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Sample records for brittle bone disease

  1. Children with Brittle Bones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Special help given to children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (brittle bone disease) is described, including adapted equipment to allow for writing and use of a classroom assistant to aid participation in a regular classroom. (CL)

  2. Bone Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... avoid smoking and drinking too much alcohol. Bone diseases can make bones easy to break. Different kinds ... break Osteogenesis imperfecta makes your bones brittle Paget's disease of bone makes them weak Bones can also ...

  3. Johanna and Tommy: Two Preschoolers in Sweden with Brittle Bones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millde, Kristina; Brodin, Jane

    Information is presented for caregivers of Swedish children with osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bones) and their families. Approximately five children with brittle bones are born in Sweden annually. Two main types of brittle bone disease have been identified: congenita and tarda. Typical symptoms include numerous and unexpected fractures, bluish…

  4. Battling Brittle Bones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The accuDEXA(R) Bone Mineral Density Assessment System, manufactured by Schick Technologies, Inc., utilizes "camera on a chip" sensor technology invented and developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Schick's accuDEXA system offers several advantages over traditional osteoporosis tests, which assess bone density loss in the hip and spine, and require specialized personnel to conduct. With accuDEXA, physicians can test the entire body's bone density at a peripheral site, such as the finger, without applying gels or having patients remove garments. Results are achieved in 30 seconds and printed out in less than a minute, compared to the estimated exam time of 15 minutes for hip and spine density analyses. Schick has also applied the CMOS APS technology to a new software product that performs dental radiography using up to 90 percent less radiation exposure than conventional X-rays. Called Computed Dental Radiography(R), the new digital imaging product utilizes an electronic sensor in place of X-ray film to generate sharp and clear images that appear on a computer screen within 3 seconds, and can be enlarged and enhanced to identify problems.

  5. Structural and mechanical differences between collagen homo- and heterotrimers: relevance for the molecular origin of brittle bone disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Wei; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Buehler, Markus J

    2012-02-01

    Collagen constitutes one-third of the human proteome, providing mechanical stability, elasticity, and strength to organisms. Normal type I collagen is a heterotrimer triple-helical molecule consisting of two α-1 chains and one α-2 chain. The homotrimeric isoform of type I collagen, which consists of three α-1 chains, is only found in fetal tissues, fibrosis, and cancer in humans. A mouse model of the genetic brittle bone disease, osteogenesis imperfect, oim, is characterized by a replacement of the α-2 chain by an α-1 chain, resulting also in a homotrimer collagen molecule. Experimental studies of oim mice tendon and bone have shown reduced mechanical strength compared to normal mice. The relationship between the molecular content and the decrease in strength is, however, still unknown. Here, fully atomistic simulations of a section of mouse type I heterotrimer and homotrimer collagen molecules are developed to explore the effect of the substitution of the α-2 chain. We calculate the persistence length and carry out a detailed analysis of the structure to determine differences in structural and mechanical behavior between hetero- and homotrimers. The results show that homotrimer persistence length is half of that of the heterotrimer (96 Å vs. 215 Å), indicating it is more flexible and confirmed by direct mechanical testing. Our structural analyses reveal that in contrast to the heterotrimer, the homotrimer easily forms kinks and freely rotates with angles much larger than heterotrimer. These local kinks may explain the larger lateral distance between collagen molecules seen in the fibrils of oim mice tendon and could have implications for reducing the intermolecular cross-linking, which is known to reduce the mechanical strength. PMID:22325288

  6. Children with Brittle Bones: An Examination of Their Educational Needs and Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Jean

    1983-01-01

    A study of the educational achievements of 40 children (5-16 years old) with osteogenesis imperfecta, brittle bone disease, revealed no differences between Ss and control Ss without the condition in terms of nonverbal intelligence. Differences were found, however, in writing speed. Inteviews with children, teachers, and parents revealed…

  7. Bone disease in hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Bart L

    2014-07-01

    Hypoparathyroidism is a rare disorder that may be acquired or inherited. Postsurgical hypoparathyroidism is responsible for the majority of acquired hypoparathyroidism. Bone disease occurs in hypoparathyroidism due to markedly reduced bone remodeling due to the absence or low levels of parathyroid hormone. Chronically reduced bone turnover in patients with hypoparathyroidism typically leads to higher bone mass than in age- and sex-matched controls. Whether this increased bone density reduces fracture risk is less certain, because while increased bone mineralization may be associated with increased brittleness of bone, this does not appear to be the case in hypoparathyroidism. Treatment of hypoparathyroidism with recombinant parathyroid hormone may reduce bone mineral density but simultaneously strengthen the mechanical properties of bone.

  8. How tough is Brittle Bone? Investigating Osteogenesis Imperfecta in Mouse Bone††

    PubMed Central

    Carriero, A.; Zimmermann, E. A.; Paluszny, A.; Tang, S. Y.; Bale, H.; Busse, B.; Alliston, T.; Kazakia, G.

    2015-01-01

    The multiscale hierarchical structure of bone is naturally optimized to resist fractures. In osteogenesis imperfecta, or brittle bone disease, genetic mutations affect the quality and/or quantity of collagen, dramatically increasing bone fracture risk. Here we reveal how the collagen defect results in bone fragility in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (oim), which has homotrimeric α1(I) collagen. At the molecular level we attribute the loss in toughness to a decrease in the stabilizing enzymatic crosslinks and an increase in non-enzymatic crosslinks, which may break prematurely inhibiting plasticity. At the tissue level, high vascular canal density reduces the stable crack growth, and extensive woven bone limits the crack-deflection toughening during crack growth. This demonstrates how modifications at the bone molecular level have ramifications at larger length scales affecting the overall mechanical integrity of the bone; thus, treatment strategies have to address multiscale properties in order to regain bone toughness. In this regard, findings from the heterozygous oim bone, where defective as well as normal collagen are present, suggest that increasing the quantity of healthy collagen in these bones helps to recover toughness at the multiple length scales. PMID:24420672

  9. [Bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Uebelhart, Brigitte; Rizzoli, René

    2016-01-13

    Calcium intake shows a small impact on bone mineral density and fracture risk. Denosumab is a more potent inhibitor of bone resorption than zoledronate. Abaloparatide, PTHrP analog, increases bone mineral density and decreases fracture incidence. Teriparatide could be delivered via a transdermic device. Romosozumab and odanacatib improve calculated bone strength. Sequential or combined treatments with denosumab and teriparatide could be of interest, but not denosumab followed by teriparatide. Fibrous dysplasia, Paget disease and hypophosphatasia are updated, as well as atypical femoral fracture and osteonecrosis of the jaw.

  10. Metastatic Bone Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bone Disease cont. Page ( 4 ) MBD vs. Primary Bone Cancer The diagnosis of metastatic bone disease should not ... from an unknown primary carcinoma or a primary bone cancer (sarcoma). For example, if an area of bone ...

  11. Brittle teeth with brittle bone in a family for four generations: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Shilpa, P S; David, Chaya M; Kaul, Rachna; Sanjay, C J; Narayan, B K Ram

    2012-04-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfect (DI) is a hereditary dentine disorder affecting both deciduous and permanent teeth. DI is caused by mutations in genes encoding for type I collagen leading to discoloration of teeth. Shield around 30 years ago classified DI into 3 types (type I, II, and III). DI type I is associated with osteogenesis imperfect (OI), which is an inheritable disorder of connective tissue. Bone fragility and fracture of bone with minor trauma are hallmarks of this disorder. The objective of this article is to report and review a rare case of DI with OI affecting 4 generations of the family. Through this article, we intend to highlight genetic influence that affected a family for many generations, discuss the oral manifestations that can lead to the diagnosis of OI, and the importance of early diagnosis of OI. PMID:22919223

  12. An investigation of the mineral in ductile and brittle cortical mouse bone.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Garcia-Tunon, Esther; Mukadam, Quresh; Saiz, Eduardo; Oldknow, Karla J; Farquharson, Colin; Millán, José Luis; Boyde, Alan; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2015-05-01

    Bone is a strong and tough material composed of apatite mineral, organic matter, and water. Changes in composition and organization of these building blocks affect bone's mechanical integrity. Skeletal disorders often affect bone's mineral phase, either by variations in the collagen or directly altering mineralization. The aim of the current study was to explore the differences in the mineral of brittle and ductile cortical bone at the mineral (nm) and tissue (µm) levels using two mouse phenotypes. Osteogenesis imperfecta model, oim(-/-) , mice have a defect in the collagen, which leads to brittle bone; PHOSPHO1 mutants, Phospho1(-/-) , have ductile bone resulting from altered mineralization. Oim(-/-) and Phospho1(-/-) were compared with their respective wild-type controls. Femora were defatted and ground to powder to measure average mineral crystal size using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and to monitor the bulk mineral to matrix ratio via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). XRD scans were run after TGA for phase identification to assess the fractions of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate. Tibiae were embedded to measure elastic properties with nanoindentation and the extent of mineralization with backscattered electron microscopy (BSE SEM). Results revealed that although both pathology models had extremely different whole-bone mechanics, they both had smaller apatite crystals, lower bulk mineral to matrix ratio, and showed more thermal conversion to β-tricalcium phosphate than their wild types, indicating deviations from stoichiometric hydroxyapatite in the original mineral. In contrast, the degree of mineralization of bone matrix was different for each strain: brittle oim(-/-) were hypermineralized, whereas ductile Phospho1(-/-) were hypomineralized. Despite differences in the mineralization, nanoscale alterations in the mineral were associated with reduced tissue elastic moduli in both pathologies. Results indicated that alterations from normal crystal size

  13. Bone Marrow Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem cells or ... marrow makes too many white blood cells Other diseases, such as lymphoma, can spread into the bone ...

  14. Pituitary diseases and bone.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, Gherardo; Chiavistelli, Silvia; Giustina, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Pituitary hormones have direct and indirect effects on bone remodeling, and skeletal fragility is a frequent complication of pituitary diseases. Fragility fractures may occur in many patients with prolactinomas, acromegaly, Cushing disease, and hypopituitarism. As in other forms of secondary osteoporosis, pituitary diseases generally affect bone quality more than bone quantity, and fractures may occur even in the presence of normal or low-normal bone mineral density, making difficult the prediction of fractures in these settings. Treatment of excess and defective pituitary hormone generally improves skeletal health, although some patients remain at high risk for fractures, necessitating treatment with bone-active drugs.

  15. New brittle bone disorder: report of a family with six affected individuals.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, G; Haga, N; Aoki, K; Hamazaki, M; Taniguchi, K; Iwaya, T

    1999-06-01

    We report on a family in which four females and two males in three generations had a previously undescribed brittle bone disorder that was dominantly transmitted through a maternal line. The cardinal manifestations of the disorder comprised dolichocephaly with frontal bossing, hypoplasia of the midface, postpubertal prognathism, micromelic short stature, coarse trabeculae of the entire skeleton, and bone fragility of variable degrees. Mild spondylar modification and iliac hypoplasia were other hallmarks that were recognized in childhood. The proband, a 19-year-old male, was most severely affected with multiple wormian bones in the calvaria, repetitive fractures, intractable bowing of the legs and forearms, and pseudofractures of the long bones with metaphyseal narrowing. His male cousin was next severely affected with angular deformity restricted to the forearm. The four females were much less affected without angular deformity. The mode of inheritance was thus consistent with either an autosomal dominant trait with sex-influence or an X-linked semidominant trait. Histological bone examination in the proband showed atrophy and fibrous degeneration of the lamellar trabeculae and disorganized chondro-osseous junction, which implied that the disorder involved both intramembranous and enchondral ossifications. PMID:10340645

  16. Thrombospondin-2 deficiency in growing mice alters bone collagen ultrastructure and leads to a brittle bone phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Manley, Eugene; Perosky, Joseph E.; Khoury, Basma M.; Reddy, Anita B.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombospondin-2 (TSP2) is a matricellular protein component of the bone extracellular matrix. Long bones of adult TSP2-deficient mice have increased endosteal bone thickness due to expansion of the osteoblast progenitor cell pool, and these cells display deficits in osteoblastic potential. Here, we investigated the effects of TSP2 deficiency on whole bone geometric and mechanical properties in growing 6-wk-old male and female wild-type and TSP2-knockout (KO) mice. Microcomputed tomography and mechanical testing were conducted on femora and L2 vertebrae to assess morphology and whole bone mechanical properties. In a second series of experiments, femoral diaphyses were harvested from wild-type and TSP2-KO mice. Detergent-soluble type I collagen content was determined by Western blot of right femora. Total collagen content was determined by hydroxyproline analysis of left femora. In a third series of experiments, cortical bone was dissected from the anterior and posterior aspects of the femoral middiaphysis and imaged by transmission electron microscopy to visualize collagen fibrils. Microcomputed tomography revealed minimal structural effects of TSP2 deficiency. TSP2 deficiency imparted a brittle phenotype on cortical bone. Femoral tissue mineral density was not affected by TSP2 deficiency. Instead, transmission electron microscopy revealed less intensely stained collagen fibrils with altered morphology in the extracellular matrix assembled by osteoblasts on the anterior surface of TSP2-KO femora. Femoral diaphyseal bone displayed comparable amounts of total collagen, but the TSP2-KO bones had higher levels of detergent-extractable type I collagen. Together, our data suggest that TSP2 is required for optimal collagen fibrillogenesis in bone and thereby contributes to normal skeletal tissue quality. PMID:26272319

  17. Thrombospondin-2 deficiency in growing mice alters bone collagen ultrastructure and leads to a brittle bone phenotype.

    PubMed

    Manley, Eugene; Perosky, Joseph E; Khoury, Basma M; Reddy, Anita B; Kozloff, Kenneth M; Alford, Andrea I

    2015-10-15

    Thrombospondin-2 (TSP2) is a matricellular protein component of the bone extracellular matrix. Long bones of adult TSP2-deficient mice have increased endosteal bone thickness due to expansion of the osteoblast progenitor cell pool, and these cells display deficits in osteoblastic potential. Here, we investigated the effects of TSP2 deficiency on whole bone geometric and mechanical properties in growing 6-wk-old male and female wild-type and TSP2-knockout (KO) mice. Microcomputed tomography and mechanical testing were conducted on femora and L2 vertebrae to assess morphology and whole bone mechanical properties. In a second series of experiments, femoral diaphyses were harvested from wild-type and TSP2-KO mice. Detergent-soluble type I collagen content was determined by Western blot of right femora. Total collagen content was determined by hydroxyproline analysis of left femora. In a third series of experiments, cortical bone was dissected from the anterior and posterior aspects of the femoral middiaphysis and imaged by transmission electron microscopy to visualize collagen fibrils. Microcomputed tomography revealed minimal structural effects of TSP2 deficiency. TSP2 deficiency imparted a brittle phenotype on cortical bone. Femoral tissue mineral density was not affected by TSP2 deficiency. Instead, transmission electron microscopy revealed less intensely stained collagen fibrils with altered morphology in the extracellular matrix assembled by osteoblasts on the anterior surface of TSP2-KO femora. Femoral diaphyseal bone displayed comparable amounts of total collagen, but the TSP2-KO bones had higher levels of detergent-extractable type I collagen. Together, our data suggest that TSP2 is required for optimal collagen fibrillogenesis in bone and thereby contributes to normal skeletal tissue quality.

  18. Autoinflammatory bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Stern, Sara M; Ferguson, Polly J

    2013-11-01

    Autoinflammatory bone disease is a new branch of autoinflammatory diseases caused by seemingly unprovoked activation of the innate immune system leading to an osseous inflammatory process. The inflammatory bone lesions in these disorders are characterized by chronic inflammation that is typically culture negative with no demonstrable organism on histopathology. The most common autoinflammatory bone diseases in childhood include chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis (CNO), synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis syndrome, Majeed syndrome, deficiency of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, and cherubism. In this article, the authors focus on CNO and summarize the distinct genetic autoinflammatory bone syndromes.

  19. Bone and Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Zanchetta, María Belén; Longobardi, Vanesa; Bai, Julio César

    2016-04-01

    More than 50% of untreated patients with celiac disease (CD) have bone loss detected by bone densitometry (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry:DXA). Moreover, patients with CD are more likely to have osteoporosis and fragility fractures, especially of the distal radius. Although still controversial, we recommend DXA screening in all celiac disease patients, particularly in those with symptomatic CD at diagnosis and in those who present risk factors for fracture such as older age, menopausal status, previous fracture history, and familial hip fracture history. Bone microarchitecture, especially the trabecular network, may be deteriorated, explaining the higher fracture risk in these patients. Adequate calcium and vitamin D supplementation are also recommended to optimize bone recovery, especially during the first years of gluten free diet (GFD). If higher fracture risk persists after 1 or 2 years of GFD, specific osteoactive treatment may be necessary to improve bone health.

  20. Hypercalciuric Bone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favus, Murray J.

    2008-09-01

    Hypercalciuria plays an important causal role in many patients with calcium oxalate (CaOx) stones. The source of the hypercalciuria includes increased intestinal Ca absorption and decreased renal tubule Ca reabsorption. In CaOx stone formers with idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH), Ca metabolic balance studies have revealed negative Ca balance and persistent hypercalciuria in the fasting state and during low dietary Ca intake. Bone resorption may also contribute to the high urine Ca excretion and increase the risk of bone loss. Indeed, low bone mass by DEXA scanning has been discovered in many IH patients. Thiazide diuretic agents reduce urine Ca excretion and may increase bone mineral density (BMD), thereby reducing fracture risk. Dietary Ca restriction that has been used unsuccessfully in the treatment of CaOx nephrolithiasis in the past may enhance negative Ca balance and accelerate bone loss. DEXA scans may demonstrate low BMD at the spine, hip, or forearm, with no predictable pattern. The unique pattern of bone histologic changes in IH differs from other causes of low DEXA bone density including postmenopausal osteoporosis, male hypogonadal osteoporosis, and glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Hypercalciuria appears to play an important pathologic role in the development of low bone mass, and therefore correction of urine Ca losses should be a primary target for treatment of the bone disease accompanying IH.

  1. Oral Health and Bone Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Bones Resources For Your Information Skeletal Bone Density and Dental Concerns The portion of the jawbone ... who do not have the disease. Low bone density in the jaw can result in other dental ...

  2. Bone-immune cell crosstalk: bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Mori, Giorgio; D'Amelio, Patrizia; Faccio, Roberta; Brunetti, Giacomina

    2015-01-01

    Bone diseases are associated with great morbidity; thus, the understanding of the mechanisms leading to their development represents a great challenge to improve bone health. Recent reports suggest that a large number of molecules produced by immune cells affect bone cell activity. However, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. This review aims to shed new lights into the mechanisms of bone diseases involving immune cells. In particular, we focused our attention on the major pathogenic mechanism underlying periodontal disease, psoriatic arthritis, postmenopausal osteoporosis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, metastatic solid tumors, and multiple myeloma. PMID:26000310

  3. Bone-immune cell crosstalk: bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Mori, Giorgio; D'Amelio, Patrizia; Faccio, Roberta; Brunetti, Giacomina

    2015-01-01

    Bone diseases are associated with great morbidity; thus, the understanding of the mechanisms leading to their development represents a great challenge to improve bone health. Recent reports suggest that a large number of molecules produced by immune cells affect bone cell activity. However, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. This review aims to shed new lights into the mechanisms of bone diseases involving immune cells. In particular, we focused our attention on the major pathogenic mechanism underlying periodontal disease, psoriatic arthritis, postmenopausal osteoporosis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, metastatic solid tumors, and multiple myeloma.

  4. Marble Bone Disease: A Rare Bone Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Harinathbabu, Maheswari; Thillaigovindan, Ranjani; Prabhu, Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis, or marble bone disease, is a rare skeletal disorder due to a defective function of the osteoclasts. This defect renders bones more susceptible to osteomyelitis due to decreased vascularity. This disorder is inherited as autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive. Healthcare professionals should urge these patients to maintain their oral health as well as general health, as this condition makes these patients more susceptible to frequent infections and fractures. This case report emphasizes the signs and symptoms of marble bone disease and presents clinical and radiographic findings.  PMID:26594603

  5. Diagnosis of metabolic bone disease

    SciTech Connect

    Grech, P.; Martin, T.J.; Barrington, N.A.; Ell, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents a reference on the radiologic evaluation, features, and differential diagnosis of metabolic diseases involving the whole skeleton, calcium deficiencies resulting from pharmacologic agents, and bone changes related to endocrine disturbances. It also stresses how radiology, nuclear medicine, and biochemistry - either alone or in concert - contribute to clinical diagnosis. It covers renal bone disease, Paget's disease, hyperphosphatasia, extraskeletal mineralization, metabolic bone disorders related to malnutrition, tumors, plus radionuclide studies including materials and methods.

  6. Theoretical effects of fully ductile versus fully brittle behaviors of bone tissue on the strength of the human proximal femur and vertebral body.

    PubMed

    Nawathe, Shashank; Yang, Haisheng; Fields, Aaron J; Bouxsein, Mary L; Keaveny, Tony M

    2015-05-01

    The influence of the ductility of bone tissue on whole-bone strength represents a fundamental issue of multi-scale biomechanics. To gain insight, we performed a computational study of 16 human proximal femurs and 12 T9 vertebral bodies, comparing the whole-bone strength for the two hypothetical bounding cases of fully brittle versus fully ductile tissue-level failure behaviors, all other factors, including tissue-level elastic modulus and yield stress, held fixed. For each bone, a finite element model was generated (60-82 μm element size; up to 120 million elements) and was virtually loaded in habitual (stance for femur, compression for vertebra) and non-habitual (sideways fall, only for femur) loading modes. Using a geometrically and materially non-linear model, the tissue was assumed to be either fully brittle or fully ductile. We found that, under habitual loading, changing the tissue behavior from fully ductile to fully brittle reduced whole-bone strength by 38.3±2.4% (mean±SD) and 39.4±1.9% for the femur and vertebra, respectively (p=0.39 for site difference). These reductions were remarkably uniform across bones, but (for the femur) were greater for non-habitual (57.1±4.7%) than habitual loading (p<0.001). At overall structural failure, there was 5-10-fold less failed tissue for the fully brittle than fully ductile cases. These theoretical results suggest that the whole-bone strength of the proximal femur and vertebra can vary substantially between fully brittle and fully ductile tissue-level behaviors, an effect that is relatively insensitive to bone morphology but greater for non-habitual loading.

  7. Polarization in Raman spectroscopy helps explain bone brittleness in genetic mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski, Alexander J.; Pence, Isaac J.; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Zein-Sabatto, Ahbid; Huszagh, Meredith C.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Nyman, Jeffry S.

    2014-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been extensively used to characterize bone composition. However, the link between bone biomechanics and RS measures is not well established. Here, we leveraged the sensitivity of RS polarization to organization, thereby assessing whether RS can explain differences in bone toughness in genetic mouse models for which traditional RS peak ratios are not informative. In the selected mutant mice-activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) or matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) knock-outs-toughness is reduced but differences in bone strength do not exist between knock-out and corresponding wild-type controls. To incorporate differences in the RS of bone occurring at peak shoulders, a multivariate approach was used. Full spectrum principal components analysis of two paired, orthogonal bone orientations (relative to laser polarization) improved genotype classification and correlation to bone toughness when compared to traditional peak ratios. When applied to femurs from wild-type mice at 8 and 20 weeks of age, the principal components of orthogonal bone orientations improved age classification but not the explanation of the maturation-related increase in strength. Overall, increasing polarization information by collecting spectra from two bone orientations improves the ability of multivariate RS to explain variance in bone toughness, likely due to polarization sensitivity to organizational changes in both mineral and collagen.

  8. Polarization in Raman spectroscopy helps explain bone brittleness in genetic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Makowski, Alexander J.; Pence, Isaac J.; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Zein-Sabatto, Ahbid; Huszagh, Meredith C.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Nyman, Jeffry S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been extensively used to characterize bone composition. However, the link between bone biomechanics and RS measures is not well established. Here, we leveraged the sensitivity of RS polarization to organization, thereby assessing whether RS can explain differences in bone toughness in genetic mouse models for which traditional RS peak ratios are not informative. In the selected mutant mice—activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) or matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) knock-outs—toughness is reduced but differences in bone strength do not exist between knock-out and corresponding wild-type controls. To incorporate differences in the RS of bone occurring at peak shoulders, a multivariate approach was used. Full spectrum principal components analysis of two paired, orthogonal bone orientations (relative to laser polarization) improved genotype classification and correlation to bone toughness when compared to traditional peak ratios. When applied to femurs from wild-type mice at 8 and 20 weeks of age, the principal components of orthogonal bone orientations improved age classification but not the explanation of the maturation-related increase in strength. Overall, increasing polarization information by collecting spectra from two bone orientations improves the ability of multivariate RS to explain variance in bone toughness, likely due to polarization sensitivity to organizational changes in both mineral and collagen. PMID:25402627

  9. Metabolic bone disease in gut diseases.

    PubMed

    Lipkin, E W

    1998-06-01

    A wide spectrum of gastrointestinal illnesses impairs bone health and can result in bone pain, demineralization, and fracture. This article summarizes current knowledge of the skeletal pathology exhibited in patients with diseases of the liver, biliary tree, pancreas, and bowel. Mechanisms responsible for these syndromes and treatment options are discussed. This article enhances the practicing gastroenterologist's knowledge of the implications of gastrointestinal illness for bone. PMID:9650030

  10. Preventing and Treating Brittle Bones and Osteoporosis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... living, growing tissue. It is made mostly of collagen, a protein that provides a soft framework, and ... a mineral that strengthens and hardens the framework. Collagen and calcium combine to make bone flexible, strong, ...

  11. Bone disease in primary hypercalciuria

    PubMed Central

    Sella, Stefania; Cattelan, Catia; Realdi, Giuseppe; Giannini, Sandro

    2008-01-01

    Primary Hypercalciuria (PH) is very often accompanied with some degrees of bone demineralization. The most frequent clinical condition in which this association has been observed is calcium nephrolithiasis. In patients affected by this disorder bone density is very frequently low and increased susceptibility to fragility fractures is reported. The very poor definition of this bone disease from a histomorphometric point of view is a crucial aspect. At present, the most common finding seems to be a low bone turnover condition. Many factors are involved in the complex relationships between bone loss and PH. Since bone loss was mainly reported in patients with fasting hypercalciuria, a primary alteration in bone metabolism was proposed as a cause of both hypercalciuria and bone demineralization. This hypothesis was strengthened by the observation that some bone resorbing-cytokines, such as IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α are high in hypercalciuric patients. The effect of an excessive response to the acid load induced by dietary protein intake seems an additional factor explaining a primitive alteration of bone. The intestine plays a major role in the clinical course of bone disease in PH. Patients with absorptive hypercalciuria less frequently show bone disease and a reduction in dietary calcium greatly increases the probability of bone loss in PH subjects. It has recently been reported that greater bone loss is associated with a larger increase in intestinal calcium absorption in PH patients. Considering the absence of PTH alterations, it was proposed that this is not a compensatory phenomenon, but probably the marker of disturbed cell calcium transport, involving both intestinal and bone tissues. While renal hypercalciuria is rather uncommon, the kidney still seems to play a role in the pathogenesis of bone loss of PH patients, possibly via the effect of mild to moderate urinary phosphate loss with secondary hypophosphatemia. In conclusion, bone loss is very common in PH

  12. Bone Disease after Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bouquegneau, Antoine; Salam, Syrazah; Delanaye, Pierre; Eastell, Richard; Khwaja, Arif

    2016-07-01

    Bone and mineral disorders occur frequently in kidney transplant recipients and are associated with a high risk of fracture, morbidity, and mortality. There is a broad spectrum of often overlapping bone diseases seen after transplantation, including osteoporosis as well as persisting high- or low-turnover bone disease. The pathophysiology underlying bone disorders after transplantation results from a complex interplay of factors, including preexisting renal osteodystrophy and bone loss related to a variety of causes, such as immunosuppression and alterations in the parathyroid hormone-vitamin D-fibroblast growth factor 23 axis as well as changes in mineral metabolism. Management is complex, because noninvasive tools, such as imaging and bone biomarkers, do not have sufficient sensitivity and specificity to detect these abnormalities in bone structure and function, whereas bone biopsy is not a widely available diagnostic tool. In this review, we focus on recent data that highlight improvements in our understanding of the prevalence, pathophysiology, and diagnostic and therapeutic strategies of mineral and bone disorders in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:26912549

  13. [Inflammatory bowel disease and bone decreased bone mineral density].

    PubMed

    Hisamatsu, Tadakazu; Wada, Yasuyo; Kanai, Takanori

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic bone diseases such as osteopenia and osteoporosis increase the risk of bone fracture that negatively affects quality of life of individuals. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease(IBD), including ulcerative colitis(UC)and Crohn's disease(CD), have been shown to be at increased risk of decreased bone mineral density, however frequency of metabolic bone disease in IBD and identified risk factors are varied among reports. PMID:26503868

  14. Paget's Disease of Bone

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment can prevent some symptoms from getting worse. Treatments include medicines and sometimes surgery. A good diet and exercise might also help. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  15. FGF23 associated bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Liao, Eryuan

    2013-03-01

    Recently, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) has sparked widespread interest because of its potential role in regulating phosphate and vitamin D metabolism. In this review, we summarized the FGF superfamily, the mechanism of FGF23 on phosphate and vitamin D metabolism, and the FGF23 related bone disease.

  16. Pain and Paget's Disease of Bone

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pub. No. 15-7918 NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center 2 AMS Circle Bethesda, MD ... another language, contact the NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center at NIHBoneInfo@mail.nih.gov . ...

  17. What Is Paget's Disease of Bone?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Other Related Conditions: NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center 2 AMS Circle Bethesda, MD ... preparation of this publication. NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center 2 AMS Circle Bethesda, MD ...

  18. Denosumab for bone diseases: translating bone biology into targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsourdi, Elena; Rachner, Tilman D; Rauner, Martina; Hamann, Christine; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2011-12-01

    Signalling of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) ligand (RANKL) through RANK is a critical pathway to regulate the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts and, hence, a master regulator of bone resorption. Increased RANKL activity has been demonstrated in diseases characterised by excessive bone loss such as osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteolytic bone metastases. The development and approval of denosumab, a fully MAB against RANKL, has heralded a new era in the treatment of bone diseases by providing a potent, targeted and reversible inhibitor of bone resorption. This article summarises the molecular and cellular biology of the RANKL/RANK system and critically reviews preclinical and clinical studies that have established denosumab as a promising novel therapy for metabolic and malignant bone diseases. We will discuss the potential indications for denosumab along with a critical review of safety and analyse its potential within the concert of established therapies.

  19. Photodynamic therapy of diseased bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisland, Stuart K.; Yee, Albert; Siewerdsen, Jeffery; Wilson, Brian C.; Burch, Shane

    2005-08-01

    Objective: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) defines the oxygen-dependent reaction that occurs upon light-mediated activation of a photosensitizing compound, culminating in the generation of cytotoxic, reactive oxygen species, predominantly, singlet oxygen. We are investigating PDT treatment of diseased bone. Methods: Using a rat model of human breast cancer (MT-1)-derived bone metastasis we confirmed the efficacy of benzoporphyrin-derivative monoacid (BPD-MA)-PDT for treating metastatic lesions within vertebrae or long bones. Results: Light administration (150 J) 15 mins after BPDMA (2.5 mg/Kg, i.v.) into the lumbar (L3) vertebra of rats resulted in complete ablation of the tumour and surrounding bone marrow 48 hrs post-PDT without paralysis. Porcine vertebrae provided a model comparable to that of human for light propagation (at 150 J/cm) and PDT response (BPD-MA; 6 mg/m2, i.v.) in non-tumour vertebrae. Precise fibre placement was afforded by 3-D cone beam computed tomography. Average penetration depth of light was 0.16 +/- 0.04 cm, however, the necrotic/non-necrotic interface extended 0.6 cm out from the treatment fiber with an average incident fluence rate of 4.3 mW/cm2. Non-necrotic tissue damage was evident 2 cm out from the treatment fiber. Current studies involving BPD-MA-PDT treatment of primary osteosarcomas in the forelimbs of dogs are very promising. Magnetic resonance imaging 24 hr post treatment reveal well circumscribed margins of treatment that encompass the entire 3-4 cm lesion. Finally, we are also interested in using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) mediated PDT to treat osteomyelitis. Response to therapy was monitored as changes in bioluminescence signal of staphylococcus aureus (SA)-derived biofilms grown onto 0.5 cm lengths of wire and subjected to ALA-PDT either in vitro or in vivo upon implant into the intramedullary space of rat tibia. Transcutaneous delivery of PDT (75 J/cm2) effectively eradicated SAbiofilms within bone. Conclusions: Results support

  20. Metabolic bone diseases in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rubin; Chouhan, Kanwaljit K

    2012-10-01

    Metabolic bone disease after kidney transplantation has a complex pathophysiology and heterogeneous histology. Pre-existing renal osteodystrophy may not resolve completely, but continue or evolve into a different osteodystrophy. Rapid bone loss immediately after transplant can persist, at a lower rate, for years to come. These greatly increase the risk of bone fracture and vertebral collapse. Each patient may have multiple risk factors of bone loss, such as steroids usage, hypogonadism, persistent hyperparathyroidism (HPT), poor allograft function, metabolic acidosis, hypophosphatemia, vitamin D deficiency, aging, immobility and chronic disease. Clinical management requires a comprehensive approach to address the underlying and ongoing disease processes. Successful prevention of bone loss has been shown with vitamin D, bisphosphonates, calcitonin as well as treatment of hypogonadism and HPT. Novel approach to restore the normal bone remodeling and improve the bone quality may be needed in order to effectively decrease bone fracture rate in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:24175250

  1. MiRNAs in bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Moore, Benjamin T; Xiao, Peng

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), which mainly inhibit protein expression by targeting the 3'UTR (untranslated region) of mRNAs, are known to play various roles in the pathogenesis of many different types of diseases. Specifically, in bone diseases, recent emphasis has been placed on the involvement of miRNAs in the differentiation and proliferation of bone and cartilage cells, particularly with regards to how these mechanisms contribute to bone homeostasis. In this review, we summarize miRNAs that are important in the differentiation and proliferation of bone cells, and specific miRNAs associated with bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. This review also provides the perspective that miRNA studies will identify not only new mechanisms in basic bone research, but also potential novel diagnostic biomarkers and drug targets for bone diseases.

  2. Alterations in lignin content and phenylpropanoids pathway in date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) tissues affected by brittle leaf disease.

    PubMed

    Saidi, Mohammed Najib; Bouaziz, Donia; Hammami, Ines; Namsi, Ahmed; Drira, Noureddine; Gargouri-Bouzid, Radhia

    2013-10-01

    Brittle leaf disease or Maladie de la Feuille Cassante (MFC) is a lethal disorder of date palm that has assumed epidemic proportions in the oases of Tunisia and Algeria. No pathogen could ever be associated with the disease, while leaflets of affected palms have been previously shown to be deficient in manganese. The work reported here aims to understand the biochemical basis of the date palm response to this disorder. Since the typical disease symptom is the leaf fragility, we have investigated lignin content in leaves and roots. Strong decrease in total lignin content was observed in affected leaves, while lignin content increased in affected roots. Histochemical analyses showed hyperlignification thicker suberin layer in roots cortical cells. The phenylpropanoids pathway was also disrupted in leaves and roots, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase and cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase gene expression was affected by the disease which severely affects the cell wall integrity. PMID:23987806

  3. [Paget's disease of bone: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Winter, E M; Hamdy, N A T; de Jongh, R T; Eekhoff, E M W; Zillikens, M C; Appelman-Dijkstra, N M

    2016-01-01

    Paget's disease of bone is a focal disorder of bone remodelling that leads to changes in the shape and size of affected bones, and is associated with articular and vascular complications. The disorder is characterised by a localised increase in osteoclast number and activity in one or more affected sites while the rest of the skeleton remains unaffected. The excessive bone resorption leads to recruitment of osteoblasts to the remodelling sites, resulting in increased bone formation. This accelerated bone turnover causes deposition of bone with disorganised architecture and structural weakness. The precise aetiology is unknown. It is thought that the disease is caused by interactions between environmental and genetic factors; the nature of this interaction still has to be determined. The disease is progressive, but can be treated with a single infusion of zoledronic acid. In this manuscript three cases are described, along with a review of the current diagnostic tools and treatment. PMID:27650015

  4. Radiology of bone diseases. 5th edition

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, G.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry of bone. This book presents alterations in overall characteristics such as density and bone texture. It describes Salterations in specific anatomic regions of bone, as well ad discuss solitary bone lesions. The style in which the diseases are grouped according to specific regions and morphologic alterations rather than by individual pathologic condition is the most powerful aspect of this format.

  5. LRP receptor family member associated bone disease.

    PubMed

    Lara-Castillo, N; Johnson, M L

    2015-06-01

    A dozen years ago the identification of causal mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene involved in two rare bone disorders propelled research in the bone field in totally new directions. Since then, there have been an explosion in the number of reports that highlight the role of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in the regulation of bone homeostasis. In this review we discuss some of the most recent reports (in the past 2 years) highlighting the involvement of the members of the LRP family (LRP5, LRP6, LRP4, and more recently LRP8) in the maintenance of bone and their implications in bone diseases. These reports include records of new single nucleotides polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes that suggest variants in these genes can contribute to subtle variation in bone traits to mutations that give rise to extreme bone phenotypes. All of these serve to further support and reinforce the importance of this tightly regulated pathway in bone. Furthermore, we discuss provocative reports suggesting novel approaches through inhibitors of this pathway to treat rarer diseases such as Osteoporosis-Pseudoglioma Syndrome (OPPG), Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI), and Sclerosteosis/Van Buchem disease. It is hoped that by understanding the role of each component of the pathway and their involvement in bone diseases that this knowledge will allow us to develop new, more effective therapeutic approaches for more common diseases such as post-menopausal osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis as well as these rarer bone diseases.

  6. Roles of leptin in bone metabolism and bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu Xu; Yang, Tianfu

    2015-09-01

    Adipose tissue has been more accepted as an active contributor to whole body homeostasis, rather than just a fat depot, since leptin, a 16 kDa protein, was discovered as the product of the obese gene in 1994. With more and more studies conducted on this hormone, it has been shown that there is a close relationship between adipose tissue and bone, which have important effects on each other. Bone is the source of many hormones, such as osteocalcin, that can affect energy metabolism and then the anabolism or catabolism of fat tissue. In contrast, the adipose tissue synthesizes and releases a series of adipokines, which are involved in bone metabolism through direct or indirect effects on bone formation and resorption. Interestingly, leptin, one of the most important cytokines derived from fat tissue, seems to account for the largest part of effects on bone, through direct or indirect involvement in bone remodeling and by playing a significant role in many bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, rheumatic arthritis, bone tumors and even fractures. In this review, we will discuss the progress in leptin research, particularly focusing on the roles of leptin in bone diseases.

  7. Novel therapeutic targets in myeloma bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Webb, S L; Edwards, C M

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a neoplastic disorder of plasma cells characterized by clonal proliferation within the bone marrow. One of the major clinical features of multiple myeloma is the destructive osteolytic bone disease that occurs in the majority of patients. Myeloma bone disease is associated with increased osteoclast activity and suppression of osteoblastogenesis. Bisphosphonates have been the mainstay of treatment for many years; however, their use is limited by their inability to repair existing bone loss. Therefore, research into novel approaches for the treatment of myeloma bone disease is of the utmost importance. This review will discuss the current advances in our understanding of osteoclast stimulation and osteoblast suppression mechanisms in myeloma bone disease and the treatments that are under development to target this destructive and debilitating feature of myeloma. PMID:24750110

  8. Chronic kidney disease and bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Junichiro James; Matsuo, Koji; Iwasaki, Yoshiko; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2015-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease-related mineral and bone disease (CKD-MBD) is a syndrome defined as a systemic mineral metabolic disorder associated with CKD, and the term renal osteodystrophy indicates a pathomorphological concept of bone lesions associated with CKD-MBD. Cortical bone thinning, abnormalities in bone turnover and primary/secondary mineralization, elevated levels of circulating sclerostin, increased apoptosis in osteoblasts and osteocytes, disturbance of the coupling phenomenon, iatrogenic factors, accumulated micro-crackles, crystal/collagen disorientation, and chemical modification of collagen crosslinks are all possible candidates found in CKD that could promote osteopenia and/or bone fragility. Some of above factors are the consequences of abnormal systemic mineral metabolism but for others it seem unlikely. We have used the term uremic osteoporosis to describe the uremia-induced bone fragility which is not derived from abnormal systemic mineral metabolism. Interestingly, the disease aspect of uremic osteoporosis appears to be similar to that of senile osteoporosis. PMID:25653092

  9. [Serum sclerostin levels and metabolic bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Mika; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2013-06-01

    Serum sclerostin levels are being investigated in various metabolic bone diseases. Since serum sclerostin levels are decreased in primary hyperparathyroidism and elevated in hypoparathyroidism, parathyroid hormone (PTH) is thought to be a regulatory factor for sclerostin. Serum sclerostin levels exhibit a significant positive correlation with bone mineral density. On the other hand, a couple of studies on postmenopausal women have shown that high serum sclerostin levels are a risk factor for fracture. Although glucocorticoid induced osteoporosis and diabetes are both diseases that reduce bone formation, serum sclerostin levels have been reported to be decreased in the former and elevated in the latter, suggesting differences in the effects of sclerostin in the two diseases. Serum sclerostin levels are correlated with renal function, and increase with reduction in renal function. Serum sclerostin level may be a new index of bone assessment that differs from bone mineral density and bone metabolic markers.

  10. Paget's Disease of Bone and Osteoarthritis: Different Yet Related

    MedlinePlus

    ... about Paget’s disease , contact: NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center Website: http://www.bones.nih. ... Pub. No. 15-7919 NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center 2 AMS Circle Bethesda, MD ...

  11. [Clinical condition and therapy of bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Miura, Kohji; Oznono, Keiichi

    2013-12-01

    Skeletal dysplasia is the term which represents disorders including growth and differentiation of bone, cartilage and ligament. A lot of diseases are included, and new disorders have been added. However, the therapy of most bone diseases is less well-established. Achondroplasia, hypochondroplasia, and osteogenesis imperfecta are most frequent bone diseases. There is no curative treatment for these diseases, however, supportive therapies are available ; for example, growth-hormone therapy for achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia, and bisphosphonate therapy for osteogenesis imperfecta. In addition, enzyme replacement therapy for hypophosphatasia is now on clinical trial.

  12. ISOLATED HYDATID DISEASE OF THE ILIAC BONE.

    PubMed

    Baf, Morteza Mazloum Farsi; Baf, Mostafa Mazloum Farsi; Sasannejad, Payman

    2015-01-01

    Hydatid disease of the bone usually is asymptomatic and is found as an accidental finding during unrelated imaging. However, they can become symptomatic due to enlargement and pressure effect or being infected by bacteria. Hydatid disease usually involves multiple organs (such as liver, lungs and brain). In our case, hydatid disease had involved bone and the patient presented only with a chronic hip pain without other symptom or sign. Here, a case of isolated ilium hydatidosis is reported. PMID:27004362

  13. [Treatment of bone disease caused by gastrectomy].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Gastrectomy is undergone mainly in patients with gastric cancer. Bone diseases(osteoporosis and osteomalacia)caused by gastractomy are associated with weight loss, calcium and vitamin D inadequancy, and malnutrition. Most patients after gastrectomy have multile risk factors of bone diseases and subsequently are at a higher risk for fractures. In particular, sex hormone deficiency and aging enhance the risk for fractures. The management of bone diseases caused by gastraectomy include adequet intake of calcium, vitamin D and protein, sunlight exposure, and regular weight-bearing exercise, as well as non-smoking and avoiding excess alcohol drinking. The patients at a high risk for fractures shoud be treated with bisphosphonates.

  14. LRP Receptor Family Member Associated Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Castillo, N; Johnson, ML

    2015-01-01

    A dozen years ago the identification of causal mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene involved in two rare bone disorders propelled research in the bone field in totally new directions. Since then, there have been an explosion in the number of reports that highlight the role of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in the regulation of bone homeostasis. In this review we discuss some of the most recent reports (in the past 2 years) highlighting the involvement of the members of the LRP family (LRP5, LRP6, LRP4, and more recently LRP8) in the maintenance of bone and their implications in bone diseases. These reports include records of new single nucleotides polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes that suggest variants in these genes can contribute to subtle variation in bone traits to mutations that give rise to extreme bone phenotypes. All of these serve to further support and reinforce the importance of this tightly regulated pathway in bone. Furthermore, we discuss provocative reports suggesting novel approaches through inhibitors of this pathway to treat rarer diseases such as Osteoporosis-Pseudoglioma Syndrome (OPPG), Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI), and Sclerosteosis/Van Buchem disease. It is hoped that by understanding the role of each component of the pathway and their involvement in bone diseases that this knowledge will allow us to develop new, more effective therapeutic approaches for more common diseases such as post-menopausal osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis as well as these rarer bone diseases. PMID:26048454

  15. How Is Paget's Disease of Bone Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of bone. Blood test (measurement of serum alkaline phosphatase) . Sometimes blood test results are what first alert ... level of a chemical substance called serum alkaline phosphatase (SAP), it is a sign that the disease ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Paget disease of bone

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic cause of classic Paget disease of bone , accounting for 10 to 50 percent of cases that ... be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic Conditions Diagnosis & Management These resources address the diagnosis or management of ...

  17. The genetics of bone mass and susceptibility to bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Karasik, David; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Johnson, Mark L

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass and an increased risk of fracture. Genetic factors, environmental factors and gene-environment interactions all contribute to a person's lifetime risk of developing an osteoporotic fracture. This Review summarizes key advances in understanding of the genetics of bone traits and their role in osteoporosis. Candidate-gene approaches dominated this field 20 years ago, but clinical and preclinical genetic studies published in the past 5 years generally utilize more-sophisticated and better-powered genome-wide association studies (GWAS). High-throughput DNA sequencing, large genomic databases and improved methods of data analysis have greatly accelerated the gene-discovery process. Linkage analyses of single-gene traits that segregate in families with extreme phenotypes have led to the elucidation of critical pathways controlling bone mass. For example, components of the Wnt-β-catenin signalling pathway have been validated (in both GWAS and functional studies) as contributing to various bone phenotypes. These notable advances in gene discovery suggest that the next decade will witness cataloguing of the hundreds of genes that influence bone mass and osteoporosis, which in turn will provide a roadmap for the development of new drugs that target diseases of low bone mass, including osteoporosis.

  18. Recent developments in metabolic bone diseases: a gnathic perspective.

    PubMed

    Raubenheimer, Erich J; Noffke, Claudia E; Hendrik, Hilde D

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic bone diseases often are asymptomatic and progress sub clinically. Many patients present at a late stage with catastrophic skeletal and extra skeletal complications. In this article, we provide an overview of normal bone remodeling and a synopsis of recent developments in the following conditions: osteoporosis, rickets/osteomalacia, endocrine-induced bone disease, chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder and Paget's disease of bone. Our discussion will emphasize the clinical and microscopic manifestations of these diseases in the jaws.

  19. Osteopetrosis (Marble Bone Disease): A Rare Disease in Children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a group of diseases that affects the growth and remodeling of bone and characterized by over growth and sclerosis of bone, with thickening of the bony cortices, abnormal dental development and narrowing of the marrow cavities throughout the skeleton. It is an uncommon disease of unknown cause. A 5-year-old boy was suffering from infantile (severe form) osteopetrosis with cardiac enlargement, severe anemia, hepatosplenomagaly and radiographs showed generalized increase in bone density (chalky white), narrowing of skull base is reported here.

  20. Adynamic bone disease: from bone to vessels in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Bover, Jordi; Ureña, Pablo; Brandenburg, Vincent; Goldsmith, David; Ruiz, César; DaSilva, Iara; Bosch, Ricardo J

    2014-11-01

    Adynamic bone disease (ABD) is a well-recognized clinical entity in the complex chronic kidney disease (CKD)-mineral and bone disorder. Although the combination of low intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) and low bone alkaline phosphatase levels may be suggestive of ABD, the gold standard for precise diagnosis is histomorphometric analysis of tetracycline double-labeled bone biopsies. ABD essentially is characterized by low bone turnover, low bone volume, normal mineralization, and markedly decreased cellularity with minimal or no fibrosis. ABD is increasing in prevalence relative to other forms of renal osteodystrophy, and is becoming the most frequent type of bone lesion in some series. ABD develops in situations with reduced osteoanabolic stimulation caused by oversuppression of PTH, multifactorial skeletal resistance to PTH actions in uremia, and/or dysregulation of Wnt signaling. All may contribute not only to bone disease but also to the early vascular calcification processes observed in CKD. Various risk factors have been linked to ABD, including calcium loading, ageing, diabetes, hypogonadism, parathyroidectomy, peritoneal dialysis, and antiresorptive therapies, among others. The relationship between low PTH level, ABD, increased risk fracture, and vascular calcifications may at least partially explain the association of ABD with increased mortality rates. To achieve optimal bone and cardiovascular health, attention should be focused not only on classic control of secondary hyperparathyroidism but also on prevention of ABD, especially in the steadily growing proportions of diabetic, white, and elderly patients. Overcoming the insufficient osteoanabolic stimulation in ABD is the ultimate treatment goal. PMID:25498381

  1. Nuclear Receptors in Bone Physiology and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Min-Young; Inoue, Kazuki; Takada, Ichiro; Kouzmenko, Alexander; Kato, Shigeaki

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, our view on the skeleton as a mere solid physical support structure has been transformed, as bone emerged as a dynamic, constantly remodeling tissue with systemic regulatory functions including those of an endocrine organ. Reflecting this remarkable functional complexity, distinct classes of humoral and intracellular regulatory factors have been shown to control vital processes in the bone. Among these regulators, nuclear receptors (NRs) play fundamental roles in bone development, growth, and maintenance. NRs are DNA-binding transcription factors that act as intracellular transducers of the respective ligand signaling pathways through modulation of expression of specific sets of cognate target genes. Aberrant NR signaling caused by receptor or ligand deficiency may profoundly affect bone health and compromise skeletal functions. Ligand dependency of NR action underlies a major strategy of therapeutic intervention to correct aberrant NR signaling, and significant efforts have been made to design novel synthetic NR ligands with enhanced beneficial properties and reduced potential negative side effects. As an example, estrogen deficiency causes bone loss and leads to development of osteoporosis, the most prevalent skeletal disorder in postmenopausal women. Since administration of natural estrogens for the treatment of osteoporosis often associates with undesirable side effects, several synthetic estrogen receptor ligands have been developed with higher therapeutic efficacy and specificity. This review presents current progress in our understanding of the roles of various nuclear receptor-mediated signaling pathways in bone physiology and disease, and in development of advanced NR ligands for treatment of common skeletal disorders. PMID:23589826

  2. Information for Patients about Paget's Disease of Bone

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pub. No. 15-7922 NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center 2 AMS Circle Bethesda, MD ... another language, contact the NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center at NIHBoneInfo@mail.nih.gov . ...

  3. Bone histology in chronic kidney disease-related mineral and bone disorder.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Junichiro James

    2011-06-01

    A quantitative histological analysis of biopsied bone samples is currently regarded as the gold standard for a diagnosing procedure for bone diseases associated with chronic kidney disease-related mineral and bone disorder. Conventionally, "bone cell activities" and "bone mineralization" are applied as two independent assessment axes, and the histology results are classified into five categories according to these axes. Recently, a new bone histology classification system called the Turnover-Mineralization-Volume system, which applied "cancellous bone volume" as another major assessing axis, was advocated; however, both classification systems have many unsolved problems. Clinicians must realize the limitations in evaluating bone metabolism by bone histology. We will need to establish a new classification method for renal bone diseases independent of histological findings.

  4. Pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder.

    PubMed

    Mac Way, Fabrice; Lessard, Myriam; Lafage-Proust, Marie-Hélène

    2012-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) alters the metabolism of several minerals, thereby inducing bone lesions and vessel-wall calcifications that can cause functional impairments and excess mortality. The histological bone abnormalities seen in CKD, known as renal osteodystrophy, consist of alterations in the bone turnover rate, which may be increased (osteitis fibrosa [OF]) or severely decreased (adynamic bone disease [AD]); abnormal mineralization (osteomalacia [OM]), and bone loss. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is related to early phosphate accumulation (responsible for FGF23 overproduction by bone tissue), decreased calcitriol production by the kidneys, and hypocalcemia. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is associated with OF. Other factors that affect bone include acidosis, chronic inflammation, nutritional deficiencies, and iatrogenic complications.

  5. Fracture, aging and disease in bone

    SciTech Connect

    Ager, J.W.; Balooch, G.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2006-02-01

    fracture resistance, whereas regulating the level of the cytokine TGF-beta can offer significant improvements in the stiffness, strength and toughness of bone, and as such may be considered as a therapeutic target to treat increased bone fragility induced by aging, drugs, and disease.

  6. Bone loss in chronic kidney disease: Quantity or quality?

    PubMed

    Zheng, Cai-Mei; Zheng, Jin-Quan; Wu, Chia-Chao; Lu, Chien-Lin; Shyu, Jia-Fwu; Yung-Ho, Hsu; Wu, Mei-Yi; Chiu, I-Jen; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Lu, Kuo-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients experience bone loss and fracture because of a specific CKD-related systemic disorder known as CKD-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). The bone turnover, mineralization, and volume (TMV) system describes the morphological bone lesions in renal osteodystrophy related to CKD-MBD. Bone turnover and bone volume are defined as high, normal, or low, and bone mineralization is classified as normal or abnormal. All types of bone histology related to TMV are responsible for both bone quantity and bone quality losses in CKD patients. This review focuses on current bone quantity and bone quality losses in CKD patients and finally discusses potential therapeutic measures. PMID:27049042

  7. GORHAM-STOUT SYNDROME: PHANTOM BONE DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    El-Kouba, Gabriel; de Araújo Santos, Romilton; Pilluski, Paulo César; Severo, Antonio; Lech, Osvandré

    2015-01-01

    Gorham-Stout syndrome is a disease that presents idiopathic osteolysis of a bone or closely contiguous area. The etiology is unknown. It is a rare condition that is difficult to diagnose, and its treatment is controversial. It affects individuals irrespective of age or sex. In this study, we conducted a bibliographic review of the disease, specifically focusing on the differential diagnosis, and we demonstrated the follow-up on a patient with this syndrome from the time of its diagnosis, through treatment, to its current state of evolution. PMID:27026974

  8. Sclerostin and Dickkopf-1 as therapeutic targets in bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Ke, Hua Zhu; Richards, William G; Li, Xiaodong; Ominsky, Michael S

    2012-10-01

    The processes of bone growth, modeling, and remodeling determine the structure, mass, and biomechanical properties of the skeleton. Dysregulated bone resorption or bone formation may lead to metabolic bone diseases. The Wnt pathway plays an important role in bone formation and regeneration, and expression of two Wnt pathway inhibitors, sclerostin and Dickkopf-1 (DKK1), appears to be associated with changes in bone mass. Inactivation of sclerostin leads to substantially increased bone mass in humans and in genetically manipulated animals. Studies in various animal models of bone disease have shown that inhibition of sclerostin using a monoclonal antibody (Scl-Ab) increases bone formation, density, and strength. Additional studies show that Scl-Ab improves bone healing in models of bone repair. Inhibition of DKK1 by monoclonal antibody (DKK1-Ab) stimulates bone formation in younger animals and to a lesser extent in adult animals and enhances fracture healing. Thus, sclerostin and DKK1 are emerging as the leading new targets for anabolic therapies to treat bone diseases such as osteoporosis and for bone repair. Clinical trials are ongoing to evaluate the effects of Scl-Ab and DKK1-Ab in humans for the treatment of bone loss and for bone repair.

  9. [Bone and Calcium Metabolisms Associated with Dental and Oral-Maxillofacial Diseases. Bone remodeling and alveolar bone homeostasis].

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Tomoki

    2015-08-01

    Bone, which support motile organ and periodontal tissue, is renewing throughout our life. This restructuring process is called "bone remodeling" , and osteoclasts and osteoblasts play a crucial role in this process. Bone remodeling is important not only for normal bone mass and strength, but also for mineral homeostasis. Bone remodeling is stringently regulated by communication between bone component cells such as osteoclasts, osteoblasts and osteocytes. An imbalance of this process is often linked to various bone diseases. Alveolar bone remodeling is directly influenced by occlusal force from the teeth. Thus, the elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms involved in alveolar bone remodeling is critical for a deeper understanding of the maintenance of healthy tooth and dental disease.

  10. Diphosphonates in the evaluation of metabolic bone disease.

    PubMed

    Fogelman, I; Smith, M L

    1982-03-01

    The bone scan may be of value in the assessment of patients with metabolic bone disease. However the superiority of the bone scan when compared to radiology in conditions such as renal osteodystrophy, osteomalacia, primary hyperparathyroidism, and osteoporosis requires substantiation with the newer radiopharmaceuticals which have a higher affinity for bone. Two methods of quantitating skeletal uptake of tracer have been assessed to try to remove the subjective aspect of bone scan evaluation. Measurements of bone to soft tissue ratios have proved clinically disappointing, but 24 hour whole body retention of diphosphonate appears to provide a sensitive index of increased bone turnover.

  11. Enzymatic activities in different strains isolated from healthy and brittle leaf disease affected date palm leaves: study of amylase production conditions.

    PubMed

    Mouna, Jrad; Imen, Fendri; Choba Ines, Ben; Nourredine, Drira; Adel, Kadri; Néji, Gharsallah

    2015-02-01

    The present study aimed to investigate and compare the enzymatic production of endophytic bacteria isolated from healthy and brittle leaf disease affected date palm leaves (pectinase, cellulase, lipase, and amylase). The findings revealed that the enzymatic products from the bacterial isolates of healthy date palm leaves were primarily 33% amylolytic enzyme, 33 % cellulase, 25 % pectinase, and 25 % lipase. The isolates from brittle leaf disease date palm leaves, on the other hand, were noted to produce 16 % amylolytic enzyme, 20 % cellulose, 50 % pectinase, and 50 % lipase. The effects of temperature and pH on amylase, pectinase, and cellulose activities were investigated. The Bacillus subtilis JN934392 strain isolated from healthy date palm leaves produced higher levels of amylase activity at pH 7. A Box Behnken Design (BBD) was employed to optimize amylase extraction. Maximal activity was observed at pH and temperature ranges of pH 6-6.5 and 37-39 °C, respectively. Under those conditions, amylase activity was noted to be attained 9.37 U/ml. The results showed that the enzyme was able to maintain more than 50 % of its activity over a temperature range of 50-80 °C, with an optimum at 70 °C. This bacterial amylase showed high activity compared to other bacteria, which provides support for its promising candidacy for future industrial application.

  12. Geranylgeranyl transferase type II inhibition prevents myeloma bone disease.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Michelle A; Coulton, Les; Ebetino, Frank H; Vanderkerken, Karin; Croucher, Peter I

    2008-12-12

    Geranylgeranyl transferase II (GGTase II) is an enzyme that plays a key role in the isoprenylation of proteins. 3-PEHPC, a novel GGTase II inhibitor, blocks bone resorption and induces myeloma cell apoptosis in vitro. Its effect on bone resorption and tumor growth in vivo is unknown. We investigated the effect of 3-PEHPC on tumor burden and bone disease in the 5T2MM model of multiple myeloma in vivo. 3-PEHPC significantly reduced osteoclast numbers and osteoclast surface. 3-PEHPC prevented the bone loss and the development of osteolytic bone lesions induced by 5T2MM myeloma cells. Treatment with 3-PEHPC also significantly reduced myeloma burden in bone. The magnitude of response was similar to that seen with the bisphosphonate, risedronate. These data show that targeting GGTase II with 3-PEHPC can prevent osteolytic bone disease and reduce tumor burden in vivo, and represents a novel approach to treating tumors that grow in bone.

  13. Metabolic bone disease in chronic renal failure. I. Dialyzed uremics.

    PubMed Central

    Huffer, W. E.; Kuzela, D.; Popovtzer, M. M.

    1975-01-01

    Garner and ball's point counting technic was used to compare metabolic bone disease in dialyzed and nondialyzed uremic patients. Histologic measurements of bone from dialyzed and nondialyzed uremic patients dying between 1966 and 1971 showed that dialyzed patients have quantitatively more severe bone resorption, distortion of trabecular architecture and mineralization defects. Mineralization defects become more severe as the duration of dialysis increases but are not related to serum calcium and phosphorus levels. Bone volume in both groups is normal or increased and in dialysis patients increases in proportion to the elevation of serum phosphorus. Mean serum phosphorus and calcium levels, bone volume, and volume: surface ratios all decreased in dialysis patients between 1966 and 1971, while bone resorption and mineralization defects did not change. These results suggest that lowering of serum phosphorus without increasing serum calcium may aggrevate the uremic bone disease by reducing bone volume without improvement of mineralization and resorption defects. Images Fig 1 PMID:1119535

  14. Nanotechnology in the targeted drug delivery for bone diseases and bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenyi; Wu, Chengtie; Chen, Jiezhong; Xiao, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a vigorous research area and one of its important applications is in biomedical sciences. Among biomedical applications, targeted drug delivery is one of the most extensively studied subjects. Nanostructured particles and scaffolds have been widely studied for increasing treatment efficacy and specificity of present treatment approaches. Similarly, this technique has been used for treating bone diseases including bone regeneration. In this review, we have summarized and highlighted the recent advancement of nanostructured particles and scaffolds for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis, osteosarcoma, bone infections and inflammatory diseases, osteoarthritis, as well as for bone regeneration. Nanoparticles used to deliver deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid molecules to specific bone sites for gene therapies are also included. The investigation of the implications of nanoparticles in bone diseases have just begun, and has already shown some promising potential. Further studies have to be conducted, aimed specifically at assessing targeted delivery and bioactive scaffolds to further improve their efficacy before they can be used clinically.

  15. Update on Bone Health in Pediatric Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kristen M

    2016-06-01

    Children and adolescents with chronic disease are predisposed to impaired bone health. Pediatric illness, including type 1 diabetes mellitus, celiac disease, and cystic fibrosis, have significant risk of low bone mineralization and fracture due to underlying inflammation, malabsorption, lack of physical activity, and delayed puberty. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is the primary imaging method to assess bone health in this population. The purpose of this review is to update readers about the assessment and management of bone health in children with common pediatric chronic illnesses and review recent advances in the prevention and treatment of impaired bone health. PMID:27241973

  16. Update on Bone Health in Pediatric Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kristen M

    2016-06-01

    Children and adolescents with chronic disease are predisposed to impaired bone health. Pediatric illness, including type 1 diabetes mellitus, celiac disease, and cystic fibrosis, have significant risk of low bone mineralization and fracture due to underlying inflammation, malabsorption, lack of physical activity, and delayed puberty. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is the primary imaging method to assess bone health in this population. The purpose of this review is to update readers about the assessment and management of bone health in children with common pediatric chronic illnesses and review recent advances in the prevention and treatment of impaired bone health.

  17. Bone Disease in Thalassemia: A Molecular and Clinical Overview.

    PubMed

    Wong, Phillip; Fuller, Peter J; Gillespie, Matthew T; Milat, Frances

    2016-08-01

    Thalassemia bone disease is a common and severe complication of thalassemia-an inherited blood disorder due to mutations in the α or β hemoglobin gene. In its more severe form, severe anemia is present, and treatment with frequent red blood cell transfusion is necessary. Because the body has limited capacity to excrete iron, concomitant iron chelation is required to prevent the complications of iron overload. The effects of chronic anemia and iron overload can lead to multiple end-organ complications such as cardiomyopathy, increased risks of blood-borne diseases, and liver, pituitary, and bone disease. However, our understanding of thalassemia bone disease is incomplete and is composed of a complex piecemeal of risk factors that include genetic factors, hormonal deficiency, marrow expansion, skeletal dysmorphism, iron toxicity, chelators, and increased bone turnover. The high prevalence of bone disease in transfusion-dependent thalassemia is seen in both younger and older patients as life expectancy continues to improve. Indeed, hypogonadism and GH deficiency contribute to a failure to achieve peak bone mass in this group. The contribution of kidney dysfunction to bone disease in thalassemia is a new and significant complication. This coincides with studies confirming an increase in kidney stones and associated accelerated bone loss in the thalassemia cohort. However, multiple factors are also associated with reduced bone mineral density and include marrow expansion, iron toxicity, iron chelators, increased bone turnover, GH deficiency, and hypogonadism. Thalassemia bone disease is a composite of not only multiple hormonal deficiencies but also multiorgan diseases. This review will address the molecular mechanisms and clinical risk factors associated with thalassemia bone disease and the clinical implications for monitoring and treating this disorder. PMID:27309522

  18. Lessons from rare diseases of cartilage and bone.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, James A; Ranganath, Lakshminarayan R; Boyde, Alan

    2015-06-01

    Studying severe phenotypes of rare syndromes can elucidate disease mechanisms of more common disorders and identify potential therapeutic targets. Lessons from rare bone diseases contributed to the development of the most successful class of bone active agents, the bisphosphonates. More recent research on rare bone diseases has helped elucidate key pathways and identify new targets in bone resorption and bone formation including cathepsin K and sclerostin, for which drugs are now in clinical trials. By contrast, there has been much less focus on rare cartilage diseases and osteoarthritis (OA) remains a common disease with no effective therapy. Investigation of rare cartilage syndromes is identifying new potential targets in OA including GDF5 and lubricin. Research on the arthropathy of the ultra-rare disease alkaptonuria has identified several new features of the OA phenotype, including high density mineralized protrusions (HDMPs) which constitute a newly identified mechanism of joint destruction.

  19. Gamma images in benign and metabolic bone diseases: volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sy, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    Volume 1 of ''Gamma images in benign and metabolic bone diseases'' comprises chapters devoted to: general remarks and considerations, radiopharmaceuticals, Paget disease, osteomyelitis, trauma, benign bone tumors, chronic renal dialysis, acute renal failure, osteomalacia and rickets, and osteoporosis. Although published in 1981, the most recent references in the book were 1978 and most are 1977 or earlier. One of the strongest aspects of the volume are tables which categorize diseases, pathophysiology of disease, and image abnormalities. (JMT)

  20. Disease-specific clinical problems associated with the subchondral bone.

    PubMed

    Pape, Dietrich; Filardo, Giuseppe; Kon, Elisaveta; van Dijk, C Niek; Madry, Henning

    2010-04-01

    The subchondral bone is involved in a variety of diseases affecting both the articular cartilage and bone. Osteochondral defects in distinct locations and of variable sizes are the final results of different etiologies. These include traumatic osteochondral defects, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis. Traumatic osteochondral defects are caused by osteochondral fractures, separating an osteochondral fragment that includes articular cartilage and both subchondral and trabecular bone from the joint surface. In osteochondritis dissecans, the disease originates in the subchondral bone and secondarily affects the articular cartilage. Location, stage, size, and depth of osteochondral lesions play a role in the treatment of traumatic osteochondral defects and osteochondritis dissecans. Surgical options include fragment refixation, transplantation of osteochondral autografts, or bone restoration by impacted cancellous bone grafts combined with autologous chondrocyte transplantation. An insufficiency fracture of the subchondral bone may be the initiating factor of what was formerly believed to be a spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK). Recent histopathological studies suggest that each stage of SPONK reflects different types of bone repair reactions following a fracture of the subchondral bone plate. Osteoarthritis is a disease that does affect not only the articular cartilage, but also the subchondral bone. Reconstructive surgical techniques aim at preserving joint function, inducing fibrocartilaginous repair, and at correcting malalignment. This review summarizes the current status of the clinical treatment of traumatic osteochondral defects, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis as they affect the subchondral bone region and its adjacent structures.

  1. Bone health and disease in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Marquette, Malcolm; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-08-01

    Low bone mineral density is common in children and adults with CF. It has a multifactorial aetiology that includes direct effects of CFTR dysfunction on bone cell activity, as well as the secondary effects of CFTR dysfunction including pancreatic insufficiency (leading to malnutrition/malabsorption of fat soluble vitamins) and pulmonary infection (leading to systemic inflammation and increased bone resorption). Strategies to improve bone health in CF include optimising general CF nutritional and pulmonary care and the judicious use of bisphosphonates in selected patients. CFTR correctors/potentiators may have positive impact on bone metabolism in people with CF. PMID:27461283

  2. Paget's disease with craniofacial and skeletal bone involvement.

    PubMed

    Rai, Narendra Prakash; Anekar, Jayaprasad; Mustafa, Shabil Mohamed; Devang Divakar, Darshan

    2016-01-01

    Paget's disease is a metabolic disorder of bone caused due to defect in the remodelling process and is very common in western countries but is very rare in Asians and Africans. It was first described by a British scientist Sir James Paget in 1877. It can be monostotic or polyostotic depending on the number of bones involved. It most commonly affects older people of more than 50 years. Disease involvement can be symptomatic or asymptomatic depending on the extent of the disease process. Diagnosis of Paget's disease can be made by raised serum alkaline phosphatase levels, radiological examination and by radioisotope bone scans. PMID:27587747

  3. The complexity of bone architecture: A tool to differentiate bone diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saparin, Peter I.; Gowin, Wolfgang; Kurths, Jürgen; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2000-02-01

    We introduce a generalization of symbolic dynamics to analyze two-dimensional objects and propose measures of complexity to quantify the structure of symbol encoded images. This technique is applied to evaluate the architecture of human cancellous bone by analyzing computed tomography images of vertebrae acquired from specimens and in vivo. The pixels of the preprocessed images are encoded using a mixture of static and dynamic encoding. The architecture of encoded cancellous bone is evaluated as a whole using measures of complexity. A set of new parameters are introduced to quantify the different aspects of structure: complexity and degree of disorder of the architecture as a whole, or spatial arrangements of hard or soft elements of the bone separately. It is found that the complexity of the bone structure relates to its density exponentially. Normal bone has a complex ordered structure, while the architecture during the initial stage of bone loss is characterized by lower complexity and a maximal level of disorder. Increased bone loss leads again to ordered structure, however, its complexity is minimal. This phenomenon was observed in a series of osteoporotic specimens as well as in vivo in patients treated with fluor, and hormone replacement therapy. We found that different bone diseases demonstrate distinctive features captured by the measurements of complexity of the bone's structural composition. It is shown that the application of the proposed technique leads to new insights for understanding of the bone's response on medical treatment and provide important additional information for the diagnostics of bone diseases.

  4. Bone marrow invasion in multiple myeloma and metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, J C; Luna, A

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine is the imaging study of choice for the management of bone marrow disease. MRI sequences enable us to integrate structural and functional information for detecting, staging, and monitoring the response the treatment of multiple myeloma and bone metastases in the spine. Whole-body MRI has been incorporated into different guidelines as the technique of choice for managing multiple myeloma and metastatic bone disease. Normal physiological changes in the yellow and red bone marrow represent a challenge in analyses to differentiate clinically significant findings from those that are not clinically significant. This article describes the findings for normal bone marrow, variants, and invasive processes in multiple myeloma and bone metastases. PMID:26767542

  5. Bone marrow invasion in multiple myeloma and metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, J C; Luna, A

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine is the imaging study of choice for the management of bone marrow disease. MRI sequences enable us to integrate structural and functional information for detecting, staging, and monitoring the response the treatment of multiple myeloma and bone metastases in the spine. Whole-body MRI has been incorporated into different guidelines as the technique of choice for managing multiple myeloma and metastatic bone disease. Normal physiological changes in the yellow and red bone marrow represent a challenge in analyses to differentiate clinically significant findings from those that are not clinically significant. This article describes the findings for normal bone marrow, variants, and invasive processes in multiple myeloma and bone metastases.

  6. Bone Vascularization in Normal and Disease Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Christian; Innocenti, Massimo; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Bone vasculature is essential for many processes, such as skeletal development and growth, bone modeling and remodeling, and healing processes. Endothelium is an integral part of bone tissue, expressing a physiological paracrine function via growth factors and chemokines release, and interacting with several cellular lines. Alterations of the complex biochemical interactions between vasculature and bone cells may lead to various clinical manifestations. Two different types of pathologies result: a defect or an excess of bone vasculature or endothelium metabolism. Starting from the molecular basis of the interactions between endothelial and bone cells, the Authors present an overview of the recent acquisitions in the physiopathology of the most important clinical patterns, and the modern therapeutic strategies for their treatments. PMID:23986744

  7. Atlas of computerized blood flow analysis in bone disease.

    PubMed

    Gandsman, E J; Deutsch, S D; Tyson, I B

    1983-11-01

    The role of computerized blood flow analysis in routine bone scanning is reviewed. Cases illustrating the technique include proven diagnoses of toxic synovitis, Legg-Perthes disease, arthritis, avascular necrosis of the hip, fractures, benign and malignant tumors, Paget's disease, cellulitis, osteomyelitis, and shin splints. Several examples also show the use of the technique in monitoring treatment. The use of quantitative data from the blood flow, bone uptake phase, and static images suggests specific diagnostic patterns for each of the diseases presented in this atlas. Thus, this technique enables increased accuracy in the interpretation of the radionuclide bone scan.

  8. Changing bone patterns with progression of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Drüeke, Tilman B; Massy, Ziad A

    2016-02-01

    It is commonly held that osteitis fibrosa and mixed uremic osteodystrophy are the predominant forms of renal osteodystrophy in patients with chronic kidney disease. Osteitis fibrosa is a high-turnover bone disease resulting mainly from secondary hyperparathyroidism, and mixed uremic osteodystrophy is in addition characterized by a mineralization defect most often attributed to vitamin D deficiency. However, there is ancient and more recent evidence that in early chronic kidney disease stages adynamic bone disease characterized by low bone turnover occurs first, at least in a significant proportion of patients. This could be due to the initial predominance of bone turnover-inhibitory conditions such as resistance to the action of parathyroid hormone (PTH), reduced calcitriol levels, sex hormone deficiency, diabetes, and, last but not least, uremic toxins leading to repression of osteocyte Wnt/β-catenin signaling and increased expression of Wnt antagonists such as sclerostin, Dickkopf-1, and sFRP4. The development of high-turnover bone disease would occur only later on, when serum PTH levels are able to overcome peripheral PTH resistance and the other inhibitory factors of bone formation. Whether FGF23 and Klotho play a direct role in the transition from low- to high-turnover bone disease or participate only indirectly via regulating PTH secretion remains to be seen. PMID:26806832

  9. Gallium scanning in Paget's disease of bone: effect of calcitonin

    SciTech Connect

    Waxman, A.D.; McKee, D.; Siemsen, J.K.; Singer, F.R.

    1980-02-01

    Calcitonin has been used in the treatment of Paget's disease of bone, and serum alkaline phosphatase level and 24 hr urinary hydroxyproline excretion have been used to follow therapeutic response. The radionuclide bone scan has been used as a visual indicator; however, there is some uncertainty as to its value in following changes in disease activity. Four patients with both serial technetium phosphate bone scans and serial gallium studies were studied. In each case the beneficial effect of calcitonin was demonstrated more accurately with gallium than with technetium diphosphonate. Since biochemical changes in Paget's disease are believed to be mediated at the cellular level and gallium uptake depends on cellular activity, it is proposed that gallium uptake is more appropriate measure of the activity of Paget's disease than a noncellular marker such as a technetium-containing bone scan agent.

  10. The Role of Hedgehog Signaling in Tumor Induced Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cannonier, Shellese A.; Sterling, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant progress in cancer treatments, tumor induced bone disease continues to cause significant morbidities. While tumors show distinct mutations and clinical characteristics, they behave similarly once they establish in bone. Tumors can metastasize to bone from distant sites (breast, prostate, lung), directly invade into bone (head and neck) or originate from the bone (melanoma, chondrosarcoma) where they cause pain, fractures, hypercalcemia, and ultimately, poor prognoses and outcomes. Tumors in bone secrete factors (interleukins and parathyroid hormone-related protein) that induce RANKL expression from osteoblasts, causing an increase in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. While the mechanisms involved varies slightly between tumor types, many tumors display an increase in Hedgehog signaling components that lead to increased tumor growth, therapy failure, and metastasis. The work of multiple laboratories has detailed Hh signaling in several tumor types and revealed that tumor establishment in bone can be controlled by both canonical and non-canonical Hh signaling in a cell type specific manner. This review will explore the role of Hh signaling in the modulation of tumor induced bone disease, and will shed insight into possible therapeutic interventions for blocking Hh signaling in these tumors. PMID:26343726

  11. Anemia and bone disease of chronic kidney disease: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Shemin, Douglas

    2014-12-02

    Anemia and metabolic bone disease accompany chronic kidney disease (CKD), and worsen as CKD progresses. It is likely that both processes contribute to the increased morbidity and mortality seen in CKD. This paper briefly reviews the pathogenesis and diagnosis of anemia and bone disease in CKD, and summarizes recent consensus guidelines for treatment.

  12. Novel therapies in benign and malignant bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Rachner, Tilman D; Hadji, Peyman; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2012-06-01

    With an ageing population and improving cancer therapies, the two most common benign and malignant bone diseases, osteoporosis and bone metastases, will continue to affect an increasing number of patients. Our expanding knowledge of the molecular processes underlying these conditions has resulted in novel bone targets that are currently being explored in clinical trials. Clearly, the approval of denosumab, a monoclonal antibody directed against RANKL, has just marked the beginning of a new era for bone therapy with several additional new therapies lining up for clinical approval in the coming years. Potential agents targeting the osteoclast include cathepsin K, currently in phase 3 trials, and src inhibitors. Amongst anabolic agents, inhibitors of the Wnt-inhibitor sclerostin and dickkopf-1 are promising in clinical trials. Here, we will provide a comprehensive overview of the most promising agents currently explored for the treatment of bone diseases.

  13. Diagnosis of thyroid disease on bone scans

    SciTech Connect

    Peterdy, A.E.

    1985-03-01

    Three cases are reported in which visualization of the thyroid occurred during Tc-99m pyrophosphate bone scans. All were found to be hyperthyroid with elevated serum thyroid hormone and two patients also had elevated 4-hour radioactive iodine uptakes.

  14. Bone disease in calcium stone forming patients.

    PubMed

    Heilberg, I P; Martini, L A; Szejnfeld, V L; Carvalho, A B; Draibe, S A; Ajzen, H; Ramos, O L; Schor, N

    1994-09-01

    The association between idiopathic hypercalciuria and osteopenia (OP) has been recently recognized. It is not established whether or not calcium intake plays a critical role in the loss of bone mass. Fifty-five calcium stone forming patients with either absorptive hypercalciuria (AH) or fasting hypercalciuria (FH), 29 males and 26 premenopausal females, were submitted to dual photon absorptiometry at lumbar spine. Calcium intake was assessed by a 72 hr dietary record. OP was detected in 20% (11/55) of patients, being more common among men, 9/26 (35%) than in women, 2/29 (7%), p < 0.05. Male FH patients presented lower mean bone mineral density (BMD) than sex, weight and age-matched control (1.058 +/- 0.18 vs 1.209 +/- 0.13 g/cm2, X +/- SD, p < 0.05). OP was more frequent in FH patients, 7/20 (35%) than in AH patients 4/35 (11%), albeit the difference was not statistically significant. There was no correlation between calcium intake and BMD measurement. Six osteopenic male FH patients were further submitted to histomorphometric evaluation with tetracycline double labeling. Bone volume was lower than the controls (13.2 +/- 3.0 vs 27.2 +/- 3.7%, p < 0.05). Osteoid surfaces were reduced, although not significantly (10.1 +/- 8.2% vs 15.9 +/- 6.7%). Eroded surfaces were markedly increased (23.9 +/- 13.4 vs 4.2 +/- 1.4%, p < 0.05). The bone formation rate was very low with a complete lack of tetracycline double labeling in 4 patients. These data suggest low bone volume, tendency to low bone formation, increased bone resorption and a severe mineralization defect, consistent with normal or low bone turnover osteoporosis. PMID:7994936

  15. Metabolic bone disease in children : etiology and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Skowrońska-Jóźwiak, Elzbieta; Lorenc, Roman S

    2006-01-01

    Metabolic bone disease in children includes many hereditary and acquired conditions of diverse etiology that lead to disturbed metabolism of the bone tissue. Some of these processes primarily affect bone; others are secondary to nutritional deficiencies, a variety of chronic disorders, and/or treatment with some drugs. Some of these disorders are rare, but some present public health concerns (for instance, rickets) that have been well known for many years but still persist. The most important clinical consequences of bone metabolic diseases in the pediatric population include reduced linear growth, bone deformations, and non-traumatic fractures leading to bone pain, deterioration of motor development and disability. In this article, we analyze primary and secondary osteoporosis, rickets, osteomalacia (nutritional and hereditary vitamin D-dependent, hypophosphatemic and that due to renal tubular abnormalities), renal osteodystrophy, sclerosing bony disorders, and some genetic bone diseases (hypophosphatasia, fibrous dysplasia, skeletal dysplasia, juvenile Paget disease, familial expansile osteolysis, and osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome). Early identification and treatment of potential risk factors is essential for skeletal health in adulthood. In most conditions it is necessary to ensure an appropriate diet, with calcium and vitamin D, and an adequate amount of physical activity as a means of prevention. In secondary bone diseases, treatment of the primary disorder is crucial. Most genetic disorders await prospective gene therapies, while bone marrow transplantation has been attempted in other disorders. At present, affected patients are treated symptomatically, frequently by interdisciplinary teams. The role of exercise and pharmacologic therapy with calcium, vitamin D, phosphate, bisphosphonates, calcitonin, sex hormones, growth hormone, and thiazides is discussed. The perspectives on future therapy with insulin-like growth factor-1, new analogs of vitamin D

  16. [Bone and Calcium Metabolisms Associated with Dental and Oral-Maxillofacial Diseases. Destructive bone resorption by osteoclasts and oral disease].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Midori; Koide, Masanori; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Udagawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells that resorb bone, originate from monocyte-macrophage lineage cells. Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by destruction of periodontal tissues including alveolar bones. Oral implant system is established average dental treatment method. However, peri-implantitis affects the convalescence. Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is also inflammatory disease associated with antiresorptive therapy of bisphosphonates. Diagnosis and management of ONJ is more important issue.

  17. Nanotechnology in the targeted drug delivery for bone diseases and bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wenyi; Wu, Chengtie; Chen, Jiezhong; Xiao, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a vigorous research area and one of its important applications is in biomedical sciences. Among biomedical applications, targeted drug delivery is one of the most extensively studied subjects. Nanostructured particles and scaffolds have been widely studied for increasing treatment efficacy and specificity of present treatment approaches. Similarly, this technique has been used for treating bone diseases including bone regeneration. In this review, we have summarized and highlighted the recent advancement of nanostructured particles and scaffolds for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis, osteosarcoma, bone infections and inflammatory diseases, osteoarthritis, as well as for bone regeneration. Nanoparticles used to deliver deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid molecules to specific bone sites for gene therapies are also included. The investigation of the implications of nanoparticles in bone diseases have just begun, and has already shown some promising potential. Further studies have to be conducted, aimed specifically at assessing targeted delivery and bioactive scaffolds to further improve their efficacy before they can be used clinically. PMID:23836972

  18. Bone metastatic disease: taking aim at new therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Coluzzi, F; Di Bussolo, E; Mandatori, I; Mattia, C

    2011-01-01

    Conventional treatment for metastatic bone pain requires a multidisciplinary approach (medical therapy, surgery, and radiation), but is primarily palliative. Biphosphonates introduced the concept of disease-modifying therapy, by effectively reducing bone pain and skeletal related events in patients suffering from bone metastatic cancer. In the past decade, the growing knowledge of bone biology and our understanding of the molecular mechanisms at the basis of the interaction between cancer cells and bone matrix led to the identification of new therapeutic targets for innovative "smart drugs". The most investigated is the RANK/RANKL/OPG pathway, and denosumab, among novel targeted therapies, is the molecule that is in the most advanced development phase. Additional targets have been identified and potential novel therapeutic interventions, classified as inhibitors of bone resorption or stimulators of bone formation, are under preclinical and clinical evaluation. These promising targets include cathepsin K, the Src tyrosine kinases, integrins, chloride channels, the parathyroid hormone-related peptide, endotelin-1, sclerostin, and TGF-beta. Other pathways or molecules expressed by bone cells and cancer cells, such as CXCR4, GPNMB, EGF-family ligands, Wnt/DKK1, and MIP-1 alpha have recently emerged as potential targets. The aim of this review is to discuss the molecular mechanisms behind these emerging therapeutic targets in bone metastases and to give an overview of results from those in advanced clinical phases.

  19. Recent advances in bone biology provide insight into the pathogenesis of bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Boyce, B F; Hughes, D E; Wright, K R; Xing, L; Dai, A

    1999-02-01

    treat or prevent common bone diseases. PMID:10068197

  20. Fracture of brittle solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, R. D.; Nash, S. K.

    1990-01-01

    Upon completion of this experiment, the student should be able to give an elementary account of brittle versus ductile failure, conduct a three-point bend test on a tensile testing machine, and statistically analyze experimental data that exhibit inherently wide scatter. The experimental procedure is described.

  1. Brittleness of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroupa, F.

    1984-01-01

    The main characteristics of mechanical properties of ceramics are summarized and the causes of their brittleness, especially the limited mobility of dislocations, are discussed. The possibility of improving the fracture toughness of ceramics and the basic research needs relating to technology, structure and mechanical properties of ceramics are stressed in connection with their possible applications in engineering at high temperature.

  2. Prediction and Informative Risk Factor Selection of Bone Diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Li, Xiaoyi; Ramanathan, Murali; Zhang, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    With the booming of healthcare industry and the overwhelming amount of electronic health records (EHRs) shared by healthcare institutions and practitioners, we take advantage of EHR data to develop an effective disease risk management model that not only models the progression of the disease, but also predicts the risk of the disease for early disease control or prevention. Existing models for answering these questions usually fall into two categories: the expert knowledge based model or the handcrafted feature set based model. To fully utilize the whole EHR data, we will build a framework to construct an integrated representation of features from all available risk factors in the EHR data and use these integrated features to effectively predict osteoporosis and bone fractures. We will also develop a framework for informative risk factor selection of bone diseases. A pair of models for two contrast cohorts (e.g., diseased patients versus non-diseased patients) will be established to discriminate their characteristics and find the most informative risk factors. Several empirical results on a real bone disease data set show that the proposed framework can successfully predict bone diseases and select informative risk factors that are beneficial and useful to guide clinical decisions.

  3. [Pathological and metabolic bone diseases: Clinical importance for fracture treatment].

    PubMed

    Oheim, R

    2015-12-01

    Pathological and metabolic bone diseases are common and relevant occurrences in orthopedics and trauma surgery; however, fractures are often treated as being the illness itself and not seen as the symptom of an underlying bone disease. This is why further diagnostics and systemic treatment options are often insufficiently considered in the routine treatment of fractures. This review focuses on osteoporosis, osteopetrosis, hypophosphatasia and Paget's disease of bone.In patients with osteoporotic vertebral or proximal femur fractures, pharmaceutical treatment to prevent subsequent fractures is an integral part of fracture therapy together with surgical treatment. Osteopetrosis is caused by compromised osteoclastic bone resorption; therefore, even in the face of an elevated bone mass, vitamin D3 supplementation is crucial to avoid clinically relevant hypocalcemia. Unspecific symptoms of the musculoskeletal system, especially together with stress fractures, are typically found in patients suffering from hypophosphatasia. In these patients measurement of alkaline phosphatase shows reduced enzyme activity. Elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase are found in Paget's disease of bone where bisphosphonates are still the treatment of choice.

  4. T CELLS: CRITICAL BONE REGULATORS IN HEALTH AND DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis and hyperparathyroidism are to two common forms of bone loss caused primarily by an expansion of the osteoclastic pool only partially compensated by a stimulation of bone formation. The intimate mechanisms by which estrogen deficiency and excessive production of PTH cause bone loss remain to be determined in part because in vitro studies do not provide the means to adequately reproduce the effects of ovx and PTH overproduction observed in vivo. This article examines the connection between T cells and bone in health and disease and reviews the evidence in favor of the hypothesis that T cells play an unexpected critical role in the mechanism of action of estrogen and PTH in bone. PMID:20452473

  5. [Bone diseases caused by impaired glucose and lipid metabolism].

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Ippei; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2013-11-01

    The number of patients with lifestyle-related diseases is rapidly increasing in Japan. Metabolic syndrome caused by abdominal fat accumulation induces diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, resulting in an increase in cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand, recent studies have shown that the lifestyle-related diseases are risk factors of osteoporotic fractures. Although it remains still unclear how metabolic disorders affect bone tissue, oxidative stress and/or glycation stress might directly have negative impacts on bone tissue and increase the risk of fractures. In this review, we describe the association of diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia with the fracture risk through oxidative stress and glycation stress.

  6. Modeling of ductile and brittle/brittle laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.P.

    1996-02-01

    A micro-mechanical ``spring``-network model was used to simulate the deformation and fracture behaviors of ductile/brittle and brittle/brittle laminates. Effects of interfacial cohesion, moduli, grain boundary cohesion, yield stress are presented and compared with available experiments. We found that composites with higher yield stress and lower interfacial cohesion are tougher.

  7. Bone marrow derived stem cells in joint and bone diseases: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Marmotti, Antonio; de Girolamo, Laura; Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Bruzzone, Matteo; Mattia, Silvia; Rossi, Roberto; Montaruli, Angela; Dettoni, Federico; Castoldi, Filippo; Peretti, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Stem cells have huge applications in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Their use is currently not restricted to the life-threatening diseases but also extended to disorders involving the structural tissues, which may not jeopardize the patients' life, but certainly influence their quality of life. In fact, a particularly popular line of research is represented by the regeneration of bone and cartilage tissues to treat various orthopaedic disorders. Most of these pioneering research lines that aim to create new treatments for diseases that currently have limited therapies are still in the bench of the researchers. However, in recent years, several clinical trials have been started with satisfactory and encouraging results. This article aims to review the concept of stem cells and their characterization in terms of site of residence, differentiation potential and therapeutic prospective. In fact, while only the bone marrow was initially considered as a "reservoir" of this cell population, later, adipose tissue and muscle tissue have provided a considerable amount of cells available for multiple differentiation. In reality, recently, the so-called "stem cell niche" was identified as the perivascular space, recognizing these cells as almost ubiquitous. In the field of bone and joint diseases, their potential to differentiate into multiple cell lines makes their application ideally immediate through three main modalities: (1) cells selected by withdrawal from bone marrow, subsequent culture in the laboratory, and ultimately transplant at the site of injury; (2) bone marrow aspirate, concentrated and directly implanted into the injury site; (3) systemic mobilization of stem cells and other bone marrow precursors by the use of growth factors. The use of this cell population in joint and bone disease will be addressed and discussed, analysing both the clinical outcomes but also the basic research background, which has justified their use for the

  8. Markers of bone turnover in patients with epilepsy and their relationship to management of bone diseases induced by antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Sherifa A

    2016-01-01

    Data from cross-sectional and prospective studies revealed that patients with epilepsy and on long-term treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are at increased risk for metabolic bone diseases. Bone diseases were reported in about 50% of patients on AEDs. Low bone mineral density, osteopenia/osteoporosis, osteomalacia, rickets, altered concentration of bone turnover markers and fractures were reported with phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine, valproate, oxcarbazepine and lamotrigine. The mechanisms for AEDs-induced bone diseases are heterogeneous and include hypovitaminosis D, hypocalcemia and direct acceleration of bone loss and/or reduction of bone formation. This article reviews the evidence, predictors and mechanisms of AEDs-induced bone abnormalities and its clinical implications. For patients on AEDs, regular monitoring of bone health is recommended. Prophylactic administration of calcium and vitamin D is recommended for all patients. Treatment doses of calcium and vitamin D and even anti-resorptive drug therapy are reserved for patients at high risk of pathological fracture.

  9. [Insights into cystic fibrosis-related bone disease].

    PubMed

    Braun, C; Bacchetta, J; Reix, P

    2016-08-01

    With the increasing life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), prevalence of late complications such as CF-related bone disease (CFBD) has increased. It was initially described in 24% of the adult population with CF and has also been reported in the pediatric population. CFBD is multifactorial and progresses in different steps. Both decreased bone formation and increased bone resorption (in different amounts) are observed. CFBD is likely primitive (directly related to the CFTR defect itself), but is also worsened by acquired secondary factors such as lung infections, chronic inflammation, denutrition, vitamin deficiency, and decreased physical activity. CFBD may be clinically apparent (i.e., mainly vertebral and costal fractures), or clinically asymptomatic (therefore corresponding to abnormalities in bone density and architecture). CFBD management mainly aims to prevent the occurrence of fractures. Prevention and regular monitoring of bone disease as early as 8 years of age is of the utmost importance, as is the control of possible secondary deleterious CFBD factors. New radiological tools, such as high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography, allow an accurate evaluation of cortical and trabecular bone micro-architecture in addition to compartmental density; as such, they will likely improve the assessment of the bone fracture threat in CF patients in the near future. PMID:27345551

  10. [Notch signaling in bone formation and related skeletal diseases].

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongwei; Wu, Yaqiong; Zhang, Haifeng

    2015-04-01

    Notch signaling is highly conserved in evolution and regarded as a key factor in cell fate determination. It mediates cell-to-cell interactions that are critical for embryonic development and tissue renewal, and is involved in the occurrence and metastasis of neoplasm. Recent researches have found that such signaling plays an important role in modulating the differentiation of chondrocytes, osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Dysfunction of Notch signaling can result in many skeletal diseases such as bone tumor, disorders of bone development or bone metabolism.

  11. Leptin in joint and bone diseases: new insights.

    PubMed

    Scotece, M; Conde, J; Lopez, V; Lago, F; Pino, J; Gomez-Reino, J J; Gualillo, O

    2013-01-01

    Leptin is an adipokine with pleiotropic actions that regulates food intake, energy metabolism, inflammation and immunity, and also participates in the complex mechanism that regulates skeleton biology, both at bone and cartilage level. Leptin is increased in obesity and contributes to the "low-grade inflammatory state" of obese subjects causing a cluster of metabolic aberrations that affects joints and bone. In this review, we report the most recent research advances about the role of leptin in bone and cartilage function and its implication in inflammatory and degenerative joint diseases, such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis.

  12. Chronic Kidney Disease Impairs Bone Defect Healing in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weiqing; Kang, Ning; Seriwatanachai, Dutmanee; Dong, Yuliang; Zhou, Liyan; Lin, Yunfeng; Ye, Ling; Liang, Xing; Yuan, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been regarded as a risk for bone health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CKD on bone defect repair in rats. Uremia was induced by subtotal renal ablation, and serum levels of BUN and PTH were significantly elevated four weeks after the second renal surgery. Calvarial defects of 5-mm diameter were created and implanted with or without deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM). Micro-CT and histological analyses consistently revealed a decreased newly regenerated bone volume for CKD rats after 4 and 8 weeks. In addition, 1.4-mm-diameter cortical bone defects were established in the distal end of femora and filled with gelatin sponge. CKD rats exhibited significantly lower values of regenerated bone and bone mineral density (BMD) within the cortical gap after 2 and 4 weeks. Moreover, histomorphometric analysis showed an increase in both osteoblast number (N.Ob/B.Pm) and osteoclast number (N.Oc/B.Pm) in CKD groups due to hyperparathyroidism. Notably, collagen maturation was delayed in CKD rats as verified by Masson’s Trichrome staining. These data indicate that declined renal function negatively affects bone regeneration in both calvarial and femoral defects. PMID:26955758

  13. Chronic Kidney Disease Impairs Bone Defect Healing in Rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weiqing; Kang, Ning; Seriwatanachai, Dutmanee; Dong, Yuliang; Zhou, Liyan; Lin, Yunfeng; Ye, Ling; Liang, Xing; Yuan, Quan

    2016-03-09

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been regarded as a risk for bone health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CKD on bone defect repair in rats. Uremia was induced by subtotal renal ablation, and serum levels of BUN and PTH were significantly elevated four weeks after the second renal surgery. Calvarial defects of 5-mm diameter were created and implanted with or without deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM). Micro-CT and histological analyses consistently revealed a decreased newly regenerated bone volume for CKD rats after 4 and 8 weeks. In addition, 1.4-mm-diameter cortical bone defects were established in the distal end of femora and filled with gelatin sponge. CKD rats exhibited significantly lower values of regenerated bone and bone mineral density (BMD) within the cortical gap after 2 and 4 weeks. Moreover, histomorphometric analysis showed an increase in both osteoblast number (N.Ob/B.Pm) and osteoclast number (N.Oc/B.Pm) in CKD groups due to hyperparathyroidism. Notably, collagen maturation was delayed in CKD rats as verified by Masson's Trichrome staining. These data indicate that declined renal function negatively affects bone regeneration in both calvarial and femoral defects.

  14. Neridronic acid for the treatment of bone metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Davide; Viapiana, Ombretta; Idolazzi, Luca; Fracassi, Elena; Adami, Silvano

    2009-10-01

    Neridronic acid (6-amino-1-idroxyesilidene-1,1-bisphosphonate) is a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate licensed in Italy for the treatment of osteogenesis imperfecta and Paget's disease of bone. The pharmacodynamic profile is similar to that of other nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates and is characterized by its high affinity for bone tissue particularly at sites undergoing a process of remodeling. In growing children affected by osteogenesis imperfect, neridronic acid rapidly increases bone mineral density as measured by dual X-ray absortiometry and this is associated with a significant decrease in fracture cumulative number. Similar results have been obtained also in newborns (< 12 month old) and in adult patients. In Paget's disease of bone, 200 mg intravenous neridronic acid is associated with a 65% rate of full remission and a biochemical response (decrease of > 75% of bone turnover markers) in 95% of the patients. Neridronic acid treatment has been reported to be effective also in other skeletal diseases such as osteoporosis, algodystrophy, hypercalcemia of malignancy and bone metastasis. Neridronic acid has been developed only for parenteral use, and it is the only one used as intramuscular injection. This avoids all the limitations of oral bisphosphonates and may be offered for a home treatment with simple nursing assistance. PMID:19761412

  15. [Updates on Lifestyle-Related Diseases and Bone Metabolism. Bidirectional relationship between lifestyle-related diseases and bone metabolism].

    PubMed

    Sato, Shingo; Takeda, Shu

    2014-11-01

    Lifestyle-related diseases such as diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and hypertension were previously considered to be unrelated to osteoporosis. However, recent investigations have demonstrated that lifestyle-related diseases have a significant effect on the regulation of bone metabolism. In addition, it has been also revealed that osteocalcin or fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) , which is produced by osteoblasts, has an important role in glucose metabolism, fat metabolism, or calcium homeostasis. These findings suggest that bone is not only a target organ of hormones but also involved in regulating other organs as an endocrine organ. This review introduces such a bidirectional relationship between several lifestyle-related diseases and bone metabolism. PMID:25355142

  16. [Updates on Lifestyle-Related Diseases and Bone Metabolism. Bidirectional relationship between lifestyle-related diseases and bone metabolism].

    PubMed

    Sato, Shingo; Takeda, Shu

    2014-11-01

    Lifestyle-related diseases such as diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and hypertension were previously considered to be unrelated to osteoporosis. However, recent investigations have demonstrated that lifestyle-related diseases have a significant effect on the regulation of bone metabolism. In addition, it has been also revealed that osteocalcin or fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) , which is produced by osteoblasts, has an important role in glucose metabolism, fat metabolism, or calcium homeostasis. These findings suggest that bone is not only a target organ of hormones but also involved in regulating other organs as an endocrine organ. This review introduces such a bidirectional relationship between several lifestyle-related diseases and bone metabolism.

  17. Bone Diseases - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... 繁體中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) ... 骨スキャン - 日本語 (Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Korean (한국어) Bone Scan 골 (骨) 스캔 - 한국어 (Korean) ...

  18. Biochemical markers in the assessment of bone disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D. D.

    1997-01-01

    As the mean age of our population increases, increasing attention has been paid to the diseases associated with aging, including diseases of the skeleton such as osteoporosis. Effective means of treating and possibly preventing such skeletal disorders are emerging, making their early recognition an important goal for the primary care physician. Although bone density measurements and skeletal imaging studies remain of primary diagnostic importance in this regard, a large number of assays for biochemical markers of bone formation and resorption are being developed that promise to complement the densitometry measurements and imaging studies, providing an assessment of the rates of bone turnover and an earlier evaluation of the effects of therapy. In this review, emphasizing the recent literature, the major biochemical markers currently in use or under active investigation are described, and their application in a number of diseases of the skeleton including osteoporosis is evaluated.

  19. Rare Bone Diseases and Their Dental, Oral, and Craniofacial Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Foster, B.L.; Ramnitz, M.S.; Gafni, R.I.; Burke, A.B.; Boyce, A.M.; Lee, J.S.; Wright, J.T.; Akintoye, S.O.; Somerman, M.J.; Collins, M.T.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary diseases affecting the skeleton are heterogeneous in etiology and severity. Though many of these conditions are individually rare, the total number of people affected is great. These disorders often include dental-oral-craniofacial (DOC) manifestations, but the combination of the rarity and lack of in-depth reporting often limit our understanding and ability to diagnose and treat affected individuals. In this review, we focus on dental, oral, and craniofacial manifestations of rare bone diseases. Discussed are defects in 4 key physiologic processes in bone/tooth formation that serve as models for the understanding of other diseases in the skeleton and DOC complex: progenitor cell differentiation (fibrous dysplasia), extracellular matrix production (osteogenesis imperfecta), mineralization (familial tumoral calcinosis/hyperostosis hyperphosphatemia syndrome, hypophosphatemic rickets, and hypophosphatasia), and bone resorption (Gorham-Stout disease). For each condition, we highlight causative mutations (when known), etiopathology in the skeleton and DOC complex, and treatments. By understanding how these 4 foci are subverted to cause disease, we aim to improve the identification of genetic, molecular, and/or biologic causes, diagnoses, and treatment of these and other rare bone conditions that may share underlying mechanisms of disease. PMID:24700690

  20. Rare bone diseases and their dental, oral, and craniofacial manifestations.

    PubMed

    Foster, B L; Ramnitz, M S; Gafni, R I; Burke, A B; Boyce, A M; Lee, J S; Wright, J T; Akintoye, S O; Somerman, M J; Collins, M T

    2014-07-01

    Hereditary diseases affecting the skeleton are heterogeneous in etiology and severity. Though many of these conditions are individually rare, the total number of people affected is great. These disorders often include dental-oral-craniofacial (DOC) manifestations, but the combination of the rarity and lack of in-depth reporting often limit our understanding and ability to diagnose and treat affected individuals. In this review, we focus on dental, oral, and craniofacial manifestations of rare bone diseases. Discussed are defects in 4 key physiologic processes in bone/tooth formation that serve as models for the understanding of other diseases in the skeleton and DOC complex: progenitor cell differentiation (fibrous dysplasia), extracellular matrix production (osteogenesis imperfecta), mineralization (familial tumoral calcinosis/hyperostosis hyperphosphatemia syndrome, hypophosphatemic rickets, and hypophosphatasia), and bone resorption (Gorham-Stout disease). For each condition, we highlight causative mutations (when known), etiopathology in the skeleton and DOC complex, and treatments. By understanding how these 4 foci are subverted to cause disease, we aim to improve the identification of genetic, molecular, and/or biologic causes, diagnoses, and treatment of these and other rare bone conditions that may share underlying mechanisms of disease.

  1. Consequences of Daily Administered Parathyroid Hormone on Myeloma Growth, Bone Disease, and Molecular Profiling of Whole Myelomatous Bone

    PubMed Central

    Pennisi, Angela; Ling, Wen; Li, Xin; Khan, Sharmin; Wang, Yuping; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D.; Yaccoby, Shmuel

    2010-01-01

    Background Induction of osteolytic bone lesions in multiple myeloma is caused by an uncoupling of osteoclastic bone resorption and osteoblastic bone formation. Current management of myeloma bone disease is limited to the use of antiresorptive agents such as bisphosphonates. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested the effects of daily administered parathyroid hormone (PTH) on bone disease and myeloma growth, and we investigated molecular mechanisms by analyzing gene expression profiles of unique myeloma cell lines and primary myeloma cells engrafted in SCID-rab and SCID-hu mouse models. PTH resulted in increased bone mineral density of myelomatous bones and reduced tumor burden, which reflected the dependence of primary myeloma cells on the bone marrow microenvironment. Treatment with PTH also increased bone mineral density of uninvolved murine bones in myelomatous hosts and bone mineral density of implanted human bones in nonmyelomatous hosts. In myelomatous bone, PTH markedly increased the number of osteoblasts and bone-formation parameters, and the number of osteoclasts was unaffected or moderately reduced. Pretreatment with PTH before injecting myeloma cells increased bone mineral density of the implanted bone and delayed tumor progression. Human global gene expression profiling of myelomatous bones from SCID-hu mice treated with PTH or saline revealed activation of multiple distinct pathways involved in bone formation and coupling; involvement of Wnt signaling was prominent. Treatment with PTH also downregulated markers typically expressed by osteoclasts and myeloma cells, and altered expression of genes that control oxidative stress and inflammation. PTH receptors were not expressed by myeloma cells, and PTH had no effect on myeloma cell growth in vitro. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that PTH-induced bone formation in myelomatous bones is mediated by activation of multiple signaling pathways involved in osteoblastogenesis and attenuated bone resorption

  2. Tumor-host cell interactions in the bone disease of myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Jessica A.; Edwards, Claire M.; Croucher, Peter I.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a hematological malignancy that is associated with the development of a destructive osteolytic bone disease, which is a major cause of morbidity for patients with myeloma. Interactions between myeloma cells and cells of the bone marrow microenvironment promote both tumor growth and survival and bone destruction, and the osteolytic bone disease is now recognized as a contributing component to tumor progression. Since myeloma bone disease is associated with both an increase in osteoclastic bone resorption and a suppression of osteoblastic bone formation, research to date has largely focused upon the role of the osteoclast and osteoblast. However, it is now clear that other cell types within the bone marrow, including cells of the immune system, mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow stromal cells, can contribute to the development of myeloma bone disease. This review discusses the cellular mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets that have been implicated in myeloma bone disease. PMID:20615487

  3. Gaucher disease: the role of the specialist on metabolic bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Masi, Laura; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    According to European legislation, a disease can be considered rare or "orphan" when it affects less than 1 subject of 2000 (1). Often these diseases affecting the pediatric age, are complex diseases and chronically debilitating and for this motive need the intervention of multidisciplinary skills specific. Among the rare disease as affecting the skeleton more than 400 are characterized by dysplastic changes of the skeleton (2). Alongside the disorders affecting the skeleton primitively, many systemic diseases can have a bone involvement. Among these, the Gaucher disease (GD), an heterogeneous lysosomal storage determined by hereditary enzyme deficiency of β-glucosidase. Patients with this disease have skeletal disorders of varying severity (Erlenmeyer flask deformity, lytic lesions and osteonecrosis, pathological fractures) that affects both the bone marrow, both mineralized bone with progressive damage of the tissue. The bone disease is the most debilitating of GD and can have a significant impact on the quality of life of patients. Thorough evaluations by monitoring biochemical markers of bone turnover and instrumental, with a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the bone, are of fundamental importance to intervene early so they can prevent complications irreversible. PMID:26604943

  4. Gaucher disease: the role of the specialist on metabolic bone diseases

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Laura; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Summary According to European legislation, a disease can be considered rare or “orphan” when it affects less than 1 subject of 2000 (1). Often these diseases affecting the pediatric age, are complex diseases and chronically debilitating and for this motive need the intervention of multidisciplinary skills specific. Among the rare disease as affecting the skeleton more than 400 are characterized by dysplastic changes of the skeleton (2). Alongside the disorders affecting the skeleton primitively, many systemic diseases can have a bone involvement. Among these, the Gaucher disease (GD), an heterogeneous lysosomal storage determined by hereditary enzyme deficiency of β-glucosidase. Patients with this disease have skeletal disorders of varying severity (Erlenmeyer flask deformity, lytic lesions and osteonecrosis, pathological fractures) that affects both the bone marrow, both mineralized bone with progressive damage of the tissue. The bone disease is the most debilitating of GD and can have a significant impact on the quality of life of patients. Thorough evaluations by monitoring biochemical markers of bone turnover and instrumental, with a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the bone, are of fundamental importance to intervene early so they can prevent complications irreversible. PMID:26604943

  5. Gaucher disease: the role of the specialist on metabolic bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Masi, Laura; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    According to European legislation, a disease can be considered rare or "orphan" when it affects less than 1 subject of 2000 (1). Often these diseases affecting the pediatric age, are complex diseases and chronically debilitating and for this motive need the intervention of multidisciplinary skills specific. Among the rare disease as affecting the skeleton more than 400 are characterized by dysplastic changes of the skeleton (2). Alongside the disorders affecting the skeleton primitively, many systemic diseases can have a bone involvement. Among these, the Gaucher disease (GD), an heterogeneous lysosomal storage determined by hereditary enzyme deficiency of β-glucosidase. Patients with this disease have skeletal disorders of varying severity (Erlenmeyer flask deformity, lytic lesions and osteonecrosis, pathological fractures) that affects both the bone marrow, both mineralized bone with progressive damage of the tissue. The bone disease is the most debilitating of GD and can have a significant impact on the quality of life of patients. Thorough evaluations by monitoring biochemical markers of bone turnover and instrumental, with a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the bone, are of fundamental importance to intervene early so they can prevent complications irreversible.

  6. [Mineral and bone disorder in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Matuszkiewicz-Rowińska, Joanna; Kulicki, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is characterized by at least one ofthefollowing: 1. biochemical abnormalities in calcium, phosphate, parathormone (PTH) and vitamin D metabolism; 2. renal osteodystrophy; and 3. cardiovascular or other soft tissue calcifications. All these abnormalities are interrelated and significantly contribute to the increased morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD. PMID:25782203

  7. Effect of glycosphingolipids on osteoclastogenesis and osteolytic bone diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ersek, Adel; Karadimitris, Anastasios; Horwood, Nicole J.

    2012-01-01

    Alterations in glycosphingolipid (GSL) production results in lysosomal storage disorders associated with neurodegenerative changes. In Gaucher’s disease, the patients also develop osteoporosis that is ameliorated upon treatment for the underlying defect in GSL metabolism. The role of GSLs in osteoclast and osteoblast formation is discussed here as well as the potential therapeutic uses of already approved drugs that limit GSL production in bone loss disorders such as multiple myeloma and periodontal disease. PMID:22936926

  8. In vivo bone aluminum measurements in patients with renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, K.J.; Kelleher, S.P.

    1986-01-01

    Contamination of the dialysis solution with trace amounts of aluminum and long-term use of aluminum-based phosphate binders have led to increased body burden of aluminum in patients with end-stage renal disease. A significant clinical problem associated with aluminum-overload is the early diagnosis of aluminum-induced dialysis dementia and osteomalacic osteodystrophy. There are few, if any, blood or urine indices that provide an early monitor of this bone disease, especially in the asymptomatic patient. Although a bone biopsy is usually the basis for the final clinical diagnosis, this procedure is not recommended for routine monitoring of patients. The present technique demonstrates the direct in vivo measurement of bone aluminum levels in patients with renal failure. The interference normally present from activation of bone phosphorus is eliminated by using a thermal/epithermal neutron beam. For the clinical management of the patients, the Al/Ca ratio for the hand may be more useful than an absolute measurement of the total body or skeletal aluminum burden. The relationship between the increased serum Al levels following disferrioxamine infusion and the direct in vivo measurement of bone aluminum using the Al/Ca ratio are currently under investigation. The neutron activation procedure presented in this pilot study is a promising new technique with an immediate clinical application. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Stem cells and bone diseases: new tools, new perspective.

    PubMed

    Riminucci, Mara; Remoli, Cristina; Robey, Pamela G; Bianco, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Postnatal skeletal stem cells are a unique class of progenitors with biological properties that extend well beyond the limits of stemness as commonly defined. Skeletal stem cells sustain skeletal tissue homeostasis, organize and maintain the complex architectural structure of the bone marrow microenvironment and provide a niche for hematopoietic progenitor cells. The identification of stem cells in the human post-natal skeleton has profoundly changed our approach to the physiology and pathology of this system. Skeletal diseases have been long interpreted essentially in terms of defective function of differentiated cells and/or abnormal turnover of the matrix that they produce. The notion of a skeletal stem cell has brought forth multiple, novel concepts in skeletal biology that provide potential alternative concepts. At the same time, the recognition of the complex functions played by skeletal progenitors, such as the structural and functional organization of the bone marrow, has provided an innovative, unifying perspective for understanding bone and bone marrow changes simultaneously occurring in many disorders. Finally, the possibility to isolate and highly enrich for skeletal progenitors, enables us to reproduce perfectly normal or pathological organ miniatures. These, in turn, provide suitable models to investigate and manipulate the pathogenetic mechanisms of many genetic and non-genetic skeletal diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Stem cells and Bone.

  10. Turner's syndrome presenting as metabolic bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar; Balachandran, Karthik; Ananthakrishnan, Ramesh; Hamide, Abdoul

    2012-01-01

    Turner's syndrome is a genetic disorder with a complete or partial absence of one X chromosome with characteristic phenotypic features. The prevalence of renal anomalies in turner syndrome is 30–40%. However, the renal function is usually normal. We report a case of Turner's syndrome presenting with chronic kidney disease and renal osteodystrophy. PMID:22837932

  11. Sclerostin, Osteocytes, and Chronic Kidney Disease - Mineral Bone Disorder.

    PubMed

    Moysés, Rosa M A; Schiavi, Susan C

    2015-01-01

    Osteocytes respond to kidney damage by increasing production of secreted factors important to bone and mineral metabolism. These circulating proteins include the antianabolic factor, sclerostin, and the phosphaturic hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). Elevated sclerostin levels correlate with increased FGF23, localized reduction in Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the skeleton and reduced osteoblast differentiation/activity. Decreased Wnt/β-catenin signaling occurs regardless of the overall changes in bone formation rates, suggesting that a reduction in the anabolic response may be a common feature of renal bone disorders but additional mechanisms may contribute to the diversity of osteodystrophy phenotypes. Recent preclinical studies support this hypothesis, as treatment with antisclerostin antibodies improved bone quality in the context of low but not high turnover renal osteodystrophy. Sclerostin also appears in the circulation suggesting additional roles outside the skeleton in normal and disease states. In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), serum levels are elevated several fold relative to healthy individuals. Emerging data suggest that these changes are associated with increased fracture rates but the relationship between sclerostin and cardiovascular disease is unclear. Additional epidemiologic studies that examine stage specific and patient sub-populations are needed to assess whether sclerostin elevations influence comorbidities associated with CKD. PMID:26288182

  12. Bone Disease in the Common Marmoset: Radiographic and Histological Findings.

    PubMed

    Olson, E J; Shaw, G C; Hutchinson, E K; Schultz-Darken, N; Bolton, I D; Parker, J B; Morrison, J M; Baxter, V K; Pate, K A Metcalf; Mankowski, J L; Carlson, C S

    2015-09-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is a New World primate that is used in biomedical research due to its small size and relative ease of handling compared with larger primates. Although bone disease in common marmosets is well recognized, there are very few detailed descriptions in the literature that cover the range of lesions seen in these animals. For all animals used to model human disease, it is important to be aware of background lesions that may affect the interpretation of study findings. This retrospective study details bone diseases encountered in marmoset breeding colonies at 2 different institutions. Affected marmosets at Johns Hopkins University had lesions compatible with diagnoses of rickets, fibrous osteodystrophy and osteopenia. Affected marmosets at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center exhibited severe lesions of osteoclastic bone resorption and remodeling that had an unusual distribution and were not easily categorized into a known disease entity. The purpose of this report is to document these naturally occurring skeletal lesions of common marmosets and suggest an approach to evaluating skeletal disease in prospective studies of these animals that will allow the most accurate diagnoses.

  13. Bone disease in multiple myeloma: pathophysiology and management.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Abdul; Brady, Jennifer J; Dowling, Paul; Clynes, Martin; O'Gorman, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Myeloma bone disease (MBD) is a devastating complication of multiple myeloma (MM). More than 80% of MM patients suffer from destructive bony lesions, leading to pain, fractures, mobility issues, and neurological deficits. MBD is not only a main cause of disability and morbidity in MM patients but also increases the cost of management. Bone destruction and lack of bone formation are main factors in the development of MBD. Some novel factors are found to be involved in the pathogenesis of MBD, eg, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG) system (RANKL/OPG), Wingless (Wnt), dickkopf-1 (Wnt/DKK1) pathway. The addition of novel agents in the treatment of MM, use of bisphosphonates and other supportive modalities such as radiotherapy, vertebroplasty/kyphoplasty, and surgical interventions, all have significant roles in the treatment of MBD. This review provides an overview on the pathophysiology and management of MBD.

  14. Metabolic effects of pamidronate in patients with metastatic bone disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vinholes, J.; Guo, C. Y.; Purohit, O. P.; Eastell, R.; Coleman, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    We have evaluated the value of specific bone resorption markers in monitoring metastatic bone disease to define the duration of action of a single high-dose pamidronate infusion. Twenty patients received a single infusion of pamidronate 120 mg for painful bone metastases. Ten out of these 20 patients also received a second infusion. They were evaluated at baseline, 2, 4 and 8 weeks after each infusion. A composite pain questionnaire, serum and urine tests were carried out at these time points. Bone resorption markers measured included urinary calcium, hydroxyproline and two new markers: pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline. Reference values were defined by 20 healthy controls matched by age and sex. Pamidronate induced a profound fall in bone resorption with a maximal effect within the first month after therapy. Changes in urinary calcium levels were confounded by a rise of 100% in the parathyroid hormone levels. Before treatment, pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline were increased in 70% of patients, while urinary calcium was increased in only 40% of them. Thirteen patients had a > or = 50% fall in deoxypyridinoline levels and were considered as biochemical responders. These patients had a mean reduction in pain score of about 30% of baseline levels, which was significantly higher than the seven non-biochemical responders. In conclusion, urinary calcium is not a precise marker of bone resorption. Deoxypyridinoline seems to be the most specific bone resorption marker in cancer patients. Biochemical responders have the most benefit from pamidronate in terms of pain relief. This suggests that patients may benefit from more potent or repeated infusions of bisphosphonates. PMID:8624269

  15. Bones of contention: bone mineral density recovery in celiac disease--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Grace-Farfaglia, Patricia

    2015-05-01

    Metabolic bone disease is a frequent co-morbidity in newly diagnosed adults with celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disorder triggered by the ingestion of dietary gluten. This systematic review of studies looked at the efficacy of the gluten-free diet, physical activity, nutrient supplementation, and bisphosphonates for low bone density treatment. Case control and cohort designs were identified from PubMed and other academic databases (from 1996 to 2015) that observed newly diagnosed adults with CD for at least one year after diet treatment using the dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan. Only 20 out of 207 studies met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality was assessed using the Strengthening of the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement checklist. Gluten-free diet adherence resulted in partial recovery of bone density by one year in all studies, and full recovery by the fifth year. No treatment differences were observed between the gluten-free diet alone and diet plus bisphosphonates in one study. For malnourished patients, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium resulted in significant improvement. Evidence for the impact of physical activity on bone density was limited. Therapeutic strategies aimed at modifying lifestyle factors throughout the lifespan should be studied.

  16. Bone disease in multiple myeloma and precursor disease: novel diagnostic approaches and implications on clinical management.

    PubMed

    Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y; Minter, Alex R; Korde, Neha; Tan, Esther; Landgren, Ola

    2011-07-01

    The manifestations of bone involvement in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) can have devastating clinical effects and increase mortality. Recent studies demonstrate that patients with the precursor conditions smoldering MM (SMM) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) show evidence of bone disease and increased risk of fractures. The understanding of the pathogenesis of bone disease in MM has expanded in recent years. The traditional skeletal survey will probably be replaced by newer and more sensitive imaging techniques, which may have a prognostic impact and change our definition of MGUS and SMM. Bisphosphonates are recommended to prevent skeletal events in patients with MM, and have also been studied in SMM and MGUS. This article summarizes the current knowledge of bone disease in plasma cell disorders, and discusses the current standard and future role of novel imaging techniques, as well as the evidence and current guidelines for bisphosphonates in MM, SMM and MGUS. PMID:21745013

  17. Bone disease in multiple myeloma and precursor disease: novel diagnostic approaches and implications on clinical management.

    PubMed

    Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y; Minter, Alex R; Korde, Neha; Tan, Esther; Landgren, Ola

    2011-07-01

    The manifestations of bone involvement in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) can have devastating clinical effects and increase mortality. Recent studies demonstrate that patients with the precursor conditions smoldering MM (SMM) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) show evidence of bone disease and increased risk of fractures. The understanding of the pathogenesis of bone disease in MM has expanded in recent years. The traditional skeletal survey will probably be replaced by newer and more sensitive imaging techniques, which may have a prognostic impact and change our definition of MGUS and SMM. Bisphosphonates are recommended to prevent skeletal events in patients with MM, and have also been studied in SMM and MGUS. This article summarizes the current knowledge of bone disease in plasma cell disorders, and discusses the current standard and future role of novel imaging techniques, as well as the evidence and current guidelines for bisphosphonates in MM, SMM and MGUS.

  18. Facts a New Patient Needs to Know about Paget's Disease of Bone

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease of Bone Paget’s Disease Basics Facts a New Patient Needs to Know About Paget’s Disease of Bone Publication available in: PDF (63 KB) ... geographical areas, including England, the United States, Australia, New Zealand, and ... Paget’s Disease a Form of Arthritis? People with Paget’s disease ...

  19. Update on Mineral and Bone Disorders in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Foster, Jonathan D

    2016-11-01

    The inappropriate phosphorus retention observed in chronic kidney disease is central to the pathophysiology of mineral and bone disorders observed in these patients. Subsequent derangements in serum fibroblast growth factor 23, parathyroid hormone, and calcitriol concentrations play contributory roles. Therapeutic intervention involves dietary phosphorus restriction and intestinal phosphate binders in order to correct phosphorus retention and maintain normocalcemia. Additional therapies may be considered to normalize serum fibroblast growth factor 23 and parathyroid hormone. PMID:27436330

  20. Perspectives on the future of bone and joint diseases.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Joan A

    2003-08-01

    The diseases of bones, joints, and muscles are common, chronic, and very costly to society. While the impact of these diseases falls across the age spectrum, the worldwide growth in the percentage of elderly in the population makes attention to musculoskeletal disorders and conditions particularly critical. An effective prevention strategy, driven by an understanding of the fundamental biology of bone and connective tissue, can only result from an upshift in the efforts of many sectors--public and private, academic, scientific, and patient-based--with new opportunities for partnerships and collaborative efforts flourishing. The Decade of the Bone and Joint can serve as a catalyst in this effort. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) are pleased to join with other national and international organizations to promote new activities and initiatives during the next decade. The NIH Osteoarthritis Initiative is highlighted as an example of a public-private partnership to develop resources and information on the natural history of the disease process that can drive new clinical intervention studies in osteoarthritis. Hopefully, this initiative and others will pave the way for important, scientifically driven prevention strategies during the next decade. PMID:12926660

  1. Metabolic bone disease in home total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    McCullough, M L; Hsu, N

    1987-07-01

    Home total parenteral nutrition (HTPN) is in its infancy but has proved to be lifesaving for patients unable to manage on enteral nutrition alone. However, this mode of nutrition therapy is not without problems. Aside from mechanical and other metabolic complications, a peculiar metabolic bone disease has been reported to occur in some HTPN recipients. The disease, characterized by abnormalities in calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, often results in osteomalacia, bone pain, and fractures. Reports of approximately 50 cases of metabolic bone disease have been published by centers in the United States and Canada. Factors that have been implicated as possible causes include infusion of excess vitamin D, aluminum, calcium, protein, or glucose; cyclic vs. continuous TPN administration; and the patient's previous nutritional state. Although removal of vitamin D or aluminum from the TPN solution and discontinuation of TPN altogether have been associated with improvement in symptoms, histology, and laboratory values, no single factor has been identified as the cause of this troubling phenomenon. PMID:3110249

  2. Update on Wnt signaling in bone cell biology and bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, David G.; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Oursler, Merry Jo; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2012-01-01

    For more than a decade, Wnt signaling pathways have been the focus of intense research activity in bone biology laboratories because of their importance in skeletal development, bone mass maintenance, and therapeutic potential for regenerative medicine. It is evident that even subtle alterations in the intensity, amplitude, location, and duration of Wnt signaling pathways affects skeletal development, as well as bone remodeling, regeneration, and repair during a lifespan. Here we review recent advances and discrepancies in how Wnt/Lrp5 signaling regulates osteoblasts and osteocytes, introduce new players in Wnt signaling pathways that have important roles in bone development, discuss emerging areas such as the role of Wnt signaling in osteoclastogenesis, and summarize progress made in translating basic studies to clinical therapeutics and diagnostics centered around inhibiting Wnt pathway antagonists, such as sclerostin, Dkk1 and Sfrp1. Emphasis is placed on the plethora of genetic studies in mouse models and genome wide association studies that reveal the requirement for and crucial roles of Wnt pathway components during skeletal development and disease. PMID:22079544

  3. Development of a molecular test of Paget's disease of bone.

    PubMed

    Guay-Bélanger, Sabrina; Simonyan, David; Bureau, Alexandre; Gagnon, Edith; Albert, Caroline; Morissette, Jean; Siris, Ethel S; Orcel, Philippe; Brown, Jacques P; Michou, Laëtitia

    2016-03-01

    Depending on populations, 15 to 40% of patients have a familial form of Paget's disease of bone (PDB), which is transmitted in an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance with incomplete penetrance. To date, only SQSTM1 gene mutations have been linked to the disease. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with PDB in patient non-carriers of SQSTM1 mutations, but they have minor size effects. The current clinical practice guidelines still recommend to measure total serum alkaline phosphatase (sALP) for PDB screening. However, genetic or bone biomarkers alone may lack sensitivity to detect PDB. Thus, the objective of this study was to develop a molecular test of PDB, combining genetic and bone biomarkers, in order to detect PDB, which is frequently asymptomatic. We genotyped 35 SNPs previously associated with PDB in 305 patients, and 292 healthy controls. In addition, serum levels of 14 bone biomarkers were assayed in 51 patients and 151 healthy controls. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models with adjustment for age and sex were fitted to search for a combination of SNPs and/or bone biomarkers that could best detect PDB in patient non-carriers of SQSTM1 mutations. First, a combination of five genetic markers gave rise to the highest area under the ROC curve (AUC) with 95% confidence interval [95% CI] of 0.731 [0.688; 0.773], which allowed us to detect 81.5% of patients with PDB. Second, a combination of two bone biomarkers had an AUC of 0.822 [0.726; 0.918], and was present in 81.5% of patients with PDB. Then, the combination of the five genetic markers and the two bone biomarkers increased the AUC up to 0.892 [0.833; 0.951], and detected 88.5% of patients with PDB. These results suggested that an algorithm integrating first a screen for SQSTM1 gene mutations, followed by either a genetic markers combination or a combined genetic and biochemical markers test in patients non-carrier of any SQSTM1 mutation, may detect the PDB

  4. Consensus on Surgical Management of Myeloma Bone Disease.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    Myeloma bone disease (MBD), the skeletal lesions caused by multiple myeloma, is also known as skeletal related events and includes bone pain, osteoporosis, pathological fractures, osteolytic bone lesions, spinal instability, spinal cord and nerve root compression and extramedullary plasmacytoma. It is now generally accepted that patients with these complications usually require surgical management and that such treatment is safe and effective. The aims of surgical interventions are to alleviate pain, improve quality of life, treat potential or existing pathological fractures, decompress the spinal cord and nerve roots, and reestablish bone continuity. Thus far, there have not been uniform standards for surgical treatment of MBD. The Surgeon's Committee of the Chinese Myeloma Working Group has therefore achieved a consensus with the aim of providing guidance for clinicians and benefitting patients with MBD. This consensus focuses on the treatment of MBD, including its clinical definition and characteristics, diagnosis and surgical management. This expert consensus document was compiled after discussion and revision by experts from several relevant institutions in China. However, it is only an interim guide that cannot be enforced legally. It will be updated with development of new techniques of treatment. PMID:27627707

  5. The Kidney-Vascular-Bone Axis in the Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Michael E; Hruska, Keith A

    2016-03-01

    The last 25 years have been characterized by dramatic improvements in short-term patient and allograft survival after kidney transplantation. Long-term patient and allograft survival remains limited by cardiovascular disease and chronic allograft injury, among other factors. Cardiovascular disease remains a significant contributor to mortality in native chronic kidney disease as well as cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease more than doubles that of the general population. The chronic kidney disease (CKD)-mineral bone disorder (MBD) is a syndrome recently coined to embody the biochemical, skeletal, and cardiovascular pathophysiology that results from disrupting the complex systems biology between the kidney, skeleton, and cardiovascular system in native and transplant kidney disease. The CKD-MBD is a unique kidney disease-specific syndrome containing novel cardiovascular risk factors, with an impact reaching far beyond traditional notions of renal osteodystrophy and hyperparathyroidism. This overview reviews current knowledge of the pathophysiology of the CKD-MBD, including emerging concepts surrounding the importance of circulating pathogenic factors released from the injured kidney that directly cause cardiovascular disease in native and transplant chronic kidney disease, with potential application to mechanisms of chronic allograft injury and vasculopathy.

  6. The Kidney-Vascular-Bone Axis in the Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Michael E; Hruska, Keith A

    2016-03-01

    The last 25 years have been characterized by dramatic improvements in short-term patient and allograft survival after kidney transplantation. Long-term patient and allograft survival remains limited by cardiovascular disease and chronic allograft injury, among other factors. Cardiovascular disease remains a significant contributor to mortality in native chronic kidney disease as well as cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease more than doubles that of the general population. The chronic kidney disease (CKD)-mineral bone disorder (MBD) is a syndrome recently coined to embody the biochemical, skeletal, and cardiovascular pathophysiology that results from disrupting the complex systems biology between the kidney, skeleton, and cardiovascular system in native and transplant kidney disease. The CKD-MBD is a unique kidney disease-specific syndrome containing novel cardiovascular risk factors, with an impact reaching far beyond traditional notions of renal osteodystrophy and hyperparathyroidism. This overview reviews current knowledge of the pathophysiology of the CKD-MBD, including emerging concepts surrounding the importance of circulating pathogenic factors released from the injured kidney that directly cause cardiovascular disease in native and transplant chronic kidney disease, with potential application to mechanisms of chronic allograft injury and vasculopathy. PMID:26356179

  7. National Institutes of Health Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases~National Resource Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language Publications (en español) | Asian-Language Publications NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ NIH National Resource Center ... Font Size | S S M M L L Bone Basics Osteoporosis Osteogenesis Imperfecta Paget’s Disease of Bone Related Topics ...

  8. How rare bone diseases have informed our knowledge of complex diseases.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    Rare bone diseases, generally defined as monogenic traits with either autosomal recessive or dominant patterns of inheritance, have provided a rich database of genes and associated pathways over the past 2-3 decades. The molecular genetic dissection of these bone diseases has yielded some major surprises in terms of the causal genes and/or involved pathways. The discovery of genes/pathways involved in diseases such as osteopetrosis, osteosclerosis, osteogenesis imperfecta and many other rare bone diseases have all accelerated our understanding of complex traits. Importantly these discoveries have provided either direct validation for a specific gene embedded in a group of genes within an interval identified through a complex trait genome-wide association study (GWAS) or based upon the pathway associated with a monogenic trait gene, provided a means to prioritize a large number of genes for functional validation studies. In some instances GWAS studies have yielded candidate genes that fall within linkage intervals associated with monogenic traits and resulted in the identification of causal mutations in those rare diseases. Driving all of this discovery is a complement of technologies such as genome sequencing, bioinformatics and advanced statistical analysis methods that have accelerated genetic dissection and greatly reduced the cost. Thus, rare bone disorders in partnership with GWAS have brought us to the brink of a new era of personalized genomic medicine in which the prevention and management of complex diseases will be driven by the molecular understanding of each individuals contributing genetic risks for disease. PMID:27688878

  9. How rare bone diseases have informed our knowledge of complex diseases.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    Rare bone diseases, generally defined as monogenic traits with either autosomal recessive or dominant patterns of inheritance, have provided a rich database of genes and associated pathways over the past 2-3 decades. The molecular genetic dissection of these bone diseases has yielded some major surprises in terms of the causal genes and/or involved pathways. The discovery of genes/pathways involved in diseases such as osteopetrosis, osteosclerosis, osteogenesis imperfecta and many other rare bone diseases have all accelerated our understanding of complex traits. Importantly these discoveries have provided either direct validation for a specific gene embedded in a group of genes within an interval identified through a complex trait genome-wide association study (GWAS) or based upon the pathway associated with a monogenic trait gene, provided a means to prioritize a large number of genes for functional validation studies. In some instances GWAS studies have yielded candidate genes that fall within linkage intervals associated with monogenic traits and resulted in the identification of causal mutations in those rare diseases. Driving all of this discovery is a complement of technologies such as genome sequencing, bioinformatics and advanced statistical analysis methods that have accelerated genetic dissection and greatly reduced the cost. Thus, rare bone disorders in partnership with GWAS have brought us to the brink of a new era of personalized genomic medicine in which the prevention and management of complex diseases will be driven by the molecular understanding of each individuals contributing genetic risks for disease.

  10. Glycosphingolipid synthesis inhibition limits osteoclast activation and myeloma bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Ersek, Adel; Xu, Ke; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Butters, Terry D.; Santo, Ana Espirito; Vattakuzhi, Youridies; Williams, Lynn M.; Goudevenou, Katerina; Danks, Lynett; Freidin, Andrew; Spanoudakis, Emmanouil; Parry, Simon; Papaioannou, Maria; Hatjiharissi, Evdoxia; Chaidos, Aristeidis; Alonzi, Dominic S.; Twigg, Gabriele; Hu, Ming; Dwek, Raymond A.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Roberts, Irene; Dell, Anne; Rahemtulla, Amin; Horwood, Nicole J.; Karadimitris, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are essential constituents of cell membranes and lipid rafts and can modulate signal transduction events. The contribution of GSLs in osteoclast (OC) activation and osteolytic bone diseases in malignancies such as the plasma cell dyscrasia multiple myeloma (MM) is not known. Here, we tested the hypothesis that pathological activation of OCs in MM requires de novo GSL synthesis and is further enhanced by myeloma cell–derived GSLs. Glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitors, including the clinically approved agent N-butyl-deoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ), prevented OC development and activation by disrupting RANKL-induced localization of TRAF6 and c-SRC into lipid rafts and preventing nuclear accumulation of transcriptional activator NFATc1. GM3 was the prevailing GSL produced by patient-derived myeloma cells and MM cell lines, and exogenous addition of GM3 synergistically enhanced the ability of the pro-osteoclastogenic factors RANKL and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) to induce osteoclastogenesis in precursors. In WT mice, administration of GM3 increased OC numbers and activity, an effect that was reversed by treatment with NB-DNJ. In a murine MM model, treatment with NB-DNJ markedly improved osteolytic bone disease symptoms. Together, these data demonstrate that both tumor-derived and de novo synthesized GSLs influence osteoclastogenesis and suggest that NB-DNJ may reduce pathological OC activation and bone destruction associated with MM. PMID:25915583

  11. Recommendations for evaluation and management of bone disease in HIV.

    PubMed

    Brown, Todd T; Hoy, Jennifer; Borderi, Marco; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Renjifo, Boris; Vescini, Fabio; Yin, Michael T; Powderly, William G

    2015-04-15

    Thirty-four human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) specialists from 16 countries contributed to this project, whose primary aim was to provide guidance on the screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of bone disease in HIV-infected patients. Four clinically important questions in bone disease management were identified, and recommendations, based on literature review and expert opinion, were agreed upon. Risk of fragility fracture should be assessed primarily using the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX), without dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), in all HIV-infected men aged 40-49 years and HIV-infected premenopausal women aged ≥40 years. DXA should be performed in men aged ≥50 years, postmenopausal women, patients with a history of fragility fracture, patients receiving chronic glucocorticoid treatment, and patients at high risk of falls. In resource-limited settings, FRAX without bone mineral density can be substituted for DXA. Guidelines for antiretroviral therapy should be followed; adjustment should avoid tenofovir disoproxil fumarate or boosted protease inhibitors in at-risk patients. Dietary and lifestyle management strategies for high-risk patients should be employed and antiosteoporosis treatment initiated.

  12. Multiple ‘Brown Tumors’ Masquerading as Metastatic Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Singh, Harsh; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    ‘Brown tumors’ are known as ‘osteitis fibrosa cystica’ or ‘Von Recklinghausen’s disease’ of the bone. A high index of suspicion is required by the treating doctor for diagnosing a ‘brown tumor’ in its early stage. Clinical suspicion, along with laboratory and radiological investigations, is required to diagnose this condition. We present a case of a 65-year-old woman who had multiple bony lesions and a thyroid nodule, which was initially considered as a metastatic bone disease, but later turned out to be ‘brown tumors.' In all cases with multiple osteolytic lesions, a possibility of ‘brown tumor’ must be kept in mind. PMID:26848420

  13. [Aluminum-related bone disease in chronic hemodialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Jara, A; Rosenberg, H; Bruhn, C; Vaccarezza, A; Vial, S; Jalil, R; Cisternas, H

    1993-07-01

    Plasma aluminum (pAl) was measured in 58 patients coming from three centers using different preparation of dialysis water: deionizer (29 patients), softener (16 patients) and reverse osmosis (13 patients). Twenty five healthy subjects were used as controls. A deferoxamine test was performed to 11 of 19 patients with pAl between 40 and 200 micrograms/dl and a bone biopsy with double tetracycline staining was executed to 15 patients with pAl over 40 micrograms/dl. Mean pAl was 9.5 +/- 1.7 micrograms/dl in controls and 34.3 +/- 6.1 169 +/- 27.8 and 50.8 +/- 10.3 micrograms/dl in patients coming form centers using deionizers, softeners and reverse osmosis respectively. Seventy six percent of patients coming from centers using deionizers and 85% of patients coming from centers with reverse osmosis had pAl below 40 micrograms/dl and all had values below 200 micrograms/dl. Plasma aluminum had a increase of over 200 micrograms/dl in 6 of 11 patients in which the deferoxamine test was performed. Six patients had a positive staining for aluminum in bone biopsies (three with basal pAl over 200 micrograms/dl and one with a increase in pAL after deferoxamine < 200 micrograms/dl). Of these, 2 patients had a mixed osteodystrophy and 4 a low turnover bone disease. Centers with deionizers and reverse osmosis had very low aluminum levels in dialysis water and five of six patients with aluminum levels related bone disease came from the center using softener.

  14. Circulating microRNAs as novel biomarkers for bone diseases - Complex signatures for multifactorial diseases?

    PubMed

    Hackl, Matthias; Heilmeier, Ursula; Weilner, Sylvia; Grillari, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Biomarkers are essential tools in clinical research and practice. Useful biomarkers must combine good measurability, validated association with biological processes or outcomes, and should support clinical decision making if used in clinical practice. Several types of validated biomarkers have been reported in the context of bone diseases. However, because these biomarkers face certain limitations there is an interest in the identification of novel biomarkers for bone diseases, specifically in those that are tightly linked to the disease pathology leading to increased fracture-risk. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the most abundant RNA species to be found in cell-free blood. Encapsulated within microvesicles or bound to proteins, circulating miRNAs are remarkably stable analytes that can be measured using gold-standard technologies such as quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction (qPCR). Nevertheless, the analysis of circulating miRNAs faces several pre-analytical as well as analytical challenges. From a biological view, there is accumulating evidence that miRNAs play essential roles in the regulation of various biological processes including bone homeostasis. Moreover, specific changes in miRNA transcription levels or miRNA secretory levels have been linked to the development and progression of certain bone diseases. Only recently, results from circulating miRNAs analysis in patients with osteopenia, osteoporosis and fragility fractures have been reported. By comparing these findings to studies on circulating miRNAs in cellular senescence and aging or muscle physiology and sarcopenia, several overlaps were observed. This suggests that signatures observed during osteoporosis might not be specific to the pathophysiology in bone, but rather integrate information from several tissue types. Despite these promising first data, more work remains to be done until circulating miRNAs can serve as established and robust diagnostic tools for bone diseases in clinical research, clinical

  15. Deregulation of bone forming cells in bone diseases and anabolic effects of strontium-containing agents and biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shuang; Zhang, Binbin; Zhu, Xiaomei; Ao, Ping; Guo, Huajie; Yi, Weihong; Zhou, Guang-Qian

    2014-01-01

    Age-related bone loss and osteoporosis are associated with bone remodeling changes that are featured with decreased trabecular and periosteal bone formation relative to bone resorption. Current anticatabolic therapies focusing on the inhibition of bone resorption may not be sufficient in the prevention or reversal of age-related bone deterioration and there is a big need in promoting osteoblastogenesis and bone formation. Enhanced understanding of the network formed by key signaling pathways and molecules regulating bone forming cells in health and diseases has therefore become highly significant. The successful development of agonist/antagonist of the PTH and Wnt signaling pathways are profits of the understanding of these key pathways. As the core component of an approved antiosteoporosis agent, strontium takes its effect on osteoblasts at multilevel through multiple pathways, representing a good example in revealing and exploring anabolic mechanisms. The recognition of strontium effects on bone has led to its expected application in a variety of biomaterial scaffolds used in tissue engineering strategies aiming at bone repairing and regeneration. While summarizing the recent progress in these respects, this review also proposes the new approaches such as systems biology in order to reveal new insights in the pathology of osteoporosis as well as possible discovery of new therapies. PMID:24800251

  16. Deregulation of Bone Forming Cells in Bone Diseases and Anabolic Effects of Strontium-Containing Agents and Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shuang; Zhang, Binbin; Zhu, Xiaomei; Ao, Ping; Guo, Huajie; Yi, Weihong; Zhou, Guang-Qian

    2014-01-01

    Age-related bone loss and osteoporosis are associated with bone remodeling changes that are featured with decreased trabecular and periosteal bone formation relative to bone resorption. Current anticatabolic therapies focusing on the inhibition of bone resorption may not be sufficient in the prevention or reversal of age-related bone deterioration and there is a big need in promoting osteoblastogenesis and bone formation. Enhanced understanding of the network formed by key signaling pathways and molecules regulating bone forming cells in health and diseases has therefore become highly significant. The successful development of agonist/antagonist of the PTH and Wnt signaling pathways are profits of the understanding of these key pathways. As the core component of an approved antiosteoporosis agent, strontium takes its effect on osteoblasts at multilevel through multiple pathways, representing a good example in revealing and exploring anabolic mechanisms. The recognition of strontium effects on bone has led to its expected application in a variety of biomaterial scaffolds used in tissue engineering strategies aiming at bone repairing and regeneration. While summarizing the recent progress in these respects, this review also proposes the new approaches such as systems biology in order to reveal new insights in the pathology of osteoporosis as well as possible discovery of new therapies. PMID:24800251

  17. Deregulation of bone forming cells in bone diseases and anabolic effects of strontium-containing agents and biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shuang; Zhang, Binbin; Zhu, Xiaomei; Ao, Ping; Guo, Huajie; Yi, Weihong; Zhou, Guang-Qian

    2014-01-01

    Age-related bone loss and osteoporosis are associated with bone remodeling changes that are featured with decreased trabecular and periosteal bone formation relative to bone resorption. Current anticatabolic therapies focusing on the inhibition of bone resorption may not be sufficient in the prevention or reversal of age-related bone deterioration and there is a big need in promoting osteoblastogenesis and bone formation. Enhanced understanding of the network formed by key signaling pathways and molecules regulating bone forming cells in health and diseases has therefore become highly significant. The successful development of agonist/antagonist of the PTH and Wnt signaling pathways are profits of the understanding of these key pathways. As the core component of an approved antiosteoporosis agent, strontium takes its effect on osteoblasts at multilevel through multiple pathways, representing a good example in revealing and exploring anabolic mechanisms. The recognition of strontium effects on bone has led to its expected application in a variety of biomaterial scaffolds used in tissue engineering strategies aiming at bone repairing and regeneration. While summarizing the recent progress in these respects, this review also proposes the new approaches such as systems biology in order to reveal new insights in the pathology of osteoporosis as well as possible discovery of new therapies.

  18. Bone imaging and fracture risk assessment in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Sophie A; Nickolas, Thomas L

    2015-06-01

    Fractures are more common and are associated with greater morbidity and morality in patients with kidney disease than in members of the general population. Thus, it is troubling that in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients there has been a paradoxical increase in fracture rates over the past 20 years compared to the general population. Increased fracture incidence in CKD patients may be driven in part by the lack of screening for fracture risk. In the general population, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the clinical standard to stratify fracture risk, and its use has contributed to decreases in fracture incidence. In contrast, in CKD, fracture risk screening with DXA has been uncommon due to its unclear efficacy in predicting fracture and its inability to predict type of renal osteodystrophy. Recently, several prospective studies conducted in patients across the spectrum of kidney disease have demonstrated that bone mineral density measured by DXA predicts future fracture risk and that clinically relevant information regarding fracture risk is provided by application of the World Health Organization cutoffs for osteopenia and osteoporosis to DXA measures. Furthermore, novel high-resolution imaging tools, such as high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT), have been used to elucidate the effects of kidney disease on cortical and trabecular microarchitecture and bone strength and to identify potential targets for strategies that protect against fractures. This review will discuss the updated epidemiology of fractures in CKD, fracture risk screening by DXA, and the utility of state-of-the art imaging methods to uncover the effects of kidney disease on the skeleton. PMID:25744703

  19. Bone Grafts

    MedlinePlus

    A bone graft transplants bone tissue. Surgeons use bone grafts to repair and rebuild diseased bones in your hips, knees, ... fractures or cancers. Once your body accepts the bone graft, it provides a framework for growth of new, ...

  20. Peritoneal dialysis per se is a risk factor for sclerostin-associated adynamic bone disease.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rodrigo A; Barreto, Fellype C; Mendes, Monique; dos Reis, Luciene M; Castro, João Henrique; Britto, Zita Maria L; Marques, Igor D B; Carvalho, Aluizio B; Moysés, Rosa M; Jorgetti, Vanda

    2015-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease--mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is a complex syndrome influenced by various factors, such as age, CKD etiology, uremic toxins, and dialysis modality. Although extensively studied in hemodialysis (HD) patients, only a few studies exist for peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Since most of these older studies contain no bone biopsy data, we studied the pattern of renal osteodystrophy in 41 prevalent PD patients. The most common presentation was adynamic bone disease (49%). There was a significant inverse association between serum sclerostin (a Wnt/β-catenin pathway inhibitor that decreases osteoblast action and bone formation) and the bone formation rate. Bone alkaline phosphatase had the best sensitivity and specificity to detect both high- and low-turnover diseases. The comparison between nondiabetic PD and HD patients, matched by age, gender, parathyroid hormone level, and length of dialysis, revealed low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, worse bone mineralization, and low bone turnover in the nondiabetic PD group. Thus, adynamic bone disease was the most frequent type of renal osteodystrophy in PD patients. Sclerostin seems to participate in the pathophysiology of adynamic bone disease and bone alkaline phosphatase was the best serum marker of bone turnover in these patients. PMID:25493951

  1. The Application of Bone Marrow Transplantation to the Treatment of Genetic Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkman, Robertson

    1986-06-01

    Genetic diseases can be treated by transplantation of either normal allogeneic bone marrow or, potentially, autologous bone marrow into which the normal gene has been inserted in vitro (gene therapy). Histocompatible allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is used for the treatment of genetic diseases whose clinical expression is restricted to lymphoid or hematopoietic cells. The therapeutic role of bone marrow transplantation in the treatment of generalized genetic diseases, especially those affecting the central nervous system, is under investigation. The response of a generalized genetic disease to allogeneic bone marrow transplantation may be predicted by experiments in vitro. Gene therapy can be used only when the gene responsible for the disease has been characterized. Success of gene therapy for a specific genetic disease may be predicted by its clinical response to allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

  2. Management of bone disease in Gaucher disease type 1: clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida, Gaetano; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Carubbi, Francesca; Di Rocco, Maja; Iolascon, Giovanni

    2014-12-01

    Gaucher disease is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism resulting from deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme beta-glucocerebrosidase that causes accumulation of glucosylceramide in tissue macrophage with damage to hematological, visceral, and skeletal organ systems. Severity and progression may vary independently among these domains, necessitating individualized therapy. Skeletal involvement is highly prevalent and often associated with intense pain, impaired mobility, and reduced quality of life. Enzyme replacement therapy improves parameters in all affected domains, but skeletal involvement requires longer treatment and higher dosages to obtain significant results. Despite numerous papers on bone complications in patients with Gaucher disease, there are no specific indications on how to assess properly bone involvement in such condition, the frequency of assessment, the use of markers for osteoblast and osteoclast activity, or the administration of bisphosphonates or other symptomatic drugs in adult and pediatric patients. Starting from a re-evaluation of cases with bone involvement, we have identified some common errors in the diagnostic approach and management. The aim of this paper was to propose a methodological and critical approach to the diagnosis, follow-up and treatment of bone disease in patients with Gaucher disease type 1.

  3. Management of metastatic bone disease of the acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Issack, Paul S; Kotwal, Suhel Y; Lane, Joseph M

    2013-11-01

    Metastatic acetabular disease can be severely painful and may result in loss of mobility. Initial management may consist of diphosphonates, narcotic analgesics, radiation therapy, protected weight bearing, cementoplasty, and radiofrequency ablation. Patients with disease affecting large weight-bearing regions of the acetabulum and with impending failure of the hip joint are unlikely to gain much relief from nonsurgical treatment and interventional procedures. The profound osteopenia of the acetabulum, limited healing potential of the fracture, and projected patient life span and function necessitate surgical techniques that provide immediate stable fixation to reduce pain and restore ambulatory function. Current reconstructive procedures, including cemented total hip arthroplasty, the saddle or periacetabular endoprosthesis, and porous tantalum implants, are based on the quality of remaining acetabular bone as well as the patient's level of function and general health. Well-executed acetabular reconstructions can provide durable hip joints with good pain relief and function.

  4. Bone: a new endocrine organ at the heart of chronic kidney disease and mineral and bone disorders.

    PubMed

    Vervloet, Marc G; Massy, Ziad A; Brandenburg, Vincent M; Mazzaferro, Sandro; Cozzolino, Mario; Ureña-Torres, Pablo; Bover, Jordi; Goldsmith, David

    2014-05-01

    Recent reports of several bone-derived substances, some of which have hormonal properties, have shed new light on the bone-cardiovascular axis. Deranged concentrations of humoral factors are not only epidemiologically connected to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but can also be causally implicated, especially in chronic kidney disease. FGF23 rises exponentially with advancing chronic kidney disease, seems to reach maladaptive concentrations, and then induces left ventricular hypertrophy, and is possibly implicated in the process of vessel calcification. Sclerostin and DKK1, both secreted mainly by osteocytes, are important Wnt inhibitors and as such can interfere with systems for biological signalling that operate in the vessel wall. Osteocalcin, produced by osteoblasts or released from mineralised bone, interferes with insulin concentrations and sensitivity, and its metabolism is disturbed in kidney disease. These bone-derived humoral factors might place the bone at the centre of cardiovascular disease associated with chronic kidney disease. Most importantly, factors that dictate the regulation of these substances in bone and subsequent secretion into the circulation have not been researched, and could provide entirely new avenues for therapeutic intervention.

  5. The fracture mechanics of human bone: influence of disease and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Busse, Björn; Ritchie, Robert O

    2015-01-01

    Aging and bone diseases are associated with increased fracture risk. It is therefore pertinent to seek an understanding of the origins of such disease-related deterioration in bone's mechanical properties. The mechanical integrity of bone derives from its hierarchical structure, which in healthy tissue is able to resist complex physiological loading patterns and tolerate damage. Indeed, the mechanisms through which bone derives its mechanical properties make fracture mechanics an ideal framework to study bone's mechanical resistance, where crack-growth resistance curves give a measure of the intrinsic resistance to the initiation of cracks and the extrinsic resistance to the growth of cracks. Recent research on healthy cortical bone has demonstrated how this hierarchical structure can develop intrinsic toughness at the collagen fibril scale mainly through sliding and sacrificial bonding mechanisms that promote plasticity. Furthermore, the bone-matrix structure develops extrinsic toughness at much larger micrometer length-scales, where the structural features are large enough to resist crack growth through crack-tip shielding mechanisms. Although healthy bone tissue can generally resist physiological loading environments, certain conditions such as aging and disease can significantly increase fracture risk. In simple terms, the reduced mechanical integrity originates from alterations to the hierarchical structure. Here, we review how human cortical bone resists fracture in healthy bone and how changes to the bone structure due to aging, osteoporosis, vitamin D deficiency and Paget's disease can affect the mechanical integrity of bone tissue. PMID:26380080

  6. Metabolic bone disease associated with total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Klein, G L; Coburn, J W

    1984-01-01

    Patients receiving long-term treatment with total parenteral nutrition often develop bony abnormalities characterized by patchy osteomalacia and low bone turnover. The patients present evidence of physiologic hypoparathyroidism, although low levels of iPTH cannot entirely explain the osteomalacia. Abnormally low serum levels of 1,25(OH)2-vitamin D have been demonstrated, but the significance of these reduced levels in the pathogenesis of the bone lesions is not defined. Aluminum has been detected in large quantities in the plasma, urine, and bone of some patients treated with TPN, and there is mounting evidence that aluminum may be associated with skeletal pathology, particularly osteomalacia. There is, however, no clear documentation that aluminum accumulation produces the skeletal lesions observed, although it could be a contributing factor. There has been the unusual empiric observation that the removal of vitamin D2 from the infusate is associated with a decrease in the quantity of unmineralized osteoid in TPN patients. A possible role of vitamin D2 in producing osteomalacia is not easy to understand since normal serum levels of 25(OH)-D2, the circulating form of vitamin D2, have been reported. The long-term consequences of intravenous nutritional support for many aspects of metabolism remain unknown. Administration into the systemic circulation of predetermined quantities of calcium and phosphorus via a route that bypasses their passage across the intestinal mucosa, the portal system and the liver may have adverse consequences. It is possible that bypassing homeostatic mechanisms may affect bone formation and metabolism or lead to alterations in vitamin D sterols. Alternatively, a deficiency of an essential trace metal or the accumulation of a toxic trace substance could be responsible for the bony abnormalities. Much remains to be clarified concerning calcium homeostasis and bone disease during total parenteral nutrition. Among various possible factors, it

  7. [Analysis of Musculoskeletal Systems and Their Diseases. Bone metabolism and intercellular network].

    PubMed

    Terashima, Asuka; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Bone is an active organ under continuous bone remodeling that consists of bone resorption and synthesis. The process requires precise communication among bone cells including osteoclasts, osteoblasts and osteocytes. However, the detailed mechanisms of bone cell interactions have been poorly understood. Technological advances and the accumulating evidence in recent years enabled a better understanding of the communication and coupling mechanisms at the cellular and molecular levels. These studies provide new insights into bone disease pathogenesis and molecular basis for novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26224669

  8. Vitamin D and chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disease (CKD-MBD).

    PubMed

    Nigwekar, Sagar U; Tamez, Hector; Thadhani, Ravi I

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a modern day epidemic and has significant morbidity and mortality implications. Mineral and bone disorders are common in CKD and are now collectively referred to as CKD- mineral and bone disorder (MBD). These abnormalities begin to appear even in early stages of CKD and contribute to the pathogenesis of renal osteodystrophy. Alteration in vitamin D metabolism is one of the key features of CKD-MBD that has major clinical and research implications. This review focuses on biology, epidemiology and management aspects of these alterations in vitamin D metabolism as they relate to skeletal aspects of CKD-MBD in adult humans. PMID:24605215

  9. Role of bone morphogenetic proteins in adrenal physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Inga K; Beuschlein, Felix

    2010-04-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of ligands that impact on a multitude of biological processes including cell type specification, differentiation and organogenesis. Furthermore, a large body of evidence points towards important BMP-dependent mechanisms in tumorigenesis. In accordance with their diverse actions, BMPs have been demonstrated to serve as auto-, para- and endocrine modulators also in a number of hormonal systems. In this review, we highlight novel aspects of BMP-dependent regulatory networks that pertain to adrenal physiology and disease, which have been uncovered during recent years. These aspects include the role of BMP-dependent mechanism during adrenal development, modulating effects on catecholamine synthesis and steroidogenesis and dysregulation of BMP signalling in adrenal tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we summarize potential therapeutic approaches that are based on reconstitution of BMP signalling in adrenocortical tumour cells. PMID:20133384

  10. Volumetric bone mineral density and bone structure in childhood chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wetzsteon, Rachel J; Kalkwarf, Heidi J; Shults, Justine; Zemel, Babette S; Foster, Bethany J; Griffin, Lindsay; Strife, C Frederic; Foerster, Debbie L; Jean-Pierre, Darlene K; Leonard, Mary B

    2011-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased fracture risk and skeletal deformities. The impact of CKD on volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and cortical dimensions during growth is unknown. Tibia quantitative computed tomographic scans were obtained in 156 children with CKD [69 stages 2 to 3, 51 stages 4 to 5, and 36 stage 5D (dialysis)] and 831 healthy participants aged 5 to 21 years. Sex-, race-, and age- or tibia length-specific Z-scores were generated for trabecular BMD (TrabBMD), cortical BMD (CortBMD), cortical area (CortArea) and endosteal circumference (EndoC). Greater CKD severity was associated with a higher TrabBMD Z-score in younger participants (p < .001) compared with healthy children; this association was attenuated in older participants (interaction p < .001). Mean CortArea Z-score was lower (p < .01) in CKD 4-5 [-0.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.80, -0.18)] and CKD 5D (-0.49, 95% CI -0.83, -0.15) compared with healthy children. Among CKD participants, parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels were positively associated with TrabBMD Z-score (p < .01), and this association was significantly attenuated in older participants (interaction p < .05). Higher levels of PTH and biomarkers of bone formation (bone-specific alkaline phosphatase) and resorption (serum C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen) were associated with lower CortBMD and CortArea Z-scores and greater EndoC Z-score (r = 0.18-0.36, all p ≤ .02). CortBMD Z-score was significantly lower in CKD participants with PTH levels above versus below the upper limit of the Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative (KDOQI) CKD stage-specific target range: -0.46 ± 1.29 versus 0.12 ± 1.14 (p < .01). In summary, childhood CKD and secondary hyperparathyroidism were associated with significant reductions in cortical area and CortBMD and greater TrabBMD in younger children. Future studies are needed to establish the fracture implications of these

  11. The role of biochemical of bone turnover markers in osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease: a consensus paper of the Belgian Bone Club.

    PubMed

    Cavalier, E; Bergmann, P; Bruyère, O; Delanaye, P; Durnez, A; Devogelaer, J-P; Ferrari, S L; Gielen, E; Goemaere, S; Kaufman, J-M; Toukap, A Nzeusseu; Reginster, J-Y; Rousseau, A-F; Rozenberg, S; Scheen, A J; Body, J-J

    2016-07-01

    The exact role of biochemical markers of bone turnover in the management of metabolic bone diseases remains a topic of controversy. In this consensus paper, the Belgian Bone Club aimed to provide a state of the art on the use of these biomarkers in different clinical or physiological situations like in postmenopausal women, osteoporosis in men, in elderly patients, in patients suffering from bone metastasis, in patients with chronic renal failure, in pregnant or lactating women, in intensive care patients, and in diabetics. We also gave our considerations on the analytical issues linked to the use of these biomarkers, on potential new emerging biomarkers, and on the use of bone turnover biomarkers in the follow-up of patients treated with new drugs for osteoporosis. PMID:27026330

  12. Evaluating bone quality in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Malluche, Hartmut H.; Porter, Daniel S.; Pienkowski, David

    2013-01-01

    Bone of normal quality and quantity can successfully endure physiologically imposed mechanical loads. Chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD) adversely affects bone quality through alterations in bone turnover and mineralization, whereas bone quantity is affected through changes in bone volume. Changes in bone quality can be associated with altered bone material, structure, or microdamage, which can result in an elevated rate of fracture in patients with CKD–MBD. Fractures cannot always be explained by reduced bone quantity and, therefore, bone quality should be assessed with a variety of techniques from the macro-organ level to the nanoscale level. In this Review, we demonstrate the importance of evaluating bone from multiple perspectives and hierarchical levels to understand CKD–MBD-related abnormalities in bone quality. Understanding the relationships between variations in material, structure, microdamage, and mechanical properties of bone in patients with CKD–MBD should aid in the development of new modalities to prevent, or treat, these abnormalities. PMID:24100399

  13. Soft matter: Brittle for breakfast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-10-01

    Crushing a brittle porous medium such as a box of cereal causes the grains to break up and rearrange themselves. A lattice spring model based on simple physical assumptions gives rise to behaviours that are complex enough to reproduce diverse compaction patterns.

  14. [Cytokines in bone diseases. Cytokine and postmenopausal osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Inada, Masaki; Miyaura, Chisato

    2010-10-01

    Bone resorption is regulated by various cytokines. In postmenopausal osteoporosis, bone loss due to estrogen deficiency is closely related to the production of bone-resorbing cytokine. Especially, the increased production of IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α could induce the expression of RANKL in bone tissues to enhance osteoclastogenesis. Relationship between estrogen deficiency and various cytokines is important to clarify the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  15. [Bone mineral density in patients with celiac disease and medical treatment of the disorder].

    PubMed

    Albulova, E A; Drozdov, V N; Parfenov, A I

    2011-01-01

    The article presents the results of a bone mineral density study in patients with glutensensitive celiac disease. Was discussed problem of malabsorption syndrome with clinical and pathogenetic point of view, which can lead to bone loss due to malabsorption of calcium and vitamin D for celiac disease. Also was take into account the effect of inflammatory cytokines and hormones on calcium regulating processes of bone remodeling. The role of adherence to a gluten-free diet in the formation of bone loss. The article is illustrated with three tables, one figure and two schedules. PMID:21695949

  16. When, how, and why a bone biopsy should be performed in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Pablo Ureña; Bover, Jordi; Mazzaferro, Sandro; de Vernejoul, Marie Christine; Cohen-Solal, Martine

    2014-11-01

    In chronic kidney disease the excessive production of parathyroid hormone increases the bone resorption rate and leads to histologic bone signs of secondary hyperparathyroidism. However, in other situations, the initial increase in parathyroid hormone and bone remodeling may be slowed down excessively by a multitude of factors including age, ethnic origin, sex, and treatments such as vitamin D, calcium salts, calcimimetics, steroids, and so forth, leading to low bone turnover or adynamic bone disease. Both high and low bone turnover diseases actually are observed equally in chronic kidney disease patients treated by dialysis, and all types of renal osteodystrophy are associated with an increased risk of skeletal fractures, reduced quality of life, and poor clinical outcomes. Unfortunately, the diagnosis of these bone abnormalities cannot be obtained correctly by current clinical, biochemical, and imaging methods. Therefore, bone biopsy has been, and still remains, the gold standard analysis for assessing the exact type of renal osteodystrophy. It is also the unique way to assess the mechanisms of action, safety, and efficacy of new bone-targeting therapies. PMID:25498380

  17. Bone mineral disorder in chronic kidney disease: Klotho and FGF23; cardiovascular implications.

    PubMed

    Salanova Villanueva, Laura; Sánchez González, Carmen; Sánchez Tomero, José Antonio; Aguilera, Abelardo; Ortega Junco, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular factors are one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Bone mineral metabolism disorders and inflammation are pathological conditions that involve increased cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease. The cardiovascular risk involvement of bone mineral metabolism classical biochemical parameters such as phosphorus, calcium, vitamin D and PTH is well known. The newest markers, FGF23 and klotho, could also be implicated in cardiovascular disease.

  18. Rheumatic manifestations of primary and metastatic bone tumors and paraneoplastic bone disease.

    PubMed

    Waimann, Christian A; Lu, Huifang; Suarez Almazor, Maria E

    2011-11-01

    Bone tumors can show a wide range of nonspecific rheumatic manifestations. The presence of unexplained or atypical chronic bone pain, an enlarging bone mass, neurovascular compression syndromes, or pathologic fractures should alert us to the possibility of a bone tumor causing these symptoms. These patients must undergo a complete physical examination; adequate imaging; and, if needed, a biopsy to confirm their diagnosis and offer them an opportune treatment. In addition, bone tumors and other malignancies can present remote clinical manifestations and unusual laboratory findings (eg, HOA, hypophosphatemia, hyperphosphaturia, and hypercalcemia) that may be the first and early manifestation of an occult cancer. These findings should motivate a cancer screening according to age, sex, and personal history. Cancer therapies also have a big impact on bone health, increasing the risk of osteoporosis, osteomalacia, and/or osteonecrosis. Rheumatologists should be aware of possible long-term adverse events of cancer treatment to avoid future complications.

  19. The Role of IL-1β in the Bone Loss during Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ruscitti, Piero; Cipriani, Paola; Carubbi, Francesco; Liakouli, Vasiliki; Di Benedetto, Paola; Berardicurti, Onorina; Alesse, Edoardo; Giacomelli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Several inflammatory diseases have been associated with increased bone resorption and fracture rates and different studies supported the relation between inflammatory cytokines and osteoclast activity. The main factor required for osteoclast activation is the stimulation by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) expressed on osteoblasts. In this context, interleukin- (IL-) 1β, one of the most powerful proinflammatory cytokines, is a strong stimulator of in vitro and in vivo bone resorption via upregulation of RANKL that stimulates the osteoclastogenesis. The resulting effects lead to an imbalance in bone metabolism favouring bone resorption and osteoporosis. In this paper, we review the available literature on the role of IL-1β in the pathogenesis of bone loss. Furthermore, we analysed the role of IL-1β in bone resorption during rheumatic diseases and, when available, we reported the efficacy of anti-IL-1β therapy in this field. PMID:25954061

  20. Assessment of metabolic bone disease: review of new nuclear medicine procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Wahner, H.W.

    1985-12-01

    In the management of patients with metabolic bone disease, nuclear medicine laboratories offer two nontraumatic procedures of potential clinical importance: bone mineral measurements and bone scintigraphy. Bone mineral measurements from the radius, lumbar spine, and hip obtained with use of absorptiometry or computed tomography can be used to predict the risk of fracture at these skeletal sites, can determine the severity of bone loss for the assessment of a benefit-versus-risk ratio on which appropriate therapy can be based, and can substantiate the effectiveness of therapy over time. Bone scintigraphy with use of labeled diphosphonate allows assessment of focal and, in defined circumstances, of total skeletal bone turnover in patients with normal kidney function. Both of these techniques have been used successfully in studies of population groups for the evaluation of trends. Their application to the management of individual patients is currently being evaluated. 41 references.

  1. Burden of metastatic bone disease from genitourinary malignancies.

    PubMed

    Mulders, Peter F; Abrahamsson, Per-Anders; Bukowski, Ronald M

    2010-11-01

    Bone metastases are common among patients with stage IV genitourinary cancers. Most patients with bone metastases develop at least one debilitating and potentially life-limiting skeletal-related event. These events are associated with increased medical expenses and decreased quality of life. Current guidelines recommend screening for bone metastases in men with high-risk prostate cancer, but guidance for screening and treatment of bone metastases from genitourinary cancers varies by country and setting. Several bisphosphonates have been evaluated in the advanced genitourinary cancer setting. Zoledronic acid has demonstrated efficacy in significantly reducing the risk of skeletal-related events in patients with bone metastases from a broad range of solid tumors including prostate, renal and bladder cancers, and is recommended for preserving bone health.

  2. Treatment of Paget's Disease of Bone with Synthetic Salmon Calcitonin

    PubMed Central

    Kanis, J. A.; Horn, D. B.; Scott, R. D. M.; Strong, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Thirteen patients with painful Paget's disease of bone were treated as outpatients with low doses of synthetic salmon calcitonin 22·5-50 μg three times weekly. Treatment produced full remission of pain in a mean time of 5·5 weeks and a mean depression of serum alkaline phosphatase activity of 33%. The interval before symptomatic relief could not be predicted from the variables studied. The ultimate fall in serum alkaline phosphatase activity, however, could be predicted from the initial levels and from the early rate of decrease (P < 0·001). Biochemical resistance to treatment, which occurred in three cases, could be related to the dose and duration of treatment. Prolonged remissions of pain may occur which are not related to biochemical remission, to the dose of calcitonin, or to the duration of treatment. The side effects attributable to salmon calcitonin were transient nausea (in nine patients), transient flushing (in four), diarrhoea (in two), and rash (in one) though in only one patient did treatment have to be withdrawn prematurely because of these effects. PMID:4472416

  3. Bone marrow scintigraphy and computed tomography in myloproliferative disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, S.J.; Gilbert, H.S.; Hermann, G.

    1985-05-01

    Peripheral bone marrow (BM) expansion in myeloproliferative disease (MPD) is demonstrated by scintigraphy (scint) with Technetium 99m sulfur colloid (TSC) or Indium III chloride (In). Computed tomography (CT) of the normal adult medullary cavity yields negative attenuation coefficients (AC) which become positive when BM fat is replaced. BM scint and CT of the medullary cavity are obtained in 23 studies in 21 pts: 6 polycythemia vera (PCV), 6 post PCV myeloid metaplasis (MyM), 4 agnogenic MyM, 3 myelodysplasia with refractory anemia, 1 acute myelocytic leukemia and 1 chronic myelocytic with acute leukemic transformation. AC were measured for BM cavity of lower extremities at each third of the femur and tibia. Values ranged from -89 to +289 Hounsfield units. The results are presented in this paper. There was agreement between SCINT and CT in 83% pts and segments. 80% of MB segments with + AC had scint identified BM. BM biopsy of the iliac crest demonstrated fibrosis or blast proliferation in pts with +AC rather than hypercellularity or osteosclerosis. The highest AC values (>200) were seen in pts with blast proliferation and fibrosis. Decreased BM scint visualization and +CT AC correlated with BM fibrosis and may reflect replacement of BM elements or decreased RES function. BM scint and CT are useful to monitor MPD and select BM sites for biopsy.

  4. Bone disease in uremic patients: advances in PTH suppression.

    PubMed

    Brancaccio, Diego; Cozzolino, Mario; Gorio, Alfredo; Di Giulio, Anna Maria; Gallieni, Maurizio

    2002-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is often complicated by altered calcium and phosphate omeostasis. Many patients develop secondary hyperparathyroidism during the course of the disease. Therefore, both prevention and treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism are central issues in the treatment of uremic patients. Active vitamin D metabolites are important agents in uremic patients, who have a defective activity of the renal 1alpha-hydroxylase responsible for calcitriol synthesis. Howewer, treatment with calcitriol has some limitations, namely an increase in intestinal phosphate absorption, a possible calcium overload and therefore an increase in CaxP ion product. These limitations stimulated an active research on the development of vitamin D analogs with reduced effects on intestinal transport as well as on bone mobilization of calcium and phosphate. Three vitamin D analogs, which have been used in humans, are reviewed in this article: 22-oxacalcitriol (Maxacalcitol), 19-nor-1alpha,25(OH)2 vitamin D2 (Paricalcitol), and 1alpha(OH) Vitamin D2 (Doxercalciferol). In addition, a new pharmacologic approach to the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism has been developed: the use of agonists for the parathyroid calcium sensing receptor, or calcimimetics. AMG O73, a second generation agent, is now under clinical evaluation in phase 3 studies, and it will soon be available in clinical practice. Given the different mechanism of action, it will be possible to use it along with vitamin D analogs and non calcemic phosphate binders. A broader spectrum of therapeutic approaches will enable the nephrologist to individually tailor the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:12515379

  5. Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmberger, Thomas K.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten

    The typical clinical signs in bone tumours are pain, destruction and destabilization, immobilization, neurologic deficits, and finally functional impairment. Primary malignant bone tumours are a rare entity, accounting for about 0.2% of all malignancies. Also benign primary bone tumours are in total rare and mostly asymptomatic. The most common symptomatic benign bone tumour is osteoid osteoma with an incidence of 1:2000.

  6. Infrared imaging microscopy of bone: Illustrations from a mouse model of Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Boskey, Adele L.; Goldberg, Michel; Kulkarni, Ashok; Gomez, Santiago

    2006-01-01

    Bone is a complex tissue whose composition and properties vary with age, sex, diet, tissue type, health and disease. In this review, we demonstrate how infrared spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopic imaging can be applied to the study of these variations. A specific example of mice with Fabry disease (a lipid storage disease) is presented in which it is demonstrated that the bones of these young animals, while showing typical spatial variation in mineral content, mineral crystal size, and collagen maturity, do not differ from the bones of age- and sex-matched wild type animals. PMID:16697974

  7. Combined bone scintigraphy and indium-111 leukocyte scans in neuropathic foot disease

    SciTech Connect

    Schauwecker, D.S.; Park, H.M.; Burt, R.W.; Mock, B.H.; Wellman, H.N.

    1988-10-01

    It is difficult to diagnose osteomyelitis in the presence of neurotrophic osteoarthropathy. We performed combined (99mTc)MDP bone scans and indium-111 (111In) leukocyte studies on 35 patients who had radiographic evidence of neuropathic foot disease and clinically suspected osteomyelitis. The (111In)leukocyte study determined if there was an infection and the bone scan provided the anatomic landmarks so that the infection could be localized to the bone or the adjacent soft tissue. Seventeen patients had osteomyelitis and all showed increased (111In)leukocyte activity localized to the bone, giving a sensitivity of 100%. Among the 18 patients without osteomyelitis, eight had no accumulation of (111In)leukocytes, seven had the (111In)leukocyte activity correctly localized to the soft tissue, two had (111In)leukocyte activity mistakenly attributed to the bone, and one had (111In)leukocyte accumulation in a proven neuroma which was mistakenly attributed to bone. These three false-positive results for osteomyelitis reduced the specificity to 83%. Considering only the 27 patients with a positive (111In)leukocyte study, the combined bone scan and (111In)leukocyte study correctly localized the infection to the soft tissues or bone in 89%. Uninfected neurotrophic osteoarthropathy does not accumulate (111In)leukocytes. We found the combined bone scan and (111In) leukocyte study useful for the detection and localization of infection to soft tissue or bone in patients with neuropathic foot disease.

  8. Current options for the treatment of Paget’s disease of the bone

    PubMed Central

    Merlotti, Daniela; Gennari, Luigi; Martini, Giuseppe; Nuti, Ranuccio

    2009-01-01

    Paget’s disease of bone (PDB) is a chronic bone remodelling disorder characterized by increased osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, with subsequent compensatory increases in new bone formation, resulting in a disorganized mosaic of woven and lamellar bone at affected skeletal sites. This disease is most often asymptomatic but can be associated with bone pain or deformity, fractures, secondary arthritis, neurological complications, deafness, contributing to substantial morbidity and reduced quality of life. Neoplastic degeneration of pagetic bone is a relatively rare event, occurring with an incidence of less than 1%, but has a grave prognosis. Specific therapy for PDB is aimed at decreasing the abnormal bone turnover and bisphosphonates are currently considered the treatment of choice. These treatments are associated with a reduction in plasma alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and an improvement in radiological and scintigraphic appearance and with a reduction in bone pain and bone deformity, Recently, the availability of newer, more potent nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates has improved treatment outcomes, allowing a more effective and convenient management of this debilitating disorder.

  9. Clinical utility of (18)F-fluoride PET/CT in benign and malignant bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuxin; Schiepers, Christiaan; Lake, Ralph; Dadparvar, Simin; Berenji, Gholam R

    2012-01-01

    (18)F labeled sodium fluoride is a positron-emitting, bone seeking agent with more favorable skeletal kinetics than conventional phosphate and diphosphonate compounds. With the expanding clinical usage of PET/CT, there is renewed interest in using (18)F-fluoride PET/CT for imaging bone diseases. Growing evidence indicates that (18)F fluoride PET/CT offers increased sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy in evaluating metastatic bone disease compared to (99m)Tc based bone scintigraphy. National Oncologic PET Registry (NOPR) has expanded coverage for (18)F sodium fluoride PET scans since February 2011 for the evaluation of osseous metastatic disease. In this article, we reviewed the pharmacological characteristics of sodium fluoride, as well as the clinical utility of PET/CT using (18)F-fluoride in both benign and malignant bone disorders.

  10. Postnatal Changes in Humerus Cortical Bone Thickness Reflect the Development of Metabolic Bone Disease in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Tokuriki, Shuko; Igarashi, Aiko; Okuno, Takashi; Ohta, Genrei; Kosaka, Takuya; Ohshima, Yusei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To use cortical bone thickness (CBT) of the humerus to identify risk factors for the development of metabolic bone disease in preterm infants. Methods. Twenty-seven infants born at <32 weeks of gestational age, with a birth weight of <1,500 g, were enrolled. Humeral CBT was measured from chest radiographs at birth and at 27-28, 31-32, and 36–44 weeks of postmenstrual age (PMA). The risk factors for the development of osteomalacia were statistically analyzed. Results. The humeral CBT at 36–44 weeks of PMA was positively correlated with gestational age and birth weight and negatively correlated with the duration of mechanical ventilation. CBT increased with PMA, except in six very early preterm infants in whom it decreased. Based on logistic regression analysis, gestational age and duration of mechanical ventilation were identified as risk factors for cortical bone thinning. Conclusions. Humeral CBT may serve as a radiologic marker of metabolic bone disease at 36–44 weeks of PMA in preterm infants. Cortical bones of extremely preterm infants are fragile, even when age is corrected for term, and require extreme care to lower the risk of fractures. PMID:27194819

  11. Role of sclerostin in bone and cartilage and its potential as a therapeutic target in bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Lewiecki, E Michael

    2014-04-01

    Sclerostin is a small protein expressed by the SOST gene in osteocytes, bone cells that respond to mechanical stress applied to the skeleton and appear to play an important role in the regulation of bone remodeling. When sclerostin binds to its receptors on the cell surface of osteoblasts, a downstream cascade of intracellular signaling is initiated, with the ultimate effect of inhibiting osteoblastic bone formation. Recent studies have shown that the SOST gene is also expressed by articular chondrocytes and that modulation of its activity may have effects on articular cartilage and subchondral bone. The role of sclerostin in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis in humans has not yet been defined, and the potential utility of treating osteoarthritis with interventions that alter sclerostin is not known. Rare genetic skeletal disorders in humans with low sclerostin levels, such as sclerosteosis and van Buchem disease, have been associated with a high bone mineral density (BMD) phenotype and low risk of fractures. This has led to the concept that antisclerostin interventions might be useful in the treatment of patients with osteoporosis and skeletal disorders associated with low bone mass. Compounds that inhibit sclerostin have been shown to stimulate bone formation and reduce bone resorption, with a robust increase in BMD. Investigational monoclonal antibodies to sclerostin, including romosozumab, blosozumab, and BPS804, have advanced to phase II clinical trials or beyond. If antisclerostin therapy is found to have beneficial effects on clinical endpoints, such as reduction of fracture risk or improvement in quality of life in patients with osteoarthritis, with a favorable balance of benefit and risk, then this class of compounds may become a prominent addition to the options for therapy of osteoporosis and other skeletal disorders.

  12. Effect of alfacalcidol on natural course of renal bone disease in mild to moderate renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Hamdy, N. A.; Kanis, J. A.; Beneton, M. N.; Brown, C. B.; Juttmann, J. R.; Jordans, J. G.; Josse, S.; Meyrier, A.; Lins, R. L.; Fairey, I. T.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether alfacalcidol--used in management of overt renal bone disease--may safely prevent renal bone disease when used earlier in course of renal failure. DESIGN--Double blind, prospective, randomised, placebo controlled study. SETTING--17 nephrology centres from Belgium, France, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. SUBJECTS--176 patients aged 18-81 with mild to moderate chronic renal failure (creatinine clearance 15-50 ml/min) and with no clinical, biochemical, or radiographic evidence of bone disease. INTERVENTIONS--Alfacalcidol 0.25 micrograms (titrated according to serum calcium concentration) or placebo given for two years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Quantitative histology of bone to assess efficacy of treatment and renal function to assess safety. RESULTS--132 patients had histological evidence of bone disease at start of study. Biochemical, radiographic, and histological indices of bone metabolism were similar for the 89 patients given alfacalcidol and the 87 controls given placebo. After treatment, mean serum alkaline phosphatase activity and intact parathyroid hormone concentration had increased by 13% and 126% respectively in controls but had not changed in patients given alfacalcidol (P < 0.001). Hypercalcaemic episodes occurred in 10 patients given alfacalcidol (but responded to decreases in drug dose) and in three controls. Histological indices of bone turnover significantly improved in patients given alfacalcidol and significantly deteriorated in controls: among patients with abnormal bone histology before treatment, bone disease resolved in 23 (42%) of those given alfacalcidol compared with two (4%) of the controls (P < 0.001). There was no difference in rate of progression of renal failure between the two groups. CONCLUSION--Early administration of alfacalcidol can safely and beneficially alter the natural course of renal bone disease in patients with mild to moderate renal failure. PMID:7677827

  13. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells as a novel target for the control of osteolytic bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Anandi; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) from mice bearing bone metastases differentiate into functional osteoclasts in vitro and in vivo, through a signaling pathway that relies on nitric oxide. In addition, MDSC-targeting drugs have been shown to robustly inhibit osteolysis. Thus, MDSC stand out as novel osteoclast progenitors and hence as candidate targets for the control of osteolytic bone disease. PMID:23762794

  14. [The OPG/RANKL/RANK system and bone resorptive disease].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji-Zhong; Ji, Zong-Ling; Chen, Su-Min

    2003-11-01

    The OPG/RANKL/RANK system plays an important role in osteoclastogenesis and represents a great progress in bone biology. RANKL, which expresses on the surface of osteoblast/stromal cells and activated T cells, binds to RANK on the osteoclastic precursors or mature osteoclasts, and promotes osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. While osteoprotegerin (OPG), which is expressed by osteoblasts/stromal cells, strongly inhibits bone resorption by binding to its ligand RANKL and thereby blocks the interaction between BANKL and RANK. A number of cytokines and hormones exert their effects on bone metabolism by regulating the OPG/RANKL ratio in the bone marrow microenvironment. RANK is also expressed on mammary epithelial cells and RANKL expression in these cells is induced by pregnancy hormones, RANKL and RANK are essential for the formation of the lactating mammary gland and the transmission of maternal calcium to neonates in mammalian species. Modulation of these systems provides a unique opportunity to develop novel therapeutics to inhibit bone loss in osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and bone metastasis of cancer. Further research should be focused on the cooperation of OPG/RANKL/RANK system with other signal pathways and the interactions among bone remodeling, immune system and endocrinology system. Currently, the development of OPG analogues or compounds which may stimulate OPG expression is becoming an attractive industry which may be profitable to both patients and manufacturers. PMID:15971575

  15. Wnt Signaling as a Therapeutic Target for Bone Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hoeppner, Luke H.; Secreto, Frank J.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2010-01-01

    Background There is a need to develop new bone anabolic agents because current bone regeneration regimens have limitations. The Wingless-type MMTV integration site (Wnt) pathway has emerged as a crucial regulator of bone formation and regeneration. Objective Toreview the molecular basis for Wnt pathway modulation and discuss potential strategies that target it and improve bone mass. Methods Data in peer-reviewed reports and meeting abstracts are discussed. Results/Conclusions Neutralizing inhibitors of Wnt signaling have emerged as promising and feasible strategies. Small molecule inhibitors of GSK3β increase bone mass, lower adiposity and reduce fracture risk. Neutralizing antibodies to Dickkopf 1, secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 and sclerostin produce similar outcomes in animal models. These drugs are exciting breakthroughs, but they are not without risks. The challenges include tissue-specific targeting and consequently, long-term safety. PMID:19335070

  16. Chromatin modifiers and histone modifications in bone formation, regeneration, and therapeutic intervention for bone-related disease.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jonathan A R; Stein, Janet L; Westendorf, Jennifer J; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2015-12-01

    Post-translational modifications of chromatin such as DNA methylation and different types of histone acetylation, methylation and phosphorylation are well-appreciated epigenetic mechanisms that confer information to progeny cells during lineage commitment. These distinct epigenetic modifications have defined roles in bone, development, tissue regeneration, cell commitment and differentiation, as well as disease etiologies. In this review, we discuss the role of these chromatin modifications and the enzymes regulating these marks (methyltransferases, demethylases, acetyltransferases, and deacetylases) in progenitor cells, osteoblasts and bone-related cells. In addition, the clinical relevance of deregulated histone modifications and enzymes as well as current and potential therapeutic interventions targeting chromatin modifiers are addressed.

  17. Predictive factors for skeletal complications in hormone-refractory prostate cancer patients with metastatic bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Berruti, A; Tucci, M; Mosca, A; Tarabuzzi, R; Gorzegno, G; Terrone, C; Vana, F; Lamanna, G; Tampellini, M; Porpiglia, F; Angeli, A; Scarpa, R M; Dogliotti, L

    2005-01-01

    Factors predictive of skeletal-related events (SREs) in bone metastatic prostate cancer patients with hormone-refractory disease were investigated. We evaluated the frequency of SREs in 200 hormone-refractory patients consecutively observed at our Institution and followed until death or the last follow-up. Baseline parameters were evaluated in univariate and multivariate analysis as potential predictive factors of SREs. Skeletal-related events were observed in 86 patients (43.0%), 10 of which (5.0%) occurred before the onset of hormone-refractory disease. In univariate analysis, patient performance status (P=0.002), disease extent (DE) in bone (P=0.0001), bone pain (P=0.0001), serum alkaline phosphatase (P=0.0001) and urinary N-telopeptide of type one collagen (P=0.0001) directly correlated with a greater risk to develop SREs, whereas Gleason score at diagnosis, serum PSA, Hb, serum albumin, serum calcium, types of bone lesions and duration of androgen deprivation therapy did not. Both DE in bone (hazard ratio (HR): 1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07–1.25, P=0.000) and pain score (HR: 1.13, 95% CI: 1.06–1.20, P=0.000) were independent variables predicting for the onset of SREs in multivariate analysis. In patients with heavy tumour load in bone and great bone pain, the percentage of SREs was almost twice as high as (26 vs 52%, P<0.02) and occurred significantly earlier (P=0.000) than SREs in patients with limited DE in bone and low pain. Bone pain and DE in bone independently predict the occurrence of SREs in bone metastatic prostate cancer patients with hormone-refractory disease. These findings could help physicians in tailoring the skeletal follow-up most appropriate to individual patients and may prove useful for stratifying patients enrolled in bisphosphonate clinical trials. PMID:16222309

  18. LIGHT/TNFSF14 increases osteoclastogenesis and decreases osteoblastogenesis in multiple myeloma-bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Oranger, Angela; Gigante, Isabella; Mori, Giorgio; Taurino, Grazia; Mongelli, Teresa; Colaianni, Graziana; Di Benedetto, Adriana; Tamma, Roberto; Ingravallo, Giuseppe; Napoli, Anna; Faienza, Maria Felicia; Mestice, Anna; Curci, Paola; Specchia, Giorgina

    2014-01-01

    LIGHT, a TNF superfamily member, is involved in T-cell homeostasis and erosive bone disease associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Herein, we investigated whether LIGHT has a role in Multiple Myeloma (MM)-bone disease. We found that LIGHT was overproduced by CD14+ monocytes, CD8+ T-cells and neutrophils of peripheral blood and bone marrow (BM) from MM-bone disease patients. We also found that LIGHT induced osteoclastogenesis and inhibited osteoblastogenesis. In cultures from healthy-donors, LIGHT induced osteoclastogenesis in RANKL-dependent and -independent manners. In the presence of a sub-optimal RANKL concentration, LIGHT and RANKL synergically stimulated osteoclast formation, through the phosphorylation of Akt, NFκB and JNK pathways. In cultures of BM samples from patients with bone disease, LIGHT inhibited the formation of CFU-F and CFU-OB as well as the expression of osteoblastic markers including collagen-I, osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein-II. LIGHT indirectly inhibited osteoblastogenesis in part through sclerostin expressed by monocytes. In conclusion, our findings for the first time provide evidence for a role of LIGHT in MM-bone disease development. PMID:25460501

  19. Development, validation and characterization of a novel mouse model of Adynamic Bone Disease (ABD).

    PubMed

    Ng, Adeline H; Willett, Thomas L; Alman, Benjamin A; Grynpas, Marc D

    2014-11-01

    The etiology of Adynamic Bone Disease (ABD) is poorly understood but the hallmark of ABD is a lack of bone turnover. ABD occurs in renal osteodystrophy (ROD) and is suspected to occur in elderly patients on long-term anti-resorptive therapy. A major clinical concern of ABD is diminished bone quality and an increased fracture risk. To our knowledge, experimental animal models for ABD other than ROD-ABD have not been developed or studied. The objectives of this study were to develop a mouse model of ABD without the complications of renal ablation, and to characterize changes in bone quality in ABD relative to controls. To re-create the adynamic bone condition, 4-month old female Col2.3Δtk mice were treated with ganciclovir to specifically ablate osteoblasts, and pamidronate was used to inhibit osteoclastic resorption. Four groups of animals were used to characterize bone quality in ABD: Normal bone controls, No Formation controls, No Resorption controls, and an Adynamic group. After a 6-week treatment period, the animals were sacrificed and the bones were harvested for analyses. Bone quality assessments were conducted using established techniques including bone histology, quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI), dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), microcomputed tomography (microCT), and biomechanical testing. Histomorphometry confirmed osteoblast-related hallmarks of ABD in our mouse model. Bone formation was near complete suppression in the No Formation and Adynamic specimens. Inhibition of bone resorption in the Adynamic group was confirmed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) stain. Normal bone mineral density and architecture were maintained in the Adynamic group, whereas the No Formation group showed a reduction in bone mineral content and trabecular thickness relative to the Adynamic group. As expected, the No Formation group had a more hypomineralized profile and the Adynamic group had a higher mean mineralization profile that is

  20. Development, validation and characterization of a novel mouse model of Adynamic Bone Disease (ABD).

    PubMed

    Ng, Adeline H; Willett, Thomas L; Alman, Benjamin A; Grynpas, Marc D

    2014-11-01

    The etiology of Adynamic Bone Disease (ABD) is poorly understood but the hallmark of ABD is a lack of bone turnover. ABD occurs in renal osteodystrophy (ROD) and is suspected to occur in elderly patients on long-term anti-resorptive therapy. A major clinical concern of ABD is diminished bone quality and an increased fracture risk. To our knowledge, experimental animal models for ABD other than ROD-ABD have not been developed or studied. The objectives of this study were to develop a mouse model of ABD without the complications of renal ablation, and to characterize changes in bone quality in ABD relative to controls. To re-create the adynamic bone condition, 4-month old female Col2.3Δtk mice were treated with ganciclovir to specifically ablate osteoblasts, and pamidronate was used to inhibit osteoclastic resorption. Four groups of animals were used to characterize bone quality in ABD: Normal bone controls, No Formation controls, No Resorption controls, and an Adynamic group. After a 6-week treatment period, the animals were sacrificed and the bones were harvested for analyses. Bone quality assessments were conducted using established techniques including bone histology, quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI), dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), microcomputed tomography (microCT), and biomechanical testing. Histomorphometry confirmed osteoblast-related hallmarks of ABD in our mouse model. Bone formation was near complete suppression in the No Formation and Adynamic specimens. Inhibition of bone resorption in the Adynamic group was confirmed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) stain. Normal bone mineral density and architecture were maintained in the Adynamic group, whereas the No Formation group showed a reduction in bone mineral content and trabecular thickness relative to the Adynamic group. As expected, the No Formation group had a more hypomineralized profile and the Adynamic group had a higher mean mineralization profile that is

  1. Severe hypocalcemia following bisphosphonate treatment in a patient with Paget's disease of bone.

    PubMed

    Whitson, Heather E; Lobaugh, Bruce; Lyles, Kenneth W

    2006-10-01

    Bisphosphonate therapy is a common and effective treatment for Paget's disease of bone, osteoporosis, hypercalcemia of malignancy and cancer metastatic to bone. Clinically significant hypocalcemia has not been reported in patients with Paget's disease of bone and normal parathyroid function treated with an aminobisphosphonate. We treated a 52-year-old woman with polyostotic Paget's disease of bone (serum alkaline phosphatase level-1971 IU/L [normal 31-110 IU/L]), who had not previously received bisphosphonates, with daily oral 30 mg risedronate, oral 1000 mg elemental calcium and oral 400 IU cholecalciferol. After 10 days of treatment, she developed severe hypocalcemia (5.4 mg/dL [normal 8.7-10.2 mg/dL]), requiring hospitalization and support with 5 days of intravenous calcium gluconate. On the day risedronate treatment began, her PTH was low normal at 14 pg/mL (normal 12-72 pg/mL), consistent with a relatively suppressed PTH axis due to high bone turnover. Her vitamin D level was within normal limits (serum 25(OH)D 19 ng/mL [normal 8-38 ng/mL]), although possibly not optimally repleted. We hypothesize that this case represents an example of hungry bone syndrome in a patient with extensive Paget's disease of bone who received risedronate, causing acute suppression of bone resorption while elevated bone formation rates continued. In the year following her recovery, the patient was successfully treated with slowly titrated anti-resorptive therapy (subcutaneous calcitonin followed by titrated doses of risedronate), and is now clinically well. Physicians should be aware of the potential for hypocalcemia when patients with polyostotic Paget's disease and markedly elevated indicators of bone remodeling are initiated on powerful anti-resorptive therapy.

  2. Assessment of metabolic bone diseases by quantitative computed tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, M. L.; Genant, H. K.; Cann, C. E.; Ettinger, B.; Gordan, G. S.; Kolb, F. O.; Reiser, U. J.

    1985-01-01

    Advances in the radiologic sciences have permitted the development of numerous noninvasive techniques for measuring the mineral content of bone, with varying degrees of precision, accuracy, and sensitivity. The techniques of standard radiography, radiogrammetry, photodensitometry, Compton scattering, neutron activation analysis, single and dual photon absorptiometry, and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) are described and reviewed in depth. Results from previous cross-sectional and longitudinal QCT investigations are given. They then describe a current investigation in which they studied 269 subjects, including 173 normal women, 34 patients with hyperparathyroidism, 24 patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis, and 38 men with idiopathic osteoporosis. Spinal quantitative computed tomography, radiogrammetry, and single photon absorptiometry were performed, and a spinal fracture index was calculated on all patients. The authors found a disproportionate loss of spinal trabecular mineral compared to appendicular mineral in the men with idiopathic osteoporosis and the patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis. They observed roughly equivalent mineral loss in both the appendicular and axial regions in the hyperparathyroid patients. The appendicular cortical measurements correlated moderately well with each other but less well with spinal trabecular QCT. The spinal fracture index correlated well with QCT and less well with the appendicular measurements. Knowledge of appendicular cortical mineral status is important in its own right but is not a valid predictor of axial trabecular mineral status, which may be disproportionately decreased in certain diseases. Quantitative CT provides a reliable means of assessing the latter region of the skeleton, correlates well with the spinal fracture index (a semiquantitative measurement of end-organ failure), and offers the clinician a sensitive means of following the effects of therapy.

  3. Kuhlmann vascularized bone grafting for treatment of Kienböck's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Msek, Hichem; Benzarti, Sofien; Boussen, Monia; Maalla, Riadh

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of Kienböck's disease has historically been determined by staging, ulnar variance, and presence or absence of arthritic changes. With the advent of newer techniques of vascularized bone grafting, the status of the cartilage shell of the lunate has become another factor that can influence the procedure performed. The purpose of this article is to describe the technique of Kuhlmann vascularized bone graft for Kienböck's disease. In addition, the indications, contraindications, and outcomes are described. PMID:27583101

  4. Osteoblast dysfunctions in bone diseases: from cellular and molecular mechanisms to therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Marie, Pierre J

    2015-04-01

    Several metabolic, genetic and oncogenic bone diseases are characterized by defective or excessive bone formation. These abnormalities are caused by dysfunctions in the commitment, differentiation or survival of cells of the osteoblast lineage. During the recent years, significant advances have been made in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the osteoblast dysfunctions in osteoporosis, skeletal dysplasias and primary bone tumors. This led to suggest novel therapeutic approaches to correct these abnormalities such as the modulation of WNT signaling, the pharmacological modulation of proteasome-mediated protein degradation, the induction of osteoprogenitor cell differentiation, the repression of cancer cell proliferation and the manipulation of epigenetic mechanisms. This article reviews our current understanding of the major cellular and molecular mechanisms inducing osteoblastic cell abnormalities in age-related bone loss, genetic skeletal dysplasias and primary bone tumors, and discusses emerging therapeutic strategies to counteract the osteoblast abnormalities in these disorders of bone formation.

  5. Wnt and the Wnt signaling pathway in bone development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiping; Li, Yi-Ping; Paulson, Christie; Shao, Jian-Zhong; Zhang, Xiaoling; Wu, Mengrui; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signaling affects both bone modeling, which occurs during development, and bone remodeling, which is a lifelong process involving tissue renewal. Wnt signals are especially known to affect the differentiation of osteoblasts. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding the mechanisms of Wnt signaling, which is divided into two major branches: the canonical pathway and the noncanonical pathway. The canonical pathway is also called the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. There are two major noncanonical pathways: the Wnt-planar cell polarity pathway (Wnt-PCP pathway) and the Wnt-calcium pathway (Wnt-Ca2+ pathway). This review also discusses how Wnt ligands, receptors, intracellular effectors, transcription factors, and antagonists affect both the bone modeling and bone remodeling processes. We also review the role of Wnt ligands, receptors, intracellular effectors, transcription factors, and antagonists in bone as demonstrated in mouse models. Disrupted Wnt signaling is linked to several bone diseases, including osteoporosis, van Buchem disease, and sclerosteosis. Studying the mechanism of Wnt signaling and its interactions with other signaling pathways in bone will provide potential therapeutic targets to treat these bone diseases. PMID:24389191

  6. PERIODONTAL DISEASE AND BONE PATHOGENESIS: THE CROSSTALK BETWEEN CYTOKINES AND PORPHYROMONAS GINGIVALIS.

    PubMed

    Ballini, A; Cantore, S; Farronato, D; Cirulli, N; Inchingolo, F; Papa, F; Malcangi, G; Inchingolo, A D; Dipalma, G; Sardaro, N; Lippolis, R; Santacroce, L; Coscia, M F; Pettini, F; De Vito, D; Scacco, S

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is the most frequent cause of tooth loss among adults. It is defined as a plaque-induced inflammation of the periodontal tissues that results in a loss of support of the affected teeth. This process is characterized by destruction of the periodontal attachment apparatus, increased bone resorption with loss of crestal alveolar bone, apical migration of the epithelial attachment, and formation of periodontal pockets. Although the presence of periodontal pathogens such as Porphyromonas gingivalis is a prerequisite, the progression of periodontal disease is dependent on the host response to pathogenic bacteria that colonize the tooth surface. Nowadays, a growing body of literature has accumulated to investigate the association between bone diseases, periodontal pathogens and periodontal diseases. The integration of pathogen-associated molecular patterns from microorganisms with their surface receptors in the immune cells, induces the production of several cytokines and chemokines that present either a pro- and/or anti-inflammatory role and the activation of mechanisms of controlling this and the related disease, such as osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis. This review focuses on the evidence and significance of bone host cell invasion by Porphyromonas gingivalis in the pathogenesis of bone disorders, as well as the different lines of evidence supporting the role of cytokines in bone diseases. PMID:26122214

  7. Comparison of bone marrow aspiration and bone marrow biopsy in neoplastic diseases.

    PubMed

    Hamid, G A; Hanbala, N

    2009-07-01

    Naturally trephine biopsies have definitive advantages over aspirates in case of dry tap bone marrow aspirates as a result of fibrosis or densely packed bone marrow by tumour cells and may be informative independent of cytology especially in bone marrow involvement by lymphomas and carcinomas. In this prospective descriptive study we aimed to compare between the bone marrow trephine biopsy (BMTB) and bone marrow aspirates (BMAs) regarding the detection rate of solid tumours, lymphoma and myeloma involvement of the bone marrow. The study was carried out in the department of pathology and Haematology-Oncology of Al-Gamhouria Teaching Hospital/Aden during the period between Jan 2005 to Dec 2005. A total of 32 patients with suspected or confirmed malignancy undergone both BMTB and BMA from the posterior superior iliac crest and both results were compared. We divided them into three groups: those with solid tumours (21) patients, lymphoma (7) patients and with MM (4) patients. Our results showed that BMA had a 47.6% sensitivity, 100.0% specificity, with positive predictive value (100%), and negative predictive value (50.0%). In solid tumours alone it had a sensitivity of (40.0%), 100% specificity, with positive predictive value (100%), and negative predictive value (64.7%). This gives the BMA a lower sensitivity in detecting solid tumour metastasis and lymphoma involvement in comparison to BMTB. In conclusion, any patient with suspected or confirmed cancer should undergo BMTB because of its high sensitivity compared to BMA. PMID:20194084

  8. Interventional Radiologist's perspective on the management of bone metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Cazzato, R L; Buy, X; Grasso, R F; Luppi, G; Faiella, E; Quattrocchi, C C; Pantano, F; Beomonte Zobel, B; Tonini, G; Santini, D; Palussiere, J

    2015-08-01

    Bone metastases can be treated by interventional radiologists with a minimally invasive approach. Such treatments are performed percutaneously under radiological imaging guidance. Different interventional techniques can be applied with curative or palliative intent depending on lesions and patients' status. In the whole, available interventional techniques are distinguished into "ablative" and "consolidative". Ablative techniques achieve bone tumor necrosis by dramatically increasing or decreasing intra-tumoral temperature. This option can be performed in order to alleviate pain or to eradicate the lesion. On the other hand, consolidative techniques aim at obtaining bone defect reinforcement mainly to alleviate pain and prevent pathological fractures. We herein present evidence supporting the application of each different interventional technique, as well as common strategies followed by interventional radiologists while approaching bone metastases.

  9. Bone Disease in Myeloma: The Claws of CRAB.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Rafael; Jain, Tania

    2016-03-15

    A dynamic approach to use bisphosphonates according to biomarkers of bone metabolism is presented in the Z-MARK study by Raje and colleagues. This is a major step forward toward a rational approach to bisphosphonate usage.

  10. Bone and mineral metabolism in adult celiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Caraceni, M.P.; Molteni, N.; Bardella, M.T.; Ortolani, S.; Nogara, A.; Bianchi, P.A.

    1988-03-01

    Bone mineral density (/sup 125/I photon absorptiometry) was lower in 20 untreated adult celiac patients than in sex- and age-matched controls (p less than 0.001), and plasma alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine levels were higher than normal (p less than 0.05, less than 0.001, less than 0.05, respectively). Gluten-free diet was started, and the patients were divided randomly into two treatment groups, one which received oral 25-hydroxyvitamin D 50 micrograms/day and one which did not. After 12 months' treatment, bone turnover markers showed a decrease, which did not reach statistical significance, and bone mineral density did not show significant modifications compared with base line in either group. It was found that a gluten-free diet followed for 1 yr can prevent further bone loss, but no significant differences were detected between the two groups.

  11. Altered interaction and distribution of glycosaminoglycans and growth factors in mucopolysaccharidosis type I bone disease.

    PubMed

    Kingma, Sandra D K; Wagemans, Tom; IJlst, Lodewijk; Bronckers, Antonius L J J; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Everts, Vincent; Wijburg, Frits A; van Vlies, Naomi

    2016-07-01

    The mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs) comprise a group of lysosomal storage disorders characterized by deficient degradation and subsequent accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Progressive bone and joint disease are a major cause of morbidity, and current therapeutic strategies have limited effect on these symptoms. By elucidating pathophysiological mechanisms underlying bone disease, new therapeutic targets may be identified. Longitudinal growth is regulated by interaction between GAGs and growth factors. Because GAGs accumulate in the MPSs, we hypothesized that altered interaction between growth factors and GAGs contribute to the pathogenesis of MPS bone disease. In this study, binding between GAGs from MPS I chondrocytes and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) was not significantly different from binding of FGF2 to GAGs from control chondrocytes. FGF2 signaling, however, was increased in MPS I chondrocytes after incubation with FGF2, as compared to control chondrocytes. Using bone cultures, we demonstrated decreased growth of WT mouse bones after incubation with FGF2, but no effect on MPS I bone growth. However, MPS I bones showed decreased growth in the presence of GAGs from MPS I chondrocytes. Finally, we demonstrate altered GAG distribution in MPS I chondrocytes, and altered GAG, FGF2 and Indian hedgehog distribution in growth plates from MPS I mice. In summary, our results suggest that altered interaction and distribution of growth factors and accumulated GAGs may contribute to the pathogenesis of MPS bone disease. In the future, targeting growth factor regulation or the interaction between in growth factors and GAGs might be a promising therapeutic strategy for MPS bone disease. PMID:27105565

  12. Altered interaction and distribution of glycosaminoglycans and growth factors in mucopolysaccharidosis type I bone disease.

    PubMed

    Kingma, Sandra D K; Wagemans, Tom; IJlst, Lodewijk; Bronckers, Antonius L J J; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Everts, Vincent; Wijburg, Frits A; van Vlies, Naomi

    2016-07-01

    The mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs) comprise a group of lysosomal storage disorders characterized by deficient degradation and subsequent accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Progressive bone and joint disease are a major cause of morbidity, and current therapeutic strategies have limited effect on these symptoms. By elucidating pathophysiological mechanisms underlying bone disease, new therapeutic targets may be identified. Longitudinal growth is regulated by interaction between GAGs and growth factors. Because GAGs accumulate in the MPSs, we hypothesized that altered interaction between growth factors and GAGs contribute to the pathogenesis of MPS bone disease. In this study, binding between GAGs from MPS I chondrocytes and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) was not significantly different from binding of FGF2 to GAGs from control chondrocytes. FGF2 signaling, however, was increased in MPS I chondrocytes after incubation with FGF2, as compared to control chondrocytes. Using bone cultures, we demonstrated decreased growth of WT mouse bones after incubation with FGF2, but no effect on MPS I bone growth. However, MPS I bones showed decreased growth in the presence of GAGs from MPS I chondrocytes. Finally, we demonstrate altered GAG distribution in MPS I chondrocytes, and altered GAG, FGF2 and Indian hedgehog distribution in growth plates from MPS I mice. In summary, our results suggest that altered interaction and distribution of growth factors and accumulated GAGs may contribute to the pathogenesis of MPS bone disease. In the future, targeting growth factor regulation or the interaction between in growth factors and GAGs might be a promising therapeutic strategy for MPS bone disease.

  13. Pathogenesis of Bone Alterations in Gaucher Disease: The Role of Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Mucci, Juan Marcos; Rozenfeld, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher, the most prevalent lysosomal disorder, is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder due to a deficiency of glucocerebrosidase. Glucocerebrosidase deficiency leads to the accumulation of glucosylceramide primarily in cells of mononuclear-macrophage lineage. Clinical alterations are visceral, hematological, and skeletal. Bone disorder in Gaucher disease produces defects on bone metabolism and structure and patients suffer from bone pain and crisis. Skeletal problems include osteopenia, osteoporosis, osteolytic lesions, and osteonecrosis. On the other hand a chronic stimulation of the immune system is a well-accepted hallmark in this disease. In this review we summarize the latest findings in the mechanisms leading to the bone pathology in Gaucher disease in relationship with the proinflammatory state. PMID:26064996

  14. Investigating the efficacy of bisphosphonates treatment against multiple myeloma induced bone disease using a computational model.

    PubMed

    Ji, Bing; Yang, Qing; Genever, Paul G; Fagan, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM)-induced bone disease is mortal for most MM patients. Bisphosphonates are first-line treatment for MM-induced bone disease, since it can inhibit osteoclast activity and the resultant bone resorption by suppressing the differentiation of osteoclast precursors into mature osteoclasts, promoting osteoclast apoptosis and disrupting osteoclast function. However, it is still unclear whether bisphosphonates have an anti-tumour effect. In our previous work, a computational model was built to simulate the pathology of MM-induced bone disease. This paper extends this proposed computational model to investigate the efficacy of bisphosphonates treatment and then clear the controversy of this therapy. The extended model is validated through the good agreement between simulation results and experimental data. The simulation results suggest that bisphosphonates indeed have an anti-tumour effect.

  15. Pelvic bone and hip joint hydatid disease revealing a retroperitoneal location.

    PubMed

    El Ibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Ankouz, Amal; Daoudi, Abdelkrim; Elmrini, Abdelmayid

    2009-06-30

    Echinococcosis is a parasitic disease produced by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus. Hydatid disease of bone is rarely seen in humans and it has been reported in only 1-2% of cases of echinococcosis. We present a patient who developed hydatid disease of the left pelvic and femoral bones with cartilage destruction of the ipsilateral hip joint revealing a retroperitoneal location of hydatid cyst. Hydatid bone must be present in the differential diagnosis of chronic monoarthritis. Skeletal involvement is usually secondary to visceral hydatidosis that we must research. Early diagnosis allows eradication and salvage of the bone and the hip joint. Delayed diagnosis is always fraught with the risk of recurrence and sepsis.

  16. Optimal management of bone mineral disorders in chronic kidney disease and ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Lundquist, Andrew L.; Nigwekar, Sagar U.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review This review summarizes recent studies on chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorders, with a focus on new developments in disease management. Recent findings The term chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder has come to describe an increasingly complex network of alterations in minerals and skeletal disorders that contribute to the significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality seen in patients with chronic kidney disease and ESRD. Clinical studies continue to suggest associations with clinical outcomes, yet current clinical trials have failed to support causality. Variability in practice exists as current guidelines for management of bone-mineral disorders are often based on weak evidence. Recent studies implicate novel pathways for therapeutic intervention in clinical trials. Summary Mineral-bone disorders in chronic kidney disease arise from alterations in a number of molecules in an increasingly complex physiological network interconnecting bone and the cardiovascular system. Despite extensive associations with improved outcomes in a number of molecules, clinical trials have yet to prove causality and there is an absence of new therapies available to improve patient outcomes. Additional clinical trials that can incorporate the complexity of mineral bone disorders and with the ability to intervene on more than one pathway are needed to advance patient care. PMID:26785065

  17. Molecular Actions of Glucocorticoids in Cartilage and Bone During Health, Disease, and Steroid Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Kerstin; Koenen, Mascha; Schauer, Sebastian; Wittig-Blaich, Stephanie; Ahmad, Mubashir; Baschant, Ulrike; Tuckermann, Jan P

    2016-04-01

    Cartilage and bone are severely affected by glucocorticoids (GCs), steroid hormones that are frequently used to treat inflammatory diseases. Major complications associated with long-term steroid therapy include impairment of cartilaginous bone growth and GC-induced osteoporosis. Particularly in arthritis, GC application can increase joint and bone damage. Contrarily, endogenous GC release supports cartilage and bone integrity. In the last decade, substantial progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of GC action has been gained through genome-wide binding studies of the GC receptor. These genomic approaches have revolutionized our understanding of gene regulation by ligand-induced transcription factors in general. Furthermore, specific inactivation of GC signaling and the GC receptor in bone and cartilage cells of rodent models has enabled the cell-specific effects of GCs in normal tissue homeostasis, inflammatory bone diseases, and GC-induced osteoporosis to be dissected. In this review, we summarize the current view of GC action in cartilage and bone. We further discuss future research directions in the context of new concepts for optimized steroid therapies with less detrimental effects on bone.

  18. Preliminary results of automated removal of degenerative joint disease in bone scan lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Gregory H.; Lo, Pechin; Kim, Hyun J.; Auerbach, Martin; Goldin, Jonathan; Henkel, Keith; Banola, Ashley; Morris, Darren; Coy, Heidi; Brown, Matthew S.

    2013-03-01

    Whole-body bone scintigraphy (or bone scan) is a highly sensitive method for visualizing bone metastases and is the accepted standard imaging modality for detection of metastases and assessment of treatment outcomes. The development of a quantitative biomarker using computer-aided detection on bone scans for treatment response assessment may have a significant impact on the evaluation of novel oncologic drugs directed at bone metastases. One of the challenges to lesion segmentation on bone scans is the non-specificity of the radiotracer, manifesting as high activity related to non-malignant processes like degenerative joint disease, sinuses, kidneys, thyroid and bladder. In this paper, we developed an automated bone scan lesion segmentation method that implements intensity normalization, a two-threshold model, and automated detection and removal of areas consistent with non-malignant processes from the segmentation. The two-threshold model serves to account for outlier bone scans with elevated and diffuse intensity distributions. Parameters to remove degenerative joint disease were trained using a multi-start Nelder-Mead simplex optimization scheme. The segmentation reference standard was constructed manually by a panel of physicians. We compared the performance of the proposed method against a previously published method. The results of a two-fold cross validation show that the overlap ratio improved in 67.0% of scans, with an average improvement of 5.1% points.

  19. Modeling failure in brittle porous ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keles, Ozgur

    Brittle porous materials (BPMs) are used for battery, fuel cell, catalyst, membrane, filter, bone graft, and pharmacy applications due to the multi-functionality of their underlying porosity. However, in spite of its technological benefits the effects of porosity on BPM fracture strength and Weibull statistics are not fully understood--limiting a wider use. In this context, classical fracture mechanics was combined with two-dimensional finite element simulations not only to account for pore-pore stress interactions, but also to numerically quantify the relationship between the local pore volume fraction and fracture statistics. Simulations show that even the microstructures with the same porosity level and size of pores differ substantially in fracture strength. The maximum reliability of BPMs was shown to be limited by the underlying pore--pore interactions. Fracture strength of BMPs decreases at a faster rate under biaxial loading than under uniaxial loading. Three different types of deviation from classic Weibull behavior are identified: P-type corresponding to a positive lower tail deviation, N-type corresponding to a negative lower tail deviation, and S-type corresponding to both positive upper and lower tail deviations. Pore-pore interactions result in either P-type or N-type deviation in the limit of low porosity, whereas S-type behavior occurs when clusters of low and high fracture strengths coexist in a fracture data.

  20. Protection of brittle film against cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musil, J.; Sklenka, J.; Čerstvý, R.

    2016-05-01

    This article reports on the protection of the brittle Zrsbnd Sisbnd O film against cracking in bending by the highly elastic top film (over-layer). In experiments the Zrsbnd Sisbnd O films with different elemental composition and structure were used. Both the brittle and highly elastic films were prepared by magnetron sputtering using a dual magnetron. The brittle film easily cracks in bending. On the other hand, the highly elastic film exhibits enhanced resistance to cracking in bending. Main characteristic parameters of both the brittle and highly elastic films are given. Special attention is devoted to the effect of the structure (crystalline, amorphous) of both the brittle and highly elastic top film on the resistance of cracking of the brittle film. It was found that (1) both the X-ray amorphous and crystalline brittle films easily crack in bending, (2) the highly elastic film can have either X-ray amorphous or crystalline structure and (3) both the X-ray amorphous and crystalline, highly elastic top films perfectly protect the brittle films against cracking in bending. The structure, mechanical properties and optical transparency of the brittle and highly elastic sputtered Zrsbnd Sisbnd O films are described in detail. At the end of this article, the principle of the low-temperature formation of the highly elastic films is also explained.

  1. Assessment of the serum levels of bone alkaline phosphatase with a new immunoradiometric assay in patients with metabolic bone disease

    SciTech Connect

    Garnero, P.; Delmas, P.D.

    1993-10-01

    The authors measured serum bone alkaline phosphatase (B-ALP) with a new immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) in a large sample of healthy controls comprising 173 women and 180 men, 20-88 yr of age, and in patients with metabolic bone disease. Using serum samples from patients with liver disease and patients with Paget's disease with elevated total alkaline phosphatase (T-ALP) as a source of, respectively, liver and bone isoenyzmes, they determined a liver cross-reactivity of the IRMA of 16% that was confirmed by electrophoresis of the circulating alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes. The IRMA was linear for serial sample dilutions, the recovery ranged from 89-110%, and the intra- and interassay variations were below 7% and 9%, respectively. B-ALP increased linearly with age in both sexes, and the mean B-ALP serum levels were not significantly different for women and men (11.3 [+-] 4.8 ng/mL for women; 11.0 [+-] 4.0 ng/mL for men). The increase in B-ALP after the menopause was significantly higher than that in T-ALP (+77% vs. +24%; P<0.001). When the values of postmenopausal women were expressed as the SD from the mean of premenopausal women, the mean Z scores were 2.2[+-] 1.8 for B-ALP and 0.9 [+-] 1.3 for T-ALP (P<0.001 between the two).

  2. The influence of genetic variability and proinflammatory status on the development of bone disease in patients with Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Gervas-Arruga, Javier; Cebolla, Jorge Javier; de Blas, Ignacio; Roca, Mercedes; Pocovi, Miguel; Giraldo, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease, the most common lysosomal storage disorder, is caused by β-glucocerebrosidase deficiency. Bone complications are the major cause of morbidity in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease (GD1). Genetic components strongly influence bone remodelling. In addition, chronic inflammation produced by Gaucher cells induces the production of several cytokines, which leads to direct changes in the bone remodelling process and can also affect the process indirectly through other immune cells. In this study, we analysed the association between bone mineral density (BMD), bone marrow burden score, and relevant genetic polymorphisms related to bone metabolism, as well as profiles of proinflammatory cytokines in a GD1 cohort. This study included 83 patients distributed according to bone status. BMD was measured with DXA and broadband ultrasound attenuation; bone marrow involvement was evaluated using MRI. We also analysed 26 SNPs located in 14 genes related to bone metabolism. To assess proinflammatory status, we analysed IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-10, IL-13, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and TNFα in plasma samples from 71 control participants and GD1 patients. SNP genotype proportions and BMD differed significantly between ESRI c.453-397T>C and VDR c.1024+283G>A variants. We also observed significant associations between GD1 genotypes and bone affectation. When patients were stratified by spleen status, we observed significant correlations between non-/splenectomized groups and Spanish MRI (S-MRI) score. Across genotype proportions of non-/splenectomized patients and S-MRI, we observed significant differences in ESRI c.453-397T>C, VDR c.-83-25988G>A, and TNFRSF11B c.9C>G polymorphisms. We observed different significant proinflammatory profiles between control participants, treatment-naïve patients, and patients on enzyme replacement therapy (ERT); between non-/splenectomized patients (between untreated and ERT-treated patients) and among those with differing GBA genotypes. The

  3. The Influence of Genetic Variability and Proinflammatory Status on the Development of Bone Disease in Patients with Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gervas-Arruga, Javier; Cebolla, Jorge Javier; de Blas, Ignacio; Roca, Mercedes; Pocovi, Miguel; Giraldo, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease, the most common lysosomal storage disorder, is caused by β-glucocerebrosidase deficiency. Bone complications are the major cause of morbidity in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease (GD1). Genetic components strongly influence bone remodelling. In addition, chronic inflammation produced by Gaucher cells induces the production of several cytokines, which leads to direct changes in the bone remodelling process and can also affect the process indirectly through other immune cells. In this study, we analysed the association between bone mineral density (BMD), bone marrow burden score, and relevant genetic polymorphisms related to bone metabolism, as well as profiles of proinflammatory cytokines in a GD1 cohort. This study included 83 patients distributed according to bone status. BMD was measured with DXA and broadband ultrasound attenuation; bone marrow involvement was evaluated using MRI. We also analysed 26 SNPs located in 14 genes related to bone metabolism. To assess proinflammatory status, we analysed IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-10, IL-13, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and TNFα in plasma samples from 71 control participants and GD1 patients. SNP genotype proportions and BMD differed significantly between ESRI c.453-397T>C and VDR c.1024+283G>A variants. We also observed significant associations between GD1 genotypes and bone affectation. When patients were stratified by spleen status, we observed significant correlations between non-/splenectomized groups and Spanish MRI (S-MRI) score. Across genotype proportions of non-/splenectomized patients and S-MRI, we observed significant differences in ESRI c.453-397T>C, VDR c.-83-25988G>A, and TNFRSF11B c.9C>G polymorphisms. We observed different significant proinflammatory profiles between control participants, treatment-naïve patients, and patients on enzyme replacement therapy (ERT); between non-/splenectomized patients (between untreated and ERT-treated patients) and among those with differing GBA genotypes. The

  4. Results of bone conduction following surgery for chronic ear disease.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, E; Seppä, J

    1997-01-01

    Preoperative and postoperative bone conduction thresholds were compared in 181 chronic ears operated on over a 5-year period between 1990 to 1994. In the majority (92%) of cases the bone conduction thresholds remained unchanged (+/-10 dB). Nine ears (5%) showed better thresholds after surgery, with improvements ranging from 11 dB to 25 dB. This improvement was especially noted in ears with severe tympanic pathology. One ear with a large labyrinthine fistula became totally deaf after surgery. In 5 ears (3%) bone-conduction thresholds deteriorated, but remained measurable at all frequencies tested. In these latter cases this impairment ranged from 11 dB to 27 dB. Cholesteatomatous ears having intact ossicular chains were found to be at the highest risk of inner ear damage when "canal wall-down" mastoidectomies were performed. Methods for prevention of sensorineural hearing loss following chronic ear surgery are discussed. PMID:9332894

  5. [Osteoporosis- more than a bone disease (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Krokowski, E; Fricke, M

    1975-05-01

    Neither the bone-matrix theory of osteoporosis established by Albright in the 1940's nor the lack-of-calcium theory of the 1960's especially represented by Nordin, due to experimental tests and clinical results could be maintained. Here a new theory of osteoporosis is introduced, explaining osteoporosis not to be primarily a disfunction of calcium- or bone metabolism, but as a part-symptom of disfunction of the whole sustentaculum -bones, marrow, nucleus pulposus and musculation. Osteoporosis is predisposed by amyothenia respectively in activity and is initiated by reduced blood circulation of the sustentaculum. Certain relevant conclusions for prophylaxis and therapy of osteoporosis can be deduced without neglecting already the presently only effective therapy using sodium fluoride. PMID:1143172

  6. TGF-β and BMP signaling in osteoblast, skeletal development, and bone formation, homeostasis and disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mengrui; Chen, Guiqian; Li, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling has fundamental roles in both embryonic skeletal development and postnatal bone homeostasis. TGF-βs and BMPs, acting on a tetrameric receptor complex, transduce signals to both the canonical Smad-dependent signaling pathway (that is, TGF-β/BMP ligands, receptors, and Smads) and the non-canonical-Smad-independent signaling pathway (that is, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase/p38 MAPK) to regulate mesenchymal stem cell differentiation during skeletal development, bone formation and bone homeostasis. Both the Smad and p38 MAPK signaling pathways converge at transcription factors, for example, Runx2 to promote osteoblast differentiation and chondrocyte differentiation from mesenchymal precursor cells. TGF-β and BMP signaling is controlled by multiple factors, including the ubiquitin-proteasome system, epigenetic factors, and microRNA. Dysregulated TGF-β and BMP signaling result in a number of bone disorders in humans. Knockout or mutation of TGF-β and BMP signaling-related genes in mice leads to bone abnormalities of varying severity, which enable a better understanding of TGF-β/BMP signaling in bone and the signaling networks underlying osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. There is also crosstalk between TGF-β/BMP signaling and several critical cytokines' signaling pathways (for example, Wnt, Hedgehog, Notch, PTHrP, and FGF) to coordinate osteogenesis, skeletal development, and bone homeostasis. This review summarizes the recent advances in our understanding of TGF-β/BMP signaling in osteoblast differentiation, chondrocyte differentiation, skeletal development, cartilage formation, bone formation, bone homeostasis, and related human bone diseases caused by the disruption of TGF-β/BMP signaling. PMID:27563484

  7. TGF-β and BMP signaling in osteoblast, skeletal development, and bone formation, homeostasis and disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mengrui; Chen, Guiqian; Li, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling has fundamental roles in both embryonic skeletal development and postnatal bone homeostasis. TGF-βs and BMPs, acting on a tetrameric receptor complex, transduce signals to both the canonical Smad-dependent signaling pathway (that is, TGF-β/BMP ligands, receptors, and Smads) and the non-canonical-Smad-independent signaling pathway (that is, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase/p38 MAPK) to regulate mesenchymal stem cell differentiation during skeletal development, bone formation and bone homeostasis. Both the Smad and p38 MAPK signaling pathways converge at transcription factors, for example, Runx2 to promote osteoblast differentiation and chondrocyte differentiation from mesenchymal precursor cells. TGF-β and BMP signaling is controlled by multiple factors, including the ubiquitin–proteasome system, epigenetic factors, and microRNA. Dysregulated TGF-β and BMP signaling result in a number of bone disorders in humans. Knockout or mutation of TGF-β and BMP signaling-related genes in mice leads to bone abnormalities of varying severity, which enable a better understanding of TGF-β/BMP signaling in bone and the signaling networks underlying osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. There is also crosstalk between TGF-β/BMP signaling and several critical cytokines’ signaling pathways (for example, Wnt, Hedgehog, Notch, PTHrP, and FGF) to coordinate osteogenesis, skeletal development, and bone homeostasis. This review summarizes the recent advances in our understanding of TGF-β/BMP signaling in osteoblast differentiation, chondrocyte differentiation, skeletal development, cartilage formation, bone formation, bone homeostasis, and related human bone diseases caused by the disruption of TGF-β/BMP signaling. PMID:27563484

  8. Sudeck-type dystrophy in Paget's disease of bone. An anatomico-radiological approach.

    PubMed

    Lagier, R

    1985-03-01

    Anatomico-radiological study of a humerus with Paget's disease and unhealed fracture makes it possible to demonstrate the uneven development of the disease according to local conditions. The possible role of a bone dystrophy similar to that in Sudeck's disease which might - along with a slow virus infection - be involved in the development of Paget's disease is discussed. The discussion is based on the present case, on two previous studies as well as on data found in the literature. PMID:2580661

  9. Evaluation of the brittleness of the rocks using various brittleness indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Dae-Sung; Jung, Yong-Bok; Park, Chan; Park, Eui-Seob

    2015-04-01

    In general, the rock has the feature of drastically reduced bearing capacity during the small strain by the brittle characteristic. Because brittleness is considered as both of inherent property and behavior of materials, various brittleness indices have been proposed and based on these the brittleness degrees of the rock are determined. The brittleness indices are used for evaluating the stability of brittle failure in deep mines or underground excavations, drillability evaluation in the well drilling field, sawability evaluation in the building stone field and others. In recent years there has been utilized as a descriptor of the hydraulic fracturing in shale gas and enhanced geothermal system. In this paper, we estimated the brittleness index of different types of rocks using various brittleness indices proposed by previous researchers and investigated their relationship and applicability. The commonly used brittleness index in Rock Mechanics is the ratio between uniaxial compressive strength and tensile strength. In Reservior Geomechanics, the indices using dynamic elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio calculated from well logging data are generally used. In higher brittleness or brittleness index, the rock shows the following characteristics; low values of elongation of grains, fracture failure, formation of fines and debris, a higher ratio of compressive to tensile strength, higher resilience, higher internal friction angle, formation of cracks in indentation, easy to fracture etc.. The brittleness index showed relatively good relations with rock intrinsic properties such as uniaxial compressive strength, elastic modulus and fracture toughness in particular rock types. The correlation among brittleness index using geophysical logging data was shown. However, it was difficult to find a relationship of the brittleness indices between uses in traditional Rock Mechanics and Reservoir Geomechanics. Since some brittleness indices have no special meaning, a careful

  10. New mouse models for metabolic bone diseases generated by genome-wide ENU mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Sabrautzki, Sibylle; Rubio-Aliaga, Isabel; Hans, Wolfgang; Fuchs, Helmut; Rathkolb, Birgit; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cohrs, Christian M; Klaften, Matthias; Seedorf, Hartwig; Eck, Sebastian; Benet-Pagès, Ana; Favor, Jack; Esposito, Irene; Strom, Tim M; Wolf, Eckhard; Lorenz-Depiereux, Bettina; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2012-08-01

    Metabolic bone disorders arise as primary diseases or may be secondary due to a multitude of organ malfunctions. Animal models are required to understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for the imbalances of bone metabolism in disturbed bone mineralization diseases. Here we present the isolation of mutant mouse models for metabolic bone diseases by phenotyping blood parameters that target bone turnover within the large-scale genome-wide Munich ENU Mutagenesis Project. A screening panel of three clinical parameters, also commonly used as biochemical markers in patients with metabolic bone diseases, was chosen. Total alkaline phosphatase activity and total calcium and inorganic phosphate levels in plasma samples of F1 offspring produced from ENU-mutagenized C3HeB/FeJ male mice were measured. Screening of 9,540 mice led to the identification of 257 phenodeviants of which 190 were tested by genetic confirmation crosses. Seventy-one new dominant mutant lines showing alterations of at least one of the biochemical parameters of interest were confirmed. Fifteen mutations among three genes (Phex, Casr, and Alpl) have been identified by positional-candidate gene approaches and one mutation of the Asgr1 gene, which was identified by next-generation sequencing. All new mutant mouse lines are offered as a resource for the scientific community.

  11. Age and disease-related changes in the mineral of bone.

    PubMed

    Grynpas, M

    1993-01-01

    Bone mineralization changes with age and disease. The distribution of mineral particles in a given bone (mineralization profile) has been studied using density fractionation as well as microradiography and electron backscattering imaging. The biological determinant of mineralization is the rate of turnover. During rapid growth and periods of high remodeling, mineralization is shifted towards lower mineral density (hypomineralization). During aging and periods of low remodeling, mineralization is shifted towards higher mineral densities (hypermineralization). Chemicals can also influence the mineralization profile of bone. Fluoride induces hypermineralization by stabilizing the apatite lattice and reducing bone mineral solubility, whereas strontium induces hypomineralization by loosening the apatite lattice and increasing bone mineral solubility. Drugs such as bisphosphonates induce hypermineralization by inhibiting resorption and acting as crystal poison. Finally, mineralization can be impaired by defects as in rickets and osteomalacia or made excessive by continuous accretion of mineral without resorption as in osteopetrosis. PMID:8275381

  12. Autologous bone marrow stromal cells are promising candidates for cell therapy approaches to treat bone degeneration in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lebouvier, Angélique; Poignard, Alexandre; Coquelin-Salsac, Laura; Léotot, Julie; Homma, Yasuhiro; Jullien, Nicolas; Bierling, Philippe; Galactéros, Frédéric; Hernigou, Philippe; Chevallier, Nathalie; Rouard, Hélène

    2015-11-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a frequent complication in adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). To delay hip arthroplasty, core decompression combined with concentrated total bone marrow (BM) treatment is currently performed in the early stages of the osteonecrosis. Cell therapy efficacy depends on the quantity of implanted BM stromal cells. For this reason, expanded bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells) can be used to improve osteonecrosis treatment in SCD patients. In this study, we quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated the function of BMSCs isolated from a large number of SCD patients with osteonecrosis (SCD-ON) compared with control groups (patients with osteonecrosis not related to SCD (ON) and normal donors (N)). BM total nuclear cells and colony-forming efficiency values (CFE) were significantly higher in SCD-ON patients than in age and sex-matched controls. The BMSCs from SCD-ON patients were similar to BMSCs from the control groups in terms of their phenotypic and functional properties. SCD-ON patients have a higher frequency of BMSCs that retain their bone regeneration potential. Our findings suggest that BMSCs isolated from SCD-ON patients can be used clinically in cell therapy approaches. This work provides important preclinical data that is necessary for the clinical application of expanded BMSCs in advanced therapies and medical products. PMID:26492634

  13. Autologous bone marrow stromal cells are promising candidates for cell therapy approaches to treat bone degeneration in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lebouvier, Angélique; Poignard, Alexandre; Coquelin-Salsac, Laura; Léotot, Julie; Homma, Yasuhiro; Jullien, Nicolas; Bierling, Philippe; Galactéros, Frédéric; Hernigou, Philippe; Chevallier, Nathalie; Rouard, Hélène

    2015-11-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a frequent complication in adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). To delay hip arthroplasty, core decompression combined with concentrated total bone marrow (BM) treatment is currently performed in the early stages of the osteonecrosis. Cell therapy efficacy depends on the quantity of implanted BM stromal cells. For this reason, expanded bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells) can be used to improve osteonecrosis treatment in SCD patients. In this study, we quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated the function of BMSCs isolated from a large number of SCD patients with osteonecrosis (SCD-ON) compared with control groups (patients with osteonecrosis not related to SCD (ON) and normal donors (N)). BM total nuclear cells and colony-forming efficiency values (CFE) were significantly higher in SCD-ON patients than in age and sex-matched controls. The BMSCs from SCD-ON patients were similar to BMSCs from the control groups in terms of their phenotypic and functional properties. SCD-ON patients have a higher frequency of BMSCs that retain their bone regeneration potential. Our findings suggest that BMSCs isolated from SCD-ON patients can be used clinically in cell therapy approaches. This work provides important preclinical data that is necessary for the clinical application of expanded BMSCs in advanced therapies and medical products.

  14. Calcium regulation and bone mineral metabolism in elderly patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tejwani, Vickram; Qian, Qi

    2013-05-29

    The elderly chronic kidney disease (CKD) population is growing. Both aging and CKD can disrupt calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis and cause alterations of multiple Ca2+-regulatory mechanisms, including parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, fibroblast growth factor-23/Klotho, calcium-sensing receptor and Ca2+-phosphate product. These alterations can be deleterious to bone mineral metabolism and soft tissue health, leading to metabolic bone disease and vascular calcification and aging, termed CKD-mineral and bone disorder (MBD). CKD-MBD is associated with morbid clinical outcomes, including fracture, cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. In this paper, we comprehensively review Ca2+ regulation and bone mineral metabolism, with a special emphasis on elderly CKD patients. We also present the current treatment-guidelines and management options for CKD-MBD.

  15. Reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in osteoclastogenesis, skeletal aging and bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Callaway, Danielle A; Jiang, Jean X

    2015-07-01

    Osteoclasts are cells derived from bone marrow macrophages and are important in regulating bone resorption during bone homeostasis. Understanding what drives osteoclast differentiation and activity is important when studying diseases characterized by heightened bone resorption relative to formation, such as osteoporosis. In the last decade, studies have indicated that reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, are crucial components that regulate the differentiation process of osteoclasts. However, there are still many unanswered questions that remain. This review will examine the mechanisms by which ROS can be produced in osteoclasts as well as how it may affect osteoclast differentiation and activity through its actions on osteoclastogenesis signaling pathways. In addition, the contribution of ROS to the aging-associated disease of osteoporosis will be addressed and how targeting ROS may lead to the development of novel therapeutic treatment options.

  16. High phosphate feeding promotes mineral and bone abnormalities in mice with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wei Ling; Linnes, Michael; Chu, Emily Y.; Foster, Brian L.; Bartley, Bryan A.; Somerman, Martha J.; Giachelli, Cecilia M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is a systemic syndrome characterized by imbalances in mineral homeostasis, renal osteodystrophy (ROD) and ectopic calcification. The mechanisms underlying this syndrome in individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are not yet clear. Methods We examined the effect of normal phosphate (NP) or high phosphate (HP) feeding in the setting of CKD on bone pathology, serum biochemistry and vascular calcification in calcification-prone dilute brown non-agouti (DBA/2) mice. Results In both NP and HP-fed CKD mice, elevated serum parathyroid hormone and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels were observed, but serum phosphorus levels were equivalent compared with sham controls. CKD mice on NP diet showed trabecular alterations in the long bone consistent with high–turnover ROD, including increased trabecular number with abundant osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Despite trabecular bone and serum biochemical changes, CKD/NP mice did not develop vascular calcification. In contrast, CKD/HP mice developed arterial medial calcification (AMC), more severe trabecular bone alterations and cortical bone abnormalities that included decreased cortical thickness and density, and increased cortical porosity. Cortical bone porosity and trabecular number strongly correlated with the degree of aortic calcification. Conclusions HP feeding was required to induce the full spectrum of CKD-MBD symptoms in CKD mice. PMID:23045434

  17. Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder: Guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, and management.

    PubMed

    Moschella, Carla

    2016-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease affects 23 million Americans and is associated with many complications, one of the most complex of which is mineral and bone disorder. Pathophysiologic mechanisms begin to occur early in CKD but when the glomerular filtration rate declines to <50% of normal, biochemical and bone matrix abnormalities, which vary and are multifactorial, begin to be clinically apparent. Mainstays of treatment remain management of hyperphosphatemia and prevention or treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:27272731

  18. Detection of degenerative disease of the temporomandibular joint by bone scintigraphy: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Bloom, C.Y.

    1980-10-01

    Nine patients with facial pain were evaluated with limited bone scans. The scintigrams correlated with microscopy in all patients, although radiographs correlated with microscopy in only five patients. The degenerative disease process in the temporomandibular joint was more extensive in the patients with radiographic and scintigraphic abnormalities than in those with scintigraphic abnormalities alone. The limited bone scan appears useful in detecting early degenerative changes in the temporomandibular joint.

  19. The role of bone in CKD-mediated mineral and vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Khouzam, Nadine M; Wesseling-Perry, Katherine; Salusky, Isidro B

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and vascular calcifications start early in the course of CKD. Based on the growing body of evidence that alterations of bone and mineral metabolism and the therapies designed to treat the skeletal consequences of CKD are linked to cardiovascular calcifications, the Kidney Disease, Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) working group redefined renal osteodystrophy as a systemic disorder of mineral and bone metabolism due to CKD, and this newly defined disorder is now known as "chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD)". Elevated fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), a bone-derived protein, is the first biochemical abnormality to be associated with CKD-MBD, and high FGF23 levels correlate with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, suggesting that bone is central to both initiating and perpetuating the abnormal mineral metabolism and vascular disease in CKD. The current standard therapies for CKD-MBD affect FGF23 levels differently; non-calcium-based binders with or without concurrent use of dietary phosphate restriction reduce FGF23 levels, while calcium-based binders seem to either increase or have no effect on FGF23 levels. Active vitamin D sterols increase FGF23 levels, whereas therapy with calcimimetics decreases FGF23 levels. Thus, the appropriate therapy that will minimize the rise in FGF23 and prevent cardiovascular morbidity remains to be defined. PMID:25168424

  20. The impact of methods for estimating bone health and the global burden of bone disease.

    PubMed

    Cole, Zoë A; Dennison, Elaine M; Cooper, Cyrus

    2009-01-01

    Osteoporosis constitutes a major public health problem through its association with age related fractures. Fracture rates are generally higher in caucasian women than in other populations. Important determinants include estrogen deficiency in women, low body mass index, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, poor dietary calcium intake, physical inactivity, certain drugs and illnesses. Thus, modification of physical activity and dietary calcium/vitamin D nutrition should complement high risk approaches. In addition, the recently developed WHO algorithm for evaluation of 10-year absolute risk of fracture provides a means whereby various therapies can be targeted cost-effectively to those at risk. Risk factors, together with bone mineral density (BMD) and biochemical indices of bone turnover, can be utilised to derive absolute risks of fracture and cost-utility thresholds at which treatment is justified. These data will provide the basis for translation into coherent public health strategies aiming to prevent osteoporosis both in individuals and in the general population.

  1. SRC kinase inhibition with saracatinib limits the development of osteolytic bone disease in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Binsfeld, Marilène; Marty, Caroline; Plougonven, Erwan; Dubois, Sophie; Mahli, Nadia; Moermans, Karen; Carmeliet, Geert; Léonard, Angélique; Baron, Frédéric; Beguin, Yves; Menu, Eline; Cohen-Solal, Martine; Caers, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM)-associated osteolytic bone disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in MM patients and the development of new therapeutic strategies is of great interest. The proto-oncogene SRC is an attractive target for such a strategy. In the current study, we investigated the effect of treatment with the SRC inhibitor saracatinib (AZD0530) on osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation and function, and on the development of MM and its associated bone disease in the 5TGM.1 and 5T2MM murine MM models. In vitro data showed an inhibitory effect of saracatinib on osteoclast differentiation, polarization and resorptive function. In osteoblasts, collagen deposition and matrix mineralization were affected by saracatinib. MM cell proliferation and tumor burden remained unaltered following saracatinib treatment and we could not detect any synergistic effects with drugs that are part of standard care in MM. We observed a marked reduction of bone loss after treatment of MM-bearing mice with saracatinib as reflected by a restoration of trabecular bone parameters to levels observed in naive control mice. Histomorphometric analyses support that this occurs through an inhibition of bone resorption. In conclusion, these data further establish SRC inhibition as a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of MM-associated osteolytic bone disease. PMID:27095574

  2. Bone mass and vitamin D levels in Parkinson's disease: is there any difference between genders?

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Erhan Arif; Gundogdu, Ibrahim; Tonuk, Burak; Kocer, Bilge Gonenli; Tombak, Yasemin; Comoglu, Selcuk; Cakci, Aytul

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the bone mineral density, vitamin D level, and frequencies of osteopenia and osteoporosis in patients with Parkinson's disease and to compare male and female patients with the controls separately. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred fifteen Parkinson's disease patients (47 males, 68 females; age range: 55-85 years) and 117 age- and gender-matched controls (47 males, 70 females) were enrolled in the study. Bone mineral density measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and serum D vitamin levels of each participant were recorded. [Results] The mean lumbar spine, femur neck, and total femur bone mineral density levels, T-scores, and vitamin D levels were found to be significantly lower in Parkinson's disease patients in both genders. Furthermore, osteoporosis rates were found be significantly higher only in female Parkinson's disease patients compared with female controls. [Conclusion] Data from the present study revealed that while osteoporosis was significantly higher only in female Parkinson's disease patients, all Parkinson's disease patients had lower bone mineral density scores and vitamin D levels compared with the controls regardless of gender, suggesting that clinicians should pay attention to the osteoporosis risk in Parkinson's disease and that adequate preventive measures should be taken in order to limit the future risk due to osteoporotic fractures. PMID:27630398

  3. Bone mass and vitamin D levels in Parkinson's disease: is there any difference between genders?

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Erhan Arif; Gundogdu, Ibrahim; Tonuk, Burak; Kocer, Bilge Gonenli; Tombak, Yasemin; Comoglu, Selcuk; Cakci, Aytul

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the bone mineral density, vitamin D level, and frequencies of osteopenia and osteoporosis in patients with Parkinson's disease and to compare male and female patients with the controls separately. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred fifteen Parkinson's disease patients (47 males, 68 females; age range: 55-85 years) and 117 age- and gender-matched controls (47 males, 70 females) were enrolled in the study. Bone mineral density measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and serum D vitamin levels of each participant were recorded. [Results] The mean lumbar spine, femur neck, and total femur bone mineral density levels, T-scores, and vitamin D levels were found to be significantly lower in Parkinson's disease patients in both genders. Furthermore, osteoporosis rates were found be significantly higher only in female Parkinson's disease patients compared with female controls. [Conclusion] Data from the present study revealed that while osteoporosis was significantly higher only in female Parkinson's disease patients, all Parkinson's disease patients had lower bone mineral density scores and vitamin D levels compared with the controls regardless of gender, suggesting that clinicians should pay attention to the osteoporosis risk in Parkinson's disease and that adequate preventive measures should be taken in order to limit the future risk due to osteoporotic fractures.

  4. Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling in development and human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Richard N.; Green, Jordan; Wang, Zhongliang; Deng, Youlin; Qiao, Min; Peabody, Michael; Zhang, Qian; Ye, Jixing; Yan, Zhengjian; Denduluri, Sahitya; Idowu, Olumuyiwa; Li, Melissa; Shen, Christine; Hu, Alan; Haydon, Rex C.; Kang, Richard; Mok, James; Lee, Michael J.; Luu, Hue L.; Shi, Lewis L.

    2014-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) are a group of signaling molecules that belongs to the Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily of proteins. Initially discovered for their ability to induce bone formation, BMPs are now known to play crucial roles in all organ systems. BMPs are important in embryogenesis and development, and also in maintenance of adult tissue homeostasis. Mouse knockout models of various components of the BMP signaling pathway result in embryonic lethality or marked defects, highlighting the essential functions of BMPs. In this review, we first outline the basic aspects of BMP signaling and then focus on genetically manipulated mouse knockout models that have helped elucidate the role of BMPs in development. A significant portion of this review is devoted to the prominent human pathologies associated with dysregulated BMP signaling. PMID:25401122

  5. Bone Marrow Diseases - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. French (français) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) ... 骨髄生検 - 日本語 (Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Korean (한국어) Bone Marrow Biopsy 골수 생체조직 검사 - 한국어 ( ...

  6. Nutritional and metabolic correlates of cardiovascular and bone disease in HIV-infected patients1234

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of HIV infection has dramatically reduced the incidence of AIDS-related illnesses. At the same time, non-AIDS-related illnesses such as cardiovascular and bone disease are becoming more prevalent in this population. The mechanisms of these illnesses are complex and are related in part to the HIV virus, antiretroviral medications prescribed for HIV infection, traditional risk factors exacerbated by HIV, and lifestyle and nutritional factors. Further prospective research is needed to clarify the mechanisms by which HIV, antiretroviral medications, and nutritional abnormalities contribute to bone and cardiovascular disease in the HIV population. Increasingly, it is being recognized that optimizing the treatment of HIV infection to improve immune function and reduce viral load may also benefit the development of non-AIDS-related illnesses such as cardiovascular and bone disease. PMID:22089442

  7. MicroRNAs: Potential Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets for Alveolar Bone Loss in Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kagiya, Tadayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease caused by bacterial infection of tooth-supporting structures, which results in the destruction of alveolar bone. Osteoclasts play a central role in bone destruction. Osteoclasts are tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated giant cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells. Recently, we and other researchers revealed that microRNAs are involved in osteoclast differentiation. MicroRNAs are novel, single-stranded, non-coding, small (20–22 nucleotides) RNAs that act in a sequence-specific manner to regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level through cleavage or translational repression of their target mRNAs. They regulate various biological activities such as cellular differentiation, apoptosis, cancer development, and inflammatory responses. In this review, the roles of microRNAs in osteoclast differentiation and function during alveolar bone destruction in periodontal disease are described. PMID:27529224

  8. Nutritional and metabolic correlates of cardiovascular and bone disease in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Kathleen; Grinspoon, Steven

    2011-12-01

    The treatment of HIV infection has dramatically reduced the incidence of AIDS-related illnesses. At the same time, non-AIDS-related illnesses such as cardiovascular and bone disease are becoming more prevalent in this population. The mechanisms of these illnesses are complex and are related in part to the HIV virus, antiretroviral medications prescribed for HIV infection, traditional risk factors exacerbated by HIV, and lifestyle and nutritional factors. Further prospective research is needed to clarify the mechanisms by which HIV, antiretroviral medications, and nutritional abnormalities contribute to bone and cardiovascular disease in the HIV population. Increasingly, it is being recognized that optimizing the treatment of HIV infection to improve immune function and reduce viral load may also benefit the development of non-AIDS-related illnesses such as cardiovascular and bone disease.

  9. MicroRNAs: Potential Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets for Alveolar Bone Loss in Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Kagiya, Tadayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease caused by bacterial infection of tooth-supporting structures, which results in the destruction of alveolar bone. Osteoclasts play a central role in bone destruction. Osteoclasts are tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated giant cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells. Recently, we and other researchers revealed that microRNAs are involved in osteoclast differentiation. MicroRNAs are novel, single-stranded, non-coding, small (20-22 nucleotides) RNAs that act in a sequence-specific manner to regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level through cleavage or translational repression of their target mRNAs. They regulate various biological activities such as cellular differentiation, apoptosis, cancer development, and inflammatory responses. In this review, the roles of microRNAs in osteoclast differentiation and function during alveolar bone destruction in periodontal disease are described. PMID:27529224

  10. Cilia/Ift protein and motor-related bone diseases and mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are essential cellular organelles projecting from the cell surface to sense and transduce developmental signaling. They are tiny but have complicated structures containing microtubule (MT)-based internal structures (the axoneme) and mother centriole formed basal body. Intraflagellar transport (Ift) operated by Ift proteins and motors are indispensable for cilia formation and function. Mutations in Ift proteins or Ift motors cause various human diseases, some of which have severe bone defects. Over the last few decades, major advances have occurred in understanding the roles of these proteins and cilia in bone development and remodeling by examining cilia/Ift protein-related human diseases and establishing mouse transgenic models. In this review, we describe current advances in the understanding of the cilia/Ift structure and function. We further summarize cilia/Ift-related human diseases and current mouse models with an emphasis on bone-related phenotypes, cilia morphology, and signaling pathways. PMID:25553465

  11. Cilia/Ift protein and motor -related bone diseases and mouse models.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are essential cellular organelles projecting from the cell surface to sense and transduce developmental signaling. They are tiny but have complicated structures containing microtubule (MT)-based internal structures (the axoneme) and mother centriole formed basal body. Intraflagellar transport (Ift) operated by Ift proteins and motors are indispensable for cilia formation and function. Mutations in Ift proteins or Ift motors cause various human diseases, some of which have severe bone defects. Over the last few decades, major advances have occurred in understanding the roles of these proteins and cilia in bone development and remodeling by examining cilia/Ift protein-related human diseases and establishing mouse transgenic models. In this review, we describe current advances in the understanding of the cilia/Ift structure and function. We further summarize cilia/Ift-related human diseases and current mouse models with an emphasis on bone-related phenotypes, cilia morphology, and signaling pathways.

  12. Triazolopyrimidine (trapidil), a platelet-derived growth factor antagonist, inhibits parathyroid bone disease in an animal model for chronic hyperparathyroidism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lotinun, Sutada; Sibonga, Jean D.; Turner, Russell T.

    2003-01-01

    Parathyroid bone disease in humans is caused by chronic hyperparathyroidism (HPT). Continuous infusion of PTH into rats results in histological changes similar to parathyroid bone disease, including increased bone formation, focal bone resorption, and severe peritrabecular fibrosis, whereas pulsatile PTH increases bone formation without skeletal abnormalities. Using a cDNA microarray with over 5000 genes, we identified an association between increased platelet-derived growth factor-A (PDGF-A) signaling and PTH-induced bone disease in rats. Verification of PDGF-A overexpression was accomplished with a ribonuclease protection assay. Using immunohistochemistry, PDGF-A peptide was localized to mast cells in PTH-treated rats. We also report a novel strategy for prevention of parathyroid bone disease using triazolopyrimidine (trapidil). Trapidil, an inhibitor of PDGF signaling, did not have any effect on indexes of bone turnover in normal rats. However, dramatic reductions in marrow fibrosis and bone resorption, but not bone formation, were observed in PTH-treated rats given trapidil. Also, trapidil antagonized the PTH-induced increases in mRNA levels for PDGF-A. These results suggest that PDGF signaling is important for the detrimental skeletal effects of HPT, and drugs that target the cytokine or its receptor might be useful in reducing or preventing parathyroid bone disease.

  13. Animal model for medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw with precedent metabolic bone disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Tatad, Jacquiline Czar I; Landayan, Maria Erika A; Kim, Sun-Jong; Kim, Myung-Rae

    2015-12-01

    Despite the fact that the medications used to treat abnormal bone conditions often induce osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), previous attempts to establish an animal model for ONJ have shown insufficient consideration for this important prerequisite for the development of the disease. The purpose of this study was to establish an animal model with the most common metabolic bone disease, osteoporosis. Ninty-six rats were randomly divided into ovariectomy (Ov) group (n=48) and sham-operated group (n=48). Six weeks after Ov or sham surgery, rats in each group were subdivided into bisphosphonate group (n=36 each) and control group (n=12 each) and injected with zoledronic acid and normal saline, respectively, once a week. After additional 6weeks, surgical intervention was performed, and the injections were continued for 8 more weeks. The animals were then sacrificed for further macroscopic, histological, histomorphometric, radiological, and bone biomarker investigations. As histologically determined, the Ov group (77.8%) showed higher ONJ prevalence compared to the sham group (47.2%; P<0.05). Micro-structural and histomorphometric assessments revealed that rats with ONJ (ONJ group) presented with deteriorated bone architectures with higher necrotic bone fraction and lower number of osteoclasts (P<0.05). Compared to the sham-operated ONJ group, the Ov ONJ group showed significantly lower values of Tb.N, Tb.Sp, Conn.D, N.Oc/T.Ar, and TRACP 5b and CTX/TRACP (P<0.05). The ovariectomized rat model in this study successfully mimicked human ONJ lesions with an underlying bone disease and showed different bone characteristics than that of the previous ONJ model. Based on the differences, further researches for investigating pathophysiology of ONJ, including various pharmacological responses for deteriorated bone environment, are required.

  14. Noninvasive assessment of bone health in Indian patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Jabbar, Z; Aggarwal, P K; Chandel, N; Khandelwal, N; Kohli, H S; Sakhuja, V; Jha, V

    2013-05-01

    Abnormalities in mineral and bone disease are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Evaluation of bone health requires measurement of parameters of bone turnover, mineralization, and volume. There are no data on bone health in CKD patients from India. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated serum biomarkers of bone turnover: Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and total deoxypyridinoline (tDPD) along with parathyroid hormone, 25(OH) vitamin D, and bone mineral density (BMD) using dual absorption X-ray absorptiometry in a cohort of 74 treatment-naive patients with newly diagnosed stage 4 and 5 CKD (age 42 ± 14.5 years, 54 men) and 52 non-CKD volunteers (age 40.2 ± 9.3 years, 40 men). Compared to the controls, CKD subjects showed elevated intact PTH (iPTH), BAP, and tDPD and lower BMD. There was a strong correlation between iPTH and BAP (r = 0.88, P < 0.0001), iPTH and tDPD (r = 0.51, P < 0.0001), and BAP and tDPD (r = 0.46, P = 0.0004). The iPTH elevation was greater than twice the upper range of normal in 73% cases, and BAP was >40 U/L in 66% cases. The combination of these markers suggests high turnover bone disease in over 60% cases. The prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis was 37% and 12%, respectively. Osteoporotic subjects had higher iPTH, BAP, and tDPD, suggesting a role of high turnover in genesis of osteoporosis. Vitamin D deficiency was seen in 80%, and another 13% had insufficient levels. Vitamin D correlated inversely with BAP (r = -0.3, P = 0.009), and levels were lower in those with iPTH >300 pg/ml (P = 0.0.04). In conclusion, over 60% of newly diagnosed Indian stage 4-5 CKD patients show biochemical parameters consistent with high turnover bone disease. High turnover could contribute to the development of osteoporosis in CKD subjects. Deficiency of 25 (OH) vitamin D is widespread and seems to have a role in the genesis of renal bone disease. Studies on the effect of supplementation of native vitamin D are needed. PMID:23814412

  15. Brittle microtectonics: principles and practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, P. L.

    Brittle microtectonics as defined here is the application of mesofracture analysis to the solution of tectonic problems. For the determination of regionally significant stress or strain trajectories the ideal suite of structures comprises kinematic indicators such as mesofaults, shear zones, arrays of en échelon cracks, kink bands, stylolites and fibrous veins. However, in many tectonic settings joints are the only widespread structures capable of being analysed. The principal criteria for classifying joints into extension, hybrid and shear classes are fracture-system architecture and symmetry, surface morphology, dihedral angles and thin-section characteristics. The architecture of orthogonal extension joints is commonly T-shaped, the younger joint abutting the older one. Neighbouring conjugate hybrid or shear joints generally define X, Y or V shapes but some X patterns are artefacts of unrelated cross-cutting fractures. Conjugate joints enclosing dihedral angles of less than 45° are common; they are interpreted as hybrid failure surfaces initiated in the shear-extension fracture transition. The orientations of many joint sets in platforms are related to far-field stresses generated during plate motion and the subsidence, uplift and inversion of basins. Even within a single joint set there is commonly field evidence to show that it developed during a multiphase failure sequence. Some joints are younger than folds but where a system was established before the close of folding the surfaces commonly become the sites of slip, dilation or pressure solution, and are thus transformed into structures no longer classed as joints.

  16. Biosilica-based strategies for treatment of osteoporosis and other bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Heinz C; Wiens, Matthias; Wang, Xiaohong; Schloßmacher, Ute; Müller, Werner E G

    2011-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a common disease in later life, which has become a growing public health problem. This degenerative bone disease primarily affects postmenopausal women, but also men may suffer from reduced bone mineral density. The development of prophylactic treatments and medications of osteoporosis has become an urgent issue due to the increasing proportion of the elderly in the population. Apart from medical/hormonal treatments, current strategies for prophylaxis of osteoporosis are primarily based on calcium supplementation as a main constituent of bone hydroxyapatite mineral. Despite previous reports suggesting an essential role in skeletal growth and development, the significance of the trace element silicon in human bone formation has attracted major scientific interest only rather recently. The interest in silicon has been further increased by the latest discoveries in the field of biosilicification, the formation of the inorganic silica skeleton of the oldest still extant animals on Earth, the sponges, which revealed new insights in the biological function of this element. Sponges make use of silicon to build up their inorganic skeleton which consists of biogenously formed polymeric silica (biosilica). The formation of biosilica is mediated by specific enzymes, silicateins, which have been isolated, characterized, and expressed in a recombinant way. Epidemiological studies revealed that dietary silicon reduces the risk of osteoporosis and other bone diseases. Recent results allowed for the first time to understand the molecular mechanism underlying the protective effect of silicic acid/biosilica against osteoporosis. Biosilica was shown to modulate the ratio of expression of two cytokines involved in bone formation-RANKL and osteoprotegerin. Hence, biosilica has been proposed to have a potential in prophylaxis and therapy of osteoporosis and related bone diseases.

  17. Bone scanning.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, L D; Bennett, L R

    1975-03-01

    Scanning is based on the uptake of a nuclide by the crystal lattice of bone and is related to bone blood flow. Cancer cells do not take up the tracer. Normally, the scan visualizes the highly vascular bones. Scans are useful and are indicated in metastatic bone disease, primary bone tumors, hematologic malignancies and some non-neoplastic diseases. The scan is more sensitive than x-ray in the detection of malignant diseases of the skeleton. PMID:1054210

  18. Wnt signaling in bone formation and its therapeutic potential for bone diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Hwan; Liu, Xing; Wang, Jinhua; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Hongyu; Kim, Stephanie H.; Cui, Jing; Li, Ruidong; Zhang, Wenwen; Kong, Yuhan; Zhang, Jiye; Shui, Wei; Lamplot, Joseph; Rogers, Mary Rose; Zhao, Chen; Wang, Ning; Rajan, Prashant; Tomal, Justin; Statz, Joseph; Wu, Ningning; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.

    2013-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays an important role not only in embryonic development but also in the maintenance and differentiation of the stem cells in adulthood. In particular, Wnt signaling has been shown as an important regulatory pathway in the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Induction of the Wnt signaling pathway promotes bone formation while inactivation of the pathway leads to osteopenic states. Our current understanding of Wnt signaling in osteogenesis elucidates the molecular mechanisms of classic osteogenic pathologies. Activating and inactivating aberrations of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway in osteogenesis results in sclerosteosis and osteoporosis respectively. Recent studies have sought to target the Wnt signaling pathway to treat osteogenic disorders. Potential therapeutic approaches attempt to stimulate the Wnt signaling pathway by upregulating the intracellular mediators of the Wnt signaling cascade and inhibiting the endogenous antagonists of the pathway. Antibodies against endogenous antagonists, such as sclerostin and dickkopf-1, have demonstrated promising results in promoting bone formation and fracture healing. Lithium, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3β, has also been reported to stimulate osteogenesis by stabilizing β catenin. Although manipulating the Wnt signaling pathway has abundant therapeutic potential, it requires cautious approach due to risks of tumorigenesis. The present review discusses the role of the Wnt signaling pathway in osteogenesis and examines its targeted therapeutic potential. PMID:23514963

  19. Bone Mass and Mineral Metabolism Alterations in Adult Celiac Disease: Pathophysiology and Clinical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Di Stefano, Michele; Mengoli, Caterina; Bergonzi, Manuela; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects many patients with celiac disease (CD), representing the consequence of calcium malabsorption and persistent activation of mucosal inflammation. A slight increase of fracture risk is evident in this condition, particularly in those with overt malabsorption and in postmenopausal state. The adoption of a correct gluten-free diet (GFD) improves bone derangement, but is not able to normalize bone mass in all the patients. Biomarkers effective in the prediction of bone response to gluten-free diet are not yet available and the indications of guidelines are still imperfect and debated. In this review, the pathophysiology of bone loss is correlated to clinical aspects, defining an alternative proposal of management for this condition. PMID:24284619

  20. Osteoporosis: Modern Paradigms for Last Century's Bones.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Marlena C; Wolber, Frances M

    2016-01-01

    The skeleton is a metabolically active organ undergoing continuously remodelling. With ageing and menopause the balance shifts to increased resorption, leading to a reduction in bone mineral density and disruption of bone microarchitecture. Bone mass accretion and bone metabolism are influenced by systemic hormones as well as genetic and lifestyle factors. The classic paradigm has described osteoporosis as being a "brittle bone" disease that occurs in post-menopausal, thin, Caucasian women with low calcium intakes and/or vitamin D insufficiency. However, a study of black women in Africa demonstrated that higher proportions of body fat did not protect bone health. Isoflavone interventions in Asian postmenopausal women have produced inconsistent bone health benefits, due in part to population heterogeneity in enteric bacterial metabolism of daidzein. A comparison of women and men in several Asian countries identified significant differences between countries in the rate of bone health decline, and a high incidence rate of osteoporosis in both sexes. These studies have revealed significant differences in genetic phenotypes, debunking long-held beliefs and leading to new paradigms in study design. Current studies are now being specifically designed to assess genotype differences between Caucasian, Asian, African, and other phenotypes, and exploring alternative methodology to measure bone architecture. PMID:27322315

  1. Periodontal disease exacerbates systemic ovariectomy-induced bone loss in mice.

    PubMed

    Anbinder, Ana Lia; Moraes, Renata M; Lima, Gabriela M G; Oliveira, Felipe E; Campos, Débora R C; Rossoni, Rodnei D; Oliveira, Luciane D; Junqueira, Juliana C; Ma, Yun; Elefteriou, Florent

    2016-02-01

    Periodontal pathogens and/or inflammatory products from periodontitis participate in the development or progression of systemic diseases. In this context, periodontitis acts as a modifying factor to systemic health, including diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Osteoporosis is an increasingly prevalent condition in our aging population and considered a risk factor for periodontal disease, but the effect of periodontitis on systemic bone homeostasis is unknown. We thus evaluated the effects of experimental periodontitis (EP) on systemic bone loss and the influence of estrogen deficiency in this context, using a mouse model of combined periodontitis and osteoporosis. Experimental periodontitis (EP) was induced by a ligature insertion around the mandibular first molars and Porphyromonas gingivalis infection. Three-dimensional microcomputed tomographic analyses performed 48days following infection revealed that EP and ovariectomy (OVX) induced a significantly higher femoral and mandibular bone loss compared to EP or OVX alone. EP alone did not induce systemic bone loss. In addition, the EP+OVX and EP groups showed significantly higher levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α than OVX and control groups at end point. These results suggest that periodontitis could be a risk factor for systemic bone loss, especially in post-menopausal women, and warrant further clinical investigations to confirm this association and propose adapted prophylactic and curative therapies.

  2. The role of fibroblast growth factor 23 in chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Hugo; Frazão, João M

    2013-11-13

    Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 (FGF-23) is a bone-derived hormone involved in the regulation of phosphate homeostasis. FGF-23 levels are extremely elevated in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) and there is evidence supporting the role of this hormone in the pathogenesis of Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder (CKD-MBD). Furthermore, recent data associates FGF-23 with the pathogenesis of systemic complications of CKD-MBD. The increasing evidence that the consequences of abnormal mineral metabolism are not restricted to bone disease changed the approach to the pathophysiology and treatment of disturbed bone and mineral metabolism in CKD patients. FGF-23 has been proposed to be the initial adaptive response in early CKD to protect the organism from the adverse effects of phosphate retention. Increased levels of FGF-23 observed in CKD patients are associated with cardiovascular mortality risk and was shown to mediate direct, "off-target" toxicity to the heart. This report aims to review the relevant aspects of the physiology of FGF-23 in bone biology and mineral homeostasis and the role of FGF-23 in the pathophysiology of CKD-BMD and its clinical implications. PMID:24158124

  3. Smokers with emphysema and small airway disease on computed tomography have lower bone density

    PubMed Central

    Pompe, Esther; de Jong, Pim A; van Rikxoort, Eva M; Gallardo Estrella, Leticia; de Jong, Werner U; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Oudkerk, Matthijs; van der Aalst, Carlijn M; van Ginneken, Bram; Lammers, Jan-Willem J; Mohamed Hoesein, Firdaus AA

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is more common in patients with COPD and in smokers. The aim of this study was to assess whether measures of emphysema and airway disease on computed tomography (CT) were associated with lower bone density or vertebral fractures in smokers with and without COPD. For this purpose, we included participants from the NELSON lung cancer screening trial. Bone density was measured as Hounsfield Units in the first lumbar vertebra, and vertebral fractures were assessed semiquantitatively. The 15th percentile method (Perc15) was used to assess emphysema, and the airway lumen perimeter (Pi10) was used for airway wall thickness. Expiratory/inspiratory-ratiomean lung density (E/I-ratioMLD) was used as a measure for air trapping and tracheal index to assess tracheal deformity. Linear regression models and logistic regression models were used to assess associations between CT biomarkers, bone density, and presence of fractures. Exactly 1,093 male participants were eligible for analysis. Lower Perc15 and higher E/I-ratioMLD were significantly associated with lower bone density (b=−1.27, P=0.02 and b=−0.37, P=0.02, respectively). Pi10 and tracheal index were not associated with bone density changes. CT-derived biomarkers were not associated with fracture prevalence. Bone density is lower with increasing extent of emphysema and small airway disease but is not associated with large airway disease and tracheal deformity. This may indicate the necessity to measure bone density early in smokers with emphysema and air trapping to prevent vertebral fractures. PMID:27354779

  4. Smokers with emphysema and small airway disease on computed tomography have lower bone density.

    PubMed

    Pompe, Esther; de Jong, Pim A; van Rikxoort, Eva M; Gallardo Estrella, Leticia; de Jong, Werner U; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Oudkerk, Matthijs; van der Aalst, Carlijn M; van Ginneken, Bram; Lammers, Jan-Willem J; Mohamed Hoesein, Firdaus Aa

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is more common in patients with COPD and in smokers. The aim of this study was to assess whether measures of emphysema and airway disease on computed tomography (CT) were associated with lower bone density or vertebral fractures in smokers with and without COPD. For this purpose, we included participants from the NELSON lung cancer screening trial. Bone density was measured as Hounsfield Units in the first lumbar vertebra, and vertebral fractures were assessed semiquantitatively. The 15th percentile method (Perc15) was used to assess emphysema, and the airway lumen perimeter (Pi10) was used for airway wall thickness. Expiratory/inspiratory-ratiomean lung density (E/I-ratioMLD) was used as a measure for air trapping and tracheal index to assess tracheal deformity. Linear regression models and logistic regression models were used to assess associations between CT biomarkers, bone density, and presence of fractures. Exactly 1,093 male participants were eligible for analysis. Lower Perc15 and higher E/I-ratioMLD were significantly associated with lower bone density (b=-1.27, P=0.02 and b=-0.37, P=0.02, respectively). Pi10 and tracheal index were not associated with bone density changes. CT-derived biomarkers were not associated with fracture prevalence. Bone density is lower with increasing extent of emphysema and small airway disease but is not associated with large airway disease and tracheal deformity. This may indicate the necessity to measure bone density early in smokers with emphysema and air trapping to prevent vertebral fractures.

  5. Smokers with emphysema and small airway disease on computed tomography have lower bone density.

    PubMed

    Pompe, Esther; de Jong, Pim A; van Rikxoort, Eva M; Gallardo Estrella, Leticia; de Jong, Werner U; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Oudkerk, Matthijs; van der Aalst, Carlijn M; van Ginneken, Bram; Lammers, Jan-Willem J; Mohamed Hoesein, Firdaus Aa

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is more common in patients with COPD and in smokers. The aim of this study was to assess whether measures of emphysema and airway disease on computed tomography (CT) were associated with lower bone density or vertebral fractures in smokers with and without COPD. For this purpose, we included participants from the NELSON lung cancer screening trial. Bone density was measured as Hounsfield Units in the first lumbar vertebra, and vertebral fractures were assessed semiquantitatively. The 15th percentile method (Perc15) was used to assess emphysema, and the airway lumen perimeter (Pi10) was used for airway wall thickness. Expiratory/inspiratory-ratiomean lung density (E/I-ratioMLD) was used as a measure for air trapping and tracheal index to assess tracheal deformity. Linear regression models and logistic regression models were used to assess associations between CT biomarkers, bone density, and presence of fractures. Exactly 1,093 male participants were eligible for analysis. Lower Perc15 and higher E/I-ratioMLD were significantly associated with lower bone density (b=-1.27, P=0.02 and b=-0.37, P=0.02, respectively). Pi10 and tracheal index were not associated with bone density changes. CT-derived biomarkers were not associated with fracture prevalence. Bone density is lower with increasing extent of emphysema and small airway disease but is not associated with large airway disease and tracheal deformity. This may indicate the necessity to measure bone density early in smokers with emphysema and air trapping to prevent vertebral fractures. PMID:27354779

  6. Long-term disease-free survival after surgical resection for multiple bone metastases from rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seok Jin; Kim, Jong Hun; Lee, Min Ro; Lee, Chang Ho; Kuh, Ja Hong; Kim, Jung Ryul

    2011-01-01

    Bone metastasis of primary colorectal cancer is uncommon. When it occurs, it is usually a late manifestation of disease and is indicative of poor prognosis. We describe a patient with multiple metachronous bone metastases from lower rectal cancer who was successfully treated with multimodal treatment including surgical resections and has shown 32 mo disease-free survival. Surgical resection of metastatic bone lesion(s) from colorectal cancer may be a good treatment option in selected patients. PMID:21876853

  7. Altered lacunar and vascular porosity in osteogenesis imperfecta mouse bone as revealed by synchrotron tomography contributes to bone fragility.

    PubMed

    Carriero, A; Doube, M; Vogt, M; Busse, B; Zustin, J; Levchuk, A; Schneider, P; Müller, R; Shefelbine, S J

    2014-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bone disease) is caused by mutations in the collagen genes and results in skeletal fragility. Changes in bone porosity at the tissue level indicate changes in bone metabolism and alter bone mechanical integrity. We investigated the cortical bone tissue porosity of a mouse model of the disease, oim, in comparison to a wild type (WT-C57BL/6), and examined the influence of canal architecture on bone mechanical performance. High-resolution 3D representations of the posterior tibial and the lateral humeral mid-diaphysis of the bones were acquired for both mouse groups using synchrotron radiation-based computed tomography at a nominal resolution of 700nm. Volumetric morphometric indices were determined for cortical bone, canal network and osteocyte lacunae. The influence of canal porosity architecture on bone mechanics was investigated using microarchitectural finite element (μFE) models of the cortical bone. Bright-field microscopy of stained sections was used to determine if canals were vascular. Although total cortical porosity was comparable between oim and WT bone, oim bone had more numerous and more branched canals (p<0.001), and more osteocyte lacunae per unit volume compared to WT (p<0.001). Lacunae in oim were more spherical in shape compared to the ellipsoidal WT lacunae (p<0.001). Histology revealed blood vessels in all WT and oim canals. μFE models of cortical bone revealed that small and branched canals, typical of oim bone, increase the risk of bone failure. These results portray a state of compromised bone quality in oim bone at the tissue level, which contributes to its deficient mechanical properties.

  8. Excretion of pyridinium crosslinks correlates with disease activity and appendicular bone loss in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Gough, A K; Peel, N F; Eastell, R; Holder, R L; Lilley, J; Emery, P

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To establish if urinary excretion rates of the collagen crosslinks pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline, which are known to be elevated in established rheumatoid arthritis (RA), are useful markers of bone loss in this disease. METHODS--Eight hour urine collections on all patients and 52 controls were performed, and the rates of pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline excretion were measured. Bone mineral density (BMD), by dual energy x-ray absorption, and full laboratory and clinical assessments were performed. RESULTS--The rates of excretion of pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline were significantly increased in patients compared with controls (p < 0.001). Pyridinoline excretion was associated with increased disease activity (ESR/CRP) but not disability (HAQ score/Functional Grade), and correlated with BMD loss at the femoral neck (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION--The excretion of collagen crosslinks may be useful as markers of bone and cartilage turnover in patients with RA. PMID:8311548

  9. Known VDR polymorphisms are not associated with bone mineral density measures in pediatric Cushing disease.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Maya B; Mastroyannis, Spyridon A; Sinaii, Ninet; Boikos, Sosipatros A; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2012-01-01

    Decreased bone mineral density (BMD) has been documented in adults with Cushing disease (CD), and allelic variants of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene have been associated with osteopenia. Genetic factors play an important role in bone accrual and its response to various diseases; among them, the most studied are the allelic variants of the VDR gene. There is debate as to whether described variants in the VDR gene have an effect on BMD. In the current study, we sought to analyze whether BMD differences in patients with CD were associated with the Taq1 and Apal VDR allelotypes. The data showed lack of association between BMD and these widely studied VDR polymorphisms, suggesting that the effect of endogenous hypercortisolism on bone in the context of CD does not depend on VDR genotypes.

  10. Cardiovascular risk and mineral bone disorder in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Staude, Hagen; Jeske, Susann; Schmitz, Karin; Warncke, Gert; Fischer, Dagmar-Christiane

    2013-01-01

    The term chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder has been coined recently to highlight that the disturbed mineral and bone metabolism is a major contributor to vascular calcification and finally cardiovascular disease. This syndrome is characterized by clinical, biochemical and/or histological findings, i.e. i) biochemical alterations in the homeostasis of calcium, phosphate and their key player parathyroid hormone (PTH), Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), klotho and vitamin-D, ii) the occurrence of vascular and/or soft tissue calcification, and iii) an abnormal bone structure and/or turnover. Apart from the combined and synergistic action of "traditional" and uremia-related risk factors, promoters and inhibitors of calcification have to be considered as well. This review will focus on the disturbed mineral metabolism as the triggering force behind distortion of vascular integrity and cardiovascular malfunction in CKD patients.

  11. Cytopenia and Bone Marrow Dysplasia in a Case of Wilson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Rau, Aarathi R; Usha, M; Mallya, Pooja; Rau, A T K

    2014-09-01

    We describe a sixteen year old with Wilson's disease on copper chelation and subsequent high dose oral zinc who developed severe anemia and neutropenia. Bone marrow aspirate done to evaluate the cause of bicytopenia revealed trilineage dysplasia. Correlating the clinical context with bone marrow and biochemical parameters, copper deficiency was suspected and he was given a trial of therapy, following which the hematological parameters improved. This case highlights hypocupremia as a reversible cause of bone marrow dysplasia in patients with Wilson's disease on chelation, where serum copper levels are not useful in the diagnosis. We also believe that monitoring of the blood counts in patients on copper chelation may provide a clue to impending copper deficiency.

  12. A small molecule, odanacatib, inhibits inflammation and bone loss caused by endodontic disease.

    PubMed

    Hao, Liang; Chen, Wei; McConnell, Matthew; Zhu, Zheng; Li, Sheng; Reddy, Michael; Eleazer, Paul D; Wang, Min; Li, Yi-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Periapical disease, an inflammatory disease mainly caused by dental caries, is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases of humans, affecting both children and adults. The infection travels through the root, leading to inflammation, bone destruction, and severe pain for the patient. Therefore, the development of a new class of anti-periapical disease therapies is necessary and critical for treatment and prevention. A small molecule, odanacatib (ODN), which is a cathepsin K (Ctsk) inhibitor, was investigated to determine its ability to treat this disease in a mouse model of periapical disease. While Ctsk was originally found in osteoclasts as an osteoclast-specific lysosomal protease, we were surprised to find that ODN can suppress the bacterium-induced immune response as well as bone destruction in the lesion area. X rays and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) showed that ODN treatment had significant bone protection effects at different time points. Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent staining show that ODN treatment dramatically decreased F4/80+ macrophages and CD3+ T cells in the lesion areas 42 days after infection. Consistent with these findings, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis showed low levels of proinflammatory mRNAs (for tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6, and interleukin 23α) and corresponding cytokine expression in the ODN-treated disease group. The levels of mRNA for Toll-like receptors 4, 5, and 9 also largely decreased in the ODN-treated disease group. Our results demonstrated that ODN can inhibit endodontic disease development, bone erosion, and immune response. These results indicate that application of this small molecule offers a new opportunity to design effective therapies that could prevent periapical inflammation and revolutionize current treatment options.

  13. Computational brittle fracture using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Schwalbe, L.A.

    1996-10-01

    We are developing statistically based, brittle-fracture models and are implementing them into hydrocodes that can be used for designing systems with components of ceramics, glass, and/or other brittle materials. Because of the advantages it has simulating fracture, we are working primarily with the smooth particle hydrodynamics code SPBM. We describe a new brittle fracture model that we have implemented into SPBM. To illustrate the code`s current capability, we have simulated a number of experiments. We discuss three of these simulations in this paper. The first experiment consists of a brittle steel sphere impacting a plate. The experimental sphere fragment patterns are compared to the calculations. The second experiment is a steel flyer plate in which the recovered steel target crack patterns are compared to the calculated crack patterns. We also briefly describe a simulation of a tungsten rod impacting a heavily confined alumina target, which has been recently reported on in detail.

  14. Disease activity and severity in early inflammatory arthritis predict hand cortical bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Pye, Stephen R.; Adams, Judith E.; Ward, Kate A.; Bunn, Diane K.; Symmons, Deborah P. M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. To determine the influence of disease-related variables on hand cortical bone loss in women with early inflammatory arthritis (IA), and whether hand cortical bone mass predicts subsequent joint damage. Method. Adults aged ≥16 years with recent onset of IA were recruited to the Norfolk Arthritis Register between 1990 and 1998, and followed prospectively. At baseline, patients had their joints examined for swelling and tenderness and had CRP and disease activity 28-joint assessment score (DAS-28) measured. Radiographs of the hands were performed in a subgroup of patients at Year 1 and at follow-up, which were assessed using digital X-ray radiogrammetry (DXR). They were also evaluated for the presence of erosions using Larsen’s method. Linear mixed models were used to investigate whether disease-related factors predicted change in DXR–areal bone mineral density (BMDa). We also evaluated whether DXR–BMDa predicted the subsequent occurrence of erosive disease. Results. Two hundred and four women, mean (s.d.) age 55.1 (14.0) years, were included. Median follow-up between radiographs was 4 years. The mean within-subject change in BMDa was 0.024 g/cm2 equivalent to 1% decline per year. After adjustment for age, height and weight, compared with those within the lower tertile for CRP, those in the upper tertile had greater subsequent loss of bone. This was true also for DAS-28 and Larsen score. Among those without erosions on the initial radiograph (121), DXR–BMDa at baseline did not predict the new occurrence of erosions. Conclusion. Increased disease activity and severity are associated with accelerated bone loss. However, lower BMDa did not predict the new occurrence of erosive disease. PMID:20573690

  15. The role of physical therapy in patients with metastatic disease to bone.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, M E; Shea, B D

    1993-01-01

    The American Cancer Society estimates that in 1991 over seven million Americans were alive despite a diagnosis of cancer.1 As the medical community becomes more successful in prolonging the lives of cancer patients, a significant number will experience the resultant disability of cancer and its treatment. Those with advanced disease may find the quality of their lives to be profoundly compromised. The role of rehabilitation with the latter population is to maximize the patients' functional capabilities and to conserve their limited energy reserves. Clearly, quality of life is an overriding issue fix this population.The development of bony metastases is devastating for the cancer patient and presents a considerable challenge for the physical therapist. Approximately 50% of patients with breast, lung, or prostate cancer will develop bony metastases. Less common, though equally problematic, are bone metastases in patients with carcinoma of the kidney, pancreas, bladder, thyroid, and cervix.Patients with advanced disease present a complex clinical picture. It is imperative that the physical therapist consult and confer regularly with the oncologist, physiatrist, and/or orthopedist to remain abreast of the patient's changing clinical picture. Information vital to safe and effective rehabilitation includes the presence, location, and extent of bony metastases, involvement of bone marrow potentiating refractory pancytopenia, infection, and hypercalcemia secondary to prolonged immobility.In patients with metastatic disease to bone, it is not sufficient to rely solely on plain X-ray findings. Plain radiographs will not detect bone lesions unless a sufficient amount of matrix is destroyed (30-50% of bone matrix must be involved to be visualized). Bone scan results should be assessed prior to establishing a rehabilitation program for most cancer patients. Patients with advanced disease frequently present with pain, neurologic deficits, impending or pathologic fractures, and

  16. Treatment of Paget's Disease of Bone with Denosumab: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Reid, Ian R; Sharma, Sonakshi; Kalluru, Ramanamma; Eagleton, Carl

    2016-09-01

    Paget's disease is a condition involving focal overactivity of bone cells (osteoblasts and osteoclasts), which can result in significant skeletal morbidity. It is unclear in which bone cells the causative lesion resides. It is managed effectively with potent bisphosphonates, but treatment is difficult if these drugs are contraindicated. We describe a 75-year-old woman with Paget's disease involving the skull who was intolerant of bisphosphonates, so was treated with denosumab. This intervention normalized serum alkaline phosphatase for 4-8 months after each injection and led to some symptomatic improvement. Scintigraphic activity in the lesion was improved but not normalized. We conclude that reduction in RANKL activity by denosumab only partially corrects pagetic activity, indicating that the osteoclast overactivity of Paget's disease is not wholly mediated by RANKL. Denosumab has some clinical utility in Paget's disease and may become a second-line agent in those with contraindications to intravenous bisphosphonates. PMID:27193832

  17. B-vitamins and bone in health and disease: the current evidence.

    PubMed

    Clarke, M; Ward, M; Strain, J J; Hoey, L; Dickey, W; McNulty, H

    2014-05-01

    Osteoporosis, a metabolic skeletal disease characterised by decreased bone mass and increased fracture risk, is a growing public health problem. Among the various risk factors for osteoporosis, calcium and vitamin D have well-established protective roles, but it is likely that other nutritional factors are also implicated. This review will explore the emerging evidence supporting a role for certain B-vitamins, homocysteine and the 677 C → T polymorphism in the gene encoding the folate-metabolising enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, in bone health and disease. The evidence, however, is not entirely consistent and as yet no clear mechanism has been defined to explain the potential link between B-vitamins and bone health. Coeliac disease, a common condition of malabsorption, induced by gluten ingestion in genetically susceptible individuals, is associated with an increased risk both of osteoporosis and inadequate B-vitamin status. Given the growing body of evidence linking low bone mineral density and/or increased fracture risk with low B-vitamin status and elevated homocysteine, optimal B-vitamin status may play an important protective role against osteoporosis in coeliac disease; to date, no trial has addressed this possible link.

  18. Brittleness Effect on Rock Fatigue Damage Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejati, Hamid Reza; Ghazvinian, Abdolhadi

    2014-09-01

    The damage evolution mechanism of rocks is one of the most important aspects in studying of rock fatigue behavior. Fatigue damage evolution of three rock types (onyx marble, sandstone and soft limestone) with different brittleness were considered in the present study. Intensive experimental tests were conducted on the chosen rock samples and acoustic emission (AE) sensors were used in some of them to monitor the fracturing process. Experimental tests indicated that brittleness strongly influences damage evolution of rocks in the course of static and dynamic loading. AE monitoring revealed that micro-crack density induced by the applied loads during different stages of the failure processes increases as rock brittleness increases. Also, results of fatigue tests on the three rock types indicated that the rock with the most induced micro-cracks during loading cycles has the least fatigue life. Furthermore, the condition of failure surfaces of the studied rocks samples, subjected to dynamic and static loading, were evaluated and it was concluded that the roughness of failure surfaces is influenced by loading types and rock brittleness. Dynamic failure surfaces were rougher than static ones and low brittle rock demonstrate a smoother failure surface compared to high brittle rock.

  19. D-dimer assay in Egyptian patients with Gaucher disease: correlation with bone and lung involvement.

    PubMed

    Sherif, Eman M; Tantawy, Azza A G; Adly, Amira A M; Kader, Hossam A; Ismail, Eman A R

    2011-04-01

    Gaucher disease is the most frequent lysosomal storage disorder. Bone and lung involvement are two major causes of morbidity in this disease. D-dimer is a reliable indicator of active microvascular thrombosis, even in patients without overt hypercoagulation. This study aimed to assess D-dimer levels in Gaucher disease, correlating this marker to clinical characteristics and radiological parameters to investigate its role as a potential predictor for the occurrence and severity of skeletal and pulmonary manifestations. The study population consisted of 56 Egyptian patients with Gaucher disease, 36 had type 1 Gaucher disease (64.3%) and 20 had type 3 Gaucher disease (35.7%). Thirty healthy individuals were enrolled as a control group. D-dimer levels were significantly higher in all patients with Gaucher disease compared with controls (P < 0.001). Patients with type 3 showed significantly higher D-dimer concentrations compared with type 1 (P < 0.001). Pulmonary involvement was present in a significant proportion among type 3 Gaucher patients (P < 0.05), whereas bone changes were present in a higher percentage in type 1 compared with type 3 Gaucher patients. D-dimers were significantly higher in patients with abnormal MRI findings of the long bones and in those with ground glass appearance on high-resolution computerized tomography of the chest compared with patients with normal radiology (P < 0.001). Splenectomized patients displayed significantly higher D-dimer levels compared with nonsplenectomized patients (P < 0.001). Our results suggest that D-dimer is significantly elevated in Gaucher disease, particularly type 3, and may be considered as a potential marker of risk prediction of bone and lung involvement that could be used to monitor treatment response.

  20. Dietary antioxidants and magnesium in type 1 brittle asthma: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Baker, J; Tunnicliffe, W; Duncanson, R; Ayres, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Type 1 brittle asthma is a rare form of asthma. Atopy, psychosocial factors and diet may contribute to this condition. As increased dietary magnesium has a beneficial effect on lung function and selenium, vitamins A, C and E have antioxidant properties, a study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that patients with brittle asthma have diets deficient in these nutrients compared with subjects with non-brittle asthma and healthy adults.
METHODS—A case control study of the dietary intakes of 20 subjects with brittle asthma, 20 with non-brittle asthma, and 20 healthy adults was performed using five day weighed dietary records. Intake of magnesium was the primary outcome measure with selenium and vitamins A, C and E as secondary outcomes. Serum levels were measured at the same time as the dietary assessment.
RESULTS—Sixty subjects (27 men) of mean age 49.5 years were recruited and completed the study. Subjects with brittle asthma had statistically lower median dietary intakes of vitamins A and E than the other groups (vitamin A: brittle asthma 522.5 µg/day, non-brittle asthma 869.5 µg/day, healthy adults 806.5 µg/day; vitamin E: brittle asthma 4.3 mg/day, non-brittle asthma 4.6 mg/day, healthy adults 4.5 mg/day). Median dietary intakes for the other nutrients were not significantly different between groups. Serum levels were within normal ranges for each nutrient in all subjects. Intakes less than the reference nutrient intake (RNI) for magnesium and vitamins A and C, and less than the safe intake (SI) for vitamin E were more likely in patients with brittle asthma than in those with non-brittle asthma.
CONCLUSION—Nutrient deficiency and reduced antioxidant activity may contribute to disease activity in type 1 brittle asthma, although a prospective study of replacement therapy will be needed to confirm this hypothesis.

 PMID:10325914

  1. Bone Disorders in Chronic Kidney Disease: An Update in Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Babayev, Revekka; Nickolas, Thomas L

    2015-01-01

    Renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is a bone disorder that occurs in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and is associated with 2- to 14-fold increased fracture risk compared to the general population. Risk of fractures is also increased in kidney transplant recipients especially within the first 5 years after transplantation. Fractures in CKD patients are associated with increased morbidity and mortality; thus, proper screening and management of CKD bone complications is critical to improving clinical outcomes. Tetracycline double-labeled transiliac crest bone biopsy with histomorphometry is the gold standard for the diagnosis and classification of ROD. However, bone biopsy is not practical to obtain in all patients. Thus, there is great interest in noninvasive approaches that can be used in the clinic to assess ROD. Here, we discuss the role of surrogate measures of bone health in CKD patients, such as dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and novel high-resolution imaging, in conjunction with biochemical biomarkers of bone turnover. Recommended guidelines for diagnosis and management of CKD-MBD are discussed.

  2. Bone Disorders in Chronic Kidney Disease: An Update in Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Babayev, Revekka; Nickolas, Thomas L

    2015-01-01

    Renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is a bone disorder that occurs in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and is associated with 2- to 14-fold increased fracture risk compared to the general population. Risk of fractures is also increased in kidney transplant recipients especially within the first 5 years after transplantation. Fractures in CKD patients are associated with increased morbidity and mortality; thus, proper screening and management of CKD bone complications is critical to improving clinical outcomes. Tetracycline double-labeled transiliac crest bone biopsy with histomorphometry is the gold standard for the diagnosis and classification of ROD. However, bone biopsy is not practical to obtain in all patients. Thus, there is great interest in noninvasive approaches that can be used in the clinic to assess ROD. Here, we discuss the role of surrogate measures of bone health in CKD patients, such as dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and novel high-resolution imaging, in conjunction with biochemical biomarkers of bone turnover. Recommended guidelines for diagnosis and management of CKD-MBD are discussed. PMID:26332760

  3. Fracturing and brittleness index analyses of shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhoorn, Auke; Primarini, Mutia; Houben, Maartje

    2016-04-01

    The formation of a fracture network in rocks has a crucial control on the flow behaviour of fluids. In addition, an existing network of fractures , influences the propagation of new fractures during e.g. hydraulic fracturing or during a seismic event. Understanding of the type and characteristics of the fracture network that will be formed during e.g. hydraulic fracturing is thus crucial to better predict the outcome of a hydraulic fracturing job. For this, knowledge of the rock properties is crucial. The brittleness index is often used as a rock property that can be used to predict the fracturing behaviour of a rock for e.g. hydraulic fracturing of shales. Various terminologies of the brittleness index (BI1, BI2 and BI3) exist based on mineralogy, elastic constants and stress-strain behaviour (Jin et al., 2014, Jarvie et al., 2007 and Holt et al., 2011). A maximum brittleness index of 1 predicts very good and efficient fracturing behaviour while a minimum brittleness index of 0 predicts a much more ductile shale behaviour. Here, we have performed systematic petrophysical, acoustic and geomechanical analyses on a set of shale samples from Whitby (UK) and we have determined the three different brittleness indices on each sample by performing all the analyses on each of the samples. We show that each of the three brittleness indices are very different for the same sample and as such it can be concluded that the brittleness index is not a good predictor of the fracturing behaviour of shales. The brittleness index based on the acoustic data (BI1) all lie around values of 0.5, while the brittleness index based on the stress strain data (BI2) give an average brittleness index around 0.75, whereas the mineralogy brittleness index (BI3) predict values below 0.2. This shows that by using different estimates of the brittleness index different decisions can be made for hydraulic fracturing. If we would rely on the mineralogy (BI3), the Whitby mudstone is not a suitable

  4. International Myeloma Working Group Recommendations for the Treatment of Multiple Myeloma–Related Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Terpos, Evangelos; Morgan, Gareth; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Drake, Matthew T.; Lentzsch, Suzanne; Raje, Noopur; Sezer, Orhan; García-Sanz, Ramón; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Turesson, Ingemar; Reiman, Tony; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Merlini, Giampaolo; Spencer, Andrew; Leleu, Xavier; Cavo, Michele; Munshi, Nikhil; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Durie, Brian G.M.; Roodman, G. David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the International Myeloma Working Group was to develop practice recommendations for the management of multiple myeloma (MM) –related bone disease. Methodology An interdisciplinary panel of clinical experts on MM and myeloma bone disease developed recommendations based on published data through August 2012. Expert consensus was used to propose additional recommendations in situations where there were insufficient published data. Levels of evidence and grades of recommendations were assigned and approved by panel members. Recommendations Bisphosphonates (BPs) should be considered in all patients with MM receiving first-line antimyeloma therapy, regardless of presence of osteolytic bone lesions on conventional radiography. However, it is unknown if BPs offer any advantage in patients with no bone disease assessed by magnetic resonance imaging or positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Intravenous (IV) zoledronic acid (ZOL) or pamidronate (PAM) is recommended for preventing skeletal-related events in patients with MM. ZOL is preferred over oral clodronate in newly diagnosed patients with MM because of its potential antimyeloma effects and survival benefits. BPs should be administered every 3 to 4 weeks IV during initial therapy. ZOL or PAM should be continued in patients with active disease and should be resumed after disease relapse, if discontinued in patients achieving complete or very good partial response. BPs are well tolerated, but preventive strategies must be instituted to avoid renal toxicity or osteonecrosis of the jaw. Kyphoplasty should be considered for symptomatic vertebral compression fractures. Low-dose radiation therapy can be used for palliation of uncontrolled pain, impending pathologic fracture, or spinal cord compression. Orthopedic consultation should be sought for long-bone fractures, spinal cord compression, and vertebral column instability. PMID:23690408

  5. Effect of Crohn's disease on bone metabolism in vitro: a role for interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Francisco A; Wyzga, Nancy; Hyams, Jeffrey S; Gronowicz, Gloria A

    2002-04-01

    Circulating proinflammatory cytokines may be involved in osteopenia associated with Crohn's disease (CD). Therefore, the effect of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1beta, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) a contained in Crohn's serum on bone formation was examined in a bone organ culture system. Initially, serum levels of IL-6, IL-1beta, and TNF-a were determined by ELISA in newly diagnosed, untreated children with CD and healthy age-matched controls. Serum IL-6 levels were significantly higher in patients with CD than in controls (23.9 +/- 2.8 pg/ml vs. 0.7 pg/ml +/- 0.2; p < 0.001), whereas IL-1beta and TNF-alpha serum levels were not. In the organ culture studies, 20-day-old fetal rat parietal bones were incubated for 96 h with CD or control serum, serum preincubated with a neutralizing antibody to each cytokine or a nonimmune immunoglobulin control, and with IL-6. Bone formation measured by assaying calcium content and dry weight was significantly decreased in bones exposed to Crohn's serum. Light microscopy of the bones treated with CD serum revealed a discontinuous, uneven mineralized bone matrix and disorganized osteoblasts with altered morphology. Incubation with an antibody that neutralized IL-6 activity prevented the change in osteoblast and bone morphology. TNF-a and IL-1beta antibodies had no apparent effects. Collagen synthesis and DNA content were not affected by CD serum. Also, addition of IL-6 to the culture medium decreased mineralization. These results suggest that IL-6 is a mediator of the effects of Crohn's serum on in vitro mineralization and may be a contributing factor to the osteopenia associated with CD.

  6. Improvements in Bone Density and Structure during Anti-TNF-α Therapy in Pediatric Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thayu, Meena; Baldassano, Robert N.; DeBoer, Mark D.; Zemel, Babette S.; Denburg, Michelle R.; Denson, Lee A.; Shults, Justine; Herskovitz, Rita; Long, Jin; Leonard, Mary B.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Pediatric Crohn's Disease (CD) is associated with deficits in trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) and cortical structure, potentially related to TNF-α effects to decrease bone formation and promote bone resorption. Objective: This study aimed to examine changes in bone density and structure in children and adolescents with CD following initiation of anti-TNF-α therapy. Design and Participants: Participants (n = 74; age 5–21 years) with CD completed a 12-month prospective cohort study. Main Outcome Measures: Tibia peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans were obtained at initiation of anti-TNF-α therapy and 12 months later. Musculoskeletal outcomes were expressed as sex-and race-specific z scores relative to age, based on >650 reference participants. Results: At baseline, CD participants had lower height, trabecular BMD, cortical area (due to smaller periosteal and larger endocortical circumferences), and muscle area z scores, compared with reference participants (all P < .01). Pediatric CD activity index decreased during the 10-week induction (P < .001), in association with subsequent gains in height, trabecular BMD, cortical area (due to recovery of endocortical bone), and muscle area z scores over 12 months (height P < .05; others P < .001). Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase levels, a biomarker of bone formation, increased a median of 75% (P < .001) during induction with associated 12-month improvements in trabecular BMD and cortical area z scores (both P < .001). Younger age was associated with greater increases in trabecular BMD z scores (P < .001) and greater linear growth with greater recovery of cortical area (P < .001). Conclusions: Anti-TNF-α therapy was associated with improvements in trabecular BMD and cortical structure. Improvements were greater in younger and growing participants, suggesting a window of opportunity for treatment of bone deficits. PMID:25919459

  7. Added Value of SPECT/CT in the Evaluation of Benign Bone Diseases of the Appendicular Skeleton.

    PubMed

    Abikhzer, Gad; Srour, Saher; Keidar, Zohar; Bar-Shalom, Rachel; Kagna, Olga; Israel, Ora; Militianu, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    Bone scintigraphy is a sensitive technique to detect altered bone mineralization but has limited specificity. The use of SPECT/CT has improved significantly the diagnostic accuracy of bone scintigraphy, in patients with cancer as well as in evaluation of benign bone disease. It provides precise localization and characterization of tracer-avid foci, shortens the diagnostic workup, and decreases patient anxiety. Through both the SPECT and the CT components, SPECT/CT has an incremental value in characterizing benign bone lesions, specifically in the appendicular skeleton, as illustrated by present case series.

  8. Assessment of metabolic bone diseases by quantitative computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, M.L.; Genant, H.K.; Cann, C.E.; Ettinger, B.; Gordan, G.S.; Kolb, F.O.; Reiser, U.J.

    1985-05-01

    Advances in the radiologic sciences have permitted the development of numerous noninvasive techniques for measuring the mineral content of bone, with varying degrees of precision, accuracy, and sensitivity. The techniques of standard radiography, radiogrammetry, photodensitometry, Compton scattering, neutron activation analysis, single and dual photon absorptiometry, and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) are described and reviewed in depth. Results from previous cross-sectional and longitudinal QCT investigations are given. They then describe a current investigation in which they studied 269 subjects, including 173 normal women, 34 patients with hyperparathyroidism, 24 patients with steroid- induced osteoporosis, and 38 men with idiopathic osteoporosis. Spinal quantitative computed tomography, radiogrammetry, and single photon absorptiometry were performed, and a spinal fracture index was calculated on all patients. The authors found a disproportionate loss of spinal trabecular mineral compared to appendicular mineral in the men with idiopathic osteoporosis and the patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis. They observed roughly equivalent mineral loss in both the appendicular and axial regions in the hyperparathyroid patients. The appendicular cortical measurements correlated moderately well with each other but less well with spinal trabecular QCT. The spinal fracture index correlated well with QCT and less well with the appendicular measurements.

  9. Chemical and biomechanical characterization of hyperhomocysteinemic bone disease in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Massé, Priscilla G; Boskey, Adele L; Ziv, Israel; Hauschka, Peter; Donovan, Sharon M; Howell, David S; Cole, David EC

    2003-01-01

    Background Classical homocystinuria is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency and characterized by distinctive alterations of bone growth and skeletal development. Skeletal changes include a reduction in bone density, making it a potentially attractive model for the study of idiopathic osteoporosis. Methods To investigate this aspect of hyperhomocysteinemia, we supplemented developing chicks (n = 8) with 0.6% dl-homocysteine (hCySH) for the first 8 weeks of life in comparison to controls (n = 10), and studied biochemical, biomechanical and morphologic effects of this nutritional intervention. Results hCySH-fed animals grew faster and had longer tibiae at the end of the study. Plasma levels of hCySH, methionine, cystathionine, and inorganic sulfate were higher, but calcium, phosphate, and other indices of osteoblast metabolism were not different. Radiographs of the lower limbs showed generalized osteopenia and accelerated epiphyseal ossification with distinct metaphyseal and suprametaphyseal lucencies similar to those found in human homocystinurics. Although biomechanical testing of the tibiae, including maximal load to failure and bone stiffness, indicated stronger bone, strength was proportional to the increased length and cortical thickness in the hCySH-supplemented group. Bone ash weights and IR-spectroscopy of cortical bone showed no difference in mineral content, but there were higher Ca2+/PO43- and lower Ca2+/CO32- molar ratios than in controls. Mineral crystallization was unchanged. Conclusion In this chick model, hyperhomocysteinemia causes greater radial and longitudinal bone growth, despite normal indices of bone formation. Although there is also evidence for an abnormal matrix and altered bone composition, our finding of normal biomechanical bone strength, once corrected for altered morphometry, suggests that any increase in the risk of long bone fracture in human hyperhomocysteinemic disease is small. We

  10. Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation (AA&MDSIF): bone marrow failure disease scientific symposium 2012.

    PubMed

    Savage, Sharon A; Pulsipher, Michael A; Romano, Alessandra; Berlyne, Deborah

    2013-07-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) are rare disorders of bone marrow failure. Once considered distinct entities, these three diseases are now believed to have overlapping pathophysiologies. The Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation, a nonprofit organization that supports patients and families living with bone marrow failure disorders, sponsored a scientific symposium in Bethesda, MD, in March 2012. This report summarizes the symposium presentations by 30 of the world's leading AA, MDS, and PNH researchers on recent findings, current areas of controversy, and recommendations for basic and clinical research to advance the field.

  11. Early chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder stimulates vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yifu; Ginsberg, Charles; Sugatani, Toshifumi; Monier-Faugere, Marie-Claude; Malluche, Hartmut; Hruska, Keith A

    2014-01-01

    The chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) syndrome is an extremely important complication of kidney diseases. Here we tested whether CKD-MBD causes vascular calcification in early kidney failure by developing a mouse model of early CKD in a background of atherosclerosis-stimulated arterial calcification. CKD equivalent in glomerular filtration reduction to human CKD stage 2 stimulated early vascular calcification and inhibited the tissue expression of α-klotho (klotho) in the aorta. In addition, osteoblast transition in the aorta was stimulated by early CKD as shown by the expression of the critical transcription factor Runx2. The ligand associated with the klotho-fibroblast growth factor receptor complex, FGF23, was found to be expressed in the vascular media of sham-operated mice. Its expression was decreased in early CKD. Increased circulating levels of the osteocyte-secreted proteins, FGF23, and sclerostin may have been related to increased circulating klotho levels. Finally, we observed low-turnover bone disease with a reduction in bone formation rates more than bone resorption. Thus, the CKD-MBD, characterized by cardiovascular risk factors, vascular calcification, increased circulating klotho, FGF23 and sclerostin levels, and low-turnover renal osteodystrophy, was established in early CKD. Early CKD caused a reduction of vascular klotho, stimulated vascular osteoblastic transition, increased osteocytic secreted proteins, and inhibited skeletal modeling producing the CKD-MBD. PMID:23884339

  12. The consequences of chronic kidney disease on bone metabolism and growth in children

    PubMed Central

    Bacchetta, Justine; Harambat, Jérôme; Cochat, Pierre; Salusky, Isidro B.; Wesseling-Perry, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Growth retardation, decreased final height and renal osteodystrophy (ROD) are common complications of childhood chronic kidney disease (CKD), resulting from a combination of abnormalities in the growth hormone (GH) axis, vitamin D deficiency, hyperparathyroidism, hypogonadism, inadequate nutrition, cachexia and drug toxicity. The impact of CKD-associated bone and mineral disorders (CKD–MBD) may be immediate (serum phosphate/calcium disequilibrium) or delayed (poor growth, ROD, fractures, vascular calcifications, increased morbidity and mortality). In 2012, the clinical management of CKD–MBD in children needs to focus on three main objectives: (i) to provide an optimal growth in order to maximize the final height with an early management with recombinant GH therapy when required, (ii) to equilibrate calcium/phosphate metabolism so as to obtain acceptable bone quality and cardiovascular status and (iii) to correct all metabolic and clinical abnormalities that can worsen bone disease, growth and cardiovascular disease, i.e. metabolic acidosis, anaemia, malnutrition and 25(OH)vitamin D deficiency. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the mineral, bone and vascular abnormalities associated with CKD in children in terms of pathophysiology, diagnosis and clinical management. PMID:22851629

  13. Efficacy of bisphosphonates and other bone-targeted agents in metastatic bone disease from solid tumors other than breast and prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Karim, Syed Mustafa; Brown, Janet; Zekri, Jamal

    2013-05-01

    Metastatic bone disease complicates the course of malignancy in a substantial proportion of patients with advanced cancer. Bisphosphonates are now widely used to improve skeleton-related outcomes of patients with metastatic cancer to the bone. Most studies evaluating the efficacy of bisphosphonates and other bone-targeted agents have been performed in patients with metastatic breast and prostate cancer. Only a few studies have evaluated the role of bisphosphonates in other tumor types involving the skeletal system. We present a review of the clinical literature focusing on the current and potential roles of bisphosphonates (particularly zoledronic acid) and newer bone-targeted therapies in patients with metastasis to bone arising from solid tumors other than breast and prostate cancer.

  14. Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation (AA&MDSIF): Bone Marrow Failure Disease Scientific Symposium 2014.

    PubMed

    Visconte, Valeria; Lindsley, R Coleman; Berlyne, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFS) are characterized by a failure of the hematopoietic stem cells to produce adequate blood cells, resulting in either cytopenia (defect in one or more blood cell lineages) or pancytopenia (defect in all blood cell lineages). BMFS can be inherited or acquired. The pathogenesis of these diseases is very heterogeneous. Research efforts have been made all over the world to improve the basic knowledge of these diseases. The Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation (AA&MDSIF) is an independent nonprofit organization whose mission is to help patients and family members cope with BMFS. Here, we summarize novel scientific discoveries in several BMFS that were presented at the 4th International Bone Marrow Failure Disease Scientific Symposium 2014 that AA&MDSIF sponsored on March 27-28, 2014, in Rockville, MD.

  15. Laser technologies in treatment of degenerative-dystrophic bone diseases in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abushkin, Ivan A.; Privalov, Valery A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Noskov, Nikolay V.; Neizvestnykh, Elena A.; Kotlyarov, Alexander N.; Shekunova, Yulia G.

    2014-03-01

    Two low invasive laser technologies for treatment of degenerative-dystrophic bone diseases in children are presented. The first is the transcutaneous laser osteoperforation developed by us and initially applied for treatment of different inflammatory and traumatic diseases (osteomyelitides, osteal and osteoarticular panaritiums, delayed unions, false joints, and others). Now the technology was applied to treatment of aseptic osteonecrosis of different localizations in 134 children aged from 1 to 16 years, including 56 cases with necrosis of femoral head (Legg-Calve-Perthes disease), 42 with necrosis of 2nd metatarsal bone head (Kohler II disease), and 36 with necrosis of tibial tuberosity (Osgood-Schlatter disease). The second technology is the laser intracystic thermotherapy for treatment of bone cysts. The method was applied to 108 children aged from 3 to 16 years with aneurismal and solitary cysts of different localizations. In both technologies a 970 nm diode laser was used. The suggested technologies increase the efficiency of treatment, reduce its duration, can be performed on outpatient basis, which resulted in great economical effect.

  16. [Pain control of bone and joint diseases in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Soen, Satoshi

    2014-10-01

    The decline of multiple physiological processes, even in the absence of disease, combined should logically influence treatment options. Decreased gastric secretions, intestinal motility, and vitamin D receptors lead to loss of appetite, malnutrition. Increased arterial thickening and rigidity elevate cardiac risk, while decreased elasticity in the lungs potentially exacerbates breathing disorders. Memory impairment and cognitive decline progress as neurons become less resilient to stress over time. Reduced hepatic and renal blood flow limit metabolism and filtration, increasing the risk for accumulation of toxic substances. Physiologic changes, drug-drug interactions resulting from polypharmacy, and drug-disease interactions combine to make elderly patients more sensitive to the AEs of medications. Effective pain management in the elderly is challenging. The purpose of this review is to highlight the use of several treatment options for elderly patients. PMID:25509813

  17. Patients with sclerosteosis and disease carriers: human models of the effect of sclerostin on bone turnover.

    PubMed

    van Lierop, Antoon H; Hamdy, Neveen At; Hamersma, Herman; van Bezooijen, Rutger L; Power, Jon; Loveridge, Nigel; Papapoulos, Socrates E

    2011-12-01

    Sclerosteosis is a rare bone sclerosing dysplasia, caused by loss-of-function mutations in the SOST gene, encoding sclerostin, a negative regulator of bone formation. The purpose of this study was to determine how the lack of sclerostin affects bone turnover in patients with sclerosteosis and to assess whether sclerostin synthesis is decreased in carriers of the SOST mutation and, if so, to what extent this would affect their phenotype and bone formation. We measured sclerostin, procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptide (P1NP), and cross-linked C-telopeptide (CTX) in serum of 19 patients with sclerosteosis, 26 heterozygous carriers of the C69T SOST mutation, and 77 healthy controls. Chips of compact bone discarded during routine surgery were also examined from 6 patients and 4 controls. Sclerostin was undetectable in serum of patients but was measurable in all carriers (mean 15.5 pg/mL; 95% confidence interval [CI] 13.7 to 17.2 pg/mL), in whom it was significantly lower than in healthy controls (mean 40.0 pg/mL; 95% CI 36.9 to 42.7 pg/mL; p < 0.001). P1NP levels were highest in patients (mean 153.7 ng/mL; 95% CI 100.5 to 206.9 ng/mL; p = 0.01 versus carriers, p = 0.002 versus controls), but carriers also had significantly higher P1NP levels (mean 58.3 ng/mL; 95% CI 47.0 to 69.6 ng/mL) than controls (mean 37.8 ng/mL; 95% CI 34.9 to 42.0 ng/mL; p = 0.006). In patients and carriers, P1NP levels declined with age, reaching a plateau after the age of 20 years. Serum sclerostin and P1NP were negatively correlated in carriers and age- and gender-matched controls (r = 0.40, p = 0.008). Mean CTX levels were well within the normal range and did not differ between patients and disease carriers after adjusting for age (p = 0.22). Our results provide in vivo evidence of increased bone formation caused by the absence or decreased synthesis of sclerostin in humans. They also suggest that inhibition of sclerostin can be titrated because the decreased sclerostin levels in

  18. Alveolar bone loss associated to periodontal disease in lead intoxicated rats under environmental hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Terrizzi, Antonela R; Fernandez-Solari, Javier; Lee, Ching M; Bozzini, Clarisa; Mandalunis, Patricia M; Elverdin, Juan C; Conti, María Ines; Martínez, María Pilar

    2013-10-01

    Previously reported studies from this laboratory revealed that rats chronically intoxicated with lead (Pb) under hypoxic conditions (HX) impaired growth parameters and induced damages on femoral and mandibular bones predisposing to fractures. We also described periodontal inflammatory processes under such experimental conditions. Periodontitis is characterised by inflammation of supporting tissues of the teeth that result in alveolar bone loss. The existence of populations living at high altitudes and exposed to lead contamination aimed us to establish the macroscopic, biochemical and histological parameters consistent with a periodontal disease in the same rat model with or without experimental periodontitis (EP). Sixty female rats were divided into: Control; Pb (1000ppm of lead acetate in drinking water); HX (506mbar) and PbHX (both treatments simultaneously). EP was induced by placing ligatures around the molars of half of the rats during the 14 days previous to the autopsy. Hemi-mandibles were extracted to evaluate bone loss by histomorphometrical techniques. TNFα plasmatic concentration was greater (p<0.01) in Pb and HX animals. TBA-RS content was significantly higher in gums of rats with or without EP only by means of Pb. The SMG PGE2 content increased by Pb or HX was higher in PbHX rats (p<0.01). Pb and HX increased EP induced alveolar bone loss, while Pb showed spontaneous bone loss also. In conclusion, these results show that lead intoxication under hypoxic environment enhanced not only alveolar bone loss but also systemic and oral tissues inflammatory parameters, which could aggravate the physiopathological alterations produced by periodontal disease.

  19. Bone disease in adult patients with β-thalassaemia major: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Marina; Forti, Stella; Orsatti, Alessandra; Ulivieri, Fabio Massimo; Airaghi, Lorena; Zanaboni, Laura; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2014-02-01

    Despite the extraordinary improvements carried out in diagnostic and therapeutic management of thalassaemia major over the past few decades, bone demineralization is still a common finding, even in optimally treated patients. The relationships between bone density and several clinical characteristics or hematological markers have been described, and many factors contributing to demineralization have been identified; among them endocrine complications seem to play an important role. Nevertheless, the complex etiological mechanisms of this heterogeneous osteopathy still remains incompletely clarified. While previous studies focused on the characteristics of thalassaemic patients affected from bone demineralization, we conducted a case-control study focused on thalassaemic patients free from bone disease, aimed to detect the distinctive characteristics and any possible protective feature. Among a large cohort of 150 adult patients with β-thalassaemia major, we enrolled 20 patients with normal bone mineralization and 20 patients with osteoporosis matched for gender, BMI, age at first transfusion, serum ferritin and pre-transfusional hemoglobin (Hb) levels. The differences in demographic, clinical and endocrinological profiles were investigated, correcting for physical and hematological features known as confounding variables. The comparison of the two groups for biochemical parameters and endocrine function showed a protective role of normal gonadic function and IGF-1 levels against osteoporosis, and a similar influence of hypoparathyroidism. Treatment-corrected hypothyroidism and diabetes seemed not to affect bone mineralization. In conclusion, from a different perspective our results corroborate the role of endocrinopathies in thalassaemic osteopathy, and once again underline the crucial importance of an early and multi-disciplinary intervention in preventing bone complications in thalassaemic patients. PMID:22179745

  20. [Animal models for bone and joint disease. CIA, CAIA model].

    PubMed

    Hirose, Jun; Tanaka, Sakae

    2011-02-01

    The collagen-induced arthritis (collagen-induced arthritis, CIA) is an autoimmune arthritis that resembles rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in many ways, therefore it has been used most commonly as a model of RA. CIA is induced by immunization with an emulsion of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) and type II collagen (C II ) . Collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) is induced by the administration of a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies recognizing conserved epitopes located within the CB11 fragment. CAIA offers several advantages over CIA, including rapid disease onset, high uptake rate, and the capacity to use genetically modified mice, such as transgenics and knockouts.

  1. [Comparison of bone marrow and blood cell morphology between refractory anemia and other anemia disease].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hong; Jiang, Ming; DU, Wei; Zhong, Di; Hao, Jian-Ping; Li, Ling

    2012-12-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the cell morphological features of bone marrow and peripheral blood in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, mainly with refractory anemia, and to compare them with other anemia diseases including chronic aplastic anemia, hemolytic anemia and megaloblastic anemia. The bone marrow and peripheral blood were taken from patients for preparing the smears with Wright staining. 500 karyocytes in bone marrow and 100 karyocytes in peripheral blood were detected, and the features of morbid cells of erythrocyte, granulocyte and megakaryocytic series were observed. The results showed that differences between refractory anemia, chronic aplastic anemias and hemolytic anemia as well as megaloblastic anemia were statistically significant (P < 0.05) in the granules scarce and absence in the intracytoplasm of segmented neutrocyte in peripheral blood, Pelger dyskaryosis, the numbers and detected rate of immature granulocytes, monocyte detected rate, the granules scarce in all stage of granulocytic series in bone marrow, odd number and prolification of nucleolus in erythrocytic series, little macronucleus and single circle nucleus macronucleus. It is concluded that cell morphology is the foundation of diagnosing the MDS, the abnormality morphology both in peripheral blood and bone marrow play the consequence role in the diagnosis of MDS. PMID:23257446

  2. The dependences of osteocyte network on bone compartment, age, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xiaohan; Price, Christopher; Modla, Shannon; Thompson, William R; Caplan, Jeffrey; Kirn-Safran, Catherine B; Wang, Liyun

    2015-01-01

    Osteocytes, the most abundant bone cells, form an interconnected network in the lacunar-canalicular pore system (LCS) buried within the mineralized matrix, which allows osteocytes to obtain nutrients from the blood supply, sense external mechanical signals, and communicate among themselves and with other cells on bone surfaces. In this study, we examined key features of the LCS network including the topological parameter and the detailed structure of individual connections and their variations in cortical and cancellous compartments, at different ages, and in two disease conditions with altered mechanosensing (perlecan deficiency and diabetes). LCS network showed both topological stability, in terms of conservation of connectivity among osteocyte lacunae (similar to the “nodes” in a computer network), and considerable variability the pericellular annular fluid gap surrounding lacunae and canaliculi (similar to the “bandwidth” of individual links in a computer network). Age, in the range of our study (15–32 weeks), affected only the pericellular fluid annulus in cortical bone but not in cancellous bone. Diabetes impacted the spacing of the lacunae, while the perlecan deficiency had a profound influence on the pericellular fluid annulus. The LCS network features play important roles in osteocyte signaling and regulation of bone growth and adaptation. PMID:26213632

  3. Effects of dietary phosphate on adynamic bone disease in rats with chronic kidney disease--role of sclerostin?

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Juliana C; Ferrari, Guaraciaba O; Neves, Katia R; Cavallari, Raquel T; Dominguez, Wagner V; Dos Reis, Luciene M; Graciolli, Fabiana G; Oliveira, Elizabeth C; Liu, Shiguang; Sabbagh, Yves; Jorgetti, Vanda; Schiavi, Susan; Moysés, Rosa M A

    2013-01-01

    High phosphate intake is known to aggravate renal osteodystrophy along various pathogenetic pathways. Recent studies have raised the possibility that dysregulation of the osteocyte Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is also involved in chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related bone disease. We investigated the role of dietary phosphate and its possible interaction with this pathway in an experimental model of adynamic bone disease (ABD) in association with CKD and hypoparathyroidism. Partial nephrectomy (Nx) and total parathyroidectomy (PTx) were performed in male Wistar rats. Control rats with normal kidney and parathyroid function underwent sham operations. Rats were divided into three groups and underwent pair-feeding for 8 weeks with diets containing either 0.6% or 1.2% phosphate: sham 0.6%, Nx+PTx 0.6%, and Nx+PTx 1.2%. In the two Nx+PTx groups, serum creatinine increased and blood ionized calcium decreased compared with sham control group. They also presented hyperphosphatemia and reduced serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) levels. Fractional urinary excretion of phosphate increased in Nx+PTx 1.2% rats despite lower PTH and FGF23 levels than in sham group. These biochemical changes were accompanied by a decrease in bone formation rates. The Nx+PTx 1.2% group had lower bone volume (BV/TV), higher osteoblast and osteocyte apoptosis, and higher SOST and Dickkopf-1 gene expression than the Nx+PTx 0.6% group. Nx+PTx 0.6% rat had very low serum sclerostin levels, and Nx+PTx 1.2% had intermediate sclerostin levels compared with sham group. Finally, there was a negative correlation between BV/TV and serum sclerostin. These results suggest that high dietary phosphate intake decreases bone volume in an experimental model of CKD-ABD, possibly via changes in SOST expression through a PTH-independent mechanism. These findings could have relevance for the clinical setting of CKD-ABD in patients who low turnover bone disease might be attenuated

  4. Odanacatib, A Cathepsin K-Specific Inhibitor, Inhibits Inflammation and Bone Loss Caused by Periodontal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Liang; Chen, Jianwei; Zhu, Zheng; Reddy, Michael S.; Mountz, John D.; Chen, Wei; Li, Yi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background Periodontitis is a bacteria-induced inflammatory disease mainly affecting periodontal tissues, leading to periodontal inflammation, bone breakdown, and loss of the tooth. The main obstacle for treating periodontitis effectively is the difficulty in finding a target that can inhibit bone loss and inflammation simultaneously. Recent studies showed that cathepsin K (CTSK) might have functions in the immune system besides its role in osteoclasts. Thus, targeting CTSK would have a potential therapeutic effect in both the bone system and the immune system during the progression of periodontitis. Methods In the current study, a small molecular inhibitor (odanacatib [ODN]) is explored to inhibit the function of CTSK in a bacteria-induced periodontitis mouse model. Results The application of ODN decreased the number of osteoclasts, macrophages, and T cells, as well as the expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the periodontitis lesion area. Furthermore, lack of CTSK inhibited the expression of TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9 and their downstream cytokine signaling in the gingival epithelial cells in periodontitis lesions, demonstrating that the innate immune response was inhibited in periodontitis. Conclusion The present results show that inhibition of CTSK can prevent bone loss and the immune response during the progression of periodontitis, indicating that CTSK is a promising target for treating inflammatory diseases such as periodontitis by affecting both osteoclasts and the immune system. PMID:25879791

  5. FGF23 neutralization improves bone quality and osseointegration of titanium implants in chronic kidney disease mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ningyuan; Guo, Yuchen; Liu, Weiqing; Densmore, Michael; Shalhoub, Victoria; Erben, Reinhold G; Ye, Ling; Lanske, Beate; Yuan, Quan

    2015-02-10

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide health problem. Serum levels of FGF23, a phosphaturic hormone, increase at the earliest stages of CKD, and have been found to be independently associated with the mortality and morbidity of CKD patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether FGF23 neutralization was able to improve bone quality and osseointegration of titanium implants. Uremia was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy in adult female mice. Postsurgery, the mice were injected with vehicle or FGF23 neutralizing antibody (5 mg/kg body weight) 3 times a week. Experimental titanium implants were inserted in the distal end of the femurs. FGF23 neutralization significantly increased serum phosphate, 1,25(OH)2D and BUN, and decreased serum PTH and FGF23, relative to vehicle-treated CKD mice. Histomorphometric analysis of the tibiae indicated that FGF23 neutralization normalized the osteoidosis observed in vehicle-treated CKD mice. Although bone-implant contact ratio remained unchanged by anti-FGF23 antibody treatment, the strength of osseointegration, as evidenced by a biomechanical push-in test, was significantly improved by FGF23 neutralization. Our findings revealed that FGF23 neutralization effectively improves bone quality and osseointegration of titanium implants in CKD mice, suggesting FGF23 as a key factor of CKD related bone diseases.

  6. Role of apoptosis in pathogenesis and treatment of bone-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Mollazadeh, Samaneh; Fazly Bazzaz, Bibi Sedigheh; Kerachian, Mohammad Amin

    2015-01-28

    In this article, bone cells and their intercellular communications have been reviewed. Gap junctions and hemichannels are the main routes of interactions in bone tissue. They play a substantial role in survival and cell death, since pro-apoptotic signals can propagate through them. Different adhesion molecules are required for apoptosis, particularly caspase family as well as noncaspase proteases. The disruption outcome of apoptosis could result in bone-related diseases such as osteonecrosis. Anti-apoptotic strategies include inhibition of caspase, poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase (PARP), and Bcl-2 proteins as well as induction of the PKB/Akt pathway and inhibitors of apoptosis (IAP) family of proteins. Thus, understanding the mechanism of apoptosis gives detailed insights of anti-apoptotic molecular targets. Based on these targets, different treatments were designed and produced such as estrogen replacement therapy, administration of different bisphosphonates, raloxifene, calcitonin, sodium fluoride, calcium, and vitamin D. As a result, new applicable drugs for treatment of related bone problems can be proposed for clinical approach especially in the early stage of diseases.

  7. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  8. Effects of Uremic Toxins from the Gut Microbiota on Bone: A Brief Look at Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Black, Ana Paula; Cardozo, Ludmila F M F; Mafra, Denise

    2015-10-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) frequently have mineral and bone disorders (CKD-MBD) that are caused by several mechanisms. Recent research has suggested that uremic toxins from the gut such as p-cresyl sulfate (PCS) and indoxyl sulfate (IS) could also be involved in the development of bone disease in patients with CKD. IS and PCS are produced by microbiota in the gut, carried into the plasma bound to serum albumin, and are normally excreted into the urine. However, in patients with CKD, there is an accumulation of high levels of these uremic toxins. The exact mechanisms of action of uremic toxins in bone disease remain unclear. The purpose of this brief review is to discuss the link between uremic toxins (IS and PCS) and bone mineral disease in chronic kidney disease.

  9. High Speed Dynamics in Brittle Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiermaier, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Brittle Materials under High Speed and Shock loading provide a continuous challenge in experimental physics, analysis and numerical modelling, and consequently for engineering design. The dependence of damage and fracture processes on material-inherent length and time scales, the influence of defects, rate-dependent material properties and inertia effects on different scales make their understanding a true multi-scale problem. In addition, it is not uncommon that materials show a transition from ductile to brittle behavior when the loading rate is increased. A particular case is spallation, a brittle tensile failure induced by the interaction of stress waves leading to a sudden change from compressive to tensile loading states that can be invoked in various materials. This contribution highlights typical phenomena occurring when brittle materials are exposed to high loading rates in applications such as blast and impact on protective structures, or meteorite impact on geological materials. A short review on experimental methods that are used for dynamic characterization of brittle materials will be given. A close interaction of experimental analysis and numerical simulation has turned out to be very helpful in analyzing experimental results. For this purpose, adequate numerical methods are required. Cohesive zone models are one possible method for the analysis of brittle failure as long as some degree of tension is present. Their recent successful application for meso-mechanical simulations of concrete in Hopkinson-type spallation tests provides new insight into the dynamic failure process. Failure under compressive loading is a particular challenge for numerical simulations as it involves crushing of material which in turn influences stress states in other parts of a structure. On a continuum scale, it can be modeled using more or less complex plasticity models combined with failure surfaces, as will be demonstrated for ceramics. Models which take microstructural

  10. Bone Marrow-Derived Cells as a Therapeutic Approach to Optic Nerve Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mesentier-Louro, Louise A.; Zaverucha-do-Valle, Camila; Rosado-de-Castro, Paulo H.; Silva-Junior, Almir J.; Pimentel-Coelho, Pedro M.; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Santiago, Marcelo F.

    2016-01-01

    Following optic nerve injury associated with acute or progressive diseases, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) of adult mammals degenerate and undergo apoptosis. These diseases have limited therapeutic options, due to the low inherent capacity of RGCs to regenerate and due to the inhibitory milieu of the central nervous system. Among the numerous treatment approaches investigated to stimulate neuronal survival and axonal extension, cell transplantation emerges as a promising option. This review focuses on cell therapies with bone marrow mononuclear cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, which have shown positive therapeutic effects in animal models of optic neuropathies. Different aspects of available preclinical studies are analyzed, including cell distribution, potential doses, routes of administration, and mechanisms of action. Finally, published and ongoing clinical trials are summarized. PMID:26649049

  11. Novel, near-infrared spectroscopic, label-free, techniques to assess bone abnormalities such as Paget's disease, osteoporosis and bone fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordillo, Diana C.; Sordillo, Laura A.; Shi, Lingyan; Budansky, Yury; Sordillo, Peter P.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-02-01

    Near- infrared (NIR) light with wavelengths from 650 nm to 950 nm (known as the first NIR window) has conventionally been used as a non-invasive technique that can reach deeper penetration depths through media than light at shorter wavelengths. Recently, several novel, NIR, label-free, techniques have been developed to assess Paget's disease of bone, osteoporosis and bone microfractures. We designed a Bone Optical Analyzer (BOA) which utilizes the first window to measure changes of Hb and HbO2. Paget's disease is marked by an increase in vascularization in bones, and this device can enable easy diagnosis and more frequent monitoring of the patient's condition, without exposing him to a high cumulative dose of radiation. We have also used inverse imaging algorithms to reconstruct 2D and 3D maps of the bone's structure. This device could be used to assess diseases such as osteoporosis. Using 800 nm femtosecond excitation with two-photon (2P) microscopy, we acquired 2PM images of the periosteum and spatial frequency spectra (based on emission of collagen) from the periosteal regions. This technique can provide information on the structure of the periosteum and can detect abnormalities which may be an indication of disease. Most recently, we showed that longer NIR wavelengths in the second and third NIR windows (1100 nm-1350 nm, 1600 nm-1870 nm), could be used to image bone microfractures. Use of NIR light could allow for repeated studies in patients with diseases such as Paget's and osteoporosis quickly and non-invasively, and could impact the current management for these diseases.

  12. Aplastic anemia & MDS International Foundation (AA&MDSIF): Bone Marrow Failure Disease Scientific Symposium 2010.

    PubMed

    Malcovati, Luca; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Risitano, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of rare hematological disorders belonging to the Bone Marrow Failure (BMF) syndromes. The Aplastic Anemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes International Foundation (AA&MDSIF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting patients and families living with a BMF disease. They work to bring investigators together in a collaborative manner. This article summarizes key presentations from the last AA&MDSIF scientific symposium held in Bethesda, Maryland on March 2010.

  13. Bone marrow-derived progenitor cells in end-stage lung disease patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic lung diseases are marked by progressive inflammation, tissue damage and remodelling. Bone marrow-derived progenitor cells may contribute to these processes. The objectives of this study were to (1) to quantify CD45+Collagen-1+ fibrocytes and a novel epithelial-like population of bone marrow-derived cells, which express Clara Cell Secretory Protein, in patients at the time of lung transplant and (2) to evaluate mediators that may act to recruit these cells during injury. Methods Using an observational design, progenitor cells were quantified by flow cytometry from both bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB). Migration was tested using in vitro transwell assays. Multiplex bead-based assays were used to quantify plasma cytokines. Results An increase in CD45+Collagen-1+ fibrocytes was found in pulmonary fibrosis and bronchiolitis obliterans patients. Cystic fibrosis patients had an increase in CCSP+ cells in both the BM and PB. The proportion of CCSP+ cells in the BM and PB was correlated. CCSP+ cells express the chemokine receptors CCR2, CCR4, CXCR3, and CXCR4, and significantly migrated in vitro toward Stromal Derived Factor-1 (SDF-1) and Stem Cell Growth Factor-β (SCGF-β). Plasma cytokine levels differed between disease groups, with a significant correlation between SCGF-β and CCSP+ cells and between Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1 and fibrocytes. Conclusions Different bone marrow-derived cells are found in various lung diseases. Increased fibrocytes were associated with fibrotic lung diseases. An increase in the novel CCSP+ epithelial-like progenitors in cystic fibrosis patients was found. These differences may be mediated by alterations in plasma cytokines responsible for cell recruitment. PMID:23915095

  14. Taliglucerase alfa leads to favorable bone marrow responses in patients with type I Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    van Dussen, L; Zimran, A; Akkerman, E M; Aerts, J M F G; Petakov, M; Elstein, D; Rosenbaum, H; Aviezer, D; Brill-Almon, E; Chertkoff, R; Maas, M; Hollak, C E M

    2013-03-01

    Taliglucerase alfa (Protalix Biotherapeutics, Israel) is a carrot-cell-expressed recombinant human beta-glucocerebrosidase recently approved in the United States for the treatment of type 1 Gaucher disease (GD). As bone disease is one of the most debilitating features of GD, quantification of bone marrow involvement is important for monitoring the response to treatment. Therefore, bone marrow fat fraction (Ff) measured by quantitative chemical shift imaging (QCSI) was included as exploratory parameter to evaluate bone marrow response in treatment naïve GD patients participating in a double-blind, randomized phase III study. Eight GD patients with intact spleens were treated with 30 or 60U/kg biweekly. Ff results were compared to outcomes in 15 untreated Dutch GD patients with a follow-up interval of 1year. Five taliglucerase alfa treated patients had a Ff below the threshold that relates to complication risk (<0.23) at baseline (median (n=8) 0.19, range 0.11-0.35). Ff significantly increased compared to baseline (p=0.012) and compared to untreated patients (p=0.005), already after 1year of follow-up with further improvement up to 36months. In four patients with the lowest Ff, the higher dose resulted in increases above 0.23 within 1year. All patients had sustained improvements in all other parameters. There was no influence of antibodies on response parameters. Treatment with taliglucerase alfa results in significant increases in lumbar spine fat fractions, which indicates clearance of Gaucher cells from the bone marrow. PMID:23199589

  15. Multiple myeloma mesenchymal stromal cells: Contribution to myeloma bone disease and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gomez, Antonio; Sanchez-Guijo, Fermin; Del Cañizo, M Consuelo; San Miguel, Jesus F; Garayoa, Mercedes

    2014-07-26

    Multiple myeloma is a hematological malignancy in which clonal plasma cells proliferate and accumulate within the bone marrow. The presence of osteolytic lesions due to increased osteoclast (OC) activity and suppressed osteoblast (OB) function is characteristic of the disease. The bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) play a critical role in multiple myeloma pathophysiology, greatly promoting the growth, survival, drug resistance and migration of myeloma cells. Here, we specifically discuss on the relative contribution of MSCs to the pathophysiology of osteolytic lesions in light of the current knowledge of the biology of myeloma bone disease (MBD), together with the reported genomic, functional and gene expression differences between MSCs derived from myeloma patients (pMSCs) and their healthy counterparts (dMSCs). Being MSCs the progenitors of OBs, pMSCs primarily contribute to the pathogenesis of MBD because of their reduced osteogenic potential consequence of multiple OB inhibitory factors and direct interactions with myeloma cells in the bone marrow. Importantly, pMSCs also readily contribute to MBD by promoting OC formation and activity at various levels (i.e., increasing RANKL to OPG expression, augmenting secretion of activin A, uncoupling ephrinB2-EphB4 signaling, and through augmented production of Wnt5a), thus further contributing to OB/OC uncoupling in osteolytic lesions. In this review, we also look over main signaling pathways involved in the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs and/or OB activity, highlighting amenable therapeutic targets; in parallel, the reported activity of bone-anabolic agents (at preclinical or clinical stage) targeting those signaling pathways is commented.

  16. Multiple myeloma mesenchymal stromal cells: Contribution to myeloma bone disease and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Gomez, Antonio; Sanchez-Guijo, Fermin; del Cañizo, M Consuelo; San Miguel, Jesus F; Garayoa, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a hematological malignancy in which clonal plasma cells proliferate and accumulate within the bone marrow. The presence of osteolytic lesions due to increased osteoclast (OC) activity and suppressed osteoblast (OB) function is characteristic of the disease. The bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) play a critical role in multiple myeloma pathophysiology, greatly promoting the growth, survival, drug resistance and migration of myeloma cells. Here, we specifically discuss on the relative contribution of MSCs to the pathophysiology of osteolytic lesions in light of the current knowledge of the biology of myeloma bone disease (MBD), together with the reported genomic, functional and gene expression differences between MSCs derived from myeloma patients (pMSCs) and their healthy counterparts (dMSCs). Being MSCs the progenitors of OBs, pMSCs primarily contribute to the pathogenesis of MBD because of their reduced osteogenic potential consequence of multiple OB inhibitory factors and direct interactions with myeloma cells in the bone marrow. Importantly, pMSCs also readily contribute to MBD by promoting OC formation and activity at various levels (i.e., increasing RANKL to OPG expression, augmenting secretion of activin A, uncoupling ephrinB2-EphB4 signaling, and through augmented production of Wnt5a), thus further contributing to OB/OC uncoupling in osteolytic lesions. In this review, we also look over main signaling pathways involved in the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs and/or OB activity, highlighting amenable therapeutic targets; in parallel, the reported activity of bone-anabolic agents (at preclinical or clinical stage) targeting those signaling pathways is commented. PMID:25126382

  17. The KISS1 Receptor as an In Vivo Microenvironment Imaging Biomarker of Multiple Myeloma Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, Andreas; Müller, Marc; Hofbauer, Lorenz C.; Beilhack, Andreas; Ebert, Regina; Glüer, Claus C.; Tiwari, Sanjay; Schütze, Norbert; Jakob, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is one of the most common hematological diseases and is characterized by an aberrant proliferation of plasma cells within the bone marrow. As a result of crosstalk between cancer cells and the bone microenvironment, bone homeostasis is disrupted leading to osteolytic lesions and poor prognosis. Current diagnostic strategies for myeloma typically rely on detection of excess monoclonal immunoglobulins or light chains in the urine or serum. However, these strategies fail to localize the sites of malignancies. In this study we sought to identify novel biomarkers of myeloma bone disease which could target the malignant cells and/or the surrounding cells of the tumor microenvironment. From these studies, the KISS1 receptor (KISS1R), a G-protein-coupled receptor known to play a role in the regulation of endocrine functions, was identified as a target gene that was upregulated on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and osteoprogenitor cells (OPCs) when co-cultured with myeloma cells. To determine the potential of this receptor as a biomarker, in vitro and in vivo studies were performed with the KISS1R ligand, kisspeptin, conjugated with a fluorescent dye. In vitro microscopy showed binding of fluorescently-labeled kisspeptin to both myeloma cells as well as MSCs under direct co-culture conditions. Next, conjugated kisspeptin was injected into immune-competent mice containing myeloma bone lesions. Tumor-burdened limbs showed increased peak fluorescence compared to contralateral controls. These data suggest the utility of the KISS1R as a novel biomarker for multiple myeloma, capable of targeting both tumor cells and host cells of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27158817

  18. A fresh look at metabolic bone diseases in reptiles and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Klaphake, Eric

    2010-09-01

    Metabolic bone diseases (MBDs) are a common presenting complaint in reptiles and amphibians to veterinarians; however, understanding of the causes and diagnostic and treatment options is often extrapolated from human or other mammalian medicine models. Although the roles of UV-B, calcium, phosphorus, and cholecalciferol are better understood in some MBDs, there remain many X factors that are not. Likewise, quantitative diagnosis of MBDs has been difficult not only in terms of staging a disease but also regarding whether or not a condition is present. Treatment options also present challenges in corrective husbandry and diet modifications, medication/modality selection, and dosing/regimen parameters. PMID:20682425

  19. Precision grinding process development for brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Davis, P J; Piscotty, M A

    1999-04-01

    High performance, brittle materials are the materials of choice for many of today's engineering applications. This paper describes three separate precision grinding processes developed at Lawrence Liver-more National Laboratory to machine precision ceramic components. Included in the discussion of the precision processes is a variety of grinding wheel dressing, truing and profiling techniques.

  20. Bone tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical exam. Tests that may be done include: Alkaline phosphatase blood level Bone biopsy Bone scan Chest x- ... may also be ordered to monitor the disease: Alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme Blood calcium level Parathyroid hormone Blood phosphorus ...

  1. Effects of Collagen Crosslinking on Bone Material Properties in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Saito, Mitsuru; Marumo, Keishi

    2015-09-01

    Data have accumulated to show that various types of collagen crosslinking are implicated in the health of individuals, as well as in a number of disease states, such as osteoporosis, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease, or in conditions of mild hyperhomocysteinemia, or when glucocorticoid use is indicated. Collagen crosslinking is a posttranslational modification of collagen molecules and plays important roles in tissue differentiation and in the mechanical properties of collagenous tissue. The crosslinking of collagen in the body can form via two mechanisms: one is enzymatic crosslinking and the other is nonenzymatic crosslinking. Lysyl hydroxylases and lysyl oxidases regulate tissue-specific crosslinking patterns and quantities. Enzymatic crosslinks initially form via immature divalent crosslinking, and a portion of them convert into mature trivalent forms such as pyridinoline and pyrrole crosslinks. Nonenzymatic crosslinks form as a result of reactions which create advanced glycation end products (AGEs), such as pentosidine and glucosepane. These types of crosslinks differ in terms of their mechanisms of formation and function. Impaired enzymatic crosslinking and/or an increase of AGEs have been proposed as a major cause of bone fragility associated with aging and numerous disease states. This review focuses on the effects of collagen crosslinking on bone material properties in health and disease.

  2. Mandibular bone mineral density in patients with Behçet’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Asutay, Fatih; Atalay, Yusuf; Acar, Ahmet Hüseyin; Asutay, Hilal; Eroğlu, Selma; Burdurlu, Muammer Çağrı

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Behçet’s disease (BD) is a chronic, recurring vasculitis of unknown etiology. Patients with BD may use a lot of medications associated with the clinical symptoms. Drugs that are used in the treatment of BD may cause bone loss. The aims of the current study were to compare the bone mineral density (BMD) values between BD and healthy volunteers and describe the effect of disease duration on mandibular BMD. Materials and methods The study comprised 30 healthy volunteers (15 males and 15 females, mean age 35.50±6.80 years) and 45 patients with BD (24 males and 21 females, mean age 38.93±8.93 years). The BD group was subdivided according to disease duration (0–5, 6–10, and >10 years). The BMD value of the mandibular body was determined by the dual energy X-ray absorptiometry technique. Results The mean mandibular body BMD values were 1.294±0.21 g/cm2 in the control group and 1.216±0.22 g/cm2 in the BD patients, although there was no statistically significant difference. The BMD was observed to decrease with increased disease duration but not to a statistically significant degree. Conclusion The results of this study showed that although the BMD value decreased as the duration of the disease increased, no statistically significant difference was found between the BD patients and the healthy control group. PMID:26508868

  3. Is chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) really a syndrome?

    PubMed

    Cozzolino, Mario; Ureña-Torres, Pablo; Vervloet, Marc G; Brandenburg, Vincent; Bover, Jordi; Goldsmith, David; Larsson, Tobias E; Massy, Ziad A; Mazzaferro, Sandro

    2014-10-01

    The concept of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) does not appear to fulfil the requirements for a syndrome at first glance, but its definition has brought some clear-cut benefits for clinicians and patients, including wider and more complex diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to the management of this challenging set of issues. Admittedly, not all components of CKD-MBD are present in all patients at all times, but these are highly interrelated, involving mineral and bone laboratory abnormalities, clinical and histological bone disease and finally, cardiovascular disease. The presence of typical biological bone ossification processes in an ectopic anatomical location in CKD has helped to define the existence of an unprecedented bone-vascular relationship, extending its interest even to other medical specialities. For now, we believe that CKD-MBD does not reach full criteria to be defined as a syndrome. However, this novel concept has clearly influenced current clinical guidelines. The National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF/KDOQI™) guidelines in 2003 for instance recommended that calcium-based phosphate binders should be avoided to treat hyperphosphataemia in the presence of cardiovascular calcifications. In 2009, the KDIGO and other guidelines reinforced and extended this recommendation by stating that it is reasonable to choose oral phosphate binder therapy by taking into consideration other components of CKD-MBD. Similarly, it is also considered reasonable to use information on vascular/valvular calcification to guide the management of CKD-MBD. Our current assumption as a working group 'CKD-MBD' is that CKD-MBD has the potential to be defined a true syndrome, such as a constellation of concurrent signs and symptoms that suggest a common underlying mechanism for these components as opposed to the term disease. The term 'syndrome' also implies that in any patient at risk due to the presence of one or a few

  4. Is chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) really a syndrome?

    PubMed

    Cozzolino, Mario; Ureña-Torres, Pablo; Vervloet, Marc G; Brandenburg, Vincent; Bover, Jordi; Goldsmith, David; Larsson, Tobias E; Massy, Ziad A; Mazzaferro, Sandro

    2014-10-01

    The concept of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) does not appear to fulfil the requirements for a syndrome at first glance, but its definition has brought some clear-cut benefits for clinicians and patients, including wider and more complex diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to the management of this challenging set of issues. Admittedly, not all components of CKD-MBD are present in all patients at all times, but these are highly interrelated, involving mineral and bone laboratory abnormalities, clinical and histological bone disease and finally, cardiovascular disease. The presence of typical biological bone ossification processes in an ectopic anatomical location in CKD has helped to define the existence of an unprecedented bone-vascular relationship, extending its interest even to other medical specialities. For now, we believe that CKD-MBD does not reach full criteria to be defined as a syndrome. However, this novel concept has clearly influenced current clinical guidelines. The National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF/KDOQI™) guidelines in 2003 for instance recommended that calcium-based phosphate binders should be avoided to treat hyperphosphataemia in the presence of cardiovascular calcifications. In 2009, the KDIGO and other guidelines reinforced and extended this recommendation by stating that it is reasonable to choose oral phosphate binder therapy by taking into consideration other components of CKD-MBD. Similarly, it is also considered reasonable to use information on vascular/valvular calcification to guide the management of CKD-MBD. Our current assumption as a working group 'CKD-MBD' is that CKD-MBD has the potential to be defined a true syndrome, such as a constellation of concurrent signs and symptoms that suggest a common underlying mechanism for these components as opposed to the term disease. The term 'syndrome' also implies that in any patient at risk due to the presence of one or a few

  5. ZNF687 Mutations in Severe Paget Disease of Bone Associated with Giant Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Divisato, Giuseppina; Formicola, Daniela; Esposito, Teresa; Merlotti, Daniela; Pazzaglia, Laura; Del Fattore, Andrea; Siris, Ethel; Orcel, Philippe; Brown, Jacques P.; Nuti, Ranuccio; Strazzullo, Pasquale; Benassi, Maria Serena; Cancela, M. Leonor; Michou, Laetitia; Rendina, Domenico; Gennari, Luigi; Gianfrancesco, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Paget disease of bone (PDB) is a skeletal disorder characterized by focal abnormalities of bone remodeling, which result in enlarged and deformed bones in one or more regions of the skeleton. In some cases, the pagetic tissue undergoes neoplastic transformation, resulting in osteosarcoma and, less frequently, in giant cell tumor of bone (GCT). We performed whole-exome sequencing in a large family with 14 PDB-affected members, four of whom developed GCT at multiple pagetic skeletal sites, and we identified the c.2810C>G (p.Pro937Arg) missense mutation in the zinc finger protein 687 gene (ZNF687). The mutation precisely co-segregated with the clinical phenotype in all affected family members. The sequencing of seven unrelated individuals with GCT associated with PDB (GCT/PDB) identified the same mutation in all individuals, unravelling a founder effect. ZNF687 is highly expressed during osteoclastogenesis and osteoblastogenesis and is dramatically upregulated in the tumor tissue of individuals with GCT/PDB. Interestingly, our preliminary findings showed that ZNF687, indicated as a target gene of the NFkB transcription factor by ChIP-seq analysis, is also upregulated in the peripheral blood of PDB-affected individuals with (n = 5) or without (n = 6) mutations in SQSTM1, encouraging additional studies to investigate its potential role as a biomarker of PDB risk. PMID:26849110

  6. Molecular Mechanisms of Vascular Calcification in Chronic Kidney Disease: The Link between Bone and the Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Byon, Chang Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Vascular calcification is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and increases mortality in those patients. Impaired calcium and phosphate homeostasis, increased oxidative stress, and loss of calcification inhibitors have been linked to vascular calcification in CKD. Additionally, impaired bone may perturb serum calcium/phosphate and their key regulator, parathyroid hormone, thus contributing to increased vascular calcification in CKD. Therapeutic approaches for CKD, such as phosphate binders and bisphosphonates, have been shown to ameliorate bone loss as well as vascular calcification. The precise mechanisms responsible for vascular calcification in CKD and the contribution of bone metabolism to vascular calcification have not been elucidated. This review discusses the role of systemic uremic factors and impaired bone metabolism in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification in CKD. The regulation of the key osteogenic transcription factor Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and the emerging role of Runx2-dependent receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) in vascular calcification of CKD are emphasized. PMID:25947259

  7. Asfotase alfa: enzyme replacement for the treatment of bone disease in hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, C; Seefried, L; Jakob, F

    2016-05-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is a rare disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP, TNSALP) gene. HPP causes a multisystemic syndrome with a predominant bone phenotype. The clinical spectrum ranges from high lethality in early onset (<6 months) HPP to mild late-onset syndromes. HPP management so far has been only supportive. Subcutaneous asfotase alfa, a first-in-class bone-targeted human TNAP enzyme replacement therapy, is the first compound to be approved for long-term treatment of bone manifestations in pediatric-onset HPP. In noncomparative clinical trials (treatment up to 7 years), this treatment was associated with skeletal, respiratory and functional improvement in perinatal, infantile and childhood-onset HPP. Compared with age-matched historical controls, patients with life-threatening perinatal and infantile HPP treated with asfotase alfa had substantially improved bone mineralization, survival and ventilation-free survival. In childhood HPP, asfotase alfa improved growth, gross motor function, strength and agility and decreased pain. The compound was well tolerated and most adverse events were of mild to moderate intensity. To date, data and experience concerning its efficacy and safety in long-term treatment are not yet available. Further studies to evaluate risks and benefits of enzyme replacement therapy with asfotase alfa in adults are in progress and are also strongly needed. PMID:27376160

  8. Bone Cement-Augmented Percutaneous Short Segment Fixation: An Effective Treatment for Kummell's Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon Joo; Kim, Hyeun Sung; Lee, Seok Ki

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the efficacy of bone cement-augmented percutaneous short segment fixation for treating Kummell's disease accompanied by severe osteoporosis. Methods From 2009 to 2013, ten patients with single-level Kummell's disease accompanied by severe osteoporosis were enrolled in this study. After postural reduction for 1-2 days, bone cement-augmented percutaneous short segment fixation was performed at one level above, one level below, and at the collapsed vertebra. Clinical results, radiological parameters, and related complications were assessed preoperatively and at 1 month and 12 months after surgery. Results Prior to surgery, the mean pain score on the visual analogue scale was 8.5±1.5. One month after the procedure, this score improved to 2.2±2.0 and the improvement was maintained at 12 months after surgery. The mean preoperative vertebral height loss was 48.2±10.5%, and the surgical procedure reduced this loss to 22.5±12.4%. In spite of some recurrent height loss, significant improvement was achieved at 12 months after surgery compared to preoperative values. The kyphotic angle improved significantly from 22.4±4.9° before the procedure to 10.1±3.8° after surgery and the improved angle was maintained at 12 months after surgery despite a slight correction loss. No patient sustained adjacent fractures after bone cement-augmented percutaneous short segment fixation during the follow-up period. Asymptomatic cement leakage into the paravertebral area was observed in one patient, but no major complications were seen. Conclusion Bone cement-augmented percutaneous short segment fixation can be an effective and safe procedure for Kummell's disease. PMID:26279814

  9. Selection of patients with Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma for bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, K M; Appelbaum, F R; Horning, S J; Rosenberg, S A; Thomas, E D

    1986-01-01

    Despite substantial progress in curative therapy of malignant lymphomas, some patients fail current treatment and die of refractory disease. Although Although high-dose chemotherapy and supralethal total body irradiation followed by bone marrow transplantation may salvage and cure a proportion of these refractory patients, treatment of such end-stage patients with marrow grafting often fails because of resistant disease or transplant-related complications. Using the analogy of transplantation in the early phases of acute and chronic leukemias, results of marrow transplant in Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma might be improved if performed earlier in the course of the malignancy. The following collaborative report by the Seattle and Stanford groups examines current results of conventional lymphoma therapy to define subgroups of patients with "high-risk" lymphoma for whom early marrow transplant might be offered to control otherwise incurable disease. PMID:3528333

  10. [Italian guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Paget's disease of bone].

    PubMed

    Adami, S; Bartolozzi, P; Brandi, M L; Falchetti, A; Filipponi, P; Gonnelli, S; Bianchi, G; Isaia, G C; Nuti, R

    2007-01-01

    Paget's disease of bone is a chronic focal abnormality of bone turnover that remains totally asymptomatic over a very long period of time but that eventually ensue in bone pain and skeletal deformities. Although, in the last decade new insights have been obtained on its etiology, this remains largely obscure. Effective medical treatment (based on the use of bisphosphonates) has become available and the diagnostic procedures are now well defined. However, there remains considerable controversy regarding the hierarchy of diagnostic procedures and the medical treatment threshold. In the last few years different institution have published national guidelines, reflecting local national health systems and the available medical treatment. In this review, a working group derived from members of the SIOMMMS has examined the information available regarding the diagnosis and treatment of Paget's disease in order to develop guidelines to assist in the management of this condition. The first draft was then extensively reviewed by experts derived from the most representative scientific societies of rheumatology, internal medicine, and orthopaedic surgery. The document provides the most updated recommendations based primarily on the "evidence-based- medicine" but also on the Italian regulation for the diagnostic procedures and on the available medical treatments.

  11. Vascularized Bone Grafts from the Dorsal Wrist for the Treatment of Kienböck Disease.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Makoto; Omokawa, Shohei; Kira, Tsutomu; Kawamura, Kenji; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2016-05-01

    Purpose The objective of this article is to evaluate functional and radiological outcomes of vascularized bone grafts for stage 2 and 3 Kienböck disease. The outcomes of three different donor sites via dorsal approach of the wrist were compared. Pearls and pitfalls in surgical technique were discussed. Methods There were 28 patients who underwent vascularized bone grafts, including the extensor fourth and fifth compartmental artery graft of distal radius in 8 patients, the first and second supraretinacular intercompartmental artery graft of distal radius in 12 patients, and the second dorsal metacarpal neck graft in 8 patients. Average age was 32 years, and radiological grading according to Lichtman classification was stage 2 in 8 patients, stage 3A in 10 patients, and stage 3B in 10 patients. Temporary pinning fixing the midcarpal joint was conducted for 10 weeks postoperatively. Results Follow-up periods averaged 70 months. Pain reduced in 27 patients, and visual analog scale for pain of pre- and postoperative level averaged 59 and 18. Range of wrist flexion and extension motion improved from 87 to 117 degrees, and average grip strength improved from 21 kg preoperatively to 33 kg postoperatively. Carpal height ratio had almost no change from 0.52 to 0.53. Fragmentation of necrotic bone healed in 7 of the 14 cases. Comparative analyses of functional and radiological outcomes between three donor sites found no significant difference. Conclusion Three different vascularized bone grafts from the dorsal wrist and hand area demonstrated favorable and comparable functional outcomes. It was technically important to elevate vascular bundle with surrounding retinaculum or fascia, to include sufficient periosteum, and to insert the vascularized bone as the cortex aligned longitudinally. PMID:27104073

  12. Bone development and inflammatory disease is regulated by AP-1 (Fos/Jun).

    PubMed

    Wagner, E F

    2010-01-01

    The Fos and Jun proteins are members of the AP-1 transcription factor complex, which is a central regulator for many cellular functions. This paper summarises the important functions of Fos proteins in bone development, with special emphasis on the Fos-related proteins Fra-1 and Fra-2. These factors determine the functions of osteoblasts and osteoclasts and regulate cytokine signalling during bone development. Likewise, the Jun proteins control the expression of cytokines and chemokines and are probably causally involved in inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis. Investigations into the molecular mechanisms responsible for skin inflammation have revealed that Jun proteins control cytokine expression, such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor alpha by transcriptional and posttranscriptional pathways. Finally, the paper discusses the relevance of the Jun-dependent mouse model for psoriasis for preclinical studies in the field of anti-angiogenic therapies.

  13. Patient and implant survival following joint replacement because of metastatic bone disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients suffering from a pathological fracture or painful bony lesion because of metastatic bone disease often benefit from a total joint replacement. However, these are large operations in patients who are often weak. We examined the patient survival and complication rates after total joint replacement as the treatment for bone metastasis or hematological diseases of the extremities. Patients and methods 130 patients (mean age 64 (30–85) years, 76 females) received 140 joint replacements due to skeletal metastases (n = 114) or hematological disease (n = 16) during the period 2003–2008. 21 replaced joints were located in the upper extremities and 119 in the lower extremities. Clinical and survival data were extracted from patient files and various registers. Results The probability of patient survival was 51% (95% CI: 42–59) after 6 months, 39% (CI: 31–48) after 12 months, and 29% (CI: 21–37) after 24 months. The following surgical complications were seen (8 of which led to additional surgery): 2–5 hip dislocations (n = 8), deep infection (n = 3), peroneal palsy (n = 2), a shoulder prosthesis penetrating the skin (n = 1), and disassembly of an elbow prosthesis (n = 1). The probability of avoiding all kinds of surgery related to the implanted prosthesis was 94% (CI: 89–99) after 1 year and 92% (CI: 85–98) after 2 years. Conclusion Joint replacement operations because of metastatic bone disease do not appear to have given a poorer rate of patient survival than other types of surgical treatment, and the reoperation rate was low. PMID:23530874

  14. Extent of Surgery Does Not Influence 30-Day Mortality in Surgery for Metastatic Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Michala Skovlund; Hindsø, Klaus; Hovgaard, Thea Bechmann; Petersen, Michael Mørk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Estimating patient survival has hitherto been the main focus when treating metastatic bone disease (MBD) in the appendicular skeleton. This has been done in an attempt to allocate the patient to a surgical procedure that outlives them. No questions have been addressed as to whether the extent of the surgery and thus the surgical trauma reduces survival in this patient group. We wanted to evaluate if perioperative parameters such as blood loss, extent of bone resection, and duration of surgery were risk factors for 30-day mortality in patients having surgery due to MBD in the appendicular skeleton. We retrospectively identified 270 consecutive patients who underwent joint replacement surgery or intercalary spacing for skeletal metastases in the appendicular skeleton from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2013. We collected intraoperative (duration of surgery, extent of bone resection, and blood loss), demographic (age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologist score [ASA score], and Karnofsky score), and disease-specific (primary cancer) variables. An association with 30-day mortality was addressed using univariate and multivariable analyses and calculation of odds ratio (OR). All patients were included in the analysis. ASA score 3 + 4 (OR 4.16 [95% confidence interval, CI, 1.80–10.85], P = 0.002) and Karnofsky performance status below 70 (OR 7.34 [95% CI 3.16–19.20], P < 0.001) were associated with increased 30-day mortality in univariate analysis. This did not change in multivariable analysis. No parameters describing the extent of the surgical trauma were found to be associated with 30-day mortality. The 30-day mortality in patients undergoing surgery for MBD is highly dependent on the general health status of the patients as measured by the ASA score and the Karnofsky performance status. The extent of surgery, measured as duration of surgery, blood loss, and degree of bone resection were not associated with 30-day mortality. PMID:27082592

  15. Overexpression of RANKL in osteoblasts: a possible mechanism of susceptibility to bone disease in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Delion, Martial; Braux, Julien; Jourdain, Marie-Laure; Guillaume, Christine; Bour, Camille; Gangloff, Sophie; Pimpec-Barthes, Françoise Le; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Jacquot, Jacky; Velard, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    Bone fragility and loss are a significant cause of morbidity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and the lack of effective therapeutic options means that treatment is more often palliative rather than curative. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of CF-related bone disease (CFBD) is necessary to develop new therapies. Defective CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein and chronic inflammation in bone are important components of the CFBD development. The receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) drive the regulation of bone turnover. To investigate their roles in CFBD, we evaluated the involvement of defective CFTR in their production level in CF primary human osteoblasts with and without inflammatory stimulation, in the presence or not of pharmacological correctors of the CFTR. No major difference in cell ultrastructure was noted between cultured CF and non-CF osteoblasts, but a delayed bone matrix mineralization was observed in CF osteoblasts. Strikingly, resting CF osteoblasts exhibited strong production of RANKL protein, which was highly localized at the cell membrane and was enhanced in TNF (TNF-α) or IL-17-stimulated conditions. Under TNF stimulation, a defective response in OPG production was observed in CF osteoblasts in contrast to the elevated OPG production of non-CF osteoblasts, leading to an elevated RANKL-to-OPG protein ratio in CF osteoblasts. Pharmacological inhibition of CFTR chloride channel conductance in non-CF osteoblasts replicated both the decreased OPG production and the enhanced RANKL-to-OPG ratio. Interestingly, using CFTR correctors such as C18, we significantly reduced the production of RANKL by CF osteoblasts, in both resting and TNF-stimulated conditions. In conclusion, the overexpression of RANKL and high membranous RANKL localization in osteoblasts are related to defective CFTR, and may worsen bone resorption, leading to bone loss in patients with CF. Targeting

  16. The bone marrow stem stromal imbalance--a key feature of disease progression in case of myelodysplastic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Das, Madhurima; Chatterjee, Sumanta; Basak, Pratima; Das, Prosun; Pereira, Jacintha Archana; Dutta, Ranjan Kumar; Chaklader, Malay; Chaudhuri, Samaresh; Law, Sujata

    2010-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) represent a spectrum of disorders that are generally thought to arise from a defective hematopoietic stem cell leading to clonal, dysregulated hematopoiesis. Although it is generally agreed that the marrow microenvironment plays a role in the biology of MDS, it is unclear whether this represents an intrinsically abnormal stromal compartment derived from the MDS clone. Hematopoiesis requires cooperation between progenitors and a variety of functionally and phenotypically different cell types that form the bone marrow stroma. Stromal abnormalities suspected to contribute to the pathology of bone marrow disorder with impaired hematopoiesis. Several studies on human MDS bone marrow microenvironment revealed functional alteration and increased cellular apoptosis thus contribute to the pathology of the disease progression. In this present study, we have investigated alterations in the hematopoietic microenvironment and underlying mechanisms involved in the disease progression of MDS animal model. We presented the results of bone marrow single cell culture study, Long-term bone marrow adherent culture study (LTBMC) and their functional efficacy, flowcytometric characterization of stem (Scal+c-kit+) and stromal (Scal+CD44+) progenitor cell population and expression level of extracellular apoptosis marker (Annexin v) in the bone marrow cells of MDS animal model. Bone marrow single cell culture study of MDS animal showed impairment in the normal cellular generation, proliferation and presence of apoptic cells. Long-term liquid Bone marrow stromal cell colony formation assay from MDS bone marrow cells showed significant difference in the colony formation and their maintenance than the control groups of animals. Immune functional capacity of the bone marrow stromal cells through cell mediated immune (CMI) parameter study denoted defects in the stromal microenvironment. Decreased expression of bone marrow long-term primitive hematopoietic

  17. An educational program on structural design with brittle /ceramic/ materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, J. I.

    1978-01-01

    The organization of a proposed ceramic structural materials program is described, and a suggested course sequence for college-level and graduate-level courses is presented. The course work on ceramics and brittle fracture are intended to lead to a brittle material design project and a brittle material design problem. Criteria for the selection of appropriate projects/problems are considered.

  18. The Biomechanical Testing for the Assessment of Bone Quality in an Experimental Model of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Oksztulska-Kolanek, Ewa; Znorko, Beata; Michałowska, Małgorzata; Pawlak, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Mineral metabolism disturbances are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and have been classified as a new clinical entity, also known as CKD-mineral and bone disorders (CKD-MBD). A decrease in the bone strength, whose clinical manifestation is a tendency for fracture, has been recognized as an important component of CKD-MBD. Because of ethical issues, measurements of the bone strength in the human body are usually limited to noninvasive techniques, such as radiography, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and the assays of bone turnover biomarkers. However, it has been postulated recently that the evidence concerning bone strength based solely on the determination of the bone quantity may be insufficient and that bone quality should also be examined. In this regard, an animal model of CKD can represent an experimental tool to test the effectiveness of new therapeutic strategies. Despite the many available methods that are used to diagnose metabolic bone disorders and predict fracture risk especially in small rodents with CKD, it turns out that the most appropriate are biomechanical tests, which can provide information about the structural and material properties of bone. The present review summarizes and discusses the principles for carrying out selected biomechanical tests (3-point bending test and compression test) and their application in clinical practice.

  19. The importance of vitamin D in the pathology of bone metabolism in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Krela-Kaźmierczak, Iwona; Szymczak, Aleksandra; Łykowska-Szuber, Liliana; Eder, Piotr; Stawczyk-Eder, Kamila; Klimczak, Katarzyna; Linke, Krzysztof; Horst-Sikorska, Wanda

    2015-10-12

    Etiological factors of bone metabolism disorders in inflammatory bowel diseases have been the subject of interest of many researchers. One of the questions often raised is vitamin D deficiency. Calcitriol acts on cells, tissues and organs through a vitamin D receptor. The result of this action is the multi-directional effect of vitamin D. The reasons for vitamin D deficiency are: decreased exposure to sunlight, inadequate diet, inflammatory lesions of the intestinal mucosa and post-gastrointestinal resection states. This leads not only to osteomalacia but also to osteoporosis. Of significance may be the effect of vitamin D on the course of the disease itself, through modulation of the inflammatory mechanisms. It is also necessary to pay attention to the role of vitamin D in skeletal pathology in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and thus take measures aimed at preventing and treating these disorders through the supplementation of vitamin D. PMID:26528347

  20. Fracture in compression of brittle solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The fracture of brittle solids in monotonic compression is reviewed from both the mechanistic and phenomenological points of view. The fundamental theoretical developments based on the extension of pre-existing cracks in general multiaxial stress fields are recognized as explaining extrinsic behavior where a single crack is responsible for the final failure. In contrast, shear faulting in compression is recognized to be the result of an evolutionary localization process involving en echelon action of cracks and is termed intrinsic.

  1. Fracture of Silicate Glasses: Ductile or Brittle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guin, Jean-Pierre; Wiederhorn, Sheldon M.

    2004-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy is used to investigate the possibility of cavity formation during crack growth in silicate glasses. Matching areas on both fracture surfaces were mapped and then compared. For silica glass, and soda-lime-silicate glass, the fracture surfaces matched to a resolution of better than 0.3 nm normal to the surface and 5 nm parallel to the surface. We could find no evidence for cavity formation in our study and suggest that completely brittle fracture occurs in glass.

  2. Micromechanics of brittle creep in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantut, N.; Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.

    2012-08-01

    In the upper crust, the chemical influence of pore water promotes time dependent brittle deformation through sub-critical crack growth. Sub-critical crack growth allows rocks to deform and fail at stresses well below their short-term failure strength, and even at constant applied stress (“brittle creep”). Here we provide a micromechanical model describing time dependent brittle creep of water-saturated rocks under triaxial stress conditions. Macroscopic brittle creep is modeled on the basis of microcrack extension under compressive stresses due to sub-critical crack growth. The incremental strains due to the growth of cracks in compression are derived from the sliding wing crack model of Ashby and Sammis (1990), and the crack length evolution is computed from Charles' law. The macroscopic strains and strain rates computed from the model are non linear, and compare well with experimental results obtained on granite, low porosity sandstone and basalt rock samples. Primary creep (decelerating strain) corresponds to decelerating crack growth, due to an initial decrease in stress intensity factor with increasing crack length in compression. Tertiary creep (accelerating strain as failure is approached) corresponds to an increase in crack growth rate due to crack interactions. Secondary creep with apparently constant strain rate arises as an inflexion between those two end-member phases. The minimum strain rate at the inflexion point can be estimated analytically as a function of model parameters, effective confining pressure and temperature, which provides an approximate creep law for the process. The creep law is used to infer the long term strain rate as a function of depth in the upper crust due to the action of the applied stresses: in this way, sub-critical cracking reduces the failure stress in a manner equivalent to a decrease in cohesion. We also investigate the competition with pressure solution in porous rocks, and show that the transition from sub

  3. The link between bone disease and cardiovascular complications in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Elsheikh, Noha; Sherif, Nevine; Zeid, Sameh Abou; Eldamarawy, Mervat; Ali, Ahmed; Sabry, Amal Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The burden on the cardiovascular system is the main cause of mortality in chronic renal patients, and bone disease, which also may cause disability, is one of the most important complications in those patients. The aim of this study was to determine the link between cardiovascular and bone disease, which frequently occur together. Methods In this matched case-control study, 70 subjects were subjected for full laboratory assessment as well as estimation of parathyroid hormone (PTH) level, vitamin D level, complete echocardiography, and dual energy absorptiometry. Of the 70 patients, 50 were on regular hemodialysis, and there were 20 normal controls matched with the patients with respect to age and gender. Results There was a significant decrease in the mean value of serum vitamin D in the hemodialysis patients, i.e., their mean value was 20.47 ± 9.60 whereas the controls had a mean value of 37.15 ± 7.67. Thus, there was a highly-significant, negative correlation between vitamin D and left ventricular mass (LVM) in the patients. We found that there was a highly-significant increase in the mean PTH levels of the patients (820.22 ± 393.51), whereas it was 57.60 ± 13.72 for the controls. The statistical significance was less than 0.001, a highly-significant increase in the mean of the T score levels in the patients (−2.15 ± 2.56), whereas it was −0.47 ± 0.71 for the controls with a statistical significance of less than 0.001. There also was a highly-significant correlation between the T score and LVM. Conclusion A significant correlation was found between bone disease and the occurrence of a left ventricular mass. We recommend early strict correction of the serum levels of vitamin D, PTH, calcium, and phosphorus. PMID:27504162

  4. Inhibition of Autoimmune Chagas-Like Heart Disease by Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Guimaro, Maria C.; Alves, Rozeneide M.; Rose, Ester; Sousa, Alessandro O.; de Cássia Rosa, Ana; Hecht, Mariana M.; Sousa, Marcelo V.; Andrade, Rafael R.; Vital, Tamires; Plachy, Jiří; Nitz, Nadjar; Hejnar, Jiří; Gomes, Clever C.; L. Teixeira, Antonio R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi manifests in mammals as Chagas heart disease. The treatment available for chagasic cardiomyopathy is unsatisfactory. Methods/Principal Findings To study the disease pathology and its inhibition, we employed a syngeneic chicken model refractory to T. cruzi in which chickens hatched from T. cruzi inoculated eggs retained parasite kDNA (1.4 kb) minicircles. Southern blotting with EcoRI genomic DNA digests revealed main 18 and 20 kb bands by hybridization with a radiolabeled minicircle sequence. Breeding these chickens generated kDNA-mutated F1, F2, and F3 progeny. A targeted-primer TAIL-PCR (tpTAIL-PCR) technique was employed to detect the kDNA integrations. Histocompatible reporter heart grafts were used to detect ongoing inflammatory cardiomyopathy in kDNA-mutated chickens. Fluorochromes were used to label bone marrow CD3+, CD28+, and CD45+ precursors of the thymus-dependent CD8α+ and CD8β+ effector cells that expressed TCRγδ, vβ1 and vβ2 receptors, which infiltrated the adult hearts and the reporter heart grafts. Conclusions/Significance Genome modifications in kDNA-mutated chickens can be associated with disruption of immune tolerance to compatible heart grafts and with rejection of the adult host's heart and reporter graft, as well as tissue destruction by effector lymphocytes. Autoimmune heart rejection was largely observed in chickens with kDNA mutations in retrotransposons and in coding genes with roles in cell structure, metabolism, growth, and differentiation. Moreover, killing the sick kDNA-mutated bone marrow cells with cytostatic and anti-folate drugs and transplanting healthy marrow cells inhibited heart rejection. We report here for the first time that healthy bone marrow cells inhibited heart pathology in kDNA+ chickens and thus prevented the genetically driven clinical manifestations of the disease. PMID:25521296

  5. Fabrication of brittle materials -- current status

    SciTech Connect

    Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    The research initiatives in the area of precision fabrication will be continued in the upcoming year. Three students, T. Bifano (PhD), P. Blake (PhD) and E. Smith (MS), finished their research programs in the last year. Sections 13 and 14 will summarize the essential results from the work of the Materials Engineering students Blake and Smith. Further details will be presented in forthcoming publications that are now in preparation. The results from Bifano`s thesis have been published in adequate detail and need not be summarized further. Three new students, S. Blackley (MS), H. Paul (PhD), and S. Smith (PhD) have joined the program and will continue the research efforts in precision fabrication. The programs for these students will be outlined in Sections 15 and 16. Because of the success of the earlier work in establishing new process models and experimental techniques for the study of diamond turning and diamond grinding, the new programs will, in part, build upon the earlier work. This is especially true for investigations concerned with brittle materials. The basic understanding of material response of nominally brittle materials during machining or grinding operations remains as a challenge. The precision fabrication of brittle materials will continue as an area of emphasis for the Precision Engineering Center.

  6. Rationale for bone marrow transplantation in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Ikehara, S; Good, R A; Nakamura, T; Sekita, K; Inoue, S; Oo, M M; Muso, E; Ogawa, K; Hamashima, Y

    1985-01-01

    Transplantation of normal bone marrow from C3H/HeN nu/nu (H-2k) mice into young MRL/MP-lpr/lpr (MRL/l; H-2k) mice (less than 1.5 mo) prevented the development of autoimmune diseases and characteristic thymic abnormalities in the recipient mice. When female MRL/1 (greater than 2 mo) or male BXSB (H-2b) mice (9 mo) with autoimmune diseases and lymphadenopathy were lethally irradiated and then reconstituted with allogeneic bone marrow cells from young BALB/c nu/nu (H-2d) mice (less than 2 mo), the recipients survived for more than 3 mo after the bone marrow transplantation and showed no graft-versus-host reaction. Histopathological study revealed that lymphadenopathy disappeared and that all evidence of autoimmune disease either was prevented from developing or was completely corrected even after its development in such mice. All abnormal T-cell functions were restored to normal. The newly developed T cells were found to be tolerant of both bone marrow donor-type (BALB/c) and host-type (MRL/1 or BXSB) major histocompatibility complex (MHC) determinants. Therefore, T-cell dysfunction in autoimmune-prone mice can be associated with both the involutionary changes that occur in the thymus of the autoimmune-prone mice and also to abnormalities that reside in the stem cells. However, normal stem cells from BALB/c nu/nu donors can differentiate into normal functional T cells even in mice whose thymus had undergone considerable involution, as in the case of BXSB or MRL/1 mice in the present studies. These findings suggest that marrow transplantation may be a strategy ultimately to be considered as an approach to treatment of life-threatening autoimmune diseases in humans. T-cell dysfunction in autoimmune-prone mice previously attributed to involutionary changes that occur in the thymus of these mice may instead be attributed to abnormalities that basically reside in the stem cells of the autoimmune-prone mice. Images PMID:3887403

  7. Genomic deletion of a long-range bone enhancer misregulatessclerostin in Van Buchem disease

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, Gabriela G.; Kneissel, Michaela; Keller, Hansjoerg; Baptist, Myma; Chang, Jessie; Collette, Nicole M.; Ovcharenko, Dmitriy; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Rubin, Edward M.

    2005-04-15

    Mutations in distant regulatory elements can negatively impact human development and health, yet due to the difficulty of detecting these critical sequences we predominantly focus on coding sequences for diagnostic purposes. We have undertaken a comparative sequence-based approach to characterize a large noncoding region deleted in patients affected by Van Buchem disease (VB), a severe sclerosing bone dysplasia. Using BAC recombination and transgenesis we characterized the expression of human sclerostin (sost) from normal (hSOSTwt) or Van Buchem(hSOSTvb D) alleles. Only the hSOSTwt allele faithfully expressed high levels of human sost in the adult bone and impacted bone metabolism, consistent with the model that the VB noncoding deletion removes a sost specific regulatory element. By exploiting cross-species sequence comparisons with in vitro and in vivo enhancer assays we were able to identify a candidate enhancer element that drives human sost expression in osteoblast-like cell lines in vitro and in the skeletal anlage of the E14.5 mouse embryo, and discovered a novel function for sclerostin during limb development. Our approach represents a framework for characterizing distant regulatory elements associated with abnormal human phenotypes.

  8. Increased serum IgE concentrations during infection and graft versus host disease after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, S A; Rogers, T R; Perry, D; Hobbs, J R; Riches, P G

    1984-01-01

    Serum IgE concentrations estimated in 25 bone marrow transplant recipients during episodes of infection or graft versus host disease, or both, were raised not only in some patients with acute graft versus host disease but also in many patients with infection. Raised values were not seen in chronic graft versus host disease. The routine estimation of serum IgE in bone marrow transplant recipients had minimal value because of the lack of specificity of the IgE response. PMID:6368605

  9. Sclerostin levels in uremic patients: a link between bone and vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bruzzese, Annamaria; Lacquaniti, Antonio; Cernaro, Valeria; Ricciardi, Carlo Alberto; Loddo, Saverio; Romeo, Adolfo; Montalto, Gaetano; Costantino, Giuseppe; Torre, Francesco; Pettinato, Giuseppina; Salamone, Ignazio; Aloisi, Carmela; Santoro, Domenico; Buemi, Michele

    2016-06-01

    Sclerostin is a marker of low-turnover bone disease in end stage renal disease patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum sclerostin in uremic patients, analyzing its behavior during a single hemodialysis session. Twenty-one adult patients on intermittent hemodialysis treatment were enrolled. Acetate Free Bio-filtration (AFB) was the technique employed. Uremic patients were characterized by higher levels of serum sclerostin when compared with values observed in healthy subjects. Sclerostin assessed in pre-dialysis samples was 1.4 ± 1.02 ng/mL, whereas, in post dialysis samples, a reduction of sclerostin values was observed (0.8 ± 0.6 ng/mL; p: 0.008). Sclerostin correlated with parameters of dialysis adequacy, such as creatinine levels and Kt/V values, and it was significantly associated with atherosclerotic disease. Receiver operating characteristics analysis revealed a good diagnostic profile in identifying atherosclerotic disease. Sclerostin, a full dialyzable substance during AFB dialysis, is closely associated with atherosclerotic disease. Its reduction obtained through AFB could represent a defensive mechanism, improving vascular disease and renal osteodystrophy. PMID:27001371

  10. A phase IIa, nonrandomized study of radium-223 dichloride in advanced breast cancer patients with bone-dominant disease.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Robert; Aksnes, Anne-Kirsti; Naume, Bjørn; Garcia, Camilo; Jerusalem, Guy; Piccart, Martine; Vobecky, Nancy; Thuresson, Marcus; Flamen, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Radium-223 dichloride (radium-223) mimics calcium and emits high-energy, short-range alpha-particles resulting in an antitumor effect on bone metastases. This open-label, phase IIa nonrandomized study investigated safety and short-term efficacy of radium-223 in breast cancer patients with bone-dominant disease. Twenty-three advanced breast cancer patients with progressive bone-dominant disease, and no longer candidates for further endocrine therapy, were to receive radium-223 (50 kBq/kg IV) every 4 weeks for 4 cycles. The coprimary end points were change in urinary N-telopeptide of type 1 (uNTX-1) and serum bone alkaline phosphatase (bALP) after 16 weeks of treatment. Exploratory end points included sequential (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) to assess metabolic changes in osteoblastic bone metastases. Safety data were collected for all patients. Radium-223 significantly reduced uNTX-1 and bALP from baseline to end of treatment. Median uNTX-1 change was -10.1 nmol bone collagen equivalents/mmol creatinine (-32.8 %; P = 0.0124); median bALP change was -16.7 ng/mL (-42.0 %; P = 0.0045). Twenty of twenty-three patients had FDG PET/CT identifying 155 hypermetabolic osteoblastic bone lesions at baseline: 50 lesions showed metabolic decrease (≥25 % reduction of maximum standardized uptake value from baseline) after 2 radium-223 injections [32.3 % metabolic response rate (mRR) at week 9], persisting after the treatment period (41.5 % mRR at week 17). Radium-223 was safe and well tolerated. Radium-223 targets areas of increased bone metabolism and shows biological activity in advanced breast cancer patients with bone-dominant disease.

  11. The Impact of Conventional and Biological Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs on Bone Biology. Rheumatoid Arthritis as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Barreira, Sofia Carvalho; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2016-08-01

    The bone and the immune system have a very tight interaction. Systemic immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), induce bone loss, leading to a twofold increase in osteoporosis and an increase of fragility fracture risk of 1.35-2.13 times. This review focuses on the effects of conventional and biological disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) on bone biology, in the context of systemic inflammation, with a focus on RA. Published evidence supports a decrease in osteoclastic activity induced by DMARDs, which leads to positive effects on bone mineral density (BMD). It is unknown if this effect could be translated into fracture risk reduction. The combination with antiosteoclastic drugs can have an additional benefit.

  12. Vanishing bone disease in a five year old: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, P; Ord, R A; Sun, C-C J

    2003-04-01

    Vanishing bone disease is a rare condition of unknown aetiology. It can affect almost any bone, including those of the maxillofacial region. It is most commonly seen in the second and third decades of life. To the author's knowledge, this is the second case reported in the maxillofacial region of a child within the first decade of life, and the first who survived. PMID:12729788

  13. Identification of DNA methylation changes associated with disease progression in subchondral bone with site-matched cartilage in knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanfei; Fukui, Naoshi; Yahata, Mitsunori; Katsuragawa, Yozo; Tashiro, Toshiyuki; Ikegawa, Shiro; Lee, Ming Ta Michael

    2016-01-01

    Subchondral bone plays a key role in the development of osteoarthritis, however, epigenetics of subchondral bone has not been extensively studied. In this study, we examined the genome-wide DNA methylation profiles of subchondral bone from three regions on tibial plateau representing disease progression using HumanMethylation450 BeadChip to identify progression associated DNA methylation alterations. Significant differential methylated probes (DMPs) and differential methylated genes (DMGs) were identified in the intermediate and late stages and during the transition from intermediate to late stage of OA in the subchondral bone. Over half of the DMPs were hyper-methylated. Genes associated with OA and bone remodeling were identified. DMGs were enriched in morphogenesis and development of skeletal system, and HOX transcription factors. Comparison of DMGs identified in subchondral bone and site-matched cartilage indicated that DNA methylation changes occurred earlier in subchondral bone and identified different methylation patterns at the late stage of OA. However, shared DMPs, DMGs and common pathways that implicated the tissue reparation were also identified. Methylation is one key mechanism to regulate the crosstalk between cartilage and subchondral bone. PMID:27686527

  14. Bone Remodeling Associated Salivary Biomarker MIP-1α Distinguishes Periodontal Disease from Health

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Alladah, Amjad; Lin, Yushun; Kryscio, Richard J.; Thomas, Mark V.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Miller, Craig S.

    2011-01-01

    Background and objective The field of salivary diagnostics lacks an accepted and validated biomarker of alveolar bone remodeling. To address this we examined levels of salivary biomolecules specifically associated with biological aspects of bone remodeling in subjects with chronic periodontitis in a case-control study. Methods Levels of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, osteoprotegerin (OPG), C-telopeptide pyridinoline cross-links of type I collagen (ICTP), and β-C-terminal type I collagen telopeptide (β-CTX) in unstimulated whole saliva of 80 subjects (40 subjects with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis and 40 gender- and age-matched healthy control subjects) were measured using enzyme immunosorbent assays. Saliva was collected before clinical examination that included probing depth (PD), clinical attachment loss (CAL), and bleeding on probing (BOP). Results The mean level of MIP-1α in periodontitis subjects was 18-fold higher than in healthy subjects (p < 0.0001). Clinical periodontal indices significantly correlated with MIP-1α levels (p < 0.0001). MIP-1α, of the biomolecules examined, demonstrated the highest ability to discriminate between periodontal disease and health as determined by area under the curve (AUC = 0.94) and classification and regression tree analysis (sensitivity 94%, specificity 92.7%). OPG levels were elevated 1.6-fold (P = 0.055), whereas ICTP and β-CTX levels were below the level of detection in the majority of subjects. Conclusion These findings suggest that the chemokine MIP-1α may aid in identifying periodontitis. Future longitudinal studies are warranted to determine whether this biomarker can help to ascertain progression of bone loss in subjects with periodontal disease. PMID:22126530

  15. Osteoporosis: Modern Paradigms for Last Century’s Bones

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Marlena C.; Wolber, Frances M.

    2016-01-01

    The skeleton is a metabolically active organ undergoing continuously remodelling. With ageing and menopause the balance shifts to increased resorption, leading to a reduction in bone mineral density and disruption of bone microarchitecture. Bone mass accretion and bone metabolism are influenced by systemic hormones as well as genetic and lifestyle factors. The classic paradigm has described osteoporosis as being a “brittle bone” disease that occurs in post-menopausal, thin, Caucasian women with low calcium intakes and/or vitamin D insufficiency. However, a study of black women in Africa demonstrated that higher proportions of body fat did not protect bone health. Isoflavone interventions in Asian postmenopausal women have produced inconsistent bone health benefits, due in part to population heterogeneity in enteric bacterial metabolism of daidzein. A comparison of women and men in several Asian countries identified significant differences between countries in the rate of bone health decline, and a high incidence rate of osteoporosis in both sexes. These studies have revealed significant differences in genetic phenotypes, debunking long-held beliefs and leading to new paradigms in study design. Current studies are now being specifically designed to assess genotype differences between Caucasian, Asian, African, and other phenotypes, and exploring alternative methodology to measure bone architecture. PMID:27322315

  16. Metastatic bone disease: the requirement for improvement in a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Cumming, D; Cumming, J; Vince, A; Benson, R

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the referral system, clinical notes and radiographs of patients presenting with metastatic disease of long bones. The study demonstrated that 93% of oncologists did not use a reliable scoring system to assess risk of pathological fracture, and 60% felt an improvement in communication was required. Notes and radiographs were reviewed for 37 patients presenting with femoral metastatic lesions. Sixteen patients had a Mirels' score of greater than 8. Four patients were referred for an orthopaedic opinion. Twelve patients with a score of greater than 8 were not referred; seven of these patients suffered a pathological fracture. Sixteen patients had a Mirels' score of less than 8; none of these patients were referred for an orthopaedic opinion. No pathological fractures occurred. In conclusion, the majority of patients who score above 8 in the Mirels' scoring system are at risk of fracture and do require prophylactic surgery. In keeping with the British Orthopaedic Association (BOA) guidelines, "Metastatic Bone Disease: A Guide to Good Practice", we would recommend a multidisciplinary approach and the use of a recognised scoring system.

  17. Genetic Sharing with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Diabetes Reveals Novel Bone Mineral Density Loci

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Wesley K.; McEvoy, Linda K.; Schork, Andrew J.; Zuber, Verena; LeBlanc, Marissa; Bettella, Francesco; Mills, Ian G.; Desikan, Rahul S.; Djurovic, Srdjan; Gautvik, Kaare M.; Dale, Anders M.; Andreassen, Ole A.

    2015-01-01

    Bone Mineral Density (BMD) is a highly heritable trait, but genome-wide association studies have identified few genetic risk factors. Epidemiological studies suggest associations between BMD and several traits and diseases, but the nature of the suggestive comorbidity is still unknown. We used a novel genetic pleiotropy-informed conditional False Discovery Rate (FDR) method to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with BMD by leveraging cardiovascular disease (CVD) associated disorders and metabolic traits. By conditioning on SNPs associated with the CVD-related phenotypes, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, triglycerides and waist hip ratio, we identified 65 novel independent BMD loci (26 with femoral neck BMD and 47 with lumbar spine BMD) at conditional FDR < 0.01. Many of the loci were confirmed in genetic expression studies. Genes validated at the mRNA levels were characteristic for the osteoblast/osteocyte lineage, Wnt signaling pathway and bone metabolism. The results provide new insight into genetic mechanisms of variability in BMD, and a better understanding of the genetic underpinnings of clinical comorbidity. PMID:26695485

  18. Effect of calcitonin treatment on osteoclast counts in Paget's disease of bone.

    PubMed

    Williams, C P; Meachim, G; Taylor, W H

    1978-12-01

    Histological and biochemical changes during calcitonin treatment have been studied in 15 patients with Paget's disease of bone. For each patient, osteoclast counts were made by the same observer on serial needle biopsies of diseased bone from the posterosuperior iliac spine. Serial estimations were also made of the serum alkaline phosphatase and urinary hydroxyproline excretion. A total of 66 biopsies was examined (ranging from two to seven per patient). Osteoclast populations and the biochemical measurements were log normally distributed. During calcitonin treatment there was a statistically significant decrease in: (1) the total osteoclast count per square millimetre; (2) the number per square millimetre of osteoclasts in resorption cavities on the trabecular surface; (3) the relative proportion of osteoclasts sited in resorption cavities compared with total osteoclasts; (4) the serum alkaline phosphatase level; (5) 24-hour urinary hydroxyproline excretion. On stopping treatment there was a statistically significant increase in all of these histological and biochemical values except that the proportion of osteoclasts in resorption cavities remained low. The trabecular cement line pattern remained abnormal during and after treatment in all biopsies examined, and complete suppression of osteoclast activity was not observed. One of the patients developed a Paget's osteosarcoma while on calcitonin therapy.

  19. Bone mass and vitamin D levels in Parkinson’s disease: is there any difference between genders?

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Erhan Arif; Gundogdu, Ibrahim; Tonuk, Burak; Kocer, Bilge Gonenli; Tombak, Yasemin; Comoglu, Selcuk; Cakci, Aytul

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the bone mineral density, vitamin D level, and frequencies of osteopenia and osteoporosis in patients with Parkinson’s disease and to compare male and female patients with the controls separately. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred fifteen Parkinson’s disease patients (47 males, 68 females; age range: 55–85 years) and 117 age- and gender-matched controls (47 males, 70 females) were enrolled in the study. Bone mineral density measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and serum D vitamin levels of each participant were recorded. [Results] The mean lumbar spine, femur neck, and total femur bone mineral density levels, T-scores, and vitamin D levels were found to be significantly lower in Parkinson’s disease patients in both genders. Furthermore, osteoporosis rates were found be significantly higher only in female Parkinson’s disease patients compared with female controls. [Conclusion] Data from the present study revealed that while osteoporosis was significantly higher only in female Parkinson’s disease patients, all Parkinson’s disease patients had lower bone mineral density scores and vitamin D levels compared with the controls regardless of gender, suggesting that clinicians should pay attention to the osteoporosis risk in Parkinson’s disease and that adequate preventive measures should be taken in order to limit the future risk due to osteoporotic fractures. PMID:27630398

  20. Bone mass and vitamin D levels in Parkinson’s disease: is there any difference between genders?

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Erhan Arif; Gundogdu, Ibrahim; Tonuk, Burak; Kocer, Bilge Gonenli; Tombak, Yasemin; Comoglu, Selcuk; Cakci, Aytul

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the bone mineral density, vitamin D level, and frequencies of osteopenia and osteoporosis in patients with Parkinson’s disease and to compare male and female patients with the controls separately. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred fifteen Parkinson’s disease patients (47 males, 68 females; age range: 55–85 years) and 117 age- and gender-matched controls (47 males, 70 females) were enrolled in the study. Bone mineral density measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and serum D vitamin levels of each participant were recorded. [Results] The mean lumbar spine, femur neck, and total femur bone mineral density levels, T-scores, and vitamin D levels were found to be significantly lower in Parkinson’s disease patients in both genders. Furthermore, osteoporosis rates were found be significantly higher only in female Parkinson’s disease patients compared with female controls. [Conclusion] Data from the present study revealed that while osteoporosis was significantly higher only in female Parkinson’s disease patients, all Parkinson’s disease patients had lower bone mineral density scores and vitamin D levels compared with the controls regardless of gender, suggesting that clinicians should pay attention to the osteoporosis risk in Parkinson’s disease and that adequate preventive measures should be taken in order to limit the future risk due to osteoporotic fractures.

  1. Effects of Cushing Disease on Bone Mineral Density in a Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Lodish, Maya B.; Hsiao, Hui-Pin; Sermbis, Anastasios; Sinaii, Ninet; Rothenbuhler, Anya; Keil, Margaret F; Boikos, Sosipatros A.; Reynolds, James C.; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate bone mineral density (BMD) in children with Cushing disease before and after transphenoidal surgery (TSS). Study design Hologic dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans of 35 children with Cushing disease were analyzed retrospectively. Sixteen of the 35 patients had follow up DXA scans 13–18 months after TSS. BMD and bone mineral apparent density (BMAD) for lumbar spine (LS) L1–L4 and femoral neck (FN) were calculated. Results Preoperatively, 38% and 23% of patients had osteopenia of the LS and FN, respectively. Both BMD and BMAD Z-scores of the LS were worse than those for the FN (−1.60 ± 1.37 vs. −1.04 ± 1.19, p=0.003), and (−1.90 ± 1.49 vs. −0.06 ± 1.90, p<.001); postoperative improvement in BMD and BMAD were more pronounced in LS as compared with the FN (0.84 ± 0.88 vs. 0.15 ± 0.62, p<.001) and (0.73 ± 1.13 vs −0.26 ± 1.21, p=0.015). Pubertal stage, cortisol levels, and length of disease had no effects on BMD. Conclusions In children with Cushing disease, vertebral BMD was more severely affected than femoral BMD and was independent of degree or duration of hypercortisolism. BMD for the LS improved significantly after TSS; osteopenia in this group may be reversible. PMID:20223476

  2. Pathophysiology of the Chronic Kidney Disease – Mineral Bone Disorder (CKD-MBD)

    PubMed Central

    Hruska, Keith A.; Seifert, Michael; Sugatani, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review The causes of excess cardiovascular mortality associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have been attributed in part to the CKD-mineral bone disorder syndrome (CKD-MBD), wherein, novel cardiovascular risk factors have been identified. The causes of the CKD-MBD are not well known and they will be discussed in this review Recent findings The discovery of WNT (portmanteau of wingless and int) inhibitors, especially Dickkopf 1 (Dkk1), produced during renal repair as participating in the pathogenesis of the vascular and skeletal components of the CKD-MBD implied that additional pathogenic factors are critical, and whose discovery lead to the finding that activin A is a second renal repair factor circulating in increased levels during CKD. Activin A derives from peritubular myofibroblasts of diseased kidneys, wherein it stimulates fibrosis, and decreases tubular klotho expression.The type 2 activin A receptor, ActRIIA, is induced by CKD in atherosclerotic aortas specifically in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Inhibition of ActRIIA signaling by a ligand trap inhibited CKD induced VSMC dedifferentiation, osteogenic transition and atherosclerotic calcification. Inhibition of ActRIIA signaling in the kidney decreased renal fibrosis and proteinuria. Summary These studies demonstrate that circulating renal repair factors are causal of the CKD-MBD and CKD associated cardiovascular disease, and identify ActRIIA signaling as a therapeutic target in CKD that links progression of renal disease and vascular disease. PMID:26050115

  3. Characterization of Gaucher disease bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells reveals an altered inflammatory secretome

    PubMed Central

    Campeau, Philippe M.; Rafei, Moutih; Boivin, Marie-Noëlle; Sun, Ying; Grabowski, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    Gaucher disease causes pathologic skeletal changes that are not fully explained. Considering the important role of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in bone structural development and maintenance, we analyzed the cellular biochemistry of MSCs from an adult patient with Gaucher disease type 1 (N370S/L444P mutations). Gaucher MSCs possessed a low glucocerebrosidase activity and consequently had a 3-fold increase in cellular glucosylceramide. Gaucher MSCs have a typical MSC marker phenotype, normal osteocytic and adipocytic differentiation, growth, exogenous lactosylceramide trafficking, cholesterol content, lysosomal morphology, and total lysosomal content, and a marked increase in COX-2, prostaglandin E2, interleukin-8, and CCL2 production compared with normal controls. Transcriptome analysis on normal MSCs treated with the glucocerebrosidase inhibitor conduritol B epoxide showed an up-regulation of an array of inflammatory mediators, including CCL2, and other differentially regulated pathways. These cells also showed a decrease in sphingosine-1-phosphate. In conclusion, Gaucher disease MSCs display an altered secretome that could contribute to skeletal disease and immune disease manifestations in a manner distinct and additive to Gaucher macrophages themselves. PMID:19587377

  4. Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein, Its Regulation of Cartilage and Bone Development, and Role in Treating Bone Diseases.

    PubMed

    Martin, T John

    2016-07-01

    Although parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) was discovered as a cancer-derived hormone, it has been revealed as an important paracrine/autocrine regulator in many tissues, where its effects are context dependent. Thus its location and action in the vasculature explained decades-long observations that injection of PTH into animals rapidly lowered blood pressure by producing vasodilatation. Its roles have been specified in development and maturity in cartilage and bone as a crucial regulator of endochondral bone formation and bone remodeling, respectively. Although it shares actions with parathyroid hormone (PTH) through the use of their common receptor, PTHR1, PTHrP has other actions mediated by regions within the molecule beyond the amino-terminal sequence that resembles PTH, including the ability to promote placental transfer of calcium from mother to fetus. A striking feature of the physiology of PTHrP is that it possesses structural features that equip it to be transported in and out of the nucleus, and makes use of a specific nuclear import mechanism to do so. Evidence from mouse genetic experiments shows that PTHrP generated locally in bone is essential for normal bone remodeling. Whereas the main physiological function of PTH is the hormonal regulation of calcium metabolism, locally generated PTHrP is the important physiological mediator of bone remodeling postnatally. Thus the use of intermittent injection of PTH as an anabolic therapy for bone appears to be a pharmacological application of the physiological function of PTHrP. There is much current interest in the possibility of developing PTHrP analogs that might enhance the therapeutic anabolic effects. PMID:27142453

  5. Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein, Its Regulation of Cartilage and Bone Development, and Role in Treating Bone Diseases.

    PubMed

    Martin, T John

    2016-07-01

    Although parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) was discovered as a cancer-derived hormone, it has been revealed as an important paracrine/autocrine regulator in many tissues, where its effects are context dependent. Thus its location and action in the vasculature explained decades-long observations that injection of PTH into animals rapidly lowered blood pressure by producing vasodilatation. Its roles have been specified in development and maturity in cartilage and bone as a crucial regulator of endochondral bone formation and bone remodeling, respectively. Although it shares actions with parathyroid hormone (PTH) through the use of their common receptor, PTHR1, PTHrP has other actions mediated by regions within the molecule beyond the amino-terminal sequence that resembles PTH, including the ability to promote placental transfer of calcium from mother to fetus. A striking feature of the physiology of PTHrP is that it possesses structural features that equip it to be transported in and out of the nucleus, and makes use of a specific nuclear import mechanism to do so. Evidence from mouse genetic experiments shows that PTHrP generated locally in bone is essential for normal bone remodeling. Whereas the main physiological function of PTH is the hormonal regulation of calcium metabolism, locally generated PTHrP is the important physiological mediator of bone remodeling postnatally. Thus the use of intermittent injection of PTH as an anabolic therapy for bone appears to be a pharmacological application of the physiological function of PTHrP. There is much current interest in the possibility of developing PTHrP analogs that might enhance the therapeutic anabolic effects.

  6. Bone metabolism status and associated risk factors in elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    PubMed

    Xiaomei, Wang; Hang, Xiao; Lingling, Liu; Xuejun, Li

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of osteoporosis in older patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is higher than in the age-matched elderly patients, but the exact cause in relation to COPD is not clear. We hypothesized that the underlying causes for this difference are related to bone metabolism with the possible risk factors that include the duration of COPD, GOLD grade, cor pulmonale, the frequencies of acute exacerbations within the past year, smoking and inhaled corticosteroid therapy. We conducted a matched-pair study of 100 patients aged older than 65 years at the Southwest Hospital from May to November 2012. The enrolled patients with COPD were matched to controls for age and gender. Clinical characteristics of cohorts were recorded. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and osteoporosis was diagnosed according to the definition of WHO. All cohorts accepted bone metabolism marker measurement, including Procollagen type 1 aminoterminal propeptide (P1NP), β-C-telopeptides of type I collagen (βCTX), and N-terminal midmolecule fragment osteocalcin (N-MID OC). Statistical analysis was calculated using the student's t test, ANOVA and multiple regression analysis at a significance level set at a p < 0.05. Circulating biochemical markers of bone formation (P1NP), resorption (βCTX) and turnover (N-MID OC) were significantly lower in the COPD group than control group, while mean 25-OH Vitamin D was similar in two groups. The P1NP, βCTX, and N-MID OC were still lower in men with COPD, but only P1NP was lower in women with COPD compared to that of controls. Multiple regression analysis in COPD group suggests that age, the frequency of acute exacerbation, and BMD are independent risk factors for P1NP. The frequency of acute exacerbation within the past one year and 25-OH D level are independent risk factors for βCTX; the frequency of acute exacerbation is the only independent risk factor for N-MID OC. These were significant

  7. Randomized trial of intensive bisphosphonate treatment versus symptomatic management in Paget's disease of bone.

    PubMed

    Langston, Anne L; Campbell, Marion K; Fraser, William D; MacLennan, Graeme S; Selby, Peter L; Ralston, Stuart H

    2010-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely regarded as the treatment of choice for Paget's disease of bone (PDB) because of their potent inhibitory effects on bone turnover, but the effects of bisphosphonate therapy on symptoms and complications of PDB have been little studied. Here we report the results of a randomized trial that compared the effects of symptomatic treatment with intensive bisphosphonate therapy in a cohort of 1324 patients with PDB who were followed up for a median of 3 years (range 2 to 5 years). The symptomatic treatment group was treated only if they had pagetic bone pain, for which they were first given analgesics or anti-inflammatory drugs, followed by bisphosphonates if they did not respond. The intensive group received repeat courses of bisphosphonates irrespective of symptoms with the aim of reducing and maintaining serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels within the normal range. The endpoints were fracture, orthopedic surgery, quality of life, bone pain, and hearing thresholds. Serum ALP levels were significantly lower in the intensive treatment group than in with the symptomatic treatment group within 4 months of commencing treatment and remained lower throughout the study (p < .001). There was no difference between the groups in quality of life (as assessed by the SF36 questionnaire), in overall bodily pain, or in pagetic bone pain. Hearing thresholds, as assessed by audiometry did not change significantly and did not differ between the treatment groups. Clinical fractures occurred in 46 of 661 patients (7.0%) in the intensive treatment group compared with 49 of 663 patients (7.4%) in the symptomatic treatment group, and orthopedic surgery was required in 50 of 661 patients (7.3%) in the intensive treatment group and in 55 of 663 patients (8.3%) in the symptomatic treatment group. These differences were not significant. Subgroup analyses of patients with elevated ALP levels at baseline and those who did or did not receive bisphosphonates during the

  8. A Unique Case of Erdheim-Chester Disease with Axial Skeleton, Lymph Node, and Bone Marrow Involvement.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jin; Kim, Ki Hwan; Suh, Koung Jin; Yoh, Kyung Ah; Moon, Jin Young; Kim, Ji Eun; Roh, Eun Youn; Choi, In Sil; Kim, Jin-Soo; Park, Jin Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease is a rare non-Langerhans-cell histiocytosis with bone and organ involvement. A 76-year-old man presented with low back pain and a history of visits for exertional dyspnea. We diagnosed him with anemia of chronic disease, cytopenia related to chronic illness, chronic renal failure due to hypertension, and hypothyroidism. However, we could not determine a definite cause or explanation for the cytopenia. Multiple osteosclerotic axial skeleton lesions and axillary lymph node enlargement were detected by computed tomography. Bone marrow biopsy revealed histiocytic infiltration, which was CD68-positive and CD1a-negative. This report describes an unusual presentation of Erdheim-Chester disease involving the bone marrow, axial skeleton, and lymph nodes.

  9. Prevalence of Bone Mineral Density Abnormalities and Factors Affecting Bone Density in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Sathish Kumar; Gopal, Gopinath Kango; Rangasami, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a disease of wasting with airflow limitation, associated with a variety of systemic manifestations such as reduced Bone Mineral Density (BMD). There is a paucity of Indian studies on the effects of COPD on BMD. Aim This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis in COPD patients and the correlation between bone density and severity of COPD classified according to GOLD Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines (GOLD). Materials and Methods A prospective study of 60 patients diagnosed to have COPD, was conducted in the outpatient department of Respiratory Medicine, at a tertiary care hospital in Southern India, between September 2012 and September 2013. BMD was measured using ultrasound bone densitometer (ACHILLES GE HEALTH CARE). Patients with a T-score between -1 and -2.5 were considered to be osteopenic while patients with a T score less than -2.5 were considered to be osteoporotic (WHO criteria). Results Overall, 40 (67%) patients had an abnormal bone mineral density. A total of 21 (35%) patients were osteoporotic while 19 (33%) were osteopenic. BMD levels correlated with severity of obstruction (p<0.001), smoking status (p=0.02), age (p=0.05) and number of pack years (p=0.001). Conclusion Patients with COPD are at an increased risk for lower BMD and osteoporotic fractures and the risk appears to increase with disease severity. Further studies are required to assess whether routine BMD measurements in COPD patients is beneficial to diagnose osteoporosis and reduce morbidity. PMID:27790490

  10. In silico investigations of the anti-catabolic effects of pamidronate and denosumab on multiple myeloma-induced bone disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Lin, Bo

    2012-01-01

    It is unclear whether the new anti-catabolic agent denosumab represents a viable alternative to the widely used anti-catabolic agent pamidronate in the treatment of Multiple Myeloma (MM)-induced bone disease. This lack of clarity primarily stems from the lack of sufficient clinical investigations, which are costly and time consuming. However, in silico investigations require less time and expense, suggesting that they may be a useful complement to traditional clinical investigations. In this paper, we aim to (i) develop integrated computational models that are suitable for investigating the effects of pamidronate and denosumab on MM-induced bone disease and (ii) evaluate the responses to pamidronate and denosumab treatments using these integrated models. To achieve these goals, pharmacokinetic models of pamidronate and denosumab are first developed and then calibrated and validated using different clinical datasets. Next, the integrated computational models are developed by incorporating the simulated transient concentrations of pamidronate and denosumab and simulations of their actions on the MM-bone compartment into the previously proposed MM-bone model. These integrated models are further calibrated and validated by different clinical datasets so that they are suitable to be applied to investigate the responses to the pamidronate and denosumab treatments. Finally, these responses are evaluated by quantifying the bone volume, bone turnover, and MM-cell density. This evaluation identifies four denosumab regimes that potentially produce an overall improved bone-related response compared with the recommended pamidronate regime. This in silico investigation supports the idea that denosumab represents an appropriate alternative to pamidronate in the treatment of MM-induced bone disease.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging and BMB score in the evaluation of bone involvement in Gaucher’s disease patients*

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Ricardo Andrade Fernandes; Mello, Melissa Bozzi Nonato; Pessanha, Laís Bastos

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate by magnetic resonance imaging changes in bone marrow of patients undergoing treatment for type I Gaucher’s disease. Materials and Methods Descriptive, cross-sectional study of Gaucher’s disease patients submitted to 3 T magnetic resonance imaging of femurs and lumbar spine. The images were blindly reviewed and the findings were classified according to the semiquantitative bone marrow burden (BMB) scoring system. Results All of the seven evaluated patients (three men and four women) presented signs of bone marrow infiltration. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head was found in three patients, Erlenmeyer flask deformity in five, and no patient had vertebral body collapse. The mean BMB score was 11, ranging from 9 to 14. Conclusion Magnetic resonance imaging is currently the method of choice for assessing bone involvement in Gaucher’s disease in adults due to its high sensitivity to detect both focal and diffuse bone marrow changes, and the BMB score is a simplified method for semiquantitative analysis, without depending on advanced sequences or sophisticated hardware, allowing for the classification of the disease extent and assisting in the treatment monitoring. PMID:26379319

  12. Modeling of dynamic fragmentation in brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Olga

    Fragmentation of brittle materials under high rates of loading is commonly encountered in materials processing and under impact loading conditions. Theoretical models intended to correlate the features of dynamic fragmentation have been suggested during the past few years with the goal of providing a rational basis for prediction of fragment sizes. In this thesis, a new model based on the dynamics of the process is developed. In this model, the spatial distribution and strength variation representative of flaws in real brittle materials are taken into account. The model captures the competition between rising mean stress in a brittle material due to an imposed high strain rate and falling mean stress due to loss of compliance. The model is studied computationally through an adaptation of a concept introduced by Xu and Needleman (1994). The deformable body is first divided into many small regions. Then, the mechanical behavior of the material is characterized by two constitutive relations, a volumetric constitutive relationship between stress and strain within the small continuous regions and a cohesive surface constitutive relationship between traction and displacement discontinuity across the cohesive surfaces between the small regions. These surfaces provide prospective fracture paths. Numerical experiments were conducted for a system with initial and boundary conditions similar to those invoked in the simple energy balance models, in order to provide a basis for comparison. It is found that, these models lead to estimates of fragment size which are an order of magnitude larger than those obtained by a more detailed calculation. The differences indicate that the simple analytical models, which deal with the onset of fragmentation but not its evolution, are inadequate as a basis for a complete description of a dynamic fragmentation process. The computational model is then adapted to interpret experimental observations on the increasing energy dissipation for

  13. Controlled crack growth specimen for brittle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1992-01-01

    A pure Mode 1 fracture specimen and test procedure has been developed which provides extended, stable, through-thickness crack growth in ceramics and other brittle, nonmetallic materials. Fixed displacement loading, applied at the crack mouth, promotes stable crack extension by reducing the stored elastic strain energy. Extremely fine control of applied displacements is achieved by utilizing the Poisson's expansion of a compressively loaded cylindrical pin. Stable cracks were successfully grown in soda-lime glass and monolithic Al2O3 for lengths in excess of 2O mm without uncontrollable catastrophic failure.

  14. Controlled crack growth specimen for brittle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1990-01-01

    A pure Mode 1 fracture specimen and test procedure has been developed which provides extended, stable, through-thickness crack growth in ceramics and other brittle, nonmetallic materials. Fixed displacement loading, applied at the crack mouth, promotes stable crack extension by reducing the stored elastic strain energy. Extremely fine control of applied displacements is achieved by utilizing the Poisson's expansion of a compressively loaded cylindrical pin. Stable cracks were successfully grown in soda-lime glass and monolithic Al2O3 for lengths in excess of 20 mm without uncontrollable catastrophic failure.

  15. Modeling of transformation toughening in brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    LeSar, R.; Rollett, A.D. ); Srolovitz, D.J. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1992-01-24

    Results from modeling of transformation toughening in brittle materials using a discrete micromechanical model are presented. The material is represented as a two-dimensional triangular array of nodes connected by elastic springs. Microstructural effects are included by varying the spring parameters for the bulk, grain boundaries, and transforming particles. Using the width of the damage zone and the effective compliance (after the initial creation of the damage zone) as measures of fracture toughness, we find that there is a strong dependence of toughness on the amount, size, and shape of the transforming particles, with the maximum toughness achieved with the higher amounts of the larger particles.

  16. Aerogel: Tile Composites Toughen a Brittle Superinsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Rasky, Daniel; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Pure aerogels, though familiar in the laboratory for decades as exotic lightweight insulators with unusual physical properties, have had limited industrial applications due to their low strength and high brittleness. Composites formed of aerogels and the ceramic fiber matrices used as space shuttle tiles bypass the fragility of pure aerogels and can enhance the performance of space shuttle tiles in their harsh operating environment. Using a layer of aerogel embedded in a tile may open up a wide range of applications where thermal insulation, gas convection control and mechanical strength matter.

  17. Aerogel: Tile Composites Toughen a Brittle Superinsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Rasky, Daniel; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Pure aerogels, though familiar in the laboratory for decades as exotic lightweight insulators with unusual physical properties, have had limited industrial applications due to their low strength and high brittleness. Composites formed of aerogels and the ceramic fiber matrices like those used as space shuttle tiles bypass the fragility of pure aerogels and can enhance the performance of space shuttle tiles in their harsh operating environment. Using a layer of aerogel embedded in a tile may open up a wide range of applications where thermal insulation, gas convection control and mechanical strength matter.

  18. Novel Lesions of Bones and Joints Associated with Chikungunya Virus Infection in Two Mouse Models of Disease: New Insights into Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Goupil, Brad A.; McNulty, Margaret A.; Martin, Matthew J.; McCracken, Michael K.; Christofferson, Rebecca C.; Mores, Christopher N.

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus is an arbovirus spread predominantly by Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes, and causes debilitating arthralgia and arthritis. While these are common manifestations during acute infection and it has been suggested they can recur in patients chronically, gaps in knowledge regarding the pathogenesis still exist. Two established mouse models were utilized (adult IRF 3/7 -/- -/- and wild-type C57BL/6J mice) to evaluate disease manifestations in bones and joints at various timepoints. Novel lesions in C57BL/6J mice consisted of periostitis (91%) and foci of cartilage of necrosis (50% of mice at 21 DPI). Additionally, at 21 DPI, 50% and 75% of mice exhibited periosteal bone proliferation affecting the metatarsal bones, apparent via histology and μCT, respectively. μCT analysis did not reveal any alterations in trabecular bone volume measurements in C57BL/6J mice. Novel lesions demonstrated in IRF 3/7 -/- -/- mice at 5 DPI included focal regions of cartilage necrosis (20%), periosteal necrosis (66%), and multifocal ischemic bone marrow necrosis (100%). Contralateral feet in 100% of mice of both strains had similar, though milder lesions. Additionally, comparison of control IRF 3/7 -/- -/- and wild-type C57BL/6J mice demonstrated differences in cortical bone. These experiments demonstrate novel manifestations of disease similar to those occurring in humans, adding insight into disease pathogenesis, and representing new potential targets for therapeutic interventions. Additionally, results demonstrate the utility of μCT in studies of bone and joint pathology and illustrate differences in bone dynamics between mouse strains. PMID:27182740

  19. Novel Lesions of Bones and Joints Associated with Chikungunya Virus Infection in Two Mouse Models of Disease: New Insights into Disease Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goupil, Brad A; McNulty, Margaret A; Martin, Matthew J; McCracken, Michael K; Christofferson, Rebecca C; Mores, Christopher N

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus is an arbovirus spread predominantly by Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes, and causes debilitating arthralgia and arthritis. While these are common manifestations during acute infection and it has been suggested they can recur in patients chronically, gaps in knowledge regarding the pathogenesis still exist. Two established mouse models were utilized (adult IRF 3/7 -/- -/- and wild-type C57BL/6J mice) to evaluate disease manifestations in bones and joints at various timepoints. Novel lesions in C57BL/6J mice consisted of periostitis (91%) and foci of cartilage of necrosis (50% of mice at 21 DPI). Additionally, at 21 DPI, 50% and 75% of mice exhibited periosteal bone proliferation affecting the metatarsal bones, apparent via histology and μCT, respectively. μCT analysis did not reveal any alterations in trabecular bone volume measurements in C57BL/6J mice. Novel lesions demonstrated in IRF 3/7 -/- -/- mice at 5 DPI included focal regions of cartilage necrosis (20%), periosteal necrosis (66%), and multifocal ischemic bone marrow necrosis (100%). Contralateral feet in 100% of mice of both strains had similar, though milder lesions. Additionally, comparison of control IRF 3/7 -/- -/- and wild-type C57BL/6J mice demonstrated differences in cortical bone. These experiments demonstrate novel manifestations of disease similar to those occurring in humans, adding insight into disease pathogenesis, and representing new potential targets for therapeutic interventions. Additionally, results demonstrate the utility of μCT in studies of bone and joint pathology and illustrate differences in bone dynamics between mouse strains.

  20. Picking a bone with WISP1 (CCN4): new strategies against degenerative joint disease

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    As the world’s population continues to age, it is estimated that degenerative joint disease disorders such as osteoarthritis will impact at least 130 million individuals throughout the globe by the year 2050. Advanced age, obesity, genetics, gender, bone density, trauma, and a poor level of physical activity can lead to the onset and progression of osteoarthritis. However, factors that lead to degenerative joint disease and involve gender, genetics, epigenetic mechanisms, and advanced age are not within the control of an individual. Furthermore, current therapies including pain management, improved nutrition, and regular programs for exercise do not lead to the resolution of osteoarthritis. As a result, new avenues for targeting the treatment of osteoarthritis are desperately needed. Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (WISP1), a matricellular protein and a downstream target of the wingless pathway Wnt1, is one such target to consider that governs cellular protection, stem cell proliferation, and tissue regeneration in a number of disorders including bone degeneration. However, increased WISP1 expression also has been associated with the progression of osteoarthritis. WISP1 has an intricate relationship with a number of proliferative and protective pathways that include phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K), protein kinase B (Akt), nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), interleukin -6 (IL-6), transforming growth factor-β, matrix metalloproteinase, small non-coding ribonucleic acids (RNAs), sirtuin silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (SIRT1), and the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). Taken together, this complex association WISP1 holds with these signaling pathways necessitates a fine biological regulation of WISP1 activity that can offset the progression of degenerative joint disease, but not limit the cellular protective capabilities of the WISP1 pathway. PMID:26893943

  1. Approach to diagnosing celiac disease in patients with low bone mineral density or fragility fractures

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Lorena P.; Khan, Aliya; Sultan, Muhammad; McAssey, Karen; Fouda, Mona A.; Armstrong, David

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide clinicians with an update on the diagnosis of celiac disease (CD) and to make recommendations on the indications to screen for CD in patients presenting with low bone mineral density (BMD) or fragility fractures. Quality of evidence A multidisciplinary task force developed clinically relevant questions related to the diagnosis of CD as the basis for a literature search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases (January 2000 to January 2009) using the key words celiac disease, osteoporosis, osteopenia, low bone mass, and fracture. The existing literature consists of level I and II studies. Main message The estimated prevalence of asymptomatic CD is 2% to 3% in individuals with low BMD. Routine screening for CD is not justified in patients with low BMD. However, targeted screening for CD is recommended for patients who have T-scores of −1.0 or less at the spine or hip, or a history of fragility fractures in association with any CD-related symptoms or conditions; family history of CD; or low urinary calcium levels, vitamin D insufficiency, and raised parathyroid hormone levels despite adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D. Celiac disease testing should be performed while the subject is consuming a gluten-containing diet; initial screening should be performed with human recombinant immunoglobulin (Ig) A tissue transglutaminase or other IgA tissue transglutaminase assays, in association with IgA endomysial antibody immunofluorescence. Duodenal biopsy is necessary to confirm the diagnosis of CD. Human leukocyte antigen typing might assist in confirming or ruling out the diagnosis of CD in cases where serology and histology are discordant. Definitive diagnosis is based on clinical, serologic, and histologic features, combined with a positive response to a gluten-free diet. Conclusion Current evidence does not support routine screening for CD in all patients with low BMD. A targeted case-finding approach is appropriate for patients

  2. Prediction of low bone mineral density in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schüle, Solvey; Rossel, Jean-Benoît; Frey, Diana; Biedermann, Luc; Scharl, Michael; Zeitz, Jonas; Freitas-Queiroz, Natália; Pittet, Valérie; Vavricka, Stephan R; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Background Low bone mineral density (BMD) remains a frequent problem in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). There is no general agreement regarding osteoporosis screening in IBD patients. Methods Cases of low BMD and disease characteristics were retrieved from 3172 patients of the Swiss IBD cohort study. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted for predictive modeling. In a subgroup of 877 patients, 253 dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans were available for validation. Results Low BMD was prevalent in 19% of patients. We identified seven predictive factors: type of IBD, age, recent steroid usage, low body mass index, perianal disease, recent high disease activity and malabsorption syndrome. Low BMD could be predicted with a sensitivity of 79% and a specificity of 64%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 35% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 93%. The area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristics was 0.78. In the validation cohort we calculated a PPV of 26% and an NPV of 88%. Conclusion We provide a comprehensive analysis of risk factors for low BMD and propose a predictive model with seven clinical variables. The high NPV of models such as ours might help in excluding low BMD to prevent futile investigations.

  3. Critical review of clinical trials of bone marrow stem cells in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Houlihan, Diarmaid Dominic; Newsome, Philip Noel

    2008-08-01

    Morbidity and mortality from cirrhosis is increasing rapidly in the Western world. Currently the only effective treatment is liver transplantation, an increasingly limited and expensive resource. Consequently, there has been great hope that stem cells may offer new therapeutic approaches in the management of liver disease. In this review we critically appraise the 11 published clinical studies of bone marrow stem cells in liver disease, and focus on the unresolved issues regarding their role. We outline the different mechanisms by which stem cells may impact on liver disease, as well as highlight the importance of the type of stem cell chosen. There are multiple different stem cell populations that have, in rodent studies, been shown to have differing effects on liver regeneration and fibrogenesis/degradation. Thus, choice of cell should reflect the desired or expected mechanism of action. The importance, and methods, of studying the fate of stem cells infused in clinical studies is emphasized as we seek to translate observations in rodents into the clinical setting. Finally, we discuss which cohorts of patients with liver disease would benefit from stem cell therapy, as well as establish minimum criteria for future clinical trials of stem cells.

  4. Peripartum anesthetic management of a patient with brittle cornea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ioscovich, A; Grisaru-Granovsky, S; Halpern, S; Shapiro, Y

    2011-03-01

    Brittle cornea syndrome (BCS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease that affects the connective tissue. The syndrome is caused by genetic changes in the 4.7-Mb interval between the D16S3423 and D16S3425 markers on the 16q24 chromosome and mutations in the Zinc-Finger 469 gene (ZNF469). BCS is characterized by thin and fragile cornea that tends to perforate spontaneously or as a result of minor trauma to the eye. In addition, the patient usually suffers from hearing loss, mental retardation, hyperextensibility of skin and joints, as well as varying degrees of scoliosis. This phenotypical expression presents an interesting challenge to anesthetic care. We briefly present the perioperative management of a patient with BCS who underwent three cesarean sections. PMID:21258811

  5. Brittle and semi-brittle behaviours of a carbonate rock: influence of water and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Regnet, J. B.; Dimanov, A.; Guéguen, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Inelastic deformation can either occur with dilatancy or compaction, implying differences in porosity changes, failure and petrophysical properties. In this study, the roles of water as a pore fluid, and of temperature, on the deformation and failure of a micritic limestone (white Tavel limestone, porosity 14.7 per cent) were investigated under triaxial stresses. For each sample, a hydrostatic load was applied up to the desired confining pressure (from 0 up to 85 MPa) at either room temperature or at 70 °C. Two pore fluid conditions were investigated at room temperature: dry and water saturated. The samples were deformed up to failure at a constant strain rate of ˜10-5 s-1. The experiments were coupled with ultrasonic wave velocity surveys to monitor crack densities. The linear trend between the axial crack density and the relative volumetric strain beyond the onset of dilatancy suggests that cracks propagate at constant aspect ratio. The decrease of ultrasonic wave velocities beyond the onset of inelastic compaction in the semi-brittle regime indicates the ongoing interplay of shear-enhanced compaction and crack development. Water has a weakening effect on the onset of dilatancy in the brittle regime, but no measurable influence on the peak strength. Temperature lowers the confining pressure at which the brittle-semi-brittle transition is observed but does not change the stress states at the onset of inelastic compaction and at the post-yield onset of dilatancy.

  6. Radiographic evaluation of the effect of obesity on alveolar bone in rats with ligature-induced periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Cassiane Merigo; Cassol, Tiago; da Silva, Fernanda Soares; Bonfleur, Maria Lucia; Nassar, Carlos Augusto; Nassar, Patricia Oehlmeyer

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence that the lack of metabolic control of obese patients may accelerate periodontitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate radiographically the effect of cafeteria-diet-induced obesity on alveolar bone loss in rats subjected to periodontal disease. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: 1) control group, 2) control and ligature group; 3) cafeteria group; and 4) cafeteria and ligature group. The animals were evaluated for obesity and euthanized, and the mandible of each rat was removed to perform a radiographic evaluation of alveolar bone loss and its effect on diet-induced obesity. The results showed greater alveolar bone loss in the mice in Group 4 (P<0.01). Thus, we concluded that obese mice, on average, showed greater radiographic evidence of alveolar bone loss than mice undergoing induction of obesity. PMID:24124386

  7. From "Kidneys Govern Bones" to Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, and Metabolic Bone Disorder: A Crosstalk between Traditional Chinese Medicine and Modern Science.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Qin; Zou, Xin-Rong; Zhang, Yuan Clare

    2016-01-01

    Although traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and Western medicine have evolved on distinct philosophical foundations and reasoning methods, an increasing body of scientific data has begun to reveal commonalities. Emerging scientific evidence has confirmed the validity and identified the molecular mechanisms of many ancient TCM theories. One example is the concept of "Kidneys Govern Bones." Here we discuss the molecular mechanisms supporting this theory and its potential significance in treating complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus. Two signaling pathways essential for calcium-phosphate metabolism can mediate the effect of kidneys in bone homeostasis, one requiring renal production of bioactive vitamin D and the other involving an endocrine axis based on kidney-expressed Klotho and bone-secreted fibroblast growth factor 23. Disruption of either pathway can lead to calcium-phosphate imbalance and vascular calcification, accelerating metabolic bone disorder. Chinese herbal medicine is an adjunct therapy widely used for treating CKD and diabetes. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic effects and underlying mechanisms of a Chinese herbal formulation, Shen-An extracts, in diabetic nephropathy and renal osteodystrophy. We believe that the smart combination of Eastern and Western concepts holds great promise for inspiring new ideas and therapies for preventing and treating complications of CKD and diabetes.

  8. From "Kidneys Govern Bones" to Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, and Metabolic Bone Disorder: A Crosstalk between Traditional Chinese Medicine and Modern Science.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Qin; Zou, Xin-Rong; Zhang, Yuan Clare

    2016-01-01

    Although traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and Western medicine have evolved on distinct philosophical foundations and reasoning methods, an increasing body of scientific data has begun to reveal commonalities. Emerging scientific evidence has confirmed the validity and identified the molecular mechanisms of many ancient TCM theories. One example is the concept of "Kidneys Govern Bones." Here we discuss the molecular mechanisms supporting this theory and its potential significance in treating complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus. Two signaling pathways essential for calcium-phosphate metabolism can mediate the effect of kidneys in bone homeostasis, one requiring renal production of bioactive vitamin D and the other involving an endocrine axis based on kidney-expressed Klotho and bone-secreted fibroblast growth factor 23. Disruption of either pathway can lead to calcium-phosphate imbalance and vascular calcification, accelerating metabolic bone disorder. Chinese herbal medicine is an adjunct therapy widely used for treating CKD and diabetes. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic effects and underlying mechanisms of a Chinese herbal formulation, Shen-An extracts, in diabetic nephropathy and renal osteodystrophy. We believe that the smart combination of Eastern and Western concepts holds great promise for inspiring new ideas and therapies for preventing and treating complications of CKD and diabetes. PMID:27668003

  9. Detection of bone disease by hybrid SST-watershed x-ray image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanei, Saeid; Azron, Mohammad; Heng, Ong Sim

    2001-07-01

    Detection of diagnostic features from X-ray images is favorable due to the low cost of these images. Accurate detection of the bone metastasis region greatly assists physicians to monitor the treatment and to remove the cancerous tissue by surgery. A hybrid SST-watershed algorithm, here, efficiently detects the boundary of the diseased regions. Shortest Spanning Tree (SST), based on graph theory, is one of the most powerful tools in grey level image segmentation. The method converts the images into arbitrary-shape closed segments of distinct grey levels. To do that, the image is initially mapped to a tree. Then using RSST algorithm the image is segmented to a certain number of arbitrary-shaped regions. However, in fine segmentation, over-segmentation causes loss of objects of interest. In coarse segmentation, on the other hand, SST-based method suffers from merging the regions belonged to different objects. By applying watershed algorithm, the large segments are divided into the smaller regions based on the number of catchment's basins for each segment. The process exploits bi-level watershed concept to separate each multi-lobe region into a number of areas each corresponding to an object (in our case a cancerous region of the bone,) disregarding their homogeneity in grey level.

  10. Molecular Imaging of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Survival and Homing in Murine Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    van der Bogt, Koen E.A.; Hellingman, Alwine A.; Lijkwan, Maarten A.; Bos, Ernst-Jan; de Vries, Margreet R.; Fischbein, Michael P.; Quax, Paul H.; Robbins, Robert C.; Hamming, Jaap F.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow mononuclear cell (MNC) therapy is a promising treatment for peripheral artery disease (PAD). This study aims to provide insight into cellular kinetics using molecular imaging following different transplantation methods. Methods and Results MNCs were isolated from F6 transgenic mice (FVB background) that express firefly luciferase (Fluc) and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Male FVB and C57Bl6 mice (n=50) underwent femoral artery ligation and were randomized into 4 groups receiving: (1) single intramuscular (i.m.) injection of 2×106 MNC; (2) four weekly i.m. injections of 5×105 MNC; (3) 2×106 MNCs intravenously (i.v.); and (4) PBS. Cellular kinetics, measured by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI), revealed near-complete donor cell death 4 weeks after i.m. transplantation. Following i.v. transplantation, BLI monitored cells homed in on the injured area in the limb, as well as to the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. Ex vivo BLI showed presence of MNCs in the scar tissue and adductor muscle. However, no significant effects on neovascularisation were observed as monitored by Laser-Doppler-Perfusion-Imaging and histology. Conclusion This is one of the first studies to assess kinetics of transplanted MNCs in PAD using in vivo molecular imaging. MNC survival is short lived and MNCs do not significantly stimulate perfusion in this model. PMID:22239892

  11. The potential of bone marrow stem cells to correct liver dysfunction in a mouse model of Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Allen, Katrina J; Cheah, Daphne M Y; Lee, Xiao Ling; Pettigrew-Buck, Nicole E; Vadolas, Jim; Mercer, Julian F B; Ioannou, Panayiotis A; Williamson, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Metabolic liver diseases are excellent targets for correction using novel stem cell, hepatocyte, and gene therapies. In this study, the use of bone marrow stem cell transplantation to correct liver disease in the toxic milk (tx) mouse, a murine model for Wilson's disease, was evaluated. Preconditioning with sublethal irradiation, dietary copper loading, and the influence of cell transplantation sites were assessed. Recipient tx mice were sublethally irradiated (4 Gy) prior to transplantation with bone marrow stem cells harvested from normal congenic (DL) littermates. Of 46 transplanted tx mice, 11 demonstrated genotypic repopulation in the liver. Sublethal irradiation was found to be essential for donor cell engraftment and liver repopulation. Dietary copper loading did not improve cell engraftment and repopulation results. Both intravenously and intrasplenically transplanted cells produced similar repopulation successes. Direct evidence of functionality and disease correction following liver repopulation was observed in the 11 mice where liver copper levels were significantly reduced when compared with mice with no liver repopulation. The reversal of copper loading with bone marrow cells is similar to the level of correction seen when normal congenic liver cells are used. Transplantation of bone marrow cells partially corrects the metabolic phenotype in a mouse model for Wilson's disease.

  12. The negative bone effects of the disease and of chronic corticosteroid treatment in premenopausal women affected by rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fassio, A; Idolazzi, L; Jaber, M A; Dartizio, C; Viapiana, O; Rossini, M; Gatti, D

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a well-known extra-articular complication in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The chronic corticosteroid treatment, the functional impairment associated with RA and the disease itself appear to be the most relevant determinants. Most of the previous studies involved postmenopausal women, in whom the estrogenic deficiency might amplify the negative effect towards bone of both RA and corticosteroid therapy. We decided to evaluate bone health in a cohort of premenopausal RA patients. The study population includes 47 premenopausal women attending our outpatient clinic for RA and twice as many healthy age-matched control women selected from the hospital personnel. The bone density at the spine and femoral neck were significantly lower in patients with RA as compared with controls. When spine bone mineral density (BMD) values were adjusted for the cumulative glucocorticoid (GC) dose alone and for the cumulative GC dose plus body mass index (BMI) the mean differences between two groups decreased but they remained statistically significant. We found no difference when the spine BMD was adjusted for cumulative GC dose, BMI and health assessment questionnaire. The difference in femoral neck BMD remained statistically significant also after all the same adjustments. In conclusion, our study shows that a BMD deficiency is frequent also in premenopausal women affected by RA, especially at femoral site and that the main determinants of this bone loss are not only the disease-related weight loss, corticosteroid therapy and functional impairment, but also the systemic effects of the disease itself. PMID:27608794

  13. Mineral and bone disorder and vascular calcification in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Peres, Luis Alberto Batista; Pércio, Pedro Paulo Verona

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcifications has been associated with bone and mineral disorders. The alterations in the serum level of calcium concentrations and phosphate are importants factors implicated in the arterial calcification in chronic kidney disease. The pathogenesis of vascular calcification is a complex mechanism and not completely clear, being able to correspond to an active process of cellular transformation and heterotopic ossification. Beyond the hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia, they are involved in this process changes in the metabolism of inhibitors and promoters of calcification such as fetuin A, osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, and matrix gla protein. For the diagnosis of the calcified arterial injury are available several complementary methods, a method of estimate of the cardiovascular risk based on plain radiographs of the lumbar column and another method based on simple x-rays of the pelvis and hands. Below, we will present a review approching the link between vascular calcifications and mineral disorders. PMID:25055361

  14. [Treatment for CKD-MBD(Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder)].

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Yuko; Iwashita, Yu; Ito, Takafumi; Shigematsu, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    CKD is a common disease that is estimated to develop one in eight persons in Japan. The CKD itself is highly risk factor on the cardiac/vascular mortality. In addition,a new concept has been proposed "CKD-MBD". CKD-MBD is composed of a combination of abnormal mineral metabolism, abnormal bone, and extra skeletal calcification with cardiovascular high mortality. Treatment for CKD-MBD is a wide-ranging. We aim to decline cardiovascular event, fracture, and mortality rate of patients with CKD. The main therapeutic target for CKD-MBD becomes the phosphate control. Today, we can use of the VRDA, Calcimimetics and muti-phosphate binders as a lot of pharmacological intervention. PMID:26813506

  15. Role of RANKL-RANK/Osteoprotegerin Pathway in Cardiovascular and Bone Disease Associated with HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kelesidis, Theodoros; Currier, Judith S.; Yang, Otto O.; Brown, Todd T

    2016-01-01

    Patients with HIV-1 infection often develop multiple complications and comorbidities, including osteoporosis and atherosclerosis. The receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B/receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand/osteoprotegerin axis has been identified as a possible common link between osteoporosis and vascular diseases. Since the discovery of this axis, much has been learned about its role in controlling skeletal biology and less about its role in the context of vascular biology. However, the exact role of the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand/osteoprotegerin axis in HIV infection is not completely understood. In this review we examine the mechanisms by which inflammation and immune dysregulation in HIV-1 infection may impact bone turnover and atherogenesis through perturbations in the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B/receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand/osteoprotegerin axis. PMID:25102334

  16. Targeting the Molecular and Cellular Interactions of the Bone Marrow Niche in Immunologic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brozowski, Jaime M.; Billard, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent investigations have expanded our knowledge of the regulatory bone marrow (BM) niche, which is critical in maintaining and directing hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and differentiation. Osteoblasts, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells are niche components in close association with HSCs and have been more clearly defined in immune cell function and homeostasis. Importantly, cellular inhabitants of the BM niche signal through G protein-coupled surface receptors (GPCRs) for various appropriate immune functions. In this article, recent literature on BM niche inhabitants (HSCs, osteoblasts, MSCs, CAR cells) and their GPCR mechanistic interactions are reviewed for better understanding of the BM cells involved in immune development, immunologic disease, and current immune reconstitution therapies. PMID:24408534

  17. Roles and regulation of bone morphogenetic protein-7 in kidney development and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimura, Taro; Idei, Mana; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Takase, Osamu; Hishikawa, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    The gene encoding bone morphogenetic protein-7 (Bmp7) is expressed in the developing kidney in embryos and also in the mature organ in adults. During kidney development, expression of Bmp7 is essential to determine the final number of nephrons in and proper size of the organ. The secreted BMP7 acts on the nephron progenitor cells to exert its dual functions: To maintain and expand the progenitor population and to provide them with competence to respond to differentiation cues, each relying on distinct signaling pathways. Intriguingly, in the adult organ, BMP7 has been implicated in protection against and regeneration from injury. Exogenous administration of recombinant BMP7 to animal models of kidney diseases has shown promising effects in counteracting inflammation, apoptosis and fibrosis evoked upon injury. Although the expression pattern of Bmp7 has been well described, the mechanisms by which it is regulated have remained elusive and the processes by which the secretion sites of BMP7 impinge upon its functions in kidney development and diseases have not yet been assessed. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms will pave the way towards gaining better insight into the roles of BMP7, and to achieving desired control of the gene expression as a therapeutic strategy for kidney diseases. PMID:27679685

  18. Roles and regulation of bone morphogenetic protein-7 in kidney development and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimura, Taro; Idei, Mana; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Takase, Osamu; Hishikawa, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    The gene encoding bone morphogenetic protein-7 (Bmp7) is expressed in the developing kidney in embryos and also in the mature organ in adults. During kidney development, expression of Bmp7 is essential to determine the final number of nephrons in and proper size of the organ. The secreted BMP7 acts on the nephron progenitor cells to exert its dual functions: To maintain and expand the progenitor population and to provide them with competence to respond to differentiation cues, each relying on distinct signaling pathways. Intriguingly, in the adult organ, BMP7 has been implicated in protection against and regeneration from injury. Exogenous administration of recombinant BMP7 to animal models of kidney diseases has shown promising effects in counteracting inflammation, apoptosis and fibrosis evoked upon injury. Although the expression pattern of Bmp7 has been well described, the mechanisms by which it is regulated have remained elusive and the processes by which the secretion sites of BMP7 impinge upon its functions in kidney development and diseases have not yet been assessed. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms will pave the way towards gaining better insight into the roles of BMP7, and to achieving desired control of the gene expression as a therapeutic strategy for kidney diseases.

  19. Roles and regulation of bone morphogenetic protein-7 in kidney development and diseases.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Taro; Idei, Mana; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Takase, Osamu; Hishikawa, Keiichi

    2016-09-26

    The gene encoding bone morphogenetic protein-7 (Bmp7) is expressed in the developing kidney in embryos and also in the mature organ in adults. During kidney development, expression of Bmp7 is essential to determine the final number of nephrons in and proper size of the organ. The secreted BMP7 acts on the nephron progenitor cells to exert its dual functions: To maintain and expand the progenitor population and to provide them with competence to respond to differentiation cues, each relying on distinct signaling pathways. Intriguingly, in the adult organ, BMP7 has been implicated in protection against and regeneration from injury. Exogenous administration of recombinant BMP7 to animal models of kidney diseases has shown promising effects in counteracting inflammation, apoptosis and fibrosis evoked upon injury. Although the expression pattern of Bmp7 has been well described, the mechanisms by which it is regulated have remained elusive and the processes by which the secretion sites of BMP7 impinge upon its functions in kidney development and diseases have not yet been assessed. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms will pave the way towards gaining better insight into the roles of BMP7, and to achieving desired control of the gene expression as a therapeutic strategy for kidney diseases.

  20. Activator protein 1 (Fos/Jun) functions in inflammatory bone and skin disease.

    PubMed

    Zenz, Rainer; Eferl, Robert; Scheinecker, Clemens; Redlich, Kurt; Smolen, Josef; Schonthaler, Helia B; Kenner, Lukas; Tschachler, Erwin; Wagner, Erwin F

    2008-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) (Fos/Jun) is a transcriptional regulator composed of members of the Fos and Jun families of DNA binding proteins. The functions of AP-1 were initially studied in mouse development as well as in the whole organism through conventional transgenic approaches, but also by gene targeting using knockout strategies. The importance of AP-1 proteins in disease pathways including the inflammatory response became fully apparent through conditional mutagenesis in mice, in particular when employing gene inactivation in a tissue-specific and inducible fashion. Besides the well-documented roles of Fos and Jun proteins in oncogenesis, where these genes can function both as tumor promoters or tumor suppressors, AP-1 proteins are being recognized as regulators of bone and immune cells, a research area termed osteoimmunology. In the present article, we review recent data regarding the functions of AP-1 as a regulator of cytokine expression and an important modulator in inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. These new data provide a better molecular understanding of disease pathways and should pave the road for the discovery of new targets for therapeutic applications.

  1. Roles and regulation of bone morphogenetic protein-7 in kidney development and diseases.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Taro; Idei, Mana; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Takase, Osamu; Hishikawa, Keiichi

    2016-09-26

    The gene encoding bone morphogenetic protein-7 (Bmp7) is expressed in the developing kidney in embryos and also in the mature organ in adults. During kidney development, expression of Bmp7 is essential to determine the final number of nephrons in and proper size of the organ. The secreted BMP7 acts on the nephron progenitor cells to exert its dual functions: To maintain and expand the progenitor population and to provide them with competence to respond to differentiation cues, each relying on distinct signaling pathways. Intriguingly, in the adult organ, BMP7 has been implicated in protection against and regeneration from injury. Exogenous administration of recombinant BMP7 to animal models of kidney diseases has shown promising effects in counteracting inflammation, apoptosis and fibrosis evoked upon injury. Although the expression pattern of Bmp7 has been well described, the mechanisms by which it is regulated have remained elusive and the processes by which the secretion sites of BMP7 impinge upon its functions in kidney development and diseases have not yet been assessed. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms will pave the way towards gaining better insight into the roles of BMP7, and to achieving desired control of the gene expression as a therapeutic strategy for kidney diseases. PMID:27679685

  2. Potential of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in management of Alzheimer's disease in female rats.

    PubMed

    Salem, Ahmed M; Ahmed, Hanaa H; Atta, Hazem M; Ghazy, Mohamed A; Aglan, Hadeer A

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been called the disease of the century with significant clinical and socioeconomic impacts. Pharmacological treatment has limited efficacy and only provides symptomatic relief without long-term cure. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to develop novel and effective medications for AD. Stem cell-based therapy is a promising approach to handling neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, the current study aimed to explore the possible therapeutic role of single intravenous injection of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) after 4 months in management of AD in the experimental model. The work also extended to compare the therapeutic potential of BM-MSCs with 2 conventional therapies of AD; rivastigmine and cerebrolysin administered daily. BM-MSCs were able to home at the injured brains and produced significant increases in the number of positive cells for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and survivin expression, as well as selective AD indicator-1 (seladin-1) and nestin gene expression. Histopathological examination indicated that BM-MSCs could remove beta-amyloid plaques from hippocampus. Significant improvement in these biomarkers was similar to or better sometimes than the reference drugs, clearly showing the potential therapeutic role of BM-MSCs against AD through their anti-apoptotic, neurogenic and immunomodulatory properties.

  3. Autotransplantation of bone marrow-derived stem cells as a therapy for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Kan, I; Melamed, E; Offen, D

    2007-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by a progressive degeneration of selective neural populations. This selective hallmark pathology and the lack of effective treatment modalities make these diseases appropriate candidates for cell therapy. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are self-renewing precursors that reside in the bone marrow and may further be exploited for autologous transplantation. Autologous transplantation of MSCs entirely circumvents the problem of immune rejection, does not cause the formation of teratomas, and raises very few ethical or political concerns. More than a few studies showed that transplantation of MSCs resulted in clinical improvement. However, the exact mechanisms responsible for the beneficial outcome have yet to be defined. Possible rationalizations include cell replacement, trophic factors delivery, and immunomodulation. Cell replacement theory is based on the idea that replacement of degenerated neural cells with alternative functioning cells induces long-lasting clinical improvement. It is reasoned that the transplanted cells survive, integrate into the endogenous neural network, and lead to functional improvement. Trophic factor delivery presents a more practical short-term approach. According to this approach, MSC effectiveness may be credited to the production of neurotrophic factors that support neuronal cell survival, induce endogenous cell proliferation, and promote nerve fiber regeneration at sites of injury. The third potential mechanism of action is supported by the recent reports claiming that neuroinflammatory mechanisms play an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, inhibiting chronic inflammatory stress might explain the beneficial effects induced by MSC transplantation. Here, we assemble evidence that supports each theory and review the latest studies that have placed MSC transplantation into the spotlight of biomedical research.

  4. Bone mineral density among elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Hattiholi, Jyothi; Gaude, Gajanan S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is one of the major extra-pulmonary manifestations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which limits the physical activity. The present study was undertaken to study the bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis in the elderly COPD patients. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study carried out among elderly COPD patients. After a detailed clinical history spirometry was done to stage the severity of COPD. DEXA scan of the lumbar spine was performed using bone densitometer to determine osteoporosis. Statistical analysis was based on Chi-square test. Risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 70 elderly COPD patients were included. Fourty-six patients (65.7%) had osteoporosis and 13 (18.6%) had osteopenia. Majority of the osteoporosis patients had stage III or stage IV COPD disease (77.2%). As the severity grade of COPD increased, the risk of osteoporosis also increased. Also, with the increasing severity of COPD, BMD decreased. Patients with lower body mass index (BMI) had higher prevalence of osteoporosis (45.7%). Using multivariate regression analysis, stage IV COPD, number of acute exacerbations >3 and steroid cumulative dose >1000 mg were independent risk factors for osteoporosis in elderly COPD patients. Conclusions: The prevalence of osteoporosis was 65.7%, and 18.6% had osteopenia. Stage III and IV patients had significantly lower BMI in elderly COPD patients. High clinical suspicion and early diagnosis and treatment are required in the evaluation of osteoporosis in elderly COPD patients. PMID:24403704

  5. The Physiopathological Role of IL-33: New Highlights in Bone Biology and a Proposed Role in Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cordero da Luz, Felipe Andrés; Lima Oliveira, Ana Paula; Borges, Daniella; Cristina Brígido, Paula; Barbosa Silva, Marcelo José

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is a recently described member of the IL-1 family. IL-33 acts as an alarmin, chemoattractant, and nuclear factor. ST2, a member of the Toll-like receptor/IL-1R superfamily, the receptor of IL-33, triggers a plethora of downstream effectors and leads the activation of NFK-B, leading the expression of several genes. IL-33 and ST2 are expressed in the majority of cell types, and the IL-33/ST2 axis has a role in immune response, bone homeostasis, and osteoclastogenesis. Several studies show opposite roles of IL-33 in osteoclastogenesis and the implication in bone biology. Few works studied the role of IL-33 in periodontal disease, but we hypothesize a possible role of IL-33 in periodontal disease and bone loss. PMID:24692848

  6. The physiopathological role of IL-33: new highlights in bone biology and a proposed role in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    da Luz, Felipe Andrés Cordero; Oliveira, Ana Paula Lima; Borges, Daniella; Brígido, Paula Cristina; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is a recently described member of the IL-1 family. IL-33 acts as an alarmin, chemoattractant, and nuclear factor. ST2, a member of the Toll-like receptor/IL-1R superfamily, the receptor of IL-33, triggers a plethora of downstream effectors and leads the activation of NFK-B, leading the expression of several genes. IL-33 and ST2 are expressed in the majority of cell types, and the IL-33/ST2 axis has a role in immune response, bone homeostasis, and osteoclastogenesis. Several studies show opposite roles of IL-33 in osteoclastogenesis and the implication in bone biology. Few works studied the role of IL-33 in periodontal disease, but we hypothesize a possible role of IL-33 in periodontal disease and bone loss.

  7. Regulation of Sclerostin Expression in Multiple Myeloma by Dkk-1: A Potential Therapeutic Strategy for Myeloma Bone Disease.

    PubMed

    Eda, Homare; Santo, Loredana; Wein, Marc N; Hu, Dorothy Z; Cirstea, Diana D; Nemani, Neeharika; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Raines, Sarah E; Kuhstoss, Stuart Allen; Munshi, Nikhil C; Kronenberg, Henry M; Raje, Noopur S

    2016-06-01

    Sclerostin is a potent inhibitor of osteoblastogenesis. Interestingly, newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) patients have high levels of circulating sclerostin that correlate with disease stage and fractures. However, the source and impact of sclerostin in MM remains to be defined. Our goal was to determine the role of sclerostin in the biology of MM and its bone microenvironment as well as investigate the effect of targeting sclerostin with a neutralizing antibody (scl-Ab) in MM bone disease. Here we confirm increased sclerostin levels in MM compared with precursor disease states like monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering MM. Furthermore, we found that a humanized MM xenograft mouse model bearing human MM cells (NOD-SCID.CB17 male mice injected intravenously with 2.5 million of MM1.S-Luc-GFP cells) demonstrated significantly higher concentrations of mouse-derived sclerostin, suggesting a microenvironmental source of sclerostin. Associated with the increased sclerostin levels, activated β-catenin expression levels were lower than normal in MM mouse bone marrow. Importantly, a high-affinity grade scl-Ab reversed osteolytic bone disease in this animal model. Because scl-Ab did not demonstrate significant in vitro anti-MM activity, we combined it with the proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib. Our data demonstrated that this combination therapy significantly inhibited tumor burden and improved bone disease in our in vivo MM mouse model. In agreement with our in vivo data, sclerostin expression was noted in marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts of MM patient bone marrow samples. Moreover, MM cells stimulated sclerostin expression in immature osteoblasts while inhibiting osteoblast differentiation in vitro. This was in part regulated by Dkk-1 secreted by MM cells and is a potential mechanism contributing to the osteoblast dysfunction noted in MM. Our data confirm the role of sclerostin as a potential therapeutic target in MM bone disease

  8. Machine learning based analytics of micro-MRI trabecular bone microarchitecture and texture in type 1 Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gulshan B; Robertson, Douglas D; Laney, Dawn A; Gambello, Michael J; Terk, Michael

    2016-06-14

    Type 1 Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease, affecting bone metabolism, structure and strength. Current bone assessment methods are not ideal. Semi-quantitative MRI scoring is unreliable, not standardized, and only evaluates bone marrow. DXA BMD is also used but is a limited predictor of bone fragility/fracture risk. Our purpose was to measure trabecular bone microarchitecture, as a biomarker of bone disease severity, in type 1 GD individuals with different GD genotypes and to apply machine learning based analytics to discriminate between GD patients and healthy individuals. Micro-MR imaging of the distal radius was performed on 20 type 1 GD patients and 10 healthy controls (HC). Fifteen stereological and textural measures (STM) were calculated from the MR images. General linear models demonstrated significant differences between GD and HC, and GD genotypes. Stereological measures, main contributors to the first two principal components (PCs), explained ~50% of data variation and were significantly different between males and females. Subsequent PCs textural measures were significantly different between GD patients and HC individuals. Textural measures also significantly differed between GD genotypes, and distinguished between GD patients with normal and pathologic DXA scores. PCA and SVM predictive analyses discriminated between GD and HC with maximum accuracy of 73% and area under ROC curve of 0.79. Trabecular STM differences can be quantified between GD patients and HC, and GD sub-types using micro-MRI and machine learning based analytics. Work is underway to expand this approach to evaluate GD disease burden and treatment efficacy. PMID:27109052

  9. Machine learning based analytics of micro-MRI trabecular bone microarchitecture and texture in type 1 Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gulshan B; Robertson, Douglas D; Laney, Dawn A; Gambello, Michael J; Terk, Michael

    2016-06-14

    Type 1 Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease, affecting bone metabolism, structure and strength. Current bone assessment methods are not ideal. Semi-quantitative MRI scoring is unreliable, not standardized, and only evaluates bone marrow. DXA BMD is also used but is a limited predictor of bone fragility/fracture risk. Our purpose was to measure trabecular bone microarchitecture, as a biomarker of bone disease severity, in type 1 GD individuals with different GD genotypes and to apply machine learning based analytics to discriminate between GD patients and healthy individuals. Micro-MR imaging of the distal radius was performed on 20 type 1 GD patients and 10 healthy controls (HC). Fifteen stereological and textural measures (STM) were calculated from the MR images. General linear models demonstrated significant differences between GD and HC, and GD genotypes. Stereological measures, main contributors to the first two principal components (PCs), explained ~50% of data variation and were significantly different between males and females. Subsequent PCs textural measures were significantly different between GD patients and HC individuals. Textural measures also significantly differed between GD genotypes, and distinguished between GD patients with normal and pathologic DXA scores. PCA and SVM predictive analyses discriminated between GD and HC with maximum accuracy of 73% and area under ROC curve of 0.79. Trabecular STM differences can be quantified between GD patients and HC, and GD sub-types using micro-MRI and machine learning based analytics. Work is underway to expand this approach to evaluate GD disease burden and treatment efficacy.

  10. Allelic variation at the interleukin 1β gene is associated with decreased bone mass in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nemetz, A; Toth, M; Garcia-Gonzalez, M; Zagoni, T; Feher, J; Pena, A; Tulassay, Z

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and its natural antagonist have been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Both cytokines influence bone formation. IL-1β stimulates osteoclast activity while interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) enhances bone formation.
AIMS—To determine whether the decreased bone mass in IBD is related to gene polymorphisms coding for IL-1β and IL-1ra, and thus identify patients with an increased risk.
METHODS—Bone mineral densitometry was performed at the femoral neck, lumbar spine, and the distal third of the radius in 75 IBD patients (34 men/41 women; 40.3 (1.6) years) and in 58 healthy controls (HC; 28 men/30 women; 32.4 (1.2) years). Values were correlated with the TaqI and AvaI gene polymorphisms in the IL1B and the variable number of tandem repeats gene polymorphism in the IL1RN gene.
RESULTS—In IBD patients, but not in HC, carriers of allele 2 at the AvaI gene polymorphism (IL1B-511*2) had significantly lower Z scores at the lumbar spine (−0.82 (0.13) v −0.29 (0.21) p=0.03) and the femoral neck (−0.59 (0.14) v 0.15 (0.19); p=0.003) than non-carriers. These patients also had a higher risk for osteopenia or osteoporosis at the femoral neck (odds ratio 3.63 (95% confidence interval 0.95-13.93)). No association was found between bone mass and the other gene polymorphisms analysed in IBD patients or in HC.
CONCLUSIONS—Our results suggest that genetic variability may be a major determinant of bone loss in IBD. Carriers of IL1B-511*2, who are hypersecretors of IL-1β, have a higher risk of presenting with low bone mass in IBD. Screening for this allele may contribute to determination of the risk of bone loss at the time of disease onset.


Keywords: inflammatory bowel diseases; ulcerative colitis; Crohn's disease; osteoporosis; bone density; genetic polymorphisms; interleukin 1 PMID:11600466

  11. The Presence of Thyroid-Stimulation Blocking Antibody Prevents High Bone Turnover in Untreated Premenopausal Patients with Graves’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun Wook; Bae, Jae Hyun; Noh, Gyeong Woon; Kim, Ye An; Moon, Min Kyong; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Yi, Ka Hee; Park, Do Joon; Chung, June-Key; Cho, Bo Youn; Park, Young Joo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis-related fractures are one of the complications of Graves’ disease. This study hypothesized that the different actions of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) antibodies, both stimulating and blocking activities in Graves’ disease patients might oppositely impact bone turnover. Newly diagnosed premenopausal Graves’ disease patients were enrolled (n = 93) and divided into two groups: patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity (stimulating activity group, n = 83) and patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity combined with blocking activity (blocking activity group, n = 10). From the stimulating activity group, patients who had matched values for free T4 and TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulin (TBII) to the blocking activity group were further classified as stimulating activity-matched control (n = 11). Bone turnover markers BS-ALP, Osteocalcin, and C-telopeptide were significantly lower in the blocking activity group than in the stimulating activity or stimulating activity-matched control groups. The TBII level showed positive correlations with BS-ALP and osteocalcin levels in the stimulating activity group, while it had a negative correlation with the osteocalcin level in the blocking activity group. In conclusion, the activation of TSHR antibody-activated TSH signaling contributes to high bone turnover, independent of the actions of thyroid hormone, and thyroid-stimulation blocking antibody has protective effects against bone metabolism in Graves’ disease. PMID:26650844

  12. Brittle dynamic damage due to earthquake rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Harsha; Thomas, Marion

    2016-04-01

    The micromechanical damage mechanics formulated by Ashby and Sammis, 1990, and generalized by Deshpande and Evans 2008 has been extended to allow for a more generalized stress state and to incorporate an experimentally motivated new crack growth (damage evolution) law that is valid over a wide range of loading rates. This law is sensitive to both the crack tip stress field and its time derivative. Incorporating this feature produces additional strain-rate sensitivity in the constitutive response. The model is also experimentally verified by predicting the failure strength of Dionysus-Pentelicon marble over wide range of strain rates. We then implement this constitutive response to understand the role of dynamic brittle off-fault damage on earthquake ruptures. We show that off-fault damage plays an important role in asymmetry of rupture propagation and is a source of high-frequency ground motion in the near source region.

  13. Reliability Analysis of Brittle, Thin Walled Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan A Salem and Lynn Powers

    2007-02-09

    One emerging application for ceramics is diesel particulate filters being used order to meet EPA regulations going into effect in 2008. Diesel particulates are known to be carcinogenic and thus need to be minimized. Current systems use filters made from ceramics such as mullite and corderite. The filters are brittle and must operate at very high temperatures during a burn out cycle used to remove the soot buildup. Thus the filters are subjected to thermal shock stresses and life time reliability analysis is required. NASA GRC has developed reliability based design methods and test methods for such applications, such as CARES/Life and American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C1499 “Standard Test Method for Equibiaxial Strength of Ceramics.”

  14. Isotropic MD simulations of dynamic brittle fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Espanol, P.; Rubio, M.A.; Zuniga, I.

    1996-12-01

    The authors present results obtained by molecular dynamics simulations on the propagation of fast cracks in triangular 2D lattices. Their aim is to simulate Mode 1 fracture of brittle isotropic materials. They propose a force law that respects the isotropy of the material. The code yields the correct imposed sound c{sub {parallel}}, shear c{sub {perpendicular}} and surface V{sub R} wave speeds. Different notch lengths are systematically studied. They observed that initially the cracks are linear and always branch at a particular critical velocity c* {approx} 0.8V{sub R} and that this occurs when the crack tip reaches the position of a front emitted from the initial crack tip and propagating at a speed c = 0.68V{sub R}.

  15. Brittle failure kinetics model for concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, S.A.

    1997-03-01

    A new constitutive model is proposed for the modeling of penetration and large stress waves in concrete. Rate effects are incorporated explicitly into the damage evolution law, hence the term brittle failure kinetics. The damage variable parameterizes a family of Mohr-Coulomb strength curves. The model, which has been implemented in the CTH code, has been shown to reproduce some distinctive phenomena that occur in penetration of concrete targets. Among these are the sharp spike in deceleration of a rigid penetrator immediately after impact. Another is the size scale effect, which leads to a nonlinear scaling of penetration depth with penetrator size. This paper discusses the theory of the model and some results of an extensive validation effort.

  16. [Results of a combined therapy of patients with metastatic bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Protsenko, V V; Konovalenko, V F; Boĭchuk, S I; Volkov, I B

    2007-01-01

    In the department of bone and soft tissue tumors of Institute of oncology the authors performed a combined treatment (surgery + combined chemotherapy + bisphosphonates + radiation) in 20 patients with bone metastases. Results showed that postoperative complications were observed in 2 patients, new bone lesions in 4 patients. Those satisfactory results prove the efficacy of these treatment options.

  17. Evolutionary medicine and bone loss in chronic inflammatory diseases – a theory of inflammation-related osteopenia

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Rainer H.; Cutolo, Maurizio; Pacifici, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective Bone loss is typical in chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, ankylosing spondylitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel diseases, pemphigus vulgaris, and others. It is also typical in transplantation-related inflammation and during the process of aging. While we recognized that bone loss is tightly linked to immune system activation or inflammaging in the form of acute, chronic active, or chronic smoldering inflammation, bone loss is typically discussed to be an “accident of inflammation”. Methods Extensive literature search in PubMed central. Results Using elements of evolutionary medicine, energy regulation, and neuroendocrine regulation of homeostasis and immune function, we work out that bone waste is an adaptive, evolutionarily positively selected program that is absolutely necessary during acute inflammation. However, when acute inflammation enters a chronic state due to the inability to terminate inflammation (e.g., in autoimmunity or in continuous immunity against microbes), the acute program of bone loss is a misguided adaptive program. Conclusions The article highlights the complexity of interwoven pathways of osteopenia. PMID:26044543

  18. Dual X-ray absorptiometry detects disease- and treatment-related alterations of bone density in prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Smith, G L; Doherty, A P; Banks, L M; Dutton, J; Hanham, L W; Christmas, T J; Epstein, R J

    2000-01-01

    Metastatic bone disease is an important clinical problem which has proven difficult to study because of a lack of noninvasive investigative modalities. Here we show that dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning provides clinically useful information about the status of metastatic bone lesions in cancer patients undergoing palliative treatment. In the study group of 21 patients, a significant increase in metastatic bone mineral density (BMD) was confirmed in prostate (n = 14) relative to breast (n = 7) cancer patients. With respect to the prostate cancer cohort, further increases in lesional BMD were evident in all evaluable patients in whom biochemical progression occurred; conversely, lesional BMD declined in patients who had a partial response to therapy. BMD of uninvolved bone decreased with all types of androgen-deprivation therapy regardless of whether patients responded or relapsed. We conclude that BMD changes in both lesional and uninvolved bone are readily detectable in metastatic prostate cancer, and propose that DXA scanning represents a promising new approach to monitoring the natural history and therapeutic course of this disease.

  19. Markers of Bone Metabolism Are Affected by Renal Function and Growth Hormone Therapy in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doyon, Anke; Fischer, Dagmar-Christiane; Bayazit, Aysun Karabay; Canpolat, Nur; Duzova, Ali; Sözeri, Betül; Bacchetta, Justine; Balat, Ayse; Büscher, Anja; Candan, Cengiz; Cakar, Nilgun; Donmez, Osman; Dusek, Jiri; Heckel, Martina; Klaus, Günter; Mir, Sevgi; Özcelik, Gül; Sever, Lale; Shroff, Rukshana; Vidal, Enrico; Wühl, Elke; Gondan, Matthias; Melk, Anette; Querfeld, Uwe; Haffner, Dieter; Schaefer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The extent and relevance of altered bone metabolism for statural growth in children with chronic kidney disease is controversial. We analyzed the impact of renal dysfunction and recombinant growth hormone therapy on a panel of serum markers of bone metabolism in a large pediatric chronic kidney disease cohort. Methods Bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b), sclerostin and C-terminal FGF-23 (cFGF23) normalized for age and sex were analyzed in 556 children aged 6–18 years with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 10–60 ml/min/1.73m2. 41 children receiving recombinant growth hormone therapy were compared to an untreated matched control group. Results Standardized levels of BAP, TRAP5b and cFGF-23 were increased whereas sclerostin was reduced. BAP was correlated positively and cFGF-23 inversely with eGFR. Intact serum parathormone was an independent positive predictor of BAP and TRAP5b and negatively associated with sclerostin. BAP and TRAP5B were negatively affected by increased C-reactive protein levels. In children receiving recombinant growth hormone, BAP was higher and TRAP5b lower than in untreated controls. Sclerostin levels were in the normal range and higher than in untreated controls. Serum sclerostin and cFGF-23 independently predicted height standard deviation score, and BAP and TRAP5b the prospective change in height standard deviation score. Conclusion Markers of bone metabolism indicate a high-bone turnover state in children with chronic kidney disease. Growth hormone induces an osteoanabolic pattern and normalizes osteocyte activity. The osteocyte markers cFGF23 and sclerostin are associated with standardized height, and the markers of bone turnover predict height velocity. PMID:25659076

  20. The long-term effects of MVPP chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease on bone marrow function.

    PubMed Central

    Radford, J. A.; Testa, N. G.; Crowther, D.

    1990-01-01

    Using in vitro techniques, bone marrow (BM) function has been studied in 25 patients in complete remission and at least one year after the completion of MVPP chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. The numbers of granulocyte/macrophage (GM-CFC) and fibroblastoid (CFU-F) progenitors were significantly lower than controls and there was no evidence of any improvement with time (median months off treatment was 30 for GM-CFC and 34 for CFU-F). In long-term BM culture production of haemopoietic cells were strikingly lower in the post-MVPP group and the development of adherent stromal cell populations was also significantly less. In addition, the yield of GM-CFC in adherent layers after four weeks of culture was significantly lower than in controls. We conclude that following MVPP chemotherapy and in apparently disease free and haematologically normal individuals there is evidence of impaired BM function up to nine years after the completion of treatment. These abnormalities may be relevant to the known increased risk of acute non-lymphocytic leukaemias in this group of patients and are likely to render the BM less able to withstand subsequent insults such as further chemotherapy or infection. The eventual development of BM failure is also a possibility and long-term follow-up of these patients is essential. PMID:2390472

  1. Bone Marrow-Derived Progenitor Cells Are Functionally Impaired in Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Nollet, Evelien; Hoymans, Vicky Y; Rodrigus, Inez R; De Bock, Dina; Dom, Marc; Vanassche, Bruno; Van Hoof, Viviane O M; Cools, Nathalie; Van Ackeren, Katrijn; Wouters, Kristien; Vermeulen, Katrien; Vrints, Christiaan J; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M

    2016-08-01

    To determine whether the presence of ischemic heart disease (IHD) per se, or rather the co-presence of heart failure (HF), is the primum movens for less effective stem cell products in autologous stem cell therapy, we assessed numbers and function of bone marrow (BM)-derived progenitor cells in patients with coronary artery disease (n = 17), HF due to ischemic cardiomyopathy (n = 8), non-ischemic HF (n = 7), and control subjects (n = 11). Myeloid and erythroid differentiation capacity of BM-derived mononuclear cells was impaired in patients with underlying IHD but not with non-ischemic HF. Migration capacity decreased with increasing IHD severity. Hence, IHD, with or without associated cardiomyopathy, is an important determinant of progenitor cell function. No depletion of hematopoietic and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) within the BM was observed, while circulating EPC numbers were increased in the presence of IHD, suggesting active recruitment. The observed myelosuppression was not driven by inflammation and thus other mechanisms are at play. PMID:27456951

  2. Basic bone radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    This clinical book surveys the skeletal system as seen through radiological imaging. It emphasizing abnormalities, disease, and trauma, and includes vital information on bones, bone growth, and the cells involved in bone pathology. It covers many bone diseases and injuries which are rarely covered in medical texts, as well as descriptions of radiologic procedures that specifically relate to the skeleton. This edition includes many illustrations, information on MR imaging and CT scanning, and discussions of osteoporosis, dysplasias, and metabolic bone disease.

  3. Total lymphoid irradiation, high-dose chemotherapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation for chemotherapy-resistant Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Yahalom, J; Gulati, S; Shank, B; Clarkson, B; Fuks, Z

    1989-11-01

    Seventeen patients with advanced stage Hodgkin's disease who relapsed or failed to respond to multiple regimens of combination chemotherapy (mostly Mechlorethamine, Vincristine, Procarbarzine, Prednisone and Adriamycin, Bleomycin, Vinblastine, Dacarbazine) were treated with accelerated hyperfractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous bone marrow transplantation (AuBMT). Candidates for the protocol did not have prior radiation therapy and had no evidence of bone marrow involvement. Their bone marrow was initially harvested and cryopreserved. The treatment protocol consisted of reinduction with conventional doses of combination chemotherapy followed by boost local field irradiation to areas of residual disease (1500 cGy within 5 days) and total lymphoid irradiation (2004 cGy given in 12 fractions of 167 cGy each t.i.d. delivered within 4 days). The patients were treated with Etoposide (250 mg/m2/day I.V. X 3 days) and high-dose Cyclophosphamide (60 mg/kg/day I.V. X 2 days). Cryopreserved (unpurged) autologous bone marrow was infused 48 hr after completion of chemotherapy. Of the 17 patients treated, four were in relapse and 13 refractory to multiple regimens of combination chemotherapy. Four patients died during the immediate peritransplant period (2--septicemia, 2--pulmonary complications). Of the 13 surviving patients, 12 entered a complete remission and one had a partial remission and died of disease 6 months later. One patient relapsed 5 months after treatment and is currently alive with disease. Eleven patients (65%) are alive with no evidence of disease 4-35 months (median 20 months) following completion of therapy. Treatment with this protocol results in a high rate of complete remission and a potential for long-term disease-free survival in previously unirradiated patients with advanced stage refractory or relapsed Hodgkin's disease who have exhausted conventional modes of chemotherapy. PMID:2478511

  4. Bone Disease in HIV: Recommendations for Screening and Management in the Older Patient.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Jennifer

    2015-07-01

    Availability of potent antiretroviral therapy (ART) has resulted in markedly improved survival for people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, as well as an aging HIV population. Increasing morbidity from age-related conditions has resulted in the need to understand the complex roles HIV and its treatment play in the pathogenesis of these conditions. Bone disease and fragility fractures are conditions that occur more frequently in HIV. It is therefore recommended that risk assessment for fragility fracture using the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX(®)) algorithm, and low bone mass by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan, be performed in all patients with HIV infection over the age of 50 years and in those with a history of fragility fracture, and should be repeated every 2-3 years. Because many HIV experts believe that HIV infection and its treatment is a secondary cause of osteoporosis, it should be included as such in the FRAX(®) assessment tool. Management of osteoporosis in HIV infection should follow the same guidelines as that in the general population. Attention to lifestyle factors, including vitamin D replacement, should be emphasized. Whether cessation of tenofovir- or protease inhibitor-based ART regimens should be considered prior to bisphosphonate treatment is currently unknown and should only occur in patients with active alternative ART regimens. The use of bisphosphonates has been shown to be safe and effective in HIV patients, and while there is limited data on second-line osteoporosis regimens, there is no reason to suggest they would not be effective in people with HIV.

  5. Paradoxical acute hypercalcemic effect of salmon calcitonin in patients having Paget's disease of bone after treatment with dichloromethylene diphosphonate.

    PubMed

    Delmas, P D; Chapuy, M C; Meunier, P J

    1984-05-01

    The hypocalcemia following administration of calcitonin may be an index to disease activity in Paget's disease of bone. Therefore, we assessed the effect of a single injection of 100 MRC units of salmon calcitonin (SCT) on plasma calcium in 28 patients with active Paget's disease before and after 6 months of treatment with dichloromethylene diphosphonate (Cl2MDP) at a dose of 400 mg/day (3 patients), 800 mg/day (8 patients), 1.600 mg/day (9 patients) or 2.600 mg/day (8 patients). The mean SCT-induced hypocalcemia was reduced by Cl2MDP and there was a significant positive correlation between the decrease of serum calcium induced by SCT and bone resorption evaluated by the number of osteoclasts on bone biopsy taken in pagetic iliac crest. After Cl2MCP treatment, 5 patients manifested a paradoxical hypercalcemic response to SCT injection ranging from +0.3 mg/dl to +0.5 mg/dl, which was sustained over the 9 hours following injection. As these patients had a dramatic inhibition of bone resorption induced by Cl2 MDP, it is suggested that the hypercalcemic response to SCT might reflect persistence or exaggeration of the early hypercalcemic effect of CT which reportedly precedes the hypocalcemic response to SCT. PMID:6234216

  6. Bone marrow abnormalities and early bone lesions in multiple myeloma and its precursor disease: a prospective study using functional and morphologic imaging.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Manisha; Turkbey, Baris; Tan, Esther; Korde, Neha; Kwok, Mary; Manasanch, Elisabet E; Tageja, Nishant; Mailankody, Sham; Roschewski, Mark; Mulquin, Marcia; Carpenter, Ashley; Lamping, Elizabeth; Minter, Alex R; Weiss, Brendan M; Mena, Esther; Lindenberg, Liza; Calvo, Katherine R; Maric, Irina; Usmani, Saad Z; Choyke, Peter L; Kurdziel, Karen; Landgren, Ola

    2016-05-01

    The incidence and importance of bone marrow involvement and/or early bone lesions in multiple myeloma (MM) precursor diseases is largely unknown. This study prospectively compared the sensitivity of several imaging modalities in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) and MM. Thirty patients (10 each with MGUS, SMM and MM) were evaluated with skeletal survey, [18F]FDG-PET/CT, [18F]NaF-PET/CT and morphologic dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI. An additional 16 SMM patients had skeletal surveys and FDG-PET/CT. Among MGUS patients, DCE-MRI found only one focal marrow abnormality; other evaluations were negative. Among 26 SMM patients, five (19%) were re-classified as MM based on lytic bone lesions on CT and six had unifocal or diffuse marrow abnormality. Among MM, marrow abnormalities were observed on FDG-PET/CT in 8/10 patients and on DCE-MRI in nine evaluable patients. Abnormal NaF uptake was observed only in MM patients with lytic lesions on CT, providing no additional clinical information. PMID:26690712

  7. A New Data Analysis System to Quantify Associations between Biochemical Parameters of Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Mariano; Salmeron, M. Dolores; Martin-Malo, Alejandro; Barbieri, Carlo; Mari, Flavio; Molina, Rafael I.; Costa, Pedro; Aljama, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Background In hemodialysis patients, deviations from KDIGO recommended values of individual parameters, phosphate, calcium or parathyroid hormone (PTH), are associated with increased mortality. However, it is widely accepted that these parameters are not regulated independently of each other and that therapy aimed to correct one parameter often modifies the others. The aim of the present study is to quantify the degree of association between parameters of chronic kidney disease and mineral bone disease (CKD-MBD). Methods Data was extracted from a cohort of 1758 adult HD patients between January 2000 and June 2013 obtaining a total of 46.141 records (10 year follow-up). We used an advanced data analysis system called Random Forest (RF) which is based on self-learning procedure with similar axioms to those utilized for the development of artificial intelligence. This new approach is particularly useful when the variables analyzed are closely dependent to each other. Results The analysis revealed a strong association between PTH and phosphate that was superior to that of PTH and Calcium. The classical linear regression analysis between PTH and phosphate shows a correlation coefficient is 0.27, p<0.001, the possibility to predict PTH changes from phosphate modification is marginal. Alternatively, RF assumes that changes in phosphate will cause modifications in other associated variables (calcium and others) that may also affect PTH values. Using RF the correlation coefficient between changes in serum PTH and phosphate is 0.77, p<0.001; thus, the power of prediction is markedly increased. The effect of therapy on biochemical variables was also analyzed using this RF. Conclusion Our results suggest that the analysis of the complex interactions between mineral metabolism parameters in CKD-MBD may demand a more advanced data analysis system such as RF. PMID:26808154

  8. Valosin-containing protein disease: inclusion body myopathy with Paget's disease of the bone and fronto-temporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Weihl, Conrad C.; Pestronk, Alan; Kimonis, Virginia E.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in valosin-containing protein (VCP) cause inclusion body myopathy (IBM) associated with Paget's disease of the bone (PDB) and fronto-temporal dementia (FTD) or IBMPFD. Although IBMPFD is a multisystem disorder, muscle weakness is the presenting symptom in greater than half of patients and an isolated symptom in 30%. Patients with the full spectrum of the disease make up only 12% of those affected; therefore it is important to consider and recognize IBMPFD in a neuromuscular clinic. The current review describes the skeletal muscle phenotype and common muscle histochemical features in IBMPFD. In addition to myopathic features; vacuolar changes and tubulofilamentous inclusions are found in a subset of patients. The most consistent findings are VCP, ubiquitin and TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) positive inclusions. VCP is a ubiquitously expressed multifunctional protein that is a member of the AAA+ (ATPase associated with various activities) protein family. It has been implicated in multiple cellular functions ranging from organelle biogenesis to protein degradation. Although the role of VCP in skeletal muscle is currently unknown, it is clear that VCP mutations lead to the accumulation of ubiquitinated inclusions and protein aggregates in patient tissue, transgenic animals and in vitro systems. We suggest that IBMPFD is novel type of protein surplus myopathy. Instead of accumulating a poorly degraded and aggregated mutant protein as seen in some myofibrillar and nemaline myopathies, VCP mutations disrupt its normal role in protein homeostasis resulting in the accumulation of ubiquitinated and aggregated proteins that are deleterious to skeletal muscle. PMID:19380227

  9. Asymptomatic Paget's disease of bone in a 62-year-old Nigerian man: three years post-alendronate therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ipadeola, Arinola

    2016-01-01

    Summary Paget's disease is a chronic and progressive disorder of bone characterized by focal areas of excessive osteoclastic resorption accompanied by a secondary increase in the osteoblastic activity. Paget's disease of bone (PBD) is a rare endocrine disease especially among Africans and Asians. Hence the detection of a case in a middle-aged Nigerian is of interest. We present the case of a 62-year-old Nigerian man in apparent good health who was found to have a markedly elevated serum total alkaline phosphatase (ALP) of 1179 U/l (reference range, 40–115 U/l) 4 years ago during a routine medical check-up in the USA. He had no history suggestive of PDB and also had no known family history of bone disease. Examination findings were not remarkable except for a relatively large head. A repeat ALP in our centre was 902 U/l (reference range, 40–120 U/l). Cranial CT scan showed diffuse cranial vault thickening consistent with Paget's disease which was confirmed by Tc-99m hydroxymethylene diphosphonate. He was placed on 40 mg alendronate tablets daily for 6 months. The patient has remained asymptomatic and has been in continuing biochemical remission during the 3-year follow-up period. The most recent ALP result is 88 U/l (reference range, 30–132 U/l) in April 2015. Learning points Serum total alkaline phosphatase remains a sensitive marker of bone turnover and an isolated increase above the upper limit of normal warrants more intense scrutiny in form of investigations targeted at excluding PD.Paget's disease is very rare but can occur in the Africans as seen in this Nigerian man and most patients are asymptomatic.Asymptomatic patients can benefit from treatment if disease is active, polyostotic or the lesions are located in bones with future risk of complications such as long bones, vertebrae and skull.Bisphosphonates are still the mainstay of treatment and alendronate is a useful therapeutic option for treatment. PMID:26870373

  10. Biochemical and genetic analysis of ANK in arthritis and bone disease.

    PubMed

    Gurley, Kyle A; Reimer, Richard J; Kingsley, David M

    2006-12-01

    Mutations in the progressive ankylosis gene (Ank/ANKH) cause surprisingly different skeletal phenotypes in mice and humans. In mice, recessive loss-of-function mutations cause arthritis, ectopic crystal formation, and joint fusion throughout the body. In humans, some dominant mutations cause chondrocalcinosis, an adult-onset disease characterized by the deposition of ectopic joint crystals. Other dominant mutations cause craniometaphyseal dysplasia, a childhood disease characterized by sclerosis of the skull and abnormal modeling of the long bones, with little or no joint pathology. Ank encodes a multiple-pass transmembrane protein that regulates pyrophosphate levels inside and outside tissue culture cells in vitro, but its mechanism of action is not yet clear, and conflicting models have been proposed to explain the effects of the human mutations. Here, we test wild-type and mutant forms of ANK for radiolabeled pyrophosphate-transport activity in frog oocytes. We also reconstruct two human mutations in a bacterial artificial chromosome and test them in transgenic mice for rescue of the Ank null phenotype and for induction of new skeletal phenotypes. Wild-type ANK stimulates saturable transport of pyrophosphate ions across the plasma membrane, with half maximal rates attained at physiological levels of pyrophosphate. Chondrocalcinosis mutations retain apparently wild-type transport activity and can rescue the joint-fusion phenotype of Ank null mice. Craniometaphyseal dysplasia mutations do not transport pyrophosphate and cannot rescue the defects of Ank null mice. Furthermore, microcomputed tomography revealed previously unappreciated phenotypes in Ank null mice that are reminiscent of craniometaphyseal dysplasia. The combination of biochemical and genetic analyses presented here provides insight into how mutations in ANKH cause human skeletal disease.

  11. Bone image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Q; Liew, H L; Clement, J G; Thomas, C D

    1999-05-01

    Characteristics of microscopic structures in bone cross sections carry essential clues in age determination in forensic science and in the study of age-related bone developments and bone diseases. Analysis of bone cross sections represents a major area of research in bone biology. However, traditional approaches in bone biology have relied primarily on manual processes with very limited number of bone samples. As a consequence, it is difficult to reach reliable and consistent conclusions. In this paper we present an image processing system that uses microstructural and relational knowledge present in the bone cross section for bone image segmentation. This system automates the bone image analysis process and is able to produce reliable results based on quantitative measurements from a large number of bone images. As a result, using large databases of bone images to study the correlation between bone structural features and age-related bone developments becomes feasible.

  12. Magnetic fabric of brittle fault rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomella, Hannah

    2014-05-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) has been recognized as a highly sensitive indicator of rock fabric and is widely employed in the field of structural geology. Brittle faults are often characterized by fault breccia and gouge, fault rocks with clast-in-matrix textures. A noteworthy property of both gouge and breccia is the often observed presence of a fabric that is defined by the preferred orientation of clasts and grains in the matrix. In the very fine-grained gouge and in the matrix of the breccia the fabric is not visible in the field or in thin sections but can probably be detected by AMS analyses. For the present study different kinds of brittle fault rocks have been sampled on two faults with known tectonic settings, in order to allow for a structural interpretation of the measured AMS signal. The measurements were carried out with an AGICO MFK1-FA Kappabridge and a CS4 furnace apparatus at the Institute of Geology, University of Innsbruck. Fault gouge was sampled on the Naif fault located in the Southern Alps, E of Meran, South Tyrol, Italy. Along this fault the Permian Granodiorite overthrusts the Southalpine basement and its Permomesozoic cover. The Neoalpine thrust fault is characterised by a wide cataclastic zone and an up to 1 m thick fault gouge. The gouge was sampled using paleomagnetic sample boxes. Heating experiments indicate that the magnetic fabric is dominated by paramagnetic minerals (>95%). The samples provide a magnetic susceptibility in the range of +10*E-5 [SI]. The K-min axis of the magnetic ellipsoid corresponds approximately to the pol of the fault plane measured in the field. However the whole magnetic ellipsoid shows a variation in the inclination compared to the structural data. Fine-grained ultracataclasites were sampled on the Assergi fault, located in the Abruzzi Apennines, NE of L'Aquila, Italy. This normal fault was active in historical time and crosscuts limestones as well as talus deposits. An up to 20 cm thick

  13. Brittle and compaction creep in porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Strain localisation in the Earth's crust occurs at all scales, from the fracture of grains at the microscale to crustal-scale faulting. Over the last fifty years, laboratory rock deformation studies have exposed the variety of deformation mechanisms and failure modes of rock. Broadly speaking, rock failure can be described as either dilatant (brittle) or compactive. While dilatant failure in porous sandstones is manifest as shear fracturing, their failure in the compactant regime can be characterised by either distributed cataclastic flow or the formation of localised compaction bands. To better understand the time-dependency of strain localisation (shear fracturing and compaction band growth), we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (porosity = 24%) under a constant stress (creep) in the dilatant and compactive regimes, with particular focus on time-dependent compaction band formation in the compactive regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the brittle and compactive regimes leading to the development of shear fractures and compaction bands, respectively. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterised by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain to shear failure (as observed in previous studies), compaction creep is characterised by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain. The overall deceleration in axial strain, AE activity, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated by excursions interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased, although the inelastic strain required for a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude. We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate

  14. Panostotic expansile bone disease with massive jaw tumor formation and a novel mutation in the signal peptide of RANK.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Anne L; Mumm, Steven; El-Sayed, Ivan; McAlister, William H; Horvai, Andrew E; Tom, Andrea M; Hsiao, Edward C; Schaefer, Frederick V; Collins, Michael T; Anderson, Mark S; Whyte, Michael P; Shoback, Dolores M

    2014-04-01

    Precise regulation of bone resorption is critical for skeletal homeostasis. We report a 32-year-old man with a panostotic expansile bone disease and a massive hemorrhagic mandibular tumor. Originally from Mexico, he was deaf at birth and became bow-legged during childhood. There was no family history of skeletal disease. Puberty occurred normally, but during adolescence he experienced difficulty straightening his limbs, sustained multiple fractures, and developed a bony tumor on his chin. By age 18 years, all limbs were misshapen. The mandibular mass grew and protruded from the oral cavity, extending to the level of the lower ribs. Other bony defects included a similar maxillary mass and serpentine limbs. Upon referral at age 27 years, biochemical studies showed serum alkaline phosphatase of 1760 U/L (Nl: 29-111) and other elevated bone turnover markers. Radiography of the limbs showed medullary expansion and cortical thinning with severe bowing. Although the jaw tumors were initially deemed inoperable, mandibular mass excision and staged partial maxillectomy were eventually performed. Tumor histopathology showed curvilinear trabeculae of woven bone on a background of hypocellular fibrous tissue. Fibrous dysplasia of bone was suspected, but there was no mutation in codon 201 of GNAS in samples from blood or tumor. His clinical and radiographic findings, elevated serum markers, and disorganized bone morphology suggested amplified receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) signaling, even though his disorder differed from conditions with known constitutive activation of RANK signaling (eg, familial expansile osteolysis). We found a unique 12-base pair duplication in the signal peptide of TNFRSF11A, the gene that encodes RANK. No exon or splice site mutations were found in the genes encoding RANK ligand or osteoprotegerin. Alendronate followed by pamidronate therapies substantially decreased his serum alkaline phosphatase activity. This unique patient expands the

  15. Panostotic Expansile Bone Disease With Massive Jaw Tumor Formation and a Novel Mutation in the Signal Peptide of RANK

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Anne L; Mumm, Steven; El-Sayed, Ivan; McAlister, William H; Horvai, Andrew E; Tom, Andrea M; Hsiao, Edward C; Schaefer, Frederick V; Collins, Michael T; Anderson, Mark S; Whyte, Michael P; Shoback, Dolores M

    2015-01-01

    Precise regulation of bone resorption is critical for skeletal homeostasis. We report a 32-year-old man with a panostotic expansile bone disease and a massive hemorrhagic mandibular tumor. Originally from Mexico, he was deaf at birth and became bow-legged during childhood. There was no family history of skeletal disease. Puberty occurred normally, but during adolescence he experienced difficulty straightening his limbs, sustained multiple fractures, and developed a bony tumor on his chin. By age 18 years, all limbs were misshapen. The mandibular mass grew and protruded from the oral cavity, extending to the level of the lower ribs. Other bony defects included a similar maxillary mass and serpentine limbs. Upon referral at age 27 years, biochemical studies showed serum alkaline phosphatase of 1760 U/L (Nl: 29-111) and other elevated bone turnover markers. Radiography of the limbs showed medullary expansion and cortical thinning with severe bowing. Although the jaw tumors were initially deemed inoperable, mandibular mass excision and staged partial maxillectomy were eventually performed. Tumor histopathology showed curvilinear trabeculae of woven bone on a background of hypocellular fibrous tissue. Fibrous dysplasia of bone was suspected, but there was no mutation in codon 201 of GNAS in samples from blood or tumor. His clinical and radiographic findings, elevated serum markers, and disorganized bone morphology suggested amplified receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) signaling, even though his disorder differed from conditions with known constitutive activation of RANK signaling (eg, familial expansile osteolysis). We found a unique 12-base pair duplication in the signal peptide of TNFRSF11A, the gene that encodes RANK. No exon or splice site mutations were found in the genes encoding RANK ligand or osteoprotegerin. Alendronate followed by pamidronate therapies substantially decreased his serum alkaline phosphatase activity. This unique patient expands the phenotypes

  16. Targeting cells of the myeloid lineage attenuates pain and disease progression in a prostate model of bone cancer.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michelle L; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M; Chartier, Stephane; Tsai, James; Burton, Elizabeth A; Habets, Gaston; Lin, Paul S; West, Brian L; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2015-09-01

    Tumor cells frequently metastasize to bone where they can generate cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) that can be difficult to fully control using available therapies. Here, we explored whether PLX3397, a high-affinity small molecular antagonist that binds to and inhibits phosphorylation of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor, the tyrosine-protein kinase c-Kit, and the FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3, can reduce CIBP. These 3 targets all regulate the proliferation and function of a subset of the myeloid cells including macrophages, osteoclasts, and mast cells. Preliminary experiments show that PLX3397 attenuated inflammatory pain after formalin injection into the hind paw of the rat. As there is an inflammatory component in CIBP, involving macrophages and osteoclasts, the effect of PLX3397 was explored in a prostate model of CIBP where skeletal pain, cancer cell proliferation, tumor metastasis, and bone remodeling could be monitored in the same animal. Administration of PLX3397 was initiated on day 14 after prostate cancer cell injection when the tumor was well established, and tumor-induced bone remodeling was first evident. Over the next 6 weeks, sustained administration of PLX3397 attenuated CIBP behaviors by approximately 50% and was equally efficacious in reducing tumor cell growth, formation of new tumor colonies in bone, and pathological tumor-induced bone remodeling. Developing a better understanding of potential effects that analgesic therapies have on the tumor itself may allow the development of therapies that not only better control the pain but also positively impact disease progression and overall survival in patients with bone cancer.

  17. Targeting cells of the myeloid lineage attenuates pain and disease progression in a prostate model of bone cancer.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michelle L; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M; Chartier, Stephane; Tsai, James; Burton, Elizabeth A; Habets, Gaston; Lin, Paul S; West, Brian L; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2015-09-01

    Tumor cells frequently metastasize to bone where they can generate cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) that can be difficult to fully control using available therapies. Here, we explored whether PLX3397, a high-affinity small molecular antagonist that binds to and inhibits phosphorylation of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor, the tyrosine-protein kinase c-Kit, and the FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3, can reduce CIBP. These 3 targets all regulate the proliferation and function of a subset of the myeloid cells including macrophages, osteoclasts, and mast cells. Preliminary experiments show that PLX3397 attenuated inflammatory pain after formalin injection into the hind paw of the rat. As there is an inflammatory component in CIBP, involving macrophages and osteoclasts, the effect of PLX3397 was explored in a prostate model of CIBP where skeletal pain, cancer cell proliferation, tumor metastasis, and bone remodeling could be monitored in the same animal. Administration of PLX3397 was initiated on day 14 after prostate cancer cell injection when the tumor was well established, and tumor-induced bone remodeling was first evident. Over the next 6 weeks, sustained administration of PLX3397 attenuated CIBP behaviors by approximately 50% and was equally efficacious in reducing tumor cell growth, formation of new tumor colonies in bone, and pathological tumor-induced bone remodeling. Developing a better understanding of potential effects that analgesic therapies have on the tumor itself may allow the development of therapies that not only better control the pain but also positively impact disease progression and overall survival in patients with bone cancer. PMID:25993548

  18. A promising approach for treatment of tumor-induced bone diseases: utilizing bisphosphonate derivatives of nucleoside antimetabolites.

    PubMed

    Reinholz, Monica M; Zinnen, Shawn P; Dueck, Amylou C; Dingli, David; Reinholz, Gregory G; Jonart, Leslie A; Kitzmann, Kathleen A; Bruzek, Amy K; Negron, Vivian; Abdalla, Abdalla K; Arendt, Bonnie K; Croatt, Anthony J; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Sebesta, David P; Lönnberg, Harri; Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Nath, Karl A; Jelinek, Diane F; Russell, Stephen J; Ingle, James N; Spelsberg, Thomas C; Dixon, Henry B F Hal; Karpeisky, Alexander; Lingle, Wilma L

    2010-07-01

    Despite palliative treatments, tumor-induced bone disease (TIBD) remains highly debilitating for many cancer patients and progression typically results in death within two years. Therefore, more effective therapies with enhanced anti-resorptive and cytotoxic characteristics are needed. We developed bisphosphonate-chemotherapeutic conjugates designed to bind bone and hydrolyze, releasing both compounds, thereby targeting both osteoclasts and tumor cells. This study examined the effects of our lead compound, MBC-11 (the anhydride formed between arabinocytidine (AraC)-5'-phosphate and etidronate), on bone tumor burden, bone volume, femur bone mineral density (BMD), and overall survival using two distinct mouse models of TIBD, the 4T1/luc breast cancer and the KAS-6/1-MIP1alpha multiple myeloma models. In mice orthotopically inoculated with 4T1/luc mouse mammary cells, MBC-11 (0.04 microg/day; s.c.) reduced the incidence of bone metastases to 40% (4/10), compared to 90% (9/10; p=0.057) and 100% (5/5; p=0.04) of PBS- or similarly-dosed, zoledronate-treated mice, respectively. MBC-11 also significantly decreased bone tumor burden compared to PBS- or zoledronate-treated mice (p=0.021, p=0.017, respectively). MBC-11 and zoledronate (0.04 microg/day) significantly increased bone volume by two- and four-fold, respectively, compared to PBS-treated mice (p=0.005, p<0.001, respectively). In mice systemically injected with human multiple myeloma KAS-6/1-MIP1alpha cells, 0.04 and 4.0 microg/day MBC-11 improved femur BMD by 13% and 16%, respectively, compared to PBS (p=0.025, p=0.017, respectively) at 10 weeks post-tumor cell injection and increased mean survival to 95 days compared to 77 days in mice treated with PBS (p=0.047). Similar doses of zoledronate also improved femur BMD (p< or =0.01 vs PBS) and increased mean survival to 86 days, but this was not significantly different than in PBS-treated mice (p=0.53). These results demonstrate that MBC-11 decreases bone tumor burden

  19. A Promising Approach for Treatment of Tumor-Induced Bone Diseases: Utilizing Bisphosphonate Derivatives of Nucleoside Antimetabolites*

    PubMed Central

    Reinholz, Monica M.; Zinnen, Shawn P.; Dueck, Amylou C.; Dingli, David; Reinholz, Gregory G.; Jonart, Leslie A.; Kitzmann, Kathleen A.; Bruzek, Amy K.; Negron, Vivian; Abdalla, Abdalla K.; Arendt, Bonnie K.; Croatt, Anthony J.; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Sebesta, David P.; Lönnberg, Harri; Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Nath, Karl A.; Jelinek, Diane F.; Russell, Stephen J.; Ingle, James N.; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; (Hal) Dixon, Henry B.F.; Karpeisky, Alexander; Lingle, Wilma L.

    2010-01-01

    Despite palliative treatments, tumor-induced bone disease (TIBD) remains highly debilitating for many cancer patients and progression typically results in death within two years. Therefore, more effective therapies with enhanced antiresorptive and cytotoxic characteristics are needed. We developed bisphosphonate-chemotherapeutic conjugates designed to bind bone and hydrolyze, releasing both compounds, thereby targeting both osteoclasts and tumor cells. This study examined the effects of our lead compound, MBC-11 (the anhydride formed between arabinocytidine (AraC)-5’-phosphate and etidronate), on bone tumor burden, bone volume, femur bone mineral density (BMD), and overall survival using two distinct mouse models of TIBD, the 4T1/luc breast cancer and the KAS-6/1-MIP1α multiple myeloma models. In mice orthotopically inoculated with 4T1/luc mouse mammary cells, MBC-11 (0.04 µg/day; s.c.) reduced the incidence of bone metastases to 40% (4/10), compared to 90% (9/10; p=0.057) and 100% (5/5; p=0.04) of PBS- or similarly-dosed, zoledronate-treated mice, respectively. MBC-11 also significantly decreased bone tumor burden compared to PBS- or zoledronate-treated mice (p=0.021, p=0.017, respectively). MBC-11 and zoledronate (0.04 µg/day) significantly increased bone volume by two- and four-fold, respectively, compared to PBS-treated mice (p=0.005, p<0.001, respectively). In mice systemically injected with human multiple myeloma KAS-6/1-MIP1α cells, 0.04 and 4.0 µg/day MBC-11 improved femur BMD by 13% and 16%, respectively, compared to PBS (p=0.025, p=0.017, respectively) at 10 weeks post-tumor cell injection and increased mean survival to 95 days compared to 77 days in mice treated with PBS (p=0.047). Similar doses of zoledronate also improved femur BMD (p≤0.01 vs PBS) and increased mean survival to 86 days, but this was not significantly different than in PBS-treated mice (p=0.53). These results demonstrate that MBC-11 decreases bone tumor burden, maintains bone

  20. Bone marrow plasma macrophage inflammatory protein protein-1 alpha(MIP-1 alpha) and sclerostin in multiple myeloma: relationship with bone disease and clinical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Tao; He, Yu-Chan; Zhou, Si-Yao; Jiang, Jing-zi; Huang, Yu-Mei; Liang, Yu-Zhen; Lai, Yong-Rong

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the expression of MIP-1 alpha and sclerostin in bone marrow of patients with multiple myeloma (MM), the possible association of the sclerostin and MIP-1 alpha with MBD and the clinical characteristics. 53 patients (29 M, 24 F), median age 64 years was studied. MIP-1 alpha, sclerostin and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (bALP) levels were quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Sclerostin and MIP-1 alpha mRNA expression was determined by RT-PCR. PTH and 1,25(OH) 2D3 levels were measured with an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. The sclerostin and MIP-1 alpha concentrations in patients with MM were higher than those in the controls. RT-PCR analysis verified that the bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) of most patients showed sclerostin and MIP-1 alpha mRNA expression. The sclerostin and MIP-1 alpha levels in patients with ISS stage III disease were significantly higher than those in patients with ISS stage II disease (p=0.01 and 0.06). The sclerostin and MIP-1 alpha levels in patients with BMD in group C were significantly higher than those in group A+B. There was positive correlation between sclerostin levels and MIP-1 alpha, beta2-microglobulin and aCa levels. A negative association was seen between sclerostin levels and bALP, HB and ALB levels. The MM patients with high sclerostin levels (>0.72 ng/ml) had significantly shorter median survival than those with low sclerostin levels (≤0.72 ng/ml) (χ(2)=7.574, p=0.006). Our findings support the positive relationship between sclerostin levels and MIP-1alpha levels deserve further detailed research.

  1. Theory of friction based on brittle fracture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.D.

    1967-01-01

    A theory of friction is presented that may be more applicable to geologic materials than the classic Bowden and Tabor theory. In the model, surfaces touch at the peaks of asperities and sliding occurs when the asperities fail by brittle fracture. The coefficient of friction, ??, was calculated from the strength of asperities of certain ideal shapes; for cone-shaped asperities, ?? is about 0.1 and for wedge-shaped asperities, ?? is about 0.15. For actual situations which seem close to the ideal model, observed ?? was found to be very close to 0.1, even for materials such as quartz and calcite with widely differing strengths. If surface forces are present, the theory predicts that ?? should decrease with load and that it should be higher in a vacuum than in air. In the presence of a fluid film between sliding surfaces, ?? should depend on the area of the surfaces in contact. Both effects are observed. The character of wear particles produced during sliding and the way in which ?? depends on normal load, roughness, and environment lend further support to the model of friction presented here. ?? 1967 The American Institute of Physics.

  2. Topical HPMC/S-Nitrosoglutathione Solution Decreases Inflammation and Bone Resorption in Experimental Periodontal Disease in Rats.

    PubMed

    Martins, Conceição S; Leitão, Renata F C; Costa, Deiziane V S; Melo, Iracema M; Santos, Glaylton S; Lima, Vilma; Baldim, Victor; Wong, Deysi V T; Bonfim, Luana E; Melo, Cíntia B; G de Oliveira, Marcelo; Brito, Gerly A C

    2016-01-01

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is a nitric oxide (NO) donor, which exerts antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and microbicidal actions. Intragingival application of GSNO was already shown to decrease alveolar bone loss, inflammation and oxidative stress in an experimental periodontal disease (EPD) model. In the present study, we evaluated the potential therapeutic effect of topical applications of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC)/GSNO solutions on EPD in Wistar rats. EPD was induced by placing a sterilized nylon (3.0) thread ligature around the cervix of the second left upper molar of the animals, which received topical applications of a HPMC solutions containing GSNO 2 or 10 mM or vehicle (HPMC solution), 1 h prior to the placement of the ligature and then twice daily until sacrifice on day 11. Treatment with HPMC/GSNO 10 mM solution significantly reduced alveolar bone loss, oxidative stress and TNF-α e IL-1β levels in the surrounding gingival tissue, and led to a decreased transcription of RANK and TNF-α genes and elevated bone alkaline phosphatase, compared to the HPMC group. In conclusion, topical application of HPMC/GSNO solution is a potential treatment to reduce inflammation and bone loss in periodontal disease. PMID:27116554

  3. Context Matters: Distinct Disease Outcomes as a Result of Crebbp Hemizygosity in Different Mouse Bone Marrow Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ting; Perez, Stephanie N.; Cheng, Ziming; Kinney, Marsha C.; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Scott, Linda M.; Rebel, Vivienne I.

    2016-01-01

    Perturbations in CREB binding protein (CREBBP) are associated with hematopoietic malignancies, including myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Mice hemizygous for Crebbp develop myelodysplasia with proliferative features, reminiscent of human MDS/myeloproliferative neoplasm-unclassifiable (MDS/MPN-U), and a proportion goes on to develop acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We have also shown that the Crebbp+/- non-hematopoietic bone marrow microenvironment induces excessive myeloproliferation of wild-type cells. We now report that transplantation of unfractionated Crebbp+/- bone marrow into wild-type recipients resulted in either early-onset AML or late-onset MDS and MDS/MPN-U. In contrast, purified Lin-Sca-1+c-Kit++ cells primarily gave rise to MDS with occasional transformation to AML. Furthermore, Crebbp+/- common myeloid progenitors and granulocyte/macrophage progenitors could trigger skewed myelopoiesis, myelodysplasia and late-onset AML. Surprisingly, the phenotypically abnormal cells were all of wild-type origin. MDS, MPN and AML can thus all be transferred from Crebbp+/- BM to wild-type hosts but fractionated bone marrow does not recapitulate the full disease spectrum of whole bone marrow, indicating that not only mutational status but also cellular context contribute to disease outcome. This has important consequences for structuring and interpreting future investigations into the underlying mechanisms of myeloid malignancies as well as for their treatment. PMID:27427906

  4. CYR61/CCN1 overexpression in the myeloma microenvironment is associated with superior survival and reduced bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, James P.; Bam, Rakesh; Qu, Pingping; Barlogie, Bart; van Rhee, Frits; Shaughnessy, John D.; Epstein, Joshua; Yaccoby, Shmuel

    2014-01-01

    Secreted protein CCN1, encoded by CYR61, is involved in wound healing, angiogenesis, and osteoblast differentiation. We identified CCN1 as a microenvironmental factor produced by mesenchymal cells and overexpressed in bones of a subset of patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), asymptomatic myeloma (AMM), and multiple myeloma (MM). Our analysis showed that overexpression of CYR61 was independently associated with superior overall survival of MM patients enrolled in our Total Therapy 3 protocol. Moreover, elevated CCN1 was associated with a longer time for MGUS/AMM to progress to overt MM. During remission from MM, high levels of CCN1 were associated with superior progression-free and overall survival and stratified patients with molecularly defined high-risk MM. Recombinant CCN1 directly inhibited in vitro growth of MM cells, and overexpression of CYR61 in MM cells reduced tumor growth and prevented bone destruction in vivo in severe combined immunodeficiency-hu mice. Signaling through αvβ3 was required for CCN1 prevention of bone disease. CYR61 expression may signify early perturbation of the microenvironment before conversion to overt MM and may be a compensatory mechanism to control MM progression. Therapeutics that upregulate CYR61 should be investigated for treating MM bone disease. PMID:25061178

  5. Topical HPMC/S-Nitrosoglutathione Solution Decreases Inflammation and Bone Resorption in Experimental Periodontal Disease in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Conceição S.; Leitão, Renata F. C.; Costa, Deiziane V. S.; Melo, Iracema M.; Santos, Glaylton S.; Lima, Vilma; Baldim, Victor; Wong, Deysi V. T.; Bonfim, Luana E.; Melo, Cíntia B.; Brito, Gerly A. C.

    2016-01-01

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is a nitric oxide (NO) donor, which exerts antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and microbicidal actions. Intragingival application of GSNO was already shown to decrease alveolar bone loss, inflammation and oxidative stress in an experimental periodontal disease (EPD) model. In the present study, we evaluated the potential therapeutic effect of topical applications of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC)/GSNO solutions on EPD in Wistar rats. EPD was induced by placing a sterilized nylon (3.0) thread ligature around the cervix of the second left upper molar of the animals, which received topical applications of a HPMC solutions containing GSNO 2 or 10 mM or vehicle (HPMC solution), 1 h prior to the placement of the ligature and then twice daily until sacrifice on day 11. Treatment with HPMC/GSNO 10 mM solution significantly reduced alveolar bone loss, oxidative stress and TNF-α e IL-1β levels in the surrounding gingival tissue, and led to a decreased transcription of RANK and TNF-α genes and elevated bone alkaline phosphatase, compared to the HPMC group. In conclusion, topical application of HPMC/GSNO solution is a potential treatment to reduce inflammation and bone loss in periodontal disease. PMID:27116554

  6. Dietary phosphorus excess: a risk factor in chronic bone, kidney, and cardiovascular disease?

    PubMed

    Uribarri, Jaime; Calvo, Mona S

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence in the nephrology literature supporting the deleterious health effect of excess dietary phosphorus intake. This issue has largely escaped the attention of nutrition experts until this symposium, which raised the question of whether the same health concerns should be extended to the general population. The potential hazard of a high phosphorus intake in the healthy population is illustrated by findings from acute and epidemiologic studies. Acute studies in healthy young adults demonstrate that phosphorus intakes in excess of nutrient needs may significantly disrupt the hormonal regulation of phosphorus contributing to disordered mineral metabolism, vascular calcification, bone loss, and impaired kidney function. One of the hormonal factors acutely affected by dietary phosphorus loading is fibroblast growth factor-23, which may be a key factor responsible for many of the cardiovascular disease (CVD) complications of high phosphorus intake. Increasingly, large epidemiological studies suggest that mild elevations of serum phosphorus within the normal range are associated with CVD risk in healthy populations. Few population studies link high dietary phosphorus intake to mild changes in serum phosphorus due to study design issues specific to phosphorus and inaccurate nutrient composition databases. The increasing phosphorus intake due to the use of phosphorus-containing ingredients in processed food and the growing consumption of processed convenience and fast foods is an important factor that needs to be emphasized.

  7. Dietary phosphorus excess: a risk factor in chronic bone, kidney, and cardiovascular disease?

    PubMed

    Uribarri, Jaime; Calvo, Mona S

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence in the nephrology literature supporting the deleterious health effect of excess dietary phosphorus intake. This issue has largely escaped the attention of nutrition experts until this symposium, which raised the question of whether the same health concerns should be extended to the general population. The potential hazard of a high phosphorus intake in the healthy population is illustrated by findings from acute and epidemiologic studies. Acute studies in healthy young adults demonstrate that phosphorus intakes in excess of nutrient needs may significantly disrupt the hormonal regulation of phosphorus contributing to disordered mineral metabolism, vascular calcification, bone loss, and impaired kidney function. One of the hormonal factors acutely affected by dietary phosphorus loading is fibroblast growth factor-23, which may be a key factor responsible for many of the cardiovascular disease (CVD) complications of high phosphorus intake. Increasingly, large epidemiological studies suggest that mild elevations of serum phosphorus within the normal range are associated with CVD risk in healthy populations. Few population studies link high dietary phosphorus intake to mild changes in serum phosphorus due to study design issues specific to phosphorus and inaccurate nutrient composition databases. The increasing phosphorus intake due to the use of phosphorus-containing ingredients in processed food and the growing consumption of processed convenience and fast foods is an important factor that needs to be emphasized. PMID:24038251

  8. ON THE BRITTLENESS OF ENAMEL AND SELECTED DENTAL MATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Park, S.; Quinn, J. B; Romberg, E.; Arola, D.

    2008-01-01

    Although brittle material behavior is often considered undesirable, a quantitative measure of “brittleness” is currently not used in assessing the clinical merits of dental materials. Objective To quantify and compare the brittleness of human enamel and common dental restorative materials used for crown replacement. Methods Specimens of human enamel were prepared from the 3rd molars of “young” (18≤age≤25) and “old” (50≤age) patients. The hardness, elastic modulus and apparent fracture toughness were characterized as a function of distance from the DEJ using indentation approaches. These properties were then used in estimating the brittleness according to a model that accounts for the competing dissipative processes of deformation and fracture. The brittleness of selected porcelain, ceramic and Micaceous Glass Ceramic (MGC) dental materials was estimated and compared with that of the enamel. Results The average brittleness of the young and old enamel increased with distance from the DEJ. For the old enamel the average brittleness increased from approximately 300 µm−1 at the DEJ to nearly 900 µm−1 at the occlusal surface. While there was no significant difference between the two age groups at the DEJ, the brittleness of the old enamel was significantly greater (and up to 4 times higher) than that of the young enamel near the occlusal surface. The brittleness numbers for the restorative materials were up to 90% lower than that of young occlusal enamel. Significance The brittleness index could serve as a useful scale in the design of materials used for crown replacement, as well as a quantitative tool for characterizing degradation in the mechanical behavior of enamel. PMID:18436299

  9. Modelling Gaucher disease progression: long-term enzyme replacement therapy reduces the incidence of splenectomy and bone complications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Long-term complications and associated conditions of type 1 Gaucher Disease (GD) can include splenectomy, bone complications, pulmonary hypertension, Parkinson disease and malignancies. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) reverses cytopenia and reduces organomegaly. To study the effects of ERT on long-term complications and associated conditions, the course of Gaucher disease was modelled. The cohort consisted of all diagnosed GD patients in the Netherlands. Mutually exclusive disease states were defined as ‘asymptomatic’, ‘signs/symptoms’, ‘recovery’, ‘splenectomy’, ‘bone complication’, ‘multiple complications’ and ‘malignancy’. A natural history (NH) cohort was delineated based upon historical data on Dutch patients before ERT was available. Cumulative incidence curves were composed for progression from each disease state to the next. Two scenarios were applied for the ERT cohort: time to complications was calculated from A. start of ERT; B. entering the previous disease state. Median time for the development of signs and/or symptoms was 30.1 years (N = 73). In the NH cohort (N = 42), 9% had developed a bone complication after 10 years in the signs/symptoms phase, while 21% had undergone a splenectomy. In the ERT cohort (N = 29 (A), N = 28 (B)), 12% (A) or 4% (B) had developed a bone complication after 10 years in this phase and no patient was splenectomized. No patients in the NH cohort recovered, compared to 50% in the ERT cohort after 3.6 years (N = 28 (A)) or 22.4 years (N = 27 (B)) of treatment. Median time from a first to a second complication was 11 years in the NH cohort (N = 31), whereas 16 respectively 14 percent had developed a second complication after 10 years in the ERT cohort (N = 17, scenario A/B). Fourteen percent (scenario A/B) developed an associated malignancy after 10 years in the phase ‘multiple complications’ (N = 23). Associated malignancies occurred almost exclusively in advanced disease stages, therefore it

  10. Subtle changes in bone mineralization density distribution in most severely affected patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Misof, B M; Roschger, P; Jorgetti, V; Klaushofer, K; Borba, V Z C; Boguszewski, C L; Cohen, A; Shane, E; Zhou, H; Dempster, D W; Moreira, C A

    2015-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with low aBMD as measured by DXA and altered microstructure as assessed by bone histomorphometry and microcomputed tomography. Knowledge of bone matrix mineralization is lacking in COPD. Using quantitative backscatter electron imaging (qBEI), we assessed cancellous (Cn.) and cortical (Ct.) bone mineralization density distribution (BMDD) in 19 postmenopausal women (62.1 ± 7.3 years of age) with COPD. Eight had sustained fragility fractures, and 13 had received treatment with inhaled glucocorticoids. The BMDD outcomes from the patients were compared with healthy reference data and were correlated with previous clinical and histomorphometric findings. In general, the BMDD outcomes for the patients were not significantly different from the reference data. Neither the subgroups of with or without fragility fractures or of who did or did not receive inhaled glucocorticoid treatment, showed differences in BMDD. However, subgroup comparison according to severity revealed 10% decreased cancellous mineralization heterogeneity (Cn.CaWidth) for the most severely affected compared with less affected patients (p=0.042) and compared with healthy premenopausal controls (p=0.021). BMDD parameters were highly correlated with histomorphometric cancellous bone volume (BV/TV) and formation indices: mean degree of mineralization (Cn.CaMean) versus BV/TV (r=0.58, p=0.009), and Cn.CaMean and Ct.CaMean versus bone formation rate (BFR/BS) (r=-0.71, p<0.001). In particular, those with lower BV/TV (<50th percentile) had significantly lower Cn.CaMean (p=0.037) and higher Cn.CaLow (p=0.020) compared with those with higher (>50th percentile) BV/TV. The normality in most of the BMDD parameters and bone formation rates as well as the significant correlations between them suggests unaffected mineralization processes in COPD. Our findings also indicate no significant negative effect of treatment with inhaled glucocorticoids on the bone

  11. Role of bone and liver scans in surveying patients with breast cancer for metastatic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, D.M.; Wright, D.J.

    1987-10-01

    The objective of this study is to correlate the presence of bone and liver metastases in patients with breast cancer with respect to the results of bone and liver scans, axillary nodal status, and serum alkaline phosphatase levels. One hundred ninety-seven patients with breast cancer treated by modified radical mastectomy between the years 1978 and 1981 were studied. Fifty-nine (30%) of the total group had distant metastases during the course of observation of 60 to 96 months; of 35 patients in whom bone metastases developed, 30 had normal preoperative bone scan results. Of 21 patients who had liver metastases, 19 had normal preoperative liver scans. Nineteen (70%) of the 27 patients with abnormal bone scans had normal alkaline phosphatase levels. Seven (63%) of the 11 patients who had abnormal liver scans had a normal alkaline phosphatase. The study supports the concept that preoperative bone and liver scans are ineffective indicators of metastatic involvement. Selection of patients for screening by bone and liver scans according to alkaline phosphatase determinations was not supported by this study. The appropriate use of bone scans for screening in patients with breast carcinoma is suggested as a follow-up device in patients with positive lymph nodes.

  12. β-Glucans (Saccharomyces cereviseae) Reduce Glucose Levels and Attenuate Alveolar Bone Loss in Diabetic Rats with Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of oral ingestion of β-glucans isolated from Saccharomyces cereviseae on the metabolic profile, expression of gingival inflammatory markers and amount of alveolar bone loss in diabetic rats with periodontal disease. Diabetes mellitus was induced in 48 Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (80 mg/kg). After confirming the diabetes diagnosis, the animals were treated with β-glucans (by gavage) for 28 days. On the 14th day of this period, periodontal disease was induced using a ligature protocol. β-glucans reduced the amount of alveolar bone loss in animals with periodontal disease in both the diabetic and non-diabetic groups (p < 0.05). β-glucans reduced blood glucose, cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels in diabetic animals, both with and without periodontal disease (p < 0.05). Furthermore, treatment with β-glucans reduced the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand and increased osteoprotegerin expression in animals with diabetes and periodontal disease (p < 0.05). It was concluded that treatment with β-glucans has beneficial metabolic and periodontal effects in diabetic rats with periodontal disease. PMID:26291983

  13. A Pilot Study Measuring Aluminum in Bone in Alzheimer's Disease and control Subjects Using in vivo Neutron Activation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, Hedieh K; Cowan, David; Chettle, David R; Milić, Ana Pejović; Priest, Nicholas; Matysiak, Witold; Atanackovic, Jovica; Byun, Soo Hyun; Prestwich, William V

    2016-06-18

    Aluminum, being the most abundant metal in the earth's crust, is widely distributed in the environment, and is routinely taken up by the human body through ingestion and inhalation. Aluminum is not considered an essential element and it can be toxic in high concentrations. Most of the body burden of aluminum is stored in the bones. Aluminum has been postulated to be involved in the causality of Alzheimer's disease. A system for non-invasive measurement of bone aluminum using the in vivo neutron activation analysis technique has been developed and previously reported in the literature by our group. The results are reported as ratio of Al to Ca in order to eliminate the variations in beam parameters and geometry as well as the physical variations among the subjects such as size of the hand and bone structure. This pilot study included 30 subjects, 15 diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in mild and moderate stages and 15 control subjects, all of whom were 60 years of age or older. The mean value of aluminum for the control group was 2.7±8.2μg Al/g Ca (inverse-variance weighted mean 3.5±0.9μg Al/g Ca) and for the Alzheimer's disease subjects was 12.5±13.1μg Al/g Ca (inverse-variance weighted mean 7.6±0.6μg Al/g Ca). The difference between the mean of the Alzheimer's disease group and the mean of the control group was 9.8±15.9μg Al/g Ca, with a p-value of 0.02. An age-dependent linear increase in bone aluminum concentration was observed for all subjects. The difference in serum aluminum levels between the two groups did not reach significance. PMID:27340850

  14. Bone disease in patients with haemophilia A and B--where are we now?

    PubMed

    Anagnostis, P; Karras, S N; Goulis, D G

    2015-01-01

    It is evident that haemophilia A and B are associated with decreased bone mass in both adults and children. Decreased physical activity and vitamin D deficiency are some of the major factors leading to bone loss. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may also contribute to low bone mineral density (BMD). However, definite conclusions regarding the exact prevalence and pathogenesis of osteoporosis cannot be conducted yet, due to the small sample size and significant heterogeneity among studies. Discordant findings with regard to the skeletal site of low BMD have also been reported. Furthermore, data on fracture risk are sparse. The use of the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) for assessing fracture risk, regular BMD assessment at the age of 25 and thereafter, careful evaluation of risk factors associated with bone loss and optimal calcium and vitamin D intake are recommended. Long-term prophylactic factor replacement therapy, resistance exercise and bisphosphonates, in severe cases of increased fracture risk, can prevent bone loss. PMID:25251867

  15. Bone Mineral Density at Diagnosis of Celiac Disease and after 1 Year of Gluten-Free Diet

    PubMed Central

    Pantaleoni, Stefano; Luchino, Massimo; Adriani, Alessandro; Pellicano, Rinaldo; Stradella, Davide; Ribaldone, Davide Giuseppe; Sapone, Nicoletta; Isaia, Gian Carlo; Di Stefano, Marco; Astegiano, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Atypical or silent celiac disease may go undiagnosed for many years and can frequently lead to loss of bone mineral density, with evolution to osteopenia or osteoporosis. The prevalence of the latter conditions, in case of new diagnosis of celiac disease, has been evaluated in many studies but, due to the variability of epidemiologic data and patient features, the results are contradictory. The aim of this study was to evaluate bone mineral density by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 175 consecutive celiac patients at time of diagnosis (169 per-protocol, 23 males, 146 females; average age 38.9 years). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was repeated after 1 year of gluten-free diet in those with T-score value <−1 at diagnosis. Stratification of patients according to sex and age showed a higher prevalence of low bone mineral density in men older than 30 years and in women of all ages. A 1-year gluten-free diet led to a significant improvement in lumbar spine and femoral neck mean T-score value. We propose that dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry should be performed at diagnosis of celiac disease in all women and in male aged >30 years, taking into account each risk factor in single patients. PMID:25379519

  16. CCR1 blockade reduces tumor burden and osteolysis in vivo in a mouse model of myeloma bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Oyajobi, Babatunde O.; Gupta, Anjana; McCluskey, Brandon; Miao, Shichang; Powers, Jay P.; Seitz, Lisa C.; Wang, Yu; Zeng, Yibin; Zhang, Penglie; Schall, Thomas J.; Jaen, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    The chemokine CCL3/MIP-1α is a risk factor in the outcome of multiple myeloma (MM), particularly in the development of osteolytic bone disease. This chemokine, highly overexpressed by MM cells, can signal mainly through 2 receptors, CCR1 and CCR5, only 1 of which (CCR1) is responsive to CCL3 in human and mouse osteoclast precursors. CCR1 activation leads to the formation of osteolytic lesions and facilitates tumor growth. Here we show that formation of mature osteoclasts is blocked by the highly potent and selective CCR1 antagonist CCX721, an analog of the clinical compound CCX354. We also show that doses of CCX721 selected to completely inhibit CCR1 produce a profound decrease in tumor burden and osteolytic damage in the murine 5TGM1 model of MM bone disease. Similar effects were observed when the antagonist was used prophylactically or therapeutically, with comparable efficacy to that of zoledronic acid. 5TGM1 cells were shown to express minimal levels of CCR1 while secreting high levels of CCL3, suggesting that the therapeutic effects of CCX721 result from CCR1 inhibition on non-MM cells, most likely osteoclasts and osteoclast precursors. These results provide a strong rationale for further development of CCR1 antagonists for the treatment of MM and associated osteolytic bone disease. PMID:22618707

  17. The management of metastatic bone disease with the combination of bisphosphonates and radiotherapy: from theory to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Vassiliou, V; Kardamakis, D

    2009-03-01

    Bone metastases are common in the event of malignancy and are inevitably associated with serious complications that may deteriorate the quality of life (QOL) of patients and threaten life. Both radiotherapy (RT) and bisphosphonates (BPs) have an established role in the management of metastatic bone disease. Many clinical trials have demonstrated their effectiveness when used as sole treatment modalities, but only a few have evaluated their therapeutic value when applied concomitantly. We herein discuss the pathophysiology of bone metastases and the potential interactions between RT and BPs. Moreover, the results of both animal models and clinical studies are presented in detail. Apart from aspects of normal tissue tolerance, other interactions include spatial cooperation and additive or super-additive effects. The latter brings about a synergistic activity that results in an enhanced reossification, improved bone stability and microarchitecture, and increased mechanical strength, as documented through animal model studies. The results of published clinical studies investigating the effectiveness of concomitant application of RT and BPs are promising, reporting a significant clinical and radiologic response. More specifically, a significant reduction of pain scores and a worth noticing improvement in QOL and performance status (PS) were noted, accompanied by a considerable increase in bone density. Pain relief was accompanied by a marked reduction in analgesic opioid need. The enhanced reossification may be responsible for the improved therapeutic response, since it was shown that the correlation between pain and bone density is negative and strong. Although promising and encouraging, the results of such studies should be corroborated by larger, randomized trials.

  18. Role of 99mTc-MDP bone scan in the diagnosis of Erdheim–Chester disease

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Anirban; Damle, Nishikant; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Arora, Arundeep; Singhal, Abhinav; Tripathi, Madhavi; Peepre, Karan

    2014-01-01

    Erdheim–Chester disease (ECD) is a rare systemic non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis. It is a progressive disease of unknown etiology. The 99mtechnetium-methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) bone scan is useful in finding the sites of involvement in the skeleton and is helpful in excluding other causes of bony pain. Also a scintigraphic pattern consistent with ECD should alert the physician to evaluate the patient for visceral sites of involvement using fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT), as this is known to be fatal at times. PMID:25210284

  19. Microscopic mechanisms of the brittleness of viscoelastic fluids.

    PubMed

    Tabuteau, H; Mora, S; Porte, G; Abkarian, M; Ligoure, C

    2009-04-17

    We show that a large class of viscoelastic fluids, i.e., transient networks, are brittle according to the Griffith's theory of solid fracture. However, contrary to solids, cracks are intrinsic to the material arising from the equilibrium nature of the fluid microstructure. The brittleness of these fluids comes from thermal fluctuations of bonds distribution. In this approach, the rupture stress is predicted to be on the order of the Young modulus, in very good agreement with experimental values.

  20. Dependence of tablet brittleness on tensile strength and porosity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xingchu; Chang, Shao-Yu; Osei-Yeboah, Frederick; Paul, Shubhajit; Perumalla, Sathyanarayana Reddy; Shi, Limin; Sun, Wei-Jhe; Zhou, Qun; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2015-09-30

    An analysis of data collected from 25 sets of diverse pharmaceutical powders has identified that an exponential growth function satisfactorily describes the relationship between tablet brittleness and tablet porosity while a power law function well describes the relationship between tablet brittleness and tensile strength. These equations have the potential to facilitate better characterization of tablet mechanical properties and to guide the design and optimization of pharmaceutical tablet products. PMID:26226338

  1. Increased serum levels of MIP-1alpha correlate with bone disease and angiogenic cytokines in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Tsirakis, George; Roussou, Parascevi; Pappa, Constantina A; Kolovou, Anna; Vasilokonstantaki, Chrysoula; Miminas, Ioannis; Kyriakaki, Stavroula; Alegakis, Athanasios; Alexandrakis, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    Many cytokines possess variable roles in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma. Macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) is an osteoclast-activating factor with a major role in myeloma bone disease. The aim of the study was to examine its participation in the angiogenic process of the disease. We measured, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, its serum levels in 56 newly diagnosed myeloma patients, in several skeletal grades and stages of the disease and in 25 healthy controls. Concurrently, we measured serum levels of the angiogenic cytokines basic-fibroblast growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and interleukin-18. All the above cytokines were higher in myeloma patients (p < 0.001 for all cases) and were increasing in parallel with disease stage (p < 0.001 for all cases) and skeletal grade (p < 0.04 for MIP-1alpha and p < 0.001 for the other cases). Moreover, positive correlations between MIP-1alpha and all the angiogenic cytokines were noted (p < 0.001 for all cases). MIP-1alpha seems to be a predominant factor responsible for the enhancement of bone resorption and increased angiogenesis. The positive correlation between MIP-1alpha and the angiogenic chemoattractants supports the involvement of these factors in the biology of myeloma cell growth. Moreover, they could be used as possible therapeutic targets as well as markers of disease activity.

  2. [Cytokines in bone diseases. Wnt signaling and osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ozono, Keiichi

    2010-10-01

    Wnt signaling system plays essential roles in development, cancer and bone metabolism. Canonical wnt signaling, which involves wnt ligands, receptor named frizzled and co-receptors LRP5/6, beta-catenin and transcription factors named LEF/TCF is well characterized and its defect causes bone abnormalities. The loss-of-function type of the LRP5 gene mutation is responsible for osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome. In addition, the LRP6 gene mutation leads to osteoporosis and metabolic syndrome. Thus, wnt signaling system is one of determinant factors for bone mineral density. PMID:20890034

  3. [Teriparatide:benefit and safety for bone disease in CKD patients undergoing hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Suguru; Ei, Isei; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-09-01

    Teriparatide, 1-34 parathyroid hormone, is one of effective treatments for osteoporosis. Teriparatide shows an anabolic effect for bone formation, as a result, increases bone mineral density as well as prevention of fractures in the general population. On the other hand, there are a few report about the effect of teriparatide on increase of bone mineral density in maintenance hemodialysis patients. In addition to CKD-MBD, osteoporosis is also an important pathological change in ESRD patients, therefore its safety and efficacy should be discussed in more detail. PMID:27561345

  4. Characterization of human bone morphogenetic protein gene variants for possible roles in congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei Feng; Deng, Xia; Zhou, Jing; Yan, Peng; Zhao, Er Ying; Liu, Shu Lin

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a complex illness with high rates of morbidity and mortality. In embryonic development, the heart is the first formed organ, which is strictly controlled by gene regulatory networks, including transcription factors, signaling pathways, epigenetic factors and microRNAs. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and -4 are essential in cardiogenesis as they can induce the expression of transcription factors, NKX2-5 and GATA binding protein 4, which are important in the development of the heart. The inhibition of BMP-2 and 4- inhibits the late expression of NKX2-5 and affects cardiac differentiation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether BMP-2 and -4 variations may be associated with CHD in Chinese Han populations. The rs1049007, rs235768 and rs17563 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are genetic variations located within the translated region of the BMP-2 and -4, were evaluated in 230 patients with CHD from the Chinese Han population and 160 non CHD control individuals. Statistical analyses were performed using the χ2 test, implemented using SPSS software (version 13.0). The Hardy Weinberg equilibrium test was performed on the population using online Online Encyclopedia for Genetic Epidemiology studies software, and multiple-sequence alignments of the BMP proteins were performed using Vector NTI software. No statistically significant associations were identified between these genetic variations and the risk of CHD (rs1049007, P value=0.560; rs235768, P value=0.972; rs17563, P value=0.787). In addition, no correlation was found between the patients with CHD and the non-CHD control individuals. Therefore, the rs1049007, rs235768 and rs17563 genetic variations of BMP-2 were not associated with CHD in the Chinese Han population. PMID:27357418

  5. Genetic association study of Dickkopf-1 and sclerostin genes with paget disease of bone.

    PubMed

    Beauregard, Mariejka; Gagnon, Edith; Guay-Bélanger, Sabrina; Siris, Ethel S; Morissette, Jean; Brown, Jacques P; Michou, Laëtitia

    2013-11-01

    Increased expression of DKK1 gene was reported in pagetic osteoblasts and stromal cells, and increased serum levels of DKK1 and SOST proteins were reported in patients with Paget disease of bone (PDB). This study aimed at identifying rare genetic variants of the DKK1 and SOST genes and at testing for genetic association with PDB in the French-Canadian population. Exons, promoters, and exon-intron junctions of these genes were sequenced in patients with PDB and healthy controls. An association study of Tag SNPs of both genes was also performed in 239 pagetic patients and 297 healthy individuals. Three rare variants were identified in this study, all located in the DKK1 gene: one variant in the second exon leading to alteration in a highly conserved amino acid (p.R120L), one in the 5'-untranslated region (-50 C/A), and one in a splice site of intron 1 (IVS1 184 T/C), although none of these rare variants were associated with PDB. A genetic association of a Tag SNP of the DKK1 gene was found: the G allele of rs1569198 was significantly decreased in patients in comparison to controls (42 vs. 49 %, uncorrected P = 0.03, OR = 0.77, 95 % CI 0.61-0.98). In conclusion, this study identified three rare genetic variants in DKK1 in the French-Canadian population. In addition, a weak genetic association of a common variant of DKK1, rs1569198, which is located on a predicted new acceptor site for splicing of this gene, was observed in PDB, whereas no rare variant or genetic association was found in the SOST gene.

  6. Characterization of human bone morphogenetic protein gene variants for possible roles in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei-Feng; Deng, Xia; Zhou, Jing; Yan, Peng; Zhao, Er-Ying; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2016-08-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a complex illness with high rates of morbidity and mortality. In embryonic development, the heart is the first formed organ, which is strictly controlled by gene regulatory networks, including transcription factors, signaling pathways, epigenetic factors and microRNAs. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and -4 are essential in cardiogenesis as they can induce the expression of transcription factors, NKX2‑5 and GATA binding protein 4, which are important in the development of the heart. The inhibition of BMP‑2 and ‑4 inhibits the late expression of NKX2-5 and affects cardiac differentiation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether BMP-2 and ‑4 variations may be associated with CHD in Chinese Han populations. The rs1049007, rs235768 and rs17563 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are genetic variations located within the translated region of the BMP-2 and -4, were evaluated in 230 patients with CHD from the Chinese Han population and 160 non-CHD control individuals. Statistical analyses were performed using the χ2 test, implemented using SPSS software (version 13.0). The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test was performed on the population using online Online Encyclopedia for Genetic Epidemiology studies software, and multiple-sequence alignments of the BMP proteins were performed using Vector NTI software. No statistically significant associations were identified between these genetic variations and the risk of CHD (rs1049007, P‑value=0.560; rs235768, P‑value=0.972; rs17563, P‑value=0.787). In addition, no correlation was found between the patients with CHD and the non‑CHD control individuals. Therefore, the rs1049007, rs235768 and rs17563 genetic variations of BMP-2 were not associated with CHD in the Chinese Han population. PMID:27357418

  7. Myeloma bone and extra-medullary disease: Role of PET/CT and other whole-body imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Rubini, Giuseppe; Niccoli-Asabella, Artor; Ferrari, Cristina; Racanelli, Vito; Maggialetti, Nicola; Dammacco, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematological malignancy. Although it can affect different organs, the bone compartment stands out both in terms of prevalence and clinical impact. Despite the striking advances in MM therapy, bone disease can remarkably affect the patient's quality of life. The occurrence and extension of bone marrow and extra-medullary involvement should be carefully assessed to confirm the diagnosis, to locate and whenever possible prevent dreadful complications such as pathological fractures and spinal cord compression, and to establish suitable therapeutic measures. Many imaging techniques have been proposed for the detection of MM skeletal involvement. With the development of more sophisticated imaging tools, it is time to use the right technique at the right time. Based on the review of the literature and our own experience, this article discusses advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging methods in the work-up of MM patients, with particular emphasis on the role that PET/CT can play. It is emphasized that whole body low-dose computed tomography should be the preferred imaging technique at baseline. However, bone marrow infiltration and extra-medullary manifestations are better detected by whole body magnetic resonance imaging. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography, on the other hand, combines the benefits of the two mentioned imaging procedures and is particularly useful not only for the detection of osteolytic lesions unrevealed by conventional X-ray, but also in the assessment of prognosis and therapeutic response. PMID:26997302

  8. Brittle Cornea Syndrome: Case Report with Novel Mutation in the PRDM5 Gene and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Avgitidou, Georgia; Siebelmann, Sebastian; Bachmann, Bjoern; Kohlhase, Juergen; Heindl, Ludwig M; Cursiefen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy presented with acute corneal hydrops on the left eye and spontaneous corneal rupture on the right eye. A diagnosis of brittle cornea syndrome was confirmed by molecular analysis. A novel mutation, the homozygous variant c.17T>G, p.V6G, was found in the gene for PR-domain-containing protein 5 (PRDM5) in exon 1. Brittle cornea syndrome is a rare connective tissue disease with typical ocular, auditory, musculoskeletal, and cutaneous disorders. Almost all patients suffer from declined vision due to corneal scarring, thinning, and rupture. The most common ophthalmologic findings include keratoconus, progressive central corneal thinning, high myopia, irregular astigmatism, retinal detachment, and high risk for spontaneous corneal or scleral rupture. In addition to describing the case with a novel mutation here we review the current literature on brittle cornea syndrome pathogenesis, clinical findings, and therapy.

  9. Bone regeneration in strong porous bioactive glass (13–93) scaffolds with an oriented microstructure implanted in rat calvarial defects

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Fu, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for synthetic bone graft substitutes to repair large bone defects resulting from trauma, malignancy, and congenital diseases. Bioactive glass has attractive properties as a scaffold material but factors that influence its ability to regenerate bone in vivo are not well understood. In the present work, the ability of strong porous scaffolds of 13–93 bioactive glass with an oriented microstructure to regenerate bone was evaluated in vivo using a rat calvarial defect model. Scaffolds with an oriented microstructure of columnar pores (porosity = 50%; pore diameter = 50–150 µm) showed mostly osteoconductive bone regeneration, and new bone formation, normalized to the available pore area (volume) of the scaffolds, increased from 37% at 12 weeks to 55% at 24 weeks. Scaffolds of the same glass with a trabecular microstructure (porosity = 80%; pore width = 100–500 µm), used as the positive control, showed bone regeneration in the pores of 25% and 46% at 12 and 24 weeks, respectively. The brittle mechanical response of the as-fabricated scaffolds changed markedly to an elasto-plastic response in vivo at both implantation times. These results indicate that both groups of 13–93 bioactive glass scaffolds could potentially be used to repair large bone defects, but scaffolds with the oriented microstructure could also be considered for the repair of loaded bone. PMID:22922251

  10. Relationship between Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and Biochemical and Bone Histomorphometric Alterations in a Chronic Kidney Disease Rat Model Undergoing Parathyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hung-Wei; Hung, Peir-Haur; Hsiao, Chih-Yen; Liou, Hung-Hsiang; Lin, Hsin-Shih; Huang, Tsang-Hai; Jou, I-Ming; Tsai, Kuen-Jer

    2015-01-01

    Background Phosphate burden in chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to elevated serum fibroblast factor-23 (FGF-23) levels, secondary hyperparathyroidism and chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). However dissociated hyperphosphatemia and low serum FGF-23 concentrations have been observed in experimentally parathyoridectomized rats. The relationships between serum mineral, hormone, and bone metabolism may be altered in the presence of CKD. The aim of our study was to investigate whether a consistent relationship existed between serum FGF-23 levels, specific serum biochemical markers, and histomorphometric parameters of bone metabolism in a parathyroidectomized CKD animal model. Results Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: parathyroidectomy (PTX) and CKD (PTX+CKD, 9 rats), CKD without PTX (CKD, 9 rats), and neither PTX nor CKD (sham-operated control, 8 rats); CKD was induced by partial nephrectomy. At 8 weeks after partial nephrectomy, serum biomarkers were measured. Bone histomorphometries of the distal femoral metaphyseal bone were analyzed. The mean serum FGF-23 levels and mean bone formation rate were the highest in the CKD group and the lowest in the PTX+CKD group. Bone volume parameters increased significantly in the PTX+CKD group. Pearson’s correlation revealed that serum FGF-23 levels associated with those of intact parathyroid hormone, phosphate, collagen type I C-telopeptide, and calcium. Univariate linear regression showed that serum FGF-23 values correlated with bone formation rate, bone volume, and osteoid parameters. Stepwise multivariate regression analysis revealed that circulating FGF-23 values were independently associated with bone volume and thickness (β = -0.737; p < 0.001 and β = -0.526; p = 0.006, respectively). Serum parathyroid hormone levels independently correlated with bone formation rate (β = 0.714; p < 0.001) while collagen type I C-telopeptide levels correlated with osteoid parameter. Conclusion Serum FGF

  11. Relation of osteoclast activating factor production to extent of bone disease in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Durie, B G; Salmon, S E; Mundy, G R

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of total body myeloma cell number and osteoclast activating factor (OAF) production by bone marrow myeloma cells in vitro were made in 33 patients with plasma cell myeloma. There was a highly significant correlation (P < 0.001) between the amount of OAF produced by bone marrow myeloma cells and the extent of skeletal destruction. Serial studies indicated reduction of OAF production with remission induction and high OAF production at the time of relapse with new bone destruction. Although hypercalcaemia occurred only in patients with the most extensive bone lesions, there was no direct relationship between OAF production and the serum calcium concentration. These data suggest that measurement of OAF production in multiple myeloma may predict those patients at risk for development of extensive skeletal destruction due to this neoplasm.

  12. Ultrasonic Apparatus for Pulverizing Brittle Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Dolgin, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2004-01-01

    The figure depicts an apparatus that pulverizes brittle material by means of a combination of ultrasonic and sonic vibration, hammering, and abrasion. The basic design of the apparatus could be specialized to be a portable version for use by a geologist in collecting powdered rock samples for analysis in the field or in a laboratory. Alternatively, a larger benchtop version could be designed for milling and mixing of precursor powders for such purposes as synthesis of ceramic and other polycrystalline materials or preparing powder samples for x-ray diffraction or x-ray fluorescence measurements to determine crystalline structures and compositions. Among the most attractive characteristics of this apparatus are its light weight and the ability to function without need for a large preload or a large power supply: It has been estimated that a portable version could have a mass <0.5 kg, would consume less than 1 W h of energy in milling a 1-cm3 volume of rock, and could operate at a preload <10 N. The basic design and principle of operation of this apparatus are similar to those of other apparatuses described in a series of prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, the two most relevant being Ultrasonic/ Sonic Drill/Corers With Integrated Sensors (NPO-20856), Vol. 25, No. 1 (January 2001), page 38 and Ultrasonic/ Sonic Mechanisms for Deep Drilling and Coring (NPO-30291), Vol. 27, No. 9 (September 2003), page 65. As before, vibrations are excited by means of a piezoelectric actuator, an ultrasonic horn, and a mass that is free to move axially over a limited range. As before, the ultrasonic harmonic motion of the horn drives the free-mass in a combination of ultrasonic harmonic and lower-frequency hammering motion. In this case, the free-mass is confined within a hollow cylinder that serves as a crushing chamber, and the free-mass serves as a crushing or milling tool. The hammering of the free-mass against a material sample at the lower end of the chamber grinds the sample into

  13. MKP-1 knockout does not prevent glucocorticoid-induced bone disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Conradie, Maria M; Cato, Andrew C B; Ferris, William F; de Wet, Heidi; Horsch, Kay; Hough, Stephen

    2011-09-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GCOP) is predominantly caused by inhibition of bone formation, resulting from a decrease in osteoblast numbers. Employing mouse (MBA-15.4) and human (MG-63) osteoblast cell lines, we previously found that the glucocorticoid (GC) dexamethasone (Dex) inhibits cellular proliferation as well as activation of the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway, essential for mitogenesis in these cells, and that both these effects could be reversed by the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor vanadate. In a rat model of GCOP, the GC-induced changes in bone formation, mass, and strength could be prevented by vanadate cotreatment, suggesting that the GC effects on bone were mediated by one or more PTPs. Employing phosphatase inhibitors, qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and overexpression/knockdown experiments, we concluded that MKP-1 was upregulated by Dex, that this correlated with the dephosphorylation of ERK, and that it largely mediated the in vitro effects of GCs on bone. To confirm the pivotal role of MKP-1 in vivo, we investigated the effects of the GC methylprednisolone on the quantitative bone histology of wild-type (WT) and MKP-1 homozygous knockout (MKP-1(-/-)) mice. In WT mice, static bone histology revealed that GC administration for 28 days decreased osteoid surfaces, volumes, and osteoblast numbers. Dynamic histology, following time-spaced tetracycline labeling, confirmed a significant GC-induced reduction in osteoblast appositional rate and bone formation rate. However, identical results were obtained in MKP-1 knockout mice, suggesting that in these animals upregulation of MKP-1 by GCs cannot be regarded as the sole mediator of the GC effects on bone. PMID:21698455

  14. Known vitamin D receptor polymorphisms are not associated with bone mineral density measures in pediatric Cushing disease

    PubMed Central

    Lodish, Maya B.; Mastroyannis, Spyridon A.; Sinaii, Ninet; Boikos, Sosipatros A.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Decreased bone mineral density (BMD) has been documented in adults with Cushing disease (CD), and allelic variants of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene have been associated with osteopenia. Genetic factors play an important role in bone accrual and its response to various diseases; among them, the most studied are the allelic variants of the VDR gene. There is debate as to whether or not described variants in the VDR gene have an effect on BMD. We previously investigated the Taq I and Apa I VDR alleles for an association with low BMD in women with depression and evidence of endogenous hypercortisolism. Methods In the current study, we sought to analyze whether BMD differences in patients with CD were associated with the Taq I and Apa I VDR allelotypes. Results The data showed lack of association between BMD and VDR polymorphisms. Conclusions This study suggests that the effect of endogenous hypercortisolism on bone in the context of CD is independent of VDR genotypes. PMID:22570981

  15. Treatment of Metastatic Bone Disease and the Emerging Role of Radium-223.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Bone metastases are common in advanced malignancy and, despite the developments in both anticancer and bone-targeted therapies in recent years, new therapeutic strategies are still needed. Traditionally, radioisotopes have been rarely used in part owing to concerns about bone marrow toxicity that limits retreatment and may prevent safe administration of subsequent chemotherapy. Radium-223 dichloride (Ra-223) is a calcium mimetic that binds preferentially to newly formed bone in areas of bone metastases, is the first alpha-emitting radionuclide to be developed for clinical use, and is approved for treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases. In this setting, it improves overall survival and delays symptomatic skeletal complications. The high linear energy transfer of the emitted alpha particles causes predominantly nonrepairable double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid breaks in tumor cells, and the large size of the alpha particle, compared with other forms of radiation, results in a short path length and highly localized tissue destruction. As a result, Ra-223 has a highly favorable safety profile with a low level of myelosuppression. The role of Ra-223 in malignancy is discussed and the prospects for future development outlined.

  16. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and bone mass in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Di Munno, O; Delle Sedie, A; Rossini, M; Adami, S

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews the effects of DMARDs (including biologic agents) on bone metabolism in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). At present there is no evidence that methotrexate, at least at dosages ranging from 5 to 20 mg/week, negatively affects bone mass as measured by DXA (BMD) as documented in both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. Most studies of cyclosporine (CyA) use reporting a reduction in erosions and joint damage with no adverse effects on bone, did not measure BMD; CyA treatment is associated with a dose-dependent increase of bone turnover as well as a decrease in both animal and human studies; however, its use in RA setting at a dose < or =5 mg/Kg/ day has so far not been associated with clinical relevant adverse effects on bone metabolism. Anti-TNF-alpha agents, infliximab reduced markers of bone turnover in two longitudinal studies. Data on BMD are not available in RA; nevertheless, an increase in BMD has been documented in spondyloarthropathies with infliximab and etanercept. No clinical data concerning BMD are available on leflunomide as well as on the newer biologic agents (adalimumab, rituximab, anakinra).

  17. Improved graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival associated with bone marrow as the stem cell source in adults

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rohtesh S.; de Latour, Regis Peffault; DeFor, Todd E; Robin, Marie; Lazaryan, Aleksandr; Xhaard, Aliénor; Bejanyan, Nelli; de Fontbrune, Flore Sicre; Arora, Mukta; Brunstein, Claudio G.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; MacMillan, Margaret L.; Socie, Gerard; Holtan, Shernan G.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that bone marrow grafts from matched sibling donors resulted in best graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival at 1-year post allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. However, pediatric patients comprised the majority of bone marrow graft recipients in that study. To better define this outcome in adults and pediatric patients at 1- and 2-years post- allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, we pooled data from the University of Minnesota and the Hôpital Saint-Louis in Paris, France (n=1901). Graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival was defined as the absence of grade III–IV acute graft-versus-host disease, chronic graft-versus-host disease (requiring systemic therapy or extensive stage), relapse and death. In adults, bone marrow from matched sibling donors (n=123) had best graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival at 1- and 2-years, compared with peripheral blood stem cell from matched sibling donors (n=540) or other graft/donor types. In multivariate analysis, peripheral blood stem cells from matched sibling donors resulted in a 50% increased risk of events contributing to graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival at 1- and 2-years than bone marrow from matched sibling donors. With limited numbers of peripheral blood stem cell grafts in pediatric patients (n=12), graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival did not differ between bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell graft from any donor. While not all patients have a matched sibling donor, graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival may be improved by the preferential use of bone marrow for adults with malignant diseases. Alternatively, novel graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis regimens are needed to substantially impact graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival with the use of peripheral blood stem cell. PMID:27036159

  18. High Potency VEGFRs/MET/FMS Triple Blockade by TAS-115 Concomitantly Suppresses Tumor Progression and Bone Destruction in Tumor-Induced Bone Disease Model with Lung Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Yayoi; Kataoka, Yuki; Tanaka, Kenji; Hashimoto, Akihiro; Suzuki, Takamasa; Ito, Kenjiro; Haruma, Tomonori; Yamamoto-Yokoi, Hiromi; Harada, Naomoto; Sakuragi, Motomu; Oda, Nobuyuki; Matsuo, Kenichi; Inada, Masaki; Yonekura, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 25–40% of patients with lung cancer show bone metastasis. Bone modifying agents reduce skeletal-related events (SREs), but they do not significantly improve overall survival. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches are urgently required. In this study, we investigated the anti-tumor effect of TAS-115, a VEGFRs and HGF receptor (MET)-targeted kinase inhibitor, in a tumor-induced bone disease model. A549-Luc-BM1 cells, an osteo-tropic clone of luciferase-transfected A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549-Luc), produced aggressive bone destruction associated with tumor progression after intra-tibial (IT) implantation into mice. TAS-115 significantly reduced IT tumor growth and bone destruction. Histopathological analysis showed a decrease in tumor vessels after TAS-115 treatment, which might be mediated through VEGFRs inhibition. Furthermore, the number of osteoclasts surrounding the tumor was decreased after TAS-115 treatment. In vitro studies demonstrated that TAS-115 inhibited HGF-, VEGF-, and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF)-induced signaling pathways in osteoclasts. Moreover, TAS-115 inhibited Feline McDonough Sarcoma oncogene (FMS) kinase, as well as M-CSF and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation. Thus, VEGFRs/MET/FMS-triple inhibition in osteoclasts might contribute to the potent efficacy of TAS-115. The fact that concomitant dosing of sunitinib (VEGFRs/FMS inhibition) with crizotinib (MET inhibition) exerted comparable inhibitory efficacy for bone destruction to TAS-115 also supports this notion. In conclusion, TAS-115 inhibited tumor growth via VEGFR-kinase blockade, and also suppressed bone destruction possibly through VEGFRs/MET/FMS-kinase inhibition, which resulted in potent efficacy of TAS-115 in an A549-Luc-BM1 bone disease model. Thus, TAS-115 shows promise as a novel therapy for lung cancer patients with bone metastasis. PMID:27736957

  19. SGLT2 inhibitor therapy improves blood glucose but does not prevent diabetic bone disease in diabetic DBA/2J male mice.

    PubMed

    Thrailkill, Kathryn M; Clay Bunn, R; Nyman, Jeffry S; Rettiganti, Mallikarjuna R; Cockrell, Gael E; Wahl, Elizabeth C; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Lumpkin, Charles K; Fowlkes, John L

    2016-01-01

    Persons with type 1 and type 2 diabetes have increased fracture risk, attributed to deficits in the microarchitecture and strength of diabetic bone, thought to be mediated, in part, by the consequences of chronic hyperglycemia. Therefore, to examine the effects of a glucose-lowering SGLT2 inhibitor on blood glucose (BG) and bone homeostasis in a model of diabetic bone disease, male DBA/2J mice with or without streptozotocin (STZ)-induced hyperglycemia were fed chow containing the SGLT2 inhibitor, canagliflozin (CANA), or chow without drug, for 10weeks of therapy. Thereafter, serum bone biomarkers were measured, fracture resistance of cortical bone was assessed by μCT analysis and a three-point bending test of the femur, and vertebral bone strength was determined by compression testing. In the femur metaphysis and L6 vertebra, long-term diabetes (DM) induced deficits in trabecular bone microarchitecture. In the femur diaphysis, a decrease in cortical bone area, cortical thickness and minimal moment of inertia occurred in DM (p<0.0001, for all) while cortical porosity was increased (p<0.0001). These DM changes were associated with reduced fracture resistance (decreased material strength and toughness; decreased structural strength and rigidity; p<0.001 for all). Significant increases in PTH (p<0.0001), RatLAPs (p=0.0002), and urine calcium concentration (p<0.0001) were also seen in DM. Canagliflozin treatment improved BG in DM mice by ~35%, but did not improve microarchitectural parameters. Instead, in canagliflozin-treated diabetic mice, a further increase in RatLAPs was evident, possibly suggesting a drug-related intensification of bone resorption. Additionally, detrimental metaphyseal changes were noted in canagliflozin-treated control mice. Hence, diabetic bone disease was not favorably affected by canagliflozin treatment, perhaps due to insufficient glycemic improvement. Instead, in control mice, long-term exposure to SGLT2 inhibition was associated with

  20. Tolerability of different dosing regimens of bisphosphonates for the treatment of osteoporosis and malignant bone disease.

    PubMed

    Bobba, Raja S; Beattie, Karen; Parkinson, Bill; Kumbhare, Dinesh; Adachi, Jonathan D

    2006-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are the primary pharmacological agents used for the management of osteoporosis and hypercalcaemia of malignant bone disease. The efficacy of these agents in these two conditions has been demonstrated in many well designed trials published over the past 2 decades. The variety of bisphosphonates currently available to us provides a wide range of tolerability and dosing profiles thus necessitating a thorough comparison of the most recent oral and intravenous bisphosphonates to differentiate the clinical context in which they should be used. Despite the fact that bisphosphonates are generally well accepted, their tolerability is dependent on complications which encompass gastrointestinal (GI) and renal toxicity. Other adverse events include osteonecrosis of the jaw, arthralgias, flu-like symptoms and uveitis. Studies have shown that various dosing regimens are able to modulate these rates of toxicity. To maximise tolerability, the direction of future therapy will likely fall into a pattern of decreasing the frequency of administration of bisphosphonates, whether it is oral or intravenous formulations, thus improving patient adherence. To review the literature on different dosing regimens of various bisphosphonates and their associated tolerability, we searched MEDLINE for articles from 1975 to 2006. Oral bisphosphonates, in particular alendronate and risedronate, have been systematically evaluated with regards to GI toxicity. Overall tolerability with these oral formulations has found GI toxicity to be the primary adverse event of interest. Both alendronate and risedronate have been found to have similar rates of GI toxicity when compared with placebo. Mounting evidence has developed validating the use of intravenous ibandronate and zoledronic acid for the purpose of treating hypercalcaemia secondary to malignancy. Unique to all other bisphosphonates, ibandronate also has an oral form which has a similar GI-toxicity profile to placebo. In addition, no

  1. Occurrence of osteoporosis & factors determining bone mineral loss in young adults with Graves’ disease

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Dibakar; Dutta, Deep; Maisnam, Indira; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: There is a paucity of data with conflicting reports regarding the extent and pattern of bone mineral (BM) loss in Graves’ disease (GD), especially in young adults. Also, interpretation of BM data in Indians is limited by use of T-score cut-offs derived from Caucasians. This study was aimed to evaluate the occurrence of osteoporosis in active treatment naive patients with GD and determine the factors predicting BM loss, using standard T-scores from Caucasians and compare with the cut-offs proposed by the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) for diagnosing osteoporosis in Indians. Methods: Patients with GD, >20 yr age without any history of use of anti-thyroid drugs, and normal controls without fracture history, drugs use or co-morbidities underwent BM density (BMD) assessment at lumbar spine, hip and forearm, thyroid function and calcium profile assessment. Women with menopause or premature ovarian insufficiency and men with androgen deficiency were excluded. Results: Patients with GD (n=31) had significantly lower BMD at spine (1.01±0.10 vs. 1.13±0.16 g/cm2), hip (0.88±0.10 vs. 1.04±0.19 g/cm2) and forearm (0.46±0.04 vs. 0.59±0.09 g/cm2) compared with controls (n=30) (P<0.001). Nine (29%) and six (19.3%) patients with GD had osteoporosis as per T-score and ICMR criteria, respectively. None of GD patients had osteoporosis at hip or spine as per ICMR criteria. Serum T3 had strongest inverse correlation with BMD at spine, hip and femur. Step-wise linear regression analysis after adjusting for age, BMI and vitamin D showed T3 to be the best predictor of reduced BMD at spine, hip and forearm, followed by phosphate at forearm and 48 h I131 uptake for spine BMD in GD. Interpretation & conclusions: Osteoporosis at hip or spine is not a major problem in GD and more commonly involves forearm. Diagnostic criterion developed from Caucasians tends to overdiagnose osteoporosis in Indians. T3 elevation and phosphate are important predictors

  2. Usefulness of bone turnover markers as predictors of mortality risk, disease progression and skeletal-related events appearance in patients with prostate cancer with bone metastases following treatment with zoledronic acid: TUGAMO study

    PubMed Central

    de la Piedra, C; Alcaraz, A; Bellmunt, J; Meseguer, C; Gómez-Caamano, A; Ribal, M J; Vázquez, F; Anido, U; Samper, P; Esteban, E; Álvarez-Ossorio, J L; Lara, P C; San José, L A; Contreras, J A; del Alba, A G; González-Gragera, B; Tabernero, A J; González-Enguita, C; Fernández, J M; García-Escudero, A; Gómez-Veiga, F; Méndez, M J; Segarra, J; Virizuela, J A; Carles, J; Lassa, A; Calderero, V; Constela, M; Delgado, D; Mañas, A; Murias, A; Reynes, G; Rodriguez, B; Rubio, G; Sánchez, E; Unda, M; Solsona, E; Martínez-Javaloyas, J M; Comet-Batlle, J; Quicios, C; Martín-Fernández, M; Mahillo-Fernández, I; Morote, J

    2013-01-01

    Background: Owing to the limited validity of clinical data on the treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) and bone metastases, biochemical markers are a promising tool for predicting survival, disease progression and skeletal-related events (SREs) in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive capacity of biochemical markers of bone turnover for mortality risk, disease progression and SREs in patients with PCa and bone metastases undergoing treatment with zoledronic acid (ZA). Methods: This was an observational, prospective and multicenter study in which ninety-eight patients were included. Patients were treated with ZA (4 mg every 4 weeks for 18 months). Data were collected at baseline and 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 months after the beginning of treatment. Serum levels of bone alkaline phosphtase (BALP), aminoterminal propeptide of procollagen type I (P1NP) and beta-isomer of carboxiterminal telopeptide of collagen I (β-CTX) were analysed at all points in the study. Data on disease progression, SREs development and survival were recorded. Results: Cox regression models with clinical data and bone markers showed that the levels of the three markers studied were predictive of survival time, with β-CTX being especially powerful, in which a lack of normalisation in visit 1 (3 months after the beginning of treatment) showed a 6.3-times more risk for death than in normalised patients. Levels of these markers were also predictive for SREs, although in this case BALP and P1NP proved to be better predictors. We did not find any relationship between bone markers and disease progression. Conclusion: In patients with PCa and bone metastases treated with ZA, β-CTX and P1NP can be considered suitable predictors for mortality risk, while BALP and P1NP are appropriate for SREs. The levels of these biomarkers 3 months after the beginning of treatment are especially important. PMID:23722472

  3. Bone kidney interactions.

    PubMed

    Nickolas, Thomas L; Jamal, Sophie A

    2015-06-01

    The fact that bone disease and kidney disease co-exist is well known. Formally, this inter-relationship is called chronic kidney disease mineral bone disorder or CKD-MBD. Traditionally, it was thought that bone played a passive role in CKD-MBD - specifically that kidney disease caused disordered mineral metabolism which resulted in bone disease and ultimately fractures. More recently however our understanding of bone function in general and the role that bone plays in CKD-MBD in particular, has changed. This chapter will briefly review epidemiology of fractures in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and the roles that imaging and measuring markers of mineral metabolism can play in assessing fracture risk. We will then review more recent data consistent with the concept MBD occurs early in the course of CKD and, via the secretion of novel molecules and/or signalling pathways, the bone can influence other organ systems. PMID:26156535

  4. Meat and bone meal and mineral feed additives may increase the risk of oral prion disease transmission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Christopher J.; McKenzie, Debbie; Pedersen, Joel A.; Aiken, Judd M.

    2011-01-01

    Ingestion of prion-contaminated materials is postulated to be a primary route of prion disease transmission. Binding of prions to soil (micro)particles dramatically enhances peroral disease transmission relative to unbound prions, and it was hypothesized that micrometer-sized particles present in other consumed materials may affect prion disease transmission via the oral route of exposure. Small, insoluble particles are present in many substances, including soil, human foods, pharmaceuticals, and animal feeds. It is known that meat and bone meal (MBM), a feed additive believed responsible for the spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), contains particles smaller than 20 μm and that the pathogenic prion protein binds to MBM. The potentiation of disease transmission via the oral route by exposure to MBM or three micrometer-sized mineral feed additives was determined. Data showed that when the disease agent was bound to any of the tested materials, the penetrance of disease was increased compared to unbound prions. Our data suggest that in feed or other prion-contaminated substances consumed by animals or, potentially, humans, the addition of MBM or the presence of microparticles could heighten risks of prion disease acquisition.

  5. Meat and bone meal and mineral feed additives may increase the risk of oral prion disease transmission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.J.; McKenzie, D.; Pedersen, J.A.; Aiken, Judd M.

    2011-01-01

    Ingestion of prion-contaminated materials is postulated to be a primary route of prion disease transmission. Binding of prions to soil (micro)particles dramatically enhances peroral disease transmission relative to unbound prions, and it was hypothesized that micrometer-sized particles present in other consumed materials may affect prion disease transmission via the oral route of exposure. Small, insoluble particles are present in many substances, including soil, human foods, pharmaceuticals, and animal feeds. It is known that meat and bone meal (MBM), a feed additive believed responsible for the spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), contains particles smaller than 20 ??m and that the pathogenic prion protein binds to MBM. The potentiation of disease transmission via the oral route by exposure to MBM or three micrometer-sized mineral feed additives was determined. Data showed that when the disease agent was bound to any of the tested materials, the penetrance of disease was increased compared to unbound prions. Our data suggest that in feed or other prion-contaminated substances consumed by animals or, potentially, humans, the addition of MBM or the presence of microparticles could heighten risks of prion disease acquisition. Copyright ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  6. MEAT AND BONE MEAL AND MINERAL FEED ADDITIVES MAY INCREASE THE RISK OF ORAL PRION DISEASE TRANSMISSION

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Christopher J.; McKenzie, Debbie; Pedersen, Joel A.; Aiken, Judd M.

    2011-01-01

    Ingestion of prion-contaminated materials is postulated to be a primary route of prion disease transmission. Binding of prions to soil (micro)particles dramatically enhances peroral disease transmission relative to unbound prions, and it was hypothesized that micrometer–sized particles present in other consumed materials may affect prion disease transmission via the oral route of exposure. Small, insoluble particles are present in many substances, including soil, human foods, pharmaceuticals, and animal feeds. It is known that meat and bone meal (MBM), a feed additive believed responsible for the spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), contains particles smaller than 20 μm and that the pathogenic prion protein binds to MBM. The potentiation of disease transmission via the oral route by exposure to MBM or three micrometer-sized mineral feed additives was determined. Data showed that when the disease agent was bound to any of the tested materials, the penetrance of disease was increased compared to unbound prions. Our data suggest that in feed or other prion–contaminated substances consumed by animals or, potentially, humans, the addition of MBM or the presence of microparticles could heighten risks of prion disease acquisition. PMID:21218345

  7. Brittle and semibrittle creep in a low porosity carbonate rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, Aurélien; Fortin, Jérôme; Regnet, Jean-Baptiste; Dimanov, Alexandre; Guéguen, Yves

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of limestones at room temperature is brittle at low confining pressure and becomes semi-brittle with the increase of the confining pressure. The brittle behavior is characterized by a macroscopic dilatancy due to crack propagation, leading to a stress drop when cracks coalesce at failure. The semi-brittle behavior is characterized by diffuse deformation due to intra-crystalline plasticity (dislocation movements and twinning) and microcracking. The aim of this work is to examine the influence of pore fluid and time on the mechanical behavior. Constant strain rate triaxial deformation experiments and stress-stepping creep experiments were performed on white Tavel limestone (porosity 14.7%). Elastic wave velocity evolutions were recorded during each experiment and inverted to crack densities. Constant strain rate triaxial experiments were performed for confining pressure in the range of 5-90 MPa. For Pc≤55 MPa our results show that the behavior is brittle. In this regime, water-saturation decreases the differential stress at the onset of crack propagation and enhances macroscopic dilatancy. For Pc≥70 MPa, the behavior is semi-brittle. Inelastic compaction is due to intra-crystalline plasticity and micro-cracking. However, in this regime, our results show that water-saturation has no clear effect at the onset of inelastic compaction. Stress stepping creep experiments were performed in a range of confining pressures crossing the brittle-ductile transition. In the brittle regime, the time-dependent axial deformation is coupled with dilatancy and a decrease of elastic wave velocities, which is characteristic of crack propagation and/or nucleation. In the semi-brittle regime, the first steps are inelastic compactant because of plastic pore collapse. But, following stress steps are dilatant because of crack nucleation and/or propagation. However, our results show that the axial strain rate is always controlled by plastic phenomena, until the last

  8. Heterotopic bone formation (myositis ossificans) and lower-extremity swelling mimicking deep-venous disease

    SciTech Connect

    Orzel, J.A.; Rudd, T.G.; Nelp, W.B.

    1984-10-01

    A quadriplegic patient with a swollen leg was suspected of having deep-venous thrombosis, and was studied with radionuclide venography (RNV) and contrast venography. Focal narrowing of the femoral vein, seen on RNV, was due to extrinsic compression. Although soft-tissue radiographs were normal, Tc-99m diphosphonate imaging established the diagnosis of early heterotopic bone formation (myositis ossificans), which was responsible for the venous compression. Clinically this inflammatory process can mimic deep-venous thrombosis, and should be considered in evaluating patients at risk for both heterotopic bone formation and deep-venous thrombosis.

  9. [Progress of Clinical Trials on Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Prevention and Therapy of Graft-Versus-Host Disease].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Dan-Li; Tu, San-Fang; Li, Yu-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major complication following allogenetic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which shows a great threat to patients' survival and life quality. Along with multiple differentiation potential to various types of progenitor cells, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSC) have been confirmed to possess low immunogenicity and exert favorable immunomodulation. The recent studies show that the safety and high efficiency of BMMSC to prevent and cure GVHD greatly improved survival rate of the hosts. The most recent progress on prevention and therapy of GVHD is summarized in this review based on biology of BMMSC and pathogenesis of GVHD, so as to provide the effective evidence for further research.