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Sample records for broad growth substrate

  1. Differentially expressed myo-inositol monophosphatase gene (CaIMP) in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) encodes a lithium-sensitive phosphatase enzyme with broad substrate specificity and improves seed germination and seedling growth under abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Saurabh C; Salvi, Prafull; Kaur, Harmeet; Verma, Pooja; Petla, Bhanu Prakash; Rao, Venkateswara; Kamble, Nitin; Majee, Manoj

    2013-12-01

    myo-Inositol monophosphatase (IMP) is an essential enzyme in the myo-inositol metabolic pathway where it primarily dephosphorylates myo-inositol 1-phosphate to maintain the cellular inositol pool which is important for many metabolic and signalling pathways in plants. The stress-induced increased accumulation of inositol has been reported in a few plants including chickpea; however, the role and regulation of IMP is not well defined in response to stress. In this work, it has been shown that IMP activity is distributed in all organs in chickpea and was noticeably enhanced during environmental stresses. Subsequently, using degenerate oligonucleotides and RACE strategy, a full-length IMP cDNA (CaIMP) was cloned and sequenced. Biochemical study revealed that CaIMP encodes a lithium-sensitive phosphatase enzyme with broad substrate specificity, although maximum activity was observed with the myo-inositol 1-phosphate and l-galactose 1-phosphate substrates. Transcript analysis revealed that CaIMP is differentially expressed and regulated in different organs, stresses and phytohormones. Complementation analysis in Arabidopsis further confirmed the role of CaIMP in l-galactose 1-phosphate and myo-inositol 1-phosphate hydrolysis and its participation in myo-inositol and ascorbate biosynthesis. Moreover, Arabidopsis transgenic plants over-expressing CaIMP exhibited improved tolerance to stress during seed germination and seedling growth, while the VTC4/IMP loss-of-function mutants exhibited sensitivity to stress. Collectively, CaIMP links various metabolic pathways and plays an important role in improving seed germination and seedling growth, particularly under stressful environments.

  2. Film Growth on Nanoporous Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue; Joy, James; Zhao, Chenwei; Xu, J. M.; Valles, James

    Self-ordered nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) provides an easy way to fabricate nano structured material, such as nano wires and nano particles. We employ AAO as substrates and focus on the thermally evaporated film growth on the surface of the substrate. With various materials deposited onto the substrate, we find the films show different structures, e,g. ordered array of nano particles for Lead and nanohoneycomb structure for Silver. We relate the differing behaviors to the difference of surface energy and diffusion constant. To verify this, the effect of substrate temperature on the film growth has been explored and the structure of the film has been successfully changed through the process. We are grateful for the support of NSF Grants No. DMR-1307290.

  3. Molecular basis for the broad substrate selectivity of a peptide prenyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yue; Pierce, Elizabeth; Roe, Daniel; Morita, Maho; McIntosh, John A; Agarwal, Vinayak; Cheatham, Thomas E; Schmidt, Eric W; Nair, Satish K

    2016-12-06

    The cyanobactin prenyltransferases catalyze a series of known or unprecedented reactions on millions of different substrates, with no easily observable recognition motif and exquisite regioselectivity. Here we define the basis of broad substrate tolerance for the otherwise uncharacterized TruF family. We determined the structures of the Tyr-prenylating enzyme PagF, in complex with an isoprenoid donor analog and a panel of linear and macrocyclic peptide substrates. Unexpectedly, the structures reveal a truncated barrel fold, wherein binding of large peptide substrates is necessary to complete a solvent-exposed hydrophobic pocket to form the catalytically competent active site. Kinetic, mutational, chemical, and computational analyses revealed the structural basis of selectivity, showing a small motif within peptide substrates that is sufficient for recognition by the enzyme. Attaching this 2-residue motif to two random peptides results in their isoprenylation by PagF, demonstrating utility as a general biocatalytic platform for modifications on any peptide substrate.

  4. Substrate solder barriers for semiconductor epilayer growth

    DOEpatents

    Drummond, T.J.; Ginley, D.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1989-05-09

    During the growth of compound semiconductors by epitaxial processes, substrates are typically mounted to a support. In modular beam epitaxy, mounting is done using indium as a solder. This method has two drawbacks: the indium reacts with the substrate, and it is difficult to uniformly wet the back of a large diameter substrate. Both of these problems have been successfully overcome by sputter coating the back of the substrate with a thin layer of tungsten carbide or tungsten carbide and gold. In addition to being compatible with the growth of high quality semiconductor epilayers this coating is also inert in all standard substrate cleaning etchants used for compound semiconductors, and provides uniform distribution of energy in radiant heating.

  5. Substrate solder barriers for semiconductor epilayer growth

    DOEpatents

    Drummond, Timothy J.; Ginley, David S.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1989-01-01

    During the growth of compound semiconductors by epitaxial processes, substrates are typically mounted to a support. In modular beam epitaxy, mounting is done using indium as a solder. This method has two drawbacks: the indium reacts with the substrate, and it is difficult to uniformly wet the back of a large diameter substrate. Both of these problems have been successfully overcome by sputter coating the back of the substrate with a thin layer of tungsten carbide or tungsten carbide and gold. In addition to being compatible with the growth of high quality semiconductor epilayers this coating is also inert in all standard substrate cleaning etchants used for compound semiconductors, and provides uniform distribution of energy in radiant heating.

  6. Graphene growth on coinage-metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarty, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    The low solubility of carbon in Cu and Au gives these coinage metals advantages as substrates for graphene growth. Namely, growth occurs exclusively by surface processes, avoiding the complications of C segregating from the bulk of the metal substrate. However, the relatively weak interactions of Cu and Au with graphene can lead to mosaic films having large ranges of in-plane orientations. This talk will emphasize understanding the relationship between the microstructure of graphene sheets and the mechanisms of island nucleation and growth. We use low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) to observe growth. We find that bunches of substrate steps on Cu(111) can generate misorientation boundaries in a graphene sheet as it overgrows the steps [1]. Thus, growth on rough Cu(111) leads to large rotational disorder. Optimized growth on smooth Cu(111) and Au(111), however, produces islands all in close registry to a single in-plane orientation. On Cu(100), the most abundant grain orientation of commercial Cu foils, graphene islands align around two equivalent in-plane Cu directions [2]. This inherent source of disorder from symmetry mismatch is further compounded by large spreads of orientation around the equivalent directions. The substrate choice also affects the microscopic growth mechanism. The rate that C diffuses to the graphene islands limits growth on Cu(111) [and likely on Au(111)]. The sheet edges are then morphologically unstable, with dendritic islands at low temperature and six-fold loped islands at higher temperature. In contrast, growth on Cu(100) is limited by the rate of C attaching to the graphene edge. This mechanism, combined with the symmetry mismatch, produces two-fold islands. Finally, the coinage metals will be compared to other transition metal substrates. [4pt] [1] Phys. Rev. B 84, p. 155425 (2011). [0pt] [2] Nano Lett. 10, p. 4890 (2010).

  7. Substrate solder barriers for semiconductor epilayer growth

    DOEpatents

    Drummond, T.J.; Ginley, D.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1987-10-23

    During the growth of compound semiconductors by epitaxial processes, substrates are typically mounted to a support. In molecular beam epitaxy, mounting is done using indium as a solder. This method has two drawbacks: the indium reacts with the substrate, and it is difficult to uniformly wet the back of a large diameter substrate. Both of these problems have been successfully overcome by sputter coating the back of the substrate with a thin layer of tungsten carbide or tungsten carbide and gold. In addition to being compatible with the growth of high quality semiconductor epilayers this coating is also inert in all standard substate cleaning etchants used for compound semiconductors, and provides uniform distribution of energy in radiant heating. 1 tab.

  8. Structural insights into the broad substrate specificity of carboxypeptidase T from Thermoactinomyces vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Akparov, Valery Kh; Timofeev, Vladimir I; Khaliullin, Ilyas G; Švedas, Vytas; Chestukhina, Galina G; Kuranova, Inna P

    2015-04-01

    The crystal structures of carboxypeptidase T (CpT) complexes with phenylalanine and arginine substrate analogs - benzylsuccinic acid and (2-guanidinoethylmercapto)succinic acid - were determined by the molecular replacement method at resolutions of 1.57 Å and 1.62 Å to clarify the broad substrate specificity profile of the enzyme. The conservative Leu211 and Leu254 residues (also present in both carboxypeptidase A and carboxypeptidase B) were shown to be structural determinants for recognition of hydrophobic substrates, whereas Asp263 was for recognition of positively charged substrates. Mutations of these determinants modify the substrate profile: the CpT variant Leu211Gln acquires carboxypeptidase B-like properties, and the CpT variant Asp263Asn the carboxypeptidase A-like selectivity. The Pro248-Asp258 loop interacting with Leu254 and Tyr255 was shown to be responsible for recognition of the substrate's C-terminal residue. Substrate binding at the S1' subsite leads to the ligand-dependent shift of this loop, and Leu254 side chain movement induces the conformation rearrangement of the Glu277 residue crucial for catalysis. This is a novel insight into the substrate selectivity of metallocarboxypeptidases that demonstrates the importance of interactions between the S1' subsite and the catalytic center.

  9. Broad Substrate Specificity of the Loading Didomain of the Lipomycin Polyketide Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Yuzawa, S; Eng, CH; Katz, L; Keasling, JD

    2013-06-04

    LipPks1, a polyketide synthase subunit of the lipomycin synthase, is believed to catalyze the polyketide chain initiation reaction using isobutyryl-CoA as a substrate, followed by an elongation reaction with methylmalonyl-CoA to start the biosynthesis of antibiotic alpha-lipomycin in Streptomyces aureofaciens Tu117. Recombinant LipPks1, containing the thioesterase domain from the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase, was produced in Escherichia coli, and its substrate specificity was investigated in vitro. Surprisingly, several different acyl-CoAs, including isobutyryl-CoA, were accepted as the starter substrates, while no product was observed with acetyl-CoA. These results demonstrate the broad substrate specificity of LipPks1 and may be applied to producing new antibiotics.

  10. Vertical-Substrate MPCVD Epitaxial Nanodiamond Growth.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Yan-Kai; Zhang, Jingyuan Linda; Lu, Haiyu; Ishiwata, Hitoshi; Dahl, Jeremy; Carlson, Robert M K; Yan, Hao; Schreiner, Peter R; Vučković, Jelena; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Melosh, Nicholas; Chu, Steven

    2017-03-08

    Color center-containing nanodiamonds have many applications in quantum technologies and biology. Diamondoids, molecular-sized diamonds have been used as seeds in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth. However, optimizing growth conditions to produce high crystal quality nanodiamonds with color centers requires varying growth conditions that often leads to ad-hoc and time-consuming, one-at-a-time testing of reaction conditions. In order to rapidly explore parameter space, we developed a microwave plasma CVD technique using a vertical, rather than horizontally oriented stage-substrate geometry. With this configuration, temperature, plasma density, and atomic hydrogen density vary continuously along the vertical axis of the substrate. This variation allowed rapid identification of growth parameters that yield single crystal diamonds down to 10 nm in size and 75 nm diameter optically active center silicon-vacancy (Si-V) nanoparticles. Furthermore, this method may provide a means of incorporating a wide variety of dopants in nanodiamonds without ion irradiation damage.

  11. Structural Basis for Broad Substrate Specificity in Higher Plant β-d-Glucan Glucohydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Hrmova, Maria; De Gori, Ross; Smith, Brian J.; Fairweather, Jon K.; Driguez, Hugues; Varghese, Joseph N.; Fincher, Geoffrey B.

    2002-01-01

    Family 3 β-d-glucan glucohydrolases are distributed widely in higher plants. The enzymes catalyze the hydrolytic removal of β-d-glucosyl residues from nonreducing termini of a range of β-d-glucans and β-d-oligoglucosides. Their broad specificity can be explained by x-ray crystallographic data obtained from a barley β-d-glucan glucohydrolase in complex with nonhydrolyzable S-glycoside substrate analogs and by molecular modeling of enzyme/substrate complexes. The glucosyl residue that occupies binding subsite −1 is locked tightly into a fixed position through extensive hydrogen bonding with six amino acid residues near the bottom of an active site pocket. In contrast, the glucosyl residue at subsite +1 is located between two Trp residues at the entrance of the pocket, where it is constrained less tightly. The relative flexibility of binding at subsite +1, coupled with the projection of the remainder of bound substrate away from the enzyme's surface, means that the overall active site can accommodate a range of substrates with variable spatial dispositions of adjacent β-d-glucosyl residues. The broad specificity for glycosidic linkage type enables the enzyme to perform diverse functions during plant development. PMID:12034895

  12. Iron Complex Catalyzed Selective C-H Bond Oxidation with Broad Substrate Scope.

    PubMed

    Jana, Sandipan; Ghosh, Munmun; Ambule, Mayur; Sen Gupta, Sayam

    2017-02-17

    The use of a peroxidase-mimicking Fe complex has been reported on the basis of the biuret-modified TAML macrocyclic ligand framework (Fe-bTAML) as a catalyst to perform selective oxidation of unactivated 3° C-H bonds and activated 2° C-H bonds with low catalyst loading (1 mol %) and high product yield (excellent mass balance) under near-neutral conditions and broad substrate scope (18 substrates which includes arenes, heteroaromatics, and polar functional groups). Aliphatic C-H oxidation of 3° and 2° sites of complex substrates was achieved with predictable selectivity using steric, electronic, and stereoelectronic rules that govern site selectivity, which included oxidation of (+)-artemisinin to (+)-10β-hydroxyartemisinin. Mechanistic studies indicate Fe(V)(O) to be the active oxidant during these reactions.

  13. A measure of the broad substrate specificity of enzymes based on 'duplicate' catalytic residues.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Ásgeirsson, Bjarni; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2012-01-01

    The ability of an enzyme to select and act upon a specific class of compounds with unerring precision and efficiency is an essential feature of life. Simultaneously, these enzymes often catalyze the reaction of a range of similar substrates of the same class, and also have promiscuous activities on unrelated substrates. Previously, we have established a methodology to quantify promiscuous activities in a wide range of proteins. In the current work, we quantitatively characterize the active site for the ability to catalyze distinct, yet related, substrates (BRASS). A protein with known structure and active site residues provides the framework for computing 'duplicate' residues, each of which results in slightly modified replicas of the active site scaffold. Such spatial congruence is supplemented by Finite difference Poisson Boltzmann analysis which filters out electrostatically unfavorable configurations. The congruent configurations are used to compute an index (BrassIndex), which reflects the broad substrate profile of the active site. We identify an acetylhydrolase and a methyltransferase as having the lowest and highest BrassIndex, respectively, from a set of non-homologous proteins extracted from the Catalytic Site Atlas. The acetylhydrolase, a regulatory enzyme, is known to be highly specific for platelet-activating factor. In the methyltransferase (PDB: 1QAM), various combinations of glycine (Gly38/40/42), asparagine (Asn101/11) and glutamic acid (Glu59/36) residues having similar spatial and electrostatic profiles with the specified scaffold (Gly38, Asn101 and Glu59) exemplifies the broad substrate profile such an active site may provide. 'Duplicate' residues identified by relaxing the spatial and/or electrostatic constraints can be the target of directed evolution methodologies, like saturation mutagenesis, for modulating the substrate specificity of proteins.

  14. Understanding the Broad Substrate Repertoire of Nitroreductase Based on Its Kinetic Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Pitsawong, Warintra; Hoben, John P.; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2014-01-01

    The oxygen-insensitive nitroreductase from Enterobacter cloacae (NR) catalyzes two-electron reduction of nitroaromatics to the corresponding nitroso compounds and, subsequently, to hydroxylamine products. NR has an unusually broad substrate repertoire, which may be related to protein dynamics (flexibility) and/or a simple non-selective kinetic mechanism. To investigate the possible role of mechanism in the broad substrate repertoire of NR, the kinetics of oxidation of NR by para-nitrobenzoic acid (p-NBA) were investigated using stopped-flow techniques at 4 °C. The results revealed a hyperbolic dependence on the p-NBA concentration with a limiting rate of 1.90 ± 0.09 s−1, indicating one-step binding before the flavin oxidation step. There is no evidence for a distinct binding step in which specificity might be enforced. The reduction of p-NBA is rate-limiting in steady-state turnover (1.7 ± 0.3 s−1). The pre-steady-state reduction kinetics of NR by NADH indicate that NADH reduces the enzyme with a rate constant of 700 ± 20 s−1 and a dissociation constant of 0.51 ± 0.04 mm. Thus, we demonstrate simple transient kinetics in both the reductive and oxidative half-reactions that help to explain the broad substrate repertoire of NR. Finally, we tested the ability of NR to reduce para-hydroxylaminobenzoic acid, demonstrating that the corresponding amine does not accumulate to significant levels even under anaerobic conditions. Thus E. cloacae NR is not a good candidate for enzymatic production of aromatic amines. PMID:24706760

  15. Spatiospectral and picosecond spatiotemporal properties of a broad area operating channeled-substrate-planar laser array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, NU; Defreez, Richard K.; Bossert, David J.; Wilson, Geoffrey A.; Elliott, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    Spatiospectral and spatiotemporal properties of an eight-element channeled-substrate-planar laser array are investigated in both CW and pulsed operating conditions. The closely spaced CSP array with strong optical coupling between array elements is characterized by a broad area laserlike operation determined by its spatial mode spectra. The spatiotemporal evolution of the near and far field exhibits complex dynamic behavior in the picosecond to nanosecond domain. Operating parameters for the laser device have been experimentally determined. These results provide important information for the evaluation of the dynamic behavior of coherent semiconductor laser arrays.

  16. Efficient production of l-lactic acid by an engineered Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense with broad substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Efficient conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to optically pure lactic acid is a key challenge for the economical production of biodegradable poly-lactic acid. A recently isolated strain, Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense SCUT27, is promising as an efficient lactic acid production bacterium from biomass due to its broad substrate specificity. Additionally, its strictly anaerobic and thermophilic characteristics suppress contamination from other microoragnisms. Herein, we report the significant improvements of concentration and yield in lactic acid production from various lignocellulosic derived sugars, achieved by the carbon flux redirection through homologous recombination in T. aotearoense SCUT27. Results T. aotearoense SCUT27 was engineered to block the acetic acid formation pathway to improve the lactic acid production. The genetic manipulation resulted in 1.8 and 2.1 fold increase of the lactic acid yield using 10 g/L of glucose or 10 g/L of xylose as substrate, respectively. The maximum l-lactic acid yield of 0.93 g/g glucose with an optical purity of 99.3% was obtained by the engineered strain, designated as LA1002, from 50 g/L of substrate, which is very close to the theoretical value (1.0 g/g of glucose). In particular, LA1002 produced lactic acid at an unprecedented concentration up to 3.20 g/L using 10 g/L xylan as the single substrate without any pretreatment after 48 h fermentation. The non-sterilized fermentative production of l-lactic acid was also carried out, achieving values of 44.89 g/L and 0.89 g/g mixed sugar for lactic acid concentration and yield, respectively. Conclusions Blocking acetic acid formation pathway in T. aotearoense SCUT27 increased l-lactic acid production and yield dramatically. To our best knowledge, this is the best performance of fermentation on lactic acid production using xylan as the sole carbon source, considering the final concentration, yield and fermentation time. In addition, it should be

  17. CTL0511 from Chlamydia trachomatis Is a Type 2C Protein Phosphatase with Broad Substrate Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Claywell, Ja E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protein phosphorylation has become increasingly recognized for its role in regulating bacterial physiology and virulence. Chlamydia spp. encode two validated Hanks'-type Ser/Thr protein kinases, which typically function with cognate protein phosphatases and appear capable of global protein phosphorylation. Consequently, we sought to identify a Ser/Thr protein phosphatase partner for the chlamydial kinases. CTL0511 from Chlamydia trachomatis L2 434/Bu, which has homologs in all sequenced Chlamydia spp., is a predicted type 2C Ser/Thr protein phosphatase (PP2C). Recombinant maltose-binding protein (MBP)-tagged CTL0511 (rCTL0511) hydrolyzed p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP), a generic phosphatase substrate, in a MnCl2-dependent manner at physiological pH. Assays using phosphopeptide substrates revealed that rCTL0511 can dephosphorylate phosphorylated serine (P-Ser), P-Thr, and P-Tyr residues using either MnCl2 or MgCl2, indicating that metal usage can alter substrate preference. Phosphatase activity was unaffected by PP1, PP2A, and PP3 phosphatase inhibitors, while mutation of conserved PP2C residues significantly inhibited activity. Finally, phosphatase activity was detected in elementary body (EB) and reticulate body (RB) lysates, supporting a role for protein dephosphorylation in chlamydial development. These findings support that CTL0511 is a metal-dependent protein phosphatase with broad substrate specificity, substantiating a reversible phosphorylation network in C. trachomatis. IMPORTANCE Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens responsible for a variety of diseases in humans and economically important animal species. Our work demonstrates that Chlamydia spp. produce a PP2C capable of dephosphorylating P-Thr, P-Ser, and P-Tyr and that Chlamydia trachomatis EBs and RBs possess phosphatase activity. In conjunction with the chlamydial Hanks'-type kinases Pkn1 and PknD, validation of CTL0511 fulfills the enzymatic requirements for a

  18. Structural and Kinetic Studies of the Human Nudix Hydrolase MTH1 Reveal the Mechanism for Its Broad Substrate Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Waz, Shaimaa; Nakamura, Teruya; Hirata, Keisuke; Koga-Ogawa, Yukari; Chirifu, Mami; Arimori, Takao; Tamada, Taro; Ikemizu, Shinji; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Yamagata, Yuriko

    2017-01-01

    The human MutT homolog 1 (hMTH1, human NUDT1) hydrolyzes oxidatively damaged nucleoside triphosphates and is the main enzyme responsible for nucleotide sanitization. hMTH1 recently has received attention as an anticancer target because hMTH1 blockade leads to accumulation of oxidized nucleotides in the cell, resulting in mutations and death of cancer cells. Unlike Escherichia coli MutT, which shows high substrate specificity for 8-oxoguanine nucleotides, hMTH1 has broad substrate specificity for oxidized nucleotides, including 8-oxo-dGTP and 2-oxo-dATP. However, the reason for this broad substrate specificity remains unclear. Here, we determined crystal structures of hMTH1 in complex with 8-oxo-dGTP or 2-oxo-dATP at neutral pH. These structures based on high quality data showed that the base moieties of two substrates are located on the similar but not the same position in the substrate binding pocket and adopt a different hydrogen-bonding pattern, and both triphosphate moieties bind to the hMTH1 Nudix motif (i.e. the hydrolase motif) similarly and align for the hydrolysis reaction. We also performed kinetic assays on the substrate-binding Asp-120 mutants (D120N and D120A), and determined their crystal structures in complex with the substrates. Analyses of bond lengths with high-resolution X-ray data and the relationship between the structure and enzymatic activity revealed that hMTH1 recognizes the different oxidized nucleotides via an exchange of the protonation state at two neighboring aspartate residues (Asp-119 and Asp-120) in its substrate binding pocket. To our knowledge, this mechanism of broad substrate recognition by enzymes has not been reported previously and may have relevance for anticancer drug development strategies targeting hMTH1. PMID:28035004

  19. Structural and Kinetic Studies of the Human Nudix Hydrolase MTH1 Reveal the Mechanism for Its Broad Substrate Specificity.

    PubMed

    Waz, Shaimaa; Nakamura, Teruya; Hirata, Keisuke; Koga-Ogawa, Yukari; Chirifu, Mami; Arimori, Takao; Tamada, Taro; Ikemizu, Shinji; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Yamagata, Yuriko

    2017-02-17

    The human MutT homolog 1 (hMTH1, human NUDT1) hydrolyzes oxidatively damaged nucleoside triphosphates and is the main enzyme responsible for nucleotide sanitization. hMTH1 recently has received attention as an anticancer target because hMTH1 blockade leads to accumulation of oxidized nucleotides in the cell, resulting in mutations and death of cancer cells. Unlike Escherichia coli MutT, which shows high substrate specificity for 8-oxoguanine nucleotides, hMTH1 has broad substrate specificity for oxidized nucleotides, including 8-oxo-dGTP and 2-oxo-dATP. However, the reason for this broad substrate specificity remains unclear. Here, we determined crystal structures of hMTH1 in complex with 8-oxo-dGTP or 2-oxo-dATP at neutral pH. These structures based on high quality data showed that the base moieties of two substrates are located on the similar but not the same position in the substrate binding pocket and adopt a different hydrogen-bonding pattern, and both triphosphate moieties bind to the hMTH1 Nudix motif (i.e. the hydrolase motif) similarly and align for the hydrolysis reaction. We also performed kinetic assays on the substrate-binding Asp-120 mutants (D120N and D120A), and determined their crystal structures in complex with the substrates. Analyses of bond lengths with high-resolution X-ray data and the relationship between the structure and enzymatic activity revealed that hMTH1 recognizes the different oxidized nucleotides via an exchange of the protonation state at two neighboring aspartate residues (Asp-119 and Asp-120) in its substrate binding pocket. To our knowledge, this mechanism of broad substrate recognition by enzymes has not been reported previously and may have relevance for anticancer drug development strategies targeting hMTH1.

  20. l-Selective Amidase with Extremely Broad Substrate Specificity from Ochrobactrum anthropi NCIMB 40321

    PubMed Central

    Sonke, Theo; Ernste, Sandra; Tandler, Renate F.; Kaptein, Bernard; Peeters, Wilco P. H.; van Assema, Friso B. J.; Wubbolts, Marcel G.; Schoemaker, Hans E.

    2005-01-01

    An industrially attractive l-specific amidase was purified to homogeneity from Ochrobactrum anthropi NCIMB 40321 wild-type cells. The purified amidase displayed maximum initial activity between pH 6 and 8.5 and was fully stable for at least 1 h up to 60°C. The purified enzyme was strongly inhibited by the metal-chelating compounds EDTA and 1,10-phenanthroline. The activity of the EDTA-treated enzyme could be restored by the addition of Zn2+ (to 80%), Mn2+ (to 400%), and Mg2+ (to 560%). Serine and cysteine protease inhibitors did not influence the purified amidase. This enzyme displayed activity toward a broad range of substrates consisting of α-hydrogen- and (bulky) α,α-disubstituted α-amino acid amides, α-hydroxy acid amides, and α-N-hydroxyamino acid amides. In all cases, only the l-enantiomer was hydrolyzed, resulting in E values of more than 150. Simple aliphatic amides, β-amino and β-hydroxy acid amides, and dipeptides were not converted. The gene encoding this l-amidase was cloned via reverse genetics. It encodes a polypeptide of 314 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 33,870. Since the native enzyme has a molecular mass of about 66 kDa, it most likely has a homodimeric structure. The deduced amino acid sequence showed homology to a few other stereoselective amidases and the acetamidase/formamidase family of proteins (Pfam FmdA_AmdA). Subcloning of the gene in expression vector pTrc99A enabled efficient heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. Altogether, this amidase has a unique set of properties for application in the fine-chemicals industry. PMID:16332774

  1. Substrate and nutrient limitation regulating microbial growth in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bååth, Erland

    2015-04-01

    Microbial activity and growth in soil is regulated by several abiotic factors, including temperature, moisture and pH as the most important ones. At the same time nutrient conditions and substrate availability will also determine microbial growth. Amount of substrate will not only affect overall microbial growth, but also affect the balance of fungal and bacterial growth. The type of substrate will also affect the latter. Furthermore, according to Liebig law of limiting factors, we would expect one nutrient to be the main limiting one for microbial growth in soil. When this nutrient is added, the initial second liming factor will become the main one, adding complexity to the microbial response after adding different substrates. I will initially describe different ways of determining limiting factors for bacterial growth in soil, especially a rapid method estimating bacterial growth, using the leucine incorporation technique, after adding C (as glucose), N (as ammonium nitrate) and P (as phosphate). Scenarios of different limitations will be covered, with the bacterial growth response compared with fungal growth and total activity (respiration). The "degree of limitation", as well as the main limiting nutrient, can be altered by adding substrate of different stoichiometric composition. However, the organism group responding after alleviating the nutrient limitation can differ depending on the type of substrate added. There will also be situations, where fungi and bacteria appear to be limited by different nutrients. Finally, I will describe interactions between abiotic factors and the response of the soil microbiota to alleviation of limiting factors.

  2. The Staphylococcus aureus leucine aminopeptidase is localized to the bacterial cytosol and demonstrates a broad substrate range that extends beyond leucine.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Ronan K; Veillard, Florian; Gagne, Danielle T; Lindenmuth, Jarrod M; Poreba, Marcin; Drag, Marcin; Potempa, Jan; Shaw, Lindsey N

    2013-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a potent pathogen of humans exhibiting a broad disease range, in part due to an extensive repertoire of secreted virulence factors, including proteases. Recently, we identified the first example of an intracellular protease (leucine aminopeptidase, LAP) that is required for virulence in S. aureus. Disruption of pepZ, the gene encoding LAP, had no affect on the growth rate of bacteria; however, in systemic and localized infection models the pepZ mutant had significantly attenuated virulence. Recently, a contradictory report was published suggesting that LAP is an extracellular enzyme and it is required for growth in S. aureus. Here, we investigate these results and confirm our previous findings that LAP is localized to the bacterial cytosol and is not required for growth. In addition, we conduct a biochemical investigation of purified recombinant LAP, identifying optimal conditions for enzymatic activity and substrate preference for hydrolysis. Our results show that LAP has a broad substrate range, including activity against the dipeptide cysteine-glycine, and that leucine is not the primary target of LAP.

  3. Conductive Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Substrates Modulate Neuronal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Malarkey, Erik B.; Fisher, Kirk A.; Bekyarova, Elena; Liu, Wei; Haddon, Robert C.; Parpura, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    We used conductive nanotube films as substrates with which we could systematically vary the conductance to see how this property affects neuronal growth. Here we show that nanotube substrates in a narrow range of conductivity promote the outgrowth of neurites with a decrease in the number of growth cones as well as an increase in cell body area, while at higher conductance these effects disappear. PMID:19143503

  4. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase with Broad Substrate Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Borisova, Anna S.; Isaksen, Trine; Dimarogona, Maria; Kognole, Abhishek A.; Mathiesen, Geir; Várnai, Anikó; Røhr, Åsmund K.; Payne, Christina M.; Sørlie, Morten; Sandgren, Mats; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.

    2015-01-01

    The recently discovered lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) carry out oxidative cleavage of polysaccharides and are of major importance for efficient processing of biomass. NcLPMO9C from Neurospora crassa acts both on cellulose and on non-cellulose β-glucans, including cellodextrins and xyloglucan. The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of NcLPMO9C revealed an extended, highly polar substrate-binding surface well suited to interact with a variety of sugar substrates. The ability of NcLPMO9C to act on soluble substrates was exploited to study enzyme-substrate interactions. EPR studies demonstrated that the Cu2+ center environment is altered upon substrate binding, whereas isothermal titration calorimetry studies revealed binding affinities in the low micromolar range for polymeric substrates that are due in part to the presence of a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM1). Importantly, the novel structure of NcLPMO9C enabled a comparative study, revealing that the oxidative regioselectivity of LPMO9s (C1, C4, or both) correlates with distinct structural features of the copper coordination sphere. In strictly C1-oxidizing LPMO9s, access to the solvent-facing axial coordination position is restricted by a conserved tyrosine residue, whereas access to this same position seems unrestricted in C4-oxidizing LPMO9s. LPMO9s known to produce a mixture of C1- and C4-oxidized products show an intermediate situation. PMID:26178376

  5. Passivation oxide controlled selective carbon nanotube growth on metal substrates.

    PubMed

    Bult, J B; Sawyer, W G; Ajayan, P M; Schadler, L S

    2009-02-25

    Vertically aligned arrays of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) are grown on Inconel 600, a nickel-based super-alloy. Using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of the MWNTs it is shown that a stable oxidation barrier is required for the stabilization of iron on the substrate and subsequent nanotube growth. This evidence for passivation oxide supported growth of MWNTs was then used to grow MWNTs on patterned oxidized substrates in a selective growth furnace. The unique advantage of this patterned growth on Inconel 600 is found to be the chromia passivation layer's electrical conductivity (measured value of 1.08 micro Omega m), creating the opportunity for low resistivity electrodes made from nanotubes. Inconel substrates with 100 microm long aligned MWNTs are demonstrated to exhibit an average resistance value of 2 Omega.

  6. Influence of substrate micropatterning on biofilm growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Stephan; Li, Yiwei; Liu, Bi-Feng Liu; Weitz, David

    2015-11-01

    We culture triple reporter Bacillus Subtilis biofilm on micropatterned agar substrates. We track the biofilm development in terms of size, thickness, shape, and phenotype expression. For a tiling composed of elevated rectangles, we observe the biofilm develops an oval shape or triangular shape depending on the rectangle's aspect ratio and orientation. The motile cells are primarily located in the valleys between the rectangles and the matrix producing cells are mostly located on the rectangles. Wrinkles form at the edges of the elevated surfaces, and upon merging form channels centered on the elevated surface. After a few days, the spore-forming cells appear at the periphery. Since biofilms in nature grow on irregular surfaces, our work may provide insight into the complex patterns observed.

  7. Direct growth of Si nanowires on flexible organic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lin; Di Mario, Lorenzo; Minotti, Antonio; Tiburzi, Giorgio; Mendis, Budhika G.; Zeze, Dagou A.; Martelli, Faustino

    2016-06-01

    A key characteristic of semiconductor nanowires (NWs) is that they grow on any substrate that can withstand the growth conditions, paving the way for their use in flexible electronics. We report on the direct growth of crystalline silicon nanowires on polyimide substrates. The Si NWs are grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, which allows the growth to proceed at temperatures low enough to be compatible with plastic substrates (350 °C), where gold or indium are used as growth seeds. In is particularly interesting as the seed not only because it leads to a better NW crystal quality but also because it overcomes a core problem induced by the use of Au in silicon processing, i.e. Au creates deep carrier traps when incorporated in the nanowires.

  8. Growth patterns of two marine isolates: adaptations to substrate patchiness?

    PubMed

    Pernthaler, A; Pernthaler, J; Eilers, H; Amann, R

    2001-09-01

    During bottle incubations of heterotrophic marine picoplankton, some bacterial groups are conspicuously favored. In an earlier investigation bacteria of the genus Pseudoalteromonas rapidly multiplied in substrate-amended North Sea water, whereas the densities of Oceanospirillum changed little (H. Eilers, J. Pernthaler, and R. Amann, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 66:4634-4640, 2000). We therefore studied the growth patterns of two isolates affiliating with Pseudoalteromonas and Oceanospirillum in batch culture. Upon substrate resupply, Oceanospirillum lagged threefold longer than Pseudoalteromonas but reached more than fivefold-higher final cell density and biomass. A second, mobile morphotype was present in the starved Oceanospirillum populations with distinctly greater cell size, DNA and protein content, and 16S rRNA concentration. Contrasting cellular ribosome concentrations during stationary phase suggested basic differences in the growth responses of the two strains to a patchy environment. Therefore, we exposed the strains to different modes of substrate addition. During cocultivation on a single batch of substrates, the final cell densities of Oceanospirillum were reduced three times as much as those Pseudoalteromonas, compared to growth yields in pure cultures. In contrast, the gradual addition of substrates to stationary-phase cocultures was clearly disadvantageous for the Pseudoalteromonas population. Different growth responses to substrate gradients could thus be another facet affecting the competition between marine bacteria and may help to explain community shifts observed during enrichments.

  9. Discrete growth models on deterministic fractal substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gang; Xun, Zhipeng; Wen, Rongji; Han, Kui; Xia, Hui; Hao, Dapeng; Zhou, Wei; Yang, Xiquan; Chen, Yuling

    2010-11-01

    The growth of the modified Family model and the Etching model on the Sierpinski carpet is studied by means of numerical simulations. The evolving interface of the aggregates is described by the well-established Family-Vicsek dynamic scaling approach. The results of the modified Family model prove the universality of the fractional Langevin equation introduced by Lee and Kim [S.B. Lee, J.M. Kim, Phys. Rev. E 80 (2009) 021101]. The Etching model also shows good scaling behavior. We conjecture that the systematic deviations of the data found in the ballistic deposition [C.M. Horowitz, F. Romá, E.V. Albano, Phys. Rev. E 78 (2008) 061118] may be due to the finite-size effects of the Ballistic Deposition model.

  10. Bacterial Anabaena variabilis phenylalanine ammonia lyase: a biocatalyst with broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, Sarah L; Turner, Nicholas J

    2014-10-15

    Phenylalanine ammonia lyases (PALs) catalyse the regio- and stereoselective hydroamination of cinnamic acid analogues to yield optically enriched α-amino acids. Herein, we demonstrate that a bacterial PAL from Anabaena variabilis (AvPAL) displays significantly higher activity towards a series of non-natural substrates than previously described eukaryotic PALs. Biotransformations performed on a preparative scale led to the synthesis of the 2-chloro- and 4-trifluoromethyl-phenylalanine derivatives in excellent ee, highlighting the enormous potential of bacterial PALs as biocatalysts for the synthesis of high value, non-natural amino acids.

  11. Synergistic growth in bacteria depends on substrate complexity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yi-Jie; Wang, Shiao Y

    2016-01-01

    Both positive and negative interactions among bacteria take place in the environment. We hypothesize that the complexity of the substrate affects the way bacteria interact with greater cooperation in the presence of recalcitrant substrate. We isolated lignocellulolytic bacteria from salt marsh detritus and compared the growth, metabolic activity and enzyme production of pure cultures to those of three-species mixed cultures in lignocellulose and glucose media. Synergistic growth was common in lignocellulose medium containing carboxyl methyl cellulose, xylan and lignin but absent in glucose medium. Bacterial synergism promoted metabolic activity in synergistic mixed cultures but not the maximal growth rate (μ). Bacterial synergism also promoted the production of β-1,4-glucosidase but not the production of cellobiohydrolase or β-1,4-xylosidase. Our results suggest that the chemical complexity of the substrate affects the way bacteria interact. While a complex substrate such as lignocellulose promotes positive interactions and synergistic growth, a labile substrate such as glucose promotes negative interactions and competition. Synergistic interactions among indigenous bacteria are suggested to be important in promoting lignocellulose degradation in the environment.

  12. Broad-substrate screen as a tool to identify substrates for bacterial Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferases with unknown substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Misty L; Majorek, Karolina A; Minor, Wladek; Anderson, Wayne F

    2013-02-01

    Due to a combination of efforts from individual laboratories and structural genomics centers, there has been a surge in the number of members of the Gcn5-related acetyltransferasesuperfamily that have been structurally determined within the past decade. Although the number of three-dimensional structures is increasing steadily, we know little about the individual functions of these enzymes. Part of the difficulty in assigning functions for members of this superfamily is the lack of information regarding how substrates bind to the active site of the protein. The majority of the structures do not show ligand bound in the active site, and since the substrate-binding domain is not strictly conserved, it is difficult to predict the function based on structure alone. Additionally, the enzymes are capable of acetylating a wide variety of metabolites and many may exhibit promiscuity regarding their ability to acetylate multiple classes of substrates, possibly having multiple functions for the same enzyme. Herein, we present an approach to identify potential substrates for previously uncharacterized members of the Gcn5-related acetyltransferase superfamily using a variety of metabolites including polyamines, amino acids, antibiotics, peptides, vitamins, catecholamines, and other metabolites. We have identified potential substrates for eight bacterial enzymes of this superfamily. This information will be used to further structurally and functionally characterize them.

  13. Mechanistic Basis for High Stereoselectivity and Broad Substrate Scope in the (salen)Co(III)-Catalyzed Hydrolytic Kinetic Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ford, David D.; Nielsen, Lars P. C.; Zuend, Stephan J.; Jacobsen, Eric N.

    2013-01-01

    In the (salen)Co(III)-catalyzed hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of terminal epoxides, the rate- and stereoselectivity-determining epoxide ring-opening step occurs by a cooperative bimetallic mechanism with one Co(III) complex acting as a Lewis acid and another serving to deliver the hydroxide nucleophile. In this paper, we analyze the basis for the extraordinarily high stereoselectivity and broad substrate scope observed in the HKR. We demonstrate that the stereochemistry of each of the two (salen)Co(III) complexes in the rate-determining transition structure is important for productive catalysis: a measurable rate of hydrolysis occurs only if the absolute stereochemistry of each of these (salen)Co(III) complexes is the same. Experimental and computational studies provide strong evidence that stereochemical communication in the HKR is mediated by the stepped conformation of the salen ligand, and not the shape of the chiral diamine backbone of the ligand. A detailed computational analysis reveals that the epoxide binds the Lewis acidic Co(III) complex in a well-defined geometry imposed by stereoelectronic, rather than steric effects. This insight serves as the basis of a complete stereochemical and transition structure model that sheds light on the reasons for the broad substrate generality of the HKR. PMID:24041239

  14. Mechanistic basis for high stereoselectivity and broad substrate scope in the (salen)Co(III)-catalyzed hydrolytic kinetic resolution.

    PubMed

    Ford, David D; Nielsen, Lars P C; Zuend, Stephan J; Musgrave, Charles B; Jacobsen, Eric N

    2013-10-16

    In the (salen)Co(III)-catalyzed hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of terminal epoxides, the rate- and stereoselectivity-determining epoxide ring-opening step occurs by a cooperative bimetallic mechanism with one Co(III) complex acting as a Lewis acid and another serving to deliver the hydroxide nucleophile. In this paper, we analyze the basis for the extraordinarily high stereoselectivity and broad substrate scope observed in the HKR. We demonstrate that the stereochemistry of each of the two (salen)Co(III) complexes in the rate-determining transition structure is important for productive catalysis: a measurable rate of hydrolysis occurs only if the absolute stereochemistry of each of these (salen)Co(III) complexes is the same. Experimental and computational studies provide strong evidence that stereochemical communication in the HKR is mediated by the stepped conformation of the salen ligand, and not the shape of the chiral diamine backbone of the ligand. A detailed computational analysis reveals that the epoxide binds the Lewis acidic Co(III) complex in a well-defined geometry imposed by stereoelectronic rather than steric effects. This insight serves as the basis of a complete stereochemical and transition structure model that sheds light on the reasons for the broad substrate generality of the HKR.

  15. The IRT1 protein from Arabidopsis thaliana is a metal transporter with a broad substrate range.

    PubMed

    Korshunova, Y O; Eide, D; Clark, W G; Guerinot, M L; Pakrasi, H B

    1999-05-01

    The molecular basis for the transport of manganese across membranes in plant cells is poorly understood. We have found that IRT1, an Arabidopsis thaliana metal ion transporter, can complement a mutant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain defective in high-affinity manganese uptake (smf1 delta). The IRT1 protein has previously been identified as an iron transporter. The current studies demonstrated that IRT1, when expressed in yeast, can transport manganese as well. This manganese uptake activity was inhibited by cadmium, iron(II) and zinc, suggesting that IRT1 can transport these metals. The IRT1 cDNA also complements a zinc uptake-deficient yeast mutant strain (zrt1zrt2), and IRT1-dependent zinc transport in yeast cells is inhibited by cadmium, copper, cobalt and iron(III). However, IRT1 did not complement a copper uptake-deficient yeast mutant (ctr1), implying that this transporter is not involved in the uptake of copper in plant cells. The expression of IRT1 is enhanced in A. thaliana plants grown under iron deficiency. Under these conditions, there were increased levels of root-associated manganese, zinc and cobalt, suggesting that, in addition to iron, IRT1 mediates uptake of these metals into plant cells. Taken together, these data indicate that the IRT1 protein is a broad-range metal ion transporter in plants.

  16. The dynamical analogy between microbial growth on mixtures of substrates and population growth of competing species.

    PubMed

    Narang, A

    1998-07-05

    There is a similarity between the metabolic dynamics of a microbial species growing on a mixture of two substrates and the dynamics of growth of two competing populations. Specifically, the enzymes catalyzing the uptake and catabolism of substrates exhibit phenomena analogous to extinction and coexistence."Extinction" of the enzymes associated with one of the substrates results in sequential utilization of the substrates (diauxie) (Monod, 1942). "Coexistence" of the enzymes associated with the substrates results in simultaneous utilization of the substrates (Egli, 1995). Here, we formulate a simple model that shows the basis for this dynamical similarity: The equations describing the evolution of the enzyme levels are dynamical analogs of the Lotka-Volterra model for two competing species. The analogy suggests ways of capturing the experimentally observed preculture-dependent growth patterns, i.e., growth patterns that vary depending on the physiological state of the preculture.

  17. MBE growth of GaP on a Si substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, M. S. Lazarenko, A. A.; Nikitina, E. V.; Pirogov, E. V.; Gudovskikh, A. S.; Egorov, A. Yu.

    2015-04-15

    It is shown that single-crystal GaP buffer layers can be formed on a Si substrate by molecular-beam epitaxy, with the “migration-enhanced epitaxy” procedure applied in the stage in which the nucleating layer is formed. When a GaP layer is produced on a p-type silicon substrate, a p-n junction is created in a natural way between the p-Si substrate and the surface n-Si layer produced by the diffusion of phosphorus into the substrate during the course of the epitaxial growth of GaP. This p-n junction can be used as the first junction of a silicon-based multijunction photovoltaic converter.

  18. Substrate Preparations in Epitaxial ZnO Film Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Harris, M. T.; Callahan, M. J.; George, M. A.

    2000-01-01

    Epitaxial ZnO films were grown on the two polar surfaces (O-face and Zn-face) of (0001) ZnO single crystal substrates using off-axis magnetron sputtering deposition. Annealing-temperature dependence of ZnO substrates was studied. ZnO films grown on sapphire substrates have also been investigated for comparison purposes and the annealing temperature of A1203 substrates is 1000 C. Substrates and films were characterized using photoluminescence (PL) spectrum, x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscope, energy dispersive spectrum, and electric transport measurements. It has been found that the ZnO film properties were different when films were grown on the two polarity surfaces of ZnO substrates and the A1203 substrates. An interesting result shows that high temperature annealing of ZnO single crystals will improve the surface structure on the O-face surface rather than the opposite surface. The measurements of homoepitaxial ZnO films indicate that the O-terminated surface is better for ZnO epitaxial film growth.

  19. Use of alternative growth substrates to enhance PAH degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Tittle, P.C.; Liu, Y.T.; Strand, S.E.; Stensel, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    Freshwater and saltwater polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-degrading enrichments were developed from seed from a manufactured gas plant site and contaminated marine sediment, respectively. Both enrichments were able to maintain specific degradation rates of 3- and 4-ring PAHs after growth with salicylate or phthalate, which increased their biomass concentrations by a factor of 9 to 10. Phthalate was a more effective alternative substrate than was salicylate. Specific degradation rates of phenanthrene and anthracene by the freshwater enrichment were increased after growth with phthalate. Growth with phthalate increased the specific degradation rates of phenanthrene and pyrene by the saltwater enrichment.

  20. Differential growth responses of soil bacterial taxa to carbon substrates of varying chemical recalcitrance

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, K.C.; Karaoz, U.; Hanson, C.A.; Santee, C.A.; Bradford, M.A.; Treseder, K.K.; Wallenstein, M.D.; Brodie, E.L.

    2011-04-18

    Soils are immensely diverse microbial habitats with thousands of co-existing bacterial, archaeal, and fungal species. Across broad spatial scales, factors such as pH and soil moisture appear to determine the diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities. Within any one site however, bacterial taxon diversity is high and factors maintaining this diversity are poorly resolved. Candidate factors include organic substrate availability and chemical recalcitrance, and given that they appear to structure bacterial communities at the phylum level, we examine whether these factors might structure bacterial communities at finer levels of taxonomic resolution. Analyzing 16S rRNA gene composition of nucleotide analog-labeled DNA by PhyloChip microarrays, we compare relative growth rates on organic substrates of increasing chemical recalcitrance of >2,200 bacterial taxa across 43 divisions/phyla. Taxa that increase in relative abundance with labile organic substrates (i.e., glycine, sucrose) are numerous (>500), phylogenetically clustered, and occur predominantly in two phyla (Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria) including orders Actinomycetales, Enterobacteriales, Burkholderiales, Rhodocyclales, Alteromonadales, and Pseudomonadales. Taxa increasing in relative abundance with more chemically recalcitrant substrates (i.e., cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein) are fewer (168) but more phylogenetically dispersed, occurring across eight phyla and including Clostridiales, Sphingomonadalaes, Desulfovibrionales. Just over 6% of detected taxa, including many Burkholderiales increase in relative abundance with both labile and chemically recalcitrant substrates. Estimates of median rRNA copy number per genome of responding taxa demonstrate that these patterns are broadly consistent with bacterial growth strategies. Taken together, these data suggest that changes in availability of intrinsically labile substrates may result in predictable shifts in soil bacterial composition.

  1. Controlled growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhaoli

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) is a fascinating material with extraordinary electrical thermal and mechanical properties. Growing vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays on metal substrates is an important step in bringing CNT into practical applications such as thermal interface materials (TIMs) and microelectrodes. However, the growth process is challenging due to the difficulties in preventing catalyst diffusion and controlling catalyst dewetting on metal substrates with physical surface heterogeneity. In this work, the catalyst diffusion mechanism and catalyst dewetting theory were studied for the controlled growth of VACNTs on metal substrates. The diffusion time of the catalyst, the diffusion coefficients for the catalyst in the substrate materials and the number density of catalyst nanoparticles after dewetting are identified as the key parameters, based on which three strategies are developed. Firstly, a fast-heating catalyst pretreatment strategy was used, aiming at preserving the amount of catalyst prior to CNT growth by reducing the catalyst diffusion time. The catalyst lifetime is extended from half an hour to one hour on a patterned Al thin film and a VACNT height of 106 mum, about twenty fold of that reported in the literature, was attained. Secondly, a diffusion barrier layer strategy is employed for a reduction of catalyst diffusion into the substrate materials. Enhancement of VACNT growth on Cu substrates was achieved by adopting a conformal Al2O 3 diffusion barrier layer fabricated by a specially designed atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. Lastly, a novel catalyst glancing angle deposition (GLAD) strategy is performed to manipulate the morphology of a relatively thick catalyst on metal substrates with physical surface heterogeneity, aiming to obtain uniform and dense catalyst nanoparticles after dewetting in the pretreatment process for enhanced VACNT growth. We are able to control the VACNT growth conditions on metal substrates in terms of their

  2. Use of lunar regolith as a substrate for plant growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, D. W.; Henninger, D. L.

    1994-11-01

    Regenerative Life Support Systems (RLSS) will be required to regenerate air, water, and wastes, and to produce food for human consumption during long-duration missions to the Moon and Mars. It may be possible to supplement some of the materials needed for a lunar RLSS from resources on the Moon. Natural materials at the lunar surface may be used for a variety of lunar RLSS needs, including (i) soils or solid-support substrates for plant growth, (ii) sources for extraction of essential, plant-growth nutrients, (iii) substrates for microbial populations in the degradation of wastes, (iv) sources of O2 and H2, which may be used to manufacture water, (v) feed stock materials for the synthesis of useful minerals (e.g., molecular sieves), and (vi) shielding materials surrounding the outpost structure to protect humans, plants, and microorganism from harmful radiation. Use of indigenous lunar regolith as a terrestrial-like soil for plant growth could offer a solid support substrate, buffering capacity, nutrient source/storage/retention capabilities, and should be relatively easy to maintain. The lunar regolith could, with a suitable microbial population, play a role in waste renovation; much like terrestrial waste application directly on soils. Issues associated with potentially toxic elements, pH, nutrient availability, air and fluid movement parameters, and cation exchange capacity of lunar regolith need to be addressed before lunar materials can be used effectively as soils for plant growth.

  3. Use of lunar regolith as a substrate for plant growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, D. W.; Henninger, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Regenerative Life Support Systems (RLSS) will be required to regenerate air, water, and wastes, and to produce food for human consumption during long-duration missions to the Moon and Mars. It may be possible to supplement some of the materials needed for a lunar RLSS from resources on the Moon. Natural materials at the lunar surface may be used for a variety of lunar RLSS needs, including (1) soils or solid-support substrates for plant growth, (2) sources for extraction of essential, plant-growth nutrients, (3) substrates for microbial populations in the degradation of wastes, (4) sources of O2 and H2, which may be used to manufacture water, (5) feed stock materials for the synthesis of useful minerals (e.g., molecular sieves), and (6) shielding materials surrounding the outpost structure to protect humans, plants, and microorganisms from harmful radiation. Use of indigenous lunar regolith as a terrestrial-like soil for plant growth could offer a solid support substrate, buffering capacity, nutrient source/storage/retention capabilities, and should be relatively easy to maintain. The lunar regolith could, with a suitable microbial population, play a role in waste renovation; much like terrestrial waste application directly on soils. Issues associated with potentially toxic elements, pH, nutrient availability, air and fluid movement parameters, and cation exchange capacity of lunar regolith need to be addressed before lunar materials can be used effectively as soils for plant growth.

  4. Use of lunar regolith as a substrate for plant growth.

    PubMed

    Ming, D W; Henninger, D L

    1994-01-01

    Regenerative Life Support Systems (RLSS) will be required to regenerate air, water, and wastes, and to produce food for human consumption during long-duration missions to the Moon and Mars. It may be possible to supplement some of the materials needed for a lunar RLSS from resources on the Moon. Natural materials at the lunar surface may be used for a variety of lunar RLSS needs, including (i) soils or solid-support substrates for plant growth, (ii) sources for extraction of essential, plant-growth nutrients, (iii) substrates for microbial populations in the degradation of wastes, (iv) sources of O2 and H2, which may be used to manufacture water, (v) feed stock materials for the synthesis of useful minerals (e.g., molecular sieves), and (vi) shielding materials surrounding the outpost structure to protect humans, plants, and microorganisms from harmful radiation. Use of indigenous lunar regolith as a terrestrial-like soil for plant growth could offer a solid support substrate, buffering capacity, nutrient source/storage/retention capabilities, and should be relatively easy to maintain. The lunar regolith could, with a suitable microbial population, play a role in waste renovation; much like terrestrial waste application directly on soils. Issues associated with potentially toxic elements, pH, nutrient availability, air and fluid movement parameters, and cation exchange capacity of lunar regolith need to be addressed before lunar materials can be used effectively as soils for plant growth.

  5. Characterisation of Host Growth after Infection with a Broad-Range Freshwater Cyanopodophage

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Siobhan C.; Smith, James R.; Hayes, Paul K.; Watts, Joy E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater cyanophages are poorly characterised in comparison to their marine counterparts, however, the level of genetic diversity that exists in freshwater cyanophage communities is likely to exceed that found in marine environments, due to the habitat heterogeneity within freshwater systems. Many cyanophages are specialists, infecting a single host species or strain; however, some are less fastidious and infect a number of different host genotypes within the same species or even hosts from different genera. Few instances of host growth characterisation after infection by broad host-range phages have been described. Here we provide an initial characterisation of interactions between a cyanophage isolated from a freshwater fishing lake in the south of England and its hosts. Designated ΦMHI42, the phage is able to infect isolates from two genera of freshwater cyanobacteria, Planktothrix and Microcystis. Transmission Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy indicate that ΦMHI42 is a member of the Podoviridae, albeit with a larger than expected capsid. The kinetics of host growth after infection with ΦMHI42 differed across host genera, species and strains in a way that was not related to the growth rate of the uninfected host. To our knowledge, this is the first characterisation of the growth of cyanobacteria in the presence of a broad host-range freshwater cyanophage. PMID:24489900

  6. Chemically Engineered Substrates for Patternable Growth of Two-Dimensional Chalcogenide Crystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingzhan; Wu, Jinxiong; Lin, Li; Liu, Yujing; Deng, Bing; Guo, Yunfan; Lin, Yuanwei; Xie, Tian; Dang, Wenhui; Zhou, Yubing; Peng, Hailin

    2016-11-22

    The key challenge of direct integration of two-dimensional (2D) chalcogenide crystals into functional modules is precise control of the nucleation sites of the building blocks. Herein, we exploit the chemical activities and surface engineering of the substrates to manipulate the nucleation energy barrier of 2D crystals and thereby realize the patternable growth of 2D crystals. The selective-region chemical modifications of the substrates are achieved via microcontact printing combined with the elegant self-assembly of octadecyltrichlorosilane molecules on the substrates. The patternable growth method is versatile and can be used as a general strategy for growing a broad class of high-quality 2D chalcogenide crystals with tailorable configurations on a variety of chemically engineered substrates. Moreover, we demonstrate flexible transparent electrodes based on large-scale patterned nanogrids of topological insulator Bi2Se3, which possess tailored trade-off between electric conductivity and optical transmittance across the visible to near-infrared regime. We hope this method may open an avenue to the efficient integration and batch production of 2D chalcogenide crystals and could inspire ongoing efforts of the fabrication of van der Waals heterostructures.

  7. Environmental control of daily stem growth patterns in five temperate broad-leaved tree species.

    PubMed

    Köcher, Paul; Horna, Viviana; Leuschner, Christoph

    2012-08-01

    Tree ring analysis investigates growth processes at time horizons of several weeks to millennia, but lacks the detail of short-term fluctuation in cambial activity. This study used electronic high-precision dendrometry for analyzing the environmental factors controlling stem diameter variation and radial growth in daily resolution in five co-existing temperate broad-leaved tree species (genera Fraxinus, Acer, Carpinus, Tilia and Fagus) with different growth and survival strategies. Daily stem radius change (SRC(d)) was primarily influenced by the atmospheric demand for water vapor (expressed either as vapor pressure deficit (D) or relative air humidity (RH)) while rainfall, soil matrix potential, temperature and radiation were only secondary factors. SRC(d) increased linearly with increasing RH and decreasing D in all species. The positive effect of a low atmospheric water vapor demand on SRC(d) was largest in June during the period of maximal radial growth rate and persisted when observation windows of 7 or 21 days instead of 1 day were used. We found a high synchronicity in the day-to-day growth rate fluctuation among the species with increment peaks corresponding to air humidity maxima, even though the mean daily radial growth rate differed fivefold among the species. The five -species also differed in the positive slope of the growth/RH relationship with the steepest increase found in Fraxinus and the lowest in Fagus. We explain the strong positive effect of high RH and low D on radial stem increment by lowered transpiration which reduces negative pressure in the conducting system and increases turgor in the stem cambium cells, thereby favoring cell division and expansion. The results suggest that mechanistic models of tree growth need to consider the atmospheric water status in addition to the known controlling environmental factors: temperature, soil moisture and precipitation. The results further have implications for sensitivity analyses of tree growth to

  8. ``Electric growth`` of metal overlayers on semiconductor substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Cho, J.H. |; Niu, Q.; Shih, C.K.; Suo, Z.

    1998-02-01

    In this article, the authors present the main results from their recent studies of metal overlayer growth on semiconductor substrates. They show that a variety of novel phenomena can exist in such systems, resulting from several competing interactions. The confined motion of the conduction electrons within the metal overlayer can mediate a surprisingly long-range repulsive force between the metal-semiconductor interface and the growth front, acting to stabilize the overlayer. Electron transfer from the overlayer to the substrate leads to an attractive force between the two interfaces, acting to destabilize the overlayer. Interface-induced Friedel oscillations in electron density can further impose an oscillatory modulation onto the two previous interactions. These three competing factors, of all electronic nature, can make a flat metal overlayer critically, marginally, or magically stable, or totally unstable against roughening. The authors further show that, for many systems, these electronic effects can easily win over the effect of stress. First-principles studies of a few representative systems support the main features of the present electronic growth concept.

  9. Graphene on Pt(111): Growth and substrate interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Peter; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Sutter, Eli

    2009-12-01

    In situ low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) of graphene growth combined with measurements of the graphene structure and electronic band structure has been used to study graphene on Pt(111). Growth by carbon segregation produces macroscopic monolayer graphene domains extending continuously across Pt(111) substrate steps and bounded by strongly faceted edges. LEEM during cooling from the growth temperature shows the propagation of wrinkles in the graphene sheet, driven by thermal stress. The lattice mismatch between graphene and Pt(111) is accommodated by moiré structures with a large number of different rotational variants, without a clear preference for a particular interface geometry. Fast and slow growing graphene domains exhibit moiré structures with small [e.g., (3×3)G , (6×6)R2G , and (2×2)R4G ] and large unit cells [e.g., (44×44)R15G , (52×52)R14G , and (8×8)G ], respectively. A weak substrate coupling, suggested by the growth and structural properties of monolayer graphene on Pt(111), is confirmed by maps of the band structure, which is close to that of isolated graphene aside from minimal hole doping due to charge transfer from the metal. Finally, the decoupled graphene monolayer on Pt(111) appears impenetrable to carbon diffusion, which self-limits the graphene growth at monolayer thickness. Thicker graphene domains, which can form at boundaries between monolayer domains, have been used to characterize the properties of few-layer graphene on Pt(111).

  10. Graphene on Pt(111): Growth and Substrate interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, P.; Sadowski, J.T.; Sutter, E.

    2009-12-01

    In situ low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) of graphene growth combined with measurements of the graphene structure and electronic band structure has been used to study graphene on Pt(111). Growth by carbon segregation produces macroscopic monolayer graphene domains extending continuously across Pt(111) substrate steps and bounded by strongly faceted edges. LEEM during cooling from the growth temperature shows the propagation of wrinkles in the graphene sheet, driven by thermal stress. The lattice mismatch between graphene and Pt(111) is accommodated by moire structures with a large number of different rotational variants, without a clear preference for a particular interface geometry. Fast and slow growing graphene domains exhibit moire structures with small [e.g., (3 x 3){sub G}, ({radical}6 x {radical}6)R2{sub G}, and (2 x 2)R4{sub G}] and large unit cells [e.g., ({radical}44 x {radical}44)R15{sub G}, ({radical}52 x {radical}52)R14{sub G}, and (8 x 8){sub G}], respectively. A weak substrate coupling, suggested by the growth and structural properties of monolayer graphene on Pt(111), is confirmed by maps of the band structure, which is close to that of isolated graphene aside from minimal hole doping due to charge transfer from the metal. Finally, the decoupled graphene monolayer on Pt(111) appears impenetrable to carbon diffusion, which self-limits the graphene growth at monolayer thickness. Thicker graphene domains, which can form at boundaries between monolayer domains, have been used to characterize the properties of few-layer graphene on Pt(111).

  11. Purification and properties of Escherichia coli dimethyl sulfoxide reductase, an iron-sulfur molybdoenzyme with broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Weiner, J H; MacIsaac, D P; Bishop, R E; Bilous, P T

    1988-04-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide reductase, a terminal electron transfer enzyme, was purified from anaerobically grown Escherichia coli harboring a plasmid which codes for dimethyl sulfoxide reductase. The enzyme was purified to greater than 90% homogeneity from cell envelopes by a three-step purification procedure involving extraction with the detergent Triton X-100, chromatofocusing, and DEAE ion-exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme was composed of three subunits with molecular weights of 82,600, 23,600, and 22,700 as identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The native molecular weight was determined by gel electrophoresis to be 155,000. The purified enzyme contained 7.5 atoms of iron and 0.34 atom of molybdenum per mol of enzyme. The presence of molybdopterin cofactor in dimethyl sulfoxide reductase was identified by reconstitution of cofactor-deficient NADPH nitrate reductase activity from Neurospora crassa nit-I mutant and by UV absorption and fluorescence emission spectra. The enzyme displayed a very broad substrate specificity, reducing various N-oxide and sulfoxide compounds as well as chlorate and hydroxylamine.

  12. Laser direct growth of graphene on silicon substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Dapeng; Xu Xianfan

    2012-01-09

    We demonstrate laser direct growth of few layer graphene on a silicon substrate. In our study, a continuous wave laser beam was focused on a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-coated silicon wafer to evaporate PMMA and melt the silicon wafer. Carbon atoms, decomposed from PMMA, were absorbed by the molten silicon surface, and then separated from silicon in the cooling process to form few-layer graphene. This Si-catalyzed method will provide a new approach and platform for applications of graphene.

  13. Selective Growth of Cu Nanowires on Si(111) Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuda, Norio; Hojo, Daisuke; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Miki, Kazushi; Yamabe, Kikuo

    2003-10-01

    We succeeded in the fabrication of high-aspect-ratio (length to width) Cu nanowires of less than 10 nm width and 0.5 nm height along atomic step edge lines on Si(111) substrate. The fabrication procedure consisted of two wet process steps: (1) flattening of the surface roughness to an atomic level by immersing Si(111) wafers in ultralow-dissolved-oxygen water (LOW) and (2) Cu nanowire formation by immersion in LOW containing 100 ppb Cu ions for 100 s at room temperature. The selective growth of the Cu nanowires at the step edges indicates that Cu adsorption sites could be formed there during the flattening stage.

  14. Atomistic mechanisms for bilayer growth of graphene on metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Cui, Ping; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Gao, Yanfei; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    Epitaxial growth on metal substrates has been shown to be the most powerful approach in producing large-scale high-quality monolayer graphene, yet it remains a major challenge to realize uniform bilayer graphene growth. Here we carry out a comparative study of the atomistic mechanisms for bilayer graphene growth on the (111) surfaces of Cu and Ni, using multiscale approaches combining first-principles calculations and rate-equation analysis. We first show that the relatively weak graphene-Cu interaction enhances the lateral diffusion and effective nucleation of C atoms underneath the graphene island, thereby making it more feasible to grow bilayer graphene on Cu. In contrast, the stronger graphene-Ni interaction suppresses the lateral mobility and dimerization of C atoms underneath the graphene, making it unlikely to achieve controlled growth of bilayer graphene on Ni. We then determine the critical graphene size beyond which nucleation of the second layer will take place. Intriguingly, the critical size exhibits an effective inverse "Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier" effect, becoming smaller for faster C migration from the Cu surface to the graphene-Cu interface sites across the graphene edge. These findings allow us to propose a novel alternating growth scheme to realize mass production of bilayer graphene.

  15. Atomistic mechanisms for bilayer growth of graphene on metal substrates

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Wei; Cui, Ping; Zhu, Wenguang; ...

    2015-01-08

    Epitaxial growth on metal substrates has been shown to be the most powerful approach in producing large-scale high-quality monolayer graphene, yet it remains a major challenge to realize uniform bilayer graphene growth. Here we carry out a comparative study of the atomistic mechanisms for bilayer graphene growth on the (111) surfaces of Cu and Ni, using multiscale approaches combining first-principles calculations and rate-equation analysis. We first show that the relatively weak graphene-Cu interaction enhances the lateral diffusion and effective nucleation of C atoms underneath the graphene island, thereby making it more feasible to grow bilayer graphene on Cu. In contrast,more » the stronger graphene-Ni interaction suppresses the lateral mobility and dimerization of C atoms underneath the graphene, making it unlikely to achieve controlled growth of bilayer graphene on Ni. We then determine the critical graphene size beyond which nucleation of the second layer will take place. Intriguingly, the critical size exhibits an effective inverse "Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier" effect, becoming smaller for faster C migration from the Cu surface to the graphene-Cu interface sites across the graphene edge. Lastly, these findings allow us to propose a novel alternating growth scheme to realize mass production of bilayer graphene.« less

  16. Atomistic mechanisms for bilayer growth of graphene on metal substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Cui, Ping; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Gao, Yanfei; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-08

    Epitaxial growth on metal substrates has been shown to be the most powerful approach in producing large-scale high-quality monolayer graphene, yet it remains a major challenge to realize uniform bilayer graphene growth. Here we carry out a comparative study of the atomistic mechanisms for bilayer graphene growth on the (111) surfaces of Cu and Ni, using multiscale approaches combining first-principles calculations and rate-equation analysis. We first show that the relatively weak graphene-Cu interaction enhances the lateral diffusion and effective nucleation of C atoms underneath the graphene island, thereby making it more feasible to grow bilayer graphene on Cu. In contrast, the stronger graphene-Ni interaction suppresses the lateral mobility and dimerization of C atoms underneath the graphene, making it unlikely to achieve controlled growth of bilayer graphene on Ni. We then determine the critical graphene size beyond which nucleation of the second layer will take place. Intriguingly, the critical size exhibits an effective inverse "Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier" effect, becoming smaller for faster C migration from the Cu surface to the graphene-Cu interface sites across the graphene edge. Lastly, these findings allow us to propose a novel alternating growth scheme to realize mass production of bilayer graphene.

  17. Growth of Quantum Wires on Step-Bunched Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Feng

    2005-02-01

    This proposal initiates a combined theoretical and experimental multidisciplinary research effort to explore a novel approach for growing metallic and magnetic nanowires on step-bunched semiconductor and dielectric substrates, and to lay the groundwork for understanding the growth mechanisms and the electronic, electrical, and magnetic properties of metallic and magnetic nanowires. The research will focus on four topics: (1) fundamental studies of step bunching and self-organization in a strained thin film for creating step-bunched substrates. (2) Interaction between metal adatoms (Al,Cu, and Ni) and semiconductor (Si and SiGe) and dielectric (CaF2) surface steps. (3) growth and characterization of metallic and magnetic nanowires on step-bunched templates. (4) fabrication of superlattices of nanowires by growing multilayer films. We propose to attack these problems at both a microscopic and macroscopic level, using state-of-the-art theoretical and experimental techniques. Multiscale (electronic-atomic-continuum) theories will be applied to investigate growth mechanisms of nanowires: mesoscopic modeling and simulation of step flow growth of strained thin films, in particular, step bunching and self-organization will be carried out within the framework of continuum linear elastic theory; atomistic calculation of interaction between metal adatoms and semiconductor and dielectric surface steps will be done by large-scale computations using first-principles total-energy methods. In parallel, thin films and nanowires will be grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and the resultant structure and morphology will be characterized at the atomic level up to micrometer range, using a combination of different surface/interface probes, including scanning tunneling microscopy (STM, atomic resolution), atomic force microscopy (AFM, nanometer resolution), low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM, micrometer resolution), reflectance high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), and x

  18. Monolayers of hard rods on planar substrates. II. Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopotek, M.; Hansen-Goos, H.; Dixit, M.; Schilling, T.; Schreiber, F.; Oettel, M.

    2017-02-01

    Growth of hard-rod monolayers via deposition is studied in a lattice model using rods with discrete orientations and in a continuum model with hard spherocylinders. The lattice model is treated with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and dynamic density functional theory while the continuum model is studied by dynamic Monte Carlo simulations equivalent to diffusive dynamics. The evolution of nematic order (excess of upright particles, "standing-up" transition) is an entropic effect and is mainly governed by the equilibrium solution, rendering a continuous transition [Paper I, M. Oettel et al., J. Chem. Phys. 145, 074902 (2016)]. Strong non-equilibrium effects (e.g., a noticeable dependence on the ratio of rates for translational and rotational moves) are found for attractive substrate potentials favoring lying rods. Results from the lattice and the continuum models agree qualitatively if the relevant characteristic times for diffusion, relaxation of nematic order, and deposition are matched properly. Applicability of these monolayer results to multilayer growth is discussed for a continuum-model realization in three dimensions where spherocylinders are deposited continuously onto a substrate via diffusion.

  19. EGFR kinase possesses a broad specificity for ErbB phosphorylation sites, and ligand increases catalytic-centre activity without affecting substrate binding affinity

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    We previously found that EGF (epidermal growth factor) increases the EGFR (EGF receptor) kinase-binding affinity towards the major tyrosine phosphorylation sites in downstream adaptor proteins such as Gab1 (Grb2-associated binding protein 1) and Shc [Src homology 2 (SH2) domain and collagen containing protein], but not that towards EGFR autophosphorylation sites [Fan, Wong, Deb and Johnson (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 38143–38150]. EGFR activation can also result in transphosphorylation of tyrosine resides in the C-terminal region of the related receptors ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 in heterodimers which are formed upon ligand stimulation. In the present study, we investigated the specificity of EGFR kinase by comparing the steady state kinetic parameters for peptides derived from all four ErbBs in the absence or presence of EGF. Our results demonstrated that (i) EGFR kinase can efficiently phosphorylate a broad range of diverse peptide sequences representing ErbB sites; (ii) certain ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 sites had higher specificity constants than any EGFR sequence and (iii) EGF stimulation consistently increases the kcat approx. 5-fold, but does not significantly alter the Km for any ErbB peptides. Furthermore, peptides containing lysine at position −2 or −3 N-terminal to the target tyrosine were found to be poor EGFR kinase substrates, and substitution of these lysines with glutamine decreased the Km and increased the kcat for these substrates. We conclude that EGFR kinase-mediated ErbB transphosphorylations are mostly controlled at the level of oligomerization, and not by a preference of the EGFR kinase for phosphorylation sites in any particular ErbB. The results also demonstrated that, unlike phosphorylation sites in select downstream targets, EGF does not regulate the recognition of phosphorylation sites in the C-terminal region of any of the ErbBs. PMID:16122376

  20. [Utilization of the mix of growth and nongrowth substrates by microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Pirog, T P; Kovalenko, M O

    2004-01-01

    Author's experimental data and those from literature, concerning the utilization of growth and nongrowth substrates by microorganisms, are presented in the review. The notions "growth" and "nongrowth" substrate as well as the types of transformation of mixed substrates (mixotrophy, diauxia, nongrowth oxidation, cometabolism, syntabolism) have been considered. Main propositions of the conception of auxiliary substrate and the essence of energetic classification of substrates have been presented. Data from literature concerning the effect of cultivation conditions (concentration of substrates, their ratio, cultivation method, dissolution rate under continuous cultivation, etc.) on the character of substrate mixed use, as well as the use of mixed substrates aimed at the intensification of microorganism growth. Data are presented on the intensification of metabolites synthesis (e. g. microbial exopolysaccharide etapolan) on the mixture of energetically non-equivalent growth substrates.

  1. Seedless Pattern Growth of Quasi-Aligned ZnO Nanorod Arrays on Cover Glass Substrates in Solution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid technique for the selective growth of ZnO nanorod arrays on wanted areas of thin cover glass substrates was developed without the use of seed layer of ZnO. This method utilizes electron-beam lithography for pattern transfer on seedless substrate, followed by solution method for the bottom-up growth of ZnO nanorod arrays on the patterned substrates. The arrays of highly crystalline ZnO nanorods having diameter of 60 ± 10 nm and length of 750 ± 50 nm were selectively grown on different shape patterns and exhibited a remarkable uniformity in terms of diameter, length, and density. The room temperature cathodluminescence measurements showed a strong ultraviolet emission at 381 nm and broad visible emission at 585–610 nm were observed in the spectrum. PMID:20672029

  2. Structural Insights into the Broad Substrate Specificity of a Novel Endoglycoceramidase I Belonging to a New Subfamily of GH5 Glycosidases.

    PubMed

    Han, Yun-Bin; Chen, Liu-Qing; Li, Zhuo; Tan, Yu-Meng; Feng, Yan; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2017-03-24

    Endoglycoceramidases (EGCases) specifically hydrolyze the glycosidic linkage between the oligosaccharide and the ceramide moieties of various glycosphingolipids, and they have received substantial attention in the emerging field of glycosphingolipidology. However, the mechanism regulating the strict substrate specificity of these GH5 glycosidases has not been identified. In this study, we report a novel EGCase I from Rhodococcus equi 103S (103S_EGCase I) with remarkably broad substrate specificity. Based on phylogenetic analyses, the enzyme may represent a new subfamily of GH5 glycosidases. The X-ray crystal structures of 103S_EGCase I alone and in complex with its substrates monosialodihexosylganglioside (GM3) and monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1) enabled us to identify several structural features that may account for its broad specificity. Compared with EGCase II from Rhodococcus sp. M-777 (M777_EGCase II), which possesses strict substrate specificity, 103S_EGCase I possesses a longer α7-helix and a shorter loop 4, which forms a larger substrate-binding pocket that could accommodate more extended oligosaccharides. In addition, loop 2 and loop 8 of the enzyme adopt a more open conformation, which also enlarges the oligosaccharide-binding cavity. Based on this knowledge, a rationally designed experiment was performed to examine the substrate specificity of EGCase II. The truncation of loop 4 in M777_EGCase II increased its activity toward GM1 (163%). Remarkably, the S63G mutant of M777_EGCase II showed a broader substrate spectra and significantly increased activity toward bulky substrates (up to >1370-fold for fucosyl-GM1). Collectively, the results presented here reveal the exquisite substrate recognition mechanism of EGCases and provide an opportunity for further engineering of these enzymes.

  3. Growth and characterization of rutile TiO2 nanorods on various substrates with fabricated fast-response metal-semiconductor-metal UV detector based on Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selman, Abbas M.; Hassan, Z.

    2015-07-01

    Rutile-phase titanium dioxide nanorods (NRs) were synthesized successfully on p-type silicon (Si) (1 1 1), c-plane sapphire (Al2O3), glass coated with fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO), glass, and quartz substrates via chemical bath deposition method. All substrates were seeded with a TiO2 seed layer synthesized with a radio frequency reactive magnetron sputtering system prior to NRs growth. The effect of substrate type on structural, morphological, and optical properties of rutile TiO2 NRs was studied. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy analyses showed the tetragonal rutile structure of the synthesized TiO2 NRs. Optical properties were examined with photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy of the grown rutile NRs on all substrates, with the spectra exhibiting one strong ultraviolet emission peak intensity compared with broad visible peak. The optimal sample of rutile NRs was grown on Si substrate. Thus, a fast-response metal-semiconductor-metal ultraviolet (UV) detector was fabricated. Upon exposure to 365 nm light (2.3 mW/cm2) at 5 V bias, the device displays 2.62 × 10-5 A photocurrent, and the response and recovery times are calculated as 18.5 and 19.1 ms, respectively. These results demonstrate that the fabricated high-quality photodiode is a promising candidate as a low-cost UV photodetector for commercially integrated photoelectronic applications.

  4. Physiological minimum temperatures for root growth in seven common European broad-leaved tree species.

    PubMed

    Schenker, Gabriela; Lenz, Armando; Körner, Christian; Hoch, Günter

    2014-03-01

    Temperature is the most important factor driving the cold edge distribution limit of temperate trees. Here, we identified the minimum temperatures for root growth in seven broad-leaved tree species, compared them with the species' natural elevational limits and identified morphological changes in roots produced near their physiological cold limit. Seedlings were exposed to a vertical soil-temperature gradient from 20 to 2 °C along the rooting zone for 18 weeks. In all species, the bulk of roots was produced at temperatures above 5 °C. However, the absolute minimum temperatures for root growth differed among species between 2.3 and 4.2 °C, with those species that reach their natural distribution limits at higher elevations also tending to have lower thermal limits for root tissue formation. In all investigated species, the roots produced at temperatures close to the thermal limit were pale, thick, unbranched and of reduced mechanical strength. Across species, the specific root length (m g(-1) root) was reduced by, on average, 60% at temperatures below 7 °C. A significant correlation of minimum temperatures for root growth with the natural high elevation limits of the investigated species indicates species-specific thermal requirements for basic physiological processes. Although these limits are not necessarily directly causative for the upper distribution limit of a species, they seem to belong to a syndrome of adaptive processes for life at low temperatures. The anatomical changes at the cold limit likely hint at the mechanisms impeding meristematic activity at low temperatures.

  5. Virtual substrates for epitaxial growth and methods of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Atwater, Harry A.; Leite, Marina S.; Warmann, Emily C.; Callahan, Dennis M.

    2016-09-27

    A virtual substrate includes a handle support and a strain-relieved single crystalline layer on the handle support. A method of making the virtual substrate includes growing a coherently-strained single crystalline layer on an initial growth substrate, removing the initial growth substrate to relieve the strain on the single crystalline layer, and applying the strain-relieved single crystalline layer on a handle support.

  6. Connective tissue growth factor is a substrate of ADAM28

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, Satsuki; Tanaka, Rena; Shimoda, Masayuki; Onuma, Junko; Fujii, Yutaka; Jinno, Hiromitsu; Okada, Yasunori

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} The hyper-variable region in the cysteine-rich domain of ADAM28 binds to C-terminal domain of CTGF. {yields} ADAM28 cleaves CTGF alone and CTGF in the CTGF/VEGF{sub 165} complex. {yields} CTGF digestion by ADAM28 releases biologically active VEGF{sub 165} from the complex. {yields} ADAM28, CTGF and VEGF{sub 165} are commonly co-expressed by carcinoma cells in human breast carcinoma tissues. {yields} These suggest that ADAM28 promotes VEGF{sub 165}-induced angiogenesis in the breast carcinomas by selective CTGF digestion in the CTGF/VEGF{sub 165} complex. -- Abstract: ADAM28, a member of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) gene family, is over-expressed by carcinoma cells and the expression correlates with carcinoma cell proliferation and progression in human lung and breast carcinomas. However, information about substrates of ADAM28 is limited. We screened interacting molecules of ADAM28 in human lung cDNA library by yeast two-hybrid system and identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Binding of CTGF to proADAM28 was demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid assay and protein binding assay. ADAM28 cleaved CTGF in dose- and time-dependent manners at the Ala{sup 181}-Tyr{sup 182} and Asp{sup 191}-Pro{sup 192} bonds in the hinge region of the molecule. ADAM28 selectively digested CTGF in the complex of CTGF and vascular endothelial growth factor{sub 165} (VEGF{sub 165}), releasing biologically active VEGF{sub 165} from the complex. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that ADAM28, CTGF and VEGF are commonly co-expressed in the breast carcinoma tissues. These data provide the first evidence that CTGF is a novel substrate of ADAM28 and suggest that ADAM28 may promote VEGF{sub 165}-induced angiogenesis in the breast carcinomas by the CTGF digestion in the CTGF/VEGF{sub 165} complex.

  7. Methods of preparing flexible photovoltaic devices using epitaxial liftoff, and preserving the integrity of growth substrates used in epitaxial growth

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Lee, Kyusang; Shiu, Kuen-Ting

    2013-02-19

    There is disclosed methods of making photosensitive devices, such as flexible photovoltaic (PV) devices, through the use of epitaxial liftoff. Also described herein are methods of preparing flexible PV devices comprising a structure having a growth substrate, wherein the selective etching of protective layers yields a smooth growth substrate that us suitable for reuse.

  8. Methods of preparing flexible photovoltaic devices using epitaxial liftoff, and preserving the integrity of growth substrates used in epitaxial growth

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Lee, Kyusang; Shiu, Kuen-Ting

    2015-01-06

    There is disclosed methods of making photosensitive devices, such as flexible photovoltaic (PV) devices, through the use of epitaxial liftoff. Also described herein are methods of preparing flexible PV devices comprising a structure having a growth substrate, wherein the selective etching of protective layers yields a smooth growth substrate that us suitable for reuse.

  9. Fast Growth of Highly Ordered TiO2 Nanotube Arrays on Si Substrate under High-Field Anodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jingnan; Zheng, Maojun; Zhang, Bin; Li, Qiang; Wang, Faze; Ma, Liguo; Li, Yanbo; Zhu, Changqing; Ma, Li; Shen, Wenzhong

    2017-04-01

    Highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays (NTAs) on Si substrate possess broad applications due to its high surface-to-volume ratio and novel functionalities, however, there are still some challenges on facile synthesis. Here, we report a simple and cost-effective high-field (90-180 V) anodization method to grow highly ordered TiO2 NTAs on Si substrate, and investigate the effect of anodization time, voltage, and fluoride content on the formation of TiO2 NTAs. The current density-time curves, recorded during anodization processes, can be used to determine the optimum anodization time. It is found that the growth rate of TiO2 NTAs is improved significantly under high field, which is nearly 8 times faster than that under low fields (40-60 V). The length and growth rate of the nanotubes are further increased with the increase of fluoride content in the electrolyte.

  10. LPE growth of 1.3 micron InGaAsP CW lasers on /110/ InP substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawrylo, F. Z.

    1981-01-01

    A description is presented of the liquid-phase epitaxial (LPE) growth of high-quality InGaAsP/InP continuous-wave (CW) laser structures on (110) InP substrates using conventional LPE without the need for special growth procedures. Double heterojunction laser structures were grown using the LPE supercooling method with a horizontal sliding boat. Low broad-area current densities (970 A/sq cm) and CW operation achieved at room temperature indicate that results comparable to up-to-date devices may be achieved. The inherent tendency for surface planarity maintenance due to the perfect surface stoichiometry of the (110) surface is a feature that may lend itself to the generation of improved interface growth in quaternary III-V and related semiconductor alloy systems. The similar cross-sectional appearance of structures grown on (110) and (100) orientations show that conventional LPE can be used with (110) surface planes without introducing special growth procedures.

  11. Investigation of Drainage and Plant Growth from Nursery Container Substrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The amount of water and major nutrients lost through drainage from a nursery container substrate treated with different amounts of nitrogen (N), phosphate (P), and potassium (K), and potted with butterfly bush plants were investigated. The substrate was mainly composed of aged pine bark and steamed...

  12. Strawberry Production in Soilless Substrate Troughs – Plant Growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soilless substrates made of peat moss, coconut coir, perlite, rockwool or bark are pathogen free and they have been used in strawberry production in Europe in troughs or containers. Open field strawberry production in soilless substrate is new to California growers. The objective of this study was t...

  13. Quantum Dots: Growth of InAs Quantum Dots on GaAs (511)A Substrates: The Competition between Thermal Dynamics and Kinetics (Small 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Wen, Lei; Gao, Fangliang; Zhang, Shuguang; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-08-01

    On page 4277, G. Li and co-workers aim to promote III-V compound semiconductors and devices for a broad range of applications with various technologies. The growth process of InAs quantum dots on GaAs (511)A substrates is systematically studied. By carefully controlling the competition between growth thermal-dynamics and kinetics, InAs quantum dots with high size uniformity are prepared, which are highly desirable for the fabrication of high-efficiency solar cells.

  14. In situ growth of monolayer porous gold nanoparticles film as high-performance SERS substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chunyuan; Wei, Yuhan; Da, Bingtao; Zhang, Haiting; Cong, Xing; Yang, Boyue; Yang, Yanjun; Wang, Lianhui

    2016-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has recently received considerable attention as an ultrasensitive analytic technique. However, its wide application is limited by lack of excellent SERS-active substrates. In this work a SERS substrate with arrayed monolayer films of porous gold nanoparticles is prepared on a solid substrate by a facile, in situ and one-step growth approach. Specifically, the solid substrate was coated with a layer of dense positive charges first by layer-by-layer assembly, followed by patterned a PDMS film with arrayed wells on the substrate. Then the growth solution including chlorauric acid, cetyltrimethylammonium chloride, and ascorbic acid in a certain proportion was transferred into the wells for in situ and one-step growth of porous gold nanoparticles on the substrate. The growth time, feed ratio of the reagents, and repeat times of the in situ growth were studied systematically to obtain optimal parameters for preparing an optimal SERS substrate. The as-prepared optimal SERS substrate not only has good SERS performance with the enhancement factor up to ∼1.10 × 106, but also shows good uniformity and stability. The SERS substrate was further utilized to be ultrasensitive SERS-based chemical sensors for ppb-level detection of highly toxic dyfonate. The preliminary result indicates that the as-prepared SERS substrate has good SERS performance and shows a number of great potential applications in SERS-based sensors.

  15. Lattice matched semiconductor growth on crystalline metallic substrates

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J; McMahon, William E

    2013-11-05

    Methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and said devices are disclosed. The methods include but are not limited to providing a metal or metal alloy substrate having a crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter (a). The methods further include growing a crystalline semiconductor alloy layer on the crystalline substrate surface by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy. The semiconductor layer may be grown without any buffer layer between the alloy and the crystalline surface of the substrate. The semiconductor alloy may be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the lattice parameter (a). The semiconductor alloy may further be prepared to have a selected band gap.

  16. Growth of self-standing GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-Jae; Fujii, Katsushi; Goto, Takenari; Kim, Chinkyo; Chang, Jiho; Hong, Soon-Ku; Cho, Meoungwhan; Yao, Takafumi

    2010-03-01

    Large-sized and high-quality free standing GaN are required with the development of GaN-based devices. We have developed new techniques to reduce the price of GaN substrates. In this paper, we introduce a simple fabrication way of freestanding GaN substrate using hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). An evaporable buffer layer was applied for the fabrication of 2inch freestanding GaN to separate from a sapphire substrate, in other words, a freestanding GaN was fabricated only by HVPE (one-stop process) without any process.

  17. Substrate-bound growth of Au-Pd diblock nanowire and hybrid nanorod-plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiating; Wang, Yawen; Fan, Zhanxi; Lam, Zhenhui; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Bin; Chen, Hongyu

    2015-04-01

    We expand the scope of the previously developed Active Surface Growth mode for growing substrate-bound ultrathin Pd (d = 4 nm) and Ag nanowires (d = 30 nm) in aqueous solution under ambient conditions. Using Au nanorods as the seeds, selective growth at the contact line between the rod and the substrate eventually leads to an attached Pd nanoplate. The unique growth mode also allows sequential growth of different materials via a single seed, giving substrate-bound Au-Pd diblock nanowires. The new abilities to use seed shape to pre-define the active sites and to apply sequential growth open windows for new pathways to hybrid nanostructures.We expand the scope of the previously developed Active Surface Growth mode for growing substrate-bound ultrathin Pd (d = 4 nm) and Ag nanowires (d = 30 nm) in aqueous solution under ambient conditions. Using Au nanorods as the seeds, selective growth at the contact line between the rod and the substrate eventually leads to an attached Pd nanoplate. The unique growth mode also allows sequential growth of different materials via a single seed, giving substrate-bound Au-Pd diblock nanowires. The new abilities to use seed shape to pre-define the active sites and to apply sequential growth open windows for new pathways to hybrid nanostructures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Supporting TEM and SEM images of control experiments with different reaction conditions and another type of diblock nanowires. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00361j

  18. Chemically Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes as Substrates for Neuronal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hui; Ni, Yingchun; Montana, Vedrana; Haddon, Robert C.; Parpura, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    We report the use of chemically modified carbon nanotubes as a substrate for cultured neurons. The morphological features of neurons that directly reflect their potential capability in synaptic transmission are characterized. The chemical properties of carbon nanotubes are systematically varied by attaching different functional groups that confer known characteristics to the substrate. By manipulating the charge carried by functionalized carbon nanotubes we are able to control the outgrowth and branching pattern of neuronal processes. PMID:21394241

  19. Direct Image-Based Enumeration of Clostridium phytofermentans Cells on Insoluble Plant Biomass Growth Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Alvelo-Maurosa, Jesús G.; Lee, Scott J.; Hazen, Samuel P.

    2015-01-01

    A dual-fluorescent-dye protocol to visualize and quantify Clostridium phytofermentans ISDg (ATCC 700394) cells growing on insoluble cellulosic substrates was developed by combining calcofluor white staining of the growth substrate with cell staining using the nucleic acid dye Syto 9. Cell growth, cell substrate attachment, and fermentation product formation were investigated in cultures containing either Whatman no. 1 filter paper, wild-type Sorghum bicolor, or a reduced-lignin S. bicolor double mutant (bmr-6 bmr-12 double mutant) as the growth substrate. After 3 days of growth, cell numbers in cultures grown on filter paper as the substrate were 6.0- and 2.2-fold higher than cell numbers in cultures with wild-type sorghum and double mutant sorghum, respectively. However, cells produced more ethanol per cell when grown with either sorghum substrate than with filter paper as the substrate. Ethanol yields of cultures were significantly higher with double mutant sorghum than with wild-type sorghum or filter paper as the substrate. Moreover, ethanol production correlated with cell attachment in sorghum cultures: 90% of cells were directly attached to the double mutant sorghum substrate, while only 76% of cells were attached to wild-type sorghum substrate. With filter paper as the growth substrate, ethanol production was correlated with cell number; however, with either wild-type or mutant sorghum, ethanol production did not correlate with cell number, suggesting that only a portion of the microbial cell population was active during growth on sorghum. The dual-staining procedure described here may be used to visualize and enumerate cells directly on insoluble cellulosic substrates, enabling in-depth studies of interactions of microbes with plant biomass. PMID:26637592

  20. A Fungal α-Galactosidase from Tricholoma matsutake with Broad Substrate Specificity and Good Hydrolytic Activity on Raffinose Family Oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xueran; Tian, Guoting; Zhao, Yongchang; Zhao, Liyan; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-07-24

    An acidic α-galactosidase designated as TMG was purified from the fruiting bodies The purification protocol entailed ion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose and of Tricholoma matsutake with 136-fold purification and a specific activity of 909 units/mg. Mono-Q and fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. TMG is a monomeric protein exhibiting a molecular mass of 47 kDa in SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. The purified enzyme was identified by LC-MS/MS and three inner amino acid sequences were obtained. The optimum pH and temperature for TMG with pNPGal as substrate were pH 4.5 and 55 °C, respectively. The α-galactosidase activity was strongly inhibited by K+, Ca2+, Cd2+, Hg2+, Ag+ and Zn2+ ions. The enzyme activity was inhibited by the chemical modification agent N-bromosuccinimide (NBS), indicating the importance of tryptophan residue(s) at or near the active site. Besides hydrolyzing pNPGal, TMG also efficaciously catalyzed the degradation of natural substrates such as stachyose, raffinose, and melibiose. Thus TMG can be exploited commercially for improving the nutritional value of soy milk by degradation of indigestible oligosaccharides.

  1. Crystal structure of the leucine aminopeptidase from Pseudomonas putida reveals the molecular basis for its enantioselectivity and broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Kale, Avinash; Pijning, Tjaard; Sonke, Theo; Dijkstra, Bauke W; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W H

    2010-05-21

    The zinc-dependent leucine aminopeptidase from Pseudomonas putida (ppLAP) is an important enzyme for the industrial production of enantiomerically pure amino acids. To provide a better understanding of its structure-function relationships, the enzyme was studied by X-ray crystallography. Crystal structures of native ppLAP at pH 9.5 and pH 5.2, and in complex with the inhibitor bestatin, show that the overall folding and hexameric organization of ppLAP are very similar to those of the closely related di-zinc leucine aminopeptidases (LAPs) from bovine lens and Escherichia coli. At pH 9.5, the active site contains two metal ions, one identified as Mn(2+) or Zn(2+) (site 1), and the other as Zn(2+) (site 2). By using a metal-dependent activity assay it was shown that site 1 in heterologously expressed ppLAP is occupied mainly by Mn(2+). Moreover, it was shown that Mn(2+) has a significant activation effect when bound to site 1 of ppLAP. At pH 5.2, the active site of ppLAP is highly disordered and the two metal ions are absent, most probably due to full protonation of one of the metal-interacting residues, Lys267, explaining why ppLAP is inactive at low pH. A structural comparison of the ppLAP-bestatin complex with inhibitor-bound complexes of bovine lens LAP, along with substrate modelling, gave clear and new insights into its substrate specificity and high level of enantioselectivity.

  2. Growth of homogeneous single-layer graphene on Ni-Ge binary substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Chen, Da; Lu, Zitong; Guo, Qinglei; Ye, Lin; Wei, Xing; Ding, Guqiao; Zhang, Miao; Di, Zengfeng; Liu, Su

    2014-02-01

    In contrast to the commonly used chemical vapor deposition growth that leads to multilayer graphene formation by carbon segregation from the Ni bulk, we designed a Ni-Ge binary system to directly grow graphene film on Ni-Ge binary substrate, via chemical vapor deposition with methane and hydrogen gas as precursors. Our system fully overcomes the fundamental limitations of Ni and yields homogenous single layer graphene over large areas. The chemical vapor deposition growth of graphene on Ni-Ge binary substrate shows that self limiting monolayer graphene growth can be obtained on these substrate.

  3. Substrate flexibility regulates growth and apoptosis of normal but not transformed cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. B.; Dembo, M.; Wang, Y. L.

    2000-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of oncogenic transformation is anchorage-independent growth (27). Here we demonstrate that responses to substrate rigidity play a major role in distinguishing the growth behavior of normal cells from that of transformed cells. We cultured normal or H-ras-transformed NIH 3T3 cells on flexible collagen-coated polyacrylamide substrates with similar chemical properties but different rigidity. Compared with cells cultured on stiff substrates, nontransformed cells on flexible substrates showed a decrease in the rate of DNA synthesis and an increase in the rate of apoptosis. These responses on flexible substrates are coupled to decreases in cell spreading area and traction forces. In contrast, transformed cells maintained their growth and apoptotic characteristics regardless of substrate flexibility. The responses in cell spreading area and traction forces to substrate flexibility were similarly diminished. Our results suggest that normal cells are capable of probing substrate rigidity and that proper mechanical feedback is required for regulating cell shape, cell growth, and survival. The loss of this response can explain the unregulated growth of transformed cells.

  4. MPACVD growth of single crystalline diamond substrates with PCD rimless and expanding surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nad, Shreya; Charris, Amanda; Asmussen, Jes

    2016-10-01

    Single crystal diamond (SCD) growth was performed in optimized pocket substrate holders at a high pressure (240 Torr) and a high power density (˜1000 W/cm3). In an effort to overcome the challenges of growing large area SCD substrates without a corresponding polycrystalline diamond (PCD) rim, a growth recipe using these pocket holders was developed. This growth recipe controls the substrate temperature (Ts) and the incident microwave power (Pinc) in a prescribed function of growth time. Through this process, the feasibility to enlarge the SCD substrate in situ, i.e., during the growth itself is shown. By allowing the temperature to increase from ˜980 °C to 1040 °C, then reducing the temperature, and then allowing it to drift up again, the deposition process alternates between the fast growth of the different crystal directions (i.e., <110>, <111>, and <100>) and a slow growth to smoothen the top surface. This leads to an increased lateral SCD growth. The slow growth of the crystal faces in turn leads to a smooth and enlarged top surface. Certain strategies such as the termination of the growth process at the appropriate time are critical in obtaining flat and smooth SCD surfaces without the formation of any PCD rim. The SCD substrates grown via this method have been analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopies. The lateral SCD surface area increased between 1.7 and 2 times greater than the initial seed surface area during one continuous run. The deposited SCDs have high growth rates of ˜30 μm/h resulting in smooth, flat and rimless substrates, hence indicating the improvement in the quality and morphology of the deposited substrates.

  5. Growth of single crystalline germanium thin film on (100) silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Wook; Lee, Jaejun; Park, Youn Ho; Park, Jeong Min; Park, Sangwon; Kim, Yeon Joo; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2017-03-01

    Epitaxial growth of germanium thin films (GeTFs) on Si (111) and Si (100) substrates was investigated, and the prepared films were compared with the films grown on SiO2 substrates. Ge films were prepared in three steps. Initially, a Ge interlayer film with thickness of ˜ 10 nm was deposited on the substrate followed by annealing and recrystallization of the film. A Ge film with a thickness of 500 nm was then deposited. A single crystalline Ge film was grown on Si (100) whereas polycrystalline films were grown on the other substrates. The growth rate of the films depends on the type of the substrates used, which in turn determines the crystallinity of the films. Highly crystalline films were obtained with slow growth rates. The single crystalline epitaxial layer of GeTFs formed on Si (100) exhibited a lower threading dislocation density as compared with those grown on Si (111) and SiO2.

  6. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from the cold adapted microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii: a low temperature active enzyme with broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Angelaccio, Sebastiana; Florio, Rita; Consalvi, Valerio; Festa, Guido; Pascarella, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from the psychrophilic microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified as a His-tag fusion protein. The enzyme was characterized with respect to its spectroscopic, catalytic, and thermodynamic properties. The properties of the psychrophilic enzyme have been contrasted with the characteristics of the homologous counterpart from E. coli, which has been structurally and functionally characterized in depth and with which it shares 75% sequence identity. Spectroscopic measures confirmed that the psychrophilic enzyme displays structural properties almost identical to those of the mesophilic counterpart. At variance, the P. ingrahamii enzyme showed decreased thermostability and high specific activity at low temperature, both of which are typical features of cold adapted enzymes. Furthermore, it was a more efficient biocatalyst compared to E. coli serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) particularly for side reactions. Many β-hydroxy-α-amino acids are SHMT substrates and represent important compounds in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and food additives. Thanks to these attractive properties, this enzyme could have a significant potential for biotechnological applications.

  7. A thraustochytrid diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 with broad substrate specificity strongly increases oleic acid content in engineered Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunyu; Iskandarov, Umidjon; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2013-01-01

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) catalyses the last step in acyl-CoA-dependent triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis and is an important determinant of cellular oil content and quality. In this study, a gene, designated TaDGAT2, encoding a type 2 DGAT (DGAT2)-related enzyme was identified from the oleaginous marine protist Thraustochytrium aureum. The deduced TaDGAT2 sequence contains a ~460 amino acid domain most closely related to DGAT2s from Dictyostelium sp. (45–50% identity). Recombinant TaDGAT2 restored TAG biosynthesis to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae H1246 TAG-deficient mutant, and microsomes from the complemented mutant displayed DGAT activity with C16 and C18 saturated and unsaturated fatty acyl-CoA and diacylglycerol substrates. To examine its biotechnological potential, TaDGAT2 was expressed under control of a strong seed-specific promoter in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and the high linoleic acid fad3fae1 mutant. In both backgrounds, little change was detected in seed oil content, but a striking increase in oleic acid content of seeds was observed. This increase was greatest in fad3fae1 seeds, where relative amounts of oleic acid increased nearly 2-fold to >50% of total fatty acids. In addition, >2-fold increase in oleic acid levels was detected in the triacylglycerol sn-2 position and in the major seed phospholipid phosphatidylcholine. These results suggest that increased seed oleic acid content mediated by TaDGAT2 is influenced in part by the fatty acid composition of host cells and occurs not by enhancing oleic acid content at the TAG sn-3 position directly but by increasing total oleic acid levels in seeds, presumably by limiting flux through phosphatidylcholine-based desaturation reactions. PMID:23814277

  8. A thraustochytrid diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 with broad substrate specificity strongly increases oleic acid content in engineered Arabidopsis thaliana seeds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunyu; Iskandarov, Umidjon; Klotz, Elliott T; Stevens, Robyn L; Cahoon, Rebecca E; Nazarenus, Tara J; Pereira, Suzette L; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2013-08-01

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) catalyses the last step in acyl-CoA-dependent triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis and is an important determinant of cellular oil content and quality. In this study, a gene, designated TaDGAT2, encoding a type 2 DGAT (DGAT2)-related enzyme was identified from the oleaginous marine protist Thraustochytrium aureum. The deduced TaDGAT2 sequence contains a ~460 amino acid domain most closely related to DGAT2s from Dictyostelium sp. (45-50% identity). Recombinant TaDGAT2 restored TAG biosynthesis to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae H1246 TAG-deficient mutant, and microsomes from the complemented mutant displayed DGAT activity with C16 and C18 saturated and unsaturated fatty acyl-CoA and diacylglycerol substrates. To examine its biotechnological potential, TaDGAT2 was expressed under control of a strong seed-specific promoter in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and the high linoleic acid fad3fae1 mutant. In both backgrounds, little change was detected in seed oil content, but a striking increase in oleic acid content of seeds was observed. This increase was greatest in fad3fae1 seeds, where relative amounts of oleic acid increased nearly 2-fold to >50% of total fatty acids. In addition, >2-fold increase in oleic acid levels was detected in the triacylglycerol sn-2 position and in the major seed phospholipid phosphatidylcholine. These results suggest that increased seed oleic acid content mediated by TaDGAT2 is influenced in part by the fatty acid composition of host cells and occurs not by enhancing oleic acid content at the TAG sn-3 position directly but by increasing total oleic acid levels in seeds, presumably by limiting flux through phosphatidylcholine-based desaturation reactions.

  9. Mathematical modeling of the growth and development of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis on artificial substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasechkina, E. F.; Kazankova, I. I.

    2014-11-01

    A mathematical model simulating the growth and development of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis Lam. on artificial substrates has been constructed. The model is based on experimental data and contains mathematical descriptions of the filtration, respiration, excretion, spawning, and growth of an individual during its ontogenesis from the moment it attaches to a solid substrate to the attainment of a marketable size. The test computations have been compared to the available observation data for mussel farms.

  10. Surface diffusion and substrate-nanowire adatom exchange in InAs nanowire growth.

    PubMed

    Dayeh, Shadi A; Yu, Edward T; Wang, Deli

    2009-05-01

    We report new fundamental insights into InAs nanowire (NW) nucleation and evolution on InAs (111)B surfaces using organometallic vapor phase epitaxy and present the first experimental demonstration of two distinct NW growth regimes, defined by the direction of substrate-NW adatom exchange, that lead to nonlinear growth rates. We show that the NW elongation rate and morphology in these two growth regimes are governed by the relative difference between the In adatom diffusion lengths on the growth substrate surface and on the NW sidewalls, resulting in strong growth rate dependence on the NW length. These results indicate that surface solid-phase diffusion of In adatoms is a key process in InAs NW growth, which is also supported by diameter-dependent growth rates. These developments enable rational growth of axial and radial NW heterostructures.

  11. Plant Growth Experiments in Zeoponic Substrates: Applications for Advanced Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Gruener, J. E.; Henderson, K. E.; Steinberg, S. L.; Barta, D. J.; Galindo, C.; Henninger, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    A zeoponic plant-growth system is defined as the cultivation of plants in artificial soils, which have zeolites as a major component (Allen and Ming, 1995). Zeolites are crystalline, hydrated aluminosilicate minerals that have the ability to exchange constituent cations without major change of the mineral structure. Recently, zeoponic systems developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) slowly release some (Allen et at., 1995) or all of the essential plant-growth nutrients (Ming et at., 1995). These systems have NH4- and K-exchanged clinoptilolite (a natural zeolite) and either natural or synthetic apatite (a calcium phosphate mineral). For the natural apatite system, Ca and P were made available to the plant by the dissolution of apatite. Potassium and NH4-N were made available by ion-exchange reactions involving Ca(2+) from apatite dissolution and K(+) and NH4(+) on zeolitic exchange sites. In addition to NH4-N, K, Ca, and P, the synthetic apatite system also supplied Mg, S, and other micronutrients during dissolution (Figure 1). The overall objective of this research task is to develop zeoponic substrates wherein all plant growth nutrients are supplied by the plant growth medium for several growth seasons with only the addition of water. The substrate is being developed for plant growth in Advanced Life Support (ALS) testbeds (i.e., BioPLEX) and microgravity plant growth experiments. Zeoponic substrates have been used for plant growth experiments on two Space Shuttle flight experiments (STS-60; STS-63; Morrow et aI., 1995). These substrates may be ideally suited for plant growth experiments on the International Space Station and applications in ALS testbeds. However, there are several issues that need to be resolved before zeoponics will be the choice substrate for plant growth experiments in space. The objective of this paper is to provide an overview on recent research directed toward the refinement of zeoponic plant growth substrates.

  12. Effects of substrate orientation on the growth of InSb nanostructures by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. Y.; Torfi, A.; Pei, C.; Wang, W. I.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the effects of substrate orientation on InSb quantum structure growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are presented. Motivated by the observation that (411) evolves naturally as a stable facet during MBE crystal growth, comparison studies have been carried out to investigate the effects of the crystal orientation of the underlying GaSb substrate on the growth of InSb by MBE. By depositing InSb on a number of different substrate orientations, namely: (100), (311), (411), and (511), a higher nanostructure density was observed on the (411) surface compared with the other orientations. This result suggests that the (411) orientation presents a superior surface in MBE growth to develop a super-flat GaSb buffer surface, naturally favorable for nanostructure growth.

  13. Computational Model for Liquid Phase Electro-Epitaxial Crystal Growth on Partially Masked Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khenner, Mikhail; Braun, Richard J.

    2003-03-01

    A computational model for semiconductor crystal growth on a partially masked substrate under simplified LPEE conditions is developed. The model assumes isothermal diffusional growth from molten metal solution, which is enhanced by applied DC current through crystal/melt interface. Finite-difference, front-tracking method is used to numerically evolve the interface according to the set of governing partial differential equations and boundary conditions. Computed examples show strong influence of the electromigration on growth rates in vertical and lateral directions and the dependence of growth on electrical conductivities of substrate and mask materials as well as on wetting contact angle. The study presented is the first attempt to model LPEE growth on patterned substrates commonly employed in semiconductor industry.

  14. Ammothermal Growth of Gan Substrates For Leds: High-Pressure Ammonothermal Process for Bulk Gallium Nitride Crystal Growth for Energy Efficient Commercially Competitive Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: The new GaN crystal growth method is adapted from that used to grow quartz crystals, which are very inexpensive and represent the second-largest market for single crystals for electronic applications (after silicon). More extreme conditions are required to grow GaN crystals and therefore a new type of chemical growth chamber was invented that is suitable for large-scale manufacturing. A new process was developed that grows GaN crystals at a rate that is more than double that of current processes. The new technology will enable GaN substrates with best-in-world quality at lowest-in-world prices, which in turn will enable new generations of white LEDs, lasers for full-color displays, and high-performance power electronics.

  15. Growth factor and co-receptor release by structural regulation of substrate metalloprotease accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Liseth M.; Hartmann, Monika; Schubach, Salome; Ma, Junzhi; Herrlich, Peter; Herrlich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Release of cytokines, growth factors and other life-essential molecules from precursors by a-disintegrin-and-metalloproteases (ADAMs) is regulated with high substrate-specificity. We hypothesized that this is achieved by cleavage-regulatory intracellular-domain (ICD)-modifications of the precursors. We show here that cleavage-stimuli-induced specific ICD-modifications cause structural substrate changes that enhance ectodomain sensitivity of neuregulin-1 (NRG1; epidermal-growth-factor) or CD44 (receptor-tyrosine-kinase (RTK) co-receptor) to chymotrypsin/trypsin or soluble ADAM. This inside-out signal transfer required substrate homodimerization and was prevented by cleavage-inhibitory ICD-mutations. In chimeras, regulation could be conferred to a foreign ectodomain, suggesting a common higher-order structure. We predict that substrate-specific protease-accessibility-regulation controls release of numerous ADAM substrates. PMID:27876763

  16. The impact of substrate selection for the controlled growth of graphene by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, T.; Lopes, J. M. J.; Wofford, J. M.; Oliveira, M. H.; Dubslaff, M.; Hanke, M.; Jahn, U.; Geelhaar, L.; Riechert, H.

    2015-09-01

    We examine how substrate selection impacts the resulting film properties in graphene growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Graphene growth on metallic as well as dielectric templates was investigated. We find that MBE offers control over the number of atomic graphene layers regardless of the substrate used. High structural quality could be achieved for graphene prepared on Ni (111) films which were epitaxially grown on MgO (111). For growth either on Al2O3 (0001) or on (6√3×6√3)R30°-reconstructed SiC (0001) surfaces, graphene with a higher density of defects is obtained. Interestingly, despite their defective nature, the layers possess a well defined epitaxial relation to the underlying substrate. These results demonstrate the feasibility of MBE as a technique for realizing the scalable synthesis of this two-dimensional crystal on a variety of substrates.

  17. Characterization of the RokA and HexA broad-substrate-specificity hexokinases from Bacteroides fragilis and their role in hexose and N-acetylglucosamine utilization.

    PubMed

    Brigham, Christopher J; Malamy, Michael H

    2005-02-01

    Bacteroides fragilis, a human gastrointestinal commensal and an opportunistic pathogen, utilizes simple and complex sugars and polysaccharides for growth in the large intestine and at sites of infection. Because B. fragilis lacks transport-linked sugar phosphorylation systems, cytoplasmic kinase(s) was expected to be required for the phosphorylation of hexoses and hexosamines. We have now identified two hexose kinases that are important for growth of B. fragilis on glucose, mannose, and other sugars. One kinase (RokA), a member of the ROK family of proteins, was found to be the sole kinase for activation of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (NAG). The other kinase (HexA) is responsible for the majority of the glucose kinase activity in the cell, although a hexA deletion mutant strain was not defective for growth on any substrate tested. Deletion of both the rokA and hexA kinase genes resulted in inability of the cell to use glucose, mannose, NAG, and many other sugars. We purified RokA and determined its approximate molecular mass to be 36.5 kDa. The purified RokA protein was shown to phosphorylate several substrates, including glucose, NAG, and mannose, but not N-acetylmannosamine or N-acetylneuraminic acid. Phylogenetic analysis of RokA showed that it is most similar to kinases from the Cytophaga-Flavibacterium-Bacteroides group, while HexA was most similar to other bacterial hexokinases and eukaryotic hexokinases.

  18. The Aspergillus niger growth on the treated concrete substrate using variable antifungals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parjo, U. K.; Sunar, N. M.; Leman, A. M.; Gani, P.; Embong, Z.; Tajudin, S. A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the Aspergillus niger (A. niger) growth on substrates after incorporates with different compounds of antifungals which is normally used in food industry. The antifungals named as potassium sorbate (PS), calcium benzoate (CB) and zinc salicylate (ZS) were applied on concrete substrate covered with different wall finishing such as acrylic paint (AP), glycerol based paint (GBP), thin wallpaper (THIN) and thick wallpaper (THICK). The concrete substrate were inoculated with spore suspension, incubated at selected temperature (30oC) and relative humidity (90%)in plant growth chamber. The observations were done from the Day 3 until Day 27. The results showed that the growth of the A. niger for concrete treated by PS for AP, GBP, THIN, and THICK were 64%, 32%, 11% and 100%, respectively. Meanwhile for CB, the growth of A. niger on AP, GBP, THIN, and THICK were 100%, 12%, 41%, and 13%, respectively. Similarly, treated concrete by ZS revealed that the growth of A. niger on the same substrate cover were 33%, 47%, 40%, and 39%, respectively. The results obtained in this study provide a valuable knowledge on the abilities of antifungals to remediate A. niger that inoculated on the concrete substrate. Consequently, this study proved that the PS covering with THIN more efficiency compares CB and ZS to prevent A. niger growth.

  19. MOCVD growth of GaN on Si through novel substrate modification techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Jarod C.

    GaN is a semiconductor material with great potential for use in high power electronics and optoelectronics due to the high electron mobility, high breakdown voltage, high thermal stability, and large direct bandgap of GaN. Si is a desirable substrate material for GaN heteroepitaxy due to the low cost of production, large wafer sizes available, and current widespread use in the electronics industry. The growth of GaN/Si devices suffers from the lattice and CTE mismatches between GaN and Si and therefore multiple methods of strain reduction have been employed to counter these effects. In this work we presented two novel methods of substrate modification to promote the growth of device quality GaN on Si. Initial work focused on the implantation of AlN/Si(111) substrates with N+ ions below the AlN/Si(111) interface. A reduction in the initial compressive stress in GaN films as well as the degree of tensile stress generation during growth was observed on implanted samples. Optical microscopy of the GaN surfaces showed reduced channeling crack density on implanted substrates. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies showed a disordered layer in the Si substrate at the implantation depth which consisted of a mixture of polycrystalline and amorphous Si. Evidence was provided to suggest that the disordered layer at the implantation depth was acting as a compliant layer which decoupled the GaN film from the bulk Si substrate and partially accommodated the tensile stress formed during growth and cooling. A reduction in threading dislocation (TD) density on ion implanted substrates was also observed. Additional studies showed that by increasing the lateral size of AlN islands, the tensile growth stress and TD density in GaN films on ion implanted substrates could be further reduced. XRD studies showed an expansion of the AlN lattice on implanted substrates with larger lateral island sizes. The final tensile growth stress of films on implanted substrates was further

  20. Control of heterogeneous nucleation and growth kinetics of dopamine-melanin by altering substrate chemistry.

    PubMed

    Klosterman, Luke; Riley, John K; Bettinger, Christopher John

    2015-03-24

    Dopamine-melanin (DM or "polydopamine") can be deposited on virtually any substrate from solution through autoxidation of dopamine. The versatility of this process has allowed surface-mediated assembly of DM for a wide variety of functional coatings. Here we report the impact of well-defined surface chemistries on the nucleation and growth of such films. DM was deposited on silicon dioxide (SiO2) and SiO2 substrates modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) bearing octadecyl (C18), phenethyl, and aminopropyl functional groups. Atomic force microscopy revealed three-dimensional islands whose areal density and surface coverage are lowest on bare SiO2 substrates and highest on the neutral aromatic and aliphatic substrates. Increasing the pH of the solution from 8.2 to 10 dissociates catechol moieties in DM and inhibits adsorption on negatively charged SiO2 substrates. The growth rate of DM films on SAM-modified SiO2 is maximized at pH 9.5 and almost completely abolished at pH 10 because of increased DM solubility. The initial rates of DM adsorption were measured using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation measurements. The initial adsorption rate is proportional to the nucleation density, which increases as the hydrophobicity of the substrate increases. Taken together, these data provide insight into the rates of heterogeneous nucleation and growth of DM on substrates with well-defined chemistries.

  1. Increased monolayer domain size and patterned growth of tungsten disulfide through controlling surface energy of substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Kyle; Kang, Kyungnam; Fu, Shichen; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2016-08-01

    We report a surface energy-controlled low-pressure chemical vapor deposition growth of WS2 monolayers on SiO2 using pre-growth oxygen plasma treatment of substrates, facilitating increased monolayer surface coverage and patterned growth without lithography. Oxygen plasma treatment of the substrate caused an increase in the average domain size of WS2 monolayers by 78%  ±  2% while having a slight reduction in nucleation density, which translates to increased monolayer surface coverage. This substrate effect on growth was exploited to grow patterned WS2 monolayers by patterned plasma treatment on patterned substrates and by patterned source material with resolutions less than 10 µm. Contact angle-based surface energy measurements revealed a dramatic increase in polar surface energy. A growth model was proposed with lowered activation energies for growth and increased surface diffusion length consistent with the range of results observed. WS2 samples grown with and without oxygen plasma were similar high quality monolayers verified through transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, Raman, and photoluminescence measurements. This technique enables the production of large-grain size, patterned WS2 without a post-growth lithography process, thereby providing clean surfaces for device applications.

  2. Growth evolution of AlN films on silicon (111) substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Wenliang; Yang, Weijia; Zhou, Shizhong; Lin, Zhiting; Li, Guoqiang

    2015-05-14

    AlN films with various thicknesses have been grown on Si(111) substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The surface morphology and structural property of the as-grown AlN films have been investigated carefully to comprehensively explore the epitaxial behavior. The ∼2 nm-thick AlN film initially grown on Si substrate exhibits an atomically flat surface with a root-mean-square surface roughness of 0.23 nm. As the thickness increases, AlN grains gradually grow larger, causing a relatively rough surface. The surface morphology of ∼120 nm-thick AlN film indicates that AlN islands coalesce together and eventually form AlN layers. The decreasing growth rate from 240 to 180 nm/h is a direct evidence that the growth mode of AlN films grown on Si substrates by PLD changes from the islands growth to the layer growth. The evolution of AlN films throughout the growth is studied deeply, and its corresponding growth mechanism is hence proposed. These results are instructional for the growth of high-quality nitride films on Si substrates by PLD, and of great interest for the fabrication of AlN-based devices.

  3. Vertical growth of cadmium sulfide crystals on a silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, A. P.; Rubets, V. P.; Antipov, V. V.

    2017-02-01

    The results of the technological and microscopy studies of the mechanisms of the vertical growth of cadmium sulfide crystals during vacuum synthesis from the vapor phase were reported. Whisker crystals with a diameter from 10 nm to a few micrometers and with a length of dozens of millimeters can be grown by the vacuum vapor phase synthesis in a quasi-closed volume. The results of studies are satisfactorily explained in terms of the classical vapor-liquid-crystal model. The SEM micrographs are presented.

  4. Cold-adapted and rhizosphere-competent strain of Rahnella sp. with broad-spectrum plant growth-promotion potential.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Pratibha; Joshi, Robin; Sharma, K C; Rahi, Praveen; Gulati, Ashu; Gulati, Arvind

    2010-12-01

    A phosphate-solubilizing bacterial strain isolated from Hippophae rhamnoides rhizosphere was identified as Rahnella sp. based on its phenotypic features and 16S rRNA gene sequence. The bacterial strain showed the growth characteristics of a cold-adapted psychrotroph, with the multiple plant growth-promoting traits of inorganic and organic phosphate solubilization, 1-aminocyclopropane-1- carboxylate-deaminase activity, ammonia generation, and siderophore production. The strain also produced indole- 3-acetic acid, indole-3-acetaldehyde, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-acetonitrile, indole-3-lactic acid, and indole-3- pyruvic acid in tryptophan-supplemented nutrient broth. Gluconic, citric and isocitric acids were the major organic acids detected during tricalcium phosphate solubilization. A rifampicin-resistant mutant of the strain exhibited high rhizosphere competence without disturbance to the resident microbial populations in pea rhizosphere. Seed bacterization with a charcoal-based inoculum significantly increased growth in barley, chickpea, pea, and maize under the controlled environment. Microplot testing of the inoculum at two different locations in pea also showed significant increase in growth and yield. The attributes of coldtolerance, high rhizosphere competence, and broad-spectrum plant growth-promoting activity exhibited the potential of Rahnella sp. BIHB 783 for increasing agriculture productivity.

  5. Live substrate positively affects root growth and stolon direction in the woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Erica M.; Watson, Maxine A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of clonal plant foraging generally focus on growth responses to patch quality once rooted. Here we explore the possibility of true plant foraging; the ability to detect and respond to patch resource status prior to rooting. Two greenhouse experiments were conducted to investigate the morphological changes that occur when individual daughter ramets of Fragaria vesca (woodland strawberry) were exposed to air above live (non-sterilized) or dead (sterilized) substrates. Contact between daughter ramets and substrate was prohibited. Daughter ramet root biomass was significantly larger over live versus dead substrate. Root:shoot ratio also increased over live substrate, a morphological response we interpret as indicative of active nutrient foraging. Daughter ramet root biomass was positively correlated with mother ramet size over live but not dead substrate. Given the choice between a live versus a dead substrate, primary stolons extended preferentially toward live substrates. We conclude that exposure to live substrate drives positive nutrient foraging responses in F. vesca. We propose that volatiles emitted from the substrates might be effecting the morphological changes that occur during true nutrient foraging. PMID:26483826

  6. Growth mechanism of silicon carbide films on silicon substrates using C 60 carbonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Workman, Richard; Sarid, Dror

    1995-12-01

    Silicon carbide films were grown on silicon substrates using C 60 molecules as a carbon source. The grown films were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and infrared spectroscopy (IRS). Also, using SiO 2 as a mask on the Si substrate, a patterned SiC film was grown. Growth and defect mechanisms are discussed and compared with conventional CVD carbidizing methods.

  7. Amorphous carbon film growth on Si: Correlation between stress and generation of defects into the substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Brusa, R.S.; Macchi, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Karwasz, G.P.; Laidani, N.; Bartali, R.; Anderle, M.

    2005-05-30

    Amorphous carbon films of several thicknesses were prepared by graphite sputtering on crystalline silicon substrate. The samples were depth profiled with positron annihilation spectroscopy for open-volume measurements and characterized for their residual internal stress. It was found that after film growth the substrate presents vacancy-like defects decorated by oxygen in a layer extending in the substrate by several tens of nanometers beyond the film/Si interface. The width of the defected layer and the decoration of vacancy-like defects are directly and inversely proportional to the measured intensity of the residual stress, respectively. These findings indicate the existence of a relaxation mechanism of the stress in the films that involves deeply the substrate. The decorated vacancy-like defects are suggested to be bounded to dislocations induced in the substrate by the stress relaxation.

  8. LmbE proteins from Bacillus cereus are de-N-acetylases with broad substrate specificity and are highly similar to proteins in Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Deli, Alexandra; Koutsioulis, Dimitrios; Fadouloglou, Vasiliki E.; Spiliotopoulou, Panagiota; Balomenou, Stavroula; Arnaouteli, Sofia; Tzanodaskalaki, Maria; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Kokkinidis, Michalis; Bouriotis, Vassilis

    2010-05-19

    The genomes of Bacillus cereus and its closest relative Bacillus anthracis each contain two LmbE protein family homologs: BC1534 (BA1557) and BC3461 (BA3524). Only a few members of this family have been biochemically characterized including N-acetylglucosaminylphosphatidyl inositol (GlcNAc-PI), 1-D-myo-inosityl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-α-D-glucopyranoside (GlcNAc-Ins), N,N'-diacetylchitobiose (GlcNAc2) and lipoglycopeptide antibiotic de-N-acetylases. All these enzymes share a common feature in that they de-N-acetylate the N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) moiety of their substrates. The bc1534 gene has previously been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme was purified and its 3D structure determined. In this study, the bc3461 gene from B. cereus ATCC14579 was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The recombinant enzymes BC1534 (EC 3.5.1.-) and BC3461 were biochemically characterized. The enzymes have different molecular masses, pH and temperature optima and broad substrate specificity, de-N-acetylating GlcNAc and N-acetylchito-oligomers (GlcNAc2, GlcNAc3 and GlcNAc4), as well as GlcNAc-1P, N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-1 phosphate; GlcNAc-6P, N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-6 phosphate; GalNAc, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine; ManNAc, N-acetyl-d-mannosamine; UDP-GlcNAc, uridine 5'-diphosphate N-acetyl-d-glucosamine. However, the enzymes were not active on radiolabeled glycol chitin, peptidoglycan from B. cereus, N-acetyl-d-glucosaminyl-(β-1,4)-N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanyl-d-isoglutamine (GMDP) or N-acetyl-d-GlcN-Nα1-6-d-myo-inositol-1-HPO4-octadecyl (GlcNAc-I-P-C18). Kinetic analysis of the activity of BC1534 and BC3461 on GlcNAc and GlcNAc2 revealed that GlcNAc2 is the favored substrate for both native enzymes. Based on the recently determined crystal structure of BC1534, a mutational analysis identified functional key residues, highlighting their

  9. Effects of substrate concentrations on the growth of heterotrophic bacteria and algae in secondary facultative ponds.

    PubMed

    Kayombo, S; Mbwette, T S A; Katima, J H Y; Jorgensen, S E

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents the effect of substrate concentration on the growth of a mixed culture of algae and heterotrophic bacteria in secondary facultative ponds (SFPs) utilizing settled domestic sewage as a sole source of organic carbon. The growth of the mixed culture was studied at the concentrations ranging between 200 and 800 mg COD/l in a series of batch chemostat reactors. From the laboratory data, the specific growth rate (micro) was determined using the modified Gompertz model. The maximum specific growth rate ( micro(max)) and half saturation coefficients (K(s)) were calculated using the Monod kinetic equation. The maximum observed growth rate ( micro(max)) for heterotrophic bacteria was 3.8 day(-1) with K(s) of 200 mg COD/l. The micro(max) for algal biomass based on suspended volatile solids was 2.7 day(-1) with K(s) of 110 mg COD/l. The micro(max) of algae based on the chlorophyll-a was 3.5 day(-1) at K(s) of 50mg COD/l. The observed specific substrate removal by heterotrophic bacteria varied between the concentrations of substrate used and the average value was 0.82 (mg COD/mg biomass). The specific substrate utilization rate in the bioreactors was direct proportional to the specific growth rate. Hence, the determined Monod kinetic parameters are useful for the definition of the operation of SFPs.

  10. High quality chemical vapor deposition diamond growth on iron and stainless steel substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Eri; Hirakuri, Kenji K.; Ohyama, Manabu; Friedbacher, Gernot; Mutsukura, Nobuki

    2002-09-01

    Due to the catalytic effect and the rapid diffusion coefficients of carbon species into iron-based materials such as iron and 18-8 stainless steel [18% chrome (Cr) and 8% nickel (Ni)], it is very difficult to produce diamond grains on such substrates. However, diamond growth on iron-based materials is extremely important for mechanical and electrical applications, since these materials are widely used in industrial field and fundamental science. In our previous study, diamond nucleation and subsequent growth have been precisely controlled by the residence time of the source gas, which is an essential parameter. Here, we have carried out diamond growth on iron-based materials using the hot-filament chemical vapor deposition technique with varying residence times. At low residence times, diamond grains with practically useful growth rate are grown. The growth rate of diamond grains on stainless steel substrates was a factor of about 10 greater than that on a regular silicon substrate at optimum conditions. At optimized conditions, diamond growths with high crystalline quality on stainless steel substrates were confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The full width of half maximums of the Raman peaks for diamonds grown in this study are comparable to the ones of natural diamonds.

  11. Electrodeposition of Sb2Se3 on indium-doped tin oxides substrate: Nucleation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xuezhao; zhang, Xin; Tian, Yuan; Shen, Chengmin; Wang, Chunming; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms related to the initial stages of the nucleation and growth of antimony selenide (Sb2Se3) semiconductor compounds onto the indium-doped tin oxides (ITO) coated glass surface have been investigated using chronoamperometry (CA) technique. The fabrication was conducted from nitric acid bath containing both Sb3+ and SeO2 species at ambient conditions. No underpotential deposition (UPD) of antimony and selenium onto ITO substrate was observed in the investigated systems indicating a weak precursor-substrate interaction. Deposition of antimony and selenium onto ITO substrate occurred with large overvoltage through 3D nucleation and growth mechanism followed by diffusion limited growth. FE-SEM and XRD results show that orthorhombic phase Sb2Se3 particles with their size between 90 and 125 nm were obtained and the atomic ratio for antimony and selenium was 2:2.63 according to the EDX results.

  12. Growth of gallium nitride and indium nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Ling, Yichuan; Wang, Gongming; Lu, Xihong; Tong, Yexiang; Li, Yat

    2013-03-07

    We report a general strategy for synthesis of gallium nitride (GaN) and indium nitride (InN) nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates. GaN and InN nanowires were prepared via a nanocluster-mediated growth method using a home built chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system with Ga and In metals as group III precursors and ammonia as a group V precursor. Electron microscopy studies reveal that the group III-nitride nanowires are single crystalline wurtzite structures. The morphology, density and growth mechanism of these nanowires are determined by the growth temperature. Importantly, a photoelectrode fabricated by contacting the GaN nanowires through a carbon cloth substrate shows pronounced photoactivity for photoelectrochemical water oxidation. The ability to synthesize group III-nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible substrates should open up new opportunities for nanoscale photonic, electronic and electrochemical devices.

  13. Electron backscatter diffraction study of hexagonal boron nitride growth on Cu single-crystal substrates.

    PubMed

    Hite, Jennifer K; Robinson, Zachary R; Eddy, Charles R; Feigelson, Boris N

    2015-07-22

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is an important material for the development of new 2D heterostructures. To enable this development, the relationship between crystal growth and the substrate orientation must be explored and understood. In this study, we simultaneously grew h-BN on different orientations of Cu substrates to establish the impact of substrate structure on the growth habit of thin h-BN layers. The substrates studied were a polycrystalline Cu foil, Cu(100), Cu(110), and Cu(111). Fourier transform grazing-incidence infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS) was used to identify h-BN on copper substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine the effective thickness of the h-BN. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were used to measure the morphology of the films and postgrowth crystal structure of the Cu substrates, respectively. Combining the SEM and EBSD images allowed for the correlation between h-BN film coverage and the crystal structure of Cu. It was found that the growth rate was inversely proportional to the surface free energy of the Cu surface, with Cu(111) having the most h-BN surface coverage. The Cu foil predominately crystallized with a (100) surface orientation, and likewise had a film coverage very close to the Cu(100).

  14. Kinetic characteristics and modelling of growth and substrate removal by Alcaligenes faecalis strain NR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Zhao, Bin; An, Qiang; Wang, Xia; Zhang, Yi Xin

    2016-04-01

    Alcaligenes faecalis strain NR has the capability of simultaneous ammonium and organic carbon removal under sole aerobic conditions. The growth and substrate removal characteristics of A. faecalis strain NR were studied and appropriate kinetic models were developed. The maximum substrate removal rate of NH4 (+)-N and TOC were determined as 2.27 mg NH4 (+)-N/L/h and 30.00 mg TOC/L/h, respectively with initial NH4 (+)-N = 80 mg/L and TOC = 800 mg/L. Single-substrate models and double-substrate models based on Monod, Contois, Moser and Teissier were employed to describe the bioprocess kinetic coefficients. As a result, two double-substrate models, Teissier-Contois and Contois-Contois, were considered to be appropriate to model growth kinetics with both NH4 (+)-N and TOC as limiting substrates. The kinetic constants of maximum growth rate (μ max) and half-saturation constant (K S and B S) were obtained by solving multiple equations with regression. This work can be used to further understand and predict the performance of heterotrophic nitrifiers, and thus provides specific guidance of these functional strains in practical wastewater treatment process.

  15. HVPE-GaN growth on GaN-based Advanced Substrates by Smart Cut™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwinska, M.; Amilusik, M.; Fijalkowski, M.; Sochacki, T.; Lucznik, B.; Grzanka, E.; Litwin-Staszewska, E.; Weyher, J. L.; Nowakowska-Siwinska, A.; Muziol, G.; Skierbiszewski, C.; Grzegory, I.; Guiot, E.; Caulmilone, R.; Bockowski, M.

    2016-12-01

    Advanced Substrates consist of a thin GaN layer bonded to a carrier wafer. The layer is separated from starting material by Smart Cut™ technology. GaN on sapphire Advanced Substrates were successfully used as seeds for HVPE-GaN growth. Unintentionally doped and silicon-doped thick GaN layers were crystallized. The results were compared to HVPE-GaN grown on standard MOCVD-GaN/sapphire templates. Free-standing HVPE-GaN with high free carrier concentration was obtained. A laser diode was built on the n-type doped HVPE-GaN grown on an Advanced Substrate.

  16. Improved GaSb-based quantum well laser performance through metamorphic growth on GaAs substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Christopher J. K. He, Lei; Apiratikul, Paveen; Siwak, Nathan P.; Leavitt, Richard P.

    2015-03-09

    The promise of the metamorphic growth paradigm is to enable design freedom of the substrate selection criteria beyond current choices that are limited by lattice matching requirements. A demonstration of this emerging degree of freedom is reported here by directly comparing identical laser structures grown both pseudomorphically on a GaSb substrate and metamorphically on a GaAs substrate. Improved thermal performance of the metamorphic laser material enables a higher output power before thermal roll-over begins. These performance gains are demonstrated in minimally processed gain-guided broad-area type-I lasers emitting close to 2-μm wavelengths and mounted p-side up. Continuous wave measurements at room temperature yield a T{sub 0} of 145 K and peak output power of 192 mW from metamorphic lasers, compared to a T{sub 0} of 96 K and peak output power of 164 mW from identical lasers grown pseudomorphically on GaSb.

  17. [Nutrient transfer and growth of Pinus greggii Engelm. inoculated with edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms in two substrates].

    PubMed

    Rentería-Chávez, María C; Pérez-Moreno, Jesús; Cetina-Alcalá, Víctor M; Ferrera-Cerrato, Ronald; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz

    An ectomycorrhiza is a mutualistic symbiosis of paramount importance in forestry and tree production. One of the selection criteria of ectomycorrhizal fungi that has currently gained importance is their edibility due to the economic, ecological and cultural relevance of edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms as a non-timber forest product. The effect of the inoculation with three edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms: Laccaria laccata, Laccaria bicolor y Hebeloma leucosarx, which are widely sold in Mexico, on the growth and nutrient contents of Pinus greggii grown in an experimental substrate and a commercial substrate enriched with a slow-release fertilizer, was evaluated. Two years after sowing, differences in terms of shoot and root biomass and macro and micronutrient contents between inoculated and non-inoculated plants, were recorded independently of the fungal species and the substrate. Despite the fact that plants grown in the commercial substrate had higher growth and nutrient contents, their ectomycorrhizal colonization percentages were smaller than those of the plants grown in the experimental substrate. The differences in the nutrient transfer to the inoculated plant shoots among the evaluated fungal species were recorded. Ca mobilization by L. laccata, Na by L. bicolor and Mn by H. leucosarx were observed in the plants growing in the experimental substrate. It has been demonstrated that the selection of substrates constitutes an important factor in the production of ectomycorrhizal plants and that the three evaluated species of edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms have an enormous potential in the controlled mycorrhization of P. greggii.

  18. A mesoscopic stochastic model for the specific consumption rate in substrate-limited microbial growth

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The specific consumption rate of substrate, as well as the associated specific growth rate, is an essential parameter in the mathematical description of substrate-limited microbial growth. In this paper we develop a completely new kinetic model of substrate transport, based on recent knowledge on the structural biology of transport proteins, which correctly describes very accurate experimental results at near-zero substrate concentration values found in the literature, where the widespread Michaelis-Menten model fails. Additionally, our model converges asymptotically to Michaelis-Menten predictions as substrate concentration increases. Instead of the single active site enzymatic reaction of Michaelis-Menten type, the proposed model assumes a multi-site kinetics, simplified as an apparent all-or-none mechanism for the transport, which is controlled by means of the local substrate concentration in the close vicinity of the transport protein. Besides, the model also assumes that this local concentration is not equal to the mean substrate concentration experimentally determined in the culture medium. Instead, we propose that it fluctuates with a mostly exponential distribution of Weibull type. PMID:28187189

  19. [Effects of substrate-aeration cultivation pattern on tomato growth].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu; Li, Tian-Lai; Sun, Zhou-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Aeroponics can increase the fruit yield of tomato plant, but its cost is very high. In this paper, tomato seedlings were planted with three cultures, i. e., whole perlite culture (CK), perlite-aeration culture (T1), and aeroponics (T2), and a comparative study was made on the seedlings growth. Compared with CK, T1 improved the gas environment in root zone significantly, with the CO2 and O2 concentrations in root zone being 0.2 and 1.17 times higher, and increased the plant height and stem diameter after 60 days of transplanting by 5.1% and 8.4%, respectively. The plant net photosynthetic rate of T1 was significantly higher than that of CK, with the maximum value after transplanting 45 days increased by 13%. T1 also increased the root activity and ion absorbing ability significantly, with the root activity after transplanting 45 days being 1.23 times of CK, and the root K, Ca, and Mg contents after transplanting 60 days increased by 31%, 37%, and 27%, respectively. The fruit yield of T1 was 1.16 times of CK. No significant differences in these indices were observed between T1 and T2, and less difference in the fruit soluble sugar and organic acid contents as well as the sugar-acid ratio was found among CK, T1, and T2. It was suggested that perlite-aeration cultivation pattern was an easy and feasible way to markedly improve the fruit yield of tomato plant.

  20. Growth and characterization of CdTe on GaAs/Si substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, G.; Nouhi, A.; Liu, J.

    1988-01-01

    Epitaxial CdTe has been grown on both (100) GaAs/Si and (111) GaAs/Si substrates. A combination of molecular beam epitaxy and metal organic chemical vapor deposition have been employed to achieve this growth. The GaAs layers are grown in Si substrates by molecular beam epitaxy, followed by the growth of CdTe on GaAs/Si substra by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and scanning electron microscopy have been used to characterize the CdTe films.

  1. Growth map for Ga-assisted growth of GaAs nanowires on Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Bastiman, Faebian; Küpers, Hanno; Somaschini, Claudio; Geelhaar, Lutz

    2016-03-04

    For the Ga-assisted growth of GaAs nanowires on Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy, growth temperature, As flux, and Ga flux have been systematically varied across the entire window of growth conditions that result in the formation of nanowires. A range of GaAs structures was observed, progressing from pure Ga droplets under negligible As flux through horizontal nanowires, tilted nanowires, vertical nanowires, and nanowires without droplets to crystallites as the As flux was increased. Quantitative analysis of the resulting sample morphology was performed in terms of nanowire number and volume density, number yield and volume yield of vertical nanowires, diameter, length, as well as the number and volume density of parasitic growth. The result is a growth map that comprehensively describes all nanowire and parasitic growth morphologies and hence enables growth of nanowire samples in a predictive manner. Further analysis indicates the combination of global Ga flux and growth temperature determines the total density of all objects, whereas the global As/Ga flux ratio independently determines the resultant sample morphology. Several dependencies observed here imply that all objects present on the substrate surface, i.e. both nanowires and parasitic structures, originate from Ga droplets.

  2. Critical aspects of substrate nanopatterning for the ordered growth of GaN nanocolumns

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Precise and reproducible surface nanopatterning is the key for a successful ordered growth of GaN nanocolumns. In this work, we point out the main technological issues related to the patterning process, mainly surface roughness and cleaning, and mask adhesion to the substrate. We found that each of these factors, process-related, has a dramatic impact on the subsequent selective growth of the columns inside the patterned holes. We compare the performance of e-beam lithography, colloidal lithography, and focused ion beam in the fabrication of hole-patterned masks for ordered columnar growth. These results are applicable to the ordered growth of nanocolumns of different materials. PMID:22168918

  3. Critical aspects of substrate nanopatterning for the ordered growth of GaN nanocolumns.

    PubMed

    Barbagini, Francesca; Bengoechea-Encabo, Ana; Albert, Steven; Martinez, Javier; Sanchez García, Miguel Angel; Trampert, Achim; Calleja, Enrique

    2011-12-14

    Precise and reproducible surface nanopatterning is the key for a successful ordered growth of GaN nanocolumns. In this work, we point out the main technological issues related to the patterning process, mainly surface roughness and cleaning, and mask adhesion to the substrate. We found that each of these factors, process-related, has a dramatic impact on the subsequent selective growth of the columns inside the patterned holes. We compare the performance of e-beam lithography, colloidal lithography, and focused ion beam in the fabrication of hole-patterned masks for ordered columnar growth. These results are applicable to the ordered growth of nanocolumns of different materials.

  4. Direct growth of single-crystalline III–V semiconductors on amorphous substrates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kevin; Kapadia, Rehan; Harker, Audrey; Desai, Sujay; Seuk Kang, Jeong; Chuang, Steven; Tosun, Mahmut; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M.; Tsang, Michael; Zeng, Yuping; Kiriya, Daisuke; Hazra, Jubin; Madhvapathy, Surabhi Rao; Hettick, Mark; Chen, Yu-Ze; Mastandrea, James; Amani, Matin; Cabrini, Stefano; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Ager III, Joel W.; Chrzan, Daryl C.; Javey, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The III–V compound semiconductors exhibit superb electronic and optoelectronic properties. Traditionally, closely lattice-matched epitaxial substrates have been required for the growth of high-quality single-crystal III–V thin films and patterned microstructures. To remove this materials constraint, here we introduce a growth mode that enables direct writing of single-crystalline III–V's on amorphous substrates, thus further expanding their utility for various applications. The process utilizes templated liquid-phase crystal growth that results in user-tunable, patterned micro and nanostructures of single-crystalline III–V's of up to tens of micrometres in lateral dimensions. InP is chosen as a model material system owing to its technological importance. The patterned InP single crystals are configured as high-performance transistors and photodetectors directly on amorphous SiO2 growth substrates, with performance matching state-of-the-art epitaxially grown devices. The work presents an important advance towards universal integration of III–V's on application-specific substrates by direct growth. PMID:26813257

  5. Direct growth of single-crystalline III–V semiconductors on amorphous substrates

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Kevin; Kapadia, Rehan; Harker, Audrey; ...

    2016-01-27

    The III–V compound semiconductors exhibit superb electronic and optoelectronic properties. Traditionally, closely lattice-matched epitaxial substrates have been required for the growth of high-quality single-crystal III–V thin films and patterned microstructures. To remove this materials constraint, here we introduce a growth mode that enables direct writing of single-crystalline III–V’s on amorphous substrates, thus further expanding their utility for various applications. The process utilizes templated liquid-phase crystal growth that results in user-tunable, patterned micro and nanostructures of single-crystalline III–V’s of up to tens of micrometres in lateral dimensions. InP is chosen as a model material system owing to its technological importance. Themore » patterned InP single crystals are configured as high-performance transistors and photodetectors directly on amorphous SiO2 growth substrates, with performance matching state-of-the-art epitaxially grown devices. In conclusion, the work presents an important advance towards universal integration of III–V’s on application-specific substrates by direct growth.« less

  6. Direct growth of single-crystalline III–V semiconductors on amorphous substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kevin; Kapadia, Rehan; Harker, Audrey; Desai, Sujay; Seuk Kang, Jeong; Chuang, Steven; Tosun, Mahmut; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M.; Tsang, Michael; Zeng, Yuping; Kiriya, Daisuke; Hazra, Jubin; Madhvapathy, Surabhi Rao; Hettick, Mark; Chen, Yu-Ze; Mastandrea, James; Amani, Matin; Cabrini, Stefano; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Ager III, Joel W.; Chrzan, Daryl C.; Javey, Ali

    2016-01-27

    The III–V compound semiconductors exhibit superb electronic and optoelectronic properties. Traditionally, closely lattice-matched epitaxial substrates have been required for the growth of high-quality single-crystal III–V thin films and patterned microstructures. To remove this materials constraint, here we introduce a growth mode that enables direct writing of single-crystalline III–V’s on amorphous substrates, thus further expanding their utility for various applications. The process utilizes templated liquid-phase crystal growth that results in user-tunable, patterned micro and nanostructures of single-crystalline III–V’s of up to tens of micrometres in lateral dimensions. InP is chosen as a model material system owing to its technological importance. The patterned InP single crystals are configured as high-performance transistors and photodetectors directly on amorphous SiO2 growth substrates, with performance matching state-of-the-art epitaxially grown devices. In conclusion, the work presents an important advance towards universal integration of III–V’s on application-specific substrates by direct growth.

  7. Identification, Heterologous Expression, and Functional Characterization of Bacillus subtilis YutF, a HAD Superfamily 5'-Nucleotidase with Broad Substrate Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Zakataeva, Natalia P.; Romanenkov, Dmitriy V.; Yusupova, Yuliya R.; Skripnikova, Victoria S.; Asahara, Takayuki; Gronskiy, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    5'-nucleotidases (EC 3.1.3.5) catalyze the hydrolytic dephosphorylation of 5'-ribonucleotides and 5'-deoxyribonucleotides as well as complex nucleotides, such as uridine 5'-diphosphoglucose (UDP-glucose), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide, to their corresponding nucleosides plus phosphate. These enzymes have been found in diverse species in intracellular and membrane-bound, surface-localized forms. Soluble forms of 5'-nucleotidases belong to the ubiquitous haloacid dehalogenase superfamily (HADSF) and have been shown to be involved in the regulation of nucleotide, nucleoside and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) pools. Despite the important role of 5'-nucleotidases in cellular metabolism, only a few of these enzymes have been characterized in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, the workhorse industrial microorganism included in the Food and Drug Administration’s GRAS (generally regarded as safe) list. In the present study, we report the identification of a novel 5'-nucleotidase gene from B. subtilis, yutF, which comprises 771 bp encoding a 256-amino-acid protein belonging to the IIA subfamily of the HADSF. The gene product is responsible for the major p-nitrophenyl phosphatase activity in B. subtilis. The yutF gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its product fused to a polyhistidine tag was purified and biochemically characterized as a soluble 5'-nucleotidase with broad substrate specificity. The recombinant YutF protein was found to hydrolyze various purine and pyrimidine 5'-nucleotides, showing preference for 5'-nucleoside monophosphates and, specifically, 5'-XMP. Recombinant YutF also exhibited phosphohydrolase activity toward nucleotide precursors, ribose-5-phosphate and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate. Determination of the kinetic parameters of the enzyme revealed a low substrate specificity (Km values in the mM concentration range) and modest catalytic efficiencies with respect to substrates. An

  8. Growth and wetting of water droplet condensed between micron-sized particles and substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang, Tran Si Bui; Leong, Fong Yew; An, Hongjie; Tan, Beng Hau; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2016-08-01

    We study heterogeneous condensation growth of water droplets on micron-sized particles resting on a level substrate. Through numerical simulations on equilibrium droplet profiles, we find multiple wetting states towards complete wetting of the particle. Specifically, a partially wetting droplet could undergo a spontaneous transition to complete wetting during condensation growth, for contact angles above a threshold minimum. In addition, we find a competitive wetting behavior between the particle and the substrate, and interestingly, a reversal of the wetting dependence on contact angles during late stages of droplet growth. Using quasi-steady assumption, we simulate a growing droplet under a constant condensation flux, and the results are in good agreement with our experimental observations. As a geometric approximation for particle clusters, we propose and validate a pancake model, and with it, show that a particle cluster has greater wetting tendency compared to a single particle. Together, our results indicate a strong interplay between contact angle, capillarity and geometry during condensation growth.

  9. Inositol-1 (or 4)-monophosphatase from Glycine max embryo axes is a phosphatase with broad substrate specificity that includes phytate dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Islas-Flores, Ignacio; Villanueva, Marco A

    2007-04-01

    A phosphate-hydrolyzing activity from Glycine max embryo axes was purified by a series of chromatographic steps and electroelution from activity gels, and demonstrated to be an inositol-1 (or 4)-monophosphatase by partial internal amino acid sequence. This enzyme hydrolyzed ATP, sodium pyrophosphate (NaPPi), inositol hexakisphosphate, and inositol 1-monophosphate, but not p-nitrophenyl phosphate, ADP, AMP or glucose 6-P. Using NaPPi as substrate, the highly purified protein hydrolyzed up to 0.4 mmol phosphate min(-1) mg(-1) protein and had a Km(avg) of 235 microM for NaPPi. Since NaPPi is relatively inexpensive and readily available, we used this as substrate for the subsequent characterization. We observed the following: (a) specific inhibition by Li and NaF but not by butanedione monoxime, or orthovanadate; (b) activation by Cu(2+) and Mg(2+); (c) optimum activity at pH 7.4; and (d) temperature stability after 1-h incubations at 37-80 degrees C, with maximum activity at 37 degrees C. The partially purified protein was detected by in-gel activity assays and the band was electroeluted to yield a highly purified protein. Analysis by SDS-PAGE and native IEF-PAGE yielded a single major polypeptide of 29 kDa and pI approximately 5.9, respectively. In addition, in-gel activity from embryo axes and whole hypocotyls at early germination times revealed one high and one intermediate molecular weight isoform, but only the intermediate one corresponded to IMPase. Throughout the post-imbibition period, the activity of the high molecular weight isoform disappeared and IMPase increased, indicating an increasing expression of the enzyme as germination and growth proceeded. These data indicate that the inositol-1 (or 4)-monophosphatase present in the embryo axis of G. max has a wide phosphate substrate specificity, and may play an important role in phosphate metabolism during the germination process.

  10. Effect of season, substrate composition, and plant growth on landfill leachate treatment in a constructed wetland

    SciTech Connect

    Surface, J.M.; Peverly, J.H.; Steenhuis, T.S.; Sanford, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    In 1989 the US, Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Tompkins County, New York Departments of Planning and Solid Waste, began a 3-year study at a municipal solid-waste landfill near Ithaca, N.Y., to test the efficiency of leachate treatment by constructed wetlands and to examine the associated treatment processes. Specific objectives of the study were to examine: (1) Treatment efficiency as function of substrate composition and grain size, degree of plant growth, and seasonal changes in evapotranspiration rates and microbial activity; (2) effects of leachate and plant growth on the hydraulic characteristics of the substrate; and (3) chemical, biological, and physical processes by which nutrients, metals, and organic compounds are removed from leachate as it flows through the substrate. This report addresses the first two of these objectives and briefly discusses the third. It (1) describes the substrate plots, leachate-distribution system, sampling methods, and analytical procedures; and (2) presents results in terms of (a) percent removal rates of selected constituents between inflow- and outflow-sampling points, (b) seasonal effects on constituent-removal rates, and (c) effect of substrate composition on constituent removal and plant growth.

  11. Construction of broad-host-range cosmid cloning vectors: identification of genes necessary for growth of Methylobacterium organophilum on methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, L.N.; Hanson, R.S.

    1985-03-01

    Four new cloning vectors have been constructed from the broad-host-range cloning vector pRK290. These vectors, pLA2901, pLA2905, pLA2910, and pLA2917, confer resistance to kanamycin and tetracycline. The latter two are cosmid derivatives of pLA2901. The new vectors can be mobilized into, and are stably maintained in, a variety of gram-negative bacteria. A Sau3A genomic bank of Methylobacterium organophilum strain xx DNA has been constructed in pLA2917, and complementation analysis, with a variety of mutants unable to grow on methanol, revealed at least five separate regions necessary for growth on methanol. Complementation analysis and Tn5 mutagenesis data suggest that at least three genes are responsible for expression of active methanol dehydrogenase.

  12. Optimization of GaN MOVPE growth on patterned Si substrates using spectroscopic in situ reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strittmatter, A.; Reißmann, L.; Trepk, T.; Pohl, U. W.; Bimberg, D.; Zettler, J.-T.

    2004-12-01

    In real-time monitoring of III-Nitride growth on patterned and masked substrates by spectroscopic reflectance, a characteristic interference pattern generated by the superposition of wave-fronts reflected at different μm-sized structures at the sample surface is measured. Up to now this time- and wavelength-dependent pattern was used only for empirical fingerprint-evaluation of III-Nitride growth processes which employ patterning or masking for bulk defect reduction. In this paper, we report on the analysis of real-time spectroscopic reflectance data measured in the range 1.65-4.5 eV during the epitaxial growth of GaN layers on structured Si(1 1 1) substrates. The successful implementation of a two-dimensional interference model into conventional thin-film analysis algorithms enables the quantitative analysis of characteristic vertical and lateral growth rates and overgrowth mechanisms involved. The new method is applied to optimize III-Nitride growth processes on patterned silicon substrates used for subsequent III-Nitride device growth.

  13. Transfer free graphene growth on SiO2 substrate at 250 °C.

    PubMed

    Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Rosmi, Mohamad Saufi; Takahashi, Kazunari; Wakamatsu, Yuji; Yaakob, Yazid; Araby, Mona Ibrahim; Kalita, Golap; Kitazawa, Masashi; Tanemura, Masaki

    2017-03-02

    Low-temperature growth, as well as the transfer free growth on substrates, is the major concern of graphene research for its practical applications. Here we propose a simple method to achieve the transfer free graphene growth on SiO2 covered Si (SiO2/Si) substrate at 250 °C based on a solid-liquid-solid reaction. The key to this approach is the catalyst metal, which is not popular for graphene growth by chemical vapor deposition. A catalyst metal film of 500 nm thick was deposited onto an amorphous C (50 nm thick) coated SiO2/Si substrate. The sample was then annealed at 250 °C under vacuum condition. Raman spectra measured after the removal of the catalyst by chemical etching showed intense G and 2D peaks together with a small D and intense SiO2 related peaks, confirming the transfer free growth of multilayer graphene on SiO2/Si. The domain size of the graphene confirmed by optical microscope and atomic force microscope was about 5 μm in an average. Thus, this approach will open up a new route for transfer free graphene growth at low temperatures.

  14. Transfer free graphene growth on SiO2 substrate at 250 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Rosmi, Mohamad Saufi; Takahashi, Kazunari; Wakamatsu, Yuji; Yaakob, Yazid; Araby, Mona Ibrahim; Kalita, Golap; Kitazawa, Masashi; Tanemura, Masaki

    2017-03-01

    Low-temperature growth, as well as the transfer free growth on substrates, is the major concern of graphene research for its practical applications. Here we propose a simple method to achieve the transfer free graphene growth on SiO2 covered Si (SiO2/Si) substrate at 250 °C based on a solid-liquid-solid reaction. The key to this approach is the catalyst metal, which is not popular for graphene growth by chemical vapor deposition. A catalyst metal film of 500 nm thick was deposited onto an amorphous C (50 nm thick) coated SiO2/Si substrate. The sample was then annealed at 250 °C under vacuum condition. Raman spectra measured after the removal of the catalyst by chemical etching showed intense G and 2D peaks together with a small D and intense SiO2 related peaks, confirming the transfer free growth of multilayer graphene on SiO2/Si. The domain size of the graphene confirmed by optical microscope and atomic force microscope was about 5 μm in an average. Thus, this approach will open up a new route for transfer free graphene growth at low temperatures.

  15. Substrate temperature effect on the growth of carbon nanowalls synthesized via microwave PECVD

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Yun; Choi, Won Seok; Lee, Jae-Hyeoung; Hong, Byungyou

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Well grown carbon nanowalls (CNWs) were obtained by using a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) with methane and hydrogen gases on Si substrates. • CNWs were grown at the growth temperature of 850 °C showed the highest contact angle. • Raman analysis showed higher I{sub D}/I{sub G} value that the CNWs were grown at more than 850 °C growth temperature. - Abstract: A carbon nanowall (CNW) is a carbon-based nanomaterial that is constructed with vertical-structure graphenes. Thus, it effectively increases the reaction surface of electrodes. In this study, the substrate temperature effect on the growth of CNWs was investigated via microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) with methane (CH{sub 4}) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gases on silicon substrates. To find the growth mechanism of a CNW, its growth temperature was changed from 700 °C to 950 °C. The vertical and surface conditions of the grown CNWs according to the growth temperature were characterized via field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurements showed that the CNWs were composed solely of carbon.

  16. Transfer free graphene growth on SiO2 substrate at 250 °C

    PubMed Central

    Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Rosmi, Mohamad Saufi; Takahashi, Kazunari; Wakamatsu, Yuji; Yaakob, Yazid; Araby, Mona Ibrahim; Kalita, Golap; Kitazawa, Masashi; Tanemura, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Low-temperature growth, as well as the transfer free growth on substrates, is the major concern of graphene research for its practical applications. Here we propose a simple method to achieve the transfer free graphene growth on SiO2 covered Si (SiO2/Si) substrate at 250 °C based on a solid-liquid-solid reaction. The key to this approach is the catalyst metal, which is not popular for graphene growth by chemical vapor deposition. A catalyst metal film of 500 nm thick was deposited onto an amorphous C (50 nm thick) coated SiO2/Si substrate. The sample was then annealed at 250 °C under vacuum condition. Raman spectra measured after the removal of the catalyst by chemical etching showed intense G and 2D peaks together with a small D and intense SiO2 related peaks, confirming the transfer free growth of multilayer graphene on SiO2/Si. The domain size of the graphene confirmed by optical microscope and atomic force microscope was about 5 μm in an average. Thus, this approach will open up a new route for transfer free graphene growth at low temperatures. PMID:28251997

  17. Growth and characterization of α and β-phase tungsten films on various substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeong-Seop; Cho, Jaehun; You, Chun-Yeol

    2016-03-15

    The growth conditions of tungsten thin films were investigated using various substrates including Si, Si/SiO{sub 2}, GaAs, MgO, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and recipes were discovered for the optimal growth conditions of thick metastable β-phase tungsten films on Si, GaAs, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates, which is an important material in spin orbit torque studies. For the Si/SiO{sub 2} substrate, the crystal phase of the tungsten films was different depending upon the tungsten film thickness, and the transport properties were found to dramatically change with the thickness owing to a change in phase from the α + β phase to the α-phase. It is shown that the crystal phase changes are associated with residual stress in the tungsten films and that the resistivity is closely related to the grain sizes.

  18. Growth of bi- and tri-layered graphene on silicon carbide substrate via molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Tjun Kit; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with simulated annealing method is used to study the growth process of bi- and tri-layered graphene on a 6H-SiC (0001) substrate via molecular dynamics simulation. Tersoff-Albe-Erhart (TEA) potential is used to describe the inter-atomic interactions among the atoms in the system. The formation temperature, averaged carbon-carbon bond length, pair correlation function, binding energy and the distance between the graphene formed and the SiC substrate are quantified. The growth mechanism, graphitization of graphene on the SiC substrate and characteristics of the surface morphology of the graphene sheet obtained in our MD simulation compare well to that observed in epitaxially grown graphene experiments and other simulation works.

  19. Raman measurements of substrate temperature in a molecular beam epitaxy growth chamber.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, T; Nazari, M; Eridisoorya, M; Myers, T M; Holtz, M

    2015-01-01

    A method is described for directly measuring the temperature of a substrate in a molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) growth system. The approach relies on the establishment of the temperature dependence of Raman-active phonons of the substrate material using independently known calibration points across the range of interest. An unknown temperature in this range is then determined based on the Raman peak position with the substrate in situ the MBE chamber. The apparatus relies on conventional optics and Raman components. Shifting and broadening of the Raman spectrum are described based on the effects of thermal expansion and anharmonic decay. The choice of reference temperature is discussed. The method is qualified by examining the substrate temperature dependence, relative to that of a standard thermocouple, during a commonly used ramp procedure. Both temperature difference and time lag are obtained.

  20. Raman measurements of substrate temperature in a molecular beam epitaxy growth chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, T.; Nazari, M.; Eridisoorya, M.; Myers, T. M.; Holtz, M.

    2015-01-15

    A method is described for directly measuring the temperature of a substrate in a molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) growth system. The approach relies on the establishment of the temperature dependence of Raman-active phonons of the substrate material using independently known calibration points across the range of interest. An unknown temperature in this range is then determined based on the Raman peak position with the substrate in situ the MBE chamber. The apparatus relies on conventional optics and Raman components. Shifting and broadening of the Raman spectrum are described based on the effects of thermal expansion and anharmonic decay. The choice of reference temperature is discussed. The method is qualified by examining the substrate temperature dependence, relative to that of a standard thermocouple, during a commonly used ramp procedure. Both temperature difference and time lag are obtained.

  1. System for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sheldon, P.

    1996-12-31

    A system for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary or rotating substrates includes a combination of some or all of the elements including a photodiode sensor for detecting the intensity of incoming light and converting it to a measurable current, a lens for focusing the RHEED pattern emanating from the phosphor screen onto the photodiode, an interference filter for filtering out light other than that which emanates from the phosphor screen, a current amplifier for amplifying and convening the current produced by the photodiode into a voltage, a computer for receiving the amplified photodiode current for RHEED data analysis, and a graphite impregnated triaxial cable for improving the signal to noise ratio obtained while sampling a stationary or rotating substrate. A rotating stage for supporting the substrate with diametrically positioned electron beam apertures and an optically encoded shaft can also be used to accommodate rotation of the substrate during measurement. 16 figs.

  2. System for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sheldon, P.

    1995-10-10

    A system for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary or rotating substrates includes a combination of some or all of the elements including a photodiode sensor for detecting the intensity of incoming light and converting it to a measurable current, a lens for focusing the RHEED pattern emanating from the phosphor screen onto the photodiode, an interference filter for filtering out light other than that which emanates from the phosphor screen, a current amplifier for amplifying and converting the current produced by the photodiode into a voltage, a computer for receiving the amplified photodiode current for RHEED data analysis, and a graphite impregnated triaxial cable for improving the signal-to-noise ratio obtained while sampling a stationary or rotating substrate. A rotating stage for supporting the substrate with diametrically positioned electron beam apertures and an optically encoded shaft can also be used to accommodate rotation of the substrate during measurement. 16 figs.

  3. System for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sheldon, Peter

    1996-01-01

    A system for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary or rotating substrates includes a combination of some or all of the elements including a photodiode sensor for detecting the intensity of incoming light and converting it to a measurable current, a lens for focusing the RHEED pattern emanating from the phosphor screen onto the photodiode, an interference filter for filtering out light other than that which emanates from the phosphor screen, a current amplifier for amplifying and convening the current produced by the photodiode into a voltage, a computer for receiving the amplified photodiode current for RHEED data analysis, and a graphite impregnated triax cable for improving the signal to noise ratio obtained while sampling a stationary or rotating substrate. A rotating stage for supporting the substrate with diametrically positioned electron beam apertures and an optically encoded shaft can also be used to accommodate rotation of the substrate during measurement.

  4. System for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sheldon, Peter

    1995-01-01

    A system for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary or rotating substrates includes a combination of some or all of the elements including a photodiode sensor for detecting the intensity of incoming light and converting it to a measurable current, a lens for focusing the RHEED pattern emanating from the phosphor screen onto the photodiode, an interference filter for filtering out light other than that which emanates from the phosphor screen, a current amplifier for amplifying and converting the current produced by the photodiode into a voltage, a computer for receiving the amplified photodiode current for RHEED data analysis, and a graphite impregnated triax cable for improving the signal to noise ratio obtained while sampling a stationary or rotating substrate. A rotating stage for supporting the substrate with diametrically positioned electron beam apertures and an optically encoded shaft can also be used to accommodate rotation of the substrate during measurement.

  5. Epitaxial Growth of GaN-based LEDs on Simple Sacrificial Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Ferguson; Chris Summers

    2009-12-31

    The objective of this project is to produce alternative substrate technologies for GaN-based LEDs by developing an ALD interlayer of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on sacrificial substrates such as ZnO and Si. A sacrificial substrate is used for device growth that can easily be removed using a wet chemical etchant leaving only the thin GaN epi-layer. After substrate removal, the GaN LED chip can then be mounted in several different ways to a metal heat sink/reflector and light extraction techniques can then be applied to the chip and compared for performance. Success in this work will lead to high efficiency LED devices with a simple low cost fabrication method and high product yield as stated by DOE goals for its solid state lighting portfolio.

  6. Association of Growth Substrates and Bacterial Genera with Benzo[a]pyrene Mineralization in Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Maiysha D.; Rodgers-Vieira, Elyse A.; Hu, Jing; Aitken, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) that is not known to be a bacterial growth substrate. Organisms capable of cometabolizing BaP in complex field-contaminated systems have not previously been identified. We evaluated BaP mineralization by a bacterial community from a bioreactor treating PAH-contaminated soil during coincubation with or after pre-enrichment on various PAHs as growth substrates. Pyrosequence libraries of 16S rRNA genes were used to identify bacteria that were enriched on the added growth substrate as a means of associating specific organisms with BaP mineralization. Coincubating the bioreactor-treated soil with naphthalene, phenanthrene, or pyrene inhibited BaP mineralization, whereas pre-enriching the soil on the same three PAHs enhanced BaP mineralization. Combined, these results suggest that bacteria in the bioreactor community that are capable of growing on naphthalene, phenanthrene, and/or pyrene can metabolize BaP, with coincubation competitively inhibiting BaP metabolism. Anthracene, fluoranthene, and benz[a]anthracene had little effect on BaP mineralization compared to incubations without an added growth substrate under either coincubation or pre-enrichment conditions. Substantial increases in relative abundance after pre-enrichment with phenanthrene, naphthalene, or pyrene, but not the other PAHs, suggest that members of the genera Cupriavidus and Luteimonas may have been associated with BaP mineralization. PMID:25469077

  7. Availability of Clean Chip Residual as a Growth Substrate in the Southeast United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Residual chipping material (also called clean chip residual or CCR) has potential use as a growth substrate in the nursery industry. The objective of this study was to quantify the amount and type of CCR material available in the Southeast United States for possible horticultural use by surveying wo...

  8. From conformal overgrowth to lateral growth of indium arsenide nano structures on silicon substrates by MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sladek, Kamil; Haas, Fabian; Heidelmann, Markus; Park, Daesung; Barthel, Juri; Dorn, Falk; Weirich, Thomas E.; Grützmacher, Detlev; Hardtdegen, Hilde

    2013-05-01

    A methodology for the deposition of lateral InAs nanostructures on silicon by selective area metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (SA-MOVPE) is presented. Growth parameters which are optimal for the SA-MOVPE of conformal InAs overgrowth on GaAs nanowires were transferred to the lateral SA growth of InAs structures on patterned silicon substrates. The substrate pretreatment conditions and growth parameters were further optimized with respect to selectivity and nanostructure morphology. It is found that lateral growth of InAs nano structures can be achieved on patterned Si(110) as well as on patterned silicon on insulator (SOI) substrates. An investigation of the laterally grown InAs/Si nanowires' crystal structure revealed a faceted but nevertheless abrupt Si-InAs interface on the Si(110) substrate as well as relaxation and a high crystallinity of the deposited InAs on both Si template types. The morphology and crystallinity of laterally grown structures are discussed in detail and compared to that of vertical shell/core InAs/GaAs nanowires.

  9. Note: A single specimen channel crack growth technique applied to brittle thin films on polymer substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Graham, S.; Pierron, O. N.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce an external-load-assisted thin film channel crack growth technique to measure the subcritical crack growth properties of thin films (i.e., crack velocity, v, versus the strain energy release rate, G), and demonstrate it using 250-nm-thick SiNx films on poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrates. The main particularity of this technique is that it requires a polymer substrate to allow loading to large strains (in order to induce channel cracking) without substrate fracture. Its main advantages are to provide a full v-G curve with a single specimen while relying on a simple specimen preparation and straightforward crack growth characterization. Importantly, the technique can be employed for a much larger range of thin films compared to the residual-stress-driven, thin film channel crack growth tests, including ultrathin films and thin film with residual compressive stresses. The restrictions to a proper use of this technique, related to the (visco)plastic deformation of the substrate, are discussed.

  10. Effects of substrate type on plant growth and nitrogen and nitrate concentration in spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of three commercial substrates (a mixture of forest residues, composted grape husks, and white peat; black peat; and coir) on plant growth and nitrogen (N) and nitrate (NO3) concentration and content were evaluated in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv. Tapir). Spinach seedlings were trans...

  11. Interactive effects of substrate, hydroperiod, and nutrients on seedling growth of Salix nigra and Taxodium distichum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, Richard H.; Doyle, T.W.; Draugelis-Dale, R. O.

    2006-01-01

    The large river swamps of Louisiana have complex topography and hydrology, characterized by black willow (Salix nigra) dominance on accreting alluvial sediments and vast areas of baldcypress (Taxodium distichum) deepwater swamps with highly organic substrates. Seedling survival of these two wetland tree species is influenced by their growth rate in relation to the height and duration of annual flooding in riverine environments. This study examines the interactive effects of substrate, hydroperiod, and nutrients on growth rates of black willow and baldcypress seedlings. In a greenhouse experiment with a split-split-plot design, 1-year seedlings of black willow and baldcypress were subjected to two nutrient treatments (unfertilized versus fertilized), two hydroperiods (continuously flooded versus twice daily flooding/draining), and two substrates (sand versus commercial peat mix). Response variables included height, diameter, lateral branch count, biomass, and root:stem ratio. Black willow growth in height and diameter, as well as all biomass components, were significantly greater in peat substrate than in sand. Black willow showed a significant hydroperiod-nutrient interaction wherein fertilizer increased stem and root biomass under drained conditions, but flooded plants did not respond to fertilization. Baldcypress diameter and root biomass were higher in peat than in sand, and the same two variables increased with fertilization in flooded as well as drained treatments. These results can be used in Louisiana wetland forest models as inputs of seedling growth and survival, regeneration potential, and biomass accumulation rates of black willow and baldcypress.

  12. Effect of Different Substrates and Casing Materials on the Growth and Yield of Calocybe indica

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Ruhul; Khair, Abul; Alam, Nuhu

    2010-01-01

    Calocybe indica, a tropical edible mushroom, is popular because it has good nutritive value and it can be cultivated commercially. The current investigation was undertaken to determine a suitable substrate and the appropriate thickness of casing materials for the cultivation of C. indica. Optimum mycelial growth was observed in coconut coir substrate. Primordia initiation with the different substrates and casing materials was observed between the 13th and 19th day. The maximum length of stalk was recorded from sugarcane leaf, while diameter of stalk and pileus, and thickness of pileus were found in rice straw substrate. The highest biological and economic yield, and biological efficiency were also obtained in the rice straw substrate. Cow dung and loamy soil, farm-yard manure, loamy soil and sand, and spent oyster mushroom substrates were used as casing materials to evaluate the yield and yield-contributing characteristics of C. indica. The results indicate that the number of effective fruiting bodies, the biological and economic yield, and the biological efficiency were statistically similar all of the casing materials used. The maximum biological efficiency was found in the cow dung and loamy soil casing material. The cow dung and loamy soil (3 cm thick) was the best casing material and the rice straw was the best substrate for the commercial cultivation of C. indica. PMID:23956634

  13. Effect of Different Substrates and Casing Materials on the Growth and Yield of Calocybe indica.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ruhul; Khair, Abul; Alam, Nuhu; Lee, Tae Soo

    2010-06-01

    Calocybe indica, a tropical edible mushroom, is popular because it has good nutritive value and it can be cultivated commercially. The current investigation was undertaken to determine a suitable substrate and the appropriate thickness of casing materials for the cultivation of C. indica. Optimum mycelial growth was observed in coconut coir substrate. Primordia initiation with the different substrates and casing materials was observed between the 13th and 19th day. The maximum length of stalk was recorded from sugarcane leaf, while diameter of stalk and pileus, and thickness of pileus were found in rice straw substrate. The highest biological and economic yield, and biological efficiency were also obtained in the rice straw substrate. Cow dung and loamy soil, farm-yard manure, loamy soil and sand, and spent oyster mushroom substrates were used as casing materials to evaluate the yield and yield-contributing characteristics of C. indica. The results indicate that the number of effective fruiting bodies, the biological and economic yield, and the biological efficiency were statistically similar all of the casing materials used. The maximum biological efficiency was found in the cow dung and loamy soil casing material. The cow dung and loamy soil (3 cm thick) was the best casing material and the rice straw was the best substrate for the commercial cultivation of C. indica.

  14. Healing time for the growth of thin films on patterned substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanphana, R.; Chatraphorn, P.; Dasgupta, C.

    2014-08-01

    The healing times for the growth of thin films on patterned substrates are studied using simulations of two discrete models of surface growth: the Family model and the Das Sarma-Tamborenea (DT) model. The healing time, defined as the time at which the characteristics of the growing interface are “healed” to those obtained in growth on a flat substrate, is determined via the study of the nearest-neighbor height difference correlation function. Two different initial patterns are considered in this work: a relatively smooth tent-shaped triangular substrate and an atomically rough substrate with single-site pillars or grooves. We find that the healing time of the Family and DT models on a L×L triangular substrate is proportional to Lz, where z is the dynamical exponent of the models. For the Family model, we also analyze theoretically, using a continuum description based on the linear Edwards-Wilkinson equation, the time evolution of the nearest-neighbor height difference correlation function in this system. The correlation functions obtained from continuum theory and simulation are found to be consistent with each other for the relatively smooth triangular substrate. For substrates with periodic and random distributions of pillars or grooves of varying size, the healing time is found to increase linearly with the height (depth) of pillars (grooves). We show explicitly that the simulation data for the Family model grown on a substrate with pillars or grooves do not agree with results of a calculation based on the continuum Edwards-Wilkinson equation. This result implies that a continuum description does not work when the initial pattern is atomically rough. The observed dependence of the healing time on the substrate size and the initial height (depth) of pillars (grooves) can be understood from the details of the diffusion rule of the atomistic model. The healing time of both models for pillars is larger than that for grooves with depth equal to the height of the

  15. Effect of substrate offcut angle on BGaN epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueyama, Kohei; Mimura, Hidenori; Inoue, Yoku; Aoki, Toru; Nakano, Takayuki

    2016-05-01

    Researchers expect the material BGaN to be useful in neutron detectors and ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting devices. In this study, we investigate the effect of the substrate offcut angle and polarity upon BGaN growth. In particular, BGaN is grown on top of GaN upon Al2O3 substrates with various offcut angles. In the case of Ga-polar BGaN growth, the BN mole fraction increases as the offcut angle increases. Furthermore, as the offcut angle increases, the terrace width becomes reduced, which inhibits the formation of nuclei on the terrace and promotes the incorporation of B atoms at the step edges. Such incorporation is important at the step edge (which is the stable site) during BGaN growth because B atoms are easily desorbed from the surface and easily react in the gas phase. In the case of N-polar BGaN growth, the BN mole fraction exhibits different behavior in response to the offcut angle of the substrate. For this reason, the surface of N-polar BGaN is different from that of Ga-polar BGaN as it has facets of N-polar GaN and step bunching. These results indicate that the incorporation of B atoms at step edges significantly affects the BN mole fraction in BGaN growth.

  16. Graphene growth on Ge(100)/Si(100) substrates by CVD method

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Iwona; Wesolowski, Marek; Jozwik, Iwona; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Lupina, Grzegorz; Dabrowski, Pawel; Baranowski, Jacek M.; Strupinski, Wlodek

    2016-01-01

    The successful integration of graphene into microelectronic devices is strongly dependent on the availability of direct deposition processes, which can provide uniform, large area and high quality graphene on nonmetallic substrates. As of today the dominant technology is based on Si and obtaining graphene with Si is treated as the most advantageous solution. However, the formation of carbide during the growth process makes manufacturing graphene on Si wafers extremely challenging. To overcome these difficulties and reach the set goals, we proposed growth of high quality graphene layers by the CVD method on Ge(100)/Si(100) wafers. In addition, a stochastic model was applied in order to describe the graphene growth process on the Ge(100)/Si(100) substrate and to determine the direction of further processes. As a result, high quality graphene was grown, which was proved by Raman spectroscopy results, showing uniform monolayer films with FWHM of the 2D band of 32 cm−1. PMID:26899732

  17. Controlling the growth of Bi(110) and Bi(111) films on an insulating substrate.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Maciej; Kamiński, Daniel; Vergeer, Kurt; Mirolo, Marta; Carla, Francesco; Rijnders, Guus; Bollmann, Tjeerd R J

    2017-04-18

    We demonstrate the controlled growth of Bi(110) and Bi(111) films on an α-Al2O3(0001) substrate by surface x-ray diffraction and x-ray reflectivity using synchrotron radiation. At temperatures as low as 40 K, unanticipated pseudo-cubic Bi(110) films are grown with thicknesses ranging from a few to tens of nanometers. The roughness at the film-vacuum as well as the film-substrate interface, can be reduced by mild heating, where a crystallographic orientation transition of Bi(110) towards Bi(111) is observed at 400 K. From 450 K onwards high quality ultrasmooth Bi(111) films form. Growth around the transition temperature results in the growth of competing Bi(110) and Bi(111) domains.

  18. Controlling the growth of Bi(110) and Bi(111) films on an insulating substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowski, Maciej; Kamiński, Daniel; Vergeer, Kurt; Mirolo, Marta; Carla, Francesco; Rijnders, Guus; Bollmann, Tjeerd R. J.

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate the controlled growth of Bi(110) and Bi(111) films on an α-Al2O3(0001) substrate by surface x-ray diffraction and x-ray reflectivity using synchrotron radiation. At temperatures as low as 40 K, unanticipated pseudo-cubic Bi(110) films are grown with thicknesses ranging from a few to tens of nanometers. The roughness at the film–vacuum as well as the film–substrate interface, can be reduced by mild heating, where a crystallographic orientation transition of Bi(110) towards Bi(111) is observed at 400 K. From 450 K onwards high quality ultrasmooth Bi(111) films form. Growth around the transition temperature results in the growth of competing Bi(110) and Bi(111) domains.

  19. Simulation of growth rate and deposition profile on the periodically patterned substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Byung-Joon; Kang, Sung-Ju; Kim, Jin-Taek; Pak, Bockchoon; Lee, Cheul-Ro

    2007-06-01

    The growth of GaN on the patterned substances has proven favorable to achieve thick, crack-free GaN layers. Based on these methods, we specially designed periodically patterned Si substrate process, which is referred to as lateral epitaxy on patterned Si substrate (LEPS). High crystalline quality GaN are obtained by using this technique. In this paper, numerical modeling of transport and reaction of species is performed to estimate the growth rate of GaN from the reaction of trimethyl gallium (TMG) and ammonia. The effect of fabricated structure of feature scale model will be predicted by using the topography simulator, and deposition profile of the GaN on the pattern will be discussed. The effect of flow conditions and pattern shape and periodicity will also be addressed, which can be critical for the quality of crystal growth. The dependency of step coverage and conformality of patterned mask will also be discussed.

  20. Droughts and broad-scale climate variability reflected by temperature-sensitive tree growth in the Qinling Mountains, central China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Qi; Bao, Guang

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between temperature and drought was investigated using the temperature-sensitive growth of Larix chinensis Beissn in the Qinling Mountains, central China. Extremely high tree-ring width index values (TRWI) agreed well with dry conditions defined by the dryness-wetness index (DWI) obtained from data in Chinese historical documents and climate-related papers between 1814 and 1956 (before the short of instrumental measurements); the reverse applied to extremely low TRWI values. The main severe drought epochs occurred from the late 1850s to the 1870s, the 1920s to 1930s and in the 2000s, whereas wet spells occurred from 1817-1827 and 1881-1886. The droughts in the 2000s exhibited a similar pattern as the ones from the 1920s to 1930s, with obviously an increasing temperature. The variation of tree growth agreed well with other reconstructed temperature series from nearby and remote regions, suggesting that Larix chinensis could respond to broad-scale climate variability. The longest cold interval, 1817-1827, could be associated with the influence of the Tambora eruption in 1815.

  1. Conformal growth of Mo/Si multilayers on grating substrates using collimated ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Voronov, D. L.; Gawlitza, Peter; Cambie, Rossana; Dhuey, Scott; Gullikson, Eric M.; Warwick, Tony; Braun, Stefan; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Padmore, Howard A.

    2012-05-07

    Deposition of multilayers on saw-tooth substrates is a key step in the fabrication of multilayer blazed gratings (MBG) for extreme ultraviolet and soft x-rays. Growth of the multilayers can be perturbed by shadowing effects caused by the highly corrugated surface of the substrates, which results in distortion of the multilayer stack structure and degradation of performance of MBGs. In this study, to minimize the shadowing effects, we used an ion-beamsputtering machine with a highly collimated atomic flux to deposit Mo/Si multilayers on saw-tooth substrates. The sputtering conditions were optimized by finding a balance between smoothening and roughening processes in order to minimize degradation of the groove profile in the course of deposition and at the same time to keep the interfaces of a multilayer stack smooth enough for high efficiency. An optimal value of energy of 200 eV for sputtering Kr+ ions was found by deposition of test multilayers on flat substrates at a range of ion energies. Two saw-tooth substrates were deposited at energies of 200 eV and 700 eV for the sputtering ions. It was found that reduction of the ion energy improved the blazing performance of the MBG and resulted in a 40% gain in the diffraction efficiency due to better replication of the groove profile by the multilayer. As a result of the optimization performed, an absolute diffraction efficiency of 28.8% was achieved for the 2nd blaze order of the MBG with a groove density of 7350 lines/mm at a wavelength of 13.5 nm. Lastly, details of the growth behavior of the multilayers on flat and saw-tooth substrates are discussed in terms of the linear continuous model of film growth.

  2. Conformal growth of Mo/Si multilayers on grating substrates using collimated ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Voronov, D. L.; Cambie, R.; Dhuey, S.; Gullikson, E. M.; Warwick, T.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Padmore, H. A.; Gawlitza, P.; Braun, S.

    2012-05-01

    Deposition of multilayers on saw-tooth substrates is a key step in the fabrication of multilayer blazed gratings (MBG) for extreme ultraviolet and soft x-rays. Growth of the multilayers can be perturbed by shadowing effects caused by the highly corrugated surface of the substrates, which results in distortion of the multilayer stack structure and degradation of performance of MBGs. To minimize the shadowing effects, we used an ion-beam sputtering machine with a highly collimated atomic flux to deposit Mo/Si multilayers on saw-tooth substrates. The sputtering conditions were optimized by finding a balance between smoothening and roughening processes in order to minimize degradation of the groove profile in the course of deposition and at the same time to keep the interfaces of a multilayer stack smooth enough for high efficiency. An optimal value of energy of 200 eV for sputtering Kr{sup +} ions was found by deposition of test multilayers on flat substrates at a range of ion energies. Two saw-tooth substrates were deposited at energies of 200 eV and 700 eV for the sputtering ions. It was found that reduction of the ion energy improved the blazing performance of the MBG and resulted in a 40% gain in the diffraction efficiency due to better replication of the groove profile by the multilayer. As a result of the optimization performed, an absolute diffraction efficiency of 28.8% was achieved for the 2nd blaze order of the MBG with a groove density of 7350 lines/mm at a wavelength of 13.5 nm. Details of the growth behavior of the multilayers on flat and saw-tooth substrates are discussed in terms of the linear continuous model of film growth.

  3. Process for selectively patterning epitaxial film growth on a semiconductor substrate

    DOEpatents

    Sheldon, P.; Hayes, R.E.

    1984-12-04

    Disclosed is a process for selectively patterning epitaxial film growth on a semiconductor substrate. The process includes forming a masking member on the surface of the substrate, the masking member having at least two layers including a first layer disposed on the substrate and the second layer covering the first layer. A window is then opened in a selected portion of the second layer by removing that portion to expose the first layer thereunder. The first layer is then subjected to an etchant introduced through the window to dissolve the first layer a sufficient amount to expose the substrate surface directly beneath the window, the first layer being adapted to preferentially dissolve at a substantially greater rate than the second layer so as to create an overhanging ledge portion with the second layer by undercutting the edges thereof adjacent the window. The epitaxial film is then deposited on the exposed substrate surface directly beneath the window. Finally, an etchant is introduced through the window to dissolve the remainder of the first layer so as to lift-off the second layer and materials deposited thereon to fully expose the balance of the substrate surface.

  4. Process for selectively patterning epitaxial film growth on a semiconductor substrate

    DOEpatents

    Sheldon, Peter; Hayes, Russell E.

    1986-01-01

    A process is disclosed for selectively patterning epitaxial film growth on a semiconductor substrate. The process includes forming a masking member on the surface of the substrate, the masking member having at least two layers including a first layer disposed on the substrate and the second layer covering the first layer. A window is then opened in a selected portion of the second layer by removing that portion to expose the first layer thereunder. The first layer is then subjected to an etchant introduced through the window to dissolve a sufficient amount of the first layer to expose the substrate surface directly beneath the window, the first layer being adapted to preferentially dissolve at a substantially greater rate than the second layer so as to create an overhanging ledge portion with the second layer by undercutting the edges thereof adjacent to the window. The epitaxial film is then deposited on the exposed substrate surface directly beneath the window. Finally, an etchant is introduced through the window to dissolve the remainder of the first layer so as to lift-off the second layer and materials deposited thereon to fully expose the balance of the substrate surface.

  5. Direct growth of nanocrystalline hexagonal boron nitride films on dielectric substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, Roland Yingjie; Tsang, Siu Hon; Loeblein, Manuela; Chow, Wai Leong; Loh, Guan Chee; Toh, Joo Wah; Ang, Soon Loong; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    2015-03-09

    Atomically thin hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN) films are primarily synthesized through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on various catalytic transition metal substrates. In this work, a single-step metal-catalyst-free approach to obtain few- to multi-layer nanocrystalline h-BN (NCBN) directly on amorphous SiO{sub 2}/Si and quartz substrates is demonstrated. The as-grown thin films are continuous and smooth with no observable pinholes or wrinkles across the entire deposited substrate as inspected using optical and atomic force microscopy. The starting layers of NCBN orient itself parallel to the substrate, initiating the growth of the textured thin film. Formation of NCBN is due to the random and uncontrolled nucleation of h-BN on the dielectric substrate surface with no epitaxial relation, unlike on metal surfaces. The crystallite size is ∼25 nm as determined by Raman spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the NCBN formed sheets of multi-stacked layers with controllable thickness from ∼2 to 25 nm. The absence of transfer process in this technique avoids any additional degradation, such as wrinkles, tears or folding and residues on the film which are detrimental to device performance. This work provides a wider perspective of CVD-grown h-BN and presents a viable route towards large-scale manufacturing of h-BN substrates and for coating applications.

  6. Modeling gravity effects on water retention and gas transport characteristics in plant growth substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamindu Deepagoda, T. K. K.; Jones, Scott B.; Tuller, Markus; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Kawamoto, Ken; Komatsu, Toshiko; Moldrup, Per

    2014-08-01

    Growing plants to facilitate life in outer space, for example on the International Space Station (ISS) or at planned deep-space human outposts on the Moon or Mars, has received much attention with regard to NASA's advanced life support system research. With the objective of in situ resource utilization to conserve energy and to limit transport costs, native materials mined on Moon or Mars are of primary interest for plant growth media in a future outpost, while terrestrial porous substrates with optimal growth media characteristics will be useful for onboard plant growth during space missions. Due to limited experimental opportunities and prohibitive costs, liquid and gas behavior in porous substrates under reduced gravity conditions has been less studied and hence remains poorly understood. Based on ground-based measurements, this study examined water retention, oxygen diffusivity and air permeability characteristics of six plant growth substrates for potential applications in space, including two terrestrial analogs for lunar and Martian soils and four particulate substrates widely used in reduced gravity experiments. To simulate reduced gravity water characteristics, the predictions for ground-based measurements (1 - g) were scaled to two reduced gravity conditions, Martian gravity (0.38 - g) and lunar gravity (0.16 - g), following the observations in previous reduced gravity studies. We described the observed gas diffusivity with a recently developed model combined with a new approach that estimates the gas percolation threshold based on the pore size distribution. The model successfully captured measured data for all investigated media and demonstrated the implications of the poorly-understood shift in gas percolation threshold with improved gas percolation in reduced gravity. Finally, using a substrate-structure parameter related to the gaseous phase, we adequately described the air permeability under reduced gravity conditions.

  7. Bacterial growth in the cold: Evidence for an enhanced substrate requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, W.J.; Sheldon, W.M. Jr.; Pomeroy, L.R. )

    1992-01-01

    Growth responses and biovolume changes for four facultatively psychrophilic bacterial isolates from Conception Bay, Newfoundland, and the Arctic Ocean were examined at temperatures from {minus}1.5 to 35C, with substrate concentrations of 0.15, 1.5, and 1,500 mg of proteose peptone-yeast extract per liter. For two cultures, growth in 0.1, 1.0, and 1,000 mg of proline per liter was also examined. At 10 to 15C and above, growth rates showed no marked effect of substrate concentration, while at {minus}1.5 and 0C, there was an increasing requirement for organic nutrients, with generation times in low-nutrient media that were two to three times longer than in high-nutrient media. Biovolume showed a clear dependence on substrate concentration and quality; the largest cells were in the highest-nutrient media. Biovolume was also affected by temperature; the largest cells were found at the lowest temperatures. These data have implications for both food web structure and carbon flow in cold waters and for the effects of global climate change, since the change in growth rate is most dramatic at the lowest temperatures.

  8. Studies of molecular-beam epitaxy growth of GaAs on porous Si substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mii, Y. J.; Kao, Y. C.; Wu, B. J.; Wang, K. L.; Lin, T. L.; Liu, J. K.

    1988-01-01

    GaAs has been grown on porous Si directly and on Si buffer layer-porous Si substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy. In the case of GaAs growth on porous Si, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the dominant defects in GaAs layers grown on porous Si are microtwins and stacking faults, which originate from the GaAs/porous Si interface. GaAs is found to penetrate into the porous Si layers. By using a thin Si buffer layer (50 nm), GaAs penetration diminishes and the density of microtwins and stacking faults is largely reduced and localized at the GaAs/Si buffer interface. However, there is a high density of threading dislocations remaining. Both Si (100) aligned and four degree tilted substrates have been examined in this study. TEM results show no observable effect of the tilted substrates on the quality of the GaAs epitaxial layer.

  9. Crystal growth induced by Nd:YAG laser irradiation in patterning glass ceramic substrates with dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, D.; Escartín, A.; Cases, R.; Peña, J. I.

    2011-03-01

    In this work a glass ceramic substrate was processed by focusing a laser beam inside the said material. The crystal phase within the amorphous matrix provides mechanical properties to the glass ceramic substrate in such a way that dots can be patterned inside the fore-mentioned material without producing any cracks. These marks are made up of crystals, the growth of which has been induced by the laser beam. These inner structures can modify the optical, thermal and mechanical properties of the glass ceramic substrate. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with pulsewidths in the nanosecond range has been used. Morphology, composition, microstructure, mechanical and thermal properties of the processed material are described.

  10. Heteroepitaxial Growth of Ferromagnetic MnSb(0001) Films on Ge/Si(111) Virtual Substrates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Molecular beam epitaxial growth of ferromagnetic MnSb(0001) has been achieved on high quality, fully relaxed Ge(111)/Si(111) virtual substrates grown by reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition. The epilayers were characterized using reflection high energy electron diffraction, synchrotron hard X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and magnetometry. The surface reconstructions, magnetic properties, crystalline quality, and strain relaxation behavior of the MnSb films are similar to those of MnSb grown on GaAs(111). In contrast to GaAs substrates, segregation of substrate atoms through the MnSb film does not occur, and alternative polymorphs of MnSb are absent. PMID:24409091

  11. Spent mushroom substrates as component of growing media for germination and growth of horticultural plants.

    PubMed

    Medina, E; Paredes, C; Pérez-Murcia, M D; Bustamante, M A; Moral, R

    2009-09-01

    This research work was conducted in order to investigate the possibility of using spent mushroom substrate (SMS) in the production of horticultural seedlings replacing part of the peat in the growing media. Three vegetable species with different salt sensitivities, the less sensitive being tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum var. Muchamiel), the moderately salt-sensitive being courgette (Cucurbita pepo L. var. Afrodite F1) and the most salt-sensitive being pepper (Capsicum annum L. var. Lamuyo F1) were grown in 12 media containing SMS of two types of mushroom (Agaricus bisporus (SMS-AB) and Pleurotus ostreatus (SMS-PO)) or a mixture of both 50% (v/v) (SMS-50), as well as peat in various ratios. The proportions of each residue in the mixtures elaborated with peat were 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% v/v residue. A substrate of 100% peat was used as control. The experiment was arranged in a completely-randomised design with two replicates per treatment under greenhouse conditions. Prior to sowing, some physical, physico-chemical and chemical properties of the growing media were determined and seed germination and fresh weight of seedling were also measured. In most of the cases, the addition of SMS to the growing media produced an increase in the pH values, salt contents, macro and micronutrient concentrations and a decrease in the water holding capacity contents in comparison to peat, whereas great differences were found in the air capacity values between SMS-based substrates and peat. Up to 75% SMS can be used in mixtures with peat for seed germination of the plant species studied. Regarding the most suitable SMS-based substrates for plant growth, any substrate could be used for tomato seedling production. However, all SMS-AB-based substrates and the media containing low dose of SMS-PO and SMS-50 were adequate for growth of courgette and pepper.

  12. IV-VI semiconductor growth on silicon substrates and new mid-infrared laser fabrication methods

    PubMed

    McCann; Chao; Sachar; McAlister; Li; Fang; Wu; Namjou

    1999-09-01

    This paper reviews results from research conducted at the University of Oklahoma on the development of new IV-VI semiconductor (lead salt) epitaxial growth and laser fabrication procedures that can ultimately lead to dramatic increases in mid-IR laser operating temperatures. Work has focused on growth of IV-VI semiconductor laser structures on silicon substrates using buffer layers that contain BaF2. Recent experiments show that it is possible to obtain high crystalline quality IV-VI semiconductor layer structures on (111)-oriented silicon substrates using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) or on (100)-oriented silicon using a combination of MBE and liquid phase epitaxy (LPE). Experimental data for IV-VI semiconductor layer structures grown on silicon substrates including crystalline quality information as determined by high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) measurements and absorption edge information as determined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) transmission measurements are presented. Results show that these materials can be used to fabricate lasers that cover the 3 microns (3333 cm-1) to 16 microns (625 cm-1) spectral range. Removal of IV-VI semiconductor laser structures from the silicon growth substrate by dissolving BaF2 buffer layers with water is also demonstrated. This allows epitaxially-grown laser structures to be sandwiched between two heat sinks with a minimum of thermally resistive IV-VI semiconductor material. Theoretical modeling predicts that IV-VI lasers fabricated this way will have maximum continuous wave (cw) operating temperatures at least 60 degrees higher than those of IV-VI lasers fabricated on PbSe or PbTe substrates.

  13. Enhancing trichloroethylene degradation using non-aromatic compounds as growth substrates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungjin; Hwang, Jeongmin; Chung, Jinwook; Bae, Wookeun

    2014-06-30

    The effect of non-aromatic compounds on the trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation of toluene-oxidizing bacteria were evaluated using Burkholderia cepacia G4 that expresses toluene 2-monooxygenase and Pseudomonas putida that expresses toluene dioxygenase. TCE degradation rates for B. cepacia G4 and P. putida with toluene alone as growth substrate were 0.144 and 0.123 μg-TCE/mg-protein h, respectively. When glucose, acetate and ethanol were fed as additional growth substrates, those values increased up to 0.196, 0.418 and 0.530 μg-TCE/mg-protein h, respectively for B. cepacia G4 and 0.319, 0.219 and 0.373 μg-TCE/mg-protein h, respectively for P. putida. In particular, the addition of ethanol resulted in a high TCE degradation rate regardless of the initial concentration. The use of a non-aromatic compound as an additional substrate probably enhanced the TCE degradation because of the additional supply of NADH that is consumed in co-metabolic degradation of TCE. Also, it is expected that the addition of a non-aromatic substrate can reduce the necessary dose of toluene and, subsequently, minimize the potential competitive inhibition upon TCE co-metabolism by toluene.

  14. Polarity Effects of Substrate Surface in Epitaxial ZnO Film Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Harris, M. T.; Callahan, M. J.; George, M. A.; McCarty, P.

    1999-01-01

    Epitaxial ZnO films were grown on the two polar surfaces (0-face and Zn-face) of (0001) ZnO single crystal substrates using off-axis magnetron sputtering deposition. As a comparison, films are also deposited on the (000 I) Al203 substrates. It is found that the two polar surfaces have different photoluminescence (PL) spectrum, surface structure and morphology, which are strongly inference the epitaxial film growth. The morphology and structure of epitaxial films on the ZnO substrates are different from the film on the Al203 substrates. An interesting result shows that high temperature annealing of ZnO single crystals will improve the surface structure on the O-face surface rather than the opposite Surface. The measurements of PL, low-angle incident x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy of ZnO films indicate that the O-terminated surface is better for ZnO epitaxial film growth using reactive sputtering deposition.

  15. Dracaena marginata biofilter: design of growth substrate and treatment of stormwater runoff.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Praveen, R S

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the efficiency of Dracaena marginata planted biofilters to decontaminate urban runoff. A new biofilter growth substrate was prepared using low-cost and locally available materials such as red soil, fine sand, perlite, vermiculite, coco-peat and Sargassum biomass. The performance of biofilter substrate was compared with local garden soil based on physical and water quality parameters. Preliminary analyses indicated that biofilter substrate exhibited desirable characteristics such as low bulk density (1140 kg/m(3)), high water holding capacity (59.6%), air-filled porosity (7.82%) and hydraulic conductivity (965 mm/h). Four different biofilter assemblies, with vegetated and non-vegetated systems, were examined for several artificial rain events (un-spiked and metal-spiked). Results from un-spiked artificial rain events suggested that concentrations of most of the chemical components in effluent were highest at the beginning of rain events and thereafter subsided during the subsequent rain events. Biofilter growth substrate showed superior potential over garden soil to retain metal ions such as Al, Fe, Cu, Cr, Ni, Zn, Cd and Pb during metal-spiked rain events. Significant differences were also observed between non-vegetated and vegetated biofilter assemblies in runoff quality, with the latter producing better results.

  16. Manganese induced changes in growth, chlorophyll content and antioxidants activity in seedlings of broad bean (Vicia faba L.).

    PubMed

    Arya, Shashi K; Roy, B K

    2011-11-01

    The effect of manganese (Mn) on broad bean (Vicia faba L.) was studied with regard to growth, Mn accumulation in root and shoot, chlorophyll, proline content and peroxidase activity. Seeds were treated with Mn (10, 20, 40, 80,120,160 microM) and grown hydroponically up to 15 days. Manganese level in both root and shoot increased progressively in response to increasing concentration and it was high in roots (13 fold) overthe shoots (8 fold). The reductions in root (52%) and shoot (62.92%) development were evident for the maximum Mn concentration (160 microM). The chlorophyll amount gradually declined with increasing Mn concentrations and attained its maximum (42%) at 160 microM. By contrast, the guaiacol peroxidase activity was high (71%) along with the accompanying rise in proline content (75%) in shoots of the highest Mn concentration (160 microM). However, there was about 2 fold increase in total glutathione content at 40 microM than the basal level and further declined to 21.65 microg g(-1) fresh wt. at 160 microM Mn. The alterations in overall reflected Mn concentration-dependent changes in the parameters studied. The results suggest thatthe plant Vicia faba L. copes with Mn exposure through enhanced production of antioxidants.

  17. MOCVD Growth of III-V Photodetectors and Light Emitters for Integration of Optoelectronic Devices on Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Yu

    With the increase of clock speed and wiring density in integrated circuits, inter-chip and intra-chip interconnects through conventional electrical wires encounter increasing difficulties because of the large power loss and bandwidth limitation. Optical interconnects have been proposed as an alternative to copper-based interconnects and are under intense study due to their large data capacity, high data quality and low power consumption. III-V compound semiconductors offer high intrinsic electron mobility, small effective electron mass and direct bandgap, which make this material system advantageous for high-speed optoelectronic devices. The integration of III-V optoelectronic devices on Si substrates will provide the combined advantage of a high level of integration and large volume production of Si-based electronic circuitry with the superior electrical and optical performance of III-V components, paving the way to a new generation of hybrid integrated circuits. In this thesis, the direct heteroepitaxy of photodetectors (PDs) and light emitters using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition for the integration of photonic devices on Si substrates were studied. First we studied the selective-area growth of InP/GaAs on patterned Si substrates for PDs. To overcome the loading effect, a multi-temperature composite growth technique for GaAs was developed. By decreasing various defects such as dislocations and anti-phase domains, the GaAs and InP buffer layers are with good crystalline quality and the PDs show high speed and low dark current performance both at the edge and center of the large growth well. Then the growth and fabrication of GaAs/AlGaAs QW lasers were studied. Ellipsometry was used to calibrate the Al composition of AlGaAs. Thick p and n type AlGaAs with a mirrorlike surface were grown by high V/III ratio and high temperature. The GaAs/AlGaAs broad area QW laser was successfully grown and fabricated on GaAs substrate and showed a pulsed lasing result

  18. CONTROLLED GROWTH OF CARBON NANOTUBES ON CONDUCTIVE METAL SUBSTRATES FOR ENERGY STORAGE APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.; Engtrakul, C.

    2009-01-01

    The impressive mechanical and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them ideally suited for use in a variety of nanostructured devices, especially in the realm of energy production and storage. In particular, vertically-aligned CNT “forests” have been the focus of increasing investigation for use in supercapacitor electrodes and as hydrogen adsorption substrates. Vertically-aligned CNT growth was attempted on metal substrates by waterassisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). CNT growth was catalyzed by iron-molybdenum (FeMo) nanoparticle catalysts synthesized by a colloidal method, which were then spin-coated onto Inconel® foils. The substrates were loaded into a custom-built CVD apparatus, where CNT growth was initiated by heating the substrates to 750 °C under the fl ow of He, H2, C2H4 and a controlled amount of water vapor. The resultant CNTs were characterized by a variety of methods including Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the growth parameters were varied in an attempt to optimize the purity and growth yield of the CNTs. The surface area and hydrogen adsorption characteristics of the CNTs were quantifi ed by the Brunauer- Emmett-Teller (BET) and Sieverts methods, and their capacitance was measured via cyclic voltammetry. While vertically-aligned CNT growth could not be verifi ed, TEM and SEM analysis indicated that CNT growth was still obtained, resulting in multiwalled CNTs of a wide range in diameter along with some amorphous carbon impurities. These microscopy fi ndings were reinforced by Raman spectroscopy, which resulted in a G/D ratio ranging from 1.5 to 3 across different samples, suggestive of multiwalled CNTs. Changes in gas fl ow rates and water concentration during CNT growth were not found to have a discernable effect on the purity of the CNTs. The specifi c capacitance of a CNT/FeMo/Inconel® electrode was found to be 3.2 F/g, and the BET surface area of

  19. Metal catalyst for low-temperature growth of controlled zinc oxide nanowires on arbitrary substrates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Baek Hyun; Kwon, Jae W

    2014-03-14

    Zinc oxide nanowires generated by hydrothermal method present superior physical and chemical characteristics. Quality control of the growth has been very challenging and controlled growth is only achievable under very limited conditions using homogeneous seed layers with high temperature processes. Here we show the controlled ZnO nanowire growth on various organic and inorganic materials without the requirement of a homogeneous seed layer and a high temperature process. We also report the discovery of an important role of the electronegativity in the nanowire growth on arbitrary substrates. Using heterogeneous metal oxide interlayers with low-temperature hydrothermal methods, we demonstrate well-controlled ZnO nanowire arrays and single nanowires on flat or curved surfaces. A metal catalyst and heterogeneous metal oxide interlayers are found to determine lattice-match with ZnO and to largely influence the controlled alignment. These findings will contribute to the development of novel nanodevices using controlled nanowires.

  20. Metal Catalyst for Low-Temperature Growth of Controlled Zinc Oxide Nanowires on Arbitrary Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Baek Hyun; Kwon, Jae W.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanowires generated by hydrothermal method present superior physical and chemical characteristics. Quality control of the growth has been very challenging and controlled growth is only achievable under very limited conditions using homogeneous seed layers with high temperature processes. Here we show the controlled ZnO nanowire growth on various organic and inorganic materials without the requirement of a homogeneous seed layer and a high temperature process. We also report the discovery of an important role of the electronegativity in the nanowire growth on arbitrary substrates. Using heterogeneous metal oxide interlayers with low-temperature hydrothermal methods, we demonstrate well-controlled ZnO nanowire arrays and single nanowires on flat or curved surfaces. A metal catalyst and heterogeneous metal oxide interlayers are found to determine lattice-match with ZnO and to largely influence the controlled alignment. These findings will contribute to the development of novel nanodevices using controlled nanowires. PMID:24625584

  1. A growth kinetic model of Kluyveromyces marxianus cultures on cheese whey as substrate.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Luís G S; Luvizetto, Débora J; Ferreira, Luciane S; Rech, Rosane; Ayub, Marco A Z; Secchi, Argimiro R

    2004-01-01

    This work presents a multi-route, non-structured kinetic model for determination of microbial growth and substrate consumption in an experimental batch bioreactor in which beta-galactosidase is produced by Kluyveromyces marxianus growing on cheese whey. The main metabolic routes for lactose, and oxygen consumption, cell growth, and ethanol production are derived based on experimental data. When these individual rates are combined into a single growth rate, by rewriting the model equations, the model re-interpretation has a complexity similar to that of the usual variations of the Monod kinetic model, available in the literature. Furthermore, the proposed model is in good agreement with the experimental data for different growth temperatures, being acceptable for dynamic simulations, processes optimization, and implementations of model-based control technologies.

  2. Engineering the Activity and Lifetime of Heterogeneous Catalysts for Carbon Nanotube Growth via Substrate Ion Beam Bombardment (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-31

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2014-0159 ENGINEERING THE ACTIVITY AND LIFETIME OF HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSTS FOR CARBON NANOTUBE GROWTH VIA SUBSTRATE ION BEAM...July 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ENGINEERING THE ACTIVITY AND LIFETIME OF HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSTS FOR CARBON NANOTUBE GROWTH VIA SUBSTRATE ION BEAM...the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes from iron catalysts with a density, height, and quality equivalent to those grown on conventional

  3. Sub-surface alloying largely influences graphene nucleation and growth over transition metal substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liying; Zhao, Xingju; Xue, Xinlian; Shi, Jinlei; Li, Chong; Ren, Xiaoyan; Niu, Chunyao; Jia, Yu; Guo, Zhengxiao; Li, Shunfang

    2015-11-11

    Sub-surface alloying (SSA) can be an effective approach to tuning surface functionalities. Focusing on Rh(111) as a typical substrate for graphene nucleation, we show strong modulation by SSA atoms of both the energetics and kinetics of graphene nucleation simulated by first-principles calculations. Counter-intuitively, when the sub-surface atoms are replaced by more active solute metal elements to the left of Rh in the periodic table, such as the early transition metals (TMs), Ru and Tc, the binding between a C atom and the substrate is weakened and two C atoms favor dimerization. Alternatively, when the alloying elements are the late TMs to the right of Rh, such as the relatively inert Pd and Ag, the repulsion between the two C atoms is enhanced. Such distinct results can be well addressed by the delicately modulated activities of the surface host atoms in the framework of the d-band theory. More specifically, we establish a very simple selection rule for optimizing the metal substrate for high quality graphene growth: the introduction of an early (late) solute TM in the SSA lowers (raises) the d-band center and the activity of the top-most host metal atoms, weakening (strengthening) the C-substrate binding, meanwhile both energetically and kinetically facilitating (hindering) the graphene nucleation, and simultaneously promoting (suppressing) the orientation disordering the graphene domains. Importantly, our preliminary theoretical results also show that such a simple rule is also proposed to be operative for graphene growth on the widely invoked Cu(111) catalytic substrate.

  4. MBE Growth and Transfer of HgCdTe Epitaxial Films from InSb Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lyon, T. J.; Rajavel, R. D.; Nosho, B. Z.; Terterian, S.; Beliciu, M. L.; Patterson, P. R.; Chang, D. T.; Boag-O'Brien, M. F.; Holden, B. T.; Jacobs, R. N.; Benson, J. D.

    2010-07-01

    An investigation of the heteroepitaxial growth of HgCdTe films onto InSb(211)B substrates is reported. High-quality HgCdTe(211)B single-crystal films have been successfully deposited onto InSb(211)B substrates and have been characterized with x-ray diffraction rocking curve analysis, etch pit density analysis, and surface void defect mapping. X-ray rocking curve (422) reflection full-width at half-maximum of 60 arcsec has been obtained for 7- μm-thick x = 0.22 HgCdTe epitaxial films, and etch pit densities of 3 × 106 cm-2 to 3 × 107 cm-2 have been observed. A significant reduction in HgCdTe void defect densities to 100 cm-2 to 200 cm-2 has been observed on InSb, including a complete absence of large “void cluster” defects that are often observed for growth on CdZnTe. Wafer bow induced by the growth of HgCdTe on InSb is less than 1 μm for 2-inch-diameter substrates. Significant diffusion of In into HgCdTe is observed for HgCdTe/InSb wafers that are subjected to Hg anneals at 250°C to 300°C. A preliminary investigation of the transfer of HgCdTe films from InSb onto Si substrates has also been undertaken, using an adhesive wafer bonding approach evaluated with scanning acoustic microscopy. The infrared transmission characteristics of the bonding adhesive have been investigated with respect to postgrowth annealing procedures to establish the compatibility of the bonding approach with HgCdTe device processing and detector operation.

  5. Growth and characterization of CdTe and CdZnTe crystals for substrate application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, Moshe; Zilber, Raphael; Shusterman, Sergy; Goldgirsh, Alex; Zontag, Itzhak

    2003-01-01

    During the last decade we have investigated the synthesis, growth and characterization of CdTe and CdZnTe semiconductor compounds. As a result, substrate crystals, suitable for mercury cadmium telluride thin film growth are prepared. The emphasis will be given to the investigation of the thermal regime during growth, reflected at the solid liquid interface shape and its influence on the crystalline quality. Seeded and unseeded growth experiments are compared in terms of structural crystalline quality. Seeded and unseeded growth experiments are compared in terms of structural crystalline perfection as well as single crystal yield. The effect of thermal annealing on IR transmittance, precipitates and inclusions will be discussed in detail. Moreover, we will show the recent new trends for simulation of crystal growth processes by CRYSVUN software as well as practical implementation of calculated data for the grwoth of II-VI crystals. Preliminary study on the vapor phase control during growth and crystal cooling procedures will also be discussed.

  6. Growth and wetting of water droplet condensed between micron-sized particles and substrate

    PubMed Central

    Quang, Tran Si Bui; Leong, Fong Yew; An, Hongjie; Tan, Beng Hau; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    We study heterogeneous condensation growth of water droplets on micron-sized particles resting on a level substrate. Through numerical simulations on equilibrium droplet profiles, we find multiple wetting states towards complete wetting of the particle. Specifically, a partially wetting droplet could undergo a spontaneous transition to complete wetting during condensation growth, for contact angles above a threshold minimum. In addition, we find a competitive wetting behavior between the particle and the substrate, and interestingly, a reversal of the wetting dependence on contact angles during late stages of droplet growth. Using quasi-steady assumption, we simulate a growing droplet under a constant condensation flux, and the results are in good agreement with our experimental observations. As a geometric approximation for particle clusters, we propose and validate a pancake model, and with it, show that a particle cluster has greater wetting tendency compared to a single particle. Together, our results indicate a strong interplay between contact angle, capillarity and geometry during condensation growth. PMID:27487977

  7. Oligosaccharides Released from Milk Glycoproteins Are Selective Growth Substrates for Infant-Associated Bifidobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Karav, Sercan; Le Parc, Annabelle; Leite Nobrega de Moura Bell, Juliana Maria; Frese, Steven A.; Kirmiz, Nina; Block, David E.; Barile, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Milk, in addition to nourishing the neonate, provides a range of complex glycans whose construction ensures a specific enrichment of key members of the gut microbiota in the nursing infant, a consortium known as the milk-oriented microbiome. Milk glycoproteins are thought to function similarly, as specific growth substrates for bifidobacteria common to the breast-fed infant gut. Recently, a cell wall-associated endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (EndoBI-1) found in various infant-borne bifidobacteria was shown to remove a range of intact N-linked glycans. We hypothesized that these released oligosaccharide structures can serve as a sole source for the selective growth of bifidobacteria. We demonstrated that EndoBI-1 released N-glycans from concentrated bovine colostrum at the pilot scale. EndoBI-1-released N-glycans supported the rapid growth of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis), a species that grows well on human milk oligosaccharides, but did not support growth of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B. lactis), a species which does not. Conversely, B. infantis ATCC 15697 did not grow on the deglycosylated milk protein fraction, clearly demonstrating that the glycan portion of milk glycoproteins provided the key substrate for growth. Mass spectrometry-based profiling revealed that B. infantis consumed 73% of neutral and 92% of sialylated N-glycans, while B. lactis degraded only 11% of neutral and virtually no (<1%) sialylated N-glycans. These results provide mechanistic support that N-linked glycoproteins from milk serve as selective substrates for the enrichment of infant-associated bifidobacteria capable of carrying out the initial deglycosylation. Moreover, released N-glycans were better growth substrates than the intact milk glycoproteins, suggesting that EndoBI-1 cleavage is a key initial step in consumption of glycoproteins. Finally, the variety of N-glycans released from bovine milk glycoproteins suggests that they may serve as

  8. Substrate-induced growth and isolation of Acidobacteria from acidic Sphagnum peat.

    PubMed

    Pankratov, Timofei A; Serkebaeva, Yulia M; Kulichevskaya, Irina S; Liesack, Werner; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2008-05-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was applied to estimate the population size of the poorly characterized phylum Acidobacteria in acidic peat sampled from nine different Sphagnum-dominated wetlands of Northern Russia. The cell numbers of these bacteria in oxic peat layers ranged from 0.4 x 10(6) to 1.3 x 10(7) cells per g of wet peat, comprising up to 4% of total bacterial cells. Substrate-induced growth of acidobacteria was observed after amendment of peat samples with glucose, pectin, xylan, starch, ethanol and methanol, while weak or no response was obtained for acetate, pyruvate, mannitol and cellobiose. Using low-nutrient media and FISH-mediated monitoring of the isolation procedure, we succeeded in obtaining nine strains of acidobacteria in pure cultures. These strains belonged to subdivisions 1 and 3 of the Acidobacteria and represented strictly aerobic, heterotrophic organisms. Except for methanol, the substrate utilization patterns of these isolates matched the results obtained in our substrate-amendment experiments with native peat. All strains were also capable of utilizing galacturonic acid, a characteristic component of the cell wall in Sphagnum spp, which is released during moss decomposition. Most isolates from subdivision 1 were truly acidophilic organisms with the growth optimum at pH 3.5-4.5, while the isolates from subdivision 3 grew optimally at pH 5.5-6.5. Another important phenotypic trait of novel strains was their capability of active growth at low temperatures. Both acidophily and low-temperature growth are consistent with the occurrence of acidobacteria in cold and acidic northern wetlands.

  9. Growth of carbon nanotubes on fully processed silicon-on-insulator CMOS substrates.

    PubMed

    Haque, M Samiul; Ali, S Zeeshan; Guha, P K; Oei, S P; Park, J; Maeng, S; Teo, K B K; Udrea, F; Milne, W I

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes the growth of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) both aligned and non-aligned on fully processed CMOS substrates containing high temperature tungsten metallization. While the growth method has been demonstrated in fabricating CNT gas sensitive layers for high temperatures SOI CMOS sensors, it can be employed in a variety of applications which require the use of CNTs or other nanomaterials with CMOS electronics. In our experiments we have grown CNTs both on SOI CMOS substrates and SOI CMOS microhotplates (suspended on membranes formed by post-CMOS deep RIE etching). The fully processed SOI substrates contain CMOS devices and circuits and additionally, some wafers contained high current LDMOSFETs and bipolar structures such as Lateral Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors. All these devices were used as test structures to investigate the effect of additional post-CMOS processing such as CNT growth, membrane formation, high temperature annealing, etc. Electrical characterisation of the devices with CNTs were performed along with SEM and Raman spectroscopy. The CNTs were grown both at low and high temperatures, the former being compatible with Aluminium metallization while the latter being possible through the use of the high temperature CMOS metallization (Tungsten). In both cases we have found that there is no change in the electrical behaviour of the CMOS devices, circuits or the high current devices. A slight degradation of the thermal performance of the CMOS microhotplates was observed due to the extra heat dissipation path created by the CNT layers, but this is expected as CNTs exhibit a high thermal conductance. In addition we also observed that in the case of high temperature CNT growth a slight degradation in the manufacturing yield was observed. This is especially the case where large area membranes with a diameter in excess of 500 microns are used.

  10. Growth and yield performance of Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. Fr.) Kumm (oyster mushroom) on different substrates.

    PubMed

    Girmay, Zenebe; Gorems, Weldesemayat; Birhanu, Getachew; Zewdie, Solomon

    2016-12-01

    Mushroom cultivation is reported as an economically viable bio-technology process for conversion of various lignocellulosic wastes. Given the lack of technology know-how on the cultivation of mushroom, this study was conducted in Wondo Genet College of Forestry and Natural Resource, with the aim to assess the suitability of selected substrates (agricultural and/or forest wastes) for oyster mushroom cultivation. Accordingly, four substrates (cotton seed, paper waste, wheat straw, and sawdust) were tested for their efficacy in oyster mushroom production. Pure culture of oyster mushroom was obtained from Mycology laboratory, Department of Plant Biology and Biodiversity Management, Addis Ababa University. The pure culture was inoculated on potato dextrose agar for spawn preparation. Then, the spawn containing sorghum was inoculated with the fungal culture for the formation of fruiting bodies on the agricultural wastes. The oyster mushroom cultivation was undertaken under aseptic conditions, and the growth and development of mushroom were monitored daily. Results of the study revealed that oyster mushroom can grow on cotton seed, paper waste, sawdust and wheat straw, with varying growth performances. The highest biological and economic yield, as well as the highest percentage of biological efficiency of oyster mushroom was obtained from cotton seed, while the least was from sawdust. The study recommends cotton seed, followed by paper waste as suitable substrates for the cultivation of oyster mushroom. It also suggests that there is a need for further investigation on various aspects of oyster mushroom cultivation in Ethiopia to promote the industry.

  11. Ni nanoparticle catalyzed growth of MWCNTs on Cu NPs @ a-C:H substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodselahi, T.; Solaymani, S.; Akbarzadeh Pasha, M.; Vesaghi, M. A.

    2012-11-01

    NiCu NPs @ a-C:H thin films with different Cu content were prepared by co-deposition by RF-sputtering and RF-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) from acetylene gas and Cu and Ni targets. The prepared samples were used as catalysts for growing multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) from liquid petroleum gas (LPG) at 825 °C by thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD). By addition of Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer as substrate for Ni NPs catalyst, the density of the grown CNTs is greatly enhanced in comparison to bare Si substrate. Furthermore the average diameter of the grown CNTs decreases by decreasing of Cu content of Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer. However Cu NPs @ a-C:H by itself has no catalytic property in MWCNTs growth. Morphology and electrical and optical properties of Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer is affected by Cu content and each of them is effective parameter on growth of MWCNTs based on Ni NPs catalyst. Moreover, adding of a low amount of Ni NPs doesn't vary optical, electrical and morphology properties of Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer but it has a profound effect on its catalytic activity. Finally the density and diameter of MWCNTs can be optimized by selection of the Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer as substrate of Ni NPs.

  12. Effects of substrate rotation in oblique-incidence metal(100) epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Yunsic; Mills, Mary E.; Borovikov, Valery; Amar, Jacques G.

    2009-05-01

    The effects of substrate rotation on the surface morphology in oblique-incidence metal(100) epitaxial growth are studied via kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of a simplified model, and compared with previous results obtained without rotation. In general, we find that substrate rotation leads to two main effects. At high deposition angles with respect to the substrate normal, rotation leads to a significant change in the surface morphology. In particular, it leads to isotropic mounds and pyramids with (111) facets rather than the anisotropic ripples and rods observed in the absence of rotation. Due to the existence of rapid transport on these facets, the lateral feature size increases approximately linearly with film thickness. Due to the fact that substrate rotation tends to reduce the effects of shadowing, the surface roughness is also decreased compared to the roughness in the absence of rotation. While this leads to a moderate reduction in the roughness for the case of ballistic deposition, the effect is significantly larger in the case of deposition with attraction. In the case of ballistic deposition, we also find that the surface roughness increases with rotation rate Ω for Ω<1 rev/monolayer (ML) before saturating at larger rotation rates ( Ω>1 rev/ML). In contrast, for the case of attraction the surface roughness exhibits a negligible dependence on rotation rate for finite rotation rate.

  13. The relative importance of exogenous and substrate-derived nitrogen for microbial growth during leaf decomposition.

    PubMed

    Cheever, B M; Webster, J R; Bilger, E E; Thomas, S A

    2013-07-01

    Heterotrophic microbes colonizing detritus obtain nitrogen (N) for growth by assimilating N from their substrate or immobilizing exogenous inorganic N. Microbial use of these two pools has different implications for N cycling and organic matter decomposition in the face of the global increase in biologically available N. We used sugar maple leaves labeled with 15N to differentiate between microbial N that had been assimilated from the leaf substrate (enriched with 15N) or immobilized from the water (natural abundance 15N:14N) in five Appalachian streams ranging in ambient NO3(-)N concentrations from about 5 to 900 microg NO3(-)N/L. Ambient NO3(-) concentration increased sugar maple decomposition rate but did not influence the proportion of microbial N derived from substrate or exogenous pools. Instead, these proportions were strongly influenced by the percentage of detrital ash-free dry mass (AFDM) remaining. Substrate-derived N made up a large proportion of the microbial N after the first 24 h in all streams. Detrital and microbial isotopic 15N signatures approached that of the water as decomposition progressed in all streams, suggesting that exogenous N may be the predominant source of N for meeting microbial requirements even when exogenous N concentrations are low. Our results support predictions of more rapid decomposition of organic matter in response to increased N availability and highlight the tight coupling of processes driving microbial N cycling and organic matter decomposition.

  14. Modeling the utilization of starch by activated sludge for simultaneous substrate storage and microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Ozlem; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Orhon, Derin

    2006-05-05

    This paper presents a mechanistic model incorporating microbial growth on external substrate with simultaneous formation of storage biopolymers (activated sludge model for growth and storage-ASMGS) for the utilization of starch by activated sludge. Model description and calibration utilized experimental data of an SBR fed with particulate native potato starch (NPS) and soluble starch (SolS) selected as model substrates. The fate of starch was monitored in a cycle together with glycogen and oxygen uptake rate (OUR) profiles. In the experiments, glycogen formation was significantly lower than predicted by total conversion of starch to glycogen, justifying the need to account for primary growth on starch. The proposed model basically modified Activated Sludge Model No.3 (ASM3), to include adsorption of starch, its hydrolysis and simultaneous growth and glycogen formation using the hydrolysis products, which was mainly maltose. Model simulations indicated hydrolysis of the adsorbed starch as the rate limiting process. The proposed model calibrated well the fate of all major model components, namely, starch, glycogen, and OUR. Particulate NPS and SolS were hydrolyzed with similar rates; however, primary and secondary growth processes on SolS were more efficient, with higher yields, due to the more easily utilizable products of SolS, both in terms of extracellular hydrolysis and of stored poly-glucose. Modeling with ASM3, assuming starch as either readily or slowly biodegradable, did not provide an equally acceptable fit for the glycogen and OUR curves; supporting the need to consider primary growth together with storage as defined in the proposed model.

  15. Transhydrogenase and Growth Substrate Influence Lipid Hydrogen Isotope Ratios in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Flynn, Theodore M.; Suess, Melanie K.; Bradley, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fatty acids preserve metabolic and environmental information in their hydrogen isotope ratios (2H/1H). This ratio is influenced by parameters that include the 2H/1H of water in the microbial growth environment, and biosynthetic fractionations between water and lipid. In some microbes, this biosynthetic fractionation has been shown to vary systematically with central energy metabolism, and controls on fatty acid 2H/1H may be linked to the intracellular production of NADPH. We examined the apparent fractionation between media water and the fatty acids produced by Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Growth was in batch culture with malate as an electron donor for sulfate respiration, and with pyruvate and fumarate as substrates for fermentation and for sulfate respiration. A larger fractionation was observed as a consequence of respiratory or fermentative growth on pyruvate than growth on fumarate or malate. This difference correlates with opposite apparent flows of electrons through the electron bifurcating/confurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB. When grown on malate or fumarate, mutant strains of D. alaskensis G20 containing transposon disruptions in a copy of nfnAB show different fractionations than the wild type strain. This phenotype is muted during fermentative growth on pyruvate, and it is absent when pyruvate is a substrate for sulfate reduction. All strains and conditions produced similar fatty acid profiles, and the 2H/1H of individual lipids changed in concert with the mass-weighted average. Unsaturated fatty acids were generally depleted in 2H relative to their saturated homologs, and anteiso-branched fatty acids were generally depleted in 2H relative to straight-chain fatty acids. Fractionation correlated with growth rate, a pattern that has also been observed in the fractionation of sulfur isotopes during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by sulfate-reducing bacteria. PMID:27445998

  16. Dual inoculation with an Aarbuscular Mycorrhizal fungus and Rhizobium to facilitate the growth of alfalfa on coal mine substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, F.Y.; Bi, Y.L.; Wong, M.H.

    2009-07-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of Glomus mosseae and Rhizobium on Medicago sativa grown on three types of coal mine substrates, namely a mixture of coal wastes and sands (CS), coal wastes and fly ash (CF), and fly ash (FA). Inoculation with Rhizobium alone did not result in any growth response but G. mosseae alone displayed a significant effect on plant growth. G. mosseae markedly increased the survival rate of M. sativa in CS substrate. In CF and FA substrates the respective oven dry weights of M. sativa inoculated with G. mosseae were 1.8 and 5.1 times higher than those without inoculation. Based on nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) uptake and legume growth, the results also show that dual inoculation in CS and CF substrates elicited a synergistic effect. This indicates that inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi may be a promising approach for revegetation of coal mine substrates.

  17. Pressate from peat dewatering as a substrate for bacterial growth. [Rhizopus arrhizus; Xanthomonas campestris; Aureobasidium

    SciTech Connect

    Mulligan, C.N.; Cooper, D.G.

    1985-07-01

    This study considered the possibility of using water expressed during the drying of fuel-grade peat as a substrate for microbial growth. Highly humified peat pressed for 2.5 min at 1.96 MPa produced water with a chemical oxygen demand of 690 mg/liter. Several biological compounds could be produced by using the organic matter inexpressed peat water as a substrate. These included polymers such as chitosan, contained in the cell wall of Rhizopus arrhizus, and two extracellular polysaccharides, xanthan gum and pullulan, produced by Bacillus subtilis grown in the expressed water. Small additions of nutrients to the peat pressate were necessary to obtain substantial yields of products. The addition of peptone, yeast extract, and glucose improved production of the various compounds. Biological treatment improved the quality of the expressed water to the extent that in an industrial process it could be returned to the environment.

  18. Growth of oriented vanadium pentaoxide nanostructures on transparent conducting substrates and their applications in photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hongjiang; Gao, Yanfeng; Zhou, Jiadong; Liu, Xinling; Chen, Zhang; Cao, Chuanxiang; Luo, Hongjie; Kanehira, Minoru

    2014-06-01

    A novel, hydrothermal and hard-template-free method was developed for the first time to grow oriented, single-crystalline monoclinic VO{sub 2} (B) flower-like nanorod films on transparent conductive fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates. The length and morphology of the nanorods can be tuned by changing the growth parameters, such as growth time and initial precursor concentration. The flower-like V{sub 2}O{sub 5} films were obtained after post-calcination treatment of VO{sub 2} (B) films. The photocatalytic activity of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} films was investigated by the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under UV and visible light. The prepared V{sub 2}O{sub 5} film exhibited good photocatalytic performance (74.6% and 63% under UV and visible light for 210 min, respectively) and more practical application in industry. - Graphical abstract: Flower nanostructured vanadium oxide film was prepared by hydrothermal reaction for photocatalysis application. - Highlights: • Monoclinic VO{sub 2} nanorod array and flower-like nanostructure were directly grown on FTO substrate by hydrothermal reaction. • The growth mechanism was analyzed by FESEM at different time. • V{sub 2}O{sub 5} flower-like nanostructure film was obtained after calcining VO{sub 2} film. • V{sub 2}O{sub 5} film exhibited good light activity and potential application in photocatalysis.

  19. Influence of electron beam irradiation on growth of Phytophthora cinnamomi and its control in substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MigdaŁ, Wojciech; Orlikowski, Leszek B.; Ptaszek, Magdalena; Gryczka, Urszula

    2012-08-01

    Very extensive production procedure, especially in plants growing under covering, require methods, which would allow quick elimination or substantial reduction of populations of specific pathogens without affecting the growth and development of the cultivated plants. Among soil-borne pathogens, the Phytophthora species are especially dangerous for horticultural plants. In this study, irradiation with electron beam was applied to control Phytophthora cinnamomi. The influence of irradiation dose on the reduction of in vitro growth and the population density of the pathogen in treated peat and its mixture with composted pine bark (1:1), as well as the health of Chamaecyparis lawsoniana and Lavandula angustifolia plants were evaluated. Application of irradiation at a dose of 1.5 kGy completely inhibited the in vitro development of P. cinnamomi. This irradiation effect was connected with the disintegration of the hyphae and spores of the species. Irradiation of peat and its mixture with composted pine bark with 10 kGy resulted in the inhibition of stem base rot development in Ch. lawsoniana. Symptoms of the disease were not observed when the substrates were treated with 15 kGy. In the case of L. angustifolia, stem root rot was not observed on cuttings transplanted to infected peat irradiated at a dose of 10 kGy. Irradiation of the horticultural substrates did not affect plant growth.

  20. Rayleigh-Taylor instability under curved substrates: An optimal transient growth analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balestra, Gioele; Brun, P.-T.; Gallaire, François

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the stability of thin viscous films coated on the inside of a horizontal cylindrical substrate. In such a case, gravity acts both as a stabilizing force through the progressive drainage of the film and as a destabilizing force prone to form droplets via the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The drainage solution, derived from lubrication equations, is found asymptotically stable with respect to infinitesimally small perturbations, although in reality, droplets often form. To resolve this paradox, we perform an optimal transient growth analysis for the first-order perturbations of the liquid's interface, generalizing the results of Trinh et al. [Phys. Fluids 26, 051704 (2014), 10.1063/1.4876476]. We find that the system displays a linear transient growth potential that gives rise to two different scenarios depending on the value of the Bond number (prescribing the relative importance of gravity and surface tension forces). At low Bond numbers, the optimal perturbation of the interface does not generate droplets. In contrast, for higher Bond numbers, perturbations on the upper hemicircle yield gains large enough to potentially form droplets. The gain increases exponentially with the Bond number. In particular, depending on the amplitude of the initial perturbation, we find a critical Bond number above which the short-time linear growth is sufficient to trigger the nonlinear effects required to form dripping droplets. We conclude that the transition to droplets detaching from the substrate is noise and perturbation dependent.

  1. Growth of epitaxial silicon nanowires on a Si substrate by a metal-catalyst-free process

    PubMed Central

    Ishiyama, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Shuhei; Wakamatsu, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    The growth of epitaxial Si nanowires by a metal-catalyst-free process has been investigated as an alternative to the more common metal-catalyzed vapor–liquid–solid process. The well-aligned Si nanowires are successfully grown on a (111)-oriented Si substrate without any metal catalysts by a thermal treatment using silicon sulfide as a Si source at approximately 1200 °C. The needle-shaped Si nanowires, which have a core–shell structure that consists of a single-crystalline Si core along the <111> direction consistent with the substrate direction and a surface coating of silicon oxide, are grown by a metal-catalyst-free process. In this process, the silicon sulfide in the liquid phase facilitates the nucleation and nanowire growth. In contrast, oxygen-rich nanowires that consist of crystalline Si at the tip and lumpy silicon oxide on the body are observed in a sample grown at 1300 °C, which disturbs the epitaxial growth of Si nanowires. PMID:27465800

  2. Electric field stimulation through a biodegradable polypyrrole-co-polycaprolactone substrate enhances neural cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hieu T; Wei, Claudia; Chow, Jacqueline K; Nguyen, Alvin; Coursen, Jeff; Sapp, Shawn; Luebben, Silvia; Chang, Emily; Ross, Robert; Schmidt, Christine E

    2014-01-01

    Nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) are FDA-approved devices used to bridge gaps across severed nerve cables and help direct axons sprouting from the proximal end toward the distal stump. In this paper we present the development of a novel electrically conductive, biodegradable NGC made from a polypyrrole-block-polycaprolactone (PPy-PCL) copolymer material laminated with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The PPy-PCL has a bulk conductivity ranging 10–20 S/cm and loses 40 wt% after 7 months under physiologic conditions. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) grown on flat PPy-PCL/PLGA material exposed to direct current electric fields (EF) of 100 mV/cm for 2 h increased axon growth by 13% (± 2%) towards either electrode of a 2-electrode setup, compared to control grown on identical substrates without EF exposure. Alternating current increased axon growth by 21% (± 3%) without an observable directional preference, compared to the same control group. The results from this study demonstrate PLGA-coated PPy-PCL is a unique biodegradable material that can deliver substrate EF stimulation to improve axon growth for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:23964001

  3. Electric field stimulation through a biodegradable polypyrrole-co-polycaprolactone substrate enhances neural cell growth.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hieu T; Sapp, Shawn; Wei, Claudia; Chow, Jacqueline K; Nguyen, Alvin; Coursen, Jeff; Luebben, Silvia; Chang, Emily; Ross, Robert; Schmidt, Christine E

    2014-08-01

    Nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) are FDA-approved devices used to bridge gaps across severed nerve cables and help direct axons sprouting from the proximal end toward the distal stump. In this article, we present the development of a novel electrically conductive, biodegradable NGC made from a polypyrrole-block-polycaprolactone (PPy-PCL) copolymer material laminated with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The PPy-PCL has a bulk conductivity ranging 10-20 S/cm and loses 40 wt % after 7 months under physiologic conditions. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) grown on flat PPy-PCL/PLGA material exposed to direct current electric fields (EF) of 100 mV/cm for 2 h increased axon growth by 13% (± 2%) toward either electrode of a 2-electrode setup, compared with control grown on identical substrates without EF exposure. Alternating current increased axon growth by 21% (±3%) without an observable directional preference, compared with the same control group. The results from this study demonstrate PLGA-coated PPy-PCL is a unique biodegradable material that can deliver substrate EF stimulation to improve axon growth for peripheral nerve repair.

  4. Demonstrating benthic control of anomalous solute transport: biofilm growth interacts with substrate size.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubeneau, A. F.; Tank, J. L.; Bolster, D.; Hanrahan, B.

    2014-12-01

    In fluvial systems, biofilms are the main driver of biogeochemical transformations. Biofilms grow on most surfaces in the benthic and hyporheic regions, where they process waterborne solutes. These solutes are transported in the regional flow and their fluxes near the biofilms are controlled by local physical properties, such as head gradients and hydraulic conductivity. These properties are in turn influenced by the growth of the biofilm itself, which can clog porous media and/or develop its own network of porous space. Therefore, the residence time of a solute in proximity to biofilm surfaces, where it can be processed, should be influenced by the properties not only of the physical environment, but by that of the biofilm itself. We hypothesized that the presence of biofilms would increase residence times in the benthic and shallow subsurface regions of the stream bed. We performed controlled experiments in 4 experimental streams at Notre Dame's Linked Experimental Ecosystem Facility (ND-LEEF) to quantify the interaction between substrate and biofilm in controlling anomalous solute transport. Each stream at ND-LEEF had a different substrate configuration: 2 with homogeneous substrate but with different sizes (pea gravel vs. coarse gravel) and 2 with heterogeneous substrate (alternating sections vs. well-mixed reaches). We measured the evolution of the residence time distributions in the streams by injecting rhodamine tracer (RWT) multiple times over the course of a 5 month colonization gradient. Analysis of breakthrough curves demonstrated that in addition to the influence of substrate, biofilm colonization and growth significantly influenced the residence time in the system. Specifically, as biofilms grew, the power-law exponent of the RTD decreased, i.e. the tails of the distributions became heavier, suggesting prolonged retention due to the presence of the biofilms. Although the substrate signature persisted over time, with the coarser gravel bed washing out

  5. Compact laser molecular beam epitaxy system using laser heating of substrate for oxide film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, S.; Lippmaa, M.; Nakagawa, N.; Nagasawa, H.; Koinuma, H.; Kawasaki, M.

    1999-01-01

    A high-temperature, oxygen compatible, and compact laser molecular beam epitaxy (laser MBE) system has been developed. The 1.06 μm infrared light from a continuous wave neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser was used to achieve a wide range and rapid control of substrate temperature in ultrahigh vacuum and at up to 1 atm oxygen pressure. The maximum usable temperature was limited to 1453 °C by the melting point of the nickel sample holder. To our knowledge, this is the highest temperature reported for pulsed laser deposition of oxide films. The efficient laser heating combined with temperature monitoring by a pyrometer and feedback control of the Nd:YAG laser power by a personal computer made it possible to regulate the substrate temperature accurately and to achieve high sample heating and cooling rates. The oxygen pressure and ablation laser triggering were also controlled by the computer. The accurate growth parameter control was combined with real-time in situ surface structure monitoring by reflection high energy electron diffraction to investigate oxide thin film growth in detail over a wide range of temperatures, oxygen partial pressures, and deposition rates. We have demonstrated the performance of this system by the fabrication of homoepitaxial SrTiO3 films as well as heteroepitaxial Sr2RuO4, and SrRuO3 films on SrTiO3 substrates at temperatures of up to 1300 °C. This temperature was high enough to change the film growth mode from layer by layer to step flow.

  6. Modeling of microbial substrate conversion, growth and product formation in a recycling fermentor.

    PubMed

    van Verseveld, H W; de Hollander, J A; Frankena, J; Braster, M; Leeuwerik, F J; Stouthamer, A H

    1986-01-01

    Paracoccus denitrificans and Bacillus licheniformis were grown in a carbon- and energy source-limited recycling fermentor with 100% biomass feedback. Experimental data for biomass accumulation and product formation as well as rates of carbon dioxide evolution and oxygen consumption were used in a parameter optimization procedure. This procedure was applied on a model which describes biomass growth as a linear function of the substrate consumption rate and the rate of product formation as a linear function of the biomass growth rate. The fitting procedure yielded two growth domains for P. denitrificans. In the first domain the values for the maximal growth yield and the maintenance coefficient were identical to those found in a series of chemostat experiments. The second domain could be described best with linear biomass increase, which is equal to a constant growth yield. Experimental data of a protease producing B. licheniformis also yielded two growth domains via the fitting procedure. Again, in the first domain, maximal growth yield and maintenance requirements were not significantly different from those derived from a series of chemostat experiments. Domain 2 behaviour was different from that observed with P. denitrificans. Product formation halts and more glucose becomes available for biomass formation, and consequently the specific growth rate increases in the shift from domain 1 to 2. It is concluded that for many industrial production processes, it is important to select organisms on the basis of a low maintenance coefficient and a high basic production of the desired product. It seems less important that the maximal production becomes optimized, which is the basis of most selection procedures.

  7. Ordered growth of germanium hut islands on Si (001) molecular bonded substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poydenot, V.; Dujardin, R.; Rouvière, J. L.; Barski, A.; Fournel, F.

    2004-12-01

    Ordered germanium hut islands are grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on high twist angle molecular bonded silicon (001) substrates (twist angle higher than 20°). We show that the growth organization is induced by an array of interfacial tilt dislocations. Plan-view transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy observations show that the orientation and period of the tilt dislocation array determine the orientation, period, and length of elongated germanium hut islands. The strain field generated by an array of tilt dislocations is proposed as the driving force of the reported organization.

  8. Glycothermal Growth of Silver Core/TiO2 Shell Nano-Wires on FTO Substrate.

    PubMed

    Song, Duck-Hyun; Hirato, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Silver core/TiO2 shell nano-wires have been successfully prepared on fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass substrate via a glycothermal process assisted by a photochemical process. The morphology, diameter, length, and density of synthesized core/shell nano-wires could be varied by photochemical reaction time. The fabricated samples were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray. We suggested a mechanism to explain the growth of the silver core/TiO2 shell nano-wires.

  9. Au impact on GaAs epitaxial growth on GaAs (111)B substrates in molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zhi-Ming; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Sun, Wen; Zhang, Zhi; Yang, Lei; Chen, Ping-Ping; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2013-02-01

    GaAs growth behaviour under the presence of Au nanoparticles on GaAs {111}B substrate is investigated using electron microscopy. It has been found that, during annealing, enhanced Ga surface diffusion towards Au nanoparticles leads to the GaAs epitaxial growth into {113}B faceted triangular pyramids under Au nanoparticles, governed by the thermodynamic growth, while during conventional GaAs growth, growth kinetics dominates, resulting in the flatted triangular pyramids at high temperature and the epitaxial nanowires growth at relatively low temperature. This study provides an insight of Au nanoparticle impact on GaAs growth, which is critical for understanding the formation mechanisms of semiconductor nanowires.

  10. Peripheral Nervous System Genes Expressed in Central Neurons Induce Growth on Inhibitory Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Buchser, William J.; Smith, Robin P.; Pardinas, Jose R.; Haddox, Candace L.; Hutson, Thomas; Moon, Lawrence; Hoffman, Stanley R.; Bixby, John L.; Lemmon, Vance P.

    2012-01-01

    Trauma to the spinal cord and brain can result in irreparable loss of function. This failure of recovery is in part due to inhibition of axon regeneration by myelin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). Peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons exhibit increased regenerative ability compared to central nervous system neurons, even in the presence of inhibitory environments. Previously, we identified over a thousand genes differentially expressed in PNS neurons relative to CNS neurons. These genes represent intrinsic differences that may account for the PNS’s enhanced regenerative ability. Cerebellar neurons were transfected with cDNAs for each of these PNS genes to assess their ability to enhance neurite growth on inhibitory (CSPG) or permissive (laminin) substrates. Using high content analysis, we evaluated the phenotypic profile of each neuron to extract meaningful data for over 1100 genes. Several known growth associated proteins potentiated neurite growth on laminin. Most interestingly, novel genes were identified that promoted neurite growth on CSPGs (GPX3, EIF2B5, RBMX). Bioinformatic approaches also uncovered a number of novel gene families that altered neurite growth of CNS neurons. PMID:22701605

  11. Peripheral nervous system genes expressed in central neurons induce growth on inhibitory substrates.

    PubMed

    Buchser, William J; Smith, Robin P; Pardinas, Jose R; Haddox, Candace L; Hutson, Thomas; Moon, Lawrence; Hoffman, Stanley R; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2012-01-01

    Trauma to the spinal cord and brain can result in irreparable loss of function. This failure of recovery is in part due to inhibition of axon regeneration by myelin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). Peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons exhibit increased regenerative ability compared to central nervous system neurons, even in the presence of inhibitory environments. Previously, we identified over a thousand genes differentially expressed in PNS neurons relative to CNS neurons. These genes represent intrinsic differences that may account for the PNS's enhanced regenerative ability. Cerebellar neurons were transfected with cDNAs for each of these PNS genes to assess their ability to enhance neurite growth on inhibitory (CSPG) or permissive (laminin) substrates. Using high content analysis, we evaluated the phenotypic profile of each neuron to extract meaningful data for over 1100 genes. Several known growth associated proteins potentiated neurite growth on laminin. Most interestingly, novel genes were identified that promoted neurite growth on CSPGs (GPX3, EIF2B5, RBMX). Bioinformatic approaches also uncovered a number of novel gene families that altered neurite growth of CNS neurons.

  12. Low Temperature Metal Free Growth of Graphene on Insulating Substrates by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, R; Munuera, C; Martínez, J I; Azpeitia, J; Gómez-Aleixandre, C; García-Hernández, M

    2017-03-01

    Direct growth of graphene films on dielectric substrates (quartz and silica) is reported, by means of remote electron cyclotron resonance plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition r-(ECR-CVD) at low temperature (650°C). Using a two step deposition process- nucleation and growth- by changing the partial pressure of the gas precursors at constant temperature, mostly monolayer continuous films, with grain sizes up to 500 nm are grown, exhibiting transmittance larger than 92% and sheet resistance as low as 900 Ω·sq(-1). The grain size and nucleation density of the resulting graphene sheets can be controlled varying the deposition time and pressure. In additon, first-principles DFT-based calculations have been carried out in order to rationalize the oxygen reduction in the quartz surface experimentally observed. This method is easily scalable and avoids damaging and expensive transfer steps of graphene films, improving compatibility with current fabrication technologies.

  13. Growth of oriented vanadium pentaoxide nanostructures on transparent conducting substrates and their applications in photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongjiang; Gao, Yanfeng; Zhou, Jiadong; Liu, Xinling; Chen, Zhang; Cao, Chuanxiang; Luo, Hongjie; Kanehira, Minoru

    2014-06-01

    A novel, hydrothermal and hard-template-free method was developed for the first time to grow oriented, single-crystalline monoclinic VO2 (B) flower-like nanorod films on transparent conductive fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates. The length and morphology of the nanorods can be tuned by changing the growth parameters, such as growth time and initial precursor concentration. The flower-like V2O5 films were obtained after post-calcination treatment of VO2 (B) films. The photocatalytic activity of V2O5 films was investigated by the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under UV and visible light. The prepared V2O5 film exhibited good photocatalytic performance (74.6% and 63% under UV and visible light for 210 min, respectively) and more practical application in industry.

  14. Microbial uptake of radiolabeled substrates: estimates of growth rates from time course measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Li, W K

    1984-01-01

    The uptake of [3H]glucose and a mixture of 3H-labeled amino acids was measured, in time course fashion, in planktonic microbial assemblages of the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. The average generation times of those portions of the assemblages able to utilize these substrates were estimated from a simple exponential growth model. Other workers have independently used this model in its integrated or differential form. A mathematical verification and an experimental demonstration of the equivalence of the two approaches are presented. A study was made of the size distribution of heterotrophic activity, using time course measurements. It was found that the size distribution and the effect of sample filtration before radiolabeling were dependent on time of incubation. In principle, it was possible to ascribe these time dependences to differences in the specific growth rate and initial standing stock of the microbial assemblages. PMID:6696414

  15. Suitability of different growth substrates as source of nitrogen for sulfate reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dev, Subhabrata; Patra, Aditya Kumar; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2015-11-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) mediated treatment of acid mine drainage is considered as a globally accepted technology. However, inadequate information on the role of nitrogen source in the augmentation of SRB significantly affects the overall treatment process. Sustenance of SRB depends on suitable nitrogen source which is considered as an important nutrient. This review focuses on the different nitrogen rich growth substrates for their effectiveness to support SRB growth and sulfate reduction in passive bioreactors. Compounds like NH4Cl, NH4HCO3, NO3 (-), aniline, tri-nitrotoluene, cornsteep liquor, peptone, urea, and chitin are reported to have served as nitrogen source for SRB. In association with fermentative bacteria, SRB can metabolize these complex compounds to NH4 (+), amines, and amino acids. After incorporation into cells, these compounds take part in the biosynthesis of nucleic acids, amino acids and enzyme co-factor. This work describes the status of current and the probable directions of the future research.

  16. Low temperature metal free growth of graphene on insulating substrates by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, R.; Munuera, C.; Martínez, J. I.; Azpeitia, J.; Gómez-Aleixandre, C.; García-Hernández, M.

    2017-03-01

    Direct growth of graphene films on dielectric substrates (quartz and silica) is reported, by means of remote electron cyclotron resonance plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition r-(ECR-CVD) at low temperature (650 °C). Using a two step deposition process- nucleation and growth- by changing the partial pressure of the gas precursors at constant temperature, mostly monolayer continuous films, with grain sizes up to 500 nm are grown, exhibiting transmittance larger than 92% and sheet resistance as low as 900 Ω sq-1. The grain size and nucleation density of the resulting graphene sheets can be controlled varying the deposition time and pressure. In additon, first-principles DFT-based calculations have been carried out in order to rationalize the oxygen reduction in the quartz surface experimentally observed. This method is easily scalable and avoids damaging and expensive transfer steps of graphene films, improving compatibility with current fabrication technologies.

  17. Low Temperature Metal Free Growth of Graphene on Insulating Substrates by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, R.; Munuera, C.; Martínez, J. I.; Azpeitia, J.; Gómez-Aleixandre, C.; García-Hernández, M.

    2016-01-01

    Direct growth of graphene films on dielectric substrates (quartz and silica) is reported, by means of remote electron cyclotron resonance plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition r-(ECR-CVD) at low temperature (650°C). Using a two step deposition process- nucleation and growth- by changing the partial pressure of the gas precursors at constant temperature, mostly monolayer continuous films, with grain sizes up to 500 nm are grown, exhibiting transmittance larger than 92% and sheet resistance as low as 900 Ω·sq-1. The grain size and nucleation density of the resulting graphene sheets can be controlled varying the deposition time and pressure. In additon, first-principles DFT-based calculations have been carried out in order to rationalize the oxygen reduction in the quartz surface experimentally observed. This method is easily scalable and avoids damaging and expensive transfer steps of graphene films, improving compatibility with current fabrication technologies. PMID:28070341

  18. Metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaAs on patterned GaAs substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, D.; Asahi, H.; Liu, X. F.; Okuno, Y.; Inoue, K.; Gonda, S.; Shimomura, S.; Hiyamizu, S.

    1994-03-01

    GaAs layers were grown on etch-patterned (100) GaAs substrates by MOMBE (metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy) using TEGa (triethylgallium) and thermally cracked TEAs (triethylarsine). Morphology and orientation dependencies of the grown facets on the growth temperature (400-630°C) and V/III ratio (2-4) are investigated. Good morphology of grown layers was obtained on (111)A side facets at a low V/III ratio of 3 and low growth temperatures of 450-500°C. We also found strong evidence that the formation of facets is not only governed by the migration of Ga precursors and/or Ga atoms, but also by a preferential catalytic decomposition of Ga precursors on the facet edges.

  19. Self-catalyzed Growth of InAs Nanowires on InP Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bang; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2017-01-01

    We report on the self-catalyzed growth of InAs nanowires on InP substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. At a moderate V/III ratio, tapered nanowires are obtained, suggesting a strong surface diffusion effect. Dense twin faults are observed perpendicular to the nanowire growth direction due to the fluctuation of In atoms in the droplet originating from the surface diffusion effect. At a lower V/III ratio, the nanowires exhibit kinking, which is associated with a high adhesion due to a large sticking coefficient of TMIn. The twin faults are dramatically suppressed and even completely eliminated in the NW branch after kinking, which is attributed to a stable In supply with a negligible diffusion effect. This work provides a method for the fabrication of defect-free InAs nanowires.

  20. Hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanowires on flexible fabric substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Gwang-Wook; Yun, Sang-Ho; Kim, Joo-Hyung

    2016-04-01

    ZnO nanowires (NWs) would provide significant enhancement in sensitivity due to high surface to volume ratio. We investigated the first methodical study on the quantitative relationship between the process parameters of solution concentration ratio, structure, and physical and properties of ZnO NWs grown on different flexible fabric surfaces. To develop a fundamental following concerning various substrates, we controlled the growth speed of ZnO NWs and nanowires on cotton surface with easy and moderate cost fabrication method. Using ammonium hydroxide as the reactant with zinc nitrate hexahydrate, ZnO NWs layer have been grown on metal layers, instead of seed layer. ZnO NWs fabrication was done on different fabric substrates such as wool, nylon and polypropylene (PP). After the ZnO NWs grown to each substrates, we coated insulating layer with polyurethane (PU) and ethyl cellulose for prevent external intervention. Detailed electrical characterization was subsequently performed to reveal the working characteristics of the hybrid fabric. For electrical verification of fabricated ZnO NWs, we implemented measurement impact test and material properties with FFT analyzer and LCR meter.

  1. Interfacial modification of amorphous substrates for microcrystalline silicon growth with in situ hydrogen plasma pretreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young-Bae; Rhee, Shi-Woo; Li, Xiaodong

    2005-10-01

    Microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) films have been deposited onto hydrogenated and amorphous Si-rich silicon nitride and thermal oxide substrates with silane (SiH4)-hydrogen (H2) in remote plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RPECVD) at 250 °C, and these films have been investigated. It is found that in situ hydrogen plasma pretreatment of the amorphous substrates prior to μc-Si:H deposition is effective in reducing the interfacial amorphous transition region. It is believed that this hydrogen plasma pretreatment gives adsorption and nucleation sites by breaking weak Si-N and Si-Si bonds and also removes native Si-O x and hydrocarbon impurities. In the case of SiNx:H surface, surface roughening from atomic hydrogen etching and surface cleaning effects are greater than those for stable thermal oxide. Surface crystallization at the initial stage of the growth can be obtained on amorphous substrate at low temperature without an a-Si transition layer.

  2. Correlation between substrate bias, growth process and structural properties of phosphorus incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Aiping; Zhu, Jiaqi; Han, Jiecai; Wu, Huaping; Jia, Zechun

    2007-09-01

    We investigate the growth process and structural properties of phosphorus incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C:P) films which are deposited at different substrate biases by filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique with PH 3 as the dopant source. The films are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, residual stress measurement, UV/VIS/NIR absorption spectroscopy and temperature-dependent conductivity measurement. The atomic fraction of phosphorus in the films as a function of substrate bias is obtained by XPS analysis. The optimum bias for phosphorus incorporation is about -80 V. Raman spectra show that the amorphous structures of all samples with atomic-scaled smooth surface are not remarkably changed when PH 3 is implanted, but some small graphitic crystallites are formed. Moreover, phosphorus impurities and higher-energetic impinging ions are favorable for the clustering of sp 2 sites dispersed in sp 3 skeleton and increase the level of structural ordering for ta-C:P films, which further releases the compressive stress and enhances the conductivity of the films. Our analysis establishes an interrelationship between microstructure, stress state, electrical properties, and substrate bias, which helps to understand the deposition mechanism of ta-C:P films.

  3. Graphene growth at the interface between Ni catalyst layer and SiO2/Si substrate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Song, Kwan-Woo; Park, Min-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Yang, Cheol-Woong

    2011-07-01

    Graphene was synthesized deliberately at the interface between Ni film and SiO2/Si substrate as well as on top surface of Ni film using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which is suitable for large-scale and low-cost synthesis of graphene. The carbon atom injected at the top surface of Ni film can penetrate and reach to the Ni/SiO2 interface for the formation of graphene. Once we have the graphene in between Ni film and SiO2/Si substrate, the substrate spontaneously provides insulating SiO2 layer and we may easily get graphene/SiO2/Si structure simply by discarding Ni film. This growth of graphene at the interface can exclude graphene transfer step for electronic application. Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy show that graphene was successfully synthesized at the back of Ni film and the coverage of graphene varies with temperature and time of synthesis. The coverage of graphene at the interface depends on the amount of carbon atoms diffused into the back of Ni film.

  4. Growth and spectroscopic characterization of monolayer and few-layer hexagonal boron nitride on metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Boris N.; Bermudez, Victor M.; Hite, Jennifer K.; Robinson, Zachary R.; Wheeler, Virginia D.; Sridhara, Karthik; Hernández, Sandra C.

    2015-02-01

    Atomically thin two dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (2D h-BN) is one of the key materials in the development of new van der Waals heterostructures due to its outstanding properties including an atomically smooth surface, high thermal conductivity, high mechanical strength, chemical inertness and high electrical resistance. The development of 2D h-BN growth is still in the early stages and largely depends on rapid and accurate characterization of the grown monolayer or few layers h-BN films. This paper demonstrates a new approach to characterizing monolayer h-BN films directly on metal substrates by grazing-incidence infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). Using h-BN films grown by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition on Cu and Ni substrates, two new sub-bands are found for the A2u out-of-plane stretching mode. It is shown, using both experimental and computational methods, that the lower-energy sub-band is related to 2D h-BN coupled with substrate, while the higher energy sub-band is related to decoupled (or free-standing) 2D h-BN. It is further shown that this newly-observed fine structure in the A2u mode can be used to assess, quickly and easily, the homogeneity of the h-BN-metal interface and the effects of metal surface contamination on adhesion of the layer.

  5. Growth of nano hexagon-like flake arrays cerium carbonate created with PAH as the substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Hu, Y. H.; Liu, Z. G.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, M. T.

    2015-01-01

    Petals-like Ce2(CO3)3 on Ce2(CO3)3 nano hexagon-like flake arrays have been precipitatingly fabricated using PAH substrates. By changing the way of feeding, PAH concentration and aging time, petals-like Ce2(CO3)3 was created best when adding PAH into the Ce(NO3)3 solution, joined (NH4)2CO3 solution along with mixing, PAH concentration is 0.9 g/L, aging time is 4 h. A growth mechanism was proposed to account for the growth of the petals-like Ce2(CO3)3 with PAH as the substrate. Poly allylamine hydrochloride (PAH) is as template agent which forms π-allyl complex with Ce3+ and controls the morphology of Ce2(CO3)3 particle. PAH and Ce3+ form π-allyl complex, and then induce the formation of Ce2(CO3)3 crystal nucleus. And infrared spectrum analysis verified. XRD show that after adding PAH which is adsorbed on the crystal plane, the growth of Ce2(CO3)3 crystal is inhibited on (2 4 2), the growth is promoted on (2 0 2) which is differentiated into the new (1 5 1), (2 2 2) is unchanged, Ce2(CO3)3 crystal is accumulated petals shape by hexagon-like flake. UV absorption spectra show that CeO2 as prepared precursor Ce2(CO3)3 after calcinations in air at high temperatures, the petal-like CeO2 has strong UV absorption and reflection effects, and absorption interval changed significantly by the move to UVA from UVB.

  6. A CENSUS OF BROAD-LINE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN NEARBY GALAXIES: COEVAL STAR FORMATION AND RAPID BLACK HOLE GROWTH

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Fang, Jerome J.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Kocevski, Dale D.

    2013-02-15

    We present the first quantified, statistical map of broad-line active galactic nucleus (AGN) frequency with host galaxy color and stellar mass in nearby (0.01 < z < 0.11) galaxies. Aperture photometry and z-band concentration measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are used to disentangle AGN and galaxy emission, resulting in estimates of uncontaminated galaxy rest-frame color, luminosity, and stellar mass. Broad-line AGNs are distributed throughout the blue cloud and green valley at a given stellar mass, and are much rarer in quiescent (red sequence) galaxies. This is in contrast to the published host galaxy properties of weaker narrow-line AGNs, indicating that broad-line AGNs occur during a different phase in galaxy evolution. More luminous broad-line AGNs have bluer host galaxies, even at fixed mass, suggesting that the same processes that fuel nuclear activity also efficiently form stars. The data favor processes that simultaneously fuel both star formation activity and rapid supermassive black hole accretion. If AGNs cause feedback on their host galaxies in the nearby universe, the evidence of galaxy-wide quenching must be delayed until after the broad-line AGN phase.

  7. Effect of lateral dimension on the surface wrinkling of a thin film on compliant substrate induced by differential growth/swelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan; Han, Xue; Li, Guoyang; Lu, Conghua; Cao, Yanping; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2015-10-01

    Surface wrinkling in thin films on compliant substrates is of considerable interest for applications involving surface patterning, smart adhesion, liquid/cell shaping, particle assembly, design of flexible electronic devices, as well as mechanical characterization of thin film systems. When the in-plane size of the system is infinite, the critical wrinkling strain is known to be governed by the moduli ratio between the film and substrate. Here we show a surprising result that the lateral dimension of the film can play a critical role in the occurrence of surface wrinkling. The basic phenomenon was established through selective UV/Ozone (UVO) exposure of a strain-free PDMS slab via composite copper grids with different meshes, followed by treatment using mixed ethanol/glycerol solvents with different volume fractions of ethanol. To understand the physics behind the experimental observations, finite element (FE) simulations were performed to establish an analytical expression for the distribution of shear tractions at the film-substrate interface. Subsequent theoretical analysis leads to closed-form predictions for the critical growth/swelling strain for the onset of wrinkling. Our analysis reveals that the occurrence of surface wrinkling and post-wrinkling pattern evolution can be controlled by tuning the lateral size of the thin film for a given moduli ratio. These results may find broad applications in preventing surface wrinkling, creating desired surface patterns, evaluating the interfacial shear strength of a film/substrate system and designing flexible electronic devices.

  8. Growth and fabrication of deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes on silicon carbide substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moe, Craig Gunar

    Interest in deep ultraviolet (< 280 nm) emitters has developed rapidly in recent years, with its use in applications such as water purification, solid state lighting, and biochemical detection now being explored. The aluminum nitride and aluminum gallium nitride material systems are ideal for low cost, highly efficient emitters at these wavelengths, in the same manner that the InGaN LED revolutionized light emitters in the blue, green, and near-ultraviolet wavelengths. While the work to date on such devices have made use of sapphire as a substrate for epitaxial growth, silicon carbide has significant advantages including ease of growth and manufacture, reproducibility, and the potential for fewer dislocations in the material. This work follows the development of AlN and high-composition AlGaN films on SiC to a sufficient quality for emitter applications. A comprehensive examination of the AlN nucleation and buffer layers led to dislocation densities in the low 109cm-2. An extensive study of the n- and p-type doping of AlxGa 1-xN (x > 0.5) was undertaken to develop highly conductive material. The internal quantum efficiency of the quantum well region was significantly improved through modified growth conditions and precursor selection, and a device fabrication process was developed to obtain low turn-on voltages below 5 V and reliable device performance for over 100 hours of use. Careful thermal management of the devices through novel mask designs and improvement in packaging allowed for significant advances in light extraction, resulting in high-power LED emission at 280 nm. Packaged dies exhibited powers as high as 52 muW at 20 mA and 0.24 mW at 100 mA. The greatest obstacle to high external quantum efficiency in these devices is the absorbing nature SiC substrate. This has been successfully mitigated through two different techniques. First, distributed Bragg reflectors consisting of AlGaN/AlN stacks have been developed, with reflectivities greater than 80% at 275

  9. Alignment controlled growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes on quartz substrates.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianliang; Dunham, Simon; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Yongwei; Kocabas, Coskun; Moh, Lionel; Huang, Yonggang; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Lu, Chun; Huang, Wei; Rogers, John A

    2009-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess extraordinary electrical properties, with many possible applications in electronics. Dense, horizontally aligned arrays of linearly configured SWNTs represent perhaps the most attractive and scalable way to implement this class of nanomaterial in practical systems. Recent work shows that templated growth of tubes on certain crystalline substrates yields arrays with the necessary levels of perfection, as demonstrated by the formation of devices and full systems on quartz. This paper examines advanced implementations of this process on crystalline quartz substrates with different orientations, to yield strategies for forming diverse, but well-defined horizontal configurations of SWNTs. Combined experimental and theoretical studies indicate that angle-dependent van der Waals interactions can account for nearly all aspects of alignment on quartz with X, Y, Z, and ST cuts, as well as quartz with disordered surface layers. These findings provide important insights into methods for guided growth of SWNTs, and possibly other classes of nanomaterials, for applications in electronics, sensing, photodetection, light emission, and other areas.

  10. Multiple growths of epitaxial lift-off solar cells from a single InP substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyusang; Shiu, Kuen-Ting; Zimmerman, Jeramy D.; Forrest, Stephen R.; Renshaw, Christopher K.

    2010-09-06

    We demonstrate multiple growths of flexible, thin-film indium tin oxide-InP Schottky-barrier solar cells on a single InP wafer via epitaxial lift-off (ELO). Layers that protect the InP parent wafer surface during the ELO process are subsequently removed by selective wet-chemical etching, with the active solar cell layers transferred to a thin, flexible plastic host substrate by cold welding at room temperature. The first- and second-growth solar cells exhibit no performance degradation under simulated Atmospheric Mass 1.5 Global (AM 1.5G) illumination, and have a power conversion efficiency of {eta}{sub p}=14.4{+-}0.4% and {eta}{sub p}=14.8{+-}0.2%, respectively. The current-voltage characteristics for the solar cells and atomic force microscope images of the substrate indicate that the parent wafer is undamaged, and is suitable for reuse after ELO and the protection-layer removal processes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction observation, and three-dimensional surface profiling show a surface that is comparable or improved to the original epiready wafer following ELO. Wafer reuse over multiple cycles suggests that high-efficiency; single-crystal thin-film solar cells may provide a practical path to low-cost solar-to-electrical energy conversion.

  11. Carbon tetrachloride degradation: Effect of microbial growth substrate and vitamin B{sub 12} content

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, S.; Stensel, H.D.; Ferguson, J.F.

    2000-05-01

    Microbial degradation kinetics of carbon tetrachloride (CT) under reducing conditions were investigated for different cultures, fed with 1,2-propanediol, dextrose, propionalde-hyde, or acetate and nitrate, in the anaerobic step of an anaerobic/aerobic operation sequence. Methanogenesis was inhibited due to the aerobic step. CT biodegradation rates followed first-order kinetics with respect to CT concentration and biomass and were not affected by the presence of growth substrate. CT degradation rates increased linearly with higher intracellular vitamin B{sub 12} content. The culture fed 1,2-propanediol had the highest vitamin B{sub 12} content, which was 3.8, 4.7, and 16 times that of the propionaldehyde-,dextrose-, and acetate-fed cultures, respectively, and its first-order degradation rate constant was 2.8, 4.5, 6.0 times that for those cultures, respectively. No CT degradation occurred with culture liquid, suggesting that intracellular factors were responsible for CT degradation. The propanediol culture was able to sustain a constant CT degradation rate for a 16-day test period without substrate addition. Compared to a propanediol-fed culture grown only under anaerobic conditions, the propanediol culture grown under the sequential anaerobic/aerobic condition resulted in more biomass growth and a greater CT degradation rate per unit of propanediol fed, although its CT degradation rate per unit of biomass was lower.

  12. Growth of thick GaN layers on laser-processed sapphire substrate by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Koji; Aida, Hideo; Kim, Seong-Woo; Ikejiri, Kenjiro; Doi, Toshiro; Yamazaki, Tsutomu

    2014-10-01

    A 600 μm thick GaN layer was successfully grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy by replacing the standard sapphire substrate with that processed by a focused laser beam within the substrate. The effects of the laser processing on the curvature and cracking of the GaN layer were investigated. Microscopic observations of the interior of the thick GaN layer revealed that the laser-processed substrate suppressed the generation of microcracks in the GaN layer. In addition, the laser processing was also found to reduce the change in the curvature during the GaN layer growth in comparison to that on the standard substrate. It is shown that the overlapping microcracks observed in the GaN layer on the standard sapphire substrate lead to serious cracking after thick GaN layer growth.

  13. Inactivation of human pathogens during phase II composting of manure-based mushroom growth substrate.

    PubMed

    Weil, Jennifer D; Cutter, Catherine N; Beelman, Robert B; LaBorde, Luke F

    2013-08-01

    Commercial production of white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) requires a specialized growth substrate prepared from composted agricultural by-products. Because horse and poultry manures are widely used in substrate formulations, there is a need to determine the extent to which the composting process is capable of eliminating human pathogens. In this study, partially composted substrate was inoculated with a pathogen cocktail (log 10⁶ to 10⁸ CFU/g) containing Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella. Pathogen and indicator-organism reductions were followed at temperatures that typically occurred during a standard 6-day phase II pasteurization and conditioning procedure. Controlled-temperature water bath studies at 48.8, 54.4, and 60°C demonstrated complete destruction of the three pathogens after 36.0, 8.0, and 0.5 h, respectively. Destruction of L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 at 54.4°C occurred more slowly than E. coli, total coliforms, Enterobacteriaceae, and Salmonella. Microbial reductions that occurred during a standard 6-day phase II pasteurization and conditioning treatment were studied in a small-scale mushroom production research facility. After phase II composting, E. coli, coliforms, and Enterobacteriaceae were below detectable levels, and inoculated pathogens were not detected by direct plating or by enrichment. The results of this study show that a phase II composting process can be an effective control measure for eliminating risks associated with the use of composted animal manures during mushroom production. Growers are encouraged to validate and verify their own composting processes through periodic microbial testing for pathogens and to conduct studies to assure uniform distribution of substrate temperatures during phase II.

  14. Controlled-Direction Growth of Planar InAsSb Nanowires on Si Substrates without Foreign Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Du, Wenna; Yang, Xiaoguang; Pan, Huayong; Ji, Xianghai; Ji, Haiming; Luo, Shuai; Zhang, Xingwang; Wang, Zhanguo; Yang, Tao

    2016-02-10

    We describe the controlled growth of planar InAsSb nanowires (NWs) on differently oriented Si substrates without any foreign catalysts. Interestingly, the planar InAsSb NWs grew along four criss-crossed ⟨110⟩ directions on an [100]-oriented substrate, two ⟨100⟩ directions plus four ⟨111⟩ directions on an [110]-oriented substrate, and six equivalent ⟨112⟩ directions on an [111]-oriented substrate, which correspond to the projections of ⟨111⟩ family crystal directions on the substrate planes. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) reveals that the NWs experienced a transition from out-of-plane to in-plane growth at the early growth stage but still occurred on the {111} plane, which has the lowest surface energy among all the surfaces. Furthermore, the NWs exhibit a pure zinc-blende crystal structure without any defects. A growth model is presented to explain growth of the NWs. In addition, conductive atomic force microscopy shows that electrically rectifying p-n junctions form naturally between the planar InAsSb NWs and the p-type Si substrates. The results presented here could open up a new route way to fabricate highly integrated III-V nanodevices.

  15. [Environmental Effect of Substrate Amelioration on Lake: Effects on Phragmites communis Growth and Photosynthetic Fluorescence Characteristics].

    PubMed

    Yu, Ju-hua; Zhong, Ji-cheng; Fan, Cheng-xin; Huang, Wei; Shang, Jing-ge; Gu, Xiao-zhi

    2015-12-01

    Growth of rooted aquatic macrophytes was affected by the nature and composition of lake bottom sediments. Obviously, it has been recognized as an important ecological restoration measure by improving lake substrate and then reestablishing and restoring aquatic macrophytes in order to get rid of the environmental problem of lake. This study simulated five covering thickness to give an insight into the influence of substrate amelioration on Phragmites communis growth and photosynthetic fluorescence characteristics. The results showed that the total biomass, plant height, leaf length and leaf width of Phragmites communis under capping 5 cm were much more significant than those of capping 18 cm (P < 0.01), at the 120 d, the underground: shoot biomass ratio and fine root: underground biomass ratio were also much higher than those of other treatments (P < 0.05), which indicated that capping 18 cm treatment would significantly inhibit the growth of Phragmites communis , but the growth of control group Phragmites communis was slightly constrained by eutrophicated sediment. In addition, as the capping thickness growing, the underground: shoot biomass ratio of the plant would be reduced dramatically, in order to acquire much more nutrients from sediment for plant growing, the underground biomass of Phragmites communis would be preferentially developed, especially, the biomass of fine root. However, Photosystem II (PS II) photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), quantum yield (Yield), photochemical quenching (qP), non-photochemical quenching (qN) of Phragmites communis under different treatments had no significant differences (P > 0.05), furthermore, with much greater capping thickness, the photosynthesis structure of PS II would be much easier destroyed, and PS II would be protected by increasing heat dissipating and reducing leaf photosynthetic area and leaf light-captured pigment contents. In terms of the influence of sediment amelioration by soil exchange on the growth and

  16. Alteration of architecture of MoO₃ nanostructures on arbitrary substrates: growth kinetics, spectroscopic and gas sensing properties.

    PubMed

    Illyaskutty, Navas; Sreedhar, Sreeja; Sanal Kumar, G; Kohler, Heinz; Schwotzer, Matthias; Natzeck, Carsten; Pillai, V P Mahadevan

    2014-11-21

    MoO3 nanostructures have been grown in thin film form on five different substrates by RF magnetron sputtering and subsequent annealing; non-aligned nanorods, aligned nanorods, bundled nanowires, vertical nanorods and nanoslabs are formed respectively on the glass, quartz, wafer, alumina and sapphire substrates. The nanostructures formed on these substrates are characterized by AFM, SEM, GIXRD, XPS, micro-Raman, diffuse reflectance and photoluminescence spectroscopy. A detailed growth model for morphology alteration with respect to substrates has been discussed by considering various aspects such as surface roughness, lattice parameters and the thermal expansion coefficient, of both substrates and MoO3. The present study developed a strategy for the choice of substrates to materialize different types MoO3 nanostructures for future thin film applications. The gas sensing tests point towards using these MoO3 nanostructures as principal detection elements in gas sensors.

  17. Quantitative structure-activity relationship for the cleavage of C3/C4-substituted catechols by a prototypal extradiol catechol dioxygenase with broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Horiike, Kihachiro

    2004-06-01

    Catechol 2,3-dioxygenase [EC 1.13.11.2] from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 (Mpc) catalyzes the extradiol cleavage of catechol to produce 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde. The K(m) values for the catecholic substrate (K(mA)) and O(2) (K(mO2)), and catalytic constants (k(cat)) were kinetically determined for eight C3/C4-substituted catechols at 25 degrees C and pH 6.5 or 7.5. The first pK(a) values (pK(1)) were determined for eleven catechols (pK(1) = 7.26-9.47), correlated with Hammett substituent constants, and electron-withdrawing substituents significantly stabilized the monoanionic species of free catechols. Mpc preferred catechols with non-ionic substituents at the C3 or C4 position. 3-Phenylcatechol, a biphenyl, was cleaved, while 4-tert-butylcatechol was not. The logarithm of k(cat)/K(mA) (substrate specificity constant) exhibited a good linear correlation with pK(1), with the exception of those for 4-halocatechols. The logarithm of k(cat)/K(mO2) showed a good linear correlation with pK(1), with the exception of that of 3-phenylcatechol. These results demonstrate that catechol binding to the Mpc active site, the following O(2) binding, and the activation of the bound O(2) are all sensitive to electronic effects of the substituents. However, k(cat) did not correlate significantly with pK(1). The present study distinguishes clearly between the electronic and the steric effects of catecholic substrates in the reactivity of Mpc, and provides important insight into the mechanistic basis for a vast range of substrate specificities of extradiol dioxygenases.

  18. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke

    2015-02-23

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50–200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10–50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs.

  19. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke

    2015-02-01

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50-200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10-50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs.

  20. GaAs buffer layer technique for vertical nanowire growth on Si substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiaoqing Parizi, Kokab B.; Huo, Yijie; Kang, Yangsen; Philip Wong, H.-S.; Li, Yang

    2014-02-24

    Gold catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid method is widely applied to III–V nanowire (NW) growth on Si substrate. However, the easy oxidation of Si, possible Si contamination in the NWs, high defect density in the NWs, and high sensitivity of the NW morphology to growth conditions largely limit its controllability. In this work, we developed a buffer layer technique by introducing a GaAs thin film with predefined polarity as a template. It is found that samples grown on these buffer layers all have high vertical NW yields in general, due to the single-orientation of the buffer layers. Low temperature buffer with smoother surface leads to highest yield of vertical NWs, while high temperature (HT) buffer with better crystallinity results in perfect NW quality. The defect-free property we observed here is very promising for optoelectronic device applications based on GaAs NW. Moreover, the buffer layers can eliminate Si contamination by preventing Si-Au alloy formation and by increasing the thickness of the Si diffusion barrier, thus providing more flexibility to vertical NW growth. The buffer layer technique we demonstrated here could be easily extended to other III-V on Si system for electronic and photonic applications.

  1. Solid-support substrates for plant growth at a lunar base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, D. W.; Galindo, C.; Henninger, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    Zeoponics is only in its developmental stages at the Johnson Space Center and is defined as the cultivation of plants in zeolite substrates that contain several essential plant growth cations on their exchange sites, and have minor amounts of mineral phases and/or anion-exchange resins that supply essential plant growth anions. Zeolites are hydrated aluminosilicates of alkali and alkaline earth cations with the ability to exchange most of their constituent exchange cations as well as hydrate/dehydrate without change to their structural framework. Because zeolites have extremely high cation exchange capabilities, they are very attractive media for plant growth. It is possible to partially or fully saturate plant-essential cations on zeolites. Zeoponic systems will probably have their greatest applications at planetary bases (e.g., lunar bases). Lunar raw materials will have to be located that are suited for the synthesis of zeolites and other exchange resings. Lunar 'soil' simulants have been or are being prepared for zeolite/smectite synthesis and 'soil' dissolution studies.

  2. Growth and characterization of epitaxial aluminum layers on gallium-arsenide substrates for superconducting quantum bits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournet, J.; Gosselink, D.; Miao, G.-X.; Jaikissoon, M.; Langenberg, D.; McConkey, T. G.; Mariantoni, M.; Wasilewski, Z. R.

    2016-06-01

    The quest for a universal quantum computer has renewed interest in the growth of superconducting materials on semiconductor substrates. High-quality superconducting thin films will make it possible to improve the coherence time of superconducting quantum bits (qubits), i.e., to extend the time a qubit can store the amplitude and phase of a quantum state. The electrical losses in superconducting qubits highly depend on the quality of the metal layers the qubits are made from. Here, we report on the epitaxy of single-crystal Al (011) layers on GaAs (001) substrates. Layers with 110 nm thickness were deposited by means of molecular beam epitaxy at low temperature and monitored by in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction performed simultaneously at four azimuths. The single-crystal nature of the layers was confirmed by ex situ high-resolution x-ray diffraction. Differential interference contrast and atomic force microscopy analysis of the sample’s surface revealed a featureless surface with root mean square roughness of 0.55 nm. A detailed in situ study allowed us to gain insight into the nucleation mechanisms of Al layers on GaAs, highlighting the importance of GaAs surface reconstruction in determining the final Al layer crystallographic orientation and quality. A highly uniform and stable GaAs (001)-(2× 4) reconstruction reproducibly led to a pure Al (011) phase, while an arsenic-rich GaAs (001)-(4× 4) reconstruction yielded polycrystalline films with an Al (111) dominant orientation. The near-atomic smoothness and single-crystal character of Al films on GaAs, in combination with the ability to trench GaAs substrates, could set a new standard for the fabrication of superconducting qubits.

  3. Effect of graphene oxide ratio on the cell adhesion and growth behavior on a graphene oxide-coated silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jin-Tak; Choi, Mun-Ki; Sim, Yumin; Lim, Jung-Taek; Kim, Gil-Sung; Seong, Maeng-Je; Hyung, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Keun Soo; Umar, Ahmad; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2016-09-01

    Control of living cells on biocompatible materials or on modified substrates is important for the development of bio-applications, including biosensors and implant biomaterials. The topography and hydrophobicity of substrates highly affect cell adhesion, growth, and cell growth kinetics, which is of great importance in bio-applications. Herein, we investigate the adhesion, growth, and morphology of cultured breast cancer cells on a silicon substrate, on which graphene oxides (GO) was partially formed. By minimizing the size and amount of the GO-containing solution and the further annealing process, GO-coated Si samples were prepared which partially covered the Si substrates. The coverage of GO on Si samples decreases upon annealing. The behaviors of cells cultured on two samples have been observed, i.e. partially GO-coated Si (P-GO) and annealed partially GO-coated Si (Annealed p-GO), with a different coverage of GO. Indeed, the spreading area covered by the cells and the number of cells for a given culture period in the incubator were highly dependent on the hydrophobicity and the presence of oxygenated groups on GO and Si substrates, suggesting hydrophobicity-driven cell growth. Thus, the presented method can be used to control the cell growth via an appropriate surface modification.

  4. Custom fabrication of biomass containment devices using 3-D printing enables bacterial growth analyses with complex insoluble substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Cassandra E.; Beri, Nina R.; Gardner, Jeffrey G.

    2016-09-21

    Physiological studies of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation are challenging for several reasons, one of which is the difficulty in obtaining a reproducibly accurate real-time measurement of bacterial growth using insoluble substrates. Current methods suffer from several problems including (i) high background noise due to the insoluble material interspersed with cells, (ii) high consumable and reagent cost and (iii) significant time delay between sampling and data acquisition. A customizable substrate and cell separation device would provide an option to study bacterial growth using optical density measurements. To test this hypothesis we used 3-D printing to create biomass containment devices that allow interaction between insoluble substrates and microbial cells but do not interfere with spectrophotometer measurements. Evaluation of materials available for 3-D printing indicated that UV-cured acrylic plastic was the best material, being superior to nylon or stainless steel when examined for heat tolerance, reactivity, and ability to be sterilized. Cost analysis of the 3-D printed devices indicated they are a competitive way to quantitate bacterial growth compared to viable cell counting or protein measurements, and experimental conditions were scalable over a 100-fold range. The presence of the devices did not alter growth phenotypes when using either soluble substrates or insoluble substrates. Furthermore, we applied biomass containment to characterize growth of Cellvibrio japonicus on authentic lignocellulose (non-pretreated corn stover), and found physiological evidence that xylan is a significant nutritional source despite an abundance of cellulose present.

  5. Effect of substrate component on the growth and survival of juvenile sunray surf clam ( Mactra chinensis Philippi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuekai; Li, Zhuang; Huo, Zhongming; Yan, Xiwu; Yang, Feng; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Xingzhi

    2016-08-01

    Substrate is a critical environmental factor affecting the activity of bivalves. To examine the effect of the substrate component on the growth and survival of juvenile sunray surf clam ( Mactra chinensis Philippi), a series of short-term experiments were conducted using a variety of substrates with different ratios of sand to mud. The experimental group cultured without substrate showed poor survival, with all juveniles died after day 20. The juveniles cultured in mud without sand showed a lower survival rate (25.54% ± 0.40% on day 45) than those in other groups. The juveniles cultured in sand without mud, or the mixtures of sand and mud with a ratio of 1:1 and 2:1, respectively, exhibited modest survival at day 45. Maximal weight gain rate ( WGR), shell length growth rate ( LGR), and specific growth rate ( SGR) were observed when the sand concentration was 61.97%, 77.69%, and 64.64%, respectively. As the fast growth and high survival were observed when the sand to mud ratio was 1:1 (50% sand) and 2:1 (67% sand), a sand concentration of more than 50% is optimal. The optimal concentration of sand in the substrate for rearing juvenile sunray surf clams was 67% which resulted in the fastest growth and highest survival. These results can be used to developing a nursery/farming technique of improving the yield of sunray surf clams.

  6. Effect of graphene oxide ratio on the cell adhesion and growth behavior on a graphene oxide-coated silicon substrate

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jin-Tak; Choi, Mun-Ki; Sim, Yumin; Lim, Jung-Taek; Kim, Gil-Sung; Seong, Maeng-Je; Hyung, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Keun Soo; Umar, Ahmad; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Control of living cells on biocompatible materials or on modified substrates is important for the development of bio-applications, including biosensors and implant biomaterials. The topography and hydrophobicity of substrates highly affect cell adhesion, growth, and cell growth kinetics, which is of great importance in bio-applications. Herein, we investigate the adhesion, growth, and morphology of cultured breast cancer cells on a silicon substrate, on which graphene oxides (GO) was partially formed. By minimizing the size and amount of the GO-containing solution and the further annealing process, GO-coated Si samples were prepared which partially covered the Si substrates. The coverage of GO on Si samples decreases upon annealing. The behaviors of cells cultured on two samples have been observed, i.e. partially GO-coated Si (P-GO) and annealed partially GO-coated Si (Annealed p-GO), with a different coverage of GO. Indeed, the spreading area covered by the cells and the number of cells for a given culture period in the incubator were highly dependent on the hydrophobicity and the presence of oxygenated groups on GO and Si substrates, suggesting hydrophobicity-driven cell growth. Thus, the presented method can be used to control the cell growth via an appropriate surface modification. PMID:27652886

  7. Custom fabrication of biomass containment devices using 3-D printing enables bacterial growth analyses with complex insoluble substrates

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Cassandra E.; Beri, Nina R.; Gardner, Jeffrey G.

    2016-09-21

    Physiological studies of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation are challenging for several reasons, one of which is the difficulty in obtaining a reproducibly accurate real-time measurement of bacterial growth using insoluble substrates. Current methods suffer from several problems including (i) high background noise due to the insoluble material interspersed with cells, (ii) high consumable and reagent cost and (iii) significant time delay between sampling and data acquisition. A customizable substrate and cell separation device would provide an option to study bacterial growth using optical density measurements. To test this hypothesis we used 3-D printing to create biomass containment devices that allow interactionmore » between insoluble substrates and microbial cells but do not interfere with spectrophotometer measurements. Evaluation of materials available for 3-D printing indicated that UV-cured acrylic plastic was the best material, being superior to nylon or stainless steel when examined for heat tolerance, reactivity, and ability to be sterilized. Cost analysis of the 3-D printed devices indicated they are a competitive way to quantitate bacterial growth compared to viable cell counting or protein measurements, and experimental conditions were scalable over a 100-fold range. The presence of the devices did not alter growth phenotypes when using either soluble substrates or insoluble substrates. Furthermore, we applied biomass containment to characterize growth of Cellvibrio japonicus on authentic lignocellulose (non-pretreated corn stover), and found physiological evidence that xylan is a significant nutritional source despite an abundance of cellulose present.« less

  8. Characterization of new exopolysaccharide production by Rhizobium tropici during growth on hydrocarbon substrate.

    PubMed

    Castellane, Tereza Cristina Luque; Campanharo, João Carlos; Colnago, Luiz Alberto; Coutinho, Isabel Duarte; Lopes, Érica Mendes; Lemos, Manoel Victor Franco; de Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes

    2017-03-01

    Exopolysaccharide (EPS) are produced by a diverse of rhizobia species and has been demonstrated to be a bioemulsifier with potential applications in the degradation of hydrocarbons. In the present study, attempts were made to obtain the new exopolysaccharide production by Rhizobium tropici (SEMIA 4080 and MUTZC3) strains during growth on hydrocarbon substrate. Under the different cultivation conditions, the high molecular weight exopolysaccharides from Rhizobium tropici strains cultivated for 96h mainly consisted of carbohydrates (79-85%) and a low percentage of protein. The EPSC3-D differed from the others, with only 60% of carbohydrate. However, all strains produced polymers with distinct rheology properties, such as viscosity of each EPS sample, suitable for different applications. In addition, RP-HPLC, FTIR and NMR studies revealed EPS produced by rhizobia strains were similar indicating minimal difference between EPS compositions.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cell growth behavior on micro/nano hierarchical surfaces of titanium substrates.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinkun; Ma, Pingping; Hu, Yan; Xu, Gaoqiang; Zhou, Jun; Cai, Kaiyong

    2015-03-01

    Surface topography of an orthopedic implant plays an essential role in the regulation of bone formation with surrounding bone tissue. To investigate the effects of surface topography of titanium (Ti) substrates on cellular behavior of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), a series of micro/nano hierarchical structures were fabricated onto micro-structured titanium (Micro-Ti) substrates via a sol-gel method with spin-coat technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface profiler, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle measurement were employed to certify the successful fabrication of micro/nano hierarchical structures with the presence of various nano-sized TiO2 grains (20 nm, 40 nm and 80 nm, respectively) onto micro-structured surfaces. The formation mechanism of the micro/nano hierarchical structures was proposed. Moreover, the effects of those hierarchical structures on the growth behavior of MSCs were evaluated both on cellular and molecular levels in vitro. The results confirmed that micro/nano hierarchical structures with large grains (80 nm) greatly promoted the proliferation and differentiation of MSCs comparing with other small grains (20 nm and 40 nm). The study provides an alternative for the fabrication of hierarchically structured Ti implants for potential orthopedic application.

  10. Current Trends in Bioethanol Production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Substrate, Inhibitor Reduction, Growth Variables, Coculture, and Immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Assefa, Fassil

    2014-01-01

    Bioethanol is one of the most commonly used biofuels in transportation sector to reduce greenhouse gases. S. cerevisiae is the most employed yeast for ethanol production at industrial level though ethanol is produced by an array of other yeasts, bacteria, and fungi. This paper reviews the current and nonmolecular trends in ethanol production using S. cerevisiae. Ethanol has been produced from wide range of substrates such as molasses, starch based substrate, sweet sorghum cane extract, lignocellulose, and other wastes. The inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates can be reduced by repeated sequential fermentation, treatment with reducing agents and activated charcoal, overliming, anion exchanger, evaporation, enzymatic treatment with peroxidase and laccase, in situ detoxification by fermenting microbes, and different extraction methods. Coculturing S. cerevisiae with other yeasts or microbes is targeted to optimize ethanol production, shorten fermentation time, and reduce process cost. Immobilization of yeast cells has been considered as potential alternative for enhancing ethanol productivity, because immobilizing yeasts reduce risk of contamination, make the separation of cell mass from the bulk liquid easy, retain stability of cell activities, minimize production costs, enable biocatalyst recycling, reduce fermentation time, and protect the cells from inhibitors. The effects of growth variables of the yeast and supplementation of external nitrogen sources on ethanol optimization are also reviewed. PMID:27379305

  11. Current Trends in Bioethanol Production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Substrate, Inhibitor Reduction, Growth Variables, Coculture, and Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Tesfaw, Asmamaw; Assefa, Fassil

    2014-01-01

    Bioethanol is one of the most commonly used biofuels in transportation sector to reduce greenhouse gases. S. cerevisiae is the most employed yeast for ethanol production at industrial level though ethanol is produced by an array of other yeasts, bacteria, and fungi. This paper reviews the current and nonmolecular trends in ethanol production using S. cerevisiae. Ethanol has been produced from wide range of substrates such as molasses, starch based substrate, sweet sorghum cane extract, lignocellulose, and other wastes. The inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates can be reduced by repeated sequential fermentation, treatment with reducing agents and activated charcoal, overliming, anion exchanger, evaporation, enzymatic treatment with peroxidase and laccase, in situ detoxification by fermenting microbes, and different extraction methods. Coculturing S. cerevisiae with other yeasts or microbes is targeted to optimize ethanol production, shorten fermentation time, and reduce process cost. Immobilization of yeast cells has been considered as potential alternative for enhancing ethanol productivity, because immobilizing yeasts reduce risk of contamination, make the separation of cell mass from the bulk liquid easy, retain stability of cell activities, minimize production costs, enable biocatalyst recycling, reduce fermentation time, and protect the cells from inhibitors. The effects of growth variables of the yeast and supplementation of external nitrogen sources on ethanol optimization are also reviewed.

  12. [Physical and chemical effects and plant growth suitability of substrates in subsurface flow wetland].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Xu; Li, Guang-he; Zhang, Hong-tao

    2006-05-01

    Substrate, which not only takes part in the pollutant-removing, but influences the plant growth, plays an important role in subsurface flow wetland. With X-ray fluorescence measurement and X-ray diffractometer, the elements and minerals in zeolite and shale were confirmed, and the removal mechanics of nitrogen, phosphate and hydrogen ion in substrates were explained respectively. The investigation show that the zeolite has abounded with micropores and mesopores, while the shale has only mesopores, which causes the NH4+ -N adsorption capability of the shale is less than zeolite. The PO4(3-) -P removal and hydrogen ion buffer capacity of shale are greater than those of zeolite because CaCO3 is one of the main contents of shale. In pilot-plant system to treat starch waste water, the reeds and acorus aclamuc were either planted in shale and zeolite, and the phytum's indexes in shale including relative green concentration, average plant height, root stem ratio were higher than those in zeolite. The root vitality of reeds and acorus aclamuc planted in shale were 3.7 and 1.6 times of those in zeolite respectively. Total nitrogen and phosphorus contents in the plant organization of acorus aclamuc in shale were 7.8 and 3.4 times of those in zeolite; total nitrogen and phosphorus contents in the plant organization of reeds in shale were 3.3 and 2.2 times of those in zeolite. The results indicate that shale provides a steady pH for the plant's root in the acid waste water and it is more suitable for plant growth than zeolite.

  13. Aerobic degradation of trichloroethylene by co-metabolism using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Bing; Wang, Cui-Ping; Fan, Jun-Zhao; Sun, Hong-Wen

    2014-05-22

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common groundwater contaminant of toxic and carcinogenic concern. Aerobic co-metabolic processes are the predominant pathways for TCE complete degradation. In this study, Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied as the active microorganism to degrade TCE under aerobic condition by co-metabolic degradation using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates. Operating conditions influencing TCE degradation efficiency were optimized. TCE co-metabolic degradation rate reached the maximum of 80% under the optimized conditions of degradation time of 3 days, initial OD600 of microorganism culture of 0.14 (1.26×10⁷ cell/mL), initial phenol concentration of 100 mg/L, initial TCE concentration of 0.1 mg/L, pH of 6.0, and salinity of 0.1%. The modified transformation capacity and transformation yield were 20 μg (TCE)/mg (biomass) and 5.1 μg (TCE)/mg (phenol), respectively. Addition of nutrient broth promoted TCE degradation with phenol as growth substrate. It was revealed that catechol 1,2-dioxygenase played an important role in TCE co-metabolism. The dechlorination of TCE was complete, and less chlorinated products were not detected at the end of the experiment. TCE could also be co-metabolized in the presence of gasoline; however, the degradation rate was not high (28%). When phenol was introduced into the system of TCE and gasoline, TCE and gasoline could be removed at substantial rates (up to 59% and 69%, respectively). This study provides a promising approach for the removal of combined pollution of TCE and gasoline.

  14. Aerobic Degradation of Trichloroethylene by Co-Metabolism Using Phenol and Gasoline as Growth Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Bing; Wang, Cui-Ping; Fan, Jun-Zhao; Sun, Hong-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common groundwater contaminant of toxic and carcinogenic concern. Aerobic co-metabolic processes are the predominant pathways for TCE complete degradation. In this study, Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied as the active microorganism to degrade TCE under aerobic condition by co-metabolic degradation using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates. Operating conditions influencing TCE degradation efficiency were optimized. TCE co-metabolic degradation rate reached the maximum of 80% under the optimized conditions of degradation time of 3 days, initial OD600 of microorganism culture of 0.14 (1.26 × 107 cell/mL), initial phenol concentration of 100 mg/L, initial TCE concentration of 0.1 mg/L, pH of 6.0, and salinity of 0.1%. The modified transformation capacity and transformation yield were 20 μg (TCE)/mg (biomass) and 5.1 μg (TCE)/mg (phenol), respectively. Addition of nutrient broth promoted TCE degradation with phenol as growth substrate. It was revealed that catechol 1,2-dioxygenase played an important role in TCE co-metabolism. The dechlorination of TCE was complete, and less chlorinated products were not detected at the end of the experiment. TCE could also be co-metabolized in the presence of gasoline; however, the degradation rate was not high (28%). When phenol was introduced into the system of TCE and gasoline, TCE and gasoline could be removed at substantial rates (up to 59% and 69%, respectively). This study provides a promising approach for the removal of combined pollution of TCE and gasoline. PMID:24857922

  15. Growth of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes on anisotropically etched silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orofeo, Carlo M.; Ago, Hiroki; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Takahasi, Koji; Tsuji, Masaharu

    2010-09-01

    Directional controllability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is an important issue for future nanoelectronics applications. For direct integration of carbon nanotubes with modern electronics, aligned growth of carbon nanotubes on SiO2/Si is desirable. We developed a new method to horizontally align SWNTs directly on SiO2/Si substrate by creating trenches on Si(100) through anisotropic etching followed by thermal oxidation. The V-shaped trenches highly improved the alignment of SWNTs and the degree of alignment is comparable to the step-templated alignment of carbon nanotubes on crystals. The trenches also improved the density of aligned nanotubes due to the combination of ``trench-guided'' and gas-flow guided alignment. Our new insights on carbon nanotube alignment on SiO2/Si will greatly contribute to future large-scale nanoelectronic applications.Directional controllability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is an important issue for future nanoelectronics applications. For direct integration of carbon nanotubes with modern electronics, aligned growth of carbon nanotubes on SiO2/Si is desirable. We developed a new method to horizontally align SWNTs directly on SiO2/Si substrate by creating trenches on Si(100) through anisotropic etching followed by thermal oxidation. The V-shaped trenches highly improved the alignment of SWNTs and the degree of alignment is comparable to the step-templated alignment of carbon nanotubes on crystals. The trenches also improved the density of aligned nanotubes due to the combination of ``trench-guided'' and gas-flow guided alignment. Our new insights on carbon nanotube alignment on SiO2/Si will greatly contribute to future large-scale nanoelectronic applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SEM images of SWNTs grown under different CVD conditions. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00170h

  16. Growth and characterization of large, high quality single crystal diamond substrates via microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nad, Shreya

    Single crystal diamond (SCD) substrates can be utilized in a wide range of applications. Important issues in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of such substrates include: shrinking of the SCD substrate area, stress and cracking, high defect density and hence low electronic quality and low optical quality due to high nitrogen impurities. The primary objective of this thesis is to begin to address these issues and to find possible solutions for enhancing the substrate dimensions and simultaneously improving the quality of the grown substrates. The deposition of SCD substrates is carried out in a microwave cavity plasma reactor via the microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. The operation of the reactor was first optimized to determine the safe and efficient operating regime. By adjusting the matching of the reactor cavity with the help of four internal tuning length variables, the system was further matched to operate at a maximum overall microwave coupling efficiency of ˜ 98%. Even with adjustments in the substrate holder position, the reactor remains well matched with a coupling efficiency of ˜ 95% indicating good experimental performance over a wide range of operating conditions. SCD substrates were synthesized at a high pressure of 240 Torr and with a high absorbed power density of 500 W/cm3. To counter the issue of shrinking substrate size during growth, the effect of different substrate holder designs was studied. An increase in the substrate dimensions (1.23 -- 2.5 times) after growth was achieved when the sides of the seeds were shielded from the intense microwave electromagnetic fields in a pocket holder design. Using such pocket holders, high growth rates of 16 -- 32 mum/hr were obtained for growth times of 8 -- 72 hours. The polycrystalline diamond rim deposition was minimized/eliminated from these growth runs, hence successfully enlarging the substrate size. Several synthesized CVD SCD substrates were laser cut and separated

  17. Tolerance of GaAs as an original substrate for HVPE growth of free standing GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Mio; Sato, T.; Suemasu, T.; Hasegawa, F.

    2004-09-01

    In order to investigate possibility of thick GaN growth on a GaAs substrate by halide vapar phase epitaxy (HVPE), GaN was grown on GaAs(111)/Ti wafer with Ti deposited by E-gun. It was found that surface treatment of the GaAs substrate by HF solution deteriorated greatly the tolerence of GaAs and that Ti can protected GaAs from erosion by NH3. By depositing Ti on GaAs(111)A surface, a millor-like GaN layer could be grown at 1000 °C for 1 hour without serious deterioration of the original GaAs substrate. By increasing the growth rate, a thick free standing GaN will be obtained with GaAs as an original substrate in near future.

  18. Nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Van Der Hofstadt, M; Hüttener, M; Juárez, A; Gomila, G

    2015-07-01

    With the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM), the Nanomicrobiology field has advanced drastically. Due to the complexity of imaging living bacterial processes in their natural growing environments, improvements have come to a standstill. Here we show the in situ nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of single bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope. To achieve this, we minimized the lateral shear forces responsible for the detachment of weakly adsorbed bacteria on planar substrates with the use of the so called dynamic jumping mode with very soft cantilever probes. With this approach, gentle imaging conditions can be maintained for long periods of time, enabling the continuous imaging of the bacterial cell growth and division, even on planar substrates. Present results offer the possibility to observe living processes of untrapped bacteria weakly attached to planar substrates.

  19. Zeoponic Plant Growth Substrate Development at the Johnson Space Center and Possible Use at a Martian Outpost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruener, John E.; Ming, Douglas W.

    2000-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) is developing a substrate, termed zeoponics, that will slowly release all of the essential nutrients into solution for plant growth experiments in advanced life support system testbeds. This substrate is also potentially useful in the near future on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station and could eventually be used at an outpost on Mars. Chemical analyses of the Martian soil by the Viking and Mars Pathfinder missions have indicated that several of the elements required for plant growth are available in the soil. It may be possible to use the martian soil as the bulk substrate for growing food crops, while using smaller amounts of zeoponic substrate as an amendment to rectify any nutrient deficiencies.

  20. Growth characteristics of different heart cells on novel nanopatch substrate during electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Stout, David A; Raimondo, Emilia; Marostica, Giuliano; Webster, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    During a heart attack, the heart's oxygen supply is cut off, and cardiomyocytes perish. Unfortunately, once these tissues are lost, they cannot be replaced and results in cardiovascular disease-the leading cause of deaths worldwide. Advancements in medical research have been targeted to understand and combat the death of these cardiomyocytes. For example, new research (in vitro) has demonstrated that one can expand cardiomyocyte adhesion and proliferation using polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) (50:50 (weight percent)) supplemented with carbon nanofibers (CNFs) to create a cardiovascular patch. However, the examination of other cardiovascular cell types has not been investigated. Therefore, the purpose of this present in vitro study was to determine cell growth characteristics of three different important cardiovascular cell types (aortic endothelial, fibroblast and cardiomyocyte) onto the substrate. Cells were seeded onto different PLGA:CNF ratio composites to determine if CNF density has an effect on cell growth, both in static and electrically stimulated environments. During continuous electrical stimulation (rectangle, 2 nm, 5 V/cm, 1 Hz), cardiomyocyte cell density increased in comparison to its static counterparts after 24, 72 and 120 hours. A minor rise in Troponin I excretion in electrical stimulation compared to static conditions indicated nominal cardiomyocyte cell function during cell experiments. Endothelial and fibroblast cell growth experiments indicated the material hindered or stalled proliferation during both static and electrical stimulation experiments, thus supporting the growth of cardiomyocytes onto the dead tissue zone. Furthermore, the results specified that CNF density did have an effect on PLGA:CNF composite cytocompatibility properties with the best results coming from the 50:50 [PLGA:CNF (weight percent:weight percent)] composite. Therefore, this study provides further evidence that a conductive scaffold using nanotechnology should be

  1. Direct Growth of Graphene-like Films on Single Crystal Quartz Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonau, Siarhei

    Direct growth of graphene-like (GL) films (nano-crystalline graphite films) on single crystal quartz substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from methane and molecular beam growth (MBG) is reported. The GL films have been characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and electrical measurements. Raman spectroscopy reveals nanocrystalline structure of the films grown at different conditions. The thinnest CVD grown GL films obtained so far have a thickness of 1.5 nm, a relatively rough surface structure and electrical conductivity in the range of 20 kO/square. Low temperature Hall-effect measurements performed on these films have revealed that the major charge carriers are holes with mobility of 40 cm2/Vs at room temperature. While inferior to graphene in terms of electronic properties, the graphene-like films possess very high chemical sensitivity. Study of MBG grown films revealed formation of a non-conductive carbon layer of low crystallinity on the initial stage of the growth process. In order to study the influence of the quartz substrate on the film formation process we performed ab initio simulation of the MBG process. For this simulation we used an atom-by-atom approach, which, we believe, is a closer approximation to the real molecular beam deposition process reported so far. The simulation showed that the initial formation of the film follows the atomic structure of the substrate. This leads to a high content of sp3 hybridized atoms at the initial stage of growth and explains formation of a non-conductive film. Additionally, we demonstrated how a non-conductive film becomes conductive with the increase of the film thickness. These results agree fairly well with the data obtained by AFM, electrical, and Raman measurements conducted on the films grown by MBG. High chemical sensitivity of GL films has been demonstrated by measuring the change in their conductance during exposure to a NO2-containing atmosphere. Sensitivity of CVD

  2. Growth of high quality germanium films on patterned silicon substrates and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanamu, Ganesh

    The principal objective of this work is to determine optimal pattern structures for highest quality (defect free) heteroepitaxial growth. High quality films of Ge on Si are of significant importance and can be used in high electron mobility devices, photodetectors for optical communications (1.3mum or 1.55mum) and integrating III-V optoelectronic devices. However, a 4% lattice mismatch and ˜ 50% thermal expansion mismatch between Ge and Si create three major challenges in growing high quality Ge films on Si, (a) high surface roughness due to a pronounced <110> crosshatch pattern, (b) high dislocation densities in Ge films and (c) high density of microcracks and wafer bending. A common way of reducing lattice and thermal expansion mismatch is to form a "virtual substrate (VS)" by growing a graded composition followed by a uniform layer of the desired epitaxial film on a defect-free Si substrate. Virtual graded layers could not decrease the dislocation densities to the numbers acceptable for most of the devices. Mathews et al. first proposed that limiting the lateral dimensions of the sample prior to growth could reduce the dislocation density. Later On Fitzgerald proposed that patterning decreases the dislocation density in the films. In this work we show high quality crosshatch-free Ge films with dislocation density ˜ 105 cm-2 on the nano-patterned Si and also high quality GaAs films on the Ge/Si virtual substrate. The first step in this research was to perform a systematic study to identify the role of pattern width on the quality of Ge growth. We investigated micrometer and submicrometer scale patterns. We demonstrated that the quality of the heteroepitaxial layers improves as the pattern width decreases. Then we have decreased the pattern width to nanometer-scale dimensions. Significant improvement of the Ge film quality was observed. We used novel interferometric lithography techniques combined with reactive ion and wet chemical etching to fabricate Si

  3. Growth and field emission of carbon nanotubes on electroplated Ni catalyst coated on glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaemyung; No, Kwangsoo; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2001-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are grown on Ni catalyst coated on soda-lime glass substrates using chemical vapor deposition of C2H2 gas at 550 °C. Ni film is coated on the surface of Ag film using the electroplating method. Ni was etched by ammonia (NH3) gas in order to form nanometer sized catalytic particles before carbon nanotube growth. Pd film is applied as a gas activator to decrease the growth temperature of carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes grown on Ni catalyst particles showed a multiwalled structure with defective graphite sheets at the wall. The turn-on voltage was about 2.8 V/μm with an emission current density of 10 μA/cm2, and the threshold voltage was about 4.0 V/μm with an emission current density of 10 mA/cm2. The Fowler-Nordheim plot showed a good linear fit, indicating that the emission current of carbon nanotubes follows Fowler-Nordheim behavior. The calculated field enhancement factor was 2850.

  4. Molten salt-based growth of bulk GaN and InN for substrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth

    2007-08-01

    An atmospheric pressure approach to growth of bulk group III-nitrides is outlined. Native III-nitride substrates for optoelectronic and high power, high frequency electronics are desirable to enhance performance and reliability of these devices; currently, these materials are available in research quantities only for GaN, and are unavailable in the case of InN. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions associated with traditional crystal growth techniques place these activities on the extreme edges of experimental physics. The novel techniques described herein rely on the production of the nitride precursor (N{sup 3-}) by chemical and/or electrochemical methods in a molten halide salt. This nitride ion is then reacted with group III metals in such a manner as to form the bulk nitride material. The work performed during the period of funding (February 2006-September 2006) focused on establishing that mass transport of GaN occurs in molten LiCl, the construction of a larger diameter electrochemical cell, the design, modification, and installation of a made-to-order glove box (required for handling very hygroscopic LiCl), and the feasibility of using room temperature molten salts to perform nitride chemistry experiments.

  5. Growth and characterization of InAs quantum dots on Si(0 0 1) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z. M.; Hul'ko, O.; Kim, H. J.; Liu, J.; Sugahari, T.; Shi, B.; Xie, Y. H.

    2004-11-01

    Self-assembled InAs quantum dots were grown on (0 0 1) orientated Si substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Growth condition dependence of dot formation was studied. The evolution of size and shape of quantum dots with InAs coverage was examined using plan-view and cross-section transmission electron microscopy. Dot formation started at below 1 monolayer (ML) of InAs coverage, indicating Volmer-Weber growth mode. Dot size and density grew with increasing InAs coverage up to 0.7 ML. Dot density was observed to be strongly dependent on arsenic (As) beam equivalent pressure (BEP). A decrease of As BEP from 9.2×10 -6 to 1.2×10 -7 torr resulted in an increase in dot density from 4.3×10 9 to 1.8×10 11 cm -2 at a constant InAs coverage of 0.7 ML. Further increase in InAs coverage led to a clear broadening of dot size distribution and a slight decrease in dot density, presumably due to coarsening.

  6. Large interface diffusion in endotaxial growth of MnP films on GaP substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Nateghi, N. Ménard, D.; Masut, R. A.

    2014-10-07

    The metal organic vapor deposition of MnP films on GaP (100) substrates is shown to have a substantial endotaxial component. A study of the growth time evolution of the endotaxial depths of MnP grains reveals a diffusion-controlled growth with a relatively large diffusion coefficient of Mn in GaP. The value (2.2 ± 1.5) × 10⁻¹⁵ (cm²/s) obtained at 650 °C is at least two orders of magnitude larger than the reported Mn diffusion in bulk GaP. GaP surface mounds provide further indirect evidence that this large diffusion coefficient is concurrent with the out-diffusion of Ga atoms at the growing MnP/GaP interface. No trace of dislocations could be observed at or near this interface, which strongly suggests that Mn diffusion occurs through vacant sites generated by the difference between the crystallographic structures of MnP and GaP.

  7. Growth-induced optical anisotropy of epitaxial garnet films grown on (110)-oriented substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, K.; Iyi, N.; Kimura, S.; Chevrier, F.; Devignes, J. M.; Le Gall, H.

    1986-08-01

    Garnet films of nominal composition (Y,Nd)3Ga5O12, were grown on (110) 1°-off Gd3Ga5O12 substrates for investigation of their growth-induced optical anisotropy. Optical birefringence and directions of the electric vectors of polarized rays passing through the films were measured under a polarizing microscope using a Brace-Köhler compensator. The growth-induced anisotropy of these films optically exhibited orthorhombic characteristics with the X, Y, and Z optic elasticity axes coinciding with the [001], [110], and [1¯10] directions, respectively. The crystallographic data obtained by means of single-crystal diffractometry suggested that the cubic crystal system of the garnet film was distorted, though very slightly, to an orthorhombic one with a,b, and c axes that coincided, respectively, with the [1¯10],[001], and [110] of the original cubic cell. In addition, by annealing at 1150 °C, this distortion disappeared and the crystal system reverted to cubic.

  8. Molten Salt-Based Growth of Bulk GaN and InN for Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth; Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2006-09-01

    An atmospheric pressure approach to growth of bulk group III-nitrides is outlined. Native III-nitride substrates for optoelectronic and high power, high frequency electronics are desirable to enhance performance and reliability of these devices; currently, these materials are available in research quantities only for GaN, and are unavailable in the case of InN. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions associated with traditional crystal growth techniques place these activities on the extreme edges of experimental physics. The technique described herein relies on the production of the nitride precursor (N3-) by chemical and/or electrochemical methods in a molten halide salt. This nitride ion is then reacted with group III metals in such a manner as to form the bulk nitride material. The work performed during the period of funding (July 2004-September 2005) focused on the initial measurement of the solubility of GaN in molten LiCl as a function of temperature, the construction of electrochemical cells, the modification of a commercial glove box (required for handling very hygroscopic LiCl), and on securing intellectual property for the technique.

  9. Si substrates texturing and vapor-solid-solid Si nanowhiskers growth using pure hydrogen as source gas

    SciTech Connect

    Nordmark, H.; Holmestad, R.; Nagayoshi, H.; Matsumoto, N.; Nishimura, S.; Terashima, K.; Marioara, C. D.; Walmsley, J. C.; Ulyashin, A.

    2009-02-15

    Scanning and transmission electron microscopies have been used to study silicon substrate texturing and whisker growth on Si substrates using pure hydrogen source gas in a tungsten hot filament reactor. Substrate texturing, in the nanometer to micrometer range of mono- and as-cut multicrystalline silicon, was observed after deposition of WSi{sub 2} particles that acted as a mask for subsequent hydrogen radical etching. Simultaneous Si whisker growth was observed for long residence time of the source gas and low H{sub 2} flow rate with high pressure. The whiskers formed via vapor-solid-solid growth, in which the deposited WSi{sub 2} particles acted as catalysts for a subsequent metal-induced layer exchange process well below the eutectic temperature. In this process, SiH{sub x} species, formed by substrate etching by the H radicals, diffuse through the metal particles. This leads to growth of crystalline Si whiskers via metal-induced solid-phase crystallization. Transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to study the WSi{sub 2} particles and the structure of the Si substrates in detail. It has been established that the whiskers are partly crystalline and partly amorphous, consisting of pure Si with WSi{sub 2} particles on their tips as well as sometimes being incorporated into their structure.

  10. Effect of the crystalline constitution of TiO2 substrates on the growth of ultrathin Mo layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noirfalise, X.; Renaux, F.; Cossement, D.; Sebaihi, Noham; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Snyders, R.

    2012-11-01

    Metallic molybdenum was deposited by magnetron sputtering on amorphous and (110) rutile TiO2 substrates. An interfacial reaction between the deposited Mo and the TiO2 substrates generating Ti3 +, Ti2 + oxidation states is evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Our XPS data suggest, as compared to the (110) rutile substrate, a higher reactivity of the amorphous TiO2 leading to a stronger Mo oxidation. In both cases, this reaction, leads to the formation of MoOx nanostructures at the interfaces. The growth mechanism of the Mo deposit as a function of the crystalline constitution of the TiO2 substrate was analyzed by processing the XPS data using the Quases ® software. The data reveal a layer-by-layer growth of the Mo deposit on the (110) rutile substrate and a Stranski-Krastanov growth on the amorphous one. We explain these different growth modes based on the TiO2 surface reactivity and electronic structure using the Cabrera-Mott theory. This explanation is supported by Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass spectrometry profiling.

  11. [Macrokinetic basis for the model of microbial growth in a limited volume under constant conditions with a single leading substrate].

    PubMed

    Gendugov, V M; Glazunov, G P

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of the macrokinetic approach and continuum and chemical/biochemical gross reaction conceptions, an equation describing the complete dynamics of microbial growth and decline as function of a variable concentration of the leading substrate was deduced. This equation allows us to distinguish quantitatively and qualitatively the stages of microbial growth and the intervals of microbial tolerance to the initial concentration of the leading substrate. Adequacy of the model was confirmed by comparison with experimental dynamics of aerobic microorganisms in the samples of groundwater collected from a region polluted with uranium.

  12. Method for improving the growth of cadmium telluride on a gallium arsenide substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, J.L.

    1990-12-31

    A method for preparing a gallium arsenide substrate, prior to growing a layer of cadmium telluride on a support surface thereof. The preparation includes the steps of cleaning the gallium arsenide substrate and thereafter forming prepatterned shapes on the support surface of the gallium arsenide substrate. The layer of cadmium telluride then grown on the prepared substrate results in dislocation densities of approximately 1{times}10{sup 6}/cm{sup 2} or less. The prepatterned shapes on the support surface of the gallium arsenide substrate are formed by reactive ion etching an original outer surface of the gallium arsenide substrate and into the body of the gallium arsenide substrate to a depth of at least two microns. The prepatterned shapes have the appearance of cylindrical mesas each having a diameter of at lease twelve microns. After the mesas are formed on the support surface of the gallium arsenide substrate, the substrate is again cleaned.

  13. MOVPE growth of GaN on 6-inch SOI-substrates: effect of substrate parameters on layer quality and strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemettinen, J.; Kauppinen, C.; Rudzinski, M.; Haapalinna, A.; Tuomi, T. O.; Suihkonen, S.

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate that higher crystalline quality, lower strain and improved electrical characteristics can be achieved in gallium nitride (GaN) epitaxy by using a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate compared to a bulk silicon (Si) substrate. GaN layers were grown by metal–organic vapor phase epitaxy on 6-inch bulk Si and SOI wafers using the standard step graded AlGaN and AlN approach. The GaN layers grown on SOI exhibited lower strain according to x-ray diffraction analysis. Defect selective etching measurements suggested that the use of SOI substrate for GaN epitaxy reduces the dislocation density approximately by a factor of two. Furthermore, growth on SOI substrate allows one to use a significantly thinner AlGaN buffer compared to bulk Si. Synchrotron radiation x-ray topography analysis confirmed that the stress relief mechanism in GaN on SOI epitaxy is the formation of a dislocation network to the SOI device Si layer. In addition, the buried oxide layer significantly improves the vertical leakage characteristics as the onset of the breakdown is delayed by approximately 400 V. These results show that the GaN on the SOI platform is promising for power electronics applications.

  14. The broad-spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor BB-94 inhibits growth, HER3 and Erk activation in fulvestrant-resistant breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kirkegaard, Tove; Yde, Christina W; Kveiborg, Marie; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E

    2014-07-01

    Breast cancer cells can switch from estrogen receptor α (ER)- to human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-driven cell growth upon acquiring antiestrogen resistance. HER ligands are cleaved by metalloproteinases leading to release of active HER ligands, activation of HER receptors and consequently increased cell growth. In this study, we investigated the importance of HER receptors, in particular HER3, and HER ligand shedding for growth and signaling in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and MCF-7-derived sublines resistant to the antiestrogen fulvestrant. The HER3/HER4 ligand heregulin 1β induced phosphorylation of HER3, Akt and Erk, and partly rescued fulvestrant-inhibited growth of MCF-7 cells. HER3 ligands were found to be produced and shed from the fulvestrant-resistant cells as conditioned medium from fulvestrant-resistant MCF-7 cells induced phosphorylation of HER3 and Akt in MCF-7 cells. This was prevented by treatment of resistant cells with the metalloproteinase inhibitor TAPI-2. Only the broad-spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor BB-94, and not the more selective inhibitors GM6001 or TAPI-2, which inhibited shedding of the HER ligands produced by the fulvestrant-resistant cells, was able to inhibit growth and activation of HER3 and Erk in resistant cells. Compared to MCF-7, fulvestrant-resistant cells have increased HER3 phosphorylation, but knockdown of HER3 had no inhibitory effect on resistant cell growth. The EGFR inhibitor gefitinib exhibited only a minor growth inhibition, whereas the pan-HER inhibitor CI-1033 exerted growth arrest. Thus, neither HER3 nor EGFR alone are the main driver of fulvestrant-resistant cell growth and treatment should target both receptors. Ligand shedding is not a treatment target, as receptor activation occurred, independent of release of ligands. Only the broad-spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor BB-94 could abrogate HER3 and Erk activation in the resistant cells, which stresses the complexity of the resistance

  15. Design and development of green roof substrate to improve runoff water quality: plant growth experiments and adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Raja, Franklin D

    2014-10-15

    Many studies worldwide have investigated the potential benefits achievable by transforming brown roofs of buildings to green roofs. However, little literature examined the runoff quality/sorption ability of green roofs. As the green roof substrate is the main component to alter the quality of runoff, this investigation raises the possibility of using a mixture of low-cost inorganic materials to develop a green roof substrate. The tested materials include exfoliated vermiculite, expanded perlite, crushed brick and sand along with organic component (coco-peat). Detailed physical and chemical analyses revealed that each of these materials possesses different characteristics and hence a mix of these materials was desirable to develop an optimal green roof substrate. Using factorial design, 18 different substrate mixes were prepared and detailed examination indicated that mix-12 exhibited desirable characteristics of green roof substrate with low bulk density (431 kg/m(3)), high water holding capacity (39.4%), air filled porosity (19.5%), and hydraulic conductivity (4570 mm/h). The substrate mix also provided maximum support to Portulaca grandiflora (380% total biomass increment) over one month of growth. To explore the leaching characteristics and sorption capacity of developed green roof substrate, a down-flow packed column arrangement was employed. High conductivity and total dissolved solids along with light metal ions (Na, K, Ca and Mg) were observed in the leachates during initial stages of column operation; however the concentration of ions ceased during the final stages of operation (600 min). Experiments with metal-spiked deionized water revealed that green roof substrate possess high sorption capacity towards various heavy metal ions (Al, Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and Cd). Thus the developed growth substrate possesses desirable characteristics for green roofs along with high sorption capacity.

  16. High-salinity growth conditions promote Tat-independent secretion of Tat substrates in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    van der Ploeg, René; Monteferrante, Carmine G; Piersma, Sjouke; Barnett, James P; Kouwen, Thijs R H M; Robinson, Colin; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2012-11-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis contains two Tat translocases, which can facilitate transport of folded proteins across the plasma membrane. Previous research has shown that Tat-dependent protein secretion in B. subtilis is a highly selective process and that heterologous proteins, such as the green fluorescent protein (GFP), are poor Tat substrates in this organism. Nevertheless, when expressed in Escherichia coli, both B. subtilis Tat translocases facilitated exclusively Tat-dependent export of folded GFP when the twin-arginine (RR) signal peptides of the E. coli AmiA, DmsA, or MdoD proteins were attached. Therefore, the present studies were aimed at determining whether the same RR signal peptide-GFP precursors would also be exported Tat dependently in B. subtilis. In addition, we investigated the secretion of GFP fused to the full-length YwbN protein, a strict Tat substrate in B. subtilis. Several investigated GFP fusion proteins were indeed secreted in B. subtilis, but this secretion was shown to be completely Tat independent. At high-salinity growth conditions, the Tat-independent secretion of GFP as directed by the RR signal peptides from the E. coli AmiA, DmsA, or MdoD proteins was significantly enhanced, and this effect was strongest in strains lacking the TatAy-TatCy translocase. This implies that high environmental salinity has a negative influence on the avoidance of Tat-independent secretion of AmiA-GFP, DmsA-GFP, and MdoD-GFP. We conclude that as-yet-unidentified control mechanisms reject the investigated GFP fusion proteins for translocation by the B. subtilis Tat machinery and, at the same time, set limits to their Tat-independent secretion, presumably via the Sec pathway.

  17. Growth of nano hexagon-like flake arrays cerium carbonate created with PAH as the substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Hu, Y.H.; Liu, Z.G.; Wang, X.F.; Wang, M.T.

    2015-01-15

    Petals-like Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} on Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} nano hexagon-like flake arrays have been precipitatingly fabricated using PAH substrates. By changing the way of feeding, PAH concentration and aging time, petals-like Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} was created best when adding PAH into the Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solution, joined (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution along with mixing, PAH concentration is 0.9 g/L, aging time is 4 h. A growth mechanism was proposed to account for the growth of the petals-like Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} with PAH as the substrate. Poly allylamine hydrochloride (PAH) is as template agent which forms π-allyl complex with Ce{sup 3+} and controls the morphology of Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} particle. PAH and Ce{sup 3+} form π-allyl complex, and then induce the formation of Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} crystal nucleus. And infrared spectrum analysis verified. XRD show that after adding PAH which is adsorbed on the crystal plane, the growth of Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} crystal is inhibited on (2 4 2), the growth is promoted on (2 0 2) which is differentiated into the new (1 5 1), (2 2 2) is unchanged, Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} crystal is accumulated petals shape by hexagon-like flake. UV absorption spectra show that CeO{sub 2} as prepared precursor Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} after calcinations in air at high temperatures, the petal-like CeO{sub 2} has strong UV absorption and reflection effects, and absorption interval changed significantly by the move to UVA from UVB. - Graphical abstract: Each Ce-atom connects three Cl-atoms and three allyls in three dimensional spaces. To take the plane as a reference plane which is arrayed with three Ce-atom as equilateral triangle. The triangular each vertex is Ce-atom, the triangular center place is Cl-atom, the equilateral triangle which is mutually perpendicular with Ce-triangle surface and the inclined angle is 60° is made up with three Cl-atoms. - Highlights: • Petals

  18. Au impact on GaAs epitaxial growth on GaAs (111){sub B} substrates in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Zhi-Ming; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Sun, Wen; Zhang, Zhi; Yang, Lei; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2013-02-11

    GaAs growth behaviour under the presence of Au nanoparticles on GaAs {l_brace}111{r_brace}{sub B} substrate is investigated using electron microscopy. It has been found that, during annealing, enhanced Ga surface diffusion towards Au nanoparticles leads to the GaAs epitaxial growth into {l_brace}113{r_brace}{sub B} faceted triangular pyramids under Au nanoparticles, governed by the thermodynamic growth, while during conventional GaAs growth, growth kinetics dominates, resulting in the flatted triangular pyramids at high temperature and the epitaxial nanowires growth at relatively low temperature. This study provides an insight of Au nanoparticle impact on GaAs growth, which is critical for understanding the formation mechanisms of semiconductor nanowires.

  19. Surface stability and the selection rules of substrate orientation for optimal growth of epitaxial II-VI semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Wan-Jian; Yang, Ji-Hui; Zaunbrecher, Katherine; Gessert, Tim; Barnes, Teresa; Wei, Su-Huai; Yan, Yanfa

    2015-10-05

    The surface structures of ionic zinc-blende CdTe (001), (110), (111), and (211) surfaces are systematically studied by first-principles density functional calculations. Based on the surface structures and surface energies, we identify the detrimental twinning appearing in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of II-VI compounds as the (111) lamellar twin boundaries. To avoid the appearance of twinning in MBE growth, we propose the following selection rules for choosing optimal substrate orientations: (1) the surface should be nonpolar so that there is no large surface reconstructions that could act as a nucleation center and promote the formation of twins; (2) the surface structure should have low symmetry so that there are no multiple equivalent directions for growth. These straightforward rules, in consistent with experimental observations, provide guidelines for selecting proper substrates for high-quality MBE growth of II-VI compounds.

  20. Bulk growth and surface characterization of epitaxy ready cadmium zinc telluride substrates for use in IR imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, J. P.; Martinez, B.; Betz, T. E. M.; MacKenzie, J.; Kumar, F. J.; Bindley, G.

    2016-05-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is an important compound semiconductor material upon which Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) layers are deposited epitaxially to form structures that are used in high performance detectors covering a wide infrared (IR) spectral band. The epitaxial growth of high quality MCT layers presents many technical challenges and a critical determinant of material performance is the quality of the underlying bulk CZT substrate. CZT itself is a difficult material to manufacture where traditional methods of bulk growth are complex and low yielding, which constrains the supply of commercially available substrates. In this work we report on the epitaxy-ready finishing of Travelling Heather Method (THM) grown Cd0.96Zn0.04Te substrates. The THM method is well established for the growth of high quality CZT crystals used in nuclear, X-ray and spectroscopic imaging applications and in this work we demonstrate the application of this technique to the growth of IR specification CZT substrates with areas of up to 5 cm x 5 cm square. We will discuss the advantages of the THM method over alternative methods of bulk CZT growth where the high yield and material uniformity advantages of this technique will be demonstrated. Chemo-mechanical polishing (CMP) of 4 cm x 4 cm CZT substrates reveals that III-V (InSb/GaSb) like levels of epitaxy-ready surface finishing may be obtained with modified process chemistries. Surface quality assessments will be made by various surface analytical and microscopy techniques from which the suitability of the material for subsequent assessment of quality by epitaxial growth will be ascertained.

  1. Epitaxial growth and electrochemical transfer of graphene on Ir(111)/α-Al2O3(0001) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Shinji; Saito, Yuta; Kodama, Hideyuki; Sawabe, Atsuhito

    2016-07-01

    Low-pressure chemical vapor deposition growth of graphene on Iridium (Ir) layers epitaxially deposited on α-Al2O3 (0001) substrates was investigated. The X-ray diffraction, Raman and reflection high energy electron diffraction characterizations revealed that graphene films were epitaxially grown on Ir(111) layers, and the in-plane epitaxial relationship between graphene, Ir(111), and α-Al2O3(0001) was graphene ⟨ 1 1 ¯ 00 ⟩//Ir⟨ 11 2 ¯ ⟩//α-Al2O3⟨ 11 2 ¯ 0 ⟩. The graphene on Ir(111) was electrochemically transferred onto SiO2/Si substrates. We also demonstrated the reuse of the Ir(111)/α-Al2O3(0001) substrates in multiple growth and transfer cycles.

  2. The effect of substrate temperature and growth rate on the doping efficiency of single crystal boron doped diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Demlow, SN; Rechenberg, R; Grotjohn, T

    2014-10-01

    The substrate growth temperature dependence of the plasma gas-phase to solid-phase doping efficiency in single crystal, boron doped diamond (BDD) deposition is investigated. Single crystal diamond (SCD) is grown by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (MPACVD) on high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) type Ib substrates. Samples are grown at substrate temperatures of 850-950 degrees C for each of five doping concentration levels, to determine the effect of the growth temperature on the doping efficiency and defect morphology. The substrate temperature during growth is shown to have a significant effect on the grown sample defect morphology, and a temperature dependence of the doping efficiency is also shown. The effect of the growth rate on the doping efficiency is discussed, and the ratio of the boron concentration in the gas phase to the flux of carbon incorporated into the solid diamond phase is shown to be a more predictive measure of the resulting boron concentration than the gas phase boron to carbon ratio that is more commonly reported. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Blanket and Patterned Growth of CdTe on (211)Si Substrates by Metal-Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-15

    Vapor Deposition, Epitaxial Lateral Overgrowth, Selective Epitaxy, CdTe Ishwara B. Bhat*,1, , Sunil R. Rao1, , Shashidhar Shintri2, , Randolph N...growth of CdTe on (211)Si substrates by metal- organic vapor phase epitaxy Ishwara B. Bhat*,1, Sunil R. Rao1, Shashidhar Shintri2, and Randolph N

  4. Effect of substrate morphology slope distributions on light scattering, nc-Si:H film growth, and solar cell performance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Yun; Santbergen, Rudi; Jäger, Klaus; Sever, Martin; Krč, Janez; Topič, Marko; Hänni, Simon; Zhang, Chao; Heidt, Anna; Meier, Matthias; van Swaaij, René A C M M; Zeman, Miro

    2014-12-24

    Thin-film silicon solar cells are often deposited on textured ZnO substrates. The solar-cell performance is strongly correlated to the substrate morphology, as this morphology determines light scattering, defective-region formation, and crystalline growth of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H). Our objective is to gain deeper insight in these correlations using the slope distribution, rms roughness (σ(rms)) and correlation length (lc) of textured substrates. A wide range of surface morphologies was obtained by Ar plasma treatment and wet etching of textured and flat-as-deposited ZnO substrates. The σ(rms), lc and slope distribution were deduced from AFM scans. Especially, the slope distribution of substrates was represented in an efficient way that light scattering and film growth direction can be more directly estimated at the same time. We observed that besides a high σ(rms), a high slope angle is beneficial to obtain high haze and scattering of light at larger angles, resulting in higher short-circuit current density of nc-Si:H solar cells. However, a high slope angle can also promote the creation of defective regions in nc-Si:H films grown on the substrate. It is also found that the crystalline fraction of nc-Si:H solar cells has a stronger correlation with the slope distributions than with σ(rms) of substrates. In this study, we successfully correlate all these observations with the solar-cell performance by using the slope distribution of substrates.

  5. High Performance Bioanode Development for Fermentable Substrates via Controlled Electroactive Biofilm Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Ichihashi, Osamu; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Borole, Abhijeet P

    2014-11-11

    A bioanode was optimized to generate current densities reaching 38.4 4.9 A m-2, which brings bioelectrochemical systems closer to commercial consideration. Glucose and lactate were fed together in a continuous or fed-batch mode. The current density increased from 2.3 A m-2 to 38.4 A m-2 over a 33 day period and remained stable thereafter. The coulombic efficiency ranged from 50% to 80%. A change in substrate concentration from 200 mg L-1 to 5 mg L-1 decreased maximum current density from 38.4 A m-2 to 12.3 A m-2. The anode consortia included Firmicutes (55.0%), Proteobacteria (41.8%) and Bacteroidetes (2.1%) constituting two potential electrogenic genera: Geobacter (6.8%) and Aeromonas (31.9%). The current production was found to be limited by kinetics during the growth period (33 days), and mass transfer, thereafter. The results indicate the necessity of removing spent biomass for efficient long term operation and treatment of wastewater streams.

  6. Manufacturable MBE growth process for Sb-based photodetector materials on large diameter substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubyshev, Dmitri; Qiu, Yueming; Fastenau, Joel M.; Liu, Amy W. K.; Koerperick, Edwin J.; Olesberg, Jon T.; Norton, Dennis, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Antimony-based photodetector materials have attracted considerable interest for their potential and demonstrated performance in infrared detection and imaging applications. Mid-wavelength infrared detector has been demonstrated using bulk InAsSb/AlAsSb-based nBn structures. Heterostructures based on InAs/Ga(In)Sb strained layer superlattices create a type-II band alignment that can be tailored to cover a wide range of the mid- and long-wavelength infrared absorption bands by varying the thickness and composition of the constituent materials. Through careful design, these Sb-based detectors can realize desirable features such as higher operating temperature, better uniformity, suppression of Auger recombination, reduction of tunneling currents, and higher quantum efficiency. The manufacturing challenge of these structures is the reproducible growth of high-quality Sb-based epiwafers due to their complex designs including large numbers of alternating thin layers and mixed group-V elements. In this paper, we discuss the manufacturability of such epiwafers on 3" and 4" diameter GaSb substrates by molecular beam epitaxy using multi-wafer production tools. Various techniques were used to characterize the material properties of these wafers, including high-resolution x-ray diffraction, low-temperature photoluminescence, Nomarski optical microscopy, and atomic force microscopy.

  7. Growth of SiO 2 on InP substrate by liquid phase deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Po Hsun; Yang, Chyi Da

    2010-04-01

    We have grown silicon dioxide (SiO 2) on indium phosphorous (InP) substrate by liquid phase deposition (LPD) method. With inserting InP wafer in the treatment solution composed of SiO 2 saturated hydrofluorosilicic acid (H 2SiF 6), 0.1 M boric acid (H 3BO 3) and 1.74 M diluted hydrochloric acid (HCl), the maximum deposition rate and refractive index for the as-grown LPD-SiO 2 film were about 187.5 Å/h and 1.495 under the constant growth temperature of 40 °C. The secondary ion mass spectroscope (SIMS) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) confirmed that the elements of silicon, oxygen, and chloride were found in the as-grown LPD-SiO 2 film. On the other hand, the effects of treatment solution incorporated with the hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) that can regulate the concentration of OH - ion were also shown in this article. The experimental results represented that the deposition rate decreases with increasing the concentration of hydrogen peroxide due to the reduced concentration of SiO 2 saturated H 2SiF 6 in treatment solution.

  8. Characterization of nitrogen substrate limitation on Escherichia coli's growth by parameter identification tools.

    PubMed

    Rios-Lozano, M; Guerrero-Torres, V; Badillo-Corona, A; Chairez, I; Garibay-Orijel, C

    2016-07-01

    Carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (CNR) has shown to be a relevant factor in microorganisms growth and metabolites production. It is usual that this factor compromises the productivity yield of different microorganisms. However, CNR has been rarely modeled and therefore the nature of its specific influence on metabolites production has not been understood clearly. This paper describes a parametric characterization of the CNR effect on the Escherichia coli metabolism. A set of parameters was proposed to introduce a mathematical model that considers the biomass, substrate and several byproducts dynamical behavior under batch regimen and CNR influence. Identification algorithm used to calculate the parameters considers a novel least mean square strategy that formalizes the CNR influence in E. coli metabolism. This scheme produced a step-by-step method that was suitable for obtaining the set of parameters that describes the model. This method was evaluated under two scenarios: (a) using the data from a set of numerical simulations where the model was tested under the presence of artificial noises and (b) the information obtained from a set of experiments under different CNR. In both cases, a leave-one-experiment-out cross-validation study was considered to evaluate the model prediction capabilities. Feasibility of the parametric identification method was proven in both considered scenarios.

  9. The controlled growth of GaN microrods on Si(111) substrates by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foltynski, Bartosz; Garro, Nuria; Vallo, Martin; Finken, Matthias; Giesen, Christoph; Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei; Cantarero, Andrés; Heuken, Michael

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a selective area growth (SAG) approach for growing GaN microrods on patterned SiNx/Si(111) substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) is studied. The surface morphology, optical and structural properties of vertical GaN microrods terminated by pyramidal shaped facets (six { 10 1 bar 1} planes) were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), room temperature photoluminescence (PL) and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. Measurements revealed high-quality GaN microcolumns grown with silane support. Characterized structures were grown nearly strain-free (central frequency of Raman peak of 567±1 cm-1) with crystal quality comparable to bulk crystals (FWHM=4.2±1 cm-1). Such GaN microrods might be used as a next-generation device concept for solid-state lighting (SSL) applications by realizing core-shell InGaN/GaN multi-quantum wells (MQWs) on the n-GaN rod base.

  10. Growth, structure and magnetism of self-organized epitaxial nano-alloys on a metallic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, S.; Moreau, N.; Repain, V.; Chacon, C.; Girard, Y.; Klein, J.; Lagoute, J.; Bulou, H.; Scheurer, F.; Goyhenex, C.; Ohresser, Ph.

    2013-03-01

    The CoPt alloy is one of the most studied bimetallic compounds, due to its potential application for magnetic recording. We report here on CoxPt1-x nano-alloys deposited on the well-known Au(111) reconstructed surface since it has been recognized as a powerful substrate in order to investigate the magnetic properties of metallic nano-clusters. The growth of CoxPt1-x clusters on the Au(111) surface observed by STM revealed a morphological transition from single layer to bilayer islands with the Co concentration x. Using molecular dynamics calculations, we show that this transition is driven by the local strain due to Co atoms. These results are interpreted by a competition between the interface energy, the mixing energy and the elastic energy. Using X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism, we have studied the magnetic properties of these nano-alloys. The out-of-plane anisotropy of pure Co clusters strongly decreases, until it goes in-plane for 40% of Pt. This spin reorientation transition is interpreted by a phenomenological pair model for magnetic anisotropy.

  11. The broad-spectrum antiviral compound ST-669 restricts chlamydial inclusion development and bacterial growth and localizes to host cell lipid droplets within treated cells.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Valiant, William G; Eriksen, Steven G; Hruby, Dennis E; Allen, Robert D; Rockey, Daniel D

    2014-07-01

    Novel broad-spectrum antimicrobials are a critical component of a strategy for combating antibiotic-resistant pathogens. In this study, we explored the activity of the broad-spectrum antiviral compound ST-669 for activity against different intracellular bacteria and began a characterization of its mechanism of antimicrobial action. ST-669 inhibits the growth of three different species of chlamydia and the intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii in Vero and HeLa cells but not in McCoy (murine) cells. The antichlamydial and anti-C. burnetii activity spectrum was consistent with those observed for tested viruses, suggesting a common mechanism of action. Cycloheximide treatment in the presence of ST-669 abrogated the inhibitory effect, demonstrating that eukaryotic protein synthesis is required for tested activity. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that different chlamydiae grow atypically in the presence of ST-669, in a manner that suggests the compound affects inclusion formation and organization. Microscopic analysis of cells treated with a fluorescent derivative of ST-669 demonstrated that the compound localized to host cell lipid droplets but not to other organelles or the host cytosol. These results demonstrate that ST-669 affects intracellular growth in a host-cell-dependent manner and interrupts proper development of chlamydial inclusions, possibly through a lipid droplet-dependent process.

  12. Gallium arsenide (GaAs) island growth under SiO(2) nanodisks patterned on GaAs substrates.

    PubMed

    Tjahjana, Liliana; Wang, Benzhong; Tanoto, Hendrix; Chua, Soo-Jin; Yoon, Soon Fatt

    2010-05-14

    We report a growth phenomenon where uniform gallium arsenide (GaAs) islands were found to grow underneath an ordered array of SiO(2) nanodisks on a GaAs(100) substrate. Each island eventually grows into a pyramidal shape resulting in the toppling of the supported SiO(2) nanodisk. This phenomenon occurred consistently for each nanodisk across a large patterned area of approximately 50 x 50 microm(2) (with nanodisks of 210 nm diameter and 280 nm spacing). The growth mechanism is attributed to a combination of 'catalytic' growth and facet formation.

  13. Au-Seeded Growth of Vertical and in-Plane III–V Nanowires on Graphite Substrates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Graphene is promising as a transparent, flexible, and possibly cost-effective substrate for nanowire-based devices. We have investigated Au-seeded III–V nanowire growth with graphite as a model substrate. The highest yield of undoped vertical nanowires was found for InAs, but we also observed vertical nanowires for the InP, GaP, and GaAs materials. The yield of vertical nanowires for GaP and GaAs was strongly improved by supplying the p-dopant DEZn before nanowire growth but not by supplying H2S or HCl. In-plane GaAs and GaP nanowire growth exhibited an unexpected behavior, where the seed particles seemingly reflected on the side facets of other nanowires. These results pave the way for vertical and in-plane hybrid graphene- nanowire devices. PMID:24592968

  14. Microbial enrichment of a novel growing substrate and its effect on plant growth.

    PubMed

    Trifonova, R; Postma, J; Schilder, M T; van Elsas, J D

    2009-10-01

    The quality of torrefied grass fibers (TGF) as a new potting soil ingredient was tested in a greenhouse experiment. TGF was colonized with previously selected microorganisms. Four colonization treatments were compared: (1) no inoculants, (2) the fungus Coniochaeta ligniaria F/TGF15 alone, (3) the fungus followed by inoculation with two selected bacteria, and (4) the fungus with seven selected bacteria. Cultivation-based and DNA-based methods, i.e., PCR-DGGE and BOX-PCR, were applied to assess the bacterial and fungal communities established in the TGF. Although colonization was not performed under sterile conditions, all inoculated strains were recovered from TGF up to 26 days incubation. Stable fungal and bacterial populations of 10(8) and 10(9) CFU/g TGF, respectively, were reached. As a side effect of the torrefaction process that aimed at the chemical stabilization of grass fibers, potentially phytotoxic compounds were generated. These phytotoxic compounds were cold-extracted from the fibers and analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Four of 15 target compounds that had previously been found in the extract of TGF were encountered, namely phenol, 2-methoxyphenol, benzopyran-2-one, and tetrahydro-5,6,7,7a-benzofuranone. The concentration of these compounds decreased significantly during incubation. The colonized TGF was mixed with peat (P) in a range of 100%:0%, 50%:50%, 20%:80%, and 0%:100% TGF/P (w/w), respectively, to assess suitability for plant growth. Germination of tomato seeds was assessed three times, i.e., with inoculated TGF that had been incubated for 12, 21, and 26 days. In these tests, 90-100% of the seeds germinated in 50%:50% and 20%:80% TGF/P, whereas on average only 50% of the seeds germinated in pure TGF. Germination was not improved by the microbial inoculants. However, plant fresh weight as well as leaf area of 28-day-old tomato plants were significantly increased in all treatments where C. ligniaria F/TGF15 was inoculated compared

  15. Growth of tin oxide thin films composed of nanoparticles on hydrophilic and hydrophobic glass substrates by spray pyrolysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paloly, Abdul Rasheed; Satheesh, M.; Martínez-Tomás, M. Carmen; Muñoz-Sanjosé, Vicente; Rajappan Achary, Sreekumar; Bushiri, M. Junaid

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we have demonstrated the growth of tin oxide (SnO2) thin films composed of nanoparticles on hydrophobic (siliconized) and hydrophilic (non-siliconized) glass substrates by using the spray pyrolysis technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the formation of SnO2 thin films with tetragonal rutile-phase structure. Average particle size of nanoparticles was determined to be in the range of 3-4 nm measured from the front view images obtained by a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FESEM), while the size of nanoparticle clusters, when present, were in the range of 11-20 nm. Surface morphology of SnO2 films grown over hydrophobic substrates revealed larger isolated particles which are less crowded compared to the highly crowded and agglomerated smaller particles in films on hydrophilic substrates. Blue shift in the band gap is observed in samples in which the average particle size is slightly larger than the exciton Bohr radius. Photoluminescence (PL) analysis of samples grown over hydrophobic substrates exhibited an intense defect level emission and a weak near band edge emission. The enhanced visible emission from these SnO2 thin films is attributed to lattice defects formed during the film growth due to the mismatch between the film and the hydrophobic substrate surface.

  16. Growth mode and defect evaluation of GaSb on GaAs substrate: a transmission electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shenghong; Balakrishnan, Ganesh; Huffaker, Diana L

    2011-06-01

    We use transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques to confirm and analyze the interfacial misfit (IMF) and non-IMF growth modes for GaSb epilayers on GaAs substrates. Under optimized IMF growth conditions, only pure 90 degrees dislocations are generated along both [110] and [1-10] directions and located exactly at the epi-substrate interface, which leads to very low density of misfit dislocations propagating from the GaSb/GaAs interface along the growth direction, compared to the non-IMF growth condition. The mechanism of defect annihilation indicates that this IMF mergence process happens without formation of threading dislocations into the GaSb epilayer, which is a completely relaxed growth mode with extremely low defect density. Based on scanning several sets of wafer surfaces, plan-view TEM confirms that the misfit defect densities are estimated to be approximately 5 x 10(5) cm(-2) for IMF growth mode and approximately 10(9) cm(-2) for non-IMF growth mode.

  17. Effects of water depth and substrate color on the growth and body color of the red sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Senhao; Dong, Shuanglin; Gao, Qinfeng; Ren, Yichao; Wang, Fang

    2015-05-01

    Three color variants of the sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus are recognized, the red one is highly valued in the market. When the red variant is cultured in ponds in China, its body color changes from red to celadon in 3-6 months. The effects of water depth and substrate color on the growth and body color of this animal were investigated. Juveniles of red A. japonicus were cultured in cages suspended at a range of water depths (20, 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm). The specific growth rate of red sea cucumbers was significantly higher in animals cultured at deeper water layers compared with those grown at shallowers. Body weights were greatest for sea cucumbers cultured at a depth of 150 cm and their survival rates were highest at a depth of 200 cm. A scale to evaluate the color of red sea cucumbers ( R value) was developed using a Pantone standard color card. All stocked animals in the 9-month trial retained a red color, however the red body color was much more intense in sea cucumbers cultured at shallower depths, while animals suspended in deeper layers became pale. In a separate trial, A. japonicus were cultured in suspended cages with seven different colored substrates. Substrate color had a significant effect on the growth and body-color of red A. japonicus. The yield were greatest for A. japonicus cultured on a yellow substrate, followed by green > white > orange > red > black and blue. All sea cucumbers in the 7-month trial retained a red color, although the red was most intense (highest R value) in animals cultured on a blue substrate and pale (lowest R value) for animals cultured on a green substrate.

  18. Drawing circuits with carbon nanotubes: scratch-induced graphoepitaxial growth of carbon nanotubes on amorphous silicon oxide substrates.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Jin; Chung, Yoon Jang; Kim, Yun Ho; Han, Jeongho; Lee, Young-Kook; Kong, Ki-Jeong; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Young Kuk; Kim, Byoung Gak; Lee, Jeong-O

    2014-06-13

    Controlling the orientations of nanomaterials on arbitrary substrates is crucial for the development of practical applications based on such materials. The aligned epitaxial growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on specific crystallographic planes in single crystalline sapphire or quartz has been demonstrated; however, these substrates are unsuitable for large scale electronic device applications and tend to be quite expensive. Here, we report a scalable method based on graphoepitaxy for the aligned growth of SWNTs on conventional SiO₂/Si substrates. The "scratches" generated by polishing were found to feature altered atomic organizations that are similar to the atomic alignments found in vicinal crystalline substrates. The linear and circular scratch lines could promote the oriented growth of SWNTs through the chemical interactions between the C atoms in SWNT and the Si adatoms in the scratches. The method presented has the potential to be used to prepare complex geometrical patterns of SWNTs by 'drawing' circuits using SWNTs without the need for state-of-the-art equipment or complicated lithographic processes.

  19. Ridge InGaAs/InP multi-quantum-well selective growth in nanoscale trenches on Si (001) substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.; Zhou, X.; Li, M.; Kong, X.; Mi, J.; Wang, M.; Wang, W.; Pan, J.

    2016-01-11

    Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of InGaAs/InP multi-quantum-well in nanoscale V-grooved trenches on Si (001) substrate was studied using the aspect ratio trapping method. A high quality GaAs/InP buffer layer with two convex (111) B facets was selectively grown to promote the highly uniform, single-crystal ridge InP/InGaAs multi-quantum-well structure growth. Material quality was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and room temperature micro-photoluminescence measurements. This approach shows great promise for the fabrication of photonics devices and nanolasers on Si substrate.

  20. Microcalorimetric study of the anaerobic growth of Escherichia coli: measurements of the affinity of whole cells for various energy substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Belaich, A; Belaich, J P

    1976-01-01

    Microcalorimetry has been used to determine the affinity of whole cells of Escherichia coli for glucose, galactose, fructose, and lactose. Anaerobic growth thermograms were analyzed, and the Km and Vmax values for these energy substrates were measured at pH 7.8. Results obtained with this technique using various organisms growing anaerobically on different sugars are compared. This comparison shows that in practically all cases the cellular rate of catabolic activity is a hyperbolic function of the energy substrate concentrations at low sugar concentrations. In some cases this technique also allows determination of kinetics at high sugar concentrations. PMID:1373

  1. Properties of topological insulator Bi2Se3 films prepared by thermal evaporation growth on different substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min.

    2017-02-01

    Topological insulator Bi2Se3 thin films were grown by the thermal evaporation deposition on different substrates and their phase structures and magneto-transport properties were discussed. The films growth is along the c-axis, and their surfaces exhibited terrace-like quintuple layers. Resistivity upturn as well as weak anti-localization was observed only in the film with Si and LAO substrates. The linear magneto-resistance (LMR) under high field was found, which was associated with the gapless topological surface states and the quantum origin. The results indicate that the films are highly uniform.

  2. Epitaxial growth of highly-crystalline spinel ferrite thin films on perovskite substrates for all-oxide devices

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Jarrett A.; Gao, Ran; Schiffer, Peter; Martin, Lane W.

    2015-01-01

    The potential growth modes for epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 on SrTiO3 (001) are investigated through control of the energetics of the pulsed-laser deposition growth process (via substrate temperature and laser fluence). We find that Fe3O4 grows epitaxially in three distinct growth modes: 2D-like, island, and 3D-to-2D, the last of which is characterized by films that begin growth in an island growth mode before progressing to a 2D growth mode. Films grown in the 2D-like and 3D-to-2D growth modes are atomically flat and partially strained, while films grown in the island growth mode are terminated in islands and fully relaxed. We find that the optimal structural, transport, and magnetic properties are obtained for films grown on the 2D-like/3D-to-2D growth regime boundary. The viability for including such thin films in perovskite-based all-oxide devices is demonstrated by growing a Fe3O4/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 spin valve epitaxially on SrTiO3. PMID:26030835

  3. Retinal flat cells are a substrate that facilitates retinal neuron growth and fiber formation.

    PubMed

    Li, H P; Sheffield, J B

    1986-03-01

    When embryonic chick neural retinas are dissociated into a suspension of single cells and plated in stationary cultures, "flat cells" spread out and form a monolayer to which the neuronal cells attach. It has been shown previously that the flat cells are related to the Müller cell population of the retina. The neuronal cells form aggregates interconnected by bundles of axon-like fibers. The authors have been able to isolate relatively pure flat cells by shaking off the neuronal aggregates after 5 or 6 days of culture. In order to determine if the flat cells have a unique relationship with the neuronal cells, freshly dissociated neural retina cells were added to monolayers of flat cells and their behavior compared to that on chick embryo mesodermal cells. It has been observed by phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy that the growth behavior of the retina cells on flat cells is significantly different from that on mesodermal cells. On flat cells, neuronal retina cells form flat patches in which new growing flat cells fuse with the monolayer, and neuronal cells attach as single cells or small clusters. Axon-like fibers are present several hours after plating, and by day 4 an extensive network of fibers connects single cells and clusters on the surface of the monolayer. When retina cells are plated onto mesodermal cells, the cells form aggregates which are organized along the long axis of the mesodermal cells. The flat cells provide a unique substrate for the differentiation and neurite extension of neuronal cells from embryonic chick retina.

  4. Low-temperature GaN growth on silicon substrates by single gas-source epitaxy and photo-excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, R.A.; Tolle, J.; Chizmeshya, A.V.G.; Roucka, R.; Ritter, Cole; Kouvetakis, J.; Tsong, I.S.T.

    2005-08-15

    We report a unique low-temperature growth method for epitaxial GaN on Si(111) substrates via a ZrB{sub 2}(0001) buffer layer. The method utilizes the decomposition of a single gas-source precursor (D{sub 2}GaN{sub 3}){sub 3} on the substrate surface to form GaN. The film growth process is further promoted by irradiation of ultraviolet light to enhance the growth rate and ordering of the film. The best epitaxial film quality is achieved at a growth temperature of 550 deg. C with a growth rate of 3 nm/min. The films exhibit intense photoluminescence emission at 10 K with a single peak at 3.48 eV, indicative of band-edge emission for a single-phase hexagonal GaN film. The growth process achieved in this study is compatible with low Si processing temperatures and also enables direct epitaxy of GaN on ZrB{sub 2} in contrast to conventional metalorganic chemical vapor deposition based approaches.

  5. Marine heterotrophic bacteria in continuous culture, the bacterial carbon growth efficiency, and mineralization at excess substrate and different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Mercado, Alejandrina; Cajal-Medrano, Ramón; Maske, Helmut

    2007-07-01

    To model the physiological potential of marine heterotrophic bacteria, their role in the food web, and in the biogeochemical carbon cycle, we need to know their growth efficiency response within a matrix of different temperatures and degrees of organic substrate limitation. In this work, we present one part of this matrix, the carbon growth efficiencies of marine bacteria under different temperatures and nonlimiting organic and inorganic substrate supply. We ran aerobic turbidostats with glucose enriched seawater, inoculated with natural populations of heterotrophic marine bacteria at 10, 14, 18, 22, and 26 degrees C. The average cell-specific growth rates increased with temperature from 1.17 to 2.6 h-1. At steady-state total CO2 production, biomass production [particulate organic carbon (POC) and nitrogen (PON)], and viruslike particle abundance was measured. CO2 production and specific growth rate increased with increasing temperature. Bacterial carbon growth efficiency (BCGE), the particulate carbon produced per dissolved carbon utilized, varied between 0.12 and 0.70. Maximum BCGE values and decreased specific respiration rates occurred at higher temperatures (22 and 26 degrees C) and growth rates. This trend was largely attributable to an increase in POC per cell abundance; when the BCGE was recalculated, parameterizing the biomass as the product of cell concentration and a constant cellular carbon content, the opposite trend was observed.

  6. Direct growth of patterned graphene on SiO2 substrates without the use of catalysts or lithography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Seung; Joo, Kisu; Jerng, Sahng-Kyoon; Lee, Jae Hong; Yoon, Euijoon; Chun, Seung-Hyun

    2014-09-07

    We demonstrate a one-step fabrication of patterned graphene on SiO2 substrates through a process free from catalysts, transfer, and lithography. By simply placing a shadow mask during the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of graphene, an arbitrary shape of graphene can be obtained on SiO2 substrate. The formation of graphene underneath the shadow mask was effectively prevented by the low-temperature, catalyst-free process. Growth conditions were optimized to form polycrystalline graphene on SiO2 substrates and the crystalline structure was characterized by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Patterned graphene on SiO2 functions as a field-effect device by itself. Our method is compatible with present device processing techniques, and should be highly desirable for the proliferation of graphene applications.

  7. Direct Growth of a-Plane GaN on r-Plane Sapphire Substrate by Metalorganic Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Masahiro; Mochimizo, Noriaki; Hoshino, Katsuyuki; Tadatomo, Kazuyuki

    2007-02-01

    We have investigated the direct growth of nonpolar a-plane GaN layers on an r-plane sapphire substrate by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE). A high-density nucleation of GaN islands was obtained on the r-plane sapphire substrate at the initial stage of the high-temperature growth without a buffer layer, which resulted in a two-dimensional (2D) growth mode. We studied the effects of V/III ratio growth conditions on the surface morphology and growth features of an a-plane GaN layer. The results showed that a high density of pits with an inverse-pyramidal shape were formed at a high V/III ratio, whereas a relatively low density of pits were formed at a low V/III ratio due to the increase in the rate of lateral growth along the c-axis direction. We successfully grew a-plane GaN layers with a flat and pit-free surface using the “two-step growth method”. The method consisted of growing a first layer at a high V/III ratio and growing a second layer at a low V/III ratio. We found that the first layer plays an important role in GaN layer growth. The formation of a void-free GaN layer with sidewall facets in the first step leads to a flat and pit-free layer grown at a high rate of lateral growth along the c-axis direction in the second step.

  8. Effect of nanohole size on selective area growth of InAs nanowire arrays on Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoye; Yang, Wenyuan; Wang, Baojun; Ji, Xianghai; Xu, Shengyong; Wang, Wei; Chen, Qing; Yang, Tao

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated the influence of nanohole size on selective-area growth (SAG) of InAs nanowire (NW) arrays on Si(111) substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The growth of well-defined and position-controlled InAs NW arrays with united vertical orientation can be achieved on the patterned substrates with a certain range of nanohole size, which paves the way for the fabrication of high-electron-mobility and surrounding-gate transistor arrays using NWs as channels. Moreover, it is found that more than one NW are increasingly likely grown per nanohole as the nanohole size increases, and the NWs become increasingly thin and short. This is considered to be due to the supersaturation of adsorbed species in the nanohole and the intense competition for adatoms among multiple NWs per nanohole.

  9. Morphology and Optical Properties of Zinc Oxide Films Grown on Metal Coated Glass Substrates by Aqueous Chemical Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakar, M. A.; Hamid, M. A. A.; Jalar, A.; Shamsudin, R.

    2013-04-01

    Zinc oxide films were deposited on three different metal coated substrates (gold, nickel and platinum) by aqueous chemical growth method. This paper discusses the effect of metal coated substrates on the morphology and optical properties of grown ZnO films. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) were employed to characterize the samples. All the as-deposited ZnO films exhibit crystalline hexagonal wurzite structure. The crystallite size of the ZnO films were in the range of 29 to 32 nm. FESEM micrographs revealed hexagonal rod, oval-like and flower-like ZnO structures formed on all metal coated substrates. The Pt coated film contains higher density hexagonal rod as compared to others metal coated substrate. Most probably the Pt lattice parameter is the nearest to ZnO compared to nickel and gold. The optical band gap energy, Eg of ZnO films were estimated to be 3.30 eV which is near to bulk Eg, 3.37 eV. This indicates that the ZnO grown by aqueous chemical growth is able to produce similar quality properties to other conventional method either films or bulk size.

  10. Growth and tribological properties of diamond films on silicon and tungsten carbide substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhika, R.; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2016-11-01

    Hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique was used to deposit microcrystalline diamond (MCD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films on silicon (Si) and tungsten carbide (WC-6Co) substrates. Friction coefficient of larger diamond grains deposited on WC-6Co substrate shows less value approximately 0.2 while this differs marginally on films grown on Si substrate. The study claims that for a less friction coefficient, the grain size is not necessarily smaller. However, the less friction coefficient (less than 0.1 saturated value) in MCD and NCD deposited on Si is explained by the formation of graphitized tribolayer. This layer easily forms when diamond phase is thermodynamically unstable.

  11. Growth and characterization of Czochralski-grown n and p-type GaAs for space solar cell substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, R. T.

    1983-01-01

    Progress in LEC (liquid encapsulated Czochralski) crystal growth techniques for producing high-quality, 3-inch-diameter, n- and p-type GaAs crystals suitable for solar cell applications is described. The LEC crystals with low dislocation densities and background impurities, high electrical mobilities, good dopant uniformity, and long diffusion lengths were reproducibly grown through control of the material synthesis, growth and doping conditions. The capability for producing these large-area, high-quality substrates should positively impact the manufacturability of highly efficiency, low cost, radiation-hard GaAs solar cells.

  12. Growth and characterization of GaAs layers on Si substrates by migration-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Liu, John K.; Radhakrishnan, Gouri; Katz, Joseph; Sakai, Shiro

    1988-01-01

    Migration-enhanced molecular beam epitaxial (MEMBE) growth and characterization of the GaAs layer on Si substrates (GaAs/Si) are reported. The MEMBE growth method is described, and material properties are compared with those of normal two-step MBE-grown or in situ annealed layers. Micrographs of cross-section view transmission electron microscopy and scanning surface electron microscopy of MEMBE-grown GaAs/Si showed dislocation densities of 10 to the 7th/sq cm. AlGaAs/GaAs double heterostructures have been successfully grown on MEMBE GaAs/Si by both metalorganic chemical vapor deposition and liquid phase epitaxy.

  13. Low temperature growth of ZnO nanostructures on flexible polystyrene substrates for optical, photoluminescence and wettability applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durga Prasad, Muvva; Pasha Shaik, Ummar; Madhurima, V.; Ghanashyam Krishna, M.

    2016-08-01

    The growth of ZnO nanostructures on flexible polystyrene substrates by a simple vacuum thermal evaporation process is reported. The ZnO films are deposited on polystyrene surfaces of 6 μm thickness which are initially anchored on glass substrates. The as-deposited films are annealed at temperatures up to 180 °C for 6-24 h after which the polystyrene is lifted off from the glass substrates to yield nanostructured films on a flexible substrate. At 180 °C there is transformation of the partially oxidized as-deposited films into nearly stoichiometric ZnO. This is accompanied by the formation of nanostructures such as nanorods, nanotubes and nanodoughnuts. The films, which were 50-200 nm in thickness, are polycrystalline in nature and also exhibit Zn/ZnO core-shell structures under favorable conditions. The nanostructures exhibit transmission greater than 80% in the visible and near infrared regions and band gaps of the order of 4 eV. The films exhibit strong blue photoluminescence and the peak position as well as intensity of emission can be tuned by varying thickness and annealing conditions. To demonstrate the flexibility, the ZnO coated polystyrene substrates were wrapped around a LED to show UV blocking property. Wettability studies indicate that films are hydrophobic with water contact angles between 92°-95°.

  14. Effect of Fe coating of nucleation sites on epitaxial growth of Fe oxide nanocrystals on Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibe, Takafumi; Watanabe, Kentaro; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    We studied the effect of Fe coating on the epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 nanocrystals (NCs) over Fe-coated Ge epitaxial nuclei on Si(111). To completely cover Ge nuclei with Fe, some amount of Fe (>8 monolayers) must be deposited. Such covering is a key to epitaxial growth because an Fe coating layer prevents the oxidation of Ge surfaces during Fe3O4 formation, resulting in the epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 on them. This study demonstrates that an appropriate Fe coating of nucleation sites leads to the epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 NCs on Si substrates, indicating the realization of environmentally friendly and low-cost Fe3O4 NCs as the resistance random access memory material.

  15. Comparison of CSD-YBCO growth on different single crystal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert, J.; Bäcker, M.; Falter, M.; Schroeder-Obst, D.

    2008-02-01

    2G HTS Coated Conductors properties can be improved by comparing different raw materials, precursor production routes and coating and annealing conditions. To suppress the influence of varying substrate tapes and buffer layer qualities on the HTS layers, a standard substrate is needed to improve the Jc values. In this work various pure single crystal substrates (SrTiO3 [STO], (LaAlO3)0.3(Sr2AlTaO6)0.7 [LSAT], LaAlO3 [LAO], NdGaO3 [NdGaO]) are investigated to find the material which is best in terms of price, texture and morphological layout and instantaneous availability. YBCO films deposited onto these substrates via chemical solution deposition (CSD) are analysed using XRD texture analysis, surface morphology analysis (high resolution AFM) and inductive measurement of the critical current density.

  16. Growth of coincident site lattice matched semiconductor layers and devices on crystalline substrates

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J

    2013-08-13

    Methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and said devices are disclosed. The methods include but are not limited to providing a substrate having a crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter (a). The method further includes growing a crystalline semiconductor layer on the crystalline substrate surface by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy, without any buffer layer between the crystalline semiconductor layer and the crystalline surface of the substrate. The crystalline semiconductor layer will be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the substrate lattice parameter (a). The lattice parameter (a') maybe related to the lattice parameter (a) by a scaling factor derived from a geometric relationship between the respective crystal lattices.

  17. Stimulation by potassium ions of the growth of Rhizopus oligosporus during liquid-and solid-substrate fermentations.

    PubMed

    Peñaloza, W; Davey, C L; Hedger, J N; Kell, D B

    1991-03-01

    Soya beans and several other beans and cereals have been used as substrates for tempe fermentation with the fungus Rhizopus oligosporus Saito. Except for the presence of alkaloids, the chemical composition of lupins (Lupinus mutabilis Sweet) is similar to that of soya beans. Therefore the potential of lupins for tempe production in regions with a long tradition of lupin consumption is promising. The preparation of the fermentation substrate when using bitter lupins (which contain significan quantities of alkaloids) as starting material includes a debittering stage to remove the alkaloids. However, we found that the debittering process yielded lupins that did not support the mycelial growth required in the tempe fermentation. We discovered that potassium is preferentially leached out during the debittering process. The effect of potassium on fungal biomass formation was monitored using a computerized system that determines biomass accretion by measurement of the electrical capacitance at radio frequencies. The importance of potassium for the growth of R. oligosporus was confirmed in liquid cultures. A linear relationship was found between biomass yield and K(+) concentration in the range of 1 to 10 mg/l. The present report represents one of the few demonstrations of a mineral deficiency during the growth of a fungus on a natural, solid substrate.

  18. Growth optimization and characterization of GaN epilayers on multifaceted (111) surfaces etched on Si(100) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ansah-Antwi, KwaDwo Konadu Chua, Soo Jin; Soh, Chew Beng; Liu, Hongfei

    2015-11-15

    The four nearest Si(111) multifaceted sidewalls were exposed inside an array of 3 μm-wide square holes patterned on an Si(100) substrate, and this patterned Si(100) substrate was used as a substrate for the deposition of a gallium nitride (GaN) epilayer. Subsequently the effect that the growth pressure, the etched-hole profiles, and the etched-hole arrangement had upon the quality of the as-grown GaN was investigated. The coalescence of the as-grown GaN epilayer on the exposed Si(111) facets was observed to be enhanced with reduced growth pressure from 120 to 90 Torr. A larger Si(001) plane area at the bottom of the etched holes resulted in bidirectional GaN domains, which resulted in poor material quality. The bidirectional GaN domains were observed as two sets of six peaks via a high-resolution x-ray diffraction phi scan of the GaN(10-11) reflection. It was also shown that a triangular array of etched holes was more desirable than square arrays of etched holes for the growth high-quality and continuous GaN films.

  19. Stabilisation of spent mushroom substrate for application as a plant growth-promoting organic amendment.

    PubMed

    Paula, Fabiana S; Tatti, Enrico; Abram, Florence; Wilson, Jude; O'Flaherty, Vincent

    2017-03-23

    Over three million tonnes of spent mushroom substrate (SMS) are produced in Europe every year as a by-product of the cultivation of Agaricus bisporus. The management of SMS has become an increasing challenge for the mushroom production industry, and finding environmentally and economically sustainable solutions for this organic residue is, therefore, highly desirable. Due to its physical properties and nutrient content, SMS has great potential to be employed in agricultural and horticultural sectors, and further contribute to reduce the use of non-renewable resources, such as peat. However, SMS is often regarded as not being stable and/or mature, which hampers its wide use for crop production. Here, we demonstrate the stabilisation of SMS and its subsequent use as organic fertiliser and partial peat replacement in horticulture. The stabilisation was performed in a laboratory-scale composting system, with controlled temperature and aeration. Physical and chemical parameters were monitored during composting and provided information on the progress of the process. Water soluble carbohydrates (WSC) content was found to be the most reliable parameter to predict SMS stability. In situ oxygen consumption indicated the main composting phases, reflecting major changes in microbial activity. The structure of the bacterial community was also found to be a potential predictor of stability, as the compositional changes followed the composting progress. By contrast, the fungal community did not present clear successional process along the experiment. Maturity and quality of the stabilised SMS were assessed in a horticultural growing trial. When used as the sole fertiliser source, SMS was able to support Lolium multiflorum (Italian ryegrass) growth and significantly improved grass yield with a concentration-dependent response, increasing grass biomass up to 300%, when compared to the untreated control. In summary, the results indicated that the method employed was efficient in

  20. Synthesis of epitaxial Si(100) nanowires on Si(100) substrate using vapor liquid solid growth in anodic aluminum oxide nanopore arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T.; Senz, S.; Shingubara, S.; Gösele, U.

    2007-06-01

    The synthesis of epitaxial Si nanowires with growth direction parallel to Si [100] on Si(100) substrate was demonstrated using a combination of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template, catalytic gold film sandwiched between the template and the Si(100) substrate and vapor-liquid-solid growth using SiH4 as the Si source. After growing out from the AAO nanopores, most Si nanowires changed their diameter and growth direction into larger diameter and <111> direction.

  1. Effects of U0126 and MK2206 on cell growth and re-growth of endometriotic stromal cells grown on substrates of varying stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Sachiko; Pouly, Jean-Luc; Canis, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common gynecological disorder responsible for infertility and pelvic pain. A complete cure for patients with endometriosis awaits new targets and strategies. Here we show that U0126 (a MEK inhibitor) and MK2206 (an AKT inhibitor) synergistically inhibit cell growth of deep endometriotic stromal cells (DES) grown on polyacrylamide gel substrates (PGS) of varying stiffness (2 or 30 kilopascal [kPa]) or plastic in vitro. No significant differences in cell proliferation were observed among DES, endometrial stromal cells of patients with endometriosis (EES) from the proliferative phase (P), EES-S (secretory phase) and EES-M (menstrual phase) compared to cells grown on a substrate of the same stiffness at both higher (U0126 [30 μM] and MK2206 [9 μM]) and lower (U0126 [15 μM] and MK2206 [4.5 μM]) combined doses. However, cell re-growth of DES after drug discontinuation was higher than that of EES-P and EES-S when cells were grown on rigid substrates at both combined doses. Combination U0126 and MK2206 treatment is more effective than each drug alone in cell growth inhibition of DES. However, further studies are required to investigate the mechanisms underlying high cell survival and proliferation after drug discontinuation for developing target therapies that prevent recurrence. PMID:28218307

  2. Substrate Structures For Growth Of Highly Oriented And/Or Epitaxial Layers Thereon

    DOEpatents

    Arendt, Paul N.; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Groves, James R.; Jia, Quanxi

    2005-07-26

    A composite substrate structure including a substrate, a layer of a crystalline metal oxide or crystalline metal oxynitride material upon the substrate, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the crystalline metal oxide or crystalline metal oxynitride material layer is provided together with additional layers such as one or more layers of a buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer. Jc's of 2.3×106 A/cm2 have been demonstrated with projected Ic's of 320 Amperes across a sample 1 cm wide for a superconducting article including a flexible polycrystalline metallic substrate, an inert oxide material layer upon the surface of the flexible polycrystalline metallic substrate, a layer of a crystalline metal oxide or crystalline metal oxynitride material upon the layer of the inert oxide material, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the crystalline metal oxide or crystalline metal oxynitride material layer, a layer of a buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer, and, a top-layer of a high temperature superconducting material upon the layer of a buffer material.

  3. Growth and characterization of CdS thin films on polymer substrates for photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Park, Yongseob; Kim, Eung Kwon; Lee, Suho; Lee, Jaehyeong

    2014-05-01

    In this work, cadmium sulfide (CdS) films were deposited on flexible polymer substrates such as polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). The r.f. magnetron sputtering, which is cost-effective scalable technique, was used for the film deposition. The structural and optical properties of the films grown at different sputtering pressures were investigated. When the CdS film was deposited at lower pressure, the crystallinity and the preferred orientation toward c-axis in hexagonal phase was improved. However, the optical transmittance was reduced as the sputtering pressure was decreased. Compared with the glass substrate, CdS films grown on polymer substrates were exhibited some wore structural and optical characteristics. CdTe thin film solar cell applied to sputtered CdS as a window layer showed a maximum efficiency of 11.6%.

  4. Microbial ecology of extreme environments: Antarctic dry valley yeasts and growth in substrate-limited habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishniac, H. S.

    1982-01-01

    The success of the Antarctic Dry Valley yeasts presumeably results from adaptations to multiple stresses, to low temperatures and substrate-limitation as well as prolonged resting periods enforced by low water availability. Previous investigations have suggested that the crucial stress is substrate limitation. Specific adaptations may be pinpointed by comparing the physiology of the Cryptococcus vishniacii complex, the yeasts of the Tyrol Valley, with their congeners from other habitats. Progress was made in methods of isolation and definition of ecological niches, in the design of experiments in competition for limited substrate, and in establishing the relationships of the Cryptococcus vishniacii complex with other yeasts. In the course of investigating relationships, a new method for 25SrRNA homology was developed. For the first time it appears that 25SrRNA homology may reflect parallel or convergent evolution.

  5. Growth of carbon nanotubes by Fe-catalyzed chemical vapor processes on silicon-based substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelucci, Renato; Rizzoli, Rita; Vinciguerra, Vincenzo; Fortuna Bevilacqua, Maria; Guerri, Sergio; Corticelli, Franco; Passini, Mara

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, a site-selective catalytic chemical vapor deposition synthesis of carbon nanotubes on silicon-based substrates has been developed in order to get horizontally oriented nanotubes for field effect transistors and other electronic devices. Properly micro-fabricated silicon oxide and polysilicon structures have been used as substrates. Iron nanoparticles have been obtained both from a thin Fe film evaporated by e-gun and from iron nitrate solutions accurately dispersed on the substrates. Single-walled nanotubes with diameters as small as 1 nm, bridging polysilicon and silicon dioxide “pillars”, have been grown. The morphology and structure of CNTs have been characterized by SEM, AFM and Raman spectroscopy.

  6. Growth of ZnO:Al thin films onto different substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Prepelita, Petronela; Medianu, R.; Garoi, F.; Moldovan, A.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we present some results regarding undoped and doped ZnO thin films deposited on various substrates like glass, silicon and kapton by rf magnetron sputtering. The influence of the amount of aluminum as well as the usage of different substrates on the final photovoltaic properties of the thin films is studied. For this, structural-morphological and optical investigations on the thin films are conducted. It was found that three important factors must be taken into account for adjusting the final desired application intended for the deposited thin films. These factors are: deposition conditions, the nature of both the dopant material and the substrate. A comparison study between undoped and doped case is also realized. Smooth Al doped ZnO thin films with a polycrystalline structure and a lower roughness than undoped ZnO are obtained.

  7. Investigation of Si-substrate preparation for GaAs-on-Si MBE growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayambaki, M.; Callec, R.; Constantinidis, G.; Papavassiliou, Ch.; Löchtermann, E.; Krasny, H.; Papadakis, N.; Panayotatos, P.; Georgakilas, A.

    1995-12-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and material characterization techniques have been used to investigate different chemical treatments for the preparation of Si substrates for GaAs-on-Si molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The need for a Si surface passivating oxide is justified and three different oxidizing solutions are compared for substrate cleanliness and oxide volatility. It is shown that the SC2 solution HCl : H 2O 2 : H 2O (1 : 1 : 6) at 75°C is an appropriate treatment for the final Si cleaning step, since it results to a very volatile oxide that can be desorbed at 750°C, without compromising Si surface cleanliness and GaAs purity. Si wafers with optimized preparation/packaging may also be used as "EPI-ready" substrates within some time after manufacturing.

  8. Effect of storage on the respirometric relationship between substrate utilization and microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Ciggin, A S; Orhon, D

    2014-09-01

    The paper evaluated the impact of substrate storage on the respirometric assessment of process stoichiometry based on oxygen uptake rate (OUR) measurements. Two parallel sequencing batch reactors were operated with pulse feeding of synthetic substrate mixture at a sludge age of 8 days and 2 days. During the cycle experiments with acetate, 40-45% of acetate was converted to polyhydroxybutyrate, which was partly consumed during each cycle. Respirometric analysis also yielded OUR profiles for the corresponding cyclic operation. A mass balance expression was derived based on oxygen utilization. Oxygen demands calculated on the basis of partial PHB utilization closely matched the experimental values retrieved from OUR profiles within limits of analytical precision. The relative contribution of storage mechanism represented more than 50% of overall oxygen demand. Substrate storage, when totally disregarded or not properly evaluated, was observed to involve an error of around 10% on overall the oxygen demand.

  9. Epitaxial growth of homogeneous single-crystalline AlN films on single-crystalline Cu (1 1 1) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenliang; Yang, Weijia; Liu, Zuolian; Lin, Yunhao; Zhou, Shizhong; Qian, Huirong; Gao, Fangliang; Yang, Hui; Li, Guoqiang

    2014-03-01

    The homogeneous and crack free single-crystalline AlN thin films have been epitaxially grown on single-crystalline Cu (1 1 1) substrates with an in-plane alignment of AlN [11-20]//Cu [1-10] by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technology with an integrated laser rastering program. The as-grown AlN films are studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), polarized light microscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The spectroscopic ellipsometry reveals the excellent thickness uniformity of as-grown AlN films on the Cu (1 1 1) substrates with a root-mean-square (RMS) thickness inhomogeneity less than 2.6%. AFM and FESEM measurements indicate that very smooth and flat surface AlN films are obtained with a surface RMS roughness of 2.3 nm. The X-ray reflectivity image illustrates that there is a maximum of 1.2 nm thick interfacial layer existing between the as-grown AlN and Cu (1 1 1) substrates and is confirmed by HRTEM measurement, and reciprocal space mapping shows that almost fully relaxed AlN films are achieved only with a compressive strain of 0.48% within ∼321 nm thick films. This work demonstrates a possibility to obtain homogeneous and crack free single-crystalline AlN films on metallic substrates by PLD with optimized laser rastering program, and brings up a broad prospect for the application of acoustic filters that require abrupt hetero-interfaces between the AlN films and the metallic electrodes.

  10. Homoepitaxial growth of catalyst-free GaN wires on N-polar substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. J.; Perillat-Merceroz, G.; Sam-Giao, D.; Durand, C.; Eymery, J.

    2010-10-01

    The shape of c-oriented GaN nanostructures is found to be directly related to the crystal polarity. As evidenced by convergent beam electron diffraction applied to GaN nanostructures grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy on c-sapphire substrates: wires grown on nitridated sapphire have the N-polarity ([0001¯]) whereas pyramidal crystals have Ga-polarity ([0001]). In the case of homoepitaxy, the GaN wires can be directly selected using N-polar GaN freestanding substrates and exhibit good optical properties. A schematic representation of the kinetic Wulff's plot points out the effect of surface polarity.

  11. A one-dimensional model for the growth of CdTe quantum dots on Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, S. C.; Ferreira, S. O.

    2006-03-01

    Recent experiments involving CdTe films grown on Si(111) substrates by hot wall epitaxy revealed features not previously observed [S.O. Ferreira, et al., J. Appl. Phys. 93 (2003) 1195]. This system, which follows the Volmer Weber growth mode with nucleation of isolated 3D islands for less than one monolayer of evaporated material, was described by a peculiar behavior of the quantum dot (QD) size distributions. In this work, we proposed a kinetic deposition model to reproduce these new features. The model, which includes thermally activated diffusion and evaporation of CdTe, qualitatively reproduced the experimental QD size distributions. Moreover, the model predicts a transition from Stranski Krastanow growth mode at lower temperatures to Volmer Weber growth mode at higher ones characterized through the QD width distributions.

  12. Growth of single-crystal Al layers on GaAs and Si substrates for microwave superconducting resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournet, J.; Gosselink, D.; Jaikissoon, M.; Miao, G.-X.; Langenberg, D.; Mariantoni, M.; Wasilewski, Zr

    Thin Al layers on dielectrics are essential building blocks of circuits used in the quest for scalable quantum computing systems. While molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been shown to produce the highest quality Al layers, further reduction of losses in superconducting resonators fabricated from them is highly desirable. Defects at the Al-substrate interface are likely the key source of losses. Here we report on the optimization of MBE growth of Al layers on GaAs and Si substrates. Si surfaces were prepared by in-situ high temperature substrate annealing. For GaAs, defects typically remaining on the substrate surfaces after oxide desorption were overgrown with GaAs or GaAs/AlAs superlattice buffer layers. Such surface preparation steps were followed by cooling process to below 0°C, precisely controlled to obtain targeted surface reconstructions. Deposition of 110 nm Al layers was done at subzero temperatures and monitored with RHEED at several azimuths simultaneously. The resulting layers were characterized by HRXRD, AFM and Nomarski. Single crystal, near-atomically smooth layers of Al(110) were demonstrated on GaAs(001)-2x4 surface whereas Al(111) of comparable quality was formed on Si(111)-1x1 and 7x7 surfaces.

  13. Hierarchical ZnO Nanowire Growth with Tunable Orientations on Versatile Substrates Using Atomic Layer Deposition Seeding

    SciTech Connect

    Bielinski, Ashley R.; Kazyak, Eric; Schleputz, Christian M.; Jung, Hee Joon; Wood, Kevin N.; Dasgupta, Neil P.

    2015-07-14

    The ability to synthesize semiconductor nanowires with deterministic and tunable control of orientation and morphology on a wide range of substrates, while high precision and repeatability are maintained, is a challenge currently faced for the development of many nanoscale material systems. Here we show that atomic layer deposition (ALD) presents a reliable method of surface and interfacial modification to guide nanowire orientation on a variety of substrate materials and geometries, including high-aspect-ratio, three-dimensional templates. We demonstrate control of the orientation and geometric properties of hydrothermally grown single crystalline ZnO nanowires via the deposition of a ZnO seed layer by ALD. The crystallographic texture and roughness of the seed layer result in tunable preferred nanowire orientations and densities for identical hydrothermal growth conditions. The structural and chemical relationship between the ALD layers and nanowires was investigated with synchrotron X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of orientation and morphology control. The resulting control parameters were utilized to produce hierarchical nanostructures with tunable properties on a wide range of substrates, including vertical micropillars, paper fibers, porous polymer membranes, and biological substrates. This illustrates the power of ALD for interfacial engineering of heterogeneous material systems at the nanoscale, to provide a highly controlled and scalable seeding method for bottom-up synthesis of integrated nanosystems.

  14. Effects of substrate water potential in root growth of Agave salmiana Otto ex Salm-Dyck seedlings.

    PubMed

    Peña-Valdivia, Cecilia B; Sánchez-Urdaneta, Adriana B

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that root of maguey (Agave salmiana Otto ex Salm-Dyck) seedlings reacts during the first 24 h to low substrate water potential (PsiW), by anatomical modifications. Three-4 cm root length seedlings were planted in vermiculite for 24 h at PsiW between -0.03 and -2.35 MPa. Root dimensions, proline content and anatomy were evaluated. Substrate PsiW between -0.65 and -2.35 MPa did not significantly affect longitudinal root growth. However, proline content significantly increased from 1.6 to 2.1 micromoles mg(-1). Significant reductions of transverse root area (41%), thickness of mucilage covering the epidermis (47%), thickness of epidermis (between 15 and 46%), area of the parenchyma (between 35 and 41%) and number of vessels (up to 28%) were observed with PsiW of -2.35 MPa. In contrast, thickness of xylem wall, diameter of xylem vessels and the number of cells of the cortex of the differentiation root region significantly increased (64, 17, and 97%, respectively). The anatomical changes associated with low substrate PsiW indicate a net increase of root apoplatic paths; structures involved in water conduction increased their diameter under low substrate PsiW conditions and anatomical changes occurred during the first 24 h of water stress.

  15. The Penicillium chrysogenum aclA gene encodes a broad-substrate-specificity acyl-coenzyme A ligase involved in activation of adipic acid, a side-chain precursor for cephem antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Koetsier, Martijn J; Gombert, Andreas K; Fekken, Susan; Bovenberg, Roel A L; van den Berg, Marco A; Kiel, Jan A K W; Jekel, Peter A; Janssen, Dick B; Pronk, Jack T; van der Klei, Ida J; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the cephalosporin side-chain precursor to the corresponding CoA-thioester is an essential step for its incorporation into the beta-lactam backbone. To identify an acyl-CoA ligase involved in activation of adipate, we searched in the genome database of Penicillium chrysogenum for putative structural genes encoding acyl-CoA ligases. Chemostat-based transcriptome analysis was used to identify the one presenting the highest expression level when cells were grown in the presence of adipate. Deletion of the gene renamed aclA, led to a 32% decreased specific rate of adipate consumption and a threefold reduction of adipoyl-6-aminopenicillanic acid levels, but did not affect penicillin V production. After overexpression in Escherichia coli, the purified protein was shown to have a broad substrate range including adipate. Finally, protein-fusion with cyan-fluorescent protein showed co-localization with microbody-borne acyl-transferase. Identification and functional characterization of aclA may aid in developing future metabolic engineering strategies for improving the production of different cephalosporins.

  16. Polyethyleneimine functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes as a substrate for neuronal growth.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hui; Ni, Yingchun; Mandal, Swadhin K; Montana, Vedrana; Zhao, Bin; Haddon, Robert C; Parpura, Vladimir

    2005-03-17

    We report the synthesis of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) graft copolymer. This polymer was prepared by the functionalization of SWNTs with polyethyleneimine (PEI). We used this graft copolymer, SWNT-PEI, as a substrate for cultured neurons and found that it promotes neurite outgrowth and branching.

  17. The growth of low band-gap InAs on (111)B GaAs substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welser, R. E.; Guido, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    The use of low band-gap materials is of interest for a number of photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications, such as bottom cells of optimized multijunction solar cell designs, long wavelength light sources, detectors, and thermophotovoltaics. However, low band-gap materials are generally mismatched with respect to lattice constant, thermal expansion coefficient, and chemical bonding to the most appropriate commercially available substrates (Si, Ge, and GaAs). For the specific case of III-V semiconductor heteroepitaxy, one must contend with the strain induced by both lattice constant mismatch at the growth temperature and differences in the rates of mechanical deformation during the cool down cycle. Several experimental techniques have been developed to minimize the impact of these phenomena (i.e., compositional grading, strained layer superlattices, and high-temperature annealing). However, in highly strained systems such as InAs-on-GaAs, three-dimensional island formation and large defect densities (greater than or equal to 10(exp 8)/ cm(exp -2)) tend to limit their applicability. In these particular cases, the surface morphology and defect density must be controlled during the initial stages of nucleation and growth. At the last SPRAT conference, we reported on a study of the evolution of InAs islands on (100) and (111)B GaAs substrates. Growth on the (111)B orientation exhibits a number of advantageous properties as compared to the (100) during these early stages of strained-layer epitaxy. In accordance with a developing model of nucleation and growth, we have deposited thin (60 A - 2500 A), fully relaxed InAs films on (111)B GaAs substrates. Although thicker InAs films are subject to the formation of twin defects common to epitaxy on the (111)B orientation, appropriate control of the growth parameters can greatly minimize their density. Using this knowledge base, InAs films up to 2 microns in thickness with improved morphology and structural quality have

  18. Growth mechanism of Cobalt(II) Phthalocyanine(CoPc) thin films on SiO{sub 2} and muscovite substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Gedda, Murali; Subbarao, Nimmakayala V. V.; Goswami, Dipak K.

    2014-01-28

    Thin films of Cobalt(II) Phthalocyanine (CoPc) were grown by thermal evaporation technique on two different substrates namely SiO{sub 2} and atomically cleaned muscovite mica(001) at various substrate temperatures. Deposition rate has been maintained to 0.3Å/sec during the growth of the films. The growth process is studied by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Films on SiO{sub 2} exhibit only three-dimensional islands and uniformity of these islands improved with substrate temperatures, whereas films on mica (001) consist of long oriented percolated structures. The results revealed that the growth mechanism of CoPc strongly depends on substrate temperatures as well as nature of substrate used. Optical properties were characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy and structural properties were studied using X-ray diffraction.

  19. Growth of TiO2 nanorods on a Ta substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Suk; Hyun, Jae-Sung; Seo, Hyun Ook; Kim, Young Dok; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    2010-05-01

    TiO2 nanorods were successfully grown on Tantalum (Ta) substrates using titanium tetra isopropoxide (TTIP) as a single precursor without any carriers or bubbling gases. For characterization of the TiO2 structures, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were employed. For substrate temperatures below 800 degrees C, a rough film structure without nanorods could be found. However, at a sample temperature of 800 degrees C, nanorod structures with a respective diameter and length of 0.1 approximately 0.2 microm and 0.7 approximately 1.5 microm, respectively, could be synthesized. The nanorods exhibited a rutile phase with a 2:1 stoichiometry of O:Ti, identified using XRD and XPS. When the growth temperature exceeded 800 degrees C, agglomeration of the nanorods was identified.

  20. The inner-mitochondrial distribution of Oxa1 depends on the growth conditions and on the availability of substrates.

    PubMed

    Stoldt, Stefan; Wenzel, Dirk; Hildenbeutel, Markus; Wurm, Christian A; Herrmann, Johannes M; Jakobs, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    The Oxa1 protein is a well-conserved integral protein of the inner membrane of mitochondria. It mediates the insertion of both mitochondrial- and nuclear-encoded proteins from the matrix into the inner membrane. We investigated the distribution of budding yeast Oxa1 between the two subdomains of the contiguous inner membrane--the cristae membrane (CM) and the inner boundary membrane (IBM)--under different physiological conditions. We found that under fermentable growth conditions, Oxa1 is enriched in the IBM, whereas under nonfermentable (respiratory) growth conditions, it is predominantly localized in the CM. The enrichment of Oxa1 in the CM requires mitochondrial translation; similarly, deletion of the ribosome-binding domain of Oxa1 prevents an enrichment of Oxa1 in the CM. The predominant localization in the IBM under fermentable growth conditions is prevented by inhibiting mitochondrial protein import. Furthermore, overexpression of the nuclear-encoded Oxa1 substrate Mdl1 shifts the distribution of Oxa1 toward the IBM. Apparently, the availability of nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded substrates influences the inner-membrane distribution of Oxa1. Our findings show that the distribution of Oxa1 within the inner membrane is dynamic and adapts to different physiological needs.

  1. Growth kinetics, effect of carbon substrate in biosynthesis of mcl-PHA by Pseudomonas putida Bet001

    PubMed Central

    Gumel, A.M.; Annuar, M.S.M.; Heidelberg, T.

    2014-01-01

    Growth associated biosynthesis of medium chain length poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHA) in Pseudomonas putida Bet001 isolated from palm oil mill effluent was studied. Models with substrate inhibition terms described well the kinetics of its growth. Selected fatty acids (C8:0 to C18:1) and ammonium were used as carbon and nitrogen sources during growth and PHA biosynthesis, resulting in PHA accumulation of about 50 to 69% (w/w) and PHA yields ranging from 10.12 g L−1 to 15.45 g L−1, respectively. The monomer composition of the PHA ranges from C4 to C14, and was strongly influenced by the type of carbon substrate fed. Interestingly, an odd carbon chain length (C7) monomer was also detected when C18:1 was fed. Polymer showed melting temperature (Tm) of 42.0 (± 0.2) °C, glass transition temperature (Tg) of −1.0 (± 0.2) °C and endothermic melting enthalpy of fusion (ΔHf) of 110.3 (± 0.1) J g−1. The molecular weight (Mw) range of the polymer was relatively narrow between 55 to 77 kDa. PMID:25242925

  2. Laser-Induced Hydrothermal Growth of Heterogeneous Metal-Oxide Nanowire on Flexible Substrate by Laser Absorption Layer Design.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Junyeob; Hong, Sukjoon; Kim, Gunho; Lee, Habeom; Suh, Young Duk; Park, Inkyu; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Ko, Seung Hwan

    2015-06-23

    Recent development of laser-induced hydrothermal growth enabled direct digital growth of ZnO nanowire array at an arbitrary position even on 3D structures by creating a localized temperature field through a photothermal reaction in liquid environment. However, its spatial size was generally limited by the size of the focused laser spot and the thermal diffusion, and the target material has been limited to ZnO. In this paper, we demonstrated a next generation laser-induced hydrothermal growth method to grow nanowire on a selected area that is even smaller than the laser focus size by designing laser absorption layer. The control of laser-induced temperature field was achieved through adjusting the physical properties of the substrate (dimension and thermal conductivity), and it enabled a successful synthesis of smaller nanowire array without changing any complex optics. Through precise localized temperature control with laser, this approach could be extended to various nanowires including ZnO and TiO2 nanowires even on heat sensitive polymer substrate.

  3. Eliminating Whisker Growth by Indium Addition in Electroplated Sn on Copper Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Mahapatra, S.; Majumdar, B. S.; Dutta, I.; Bhassyvasantha, S.

    2016-12-01

    Whisker growth from Sn coatings is a reliability concern in electronic packages, until recently mitigated by Pb addition. Recently, it was demonstrated that doping with In dramatically reduces whisker growth in 1 μm thick Sn. Here, we present the results of In-doping on whisker growth from 3 μm and 6 μm thick Sn-films and explore the reasons behind this mitigation, and compare the results with a baseline sample of pure Sn and a control sample of tri-layer Sn-In-Sn, all subjected to identical thermal treatments. It is shown that In addition completely stops whisker growth from electroplated Sn. The impact of In addition on the film microstructure and the role of the surface oxide coating are investigated. Previous work had shown that while In addition reduces grain boundary diffusivity, it does not fully account for the observed dramatic reduction of whisker growth. In this work, it is shown by Auger electron spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy that In is incorporated in the surface-oxide. Since whisker-growth is contingent on the presence of a tenacious surface-oxide, this suggests that the alteration of the oxide properties may be responsible for the observed reduction in whisker growth. Finite element modeling is utilized to demonstrate that a reduction of the elastic modulus of the surface oxide would reduce the driving force of Sn whisker growth, thus proffering a rationale for the effect of In incorporation.

  4. Coincident site lattice-matched growth of semiconductors on substrates using compliant buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew

    2016-08-23

    A method of producing semiconductor materials and devices that incorporate the semiconductor materials are provided. In particular, a method is provided of producing a semiconductor material, such as a III-V semiconductor, on a silicon substrate using a compliant buffer layer, and devices such as photovoltaic cells that incorporate the semiconductor materials. The compliant buffer material and semiconductor materials may be deposited using coincident site lattice-matching epitaxy, resulting in a close degree of lattice matching between the substrate material and deposited material for a wide variety of material compositions. The coincident site lattice matching epitaxial process, as well as the use of a ductile buffer material, reduce the internal stresses and associated crystal defects within the deposited semiconductor materials fabricated using the disclosed method. As a result, the semiconductor devices provided herein possess enhanced performance characteristics due to a relatively low density of crystal defects.

  5. Direct growth and patterning of multilayer graphene onto a targeted substrate without an external carbon source.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongseok; Kim, Won-Jun; Lim, Jung Ah; Song, Yong-Won

    2012-07-25

    Using only a simple tube furnace, we demonstrate the synthesis of patterned graphene directly on a designed substrate without the need for an external carbon source. Carbon atoms are absorbed onto Ni evaporator sources as impurities, and incorporated into catalyst layers during the deposition. Heat treatment conditions were optimized so that the atoms diffused out along the grain boundaries to form nanocrystals at the catalyst-substrate interfaces. Graphene patterns were obtained under patterned catalysts, which restricted graphene formation to within patterned areas. The resultant multilayer graphene was characterized by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy to verify the high crystallinity and two-dimensional nanomorphology. Finally, a metal-semiconductor diode with a catalyst-graphene contact structure were fabricated and characterized to assess the semiconducting properties of the graphene sheets with respect to the display of asymmetric current-voltage behavior.

  6. Direct evidence of strain transfer for InAs island growth on compliant Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Marçal, L. A. B.; Magalhães-Paniago, R.; Malachias, Angelo; Richard, M.-I.; Cavallo, F.; Lagally, M. G.; Schmidt, O. G.; Schülli, T. Ü.; Deneke, Ch.

    2015-04-13

    Semiconductor heteroepitaxy on top of thin compliant layers has been explored as a path to make inorganic electronics mechanically flexible as well as to integrate materials that cannot be grown directly on rigid substrates. Here, we show direct evidences of strain transfer for InAs islands on freestanding Si thin films (7 nm). Synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements using a beam size of 300 × 700 nm{sup 2} can directly probe the strain status of the compliant substrate underneath deposited islands. Using a recently developed diffraction mapping technique, three-dimensional reciprocal space maps were reconstructed around the Si (004) peak for specific illuminated positions of the sample. The strain retrieved was analyzed using continuous elasticity theory via Finite-element simulations. The comparison of experiment and simulations yields the amount of strain from the InAs islands, which is transferred to the compliant Si thin film.

  7. Epitaxial growth of YBCO films on metallic substrates buffered with yttria-stabilized zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, B.; Li, M.; Fisher, B. L.; Koritala, R. E.; Balachandran, U.

    2002-05-01

    Biaxially textured yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) films were grown on polished Hastelloy C (HC) substrates by ion-beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) and electron-beam evaporation. A water-cooled sample stage was used to dissipate heat generated by the Kaufman ion source and to maintain the substrate temperature below 100 °C during deposition. X-ray pole figures were used for texture analysis. In-plane texture measured from the YSZ (111) φ-scan full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) was 13.2° and out-of-plane texture from the YSZ (002) ω-scan FWHM was 7.7°. In-plane texture improved with lowered substrate temperature during IBAD deposition. RMS surface roughness of 3.3 nm was measured by atomic force microscopy. A thin CeO2 buffer layer (≈10 nm) was deposited to improve the lattice match between the YSZ and YBCO films and to enhance the biaxial alignment of YBCO films. YBCO films were epitaxially grown on IBAD-YSZ buffered HC substrates with and without CeO2 buffer layers by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). In-plane texture FWHMs of 12° and 9° were observed for CeO2 (111) and YBCO (103), respectively. Tc=90 K, with sharp transition, and Jc values of ≈2×106 A/cm2 at 77 K in zero field were observed on 0.5-μm-thick, 5-mm-wide, and 1-cm-long samples.

  8. InP substrate evaluation by MOVPE growth of lattice matched epitaxial layers.

    SciTech Connect

    Overberg, Mark E.; Cederberg, Jeffrey George

    2010-09-01

    InP substrates form the starting point for a wide variety of semiconductor devices. The surface morphology produced during epitaxy depends critically on the starting substrate. We evaluated (1 0 0)-oriented InP wafers from three different vendors by growing thick (5 mu m) lattice-matched epilayers of InP, Gain As, and AlInAs. We assessed the surfaces with differential interference contrast microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Wafers with near singular (1 0 0) orientations produced inferior surfaces in general. Vicinal substrates with small misorientations improved the epitaxial surface for InP dramatically, reducing the density of macroscopic defects while maintaining a low RMS roughness. GaInAs and AlInAs epitaxy step-bunched forming undulations along the miscut direction. Sulfur-doped wafers were considered for singular (1 0 0) and for 0.2 degrees misorientation toward (1 1 0). We found that mound defects observed for InP and GaInAs layers on iron-doped singular wafers were absent for singular sulfur-doped wafers. These observations support the conclusion that dislocation termination at the surface and expansion of the step spiral lead to the macroscopic defects observed.

  9. Silicanizing Process On Mild Steel Substrate by Using Tronoh Silica Sand: Microstructure, composition and coating growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y, Yusnenti F. M.; M, Othman; Mustapha, Mazli; I, MohdYusri

    2016-02-01

    A new Silicanizing process on formation of coating on mild steel using Tronoh Silica Sand (TSS) is presented. The process was performed in the temperature range 1000- 1100°C and with varying deposition time of 1-4 hours. Influence of the layer and the substrate constituents on the coating compatibility of the whole silicanized layer is described in detail. Morphology and structure of the silicanized layer were investigated by XRF, XRD and SEM. It is observed that diffusion coatings containing high concentrations of silica which profile distribution of SiO2 in the silicanized layer was encountered and the depth from the surface to the substrate was taken as the layer thickness. The results also depicted that a longer deposition time have tendency to produce a looser and larger grain a hence rougher layer. The silicanized layer composed of FeSi and Fe2SiO4 phases with preferred orientation within the experimental range. It is also found that longer deposition time and higher temperature resulted in an increase in SiO2 concentration on the substrate (mild steel).

  10. Growth and annealing of InAs quantum dots on pre-structured GaAs substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfrich, M.; Hu, D. Z.; Hendrickson, J.; Gehl, M.; Rülke, D.; Gröger, R.; Litvinov, D.; Linden, S.; Wegener, M.; Gerthsen, D.; Schimmel, T.; Hetterich, M.; Kalt, H.; Khitrova, G.; Gibbs, H. M.; Schaadt, D. M.

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of in situ annealing on InAs quantum dots site-selectively grown on pre-structured GaAs substrates. A morphological transition is observed with original double dots merging into one single dot during annealing. This is accompanied by a reduction of quantum dots originally nucleating between defined sites. The photoluminescence intensity of annealed site-selective quantum dots is compared to annealed self-assembled dots with linewidths of single dot emission of about 170 and 81 μeV, respectively. UV-ozone cleaning is used to optimize the sample cleaning prior to quantum dot growth.

  11. In situ scanning electron microscopy of graphene growth on polycrystalline Ni substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Katsuhiro; Yamada, Kazuki; Kato, Hiroki; Hibino, Hiroki; Homma, Yoshikazu

    2012-04-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is shown to be capable of imaging a monolayer of graphene, and is employed to observe in situ the graphene growth process by segregation of bulk-dissolved carbon on a polycrystalline nickel surface. Because of a wide field of view, SEM could easily track the rapid graphene growth induced by carbon segregation. Monolayer graphene extended on (111)- and (011)-oriented nickel grains, but was excluded from the (001) grains. This is due to the difference in carbon-nickel binding energy among these crystalline faces. This work proves the usefulness of in situ SEM imaging for the investigation of large area graphene growth.

  12. Nucleation and Growth of GaN on GaAs (001) Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, Timothy J.; Hafich, Michael J.; Heller, Edwin J.; Lee, Stephen R.; Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Ruvimov, Sergei; Sullivan, John P.

    1999-05-03

    The nucleation of GaN thin films on GaAs is investigated for growth at 620 "C. An rf plasma cell is used to generate chemically active nitrogen from N2. An arsenic flux is used in the first eight monolayer of nitride growth to enhance nucleation of the cubic phase. Subsequent growth does not require an As flux to preserve the cubic phase. The nucleation of smooth interfaces and GaN films with low stacking fault densities is dependent upon relative concentrations of active nitrogen species in the plasma and on the nitrogen to gallium flux ratio.

  13. Half Layer By Half Layer Growth of a Blue Phosphorene Monolayer on a GaN(001) Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jiang; Cui, Ping; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2017-01-01

    Black phosphorene (BlackP), consisting of a vertically corrugated yet single layer of phosphorus atoms, is a latest member of the expanding two-dimensional (2D) materials family with high carrier mobility and immense application potentials. Blue phosphorene (BlueP), an allotrope of BlackP with appealing properties of its own, consists of a more flatly arranged layer of phosphorus atoms. To date, direct growth of either BlackP or BlueP remains a daunting challenge. Using first-principles approaches, here we establish a novel kinetic pathway for fabricating BlueP via epitaxial growth. Our systematic energetic studies reveal that both BlackP and BlueP monolayers can be readily stabilized on Cu(111), Au(111), and GaN(001) substrates. The semiconducting GaN(001) is further shown to be superior for fabricating BlueP, through an intriguing half-layer-by-half-layer (HLBHL) growth mechanism. Within this scheme, the GaN(001) surface is first preferentially covered by a half layer of phosphorus adatoms, followed by the addition of the other half. Once formed, such a BlueP monolayer is thermodynamically stable, as tested using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The HLBHL growth mechanism discovered here may enable mass production of high-quality BlueP, and could also be instrumental in achieving epitaxial growth of BlackP and other 2D materials.

  14. The limitations of seedling growth and drought tolerance to novel soil substrates in arid systems: Implications for restoration success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, Amber; Lewandrowski, Wolfgang; Stevens, Jason; Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam

    2016-04-01

    Introduction With the limited knowledge available regarding the impact of drought on seedling growth, an understanding of seedling tolerance to arid conditions is crucial for restoration success (James et al., 2013; Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2014). However, restoration in semi-arid areas faces the challenge of re-establishing plant communities on altered soil substrates (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2015). These substrates are a result of anthropogenic disturbances such as mining which have altered the plant-soil-water dynamics of the ecosystem (Machado et al., 2013). The aim of this study was to assess the impact of mining on the plant-soil-water dynamics of an arid ecosystem of Western Australia (Pilbara region, North Western Australia) and the implications these altered relationships have on seedling growth and their responses to drought. Methods Drought responses of native plant species were assessed through a series of glasshouse experiments. Firstly, 21 species dominant to the Pilbara region were subjected to drought in a topsoil growth media to assess variation in responses (leaf water potential at the time of stomatal closure) across species and identify traits associated with drought tolerance. Secondly, four species ranging in their drought tolerance identified previously, were grown to two leaf stages (second and fourth leaf stage) in three mining substrates (topsoil, a topsoil and waste mix and waste) to assess seedling drought responses to various potential restoration substrates and how that varied with plant development stage. Results and discussion Four morphological traits were found to be significantly associated with drought indicators (leaf mass ratio, stem area, stem length, stem weight), however, these were weak correlations. Waste substrate and its addition to topsoil reduced plant total biomass but did not alter species responses to drought. However, the soil physical properties of the waste reduced water retention and water availability for plant uptake

  15. Epitaxial Growth of Molecular Crystals on van der Waals Substrates for High-Performance Organic Electronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    but also to provide a less disruptive surface for the crystal growth. We employ vdW graphene electrodes that serve as an electrical contact [ 27,28...growth, chemical-vapor-deposited graphene fi lms were transferred onto the top of h-BN layers using the pre-patterned poly-dimethyl siloxane (PDMS...stamp [ 27 ] to create a lateral graphene /h-BN/ graphene heterostructure. During this transfer process, the h-BN surface over the channel region does

  16. Epitaxial Growth of Silicon Films on SiO2 Patterned Si(100) Substrates by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Chunyan; Deng, Youjun; Ai, Bin; Liu, Chao; Zhuang, Lin; Shen, Hui

    2012-09-01

    In order to investigate the effect of selective area nucleation on epitaxial growth of silicon (Si) films, 35 µm thick Si films were deposited by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) under the standard condition on two kinds of SiO2 patterned Si(100) wafers. One was circular patterns, and the other was striated patterns. Then, the structural properties of the as-deposited silicon thin films were investigated by metallurgical microscope, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that normal epitaxial growth occurs on the exposed Si(100) regions, while just polycrystalline Si deposition happens on the SiO2 regions. Moreover, for the substrates with circular patterns, the as-deposited Si thin films possess pyramid surface morphology thus excellent light trapping performance being spontaneously formed, and the sizes of the pyramid grains approximately equal to the sum of the diameter and spacing of the round exposed Si regions.

  17. Epitaxial growth of silicon and germanium on (100)-oriented crystalline substrates by RF PECVD at 175 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrune, M.; Bril, X.; Patriarche, G.; Largeau, L.; Mauguin, O.; Cabarrocas, P. Roca i.

    2012-11-01

    We report on the epitaxial growth of crystalline Si and Ge thin films by standard radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at 175 °C on (100)-oriented silicon substrates. We also demonstrate the epitaxial growth of silicon films on epitaxially grown germanium layers so that multilayer samples sustaining epitaxy could be produced. We used spectroscopic ellipsometry, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction to characterize the structure of the films (amorphous, crystalline). These techniques were found to provide consistent results and provided information on the crystallinity and constraints in such lattice-mismatched structures. These results open the way to multiple quantum-well structures, which have been so far limited to few techniques such as Molecular Beam Epitaxy or MetalOrganic Chemical Vapor Deposition.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens L-H15, a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria isolated from cucumber seedling substrate.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuxuan; Han, Yuzhu; Shang, QingMao; Li, Pinglan

    2015-04-20

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens L-H15 is a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) isolated from the cucumber seedling substrate collected in Beijing, China. The complete genome of B. amyloliquefaciens L-H15 consists of one single circular chromosome (3,864,316 bp) without any plasmid. From the genome, we identified clusters responsible for non-ribosomal synthesis of secondary metabolites, and genes related to the plant growth promotion hormone such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and acetoin secretion. In addition, genes that contribute to biofilm formation were also found on the genome of L-H15. Complete genome information enables further study on the beneficial interactions between B. amyloliquefaciens L-H15 and host plants, and the future application of B. amyloliquefaciens L-H15 as biofertilizer and biocide.

  19. Epitaxial growth of group III nitrides on silicon substrates via a reflective lattice-matched zirconium diboride buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolle, J.; Roucka, R.; Tsong, I. S. T.; Ritter, C.; Crozier, P. A.; Chizmeshya, A. V. G.; Kouvetakis, J.

    2003-04-01

    Growth of metallic and reflecting ZrB2 films is conducted on Si(111) substrates at 900 °C using a single-source unimolecular precursor Zr(BH4)4 in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber. Epitaxial growth of ZrB2(0001) is accomplished despite the very large lattice mismatch between ZrB2 and Si(111). High-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images of the sharp ZrB2/Si(111) interface show a heteroepitaxial relationship involving a "magic mismatch" of coincidence lattices. The GaN films grown on the ZrB2/Si(111) template is virtually homoepitaxy because of the very small lattice mismatch, 0.6%, between the in-plane lattice parameters of ZrB2(0001) and GaN(0001).

  20. Effect of substrate material on the growth and field emission characteristics of large-area carbon nanotube forests

    SciTech Connect

    Ummethala, Raghunandan; Täschner, Christine; Leonhardt, Albrecht; Büchner, Bernd; Wenger, Daniela; Tedde, Sandro F.; Eckert, Jürgen

    2016-01-28

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a promising replacement for tungsten filaments as electron emitters in conventional x-ray sources, owing to their higher aspect ratio, superior mechanical stability, chemical inertness, and high electrical and thermal conductivities. Conditions for realizing the best emission behavior from CNTs have been formulated over the last few years. In this paper, we report the relatively less-investigated factor, namely, the influence of the nature of substrate material on the growth as well as field emission characteristics of large-area multiwalled CNTs for their practical application in medical x-ray sources. We compare the morphology of CNTs on a variety of substrates such as stainless steel, copper, molybdenum, graphite, few-layer graphene, and carbon nanowalls grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition following a simple drop-coating of catalyst. We find that CNTs grown on stainless steel and graphite show the best combination of emission characteristics under pulsed operation mode. These studies are helpful in selecting the optimum substrate material for field emission applications. Ex situ studies on field emission degradation of CNTs are presented towards the end.

  1. Effect of substrate material on the growth and field emission characteristics of large-area carbon nanotube forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummethala, Raghunandan; Wenger, Daniela; Tedde, Sandro F.; Täschner, Christine; Leonhardt, Albrecht; Büchner, Bernd; Eckert, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a promising replacement for tungsten filaments as electron emitters in conventional x-ray sources, owing to their higher aspect ratio, superior mechanical stability, chemical inertness, and high electrical and thermal conductivities. Conditions for realizing the best emission behavior from CNTs have been formulated over the last few years. In this paper, we report the relatively less-investigated factor, namely, the influence of the nature of substrate material on the growth as well as field emission characteristics of large-area multiwalled CNTs for their practical application in medical x-ray sources. We compare the morphology of CNTs on a variety of substrates such as stainless steel, copper, molybdenum, graphite, few-layer graphene, and carbon nanowalls grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition following a simple drop-coating of catalyst. We find that CNTs grown on stainless steel and graphite show the best combination of emission characteristics under pulsed operation mode. These studies are helpful in selecting the optimum substrate material for field emission applications. Ex situ studies on field emission degradation of CNTs are presented towards the end.

  2. Rapid, controllable growth of silver nanostructured surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates for red blood cell detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu; Tian, Xueli; Yin, Jun; Liu, Yu; Dong, Zhanmin; Sun, Jia-Lin; Ma, Wanyun

    2016-04-01

    Silver nanostructured films suitable for use as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates are prepared in just 2 hours by the solid-state ionics method. By changing the intensity of the external direct current, we can readily control the surface morphology and growth rate of the silver nanostructured films. A detailed investigation of the surface enhancement of the silver nanostructured films using Rhodamine 6G (R6G) as a molecular probe revealed that the enhancement factor of the films was up to 1011. We used the silver nanostructured films as substrates in SERS detection of human red blood cells (RBCs). The SERS spectra of RBCs on the silver nanostructured film could be clearly detected at a laser power of just 0.05 mW. Comparison of the SERS spectra of RBCs obtained from younger and older donors showed that the SERS spectra depended on donor age. A greater proportion of the haemoglobin in the RBCs of older donors was in the deoxygenated state than that of the younger donors. This implies that haemoglobin of older people has lower oxygen-carrying capacity than that of younger people. Overall, the fabricated silver substrates show promise in biomedical SERS spectral detection.

  3. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of high-quality InSb on InP and GaAs substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, J. E.; Bhattacharya, P. K.; Chen, Y. C.; Tsukamoto, S.

    1989-01-01

    Epitaxial layers of InSb were grown on InP and GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The dependence of the epilayer quality on flux ratio, J sub Sb4/J sub In, was studied. Deviation from an optimum value of J sub Sb4/J sub In (approx. 2) during growth led to deterioration in the surface morphology and the electrical and crystalline qualities of the films. Room temperature electron mobilities as high as 70,000 and 53,000 sq cm /V-s were measured in InSb layers grown on InP and GaAs substrates, respectively. Unlike the previous results, the conductivity in these films is n-type even at T = 13 K, and no degradation of the electron mobility due to the high density of dislocations was observed. The measured electron mobilities (and carrier concentrations) at 77 K in InSb layers grown on InP and GaAs substrates are 110,000 sq cm/V-s (3 x 10(15) cm(-3)) and 55,000 sq cm/V-s (4.95 x 10(15) cm(-3)), respectively, suggesting their application to electronic devices at cryogenic temperatures.

  4. Growth substrates and caleosin-mediated functions affect conidial virulence in the insect pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Urquiza, Almudena; Fan, Yanhua; Garrett, Timothy; Keyhani, Nemat O

    2016-11-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassiana, is a microbial biological control agent capable of infecting a wide range of insect hosts. Conidia (spores) initiate infection via adhesion, growth and penetration of the insect cuticle, whose outmost layer is rich in lipids. Conidial virulence was investigated in B. bassiana WT and caleosin mutants (ΔBbcal1), the latter a protein involved in lipid storage and turnover. Topical insect bioassays revealed that conidia of the WT strain showed up to 40-fold differences in LD50 values depending upon the growth substrate. The most virulent conidia were harvested from potato dextrose agar containing oleic acid, and the least potent were those derived from Sabouraud dextrose/yeast extract agar (SDAY). However, with the exception of conidia derived from SDAY and Czapek Dox agar, in which values were reduced, mean lethal times to kill (LT50) were essentially unaffected. In topical bioassays, the ΔBbcal1 mutant displayed LD50 values 5-40-fold higher than the WT depending upon the growth substrate, with ΔBbcal1 conidia derived from SDAY unable to effectively penetrate the host cuticle. The ΔBbcal1 mutant also showed concomitant dramatic increases in LT50 values from a mean of ~4.5 for WT to >8.5 days for the mutant. In contrast, intrahaemocoel injection bioassays that bypass cuticle penetration events revealed only minor effects on virulence for either WT or ΔBbcal1 conidia. These data highlight the importance of caleosin-dependent lipid mobilization and/or signalling in cuticle penetration events but suggest their dispensability for immune evasion and within-host growth.

  5. Growth and characterization of periodically polarity-inverted ZnO structures on sapphire substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jinsub; Yao, Takafumi

    2012-10-15

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of periodically polarity inverted (PPI) ZnO heterostructures on (0 0 0 1) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates. For the periodically inverted array of ZnO polarity, CrN and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} polarity selection buffer layers are used for the Zn- and O-polar ZnO films, respectively. The change of polarity and period in fabricated ZnO structures is evaluated by diffraction patterns and polarity sensitive piezo-response microscopy. Finally, PPI ZnO structures with subnanometer scale period are demonstrated by using holographic lithography and regrowth techniques.

  6. Surfactant role of Ag atoms in the growth of Si layers on Si(111)√3×√3-Ag substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Tsuyoshi; Sone, Junki; Nakatsuji, Kan; Hirayama, Hiroyuki

    2014-10-13

    The growth of Si layers on Si(111)√3×√3-Ag substrates was studied for coverages of up to a few mono-layers. Atomically flat islands were observed to nucleate in the growth at 570 K. The top surfaces of the islands were covered in Ag atoms and exhibited a √3×√3 reconstruction with the same surface state dispersions as Si(111)√3×√3-Ag substrates. These results indicate that the Ag atoms on the substrate always hop up to the top of the Si layers.

  7. Evidence for two growth modes during tungsten oxide vapor deposition on mica substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mašek, Karel; Gillet, Marcel; Matolín, Vladimír

    2014-05-01

    The morphology, the structure and the orientation of tungsten oxide nanorods grown on mica are investigated as a function of the deposition time. The previous results are recalled to point out the changes with the nanorod thickness. The investigations were conducted by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction (RHEED). The results evidence two successive growth modes. In the first stage thin and long nanorods were formed. They grew layer by layer with a hexagonal tungsten bronze structure and two different (1-10) and (2-10) planes parallel to the mica surface. In the second stage, as the deposition time increased thin nanorods with the (1-10) orientation grew in thickness when the others preserve their morphology and structure. In the discussion the difference between the two growth modes is emphasized. In the first stage the nanorod growth proceeds mainly by the surface diffusion of KxWO3 species. In the second stage the growth is due to the by direct impinging of WO3 molecules on some thin nanorods having already the (1-10) orientation, leading to growth of thick nanorods with a monoclinic structure.

  8. Controlling growth rate anisotropy for formation of continuous ZnO thin films from seeded substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. H.; Slamovich, E. B.; Handwerker, C. A.

    2013-05-01

    Solution-processed zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films are promising candidates for low-temperature-processable active layers in transparent thin film electronics. In this study, control of growth rate anisotropy using ZnO nanoparticle seeds, capping ions, and pH adjustment leads to a low-temperature (90 ° C) hydrothermal process for transparent and high-density ZnO thin films. The common 1D ZnO nanorod array was grown into a 2D continuous polycrystalline film using a short-time pure solution method. Growth rate anisotropy of ZnO crystals and the film morphology were tuned by varying the chloride (Cl-) ion concentration and the initial pH of solutions of zinc nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA), and the competitive adsorption effects of Cl- ions and HMTA ligands on the anisotropic growth behavior of ZnO crystals were proposed. The lateral growth of nanorods constituting the film was promoted by lowering the solution pH to accelerate the hydrolysis of HMTA, thereby allowing the adsorption effects from Cl- to dominate. By optimizing the growth conditions, a dense ˜100 nm thickness film was fabricated in 15 min from a solution of [Cl-]/[Zn2+] = 1.5 and pH= 4.8 ± 0.1. This film shows >80% optical transmittance and a field-effect mobility of 2.730 cm2 V-1 s-1 at zero back-gate bias.

  9. Total contents of arsenic and associated health risks in edible mushrooms, mushroom supplements and growth substrates from Galicia (NW Spain).

    PubMed

    Melgar, M J; Alonso, J; García, M A

    2014-11-01

    The levels of arsenic (As) in the main commercial species of mushrooms present in Galicia, in their growth substrates, and mushroom supplements have been analysed by ICP-MS, with the intention of assessing potential health risks involved with their consumption. The mean concentrations of As in wild and cultivated mushrooms was 0.27mg/kg dw, in mushroom supplements 0.40mg/kg dw, in soils 5.10mg/kg dw, and in growth substrate 0.51mg/kg dw. No significant differences were observed between species, although the species Lactarius deliciosus possessed a slightly more elevated mean concentration (at 0.49mg/kg dw) than the other species investigated. In soils, statistically significant differences (p<0.05) were observed according to geographic origin. Levels in mushroom supplements, although low, were higher than in wild or cultivated mushrooms. Measured arsenic levels were within the normal range in samples analysed in unpolluted areas. Because of the low As concentrations found in fungi and mushroom supplements from Galicia, and considering the relatively small inclusion of these foods in people's diet, it can be concluded that there is no toxicological risk of arsenic associated with the consumption of the species of mushrooms analysed or at the dosages indicated for mushroom supplements.

  10. The effects of precursor concentration and thermal annealing on the growth of zinc oxide nanostructures grown on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paculba, H. M. D.; Alguno, A. C.; Vequizo, R. M.

    2015-06-01

    This study focuses on the growth of Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanostructures on SiO2/Si(100) substrate via chemical bath deposition (CBD) with varying NH4OH concentration and annealing temperature. The grown ZnOnanostructures were characterized via SEM-EDS for the surface morphology and elemental composition and UV-Vis spectroscopy for the reflectance measurement. Increasing the concentration of NH4OH produced denser ZnOnanostructures composed of rods having smaller diameter. It is believed that at higher concentration of NH4OH, more Zn(OH)2 seed will act as nucleation site for ZnOformation which suggests higher probability of ZnOgrowth. Thermal annealing increased the average diameter of ZnOnanorods. Annealing provided enough energy for unstable atoms to rearrange into a more suitable position. This would result to larger rods that have been formed in expense of the smaller rods. Furthermore, it is confirmed in the UV-Vis spectroscopy results that ZnOnanostructures were successfully grown on SiO2/Si(100) substrate. This successful growth of ZnOnanostructures is a promising material for solar cell technology.

  11. Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of ZnO on Si Substrate Using Ozone as an Oxygen Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Miki; Kawamoto, Noriaki; Tatsumi, Tomohiko; Yamagishi, Katsumi; Horikoshi, Yoshiji

    2003-01-01

    Epitaxial ZnO films have been grown on Si (111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy using ozone as an oxygen source. An initial deposition of a Zn layer followed by its oxidation produces a superior template for the subsequent ZnO growth. The reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurement suggests that the initial Zn layer and ZnO film are rotated by 30° with respect to the Si substrate orientation. The X-ray diffraction measurement reveals that the as-grown ZnO films are strongly c-oriented and include no rotational domains. Although there exists a small trace of ZnO (10\\bar{1}1) domains, it easily disappears upon annealing at 1100°C for 1 min after growth. Low-temperature photoluminescence measurements indicate that the emission property is improved significantly after annealing. The bound-exciton emission at 3.354 eV is dominant and its full-width at half maximum is as small as 11 meV.

  12. Growth and characterization of 6" InSb substrates for use in large-area infrared-imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlong, Mark J.; Dallas, Gordon; Meshew, Greg; Flint, J. Patrick; Small, David; Martinez, Becky; Mowbray, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we report on an industry first; the growth and characterization of 6" diameter indium antimonide (InSb) substrates that are suitable for use in the fabrication of MWIR focal plane infrared detectors. Results will be presented on the production of single crystal 6" InSb ingots grown by the Czochralski (Cz) technique. We will also assess the electrical quality of new 6" InSb crystals and present uniformity information on Hall mobility, resistivity and carrier level from which we will infer comparisons on the relative dark current performance of the material grown. High quality, epitaxy-ready type surfaces have been prepared and we will demonstrate how the key surface quality characteristics of roughness (<0.5nm rms), oxide thickness (<100Å) and flatness (<7 μm TTV) have been maintained across production processes that scale 4" to 6" wafer formats. We conclude by presenting our road map for the development of large area InSb substrates and describe how developments in Czochralski crystal growth and surface finishing technology will support industry's requirements to deliver higher performance, large format IR focal place array type devices.

  13. Growth and characterization of 6" InSb substrates for use in large area infrared imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlong, Mark J.; Dallas, Gordon; Meshew, Greg; Flint, J. Patrick; Small, David; Martinez, Becky; Mowbray, Andrew

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we report on an industry first; the growth and characterization of 6" diameter indium antimonide (InSb) substrates that are suitable for use in the fabrication of MWIR focal plane infrared detectors. Results will be presented on the production of single crystal 6" InSb ingots grown by the Czochralski (Cz) technique. We will also assess the electrical quality of new 6" InSb crystals and present uniformity information on Hall mobility, resistivity and carrier level from which we will infer comparisons on the relative dark current performance of the material grown. High quality, epitaxy-ready type surfaces have been prepared and we will demonstrate how the key surface quality characteristics of roughness (< 0.5 nm rms), oxide thickness (<100 Å) and flatness (<7 μm TTV) have been maintained across production processes that scale 4" to 6" wafer formats. We conclude by presenting our road map for the development of large area InSb substrates and describe how developments in Czochralski crystal growth and surface finishing technology will support industry's requirements to deliver higher performance, large format IR focal plane array type devices.

  14. Beyond Agar: Gel Substrates with Improved Optical Clarity and Drug Efficiency and Reduced Autofluorescence for Microbial Growth Experiments

    PubMed Central

    McElfresh, Cameron; Wong, Lily R.

    2015-01-01

    Agar, a seaweed extract, has been the standard support matrix for microbial experiments for over a century. Recent developments in high-throughput genetic screens have created a need to reevaluate the suitability of agar for use as colony support, as modern robotic printing systems now routinely spot thousands of colonies within the area of a single microtiter plate. Identifying optimal biophysical, biochemical, and biological properties of the gel support matrix in these extreme experimental conditions is instrumental to achieving the best possible reproducibility and sensitivity. Here we systematically evaluate a range of gelling agents by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model microbe. We find that carrageenan and Phytagel have superior optical clarity and reduced autofluorescence, crucial for high-resolution imaging and fluorescent reporter screens. Nutrient choice and use of refined Noble agar or pure agarose reduce the effective dose of numerous selective drugs by >50%, potentially enabling large cost savings in genetic screens. Using thousands of mutant yeast strains to compare colony growth between substrates, we found no evidence of significant growth or nutrient biases between gel substrates, indicating that researchers could freely pick and choose the optimal gel for their respective application and experimental condition. PMID:26070672

  15. Catalyst-free bottom-up growth of graphene nanofeatures along with molecular templates on dielectric substrates.

    PubMed

    Min, Misook; Seo, Sohyeon; Yoon, Yeoheung; Cho, Kyungjune; Lee, Sae Mi; Lee, Takhee; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2016-09-29

    Synthesis of graphene nanostructures has been investigated to provide outstanding properties for various applications. Herein, we report molecular thin film-assisted growth of graphene into nanofeatures such as nanoribbons and nanoporous sheets along with a predetermined molecular orientation on dielectric substrates without metal catalysts. A Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) method was used for the formation of the molecularly patterned SiO2 substrates with ferric stearate layers, which acted as a template for the directional growth of the polypyrrole graphene precursor. The nanofeatures of the graphene were determined by the number of ferric stearate layers (e.g., nanoribbons from multiple layers and nanoporous sheets from a single layer). The graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) containing pyrrolic N enriched edges exhibited a p-type semiconducting behavior, whereas the nanoporous graphene sheets containing inhomogeneous pores and graphitic N enriched basal planes exhibited the typical electronic transport of nitrogen-doped graphene. Our approaches provide two central methods for graphene synthesis such as bottom-up and direct processes for the future development of graphene nanoelectronics.

  16. Growth of poly-crystalline Cu films on Y substrates by picosecond pulsed laser deposition for photocathode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontad, F.; Lorusso, A.; Klini, A.; Manousaki, A.; Perrone, A.; Fotakis, C.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the deposition of Cu thin films on Y substrates for photocathode applications by pulsed laser deposition employing picosecond laser pulses is reported and compared with the use of nanosecond pulses. The influence of power density (6-50 GW/cm2) on the ablation of the target material, as well as on the properties of the resulting film, is discussed. The material transfer from the target to the substrate surface was found to be rather efficient, in comparison to nanosecond ablation, leading to the growth of films with high thickness. Scanning electron microscope analysis indicated a quasi-continuous film morphology, at low power density values, becoming granular with increasing power density. The structural investigation, through X-ray diffraction, revealed the poly-crystalline nature of the films, with a preferential growth along the (111) crystallographic orientation of Cu cubic network. Finally, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed a low contamination level of the grown films, demonstrating the potential of a PLD technique for the fabrication of Cu/Y patterned structures, with applications in radiofrequency electron gun technology.

  17. Local growth of vertical aligned carbon nanotubes by laserinduced surface modification of coated silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, K.; Böhme, R.; Ruthe, D.; Rudolph, Th; Rauschenbach, B.

    2007-04-01

    The stimulation of carbon nanotubes (CNT) growth in a thermal CVD process using an acetylene/nitrogen gas mixture by KrF-excimer laser exposure of iron nitrate coated silicon is described. At moderate laser fluences of ~1 J/cm2 the growth of nanotube bundles up to 100 μm consisting of vertical aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNT) is observed. AFM measurements show the formation of nanoparticles in the laser-exposed areas. At this catalytic sites the nanotubes grow and sustain one another and forming the well-defined bundles. Via the laser exposure the control of the catalytic sites formation and consequently the nanotube growth and properties can be achieved.

  18. Growth of bedding plants in commercial potting substrate amended with vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Bachman, G R; Metzger, J D

    2008-05-01

    Vermicompost has been promoted as a viable alternative container media component for the horticulture industry. The purpose of this research was to investigate the use of vermicompost at different points in the production cycle of tomato, marigold, pepper, and cornflower. The incorporation of vermicompost of pig manure origin into germination media up to 20% v/v enhanced shoot and root weight, leaf area, and shoot:root ratios of both tomato and French marigold seedlings; however amendment with vermicompost had little influence on pepper and cornflower seedling growth. Moreover there was no effect on the germination of seed of any species. When seedlings of tomato, French marigold, and cornflower were transplanted into 6-cell packs there was greater plant growth in media amended with vermicompost compared to the control media, and the greatest growth when vermicompost was amended into both the germination and transplant media. This effect was increased when seedlings in the transplant media were irrigated with water containing fertilizer.

  19. Biodegradation of anthracene in the roots and growth substrate of poplar cuttings.

    PubMed

    Ballach, Hans-Joachim; Kuhn, Achim; Wittig, Rüdiger

    2003-01-01

    Following their exposure to anthracene, the roots of Populus nigra L. Loenen showed traces of 9 substances classed as products of biodegradation. The main substances detected were phthalic acid and 9,10-anthraquinone, followed by hydroxyanthracene and methoxyanthracene and five other compounds which could not be identified. Due to the relatively low concentration of degradation products found in the roots, further degradation to lower molecular compounds are discussed. The presence of 9,10-anthraquinone as the main product of the degradation of anthracene was also evident in the control tests with unplanted sandy substrate, although the content was higher in the planted series of tests. As a non-sterile approach was chosen, it may be assumed that a microbial degradation for 9,10-anthraquinone took place in the control series. However, it is difficult to differentiate clearly between a microbial degradation of anthracene in the substrate and metabolization in the roots due in part to the absence of specific degradation products in the various reaction areas.

  20. Optimized morphology properties of silver catalyst substrate for twisted carbon nanoribbon growth by PECVD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad; Syuhada, Ibnu; Fikri Hidayat, Aulia; Marimpul, Rinaldo; Winata, Toto

    2016-08-01

    A twisted carbon nanoribbon was deposited onto multicoated silver thin film using RF-PECVD method at relatively low radio frequency (rf) power, 8 watt. Plasma formation in the chamber is strongly influenced not only by rf power but also by methane flowrate hence in order to get optimum condition it need to be appropriated. At low rf power, deposited carbon atoms on catalyst substrate is obviously observed which is provides that even with a minimum power it still capable of resulted in carbon nanosheet but unable to enhance plasma formation therefore the properties of material absolutely need to be optimized. The fabrication process was carried out at 20 sccm of CH4 for 20 minutes with 70 MHz/8 watt and 300 mTorr pressure. From SEM images it shows that the morphology of silver catalyst substrates determine carbon formation. Even-times coating of silver film able to reduced holes surface and more smoothing textures therefore suitable enough for carbon nanosheet medium.

  1. Substrate Inhibition of Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase by Uracil Can Account for the Uracil Growth Sensitivity of Leishmania donovani Pyrimidine Auxotrophs*

    PubMed Central

    Soysa, Radika; Wilson, Zachary N.; Elferich, Johannes; Forquer, Isaac; Shinde, Ujwal; Riscoe, Michael K.; Yates, Phillip A.; Ullman, Buddy

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenic protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani is capable of both de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis and salvage of pyrimidines from the host milieu. Genetic analysis has authenticated L. donovani uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (LdUPRT), an enzyme not found in mammalian cells, as the focal enzyme of pyrimidine salvage because all exogenous pyrimidines that can satisfy the requirement of the parasite for pyrimidine nucleotides are funneled to uracil and then phosphoribosylated to UMP in the parasite by LdUPRT. To characterize this unique parasite enzyme, LdUPRT was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme was purified to homogeneity. Kinetic analysis revealed apparent Km values of 20 and 99 μm for the natural substrates uracil and phosphoribosylpyrophosphate, respectively, as well as apparent Km values 6 and 7 μm for the pyrimidine analogs 5-fluorouracil and 4-thiouracil, respectively. Size exclusion chromatography revealed the native LdUPRT to be tetrameric and retained partial structure and activity in high concentrations of urea. L. donovani mutants deficient in de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, which require functional LdUPRT for growth, are hypersensitive to high concentrations of uracil, 5-fluorouracil, and 4-thiouracil in the growth medium. This hypersensitivity can be explained by the observation that LdUPRT is substrate-inhibited by uracil and 4-thiouracil, but 5-fluorouracil toxicity transpires via an alternative mechanism. This substrate inhibition of LdUPRT provides a protective mechanism for the parasite by facilitating purine and pyrimidine nucleotide pool balance and by sparing phosphoribosylpyrophosphate for consumption by the nutritionally indispensable purine salvage process. PMID:23986453

  2. Impact of phenolic substrate and growth temperature on the arthrobacter chlorophenolicus proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Unell, Maria; Abraham, Paul E.; Shah, Manesh; Zhang, Bing; Ruckert, Christian; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2009-02-15

    We compared the Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus proteome during growth on 4-chlorophenol, 4-nitrophenol or phenol at 5 C and 28 C; both for the wild type and a mutant strain with mass spectrometry based proteomics. A label free workflow employing spectral counting identified 3749 proteins across all growth conditions, representing over 70% of the predicted genome and 739 of these proteins form the core proteome. Statistically significant differences were found in the proteomes of cells grown under different conditions including differentiation of hundreds of unknown proteins. The 4-chlorophenol-degradation pathway was confirmed, but not that for phenol.

  3. Impact of Phenolic Substrate and Growth Temperature on the Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus Proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Unell, Maria; Abraham, Paul E; Shah, Manesh B; Zhang, B; Ruckert, Christian; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Jansson, J

    2009-01-01

    We compared the Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus proteome during growth on 4-chlorophenol, 4-nitrophenol, or phenol at 5 and 28 C, both for the wild-type and a mutant strain with mass spectrometry based proteomics. A label-free workflow employing spectral counting identified 3749 proteins across all growth conditions, representing over 70% of the predicted genome and 739 of these proteins form the core proteome. Statistically significant differences were found in the proteomes of cells grown under different conditions including differentiation of hundreds of unknown proteins. The 4-chlorophenol- degradation pathway was confirmed, but not that for phenol.

  4. Structural defects in the growth of multiple periods of InAs quantum dots on a GaAs substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwack Joo; Ryu, Hyun; Leam, Jae Y.; Noh, Sam K.; Lee, Hyung G.; Nahm, Sahn

    1997-02-01

    Microstructural observations on 20 periods of InAs quantum dots on a GaAs substrate grown by molecular beam epitaxy system were carried out by using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The spherical cap-shaped InAs quantum dots were formed in a self-organized fashion, dot over dot, along the growth direction. However, two types of anomalities were found in the growth of these superlattice structures. One is the stoppage of quantum dot formation after 4 or 5 layers have been deposited. The morphology of the quantum dots was rather flat and faceted and a black and white contrast layer has appeared in the dot structure. The other type was a volcano-like defect which was grown vertically along the growth direction with a size of about 120 nm in diameter and about 400 nm in spacing. Inside the defect, black and white contrast layers have been formed along the [110] direction at the bottom of the epilayer and then changed to the [111] direction as the growth continued to the top layer.

  5. Silver as Seed-Particle Material for GaAs Nanowires—Dictating Crystal Phase and Growth Direction by Substrate Orientation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Here we investigate the feasibility of silver as seed-particle material to synthesize GaAs nanowires and show that both crystal phase and growth direction can be controlled by choice of substrate orientation. A (111)B substrate orientation can be used to form vertically aligned wurtzite GaAs nanowires and a (100) substrate orientation to form vertically aligned zinc blende GaAs nanowires. A 45–50% yield of vertical nanowire growth is achieved on the (100) substrate orientation without employing any type of surface modification or nucleation strategy to promote a vertical growth direction. In addition, photoluminescence measurements reveal that the photon emission from the silver seeded wurtzite GaAs nanowires is characterized by a single and narrow emission peak at 1.52 eV. PMID:26998550

  6. Specific growth rate and substrate dependent polyhydroxybutyrate production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kocharin, Kanokarn; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-03-21

    Production of the biopolymer polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae starts at the end of exponential phase particularly when the specific growth rate is decreased due to the depletion of glucose in the medium. The specific growth rate and the type of carbon source (fermentable/non-fermentable) have been known to influence the cell physiology and hence affect the fermentability of S. cerevisiae. The production of PHB utilizes cytosolic acetyl-CoA as a precursor and the S. cerevisiae employed in this study is therefore a strain with the enhanced cytosolic acetyl-CoA supply. Growth and PHB production at different specific growth rates were evaluated on glucose, ethanol and a mixture of glucose and ethanol as carbon source. Ethanol as carbon source yielded a higher PHB production compared to glucose since it can be directly used for cytosolic acetyl-CoA production and hence serves as a precursor for PHB production. However, this carbon source results in lower biomass yield and hence it was found that to ensure both biomass formation and PHB production a mixture of glucose and ethanol was optimal, and this resulted in the highest volumetric productivity of PHB, 8.23 mg/L · h-1, at a dilution rate of 0.1 h-1.

  7. Graphene layer growth on silicon substrates with nickel film by pulse arc plasma deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, K.; Banno, K.; Aryal, H. R.; Egawa, T.

    2012-10-15

    Carbon layer has been grown on a Ni/SiO{sub 2}/Si(111) substrate under high vacuum pressure by pulse arc plasma deposition. From the results of Raman spectroscopy for the sample, it is found that graphene was formed by ex-situ annealing of sample grown at room temperature. Furthermore, for the sample grown at high temperature, graphene formation was shown and optimum temperature was around 1000 Degree-Sign C. Transmission electron microscopy observation of the sample suggests that the graphene was grown from step site caused by grain of Ni film. The results show that the pulse arc plasma technique has the possibility for acquiring homogenous graphene layer with controlled layer thickness.

  8. Microbial ecology of extreme environments: Antarctic dry valley yeasts and growth in substrate limited habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishniac, H. S.

    1981-01-01

    The multiple stresses temperature, moisture, and for chemoheterotrophs, sources of carbon and energy of the Dry Valley Antarctica soils allow at best depauperate communities, low in species diversity and population density. The nature of community structure, the operation of biogeochemical cycles, the evolution and mechanisms of adaptation to this habitat are of interest in informing speculations upon life on other planets as well as in modeling the limits of gene life. Yeasts of the Cryptococcus vishniacil complex (Basidiobiastomycetes) are investigated, as the only known indigenes of the most hostile, lichen free, parts of the Dry Valleys. Methods were developed for isolating these yeasts (methods which do not exclude the recovery of other microbiota). The definition of the complex was refined and the importance of nitrogen sources was established as well as substrate competition in fitness to the Dry Valley habitats.

  9. Growth and characterization of AlGaN films on patterned sapphire substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Y. S.; Lee, D. S.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, W. H.; Moon, S. W.

    2011-12-01

    A GaN film and two AlGaN films with Al compositions of 5% and 10% have been grown on the patterned sapphire substrates (PSSs) by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Optical properties and crystalline qualities of the films have been investigated. The GaN film and the Al0.05Ga0.95N film are almost entirely coalesced except for some point defects. However, the Al0.1Ga0.9N film contains large pits encircled by small pits adjacent to them. The large pits are distributed in the same manner with the PSS arrangement. Dislocations and inversion domain boundaries were also observed in the Al0.1Ga0.9N film.

  10. Size-controllable growth of ZnO nanorods on Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhentao; Li, Hui; Qiu, Yining; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Wu; Xu, Ning; Sun, Jian; Wu, Jiada

    2017-01-01

    Here we report a simple two-step chemical-solution-based method to grow highly oriented and size-controllable ZnO nanorods on ZnO-seeded Si substrate. The morphology of the grown ZnO nanorods was examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The structure was characterized by X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering spectrum. Photoluminescence spectra were measured at room temperature and low temperatures to evaluate the photoluminescence properties of the ZnO nanorods. The grown ZnO nanorods are structured with hexagonal wurtzite. The diameter and length of ZnO nanorods can be controlled by varying the crystal quality of the underlying ZnO seed layers. The crystal quality of the seed layers gets improved as the deposition time and annealing temperature for ZnO seed layers are increased. The effects of annealing on the ZnO nanorods were also studied.

  11. InAs-mediated growth of vertical InSb nanowires on Si substrates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this work, InSb nanowires are grown vertically on Si (111) with metal organic chemical vapor deposition using InAs as seed layer, instead of external metal catalyst. Two groups of InSb nanowires are fabricated and characterized: one group presents Indium droplets at the nanowire's free end, while the other, in contrast, ends without Indium droplet but with pyramid-shaped InSb. The indium-droplet-ended nanowires are longer than the other group of nanowires. For both groups of InSb nanowires, InAs layers play an important role in their formation by serving as a template for growing InSb nanowires. The results presented in this work suggest a useful approach to grow catalyst-free InSb nanowires on Si substrates, which is significant for their device applications. PMID:23883403

  12. Temperature-controlled coalescence during the growth of Ge crystals on deeply patterned Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamaschini, Roberto; Salvalaglio, Marco; Scaccabarozzi, Andrea; Isa, Fabio; Falub, Claudiu V.; Isella, Giovanni; von Känel, Hans; Montalenti, Francesco; Miglio, Leo

    2016-04-01

    A method for growing suspended Ge films on micron-sized Si pillars in Si(001) is discussed. In [C.V. Falub et al., Science 335 (2012) 1330] vertically aligned three-dimensional Ge crystals, separated by a few tens of nanometers, were obtained by depositing several micrometers of Ge using Low-Energy Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition. Here a different regime of high growth temperature is exploited in order to induce the merging of the crystals into a connected structure eventually forming a continuous, two-dimensional film. The mechanisms leading to such a behavior are discussed with the aid of an effective model of crystal growth. Both the effects of deposition and curvature-driven surface diffusion are considered to reproduce the main features of coalescence. The key enabling role of high temperature is identified with the activation of the diffusion process on a time scale competitive with the deposition rate. We demonstrate the versatility of the deposition process, which allows to switch between the formation of individual crystals and a continuous suspended film simply by tuning the growth temperature.

  13. Effect of Bifidobacterium upon Clostridium difficile Growth and Toxicity When Co-cultured in Different Prebiotic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Varela, L.; Hernández-Barranco, Ana M.; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal overgrowth of Clostridium difficile, often after disturbance of the gut microbiota by antibiotic treatment, leads to C. difficile infection (CDI) which manifestation ranges from mild diarrhea to life-threatening conditions. The increasing CDI incidence, not only in compromised subjects but also in traditionally considered low-risk populations, together with the frequent relapses of the disease, has attracted the interest for prevention/therapeutic options. Among these, probiotics, prebiotics, or synbiotics constitute a promising approach. In this study we determined the potential of selected Bifidobacterium strains for the inhibition of C. difficile growth and toxicity in different carbon sources. We conducted co-cultures of the toxigenic strain C. difficile LMG21717 with four Bifidobacterium strains (Bifidobacterium longum IPLA20022, Bifidobacterium breve IPLA20006, Bifidobacterium bifidum IPLA20015, and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb12) in the presence of various prebiotic substrates (Inulin, Synergy, and Actilight) or glucose, and compared the results with those obtained for the corresponding mono-cultures. C. difficile and bifidobacteria levels were quantified by qPCR; the pH and the production of short chain fatty acids was also determined. Moreover, supernatants of the cultures were collected to evaluate their toxicity using a recently developed model. Results showed that co-culture with B. longum IPLA20022 and B. breve IPLA20006 in the presence of short-chain fructooligosaccharides, but not of Inulin, as carbon source significantly reduced the growth of the pathogen. With the sole exception of B. animalis Bb12, whose growth was enhanced, the presence of C. difficile did not show major effects upon the growth of the bifidobacteria. In accordance with the growth data, B. longum and B. breve were the strains showing higher reduction in the toxicity of the co-culture supernatants. PMID:27242753

  14. Plasmonic-enhanced Raman scattering of graphene on growth substrates and its application in SERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuan; Chen, Guanxiong; Du, Yuanxin; Xu, Jin; Wu, Shuilin; Qu, Yan; Zhu, Yanwu

    2014-10-01

    We detail a facile method for enhancing the Raman signals of as-grown graphene on Cu foils by depositing gold nanoislands (Au Nis) onto the surface of graphene. It is found that an enhancement of up to 49 fold in the graphene Raman signal has been achieved by depositing a 4 nm thick Au film. The enhancement is considered to be related to the coupling between graphene and the plasmon modes of Au Nis, as confirmed by the finite element simulations. The plasmonic effect of the Au/graphene/Cu hybrid platform leads to a strong absorption at the resonant wavelength whose position shifts from visible light (640 nm) to near-infrared (1085 nm) when the thickness of Au films is increased from 2 nm to 18 nm. Finally, we demonstrate that hybrid substrates are reliable surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) systems, showing an enhancement factor of ~106 for dye molecules Rhodamine B and Rhodamine 6G with uniform and stable response and a detection limit of as low as 0.1 nM for Sudan III and Sudan IV.We detail a facile method for enhancing the Raman signals of as-grown graphene on Cu foils by depositing gold nanoislands (Au Nis) onto the surface of graphene. It is found that an enhancement of up to 49 fold in the graphene Raman signal has been achieved by depositing a 4 nm thick Au film. The enhancement is considered to be related to the coupling between graphene and the plasmon modes of Au Nis, as confirmed by the finite element simulations. The plasmonic effect of the Au/graphene/Cu hybrid platform leads to a strong absorption at the resonant wavelength whose position shifts from visible light (640 nm) to near-infrared (1085 nm) when the thickness of Au films is increased from 2 nm to 18 nm. Finally, we demonstrate that hybrid substrates are reliable surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) systems, showing an enhancement factor of ~106 for dye molecules Rhodamine B and Rhodamine 6G with uniform and stable response and a detection limit of as low as 0.1 nM for Sudan III and

  15. Modelling the growth kinetics of Kocuria marina DAGII as a function of single and binary substrate during batch production of β-Cryptoxanthin.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Ruchira; Chaudhuri, Surabhi; Dutta, Debjani

    2017-01-01

    In the present investigation, growth kinetics of Kocuria marina DAGII during batch production of β-Cryptoxanthin (β-CRX) was studied by considering the effect of glucose and maltose as a single and binary substrate. The importance of mixed substrate over single substrate has been emphasised in the present study. Different mathematical models namely, the Logistic model for cell growth, the Logistic mass balance equation for substrate consumption and the Luedeking-Piret model for β-CRX production were successfully implemented. Model-based analyses for the single substrate experiments suggested that the concentrations of glucose and maltose higher than 7.5 and 10.0 g/L, respectively, inhibited the growth and β-CRX production by K. marina DAGII. The Han and Levenspiel model and the Luong product inhibition model accurately described the cell growth in glucose and maltose substrate systems with a R (2) value of 0.9989 and 0.9998, respectively. The effect of glucose and maltose as binary substrate was further investigated. The binary substrate kinetics was well described using the sum-kinetics with interaction parameters model. The results of production kinetics revealed that the presence of binary substrate in the cultivation medium increased the biomass and β-CRX yield significantly. This study is a first time detailed investigation on kinetic behaviours of K. marina DAGII during β-CRX production. The parameters obtained in the study might be helpful for developing strategies for commercial production of β-CRX by K. marina DAGII.

  16. Insulin receptor substrates Irs1 and Irs2 coordinate skeletal muscle growth and metabolism via the Akt and AMPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Long, Yun Chau; Cheng, Zhiyong; Copps, Kyle D; White, Morris F

    2011-02-01

    Coordination of skeletal muscle growth and metabolism with nutrient availability is critical for metabolic homeostasis. To establish the role of insulin-like signaling in this process, we used muscle creatine kinase (MCK)-Cre to disrupt expression of insulin receptor substrates Irs1 and Irs2 in mouse skeletal/cardiac muscle. In 2-week-old mice, skeletal muscle masses and insulin responses were slightly affected by Irs1, but not Irs2, deficiency. In contrast, the combined deficiency of Irs1 and Irs2 (MDKO mice) severely reduced skeletal muscle growth and Akt→mTOR signaling and caused death by 3 weeks of age. Autopsy of MDKO mice revealed dilated cardiomyopathy, reflecting the known requirement of insulin-like signaling for cardiac function (P. G. Laustsen et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 27:1649-1664, 2007). Impaired growth and function of MDKO skeletal muscle were accompanied by increased Foxo-dependent atrogene expression and amino acid release. MDKO mice were resistant to injected insulin, and their isolated skeletal muscles showed decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Glucose utilization in MDKO mice and isolated skeletal muscles was shifted from oxidation to lactate production, accompanied by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio that increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)→acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation. Thus, insulin-like signaling via Irs1/2 is essential to terminate skeletal muscle catabolic/fasting pathways in the presence of adequate nutrition.

  17. Growth of GaN nanowall network on Si (111) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Aihua; Hane, Kazuhiro

    2012-12-27

    GaN nanowall network was epitaxially grown on Si (111) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. GaN nanowalls overlap and interlace with one another, together with large numbers of holes, forming a continuous porous GaN nanowall network. The width of the GaN nanowall can be controlled, ranging from 30 to 200 nm by adjusting the N/Ga ratio. Characterization results of a transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction show that the GaN nanowall is well oriented along the C axis. Strong band edge emission centered at 363 nm is observed in the spectrum of room temperature photoluminescence, indicating that the GaN nanowall network is of high quality. The sheet resistance of the Si-doped GaN nanowall network along the lateral direction was 58 Ω/. The conductive porous nanowall network can be useful for integrated gas sensors due to the large surface area-to-volume ratio and electrical conductivity along the lateral direction by combining with Si micromachining.

  18. Thermoresponsive Substrates Used for the Growth and Controlled Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xingliang; Nash, Maria E; Gorelov, Alexander V; Barry, Frank P; Shaw, Georgina; Rochev, Yury A

    2015-08-24

    This communication outlines the advances made in the development of thermoresponsive substrates for human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) expansion and subsequent controlled specific and multilineage differentiation from a previous study performed by this group. Previously, the development of an inexpensive and technically accessible method for hMSC expansion and harvesting was reported, using the solvent casting deposition method and thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). Here, the logical continuation of this work is reported with the multipassage expansion of hMSCs with phenotypic maintenance followed by induced adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation. Interestingly, 1 μm thick solvent cast films are not only capable of hosting an expanding population of phenotypically preserved hMSCs similar to tissue culture plastic controls, but also the cells detached via temperature control better maintain their ability to differentiate compared to conventionally trypsinized cells. This approach to hMSC expansion and differentiation can be highly attractive to stem cell researchers where clinical therapies have seen a collective deviation away from the employment of animal derived products such as proteolytic trypsin.

  19. Role of molecular conformations in rubrene polycrystalline films growth from vacuum deposition at various substrate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ku-Yen; Wang, Yan-Jun; Chen, Ko-Lun; Ho, Ching-Yuan; Yang, Chun-Chuen; Shen, Ji-Lin; Chiu, Kuan-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    We report on the optical and structural characterization of rubrene polycrystalline films fabricated from vacuum deposition with various substrate temperatures (Tsub). Depending on Tsub, the role of twisted and planar rubrene conformational isomers on the properties of rubrene films is focused. The temperature (T)-dependent inverse optical transmission (IOT) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra were performed on these rubrene films. The origins of these IOT and PL peaks are explained in terms of the features from twisted and planar rubrene molecules and of the band characteristics from rubrene molecular solid films. Here, two rarely reported weak-peaks at 2.431 and 2.605 eV were observed from IOT spectra, which are associated with planar rubrene. Besides, the T-dependence of optical bandgap deduced from IOT spectra is discussed with respect to Tsub. Together with IOT and PL spectra, for Tsub > 170 °C, the changes in surface morphology and unit cell volume were observed for the first time, and are attributed to the isomeric transformation from twisted to planar rubrenes during the deposition processes. Furthermore, a unified schematic diagram in terms of Frenkel exciton recombination is suggested to explain the origins of the dominant PL peaks performed on these rubrene films at 15 K.

  20. Role of molecular conformations in rubrene polycrystalline films growth from vacuum deposition at various substrate temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ku-Yen; Wang, Yan-Jun; Chen, Ko-Lun; Ho, Ching-Yuan; Yang, Chun-Chuen; Shen, Ji-Lin; Chiu, Kuan-Cheng

    2017-01-16

    We report on the optical and structural characterization of rubrene polycrystalline films fabricated from vacuum deposition with various substrate temperatures (Tsub). Depending on Tsub, the role of twisted and planar rubrene conformational isomers on the properties of rubrene films is focused. The temperature (T)-dependent inverse optical transmission (IOT) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra were performed on these rubrene films. The origins of these IOT and PL peaks are explained in terms of the features from twisted and planar rubrene molecules and of the band characteristics from rubrene molecular solid films. Here, two rarely reported weak-peaks at 2.431 and 2.605 eV were observed from IOT spectra, which are associated with planar rubrene. Besides, the T-dependence of optical bandgap deduced from IOT spectra is discussed with respect to Tsub. Together with IOT and PL spectra, for Tsub > 170 °C, the changes in surface morphology and unit cell volume were observed for the first time, and are attributed to the isomeric transformation from twisted to planar rubrenes during the deposition processes. Furthermore, a unified schematic diagram in terms of Frenkel exciton recombination is suggested to explain the origins of the dominant PL peaks performed on these rubrene films at 15 K.

  1. Role of molecular conformations in rubrene polycrystalline films growth from vacuum deposition at various substrate temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ku-Yen; Wang, Yan-Jun; Chen, Ko-Lun; Ho, Ching-Yuan; Yang, Chun-Chuen; Shen, Ji-Lin; Chiu, Kuan-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    We report on the optical and structural characterization of rubrene polycrystalline films fabricated from vacuum deposition with various substrate temperatures (Tsub). Depending on Tsub, the role of twisted and planar rubrene conformational isomers on the properties of rubrene films is focused. The temperature (T)-dependent inverse optical transmission (IOT) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra were performed on these rubrene films. The origins of these IOT and PL peaks are explained in terms of the features from twisted and planar rubrene molecules and of the band characteristics from rubrene molecular solid films. Here, two rarely reported weak-peaks at 2.431 and 2.605 eV were observed from IOT spectra, which are associated with planar rubrene. Besides, the T-dependence of optical bandgap deduced from IOT spectra is discussed with respect to Tsub. Together with IOT and PL spectra, for Tsub > 170 °C, the changes in surface morphology and unit cell volume were observed for the first time, and are attributed to the isomeric transformation from twisted to planar rubrenes during the deposition processes. Furthermore, a unified schematic diagram in terms of Frenkel exciton recombination is suggested to explain the origins of the dominant PL peaks performed on these rubrene films at 15 K. PMID:28091620

  2. Pulsed laser growth and characterization of thin films on titanium substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavisse, L.; Jouvard, J. M.; Imhoff, L.; Heintz, O.; Korntheuer, J.; Langlade, C.; Bourgeois, S.; Lucas, M. C. Marco de

    2007-07-01

    Colored layers were obtained by laser surface treatment of Ti substrates with a pulsed Nd:YAG Q-switched laser. The changes in the morphology, structure and chemical composition of the layers were studied by SEM, EDS, XPS, SIMS and Raman spectroscopy as a function of the laser fluence in the 4-60 J cm -2. For laser fluences lower than 25 J cm -2, the layers are colorless or yellow. Their surface is smooth, but they display cracks which increase when the fluence increases. The O/Ti ratio, determined by XPS analysis, varies from 0.7 (colorless layers) to 1.3 (yellow layer). Moreover, XPS spectra evidence non-negligible amounts of nitrogen and carbon in these layers. Raman spectra show large bands which support the formation of titanium oxy-carbo-nitride. For laser fluences higher than 25 J cm -2, the layers are purple and blue and very rough sample surfaces were obtained. As a consequence of this, XPS analysis could not be used to obtain quantitative information on the layer composition. Finally, Raman spectra clearly showed the increasing formation of anatase and rutile phases of TiO 2 in these layers when the laser fluence increases.

  3. Growth of linked silicon/carbon nanospheres on copper substrate as integrated electrodes for Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zailei; Wang, Yanhong; Tan, Qiangqiang; Li, Dan; Chen, Yunfa; Zhong, Ziyi; Su, Fabing

    2014-01-07

    We report the growth of linked silicon/carbon (Si/C) nanospheres on Cu substrate as an integrated anode for Li-ion batteries. The Si/C nanospheres were synthesized by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) on Cu substrate as current collector using methyltrichlorosilane as precursor, a cheap by-product of the organosilane industry. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermal gravimetry, Raman spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that the linked Si/C nanospheres with a diameter of 400-500 nm contain Si, Cu(x)Si, and Cu nanocrystals, which are highly dispersed in the amorphous carbon nanospheres. A CCVD mechanism was tentatively proposed, in which the evaporated Cu atoms play a critical role to catalytically grown Si nanocrystals embedded within linked Si/C nanospheres. The electrochemical measurement shows that these Si/C nanospheres delivered a capacity of 998.9, 713.1, 320.6, and 817.8 mA h g(-1) at 50, 200, 800, and 50 mA g(-1) respectively after 50 cycles, much higher than that of commercial graphite anode. This is because the amorphous carbon, Cu(x)Si, and Cu in the Si/C nanospheres could buffer the volume change of Si nanocrystals during the Li insertion and extraction reactions, thus hindering the cracking or crumbling of the electrode. Furthermore, the incorporation of conductive Cu(x)Si and Cu nanocrystals and the integration of active electrode materials with Cu substrate may improve the electrical conductivity from the current collector to individual Si active particles, resulting in a remarkably enhanced reversible capacity and cycling stability. The work will be helpful in the fabrication of low cost binder-free Si/C anode materials for Li-ion batteries.

  4. Predicted Growth of Two-Dimensional Topological Insulators Consisting of Hydrogenated III-V Thin films on Si(111) Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Crisostomo, Christian; Yao, Liang-Zi; Yeh, Chun-Chen; Lai, Shu-Ming; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Lin, Hsin; Albao, Marvin; Bansil, Arun

    We have carried out systematic first-principles electronic structure calculations of growth of ultrathin films of compounds of group III (B, Al, In, Ga and Tl) with group V (N, P, As, Sb and Bi) elements on Si(111) substrate, including effects of hydrogenation. A total of six compounds (GaBi, InBi, TlBi, TlAs, TlSb and TlN) are identified to be nontrivial in unhydrogenated case; whereas for hydrogenated case, only four (GaBi, InBi, TlBi and TlSb) remains nontrivial. The band gap is found to be as large as 855 meV for the hydrogenated TlBi film, making this class of III-V materials suitable for room temperature applications. TlBi remains topologically nontrivial with a large band gap at various hydrogen coverages, indicating the robustness of its band topology against bonding effects of substrates. Two bilayers (BLs) of AlBi, InBi, GaBi, TlAs and TlSb are found to support a topological phase over a wide range of strains, in addition to BBi, TlN and TlBi which can be driven into the nontrivial phase via strain. One and two BL films of GaBi and 2 BL films of InBi and TlAs on Si(111) surface possess nontrivial phases with a band gap as large as 121 meV in the case of 2 BL film of GaBi. Persistence of the nontrivial phase upon hydrogenations in the III-V thin films suggests that these films are suitable for growing on various substrates.

  5. Epitaxial chemical vapour deposition growth of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on a Cu(111)/sapphire substrate.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yuki; Iwaizako, Tasuku; Mizuno, Seigi; Tsuji, Masaharu; Ago, Hiroki

    2017-03-22

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), an atomically thin insulating material, shows a large band gap, mechanical flexibility, and optical transparency. It can be stacked with other two-dimensional (2D) materials through van der Waals interactions to form layered heterostructures. These properties promise its application as an insulating layer of novel 2D electronic devices due to its atomically smooth surface with a large band gap. Herein, we demonstrated the ambient-pressure chemical vapour deposition (CVD) growth of high-quality, large-area monolayer h-BN on a Cu(111) thin film deposited on a c-plane sapphire using ammonia borane (BH3NH3) as the feedstock. Highly oriented triangular h-BN grains grow on Cu(111), which finally coalescence to cover the entire Cu surface. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) measurements indicated that the hexagonal lattice of the monolayer h-BN is well-oriented along the underlying Cu(111) lattice, thus implying the epitaxial growth of h-BN, which can be applied in various 2D electronic devices.

  6. Growth of lignocellulosic-fermenting fungi on different substrates under low oxygenation conditions.

    PubMed

    Pavarina, Erika C; Durrant, Lucia R

    2002-01-01

    Four soil fungi able to grow under low oxygenation conditions were selected and used in studies to determine the production of enzymes that promote the degradation of lignocellulosic materials. The capacity of these fungi to ferment such materials was also investigated. The fungi were grown in sugarcane bagasse and sawdust at final concentrations of 4 and 10%, as the carbon sources. The strains were cultivated under microaerophilic and combined conditions of oxygenation (aerobic followed by microaerophilic conditions). The results obtained with the basidiomycete specie, Trichocladium canadense, Geotrichum sp., and Fusarium sp. suggest that they prefer lower oxygen concentration for growth and enzyme production. Lignocellulolytic activities were detected in all strains but varied with the carbon source used. The highest levels of these activities were produced by the Basidiomycete specie and Fusarium sp. Ethanol and other nongaseous fermentation products were detected following high-performance liquid chromatography analysis using a supelcogel C-610H column, demonstrating the fermentative capability of these strains. In view of their ability to produce enzymes necessary for the breakdown of lignocellulosic materials and to utilize most of the degradation products for growth, these strains have a great potential for biotechnological application.

  7. Application of RF magnetron sputtering for growth of AZO on glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorannevis, Z.; Akbarnejad, E.; Salar Elahi, A.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2016-08-01

    Aluminum zinc oxide (AZO), as one of the most promising transparent conducting oxide (TCO) materials, has now been widely used in thin film solar cells. In this study the optimization process of the RF magnetron sputtered AZO films was performed at room temperature by studying its physical properties such as structural, optical, electrical and morphological at different deposition times (10, 20, 40 and 60 min) for its use as a front contact for the Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) based thin film solar cell applications. Influence of the deposition time was investigated on the physical properties of the AZO thin film by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), spectrophotometer and four point probes. XRD analysis suggests that the preferred orientation of grains for all the samples prepared at different growth times are along (002) plane having the hexagonal structure. From optical measurements the films show an average transmission over 60%. Moreover it was found that by increasing the growth time, which implies increasing the film thicknesses as well as improving the crystallinity the resistivity of the grown films decrease from the 10-2 Ωcm to the order of 10-3 Ωcm.

  8. Optimization of growth conditions for (La1-yPry)1-x CaxMnO3 thin films on annealed oxide substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Brian; Grant, Daniel; Biswas, Amlan

    2014-03-01

    Consistent growth of flat, epitaxial thin films is essential for uncovering the unique transport characteristics of rare-earth manganite systems. We have developed pulsed laser deposition growth conditions for (La1-yPry)1-x CaxMnO3 (LPCMO, y = 0.4, 0.5, 0.6) thin films on annealed NdGaO3 (NGO) and SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. The extra annealing step for NGO and STO produces atomically flat substrates with well-defined terraces of unit cell step height. Films grown on these annealed substrates demonstrate better lattice matching compared to films grown on as-received substrates. Consequently, annealing substrates before film growth leads to higher quality thin films with a more controllable thickness. We demonstrate that these optimized growth parameters yield LPCMO thin films that are also atomically flat, as confirmed by atomic force microscopy. We are using these thin films to restrict phase growth to reduced dimensions and to study the origin of thermodynamic phase competition due to first order transitions in manganites. NSF DMR-0804452

  9. Growth of InN Nanowires with Uniform Diameter on Si(111) Substrates: Competition Between Migration and Desorption of In Atoms.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fangliang; Wen, Lei; Xu, Zhenzhu; Han, Jinglei; Yu, Yuefeng; Zhang, Shuguang; Li, Guoqiang

    2017-04-06

    The effects of the growth parameters on the uniformity and the aspect ratio of InN nanowires grown on Si(111) substrates have been studied systematically, and a modified quasi-equilibrium model is proposed. The growth temperature is of great importance for both the nucleation of the nanowires and the migration of In and N atoms, thus affecting the uniformity of the InN nanowires. In order to improve the uniformity of the InN nanowires, both traditional substrate nitridation and pre-In-droplet deposition have been implemented. It is found that the substrate nitridation is favorable for the nucleation of InN nanowires. However, the initial In atoms adhered to the substrate are insufficient to sustain the uniform growth of the InN nanowires. We have found that the initial In droplet on the substrate is not only advantageous for the nucleation of the InN nanowire, but also favorable for the In atom equilibrium between the initial In droplets and the direct In flux. Therefore, InN nanowires with a uniform aspect ratio and optimal diameter can be achieved. The results reported herein provide meaningful insights to understanding the growth kinetics during the InN nanowires growth, and open up great possibilities of developing high-performance group III-nitride-based devices.

  10. CONSTRAINTS ON BLACK HOLE GROWTH, QUASAR LIFETIMES, AND EDDINGTON RATIO DISTRIBUTIONS FROM THE SDSS BROAD-LINE QUASAR BLACK HOLE MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Brandon C.; Hernquist, Lars; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Vestergaard, Marianne; Fan Xiaohui; Hopkins, Philip

    2010-08-20

    We present an estimate of the black hole mass function of broad-line quasars (BLQSOs) that self-consistently corrects for incompleteness and the statistical uncertainty in the mass estimates, based on a sample of 9886 quasars at 1 < z < 4.5 drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We find evidence for 'cosmic downsizing' of black holes in BLQSOs, where the peak in their number density shifts to higher redshift with increasing black hole mass. The cosmic mass density for black holes seen as BLQSOs peaks at z {approx} 2. We estimate the completeness of the SDSS as a function of the black hole mass and Eddington ratio, and find that at z > 1 it is highly incomplete at M {sub BH} {approx}< 10{sup 9} M {sub sun} and L/L{sub Edd} {approx}< 0.5. We estimate a lower limit on the lifetime of a single BLQSO phase to be t {sub BL} > 150 {+-} 15 Myr for black holes at z = 1 with a mass of M {sub BH} = 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}, and we constrain the maximum mass of a black hole in a BLQSO to be {approx}3 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}. Our estimated distribution of BLQSO Eddington ratios peaks at L/L {sub Edd} {approx} 0.05 and has a dispersion of {approx}0.4 dex, implying that most BLQSOs are not radiating at or near the Eddington limit; however, the location of the peak is subject to considerable uncertainty. The steep increase in number density of BLQSOs toward lower Eddington ratios is expected if the BLQSO accretion rate monotonically decays with time. Furthermore, our estimated lifetime and Eddington ratio distributions imply that the majority of the most massive black holes spend a significant amount of time growing in an earlier obscured phase, a conclusion which is independent of the unknown obscured fraction. These results are consistent with models for self-regulated black hole growth, at least for massive systems at z > 1, where the BLQSO phase occurs at the end of a fueling event when black hole feedback unbinds the accreting gas, halting the accretion flow.

  11. Growth and spin-wave properties of thin Y3Fe5O12 films on Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stognij, A. I.; Lutsev, L. V.; Bursian, V. E.; Novitskii, N. N.

    2015-07-01

    We describe synthesis of submicron Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) films sputtered on Si substrates and present results of the investigation of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves in YIG/SiO2/Si structures. It is found that decrease of the annealing time leads to essential reduction of the FMR linewidth ΔH and, consequently, to reduction of relaxation losses of spin waves. Spin-wave propagation in in-plane magnetized YIG/SiO2/Si structures is studied. We observe the asymmetry of amplitude-frequency characteristics of the Damon-Eshbach spin waves caused by different localizations of spin waves at the free YIG surface and at the YIG/SiO2 interface. Growth of the generating microwave power leads to spin-wave instability and changes amplitude-frequency characteristics of spin waves.

  12. Selective growth of boron nitride nanotubes by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at low substrate temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Singh, R. N.

    2008-02-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were synthesized at a low substrate temperature of 800 °C on nickel (Ni) coated oxidized Si(111) wafers in a microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system (MPCVD) by decomposition and reaction of gas mixtures consisting of B2H6-NH3-H2. The 1D BN nanostructures grew preferentially on Ni catalyst islands with a small thickness only. In situ mass spectroscopic analysis and optical emission spectroscopy were used to identify the gas reactions responsible for the BNNT formation. The morphology and structural properties of the deposits were analyzed by SEM, TEM, EDX, SAD and Raman spectroscopy. The growth mechanism of the BNNTs was identified.

  13. Nanoscale spatial phase modulation of GaAs growth in V-grooved trenches on Si (001) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shi-Yan; Zhou, Xu-Liang; Kong, Xiang-Ting; Li, Meng-Ke; Mi, Jun-Ping; Wang, Meng-Qi; Pan, Jiao-Qing

    2016-12-01

    This letter reports the nanoscale spatial phase modulation of GaAs growth in V-grooved trenches fabricated on a Si (001) substrate by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy. Two hexagonal GaAs regions with high density of stacking faults parallel to Si {111} surfaces are observed. A strain-relieved and defect-free cubic phase GaAs was achieved above these highly defective regions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and fast Fourier transforms analysis were performed to characterize these regions of GaAs/Si interface. We also discussed the strain relaxation mechanism and phase structure modulation of GaAs selectively grown on this artificially manipulated surface. Project supported by the National Science and Technology Major Project of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2011ZX02708) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61504137).

  14. Predicted Growth of Two-Dimensional Topological Insulator Thin Films of III-V Compounds on Si(111) Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Liang-Zi; Crisostomo, Christian P.; Yeh, Chun-Chen; Lai, Shu-Ming; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun

    2015-11-05

    We have carried out systematic first-principles electronic structure computations of growth of ultrathin films of compounds of group III (B, Al, In, Ga, and Tl) with group V (N, P, As, Sb, and Bi) elements on Si(111) substrate, including effects of hydrogenation. Two bilayers (BLs) of AlBi, InBi, GaBi, TlAs, and TlSb are found to support a topological phase over a wide range of strains, in addition to BBi, TlN, and TlBi which can be driven into the nontrivial phase via strain. A large band gap of 134 meV is identified in hydrogenated 2 BL film of InBi. One and two BL films of GaBi and 2 BL films of InBi and TlAs on Si(111) surface possess nontrivial phases with a band gap as large as 121 meV in the case of 2 BL film of GaBi. Persistence of the nontrivial phase upon hydrogenations in the III-V thin films suggests that these films are suitable for growing on various substrates.

  15. Predicted Growth of Two-Dimensional Topological Insulator Thin Films of III-V Compounds on Si(111) Substrate

    DOE PAGES

    Yao, Liang-Zi; Crisostomo, Christian P.; Yeh, Chun-Chen; ...

    2015-11-05

    We have carried out systematic first-principles electronic structure computations of growth of ultrathin films of compounds of group III (B, Al, In, Ga, and Tl) with group V (N, P, As, Sb, and Bi) elements on Si(111) substrate, including effects of hydrogenation. Two bilayers (BLs) of AlBi, InBi, GaBi, TlAs, and TlSb are found to support a topological phase over a wide range of strains, in addition to BBi, TlN, and TlBi which can be driven into the nontrivial phase via strain. A large band gap of 134 meV is identified in hydrogenated 2 BL film of InBi. One andmore » two BL films of GaBi and 2 BL films of InBi and TlAs on Si(111) surface possess nontrivial phases with a band gap as large as 121 meV in the case of 2 BL film of GaBi. Persistence of the nontrivial phase upon hydrogenations in the III-V thin films suggests that these films are suitable for growing on various substrates.« less

  16. Predicted Growth of Two-Dimensional Topological Insulator Thin Films of III-V Compounds on Si(111) Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Liang-Zi; Crisostomo, Christian P.; Yeh, Chun-Chen; Lai, Shu-Ming; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun

    2015-11-01

    We have carried out systematic first-principles electronic structure computations of growth of ultrathin films of compounds of group III (B, Al, In, Ga, and Tl) with group V (N, P, As, Sb, and Bi) elements on Si(111) substrate, including effects of hydrogenation. Two bilayers (BLs) of AlBi, InBi, GaBi, TlAs, and TlSb are found to support a topological phase over a wide range of strains, in addition to BBi, TlN, and TlBi which can be driven into the nontrivial phase via strain. A large band gap of 134 meV is identified in hydrogenated 2 BL film of InBi. One and two BL films of GaBi and 2 BL films of InBi and TlAs on Si(111) surface possess nontrivial phases with a band gap as large as 121 meV in the case of 2 BL film of GaBi. Persistence of the nontrivial phase upon hydrogenations in the III-V thin films suggests that these films are suitable for growing on various substrates.

  17. Growth of TiO2 nanofibers on FTO substrates and their application in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryana, R.; Rahmawati, L. R.; Triyana, K.

    2016-11-01

    Growth of TiO2 nanofibers on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates have been performed using electrospinning method. Homogenous TiO2 solution as nanofibers material was prepared with titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP), ethanol, acetic acid and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) which was stirred for 24 h. TiO2 solution was loaded into the syringe pump. Electrospun voltage was operated under 15 kV with optimum distance between syringe tip and collector was 15 cm. FTO substrates were attached on the collector surface. Electrospinning coating time was varied at 15 min, 30 min, 45 min, and 60 min. Then TiO2 nanofibers layer was annealed at temperature of 450° C for 3 h. X-ray diffraction spectrum of TiO2 nanofibers showed major anatase peaks at 25.3°, 48.0° and 37.8° correlating crystal orientation of (101), (200), and (004), respectively while only one rutile peak at 27.5°(110). TiO2 nanofibers diameter was measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM). TiO2 nanofibers have diameter in range of 100-1000 nm. The obtained-TiO2 nanofibers were applied in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) with beta-carotene as dye, carbon as catalyst, and I-/I3- redox couple as electrolyte. DSSC performance was analyzed from I-V characterization. Growth of TiO2 nanofibers at electrospinning time for 45 min has highest efficiency that is 0.016%. It is considered that TiO2 nanofibers at electrospinning time for 45 min can produce optimum thickness so that it is speculated many dyes adsorb on the nanofiber surfaces and many electrons diffuse toward the electrodes.

  18. Growth and properties of crystalline barium oxide on the GaAs(100) substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Yasir, M.; Dahl, J.; Lång, J.; Tuominen, M.; Punkkinen, M. P. J.; Laukkanen, P. Kokko, K.; Kuzmin, M.; Korpijärvi, V.-M.; Polojärvi, V.; Guina, M.

    2013-11-04

    Growing a crystalline oxide film on III-V semiconductor renders possible approaches to improve operation of electronics and optoelectronics heterostructures such as oxide/semiconductor junctions for transistors and window layers for solar cells. We demonstrate the growth of crystalline barium oxide (BaO) on GaAs(100) at low temperatures, even down to room temperature. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements reveal that the amount of interface defects is reduced for BaO/GaAs, compared to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaAs, suggesting that BaO is a useful buffer layer to passivate the surface of the III-V device material. PL and photoemission data show that the produced junction tolerates the post heating around 600 °C.

  19. Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Steiner, S. A.; Baumann, T. F.; Kong, J.; Satcher, J. H.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2007-02-20

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

  20. Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, S A; Baumann, T F; Kong, J; Satcher, J H; Dresselhaus, M S

    2007-02-15

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

  1. Functional analysis and transcriptional regulation of two orthologs of ARO10, encoding broad-substrate-specificity 2-oxo-acid decarboxylases, in the brewing yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus CBS1483.

    PubMed

    Bolat, Irina; Romagnoli, Gabriele; Zhu, Feibai; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2013-09-01

    The hybrid genomes of Saccharomyces pastorianus consist of subgenomes similar to those of S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus, and impact of the genome structure on flavour production and its regulation is poorly understood. This study focuses on ARO10, a 2-oxo-acid decarboxylase involved in production of higher alcohols. In S. pastorianus CBS1483, four ARO10 copies were identified, three resembled S. cerevisiae ARO10 and one S. eubayanus ARO10. Substrate specificities of lager strain (Lg)ScAro10 and LgSeubAro10 were compared by individually expressing them in a pdc1Δ-pdc5Δ-pdc6Δ-aro10Δ-thi3Δ S. cerevisiae strain. Both isoenzymes catalysed decarboxylation of the 2-oxo-acids derived from branched-chain, sulphur-containing amino acids and preferably phenylpyruvate. Expression of both alleles was induced by phenylalanine, however in contrast to the S. cerevisiae strain, the two genes were not induced by leucine. Additionally, LgSeubARO10 showed higher basal expression levels during growth with ammonia. ARO80, which encodes ARO10 transcriptional activator, is located on CHRIV and counts three Sc-like and one Seub-like copies. Deletion of LgSeubARO80 did not affect LgSeubARO10 phenylalanine induction, revealing 'trans' regulation across the subgenomes. ARO10 transcript levels showed a poor correlation with decarboxylase activities. These results provide insights into flavour formation in S. pastorianus and illustrate the complexity of functional characterization in aneuploid strains.

  2. Growth of light-emitting SiGe heterostructures on strained silicon-on-insulator substrates with a thin oxide layer

    SciTech Connect

    Baidakova, N. A.; Bobrov, A. I.; Drozdov, M. N.; Novikov, A. V.; Pavlov, D. A.; Shaleev, M. V.; Yunin, P. A.; Yurasov, D. V.; Krasilnik, Z. F.

    2015-08-15

    The possibility of using substrates based on “strained silicon on insulator” structures with a thin (25 nm) buried oxide layer for the growth of light-emitting SiGe structures is studied. It is shown that, in contrast to “strained silicon on insulator” substrates with a thick (hundreds of nanometers) oxide layer, the temperature stability of substrates with a thin oxide is much lower. Methods for the chemical and thermal cleaning of the surface of such substrates, which make it possible to both retain the elastic stresses in the thin Si layer on the oxide and provide cleaning of the surface from contaminating impurities, are perfecte. It is demonstrated that it is possible to use the method of molecular-beam epitaxy to grow light-emitting SiGe structures of high crystalline quality on such substrates.

  3. Crop and Substrate Tests with Single Use Rooting "Pillows" for the VEGGIE Plant Growth Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, Gioia; Newsham, Gerard; Caro, Janicce; Stutte, Gary; Morrow, Robert; Wheeler, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    VEGGIE is a small plant production chamber built by ORBITEC. This chamber can be collapsed for easy stowage and deployed in orbit. It is designed for gravity independent operation, and provides 0.17 square m of crop growth area with three primary subsystems: an LED light panel, extendable transparent Teflon bellows to enclose the plants, and a wicking reservoir. VEGGIE would provide the capability for astronauts to grow fresh foods for dietary supplementation. Initial planting concepts tested with the VEGGIE included direct seeding or plug placement on the reservoir surface. These options had issues of salt accumulation and eventual toxicity if the reservoir was filled with nutrient solution, and hardware reuse was limited due to sanitation. In response a rooting packet or "pillow" concept was developed: single-use bags of media containing time release fertilizer with a wicking surface contacting the VEGGIE reservoir. Pillows being tested are small electrostatic bags with a Nitex nylon mesh side, each holding 100 mL of dry media. Six pillows fit in one VEGGIE unit; however pillow size could vary depending on crop selected. Seeds can be planted directly in pillows and planted pillows can be hydrated in space as desired. Our goals were to define optimal media and crops for an ISS mission scenario. Plant tests in pillows were performed in a controlled environment chamber set to habitat-relevant conditions, and capillary reservoir analogs were utilized. Media tested within pillows included: a commercial peat-based potting mix, arcillite (calcined clay), perlite: vermiculite, and peat-based: arcillite blends. Testing included 15 types of leafy greens, snow pea, radish, and herbs. Media performance was crop dependent, but generally plants showed the greatest growth in the peat-based: arcillite mixes. Crops with the best performance in pillows were identified, and testing is underway with select leafy greens examining plant and microbial load response to repeated harvest

  4. Alginate as a cell culture substrate for growth and differentiation of human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Razeih; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Samiei, Shahram; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Davari, Maliheh; Nazemroaya, Fatemeh; Bagheri, Abouzar; Deezagi, Abdolkhalegh

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells' behavior in alginate beads that establish 3D environment for cellular growth and mimic extracellular matrix versus the conventional 2D monolayer culture. RPE cells were encapsulated in alginate beads by dripping alginate cell suspension into CaCl2 solution. Beads were suspended in three different media including Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM)/F12 alone, DMEM/F12 supplemented with 10 % fetal bovine serum (FBS), and DMEM/F12 supplemented with 30 % human amniotic fluid (HAF). RPE cells were cultivated on polystyrene under the same conditions as controls. Cell phenotype, cell proliferation, cell death, and MTT assay, immunocytochemistry, and real-time RT-PCR were performed to evaluate the effect of alginate on RPE cells characteristics and integrity. RPE cells can survive and proliferate in alginate matrixes. Immunocytochemistry analysis exhibited Nestin, RPE65, and cytokeratin expressions in a reasonable number of cultured cells in alginate beads. Real-time PCR data demonstrated high levels of Nestin, CHX10, RPE65, and tyrosinase gene expressions in RPE cells immobilized in alginate when compared to 2D monolayer culture systems. The results suggest that alginate can be used as a reliable scaffold for maintenance of RPE cells' integrity and in vitro propagation of human retinal progenitor cells for cell replacement therapies in retinal diseases.

  5. Phenolic acid degradation potential and growth behavior of lactic acid bacteria in sunflower substrates.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Caroline; Heinrich, Veronika; Vogel, Rudi F; Toelstede, Simone

    2016-08-01

    Sunflower flour provides a high content of protein with a well-balanced amino acid composition and is therefore regarded as an attractive source for protein. The use for human nutrition is hindered by phenolic compounds, mainly chlorogenic acid, which can lead under specific circumstances to undesirable discolorations. In this study, growth behavior and degradation ability of chlorogenic acid of four lactic acid bacteria were explored. Data suggested that significant higher fermentation performances on sunflower flour as compared to sunflower protein concentrate were reached by Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus gasseri and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. In fermentation with the latter two strains reduced amounts of chlorogenic acid were observed in sunflower flour (-11.4% and -19.8%, respectively), which were more pronounced in the protein concentrate (-50.7% and -95.6%, respectively). High tolerances against chlorogenic acid and the cleavage product quinic acid with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ≥20.48 mg/ml after 48 h were recorded for all strains except Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, which was more sensitive. The second cleavage compound, caffeic acid revealed a higher antimicrobial potential with MIC values of 0.64-5.12 mg/ml. In this proof of concept study, degradation versus inhibitory effect suggest the existence of basic mechanisms of interaction between phenolic acids in sunflower and lactic acid bacteria and a feasible way to reduce the chlorogenic acid content, which may help to avoid undesired color changes.

  6. Influence of substrate and microbial interaction on efficiency of rumen microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Demeyer, D; Van Nevel, C

    1986-01-01

    Microbial N produced in the rumen and flowing to the duodenum (Ni) is related to the total amount of OM fermented or apparently digested in the rumen (OMf). This relationship, best expressed as microbial N yield (gNi/kgOMf), is affected mainly by the physical and chemical properties of feed carbohydrates and the amounts ingested. These factors influence yields at three levels of increasing complexity: Bacterial fermentation within one compartment following the continuous culture model. Fermentation pattern as such does not seem to affect yields. High fermentation rates are associated with lactate production, low methane production and transient polysaccharide synthesis. These effects induce acidification and lower yields, partly compensated by faster growth. Protozoal action, determined by the presence of sequestration spaces provided mainly by roughage diets. The presence of protozoa depresses microbial N yield but allows more complete fibre digestion. Compartmentation and differential passage. With roughage diets, optimal microbial N yield seems to require well developed microbial compartmentation, involving a large proportion of microbes in a large-particle pool with a slow turnover, balanced by a small proportion in liquid, small-particle pools with a fast turnover. Such a situation is associated with long roughage feeding. It is hypothesized that microbial N yields in the rumen may vary between two extremes which are associated with the feeding of long roughage on the one hand or with concentrate (starch) feeding on the other.

  7. Epitaxial growth of REBa 2Cu 3O 7- y films on various substrates by chemical solution deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagiwa, K.; Araki, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Hiei, H.; Kim, S. B.; Matsumoto, K.; Shibata, J.; Hirayama, T.; Ikuta, H.; Mizutani, U.; Hirabayashi, I.

    2001-07-01

    We have investigated the processing conditions for solid phase epitaxial growth of REBa 2Cu 3O 7- y (RE=rare earth and Y; RE123) by chemical solution deposition (CSD) using metalorganic precursors. We selected two kinds of starting materials, metal naphthenates and metal trifluoroacetates, for RE123 films. The films are crystallized through barium carbonate and fluoride, respectively. Superconducting properties of RE123 films were strongly dependent on microstructure of the calcined film. In the case of the metal naphthenates route, the calcined films had to be amorphous in order to realize solid phase epitaxial growth. However, Jc of the epitaxially grown film was low. On the other hand, using the metal trifluoroacetates, RE123 films were grown epitaxially even if the calcined films were crystallized in metal oxyfluoride. To prepare thicker RE123 films, single step coating controlling concentration and/or viscosity of coating solution is necessary because F-contained reactive gas was formed during heat-treatment. Using chemically stable CeO 2-buffered YSZ as substrates, we have succeeded in preparing the YBCO films, having high Jc of 3.6 MA/cm 2 and 4700 Å in thickness.

  8. Study of growth properties of InAs islands on patterned InP substrates defined by focused ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro-Andrade, R.; Malachias, A.; Miquita, D. R.; Vasconcelos, T. L.; Kawabata, R.; Pires, M. P.; Souza, P. L.; Rodrigues, W. N.

    2017-03-01

    This work describes morphological and crystalline properties of the InAs islands grown on templates created by focused ion beam (FIB) on indium phosphide (InP) substrates. Regular arrangements of shallow holes are created on the InP (001) surfaces, acting as preferential nucleation sites for InAs islands grown by Metal-Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy. Ion doses ranging from 1015 to 1016 Ga+/cm2 were used and islands were grown for two sub-monolayer coverages. We observe the formation of clusters in the inner surfaces of the FIB produced cavities and show that for low doses templates the nanostructures are mainly coherent while templates created with large ion doses lead to the growth of incoherent islands with larger island density. The modified island growth is described by a simple model based on the surface potential and the net adatom flow to the cavities. We observe that obtained morphologies result from a competition between coarsening and coalescence mechanisms.

  9. A model describing Debaryomyces hansenii growth and substrate consumption during a smear soft cheese deacidification and ripening.

    PubMed

    Riahi, M H; Trelea, I C; Picque, D; Leclercq-Perlat, M-N; Hélias, A; Corrieu, G

    2007-05-01

    A mechanistic model for Debaryomyces hansenii growth and substrate consumption, lactose conversion into lactate by lactic acid bacteria, as well as lactose and lactate transfer from the core toward the rind was established. The model described the first step (14 d) of the ripening of a smear soft cheese and included the effects of temperature and relative humidity of the ripening chamber on the kinetic parameters. Experimental data were collected from experiments carried out in an aseptic pilot scale ripening chamber under 9 different combinations of temperature (8, 12, and 16 degrees C) and relative humidity (85, 93, and 99%) according to a complete experimental design. The model considered the cheese as a system with 2 compartments (rind and core) and included 5 state evolution equations and 16 parameters. The model succeeded in predicting D. hansenii growth and lactose and lactate concentrations during the first step of ripening (curd deacidification) in core and rind. The nonlinear data-fitting method allowed the determination of tight confidence intervals for the model parameters. The residual standard error (RSE) between model predictions and experimental data was close to the experimental standard deviation between repeated experiments.

  10. Growth and characterization of GaN thin films on Si(111) substrates using SiC intermediate layer

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, K.Y.; Lee, K.J.; Park, C.I.; Kim, K.C.; Choi, S.C.; Lee, W.H.; Suh, E.K.; Yang, G.M.; Nahm, K.S.

    2000-07-01

    GaN films have been grown atop Si-terminated 3C-SiC intermediate layer on Si(111) substrates using low pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (LP-MOCVD). The SiC intermediate layer was grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using tetramethylsilane (TMS) as the single source precursor. The Si terminated SiC surface was obtained by immediately flow of SiH{sub 4} gas after growth of SiC film. LP-MOCVD growth of GaN on 3C-SiC/Si(111) was carried out with trimethylgallium (TMG) and NH{sub 3}. Single crystalline hexagonal GaN layers can be grown on Si terminated SiC intermediate layer using an AlN or GaN buffer layer. Compared with GaN layers grown using a GaN buffer layer, the crystal qualities of GaN films with AlN buffer layers are extremely improved. The GaN films were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Full width at half maximum (FWHM) of double crystal x-ray diffraction (DCXD) rocking curve for GaN (0002) on 3C-SiC/Si(111) was 890 arcsec. PL near band edge emission peak position and FWHM at room temperature are 3.38 eV and 79.35 meV, respectively.

  11. Direct in Situ Conversion of Metals into Metal-Organic Frameworks: A Strategy for the Rapid Growth of MOF Films on Metal Substrates.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hoon; Hwang, Sunhyun; Kim, Keonmok; Kim, CheolGi; Jeong, Nak Cheon

    2016-11-30

    The fabrication of metal-organic framework (MOF) films on conducting substrates has demonstrated great potential in applications such as electronic conduction and sensing. For these applications, direct contact of the film to the conducting substrate without a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) is a desired step that must be achieved prior to the use of MOF films. In this report, we propose an in situ strategy for the rapid one-step conversion of Cu metal into HKUST-1 films on conducting Cu substrates. The Cu substrate acts both as a conducting substrate and a source of Cu(2+) ions during the synthesis of HKUST-1. This synthesis is possible because of the simultaneous reaction of an oxidizing agent and a deprotonating agent, in which the former agent dissolves the metal substrate to form Cu(2+) ions while the latter agent deprotonates the ligand. Using this strategy, the HKUST-1 film could not only be rapidly synthesized within 5 min but also be directly attached to the Cu substrate. Based on microscopic studies, we propose a plausible mechanism for the growth reaction. Furthermore, we show the versatility of this in situ conversion methodology, applying it to ZIF-8, which comprises Zn(2+) ions and imidazole-based ligands. Using an I2-filled HKUST-1 film, we further demonstrate that the direct contact of the MOF film to the conducting substrate makes the material more suitable for use as a sensor or electronic conductor.

  12. Growth mechanism and microstructure of low defect density InN (0001) In-face thin films on Si (111) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kehagias, Th.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Koukoula, T.; Komninou, Ph.; Ajagunna, A. O.; Georgakilas, A.; Tsagaraki, K.; Adikimenakis, A.

    2013-10-28

    Transmission electron microscopy has been employed to analyze the direct nucleation and growth, by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, of high quality InN (0001) In-face thin films on (111) Si substrates. Critical steps of the heteroepitaxial growth process are InN nucleation at low substrate temperature under excessively high N-flux conditions and subsequent growth of the main InN epilayer at the optimum conditions, namely, substrate temperature 400–450 °C and In/N flux ratio close to 1. InN nucleation occurs in the form of a very high density of three dimensional (3D) islands, which coalesce very fast into a low surface roughness InN film. The reduced reactivity of Si at low temperature and its fast coverage by InN limit the amount of unintentional Si nitridation by the excessively high nitrogen flux and good bonding/adhesion of the InN film directly on the Si substrate is achieved. The subsequent overgrowth of the main InN epilayer, in a layer-by-layer growth mode that enhances the lateral growth of InN, reduces significantly the crystal mosaicity and the density of threading dislocations is about an order of magnitude less compared to InN films grown using an AlN/GaN intermediate nucleation/buffer layer on Si. The InN films exhibit the In-face polarity and very smooth atomically stepped surfaces.

  13. Effect of cost-effective substrates on growth cycle and yield of lingzhi or reishi medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (higher Basidiomycetes) from Northwestern Himalaya (India).

    PubMed

    Mehta, Sheetal; Jandaik, Savita; Gupta, Dharmesh

    2014-01-01

    To find a cost-effective alternative substrate, the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum was grown on sawdusts of sheesham, mango, and poplar. Optimum spawn level was determined by spawning in substrates at various levels (1, 2, 3, and 4%). To determine the effect of supplementation, substrates were supplemented with wheat bran, rice bran and corn flour at different concentrations (10, 20, and 30%). Duration of growth cycle, mushroom yield, and biological efficiency data were recorded. Among substrates, mango sawdust was superior, with 1.5-fold higher yields than poplar sawdust, which was the least suitable. However with respect to fructification, mango sawdust produced the first primordia earlier (21±1 days) compared with the other investigated substrates. 3% spawn level was found to be optimal irrespective of the substrate. Yield and biological efficiency (BE) were maximally enhanced by supplementation with wheat bran, whereas rice bran was the least suitable supplement among those tested. Growth cycle shortened and mushroom yield increased to a maximum at the 20% level of supplements. Mango sawdust in combination with 20% wheat bran, if spawned at the 3% level, resulted in a high yield (BE = 58.57%).

  14. Highly (h00) oriented growth of SrTiO 3 thin films on Si(100) substrates by RF magnetron sputtering and their optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J. H.; Pin, J. H.; Huang, Z. M.; Gao, Y. H.; Lin, T.; Shi, F. W.; Sun, J. L.; Chu, J. H.

    2008-02-01

    SrTiO 3 (STO) thin films were grown on Si(100) substrates by RF magnetron sputtering. The substrate temperature was found to be a crucial parameter to obtain the highly (h00) oriented growth. At the substrate temperature of 700 °C, STO thin films with the (h00)-orientation parameter (α h00) of more than 93% were realized. Using vitreous silica as the substrate, the optical properties of STO thin film prepared at 700 °C were investigated by transmittance measurements. The fitting method was used to calculate the refractive index and the film thickness from the transparent region of the transmittance spectra. The dispersion of the refractive index was studied by considering a single electronic oscillator model. According to Tauc's law, the band gap of the film was found to be about 3.62 eV.

  15. Dispersive growth and laser-induced rippling of large-area singlelayer MoS2 nanosheets by CVD on c-plane sapphire substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongfei; Chi, Dongzhi

    2015-06-01

    Vapor-phase growth of large-area two-dimensional (2D) MoS2 nanosheets via reactions of sulfur with MoO3 precursors vaporized and transferred from powder sources onto a target substrate has been rapidly progressing. Recent studies revealed that the growth yield of high quality singlelayer (SL) MoS2 is essentially controlled by quite a few parameters including the temperature, the pressure, the amount/weight of loaded source precursors, and the cleanup of old precursors. Here, we report a dispersive growth method where a shadow mask is encapsulated on the substrate to ‘indirectly’ supply the source precursors onto the laterally advancing growth front at elevated temperatures. With this method, we have grown large-area (up to millimeters) SL-MoS2 nanosheets with a collective in-plane orientation on c-plane sapphire substrates. Regular ripples (~1 nm in height and ~50 nm in period) have been induced by laser scanning into the SL-MoS2 nanosheets. The MoS2 ripples easily initiate at the grain boundaries and extend along the atomic steps of the substrate. Such laser-induced ripple structures can be fundamental materials for studying their effects, which have been predicted to be significant but hitherto not evidenced, on the electronic, mechanical, and transport properties of SL-MoS2.

  16. Utilization of Anodized Aluminum Oxide Substrate for the Growth of ZnO Microcrystals on Polygonized Spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deulkar, Sundeep H.; Bhosale, C. H.; Huang, Jow-Lay

    2015-04-01

    Anodized Aluminum Oxide (AAO) has been utilized as a substrate for the screw dislocation assisted growth of polygonize spirals (PS) of ZnO with diameter of the order of 230 μm by Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) process. Stoichiometric ZnO microcrystals nucleated on the terraces and tops of these polygonized spirals. Stress inherent in the ZnO polygonized spiral morphology ( 3.57 GPa) was deciphered from the values of the magnitude of shift in observed 2θ values of Glancing Incidence angle XRD (GIXRD) peaks from the standard values (JCPDS 36-1451) for hexagonal Zincite. The growth mechanism of these PS was explained albeit to a limited extent on the basis of the Burton, Cabrera and Frank (BCF) theory and its later modification, wherein data obtained from exsitu SEM measurements concomitant with numerical analysis was utilized to decipher values of the critical radius and supersaturation ratios. Nucleation of ZnO microcrystals on the PS was explained on the basis of the supersaturation ratio and the plausible values of diffusion lengths, existent on the summits of these PS. Retardation of the step rotation of the PS, due to elastic stress around the dislocation source and the Gibbs-Thomson effect, was explained on the basis of numerical coefficient ω0, the dimensionless frequency of spiral rotation. Role of stress in inhibition of ZnO nucleation on PS of smaller heights and with larger supersaturation ratio, has been discussed albeit qualitatively. The optical characteristics of a single ZnO microcrystal has been analyzed by room temperature CL measurements in the wavelength range 350 nm to 650 nm, revealing a single high intensity peak at 382 nm corresponding to a excitonic bandgap of 3.25 eV.

  17. Role of the Substrate in Feeding and Growth of the Marine Suspension-Feeding Gastropods Crepidula fornicata and Crepipatella peruviana.

    PubMed

    Pechenik, Jan A; Diederich, Casey M; Chaparro, Oscar R; Cubillos, Victor M; Mardones-Toledo, Daniela A

    2015-12-01

    Unlike lamellibranch bivalves, suspension-feeding calyptraeid gastropods lack siphons and paired shell valves to regulate water inflow. This study was designed to determine if calyptraeid gastropods use the solid surface to which they attach to facilitate food particle capture. Juveniles of both Crepidula fornicata and Crepipatella peruviana were maintained with phytoplankton for 3 to 6 wk in the laboratory, either attached to solid substrate or without solid substrate. Individuals of C. fornicata and C. peruviana that were reared on solid substrate grew about five to ten times more, or two times more, respectively, than those deprived of solid substrate. Final tissue weights were also significantly greater for individuals of both species that had been reared on solid substrate. For the two species, phytoplankton clearance rates were about two to three times higher for individuals attached to solid substrate than for those without solid substrate; rates of food cord production from the gills were also significantly higher. About 50% of C. peruviana that were deprived of solid substrate died during the first 3 wk of observation, and about 60% were dead by 6 wk. In contrast, most individuals of C. peruviana that were attached to solid substrate survived for the entire 6-wk study period, and all of the C. fornicata survived whether or not they were attached to solid substrate. The solid substrate to which calyptraeid gastropods attach clearly plays an important role in their feeding biology, although the precise role remains to be explored.

  18. Identification of HLA-A*1101-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes derived from epidermal growth factor pathway substrate number 8

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Huifang; Tang, Baishan; He, Yanjie; Zhou, Weijun; Qiu, Jielei; Li, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 (EPS8) is critical in the proliferation, progression and metastasis of solid and hematological types of cancer, and thus constitutes an ideal target for cancer immunotherapy. The present study aimed to identify human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*1101-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes from EPS8 and characterize their immunotherapeutic efficacy in vitro. Two computer-based algorithms were used to predict native EPS8 epitopes with potential high binding affinity to the HLA-A*1101 molecule, which is the HLA-A allele with the highest frequency in the Chinese population. The peptide-induced cytokine production from the CTLs was examined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot analysis. The cytotoxic effects on cancer cells by CTLs primed with the identified peptides were examined using flow cytometry. A total of five peptides, designated as P380, P70, P82, P30 and P529, presented with high affinity towards the HLA-A*1101 molecule. In response to stimulation by these five peptides, enhanced secretion of interferon-γ from the CTLs and increased cytolytic capabilities of the CTLs toward cancer cells were noted, with the most potent effects observed from the P380 peptide. Taken together, the present study identified five potential CTL epitopes from EPS8. Among these, P380 presented with the highest therapeutic efficacy in vitro. These peptides may benefit the development of EPS8-based immunotherapy for the treatment of HLA-A*1101-positive hematological malignancies. PMID:27840923

  19. Growth of InAs Quantum Dots on GaAs (511)A Substrates: The Competition between Thermal Dynamics and Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wen, Lei; Gao, Fangliang; Zhang, Shuguang; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-08-01

    The growth process of InAs quantum dots grown on GaAs (511)A substrates has been studied by atomic force microscopy. According to the atomic force microscopy studies for quantum dots grown with varying InAs coverage, a noncoherent nucleation of quantum dots is observed. Moreover, due to the long migration length of In atoms, the Ostwald ripening process is aggravated, resulting in the bad uniformity of InAs quantum dots on GaAs (511)A. In order to improve the uniformity of nucleation, the growth rate is increased. By studying the effects of increased growth rates on the growth of InAs quantum dots, it is found that the uniformity of InAs quantum dots is greatly improved as the growth rates increase to 0.14 ML s(-1) . However, as the growth rates increase further, the uniformity of InAs quantum dots becomes dual-mode, which can be attributed to the competition between Ostwald ripening and strain relaxation processes. The results in this work provide insights regarding the competition between thermal dynamical barriers and the growth kinetics in the growth of InAs quantum dots, and give guidance to improve the size uniformity of InAs quantum dots on (N11)A substrates.

  20. A model framework to describe growth-linked biodegradation of trace-level pollutants in the presence of coincidental carbon substrates and microbes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Helbling, Damian E; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Smets, Barth F

    2014-11-18

    Pollutants such as pesticides and their degradation products occur ubiquitously in natural aquatic environments at trace concentrations (μg L(-1) and lower). Microbial biodegradation processes have long been known to contribute to the attenuation of pesticides in contaminated environments. However, challenges remain in developing engineered remediation strategies for pesticide-contaminated environments because the fundamental processes that regulate growth-linked biodegradation of pesticides in natural environments remain poorly understood. In this research, we developed a model framework to describe growth-linked biodegradation of pesticides at trace concentrations. We used experimental data reported in the literature or novel simulations to explore three fundamental kinetic processes in isolation. We then combine these kinetic processes into a unified model framework. The three kinetic processes described were: the growth-linked biodegradation of micropollutant at environmentally relevant concentrations; the effect of coincidental assimilable organic carbon substrates; and the effect of coincidental microbes that compete for assimilable organic carbon substrates. We used Monod kinetic models to describe substrate utilization and microbial growth rates for specific pesticide and degrader pairs. We then extended the model to include terms for utilization of assimilable organic carbon substrates by the specific degrader and coincidental microbes, growth on assimilable organic carbon substrates by the specific degrader and coincidental microbes, and endogenous metabolism. The proposed model framework enables interpretation and description of a range of experimental observations on micropollutant biodegradation. The model provides a useful tool to identify environmental conditions with respect to the occurrence of assimilable organic carbon and coincidental microbes that may result in enhanced or reduced micropollutant biodegradation.

  1. Interspecific variation in vessel size, growth and drought tolerance of broad-leaved trees in semi-arid regions of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Shoko; Yahata, Hisashi; Nakashizuka, Tohru; Kondoh, Michio

    2006-07-01

    In semi-arid regions, trees often wither during the dry season. Withering is sometimes manifest as die-back, whereby whithering results in shoot death, which progresses downward from the uppermost part of the crown. In this study, we measured the relationships between height growth and diameter at breast height, die-back frequency and severity, vessel size and specific hydraulic conductivity of four evergreen (Senna siamea (Lamk) H.S. Irwin & Barneby, Jacaranda mimosifolia D. Don, Azadirachta indica A.H.L. Juss and Acacia gerrardii Benth.) and one deciduous (Melia volkensii Gürke) plantation tree species in Kenya, which has a conspicuous dry season. Die-back occurred readily in some species, but not in others. Senna siamea showed the highest specific hydraulic conductivity and the highest growth rate among the five species and was quite susceptible to die-back. Among species, height growth and specific hydraulic conductivity were positively correlated with vessel size and negatively correlated with die-back frequency, suggesting a trade-off between growth rate and drought tolerance. This implies that an adaptation to rapid growth under humid conditions leads to low drought tolerance. However, the deciduous tree Melia volkensii showed high specific hydraulic conductivity and growth, with no symptoms of die-back, implying that a mechanism associated with the deciduous habit results in drought avoidance by reducing the requirement for water during the dry season.

  2. Quasi-heteroepitaxial growth of β-Ga2O3 on off-angled sapphire (0 0 0 1) substrates by halide vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Yuichi; Vίllora, Encarnaciόn G.; Shimamura, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the high-speed growth of β-Ga2O3 quasi-heteroepilayers on off-angled sapphire (0 0 0 1) substrates by halide vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). (2 bar 0 1) oriented β-Ga2O3 layers were successfully grown using GaCl and O2 as source gases. The growth rate monotonically increased with increasing the partial pressures of the source gases, reaching over 250 μm/h. This rate is over two orders of magnitude larger than those of conventional vapor phase epitaxial growth techniques such as molecular beam epitaxy or metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. X-ray pole figure measurements indicated the presence of six in-plane rotational domains, in accordance with the substrate symmetry, plus some minor (3 1 0) domains. By the use of off-angled substrates and thick layer overgrowth, one of the in-plane orientations was strongly favored and the (3 1 0) residuals effectively suppressed, so that quasi-heteroepitaxial growth was achieved. Therefore, these results indicate the high-potential of the HVPE technique for the growth of thick and thin β-Ga2O3 layers for the cost-effective production of β-Ga2O3 based devices.

  3. Growth and characterization of β-Ga2O3 nanowires obtained on not-catalyzed and Au/Pt catalyzed substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calestani, Davide; Alabi, Aderemi Babatunde; Coppedè, Nicola; Villani, Marco; Lazzarini, Laura; Fabbri, Filippo; Salviati, Giancarlo; Zappettini, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, a large interest has been reported on low-dimensional β-Ga2O3 structures, like nanowires, nanobelts, nanorods or nanosheets, because of their peculiar and sometimes superior properties. These properties, however, can be strongly affected by the growth procedure, especially if metal growth catalysts are used. In this work we report the successful synthesis of β-Ga2O3 nanowires/nanobelts using a simple combination of thermal evaporation of a metallic Ga source and controlled oxidation. The same growth procedure has been used to grow nanostructures on different kind of substrates (silicon and alumina), without catalyst as well as with Au or Pt deposited on the substrates, in order to promote the nucleation of nanowires. The morphological, structural and optical properties of the obtained nanostructures have been characterized and compared. Different growth distributions on the substrates and possible growth mechanisms have been highlighted, while a strong increase in luminescence intensity has been observed on samples grown with Au and Pt catalysts.

  4. Experimental investigation of metallic thin film modification of nickel substrates for chemical vapor deposition growth of single layer graphene at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminalragia Giamini, Sigiava; Marquez-Velasco, Jose; Sakellis, Ilias; Tsipas, Polychronis; Kelaidis, Nikolaos; Tsoutsou, Dimitra; Boukos, Nikolaos; Kantarelou, Vasiliki; Xenogiannopoulou, Evangelia; Speliotis, Thanassis; Aretouli, Kleopatra; Kordas, George; Dimoulas, Athanasios

    2016-11-01

    Lowering the growth temperature of single layer graphene by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is important for its real-life application and mass production. Doing this without compromising quality requires advances in catalytic substrates. It is shown in this work that deposition of Zn and Bi metals modify the surface of nickel suppressing the uncontrollable growth of multiple layers of graphene. As a result, single layer graphene is obtained by CVD at 600 °C with minimum amount of defects, showing substantial improvement over bare Ni. In contrast, Cu, and Mo suppress graphene growth. We also show that graphene grown with our method has a defect density that is strongly dependent on the roughness of the original nickel foil. Good quality or highly defective holey single layer graphene can be grown at will by selecting a smooth or rough foil substrate respectively.

  5. Molecular beam epitaxy and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth of epitaxial CdTe on (100) GaAs/Si and (111) GaAs/Si substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nouhi, A.; Radhakrishnan, G.; Katz, J.; Koliwad, K.

    1988-01-01

    Epitaxial CdTe has been grown on both (100)GaAs/Si and (111)GaAs/Si substrates. A combination of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) has been employed for the first time to achieve this growth: the GaAs layers are grown on Si substrates by MBE and the CdTe film is subsequently deposited on GaAs/Si by MOCVD. The grown layers have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and photoluminescence.

  6. Hepatocyte growth factor regulated tyrosine kinase substrate in the peripheral development and function of B-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Takayuki; Murata, Kazuko; Murata, Ryo; Sun, Shu-lan; Saito, Yutaro; Yamaga, Shuhei; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tamai, Keiichi; Moriya, Kunihiko; Kasai, Noriyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •ESCRT-0 protein regulates the development of peripheral B-cells. •BCR expression on cell surface should be controlled by the endosomal-sorting system. •Hrs plays important roles in responsiveness to Ag stimulation in B lymphocytes. -- Abstract: Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is a vesicular sorting protein that functions as one of the endosomal-sorting proteins required for transport (ESCRT). Hrs, which binds to ubiquitinated proteins through its ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM), contributes to the lysosomal transport and degradation of ubiquitinated membrane proteins. However, little is known about the relationship between B-cell functions and ESCRT proteins in vivo. Here we examined the immunological roles of Hrs in B-cell development and functions using B-cell-specific Hrs-deficient (Hrs{sup flox/flox};mb1{sup cre/+}:Hrs-cKO) mice, which were generated using a cre-LoxP recombination system. Hrs deficiency in B-cells significantly reduced T-cell-dependent antibody production in vivo and impaired the proliferation of B-cells treated in vitro with an anti-IgM monoclonal antibody but not with LPS. Although early development of B-cells in the bone marrow was normal in Hrs-cKO mice, there was a significant decrease in the number of the peripheral transitional B-cells and marginal zone B-cells in the spleen of Hrs-cKO mice. These results indicate that Hrs plays important roles during peripheral development and physiological functions of B lymphocytes.

  7. Growth and characterization of GaN thin film on Si substrate by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundakçı, Mutlu; Mantarcı, Asim; Erdoğan, Erman

    2017-01-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) is an attractive material with a wide-direct band gap (3.4 eV) and is one of the significant III-nitride materials, with many advantageous device applications such as high electron mobility transistors, lasers, sensors, LEDs, detectors, and solar cells, and has found applications in optoelectronic devices. GaN could also be useful for industrial research in the future. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), sputter, and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) are some of the methods used to fabricate GaN thin film. In this research, a GaN thin film grown on a silicon substrate using the thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) technique has been extensively studied. Fast deposition, short production time, homogeneity, and uniform nanostructure with low roughness can be seen as some of the merits of this method. The growth of the GaN was conducted at an operating pressure of 1× {{10}-6} \\text{Torr} , a plasma current 0.6 \\text{A} and for a very short period of time of 40 s. For the characterization process, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was conducted to determine the structure and surface morphology of the material. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) was used to comprehend the elemental analysis characterization of the film. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to analyze the structure of the film. Raman measurements were taken to investigate the phonon modes of the material. The morphological properties of the material were analyzed in detail by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  8. Identification of human leukemia antigen A*0201-restricted epitopes derived from epidermal growth factor pathway substrate number 8.

    PubMed

    Tang, Baishan; Zhou, Weijun; Du, Jingwen; He, Yanjie; Li, Yuhua

    2015-08-01

    T-cell-mediated immunotherapy of hematological malignancies requires selection of targeted tumor-associated antigens and T-cell epitopes contained in these tumor proteins. Epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 (EPS8), whose function is pivotal for tumor proliferation, progression and metastasis, has been found to be overexpressed in most human tumor types, while its expression in normal tissue is low. The aim of the present study was to identify human leukemia antigen (HLA)-A*0201-restricted epitopes of EPS8 by using a reverse immunology approach. To achieve this, computer algorithms were used to predict HLA-A*0201 molecular binding, proteasome cleavage patterns as well as translocation of transporters associated with antigen processing. Candidate peptides were experimentally validated by T2 binding affinity assay and brefeldin-A decay assay. The functional avidity of peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) induced from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy volunteers were evaluated by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay and a cytotoxicity assay. Four peptides, designated as P455, P92, P276 and P360, had high affinity and stability of binding towards the HLA-A*0201 molecule, and specific CTLs induced by them significantly responded to the corresponding peptides and secreted IFN-γ. At the same time, the CTLs were able to specifically lyse EPS8-expressing cell lines in an HLA-A*0201-restricted manner. The present study demonstrated that P455, P92, P276 and P360 were CTL epitopes of EPS8, and were able to be used for epitope-defined adoptive T-cell transfer and multi-epitope-based vaccine design.

  9. The Effects of Different Substrates on the Growth, Yield, and Nutritional Composition of Two Oyster Mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus and Pleurotus cystidiosus)

    PubMed Central

    Hoa, Ha Thi; Wang, Chong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to compare the effects of different agro-wastes on the growth, yield, and nutritional composition of oyster mushrooms Pleurotus ostreatus (PO) and Pleurotus cystidiosus (PC). Seven substrate formulas including sawdust (SD), corncob (CC), sugarcane bagasse (SB) alone and in combination of 80 : 20, 50 : 50 ratio between SD and CC, SD and SB were investigated. The results indicated that different substrate formulas gave a significant difference in total colonization period, characteristics of fruiting bodies, yield, biological efficiency (BE), nutritional composition and mineral contents of two oyster mushrooms PO and PC. The results showed that increasing CC and SB reduced C/N ratio, and enhanced some mineral contents (Ca, P, and Mg) of substrate formulas. The increased amount of CC and SB of substrate formulas enhanced protein, ash, mineral contents (Ca, K, Mg, Mn, and Zn) of fruiting bodies of both mushrooms. Substrates with 100% CC and 100% SB were the most suitable substrate formulas for cultivation of oyster mushrooms PO and PC in which they gave the highest values of cap diameter, stipe thickness, mushroom weight, yield, BE, protein, fiber, ash, mineral content (Ca, K, and Mg) and short stipe length. However, substrate formula 100% CC gave the slowest time for the first harvest of both mushrooms PO and PC (46.02 days and 64.24 days, respectively). It is also found that the C/N ratio of substrate formulas has close correlation with total colonization period, mushroom weight, yield, BE and protein content of mushroom PO and PC. PMID:26839502

  10. Supported growth of polycrystalline silicon sheet on low-cost ceramic, carbon, or reusable substrate. Quarterly report No. 1, September 26-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, P.W.; Heaps, J.D.; Schuldt, S.B.; Zook, J.D.

    1980-02-01

    The overall objective of this program is to identify and develop high-throughput, supported-growth methods for producing low-cost, large-area polycrystalline silicon sheet on ceramic, carbon, or reusable substrates. The first method being investigated is the SCIM coating technique. (SCIM is an acronym for Silicon Coating by Inverted Meniscus.) With this technique, a low-cost ceramic substrate is silicon-coated in a continuous manner by passing the substrate over a molten silicon meniscus which is contained in a narrow fused-silica trough. During this reporting period, several mullite substrates were silicon-coated with this method. The best coatings were approximately 100 ..mu..m thick with large columnar grains up to 0.5 cm wide and several cm long. Structural characterization of these coatings shows that these large grains are heavily twinned with boundaries perpendicular to the surface of the layer. Minority-carrier diffusion length measurements made on photodiodes fabricated from these coatings indicate diffusion lengths of about 25 ..mu..m. The short-circuit current densities of the diodes were about 23 mA/cm/sup 2/, with open-circuit voltages of approximately 0.49 V. With the substrates positioned horizontally as they pass over the meniscus trough, instability usually occurs, causing a buildup of molten silicon immediately downstream from the trough. This solicon eventually spills over onto key parts of the coater. By tilting the substrate at angles of 10, 15, and 20/sup 0/, stability can be achieved. A theoretical study of meniscus shapes conducted during this reporting period suggests that with an appropriate trough design and the right pressure and substrate height, a SCIM-coating with horizontal substrates should also be possible.

  11. a Study of Om-Cvd Processes for GALLIUM(1-X)INDIUM(X)ARSENIDE Growth on Gallium-Arsenide Substrates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung Kul

    This work investigates OM-CVD growth processes of Ga(,l-x)In(,x)As. The motivation for this work has been the eventual application of this material in two-junction, cascaded solar cells. The growths were made using trimethylgallium, triethylindium and arsine and growths have been done on GaAs substrates. An attempt has been made to understand the growth process itself, and a possible mechanism for the growth process is proposed to explain the observations made in many aspects of crystal growth by OM-CVD. Heterogeneous catalysis of AsH(,3) on GaAs is viewed as providing a key step in understanding the growth mechanism. The growth of GaInAs on GaAs is interpreted in terms of an interfacial interaction between the grown layer and the substrate. The growth of InAs is found to be difficult on GaAs due to the large lattice mismatch. As the InAs composition is decreased, a coherent interface appears to be reached below an InAs composition of around 30-40%, where the growth displays single crystal epitaxy. The growth rate of GaInAs on GaAs is found to be more complicated than that for the lattice-matched situation of AlGaAs growth on the same GaAs substrate. Also, introduction of lattice strain appears to make the growth rate smaller than in the strain-free case. Growth of GaInAs on GaAs substrates of different orientations shows that good epitaxial growth with low defect densities can be obtained by some combinations of (100) and (111) faces. It is argued that the excellent epitaxial growth observed on the (511) surface should be on the "B" face by considering predicted growth behaviors on basic planes combined with the crystal growth mechanism of OM-CVD proposed. Background doping concentrations of layers grown by OM-CVD are found to be a strong function of source material purity as concluded by other workers. It is also found that incorporation of group II and group VI dopants decreaes with increasing growth temperature in contrast to group IV impurities, namely, C and

  12. Dolomitic lime amendment affects pine bark substrate pH, nutrient availability, and plant growth: A review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dolomitic lime (DL) is one of the most commonly used fertilizer amendments in nursery container substrates. It is used to adjust pH of pine bark substrates from their native pH, 4.1 to 5.1, up to about pH 6. Additions of DL have been shown to be beneficial, inconsequential, or detrimental dependin...

  13. In silico carbon molecular beam epitaxial growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate: carbon source effect on van der Waals epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghoon; Varshney, Vikas; Park, Jeongho; Farmer, Barry L; Roy, Ajit K

    2016-05-05

    Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon molecular beam epitaxy (CMBE) techniques using solid carbon sublimation have reported relatively poor quality of the graphene. In this article, the CMBE growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate is numerically studied in order to identify the effect of the carbon source on the quality of the graphene film. The carbon molecular beam generated by the sublimation of solid carbon source materials such as graphite and glassy carbon is mostly composed of atomic carbon, carbon dimers and carbon trimers. Therefore, the graphene film growth becomes a complex process involving various deposition characteristics of a multitude of carbon entities. Based on the study of surface adsorption and film growth characteristics of these three major carbon entities comprising graphite vapour, we report that carbon trimers convey strong traits of vdW epitaxy prone to high quality graphene growth, while atomic carbon deposition is a surface-reaction limited process accompanied by strong chemisorption. The vdW epitaxial behaviour of carbon trimers is found to be substantial enough to nucleate and develop into graphene like planar films within a nanosecond of high flux growth simulation, while reactive atomic carbons tend to impair the structural integrity of the crystalline h-BN substrate upon deposition to form an amorphous interface between the substrate and the growing carbon film. The content of reactive atomic carbons in the molecular beam is suspected to be the primary cause of low quality graphene reported in the literature. A possible optimization of the molecular beam composition towards the synthesis of better quality graphene films is suggested.

  14. Growth of aligned single-crystalline rutile TiO2 nanowires on arbitrary substrates and their application in dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Akshay; Madaria, Anuj R.; Zhou, Chongwu

    2010-05-06

    TiO{sub 2} is a wide band gap semiconductor with important applications in photovoltaic cells and photocatalysis. In this paper, we report synthesis of single-crystalline rutile phase TiO{sub 2} nanowires on arbitrary substrates, including fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO), glass slides, tin-doped indium oxide (ITO), Si/SiO{sub 2}, Si(100), Si(111), and glass rods. By controlling the growth parameters such as growth temperature, precursor concentrations, and so forth, we demonstrate that anisotropic growth of TiO{sub 2} is possible leading to various morphologies of nanowires. Optimization of the growth recipe leads to well-aligned vertical array of TiO{sub 2} nanowires on both FTO and glass substrates. Effects of various titanium precursors on the growth kinetics, especially on the growth rate of nanowires, are also studied. Finally, application of vertical array of TiO{sub 2} nanowires on FTO as the photoanode is demonstrated in dye-sensitized solar cell with an efficiency of 2.9 ± 0.2%.

  15. Patterning of GaAs and Si substrates using self-organized Al2O3 templates and epitaxial growth of GaAs nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Archana; Hatch, John; Kwon, Jaesuk; Zhang, Xin; Fraser, Everett; Kim, Chae Hyun; Zeng, Hao; Luo, Hong

    2013-03-01

    Reactive ion etching is used with Al2O3 templates to pattern SiO2 films deposited on GaAs and Si substrates. The technique allows nanopatterning of substrates without photo or e-beam lithography. The SiO2 film pattern consists of holes of about 80 nm diameter with a pitch of about 100 nm. GaAs nanostructures are grown on the patterned substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The observed arrays of nanostructures closely follow the patterns on SiO2. Several types of structures are observed depending on the growth conditions, including pillars with flat hexagonal tops and pyramidal triangular tops. Characterization of the structures will be discussed. This work was supported by NSF DMR1006286. Intelligent Epitaxy Technology, Inc., 1250 E. Collins Blvd., Richardson, TX 75081, USA

  16. Morphology Control of Metal-Organic Frameworks Based on Paddle-Wheel Units on Ion-Doped Polymer Substrate Using an Interfacial Growth Approach.

    PubMed

    Tsuruoka, Takaaki; Mantani, Koji; Miyanaga, Ayumi; Matsuyama, Tetsuhiro; Ohhashi, Takashi; Takashima, Yohei; Akamatsu, Kensuke

    2016-06-21

    A three-dimensional metal-organic framework (MOF) consisting of pillared square-grid nets based on paddle-wheel units was synthesized by interfacial self-assembly of the frameworks on a metal-ion-doped polymer substrate. Although this type of Cu-based MOF is typically synthesized by a two-step solvothermal method, the utilization of a metal-ion-doped polymer substrate as a metal source for the framework allowed for the one-pot growth of MOF crystals on the substrate. The morphology of the obtained MOF crystals could be controlled from tetragonal to elongated tetragonal with different aspect ratios by changing the concentrations of the dicarboxylate layer ligands and diamine pillar ligands. The present approach provides a new route for the design and synthesis of MOF crystals and thin films for future applications such as gas membranes, catalysts, and electronic devices.

  17. Growth of Thin Epitaxial CaxSr1-xF2/SrF2 Layers with Low Leakage Current on Ge Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Keita; Tsutsui, Kazuo

    2013-10-01

    Resonant tunneling structures composed of epitaxial fluoride layers with a large conduction band discontinuity grown on Si or Ge substrates are attractive for the monolithic integration of quantum devices with CMOS. We found that the leakage current of Ca0.42Sr0.58F2 (lattice-matched with Ge) layers on Ge substrates was unusually large, which has not been observed on Si substrates. From an investigation of the dependence of the alloy composition of the fluoride layers on the leakage, the introduction of a SrF2 buffer layer, i.e., a Ca0.42Sr0.58F2/SrF2/Ge structure, was proposed as a technique for the growth of an electron-tunneling barrier layer on Ge with low leakage current.

  18. Oil palm waste and synthetic zeolite: an alternative soil-less growth substrate for lettuce production as a waste management practice.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, Guttila Y; Tokashiki, Yoshihiro; Kitou, Makato; Kinjo, Kazutoshi

    2008-12-01

    A study was conducted to assess the characteristics and the prospective utilization of oil palm waste (OP) and synthetic zeolite (SZ) developed by coal fly ash, as an alternative substrate to peat and commercial perlite for lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) production. The SZ, OP, sphagnum peat (PE), perlite (PL) and two different SZ-OP mixtures (v/v) at the ratio of 1 : 3 and 1 : 10 were utilized as the substrates under this study. The substrates formulated by mixing SZ with OP at the ratio of 1 : 3 and 1 : 10 showed improved substrate physical and chemical properties such as air space, bulk density, particle density, water-holding capacity, pH and electrical conductivity (EC), which were in the ideal substrate range when compared with PL. Furthermore, the water-holding capacity of the substrate having a 1 : 10 mixing ratio of SZ with OP was higher than that of the PL by 28.23%, whereas the bulk density was lower than that of PL by 35%. A greenhouse experiment was carried out to assess the influence of the substrates on the growth and development of lettuce. The shoot fresh weight, shoot dry weight, root fresh weight, root dry weight and number of leaves per plant of the lettuce grown in the 1 : 10 mixing ratio of SZ and OP were the highest, which showed increased values compared with that of PL by 11.56, 9.77, 3.48, 17.35 and 16.53%, respectively. The shoot fresh weight, shoot dry weight, root fresh weight, root dry weight and number of leaves per plant of the lettuce grown in the 1 : 10 mixing ratio of SZ and OP showed increased percentages compared with that of PE by 12.12, 11.37, 3.74, 23.66 and 17.50%, respectively. In addition, the growth and yield parameters of lettuce grown in the 1 : 3 mixing ratio and the OP did not show any significant difference with PL and PE but differed from the 1 : 10 mixing ratio. The results of the study suggest that the SZ-OP-based substrates and OP can be successfully utilized as alternatives to the commercial perlite and to

  19. Laser-driven growth of silver nanoplates on p-Type GaAs substrates and their surface-enhanced raman scattering activity.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; Pelton, M.

    2009-03-20

    Contact between aqueous solutions of silver nitrate (AgNO{sub 3}) and pristine surfaces of p-type gallium arsenide (GaAs) wafers results in essentially no reaction at room temperature and in the dark. The galvanic reactions between the GaAs wafers and AgNO{sub 3} can be triggered under illumination of laser beams with power densities higher than a critical value ({approx}15 mW/cm{sup 2} for a 630 nm laser), resulting in the growth of silver (Ag) nanoplates on the GaAs surface. The density and dimensions (including both thickness and edge length) of the resulting nanoplates can be readily tuned by controlling the growth time and laser power density. The as-grown Ag nanoplates on the substrates significantly enhance Raman signals of interesting molecules and serve as a new class of promising surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates for sensitive chemical detection.

  20. Substrate effect on the growth of monolayer dendritic MoS2 on LaAlO3 (100) and its electrocatalytic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cong; Zhang, Yu; Ji, Qingqing; Shi, Jianping; Chen, Zhaolong; Zhou, Xiebo; Fang, Qiyi; Zhang, Yanfeng

    2016-09-01

    In accommodating the rapid development of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has become a powerful tool for their batch production with desirable characteristics, such as high crystal quality, large domain size, and tunable domain shape. The crystallinity and morphology of the growth substrates usually play a crucial role in the CVD synthesis of high-quality monolayer MoS2, a kind of 2D layered material which has ignited huge interest in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and energy harvesting, etc. Herein, by utilizing a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) system, we demonstrate a regioselective synthesis of monolayer MoS2 on the corrugated single-crystal LaAlO3 (100) with twin crystal domains induced by the second-order phase transition. Unique dendritic morphologies with tunable nucleation densities were obtained in different regions of the undulated substrate, presenting a strong substrate modulation effect. Interestingly, the exposure of abundant active edge sites along with the rather high nucleation density makes the monolayer dendritic MoS2 a good electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), particularly featured by a rather high exchange current density (70.4 μA cm-2). Furthermore, uniform monolayer MoS2 films can also be obtained and transferred to arbitrary substrates. We believe that this work provides a new growth system for the controllable synthesis of 2D layered materials with unique dendritic morphologies, as well as its great application potential in energy conversion and harvesting.

  1. A study of the preparation of epitaxy-ready polished surfaces of (100) Gallium Antimonide substrates demonstrating ultra-low surface defects for MBE growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Rebecca; Tybjerg, Marius; Flint, Patrick; Fastenau, Joel; Lubyshev, Dmitri; Liu, Amy W. K.; Furlong, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    Gallium Antimonide (GaSb) is an important Group III-V compound semiconductor which is suitable for use in the manufacture of a wide variety of optoelectronic devices such as infra-red (IR) focal plane detectors. A significant issue for the commercialisation of these products is the production of epitaxy ready GaSb, which remains a challenge for the substrate manufacturer, as the stringent demands of the MBE process, requires a high quality starting wafer. In this work large diameter GaSb crystals were grown by the Czochralski (Cz) method and wafers prepared for chemo-mechanical polishing (CMP). Innovative epi-ready treatments and novel post polish cleaning methodologies were applied. The effect of these modified finishing chemistries on substrate surface quality and the performance of epitaxially grown MBE GaSb IR detector structures were investigated. Improvements in the lowering of surface defectivity, maintaining of the surface roughness and optimisation of all flatness parameters is confirmed both pre and post MBE growth. In this paper we also discuss the influence of bulk GaSb quality on substrate surface performance through the characterisation of epitaxial structures grown on near zero etch pit density (EPD) crystals. In summary progression and development of current substrate polishing techniques has been demonstrated to deliver a consistent improved surface on GaSb wafers with a readily desorbed oxide for epitaxial growth.

  2. Effect of pressure on the semipolar GaN (10-11) growth mode on patterned Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Ming; Zhang, Jie; Lin, Wen-Yu; Ye, Meng-Xin; Feng, Xiang-Xu; Zhang, Dong-Yan; Steve, Ding; Xu, Chen-Ke; Liu, Bao-Lin

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of pressure on the growth mode of high quality (10-11) GaN using an epitaxial lateral over growth (ELO) technique by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Two pressure growth conditions, high pressure (HP) 1013 mbar and low pressure growth (LP) 500 mbar, are employed during growth. In the high pressure growth conditions, the crystal quality is improved by decreasing the dislocation and stack fault density in the strip connection locations. The room temperature photoluminescence measurement also shows that the light emission intensity increases three times using the HP growth condition compared with that using the LP growth conditions. In the low temperature (77 K) photoluminescence, the defects-related peaks are very obvious in the low pressure growth samples. This result also indicates that the crystal quality is improved using the high pressure growth conditions. Project support by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Green Laser).

  3. The 2010 Broad Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2011

    2011-01-01

    A new data analysis, based on data collected as part of The Broad Prize process, provides insights into which large urban school districts in the United States are doing the best job of educating traditionally disadvantaged groups: African-American, Hispanics, and low-income students. Since 2002, The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation has awarded The…

  4. The Broad Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    In the world of corporate philanthropy, there are those who give to educational causes, and this article describes one such philanthropist, Eli Broad, who shares his take on schools in America. Broad is in a category unto himself not only because of the amount of money he has given--more than $280 million since 1999--but also for his unique…

  5. Critical issues for homoepitaxial GaN growth by molecular beam epitaxy on hydride vapor-phase epitaxy-grown GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, D. F.; Hardy, M. T.; Katzer, D. S.; Nepal, N.; Downey, B. P.; Meyer, D. J.; McConkie, Thomas O.; Zhou, Lin; Smith, David J.

    2016-12-01

    While the heteroepitaxial growth of gallium nitride-based materials and devices on substrates such as SiC, sapphire, and Si has been well-documented, the lack of a cost-effective source of bulk GaN crystals has hindered similar progress on homoepitaxy. Nevertheless, freestanding GaN wafers are becoming more widely available, and there is great interest in growing GaN films and devices on bulk GaN substrates, in order to take advantage of the greatly reduced density of threading dislocations, particularly for vertical devices. However, homoepitaxial GaN growth is far from a trivial task due to the reactivity and different chemical sensitivities of N-polar (000_1) and Ga-polar (0001) GaN surfaces, which can affect the microstructure and concentrations of impurities in homoepitaxial GaN layers. In order to achieve high quality, high purity homoepitaxial GaN, it is necessary to investigate the effect of the ex situ wet chemical clean, the use of in situ cleaning procedures, the sensitivity of the GaN surface to thermal decomposition, and the effect of growth temperature. We review the current understanding of these issues with a focus on homoepitaxial growth of GaN by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on c-plane surfaces of freestanding GaN substrates grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE), as HVPE-grown substrates are most widely available. We demonstrate methods for obtaining homoepitaxial GaN layers by plasma-assisted MBE in which no additional threading dislocations are generated from the regrowth interface and impurity concentrations are greatly reduced.

  6. Growth and characterization of well-aligned densely-packed rutile TiO(2) nanocrystals on sapphire substrates via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Chen, C A; Chen, Y M; Korotcov, A; Huang, Y S; Tsai, D S; Tiong, K K

    2008-02-20

    Well-aligned densely-packed rutile TiO(2) nanocrystals (NCs) have been grown on sapphire (SA) (100) and (012) substrates via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), using titanium-tetraisopropoxide (TTIP, Ti(OC(3)H(7))(4)) as a source reagent. The surface morphology as well as structural and spectroscopic properties of the as-deposited NCs were characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electron diffractometry (SAED), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. FESEM micrographs reveal that vertically aligned NCs were grown on SA(100), whereas the NCs on the SA(012) were grown with a tilt angle of ∼33° from the normal to substrates. TEM and SAED measurements showed that the TiO(2) NCs on SA(100) with square cross section have their long axis directed along the [001] direction. The XRD results reveal TiO(2) NCs with either (002) orientation on SA(100) substrate or (101) orientation on SA(012) substrate. A strong substrate effect on the alignment of the growth of TiO(2) NCs has been demonstrated and the probable mechanism for the formation of these NCs has been discussed.

  7. Electrochemical growth of CoNi and Pt-CoNi soft magnetic composites on an alkanethiol monolayer-modified ITO substrate.

    PubMed

    Escalera-López, D; Gómez, E; Vallés, E

    2015-07-07

    CoNi and Pt-CoNi magnetic layers on indium-tin oxide (ITO) substrates modified by an alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) have been electrochemically obtained as an initial stage to prepare semiconducting layer-SAM-magnetic layer hybrid structures. The best conditions to obtain the maximum compactness of adsorbed layers of dodecanethiol (C12-SH) on ITO substrate have been studied using contact angle, AFM, XPS and electrochemical tests. The electrochemical characterization (electrochemical probe or voltammetric response in blank solutions) is fundamental to ensure the maximum blocking of the substrate. Although the electrodeposition process on the SAM-modified ITO substrate is very slow if the blocking of the surface is significant, non-cracked metallic layers of CoNi, with or without a previously electrodeposited seed-layer of platinum, have been obtained by optimizing the deposition potentials. Initial nucleation is expected to take place at the pinhole defects of the C12-SH SAM, followed by a mushroom-like growth regime through the SAM interface that allows the formation of a continuous metallic layer electrically connected to the ITO surface. Due to the potential of the methodology, the preparation of patterned metallic deposits on ITO substrate using SAMs with different coverage as templates is feasible.

  8. Growth and characterization of well-aligned densely-packed rutile TiO2 nanocrystals on sapphire substrates via metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. A.; Chen, Y. M.; Korotcov, A.; Huang, Y. S.; Tsai, D. S.; Tiong, K. K.

    2008-02-01

    Well-aligned densely-packed rutile TiO2 nanocrystals (NCs) have been grown on sapphire (SA) (100) and (012) substrates via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), using titanium-tetraisopropoxide (TTIP, Ti(OC3H7)4) as a source reagent. The surface morphology as well as structural and spectroscopic properties of the as-deposited NCs were characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electron diffractometry (SAED), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. FESEM micrographs reveal that vertically aligned NCs were grown on SA(100), whereas the NCs on the SA(012) were grown with a tilt angle of ~33° from the normal to substrates. TEM and SAED measurements showed that the TiO2 NCs on SA(100) with square cross section have their long axis directed along the [001] direction. The XRD results reveal TiO2 NCs with either (002) orientation on SA(100) substrate or (101) orientation on SA(012) substrate. A strong substrate effect on the alignment of the growth of TiO2 NCs has been demonstrated and the probable mechanism for the formation of these NCs has been discussed.

  9. Growth kinetics of AlN and GaN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on R-plane sapphire substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekaran, R.; Moustakas, T. D.; Ozcan, A. S.; Ludwig, K. F.; Zhou, L.; Smith, David J.

    2010-08-15

    This paper reports the growth by molecular beam epitaxy of AlN and GaN thin films on R-plane sapphire substrates. Contrary to previous findings that GaN grows with its (1120) A-plane parallel to the (1102) R-plane of sapphire, our results indicate that the crystallographic orientation of the III-nitride films is strongly dependent on the kinetic conditions of growth for the GaN or AlN buffer layers. Thus, group III-rich conditions for growth of either GaN or AlN buffers result in nitride films having (1120) planes parallel to the sapphire surface, and basal-plane stacking faults parallel to the growth direction. The growth of these buffers under N-rich conditions instead leads to nitride films with (1126) planes parallel to the sapphire surface, with inclined c-plane stacking faults that often terminate threading dislocations. Moreover, electron microscope observations indicate that slight miscut ({approx}0.5 deg. ) of the R-plane sapphire substrate almost completely suppresses the formation of twinning defects in the (1126) GaN films.

  10. Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waag, Andreas

    This chapter is devoted to the growth of ZnO. It starts with various techniques to grow bulk samples and presents in some detail the growth of epitaxial layers by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The last section is devoted to the growth of nanorods. Some properties of the resulting samples are also presented. If a comparison between GaN and ZnO is made, very often the huge variety of different growth techniques available to fabricate ZnO is said to be an advantage of this material system. Indeed, growth techniques range from low cost wet chemical growth at almost room temperature to high quality MOCVD growth at temperatures above 1, 000∘C. In most cases, there is a very strong tendency of c-axis oriented growth, with a much higher growth rate in c-direction as compared to other crystal directions. This often leads to columnar structures, even at relatively low temperatures. However, it is, in general, not straight forward to fabricate smooth ZnO thin films with flat surfaces. Another advantage of a potential ZnO technology is said to be the possibility to grow thin films homoepitaxially on ZnO substrates. ZnO substrates are mostly fabricated by vapor phase transport (VPT) or hydrothermal growth. These techniques are enabling high volume manufacturing at reasonable cost, at least in principle. The availability of homoepitaxial substrates should be beneficial to the development of ZnO technology and devices and is in contrast to the situation of GaN. However, even though a number of companies are developing ZnO substrates, only recently good quality substrates have been demonstrated. However, these substrates are not yet widely available. Still, the situation concerning ZnO substrates seems to be far from low-cost, high-volume production. The fabrication of dense, single crystal thin films is, in general, surprisingly difficult, even when ZnO is grown on a ZnO substrate. However

  11. Effects of Substrate Salinity on Early Seedling survival and Growth of Scirpus robustus Pursh and Spartina alterniflora Loisel

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rooted aquatic plants are being used increasingly as test species in estuarine sediment toxicity evaluations. Effects of naturally occurring substrate constituents on most potential test species however, are not well understood even though their effects could impact the data int...

  12. Cultured representatives of two major phylogroups of human colonic Faecalibacterium prausnitzii can utilize pectin, uronic acids, and host-derived substrates for growth.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Siles, Mireia; Khan, Tanweer M; Duncan, Sylvia H; Harmsen, Hermie J M; Garcia-Gil, L Jesús; Flint, Harry J

    2012-01-01

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is one of the most abundant commensal bacteria in the healthy human large intestine, but information on genetic diversity and substrate utilization is limited. Here, we examine the phylogeny, phenotypic characteristics, and influence of gut environmental factors on growth of F. prausnitzii strains isolated from healthy subjects. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA sequences indicated that the cultured strains were representative of F. prausnitzii sequences detected by direct analysis of fecal DNA and separated the available isolates into two phylogroups. Most F. prausnitzii strains tested grew well under anaerobic conditions on apple pectin. Furthermore, F. prausnitzii strains competed successfully in coculture with two other abundant pectin-utilizing species, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Eubacterium eligens, with apple pectin as substrate, suggesting that this species makes a contribution to pectin fermentation in the colon. Many F. prausnitzii isolates were able to utilize uronic acids for growth, an ability previously thought to be confined to Bacteroides spp. among human colonic anaerobes. Most strains grew on N-acetylglucosamine, demonstrating an ability to utilize host-derived substrates. All strains tested were bile sensitive, showing at least 80% growth inhibition in the presence of 0.5 μg/ml bile salts, while inhibition at mildly acidic pH was strain dependent. These attributes help to explain the abundance of F. prausnitzii in the colonic community but also suggest factors in the gut environment that may limit its distribution.

  13. Extraradical mycelium of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi radiating from large plants depresses the growth of nearby seedlings in a nutrient deficient substrate.

    PubMed

    Janoušková, Martina; Rydlová, Jana; Püschel, David; Száková, Jiřina; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2011-10-01

    The effect of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) on the interaction of large plants and seedlings in an early succession situation was investigated in a greenhouse experiment using compartmented rhizoboxes. Tripleurospermum inodorum, a highly mycorrhiza-responsive early coloniser of spoil banks, was cultivated either non-mycorrhizal or inoculated with AM fungi in the central compartment of the rhizoboxes. After two months, seedlings of T. inodorum or Sisymbrium loeselii, a non-host species colonising spoil banks simultaneously with T. inodorum, were planted in lateral compartments, which were colonised by the extraradical mycelium (ERM) of the pre-cultivated T. inodorum in the inoculated treatments. The experiment comprised the comparison of two AM fungal isolates and two substrates: spoil bank soil and a mixture of this soil with sand. As expected based on the low nutrient levels in the substrates, the pre-cultivated T. inodorum plants responded positively to mycorrhiza, the response being more pronounced in phosphorus uptake than in nitrogen uptake and growth. In contrast, the growth of the seedlings, both the host and the non-host species, was inhibited in the mycorrhizal treatments. Based on the phosphorus and nitrogen concentrations in the biomass of the experimental plants, this growth inhibition was attributed to nitrogen depletion in the lateral compartments by the ERM radiating from the central compartment. The results point to an important aspect of mycorrhizal effects on the coexistence of large plants and seedlings in nutrient deficient substrates.

  14. Radial InP/InAsP/InP heterostructure nanowires on patterned Si substrates using self-catalyzed growth for vertical-type optical devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaguchi, Kenichi; Sudo, Hisao; Matsuda, Manabu; Takemoto, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-05

    Radial InP/InAsP/InP heterostructure nanowires (NWs) on SiO{sub 2}-mask-pattered Si substrates were reported using self-catalyzed InP NWs. Self-catalyzed growth was performed using low growth temperatures and high group-III flow rates, and vertical InP NWs were formed on the mask openings. The diameter and tapering of the self-catalyzed InP NWs were controlled by the introduction of HCl and H{sub 2}S gases during the NW growth, and InP NWs that have a straight region with decreased diameter were formed. Radial InP/InAsP/InP quantum wells (QWs) were grown on the sidewall of the vertical InP NWs on Si substrates. Room-temperature photoluminescence of single NWs from the QW was clearly observed, which exhibited the potential of building blocks for vertical-type optical devices on Si substrates.

  15. A Simple Method for the Growth of Very Smooth and Ultra-Thin GaSb Films on GaAs (111) Substrate by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Pei-Nan; Tong, Jin-Chao; Tobing, Landobasa Y. M.; Qiu, Shu-Peng; Xu, Zheng-Ji; Tang, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Dao-Hua

    2017-02-01

    We present a simple thermal treatment with the antimony source for the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of thin GaSb films on GaAs (111) substrates for the first time. The properties of the as-grown GaSb films are systematically analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, photo-luminescence (PL) and Hall measurement. It is found that the as-grown GaSb films by the proposed method can be as thin as 35 nm and have a very smooth surface with the root mean square roughness as small as 0.777 nm. Meanwhile, the grown GaSb films also have high crystalline quality, of which the full width at half maximum of the rocking-curve is as small as 218 arcsec. Moreover, the good optical quality of the GaSb films has been demonstrated by the low-temperature PL. This work provides a simple and feasible buffer-free strategy for the growth of high-quality GaSb films directly on GaAs substrates and the strategy may also be applicable to the growth on other substrates and the hetero-growth of other materials.

  16. Orientation-enhanced growth and optical properties of ZnO nanowires grown on porous silicon substrates.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsu-Cheng; Cheng, Ching-Sheng; Chang, Chia-Chieh; Yang, Song; Chang, Chen-Shiung; Hsieh, Wen-Feng

    2005-02-01

    ZnO nanowires have been synthesized on porous silicon substrates with different porosities via the vapour-liquid-solid method. The texture coefficient analysed from the XRD spectra indicates that the nanowires are more highly orientated on the appropriate porosity of porous silicon substrate than on the smooth surface of silicon. The Raman spectrum reveals the high quality of the ZnO nanowires. From the temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectra, we deduced the activation energies of free and bound excitons.

  17. Two-stage metal-catalyst-free growth of high-quality polycrystalline graphene films on silicon nitride substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianyi; Guo, Yunlong; Wen, Yugeng; Huang, Liping; Xue, Yunzhou; Geng, Dechao; Wu, Bin; Luo, Birong; Yu, Gui; Liu, Yunqi

    2013-02-20

    By using two-stage, metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD), it is demonstrated that high-quality polycrystalline graphene films can directly grow on silicon nitride substrates. The carrier mobility can reach about 1500 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) , which is about three times the value of those grown on SiO(2) /Si substrates, and also is better than some examples of metal-catalyzed graphene, reflecting the good quality of the graphene lattice.

  18. Seed/catalyst-free growth of zinc oxide on graphene by thermal evaporation: effects of substrate inclination angles and graphene thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nurul Fariha; Yasui, Kanji; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2015-01-01

    A seed/catalyst-free growth of ZnO on graphene by thermal evaporation of Zn in the presence of O2 gas was further studied. The effects of substrate positions and graphene thicknesses on the morphological, structural, and optical properties were found to be very pronounced. By setting the substrate to be inclined at 90°, the growth of ZnO nanostructures, namely, nanoclusters and nanorods, on single-layer (SL) graphene was successfully realized at temperatures of 600°C and 800°C, respectively. For the growth on multilayer (ML) graphene at 600°C with an inclination angle of 90°, the grown structures show extremely thick and continuous cluster structures as compared to the growth with substrate's inclination angle of 45°. Moreover, the base of nanorod structures grown at 800°C with an inclination angle of 90° also become thicker as compared to 45°, even though their densities and aspect ratios were almost unchanged. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the grown ZnO structures were composed of the UV emission (378-386 nm) and the visible emission (517-550 nm), and the intensity ratio of the former emission ( I UV) to the latter emission ( I VIS) changed, depending on the temperature. The structures grown at a low temperature of 600°C show the highest value of I UV/ I VIS of 16.2, which is almost two times higher than the structures grown on SL graphene, indicating fewer structural defects. The possible growth mechanism was proposed and described which considered both the nucleation and oxidation processes. From the results obtained, it can be concluded that temperature below 800°C, substrate position inclined at 90° towards the gas flow, and ML graphene seems to be preferable parameters for the growth of ZnO structures by thermal evaporation because these factors can be used to overcome the problem of graphene's oxidation that takes place during the growth.

  19. Role of dislocation-free GaN substrates in the growth of indium containing optoelectronic structures by plasma-assisted MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skierbiszewski, C.; Siekacz, M.; Perlin, P.; Feduniewicz-Żmuda, A.; Cywiński, G.; Grzegory, I.; Leszczyński, M.; Wasilewski, Z. R.; Porowski, S.

    2007-07-01

    Plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) has recently emerged as a viable tool for production of nitride blue-violet laser diodes operating at room temperature in continuous wave mode and high output powers [C. Skierbiszewski, P. Wisniewski, M. Siekacz, P. Perlin, A. Feduniewicz-Zmuda, G. Nowak, I. Grzegory, M. Leszczynski, S. Porowski, Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 (2006) 221108]. The present work reviews the current state of the art in this program as well as discusses its future directions. Two elements are given particular attention: (1) the epitaxial growth in metal-rich conditions, which enables effective lateral diffusion of N adatoms at low growth temperatures and (2) the role of threading dislocations in destabilizing the growth front. Low-temperature growth by PAMBE on dislocation-free GaN substrates is instrumental in achieving high performance of optoelectronic structures. The inherent to this process capability of sustaining two-dimensional step-flow growth mode (with straight and parallel atomic steps) at low growth temperatures opens up the way to the growth of strained multilayer structures with no compositional fluctuations and with flat interfaces.

  20. Hierarchical rutile TiO2 flower cluster-based high efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells via direct hydrothermal growth on conducting substrates.

    PubMed

    Ye, Meidan; Liu, Hsiang-Yu; Lin, Changjian; Lin, Zhiqun

    2013-01-28

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) based on hierarchical rutile TiO(2) flower clusters prepared by a facile, one-pot hydrothermal process exhibit a high efficiency. Complex yet appealing rutile TiO(2) flower films are, for the first time, directly hydrothermally grown on a transparent conducting fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate. The thickness and density of as-grown flower clusters can be readily tuned by tailoring growth parameters, such as growth time, the addition of cations of different valence and size, initial concentrations of precursor and cation, growth temperature, and acidity. Notably, the small lattice mismatch between the FTO substrate and rutile TiO(2) renders the epitaxial growth of a compact rutile TiO(2) layer on the FTO glass. Intriguingly, these TiO(2) flower clusters can then be exploited as photoanodes to produce DSSCs, yielding a power conversion efficiency of 2.94% despite their rutile nature, which is further increased to 4.07% upon the TiCl(4) treatment.

  1. A Novel GH7 Endo-β-1,4-Glucanase from Neosartorya fischeri P1 with Good Thermostability, Broad Substrate Specificity and Potential Application in the Brewing Industry

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Pengjun; Ma, Rui; Luo, Huiying; Bai, Yingguo; Xie, Xiangming; Yao, Bin

    2015-01-01

    An endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene, cel7A, was cloned from the thermophilic cellulase-producing fungus Neosartorya fischeri P1 and expressed in Pichia pastoris. The 1,410-bp full-length gene encodes a polypeptide of 469 amino acids consisting of a putative signal peptide at residues 1–20, a catalytic domain of glycoside hydrolase family 7 (GH7), a short Thr/Ser-rich linker and a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM 1). The purified recombinant Cel7A had pH and temperature optima of pH 5.0 and 60°C, respectively, and showed broad pH adaptability (pH 3.0–6.0) and excellent stability at pH3.0–8.0 and 60°C. Belonging to the group of nonspecific endoglucanases, Cel7A exhibited the highest activity on barley β-glucan (2020 ± 9 U mg–1), moderate on lichenan and CMC-Na, and weak on laminarin, locust bean galactomannan, Avicel, and filter paper. Under simulated mashing conditions, addition of Cel7A (99 μg) reduced the mash viscosity by 9.1% and filtration time by 24.6%. These favorable enzymatic properties make Cel7A as a good candidate for applications in the brewing industry. PMID:26360701

  2. A Novel GH7 Endo-β-1,4-Glucanase from Neosartorya fischeri P1 with Good Thermostability, Broad Substrate Specificity and Potential Application in the Brewing Industry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Dun, Baoqing; Shi, Pengjun; Ma, Rui; Luo, Huiying; Bai, Yingguo; Xie, Xiangming; Yao, Bin

    2015-01-01

    An endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene, cel7A, was cloned from the thermophilic cellulase-producing fungus Neosartorya fischeri P1 and expressed in Pichia pastoris. The 1,410-bp full-length gene encodes a polypeptide of 469 amino acids consisting of a putative signal peptide at residues 1-20, a catalytic domain of glycoside hydrolase family 7 (GH7), a short Thr/Ser-rich linker and a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM 1). The purified recombinant Cel7A had pH and temperature optima of pH 5.0 and 60°C, respectively, and showed broad pH adaptability (pH 3.0-6.0) and excellent stability at pH3.0-8.0 and 60°C. Belonging to the group of nonspecific endoglucanases, Cel7A exhibited the highest activity on barley β-glucan (2020 ± 9 U mg-1), moderate on lichenan and CMC-Na, and weak on laminarin, locust bean galactomannan, Avicel, and filter paper. Under simulated mashing conditions, addition of Cel7A (99 μg) reduced the mash viscosity by 9.1% and filtration time by 24.6%. These favorable enzymatic properties make Cel7A as a good candidate for applications in the brewing industry.

  3. Selective Growth of Monoatomic Cu Rows at Step Edges on Si(111) Substrates in Ultralow-Dissolved-Oxygen Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuda, Norio; Nishizawa, Masayasu; Miki, Kazushi; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Hasunuma, Ryu; Yamabe, Kikuo

    2005-04-01

    We have fabricated high-aspect-ratio monoatomic Cu rows along atomic step edges on vicinal Si(111) substrates. The method consists of two wet processes: (1) the formation of a step/terrace structure by immersing a Si(111) substrate in ultralow-dissolved-oxygen water (LOW) and (2) the formation of the nanowires by immersion in LOW containing Cu ions. A systematic investigation of Si(111) surfaces with the nanowire has been performed by means of atomic force microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, and total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy.

  4. Fabrication of C 60 nanostructures by selective growth on GaSe/MoS 2 and InSe/MoS 2 heterostructure substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Keiji; Sasaki, Kentaro; Nakahara, Tomonori; Koma, Atsushi

    1998-06-01

    C 60 molecules were deposited on a submonolayer InSe film which was grown on a MoS 2 substrate. In the previous experiment on the growth of a C 60 thin film on a GaSe/MoS 2 heterostructure, C 60 grew only on exposed MoS 2 regions and never nucleated on GaSe domains at substrate temperature above 180°C. In the present case, however, C 60 molecules grow only on InSe domains and do not nucleate on the exposed MoS 2 when the substrate temperature is higher than 80°C. Using this method, C 60 domains whose dimension is smaller than 100 nm could be fabricated on each InSe domain. The selectivity of the C 60 growth is supposed to originate not from the surface morphology of those heterostructures, but from the difference in adsorption energy and surface diffusion energy of C 60 molecules on the surfaces of three different layered materials and a C 60 film.

  5. Epitaxial growth of 100-μm thick M-type hexaferrite crystals on wide bandgap semiconductor GaN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Bolin; Su, Zhijuan; Bennett, Steve; Chen, Yajie Harris, Vincent G.

    2014-05-07

    Thick barium hexaferrite BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} (BaM) films having thicknesses of ∼100 μm were epitaxially grown on GaN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates from a molten-salt solution by vaporizing the solvent. X-ray diffraction measurement verified the growth of BaM (001) textured growth of thick films. Saturation magnetization, 4πM{sub s}, was measured for as-grown films to be 4.6 ± 0.2 kG and ferromagnetic resonance measurements revealed a microwave linewidth of ∼100 Oe at X-band. Scanning electron microscopy indicated clear hexagonal crystals distributed on the semiconductor substrate. These results demonstrate feasibility of growing M-type hexaferrite crystal films on wide bandgap semiconductor substrates by using a simple powder melting method. It also presents a potential pathway for the integration of ferrite microwave passive devices with active semiconductor circuit elements creating system-on-a-wafer architectures.

  6. Epitaxial growth of fcc-Co{sub x}Ni{sub 100-x} thin films on MgO(110) single-crystal substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtake, Mitsuru; Nukaga, Yuri; Sato, Yoichi; Futamoto, Masaaki; Kirino, Fumiyoshi

    2009-12-15

    Co{sub x}Ni{sub 100-x} (x=100, 80, 20, 0 at. %) epitaxial thin films were prepared on MgO(110) single-crystal substrates heated at 300 deg. C by ultrahigh vacuum molecular beam epitaxy. The growth mechanism is discussed based on lattice strain and crystallographic defects. CoNi(110) single-crystal films with a fcc structure are obtained for all compositions. Co{sub x}Ni{sub 100-x} film growth follows the Volmer-Weber mode. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the out-of-plane and the in-plane lattice spacings of the Co{sub x}Ni{sub 100-x} films are in agreement within +-0.5% with the values of the respective bulk Co{sub x}Ni{sub 100-x} crystals, suggesting that the strain in the film is very small. High-resolution cross-sectional transmission microscopy shows that an atomically sharp boundary is formed between a Co(110){sub fcc} film and a MgO(110) substrate, where periodical misfit dislocations are preferentially introduced in the film at the Co/MgO interface. The presence of such periodical misfit dislocations relieves the strain caused by the lattice mismatch between the film and the substrate.

  7. Facile synthesis, growth mechanism and reversible superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic properties of non-flaking CuO nanowires grown from porous copper substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao bao; Xu, Daguo; Hung, Tak Fu; Zhang, Kaili

    2013-02-15

    Reversible superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic surfaces based on porous substrates covered with CuO nanowires are developed in this study. A facile thermal oxidation method is used to synthesize non-flaking bicrystalline CuO nanowires on porous copper substrates in static air. The effects of thermal oxidation temperature and duration are systemically studied. The growth mechanism of the obtained non-flaking CuO nanowires is presented and the compression stress is believed to be the key driving force. The wettability of the CuO nanowires after chemical modification with trichloro(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl)silane is systemically investigated. The porous substrates covered with CuO nanowires exhibit excellent superhydrophobic performance with almost no water adhesion and no apparent drag resistance, and a maximum static water contact angle of 162 ± 2° is observed. Moreover, a rapid reversibly switchable wettability between superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic states is realized by the alternation of air-plasma treatment and surface fluorination. The porous substrates covered with CuO nanowires will find promising applications in surface and corrosion protection, liquid transportation, oil-water separation, and self-cleaning surfaces.

  8. MOVPE growth studies of Ga(NAsP)/(BGa)(AsP) multi quantum well heterostructures (MQWH) for the monolithic integration of laser structures on (001) Si-substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewig, P.; Reinhard, S.; Jandieri, K.; Wegele, T.; Beyer, A.; Tapfer, L.; Volz, K.; Stolz, W.

    2016-03-01

    High-quality, pseudomorphically strained Ga(NAsP)/(BGa)(AsP)-multiple quantum w