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Sample records for british military media

  1. Key performance indicators in British military trauma.

    PubMed

    Stannard, Adam; Tai, Nigel R; Bowley, Douglas M; Midwinter, Mark; Hodgetts, Tim J

    2008-08-01

    Key performance indicators (KPI) are tools for assessing process and outcome in systems of health care provision and are an essential component in performance improvement. Although KPI have been used in British military trauma for 10 years, they remain poorly defined and are derived from civilian metrics that do not adjust for the realities of field trauma care. Our aim was to modify current trauma KPI to ensure they more faithfully reflect both the military setting and contemporary evidence in order to both aid accurate calibration of the performance of the British Defence Medical Services and act as a driver for performance improvement. A workshop was convened that was attended by senior, experienced doctors and nurses from all disciplines of trauma care in the British military. "Speciality-specific" KPI were developed by interest groups using evidence-based data where available and collective experience where this was lacking. In a final discussion these were streamlined into 60 KPI covering each phase of trauma management. The introduction of these KPI sets a number of important benchmarks by which British military trauma can be measured. As part of a performance improvement programme, these will allow closer monitoring of our performance and assist efforts to develop, train, and resource British military trauma providers.

  2. Tropical skin diseases in British military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Mark S

    2013-09-01

    Skin complaints are common in travellers to foreign countries and are responsible for up to 25% of medical consultations by military personnel during deployments in the tropics. They also have relatively high rates of field hospital admission, medical evacuation and referral to UK Role 4 healthcare facilities. Non-infectious tropical skin diseases include sunburn, heat rash, arthropod bites, venomous bites, contact dermatitis and phytophotodermatitis. During tropical deployments skin infections that commonly occur in military personnel may become more frequent, severe and difficult to treat. Several systemic tropical infections have cutaneous features that can be useful in making early diagnoses. Tropical skin infections such as cutaneous larva migrans, cutaneous myiasis, cutaneous leishmaniasis and leprosy do occur in British troops and require specialist clinical management. This illustrated review focuses on the most significant tropical skin diseases that have occurred in British military personnel in recent years. Clinical management of these conditions on deployments would be improved and medical evacuations could be reduced if a military dermatology 'reach-back' service (including a telemedicine facility) was available.

  3. Military and civilian media coverage of suicide.

    PubMed

    Edwards-Stewart, Amanda; Kinn, Julie T; June, Jennifer D; Fullerton, Nicole R

    2011-01-01

    Military suicide has increased over the past decade and reports of Service Member and Veteran suicides receive media attention. Some methods of reporting suicide appear to cause a "media contagion" effect, potentially increasing suicide. This effect is explored in relation to media reports of both military and civilian suicides. To reduce possible contagion, recommendations for media reporting of suicides were adapted by the Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC). We assessed 240 military and civilian newspaper reports of suicide from 15 different sources for compliance with the SPRC guidelines. Nearly all reviewed articles violated at least one guideline. Results highlighted military news articles regarding Service Members included more pejorative language and discussion of failed psychological treatment. Conversely, civilian articles romanticized the victim and provided more details regarding the suicide. Further exploration of military suicide reporting bias is discussed as a need in future research.

  4. The Future of the Military - Media Relationship.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    should be accorded First Amendment rights. Data were collected by a survey. Questionnaires were distributed to a stratified random sample of 278...the release of classified material. Media, Military, Censorship, First amendment , Sidle, Gannett.

  5. Motherhood, Choice and the British Media: A Time to Reflect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadfield, L.; Rudoe, N.; Sanderson-Mann, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we ask: How is motherhood being represented in the British media, especially in relation to choice, age and fertility? Do media discourses reflect a redefinition or transformation of "motherhood" in the twenty-first century, and what implications do they have for feminist research into maternal identity and motherhood? As…

  6. Motherhood, Choice and the British Media: A Time to Reflect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadfield, L.; Rudoe, N.; Sanderson-Mann, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we ask: How is motherhood being represented in the British media, especially in relation to choice, age and fertility? Do media discourses reflect a redefinition or transformation of "motherhood" in the twenty-first century, and what implications do they have for feminist research into maternal identity and motherhood? As…

  7. Mortality from multiple sclerosis in British military personnel.

    PubMed

    Harris, E Clare; Palmer, Keith T; Cox, Vanessa; Darnton, Andrew; Osman, John; Coggon, David

    2017-08-01

    While analysing trends in occupational mortality in England and Wales, we noticed an unexpectedly elevated proportion of deaths from multiple sclerosis (MS) among men in the armed forces. To document and explore possible explanations for the observed excess. We analysed data on underlying cause of death and last full-time occupation for 3,688,916 deaths among men aged 20-74 years in England and Wales during 1979-2010, calculating proportional mortality ratios (PMRs) standardised for age. We compared PMRs for MS in the armed forces with those for each main social class, and in selected other occupations. We also compared PMRs for MS with those for motor neurone disease (MND). The overall PMR for MS in the armed forces during 1979-2010 was 243 (95%CI 203-288). The excess was apparent in each of three separate decades of study (PMRs, ranging from 220 to 259), and across the entire age range. PMRs for MS were not elevated to the same extent in comparator occupations, nor in any of the main social classes. There was no parallel increase in PMRs for MND. These findings suggest that the high proportional mortality from MS in British military personnel is unlikely to have occurred by chance, or as an artefact of the method of investigation. However, the only military cohort study with published results on MS does not support an increased risk. It would be useful to analyse data on MS from other established military cohorts, to check for evidence of a hazard.

  8. Military Engagement with Social Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-06

    share video, especially related to trainings, vignettes, and news/educational footage. Leveraging existing hardware and software recently acquired for...of potential jihadis are more comfortable using these media. Jihadi organizations use links to videos showing everything from sermons by radical...the internet security crackdowns, they upload audio of music, sermons and lectures promoting terrorist ideals and send them out using the web enabled

  9. British media attacks on homeopathy: are they justified?

    PubMed

    Vithoulkas, George

    2008-04-01

    Homeopathy is being attacked by the British media. These attacks draw support from irresponsible and unjustified claims by certain teachers of homeopathy. Such claims include the use of 'dream' and 'imaginative' methods for provings. For prescribing some such teachers attempt to replace the laborious process of matching symptom picture and remedy with spurious theories based on 'signatures', sensations and other methods. Other irresponsible claims have also been made. These "new ideas" risk destroying the principles, theory, and practice of homeopathy.

  10. Deployment Experiences of British Army Wives Before, During and After Deployment: Satisfaction with Military Life and Use of Support Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    RTO-MP-HFM-134 38 - 1 Deployment Experiences of British Army Wives Before, During and After Deployment: Satisfaction with Military Life ...Experiences of British Army Wives Before, During and After Deployment: Satisfaction with Military Life and Use of Support Networks. In Human Dimensions...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Deployment Experiences of British Army Wives Before, During and After Deployment: Satisfaction with Military Life

  11. Military-Media Relationships: Analyzing U.S. Navy Officers’ Attitudes Towards the News Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    civil-military gap has emerged in American society where the public does not fully understand the mission of the military, and the military does not...American society where the public does not fully understand the mission of the military, and the military does not understand the expectations and...the media and the military are vital to the existence of a democratic society . However, there are inherent tensions in this relationship. Part of the

  12. The british military hospitals in macedonia during the first world war.

    PubMed

    Cvetkovski, Vladimir

    The paper focusses its attention to the medical work of the British Military hospitals stationed in Macedonia during the First World War, the surgical work carried out under very heavy conditions in improvised operating theatres as well as the treatment of the wounded and sick solders brought from the battlefields on the Macedonian Front.

  13. The Management of Combat Wounds: The British Military Experience

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Steven L.A.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of the military wound is not an easy entity to define as the wounds seen in conflict can be of many types: those caused by recognized or improvised weapon systems may have similarities to civilian wounds as well as the wounds soldiers sustain outside of battle. This article will focus on the current treatment approaches to combat wounds sustained by the deployed UK Armed Forces personnel. PMID:27785380

  14. Military and the Media - What’s Next After Embedding?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-08

    Foundation, 1998). http://www.commongroundradio.org/ shows/98/9828.html Program 9828; Strobel: “ Margaret Thatcher had just completed a war in the...reports may have played a role in preventing the United States military from invading Haiti. The United States and Haitian national leadership were in...installations for Haiti that the Haitian military leadership agreed to permissive intervention by U.S. forces.16 Military Control of Media. Until the latter part

  15. British Military surgical key performance indicators: time for an update?

    PubMed

    Marsden, Max Er; Sharrock, A E; Hansen, C L; Newton, N J; Bowley, D M; Midwinter, M

    2016-10-01

    Key performance indicators (KPIs) are metrics that compare actual care against an ideal structure, process or outcome standard. KPIs designed to assess performance in deployed military surgical facilities have previously been published. This study aimed to review the overall performance of surgical trauma care for casualties treated at Role 3 Camp Bastion, Medical Treatment Facility, Afghanistan, in light of the existing Defence Medical Services (DMS) KPIs. The secondary aims were to assess the utility of the surgical KPIs and make recommendations for future surgical trauma care review. Data on 22 surgical parameters were prospectively collected for 150 injured patients who had primary surgery at Camp Bastion between 1 May 2013 and 20 August 2013. Additional information for these patients was obtained using the Joint Theatre Trauma Register. The authors assessed data recording, applicability and compliance with the KPIs. Median data recording was 100% (IQR 98%-100%), median applicability was 56% (IQR 10%-99%) and median compliance was 78% (IQR 58%-93%). One KPI was not applicable to any patient in our population. Eleven KPIs achieved >80% compliance, five KPIs had 80%-60% compliance and five KPIs had <60% compliance. Recommendations are made for minor modifications to the current KPIs. 78% compliance with the DMS KPIs provides a snapshot of the performance of the surgical aspect of military trauma care in 2013. The KPIs highlight areas for improvement in service delivery. Individual KPI development should be driven by evidence and reflect advances in practice and knowledge. A method of stakeholder consultation, and sequential refinement following evidence review, may be the right process to develop the future set of DMS KPIs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Characteristics and values of a British military nurse. International implications of War Zone qualitative research.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Alan; Finnegan, Sara; McKenna, Hugh; McGhee, Stephen; Ricketts, Lynda; McCourt, Kath; Warren, Jem; Thomas, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Between 2001 and 2014, British military nurses served in Afghanistan caring for both Service personnel and local nationals of all ages. However, there have been few research studies assessing the effectiveness of the military nurses' operational role and no papers naming the core values and characteristics. This paper is from the only qualitative nursing study completed during this period where data was collected in the War Zone. To explore the characteristics and values that are intrinsic to military nurses in undertaking their operational role. A constructivist grounded theory was utilised. The authors designed the interview schedule, and then following a pilot study, conducted and transcribed the discussions. Informed consent and UK Ministry of Defence Research Ethical Committee approval was obtained. Camp Bastion Hospital, Afghanistan, in 2013. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 British Armed Forces nurses. A theoretical model was developed that identifies the intrinsic characteristics and values required to be a military nurse. Nursing care delivered within the operational environment was perceived as outstanding. Nurses consciously detached themselves from any legal processes and treated each casualty as a vulnerable patient, resulting in care, compassion and dignity being provided for all patients, irrespective of their background, beliefs or affiliations. The study findings provide military nurses with a framework for a realistic personal development plan that will allow them to build upon their strengths as well as to identify and ameliorate potential areas of weakness. Placing nurses first, with a model that focusses on the requirements of a good nurse has the potential to lead to better patient care, and improve the quality of the tour for defence nurses. These findings have international implications and have the potential for transferability to any level of military or civilian nursing practice. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by

  17. The U.S. Military and Social Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    i    AU/ACSC/WALINSKI, R/AY15 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY THE U.S. MILITARY AND SOCIAL MEDIA By Ryan G. Walinski...number. 1. REPORT DATE APR 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The U.S. Military And Social Media ...public has readily accepted New Media technologies, such as social networking sites, into the daily fabric of their lives both at home and at work, the

  18. Flying and dying in WWI: British aircrew losses and the origins of U.S. military aviation medicine.

    PubMed

    Jones, David R

    2008-02-01

    In 1918, 1920, and 1935, William H. Wilmer wrote that of every 100 British military pilot deaths during the first year of World War I, 90 resulted from individual deficiencies (60 of these from physical defects), 8 from aircraft defects, and 2 from enemy action. "As a result of these appalling findings, the British established a special service for the 'Care of the Flier,'" thus reducing deaths from physical defects to "20% during the second year and 12% during the third." Wilmer never specified the source of his statistics. American aeromedical texts have long cited his '90-8-2' numbers as the basis for establishing the U.S. military flight surgeon system in 1918, but these statistics never appeared in British aeromedical literature. Given the frail aircraft and sketchy mishap investigations of that era, it seems unlikely that pilot deficiencies (today, "human factors") were proven to have caused 90% of British aviation-related deaths in 1914-15, or that their military aviation medicine program reduced human factor losses to just 12% of total pilot fatalities by 1917. Recent analyses from academic British sources demonstrate that of 153 British military fliers who died while flying between August 1914 and December 1915, 89 (58%) were killed in action or died of their wounds soon after being shot down, and 64 (42%) perished from injuries suffered in training or operational mishaps. This article reviews the history of early British and American military aeromedical services, and proposes replacement of the 90-8-2 statistic with a ratio of 58:42.

  19. Media Access to United States Military Operations: Grenada and Beyond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    cultural revolution and intense social discord and change. The media were simply reflecting what was happening in the rest of American society. 58 The...and the marines were about to depart. On November 1, the JIB opened an office at the Grenada Beach Hotel and for the next four days more than one...pool is designed to provide access for the media and to accommodate their needs, while ensuring security for the military. 69 TR NATIAL MEIA QkL The

  20. Preparing British Military nurses to deliver nursing care on deployment. An Afghanistan study.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Alan; Finnegan, Sara; Bates, David; Ritsperis, Debra; McCourt, Kath; Thomas, Mike

    2015-01-01

    This paper forms part of the first British Armed forces qualitative nursing research study undertaken on deployment. To provide an analysis of the impact and effectiveness of the pre-deployment educational preparation and clinical placements provided for military nurses. A Constructivist Grounded Theory was utilised with data collected through semi-structured interviews with 18 nurses based in Camp Bastion Hospital, Afghanistan during 2013. Initial coding indicated 21 educational preparation and clinical placement categories that influenced the delivery of nursing care. Analysis of these elements led to the identification of four major clusters: Military Nursing Care; Military Nurse Education; Unique Hospital Environment and Clinical Placements. Educational preparation consists of completing deployable operational nursing competencies, specialist training and individual tailored courses. This strategy was viewed as proving the appropriate academic requirement. However, training would be enhanced by introducing a formalised military preceptorship programme focussing on fundamental nursing skills. Caring for children was a particular concern, and it was emphasised that educational courses must be combined with a standardised clinical placement policy. Adequate clinical exposure can be challenging as nurses are not routinely exposed to War Zone levels of trauma in the UK. Clinical placements need to be standardised and harmonised, and located in areas where nurses cared for patients with similar injury patterns to those witnessed on deployment. Current NHS Trust placements can reduce the opportunities for employment in suitable clinical environments and diminishing the openings for collective military training. Better use should be made of clinical rotation programmes, including high dependency units, elective surgery, medical assessment units, paediatrics, and outreach teams such as burns and plastic surgery and pain management. Practice Educators should be utilised

  1. Towards a More Productive Military-Media Relationship

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-26

    Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project (0704-0188), Washington, DC...Productive Military-Media Relationship 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Major Edward L. English 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8

  2. A brief history of British military experiences with infectious and tropical diseases.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Mark S

    2013-09-01

    Infectious and tropical diseases have been a problem for British expeditionary forces ever since the Crusades. Outbreaks were especially common on Navy ships from the 16th to 18th centuries due to poor living conditions and travel to the tropics. However, since these occurred in small, isolated and controlled environments it meant that naval medical practitioners were able to keep detailed records and develop empirical approaches for their prevention. The first Royal Naval Hospitals were established in response to these diseases and Royal Navy doctors made valuable early contributions towards understanding them. Even larger outbreaks of infectious and tropical diseases occurred in the Army during the Napoleonic, Crimean and Boer Wars and throughout the colonial era, which strongly influenced the formation of the Army Medical Services including provision for teaching and research. The establishment of germ theory led to a golden era of discovery regarding these diseases and British Army doctors made numerous important contributions. Subsequent improvements in prevention, diagnosis and treatment reduced the mortality from infectious and tropical diseases during the World Wars, but they remained a significant problem in the non-European campaigns and also the numerous 'small wars' that followed. Even in the 21st century some of these diseases still cause outbreaks with significant morbidity and impact on deployments, but the military clinical and academic resources to deal with them are now much reduced. Preventive measures such as hygiene, sanitation, infection control, vaccination and chemoprophylaxis are invaluable, but history shows that these can become neglected over time and disrupted or overwhelmed during the early or most intense stages of military operations. This is why military specialists in infectious diseases, tropical medicine, sexual health, medical microbiology and communicable diseases control are still required.

  3. Criticism of American, British, European and Classical Authors: A Selective Bibliography of Books in the United States Military Academy Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Margaret, Comp.

    The purpose of this bibliography is to provide critical, literary commentaries on the works of American, British, and classical authors, found in general literature books. Selection of authors was accomplished on the basis of West Point military cadets' choices of topics for their annual English papers; alphabetical listings of citations (from…

  4. A malaria outbreak following a British military deployment to Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Tuck, J J H; Green, A D; Roberts, K I

    2003-10-01

    To describe a malarial outbreak amongst a British military force deployed to Sierra Leone in May 2000. A case-control study was conducted that investigated possible risk or protective factors affecting the population. All bite avoidance measures (use of insecticide-treated bed nets and insecticide-treated clothes and use of thermal fogging/knockdown insecticide sprays) offered some degree of protection, although only use of clothes and nets was significant at the 5% level. Use of 3 or 4 protection measures was significantly protective, as was the cumulative protective effect when using multiple protective measures. Professionals giving travel advice must continue to advice travellers that they can significantly improve their levels of malarial protection by using multiple protection measures.

  5. The News Media and Military Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-11

    APPENDIX I OPERATION DESERT SHIELD GROUND RULES AND GUIDELINES FOR NEWS MEDIA .Z5 I I I? 1 i e: 5 FP:M riPL PAGE. 14 )AN 91 GFRULVES 7U following...numrical information on Mop strength, aircra, weapons systems, o-hud equipment, or p e (e.., artillery, tanks, udan missiles, tumcks, water ), Including

  6. Military and the Media: Resolving the Conflict

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-19

    action in 1989 are events that also contributed to the aforementioned assertion. And surprisingly, there were indictments of First Amendment violations...operations is incredible. It reveals that the Administration is out of touch with journalism, reality, and the First Amendment .Ŗ This is a statement made...by the First Amendment . Unfortunately, the media’s scathing stories about the Reagan Administration and the Department of Defense overshadowed the

  7. Mental health referrals to the Falkland Islands British Military Mental Health Team, 1986-96.

    PubMed

    Michael, G L; Fear, N T; Hacker Hughes, J

    2007-01-01

    To examine the pattern of out-patient mental health care referrals for military personnel deployed to the Falklands Islands, 1986-96. Data from referral books of British Military Community Mental Health Nurses based in the Falkland Islands were abstracted, entered into an electronic database and analysed. Over the period 1986-96, 538 Service personnel were referred to the mental health out-patient facility on the Falkland Islands. The majority were male (96%) and junior ranks (81%). Approximately a third of patients were referred for reasons relating to alcohol (31%) and for over two-thirds of patients no follow-up was required (68%). Differences were observed by Service with the Army having more referrals due to alcohol than the other two Services, whilst the Navy had more deliberate self-harm referrals and the RAF more referrals for anxiety. The lack of information on the total population deployed to the Falkland Islands over this period limits the interpretation of the results.

  8. The Military-News Media Relationship: Thinking Forward

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    eStrategic Studies Institute U.S. Army War College AD-A273 549 IlitlElmIEUII, MI DECO 91993 1 Dec 1993 Final Report The Military-News Media...commanders are fully prepared to accommodate them. Therefore, regardless of mission, commanders should immediately designate an official source of...data transmission devices; and secure transmission means. Currently they are not. Without these capabilities, those designated to communicate with

  9. Representations of energy policy and technology in British and Finnish newspaper media: a comparative perspective.

    PubMed

    Teräväinen, Tuula

    2014-04-01

    This article analyses media representations of the strengthening technological energy policy orientation in the UK and Finland. Drawing from over 1200 newspaper articles from 1991 to 2006, it scrutinises how energy policy in general and energy technologies in particular have been discussed by the media in these two countries, and how the media representations have changed over time. The results point to the importance of national political, economic and cultural features in shaping media discussions. At the same time, international political events and ideas of technology-driven economic growth have transformed media perceptions of energy technologies. While the British media have been rather critical towards national policies throughout the period of analysis, the Finnish newspaper Helsingin Sanomat has supported successive national governments. In both countries, energy technologies have increasingly become linked to global societal and political questions.

  10. An Opportunity to Improve Upon the U.S. Military-Media Relationship: Institutionalizing Embedded Media Into the Mainstream Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-16

    Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, Online at http://en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/Thucydides. 5 “Jefferson on the Bastille ”, U.S. News and World Report...himself into the middle of the storming of the Bastille in France in 1789.5 During the twentieth century in America, a constant “tension developed...made between information operations and public affairs under which embedded media fall within the military. Although both efforts can and must be

  11. Military medicine and the ethics of war: British colonial warfare during the Seven Years War (1756-63).

    PubMed

    Charters, Erica

    2010-01-01

    This article examines 18th-century European warfare, tracing the first formal codifications of conventions of war, frequently introduced by military physicians and initially regarding the treatment of the sick and wounded. It outlines to what extent these conventions were followed in practice, particularly in the challenging environment of American irregular warfare, with a focus on the most well-known incident of "biological warfare" in the period: the deliberate spread of smallpox by British officers among Amerindians in 1763. More broadly, it demonstrates that the history of military medicine provides a fruitful method with which to uncover assumptions about the ethics of war.

  12. The 2005 British Columbia Smoking Cessation Mass Media Campaign and short-term changes in smoking.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Lynda

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of the 2005 British Columbia Ministry of Health Smoking Cessation Mass Media Campaign on short-term smoking behavior. National cross-sectional data are used with a quasi-experimental approach to test the impact of the campaign. Findings indicate that prevalence and average number of cigarettes smoked per day deviated upward from trend for the rest of Canada (P = .08; P = .01) but not for British Columbia. They also indicate that British Columbia smokers in lower risk groups reduced their average daily consumption of cigarettes over and above the 1999-2004 trend (-2.23; P = .10), whereas smokers in the rest of Canada did not, and that British Columbia smokers in high-risk groups did not increase their average daily consumption of cigarettes over and above the 1999-2004 trend, whereas smokers in the rest of Canada did (2.97; P = .01). The overall poorer performance of high-risk groups is attributed to high exposure to cigarette smoking, which reduces a smoker's chances of successful cessation. In particular, high-risk groups are by definition more likely to be exposed to smoking by peers, but are also less likely to work in workplaces with smoking bans, which are shown to have a substantial impact on prevalence. Results suggest that for mass media campaigns to be more effective with high-risk groups, they need to be combined with other incentives, and that more prolonged interventions should be considered.

  13. Sand Trap: The Military and the Media during the Persian Gulf War. Symposium Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Steven L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Five articles discuss the military-media relationship during the Persian Gulf War. Highlights include the development and implementation of the Pentagon's press policy; concerns of the media and military public affairs officers; first person accounts by journalists and a public affairs officer; and First Amendment principles. (29 references) (LRW)

  14. Outbreak of acute gastroenteritis associated with Norwalk-like viruses among British military personnel--Afghanistan, May 2002.

    PubMed

    2002-06-07

    In the United States, Norwalk-like viruses (NLVs) cause an estimated 23 million episodes of illness, 50,000 hospitalizations, and 300 deaths each year. NLVs can be transmitted by fecally contaminated food and water and by direct person-to-person contact or through droplets of infected persons. Outbreaks of NLV-associated gastrointestinal illness are common in military settings. During May 13-19, 2002, a total of 29 British soldiers and staff of a field hospital in Afghanistan became acutely ill after a short incubation period with vomiting, diarrhea, and fever. This report summarizes the investigation of this outbreak and underscores the importance of the diagnostic capacity for NLVs.

  15. When climate science became climate politics: British media representations of climate change in 1988.

    PubMed

    Jaspal, Rusi; Nerlich, Brigitte

    2014-02-01

    Climate change has become a pressing environmental concern for scientists, social commentators and politicians. Previous social science research has explored media representations of climate change in various temporal and geographical contexts. Through the lens of Social Representations Theory, this article provides a detailed qualitative thematic analysis of media representations of climate change in the 1988 British broadsheet press, given that this year constitutes an important juncture in this transition of climate change from the domain of science to that of the socio-political sphere. The following themes are outlined: (i) "Climate change: a multi-faceted threat"; (ii) "Collectivisation of threat"; (iii) "Climate change and the attribution of blame"; and (iv) "Speculative solutions to a complex socio-environmental problem." The article provides detailed empirical insights into the "starting-point" for present-day disputes concerning climate change and lays the theoretical foundations for tracking the continuities and discontinuities characterising social representations of climate change in the future.

  16. Discourse, Health and Well-being of Military Populations through the Social Media Lens

    SciTech Connect

    Pavalanathan, Umashanthi; Datla, Vivek V.; Volkova, Svitlana; Charles-Smith, Lauren E.; Pirrung, Megan A.; Harrison, Joshua J.; Chappell, Alan R.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2016-02-29

    Social media can provide a resource for characterizing communities and small populations through activities and content shared online. For instance, studying the language use in social media within military populations may provide insights into their health and wellbeing. In this paper, we address three research questions: (1) How do military populations use social media? (2) What do military users discuss in social media? And (3) Do military users talk about health and well-being differently than civilians? Military Twitter users were identified through keywords in the profile description of users who posted geo-tagged tweets at military installations. The data was anonymized for the analysis. User profiles that belong to military population were compared to the nonmilitary population. Our results indicate that military users talk more about events in their military life, whereas nonmilitary users talk more about school, work, and leisure activities. We also found that the online content generated by both populations is significantly different, including health-related language and communication behavior.

  17. Representing infant feeding: content analysis of British media portrayals of bottle feeding and breast feeding

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Lesley; Kitzinger, Jenny; Green, Josephine

    2000-01-01

    Objective To examine how breast feeding and bottle feeding are represented by the British media. Design Content analysis. Subjects Television programmes and newspaper articles that made reference to infant feeding during March 1999. Setting UK mass media. Main outcome measures Visual and verbal references to breast or bottle feeding in newspapers and television programmes. Results Overall, 235 references to infant feeding were identified in the television sample and 38 in the newspaper sample. Bottle feeding was shown more often than breast feeding and was presented as less problematic. Bottle feeding was associated with “ordinary” families whereas breast feeding was associated with middle class or celebrity women. The health risks of formula milk and the health benefits of breast feeding were rarely mentioned. Conclusions The media rarely present positive information on breast feeding, even though this feeding practice is associated with the most health benefits. Health professionals and policy makers should be aware of patterns in media coverage and the cultural background within which women make decisions about infant feeding. PMID:11073512

  18. Space and terrestrial media for military communications - Technical pros and cons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharamsi, Manoj T.; Reilly, James F.; Hawrylko, Warren P.

    Technical pros and cons are presented for space and terrestrial media for defense-wide long-haul military communications. Defense-wide military space communications include use of leased commercial satellite capability in addition to the government-owned Defense Satellite Communications System (DSCS). The terrestrial communications include use of troposcatter, HF radios, line-of-sight microwave, and metallic and fiber-optic cables. The current usage, capacity, cost, and other attributes of these media are examined. Current trends and future uses of the space and terrestrial media for military communications are discussed. It is concluded that military communications can continue best by using a mix of both space and terrestrial media.

  19. The Military and the Media: Historical Perspective and Prospective Study of the Relationship

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    enlightened age, one would think not. However, the 7 words of Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes ring true: "When a nation is at war, many things that...become clear that the American people now demand the truth, not a governmental adulteration of it. Journalist Carl Sessions Stepp wrote: 6Elmer Davis and...media and military circles, it was felt that it would be helpful to determine what attitudes related to military-media relations are prevalent among

  20. India’s British Army: the Honorable East India Company’s lasting military impact.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-09

    field, the Company recruited and trained a private military force in the region that became the foundation upon which the Indian Army is 3 built...emerge from the sampled literature concerns steps the Company’s employees and military officers took to set the necessary conditions for the...for native soldiers and their families after a career in good standing or death in service to the Company. The memoirs of Colonel George Malleson

  1. British Communicator Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunstall, Jeremy

    Occupations and organizations within the British press and broadcasting systems are examined in this paper. Its sections summarize recent British research on media communicators and discuss characteristics of craft unions and other media organizations; the historical development of the British press; the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) and…

  2. British Communicator Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunstall, Jeremy

    Occupations and organizations within the British press and broadcasting systems are examined in this paper. Its sections summarize recent British research on media communicators and discuss characteristics of craft unions and other media organizations; the historical development of the British press; the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) and…

  3. An Evaluation of the Use by Teachers of British Petroleum's Multi-Media Resource Pack, A North Sea Adventure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jean; Lloyd, Gerald

    Presented is an evaluation of a multi-media resource pack, available from British Petroleum Corporation, which details the discovery and extraction of North Sea oil. The evaluation presented includes three thrusts: (1) a determination of the areas where the packs were distributed; (2) personal interviews with teachers who had used the packs; and…

  4. An Evaluation of the Use by Teachers of British Petroleum's Multi-Media Resource Pack, A North Sea Adventure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jean; Lloyd, Gerald

    Presented is an evaluation of a multi-media resource pack, available from British Petroleum Corporation, which details the discovery and extraction of North Sea oil. The evaluation presented includes three thrusts: (1) a determination of the areas where the packs were distributed; (2) personal interviews with teachers who had used the packs; and…

  5. The British Armed Forces Covenant - Protection for Tommy or a Civil Military Battleground

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    believed that his outburst would, and knew it should, cause Mr Blair to sack him; and [Dannatt] has the guts to go through with it. Whether Mr Blair...Paris article is telling, “I agree with every word Dannatt said. But he has got to be sacked ”.37 While the analysis above shows that Dannatt was...word Dannatt said. But he has got to be sacked , The Times, Military Bargain. New York: The Continuum International Publishing Group, 2011 Ministry

  6. Media-Enabled Insurgency as a Revolution in Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-18

    Insurgency as a Revolution in Military Affairs 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) Major Patrick E...Proctor, US Army 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Advanced Military Studies Program 250 Gibbon Avenue...Fort Leavenworth, KS 66027-2134 8. PERFORMING ORG REPORT NUMBER 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM( S ) USACGSC 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S

  7. A content analysis of the representation of statins in the British newsprint media.

    PubMed

    Chisnell, Julia; Marshall, Tom; Hyde, Chris; Zhelev, Zhivko; Fleming, Lora E

    2017-08-21

    This study reviewed the news media coverage of statins, seeking to identify specific trends or differences in viewpoint between media outlets and examine common themes. The study is a content analysis of the frequency and content of the reporting of statins in a selection of the British newsprint media. It involved an assessment of the number, timing and thematic content of articles followed by a discourse analysis examining the underlying narratives. The sample was the output of four UK newspapers, covering a broad-spectrum readership, over a six month timeframe 1 October 2013 to 31 March 2014. A total of 67 articles included reference to statins. The majority (39, 58%) were reporting or responding to publication of a clinical study. The ratio of negative to positive coverage was greater than 2:1 overall. In the more politically right-leaning newspapers, 67% of coverage was predominantly negative (30/45 articles); 32% in the more left-leaning papers (7/22 articles). Common themes were the perceived 'medicalisation' of the population; the balance between lifestyle modification and medical treatments in the primary prevention of heart disease; side effects and effectiveness of statins; pharmaceutical sponsorship and implications for the reliability of evidence; trust between the public and government, institutions, research organisations and the medical profession. Newsprint media coverage of statins was substantially influenced by the publication of national guidance and by coverage in the medical journals of clinical studies and comment. Statins received a predominantly negative portrayal, notably in the more right-leaning press. There were shared themes: concern about the balance between medication and lifestyle change in the primary prevention of heart disease; the adverse effects of treatment; and a questioning of the reliability of evidence from research institutions, scientists and clinicians in the light of their potential allegiances and funding. © Article

  8. Uncovering the relationships between military community health and affects expressed in social media

    DOE PAGES

    Volkova, Svitlana; Charles, Lauren E.; Harrison, Josh; ...

    2017-06-08

    Military populations present a small, unique community whose mental and physical health impacts the security of the nation. Recent literature has explored social media's ability to enhance disease surveillance and characterize distinct communities with encouraging results. We present a novel analysis of the relationships between influenza-like illnesses (ILI) clinical data and affects (i.e., emotions and sentiments) extracted from social media around military facilities. Our analyses examine (1) differences in affects expressed by military and control populations, (2) affect changes over time by users, (3) differences in affects expressed during high and low ILI seasons, and (4) correlations and cross-correlations betweenmore » ILI clinical visits and affects from an unprecedented scale –171M geo-tagged tweets across 31 global geolocations. Key findings include: Military and control populations dier in the way they express affects in social media over space and time. Control populations express more positive and less negative sentiments and less sadness, fear, disgust, and anger emotions than military. However, affects expressed in social media by both populations within the same area correlate similarly with ILI visits to military health facilities. We have identified potential responsible co-factors leading to location variability, e.g., region or state locale, military service type and/or the ratio of military to civilian populations. For most locations, ILI proportions positively correlate with sadness and neutral sentiment, which are the affects most often expressed during high ILI season. The ILI proportions negatively correlate with fear, disgust, surprise, and positive sentiment. These results are similar to the low ILI season where anger, surprise, and positive sentiment are highest. Finally, cross-correlation analysis shows that most affects lead ILI clinical visits, i.e. are predictive of ILI data, with affect-ILI leading intervals dependent on geo

  9. 21st Century Military-Media Relationships: Improving Relations and the Narrative Through Education

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-30

    news crew arrived on-scene to report the situation. This example also alludes to the powerful influence of information and the internal ethical ...Similar to the military over the last decade of war, the media writ large struggles to redefine its role, professional ethics and values, and...Contemporary Media Ethics , a Practical Guide for Students, Scholars, and Professionals, eds. Mitchell Land and Bill Hornaday (Spokane, Washington

  10. Emerging News Media Communication Technologies in Future Military Conflicts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    no related research literature of this topic was available to this researcher. However, numerous articles in the mass media were available and... mass media articles on the recent events. The sampling of the people involved in the recent conflict and future policy making was based on informational...so greatly stirred by the forerunner of today’s mass media ."󈧬 Despite strong criticism of the paper by some officials, England’s attitude on press

  11. Stigmatisation, perceived barriers to care, help seeking and the mental health of British Military personnel.

    PubMed

    Jones, Norman; Keeling, Mary; Thandi, Gursimran; Greenberg, Neil

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between mental health symptoms, stigmatising beliefs about mental health and help seeking is complex and poorly understood. 1636 UK Armed Forces personnel provided study data immediately after deployment (T1) and approximately 6 months later (T2). Stigmatising beliefs were assessed using an eight-item scale previously used in studies of UK military personnel. Symptoms of probable common mental disorder, probable post-traumatic stress disorder and subjective stressful, emotional, relationship and family problems were evaluated at T1 and T2. Help seeking during deployment was assessed at T1 and post-deployment help seeking at T2. Alcohol use and subjective alcohol problems were assessed at T2 only. Reporting a probable mental health disorder or potentially harmful alcohol use following deployment was both significantly associated with higher levels of stigmatising beliefs. The reported degree of stigma was associated with changes in mental health symptom levels; compared to those who were never classified as a probable mental health disorder case, recovered cases experienced significantly lower levels of stigmatisation, whereas new onset cases reported significantly higher levels. The way that individuals report mental health stigmatisation is not static; rather stigma fluctuates in proportion to the frequency and severity of psychological symptoms. These results suggest that public health stigma-reduction strategies which aim to promote engagement with mental health services should be focused towards people who are experiencing worsening mental health. Our results suggest that willing volunteers who have recovered from a mental-ill-health episode may be well placed to assist in the delivery of such a strategy.

  12. Paediatric admissions to the British military hospital at Camp Bastion, Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Arul, GS; Reynolds, J; DiRusso, S; Scott, A; Bree, S; Templeton, P; Midwinter, MJ

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION International humanitarian law requires emergency medical support for both military personnel and civilians, including children. Here we present a detailed review of paediatric admissions with the pattern of injury and the resources they consume. METHODS All paediatric admissions to the hospital at Camp Bastion between 1 January and 29 April 2011 were analysed prospectively. Data collected included time and date of admission, patient age and weight, mechanism of injury, extent of wounding, treatment, length of hospital stay and discharge destination. RESULTS Eighty-five children (65 boys and 17 girls, median age: 8 years, median weight: 20kg) were admitted. In 63% of cases the indication for admission was battle related trauma and in 31% non-battle trauma. Of the blast injuries, 51% were due to improvised explosive devices. Non-battle emergencies were mainly due to domestic burns (46%) and road traffic accidents (29%). The most affected anatomical area was the extremities (44% of injuries). Over 30% of patients had critical injuries. Operative intervention was required in 74% of cases. The median time to theatre for all patients was 52 minutes; 3 patients with critical injuries went straight to theatre in a median of 7 minutes. A blood transfusion was required in 27 patients; 6 patients needed a massive transfusion. Computed tomography was performed on 62% of all trauma admissions and 40% of patients went to the intensive care unit. The mean length of stay was 2 days (range: 1–26 days) and there were 7 deaths. CONCLUSIONS Paediatric admissions make up a small but significant part of admissions to the hospital at Camp Bastion. The proportion of serious injuries is very high in comparison with admissions to a UK paediatric emergency department. The concentration of major injuries means that lessons learnt in terms of teamwork, the speed of transfer to theatre and massive transfusion protocols could be applied to UK paediatric practice. PMID:22524930

  13. Military/Media Dichotomy and Its Impact on Military Operations in West Africa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-08

    dealing with the media .” This new principle resulted from “the rapid advancement in technology coupled with the proliferation and growth of television......to democracy. Closely examining Slobodan Milosevic’s stranglehold on the media and his callous use of it to churn out favorable propaganda for his

  14. The Military and the Media: A Need for Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-09

    quarterbacking because American boys were being killed in a useless attack, not to seize ground and hold it but just to kill the enemy. Isn’t that what you...determine, and then go on to something else. The old- boy network that works in the officer corps, they think, should extend to the press. With some...reporters it does. Some reporters, especially if they are from a small town in the South were the military bases are big, are one of the boys , and they’ll

  15. Validation of one-mile walk equations for the estimation of aerobic fitness in British military personnel under the age of 40 years.

    PubMed

    Lunt, Heather; Roiz De Sa, Daniel; Roiz De Sa, Julia; Allsopp, Adrian

    2013-07-01

    To provide an accurate estimate of peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) for British Royal Navy Personnel aged between 18 and 39, comparing a gold standard treadmill based maximal exercise test with a submaximal one-mile walk test. Two hundred military personnel consented to perform a treadmill-based VO2 peak test and two one-mile walk tests round an athletics track. The estimated VO2 peak values from three different one-mile walk equations were compared to directly measured VO2 peak values from the treadmill-based test. One hundred participants formed a validation group from which a new equation was derived and the other 100 participants formed the cross-validation group. Existing equations underestimated the VO2 peak values of the fittest personnel and overestimated the VO2 peak of the least aerobically fit by between 2% and 18%. The new equation derived from the validation group has less bias, the highest correlation with the measured values (r = 0.83), and classified the most people correctly according to the Royal Navy's Fitness Test standards, producing the fewest false positives and false negatives combined (9%). The new equation will provide a more accurate estimate of VO2 peak for a British military population aged 18 to 39. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  16. Low fitness, low body mass and prior injury predict injury risk during military recruit training: a prospective cohort study in the British Army

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Mark; Siddall, Andrew; Bilzon, James; Thompson, Dylan; Greeves, Julie; Izard, Rachel; Stokes, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Background Injuries sustained by military recruits during initial training impede training progression and military readiness while increasing financial costs. This study investigated training-related injuries and injury risk factors among British Army infantry recruits. Methods Recruits starting infantry training at the British Army Infantry Training Centre between September 2008 and March 2010 were eligible to take part. Information regarding lifestyle behaviours and injury history was collected using the Military Pre-training Questionnaire. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, physical fitness and injury (lower limb and lower back) data were obtained from Army databases. Univariable and multivariable Cox regression models were used to explore the association between time to first training injury and potential risk factors. Results 58% (95% CI 55% to 60%) of 1810 recruits sustained at least 1 injury during training. Overuse injuries were more common than traumatic injuries (65% and 35%, respectively). The lower leg accounted for 81% of all injuries, and non-specific soft tissue damage was the leading diagnosis (55% of all injuries). Injuries resulted in 122 (118 to 126) training days lost per 1000 person-days. Slower 2.4 km run time, low body mass, past injury and shin pain were independently associated with higher risk of any injury. Conclusions There was a high incidence of overuse injuries in British Army recruits undertaking infantry training. Recruits with lower pretraining fitness levels, low body mass and past injuries were at higher risk. Faster 2.4 km run time performance and minimal body mass standards should be considered for physical entry criteria. PMID:27900170

  17. The 2005 British Columbia smoking cessation mass media campaign and short-term changes in smokers attitudes.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Lynda

    2008-03-01

    The effect of the 2005 British Columbia (BC) smoking cessation mass media campaign on a panel (N = 1,341) of 20-30-year-old smokers' attitudes is evaluated. The 5-week campaign consisted of posters, television, and radio ads about the health benefits of cessation. Small impacts on the panel's attitudes toward the adverse impacts of smoking were found, with greater impacts found for those who had no plans to quit smoking at the initial interview. As smokers with no plans to quit increasingly recognized the adverse impacts of smoking, they also increasingly agreed that they use smoking as a coping mechanism. Smokers with plans to quit at the initial interview already were well aware of smoking's adverse impacts. Respondents recalling the campaign poster, which presented a healthy alternative to smoking, decreased their perception of smoking as a coping mechanism and devalued their attachment to smoking. Evidence was found that media ad recall mediates unobserved predictors of attitudes toward smoking.

  18. Media discourses of low carbon housing: The marginalisation of social and behavioural dimensions within the British broadsheet press.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Catherine; Hopfe, Christina; MacGillivray, Brian; Pidgeon, Nick

    2015-04-01

    Decarbonising housing is a key UK government policy to mitigate climate change. Using discourse analysis, we assess how low carbon housing is portrayed within British broadsheet media. Three distinct storylines were identified. Dominating the discourse, Zero carbon housing promotes new-build, low carbon houses as offering high technology solutions to the climate problem. Retrofitting homes emphasises the need to reduce emissions within existing housing, tackling both climate change and rising fuel prices. A more marginal discourse, Sustainable living, frames low carbon houses as related to individual identities and 'off-grid' or greener lifestyles. Our analysis demonstrates that technical and economic paradigms dominate media discourse on low carbon housing, marginalising social and behavioural aspects. © The Author(s) 2013.

  19. Tweeting Napoleon and Friending Clausewitz: Social Media and the Military Strategist

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    education. This chapter analyzes the use of social media by the medical field and in academia for the betterment of individual professionals and the...view. The medical field and academia provide a suitable sample for analysis, as each are professional organizations with its members committed to...can assist in the development of military strategists. As a corollary to the statement “first do no harm,” medical professionals continually

  20. [Illustration of military medicine on the pages of mass printed media during the First World War].

    PubMed

    Poddubnyĭ, M V

    2014-12-01

    The article analyses some of illustrations dedicated to the military medical topics on the pages of some Russian magazines and newspapers (magazine "Ogonek" newspaper "Petrograd's paper" and its annexes), its place among the images of the war, formed in the mass consciousness by periodical subjects. It is concluded that with the beginning of the First World War medical illustrations were finally approved as a recognizable symbol of the war. Mass printed media played a significant role in its entrenchment.

  1. Predictors of Emerging Suicide Death Among Military Personnel on Social Media Networks.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J; Butner, Jonathan E; Sinclair, Sungchoon; Bryan, Anna Belle O; Hesse, Christina M; Rose, Andree E

    2017-07-28

    Suicide is a leading cause of death in the United States and is the second leading cause of death in the U.S. military. Previous research suggests that data obtained from social media networks may provide important clues for identifying at-risk individuals. To test this possibility, the social media profiles from 315 military personnel who died by suicide (n = 157) or other causes (n = 158) were coded for the presence of stressful life situations (i.e., triggers), somatic complaints or health issues (i.e., physical), maladaptive or avoidant coping strategies (i.e., behaviors), negative mood states (i.e., emotion), and/or negative cognitive appraisals (cognition). Content codes were subsequently analyzed using multilevel models from a dynamical systems perspective to identify temporal change processes characteristic of suicide death. Results identified temporal sequences unique to suicide, notably social media posts about triggers followed by more posts about cognitions, posts about cognitions followed by more posts about triggers, and posts about behaviors followed by fewer posts about cognitions. Results suggest that certain sequences in social media content may predict cause of death and provide an estimate of when a social media user is likely to die by suicide. © 2017 The American Association of Suicidology.

  2. 'Quite an awkward situation to be in': perceptions of patients, carers and health and social care professionals of the supportive cancer care in British military personnel stationed in Germany.

    PubMed

    Maguire, R; Forbat, L; Kearney, N; Rowa-Dewar, N

    2009-10-01

    This paper reports findings from a study which identified the nature and volume of supportive care received by British military services personnel and their dependents who experience cancer and are based in Germany. The objectives were to (1) identify any gaps in the provision of supportive care, (2) determine the potential for additional supportive care services (local or remote), and (3) identify any educational or development issues for DMWS personnel. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with people with cancer (n = 7), informal carers (n = 6), British health care professionals employed by British Forces in Germany (n = 8), German health care professionals (n = 3), senior military personnel (n = 6) and army support personnel (n = 5). Analysis of the data was thematic and focused on accounts of care related to core issue identified in the UK's National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines (24). The paper explores the difficulties which British military personnel experience in their cancer care. The shortfalls in best practice are discussed in the framework of NICE guidelines focusing on communication, information, psychosocial care and coordination of care/inter-agency working. Significant gaps in the supportive care service provision are apparent The limited assessment and discussion of patients' supportive care needs suggests key areas for service improvement for providers both within the British Military in Germany, and in the services provided by German organisations. These findings highlight issues that should be considered by those providing supportive care for marginalised patient groups, such as patients and carers from different cultures.

  3. Sugar-sweetened beverages coverage in the British media: an analysis of public health advocacy versus pro-industry messaging

    PubMed Central

    Elliott-Green, Alex; Hyseni, Lirije; Lloyd-Williams, Ffion; Bromley, Helen; Capewell, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the extent of media-based public health advocacy versus pro-industry messaging regarding sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). Design We conducted a systematic analysis to identify and examine all articles regarding SSBs published in all mainstream British print newspapers and their online news websites from 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2014. We initially conducted a brief literature search to develop appropriate search terms and categorisations for grouping and analysing the articles. Articles were then coded according to the publishing newspaper, article type, topic, prominence and slant (pro-SSB or anti-SSB). A contextual analysis was undertaken to examine key messages in the articles. Results We identified 374 articles published during 2014. The majority of articles (81%) suggested that SSBs are unhealthy. Messaging from experts, campaign groups and health organisations was fairly consistent about the detrimental effects of SSB on health. However, relatively few articles assessed any approaches or solutions to potentially combat the problems associated with SSBs. Only one-quarter (24%) suggested any policy change. Meanwhile, articles concerning the food industry produced consistent messages emphasising consumer choice and individual responsibility for making choices regarding SSB consumption, and promoting and advertising their products. The food industry thus often managed to avoid association with the negative press that their products were receiving. Conclusions SSBs were frequently published in mainstream British print newspapers and their online news websites during 2014. Public health media advocacy was prominent throughout, with a growing consensus that sugary drinks are bad for people's health. However, the challenge for public health will be to mobilise supportive public opinion to help implement effective regulatory policies. Only then will our population's excess consumption of SSBs come under control. PMID:27436666

  4. Sugar-sweetened beverages coverage in the British media: an analysis of public health advocacy versus pro-industry messaging.

    PubMed

    Elliott-Green, Alex; Hyseni, Lirije; Lloyd-Williams, Ffion; Bromley, Helen; Capewell, Simon

    2016-07-19

    To assess the extent of media-based public health advocacy versus pro-industry messaging regarding sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). We conducted a systematic analysis to identify and examine all articles regarding SSBs published in all mainstream British print newspapers and their online news websites from 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2014. We initially conducted a brief literature search to develop appropriate search terms and categorisations for grouping and analysing the articles. Articles were then coded according to the publishing newspaper, article type, topic, prominence and slant (pro-SSB or anti-SSB). A contextual analysis was undertaken to examine key messages in the articles. We identified 374 articles published during 2014. The majority of articles (81%) suggested that SSBs are unhealthy. Messaging from experts, campaign groups and health organisations was fairly consistent about the detrimental effects of SSB on health. However, relatively few articles assessed any approaches or solutions to potentially combat the problems associated with SSBs. Only one-quarter (24%) suggested any policy change. Meanwhile, articles concerning the food industry produced consistent messages emphasising consumer choice and individual responsibility for making choices regarding SSB consumption, and promoting and advertising their products. The food industry thus often managed to avoid association with the negative press that their products were receiving. SSBs were frequently published in mainstream British print newspapers and their online news websites during 2014. Public health media advocacy was prominent throughout, with a growing consensus that sugary drinks are bad for people's health. However, the challenge for public health will be to mobilise supportive public opinion to help implement effective regulatory policies. Only then will our population's excess consumption of SSBs come under control. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  5. Jade and the journalists: media coverage of a young British celebrity dying of cancer.

    PubMed

    Walter, Tony

    2010-09-01

    In contemporary western societies, dying usually occurs in old age, out of sight in hospitals and institutions; how then do lay people learn what dying is like? Since the 1970s, one source of information in Anglophone societies has come from individuals who have chosen to publicise their dying of cancer. This article examines the most high profile case of this to date in the UK; in 2009, celebrity Jade Goody publicised in tabloid newspapers and celebrity magazines the final weeks of her dying of cervical cancer. What did she and her media say and write about dying? This article examines the print coverage of her final weeks, and four different voices are identified: those of Goody, of journalists, of her publicist, and of photographers, each representing her dying somewhat differently. Two major themes are discussed: Jade's struggles to retain autonomy (challenged by her disease and by other people), and the framing of her final weeks not primarily as a typical media cancer story of heroism, but as one of redemption in which she attained social respectability through dying.

  6. Treatment of mandibular third molars and pericoronitis in British military personnel: influence of guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence.

    PubMed

    Pepper, Thomas; Konarzewski, Thomas; Grimshaw, Paul; Combes, James

    2016-12-01

    We studied the dental records of British military personnel who were less than 20 years old on enlistment, and had at least five years' service with at least five recorded dental inspections, at three military dental centres in the UK. The median (IQR) period from first to last inspection in 720 subjects was 15 (10-19) years, and the median frequency of inspection was every 14 (13-16) months. A total of 288/1250 mandibular third molars were extracted (23%). There were significant increases in the proportion of extractions stating caries in the mandibular third molar or multi-episode pericoronitis as indications (n=13, 14%, p <0.001) (n=15, 19%, p <0.001) post-introduction of NICE guidance. The number of extractions with no documented indication was reduced by 50 (26%, p<0.001) and that for a single episode of pericoronitis by 20 (9%, p =0.02). Extractions of mandibular third molars because of caries in the adjacent second molar increased by 4 (4%, p=0.045). The median age at the time of extraction before introduction of the guidelines was 23 years compared with 25 years afterwards (p<0.001). Twenty-five of 114 (22%) extractions of mandibular third molars were in patients over the age of 30 after the introduction of guidelines compared with 1/174 (<1%) before. The introduction of the NICE guidelines on the management of third molars has significantly changed our practice. Whether or not these changes have resulted in a net benefit to patients is still a matter for debate.

  7. Determining a Relationship Between Foreign News Media Reports Covering U.S. Military Events and Network Incidents Against DoD Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    Description .............................................................................. 21 2. Statistics on the Number of FBIS Foreign News Media Reports...commanders misunderstood the intent of the DNMP and thought it would eliminate any need to include the media in military operations. The result was...documentary products for release to the news media produced by Joint Combat Camera. Ground rules must be fully developed by the combatant commander and

  8. 'A band of brothers'-an exploration of the range of medical ethical issues faced by British senior military clinicians on deployment to Afghanistan: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Bernthal, Elizabeth M; Draper, H J A; Henning, J; Kelly, J C

    2017-06-01

    To identify and explore features of ethical issues that senior clinicians faced as deployed medical directors (DMDs) to the British Field Hospital in Afghanistan as well as to determine the ethical training requirements for future deployments. A qualitative study in two phases conducted from November 2014 to June 2015. Phase 1 analysed 60 vignettes of cases that had generated ethical dilemmas for DMDs. Phase 2 included focus groups and an interview with 13 DMDs. Phase 1 identified working with limited resources, dual conflict of meeting both clinical and military obligations and consent of children as the most prevalent ethical challenges. Themes found in Phase 2 included sharing clinical responsibilities with clinicians from other countries and not knowing team members' ways of working, in addition to the themes from Phase 1. This study has drawn together examples of scenarios to form a repository that will aid future training. Recommendations included undertaking ethics training together as a team before, during and after deployment which must include all nationalities who are assigned to the same operational tour, so that different ethical views can be explored beforehand. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Mortality in British military participants in human experimental research into chemical warfare agents at Porton Down: cohort study.

    PubMed

    Venables, K M; Brooks, C; Linsell, L; Keegan, T J; Langdon, T; Fletcher, T; Nieuwenhuijsen, M J; Maconochie, N E S; Doyle, P; Beral, V; Carpenter, L M

    2009-03-24

    To investigate any long term effects on mortality in participants in experimental research related to chemical warfare agents from 1941 to 1989. Historical cohort study. Data sources Archive of UK government research facility at Porton Down, UK military personnel records, and national death and cancer records. Participants 18,276 male members of the UK armed forces who had spent one or more short periods (median 4 days between first and last test) at Porton Down and a comparison group of 17,600 non-Porton Down veterans followed to 31 December 2004. Mortality rate ratio of Porton Down compared with non-Porton Down veterans and standardised mortality ratio of each veteran group compared with the general population. Both ratios adjusted for age group and calendar period. Porton Down veterans were similar to non-Porton Down veterans in year of enlistment (median 1951) but had longer military service (median 6.2 v 5.0 years). After a median follow-up of 43 years, 40% (7306) of Porton Down and 39% (6900) of non-Porton Down veterans had died. All cause mortality was slightly greater in Porton Down veterans (rate ratio 1.06, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.10, P<0.001), more so for deaths outside the UK (1.26, 1.09 to 1.46). Of 12 cause specific groups examined, rate ratios in Porton Down veterans were increased for deaths attributed to infectious and parasitic (1.57, 1.07 to 2.29), genitourinary (1.46, 1.04 to 2.04), circulatory (1.07, 1.01 to 1.12), and external (non-medical) (1.17, 1.00 to 1.37) causes and decreased for deaths attributed to in situ, benign, and unspecified neoplasms (0.60, 0.37 to 0.99). There was no clear relation between type of chemical exposure and cause specific mortality. The mortality in both groups of veterans was lower than that in the general population (standardised mortality ratio 0.88, 0.85 to 0.90; 0.82, 0.80 to 0.84). Mortality was slightly higher in Porton Down than non-Porton Down veterans. With lack of information on other important

  10. Mortality in British military participants in human experimental research into chemical warfare agents at Porton Down: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, C; Linsell, L; Keegan, T J; Langdon, T; Fletcher, T; Nieuwenhuijsen, M J; Maconochie, N E S; Doyle, P; Beral, V

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate any long term effects on mortality in participants in experimental research related to chemical warfare agents from 1941 to 1989. Design Historical cohort study. Data sources Archive of UK government research facility at Porton Down, UK military personnel records, and national death and cancer records. Participants 18 276 male members of the UK armed forces who had spent one or more short periods (median 4 days between first and last test) at Porton Down and a comparison group of 17 600 non-Porton Down veterans followed to 31 December 2004. Main outcome measures Mortality rate ratio of Porton Down compared with non-Porton Down veterans and standardised mortality ratio of each veteran group compared with the general population. Both ratios adjusted for age group and calendar period. Results Porton Down veterans were similar to non-Porton Down veterans in year of enlistment (median 1951) but had longer military service (median 6.2 v 5.0 years). After a median follow-up of 43 years, 40% (7306) of Porton Down and 39% (6900) of non-Porton Down veterans had died. All cause mortality was slightly greater in Porton Down veterans (rate ratio 1.06, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.10, P<0.001), more so for deaths outside the UK (1.26, 1.09 to 1.46). Of 12 cause specific groups examined, rate ratios in Porton Down veterans were increased for deaths attributed to infectious and parasitic (1.57, 1.07 to 2.29), genitourinary (1.46, 1.04 to 2.04), circulatory (1.07, 1.01 to 1.12), and external (non-medical) (1.17, 1.00 to 1.37) causes and decreased for deaths attributed to in situ, benign, and unspecified neoplasms (0.60, 0.37 to 0.99). There was no clear relation between type of chemical exposure and cause specific mortality. The mortality in both groups of veterans was lower than that in the general population (standardised mortality ratio 0.88, 0.85 to 0.90; 0.82, 0.80 to 0.84). Conclusions Mortality was slightly higher in Porton Down than non

  11. Cancer morbidity in British military veterans included in chemical warfare agent experiments at Porton Down: cohort study.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, L M; Linsell, L; Brooks, C; Keegan, T J; Langdon, T; Doyle, P; Maconochie, N E S; Fletcher, T; Nieuwenhuijsen, M J; Beral, V; Venables, K M

    2009-03-24

    To determine cancer morbidity in members of the armed forces who took part in tests of chemical warfare agents from 1941 to 1989. Historical cohort study, with cohort members followed up to December 2004. Archive of UK government research facility at Porton Down, UK military personnel records, and national death and cancer records. All veterans included in the cohort study of mortality, excluding those known to have died or been lost to follow-up before 1 January 1971 when the UK cancer registration system commenced: 17,013 male members of the UK armed forces who took part in tests (Porton Down veterans) and a similar group of 16,520 men who did not (non-Porton Down veterans). Cancer morbidity in each group of veterans; rate ratios, with 95% confidence intervals, adjusted for age group and calendar period. 3457 cancers were reported in the Porton Down veterans compared with 3380 cancers in the non-Porton Down veterans. While overall cancer morbidity was the same in both groups (rate ratio 1.00, 95% confidence interval 0.95 to 1.05), Porton Down veterans had higher rates of ill defined malignant neoplasms (1.12, 1.02 to 1.22), in situ neoplasms (1.45, 1.06 to 2.00), and those of uncertain or unknown behaviour (1.32, 1.01 to 1.73). Overall cancer morbidity in Porton Down veterans was no different from that in non-Porton Down veterans.

  12. Cancer morbidity in British military veterans included in chemical warfare agent experiments at Porton Down: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Linsell, L; Brooks, C; Keegan, T J; Langdon, T; Doyle, P; Maconochie, N E S; Fletcher, T; Nieuwenhuijsen, M J; Beral, V

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine cancer morbidity in members of the armed forces who took part in tests of chemical warfare agents from 1941 to 1989. Design Historical cohort study, with cohort members followed up to December 2004. Data source Archive of UK government research facility at Porton Down, UK military personnel records, and national death and cancer records. Participants All veterans included in the cohort study of mortality, excluding those known to have died or been lost to follow-up before 1 January 1971 when the UK cancer registration system commenced: 17 013 male members of the UK armed forces who took part in tests (Porton Down veterans) and a similar group of 16 520 men who did not (non-Porton Down veterans). Main outcome measures Cancer morbidity in each group of veterans; rate ratios, with 95% confidence intervals, adjusted for age group and calendar period. Results 3457 cancers were reported in the Porton Down veterans compared with 3380 cancers in the non-Porton Down veterans. While overall cancer morbidity was the same in both groups (rate ratio 1.00, 95% confidence interval 0.95 to 1.05), Porton Down veterans had higher rates of ill defined malignant neoplasms (1.12, 1.02 to 1.22), in situ neoplasms (1.45, 1.06 to 2.00), and those of uncertain or unknown behaviour (1.32, 1.01 to 1.73). Conclusion Overall cancer morbidity in Porton Down veterans was no different from that in non-Porton Down veterans. PMID:19318700

  13. Retrospective analysis of the prevalence and incidence of caries in the distal surface of mandibular second molars in British military personnel.

    PubMed

    Pepper, T; Grimshaw, P; Konarzewski, T; Combes, J

    2017-02-01

    Mandibular third molars are commonly removed because of distal caries in the adjacent tooth. To find out the prevalence of distal caries in mandibular second molars we retrospectively studied the primary care dental records of 720 British military personnel (653 men and 67 women) from various centres. These records are standardised and personnel are required to attend for inspection regularly. Those who had been under 20 years of age at enlistment, who had served for at least five years, and had five recorded dental inspections, were included. The median (IQR) period from the first to last inspection was 15 (9.7 - 19.2) years, and inspections were a median (IQR) of 14.1 (12.8 - 15.8) months apart. A total of 59/1414 (4.2%) mandibular second molars developed caries in their distal surfaces. This was 4% higher when they were associated with a partially-erupted mandibular third molar than when associated with one that was fully erupted or absent (29/414 (7%) compared with 30/1000 (3%); p=0.001). Carious lesions developed in the distal aspect of 22/133 mandibular second molars (16.5%) that were adjacent to a mesioangularly impacted third molar. Of these, 19/22 were successfully restored. Four mesioangularly impacted mandibular third molars would have to be extracted to prevent one case of distal caries in a second molar (number needed to treat=3.25). Second molars that are associated with a partially-erupted mesioangular mandibular third molar have a higher risk of caries, and this can be reduced by removal of the third molar. However, distal caries in second molars seems to be a treatable and slowly-developing phenomenon and we recommend that the merits and risks of the prophylactic removal of third molars should be discussed with the patient, who should have long-term clinical and radiographic checks if the tooth is retained.

  14. Accountability Synopticism: How a Think Tank and the Media Developed a Quasimarket for School Choice in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmonds, Michael; Webb, P. Taylor

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes how a locally developed school ranking system affected student enrolment patterns in British Columbia over time. In developing an annual school "report card" that was published in newspapers and online, the Vancouver-based Fraser Institute created a marketplace for school choice by devising an accountability scheme…

  15. Accountability Synopticism: How a Think Tank and the Media Developed a Quasimarket for School Choice in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmonds, Michael; Webb, P. Taylor

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes how a locally developed school ranking system affected student enrolment patterns in British Columbia over time. In developing an annual school "report card" that was published in newspapers and online, the Vancouver-based Fraser Institute created a marketplace for school choice by devising an accountability scheme…

  16. Thatcher Government Censorship of British News Media in the Falkland Islands Campaign: A Model for Future United States Military Employments?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    explores reasons for the breakdown of press and government relations in Vietnem and Grenada; reviews key legal cases regarding First Amendment rights...language to file a sworn translation with the postmaster. Because of concern of violation of First Amendment Rights, newspapers contested both acts...resolu- tion to impeach President Reagan, alleging that he had violated the First Amendment . (9:932) Were the press and members of Congress justified

  17. SOCIAL MEDIA RISK ANALYSIS: HOW TO USE ACCEPTED RISK ASSESSMENT TOOLS TO ANALYZE SOCIAL MEDIA RISKS IN MILITARY ORGANIZATIONS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-01

    2011), 7. 50 Gabriel Weimann, Terrorism in Cyberspace: The Next Generation (Washington, D.C., New York : Columbia University Press: Woodrow Wilson ...SocialMediaGuide2013.pdf. Weimann, Gabriel. Terrorism in Cyberspace: The next Generation. Washington, D.C.: New York: Columbia University Press: Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 2015.

  18. Soldiers’ Perceptions of the Usefulness of Civilian and Military Media.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    INFORMATION EXCHANGE, * MASS MEDIA , ARMY PERSONNEL, SOCIAL COMMUNICATION, THESES, RADIO BROADCASTING, FEASIBILITY STUDIES, SURVEYS, PUBLIC RELATIONS, CIVILIAN PERSONNEL, PERCEPTION(PSYCHOLOGY), NEWSPAPERS.

  19. War in the Age of Information: The Military and the Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-11

    strengthened by the pres- ence of Brigadier General Frank A. Allen, Jr., as my public relations officer. He had been a successful leader of an... Public Relations Section of the headquarters. Our concern was emphasized by the necessity for keeping the two populations, the American and the British... public relations becomes critical, equally important as any other war fighting skill In the age of informatIon. It has become another pillar in the

  20. Use of social media and web 2.0 technologies to increase knowledge and skills of british columbia nurses.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Noreen C; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Mickelson, Grace; Atherton, Pat; Novak-Lauscher, Helen; Hooker, Daniel; Ho, Kendall

    2012-01-01

    Health professionals' use of social media and Web 2.0 technologies are emerging as a new area of research. We present the experiences of a province-wide network in Canada that was developed using such technologies as a means to increase nurses' capacity in nursing health services research. Our network is based on a model of electronic communities of practice (eCoPs). Network evaluation affirms that nurses do respond to social media, as membership has grown to over 1,400 members in two years. Approaches used for network development and implementation are discussed, and the network's eHealth eCoP is presented as a case of network activities and directions.

  1. Reliable reference gene selection for Cordyceps militaris gene expression studies under different developmental stages and media.

    PubMed

    Lian, Tiantian; Yang, Tao; Liu, Guijun; Sun, Junde; Dong, Caihong

    2014-07-01

    Cordyceps militaris is considered a model organism for the study of Cordyceps species, which are highly prized in traditional Chinese medicine. Gene expression analysis has become more popular and important in studies of this fungus. Reference gene validation under different experimental conditions is crucial for RT-qPCR analysis. In this study, eight candidate reference genes, actin, cox5, gpd, rpb1, tef1, try, tub, and ubi, were selected and their expression stability was evaluated in C. militaris samples using four algorithms, genorm, normfinder, bestkeeper, and the comparative ∆Ct method. Three sets of samples, five different developmental stages cultured in wheat medium and pupae, and all the samples pool were included. The results showed that rpb1 was the best reference gene during all developmental stages examined, while the most common reference genes, actin and tub, were not suitable internal controls. Cox5 also performed poorly and was less stable in our analysis. The ranks of ubi and gpd were inconsistent in different sample sets by different methods. Our results provide guidelines for reference gene selection at different developmental stages and also represent a foundation for more accurate and widespread use of RT-qPCR in C. militaris gene expression analysis. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Creating the Credibility Gap: Military Advisory Command, Vietnam, and the Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-16

    Snow 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Army Command and General Staff...Command, Vietnam failed to follow US Army doctrine and regulations in dealing with the media. Throughout the course of the war, different organizations...reporters and their requirement to remain loyal to their superiors produced a media campaign that invariably failed to be effective. Future US Army

  3. Building the Old Contemptibles: British Military Transformation and Tactical Development from the Boer War to the Great War, 1899-1914

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    question. The majority of reforms attempted by the first two Secretaries of State for War during this period, William St. John Brodrick and Sir Hugh... Sir Redvers Henry Buller and the initial British Army forces deploying to support the garrison forces already engaged in fighting the Boers in South...colonial warfare and towards continental warfare. Less than twelve years after the end of the Boer War, General Sir John French, himself a Boer War veteran

  4. An Ever Present Danger: A Concise History of British Military Operations on the North-West Frontier, 1849-1947 (Occasional Paper, Number 33)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    as three light or mountain batteries which were designed along the same lines as the irregular forces employed by the British Bengal Army in India...the frontier into Punjab. Despite the support of a large contingent of regular troops from the Bengal Army of India that had been sent to the Peshawar...the Bengal Army who were posted to Peshawar, rarely conducted pu- nitive expeditions and trained almost exclusively in conventional tactics. They

  5. Neutral Caregivers or Military Support? The British Red Cross, the Friends’ Ambulance Unit, and the Problems of Voluntary Medical Aid in Wartime

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    During the First World War the British Red Cross Society (BRCS) served as the coordinating body for voluntary medical aid giving in Britain. Among the many units which came within its purview was the Friends’ Ambulance Unit (FAU), formed by a group of young men whose desire to serve their nation in wartime conflicted with their pacifist principles. Both the BRCS and the FAU were wracked by ideological conflicts in the years which preceded and throughout the war. These struggles over voluntarist identity highlight the contested meanings of service and conscience in wartime. Through a critical examination of the language of official histories and biographies, this article will argue that the war formed a key moment in the relationship between the British state and voluntary medical aid, with the state’s increasing role in the work of such organizations raising questions about the voluntarist principles to which aid organizations laid claim. The struggles that both organizations and individuals within them faced in reconciling the competing pressures that this new relationship created form a legacy of the war which continues to have important implications for the place of medical voluntarism in wartime today. PMID:26213442

  6. Neutral Caregivers or Military Support? The British Red Cross, the Friends' Ambulance Unit, and the Problems of Voluntary Medical Aid in Wartime.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jessica

    2015-05-01

    During the First World War the British Red Cross Society (BRCS) served as the coordinating body for voluntary medical aid giving in Britain. Among the many units which came within its purview was the Friends' Ambulance Unit (FAU), formed by a group of young men whose desire to serve their nation in wartime conflicted with their pacifist principles. Both the BRCS and the FAU were wracked by ideological conflicts in the years which preceded and throughout the war. These struggles over voluntarist identity highlight the contested meanings of service and conscience in wartime. Through a critical examination of the language of official histories and biographies, this article will argue that the war formed a key moment in the relationship between the British state and voluntary medical aid, with the state's increasing role in the work of such organizations raising questions about the voluntarist principles to which aid organizations laid claim. The struggles that both organizations and individuals within them faced in reconciling the competing pressures that this new relationship created form a legacy of the war which continues to have important implications for the place of medical voluntarism in wartime today.

  7. British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Gerald

    2006-01-01

    The province of British Columbia has a dubious history where support for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) issues in education is concerned. Most notable is the Surrey School Board's decision in 1997 to ban three picture books for children that depict families with two moms or two dads. The North Vancouver School Board has also…

  8. British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Gerald

    2006-01-01

    The province of British Columbia has a dubious history where support for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) issues in education is concerned. Most notable is the Surrey School Board's decision in 1997 to ban three picture books for children that depict families with two moms or two dads. The North Vancouver School Board has also…

  9. Gaining Momentum: How Media Influences Public Opinion To Push Civil-Military Decision Makers Into Formulating Foreign Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-09

    because their choices were to be made with the public in consideration. The prevailing and widespread domestic public opinion polls had a significant...public’s approval back. What the military can pull from this operational engagement is most leaders will make decisions consistent with domestic public

  10. The Military and the Media in Conflict: The Sidle Panel and the U.S. Invasion of Grenada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warden, Michael L.

    Exclusion of the press from the first days of the American invasion of Grenada dramatically brought into focus the fundamental conflict between the military's need for secrecy and the press's need to publish information. From the viewpoint of the press, the decision to exclude reporters from the island until the third day of the invasion denied…

  11. Nutrition research in the military.

    PubMed

    Hill, Neil E; Fallowfield, J L; Delves, S K; Wilson, D R

    2014-06-01

    Military research performed in an operational environment involves mission-specific considerations. The Institute of Naval Medicine was tasked in 2008 by the Surgeon General to investigate the nutritional status of deployed British military personnel, and how this might affect body composition, physical fitness and operational capability. This paper briefly describes the logistic and technical issues specific to military research that were encountered by the study team, how these issues were overcome and how this research has influenced military practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Clausewitz and the Theory of Military Strategy in Europe - Reflections Upon a Paradigm of Military Strategy Within the European Common Security and Defense Policy (ESDP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    empirically. There is neither an investigation of the thinking tools British, French 31 Gadamer , Hans...34 Gadamer , Wahrheit und Methode, p. XVII, 261; Reid, Studies in British Military Thought, pp. 231- 232. 35 See Gray who

  13. Military Psychology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    TRANSLATIONS, MILITARY TRAINING, OFFICER PERSONNEL, PERCEPTION( PSYCHOLOGY ), PERSONALITY , COMMUNISM, INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS, EMOTIONS....MILITARY FORCES(FOREIGN), *MILITARY PSYCHOLOGY , *TEXTBOOKS, USSR, ORGANIZATIONS, COMBAT READINESS, PSYCHOMOTOR FUNCTION, REASONING, SURVEYS

  14. Best of British: British Information Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojala, Marydee

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the importance of British databases and information services to U.S. business searchers and describes several British databases and services. Topics covered include database contents, available search strategies, access from the United States, language differences, and dating problems. A directory of contacts is provided. (six…

  15. Best of British: British Information Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojala, Marydee

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the importance of British databases and information services to U.S. business searchers and describes several British databases and services. Topics covered include database contents, available search strategies, access from the United States, language differences, and dating problems. A directory of contacts is provided. (six…

  16. No lasting legacy: no change in reporting of women's sports in the British print media with the London 2012 Olympics and Paralympics.

    PubMed

    Packer, C; Geh, D J; Goulden, O W; Jordan, A M; Withers, G K; Wagstaff, A J; Bellwood, R A; Binmore, C L; Webster, C L

    2015-03-01

    The proportion of media sports coverage devoted to women is reported at between 1 and 6%. Our survey examines and compares reporting patterns before and after the 2012 Olympics and Paralympics. We collected data on sports coverage in six national newspapers on 3 weekend days in February and March 2012, and in February 2013; ∼5 months before the opening of the 2012 Olympic Games and 5 months after the closing of the Paralympic Games. In 2012, 39 of 876 articles in national newspapers (4.5%) related to women's sports, compared with 22 of 755 (2.9%) in 2013; a non-significant reduction in coverage [difference 1.54%, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.28 to 3.36). In 2012, 24 of 647 pictures (3.7%) related to women's activities, compared with 10 of 738 (1.4%) in 2013; a significant reduction in coverage (difference 2.35%; 95% CI 0.68-4.03). The median area per article was significantly greater for men in both years. We found a continuing bias towards men's sport in the media analysed and no evidence of improvement either before or after the 2012 Olympics and Paralympics. Increased support of women's sport in the print media could benefit individuals and influence the health of the population. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health.

  17. No lasting legacy: no change in reporting of women's sports in the British print media with the London 2012 Olympics and Paralympics

    PubMed Central

    Packer, C.; Geh, D.J.; Goulden, O.W.; Jordan, A.M.; Withers, G.K.; Wagstaff, A.J.; Bellwood, R.A.; Binmore, C.L.; Webster, C.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The proportion of media sports coverage devoted to women is reported at between 1 and 6%. Our survey examines and compares reporting patterns before and after the 2012 Olympics and Paralympics. Methods We collected data on sports coverage in six national newspapers on 3 weekend days in February and March 2012, and in February 2013; ∼5 months before the opening of the 2012 Olympic Games and 5 months after the closing of the Paralympic Games. Results In 2012, 39 of 876 articles in national newspapers (4.5%) related to women's sports, compared with 22 of 755 (2.9%) in 2013; a non-significant reduction in coverage [difference 1.54%, 95% confidence interval (CI) −0.28 to 3.36). In 2012, 24 of 647 pictures (3.7%) related to women's activities, compared with 10 of 738 (1.4%) in 2013; a significant reduction in coverage (difference 2.35%; 95% CI 0.68–4.03). The median area per article was significantly greater for men in both years. Conclusions We found a continuing bias towards men's sport in the media analysed and no evidence of improvement either before or after the 2012 Olympics and Paralympics. Increased support of women's sport in the print media could benefit individuals and influence the health of the population. PMID:24618182

  18. Base Realignment and Closure 2005 Military Construction Project To Consolidate and Relocate Service Media Activities to Fort Meade, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-14

    Soldier Magazine to Fort Meade, MD [Maryland]. Realign Anacostia Annex, District of Columbia, by relocating the Naval Media Center to Fort Meade, MD...Army Audit Agency Report No. A-2008-0023-ALO, “Base Realignment and Closure 2005 Construction Requirements: Armed Forces Reserve Center, Red River

  19. British Sign Name Customs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Linda; Sutton-Spence, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Research presented here describes the sign names and the customs of name allocation within the British Deaf community. While some aspects of British Sign Language sign names and British Deaf naming customs differ from those in most Western societies, there are many similarities. There are also similarities with other societies outside the more…

  20. British Sign Name Customs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Linda; Sutton-Spence, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Research presented here describes the sign names and the customs of name allocation within the British Deaf community. While some aspects of British Sign Language sign names and British Deaf naming customs differ from those in most Western societies, there are many similarities. There are also similarities with other societies outside the more…

  1. Britishness as Racist Nativism: A Case of the Unnamed "Other"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Heather Jane

    2016-01-01

    The construct of Britishness, as with nationalism elsewhere in the world, although amorphous and permeable over time, continues to be used by politicians and the media as a powerful exclusionary force. Moreover in England, fundamental British values (FBV), its most recent and official incarnation, now hold particular currency in education policy…

  2. Britishness as Racist Nativism: A Case of the Unnamed "Other"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Heather Jane

    2016-01-01

    The construct of Britishness, as with nationalism elsewhere in the world, although amorphous and permeable over time, continues to be used by politicians and the media as a powerful exclusionary force. Moreover in England, fundamental British values (FBV), its most recent and official incarnation, now hold particular currency in education policy…

  3. Impact of Public Perception on US National Policy: A Study of Media Influence in Military and Government Decision Making

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    Manufacturing Consent. New York: Pantheon Books , 1988. 7 system in such a fundamental way, that alternative bases of news choices are hardly...In actuality the system definitions and boundaries are being reinforced by the limits placed on the debate. There is no formal censorship in the US...but there is a sort of market censorship . That is, mainstream media do not want to run stories that will offend their advertisers and owners. In

  4. Cutaneous leishmaniasis in British troops following jungle training in Belize.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Mark S

    2011-09-01

    British military personnel account for 45% of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) cases seen in the UK and 103 cases from Belize were seen in 1998-2009. Systemic treatment of CL from Belize should not be considered essential in immunocompetent patients because mucosal leishmaniasis very rarely occurs.

  5. The British Peace Movement in the 1980's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reader, Mark

    The groups and personalities that comprise the British peace network are discussed and their activities are examined. The nuclear disarmament campaign is led by a combination of mass-based organizations, specialized interest groups, and individuals determined to end Britain's role as a nuclear weapons state and military base. Notable groups are…

  6. The British Peace Movement in the 1980's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reader, Mark

    The groups and personalities that comprise the British peace network are discussed and their activities are examined. The nuclear disarmament campaign is led by a combination of mass-based organizations, specialized interest groups, and individuals determined to end Britain's role as a nuclear weapons state and military base. Notable groups are…

  7. [The British Surgeon William Wittman's impression of Istanbul and its neighborhood's health problems surrounding at the beginning of 19th century].

    PubMed

    Görkey, S

    1993-01-01

    British surgeon William Wittman visited the Ottoman Empire between the years 1799 and 1802 as a member of the British Military Mission. The British Military Mission came to the Ottoman Territory in accordance with the alliance which was enacted between the Ottoman and British Empires after Napoleons' invasion of Egypt. William Wittman spent a year in Istanbul. Later on he went to Jaffa with the British Military Mission to join the Ottoman army. They traveled through El-Arish and Belbeis to Cairo with the army. During this time Wittman recorded the health problems and the diseases which were prevalent both in the Ottoman army and the British Military Mission. He also recorded the cases which he tried to cure. William Wittman appended three medical reports to his travel report. This article is on William Wittman's biography and his impressions of the Levant Chiflick in Istanbul; health problems, and diseases prevalent in Istanbul and its neighborhood during the period.

  8. Division Level Social Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-12

    social media statistics equates to companies abilities to understand the people who are looking at their social media sites and market to...measure a company’s followership and sales resulting from viewing social media . Social Media marketing companies track metrics such as consumption rates...sector, there are a myriad of marketing companies focused on social media analytics. In military terms the MOP and MOE need to be 13 analyzed

  9. The Discursive Framing of International Education Programs in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cover, Dwayne

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how international education programs in British Columbia have been discursively framed by government and media sources. Over the past two decades, international education programs have expanded in number and scale in the province, a phenomenon that has been interpreted by some education researchers and media sources as…

  10. Military Government

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1949-07-01

    CGSC MG MILITARY GOVERNMENT LIBHARY ARI\\’IY WAR COLLEGE CJ\\RLISLE BARRACKS, PAa This text is approved for resident and extension-course...and functions · of ’ military government . It conforms ·substantially to the subject matter , of Field Manual 27-5, Civil Affairs/ Military Government ...Teaching experience at the Command and General Staff College has ···--·demonstrated the need for a military government text which brings to- gether

  11. Surgeons reconsidered: military medical men of the American revolution.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Tabitha

    2010-01-01

    This paper assesses the reputation of British military medical staff in the 18th century, focusing on the character and professionalism of regimental surgeons and mates who served at the time of the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783). Examining the careers and contributions of men such as Thomas Dickson Reide, Robert Jackson, and Robert Hamilton reveals that--in contrast to charges of ineptitude, laziness and dishonesty among military surgeons--the British army could count on a cadre of military medical men who were devoted both to their patients and to the advancement of their profession.

  12. British super-shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-10-01

    British Aerospace, the nationalized aerospace manufacturer, confirmed that a space shuttle of new design is indeed being studied, and that a model of the craft will be displayed. The British television network ITN had announced that secret plans were being prepared for the construction of a reusable horizontal takeoff super-shuttle, which could breathe atmospheric oxygen to supply its propulsion system. Retracting a first denial according to which the project existed merely as scribbles on the back of an envelope, a British Aerospace spokesperson declared that it was in fact a very serious study. The super-shuttle, called HOTOL (horizontal takeoff and landing), would be placed in orbit as a platform for satellite launching. The spokesperson further indicated that with a certain resemblance to the Concorde, it would be pilotless, remote controlled, and would allow frequent operations at short time intervals.

  13. USSR Report, Military Affairs, No. 1713

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    of Western propaganda, repeating its slanderous statements and its attacks against socialism and comunism , against the Soviet Union and socialist...obedient cowitry soldiers" in the time of reactionary British military leader Wellington, an advocate of corporal punishment as a means of maintaining

  14. Chronocentrism and British criminology.

    PubMed

    Rock, Paul

    2005-09-01

    Criminologists display a largely unexamined propensity to ignore writings that are more than fifteen or so years old, with evident consequences for the public presentation and validation of expert knowledge. A citation study was combined with detailed observations from British criminologists to ascertain quite how that disavowal of the past was accomplished.

  15. British nuclear policymaking

    SciTech Connect

    Bowie, C.J.; Platt, A.

    1984-01-01

    This study analyzes the domestic political, economic, and bureaucratic factors that affect the nuclear policymaking process in Great Britain. Its major conclusion is that, although there have been changes in that process in recent years (notably the current involvement of a segment of the British public in the debate about the deployment of intermediate-range nuclear forces), future British nuclear policymaking will remain much what it has been in the past. Three ideas are central to understanding British thinking on the subject: (1) Britain's long-standing resolve to have her own national nuclear force is largely traceable to her desire to maintain first-rank standing among the nations of the world in spite of loss of empire. (2) Financial considerations have always been important--so much so that they have usually dominated issues of nuclear policy. (3) The executive branch of government dominates the nuclear policymaking process but does not always present a united front. The United States heavily influences British nuclear policy through having supplied Britain since the late 1950s with nuclear data and components of nuclear weapon systems such as Polaris and Trident. The relationship works both ways since the U.S. depends on Britain as a base for deployment of both conventional and nuclear systems.

  16. Prevent and "British Values"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Alex; Ghale, Baljeet

    2015-01-01

    At the recent National Union of Teachers' conference the role of the Prevent strategy and the introduction of "British Values" in the Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills framework emerged as key issues for delegates. Two of the speeches made at the conference are presented here.

  17. Okanagan Lake, British Columbia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-10-01

    STS068-155-011 (30 September-11 October 1994) --- (Okanagan Lake, British Columbia) View southward down the lake; Vernon is in the foreground, Kelowna just before the bend in the lake, and Penticton at the far end of the lake. Green crops are still vigorous despite the season (early October); clear-cuts dot the forested hillsides.

  18. The 1985 British Physics Olympiad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isenberg, Cyril

    1985-01-01

    Presents questions and answers to the 1985 British Physics Olympiad (BPhO) Competition. Comments about the competition (the second year of British participation) and the winners who went to Yugoslavia (and placed second behind the USSR) are included. (JN)

  19. A Survey of Media and Instructional Technology Competencies Needed by Business, Industry, Health Professions, Agencies, Military Trainers, and Independent Contractors in Northern California, USA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morlan, John E.; Lu, Mei-Yan

    To determine whether professionals in business, industry, health professions, agencies, and the military are receiving the training they need to work as instructional designers and trainers, a 54-item survey was prepared based on competencies perceived necessary by a group of university professors. Items ranged from basic demographic data to the…

  20. Strategic Factors Influencing the British and American Empires

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-07

    for the advancement of civilization and a major contribution to world peace. It was the faith if many ardent free traders that people who traded...conviction that he was an instrument for the bringing of civilization to those who stood most direly in need.43 Thus, there emerged during the nineteenth...especially after the Indian Mutiny of 1856), an increasing British military presence was required, followed by the need for greater civil control by the

  1. The British Southern Campaign in the Revolutionary War: Implications for Contemporary Counter Insurgency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-10

    seaboard and principally New York City. He also bolstered the garrison of Boston as unrest spread. After the Boston “ massacre ” of March 1770 three...remained confined to Boston for the rest of the year, surrounded by a hostile civilian populace, and devoid of a clear strategy. In December, the...absorbed the attention and efforts of British officials. Lord North, the British Prime Minister, 1770 -82, sought a quick military victory. The Army’s

  2. British Nuclear Policymaking,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    14A.,J.R. Groorn, British Thinking About Nuclear Weapons, Pinter , London, 1974, p. 555. likely, particularly if its conventional forces were deployed...In an atmosphere of crisis, Prime Minister Harold Macmillan met with President Kennedy in late 1962 and quickly hammered out an agreement whereby the...power in 1964, Prime Minister Harold Wilson noted how dependent, in fact, Britain was on the United States for important components of the nuclear force

  3. Teaching Culture during the Sixties: A British Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Laurence

    In the 1960s many teachers in the British secondary schools began a major effort to redefine their attitude toward the mass media in the light of certain social and cultural pressures. Changes in students made it necessary to provide materials of a less formal academic kind and to introduce literature, music, and art that would relate more…

  4. The Amritsar Massacre: The Origins of the British Approach of Minimal Force on Public Order Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-04

    No5, 1932), 86. 116 Sir John Dill, Notes on the Tactical Lessons of the Palestine Rebellion. (London, 1936), 21 . 44 experience of internal ...nothing new; it has been a requirement of the military to support the national government in the quelling of internal public disorder since the...military approach, the application of minimal force, will constantly be under pressure. The British approach to public order and internal security

  5. British National Formulary: its birth, death, and rebirth.

    PubMed Central

    Wade, O L

    1993-01-01

    The British National Formulary is a direct descendant of the National War Formulary, in which the titles of the preparations were in Latin and the doses in minims and grains. The British National Formulary was born in 1948, did a good job for about 20 years, but sickened and died in 1976. It was reborn in 1981. Parturition was painful with a very hostile reception from the media and the drug industry, but it survived and has grown in stature. The 25th edition was published in February. Wish it well for the next 25 issues! Images p1052-a p1053-a PMID:8490505

  6. Indians Repulse British With Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    During the early introduction of rockets to Europe, they were used only as weapons. Enemy troops in India repulsed the British with rockets. Later, in Britain, Sir William Congreve developed a rocket that could fire to about 9,000 feet. The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812.

  7. Indians Repulse British With Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    During the early introduction of rockets to Europe, they were used only as weapons. Enemy troops in India repulsed the British with rockets. Later, in Britain, Sir William Congreve developed a rocket that could fire to about 9,000 feet. The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812.

  8. Telemedicine in British Airways.

    PubMed

    Bagshaw, M

    1996-01-01

    In the year ending March 1994, British Airways (BA) carried in excess of 30 million passengers worldwide. There was a total of 2078 reported in-flight medical incidents, with 18 unscheduled diversions for medical reasons. The commonest reported conditions were faints, diarrhoea and vomiting. The BA aircraft medical kit content exceeds the statutory minimum requirement and all cabin crew undergo training in first aid and life support. There is a BA doctor on 24 h call with whom an aircraft captain may communicate via a high-frequency radio link. This link has limitations and immediate contact is not always possible. BA is installing satellite communication facilities in new aircraft and the application of telemedicine utilizing this facility is being explored.

  9. Mortality in British vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Appleby, Paul N; Key, Timothy J; Thorogood, Margaret; Burr, Michael L; Mann, Jim

    2002-02-01

    To compare the mortality of British vegetarians and non-vegetarians. Analysis of original data from two prospective studies each including a large proportion of vegetarians--the Oxford Vegetarian Study and the Health Food Shoppers Study. Standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) compared with the population of England and Wales were calculated from deaths before age 90 for vegetarians and non-vegetarians in each study. Death rate ratios (DRRs) for vegetarians compared with non-vegetarians within each study were calculated for each of 14 major causes of death. UK. Twenty-one thousand men and women aged 16-89 years at recruitment, including more than 8,000 vegetarians. SMRs for all causes of death were significantly below the reference level of 100 in both studies: 52 (95% confidence interval (CI) 49-56) based on 1,131 deaths in the Oxford Vegetarian Study and 59 (57-61) based on 2,346 deaths in the Health Food Shoppers Study. For all causes of death, the DRR for vegetarians compared with non-vegetarians was close to one in both studies: 1.01 (95% CI 0.89-1.14) in the Oxford Vegetarian Study, 1.03 (0.95-1.13) in the Health Food Shoppers Study. British vegetarians have low mortality compared with the general population. Their death rates are similar to those of comparable non-vegetarians, suggesting that much of this benefit may be attributed to non-dietary lifestyle factors such as a low prevalence of smoking and a generally high socio-economic status, or to aspects of the diet other than the avoidance of meat and fish.

  10. British Military Mission (BMM) to Greece, 1942-44

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-21

    ox, goats , and chickens lived within the houses, haphazardly built out of unhewn stone or mud walls. 53 Food for the average peasant centered on...bread and cheese , with the more affluent being lucky enough to procure meat, eggs, vegetables, and milk through the black market. 54 The majority of

  11. British Military Intervention into Sierra Leone: A Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-14

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I first wish to thank my wife, Lisa . Without her constant love, support, and encouragement I would never have accomplished many things in my...Palliser, was with the Pathfinder platoon at Lungi, where the pathfinders repelled an enemy force of roughly forty. The second engagement was Operation...likely enemy avenues of approach, the UK had a firm base. After the PARA Pathfinder platoon repelled a RUF advance towards the capital, the RUF tried to

  12. British Military Requirements, Resources, and Conventional Arms Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    AF." Includes bibliographical references. ISBN 0-8330-1042-5 1. Great Britain-Armed Forces-Appropriations and expenditures. 2 . Great Britain-Armed...high resource scenario, defense budget share of GDP should increase at an annual rate of 2 percent. In a middle ex- penditure scenario, the defense...and £30 billion from 1990 to 2005 based on defense budget growth of-1 percent and + 2 percent per year, respectively. Conventional arms control

  13. Documented suicides within the British Army during the Crimean War 1854-1856.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeffrey Allen; Masuhara, Kristi L; Frueh, B Christopher

    2014-07-01

    We have little understanding of the increased active duty military suicide rates found in the United States, and little understanding of what is historically normative for combatants. Therefore, we examined historical records on suicides among the British Army during the Crimean War for the years 1854-1856. There were 18 documented suicides in the British Army during this period. Calculating an accurate annual suicide rate per 100,000 is impossible because it is unclear how many of the 111,313 military personnel were in country for each of the 2 years of the war. However, the range is conservatively estimated between 8 and 16 per 100,000, with the likely answer somewhere near the middle. This suggests the possibility that increasing suicide rates among active duty military may be a modern U.S. phenomenon.

  14. Entrepreneurial Expeditionary Economics and the United States Military. Right Task, Wrong Tool?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    British Army School of Advanced Military Studies United States Army Command and General Staff College Fort Leavenworth, Kansas AY 2011-02 Approved...ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORG REPORT School of Advanced Military Studies NUMBER 250 Gibbon Avenue Fort Leavenworth, KS 66027-2134 9. SPONSORING I...expeditionary economics into a new approach to the successful delivery of aid? This study explores whether the military is the right actor to deliver

  15. History of British Space Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massie, Harrie; Robins, M. O.

    2009-12-01

    1. The scientific background; 2. The technical background; 3. The initiation of the Skylark rocket programme; 4. Post IGY developments; 5. The Ariel programme; 6. The European Space Research Organisation; 7. Commonwealth co-operation in space research; 8. Smaller rockets for scientific purposes - Skua and Petrel; 9. Attitude controlled Skylark rockets; 10. The Trend Committee and the Science Research Council; 11. The transformation of ESRO into ESA; 12. The Space Science Committee for Europe; 13. Scientific studies by British space scientists I; 14. Scientific studies by British space scientists II; 15. The contribution from British space scientists to astronomy; 16. Concluding remarks; Appendices; Annexes.

  16. New British deterrent: strategic planning and domestic political implications. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, K.P.

    1982-10-01

    The British Government announced its intention in July 1980 to modernize its strategic nuclear deterrent with the deployment of the Trident I (C4) submarine-launched ballistic missile. The MIRVed Trident missile will have significantly increased capabilities of range, payload and target numbers. It also represents an enormous expense for the British to bear and high political and military opportunity-costs for capabilities which may not be vital to an effective and credible national strategic deterrent. The political difficulties likely to be encountered in bringing the Trident program to fruition may portend the loss of all British strategic capability, while resulting conventional weapons reductions may even contribute to lowering the threshold of agression in Western Europe and increasing the liklihood of the threatening circumstances a nuclear deterrent is designed to avoid. Alternative strategic options, such as Polaris or Poseidon SLMBs or cruise missiles, should be explored to achieve the strategic stability and guarantee which the British seek.

  17. Military Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton; Hayes, Bill

    2001-01-01

    This issue of "Bill of Rights in Action" explores questions of military authority. The first article looks at the French Army mutinies in World War I and how the French Army dealt with them. The second article examines President Truman's firing of popular and powerful General Douglas MacArthur during the Korean War. The final article…

  18. [The Canadian military nurses of the Great War].

    PubMed

    Morin-Pelletier, Mélanie

    2014-06-01

    During the Great War, Canada deployed military nurses, like the other dominions of the British Empire. The "bluebirds" were the first nurses awarded the status of officer. Underprepared for war, they were able to adapt themselves in order to carry out the missions entrusted to them.

  19. Oil and the British economy

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, F.; Hall, S.

    1983-01-01

    Despite the 1976 discovery of North Sea oil, the British economy has floundered in the early 1980s. To uncover the reasons behind this predicament, the authors examine the North Sea oil sector, show the impact of its recent development on the British economy, and analyze the automatic responses of an economy to the development of such a new sector, the ''Kay debate,'' and the experience of six other countries with oil and the manufacturing industry.

  20. Military Strategy,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-01-01

    with a grass surface. This aircraft has the following cal- culated characteristics: maximum «peed 2500-2700 km/hour, service cell - ing up to...mobi- lisation of all the national resources to repel the enemy, and the systematic growth of the technical equipment of our Armed Forces. For...bombers. Cannon- machlnegun aircraft weapons have been replaced by rocket weapons. In recent years the speed and celling of military planes has

  1. The military physician and contested medical humanitarianism: a dueling identity?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Stuart

    2014-11-01

    A critical issue in the study of humanitarianism is who counts as a medical humanitarian. Military physicians are often characterized as caught between the potentially incompatible roles of physician and military professional. Medical NGOs, such as Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), have also vociferously rejected military medical humanitarianism: questioning the mandate, skills, and appropriateness of military involvement in humanitarian medicine as well as the potential impact on 'humanitarian space'. Yet many military doctors contest this. Consequently this study examines the ways in which primarily British military physicians identify and manage their identities as both medical humanitarians and soldiers. The research utilized a mixed method, grounded theory approach involving systematic document searches/expert identification of a core literature of 300 policy and peer reviewed documents, plus grey literature and 53 formal medical post operational reports from units serving in Iraq and Afghanistan between 2004 and 2012. Semi structured interviews involved purposive sampling (34 respondents) ranging from a former Surgeon General to more junior staff. Methods also included an analysis of the original data and literature from the 2003 Medical Services Delphi study (involving an additional 40 experts and an extensive literature review) on military medical identity/future roles as well as direct observation of military doctors in Iraq and Afghanistan (two, 2 month research trips). The research concluded that military physicians conceived of themselves as autonomous medical humanitarians with an individual morality rooted in civilian medical ethics that facilitated resistance to the potentially hegemonic military identity. Nevertheless military physicians were part of a medical organization with fundamentally different priorities from those of civilian humanitarian physicians. Furthermore, the perceived emergence of multiple civilian 'humanitarianisms' has

  2. National Military Family Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... have good news and bad news for military families. MORE Military Families Brace for What’s Next In Syria President Trump ordered an airstrike in Syria leaving military families wondering what's next. More April is the Month ...

  3. Rebuilding Public Trust in the Taiwan Military: A Systems Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    changing its posting strategies on the Taiwanese Ministry of Defense Facebook page. By enhancing public trust through social media, the military would be...Defense Facebook page. By enhancing public trust through social media, the military would be better positioned to increase recruitment, funding, and...stimulation stops but will be recalled from the memory if the same stimulation occurs again. Comparing the image with knowledge, there are some differences

  4. Civil-Military Relations: A Selected Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    International Crisis Group. Burma / Myanmar : After the Crackdown. Brussels: International Crisis Group, January 31, 2008. 41pp. (JZ5595 .I21 no.144) http...www.crisisgroup.org/ ~/media/Files/asia/south-east-asia/ burma - myanmar /144_burma_myanmar___after_the_ crackdown.ashx International Crisis Group. Burma ...www.crisisgroup.org/~/media/Files/asia/south-east-asia/ burma - myanmar / Burma %20Myanmar%20How%20Strong%20is%20the%20Military%20Regime.ashx International Crisis Group

  5. Geophysical logs in British stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, A.; Holliday, D.W.; Penn, I.E.

    1985-01-01

    This Special Report outlines the stratigraphic applications of the main geophysical logging tools. It characterises the British geological succession by means of the geophysical log signatures of its principle constituent formations. A large amount of previously unpublished data is provided on a geographical area long known for its importance in the development of the science of stratigraphy. The book in units modern developments of petroleum industry geophysical techniques with long-established stratigraphical discovery/research. Contents include: Introduction; Types of logs commonly used; Some geological uses of geophysical logs; Log signatures in British Stratigraphy; References.

  6. The intimidation of British pediatricians.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Carole

    2007-04-01

    British pediatricians who diagnose and treat child abuse cases have come under attack by the British press and by parents who have been investigated for possible abuse. Now the General Medical Council also is intimidating these pediatricians. The General Medical Council is the licensing authority for physicians in the United Kingdom. This has resulted in fewer pediatricians being willing to care for abused children or to testify in child abuse cases. In the United States, the recent recognition of the pediatric subspecialty of child abuse pediatrics should help set standards for child abuse medical evaluation and testimony.

  7. Medicine and the Egyptian campaign: the development of the military medical officer during the Napoleonic Wars c. 1798-1801.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates how French and British army medical officers in Egypt at the turn of the 19th century were affected by campaign experiences. Their encounters with ophthalmia, plague, and other diseases influenced the practice of medicine in later campaigns and fostered the development of the idea amongst military practitioners that military diseases required specialised knowledge. Practitioners' campaign writings are used to demonstrate how British army doctors approached the investigation of the "new" diseases they encountered. In particular, the article focuses on how Dr. James McGrigor used the military system to control, direct, and disseminate the development of medical knowledge.

  8. Adult Attitudes Toward the Military: Poll Two

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    of Defense’s recruitment advertising and market research programs. • The Research Methodology section provides details on the design of the...components of the recruitment- advertising program– market research, creative approaches, media tactics, contract management and program oversight. The...2000, the Department of Defense expanded its market research efforts to (1) understand attitudes of key audiences toward the military, in general, and

  9. Waves in British Workers' Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIlroy, John; Spencer, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    Waves of activity in British workers' education include (1) initiation (1899-1920), with the establishment of the Workers' Education Association; (2) consolidation (1920-1940), with the formation of the National Council of Labour Colleges; (3) growth (1940-1964); (4) increased union training (1964-1979); and (5) current attempts to broaden the…

  10. British Industrial Libraries Before 1939

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Margaret R.

    1972-01-01

    British industrial firm libraries are traced from their beginnings till 1939, by which date they had spread to many branches of industry and had been recognized as an important part of the industrial and library worlds, thus establishing standard patterns of work. The origins and significance of Aslib are discussed. (27 references) (Author/NH)

  11. Instructor Training on British Railways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, J. D.

    1970-01-01

    The value of instructor training was recognized by British Railways as early as 1950 with the setting up of a training center at Darlington. This article shows the results of this continuous training experience in the benefits to be obtained from re-appraisal techniques and practical work. (Author/EB)

  12. Children's Superstitions: British and Canadian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeish, John

    1984-01-01

    A 100-item test covering nine areas of superstitious belief administered with 10 control items to 1,749 Canadian and British children showed younger children and girls were more superstitious than older children and boys. Academically inclined children were less superstitious. Science-based education had little effect. Implications for Canadian…

  13. Instructor Training on British Railways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, J. D.

    1970-01-01

    The value of instructor training was recognized by British Railways as early as 1950 with the setting up of a training center at Darlington. This article shows the results of this continuous training experience in the benefits to be obtained from re-appraisal techniques and practical work. (Author/EB)

  14. Slowing Military Change

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Military Models to Ottoman Turkey and Meiji Japan,” in Theo Farrell and Terry Terriff, eds., The Sources of Military Change: Culture, Politics, Technology...2002; Farrell and Terriff, “The Sources of Military Change”; Goldman, “The Spread of Western Military Models to Ottoman Turkey and Meiji Japan.” 107

  15. Ophthalmic injuries in British Armed Forces in Iraq and Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Blanch, R J; Bindra, M S; Jacks, A S; Scott, R A H

    2011-01-01

    Aim British military ophthalmologists have not been deployed in support of operations since 2003. Eye injuries in British forces receive definitive treatment on return to the United Kingdom. We report the injury patterns, management strategies, and outcomes for eye injuries in British Armed Forces in Iraq and Afghanistan. Methods Retrospective consecutive case series of eye injuries in British Armed Forces in Iraq or Afghanistan from July 2004 to May 2008. Outcomes assessed by final best-corrected visual acuity (VA; few patients lost to follow-up), rates of endophthalmitis, and proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Results There were 630 cases of major trauma, 63 sustained eye injuries (10%), and 48 sustained significant eye injuries. There were 21 open-globe injuries: 9 ruptures and perforating injuries, of which 7 were enucleated/eviscerated; 11 intraocular foreign body (IOFB) injuries, of which 1 was eviscerated. Primary repair was combined with posterior segment reconstruction in 9/11 cases with IOFB. Mean time to primary repair was 1.9 days (range 0–5). Intravitreal antibiotics were given at primary repair in five cases. All cases received early broad-spectrum systemic antibiotics. Median final VA was logMAR 0.25 excluding evisceration/enucleations. There were two cases of PVR and none of endophthalmitis. Conclusions The number of eye injuries as a proportion of all casualties is lower than recently reported. The injuries are more severe than in civilian practise. The outcomes were comparable with previous reports, this demonstrates that, in certain cases, primary repair can be safely delayed beyond 24 h in the patient's best interests, in order to optimise the conditions for treatment. PMID:21164529

  16. Why Did It All Go Wrong? Reassessing British Counterinsurgency in Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    in 2003 and the murder of a hotel clerk, Baha Mousa, in 2004 also provided powerful propaganda to insurgent groups in Britain and Iraq.30...Iraqi forces and provision of military assistance if requested. Conclusion In this short article I have attempted to show that British failure in Iraq...History of Iraq (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2007). 17. Zaki Chehab, Iraq Ablaze (London: I . B. Tauris, 2007). 18. Kaldor, New and Old

  17. An Unseen Hand: The Mass Media and Education Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Mike

    This paper examines the role of mass media in the British education policy process, in particular, how the mass media steer education policy and inhibit certain issues from becoming the subject of policy. The paper describes how media professionals comprise an interest group competing with others to affect education policy; how they and other…

  18. Military specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Philip

    1987-01-01

    The current situation relative to the military specification is that there is not one specific model of turbulence which people are using. Particular disagreement exists on how turbulence levels will vary with qualitative analysis. It does not tie one down to specifics. When it comes to flying quality specifications, many feel that one should stay with the definitions of the Cooper-Harper rating scale but allow the levels to shift depending on the level of turbulence. There is a ride quality specification in the MIL-SPEC having to do with flight control systems design that is related to a turbulence model. This spec (MIL-F8785C) and others are discussed.

  19. Potentials of Advanced Database Technology for Military Information Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    might be promising for military information systems as well. In this paper, we discuss the potentials of multi-media databases and data mining . Both...directions focus on the handling of a vague information need of a user. In general, data mining systems allow a higher degree of vagueness than multi-media

  20. "Help Us, Serve England": First World War Military Nursing and National Identities.

    PubMed

    Toman, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Historians generally argue that the First World War was a defining experience from which Canadians emerged with a strong sense of national identity distinct from their British roots. There is little historical research on women's wartime experiences and even less on military nurses. This article explores the working relationships of Nursing Sister Emeline Robinson with British nurses, VAD volunteers, orderlies, and medical officers during her one and a half years with the Queen Alexandra Imperial Military Nursing Service Reserve through her diary, which spans her enlistment, resignation, and re-enlistment with the Canadian Army Medical Corps.

  1. Military-Media Relations Come of Age

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    warship to that point. As the group turned and headed back into the gulf, it received a report that the Sabalan’s sister ship, the Sahand , was moving out...6 In- truder aircraft from the USS Enterprise Battle Group in the Gulf of Oman, under the control of the Jack Williams, flew over the Sahand to...the Sahand with a Harpoon surface-to-surface missile. The pool soon heard that the Sahand lay dead in the water; it would eventually sink. This

  2. Social Media Implementation in the Romanian Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-14

    others (31 percent), while Entrepreneurs primarily use their blog to attract new clients to their business (29 percent). More than 60 percent of...article/state-of-the-blogosphere-2011-part1 (accessed 1 November 2012). 22 Entrepreneur bloggers...Facebook statistics by Country. Facebook users are 51 percent male and 49 percent female .117 The 25-30 age group is the largest group on Facebook

  3. Military/Media Relationship in Future Conflict

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    O•(’S) RANDALL L. PINGLEY, LTC, USA 3,7 ’PE OF RE.zORt 7 13b. 7.’ CCVE"RcD 14 J A,:T- .~OF iEP ,- .’,40tcPI J~y) is5. ;)-GECUN STUDY PROJECT 70 115...at the Defense Information School (DINFOS) will be examined and discussed. Additionally, this paper will examine the public information mission of...of Defense (DOD) civilians learn their basic skills at DINFOS located at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana. This single defense-wide school provides all

  4. Mental health of British farmers

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, H; Lewis, G; Thomas, D; Salmon, R; Chalmers, R; Coleman, T; Kench, S; Morgan-Capner, P; Meadows, D; Sillis, M; Softley, P; Jenkins, R

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To estimate the prevalence of neurotic symptoms in a sample of British farmers, to investigate whether farming characteristics are associated with psychiatric morbidity, and to test the hypothesis that British farmers have a higher prevalence of depression and thoughts of life not worth living than the British household population. Methods: A total of 425 farmers from Hereford, Norwich, and Preston completed the Revised Clinical Interview Schedule (CIS-R) by computer between March and July 1999. The comparison cohort consisted of 9830 private householders aged 16–64 from the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys National Psychiatric Morbidity Surveys of Great Britain carried out in 1993 in which the CIS-R was administered. All analyses used the commands developed specifically for survey data available in Stata version 6.0. Results: Taking a threshold of an overall score of 12 or more on the CIS-R, only 6% of farmers reported clinically relevant psychiatric morbidity. Psychiatric morbidity was not significantly associated with farm type or size in this study. Farmers reported a lower prevalence of psychiatric morbidity than the general population but were more likely to report thinking that life is not worth living, particularly after the low prevalence of psychiatric morbidity had been taken into account (odds ratio 2.56, 95% CI 1.39 to 4.69). When restricting the comparison to only rural or semirural householders, this increased risk was even more pronounced (odds ratio 3.26, 95% CI 1.51 to 7.02). Conclusions: The relation between depression and suicidal ideation seems to be quite different among farmers and the general population and warrants further investigation. We have shown it is possible to measure mental health systematically in a sample of British farmers. This study should be repeated in the aftermath of the foot and mouth crisis. PMID:12598664

  5. Mental health of British farmers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, H V; Lewis, G; Thomas, D Rh; Salmon, R L; Chalmers, R M; Coleman, T J; Kench, S M; Morgan-Capner, P; Meadows, D; Sillis, M; Softley, P

    2003-03-01

    To estimate the prevalence of neurotic symptoms in a sample of British farmers, to investigate whether farming characteristics are associated with psychiatric morbidity, and to test the hypothesis that British farmers have a higher prevalence of depression and thoughts of life not worth living than the British household population. A total of 425 farmers from Hereford, Norwich, and Preston completed the Revised Clinical Interview Schedule (CIS-R) by computer between March and July 1999. The comparison cohort consisted of 9830 private householders aged 16-64 from the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys National Psychiatric Morbidity Surveys of Great Britain carried out in 1993 in which the CIS-R was administered. All analyses used the commands developed specifically for survey data available in Stata version 6.0. Taking a threshold of an overall score of 12 or more on the CIS-R, only 6% of farmers reported clinically relevant psychiatric morbidity. Psychiatric morbidity was not significantly associated with farm type or size in this study. Farmers reported a lower prevalence of psychiatric morbidity than the general population but were more likely to report thinking that life is not worth living, particularly after the low prevalence of psychiatric morbidity had been taken into account (odds ratio 2.56, 95% CI 1.39 to 4.69). When restricting the comparison to only rural or semirural householders, this increased risk was even more pronounced (odds ratio 3.26, 95% CI 1.51 to 7.02). The relation between depression and suicidal ideation seems to be quite different among farmers and the general population and warrants further investigation. We have shown it is possible to measure mental health systematically in a sample of British farmers. This study should be repeated in the aftermath of the foot and mouth crisis.

  6. From Stress to Distress: Conceptualizing the British Family Farming Patriarchal Way of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Linda; Evans, Nick

    2009-01-01

    "Rural stress" and "farming stress" are terms that have become commonly appropriated by British health-based academic disciplines, the medical profession and social support networks, especially since the agricultural "crises" of B.S.E. and Foot and Mouth disease. Looking beyond the media headlines, it is apparent that…

  7. Children in Need of Protection: Reporting Policies in British Columbia School Boards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shewchuk, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    High profile sexual assault cases by British Columbia elementary school teachers in 2010 revealed BC school boards had "disturbingly inconsistent" child protection policies. As a result of the intense media scrutiny, the BC Ministry of Education required all school boards to reassess and update their policies on reporting suspected child…

  8. From Stress to Distress: Conceptualizing the British Family Farming Patriarchal Way of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Linda; Evans, Nick

    2009-01-01

    "Rural stress" and "farming stress" are terms that have become commonly appropriated by British health-based academic disciplines, the medical profession and social support networks, especially since the agricultural "crises" of B.S.E. and Foot and Mouth disease. Looking beyond the media headlines, it is apparent that…

  9. Not Again! 20th Century Hollow Force Lessons Learned for the 21st Century Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-17

    made without regard to military specialty. In 1961, the United States mobilized 120,000 reservists to beef up the North Atlantic Treaty Organization...the United States can be more selective in the choice and timing of large military hardware production commitments. But it does require maintenance...operational use of horses ended in the 1920’s, yet British artillery units had a seventh man on their Table of Organization whose function was to hold the

  10. A Historical Analysis of the Geneva And Hague Conventions and Their Protection of Military Medical Personnel, Facilities, and Transport During World War I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-05

    1998 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Historical Analysis of the Geneva And Hague Conventions and Their Protection of Military Medical Personnel, Facilities...personnel, facilities, and transport during World War I. The analysis focuses on violations against American, British, and French protected medical...and transport. Based upon the analysis , the investigator concluded that the German military frequently and intentionally violated the provisions of

  11. The Media of Guatemala Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Mary A.

    Providing insight into the problems encountered by the media in developing countries, this paper addresses the history and evolution of the press in Guatemala, focusing in particular on conditions faced by journalists today under the democratically elected civilian government of the Christian Democractic party after some 20 years of military rule.…

  12. Technogeopologistics: Supply Networks and Military Power in the Industrial Age

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    alliances that were not only transcontinental, but also global in nature, is needed. For example, did the egalitarian politics of the Allies translate...and become a crucial strategic concern in their own right. Military communications are also embedded into the global transportation route structure...the United States today. 5 The British Empire with its naval supremacy and global mercantilist empire from the late 17th to the early 20th century

  13. Children of Military Families: A Part and Yet Apart

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-01

    peoples and with broader world issues. The world view that these military dependents and the children of British- Asian couples in England share is...received a B.A. in English and Political Science . He received an M.D. from Northwestern University Medical School. Dr. Privitera completed a Psychiatry...Family in India. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 368: 132-45. 1972. "Third Culiure Factors in Educational Change.’ In

  14. Evaluating Breast Self-Examinations in a Military Beneficiary Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-01

    and African American women s highest mortality rate of 31.3 per 100,000 (http://www.cancer.org/statistics/97bcff/who.html). Military communities are...recommendations: Current status of women s knowledge. Family and Community Health, 10(3), 39-50. Gapstur, S., Dupuis, J., Gann, P., Collila, S...Implications for communication . British Medical Journal, 290, 668-670. Lierman, L., Kasprzyk, D. & Benoliel, J. (1991). Understanding adherence to

  15. Barossa Night: cohesion in the British Army officer corps.

    PubMed

    Bury, Patrick

    2017-06-01

    Contrasting the classical explanation of military group cohesion as sustained by interpersonal bonds, recent scholars have highlighted the importance of ritualized communication, training and drills in explaining effective military performance in professional armies. While this has offered a welcome addition to the cohesion literature and a novel micro-sociological method of examining cohesion, its primary evidential base has been combat groups. Indeed, despite their prominent role in directing operations over the past decade, the British Army's officer corps has received relatively little attention from sociologists during this period. No attempt has been made to explain cohesion in the officer corps. Using a similar method to recent cohesion scholars, this paper seeks to address this imbalance by undertaking a micro-sociology of one ritual in particular: 'Barossa Night' in the Royal Irish Regiment. Firstly, it draws on the work of Durkheim to examine how cohesion amongst the officer corps is created and sustained through a dense array of practises during formal social rituals. It provides evidence that the use of rituals highlights that social solidarity is central to understanding officer cohesion. Secondly, following Hockey's work on how private soldiers negotiate order, the paper shows how this solidarity in the officer corps is based on a degree of negotiated order and the need to release organizational tensions inherent in a strictly hierarchical rank structure. It highlights how the awarding of gallantry medals can threaten this negotiated order and fuel deviancy. In examining this behaviour, the paper shows that even amongst an officer class traditionally viewed as the elite upholders of organizational discipline, the negotiation of rank and hierarchy can be fluid. How deviant behaviour is later accepted and normalized by senior officers indicates that negotiated order is as important to understanding cohesion in the British Army's officer corps as it is

  16. Military nursing competencies.

    PubMed

    Ross, Mary Candice

    2010-06-01

    Competencies for military nurses are much broader in scope than their civilian counterparts. Not only must they be proficient at basic nursing skills, but they must also quickly master such military skills as protecting themselves and others during attack or threat of attack, caring for major trauma victims under austere conditions, and preparing such patients for transport through the military system of evacuation. This requires consistent and specialized training. This article describes the competencies necessary for practice by military nurses.

  17. Military Business Success

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT Military Business Success By: Lieutenant...TITLE AND SUBTITLE: Military Business Success 6. AUTHOR(S) Ahmad, Mohamad Krastev, Radostin Puciato, Arkadiusz 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING...unlimited. MILITARY BUSINESS SUCCESS Mohamad Ahmad, Lieutenant Colonel, Malaysian Air Force Radostin Krastev, Captain, Bulgarian Air

  18. Evaluation of the British Columbia AIDS Information Line.

    PubMed

    Parsons, D C; Bell, M A; Gilchrist, L D

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated implementation of the British Columbia AIDS Information Line during its initial 15 weeks of operation. Data collected during daily operation of the line included call frequency, caller characteristics, response patterns, caller concerns and community referrals. Information on activities and resources required to implement the AIDS Line was also assembled. The study concluded that the advertising campaign sponsored by the provincial government and other AIDS-related media events had a strong impact on the frequency of calls made to the AIDS Line. However, the effect of both advertising and media events was of relatively short duration, suggesting that utilization of an AIDS information line is dependent on continuing promotional activities. The evaluation results demonstrate the importance of continuous collection of data online utilization, to track public awareness of and response to AIDS-related issues, and to facilitate planning of public education.

  19. A pseudo-outbreak of skin disease in British troops.

    PubMed Central

    Croft, A; Smith, H; Creamer, I

    1996-01-01

    When a newspaper report claimed that a serious outbreak of skin disease had occurred in British Army troops stationed at the Bocac Dam, in western Bosnia, all troops at the Bocac Dam location (n = 96), followed by a matched control group of troops (n = 91) at a nearby location, were examined by two investigators. 14% of the study population and 21% of the control group were found to have skin disorders. Most were complaints that are commonly encountered in general medical practice. There was a striking absence of skin infestations. The historical consultation rate for skin disorders had not increased. It was concluded that an outbreak of skin disease had not occurred in British troops guarding the dam. This epidemiological study shows that, even under conditions of modern field hygiene, up to one in five soldiers will have skin disease. Skin infestations, however, have become progressively less common during military campaigns this century, probably because of better personal hygiene, good preventive medicine practices and better access to effective health care. PMID:8976888

  20. Not Yes or No, But What If: An Examination of Policies and Issues to be Addressed with Open Homosexuality in the US Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    the years following the inception of a new policy. The subject of transgender soldiers in the British military has grabbed headlines in England, with...POLICIES AND ISSUES TO BE ADDRESSED WITH OPEN HOMOSEXUALITY IN THE US MILITARY by Matthew P. Cashdollar, Major, US Army A Research...Homosexuality In The Us Military 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK

  1. Checklist of British and Irish Hymenoptera - Platygastroidea

    PubMed Central

    Buhl, Peter N.; Notton, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background A revised checklist of the British and Irish Platygastroidea (Platygastridae) substantially updates the previous comprehensive checklist, dating from 1978. Distribution data (i.e. occurrence in England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland and the Isle of Man) is reported where known. New information A total of 381 British and Irish Platygastroidea represents a 47% increase on the number of British and Irish species reported in 1978. PMID:27279762

  2. Supplement use by UK-based British Army soldiers in training.

    PubMed

    Casey, Anna; Hughes, Jason; Izard, Rachel M; Greeves, Julie P

    2014-10-14

    The use of supplements is widespread at all levels of civilian sport and a prevalence of 60-90 % is reported among high-performance UK athletes, including juniors. The prevalence of supplement use among UK-based British Army personnel is not known. The aim of the present study was to establish the point prevalence of supplement use in UK-based British Army soldiers under training (SuTs) and associated staff. A cross-sectional anonymous survey was carried out in 3168 British Army SuTs and soldiers, equating to 3·1 % of regular Army strength, based at eleven Phase 1, 2 and 3 UK Army training sites. Overall, 38 % of the respondents reported current use of supplements, but prevalence varied according to the course attended by the respondents. The number of different supplements used was 4·7 (sd 2·9). Supplements most commonly used were protein bars, powders and drinks (66 %), isotonic carbohydrate-electrolyte sports drinks (49 %), creatine (38 %), recovery sports drinks (35 %), multivitamins (31 %) and vitamin C (25 %). A small proportion of respondents reported the use of amphetamines and similar compounds (1·6 %), cocaine (0·8 %), anabolic androgenic steroids (1·1 %), growth hormone (2·0 %), and other anabolic agents, e.g. testosterone (4·2 %). Logistic regression modelling indicated that, for current users, younger age, being female, smoking and undergoing Officer Cadet training were associated with greater supplement use. This is the first study to investigate the prevalence of dietary and training supplement use in UK-based British military personnel. Self-administration of a wide range of supplements is reported by British military personnel in training, which is at least as great as that reported by those on deployment, and has implications for Defence policy and educational needs.

  3. International Conflict and the Media: A Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Andrew F.

    This social studies curriculum guide broadly examines the relationships between the media and the military during wartime. It is divided into three units and includes 25 activities. The first unit, "Media and Conflict," begins with an examination of the historical context of the U.S. press and media and international conflicts. The…

  4. Social Media: Strategic Asset or Operational Vulnerability?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-04

    5 The intent of this study was to try and balance the need for operational security with the growing use of social media by the members of the...regarding social media access, the intent was to provide service members a way of communicating the military message to the public; provide a resource... Social Corps,” (Washington, DC: Marine Corps Production Directorate, date unknown). 9 professional conduct must be observed when using social media

  5. Immunization delivery in British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Omura, John; Buxton, Jane; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Catterson, Jason; Li, Jane; Derban, Andrea; Hasselback, Paul; Machin, Shelagh; Linekin, Michelle; Morgana, Tamsin; O’Briain, Barra; Scheifele, David; Dawar, Meena

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the experiences of family physicians and pediatricians delivering immunizations, including perceived barriers and supports. Design Qualitative study using focus groups. Setting Ten cities throughout British Columbia. Participants A total of 46 family physicians or general practitioners, 10 pediatricians, and 2 residents. Methods A semistructured dialogue guide was used by a trained facilitator to explore participants’ experiences and views related to immunization delivery in British Columbia. Verbatim transcriptions were independently coded by 2 researchers. Key themes were analyzed and identified in an iterative manner using interpretive description. Main findings Physicians highly valued vaccine delivery. Factors facilitating physician-delivered immunizations included strong beliefs in the value of vaccines and having adequate information. Identified barriers included the large time commitment and insufficient communication about program changes, new vaccines, and the adult immunization program in general. Some physicians reported good relationships with local public health, while others reported the opposite experience, and this varied by geographic location. Conclusion These findings suggest that physicians are supportive of delivering vaccines. However, there are opportunities to improve the sustainability of physician-delivered immunizations. While compensation schemes remain under the purview of the provincial governments, local public health authorities can address the information needs of physicians. PMID:24627403

  6. New Russian Military Doctrine: Sign of the Times

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    Thought, July 1992 Special Edition, pp.18~19. 9. The Soviet Union (3d cd.; Washington: Congressional Quarterly, 1990), p. 194; Stephen Foye ... Foye , "Rebuilding the Russian Military: Some Problems and Prospects," RFEIRL Research Report, 6 November 1992, p. 52. This failure to control...these demonstrations were picked up by the Soviet media, military status began to drop to an all-time low. 19. Stephen Foye , "Grachev On Russian

  7. Military psychiatry in India

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, H. R. A.

    2010-01-01

    Military personnel, because of the unique nature of their duties and services, are likely to be under stress which at times has no parallel in civilian life. The stress of combat and service in extreme weather conditions often act as major stressors. The modern practices in military psychiatry had their beginning during the two World Wars, more particularly, the IInd World War. The GHPU concept had the beginning in India with military hospitals having such establishments in the care of their clientele. As the nation gained independence, many of the military psychiatrists shifted to the civil stream and contributed immensely in the development of modern psychiatry in India. In the recent years military psychiatry has been given the status of a subspecialty chapter and the military psychiatrists have been regularly organizing CMEs and training programs for their members to prepare them to function in the special role of military psychiatrists. PMID:21836702

  8. A Path Less Chosen: An Assessment of the School of Advanced Military Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-22

    and Relevance of Experience from SAMS/AMSP in OJC .................................. 17 Expectations/Perceptions... experience , professional military education, and a doctorate from a civilian university. 4US Department of Defense, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of...selected a smaller number for an additional 45 weeks. The British and Germans sent their officers to school for about 100 weeks and the Russians put

  9. 9 April 1940 German Invasion of Norway - The Dawn of Decisive Airpower during Joint Military Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-01

    illustrate Britain’s slow and half-hearted response. As early as the morning of 7 April, Royal Air Force Hudsons sighted one cruiser and six destroyers...Luftwaffe Attack on the British Home Fleet ..............................................................23 LESSONS FOR TODAY’S MILITARY...Figure 2. Weseruebung Command Structure / Operational Organization ........................13 Figure 3. German Attack on Norway, 7 - 9 April 1940

  10. Military Munitions Waste Working Group report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-30

    This report presents the findings of the Military Munitions Waste Working Group in its effort to achieve the goals directed under the Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-Site Innovative Technologies (DOIT Committee) for environmental restoration and waste management. The Military Munitions Waste Working Group identified the following seven areas of concern associated with the ordnance (energetics) waste stream: unexploded ordnance; stockpiled; disposed -- at known locations, i.e., disposal pits; discharged -- impact areas, unknown disposal sites; contaminated media; chemical sureties/weapons; biological weapons; munitions production; depleted uranium; and rocket motor and fuel disposal (open burn/open detonation). Because of time constraints, the Military Munitions Waste Working Group has focused on unexploded ordnance and contaminated media with the understanding that remaining waste streams will be considered as time permits. Contents of this report are as follows: executive summary; introduction; Military Munitions Waste Working Group charter; description of priority waste stream problems; shortcomings of existing approaches, processes and technologies; innovative approaches, processes and technologies, work force planning, training, and education issues relative to technology development and cleanup; criteria used to identify and screen potential demonstration projects; list of potential candidate demonstration projects for the DOIT committee decision/recommendation and appendices.

  11. Model Program: The British Schools of America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Gareth

    2007-01-01

    This article features the British Schools of America and describes the curriculum these schools offer. The British Schools of America offer a broad curriculum based on the International Primary Curriculum, the National Curriculum (England) and the International Baccalaureate, and focus on the whole development of the child, aiming to equip every…

  12. The Making of a Moral British Bangladeshi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeitlyn, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    This article traces changing notions of a moral upbringing among British Bangladesh families in London. It reviews ideas of the making of a moral person ("manush corano") in Bangladesh and contrasts those with contemporary practices and ideas about the good child in London. It argues that in London, British Bangladeshis have embraced a…

  13. British African Caribbean Women and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkison-Bradley, Carla; Maynard, Donna; Johnson, Phillip; Carter, Stephaney

    2009-01-01

    Depression is a common condition among women in the United Kingdom. However, little is known about the context of depression among British African Caribbean women. This article offers a preliminary discussion regarding issues and information pertaining to depression among British African Caribbean women. Characteristics and symptoms of depression…

  14. British Columbia Transfer TIPS. Second Edition Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlay, Finola, Ed.; Karlinski, Jean, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    BCTransfer TIPS is a user friendly document outlining how transfer between British Columbia (BC) post-secondary institutions works. It includes tips, student quotes, scenarios, a personal plan and checklist. Information in this document can only be reproduced with permission from the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT.)

  15. The Making of a Moral British Bangladeshi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeitlyn, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    This article traces changing notions of a moral upbringing among British Bangladesh families in London. It reviews ideas of the making of a moral person ("manush corano") in Bangladesh and contrasts those with contemporary practices and ideas about the good child in London. It argues that in London, British Bangladeshis have embraced a…

  16. Providing a Background for British Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Diana Macintyre

    One consequence of teaching British literature far away from British shores is the loss of intimacy that comes from a shared culture. American teachers can help bring Britain into their classrooms by requesting audiovisual aids from the various museums and galleries in Britain that are willing to supply material. Among such sources are (1) Walton…

  17. Indian Education Programs in British Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Reg

    The British North America Act of 1867, the founding constitution of Canada, provides that all matters pertaining to Indians and Indian lands are under Federal jurisdiction. Because of this, the province of British Columbia (BC) has not felt it could do much for native peoples and little attention has been paid to the extension of provincial…

  18. Utilisation of British University Research Reactors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncton, P. J.; And Others

    British experience relating to the employment of university research reactors and subcritical assemblies in the education of nuclear scientists and technologists, in the training of reactor operators and for fundamental pure and applied research in this field is reviewed. The facilities available in a number of British universities and the uses…

  19. Request Strategies in British English and Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukushima, Saeko

    1996-01-01

    Tests request strategies used by speakers of Japanese and British English in two culturally neutral situations likely to trigger a request. Concludes that the degree of imposition goes on a par with the number of politeness strategies but that there are differences in the types of strategies used: the British use conventional forms and supportive…

  20. British Children's Books in the Twentieth Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyre, Frank

    A revised and expanded version of an earlier study of modern British children's literature (1952), this latest edition begins with an introductory section on the historical development of children's literature and follows with chapters examining the main trends in British children's books from 1900 to the present day. Special attention is given to…

  1. The Current Canon in British Romantics Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linkin, Harriet Kramer

    1991-01-01

    Describes and reports on a survey of 164 U.S. universities to ascertain what is taught as the current canon of British Romantic literature. Asserts that the canon may now include Mary Shelley with the former standard six major male Romantic poets, indicating a significant emergence of a feminist perspective on British Romanticism in the classroom.…

  2. The Contemporaneity of the British Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodson, Charles Brooks

    The seeming remoteness of material studied in a British literature survey course can be frustrating for the teacher. Students may find little relevance in the story of Beowulf or the descriptions of Gulliver's voyages. However, instructors can highlight the contemporaneity of British literary texts by drawing parallels to modern times. For…

  3. Utilisation of British University Research Reactors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncton, P. J.; And Others

    British experience relating to the employment of university research reactors and subcritical assemblies in the education of nuclear scientists and technologists, in the training of reactor operators and for fundamental pure and applied research in this field is reviewed. The facilities available in a number of British universities and the uses…

  4. The Current Canon in British Romantics Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linkin, Harriet Kramer

    1991-01-01

    Describes and reports on a survey of 164 U.S. universities to ascertain what is taught as the current canon of British Romantic literature. Asserts that the canon may now include Mary Shelley with the former standard six major male Romantic poets, indicating a significant emergence of a feminist perspective on British Romanticism in the classroom.…

  5. Providing a Background for British Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Diana Macintyre

    One consequence of teaching British literature far away from British shores is the loss of intimacy that comes from a shared culture. American teachers can help bring Britain into their classrooms by requesting audiovisual aids from the various museums and galleries in Britain that are willing to supply material. Among such sources are (1) Walton…

  6. The Contemporaneity of the British Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodson, Charles Brooks

    The seeming remoteness of material studied in a British literature survey course can be frustrating for the teacher. Students may find little relevance in the story of Beowulf or the descriptions of Gulliver's voyages. However, instructors can highlight the contemporaneity of British literary texts by drawing parallels to modern times. For…

  7. Request Strategies in British English and Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukushima, Saeko

    1996-01-01

    Tests request strategies used by speakers of Japanese and British English in two culturally neutral situations likely to trigger a request. Concludes that the degree of imposition goes on a par with the number of politeness strategies but that there are differences in the types of strategies used: the British use conventional forms and supportive…

  8. British African Caribbean Women and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkison-Bradley, Carla; Maynard, Donna; Johnson, Phillip; Carter, Stephaney

    2009-01-01

    Depression is a common condition among women in the United Kingdom. However, little is known about the context of depression among British African Caribbean women. This article offers a preliminary discussion regarding issues and information pertaining to depression among British African Caribbean women. Characteristics and symptoms of depression…

  9. Indian Education Programs in British Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Reg

    The British North America Act of 1867, the founding constitution of Canada, provides that all matters pertaining to Indians and Indian lands are under Federal jurisdiction. Because of this, the province of British Columbia (BC) has not felt it could do much for native peoples and little attention has been paid to the extension of provincial…

  10. Integrated Curriculum Programs in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Julie

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses British Columbia's integrated curriculum programs (ICPs). In this province of sea and mountains, outdoor adventures figure prominently in its ICPs--with a healthy dose of environmental and sustainability education mixed in. The author presents five examples from British Columbia's ICPs: (1) Earthquest Outdoor…

  11. British surgical aid to Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, N. A.; Barry, N. A.; Davies, A. K.

    1971-01-01

    The surgical commitment of No. 2 Field Hospital, R.A.M.C., during its stay in Jordan is presented. The majority of patients that were admitted had sustained war wounds, many of which were infected due to the delay in treatment. The difficulties encountered in their subsequent management are discussed. Special reference is made to the use of ketamine (Ketalar) and mafenide acetate (Sulphamylon) in the treatment of those burns cases under our care. It is the first time for many years that a British field hospital has been employed in an active rôle. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 8Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 2Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:5114910

  12. Developments in British environmental law

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.G.T.

    1984-07-01

    Decisions on whether or not to build nuclear power plants are increasingly settled in the courts because of conflicting interests in the growth of electric power demand and environmental protection that has led to a breakdown in public order. Lawyers share the same sense of bewilderment as lay people over nuclear as well as noise, smoke, and other types of environmental questions. The author reviews British criminal and civil law to see how the courts have dealt with pollution issues in the past. Public inquiry over a proposed development has triggered many of Britain's major law and environment problems, the Windscale inquiry being a notable example. A reluctance to legislate is an underlying factor in the trend toward inquiry and litigation. 139 references.

  13. The Impact of Foreign Postings on Accompanying Military Spouses: An Ethnographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Blakely, Gillian; Hennessy, Catherine; Chung, Man C.; Skirton, Heather

    2014-01-01

    As part of an ethnographic study, the impact of foreign postings on spouses who accompany military personnel was explored. Individual interviews and focus groups with 34 British military spouses based in one location in southern Europe were conducted. Key findings suggested that reaction to a foreign posting was a reflection of personal attitudes, prior experiences, support, ability to adjust to change and strength of relationship with the serving spouse and community. For many the experience was positive due to the increased opportunity for family time, for others this helped to compensate for the difficulties experienced. Some military spouses experienced significant distress on the posting, particularly if the family was not well-supported. The potential implications of military spouses not adapting to foreign postings have significant implications for healthcare practice. Provision of more appropriate support resources before and during the posting would facilitate the transition for the military spouse and their family. PMID:26973933

  14. The Impact of Foreign Postings on Accompanying Military Spouses: An Ethnographic Study.

    PubMed

    Blakely, Gillian; Hennessy, Catherine; Chung, Man C; Skirton, Heather

    2014-04-26

    As part of an ethnographic study, the impact of foreign postings on spouses who accompany military personnel was explored. Individual interviews and focus groups with 34 British military spouses based in one location in southern Europe were conducted. Key findings suggested that reaction to a foreign posting was a reflection of personal attitudes, prior experiences, support, ability to adjust to change and strength of relationship with the serving spouse and community. For many the experience was positive due to the increased opportunity for family time, for others this helped to compensate for the difficulties experienced. Some military spouses experienced significant distress on the posting, particularly if the family was not well-supported. The potential implications of military spouses not adapting to foreign postings have significant implications for healthcare practice. Provision of more appropriate support resources before and during the posting would facilitate the transition for the military spouse and their family.

  15. Atrial and ventricular tachyarrhythmias in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Posselt, Bonnie N; Cox, A T; D'Arcy, J; Rooms, M; Saba, M

    2015-09-01

    Although rare, sudden cardiac death does occur in British military personnel. In the majority of cases, the cause is considered to be a malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmia, which can be precipitated by a number of underlying pathologies. Conversely, a tachyarrhythmia may have a more benign and treatable cause, yet the initial clinical symptoms may be similar, making differentiation difficult. This is an overview of the mechanisms underlying the initiation and propagation of arrhythmias and the various pathological conditions that predispose to arrhythmia genesis, classified according to which parts of the heart are involved: atrial tachyarrhythmias, atrial and ventricular, as well as those affecting the ventricles alone. It encompasses atrial tachycardia, atrial flutter, supraventricular tachycardias and ventricular tachycardias, including the more commonly encountered inherited primary electrical diseases, also known as the channelopathies. The clinical features, investigation and management strategies are outlined. The occupational impact-in serving military personnel and potential recruits-is described, with explanations relating to the different conditions and their specific implication on continued military service.

  16. Britain's Open University, User of Mass Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, William

    The way that the Open University system in Great Britain operates and the use of the mass media are discussed in detail. A number of problems the adult student is likely to face are identified, along with basic differences between U.S. and British societies that influence the application of an open university approach. Attention is directed to:…

  17. Media Education--Discussion or Analysis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Bob

    1977-01-01

    Aspects of "liberalism" incorporating notions of balance, fairness, objectivity, and common sense are discussed in relation to the teaching of media studies. The British TV series "Looking at Television" is examined to clarify the way which the liberal ethos pervades the series to its detriment. Liberalism is shown as allowing…

  18. Immunization and military medicine.

    PubMed

    Benenson, A S

    1984-01-01

    This lecture, a memorial to Joseph E. Smadel, reviews the involvement of the military in the development and use of immunizing materials. Smallpox and smallpox immunization in the military and the development and present status of immunization against typhoid, cholera, yellow fever, typhus, tetanus, diphtheria, plague, influenza, adenovirus, meningitis, rubella, and malaria are reviewed. Dr. Smadel's personal contributions to the significant achievements of the military program to civilian practice are emphasized.

  19. Assessing the effectiveness of the British Army's mental health service.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Alan; Finnegan, Sarah

    The Ministry of Defence's commitment to modernizing and improving mental health (MH) care for Armed Forces personnel has resulted in considerable changes to frontline services. The last remaining United Kingdom (UK) military psychiatric hospital closed on 1 April 2004 with the move to a clear, integrated care pathway between primary healthcare, military departments of community mental health (DCMHs) and secondary healthcare. The Army's eight UK DCMHs provide a patient-centred, occupational MH service grounded in the military MH philosophy of local, easily accessible, effective treatment (O'Brien, 1998). These MH services have been exposed to significant media interest and this article will attempt to quantify the correct state of affairs through patient, customer and staff satisfaction surveys. Clinical groups in the customer survey recorded a satisfaction rate of 87%, the staff survey 72% and the patient survey 94%. The Army has excellent access to specialist MH support and a common theme emerging in these surveys is the perception that the MH teams provide a high quality of service. The three surveys provide valuable direction to improve patient care and highlight strengths such as 97% of patients receiving appointments compatible with their duties.

  20. Reflections on military psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Arthur, R J

    1978-07-01

    The need for psychiatrists in the military was recognized for the first time during World War I, which involved millions of men in unusually protracted warfare. The policy of treating psychiatric casualties close to the from and returning soldiers to their military units as quickly as possible proved of great significance in the U.S. war effort. During World War II, the Korean conflict, and the war in Viet Nam, military psychiatry made great contributions and learned many lessions, both at home and abroad. The lessions learned by military psychiatry have important applications for the rest of medicine, especially in the fields of stress, crisis therapy, and community psychiatry.

  1. About Military Sexual Trauma

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans Health Administration? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 15K ...

  2. Weathering the empire: meteorological research in the early British Straits Settlements.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Fiona

    2015-09-01

    This article explores meteorological interest and experimentation in the early history of the Straits Settlements. It centres on the establishment of an observatory in 1840s Singapore and examines the channels that linked the observatory to a global community of scientists, colonial officers and a reading public. It will argue that, although the value of overseas meteorological investigation was recognized by the British government, investment was piecemeal and progress in the field often relied on the commitment and enthusiasm of individuals. In the Straits Settlements, as elsewhere, these individuals were drawn from military or medical backgrounds, rather than trained as dedicated scientists. Despite this, meteorology was increasingly recognized as of fundamental importance to imperial interests. Thus this article connects meteorology with the history of science and empire more fully and examines how research undertaken in British dependencies is revealing of the operation of transnational networks in the exchange of scientific knowledge.

  3. Nuclear weapons databook. Volume V: British, French, and Chinese nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, R.S.; Burrows, A.S.; Fieldhouse, R.W.

    1994-12-31

    How insecurity and the search military independence drove post World War II nuclear proliferation beyond the United States and the Soviet Union is the subject of the latest and most voluminous title in the Natural Resources Defense Council`s highly acclaimed Nuclear Weapons Databook series. Volume 5 explains how atomic and thermonuclear weapons spread to Britain, France, and China despite the political turmoil and economic hardship that beset these countries. The history of the British nuclear weapons program includes the most comprehensive collection of photos and specifications of British warheads and nuclear tests ever assembled in one publication. The role of the United States in the French nuclear weapons program is discussed. This is a comprehensive source for the mechanics and politics of nuclear weapons proliferation.

  4. Media Clips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vennebush, G. Patrick

    2004-01-01

    Media Clips aims to offer readers contemporary, authentic applications of quantitative reasoning based on print or electronic media. Clips may be in text or graphic format, and clip sources may be either print or electronic media.

  5. Checklist of British and Irish Hymenoptera - Proctotrupoidea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background A revised checklist of the British and Irish Heloridae and Proctotrupidae (Proctotrupoidea) substantially updates the previous comprehensive checklist, dating from 1978. Country level data (i.e. occurrence in England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland and the Isle of Man) is reported where known. New information A total of three Heloridae and 39 Proctotrupidae (including only certainly recorded species) represents a 27% increase in the British list since 1978. Most species are still poorly known and there has been a dearth of taxonomic and faunistic work on the British and Irish fauna. PMID:27226750

  6. The role of the media in influencing public attitudes to penicillin during World War II.

    PubMed

    Shama, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    Penicillin's trajectory towards becoming an effective antibacterial chemotherapeutic agent took place during World War II. Its strategic military value was immediately recognised by the Allies, and mass production was undertaken with the prime objective of meeting the needs of the armed forces. News of its development came to be widely reported on in the media and is examined here. These reports frequently combined accounts of penicillin's prodigious clinical effectiveness with the fact that it was to remain unavailable to the civilian population essentially until the war had ended. More penicillin was to be made available to the civilian population in the United States than in Britain, but the sense that it was severely rationed remained as high. It was in response to this that the idea of "homemade penicillin" was hatched. News of this was also widely promulgated by both the British and American media. Although the numbers treated with penicillin produced in this way was never to be significant, knowledge of the existence of such endeavours may have served to assuage in some measure the feelings of frustration felt by the civilian population at penicillin's non-availability.

  7. Committee on Military Nutrition Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    MILITARY RESEARCH, * NUTRITION , MILITARY PERSONNEL, PERFORMANCE(HUMAN), METABOLISM, NUTRIENTS, HIGH ENERGY, MEDICAL RESEARCH, FOOD, DIET, MENTAL ABILITY, WORKSHOPS, BIOMEDICINE, CAFFEINE, SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE.

  8. Identities in the third space? Solidity, elasticity and resilience amongst young British Pakistani Muslims.

    PubMed

    Mythen, Gabe

    2012-09-01

    Over the last decade the issue of identity has been prevalent in discussions about British Muslims, with the events of 9/11 serving as a touchstone for media debates about religious, national and cultural affiliations. The 7/7 terrorist attacks in the UK led to young British Pakistanis being subjected to intense public and institutional scrutiny and wider political concerns being expressed about the failure of multiculturalism. Young British Pakistanis have thus had to negotiate and maintain their identities in an environment in which they have been defined as a threat to national security whilst simultaneously being pressurized to align with 'core British values'. Within this context, we convey the findings of a qualitative study involving British Pakistanis living in the North-west of England. In presenting the experiences and perspectives of participants, three interconnected processes salient to the maintenance of identity are delineated: solidity, elasticity and resilience. Having unpacked these processes, we draw upon Bhabha's third space thesis to explore the political potentiality of and the limits to hybridic identities.

  9. Hebrew Military Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abarbanel, Joel I.

    Designed to give the military student a broad range of vocabulary on military subjects and a general understanding of the structure and operations of the Israel Defense Forces, this reader parallels advanced materials prepared for Foreign Service students of Hebrew and consists of short reading passages, each followed by a vocabulary list…

  10. Military Perspectives on Cyberpower

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    Zimet and Charles L. Barry Military cyberpower is the application of the domain of cyber- space to operational concepts to accomplish military objec...pable global backbone, unrestrained information sharing among com- mands, and truly interoperable networks wherein every authorized user can access...Special Operations Forces (SOF), and space forces performing missions around the world, and their supporting in- telligence networks. DOD divides

  11. Early Childhood Military Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelo, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Does the country's national security rely on top-quality early childhood education? Yes, say the military leaders of Mission: Readiness, an organization led by retired military commanders that promotes investment in education, child health, and parenting support. Actually, the generals are right, but for all the wrong reasons. The generals' aim is…

  12. Sustaining the Military Arts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    pidgin isn’t the antidote for strategic illiteracy. The military arts of strategy, operations, and tactics are merely the creative bridges that allow...Strategic pidgin isn’t the antidote for strategic illiteracy. about military arts and sciences is not merely a ’question of rhetorical clarity. Indeed

  13. Military Culture and Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    mines the success of transformation. The period between 1914 and 1945 shows the dynamic nature of military innova - tion and the difficulty military...maximized unity of effort. Leaders can foster a disciplined culture that encourages change and innova - tion by “creating a consistent system with clear

  14. Advising Transfer Military Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Today's students can come from a larger area than just high school. With the entire world's conflicts and today's society, more and more of our present day students may have come from the military ranks. Though we have not come to an actual draft system, more and more modern day students have served their time in the military, to keep America…

  15. Early Childhood Military Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelo, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Does the country's national security rely on top-quality early childhood education? Yes, say the military leaders of Mission: Readiness, an organization led by retired military commanders that promotes investment in education, child health, and parenting support. Actually, the generals are right, but for all the wrong reasons. The generals' aim is…

  16. British and American attitudes toward credit cards.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bijou; James, Simon; Lester, David

    2006-04-01

    American university students owned more than twice as many credit cards as British university students. However, scores on a credit card attitude scale predicted the number of cards owned by respondents in both countries.

  17. Racial Discrimination in the British Labor Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firth, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Contains results of a study of racial discrimination in the British job market for accountants and financial executives. Results show that considerable discrimination remains several years after the adoption of the Race Relations Act of 1968. (CT)

  18. Libraries in British Columbia: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/britishcolumbia.html Libraries in British Columbia To use the sharing features ... George University Hospital of Northern BC Northern Health Library Services / ILL Learning & Development Centre 1475 Edmonton Street ...

  19. Case report: Military subcultural competency.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Eric

    2013-07-01

    The military is comprised of numerous subcultures. These subcultures can dramatically impact perceptions of illness and care. Although efforts are currently underway to improve the military cultural competence of all health care providers, efforts to improve the subcultural competence of military providers require attention. Military providers, although part of the military culture, may not appreciate their patients' military subculture or be aware of the impact their own subculture plays on the encounter. To illustrate potential difficulties, a case is described where limited military subcultural competence disrupted care. As the military medical corps continues to integrate across service lines, this case underscores the importance of training military physicians to assess the influence of a service member's specific military subculture. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  20. Lessons for Science Education: The Print Media's Reporting of the Chernobyl Cloud Over Britain in 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, R. T.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the information concerning the Chernobyl nuclear reactor disaster provided to the British public by respected sections of the print media. Concludes that the three important representatives of the British press failed to inform the public of the potential dangers of the radioactive fallout. Discusses implications for science education.…

  1. Lessons for Science Education: The Print Media's Reporting of the Chernobyl Cloud Over Britain in 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, R. T.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the information concerning the Chernobyl nuclear reactor disaster provided to the British public by respected sections of the print media. Concludes that the three important representatives of the British press failed to inform the public of the potential dangers of the radioactive fallout. Discusses implications for science education.…

  2. Genetics and the British insurance industry.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, E D

    1999-01-01

    Genetics and genetic testing raise key issues for insurance and employment. Governmental and public concern galvanised the British insurance industry into developing a code of practice. The history of the development of the code, issues of genetic discrimination, access to medical information, consent and the dangers of withholding information and the impact on the equity of pooled risk are explored. Proactive steps by the Association of British Insurers suggest that moral reflection not legislation is the way forward. PMID:10226922

  3. Did Senior British Officers Effectively Lead Change?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-12

    environment that defined the changes to the British Army will be assessed against four factors: political, economic, technology, and environmental factors.57...last five years. Financial considerations were paramount as the British Army sought to transform and meet the future operating environment . This...and areas for improvement were always couched in a realistic appreciation of the environment in which change was carried out: non-conducive and

  4. Trends in paediatric sport- and recreation-related injuries: An injury surveillance study at the British Columbia Children's Hospital (Vancouver, British Columbia) from 1992 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Pakzad-Vaezi, Kaivon; Singhal, Ash

    2011-04-01

    Sport- and recreation-related injuries are a major source of morbidity in the paediatric population. Long-term trends for these injuries are largely unknown. A traumatic injury surveillance system (the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program) was used to examine the demographics and trends of paediatric sports injuries in children who presented to or were directly admitted to the British Columbia Children's Hospital (Vancouver, British Columbia) emergency department or intensive care unit from 1992 to 2005. Over the 14-year study period, there was a significant increase in sport- and recreation-related injuries among patients who presented to the British Columbia Children's Hospital. Of 104,414 injuries between 1992 and 2005, 27,466 were related to sports and recreational activities. The number of sport-related injuries increased by 28%, while all-cause injuries did not change significantly. Males comprised 68% of the sport-related injuries, and both sexes displayed an increasing trend over time. Cycling, basketball, soccer and ice hockey were the top four injury-causing activities. The main body parts injured were the face, head and digits. Paediatric sports injuries significantly increased at the British Columbia Children's Hospital over the 14-year study period. This is likely due to increased sport participation, increased risk associated with certain sports, or both. Trends in paediatric sports injury may be predicted by changes in popular media, possibly allowing prevention programs to help to avoid these injuries before they occur.

  5. Perceptions of breast health awareness in Black British women.

    PubMed

    Banning, Maggi

    2011-04-01

    Breast cancer is a global concern. Published studies indicate that 43% of Black and ethnic minority women interviewed have reported that they did not practice breast awareness because they did not know the relevant breast changes that occur in breast cancer. Black women are also more likely to receive a diagnosis of breast cancer when it is in an advanced stage. This pilot study aimed to address the views of Black British women on breast health awareness and breast health screening practices. In this qualitative study I used semi-structured interviews were used to investigate breast health perceptions, practices and education in a pilot sample of ten women. Women held numerous perceptions of breast cancer which ranged from no knowledge to well informed through receiving extensive education. Two out of ten women were relatively uneducated with regard to breast self examination (BSE). The remaining eight women participated in a variety of screening routines which varied from undertaking BSE everyday to once every few months. Women's experience of breast health education was also variable. One woman, younger woman, had not received any health education advice in relation to breast health awareness or BSE. The remaining nine women had received some health advice following visit to their General Practitioners, Medical consultant, media information or as a result of participating in mammographic screening. Black British women require health education that focuses on breast cancer and its associated risk factors, technique of BSE, and national breast cancer screening recommendations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The military medical school of Mexico: a tradition of excellence.

    PubMed

    Villavicencio, J Leonel; Merrill, Daniel M; Rich, Norman M

    2005-01-01

    It is a historical fact that warfare and surgery have been linked together as far back as military history has been recorded. In the 18th century, the tendency of most armies to dismiss their medical services at the end of every major conflict resulted in higher mortality at the beginning of the next war. This became evident in the French and British Armies during the Battle of Waterloo. These countries went to great efforts to mobilize their civilian reserve physicians, only to discover that more than half of the medical personnel declined to serve. The scarcity of physicians and the inexperience of those caring for the wounded resulted in a high casualty rate. The current armed conflicts throughout the world with their high number of victims are living evidence of the need for preparedness of the military medical personnel. In this article, we review the systems of military medical education in several countries, and offer the example of the Escuela Medico Militar (Military Medical School) of Mexico, a prestigious source of military medical physicians for the Mexican armed forces.

  7. Cancer incidence in British vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Key, T J; Appleby, P N; Spencer, E A; Travis, R C; Allen, N E; Thorogood, M; Mann, J I

    2009-07-07

    Few prospective studies have examined cancer incidence among vegetarians. We studied 61,566 British men and women, comprising 32,403 meat eaters, 8562 non-meat eaters who did eat fish ('fish eaters') and 20,601 vegetarians. After an average follow-up of 12.2 years, there were 3350 incident cancers of which 2204 were among meat eaters, 317 among fish eaters and 829 among vegetarians. Relative risks (RRs) were estimated by Cox regression, stratified by sex and recruitment protocol and adjusted for age, smoking, alcohol, body mass index, physical activity level and, for women only, parity and oral contraceptive use. There was significant heterogeneity in cancer risk between groups for the following four cancer sites: stomach cancer, RRs (compared with meat eaters) of 0.29 (95% CI: 0.07-1.20) in fish eaters and 0.36 (0.16-0.78) in vegetarians, P for heterogeneity=0.007; ovarian cancer, RRs of 0.37 (0.18-0.77) in fish eaters and 0.69 (0.45-1.07) in vegetarians, P for heterogeneity=0.007; bladder cancer, RRs of 0.81 (0.36-1.81) in fish eaters and 0.47 (0.25-0.89) in vegetarians, P for heterogeneity=0.05; and cancers of the lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues, RRs of 0.85 (0.56-1.29) in fish eaters and 0.55 (0.39-0.78) in vegetarians, P for heterogeneity=0.002. The RRs for all malignant neoplasms were 0.82 (0.73-0.93) in fish eaters and 0.88 (0.81-0.96) in vegetarians (P for heterogeneity=0.001). The incidence of some cancers may be lower in fish eaters and vegetarians than in meat eaters.

  8. British women's attitudes to surrogacy.

    PubMed

    Poote, A E; van den Akker, O B A

    2009-01-01

    There has been little interest in the research literature on public opinions regarding assisted conception and surrogacy, particularly in European countries, despite the growing evidence showing that problems in adaptation and coping may be related to perceived normative values. This study investigated British women's attitudes to surrogacy using components of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). Questionnaires on attitudes to surrogacy and reasons for parenthood were completed by 187 women from the general public. Significant socio-demographic differences were found between women who were possibly willing (n = 76) and those who were unwilling (n = 111) to become surrogate mothers. General attitudes to surrogacy also differed between groups (P = 0.000). This study supported the predictive utility of components of the TPB, and differentiated adequately between groups on attitudes to recruitment for surrogacy (P = 0.000), the consequences of surrogacy (P = 0.000), factors that induce people to become surrogates (P = 0.000), social support (P = 0.000), having personal control (P = 0.002) and reasons for parenthood (P = 0.000). Age (P = 0.000), attitudes to advertising (P = 0.02) and the consequences of surrogacy (P = 0.05) predicted (un)willingness to become a potential surrogate mother. Further research is needed with larger sample sizes of potential surrogates to determine whether the predictive attitudes reported here translate to actual behaviours. The larger group which was not interested in considering becoming a surrogate scored significantly more negatively on all attitudes towards surrogacy. The negative attitudes reported by the 'unwilling to consider being a surrogate' group may reflect attitudes held by the majority of the population and are likely to be influenced by reports of stigma associated with surrogacy.

  9. Media Competency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Ron

    The need to teach media competency in the schools in a systematic way has been largely unrecognized. The Media Now course of study provides an example of the type of instruction needed to teach the knowledge and skills necessary for informed media consumption and skilled media production. The course, which has been thoroughly tested and validated…

  10. Media education.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes that exposure to mass media (eg, television, movies, video and computer games, the Internet, music lyrics and videos, newspapers, magazines, books, advertising) presents health risks for children and adolescents but can provide benefits as well. Media education has the potential to reduce the harmful effects of media and accentuate the positive effects. By understanding and supporting media education, pediatricians can play an important role in reducing harmful effects of media on children and adolescents.

  11. Development of High Cordycepin-Producing Cordyceps militaris Strains.

    PubMed

    Kang, Naru; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Park, Inmyoung; Seo, Young-Su

    2017-03-01

    Cordyceps militaris, known as Dong-Chong-Xia-Cao, produces the most cordycepin among Cordyceps species and can be cultured artificially. For these reasons, C. militaris is widely used as herb or functional food in the East Asia. In this study, we developed a new strain of C. militaris that produces higher cordycepin content than parent strains through mating-based sexual reproduction. Twenty parent strains were collected and identified as C. militaris based on internal trasncrived spacer and rDNA sequences. Seven single spores of MAT 1-1 idiomorph and five single spores of MAT 1-2 idiomorph were isolated from 12 parent strains. When 35 combinations were mated on the brown rice medium with the isolated single spores, eight combinations formed a stroma with a normal perithecia and confirmed mated strains. High pressure liquid chromatography analysis showed that mated strain KSP8 produced the most cordycepin in all the media among all the tested strains. This result showed due to genetic recombination occurring during the sexual reproduction of C. militaris. The development of C. militaris strain with increased cordycepin content by this approach can help not only to generate new C. militaris strains, but also to contribute to the health food or medicine industry.

  12. Development of High Cordycepin-Producing Cordyceps militaris Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Naru; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Park, Inmyoung

    2017-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris, known as Dong-Chong-Xia-Cao, produces the most cordycepin among Cordyceps species and can be cultured artificially. For these reasons, C. militaris is widely used as herb or functional food in the East Asia. In this study, we developed a new strain of C. militaris that produces higher cordycepin content than parent strains through mating-based sexual reproduction. Twenty parent strains were collected and identified as C. militaris based on internal trasncrived spacer and rDNA sequences. Seven single spores of MAT 1-1 idiomorph and five single spores of MAT 1-2 idiomorph were isolated from 12 parent strains. When 35 combinations were mated on the brown rice medium with the isolated single spores, eight combinations formed a stroma with a normal perithecia and confirmed mated strains. High pressure liquid chromatography analysis showed that mated strain KSP8 produced the most cordycepin in all the media among all the tested strains. This result showed due to genetic recombination occurring during the sexual reproduction of C. militaris. The development of C. militaris strain with increased cordycepin content by this approach can help not only to generate new C. militaris strains, but also to contribute to the health food or medicine industry. PMID:28435352

  13. How military nurses rationalize their postoperative pain assessment decisions.

    PubMed

    Harper, Phil; Ersser, Steven; Gobbi, Mary

    2007-09-01

    This paper is a report of a study to explore how military nurses rationalize their postoperative pain assessment decisions, particularly when these differ from patients' pain self-reports. Postoperative pain is a complex phenomenon influenced by many factors that make assessment difficult. Nurses are taught to believe what patients say about their pain. However, their attitudes to pain are influenced by their cultural background and they may disagree with patients' self-reports. Military nurses belong to a military culture with different pain attitudes that may also influence their postoperative pain assessment. An ethnomethodological ethnography study was carried out in 2003. A purposive sample of 29 British military surgical/orthopaedic Registered Nurses were interviewed to identify their taken-for-granted assumptions and commonsense cultural knowledge surrounding postoperative pain assessment. The data were analysed using a systematic process of inductive reasoning aided by Non-numerical, Unstructured Data for Indexing, Searching and Theorizing (QSR N6, NUD*IST). Participants told two distinct stories in their postoperative pain narratives. The first, the cultural story, described how military nurses normally assess postoperative pain and revealed taken-for-granted assumptions surrounding this assessment. However, when military nurses believe that patients over- or under-report their pain, the cultural story was challenged through a collective story in which nurses used their commonsense knowledge to account for these differences. Postoperative pain assessment within a military culture is complex, but all nurses need to be aware that their socialization into different nursing cultures may influence their attitudes to postoperative pain assessment.

  14. Homosexuality and the military.

    PubMed

    Jones, F D; Koshes, R J

    1995-01-01

    Homosexuality has remained a focus of military concern despite society's increasing acceptance of homosexual men and women and evidence that homosexuals have served and currently serve in the U.S. armed forces. President Clinton has stated a determination to end discrimination against homosexuals in the military and reverse the exclusionary policy on homosexuals serving in the armed forces. The authors review the history of the policy of the U.S. military to exclude homosexuals from serving in the armed forces. The data for this study were drawn from military archives and court cases that have shaped U.S. policy excluding homosexuals from serving in the armed forces. The three main arguments are addressed: 1) homosexuality is a mental disorder rendering a person unstable, 2) homosexual service members are a source of poor morale for military units, and 3) homosexual service members are poor security risks. Considerable evidence demonstrates that homosexuals in the military pose no documented threat to national security and show no evidence of poor work performance. Although issues of morale and fraternization in the military remain challenges, no evidence in this review supports the exclusion of homosexuals from service in the U.S. armed forces.

  15. State and Church in British Honduran Education, 1931-39: A British Colonial Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitchen, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Offers an analysis of church and state influences on the development of education in British Honduras (now Belize). Focuses on the British neglect of education in the colony; the emergence of tensions between the church and state, exploring issues related to Roman Catholic and Protestant rivalry; and church-state issues. (CMK)

  16. British Teachers' Transnational Work within and beyond the British Empire after the Second World War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Kay

    2017-01-01

    Focusing on British graduates from Gipsy Hill Training College (GHTC) in London, this article illustrates transnational history's concerns with the reciprocal flows of people and ideas within and beyond the British Empire. GHTC's progressive curriculum and culture positioned women teachers as agents of change, and the article highlights the lives…

  17. Cancer incidence in British vegetarians

    PubMed Central

    Key, T J; Appleby, P N; Spencer, E A; Travis, R C; Allen, N E; Thorogood, M; Mann, J I

    2009-01-01

    Background: Few prospective studies have examined cancer incidence among vegetarians. Methods: We studied 61 566 British men and women, comprising 32 403 meat eaters, 8562 non-meat eaters who did eat fish (‘fish eaters') and 20 601 vegetarians. After an average follow-up of 12.2 years, there were 3350 incident cancers of which 2204 were among meat eaters, 317 among fish eaters and 829 among vegetarians. Relative risks (RRs) were estimated by Cox regression, stratified by sex and recruitment protocol and adjusted for age, smoking, alcohol, body mass index, physical activity level and, for women only, parity and oral contraceptive use. Results: There was significant heterogeneity in cancer risk between groups for the following four cancer sites: stomach cancer, RRs (compared with meat eaters) of 0.29 (95% CI: 0.07–1.20) in fish eaters and 0.36 (0.16–0.78) in vegetarians, P for heterogeneity=0.007; ovarian cancer, RRs of 0.37 (0.18–0.77) in fish eaters and 0.69 (0.45–1.07) in vegetarians, P for heterogeneity=0.007; bladder cancer, RRs of 0.81 (0.36–1.81) in fish eaters and 0.47 (0.25–0.89) in vegetarians, P for heterogeneity=0.05; and cancers of the lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues, RRs of 0.85 (0.56–1.29) in fish eaters and 0.55 (0.39–0.78) in vegetarians, P for heterogeneity=0.002. The RRs for all malignant neoplasms were 0.82 (0.73–0.93) in fish eaters and 0.88 (0.81–0.96) in vegetarians (P for heterogeneity=0.001). Conclusion: The incidence of some cancers may be lower in fish eaters and vegetarians than in meat eaters. PMID:19536095

  18. Military Careers: A Guide to Military Occupations and Selected Military Career Paths, 1992-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense, Washington, DC.

    This book was developed to help educators and youth learn about career opportunities in the military. It is a compendium of military occupational, training, and career information and is designed for use by students interested in the military. The first section, military occupations, contains descriptions of 197 enlisted and officer occupations.…

  19. Malaria on a military peacekeeping operation: a case study with no cases.

    PubMed

    Houston, David J K; Tuck, Jeremy J H

    2005-03-01

    Malaria continues to be a disease of importance to travelers and the military is no exception. Individual protection measures based on advice, bite avoidance, chemoprophylaxis, and diagnosis are advocated for protection against the disease. However, the military has an additional strand to malaria protection--the chain of command. To describe the experience of a British military deployment where the Force Commander took a proactive approach to malaria protection. In 512 person-weeks of exposure in a theater with high rates of transmission of malaria, with an enduring threat of asymmetric military action and with a proactive approach by the chain of command to the implementation of malaria protection policy, no malaria cases developed. The chain of command can have a significant impact on compliance with malaria protection measures, which might reduce incidence of the disease in the deployed population.

  20. Risk factors for heat illness among British soldiers in the hot Collective Training Environment

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Alice C; Stacey, M J; Bailey, K G H; Bunn, R J; Woods, D R; Haworth, K J; Brett, S J; Folkes, S E F

    2016-01-01

    Background Heat illness is a preventable disorder in military populations. Measures that protect vulnerable individuals and contribute to effective Immediate Treatment may reduce the impact of heat illness, but depend upon adequate understanding and awareness among Commanders and their troops. Objective To assess risk factors for heat illness in British soldiers deployed to the hot Collective Training Environment (CTE) and to explore awareness of Immediate Treatment responses. Methods An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to British soldiers deployed in the hot CTEs of Kenya and Canada. Responses were analysed to determine the prevalence of individual (Intrinsic) and Command-practice (Extrinsic) risk factors for heat illness and the self-reported awareness of key Immediate Treatment priorities (recognition, first aid and casualty evacuation). Results The prevalence of Intrinsic risk factors was relatively low in comparison with Extrinsic risk factors. The majority of respondents were aware of key Immediate Treatment responses. The most frequently reported factors in each domain were increased risk by body composition scoring, inadequate time for heat acclimatisation and insufficient briefing about casualty evacuation. Conclusions Novel data on the distribution and scale of risk factors for heat illness are presented. A collective approach to risk reduction by the accumulation of ‘marginal gains’ is proposed for the UK military. This should focus on limiting Intrinsic risk factors before deployment, reducing Extrinsic factors during training and promoting timely Immediate Treatment responses within the hot CTE. PMID:26036822

  1. Music in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Amanda

    1981-01-01

    Following a very brief history of military bands, the author describes the musical performance opportunities currently available in the United States Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard, for young musicians who may wish to enlist. (SJL)

  2. Music in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Amanda

    1981-01-01

    Following a very brief history of military bands, the author describes the musical performance opportunities currently available in the United States Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard, for young musicians who may wish to enlist. (SJL)

  3. Military usage of connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schade, R.

    1972-01-01

    Military specifications with general purpose parameters and termination data covering flat connectors and flat cables are proposed. The material, design, coating, and insulation are discussed, and drafts of specifications for flat cables including quality assurance provisions, and inspection are presented.

  4. New Model for Ecosystem Management Interpretation: Target Audiences on Military Lands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Susan K.; Marynowski, Susan B.

    1998-01-01

    An interpretation model focusing on audience characteristics guided development of an ecosystem-management interpretive program targeting military leaders and planners at Eglin Air Force Base (Florida). Of five interpretative media tested, print mass media were most successful in increasing ecosystem knowledge and enhancing attitudes of both…

  5. Change in the Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A survey was made of much of the current literature on the behavioral aspects of organizational change and how it pertains to the military. The survey is broad in nature and extends to processes for affecting change presently in use in the armed services. The study further describes some of the various opinions expressed in current articles on the affect of societal changes on the military.

  6. USSR Report, Military Affairs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-04

    area. Convinced of its tec ity, the USA still hopesXto achieve the unachievable—to gain ty over the Soviet Union and to militarize outer space... militarism was a victory for progress over reaction. It demonstrated the invincible strength of the socialist system and its great advantages over...The scientific-technical progress in military affairs, progress that has been stimulated by the military-industrial complex, a union of militarism and

  7. Evaluating Military Compensation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    has also compared the out-of-pocket health costs of families who use its preferred-provider organization ( PPO ) or fee-for-service options with those...comparison controlled for demographic differ- ences between military and civilian families. EVALUATING MILITARY COMPENSATION 17using PPO plans. In 2005...governments would have to absorb the difference. A PP E N D IX A Total Compensation for the Median Enlisted MemberUsing a different approach from

  8. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    o Suicide Bereavement in Military and their Families, Dr. Julie Cerel, University of Kentucky, (Appendix 4) o Window to Hope: Evaluating a...Managing Suicide Risk in Primary Care . Presented at Community Based Outpatient Clinic, Appleton, WI, October 11, 2011. Gutierrez, P. M., Suicide...Appendix Pages: 32-34 A4. Suicide Bereavement in Military and their Families, Dr. Julie Cerel, University of Kentucky Appendix Pages: 35

  9. Military Energy Alternatives Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-08

    Power Generation and Alternative Energy Branch US Army RDECOM CERDEC CP&ID Power Division Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD...RDER-CCA-PG PG A E - C R – 1 2– 0 1 M ili ta ry E ne rg y A lte rn at iv es C on fe re nc e Military Energy ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Energy Alternatives Conference 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jonathan

  10. Resilience among military youth.

    PubMed

    Easterbrooks, M Ann; Ginsburg, Kenneth; Lerner, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    Much research on children in military families has taken a deficit approach--that is, it has portrayed these children as a population susceptible to psychological damage from the hardships of military life, such as frequent moves and separation from their parents during deployment. But M. Ann Easterbrooks, Kenneth Ginsburg, and Richard M. Lerner observe that most military children turn out just fine. They argue that, to better serve military children, we must understand the sources of strength that help them cope with adversity and thrive. In other words, we must understand their resilience. The authors stress that resilience is not a personal trait but a product of the relationships between children and the people and resources around them. In this sense, military life, along with its hardships, offers many sources for resilience--for example, a strong sense of belonging to a supportive community with a shared mission and values. Similarly, children whose parents are deployed may build their self-confidence by taking on new responsibilities in the family, and moving offers opportunities for adventure and personal growth. As the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan drew more and more service members into combat, the military and civilian groups alike rolled out dozens of programs aimed at boosting military children's resilience. Although the authors applaud this effort, they also note that few of these programs have been based on scientific evidence of what works, and few have been rigorously evaluated for their effectiveness. They call for a program of sustained research to boost our understanding of military children's resilience.

  11. Movies and the Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-01-01

    motion picture history- movies (with two exceptions discussed below) were not made about the war. Anti-war films , and films with...of this aberration. Motion pictures are made to make money, and producers of films about the military make movies which reflect the anti-military...screen. Much of our culture is defined and transmitted by movies .2 The images implanted in the mind by motion pictures are vivid and lasting.

  12. Military Air Cargo Containerization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    MILITARY AIR CARGO CONTAINERIZATION GRADUATE RESEARCH PAPER Joseph W. Mancy, Major, USAF AFIT/ GMO /LAL/96J-4 : ."•" ’* ■- ’ DEPARTMENT OF...Approved to public release; Distribution UnHmlted ? DTIC QUALITY INSPECTED 1 AFIT/ GMO /LAL/96J-4 MILITARY AIR CARGO CONTAINERIZATION GRADUATE RESEARCH...PAPER Joseph W. Mancy, Major, USAF AFIT/ GMO /LAL/96J-4 19960617 134 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited The views expressed in this

  13. Military Production Urgencies System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1955-08-17

    echelons. I4. To guide preparation of specific urgency lists for the time -phased demands of supporting industrial resources. 5. To indicate the...AD-A270 736 ELECTE aeprlnt Incorporating Transmittal 61-2 Au-uast 17, 1955 Department of Defense Directive SUBJECT Military Production Urgencies ...Departaent of Defense Military Production Urgencies System which will provide authoritative information for guidance as to the relative urgency of desired

  14. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Reduction in self- esteem may impact this relationship such that if self-esteem is not reduced as a result of bullying , psychological distress and sui...resources of the military, impact unit morale, and take a large emotional toll on the involved friends, family, and commanders. There is significant...practice that will have a direct impact on suicide-related and other mental health outcomes for military personnel. 3. Disseminate Consortium

  15. Military Personnel Law Deskbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    February 2006). B. Purpose of the Physical Disability Evaluation System (PDES). 1. Personnel Management. a. Effective and Fit Military b. Quality ...discipline, or morale of troops on the base under his command.”). 3. Limitations. There must be some nexus between the authority sought and the effect on...preparing group for and steeling it to violent action). A-7 (2) Military Standard: Speech which undermines the effectiveness of response to command

  16. Australia's female military surgeons of World War I.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Susan J

    2013-10-01

    The war service of Lilian Violet Cooper, the first female surgeon of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, is well recognized. Not so well known however, are the other pioneering female doctors who also undertook work as military surgeons during World War I. At least four of the 14 Australian female doctors that undertook overseas war service during World War I were engaged as surgeons and treated Australian, British and Allied casualties. These women operated in London, in Egypt and on the frontlines of the Macedonian campaign. While none of these other women became Fellows of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, their war efforts deserve recognition.

  17. Radiometry in military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Krzysztof

    2001-08-01

    Missiles guided using optoelectronic methods, optoelectronic imaging systems (thermal imaging systems, night vision devices, LLLTV cameras, TV cameras), and optoelectronic countermeasures (smoke screens, camouflage paints and nets, IR flares, decoys, jamming systems, warning systems) are one of the most important components of modern military armament. There are numerous military standards, some of them secret, that precise radiometric parameters to be measured and the testing methods to be used. There is also much literature on the subject of testing of the systems mentioned above, although mostly on subject of testing of the thermal imaging systems. In spite of this apparently numerous literature, there still significant confusion in this area due to secrecy of some parameters and testing methods, differences in recommendations of different military standards, fast progress in military optoelectronics, and also due to enormous number of different types of optoelectronics systems used in the military armament. A review of testing methods of the three basic groups of optoelectronics systems used in modern military armament: the missiles guided using optoelectronics methods, the optoelectronic imaging systems, and the optoelectronic countermeasures is presented in this paper. Trends in the measuring sets.

  18. Ambient Noise Tomography of the British Isles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolson, H. J.; Curtis, A.; Baptie, B.

    2009-12-01

    In recent years, surface wave tomography using empirical Green’s functions computed via the ambient noise interferometry method has become an established approach to lithospheric imaging problems. To date, ambient noise tomography has been successfully applied to seismometer arrays in the United States, Australia, Iceland, China, South Africa, Europe and the Tibetan Plateau. The basis of the ambient seismic interferometry method is that, by cross-correlating noise data between two seismic stations and stacking over a long enough time period, one can approximate the Green’s Function that would have been recorded at one of the stations if the other had actually been a source. Consequently, one of the main advantages of ambient noise interferometry is that traditional seismic sources such as earthquakes or ballistics are not required; therefore it is ideal for application to seismically quiescent areas such as the British Isles. The British Isles are an archipelago located adjacent to the Eurasian continental shelf in a typically intra-plate setting, formed by a complex amalgamation of several terranes. These range from Laurentian north of the Highland Boundary fault to Avalonian south of the Iapetus Suture and evidence of the regions turbulent geological past can be inferred from its lithospheric structure. Previous studies of the structure of the British Isles considered relatively few seismic stations and/or were limited to using offshore shots, quarry blasts or teleseismic earthquakes as seismic energy sources. We have applied the ambient noise tomography method to noise data recorded on approximately 100 broadband and short period seismometers, including many new stations, in the British Isles and mainland Europe. This dense coverage of the British Isles allows us to image the crust and upper mantle velocity structure with a horizontal resolution in the region of 100km across the North Sea and 30km in the mainland United Kingdom. Here we present the first

  19. Media, Gadgets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes papers presented at the Sixth Biennial Conference on Chemical Education describing new media and gadgets, particularly models, computers, and other media. A bibliography of 15 presented papers on these topics is attached. (CS)

  20. Military Officers, Tropical Medicine, and Racial Thought in the Formation of the West India Regiments, 1793-1802.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Michael

    2016-10-28

    The article examines the establishment and growth between 1793 and 1802 of the West India Regiments, British army corps manned by slaves of African descent and commanded by European officers. Focusing on the medical history of British military operations in the West Indies, the article demonstrates that the rationale behind the regiments was medical, but that the impetus for them came from senior military commanders rather than from the medical practitioners whose writings are usually privileged in the historiography. The senior officers who commanded the West Indian expeditions in the French Revolutionary Wars mobilized their own particular brand of medical theory, based explicitly on their experience of the region's epidemiological environment, in support of the policy. This willingness to adopt and adapt medical ideas heavily influenced both military policy regarding the regiments, and commanders' relationships with their medical men.

  1. US SNUPPS design modified for British use

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-11-01

    Britain is making some modifications in the Westinghouse pressurized water reactor (PWR) generic design used in the US and complying with the Standardized Nuclear Utility Power Plant System (SNUPPS). Britain is also working closely with Bechtel personnel on construction and safety improvements. The safety changes will improve emergency-core-cooling-system reliability, reduce the number of welds, improve shutdown capability, provide an emergency ultimate heat sink, lower staff radiation exposure, use turbine-generator configurations that are standard in British power plants, adapt to the British grid frequencies, and strengthen secondary containment buildings. 1 figure. (DCK)

  2. Checklist of British and Irish Hymenoptera - Ichneumonidae

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The checklist of British and Irish Ichneumonidae is revised, based in large part on the collections of the Natural History Museum, London and the National Museums of Scotland, Edinburgh. Distribution records are provided at the country level. New information Of the 2,447 species regarded as valid and certainly identified, 214 are here recorded for the first time from the British Isles. Neorhacodinae is considered to be a separate subfamily rather than a synonym of Tersilochinae. Echthrini is treated as a junior synonym of the tribe Cryptini, not Hemigastrini. Echthrus Gravenhorst and Helcostizus Förster are classified in Cryptini rather than, respectively, Hemigastrini and Phygadeuontini. PMID:27733812

  3. Checklist of British and Irish Hymenoptera - Braconidae

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Mark R.; Godfray, H. Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The checklist of British and Irish Braconidae is revised, based in large part on the collections of the National Museums of Scotland, Edinburgh, and the Natural History Museum, London. Distribution records are provided at the country level together with extensive synonymy and bibliography. New information Of the 1,338 species regarded as valid, presumed native and certainly identified, 83 are here recorded for the first time from the British Isles. One new synonym is established (Dyscritus suffolciensis Morley, 1933 = Syntretus splendidus (Marshall, 1887) syn. nov.) PMID:27226759

  4. Cultural and age differences in beliefs about depression: British Bangladeshis vs. British Whites

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Alastair; Khanam, Shopnara; Furnham, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    This study examines beliefs about depression as a function of ethnic background (British Bangladeshis vs. British Whites) and age. A total of 364 participants completed a 65-item questionnaire, containing general questions regarding depression and anti-depressive behaviour; the causes of depression, and treatments for depression. The hypotheses were broadly supported; there were significant interactions between ethnicity and age, which generally revealed an increasingly negative attitude towards depression with increasing age amongst British Bangladeshis. Older British Bangladeshis believed depression was an illness that brought a sense of shame and loss of dignity to the individual and his or her family, and they also favoured a lay referral system for sufferers. They also had more superstitious beliefs about depression than both younger British Bangladeshis and British Whites. A pattern of increasing negativity with increasing age was not evident amongst the British Whites, but older individuals in both groups tended to believe that depression was not helped by psychological intervention. The attitudes towards depression in the young was similar (and generally positive) in both ethnic groups. These findings highlight the necessity to provide more culturally sensitive and accessible services for migrant communities – particularly amongst older individuals. PMID:25076835

  5. Media violence.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, V C

    1999-01-01

    For decades, media violence has been viewed as largely a Western problem. New studies indicate that Indian children have increasing access to the media and that media violence will subject them to the same problems as Western children: imitation, desensitization, fear, and inappropriate attitudes about violence and aggression. Solutions exist but will have to be implemented within the next decade to protect Indian children and adolescents from the harmful effects of media violence.

  6. Military Sexual Trauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Whistleblower Rights & Protections Transparency Media Room Inside the Media Room Public Affairs News Releases Speeches Videos Publications ... Massachusetts Veteran with PTSD turns his life around : Rich Adams was sexually assaulted while in the Navy ...

  7. Medical science and the military: the Allies' use of amphetamine during World War II.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Although amphetamine was thoroughly tested by leading scientists for its effects in boosting or maintaining physical and mental performance in fatigued subjects, the results never provided solid grounds for approving the drug's use, and, in any case, came too late to be decisive. The grounds on which amphetamine was actually adopted by both British and American militaries had less to do with the science of fatigue than with the drug's mood-altering effects, as judged by military men. It increased confidence and aggression, and elevated "morale."

  8. Cardiovascular disease mortality in British merchant shipping and among British seafarers ashore in Britain.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Stephen E; Jaremin, Bogdan

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to investigate trends in work-related mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) among seafarers employed in British merchant shipping from 1919 to 2005, to compare CVD mortality among British seafarers at work in British shipping - and ashore in Britain - with that in the general British population, and to investigate work-related CVD mortality in British shipping during recent years according to factors such as rank, nationality, location, and type of ship. A longitudinal study based on examination of death inquiry files and death registers, official death returns, and information from occupational mortality decennial supplements. The main outcome measures were population-based mortality rates and standardised mortality ratios. There was an increase in work-related CVD mortality throughout much of the period from 1919 to 1962, but a subsequent reduction to 2005. Work-related mortality from CVD and ischaemic heart disease (IHD) was lower among seafarers employed in British shipping than in the corresponding general population (SMRs = 0.35 to 0.46), but mortality from CVD among British seafarers ashore in Britain was often increased. An elevated risk of work-related CVD mortality was also identified among the crews of North Sea offshore ships. This study shows a healthy worker effect against CVD mortality among seafarers at work in British shipping, but increased risks among British seafarers ashore in Britain, which would include seafarers discharged through CVD morbidity and other illnesses. The high risks of CVD mortality among seafarers in North Sea supply ships may reflect particular work-related hazards in this sector.

  9. Media Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordlund, Jan-Erik

    1978-01-01

    Defines and operationalizes the concept of media interaction, which implies that the audience member experiences "interaction" with, and in many cases identifies with, persons in the media content. Presents a model of media interaction and the results of surveys conducted to explore hypotheses derived form the model. (JMF)

  10. New Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downtown Business Quarterly, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue explores lower Manhattan's burgeoning "New Media" industry, a growing source of jobs in lower Manhattan. The first article, "New Media Manpower Issues" (Rodney Alexander), addresses manpower, training, and workforce demands faced by new media companies in New York City. The second article, "Case Study:…

  11. Media Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marklund, Inger, Ed.; Hanse, Mona-Britt, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    The Swedish Media Panel is a research program about children and young persons and their use of mass media. The aim of the ten-year (1975-1985) project is to explain how media habits originate, how they change as children grow older, what factors on the part of children themselves and in their surroundings may be connected with a certain use of…

  12. Military Gay Ban Revisited: Is our Military Ready for Change?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-20

    Military gay ban revisited: Is our military ready for change? Captain LS...2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military gay ban revisited: Is our military ready for change? 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, Transgender ] (LGBT) rights is exploited by those seeking to divide us. But at its core, this issue is about who we are as

  13. Risky business: challenges and successes in military radiation risk communication.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Mark A; Geckle, Lori S; Davidson, Bethney A

    2012-01-01

    Given the general public's overall lack of knowledge about radiation and their heightened fear of its harmful effects, effective communication of radiation risks is often difficult. This is especially true when it comes to communicating the radiation risks stemming from military operations. Part of this difficulty stems from a lingering distrust of the military that harkens back to the controversy surrounding Veteran exposures to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War along with the often classified nature of many military operations. Additionally, there are unique military exposure scenarios, such as the use of nuclear weapons and combat use of depleted uranium as antiarmor munitions that are not found in the civilian sector. Also, the large, diverse nature of the military makes consistent risk communication across the vast and widespread organization very difficult. This manuscript highlights and discusses both the common and the distinctive challenges of effectively communicating military radiation risks, to include communicating through the media. The paper also introduces the Army's Health Risk Communication Program and its role in assisting in effective risk communication efforts. The authors draw on their extensive collective experience to share 3 risk communication success stories that were accomplished through the innovative use of a matrixed, team approach that combines both health physics and risk communication expertise.

  14. Considerations for Education Reform in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Countries around the world refer to twenty-first century education as essential to maintaining personal and national economic advantage and draw on this discourse to advocate for and embark on educational reform. This paper examines issues around education reform, particularly in British Columbia. It argues that reformers should give careful…

  15. Deprivatizing Private Education: The British Columbia Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barman, Jean

    1991-01-01

    The experience of British Columbia in deprivatizing private schools by requiring their registration and providing financial support is reviewed. It is argued that family choice and state control have grown dialectically. Government funding has created higher enrollments and new schools, but resultant public oversight ultimately constrains choice.…

  16. British Columbia. Reference Series No. 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of External Affairs, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet, one of a series featuring the Canadian provinces, presents a brief overview of British Columbia and is suitable for teacher reference or student reading. A discussion of the province's history includes the early European explorers, Indian natives, and later fur traders and settlers. The building of the transcontinental railway, entry…

  17. Martin Trow on British Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Harold

    2009-01-01

    For almost half a century from the early 1960s Martin Trow was the most persistent American commentator on British higher education. He analysed the main reports from Robbins to Dearing, developed and applied a language for discussing common problems amongst different systems, and focused on the uncertain progress of the UK to mass higher…

  18. British Writers; Modules for Teacher Corps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliard, Fred

    This booklet, containing eight instructional modules on works by major British writers, can be used either within a lower-level literature course for non-English majors or in a survey course for English majors. The first four modules focus on works from the early English period through the Elizabethan Age: "Beowulf,""Sir Gawain and the Green…

  19. Home Data Banks Turn British On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes the operation and numerous capabilities of a British computerized data retrieval system named Prestel. It provides access, through the regular telephone network and a TV screen, to computer-based information supplied by many companies, agencies and commercial outlets. (GA)

  20. Home Data Banks Turn British On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes the operation and numerous capabilities of a British computerized data retrieval system named Prestel. It provides access, through the regular telephone network and a TV screen, to computer-based information supplied by many companies, agencies and commercial outlets. (GA)

  1. Earnings Returns to the British Education Expansion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devereux, Paul J.; Fan, Wen

    2011-01-01

    We study the effects of the large expansion in British educational attainment that took place for cohorts born between 1970 and 1975. Using the Quarterly Labour Force Survey, we find that the expansion caused men to increase education by about a year on average and gain about 8% higher wages; women obtained a slightly greater increase in education…

  2. Drivers of cousin marriage among British Pakistanis.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Why has the apparently high rate of cousin marriage among Bradford Pakistanis been sustained, 50 years since Pakistani migration to Britain began? A review of the anthropological literature on Pakistani migration and settlement, British Pakistani marriage patterns and the phenomenon of transnational marriage. British Pakistanis are diverse in regional origins and social class characteristics, with many Bradford Pakistanis originating from the Mirpur district and northern Punjab. British Pakistani marriages often involve a partner from Pakistan who joins a spouse in the UK. Transnational marriage of first cousins offers relatives in Pakistan opportunities for a 'better' life in the West and are important for British Pakistanis for economic, social, cultural and emotional reasons. These processes are also differentially influenced by region of origin and class characteristics in Pakistan as well as by education, employment and locality in Britain. The pattern observed in Bradford may not be applicable nationally. Further research examining marital decisions over several generations in families differing by social class, region of origin in Pakistan and locality in Britain is necessary to contextualise the findings from Bradford. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. British Columbia water quality guidelines, criteria

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This publication contains tables summarizing approved water quality guidelines for various contaminants that may be present in British Columbia water supplies. It begins with a section in question and answer format that explains certain aspects of the guidelines. Contaminants covered by the guidelines include particulate matter, nutrients and algae, aluminium, lead, mercury, nitrogen, dissolved oxygen, copper, chlorine, fluoride, hydrocarbons, pH, and silver.

  4. The British Council's Global Cataloguing Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magalhaes, Rodrigo; Nogueira, Madalena Sa

    1985-01-01

    The British Council Global Cataloging Service was initiated in 1980 to reduce duplication of cataloging same titles in council libraries abroad. Each of 56 council libraries participating in system receives list of new accessions and updated microfiche catalog. Portugal was one of the first six countries chosen to test the system. (EJS)

  5. British Columbia/Alberta Transfer System Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this agreement is to provide assurance to students that they will receive transfer credit for courses or programs they have successfully completed where the content/outcomes are demonstrably equivalent to those offered at the institution to which they transfer. This protocol is undertaken by the British Columbia Council on…

  6. A History of Modern British Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fieldhouse, Roger

    The purpose of this book is: to set the historical development of British adult education in its wider policy and ideological context; to examine its various forms and formulations; and to identify what purpose or purposes it has served. The 16 chapters are as follows: "Historical and Political Context" (Roger Fieldhouse); "The…

  7. Martin Trow on British Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Harold

    2009-01-01

    For almost half a century from the early 1960s Martin Trow was the most persistent American commentator on British higher education. He analysed the main reports from Robbins to Dearing, developed and applied a language for discussing common problems amongst different systems, and focused on the uncertain progress of the UK to mass higher…

  8. British School Chemistry Laboratories, 1830-1920.

    PubMed

    Brock, W H

    2017-04-05

    The essay examines the British secondary school as a chemical site in the nineteenth century up until the 1920s. It sketches how chemistry became part of the secondary school curriculum in the mid-nineteenth century, discusses how school laboratories were designed, and examines to what extent school laboratories provided opportunities for original research by schoolmasters.

  9. British Chinese Children: Agency and Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Carmen Lau

    2013-01-01

    The assumption that Chinese young people are passive beings with little or no agency is a dominant theme within the academic literature. However PhD research findings demonstrate how British Chinese adolescents (aged 11-14) do exhibit varying degrees of agency in their lives. Here, agency is understood as individuals having the capacity to act, to…

  10. First Employment of British Pharmacology Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Michael; Markham, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    A survey was conducted in UK Universities to identify the employment of pharmacology graduates (BSc, MSc and PhD) 6 months after graduation in 2003. The aim was to provide data for the British Pharmacological Society (BPS) so they could offer advice to interested bodies and to University staff for careers information. 85% of 52 Universities…

  11. Reading Habits of British Secondary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newkirk, Thomas

    Findings from a number of studies of the reading interests and habits of British secondary school students are reviewed, and the results of a new survey of the opinions of 55 teachers are briefly reported. The studies indicate that a number of "classic" texts are popular but that "subliterature" is also popular and becomes more…

  12. British used Congreve Rockets to Attack Napoleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Sir William Congreve developed a rocket with a range of about 9,000 feet. The incendiary rocket used black powder, an iron case, and a 16-foot guide stick. In 1806, British used Congreve rockets to attack Napoleon's headquarters in France. In 1807, Congreve directed a rocket attack against Copenhagen.

  13. The British Novel: Conrad to the Present.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Paul L.

    Intended for advanced undergraduate and graduate students who desire a useful research tool, this bibliography cites the works of and about British novelists, beginning with Joseph Conrad and terminating in 1950. The listings are selective with proper emphasis given to less celebrated but distinctive writers. A preface explaining the numerous…

  14. British used Congreve Rockets to Attack Napoleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Sir William Congreve developed a rocket with a range of about 9,000 feet. The incendiary rocket used black powder, an iron case, and a 16-foot guide stick. In 1806, British used Congreve rockets to attack Napoleon's headquarters in France. In 1807, Congreve directed a rocket attack against Copenhagen.

  15. British Columbian Geography in Historical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broom, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores how Geography's position in British Columbia (BC), Canada's school social studies curricula has been affected by changes in educational cycles over the twentieth century. The amount of instructional time, the importance assigned to the subject and the content of the subject have varied in accordance with the pre-eminence given…

  16. British Library Conducts New Technology Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graddon, Pamela H. B.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses technological research efforts by the Research and Development Department of the British Library in the areas of videotex, videodisc, and teleconferencing, noting the videotex service known as Prestel and the department's network project, called BLEND (Birmingham and Loughborough Electronic Network Development). (EJS)

  17. British Columbia. Reference Series No. 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of External Affairs, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet, one of a series featuring the Canadian provinces, presents a brief overview of British Columbia and is suitable for teacher reference or student reading. A discussion of the province's history includes the early European explorers, Indian natives, and later fur traders and settlers. The building of the transcontinental railway, entry…

  18. British Columbia Transfer TIPS: Facilitation Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer, Vancouver.

    This document is a guide for teachers, career counselors, community practitioners, and students to navigate the British Columbia (BC) Transfer TIPS (transfer information for post-secondary success), a handbook for students intending to transfer among institutions listed in the BC Transfer TIPS. Specifically, the BC Transfer TIPS is intended…

  19. Drivers of Cousin Marriage among British Pakistanis

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim Why has the apparently high rate of cousin marriage among Bradford Pakistanis been sustained, 50 years since Pakistani migration to Britain began? Methods A review of the anthropological literature on Pakistani migration and settlement, British Pakistani marriage patterns and the phenomenon of transnational marriage. Results British Pakistanis are diverse in regional origins and social class characteristics, with many Bradford Pakistanis originating from the Mirpur district and northern Punjab. British Pakistani marriages often involve a partner from Pakistan who joins a spouse in the UK. Transnational marriage of first cousins offers relatives in Pakistan opportunities for a ‘better’ life in the West and are important for British Pakistanis for economic, social, cultural and emotional reasons. These processes are also differentially influenced by region of origin and class characteristics in Pakistan as well as by education, employment and locality in Britain. The pattern observed in Bradford may not be applicable nationally. Conclusion Further research examining marital decisions over several generations in families differing by social class, region of origin in Pakistan and locality in Britain is necessary to contextualise the findings from Bradford. PMID:25060267

  20. British Chinese Children: Agency and Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Carmen Lau

    2013-01-01

    The assumption that Chinese young people are passive beings with little or no agency is a dominant theme within the academic literature. However PhD research findings demonstrate how British Chinese adolescents (aged 11-14) do exhibit varying degrees of agency in their lives. Here, agency is understood as individuals having the capacity to act, to…

  1. Vocational and Civic Education: Whither British Policy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winch, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The current crisis in British VET (Vocational Education and Training) is explained in terms of the decline of opportunities beyond preparation for university for young people after school. The continuing large numbers of "NEETS" (those not in employment, education or training) is but one aspect of this problem: much larger is the decline…

  2. A History of Modern British Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fieldhouse, Roger

    The purpose of this book is: to set the historical development of British adult education in its wider policy and ideological context; to examine its various forms and formulations; and to identify what purpose or purposes it has served. The 16 chapters are as follows: "Historical and Political Context" (Roger Fieldhouse); "The…

  3. Macro and Microenvironments at the British Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shenton, Helen

    This paper describes the storage of the 12 million items that have just been moved into the new British Library building. The specifications for the storage and environmental conditions for different types of library and archive material are explained. The varying environmental parameters for storage areas and public areas, including reading rooms…

  4. First Employment of British Pharmacology Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Michael; Markham, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    A survey was conducted in UK Universities to identify the employment of pharmacology graduates (BSc, MSc and PhD) 6 months after graduation in 2003. The aim was to provide data for the British Pharmacological Society (BPS) so they could offer advice to interested bodies and to University staff for careers information. 85% of 52 Universities…

  5. Earnings Returns to the British Education Expansion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devereux, Paul J.; Fan, Wen

    2011-01-01

    We study the effects of the large expansion in British educational attainment that took place for cohorts born between 1970 and 1975. Using the Quarterly Labour Force Survey, we find that the expansion caused men to increase education by about a year on average and gain about 8% higher wages; women obtained a slightly greater increase in education…

  6. The British Novel: Conrad to the Present.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Paul L.

    Intended for advanced undergraduate and graduate students who desire a useful research tool, this bibliography cites the works of and about British novelists, beginning with Joseph Conrad and terminating in 1950. The listings are selective with proper emphasis given to less celebrated but distinctive writers. A preface explaining the numerous…

  7. Recent British Experience with Negative Income Tax

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rein, Martin

    1973-01-01

    Unlike American proposals for welfare reform which are concerned primarily with reducing costs by altering work behavior among present recipients of public assistance, British attempts to devise an income transfer system are based on the rationale that scarce resources should be concentrated upon those in the greatest need. (Editor)

  8. The British Library's Approach to AACR2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brindley, Lynne

    1981-01-01

    Describes the substantial changes in existing catalog formats, products, and the National Bibliography entailed in the British Library's commitment to AACR2 and Dewey 19. The conversion involved not only headings but an algorithmic conversion of the descriptive cataloging. Included are the impact on services, retrospective conversion, and common…

  9. British Writers; Modules for Teacher Corps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliard, Fred

    This booklet, containing eight instructional modules on works by major British writers, can be used either within a lower-level literature course for non-English majors or in a survey course for English majors. The first four modules focus on works from the early English period through the Elizabethan Age: "Beowulf,""Sir Gawain and the Green…

  10. Live from Westminster: Broadcasting the British Parliament.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Peter Hardiman

    1978-01-01

    Describes live radio broadcasting from the chambers of the British Parliament. After 55 years of campaigning by broadcasters and Members of Parliament, and following experimental broadcasting by the BBC and Independent Local Radio, service was installed in April 1978. Initial experimentation, current procedures, and implications for television…

  11. A unique, environmentally sustainable and cost-effective programme to re-vegetate military training lands utilising composted wastewater biosolids at a large Canadian military training centre.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, R J; Allain, C J; Downe, S; Pond, N; Laughton, P J

    2006-01-01

    The Greater Moncton Sewerage Commission has developed, in concert with National Defence Canada, an environmentally sustainable and cost effective biosolids management and land reclamation programme at the Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Gagetown, New Brunswick, Canada (the second largest land based Military Training Facility in the British Commonwealth). The use of composted biosolids to revegetate military training lands is thought to be a unique application for the beneficial use of biosolids. Results and practical experience gained from this approach to successfully re-vegetate initial sections of extremely large and vast tracts of these lands are described. The paper also overviews the Commission's modern 115000 m3 x d(-1) advanced, chemically assisted primary wastewater treatment facility and associated alkaline (lime) sludge stabilisation process. Planning strategies, security aspects, special and unique challenges in operating adjacent to an active military training facility, costs, spreading techniques, monitoring, next steps and conclusions are also presented.

  12. Military Operations in the Italian East Africa, 1935-1941: Conquest and Defeat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    he considered essential to endure the Fascist regime. The overconfident emperor of Ethiopia Haile ’ Selassie ’ believed he could emulate the great Negus...Italian Somaliland? Haile ’ Selassie ’ decided to meet the Italian overwhelming military power face to face instead of resorting to guerrilla tactics and...86 See Figure 7, the British Counteroffensive 87 The 2nd of July, the Negus Haile ’ Selassie was in Khartoum ready to ignite the revolt in Ethiopia from

  13. From palace to hut: the architecture of military and naval medicine.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The walls separating medicine from society break down in this examination of early-British hospital architecture, which stresses the similarities and continuities between the civilian and the military. The hospitals examined include those for sick and wounded in the Empire, and later at home and those built for long-term chronic cases. Stevenson considers how matters of state, as well as medical theory and its changes, affected architecture.

  14. Finding the Balance: U.S. Military and Future Operations (PKSOI Papers)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Latin America . Along with General James N. Mat- tis, he spearheaded the development of the FM 3-24, Counterinsurgency in 2006, the first intensive...FINDING THE BALANCE: U.S. MILITARY AND FUTURE OPERATIONS INTRODUCTION In 1755, the British Army in North America , shak- en by the defeat of General...in the complex environment of North America .1 In 1966 the U.S Army, shaken by it experience in Viet Nam transformed itself. By 1972 the Army had

  15. Operational Implications of Private Military Companies in the Global War on Terror

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Singer,” interview by Terry Gross (11 May 2004), Fresh Air, National Public Radio. 71 Stuart McGhie, “Briefing: Private Military Contractors...involvement with the IRA . He had been working in and around British bases in Basra. 41 are...responsibility for Fallujah first heard about the killings whilst watching Fox News. The events that followed the killings are now widely acknowledged to be

  16. Headed the Wrong Way: The British Army’s Painful Re-Acquaintance with Its Own COIN Doctrine in Southern Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-10

    ed. and trans. by Michael Howard and Peter Paret (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1976). The referenced quote is found in Book 1...Bryan Ray , Dangerous Frontiers Campaigning in Somaliland & Oman (South Yorkshire, Britain: Pen and Sword Military, 2008), 46. The jebel was an...development to Dhofar became a classic revolutionary movement with much wider aims.25 Bryan Ray , a seconded26 British officer who commanded a SAF regiment

  17. LOYALTY AND THE MILITARY PROFESSION

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-06

    service member possesses, the author asserts that loyalty is the cornerstone for successful service. Military loyalty extends beyond commitment and...analysis of the common trends displays the role military loyalty plays in the profession of arms as key to successful military operations in peace...not be successful . The oath of office inspires or demands service members’ loyalty while the military leaders must ensure it is given. Therefore, a

  18. Aerospace and military

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, J.A.; Esch, K

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews military and aerospace developments of 1989. The Voyager spacecraft returned astounding imagery from Neptune, sophisticated sensors were launched to explore Venus and Jupiter, and another craft went into earth orbit to explore cosmic rays, while a huge telescope is to be launched early in 1990. The U.S. space shuttle redesign was completed and access to space has become no longer purely a governmental enterprise. In the military realm, events within the Soviet bloc, such as the Berlin Wall's destruction, have popularized arms control. Several big treaties could be signed within the year. Massive troop, equipment, and budget reductions are being considered, along with a halt or delay of major new weapons systems. For new missions, the U.S. military is retreating to its role of a century ago - patrolling the nation's borders, this time against narcotics traffickers.

  19. British International Schools: The Deployment and Training of Teaching Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarry, Estelle

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on research carried out on behalf of the Council of British International Schools (COBIS) as to the role and deployment of British international school teaching assistants. Through questionnaires and a follow up open discussion with headteachers from British international schools it was found that, due to the differing…

  20. British International Schools: The Deployment and Training of Teaching Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarry, Estelle

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on research carried out on behalf of the Council of British International Schools (COBIS) as to the role and deployment of British international school teaching assistants. Through questionnaires and a follow up open discussion with headteachers from British international schools it was found that, due to the differing…

  1. A Firsthand Look at the British Open School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staley, Gerald J.

    The author of this informal critique of the British Open School spent the 1972-73 academic year as a teacher in London's Battersea School as part of an exchange program in which six British open school teachers exchanged places with six teachers from British Columbia, Canada. After a brief description of the daily and weekly program at Battersea…

  2. Technical Education in the Military

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Charles O.

    1974-01-01

    Cooperation between military and civilian technical training institutions has included evaluation and accreditation of five military training schools by a civilian evaluation team, which was impressed by the level, completeness and quality of the instruction. Additional cooperation and improved communications between military and civilian training…

  3. Academic and Military Instructional Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Robert K.

    This paper examines the practices and accomplishments of the military in the area of instructional technology. An examination of historical background is used to increase the precision of the definition of instructional technology. Specific contributions of the military are described and then uses of instructional technology in the military and…

  4. Committee on Military Nutrition Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-99-1-9478 TITLE: COMMITTEE ON MILITARY NUTRITION ...COVERED (From - To) 01 Jun 99 – 31 Dec 06 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE COMMITTEE ON MILITARY NUTRITION RESEARCH 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...report presents the activities of the National Academy of Sciences/Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Military Nutrition Research (CMNR) for the

  5. Measuring Underemployment Among Military Spouses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    widespread underemployment among military wives, this underemployment does not necessarily translate into dissatisfaction with the military...households (DMDC, 2004). Thus, a per- sistent lack of employment opportunity affects a spouse’s quality of life, and perennial dissatisfaction with...its own right, since wives’ dissatisfaction may translate into higher service member attrition from military service. The primary outcome of interest

  6. A review of trauma and trauma-related papers published in the British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Payne, Karl F B; Tahim, Arpan; Goodson, Alexander M C; Colbert, Serryth; Brennan, Peter A

    2012-12-01

    This review summarises all trauma and related papers published in the British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (BJOMS) from January 2010 to December 2011. In total 45 articles were published, of which 42% (19) were full-length articles. These articles primarily focused on the management of mandibular condyle and orbital fractures, with several papers discussing maxillofacial surgery by the British military. There were no articles discussing midfacial fractures or massive facial trauma. The remaining papers included short communications, technical notes, and letters; and provided discussion of interesting cases, new surgical techniques and fracture classifications. The number of trauma papers published in BJOMS appears to be less than other sub-specialties such as head and neck oncology. The number of prospective and randomised studies remains low, highlighting a need to foster further research within maxillofacial trauma. Copyright © 2012 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Military Psychology: An Overview,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    Department of Leadership and Law, provide academic and personal counseling to midshipmen, and conduct research. An example of psychological research...AD-Ai40 866 MILITARY PSYCHOLOGY : AN OYERYIEM(U) NAVY PERSONNEL i/i RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER SAN DIEGO CR C NEMETH ET AL. MAY 84 UNCLASSIFIED F...G 5/1@ NL L 8 -1.25 1 1.4 11.6 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATKiAk BURAMF OF STANDARDS- 1963-A %% a • v VjUU.U. 1 // 00 Military Psychology : An

  8. Fraternization - A Military Offense?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    34While Jiaf-ing of an appropriate regulation might be diffcult, %e recommend it to the responsible military services" (8:1.60). :iteen years later in...rank or positions for personal gain, and are prejudicial to good order and discipline, action must be taken against those involved. "The basic role and...vital, and responsive military oiqa[)_Jiza-1cn5: addition, the Air Force encourages open members*,:_ arc --_ _cpation in base *recreat ional1 ac t ivi t

  9. The evolution of casualty evacuation in the British Army in the 20th century (Part 2)--1918 to 1945.

    PubMed

    Bricknell, M C M

    2002-09-01

    This is the second in a series of papers that examine the evolution of the military casualty evacuation chain during the 20th century. The Spanish Civil War demonstrated to the world the revolutionary tactic of 'Blitzkrieg' developed by the Germans. This and the experience of the British Expeditionary Force in 1940 emphasised the need for mobility in forward medical units. The campaign in the Western Desert led to the creation of a number of new units such as the Field Surgical Unit and the Field Transfusion Unit which were introduced across the British Army as a result of the findings of the Hartgill Committee. The aeroplane transformed the evacuation chain from CCSs to base hospitals and beyond.

  10. Self-Esteem: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of British-Chinese, White British and Hong Kong Chinese Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Yiu Man

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates the self-esteem scores of 1303 children, including Chinese children from Britain and Hong Kong and white British children, using the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory. Finds that British Chinese have significantly higher self-esteem than the Hong Kong children, but there is little difference among white British children. (CMK)

  11. Trends in paediatric sport- and recreation-related injuries: An injury surveillance study at the British Columbia Children’s Hospital (Vancouver, British Columbia) from 1992 to 2005

    PubMed Central

    Pakzad-Vaezi, Kaivon; Singhal, Ash

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sport- and recreation-related injuries are a major source of morbidity in the paediatric population. Long-term trends for these injuries are largely unknown. METHODS: A traumatic injury surveillance system (the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program) was used to examine the demographics and trends of paediatric sports injuries in children who presented to or were directly admitted to the British Columbia Children’s Hospital (Vancouver, British Columbia) emergency department or intensive care unit from 1992 to 2005. RESULTS: Over the 14-year study period, there was a significant increase in sport- and recreation-related injuries among patients who presented to the British Columbia Children’s Hospital. Of 104,414 injuries between 1992 and 2005, 27,466 were related to sports and recreational activities. The number of sport-related injuries increased by 28%, while all-cause injuries did not change significantly. Males comprised 68% of the sport-related injuries, and both sexes displayed an increasing trend over time. Cycling, basketball, soccer and ice hockey were the top four injury-causing activities. The main body parts injured were the face, head and digits. CONCLUSIONS: Paediatric sports injuries significantly increased at the British Columbia Children’s Hospital over the 14-year study period. This is likely due to increased sport participation, increased risk associated with certain sports, or both. Trends in paediatric sports injury may be predicted by changes in popular media, possibly allowing prevention programs to help to avoid these injuries before they occur. PMID:22468125

  12. Investigating the respiratory health of deployed military personnel.

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael J; Zacher, Lisa L; Jackson, David A

    2011-10-01

    Recent news media articles have implied a direct relationship between environmental exposures such as burn pits during current deployments and the development of serious and debilitating chronic pulmonary disease. These articles suggest that the military is superficially investigating evidence that establishes a link between deployment and development of chronic lung disease. Anecdotal cases of military personnel with lung disease are detailed to suggest a systemic problem with undiagnosed and untreated pulmonary disease in deployed service members. Despite these contentions, the U.S. Army Medical Department and other agencies have been actively pursuing numerous scientific investigations into deployment-related lung disease to define the severity and prevalence of the issue. This article will review relevant research efforts by the U.S. military in the existing medical literature and address the current efforts planned by the services to systematically investigate the possibility of deployment-related pulmonary disease.

  13. Understanding and preventing military suicide.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J; Jennings, Keith W; Jobes, David A; Bradley, John C

    2012-01-01

    The continual rise in the U.S. military's suicide rate since 2004 is one of the most vexing issues currently facing military leaders, mental health professionals, and suicide experts. Despite considerable efforts to address this problem, however, suicide rates have not decreased. The authors consider possible reasons for this frustrating reality, and question common assumptions and approaches to military suicide prevention. They further argue that suicide prevention efforts that more explicitly embrace the military culture and implement evidence-based strategies across the full spectrum of prevention and treatment could improve success. Several recommendations for augmenting current efforts to prevent military suicide are proposed.

  14. If You Can't Stay Off Social Media, Maybe It's in Your Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... 163292.html If You Can't Stay Off Social Media, Maybe It's in Your Genes Findings put 'the ... HealthDay News) -- How many hours you devote to social networking, gaming and other online media may depend on your genes, British researchers report. ...

  15. USSR Report, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    by the forces of reaction and militarism. U.S. Secretary of Defense Weinberger ticked off the British Labor Party like a naughty schoolboy for its...the ocean are reluctant to take into account the interests of the Europeans and that for the sake of those imperial ambitions they are ready over...reduction in the sides’’ strategic offensive arms, a. considerable proportion of which is accounted for by nuclear submarines equipped with ballistic

  16. Military Forces in Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    families of military professionals withdrawn from East- em Europe are living in hostels , prefabricated barracks, or tents. In some cases, conscripts...Technological Capabilities: USSR/US Semiconductor Materials and Microelectronic C ircuils Software Producibility Parallel Computer Architectures ^ r...underground leadership bunker adjacent to Moscow State University . These fa- cilities are intended for the national command authority in wartime

  17. The Military Cooperation Group

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    stay in their respective countries and continue to face their host nation contacts daily. For host nation relations , it may be more expedient to...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited THE MILITARY...THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this

  18. Why Military History?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunting, Josiah, III

    2008-01-01

    Interest in military history is as strong as it has ever been--except on American college campuses. Lt. Gen. Josiah Bunting III examines why today's undergraduates need to study the facts of war, and why knowing its causes and consequences remain a vital part of our common knowledge.

  19. Soviet Union, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    agency of the Soviet Union. Permission for further reproduction must be obtained from copyright owner. SOVIET UNION MILITARY AFFAIRS CONTENTS...internationalists, it has always embodied the inviolable friendship of the peoples of the USSR. But are some of us not hypnotized by this principle

  20. Resilience among Military Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easterbrooks, M. Ann; Ginsburg, Kenneth; Lerner, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors present their approach to understanding resilience among military connected young people, and they discuss some of the gaps in their knowledge. They begin by defining resilience, and then present a theoretical model of how young people demonstrate resilient functioning. Next they consider some of the research on…

  1. Flood Hazard Management: British and International Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, L. Douglas

    This proceedings of an international workshop at the Flood Hazard Research Centre (Queensway, Enfield, Middlesex, U.K.) begins by noting how past British research on flood problems concentrated on refining techniques to implement established policy. In contrast, research covered in North American and Australian publications involved normative issues on policy alternatives and administrative implementation. The workshop's participants included 16 widely recognized scientists, whose origins were about equally divided between Britain and overseas; from this group the workshop's organizers expertly drew ideas for refining British urban riverine flood hazard management and for cultivating links among researchers everywhere. Such intellectual exchange should be of keen interest to flood hazard program managers around the world, to students of comparative institutional performance, to those who make policy on protecting people from hazards, and to hydrologists and other geophysicists who must communicate descriptive information for bureaucratic, political, and public decision- making.

  2. Accidental Deaths Among British Columbia Indians

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, N.; Hole, L. W.; Barclay, W. S.

    1966-01-01

    A statistical and epidemiological review of British Columbia native Indian and non-Indian mortality revealed that accidents were the leading cause of death among Indians but ranked only fourth among non-Indians. Comparison of accidental death rates by age and sex showed that, without exception, the rates among Indians were considerably higher than the corressponding rates for non-Indians. While the Indians represented some 2% of the total population of British Columbia, they accounted for over 10% of the total accident fatalities, 29% of drownings, and 21% of fatal burns. Socioeconomic, environmental and psychosocial factors and excessive drinking are considered the chief causes responsible for this rather unusual epidemiological phenomenon. This study revealed certain hazardous conditions which are specific to the Indian's present way of life. In the authors' opinion the recognition of these specific hazards is imperative for the planning of effective preventive campaigns. PMID:5902238

  3. Trace nutrients. Selenium in British food.

    PubMed

    Thorn, J; Robertson, J; Buss, D H; Bunton, N G

    1978-03-01

    1. The amount of selenium in nationally representative samples of prepared and cooked groups of foods, and in a variety of raw individual foods, was determined fluorimetrically. 2. The average British diet was calculated to provide approximately 60 microgram Se/d, of which half was derived from cereals and cereal products and another 40% from meat and fish. Milk, table fats, fruit and vegetables provided little or no Se. 3. Individual foods which were particularly rich in Se (greater than 0.2 mg/kg) included 'bread-making' and wholemeal flours, kidney, fatty fish, brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa) and several other varieties of nut. In contrast, breast milk and other foods for babies (except some cereal products) contained little Se. 4. The total intake, and the amounts of Se in major foods, were lower than in most other studies. This is probably the result of the comparatively low levels of this element in British soil.

  4. Truffle diversity (Tuber, Tuberaceae) in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Berch, Shannon M; Bonito, Gregory

    2016-08-01

    To improve baseline data for the developing truffle industry in British Columbia, we compiled existing Tuber species sequences from published and unpublished studies and generated new ITS sequences for truffles belonging to Tuber collected in the province. In doing so, we obtained evidence that 13 species of Tuber occur in the province, including six introduced and seven native species, two of which are putative undescribed species. Of the native species, the Tuber anniae species complex is widely distributed in the province while Tuber beyerlei appears to be much more restricted in distribution. Four of the introduced species have commercial value (Tuber melanosporum, Tuber aestivum, Tuber brumale, and Tuber borchii) as do two of the native species (Tuber gibbosum and Tuber oregonense). Focused sampling on likely tree hosts, both hardwood and Pinaceae species, as well as in currently unexplored parts of the province seems likely to expand our knowledge of the diversity and distribution of Tuber species in British Columbia.

  5. Checklist of British and Irish Hymenoptera - Cynipoidea

    PubMed Central

    Forshage, Mattias; Bowdrey, Jeremy; Spooner, Brian M.; van Veen, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background The British and Irish checklist of Cynipoidea is revised, considerably updating the last complete checklist published in 1978. Disregarding uncertain identifications, 220 species are now known from Britain and Ireland, comprising 91 Cynipidae (including two established non-natives), 127 Figitidae and two Ibaliidae. New information One replacement name is proposed, Kleidotoma thomsoni Forshage, for the secondary homonym Kleidotoma tetratoma Thomson, 1861 (nec K. tetratoma (Hartig, 1841)). PMID:28325971

  6. Preparing the British Army for Future Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-16

    author recognizes that proscribing major combat training supported by expanded conceptual education is far from a revelation. But, like Plato’s Utopia ...be reshaped to provide a realistic environment in which to best achieve the military utopia of preparing flexibly for future warfare. From the

  7. French and British nuclear forces in an era of uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Y.

    1992-12-31

    Britain and France have always been considered as special players in the nuclear deterrence game. Their respective arsenals have never exceeded a very small fraction of the USSR`s and the United States strategic forces; Britain`s and France`s rationales for having nuclear weapons have been based on criteria tailored specifically for medium nuclear powers. Moreover, in sharp contrast with both superpowers, the development costs of the French and British nuclear forces have been very high, penalizing conventional forces in the case of France and leading to a growing dependence on the United States in the case of the United Kingdom (UK). Finally, although Paris and London have been able to draw advantages from the possession of nuclear forces, they have never been in a position to offer an explicit nuclear guarantee to their European allies, thus leaving the United States as the sole provider of extended deterrence within the framework of the integrated military structure of the Atlantic alliance. The unchallenged nuclear preponderance of Moscow and Washington was a powerful instrument of influence in world affairs during the East-West confrontation. Accordingly, debates on deterrence have always been expressed in terms and concepts designed by Washington and never explicitly rejected by Moscow. On the contrary, terms and concepts similar to those used in France are now utilized by a new generation of Russian strategic analysts to argue for a redefinition of Russia`s deterrence posture. Today, however, this mechanism of control through preponderance is severely affected because it is likely that the function of nuclear deterrence will be reassessed in the new security environment prevailing after the end of the Cold War. Meanwhile, the prospect of a new world order leads the Western nuclear states to redefine their nuclear doctrine and restructure their strategic forces. 24 refs.

  8. Blast furnace injection developments in British Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jukes, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    British Steel has four integrated steel works, i.e., Llanwern, Port Talbot, Scunthorpe, Teesside, with a total of ten blast furnaces, nine of which are currently operating. The furnaces range in size from the 14 meters (45 feet 11 inches) hearth diameter Redcar No. 1 furnace at Teesside (a single furnace works) to the 8.33 meters (27 feet 4 inches) hearth Queen Mary and Queen Bess furnaces at Schunthorpe, with a total of four furnaces at that works. All have injection systems installed, those at Scunthorpe being equipped with granular coal injection and all others currently working with oil injection. The driving force behind the development of blast furnace injection has been as a means for introducing reducing agents (British Steel now refers to coke plus hydrocarbon injectants as total reductants) into the process as a part substitute/supplement for top charged coke and the technology is still being developed and used for that purpose. By utilizing practical experience and observing the work of others, British Steel has been assessing blast furnace injection technology experimentally for purposes other than the introduction of reducing agents.

  9. Where is the British national press?

    PubMed

    MacInnes, John; Rosie, Michael; Petersoo, Pille; Condor, Susan; Kennedy, James

    2007-06-01

    Although globalization has highlighted the danger of conflating state, society and nation, sociologists remain insufficiently alert to such banal nationalism. Newspapers offer a strong test case of the extent of diversity in the construction of state, national and social boundaries, since Billig and Anderson have argued they comprise a special case where their orientation to an audience simultaneously located in a state, society and nation allows them to reproduce a sense of national identity. However, despite the commonsense obviousness of the term, it proves remarkably difficult to define what the 'British national press' might comprise. Circulation density of titles varies substantially across different parts of the UK and editorial copy is altered to address diverse 'national' readerships. 'British' newspapers also circulate in other states, especially the Republic of Ireland. After reviewing how newspapers might be defined as 'national' and/or 'British', we conclude that both Anderson and Billig over-estimate the congruence, relevance and obviousness of state, society and national boundaries. If the conceptualization of such boundaries is problematic in the case of the press, it follows that it must be still more so for most other objects of sociological analysis, including that of 'society' itself.

  10. Sustainable development in British land use regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Basiago, A.D.

    1995-12-01

    Sustainable development is a new international theory of development founded on principles of futurity, environment, equity and participation. It is the legacy of twenty years of international environmental law that has established a doctrine of global trusteeship. Sustainable development has entered British land use regulation through the Maastricth Treaty; the EU`s Fifth Environmental Action Program; as well as the British government`s Planning Policy Guidance notes on land use principles, local plans, transport and historic preservation, and its white papers. The Earth Summit accord Agenda 21 is a blueprint on how to make development socially, economically and environmentally sustainable. Under its terms, Britain has prepared a national sustainable development strategy for the UN`s Commission on Sustainable Development. It features Local Agenda 21 strategies in which local authorities develop policies for sustainable development and establish partnerships with other sectors. In this paper, the Local Agenda 21 strategies of seven local authorities are evaluated according to the paradigm introduced in Agenda 21 and elaborated by Kahn that describes sustainable development as a dynamic system of integrated and interlinked economic, social and environmental sustainability. The author concludes that sustainable development in British land use regulation is guided by notions of economic development, social justice and environmental planning and not by the dynamic, integrated model of Agenda 21. 46 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Competition law and British natural gas regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Black, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    British Gas (BG) is a seriously successful monopolist which, since its 1986 privatisation, is acing increased regulation by the Office of Gas Supply (OFGAS). OFGAS is the first public body specifically created to regulate a European gas industry. It employs a rate-capping formula instead of the more labour intensive rate-of-retum method favoured in North America. Despite initial criticisms, OFGAS has surprised industry observers with efficacious results. This article succinctly discusses the process of natural gas industry privatisation in the United Kingdom (U.K.) and the development of a British type of [open quotes]open access.[close quotes] Contemporary British gas regulation is a distinct paradigm involving the privatisation of a vertically integrated pipeline system coupled with an altemative regulatory method. These regulatory results include lower prices for core customers and the promotion of third party direct sales within the U.K. Since Britain leads the European Community (E.C.) in common carriage provisions, the regulatory r6gime here provides a benchmark for the other Member States.

  12. Military general surgical training opportunities on operations in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Adam J; Ramasamy, Arul; Hinsley, David; Midwinter, Mark

    2009-07-01

    In the UK, general surgical specialist trainees have limited exposure to general surgical trauma. Previous work has shown that trainees are involved in only two blunt and one penetrating trauma laparotomies per annum. During their training, nearly half of trainees will not be involved in the surgical management of liver injury, 20% will not undertake a trauma splenectomy and only a quarter will see a trauma thoracotomy. Military general surgical trainees require training in, and exposure to, the surgical management of trauma and specifically military wounding patterns that is not available in the UK. The objective of this study was to determine whether operative workload in the sole British surgical unit in Helmand Province, Afghanistan (Operation HERRICK) would provide a training opportunity for military general surgical trainees. A retrospective theatre log-book review of all surgical cases performed at the Role 2 (Enhanced) treatment facility at Camp Bastion, Helmand Province on Operation HERRICK between October 2006 and October 2007, inclusive. Operative cases were analysed for general surgical trauma, laparotomy, thoracotomy, vascular trauma and specific organ injury management where available. A total of 968 operative cases were performed during the study period. General surgical procedures included 51 laparotomies, 17 thoracotomies and 11 vascular repairs. There were a further 70 debridements of general surgical wounds. Specific organ management included five cases of liver packing for trauma, five trauma splenectomies and four nephrectomies. A training opportunity currently exists on Operation HERRICK for military general surgical specialist trainees. If the tempo of the last 12 months is maintained, a 2-month deployment would essentially provide trainees with the equivalent trauma surgery experience to the whole of their surgical training in the UK NHS. Trainees would gain experience in military trauma as well as specific organ injury management.

  13. Earned Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunshine, Alice

    2011-01-01

    "Earned media" is exactly what one thinks it is. The people who do the necessary work to earn coverage of their issue or battle are the ones who will get their story out to the public. Earning media coverage involves giving careful attention to the mechanics of reaching out to news outlets. Most people can learn the mechanics through…

  14. Mixed Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Erin

    2010-01-01

    While institutions do not often have a hook as compelling as an eagerly awaited movie, great content is critical for media relations success--and coupling it with the right distribution channel can ensure the story finds the right audience. Even better, retooling it for several media platforms can extend the life and reach of a story. The changes…

  15. Earned Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunshine, Alice

    2011-01-01

    "Earned media" is exactly what one thinks it is. The people who do the necessary work to earn coverage of their issue or battle are the ones who will get their story out to the public. Earning media coverage involves giving careful attention to the mechanics of reaching out to news outlets. Most people can learn the mechanics through…

  16. Mixed Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Erin

    2010-01-01

    While institutions do not often have a hook as compelling as an eagerly awaited movie, great content is critical for media relations success--and coupling it with the right distribution channel can ensure the story finds the right audience. Even better, retooling it for several media platforms can extend the life and reach of a story. The changes…

  17. British Gujarati Indian immigrants' and British Caucasians' beliefs about health and illness.

    PubMed

    Jobanputra, Rena; Furnham, Adrian

    2005-12-01

    This study examined cultural differences in beliefs about health and illness to explore differences in younger and older British Caucasians' and British Gujarati Indian immigrants' beliefs about health and illness. This study required a matched group consisting of first- and second-generation Gujarati Indian immigrants and native British Caucasians to complete a questionnaire assessing their beliefs concerning health and illness. Factor analysis of the health beliefs questionnaire identified six clear factors accounting for 36.04% of the variance. Subsequent ANCOVAs conducted on the factor scores, partialling out the demographic differences between the participants, revealed that Gujarati Indian immigrants agreed with items reflecting supernatural explanations of ill health more than indigenous British Caucasian participants. Older Indian immigrants also rated chance-related factors as more important than older Caucasian immigrants. There were no significant differences between the Gujarati Indian immigrants and British Caucasians in terms of attributions made to psychological factors and self-responsibility, social factors and life circumstances, medical treatment and physical vulnerability and the external environment. Findings are discussed in relation to the model proposed by Helman (2001) and the impact of migration on health beliefs systems; practical implications of the findings are also highlighted.

  18. Adaption and adjustment of military spouses to overseas postings: an online forum study.

    PubMed

    Blakely, Gillian; Hennessy, Catherine; Chung, Man Cheung; Skirton, Heather

    2014-09-01

    Little research has examined the impact of being an accompanying spouse on British military foreign postings. The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate the experiences of 13 military spouses from 11 different overseas locations. Data were collected via an online forum and thematic content analysis was conducted. Key findings revealed that, regardless of the location, reactions to overseas posting varied considerably and were related to the military spouse's personality and personal circumstances, as well as their relationship with family, husband and their support networks. Spouses experienced a loss of control over their lives that was in some cases psychologically distressing. The findings corroborate and extend the findings from a previous study that was limited to one location, further highlighting the need for pre-established support resources from the military and healthcare professionals to be readily accessible for all military spouses. Importantly, such support provision may also facilitate the military spouse in regaining some control over their everyday life, enhancing their well-being and the experience for the family. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Politico-Military Relations, a Basis for Military Interaction between Argentina and the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-15

    POLITICO -MILITARY RELATIONS, A BASIS FOR MILITARY INTERACTION BETWEEN ARGENTINA AND THE UNITED STATES N IN w Fn STRATEGY AND CAMPAIGN DEPARTMENT...FUNDING NUMBERS PROGRAM PROJECT TASK WORK UNIT ELEMENT NO NO NO ACCESSION NO 11 TITLE (Include Security Classificationi Politico -Military Relations, A...America. Politico -Military relations. civil-military relations, military coups. military to military relations. South American democracy -con- 𔄃

  20. Media Publics and Media Trust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaziano, Cecilie; McGrath, Kristin

    To gain a perspective on the kinds of people who find newspapers and television to be high or low in credibility, a two-phase study combined demographic and other characteristics, media behavior, and attitudes toward the media. The first phase involved a series of focused group discussions, while the second was a national, representative sampling…

  1. Media violence.

    PubMed

    Cantor, J

    2000-08-01

    Research on the effects of media violence is not well understood by the general public. Despite this fact, there is an overwhelming consensus in the scientific literature about the unhealthy effects of media violence. Meta-analyses show that media-violence viewing consistently is associated with higher levels of antisocial behavior, ranging from the trivial (imitative violence directed against toys) to the serious (criminal violence), with many consequential outcomes in between (acceptance of violence as a solution to problems, increased feelings of hostility, and the apparent delivery of painful stimulation to another person). Desensitization is another well-documented effect of viewing violence, which is observable in reduced arousal and emotional disturbance while witnessing violence, the reduced tendency to intervene in a fight, and less sympathy for the victims of violence. Although there is evidence that youth who are already violent are more likely to seek out violent entertainment, there is strong evidence that the relationship between violence viewing and antisocial behavior is bidirectional. There is growing evidence that media violence also engenders intense fear in children which often lasts days, months, and even years. The media's potential role in solutions to these problems is only beginning to be explored, in investigations examining the uses and effects of movie ratings, television ratings, and the V-chip, and the effects of media literacy programs and public education efforts. Future research should explore important individual differences in responses to media violence and effective ways to intervene in the negative effects.

  2. Hybrid Warfare: A Military Revolution or Revolution in Military Affairs?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-14

    4MacGregor Knox and Williamson Murray, eds., The Dynamics of Military Revolution 1300-2050 (Cambridge: Cambridge... Dynamics of Military Revolution 1300-2050.12 A case study helps compare the extrapolation of the analysis and synthesis of their writings on MR to...affairs as defined by Knox and Murray in their book The Dynamics of Military Revolution, 1300-2050. 37 Professors Knox and Murray, provide a conceptual

  3. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  4. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  5. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  6. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military pilot...

  7. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military pilot...

  8. Military Science and Academies,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-06

    the Higher Education Institutions" note that the higher school, which has a highly qualified-staff of scientific workers at its disposal, is not taking...deemed it necessary to significantly raise the role of higher education establish- ments in the solution of the most important scientific problems. This...requirement is totally applicable also to the higher military education institutions, it obliges the professorial teaching staffs to re-examine their

  9. Soviet Military Power 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    deployed in both a fixed and mobile ver- Kremlin should cease its massive military aid rrograms. sion. the mobile SS-25, and the new version of the...Libya. Angola, Vict- ability of mobile systems, coupled with greater yield and nam, Syria, and especially Cuba, which is only 90 miles accuracy of the...of severe repression in Poland, Moscow also deployed SS-20 intermediate-range mobile nuclear missiles that These apparent contradictions in Soviet

  10. Soviet Military Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    continuously deployed it frequently in their military journals. to South Yemen and periodically deployed to Mine warfare is a major mission of the So...plague, and cholera The results of that investment are reflected in for BW purposes, as well as botulinum toxin, a number of impressive new weapons such...since World War 11. Dur- In summary: ing the siege of Leningrad, single-cell protein "* A major outbreak of anthrax occurred at (SCP) derived from wood

  11. Military Reform -- What Next?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    at the military with small pockets of support within Congress. 13. 24 End Notes 1. Association of the United States Army, "Department of Defense...strategic reappraisal and of a much overdue organizational reordering." 2. 3’ End Notes 1. Lyman L. Lemnitzer, Gen USA, (ret), "Dont Alter the Joint Chiefs...centers for strategic thinking continue to develop joint strategic concepts that match resources with national strategy. 37 End Notes I. Fredrick H

  12. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    care resources of the military, impact unit morale, and take a large emotional toll on the involved friends, family, and commanders. There is...Psychology, 29(2), 177.,187. Gutierrez, P.M. (1999). Suicidality in parentally bereaved adolescents. Death Studies, 23(4), 359-370. Osman, A., Kopper, B. A...Gutierrez, P. M. VA continuum of care for suicidal Veterans. Panel presentation at the American Association of Suicidology conference, Pmilati.d, OR

  13. USSR Report, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-24

    Contents: TEKHNIKA I VOORUZHENIYE No 1, 1985 (TEKHNIKA I VOORUZHENIYE, No 1, Jan 85) 18 AIR / AIR DEFENSE FORCES Party Work, Improving Technical...One night an enemy aircraft flew over us and dropped its supply of bombs which, I think, our air defense troops and fighters did not allow it to...Eastern, Carpathian, Kiev and Turkestan military districts, the Baltic Fleet, the Moscow Air Defense District, and the organizations led by comrades

  14. USSR Report, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    and leading seaman and honor student. The brothers Giya and Guliver Nikolaishvili of Sukhumi, Dato Metreveli of Kutaisi, who is at the Kiev higher...policy is closely related to its domestic and foreign policy and the strategy of accelerating social and economic development based on scientific...and special informational publications and become acquainted with patent materials. There is yet one more important concept in our military lexicon

  15. Military Review: Leadership

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    development this, the proponent defines the life-cycle model techn:ques, and advances in our ability todefine. to be tollowed. prect,,e, the SKAs...amnns, we nust population through the Civilian Integration continue to provide leaders the critical experi- into the Personnel Proponent System ( CIPPS ... model is not easy. Demonstrating 32 May 1991 e MILITARY REVIEW - BECKCETAMD NORTH uncompromising integrity, inculcating values But accomplishing the

  16. Prospects for Military Reform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    tradition has a literary side as well, one most often expressing itself through the medium of military journals. Each year, these journals publish a...beyond cranky literary mutterings and hero-worship for deceased generals of flawed reputation? Can the critique fashioned by the alternative...special timeliness. The archetypal Mac still hovered on the fringes of American politics after having been relieved the previous 40 Parameters year

  17. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Balkin, T., Wesensten, N., 2006. Impaired decision making fol- lowing 49 h of sleep deprivation . Journal of Sleep Research 15 (1), 7–13. Kim, M., Hong, S...Portland VAMC, $307,128 (Appendix 2) o A Behavioral Sleep Intervention for Suicidal Behaviors in Military Veterans: A Randomized Controlled Study, Dr...Moscowitz A, & Hom MH. (June 2015). Perceived Stigma Toward Mental Health in Association with Sleep Disturbances and as an Acute Predictor of Suicidal

  18. Sound Military Decision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1942-01-01

    included all available and’ pertinent military writings. Care has also been taken to in- S~~clude, from civil sources, the findings of those...The Advisory Function. Understanding between the civil representatives of the State and the leaders of the armed forces is manifestly essential to...conduct of war thus requires that under- standing exist (see pages 9 and 10) between the civil repre- sentatives of the State and the leaders of the armed

  19. Military Hybrid Vehicle Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-03

    Some examples include:  Allison Hybrid EP System™ - Transit buses two-mode parallel hybrid with continuously variable transmission (CVT)  Azure... Transit Buses , Proceeding of the Vehicular Technology Conference, Vol. 5, pp 3310-3315, October 2003. [3] E. Rosenthal, U.S. Military Orders Less...applications such as delivery trucks and transit busses. One of the biggest justifications for hybrids is their fuel efficiency. However, the U.S

  20. USSR Report, Military Affairs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    to New Equipment ( Yu . Vikhrenko; KRASNAYA ZVEZDA, 28 Jun 86) 27 Maj Gen Avn Tabunshchikov on Results of Early Summer Training (A. Tabunshchikov...Interview; KRASNAYA ZVEZDA, 2 Jul 86). 31 Critique of Oversimplification in Pilot Training ( V . Vinokurov; KRASNAYA ZVEZDA, 7 Jul 86 34 Article...Discusses Career of Maj Gen Avn N. T. Antoshkin ( V . Filatov; KRASNAYA ZVEZDA, 7 Jun 86) 38 DOSAAF Military-Patriotic Education in Arkhangelsk

  1. Selection of Military Advisors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    this thesis will focus on the methods for selecting the best military personnel for advisor tasks. In doing so, specific qualities , capabilities...attract and keep the best personnel for subsequent advisory requirements. Finally, this document will analyze the quality and suitability of advisor...2006, p. 5-2. 5 study in its own right . Lastly, this thesis relies heavily on current published counterinsurgency doctrine since many aspects of

  2. Military display performance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Meyer, Frederick

    2012-06-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of four of its segments: avionics, vetronics, dismounted soldier, and command and control. Requirements are summarized for a number of technology-driving parameters, to include luminance, night vision imaging system compatibility, gray levels, resolution, dimming range, viewing angle, video capability, altitude, temperature, shock and vibration, etc., for direct-view and virtual-view displays in cockpits and crew stations. Technical specifications are discussed for selected programs.

  3. USSR Report, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-20

    victorious offensive of the Soviet Army which had crushed the Nazi military machine and freed many peoples from the yoke of Naziism . 25 October is celebrated...dignation and hate for Naziism and the fascist regime grew and class contradic tions became exacerbated. In telling the people the bitter truth, the...country, Romania fought along with the Soviet Union until the complete defeat of Naziism and its troops participated in the liberation of hungary and

  4. Military Pay Comparability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    for promotions and for pay based on ability. Also included in this idea is one of equal pay for basically equal work. Thus, the sub-principle of...Report established for the first time the idea that pay within the services for basically equal jobs should be the same and that the pay should be...foundation for legislation creating the first idea of 4 P "regular military compensation" (basic pay , subsistence allowance and quarters allowance) as a

  5. USSR Report, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    praporshchiki] and officers bade farewell to the colors. I am sure that these instants when they pressed down to the crimson silk of the sacred military...clarify the results of the last firing in the battalion. According to the headquarters training data , those who were not at the exercise achieved...television camera, artificially developed target data is photographed and superimposed on a real air situation pre-recorded on videotape. In a matter of

  6. Rebalancing the Military Profession

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-17

    of individual officers than the traditional ethics .”3 The authors contend this primacy of careerism over selfless service began during World War II...states the military officer, by virtue of being a professional with an oath of office and a code of ethics , is granted the moral autonomy to openly...War College on 18 April 1970, to analyze “the state of discipline, integrity, morality, ethics , and professionalism in the Army.”32 This

  7. Police or Military Police?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    their MP to Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejuene as part of the Fleet Assistance Program (FAP).12 (FAP assigns FMF Marines to fill support functions on...1778. The responsibilities of this unit were essentially the same as the MP unit of today. "...[MP] were expected to patrol the camp ... During...Marine Corps. Camp Guards turned into Base Military Police Units and the MP ranks expanded with personnel who laterally moved from every MOS in the

  8. Is Military Science Scientific?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    approaches to strategy, doctrine, and planning. Early military theory in the United States was based largely on inherited European traditions pro...frequently capi- talized and placed alongside Physics, Philosophy, and other well-established academic disciplines. An irony of the term’s decline is...WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) National Defense University,Joint Force Quarterly,260 Fifth Avenue, S.W

  9. The Military Origins of Federal Social Welfare Programs: Early British and Colonial American Precedents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Douglas Edward Leach, The Northern Colonial Frontier, 1607-1763 (New York: Holt, Rhinehart and Winston, 1966), 8-10. 2 See, for example, Russell F. Weigley...For example, in Connecticut, John Brunson was granted £5 compensation for the treatment of his wounds and housing while recovering.9" Obadiah Wood...and their evolution in America is found in Carl P. Russell , Guns on the Early Frontiers: A History of Firearms from Colonial Times Through the Years of

  10. The Little War Meets British Military Discipline in America 1755-1781

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    order." But this bucks the popular image that was painted in the very first year of the war by Major General Edward Braddock in his celebrated defeat...country. For this task Burgoyne could 14 The best source for these uniforms is a contemporary watercolor found in a copy of Riedesel’s Memoirs in the New

  11. A Commander’s Strategy for Social Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    social media and new media, may prove as profound as any of these inventions. We must therefore observe and adjust our information strategies in order not to "go under." One of the challenges that commanders now face is to develop strategies that recognize the shifts in the nature of warfare resulting from social media . There are already examples of militaries that have ignored the realities and have suffered. The effective use of social media may have the potential to help the Armed Forces better understand the environment

  12. Fighting flu: military pathology, vaccines, and the conflicted identity of the 1918-19 pandemic in Britain.

    PubMed

    Bresalier, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the decisive role of British military medicine in shaping official approaches to the 1918 influenza pandemic. It contends that British approaches were defined through a system of military pathology, which had been established by the War Office as part of the mobilization of medicine for the First World War. Relying on the bacteriological laboratory for the identification and control of pathogenic agents, military pathology delivered therapeutic and preventive measures against a range of battlefield diseases, and military and civilian authorities trusted that it could do the same with influenza. This article traces how it shaped efforts to establish the etiology of the pandemic and to produce a general influenza vaccine. It highlights the challenges involved in both strategies. Understanding the central role of military pathology helps make sense of the nature, direction, scale, and limitations of medical mobilization against the pandemic in Britain and the authority accorded to specific medical bodies for elaborating and coordinating strategies. Crucially, it demands that we rethink the relationship between the war and pandemic as one about the social organization of medical knowledge and institutions.

  13. [The cradle of military medicine].

    PubMed

    Tsygan, V N

    2013-12-01

    The Kirov Military Medical Academy, included into the State Code of Particularly Valuable Objects of Cultural Heritage of the Peoples of the Russian Federation, plays an important role in national military-medical science and education during XVIII and XIX centuries. Today the Kirov Military Medical Academy consists of 7 faculties, 63 departments (52 military departments and 11 civil departments), 31 clinics (17 surgical clinics and 14 therapeutic clinics), center of extracorporeal detoxification, 3 departments, taking part in treatment and diagnostic process, 11 clinical subdivisions, research center consisting of 4 research subdivisions and 2 laboratories, and also 14 research laboratories, 32 supply subdivisions and publications department. Glorious staff and graduates of the Academy took part in all russian wars. All famous medical schools were founded in the Academy in XIX-XX centuries. At the present time the Kirov Military Medical Academy is the main military medical university, leading research center and treatment facility of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation.

  14. Sexual assault in the military.

    PubMed

    Castro, Carl Andrew; Kintzle, Sara; Schuyler, Ashley C; Lucas, Carrie L; Warner, Christopher H

    2015-07-01

    Military sexual assault is a pervasive problem throughout the military services, despite numerous initiatives to end it. No doubt the military's lack of progress stems from the complexity of sexual assaults, yet in order to develop effective strategies and programs to end sexual assault, deep understanding and appreciation of these complexities are needed. In this paper, we describe the root causes and numerous myths surrounding sexual assault, the military cultural factors that may unintentionally contribute to sexual assault, and the uncomfortable issues surrounding sexual assault that are often ignored (such as the prevalence of male sexual assault within the military). We conclude by offering a broad, yet comprehensive set of recommendations that considers all of these factors for developing effective strategies and programs for ending sexual assault within in the military.

  15. [Civilian-military coordination].

    PubMed

    de Montravel, G

    2002-01-01

    Current humanitarian emergencies create complex, mutidimensional situations that stimulate simultaneous responses from a wide variety of sources including governments, non-governmental organizations (NGO), United Nations agencies, and private individuals. As a result, it has become essential to establish a coherent framework in which each actor can contribute promptly and effectively to the overall effort. This is the role of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Regardless of the circumstances and level of coordination, cooperation and collaboration between humanitarian and military personnel, it is necessary to bear in mind their objectives. The purpose of humanitarian action is to reduce human suffering. The purpose of military intervention is to stop warfare. The author of this article will discuss the three major obstacles to civilian-military coordination (strategic, tactical, and operational). Operations cannot be conducted smoothly and differences cannot be ironed out without mutual respect between the two parties, an explicit definition of their respective duties and responsibilities, a clear understanding of their cultural differences, and the presence of an organization and facilities for coordination and arbitrage by a neutral referee.

  16. Military Healthcare Battlefield Immunity.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J C

    2012-12-01

    The combatant soldier on the battlefield remains protected from any claim in negligence by the doctrine of combat immunity for any negligent act or omission they may make when fighting. In other words, the combatant soldier does not owe a fellow soldier a duty of care on the battlefield, as the duty of care is non-justiciable. However, the non-combatant Military Healthcare Professional, although sometimes operating in the same hostile circumstances as the fighting soldier, is unlikely to benefit from combat immunity for any clinical negligence on the battlefield. This is because they continue to owe their patient a duty of care, although this has not been tested in the courts. This paper considers if any military healthcare professional could ever benefit from combat immunity, which is unlikely due to their non-combatant status. Instead, this paper suggests that a modified form of immunity; namely, Military Healthcare Battlefield Immunity could be a new, unique and viable doctrine, however, this could only be granted in rare circumstances and to a much lesser degree than combat immunity.

  17. Triage in military settings.

    PubMed

    Falzone, E; Pasquier, P; Hoffmann, C; Barbier, O; Boutonnet, M; Salvadori, A; Jarrassier, A; Renner, J; Malgras, B; Mérat, S

    2017-02-01

    Triage, a medical term derived from the French word "trier", is the practical process of sorting casualties to rationally allocate limited resources. In combat settings with limited medical resources and long transportation times, triage is challenging since the objectives are to avoid overcrowding medical treatment facilities while saving a maximum of soldiers and to get as many of them back into action as possible. The new face of modern warfare, asymmetric and non-conventional, has led to the integrative evolution of triage into the theatre of operations. This article defines different triage scores and algorithms currently implemented in military settings. The discrepancies associated with these military triage systems are highlighted. The assessment of combat casualty severity requires several scores and each nation adopts different systems for triage on the battlefield with the same aim of quickly identifying those combat casualties requiring lifesaving and damage control resuscitation procedures. Other areas of interest for triage in military settings are discussed, including predicting the need for massive transfusion, haemodynamic parameters and ultrasound exploration.

  18. From Augmentation Media to Meme Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Yuzuru

    Computers as meta media are now evolving from augmentation media vehicles to meme media vehicles. While an augmentation media system provides a seamlessly integrated environment of various tools and documents, meme media system provides further functions to edit and distribute tools and documents. Documents and tools on meme media can easily…

  19. Media violence.

    PubMed

    Willis, E; Strasburger, V C

    1998-04-01

    American media are the most violent in the world, and American society is now paying a high price in terms of real life violence. Research has confirmed that mass media violence contributes to aggressive behavior, fear, and desensitization of violence. Television, movies, music videos, computer/video games are pervasive media and represent important influences on children and adolescents. Portraying rewards and punishments and showing the consequences of violence are probably the two most essential contextual factors for viewers as they interpret the meaning of what they are viewing on television. Public health efforts have emphasized public education, media literacy campaign for children and parents, and an increased use of technology to prevent access to certain harmful medial materials.

  20. Military applications of lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Richard A.

    1989-05-01

    Practically every weapon system requires a battery to provide electrical power for various functions. The lithium battery is becoming the 'power source of choice' for a large number of these military systems. Lithium technology offers unique solutions to the combination of requirements imposed by military systems - low weight, low volume, long storage life, low life cycle cost, and immediate readiness over the full military environmental condition spectrum.

  1. [Morbidity in draft military personnel].

    PubMed

    Mukhametzhanov, A M; Smagulov, N K

    2015-01-01

    Military service activity appeared to influence health state of military personnel. Body strain at initial stages of the service, connected with stress situation, affects general body resistance and manifests in higher general morbidity level with transitory disablement that decreases with adaptation. Based on normalized intensity parameters, the equation enables to ease a procedure of evaluation and forecast of transitory disablement morbidity in draft military personnel.

  2. Military Spending in Eastern Europe,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    on defense (the sums are less than the corresponding expenditures by the republics) or whether they involve military spending above and beyond that...certain military expenditures on personnel are included in budgetary categories other than defense spending . Transportation of soldiers to their first... expenditures and forces and military spending decisions in Eastern Europe. iii L SUMMARY Although the Soviet Union is the most threatening potential

  3. An analysis of messages about tobacco in the Military Times magazines.

    PubMed

    Haddock, C Keith; Hoffman, Kevin; Taylor, Jennifer E; Schwab, Lisa; Poston, Walker S C; Lando, Harry A

    2008-07-01

    The Military Times magazines are seen as an independent source of news and information on the military and are widely read by military members. Given the influence of Military Times as a powerful media outlet within the military and marketing to military personnel by the tobacco industry, we examined tobacco messages and advertisements in a one-year sample from each service. No advertisements for cigarettes or other forms of smoked tobacco were found in any issue published in 2005. However, smokeless tobacco products were advertised frequently, with 11 distinct ads occurring in 105 ad placements. During the year targeted in the present study, smokeless tobacco advertising generated approximately US$564,249 in revenue for the publishers of Military Times. A content analysis suggested that the advertisements intended to pair smokeless tobacco use with a pleasant mood and enjoyable events not directly associated with the product itself. In addition, magazine articles about anti-tobacco topics received among the lowest amount of coverage among all pro-health articles. These findings may partially explain the recent significant increase in smokeless tobacco use among military personnel.

  4. Using the British National Formulary effectively.

    PubMed

    Bellerby, Ann; Needham, Deborah Susan

    2016-09-21

    Nursing students, nurses and other healthcare professionals involved in prescribing, dispensing, administration and monitoring of medicines should be able to navigate and use the British National Formulary (BNF) effectively. Recent changes to the structure of the BNF have resulted in new symbols, additional sections in drug and drug-class monographs, and a reduction in the amount of cross-referencing between chapters. This article explores how healthcare professionals can access the information in the BNF to ensure that medicines use is optimised, therapeutic effects are maximised, and adverse drug reactions and drug interactions are minimised.

  5. Nurse education in the British armed forces.

    PubMed

    Carter, Chris; Finnegan, Alan P

    2014-10-21

    Defence nurses form the largest registered specialty in the UK defence medical services. Once qualified, defence nurses maintain and develop their nursing and clinical skills in appropriate healthcare settings, and can be deployed in operational environments such as Afghanistan. Workforce planning and staffing establishment levels are defined to meet the needs of British armed forces, allies and, potentially, local populations. Since the workforce is geographically dispersed, deployed or undertaking non-clinical duties, there are constraints on nurses' attempts to maintain basic skills and access continuing professional development. This article explores the concept and the developing role of defence nurse lecturers in improving educational support for defence nurses.

  6. Checklist of British and Irish Hymenoptera - Chalcidoidea and Mymarommatoidea

    PubMed Central

    Dale-Skey, Natalie; Askew, Richard R.; Noyes, John S.; Livermore, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background A revised checklist of the British and Irish Chalcidoidea and Mymarommatoidea substantially updates the previous comprehensive checklist, dating from 1978. Country level data (i.e. occurrence in England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland and the Isle of Man) is reported where known. New information A total of 1754 British and Irish Chalcidoidea species represents a 22% increase on the number of British species known in 1978. PMID:27346954

  7. Noch Einmal:American English - British English (Once More: American English -- British English).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botts, M.

    1980-01-01

    Replies critically to the article by D. K. Stevenson and R. J. Brunt, "Living English: Seeing the Forest in Spite of the Trees -- On Differences between American English and British English," in this journal, issue 1979/2. A reply by Stevenson and Brunt continues the controversy. (IFS/WGA)

  8. White British; Dual Heritage; British Muslim: Young Britons' Conceptualisation of Identity and Citizenship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basit, Tehmina N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines young British people's conceptualisation of identity and citizenship. Data were gathered through a questionnaire survey from 442 young male and female citizens of majority and minority ethnic origins, aged 14-24 years and at different stages of education, employment and non-employment. This was followed up by in-depth…

  9. The British Monarchy. On the Teaching of British Affairs at College and School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell-Doherty, Julian

    1974-01-01

    Deals with "area study" aspects of the teaching of English in schools and colleges. Using as an example the British monarchy, it is shown how "area study" elements are handled in schoolbooks in use today. Suggestions relating to the subject are also offered. (IFS/WGA)

  10. Military and Contractor Justice in Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    PI) governed under Article 32 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice.xliv For the most serious offenses, such as murder or manslaughter, the IG...mission in Iraq. While the military is governed under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, and the application of deadly force determined...mission of the military should be held accountable for their actions in the same manner as the US military, under the Uniform Code of Military

  11. Some observations on early military anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Houghton, I T

    2006-06-01

    Although anaesthesia was discovered in 1846, pain relief had been used for many years previously. Opium, mandragora, and Indian hemp amongst others have been used since the earliest times as alluded to by many of the classical writers. The use of refrigeration anaesthesia is known to have been recommended a millennium ago although it never had much usage. Very soon after the introduction of ether anaesthesia, it was recommended for military use and the first use by the American forces was in Buena Vista early in 1847 and then again at Vera Cruz. Pirogoff taught and used ether anaesthesia on active service with the Russian forces in the Caucasus in the summer of 1847. Meanwhile Spencer Wells, who was serving with the Royal Navy in Malta, was the first British service medical officer recorded to have used anaesthesia. He went on to write up a series of 106 anaesthetics. The Danes were probably next to use anaesthesia in battle using chloroform in 1848. However, it was not until the Crimean War that anaesthesia began to play an important part in battle surgery with many anaesthetics being given with varying results. The War of the Rebellion was the next war in which anaesthesia was important and the first one in which proper statistics were kept allowing useful analysis. Anaesthesia had irrevocably found its place in battlefield surgery.

  12. Readability in the British Journal of Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hayden, J D

    2008-01-01

    Readability scores predict the ease with which a document can be read and understood. Identification of the factors that affect readability might improve the quality of surgical literature. Electronic copies of submitted, peer reviewed and edited manuscripts of 189 articles published in the British Journal of Surgery from March 2006 to April 2007 were studied. Flesch reading ease scores were calculated for each version. Type of article (meta-analysis, review, randomized trial or other original paper), first language of principal author, number of peer revisions and editor were recorded. Flesch score varied according to type of article (P = 0.004). The mean readability score was lower when English was the first language of the principal author (P = 0.016). There was no significant difference in mean Flesch score between the submitted and accepted (peer reviewed) manuscripts, but a significant increase occurred after editing (P < 0.001), which did not vary between editors. Several factors influence readability. Knowledge of such factors might help authors to improve their scientific writing. Copyright (c) 2007 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd.

  13. Job satisfaction among British physician associates.

    PubMed

    Ritsema, Tamara S; Roberts, Karen A

    2016-12-01

    All British physician associates (PAs) were invited to participate in the annual census of the UK Association of Physician Associates (UKAPA) in May 2014. Each participant completed the Cooper 10-item Job Satisfaction Scale and a PA-specific job satisfaction survey. In general, PAs were found to be satisfied with their work. No factor assessed by the survey had lower than a 66.6% satisfaction rate. Of the factors assessed, PAs were most satisfied with their relationships with the doctors on their teams. They were least satisfied with their ability to use their training and abilities, with only 66.6% of participants reporting satisfaction with this aspect of their work. Like their American colleagues, British PAs are generally satisfied with their work. They are least satisfied with their ability to fully use their training, which is likely due to the youth of the profession, lack of prescriptive rights and lack of understanding of the PA role. © Royal College of Physicians 2016. All rights reserved.

  14. Is the hijab protective? An investigation of body image and related constructs among British Muslim women.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren; Miah, Jusnara; Noorani, Nazerine; Taylor, Donna

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies have reported equivocal findings concerning the impact of wearing a hijab, or Islamic head- and body-cover, on Muslim women's body image. Here, we sought to examine that impact using a larger sample of Muslim women than has been relied upon and a wider range of body image measures. A total of 587 British Muslim women completed a battery of scales assessing their frequency and conservativeness of hijab use, body image variables, attitudes towards the media and beauty ideals, importance of appearance, and religiosity. Preliminary results indicated that 218 women never used the hijab and 369 women used some form of the hijab at least rarely. Controlling for religiosity, women who wore the hijab had more positive body image, lower internalization of media messages about beauty standards, and placed less importance on appearance than women who did not wear the hijab. Among women who wore the hijab, hijab use significantly predicted weight discrepancy and body appreciation over and above religiosity. These results are discussed in terms of the possible protective impact among British Muslim women of wearing the hijab.

  15. Military Implications of Global Warming.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    U.S. environmental issues also have important global implications. This paper analyzes current U.S. Policy as it pertains to global warming and climate...for military involvement to reduce global warming . Global warming and other environmental issues are important to the U.S. military. As the United

  16. Advancing Military Professionalism in Africa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    costs for not having established strong professional militaries are high: persistent instability, chronic poverty, deterred investment, and stunted...Morsi. The constitution that subsequently passed through referendum in December 2012 made the military’s autonomy official. It required that the...Through a new constitution passed by referendum in 2014, the military affirmed autonomy over its budget, immunity for its members from prosecution

  17. Economic Conditions of Military Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosek, James; MacDermid Wadsworth, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors found that the economic circumstances of military families are good, certainly much improved compared with even a decade ago. The military context is nonetheless challenging, with long hours, dangerous work, frequent transfers, and stressful absences during deployment. Service members receive relatively high pay and…

  18. Life as a military spouse.

    PubMed

    Eubanks, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Military spouses live a capricious life. They often move away from everything familiar to support their active duty spouse. Honor, courage, and commitment are values military spouses need to assist them in being strong and resilient. Effective coping skills aid in the various roles these spouses assume, which may cause personal sacrifices to be made in support of the service member.

  19. Managing Military Child Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Based on research as well as on the down-to-earth experiences which come from running a large military child care center, this director's manual provides guidelines for running an effective program. The guidebook, one in a series on the subject of military child care centers, presents advice on the following seven topics: becoming a center…

  20. Soviet Military Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    military lpresence. To cite just one example, a Soviet Navy task force operated in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico from November 1982 to February 1985...year, Other Surface Combatants: Additionally, the Mi Prduction Naval Ship Cmo itlfon. . USSR and NATO USSR and NATO MI.l T6ype 1976’ 1979’ 1m, 101I...the Caribbean, Gulf of Soviet assistance to Grenada has taken the • Mexico and nearby portions of the Atlantic form of supplying weapons, construction

  1. Burns and military clothing.

    PubMed

    McLean, A D

    2001-02-01

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment. The risks during combat are well recognised, but the handling of fuel, oil, munitions and other hot or flammable materials during peacetime deployment and training also imposes an inherent risk of accidental burn injury. Over the last hundred years, the burn threat in combat has ranged from nuclear weapons to small shoulder-launched missiles. Materials such as napalm and white phosphorus plainly present a risk of burn, but the threat extends to encompass personnel in vehicles attacked by anti-armour weapons, large missiles, fuel-air explosives and detonations/conflagrations on weapons platforms such as ships. Large numbers of burn casualties were caused at Pearl Harbor, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam, during the Arab/Israeli Wars and in the Falkland Islands conflict. The threat from burns is unlikely to diminish, indeed new developments in weapons seek to exploit the vulnerability of the serviceman and servicewoman to burns. Clothing can be a barrier to some types of burn--both inherently in the properties of the material, but also by trapping air between clothing layers. Conversely, ignition of the clothing may exacerbate a burn. There is hearsay that burnt clothing products within a wound may complicate the clinical management, or that materials that melt (thermoplastic materials) should not be worn if there is a burn threat. This paper explores the incidence of burn injury, the mechanisms of heat transfer to bare skin and skin covered by materials, and the published evidence for the complication of wound management by materials. Even light-weight combat clothing can offer significant protection to skin from short duration flash burns; the most vulnerable areas are the parts of the body not covered--face and hands. Multilayered combat clothing can offer significant protection for short periods from engulfment by flames; lightweight tropical wear with few layers offers little protection. Under

  2. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    Disorders (month 47).  Dr. Brenner and colleagues’ publication on the cross-cultural adaptation of the Window to Hope (WtoH) intervention will...exposure to suicide and suicide risk among military service members and veterans. Journal of Affective Disorders . doi:10.1016/j.jad.2016.09.043...members and veterans. Journal of Affective Disorders . doi:10.1016/j.jad.2016.09.043 Joiner, T. E., Hom, M. A., Rogers, M. L., Chu, C., Stanley, I. H

  3. Soviet Military Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    situations of crisis and instability in the Third World." Frnt the. Coilltuiliq fth NA TO Foreign Misbrs MeabuzIM AMay 1J9J Au,3 a F~i 1or tD I iC...helicopters. rates of production. Missile Production USSR Aircraft Production USSR Misile Type 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 ICBM. 300 300 200 200 200 Arcr...marines afloat during a crisis provides the ioned landing craft. The ROGOV can embark Soviet Union with a valuable political-military about 550 raval

  4. USSR Report, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    and 24 brigades were destroyed and taken prisoner. The Wehrmacht lost 1,600,000 soldiers and officers. According to German data , irreplaceable...health, taking psychological data into acount, and their physical and general-education preparation. In so doing, how sincere the youth are in...Hospital for Political Affairs Lt-Col Aleksey Tel’nov bade them farewell heartily. The soldiers answered: "Thanks for the help and the care. Thanks, dear military doctors!..." 11409 CSO: 1801/207 END 58

  5. The Importance of Military Cultural Competence.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Eric G; Writer, Brian W; Brim, William

    2016-03-01

    Military cultural competence has recently gained national attention. Experts have posited that limited outcomes in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder and depression in the military may be related to limited familiarity with the military. National surveys have indicated low military cultural competence among providers and limited educational efforts on military culture or pertinent military pathology in medical schools and residency training programs. Military families, with their own unique military cultural identity, have been identified as a population with increased risks associated with deployment. In response to these findings, several curricula regarding military culture have been established and widely distributed. Assessments of military cultural competence have also been developed. The clinical impact of enhanced cultural competence in general has thus far been limited. The military, however, with its highly prescribed cultural identity, may be a model culture for further study.

  6. Beasts, Murrains, and the British Raj:

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Saurabh

    2011-01-01

    Summary Assessments of colonial medicine in India have, until now, focused almost exclusively on questions related to human health. This article shifts attention to the subject of animal health and reexamines existing hypotheses about colonial medicine in India from this new perspective. It looks at the linkages between veterinary medicine and the military and fiscal policies of the colonial state, arguing that animal health in the larger colony remained neglected throughout the late nineteenth century as a result of these policies. In arguing this, the essay examines several areas related to veterinary medicine in India, including bacteriology, veterinary training, horse breeding, and disease control. PMID:22506434

  7. Media Training

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  8. Media Training

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-11

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  9. Demystifying the "Victimized State": A Civil-Military Crisis in Waiting?

    PubMed

    McGarry, Ross

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate prescient issues relating to current and ex-military communities in the United Kingdom who have featured heavily within the policy arena over the past decade in relation to several key areas of importance. It will be illustrated how this population becomes visible within the public imagination (via military losses), how discourses relating to the harms they experience are structured and articulated within political and policy domains (particularly in relation to mental health) via "state talk" (qua Sim), and what the potential social consequences are for politically rendering an unproblematized populist view of current and ex-military communities (i.e., pending crises). This argument is made with the express intention of reengaging critical recognition of the distancing of the military institution from the physical and psychological vulnerability of those who have participated in war and military environments. This is an argument returned to pertinence from the recent publication of the Chilcot Inquiry into British involvement in the Iraq war.

  10. Prospects for Adult Literacy Policy in British Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darville, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Intended to assist in the formulation of effective policies for adult literacy in British Columbia, this paper reviews the current discussion of adult literacy policy and programming across Canada. It also reviews existing policies in Canada and in British Columbia, in education ministries, and in other ministries with interests and activities…

  11. Problem Gambling Treatment within the British National Health Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigbye, Jane; Griffiths, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    According to the latest British Gambling Prevalence Survey, there are approximately 300,000 adult problem gamblers in Great Britain. In January 2007, the "British Medical Association" published a report recommending that those experiencing gambling problems should receive treatment via the National Health Service (NHS). This study…

  12. Problem Gambling Treatment within the British National Health Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigbye, Jane; Griffiths, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    According to the latest British Gambling Prevalence Survey, there are approximately 300,000 adult problem gamblers in Great Britain. In January 2007, the "British Medical Association" published a report recommending that those experiencing gambling problems should receive treatment via the National Health Service (NHS). This study…

  13. Contagious ecthyma in mountain goat of coastal British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Hebert, D M; Samuel, W M; Smith, G W

    1977-04-01

    Contagious ecthyma has been reported previously from mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) in one restricted area of eastern British Columbia. A second focus of infection is reported for mountain goat from western British Columbia. Diagnosis was based on appearance of lesions at necropsy, histopathology and demonstration of poxvirus with the electron microscope. The epizootiology of this infection in mountain goat is discussed briefly.

  14. Knowledge, Character and Professionalisation in Nineteenth-Century British Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Historians have frequently referred to the British Association for the Advancement of Science as an institution that had the professionalisation of British science as its chief aim. This article seeks to complicate this picture by asking what, if any, concept of "professionalisation" would have been understood by nineteenth-century…

  15. Teaching Psychology in American and British Universities: Some Personal Impressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remington, Bob; Green, Patrick

    1988-01-01

    British psychologists, who have taught in both the United States and Great Britain, compare the teaching of psychology in British and U.S. universities. Discussing similarities and differences in course structure, curriculum, teaching methods, and evaluation procedures, they suggest ways in which each system could benefit from some of the other's…

  16. Unions between Foreign Language and Business: British Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, James Calvert

    Traditional British attitudes toward foreigners, which are now being challenged by current economic realities, and the increasing internationalization of British business, which magnifies the need for employees to communicate effectively with people from other countries and cultures, are discussed. A brief overview is provided that covers recent…

  17. British and Finnish Baseball: International Variations on an American Pastime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Emyr W.; Romar, Jan-Erik; Hartman, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Both British and Finnish baseball are easy to introduce, as the specific skills involved in both sports are identical to those used in traditional baseball. If students have the skills to play traditional baseball, they have the skills to play British and Finnish baseball as well. After a brief overview of the unique rules and strategies of these…

  18. British and Finnish Baseball: International Variations on an American Pastime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Emyr W.; Romar, Jan-Erik; Hartman, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Both British and Finnish baseball are easy to introduce, as the specific skills involved in both sports are identical to those used in traditional baseball. If students have the skills to play traditional baseball, they have the skills to play British and Finnish baseball as well. After a brief overview of the unique rules and strategies of these…

  19. Profiles of British Muslim Identity: Adolescent Girls in Birmingham

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutnik, Nimmi; Street, Rebecca Coran

    2010-01-01

    By asking students to fill in 10 statements beginning with "I am..." and a further 10 statements beginning with "I am not..." we constructed profiles of British Muslim ethnic and national identity. Participants were 108 British Muslim girls of mean age 12.6 years studying in a single sex girls' school in Birmingham, UK. Using…

  20. The Misrepresentation of Religion in Modern British (Religious) Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Philip

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to articulate a new perspective on British multi-faith religious education that both complements and, in part, subsumes existing critiques. My argument, while controversial, is straightforward: it is that British religious education has misrepresented the nature of religion in efforts to commend itself as contributing…

  1. Are We There yet? Intercultural Encounters with British Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dasli, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to the current debate on British Studies from the perspective of eight international students attending a British Studies module in part completion of a foundation/access programme in the UK. Drawing on three sets of in-depth student interviews and 15 classroom observations used to triangulate findings, the analysis…

  2. BCASP and the Evolution of School Psychology in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agar, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Since 1992, the British Columbia Association of School Psychologists (BCASP) has been the professional body for school psychologists in British Columbia. In the intervening 24 years, BCASP has been very successful in performing the dual roles of a certifying body and a professional development organization for school psychologists in British…

  3. BCASP and the Evolution of School Psychology in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agar, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Since 1992, the British Columbia Association of School Psychologists (BCASP) has been the professional body for school psychologists in British Columbia. In the intervening 24 years, BCASP has been very successful in performing the dual roles of a certifying body and a professional development organization for school psychologists in British…

  4. The Politics of Britishness: Multiculturalism, Schooling and Social Cohesion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keddie, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This paper is set against a backdrop of contemporary concerns about Britishness. It explores the dominant view that unprecedented levels of cultural diversity within western contexts such as the UK are undermining social cohesion and are attributable to minority groups' failure to connect or assimilate with mainstream "British" (read…

  5. The Genesis of Public Relations in British Colonial Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, Rosaleen

    2001-01-01

    Demonstrates how the British Colonial Office employed public relations strategies as they administered the British colony of Northern Rhodesia before, during, and after World War II. Demonstrates how civil servants in London and colonial officials implemented public relations policies, strategies, and tactics on an ad hoc basis, covering political…

  6. Soaps and Suspicious Activity: Dramatic Experiences in British Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferree, Angela M.

    2001-01-01

    Offers examples of dramatic experiences (student produced soap operas) in two classrooms in British comprehensive secondary schools. Concludes that students in other countries would find such experiences as meaningful and enjoyable as their British counterparts. Notes that the two teachers managed to be flexible, appropriating effective…

  7. Shakespearean Intertexts and European Identities in Contemporary Black British Fiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muñoz-Valdivieso, Sofía

    2012-01-01

    The article analyses the presence of William Shakespeare as intertext in three recent novels by black British writers which deploy the work of the Bard as they explore British and European identities. Caryl Phillips's "The Nature of Blood" recreates an Othello-like figure who in early Modern Venice struggles to come to terms with his…

  8. 78 FR 72598 - Airworthiness Directives; British Aerospace Regional Aircraft Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; British Aerospace... directive (AD) for British Aerospace Regional Aircraft Jetstream Series 3101 and Jetstream Model 3201... after receipt. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Taylor Martin, Aerospace Engineer, FAA, Small...

  9. Soaps and Suspicious Activity: Dramatic Experiences in British Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferree, Angela M.

    2001-01-01

    Offers examples of dramatic experiences (student produced soap operas) in two classrooms in British comprehensive secondary schools. Concludes that students in other countries would find such experiences as meaningful and enjoyable as their British counterparts. Notes that the two teachers managed to be flexible, appropriating effective…

  10. Teaching Psychology in American and British Universities: Some Personal Impressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remington, Bob; Green, Patrick

    1988-01-01

    British psychologists, who have taught in both the United States and Great Britain, compare the teaching of psychology in British and U.S. universities. Discussing similarities and differences in course structure, curriculum, teaching methods, and evaluation procedures, they suggest ways in which each system could benefit from some of the other's…

  11. The Limits of Movement Politics: The Case of British Feminism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Dorothy M.

    Analysis of the British feminist movement from 1850 to 1975 reveals a constant struggle by feminists for equality in the face of legal and social restrictions and a corresponding lack of response by the British government to movement demands. The political organization of the feminist movement is described in four phases. During the first phase,…

  12. Unions between Foreign Language and Business: British Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, James Calvert

    Traditional British attitudes toward foreigners, which are now being challenged by current economic realities, and the increasing internationalization of British business, which magnifies the need for employees to communicate effectively with people from other countries and cultures, are discussed. A brief overview is provided that covers recent…

  13. The Misrepresentation of Religion in Modern British (Religious) Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Philip

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to articulate a new perspective on British multi-faith religious education that both complements and, in part, subsumes existing critiques. My argument, while controversial, is straightforward: it is that British religious education has misrepresented the nature of religion in efforts to commend itself as contributing…

  14. British Columbia log export policy: historical review and analysis.

    Treesearch

    Craig W. Shinn

    1993-01-01

    Log exports have been restricted in British Columbia for over 100 years. The intent of the restriction is to use the timber in British Columbia to encourage development of forest industry, employment, and well-being in the Province. Logs have been exempted from the within-Province manufacturing rule at various times, in varying amounts, for different reasons, and by...

  15. Shakespearean Intertexts and European Identities in Contemporary Black British Fiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muñoz-Valdivieso, Sofía

    2012-01-01

    The article analyses the presence of William Shakespeare as intertext in three recent novels by black British writers which deploy the work of the Bard as they explore British and European identities. Caryl Phillips's "The Nature of Blood" recreates an Othello-like figure who in early Modern Venice struggles to come to terms with his…

  16. Are We There yet? Intercultural Encounters with British Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dasli, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to the current debate on British Studies from the perspective of eight international students attending a British Studies module in part completion of a foundation/access programme in the UK. Drawing on three sets of in-depth student interviews and 15 classroom observations used to triangulate findings, the analysis…

  17. Military sexual trauma.

    PubMed

    Wieland, Diane M; Haley, Jenna L; Bouder, Michelle

    2011-12-01

    Nurses' awareness of MST as a specific type of sexual assault within the military culture and sensitivity to the physical and psychological symptoms are important aspects of care. Nurses must treat the physical and emotional components of sexual assault in all settings; however, referral to the veterans administration programs and resources is key for the woman veteran to receive the specialized care developed by the healthcare system. Women veterans who have PTSD from MST and combat exposure are prone to depression, suicide and substance use/abuse. Nurses must not fear asking the woman if she is having suicidal thoughts or has a plan and intent to follow through with the plan. MST and PTSD may result in internalized anger, shame, self-blame, helplessness, hopelessness and powerlessness. Patient safety is of utmost importance. Assessing Patients for Sexual Violence, A Guide for Health Care Providers (2009) is a useful resource for nurses. The National Center for PTSD (2009) newsletter on the topic of MST includes a list of research studies. The work of Benedict (2007) and Corbett (2007) provide additional personal accounts of women soldiers who were in the Middle East conflicts. The nurse's referral to specialized services to treat MST and PTSD with evidence-based therapies is a crucial first step in the resiliency and well-being of these brave women who have served in all branches of the U.S. military.

  18. Cognitive development: No stages please - we're British.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Usha

    2001-02-01

    British cognitive developmental psychology is characterized by its interest in philosophical questions, its preference for linking basic research to applied issues in education and cognitive disorders, and its willingness to learn both methodologically and theoretically from work in animal psychology and in physiology more generally. It has also been influenced profoundly by Jean Piaget's cognitive stage theory although in general British work has focused on demonstrating early strengths, rather than early deficits, in infant and child cognition. Following an overview of British work that encompasses past and present interests, issues and challenges for the future are highlighted. While the perspectives of the founding members of the British Psychological Society (BPS), as outlined by Edgell (1947), are still apparent in British research in cognitive developmental psychology today, it is argued that future cognitive work must become even more interdisciplinary and that the symbiotic relationship between research in adult cognition and in cognitive development needs greater recognition.

  19. Cognitive development: no stages please--we're British.

    PubMed

    Goswami, U

    2001-02-01

    British cognitive developmental psychology is characterized by its interest in philosophical questions, its preference for linking basic research to applied issues in education and cognitive disorders, and its willingness to learn both methodologically and theoretically from work in animal psychology and in physiology more generally. It has also been influenced profoundly by Jean Piaget's cognitive stage theory although in general British work has focused on demonstrating early strengths, rather than early deficits, in infant and child cognition. Following an overview of British work that encompasses past and present interests, issues and challenges for the future are highlighted. While the perspectives of the founding members of the British Psychological Society (BPS), as outlined by Edgell (1947), are still apparent in British research in cognitive developmental psychology today, it is argued that future cognitive work must become even more interdisciplinary and that the symbiotic relationship between research in adult cognition and in cognitive development needs greater recognition.

  20. Migrant labour, racism and the British National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Kyriakides, Christopher; Virdee, Satnam

    2003-11-01

    This study explores the dynamics of racism, specifically its generation and reproduction as an ideology, and its role in affecting the reception and occupational location of migrant medical labour in Britain. It is argued that the treatment of 'overseas doctors' in Britain draws on a complex interplay between racism and nationalism underpinned by the historical construction of 'welfarism' as a moral legitimator of 'Britishness'. Through an exploration of internal and external immigration controls introduced with the aim of regulating migrant labour, we demonstrate how British social policy and elite discourses of 'race' combine to construct moral prescriptions of threat such that migrants and British-born 'non-whites' entering the British medical profession are forced to negotiate 'saviour/pariah' ascriptions indicative of discriminatory but contradictory processes specific to the operation of the British National Health Service as a normative institution.

  1. Mercury, cadmium, and lead in British otters

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, C.F.; Last, N.I.; Macdonald, S.M.

    1986-12-01

    Otters (subfamily Lutrinae), at the top of the food chain and feeding largely on fish, are likely to be especially vulnerable to the effects of bioaccumulating pollutants, while their aquatic habitat is often a sink for such chemicals derived from agricultural, industrial and domestic sources. The European otter (Lutra lutra) has shown substantial declines through much of its range over the past 30 years, which have been attributed to pollution by organochlorines. There are few published data on metals in tissues of European otters and these refer only to mercury. The present paper reports on burdens of mercury, cadmium and lead in tissues of a sample of British otters collected between 1982 and 1984.

  2. Women's and men's careers in British sociology.

    PubMed

    Platt, Jennifer

    2004-06-01

    The career experience of men and women in British university sociology since 1950 is compared, using published data for the whole group and fresh data from a sample of departments. It is shown that, when like is compared with like, the outcomes for men and for women have not been as different as is often suggested; family reasons were more salient in women's careers, but in the end have not made much difference to their destinations. But the proportions of women recruited have varied over time, and the experience of both sexes has been strongly influenced by historical factors affecting different periods. Within the constraints which those have imposed, individuals have not all made the same choices, and that too has affected the outcomes.

  3. Metaphyseal osteopathy in a British Shorthair cat.

    PubMed

    Adagra, Carl; Spielman, Derek; Adagra, Angela; Foster, Darren J

    2015-04-01

    Metaphyseal osteopathy, otherwise known as hypertrophic osteodystrophy, is a disease that causes pyrexia and lethargy accompanied by pain in the thoracic and pelvic limbs of rapidly growing large-breed dogs. While metaphyseal osteopathy has been descibed in association with slipped capital femoral epiphysis in cats, it has not previously been reported as a cause of limb pain and pyrexia in this species. A 7-month-old British Shorthair cat presented with a 1 month history of pyrexia, lethargy and pain in all limbs. Investigation included radiographs of the limbs and chest, abdominal ultrasound, serum biochemical analysis, haematology, bone biopsy, joint fluid aspiration and cytology. Findings were consistent with a diagnosis of metaphyseal osteopathy. The cat's clinical signs resolved following the administration of prednisolone. Symptoms recurred 1 month after the cessation of prednisolone therapy, but resolved when administration was resumed.

  4. Telemedicine in the British Antarctic survey.

    PubMed

    Grant, Iain C

    2004-12-01

    Medicine in the Antarctic is probably the most isolated situation in which a doctor can practise, differing in degree of severity even from that of the Arctic region. The increasing use of Telemedicine has helped to reduce this isolation and to improve access to secondary healthcare for those who live in the most remote bases in the world. The article describes the way in which Antarctic Telemedicine has evolved in the British Antarctic survey, outlining the use of low cost and low technology systems to improve the availability of emergency advice, both to the doctor and to isolated field parties, specialist consultation, medical education, and healthcare records. The Antarctic is a useful proving ground for technologies which may have applications in space and other extreme and isolated environments.

  5. Homosexual parents in British custody appeals.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Paul

    2003-04-01

    6 British child custody appeal cases including a homosexual parent were compared with 6 randomly drawn appeal cases between heterosexual parents for parental and mental instability, partners' instability, residential instability, criminality, and lying, and having harmed the children and exposing children to harms. In 3 of the 6 cases the homosexual or his associates were recorded as engaging in criminality, in another 2 cases with lying. In one of the 6 homosexual cases the children were recorded as harmed. The 9 recorded harms or probable harms to children in cases involving a homosexual parent were attributed to the homosexual or her associates: children were recorded as harmed and exposed to the harm of neglect in one of the 6 comparison cases.

  6. Coastal topography - Anegada, British Virgin Islands, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fredericks, Xan; ten Brink, Uri S.; Atwater, Brian F.; Kranenburg, Christine J.; Nagle, David B.

    2016-01-01

    These datasets provide lidar-derived topography for Anegada and a portion of the submerged environs. Elevation measurements were acquired on January 21, 2014 by an Optech Orion M300, and on March 19-20, 2014 by the second-generation Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL-B).The authors acknowledge Emily Klipp, Chris Pali, Virgil Rabine, Rudy Troche, and Wayne Wright, all formerly of the USGS; Sharlene DaBreo, Jason Penn, and Christopher Williams of the Department of Disaster Management, British Virgin Islands; Alberto López of the University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez; and Brian Andrews, Verita Friesner, and Craig Weaver of the USGS for their extensive logistical efforts, coordination contributions, and data support.

  7. Getting a peace of the action: measures of post traumatic stress in UK military peacekeepers

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Neil; Iversen, Amy; Hull, Lisa; Bland, Duncan; Wessely, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to measure prevalence of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a sample of UK Armed Forces peacekeepers. The study also aimed to explore the influence of deploying without an established peer group (deployment status) upon health outcomes using an accepted diagnostic tool for PTSD (PCL-M) and an alternative measure of post-traumatic distress. Design Using a sub-sample of the King's military cohort we surveyed personnel that deployed on peacekeeping operations between 1991 and 2000 (n=1198). Setting Respondents' mean age was 36 years (min, 23 to max, 60) and 81% (n=964) were serving in the Armed Forces at the time of participation. Main outcome measures PTSD prevalence was determined in British military peacekeepers using the PLC-M (cut-offs 44 and 50), the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) and a composite brief measure of potential post traumatic symptomology, ‘PostTraumatic Stress Reaction’ (PTSR) for comparison. Results PTSD prevalence varied from 3.6 to 5.5%. Officers and married personnel were less likely to be cases. Neither gender, age or deployment status influenced PTSD prevalence. Conclusions PTSD was an uncommon disorder in this sample of British military peacekeepers, with prevalence rates being lower than those reported by other nations. Deploying without an established peer group was not associated with developing PTSD. We postulate that differences in culture and operational practices may account for the lower rates of PTSD. PMID:18299627

  8. Media Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.; Pyrillis, Rita; Rosario, Ruben; Stuart, Reginald; Zinngrabe, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    This article presents five vignettes, written by veteran journalists, that focus on the current and future state of journalism. Despite almost daily reports of media consolidation and newspaper layoffs, the journalists sound a cautionary but optimistic tone about the industry. They weigh in on everything from the threats to diversity to the future…

  9. Media Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.; Pyrillis, Rita; Rosario, Ruben; Stuart, Reginald; Zinngrabe, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    This article presents five vignettes, written by veteran journalists, that focus on the current and future state of journalism. Despite almost daily reports of media consolidation and newspaper layoffs, the journalists sound a cautionary but optimistic tone about the industry. They weigh in on everything from the threats to diversity to the future…

  10. Streaming Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulley, John

    2009-01-01

    At a time when the evolutionary pace of new media resembles the real-time mutation of certain microorganisms, the age-old question of how best to connect with constituents can seem impossibly complex--even for an elite institution plugged into the motherboard of Silicon Valley. Identifying the most effective vehicle for reaching a particular…

  11. Streaming Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulley, John

    2009-01-01

    At a time when the evolutionary pace of new media resembles the real-time mutation of certain microorganisms, the age-old question of how best to connect with constituents can seem impossibly complex--even for an elite institution plugged into the motherboard of Silicon Valley. Identifying the most effective vehicle for reaching a particular…

  12. Assessing public opinion toward the military. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.H.

    1985-05-01

    Opinions and attitudes of the US public toward its military have shifted over the years from strong admiration to fear and contempt. A number of historical and cultural events have helped shape public opinion. Although public opinion is not predicated solely on what happens in an historical and cultural sense, it should be analyzed and documented on the premise that public opinion affects national power, and those things which affect national power are within the realm of interest of the military and national government. A perhaps frightening aspect of the dynamics of shifting public opinion is the dynamics of shifting public opinion is the uncontrolled nature of the shifts and the resultant impact on national power. Also influencing public opinion are developments in weapons and military technology, the massive Soviet propaganda effort, and the mass communications media. This paper is written with the purpose of raising the level of awareness of military and national leaders to the threat to national power which, although lying subtly out of view because it does not pose and immediate threat to our security, nonetheless offers a formidable challenge now. A broad proposal would lay the foundation for proper research and development. (Author)

  13. The Special Relationship: The United States as the British Have Seen It. A Selective Reading List by British Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Esmond, Comp.

    The selective annotated bibliography is a reader's guide to aspects of the American past and present as seen by British writers since the 1940s. Approximately 250 entries provide a sampling of how British students of United States studies perceive the New World. Childrens books are omitted. Nine categories are organized alphabetically by author.…

  14. India and Pakistan Civil-Military Relations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-21

    culturally similar militaries and both countries faced tremendous stresses during their independence. However, in Pakistan the military became involved...and Pakistan. Both countries achieved their independence from Great Britain. They had culturally similar militaries and both countries faced tremendous...countries had culturally similar militaries, and both countries faced tremendous stresses during their early years after independence. However, in

  15. Military Intervention, Kemalism, and Politics in Turkey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    satisfaction the Sultans derived from military campaign and conquest. The dynasty was at its political and economic apex in periods of military expansion...military defeats at the hands of the Romanov and H~psburp Empires reiniorced the military’s central position. as they were granted special privileges in

  16. The Military and the Transition to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelty, Ryan; Kleykamp, Meredith; Segal, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Ryan Kelty, Meredith Kleykamp, and David Segal examine the effect of military service on the transition to adulthood. They highlight changes since World War II in the role of the military in the lives of young adults, focusing especially on how the move from a conscription to an all-volunteer military has changed the way military service affects…

  17. Satellite Power System (SPS) military implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, C. N.

    1978-01-01

    The military implications of the reference satellite power system (SPS) were examined is well as important military related study tasks. Primary areas of investigation were the potential of the SPS as a weapon, for supporting U.S. military preparedness, and for affecting international relations. In addition, the SPS's relative vulnerability to overt military action, terrorist attacks, and sabotage was considered.

  18. 32 CFR 575.1 - Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military Academy. 575.1 Section 575.1 National... MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.1 Military Academy. (a) Organization and administration. (1) The United States Military Academy is under the general direction and supervision of the Department of the Army....

  19. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... Satisfied by June 30, 1997 § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior to that date, credit for military...

  20. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... Satisfied by June 30, 1997 § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior to that date, credit for military service...