years. The aim is to provide a fairly complete solution to the relativity of the ‘aging’ of an object due to differences in the gravitational potential. This solution—accessible at the undergraduate level—can be used for educational purposes, as an example in the classroom. Finally, we also briefly discuss why exchanging ‘years’ for ‘days’—which in retrospect is a quite simple, but significant, mistake—has been repeated seemingly uncritically, albeit in a few cases only. The pedagogical value of this discussion is to show students that any number or observation, no matter who brought it forward, must be critically examined.

  5. The Charles Perkins Centre's Twins Research Node.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lucas C; Craig, Jeffrey M; Hopper, John L; Carrick, Susan E

    2016-08-01

    Twins can help researchers disentangle the roles of genes from those of the environment on human traits, health, and diseases. To realize this potential, the Australian Twin Registry (ATR), University of Melbourne, and the Charles Perkins Centre (CPC), University of Sydney, established a collaboration to form the Twins Research Node, a highly interconnected research facility dedicated specifically to research involving twins. This collaboration aims to foster the adoption of twin designs as important tools for research in a range of health-related domains. The CPC hosted their Twins Research Node's launch seminar entitled 'Double the power of your research with twin studies', in which experienced twin researchers described how twin studies are supporting scientific discoveries and careers. The launch also featured twin pairs who have actively participated in research through the ATR. Researchers at the CPC were surveyed before the event to gauge their level of understanding and interest in utilizing twin research. This article describes the new Twins Research Node, discusses the survey's main results and reports on the launch seminar.

  6. Radio polarimetry of Galactic Centre pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Eatough, R. P.; Ferrière, K.; Kramer, M.; Lee, K. J.; Noutsos, A.; Shannon, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    To study the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the Galactic Centre (GC), we measured Faraday rotation of the radio emission of pulsars which are seen towards the GC. Three of these pulsars have the largest rotation measures (RMs) observed in any Galactic object with the exception of Sgr A⋆. Their large dispersion measures, RMs and the large RM variation between these pulsars and other known objects in the GC implies that the pulsars lie in the GC and are not merely seen in projection towards the GC. The large RMs of these pulsars indicate large line-of-sight magnetic field components between ˜ 16 and 33 μG; combined with recent model predictions for the strength of the magnetic field in the GC this implies that the large-scale magnetic field has a very small inclination angle with respect to the plane of the sky (˜12°). Foreground objects like the Radio Arc or possibly an ablated, ionized halo around the molecular cloud G0.11-0.11 could contribute to the large RMs of two of the pulsars. If these pulsars lie behind the Radio Arc or G0.11-0.11 then this proves that low-scattering corridors with lengths ≳100 pc must exist in the GC. This also suggests that future, sensitive observations will be able to detect additional pulsars in the GC. Finally, we show that the GC component in our most accurate electron density model oversimplifies structure in the GC.

  7. Environmental Studies at the Guiana Space Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Sandrine

    2013-09-01

    The Environmental Commitment of the French Space Agency at the Guiana Space Centre (CNES / CSG) specifies that the environmental protection is a major stake. Consequently, CNES participates in numerous space programs that contribute significantly to a better knowledge, management and protection of our environment at a global scale.The studies and researches that are done at CNES / CSG meet several objectives:* Assessment of safety and environmental effects and risk related to the effects overflowing due to a pollution caused by ground and flight activities* Improvement of the studies related to the knowledge of the environment (flora and fauna monitoring).* Risk assessment and management which may affect the safety of people , property, and protection of public health and environment * Verification of the compliance of the results of impact studies of launch vehicle in flight phase provided by the launch operator (Technical Regulation) with the French Safety Operational Acts.In this note, study and research programs are presented. They allow a better knowledge of the surrounding environment and of impacts caused by the industrial activities done in Guiana Space Center.

  8. Transitional and Transformational Spaces: Mentoring Young Academics through Writing Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Arlene; Parker, Shabnam

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of writing centre interventions on student writing in higher education has been well-documented in academic literacies studies. This paper changes the focus of investigation from student to consultant and, consequently, explores the way in which an academic writing centre can function as a mentoring environment for young…

  9. Research Informed Science Enrichment Programs at the Gravity Discovery Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venville, Grady; Blair, David; Coward, David; Deshon, Fred; Gargano, Mark; Gondwe, Mzamose; Heary, Auriol; Longnecker, Nancy; Pitts, Marina; Zadnik, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    Excursions to museums and science centres generally are great fun for students and teachers. The potential educational benefits beyond enjoyment, however, are rarely realised or analysed for their efficacy. The purpose of this paper is to describe four educational enrichment programs delivered at the Gravity Discovery Centre (GDC), near Gingin,…

  10. Is "Object-Centred Neglect" a Homogeneous Entity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainotti, Guido; Ciaraffa, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The nature of object-centred (allocentric) neglect and the possibility of dissociating it from egocentric (subject-centred) forms of neglect are controversial. Originally, allocentric neglect was described by and in patients who reproduced all the elements of a multi-object scene, but left unfinished the left side of one or more of them. More…

  11. Girls' Groups and Boys' Groups at a Municipal Technology Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salminen-Karlsson, Minna

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Swedish initiative of municipal technology centres from a gender point of view. These centres provide after-school technology education for children aged 6-16. By means of an ethnographic study, the effects of the use of single-sex groups in increasing the interest of girls and boys in technical activities have been…

  12. Family-Centred Practice: Collaboration, Competency and Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espe-Sherwindt, Marilyn

    2008-01-01

    In the 1990s, the developing field of early intervention with young children with disabilities and their families adopted family-centred practice as its philosophical foundation. Family-centred practice includes three key elements: (1) an emphasis on strengths, not deficits; (2) promoting family choice and control over desired resources; and (3)…

  13. Problems and Prospects of Education Resource Centres in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekanem, Johnson Efiong

    2015-01-01

    Nigeria has good policies on Education and one of such policies is the establishment of Education Resource Centres in every State of the Federation, including the Federal Capital Territory, Abuja. The need is clearly articulated in the National Policy on Education. Despite the lofty plan, most of the centres are not fulfilling the need for their…

  14. Science Centres: A Resource for School and Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilo, Miranda; Mantero, Alfonso; Marasco, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    We present a science centre established in Genoa on an agreement between Municipality of Genoa and Department of Physics of University of Genoa. The aim is to offer children, young people and community an opportunity to approach science in a playful way. The centre staffs guide the visitors through the exhibits, attracting their interests towards…

  15. Design Considerations for an Intensive Autism Treatment Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deochand, Neil; Conway, Alissa A.; Fuqua, R. Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) who display severe and challenging behaviour sometimes require centre-based intensive applied behaviour analysis (ABA) therapy to meet their health, safety and educational needs. Unfortunately, despite the need for centre-based treatment, there is a paucity of empirical research on building and…

  16. Investigating Teachers' Views of Student-Centred Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seng, Ernest Lim Kok

    2014-01-01

    Conventional learning is based on low levels of students' participation where students are rarely expected to ask questions or to challenge the theories of the academic. A paradigm shift in curriculum has resulted in implementing student-centred learning (SCL) approach, putting students as the centre of the learning process. This mode of…

  17. Low-Income Parents' Adult Interactions at Childcare Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Jeanne L.; Martin, Anne; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the extent and nature of low-income parents' interactions with other parents and staff at childcare centres, despite the potential for these interactions to provide emotional, informational, and instrumental support. This study interviewed 51 parents at three childcare centres in low-income neighbourhoods in New York City.…

  18. A Comprehensive Placement Test Tool for Language Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaime Pastor, Asuncion; Perez Guillot, Cristina; Candel-Mora, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    One of the main problems relating to language courses offered at language centres is measuring the students' entry-level skills in a fast, efficient and reliable way. This problem is particularly acute in language centres with large numbers of students, especially at the beginning of the academic year, as a mechanism has to be implemented which…

  19. Leading an Effective Improvement and Development Programme for Children's Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Gill; Tyler, Mary

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the process and achievements of leadership of an improvement and development programme for children's centres in the context of public value and Ofsted inspection. It analyses how the capacity has been developed of children's centre managers to work more strategically and collectively. Distributed leadership theory is applied…

  20. Evaluation of the Training Centre Infrastructure Fund (TCIF). Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Training Centre Infrastructure Fund (TCIF) was initially announced in Budget 2004 and represented an immediate measure of the broader Workplace Skills Strategy. TCIF was a three-year $25 million pilot project, designed to address the growing need for union-employer training centres to replace aging equipment and simulators that were not up to…

  1. Centre Computer Base for Visually Handicapped Children, Students and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, S.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The Centre Computer Base is a list of hardware which can effectively operate the software of the Research Centre for the Education of the Visually Handicapped. Essential hardware contained on the list is described, along with a variety of "add-on" devices such as joysticks, touch-screens, speech synthesizers, braille embossers, etc.…

  2. Examination and Evaluation of Websites of Science Centres in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozdogan, Aykut Emre; Bozdogan, Kerem

    2016-01-01

    Science centres which have a considerable importance and functions in developed countries are intended to be popularized in Turkey. At this point considering the fact that the first contact between science centres and visitors is usually provided with websites, it is quite important that the content of these websites should be designed and…

  3. Reducing cooling energy consumption in data centres and critical facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Gareth

    Given the rise of our everyday reliance on computers in all walks of life, from checking the train times to paying our credit card bills online, the need for computational power is ever increasing. Other than the ever-increasing performance of home Personal Computers (PC's) this reliance has given rise to a new phenomenon in the last 10 years ago. The data centre. Data centres contain vast arrays of IT cabinets loaded with servers that perform millions of computational equations every second. It is these data centres that allow us to continue with our reliance on the internet and the PC. As more and more data centres become necessary due to the increase in computing processing power required for the everyday activities we all take for granted so the energy consumed by these data centres rises. Not only are more and more data centres being constructed daily, but operators are also looking at ways to squeeze more processing from their existing data centres. This in turn leads to greater heat outputs and therefore requires more cooling. Cooling data centres requires a sizeable energy input, indeed to many megawatts per data centre site. Given the large amounts of money dependant on the successful operation of data centres, in particular for data centres operated by financial institutions, the onus is predominantly on ensuring the data centres operate with no technical glitches rather than in an energy conscious fashion. This report aims to investigate the ways and means of reducing energy consumption within data centres without compromising the technology the data centres are designed to house. As well as discussing the individual merits of the technologies and their implementation technical calculations will be undertaken where necessary to determine the levels of energy saving, if any, from each proposal. To enable comparison between each proposal any design calculations within this report will be undertaken against a notional data facility. This data facility will

  4. Stromal networking: cellular connections in the germinal centre.

    PubMed

    Denton, Alice E; Linterman, Michelle A

    2017-03-17

    Secondary lymphoid organs are organized into distinct zones, governed by different types of mesenchymal stromal cells. These stromal cell subsets are critical for the generation of protective humoral immunity because they direct the migration of, and interaction between, multiple immune cell types to form the germinal centre. The germinal centre response generates long-lived antibody-secreting plasma cells and memory B cells which can provide long-term protection against re-infection. Stromal cell subsets mediate this response through control of immune cell trafficking, activation, localization and antigen access within the secondary lymphoid organ. Further, distinct populations of stromal cells underpin the delicate spatial organization of immune cells within the germinal centre. Because of this, the interactions between immune cells and stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs are fundamental to the germinal centre response. Herein we review how this unique relationship leads to effective germinal centre responses.

  5. Rediscovering the Teacher within Indian Child-Centred Pedagogy: Implications for the Global Child-Centred Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smail, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The Child-Centred Approach (CCA) is increasingly promoted within India and internationally as a response to the challenge of delivering quality education. From identifying and examining Indian indigenous and global concepts of CCA within traditional and contemporary child-centred pedagogic discourse, this paper reveals the complexities of…

  6. Direct comparison of 3-centre and 4-centre HBr elimination pathways in methyl-substituted vinyl bromides.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Shubhrangshu; Hornung, Balázs; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2016-10-12

    Elimination of HBr from UV-photoexcited vinyl bromides can occur through both 3-centre and 4-centre transition states (TSs). The competition between these pathways is examined using velocity map imaging of HBr (v = 0-2, J) photofragments. The three vinyl bromides chosen for study have methyl substituents that block either the 3-centre or the 4-centre TS, or leave both pathways open. The kinetic energy distributions extracted from velocity map images of HBr from 193 nm photolysis of the three vinyl bromide compounds are approximately described by a statistical model of energy disposal among the degrees of freedom of the photoproducts, and are attributed to dissociation on the lowest electronic state of the molecule after internal conversion. Dissociation via the 4-centre TS gives greater average kinetic energy release than for the 3-centre TS pathway. The resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) schemes used to detect HBr restrict measurements to J ≤ 7 for v = 2 and J ≤ 15 for v = 0. Within this spectroscopic range, the HBr rotational temperature is colder for the 4-centre than for the 3-centre elimination pathway. Calculations of the intrinsic reaction coordinates and RRKM calculations of HBr elimination rate coefficients provide mechanistic insights into the competition between the pathways.

  7. The "magic" of tutorial centres in Hong Kong: An analysis of media marketing and pedagogy in a tutorial centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Aaron

    2014-12-01

    Why do more than three-quarters of Hong Kong's senior secondary students flock to tutorial centres like moths to light? What is the "magic" that is driving the popularity of the tutorial centre enterprise? Indeed, looking at the ongoing boom of tutorial centres in Hong Kong (there are almost 1,000 of them), it is difficult not to ask these questions. This paper examines the phenomenon of tutorial centres in Hong Kong and seeks to understand what draws students to these centres. Combining theories of marketing semiotics and emotion studies, the author investigates the pivotal role of media marketing in generating the "magic" of tutorial centres, whose advertising strategy includes, for example, a display of billboard posters featuring stylishly-dressed "celebrity teachers". The author reviews some of the literature available on the subject of tutorial centres. In a case study approach, he then maps out the pedagogy he observed in an English tutorial class, seeking heuristic insights into the kind of teaching students in the study were looking for. He argues that part of the "magical" attraction of what are essentially "cram schools" is their formulaic pedagogy of teaching and reinforcing exam skills. Finally, the paper considers the social implications of the tutorial centre industry in terms of media marketing of education and unequal access to tutorial services.

  8. Student-Centred and Teacher-Centred Learning Environment in Pre-Vocational Secondary Education: Psychological Needs, and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smit, Karin; de Brabander, Cornelis J.; Martens, Rob L.

    2014-01-01

    In this study the perception of psychological needs and motivation in a student-centred and a teacher-centred learning environment are compared, using Self Determination Theory as a framework. The self-report Intrinsic Motivation Inventory was completed by 230 students (mean age 16.1 years) in pre-vocational secondary education. School records on…

  9. Immunoglobulin negative follicle centre cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, E. O.; Al-Saffar, N.; Jones, D. B.; Wright, D. H.; Stevenson, F. K.; Smith, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) could not be detected on the surface or in the cytoplasm of neoplastic cells from five cases of follicle centre cell lymphoma with centroblastic/centrocytic follicular histology when examined by immunohistology of frozen or wax embedded sections. Examination by fluorescein labelled antibodies of cells in suspensions prepared from the biopsies revealed a monotypic surface Ig positive population in one case and a surface or cytoplasmic Ig kappa:lambda light chain imbalance in a further two cases consistent with neoplastic B cell involvement: in all cases the proportion of cells failing to express Ig or T cell markers ranged from 24 to 75%. The monoclonal antibodies B1 (Pan B cell), FMC4 (HLA class II) and J5 (cALL antigen) stained the majority of cells in suspension with residual cells staining with UCHT1 or OKT11 (T cell monoclonal antibodies). In frozen sections, neoplastic follicular cells did not stain with UCHT1. However, in the one case tested these cells stained with the antibodies B1 and FMC4. In paraffin sections J chain could be demonstrated in the cytoplasm of three out of five cases. Cells from four cases were cultured in vitro for Ig production: two failed to produce Ig and monotypic light chains were the sole Ig product of the remaining two cases. The failure to express Ig by the majority of the neoplastic cells from the cases described in this report is at variance with the follicular histology of these neoplasms. Mechanisms responsible for this failure are discussed with reference to current models of B cell differentiation. Images Figure 1 PMID:6437429

  10. Safe motherhood partners -- the International Children's Centre.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    The International Children's Centre (ICC) works worldwide to improve child health in the least developed countries. In its training and research projects the agency contributes to the Safe Motherhood Initiative to improve the health of mothers and infants. ICC is based in Paris, it was established in 1949, and the agency has cooperated with governments, nongovernmental organizations and international bodies like the World Health Organization (WHO) in child care. ICC's activities reflect concern for the health of women before and during pregnancy and the rest of their lives. The center's work comprises training, research, local projects, and information and documentation. Following the 1987 Nairobi conference on safe motherhood, ICC organized a seminar in Paris on maternal mortality in Sub-Saharan francophone Africa, which led to participation in the Safe Motherhood Initiative with a variety of training and research programs. ICC training is integrated, community-based, and multidisciplinary. Anthropology, psychology, economics and management have played a role in ICC training courses. The center runs an international course on maternal and child health from January to April each year and also organizes distance training courses on problem solving in health care. ICC training programs have taken place in Laos, Senegal, and Vietnam to strengthen the work of maternal and child health training centers there. A 4-week course on economic evaluation of health programs is held in Paris each July. In 1989 and 1990, ICC organized in collaboration with WHO safe motherhood workshops on research methodology in Benin and in Burkina Faso with participants from 6 francophone African countries. One research project in Benin is on risk factors for maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity, and the other in Cameroon on improving surveillance of pregnancy, delivery, and the postnatal period. ICC focuses on long-term planning and action for the benefit of mothers and children.

  11. New roles for poison control centres in the developing countries.

    PubMed

    Laborde, Amalia

    2004-05-20

    The primary mission of poison control centres has always been an improvement in the poisoned patients' care and poison prevention. The need to reach this mission implies that many functions and roles must be accomplished. Many centres, even in developing countries, are multifunctional and provide a broad toxicological information service. However, the main challenges of poison centres in developing countries are still treatment information, formal training, laboratory services accessibility and availability of antidotes. At the same time poison centres from developing countries need to accomplish their public health mission through strengthening and expansion of some well-defined roles like toxico-surveillance and environmental health monitoring according to the prevailing and future toxicological problems. Poison control centres from developing countries continue to face old challenges but cannot ignore the new ones that appear in the globalised world. Poison centres have a vital role for environmental exposure surveillance systems for sentinel event detection. Poison centres offer real-time and continuous data needed for preparation and response during such events and also offer a means to report health concerns. Centres from South America were involved in some of the most important environmental health problems of the region e.g., lead contamination (children), children 'occupational' poisoning, and flour contamination with fusarium toxins. Furthermore, poison centres can be the markers of risk factors or identifiers of vulnerable population e.g., changes in drugs prescription patterns, unusual patterns of addiction, unexpected product uses, children abuse scenarios or undetected sources of environmental contamination. In an era of evidence-based medicine and research, toxico-vigilance based on the millions of cases registered by poison centres everyday acquires more and more importance. A new approach of the toxico-vigilance and preventive roles of poison

  12. Type I photosynthetic reaction centres: structure and function.

    PubMed Central

    Heathcote, Peter; Jones, Michael R; Fyfe, Paul K

    2003-01-01

    We review recent advances in the study of the photosystem I reaction centre, following the determination of a spectacular 2.5 A resolution crystal structure for this complex of Synechococcus elongatus. Photosystem I is proving different to type II reaction centres in structure and organization, and the mechanism of transmembrane electron transfer, and is providing insights into the control of function in reaction centres that operate at very low redox potentials. The photosystem I complex of oxygenic organisms has a counterpart in non-oxygenic bacteria, the strictly anaerobic phototrophic green sulphur bacteria and heliobacteria. The most distinctive feature of these type I reaction centres is that they contain two copies of a large core polypeptide (i.e. a homodimer), rather than a heterodimeric arrangement of two related, but different, polypeptides as in the photosystem I complex. To compare the structural organization of the two forms of type I reaction centre, we have modelled the structure of the central region of the reaction centre from green sulphur bacteria, using sequence alignments and the structural coordinates of the S. elongatus Photosystem I complex. The outcome of these modelling studies is described, concentrating on regions of the type I reaction centre where important structure-function relationships have been demonstrated or inferred. PMID:12594931

  13. Native NIR-emitting single colour centres in CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatto Monticone, D.; Traina, P.; Moreva, E.; Forneris, J.; Olivero, P.; Degiovanni, I. P.; Taccetti, F.; Giuntini, L.; Brida, G.; Amato, G.; Genovese, M.

    2014-05-01

    Single-photon sources are a fundamental element for developing quantum technologies, and sources based on colour centres in diamonds are among the most promising candidates. The well-known nitrogen vacancy centres are characterized by several limitations, and thus few other defects have recently been considered. In the present work, we characterize, in detail, native efficient single colour centres emitting in the near infra-red (λ = 740-780 nm) in both standard IIa single-crystal and electronic-grade polycrystalline commercial chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond samples. In the former case, a high-temperature (T > 1000 °C) annealing process in vacuum is necessary to induce the formation/activation of luminescent centres with good emission properties, while in the latter case the annealing process has marginally beneficial effects on the number and performance of native centres in commercially available samples. Although displaying significant variability in several photo-physical properties (emission wavelength, emission rate instabilities, saturation behaviours), these centres generally display appealing photophysical properties for applications as single photon sources: short lifetimes (0.7-3 ns), high emission rates (˜50-500 × 103 photons s-1) and strongly (>95%) polarized light. The native centres are tentatively attributed to impurities incorporated in the diamond crystal during the CVD growth of high-quality type-IIa samples, and offer promising perspectives in diamond-based photonics.

  14. Defect centres and thermoluminescence in SrS : Bi phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, V.; Tiwari, M.; Rao, T. K. G.

    2004-11-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) and electron spin resonance studies have been carried out on SrS:Bi phosphor. The TL glow curve is broad and indicates a dominant peak at 120 degrees C with two additional peaks, not clearly resolved, appearing as shoulders at around 180 and 250 degrees C. Two defect centres are observed at room temperature. One of them is characterized by an isotropic g-value 2.0034 and is assigned to an F+ centre. Step annealing measurements indicate a possible association between the F+ centre and the three TL peaks.

  15. Staff concerns in heroin-assisted treatment centres.

    PubMed

    Demaret, I; Lemaître, A; Ansseau, M

    2012-08-01

    Heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) is a solution for improving the condition of treatment-resistant heroin addicts. Since 1994, six randomized controlled trials have concluded that HAT is more efficacious than oral methadone for severe heroin addicts. We visited seven HAT treatment centres in four countries in order to observe diacetylmorphine (DAM) administration and to study the main concerns of the staff. Nurses were concerned by the risk taken if a previously intoxicated patient received his dose of DAM. Another concern was the smuggling of DAM doses. The HAT centres face a dilemma: treating patients while at the same time allowing their risky street habits in the centre.

  16. L'asthme allergique au centre tunisien

    PubMed Central

    Joobeur, Samah; Mhamed, Saousen Cheikh; Saad, Ahmed Ben; Mribah, Hathami; Dekhil, Asma; Rouatbi, Naceur; El Kamel, Ali

    2015-01-01

    L'asthme allergique pose un réel problème de santé publique vu sa prévalence et son coût de prise en charge élevés. Etudier le profil clinique, fonctionnel respiratoire, allergologique, thérapeutique et évolutif de l'asthme allergique dans une région du centre tunisien. Etude rétrospective portant sur 1132 dossiers de patients porteurs d'asthme allergique suivis dans le service de pneumologie et d'allergologie à l'hôpital de Monastir (Tunisie). L’âge moyen est de 27 ± 12,5 ans. 61,1% des patients sont âgés entre 16 et 39 ans. Une prédominance féminine est notée (56,7%). L'identification de l'allergène en cause s'est basée essentiellement sur les tests cutanés allergologiques (99,4%). Les principaux pneumallergènes identifiés sont les acariens (91,2%), suivis par les pollens (22,8%) et les phanères des animaux (12%). La classification selon la sévérité a conclu à un asthme intermittent à persistant léger chez 87.1% de nos patients. Le traitement s'est basé essentiellement sur la corticothérapie inhalée (67,6%). L'asthme dans notre étude a été jugé contrôlé dans 68,3% des cas, partiellement contrôlé dans 24,8% et non contrôlé dans 6,9% des cas. L'asthme allergique est une affection répandue qui touche essentiellement le sujet jeune en pleine activité. Une prise en charge adéquate permet de contrôler la maladie et de réduire ses répercussions sur le patient et la collectivité. PMID:26097637

  17. An enhanced Planetary Radar Operating Centre (PROC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catallo, C.

    2010-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using GPRs is an important role of Italy and numerous scientific international space programs are carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Three experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry) provided by ASI within a NASA/ESA/ASI joint venture framework are successfully operating: MARSIS on-board MEX, SHARAD on-board MRO and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft: the missions have been further extended . Three dedicated operational centers, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD are operating from the missions beginning to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution and even if they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). In order to harmonize operations either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view PROC is designed and developed for offering improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. PROC is, therefore, conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs, such as Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) The paper describes how the new PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation aiding scientists to increase their knowledge in the field of surface

  18. PROC: a new Planetary Radars Operating Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catallo, C.; Alberti, G.; Flamini, E.; Olivieri, A.; Orosei, R.

    2009-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using Ground Penetrating Radars (GPR) is an important role of Italy and numerous scientific international space programs are carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Actually three important experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry) provided by ASI within a NASA/ESA/ASI joint venture framework are operating in the frame of an extended missions : MARSIS on-board Mars Express, SHARAD on-board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft. Three dedicated operational centers, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD are operating from the starting of the missions in order In order to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution and even if they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). In order to harmonize operations either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view PROC is designed and developed for offering improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. PROC is, therefore, conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs, such as Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) The paper describes how PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and

  19. Addiction Research Centres and the Nurturing of Creativity. Substance abuse research in a modern health care centre: the case of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Jürgen; Giesbrecht, Norman; Gliksman, Louis; Graham, Kathryn; Le, Anh D; Mann, Robert E; Room, Robin; Rush, Brian; Tyndale, Rachel F; Wells, Samantha

    2011-04-01

    The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health is one of the premier centres for research related to substance use and addiction. This research began more than 50 years ago with the Addiction Research Foundation (ARF), an organization that contributed significantly to knowledge about the aetiology, treatment and prevention of substance use, addiction and related harm. After the merger of the ARF with three other institutions in 1998, research on substance use continued, with an additional focus on comorbid substance use and other mental health disorders. In the present paper, we describe the structure of funding and organization and selected current foci of research. We argue for the continuation of this successful model of integrating basic, epidemiological, clinical, health service and prevention research under the roof of a health centre.

  20. Regional Centres for Space Science and Technology Education and ICG Information Centres affiliated to the United Nations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadimova, S.; Haubold, H. J.

    2009-06-01

    Based on resolutions of the United Nations General Assembly, Regional Centres for Space Science and Technology Education were established in India, Morocco, Nigeria, Brazil and Mexico. Simultaneously, education curricula were developed for the core disciplines of remote sensing, satellite communications, satellite meteorology, and space and atmospheric science. This paper provides a brief summary on the status of the operation of the regional centres with a view to use them as information centres of the International Committee on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (ICG), and draws attention to their educational activities.

  1. Light-induced ESR centres in single crystal rutile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgskiss, S. W.; Thorp, J. S.

    1983-04-01

    Electron spin resonance studies have been made on Verneuil-grown rutile single crystals, which were doped with a variety of transition gorup ions. Measurements were made at 9 GHz, both before and after UV irradiation, at temperatures in the range from 4.2 to 300 K. UV irradiation had two effects: (a) to affect the relative intensities of esr lines due to species already present, (b) to generate new esr spectra. Both effects are interpreted as representing a redistribution of charge amongst trapping centres. Seven UV generated centres have been identified and characterised in terms of their spin Hamiltonian parameters. Isochronal annealing techniques have been used to determine the ionisation temperatures of the traps. Observation of interactions and charge transfers between centres during isochronal annealing was used to determine the polarity and type of each centre.

  2. Nano-engineered pinning centres in YBCO superconducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisan, A.; Dang, V. S.; Mikheenko, P.

    2017-02-01

    For practical applications of superconducting materials in applied magnetic fields, artificial pinning centres in addition to natural ones are required to oppose the Lorentz force. These pinning centres are actually various types of defects in the superconductor matrix. The pinning centres can be categorised on their dimension (volume, surface or point) and on their character (normal cores or Δκ cores). Different samples have been produced by Pulsed Laser Deposition, with various thicknesses, temperatures and nanostructured additions to the superconducting matrix. They have been characterized by SQUID Magnetic Properties Measurement System and Physical Properties Measurement System, as well as by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Correlations between pinning architecture, TEM images, and critical currents at various fields and field orientations will be shown for a large number of YBa2Cu3Ox films with various types and architectures of artificial pinning centres.

  3. City Learning Centres for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PEB Exchange, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Examines England's City Learning Centres (CLC) component of the Excellence in Cities initiative aimed at driving up standards in inner city schools. CLC objectives, business involvement in the CLC initiative, funding, and technical guidelines in CLC development are discussed. (GR)

  4. Student centred teaching methods in a Chinese setting.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Janice

    2010-01-01

    This paper offers a discussion about using Western, student centred teaching methods with Chinese student nurses. There is increasing interest from Chinese nurse educators in student centred learning and an increase in partnerships between Chinese and Western universities. This paper suggests that the assumption that Western teaching methods are superior is now questioned and transferring Western style teaching to China requires a high degree of cultural sensitivity.

  5. Negotiation-centred versus client-centred: which approach should be used?

    PubMed

    Falardeau, Marlène; Durand, Marie José

    2002-06-01

    For nearly 20 years, Canadian occupational therapists have attached great importance to the client-centred approach within their practice. Professionals have agreed to define this approach through a philosophy built around the concepts of respect, power and partnership. But no reported work has really clarified what is meant by these three fundamental concepts. This article attempts to define the concepts of respect and power in the therapist-client relationship through a review of occupational therapy and related health and social sciences literature. It raises the question: "In the professional-client relationship, should the power reside with the client or is a more balanced approach needed?" This paper also proposes using the term negotiation instead of partnership, since negotiation seems to offer more applications for occupational therapy practice. The objective of the authors who advocate for greater negotiation between client and therapist is to stimulate analysis.

  6. A relational conceptual framework for multidisciplinary health research centre infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Although multidisciplinary and team-based approaches are increasingly acknowledged as necessary to address some of the most pressing contemporary health challenges, many researchers struggle with a lack of infrastructure to facilitate and formalise the requisite collaborations. Specialised research centres have emerged as an important organisational solution, yet centre productivity and sustainability are frequently dictated by the availability and security of infrastructure funds. Despite being widely cited as a core component of research capacity building, infrastructure as a discrete concept has been rather analytically neglected, often treated as an implicit feature of research environments with little specification or relegated to a narrow category of physical or administrative inputs. The terms research infrastructure, capacity, and culture, among others, are deployed in overlapping and inconsistent ways, further obfuscating the crucial functions of infrastructure specifically and its relationships with associated concepts. The case is made for an expanded conceptualisation of research infrastructure, one that moves beyond conventional 'hardware' notions. Drawing on a case analysis of NEXUS, a multidisciplinary health research centre based at the University of British Columbia, Canada, a conceptual framework is proposed that integrates the tangible and intangible structures that interactively underlie research centre functioning. A relational approach holds potential to allow for more comprehensive accounting of the returns on infrastructure investment. For those developing new research centres or seeking to reinvigorate existing ones, this framework may be a useful guide for both centre design and evaluation. PMID:20925953

  7. [Interdisciplinary centres in hospitals? A review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Erbsen, Astrid; Rüdiger-Stürchler, Marjam; Heberer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of complex disease patterns demands knowledge, and hence the collaboration of many medical disciplines. Interdisciplinary approaches to treatment are thus superior to multidisciplinary ones in terms of quality and costs. To make use of those benefits, interdisciplinary centres have emerged at many hospitals. Our review of the literature has sought to answer two questions: 1) Is there any evidence for the relationship 'creation of a centre = creation of interdisciplinarity'? 2) How can interdisciplinarity be fostered in centres? Medical and economic publications were identified via key terms in PubMed, Web of Knowledge and WISO. Using their references, further publications were researched. Contributions that complied with predefined criteria were included. For 75 of the 78 publications interdisciplinarity is the means to achieve a centre's objectives in quality and cost. Almost all the positive results achieved in centres, e.g., an increase in number of cases, are attributed to the seemingly established interdisciplinarity, without any evidence to substantiate this interrelation (question 1). The recommendations for creating the requested lively interdisciplinarity are insufficient, since technical arrangements dominate and the importance of social and therewith behavioural aspects is often forgotten--the findings of the respective literature remain unappreciated (question 2). Moreover, pertinent research as well as qualitative longitudinal research designs activating the knowledge of physicians, social scientists and economists should be used to investigate the interdisciplinarity sought for in centres.

  8. Health visitors: finding their place in children's centres.

    PubMed

    Potter, Barbara

    2010-11-01

    Children's centres aim to improve outcomes for children through the development of integrated services. Health visitors are expected to lead the delivery of child health promotion programmes in geographical areas that include children's centres. During 2007, a group of eight health visitors linked to Phase 2 children's centres in Bristol formed a learning set facilitated by a public health specialist to explore how their role as both caseworkers and public health practitioners could become part of an integrated children's centre team. They developed two linked models intended to help health visitors develop both aspects of their role in practice. First, a proposed management structure for a children's centre which included health visitors at both the strategic and practice delivery levels of the organisation. Second, a conceptualisation of how the proposed management structure would support and develop an integrated team. The paper then discusses an early attempt by one children's centre in Bristol to implement the two models through the development of an integrated outreach team.

  9. Comparison of centre of gravity and centre of pressure patterns in the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aimée C; Roberts, Jonathan R; Kong, Pui Wah; Forrester, Stephanie E

    2017-03-01

    Analysing the centre of pressure (COP) and centre of gravity (COG) could reveal stabilising strategies used by golfers throughout the golf swing. This study identified and compared golfers' COP and COG patterns throughout the golf swing in medial-lateral (ML) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions using principal component analysis (PCA) and examined their relationship to clubhead velocity. Three-dimensional marker trajectories were collected using Vicon motion analysis and force plate data from two Kistler force plates for 22 low-handicap golfers during drives. Golfers' COG and COP were expressed as a percentage distance between their feet. PCA was performed on COG and COP in ML and AP directions. Relationships between principal component (PC) scores were examined using Pearson correlation and regression analysis used to examine the relationship with clubhead velocity. ML COP movements varied in magnitude (PC1), rate of change and timing (PC2 and PC3). The COP and COG PC1 scores were strongly correlated in both directions (ML: r = 0.90, P < .05; AP: r = 0.81, P < .05). Clubhead velocity, explained by three PCs (74%), related to timing and rate of change in COPML near downswing (PC2 and PC3) and timing of COGML late backswing (PC2). The relationship between COPML and COGML PC1 scores identified extremes of COP and COG patterns in golfers and could indicate a golfer's dynamic balance. Golfers with earlier movement of COP to the front foot (PC2) and rate of change (PC3) patterns in ML COP, prior to the downswing, may be more likely to generate higher clubhead velocity.

  10. Comparison of planned menus and centre characteristics with foods and beverages served in New York City child-care centres

    PubMed Central

    Breck, Andrew; Dixon, L Beth; Khan, Laura Kettel

    2016-01-01

    Objective The present study evaluated the extent to which child-care centre menus prepared in advance correspond with food and beverage items served to children. The authors identified centre and staff characteristics that were associated with matches between menus and what was served. Design Menus were collected from ninety-five centres in New York City (NYC). Direct observation of foods and beverages served to children were conducted during 524 meal and snack times at these centres between April and June 2010, as part of a larger study designed to determine compliance of child-care centres with city health department regulations for nutrition. Setting Child-care centres were located in low-income neighbourhoods in NYC. Results Overall, 87% of the foods and beverages listed on the menus or allowed as substitutions were served. Menu items matched with foods and beverages served for all major food groups by > 60%. Sweets and water had lower match percentages (40 and 32%, respectively), but water was served 68% of the time when it was not listed on the menu. The staff person making the food and purchasing decisions predicted the match between the planned or substituted items on the menus and the foods and beverages served. Conclusions In the present study, child-care centre menus included most foods and beverages served to children. Menus planned in advance have potential to be used to inform parents about which child-care centre to send their child or what foods and beverages their enrolled children will be offered throughout the day. PMID:27280341

  11. Sure Start Children's Centres: time to make them better known.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Health services have traditionally been available to local communities through general practices, health visitors and midwives. Since the introduction of the Sure Start Local programme in 1997 and Sure Start Children's Centres in 2004, an increasing number of children's centres are working with their local NHS to provide health services for the under fives, and improve the accessibility of these services to local families. Sure Start Children's Centres were set up in England as part of the Department for Children, Schools and Families' Children's Plan to improve outcomes for children and their families and contribute to the strategic objectives of Every Child Matters. Children's centres offer a range of integrated services from child health and maternity services to parenting and childcare provisions. They also deliver key health promotion activities and programmes that contribute to the public health priorities of Primary Care Trusts, e.g. breast-feeding, smoking in pregnancy, physical activity and healthy eating. There are now 3,500 children's centres offering easily accessible services to more than 2.4 million children and families across England. Health professionals are asked work proactively together to raise awareness of these among local communities so that more families can benefit from the services they offer.

  12. Explaining the Sentinel-3 Marine Centre and related services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonekamp, Hans; Wilson, Hilary; Munro, Rosemary; Montagner, Francois; Provost, Dany

    2014-05-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the Sentinel-3 Marine Centre and related services and topics. In phase E of the Sentinel-3 program, EUMETSAT will be the Sentinel-3 satellite and Sentinel-3 Marine Centre operator. Verification and validation activities for the Marine Centre have recently started at EUMETSAT. The cal/val plans and mission performance set-up have been defined, together with ESA, to ensure that the core mission performance and operational products will be state of the art, and that new product definitions can be taken on board for operational services. To support the discussions in this session and ensure familiarity with the planned operational data streams, we will provide an overview of the set-up of product monitoring and services originating from the EUMETSAT premises. Major recent developments regarding EUMETSAT involvement in other areas of the sentinel program will also be presented.

  13. Height of centre of body mass during osteoarthritic gait.

    PubMed

    Khodadadeh, S; Whittle, M W; Bremble, G R

    1986-05-01

    Early attempts to locate the position of the centre of mass of the body during walking involved the use of cinematography, followed by kinetic analysis of the forces and couples acting about three axes at the ground and centre of mass. These methods, requiring data on the individual body segments, are too lengthy and complex for routine clinical use. A method is described which estimates both the trajectory and the mean height of the centre of mass, using only dynamic data from a single walk across one pair of force plates. Relating a possible trajectory height to the measured force vectors gives a profile for the horizontal velocity. The correct height is determined by seeking the smooth profile corresponding to the known horizontal velocity obtained by integration. Results are presented for 42 osteoarthritic patients undergoing total hip replacement operations.

  14. Stimulated emission from nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeske, Jan; Lau, Desmond W. M.; Vidal, Xavier; McGuinness, Liam P.; Reineck, Philipp; Johnson, Brett C.; Doherty, Marcus W.; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Onoda, Shinobu; Jelezko, Fedor; Ohshima, Takeshi; Volz, Thomas; Cole, Jared H.; Gibson, Brant C.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2017-01-01

    Stimulated emission is the process fundamental to laser operation, thereby producing coherent photon output. Despite negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centres being discussed as a potential laser medium since the 1980s, there have been no definitive observations of stimulated emission from ensembles of NV- to date. Here we show both theoretical and experimental evidence for stimulated emission from NV- using light in the phonon sidebands around 700 nm. Furthermore, we show the transition from stimulated emission to photoionization as the stimulating laser wavelength is reduced from 700 to 620 nm. While lasing at the zero-phonon line is suppressed by ionization, our results open the possibility of diamond lasers based on NV- centres, tuneable over the phonon sideband. This broadens the applications of NV- magnetometers from single centre nanoscale sensors to a new generation of ultra-precise ensemble laser sensors, which exploit the contrast and signal amplification of a lasing system.

  15. Stimulated emission from nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Jeske, Jan; Lau, Desmond W. M.; Vidal, Xavier; McGuinness, Liam P.; Reineck, Philipp; Johnson, Brett C.; Doherty, Marcus W.; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Onoda, Shinobu; Jelezko, Fedor; Ohshima, Takeshi; Volz, Thomas; Cole, Jared H.; Gibson, Brant C.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2017-01-01

    Stimulated emission is the process fundamental to laser operation, thereby producing coherent photon output. Despite negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV−) centres being discussed as a potential laser medium since the 1980s, there have been no definitive observations of stimulated emission from ensembles of NV− to date. Here we show both theoretical and experimental evidence for stimulated emission from NV− using light in the phonon sidebands around 700 nm. Furthermore, we show the transition from stimulated emission to photoionization as the stimulating laser wavelength is reduced from 700 to 620 nm. While lasing at the zero-phonon line is suppressed by ionization, our results open the possibility of diamond lasers based on NV− centres, tuneable over the phonon sideband. This broadens the applications of NV− magnetometers from single centre nanoscale sensors to a new generation of ultra-precise ensemble laser sensors, which exploit the contrast and signal amplification of a lasing system. PMID:28128228

  16. Centre of Excellence For Simulation Education and Innovation (CESEI).

    PubMed

    Qayumi, A Karim

    2010-01-01

    Simulation is becoming an integral part of medical education. The American College of Surgeons (ACS) was the first organization to recognize the value of simulation-based learning, and to award accreditation for educational institutions that aim to provide simulation as part of the experiential learning opportunity. Centre of Excellence for Simulation Education and Innovation (CESEI) is a multidisciplinary and interprofessional educational facility that is based at the University of British Columbia (UBC) and Vancouver Costal Health Authority (VCH). Centre of Excellence for Simulation Education and Innovation's goal is to provide excellence in education, research, and healthcare delivery by providing a technologically advanced environment and learning opportunity using simulation for various groups of learners including undergraduate, postgraduate, nursing, and allied health professionals. This article is an attempt to describe the infrastructure, services, and uniqueness of the Centre of Excellence for Simulation Education and Innovation.

  17. Energy efficiency in U.K. shopping centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangiarotti, Michela

    Energy efficiency in shopping centres means providing comfortable internal environment and services to the occupants with minimum energy use in a cost-effective and environmentally sensitive manner. This research considers the interaction of three factors affecting the energy efficiency of shopping centres: i) performance of the building fabric and services ii) management of the building in terms of operation, control, maintenance and replacement of the building fabric and services, and company's energy policy iii) occupants' expectation for comfort and awareness of energy efficiency. The aim of the investigation is to determine the role of the above factors in the energy consumption and carbon emissions of shopping centres and the scope for reducing this energy usage by changing one or all the three factors. The study also attempts to prioritize the changes in the above factors that are more cost-effective at reducing that energy consumption and identify the benefits and main economic and legal drivers for energy efficiency in shopping centres. To achieve these targets, three case studies have been analysed. Using energy data from bills, the performance of the selected case studies has been assessed to establish trends and current energy consumption and carbon emissions of shopping centres and their related causes. A regression analysis has attempted to break down the energy consumption of the landlords' area by end-use to identify the main sources of energy usage and consequently introduce cost-effective measures for saving energy. A monitoring and occupants' survey in both landlords' and tenants' areas have been carried out at the same time to compare the objective data of the environmental conditions with the subjective impressions of shoppers and shopkeepers. In particular, the monitoring aimed at assessing the internal environment to identify possible causes of discomfort and opportunities for introducing energy saving measures. The survey looked at

  18. Using a media centre to facilitate team-based learning.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Rafael A; Stanley, Glynne; Snavely, Adam

    2006-06-01

    Team-based learning is a relatively new educational approach in which learning occurs in three phases. Team-based learning is so named because in the third and final phase, students are organized into teams to participate in a classroom team-based learning session. In the Department of Anesthesiology at Boston University Medical Center, a multi-purpose Media Centre is used to facilitate the team-based learning approach. This Media Centre facilitates the creation and study of team-based learning educational materials distributed through a course website.

  19. Day-Care Centres: Risks and Prevention of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Dorli

    1988-01-01

    Children attending day-care centres are at increased risk of acquiring various infectious diseases, some with short- and long-term costs to individuals and society. Parents may approach their family physician for advice about placement of their child in day care. It is useful to have an understanding of the attributes of good day-care facilities and of the infections commonly acquired in this setting. In co-operation with day-care personnel and public health authorities, family physicians can help to implement strategies effective in reducing the incidence of infectious diseases in day-care centres. PMID:21253184

  20. Student Experience of a Scenario-Centred Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Sarah; Galilea, Patricia; Tolouei, Reza

    2010-01-01

    In 2006 UCL implemented new scenario-centred degree programmes in Civil and Environmental Engineering. The new curriculum can be characterised as a hybrid of problem-based, project-based and traditional approaches to learning. Four times a year students work in teams for one week on a scenario which aims to integrate learning from lecture and…

  1. Education at the Centre? Australia's National Union Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tony; Yasukawa, Keiko

    2009-01-01

    Australian trade unions are at a pivotal moment. In 2007-2008, a review of the training and education programs of the Education and Campaign Centre (ECC), the education arm of the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU), was conducted through a series of interviews with leaders of twenty-five unions. The review found that Australian unions do…

  2. Openness--A Way Forward: Development Education Research Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare-Heremia, Mahora

    2014-01-01

    Education is a vital aspect in the lives of humankind. It contributes and shapes our future as citizens of the world. To understand it is to discover the many hidden talents the world has in store for all. The Development Education Research Centre (DERC) holds many resources that aid in the development of education at a global level. With the…

  3. Analytical model of peptide mass cluster centres with applications

    PubMed Central

    Wolski, Witold E; Farrow, Malcolm; Emde, Anne-Katrin; Lehrach, Hans; Lalowski, Maciej; Reinert, Knut

    2006-01-01

    Background The elemental composition of peptides results in formation of distinct, equidistantly spaced clusters across the mass range. The property of peptide mass clustering is used to calibrate peptide mass lists, to identify and remove non-peptide peaks and for data reduction. Results We developed an analytical model of the peptide mass cluster centres. Inputs to the model included, the amino acid frequencies in the sequence database, the average length of the proteins in the database, the cleavage specificity of the proteolytic enzyme used and the cleavage probability. We examined the accuracy of our model by comparing it with the model based on an in silico sequence database digest. To identify the crucial parameters we analysed how the cluster centre location depends on the inputs. The distance to the nearest cluster was used to calibrate mass spectrometric peptide peak-lists and to identify non-peptide peaks. Conclusion The model introduced here enables us to predict the location of the peptide mass cluster centres. It explains how the location of the cluster centres depends on the input parameters. Fast and efficient calibration and filtering of non-peptide peaks is achieved by a distance measure suggested by Wool and Smilansky. PMID:16995952

  4. A Learner-Centred Mock Conference Model for Undergraduate Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Kari

    2011-01-01

    This essay describes a mock conference model of instruction suitable for use in undergraduate teaching, and which adheres to principles of learner-centred instruction and universal design for learning. A staged process of learner preparation for the conference is outlined, and student and instructor roles during preconference, conference, and…

  5. Lively Bureaucracy? The ESRC's Doctoral Training Centres and UK Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunt, Ingrid; McAlpine, Lynn; Mills, David

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the changing relationships between the UK government, its research councils and universities, focusing on the governing, funding and organisation of doctoral training. We use the Doctoral Training Centres (DTCs) funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as a prism through which to study the shifting nature of…

  6. Language Experiences of Preverbal Children in Australian Childcare Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyland, Berenice

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the language experiences of preverbal infants in Australian childcare centres with the aim of examining cultural regulation within the childcare context. Language is defined as a social and communicative act that is related to the development of voluntary action (Vygotsky 1962; Lock 1980; Leontiev 1994). The study uses…

  7. Automation of (64)Cu production at Turku PET Centre.

    PubMed

    Elomaa, Viki-Veikko; Jurttila, Jori; Rajander, Johan; Solin, Olof

    2014-07-01

    At Turku PET Centre automation for handling solid targets for the production of (64)Cu has been built. The system consists of a module for moving the target from the irradiation position into a lead transport shield and a robotic-arm assisted setup for moving the target within radiochemistry laboratory. The main motivation for designing automation arises from radiation hygiene.

  8. Training Leisure Centre Instructors: Client Motivational Profiles Examined

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniveton, Bromley H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the motivations of clients attending leisure centres/clubs. It is noted that training programmes for instructors tend to neglect this, particularly in relation to the gender and age of clients. Design/methodology/approach: In this study 460 recreational athletes including equal numbers of males and females in the two age…

  9. Grid Operation at Tokyo Tier-2 Centre for ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Isobe, Tadaaki; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Ueda, Ikuo

    International Centre for Elementary Particle Physics, the University of Tokyo, has been involved in the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid since 2003. After extensive R&D experience of the PC computing farm, disk and tape storage systems, network technology and the integration of these components, it is now operating a regional centre for the ATLAS data analysis. The regional centre includes an ATLAS Tier-2 site which is running the gLite middleware developed by the Enabling Grids for E-sciencE (EGEE) project. One of the biggest challenges at the regional centre is efficient data transfer between the Tier-2 site in Tokyo and other sites, in particular the associated Tier-1 site in France, because the large round trip time due to the long distance makes it difficult to transfer data at a high rate. We have been studying to achieve a good performance of the data transfer, and some results of network tests and ATLAS data transfer are described. Hardware and software components and the operational experience are also reported in this article.

  10. Constructing Learning Spaces? Videoconferencing at Local Learning Centres in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logdlund, Ulrik

    2010-01-01

    This article explores videoconferencing in the context of local learning centres in Sweden. The practice is described as a "learning space" in which adult learners construct socio-spatial relations. The study goes beyond a sociological apprehension of actors and opposes the idea of the material as neutral, passive and conformed by…

  11. Al-Manakh. Language Centre Journal, Volume 4, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Manakh, Journal of The Language Centre, 1980

    1980-01-01

    This issue of a journal devoted primarily to teaching English as a second language to engineering students contains the following articles: (1) "The Contribution of Educational Technology to ELT [English Language Teaching]" by Mike Laflin; (2) "Looking Again at Student-Centred Study Skills" by Andrew E. Seymour; (3)…

  12. Space-Centred English Language Learning: The Cyprus Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurt, Mustafa; Kurt, Sevinc

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a study conducted in the Ledra/Lokmaci Milieu in Cyprus, the area in the centre of the divided walled city of Nicosia where Greek and Turkish Cypriots have to use English to communicate with one another. The aim of the study was to locate the effects of a learning space on language learners, teachers and syllabus designers.…

  13. Learner Centred Design for a Hybrid Interaction Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Simon; Romero, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Learner centred design methods highlight the importance of involving the stakeholders of the learning process (learners, teachers, educational researchers) at all stages of the design of educational applications and of refining the design through an iterative prototyping process. These methods have been used successfully when designing systems…

  14. Revitalization of Indigenous Culture in Child Care Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulhankova, Jana

    2011-01-01

    In this study, I address contemporary ways of looking after children and care giving roles women play in today's Aboriginal community in Brisbane, Australia. Data were collected through participant observation and interviews during field work in a family care centre managed by Indigenous women with the staff and their clients. My main contribution…

  15. Democratising Turkey through Student-Centred Pedagogy: Opportunities and Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altinyelken, Hülya Kosar

    2015-01-01

    Global reform talk on pedagogy has been converging around student-centred pedagogy (SCP) in recent decades. One of the significant appeals of this pedagogical model is its democratisation potentials. This article seeks to empirically study SCP's role in democratising learning and promoting social democratisation by taking the case of Turkey, a…

  16. Introduction of ICT and Multimedia into Cambodia's Teacher Training Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dionys, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the integration of ICT in the teacher training centres of Cambodia. It focuses on the collaboration between the Teacher Training Department of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (MoEYS) of Cambodia and VVOB (Flemish Association for Development Cooperation and Technical Assistance), which is aimed at improving ICT…

  17. Frambu Health Centre: Promoting Family Focused Care for Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storhaug, Kari; Vandvik, Inger Helene

    1983-01-01

    The article describes services of the Frambu Health Centre in Norway, which has evolved during the past 30 years from a summer camp for children with poliomyelitis to a modern information and treatment center for families with disabled members, and offers fortnightly courses for patients with rare congenital and/or hereditary disorders. (Author/MC)

  18. Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre Bulletin No. 55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1972

    Instructions for the construction of the following apparatus for the secondary school science laboratory are included in this issue of the Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre Bulletin: a cheap water purifier using an expendable deionizer can; a simple amplifier suitable for detecting or displaying D. C. currents of 1 microamp or…

  19. An African-Centred Approach to Land Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel-Di Mauro, Salvatore; Carroll, Karanja Keita

    2014-01-01

    Approaches to environmental education which are engaging with place and critical pedagogy have not yet broadly engaged with the African world and insights from Africana Studies and Geography. An African-centred approach facilitates people's reconnection to places and ecosystems in ways that do not reduce places to objects of conquest and…

  20. Person-centred care: Principle of Nursing Practice D.

    PubMed

    Manley, Kim; Hills, Val; Marriot, Sheila

    This is the fifth article in a nine-part series describing the Principles of Nursing Practice developed by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) in collaboration with patient and service organisations, the Department of Health, the Nursing and Midwifery Council, nurses and other healthcare professionals. This article discusses Principle D, the provision of person-centred care.

  1. Radiation from an off-centred rotating dipole in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétri, J.

    2016-12-01

    When a neutron star forms, after the collapse of its progenitor, a strong magnetic field survives in its interior. This magnetic topology is usually assumed to be well approximated by a dipole located right at the centre of the star. However, there is no particular reason why this dipole should be attached to this very special point. A slight shift from the stellar centre could have strong implications for the surrounding electromagnetic field configuration leading to clear observational signatures. We study the effect of the most general off-centred dipole anchored in the neutron star interior. Exact analytical solutions are given in vacuum outside the star to any order of accuracy in the small parameter ɛ = d/R, where d is the displacement of the dipole from the stellar centre and R the neutron star radius. As a simple diagnostic of this decentred dipole, the spin-down luminosity and the torque exerted on its crust are computed to the lowest leading order in ɛ. Results are compared to earlier works and a discussion on repercussions on pulsar braking index and multiwavelength light curves is proposed.

  2. Design of Curriculum Development Centres. Educational Building Report 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamel, Jean-Pierre

    Periodic adaptations of the curriculum to new needs with continuous analysis of results and feedback are some of the functions performed in many Asian countries by an institution called a Curriculum Development Centre (CDC). The first part of the study analyzes the function of a CDC, examines in general terms what sort of facilities are needed,…

  3. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2009 Strategic Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2009

    2009-01-01

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) was established in 1981 as a not-for-profit company owned by the Commonwealth and state and territory ministers with responsibility for vocational education and training (VET). It is a professional, independent body at arm's length from government. The company initially conducted research…

  4. Physical Activity Promotion in Call Centres: Employers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renton, Sheila J.; Lightfoot, Nancy E.; Maar, Marion A.

    2011-01-01

    This study followed a predominantly qualitative approach to explore the perspectives of employers in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, call centres (CCs) regarding physical activity (PA) promotion in workplaces, by identifying current practices and employers' motivation to promote PA, as well as perceived facilitators and barriers. In-depth interviews…

  5. Evaluation of telemedicine centres in Madhya Pradesh, Central India.

    PubMed

    Bali, Surya; Gupta, Arti; Khan, Asif; Pakhare, Abhijit

    2016-04-01

    In a developing country such as India, there is substantial inequality in health care distribution. Telemedicine facilities were established in Madhya Pradesh in 2007-2008. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the infrastructure, equipment, manpower, and functional status of Indian Space and Research Organisation (ISRO) telemedicine nodes in Madhya Pradesh. All district hospitals and medical colleges with nodes were visited by a team of three members. The study was conducted from December 2013-January 2014. The team recorded the structural facility situation and physical conditions on a predesigned pro forma. The team also conducted interviews with the nodal officers, data entry operator and other relevant people at these centres. Of the six specialist nodes, four were functional and two were non-functional. Of 10 patient nodes, two nodes were functional, four were semi-functional and four were non-functional. Most of the centres were not working due to a problem with their satellite modem. The overall condition of ISRO run telemedicine centres in Madhya Pradesh was found to be poor. Most of these centres failed to provide telemedicine consultations. We recommend replacing this system with another cost effective system available in the state wide area network (SWAN). We suggest the concept of the virtual out-patient department.

  6. Cyberage Narratives: Creative Computing in After-School Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klerfelt, Anna

    2006-01-01

    In this article two computer-produced multimedia stories created by children in their after-school centre are analysed, building on the assumption that children draw that which is important for them. The aim is to make visible the significance of narrative structure, reaccentuation, intertextuality, multivoicedness and various levels of…

  7. Centres for People with Intellectual Disabilities: Attendees' Perceptions of Benefit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gajewska, Urszula; Trigg, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Day and community learning centres aim to provide intellectually disabled (ID) people with social support, life skills and greater control over their lives. However, there is little research exploring the benefits of attendance from the perspective of attendees and whether these goals are met. Materials and methods: Unstructured…

  8. The Makana Regional Centre of Expertise: Experiments in Social Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotz-Sisitka, Heila; O'Donoghue, Rob; Wilmot, Di

    2010-01-01

    This article deliberates the possibilities for Regional Centres of Expertise (RCEs) to become "experiments" in social learning. The purpose of the article is to advance the broader research agenda of RCEs through reflection on the empirical research agenda of one RCE, Makana RCE in South Africa. As such it opens questions on how we might…

  9. Fungal genetic resource centres and the genomic challenge.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Matthew J; Smith, David

    2004-12-01

    Fungal research and education has for many years been supported by public service genetic resource centres, whose roles have been to maintain, preserve and supply living cultures to the research community. In the genomic era, genetic resource centres are perhaps more important than ever before. The cultures held, many of which are described and validated by expert biosystematists, are valuable resources for the future. There is a need to supply genomic and proteomic research programmes with fully characterised organisms, as usage of organisms from unreliable sources can prove disastrous, not least in economical terms. However, mycologists often require more than just the organisms, for example, their associated information is vital for bioinformatic applications and some researchers may only require genomic DNA from the organism rather than the organism per se. Genetic resource centres are continually adapting to meet the needs of their users and the wider mycological research community, this associated with OECD international initiatives should ensure they exist to support research for many years to come. This review considers the impact of such initiatives, the current roles of fungal genetic resource centres, the mechanisms used to preserve organisms in a stable manner and the range of resources that are offered for genomic research.

  10. Evaluation of the Centres of Excellence in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettunen, Juha Matti

    2011-01-01

    This study presents an evaluation of the centres of excellence in higher education in Finland. This approach is an example of enhancement-led evaluation aiming to improve the long-term development of education. The study presents the Degree Programme in Civil Engineering of the Turku University of Applied Sciences, which was awarded the…

  11. Yggdrasyll, a Concept for a Virtual Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wolf, H.; Beerthuizen, P.; Plevier, C.

    2009-05-01

    YGGDRASILL is the name for a Virtual Data Centre, an infrastructural solution to make a large variety of data available in a simple and uniform way to a user community, while only requiring minimal effort from the data providers. In many cases, science projects want and need to make their results available to the community, thus acting as data provider to related projects. However, most of these projects are focussed on the domain-specific scientific activities and cannot afford to spend significant technical and administrative effort on setting up a facility that provides search and download functions. It is not sufficient to make it possible to download the data, it must also be possible for users to find the appropriate data. The concept of a virtual data centre delivers a solution to this problem, by offering a central web portal that offers users advanced functions to locate and download data products. The YGGDRASILL virtual data centre improves this concept by minimizing the effort to act as a data provider in the virtual data centre. In addition to facilitating the delivery of data products that have been prepared in advance, YGGDRASILL provides also the means to create customized data products by processing on-demand. The development of YGGDRASILL was driven by the needs from the Dutch national project on climate Change, "Climate changes Spatial Planning" (http://www.klimaatvoorruimte.nl).

  12. [The main missions of the National Palliative Care Resource Centre].

    PubMed

    Doré-Pautonnier, Delphine; Baussant-Crenn, Camille; Frattini, Marie-Odile; Mino, Jean-Christophe; Rennesson, Marina

    2011-09-01

    The French National Palliative Care Resource Centre (CNDR) provides people impacted by the end of life, death and bereavement with a range of constantly evolving services. Spreading the palliative approach in order to enable everyone to benefit from it and appropriate it constitutes the main mission of the CNDR.

  13. Toward a Student-Centred Process of Teaching Arithmetic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksson, Gota

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a way toward a student-centred process of teaching arithmetic, where the content is harmonized with the students' conceptual levels. At school start, one classroom teacher is guided in recurrent teaching development meetings in order to develop teaching based on the students' prerequisites and to successively learn the…

  14. Let's Talk! ESL Students' Needs and Writing Centre Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moussu, Lucie

    2013-01-01

    When university/college faculty members believe that ESL students' writing skills are not equivalent to those of native speakers, they frequently send these ESL students to their institution's writing centres (WCs). However, this often results in frustration for WC staff, the students, and faculty members. This article first describes ESL…

  15. A User-Centred Design and Evaluation of IR Interfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, S. M. Zabed; McKnight, Cliff; Oppenheim, Charles

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a user-centred design and evaluation methodology for ensuring the usability of IR interfaces. The methodology is based on sequentially performing: a competitive analysis, user task analysis, heuristic evaluation, formative evaluation and a summative comparative evaluation. These techniques are described, and their application…

  16. Fractures of the mandibular coronoid process: a two centres study.

    PubMed

    Boffano, Paolo; Kommers, Sofie C; Roccia, Fabio; Gallesio, Cesare; Forouzanfar, Tymour

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of patients with coronoid fractures treated in two European centres over 10 years and to briefly review the literature. This study is based on 2 systematic computer-assisted databases that have continuously recorded patients hospitalized with maxillofacial fractures and surgically treated in two European centres between 2001 and 2010. During the 10 years, 1818 patients and 523 patients with maxillofacial fractures were admitted to the two centres respectively: 21 patients (16 males, 5 females) were admitted with 21 coronoid fractures and 28 associated maxillofacial fractures. A mean age of 42.1 years was observed. The fractures were mainly the result of motor vehicle accidents, followed by assaults and falls. The most frequently observed associated maxillofacial fracture was a zygomatic fracture (13 fractures). In both centres, mandibular coronoid fractures are treated unless a severe dislocation of the fractured coronoid is observed or a functional mandibular impairment is encountered. Conservative treatment can be used, together with the open reduction and internal fixation of associated fractures. The crucial point is to prevent ankylosis, which may be prevented by correct and early postoperative physiotherapy and mandibular function.

  17. Centre for Applied Language Studies, University of Limerick, Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Angela; Atkinson, David; Farr, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    The Centre for Applied Language Studies (CALS), founded in 1997, brings together researchers and postgraduate students from several disciplines in language studies, and is structured in three research clusters: New learning environments; Discourse, society and identity; and Plurilingualism and language policy. There is a certain amount of…

  18. Lipids in photosynthetic reaction centres: structural roles and functional holes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael R

    2007-01-01

    Photosynthetic proteins power the biosphere. Reaction centres, light harvesting antenna proteins and cytochrome b(6)f (or bc(1)) complexes are expressed at high levels, have been subjected to an intensive spectroscopic, biochemical and mutagenic analysis, and several have been characterised to an informatively high resolution by X-ray crystallography. In addition to revealing the structural basis for the transduction of light energy, X-ray crystallography has brought molecular insights into the relationships between these multicomponent membrane proteins and their lipid environment. Lipids resolved in the X-ray crystal structures of photosynthetic proteins bind light harvesting cofactors, fill intra-protein cavities through which quinones can diffuse, form an important part of the monomer-monomer interface in multimeric structures and may facilitate structural flexibility in complexes that undergo partial disassembly and repair. It has been proposed that individual lipids influence the biophysical properties of reaction centre cofactors, and so affect the rate of electron transfer through the complex. Lipids have also been shown to be important for successful crystallisation of photosynthetic proteins. Comparison of the three types of reaction centre that have been structurally characterised reveals interesting similarities in the position of bound lipids that may point towards a generic requirement to reinforce the structure of the core electron transfer domain. The crystallographic data are also providing new opportunities to find molecular explanations for observed effects of different types of lipid on the structure, mechanism and organisation of reaction centres and other photosynthetic proteins.

  19. Identifying Centres of Plant Biodiversity in South Australia

    PubMed Central

    Guerin, Greg R.; Biffin, Ed; Baruch, Zdravko; Lowe, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify regional centres of plant biodiversity in South Australia, a sub-continental land area of 983,482 km2, by mapping a suite of metrics. Broad-brush conservation issues associated with the centres were mapped, specifically climate sensitivity, exposure to habitat fragmentation, introduced species and altered fire regimes. We compiled 727,417 plant species records from plot-based field surveys and herbarium records and mapped the following: species richness (all species; South Australian endemics; conservation-dependent species; introduced species); georeferenced weighted endemism, phylogenetic diversity, georeferenced phylogenetic endemism; and measures of beta diversity at local and state-wide scales. Associated conservation issues mapped were: climate sensitivity measured via ordination and non-linear modelling; habitat fragmentation represented by the proportion of remnant vegetation within a moving window; fire prone landscapes assessed using fire history records; invasive species assessed through diversity metrics, species distribution and literature. Compared to plots, herbarium data had higher spatial and taxonomic coverage but records were more biased towards major transport corridors. Beta diversity was influenced by sampling intensity and scale of comparison. We identified six centres of high plant biodiversity for South Australia: Western Kangaroo Island; Southern Mount Lofty Ranges; Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara lands; Southern Flinders Ranges; Southern Eyre Peninsula; Lower South East. Species composition in the arid-mediterranean ecotone was the most climate sensitive. Fragmentation mapping highlighted the dichotomy between extensive land-use and high remnancy in the north and intensive land-use and low remnancy in the south. Invasive species were most species rich in agricultural areas close to population centres. Fire mapping revealed large variation in frequency across the state. Biodiversity scores were not always

  20. The IOC Centres of Excellence bring prevention to sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Engebretsen, Lars; Bahr, Roald; Cook, Jill L; Derman, Wayne; Emery, Carolyn A; Finch, Caroline F; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Schwellnus, Martin; Steffen, Kathrin

    2014-09-01

    The protection of an athlete's health and preventing injuries and illnesses in sport are top priorities for the IOC and its Medical Commission. The IOC therefore partners with selected research centres around the world and supports research in the field of sports medicine. This has enabled the IOC to develop an international network of expert scientists and clinicians in sports injury and disease prevention research. The IOC wants to promote injury and disease prevention and the improvement of physical health of the athlete by: (1) establishing long-term research programmes on injury and disease prevention (including studies on basic epidemiology, risk factors, injury mechanisms and intervention), (2) fostering collaborative relationships with individuals, institutions and organisations to improve athletes' health, (3) implementing and collaborating with applied, ongoing and novel research and development within the framework and long-term strategy of the IOC and (4) setting up knowledge translation mechanisms to share scientific research results with the field throughout the Olympic Movement and sports community and converting these results into concrete actions to protect the health of the athletes. In 2009, the IOC also identified four research centres that had an established track record in research, educational and clinical activities to achieve these ambitions: (1) the Australian Centre for Research into Injury in Sport and its Prevention (ACRISP), Australia; (2) the Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre (SIPRC), Canada; (3) the Clinical Sport and Exercise Medicine Research (CSEM), South Africa and (4) the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center (OSTRC), Norway. This paper highlights the work carried out by these four IOC Centres of Excellence over the past 6 years and their contribution to the world of sports medicine.

  1. 3 or 1? - 3D cone-sheet architecture provides insight into the centre(s) of Ardnamurchan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R.; Mathieu, Lucie; Emeleus, Henry C.; Donaldson, Colin H.

    2013-04-01

    The Palaeogene Ardnamurchan igneous centre, NW Scotland, was a defining place for the development of classic concepts of cone-sheet, ring-dyke, and dyke emplacement. It holds therefore an iconic status among geologists and has influenced our understanding of subvolcanic structures fundamentally. We have used historic geological maps of Ardnamurchan to project the underlying three-dimensional (3D) cone-sheet structure. The results illustrate that a single elongate magma chamber likely acted as the source of the cone-sheet swarms, instead of the traditionally accepted model of three successive centres. Our finding is moreover consistent with recent sedimentological, geochemical, geophysical, and structural investigations that all support a ridge-like morphology for the Ardnamurchan volcano. This challenges the static model of cone-sheet emplacement that involves successive but independent centres in favour of a dynamical one that involves a single, but elongate magma chamber that is progressively evolving. The latter model reduces the lifetime required for the Ardnamurchan centre considerably.

  2. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: National Drug Dependence Treatment Centre, India--a profile.

    PubMed

    Ray, Rajat; Dhawan, Anju; Chopra, Anita

    2013-10-01

    The National Drug Dependence Treatment Centre (NDDTC) is a part of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, a premier autonomous medical university in India. This article provides an account of its origin and its contribution to the field of substance use disorder at the national and international levels. Since its establishment, the NDDTC has played a major role in the development of various replicable models of care, the training of post-graduate students of psychiatry, research, policy development and planning. An assessment of the magnitude of drug abuse in India began in the early 1990s and this was followed by a National Survey on Extent, Patterns and Trends of Drug Abuse in 2004. Several models of clinical care have been developed for population subgroups in diverse settings. The centre played an important role in producing data and resource material which helped to scale up opioid substitution treatment in India. A nationwide database on the profile of patients seeking treatment (Drug Abuse Monitoring System) at government drug treatment centres has also been created. The centre has provided valuable inputs for the Government of India's programme planning. Besides clinical studies, research has also focused on pre-clinical studies. Capacity-building is an important priority, with training curricula and resource material being developed for doctors and paramedical staff. Many of these training programmes are conducted in collaboration with other institutions in the country. The NDDTC has received funding from several national and international organizations for research and scientific meetings, and, most recently (2012), it has been designated as a World Health Organization Collaborating Centre on Substance Abuse.

  3. Home-based versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Rod S; Dalal, Hayes; Jolly, Kate; Moxham, Tiffany; Zawada, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background The burden of cardiovascular disease world-wide is one of great concern to patients and health care agencies alike. Traditionally centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes are offered to individuals after cardiac events to aid recovery and prevent further cardiac illness. Home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes have been introduced in an attempt to widen access and participation. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes compared with supervised centre-based cardiac rehabilitation on mortality and morbidity, health-related quality of life and modifiable cardiac risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease. Search methods We updated the search of a previous review by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (2007, Issue 4), MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL from 2001 to January 2008. We checked reference lists and sought advice from experts. No language restrictions were applied. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (e.g. hospital, gymnasium, sports centre) with home-based programmes, in adults with myocardial infarction, angina, heart failure or who had undergone revascularisation. Data collection and analysis Studies were selected independently by two reviewers, and data extracted by a single reviewer and checked by a second one. Authors were contacted where possible to obtain missing information. Main results Twelve studies (1,938 participants) met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies recruited a lower risk patient following an acute myocardial infarction (MI) and revascularisation. There was no difference in outcomes of home- versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation in mortality risk ratio (RR) was 1.31 (95% confidence interval (C) 0.65 to 2.66), cardiac events, exercise capacity standardised mean difference (SMD) −0.11 (95% CI −0.35 to 0.13), as well

  4. Children as service users of a children's centre.

    PubMed

    James, Joan

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish what is important to pre-school children as service users of a children's centre. This research was conducted as part of a range of service users' perspectives in one inner city children's centre. This study shows that young children as service users are capable of contributing their views. The participants enjoyed private spaces. Nature and the environment were important to these children, as was watching their friends playing happily A mosaic approach was used in this qualitative study of five children aged three to four years. The mosaic approach uses observation and interviewing with participatory use of cameras by the children. It is a strengths-based approach, which extends to all children irrespective of ability and background. If adults are to understand children they need to look for opportunities for their voices to be heard.

  5. Optimising the person-centred management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Anne

    Type 2 diabetes is increasing in prevalence at a worrying rate and has been exacerbated by the worldwide obesity epidemic. The number of people in the UK diagnosed with type 2 diabetes has soared by 60% in the past 10 years. Type 2 diabetes is a very serious condition, with significant associated risks, and is the leading cause of avoidable macro- and microvascular complications. Health professionals have a key role in enabling and optimising person-centred approaches, educating and augmenting the essential skills every person, whatever his or her individual circumstances, requires for the successful self-management of this lifelong condition. This article reviews approaches to care for the management of hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes, which includes optimising person-centred targets, promoting individualised care, minimising the risk of complications and promoting education from diagnosis onwards.

  6. Plans for a German Grid Operations and Support Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reißer, Sabin

    The German grid initiative D-Grid brings together various scientific and commercial projects in fields like medicine, engineering, banking, meteorology using the same grid infrastructure. In this infrastructure, which comprises more than 30 computing centres, three middleware stacks (gLite, Globus and Unicore) are deployed and used by the various communities. This variety of applications as well as of middleware calls for well organised operations and support. The German Grid Operations and Support Centre (GOSC) aim to answer this challenge and also provides an uplink to international activities like EGI. The GOSC will provide middleware services like reference installations for the various middleware flavours. It will manage the national grid operations (regional monitoring, SLA enforcement) and will be responsible for providing VO and user services, like application support and a helpdesk.

  7. The Manitoba Centre for Health Policy: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Marchessault, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Context: The Manitoba Centre for Health Policy (MCHP) is a university research centre with a long-standing contractual arrangement with government. Objective: The purpose of this project was to examine the facilitators and challenges in the development, establishment and continuation of MCHP. Methods: In-depth, semi-structured interviews with 28 participants selected purposefully and a document review were conducted and analyzed using qualitative methods. Results: Although a unique confluence of factors facilitated MCHP's establishment, participants viewed safeguards to credibility (arm's-length from government; guaranteed academic freedom) along with powerful advocates as key to longevity. Other factors that participants discussed as important to sustainability included excellence in scholarship; thorough protection of privacy; stable funding; incremental growth; teamwork; leadership; nurturing of relationships; and authentic partnerships. Conclusions: MCHP has demonstrated that using local administrative data to address policy-related research questions is of enduring value to local and provincial communities, and also has national and international relevance. PMID:24933371

  8. Safety Assurances at Space Test Centres: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcon Ruiz, Raul; O'Neil, Sean; Valls, Rafel Prades

    2010-09-01

    The European Space Agency’s(ESA) experts in quality, cleanliness and contamination control, safety, test facilities and test methods have accumulated valuable experience during the performance of dedicated audits of space test centres in Europe over a period of 10 years. This paper is limited to a summary of the safety findings and provides a valuable reference to the lessons learned, identifying opportunities for improvement in the areas of risk prevention measures associated to the safety of all test centre personnel, the test specimen, the test facilities and associated infrastructure. Through the analysis of the audit results the authors present what are the main lessons learned, and conclude how an effective safety management system will contribute to successful test campaigns and have a positive impact on the cost and schedule of space projects.

  9. The Contribution of OLG Data and Analysis Centre to EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stangl, Günter; Krauss, Sandro

    2013-04-01

    OLG (Observatory Lustbuehel Graz) as a joint venture of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Federal Office of Metrology and Surveying works as a GNSS data centre and analyses GNSS data for reference maintenance, geokinematics and ionosphere research. Due to the change from epoch to permanent sites regions in Africa, Asia and Europe are investigated since 1995. Presently, observations from about 300 GNSS stations are used for analysis. Most of the stations are public and are retrieved from different global, regional and local data centres. In addition some institutions provide their private data to the OLG. After presenting the main regions Austria, Central Europe, the Eastern Mediterranean and the Western Indian Ocean the question will be how these data and products could be included into EPOS.

  10. Zoonotic infection with Chlamydia psittaci at an avian refuge centre.

    PubMed

    Kalmar, Isabelle D; Dicxk, Veerle; Dossche, Liesbeth; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports the zoonotic transmission of Chlamydia psittaci at a wild bird refuge centre resulting in the infection of members of the staff. Pharyngeal swabs were culture positive in 26% (11/42) of the sampled birds, and molecular characterisation of isolates revealed genotypes A, B, D, and E/B. The finding reflects multiple distinct infections and highlights the endemic nature of this pathogen in avian wildlife. Two clinically normal birds being prepared for release were found to be excreting C. psittaci genotype B or E/B and viable genotype B was detected in pharyngeal swabs from 30% (3/10) of the human workers tested. The findings suggest there should be enhanced surveillance and control measures in place in bird rehabilitation centres in order to minimise the risk of both zoonoses and of re-introduction of infection back into wildlife populations.

  11. Flexible learning to support safe, person-centred care.

    PubMed

    Rae, Ann

    2012-02-01

    Effective Practitioner is an educational initiative that supports nurses, midwives and allied health professionals to deliver person-centred, safe and effective care. It offers access to flexible work-based learning and development resources. This article describes the progress of the initiative and sets out the expected effects on service delivery, as well as exploring the Scottish context and the initiative's relevance to the rest of the UK and abroad.

  12. Medical students’ and patients’ perceptions of patient-centred attitude

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Patient-centred care can increase patient satisfaction and lead to better clinical outcomes for them, such as improved physical status and higher health-related quality of life. However, doctors’ and patients’ views on patient-centred attitude might differ and could be affected by culture and the community environment. To clarify the differences in primary care patients’ and senior medical students’ perceptions of medical students’ patient-centred attitude. Methods A total of 1,025 subjects—827 patients from primary care institutions and 198 fourth-year medical students from a medical college in South Korea—completed the Patient Practitioner Orientation Scale (PPOS). The students completed the self-reported questionnaire at the end of their clinical clerkship. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, and one-way analysis of variances were conducted in SPSS version 21.0. Results Firstly, sharing subscale scores were higher among patients than among medical students (students, 3.61 vs. patients, 3.76; p<0.001), but secondly, caring subscale scores were higher among medical students (students, 4.18 vs. patients, 3.82; p<0.001). Thirdly, PPOS total scores were higher among medical students (students, 3.90 vs. patients, 3.79; p=0.001). Finally, male students had the lowest sharing scores (F=6.811, p<0.001) and female students showed the highest PPOS total scores (F=5.805, p=0.001). Conclusion Significant differences between medical students’ and patients’ perceptions of medical students’ patient-centred attitudes suggest the necessity of educational efforts to overcome the gap between the groups. PMID:28264552

  13. Planetary nebulae near the Galactic Centre: chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavichia, O.; Costa, R. D. D.; Maciel, W. J.; Mollá, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we report physical parameters and abundances derived for a sample of high extinction planetary nebulae located in the Galactic bulge, near the Galactic Centre, based on low dispersion spectroscopy secured at the SOAR telescope using the Goodman spectrograph. The results show that the abundances of our sample are similar to those from other regions of the bulge. Nevertheless, the average abundances of the Galactic bulge do not follow the observed trend of the radial abundance gradient in the disk.

  14. The European Micropaleontological Reference Centre in Kraków

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Michael; Waskowska, Anna; Bebenek, Slawomir; Pilarz, Monika

    2016-04-01

    We are pleased to announce the establishment of the European Micropaleontological Reference Centre, housed in the offices of Micropress Europe at the AGH University of Science & Technology in Krakow, Poland. The new European Micropaleontological Reference Centre is an initiative of the Grzybowski Foundation and Micropress Europe. The centre is designed to serve the micropaleontological community by providing a permanent repository or "museum" for published microfossil collections. The centre houses a growing collection of microfossils picked into faunal slides, as well as a well-stocked library of micropaleontological books, journals, and reprints. We have the only up-to-date paper copy of the Ellis & Messina Catalogue of Foraminifera in Central Europe. Currently, the slide collections include: - Type slides of benthic foraminifera from Poland (the collection of I. Heller from the Polish oil company GEONAFTA), - Carboniferous foraminifera from Germany and Poland (collections of G. Eickhoff and Z. Alexandrowicz), - IODP sites in the Arctic, Atlantic, and Indian Oceans (collections of M. Kaminski, E. Setoyama, A. Holborn), - Exploration wells in the Boreal seas: North Sea, Norwegian Sea, Western Barents Sea, Labrador Sea, Bering Sea, Spitsbergen, Western Siberia (collections of M. Kaminski, J. Nagy, T. Van Den Akker, V. Podobina, and others), - Paratethyan Foraminifera (collections of E. Luczkowska, C. Beldean, F. Szekely), - Mesozoic-Paleogene Foraminifera from Gubbio, Italy (collections of M. Kaminski, C. Cetean, and students) and the Polish Carpathians (collection of A. Waskowska), - Caribbean (collection of M. Kaminski, R. Preece), West Africa (collection of R. Preece, S. Kender, C. Cetean), - We have a separate collection of type specimens of species (paratypes). Slides are housed in cabinet drawers together with the relevant publication. Researchers are welcome to visit the offices of Micropress Europe to view the archived microfossil collections. The center

  15. Underwater manifold centre-drilled cuttings disposal system

    SciTech Connect

    Biddlestone, P.A.

    1983-09-01

    During the construction of the Central Cormorant Underwater Manifold Centre (UMC), it was recognised that the cuttings produced during the drilling of template wells would interfere with UMC operations, if deposited on top of the structure. A dual system was developed and installed on the Stadrill (the unit planned to drill the wells) to remove the cuttings from the rig to the seabed away from the UMC.

  16. Dispatch centres: what is the right population catchment size?

    PubMed

    Dami, Fabrice; Fuchs, Vincent; Hugli, Olivier

    2015-04-09

    Literature on medical dispatch is growing, focusing mainly on efficiency (under and overtriage) and dispatch-assisted CPR. But the issue of population catchment size, functional costs and rationalization is rarely addressed. If we can observe a trend toward a decreasing number of dispatch centres in many European countries, there is today no evidence on what is the right catchment size to reach the best balance between quality of services and costs.

  17. Infrared diffuse interstellar bands in the Galactic Centre region.

    PubMed

    Geballe, T R; Najarro, F; Figer, D F; Schlegelmilch, B W; de la Fuente, D

    2011-11-02

    The spectrum of any star viewed through a sufficient quantity of diffuse interstellar material reveals a number of absorption features collectively called 'diffuse interstellar bands' (DIBs). The first DIBs were reported about 90  years ago, and currently well over 500 are known. None of them has been convincingly identified with any specific element or molecule, although recent studies suggest that the DIB carriers are polyatomic molecules containing carbon. Most of the DIBs currently known are at visible and very near-infrared wavelengths, with only two previously known at wavelengths beyond one micrometre (10,000 ångströms), the longer of which is at 1.318 micrometres (ref. 6). Here we report 13 diffuse interstellar bands in the 1.5-1.8 micrometre interval on high-extinction sightlines towards stars in the Galactic Centre. We argue that they originate almost entirely in the Galactic Centre region, a considerably warmer and harsher environment than where DIBs have been observed previously. The relative strengths of these DIBs towards the Galactic Centre and the Cygnus OB2 diffuse cloud are consistent with their strengths scaling mainly with the extinction by diffuse material.

  18. Ancient deuterostome origins of vertebrate brain signalling centres.

    PubMed

    Pani, Ariel M; Mullarkey, Erin E; Aronowicz, Jochanan; Assimacopoulos, Stavroula; Grove, Elizabeth A; Lowe, Christopher J

    2012-03-14

    Neuroectodermal signalling centres induce and pattern many novel vertebrate brain structures but are absent, or divergent, in invertebrate chordates. This has led to the idea that signalling-centre genetic programs were first assembled in stem vertebrates and potentially drove morphological innovations of the brain. However, this scenario presumes that extant cephalochordates accurately represent ancestral chordate characters, which has not been tested using close chordate outgroups. Here we report that genetic programs homologous to three vertebrate signalling centres-the anterior neural ridge, zona limitans intrathalamica and isthmic organizer-are present in the hemichordate Saccoglossus kowalevskii. Fgf8/17/18 (a single gene homologous to vertebrate Fgf8, Fgf17 and Fgf18), sfrp1/5, hh and wnt1 are expressed in vertebrate-like arrangements in hemichordate ectoderm, and homologous genetic mechanisms regulate ectodermal patterning in both animals. We propose that these genetic programs were components of an unexpectedly complex, ancient genetic regulatory scaffold for deuterostome body patterning that degenerated in amphioxus and ascidians, but was retained to pattern divergent structures in hemichordates and vertebrates.

  19. A New Acoustic Test Facility at Alcatel Space Test Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurat, A.; Jezequel, L.

    2004-08-01

    Due to the obsolescence of its acoustic test facility, Alcatel Space has initiated the investment of a large acoustic chamber on its test centre located in Cannes, south of France. This paper presents the main specification elaborated to design the facility, and the solution chosen : it will be located on a dedicated area of the existing test centre and will be based on technical solution already used in similar facilities over the world. The main structure consists in a chamber linked to an external envelope (concrete building) through suspension aiming at decoupling the vibration and preventing from seismic risks. The noise generation system is based on the use of Wyle modulators located on the chamber roof. Gaseous nitrogen is produced by a dedicated gas generator developed by Air-Liquide that could deliver high flow rate with accurate pressure and temperature controls. The control and acquisition system is based on existing solution implemented on the vibration facilities of the test centre. With the start of the construction in May 2004, the final acceptance tests are planned for April 2005, and the first satellites to be tested are planned for May 2005.

  20. Centre of pressure correlates with pyramid performance in acrobatic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Floría, Pablo; Gómez-Landero, Luis Arturo; Harrison, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Acrobatic gymnasts need excellent balance control to execute pyramids where one gymnast is supported by another. The objectives of this study were: (1) to describe balance performance by assessing the centre of pressure displacement in a group of acrobatic gymnasts executing pyramids; (2) to determine the relationship between the parameters describing the centre of pressure oscillations and pyramid score; and (3) to examine the role of each foot in providing a solid base of support to maintain the balance of the pyramid. Sixteen acrobatic gymnasts grouped in pairs performed a Half pyramid and a Straddle pyramid held for 7 s on two force platforms. Path length, variance, range trajectory, and surface area of the centre of pressure of each foot were examined to analyse the balance of the pyramid. The path length was correlated with the pyramid score (Straddle: p = 0.692 [large]; Half: p = 0.407 [moderate]). There were differences in the functions of each leg to maintain balance, with the non-preferred leg supporting a higher weight of the pyramid while the preferred leg performed control movements to maintain balance. The results suggested that quantitative analysis of balance can provide important information on pyramid performance.

  1. Laser writing of coherent colour centres in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Chen; Salter, Patrick S.; Knauer, Sebastian; Weng, Laiyi; Frangeskou, Angelo C.; Stephen, Colin J.; Ishmael, Shazeaa N.; Dolan, Philip R.; Johnson, Sam; Green, Ben L.; Morley, Gavin W.; Newton, Mark E.; Rarity, John G.; Booth, Martin J.; Smith, Jason M.

    2016-12-01

    Optically active point defects in crystals have gained widespread attention as photonic systems that could be applied in quantum information technologies. However, challenges remain in the placing of individual defects at desired locations, an essential element of device fabrication. Here we report the controlled generation of single negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV‑) centres in diamond using laser writing. Aberration correction in the writing optics allows precise positioning of the vacancies within the diamond crystal, and subsequent annealing produces single NV‑ centres with a probability of success of up to 45 ± 15%, located within about 200 nm of the desired position in the transverse plane. Selected NV‑ centres display stable, coherent optical transitions at cryogenic temperatures, a prerequisite for the creation of distributed quantum networks of solid-state qubits. The results illustrate the potential of laser writing as a new tool for defect engineering in quantum technologies, and extend laser processing to the single-defect domain.

  2. Service quality perceptions in primary health care centres in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, Vicky; Zygiaris, Sotiris

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Context  The paper refers to the increased competition between health care providers and the need for patient‐centred services in Greece. Using service quality methodology, this paper investigates service quality perceptions of patients in Greek public primary health centres. Objective  To test the internal consistency and applicability of SERVQUAL in primary health care centres in Greece. Strategy  SERVQUAL was used to examine whether patients have different expectations from health care providers and whether different groups of patients may consider some dimensions of care more important than others. Results  The analysis showed that there were gaps in all dimensions measured by SERVQUAL. The largest gap was detected in empathy. Further analysis showed that there were also differences depending on gender, age and education levels. A separate analysis of expectations and perceptions revealed that this gap was because of differences in patients’ perceptions rather than expectations. Discussion and conclusions  This paper raises a number of issues that concern the applicability of SERVQUAL in health care services and could enhance current discussions about SERVQUAL improvement. Quality of health care needs to be redefined by encompassing multiple dimensions. Beyond a simple expectations–perceptions gap, people may hold different understandings of health care that, in turn, influence their perception of the quality of services. PMID:22296402

  3. Role of operation centres in the future exploration programme.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, C.; Moreau, D.; Daerden, F.; Michel, A.

    2009-04-01

    In the Apollo programme, the role of ground operations was at the minimum due to limited communication means. The absence of support to the astronaut limited the science return of the missions by imposing very coarse operations. The Space Shuttle era saw the implementation of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite Systems which since 1983 leads to unprecedented ground monitoring and commanding capabilities and presently allows ground operation centres to conduct experiments on the ISS either independently or in support of the crew. These aspects of telescience on the ISS are currently exercised in Europe by the USOC's (User support and Operation Centres) and a few examples of the successes of this concept on external payloads will be described. The extension of this telescience aspect to robotic exploration brings some of the advantages of manned flight to automatic missions. The advantages of testing dedicated exploration operation centres during automatic missions are of different orders: direct science enhancement, increase of the exploration manned base, direct involvement of scientists in exploration operations and finally training for the operations of the manned flights. Examples in the current and near future Mars missions will be shown. In the final stage of exploration: manned flight, the role of ground support will increase crew efficiency and limit the dangers of astronaut exhaustion. The necessary infrastructure to fulfil this role will be described.

  4. Head-centred meridian effect on auditory spatial attention orienting.

    PubMed

    Ferlazzo, Fabio; Couyoumdjian, Messandro; Padovani, Tullia; Belardinelli, Marta Olivetti

    2002-07-01

    Six experiments examined the issue of whether one single system or separate systems underlie visual and auditory orienting of spatial attention. When auditory targets were used, reaction times were slower on trials in which cued and target locations were at opposite sides of the vertical head-centred meridian than on trials in which cued and target locations were at opposite sides of the vertical visual meridian or were not separated by any meridian. The head-centred meridian effect for auditory stimuli was apparent when targets were cued by either visual (Experiments 2, 3, and 6) or auditory cues (Experiment 5). Also, the head-centred meridian effect was found when targets were delivered either through headphones (Experiments 2, 3, and 5) or external loud-speakers (Experiment 6). Conversely, participants showed a visual meridian effect when they were required to respond to visual targets (Experiment 4). These results strongly suggest that auditory and visual spatial attention systems are indeed separate, as far as endogenous orienting is concerned.

  5. Polarized emission from an off-centred dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétri, J.

    2017-03-01

    Radio polarization measurements of pulsed emission from pulsars offer a valuable insight into the basic geometry of the neutron star: inclination angle between the magnetic and rotation axis and inclination of the line of sight. So far, all studies about radio polarization focused on the standard rotating vector model with the underlying assumption of a centred dipole. In this Letter, we extend this model to the most general off-centred dipole configuration and give an exact closed analytic expression for the phase-resolved polarization angle. It is shown that contrary to the rotating vector model, for an off-centred dipole, the polarization angle also depends on the emission altitude. Although the fitting parameter space increases from two to six (position of the dipole, altitude and shift of the zero phase), statistical analysis should remain tractable. Observations revealing an evolution of the polarization angle with frequency would undeniably furnish a strong hint for the presence of a decentred magnetic dipole in neutron stars.

  6. Patient-centred measurement in ophthalmology – a paradigm shift

    PubMed Central

    Pesudovs, Konrad

    2006-01-01

    Ophthalmologists and researchers in ophthalmology understand what a rapidly evolving field ophthalmology is, and that to conduct good research it is essential to use the latest and best methods. In outcomes research, one modern initiative has been to conduct holistic measurement of outcomes inclusive of the patient's point of view; patient-centred outcome. This, of course, means including a questionnaire. However, the irony of trying to improve outcomes research by being inclusive of many measures is that the researcher may not be expert in all measures used. Certainly, few people conducting outcomes research in ophthalmology would claim to be questionnaire experts. Most tend to be experts in their ophthalmic subspecialty and probably simply choose a popular questionnaire that appears to fit their needs and think little more about it. Perhaps, unlike our own field, we assume that the field of questionnaire research is relatively stable. This is far from the case. The measurement of patient-centred outcomes with questionnaires is a rapidly evolving field. Indeed, over the last few years a paradigm shift has occurred in patient-centred measurement. PMID:16774690

  7. U. S. Geological Survey begins seismic ground response experiments in Washington State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarr, A.C.; King, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    The men were Denver-based U.S Geological Survey (USGS) geophysicists working on the Urban Hazards Field Investigations project. On the previous day they had recorded two events on their seismographs-a distant nuclear explosion in Nevada and a blast at amine near Centralia, Washington. On another day, they used seismic refraction equipment to locate the depth of bedrock and seismic velocity to it at several locations in West Seattle and in the Seward Park-Brighton district of southeast Seattle. 

  8. [Thermodynamic principles and physiologic criteria for the use of heat engines to drive the ventricles of an artificial heart].

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Iu M; Mordashev, V M; Osipov, A P; Shumakov, V I

    1990-01-01

    The authors review the thermodynamic bases and physiological limitations of the applicability of thermal engines for driving artificial heart ventricles. Show that the thermodynamic characteristics of Stirling and Brighton cycles do not make it possible to effectively use cycle-based engines in the artificial heart. A steam engine operating in accordance with the Rankine cycle may be regarded as an optimum type engine for that purpose. Demonstrate that according to the rules of physiology, use should be made of a separate driving of artificial heart ventricles by two independently operating steam engines. Provide the characteristics of the Soviet artificial heart "MIKRON" acceptable for implantation into the orthotopic position.

  9. Extreme preconditioning: cold adaptation through sea swimming as a means to improving surgical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Harper, C Mark

    2012-04-01

    The practice of sea bathing for its health benefits was popularised by Richard Russell in Regency Brighton during the 18th Century. Although the cures he claimed it could effect seem a little far-fetched today, as with many historical remedies, there is much to be gained from revisiting such theories in the light of modern medical research. In this paper I will draw parallels between the surgical stress response and the response to cold exposure and hypothesise how a programme of sea bathing may be used to enhance postoperative recovery and reduce preoperative complications.

  10. Executive summary: value-based purchasing and technology assessment in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Ranawat, Anil S; Nunley, Ryan; Bozic, Kevin

    2009-10-01

    As US healthcare expenditures continue to rise, reform has shifted from spending controls to value-based purchasing. This paradigm shift is a drastic change on how health care is delivered and reimbursed. For the shift to work, policymakers and physicians must restructure the present system by using initiatives such as process reengineering, insurance and payment reforms, physician reeducation, data and quality measurements, and technology assessments. Value, as defined in economic terms, will be a critical concept in modern healthcare reform. We summarize the conclusions of this ABJS Carl T. Brighton Workshop on healthcare reform.

  11. Technology demonstration summary: Bio Trol soil-washing system for treatment of a wood-preserving site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program was instituted in 1986 to promote the development and application of innovative technologies to the remediation of Superfund and other sites contaminated with hazardous wastes. The Project Summary highlights the results of an evaluation of a specific arrangement of the three technologies of the BSWS. The system consists of multiple stages of physical abrasion, attrition, flotation, and washing of excavated soil in the BSW. The site selected for the evaluation is a wood preserving facility in New Brighton, MN, where creosote and pentachlorophenol were used for several decades.

  12. Applications of ERTS imagery to mappings sediments of the Twin Cities Metropolitan area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppe, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    ERTS images were compared to surficial geologic maps, prepared through traditional field studies. Lithologic boundaries, bedrock outcrops, bedrock structures, and geomorphologic features were examined. An area southeast of the Twin Cities, located chiefly in northern Dakota County was studied, as well as the New Brighton 15-minute quadrangle located in portions of Ramsey and Anoka Counties. Visual comparison of geologic maps and ERTS imagery demonstrated the limitations of this approach to geological investigations. Bedrock outcrops and bedrock structure in the metropolitan area do not appear on ERTS imagery. However, certain glacial sediments can be identified and are potentially mappable. Certain geomorphological features were also discernable.

  13. Medium scale structure of the F region

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A.K. )

    1989-06-01

    Data collected during 1980/1981 at Brighton, Colorado show clearly that the F region variations are undersampled in space and time by standard recording procedures. Fast temporal changes with periods as short as 10 min are directly observable if ionograms are taken in rapid sequences of at least 12 ionograms per hour. In order to obtain a correct spatial sampling, the distances between observing stations should not be much larger than 100 km. This conclusion is derived from the temporal variations of F layer parameters assuming a propagation velocity typical for acoustic gravity waves. 5 refs.

  14. Ionospheric variability. Final report, October 1985-October 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A.K.

    1989-03-01

    This report summarizes the results of a study of short-term variations of the ionosphere. The digital ionograms used in this analysis were recorded at Brighton, Colorado, many of them at a high rate of 12 ionograms per hour and faster. The results show that oscillations of the electron-density distribution take place in the F region with varying amplitudes and with periods of a fraction of an hour. The oscillations are coupled with varying tilts. Rapid changes, mainly of the electron density, are also observed at E-layer heights and many records indicate that the echoes come from tilted sporadic-E patches with relatively small dimensions.

  15. MUF (maximum usable frequency) (3000) as an indicator for F-region variations. Final report, February 1986-August 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A.K.

    1988-01-01

    Ionograms recorded at Brighton, Colorado during the last sunspot maximum are still being studied. Samples show that the high quality and high temporal resolution of the data may yield new information about the dynamics of the ionosphere, especially in the F region. F-region parameters from these data show that this part of the ionosphere is highly variable, with short periods of the order of the order of fractions of an hour. This report explains why the maximum usable frequency (MUF) (3000) appears to be the most-appropriate indicator for F-region variations.

  16. Division G Commission 42: Close Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Mercedes T.; Pribulla, Theodor; Ribas, Ignasi; Bradstreet, David H.; Dreschsel, Horst; Maceroni, Carla; Mikolajewska, Joanna; Munari, Ulisse; Prsa, Andrej; Scharfe, Colin; Southworth, John; Trimble, Virginia

    2016-04-01

    Commission 42 began life as Photometric Double Stars in 1948 at the 7th General Assembly in Zurich, under the presidency of Zdenek Kopal. As early as 1961, then General Secretary Lukas Plaut recommended a merger between C42 and C26, Double Stars, one of the original 32 commissions going back to 1919-22 (first president Aitken, assistant director at Lick). C42 became Close Binary Stars in 1970, at the 14th GA in Brighton (the first one I attended). Table 1 shows the presidents of C42, and vice presidents, from when the office started, through the history of the Commission.

  17. INTEGRAL Science Data Centre to be presented to the press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-03-01

    The task of INTEGRAL, the most sensitive gamma-ray observatory ever launched, will be to gather some of the most energetic radiation that comes from space. It will pinpoint and study gamma-ray sources in unprecedented detail and will help to solve some of the biggest mysteries in astronomy: INTEGRAL will investigate the origin of enigmatic gamma-ray bursts, brief but extremely powerful releases of energy, and will bring much new information on stellar explosions and black holes. Not only does INTEGRAL tell us about places where we could not live, it also tell us about the processes that made the Universe habitable, such as the formation of chemical elements. The INTEGRAL Science Data Centre (ISDC), located near Geneva, represents the key element in the exploitation and analysis of the data that will come from INTEGRAL during the two years planned for in-orbit operations. In the centre, the data will be analysed, formatted and made accessible to the worldwide astronomical community. Such fundamental work on INTEGRAL data guarantees that data can be exploited by a wide community of astronomers, including those who are not familiar with the instrumentation used for gamma-ray observations. The ISDC is supported and funded by a dozen institutes in Europe and the United States (the ISDC consortium). The press conference on 11 April marks the end of the centre's development phase and the start of its operational phase. The presence of the ISDC in Switzerland represents a particular opportunity for Swiss scientists, who will participate in a special way to the development of high-energy particle astrophysics, as a result of having privileged access to INTEGRAL data. Speakers at the press conference will include Professor T. Courvoisier (Geneva Observatory, Principal Investigator of the INTEGRAL Science Data Centre), Doctor P. Creola, (Head of Swiss Space Office), and Professor D. Southwood (Director of Science at the European Space Agency). Note to editors INTEGRAL, ESA

  18. Kinship--king's social harmonisation project. Pilot phase of a social network for use in higher education (HE).

    PubMed

    John, B A

    2013-05-08

    Students entering Higher Education are increasingly information and communications technology literate. Many students (graduates and undergraduates) arrive as "digital residents", who are adept with social media and technologically fluent. The informal use of social media for learning is becoming increasingly evident, along with the potentially detrimental effects of a poor digital profile on employment prospects. This paper describes the creation of Kinship (King's Social Harmonisation Project), a university hosted, members only social network, which is currently being piloted in the Medical School at King's College London. Along with a number of other teaching and learning resources, it is intended to use Kinship to establish an informal code of conduct by modelling and moderating appropriate professional online behaviour. Kinship was developed using an open source Elgg platform, thanks to funding of £20,000 from the College Teaching Fund under the mentorship of Brighton University (1). This educational research project, led by Medicine, was proposed to select, customise and evaluate a social networking platform in order to provide functionality that would enhance new and existing e-learning resources, support group interaction, participation and sharing and meet the diverse needs of three academic schools: Medicine, the Dental Institute and two separate Departments, the Modern Languages Centre and the Department of English from Arts & Humanities, as a pilot for wider College deployment. Student involvement is central to the project, from conducting the evaluation to moulding and customising the functionality and look of Kinship, in order to ensure that the site is authentic and evolves in response to their wishes and requirements. Formal evaluation of Kinship commences summer 2012.

  19. Sustaining the Leaders of Children's Centres: The Role of Leadership Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Leadership mentoring is a central component of the National Professional Qualification in Integrated Centre Leadership (NPQICL), which is designed to develop robust, creative and courageous children's centre leaders. Mentoring provides a safe, supportive and confidential space in which leaders can discuss the challenges of leading their centres.…

  20. Developing a Partnership between the Riverina Environmental Education Centre and Charles Sturt University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Colin; Collin, Keith

    2006-01-01

    A collaborative partnership has evolved between the Riverina Environmental Education Centre (REEC) and Charles Sturt University in Wagga Wagga. The Riverina Environmental Education Centre (REEC) is one of 24 Department of Education and Training environmental education centres in New South Wales (see www.reec.nsw.edu.au). As part of this…

  1. Rapid health assessments of evacuation centres in areas affected by Typhoon Haiyan

    PubMed Central

    de los Reyes, Vikki Carr; Sucaldito, Ma Nemia; Tayag, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Typhoon Haiyan caused thousands of deaths and catastrophic destruction, leaving many homeless in Region 8 of the Philippines. A team from the Philippine Field Epidemiology Training Program conducted a rapid health assessment survey of evacuation centres severely affected by Haiyan. Methods A descriptive study was conducted whereby a convenience sample of evacuation centres were assessed on the number of toilets per evacuee, sanitation, drinking-water, food supply source and medical services. Results Of the 20 evacuation centres assessed, none had a designated manager. Most were located in schools (70%) with the estimated number of evacuees ranging from 15 to 5000 per centre. Only four (20%) met the World Health Organization standard for number of toilets per evacuee; none of the large evacuation centres had even half the recommended number of toilets. All of the evacuation centres had available drinking-water. None of the evacuation centres had garbage collection, vector control activities or standby medical teams. Fourteen (70%) evacuation centres had onsite vaccination activities for measles, tetanus and polio virus. Many evacuation centres were overcrowded. Conclusion Evacuation centres are needed in almost every disaster. They should be safely located and equipped with the required amenities. In disaster-prone areas such as the Philippines, schools and community centres should not be designated as evacuation centres unless they are equipped with adequate sanitation services. PMID:26767134

  2. A Brief History of the J.P. Das Developmental Disabilities Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobsey, Dick

    2008-01-01

    The J.P. Das Developmental Disabilities Centre celebrated its 40th anniversary on September 1, 2007, followed by The University of Alberta's 100th anniversary in 2008. The year 2008 also brought the appointment of a new Director for the Centre. As the immediate past Director of the Centre, the author recounts some of the history of the J.P. Das…

  3. Policy in Practice: Enabling and Inhibiting Factors for the Success of Suspension Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Alison J.

    2014-01-01

    Suspension centres are a government initiative to help address disruptive student beahviour in NSW government schools. The centres are for students on long suspension from school and have not been formally evaluated. Stakeholders were asked their opinions regarding: what are the best things happening with suspension centres or what should be…

  4. Patients' attitudes to the provision of medical care from a health centre

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, M. D.; Morgan, D. C.; Tucker, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    A one in 20 sample of patients aged 18 and over registered at a health centre in Sidmouth were interviewed in their homes. Information about their personal characteristics was related to patients' use of the centre. A majority of patients found the facilities satisfactory and approved of the health-centre concept. Suggestions for improvements were also obtained. PMID:4465443

  5. In vivo estimation of the glenohumeral joint centre by functional methods: accuracy and repeatability assessment.

    PubMed

    Lempereur, Mathieu; Leboeuf, Fabien; Brochard, Sylvain; Rousset, Jean; Burdin, Valérie; Rémy-Néris, Olivier

    2010-01-19

    Several algorithms have been proposed for determining the centre of rotation of ball joints. These algorithms are used rather to locate the hip joint centre. Few studies have focused on the determination of the glenohumeral joint centre. However, no studies have assessed the accuracy and repeatability of functional methods for glenohumeral joint centre. This paper aims at evaluating the accuracy and the repeatability with which the glenohumeral joint rotation centre (GHRC) can be estimated in vivo by functional methods. The reference joint centre is the glenohumeral anatomical centre obtained by medical imaging. Five functional methods were tested: the algorithm of Gamage and Lasenby (2002), bias compensated (Halvorsen, 2003), symmetrical centre of rotation estimation (Ehrig et al., 2006), normalization method (Chang and Pollard, 2007), helical axis (Woltring et al., 1985). The glenohumeral anatomical centre (GHAC) was deduced from the fitting of the humeral head. Four subjects performed three cycles of three different movements (flexion/extension, abduction/adduction and circumduction). For each test, the location of the glenohumeral joint centre was estimated by the five methods. Analyses focused on the 3D location, on the repeatability of location and on the accuracy by computing the Euclidian distance between the estimated GHRC and the GHAC. For all the methods, the error repeatability was inferior to 8.25 mm. This study showed that there are significant differences between the five functional methods. The smallest distance between the estimated joint centre and the centre of the humeral head was obtained with the method of Gamage and Lasenby (2002).

  6. Review of the Contribution of the Scottish Science Centres Network to Formal and Informal Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In 2002, HM Inspectorate of Education (HMIE) carried out a review of the contribution of the Scottish science centres to formal and informal science education as part of a broader review of all science centres in the United Kingdom. This report identifies many strengths in individual centres and across the network. It is clear that the centres…

  7. Programmes & Projects of the Shell Science & Mathematics Resource Centre Educational Trust. 1987 Evaluation Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botha, P. M. C., Ed.

    This report, containing seven articles, summarizes a series of evaluation studies. The first article, "The Shell Science and Mathematics Resource Centre in 1987," provides an overview of the Centre's mode and reflections about the achievements of the Centre during the three years of its operation. The second article, "The Curriculum…

  8. Oxidation of methane by a biological dicopper centre.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Ramakrishnan; Smith, Stephen M; Rawat, Swati; Yatsunyk, Liliya A; Stemmler, Timothy L; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2010-05-06

    Vast world reserves of methane gas are underutilized as a feedstock for the production of liquid fuels and chemicals owing to the lack of economical and sustainable strategies for the selective oxidation of methane to methanol. Current processes to activate the strong C-H bond (104 kcal mol(-1)) in methane require high temperatures, are costly and inefficient, and produce waste. In nature, methanotrophic bacteria perform this reaction under ambient conditions using metalloenzymes called methane monooxygenases (MMOs). MMOs thus provide the optimal model for an efficient, environmentally sound catalyst. There are two types of MMO. Soluble MMO (sMMO) is expressed by several strains of methanotroph under copper-limited conditions and oxidizes methane with a well-characterized catalytic di-iron centre. Particulate MMO (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme produced by all methanotrophs and is composed of three subunits, pmoA, pmoB and pmoC, arranged in a trimeric alpha(3)beta(3)gamma(3) complex. Despite 20 years of research and the availability of two crystal structures, the metal composition and location of the pMMO metal active site are not known. Here we show that pMMO activity is dependent on copper, not iron, and that the copper active site is located in the soluble domains of the pmoB subunit rather than within the membrane. Recombinant soluble fragments of pmoB (spmoB) bind copper and have propylene and methane oxidation activities. Disruption of each copper centre in spmoB by mutagenesis indicates that the active site is a dicopper centre. These findings help resolve the pMMO controversy and provide a promising new approach to developing environmentally friendly C-H oxidation catalysts.

  9. Transcription factors regulating B cell fate in the germinal centre.

    PubMed

    Recaldin, T; Fear, D J

    2016-01-01

    Diversification of the antibody repertoire is essential for the normal operation of the vertebrate adaptive immune system. Following antigen encounter, B cells are activated, proliferate rapidly and undergo two diversification events; somatic hypermutation (followed by selection), which enhances the affinity of the antibody for its cognate antigen, and class-switch recombination, which alters the effector functions of the antibody to adapt the response to the challenge faced. B cells must then differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. These activities take place in specialized immunological environments called germinal centres, usually located in the secondary lymphoid organs. To complete the germinal centre activities successfully, a B cell adopts a transcriptional programme that allows it to migrate to specific sites within the germinal centre, proliferate, modify its DNA recombination and repair pathways, alter its apoptotic potential and finally undergo terminal differentiation. To co-ordinate these processes, B cells employ a number of 'master regulator' transcription factors which mediate wholesale transcriptomic changes. These master transcription factors are mutually antagonistic and form a complex regulatory network to maintain distinct gene expression programs. Within this network, multiple points of positive and negative feedback ensure the expression of the 'master regulators', augmented by a number of 'secondary' factors that reinforce these networks and sense the progress of the immune response. In this review we will discuss the different activities B cells must undertake to mount a successful T cell-dependent immune response and describe how a regulatory network of transcription factors controls these processes.

  10. JINR Tier-1 centre for the CMS experiment at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astakhov, N. S.; Baginyan, A. S.; Belov, S. D.; Dolbilov, A. G.; Golunov, A. O.; Gorbunov, I. N.; Gromova, N. I.; Kadochnikov, I. S.; Kashunin, I. A.; Korenkov, V. V.; Mitsyn, V. V.; Pelevanyuk, I. S.; Shmatov, S. V.; Strizh, T. A.; Tikhonenko, E. A.; Trofimov, V. V.; Voitishin, N. N.; Zhiltsov, V. E.

    2016-09-01

    An overview of the JINR Tier-1 centre for the CMS experiment at the LHC is given. Special emphasis is placed on the main tasks and services of the CMS Tier-1 at JINR. In February 2015 the JINR CMS Tier-1 resources were increased to the level that was outlined in JINR's rollout plan: CPU 2400 cores (28800 HEP-Spec06), 2.4 PB disks, and 5.0 PB tapes. The first results of the Tier-1 operations received during the LHC Run-2 start are presented.

  11. The Galactic Centre Mini-Spiral with CARMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunneriath, D.; Eckart, A.; Vogel, S. N.; Teuben, P.; Muzic, K.; Schodel. R.; Garcia-Marin, M.; Moultaka, J.; Staguhn, J.; Straubmeier, C.; Zensus, J.; Valencia-S, M.; Karas, V.

    2012-01-01

    The Galactic centre mini-spiral region is a mixture of gas and dust with temperatures ranging from a few hundred K to 10(exp 4) K. We report results from 1.3 and 3mm radio interferometric observations of this region with CARMA, and present a spectral index map of this region. We find a range of emission mechanisms in the region, including the inverted synchrotron spectrum of Sgr A*, free-free emission from the mini-spiral arms, and a possible dust emission contribution indicated by a positive spectral index.

  12. Preparing for space - EVA training at the European Astronaut Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolender, Hans; Stevenin, Hervé; Bessone, Loredana; Torres, Antonio

    2006-11-01

    The European Astronaut Centre has developed an Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) training course for ESA astronauts to bridge the gap between their scuba diving certification and the spacesuit qualification provided by NASA. ESA astronauts André Kuipers and Frank De Winne have already completed this "EVA Pre-Familiarisation Training Programme" before their training at NASA. In June 2006, an international crew of experienced EVA astronauts approved the course as good preparation for suited EVA training; they recommended that portions of it be used to help maintain EVA proficiency for astronauts.

  13. [Management of hypothermia -- Severe Accidental Hypothermia Centre in Krakow].

    PubMed

    Darocha, Tomasz; Kosiński, Sylweriusz; Jarosz, Anna; Sobczyk, Dorota; Gałązkowski, Robert; Sanak, Tomasz; Hymczak, Hubert; Kapelak, Bogusław; Drwiła, Rafał

    2015-01-01

    Severe accidental hypothermia is a condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In the years 2009–2012 the Polish National Statistics Department reported 1836 deaths due to exposure to excessive natural cold. The Severe Accidental Hypothermia Centre (CLHG, Centrum Leczenia Hipotermii Glebokiej) was set up in Krakow in 2013. It is a unit functioning within the structure of the Cardiac Surgery Clinic, established in order to improve the effectiveness of the treatment of patients in the advanced stages of severe hypothermia. Early identification of hypothermia, binding algorithm and coordination leading to extracorporeal rewarming, are the most important elements in the deep hypothermia management.

  14. CCS-MIP: Low cost Customizable Control Centre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labezin, Christian; Vielcanet, Pierre

    1994-01-01

    The positioning and station keeping of French national satellites are among the main missions of CNES French Space Agency CNES. The related experience and skills of the Toulouse Space Centre are reknown and often required at international level for a wide range of missions. CISI, a software engineering company, has been contributing during the last 20 years to the development of the French space programs, particularly in the field of space missions ground control segments. The CCS-MIP system, presented here, is a satellite positioning and station-keeping system designed to answer the CNES multi-mission needs, easily adaptable for a wide range of applications.

  15. Anisotropic Kepler and anisotropic two fixed centres problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Andrzej J.; Przybylska, Maria; Szumiński, Wojciech

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we show that the anisotropic Kepler problem is dynamically equivalent to a system of two point masses which move in perpendicular lines (or planes) and interact according to Newton's law of universal gravitation. Moreover, we prove that generalised version of anisotropic Kepler problem as well as anisotropic two centres problem are non-integrable. This was achieved thanks to investigation of differential Galois groups of variational equations along certain particular solutions. Properties of these groups yield very strong necessary integrability conditions.

  16. Towards Human Centred Manufacturing Systems in the Next Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anezaki, Takashi; Hata, Seiji

    Nowadays agile market is in common, and the fundamental technology supporting next-generation production system requires further development of machine and information technologies to establish “human friendly technology" and a bridging of these technologies together. IMS-HUTOP project proposes a new product life cycle that respects the human nature of individuals, and establishes the elemental technologies necessary for acquiring, modelling and evaluating various human factors in an effort to achieve the HUTOP cycle. In this paper we propose a human centred and human friendly manufacturing system, which has been proposed in the IMS-HUTOP project.

  17. Scattering Parabolic Solutions for the Spatial N-Centre Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscaggin, Alberto; Dambrosio, Walter; Terracini, Susanna

    2017-03-01

    For the N-centre problem in the three dimensional space, {ddot{x}} = -sum_{i=1}N m_i (x-c_i)/\\vert x - c_i \\vert^{α+2}, qquad x in R^3 {setminus} {c_1,ldots,c_N}, where {N ≥q 2}, {m_i > 0} and {α in [1,2)}, we prove the existence of entire parabolic trajectories having prescribed asymptotic directions. The proof relies on a variational argument of min-max type. Morse index estimates and regularization techniques are used in order to rule out the possible occurrence of collisions.

  18. The Sacred Heart Hospice: an Australian centre for palliative medicine.

    PubMed

    Stuart-Harris, R

    1995-09-01

    The Sacred Heart Hospice, Sydney, was founded in 1890 and is the largest inpatient palliative-care facility in Australia. Patients with advanced cancer form the predominant patient group, although patients with HIV/AIDS account for approximately 20% of admissions. A community-outreach service, established in 1983, cares for more patients at home than in the Hospice. Recently the Hospice has participated in a number of clinical trials and intends to become a regional centre for palliative-care research, education and training.

  19. Saskatchewan Forest Fire Control Centre Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Funk, Barry; Strub, Richard

    2000-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Forest Fire Control Centre (SFFCC) provided surface meteorological data to BOREAS from its archive. This data set contains hourly surface meteorological data from 18 of the Meteorological stations located across Saskatchewan. Included in these data are parameters of date, time, temperature, relative humidity, wind direction, wind speed, and precipitation. Temporally, the data cover the period of May through September of 1994 and 1995. The data are provided in comma-delimited ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-Staff data. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  20. INFOMAT: The international materials assessment and application centre's internet gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branquinho, Carmen Lucia; Colodete, Leandro Tavares

    2004-08-01

    INFOMAT is an electronic directory structured to facilitate the search and retrieval of materials science and technology information sources. Linked to the homepage of the International Materials Assessment and Application Centre, INFOMAT presents descriptions of 392 proprietary databases with links to their host systems as well as direct links to over 180 public domain databases and over 2,400 web sites. Among the web sites are associations/unions, governmental and non-governmental institutions, industries, library holdings, market statistics, news services, on-line publications, standardization and intellectual property organizations, and universities/research groups.

  1. Award-winning centre a spur for regeneration.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2010-09-01

    An impressive new health and social care centre designed to act as a focal point for the local community in Dudley in the West Midlands, which brings together a wide range of medical and social care services, has won the architects string of awards, including, most recently, the award for Best Design in the LIFT Awards 2010. The building's construction, however, was not without substantial challenges, among them being difficulties in securing the required funding to treat former mine workings, and construct one and a half floors of underground car parking to make the site ready for building to start. HEJ editor Jonathan Baillie reports.

  2. Maintaining health: proactive client-oriented community day treatment centres for the chronic mentally ill.

    PubMed

    Yurkovich, E; Smyer, T; Dean, L

    1999-02-01

    This grounded theory study compared the definition of health by clients of two rural mental health day treatment centres, Big Sky Centre and Montana Centre. Based on an original grounded theory study of seven chronic mentally ill/disabled clients in Big Sky Centre (Yurkovich et al. 1997), the core variable, 'preventing loss of control' and related properties, were validated with nine residents of Montana Centre. While establishing a 'fit' with previous research findings, differences emerged between these two centres. These differences related to the staffs' philosophical approaches in providing treatment to the chronic mentally ill. Big Sky Centre care providers empowered their clients to learn new behaviours from their peers and assume new roles such as newcomer, member and leader. They also encouraged a prosocial attitude, and created a sense of belonging through valued involvement in their treatment. Montana Centre clients were not empowered to try out new behaviours in the treatment environment, or seek social support networks among their peers at the centre, which would foster a sense of belonging. The result was that clients from Montana Centre relied on the formal healthcare system more often than clients from the Big Sky Centre. The competing forces in healthcare today--family members, mental health providers, and insurance or managed care providers--make it easy to lose sight of or fail to gain the client's perspective about their health status and maintenance, particularly as it concerns day treatment centres. The importance of the day treatment centre as a therapeutic community which requires educational processes, innovative nursing practice, and client-centred interventions will be discussed.

  3. European guidelines for the accreditation of Sleep Medicine Centres.

    PubMed

    Pevernagie, Dirk

    2006-06-01

    This document describes guidelines for accreditation of Sleep Medicine Centres in Europe. These guidelines are the result of a consensus procedure, in which representatives of the European Sleep Research Society (ESRS) and representatives of different European National Sleep Societies (ENSS) were involved. The information obtained during different rounds of consultation was gathered and processed by the members of the Steering Committee of the ESRS. The scope of the guidelines is to define the characteristics of multidisciplinary Sleep Medicine Centres (SMCs), in terms of requirements regarding staff, operational procedures and logistic facilities. Accreditation of SMCs is proposed to be the responsibility of the individual ENSS. The Accreditation Guidelines may thus be considered an instrument for the national societies to develop new or standardize existing accreditation questionnaires, as well as procedures for visiting the site, drafting the accreditation report, and finally, granting the accreditation. The Accreditation Guidelines are meant to be a line of action, that ideally should be followed as close as possible, but that may be subject to certain exceptions, depending on local customs or regulations.

  4. VLF Science at Indian Centre for Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Indian Centre for Space Physics has been monitoring VLF signals from stations around the world at its laboratories at Kolkata and Sitapur (Ionospheric and Earthquake Research Centre) as well as at several places throughout India when in a campaign mode. We have been interested to study high energy events from space, such as solar flares and gamma ray bursts. We have made studies during multiple solar eclipses and most importantly made substantial progress in the problem of lithosphere-ionosphere coupling while understanding various types of anomalies prior to major earthquakes. Other effects such as AGWs and LEPs are being studied. We have experience of two antarctic expedition and obtained VLF data from both Maitri and Bharati stations of India, which revealed, among other things, how the signal attenuation can indicate the extent of ice mass in Antarctica. We have been able to reproduce various VLF perturbation events using Atmospheric Chemical evolution model coupled with LWPC code. For instance we have reproduced solar flare induced VLF amplitude perturbation pattern by completely ab initio calculation. We also targeted the inverse problem, namely, deduction of the injected radiation spectra from space from the VLF signal alone, thereby establishing that the Earth can be used as a gigantic detector. These interesting results would be presented in my review talk.

  5. Colour centres and nanostructures on the surface of laser crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulagin, N. A.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a study of structural and radiationinduced colour centres in the bulk and ordered nanostructures on the surface of doped laser crystals: sapphire, yttrium aluminium garnet and strontium titanate. The influence of thermal annealing, ionising radiation and plasma exposure on the spectroscopic properties of high-purity materials and crystals containing Ti, V and Cr impurities is examined. Colour centres resulting from changes in the electronic state of impurities and plasma-induced surface modification of the crystals are studied by optical, EPR and X-ray spectroscopies, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. X-ray line valence shift measurements are used to assess changes in the electronic state of some impurity and host ions in the bulk and on the surface of oxide crystals. Conditions are examined for the formation of one- and two-level arrays of ordered crystallites 10-10 to 10-7 m in size on the surface of crystals doped with irongroup and lanthanoid ions. The spectroscopic properties of the crystals are analysed using ab initio self-consistent field calculations for Men+ : [O2-]k clusters.

  6. Science Archives at the ESAC Science Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arviset, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    The ESAC Science Data Centre (ESDC) provides services and tools to access and retrieve science data from all ESA space science missions (astronomy, planetary and solar heliospheric). The ESDC consists of a team of scientists and engineers working together and in very close collaboration with Science Ground Segments teams. The large set of science archives located at ESAC represent a major research asset for the community, as well as a unique opportunity to provide multi missions and multi wavelength science exploitation services. ESAC Science Archives long term strategy is set along the main three axes: (1) enable maximum scientific exploitation of data sets; (2) enable efficient long-term preservation of data, software and knowledge, using modern technology and, (3) enable cost-effective archive production by integration in, and across, projects The author wants to thanks all the people from the ESAC Science Data Centre and the mission archive scientists who have participated to the development of the archives and services presented in this paper.

  7. Conceptual Framework for Educational Disaster Centre "save the Children Life"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrova, T.; Kouteva, M.; Pashova, L.; Savova, D.; Marinova, S.

    2015-08-01

    Millions of people are affected by natural and man-made disasters each year, among which women, children, elderly persons, people with disabilities or special needs, prisoners, certain members of ethnic minorities, people with language barriers, and the impoverished are the most vulnerable population groups in case of emergencies. Many national and international organizations are involved in Early Warning and Crisis Management training, particularly focused on the special target to safe children and improve their knowledge about disasters. The success of these efforts is based on providing the specific information about disaster preparedness and emergency in adapted for children educational materials, accompanied with simple illustrative explanations for easy and fast understanding of the disasters. The active participation of the children in the educational activities through appropriate presenting the information, short training seminars and entertaining games will increase their resilience and will contribute significantly to their preparedness and adequate response in emergency situations. This paper aims to present the conceptual framework of a project for establishing an Educational Disaster Centre (EDC) "Save the children life" at University of Architecture, Civil Engineering and Geodesy (UACEG), providing relevant justification of the necessity to organize such centre in Bulgaria and discussing good practices in Europe and worldwide for children' education and training in case of disastrous event. General concepts for educational materials and children training are shared. Appropriate equipment for the EDC is shortly described.

  8. Enhanced Schwinger pair production in many-centre systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillion-Gourdeau, François; Lorin, Emmanuel; Bandrauk, André D.

    2013-09-01

    Electron-positron pair production is considered for many-centre systems with multiple bare nuclei immersed in a constant electric field. It is shown that there are two distinct regimes where the pair production rate is enhanced. At small interatomic distance, the effective charge of the nuclei approaches the critical charge where the ground state dives into the negative continuum. This facilitates the transition from the negative to the positive energy states, which in turn increases the pair production rate. At larger atomic distance, the enhancement is due to the crossing of resonances and the pair production proceeds by the resonantly enhanced pair production mechanism. These processes are studied within a simple one-dimensional model. A numerical method is developed to evaluate the transmission coefficient in relativistic quantum mechanics, which is required in the calculation of the pair production rate. The latter is evaluated for systems with many (up to five) nuclei. It is shown that the production rate for many-centre systems can reach a few orders of magnitude above Schwinger’s tunnelling result in a static field.

  9. A Registry Framework Enabling Patient-Centred Care.

    PubMed

    Bellgard, Matthew I; Napier, Kathryn; Render, Lee; Radochonski, Maciej; Lamont, Leanne; Graham, Caroline; Wilton, Steve D; Fletcher, Sue; Goldblatt, Jack; Hunter, Adam A; Weeramanthri, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Clinical decisions rely on expert knowledge that draws on quality patient phenotypic and physiological data. In this regard, systems that can support patient-centric care are essential. Patient registries are a key component of patient-centre care and can come in many forms such as disease-specific, recruitment, clinical, contact, post market and surveillance. There are, however, a number of significant challenges to overcome in order to maximise the utility of these information management systems to facilitate improved patient-centred care. Registries need to be harmonised regionally, nationally and internationally. However, the majority are implemented as standalone systems without consideration for data standards or system interoperability. Hence the task of harmonisation can become daunting. Fortunately, there are strategies to address this. In this paper, a disease registry framework is outlined that enables efficient deployment of national and international registries that can be modified dynamically as registry requirements evolve. This framework provides a basis for the development and implementation of data standards and enables patients to seamlessly belong to multiple registries. Other significant advances include the ability for registry curators to create and manage registries themselves without the need to contract software developers, and the concept of a registry description language for ease of registry template sharing.

  10. [Physical activity centre VSTJ MEDICINA Prague--rehabilitation for diabetics].

    PubMed

    Fábin, P; Matoulek, M

    2007-05-01

    Physical activity is the basic non-pharmacological instrument in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Nevertheless, only a small number of diabetics take regular physical exercise. One of the reasons why diabetics "do not exercise" is that they have little opportunity to try physical stress under expert supervision and to get to know its effects on, for example, sugar levels. It is a very complex matter to define the optimal intensity of physical activity of, for example, a diabetic who suffers from obesity. In 2001 VSTJ MEDICINA Prague opened its first physical activity centre at the First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, in cooperation with the Third Internal Clinic and the Institute of Sports Medicine of the First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague. It now has over 2000 members, of whom around 60% are patients with metabolic syndrome. Over 150 patients exercise every day under the supervision of expert instructors. The main objective of the Physical Activity Centre is to teach patients the correct principles of physical exercise to enable them to continue carrying out their trainers' instructions at home. A correct understanding of the importance of physical exercise and practical experience under the supervision of experienced instructors improves compliance and has a strong effect on the compensation of diabetes, thereby improving the prognoses of these patients.

  11. Giant magnetized outflows from the centre of the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Carretti, Ettore; Crocker, Roland M; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Haverkorn, Marijke; Purcell, Cormac; Gaensler, B M; Bernardi, Gianni; Kesteven, Michael J; Poppi, Sergio

    2013-01-03

    The nucleus of the Milky Way is known to harbour regions of intense star formation activity as well as a supermassive black hole. Recent observations have revealed regions of γ-ray emission reaching far above and below the Galactic Centre (relative to the Galactic plane), the so-called 'Fermi bubbles'. It is uncertain whether these were generated by nuclear star formation or by quasar-like outbursts of the central black hole and no information on the structures' magnetic field has been reported. Here we report observations of two giant, linearly polarized radio lobes, containing three ridge-like substructures, emanating from the Galactic Centre. The lobes each extend about 60 degrees in the Galactic bulge, closely corresponding to the Fermi bubbles, and are permeated by strong magnetic fields of up to 15 microgauss. We conclude that the radio lobes originate in a biconical, star-formation-driven (rather than black-hole-driven) outflow from the Galaxy's central 200 parsecs that transports a huge amount of magnetic energy, about 10(55) ergs, into the Galactic halo. The ridges wind around this outflow and, we suggest, constitute a 'phonographic' record of nuclear star formation activity over at least ten million years.

  12. A powerful bursting radio source towards the Galactic Centre.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Scott D; Lazio, T Joseph W; Kassim, Namir E; Ray, Paul S; Markwardt, Craig B; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad

    2005-03-03

    Transient astronomical sources are typically powered by compact objects and usually signify highly explosive or dynamic events. Although high-time-resolution observations are often possible in radio astronomy, they are usually limited to quite narrow fields of view. The dynamic radio sky is therefore poorly sampled, in contrast to the situation in the X-ray and gamma-ray bands in which wide-field instruments routinely detect transient sources. Here we report a transient radio source, GCRT J1745-3009, which was detected during a moderately wide-field monitoring programme of the Galactic Centre region at 0.33 GHz. The characteristics of its bursts are unlike those known for any other class of radio transient. If located in or near the Galactic Centre, its brightness temperature (approximately 10(16) K) and the implied energy density within GCRT J1745-3009 vastly exceed those observed in most other classes of radio astronomical sources, and are consistent with coherent emission processes that are rarely observed. We conclude that it represents a hitherto unknown class of transient radio sources, the first of possibly many new classes that may be discovered by emerging wide-field radio telescopes.

  13. Single centre experience of the upper limb replantation and revascularisation.

    PubMed

    Visnjic, Milan M; Kovacevic, Predrag T; Paunkovic, Ljiljana M; Milenkovic, Sasa S

    2004-01-01

    Replantation is defined as reattachment of the amputated limb using the neurovascular and musculoskeletal structures in order to obtain the recovery of the limb. Fortunately, injuries causing limb amputation are rare. Adequate treatment within the optimal time scale can provide successful rehabilitation of the shape and function of the replanted part. We report the experience of our Clinical Centre (regional replantation centre) in the replantation of five forearms/hands and revascularisation of six hands between 1997 and 2001. The most frequent site of injury was the distal part of the forearm, while the major cause of injuries was a wood processing machine. The surgical procedures were performed under general anaesthesia within 2-6 hours after injury. Vascular anastomoses, nerve repair and muscle repair were performed following the external bone fixation. All patients were given anticoagulation treatment postoperatively. Thrombosis in the anastomotic site developed as an early complication in two patients who underwent thrombectomy; one of these patients developed gangrene and underwent amputation. Late postoperative results were good in 10 patients. One patient developed acral epidermolysis. Postoperative results after revascularisation were good in all patients.

  14. Status of the "ETOILE" project for a French hadrontherapy centre.

    PubMed

    Bajard, Marcel; De Conto, Jean-Marie; Remillieux, Joseph

    2004-12-01

    It is proposed to build a national centre for light-ion hadrontherapy in France, located in Lyon in the Rhône-Alpes region. Under the auspices of University Claude Bemard Lyon-I and with the support of a research contract between Rhône-Alpes region and the Minister of Research, a design has been elaborated. This paper reviews the medical and technical characteristics of the project, called ETOILE (Espace de Traitement Oncologique par Ions Légers dans le cadre Européen). The research programs associated with ETOILE concern mainly the tracking of moving organs, the design of an in-beam PET detector, the simulation of the interaction of carbon ions with tissues and radiobiological studies on the radiosensitivity and tolerance of normal tissues and on the radioresistance of tumours. The capital cost needed to realize ETOILE is about 90 M Euro. We expect a definitive decision to build ETOILE at the end of 2004. In that case the centre will treat its first patients in 2009. A routine flux of 1000 patients per year will be reached after 3 years with an operation cost of 15 M Euro.

  15. CNAO--The Italian Centre for Light-Ion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Amaldi, Ugo

    2004-12-01

    In 1991 the author involved the Italian institute of nuclear physics (INFN) in R&D work in the field of hadrontherapy. In 1992 the TERA Foundation was created with the purpose of forming and employing people fully devoted to the design, promotion and construction of hadrontherapy centres in Italy and in Europe. The present contribution describes the main project of TERA, the CNAO (Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica), and the status of its construction in Pavia. The Italian Centre is based on the optimised medical synchrotron designed in the framework of the "Proton Ion Medical Machine Study" (PIMMS) carried out at CERN from 1996 to 2000 with CERN, the Med-AUSTRO project, Oncology 2000 (Prague) and TERA as partners. In the following years TERA introduced modifications and improvements in the original PIMMS design producing what is now dubbed the PIMMS/TERA design. Since 2001 the construction of CNAO has been endorsed by the Italian government to the CNAO Foundation formed by five major hospitals, seated in Milan and Pave, and by TERA. Since 2003 INFN is an Institutional Participant. The site chosen at the beginning of 2003 (37,000 m2) is in the close vicinities of one of the five hospitals, the San Matteo University Hospital of Pave. The construction plan foresees the treatment of the first patient at the end of 2007.

  16. Acid-rock drainage at Skytop, Centre County, Pennsylvania, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Brady, Keith; Cravotta, Charles A.

    2005-01-01

    Recent construction for Interstate Highway 99 (I?99) exposed pyrite and associated Zn-Pb sulfide minerals beneath a >10-m thick gossan to oxidative weathering along a 40-60-m deep roadcut through a 270-m long section of the Ordovician Bald Eagle Formation at Skytop, near State College, Centre County, Pennsylvania. Nearby Zn-Pb deposits hosted in associated sandstone and limestone in Blair and Centre Counties were prospected in the past; however, these deposits generally were not viable as commercial mines. The pyritic sandstone from the roadcut was crushed and used locally as road base and fill for adjoining segments of I?99. Within months, acidic (pH1,000 mg/L), seep waters at the base of the cut contain >100 mg/L dissolved Zn and >1 mg/L As, Co, Cu, and Ni. Lead is relatively immobile (<10 ?g/L in seep waters). The salts sequester metals and acidity between rainfall events. Episodic salt dissolution then contributes pulses of contamination including acid to surface runoff and ground water. The Skytop experience highlights the need to understand dynamic interactions of mineralogy and hydrology in order to avoid potentially negative environmental impacts associated with excavation in sulfidic rocks.

  17. Translating the medical home into patient-centred language

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Camille; Zittleman, Linda; Ringel, Marc; Felzien, Maret; Bennett, Christopher; Cowart, Shirley; Flores, Martha; Flores, Rafael; Hernandez, Mike; Norman, Ned; Rodriquez, Mary; Sanchez, Norah; Sanchez, Sergio; Winkelman, Kathryn; Winkelman, Steve; Sutter, Christin; Gale, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Background The patient-centred medical home (PCMH) is a healthcare delivery model that aims to make health care more effective and affordable and to curb the rise in episodic care resulting from increasing costs and sub-specialisation of health care. Although the PCMH model has been implemented in many different healthcare settings, little is known about the PCMH in rural or underserved settings. Further, less is known about patients' understanding of the PCMH and its effect on their care. Aims The goal of this project was to ascertain the patient perspective of the PCMH and develop meaningful language around the PCMH to help inform and promote patients' participation with the PCMH. Method The High Plains Research Network Community Advisory Council (CAC) is comprised of a diverse group of individuals from rural eastern Colorado. The CAC and its academic partners started this project by receiving a comprehensive education on the PCMH. Using a community-based participatory research approach, the CAC translated technical medical jargon on the PCMH into a core message that the ‘Medical Home is Relationship’. Results The PCMH should focus on the relationship of the patient with their personal physician. Medical home activities should be used to support and strengthen this relationship. Conclusion The findings serve as a reminder of the crucial elements of the PCMH that make it truly patient centred and the importance of engaging local patients in developing and implementing the medical home. PMID:25949733

  18. Surgical Management of Boerhaave's Syndrome in a Tertiary Oesophagogastric Centre

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, Robert P; Forshaw, Matthew J; Datta, Gourab; Rohatgi, Ashish; Strauss, Dirk C; Mason, Robert C; Botha, Abraham J

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this study was to review the management and outcome of patients with Boerhaave's syndrome in a specialist centre between 2000–2007. PATIENTS AND METHODS Patients were grouped according to time from symptoms to referral (early, < 24 h; late, > 24 h). The effects of referral time and management on outcomes (oesophageal leak, reoperation and mortality) were evaluated. RESULTS Of 21 patients (early 10; late 11), three were unfit for surgery. Of the remaining 18, immediate surgery was performed in 8/8 referred early and 6/10 referred late. Four patients referred late were treated conservatively. Oesophageal leak (78% versus 12.5%; P < 0.05) and mortality (40% versus 0%; P < 0.05) rates were higher in patients referred late. For patients referred late, mortality was higher in patients managed conservatively (75% versus 17%; not significant). CONCLUSIONS The best outcomes in Boerhaave's syndrome are associated with early referral and surgical management in a specialist centre. Surgery appears to be superior to conservative treatment for patients referred late. PMID:19409144

  19. Star Formation and Dynamics in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapelli, Michela; Gualandris, Alessia

    The centre of our Galaxy is one of the most studied and yet enigmatic places in the Universe. At a distance of about 8 kpc from our Sun, the Galactic centre (GC) is the ideal environment to study the extreme processes that take place in the vicinity of a supermassive black hole (SMBH). Despite the hostile environment, several tens of early-type stars populate the central parsec of our Galaxy. A fraction of them lie in a thin ring with mild eccentricity and inner radius ˜ 0.04 pc, while the S-stars, i.e. the ˜ 30 stars closest to the SMBH ( lesssim 0.04 pc), have randomly oriented and highly eccentric orbits. The formation of such early-type stars has been a puzzle for a long time: molecular clouds should be tidally disrupted by the SMBH before they can fragment into stars. We review the main scenarios proposed to explain the formation and the dynamical evolution of the early-type stars in the GC. In particular, we discuss the most popular in situ scenarios (accretion disc fragmentation and molecular cloud disruption) and migration scenarios (star cluster inspiral and Hills mechanism). We focus on the most pressing challenges that must be faced to shed light on the process of star formation in the vicinity of a SMBH.

  20. Genetic counselling in a national referral centre for pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Girerd, Barbara; Montani, David; Jaïs, Xavier; Eyries, Mélanie; Yaici, Azzedine; Sztrymf, Benjamin; Savale, Laurent; Parent, Florence; Coulet, Florence; Godinas, Laurent; Lau, Edmund M; Tamura, Yuichi; Sitbon, Olivier; Soubrier, Florent; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Genetic causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) have been identified, leading to a growing need for genetic counselling.Between 2003 and 2014, genetic counselling was offered to 529 PAH and 100 PVOD patients at the French Referral Centre for Pulmonary Hypertension.Mutations in PAH-predisposing genes were identified in 72 patients presenting as sporadic PAH (17% of cases; 62 mutations in BMPR2, nine in ACVRL1 (ALK1) and one in ENG) and in 94 patients with a PAH family history (89% of cases; 89 mutations in BMPR2, three in ACVRL1 (ALK1) and two in KCNK3). Bi-allelic mutations in EIF2AK4 were identified in all patients with a family history of PVOD (n=19) and in seven patients (8.6%) presenting as sporadic PVOD. Pre-symptomatic genetic diagnosis was offered to 272 relatives of heritable PAH patients, identifying mutations in 36.4% of them. A screening programme is now offered to asymptomatic mutation carriers to detect PAH in an early phase and to identify predictors of outcomes in asymptomatic BMPR2 mutation carriers. BMPR2 screening allowed us to offer pre-implantation diagnosis to two couples with a BMPR2 mutation.Genetic counselling can be implemented in pulmonary hypertension centres.

  1. The European Astronaut Centre prepares for International Space Station operations.

    PubMed

    Messerschmid, E; Haignere, J P; Damian, K; Damann, V

    2004-04-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) contribution to the International Space Station (ISS) goes much beyond the delivery of hardware like the Columbus Laboratory, its payloads and the Automated Transfer Vehicles. ESA Astronauts will be members of the ISS crew. ESA, according to its commitments as ISS international partner, will be responsible to provide training on its elements and payloads to all ISS crewmembers and medical support for ESA astronauts. The European Astronaut Centre (EAC) in Cologne has developed over more than a decade into the centre of expertise for manned space activities within ESA by contributing to a number of important co-operative spaceflight missions. This role will be significantly extended for ISS manned operations. Apart from its support to ESA astronauts and their onboard operations, EAC will have a key role in training all ISS astronauts on ESA elements and payloads. The medical support of ISS crew, in particular of ESA astronauts has already started. This paper provides an overview on status and further plans in building up this homebase function for ESA astronauts and on the preparation towards Training Readiness for ISS crew training at EAC, Cologne. Copyright 2001 by the European Space Agency. Published by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., with permission. Released to IAF/IAA/AIAA to publish in all forms.

  2. Colour centres and nanostructures on the surface of laser crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kulagin, N A

    2012-11-30

    This paper presents a study of structural and radiationinduced colour centres in the bulk and ordered nanostructures on the surface of doped laser crystals: sapphire, yttrium aluminium garnet and strontium titanate. The influence of thermal annealing, ionising radiation and plasma exposure on the spectroscopic properties of high-purity materials and crystals containing Ti, V and Cr impurities is examined. Colour centres resulting from changes in the electronic state of impurities and plasma-induced surface modification of the crystals are studied by optical, EPR and X-ray spectroscopies, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. X-ray line valence shift measurements are used to assess changes in the electronic state of some impurity and host ions in the bulk and on the surface of oxide crystals. Conditions are examined for the formation of one- and two-level arrays of ordered crystallites 10{sup -10} to 10{sup -7} m in size on the surface of crystals doped with irongroup and lanthanoid ions. The spectroscopic properties of the crystals are analysed using ab initio self-consistent field calculations for Me{sup n+} : [O{sup 2-}]{sub k} clusters. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  3. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: the Kurihama medical and addiction centre-a profile.

    PubMed

    Tohyama, Tomomi; Yokoyama, Akira; Matsushita, Sachio; Higuchi, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    The Kurihama Medical and Addiction Center began to conduct research and to provide medical care for alcohol-related problems in 1963, when special alcoholism treatment wards were established in Japan for the first time. At first, the provision of medical care to patients was prioritized. However, training courses for specialists were initiated in 1975, and the Department of Clinical Research was established in 1984, which led to the formation of the present management structure in which the centre's staff are shared by three departments: Medical Care, Clinical Research and Education and Information. The Department of Medical Care provides specialized treatment for alcohol use disorders and medical services for other conditions, including behavioural addictions such as internet addiction and gambling disorder, as well as dementia and other psychiatric disorders. The Departments of Clinical Research and Education and Information are engaged mainly in specialized activities related to alcohol. The Department of Clinical Research conducts research on the epidemiology of alcohol use, the effects of alcohol on health and the treatment of alcohol use disorders in Japan, in cooperation with universities and other research institutions. The Department of Education and Information fosters the human capacity to achieve the primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of alcohol-related problems and the dissemination of information on alcohol. The centre also performs alcohol-related problem prevention activities, government consultations and international collaborative research and personal exchanges, thereby functioning as a central institution for alcohol policy-based medical services and research in Japan.

  4. Macroergonomic study of food sector company distribution centres.

    PubMed

    García Acosta, Gabriel; Lange Morales, Karen

    2008-07-01

    This study focussed on the work system design to be used by a Colombian food sector company for distributing products. It considered the concept of participative ergonomics, where people from the commercial, logistics, operation, occupational health areas worked in conjunction with the industrial designers, ergonomists who methodologically led the project. As a whole, the project was conceived as having five phases: outline, diagnosis, modelling the process, scalability, instrumentation. The results of the project translate into procedures for selecting, projecting a new distribution centre, the operational process model, a description of ergonomic systems that will enable specific work stations to be designed, the procedure for adapting existing warehouses. Strategically, this work helped optimise the company's processes and ensure that knowledge would be transferred within it. In turn, it became a primary prevention strategy in the field of health, aimed at reducing occupational risks, improving the quality of life at work.

  5. Student experience of a scenario-centred curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Sarah; Galilea, Patricia; Tolouei, Reza

    2010-06-01

    In 2006 UCL implemented new scenario-centred degree programmes in Civil and Environmental Engineering. The new curriculum can be characterised as a hybrid of problem-based, project-based and traditional approaches to learning. Four times a year students work in teams for one week on a scenario which aims to integrate learning from lecture and laboratory classes and to develop generic skills including team working and communication. Student experience of the first two years the old and new curricula were evaluated using a modified Course Experience Questionnaire. The results showed that students on the new programme were motivated by the scenarios and perceived better generic skills development, but had a lower perception of teaching quality and the development of design skills. The results of the survey support the implementation new curriculum but highlight the importance of strong integration between conventional teaching and scenarios, and the challenges of adapting teaching styles to suit.

  6. Prenatal screening of Cystic Fibrosis: a single centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Bizzoco, Domenico; Mesoraca, Alvaro; Cima, Antonella; Sarti, Monica; Di Giacomo, Gianluca; Scerra, Giovanna; Barone, Maria Antonietta; Di Natale, Manuela; Gabrielli, Ivan; Tamburino, Caterina; Scargiali, Claudia; Ernandez, Cristina; D’Aleo, Maria Pia; Todini, Michele; Pompili, Rita; Mobili, Luisa; Mangiafico, Lucia; Carcioppolo, Ornella; Coco, Claudio; Cignini, Pietro; D’Emidio, Laura; Girgenti, Alessandra; Brizzi, Cristiana; Cavaliere, Alessandro; Giorlandino, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The gene responsible for the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis has been known for over 15 years and represent the most common autosomal recessive disease in the european population. We aimed to investigate the incidence of this condition during fetal life. Methods: In the past 10 years we examined in our centre 25393 fetuses of women underwent to amniocentesis. We carried out the examination of the most frequent mutations which enable, according to the literature data, the identification of almost 80% of the affected alleles. Result: We identified 922 heterozygous and 9 homozygous for the mutation. The frequency of heterozygousin the examined sample was 1/27,5 while that of the affected was 1/2821. Conclusion: We encourage new thoughts regarding the diagnostic validity of the most frequent panel of mutations among the italian population in order to exclude never encountered mutations and the insertion of other more significant mutations. PMID:22439019

  7. The virtual atomic and molecular data centre (VAMDC) consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubernet, M. L.; Antony, B. K.; Ba, Y. A.; Babikov, Yu L.; Bartschat, K.; Boudon, V.; Braams, B. J.; Chung, H.-K.; Daniel, F.; Delahaye, F.; Del Zanna, G.; de Urquijo, J.; Dimitrijević, M. S.; Domaracka, A.; Doronin, M.; Drouin, B. J.; Endres, C. P.; Fazliev, A. Z.; Gagarin, S. V.; Gordon, I. E.; Gratier, P.; Heiter, U.; Hill, C.; Jevremović, D.; Joblin, C.; Kasprzak, A.; Krishnakumar, E.; Leto, G.; Loboda, P. A.; Louge, T.; Maclot, S.; Marinković, B. P.; Markwick, A.; Marquart, T.; Mason, H. E.; Mason, N. J.; Mendoza, C.; Mihajlov, A. A.; Millar, T. J.; Moreau, N.; Mulas, G.; Pakhomov, Yu; Palmeri, P.; Pancheshnyi, S.; Perevalov, V. I.; Piskunov, N.; Postler, J.; Quinet, P.; Quintas-Sánchez, E.; Ralchenko, Yu; Rhee, Y.-J.; Rixon, G.; Rothman, L. S.; Roueff, E.; Ryabchikova, T.; Sahal-Bréchot, S.; Scheier, P.; Schlemmer, S.; Schmitt, B.; Stempels, E.; Tashkun, S.; Tennyson, J.; Tyuterev, Vl G.; Vujčić, V.; Wakelam, V.; Walton, N. A.; Zatsarinny, O.; Zeippen, C. J.; Zwölf, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) Consortium is a worldwide consortium which federates atomic and molecular databases through an e-science infrastructure and an organisation to support this activity. About 90% of the inter-connected databases handle data that are used for the interpretation of astronomical spectra and for modelling in many fields of astrophysics. Recently the VAMDC Consortium has connected databases from the radiation damage and the plasma communities, as well as promoting the publication of data from Indian institutes. This paper describes how the VAMDC Consortium is organised for the optimal distribution of atomic and molecular data for scientific research. It is noted that the VAMDC Consortium strongly advocates that authors of research papers using data cite the original experimental and theoretical papers as well as the relevant databases. .

  8. Research in subsea welding technology at the National Hyperbaric Centre

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D.E.; Liddle, D.; Richardson, I.M.

    1993-12-31

    The National Hyperbaric Centre in Aberdeen is a testing facility used by diving contractors, manufacturers and offshore operators for testing of their equipment and procedures. The onshore saturation diving system is used for the qualification of hyperbaric welding procedures and diver welders. Research and development projects are also ongoing at NHC. During the past year, work has focused on the development of synergic MIG and Fluxcored wire welding parameters for the subsea repair of offshore structures. A robot welding system has been installed for operation in the large test chamber. Various aspects of health and safety in hyperbaric welding have also been addressed. These include a survey of current practice by contractors regarding welding fumes and gases and the development of an ozone monitoring system suitable for use in welding habitats.

  9. Standards of care for obsessive–compulsive disorder centres

    PubMed Central

    Menchón, José M.; van Ameringen, Michael; Dell’Osso, Bernardo; Denys, Damiaan; Figee, Martijn; Grant, Jon E.; Hollander, Eric; Marazziti, Donatella; Nicolini, Humberto; Pallanti, Stefano; Ruck, Christian; Shavitt, Roseli; Stein, Dan J.; Andersson, Erik; Bipeta, Rajshekhar; Cath, Danielle C.; Drummond, Lynne; Feusner, Jamie; Geller, Daniel A.; Hranov, Georgi; Lochner, Christine; Matsunaga, Hisato; McCabe, Randy E.; Mpavaenda, Davis; Nakamae, Takashi; O'Kearney, Richard; Pasquini, Massimo; Pérez Rivera, Ricardo; Poyurovsky, Michael; Real, Eva; do Rosário, Maria Conceição; Soreni, Noam; Swinson, Richard P.; Vulink, Nienke; Zohar, Joseph; Fineberg, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In recent years, many assessment and care units for obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) have been set up in order to detect, diagnose and to properly manage this complex disorder, but there is no consensus regarding the key functions that these units should perform. The International College of Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS) together with the Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders Network (OCRN) of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) and the Anxiety and Obsessive Compulsive Disorders Section of the World Psychiaric Association (WPA) has developed a standards of care programme for OCD centres. The goals of this collaborative initiative are promoting basic standards, improving the quality of clinical care and enhance the validity and reliability of research results provided by different facilities and countries. PMID:27359333

  10. Factors predicting drop-out in community mental health centres

    PubMed Central

    RENESES, BLANCA; MUÑOZ, ELENA; LÓPEZ-IBOR, JUAN JOSÉ

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to identify treatment, therapist and patient factors associated with dropping out of treatment in four outpatient mental health services. The experimental group comprised all 789 individuals who attended for the first time the mental health services during one year and dropped out of treatment in the same year or during the two following ones. The control group consisted of the same number of individuals, chosen at random from patients who, in the same year, attended for the first time the services and did not subsequently drop out of treatment. The overall drop-out rate was 33.2%. According to logistic regression analysis, the predictive factors of dropping out were: being treated in a particular centre, the involvement of more than one therapist in treatment, having no previous history of psychiatric disorders, being young and being male. PMID:19812755

  11. Peptic Ulcer Disease in Bangladesh: A Multi-centre Study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, C K; Khan, M R; Alam, F; Shil, B C; Kabir, M S; Mahmuduzzaman, M; Das, S C; Masud, H; Roy, P K

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of peptic ulcer has steadily declined through out the world. This decreasing trend is also noticeable in this subcontinent. The point prevalence of peptic ulcer (PUD) in Bangladesh was around 15% in eighties. The aim of this study was to see the present prevalence of peptic ulcer at endoscopy and to identify changing trends in the occurrence of peptic ulcer in Bangladesh. This retrospective analysis of the endoscopic records of multiple tertiary referral centres of Dhaka city were done from January 2012 to July 2013. A total of 5608 subjects were the study samples. We included those patients having peptic ulcer in the form of duodenal ulcer, benign gastric ulcer including pre-pyloric ulcer and gastric outlet obstruction due to peptic ulcer. Duodenal ulcer and benign gastric ulcer were found in 415(7.4%) and 184(3.28%) patients respectively and gastric outlet obstruction due to peptic ulcer was found in 23(0.40%) patients.

  12. Standards of care for obsessive-compulsive disorder centres.

    PubMed

    Menchón, José M; van Ameringen, Michael; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Denys, Damiaan; Figee, Martijn; Grant, Jon E; Hollander, Eric; Marazziti, Donatella; Nicolini, Humberto; Pallanti, Stefano; Ruck, Christian; Shavitt, Roseli; Stein, Dan J; Andersson, Erik; Bipeta, Rajshekhar; Cath, Danielle C; Drummond, Lynne; Feusner, Jamie; Geller, Daniel A; Hranov, Georgi; Lochner, Christine; Matsunaga, Hisato; McCabe, Randy E; Mpavaenda, Davis; Nakamae, Takashi; O'Kearney, Richard; Pasquini, Massimo; Pérez Rivera, Ricardo; Poyurovsky, Michael; Real, Eva; do Rosário, Maria Conceição; Soreni, Noam; Swinson, Richard P; Vulink, Nienke; Zohar, Joseph; Fineberg, Naomi

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, many assessment and care units for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have been set up in order to detect, diagnose and to properly manage this complex disorder, but there is no consensus regarding the key functions that these units should perform. The International College of Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS) together with the Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders Network (OCRN) of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) and the Anxiety and Obsessive Compulsive Disorders Section of the World Psychiaric Association (WPA) has developed a standards of care programme for OCD centres. The goals of this collaborative initiative are promoting basic standards, improving the quality of clinical care and enhance the validity and reliability of research results provided by different facilities and countries.

  13. Landtesting the underwater Manifold Centre for the Central Cormorant field

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.M.

    1983-05-01

    This paper describes the commissioning on land prior to installation of the Underwater Manifold Centre (UMC) for the Central Cormorant field. The test programme was unique in its scope and depth requiring 15 months and 11 million pounds to complete. Included in the paper are guidelines to assist future projects as well as summaries of technical results and a list of the principal problems that were encountered. Management practices utilised to guide the programme to its successful completion are emphasised throughout. Finally, the paper concludes that the landtest programme was a cost-effective and indispensable step which resulted in the UMC being installed in May, 1982 with full confidence, especially in the essential high technology components.

  14. Underwater Manifold Centre - drilled-cuttings disposal system

    SciTech Connect

    Biddlestone, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    During the construction of the Central Cormorant Underwater Manifold Centre (UMC), it was recognized that the cuttings produced during the drilling of template wells would interfere with UMC operations, if deposited on top of the structure. A dual system was developed and installed on the Stadrill (the unit planned to drill the wells) to remove the cuttings from the rig to the seabed away from the UMC. The system as conceived and designed has been successful; it fulfills the requirements for flexibility, reliability, and efficiency. Its dependence on equipment external to the rig is minimal and after the capital outlay, the running costs are only for extra crew to operate the equipment and for maintenance. However, the system has been tailor-made for the UMC, the Stadrill, and the conditions prevailing in the Cormorant area.

  15. Information security requirements in patient-centred healthcare support systems.

    PubMed

    Alsalamah, Shada; Gray, W Alex; Hilton, Jeremy; Alsalamah, Hessah

    2013-01-01

    Enabling Patient-Centred (PC) care in modern healthcare requires the flow of medical information with the patient between different healthcare providers as they follow the patient's treatment plan. However, PC care threatens the stability of the balance of information security in the support systems since legacy systems fall short of attaining a security balance when sharing their information due to compromises made between its availability, integrity, and confidentiality. Results show that the main reason for this is that information security implementation in discrete legacy systems focused mainly on information confidentiality and integrity leaving availability a challenge in collaboration. Through an empirical study using domain analysis, observations, and interviews, this paper identifies a need for six information security requirements in legacy systems to cope with this situation in order to attain the security balance in systems supporting PC care implementation in modern healthcare.

  16. The Walking Egg Project: how to start a TWE centre?

    PubMed Central

    Ombelet, W; Goossens, J

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The main objective of the Walking Egg non-profit organization is the implementation of good quality and affordable infertility centres in resource-poor countries. Three levels of assistance are suggested: A level 1 infertility clinic is a basic infertility clinic capable of offering semen analysis, hormonal assays, follicular scanning, ovulation induction and intrauterine inseminations. Level 2 infertility clinics are supposed to perform simplified IVF as well. Level 3 infertility clinics capable of offering ICSI, cryopreservation and operative endoscopy are not part of the Walking Egg Project in the initial phase. A high quality but affordable service delivery with special attention to the prevention of complications and unnecessary interventions should be the trademark of this project. PMID:27909569

  17. The ESA Virtual Space Weather Modelling Centre - Phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poedts, Stefaan

    The ESA ITT project (AO/1-6738/11/NL/AT) to develop Phase 1 of a Virtual Space Weather Modelling Centre has the following objectives and scope: 1. The construction of a long term (~10 yrs) plan for the future development of a European virtual space weather modelling centre consisting of a new ‘open’ and distributed framework for the coupling of physics based models for space weather phenomena; 2. The assessment of model capabilities and the amount of work required to make them operational by integrating them in this framework and the identification of computing and networking requirements to do so. 3. The design of a system to enable models and other components to be installed locally or geographically distributed and the creation of a validation plan including a system of metrics for testing results. The consortium that took up this challenge involves: 1)the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Prime Contractor, coordinator: Prof. S. Poedts); 2) the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB); 3) the Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB); 4) the Von Karman Institute (VKI); 5) DH Consultancy (DHC); 6) Space Applications Services (SAS). The project started on May 14 2012, and will finish in May 2014. Thus, by the time of the meeting, both Phase 1A and Phase 1B (the development of the prototype) will be finished. The final report will be presented incl. the architecture decisions made, the framework, the current models integrated already as well as the model couplers installed. The prototype VSWMC will be demonstrated.

  18. Monitoring the Galactic Centre with the Australia Telescope Compact Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkar, A.; Eckart, A.; Straubmeier, C.; Kunneriath, D.; Jalali, B.; Sabha, N.; Shahzamanian, B.; García-Marín, M.; Valencia-S, M.; Sjouwerman, L.; Britzen, S.; Karas, V.; Dovčiak, M.; Donea, A.; Zensus, A.

    2016-05-01

    The supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), at the centre of the Milky Way undergoes regular flaring activity, which is thought to arise from the innermost region of the accretion flow. Between 2010 and 2014, we performed monitoring observations of the Galactic Centre to study the flux-density variations at 3 mm using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). We obtain light curves of Sgr A* by subtracting the contributions from the extended emission around it, and the elevation and time-dependent gains of the telescope. We perform structure function analysis and the Bayesian blocks representation to detect flare events. The observations detect six instances of significant variability in the flux density of Sgr A* in three observations, with variations between 0.5 and 1.0 Jy, which last for 1.5-3 h. We use the adiabatically expanding plasmon model to explain the short time-scale variations in the flux density. We derive the physical quantities of the modelled flare emission, such as the source expansion speed vexp, source sizes, spectral indices and the turnover frequency. These parameters imply that the expanding source components are either confined to the immediate vicinity of Sgr A* by contributing to the corona or the disc, or have a bulk motion greater than vexp. No exceptional flux-density variation on short flare time-scales was observed during the approach and the flyby of the dusty S-cluster object (DSO/G2). This is consistent with its compactness and the absence of a large bow shock.

  19. Acceleration of petaelectronvolt protons in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HESS Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E. O.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Becherini, Y.; Tjus, J. Becker; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dewilt, P.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Hadasch, D.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemiére, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Lui, R.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Arribas, M. Paz; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reichardt, I.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de Los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seyffert, A. S.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tuffs, R.; Valerius, K.; van der Walt, J.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Żywucka, N.

    2016-03-01

    Galactic cosmic rays reach energies of at least a few petaelectronvolts (of the order of 1015 electronvolts). This implies that our Galaxy contains petaelectronvolt accelerators (‘PeVatrons’), but all proposed models of Galactic cosmic-ray accelerators encounter difficulties at exactly these energies. Dozens of Galactic accelerators capable of accelerating particles to energies of tens of teraelectronvolts (of the order of 1013 electronvolts) were inferred from recent γ-ray observations. However, none of the currently known accelerators—not even the handful of shell-type supernova remnants commonly believed to supply most Galactic cosmic rays—has shown the characteristic tracers of petaelectronvolt particles, namely, power-law spectra of γ-rays extending without a cut-off or a spectral break to tens of teraelectronvolts. Here we report deep γ-ray observations with arcminute angular resolution of the region surrounding the Galactic Centre, which show the expected tracer of the presence of petaelectronvolt protons within the central 10 parsecs of the Galaxy. We propose that the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* is linked to this PeVatron. Sagittarius A* went through active phases in the past, as demonstrated by X-ray outburstsand an outflow from the Galactic Centre. Although its current rate of particle acceleration is not sufficient to provide a substantial contribution to Galactic cosmic rays, Sagittarius A* could have plausibly been more active over the last 106-107 years, and therefore should be considered as a viable alternative to supernova remnants as a source of petaelectronvolt Galactic cosmic rays.

  20. Acceleration of petaelectronvolt protons in the Galactic Centre.

    PubMed

    2016-03-24

    Galactic cosmic rays reach energies of at least a few petaelectronvolts (of the order of 10(15) electronvolts). This implies that our Galaxy contains petaelectronvolt accelerators ('PeVatrons'), but all proposed models of Galactic cosmic-ray accelerators encounter difficulties at exactly these energies. Dozens of Galactic accelerators capable of accelerating particles to energies of tens of teraelectronvolts (of the order of 10(13) electronvolts) were inferred from recent γ-ray observations. However, none of the currently known accelerators--not even the handful of shell-type supernova remnants commonly believed to supply most Galactic cosmic rays--has shown the characteristic tracers of petaelectronvolt particles, namely, power-law spectra of γ-rays extending without a cut-off or a spectral break to tens of teraelectronvolts. Here we report deep γ-ray observations with arcminute angular resolution of the region surrounding the Galactic Centre, which show the expected tracer of the presence of petaelectronvolt protons within the central 10 parsecs of the Galaxy. We propose that the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* is linked to this PeVatron. Sagittarius A* went through active phases in the past, as demonstrated by X-ray outburstsand an outflow from the Galactic Centre. Although its current rate of particle acceleration is not sufficient to provide a substantial contribution to Galactic cosmic rays, Sagittarius A* could have plausibly been more active over the last 10(6)-10(7) years, and therefore should be considered as a viable alternative to supernova remnants as a source of petaelectronvolt Galactic cosmic rays.

  1. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M; Field, Martin J; Li, Hongbin

    2015-06-25

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions.

  2. Walk-in centres in primary care: a review of the international literature.

    PubMed Central

    Salisbury, Chris; Munro, James

    2003-01-01

    Nurse-led walk-in centres were first announced in April 1999. They represent a new development in unscheduled care provision in the United Kingdom (UK) National Health Service (NHS). By the end of 2000, 40 NHS walk-in centres had been opened, with further centres recently announced. This paper aims to review international experience with walk-in centres in primary and emergency care and identify relevant lessons for the UK. This study is a systematic review, with qualitative synthesis of relevant findings. Studies were identified from seven major bibliographic databases using a sensitive search strategy, and 244 relevant documents relating to walk-in or 'ambulatory care' centres were identified. Users of walk-in centres in other countries tend to be a relatively affluent population of working age, and a different population from those using conventional general practice services. Walk-in centres are used particularly when other health services are closed. The problems presented are mainly minor illnesses and minor injuries. People choose this form of care mainly for reasons of convenience, and satisfaction with the service is generally high. The very limited evidence available suggests that walk-in centres provide care of reasonable quality, but there is insufficient evidence to draw firm conclusions about the impact of walk-in centres on other healthcare services or the costs of such care. Although a number of countries have had a long experience of walk-in centres, the lack of reliable evidence on many of the most important issues is notable. In the NHS, walk-in centres represent a radically innovative attempt to improve access to health care, but the limited research available does little to inform their development. Important questions that need to be addressed include whether walk-in centres do improve access to care, for whom, and at what overall cost. PMID:12564280

  3. [Health centres, a new mode of practice for private practice nurses].

    PubMed

    Chauvet, Pascal

    2016-09-01

    Health centres group together health professionals within the same complex. They work in collaboration, have a shared information system and regularly come together around a common project, while being remunerated for treatments not covered by the French social security system by grants from regional health authorities. The advantage of health centres in terms of the multi-professional follow-up of patients is undeniable. Such centres represent a real opportunity for nurses.

  4. Nitrogen-vacancy centres: New life for hard-disk write heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamin, H. Jonathon

    2017-01-01

    Broadband nitrogen-vacancy centre magnetometry demonstrates how commercial hard-disk write heads may become useful experimental tools for nanoscale applications involving magnetism and magnetic resonance.

  5. Operational flood forecasting system of Umbria Region "Functional Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berni, N.; Pandolfo, C.; Stelluti, M.; Ponziani, F.; Viterbo, A.

    2009-04-01

    The hydrometeorological alert office (called "Decentrate Functional Centre" - CFD) of Umbria Region, in central Italy, is the office that provides technical tools able to support decisions when significant flood/landslide events occur, furnishing 24h support for the whole duration of the emergency period, according to the national directive DPCM 27 February 2004 concerning the "Operating concepts for functional management of national and regional alert system during flooding and landslide events for civil protection activities purposes" that designs, within the Italian Civil Defence Emergency Management System, a network of 21 regional Functional Centres coordinated by a central office at the National Civil Protection Department in Rome. Due to its "linking" role between Civil Protection "real time" activities and environmental/planning "deferred time" ones, the Centre is in charge to acquire and collect both real time and quasi-static data: quantitative data from monitoring networks (hydrometeorological stations, meteo radar, ...), meteorological forecasting models output, Earth Observation data, hydraulic and hydrological simulation models, cartographic and thematic GIS data (vectorial and raster type), planning studies related to flooding areas mapping, dam managing plans during flood events, non instrumental information from direct control of "territorial presidium". A detailed procedure for the management of critical events was planned, also in order to define the different role of various authorities and institutions involved. Tiber River catchment, of which Umbria region represents the main upper-medium portion, includes also regional trans-boundary issues very important to cope with, especially for what concerns large dam behavior and management during heavy rainfall. The alert system is referred to 6 different warning areas in which the territory has been divided into and based on a threshold system of three different increasing critical levels according

  6. Intussusception following rotavirus vaccination in the Valencia Region, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Vilar, Silvia; Díez-Domingo, Javier; Puig-Barberà, Joan; Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Romio, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown high intussusception rates in Spain. We performed a hospital-based retrospective observational study of the intussusception risk following rotavirus vaccinations among infants in Valencia, a region of Spain with an annual birth cohort of approximately 48,000 children, during 2007–2011, using a self-controlled case series design. We performed medical record review of all cases using Brighton Collaboration´s case definition and assessed the positive predictive value (PPV) of the intussusception diagnosis code. Among 151 hospitalized cases discharged as intussusception, we confirmed 136 as Brighton Collaboration's Levels 1 or 2, resulting in a PPV of 93% (95% CI: 87%–96%). Three confirmed cases occurred within days 1–7 following the first rotavirus vaccination. The incidence rate ratio was 9.0 (95% CI: 0.9–86.5) (crude) and 4.7 (95% CI:0.3–74.1)(age adjusted). In this first study in Europe, the intussusception risk point estimate was comparable to other studies, although results were not statistically significant, maybe due to limited power. The high PPV found will facilitate implementation of a larger study without requiring medical record review. Our finding of very few vaccinated cases despite a thorough 5-year investigation in a country that, according to previous studies, may have a large background rate of intussusception is reassuring and should contribute to deliberations about the need to include rotavirus vaccines in the official Spanish calendars. PMID:26083707

  7. Correlations Between General Joint Hypermobility and Joint Hypermobility Syndrome and Injury in Contemporary Dance Students.

    PubMed

    Ruemper, Alia; Watkins, Katherine

    2012-12-01

    The first objective of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of general joint hypermobility (GJH) and joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) in BA Dance Theatre 1st and 3rd year students at a contemporary dance conservatory. The second objective was to determine the statistical correlation between GJH, JHS, and injury in this population. A total of 85 (female, N = 78; male, N = 7) contemporary dance students participated in the study. The Beighton score (with a forward flexion test modification) was used to determine GJH, and the Brighton criteria were used to verify JHS. Participants completed a self-reported injury questionnaire that included type of injury (physical complaint, medical diagnosis, or time-loss) and injury frequency. Statistical analysis (Pearson correlation) was used to correlate GJH, JHS, and frequency-of-injury scores. Overall, 69% of the students were found to have GJH, and 33% had JHS. A statistical correlation of r = + 0.331 (p < 0.01) was found between JHS and injury. No significant correlation was found between GJH and injury. This is the first study to look at these correlations in contemporary dance students and suggests that screening programs should include the Brighton criteria to identify JHS in these dancers. Subsequent injury tracking and injury prevention programs would then provide data for further research in this area.

  8. A community training scheme in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, R; Martin, B; Williams, G; Quinn, E; Robertson, G; Chamberlain, D A

    1984-01-01

    Community instruction in basic life support and resuscitation techniques has been offered in Brighton Health District since 1978. Classes are held frequently for the general public and businesses, schools, and other organisations. First aid care for unconscious patients, the treatment of respiratory obstruction or failure, and the recognition and management of cardiac arrest is taught in a single two hour session. Over 20 000 people have been taught, up to 40 at a time in multiple groups of six to eight, by lay instructors usually supervised by ambulancemen trained to "paramedic" standards. Fifty four incidents have been reported to us in which techniques learnt in the classes have been implemented. Five patients recovered after first aid support but subsequently did not seek medical treatment. Of the 34 patients reviewed in hospital, at least 20 survived to be discharged. We believe that intervention may have been life saving in 16 instances. The benefit of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for victims who may have been asystolic is, however, difficult to quantify because the outcome without intervention cannot be predicted accurately. Community training in basic life support should be considered in association with ambulances equipped for resuscitation and hospital intensive care and cardiac care units as an integrated service for the victims of sudden circulatory or respiratory emergencies. The results achieved so far in Brighton and in other more advanced schemes, particularly in the United States of America, may encourage other health authorities to adopt similar programmes. PMID:6421403

  9. Implementing RFID in a hospital library: a scoping study.

    PubMed

    Norwood, Joseph; Skinner, Ben

    2012-06-01

    This article discusses a scoping study on implementing radio frequency identification device (RFID) in a hospital library context, conducted by Joseph Norwood for his MA dissertation at the University of Brighton. The study was carried out during the summer of 2011 to support possible RFID implementation at the Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals (BSUH) Trust, and the library staff were able to use the findings to good effect to create a business plan. This article also acts as the template for the new Dissertations into Practice feature, which was introduced in the March issue (Marshall, A. Health Information and Libraries Journal 2012, 29, 72). The dissertation highlighted here is very practical in nature and had immediate and quantifiable benefits for the Trust library. Future feature articles are likely to reflect the range of health-related dissertation topics which students choose and will include studies on user information behaviour, information services related to mental health and well-being, as well as the impact of technology on health-related library or information services.AM.

  10. A Holistic, Person-Centred Care Model for Victims of Sexual Violence in Democratic Republic of Congo: The Panzi Hospital One-Stop Centre Model of Care.

    PubMed

    Mukwege, Denis; Berg, Marie

    2016-10-01

    Denis Mukwege and Marie Berg describe the One Stop Centre at Panzi Hospital in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo that provides care for girls and women who have been raped in combination with extreme bodily harm.

  11. Service architecture challenges in building the KNMI Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som de Cerff, Wim; van de Vegte, John; Plieger, Maarten; de Vreede, Ernst; Sluiter, Raymond; Willem Noteboom, Jan; van der Neut, Ian; Verhoef, Hans; van Versendaal, Robert; van Binnendijk, Martin; Kalle, Henk; Knopper, Arthur; Calis, Gijs; Ha, Siu Siu; van Moosel, WIm; Klein Ikkink, Henk-Jan; Tosun, Tuncay

    2013-04-01

    One of the objectives of KNMI is to act as a National Data centre for weather, climate and seismological data. KNMI has experience in curation of data for many years however important scientific data is not well accessible. New technologies also are available to improve the current infrastructure. Therefore a data curation program is initiated with two main goals: setup a Satellite Data Platform (SDP) and a KNMI data centre (KDC). KDC will provide, besides curation, data access, and storage and retrieval portal for KNMI data. In 2010 first requirements were gathered, in 2011 the main architecture was sketched, KDC was implemented in 2012 and is available on: http://data.knmi.nl KDC is built with the data providers involved with as key challenge: 'adding a dataset should be as simple as creating an HTML page'. This is enabled by a three step process, in which the data provider is responsible for two steps: 1. Provide dataset metadata: An easy to use web interface for providing metadata, with automated validation. Metadata consists of an ISO 19115 profile (matching INSPIRE and WMO requirements) and additional technical metadata regarding the data structure and access rights to the data. The interface hides certain metadata fields, which are filed by KDC automatically. 2. Provide data: after metadata has been entered, an upload location for uploading the dataset is provided. Also scripts for pushing large datasets are available. 3. Process and publish: once files are uploaded, they are processed for metadata (e.g., geolocation, time, version) and made available in KDC. The data is put into archive and made available using the in-house developed Virtual File System, which provides a persistent virtual path to the data. For the end-user of the data, KDC provides a web interface with search filters on key words, geolocation and time. Data can be downloaded using HTTP or FTP and can be scripted. Users can register to gain access to restricted datasets. The architecture

  12. Talc Chimneys on the Mid Cayman Rise Spreading Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkinson, M.; Murton, B. J.; Roberts, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Von Damm Vent Field, located at a depth of 2300 metres on the Mid-Cayman Rise Spreading Centre, features an 80 metre, steep sided, conical mound. Hosted in ultramafic/mafic intrusives it is one of the few known off-axis vent sites, and is located on the Mount Dent Oceanic Core Complex. There are two main fluid orifices, which vent shimmering fluid, located at the top of the main mound with contrasting morphologies. The highest temperature fluid at 230oC is emanating from a wide-based spire approximately 3 metres high, with a wide 1-metre diameter hole on the western side of the spire, venting fluids at around 125oC. The chimneys are composed of talc (75%), silica (15%) and sufides (10%), with chalcopyrite representing the most common sulfide phase, despite the relatively low T and colourless plumes. In the chimneys, talc occurs as botryoidal and colloform masses indicating primary precipitation into pore space and is intergrown with silica in a very fine grained groundmass. Sulfides occur disseminated in both talc and silica, with minor pyrite and sphalerite present as well as the chalcopyrite. To our knowledge no other sea floor hydrothermal vent sites feature the concentrations of talc observed at Von Damm, which likely represents a third, new type of hydrothermal system after conventional black smoker systems and lower temperature, serpentinisation driven carbonate occurrences. During hydrothermal circulation of seawater at seafloor spreading centres magnesium is sequestered into clays and chlorite in the upper oceanic crust resulting in complete removal of Mg and absence of Mg in the emanating vent fluid. However, the presence of Mg-bearing silicates in mound and chimney material is not uncommon, but not in the volumes reported here, with the magnesium thought to originate from seawater, pore water, or sediments. Experimental studies confirm that on reaction with mafic and in particular pyroxene dominated lithologies, Mg is preferentially removed from the

  13. Seismological investigation of the National Data Centre Preparedness Exercise 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gestermann, Nicolai; Hartmann, Gernot; Ross, J. Ole; Ceranna, Lars

    2015-04-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) prohibits all kinds of nuclear explosions conducted on Earth - underground, underwater or in the atmosphere. The verification regime of the CTBT is designed to detect any treaty violation. While the data of the International Monitoring System (IMS) is collected, processed and technically analyzed at the International Data Centre (IDC) of the CTBT-Organization, National Data Centres (NDC) of the member states provide interpretation and advice to their government concerning suspicious detections. The NDC Preparedness Exercises (NPE) are regularly performed dealing with fictitious treaty violations to practice the combined analysis of CTBT verification technologies. These exercises should help to evaluate the effectiveness of analysis procedures applied at NDCs and the quality, completeness and usefulness of IDC products for example. The exercise trigger of NPE2013 is a combination of a tempo-spatial indication pointing to a certain waveform event and simulated radionuclide concentrations generated by forward Atmospheric Transport Modelling based on a fictitious release. For the waveform event the date (4 Sept. 2013) is given and the region is communicated in a map showing the fictitious state of "Frisia" at the Coast of the North Sea in Central Europe. The potential connection between the waveform and radionuclide evidence remains unclear for exercise participants. The verification task was to identify the waveform event and to investigate potential sources of the radionuclide findings. The final question was whether the findings are CTBT relevant and justify a request for On-Site-Inspection in "Frisia". The seismic event was not included in the Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB) of the IDC. The available detections from the closest seismic IMS stations lead to a epicenter accuracy of about 24 km which is not sufficient to specify the 1000 km2 inspection area in case of an OSI. With use of data from local stations and

  14. Establishing a malaria diagnostics centre of excellence in Kisumu, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Ohrt, Colin; Obare, Peter; Nanakorn, Ampon; Adhiambo, Christine; Awuondo, Ken; O'Meara, Wendy Prudhomme; Remich, Shon; Martin, Kurt; Cook, Earnest; Chretien, Jean-Paul; Lucas, Carmen; Osoga, Joseph; McEvoy, Peter; Owaga, Martin Lucas; Odera, James Sande; Ogutu, Bernhards

    2007-01-01

    Background Malaria microscopy, while the gold standard for malaria diagnosis, has limitations. Efficacy estimates in drug and vaccine malaria trials are very sensitive to small errors in microscopy endpoints. This fact led to the establishment of a Malaria Diagnostics Centre of Excellence in Kisumu, Kenya. The primary objective was to ensure valid clinical trial and diagnostic test evaluations. Key secondary objectives were technology transfer to host countries, establishment of partnerships, and training of clinical microscopists. Case description A twelve-day "long" and a four-day "short" training course consisting of supervised laboratory practicals, lectures, group discussions, demonstrations, and take home assignments were developed. Well characterized slides were developed and training materials iteratively improved. Objective pre- and post-course evaluations consisted of 30 slides (19 negative, 11 positive) with a density range of 50–660 parasites/μl, a written examination (65 questions), a photographic image examination (30 images of artifacts and species specific characteristics), and a parasite counting examination. Discussion and Evaluation To date, 209 microscopists have participated from 11 countries. Seventy-seven experienced microscopists participated in the "long" courses, including 47 research microscopists. Sensitivity improved by a mean of 14% (CI 9–19%) from 77% baseline (CI 73–81 %), while specificity improved by a mean of 17% (CI 11–23%) from 76% (CI 70–82%) baseline. Twenty-three microscopists who had been selected for a four-day refresher course showed continued improvement with a mean final sensitivity of 95% (CI 91–98%) and specificity of 97% (CI 95–100%). Only 9% of those taking the pre-test in the "long" course achieved a 90% sensitivity and 95% specificity, which increased to 61% of those completing the "short" course. All measures of performance improved substantially across each of the five organization types and in

  15. Regional centres for space science and technology education affiliated to the United Nations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadimova, Sharafat

    Capacity-building efforts in space science and technology are a major focus of the activities of the Office of Outer Space Affairs. Such efforts include providing support to the regional centres for space science and technology education, affiliated to the United Nations, whose goal is to develop, through in-depth education, an indigenous capability for research and applications in the core disciplines of: (a) remote sensing and geographical information systems; (b) satellite communications; (c) satellite meteorology and global climate; and (d) space and atmospheric sciences and data management. The regional centres are located in Morocco and Nigeria for Africa, in Brazil and Mexico for Latin America and the Caribbean and in India for Asia and the Pacific. The overall policy-making body of each Centre is its Governing Board and consists of member States (within the region where the Centre is located), that have agreed, through their endorsement of the Centre's agreement, to the goals and objectives of the Centre. The United Nations Programme on Space Applications, with the support of prominent educators, has developed standard education curricula, which were adopted by the Centres for teaching each of the four core disciplines. Within the framework of the International Committee on global navigation satellite systems (ICG), which is established as an informal body for the purpose of promoting the use and application of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) on a global basis, the Regional Centres will also be acting as the ICG Information Centres. The ICG Information Centres aim to foster a more structured approach to information exchange in order to fulfil the reciprocal expectations of a network between ICG and Regional Centres.

  16. Serbia National Poison Control Centre: organization and current activities.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Dugan; Joksović, Dragan; Vucinić, Savica; Todorović, Veljko; Segrt, Zoran; Kilibarda, Vesna; Bokonjić, Dubravko

    2005-01-01

    Ministry of Health of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia established the National Poison Control Centre in 1995. However, that was only the formally solution since clinical, analytical and experimental services in toxicology had worked independently for at least 40 years. Besides the Headquarters, NPCC has currently 2 main units, the Clinic of Emergency and Clinical Toxicology and Pharmacology and the Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology. The latter is consisted of Toxicological Information Department, Department of Analytical Toxicology and Department of Experimental Toxicology and Pharmacology. The Mobile Toxicological Chemical Unit is a separate department that is activated from personnel of the NPCC in a case of chemical accidents and/or disasters. Clinical, information and analytical parts of NPCC have a 365-day/24-hour working service. The Clinic of Emergency and Clinical Toxicology and Pharmacology is a place where the intoxicated patients are treated, including those that need the intensive care measures. Toxicological Information Department uses the data from a self-made computer Database for different information purposes. Department of Analytical Toxicology is equipped with a lot of contemporary analytical equipment that is giving the opportunity of identification and quantification of chemicals/metabolites/degradation products in biological material, food, water, air and soil. Basic pharmacological and toxicological research of chemicals and pre-clinical investigations of antidotes are realized in the Department of Experimental Toxicology and Pharmacology. In terms of medical prevention and rational treatment of human poison exposures in Serbia, the current organization of NPCC has so far proven to be effective.

  17. Gamma rays from the Galactic Centre region: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eldik, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    During the last decades, increasingly precise astronomical observations of the Galactic Centre (GC) region at radio, infrared, and X-ray wavelengths laid the foundations to a detailed understanding of the high energy astroparticle physics of this most remarkable location in the Galaxy. Recently, observations of this region in high energy (HE, 10 MeV-100 GeV) and very high energy (VHE, > 100 GeV) γ-rays added important insights to the emerging picture of the Galactic nucleus as a most violent and active region where acceleration of particles to very high energies - possibly up to a PeV - and their transport can be studied in great detail. Moreover, the inner Galaxy is believed to host large concentrations of dark matter (DM), and is therefore one of the prime targets for the indirect search for γ-rays from annihilating or decaying dark matter particles. In this article, the current understanding of the γ-ray emission emanating from the GC is summarised and the results of recent DM searches in HE and VHE γ-rays are reviewed.

  18. The African Laser Centre: Transforming the Laser Community in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mtingwa, Sekazi

    2012-02-01

    We describe the genesis and programs of the African Laser Centre (ALC), which is an African nonprofit network of laser users that is based in Pretoria, South Africa. Composed of over thirty laboratories from countries throughout the continent of Africa, the ALC has the mission of enhancing the application of lasers in research and education. Its programs include grants for research and training, equipment loans and donations, student scholarships, faculty grants for visits to collaborators' institutions, conferences, and technician training. A long-term goal of the ALC is to bring a synchrotron light source to Africa, most probably to South Africa. One highly popular program is the biennial conference series called the US-Africa Advanced Studies Institute, which is funded by the ALC in collaboration with the U.S. National Science Foundation and the International Center for Theoretical Physics in Trieste. The Institutes typically bring about thirty faculty and graduate students from the U.S. to venues in Africa in order to introduce U.S. and African graduate students to major breakthroughs in targeted areas that utilize lasers. In this presentation, we will summarize the ALC achievements to date and comment on the path forward.

  19. Photoluminescence of monovalent indium centres in phosphate glass

    PubMed Central

    Masai, Hirokazu; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Okumura, Shun; Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko; Ina, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Valence control of polyvalent cations is important for functionalization of various kinds of materials. Indium oxides have been used in various applications, such as indium tin oxide in transparent electrical conduction films. However, although metastable In+ (5 s2 configuration) species exhibit photoluminescence (PL), they have attracted little attention. Valence control of In+ cations in these materials will be important for further functionalization. Here, we describe In+ species using PL and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis. Three absorption bands in the UV region are attributed to the In+ centre: two weak forbidden bands (1S0 → 3P1, 1S0 → 3P2) and a strong allowed band (1S0 → 1P1). The strongest PL excitation band cannot be attributed to the conventional allowed transition to the singlet excited state. Emission decay of the order of microseconds suggests that radiative relaxation occurs from the triplet excitation state. The XAFS analysis suggests that these In+ species have shorter In–O distances with lower coordination numbers than in In2O3. These results clearly demonstrate that In+ exists in a metastable amorphous network, which is the origin of the observed luminescent properties.

  20. EUMETSAT activities in preparation of the Sentinel-3 Marine Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonekamp, H.; O'Carroll, A.; Kwiatkowska, E.; Montagner, F.; Wilson, H.; Fournier Sicre, V.; Santacesaria, V.; Loddo, C.

    2012-04-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the EUMETSAT preparations towards the operational phase of the sentinel-3A mission scheduled for launch in 2013. EUMETSAT is expanding its operational services for applications related to the marine environment and climate monitoring. In its phase E, EUMETSAT will be the Sentinel-3 satellite and Sentinel-3 Marine Centre operator. EUMETSAT has joined up with ESA for the definition of the cal val plans and systems, and to define the set-ups ensuring that the core mission performances and operational products will be state of the art. Specific aspects are the validation and monitoring against in-situ data, and different modes of operations. To support the science discussion in this session with a general familiarisation with the planned operational data streams, the presentation will provide an overview of the set-up of product monitoring and services originating from the EUMETSAT premises. Major recent developments of other marine missions involving EUMETSAT partnerships will also be debriefed.

  1. Updates to the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Christian; Tennyson, Jonathan; Gordon, Iouli E.; Rothman, Laurence S.; Dubernet, Marie-Lise

    2014-06-01

    The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) has established a set of standards for the storage and transmission of atomic and molecular data and an SQL-based query language (VSS2) for searching online databases, known as nodes. The project has also created an online service, the VAMDC Portal, through which all of these databases may be searched and their results compared and aggregated. Since its inception four years ago, the VAMDC e-infrastructure has grown to encompass over 40 databases, including HITRAN, in more than 20 countries and engages actively with scientists in six continents. Associated with the portal are a growing suite of software tools for the transformation of data from its native, XML-based, XSAMS format, to a range of more convenient human-readable (such as HTML) and machinereadable (such as CSV) formats. The relational database for HITRAN1, created as part of the VAMDC project is a flexible and extensible data model which is able to represent a wider range of parameters than the current fixed-format text-based one. Over the next year, a new online interface to this database will be tested, released and fully documented - this web application, HITRANonline2, will fully replace the ageing and incomplete JavaHAWKS software suite.

  2. Behaviour Centred Design: towards an applied science of behaviour change

    PubMed Central

    Aunger, Robert; Curtis, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Behaviour change has become a hot topic. We describe a new approach, Behaviour Centred Design (BCD), which encompasses a theory of change, a suite of behavioural determinants and a programme design process. The theory of change is generic, assuming that successful interventions must create a cascade of effects via environments, through brains, to behaviour and hence to the desired impact, such as improved health. Changes in behaviour are viewed as the consequence of a reinforcement learning process involving the targeting of evolved motives and changes to behaviour settings, and are produced by three types of behavioural control mechanism (automatic, motivated and executive). The implications are that interventions must create surprise, revalue behaviour and disrupt performance in target behaviour settings. We then describe a sequence of five steps required to design an intervention to change specific behaviours: Assess, Build, Create, Deliver and Evaluate. The BCD approach has been shown to change hygiene, nutrition and exercise-related behaviours and has the advantages of being applicable to product, service or institutional design, as well as being able to incorporate future developments in behaviour science. We therefore argue that BCD can become the foundation for an applied science of behaviour change. PMID:27535821

  3. Experimental Forecasts of Wildfire Pollution at the Canadian Meteorological Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Radenko; Beaulieu, Paul-Andre; Chen, Jack; Landry, Hugo; Cousineau, Sophie; Moran, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Environment and Climate Change Canada's Canadian Meteorological Centre Operations division (CMCO) has been running an experimental North American air quality forecast system with near-real-time wildfire emissions since 2014. This system, named FireWork, also takes anthropogenic and other natural emission sources into account. FireWork 48-hour forecasts are provided to CMCO forecasters and external partners in Canada and the U.S. twice daily during the wildfire season. This system has proven to be very useful in capturing short- and long-range smoke transport from wildfires over North America. Several upgrades to the FireWork system have been made since 2014 to accommodate the needs of operational AQ forecasters and to improve system performance. In this talk we will present performance statistics and some case studies for the 2014 and 2015 wildfire seasons. We will also describe current limitations of the FireWork system and ongoing and future work planned for this air quality forecast system.

  4. Energetically optimal running requires torques about the centre of mass.

    PubMed

    Usherwood, James R; Hubel, Tatjana Y

    2012-08-07

    Bipedal animals experience ground reaction forces (GRFs) that pass close to the centre of mass (CoM) throughout stance, first decelerating the body, then re-accelerating it during the second half of stance. This results in fluctuations in kinetic energy, requiring mechanical work from the muscles. However, here we show analytically that, in extreme cases (with a very large body pitch moment of inertia), continuous alignment of the GRF through the CoM requires greater mechanical work than a maintained vertical force; we show numerically that GRFs passing between CoM and vertical throughout stance are energetically favourable under realistic conditions; and demonstrate that the magnitude, if not the precise form, of actual CoM-torque profiles in running is broadly consistent with simple mechanical work minimization for humans with appropriate pitch moment of inertia. While the potential energetic savings of CoM-torque support strategies are small (a few per cent) over the range of human running, their importance increases dramatically at high speeds and stance angles. Fast, compliant runners or hoppers would benefit considerably from GRFs more vertical than the zero-CoM-torque strategy, especially with bodies of high pitch moment of inertia--suggesting a novel advantage to kangaroos of their peculiar long-head/long-tail structure.

  5. Hip joint centre localisation with an unscented Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    De Momi, Elena; Beretta, Elisa; Ferrigno, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    The accurate estimation of the hip joint centre (HJC) in gait analysis and in computer assisted orthopaedic procedures is a basic requirement. Functional methods, based on rigid body localisation, assessing the kinematics of the femur during circumduction movements (pivoting) have been used for estimating the HJC. Localising the femoral segment only, as it is usually done in total knee replacement procedure, can give rise to estimation errors, since the pelvis, during the passive pivoting manoeuvre, might undergo spatial displacements. This paper presents the design and test of an unscented Kalman filter that allows the estimation of the HJC by observing the pose of the femur and the 3D coordinates of a single marker attached to the pelvis. This new approach was validated using a hip joint mechanical simulator, mimicking both hard and soft tissues. The algorithm performances were compared with the literature standards and proved to have better performances in case of pelvis translation greater than 8 mm, thus satisfying the clinical requirements of the application.

  6. Ceramide synthases at the centre of sphingolipid metabolism and biology.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Thomas D; Hannun, Yusuf A; Obeid, Lina M

    2012-02-01

    Sphingolipid metabolism in metazoan cells consists of a complex interconnected web of numerous enzymes, metabolites and modes of regulation. At the centre of sphingolipid metabolism reside CerSs (ceramide synthases), a group of enzymes that catalyse the formation of ceramides from sphingoid base and acyl-CoA substrates. From a metabolic perspective, these enzymes occupy a unique niche in that they simultaneously regulate de novo sphingolipid synthesis and the recycling of free sphingosine produced from the degradation of pre-formed sphingolipids (salvage pathway). Six mammalian CerSs (CerS1-CerS6) have been identified. Unique characteristics have been described for each of these enzymes, but perhaps the most notable is the ability of individual CerS isoforms to produce ceramides with characteristic acyl-chain distributions. Through this control of acyl-chain length and perhaps in a compartment-specific manner, CerSs appear to regulate multiple aspects of sphingolipid-mediated cell and organismal biology. In the present review, we discuss the function of CerSs as critical regulators of sphingolipid metabolism, highlight their unique characteristics and explore the emerging roles of CerSs in regulating programmed cell death, cancer and many other aspects of biology.

  7. South Cheshire Local Multi-disciplinary Evidence Centre: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Howard, John C

    2002-07-01

    The South Cheshire Local Multidisciplinary Evidence Centre (LMEC) was a two-year project commenced in March 1998 and completed in April 2000. The project aimed to develop an information service to enable all primary and community care staff in South Cheshire to access high-quality evidence and thus to improve patient care. The LMEC gave access from the workplace to both physical and electronic resources to support clinical governance and lifelong learning, with a strong emphasis on evidence-based material. Automation of the library catalogue enabled its inclusion on the website. The project developed enquiry and document delivery services and provided training on using the LMEC and on critical appraisal. An evaluation carried out at the end of the project showed that over 120 primary and community care staff had used the LMEC and were positive about the service. As Clinical Governance, the NHSnet, and plans for continuing professional development are implemented, the LMEC is one model for a Local Health Information Service outlined in the NHS IT strategy.

  8. Burnout among faculty physicians in an academic health science centre

    PubMed Central

    Wright, James Gardner; Khetani, Nicole; Stephens, Derek

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Burnout experienced by physicians is concerning because it may affect quality of care. OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of burnout among physicians at an academic health science centre and to test the hypothesis that work hours are related to burnout. METHODS: All 300 staff physicians, contacted through their personal e-mail, were provided an encrypted link to an anonymous questionnaire. The primary outcome measure, the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory, has three subscales: personal, work related and patient related. RESULTS: The response rate for the questionnaire was 70%. Quantitative demands, insecurity at work and job satisfaction affected all three components of burnout. Of 210 staff physicians, 22% (n=46) had scores indicating personal burnout, 14% (n=30) had scores indicating work-related burnout and 8% (n=16) had scores indicating patient-related burnout. The correlation between total hours worked and total burnout was only 0.10 (P=0.14) DISCUSSION: Up to 22% of academic paediatric physicians had scores consistent with mild to severe burnout. A simple reduction in work hours is unlikely to be successful in reducing burnout and, therefore, quantitative demands, job satisfaction and work insecurity may require attention to address burnout among academic physicians. PMID:22851895

  9. 'Underclassism' and access to healthcare in urban centres.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sannie Y; Browne, Annette J; Mussell, Bill; Smye, Victoria L; Rodney, Patricia

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we draw on findings from an ethnographic study that explored experiences of healthcare access from the perspectives of Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients seeking services at the non-urgent division of an urban emergency department (ED) in Canada. Our aim is to critically examine the notion of 'underclassism' within the context of healthcare in urban centres. Specifically, we discuss some of the processes by which patients experiencing poverty and racialisation are constructed as 'underclass' patients, and how assumptions of those patients as social and economic Other (including being seen as 'drug users' and 'welfare dependents') subject them to marginalisation, discrimination, and inequitable treatment within the healthcare system. We contend that healthcare is not only a clinical space; it is also a social space in which unequal power relations along the intersecting axes of 'race' and class are negotiated. Given the largely invisible roles that healthcare plays in controlling access to resources and power for people who are marginalised, we argue that there is an urgent need to improve healthcare inequities by challenging the taken-for-granted assumption that healthcare is equally accessible for all Canadians irrespective of differences in social and economic positioning.

  10. An Optimization of Inventory Demand Forecasting in University Healthcare Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bon, A. T.; Ng, T. K.

    2017-01-01

    Healthcare industry becomes an important field for human beings nowadays as it concerns about one’s health. With that, forecasting demand for health services is an important step in managerial decision making for all healthcare organizations. Hence, a case study was conducted in University Health Centre to collect historical demand data of Panadol 650mg for 68 months from January 2009 until August 2014. The aim of the research is to optimize the overall inventory demand through forecasting techniques. Quantitative forecasting or time series forecasting model was used in the case study to forecast future data as a function of past data. Furthermore, the data pattern needs to be identified first before applying the forecasting techniques. Trend is the data pattern and then ten forecasting techniques are applied using Risk Simulator Software. Lastly, the best forecasting techniques will be find out with the least forecasting error. Among the ten forecasting techniques include single moving average, single exponential smoothing, double moving average, double exponential smoothing, regression, Holt-Winter’s additive, Seasonal additive, Holt-Winter’s multiplicative, seasonal multiplicative and Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA). According to the forecasting accuracy measurement, the best forecasting technique is regression analysis.

  11. Low Cost Balloon programme of Indian Centre for Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Indian Centre for Space Physics has launched 89 Missions to near space using single or multiple weather balloons or very light plastic balloons. Basic goal was to capitalize miniaturization of equipments in modern ages. Our typical payload of less than 4kg weight consists of GPS, video camera, cosmic ray detectors, Attitude measurement unit, sunsensor and most importantly a 50-100sqcm X-ray/Gamma-ray detector (usually a scintillator type). The main purpose of the latter is to study spectra of secondary cosmic ray spectra (till our ceiling altitude of 36-42km) over the years and their seasonal variation or variation with solar cycle. We also study solar X-ray spectra, especially of solar flares. We have detected a Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) and pulsars. Our observation of black hole candidates did not yield satisfactory result yet mainly because of poor collimation (~ 10 deg x 10 deg) by lead collimator which introduces strong background also. Our effort with multiple balloon flights enabled us to have long duration flights. We believe that our procedure is very futuristic and yet at an affordable cost.

  12. Mechanical properties for irradiated face-centred cubic nanocrystalline metals.

    PubMed

    Xiao, X Z; Song, D K; Chu, H J; Xue, J M; Duan, H L

    2015-05-08

    In this paper, a self-consistent plasticity theory is proposed to model the mechanical behaviours of irradiated face-centred cubic nanocrystalline metals. At the grain level, a tensorial crystal model with both irradiation and grain size effects is applied for the grain interior (GI), whereas both grain boundary (GB) sliding with irradiation effect and GB diffusion are considered in modelling the behaviours of GBs. The elastic-viscoplastic self-consistent method with considering grain size distribution is developed to transit the microscopic behaviour of individual grains to the macroscopic properties of nanocrystals (NCs). The proposed theory is applied to model the mechanical properties of irradiated NC copper, and the feasibility and efficiency have been validated by comparing with experimental data. Numerical results show that: (i) irradiation-induced defects can lead to irradiation hardening in the GIs, but the hardening effect decreases with the grain size due to the increasing absorption of defects by GBs. Meanwhile, the absorbed defects would make the GBs softer than the unirradiated case. (ii) There exists a critical grain size for irradiated NC metals, which separates the grain size into the irradiation hardening dominant region (above the critical size) and irradiation softening dominant region (below the critical size). (iii) The distribution of grain size has a significant influence on the mechanical behaviours of both irradiated and unirradiated NCs. The proposed model can offer a valid theoretical foundation to study the irradiation effect on NC materials.

  13. National Cancer Centre Singapore Consensus Guidelines for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Pierce K. H.; Choo, Su Pin; Ng, David C. E.; Lo, Richard H. G.; Wang, Michael L. C.; Toh, Han Chong; Tai, David W. M.; Goh, Brian K. P.; Wong, Jen San; Tay, Kiang Hiong; Goh, Anthony S. W.; Yan, Sean X.; Loke, Kelvin S. H.; Thang, Sue Ping; Gogna, Apoorva; Too, Chow Wei; Irani, Farah Gillian; Leong, Sum; Lim, Kiat Hon; Thng, Choon Hua

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 6th most common cancer in the world, but the second most common cause of cancer death. There is no universally accepted consensus practice guidelines for HCC owing to rapid developments in new treatment modalities, the heterogeneous epidemiology and clinical presentation of HCC worldwide. However, a number of regional and national guidelines currently exist which reflect practice relevant to the epidemiology and collective experience of the consensus group. In 2014, clinicians at the multidisciplinary Comprehensive Liver Cancer Clinic (CLCC) at the National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS) reviewed the latest published scientific data and existing international and regional practice guidelines, such as those of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the Asian Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver, and modified them to reflect local practice. These would serve as a template by which treatment outcomes can be collated and benchmarked against international data. The NCCS Consensus Guidelines for HCC have been successfully implemented in the CLCC since their publication online on 26th September 2014, and the guidelines allow outcomes of treatment to be compared to international data. These guidelines will be reviewed periodically to incorporate new data. PMID:27386428

  14. A model to forecast data centre infrastructure costs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernet, R.

    2015-12-01

    The computing needs in the HEP community are increasing steadily, but the current funding situation in many countries is tight. As a consequence experiments, data centres, and funding agencies have to rationalize resource usage and expenditures. CC-IN2P3 (Lyon, France) provides computing resources to many experiments including LHC, and is a major partner for astroparticle projects like LSST, CTA or Euclid. The financial cost to accommodate all these experiments is substantial and has to be planned well in advance for funding and strategic reasons. In that perspective, leveraging infrastructure expenses, electric power cost and hardware performance observed in our site over the last years, we have built a model that integrates these data and provides estimates of the investments that would be required to cater to the experiments for the mid-term future. We present how our model is built and the expenditure forecast it produces, taking into account the experiment roadmaps. We also examine the resource growth predicted by our model over the next years assuming a flat-budget scenario.

  15. People at the centre of complex adaptive health systems reform.

    PubMed

    Sturmberg, Joachim P; O'Halloran, Diana M; Martin, Carmel M

    2010-10-18

    Health systems are increasingly recognised to be complex adaptive systems (CASs), functionally characterised by their continuing and dynamic adaptation in response to core system drivers, or attractors. The core driver for our health system (and for the health reform strategies intended to achieve it) should clearly be the improvement of people's health - the personal experience of health, regardless of organic abnormalities; we contend that a patient-centred health system requires flexible localised decision making and resource use. The prevailing trend is to use disease protocols, financial management strategies and centralised control of siloed programs to manage our health system. This strategy is suggested to be fatally flawed, as: people's health and health experience as core system drivers are inevitably pre-empted by centralised and standardised strategies; the context specificity of personal experience and the capacity of local systems are overlooked; and in line with CAS patterns and characteristics, these strategies will lead to "unintended" consequences on all parts of the system. In Australia, there is still the time and opportunity for health system redesign that truly places people and their health at the core of the system.

  16. Preliminary analysis of the International Data Centre pipeline.

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthier, John Henry

    2009-07-01

    The International Data Centre of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization relies on automatic data processing as the first step in identifying seismic events from seismic waveform data. However, more than half of the automatically identified seismic events are eliminated by IDC analysts. Here, an IDC dataset is analyzed to determine if the number of automatically generated false positives could be reduced. Data that could be used to distinguish false positives from analyst-accepted seismic events includes the number of stations, the number of phases, the signal-to-noise ratio, and the pick error. An empirical method is devised to determine whether an automatically identified seismic event is acceptable, and the method is found to identify a significant number of the false positives in IDC data. This work could help reduce seismic analyst workload and could help improve the calibration of seismic monitoring stations. This work could also be extended to address identification of seismic events missed by automatic processing.

  17. "Less than a Dog": Interrogating Theatre for Debate in Westville Female Correctional Centre, Durban South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young-Jahangeer, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Incarcerated women at Westville Female Correctional Centre in Durban, South Africa have been using popular participatory theatre (PPT) to create a space to generate debate about aspects of prison life for over 10 years. This article explores how these women engaged the issue of lesbianism in the Correctional Centre and how the process and form was…

  18. Missed Opportunities to Keep Children Safe? National Survey of Injury Prevention Activities of Children's Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Michael Craig; Mulvaney, Caroline; Timblin, Clare; Stewart, Jane; Coupland, Carol A.; Deave, Toity; Hayes, Mike; Kendrick, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the activities undertaken by children's centres to prevent unintentional injuries in the under-fives and, in particular, the prevention of falls, poisoning and scalds. Design: A questionnaire was posted to managers of 851 children's centres, using stratified cluster sampling. The questionnaire included questions on injury…

  19. Exploring ICT Integration as a Tool to Engage Young People at a Flexible Learning Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kimberley Luanne; Boldeman, Suzi Ursula

    2012-01-01

    The Edmund Rice Education Australia (EREA) Flexible Learning Centres aim to provide a supportive learning environment for young people who find themselves outside of the mainstream secondary schooling system. Drawing on twenty first Century learning principles, the Centres aim to deliver a personalised learning experience with an emphasis on…

  20. The Role of Science and Discovery Centres in the Public Understanding of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Daniel B.; Weis, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The number of science and discovery centres has grown exponentially over the last two centuries. Science and discovery centres are one of the top five stimuli that influence a career choice in science. Their history, growth, impact and role in the public understanding of science are discussed. (Contains 2 tables, 7 figures, and 21 online…

  1. Daily Welcoming in Childcare Centre as a Microtransition: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venturelli, Elena; Cigala, Ada

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the everyday morning microtransition in childcare centres that involves child-parent separation. This moment involves the contemporary presence of the child, caregiver and parent in the day-care centre. This coexistence is considered extremely relevant and full of important meanings for the interactive patterns they will…

  2. Staff Morale in Day Care Centres for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascha, Katerina

    2007-01-01

    Background: Levels of burnout, job satisfaction and intended turnover of staff working in day care centres for adults with intellectual disabilities are investigated in relation to role clarity, staff support and supervision, and coping strategies used by staff. Materials and methods: Thirty six direct-care staff of four day care centres in the UK…

  3. Germinal centre protein HGAL promotes lymphoid hyperplasia and amyloidosis via BCR-mediated Syk activation.

    PubMed

    Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Natkunam, Yasodha; Lu, Xiaoqing; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Gonzalez-Herrero, Ines; Flores, Teresa; Garcia, Juan Luis; McNamara, George; Kunder, Christian; Zhao, Shuchun; Segura, Victor; Fontan, Lorena; Martínez-Climent, Jose A; García-Criado, Francisco Javier; Theis, Jason D; Dogan, Ahmet; Campos-Sánchez, Elena; Green, Michael R; Alizadeh, Ash A; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Lossos, Izidore S

    2013-01-01

    The human germinal centre-associated lymphoma gene is specifically expressed in germinal centre B-lymphocytes and germinal centre-derived B-cell lymphomas, but its function is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that human germinal centre-associated lymphoma directly binds to Syk in B cells, increases its kinase activity on B-cell receptor stimulation and leads to enhanced activation of Syk downstream effectors. To further investigate these findings in vivo, human germinal centre-associated lymphoma transgenic mice were generated. Starting from 12 months of age these mice developed polyclonal B-cell lymphoid hyperplasia, hypergammaglobulinemia and systemic reactive amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis, leading to shortened survival. The lymphoid hyperplasia in the human germinal centre-associated lymphoma transgenic mice are likely attributable to enhanced B-cell receptor signalling as shown by increased Syk phosphorylation, ex vivo B-cell proliferation and increased RhoA activation. Overall, our study shows for the first time that the germinal centre protein human germinal centre-associated lymphoma regulates B-cell receptor signalling in B-lymphocytes which, without appropriate control, may lead to B-cell lymphoproliferation.

  4. Challenges and Potentials for Writing Centres in South African Tertiary Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, A.

    2010-01-01

    There are many challenges involved in developing and running Writing Centres in tertiary contexts in South Africa. These challenges include recognizing the role Writing Centres need to play in the redress of basic academic literacies. They also involve emphasizing writing as a mode of learning where higher cognitive functions such as analysis and…

  5. Hands-On versus Teacher-Centred Experiments in Soil Ecology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randler, Christoph; Hulde, Madeleine

    2007-01-01

    This study focused on differences between teacher-centred and learner-centred experiments in soil ecology. After a pilot study, we selected three experiments simple enough to be carried out by pupils even with little experience in self-determined learning and hands-on practice. The sample comprised 123 fifth and sixth graders from a middle school…

  6. From Politics to Policy: Rethinking the Relationship between Language Centres and Modern Foreign Language Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dlaska, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    One of the key recommendations of the Worton Review of Modern Foreign Languages provision in higher education in England (2009) is more effective collaboration between language centres and language departments. This paper presents a fully integrated model of such collaboration and develops recommendations for language centres and language…

  7. Leading a Learning Organisation: Australian Early Years Centres as Learning Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colmer, Kaye

    2008-01-01

    Established in 1940, Lady Gowrie Child Centres in Australia provide integrated early childhood programs and develop and share project work, information, resources and training at local and national levels. While changes in social policy compromised their provision of integrated programs, the centre in Adelaide has made real strides towards moving…

  8. Children's Preferences for Group Musical Activities in Child Care Centres: A Cross-Cultural Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yim, Hoi Yin Bonnie; Ebbeck, Marjory

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a cross-cultural research study of children's preferences for group musical activities in child care centres. A total of 228 young children aged 4-5 years in seven child care centres in Hong Kong and in the Adelaide City of South Australia participated in the study. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected via a…

  9. Business Models of High Performance Computing Centres in Higher Education in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eurich, Markus; Calleja, Paul; Boutellier, Roman

    2013-01-01

    High performance computing (HPC) service centres are a vital part of the academic infrastructure of higher education organisations. However, despite their importance for research and the necessary high capital expenditures, business research on HPC service centres is mostly missing. From a business perspective, it is important to find an answer to…

  10. Evaluation of the Behaviour Management Program at the Melbourne Juvenile Justice Centre. Working Paper 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semmens, Bob; Cook, Sandy; Grimwade, Cherry

    In 1998, researchers were requested to undertake an evaluation of a proposed new behavior program at the Melbourne Juvenile Justice Centre. The behavior management program at the Centre attempts to intervene constructively in the lives of young offenders. The project aims to increase the range of skills for management of clients' behaviors in a…

  11. Negotiating and Creating Intercultural Relations: Chinese Immigrant Children in New Zealand Early Childhood Education Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Karen; Dalli, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    A multiple-case study investigation of the experiences of eight Chinese immigrant children in New Zealand early childhood centres suggested that the immigrant children's learning experiences in their first centre can be understood as a process of negotiating and creating intercultural relations. The children's use of family cultural tools, such as…

  12. A Person-Centred Analysis of Teacher-Child Relationships in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Kathleen; Bullock, Amanda; Coplan, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previously, the nature of teacher-child relationships (TCRs) has been explored through dimensions of close, conflicted, and dependent. However, this "variable-centred" approach is limited, as many relationships can be characterized by more than one characteristic or trait. A "person-centred" approach would allow for…

  13. Strategic Leadership of Teaching and Learning Centres: From Reality to Ideal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Stuart; Holt, Dale; Challis, Di

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the third phase of a study of Australian Teaching and Learning Centres to identify factors that contribute to the effective strategic leadership of Centres. Focus groups at 10 Australian universities included 66 respondents, providing a diverse range of perspectives, from students to members of the university executive.…

  14. Deformation-induced structural transition in body-centred cubic molybdenum.

    PubMed

    Wang, S J; Wang, H; Du, K; Zhang, W; Sui, M L; Mao, S X

    2014-03-07

    Molybdenum is a refractory metal that is stable in a body-centred cubic structure at all temperatures before melting. Plastic deformation via structural transitions has never been reported for pure molybdenum, while transformation coupled with plasticity is well known for many alloys and ceramics. Here we demonstrate a structural transformation accompanied by shear deformation from an original <001>-oriented body-centred cubic structure to a <110>-oriented face-centred cubic lattice, captured at crack tips during the straining of molybdenum inside a transmission electron microscope at room temperature. The face-centred cubic domains then revert into <111>-oriented body-centred cubic domains, equivalent to a lattice rotation of 54.7°, and ~15.4% tensile strain is reached. The face-centred cubic structure appears to be a well-defined metastable state, as evidenced by scanning transmission electron microscopy and nanodiffraction, the Nishiyama-Wassermann and Kurdjumov-Sachs relationships between the face-centred cubic and body-centred cubic structures and molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings reveal a deformation mechanism for elemental metals under high-stress deformation conditions.

  15. Learning in a Language Centre: A New Kind of "Do-It-Yourself"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chateau, Anne; Bailly, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Since CercleS was created in 1990, language resource centres, or language centres, have offered learners various means to improve their language skills. They are often places where new pedagogical approaches and innovative learning environments are proposed (Rivens Mompean 2011). As the names of some of the associations belonging to CercleS…

  16. Training Opportunities and Employee Exhaustion in Call Centres: Mediation by Psychological Contract Fulfilment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambel, Maria Jose; Castanheira, Filipa

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse psychological contract fulfilment as a mechanism through which training affects stress in call centres. The hypotheses were tested on a sample of 412 call centre operators, using structural equation modelling to analyse their survey responses. Our results demonstrated that training is negatively related to…

  17. Deformation-induced structural transition in body-centred cubic molybdenum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S. J.; Wang, H.; Du, K.; Zhang, W.; Sui, M. L.; Mao, S. X.

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum is a refractory metal that is stable in a body-centred cubic structure at all temperatures before melting. Plastic deformation via structural transitions has never been reported for pure molybdenum, while transformation coupled with plasticity is well known for many alloys and ceramics. Here we demonstrate a structural transformation accompanied by shear deformation from an original <001>-oriented body-centred cubic structure to a <110>-oriented face-centred cubic lattice, captured at crack tips during the straining of molybdenum inside a transmission electron microscope at room temperature. The face-centred cubic domains then revert into <111>-oriented body-centred cubic domains, equivalent to a lattice rotation of 54.7°, and ~15.4% tensile strain is reached. The face-centred cubic structure appears to be a well-defined metastable state, as evidenced by scanning transmission electron microscopy and nanodiffraction, the Nishiyama–Wassermann and Kurdjumov–Sachs relationships between the face-centred cubic and body-centred cubic structures and molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings reveal a deformation mechanism for elemental metals under high-stress deformation conditions. PMID:24603655

  18. Individual Focus in an Activity Centre: An Observational Study among Persons with Profound and Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiemstra, S. J.; Vlaskamp, C.; Wiersma, L. A.

    2007-01-01

    Increasing numbers of adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) are being offered more--and more frequent--day services at activity centres. Little is known about the way direct support persons (DSP) in activity centres divide their time over the various tasks they have to perform and to what extent they are focused on…

  19. Putting Children at the Centre: Making Policy as if Children Mattered

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Susan

    2014-01-01

    What do we mean when we say we want to put children at the centre of policy? What are the moral justifications for this approach? Has it become harder for us to understand this concept, when in practice paid work has been at the centre? In part confusion arises because the unpaid work of caring for children is invisible until it is marketized. In…

  20. Marketing, Management and Performance: Multilingualism as Commodity in a Tourism Call Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchene, Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the ways an institution of the new economy--a tourism call centre in Switzerland--markets, manages and performs multilingual services. In particular, it explores the ways multilingualism operates as a strategic and managerial tool within tourism call centres and how the institutional regulation of language practices…

  1. The Centre for Communicative and Cognitive Disabilities at the University of Western Ontario: An Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Frank, B. W.; Sitko, Merrill

    1991-01-01

    The Centre for Communicative and Cognitive Disabilities at the University of Western Ontario provides support services for students with hearing impairment, visual impairment, physical impairment, and learning disabilities. Centre activities have included policy development, student organization, interpreter services, technology development, and…

  2. What a Difference a Writing Centre Makes: A Small Scale Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeats, Rowena; Reddy, Peter; Wheeler, Anne; Senior, Carl; Murray, John

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Academic writing is often considered to be a weakness in contemporary students, while good reporting and writing skills are highly valued by graduate employers. A number of universities have introduced writing centres aimed at addressing this problem; however, the evaluation of such centres is usually qualitative. The paper seeks to…

  3. Professionalism--A Breeding Ground for Struggle. The Example of the Finnish Day-Care Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinos, Jarmo

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the Finnish day-care centre out of a neo-Weberian-Bourdieuan frame of reference. The leading idea is that the day-care centre field is continuously shaping as a result of both inner struggles and struggles with other fields. The state, the education system, and trade unions act as the dealers of professional playing cards.…

  4. The Invisible Developers? Academic Coordinators in the UK Subject Centre Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canning, John

    2010-01-01

    Staff of subject centres have been largely invisible from discussions about the nature of Educational Development in the UK, which has largely focused on the institutional context. This article seeks to enhance the visibility and identity of subject centre academic coordinators who provide discipline-based teaching and learning support across the…

  5. Impact of Patient and Procedure Mix on Finances of Perinatal Centres – Theoretical Models for Economic Strategies in Perinatal Centres

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, T.; Kraml, F.; Wagner, S.; Hack, C. C.; Thiel, F. C.; Kehl, S.; Winkler, M.; Frobenius, W.; Faschingbauer, F.; Beckmann, M. W.; Lux, M. P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In Germany, cost and revenue structures of hospitals with defined treatment priorities are currently being discussed to identify uneconomic services. This discussion has also affected perinatal centres (PNCs) and represents a new economic challenge for PNCs. In addition to optimising the time spent in hospital, the hospital management needs to define the “best” patient mix based on costs and revenues. Method: Different theoretical models were proposed based on the cost and revenue structures of the University Perinatal Centre for Franconia (UPF). Multi-step marginal costing was then used to show the impact on operating profits of changes in services and bed occupancy rates. The current contribution margin accounting used by the UPF served as the basis for the calculations. The models demonstrated the impact of changes in services on costs and revenues of a level 1 PNC. Results: Contribution margin analysis was used to calculate profitable and unprofitable DRGs based on average inpatient cost per day. Nineteen theoretical models were created. The current direct costing used by the UPF and a theoretical model with a 100 % bed occupancy rate were used as reference models. Significantly higher operating profits could be achieved by doubling the number of profitable DRGs and halving the number of less profitable DRGs. Operating profits could be increased even more by changing the rates of profitable DRGs per bed occupancy. The exclusive specialisation on pathological and high-risk pregnancies resulted in operating losses. All models which increased the numbers of caesarean sections or focused exclusively on c-sections resulted in operating losses. Conclusion: These theoretical models offer a basis for economic planning. They illustrate the enormous impact potential changes can have on the operating profits of PNCs. Level 1 PNCs require high bed occupancy rates and a profitable patient mix to cover the extremely high costs incurred due to the services

  6. Impact of Patient and Procedure Mix on Finances of Perinatal Centres - Theoretical Models for Economic Strategies in Perinatal Centres.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, T; Kraml, F; Wagner, S; Hack, C C; Thiel, F C; Kehl, S; Winkler, M; Frobenius, W; Faschingbauer, F; Beckmann, M W; Lux, M P

    2013-08-01

    Introduction: In Germany, cost and revenue structures of hospitals with defined treatment priorities are currently being discussed to identify uneconomic services. This discussion has also affected perinatal centres (PNCs) and represents a new economic challenge for PNCs. In addition to optimising the time spent in hospital, the hospital management needs to define the "best" patient mix based on costs and revenues. Method: Different theoretical models were proposed based on the cost and revenue structures of the University Perinatal Centre for Franconia (UPF). Multi-step marginal costing was then used to show the impact on operating profits of changes in services and bed occupancy rates. The current contribution margin accounting used by the UPF served as the basis for the calculations. The models demonstrated the impact of changes in services on costs and revenues of a level 1 PNC. Results: Contribution margin analysis was used to calculate profitable and unprofitable DRGs based on average inpatient cost per day. Nineteen theoretical models were created. The current direct costing used by the UPF and a theoretical model with a 100 % bed occupancy rate were used as reference models. Significantly higher operating profits could be achieved by doubling the number of profitable DRGs and halving the number of less profitable DRGs. Operating profits could be increased even more by changing the rates of profitable DRGs per bed occupancy. The exclusive specialisation on pathological and high-risk pregnancies resulted in operating losses. All models which increased the numbers of caesarean sections or focused exclusively on c-sections resulted in operating losses. Conclusion: These theoretical models offer a basis for economic planning. They illustrate the enormous impact potential changes can have on the operating profits of PNCs. Level 1 PNCs require high bed occupancy rates and a profitable patient mix to cover the extremely high costs incurred due to the services

  7. Establishment of the National Centre for Multidisciplinary Studies of Back Pain. An historical overview.

    PubMed

    Giles, L G; Walker, B F

    1996-11-01

    Spinal pain of mechanical origin, with or without referred pain, is a serious health problem suffered by many Australians. In order to help patients with this ailment, and to investigate this costly and debilitating condition, the National Centre for Multidisciplinary Studies of Back Pain was established at Townsville General Hospital as a joint venture between James Cook University of North Queensland and the Northern Regional Health Authority. The Centre has a multidisciplinary clinical team including a chiropractor. The Centre functions successfully, contributes to the public health of the community and shows that a multidisciplinary clinical team which includes a chiropractor can work harmoniously in an Australian hospital setting. The need for such a centre is demonstrated by an ever increasing demand for its professional services in Townsville as indicated by a review of the number of new patients and overall patient visits. The Centre could act as a model for the inclusion of chiropractic into the Australian hospital setting.

  8. F-actin mechanics control spindle centring in the mouse zygote

    PubMed Central

    Chaigne, Agathe; Campillo, Clément; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S.; Sykes, Cécile; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène; Terret, Marie-Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle position relies on interactions between astral microtubules nucleated by centrosomes and a rigid cortex. Some cells, such as mouse oocytes, do not possess centrosomes and astral microtubules. These cells rely only on actin and on a soft cortex to position their spindle off-centre and undergo asymmetric divisions. While the first mouse embryonic division also occurs in the absence of centrosomes, it is symmetric and not much is known on how the spindle is positioned at the exact cell centre. Using interdisciplinary approaches, we demonstrate that zygotic spindle positioning follows a three-step process: (1) coarse centring of pronuclei relying on the dynamics of an F-actin/Myosin-Vb meshwork; (2) fine centring of the metaphase plate depending on a high cortical tension; (3) passive maintenance at the cell centre. Altogether, we show that F-actin-dependent mechanics operate the switch between asymmetric to symmetric division required at the oocyte to embryo transition. PMID:26727405

  9. The strategic role of recycling centres for environmental performance of waste management systems.

    PubMed

    Krook, Joakim; Eklund, Mats

    2010-05-01

    This paper analyses how different actors influence the sorting quality of waste at recycling centres. Users (i.e. citizens) play an essential role since they conduct the actual sorting. They have difficulties sorting many of their discarded products, leading to decreased performance of the entire waste management system of which recycling centres are a part. Several measures addressing this problem are identified such as product design, improved terminology for labelling waste and increased manning at recycling centres. A fundamental task for managers and employees is to further develop information and guidance for users, both at home and at recycling centres. Several obstacles for improvements are also discussed, including working conditions and the economy of recycling centres, as well as the routines for communication and quality assurance among actors in the recycling business.

  10. Impact of trauma centre designation level on outcomes following hemorrhagic shock: a multicentre cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Dufresne, Philippe; Moore, Lynne; Tardif, Pier-Alexandre; Razek, Tarek; Omar, Madiba; Boutin, Amélie; Clément, Julien

    2017-01-01

    Background Hemorrhagic shock is responsible for 45% of injury fatalities in North America, and 50% of these occur within 2 h of injury. There is currently a lack of evidence regarding the trajectories of patients in hemorrhagic shock and the potential benefit of level I/II care for these patients. We aimed to compare mortality across trauma centre designation levels for patients in hemorrhagic shock. Secondary objectives were to compare surgical delays, complications and hospital length of stay (LOS). Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study based on a Canadian inclusive trauma system (1999–2012), including adults with systolic blood pressure (SBP) < 90 mm Hg on arrival who required urgent surgical care (< 6 h). Logistic regression was used to examine the influence of trauma centre designation level on risk-adjusted surgical delays, mortality and complications. Linear regression was used to examine LOS. Results Compared with level I centres, adjusted odds ratios (and 95% confidence intervals [CI]) of mortality for level III and IV centres were 1.71 (1.03–2.85) and 2.25 (1.08–4.73), respectively. Surgical delays did not vary across designation levels, but mean LOS and complications were lower in level II–IV centres than level I centres. Conclusion Level I/II centres may offer a survival advantage over level III/IV centres for patients requiring emergency intervention for hemorrhagic shock. Further research with larger sample sizes is required to confirm these results and to identify optimal transport time thresholds for bypassing level III/IV centres in favour of level I/II centres. PMID:28234589

  11. DORIS processing at the European Space Operations Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, Michiel; Flohrer, Claudia; Springer, Tim; Dow, John

    2010-12-01

    This paper gives an overview of the DORIS related activities at the Navigation Support Office of the European Space Operations Centre. The DORIS activities were started in 2002 because of the launch of the Envisat satellite where ESOC is responsible for the validation of the Envisat Precise Orbits and a brief overview of the key Envisat activities at ESOC is given. Typical orbit comparison RMS values between the CNES POE (GDR-C) and the ESOC POD solution is 6.5, 18.8 and 23.1 mm in radial-, along- and cross-track direction. In the framework of the generation of the ITRF2008 ESOC participated in the reprocessing of all three space geodetic techniques; DORIS, SLR, and GPS. Here the main results of our DORIS reprocessing, in the framework of the International DORIS Service (IDS), are given. The WRMS of the weekly ESOC solution (esawd03) for the 2004-2009 period compared to the IDS-1 combined solution is of the order of 12 mm. Based on the long time series of homogeneously processed data a closer look is taken at the estimated solar radiation pressure parameters of the different satellites used in this DORIS analysis. The main aim being the stabilization of the Z-component of the geocentre estimates. We conclude that the ESOC participation to the IDS ITRF2008 contribution has been beneficial for both ESOC and the IDS. ESOC has profited significantly from the very open and direct communications and comparisons that took place within the IDS during the reprocessing campaign.

  12. A submillimetre continuum survey of the galactic centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce-Price, Douglas P. I.

    2002-05-01

    The Galactic Centre is a site of exotic astrophysics on many scales, from the central black hole Sgr A* to the ~400 pc-wide Central Molecular Zone (CMZ). I present a submillimetre continuum survey at 850 micron and 450 micron of the CMZ made using the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). The submillimetre continuum emission traces the temperature-weighted column density of dust grains, and hence molecular material, in a less biased way than molecular line maps. This new survey covers a region 4 times larger and ~100 times deeper than earlier surveys. The SCUBA data form the first optically-thin map to trace essentially all the mass in the CMZ at high resolution and reveal that the CMZ is filled with filamentary dust structures. I attempt to characterise the mass spectrum of these structures with a clump-finding algorithm. I estimate the dust temperature throughout the CMZ by combining SCUBA data with IRAS far-infrared data, deriving a temperature ~20 K. I find that the 850 micron / 450 micron spectral index is alpha ~ 3--4, consistent with dust emission. I calculate a total molecular gas and dust mass in the CMZ of (53 +/- 10) x 10^6 solar masses. I also analyse the maps in conjunction with surveys at other wavelengths and characterise individual features. I measure the flux density of Sgr A* at both wavelengths and detect variability at 850 micron on ~year-timescales. SCUBA scan map observations produce images convolved with a dual-beam function. I develop optimal techniques to reduce, mosaic, and deconvolve the survey. This leads to greatly improved image fidelity compared to previous such maps. I develop a Maximum Entropy technique for deconvolving SCUBA scan maps and discuss how it can be further improved.

  13. Kidney transplant in Nigeria: a single centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, Umezurike Hughes

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Kidney transplant is the preferred renal replacement therapy for patients with end stage kidney disease. However management of patients with kidney transplant in resource poor countries is evolving and groaning under several mental, financial and infrastructural challenges. The objective of the study is to evaluate the management of patients with kidney transplant in a kidney care Centre in Nigeria. Methods This was a non-randomized prospective study. The study population were post-transplant patients presenting between 1st August 2010 and 31st December 2014.The biodata, pre and post-transplant details of these patients were documented. The data was analysed using SPSS Vs 17. Results A total of 47 patients were studied with M: F ratio of 4:1, the mean age was 45.4 ± 13.6 years. Chronic glomerulonephritis, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and HIV related kidney disease were the commonest cause of CKD. Financial constraint delayed transplant in 66% and non-availability of donor in 17.2%. About 90% of the transplants were in India and 81% either financed the transplant either directly or through a relation. There was no cadaveric transplant and about 70% of the donors were not related. Tacrolimus, mycophenolate and prednisolone were most frequently used immunosuppressive combination. The one and three years graft survival were 95.3% and 67.6% respectively while corresponding patients survival were 97.7% and 82.4% respectively. Septicaemia, acute rejection and urinary tract infection were most common complications. Conclusion Management of patients with kidney transplant has good prospect despite the challenges. PMID:28292075

  14. Common variable immunodeficiency: 20-yr experience at a single centre.

    PubMed

    Llobet, M Pilar; Soler-Palacin, Pere; Detkova, Drahomira; Hernández, Manuel; Caragol, Isabel; Espanol, Teresa

    2009-03-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common symptomatic primary immunodeficiency. It can present at any age in patients with a history of recurrent bacterial infections, with or without a family history of other primary immunodeficiencies (PID), and shows a wide range of clinical manifestations and immunological data. Diagnosis is based on low IgG, IgM and/or IgA levels. Delayed diagnosis and therapy can lead to bronchiectasis and malabsorption. The aim of this study was to describe a paediatric population diagnosed of CVID and its evolution in the population. Memory B-cell (MB) classification carried out in these patients was correlated with clinical manifestations and outcome. Clinical and immunological data of 22 CVID children under 18 yr treated at our centre between 1985 and 2005 are presented. Immunological studies included those for diagnosis and MB quantification. Differences in form of presentation, familial incidence and MB classification were reviewed. A statistical descriptive analysis was made. Infections were the commonest manifestation, affecting mainly respiratory (19/22) and gastrointestinal (10/22) tracts. Bronchiectasis was present in seven cases, and detected prior to CVID diagnosis in five. Replacement therapy led to a significant reduction in the number of infections. Severe complications appeared mostly in patients without MB. Patients of the same family share the same MB group. Family members had also been diagnosed of CVID in seven cases. Early diagnosis and therapy are essential to improve outcome in these patients. MB studies are useful in children to orient prognosis and further genetic studies.

  15. Bilateral adrenal masses: a single-centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Bandgar, Tushar; Khare, Shruti; Jadhav, Swati; Lila, Anurag; Goroshi, Manjunath; Kasaliwal, Rajeev; Khadilkar, Kranti; Shah, Nalini S

    2016-01-01

    Background Bilateral adrenal masses may have aetiologies like hyperplasia and infiltrative lesions, besides tumours. Hyperplastic and infiltrative lesions may have coexisting hypocortisolism. Bilateral tumours are likely to have hereditary/syndromic associations. The data on clinical profile of bilateral adrenal masses are limited. Aims To analyse clinical, biochemical and radiological features, and management outcomes in patients with bilateral adrenal masses. Methods Retrospective analysis of 70 patients with bilateral adrenal masses presenting to a single tertiary care endocrine centre from western India (2002–2015). Results The most common aetiology was pheochromocytoma (40%), followed by tuberculosis (27.1%), primary adrenal lymphoma (PAL) (10%), metastases (5.7%), non-functioning adenomas (4.3%), primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (4.3%), and others (8.6%). Age at presentation was less in patients with pheochromocytoma (33 years) and tuberculosis (41 years) compared with PAL (48 years) and metastases (61 years) (P<0.001). The presenting symptoms for pheochromocytoma were hyperadrenergic spells (54%) and abdominal pain (29%), whereas tuberculosis presented with adrenal insufficiency (AI) (95%). The presenting symptoms for PAL were AI (57%) and abdominal pain (43%), whereas all cases of metastasis had abdominal pain. Mean size of adrenal masses was the largest in lymphoma (5.5cm) followed by pheochromocytoma (4.8cm), metastasis (4cm) and tuberculosis (2.1cm) (P<0.001). Biochemically, most patients with pheochromocytoma (92.8%) had catecholamine excess. Hypocortisolism was common in tuberculosis (100%) and PAL (71.4%) and absent with metastases (P<0.001). Conclusion In evaluation of bilateral adrenal masses, age at presentation, presenting symptoms, lesion size, and biochemical features are helpful in delineating varied underlying aetiologies. PMID:27037294

  16. The National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO): Status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Sandro

    2015-06-01

    The National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO, sited in Pavia, Italy) completed at the end of 2013 the clinical trial phase achieving the CE label from the notified body of the Italian Health Ministry and obtained the authorisation to treat patients within the national health system. Nowadays more than 400 patients completed the treatments, two thirds of them with carbon ions, and recently started the treatment of pathologies located within moving organs. For the first time in the world carbon ions delivered with active scanning, coupled with breathing synchronisation and rescanning modalities have been applied to treat patients affected by tumours of the liver and by pancreatic cancers. The path to reach the final CE label required a wide-ranging experimental activity that went through dosimetry measurements of the hadron beams, in-vitro and in-vivo radiobiology essays and treatments of 150 patients, all enrolled in one of the 23 clinical trials approved by the Ethical Committee of CNAO and then authorized by the Italian Ministry of Health. The results of the trials were very positive in terms of safety and reliability of the procedures. The follow-up period is still short, but preliminary good results are observed in particular in terms of limited toxicity, that on the whole is less than expected. The paper gives a status report on the experimental phase that completed the CE certification process and then outlines the ongoing activities with also indications on the future trends and the most interesting R&D programmes pursued at CNAO.

  17. Hand-assisted laparoscopic donor nephrectomy: a single centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Macech, Michał; Alsharabi, Amro; Romanowski, Łukasz; Grochowiecki, Tadeusz; Lewandowska, Dorota; Kaliciński, Piotr; Durlik, Magdalena; Pączek, Leszek; Nazarewski, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The advantages of a minimally invasive nephrectomy are a faster recovery and better quality of life for the donors. Until recently, the majority of donor nephrectomies in Poland were done by open surgery. Aim To present a single centre experience in hand-assisted laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (HALDN). Material and methods The first videoscopic left donor nephrectomy in Poland was performed in our department in 2003 using a hand-assisted retroperitoneal approach. From 2011, we changed the method to a transperitoneal approach and started to harvest also right kidneys. Since then, it has become the method of choice for donor nephrectomy and has been performed in 59 cases. Preoperatively, kidneys were assessed by scintigraphy and by angio-computed tomography. We harvested 32 left and 27 right kidneys. There were double renal arteries in 2 cases and triple renal arteries in 1 case. The warm ischaemia time (WIT) was 80–420 s (average 176.13 s); operative time was 85–210 min (average 140 min). Results All procedures were uncomplicated, and all donors were discharged after 2–8 days with normal creatinine levels. The average follow-up period lasted 23 months (1–51 months). Out of all of the cases, 1 case had two minor complications, while all others were uneventful. None of the donors were lost to follow-up. All of the kidneys were transplanted. There were 2 cases of delayed graft function (DGF) and 2 cases of ureter necrosis. One of those kidneys was lost in the third postoperative week. Conclusions Our limited experience shows that HALDN is a safe method and should be used routinely instead of open surgery. PMID:28194249

  18. CIDA funds AIDS counselling and care centre in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Meehan, S T

    1993-12-01

    In its fight against the spread of AIDS, which is inextricably linked to the issues of international development, the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) has focused support on strengthening existing health care systems, helping vulnerable groups gain control over their lives and health, promoting AIDS prevention measures, and building links to other related health services. Funding includes 1) a grant to Hope House in Zambia (counseling and support for persons with AIDS); 2) a contribution to the Canadian Public Health Association's $11 million Southern Africa AIDS Training Programme (helps regional organizations working in AIDS prevention and support through education, training, hospital outreach, peer education for vulnerable groups, assistance to women's shelters, and networking); 3) support for Laval University's Laval Centre for International Cooperation in Health and Development (runs a $22 million program in French-speaking West Africa that operates in over 10 countries and focuses on epidemiological surveillance, information, education, and communication, control of sexually transmitted diseases [STDs], and management of national AIDS programs); 4) support for the University of Manitoba's $3 million program with the University of Nairobi to slow the spread of HIV (strengthens local health care capabilities for STD/HIV diagnosis, treatment, and counseling, with special emphasis on training and education); 5) support in the past for a study of proposed AIDS legislation and its potential impact on the human rights of PLWHIV/AIDS in Thailand; 6) a contribution to help equip the office of the National Movement for Street Children, Rio de Janeiro (focuses on preventing the spread of AIDS among child prostitutes); and 7) long-term financial support to the Interagency Coalition on AIDS and Development, a coalition of Canadian development nongovernmental organizations responding to AIDS in developing countries. An address to obtain a pamphlet giving

  19. Interdisciplinary collaboration within Quebec Community Health Care Centres.

    PubMed

    Sicotte, Claude; D'Amour, Danielle; Moreault, Marie-Pierre

    2002-09-01

    Central to the success of many recent health system reforms is the implementation of new primary health care delivery models. The central characteristic common to these new models usually emphasises interdisciplinary collaboration. Using empirical research, this paper studies interdisciplinary collaboration among various groups of professionals within an original Canadian primary health care delivery model, the Quebec Community Health Care Centres (CCHCs). The entire population of more than 150 CHCCs have been surveyed. The goals of this study are (1) to measure the achieved intensity of inter-professional collaboration among Quebec CHCCs, and (2) to identify the organisational and professional factors fostering or limiting interdisciplinary collaboration. The results show that Quebec CHCCs have reached modest results in achieving interdisciplinary collaboration especially since interdisciplinary collaboration is a central objective that has been pursued for more than 25 years. This study demonstrates that the main factors associated with interdisciplinary collaboration are closely linked to work group internal dynamics. Interdisciplinary collaboration is linked to the simultaneous and antagonistic effect of some central intragroup process factors. Conflicting values and beliefs are present that both enhance and limit interdisciplinary collaboration. The presence of conflicting stimuli seriously undermines the strength of the CHCC work group's shared beliefs and strongly limits interdisciplinary collaboration. The results also stress the importance of administrative formalisation initiatives to enhance collaboration among different professions. The efficacy of formalisation in this context is based on its capacity to offer an articulated and operative interdisciplinary framework that can generate a counteractive effect to the traditional professional framework. It offers concrete rules that help align the work group beliefs with interdisciplinary values. The

  20. European Cystic Fibrosis Society Standards of Care: Framework for the Cystic Fibrosis Centre.

    PubMed

    Conway, Steven; Balfour-Lynn, Ian M; De Rijcke, Karleen; Drevinek, Pavel; Foweraker, Juliet; Havermans, Trudy; Heijerman, Harry; Lannefors, Louise; Lindblad, Anders; Macek, Milan; Madge, Sue; Moran, Maeve; Morrison, Lisa; Morton, Alison; Noordhoek, Jacquelien; Sands, Dorota; Vertommen, Anneke; Peckham, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    A significant increase in life expectancy in successive birth cohorts of people with cystic fibrosis (CF) is a result of more effective treatment for the disease. It is also now widely recognized that outcomes for patients cared for in specialist CF Centres are better than for those who are not. Key to the effectiveness of the specialist CF Centre is the multidisciplinary team (MDT), which should include consultants, clinical nurse specialist, microbiologist, physiotherapist, dietitian, pharmacist, clinical psychologist, social worker, clinical geneticist and allied healthcare professionals, all of whom should be experienced in CF care. Members of the MDT are also expected to keep up to date with developments in CF through continued professional development, attendance at conferences, auditing and involvement in research. Specialists CF Centres should also network with other Centres both nationally and internationally, and feed Centre data to registries in order to further the understanding of the disease. This paper provides a framework for the specialist CF Centre, including the organisation of the Centre and the individual roles of MDT members, as well as highlighting the value of CF organisations and disease registries.

  1. Nurse middle managers contributions to patient-centred care: A 'managerial work' analysis.

    PubMed

    Lalleman, Pcb; Smid, Gac; Dikken, J; Lagerwey, M D; Schuurmans, M J

    2017-03-21

    Nurse middle managers are in an ideal position to facilitate patient-centred care. However, their contribution is underexposed in literature due to difficulties to articulate this in practice. This paper explores how nurse middle managers contribute to patient-centred care in hospitals. A combination of time-use analysis and ethnographic work was used to disclose their contribution to patient-centred care at a micro level. Sixteen nurse managers were shadowed for over 560 hours in four hospitals. Some nurse middle managers seldom contribute to patient-centred care. Others are involved in direct patient care, but this does not result in patient-centred practices. At one hospital, the nurse middle managers did contribute to patient-centred care. Here balancing between "organizing work" and "caring work" is seen as a precondition for their patient-centeredness. Other important themes are feedback mechanisms; place matters; with whom to talk and how to frame the issues at stake; and behavioral style. Both "hands-on" and "heads-on" caring work of nurse middle managers enhances their patient-centeredness. This study is the first of its kind to obtain insight in the often difficult to articulate "doings" of nurse middle managers with regard to patient-centred care through combining time-use analysis with ethnographic work.

  2. The effect of centre of mass location on sagittal plane moments around the centre of mass in trotting horses.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Sarah Jane; Richards, Jim; Clayton, Hilary M

    2014-04-11

    The diagonal limb support pattern at trot provides pitch and roll stability, but little is known about the control of moments about the centre of mass (COM) in horses. Correct COM location is critical in the calculation of pitching moments. The objectives were to determine the effect of COM location on pitching moments in trotting horses and explore how COM location could influence balance. Kinematic (120 Hz) and GRF (4 force plates, 960 Hz) data were collected at trot from three trials of eight horses. The position of the COM was determined from the weighted summation of the segmental COMs and this was then manipulated cranially and caudally to test the model. Sagittal-plane moments around the COM were calculated for each manipulation of the model and their relationship determined using reduced major axis regression. Over the stride, the moments must sum to zero to prevent accumulation of rotational motion. This was found when the weight on the forelimbs in standing was 58.7% ± 3% (mean ± 95% C.I.), which corresponded closely to the COP ratio in standing. Moments were typically nose-up at foot strike changing to nose-down prior to midstance, and then reversing to nose-up in late stance. Mean moments were larger in the hindlimbs and more sensitive to COM location changes. Divergence of the COM from the COP creating a vertical force moment arm prior to midstance may assist the hindlimb in relation to propulsive effort. A similar effect is seen in the forelimb during single limb support.

  3. Establishing a network of specialist Porphyria centres - effects on diagnostic activities and services

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The porphyrias are a heterogeneous group of rare metabolic diseases. The full spectrum of porphyria diagnostics is usually performed by specialized porphyria laboratories or centres. The European Porphyria Initiative (EPI), a collaborative network of porphyria centres formed in 2001, evolved in 2007 into the European Porphyria Network (EPNET), where participating centres are required to adhere to agreed quality criteria. The aim of this study was to examine the state and distribution of porphyria diagnostic services in 2009 and to explore potential effects of increased international collaboration in the field of these rare diseases in the period 2006–2009. Methods Data on laboratory, diagnostic and clinical activities and services reported to EPI/EPNET in yearly activity reports during 2006 through 2009 were compared between reporting centres, and possible time trends explored. Results Thirty-five porphyria centres from 22 countries, five of which were non-European associate EPNET members, filed one or more activity reports to EPI/EPNET during the study period. Large variations between centres were observed in the analytical repertoire offered, numbers of analyses performed and type and number of staff engaged. The proportion of centres fulfilling the minimum criteria set by EPNET to be classified as a specialist porphyria centre increased from 80% to 94% during the study period. Conclusions Porphyria services are unevenly distributed, and some areas are probably still lacking in specialized porphyria services altogether. However, improvements in the quality of diagnostic services provided by porphyria centres participating in EPI/EPNET were observed during 2006 through 2009. PMID:23227998

  4. Claims for fertility interventions: a systematic assessment of statements on UK fertility centre websites

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, E A; Mahtani, K R; Goldacre, B; Heneghan, C

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Fertility services in the UK are offered by over 200 Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA)-registered NHS and private clinics. While in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) form part of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance, many further interventions are offered. We aimed to record claims of benefit for interventions offered by fertility centres via information on the centres' websites and record what evidence was cited for these claims. Methods We obtained from HFEA a list of all UK centres providing fertility treatments and examined their websites. We listed fertility interventions offered in addition to standard IVF and ICSI and recorded statements about interventions that claimed or implied improvements in fertility in healthy women. We recorded which claims were quantified, and the evidence cited in support of the claims. Two reviewers extracted data from websites. We accessed websites from 21 December 2015 to 31 March 2016. Results We found 233 websites for HFEA-registered fertility treatment centres, of which 152 (65%) were excluded as duplicates or satellite centres, 2 were andrology clinics and 5 were unavailable or under construction websites. In total, 74 fertility centre websites, incorporating 1401 web pages, were examined for claims. We found 276 claims of benefit relating to 41 different fertility interventions made by 60 of the 74 centres (median 3 per website; range 0 to 10). Quantification was given for 79 (29%) of the claims. 16 published references were cited 21 times on 13 of the 74 websites. Conclusions Many fertility centres in the UK offer a range of treatments in addition to standard IVF procedures, and for many of these interventions claims of benefit are made. In most cases, the claims are not quantified and evidence is not cited to support the claims. There is a need for more information on interventions to be made available by fertility centres

  5. Improving the layout of recycling centres by use of lean production principles.

    PubMed

    Sundin, Erik; Björkman, Mats; Eklund, Mats; Eklund, Jörgen; Engkvist, Inga-Lill

    2011-06-01

    There has been increased focus on recycling in Sweden during recent years. This focus can be attributed to external environmental factors such as tougher legislation, but also to the potential gains for raw materials suppliers. Recycling centres are important components in the Swedish total recycling system. Recycling centres are manned facilities for waste collection where visitors can bring, sort and discard worn products as well as large-sized, hazardous, and electrical waste. The aim of this paper was to identify and describe the main flows and layout types at Swedish recycling centres. The aim was also to adapt and apply production theory for designing and managing recycling centre operations. More specifically, this means using lean production principles to help develop guidelines for recycling centre design and efficient control. Empirical data for this research was primarily collected through interviews and questionnaires among both visitors and employees at 16 Swedish recycling centres. Furthermore, adapted observation protocols have been used in order to explore visitor activities. There was also close collaboration with a local recycling centre company, which shared their layout experiences with the researchers in this project. The recycling centres studied had a variety of problems such as queues of visitors, overloading of material and improper sorting. The study shows that in order to decrease the problems, the recycling centres should be designed and managed according to lean production principles, i.e. through choosing more suitable layout choices with visible and linear flows, providing better visitor information, and providing suitable technical equipment. Improvements can be achieved through proper planning of the layout and control of the flow of vehicles, with the result of increased efficiency and capacity, shorter visits, and cleaner waste fractions. The benefits of a lean production mindset include increased visitor capacity, waste

  6. Standards for heart valve surgery in a ‘Heart Valve Centre of Excellence’

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, John; Ray, Simon; Prendergast, Bernard; Graham, Tim; Campbell, Brian; Greenhalgh, Donna; Petrou, Mario; Tinkler, Jeremy; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Mestres, Carlos A; Rosenhek, Raphael; Pibarot, Philippe; Otto, Catherine; Sundt, Thoralf

    2015-01-01

    Surgical centres of excellence should include multidisciplinary teams with specialist expertise in imaging, clinical assessment and surgery for patients with heart valve disease. There should be structured training programmes for the staff involved in the periprocedural care of the patient and these should be overseen by national or international professional societies. Good results are usually associated with high individual and centre volumes, but this relationship is complex. Results of surgery should be published by centre and should include rates of residual regurgitation for mitral repairs and reoperation rates matched to the preoperative pathology and risk. PMID:26180639

  7. Helium ion microscope generated nitrogen-vacancy centres in type Ib diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCloskey, D.; Fox, D.; O'Hara, N.; Usov, V.; Scanlan, D.; McEvoy, N.; Duesberg, G. S.; Cross, G. L. W.; Zhang, H. Z.; Donegan, J. F.

    2014-01-01

    We report on position and density control of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres created in type Ib diamond using localised exposure from a helium ion microscope and subsequent annealing. Spatial control to <380 nm has been achieved. We show that the fluorescence lifetime of the created centres decreases with increasing ion dose. Furthermore, we show that for doses >1 × 1017 ion/cm2, significant damage of the diamond lattice occurs resulting in fluorescence quenching and amorphization. This places an upper limit on the density of NV centres that can be created using this method.

  8. Development of a simulation and skills centre in East Africa: a Rwandan-Canadian partnership.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Patricia; Bailey, Jonathan; Ntakiyiruta, Georges; Mukwesi, Christian; Whynot, Sara; Brindley, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Simulation replicates clinical experiences without patient risk; it remains uncommon in lower-income countries. We outline the creation of Rwanda's first centre for simulation and skills training. We secured funding for renovations, equipment and staff; curricula were developed, tested, and refined; local clinicians were trained to teach. In 13 months the centre provided 2,377 learning-encounters and 822 hours of training to Rwandan health care professionals. Our strategy represents an adaptable model for simulation and skills centre development in low-resources settings.

  9. Fluorescence Polarization Switching from a Single Silicon Vacancy Colour Centre in Diamond

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Chen, Gengxu; Rong, Youying; McGuinness, Liam Paul; Jelezko, Fedor; Tamura, Syuto; Tanii, Takashi; Teraji, Tokuyuki; Onoda, Shinobu; Ohshima, Takeshi; Isoya, Junichi; Shinada, Takahiro; Wu, E; Zeng, Heping

    2015-01-01

    Single-photon emitters with stable and uniform photoluminescence properties are important for quantum technology. However, in many cases, colour centres in diamond exhibit spectral diffusion and photoluminescence intensity fluctuation. It is therefore essential to investigate the dynamics of colour centres at the single defect level in order to enable the on-demand manipulation and improved applications in quantum technology. Here we report the polarization switching, intensity jumps and spectral shifting observed on a negatively charged single silicon-vacancy colour centre in diamond. The observed phenomena elucidate the single emitter dynamics induced by photoionization of nearby electron donors in the diamond. PMID:26202940

  10. Observation and control of blinking nitrogen-vacancy centres in discrete nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Bradac, C; Gaebel, T; Naidoo, N; Sellars, M J; Twamley, J; Brown, L J; Barnard, A S; Plakhotnik, T; Zvyagin, A V; Rabeau, J R

    2010-05-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy colour centres in diamond can undergo strong, spin-sensitive optical transitions under ambient conditions, which makes them attractive for applications in quantum optics, nanoscale magnetometry and biolabelling. Although nitrogen-vacancy centres have been observed in aggregated detonation nanodiamonds and milled nanodiamonds, they have not been observed in very small isolated nanodiamonds. Here, we report the first direct observation of nitrogen-vacancy centres in discrete 5-nm nanodiamonds at room temperature, including evidence for intermittency in the luminescence (blinking) from the nanodiamonds. We also show that it is possible to control this blinking by modifying the surface of the nanodiamonds.

  11. Swan Hills Special Waste Treatment Centre human health impact assessment. Volume 2: Technical appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Appendices to a study of human health impacts of the Swan Hills Waste Treatment Centre in Alberta include: Background information on the Centre, including site characteristics, operational history, environmental incidents, and land use; protocols for sampling of locally obtained meat and fish; data on levels of polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins in meat and fish samples; protocols for human blood monitoring and sampling; congener profiles for deer, fish, and human blood samples; survey questionnaires and news releases related to possible impacts of a contaminant release from the Centre; and information on databases used.

  12. Swan Hills Special Waste Treatment Centre human health impact assessment. Volume 2: Technical appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1997-01-01

    Appendices to a study of human health impacts of the Swan Hills Waste Treatment Centre in Alberta include: Background information on the Centre, including site characteristics, operational history, environmental incidents, and land use; protocols for sampling of locally obtained meat and fish; data on levels of polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins in meat and fish samples; protocols for human blood monitoring and sampling; congener profiles for deer, fish, and human blood samples; survey questionnaires and news releases related to possible impacts of a contaminant release from the Centre; and information on databases used.

  13. Development of a simulation and skills centre in East Africa: a Rwandan-Canadian partnership

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Patricia; Bailey, Jonathan; Ntakiyiruta, Georges; Mukwesi, Christian; Whynot, Sara; Brindley, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Simulation replicates clinical experiences without patient risk; it remains uncommon in lower-income countries. We outline the creation of Rwanda's first centre for simulation and skills training. We secured funding for renovations, equipment and staff; curricula were developed, tested, and refined; local clinicians were trained to teach. In 13 months the centre provided 2,377 learning-encounters and 822 hours of training to Rwandan health care professionals. Our strategy represents an adaptable model for simulation and skills centre development in low-resources settings PMID:25328611

  14. Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 32: Patterns in Soil-Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollet, S. J.; Simmer, C.; Masbou, M.; Boessenkool, K.; Crewell, S.; Diekkruger, B.; Huber, K.; Klitzsch, N.; Koyama, C. N.; Vereecken, H.

    2011-12-01

    The soil, vegetation and the lower atmosphere (SVA) are key compartments of the Earth, where almost all activities of mankind take place. This region is characterized by extremely complex patterns, structures and processes that act at different temporal and spatial scales. While the exchange of energy, water and carbon is continuous between the different compartments, the pertinent fluxes are strongly heterogeneous and variable in space and time. The overarching TR32 paradigm is that the characterisation of structures and patterns will lead to a deeper qualitative and quantitative understanding of the SVA system, and ultimately to better predictions of the SVA state. The TR32 combines research groups in the field of soil and plant science, remote sensing, hydrology, meteorology and mathematics located at the Universities of Aachen, Bonn, Braunschweig and Cologne and the Research Centre Juelich study the soil-vegetation atmosphere system under the novel holistic paradigm of patterns. To understand the mechanisms leading to spatial and temporal patterns in energy and matter fluxes of the SVA system we link experiments and theory via model-observation integration. Focusing our research on the Rur Catchment (Germany), patterns are monitored since 2006 continuously using existing and novel geophysical and remote sensing techniques from the local to the catchment scale based on ground penetrating radar methods, induced polarization, radiomagnetotellurics, electrical resistivity tomography, boundary layer scintillometry, lidar techniques, microwave radiometry, and precipitation radars with polarization diversity. Modeling approaches involve high resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP; 400m) and hydrological models (few meters). Example work from the first phase includes the transfer of laboratory methods to the field; the measurements of patterns of soil-carbon, evapotranspiration and respiration measured in the field; catchment-scale modeling of exchange processes

  15. Molecular analysis of IgD-positive human germinal centres.

    PubMed

    Müller, Claudia; Siemer, Dörte; Lehnerdt, Götz; Lang, Stephan; Küppers, Ralf

    2010-04-01

    It is controversially discussed whether human IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells, which carry somatically mutated Ig variable region (IgV) genes, are derived from germinal centres (GC) B cells or originate from another developmental pathway. GC composed of IgM(+)IgD(+) B cells, which co-express the CD70 surface marker, have been described in approximately 10% of tonsils. As IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells might be generated in such GC, we characterized IgD(+) tonsillar GC cells. GC dominated by IgD(+) B cells were present in 10 of 67 tonsils analyzed. Three GC were additionally positive for CD70. Detailed analysis of one such GC by microdissection and single-cell DNA PCR revealed IgD(+) GC B cells undergoing somatic hypermutation during clonal expansion. However, further analysis of this GC as well as five additional microdissected GC by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR for clonally related Igmu and Igdelta transcripts indicated that the B-cell clones in five of these six IgD(+) GC belong to the IgD-only B cell subset, which has deleted the Cmu gene, and that only one GC harboured a large IgM(+)IgD(+) B-cell clone. Hence, most IgD(+) GC consist of IgD-only B cells and fully developed IgM(+)IgD(+)(CD70(+)) GC are very rare. This indicates that the rare IgM(+)IgD(+) GC B-cell clones from IgD(+) GC contribute little to the large population of IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells. Finally, an RT-PCR analysis with clone-specific primers for two IgD(+) GC B-cell clones showed an absence of IgG or IgA class-switched clone members, indicating strict regulation of class switching and a selective production of IgD(+) B cells from such clones.

  16. Optical properties of off-centred ? ions in ? crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Taiju; Scacco, Augusto

    1998-03-01

    Optical absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of 0953-8984/10/12/016/img7 crystals with different concentrations of 0953-8984/10/12/016/img8 ions have been studied in the temperature range 15-296 K. Absorption bands due to isolated 0953-8984/10/12/016/img8 are observed at 27 000, 28 593, 31 250, 32 010 and 47 600 0953-8984/10/12/016/img10, and their intensities are almost constant for variation of temperature. A vibronic fine structure is observed with a sharp line at 27 460 0953-8984/10/12/016/img10 on the low energy tail of the 28 593 0953-8984/10/12/016/img10 band. From the temperature behaviour of the absorptions and MCD spectra of the intense 28 593 and 32 010 0953-8984/10/12/016/img10 bands, it is concluded that the first four bands arise from the 0953-8984/10/12/016/img14 transition of 0953-8984/10/12/016/img8 occupying an off-centred position at the 0953-8984/10/12/016/img16 site. By comparison with the 0953-8984/10/12/016/img17 absorption bands in 0953-8984/10/12/016/img18 and NaF, it is suggested that the 28 593 and 32 010 0953-8984/10/12/016/img10 bands are caused by the 0953-8984/10/12/016/img20 and 0953-8984/10/12/016/img21 transitions, respectively, while the weak 27 000 and 31 250 0953-8984/10/12/016/img10 bands are related to the triplet states 0953-8984/10/12/016/img23 and 0953-8984/10/12/016/img24. The high-energy 47 600 0953-8984/10/12/016/img10 band is proposed to be attributable to the 0953-8984/10/12/016/img26 transition.

  17. The Centre for History in Public Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, University of London (LSHTM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berridge, Virginia

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the origin of the Centre for History in Public Health and the significance of its location in a leading school of public health. It is in three parts: (1) A brief history of how the AIDS programme became the History Centre; (2) The distinctive approach of the Centre's staff as historians: their contribution and its…

  18. Towards a shared service centre for telemedicine: Telemedicine in Denmark, and a possible way forward.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Simon Bo; Sørensen, Nanna Skovgaard; Petersen, Matilde Grøndahl; Kjeldsen, Gitte Friis

    2016-12-01

    Although evidence of the effectiveness of telemedicine is accumulating, knowledge of how to make best use of telemedicine is limited. This article presents results from a multi-stakeholder project that developed a new concept, a 'shared service centre' for telemedicine that is envisioned as working across different telemedical initiatives to support the implementation and wider adoption of telemedicine. One year of participatory design and analysis of the shared service centre concept involved stakeholders, such as clinicians, patients, technicians, policy makers, lawyers, economists and information technology architects. More than 100 people contributed to the findings. Most of the ideas generated for potential centre support for telemedicine could be categorised under four service categories. The need for such support services was verified in the cases investigated, and by agreement among stakeholders from regional health authorities, municipalities, and general practice. Therefore, it is probable that a shared service centre could help enable the wider deployment of telemedicine.

  19. Environmental conservation by radiation technology: A new Italian multipurpose demonstration centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tata, A.; Manni, S.

    1993-10-01

    A new italian R&D/ Demonstration Centre, named CE.S.T.I.A. (CEntro Sperimentazione Tecnologie di Irraggiamento per l'Ambiente, namely Experimental Centre for Environmental Applications of Radiation Technology) will be presented. The Centre, that should represent the largest project in the world for research on environmental applications of radiation technology, will be located in the South of Italy and foresees, over an area of 35, 000 m 2, four independent irradiation plants, each one with a dedicated electron beam machine. The foreseen EB-machines features allow a large operative flexibility; the first research cycle will regard five activity lines: hazardous wastes, waste water, flue gases, hospital wastes, clean technologies. The Centre technical and economic features are described, together with an analysis of realistic spreading perspectives of radiation technology on the Italian industrial wastes management market.

  20. Sneeze related area in the medulla: localisation of the human sneezing centre?

    PubMed

    Seijo-Martínez, M; Varela-Freijanes, A; Grandes, J; Vázquez, F

    2006-04-01

    Sneezing is a rarely explored symptom in neurological practice. In the cat, a sneeze evoking centre is located in the medulla. The existence of a sneezing centre has not been confirmed in humans. A case with abnormal sneezing secondary to a strategic infarct in the right latero-medullary region is presented. A 66 year old man suddenly presented paroxysmal sneezing followed by ataxia, right sided motor and sensory symptoms, and hoarseness. The application of stimuli to the right nasal fossa did not evoke sneezing nor the wish to sneeze. The same stimuli to the contralateral nasal fossa evoked normal sneezing. The preservation of the superficial sensitivity of the nasal fossa indicates that the lesion was localised in the hypothetical human sneezing centre, very close to the spinal trigeminal tract and nucleus. This centre appears to be bilateral and functionally independent on both sides.

  1. Protonic sidedness of the binuclear iron-copper centre in cytochrome oxidase.

    PubMed

    Wikström, M

    1988-04-11

    The oxidised (ferric-cupric) binuclear centre of cytochrome oxidase is converted into two other states, presumably ferrylcupric (F) and ferric-peroxy-cupric (P), by energy-dependent reversed electron transfer from the centre (and water) to cytochrome c [(1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 4051-4054; (1987) Chem. Scr. 27B, 53-58]. This sequence of events represents a partial reversal of the O2 reduction catalysed by the centre. Here it is shown that the strong pH-dependence of these reactions is exerted specifically from the matrix (M) side of the inner mitochondrial membrane. This proves unequivocally that the binuclear centre generates protonmotive force by means of its vectorial accessibility for electrons and protons.

  2. The diastereoselective synthesis of octahedral cationic iridium hydride complexes with a stereogenic metal centre.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Nicolas; Mazet, Clément

    2016-08-23

    We report herein the highly diastereoselective synthesis of octahedral cationic Ir(iii) hydride complexes with a stereogenic metal centre following various strategies. The configurational stability of these compounds has also been investigated.

  3. Wear simulation for the centre plate arrangement of a freight car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olshevskiy, Alexander; Kim, Chang-Wan; Yang, Hyun-Ik; Olshevskiy, Alexey

    2015-06-01

    The bodies of many railway freight cars in many countries of the world are coupled to the running gear by means of a body centre plate that makes a friction pair with a centre bowl. During motion, the bogie is rotated and moved with respect to the car body. This leads to wear on the contact surfaces. Lubrication is inexpedient in this case because the friction forces damp the vibrations (so-called bogie hunting) during motion. Usually, centre plates exhibit noticeable wear after two years of operation. Reducing wear requires knowing details of the wear process which, in turn, requires computer simulation of freight car motion for an operation period of 10-15 years. The purpose of this paper is to develop a universal method for wear simulation of friction pairs that could be used, in particular, for the centre plate of a freight car.

  4. Evaluation Of Levels Of Climate Favorability For Viticulture In Breasta Viticultural Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzatu, Gilda-Diana; Mărăcineanu, Liviu Cristian

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this present research was to evaluate the climatic conditions of a viticultural centre, as there are always needed studies to determine the climate favorability of the vine cultivation and the varieties resistant to heat and water stress, especially when climate change affects globally viticulture. The present research was made using the interpretation of Craiova Regional Weather Centre's meteorological records for the year of 2014, for Breasta viticultural centre. The climatic factors permitted the determination of several indexes used in viticultural climatology for the appreciation of the viticultural biotope characteristics. Assessment of climatic resources through synthetic climatic indexes, clearly express the generous heliothermic offer available for Breasta viticultural centre, the guarantee of quality and specificity of vine products obtained in this area.

  5. Sneeze related area in the medulla: localisation of the human sneezing centre?

    PubMed Central

    Seijo‐Martínez, M; Varela‐Freijanes, A; Grandes, J; Vázquez, F

    2006-01-01

    Sneezing is a rarely explored symptom in neurological practice. In the cat, a sneeze evoking centre is located in the medulla. The existence of a sneezing centre has not been confirmed in humans. A case with abnormal sneezing secondary to a strategic infarct in the right latero‐medullary region is presented. A 66 year old man suddenly presented paroxysmal sneezing followed by ataxia, right sided motor and sensory symptoms, and hoarseness. The application of stimuli to the right nasal fossa did not evoke sneezing nor the wish to sneeze. The same stimuli to the contralateral nasal fossa evoked normal sneezing. The preservation of the superficial sensitivity of the nasal fossa indicates that the lesion was localised in the hypothetical human sneezing centre, very close to the spinal trigeminal tract and nucleus. This centre appears to be bilateral and functionally independent on both sides. PMID:16354739

  6. Loss of signalling via Gα13 in germinal centre B-cell-derived lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Muppidi, Jagan R; Schmitz, Roland; Green, Jesse A; Xiao, Wenming; Larsen, Adrien B; Braun, Sterling E; An, Jinping; Xu, Ying; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Gascoyne, Randy D; Rimsza, Lisa M; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B; Braziel, Rita M; Tubbs, Raymond R; Cook, J R; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Chan, Wing C; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Staudt, Louis M; Cyster, Jason G

    2014-12-11

    Germinal centre B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (GCB-DLBCL) is a common malignancy, yet the signalling pathways that are deregulated and the factors leading to its systemic dissemination are poorly defined. Work in mice showed that sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-2 (S1PR2), a Gα12 and Gα13 coupled receptor, promotes growth regulation and local confinement of germinal centre B cells. Recent deep sequencing studies of GCB-DLBCL have revealed mutations in many genes in this cancer, including in GNA13 (encoding Gα13) and S1PR2 (refs 5,6, 7). Here we show, using in vitro and in vivo assays, that GCB-DLBCL-associated mutations occurring in S1PR2 frequently disrupt the receptor's Akt and migration inhibitory functions. Gα13-deficient mouse germinal centre B cells and human GCB-DLBCL cells were unable to suppress pAkt and migration in response to S1P, and Gα13-deficient mice developed germinal centre B-cell-derived lymphoma. Germinal centre B cells, unlike most lymphocytes, are tightly confined in lymphoid organs and do not recirculate. Remarkably, deficiency in Gα13, but not S1PR2, led to germinal centre B-cell dissemination into lymph and blood. GCB-DLBCL cell lines frequently carried mutations in the Gα13 effector ARHGEF1, and Arhgef1 deficiency also led to germinal centre B-cell dissemination. The incomplete phenocopy of Gα13- and S1PR2 deficiency led us to discover that P2RY8, an orphan receptor that is mutated in GCB-DLBCL and another germinal centre B-cell-derived malignancy, Burkitt's lymphoma, also represses germinal centre B-cell growth and promotes confinement via Gα13. These findings identify a Gα13-dependent pathway that exerts dual actions in suppressing growth and blocking dissemination of germinal centre B cells that is frequently disrupted in germinal centre B-cell-derived lymphoma.

  7. The case for routine HIV screening before IVF treatment: a survey of UK IVF centre policies.

    PubMed

    Marcus, S F; Avery, S M; Abusheikha, N; Marcus, N K; Brinsden, P R

    2000-08-01

    The case for routine human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening of all couples seeking assisted reproductive treatment is so strong that it should be made obligatory for all couples entering IVF programmes to be given information about HIV transmission, and offered testing. In August 1999, questionnaires regarding routine HIV screening of couples seeking IVF treatment were sent to the medical directors of the 74 licensed assisted conception units in the UK. Of the 45 (60.8%) centres who responded, 19 (42.2%) routinely screen both partners for HIV antibodies, 25 (55.5%) do not screen and one centre selectively screens high-risk patients. There was no significant difference in the proportion of centres that routinely carried out screening with regards to the unit size: six out of 13 (46.2%) small units compared with 13/32 (40.6%) large units. In all, 17 centres (37.8%) rated HIV screening as essential, nine (20%) as desirable, 11 (24.4%) as not required, while eight (17. 8%) centres did not comment. Of the 19 centres that have a routine screening policy, 18 have management protocols in the event that the test is positive. Of these 18 centres, 12 adhere rigidly to the protocol, while five centres adhere to the protocol with few exceptions and the remaining one uses its protocol for guidance only. The main reasons for not employing routine HIV screening were: the lack of cost effectiveness, low prevalence of HIV infection in their population, necessity for and cost of counselling, uncertainty about the need for screening and potential delay to start of treatment.

  8. Instantaneous centre of rotation in human motion: measurement and computational issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crenna, Francesco; Battista Rossi, Giovanni; Palazzo, Alice

    2016-11-01

    The instantaneous centre of rotation plays an important role in biomechanical modelling and physical-medical interpretation of human gestures. Therefore, we consider its measurement, based on video-image acquisition and processing of human motion records. Measurement and computational aspects are discussed, including the evaluation of measurement uncertainty and the estimation of the effect of some influence quantities on the determination of the position of the instantaneous centre of rotation.

  9. Annealing dynamics of waveguide Bragg gratings: evidence of femtosecond laser induced colour centres.

    PubMed

    Dekker, P; Ams, M; Marshall, G D; Little, D J; Withford, M J

    2010-02-15

    There is still significant speculation regarding the nature of femtosecond laser induced index change in bulk glasses with colour centre formation and densification the main candidates. In the work presented here, we fabricated waveguide Bragg gratings in doped and undoped phosphate glasses and use these as a diagnostic for monitoring subtle changes in the induced refractive index during photo- and thermal annealing experiments. Reductions in grating strengths during such experiments were attributed to the annihilation of colour centres.

  10. How T follicular helper cells and the germinal centre response change with age.

    PubMed

    Linterman, Michelle A

    2014-01-01

    Normal ageing is accompanied by a decline in the function of the immune system that causes an increased susceptibility to infections and an impaired response to vaccination in older individuals. This results in an increased disease burden in the aged population, even with good immunisation programmes in place. The decreased response to vaccination is partly due to the diminution of the germinal centre response with age, caused by impaired T-cell help to B cells. Within the germinal centre, T-cell help is provided by a specialised subset of CD4(+) T cells; T follicular helper (Tfh) cells. Tfh cells provide survival and selection signals to germinal centre B cells, allowing them to egress from the germinal centre and become long-live plasma cells or memory B cells, and provide life-long protection against subsequent infection. This review will discuss the cellular and molecular changes in both Tfh cells and germinal centre B cells that occur with advancing age, which result in a smaller germinal centre response and a less effective response to immunisation.

  11. The Galactic Centre at infrared wavelengths: towards the highest spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clénet, Yann; Rouan, Daniel; Léna, Pierre; Gendron, Eric; Lacombe, François

    2007-01-01

    We now know that our Galaxy harbors at its centre a supermassive 3.6×10M black hole. This result came after more than 2 decades of infrared studies of the Galactic Centre and important instrumental developments in infrared detectors and in high spatial resolution techniques. Adaptive optics, which allows diffraction-limited infrared observations and enhanced sensitivity, was actually the major breakthrough in this respect. We introduce in the first section of this article what was our knowledge of the Galactic Centre before the advent of adaptive optics. In the second section, after a reminder of the first adaptive optics observations of this region, we highlight the specificities of Galactic Centre adaptive optics observations. In the third and fourth sections, we present the major results obtained from adaptive optics observations of the Galactic Centre: the case of the supermassive black hole and the paradox of youth. In the fifth section, we introduce two main future facilities that will provide even higher spatial resolutions, Gravity—a second generation VLTI instrument—and Extremely Large Telescopes, and the improvements that we expect with these new instruments in our knowledge of the Galactic Centre region. We conclude in the last section. To cite this article: Y. Clénet et al., C. R. Physique 8 (2007).

  12. Generation of (F+2)_AH Centres in Sodium Ion Doped KCl:CO^{2-3}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaf, M.; Chihi, I.; Hamaïdia, A.; Akrmi, El.

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrate that (F+2)AH centres of KCl may be obtained from crystals doped with K{2}CO{3} and NaCl, grown by the Czochralski method in open atmosphere. The optical properties of (F+2)AH centres thus produced are exactly the same as those of (F+2)AH centres prepared by the usual technique, which involves superoxide doping and a controlled atmosphere. Nous montrons que les centres (F+2)AH de KCl peuvent être obtenus à partir de cristaux dopés par K{2}CO{3} et NaCl, fabriqués par la méthode de Czochralski à l'air libre. Les propriétés optiques des centres (F+2)AH ainsi produits sont exactement les mêmes que celles des centres (F+2)AH préparés par la technique habituelle, qui comporte le dopage par un superoxyde et l'emploi d'une atmosphère contrôlée.

  13. Invasive procedures carried out in conscious children: contrast between North American and European paediatric oncology centres

    PubMed Central

    Hain, R; Campbell, C; SPACE, S; KHARASCH, S; BAUCHNER, H

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To define practice in managing repeated invasive procedures in selected paediatric oncology centres in North America and Europe, especially the United Kingdom; to define and contrast concerns that shape policy making, and to contrast practice, particularly regarding procedures performed on conscious patients.
METHODS—Postal survey: 118 centres of the Pediatric Oncology Group and the United Kingdom Children's Cancer Study Group received questionnaires.
RESULTS—68 questionnaires (58%) were returned (52 from North America, 12 from Europe). For all procedures, North American centres tended to use less effective techniques than European, especially for bone marrow procedures. Many North American centres reported performing these on conscious patients on at least three quarters (25%) or half (30%) the occasions. In contrast, corresponding figures for the European centres were 6% and 0%.
CONCLUSIONS—Many bone marrow procedures are still carried out in the conscious patient despite the safety and effectiveness of modern anaesthetic and deep sedation techniques. There appears to be a greater reluctance to offer these to patients in North American centres than in European ones. This may reflect a misperception that the risks of adverse effects are high. Several non-pharmacological techniques are used, but they remain uncommon.

 PMID:11420188

  14. Person Centred Planning "In Action": Exploring the Use of Person Centred Planning in Supporting Young People's Transition and Re-integration to Mainstream Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, Emma

    2014-01-01

    This study, by Emma Corrigan of the Plymouth Excellence Cluster and Community Psychology Service, explores the use of person centred planning (PCP) in supporting young people who have experienced school exclusion, in their transition and re-integration to mainstream settings. Young people of different ages participated in the PCP process and…

  15. Is Student-Centred Learning a Western Concept? Lessons from an Academic Development Programme to Support Student-Centred Learning in Iraq

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, L.; Bovill, C.; Othman, S. M.; Saleh, A. M.; Shabila, N. P.; Watters, N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the idea that student-centred learning (SCL) is a concept and an approach that is internationally useful and transferable to a range of higher education settings. We present details of a British Council funded collaborative project between Hawler Medical University (HMU), in Erbil in the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq and…

  16. Predictors of valued everyday occupations, empowerment and satisfaction in day centres: implications for services for persons with psychiatric disabilities.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Mona; Sandlund, Mikael

    2014-09-01

    This study addresses predictors of occupational value, empowerment and satisfaction with the rehabilitation received in day centres for people with psychiatric disabilities. These outcomes represent varying aspects of relevance for the day centre context and together create a manifold outcome picture. This was a longitudinal study with approval from the regional research vetting board. Self-report instruments were used, and the investigated predictors motivation for going to the day centre, occupational engagement, socio-demographic factors and self-reported diagnosis. Attendees (N = 108) at 8 day centres participated and filled in self-report questionnaires regarding the predictor and outcome variables. A baseline measurement and a 14-month follow-up composed the data. Occupational engagement at baseline could predict all three outcomes at the follow-up. Motivation for the day centre activities and not preferring work before attending the day centre were positive for satisfaction with the day centre. A low participation rate, although comparable with previous studies on the target group, was a limitation of this study. To conclude, both occupational engagement and motivation are factors that can be stimulated by the staff in day centres. Actions for how to accomplish that, and thereby also more positive outcomes of the day centre services, are proposed, such as a system of freedom of choice among day centres, and between day centres and supported employment.

  17. Outcomes of Cryoballoon Ablation in High- and Low-Volume Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Centres: A Russian Pilot Survey

    PubMed Central

    Mikhaylov, Evgeny N.; Lebedev, Dmitry S.; Pokushalov, Evgeny A.; Davtyan, Karapet V.; Ivanitskii, Eduard A.; Nechepurenko, Anatoly A.; Kosonogov, Alexey Ya.; Kolunin, Grigory V.; Morozov, Igor A.; Termosesov, Sergey A.; Maykov, Evgeny B.; Khomutinin, Dmitry N.; Eremin, Sergey A.; Mayorov, Igor M.; Romanov, Alexander B.; Shabanov, Vitaliy V.; Shatakhtsyan, Victoria; Tsivkovskii, Viktor; Revishvili, Amiran Sh.; Shlyakhto, Evgeny V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The results of cryoballoon ablation (CBA) procedure have been mainly derived from studies conducted in experienced atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation centres. Here, we report on CBA efficacy and complications resulting from real practice of this procedure at both high- and low-volume centres. Methods. Among 62 Russian centres performing AF ablation, 15 (24%) used CBA technology for pulmonary vein isolation. The centres were asked to provide a detailed description of all CBA procedures performed and complications, if encountered. Results. Thirteen sites completed interviews on all CBAs in their centres (>95% of CBAs in Russia). Six sites were high-volume AF ablation (>100 AF cases/year) centres, and 7 were low-volume AF ablation. There was no statistical difference in arrhythmia-free rates between high- and low-volume centres (64.6 versus 60.8% at 6 months). Major complications developed in 1.5% of patients and were equally distributed between high- and low-volume centres. Minor procedure-related events were encountered in 8% of patients and were more prevalent in high-volume centres. Total event and vascular access site event rates were higher in women than in men. Conclusions. CBA has an acceptable efficacy profile in real practice. In less experienced AF ablation centres, the major complication rate is equal to that in high-volume centres. PMID:26640789

  18. What specifications for a centre or network of excellence in clinical research?

    PubMed

    Diebolt, Vincent; Lang, Marie; Thoby, Frédérique

    2016-02-01

    The Giens 2015 Workshop Round Table entitled "What specifications for a centre or network of excellence in clinical research?" took a viewpoint distinct from earlier work and studies on changes in clinical research activities in France. The purpose of the present work was to identify, starting from concrete examples, the main strengths and advantages of clinical research activity in France related, in part, to the background environment and also to the specific characteristics of the investigation centres considered to be among the most high-performance units in activity. The criteria retained were grouped into a set of specifications that could be used to establish a "label of excellence" upon which the different teams and clinical research centres could model themselves. It was thus considered that belonging to a centre or structured network with at least a national configuration, when this is possible for the medial topic in question, constitutes a real advantage. Four benchmarks were identified: the scientific and clinical expertise of the head investigator, as well as the qualification and operational capacity of the centre's team; definition and measurement of performance using clearly displayed indicators and evaluation procedures; the quality of the overall trial "process" and of each of its component steps; communication, because know-how and promotion go hand in hand, with the main objective of informing the professional and general public about the value of the research centre meeting the above-mentioned criteria, about its networks of competencies, and more generally, about the important assets of the background of clinical research in France. This sector of research is funded by the public authorities via calls for public grants, financial aids for structures supporting clinical research in the University Hospital Centres and other healthcare institutions allowing for a professionalization of the research occupations, and the national public health

  19. 'Smashed by the National Health'? A Closer Look at the Demise of the Pioneer Health Centre, Peckham.

    PubMed

    Conford, Philip

    2016-04-01

    The Pioneer Health Centre, based in South London before and after the Second World War, remains a source of interest for advocates of a positive approach to health promotion in contrast with the treatment of those already ill. Its closure in 1950 for lack of funds has been blamed on the then recently established National Health Service, but this article argues that such an explanation is over-simplified and ignores a number of other factors. The Centre had struggled financially during the 1930s and tried to gain support from the Medical Research Council. The Council appeared interested in the Centre before the war, but was less sympathetic in the 1940s. Around the time of its closure and afterwards, the Centre was also involved in negotiations with London County Council; these failed because the Centre's directors would not accept the changes which the Council would have needed to make. Unpublished documents reveal that the Centre's directors were uncompromising and that their approach to the situation antagonised their colleagues. Changes in medical science also worked against the Centre. The success of sulphonamide drugs appeared to render preventive medicine less significant, while the development of statistical techniques cast doubt on the Centre's experimental methods. The Centre was at the heart of the nascent organic farming movement, which opposed the rapid growth of chemical cultivation. But what might be termed 'chemical triumphalism' was on the march in both medicine and agriculture, and the Centre was out of tune with the mood of the times.

  20. The application of client-centred occupational therapy for Korean children with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dae Hyuk; Yoo, Eun Young; Chung, Bo In; Jung, Min Ye; Chang, Ki Yeon; Jeon, Hye Seon

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the effectiveness of client-centred occupational therapy using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS). Eight girls and 23 boys from Korea, with developmental disabilities and from 3 to 10 years of age participated in this study. Each child participated in 20 to 24 sessions of client-centred occupational therapy. Both the COPM and the AMPS change scores demonstrated statistically significant improvement (p < 0.01) in occupational performance. Significant correlations were found between COPM - Performance and AMPS - Motor skills (r(s) = 0.64, p < 0.05), and COPM - Satisfaction and AMPS - Process skills (r(s) = 0.62, p < 0.05) in a group positive towards client-centred occupational therapy. The COPM was a valuable tool in guiding and measuring the client-centred occupational therapy for children with developmental disabilities. The small sample size of 31 children limits the generalizability of the study's results. Future research needs to use a larger and more diverse sample of children to further validate the effectiveness of client-centred occupational therapy.

  1. Combined medical-psychiatric inpatient units: evaluation of the Centre for the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Maier, A B; Wächtler, C; Hofmann, W

    2007-08-01

    Considering the large number of elderly patients in acute hospitals who receive medical as well as psychiatric treatment because of relevant comorbidity, adequate interdisciplinary treatment models have to be developed and applied. The Centre for Elderly, a cooperation project between the departments of geriatric and psychogeriatric medicine in a community hospital in Germany, was founded in 2000. In addition to traditionally structured units, the centre consists of interdisciplinary units. Patient-, staff- and hospital-related characteristics influenced by the reformation of both departments were evaluated by comparing hospital-based registry data records containing age, gender, main and minor diagnoses, length of stay and patient transferrals within the centre. Experts working at the centre were asked to take a stand on the development of the treatment quality, allocation of patients, diagnostic procedures, consultation services and information transmission. The number of admissions to the Centre for the Elderly increased within one year. The distribution of the main diagnose groups remained unchanged, with an overlap between the geriatric and psychogeriatric department consisting of the main diagnoses dementia and depression. The length of stay and the number of transferrals decreased significantly in both departments. The majority of the interviewed employees stated that the treatment quality and the allocation of patients were improved. We conclude that interdisciplinary treatment between the departments of psychiatry and geriatric medicine may contribute to the medical needs of subgroups of elderly inpatients suffering from medical-psychiatric comorbidity.

  2. Conducting a paediatric multi-centre RCT with an industry partner: challenges and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Maskell, Jessica; Newcombe, Peter; Martin, Graham; Kimble, Roy

    2012-11-01

    There are many benefits of multi-centred research including large sample sizes, statistical power, timely recruitment and generalisability of results. However, there are numerous considerations when planning and implementing a multi-centred study. This article reviews the challenges and successes of planning and implementing a multi-centred prospective randomised control trial involving an industry partner. The research investigated the impact on psychosocial functioning of a cosmetic camouflage product for children and adolescents with burn scarring. Multi-centred studies commonly have many stakeholders. Within this study, six Australian and New Zealand paediatric burn units as well as an industry partner were involved. The inclusion of an industry partner added complexities as they brought different priorities and expectations to the research. Further, multifaceted ethical and institutional approval processes needed to be negotiated. The challenges, successes, lessons learned and recommendations from this study regarding Australian and New Zealand ethics and research governance approval processes, collaboration with industry partners and the management of differing expectations will be outlined. Recommendations for future multi-centred research with industry partners include provision of regular written reports for the industry partner; continual monitoring and prompt resolution of concerns; basic research practices education for industry partners; minimisation of industry partner contact with participants; clear roles and responsibilities of all stakeholders and utilisation of single ethical review if available.

  3. Histomorphological study of germinal centre of vermiform appendix in Bangladeshi cadaver.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M M; Sultana, S Z; Mannan, S; Ara, Z G; Chowdhury, A I; Ara, A; Mukta, T B

    2013-01-01

    The study was done to find out the number of germinal centre in human vermiform appendix of Bangladeshi people to magnify the knowledge regarding the diverse number of germinal centre of human vermiform appendix in our population in the department of Anatomy, Mymensingh Medical College, Bangladesh from July 2006 to June 2007. Total 40 appendices were collected for histological study of different age and sex during postmortem examination in the autopsy laboratory of department of Forensic Medicine, Mymensingh Medical College. This cross sectional study was done by convenient sampling technique. For convenience of differentiating the changes in number of germinal centre of vermiform appendix in relation to age and sex, findings were classified in four groups, Group A up to 20 years, Group B 21-35 years, Group C 36-55 years and Group D 56-70 years. In the present study the number of germinal centre was highest in Group B (52.38%) but in Group D it was nil. Here mean number of germinal centre in male (1.05) were more than in female (0.8).

  4. Short-stay daycare laparoscopic cholecystectomy at a dedicated daycare centre: Feasible or futile

    PubMed Central

    Zirpe, Dinesh; Swain, Sudeepta K.; Das, Somak; Gopakumar, CV; Kollu, Sriharsha; Patel, Darshan; Patta, Radhakrishna; Balachandar, Tirupporur G.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the last decade, laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) has become a regular daycare surgery at many centres across the world. However, only a few centres in India have a dedicated daycare surgery centre, and very few of them have reported their experience. Concerns remain regarding the feasibility, safety and acceptability of the introduction of daycare laparoscopic cholecystectomy (DCLC) in India. There is a need to assess the safety and acceptability of the implementation of short-stay DCLC service at a centre completely dedicated to daycare surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Comprehensive care and operative data were retrospectively collected from a daycare centre of our hospital. Postoperative recovery was monitored by telephone questionnaire on days 0, 1 and 5 postoperatively, including adverse outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 211 patients were admitted for DCLC during the period from November 2011 till November 2014, of whom 211 were discharged on the day of surgery. Two hundred and two patients could be discharged within 6 h of surgery. Mean operation time was 72 min. No patient required admission. No patient needed conversion to open surgery. Only 1 patient was re-admitted due to bilioma formation and was managed with minimal intervention. CONCLUSION: The introduction of short-stay DCLC in India is feasible and acceptable to patients. High body mass index (BMI) in otherwise healthy patients and selective additional procedures are not contraindications for DCLC. PMID:27251816

  5. Photoelectric detection of electron spin resonance of nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois, E.; Jarmola, A.; Siyushev, P.; Gulka, M.; Hruby, J.; Jelezko, F.; Budker, D.; Nesladek, M.

    2015-01-01

    The readout of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy centre electron spins is essential for applications in quantum computation, metrology and sensing. Conventional readout protocols are based on the detection of photons emitted from nitrogen-vacancy centres, a process limited by the efficiency of photon collection. We report on an alternative principle for detecting the magnetic resonance of nitrogen-vacancy centres, allowing the direct photoelectric readout of nitrogen-vacancy centres spin state in an all-diamond device. The photocurrent detection of magnetic resonance scheme is based on the detection of charge carriers promoted to the conduction band of diamond by two-photon ionization of nitrogen-vacancy centres. The optical and photoelectric detection of magnetic resonance are compared, by performing both types of measurements simultaneously. The minima detected in the measured photocurrent at resonant microwave frequencies are attributed to the spin-dependent ionization dynamics of nitrogen-vacancy, originating from spin-selective non-radiative transitions to the metastable singlet state. PMID:26486014

  6. Wiener index on rows of unit cells of the face-centred cubic lattice.

    PubMed

    Mujahed, Hamzeh; Nagy, Benedek

    2016-03-01

    The Wiener index of a connected graph, known as the `sum of distances', is the first topological index used in chemistry to sum the distances between all unordered pairs of vertices of a graph. The Wiener index, sometimes called the Wiener number, is one of the indices associated with a molecular graph that correlates physical and chemical properties of the molecule, and has been studied for various kinds of graphs. In this paper, the graphs of lines of unit cells of the face-centred cubic lattice are investigated. This lattice is one of the simplest, the most symmetric and the most usual, cubic crystal lattices. Its graphs contain face centres of the unit cells and other vertices, called cube vertices. Closed formulae are obtained to calculate the sum of shortest distances between pairs of cube vertices, between cube vertices and face centres and between pairs of face centres. Based on these formulae, their sum, the Wiener index of a face-centred cubic lattice with unit cells connected in a row graph, is computed.

  7. Exergaming in retirement centres and the integration of media and physical literacies.

    PubMed

    Millington, Brad

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports on a multi-method analysis of a recently emergent, though still understudied, trend: the use of exercise-themed video games (i.e., 'exergames') in retirement centres. The study in question specifically featured participant observation and interviews with residents and members of staff at retirement centres in Ontario, Canada. Data collection was aimed at understanding how games such as Wii Bowling are being put to use in retirement centre contexts and the implications of such activity. Findings on the one hand suggest that exergames are deemed valuable in the process of promoting both social engagement and physical activity. 'Virtual' bowling can bring people together in communal spaces while also 'getting them up' and active. On the other hand, however, exergaming presents challenges. For retirement centre residents, it engenders health risks while also demanding the deft synchronization of media and physical literacies. For activities coordinators and other members of staff responsible for residents' care, it means they too must stay abreast of the technology sector's latest innovations; they must develop media and physical literacies of their own. These findings are used as a platform for a broader discussion of aging, embodiment, and media in the paper's final section. Against the backdrop of existing conceptualizations of the third age, the use of exergames in retirement centres is deemed conducive not to independence and consumerism fully-fledged, but rather to the manifestation of 'quasi-consumerism' and 'quasi-independence' instead. Third age logic is thus both reinforced and subtly undermined.

  8. Sentinel-3 Mission Performance Centre: a Summary of First Months of Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruniquel, Jerome; S3MPC Partners

    2016-08-01

    The Sentinel-3 Mission Performance Centre (S-3 MPC) is one of the facility part of the Payload Data Ground Segment (PDGS). It and aims at controlling the quality of all generated products, from L0 to L2. The S-3 MPC is composed of a Coordinating Centre (CC), where the core infrastructure is hosted, which is in charge of the main routine activities (especially the quality control of data) and the overall service management. Expert Support Laboratories (ESLs) are involved in calibration and validation activities and provide specific assessment of the products (e.g., analysis of trends, ad hoc analysis of anomalies, etc.). The S-3 MPC interacts with the Processing Archiving Centers (PACs) and the Marine Centre at EUMETSAT.The S3MPC covers both optical and topography missions, each of them composed of several instruments.Since S3-A launch on the 16th of February 2016, the S3- MPC has started its activities, mainly focused on: Calibration activities, done in close relationship with the satellite commissioning team at ESTEC; Processor verification and update of specifications; Validation of L1 products and assessment of instrument performances; Cross-checking of L1 products processed in various processing centres; Progressive implementation of Quality Control activities done at the S3-MPC; Validation of L2 products, in synergy with the Marine Centre for L2 marine products

  9. Person-centred care: clarifying the concept in the context of inpatient psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Sebastian; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Zingmark, Karin

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports an analysis of the concept of person-centred care in the context of inpatient psychiatry. It has been suggested that person-centred care in inpatient psychiatry might differ from person-centred care in other contexts, indicating a need to clarify the concept in this specific context. Scholarly papers from health-related disciplines were identified following a systematic search of the electronic databases CINAHL, PUBMED and PsycINFO, covering records indexed up until March 2014. An evolutionary approach to concept analysis was applied, integrating principles for data extraction and analysis in integrative reviews. The concept of person-centred care was defined as cultural, relational and recovery-oriented. It aspires to improve care and calls for a transformation of inpatient psychiatry. The concept is closely related to the concepts of recovery and interpersonal nursing. The result is described in terms of attributes, antecedents, consequences and related concepts. It is concluded that the further development of the concept needs to consider the contexts of the concept at both conceptual and praxis levels. Further research should explore the nature of and relationships between context, culture, care practice and outcomes in inpatient psychiatry from a perspective of person-centred care. The results of this analysis can provide a framework for such research.

  10. The pattern of antenatal visits with emphasis on gestational age at booking in Riyadh Health Centres.

    PubMed

    al-Shammari, S A; Khoja, T; Jarallah, J S

    1994-04-01

    1344 expectant mothers were selected by random sampling from the catchment population of 15 health centres in Riyadh. The health centres were taken to represent all areas of urban Riyadh. These mothers were asked to complete a pre-designed questionnaire in Arabic and undergo a structured interview by trained midwives to explore their knowledge, attitude and practice toward antenatal visits. It was found that the average gestational age at booking was 13 weeks. The number of antenatal visits achieved during the current pregnancy was 6. 97% of expectant mothers were aware of the importance of antenatal visits. Various demographic characteristics were studied in relation to the number of antenatal visits achieved and the gestational age at booking. It was found that the level of education of both husband and wife and poor obstetric history significantly affected gestational age at booking, (P-values) were less than 0.03 and 0.002 respectively). However the family income and gestational age at booking affected the number of antenatal visits (P-values were less than 0.0003 and 0.0001 respectively). The respondents' most striking reason for non-compliance was related to accessibility to health centre. 23.3% thought that the health centres were far away from their residence and they needed to involve the husbands in driving them to health centres. Recommendations were given to improve aspects of accessibility and inviting more antenatal visits in addition to improving quality of such service.

  11. Person-centred rehabilitation: what exactly does it mean? Protocol for a scoping review with thematic analysis towards framing the concept and practice of person-centred rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Felicity; Kayes, Nicola; Cott, Cheryl A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Person-centredness is a philosophy for organising and delivering healthcare based on patients’ needs, preferences and experiences. Although widely endorsed, the concept suffers from a lack of detail and clarification, in turn accounting for ambiguous implementation and outcomes. While a conceptual framework based on a systematic review defines person/patient-centred care components (Scholl et al, 2014), it applies across healthcare contexts and may not be sensitive to the nuances of the rehabilitation of adults with physical impairments. Accordingly, this study aims to build a conceptual framework, based on existing literature, of what person-centredness means in the rehabilitation of adults with physical impairments in the clinical encounter and broader health service delivery. Methods and analysis We will use a scoping review methodology. Searches on relevant databases will be conducted first, combining keywords for ‘rehabilitation’, ‘person-centered’ and associated terms (including patient preferences/experiences). Next, snowball searches (citation tracking, references lists) will be performed. Papers will be included if they fall within predefined selection categories (seen as most likely informative on elements pertaining to person-centred rehabilitation) and are written in English, regardless of design (conceptual, qualitative, quantitative). Two reviewers will independently screen titles and abstracts, followed by screening of the full text to determine inclusion. Experts will then be consulted to identify relevant missing papers. This can include elements other than the peer-reviewed literature (eg, book chapters, policy/legal papers). Finally, information that helps to build the concept and practice of person-centred rehabilitation will be abstracted independently by two reviewers and analysed by inductive thematic analysis to build the conceptual framework. Dissemination The resulting framework will aid clarification regarding

  12. Assessment and determinants of airborne bacterial and fungal concentrations in different indoor environments: Homes, child day-care centres, primary schools and elderly care centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madureira, Joana; Paciência, Inês; Rufo, João Cavaleiro; Pereira, Cristiana; Teixeira, João Paulo; de Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo

    2015-05-01

    Until now the influence of risk factors resulting from exposure to biological agents in indoor air has been far less studied than outdoor pollution; therefore the uncertainty of health risks, and how to effectively prevent these, remains. This study aimed (i) to quantify airborne cultivable bacterial and fungal concentrations in four different types of indoor environment as well as to identify the recovered fungi; (ii) to assess the impact of outdoor bacterial and fungal concentrations on indoor air; (iii) to investigate the influence of carbon dioxide (CO2), temperature and relative humidity on bacterial and fungal concentrations; and (iv) to estimate bacterial and fungal dose rate for children (3-5 years old and 8-10 years old) in comparison with the elderly. Air samples were collected in 68 homes, 9 child day-care centres, 20 primary schools and 22 elderly care centres, in a total of 264 rooms with a microbiological air sampler and using tryptic soy agar and malt extract agar culture media for bacteria and fungi growth, respectively. For each building, one outdoor representative location were identified and simultaneously studied. The results showed that child day-care centres were the indoor microenvironment with the highest median bacterial and fungal concentrations (3870 CFU/m3 and 415 CFU/m3, respectively), whereas the lowest median concentrations were observed in elderly care centres (222 CFU/m3 and 180 CFU/m3, respectively). Indoor bacterial concentrations were significantly higher than outdoor concentrations (p < 0.05); whereas the indoor/outdoor ratios for the obtained fungal concentrations were approximately around the unit. Indoor CO2 levels were associated with the bacterial concentration, probably due to occupancy and insufficient ventilation. Penicillium and Cladosporium were the most frequently occurring fungi. Children's had two times higher dose rate to biological pollutants when compared to adult individuals. Thus, due to children

  13. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD), Stockholm University, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Stenius, Kerstin; Ramstedt, Mats; Olsson, Börje

    2010-03-01

    The Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD) was established as a national research centre and department within the Faculty of Social Science at Stockholm University in 1997, following a Government Report and with the aim to strengthen social alcohol and drug research. Initially, core funding came from the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research and from the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs for several long-term projects. Today, SoRAD, with 25 senior and junior researchers, has core funding from the university but most of its funding comes from external national and international grants. Research is organized under three themes: consumption, problems and norms, alcohol and drug policy and societal reactions, treatment and recovery processes. SoRADs scientific approach, multi-disciplinarity, a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods and international comparisons was established by the centre's first leader, Robin Room. Regular internal seminars are held and young researchers are encouraged to attend scientific meetings and take part in collaborative projects. SoRAD researchers produce government-funded monthly statistics on alcohol consumption and purchase, and take part in various national government committees, but SoRADs research has no clear political or bureaucratic constraints. One of the future challenges for SoRAD will be the proposed system for university grants allocation, where applied social science will have difficulties competing with basic biomedical research if decisions are based on publication and citation measures.

  14. [Bavarian Centre for Health: Health-related Prevention - Pragmatic and Need-oriented].

    PubMed

    Enke, M C

    2016-02-01

    The idea of improving population health by means of collective action and prevention of diseases in 1973 resulted in the decision of the Bavarian Parliament to establish a "Bavarian Centre for Health Education". According to its statutes, the aim was to promote the cooperation between institutions and organizations working in the field of public health and health education in Bavaria and to make their efforts effective by information, organization and coordination. The work of the 1970s and 80s was largely based on risk factor model, using methods of information and deterrence. The findings of salutogenesis led to changes in the methods of disease prevention and health education in the early 1990s, health promotion was established, new approaches and new subjects were added. The renaming of "Bavarian Centre for Health Education" to "Bavarian Centre for Health" represents the change in the underlying concept of health. This paper traces the development until today.

  15. Epstein-Barr virus, the germinal centre and the development of Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Ghada; Vrzalikova, Katerina; Cader, Fathima Zumla; Vockerodt, Martina; Nagy, Eszter; Flodr, Patrik; Yap, Lee-Fah; Diepstra, Arjan; Kluin, Philip M; Rosati, Stefano; Murray, Paul

    2014-09-01

    The relationship between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and the germinal centre (GC) of the asymptomatic host remains an enigma. The occasional appearance of EBV-positive germinal centres in some patients, particularly those with a history of immunosuppression, suggests that EBV numbers in the GC are subject to immune control. The relationship, if any, between lymphoid hyperplasia with EBV-positive germinal centres and subsequent or concurrent lymphomagenesis remains to be clarified. As far as the development of EBV-associated Hodgkin's lymphoma is concerned, the suppression of virus replication, mediated by LMP1 on the one hand, and the loss of B-cell receptor signalling on the other, appears to be an important pathogenic mechanism. A further important emerging concept is that alterations in the microenvironment of the EBV-infected B-cell may be important for lymphomagenesis.

  16. A feasibility study for the establishment of a national wildlife health centre in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Valeix, S; Lokugalappatti, L G S; Abeynayake, P; Prasad, T; Chandrasiri, A D N; Daniel, S L A; Stephen, C; Leighton, F A

    2011-12-01

    Sri Lanka is a tropical nation within a zoogeographic zone that is at high risk for infectious disease emergence. In 2010, a study was conducted on the feasibility of enhancing capacity in Sri Lanka to manage wildlife diseases through the establishment of a national wildlife health centre. The Canadian Cooperative Wildlife Health Centre was assessed as a potential model for adaptation in Sri Lanka. Interviews and group meetings were conducted with potential key participants from the Sri Lankan Departments of Wildlife Conservation and Animal Production and Health, and the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science of the University of Peradeniya. In addition, site visits were made to potentially participating facilities and the literature on best practices in building scientific capacity was consulted. With strategic enhancements in education and training, additional personnel, improvements in transportation and diagnostic facilities, and central coordination, Sri Lanka appears very well positioned to establish a sustainable wildlife health centre and programme.

  17. Spectral behaviour of bismuth centres in different steps of the FCVD process

    SciTech Connect

    Zlenko, Alexander S; Mashinsky, Valerii M; Iskhakova, L D; Ermakov, R P; Semjonov, S L; Koltashev, V V

    2013-07-31

    The behaviour of bismuth ions in silica glass free of other dopants has been studied in different steps of the furnace chemical vapour deposition (FCVD) process. Porous layers annealed and consolidated in different atmospheres, a bismuth chloride solution in acetone for porous layer impregnation, the resultant glass preform and holey fibres drawn out under various conditions have been characterised by spectroscopic techniques and X-ray diffraction. Active bismuth centres present in the preform and luminescing in the visible and IR spectral regions persist during drawing under reducing conditions, whereas drawing under oxidising conditions eliminates such centres. Annealing under reducing conditions produces absorption bands of IR-emitting bismuth centres (IRBCs) in spectra of fibres drawn out under oxidising conditions and concurrently increases the background loss. Under the annealing conditions of this study (argon atmosphere, T{sub max} = 1100 Degree-Sign C, 30 min), the IRBC concentration reaches a maximum and then decreases, whereas the background loss increases monotonically. (fiber optics)

  18. How do people with learning disability experience the city centre? A Sheffield case study.

    PubMed

    McClimens, Alex; Partridge, Nick; Sexton, Ed

    2014-07-01

    The use of city centre spaces by people with learning disability is not much debated in the literature. Here we include the thoughts and opinions of groups of people with learning disability as we undertook some guided walks through Sheffield city centre. We found that few of the participants had independent access to the city centre. Many cited concerns over personal safety and the most, on few occasions when they did visit, did so with family and/or paid staff for pre-planned purposes, usually linked to shopping. The need for appropriate support figured prominently. There is also a need to re-assess what we mean by social inclusion for this cohort.

  19. Demonstration of asymmetric electron conduction in pseudosymmetrical photosynthetic reaction centre proteins in an electrical circuit.

    PubMed

    Kamran, Muhammad; Friebe, Vincent M; Delgado, Juan D; Aartsma, Thijs J; Frese, Raoul N; Jones, Michael R

    2015-03-09

    Photosynthetic reaction centres show promise for biomolecular electronics as nanoscale solar-powered batteries and molecular diodes that are amenable to atomic-level re-engineering. In this work the mechanism of electron conduction across the highly tractable Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centre is characterized by conductive atomic force microscopy. We find, using engineered proteins of known structure, that only one of the two cofactor wires connecting the positive and negative termini of this reaction centre is capable of conducting unidirectional current under a suitably oriented bias, irrespective of the magnitude of the bias or the applied force at the tunnelling junction. This behaviour, strong functional asymmetry in a largely symmetrical protein-cofactor matrix, recapitulates the strong functional asymmetry characteristic of natural photochemical charge separation, but it is surprising given that the stimulus for electron flow is simply an externally applied bias. Reasons for the electrical resistance displayed by the so-called B-wire of cofactors are explored.

  20. Monitoring and predicting community mental health centre utilization in Auckland, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Hall, G B

    1988-01-01

    Deinstitutionalization of mental health care has been in progress in many countries for over a quarter of a century. A comprehensive and detailed literature has evolved focussing on this process and its implications for alternative forms of combatting the incidence of mental illness. Most notably, literature has concentrated on the need for community-based mental health services both to prevent hospitalization in the first place and to ease the return of the hospital patient into the outside environment. In this paper the evolution of such a community-based system in metropolitan Auckland, New Zealand is discussed. More specifically, the focus is on the utilization of four community-based centres, with a view to plan better growth or reduction of service provision. Two dimensions of centre use, spatial and sociodemographic, are analysed and incorporated into four predictive models that, with appropriate refinement, can be used to determine the likely level of centre use in unserviced parts of the metropolitan area. Distance of individuals from centre locations is shown to be a significant factor in affecting use for three suburban primary prevention and intervention centres, whilst distance is non-significant for an inner-city aftercare facility. Also, various combinations of socio-demographic variables, reflecting service-specific needs for specific groups in the population, are shown to contribute significantly to predicting centre use. The paper presents the results against a policy backdrop in New Zealand where community mental health services are very much experimental in nature. The results reaffirm the importance of community mental health care in fulfilling an important need in society that health care administrators should take seriously in future policy developments.