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Sample records for broad growth substrate

  1. Differentially expressed myo-inositol monophosphatase gene (CaIMP) in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) encodes a lithium-sensitive phosphatase enzyme with broad substrate specificity and improves seed germination and seedling growth under abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Saurabh C; Salvi, Prafull; Kaur, Harmeet; Verma, Pooja; Petla, Bhanu Prakash; Rao, Venkateswara; Kamble, Nitin; Majee, Manoj

    2013-12-01

    myo-Inositol monophosphatase (IMP) is an essential enzyme in the myo-inositol metabolic pathway where it primarily dephosphorylates myo-inositol 1-phosphate to maintain the cellular inositol pool which is important for many metabolic and signalling pathways in plants. The stress-induced increased accumulation of inositol has been reported in a few plants including chickpea; however, the role and regulation of IMP is not well defined in response to stress. In this work, it has been shown that IMP activity is distributed in all organs in chickpea and was noticeably enhanced during environmental stresses. Subsequently, using degenerate oligonucleotides and RACE strategy, a full-length IMP cDNA (CaIMP) was cloned and sequenced. Biochemical study revealed that CaIMP encodes a lithium-sensitive phosphatase enzyme with broad substrate specificity, although maximum activity was observed with the myo-inositol 1-phosphate and l-galactose 1-phosphate substrates. Transcript analysis revealed that CaIMP is differentially expressed and regulated in different organs, stresses and phytohormones. Complementation analysis in Arabidopsis further confirmed the role of CaIMP in l-galactose 1-phosphate and myo-inositol 1-phosphate hydrolysis and its participation in myo-inositol and ascorbate biosynthesis. Moreover, Arabidopsis transgenic plants over-expressing CaIMP exhibited improved tolerance to stress during seed germination and seedling growth, while the VTC4/IMP loss-of-function mutants exhibited sensitivity to stress. Collectively, CaIMP links various metabolic pathways and plays an important role in improving seed germination and seedling growth, particularly under stressful environments.

  2. Film Growth on Nanoporous Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue; Joy, James; Zhao, Chenwei; Xu, J. M.; Valles, James

    Self-ordered nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) provides an easy way to fabricate nano structured material, such as nano wires and nano particles. We employ AAO as substrates and focus on the thermally evaporated film growth on the surface of the substrate. With various materials deposited onto the substrate, we find the films show different structures, e,g. ordered array of nano particles for Lead and nanohoneycomb structure for Silver. We relate the differing behaviors to the difference of surface energy and diffusion constant. To verify this, the effect of substrate temperature on the film growth has been explored and the structure of the film has been successfully changed through the process. We are grateful for the support of NSF Grants No. DMR-1307290.

  3. Molecular basis for the broad substrate selectivity of a peptide prenyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yue; Pierce, Elizabeth; Roe, Daniel; Morita, Maho; McIntosh, John A; Agarwal, Vinayak; Cheatham, Thomas E; Schmidt, Eric W; Nair, Satish K

    2016-12-06

    The cyanobactin prenyltransferases catalyze a series of known or unprecedented reactions on millions of different substrates, with no easily observable recognition motif and exquisite regioselectivity. Here we define the basis of broad substrate tolerance for the otherwise uncharacterized TruF family. We determined the structures of the Tyr-prenylating enzyme PagF, in complex with an isoprenoid donor analog and a panel of linear and macrocyclic peptide substrates. Unexpectedly, the structures reveal a truncated barrel fold, wherein binding of large peptide substrates is necessary to complete a solvent-exposed hydrophobic pocket to form the catalytically competent active site. Kinetic, mutational, chemical, and computational analyses revealed the structural basis of selectivity, showing a small motif within peptide substrates that is sufficient for recognition by the enzyme. Attaching this 2-residue motif to two random peptides results in their isoprenylation by PagF, demonstrating utility as a general biocatalytic platform for modifications on any peptide substrate.

  4. Substrate solder barriers for semiconductor epilayer growth

    DOEpatents

    Drummond, T.J.; Ginley, D.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1989-05-09

    During the growth of compound semiconductors by epitaxial processes, substrates are typically mounted to a support. In modular beam epitaxy, mounting is done using indium as a solder. This method has two drawbacks: the indium reacts with the substrate, and it is difficult to uniformly wet the back of a large diameter substrate. Both of these problems have been successfully overcome by sputter coating the back of the substrate with a thin layer of tungsten carbide or tungsten carbide and gold. In addition to being compatible with the growth of high quality semiconductor epilayers this coating is also inert in all standard substrate cleaning etchants used for compound semiconductors, and provides uniform distribution of energy in radiant heating.

  5. Substrate solder barriers for semiconductor epilayer growth

    DOEpatents

    Drummond, Timothy J.; Ginley, David S.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1989-01-01

    During the growth of compound semiconductors by epitaxial processes, substrates are typically mounted to a support. In modular beam epitaxy, mounting is done using indium as a solder. This method has two drawbacks: the indium reacts with the substrate, and it is difficult to uniformly wet the back of a large diameter substrate. Both of these problems have been successfully overcome by sputter coating the back of the substrate with a thin layer of tungsten carbide or tungsten carbide and gold. In addition to being compatible with the growth of high quality semiconductor epilayers this coating is also inert in all standard substrate cleaning etchants used for compound semiconductors, and provides uniform distribution of energy in radiant heating.

  6. Graphene growth on coinage-metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarty, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    The low solubility of carbon in Cu and Au gives these coinage metals advantages as substrates for graphene growth. Namely, growth occurs exclusively by surface processes, avoiding the complications of C segregating from the bulk of the metal substrate. However, the relatively weak interactions of Cu and Au with graphene can lead to mosaic films having large ranges of in-plane orientations. This talk will emphasize understanding the relationship between the microstructure of graphene sheets and the mechanisms of island nucleation and growth. We use low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) to observe growth. We find that bunches of substrate steps on Cu(111) can generate misorientation boundaries in a graphene sheet as it overgrows the steps [1]. Thus, growth on rough Cu(111) leads to large rotational disorder. Optimized growth on smooth Cu(111) and Au(111), however, produces islands all in close registry to a single in-plane orientation. On Cu(100), the most abundant grain orientation of commercial Cu foils, graphene islands align around two equivalent in-plane Cu directions [2]. This inherent source of disorder from symmetry mismatch is further compounded by large spreads of orientation around the equivalent directions. The substrate choice also affects the microscopic growth mechanism. The rate that C diffuses to the graphene islands limits growth on Cu(111) [and likely on Au(111)]. The sheet edges are then morphologically unstable, with dendritic islands at low temperature and six-fold loped islands at higher temperature. In contrast, growth on Cu(100) is limited by the rate of C attaching to the graphene edge. This mechanism, combined with the symmetry mismatch, produces two-fold islands. Finally, the coinage metals will be compared to other transition metal substrates. [4pt] [1] Phys. Rev. B 84, p. 155425 (2011). [0pt] [2] Nano Lett. 10, p. 4890 (2010).

  7. Substrate solder barriers for semiconductor epilayer growth

    DOEpatents

    Drummond, T.J.; Ginley, D.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1987-10-23

    During the growth of compound semiconductors by epitaxial processes, substrates are typically mounted to a support. In molecular beam epitaxy, mounting is done using indium as a solder. This method has two drawbacks: the indium reacts with the substrate, and it is difficult to uniformly wet the back of a large diameter substrate. Both of these problems have been successfully overcome by sputter coating the back of the substrate with a thin layer of tungsten carbide or tungsten carbide and gold. In addition to being compatible with the growth of high quality semiconductor epilayers this coating is also inert in all standard substate cleaning etchants used for compound semiconductors, and provides uniform distribution of energy in radiant heating. 1 tab.

  8. Structural insights into the broad substrate specificity of carboxypeptidase T from Thermoactinomyces vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Akparov, Valery Kh; Timofeev, Vladimir I; Khaliullin, Ilyas G; Švedas, Vytas; Chestukhina, Galina G; Kuranova, Inna P

    2015-04-01

    The crystal structures of carboxypeptidase T (CpT) complexes with phenylalanine and arginine substrate analogs - benzylsuccinic acid and (2-guanidinoethylmercapto)succinic acid - were determined by the molecular replacement method at resolutions of 1.57 Å and 1.62 Å to clarify the broad substrate specificity profile of the enzyme. The conservative Leu211 and Leu254 residues (also present in both carboxypeptidase A and carboxypeptidase B) were shown to be structural determinants for recognition of hydrophobic substrates, whereas Asp263 was for recognition of positively charged substrates. Mutations of these determinants modify the substrate profile: the CpT variant Leu211Gln acquires carboxypeptidase B-like properties, and the CpT variant Asp263Asn the carboxypeptidase A-like selectivity. The Pro248-Asp258 loop interacting with Leu254 and Tyr255 was shown to be responsible for recognition of the substrate's C-terminal residue. Substrate binding at the S1' subsite leads to the ligand-dependent shift of this loop, and Leu254 side chain movement induces the conformation rearrangement of the Glu277 residue crucial for catalysis. This is a novel insight into the substrate selectivity of metallocarboxypeptidases that demonstrates the importance of interactions between the S1' subsite and the catalytic center.

  9. Broad Substrate Specificity of the Loading Didomain of the Lipomycin Polyketide Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Yuzawa, S; Eng, CH; Katz, L; Keasling, JD

    2013-06-04

    LipPks1, a polyketide synthase subunit of the lipomycin synthase, is believed to catalyze the polyketide chain initiation reaction using isobutyryl-CoA as a substrate, followed by an elongation reaction with methylmalonyl-CoA to start the biosynthesis of antibiotic alpha-lipomycin in Streptomyces aureofaciens Tu117. Recombinant LipPks1, containing the thioesterase domain from the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase, was produced in Escherichia coli, and its substrate specificity was investigated in vitro. Surprisingly, several different acyl-CoAs, including isobutyryl-CoA, were accepted as the starter substrates, while no product was observed with acetyl-CoA. These results demonstrate the broad substrate specificity of LipPks1 and may be applied to producing new antibiotics.

  10. Vertical-Substrate MPCVD Epitaxial Nanodiamond Growth.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Yan-Kai; Zhang, Jingyuan Linda; Lu, Haiyu; Ishiwata, Hitoshi; Dahl, Jeremy; Carlson, Robert M K; Yan, Hao; Schreiner, Peter R; Vučković, Jelena; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Melosh, Nicholas; Chu, Steven

    2017-03-08

    Color center-containing nanodiamonds have many applications in quantum technologies and biology. Diamondoids, molecular-sized diamonds have been used as seeds in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth. However, optimizing growth conditions to produce high crystal quality nanodiamonds with color centers requires varying growth conditions that often leads to ad-hoc and time-consuming, one-at-a-time testing of reaction conditions. In order to rapidly explore parameter space, we developed a microwave plasma CVD technique using a vertical, rather than horizontally oriented stage-substrate geometry. With this configuration, temperature, plasma density, and atomic hydrogen density vary continuously along the vertical axis of the substrate. This variation allowed rapid identification of growth parameters that yield single crystal diamonds down to 10 nm in size and 75 nm diameter optically active center silicon-vacancy (Si-V) nanoparticles. Furthermore, this method may provide a means of incorporating a wide variety of dopants in nanodiamonds without ion irradiation damage.

  11. Structural Basis for Broad Substrate Specificity in Higher Plant β-d-Glucan Glucohydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Hrmova, Maria; De Gori, Ross; Smith, Brian J.; Fairweather, Jon K.; Driguez, Hugues; Varghese, Joseph N.; Fincher, Geoffrey B.

    2002-01-01

    Family 3 β-d-glucan glucohydrolases are distributed widely in higher plants. The enzymes catalyze the hydrolytic removal of β-d-glucosyl residues from nonreducing termini of a range of β-d-glucans and β-d-oligoglucosides. Their broad specificity can be explained by x-ray crystallographic data obtained from a barley β-d-glucan glucohydrolase in complex with nonhydrolyzable S-glycoside substrate analogs and by molecular modeling of enzyme/substrate complexes. The glucosyl residue that occupies binding subsite −1 is locked tightly into a fixed position through extensive hydrogen bonding with six amino acid residues near the bottom of an active site pocket. In contrast, the glucosyl residue at subsite +1 is located between two Trp residues at the entrance of the pocket, where it is constrained less tightly. The relative flexibility of binding at subsite +1, coupled with the projection of the remainder of bound substrate away from the enzyme's surface, means that the overall active site can accommodate a range of substrates with variable spatial dispositions of adjacent β-d-glucosyl residues. The broad specificity for glycosidic linkage type enables the enzyme to perform diverse functions during plant development. PMID:12034895

  12. Iron Complex Catalyzed Selective C-H Bond Oxidation with Broad Substrate Scope.

    PubMed

    Jana, Sandipan; Ghosh, Munmun; Ambule, Mayur; Sen Gupta, Sayam

    2017-02-17

    The use of a peroxidase-mimicking Fe complex has been reported on the basis of the biuret-modified TAML macrocyclic ligand framework (Fe-bTAML) as a catalyst to perform selective oxidation of unactivated 3° C-H bonds and activated 2° C-H bonds with low catalyst loading (1 mol %) and high product yield (excellent mass balance) under near-neutral conditions and broad substrate scope (18 substrates which includes arenes, heteroaromatics, and polar functional groups). Aliphatic C-H oxidation of 3° and 2° sites of complex substrates was achieved with predictable selectivity using steric, electronic, and stereoelectronic rules that govern site selectivity, which included oxidation of (+)-artemisinin to (+)-10β-hydroxyartemisinin. Mechanistic studies indicate Fe(V)(O) to be the active oxidant during these reactions.

  13. A measure of the broad substrate specificity of enzymes based on 'duplicate' catalytic residues.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Ásgeirsson, Bjarni; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2012-01-01

    The ability of an enzyme to select and act upon a specific class of compounds with unerring precision and efficiency is an essential feature of life. Simultaneously, these enzymes often catalyze the reaction of a range of similar substrates of the same class, and also have promiscuous activities on unrelated substrates. Previously, we have established a methodology to quantify promiscuous activities in a wide range of proteins. In the current work, we quantitatively characterize the active site for the ability to catalyze distinct, yet related, substrates (BRASS). A protein with known structure and active site residues provides the framework for computing 'duplicate' residues, each of which results in slightly modified replicas of the active site scaffold. Such spatial congruence is supplemented by Finite difference Poisson Boltzmann analysis which filters out electrostatically unfavorable configurations. The congruent configurations are used to compute an index (BrassIndex), which reflects the broad substrate profile of the active site. We identify an acetylhydrolase and a methyltransferase as having the lowest and highest BrassIndex, respectively, from a set of non-homologous proteins extracted from the Catalytic Site Atlas. The acetylhydrolase, a regulatory enzyme, is known to be highly specific for platelet-activating factor. In the methyltransferase (PDB: 1QAM), various combinations of glycine (Gly38/40/42), asparagine (Asn101/11) and glutamic acid (Glu59/36) residues having similar spatial and electrostatic profiles with the specified scaffold (Gly38, Asn101 and Glu59) exemplifies the broad substrate profile such an active site may provide. 'Duplicate' residues identified by relaxing the spatial and/or electrostatic constraints can be the target of directed evolution methodologies, like saturation mutagenesis, for modulating the substrate specificity of proteins.

  14. Substrate Deformation Predicts Neuronal Growth Cone Advance

    PubMed Central

    Athamneh, Ahmad I.M.; Cartagena-Rivera, Alexander X.; Raman, Arvind; Suter, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Although pulling forces have been observed in axonal growth for several decades, their underlying mechanisms, absolute magnitudes, and exact roles are not well understood. In this study, using two different experimental approaches, we quantified retrograde traction force in Aplysia californica neuronal growth cones as they develop over time in response to a new adhesion substrate. In the first approach, we developed a novel method, to our knowledge, for measuring traction forces using an atomic force microscope (AFM) with a cantilever that was modified with an Aplysia cell adhesion molecule (apCAM)-coated microbead. In the second approach, we used force-calibrated glass microneedles coated with apCAM ligands to guide growth cone advance. The traction force exerted by the growth cone was measured by monitoring the microneedle deflection using an optical microscope. Both approaches showed that Aplysia growth cones can develop traction forces in the 100–102 nN range during adhesion-mediated advance. Moreover, our results suggest that the level of traction force is directly correlated to the stiffness of the microneedle, which is consistent with a reinforcement mechanism previously observed in other cell types. Interestingly, the absolute level of traction force did not correlate with growth cone advance toward the adhesion site, but the amount of microneedle deflection did. In cases of adhesion-mediated growth cone advance, the mean needle deflection was 1.05 ± 0.07 μm. By contrast, the mean deflection was significantly lower (0.48 ± 0.06 μm) when the growth cones did not advance. Our data support a hypothesis that adhesion complexes, which can undergo micron-scale elastic deformation, regulate the coupling between the retrogradely flowing actin cytoskeleton and apCAM substrates, stimulating growth cone advance if sufficiently abundant. PMID:26445437

  15. Understanding the Broad Substrate Repertoire of Nitroreductase Based on Its Kinetic Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Pitsawong, Warintra; Hoben, John P.; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2014-01-01

    The oxygen-insensitive nitroreductase from Enterobacter cloacae (NR) catalyzes two-electron reduction of nitroaromatics to the corresponding nitroso compounds and, subsequently, to hydroxylamine products. NR has an unusually broad substrate repertoire, which may be related to protein dynamics (flexibility) and/or a simple non-selective kinetic mechanism. To investigate the possible role of mechanism in the broad substrate repertoire of NR, the kinetics of oxidation of NR by para-nitrobenzoic acid (p-NBA) were investigated using stopped-flow techniques at 4 °C. The results revealed a hyperbolic dependence on the p-NBA concentration with a limiting rate of 1.90 ± 0.09 s−1, indicating one-step binding before the flavin oxidation step. There is no evidence for a distinct binding step in which specificity might be enforced. The reduction of p-NBA is rate-limiting in steady-state turnover (1.7 ± 0.3 s−1). The pre-steady-state reduction kinetics of NR by NADH indicate that NADH reduces the enzyme with a rate constant of 700 ± 20 s−1 and a dissociation constant of 0.51 ± 0.04 mm. Thus, we demonstrate simple transient kinetics in both the reductive and oxidative half-reactions that help to explain the broad substrate repertoire of NR. Finally, we tested the ability of NR to reduce para-hydroxylaminobenzoic acid, demonstrating that the corresponding amine does not accumulate to significant levels even under anaerobic conditions. Thus E. cloacae NR is not a good candidate for enzymatic production of aromatic amines. PMID:24706760

  16. Spatiospectral and picosecond spatiotemporal properties of a broad area operating channeled-substrate-planar laser array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, NU; Defreez, Richard K.; Bossert, David J.; Wilson, Geoffrey A.; Elliott, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    Spatiospectral and spatiotemporal properties of an eight-element channeled-substrate-planar laser array are investigated in both CW and pulsed operating conditions. The closely spaced CSP array with strong optical coupling between array elements is characterized by a broad area laserlike operation determined by its spatial mode spectra. The spatiotemporal evolution of the near and far field exhibits complex dynamic behavior in the picosecond to nanosecond domain. Operating parameters for the laser device have been experimentally determined. These results provide important information for the evaluation of the dynamic behavior of coherent semiconductor laser arrays.

  17. Soluble artificial metalloproteases with broad substrate selectivity, high reactivity, and high thermal and chemical stabilities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Gyum; Yoo, Sang Ho; Chei, Woo Suk; Lee, Tae Yeon; Kim, Hye Mi; Suh, Junghun

    2010-09-01

    To design soluble artificial proteases that cleave peptide backbones of a wide range of proteins with high reactivity, artificial active sites comprising the Cu(II) complex of 1-oxa-4,7,10-triazacyclodedecane (oxacyclen) and the aldehyde group were synthesized. The aldehyde group was employed as the binding site in view of its ability to reversibly form imine bonds with ammonium groups exposed on the surfaces of proteins, and Cu(II) oxacyclen was exploited as the catalytic group for peptide hydrolysis. The artificial metalloproteases synthesized in the present study cleaved all of the protein substrates examined (albumin, gamma-globulin, myoglobin, and lysozyme). In addition, the activity of the best soluble artificial protease was enhanced by up to 190-fold in terms of kcat/Km. When the temperature was raised to 80 degrees C, the activities of the artificial proteases were significantly enhanced. The activity of the artificial protease was not greatly affected by surfactants, including sodium dodecyl sulfate. The intermediacy of the imine complex formed between the artificial protease and the protein substrate was supported by an experiment using sodium cyanoborohydride. Soluble artificial metalloproteases with broad substrate selectivity, high reactivity, high thermal and chemical stabilities, and small molecular weights were thus synthesized by positioning the aldehyde group in proximity to Cu(II) oxacyclen.

  18. Characterization of an Escherichia coli aromatic hydroxylase with a broad substrate range.

    PubMed

    Prieto, M A; Perez-Aranda, A; Garcia, J L

    1993-04-01

    The hpaB gene encoding an aromatic hydroxylase of Escherichia coli ATCC 11105, a penicillin G acylase-producing strain, has been cloned and expressed in E. coli K-12. This gene was located near the pacA gene coding for penicillin G acylase. The hydroxylase has a molecular mass of 59,000 Da, uses NADH as a cosubstrate, and was tentatively classified as a 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid hydroxylase, albeit it exhibited a rather broad substrate specificity acting on different monohydric and dihydric phenols. E. coli W, C, and B as well as Klebsiella pneumoniae M5a1 and Kluyvera citrophila ATCC 21285 (a penicillin G acylase-producing strain) but not E. coli K-12 contained sequences homologous to hpaB. Our results support the hypothesis that hpaB is a component of the 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid degradative pathway of E. coli W.

  19. Characterization of an Escherichia coli aromatic hydroxylase with a broad substrate range.

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, M A; Perez-Aranda, A; Garcia, J L

    1993-01-01

    The hpaB gene encoding an aromatic hydroxylase of Escherichia coli ATCC 11105, a penicillin G acylase-producing strain, has been cloned and expressed in E. coli K-12. This gene was located near the pacA gene coding for penicillin G acylase. The hydroxylase has a molecular mass of 59,000 Da, uses NADH as a cosubstrate, and was tentatively classified as a 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid hydroxylase, albeit it exhibited a rather broad substrate specificity acting on different monohydric and dihydric phenols. E. coli W, C, and B as well as Klebsiella pneumoniae M5a1 and Kluyvera citrophila ATCC 21285 (a penicillin G acylase-producing strain) but not E. coli K-12 contained sequences homologous to hpaB. Our results support the hypothesis that hpaB is a component of the 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid degradative pathway of E. coli W. Images PMID:8458860

  20. Efficient production of l-lactic acid by an engineered Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense with broad substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Efficient conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to optically pure lactic acid is a key challenge for the economical production of biodegradable poly-lactic acid. A recently isolated strain, Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense SCUT27, is promising as an efficient lactic acid production bacterium from biomass due to its broad substrate specificity. Additionally, its strictly anaerobic and thermophilic characteristics suppress contamination from other microoragnisms. Herein, we report the significant improvements of concentration and yield in lactic acid production from various lignocellulosic derived sugars, achieved by the carbon flux redirection through homologous recombination in T. aotearoense SCUT27. Results T. aotearoense SCUT27 was engineered to block the acetic acid formation pathway to improve the lactic acid production. The genetic manipulation resulted in 1.8 and 2.1 fold increase of the lactic acid yield using 10 g/L of glucose or 10 g/L of xylose as substrate, respectively. The maximum l-lactic acid yield of 0.93 g/g glucose with an optical purity of 99.3% was obtained by the engineered strain, designated as LA1002, from 50 g/L of substrate, which is very close to the theoretical value (1.0 g/g of glucose). In particular, LA1002 produced lactic acid at an unprecedented concentration up to 3.20 g/L using 10 g/L xylan as the single substrate without any pretreatment after 48 h fermentation. The non-sterilized fermentative production of l-lactic acid was also carried out, achieving values of 44.89 g/L and 0.89 g/g mixed sugar for lactic acid concentration and yield, respectively. Conclusions Blocking acetic acid formation pathway in T. aotearoense SCUT27 increased l-lactic acid production and yield dramatically. To our best knowledge, this is the best performance of fermentation on lactic acid production using xylan as the sole carbon source, considering the final concentration, yield and fermentation time. In addition, it should be

  1. CTL0511 from Chlamydia trachomatis Is a Type 2C Protein Phosphatase with Broad Substrate Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Claywell, Ja E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protein phosphorylation has become increasingly recognized for its role in regulating bacterial physiology and virulence. Chlamydia spp. encode two validated Hanks'-type Ser/Thr protein kinases, which typically function with cognate protein phosphatases and appear capable of global protein phosphorylation. Consequently, we sought to identify a Ser/Thr protein phosphatase partner for the chlamydial kinases. CTL0511 from Chlamydia trachomatis L2 434/Bu, which has homologs in all sequenced Chlamydia spp., is a predicted type 2C Ser/Thr protein phosphatase (PP2C). Recombinant maltose-binding protein (MBP)-tagged CTL0511 (rCTL0511) hydrolyzed p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP), a generic phosphatase substrate, in a MnCl2-dependent manner at physiological pH. Assays using phosphopeptide substrates revealed that rCTL0511 can dephosphorylate phosphorylated serine (P-Ser), P-Thr, and P-Tyr residues using either MnCl2 or MgCl2, indicating that metal usage can alter substrate preference. Phosphatase activity was unaffected by PP1, PP2A, and PP3 phosphatase inhibitors, while mutation of conserved PP2C residues significantly inhibited activity. Finally, phosphatase activity was detected in elementary body (EB) and reticulate body (RB) lysates, supporting a role for protein dephosphorylation in chlamydial development. These findings support that CTL0511 is a metal-dependent protein phosphatase with broad substrate specificity, substantiating a reversible phosphorylation network in C. trachomatis. IMPORTANCE Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens responsible for a variety of diseases in humans and economically important animal species. Our work demonstrates that Chlamydia spp. produce a PP2C capable of dephosphorylating P-Thr, P-Ser, and P-Tyr and that Chlamydia trachomatis EBs and RBs possess phosphatase activity. In conjunction with the chlamydial Hanks'-type kinases Pkn1 and PknD, validation of CTL0511 fulfills the enzymatic requirements for a

  2. Growth of marine fungi on polymeric substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanming; Barth, Dorothee; Tamminen, Anu; Wiebe, Marilyn G

    2016-01-16

    Marine fungi are a diverse group of opportunistic and obligate organisms isolated from marine environments. These fungi are now often included in screens for novel metabolites, while less attention has been given to their production of hydrolytic enzymes. Most enzymes derived from marine microorganisms have been obtained from marine bacteria. The enzymes produced by marine fungi may have different properties than those derived from bacteria or from terrestrial fungi. Here we assess the growth of six filamentous marine fungi on a wide range of polymeric substrates as an indication of their general capacity to produce hydrolytic enzymes. Calcarisporium sp. KF525, Tritirachium sp. LF562, Bartalinia robillardoides LF550, Penicillium pinophilum LF458, Scopulariopsis brevicaulis LF580 and Pestalotiopsis sp. KF079 all grew on both casein and gelatin as N-source, indicating secretion of proteases. All species also grew on starch, laminarin, xylan, pectin and oil, indicating production of amylases, glucanases, xylanases, pectinases and lipases. Growth on cellulose occurred but was weaker than on xylan. All strains also grew to some extent on sulphated arabinogalactan, although only LF562 could utilise arabinose. Four strains grew on the sulphated ulvans, whereas only KF525 grew on agar or carrageenan. KF525 and LF562 showed limited growth on alginate. Although fucose was used as carbon source by several species, fucoidan did not support biomass production. Marine fungi could be excellent sources of a wide range of hydrolytic enzymes, including those able to hydrolyse various seaweed polymers. Although the native hosts may secrete only small amounts of these enzymes, the genes may provide a rich source of novel enzymes.

  3. Structural and Kinetic Studies of the Human Nudix Hydrolase MTH1 Reveal the Mechanism for Its Broad Substrate Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Waz, Shaimaa; Nakamura, Teruya; Hirata, Keisuke; Koga-Ogawa, Yukari; Chirifu, Mami; Arimori, Takao; Tamada, Taro; Ikemizu, Shinji; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Yamagata, Yuriko

    2017-01-01

    The human MutT homolog 1 (hMTH1, human NUDT1) hydrolyzes oxidatively damaged nucleoside triphosphates and is the main enzyme responsible for nucleotide sanitization. hMTH1 recently has received attention as an anticancer target because hMTH1 blockade leads to accumulation of oxidized nucleotides in the cell, resulting in mutations and death of cancer cells. Unlike Escherichia coli MutT, which shows high substrate specificity for 8-oxoguanine nucleotides, hMTH1 has broad substrate specificity for oxidized nucleotides, including 8-oxo-dGTP and 2-oxo-dATP. However, the reason for this broad substrate specificity remains unclear. Here, we determined crystal structures of hMTH1 in complex with 8-oxo-dGTP or 2-oxo-dATP at neutral pH. These structures based on high quality data showed that the base moieties of two substrates are located on the similar but not the same position in the substrate binding pocket and adopt a different hydrogen-bonding pattern, and both triphosphate moieties bind to the hMTH1 Nudix motif (i.e. the hydrolase motif) similarly and align for the hydrolysis reaction. We also performed kinetic assays on the substrate-binding Asp-120 mutants (D120N and D120A), and determined their crystal structures in complex with the substrates. Analyses of bond lengths with high-resolution X-ray data and the relationship between the structure and enzymatic activity revealed that hMTH1 recognizes the different oxidized nucleotides via an exchange of the protonation state at two neighboring aspartate residues (Asp-119 and Asp-120) in its substrate binding pocket. To our knowledge, this mechanism of broad substrate recognition by enzymes has not been reported previously and may have relevance for anticancer drug development strategies targeting hMTH1. PMID:28035004

  4. Structural and Kinetic Studies of the Human Nudix Hydrolase MTH1 Reveal the Mechanism for Its Broad Substrate Specificity.

    PubMed

    Waz, Shaimaa; Nakamura, Teruya; Hirata, Keisuke; Koga-Ogawa, Yukari; Chirifu, Mami; Arimori, Takao; Tamada, Taro; Ikemizu, Shinji; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Yamagata, Yuriko

    2017-02-17

    The human MutT homolog 1 (hMTH1, human NUDT1) hydrolyzes oxidatively damaged nucleoside triphosphates and is the main enzyme responsible for nucleotide sanitization. hMTH1 recently has received attention as an anticancer target because hMTH1 blockade leads to accumulation of oxidized nucleotides in the cell, resulting in mutations and death of cancer cells. Unlike Escherichia coli MutT, which shows high substrate specificity for 8-oxoguanine nucleotides, hMTH1 has broad substrate specificity for oxidized nucleotides, including 8-oxo-dGTP and 2-oxo-dATP. However, the reason for this broad substrate specificity remains unclear. Here, we determined crystal structures of hMTH1 in complex with 8-oxo-dGTP or 2-oxo-dATP at neutral pH. These structures based on high quality data showed that the base moieties of two substrates are located on the similar but not the same position in the substrate binding pocket and adopt a different hydrogen-bonding pattern, and both triphosphate moieties bind to the hMTH1 Nudix motif (i.e. the hydrolase motif) similarly and align for the hydrolysis reaction. We also performed kinetic assays on the substrate-binding Asp-120 mutants (D120N and D120A), and determined their crystal structures in complex with the substrates. Analyses of bond lengths with high-resolution X-ray data and the relationship between the structure and enzymatic activity revealed that hMTH1 recognizes the different oxidized nucleotides via an exchange of the protonation state at two neighboring aspartate residues (Asp-119 and Asp-120) in its substrate binding pocket. To our knowledge, this mechanism of broad substrate recognition by enzymes has not been reported previously and may have relevance for anticancer drug development strategies targeting hMTH1. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. l-Selective Amidase with Extremely Broad Substrate Specificity from Ochrobactrum anthropi NCIMB 40321

    PubMed Central

    Sonke, Theo; Ernste, Sandra; Tandler, Renate F.; Kaptein, Bernard; Peeters, Wilco P. H.; van Assema, Friso B. J.; Wubbolts, Marcel G.; Schoemaker, Hans E.

    2005-01-01

    An industrially attractive l-specific amidase was purified to homogeneity from Ochrobactrum anthropi NCIMB 40321 wild-type cells. The purified amidase displayed maximum initial activity between pH 6 and 8.5 and was fully stable for at least 1 h up to 60°C. The purified enzyme was strongly inhibited by the metal-chelating compounds EDTA and 1,10-phenanthroline. The activity of the EDTA-treated enzyme could be restored by the addition of Zn2+ (to 80%), Mn2+ (to 400%), and Mg2+ (to 560%). Serine and cysteine protease inhibitors did not influence the purified amidase. This enzyme displayed activity toward a broad range of substrates consisting of α-hydrogen- and (bulky) α,α-disubstituted α-amino acid amides, α-hydroxy acid amides, and α-N-hydroxyamino acid amides. In all cases, only the l-enantiomer was hydrolyzed, resulting in E values of more than 150. Simple aliphatic amides, β-amino and β-hydroxy acid amides, and dipeptides were not converted. The gene encoding this l-amidase was cloned via reverse genetics. It encodes a polypeptide of 314 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 33,870. Since the native enzyme has a molecular mass of about 66 kDa, it most likely has a homodimeric structure. The deduced amino acid sequence showed homology to a few other stereoselective amidases and the acetamidase/formamidase family of proteins (Pfam FmdA_AmdA). Subcloning of the gene in expression vector pTrc99A enabled efficient heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. Altogether, this amidase has a unique set of properties for application in the fine-chemicals industry. PMID:16332774

  6. Tree growth and climate in the Pacific Northwest, North America: a broad-scale analysis of changing growth environments

    Treesearch

    Whitney L. Albright; David L. Peterson

    2013-01-01

    Climate change in the 21st century will affect tree growth in the Pacific Northwest region of North America, although complex climate–growth relationships make it difficult to identify how radial growth will respond across different species distributions. We used a novel method to examine potential growth responses to climate change at a broad geographical scale with a...

  7. Substrate and nutrient limitation regulating microbial growth in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bååth, Erland

    2015-04-01

    Microbial activity and growth in soil is regulated by several abiotic factors, including temperature, moisture and pH as the most important ones. At the same time nutrient conditions and substrate availability will also determine microbial growth. Amount of substrate will not only affect overall microbial growth, but also affect the balance of fungal and bacterial growth. The type of substrate will also affect the latter. Furthermore, according to Liebig law of limiting factors, we would expect one nutrient to be the main limiting one for microbial growth in soil. When this nutrient is added, the initial second liming factor will become the main one, adding complexity to the microbial response after adding different substrates. I will initially describe different ways of determining limiting factors for bacterial growth in soil, especially a rapid method estimating bacterial growth, using the leucine incorporation technique, after adding C (as glucose), N (as ammonium nitrate) and P (as phosphate). Scenarios of different limitations will be covered, with the bacterial growth response compared with fungal growth and total activity (respiration). The "degree of limitation", as well as the main limiting nutrient, can be altered by adding substrate of different stoichiometric composition. However, the organism group responding after alleviating the nutrient limitation can differ depending on the type of substrate added. There will also be situations, where fungi and bacteria appear to be limited by different nutrients. Finally, I will describe interactions between abiotic factors and the response of the soil microbiota to alleviation of limiting factors.

  8. Growth Kinetics of Suspended Microbial Cells: From Single-Substrate-Controlled Growth to Mixed-Substrate Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Kovárová-Kovar, Karin; Egli, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Growth kinetics, i.e., the relationship between specific growth rate and the concentration of a substrate, is one of the basic tools in microbiology. However, despite more than half a century of research, many fundamental questions about the validity and application of growth kinetics as observed in the laboratory to environmental growth conditions are still unanswered. For pure cultures growing with single substrates, enormous inconsistencies exist in the growth kinetic data reported. The low quality of experimental data has so far hampered the comparison and validation of the different growth models proposed, and only recently have data collected from nutrient-controlled chemostat cultures allowed us to compare different kinetic models on a statistical basis. The problems are mainly due to (i) the analytical difficulty in measuring substrates at growth-controlling concentrations and (ii) the fact that during a kinetic experiment, particularly in batch systems, microorganisms alter their kinetic properties because of adaptation to the changing environment. For example, for Escherichia coli growing with glucose, a physiological long-term adaptation results in a change in KS for glucose from some 5 mg liter−1 to ca. 30 μg liter−1. The data suggest that a dilemma exists, namely, that either “intrinsic” KS (under substrate-controlled conditions in chemostat culture) or μmax (under substrate-excess conditions in batch culture) can be measured but both cannot be determined at the same time. The above-described conventional growth kinetics derived from single-substrate-controlled laboratory experiments have invariably been used for describing both growth and substrate utilization in ecosystems. However, in nature, microbial cells are exposed to a wide spectrum of potential substrates, many of which they utilize simultaneously (in particular carbon sources). The kinetic data available to date for growth of pure cultures in carbon-controlled continuous culture

  9. The Staphylococcus aureus leucine aminopeptidase LAP is localized to the bacterial cytosol and demonstrates a broad substrate range that extends beyond leucine

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Ronan K.; Veillard, Florian; Gagne, Danielle T.; Lindenmuth, Jarrod M.; Poreba, Marcin; Drag, Marcin; Potempa, Jan; Shaw, Lindsey N.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a potent pathogen of humans exhibiting a broad disease range, in part, due to an extensive repertoire of secreted virulence factors, including proteases. Recently, we identified the first example of an intracellular protease (leucine aminopeptidase - LAP) that is required for virulence in S. aureus. Disruption of pepZ, the gene encoding LAP, had no affect on the growth rate of bacteria, however, in systemic and localized infection models the pepZ mutant was significantly attenuated in virulence. Recently, a contradictory report has been published, suggesting that LAP is an extracellular enzyme and it is required for growth in S. aureus. Here, we investigate these results and confirm our previous findings that LAP is localized to the bacterial cytosol and is not required for growth. In addition we conduct a biochemical investigation of purified recombinant LAP identifying optimal conditions for enzymatic activity and substrate preference for hydrolysis. Our results show that LAP has a broad substrate range, including activity against the dipeptide cysteine-glycine and that leucine is not the primary target of LAP. PMID:23241672

  10. The Staphylococcus aureus leucine aminopeptidase is localized to the bacterial cytosol and demonstrates a broad substrate range that extends beyond leucine.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Ronan K; Veillard, Florian; Gagne, Danielle T; Lindenmuth, Jarrod M; Poreba, Marcin; Drag, Marcin; Potempa, Jan; Shaw, Lindsey N

    2013-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a potent pathogen of humans exhibiting a broad disease range, in part due to an extensive repertoire of secreted virulence factors, including proteases. Recently, we identified the first example of an intracellular protease (leucine aminopeptidase, LAP) that is required for virulence in S. aureus. Disruption of pepZ, the gene encoding LAP, had no affect on the growth rate of bacteria; however, in systemic and localized infection models the pepZ mutant had significantly attenuated virulence. Recently, a contradictory report was published suggesting that LAP is an extracellular enzyme and it is required for growth in S. aureus. Here, we investigate these results and confirm our previous findings that LAP is localized to the bacterial cytosol and is not required for growth. In addition, we conduct a biochemical investigation of purified recombinant LAP, identifying optimal conditions for enzymatic activity and substrate preference for hydrolysis. Our results show that LAP has a broad substrate range, including activity against the dipeptide cysteine-glycine, and that leucine is not the primary target of LAP.

  11. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase with Broad Substrate Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Borisova, Anna S.; Isaksen, Trine; Dimarogona, Maria; Kognole, Abhishek A.; Mathiesen, Geir; Várnai, Anikó; Røhr, Åsmund K.; Payne, Christina M.; Sørlie, Morten; Sandgren, Mats; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.

    2015-01-01

    The recently discovered lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) carry out oxidative cleavage of polysaccharides and are of major importance for efficient processing of biomass. NcLPMO9C from Neurospora crassa acts both on cellulose and on non-cellulose β-glucans, including cellodextrins and xyloglucan. The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of NcLPMO9C revealed an extended, highly polar substrate-binding surface well suited to interact with a variety of sugar substrates. The ability of NcLPMO9C to act on soluble substrates was exploited to study enzyme-substrate interactions. EPR studies demonstrated that the Cu2+ center environment is altered upon substrate binding, whereas isothermal titration calorimetry studies revealed binding affinities in the low micromolar range for polymeric substrates that are due in part to the presence of a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM1). Importantly, the novel structure of NcLPMO9C enabled a comparative study, revealing that the oxidative regioselectivity of LPMO9s (C1, C4, or both) correlates with distinct structural features of the copper coordination sphere. In strictly C1-oxidizing LPMO9s, access to the solvent-facing axial coordination position is restricted by a conserved tyrosine residue, whereas access to this same position seems unrestricted in C4-oxidizing LPMO9s. LPMO9s known to produce a mixture of C1- and C4-oxidized products show an intermediate situation. PMID:26178376

  12. Conductive Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Substrates Modulate Neuronal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Malarkey, Erik B.; Fisher, Kirk A.; Bekyarova, Elena; Liu, Wei; Haddon, Robert C.; Parpura, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    We used conductive nanotube films as substrates with which we could systematically vary the conductance to see how this property affects neuronal growth. Here we show that nanotube substrates in a narrow range of conductivity promote the outgrowth of neurites with a decrease in the number of growth cones as well as an increase in cell body area, while at higher conductance these effects disappear. PMID:19143503

  13. Passivation oxide controlled selective carbon nanotube growth on metal substrates.

    PubMed

    Bult, J B; Sawyer, W G; Ajayan, P M; Schadler, L S

    2009-02-25

    Vertically aligned arrays of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) are grown on Inconel 600, a nickel-based super-alloy. Using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of the MWNTs it is shown that a stable oxidation barrier is required for the stabilization of iron on the substrate and subsequent nanotube growth. This evidence for passivation oxide supported growth of MWNTs was then used to grow MWNTs on patterned oxidized substrates in a selective growth furnace. The unique advantage of this patterned growth on Inconel 600 is found to be the chromia passivation layer's electrical conductivity (measured value of 1.08 micro Omega m), creating the opportunity for low resistivity electrodes made from nanotubes. Inconel substrates with 100 microm long aligned MWNTs are demonstrated to exhibit an average resistance value of 2 Omega.

  14. Influence of substrate micropatterning on biofilm growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Stephan; Li, Yiwei; Liu, Bi-Feng Liu; Weitz, David

    2015-11-01

    We culture triple reporter Bacillus Subtilis biofilm on micropatterned agar substrates. We track the biofilm development in terms of size, thickness, shape, and phenotype expression. For a tiling composed of elevated rectangles, we observe the biofilm develops an oval shape or triangular shape depending on the rectangle's aspect ratio and orientation. The motile cells are primarily located in the valleys between the rectangles and the matrix producing cells are mostly located on the rectangles. Wrinkles form at the edges of the elevated surfaces, and upon merging form channels centered on the elevated surface. After a few days, the spore-forming cells appear at the periphery. Since biofilms in nature grow on irregular surfaces, our work may provide insight into the complex patterns observed.

  15. Direct growth of Si nanowires on flexible organic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lin; Di Mario, Lorenzo; Minotti, Antonio; Tiburzi, Giorgio; Mendis, Budhika G.; Zeze, Dagou A.; Martelli, Faustino

    2016-06-01

    A key characteristic of semiconductor nanowires (NWs) is that they grow on any substrate that can withstand the growth conditions, paving the way for their use in flexible electronics. We report on the direct growth of crystalline silicon nanowires on polyimide substrates. The Si NWs are grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, which allows the growth to proceed at temperatures low enough to be compatible with plastic substrates (350 °C), where gold or indium are used as growth seeds. In is particularly interesting as the seed not only because it leads to a better NW crystal quality but also because it overcomes a core problem induced by the use of Au in silicon processing, i.e. Au creates deep carrier traps when incorporated in the nanowires.

  16. Growth patterns of two marine isolates: adaptations to substrate patchiness?

    PubMed

    Pernthaler, A; Pernthaler, J; Eilers, H; Amann, R

    2001-09-01

    During bottle incubations of heterotrophic marine picoplankton, some bacterial groups are conspicuously favored. In an earlier investigation bacteria of the genus Pseudoalteromonas rapidly multiplied in substrate-amended North Sea water, whereas the densities of Oceanospirillum changed little (H. Eilers, J. Pernthaler, and R. Amann, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 66:4634-4640, 2000). We therefore studied the growth patterns of two isolates affiliating with Pseudoalteromonas and Oceanospirillum in batch culture. Upon substrate resupply, Oceanospirillum lagged threefold longer than Pseudoalteromonas but reached more than fivefold-higher final cell density and biomass. A second, mobile morphotype was present in the starved Oceanospirillum populations with distinctly greater cell size, DNA and protein content, and 16S rRNA concentration. Contrasting cellular ribosome concentrations during stationary phase suggested basic differences in the growth responses of the two strains to a patchy environment. Therefore, we exposed the strains to different modes of substrate addition. During cocultivation on a single batch of substrates, the final cell densities of Oceanospirillum were reduced three times as much as those Pseudoalteromonas, compared to growth yields in pure cultures. In contrast, the gradual addition of substrates to stationary-phase cocultures was clearly disadvantageous for the Pseudoalteromonas population. Different growth responses to substrate gradients could thus be another facet affecting the competition between marine bacteria and may help to explain community shifts observed during enrichments.

  17. Discrete growth models on deterministic fractal substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gang; Xun, Zhipeng; Wen, Rongji; Han, Kui; Xia, Hui; Hao, Dapeng; Zhou, Wei; Yang, Xiquan; Chen, Yuling

    2010-11-01

    The growth of the modified Family model and the Etching model on the Sierpinski carpet is studied by means of numerical simulations. The evolving interface of the aggregates is described by the well-established Family-Vicsek dynamic scaling approach. The results of the modified Family model prove the universality of the fractional Langevin equation introduced by Lee and Kim [S.B. Lee, J.M. Kim, Phys. Rev. E 80 (2009) 021101]. The Etching model also shows good scaling behavior. We conjecture that the systematic deviations of the data found in the ballistic deposition [C.M. Horowitz, F. Romá, E.V. Albano, Phys. Rev. E 78 (2008) 061118] may be due to the finite-size effects of the Ballistic Deposition model.

  18. Bacterial Anabaena variabilis phenylalanine ammonia lyase: a biocatalyst with broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, Sarah L; Turner, Nicholas J

    2014-10-15

    Phenylalanine ammonia lyases (PALs) catalyse the regio- and stereoselective hydroamination of cinnamic acid analogues to yield optically enriched α-amino acids. Herein, we demonstrate that a bacterial PAL from Anabaena variabilis (AvPAL) displays significantly higher activity towards a series of non-natural substrates than previously described eukaryotic PALs. Biotransformations performed on a preparative scale led to the synthesis of the 2-chloro- and 4-trifluoromethyl-phenylalanine derivatives in excellent ee, highlighting the enormous potential of bacterial PALs as biocatalysts for the synthesis of high value, non-natural amino acids.

  19. Broad-substrate screen as a tool to identify substrates for bacterial Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferases with unknown substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Misty L; Majorek, Karolina A; Minor, Wladek; Anderson, Wayne F

    2013-02-01

    Due to a combination of efforts from individual laboratories and structural genomics centers, there has been a surge in the number of members of the Gcn5-related acetyltransferasesuperfamily that have been structurally determined within the past decade. Although the number of three-dimensional structures is increasing steadily, we know little about the individual functions of these enzymes. Part of the difficulty in assigning functions for members of this superfamily is the lack of information regarding how substrates bind to the active site of the protein. The majority of the structures do not show ligand bound in the active site, and since the substrate-binding domain is not strictly conserved, it is difficult to predict the function based on structure alone. Additionally, the enzymes are capable of acetylating a wide variety of metabolites and many may exhibit promiscuity regarding their ability to acetylate multiple classes of substrates, possibly having multiple functions for the same enzyme. Herein, we present an approach to identify potential substrates for previously uncharacterized members of the Gcn5-related acetyltransferase superfamily using a variety of metabolites including polyamines, amino acids, antibiotics, peptides, vitamins, catecholamines, and other metabolites. We have identified potential substrates for eight bacterial enzymes of this superfamily. This information will be used to further structurally and functionally characterize them.

  20. Fungi from koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) faeces exhibit a broad range of enzyme activities against recalcitrant substrates.

    PubMed

    Peterson, R A; Bradner, J R; Roberts, T H; Nevalainen, K M H

    2009-02-01

    Identification of fungi isolated from koala faeces and screening for their enzyme activities of biotechnological interest. Thirty-seven fungal strains were isolated from koala faeces and identified by the amplification and direct sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal DNA. The fungi were screened for selected enzyme activities using agar plates containing a single substrate for each target class of enzyme. For xylanase, endoglucanase, ligninase (ligninolytic phenoloxidase) and protease over two-thirds of the isolates produced a clearing halo at 25 degrees C, indicating the secretion of active enzyme by the fungus, and one-third produced a halo indicating amylase, mannanase and tannase activity. Some isolates were also able to degrade crystalline cellulose and others displayed lipase activity. Many of the fungal isolates also produced active enzymes at 15 degrees C and some at 39 degrees C. Koala faeces, consisting of highly lignified fibre, undigested cellulose and phenolics, are a novel source of fungi with high and diverse enzyme activities capable of breaking down recalcitrant substrates. To our knowledge, this is the first time fungi from koala faeces have been identified using ITS sequencing and screened for their enzyme activities.

  1. Synergistic growth in bacteria depends on substrate complexity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yi-Jie; Wang, Shiao Y

    2016-01-01

    Both positive and negative interactions among bacteria take place in the environment. We hypothesize that the complexity of the substrate affects the way bacteria interact with greater cooperation in the presence of recalcitrant substrate. We isolated lignocellulolytic bacteria from salt marsh detritus and compared the growth, metabolic activity and enzyme production of pure cultures to those of three-species mixed cultures in lignocellulose and glucose media. Synergistic growth was common in lignocellulose medium containing carboxyl methyl cellulose, xylan and lignin but absent in glucose medium. Bacterial synergism promoted metabolic activity in synergistic mixed cultures but not the maximal growth rate (μ). Bacterial synergism also promoted the production of β-1,4-glucosidase but not the production of cellobiohydrolase or β-1,4-xylosidase. Our results suggest that the chemical complexity of the substrate affects the way bacteria interact. While a complex substrate such as lignocellulose promotes positive interactions and synergistic growth, a labile substrate such as glucose promotes negative interactions and competition. Synergistic interactions among indigenous bacteria are suggested to be important in promoting lignocellulose degradation in the environment.

  2. Growth and characterization of graphene on CuNi substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Parul

    Graphene is a single layer of sp2 bonded carbon atoms that crystallizes in the honeycomb structure. Because of its true two-dimensional structure, it has very unique electrical properties, including a very high carrier mobility that is symmetric for holes and electrons. To realize these unique properties, it is important to develop a method for growing graphene films with uniform thickness and low defect density. One of the most popular methods of growth is by chemical vapor deposition on Cu substrates, because it is self-limited. However many applications require the growth of graphene films that are more than one atomic layer thick. In this research project, the growth of graphene on CuNi substrates has been studied. The presence of Ni in the alloy results in an increase in the catalytic activity of the surface. This results in lower deposition pressures than for pure Cu and also increases the carbon solubility, which allows the growth of films that are more than one atomic layer thick. Two types of substrates were used for the growth of the graphene films: CuNi foils with an alloy composition of 90:10 and 70:30 Cu-Ni by weight and a CuNi(111) single crystal with a composition of 90:10 by weight. For the 70:30 substrates, it was very difficult to control the graphene thickness. On the other hand, the controlled growth of graphene films that were more than one layer thick was achieved on the 90:10 substrates. The growth morphology and the crystal structure of graphene grown on the CuNi(111) surface was determined by performing these studies in an ultra-high vacuum chamber to achieve very high purity conditions. The low energy electron diffraction analysis of the graphene films showed that the graphene films always nucleated in more than one rotational orientation with respect to the substrate. The growth was achieved at temperatures as low as 500 °C, which is much lower in temperature than for Cu substrates. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the graphene

  3. Mechanistic Basis for High Stereoselectivity and Broad Substrate Scope in the (salen)Co(III)-Catalyzed Hydrolytic Kinetic Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ford, David D.; Nielsen, Lars P. C.; Zuend, Stephan J.; Jacobsen, Eric N.

    2013-01-01

    In the (salen)Co(III)-catalyzed hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of terminal epoxides, the rate- and stereoselectivity-determining epoxide ring-opening step occurs by a cooperative bimetallic mechanism with one Co(III) complex acting as a Lewis acid and another serving to deliver the hydroxide nucleophile. In this paper, we analyze the basis for the extraordinarily high stereoselectivity and broad substrate scope observed in the HKR. We demonstrate that the stereochemistry of each of the two (salen)Co(III) complexes in the rate-determining transition structure is important for productive catalysis: a measurable rate of hydrolysis occurs only if the absolute stereochemistry of each of these (salen)Co(III) complexes is the same. Experimental and computational studies provide strong evidence that stereochemical communication in the HKR is mediated by the stepped conformation of the salen ligand, and not the shape of the chiral diamine backbone of the ligand. A detailed computational analysis reveals that the epoxide binds the Lewis acidic Co(III) complex in a well-defined geometry imposed by stereoelectronic, rather than steric effects. This insight serves as the basis of a complete stereochemical and transition structure model that sheds light on the reasons for the broad substrate generality of the HKR. PMID:24041239

  4. Mechanistic basis for high stereoselectivity and broad substrate scope in the (salen)Co(III)-catalyzed hydrolytic kinetic resolution.

    PubMed

    Ford, David D; Nielsen, Lars P C; Zuend, Stephan J; Musgrave, Charles B; Jacobsen, Eric N

    2013-10-16

    In the (salen)Co(III)-catalyzed hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of terminal epoxides, the rate- and stereoselectivity-determining epoxide ring-opening step occurs by a cooperative bimetallic mechanism with one Co(III) complex acting as a Lewis acid and another serving to deliver the hydroxide nucleophile. In this paper, we analyze the basis for the extraordinarily high stereoselectivity and broad substrate scope observed in the HKR. We demonstrate that the stereochemistry of each of the two (salen)Co(III) complexes in the rate-determining transition structure is important for productive catalysis: a measurable rate of hydrolysis occurs only if the absolute stereochemistry of each of these (salen)Co(III) complexes is the same. Experimental and computational studies provide strong evidence that stereochemical communication in the HKR is mediated by the stepped conformation of the salen ligand, and not the shape of the chiral diamine backbone of the ligand. A detailed computational analysis reveals that the epoxide binds the Lewis acidic Co(III) complex in a well-defined geometry imposed by stereoelectronic rather than steric effects. This insight serves as the basis of a complete stereochemical and transition structure model that sheds light on the reasons for the broad substrate generality of the HKR.

  5. The IRT1 protein from Arabidopsis thaliana is a metal transporter with a broad substrate range.

    PubMed

    Korshunova, Y O; Eide, D; Clark, W G; Guerinot, M L; Pakrasi, H B

    1999-05-01

    The molecular basis for the transport of manganese across membranes in plant cells is poorly understood. We have found that IRT1, an Arabidopsis thaliana metal ion transporter, can complement a mutant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain defective in high-affinity manganese uptake (smf1 delta). The IRT1 protein has previously been identified as an iron transporter. The current studies demonstrated that IRT1, when expressed in yeast, can transport manganese as well. This manganese uptake activity was inhibited by cadmium, iron(II) and zinc, suggesting that IRT1 can transport these metals. The IRT1 cDNA also complements a zinc uptake-deficient yeast mutant strain (zrt1zrt2), and IRT1-dependent zinc transport in yeast cells is inhibited by cadmium, copper, cobalt and iron(III). However, IRT1 did not complement a copper uptake-deficient yeast mutant (ctr1), implying that this transporter is not involved in the uptake of copper in plant cells. The expression of IRT1 is enhanced in A. thaliana plants grown under iron deficiency. Under these conditions, there were increased levels of root-associated manganese, zinc and cobalt, suggesting that, in addition to iron, IRT1 mediates uptake of these metals into plant cells. Taken together, these data indicate that the IRT1 protein is a broad-range metal ion transporter in plants.

  6. MBE growth of GaP on a Si substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, M. S. Lazarenko, A. A.; Nikitina, E. V.; Pirogov, E. V.; Gudovskikh, A. S.; Egorov, A. Yu.

    2015-04-15

    It is shown that single-crystal GaP buffer layers can be formed on a Si substrate by molecular-beam epitaxy, with the “migration-enhanced epitaxy” procedure applied in the stage in which the nucleating layer is formed. When a GaP layer is produced on a p-type silicon substrate, a p-n junction is created in a natural way between the p-Si substrate and the surface n-Si layer produced by the diffusion of phosphorus into the substrate during the course of the epitaxial growth of GaP. This p-n junction can be used as the first junction of a silicon-based multijunction photovoltaic converter.

  7. The dynamical analogy between microbial growth on mixtures of substrates and population growth of competing species.

    PubMed

    Narang, A

    1998-07-05

    There is a similarity between the metabolic dynamics of a microbial species growing on a mixture of two substrates and the dynamics of growth of two competing populations. Specifically, the enzymes catalyzing the uptake and catabolism of substrates exhibit phenomena analogous to extinction and coexistence."Extinction" of the enzymes associated with one of the substrates results in sequential utilization of the substrates (diauxie) (Monod, 1942). "Coexistence" of the enzymes associated with the substrates results in simultaneous utilization of the substrates (Egli, 1995). Here, we formulate a simple model that shows the basis for this dynamical similarity: The equations describing the evolution of the enzyme levels are dynamical analogs of the Lotka-Volterra model for two competing species. The analogy suggests ways of capturing the experimentally observed preculture-dependent growth patterns, i.e., growth patterns that vary depending on the physiological state of the preculture.

  8. Characterization of a Naphthalene Dioxygenase Endowed with an Exceptionally Broad Substrate Specificity Toward Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Jouanneau,Y.; Meyer, C.; Jakoncic, J.; Stojanoff, V.; Gaillard, J.

    2006-01-01

    In Sphingomonas CHY-1, a single ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase is responsible for the initial attack of a range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) composed of up to five rings. The components of this enzyme were separately purified and characterized. The oxygenase component (ht-PhnI) was shown to contain one Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] cluster and one mononuclear Fe center per {alpha} subunit, based on EPR measurements and iron assay. Steady-state kinetic measurements revealed that the enzyme had a relatively low apparent Michaelis constant for naphthalene (K{sub m} = 0.92 {+-} 0.15 {mu}M) and an apparent specificity constant of 2.0 {+-} 0.3 M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Naphthalene was converted to the corresponding 1,2-dihydrodiol with stoichiometric oxidation of NADH. On the other hand, the oxidation of eight other PAHs occurred at slower rates and with coupling efficiencies that decreased with the enzyme reaction rate. Uncoupling was associated with hydrogen peroxide formation, which is potentially deleterious to cells and might inhibit PAH degradation. In single turnover reactions, ht-PhnI alone catalyzed PAH hydroxylation at a faster rate in the presence of organic solvent, suggesting that the transfer of substrate to the active site is a limiting factor. The four-ring PAHs chrysene and benz[a]anthracene were subjected to a double ring-dihydroxylation, giving rise to the formation of a significant proportion of bis-cis-dihydrodiols. In addition, the dihydroxylation of benz[a]anthracene yielded three dihydrodiols, the enzyme showing a preference for carbons in positions 1,2 and 10,11. This is the first characterization of a dioxygenase able to dihydroxylate PAHs made up of four and five rings.

  9. Substrate Preparations in Epitaxial ZnO Film Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Harris, M. T.; Callahan, M. J.; George, M. A.

    2000-01-01

    Epitaxial ZnO films were grown on the two polar surfaces (O-face and Zn-face) of (0001) ZnO single crystal substrates using off-axis magnetron sputtering deposition. Annealing-temperature dependence of ZnO substrates was studied. ZnO films grown on sapphire substrates have also been investigated for comparison purposes and the annealing temperature of A1203 substrates is 1000 C. Substrates and films were characterized using photoluminescence (PL) spectrum, x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscope, energy dispersive spectrum, and electric transport measurements. It has been found that the ZnO film properties were different when films were grown on the two polarity surfaces of ZnO substrates and the A1203 substrates. An interesting result shows that high temperature annealing of ZnO single crystals will improve the surface structure on the O-face surface rather than the opposite surface. The measurements of homoepitaxial ZnO films indicate that the O-terminated surface is better for ZnO epitaxial film growth.

  10. Use of alternative growth substrates to enhance PAH degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Tittle, P.C.; Liu, Y.T.; Strand, S.E.; Stensel, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    Freshwater and saltwater polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-degrading enrichments were developed from seed from a manufactured gas plant site and contaminated marine sediment, respectively. Both enrichments were able to maintain specific degradation rates of 3- and 4-ring PAHs after growth with salicylate or phthalate, which increased their biomass concentrations by a factor of 9 to 10. Phthalate was a more effective alternative substrate than was salicylate. Specific degradation rates of phenanthrene and anthracene by the freshwater enrichment were increased after growth with phthalate. Growth with phthalate increased the specific degradation rates of phenanthrene and pyrene by the saltwater enrichment.

  11. Lateral OMVPE growth of GaAs on patterned substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, W.; Cohen, R. M.

    2000-12-01

    GaAs was grown on patterned <1 0 0> on- and off-axis GaAs substrates by organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy (OMVPE). Patterned mesas were observed to change shape because lateral growth rates varied by more than an order of magnitude in different crystallographic directions. For this study, misoriented GaAs (1 0 0) wafers were polished 3° toward the nearest [1 1 0] or [1 1 1] family of directions, and 320 nm high cross-shaped mesas were fabricated. OMVPE growth was performed between 550°C and 650°C for 1 h at a vertical growth rate of approximately 1.3 μm/h. Atomic force microscopy showed that three effects have a powerful influence on lateral growth initiated at mesa sidewalls. First, the symmetry of the dominant surface reconstruction has a major effect on the diffusion of Ga adatoms. Rapid Ga diffusion occurs along the <0 1 1>-<0-1-1> axis in OMVPE, or the perpendicular <0-1 1>-<0 1-1> axis in molecular beam epitaxy, and appears to be a result of the different surface reconstructions which exist in the two growth ambients. Second, misorientation of the wafer causes a growth asymmetry as Ga adatoms move preferentially from high-to-low terraces. When terrace steps descend toward a mesa wall, rapid lateral growth away from the wall is always observed. When terrace steps descend away from a mesa wall, little lateral growth occurs and even reduced vertical growth may be observed. When the misorientation and reconstruction symmetries align, the surface acts like an atomic diode and the rapid lateral growth can exceed the vertical growth rate by more than an order of magnitude. Third, on misoriented substrates, step bunching increases with increasing temperature, and this can lead to significant changes in the original shape of a mesa. A growth model is presented which relates the lateral growth rate in different crystallographic directions to the substrate misorientation, the growth temperature, and the partial pressure of As during growth. It is also shown that

  12. A potential substrate binding conformation of β-lactams and insight into the broad spectrum of NDM-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qinghui; He, Lin; Ke, Hengming

    2012-10-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) is a key enzyme that the pathogen Klebsiella pneumonia uses to hydrolyze almost all β-lactam antibiotics. It is currently unclear why NDM-1 has a broad spectrum of activity. Docking of the representatives of the β-lactam families into the active site of NDM-1 is reported here. All the β-lactams naturally fit the NDM-1 pocket, implying that NDM-1 can accommodate the substrates without dramatic conformation changes. The docking reveals two major binding modes of the β-lactams, which we tentatively name the S (substrate) and I (inhibitor) conformers. In the S conformers of all the β-lactams, the amide oxygen and the carboxylic group conservatively interact with two zinc ions, while the substitutions on the fused rings show dramatic differences in their conformations and positions. Since the bridging hydroxide ion/water in the S conformer is at the position for the nucleophilic attack, the S conformation may simulate the true binding of a substrate to NDM-1. The I conformer either blocks or displaces the bridging hydroxide ion/water, such as in the case of aztreonam, and is thus inhibitory. The docking also suggests that substitutions on the β-lactam ring are required for β-lactams to bind in the S conformation, and therefore, small β-lactams such as clavulanic acid would be inhibitors of NDM-1. Finally, our docking shows that moxalactam uses its tyrosyl-carboxylic group to compete with the S conformer and would thus be a poor substrate of NDM-1.

  13. A Potential Substrate Binding Conformation of β-Lactams and Insight into the Broad Spectrum of NDM-1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qinghui; He, Lin

    2012-01-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) is a key enzyme that the pathogen Klebsiella pneumonia uses to hydrolyze almost all β-lactam antibiotics. It is currently unclear why NDM-1 has a broad spectrum of activity. Docking of the representatives of the β-lactam families into the active site of NDM-1 is reported here. All the β-lactams naturally fit the NDM-1 pocket, implying that NDM-1 can accommodate the substrates without dramatic conformation changes. The docking reveals two major binding modes of the β-lactams, which we tentatively name the S (substrate) and I (inhibitor) conformers. In the S conformers of all the β-lactams, the amide oxygen and the carboxylic group conservatively interact with two zinc ions, while the substitutions on the fused rings show dramatic differences in their conformations and positions. Since the bridging hydroxide ion/water in the S conformer is at the position for the nucleophilic attack, the S conformation may simulate the true binding of a substrate to NDM-1. The I conformer either blocks or displaces the bridging hydroxide ion/water, such as in the case of aztreonam, and is thus inhibitory. The docking also suggests that substitutions on the β-lactam ring are required for β-lactams to bind in the S conformation, and therefore, small β-lactams such as clavulanic acid would be inhibitors of NDM-1. Finally, our docking shows that moxalactam uses its tyrosyl-carboxylic group to compete with the S conformer and would thus be a poor substrate of NDM-1. PMID:22825119

  14. Differential growth responses of soil bacterial taxa to carbon substrates of varying chemical recalcitrance

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, K.C.; Karaoz, U.; Hanson, C.A.; Santee, C.A.; Bradford, M.A.; Treseder, K.K.; Wallenstein, M.D.; Brodie, E.L.

    2011-04-18

    Soils are immensely diverse microbial habitats with thousands of co-existing bacterial, archaeal, and fungal species. Across broad spatial scales, factors such as pH and soil moisture appear to determine the diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities. Within any one site however, bacterial taxon diversity is high and factors maintaining this diversity are poorly resolved. Candidate factors include organic substrate availability and chemical recalcitrance, and given that they appear to structure bacterial communities at the phylum level, we examine whether these factors might structure bacterial communities at finer levels of taxonomic resolution. Analyzing 16S rRNA gene composition of nucleotide analog-labeled DNA by PhyloChip microarrays, we compare relative growth rates on organic substrates of increasing chemical recalcitrance of >2,200 bacterial taxa across 43 divisions/phyla. Taxa that increase in relative abundance with labile organic substrates (i.e., glycine, sucrose) are numerous (>500), phylogenetically clustered, and occur predominantly in two phyla (Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria) including orders Actinomycetales, Enterobacteriales, Burkholderiales, Rhodocyclales, Alteromonadales, and Pseudomonadales. Taxa increasing in relative abundance with more chemically recalcitrant substrates (i.e., cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein) are fewer (168) but more phylogenetically dispersed, occurring across eight phyla and including Clostridiales, Sphingomonadalaes, Desulfovibrionales. Just over 6% of detected taxa, including many Burkholderiales increase in relative abundance with both labile and chemically recalcitrant substrates. Estimates of median rRNA copy number per genome of responding taxa demonstrate that these patterns are broadly consistent with bacterial growth strategies. Taken together, these data suggest that changes in availability of intrinsically labile substrates may result in predictable shifts in soil bacterial composition.

  15. Controlled growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhaoli

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) is a fascinating material with extraordinary electrical thermal and mechanical properties. Growing vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays on metal substrates is an important step in bringing CNT into practical applications such as thermal interface materials (TIMs) and microelectrodes. However, the growth process is challenging due to the difficulties in preventing catalyst diffusion and controlling catalyst dewetting on metal substrates with physical surface heterogeneity. In this work, the catalyst diffusion mechanism and catalyst dewetting theory were studied for the controlled growth of VACNTs on metal substrates. The diffusion time of the catalyst, the diffusion coefficients for the catalyst in the substrate materials and the number density of catalyst nanoparticles after dewetting are identified as the key parameters, based on which three strategies are developed. Firstly, a fast-heating catalyst pretreatment strategy was used, aiming at preserving the amount of catalyst prior to CNT growth by reducing the catalyst diffusion time. The catalyst lifetime is extended from half an hour to one hour on a patterned Al thin film and a VACNT height of 106 mum, about twenty fold of that reported in the literature, was attained. Secondly, a diffusion barrier layer strategy is employed for a reduction of catalyst diffusion into the substrate materials. Enhancement of VACNT growth on Cu substrates was achieved by adopting a conformal Al2O 3 diffusion barrier layer fabricated by a specially designed atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. Lastly, a novel catalyst glancing angle deposition (GLAD) strategy is performed to manipulate the morphology of a relatively thick catalyst on metal substrates with physical surface heterogeneity, aiming to obtain uniform and dense catalyst nanoparticles after dewetting in the pretreatment process for enhanced VACNT growth. We are able to control the VACNT growth conditions on metal substrates in terms of their

  16. Broad substrate affinity and catalytic diversity of fibrinolytic enzyme from Pheretima posthumous-Purification and molecular characterization study.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mahendra Kumar; Pulicherla, K K

    2017-02-01

    In this research, a serine protease was isolated and purified from Indian earthworm Pheretima posthumous by fractionation with ammonium sulfate followed by ion exchange and size exclusion chromatography. The molecular weight of purified protease was determined 29.5kDa by Maldi-TOF/MS. The enzyme exhibited a maximum proteolytic activity of 1.2U/ml with specific activity of 17.65U/mg at pH 8 and temperature 40°C. 2D electrophoresis study illustrated purity of enzyme, purified as a single peptide and isoelectric point (pI) 4.5. The enzyme has shown tremendous stability and proteolytic activity in the wide range of pH range (4-12) and temperatures (20-60°C). The kinetic constant Km and Vmax of purified protease were reported 0.09mg/ml and 23.25mg/ml/min. The enzyme also possesses excellent catalytic capacity with Kcat (341.9min(-1)) and catalytic efficiency (3798.88). The N-terminal sequence of purified protease Arg-Lys-Lys-Gly-Ala-Ser-Try-Phe-Try-Pro-Trp-Ser-Val-Lys-Lys-Arg, PMF and MS/MS studies had shown a partial homology with Lumbrokinase-P2 (2) from Lumbricus rubellus. The CD spectroscopy result provided an evidence for broad substrate affinity and stability of enzyme. The different forms of secondary structures determined in EFE result broad substrate affinity of enzyme. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Use of lunar regolith as a substrate for plant growth.

    PubMed

    Ming, D W; Henninger, D L

    1994-01-01

    Regenerative Life Support Systems (RLSS) will be required to regenerate air, water, and wastes, and to produce food for human consumption during long-duration missions to the Moon and Mars. It may be possible to supplement some of the materials needed for a lunar RLSS from resources on the Moon. Natural materials at the lunar surface may be used for a variety of lunar RLSS needs, including (i) soils or solid-support substrates for plant growth, (ii) sources for extraction of essential, plant-growth nutrients, (iii) substrates for microbial populations in the degradation of wastes, (iv) sources of O2 and H2, which may be used to manufacture water, (v) feed stock materials for the synthesis of useful minerals (e.g., molecular sieves), and (vi) shielding materials surrounding the outpost structure to protect humans, plants, and microorganisms from harmful radiation. Use of indigenous lunar regolith as a terrestrial-like soil for plant growth could offer a solid support substrate, buffering capacity, nutrient source/storage/retention capabilities, and should be relatively easy to maintain. The lunar regolith could, with a suitable microbial population, play a role in waste renovation; much like terrestrial waste application directly on soils. Issues associated with potentially toxic elements, pH, nutrient availability, air and fluid movement parameters, and cation exchange capacity of lunar regolith need to be addressed before lunar materials can be used effectively as soils for plant growth.

  18. Use of lunar regolith as a substrate for plant growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, D. W.; Henninger, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Regenerative Life Support Systems (RLSS) will be required to regenerate air, water, and wastes, and to produce food for human consumption during long-duration missions to the Moon and Mars. It may be possible to supplement some of the materials needed for a lunar RLSS from resources on the Moon. Natural materials at the lunar surface may be used for a variety of lunar RLSS needs, including (1) soils or solid-support substrates for plant growth, (2) sources for extraction of essential, plant-growth nutrients, (3) substrates for microbial populations in the degradation of wastes, (4) sources of O2 and H2, which may be used to manufacture water, (5) feed stock materials for the synthesis of useful minerals (e.g., molecular sieves), and (6) shielding materials surrounding the outpost structure to protect humans, plants, and microorganisms from harmful radiation. Use of indigenous lunar regolith as a terrestrial-like soil for plant growth could offer a solid support substrate, buffering capacity, nutrient source/storage/retention capabilities, and should be relatively easy to maintain. The lunar regolith could, with a suitable microbial population, play a role in waste renovation; much like terrestrial waste application directly on soils. Issues associated with potentially toxic elements, pH, nutrient availability, air and fluid movement parameters, and cation exchange capacity of lunar regolith need to be addressed before lunar materials can be used effectively as soils for plant growth.

  19. Use of lunar regolith as a substrate for plant growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, D. W.; Henninger, D. L.

    1994-11-01

    Regenerative Life Support Systems (RLSS) will be required to regenerate air, water, and wastes, and to produce food for human consumption during long-duration missions to the Moon and Mars. It may be possible to supplement some of the materials needed for a lunar RLSS from resources on the Moon. Natural materials at the lunar surface may be used for a variety of lunar RLSS needs, including (i) soils or solid-support substrates for plant growth, (ii) sources for extraction of essential, plant-growth nutrients, (iii) substrates for microbial populations in the degradation of wastes, (iv) sources of O2 and H2, which may be used to manufacture water, (v) feed stock materials for the synthesis of useful minerals (e.g., molecular sieves), and (vi) shielding materials surrounding the outpost structure to protect humans, plants, and microorganism from harmful radiation. Use of indigenous lunar regolith as a terrestrial-like soil for plant growth could offer a solid support substrate, buffering capacity, nutrient source/storage/retention capabilities, and should be relatively easy to maintain. The lunar regolith could, with a suitable microbial population, play a role in waste renovation; much like terrestrial waste application directly on soils. Issues associated with potentially toxic elements, pH, nutrient availability, air and fluid movement parameters, and cation exchange capacity of lunar regolith need to be addressed before lunar materials can be used effectively as soils for plant growth.

  20. Use of lunar regolith as a substrate for plant growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, D. W.; Henninger, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Regenerative Life Support Systems (RLSS) will be required to regenerate air, water, and wastes, and to produce food for human consumption during long-duration missions to the Moon and Mars. It may be possible to supplement some of the materials needed for a lunar RLSS from resources on the Moon. Natural materials at the lunar surface may be used for a variety of lunar RLSS needs, including (1) soils or solid-support substrates for plant growth, (2) sources for extraction of essential, plant-growth nutrients, (3) substrates for microbial populations in the degradation of wastes, (4) sources of O2 and H2, which may be used to manufacture water, (5) feed stock materials for the synthesis of useful minerals (e.g., molecular sieves), and (6) shielding materials surrounding the outpost structure to protect humans, plants, and microorganisms from harmful radiation. Use of indigenous lunar regolith as a terrestrial-like soil for plant growth could offer a solid support substrate, buffering capacity, nutrient source/storage/retention capabilities, and should be relatively easy to maintain. The lunar regolith could, with a suitable microbial population, play a role in waste renovation; much like terrestrial waste application directly on soils. Issues associated with potentially toxic elements, pH, nutrient availability, air and fluid movement parameters, and cation exchange capacity of lunar regolith need to be addressed before lunar materials can be used effectively as soils for plant growth.

  1. Nucleation and growth of CVD diamond films on patterned substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, Othon R.; Liu, Hongbin

    2002-12-20

    The interest in using CVD diamond in the fabrication of microelectro-mechanical components has steadily increased over the last few years. Typical technology for manufacturing such components involves the use of molds patterned in silicon or silicon dioxide, which are filled by diamond deposition. The degree of conformality of the CVD film and the characteristics of the diamond-substrate interface becomes critical for the successful fabrication and performance of such devices. We have investigated the growth of CVD diamond films on patterned substrates using a microwave plasma assisted deposition reactor. In particular the use of seed layers to enhance nucleation on horizontal and vertical walls as well as to promote complete filling of narrow trenches is investigated. Scanning electron microscopy is used to characterize the nucleation and growth of the diamond films.

  2. Cellular response to micropatterned growth promoting and inhibitory substrates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Normal development and the response to injury both require cell growth, migration and morphological remodeling, guided by a complex local landscape of permissive and inhibitory cues. A standard approach for studying by such cues is to culture cells on uniform substrates containing known concentrations of these molecules, however this method fails to represent the molecular complexity of the natural growth environment. Results To mimic the local complexity of environmental conditions in vitro, we used a contact micropatterning technique to examine cell growth and differentiation on patterned substrates printed with the commonly studied growth permissive and inhibitory substrates, poly-L-lysine (PLL) and myelin, respectively. We show that micropatterning of PLL can be used to direct adherence and axonal outgrowth of hippocampal and cortical neurons as well as other cells with diverse morphologies like Oli-neu oligodendrocyte progenitor cell lines and fibroblast-like COS7 cells in culture. Surprisingly, COS7 cells exhibited a preference for low concentration (1 pg/mL) PLL zones over adjacent zones printed with high concentrations (1 mg/mL). We demonstrate that micropatterning is also useful for studying factors that inhibit growth as it can direct cells to grow along straight lines that are easy to quantify. Furthermore, we provide the first demonstration of microcontact printing of myelin-associated proteins and show that they impair process outgrowth from Oli-neu oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Conclusion We conclude that microcontact printing is an efficient and reproducible method for patterning proteins and brain-derived myelin on glass surfaces in order to study the effects of the microenvironment on cell growth and morphogenesis. PMID:24119185

  3. Growth behavior of cochlear nucleus neuronal cells on semiconductor substrates.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Wasielewski, Natalia; Radeloff, Andreas; Scherzed, Agmal; Jablonka, Sibylle; Hagen, Rudolf; Mlynski, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Auditory brainstem implants provide sound information by direct stimulation of the cochlear nucleus to patients with dysfunctional or absent cranial nerve VIII. In contrast to patients with cochlear implants, the use of the auditory brainstem implants is less successful. This cannot be fully explained by the difference location of stimulation but a rather unspecific neuronal stimulation. The aim of this study was to further examine neuronal cells of the cochlear nucleus and to test their interactions with semiconductor substrates as a potential electrode material for improved auditory brainstem implants. The cochlear nuclei of postnatal day 7 rats were microsurgically dissected. The tissue was dissociated enzymatically and plated on coverslips as control and on the semiconductor substrates silicon or silicon nitride. After 4 days in culture the morphology and growth of dissociated cells was determined by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. Dissociated cells of the cochlear nucleus showed reduced cell growth on semiconductor substrates compared with controls. SEM analysis demonstrated close contact of neurons with supporting cells in culture and good adherence of neuronal growth cones on the used materials. These findings present basic knowledge for the development of neuron-electrode interfaces for future auditory brainstem implants. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Chemically Engineered Substrates for Patternable Growth of Two-Dimensional Chalcogenide Crystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingzhan; Wu, Jinxiong; Lin, Li; Liu, Yujing; Deng, Bing; Guo, Yunfan; Lin, Yuanwei; Xie, Tian; Dang, Wenhui; Zhou, Yubing; Peng, Hailin

    2016-11-22

    The key challenge of direct integration of two-dimensional (2D) chalcogenide crystals into functional modules is precise control of the nucleation sites of the building blocks. Herein, we exploit the chemical activities and surface engineering of the substrates to manipulate the nucleation energy barrier of 2D crystals and thereby realize the patternable growth of 2D crystals. The selective-region chemical modifications of the substrates are achieved via microcontact printing combined with the elegant self-assembly of octadecyltrichlorosilane molecules on the substrates. The patternable growth method is versatile and can be used as a general strategy for growing a broad class of high-quality 2D chalcogenide crystals with tailorable configurations on a variety of chemically engineered substrates. Moreover, we demonstrate flexible transparent electrodes based on large-scale patterned nanogrids of topological insulator Bi2Se3, which possess tailored trade-off between electric conductivity and optical transmittance across the visible to near-infrared regime. We hope this method may open an avenue to the efficient integration and batch production of 2D chalcogenide crystals and could inspire ongoing efforts of the fabrication of van der Waals heterostructures.

  5. Characterisation of Host Growth after Infection with a Broad-Range Freshwater Cyanopodophage

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Siobhan C.; Smith, James R.; Hayes, Paul K.; Watts, Joy E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater cyanophages are poorly characterised in comparison to their marine counterparts, however, the level of genetic diversity that exists in freshwater cyanophage communities is likely to exceed that found in marine environments, due to the habitat heterogeneity within freshwater systems. Many cyanophages are specialists, infecting a single host species or strain; however, some are less fastidious and infect a number of different host genotypes within the same species or even hosts from different genera. Few instances of host growth characterisation after infection by broad host-range phages have been described. Here we provide an initial characterisation of interactions between a cyanophage isolated from a freshwater fishing lake in the south of England and its hosts. Designated ΦMHI42, the phage is able to infect isolates from two genera of freshwater cyanobacteria, Planktothrix and Microcystis. Transmission Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy indicate that ΦMHI42 is a member of the Podoviridae, albeit with a larger than expected capsid. The kinetics of host growth after infection with ΦMHI42 differed across host genera, species and strains in a way that was not related to the growth rate of the uninfected host. To our knowledge, this is the first characterisation of the growth of cyanobacteria in the presence of a broad host-range freshwater cyanophage. PMID:24489900

  6. Excavated substrate modulates growth instability during nest building in ants

    PubMed Central

    Toffin, Etienne; Kindekens, Jonathan; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    In social insects, the nests of the same species can show a large difference in size and shape. Despite these large variations, the nests share the same substructures, some appearing during nest growth. In ants, the interplay between nest size and digging activity leads to two successive morphological transitions from circular to branched shapes (budding along the perimeter of the circular cavity and tunnelling of the galleries). Like several other self-organized collective behaviours, this phenomenon, as well as the entire nest-digging process, is thought to be modulated by environmental properties. The present study investigates the effect of excavated substrate on the nest morphogenesis and the morphological transitions by using two materials with different cohesions. Here, we show that the two morphological transitions occur more frequently with a cohesive substrate than with a granular one: 96 per cent of cohesive experiments showed both transitions, whereas only 50 per cent did in granular experiments. We found that transitions and excavation cessation follow area–response thresholds: the shape transitions take place and the digging activity stops when the dug area reaches the corresponding threshold values. The shape transition thresholds are lower with the cohesive substrate and that of stopping digging is independent of nest shape and material. According to simulations, the experimental frequencies of transitions found their origin in the competition between transitions and activity cessation and in the difference between the transition threshold values of each substrate. Our results demonstrate how the substrate properties modulate the collective response and lead to various patterns. Considering the non-specific mechanisms at work, such effects of substrate coarseness have their counterparts in various collective behaviours, generating alternative patterns to colonize and exploit the environment. PMID:20410036

  7. AlN growth on sapphire substrate by ammonia MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansurov, V. G.; Nikitin, A. Yu.; Galitsyn, Yu. G.; Svitasheva, S. N.; Zhuravlev, K. S.; Osvath, Z.; Dobos, L.; Horvath, Z. E.; Pecz, B.

    2007-03-01

    Kinetics of (0 0 0 1) Al 2O 3 surface nitridation and subsequent growth of AlN films on the sapphire substrate by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are investigated. Surface morphology evolution during AlN growth is studied in situ by reflection high energy electron diffraction and ex situ by atomic force microscopy. It is found that the surfaces of AlN layers thicker than 100 nm have two major features: a quite smooth background and noticeable amount of hillocks. The influence of growth conditions on the AlN surface morphology is studied in order to find a way for reducing of the hillocks density. A modification of nitridated sapphire surface by small amount of Al (1-2 monolayers) with subsequent treatment of the surface under ammonia flux is proposed. An improvement of AlN surface morphology of the layers grown on the modified surfaces is demonstrated.

  8. Multiple substrate growth kinetics of Leptothrix discophora SP-6.

    PubMed

    Yurt, Nurdan; Sears, John; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2002-01-01

    The growth parameters of Leptothrix discophora SP-6 were quantified on the basis of the steady-state concentrations and utilization rates of pyruvate, dissolved oxygen, and concentration of microorganisms in a chemostat operated at 25 degrees C, pH 7.2, and an agitation rate of 350 rpm. The results showed that the microbial growth was limited by both pyruvate and dissolved oxygen. A combined growth kinetics model using Monod growth kinetics for pyruvate and Tessier growth kinetics for oxygen showed the best correlation with the experimental data when analyzed using an interactive multiple substrate model. The growth kinetics parameters and the respective confidence limits, estimated using the Monte Carlo simulation, were mu(max) = 0.576 +/- 0.021 h(-1), K(sMp) = 38.81 +/- 4.24 mg L(-1), K(sTo) = 0.39 +/- 0.04 mg L(-1), Y(X/p) = 0.150 (mg microorganism mg(-1) pyruvate), Y(X/o) = 1.24 (mg microorganism mg(-1) oxygen), the maintenance factors for pyruvate and oxygen were m(p) = 0.129 (mg pyruvate consumed mg(-1) microorganism h(-1)) and m(o) = 0.076 (mg oxygen consumed mg(-1) microorganism h(-1)), respectively.

  9. Silicene on substrates: interaction mechanism and growth behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Gao, J.; Zhao, J.

    2014-03-01

    Silicene, a monolayer of silicon atom assembling in a honeycomb lattice, has attracted more and more attention due to its outstanding electronic properties. The recently successful synthesis of silicene on several metal surfaces takes a big step towards the utilization of silicene in the future microelectronic devices. On the roadmap for the applications of silicene, two critical issues have to be addressed: (1) how to improve the quality of silicene; (2) how to preserve the extraordinary electronic properties of silicene. These two problems can be solved by deeply understanding the substrate effect on silicene. In this review, we systematically discuss the substrate effect on the atomic structure and electronic properties of a silicene sheet as well as the growth behavior of silicene on Ag surface, which are important for both fabrication and application of silicene.

  10. Environmental control of daily stem growth patterns in five temperate broad-leaved tree species.

    PubMed

    Köcher, Paul; Horna, Viviana; Leuschner, Christoph

    2012-08-01

    Tree ring analysis investigates growth processes at time horizons of several weeks to millennia, but lacks the detail of short-term fluctuation in cambial activity. This study used electronic high-precision dendrometry for analyzing the environmental factors controlling stem diameter variation and radial growth in daily resolution in five co-existing temperate broad-leaved tree species (genera Fraxinus, Acer, Carpinus, Tilia and Fagus) with different growth and survival strategies. Daily stem radius change (SRC(d)) was primarily influenced by the atmospheric demand for water vapor (expressed either as vapor pressure deficit (D) or relative air humidity (RH)) while rainfall, soil matrix potential, temperature and radiation were only secondary factors. SRC(d) increased linearly with increasing RH and decreasing D in all species. The positive effect of a low atmospheric water vapor demand on SRC(d) was largest in June during the period of maximal radial growth rate and persisted when observation windows of 7 or 21 days instead of 1 day were used. We found a high synchronicity in the day-to-day growth rate fluctuation among the species with increment peaks corresponding to air humidity maxima, even though the mean daily radial growth rate differed fivefold among the species. The five -species also differed in the positive slope of the growth/RH relationship with the steepest increase found in Fraxinus and the lowest in Fagus. We explain the strong positive effect of high RH and low D on radial stem increment by lowered transpiration which reduces negative pressure in the conducting system and increases turgor in the stem cambium cells, thereby favoring cell division and expansion. The results suggest that mechanistic models of tree growth need to consider the atmospheric water status in addition to the known controlling environmental factors: temperature, soil moisture and precipitation. The results further have implications for sensitivity analyses of tree growth to

  11. Purification and properties of Escherichia coli dimethyl sulfoxide reductase, an iron-sulfur molybdoenzyme with broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Weiner, J H; MacIsaac, D P; Bishop, R E; Bilous, P T

    1988-04-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide reductase, a terminal electron transfer enzyme, was purified from anaerobically grown Escherichia coli harboring a plasmid which codes for dimethyl sulfoxide reductase. The enzyme was purified to greater than 90% homogeneity from cell envelopes by a three-step purification procedure involving extraction with the detergent Triton X-100, chromatofocusing, and DEAE ion-exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme was composed of three subunits with molecular weights of 82,600, 23,600, and 22,700 as identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The native molecular weight was determined by gel electrophoresis to be 155,000. The purified enzyme contained 7.5 atoms of iron and 0.34 atom of molybdenum per mol of enzyme. The presence of molybdopterin cofactor in dimethyl sulfoxide reductase was identified by reconstitution of cofactor-deficient NADPH nitrate reductase activity from Neurospora crassa nit-I mutant and by UV absorption and fluorescence emission spectra. The enzyme displayed a very broad substrate specificity, reducing various N-oxide and sulfoxide compounds as well as chlorate and hydroxylamine.

  12. ``Electric growth`` of metal overlayers on semiconductor substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Cho, J.H. |; Niu, Q.; Shih, C.K.; Suo, Z.

    1998-02-01

    In this article, the authors present the main results from their recent studies of metal overlayer growth on semiconductor substrates. They show that a variety of novel phenomena can exist in such systems, resulting from several competing interactions. The confined motion of the conduction electrons within the metal overlayer can mediate a surprisingly long-range repulsive force between the metal-semiconductor interface and the growth front, acting to stabilize the overlayer. Electron transfer from the overlayer to the substrate leads to an attractive force between the two interfaces, acting to destabilize the overlayer. Interface-induced Friedel oscillations in electron density can further impose an oscillatory modulation onto the two previous interactions. These three competing factors, of all electronic nature, can make a flat metal overlayer critically, marginally, or magically stable, or totally unstable against roughening. The authors further show that, for many systems, these electronic effects can easily win over the effect of stress. First-principles studies of a few representative systems support the main features of the present electronic growth concept.

  13. Graphene on Pt(111): Growth and substrate interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Peter; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Sutter, Eli

    2009-12-01

    In situ low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) of graphene growth combined with measurements of the graphene structure and electronic band structure has been used to study graphene on Pt(111). Growth by carbon segregation produces macroscopic monolayer graphene domains extending continuously across Pt(111) substrate steps and bounded by strongly faceted edges. LEEM during cooling from the growth temperature shows the propagation of wrinkles in the graphene sheet, driven by thermal stress. The lattice mismatch between graphene and Pt(111) is accommodated by moiré structures with a large number of different rotational variants, without a clear preference for a particular interface geometry. Fast and slow growing graphene domains exhibit moiré structures with small [e.g., (3×3)G , (6×6)R2G , and (2×2)R4G ] and large unit cells [e.g., (44×44)R15G , (52×52)R14G , and (8×8)G ], respectively. A weak substrate coupling, suggested by the growth and structural properties of monolayer graphene on Pt(111), is confirmed by maps of the band structure, which is close to that of isolated graphene aside from minimal hole doping due to charge transfer from the metal. Finally, the decoupled graphene monolayer on Pt(111) appears impenetrable to carbon diffusion, which self-limits the graphene growth at monolayer thickness. Thicker graphene domains, which can form at boundaries between monolayer domains, have been used to characterize the properties of few-layer graphene on Pt(111).

  14. Graphene on Pt(111): Growth and Substrate interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, P.; Sadowski, J.T.; Sutter, E.

    2009-12-01

    In situ low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) of graphene growth combined with measurements of the graphene structure and electronic band structure has been used to study graphene on Pt(111). Growth by carbon segregation produces macroscopic monolayer graphene domains extending continuously across Pt(111) substrate steps and bounded by strongly faceted edges. LEEM during cooling from the growth temperature shows the propagation of wrinkles in the graphene sheet, driven by thermal stress. The lattice mismatch between graphene and Pt(111) is accommodated by moire structures with a large number of different rotational variants, without a clear preference for a particular interface geometry. Fast and slow growing graphene domains exhibit moire structures with small [e.g., (3 x 3){sub G}, ({radical}6 x {radical}6)R2{sub G}, and (2 x 2)R4{sub G}] and large unit cells [e.g., ({radical}44 x {radical}44)R15{sub G}, ({radical}52 x {radical}52)R14{sub G}, and (8 x 8){sub G}], respectively. A weak substrate coupling, suggested by the growth and structural properties of monolayer graphene on Pt(111), is confirmed by maps of the band structure, which is close to that of isolated graphene aside from minimal hole doping due to charge transfer from the metal. Finally, the decoupled graphene monolayer on Pt(111) appears impenetrable to carbon diffusion, which self-limits the graphene growth at monolayer thickness. Thicker graphene domains, which can form at boundaries between monolayer domains, have been used to characterize the properties of few-layer graphene on Pt(111).

  15. Selective Growth of Cu Nanowires on Si(111) Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuda, Norio; Hojo, Daisuke; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Miki, Kazushi; Yamabe, Kikuo

    2003-10-01

    We succeeded in the fabrication of high-aspect-ratio (length to width) Cu nanowires of less than 10 nm width and 0.5 nm height along atomic step edge lines on Si(111) substrate. The fabrication procedure consisted of two wet process steps: (1) flattening of the surface roughness to an atomic level by immersing Si(111) wafers in ultralow-dissolved-oxygen water (LOW) and (2) Cu nanowire formation by immersion in LOW containing 100 ppb Cu ions for 100 s at room temperature. The selective growth of the Cu nanowires at the step edges indicates that Cu adsorption sites could be formed there during the flattening stage.

  16. Substrate heater for the growth of epitaxial silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Matthew; Varhue, Walter; Adams, Edward; Lavoie, Mark

    1999-03-01

    The single wafer processing of epitaxial Si films requires that special attention be paid to the design of the substrate heater assembly. This document describes the evolution and testing of an in situ heater used to deposit epitaxial Si films at temperatures as high as 700 °C. One problem encountered was the production of excessive levels of ultraviolet radiation which contributed to the desorption of water vapor from the vacuum chamber walls during the in situ cleaning process. A second problem involved the formation of a molybdenum containing film that poisoned epitaxial growth. A final proven in situ heater design is presented which avoids these problems.

  17. Laser direct growth of graphene on silicon substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Dapeng; Xu Xianfan

    2012-01-09

    We demonstrate laser direct growth of few layer graphene on a silicon substrate. In our study, a continuous wave laser beam was focused on a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-coated silicon wafer to evaporate PMMA and melt the silicon wafer. Carbon atoms, decomposed from PMMA, were absorbed by the molten silicon surface, and then separated from silicon in the cooling process to form few-layer graphene. This Si-catalyzed method will provide a new approach and platform for applications of graphene.

  18. The growth of cubic silicon carbide on a compliant substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Sharanda; Soward, Ida

    1995-01-01

    Research has shown that silicon carbide grown on silicon and 6H silicon carbide has problems associated with these substrates. This is because silicon and silicon carbide has a 20% lattice mismatch and cubic silicon carbide has not been successfully achieved on 6H silicon carbide. We are investigating the growth of silicon carbide on a compliant substrate in order to grow defect free silicon carbide. This compliant substrate consists of silicon/silicon dioxide with 1200 A of single crystal silicon on the top layer. We are using this compliant substrate because there is a possibility that the silicon dioxide layer and the carbonized layer will allow the silicon lattice to shrink or expand to match the lattice of the silicon carbide. This would improve the electrical properties of the film for the use of device fabrication. When trying to grow silicon carbide, we observed amorphous film. To investigate, we examined the process step by step using RHEED. RHEED data showed that each step was amorphous. We found that just by heating the substrate in the presence of hydrogen it changed the crystal structure. When heated to 1000 C for 2 minutes, RHEED showed that there was an amorphous layer on the surface. We also heated the substrate to 900 C for 2 minutes and RHEED data showed that there was a deterioration of the single crystalline structure. We assumed that the presence of oxygen was coming from the sides of the silicon dioxide layer. Therefore, we evaporated 2500 A of silicon to all four edges of the wafer to try to enclose the oxygen. When heating the evaporated wafer to 900 C the RHEED data showed single crystalline structure however at 1000 C the RHEED data showed deterioration of the single crystalline structure. We conclude that the substrate itself is temperature dependent and that the oxygen was coming from the sides of the silicon dioxide layer. We propose to evaporate more silicon on the edges of the wafer to eliminate the escape of oxygen. this will allow

  19. Atomistic mechanisms for bilayer growth of graphene on metal substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Cui, Ping; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Gao, Yanfei; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-08

    Epitaxial growth on metal substrates has been shown to be the most powerful approach in producing large-scale high-quality monolayer graphene, yet it remains a major challenge to realize uniform bilayer graphene growth. Here we carry out a comparative study of the atomistic mechanisms for bilayer graphene growth on the (111) surfaces of Cu and Ni, using multiscale approaches combining first-principles calculations and rate-equation analysis. We first show that the relatively weak graphene-Cu interaction enhances the lateral diffusion and effective nucleation of C atoms underneath the graphene island, thereby making it more feasible to grow bilayer graphene on Cu. In contrast, the stronger graphene-Ni interaction suppresses the lateral mobility and dimerization of C atoms underneath the graphene, making it unlikely to achieve controlled growth of bilayer graphene on Ni. We then determine the critical graphene size beyond which nucleation of the second layer will take place. Intriguingly, the critical size exhibits an effective inverse "Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier" effect, becoming smaller for faster C migration from the Cu surface to the graphene-Cu interface sites across the graphene edge. Lastly, these findings allow us to propose a novel alternating growth scheme to realize mass production of bilayer graphene.

  20. Atomistic mechanisms for bilayer growth of graphene on metal substrates

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Wei; Cui, Ping; Zhu, Wenguang; ...

    2015-01-08

    Epitaxial growth on metal substrates has been shown to be the most powerful approach in producing large-scale high-quality monolayer graphene, yet it remains a major challenge to realize uniform bilayer graphene growth. Here we carry out a comparative study of the atomistic mechanisms for bilayer graphene growth on the (111) surfaces of Cu and Ni, using multiscale approaches combining first-principles calculations and rate-equation analysis. We first show that the relatively weak graphene-Cu interaction enhances the lateral diffusion and effective nucleation of C atoms underneath the graphene island, thereby making it more feasible to grow bilayer graphene on Cu. In contrast,more » the stronger graphene-Ni interaction suppresses the lateral mobility and dimerization of C atoms underneath the graphene, making it unlikely to achieve controlled growth of bilayer graphene on Ni. We then determine the critical graphene size beyond which nucleation of the second layer will take place. Intriguingly, the critical size exhibits an effective inverse "Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier" effect, becoming smaller for faster C migration from the Cu surface to the graphene-Cu interface sites across the graphene edge. Lastly, these findings allow us to propose a novel alternating growth scheme to realize mass production of bilayer graphene.« less

  1. Atomistic mechanisms for bilayer growth of graphene on metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Cui, Ping; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Gao, Yanfei; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    Epitaxial growth on metal substrates has been shown to be the most powerful approach in producing large-scale high-quality monolayer graphene, yet it remains a major challenge to realize uniform bilayer graphene growth. Here we carry out a comparative study of the atomistic mechanisms for bilayer graphene growth on the (111) surfaces of Cu and Ni, using multiscale approaches combining first-principles calculations and rate-equation analysis. We first show that the relatively weak graphene-Cu interaction enhances the lateral diffusion and effective nucleation of C atoms underneath the graphene island, thereby making it more feasible to grow bilayer graphene on Cu. In contrast, the stronger graphene-Ni interaction suppresses the lateral mobility and dimerization of C atoms underneath the graphene, making it unlikely to achieve controlled growth of bilayer graphene on Ni. We then determine the critical graphene size beyond which nucleation of the second layer will take place. Intriguingly, the critical size exhibits an effective inverse "Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier" effect, becoming smaller for faster C migration from the Cu surface to the graphene-Cu interface sites across the graphene edge. These findings allow us to propose a novel alternating growth scheme to realize mass production of bilayer graphene.

  2. Atomistic mechanisms for bilayer growth of graphene on metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Cui, Ping; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Gao, Yanfei; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-03-01

    Epitaxial growth on metal substrates has been shown to be the most powerful approach in producing large-scale high-quality monolayer graphene, yet it remains a major challenge to realize uniform bilayer graphene growth. Here we carry out a comparative study of the atomistic mechanisms for bilayer graphene growth on the (111) surfaces of Cu and Ni, using multi-scale approaches combining first-principles calculations and rate equation analysis. We first show that the relatively weak graphene-Cu interaction enhances the lateral diffusion and effective nucleation of C atoms underneath the graphene island, thereby making it more feasible to grow bilayer graphene on Cu. In contrast, the stronger graphene-Ni interaction suppresses the lateral mobility and dimerization of C atoms underneath the graphene, making it unlikely to achieve controlled growth of bilayer graphene on Ni. We then determine the critical graphene island size beyond which nucleation of the second layer will take place. Intriguingly, the critical size exhibits an effective inverse ``Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier'' effect. These findings allow us to propose a novel alternating growth scheme to realize mass production of bilayer graphene. Supported by USNSF, USDOE, and NNSF of China.

  3. Growth of Quantum Wires on Step-Bunched Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Feng

    2005-02-01

    This proposal initiates a combined theoretical and experimental multidisciplinary research effort to explore a novel approach for growing metallic and magnetic nanowires on step-bunched semiconductor and dielectric substrates, and to lay the groundwork for understanding the growth mechanisms and the electronic, electrical, and magnetic properties of metallic and magnetic nanowires. The research will focus on four topics: (1) fundamental studies of step bunching and self-organization in a strained thin film for creating step-bunched substrates. (2) Interaction between metal adatoms (Al,Cu, and Ni) and semiconductor (Si and SiGe) and dielectric (CaF2) surface steps. (3) growth and characterization of metallic and magnetic nanowires on step-bunched templates. (4) fabrication of superlattices of nanowires by growing multilayer films. We propose to attack these problems at both a microscopic and macroscopic level, using state-of-the-art theoretical and experimental techniques. Multiscale (electronic-atomic-continuum) theories will be applied to investigate growth mechanisms of nanowires: mesoscopic modeling and simulation of step flow growth of strained thin films, in particular, step bunching and self-organization will be carried out within the framework of continuum linear elastic theory; atomistic calculation of interaction between metal adatoms and semiconductor and dielectric surface steps will be done by large-scale computations using first-principles total-energy methods. In parallel, thin films and nanowires will be grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and the resultant structure and morphology will be characterized at the atomic level up to micrometer range, using a combination of different surface/interface probes, including scanning tunneling microscopy (STM, atomic resolution), atomic force microscopy (AFM, nanometer resolution), low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM, micrometer resolution), reflectance high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), and x

  4. Monolayers of hard rods on planar substrates. II. Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopotek, M.; Hansen-Goos, H.; Dixit, M.; Schilling, T.; Schreiber, F.; Oettel, M.

    2017-02-01

    Growth of hard-rod monolayers via deposition is studied in a lattice model using rods with discrete orientations and in a continuum model with hard spherocylinders. The lattice model is treated with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and dynamic density functional theory while the continuum model is studied by dynamic Monte Carlo simulations equivalent to diffusive dynamics. The evolution of nematic order (excess of upright particles, "standing-up" transition) is an entropic effect and is mainly governed by the equilibrium solution, rendering a continuous transition [Paper I, M. Oettel et al., J. Chem. Phys. 145, 074902 (2016)]. Strong non-equilibrium effects (e.g., a noticeable dependence on the ratio of rates for translational and rotational moves) are found for attractive substrate potentials favoring lying rods. Results from the lattice and the continuum models agree qualitatively if the relevant characteristic times for diffusion, relaxation of nematic order, and deposition are matched properly. Applicability of these monolayer results to multilayer growth is discussed for a continuum-model realization in three dimensions where spherocylinders are deposited continuously onto a substrate via diffusion.

  5. Cyclic stretching of soft substrates induces spreading and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yidan; Hameed, Feroz M.; Yang, Bo; Lee, Kyunghee; Pan, Catherine Qiurong; Park, Sungsu; Sheetz, Michael

    2015-02-01

    In the body, soft tissues often undergo cycles of stretching and relaxation that may affect cell behaviour without changing matrix rigidity. To determine whether transient forces can substitute for a rigid matrix, we stretched soft pillar arrays. Surprisingly, 1-5% cyclic stretching over a frequency range of 0.01-10 Hz caused spreading and stress fibre formation (optimum 0.1 Hz) that persisted after 4 h of stretching. Similarly, stretching increased cell growth rates on soft pillars comparative to rigid substrates. Of possible factors linked to fibroblast growth, MRTF-A (myocardin-related transcription factor-A) moved to the nucleus in 2 h of cyclic stretching and reversed on cessation; but YAP (Yes-associated protein) moved much later. Knockdown of either MRTF-A or YAP blocked stretch-dependent growth. Thus, we suggest that the repeated pulling from a soft matrix can substitute for a stiff matrix in stimulating spreading, stress fibre formation and growth.

  6. Cyclic stretching of soft substrates induces spreading and growth

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yidan; Hameed, Feroz M.; Yang, Bo; Lee, Kyunghee; Pan, Catherine Qiurong; Park, Sungsu; Sheetz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the body, soft tissues often undergo cycles of stretching and relaxation that may affect cell behaviour without changing matrix rigidity. To determine whether transient forces can substitute for a rigid matrix, we stretched soft pillar arrays. Surprisingly, 1–5% cyclic stretching over a frequency range of 0.01–10 Hz caused spreading and stress fibre formation (optimum 0.1 Hz) that persisted after 4 h of stretching. Similarly, stretching increased cell growth rates on soft pillars comparative to rigid substrates. Of possible factors linked to fibroblast growth, MRTF-A (myocardin-related transcription factor-A) moved to the nucleus in 2 h of cyclic stretching and reversed on cessation; but YAP (Yes-associated protein) moved much later. Knockdown of either MRTF-A or YAP blocked stretch-dependent growth. Thus, we suggest that the repeated pulling from a soft matrix can substitute for a stiff matrix in stimulating spreading, stress fibre formation and growth. PMID:25704457

  7. EGFR kinase possesses a broad specificity for ErbB phosphorylation sites, and ligand increases catalytic-centre activity without affecting substrate binding affinity

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    We previously found that EGF (epidermal growth factor) increases the EGFR (EGF receptor) kinase-binding affinity towards the major tyrosine phosphorylation sites in downstream adaptor proteins such as Gab1 (Grb2-associated binding protein 1) and Shc [Src homology 2 (SH2) domain and collagen containing protein], but not that towards EGFR autophosphorylation sites [Fan, Wong, Deb and Johnson (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 38143–38150]. EGFR activation can also result in transphosphorylation of tyrosine resides in the C-terminal region of the related receptors ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 in heterodimers which are formed upon ligand stimulation. In the present study, we investigated the specificity of EGFR kinase by comparing the steady state kinetic parameters for peptides derived from all four ErbBs in the absence or presence of EGF. Our results demonstrated that (i) EGFR kinase can efficiently phosphorylate a broad range of diverse peptide sequences representing ErbB sites; (ii) certain ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 sites had higher specificity constants than any EGFR sequence and (iii) EGF stimulation consistently increases the kcat approx. 5-fold, but does not significantly alter the Km for any ErbB peptides. Furthermore, peptides containing lysine at position −2 or −3 N-terminal to the target tyrosine were found to be poor EGFR kinase substrates, and substitution of these lysines with glutamine decreased the Km and increased the kcat for these substrates. We conclude that EGFR kinase-mediated ErbB transphosphorylations are mostly controlled at the level of oligomerization, and not by a preference of the EGFR kinase for phosphorylation sites in any particular ErbB. The results also demonstrated that, unlike phosphorylation sites in select downstream targets, EGF does not regulate the recognition of phosphorylation sites in the C-terminal region of any of the ErbBs. PMID:16122376

  8. [Utilization of the mix of growth and nongrowth substrates by microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Pirog, T P; Kovalenko, M O

    2004-01-01

    Author's experimental data and those from literature, concerning the utilization of growth and nongrowth substrates by microorganisms, are presented in the review. The notions "growth" and "nongrowth" substrate as well as the types of transformation of mixed substrates (mixotrophy, diauxia, nongrowth oxidation, cometabolism, syntabolism) have been considered. Main propositions of the conception of auxiliary substrate and the essence of energetic classification of substrates have been presented. Data from literature concerning the effect of cultivation conditions (concentration of substrates, their ratio, cultivation method, dissolution rate under continuous cultivation, etc.) on the character of substrate mixed use, as well as the use of mixed substrates aimed at the intensification of microorganism growth. Data are presented on the intensification of metabolites synthesis (e. g. microbial exopolysaccharide etapolan) on the mixture of energetically non-equivalent growth substrates.

  9. Seedless Pattern Growth of Quasi-Aligned ZnO Nanorod Arrays on Cover Glass Substrates in Solution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid technique for the selective growth of ZnO nanorod arrays on wanted areas of thin cover glass substrates was developed without the use of seed layer of ZnO. This method utilizes electron-beam lithography for pattern transfer on seedless substrate, followed by solution method for the bottom-up growth of ZnO nanorod arrays on the patterned substrates. The arrays of highly crystalline ZnO nanorods having diameter of 60 ± 10 nm and length of 750 ± 50 nm were selectively grown on different shape patterns and exhibited a remarkable uniformity in terms of diameter, length, and density. The room temperature cathodluminescence measurements showed a strong ultraviolet emission at 381 nm and broad visible emission at 585–610 nm were observed in the spectrum. PMID:20672029

  10. Pressate from Peat Dewatering as a Substrate for Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Mulligan, Catherine N.; Cooper, David G.

    1985-01-01

    This study considered the possibility of using water expressed during the drying of fuel-grade peat as a substrate for microbial growth. Highly humified peat pressed for 2.5 min at 1.96 MPa produced water with a chemical oxygen demand of 690 mg/liter. Several biological compounds could be produced by using the organic matter in expressed peat water as a substrate. These included polymers such as chitosan, contained in the cell wall of Rhizopus arrhizus, and two extracellular polysaccharides, xanthan gum and pullulan, produced by Xanthomonas campestris and Aureobasidium pullulans, respectively. A very effective surfactant was produced by Bacillus subtilis grown in the expressed water. Small additions of nutrients to the peat pressate were necessary to obtain substantial yields of products. The addition of peptone, yeast extract, and glucose improved production of the various compounds. Biological treatment improved the quality of the expressed water to the extent that in an industrial process it could be returned to the environment. PMID:16346834

  11. Connective tissue progenitor cell growth characteristics on textured substrates

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Alvaro; Boehm, Cynthia; Fleischman, Aaron J; Muschler, George F; Roy, Shuvo

    2007-01-01

    Growth characteristics of human connective tissue progenitor (CTP) cells were investigated on smooth and textured substrates, which were produced using MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) fabrication technology. Human bone marrow derived cells were cultured for 9 days under conditions promoting osteoblastic differentiation on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates comprising smooth (non-patterned) surfaces (SMOOTH), 4 different cylindrical post micro-textures (POSTS) that were 7–10 μm high and 5, 10, 20, and 40 μm diameter, respectively, and channel micro-textures (CHANNELS) with curved cross-sections that were 11 μm high, 45 μm wide, and separated by 5 μm wide ridges. Standard glass-tissue culture surfaces were used as controls. Micro-textures resulted in the modification of CTP morphology, attachment, migration, and proliferation characteristics. Specifically, cells on POSTS exhibited more contoured morphology with closely packed cytoskeletal actin microfilaments compared to the more random orientation in cells grown on SMOOTH. CTP colonies on 10 μm-diameter POSTS exhibited higher cell number than any other POSTS, and a significant increase in cell number (442%) compared to colonies on SMOOTH (71%). On CHANNELS, colonies tended to be denser (229%) than on POSTS (up to 140% on 10 μm POSTS), and significantly more so compared to those on SMOOTH (104%). PMID:18019838

  12. Pressate from peat dewatering as a substrate for bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, C N; Cooper, D G

    1985-07-01

    This study considered the possibility of using water expressed during the drying of fuel-grade peat as a substrate for microbial growth. Highly humified peat pressed for 2.5 min at 1.96 MPa produced water with a chemical oxygen demand of 690 mg/liter. Several biological compounds could be produced by using the organic matter in expressed peat water as a substrate. These included polymers such as chitosan, contained in the cell wall of Rhizopus arrhizus, and two extracellular polysaccharides, xanthan gum and pullulan, produced by Xanthomonas campestris and Aureobasidium pullulans, respectively. A very effective surfactant was produced by Bacillus subtilis grown in the expressed water. Small additions of nutrients to the peat pressate were necessary to obtain substantial yields of products. The addition of peptone, yeast extract, and glucose improved production of the various compounds. Biological treatment improved the quality of the expressed water to the extent that in an industrial process it could be returned to the environment.

  13. Structural Insights into the Broad Substrate Specificity of a Novel Endoglycoceramidase I Belonging to a New Subfamily of GH5 Glycosidases.

    PubMed

    Han, Yun-Bin; Chen, Liu-Qing; Li, Zhuo; Tan, Yu-Meng; Feng, Yan; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2017-03-24

    Endoglycoceramidases (EGCases) specifically hydrolyze the glycosidic linkage between the oligosaccharide and the ceramide moieties of various glycosphingolipids, and they have received substantial attention in the emerging field of glycosphingolipidology. However, the mechanism regulating the strict substrate specificity of these GH5 glycosidases has not been identified. In this study, we report a novel EGCase I from Rhodococcus equi 103S (103S_EGCase I) with remarkably broad substrate specificity. Based on phylogenetic analyses, the enzyme may represent a new subfamily of GH5 glycosidases. The X-ray crystal structures of 103S_EGCase I alone and in complex with its substrates monosialodihexosylganglioside (GM3) and monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1) enabled us to identify several structural features that may account for its broad specificity. Compared with EGCase II from Rhodococcus sp. M-777 (M777_EGCase II), which possesses strict substrate specificity, 103S_EGCase I possesses a longer α7-helix and a shorter loop 4, which forms a larger substrate-binding pocket that could accommodate more extended oligosaccharides. In addition, loop 2 and loop 8 of the enzyme adopt a more open conformation, which also enlarges the oligosaccharide-binding cavity. Based on this knowledge, a rationally designed experiment was performed to examine the substrate specificity of EGCase II. The truncation of loop 4 in M777_EGCase II increased its activity toward GM1 (163%). Remarkably, the S63G mutant of M777_EGCase II showed a broader substrate spectra and significantly increased activity toward bulky substrates (up to >1370-fold for fucosyl-GM1). Collectively, the results presented here reveal the exquisite substrate recognition mechanism of EGCases and provide an opportunity for further engineering of these enzymes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Growth and characterization of rutile TiO2 nanorods on various substrates with fabricated fast-response metal-semiconductor-metal UV detector based on Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selman, Abbas M.; Hassan, Z.

    2015-07-01

    Rutile-phase titanium dioxide nanorods (NRs) were synthesized successfully on p-type silicon (Si) (1 1 1), c-plane sapphire (Al2O3), glass coated with fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO), glass, and quartz substrates via chemical bath deposition method. All substrates were seeded with a TiO2 seed layer synthesized with a radio frequency reactive magnetron sputtering system prior to NRs growth. The effect of substrate type on structural, morphological, and optical properties of rutile TiO2 NRs was studied. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy analyses showed the tetragonal rutile structure of the synthesized TiO2 NRs. Optical properties were examined with photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy of the grown rutile NRs on all substrates, with the spectra exhibiting one strong ultraviolet emission peak intensity compared with broad visible peak. The optimal sample of rutile NRs was grown on Si substrate. Thus, a fast-response metal-semiconductor-metal ultraviolet (UV) detector was fabricated. Upon exposure to 365 nm light (2.3 mW/cm2) at 5 V bias, the device displays 2.62 × 10-5 A photocurrent, and the response and recovery times are calculated as 18.5 and 19.1 ms, respectively. These results demonstrate that the fabricated high-quality photodiode is a promising candidate as a low-cost UV photodetector for commercially integrated photoelectronic applications.

  15. Virtual substrates for epitaxial growth and methods of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Atwater, Harry A.; Leite, Marina S.; Warmann, Emily C.; Callahan, Dennis M.

    2016-09-27

    A virtual substrate includes a handle support and a strain-relieved single crystalline layer on the handle support. A method of making the virtual substrate includes growing a coherently-strained single crystalline layer on an initial growth substrate, removing the initial growth substrate to relieve the strain on the single crystalline layer, and applying the strain-relieved single crystalline layer on a handle support.

  16. Physiological minimum temperatures for root growth in seven common European broad-leaved tree species.

    PubMed

    Schenker, Gabriela; Lenz, Armando; Körner, Christian; Hoch, Günter

    2014-03-01

    Temperature is the most important factor driving the cold edge distribution limit of temperate trees. Here, we identified the minimum temperatures for root growth in seven broad-leaved tree species, compared them with the species' natural elevational limits and identified morphological changes in roots produced near their physiological cold limit. Seedlings were exposed to a vertical soil-temperature gradient from 20 to 2 °C along the rooting zone for 18 weeks. In all species, the bulk of roots was produced at temperatures above 5 °C. However, the absolute minimum temperatures for root growth differed among species between 2.3 and 4.2 °C, with those species that reach their natural distribution limits at higher elevations also tending to have lower thermal limits for root tissue formation. In all investigated species, the roots produced at temperatures close to the thermal limit were pale, thick, unbranched and of reduced mechanical strength. Across species, the specific root length (m g(-1) root) was reduced by, on average, 60% at temperatures below 7 °C. A significant correlation of minimum temperatures for root growth with the natural high elevation limits of the investigated species indicates species-specific thermal requirements for basic physiological processes. Although these limits are not necessarily directly causative for the upper distribution limit of a species, they seem to belong to a syndrome of adaptive processes for life at low temperatures. The anatomical changes at the cold limit likely hint at the mechanisms impeding meristematic activity at low temperatures.

  17. Connective tissue growth factor is a substrate of ADAM28

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, Satsuki; Tanaka, Rena; Shimoda, Masayuki; Onuma, Junko; Fujii, Yutaka; Jinno, Hiromitsu; Okada, Yasunori

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} The hyper-variable region in the cysteine-rich domain of ADAM28 binds to C-terminal domain of CTGF. {yields} ADAM28 cleaves CTGF alone and CTGF in the CTGF/VEGF{sub 165} complex. {yields} CTGF digestion by ADAM28 releases biologically active VEGF{sub 165} from the complex. {yields} ADAM28, CTGF and VEGF{sub 165} are commonly co-expressed by carcinoma cells in human breast carcinoma tissues. {yields} These suggest that ADAM28 promotes VEGF{sub 165}-induced angiogenesis in the breast carcinomas by selective CTGF digestion in the CTGF/VEGF{sub 165} complex. -- Abstract: ADAM28, a member of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) gene family, is over-expressed by carcinoma cells and the expression correlates with carcinoma cell proliferation and progression in human lung and breast carcinomas. However, information about substrates of ADAM28 is limited. We screened interacting molecules of ADAM28 in human lung cDNA library by yeast two-hybrid system and identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Binding of CTGF to proADAM28 was demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid assay and protein binding assay. ADAM28 cleaved CTGF in dose- and time-dependent manners at the Ala{sup 181}-Tyr{sup 182} and Asp{sup 191}-Pro{sup 192} bonds in the hinge region of the molecule. ADAM28 selectively digested CTGF in the complex of CTGF and vascular endothelial growth factor{sub 165} (VEGF{sub 165}), releasing biologically active VEGF{sub 165} from the complex. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that ADAM28, CTGF and VEGF are commonly co-expressed in the breast carcinoma tissues. These data provide the first evidence that CTGF is a novel substrate of ADAM28 and suggest that ADAM28 may promote VEGF{sub 165}-induced angiogenesis in the breast carcinomas by the CTGF digestion in the CTGF/VEGF{sub 165} complex.

  18. Co-Gradient Variation in Growth Rate and Development Time of a Broadly Distributed Butterfly

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Madeleine; Sunnucks, Paul; Norgate, Melanie; Murray, Neil; Kearney, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Widespread species often show geographic variation in thermally-sensitive traits, providing insight into how species respond to shifts in temperature through time. Such patterns may arise from phenotypic plasticity, genetic adaptation, or their interaction. In some cases, the effects of genotype and temperature may act together to reduce, or to exacerbate, phenotypic variation in fitness-related traits across varying thermal environments. We find evidence for such interactions in life-history traits of Heteronympha merope, a butterfly distributed across a broad latitudinal gradient in south-eastern Australia. We show that body size in this butterfly is negatively related to developmental temperature in the laboratory, in accordance with the temperature-size rule, but not in the field, despite very strong temperature gradients. A common garden experiment on larval thermal responses, spanning the environmental extremes of H. merope's distribution, revealed that butterflies from low latitude (warmer climate) populations have relatively fast intrinsic growth and development rates compared to those from cooler climates. These synergistic effects of genotype and temperature across the landscape (co-gradient variation) are likely to accentuate phenotypic variation in these traits, and this interaction must be accounted for when predicting how H. merope will respond to temperature change through time. These results highlight the importance of understanding how variation in life-history traits may arise in response to environmental change. Without this knowledge, we may fail to detect whether organisms are tracking environmental change, and if they are, whether it is by plasticity, adaptation or both. PMID:24743771

  19. Methods of preparing flexible photovoltaic devices using epitaxial liftoff, and preserving the integrity of growth substrates used in epitaxial growth

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Lee, Kyusang; Shiu, Kuen-Ting

    2015-01-06

    There is disclosed methods of making photosensitive devices, such as flexible photovoltaic (PV) devices, through the use of epitaxial liftoff. Also described herein are methods of preparing flexible PV devices comprising a structure having a growth substrate, wherein the selective etching of protective layers yields a smooth growth substrate that us suitable for reuse.

  20. Methods of preparing flexible photovoltaic devices using epitaxial liftoff, and preserving the integrity of growth substrates used in epitaxial growth

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Lee, Kyusang; Shiu, Kuen-Ting

    2013-02-19

    There is disclosed methods of making photosensitive devices, such as flexible photovoltaic (PV) devices, through the use of epitaxial liftoff. Also described herein are methods of preparing flexible PV devices comprising a structure having a growth substrate, wherein the selective etching of protective layers yields a smooth growth substrate that us suitable for reuse.

  1. Fast Growth of Highly Ordered TiO2 Nanotube Arrays on Si Substrate under High-Field Anodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jingnan; Zheng, Maojun; Zhang, Bin; Li, Qiang; Wang, Faze; Ma, Liguo; Li, Yanbo; Zhu, Changqing; Ma, Li; Shen, Wenzhong

    2017-04-01

    Highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays (NTAs) on Si substrate possess broad applications due to its high surface-to-volume ratio and novel functionalities, however, there are still some challenges on facile synthesis. Here, we report a simple and cost-effective high-field (90-180 V) anodization method to grow highly ordered TiO2 NTAs on Si substrate, and investigate the effect of anodization time, voltage, and fluoride content on the formation of TiO2 NTAs. The current density-time curves, recorded during anodization processes, can be used to determine the optimum anodization time. It is found that the growth rate of TiO2 NTAs is improved significantly under high field, which is nearly 8 times faster than that under low fields (40-60 V). The length and growth rate of the nanotubes are further increased with the increase of fluoride content in the electrolyte.

  2. LPE growth of 1.3 micron InGaAsP CW lasers on /110/ InP substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawrylo, F. Z.

    1981-01-01

    A description is presented of the liquid-phase epitaxial (LPE) growth of high-quality InGaAsP/InP continuous-wave (CW) laser structures on (110) InP substrates using conventional LPE without the need for special growth procedures. Double heterojunction laser structures were grown using the LPE supercooling method with a horizontal sliding boat. Low broad-area current densities (970 A/sq cm) and CW operation achieved at room temperature indicate that results comparable to up-to-date devices may be achieved. The inherent tendency for surface planarity maintenance due to the perfect surface stoichiometry of the (110) surface is a feature that may lend itself to the generation of improved interface growth in quaternary III-V and related semiconductor alloy systems. The similar cross-sectional appearance of structures grown on (110) and (100) orientations show that conventional LPE can be used with (110) surface planes without introducing special growth procedures.

  3. Investigation of Drainage and Plant Growth from Nursery Container Substrate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The amount of water and major nutrients lost through drainage from a nursery container substrate treated with different amounts of nitrogen (N), phosphate (P), and potassium (K), and potted with butterfly bush plants were investigated. The substrate was mainly composed of aged pine bark and steamed...

  4. Strawberry Production in Soilless Substrate Troughs – Plant Growth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soilless substrates made of peat moss, coconut coir, perlite, rockwool or bark are pathogen free and they have been used in strawberry production in Europe in troughs or containers. Open field strawberry production in soilless substrate is new to California growers. The objective of this study was t...

  5. In situ growth of monolayer porous gold nanoparticles film as high-performance SERS substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chunyuan; Wei, Yuhan; Da, Bingtao; Zhang, Haiting; Cong, Xing; Yang, Boyue; Yang, Yanjun; Wang, Lianhui

    2016-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has recently received considerable attention as an ultrasensitive analytic technique. However, its wide application is limited by lack of excellent SERS-active substrates. In this work a SERS substrate with arrayed monolayer films of porous gold nanoparticles is prepared on a solid substrate by a facile, in situ and one-step growth approach. Specifically, the solid substrate was coated with a layer of dense positive charges first by layer-by-layer assembly, followed by patterned a PDMS film with arrayed wells on the substrate. Then the growth solution including chlorauric acid, cetyltrimethylammonium chloride, and ascorbic acid in a certain proportion was transferred into the wells for in situ and one-step growth of porous gold nanoparticles on the substrate. The growth time, feed ratio of the reagents, and repeat times of the in situ growth were studied systematically to obtain optimal parameters for preparing an optimal SERS substrate. The as-prepared optimal SERS substrate not only has good SERS performance with the enhancement factor up to ∼1.10 × 106, but also shows good uniformity and stability. The SERS substrate was further utilized to be ultrasensitive SERS-based chemical sensors for ppb-level detection of highly toxic dyfonate. The preliminary result indicates that the as-prepared SERS substrate has good SERS performance and shows a number of great potential applications in SERS-based sensors.

  6. Quantum Dots: Growth of InAs Quantum Dots on GaAs (511)A Substrates: The Competition between Thermal Dynamics and Kinetics (Small 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Wen, Lei; Gao, Fangliang; Zhang, Shuguang; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-08-01

    On page 4277, G. Li and co-workers aim to promote III-V compound semiconductors and devices for a broad range of applications with various technologies. The growth process of InAs quantum dots on GaAs (511)A substrates is systematically studied. By carefully controlling the competition between growth thermal-dynamics and kinetics, InAs quantum dots with high size uniformity are prepared, which are highly desirable for the fabrication of high-efficiency solar cells.

  7. Substrate specificity screening of oat (Avena sativa) seeds aminopeptidase demonstrate unusually broad tolerance in S1 pocket.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Anna D; Pawełczak, Małgorzata; Drag, Marcin

    2012-05-01

    Aminopeptidases are proteolytic enzymes that remove one amino acid at a time from N-terminus of peptidic substrates. In plants, inhibitors of aminopeptidases can find potential applications in agriculture as herbicides. In this report we have used a library of fluorogenic derivatives of natural and unnatural amino acids for substrate specificity profiling of oat (Avena sativa) aminopeptidase. Interestingly, we have found that this enzyme recognizes effectively among the natural amino acids basic residues like Arg and Lys, hydrophobic Phe, Leu and Met, but also to some extent acidic residues Asp and Glu. In the case of unnatural amino acids hydrophobic residues (hPhe and hCha) and basic hArg were preferentially recognized. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Growth of self-standing GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-Jae; Fujii, Katsushi; Goto, Takenari; Kim, Chinkyo; Chang, Jiho; Hong, Soon-Ku; Cho, Meoungwhan; Yao, Takafumi

    2010-03-01

    Large-sized and high-quality free standing GaN are required with the development of GaN-based devices. We have developed new techniques to reduce the price of GaN substrates. In this paper, we introduce a simple fabrication way of freestanding GaN substrate using hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). An evaporable buffer layer was applied for the fabrication of 2inch freestanding GaN to separate from a sapphire substrate, in other words, a freestanding GaN was fabricated only by HVPE (one-stop process) without any process.

  9. Lattice matched semiconductor growth on crystalline metallic substrates

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J; McMahon, William E

    2013-11-05

    Methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and said devices are disclosed. The methods include but are not limited to providing a metal or metal alloy substrate having a crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter (a). The methods further include growing a crystalline semiconductor alloy layer on the crystalline substrate surface by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy. The semiconductor layer may be grown without any buffer layer between the alloy and the crystalline surface of the substrate. The semiconductor alloy may be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the lattice parameter (a). The semiconductor alloy may further be prepared to have a selected band gap.

  10. Substrate-bound growth of Au-Pd diblock nanowire and hybrid nanorod-plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiating; Wang, Yawen; Fan, Zhanxi; Lam, Zhenhui; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Bin; Chen, Hongyu

    2015-04-01

    We expand the scope of the previously developed Active Surface Growth mode for growing substrate-bound ultrathin Pd (d = 4 nm) and Ag nanowires (d = 30 nm) in aqueous solution under ambient conditions. Using Au nanorods as the seeds, selective growth at the contact line between the rod and the substrate eventually leads to an attached Pd nanoplate. The unique growth mode also allows sequential growth of different materials via a single seed, giving substrate-bound Au-Pd diblock nanowires. The new abilities to use seed shape to pre-define the active sites and to apply sequential growth open windows for new pathways to hybrid nanostructures.We expand the scope of the previously developed Active Surface Growth mode for growing substrate-bound ultrathin Pd (d = 4 nm) and Ag nanowires (d = 30 nm) in aqueous solution under ambient conditions. Using Au nanorods as the seeds, selective growth at the contact line between the rod and the substrate eventually leads to an attached Pd nanoplate. The unique growth mode also allows sequential growth of different materials via a single seed, giving substrate-bound Au-Pd diblock nanowires. The new abilities to use seed shape to pre-define the active sites and to apply sequential growth open windows for new pathways to hybrid nanostructures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Supporting TEM and SEM images of control experiments with different reaction conditions and another type of diblock nanowires. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00361j

  11. Chemically Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes as Substrates for Neuronal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hui; Ni, Yingchun; Montana, Vedrana; Haddon, Robert C.; Parpura, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    We report the use of chemically modified carbon nanotubes as a substrate for cultured neurons. The morphological features of neurons that directly reflect their potential capability in synaptic transmission are characterized. The chemical properties of carbon nanotubes are systematically varied by attaching different functional groups that confer known characteristics to the substrate. By manipulating the charge carried by functionalized carbon nanotubes we are able to control the outgrowth and branching pattern of neuronal processes. PMID:21394241

  12. Direct Image-Based Enumeration of Clostridium phytofermentans Cells on Insoluble Plant Biomass Growth Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Alvelo-Maurosa, Jesús G.; Lee, Scott J.; Hazen, Samuel P.

    2015-01-01

    A dual-fluorescent-dye protocol to visualize and quantify Clostridium phytofermentans ISDg (ATCC 700394) cells growing on insoluble cellulosic substrates was developed by combining calcofluor white staining of the growth substrate with cell staining using the nucleic acid dye Syto 9. Cell growth, cell substrate attachment, and fermentation product formation were investigated in cultures containing either Whatman no. 1 filter paper, wild-type Sorghum bicolor, or a reduced-lignin S. bicolor double mutant (bmr-6 bmr-12 double mutant) as the growth substrate. After 3 days of growth, cell numbers in cultures grown on filter paper as the substrate were 6.0- and 2.2-fold higher than cell numbers in cultures with wild-type sorghum and double mutant sorghum, respectively. However, cells produced more ethanol per cell when grown with either sorghum substrate than with filter paper as the substrate. Ethanol yields of cultures were significantly higher with double mutant sorghum than with wild-type sorghum or filter paper as the substrate. Moreover, ethanol production correlated with cell attachment in sorghum cultures: 90% of cells were directly attached to the double mutant sorghum substrate, while only 76% of cells were attached to wild-type sorghum substrate. With filter paper as the growth substrate, ethanol production was correlated with cell number; however, with either wild-type or mutant sorghum, ethanol production did not correlate with cell number, suggesting that only a portion of the microbial cell population was active during growth on sorghum. The dual-staining procedure described here may be used to visualize and enumerate cells directly on insoluble cellulosic substrates, enabling in-depth studies of interactions of microbes with plant biomass. PMID:26637592

  13. Uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) activities in Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens: characterization of a new class of UDG with broad substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Chembazhi, Ullas Valiya; Patil, Vinod Vikas; Sah, Shivjee; Reeve, Wayne; Tiwari, Ravi P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Repair of uracils in DNA is initiated by uracil DNA glycosylases (UDGs). Family 1 UDGs (Ung) are the most efficient and ubiquitous proteins having an exquisite specificity for uracils in DNA. Ung are characterized by motifs A (GQDPY) and B (HPSPLS) sequences. We report a novel dimeric UDG, Blr0248 (BdiUng) from Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens. Although BdiUng contains the motif A (GQDPA), it has low sequence identity to known UDGs. BdiUng prefers single stranded DNA and excises uracil, 5-hydroxymethyl-uracil or xanthine from it. BdiUng is impervious to inhibition by AP DNA, and Ugi protein that specifically inhibits family 1 UDGs. Crystal structure of BdiUng shows similarity with the family 4 UDGs in its overall fold but with family 1 UDGs in key active site residues. However, instead of a classical motif B, BdiUng has a uniquely extended protrusion explaining the lack of Ugi inhibition. Structural and mutational analyses of BdiUng have revealed the basis for the accommodation of diverse substrates into its substrate binding pocket. Phylogenetically, BdiUng belongs to a new UDG family. Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens presents a unique scenario where the presence of at least four families of UDGs may compensate for the absence of an efficient family 1 homologue. PMID:28369586

  14. A Fungal α-Galactosidase from Tricholoma matsutake with Broad Substrate Specificity and Good Hydrolytic Activity on Raffinose Family Oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xueran; Tian, Guoting; Zhao, Yongchang; Zhao, Liyan; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-07-24

    An acidic α-galactosidase designated as TMG was purified from the fruiting bodies The purification protocol entailed ion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose and of Tricholoma matsutake with 136-fold purification and a specific activity of 909 units/mg. Mono-Q and fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. TMG is a monomeric protein exhibiting a molecular mass of 47 kDa in SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. The purified enzyme was identified by LC-MS/MS and three inner amino acid sequences were obtained. The optimum pH and temperature for TMG with pNPGal as substrate were pH 4.5 and 55 °C, respectively. The α-galactosidase activity was strongly inhibited by K+, Ca2+, Cd2+, Hg2+, Ag+ and Zn2+ ions. The enzyme activity was inhibited by the chemical modification agent N-bromosuccinimide (NBS), indicating the importance of tryptophan residue(s) at or near the active site. Besides hydrolyzing pNPGal, TMG also efficaciously catalyzed the degradation of natural substrates such as stachyose, raffinose, and melibiose. Thus TMG can be exploited commercially for improving the nutritional value of soy milk by degradation of indigestible oligosaccharides.

  15. Crystal structure of the leucine aminopeptidase from Pseudomonas putida reveals the molecular basis for its enantioselectivity and broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Kale, Avinash; Pijning, Tjaard; Sonke, Theo; Dijkstra, Bauke W; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W H

    2010-05-21

    The zinc-dependent leucine aminopeptidase from Pseudomonas putida (ppLAP) is an important enzyme for the industrial production of enantiomerically pure amino acids. To provide a better understanding of its structure-function relationships, the enzyme was studied by X-ray crystallography. Crystal structures of native ppLAP at pH 9.5 and pH 5.2, and in complex with the inhibitor bestatin, show that the overall folding and hexameric organization of ppLAP are very similar to those of the closely related di-zinc leucine aminopeptidases (LAPs) from bovine lens and Escherichia coli. At pH 9.5, the active site contains two metal ions, one identified as Mn(2+) or Zn(2+) (site 1), and the other as Zn(2+) (site 2). By using a metal-dependent activity assay it was shown that site 1 in heterologously expressed ppLAP is occupied mainly by Mn(2+). Moreover, it was shown that Mn(2+) has a significant activation effect when bound to site 1 of ppLAP. At pH 5.2, the active site of ppLAP is highly disordered and the two metal ions are absent, most probably due to full protonation of one of the metal-interacting residues, Lys267, explaining why ppLAP is inactive at low pH. A structural comparison of the ppLAP-bestatin complex with inhibitor-bound complexes of bovine lens LAP, along with substrate modelling, gave clear and new insights into its substrate specificity and high level of enantioselectivity.

  16. Competitive graphitization and diamond growth on hot-dip aluminized carbon steel substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. S.; Ma, H. T.; Yang, L. Z.; Zhang, C. Z.; Feng, R. F.; Yang, Q.; Hirose, A.

    2014-09-01

    When carbon steel is directly exposed in 99%H2-1%CH4 gas mixture for plasma enhanced CVD deposition of diamond coatings, an intermediate graphite layer is preferentially formed on the substrate surface, and the substrate is subjected to a severe internal carburization attack. The diamond coatings formed easily delaminate from the steel substrate. Hot dip aluminizing treatment of the carbon steel has markedly promoted diamond nucleation, growth and interfacial adhesion. The formation of graphite intermediate phase on the substrate surface is effectively inhibited and the substrate carburization is also suppressed. The possible mechanism of this transition is discussed based on a series of analytical techniques.

  17. Effect of Ge autodoping during III-V MOVPE growth on Ge substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrutia, Laura; Barrigón, Enrique; García, Iván; Rey-Stolle, Ignacio; Algora, Carlos

    2017-10-01

    During the MOVPE growth of III-V layers on Ge substrates, Ge atoms can be evaporated or etched from the back of the wafer and reach the growth surface, becoming incorporated into the epilayers. This is the so-called Ge autodoping effect, which we have studied through a set of growth experiments of GaInP and Ga(In)As layers lattice matched to Ge substrates, which have been characterized by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy. The role of V/III ratio and growth rate on Ge autodoping has been studied and a MOVPE reactor pre-conditioning prior to the epitaxial growth of III-V semiconductor layers that mitigates this Ge autodoping has been identified. In addition, the use of 2-in. versus 4-in. Ge substrates has been compared and the use of a Si3N4 backside coating for the Ge substrates has been evaluated.

  18. Growth patterns of the slime mold Physarum on a nonuniform substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halvorsrud, Ragnhild; Wagner, Geri

    1998-01-01

    The Myxomycete Physarum polycephalum has been grown on nonuniform substrates, where the nutrients were confined in separated drops of agar medium. Spatial and temporal aspects of the resulting growth structures were studied by time-lapse video techniques and analyzed using image processing software. The growth process on a linear substrate of drops can be described in terms of a searching phase alternating with a feeding phase. On a linear array of drops, the Physarum advanced uniformly after an initial lag phase. On a two-dimensional drop substrate two different growth regimes could be distinguished: branched growth was observed on substrates with small drop diameters and compact growth, similar to growth on uniform substrates, was observed on substrates with larger drop diameters. The drop size is a crucial parameter that mediates characteristic plasmodial morphologies. A crossover from branched to compact growth was observed in some of the experiments. A spatial correlation function was used that could quantitatively distinguish between the different growth regimes.

  19. Growth of homogeneous single-layer graphene on Ni-Ge binary substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Chen, Da; Lu, Zitong; Guo, Qinglei; Ye, Lin; Wei, Xing; Ding, Guqiao; Zhang, Miao; Di, Zengfeng; Liu, Su

    2014-02-01

    In contrast to the commonly used chemical vapor deposition growth that leads to multilayer graphene formation by carbon segregation from the Ni bulk, we designed a Ni-Ge binary system to directly grow graphene film on Ni-Ge binary substrate, via chemical vapor deposition with methane and hydrogen gas as precursors. Our system fully overcomes the fundamental limitations of Ni and yields homogenous single layer graphene over large areas. The chemical vapor deposition growth of graphene on Ni-Ge binary substrate shows that self limiting monolayer graphene growth can be obtained on these substrate.

  20. Substrate flexibility regulates growth and apoptosis of normal but not transformed cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. B.; Dembo, M.; Wang, Y. L.

    2000-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of oncogenic transformation is anchorage-independent growth (27). Here we demonstrate that responses to substrate rigidity play a major role in distinguishing the growth behavior of normal cells from that of transformed cells. We cultured normal or H-ras-transformed NIH 3T3 cells on flexible collagen-coated polyacrylamide substrates with similar chemical properties but different rigidity. Compared with cells cultured on stiff substrates, nontransformed cells on flexible substrates showed a decrease in the rate of DNA synthesis and an increase in the rate of apoptosis. These responses on flexible substrates are coupled to decreases in cell spreading area and traction forces. In contrast, transformed cells maintained their growth and apoptotic characteristics regardless of substrate flexibility. The responses in cell spreading area and traction forces to substrate flexibility were similarly diminished. Our results suggest that normal cells are capable of probing substrate rigidity and that proper mechanical feedback is required for regulating cell shape, cell growth, and survival. The loss of this response can explain the unregulated growth of transformed cells.

  1. Substrate flexibility regulates growth and apoptosis of normal but not transformed cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. B.; Dembo, M.; Wang, Y. L.

    2000-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of oncogenic transformation is anchorage-independent growth (27). Here we demonstrate that responses to substrate rigidity play a major role in distinguishing the growth behavior of normal cells from that of transformed cells. We cultured normal or H-ras-transformed NIH 3T3 cells on flexible collagen-coated polyacrylamide substrates with similar chemical properties but different rigidity. Compared with cells cultured on stiff substrates, nontransformed cells on flexible substrates showed a decrease in the rate of DNA synthesis and an increase in the rate of apoptosis. These responses on flexible substrates are coupled to decreases in cell spreading area and traction forces. In contrast, transformed cells maintained their growth and apoptotic characteristics regardless of substrate flexibility. The responses in cell spreading area and traction forces to substrate flexibility were similarly diminished. Our results suggest that normal cells are capable of probing substrate rigidity and that proper mechanical feedback is required for regulating cell shape, cell growth, and survival. The loss of this response can explain the unregulated growth of transformed cells.

  2. A thermophilic endo-1,4-β-glucanase from Talaromyces emersonii CBS394.64 with broad substrate specificity and great application potentials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Luo, Huiying; Bai, Yingguo; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Xue, Xianli; Yao, Bin

    2014-08-01

    Thermophilic cellulases are of significant interest to the efficient conversion of plant cell wall polysaccharides into simple sugars. In this study, a thermophilic and thermostable endo-1,4-β-glucanase, TeEgl5A, was identified in the thermophilic fungus Talaromyces emersonii CBS394.64 and functionally expressed in Pichia pastoris. Purified recombinant TeEgl5A exhibits optimal activity at pH 4.5 and 90 °C. It is highly stable at 70 °C and over a broad pH range of 1.0-10.0, and shows strong resistance to most metal ions, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and proteases. TeEgl5A has broad substrate specificity and exhibits high activity on substrates containing β-1,4-glycosidic bonds and β-1,3-glycosidic bonds (barley β-glucan, laminarin, lichenan, CMC-Na, carob bean gum, and birchwood xylan). Under simulated mashing conditions, addition of 60 U TeEgl5A reduced more viscosity (10.0 vs.7.6 %) than 80 U of Ultraflo XL from Novozymes. These properties make TeEgl5A a good candidate for extensive application in the detergent, textile, feed, and food industries.

  3. Lattice matched crystalline substrates for cubic nitride semiconductor growth

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J; McMahon, William E

    2015-02-24

    Disclosed embodiments include methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and devices fabricated thereby. The methods include, but are not limited to, providing a substrate having a cubic crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter and growing a cubic crystalline group III-nitride alloy layer on the cubic crystalline substrate by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy. The cubic crystalline group III-nitride alloy may be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the lattice parameter of the substrate (a). The group III-nitride alloy may be a cubic crystalline In.sub.xGa.sub.yAl.sub.1-x-yN alloy. The lattice parameter of the In.sub.xGa.sub.yAl.sub.1-x-yN or other group III-nitride alloy may be related to the substrate lattice parameter by (a')= 2(a) or (a')=(a)/ 2. The semiconductor alloy may be prepared to have a selected band gap.

  4. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from the cold adapted microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii: a low temperature active enzyme with broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Angelaccio, Sebastiana; Florio, Rita; Consalvi, Valerio; Festa, Guido; Pascarella, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from the psychrophilic microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified as a His-tag fusion protein. The enzyme was characterized with respect to its spectroscopic, catalytic, and thermodynamic properties. The properties of the psychrophilic enzyme have been contrasted with the characteristics of the homologous counterpart from E. coli, which has been structurally and functionally characterized in depth and with which it shares 75% sequence identity. Spectroscopic measures confirmed that the psychrophilic enzyme displays structural properties almost identical to those of the mesophilic counterpart. At variance, the P. ingrahamii enzyme showed decreased thermostability and high specific activity at low temperature, both of which are typical features of cold adapted enzymes. Furthermore, it was a more efficient biocatalyst compared to E. coli serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) particularly for side reactions. Many β-hydroxy-α-amino acids are SHMT substrates and represent important compounds in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and food additives. Thanks to these attractive properties, this enzyme could have a significant potential for biotechnological applications.

  5. Study of spiral growth on 4H-silicon carbide on-axis substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masumoto, Keiko; Kojima, Kazutoshi; Okumura, Hajime

    2017-10-01

    We grew epitaxial layers on on-axis carbon-face 4H-silicon carbide substrates and investigated the growth conditions for the generation of spiral growth. We discovered that spiral growth occurs in regions where the local off-angle is less than 0.05° and when the spiral hillocks have a tilt angle of 0.06°. Moreover, we found that each spiral hillock coalesced without causing dislocation in the areas where the spiral growth occurred. Our results indicate that spiral growth is dominant when the spiral hillocks have a tilt angle greater than the off-angle of the substrate. Step-flow growth is overcome by spiral growth because the rate of spiral growth is greater than that of step-flow growth.

  6. Growth of single crystalline germanium thin film on (100) silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Wook; Lee, Jaejun; Park, Youn Ho; Park, Jeong Min; Park, Sangwon; Kim, Yeon Joo; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2017-03-01

    Epitaxial growth of germanium thin films (GeTFs) on Si (111) and Si (100) substrates was investigated, and the prepared films were compared with the films grown on SiO2 substrates. Ge films were prepared in three steps. Initially, a Ge interlayer film with thickness of ˜ 10 nm was deposited on the substrate followed by annealing and recrystallization of the film. A Ge film with a thickness of 500 nm was then deposited. A single crystalline Ge film was grown on Si (100) whereas polycrystalline films were grown on the other substrates. The growth rate of the films depends on the type of the substrates used, which in turn determines the crystallinity of the films. Highly crystalline films were obtained with slow growth rates. The single crystalline epitaxial layer of GeTFs formed on Si (100) exhibited a lower threading dislocation density as compared with those grown on Si (111) and SiO2.

  7. MPACVD growth of single crystalline diamond substrates with PCD rimless and expanding surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nad, Shreya; Charris, Amanda; Asmussen, Jes

    2016-10-01

    Single crystal diamond (SCD) growth was performed in optimized pocket substrate holders at a high pressure (240 Torr) and a high power density (˜1000 W/cm3). In an effort to overcome the challenges of growing large area SCD substrates without a corresponding polycrystalline diamond (PCD) rim, a growth recipe using these pocket holders was developed. This growth recipe controls the substrate temperature (Ts) and the incident microwave power (Pinc) in a prescribed function of growth time. Through this process, the feasibility to enlarge the SCD substrate in situ, i.e., during the growth itself is shown. By allowing the temperature to increase from ˜980 °C to 1040 °C, then reducing the temperature, and then allowing it to drift up again, the deposition process alternates between the fast growth of the different crystal directions (i.e., <110>, <111>, and <100>) and a slow growth to smoothen the top surface. This leads to an increased lateral SCD growth. The slow growth of the crystal faces in turn leads to a smooth and enlarged top surface. Certain strategies such as the termination of the growth process at the appropriate time are critical in obtaining flat and smooth SCD surfaces without the formation of any PCD rim. The SCD substrates grown via this method have been analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopies. The lateral SCD surface area increased between 1.7 and 2 times greater than the initial seed surface area during one continuous run. The deposited SCDs have high growth rates of ˜30 μm/h resulting in smooth, flat and rimless substrates, hence indicating the improvement in the quality and morphology of the deposited substrates.

  8. A thraustochytrid diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 with broad substrate specificity strongly increases oleic acid content in engineered Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunyu; Iskandarov, Umidjon; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2013-01-01

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) catalyses the last step in acyl-CoA-dependent triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis and is an important determinant of cellular oil content and quality. In this study, a gene, designated TaDGAT2, encoding a type 2 DGAT (DGAT2)-related enzyme was identified from the oleaginous marine protist Thraustochytrium aureum. The deduced TaDGAT2 sequence contains a ~460 amino acid domain most closely related to DGAT2s from Dictyostelium sp. (45–50% identity). Recombinant TaDGAT2 restored TAG biosynthesis to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae H1246 TAG-deficient mutant, and microsomes from the complemented mutant displayed DGAT activity with C16 and C18 saturated and unsaturated fatty acyl-CoA and diacylglycerol substrates. To examine its biotechnological potential, TaDGAT2 was expressed under control of a strong seed-specific promoter in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and the high linoleic acid fad3fae1 mutant. In both backgrounds, little change was detected in seed oil content, but a striking increase in oleic acid content of seeds was observed. This increase was greatest in fad3fae1 seeds, where relative amounts of oleic acid increased nearly 2-fold to >50% of total fatty acids. In addition, >2-fold increase in oleic acid levels was detected in the triacylglycerol sn-2 position and in the major seed phospholipid phosphatidylcholine. These results suggest that increased seed oleic acid content mediated by TaDGAT2 is influenced in part by the fatty acid composition of host cells and occurs not by enhancing oleic acid content at the TAG sn-3 position directly but by increasing total oleic acid levels in seeds, presumably by limiting flux through phosphatidylcholine-based desaturation reactions. PMID:23814277

  9. A thraustochytrid diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 with broad substrate specificity strongly increases oleic acid content in engineered Arabidopsis thaliana seeds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunyu; Iskandarov, Umidjon; Klotz, Elliott T; Stevens, Robyn L; Cahoon, Rebecca E; Nazarenus, Tara J; Pereira, Suzette L; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2013-08-01

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) catalyses the last step in acyl-CoA-dependent triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis and is an important determinant of cellular oil content and quality. In this study, a gene, designated TaDGAT2, encoding a type 2 DGAT (DGAT2)-related enzyme was identified from the oleaginous marine protist Thraustochytrium aureum. The deduced TaDGAT2 sequence contains a ~460 amino acid domain most closely related to DGAT2s from Dictyostelium sp. (45-50% identity). Recombinant TaDGAT2 restored TAG biosynthesis to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae H1246 TAG-deficient mutant, and microsomes from the complemented mutant displayed DGAT activity with C16 and C18 saturated and unsaturated fatty acyl-CoA and diacylglycerol substrates. To examine its biotechnological potential, TaDGAT2 was expressed under control of a strong seed-specific promoter in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and the high linoleic acid fad3fae1 mutant. In both backgrounds, little change was detected in seed oil content, but a striking increase in oleic acid content of seeds was observed. This increase was greatest in fad3fae1 seeds, where relative amounts of oleic acid increased nearly 2-fold to >50% of total fatty acids. In addition, >2-fold increase in oleic acid levels was detected in the triacylglycerol sn-2 position and in the major seed phospholipid phosphatidylcholine. These results suggest that increased seed oleic acid content mediated by TaDGAT2 is influenced in part by the fatty acid composition of host cells and occurs not by enhancing oleic acid content at the TAG sn-3 position directly but by increasing total oleic acid levels in seeds, presumably by limiting flux through phosphatidylcholine-based desaturation reactions.

  10. Mathematical modeling of the growth and development of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis on artificial substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasechkina, E. F.; Kazankova, I. I.

    2014-11-01

    A mathematical model simulating the growth and development of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis Lam. on artificial substrates has been constructed. The model is based on experimental data and contains mathematical descriptions of the filtration, respiration, excretion, spawning, and growth of an individual during its ontogenesis from the moment it attaches to a solid substrate to the attainment of a marketable size. The test computations have been compared to the available observation data for mussel farms.

  11. Influence of substrate material, orientation, and surface termination on GaN nanowire growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Fabian; Weiszer, Saskia; Hetzl, Martin; Winnerl, Andrea; Garrido, Jose A.; Stutzmann, Martin

    2014-08-01

    In this work, we investigate the fundamental role of the substrate material, surface orientation, and termination on GaN nanowire (NW) nucleation and growth. First of all, the use of a patterned a-Si/diamond substrate confirms that NW shape and dimension are mainly determined by the applied growth conditions instead of the nature of the substrate. More important is the surface orientation as it defines growth direction and epitaxial relationship towards the GaN NWs, where both (111) and (100) surfaces yield NW growth for equivalent growth conditions. (110) substrates are found to be not suited for NW growth. Finally, the surface termination of diamond is demonstrated to survive the employed growth conditions and, therefore, to affect the nucleation of nanowires and the electronic properties of the heterointerface by its surface dipoles. This difference in nucleation is exploited as an alternative approach for selective area growth without deposition of a foreign mask material, which might also be transferable to other substrates.

  12. Influence of substrate material, orientation, and surface termination on GaN nanowire growth

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Fabian Weiszer, Saskia; Hetzl, Martin; Winnerl, Andrea; Garrido, Jose A.; Stutzmann, Martin

    2014-08-07

    In this work, we investigate the fundamental role of the substrate material, surface orientation, and termination on GaN nanowire (NW) nucleation and growth. First of all, the use of a patterned a-Si/diamond substrate confirms that NW shape and dimension are mainly determined by the applied growth conditions instead of the nature of the substrate. More important is the surface orientation as it defines growth direction and epitaxial relationship towards the GaN NWs, where both (111) and (100) surfaces yield NW growth for equivalent growth conditions. (110) substrates are found to be not suited for NW growth. Finally, the surface termination of diamond is demonstrated to survive the employed growth conditions and, therefore, to affect the nucleation of nanowires and the electronic properties of the heterointerface by its surface dipoles. This difference in nucleation is exploited as an alternative approach for selective area growth without deposition of a foreign mask material, which might also be transferable to other substrates.

  13. A novel, broadly applicable approach to isolation of fungi in diverse growth media.

    PubMed

    Smithee, Shane; Tracy, Steven; Drescher, Kristen M; Pitz, Lisa A; McDonald, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Creatinine (CRN) is a vertebrate metabolic waste product normally found in blood and urine. Previous work demonstrated that the hydrochloride salt of creatinine (CRN-HCl) acted as a potent inhibitor of bacterial replication. Creatinine hydrochloride does not inhibit the growth of yeasts or molds (i.e. fungi), making it a potentially useful addition to growth media to facilitate isolation of environmental or clinically relevant fungal species. Sabouraud dextrose agar is the current medium of choice for detection and isolation of fungi although it does not offer optimal nutritional requirements for some fungi and can permit growth of bacteria which may subsequently inhibit fungal growth and/or obscure fungal isolation. We show that CRN-HCl effectively suppresses bacterial growth in either liquid or solid agar media while allowing outgrowth of slower growing fungi using either experimentally prepared samples or environmental samples. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Surface diffusion and substrate-nanowire adatom exchange in InAs nanowire growth.

    PubMed

    Dayeh, Shadi A; Yu, Edward T; Wang, Deli

    2009-05-01

    We report new fundamental insights into InAs nanowire (NW) nucleation and evolution on InAs (111)B surfaces using organometallic vapor phase epitaxy and present the first experimental demonstration of two distinct NW growth regimes, defined by the direction of substrate-NW adatom exchange, that lead to nonlinear growth rates. We show that the NW elongation rate and morphology in these two growth regimes are governed by the relative difference between the In adatom diffusion lengths on the growth substrate surface and on the NW sidewalls, resulting in strong growth rate dependence on the NW length. These results indicate that surface solid-phase diffusion of In adatoms is a key process in InAs NW growth, which is also supported by diameter-dependent growth rates. These developments enable rational growth of axial and radial NW heterostructures.

  15. Plant Growth Experiments in Zeoponic Substrates: Applications for Advanced Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Gruener, J. E.; Henderson, K. E.; Steinberg, S. L.; Barta, D. J.; Galindo, C.; Henninger, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    A zeoponic plant-growth system is defined as the cultivation of plants in artificial soils, which have zeolites as a major component (Allen and Ming, 1995). Zeolites are crystalline, hydrated aluminosilicate minerals that have the ability to exchange constituent cations without major change of the mineral structure. Recently, zeoponic systems developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) slowly release some (Allen et at., 1995) or all of the essential plant-growth nutrients (Ming et at., 1995). These systems have NH4- and K-exchanged clinoptilolite (a natural zeolite) and either natural or synthetic apatite (a calcium phosphate mineral). For the natural apatite system, Ca and P were made available to the plant by the dissolution of apatite. Potassium and NH4-N were made available by ion-exchange reactions involving Ca(2+) from apatite dissolution and K(+) and NH4(+) on zeolitic exchange sites. In addition to NH4-N, K, Ca, and P, the synthetic apatite system also supplied Mg, S, and other micronutrients during dissolution (Figure 1). The overall objective of this research task is to develop zeoponic substrates wherein all plant growth nutrients are supplied by the plant growth medium for several growth seasons with only the addition of water. The substrate is being developed for plant growth in Advanced Life Support (ALS) testbeds (i.e., BioPLEX) and microgravity plant growth experiments. Zeoponic substrates have been used for plant growth experiments on two Space Shuttle flight experiments (STS-60; STS-63; Morrow et aI., 1995). These substrates may be ideally suited for plant growth experiments on the International Space Station and applications in ALS testbeds. However, there are several issues that need to be resolved before zeoponics will be the choice substrate for plant growth experiments in space. The objective of this paper is to provide an overview on recent research directed toward the refinement of zeoponic plant growth substrates.

  16. Computational Model for Liquid Phase Electro-Epitaxial Crystal Growth on Partially Masked Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khenner, Mikhail; Braun, Richard J.

    2003-03-01

    A computational model for semiconductor crystal growth on a partially masked substrate under simplified LPEE conditions is developed. The model assumes isothermal diffusional growth from molten metal solution, which is enhanced by applied DC current through crystal/melt interface. Finite-difference, front-tracking method is used to numerically evolve the interface according to the set of governing partial differential equations and boundary conditions. Computed examples show strong influence of the electromigration on growth rates in vertical and lateral directions and the dependence of growth on electrical conductivities of substrate and mask materials as well as on wetting contact angle. The study presented is the first attempt to model LPEE growth on patterned substrates commonly employed in semiconductor industry.

  17. Effects of substrate orientation on the growth of InSb nanostructures by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. Y.; Torfi, A.; Pei, C.; Wang, W. I.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the effects of substrate orientation on InSb quantum structure growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are presented. Motivated by the observation that (411) evolves naturally as a stable facet during MBE crystal growth, comparison studies have been carried out to investigate the effects of the crystal orientation of the underlying GaSb substrate on the growth of InSb by MBE. By depositing InSb on a number of different substrate orientations, namely: (100), (311), (411), and (511), a higher nanostructure density was observed on the (411) surface compared with the other orientations. This result suggests that the (411) orientation presents a superior surface in MBE growth to develop a super-flat GaSb buffer surface, naturally favorable for nanostructure growth.

  18. New Crystal-Growth Methods for Producing Lattice-Matched Substrates for High-Temperature Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, L.A.

    2008-06-24

    This effort addressed the technical problem of identifying and growing, on a commercial scale, suitable single-crystal substrates for the subsequent deposition of epitaxial thin films of high temperature semiconductors such as GaN/AlN. The lack of suitable lattice-matched substrate materials was one of the major problem areas in the development of semiconducting devices for use at elevated temperatures as well as practical opto-electronic devices based on Al- and GaN technology. Such lattice-matched substrates are necessary in order to reduce or eliminate high concentrations of defects and dislocations in GaN/AlN and related epitaxial thin films. This effort concentrated, in particular, on the growth of single crystals of ZnO for substrate applications and it built on previous ORNL experience in the chemical vapor transport growth of large single crystals of zinc oxide. This combined expertise in the substrate growth area was further complemented by the ability of G. Eres and his collaborators to deposit thin films of GaN on the subject substrates and the overall ORNL capability for characterizing the quality of such films. The research effort consisted of research on the growth of two candidate substrate materials in conjunction with concurrent research on the growth and characterization of GaN films, i.e. the effort combined bulk crystal growth capabilities in the area of substrate production at both ORNL and the industrial partner, Commercial Crystal Growth Laboratories (CCL), Naples, Florida, with the novel thin-film deposition techniques previously developed in the ORNL SSD.

  19. Growth factor and co-receptor release by structural regulation of substrate metalloprotease accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Liseth M.; Hartmann, Monika; Schubach, Salome; Ma, Junzhi; Herrlich, Peter; Herrlich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Release of cytokines, growth factors and other life-essential molecules from precursors by a-disintegrin-and-metalloproteases (ADAMs) is regulated with high substrate-specificity. We hypothesized that this is achieved by cleavage-regulatory intracellular-domain (ICD)-modifications of the precursors. We show here that cleavage-stimuli-induced specific ICD-modifications cause structural substrate changes that enhance ectodomain sensitivity of neuregulin-1 (NRG1; epidermal-growth-factor) or CD44 (receptor-tyrosine-kinase (RTK) co-receptor) to chymotrypsin/trypsin or soluble ADAM. This inside-out signal transfer required substrate homodimerization and was prevented by cleavage-inhibitory ICD-mutations. In chimeras, regulation could be conferred to a foreign ectodomain, suggesting a common higher-order structure. We predict that substrate-specific protease-accessibility-regulation controls release of numerous ADAM substrates. PMID:27876763

  20. Efficient broad color luminescence from InGaN/GaN single quantum-well nanocolumn crystals on Si (111) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xuehua; Wang, Yongjin; Hu, Fangren

    2017-10-01

    Nanocolumn InGaN/GaN single quantum well crystals were deposited on Si (111) substrate with nitrified Ga dots as buffer layer. Transmission electron microscopy image shows the crystals' diameter of 100-130 nm and length of about 900 nm. Nanoscale spatial phase separation of cubic and hexagonal GaN was observed by selective area electron diffraction on the quantum well layer. Raman spectrum of the quantum well crystals proved that the crystals were fully relaxed. Room temperature photoluminescence from 450 to 750 nm and full width at half maximum of about 420 meV indicate broad color luminescence covering blue, green, yellow and red emission, which is helpful for the fabrication of tunable optoelectronic devices and colorful light emitting diodes.

  1. Ammothermal Growth of Gan Substrates For Leds: High-Pressure Ammonothermal Process for Bulk Gallium Nitride Crystal Growth for Energy Efficient Commercially Competitive Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: The new GaN crystal growth method is adapted from that used to grow quartz crystals, which are very inexpensive and represent the second-largest market for single crystals for electronic applications (after silicon). More extreme conditions are required to grow GaN crystals and therefore a new type of chemical growth chamber was invented that is suitable for large-scale manufacturing. A new process was developed that grows GaN crystals at a rate that is more than double that of current processes. The new technology will enable GaN substrates with best-in-world quality at lowest-in-world prices, which in turn will enable new generations of white LEDs, lasers for full-color displays, and high-performance power electronics.

  2. The impact of substrate selection for the controlled growth of graphene by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, T.; Lopes, J. M. J.; Wofford, J. M.; Oliveira, M. H.; Dubslaff, M.; Hanke, M.; Jahn, U.; Geelhaar, L.; Riechert, H.

    2015-09-01

    We examine how substrate selection impacts the resulting film properties in graphene growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Graphene growth on metallic as well as dielectric templates was investigated. We find that MBE offers control over the number of atomic graphene layers regardless of the substrate used. High structural quality could be achieved for graphene prepared on Ni (111) films which were epitaxially grown on MgO (111). For growth either on Al2O3 (0001) or on (6√3×6√3)R30°-reconstructed SiC (0001) surfaces, graphene with a higher density of defects is obtained. Interestingly, despite their defective nature, the layers possess a well defined epitaxial relation to the underlying substrate. These results demonstrate the feasibility of MBE as a technique for realizing the scalable synthesis of this two-dimensional crystal on a variety of substrates.

  3. Characterization of the RokA and HexA broad-substrate-specificity hexokinases from Bacteroides fragilis and their role in hexose and N-acetylglucosamine utilization.

    PubMed

    Brigham, Christopher J; Malamy, Michael H

    2005-02-01

    Bacteroides fragilis, a human gastrointestinal commensal and an opportunistic pathogen, utilizes simple and complex sugars and polysaccharides for growth in the large intestine and at sites of infection. Because B. fragilis lacks transport-linked sugar phosphorylation systems, cytoplasmic kinase(s) was expected to be required for the phosphorylation of hexoses and hexosamines. We have now identified two hexose kinases that are important for growth of B. fragilis on glucose, mannose, and other sugars. One kinase (RokA), a member of the ROK family of proteins, was found to be the sole kinase for activation of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (NAG). The other kinase (HexA) is responsible for the majority of the glucose kinase activity in the cell, although a hexA deletion mutant strain was not defective for growth on any substrate tested. Deletion of both the rokA and hexA kinase genes resulted in inability of the cell to use glucose, mannose, NAG, and many other sugars. We purified RokA and determined its approximate molecular mass to be 36.5 kDa. The purified RokA protein was shown to phosphorylate several substrates, including glucose, NAG, and mannose, but not N-acetylmannosamine or N-acetylneuraminic acid. Phylogenetic analysis of RokA showed that it is most similar to kinases from the Cytophaga-Flavibacterium-Bacteroides group, while HexA was most similar to other bacterial hexokinases and eukaryotic hexokinases.

  4. Substrate mediated smooth growth of para-sexiphenyl on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelsema, Bene; Hlawacek, Gregor; Khokhar, Fawad S.; van Gastel, Raoul; Teichert, Christian

    2010-03-01

    We report on the layer-by-layer growthof lying para-sexiphenyl (6P) molecules on metal supported graphene flakes. The formation of multilayers has been monitored in situ by means of LEEM. μ-LEED has been used to reveal a bulk-like structure of the submonolayer, monolayer and multilayer regime. Graphene is a flexible, highly conductive and transparent electrode material, making it a promising technological substrate for organic semiconductors. 6P is a blue light emitting molecule with a high charge carrier mobility. The combination of an established deposition technique with the unique properties of organic semiconductors and graphene is an enabler for future flexible and cost efficient devices based on small conjugated molecules.

  5. The Aspergillus niger growth on the treated concrete substrate using variable antifungals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parjo, U. K.; Sunar, N. M.; Leman, A. M.; Gani, P.; Embong, Z.; Tajudin, S. A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the Aspergillus niger (A. niger) growth on substrates after incorporates with different compounds of antifungals which is normally used in food industry. The antifungals named as potassium sorbate (PS), calcium benzoate (CB) and zinc salicylate (ZS) were applied on concrete substrate covered with different wall finishing such as acrylic paint (AP), glycerol based paint (GBP), thin wallpaper (THIN) and thick wallpaper (THICK). The concrete substrate were inoculated with spore suspension, incubated at selected temperature (30oC) and relative humidity (90%)in plant growth chamber. The observations were done from the Day 3 until Day 27. The results showed that the growth of the A. niger for concrete treated by PS for AP, GBP, THIN, and THICK were 64%, 32%, 11% and 100%, respectively. Meanwhile for CB, the growth of A. niger on AP, GBP, THIN, and THICK were 100%, 12%, 41%, and 13%, respectively. Similarly, treated concrete by ZS revealed that the growth of A. niger on the same substrate cover were 33%, 47%, 40%, and 39%, respectively. The results obtained in this study provide a valuable knowledge on the abilities of antifungals to remediate A. niger that inoculated on the concrete substrate. Consequently, this study proved that the PS covering with THIN more efficiency compares CB and ZS to prevent A. niger growth.

  6. Rabbit 3-hydroxyhexobarbital dehydrogenase is a NADPH-preferring reductase with broad substrate specificity for ketosteroids, prostaglandin D₂, and other endogenous and xenobiotic carbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Matsumoto, Atsuko; Arai, Yuki; Ohno, Satoshi; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Tajima, Kazuo; Bunai, Yasuo; Yamano, Shigeru; Hara, Akira; Kitade, Yukio

    2013-11-01

    3-Hydroxyhexobarbital dehydrogenase (3HBD) catalyzes NAD(P)⁺-linked oxidation of 3-hydroxyhexobarbital into 3-oxohexobarbital. The enzyme has been thought to act as a dehydrogenase for xenobiotic alcohols and some hydroxysteroids, but its physiological function remains unknown. We have purified rabbit 3HBD, isolated its cDNA, and examined its specificity for coenzymes and substrates, reaction directionality and tissue distribution. 3HBD is a member (AKR1C29) of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily, and exhibited high preference for NADP(H) over NAD(H) at a physiological pH of 7.4. In the NADPH-linked reduction, 3HBD showed broad substrate specificity for a variety of quinones, ketones and aldehydes, including 3-, 17- and 20-ketosteroids and prostaglandin D₂, which were converted to 3α-, 17β- and 20α-hydroxysteroids and 9α,11β-prostaglandin F₂, respectively. Especially, α-diketones (such as isatin and diacetyl) and lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes (such as 4-oxo- and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenals) were excellent substrates showing low K(m) values (0.1-5.9 μM). In 3HBD-overexpressed cells, 3-oxohexobarbital and 5β-androstan-3α-ol-17-one were metabolized into 3-hydroxyhexobarbital and 5β-androstane-3α,17β-diol, respectively, but the reverse reactions did not proceed. The overexpression of the enzyme in the cells decreased the cytotoxicity of 4-oxo-2-nonenal. The mRNA for 3HBD was ubiquitously expressed in rabbit tissues. The results suggest that 3HBD is an NADPH-preferring reductase, and plays roles in the metabolisms of steroids, prostaglandin D₂, carbohydrates and xenobiotics, as well as a defense system, protecting against reactive carbonyl compounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. MOCVD growth of GaN on Si through novel substrate modification techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Jarod C.

    GaN is a semiconductor material with great potential for use in high power electronics and optoelectronics due to the high electron mobility, high breakdown voltage, high thermal stability, and large direct bandgap of GaN. Si is a desirable substrate material for GaN heteroepitaxy due to the low cost of production, large wafer sizes available, and current widespread use in the electronics industry. The growth of GaN/Si devices suffers from the lattice and CTE mismatches between GaN and Si and therefore multiple methods of strain reduction have been employed to counter these effects. In this work we presented two novel methods of substrate modification to promote the growth of device quality GaN on Si. Initial work focused on the implantation of AlN/Si(111) substrates with N+ ions below the AlN/Si(111) interface. A reduction in the initial compressive stress in GaN films as well as the degree of tensile stress generation during growth was observed on implanted samples. Optical microscopy of the GaN surfaces showed reduced channeling crack density on implanted substrates. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies showed a disordered layer in the Si substrate at the implantation depth which consisted of a mixture of polycrystalline and amorphous Si. Evidence was provided to suggest that the disordered layer at the implantation depth was acting as a compliant layer which decoupled the GaN film from the bulk Si substrate and partially accommodated the tensile stress formed during growth and cooling. A reduction in threading dislocation (TD) density on ion implanted substrates was also observed. Additional studies showed that by increasing the lateral size of AlN islands, the tensile growth stress and TD density in GaN films on ion implanted substrates could be further reduced. XRD studies showed an expansion of the AlN lattice on implanted substrates with larger lateral island sizes. The final tensile growth stress of films on implanted substrates was further

  8. Control of heterogeneous nucleation and growth kinetics of dopamine-melanin by altering substrate chemistry.

    PubMed

    Klosterman, Luke; Riley, John K; Bettinger, Christopher John

    2015-03-24

    Dopamine-melanin (DM or "polydopamine") can be deposited on virtually any substrate from solution through autoxidation of dopamine. The versatility of this process has allowed surface-mediated assembly of DM for a wide variety of functional coatings. Here we report the impact of well-defined surface chemistries on the nucleation and growth of such films. DM was deposited on silicon dioxide (SiO2) and SiO2 substrates modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) bearing octadecyl (C18), phenethyl, and aminopropyl functional groups. Atomic force microscopy revealed three-dimensional islands whose areal density and surface coverage are lowest on bare SiO2 substrates and highest on the neutral aromatic and aliphatic substrates. Increasing the pH of the solution from 8.2 to 10 dissociates catechol moieties in DM and inhibits adsorption on negatively charged SiO2 substrates. The growth rate of DM films on SAM-modified SiO2 is maximized at pH 9.5 and almost completely abolished at pH 10 because of increased DM solubility. The initial rates of DM adsorption were measured using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation measurements. The initial adsorption rate is proportional to the nucleation density, which increases as the hydrophobicity of the substrate increases. Taken together, these data provide insight into the rates of heterogeneous nucleation and growth of DM on substrates with well-defined chemistries.

  9. Direct growth of graphene film on germanium substrate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Zhang, Miao; Zhu, Yun; Ding, Guqiao; Jiang, Da; Guo, Qinglei; Liu, Su; Xie, Xiaoming; Chu, Paul K; Di, Zengfeng; Wang, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has been predicted to play a role in post-silicon electronics due to the extraordinary carrier mobility. Chemical vapor deposition of graphene on transition metals has been considered as a major step towards commercial realization of graphene. However, fabrication based on transition metals involves an inevitable transfer step which can be as complicated as the deposition of graphene itself. By ambient-pressure chemical vapor deposition, we demonstrate large-scale and uniform depositon of high-quality graphene directly on a Ge substrate which is wafer scale and has been considered to replace conventional Si for the next generation of high-performance metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). The immiscible Ge-C system under equilibrium conditions dictates graphene depositon on Ge via a self-limiting and surface-mediated process rather than a precipitation process as observed from other metals with high carbon solubility. Our technique is compatible with modern microelectronics technology thus allowing integration with high-volume production of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS).

  10. Growth evolution of AlN films on silicon (111) substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Wenliang; Yang, Weijia; Zhou, Shizhong; Lin, Zhiting; Li, Guoqiang

    2015-05-14

    AlN films with various thicknesses have been grown on Si(111) substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The surface morphology and structural property of the as-grown AlN films have been investigated carefully to comprehensively explore the epitaxial behavior. The ∼2 nm-thick AlN film initially grown on Si substrate exhibits an atomically flat surface with a root-mean-square surface roughness of 0.23 nm. As the thickness increases, AlN grains gradually grow larger, causing a relatively rough surface. The surface morphology of ∼120 nm-thick AlN film indicates that AlN islands coalesce together and eventually form AlN layers. The decreasing growth rate from 240 to 180 nm/h is a direct evidence that the growth mode of AlN films grown on Si substrates by PLD changes from the islands growth to the layer growth. The evolution of AlN films throughout the growth is studied deeply, and its corresponding growth mechanism is hence proposed. These results are instructional for the growth of high-quality nitride films on Si substrates by PLD, and of great interest for the fabrication of AlN-based devices.

  11. Increased monolayer domain size and patterned growth of tungsten disulfide through controlling surface energy of substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Kyle; Kang, Kyungnam; Fu, Shichen; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2016-08-01

    We report a surface energy-controlled low-pressure chemical vapor deposition growth of WS2 monolayers on SiO2 using pre-growth oxygen plasma treatment of substrates, facilitating increased monolayer surface coverage and patterned growth without lithography. Oxygen plasma treatment of the substrate caused an increase in the average domain size of WS2 monolayers by 78%  ±  2% while having a slight reduction in nucleation density, which translates to increased monolayer surface coverage. This substrate effect on growth was exploited to grow patterned WS2 monolayers by patterned plasma treatment on patterned substrates and by patterned source material with resolutions less than 10 µm. Contact angle-based surface energy measurements revealed a dramatic increase in polar surface energy. A growth model was proposed with lowered activation energies for growth and increased surface diffusion length consistent with the range of results observed. WS2 samples grown with and without oxygen plasma were similar high quality monolayers verified through transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, Raman, and photoluminescence measurements. This technique enables the production of large-grain size, patterned WS2 without a post-growth lithography process, thereby providing clean surfaces for device applications.

  12. Vertical growth of cadmium sulfide crystals on a silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, A. P.; Rubets, V. P.; Antipov, V. V.

    2017-02-01

    The results of the technological and microscopy studies of the mechanisms of the vertical growth of cadmium sulfide crystals during vacuum synthesis from the vapor phase were reported. Whisker crystals with a diameter from 10 nm to a few micrometers and with a length of dozens of millimeters can be grown by the vacuum vapor phase synthesis in a quasi-closed volume. The results of studies are satisfactorily explained in terms of the classical vapor-liquid-crystal model. The SEM micrographs are presented.

  13. Growth and characterization of broad spectrum infrared emitting GaInAsP/InP heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakovics, V.; Nádas, J.; Réti, I.; Dücső, Cs.; Battistig, G.

    2017-06-01

    Broad spectrum InGaAsP/InP light emitting heterostructures were grown by low temperature liquid phase epitaxy (LPE). The structure of the LED wafers was investigated by optical transmission measurements, and the layer thicknesses were also measured by electron microscopy. Two quaternary light emitting layers of different composition were built in one device structure in order to broaden the usable wavelength range of the emission spectrum. One of the layers is electrically, whereas the other is optically excited as a result of internal absorption and re-emission of the LED light. As a result of this absorption and re-emission process the modified LED chips have substantially broader emission spectra and higher radiance than the conventional surface emitting multi-wavelength NIR LED structures. The two emission peaks of the spectrum were designed for matching the first and second harmonic wavelength of the fundamental absorption band of C-H bonds. The internal quantum efficiency of the wavelength conversion in this type of LEDs is nearly 100%.

  14. Cold-adapted and rhizosphere-competent strain of Rahnella sp. with broad-spectrum plant growth-promotion potential.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Pratibha; Joshi, Robin; Sharma, K C; Rahi, Praveen; Gulati, Ashu; Gulati, Arvind

    2010-12-01

    A phosphate-solubilizing bacterial strain isolated from Hippophae rhamnoides rhizosphere was identified as Rahnella sp. based on its phenotypic features and 16S rRNA gene sequence. The bacterial strain showed the growth characteristics of a cold-adapted psychrotroph, with the multiple plant growth-promoting traits of inorganic and organic phosphate solubilization, 1-aminocyclopropane-1- carboxylate-deaminase activity, ammonia generation, and siderophore production. The strain also produced indole- 3-acetic acid, indole-3-acetaldehyde, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-acetonitrile, indole-3-lactic acid, and indole-3- pyruvic acid in tryptophan-supplemented nutrient broth. Gluconic, citric and isocitric acids were the major organic acids detected during tricalcium phosphate solubilization. A rifampicin-resistant mutant of the strain exhibited high rhizosphere competence without disturbance to the resident microbial populations in pea rhizosphere. Seed bacterization with a charcoal-based inoculum significantly increased growth in barley, chickpea, pea, and maize under the controlled environment. Microplot testing of the inoculum at two different locations in pea also showed significant increase in growth and yield. The attributes of coldtolerance, high rhizosphere competence, and broad-spectrum plant growth-promoting activity exhibited the potential of Rahnella sp. BIHB 783 for increasing agriculture productivity.

  15. Live substrate positively affects root growth and stolon direction in the woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Erica M.; Watson, Maxine A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of clonal plant foraging generally focus on growth responses to patch quality once rooted. Here we explore the possibility of true plant foraging; the ability to detect and respond to patch resource status prior to rooting. Two greenhouse experiments were conducted to investigate the morphological changes that occur when individual daughter ramets of Fragaria vesca (woodland strawberry) were exposed to air above live (non-sterilized) or dead (sterilized) substrates. Contact between daughter ramets and substrate was prohibited. Daughter ramet root biomass was significantly larger over live versus dead substrate. Root:shoot ratio also increased over live substrate, a morphological response we interpret as indicative of active nutrient foraging. Daughter ramet root biomass was positively correlated with mother ramet size over live but not dead substrate. Given the choice between a live versus a dead substrate, primary stolons extended preferentially toward live substrates. We conclude that exposure to live substrate drives positive nutrient foraging responses in F. vesca. We propose that volatiles emitted from the substrates might be effecting the morphological changes that occur during true nutrient foraging. PMID:26483826

  16. Effect of 'Azotobacter' Bioinoculant on the Growth and Substrate Utilization Potential of Pleurotus eous Seed Spawn

    PubMed Central

    Parani, K.; Pothiraj, C.; Rajapandy, V.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the effect of nitrogen fixing Azotobacter bioinoculant on the mycelial growth and the rate of substrate utilization by Pleurotus eous. The synergistic or antagonistic role of the microorganism during dual culturing with the mushroom or the competitor molds Trichoderma viride, and Trichoderma reesi was studied. Azotobacter was inhibitory to the molds, which are competitive to the mushroom in the seed spawn substrate, but was synergistic towards the mushroom. The growth, substrate utilization potential as total nitrogen content and cellulase enzyme activities of the mushroom in the seed spawn substrate were also enhanced in the presence of the bioinoculant at lower inoculum concentrations, upto 5 ml broth culture per spawn bottle. PMID:24049469

  17. Growth of uniformly aligned nanorod arrays by oblique angle deposition with two-phase substrate rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, D.-X.; Karabacak, T.; Lim, B. K.; Wang, G.-C.; Lu, T.-M.

    2004-07-01

    Due to the shadowing effect, the oblique angle deposition technique can produce nanorods tilted toward the incident deposition flux. Periodic posts serving as seeds on a substrate allow the fabrication of nanorod arrays with controllable separations. However, in a conventional oblique angle deposition with no substrate rotation, nanorods grow faster along their widths in the direction perpendicular to the plane of incident flux. This anisotropic growth can result in 'fan-out' shapes of nanorods that touch each other due to the faster growing widths. Asymmetric two-phase substrate rotation was designed to eliminate the side growth in oblique angle deposition. In this method, the growing rods are exposed to the deposition flux from all angles with some portion of a rod surface receiving more flux than the rest. We fabricated well-aligned Si nanorod arrays with uniform sizes from templates arranged in square and triangular lattices using this two-phase substrate rotation method.

  18. LmbE proteins from Bacillus cereus are de-N-acetylases with broad substrate specificity and are highly similar to proteins in Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Deli, Alexandra; Koutsioulis, Dimitrios; Fadouloglou, Vasiliki E.; Spiliotopoulou, Panagiota; Balomenou, Stavroula; Arnaouteli, Sofia; Tzanodaskalaki, Maria; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Kokkinidis, Michalis; Bouriotis, Vassilis

    2010-05-19

    The genomes of Bacillus cereus and its closest relative Bacillus anthracis each contain two LmbE protein family homologs: BC1534 (BA1557) and BC3461 (BA3524). Only a few members of this family have been biochemically characterized including N-acetylglucosaminylphosphatidyl inositol (GlcNAc-PI), 1-D-myo-inosityl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-α-D-glucopyranoside (GlcNAc-Ins), N,N'-diacetylchitobiose (GlcNAc2) and lipoglycopeptide antibiotic de-N-acetylases. All these enzymes share a common feature in that they de-N-acetylate the N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) moiety of their substrates. The bc1534 gene has previously been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme was purified and its 3D structure determined. In this study, the bc3461 gene from B. cereus ATCC14579 was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The recombinant enzymes BC1534 (EC 3.5.1.-) and BC3461 were biochemically characterized. The enzymes have different molecular masses, pH and temperature optima and broad substrate specificity, de-N-acetylating GlcNAc and N-acetylchito-oligomers (GlcNAc2, GlcNAc3 and GlcNAc4), as well as GlcNAc-1P, N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-1 phosphate; GlcNAc-6P, N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-6 phosphate; GalNAc, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine; ManNAc, N-acetyl-d-mannosamine; UDP-GlcNAc, uridine 5'-diphosphate N-acetyl-d-glucosamine. However, the enzymes were not active on radiolabeled glycol chitin, peptidoglycan from B. cereus, N-acetyl-d-glucosaminyl-(β-1,4)-N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanyl-d-isoglutamine (GMDP) or N-acetyl-d-GlcN-Nα1-6-d-myo-inositol-1-HPO4-octadecyl (GlcNAc-I-P-C18). Kinetic analysis of the activity of BC1534 and BC3461 on GlcNAc and GlcNAc2 revealed that GlcNAc2 is the favored substrate for both native enzymes. Based on the recently determined crystal structure of BC1534, a mutational analysis identified functional key residues, highlighting their

  19. Growth mechanism of silicon carbide films on silicon substrates using C 60 carbonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Workman, Richard; Sarid, Dror

    1995-12-01

    Silicon carbide films were grown on silicon substrates using C 60 molecules as a carbon source. The grown films were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and infrared spectroscopy (IRS). Also, using SiO 2 as a mask on the Si substrate, a patterned SiC film was grown. Growth and defect mechanisms are discussed and compared with conventional CVD carbidizing methods.

  20. Amorphous carbon film growth on Si: Correlation between stress and generation of defects into the substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Brusa, R.S.; Macchi, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Karwasz, G.P.; Laidani, N.; Bartali, R.; Anderle, M.

    2005-05-30

    Amorphous carbon films of several thicknesses were prepared by graphite sputtering on crystalline silicon substrate. The samples were depth profiled with positron annihilation spectroscopy for open-volume measurements and characterized for their residual internal stress. It was found that after film growth the substrate presents vacancy-like defects decorated by oxygen in a layer extending in the substrate by several tens of nanometers beyond the film/Si interface. The width of the defected layer and the decoration of vacancy-like defects are directly and inversely proportional to the measured intensity of the residual stress, respectively. These findings indicate the existence of a relaxation mechanism of the stress in the films that involves deeply the substrate. The decorated vacancy-like defects are suggested to be bounded to dislocations induced in the substrate by the stress relaxation.

  1. High quality chemical vapor deposition diamond growth on iron and stainless steel substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Eri; Hirakuri, Kenji K.; Ohyama, Manabu; Friedbacher, Gernot; Mutsukura, Nobuki

    2002-09-01

    Due to the catalytic effect and the rapid diffusion coefficients of carbon species into iron-based materials such as iron and 18-8 stainless steel [18% chrome (Cr) and 8% nickel (Ni)], it is very difficult to produce diamond grains on such substrates. However, diamond growth on iron-based materials is extremely important for mechanical and electrical applications, since these materials are widely used in industrial field and fundamental science. In our previous study, diamond nucleation and subsequent growth have been precisely controlled by the residence time of the source gas, which is an essential parameter. Here, we have carried out diamond growth on iron-based materials using the hot-filament chemical vapor deposition technique with varying residence times. At low residence times, diamond grains with practically useful growth rate are grown. The growth rate of diamond grains on stainless steel substrates was a factor of about 10 greater than that on a regular silicon substrate at optimum conditions. At optimized conditions, diamond growths with high crystalline quality on stainless steel substrates were confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The full width of half maximums of the Raman peaks for diamonds grown in this study are comparable to the ones of natural diamonds.

  2. Effects of substrate concentrations on the growth of heterotrophic bacteria and algae in secondary facultative ponds.

    PubMed

    Kayombo, S; Mbwette, T S A; Katima, J H Y; Jorgensen, S E

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents the effect of substrate concentration on the growth of a mixed culture of algae and heterotrophic bacteria in secondary facultative ponds (SFPs) utilizing settled domestic sewage as a sole source of organic carbon. The growth of the mixed culture was studied at the concentrations ranging between 200 and 800 mg COD/l in a series of batch chemostat reactors. From the laboratory data, the specific growth rate (micro) was determined using the modified Gompertz model. The maximum specific growth rate ( micro(max)) and half saturation coefficients (K(s)) were calculated using the Monod kinetic equation. The maximum observed growth rate ( micro(max)) for heterotrophic bacteria was 3.8 day(-1) with K(s) of 200 mg COD/l. The micro(max) for algal biomass based on suspended volatile solids was 2.7 day(-1) with K(s) of 110 mg COD/l. The micro(max) of algae based on the chlorophyll-a was 3.5 day(-1) at K(s) of 50mg COD/l. The observed specific substrate removal by heterotrophic bacteria varied between the concentrations of substrate used and the average value was 0.82 (mg COD/mg biomass). The specific substrate utilization rate in the bioreactors was direct proportional to the specific growth rate. Hence, the determined Monod kinetic parameters are useful for the definition of the operation of SFPs.

  3. Substrate Availability of Mutant SPT Alters Neuronal Branching and Growth Cone Dynamics in Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Byung Kyu; Chandra, Ankush; Kuljis, Dika; Schmidt, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) is a key enzyme in the first step of sphingolipid biosynthesis. Mutations in the SPTLC1 gene that encodes for SPT subunits cause hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1. However, little is understood about how mutant SPT regulates mechanisms of sensory neuron and axonal growth. Using transgenic mice overexpressing the C133W SPT mutant, we found that mutant dorsal root ganglia (DRG) during growth in vitro exhibit increased neurite length and branching, coinciding with elevated expression of actin-cross-linking proteins at the neuronal growth cone, namely phosphorylated Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin. In addition, inhibition of SPT was able to reverse the mutant phenotype. Because mutant SPT preferentially uses l-alanine over its canonical substrate l-serine, we also investigated the effects of substrate availability on DRG neurons. Supplementation with l-serine or removal of l-alanine independently restored normal growth patterns in mutant SPTLC1C133W DRG. Therefore, we report that substrate availability and selectivity of SPT influence the regulation of neurite growth in DRG neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1 is an autosomal-dominant disorder that leads to a sensory neuropathy due to mutations in the serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) enzyme. We investigated how mutant SPT and substrate levels regulate neurite growth. Because SPT is an important enzyme in the synthesis of sphingolipids, our data are of broader significance to other peripheral and metabolic disorders. PMID:26446223

  4. Growth mode transition of Ni thin films on nanopatterned substrate: Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuhan; Liang, Jingshu; Zhu, Yuan; Jiang, Shaoji

    2012-03-01

    A three-dimension (3D) kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model with Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier is presented. A uniform arranged triangular prism structure is introduced to mimic the nanopatterned substrate. The transition from continuous growth to anisotropic columnar growth has been demonstrated. The kinetic process and the growth exponent are discussed by our KMC model. Results show that the growth exponent is smaller than 0.5 when the film thickness surpasses 70 ML under normal deposition but larger than 0.5 under high oblique angle deposition, such as 77°. We assume that the modulation of nanopatterned substrate reduces more quickly when the film thickness is larger than 70 ML in our model. The growth mode transition can be mainly attributed to difference in the relative importance of diffusion and shadowing with normal and high oblique angle deposition conditions. Besides, the competition and vanishing process during oblique angle deposition are also demonstrated.

  5. Electron backscatter diffraction study of hexagonal boron nitride growth on Cu single-crystal substrates.

    PubMed

    Hite, Jennifer K; Robinson, Zachary R; Eddy, Charles R; Feigelson, Boris N

    2015-07-22

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is an important material for the development of new 2D heterostructures. To enable this development, the relationship between crystal growth and the substrate orientation must be explored and understood. In this study, we simultaneously grew h-BN on different orientations of Cu substrates to establish the impact of substrate structure on the growth habit of thin h-BN layers. The substrates studied were a polycrystalline Cu foil, Cu(100), Cu(110), and Cu(111). Fourier transform grazing-incidence infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS) was used to identify h-BN on copper substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine the effective thickness of the h-BN. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were used to measure the morphology of the films and postgrowth crystal structure of the Cu substrates, respectively. Combining the SEM and EBSD images allowed for the correlation between h-BN film coverage and the crystal structure of Cu. It was found that the growth rate was inversely proportional to the surface free energy of the Cu surface, with Cu(111) having the most h-BN surface coverage. The Cu foil predominately crystallized with a (100) surface orientation, and likewise had a film coverage very close to the Cu(100).

  6. Kinetic characteristics and modelling of growth and substrate removal by Alcaligenes faecalis strain NR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Zhao, Bin; An, Qiang; Wang, Xia; Zhang, Yi Xin

    2016-04-01

    Alcaligenes faecalis strain NR has the capability of simultaneous ammonium and organic carbon removal under sole aerobic conditions. The growth and substrate removal characteristics of A. faecalis strain NR were studied and appropriate kinetic models were developed. The maximum substrate removal rate of NH4 (+)-N and TOC were determined as 2.27 mg NH4 (+)-N/L/h and 30.00 mg TOC/L/h, respectively with initial NH4 (+)-N = 80 mg/L and TOC = 800 mg/L. Single-substrate models and double-substrate models based on Monod, Contois, Moser and Teissier were employed to describe the bioprocess kinetic coefficients. As a result, two double-substrate models, Teissier-Contois and Contois-Contois, were considered to be appropriate to model growth kinetics with both NH4 (+)-N and TOC as limiting substrates. The kinetic constants of maximum growth rate (μ max) and half-saturation constant (K S and B S) were obtained by solving multiple equations with regression. This work can be used to further understand and predict the performance of heterotrophic nitrifiers, and thus provides specific guidance of these functional strains in practical wastewater treatment process.

  7. HVPE-GaN growth on GaN-based Advanced Substrates by Smart Cut™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwinska, M.; Amilusik, M.; Fijalkowski, M.; Sochacki, T.; Lucznik, B.; Grzanka, E.; Litwin-Staszewska, E.; Weyher, J. L.; Nowakowska-Siwinska, A.; Muziol, G.; Skierbiszewski, C.; Grzegory, I.; Guiot, E.; Caulmilone, R.; Bockowski, M.

    2016-12-01

    Advanced Substrates consist of a thin GaN layer bonded to a carrier wafer. The layer is separated from starting material by Smart Cut™ technology. GaN on sapphire Advanced Substrates were successfully used as seeds for HVPE-GaN growth. Unintentionally doped and silicon-doped thick GaN layers were crystallized. The results were compared to HVPE-GaN grown on standard MOCVD-GaN/sapphire templates. Free-standing HVPE-GaN with high free carrier concentration was obtained. A laser diode was built on the n-type doped HVPE-GaN grown on an Advanced Substrate.

  8. Electrodeposition of Sb2Se3 on indium-doped tin oxides substrate: Nucleation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xuezhao; zhang, Xin; Tian, Yuan; Shen, Chengmin; Wang, Chunming; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms related to the initial stages of the nucleation and growth of antimony selenide (Sb2Se3) semiconductor compounds onto the indium-doped tin oxides (ITO) coated glass surface have been investigated using chronoamperometry (CA) technique. The fabrication was conducted from nitric acid bath containing both Sb3+ and SeO2 species at ambient conditions. No underpotential deposition (UPD) of antimony and selenium onto ITO substrate was observed in the investigated systems indicating a weak precursor-substrate interaction. Deposition of antimony and selenium onto ITO substrate occurred with large overvoltage through 3D nucleation and growth mechanism followed by diffusion limited growth. FE-SEM and XRD results show that orthorhombic phase Sb2Se3 particles with their size between 90 and 125 nm were obtained and the atomic ratio for antimony and selenium was 2:2.63 according to the EDX results.

  9. Growth of gallium nitride and indium nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Ling, Yichuan; Wang, Gongming; Lu, Xihong; Tong, Yexiang; Li, Yat

    2013-03-07

    We report a general strategy for synthesis of gallium nitride (GaN) and indium nitride (InN) nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates. GaN and InN nanowires were prepared via a nanocluster-mediated growth method using a home built chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system with Ga and In metals as group III precursors and ammonia as a group V precursor. Electron microscopy studies reveal that the group III-nitride nanowires are single crystalline wurtzite structures. The morphology, density and growth mechanism of these nanowires are determined by the growth temperature. Importantly, a photoelectrode fabricated by contacting the GaN nanowires through a carbon cloth substrate shows pronounced photoactivity for photoelectrochemical water oxidation. The ability to synthesize group III-nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible substrates should open up new opportunities for nanoscale photonic, electronic and electrochemical devices.

  10. A mesoscopic stochastic model for the specific consumption rate in substrate-limited microbial growth

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The specific consumption rate of substrate, as well as the associated specific growth rate, is an essential parameter in the mathematical description of substrate-limited microbial growth. In this paper we develop a completely new kinetic model of substrate transport, based on recent knowledge on the structural biology of transport proteins, which correctly describes very accurate experimental results at near-zero substrate concentration values found in the literature, where the widespread Michaelis-Menten model fails. Additionally, our model converges asymptotically to Michaelis-Menten predictions as substrate concentration increases. Instead of the single active site enzymatic reaction of Michaelis-Menten type, the proposed model assumes a multi-site kinetics, simplified as an apparent all-or-none mechanism for the transport, which is controlled by means of the local substrate concentration in the close vicinity of the transport protein. Besides, the model also assumes that this local concentration is not equal to the mean substrate concentration experimentally determined in the culture medium. Instead, we propose that it fluctuates with a mostly exponential distribution of Weibull type. PMID:28187189

  11. Improved GaSb-based quantum well laser performance through metamorphic growth on GaAs substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Christopher J. K. He, Lei; Apiratikul, Paveen; Siwak, Nathan P.; Leavitt, Richard P.

    2015-03-09

    The promise of the metamorphic growth paradigm is to enable design freedom of the substrate selection criteria beyond current choices that are limited by lattice matching requirements. A demonstration of this emerging degree of freedom is reported here by directly comparing identical laser structures grown both pseudomorphically on a GaSb substrate and metamorphically on a GaAs substrate. Improved thermal performance of the metamorphic laser material enables a higher output power before thermal roll-over begins. These performance gains are demonstrated in minimally processed gain-guided broad-area type-I lasers emitting close to 2-μm wavelengths and mounted p-side up. Continuous wave measurements at room temperature yield a T{sub 0} of 145 K and peak output power of 192 mW from metamorphic lasers, compared to a T{sub 0} of 96 K and peak output power of 164 mW from identical lasers grown pseudomorphically on GaSb.

  12. Mammalian cell growth on gold nanoparticle-decorated substrates is influenced by the nanoparticle coating.

    PubMed

    Rosman, Christina; Pierrat, Sebastien; Tarantola, Marco; Schneider, David; Sunnick, Eva; Janshoff, Andreas; Sönnichsen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we study epithelial cell growth on substrates decorated with gold nanorods that are functionalized either with a positively charged cytotoxic surfactant or with a biocompatible polymer exhibiting one of two different end groups, resulting in a neutral or negative surface charge of the particle. Upon observation of cell growth for three days by live cell imaging using optical dark field microscopy, it was found that all particles supported cell adhesion while no directed cell migration and no significant particle internalization occurred. Concerning cell adhesion and spreading as compared to cell growth on bare substrates after 3 days of incubation, a reduction by 45% and 95%, respectively, for the surfactant particle coating was observed, whereas the amino-terminated polymer induced a reduction by 30% and 40%, respectively, which is absent for the carboxy-terminated polymer. Furthermore, interface-sensitive impedance spectroscopy (electric cell-substrate impedance sensing, ECIS) was employed in order to investigate the micromotility of cells added to substrates decorated with various amounts of surfactant-coated particles. A surface density of 65 particles/µm(2) (which corresponds to 0.5% of surface coverage with nanoparticles) diminishes micromotion by 25% as compared to bare substrates after 35 hours of incubation. We conclude that the surface coating of the gold nanorods, which were applied to the basolateral side of the cells, has a recognizable influence on the growth behavior and thus the coating should be carefully selected for biomedical applications of nanoparticles.

  13. Mammalian cell growth on gold nanoparticle-decorated substrates is influenced by the nanoparticle coating

    PubMed Central

    Rosman, Christina; Pierrat, Sebastien; Tarantola, Marco; Schneider, David; Sunnick, Eva; Janshoff, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Summary In this work, we study epithelial cell growth on substrates decorated with gold nanorods that are functionalized either with a positively charged cytotoxic surfactant or with a biocompatible polymer exhibiting one of two different end groups, resulting in a neutral or negative surface charge of the particle. Upon observation of cell growth for three days by live cell imaging using optical dark field microscopy, it was found that all particles supported cell adhesion while no directed cell migration and no significant particle internalization occurred. Concerning cell adhesion and spreading as compared to cell growth on bare substrates after 3 days of incubation, a reduction by 45% and 95%, respectively, for the surfactant particle coating was observed, whereas the amino-terminated polymer induced a reduction by 30% and 40%, respectively, which is absent for the carboxy-terminated polymer. Furthermore, interface-sensitive impedance spectroscopy (electric cell–substrate impedance sensing, ECIS) was employed in order to investigate the micromotility of cells added to substrates decorated with various amounts of surfactant-coated particles. A surface density of 65 particles/µm2 (which corresponds to 0.5% of surface coverage with nanoparticles) diminishes micromotion by 25% as compared to bare substrates after 35 hours of incubation. We conclude that the surface coating of the gold nanorods, which were applied to the basolateral side of the cells, has a recognizable influence on the growth behavior and thus the coating should be carefully selected for biomedical applications of nanoparticles. PMID:25671143

  14. Evaluation of pyritic mine tailings as a plant growth substrate.

    PubMed

    Roseby, Stuart J; Kopittke, Peter M; Mulligan, David R; Menzies, Neal W

    2017-10-01

    At the Kidston gold mine, Australia, the direct establishment of vegetation on tailings was considered as an alternative to the use of a waste rock cover. The tailings acid/base account was used to predict plant growth limitation by acidity, and thus methods capable of identifying tailings that would acidify to pH 4.5 or lower were sought. Total S was found to be poorly correlated with acid-generating sulfide, and total C was poorly correlated with acid-neutralizing carbonate, precluding the use of readily determined total S and C as predictors of net acid generation. Therefore, the selected approach used assessment of sulfide content as a predictor of acid generation, and carbonate content as a measure of the acid-neutralizing capacity available at pH 5 and above. Using this approach, the majority of tailings (67%) were found to be non-acid generating. However, areas of potentially acid-generating tailings were randomly distributed across the dam, and could only be located by intensive sampling. The limitations imposed by the large sample numbers, and costly analysis of sulfide and carbonate, make it impractical to identify and ameliorate acid-generating areas prior to vegetation establishment. However, as only a small proportion of the tailings will acidify, a strategy of re-treating acid areas following oxidation is suggested. The findings of the present study will assist in the selection of appropriate methods for the prediction of net acid generation, particularly where more conservative measurements are required to allow vegetation to be established directly in tailings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Effects of substrate-aeration cultivation pattern on tomato growth].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu; Li, Tian-Lai; Sun, Zhou-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Aeroponics can increase the fruit yield of tomato plant, but its cost is very high. In this paper, tomato seedlings were planted with three cultures, i. e., whole perlite culture (CK), perlite-aeration culture (T1), and aeroponics (T2), and a comparative study was made on the seedlings growth. Compared with CK, T1 improved the gas environment in root zone significantly, with the CO2 and O2 concentrations in root zone being 0.2 and 1.17 times higher, and increased the plant height and stem diameter after 60 days of transplanting by 5.1% and 8.4%, respectively. The plant net photosynthetic rate of T1 was significantly higher than that of CK, with the maximum value after transplanting 45 days increased by 13%. T1 also increased the root activity and ion absorbing ability significantly, with the root activity after transplanting 45 days being 1.23 times of CK, and the root K, Ca, and Mg contents after transplanting 60 days increased by 31%, 37%, and 27%, respectively. The fruit yield of T1 was 1.16 times of CK. No significant differences in these indices were observed between T1 and T2, and less difference in the fruit soluble sugar and organic acid contents as well as the sugar-acid ratio was found among CK, T1, and T2. It was suggested that perlite-aeration cultivation pattern was an easy and feasible way to markedly improve the fruit yield of tomato plant.

  16. Growth and characterization of CdTe on GaAs/Si substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, G.; Nouhi, A.; Liu, J.

    1988-01-01

    Epitaxial CdTe has been grown on both (100) GaAs/Si and (111) GaAs/Si substrates. A combination of molecular beam epitaxy and metal organic chemical vapor deposition have been employed to achieve this growth. The GaAs layers are grown in Si substrates by molecular beam epitaxy, followed by the growth of CdTe on GaAs/Si substra by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and scanning electron microscopy have been used to characterize the CdTe films.

  17. Self-organized MBE growth of II VI epilayers on patterned GaSb substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissmann, H.; Tran Anh, T.; Rogaschewski, S.; von Ortenberg, M.

    1999-05-01

    We report on the self-organized MBE growth of II-VI epilayers on patterned and unpatterned GaSb substrates resulting in quantum wires and quantum wells, respectively. The HgSe : Fe quantum wires were grown on (0 0 1)GaSb substrates with a buffer of lattice-matched ZnTe 1- xSe x. Due to the anisotropic growth of HgSe on the A-oriented stripes roof-like overgrowth with a definite ridge was obtained. Additional Fe doping in the direct vicinity of the ridge results in a highly conductive quantum wire.

  18. Direct growth of single-crystalline III–V semiconductors on amorphous substrates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kevin; Kapadia, Rehan; Harker, Audrey; Desai, Sujay; Seuk Kang, Jeong; Chuang, Steven; Tosun, Mahmut; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M.; Tsang, Michael; Zeng, Yuping; Kiriya, Daisuke; Hazra, Jubin; Madhvapathy, Surabhi Rao; Hettick, Mark; Chen, Yu-Ze; Mastandrea, James; Amani, Matin; Cabrini, Stefano; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Ager III, Joel W.; Chrzan, Daryl C.; Javey, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The III–V compound semiconductors exhibit superb electronic and optoelectronic properties. Traditionally, closely lattice-matched epitaxial substrates have been required for the growth of high-quality single-crystal III–V thin films and patterned microstructures. To remove this materials constraint, here we introduce a growth mode that enables direct writing of single-crystalline III–V's on amorphous substrates, thus further expanding their utility for various applications. The process utilizes templated liquid-phase crystal growth that results in user-tunable, patterned micro and nanostructures of single-crystalline III–V's of up to tens of micrometres in lateral dimensions. InP is chosen as a model material system owing to its technological importance. The patterned InP single crystals are configured as high-performance transistors and photodetectors directly on amorphous SiO2 growth substrates, with performance matching state-of-the-art epitaxially grown devices. The work presents an important advance towards universal integration of III–V's on application-specific substrates by direct growth. PMID:26813257

  19. Direct growth of single-crystalline III–V semiconductors on amorphous substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kevin; Kapadia, Rehan; Harker, Audrey; Desai, Sujay; Seuk Kang, Jeong; Chuang, Steven; Tosun, Mahmut; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M.; Tsang, Michael; Zeng, Yuping; Kiriya, Daisuke; Hazra, Jubin; Madhvapathy, Surabhi Rao; Hettick, Mark; Chen, Yu-Ze; Mastandrea, James; Amani, Matin; Cabrini, Stefano; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Ager III, Joel W.; Chrzan, Daryl C.; Javey, Ali

    2016-01-27

    The III–V compound semiconductors exhibit superb electronic and optoelectronic properties. Traditionally, closely lattice-matched epitaxial substrates have been required for the growth of high-quality single-crystal III–V thin films and patterned microstructures. To remove this materials constraint, here we introduce a growth mode that enables direct writing of single-crystalline III–V’s on amorphous substrates, thus further expanding their utility for various applications. The process utilizes templated liquid-phase crystal growth that results in user-tunable, patterned micro and nanostructures of single-crystalline III–V’s of up to tens of micrometres in lateral dimensions. InP is chosen as a model material system owing to its technological importance. The patterned InP single crystals are configured as high-performance transistors and photodetectors directly on amorphous SiO2 growth substrates, with performance matching state-of-the-art epitaxially grown devices. In conclusion, the work presents an important advance towards universal integration of III–V’s on application-specific substrates by direct growth.

  20. Direct growth of single-crystalline III–V semiconductors on amorphous substrates

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Kevin; Kapadia, Rehan; Harker, Audrey; ...

    2016-01-27

    The III–V compound semiconductors exhibit superb electronic and optoelectronic properties. Traditionally, closely lattice-matched epitaxial substrates have been required for the growth of high-quality single-crystal III–V thin films and patterned microstructures. To remove this materials constraint, here we introduce a growth mode that enables direct writing of single-crystalline III–V’s on amorphous substrates, thus further expanding their utility for various applications. The process utilizes templated liquid-phase crystal growth that results in user-tunable, patterned micro and nanostructures of single-crystalline III–V’s of up to tens of micrometres in lateral dimensions. InP is chosen as a model material system owing to its technological importance. Themore » patterned InP single crystals are configured as high-performance transistors and photodetectors directly on amorphous SiO2 growth substrates, with performance matching state-of-the-art epitaxially grown devices. In conclusion, the work presents an important advance towards universal integration of III–V’s on application-specific substrates by direct growth.« less

  1. Critical aspects of substrate nanopatterning for the ordered growth of GaN nanocolumns

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Precise and reproducible surface nanopatterning is the key for a successful ordered growth of GaN nanocolumns. In this work, we point out the main technological issues related to the patterning process, mainly surface roughness and cleaning, and mask adhesion to the substrate. We found that each of these factors, process-related, has a dramatic impact on the subsequent selective growth of the columns inside the patterned holes. We compare the performance of e-beam lithography, colloidal lithography, and focused ion beam in the fabrication of hole-patterned masks for ordered columnar growth. These results are applicable to the ordered growth of nanocolumns of different materials. PMID:22168918

  2. Critical aspects of substrate nanopatterning for the ordered growth of GaN nanocolumns.

    PubMed

    Barbagini, Francesca; Bengoechea-Encabo, Ana; Albert, Steven; Martinez, Javier; Sanchez García, Miguel Angel; Trampert, Achim; Calleja, Enrique

    2011-12-14

    Precise and reproducible surface nanopatterning is the key for a successful ordered growth of GaN nanocolumns. In this work, we point out the main technological issues related to the patterning process, mainly surface roughness and cleaning, and mask adhesion to the substrate. We found that each of these factors, process-related, has a dramatic impact on the subsequent selective growth of the columns inside the patterned holes. We compare the performance of e-beam lithography, colloidal lithography, and focused ion beam in the fabrication of hole-patterned masks for ordered columnar growth. These results are applicable to the ordered growth of nanocolumns of different materials.

  3. Growth map for Ga-assisted growth of GaAs nanowires on Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Bastiman, Faebian; Küpers, Hanno; Somaschini, Claudio; Geelhaar, Lutz

    2016-03-04

    For the Ga-assisted growth of GaAs nanowires on Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy, growth temperature, As flux, and Ga flux have been systematically varied across the entire window of growth conditions that result in the formation of nanowires. A range of GaAs structures was observed, progressing from pure Ga droplets under negligible As flux through horizontal nanowires, tilted nanowires, vertical nanowires, and nanowires without droplets to crystallites as the As flux was increased. Quantitative analysis of the resulting sample morphology was performed in terms of nanowire number and volume density, number yield and volume yield of vertical nanowires, diameter, length, as well as the number and volume density of parasitic growth. The result is a growth map that comprehensively describes all nanowire and parasitic growth morphologies and hence enables growth of nanowire samples in a predictive manner. Further analysis indicates the combination of global Ga flux and growth temperature determines the total density of all objects, whereas the global As/Ga flux ratio independently determines the resultant sample morphology. Several dependencies observed here imply that all objects present on the substrate surface, i.e. both nanowires and parasitic structures, originate from Ga droplets.

  4. Identification, Heterologous Expression, and Functional Characterization of Bacillus subtilis YutF, a HAD Superfamily 5'-Nucleotidase with Broad Substrate Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Zakataeva, Natalia P.; Romanenkov, Dmitriy V.; Yusupova, Yuliya R.; Skripnikova, Victoria S.; Asahara, Takayuki; Gronskiy, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    5'-nucleotidases (EC 3.1.3.5) catalyze the hydrolytic dephosphorylation of 5'-ribonucleotides and 5'-deoxyribonucleotides as well as complex nucleotides, such as uridine 5'-diphosphoglucose (UDP-glucose), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide, to their corresponding nucleosides plus phosphate. These enzymes have been found in diverse species in intracellular and membrane-bound, surface-localized forms. Soluble forms of 5'-nucleotidases belong to the ubiquitous haloacid dehalogenase superfamily (HADSF) and have been shown to be involved in the regulation of nucleotide, nucleoside and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) pools. Despite the important role of 5'-nucleotidases in cellular metabolism, only a few of these enzymes have been characterized in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, the workhorse industrial microorganism included in the Food and Drug Administration’s GRAS (generally regarded as safe) list. In the present study, we report the identification of a novel 5'-nucleotidase gene from B. subtilis, yutF, which comprises 771 bp encoding a 256-amino-acid protein belonging to the IIA subfamily of the HADSF. The gene product is responsible for the major p-nitrophenyl phosphatase activity in B. subtilis. The yutF gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its product fused to a polyhistidine tag was purified and biochemically characterized as a soluble 5'-nucleotidase with broad substrate specificity. The recombinant YutF protein was found to hydrolyze various purine and pyrimidine 5'-nucleotides, showing preference for 5'-nucleoside monophosphates and, specifically, 5'-XMP. Recombinant YutF also exhibited phosphohydrolase activity toward nucleotide precursors, ribose-5-phosphate and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate. Determination of the kinetic parameters of the enzyme revealed a low substrate specificity (Km values in the mM concentration range) and modest catalytic efficiencies with respect to substrates. An

  5. Inositol-1 (or 4)-monophosphatase from Glycine max embryo axes is a phosphatase with broad substrate specificity that includes phytate dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Islas-Flores, Ignacio; Villanueva, Marco A

    2007-04-01

    A phosphate-hydrolyzing activity from Glycine max embryo axes was purified by a series of chromatographic steps and electroelution from activity gels, and demonstrated to be an inositol-1 (or 4)-monophosphatase by partial internal amino acid sequence. This enzyme hydrolyzed ATP, sodium pyrophosphate (NaPPi), inositol hexakisphosphate, and inositol 1-monophosphate, but not p-nitrophenyl phosphate, ADP, AMP or glucose 6-P. Using NaPPi as substrate, the highly purified protein hydrolyzed up to 0.4 mmol phosphate min(-1) mg(-1) protein and had a Km(avg) of 235 microM for NaPPi. Since NaPPi is relatively inexpensive and readily available, we used this as substrate for the subsequent characterization. We observed the following: (a) specific inhibition by Li and NaF but not by butanedione monoxime, or orthovanadate; (b) activation by Cu(2+) and Mg(2+); (c) optimum activity at pH 7.4; and (d) temperature stability after 1-h incubations at 37-80 degrees C, with maximum activity at 37 degrees C. The partially purified protein was detected by in-gel activity assays and the band was electroeluted to yield a highly purified protein. Analysis by SDS-PAGE and native IEF-PAGE yielded a single major polypeptide of 29 kDa and pI approximately 5.9, respectively. In addition, in-gel activity from embryo axes and whole hypocotyls at early germination times revealed one high and one intermediate molecular weight isoform, but only the intermediate one corresponded to IMPase. Throughout the post-imbibition period, the activity of the high molecular weight isoform disappeared and IMPase increased, indicating an increasing expression of the enzyme as germination and growth proceeded. These data indicate that the inositol-1 (or 4)-monophosphatase present in the embryo axis of G. max has a wide phosphate substrate specificity, and may play an important role in phosphate metabolism during the germination process.

  6. Topotaxial growth of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires on iron substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Himanshu Srivastava, A. K.; Babu, Mahendra; Rai, S. K.; Ganguli, Tapas

    2016-05-23

    α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (hematite) nanowires have been grown by simple thermal oxidation of iron foil at 700°C in a moist oxygen flow. It was observed that the growth of nanowires highly depends on the texture of the iron substrate, in particular the presence of [110] oriented iron grains. Cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) investigation of as-grown sample revealed that the growth of nanowires has definite orientation relation with the underlying oxide grains Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite) and FeO (wustite), which can be interpreted by the primary orientation relationships of topotaxial growth of iron oxides. The observation can pave the way for patterning of the nanowire growth by controlling the texture of original substrate. Samples were also characterized with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  7. Growth and wetting of water droplet condensed between micron-sized particles and substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang, Tran Si Bui; Leong, Fong Yew; An, Hongjie; Tan, Beng Hau; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2016-08-01

    We study heterogeneous condensation growth of water droplets on micron-sized particles resting on a level substrate. Through numerical simulations on equilibrium droplet profiles, we find multiple wetting states towards complete wetting of the particle. Specifically, a partially wetting droplet could undergo a spontaneous transition to complete wetting during condensation growth, for contact angles above a threshold minimum. In addition, we find a competitive wetting behavior between the particle and the substrate, and interestingly, a reversal of the wetting dependence on contact angles during late stages of droplet growth. Using quasi-steady assumption, we simulate a growing droplet under a constant condensation flux, and the results are in good agreement with our experimental observations. As a geometric approximation for particle clusters, we propose and validate a pancake model, and with it, show that a particle cluster has greater wetting tendency compared to a single particle. Together, our results indicate a strong interplay between contact angle, capillarity and geometry during condensation growth.

  8. Topotaxial growth of α-Fe2O3 nanowires on iron substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Himanshu; Srivastava, A. K.; Babu, Mahendra; Rai, S. K.; Ganguli, Tapas

    2016-05-01

    α-Fe2O3 (hematite) nanowires have been grown by simple thermal oxidation of iron foil at 700°C in a moist oxygen flow. It was observed that the growth of nanowires highly depends on the texture of the iron substrate, in particular the presence of [110] oriented iron grains. Cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) investigation of as-grown sample revealed that the growth of nanowires has definite orientation relation with the underlying oxide grains Fe3O4 (magnetite) and FeO (wustite), which can be interpreted by the primary orientation relationships of topotaxial growth of iron oxides. The observation can pave the way for patterning of the nanowire growth by controlling the texture of original substrate. Samples were also characterized with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  9. 100mm GaSb substrate manufacturing for IRFPA epi growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Lisa P.; Flint, J. Patrick; Meshew, Greg; Dallas, Gordon; Trevethan, John; Lubyshev, Dmitri; Qiu, Yueming; Fastenau, Joel M.; Liu, Amy W. K.

    2012-06-01

    Mega-pixel FPAs in both MWIR and LWIR spectral bands based on Sb strained layer superlattices and nBn epitaxial structures grown on GaSb substrates have recently demonstrated impressive performances at high operating temperatures. An essential component of SLS epitaxial growth initiation is the starting wafer flatness, smoothness and haze. Large diameter GaSb wafers must be manufactured meeting these stringent demands and current state-of-the-art GaSb substrate manufacturing is focused on 100mm wafer diameters. Using a newly developed polishing process, 100mm GaSb substrate manufacturing has resulted in consistent starting wafer peak-to-valley flatness well below 5μm and surface roughness below Rms of 0.2nm. Final substrate and epitaxial wafer Surfscan mapping (<1000/cm2 surface defects) and surface roughness (Rms~0.2nm) are presented and compared with measurements of the starting substrates. This paper evaluates the manufacturing and epitaxial growth on 100mm GaSb substrates that have been processed to achieve an MBE grown InAsSb-based nBn MWIR photodetector structure.

  10. Growth and high rate reactive ion etching of epitaxially grown barium hexaferrite films on single crystal silicon carbide substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhaohui

    Ferrites are an invaluable group of insulating magnetic materials used for high frequency microwave applications in such passive electronic devices as isolators, phase shifters, and circulators. Because of their high permeability, non-reciprocal electromagnetic properties, and low eddy current losses, there are no other materials that serve such a broad range of applications. Until recently, they have been widely employed in bulk form, with little success in thin film-based applications in commercial or military microwave technologies. In today's technology, emerging electronic systems, such as high frequency, high power wireless and satellite communications (GPS, Bluetooth, WLAN, commercial radar, etc) thin film materials are in high demand. It is widely recognized that as high frequency devices shift to microwave frequencies the integration of passive devices with semiconductor electronics holds significant advantages in the realization of miniaturization, broader bandwidths, higher performance, speed, power and lower production costs. Thus, the primary objective of this thesis is to explore the integration of ferrite films with wide band gap semiconductor substrates for the realization of monolithic integrated circuits (MICs). This thesis focuses on two key steps for the integration of barium hexaferrite (Ba M-type or BaM) devices on semiconductor substrates. First, the development of high crystal quality ferrite film growth via pulsed laser deposition on wide band gap silicon carbide semiconductor substrates, and second, the effective patterning of BaM films using dry etching techniques. To address part one, BaM films were deposited on 6H silicon carbide (0001) substrates by Pulsed Laser Deposition. X-ray diffraction showed strong crystallographic alignment while pole figures exhibited reflections consistent with epitaxial growth. After optimized annealing, BaM films have a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy field of 16,900 Oe, magnetization (4piMs) of 4.4 k

  11. Effect of season, substrate composition, and plant growth on landfill leachate treatment in a constructed wetland

    SciTech Connect

    Surface, J.M.; Peverly, J.H.; Steenhuis, T.S.; Sanford, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    In 1989 the US, Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Tompkins County, New York Departments of Planning and Solid Waste, began a 3-year study at a municipal solid-waste landfill near Ithaca, N.Y., to test the efficiency of leachate treatment by constructed wetlands and to examine the associated treatment processes. Specific objectives of the study were to examine: (1) Treatment efficiency as function of substrate composition and grain size, degree of plant growth, and seasonal changes in evapotranspiration rates and microbial activity; (2) effects of leachate and plant growth on the hydraulic characteristics of the substrate; and (3) chemical, biological, and physical processes by which nutrients, metals, and organic compounds are removed from leachate as it flows through the substrate. This report addresses the first two of these objectives and briefly discusses the third. It (1) describes the substrate plots, leachate-distribution system, sampling methods, and analytical procedures; and (2) presents results in terms of (a) percent removal rates of selected constituents between inflow- and outflow-sampling points, (b) seasonal effects on constituent-removal rates, and (c) effect of substrate composition on constituent removal and plant growth.

  12. Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of GaAs on (631) Oriented Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz Hernandez, Esteban; Rojas Ramirez, Juan-Salvador; Contreras Hernandez, Rocio; Lopez Lopez, Maximo; Pulzara Mora, Alvaro; Mendez Garcia, Victor H.

    2007-02-09

    In this work, we report the study of the homoepitaxial growth of GaAs on (631) oriented substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). We observed the spontaneous formation of a high density of large scale features on the surface. The hilly like features are elongated towards the [-5, 9, 3] direction. We show the dependence of these structures with the growth conditions and we present the possibility of to create quantum wires structures on this surface.

  13. Transfer free graphene growth on SiO2 substrate at 250 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Rosmi, Mohamad Saufi; Takahashi, Kazunari; Wakamatsu, Yuji; Yaakob, Yazid; Araby, Mona Ibrahim; Kalita, Golap; Kitazawa, Masashi; Tanemura, Masaki

    2017-03-01

    Low-temperature growth, as well as the transfer free growth on substrates, is the major concern of graphene research for its practical applications. Here we propose a simple method to achieve the transfer free graphene growth on SiO2 covered Si (SiO2/Si) substrate at 250 °C based on a solid-liquid-solid reaction. The key to this approach is the catalyst metal, which is not popular for graphene growth by chemical vapor deposition. A catalyst metal film of 500 nm thick was deposited onto an amorphous C (50 nm thick) coated SiO2/Si substrate. The sample was then annealed at 250 °C under vacuum condition. Raman spectra measured after the removal of the catalyst by chemical etching showed intense G and 2D peaks together with a small D and intense SiO2 related peaks, confirming the transfer free growth of multilayer graphene on SiO2/Si. The domain size of the graphene confirmed by optical microscope and atomic force microscope was about 5 μm in an average. Thus, this approach will open up a new route for transfer free graphene growth at low temperatures.

  14. Transfer free graphene growth on SiO2 substrate at 250 °C

    PubMed Central

    Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Rosmi, Mohamad Saufi; Takahashi, Kazunari; Wakamatsu, Yuji; Yaakob, Yazid; Araby, Mona Ibrahim; Kalita, Golap; Kitazawa, Masashi; Tanemura, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Low-temperature growth, as well as the transfer free growth on substrates, is the major concern of graphene research for its practical applications. Here we propose a simple method to achieve the transfer free graphene growth on SiO2 covered Si (SiO2/Si) substrate at 250 °C based on a solid-liquid-solid reaction. The key to this approach is the catalyst metal, which is not popular for graphene growth by chemical vapor deposition. A catalyst metal film of 500 nm thick was deposited onto an amorphous C (50 nm thick) coated SiO2/Si substrate. The sample was then annealed at 250 °C under vacuum condition. Raman spectra measured after the removal of the catalyst by chemical etching showed intense G and 2D peaks together with a small D and intense SiO2 related peaks, confirming the transfer free growth of multilayer graphene on SiO2/Si. The domain size of the graphene confirmed by optical microscope and atomic force microscope was about 5 μm in an average. Thus, this approach will open up a new route for transfer free graphene growth at low temperatures. PMID:28251997

  15. Substrate temperature effect on the growth of carbon nanowalls synthesized via microwave PECVD

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Yun; Choi, Won Seok; Lee, Jae-Hyeoung; Hong, Byungyou

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Well grown carbon nanowalls (CNWs) were obtained by using a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) with methane and hydrogen gases on Si substrates. • CNWs were grown at the growth temperature of 850 °C showed the highest contact angle. • Raman analysis showed higher I{sub D}/I{sub G} value that the CNWs were grown at more than 850 °C growth temperature. - Abstract: A carbon nanowall (CNW) is a carbon-based nanomaterial that is constructed with vertical-structure graphenes. Thus, it effectively increases the reaction surface of electrodes. In this study, the substrate temperature effect on the growth of CNWs was investigated via microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) with methane (CH{sub 4}) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gases on silicon substrates. To find the growth mechanism of a CNW, its growth temperature was changed from 700 °C to 950 °C. The vertical and surface conditions of the grown CNWs according to the growth temperature were characterized via field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurements showed that the CNWs were composed solely of carbon.

  16. Transfer free graphene growth on SiO2 substrate at 250 °C.

    PubMed

    Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Rosmi, Mohamad Saufi; Takahashi, Kazunari; Wakamatsu, Yuji; Yaakob, Yazid; Araby, Mona Ibrahim; Kalita, Golap; Kitazawa, Masashi; Tanemura, Masaki

    2017-03-02

    Low-temperature growth, as well as the transfer free growth on substrates, is the major concern of graphene research for its practical applications. Here we propose a simple method to achieve the transfer free graphene growth on SiO2 covered Si (SiO2/Si) substrate at 250 °C based on a solid-liquid-solid reaction. The key to this approach is the catalyst metal, which is not popular for graphene growth by chemical vapor deposition. A catalyst metal film of 500 nm thick was deposited onto an amorphous C (50 nm thick) coated SiO2/Si substrate. The sample was then annealed at 250 °C under vacuum condition. Raman spectra measured after the removal of the catalyst by chemical etching showed intense G and 2D peaks together with a small D and intense SiO2 related peaks, confirming the transfer free growth of multilayer graphene on SiO2/Si. The domain size of the graphene confirmed by optical microscope and atomic force microscope was about 5 μm in an average. Thus, this approach will open up a new route for transfer free graphene growth at low temperatures.

  17. Optimization of GaN MOVPE growth on patterned Si substrates using spectroscopic in situ reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strittmatter, A.; Reißmann, L.; Trepk, T.; Pohl, U. W.; Bimberg, D.; Zettler, J.-T.

    2004-12-01

    In real-time monitoring of III-Nitride growth on patterned and masked substrates by spectroscopic reflectance, a characteristic interference pattern generated by the superposition of wave-fronts reflected at different μm-sized structures at the sample surface is measured. Up to now this time- and wavelength-dependent pattern was used only for empirical fingerprint-evaluation of III-Nitride growth processes which employ patterning or masking for bulk defect reduction. In this paper, we report on the analysis of real-time spectroscopic reflectance data measured in the range 1.65-4.5 eV during the epitaxial growth of GaN layers on structured Si(1 1 1) substrates. The successful implementation of a two-dimensional interference model into conventional thin-film analysis algorithms enables the quantitative analysis of characteristic vertical and lateral growth rates and overgrowth mechanisms involved. The new method is applied to optimize III-Nitride growth processes on patterned silicon substrates used for subsequent III-Nitride device growth.

  18. Growth and characterization of α and β-phase tungsten films on various substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeong-Seop; Cho, Jaehun; You, Chun-Yeol

    2016-03-15

    The growth conditions of tungsten thin films were investigated using various substrates including Si, Si/SiO{sub 2}, GaAs, MgO, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and recipes were discovered for the optimal growth conditions of thick metastable β-phase tungsten films on Si, GaAs, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates, which is an important material in spin orbit torque studies. For the Si/SiO{sub 2} substrate, the crystal phase of the tungsten films was different depending upon the tungsten film thickness, and the transport properties were found to dramatically change with the thickness owing to a change in phase from the α + β phase to the α-phase. It is shown that the crystal phase changes are associated with residual stress in the tungsten films and that the resistivity is closely related to the grain sizes.

  19. Formation and possible growth mechanism of bismuth nanowires on various substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V. T.; Kasumov, A. Yu.; Kasumov, Yu. A.; Khodos, I. I.

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we report results of a study of bismuth nanowires growth on various substrates, including Fe, Ni, Co, W, Pt, Au thin films on oxidized Si, Si (111), oxidized Si (100), and fused quartz. The nanowires (NW) were prepared by RF diode sputtering of Bi onto a substrate heated to about 200 °C. The structure of the wires was studied by a scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The NWs are monocrystalline up to a length of several micrometers and possess a very thin (less than 2 nm) oxide layer. A major influence of the substrate type on the quantity and the length of the obtained nanowires is observed. Based on the above studies, we propose a possible mechanism of a bismuth nanowire growth.

  20. Atomic kinetic research of ordered quantum dot growth induced by dislocation on the substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chang; Zhao, M.; Wang, Y.; Lv, A. J.; Xing, G. J.; Ma, Y. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the modified effects of stress originating from the dislocation on the substrate to the semiconductor quantum dot growth are investigated by performing an event-based continuous kinetic Monte Carlo simulation, in which the contribution of the dangling bond of the atom is considered. The research results indicate that the change of binding energy initiated by the stress between the deposit atom and the substrate's atoms may significantly influence the atoms' kinetic behaviors, and on the pattern surface the atoms' kinetic effects are very sensitive to the initial condition of the substrate. In addition, the dependence of the atomic kinetics on the growth flux and temperature are also studied. The simulation results are in good qualitative agreement with those of our experiment.

  1. Growth of bi- and tri-layered graphene on silicon carbide substrate via molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Tjun Kit; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with simulated annealing method is used to study the growth process of bi- and tri-layered graphene on a 6H-SiC (0001) substrate via molecular dynamics simulation. Tersoff-Albe-Erhart (TEA) potential is used to describe the inter-atomic interactions among the atoms in the system. The formation temperature, averaged carbon-carbon bond length, pair correlation function, binding energy and the distance between the graphene formed and the SiC substrate are quantified. The growth mechanism, graphitization of graphene on the SiC substrate and characteristics of the surface morphology of the graphene sheet obtained in our MD simulation compare well to that observed in epitaxially grown graphene experiments and other simulation works.

  2. System for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sheldon, P.

    1996-12-31

    A system for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary or rotating substrates includes a combination of some or all of the elements including a photodiode sensor for detecting the intensity of incoming light and converting it to a measurable current, a lens for focusing the RHEED pattern emanating from the phosphor screen onto the photodiode, an interference filter for filtering out light other than that which emanates from the phosphor screen, a current amplifier for amplifying and convening the current produced by the photodiode into a voltage, a computer for receiving the amplified photodiode current for RHEED data analysis, and a graphite impregnated triaxial cable for improving the signal to noise ratio obtained while sampling a stationary or rotating substrate. A rotating stage for supporting the substrate with diametrically positioned electron beam apertures and an optically encoded shaft can also be used to accommodate rotation of the substrate during measurement. 16 figs.

  3. System for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sheldon, P.

    1995-10-10

    A system for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary or rotating substrates includes a combination of some or all of the elements including a photodiode sensor for detecting the intensity of incoming light and converting it to a measurable current, a lens for focusing the RHEED pattern emanating from the phosphor screen onto the photodiode, an interference filter for filtering out light other than that which emanates from the phosphor screen, a current amplifier for amplifying and converting the current produced by the photodiode into a voltage, a computer for receiving the amplified photodiode current for RHEED data analysis, and a graphite impregnated triaxial cable for improving the signal-to-noise ratio obtained while sampling a stationary or rotating substrate. A rotating stage for supporting the substrate with diametrically positioned electron beam apertures and an optically encoded shaft can also be used to accommodate rotation of the substrate during measurement. 16 figs.

  4. System for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sheldon, Peter

    1996-01-01

    A system for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary or rotating substrates includes a combination of some or all of the elements including a photodiode sensor for detecting the intensity of incoming light and converting it to a measurable current, a lens for focusing the RHEED pattern emanating from the phosphor screen onto the photodiode, an interference filter for filtering out light other than that which emanates from the phosphor screen, a current amplifier for amplifying and convening the current produced by the photodiode into a voltage, a computer for receiving the amplified photodiode current for RHEED data analysis, and a graphite impregnated triax cable for improving the signal to noise ratio obtained while sampling a stationary or rotating substrate. A rotating stage for supporting the substrate with diametrically positioned electron beam apertures and an optically encoded shaft can also be used to accommodate rotation of the substrate during measurement.

  5. System for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sheldon, Peter

    1995-01-01

    A system for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary or rotating substrates includes a combination of some or all of the elements including a photodiode sensor for detecting the intensity of incoming light and converting it to a measurable current, a lens for focusing the RHEED pattern emanating from the phosphor screen onto the photodiode, an interference filter for filtering out light other than that which emanates from the phosphor screen, a current amplifier for amplifying and converting the current produced by the photodiode into a voltage, a computer for receiving the amplified photodiode current for RHEED data analysis, and a graphite impregnated triax cable for improving the signal to noise ratio obtained while sampling a stationary or rotating substrate. A rotating stage for supporting the substrate with diametrically positioned electron beam apertures and an optically encoded shaft can also be used to accommodate rotation of the substrate during measurement.

  6. Epitaxial Growth of GaN-based LEDs on Simple Sacrificial Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Ferguson; Chris Summers

    2009-12-31

    The objective of this project is to produce alternative substrate technologies for GaN-based LEDs by developing an ALD interlayer of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on sacrificial substrates such as ZnO and Si. A sacrificial substrate is used for device growth that can easily be removed using a wet chemical etchant leaving only the thin GaN epi-layer. After substrate removal, the GaN LED chip can then be mounted in several different ways to a metal heat sink/reflector and light extraction techniques can then be applied to the chip and compared for performance. Success in this work will lead to high efficiency LED devices with a simple low cost fabrication method and high product yield as stated by DOE goals for its solid state lighting portfolio.

  7. Raman measurements of substrate temperature in a molecular beam epitaxy growth chamber.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, T; Nazari, M; Eridisoorya, M; Myers, T M; Holtz, M

    2015-01-01

    A method is described for directly measuring the temperature of a substrate in a molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) growth system. The approach relies on the establishment of the temperature dependence of Raman-active phonons of the substrate material using independently known calibration points across the range of interest. An unknown temperature in this range is then determined based on the Raman peak position with the substrate in situ the MBE chamber. The apparatus relies on conventional optics and Raman components. Shifting and broadening of the Raman spectrum are described based on the effects of thermal expansion and anharmonic decay. The choice of reference temperature is discussed. The method is qualified by examining the substrate temperature dependence, relative to that of a standard thermocouple, during a commonly used ramp procedure. Both temperature difference and time lag are obtained.

  8. Raman measurements of substrate temperature in a molecular beam epitaxy growth chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, T.; Nazari, M.; Eridisoorya, M.; Myers, T. M.; Holtz, M.

    2015-01-15

    A method is described for directly measuring the temperature of a substrate in a molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) growth system. The approach relies on the establishment of the temperature dependence of Raman-active phonons of the substrate material using independently known calibration points across the range of interest. An unknown temperature in this range is then determined based on the Raman peak position with the substrate in situ the MBE chamber. The apparatus relies on conventional optics and Raman components. Shifting and broadening of the Raman spectrum are described based on the effects of thermal expansion and anharmonic decay. The choice of reference temperature is discussed. The method is qualified by examining the substrate temperature dependence, relative to that of a standard thermocouple, during a commonly used ramp procedure. Both temperature difference and time lag are obtained.

  9. Effect of Trichoderma on horticultural seedlings' growth promotion depending on inoculum and substrate type.

    PubMed

    Marín-Guirao, J I; Rodríguez-Romera, P; Lupión-Rodríguez, B; Camacho-Ferre, F; Tello-Marquina, J C

    2016-10-01

    The biostimulant effect of Trichoderma spp. on horticultural crops are highly variable. Thus, practical use of Trichoderma sp. requires feasible formulated products and suitable substrates. This study evaluates the survival and the growth-promotion effect of a Trichoderma saturnisporum rice formulation compared with a nonformulated conidia suspension (seven treatments in total), on tomato, pepper and cucumber seedlings grown in two substrates: (i) rich in organic matter (OM) and (ii) mineral substrate without OM. The results showed beneficial effects on seedling growth in the OM-rich substrate when T. saturnisporum rice formulation (mainly at maximum concentration) was applied, but the effects were opposite when the mineral substrate without OM was used. The effects were closely linked to the level of inoculum in the substrate, which was greater upon application of the formulated inoculum as opposed to the nonformulated one. The use of rice to prepare the inoculum of T. saturnisporum seems to be promising for seedling growth in the nursery when it is applied in a substrate that is rich in organic matter, but it must be considered that under certain conditions of food shortage, Trichoderma sp. could show pathogenicity to seedlings. This study provides evidence of the complexity inherent in the use of micro-organisms in agriculture, while also confirming that the activity of the biofertilizers based on Trichoderma depends on the type of inoculum and its concentration, as well as the properties of the medium in which the fungi develop. Further studies assessing the effectiveness or possible pathogenicity of Trichoderma in different soils under greenhouse conditions must be addressed. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Interactive effects of substrate, hydroperiod, and nutrients on seedling growth of Salix nigra and Taxodium distichum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, Richard H.; Doyle, T.W.; Draugelis-Dale, R. O.

    2006-01-01

    The large river swamps of Louisiana have complex topography and hydrology, characterized by black willow (Salix nigra) dominance on accreting alluvial sediments and vast areas of baldcypress (Taxodium distichum) deepwater swamps with highly organic substrates. Seedling survival of these two wetland tree species is influenced by their growth rate in relation to the height and duration of annual flooding in riverine environments. This study examines the interactive effects of substrate, hydroperiod, and nutrients on growth rates of black willow and baldcypress seedlings. In a greenhouse experiment with a split-split-plot design, 1-year seedlings of black willow and baldcypress were subjected to two nutrient treatments (unfertilized versus fertilized), two hydroperiods (continuously flooded versus twice daily flooding/draining), and two substrates (sand versus commercial peat mix). Response variables included height, diameter, lateral branch count, biomass, and root:stem ratio. Black willow growth in height and diameter, as well as all biomass components, were significantly greater in peat substrate than in sand. Black willow showed a significant hydroperiod-nutrient interaction wherein fertilizer increased stem and root biomass under drained conditions, but flooded plants did not respond to fertilization. Baldcypress diameter and root biomass were higher in peat than in sand, and the same two variables increased with fertilization in flooded as well as drained treatments. These results can be used in Louisiana wetland forest models as inputs of seedling growth and survival, regeneration potential, and biomass accumulation rates of black willow and baldcypress.

  11. Effects of substrate type on plant growth and nitrogen and nitrate concentration in spinach

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of three commercial substrates (a mixture of forest residues, composted grape husks, and white peat; black peat; and coir) on plant growth and nitrogen (N) and nitrate (NO3) concentration and content were evaluated in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv. Tapir). Spinach seedlings were trans...

  12. The relative importance of exogenous and substrate-derived nitrogen for microbial growth during leaf decomposition

    Treesearch

    B.M. Cheever; J. R. Webster; E. E. Bilger; S. A. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrophic microbes colonizing detritus obtain nitrogen (N) for growth by assimilating N from their substrate or immobilizing exogenous inorganic N. Microbial use of these two pools has different implications for N cycling and organic matter decomposition in the face of the global increase in biologically available N. We used sugar maple leaves labeled with

  13. Selective-area growth and controlled substrate coupling of transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersch, Brian M.; Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Zhang, Kehao; Bhimanapati, Ganesh R.; Piasecki, Aleksander F.; Labella, Michael, III; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2017-06-01

    Developing a means for true bottom-up, selective-area growth of two-dimensional (2D) materials on device-ready substrates will enable synthesis in regions only where they are needed. Here, we demonstrate seed-free, site-specific nucleation of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) with precise control over lateral growth by utilizing an ultra-thin polymeric surface functionalization capable of precluding nucleation and growth. This polymer functional layer (PFL) is derived from conventional photoresists and lithographic processing, and is compatible with multiple growth techniques, precursors (metal organics, solid-source) and TMDs. Additionally, we demonstrate that the substrate can play a major role in TMD transport properties. With proper TMD/substrate decoupling, top-gated field-effect transistors (FETs) fabricated with selectively-grown monolayer MoS2 channels are competitive with current reported MoS2 FETs. The work presented here demonstrates that substrate surface engineering is key to realizing precisely located and geometrically-defined 2D layers via unseeded chemical vapor deposition techniques.

  14. Association of Growth Substrates and Bacterial Genera with Benzo[a]pyrene Mineralization in Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Maiysha D.; Rodgers-Vieira, Elyse A.; Hu, Jing; Aitken, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) that is not known to be a bacterial growth substrate. Organisms capable of cometabolizing BaP in complex field-contaminated systems have not previously been identified. We evaluated BaP mineralization by a bacterial community from a bioreactor treating PAH-contaminated soil during coincubation with or after pre-enrichment on various PAHs as growth substrates. Pyrosequence libraries of 16S rRNA genes were used to identify bacteria that were enriched on the added growth substrate as a means of associating specific organisms with BaP mineralization. Coincubating the bioreactor-treated soil with naphthalene, phenanthrene, or pyrene inhibited BaP mineralization, whereas pre-enriching the soil on the same three PAHs enhanced BaP mineralization. Combined, these results suggest that bacteria in the bioreactor community that are capable of growing on naphthalene, phenanthrene, and/or pyrene can metabolize BaP, with coincubation competitively inhibiting BaP metabolism. Anthracene, fluoranthene, and benz[a]anthracene had little effect on BaP mineralization compared to incubations without an added growth substrate under either coincubation or pre-enrichment conditions. Substantial increases in relative abundance after pre-enrichment with phenanthrene, naphthalene, or pyrene, but not the other PAHs, suggest that members of the genera Cupriavidus and Luteimonas may have been associated with BaP mineralization. PMID:25469077

  15. Method To Estimate Growth of Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus wentii in Mixed Culture on Cellulosic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Panda, T.; Bisaria, V. S.; Ghose, T. K.

    1989-01-01

    A simple differential method based on measurement of an intracellular pigment of Aspergillus wentii was developed for estimation of the individual growths of two fungi, Trichoderma reesei and A. wentii, in mixed-culture fermentation of an insoluble cellulosic substrate. PMID:16347888

  16. Availability of Clean Chip Residual as a Growth Substrate in the Southeast United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Residual chipping material (also called clean chip residual or CCR) has potential use as a growth substrate in the nursery industry. The objective of this study was to quantify the amount and type of CCR material available in the Southeast United States for possible horticultural use by surveying wo...

  17. Note: A single specimen channel crack growth technique applied to brittle thin films on polymer substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Graham, S.; Pierron, O. N.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce an external-load-assisted thin film channel crack growth technique to measure the subcritical crack growth properties of thin films (i.e., crack velocity, v, versus the strain energy release rate, G), and demonstrate it using 250-nm-thick SiNx films on poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrates. The main particularity of this technique is that it requires a polymer substrate to allow loading to large strains (in order to induce channel cracking) without substrate fracture. Its main advantages are to provide a full v-G curve with a single specimen while relying on a simple specimen preparation and straightforward crack growth characterization. Importantly, the technique can be employed for a much larger range of thin films compared to the residual-stress-driven, thin film channel crack growth tests, including ultrathin films and thin film with residual compressive stresses. The restrictions to a proper use of this technique, related to the (visco)plastic deformation of the substrate, are discussed.

  18. Epitaxial growth of AlN films on single-crystalline Ta substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, S.; Okamoto, K.; Inoue, S. Kim, T-W.; Ohta, J.; Fujioka, H.; Oshima, M.

    2007-08-15

    We have demonstrated the first epitaxial growth of AlN films on single-crystalline Ta substrates by the use of a low-temperature growth technique based on pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Although previous AlN films grown on Ta(100) and (111) substrates have exhibited quite poor crystallinity, an epitaxial AlN(0001) film with an in-plane epitaxial relationship of AlN[112-bar 0]//Ta[001] has been obtained on a Ta(110) substrate at a growth temperature of 450 deg. C. We found that the full-width at half-maximum values for the crystal orientation distribution in the tilt and twist directions of the AlN film were 0.37{sup o} and 0.41{sup o}, respectively. Grazing-incidence X-ray reflection (GIXR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements have revealed that the AlN/Ta heterointerface is quite abrupt, and that its abruptness remains unchanged even after annealing at 1000 deg. C. - Graphical abstract: An epitaxial AlN(0001) film with an in-plane epitaxial relationship of AlN[112-bar 0]//Ta[001] has been obtained for the first time on a Ta(110) substrate by the use of a PLD low-temperature growth technique.

  19. From conformal overgrowth to lateral growth of indium arsenide nano structures on silicon substrates by MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sladek, Kamil; Haas, Fabian; Heidelmann, Markus; Park, Daesung; Barthel, Juri; Dorn, Falk; Weirich, Thomas E.; Grützmacher, Detlev; Hardtdegen, Hilde

    2013-05-01

    A methodology for the deposition of lateral InAs nanostructures on silicon by selective area metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (SA-MOVPE) is presented. Growth parameters which are optimal for the SA-MOVPE of conformal InAs overgrowth on GaAs nanowires were transferred to the lateral SA growth of InAs structures on patterned silicon substrates. The substrate pretreatment conditions and growth parameters were further optimized with respect to selectivity and nanostructure morphology. It is found that lateral growth of InAs nano structures can be achieved on patterned Si(110) as well as on patterned silicon on insulator (SOI) substrates. An investigation of the laterally grown InAs/Si nanowires' crystal structure revealed a faceted but nevertheless abrupt Si-InAs interface on the Si(110) substrate as well as relaxation and a high crystallinity of the deposited InAs on both Si template types. The morphology and crystallinity of laterally grown structures are discussed in detail and compared to that of vertical shell/core InAs/GaAs nanowires.

  20. Effect of Different Substrates and Casing Materials on the Growth and Yield of Calocybe indica.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ruhul; Khair, Abul; Alam, Nuhu; Lee, Tae Soo

    2010-06-01

    Calocybe indica, a tropical edible mushroom, is popular because it has good nutritive value and it can be cultivated commercially. The current investigation was undertaken to determine a suitable substrate and the appropriate thickness of casing materials for the cultivation of C. indica. Optimum mycelial growth was observed in coconut coir substrate. Primordia initiation with the different substrates and casing materials was observed between the 13th and 19th day. The maximum length of stalk was recorded from sugarcane leaf, while diameter of stalk and pileus, and thickness of pileus were found in rice straw substrate. The highest biological and economic yield, and biological efficiency were also obtained in the rice straw substrate. Cow dung and loamy soil, farm-yard manure, loamy soil and sand, and spent oyster mushroom substrates were used as casing materials to evaluate the yield and yield-contributing characteristics of C. indica. The results indicate that the number of effective fruiting bodies, the biological and economic yield, and the biological efficiency were statistically similar all of the casing materials used. The maximum biological efficiency was found in the cow dung and loamy soil casing material. The cow dung and loamy soil (3 cm thick) was the best casing material and the rice straw was the best substrate for the commercial cultivation of C. indica.

  1. Effect of Different Substrates and Casing Materials on the Growth and Yield of Calocybe indica

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Ruhul; Khair, Abul; Alam, Nuhu

    2010-01-01

    Calocybe indica, a tropical edible mushroom, is popular because it has good nutritive value and it can be cultivated commercially. The current investigation was undertaken to determine a suitable substrate and the appropriate thickness of casing materials for the cultivation of C. indica. Optimum mycelial growth was observed in coconut coir substrate. Primordia initiation with the different substrates and casing materials was observed between the 13th and 19th day. The maximum length of stalk was recorded from sugarcane leaf, while diameter of stalk and pileus, and thickness of pileus were found in rice straw substrate. The highest biological and economic yield, and biological efficiency were also obtained in the rice straw substrate. Cow dung and loamy soil, farm-yard manure, loamy soil and sand, and spent oyster mushroom substrates were used as casing materials to evaluate the yield and yield-contributing characteristics of C. indica. The results indicate that the number of effective fruiting bodies, the biological and economic yield, and the biological efficiency were statistically similar all of the casing materials used. The maximum biological efficiency was found in the cow dung and loamy soil casing material. The cow dung and loamy soil (3 cm thick) was the best casing material and the rice straw was the best substrate for the commercial cultivation of C. indica. PMID:23956634

  2. Construction of broad-host-range cosmid cloning vectors: identification of genes necessary for growth of Methylobacterium organophilum on methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, L.N.; Hanson, R.S.

    1985-03-01

    Four new cloning vectors have been constructed from the broad-host-range cloning vector pRK290. These vectors, pLA2901, pLA2905, pLA2910, and pLA2917, confer resistance to kanamycin and tetracycline. The latter two are cosmid derivatives of pLA2901. The new vectors can be mobilized into, and are stably maintained in, a variety of gram-negative bacteria. A Sau3A genomic bank of Methylobacterium organophilum strain xx DNA has been constructed in pLA2917, and complementation analysis, with a variety of mutants unable to grow on methanol, revealed at least five separate regions necessary for growth on methanol. Complementation analysis and Tn5 mutagenesis data suggest that at least three genes are responsible for expression of active methanol dehydrogenase.

  3. Healing time for the growth of thin films on patterned substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanphana, R.; Chatraphorn, P.; Dasgupta, C.

    2014-08-01

    The healing times for the growth of thin films on patterned substrates are studied using simulations of two discrete models of surface growth: the Family model and the Das Sarma-Tamborenea (DT) model. The healing time, defined as the time at which the characteristics of the growing interface are “healed” to those obtained in growth on a flat substrate, is determined via the study of the nearest-neighbor height difference correlation function. Two different initial patterns are considered in this work: a relatively smooth tent-shaped triangular substrate and an atomically rough substrate with single-site pillars or grooves. We find that the healing time of the Family and DT models on a L×L triangular substrate is proportional to Lz, where z is the dynamical exponent of the models. For the Family model, we also analyze theoretically, using a continuum description based on the linear Edwards-Wilkinson equation, the time evolution of the nearest-neighbor height difference correlation function in this system. The correlation functions obtained from continuum theory and simulation are found to be consistent with each other for the relatively smooth triangular substrate. For substrates with periodic and random distributions of pillars or grooves of varying size, the healing time is found to increase linearly with the height (depth) of pillars (grooves). We show explicitly that the simulation data for the Family model grown on a substrate with pillars or grooves do not agree with results of a calculation based on the continuum Edwards-Wilkinson equation. This result implies that a continuum description does not work when the initial pattern is atomically rough. The observed dependence of the healing time on the substrate size and the initial height (depth) of pillars (grooves) can be understood from the details of the diffusion rule of the atomistic model. The healing time of both models for pillars is larger than that for grooves with depth equal to the height of the

  4. Growth temperature dependence of exciton lifetime in wurtzite InP nanowires grown on silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, N.; Hadj Alouane, M. H.; Anufriev, R.; Khmissi, H.; Naji, K.; Patriarche, G.; Bru-Chevallier, C.; Gendry, M.

    2012-01-01

    InP nanowires grown on silicon substrate are investigated using time-resolved spectroscopy. A strong modification of the exciton lifetime is observed (from 0.11 to 1.2 ns) when the growth temperature is increased from 340 °C to 460 °C. This strong dependence is not related to the density of zinc-blende insertions in the wurtzite nanowires or to the wurtzite exciton linewidth. The excitation power dependence of the lifetime and linewidth is investigated, and these results allow us to interpret the growth temperature dependence on the lifetime as a consequence of the reduction of the surface recombination velocity with the growth temperature.

  5. Enhanced epitaxial growth on substrates modified by ion sputtering: Ge on GaAs(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brake, J.; Wang, X.-S.; Pechman, R. J.; Weaver, J. H.

    1996-04-01

    The growth morphology of Ge on GaAs(110) has been modified by using ion sputtering at elevated temperatures to create GaAs vacancy islands prior to Ge deposition. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of growth on such surfaces show that the Ge nucleation density is increased significantly and that this leads to island coalescence and uniform film formation at lower coverages than observed on unsputtered substrates. The driving force for this change in morphology is the reduction in energy achieved by saturation of dangling bonds at vacancy island steps. Vacancy islands with lateral sizes less than 100 Å are most effective for such a growth.

  6. Controlling the growth of Bi(110) and Bi(111) films on an insulating substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowski, Maciej; Kamiński, Daniel; Vergeer, Kurt; Mirolo, Marta; Carla, Francesco; Rijnders, Guus; Bollmann, Tjeerd R. J.

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate the controlled growth of Bi(110) and Bi(111) films on an α-Al2O3(0001) substrate by surface x-ray diffraction and x-ray reflectivity using synchrotron radiation. At temperatures as low as 40 K, unanticipated pseudo-cubic Bi(110) films are grown with thicknesses ranging from a few to tens of nanometers. The roughness at the film–vacuum as well as the film–substrate interface, can be reduced by mild heating, where a crystallographic orientation transition of Bi(110) towards Bi(111) is observed at 400 K. From 450 K onwards high quality ultrasmooth Bi(111) films form. Growth around the transition temperature results in the growth of competing Bi(110) and Bi(111) domains.

  7. Graphene growth on Ge(100)/Si(100) substrates by CVD method

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Iwona; Wesolowski, Marek; Jozwik, Iwona; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Lupina, Grzegorz; Dabrowski, Pawel; Baranowski, Jacek M.; Strupinski, Wlodek

    2016-01-01

    The successful integration of graphene into microelectronic devices is strongly dependent on the availability of direct deposition processes, which can provide uniform, large area and high quality graphene on nonmetallic substrates. As of today the dominant technology is based on Si and obtaining graphene with Si is treated as the most advantageous solution. However, the formation of carbide during the growth process makes manufacturing graphene on Si wafers extremely challenging. To overcome these difficulties and reach the set goals, we proposed growth of high quality graphene layers by the CVD method on Ge(100)/Si(100) wafers. In addition, a stochastic model was applied in order to describe the graphene growth process on the Ge(100)/Si(100) substrate and to determine the direction of further processes. As a result, high quality graphene was grown, which was proved by Raman spectroscopy results, showing uniform monolayer films with FWHM of the 2D band of 32 cm−1. PMID:26899732

  8. Controlling the growth of Bi(110) and Bi(111) films on an insulating substrate.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Maciej; Kamiński, Daniel; Vergeer, Kurt; Mirolo, Marta; Carla, Francesco; Rijnders, Guus; Bollmann, Tjeerd R J

    2017-04-18

    We demonstrate the controlled growth of Bi(110) and Bi(111) films on an α-Al2O3(0001) substrate by surface x-ray diffraction and x-ray reflectivity using synchrotron radiation. At temperatures as low as 40 K, unanticipated pseudo-cubic Bi(110) films are grown with thicknesses ranging from a few to tens of nanometers. The roughness at the film-vacuum as well as the film-substrate interface, can be reduced by mild heating, where a crystallographic orientation transition of Bi(110) towards Bi(111) is observed at 400 K. From 450 K onwards high quality ultrasmooth Bi(111) films form. Growth around the transition temperature results in the growth of competing Bi(110) and Bi(111) domains.

  9. Simulation of growth rate and deposition profile on the periodically patterned substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Byung-Joon; Kang, Sung-Ju; Kim, Jin-Taek; Pak, Bockchoon; Lee, Cheul-Ro

    2007-06-01

    The growth of GaN on the patterned substances has proven favorable to achieve thick, crack-free GaN layers. Based on these methods, we specially designed periodically patterned Si substrate process, which is referred to as lateral epitaxy on patterned Si substrate (LEPS). High crystalline quality GaN are obtained by using this technique. In this paper, numerical modeling of transport and reaction of species is performed to estimate the growth rate of GaN from the reaction of trimethyl gallium (TMG) and ammonia. The effect of fabricated structure of feature scale model will be predicted by using the topography simulator, and deposition profile of the GaN on the pattern will be discussed. The effect of flow conditions and pattern shape and periodicity will also be addressed, which can be critical for the quality of crystal growth. The dependency of step coverage and conformality of patterned mask will also be discussed.

  10. The effect of substrate modulus on the growth and function of matrix-embedded endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Murikipudi, Sylaja; Methe, Heiko; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) are potent bioregulatory cells, modulating thrombosis, inflammation and control over mural smooth muscle cells and vascular health. The biochemical roles of EC are retained when cells are embedded within three-dimensional (3D) denatured collagen matrices. Though substrate mechanics have long been known to affect cellular morphology and function and 3D-EC systems are increasingly used as therapeutic modalities little is known about the effect of substrate mechanics on EC in these 3D systems. In this work, we examined the effect of isolated changes in modulus on EC growth and morphology, extracellular matrix gene expression, modulation of smooth muscle cell growth, and immunogenicity. EC growth, but not morphology was dependent on scaffold modulus. Increased scaffold modulus reduced secretion of smooth muscle cell growth inhibiting heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), but had no effect on secreted growth factors, resulting in a loss of smooth muscle cell growth inhibition by EC on high modulus scaffolds. Expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and induction of CD4+ T-cell proliferation was reduced by increased scaffold modulus, and correlated with changes in integrin α5 expression. Expression of several common ECM proteins by EC on stiffer substrates dropped, including collagen IV(α1), collagen IV(α5), fibronectin, HSPGs (perlecan and biglycan). In contrast, expression of elastin and TIMPs were increased. This work shows even modest changes in substrate modulus can have a significant impact on EC function in three-dimensional systems. The mechanism of these changes is not clear, but the data presented herewithin suggests a model wherein EC attempt to neutralize changes in environmental force balance by altering ECM and integrin expression, leading to changes in effects on downstream signaling and function. PMID:23102623

  11. Droughts and broad-scale climate variability reflected by temperature-sensitive tree growth in the Qinling Mountains, central China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Qi; Bao, Guang

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between temperature and drought was investigated using the temperature-sensitive growth of Larix chinensis Beissn in the Qinling Mountains, central China. Extremely high tree-ring width index values (TRWI) agreed well with dry conditions defined by the dryness-wetness index (DWI) obtained from data in Chinese historical documents and climate-related papers between 1814 and 1956 (before the short of instrumental measurements); the reverse applied to extremely low TRWI values. The main severe drought epochs occurred from the late 1850s to the 1870s, the 1920s to 1930s and in the 2000s, whereas wet spells occurred from 1817-1827 and 1881-1886. The droughts in the 2000s exhibited a similar pattern as the ones from the 1920s to 1930s, with obviously an increasing temperature. The variation of tree growth agreed well with other reconstructed temperature series from nearby and remote regions, suggesting that Larix chinensis could respond to broad-scale climate variability. The longest cold interval, 1817-1827, could be associated with the influence of the Tambora eruption in 1815.

  12. Conformal growth of Mo/Si multilayers on grating substrates using collimated ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Voronov, D. L.; Gawlitza, Peter; Cambie, Rossana; Dhuey, Scott; Gullikson, Eric M.; Warwick, Tony; Braun, Stefan; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Padmore, Howard A.

    2012-05-07

    Deposition of multilayers on saw-tooth substrates is a key step in the fabrication of multilayer blazed gratings (MBG) for extreme ultraviolet and soft x-rays. Growth of the multilayers can be perturbed by shadowing effects caused by the highly corrugated surface of the substrates, which results in distortion of the multilayer stack structure and degradation of performance of MBGs. In this study, to minimize the shadowing effects, we used an ion-beamsputtering machine with a highly collimated atomic flux to deposit Mo/Si multilayers on saw-tooth substrates. The sputtering conditions were optimized by finding a balance between smoothening and roughening processes in order to minimize degradation of the groove profile in the course of deposition and at the same time to keep the interfaces of a multilayer stack smooth enough for high efficiency. An optimal value of energy of 200 eV for sputtering Kr+ ions was found by deposition of test multilayers on flat substrates at a range of ion energies. Two saw-tooth substrates were deposited at energies of 200 eV and 700 eV for the sputtering ions. It was found that reduction of the ion energy improved the blazing performance of the MBG and resulted in a 40% gain in the diffraction efficiency due to better replication of the groove profile by the multilayer. As a result of the optimization performed, an absolute diffraction efficiency of 28.8% was achieved for the 2nd blaze order of the MBG with a groove density of 7350 lines/mm at a wavelength of 13.5 nm. Lastly, details of the growth behavior of the multilayers on flat and saw-tooth substrates are discussed in terms of the linear continuous model of film growth.

  13. Conformal growth of Mo/Si multilayers on grating substrates using collimated ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Voronov, D. L.; Cambie, R.; Dhuey, S.; Gullikson, E. M.; Warwick, T.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Padmore, H. A.; Gawlitza, P.; Braun, S.

    2012-05-01

    Deposition of multilayers on saw-tooth substrates is a key step in the fabrication of multilayer blazed gratings (MBG) for extreme ultraviolet and soft x-rays. Growth of the multilayers can be perturbed by shadowing effects caused by the highly corrugated surface of the substrates, which results in distortion of the multilayer stack structure and degradation of performance of MBGs. To minimize the shadowing effects, we used an ion-beam sputtering machine with a highly collimated atomic flux to deposit Mo/Si multilayers on saw-tooth substrates. The sputtering conditions were optimized by finding a balance between smoothening and roughening processes in order to minimize degradation of the groove profile in the course of deposition and at the same time to keep the interfaces of a multilayer stack smooth enough for high efficiency. An optimal value of energy of 200 eV for sputtering Kr{sup +} ions was found by deposition of test multilayers on flat substrates at a range of ion energies. Two saw-tooth substrates were deposited at energies of 200 eV and 700 eV for the sputtering ions. It was found that reduction of the ion energy improved the blazing performance of the MBG and resulted in a 40% gain in the diffraction efficiency due to better replication of the groove profile by the multilayer. As a result of the optimization performed, an absolute diffraction efficiency of 28.8% was achieved for the 2nd blaze order of the MBG with a groove density of 7350 lines/mm at a wavelength of 13.5 nm. Details of the growth behavior of the multilayers on flat and saw-tooth substrates are discussed in terms of the linear continuous model of film growth.

  14. [Nutrient transfer and growth of Pinus greggii Engelm. inoculated with edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms in two substrates].

    PubMed

    Rentería-Chávez, María C; Pérez-Moreno, Jesús; Cetina-Alcalá, Víctor M; Ferrera-Cerrato, Ronald; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz

    An ectomycorrhiza is a mutualistic symbiosis of paramount importance in forestry and tree production. One of the selection criteria of ectomycorrhizal fungi that has currently gained importance is their edibility due to the economic, ecological and cultural relevance of edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms as a non-timber forest product. The effect of the inoculation with three edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms: Laccaria laccata, Laccaria bicolor y Hebeloma leucosarx, which are widely sold in Mexico, on the growth and nutrient contents of Pinus greggii grown in an experimental substrate and a commercial substrate enriched with a slow-release fertilizer, was evaluated. Two years after sowing, differences in terms of shoot and root biomass and macro and micronutrient contents between inoculated and non-inoculated plants, were recorded independently of the fungal species and the substrate. Despite the fact that plants grown in the commercial substrate had higher growth and nutrient contents, their ectomycorrhizal colonization percentages were smaller than those of the plants grown in the experimental substrate. The differences in the nutrient transfer to the inoculated plant shoots among the evaluated fungal species were recorded. Ca mobilization by L. laccata, Na by L. bicolor and Mn by H. leucosarx were observed in the plants growing in the experimental substrate. It has been demonstrated that the selection of substrates constitutes an important factor in the production of ectomycorrhizal plants and that the three evaluated species of edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms have an enormous potential in the controlled mycorrhization of P. greggii. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Process for selectively patterning epitaxial film growth on a semiconductor substrate

    DOEpatents

    Sheldon, Peter; Hayes, Russell E.

    1986-01-01

    A process is disclosed for selectively patterning epitaxial film growth on a semiconductor substrate. The process includes forming a masking member on the surface of the substrate, the masking member having at least two layers including a first layer disposed on the substrate and the second layer covering the first layer. A window is then opened in a selected portion of the second layer by removing that portion to expose the first layer thereunder. The first layer is then subjected to an etchant introduced through the window to dissolve a sufficient amount of the first layer to expose the substrate surface directly beneath the window, the first layer being adapted to preferentially dissolve at a substantially greater rate than the second layer so as to create an overhanging ledge portion with the second layer by undercutting the edges thereof adjacent to the window. The epitaxial film is then deposited on the exposed substrate surface directly beneath the window. Finally, an etchant is introduced through the window to dissolve the remainder of the first layer so as to lift-off the second layer and materials deposited thereon to fully expose the balance of the substrate surface.

  16. Direct growth of nanocrystalline hexagonal boron nitride films on dielectric substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, Roland Yingjie; Tsang, Siu Hon; Loeblein, Manuela; Chow, Wai Leong; Loh, Guan Chee; Toh, Joo Wah; Ang, Soon Loong; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    2015-03-09

    Atomically thin hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN) films are primarily synthesized through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on various catalytic transition metal substrates. In this work, a single-step metal-catalyst-free approach to obtain few- to multi-layer nanocrystalline h-BN (NCBN) directly on amorphous SiO{sub 2}/Si and quartz substrates is demonstrated. The as-grown thin films are continuous and smooth with no observable pinholes or wrinkles across the entire deposited substrate as inspected using optical and atomic force microscopy. The starting layers of NCBN orient itself parallel to the substrate, initiating the growth of the textured thin film. Formation of NCBN is due to the random and uncontrolled nucleation of h-BN on the dielectric substrate surface with no epitaxial relation, unlike on metal surfaces. The crystallite size is ∼25 nm as determined by Raman spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the NCBN formed sheets of multi-stacked layers with controllable thickness from ∼2 to 25 nm. The absence of transfer process in this technique avoids any additional degradation, such as wrinkles, tears or folding and residues on the film which are detrimental to device performance. This work provides a wider perspective of CVD-grown h-BN and presents a viable route towards large-scale manufacturing of h-BN substrates and for coating applications.

  17. Process for selectively patterning epitaxial film growth on a semiconductor substrate

    DOEpatents

    Sheldon, P.; Hayes, R.E.

    1984-12-04

    Disclosed is a process for selectively patterning epitaxial film growth on a semiconductor substrate. The process includes forming a masking member on the surface of the substrate, the masking member having at least two layers including a first layer disposed on the substrate and the second layer covering the first layer. A window is then opened in a selected portion of the second layer by removing that portion to expose the first layer thereunder. The first layer is then subjected to an etchant introduced through the window to dissolve the first layer a sufficient amount to expose the substrate surface directly beneath the window, the first layer being adapted to preferentially dissolve at a substantially greater rate than the second layer so as to create an overhanging ledge portion with the second layer by undercutting the edges thereof adjacent the window. The epitaxial film is then deposited on the exposed substrate surface directly beneath the window. Finally, an etchant is introduced through the window to dissolve the remainder of the first layer so as to lift-off the second layer and materials deposited thereon to fully expose the balance of the substrate surface.

  18. Modeling gravity effects on water retention and gas transport characteristics in plant growth substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamindu Deepagoda, T. K. K.; Jones, Scott B.; Tuller, Markus; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Kawamoto, Ken; Komatsu, Toshiko; Moldrup, Per

    2014-08-01

    Growing plants to facilitate life in outer space, for example on the International Space Station (ISS) or at planned deep-space human outposts on the Moon or Mars, has received much attention with regard to NASA's advanced life support system research. With the objective of in situ resource utilization to conserve energy and to limit transport costs, native materials mined on Moon or Mars are of primary interest for plant growth media in a future outpost, while terrestrial porous substrates with optimal growth media characteristics will be useful for onboard plant growth during space missions. Due to limited experimental opportunities and prohibitive costs, liquid and gas behavior in porous substrates under reduced gravity conditions has been less studied and hence remains poorly understood. Based on ground-based measurements, this study examined water retention, oxygen diffusivity and air permeability characteristics of six plant growth substrates for potential applications in space, including two terrestrial analogs for lunar and Martian soils and four particulate substrates widely used in reduced gravity experiments. To simulate reduced gravity water characteristics, the predictions for ground-based measurements (1 - g) were scaled to two reduced gravity conditions, Martian gravity (0.38 - g) and lunar gravity (0.16 - g), following the observations in previous reduced gravity studies. We described the observed gas diffusivity with a recently developed model combined with a new approach that estimates the gas percolation threshold based on the pore size distribution. The model successfully captured measured data for all investigated media and demonstrated the implications of the poorly-understood shift in gas percolation threshold with improved gas percolation in reduced gravity. Finally, using a substrate-structure parameter related to the gaseous phase, we adequately described the air permeability under reduced gravity conditions.

  19. Epitaxial Growth of Aluminum on Silicon Substrates by Metalorganic Molecular Beam Epitaxy using Dimethyl-Ethylamine Alane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neo, Yoichiro; Otoda, Toshihiro; Sagae, Katumi; Mimura, Hidenori; Yokoo, Kuniyoshi

    1998-05-01

    In this paper, the growth process of aluminum on a silicon substrate by metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy using dimethyl-ethylamine alane has been described. The crystallographic orientation of the aluminum grains strongly depends on the substrate temperature. The epitaxial single crystalline (111) Al grains grow on a (111) Si substrate at a substrate temperature between 450 and 500°C. The bi-crystalline (110) Al grains grow on a (100) Si substrate at the substrate temperature between 350 and 450°C. For a (100) Si substrate, the orientation of Al is related to the reconstruction of the Si substrate. Furthermore, the selective growth of Al into 1.5-µm-diameter via-holes is shown to be possible.

  20. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides: promising near-lattice-matched substrates for GaN growth

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Priti; Rahman, A. A.; Subramanian, Shruti; Gupta, Shalini; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Orlova, Tatyana; Rouvimov, Sergei; Vishwanath, Suresh; Protasenko, Vladimir; Laskar, Masihhur R.; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    Most III-nitride semiconductors are grown on non-lattice-matched substrates like sapphire or silicon due to the extreme difficulty of obtaining a native GaN substrate. We show that several layered transition-metal dichalcogenides are closely lattice-matched to GaN and report the growth of GaN on a range of such layered materials. We report detailed studies of the growth of GaN on mechanically-exfoliated flakes WS2 and MoS2 by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy. Structural and optical characterization show that strain-free, single-crystal islands of GaN are obtained on the underlying chalcogenide flakes. We obtain strong near-band-edge emission from these layers, and analyse their temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties. We also report a proof-of-concept demonstration of large-area growth of GaN on CVD MoS2. Our results show that the transition-metal dichalcogenides can serve as novel near-lattice-matched substrates for nitride growth. PMID:27025461

  1. Bacterial growth in the cold: Evidence for an enhanced substrate requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, W.J.; Sheldon, W.M. Jr.; Pomeroy, L.R. )

    1992-01-01

    Growth responses and biovolume changes for four facultatively psychrophilic bacterial isolates from Conception Bay, Newfoundland, and the Arctic Ocean were examined at temperatures from {minus}1.5 to 35C, with substrate concentrations of 0.15, 1.5, and 1,500 mg of proteose peptone-yeast extract per liter. For two cultures, growth in 0.1, 1.0, and 1,000 mg of proline per liter was also examined. At 10 to 15C and above, growth rates showed no marked effect of substrate concentration, while at {minus}1.5 and 0C, there was an increasing requirement for organic nutrients, with generation times in low-nutrient media that were two to three times longer than in high-nutrient media. Biovolume showed a clear dependence on substrate concentration and quality; the largest cells were in the highest-nutrient media. Biovolume was also affected by temperature; the largest cells were found at the lowest temperatures. These data have implications for both food web structure and carbon flow in cold waters and for the effects of global climate change, since the change in growth rate is most dramatic at the lowest temperatures.

  2. Studies of molecular-beam epitaxy growth of GaAs on porous Si substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mii, Y. J.; Kao, Y. C.; Wu, B. J.; Wang, K. L.; Lin, T. L.; Liu, J. K.

    1988-01-01

    GaAs has been grown on porous Si directly and on Si buffer layer-porous Si substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy. In the case of GaAs growth on porous Si, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the dominant defects in GaAs layers grown on porous Si are microtwins and stacking faults, which originate from the GaAs/porous Si interface. GaAs is found to penetrate into the porous Si layers. By using a thin Si buffer layer (50 nm), GaAs penetration diminishes and the density of microtwins and stacking faults is largely reduced and localized at the GaAs/Si buffer interface. However, there is a high density of threading dislocations remaining. Both Si (100) aligned and four degree tilted substrates have been examined in this study. TEM results show no observable effect of the tilted substrates on the quality of the GaAs epitaxial layer.

  3. Direct growth of cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates for superhydrophobicity and corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young Jun; Jang, Hanmin; Lee, Kwan-Soo; Kim, Dong Rip

    2015-06-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with anti-corrosion properties have attracted great interest in many industrial fields, particularly to enhance the thermal performance of offshore applications such as heat exchangers, pipelines, power plants, and platform structures. Nanostructures with hydrophobic materials have been widely utilized to realize superhydrophobicity of surfaces, and cerium oxide has been highlighted due to its good corrosion resistive and intrinsically hydrophobic properties. However, few studies of direct growth of cerium oxide nanostructures on diverse substrates have been reported. Herein we report a facile hydrothermal method to directly grow cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates, such as aluminum alloy, stainless steel, titanium, and silicon. Diverse substrates with cerium oxide nanorods exhibited superhydrophobicity with no hydrophobic modifiers on their surfaces, and showed good corrosion resistive properties in corrosive medium. We believe our method could pave the way for realization of scalable and sustainable corrosion resistive superhydrophobic surfaces in many industrial fields.

  4. Heteroepitaxial Growth of Ferromagnetic MnSb(0001) Films on Ge/Si(111) Virtual Substrates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Molecular beam epitaxial growth of ferromagnetic MnSb(0001) has been achieved on high quality, fully relaxed Ge(111)/Si(111) virtual substrates grown by reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition. The epilayers were characterized using reflection high energy electron diffraction, synchrotron hard X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and magnetometry. The surface reconstructions, magnetic properties, crystalline quality, and strain relaxation behavior of the MnSb films are similar to those of MnSb grown on GaAs(111). In contrast to GaAs substrates, segregation of substrate atoms through the MnSb film does not occur, and alternative polymorphs of MnSb are absent. PMID:24409091

  5. Crystal growth induced by Nd:YAG laser irradiation in patterning glass ceramic substrates with dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, D.; Escartín, A.; Cases, R.; Peña, J. I.

    2011-03-01

    In this work a glass ceramic substrate was processed by focusing a laser beam inside the said material. The crystal phase within the amorphous matrix provides mechanical properties to the glass ceramic substrate in such a way that dots can be patterned inside the fore-mentioned material without producing any cracks. These marks are made up of crystals, the growth of which has been induced by the laser beam. These inner structures can modify the optical, thermal and mechanical properties of the glass ceramic substrate. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with pulsewidths in the nanosecond range has been used. Morphology, composition, microstructure, mechanical and thermal properties of the processed material are described.

  6. Spent mushroom substrates as component of growing media for germination and growth of horticultural plants.

    PubMed

    Medina, E; Paredes, C; Pérez-Murcia, M D; Bustamante, M A; Moral, R

    2009-09-01

    This research work was conducted in order to investigate the possibility of using spent mushroom substrate (SMS) in the production of horticultural seedlings replacing part of the peat in the growing media. Three vegetable species with different salt sensitivities, the less sensitive being tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum var. Muchamiel), the moderately salt-sensitive being courgette (Cucurbita pepo L. var. Afrodite F1) and the most salt-sensitive being pepper (Capsicum annum L. var. Lamuyo F1) were grown in 12 media containing SMS of two types of mushroom (Agaricus bisporus (SMS-AB) and Pleurotus ostreatus (SMS-PO)) or a mixture of both 50% (v/v) (SMS-50), as well as peat in various ratios. The proportions of each residue in the mixtures elaborated with peat were 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% v/v residue. A substrate of 100% peat was used as control. The experiment was arranged in a completely-randomised design with two replicates per treatment under greenhouse conditions. Prior to sowing, some physical, physico-chemical and chemical properties of the growing media were determined and seed germination and fresh weight of seedling were also measured. In most of the cases, the addition of SMS to the growing media produced an increase in the pH values, salt contents, macro and micronutrient concentrations and a decrease in the water holding capacity contents in comparison to peat, whereas great differences were found in the air capacity values between SMS-based substrates and peat. Up to 75% SMS can be used in mixtures with peat for seed germination of the plant species studied. Regarding the most suitable SMS-based substrates for plant growth, any substrate could be used for tomato seedling production. However, all SMS-AB-based substrates and the media containing low dose of SMS-PO and SMS-50 were adequate for growth of courgette and pepper.

  7. IV-VI semiconductor growth on silicon substrates and new mid-infrared laser fabrication methods

    PubMed

    McCann; Chao; Sachar; McAlister; Li; Fang; Wu; Namjou

    1999-09-01

    This paper reviews results from research conducted at the University of Oklahoma on the development of new IV-VI semiconductor (lead salt) epitaxial growth and laser fabrication procedures that can ultimately lead to dramatic increases in mid-IR laser operating temperatures. Work has focused on growth of IV-VI semiconductor laser structures on silicon substrates using buffer layers that contain BaF2. Recent experiments show that it is possible to obtain high crystalline quality IV-VI semiconductor layer structures on (111)-oriented silicon substrates using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) or on (100)-oriented silicon using a combination of MBE and liquid phase epitaxy (LPE). Experimental data for IV-VI semiconductor layer structures grown on silicon substrates including crystalline quality information as determined by high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) measurements and absorption edge information as determined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) transmission measurements are presented. Results show that these materials can be used to fabricate lasers that cover the 3 microns (3333 cm-1) to 16 microns (625 cm-1) spectral range. Removal of IV-VI semiconductor laser structures from the silicon growth substrate by dissolving BaF2 buffer layers with water is also demonstrated. This allows epitaxially-grown laser structures to be sandwiched between two heat sinks with a minimum of thermally resistive IV-VI semiconductor material. Theoretical modeling predicts that IV-VI lasers fabricated this way will have maximum continuous wave (cw) operating temperatures at least 60 degrees higher than those of IV-VI lasers fabricated on PbSe or PbTe substrates.

  8. Dracaena marginata biofilter: design of growth substrate and treatment of stormwater runoff.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Praveen, R S

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the efficiency of Dracaena marginata planted biofilters to decontaminate urban runoff. A new biofilter growth substrate was prepared using low-cost and locally available materials such as red soil, fine sand, perlite, vermiculite, coco-peat and Sargassum biomass. The performance of biofilter substrate was compared with local garden soil based on physical and water quality parameters. Preliminary analyses indicated that biofilter substrate exhibited desirable characteristics such as low bulk density (1140 kg/m(3)), high water holding capacity (59.6%), air-filled porosity (7.82%) and hydraulic conductivity (965 mm/h). Four different biofilter assemblies, with vegetated and non-vegetated systems, were examined for several artificial rain events (un-spiked and metal-spiked). Results from un-spiked artificial rain events suggested that concentrations of most of the chemical components in effluent were highest at the beginning of rain events and thereafter subsided during the subsequent rain events. Biofilter growth substrate showed superior potential over garden soil to retain metal ions such as Al, Fe, Cu, Cr, Ni, Zn, Cd and Pb during metal-spiked rain events. Significant differences were also observed between non-vegetated and vegetated biofilter assemblies in runoff quality, with the latter producing better results.

  9. Polarity Effects of Substrate Surface in Epitaxial ZnO Film Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Harris, M. T.; Callahan, M. J.; George, M. A.; McCarty, P.

    1999-01-01

    Epitaxial ZnO films were grown on the two polar surfaces (0-face and Zn-face) of (0001) ZnO single crystal substrates using off-axis magnetron sputtering deposition. As a comparison, films are also deposited on the (000 I) Al203 substrates. It is found that the two polar surfaces have different photoluminescence (PL) spectrum, surface structure and morphology, which are strongly inference the epitaxial film growth. The morphology and structure of epitaxial films on the ZnO substrates are different from the film on the Al203 substrates. An interesting result shows that high temperature annealing of ZnO single crystals will improve the surface structure on the O-face surface rather than the opposite Surface. The measurements of PL, low-angle incident x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy of ZnO films indicate that the O-terminated surface is better for ZnO epitaxial film growth using reactive sputtering deposition.

  10. Twin-assisted growth of nominally stable substrates underneath dewetted Au nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fang; Xie, Dong Yue; Majdi, Tahereh; Zhu, Guo-zhen

    2016-03-15

    By applying a simple and inexpensive thermal treatment, we synthesized supported gold-oxide nanostructures, which have potential applications to plasmonic devices and biosensors. The regrowth of nominally stable substrates under gold nanoparticles is associated with the appearance of preferential orientations of dewetted nanoparticles and the formation of atomically sharp interfacial monolayers. Steps present at the interfacial monolayer usually occur at defects including the intersection points of twin planes at the interface. They were related to the nucleation and immigration of the interfacial monolayers, prompting the substrate regrowth. Accordingly, we proposed the twin-assisted growth mechanism, which provides insight on the synthesis of gold-oxide nanostructures. - Highlights: • The twin-assisted growth mechanism is proposed for the abnormal regrowth of substrate underneath Au nanoparticles. • The substrate regrowth is related to the steps and ledges that are present at the Au–MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} interfacial monolayers. • Interfacial steps are detected at defects such as the intersecting points of twin planes at the interface.

  11. Enhancing trichloroethylene degradation using non-aromatic compounds as growth substrates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungjin; Hwang, Jeongmin; Chung, Jinwook; Bae, Wookeun

    2014-06-30

    The effect of non-aromatic compounds on the trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation of toluene-oxidizing bacteria were evaluated using Burkholderia cepacia G4 that expresses toluene 2-monooxygenase and Pseudomonas putida that expresses toluene dioxygenase. TCE degradation rates for B. cepacia G4 and P. putida with toluene alone as growth substrate were 0.144 and 0.123 μg-TCE/mg-protein h, respectively. When glucose, acetate and ethanol were fed as additional growth substrates, those values increased up to 0.196, 0.418 and 0.530 μg-TCE/mg-protein h, respectively for B. cepacia G4 and 0.319, 0.219 and 0.373 μg-TCE/mg-protein h, respectively for P. putida. In particular, the addition of ethanol resulted in a high TCE degradation rate regardless of the initial concentration. The use of a non-aromatic compound as an additional substrate probably enhanced the TCE degradation because of the additional supply of NADH that is consumed in co-metabolic degradation of TCE. Also, it is expected that the addition of a non-aromatic substrate can reduce the necessary dose of toluene and, subsequently, minimize the potential competitive inhibition upon TCE co-metabolism by toluene. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Solution growth of Si on reorganized porous Si foils and on glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, C.; Bansen, R.; Markurt, T.; Uebel, D.; Teubner, Th.; Boeck, T.

    2017-06-01

    We have developed a thin film growth process, which allows for the deposition of closed layers of crystalline Si onto inexpensive substrates in a continuous fashion. Deposition is performed by steady-state solution growth on either reorganized porous Si foils, or on glass substrates with a thin amorphous Si seed layer. The respective monocrystalline and polycrystalline Si films are grown up to a thickness of several ten micrometers, making them suitable for an efficient absorption of sunlight in a photovoltaic device. The structural properties of the Si films have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The determined real structure of the polycrystalline layers with grains in the dimension of several 10 μm offers good prospects to utilize the material as an absorber layer for solar cells.

  13. Growth of large aspect ratio AuAg bimetallic nanowires on Si(110) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhukta, Anjan; Guha, Puspendu; Satpati, Biswarup; Maiti, Paramita; Satyam, Parlapalli V.

    2017-06-01

    Large aspect ratio bimetallic nanowire structures comprise potential applications in areas such as higher catalytic activity and surface Raman enhancement spectroscopy (SERS) substrates. By using the highly anisotropic ultra-clean Si(110) surface and with initial growth of sub monolayer (ML) Ag on such surface, a high aspect ratio AuAg bimetallic nanostructures can be formed. We report on the formation of large aspect ratio (>7.2 ± 0.8) AuAg nanowires on ultra-clean Si(110) surfaces using 0.5 ML Ag followed by 3.0 ML Au using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) at a growth temperature of 300 °C. Under similar growth conditions without pre-deposition of Ag and only with deposition of 3.0 ML of Au consequences smaller aspect ratio (2.1 ± 0.1) monometallic Au nanostructures. The enhancement in aspect ratio of the nanostructures is attributed to the formation of one dimensional Ag layer (prior to Au growth) and Au-Ag bimetallic intermixing at elevated temperature. Considering deposition of 3.0 ML Au, a regime of substrate temperature ≈ 270-330 °C is found to be optimum to growth some of high aspect ratio (>25.0) AuAg nanowires as well. Exterior of this regime, at lower temperature due to low mobility of the ad-atoms and at higher temperature due to probable inter-diffusion of Ag, such extremely high aspect ratio AuAg nanowires found to be infrequent to grow. For growth at substrate temperature 300 °C, mean aspect ratio of the AuAg nanostructures is gradually increased in accordance with Au thickness up to 3.0 ML due to preferential accumulation of ad-atoms (Au, Ag) along Si < 1 1 bar 0 > and thereafter reduces for adequate accumulation along Si < 001 > .

  14. MOCVD Growth of III-V Photodetectors and Light Emitters for Integration of Optoelectronic Devices on Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Yu

    With the increase of clock speed and wiring density in integrated circuits, inter-chip and intra-chip interconnects through conventional electrical wires encounter increasing difficulties because of the large power loss and bandwidth limitation. Optical interconnects have been proposed as an alternative to copper-based interconnects and are under intense study due to their large data capacity, high data quality and low power consumption. III-V compound semiconductors offer high intrinsic electron mobility, small effective electron mass and direct bandgap, which make this material system advantageous for high-speed optoelectronic devices. The integration of III-V optoelectronic devices on Si substrates will provide the combined advantage of a high level of integration and large volume production of Si-based electronic circuitry with the superior electrical and optical performance of III-V components, paving the way to a new generation of hybrid integrated circuits. In this thesis, the direct heteroepitaxy of photodetectors (PDs) and light emitters using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition for the integration of photonic devices on Si substrates were studied. First we studied the selective-area growth of InP/GaAs on patterned Si substrates for PDs. To overcome the loading effect, a multi-temperature composite growth technique for GaAs was developed. By decreasing various defects such as dislocations and anti-phase domains, the GaAs and InP buffer layers are with good crystalline quality and the PDs show high speed and low dark current performance both at the edge and center of the large growth well. Then the growth and fabrication of GaAs/AlGaAs QW lasers were studied. Ellipsometry was used to calibrate the Al composition of AlGaAs. Thick p and n type AlGaAs with a mirrorlike surface were grown by high V/III ratio and high temperature. The GaAs/AlGaAs broad area QW laser was successfully grown and fabricated on GaAs substrate and showed a pulsed lasing result

  15. Guided Growth of Ag Nanowires by Galvanic Replacement on a Flexible Substrate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sanjun; Liu, Qiming

    2017-10-10

    An aligned Ag nanowire array was directly synthesized by galvanic replacement on curved poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) by using a Cu2O microcrystal as a reductant. A more orderly aligned nanowire array was obtained when the curvature radius was reduced. A second growth with different orientation produced Ag nanowire networks. The guided growth was also achieved when using Zn as a reductant or polystyrene as a substrate. This plain method with facile control over the orientation and density of the Ag nanowire array enriches the grow-in-place methodology and can potentially be applied to various fields.

  16. CONTROLLED GROWTH OF CARBON NANOTUBES ON CONDUCTIVE METAL SUBSTRATES FOR ENERGY STORAGE APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.; Engtrakul, C.

    2009-01-01

    The impressive mechanical and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them ideally suited for use in a variety of nanostructured devices, especially in the realm of energy production and storage. In particular, vertically-aligned CNT “forests” have been the focus of increasing investigation for use in supercapacitor electrodes and as hydrogen adsorption substrates. Vertically-aligned CNT growth was attempted on metal substrates by waterassisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). CNT growth was catalyzed by iron-molybdenum (FeMo) nanoparticle catalysts synthesized by a colloidal method, which were then spin-coated onto Inconel® foils. The substrates were loaded into a custom-built CVD apparatus, where CNT growth was initiated by heating the substrates to 750 °C under the fl ow of He, H2, C2H4 and a controlled amount of water vapor. The resultant CNTs were characterized by a variety of methods including Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the growth parameters were varied in an attempt to optimize the purity and growth yield of the CNTs. The surface area and hydrogen adsorption characteristics of the CNTs were quantifi ed by the Brunauer- Emmett-Teller (BET) and Sieverts methods, and their capacitance was measured via cyclic voltammetry. While vertically-aligned CNT growth could not be verifi ed, TEM and SEM analysis indicated that CNT growth was still obtained, resulting in multiwalled CNTs of a wide range in diameter along with some amorphous carbon impurities. These microscopy fi ndings were reinforced by Raman spectroscopy, which resulted in a G/D ratio ranging from 1.5 to 3 across different samples, suggestive of multiwalled CNTs. Changes in gas fl ow rates and water concentration during CNT growth were not found to have a discernable effect on the purity of the CNTs. The specifi c capacitance of a CNT/FeMo/Inconel® electrode was found to be 3.2 F/g, and the BET surface area of

  17. Metal Catalyst for Low-Temperature Growth of Controlled Zinc Oxide Nanowires on Arbitrary Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Baek Hyun; Kwon, Jae W.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanowires generated by hydrothermal method present superior physical and chemical characteristics. Quality control of the growth has been very challenging and controlled growth is only achievable under very limited conditions using homogeneous seed layers with high temperature processes. Here we show the controlled ZnO nanowire growth on various organic and inorganic materials without the requirement of a homogeneous seed layer and a high temperature process. We also report the discovery of an important role of the electronegativity in the nanowire growth on arbitrary substrates. Using heterogeneous metal oxide interlayers with low-temperature hydrothermal methods, we demonstrate well-controlled ZnO nanowire arrays and single nanowires on flat or curved surfaces. A metal catalyst and heterogeneous metal oxide interlayers are found to determine lattice-match with ZnO and to largely influence the controlled alignment. These findings will contribute to the development of novel nanodevices using controlled nanowires. PMID:24625584

  18. Direct growth of graphene on rigid and flexible substrates: progress, applications, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Pham, Viet Phuong; Jang, Hyeon-Sik; Whang, Dongmok; Choi, Jae-Young

    2017-08-31

    Graphene has recently been attracting considerable interest because of its exceptional conductivity, mechanical strength, thermal stability, etc. Graphene-based devices exhibit high potential for applications in electronics, optoelectronics, and energy harvesting. In this paper, we review various growth strategies including metal-catalyzed transfer-free growth and direct-growth of graphene on flexible and rigid insulating substrates which are "major issues" for avoiding the complicated transfer processes that cause graphene defects, residues, tears and performance degradation in graphene-based functional devices. Recent advances in practical applications based on "direct-grown graphene" are discussed. Finally, several important directions, challenges and perspectives in the commercialization of 'direct growth of graphene' are also discussed and addressed.

  19. A growth kinetic model of Kluyveromyces marxianus cultures on cheese whey as substrate.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Luís G S; Luvizetto, Débora J; Ferreira, Luciane S; Rech, Rosane; Ayub, Marco A Z; Secchi, Argimiro R

    2004-01-01

    This work presents a multi-route, non-structured kinetic model for determination of microbial growth and substrate consumption in an experimental batch bioreactor in which beta-galactosidase is produced by Kluyveromyces marxianus growing on cheese whey. The main metabolic routes for lactose, and oxygen consumption, cell growth, and ethanol production are derived based on experimental data. When these individual rates are combined into a single growth rate, by rewriting the model equations, the model re-interpretation has a complexity similar to that of the usual variations of the Monod kinetic model, available in the literature. Furthermore, the proposed model is in good agreement with the experimental data for different growth temperatures, being acceptable for dynamic simulations, processes optimization, and implementations of model-based control technologies.

  20. Metal catalyst for low-temperature growth of controlled zinc oxide nanowires on arbitrary substrates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Baek Hyun; Kwon, Jae W

    2014-03-14

    Zinc oxide nanowires generated by hydrothermal method present superior physical and chemical characteristics. Quality control of the growth has been very challenging and controlled growth is only achievable under very limited conditions using homogeneous seed layers with high temperature processes. Here we show the controlled ZnO nanowire growth on various organic and inorganic materials without the requirement of a homogeneous seed layer and a high temperature process. We also report the discovery of an important role of the electronegativity in the nanowire growth on arbitrary substrates. Using heterogeneous metal oxide interlayers with low-temperature hydrothermal methods, we demonstrate well-controlled ZnO nanowire arrays and single nanowires on flat or curved surfaces. A metal catalyst and heterogeneous metal oxide interlayers are found to determine lattice-match with ZnO and to largely influence the controlled alignment. These findings will contribute to the development of novel nanodevices using controlled nanowires.

  1. Manganese induced changes in growth, chlorophyll content and antioxidants activity in seedlings of broad bean (Vicia faba L.).

    PubMed

    Arya, Shashi K; Roy, B K

    2011-11-01

    The effect of manganese (Mn) on broad bean (Vicia faba L.) was studied with regard to growth, Mn accumulation in root and shoot, chlorophyll, proline content and peroxidase activity. Seeds were treated with Mn (10, 20, 40, 80,120,160 microM) and grown hydroponically up to 15 days. Manganese level in both root and shoot increased progressively in response to increasing concentration and it was high in roots (13 fold) overthe shoots (8 fold). The reductions in root (52%) and shoot (62.92%) development were evident for the maximum Mn concentration (160 microM). The chlorophyll amount gradually declined with increasing Mn concentrations and attained its maximum (42%) at 160 microM. By contrast, the guaiacol peroxidase activity was high (71%) along with the accompanying rise in proline content (75%) in shoots of the highest Mn concentration (160 microM). However, there was about 2 fold increase in total glutathione content at 40 microM than the basal level and further declined to 21.65 microg g(-1) fresh wt. at 160 microM Mn. The alterations in overall reflected Mn concentration-dependent changes in the parameters studied. The results suggest thatthe plant Vicia faba L. copes with Mn exposure through enhanced production of antioxidants.

  2. Scaling of elongation transition thickness during thin-film growth on weakly interacting substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, B.; Souqui, L.; Elofsson, V.; Sarakinos, K.

    2017-08-01

    The elongation transition thickness ( θElong) is a central concept in the theoretical description of thin-film growth dynamics on weakly interacting substrates via scaling relations of θElong with respect to rates of key atomistic film-forming processes. To date, these scaling laws have only been confirmed quantitatively by simulations, while experimental proof has been left ambiguous as it has not been possible to measure θElong. Here, we present a method for determining experimentally θElong for Ag films growing on amorphous SiO2: an archetypical weakly interacting film/substrate system. Our results confirm the theoretically predicted θElong scaling behavior, which then allow us to calculate the rates of adatom diffusion and island coalescence completion, in good agreement with the literature. The methodology presented herein casts the foundation for studying growth dynamics and cataloging atomistic-process rates for a wide range of weakly interacting film/substrate systems. This may provide insights into directed growth of metal films with a well-controlled morphology and interfacial structure on 2D crystals—including graphene and MoS2—for catalytic and nanoelectronic applications.

  3. Molecular cloning and heterologous expression of novel glucosyltransferases from tobacco cultured cells that have broad substrate specificity and are induced by salicylic acid and auxin.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, G; Yazawa, T; Hayashida, N; Okazaki, M

    2001-07-01

    Scopoletin is one of the phytoalexins in tobacco. Cells of the T-13 cell line (Nicotiana tabacum L. Bright Yellow) accumulate a large amount of scopoletin, also known as 7-hydroxy-6-methoxycoumarin, as a glucoconjugate, scopolin, in vacuoles. We report here the molecular cloning of glucosyltransferases that can catalyze the glucosylation of many kinds of secondary metabolites including scopoletin. Two cDNAs encoding glucosyltransferase (NtGT1a and NtGT1b) were isolated from a cDNA library derived from the tobacco T-13 cell line by screening with heterologous cDNAs as a probe. The deduced amino-acid sequences of NtGT1a and NtGT1b exhibited 92% identity with each other, approximately 20-50% identities with other reported glucosyltransferases. Heterologous expression of these genes in Escherichia coli showed that the recombinant enzymes had glucosylation activity against both flavonoids and coumarins. They also strongly reacted with 2-naphthol as a substrate. These recombinant enzymes can utilize UDP-glucose as the sugar donor, but they can also utilize UDP-xylose as a weak donor. RNA blot analysis showed that these genes are induced by salicylic acid and auxin, but the time course of the expression was different. This result is similar to the changes in scopoletin glucosylation activity in these tobacco cells after addition of these plant growth regulators. These results might suggest that one of the roles of the products of these genes is scopoletin glucosylation, in response to salicylic acid and/or auxin, together with the other glucosyltransferases in tobacco cells.

  4. Sub-surface alloying largely influences graphene nucleation and growth over transition metal substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liying; Zhao, Xingju; Xue, Xinlian; Shi, Jinlei; Li, Chong; Ren, Xiaoyan; Niu, Chunyao; Jia, Yu; Guo, Zhengxiao; Li, Shunfang

    2015-11-11

    Sub-surface alloying (SSA) can be an effective approach to tuning surface functionalities. Focusing on Rh(111) as a typical substrate for graphene nucleation, we show strong modulation by SSA atoms of both the energetics and kinetics of graphene nucleation simulated by first-principles calculations. Counter-intuitively, when the sub-surface atoms are replaced by more active solute metal elements to the left of Rh in the periodic table, such as the early transition metals (TMs), Ru and Tc, the binding between a C atom and the substrate is weakened and two C atoms favor dimerization. Alternatively, when the alloying elements are the late TMs to the right of Rh, such as the relatively inert Pd and Ag, the repulsion between the two C atoms is enhanced. Such distinct results can be well addressed by the delicately modulated activities of the surface host atoms in the framework of the d-band theory. More specifically, we establish a very simple selection rule for optimizing the metal substrate for high quality graphene growth: the introduction of an early (late) solute TM in the SSA lowers (raises) the d-band center and the activity of the top-most host metal atoms, weakening (strengthening) the C-substrate binding, meanwhile both energetically and kinetically facilitating (hindering) the graphene nucleation, and simultaneously promoting (suppressing) the orientation disordering the graphene domains. Importantly, our preliminary theoretical results also show that such a simple rule is also proposed to be operative for graphene growth on the widely invoked Cu(111) catalytic substrate.

  5. MBE Growth and Transfer of HgCdTe Epitaxial Films from InSb Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lyon, T. J.; Rajavel, R. D.; Nosho, B. Z.; Terterian, S.; Beliciu, M. L.; Patterson, P. R.; Chang, D. T.; Boag-O'Brien, M. F.; Holden, B. T.; Jacobs, R. N.; Benson, J. D.

    2010-07-01

    An investigation of the heteroepitaxial growth of HgCdTe films onto InSb(211)B substrates is reported. High-quality HgCdTe(211)B single-crystal films have been successfully deposited onto InSb(211)B substrates and have been characterized with x-ray diffraction rocking curve analysis, etch pit density analysis, and surface void defect mapping. X-ray rocking curve (422) reflection full-width at half-maximum of 60 arcsec has been obtained for 7- μm-thick x = 0.22 HgCdTe epitaxial films, and etch pit densities of 3 × 106 cm-2 to 3 × 107 cm-2 have been observed. A significant reduction in HgCdTe void defect densities to 100 cm-2 to 200 cm-2 has been observed on InSb, including a complete absence of large “void cluster” defects that are often observed for growth on CdZnTe. Wafer bow induced by the growth of HgCdTe on InSb is less than 1 μm for 2-inch-diameter substrates. Significant diffusion of In into HgCdTe is observed for HgCdTe/InSb wafers that are subjected to Hg anneals at 250°C to 300°C. A preliminary investigation of the transfer of HgCdTe films from InSb onto Si substrates has also been undertaken, using an adhesive wafer bonding approach evaluated with scanning acoustic microscopy. The infrared transmission characteristics of the bonding adhesive have been investigated with respect to postgrowth annealing procedures to establish the compatibility of the bonding approach with HgCdTe device processing and detector operation.

  6. Growth and characterization of CdTe and CdZnTe crystals for substrate application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, Moshe; Zilber, Raphael; Shusterman, Sergy; Goldgirsh, Alex; Zontag, Itzhak

    2003-01-01

    During the last decade we have investigated the synthesis, growth and characterization of CdTe and CdZnTe semiconductor compounds. As a result, substrate crystals, suitable for mercury cadmium telluride thin film growth are prepared. The emphasis will be given to the investigation of the thermal regime during growth, reflected at the solid liquid interface shape and its influence on the crystalline quality. Seeded and unseeded growth experiments are compared in terms of structural crystalline quality. Seeded and unseeded growth experiments are compared in terms of structural crystalline perfection as well as single crystal yield. The effect of thermal annealing on IR transmittance, precipitates and inclusions will be discussed in detail. Moreover, we will show the recent new trends for simulation of crystal growth processes by CRYSVUN software as well as practical implementation of calculated data for the grwoth of II-VI crystals. Preliminary study on the vapor phase control during growth and crystal cooling procedures will also be discussed.

  7. Growth of two-dimensional materials on non-catalytic substrates: h-BN/Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilli, L.; Sutter, E.; Sutter, P.

    2014-09-01

    The growth of two-dimensional (2D) materials is a topic of very high scientific and technological interest. While chemical vapour deposition on catalytic metals has become a well developed approach for the growth of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (BN), very few alternative approaches for synthesis on non-reactive supports have been explored so far. Here we report the growth of BN on gold, using magnetron sputtering of B in N2/Ar atmosphere, a scalable method using only non-toxic reagents. Scanning tunnelling microscopy at low coverage shows primarily triangular monolayer BN islands exhibiting two ‘magic’ orientations on the Au(111) surface. Such rotational alignment of BN on Au(111) is surprising, given the expected weak binding and the high lattice mismatch (˜14%) between BN and Au. Our observations are consistent with a strong coupling between the edges of BN flakes and the substrate, which leads to the selection of BN orientations that maximize the orbital overlap between edge atoms and Au surface atoms. Diverse flake morphologies resembling the shape of butterflies, six-apex stars and diamonds, implying alternating B- and N- terminated edges, are observed as well. Our results provide insight into the growth mechanisms of 2D materials on weakly interacting and chemically inert substrates, and provide the basis for integrating other 2D materials with atomically precise graphene nanostructures synthesized from molecular precursors on Au.

  8. Growth and wetting of water droplet condensed between micron-sized particles and substrate

    PubMed Central

    Quang, Tran Si Bui; Leong, Fong Yew; An, Hongjie; Tan, Beng Hau; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    We study heterogeneous condensation growth of water droplets on micron-sized particles resting on a level substrate. Through numerical simulations on equilibrium droplet profiles, we find multiple wetting states towards complete wetting of the particle. Specifically, a partially wetting droplet could undergo a spontaneous transition to complete wetting during condensation growth, for contact angles above a threshold minimum. In addition, we find a competitive wetting behavior between the particle and the substrate, and interestingly, a reversal of the wetting dependence on contact angles during late stages of droplet growth. Using quasi-steady assumption, we simulate a growing droplet under a constant condensation flux, and the results are in good agreement with our experimental observations. As a geometric approximation for particle clusters, we propose and validate a pancake model, and with it, show that a particle cluster has greater wetting tendency compared to a single particle. Together, our results indicate a strong interplay between contact angle, capillarity and geometry during condensation growth. PMID:27487977

  9. Examining the influence of substrates and temperature on maximum specific growth rate of denitrifiers.

    PubMed

    Mokhayeri, Y; Nichols, A; Murthy, S; Riffat, R; Dold, P; Takacs, I

    2006-01-01

    Facilities across North America are designing plants to meet stringent limits of technology (LOT) treatment for nitrogen removal (3-5 mg/L total effluent nitrogen). The anoxic capacity requirements for meeting LOT treatment are dependent on the growth rates of the denitrifying organisms. The Blue Plains Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant (AWTP) is one of many facilities in the Chesapeake Bay region that is evaluating its ability to meet LOT treatment capability. The plant uses methanol as an external carbon source in a post-denitrification process. The process is very sensitive to denitrification in the winter. One approach to improve anoxic capacity utilization is to use an alternative substrate for denitrification in the winter to promote the growth of organisms that denitrify at higher rates. The aim of this study was to evaluate denitrification maximum specific growth rates for three substrates, acetate, corn syrup and methanol, at two temperatures (13 degrees C and 19 degrees C). These temperatures approximately reflect the minimum monthly and average annual wastewater temperature at the Blue Plains AWTP. The results suggest that the maximum specific growth rate (mu(max)) for corn syrup (1.3 d(-1)) and acetate (1.2 d(-1)) are higher than that for methanol (0.5d(-1)) at low temperature of 13 degrees C. A similar trend was observed at 19 degrees C.

  10. Oligosaccharides Released from Milk Glycoproteins Are Selective Growth Substrates for Infant-Associated Bifidobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Karav, Sercan; Le Parc, Annabelle; Leite Nobrega de Moura Bell, Juliana Maria; Frese, Steven A.; Kirmiz, Nina; Block, David E.; Barile, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Milk, in addition to nourishing the neonate, provides a range of complex glycans whose construction ensures a specific enrichment of key members of the gut microbiota in the nursing infant, a consortium known as the milk-oriented microbiome. Milk glycoproteins are thought to function similarly, as specific growth substrates for bifidobacteria common to the breast-fed infant gut. Recently, a cell wall-associated endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (EndoBI-1) found in various infant-borne bifidobacteria was shown to remove a range of intact N-linked glycans. We hypothesized that these released oligosaccharide structures can serve as a sole source for the selective growth of bifidobacteria. We demonstrated that EndoBI-1 released N-glycans from concentrated bovine colostrum at the pilot scale. EndoBI-1-released N-glycans supported the rapid growth of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis), a species that grows well on human milk oligosaccharides, but did not support growth of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B. lactis), a species which does not. Conversely, B. infantis ATCC 15697 did not grow on the deglycosylated milk protein fraction, clearly demonstrating that the glycan portion of milk glycoproteins provided the key substrate for growth. Mass spectrometry-based profiling revealed that B. infantis consumed 73% of neutral and 92% of sialylated N-glycans, while B. lactis degraded only 11% of neutral and virtually no (<1%) sialylated N-glycans. These results provide mechanistic support that N-linked glycoproteins from milk serve as selective substrates for the enrichment of infant-associated bifidobacteria capable of carrying out the initial deglycosylation. Moreover, released N-glycans were better growth substrates than the intact milk glycoproteins, suggesting that EndoBI-1 cleavage is a key initial step in consumption of glycoproteins. Finally, the variety of N-glycans released from bovine milk glycoproteins suggests that they may serve as

  11. Estimation of the minimum and maximum substrate temperatures for diamond growth from hydrogen-hydrocarbon gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yafei; Zhang, Fangqing; Chen, Guanghua

    1994-12-01

    It is proposed in this paper that the minimum substrate temperature for diamond growth from hydrogen-hydrocarbon gas mixtures be determined by the packing arrangements of hydrocarbon fragments at the surface, and the maximum substrate temperature be limited by the diamond growth surface reconstruction, which can be prevented by saturating the surface dangling bonds with atomic hydrogen. Theoretical calculations have been done by a formula proposed by Dryburgh [J. Crystal Growth 130 (1993) 305], and the results show that diamond can be deposited at the substrate temperatures ranging from ≈ 400 to ≈ 1200°C by low pressure chemical vapor deposition. This is consistent with experimental observations.

  12. MBE Growth of AlN Nanowires on Si Substrates by Aluminizing Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E, Yanxiong; Hao, Zhibiao; Yu, Jiadong; Wu, Chao; Liu, Runze; Wang, Lai; Xiong, Bing; Wang, Jian; Han, Yanjun; Sun, Changzheng; Luo, Yi

    2015-10-01

    By introducing an aluminization process to achieve nucleation of nanowires (NWs), spontaneous growth of AlN NWs on Si substrates has been realized by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The AlN NWs are grown from the nuclei formed by the aluminization process, and the NW density and diameter can be controlled by the aluminization parameters. The influence of growth conditions on the morphologies of AlN NWs is carefully investigated. Island-like films are found to grow between the NWs due to poor migration ability of Al adatoms. The films are proved to be Al-polar different from the N-polar AlN NWs, which can explain the absence of newly formed NWs. Increasing the V/III ratio can efficiently suppress the growth of Al-polar AlN films.

  13. Substrate-induced growth and isolation of Acidobacteria from acidic Sphagnum peat.

    PubMed

    Pankratov, Timofei A; Serkebaeva, Yulia M; Kulichevskaya, Irina S; Liesack, Werner; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2008-05-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was applied to estimate the population size of the poorly characterized phylum Acidobacteria in acidic peat sampled from nine different Sphagnum-dominated wetlands of Northern Russia. The cell numbers of these bacteria in oxic peat layers ranged from 0.4 x 10(6) to 1.3 x 10(7) cells per g of wet peat, comprising up to 4% of total bacterial cells. Substrate-induced growth of acidobacteria was observed after amendment of peat samples with glucose, pectin, xylan, starch, ethanol and methanol, while weak or no response was obtained for acetate, pyruvate, mannitol and cellobiose. Using low-nutrient media and FISH-mediated monitoring of the isolation procedure, we succeeded in obtaining nine strains of acidobacteria in pure cultures. These strains belonged to subdivisions 1 and 3 of the Acidobacteria and represented strictly aerobic, heterotrophic organisms. Except for methanol, the substrate utilization patterns of these isolates matched the results obtained in our substrate-amendment experiments with native peat. All strains were also capable of utilizing galacturonic acid, a characteristic component of the cell wall in Sphagnum spp, which is released during moss decomposition. Most isolates from subdivision 1 were truly acidophilic organisms with the growth optimum at pH 3.5-4.5, while the isolates from subdivision 3 grew optimally at pH 5.5-6.5. Another important phenotypic trait of novel strains was their capability of active growth at low temperatures. Both acidophily and low-temperature growth are consistent with the occurrence of acidobacteria in cold and acidic northern wetlands.

  14. Growth of carbon nanotubes on fully processed silicon-on-insulator CMOS substrates.

    PubMed

    Haque, M Samiul; Ali, S Zeeshan; Guha, P K; Oei, S P; Park, J; Maeng, S; Teo, K B K; Udrea, F; Milne, W I

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes the growth of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) both aligned and non-aligned on fully processed CMOS substrates containing high temperature tungsten metallization. While the growth method has been demonstrated in fabricating CNT gas sensitive layers for high temperatures SOI CMOS sensors, it can be employed in a variety of applications which require the use of CNTs or other nanomaterials with CMOS electronics. In our experiments we have grown CNTs both on SOI CMOS substrates and SOI CMOS microhotplates (suspended on membranes formed by post-CMOS deep RIE etching). The fully processed SOI substrates contain CMOS devices and circuits and additionally, some wafers contained high current LDMOSFETs and bipolar structures such as Lateral Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors. All these devices were used as test structures to investigate the effect of additional post-CMOS processing such as CNT growth, membrane formation, high temperature annealing, etc. Electrical characterisation of the devices with CNTs were performed along with SEM and Raman spectroscopy. The CNTs were grown both at low and high temperatures, the former being compatible with Aluminium metallization while the latter being possible through the use of the high temperature CMOS metallization (Tungsten). In both cases we have found that there is no change in the electrical behaviour of the CMOS devices, circuits or the high current devices. A slight degradation of the thermal performance of the CMOS microhotplates was observed due to the extra heat dissipation path created by the CNT layers, but this is expected as CNTs exhibit a high thermal conductance. In addition we also observed that in the case of high temperature CNT growth a slight degradation in the manufacturing yield was observed. This is especially the case where large area membranes with a diameter in excess of 500 microns are used.

  15. Growth and yield performance of Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. Fr.) Kumm (oyster mushroom) on different substrates.

    PubMed

    Girmay, Zenebe; Gorems, Weldesemayat; Birhanu, Getachew; Zewdie, Solomon

    2016-12-01

    Mushroom cultivation is reported as an economically viable bio-technology process for conversion of various lignocellulosic wastes. Given the lack of technology know-how on the cultivation of mushroom, this study was conducted in Wondo Genet College of Forestry and Natural Resource, with the aim to assess the suitability of selected substrates (agricultural and/or forest wastes) for oyster mushroom cultivation. Accordingly, four substrates (cotton seed, paper waste, wheat straw, and sawdust) were tested for their efficacy in oyster mushroom production. Pure culture of oyster mushroom was obtained from Mycology laboratory, Department of Plant Biology and Biodiversity Management, Addis Ababa University. The pure culture was inoculated on potato dextrose agar for spawn preparation. Then, the spawn containing sorghum was inoculated with the fungal culture for the formation of fruiting bodies on the agricultural wastes. The oyster mushroom cultivation was undertaken under aseptic conditions, and the growth and development of mushroom were monitored daily. Results of the study revealed that oyster mushroom can grow on cotton seed, paper waste, sawdust and wheat straw, with varying growth performances. The highest biological and economic yield, as well as the highest percentage of biological efficiency of oyster mushroom was obtained from cotton seed, while the least was from sawdust. The study recommends cotton seed, followed by paper waste as suitable substrates for the cultivation of oyster mushroom. It also suggests that there is a need for further investigation on various aspects of oyster mushroom cultivation in Ethiopia to promote the industry.

  16. Ni nanoparticle catalyzed growth of MWCNTs on Cu NPs @ a-C:H substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodselahi, T.; Solaymani, S.; Akbarzadeh Pasha, M.; Vesaghi, M. A.

    2012-11-01

    NiCu NPs @ a-C:H thin films with different Cu content were prepared by co-deposition by RF-sputtering and RF-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) from acetylene gas and Cu and Ni targets. The prepared samples were used as catalysts for growing multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) from liquid petroleum gas (LPG) at 825 °C by thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD). By addition of Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer as substrate for Ni NPs catalyst, the density of the grown CNTs is greatly enhanced in comparison to bare Si substrate. Furthermore the average diameter of the grown CNTs decreases by decreasing of Cu content of Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer. However Cu NPs @ a-C:H by itself has no catalytic property in MWCNTs growth. Morphology and electrical and optical properties of Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer is affected by Cu content and each of them is effective parameter on growth of MWCNTs based on Ni NPs catalyst. Moreover, adding of a low amount of Ni NPs doesn't vary optical, electrical and morphology properties of Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer but it has a profound effect on its catalytic activity. Finally the density and diameter of MWCNTs can be optimized by selection of the Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer as substrate of Ni NPs.

  17. Ultraviolet radiation on innate immunity and growth of broad-snouted caiman (Caiman latirostris): implications for facilities design.

    PubMed

    Siroski, Pablo Ariel; Poletta, Gisela Laura; Fernandez, Lucia; Ortega, Hugo Héctor; Merchant, Mark Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Sunlight is a key environmental factor in almost all ecosystems, and it is necessary for many physiological functions. Many vertebrates require ultraviolet (UV) radiation to perform different physiological processes. Artificial light is used to supplement UV in captive animals, through appropriate photoperiods and UV wavelengths. Previous studies reported that repeated exposure to artificial UV radiation may cause damage to the immune system. Taking into account the importance of UV effects and the serum complement system, the relationship between them was investigated. The study lasted 90 days and was carried out in plastic chambers. Ninety six broad-snouted caiman (C. latirostris) were assigned to four treatment groups with two replicates each: total darkness (TD), 8 hr per day (8 hr) and 16 hr per day (16 hr) of artificial UV/visible light exposure, and normal photoperiod of natural light (NP). Snout-vent length was measured to determine animal growth. Hemolytic assays were performed to evaluate the effects of artificial UV/visible light, TD, and NP on the serum complement system. Results showed that animals grew more in the NP group. The capacity of C. latirostris serum to hemolyze sheep red blood cells was higher in the NP group than when they are maintained in constant light-dark cycles (8 and 16 hr) or in TD. These data demonstrate that artificial UV should be considered as a potential hazard for captive crocodilians if it is not properly managed, and this should be taken into account in the general design of facilities for reptilian husbandry. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Features of SOI substrates heating in MBE growth process obtained by low-coherence tandem interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, P. V.; Goryunov, A.. V.; Lobanov, D. N.; Luk'yanov, A. Yu.; Novikov, A. V.; Tertyshnik, A. D.; Shaleev, M. V.; Yurasov, D. V.

    2016-08-01

    Differences in heating of silicon and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates in molecular beam epitaxy were revealed by low-coherence tandem interferometry. Using this technique the interference effects which impede the correct evaluation of SOI substrate temperature by infrared pyrometers can be eliminated and so the reliable temperature readout can be achieved. It was shown that at the same thermocouple and heater power settings the real temperature of SOI substrates is higher than of silicon ones and the difference may be as high as 40-50 °C at temperatures close to 600 °C. It is supposed that such effect is caused by the additional absorption of heater radiation by the buried oxide layer in the mid-infrared range. Independent proof of this effect was obtained by growing on both types of substrates a series of structures with self-assembled Ge nanoislands whose parameters are known to be very temperature sensitive. The proposed low-coherence interferometry technique provides precise real-time control of the growth temperature and so allows formation of SiGe nanostructures with desired parameters.

  19. Nucleation and growth of diamond films on Ni-cemented tungsten carbide: Effects of substrate pretreatments

    SciTech Connect

    Polini, R.; Traversa, E. . Dipt. di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche); Marcheselli, G. )

    1994-08-01

    The nucleation and growth of diamond films on Ni-cemented carbide is investigated. Substrates made of WC with 6 wt% of Ni were submitted to grinding, and then to different pretreatments (scratching, etching, and/or decarburization) before diamond deposition. Diamond synthesis was carried out by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) using a mixture of CH[sub 4] (1% v/v) and H[sub 2]. Depositions were performed for different lengths of time with the substrates at various temperatures. The specimens were analyzed before and after deposition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). Raman spectra showed that the phase purity of the diamond films was not affected by the presence of nickel on the substrate surface. After wet etching pretreatments, the nucleation of diamond was enhanced, mainly at the WC grain boundaries. Continuous films were obtained on scratched and etched substrates. The decarburizing treatment led to the formation of metallic tungsten and of brittle nickel-tungsten carbide phases. These phases reacted in the early stages of diamond film formation with gaseous carbon species with a parallel process which competes with stable diamond nucleus formation. The diamond film formed after long-term deposition on these samples was not continuous.

  20. Effects of substrate rotation in oblique-incidence metal(100) epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Yunsic; Mills, Mary E.; Borovikov, Valery; Amar, Jacques G.

    2009-05-01

    The effects of substrate rotation on the surface morphology in oblique-incidence metal(100) epitaxial growth are studied via kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of a simplified model, and compared with previous results obtained without rotation. In general, we find that substrate rotation leads to two main effects. At high deposition angles with respect to the substrate normal, rotation leads to a significant change in the surface morphology. In particular, it leads to isotropic mounds and pyramids with (111) facets rather than the anisotropic ripples and rods observed in the absence of rotation. Due to the existence of rapid transport on these facets, the lateral feature size increases approximately linearly with film thickness. Due to the fact that substrate rotation tends to reduce the effects of shadowing, the surface roughness is also decreased compared to the roughness in the absence of rotation. While this leads to a moderate reduction in the roughness for the case of ballistic deposition, the effect is significantly larger in the case of deposition with attraction. In the case of ballistic deposition, we also find that the surface roughness increases with rotation rate Ω for Ω<1 rev/monolayer (ML) before saturating at larger rotation rates ( Ω>1 rev/ML). In contrast, for the case of attraction the surface roughness exhibits a negligible dependence on rotation rate for finite rotation rate.

  1. The relative importance of exogenous and substrate-derived nitrogen for microbial growth during leaf decomposition.

    PubMed

    Cheever, B M; Webster, J R; Bilger, E E; Thomas, S A

    2013-07-01

    Heterotrophic microbes colonizing detritus obtain nitrogen (N) for growth by assimilating N from their substrate or immobilizing exogenous inorganic N. Microbial use of these two pools has different implications for N cycling and organic matter decomposition in the face of the global increase in biologically available N. We used sugar maple leaves labeled with 15N to differentiate between microbial N that had been assimilated from the leaf substrate (enriched with 15N) or immobilized from the water (natural abundance 15N:14N) in five Appalachian streams ranging in ambient NO3(-)N concentrations from about 5 to 900 microg NO3(-)N/L. Ambient NO3(-) concentration increased sugar maple decomposition rate but did not influence the proportion of microbial N derived from substrate or exogenous pools. Instead, these proportions were strongly influenced by the percentage of detrital ash-free dry mass (AFDM) remaining. Substrate-derived N made up a large proportion of the microbial N after the first 24 h in all streams. Detrital and microbial isotopic 15N signatures approached that of the water as decomposition progressed in all streams, suggesting that exogenous N may be the predominant source of N for meeting microbial requirements even when exogenous N concentrations are low. Our results support predictions of more rapid decomposition of organic matter in response to increased N availability and highlight the tight coupling of processes driving microbial N cycling and organic matter decomposition.

  2. Modeling the utilization of starch by activated sludge for simultaneous substrate storage and microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Ozlem; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Orhon, Derin

    2006-05-05

    This paper presents a mechanistic model incorporating microbial growth on external substrate with simultaneous formation of storage biopolymers (activated sludge model for growth and storage-ASMGS) for the utilization of starch by activated sludge. Model description and calibration utilized experimental data of an SBR fed with particulate native potato starch (NPS) and soluble starch (SolS) selected as model substrates. The fate of starch was monitored in a cycle together with glycogen and oxygen uptake rate (OUR) profiles. In the experiments, glycogen formation was significantly lower than predicted by total conversion of starch to glycogen, justifying the need to account for primary growth on starch. The proposed model basically modified Activated Sludge Model No.3 (ASM3), to include adsorption of starch, its hydrolysis and simultaneous growth and glycogen formation using the hydrolysis products, which was mainly maltose. Model simulations indicated hydrolysis of the adsorbed starch as the rate limiting process. The proposed model calibrated well the fate of all major model components, namely, starch, glycogen, and OUR. Particulate NPS and SolS were hydrolyzed with similar rates; however, primary and secondary growth processes on SolS were more efficient, with higher yields, due to the more easily utilizable products of SolS, both in terms of extracellular hydrolysis and of stored poly-glucose. Modeling with ASM3, assuming starch as either readily or slowly biodegradable, did not provide an equally acceptable fit for the glycogen and OUR curves; supporting the need to consider primary growth together with storage as defined in the proposed model.

  3. Transhydrogenase and Growth Substrate Influence Lipid Hydrogen Isotope Ratios in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Flynn, Theodore M.; Suess, Melanie K.; Bradley, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fatty acids preserve metabolic and environmental information in their hydrogen isotope ratios (2H/1H). This ratio is influenced by parameters that include the 2H/1H of water in the microbial growth environment, and biosynthetic fractionations between water and lipid. In some microbes, this biosynthetic fractionation has been shown to vary systematically with central energy metabolism, and controls on fatty acid 2H/1H may be linked to the intracellular production of NADPH. We examined the apparent fractionation between media water and the fatty acids produced by Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Growth was in batch culture with malate as an electron donor for sulfate respiration, and with pyruvate and fumarate as substrates for fermentation and for sulfate respiration. A larger fractionation was observed as a consequence of respiratory or fermentative growth on pyruvate than growth on fumarate or malate. This difference correlates with opposite apparent flows of electrons through the electron bifurcating/confurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB. When grown on malate or fumarate, mutant strains of D. alaskensis G20 containing transposon disruptions in a copy of nfnAB show different fractionations than the wild type strain. This phenotype is muted during fermentative growth on pyruvate, and it is absent when pyruvate is a substrate for sulfate reduction. All strains and conditions produced similar fatty acid profiles, and the 2H/1H of individual lipids changed in concert with the mass-weighted average. Unsaturated fatty acids were generally depleted in 2H relative to their saturated homologs, and anteiso-branched fatty acids were generally depleted in 2H relative to straight-chain fatty acids. Fractionation correlated with growth rate, a pattern that has also been observed in the fractionation of sulfur isotopes during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by sulfate-reducing bacteria. PMID:27445998

  4. Dual inoculation with an Aarbuscular Mycorrhizal fungus and Rhizobium to facilitate the growth of alfalfa on coal mine substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, F.Y.; Bi, Y.L.; Wong, M.H.

    2009-07-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of Glomus mosseae and Rhizobium on Medicago sativa grown on three types of coal mine substrates, namely a mixture of coal wastes and sands (CS), coal wastes and fly ash (CF), and fly ash (FA). Inoculation with Rhizobium alone did not result in any growth response but G. mosseae alone displayed a significant effect on plant growth. G. mosseae markedly increased the survival rate of M. sativa in CS substrate. In CF and FA substrates the respective oven dry weights of M. sativa inoculated with G. mosseae were 1.8 and 5.1 times higher than those without inoculation. Based on nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) uptake and legume growth, the results also show that dual inoculation in CS and CF substrates elicited a synergistic effect. This indicates that inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi may be a promising approach for revegetation of coal mine substrates.

  5. Direct growth of MoS2 single crystals on polyimide substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yongji; Li, Bo; Ye, Gonglan; Yang, Shize; Zou, Xiaolong; Lei, Sidong; Jin, Zehua; Bianco, Elisabeth; Vinod, Soumya; Yakobson, Boris I.; Lou, Jun; Vajtai, Robert; Zhou, Wu; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2017-06-01

    Two dimensional (2D) materials are optimum building blocks for flexible electronics due to their outstanding electrical and mechanical properties and ultimately atomically-thin structures. Unfortunately, to date, flexible electronics based on high quality 2D monolayers can only be obtained by various transfer technologies—processes that risk contamination and damage of 2D crystals. Here, we report a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method to directly grow monolayer MoS2 single crystals on polyimide (PI) substrates using ammonium molybdate as a precursor. Growth is performed at 450 °C, at which temperature PI is still insulating and flexible. A Flexible photodetector was built directly on the MoS2/PI and showed strong photoresponse. This is the first successful application of a scalable synthesis method (CVD) on a polymeric substrate. Our research represents an important step toward scalable fabrication of 2D flexible electronics.

  6. Pressate from peat dewatering as a substrate for bacterial growth. [Rhizopus arrhizus; Xanthomonas campestris; Aureobasidium

    SciTech Connect

    Mulligan, C.N.; Cooper, D.G.

    1985-07-01

    This study considered the possibility of using water expressed during the drying of fuel-grade peat as a substrate for microbial growth. Highly humified peat pressed for 2.5 min at 1.96 MPa produced water with a chemical oxygen demand of 690 mg/liter. Several biological compounds could be produced by using the organic matter inexpressed peat water as a substrate. These included polymers such as chitosan, contained in the cell wall of Rhizopus arrhizus, and two extracellular polysaccharides, xanthan gum and pullulan, produced by Bacillus subtilis grown in the expressed water. Small additions of nutrients to the peat pressate were necessary to obtain substantial yields of products. The addition of peptone, yeast extract, and glucose improved production of the various compounds. Biological treatment improved the quality of the expressed water to the extent that in an industrial process it could be returned to the environment.

  7. Growth of epitaxial silicon nanowires on a Si substrate by a metal-catalyst-free process

    PubMed Central

    Ishiyama, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Shuhei; Wakamatsu, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    The growth of epitaxial Si nanowires by a metal-catalyst-free process has been investigated as an alternative to the more common metal-catalyzed vapor–liquid–solid process. The well-aligned Si nanowires are successfully grown on a (111)-oriented Si substrate without any metal catalysts by a thermal treatment using silicon sulfide as a Si source at approximately 1200 °C. The needle-shaped Si nanowires, which have a core–shell structure that consists of a single-crystalline Si core along the <111> direction consistent with the substrate direction and a surface coating of silicon oxide, are grown by a metal-catalyst-free process. In this process, the silicon sulfide in the liquid phase facilitates the nucleation and nanowire growth. In contrast, oxygen-rich nanowires that consist of crystalline Si at the tip and lumpy silicon oxide on the body are observed in a sample grown at 1300 °C, which disturbs the epitaxial growth of Si nanowires. PMID:27465800

  8. Rayleigh-Taylor instability under curved substrates: An optimal transient growth analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balestra, Gioele; Brun, P.-T.; Gallaire, François

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the stability of thin viscous films coated on the inside of a horizontal cylindrical substrate. In such a case, gravity acts both as a stabilizing force through the progressive drainage of the film and as a destabilizing force prone to form droplets via the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The drainage solution, derived from lubrication equations, is found asymptotically stable with respect to infinitesimally small perturbations, although in reality, droplets often form. To resolve this paradox, we perform an optimal transient growth analysis for the first-order perturbations of the liquid's interface, generalizing the results of Trinh et al. [Phys. Fluids 26, 051704 (2014), 10.1063/1.4876476]. We find that the system displays a linear transient growth potential that gives rise to two different scenarios depending on the value of the Bond number (prescribing the relative importance of gravity and surface tension forces). At low Bond numbers, the optimal perturbation of the interface does not generate droplets. In contrast, for higher Bond numbers, perturbations on the upper hemicircle yield gains large enough to potentially form droplets. The gain increases exponentially with the Bond number. In particular, depending on the amplitude of the initial perturbation, we find a critical Bond number above which the short-time linear growth is sufficient to trigger the nonlinear effects required to form dripping droplets. We conclude that the transition to droplets detaching from the substrate is noise and perturbation dependent.

  9. Influence of electron beam irradiation on growth of Phytophthora cinnamomi and its control in substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MigdaŁ, Wojciech; Orlikowski, Leszek B.; Ptaszek, Magdalena; Gryczka, Urszula

    2012-08-01

    Very extensive production procedure, especially in plants growing under covering, require methods, which would allow quick elimination or substantial reduction of populations of specific pathogens without affecting the growth and development of the cultivated plants. Among soil-borne pathogens, the Phytophthora species are especially dangerous for horticultural plants. In this study, irradiation with electron beam was applied to control Phytophthora cinnamomi. The influence of irradiation dose on the reduction of in vitro growth and the population density of the pathogen in treated peat and its mixture with composted pine bark (1:1), as well as the health of Chamaecyparis lawsoniana and Lavandula angustifolia plants were evaluated. Application of irradiation at a dose of 1.5 kGy completely inhibited the in vitro development of P. cinnamomi. This irradiation effect was connected with the disintegration of the hyphae and spores of the species. Irradiation of peat and its mixture with composted pine bark with 10 kGy resulted in the inhibition of stem base rot development in Ch. lawsoniana. Symptoms of the disease were not observed when the substrates were treated with 15 kGy. In the case of L. angustifolia, stem root rot was not observed on cuttings transplanted to infected peat irradiated at a dose of 10 kGy. Irradiation of the horticultural substrates did not affect plant growth.

  10. Electric field stimulation through a biodegradable polypyrrole-co-polycaprolactone substrate enhances neural cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hieu T; Wei, Claudia; Chow, Jacqueline K; Nguyen, Alvin; Coursen, Jeff; Sapp, Shawn; Luebben, Silvia; Chang, Emily; Ross, Robert; Schmidt, Christine E

    2014-01-01

    Nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) are FDA-approved devices used to bridge gaps across severed nerve cables and help direct axons sprouting from the proximal end toward the distal stump. In this paper we present the development of a novel electrically conductive, biodegradable NGC made from a polypyrrole-block-polycaprolactone (PPy-PCL) copolymer material laminated with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The PPy-PCL has a bulk conductivity ranging 10–20 S/cm and loses 40 wt% after 7 months under physiologic conditions. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) grown on flat PPy-PCL/PLGA material exposed to direct current electric fields (EF) of 100 mV/cm for 2 h increased axon growth by 13% (± 2%) towards either electrode of a 2-electrode setup, compared to control grown on identical substrates without EF exposure. Alternating current increased axon growth by 21% (± 3%) without an observable directional preference, compared to the same control group. The results from this study demonstrate PLGA-coated PPy-PCL is a unique biodegradable material that can deliver substrate EF stimulation to improve axon growth for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:23964001

  11. Growth of oriented vanadium pentaoxide nanostructures on transparent conducting substrates and their applications in photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hongjiang; Gao, Yanfeng; Zhou, Jiadong; Liu, Xinling; Chen, Zhang; Cao, Chuanxiang; Luo, Hongjie; Kanehira, Minoru

    2014-06-01

    A novel, hydrothermal and hard-template-free method was developed for the first time to grow oriented, single-crystalline monoclinic VO{sub 2} (B) flower-like nanorod films on transparent conductive fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates. The length and morphology of the nanorods can be tuned by changing the growth parameters, such as growth time and initial precursor concentration. The flower-like V{sub 2}O{sub 5} films were obtained after post-calcination treatment of VO{sub 2} (B) films. The photocatalytic activity of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} films was investigated by the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under UV and visible light. The prepared V{sub 2}O{sub 5} film exhibited good photocatalytic performance (74.6% and 63% under UV and visible light for 210 min, respectively) and more practical application in industry. - Graphical abstract: Flower nanostructured vanadium oxide film was prepared by hydrothermal reaction for photocatalysis application. - Highlights: • Monoclinic VO{sub 2} nanorod array and flower-like nanostructure were directly grown on FTO substrate by hydrothermal reaction. • The growth mechanism was analyzed by FESEM at different time. • V{sub 2}O{sub 5} flower-like nanostructure film was obtained after calcining VO{sub 2} film. • V{sub 2}O{sub 5} film exhibited good light activity and potential application in photocatalysis.

  12. Growth of epitaxial silicon nanowires on a Si substrate by a metal-catalyst-free process.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Shuhei; Wakamatsu, Toshiki

    2016-07-28

    The growth of epitaxial Si nanowires by a metal-catalyst-free process has been investigated as an alternative to the more common metal-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid process. The well-aligned Si nanowires are successfully grown on a (111)-oriented Si substrate without any metal catalysts by a thermal treatment using silicon sulfide as a Si source at approximately 1200 °C. The needle-shaped Si nanowires, which have a core-shell structure that consists of a single-crystalline Si core along the <111> direction consistent with the substrate direction and a surface coating of silicon oxide, are grown by a metal-catalyst-free process. In this process, the silicon sulfide in the liquid phase facilitates the nucleation and nanowire growth. In contrast, oxygen-rich nanowires that consist of crystalline Si at the tip and lumpy silicon oxide on the body are observed in a sample grown at 1300 °C, which disturbs the epitaxial growth of Si nanowires.

  13. Electric field stimulation through a biodegradable polypyrrole-co-polycaprolactone substrate enhances neural cell growth.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hieu T; Sapp, Shawn; Wei, Claudia; Chow, Jacqueline K; Nguyen, Alvin; Coursen, Jeff; Luebben, Silvia; Chang, Emily; Ross, Robert; Schmidt, Christine E

    2014-08-01

    Nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) are FDA-approved devices used to bridge gaps across severed nerve cables and help direct axons sprouting from the proximal end toward the distal stump. In this article, we present the development of a novel electrically conductive, biodegradable NGC made from a polypyrrole-block-polycaprolactone (PPy-PCL) copolymer material laminated with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The PPy-PCL has a bulk conductivity ranging 10-20 S/cm and loses 40 wt % after 7 months under physiologic conditions. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) grown on flat PPy-PCL/PLGA material exposed to direct current electric fields (EF) of 100 mV/cm for 2 h increased axon growth by 13% (± 2%) toward either electrode of a 2-electrode setup, compared with control grown on identical substrates without EF exposure. Alternating current increased axon growth by 21% (±3%) without an observable directional preference, compared with the same control group. The results from this study demonstrate PLGA-coated PPy-PCL is a unique biodegradable material that can deliver substrate EF stimulation to improve axon growth for peripheral nerve repair.

  14. Demonstrating benthic control of anomalous solute transport: biofilm growth interacts with substrate size.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubeneau, A. F.; Tank, J. L.; Bolster, D.; Hanrahan, B.

    2014-12-01

    In fluvial systems, biofilms are the main driver of biogeochemical transformations. Biofilms grow on most surfaces in the benthic and hyporheic regions, where they process waterborne solutes. These solutes are transported in the regional flow and their fluxes near the biofilms are controlled by local physical properties, such as head gradients and hydraulic conductivity. These properties are in turn influenced by the growth of the biofilm itself, which can clog porous media and/or develop its own network of porous space. Therefore, the residence time of a solute in proximity to biofilm surfaces, where it can be processed, should be influenced by the properties not only of the physical environment, but by that of the biofilm itself. We hypothesized that the presence of biofilms would increase residence times in the benthic and shallow subsurface regions of the stream bed. We performed controlled experiments in 4 experimental streams at Notre Dame's Linked Experimental Ecosystem Facility (ND-LEEF) to quantify the interaction between substrate and biofilm in controlling anomalous solute transport. Each stream at ND-LEEF had a different substrate configuration: 2 with homogeneous substrate but with different sizes (pea gravel vs. coarse gravel) and 2 with heterogeneous substrate (alternating sections vs. well-mixed reaches). We measured the evolution of the residence time distributions in the streams by injecting rhodamine tracer (RWT) multiple times over the course of a 5 month colonization gradient. Analysis of breakthrough curves demonstrated that in addition to the influence of substrate, biofilm colonization and growth significantly influenced the residence time in the system. Specifically, as biofilms grew, the power-law exponent of the RTD decreased, i.e. the tails of the distributions became heavier, suggesting prolonged retention due to the presence of the biofilms. Although the substrate signature persisted over time, with the coarser gravel bed washing out

  15. Compact laser molecular beam epitaxy system using laser heating of substrate for oxide film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, S.; Lippmaa, M.; Nakagawa, N.; Nagasawa, H.; Koinuma, H.; Kawasaki, M.

    1999-01-01

    A high-temperature, oxygen compatible, and compact laser molecular beam epitaxy (laser MBE) system has been developed. The 1.06 μm infrared light from a continuous wave neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser was used to achieve a wide range and rapid control of substrate temperature in ultrahigh vacuum and at up to 1 atm oxygen pressure. The maximum usable temperature was limited to 1453 °C by the melting point of the nickel sample holder. To our knowledge, this is the highest temperature reported for pulsed laser deposition of oxide films. The efficient laser heating combined with temperature monitoring by a pyrometer and feedback control of the Nd:YAG laser power by a personal computer made it possible to regulate the substrate temperature accurately and to achieve high sample heating and cooling rates. The oxygen pressure and ablation laser triggering were also controlled by the computer. The accurate growth parameter control was combined with real-time in situ surface structure monitoring by reflection high energy electron diffraction to investigate oxide thin film growth in detail over a wide range of temperatures, oxygen partial pressures, and deposition rates. We have demonstrated the performance of this system by the fabrication of homoepitaxial SrTiO3 films as well as heteroepitaxial Sr2RuO4, and SrRuO3 films on SrTiO3 substrates at temperatures of up to 1300 °C. This temperature was high enough to change the film growth mode from layer by layer to step flow.

  16. Modeling of microbial substrate conversion, growth and product formation in a recycling fermentor.

    PubMed

    van Verseveld, H W; de Hollander, J A; Frankena, J; Braster, M; Leeuwerik, F J; Stouthamer, A H

    1986-01-01

    Paracoccus denitrificans and Bacillus licheniformis were grown in a carbon- and energy source-limited recycling fermentor with 100% biomass feedback. Experimental data for biomass accumulation and product formation as well as rates of carbon dioxide evolution and oxygen consumption were used in a parameter optimization procedure. This procedure was applied on a model which describes biomass growth as a linear function of the substrate consumption rate and the rate of product formation as a linear function of the biomass growth rate. The fitting procedure yielded two growth domains for P. denitrificans. In the first domain the values for the maximal growth yield and the maintenance coefficient were identical to those found in a series of chemostat experiments. The second domain could be described best with linear biomass increase, which is equal to a constant growth yield. Experimental data of a protease producing B. licheniformis also yielded two growth domains via the fitting procedure. Again, in the first domain, maximal growth yield and maintenance requirements were not significantly different from those derived from a series of chemostat experiments. Domain 2 behaviour was different from that observed with P. denitrificans. Product formation halts and more glucose becomes available for biomass formation, and consequently the specific growth rate increases in the shift from domain 1 to 2. It is concluded that for many industrial production processes, it is important to select organisms on the basis of a low maintenance coefficient and a high basic production of the desired product. It seems less important that the maximal production becomes optimized, which is the basis of most selection procedures.

  17. Selective-area growth of indium nitride nanowires on gold-patterned Si(100) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, C. H.; Chen, L. C.; Hwang, J. S.; Chen, K. H.; Hung, Y. T.; Chen, Y. F.

    2002-07-01

    This letter reports the synthesis of indium nitride (InN) nanowires on gold-patterned silicon substrates in a controlled manner using a method involving thermal evaporation of pure indium. The locations of these InN nanowires were controlled by depositing gold in desired areas on the substrates. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy investigations showed that the InN nanowires are single crystals with diameters ranging from 40 to 80 nm, and lengths up to 5 mum. Energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry showed that the ends of the nanowires are composed primarily of Au, and the rest of the nanowires were InN with no detectable Au incorporations. The Raman spectra showed peaks at 445, 489, and 579 cm-1, which are attributed to the A1(transverse optical), E2, and A1(longitudinal optical) phonon modes of the wurtzite InN structure, respectively. Photoluminescence spectra of the InN nanowires showed a strong broad emission peak at 1.85 eV.

  18. Ordered growth of germanium hut islands on Si (001) molecular bonded substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poydenot, V.; Dujardin, R.; Rouvière, J. L.; Barski, A.; Fournel, F.

    2004-12-01

    Ordered germanium hut islands are grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on high twist angle molecular bonded silicon (001) substrates (twist angle higher than 20°). We show that the growth organization is induced by an array of interfacial tilt dislocations. Plan-view transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy observations show that the orientation and period of the tilt dislocation array determine the orientation, period, and length of elongated germanium hut islands. The strain field generated by an array of tilt dislocations is proposed as the driving force of the reported organization.

  19. Glycothermal Growth of Silver Core/TiO2 Shell Nano-Wires on FTO Substrate.

    PubMed

    Song, Duck-Hyun; Hirato, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Silver core/TiO2 shell nano-wires have been successfully prepared on fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass substrate via a glycothermal process assisted by a photochemical process. The morphology, diameter, length, and density of synthesized core/shell nano-wires could be varied by photochemical reaction time. The fabricated samples were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray. We suggested a mechanism to explain the growth of the silver core/TiO2 shell nano-wires.

  20. Engineering the Activity and Lifetime of Heterogeneous Catalysts for Carbon Nanotube Growth via Substrate Ion Beam Bombardment (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-31

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2014-0159 ENGINEERING THE ACTIVITY AND LIFETIME OF HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSTS FOR CARBON NANOTUBE GROWTH VIA SUBSTRATE ION BEAM...July 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ENGINEERING THE ACTIVITY AND LIFETIME OF HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSTS FOR CARBON NANOTUBE GROWTH VIA SUBSTRATE ION BEAM... heterogeneous catalyst, catalyst support, ion beam bombardment 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 11

  1. Au impact on GaAs epitaxial growth on GaAs (111)B substrates in molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zhi-Ming; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Sun, Wen; Zhang, Zhi; Yang, Lei; Chen, Ping-Ping; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2013-02-01

    GaAs growth behaviour under the presence of Au nanoparticles on GaAs {111}B substrate is investigated using electron microscopy. It has been found that, during annealing, enhanced Ga surface diffusion towards Au nanoparticles leads to the GaAs epitaxial growth into {113}B faceted triangular pyramids under Au nanoparticles, governed by the thermodynamic growth, while during conventional GaAs growth, growth kinetics dominates, resulting in the flatted triangular pyramids at high temperature and the epitaxial nanowires growth at relatively low temperature. This study provides an insight of Au nanoparticle impact on GaAs growth, which is critical for understanding the formation mechanisms of semiconductor nanowires.

  2. Peripheral nervous system genes expressed in central neurons induce growth on inhibitory substrates.

    PubMed

    Buchser, William J; Smith, Robin P; Pardinas, Jose R; Haddox, Candace L; Hutson, Thomas; Moon, Lawrence; Hoffman, Stanley R; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2012-01-01

    Trauma to the spinal cord and brain can result in irreparable loss of function. This failure of recovery is in part due to inhibition of axon regeneration by myelin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). Peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons exhibit increased regenerative ability compared to central nervous system neurons, even in the presence of inhibitory environments. Previously, we identified over a thousand genes differentially expressed in PNS neurons relative to CNS neurons. These genes represent intrinsic differences that may account for the PNS's enhanced regenerative ability. Cerebellar neurons were transfected with cDNAs for each of these PNS genes to assess their ability to enhance neurite growth on inhibitory (CSPG) or permissive (laminin) substrates. Using high content analysis, we evaluated the phenotypic profile of each neuron to extract meaningful data for over 1100 genes. Several known growth associated proteins potentiated neurite growth on laminin. Most interestingly, novel genes were identified that promoted neurite growth on CSPGs (GPX3, EIF2B5, RBMX). Bioinformatic approaches also uncovered a number of novel gene families that altered neurite growth of CNS neurons.

  3. Peripheral Nervous System Genes Expressed in Central Neurons Induce Growth on Inhibitory Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Buchser, William J.; Smith, Robin P.; Pardinas, Jose R.; Haddox, Candace L.; Hutson, Thomas; Moon, Lawrence; Hoffman, Stanley R.; Bixby, John L.; Lemmon, Vance P.

    2012-01-01

    Trauma to the spinal cord and brain can result in irreparable loss of function. This failure of recovery is in part due to inhibition of axon regeneration by myelin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). Peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons exhibit increased regenerative ability compared to central nervous system neurons, even in the presence of inhibitory environments. Previously, we identified over a thousand genes differentially expressed in PNS neurons relative to CNS neurons. These genes represent intrinsic differences that may account for the PNS’s enhanced regenerative ability. Cerebellar neurons were transfected with cDNAs for each of these PNS genes to assess their ability to enhance neurite growth on inhibitory (CSPG) or permissive (laminin) substrates. Using high content analysis, we evaluated the phenotypic profile of each neuron to extract meaningful data for over 1100 genes. Several known growth associated proteins potentiated neurite growth on laminin. Most interestingly, novel genes were identified that promoted neurite growth on CSPGs (GPX3, EIF2B5, RBMX). Bioinformatic approaches also uncovered a number of novel gene families that altered neurite growth of CNS neurons. PMID:22701605

  4. Low Temperature Metal Free Growth of Graphene on Insulating Substrates by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, R; Munuera, C; Martínez, J I; Azpeitia, J; Gómez-Aleixandre, C; García-Hernández, M

    2017-03-01

    Direct growth of graphene films on dielectric substrates (quartz and silica) is reported, by means of remote electron cyclotron resonance plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition r-(ECR-CVD) at low temperature (650°C). Using a two step deposition process- nucleation and growth- by changing the partial pressure of the gas precursors at constant temperature, mostly monolayer continuous films, with grain sizes up to 500 nm are grown, exhibiting transmittance larger than 92% and sheet resistance as low as 900 Ω·sq(-1). The grain size and nucleation density of the resulting graphene sheets can be controlled varying the deposition time and pressure. In additon, first-principles DFT-based calculations have been carried out in order to rationalize the oxygen reduction in the quartz surface experimentally observed. This method is easily scalable and avoids damaging and expensive transfer steps of graphene films, improving compatibility with current fabrication technologies.

  5. Simple method for the growth of 4H silicon carbide on silicon substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Asghar, M.; Shahid, M. Y.; Iqbal, F.; Fatima, K.; Nawaz, Muhammad Asif; Arbi, H. M.; Tsu, R.

    2016-03-15

    In this study we report thermal evaporation technique as a simple method for the growth of 4H silicon carbide on p-type silicon substrate. A mixture of Si and C{sub 60} powder of high purity (99.99%) was evaporated from molybdenum boat. The as grown film was characterized by XRD, FTIR, UV-Vis Spectrophotometer and Hall Measurements. The XRD pattern displayed four peaks at 2Θ angles 28.55{sup 0}, 32.70{sup 0}, 36.10{sup 0} and 58.90{sup 0} related to Si (1 1 1), 4H-SiC (1 0 0), 4H-SiC (1 1 1) and 4H-SiC (2 2 2), respectively. FTIR, UV-Vis spectrophotometer and electrical properties further strengthened the 4H-SiC growth.

  6. Low temperature metal free growth of graphene on insulating substrates by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, R.; Munuera, C.; Martínez, J. I.; Azpeitia, J.; Gómez-Aleixandre, C.; García-Hernández, M.

    2017-03-01

    Direct growth of graphene films on dielectric substrates (quartz and silica) is reported, by means of remote electron cyclotron resonance plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition r-(ECR-CVD) at low temperature (650 °C). Using a two step deposition process- nucleation and growth- by changing the partial pressure of the gas precursors at constant temperature, mostly monolayer continuous films, with grain sizes up to 500 nm are grown, exhibiting transmittance larger than 92% and sheet resistance as low as 900 Ω sq-1. The grain size and nucleation density of the resulting graphene sheets can be controlled varying the deposition time and pressure. In additon, first-principles DFT-based calculations have been carried out in order to rationalize the oxygen reduction in the quartz surface experimentally observed. This method is easily scalable and avoids damaging and expensive transfer steps of graphene films, improving compatibility with current fabrication technologies.

  7. Simulated growth of layers on a substrate with mismatch: structural studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, S.; Ghazali, A.; Lévy, J. C. S.

    1996-12-01

    High temperature deposition of metallic materials on a (111) face of a fcc substrate, followed by a slow cooling down to a given temperature, is simulated by means of a Monte-Carlo algorithm with Lennard-Jones interatomic pair potentials. Adsorption and growth modes on the surface are studied in order to determine whether the growth is three- or two-dimensional, according to relevant parameters such as lattice mismatch and relative atomic binding energy. For a ± 10% mismatch it is found that the Stranski-Krastanov process starts early and is later healed by the appearance of bridges between islands, after a deposition of about ten monolayers. The interlayer distance undergoes oscillations as a function of the layer number. This is observed for a ± 10% mismatch as well as for a 5% mismatch.

  8. Metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaAs on patterned GaAs substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, D.; Asahi, H.; Liu, X. F.; Okuno, Y.; Inoue, K.; Gonda, S.; Shimomura, S.; Hiyamizu, S.

    1994-03-01

    GaAs layers were grown on etch-patterned (100) GaAs substrates by MOMBE (metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy) using TEGa (triethylgallium) and thermally cracked TEAs (triethylarsine). Morphology and orientation dependencies of the grown facets on the growth temperature (400-630°C) and V/III ratio (2-4) are investigated. Good morphology of grown layers was obtained on (111)A side facets at a low V/III ratio of 3 and low growth temperatures of 450-500°C. We also found strong evidence that the formation of facets is not only governed by the migration of Ga precursors and/or Ga atoms, but also by a preferential catalytic decomposition of Ga precursors on the facet edges.

  9. Microbial uptake of radiolabeled substrates: estimates of growth rates from time course measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Li, W K

    1984-01-01

    The uptake of [3H]glucose and a mixture of 3H-labeled amino acids was measured, in time course fashion, in planktonic microbial assemblages of the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. The average generation times of those portions of the assemblages able to utilize these substrates were estimated from a simple exponential growth model. Other workers have independently used this model in its integrated or differential form. A mathematical verification and an experimental demonstration of the equivalence of the two approaches are presented. A study was made of the size distribution of heterotrophic activity, using time course measurements. It was found that the size distribution and the effect of sample filtration before radiolabeling were dependent on time of incubation. In principle, it was possible to ascribe these time dependences to differences in the specific growth rate and initial standing stock of the microbial assemblages. PMID:6696414

  10. Simple method for the growth of 4H silicon carbide on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghar, M.; Shahid, M. Y.; Iqbal, F.; Fatima, K.; Nawaz, Muhammad Asif; Arbi, H. M.; Tsu, R.

    2016-03-01

    In this study we report thermal evaporation technique as a simple method for the growth of 4H silicon carbide on p-type silicon substrate. A mixture of Si and C60 powder of high purity (99.99%) was evaporated from molybdenum boat. The as grown film was characterized by XRD, FTIR, UV-Vis Spectrophotometer and Hall Measurements. The XRD pattern displayed four peaks at 2Θ angles 28.550, 32.700, 36.100 and 58.900 related to Si (1 1 1), 4H-SiC (1 0 0), 4H-SiC (1 1 1) and 4H-SiC (2 2 2), respectively. FTIR, UV-Vis spectrophotometer and electrical properties further strengthened the 4H-SiC growth.

  11. Suitability of different growth substrates as source of nitrogen for sulfate reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dev, Subhabrata; Patra, Aditya Kumar; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2015-11-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) mediated treatment of acid mine drainage is considered as a globally accepted technology. However, inadequate information on the role of nitrogen source in the augmentation of SRB significantly affects the overall treatment process. Sustenance of SRB depends on suitable nitrogen source which is considered as an important nutrient. This review focuses on the different nitrogen rich growth substrates for their effectiveness to support SRB growth and sulfate reduction in passive bioreactors. Compounds like NH4Cl, NH4HCO3, NO3 (-), aniline, tri-nitrotoluene, cornsteep liquor, peptone, urea, and chitin are reported to have served as nitrogen source for SRB. In association with fermentative bacteria, SRB can metabolize these complex compounds to NH4 (+), amines, and amino acids. After incorporation into cells, these compounds take part in the biosynthesis of nucleic acids, amino acids and enzyme co-factor. This work describes the status of current and the probable directions of the future research.

  12. Growth of oriented vanadium pentaoxide nanostructures on transparent conducting substrates and their applications in photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongjiang; Gao, Yanfeng; Zhou, Jiadong; Liu, Xinling; Chen, Zhang; Cao, Chuanxiang; Luo, Hongjie; Kanehira, Minoru

    2014-06-01

    A novel, hydrothermal and hard-template-free method was developed for the first time to grow oriented, single-crystalline monoclinic VO2 (B) flower-like nanorod films on transparent conductive fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates. The length and morphology of the nanorods can be tuned by changing the growth parameters, such as growth time and initial precursor concentration. The flower-like V2O5 films were obtained after post-calcination treatment of VO2 (B) films. The photocatalytic activity of V2O5 films was investigated by the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under UV and visible light. The prepared V2O5 film exhibited good photocatalytic performance (74.6% and 63% under UV and visible light for 210 min, respectively) and more practical application in industry.

  13. Self-catalyzed Growth of InAs Nanowires on InP Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bang; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2017-01-01

    We report on the self-catalyzed growth of InAs nanowires on InP substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. At a moderate V/III ratio, tapered nanowires are obtained, suggesting a strong surface diffusion effect. Dense twin faults are observed perpendicular to the nanowire growth direction due to the fluctuation of In atoms in the droplet originating from the surface diffusion effect. At a lower V/III ratio, the nanowires exhibit kinking, which is associated with a high adhesion due to a large sticking coefficient of TMIn. The twin faults are dramatically suppressed and even completely eliminated in the NW branch after kinking, which is attributed to a stable In supply with a negligible diffusion effect. This work provides a method for the fabrication of defect-free InAs nanowires.

  14. Low Temperature Metal Free Growth of Graphene on Insulating Substrates by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, R.; Munuera, C.; Martínez, J. I.; Azpeitia, J.; Gómez-Aleixandre, C.; García-Hernández, M.

    2016-01-01

    Direct growth of graphene films on dielectric substrates (quartz and silica) is reported, by means of remote electron cyclotron resonance plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition r-(ECR-CVD) at low temperature (650°C). Using a two step deposition process- nucleation and growth- by changing the partial pressure of the gas precursors at constant temperature, mostly monolayer continuous films, with grain sizes up to 500 nm are grown, exhibiting transmittance larger than 92% and sheet resistance as low as 900 Ω·sq-1. The grain size and nucleation density of the resulting graphene sheets can be controlled varying the deposition time and pressure. In additon, first-principles DFT-based calculations have been carried out in order to rationalize the oxygen reduction in the quartz surface experimentally observed. This method is easily scalable and avoids damaging and expensive transfer steps of graphene films, improving compatibility with current fabrication technologies. PMID:28070341

  15. Heteroepitaxial growth of colloidal nanocrystals onto substrate films via hot-injection routes.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Krishna P; Khon, Elena; O'Connor, Timothy; O'Conner, Timothy; Nemitz, Ian; Klinkova, Anna; Khnayzer, Rony S; Anzenbacher, Pavel; Zamkov, Mikhail

    2011-06-28

    Hot-injection synthesis of colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) in a substrate-bound form is demonstrated. We show that polycrystalline films submerged into hot organic solvents can nucleate the heteroepitaxial growth of semiconductor NCs, for which the ensuing lattice quality and size distribution are on the par with those of isolated colloidal nanoparticles. This strategy is demonstrated by growing lead chalcogenide NCs directly onto solvent-submerged TiO(2) substrates. The resulting PbX/TiO(2) (X = S, Se, Te) nanocomposites exhibit heteroepitaxial interfaces between lead chalcogenide and oxide domains and show an efficient separation of photoinduced charges, deployable for light-harvesting applications. The extendibility of the present method to other material systems was demonstrated through the synthesis of CdS/TiO(2) and Cu(2)S/TiO(2) heterostructures, fabricated from PbS/TiO(2) composites via cation exchange. The photovoltaic performance of nanocrystal/substrate composites comprising PbS NCs was evaluated by incorporating PbS/TiO(2) films into prototype solar cells.

  16. Growth and spectroscopic characterization of monolayer and few-layer hexagonal boron nitride on metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Boris N.; Bermudez, Victor M.; Hite, Jennifer K.; Robinson, Zachary R.; Wheeler, Virginia D.; Sridhara, Karthik; Hernández, Sandra C.

    2015-02-01

    Atomically thin two dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (2D h-BN) is one of the key materials in the development of new van der Waals heterostructures due to its outstanding properties including an atomically smooth surface, high thermal conductivity, high mechanical strength, chemical inertness and high electrical resistance. The development of 2D h-BN growth is still in the early stages and largely depends on rapid and accurate characterization of the grown monolayer or few layers h-BN films. This paper demonstrates a new approach to characterizing monolayer h-BN films directly on metal substrates by grazing-incidence infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). Using h-BN films grown by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition on Cu and Ni substrates, two new sub-bands are found for the A2u out-of-plane stretching mode. It is shown, using both experimental and computational methods, that the lower-energy sub-band is related to 2D h-BN coupled with substrate, while the higher energy sub-band is related to decoupled (or free-standing) 2D h-BN. It is further shown that this newly-observed fine structure in the A2u mode can be used to assess, quickly and easily, the homogeneity of the h-BN-metal interface and the effects of metal surface contamination on adhesion of the layer.

  17. Correlation between substrate bias, growth process and structural properties of phosphorus incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Aiping; Zhu, Jiaqi; Han, Jiecai; Wu, Huaping; Jia, Zechun

    2007-09-01

    We investigate the growth process and structural properties of phosphorus incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C:P) films which are deposited at different substrate biases by filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique with PH 3 as the dopant source. The films are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, residual stress measurement, UV/VIS/NIR absorption spectroscopy and temperature-dependent conductivity measurement. The atomic fraction of phosphorus in the films as a function of substrate bias is obtained by XPS analysis. The optimum bias for phosphorus incorporation is about -80 V. Raman spectra show that the amorphous structures of all samples with atomic-scaled smooth surface are not remarkably changed when PH 3 is implanted, but some small graphitic crystallites are formed. Moreover, phosphorus impurities and higher-energetic impinging ions are favorable for the clustering of sp 2 sites dispersed in sp 3 skeleton and increase the level of structural ordering for ta-C:P films, which further releases the compressive stress and enhances the conductivity of the films. Our analysis establishes an interrelationship between microstructure, stress state, electrical properties, and substrate bias, which helps to understand the deposition mechanism of ta-C:P films.

  18. Graphene growth at the interface between Ni catalyst layer and SiO2/Si substrate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Song, Kwan-Woo; Park, Min-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Yang, Cheol-Woong

    2011-07-01

    Graphene was synthesized deliberately at the interface between Ni film and SiO2/Si substrate as well as on top surface of Ni film using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which is suitable for large-scale and low-cost synthesis of graphene. The carbon atom injected at the top surface of Ni film can penetrate and reach to the Ni/SiO2 interface for the formation of graphene. Once we have the graphene in between Ni film and SiO2/Si substrate, the substrate spontaneously provides insulating SiO2 layer and we may easily get graphene/SiO2/Si structure simply by discarding Ni film. This growth of graphene at the interface can exclude graphene transfer step for electronic application. Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy show that graphene was successfully synthesized at the back of Ni film and the coverage of graphene varies with temperature and time of synthesis. The coverage of graphene at the interface depends on the amount of carbon atoms diffused into the back of Ni film.

  19. Interfacial modification of amorphous substrates for microcrystalline silicon growth with in situ hydrogen plasma pretreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young-Bae; Rhee, Shi-Woo; Li, Xiaodong

    2005-10-01

    Microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) films have been deposited onto hydrogenated and amorphous Si-rich silicon nitride and thermal oxide substrates with silane (SiH4)-hydrogen (H2) in remote plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RPECVD) at 250 °C, and these films have been investigated. It is found that in situ hydrogen plasma pretreatment of the amorphous substrates prior to μc-Si:H deposition is effective in reducing the interfacial amorphous transition region. It is believed that this hydrogen plasma pretreatment gives adsorption and nucleation sites by breaking weak Si-N and Si-Si bonds and also removes native Si-O x and hydrocarbon impurities. In the case of SiNx:H surface, surface roughening from atomic hydrogen etching and surface cleaning effects are greater than those for stable thermal oxide. Surface crystallization at the initial stage of the growth can be obtained on amorphous substrate at low temperature without an a-Si transition layer.

  20. Hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanowires on flexible fabric substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Gwang-Wook; Yun, Sang-Ho; Kim, Joo-Hyung

    2016-04-01

    ZnO nanowires (NWs) would provide significant enhancement in sensitivity due to high surface to volume ratio. We investigated the first methodical study on the quantitative relationship between the process parameters of solution concentration ratio, structure, and physical and properties of ZnO NWs grown on different flexible fabric surfaces. To develop a fundamental following concerning various substrates, we controlled the growth speed of ZnO NWs and nanowires on cotton surface with easy and moderate cost fabrication method. Using ammonium hydroxide as the reactant with zinc nitrate hexahydrate, ZnO NWs layer have been grown on metal layers, instead of seed layer. ZnO NWs fabrication was done on different fabric substrates such as wool, nylon and polypropylene (PP). After the ZnO NWs grown to each substrates, we coated insulating layer with polyurethane (PU) and ethyl cellulose for prevent external intervention. Detailed electrical characterization was subsequently performed to reveal the working characteristics of the hybrid fabric. For electrical verification of fabricated ZnO NWs, we implemented measurement impact test and material properties with FFT analyzer and LCR meter.

  1. Growth of nano hexagon-like flake arrays cerium carbonate created with PAH as the substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Hu, Y. H.; Liu, Z. G.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, M. T.

    2015-01-01

    Petals-like Ce2(CO3)3 on Ce2(CO3)3 nano hexagon-like flake arrays have been precipitatingly fabricated using PAH substrates. By changing the way of feeding, PAH concentration and aging time, petals-like Ce2(CO3)3 was created best when adding PAH into the Ce(NO3)3 solution, joined (NH4)2CO3 solution along with mixing, PAH concentration is 0.9 g/L, aging time is 4 h. A growth mechanism was proposed to account for the growth of the petals-like Ce2(CO3)3 with PAH as the substrate. Poly allylamine hydrochloride (PAH) is as template agent which forms π-allyl complex with Ce3+ and controls the morphology of Ce2(CO3)3 particle. PAH and Ce3+ form π-allyl complex, and then induce the formation of Ce2(CO3)3 crystal nucleus. And infrared spectrum analysis verified. XRD show that after adding PAH which is adsorbed on the crystal plane, the growth of Ce2(CO3)3 crystal is inhibited on (2 4 2), the growth is promoted on (2 0 2) which is differentiated into the new (1 5 1), (2 2 2) is unchanged, Ce2(CO3)3 crystal is accumulated petals shape by hexagon-like flake. UV absorption spectra show that CeO2 as prepared precursor Ce2(CO3)3 after calcinations in air at high temperatures, the petal-like CeO2 has strong UV absorption and reflection effects, and absorption interval changed significantly by the move to UVA from UVB.

  2. Effect of lateral dimension on the surface wrinkling of a thin film on compliant substrate induced by differential growth/swelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan; Han, Xue; Li, Guoyang; Lu, Conghua; Cao, Yanping; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2015-10-01

    Surface wrinkling in thin films on compliant substrates is of considerable interest for applications involving surface patterning, smart adhesion, liquid/cell shaping, particle assembly, design of flexible electronic devices, as well as mechanical characterization of thin film systems. When the in-plane size of the system is infinite, the critical wrinkling strain is known to be governed by the moduli ratio between the film and substrate. Here we show a surprising result that the lateral dimension of the film can play a critical role in the occurrence of surface wrinkling. The basic phenomenon was established through selective UV/Ozone (UVO) exposure of a strain-free PDMS slab via composite copper grids with different meshes, followed by treatment using mixed ethanol/glycerol solvents with different volume fractions of ethanol. To understand the physics behind the experimental observations, finite element (FE) simulations were performed to establish an analytical expression for the distribution of shear tractions at the film-substrate interface. Subsequent theoretical analysis leads to closed-form predictions for the critical growth/swelling strain for the onset of wrinkling. Our analysis reveals that the occurrence of surface wrinkling and post-wrinkling pattern evolution can be controlled by tuning the lateral size of the thin film for a given moduli ratio. These results may find broad applications in preventing surface wrinkling, creating desired surface patterns, evaluating the interfacial shear strength of a film/substrate system and designing flexible electronic devices.

  3. Slow Growth and High Substrate Affinity of Anammox Bacteria in an Oxygen Minimum Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, L. A.; Padilla, C. C.; Sarode, N. D.; Stewart, F. J.; Thamdrup, B.

    2016-02-01

    A major percentage of total fixed nitrogen (N) loss in the oceans occurs within oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) via denitrification or anammox. Anammox has been suggested as the dominant N loss pathway in these regions, but the regulation of this process remains understudied in aquatic systems, with work to date mainly coming from laboratory-scale bioreactors. Sampling was undertaken in the anoxic, coastal basin of the Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica to assess the growth and substrate kinetics of anammox bacteria in a marine OMZ. Anammox rates showed a strong dependence on nanomolar concentrations of both NH4+ and NO2-. A single Michaelis-Menten curve fitted for each substrate produced apparent half saturation constants (Km) of 335 ± 292 nM NH4+ and 167 ± 192 nM NO2- respectively. NO2- has a dual role to play in anammox metabolism, as an electron acceptor in the energy generating reaction and as an electron donor in the carbon fixation step; hence growth is associated with NO3- production. Using acetylene as an inhibitor for anammox, we were able to assess NO2- oxidation by anammox bacteria, producing a mean ratio of N2 to NO3- production of 0.26 ± 0.04, which is in direct agreement with that observed in bioreactors. This allowed calculation of a carbon fixation rate, which when combined with enumeration of anammox bacteria through qPCR allowed us to determine the first doubling time for anammox bacteria (predominately Ca. Scalindua) in the marine environment. Doubling times at the peak of anammox activity fell in the range 65 to 123 days, which is at the high end of those seen in laboratory setups. Anammox bacteria have a high affinity for both NH4+ and NO2- and are thus able to compete for these highly sought after substrates in OMZs. However, the slow growth of these bacteria will delay their response to injections of substrate, for example from inputs of fresh organic matter, and it will therefore ultimately influence their contribution to fixed N loss in the oceans.

  4. Growth and fabrication of deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes on silicon carbide substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moe, Craig Gunar

    Interest in deep ultraviolet (< 280 nm) emitters has developed rapidly in recent years, with its use in applications such as water purification, solid state lighting, and biochemical detection now being explored. The aluminum nitride and aluminum gallium nitride material systems are ideal for low cost, highly efficient emitters at these wavelengths, in the same manner that the InGaN LED revolutionized light emitters in the blue, green, and near-ultraviolet wavelengths. While the work to date on such devices have made use of sapphire as a substrate for epitaxial growth, silicon carbide has significant advantages including ease of growth and manufacture, reproducibility, and the potential for fewer dislocations in the material. This work follows the development of AlN and high-composition AlGaN films on SiC to a sufficient quality for emitter applications. A comprehensive examination of the AlN nucleation and buffer layers led to dislocation densities in the low 109cm-2. An extensive study of the n- and p-type doping of AlxGa 1-xN (x > 0.5) was undertaken to develop highly conductive material. The internal quantum efficiency of the quantum well region was significantly improved through modified growth conditions and precursor selection, and a device fabrication process was developed to obtain low turn-on voltages below 5 V and reliable device performance for over 100 hours of use. Careful thermal management of the devices through novel mask designs and improvement in packaging allowed for significant advances in light extraction, resulting in high-power LED emission at 280 nm. Packaged dies exhibited powers as high as 52 muW at 20 mA and 0.24 mW at 100 mA. The greatest obstacle to high external quantum efficiency in these devices is the absorbing nature SiC substrate. This has been successfully mitigated through two different techniques. First, distributed Bragg reflectors consisting of AlGaN/AlN stacks have been developed, with reflectivities greater than 80% at 275

  5. A CENSUS OF BROAD-LINE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN NEARBY GALAXIES: COEVAL STAR FORMATION AND RAPID BLACK HOLE GROWTH

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Fang, Jerome J.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Kocevski, Dale D.

    2013-02-15

    We present the first quantified, statistical map of broad-line active galactic nucleus (AGN) frequency with host galaxy color and stellar mass in nearby (0.01 < z < 0.11) galaxies. Aperture photometry and z-band concentration measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are used to disentangle AGN and galaxy emission, resulting in estimates of uncontaminated galaxy rest-frame color, luminosity, and stellar mass. Broad-line AGNs are distributed throughout the blue cloud and green valley at a given stellar mass, and are much rarer in quiescent (red sequence) galaxies. This is in contrast to the published host galaxy properties of weaker narrow-line AGNs, indicating that broad-line AGNs occur during a different phase in galaxy evolution. More luminous broad-line AGNs have bluer host galaxies, even at fixed mass, suggesting that the same processes that fuel nuclear activity also efficiently form stars. The data favor processes that simultaneously fuel both star formation activity and rapid supermassive black hole accretion. If AGNs cause feedback on their host galaxies in the nearby universe, the evidence of galaxy-wide quenching must be delayed until after the broad-line AGN phase.

  6. Multiple growths of epitaxial lift-off solar cells from a single InP substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyusang; Shiu, Kuen-Ting; Zimmerman, Jeramy D.; Renshaw, Christopher K.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrate multiple growths of flexible, thin-film indium tin oxide-InP Schottky-barrier solar cells on a single InP wafer via epitaxial lift-off (ELO). Layers that protect the InP parent wafer surface during the ELO process are subsequently removed by selective wet-chemical etching, with the active solar cell layers transferred to a thin, flexible plastic host substrate by cold welding at room temperature. The first- and second-growth solar cells exhibit no performance degradation under simulated Atmospheric Mass 1.5 Global (AM 1.5G) illumination, and have a power conversion efficiency of ηp=14.4±0.4% and ηp=14.8±0.2%, respectively. The current-voltage characteristics for the solar cells and atomic force microscope images of the substrate indicate that the parent wafer is undamaged, and is suitable for reuse after ELO and the protection-layer removal processes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction observation, and three-dimensional surface profiling show a surface that is comparable or improved to the original epiready wafer following ELO. Wafer reuse over multiple cycles suggests that high-efficiency; single-crystal thin-film solar cells may provide a practical path to low-cost solar-to-electrical energy conversion.

  7. Multiple growths of epitaxial lift-off solar cells from a single InP substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyusang; Shiu, Kuen-Ting; Zimmerman, Jeramy D.; Forrest, Stephen R.; Renshaw, Christopher K.

    2010-09-06

    We demonstrate multiple growths of flexible, thin-film indium tin oxide-InP Schottky-barrier solar cells on a single InP wafer via epitaxial lift-off (ELO). Layers that protect the InP parent wafer surface during the ELO process are subsequently removed by selective wet-chemical etching, with the active solar cell layers transferred to a thin, flexible plastic host substrate by cold welding at room temperature. The first- and second-growth solar cells exhibit no performance degradation under simulated Atmospheric Mass 1.5 Global (AM 1.5G) illumination, and have a power conversion efficiency of {eta}{sub p}=14.4{+-}0.4% and {eta}{sub p}=14.8{+-}0.2%, respectively. The current-voltage characteristics for the solar cells and atomic force microscope images of the substrate indicate that the parent wafer is undamaged, and is suitable for reuse after ELO and the protection-layer removal processes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction observation, and three-dimensional surface profiling show a surface that is comparable or improved to the original epiready wafer following ELO. Wafer reuse over multiple cycles suggests that high-efficiency; single-crystal thin-film solar cells may provide a practical path to low-cost solar-to-electrical energy conversion.

  8. Alignment controlled growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes on quartz substrates.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianliang; Dunham, Simon; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Yongwei; Kocabas, Coskun; Moh, Lionel; Huang, Yonggang; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Lu, Chun; Huang, Wei; Rogers, John A

    2009-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess extraordinary electrical properties, with many possible applications in electronics. Dense, horizontally aligned arrays of linearly configured SWNTs represent perhaps the most attractive and scalable way to implement this class of nanomaterial in practical systems. Recent work shows that templated growth of tubes on certain crystalline substrates yields arrays with the necessary levels of perfection, as demonstrated by the formation of devices and full systems on quartz. This paper examines advanced implementations of this process on crystalline quartz substrates with different orientations, to yield strategies for forming diverse, but well-defined horizontal configurations of SWNTs. Combined experimental and theoretical studies indicate that angle-dependent van der Waals interactions can account for nearly all aspects of alignment on quartz with X, Y, Z, and ST cuts, as well as quartz with disordered surface layers. These findings provide important insights into methods for guided growth of SWNTs, and possibly other classes of nanomaterials, for applications in electronics, sensing, photodetection, light emission, and other areas.

  9. Carbon tetrachloride degradation: Effect of microbial growth substrate and vitamin B{sub 12} content

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, S.; Stensel, H.D.; Ferguson, J.F.

    2000-05-01

    Microbial degradation kinetics of carbon tetrachloride (CT) under reducing conditions were investigated for different cultures, fed with 1,2-propanediol, dextrose, propionalde-hyde, or acetate and nitrate, in the anaerobic step of an anaerobic/aerobic operation sequence. Methanogenesis was inhibited due to the aerobic step. CT biodegradation rates followed first-order kinetics with respect to CT concentration and biomass and were not affected by the presence of growth substrate. CT degradation rates increased linearly with higher intracellular vitamin B{sub 12} content. The culture fed 1,2-propanediol had the highest vitamin B{sub 12} content, which was 3.8, 4.7, and 16 times that of the propionaldehyde-,dextrose-, and acetate-fed cultures, respectively, and its first-order degradation rate constant was 2.8, 4.5, 6.0 times that for those cultures, respectively. No CT degradation occurred with culture liquid, suggesting that intracellular factors were responsible for CT degradation. The propanediol culture was able to sustain a constant CT degradation rate for a 16-day test period without substrate addition. Compared to a propanediol-fed culture grown only under anaerobic conditions, the propanediol culture grown under the sequential anaerobic/aerobic condition resulted in more biomass growth and a greater CT degradation rate per unit of propanediol fed, although its CT degradation rate per unit of biomass was lower.

  10. Growth of thick GaN layers on laser-processed sapphire substrate by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Koji; Aida, Hideo; Kim, Seong-Woo; Ikejiri, Kenjiro; Doi, Toshiro; Yamazaki, Tsutomu

    2014-10-01

    A 600 μm thick GaN layer was successfully grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy by replacing the standard sapphire substrate with that processed by a focused laser beam within the substrate. The effects of the laser processing on the curvature and cracking of the GaN layer were investigated. Microscopic observations of the interior of the thick GaN layer revealed that the laser-processed substrate suppressed the generation of microcracks in the GaN layer. In addition, the laser processing was also found to reduce the change in the curvature during the GaN layer growth in comparison to that on the standard substrate. It is shown that the overlapping microcracks observed in the GaN layer on the standard sapphire substrate lead to serious cracking after thick GaN layer growth.

  11. Inactivation of human pathogens during phase II composting of manure-based mushroom growth substrate.

    PubMed

    Weil, Jennifer D; Cutter, Catherine N; Beelman, Robert B; LaBorde, Luke F

    2013-08-01

    Commercial production of white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) requires a specialized growth substrate prepared from composted agricultural by-products. Because horse and poultry manures are widely used in substrate formulations, there is a need to determine the extent to which the composting process is capable of eliminating human pathogens. In this study, partially composted substrate was inoculated with a pathogen cocktail (log 10⁶ to 10⁸ CFU/g) containing Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella. Pathogen and indicator-organism reductions were followed at temperatures that typically occurred during a standard 6-day phase II pasteurization and conditioning procedure. Controlled-temperature water bath studies at 48.8, 54.4, and 60°C demonstrated complete destruction of the three pathogens after 36.0, 8.0, and 0.5 h, respectively. Destruction of L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 at 54.4°C occurred more slowly than E. coli, total coliforms, Enterobacteriaceae, and Salmonella. Microbial reductions that occurred during a standard 6-day phase II pasteurization and conditioning treatment were studied in a small-scale mushroom production research facility. After phase II composting, E. coli, coliforms, and Enterobacteriaceae were below detectable levels, and inoculated pathogens were not detected by direct plating or by enrichment. The results of this study show that a phase II composting process can be an effective control measure for eliminating risks associated with the use of composted animal manures during mushroom production. Growers are encouraged to validate and verify their own composting processes through periodic microbial testing for pathogens and to conduct studies to assure uniform distribution of substrate temperatures during phase II.

  12. Nucleation and growth mechanisms in ion-plated TiN films on steel substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, A.; Cheng, C.C.

    1989-01-01

    Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) was used to investigate the nucleation and growth characteristics of TiN films, ion plated on tool and stainless steel substrates with and without an {alpha}-Ti underlayer ({approx}100 nm thick). It was found that (1) at lower deposition temperatures, the underlayer {alpha}-Ti remains unchanged and exhibits a layer + island growth mode; (2) at higher deposition temperatures, the underlayer may transform into a TiC phase on M50 steel and into a {delta}{prime}-TiN phase on 316L stainless steel; (3) the growth behavior of TiN films was controlled primarily by the reaction thermodynamics and diffusion kinetics of Ti and N adatoms. Based on microscopic evidence together with the kinetic and thermodynamic considerations a mechanistic model is presented to describe the nucleation and growth mechanisms of ion-plated TiN films under the deposition conditions explored in this study. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Polycrystalline Ni thin films on nanopatterned Si substrates: From highly conformal to nonconformal anisotropic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Adrian; Peverini, Luca; Grenzer, Jörg; Kovacs, György J.; Mücklich, Arndt; Facsko, Stefan

    2011-07-01

    The growth of polycrystalline Ni thin films on nanorippled Si templates is investigated in situ by grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering as well as ex situ by atomic force microscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The templates have been fabricated by low-energy ion sputtering which leads to the spontaneous formation of a periodic ripple pattern with about 35 nm periodicity and about 3 nm peak-to-peak height. Highly conformal growth of the Ni film is observed under normal incidence deposition with the film surface perfectly replicating the substrate morphology up to a film thickness of at least 120 nm. Grazing incidence deposition perpendicular to the ripple orientation leads to the formation of one-dimensional nanowires on one side of the ripples due to geometrical shadowing. At a film thickness of about 10 nm, a transition to anisotropic columnar growth with rapidly decreasing conformity is observed. In this regime, the nanowires act as growth seeds for the columns and further geometrical shadowing leads to a film consisting of rows of tilted columns.

  14. Plant-growth response to various combinations of mulches and spoil substrates on a Walker County, Alabama, surface coal mine

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, E.A.; Gabrielson, F.C.; Hughes, T.H.

    1982-05-01

    In 1978-1979, Walker County, Alabama, was the site of an experiment designed to assess plant growth and soil erosion. The experiment utilized 6 mulch treatments applied to each of 3 coal surface mine substrates. The mulches (wood fiber, hardwood bark, pine bark, waste compost, paper-slag, and no mulch application) were randomly combined with either A + B horizon soil, shale, or a mixture of the two. The resulting 18 plots were replicated on two slopes (N-S). A standard seed-fertilizer regimen was applied to all plots. Plots were read in June and October 1979 for species composition, density, and plane cover. Overall grass growth, as measured by plane cover, was best on mixed substrate, and growth was not significantly different between shale and topsoil plots. Density and cover provided by volunteer species varied according to slope, substrate, and mulch combinations. Overall, numbers of spoil arthropods did not show great differences according to slope or substrate.

  15. Controlled-Direction Growth of Planar InAsSb Nanowires on Si Substrates without Foreign Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Du, Wenna; Yang, Xiaoguang; Pan, Huayong; Ji, Xianghai; Ji, Haiming; Luo, Shuai; Zhang, Xingwang; Wang, Zhanguo; Yang, Tao

    2016-02-10

    We describe the controlled growth of planar InAsSb nanowires (NWs) on differently oriented Si substrates without any foreign catalysts. Interestingly, the planar InAsSb NWs grew along four criss-crossed ⟨110⟩ directions on an [100]-oriented substrate, two ⟨100⟩ directions plus four ⟨111⟩ directions on an [110]-oriented substrate, and six equivalent ⟨112⟩ directions on an [111]-oriented substrate, which correspond to the projections of ⟨111⟩ family crystal directions on the substrate planes. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) reveals that the NWs experienced a transition from out-of-plane to in-plane growth at the early growth stage but still occurred on the {111} plane, which has the lowest surface energy among all the surfaces. Furthermore, the NWs exhibit a pure zinc-blende crystal structure without any defects. A growth model is presented to explain growth of the NWs. In addition, conductive atomic force microscopy shows that electrically rectifying p-n junctions form naturally between the planar InAsSb NWs and the p-type Si substrates. The results presented here could open up a new route way to fabricate highly integrated III-V nanodevices.

  16. Alteration of architecture of MoO₃ nanostructures on arbitrary substrates: growth kinetics, spectroscopic and gas sensing properties.

    PubMed

    Illyaskutty, Navas; Sreedhar, Sreeja; Sanal Kumar, G; Kohler, Heinz; Schwotzer, Matthias; Natzeck, Carsten; Pillai, V P Mahadevan

    2014-11-21

    MoO3 nanostructures have been grown in thin film form on five different substrates by RF magnetron sputtering and subsequent annealing; non-aligned nanorods, aligned nanorods, bundled nanowires, vertical nanorods and nanoslabs are formed respectively on the glass, quartz, wafer, alumina and sapphire substrates. The nanostructures formed on these substrates are characterized by AFM, SEM, GIXRD, XPS, micro-Raman, diffuse reflectance and photoluminescence spectroscopy. A detailed growth model for morphology alteration with respect to substrates has been discussed by considering various aspects such as surface roughness, lattice parameters and the thermal expansion coefficient, of both substrates and MoO3. The present study developed a strategy for the choice of substrates to materialize different types MoO3 nanostructures for future thin film applications. The gas sensing tests point towards using these MoO3 nanostructures as principal detection elements in gas sensors.

  17. [Environmental Effect of Substrate Amelioration on Lake: Effects on Phragmites communis Growth and Photosynthetic Fluorescence Characteristics].

    PubMed

    Yu, Ju-hua; Zhong, Ji-cheng; Fan, Cheng-xin; Huang, Wei; Shang, Jing-ge; Gu, Xiao-zhi

    2015-12-01

    Growth of rooted aquatic macrophytes was affected by the nature and composition of lake bottom sediments. Obviously, it has been recognized as an important ecological restoration measure by improving lake substrate and then reestablishing and restoring aquatic macrophytes in order to get rid of the environmental problem of lake. This study simulated five covering thickness to give an insight into the influence of substrate amelioration on Phragmites communis growth and photosynthetic fluorescence characteristics. The results showed that the total biomass, plant height, leaf length and leaf width of Phragmites communis under capping 5 cm were much more significant than those of capping 18 cm (P < 0.01), at the 120 d, the underground: shoot biomass ratio and fine root: underground biomass ratio were also much higher than those of other treatments (P < 0.05), which indicated that capping 18 cm treatment would significantly inhibit the growth of Phragmites communis , but the growth of control group Phragmites communis was slightly constrained by eutrophicated sediment. In addition, as the capping thickness growing, the underground: shoot biomass ratio of the plant would be reduced dramatically, in order to acquire much more nutrients from sediment for plant growing, the underground biomass of Phragmites communis would be preferentially developed, especially, the biomass of fine root. However, Photosystem II (PS II) photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), quantum yield (Yield), photochemical quenching (qP), non-photochemical quenching (qN) of Phragmites communis under different treatments had no significant differences (P > 0.05), furthermore, with much greater capping thickness, the photosynthesis structure of PS II would be much easier destroyed, and PS II would be protected by increasing heat dissipating and reducing leaf photosynthetic area and leaf light-captured pigment contents. In terms of the influence of sediment amelioration by soil exchange on the growth and

  18. Quantitative structure-activity relationship for the cleavage of C3/C4-substituted catechols by a prototypal extradiol catechol dioxygenase with broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Horiike, Kihachiro

    2004-06-01

    Catechol 2,3-dioxygenase [EC 1.13.11.2] from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 (Mpc) catalyzes the extradiol cleavage of catechol to produce 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde. The K(m) values for the catecholic substrate (K(mA)) and O(2) (K(mO2)), and catalytic constants (k(cat)) were kinetically determined for eight C3/C4-substituted catechols at 25 degrees C and pH 6.5 or 7.5. The first pK(a) values (pK(1)) were determined for eleven catechols (pK(1) = 7.26-9.47), correlated with Hammett substituent constants, and electron-withdrawing substituents significantly stabilized the monoanionic species of free catechols. Mpc preferred catechols with non-ionic substituents at the C3 or C4 position. 3-Phenylcatechol, a biphenyl, was cleaved, while 4-tert-butylcatechol was not. The logarithm of k(cat)/K(mA) (substrate specificity constant) exhibited a good linear correlation with pK(1), with the exception of those for 4-halocatechols. The logarithm of k(cat)/K(mO2) showed a good linear correlation with pK(1), with the exception of that of 3-phenylcatechol. These results demonstrate that catechol binding to the Mpc active site, the following O(2) binding, and the activation of the bound O(2) are all sensitive to electronic effects of the substituents. However, k(cat) did not correlate significantly with pK(1). The present study distinguishes clearly between the electronic and the steric effects of catecholic substrates in the reactivity of Mpc, and provides important insight into the mechanistic basis for a vast range of substrate specificities of extradiol dioxygenases.

  19. Influence of catalyst droplet diameter on the growth direction of InP nanowires grown on Si(001) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, K.; Saint-Girons, G.; Penuelas, J.; Patriarche, G.; Largeau, L.; Dumont, H.; Rojo-Romeo, P.; Gendry, M.

    2013-06-01

    It is demonstrated that the growth direction of InP nanowires grown on (001)-oriented silicon substrate strongly depends on the diameter of the gold catalyst droplets. Small droplets with diameter less than about 15 nm lead to the formation of nanowires leaning on the {111} planes of the zinc blende InP seeds formed in the early stages of growth. Larger droplets lead to the formation of twins in the InP seeds and to the formation of nanowires leaning on the {111} planes of these twinned InP variants, inducing growth directions corresponding to the <115> directions of the silicon substrate.

  20. Deposition of AlN on WS{sub 2} (0001) substrate by atomic layer growth process

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J.W.; Ohuchi, F.S.

    1997-12-31

    Close proximity of the lattice constant for tungsten disulfide and aluminum nitride has lead to an investigation to use WS{sub 2} as a potential substrate for the growth of AlN. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) has been developed to fabricated WS{sub 2} thin films on Si(001) with their basal planes parallel to the substrate. AlN thin film was subsequently grown by atomic layer growth (ALG) process using dimethylamine-alane (DMEAA) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}). Deposition conditions for WS2 thin films by MOCVD, and AlN growth on WS2 by ALG are described.

  1. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke

    2015-02-23

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50–200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10–50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs.

  2. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke

    2015-02-01

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50-200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10-50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs.

  3. Selective area growth of GaN on trench-patterned nonpolar bulk GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Shunsuke; Iwai, Hiroki; Miyake, Hideto; Hiramatsu, Kazumasa

    2017-06-01

    Selective area growth of GaN (SAG-GaN) films grown on nonpolar m-plane bulk GaN substrates using trench patterns was performed by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. We investigated the transformation of SAG-GaN facet structures by changing growth temperature, ambient, and miscut angle of substrates. Substrates with trench patterns along a-axis formed (10-11), (10-10), and (000-1) facet structures after SAG-GaN growth for growth conditions of 800 °C in N2+NH3 and 1000 °C in H2+NH3 ambience. Those with trench pattern along 45° off from a-axis contained (11-22), (10-10), (0-110) facet structures in substrates with a miscut angle of 5° whereas SAG-GaN films completely coalesced and formed smooth (10-10) surface in substrates with a miscut angle of 1°. Undesirable grains were formed for 800 °C in N2+NH3 ambience regardless of the miscut angle of substrates whereas theses grains were annihilated using 1000 °C in H2+NH3 ambience due to the intensively hydrogen etching.

  4. GaAs buffer layer technique for vertical nanowire growth on Si substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiaoqing Parizi, Kokab B.; Huo, Yijie; Kang, Yangsen; Philip Wong, H.-S.; Li, Yang

    2014-02-24

    Gold catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid method is widely applied to III–V nanowire (NW) growth on Si substrate. However, the easy oxidation of Si, possible Si contamination in the NWs, high defect density in the NWs, and high sensitivity of the NW morphology to growth conditions largely limit its controllability. In this work, we developed a buffer layer technique by introducing a GaAs thin film with predefined polarity as a template. It is found that samples grown on these buffer layers all have high vertical NW yields in general, due to the single-orientation of the buffer layers. Low temperature buffer with smoother surface leads to highest yield of vertical NWs, while high temperature (HT) buffer with better crystallinity results in perfect NW quality. The defect-free property we observed here is very promising for optoelectronic device applications based on GaAs NW. Moreover, the buffer layers can eliminate Si contamination by preventing Si-Au alloy formation and by increasing the thickness of the Si diffusion barrier, thus providing more flexibility to vertical NW growth. The buffer layer technique we demonstrated here could be easily extended to other III-V on Si system for electronic and photonic applications.

  5. Solid-support substrates for plant growth at a lunar base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, D. W.; Galindo, C.; Henninger, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    Zeoponics is only in its developmental stages at the Johnson Space Center and is defined as the cultivation of plants in zeolite substrates that contain several essential plant growth cations on their exchange sites, and have minor amounts of mineral phases and/or anion-exchange resins that supply essential plant growth anions. Zeolites are hydrated aluminosilicates of alkali and alkaline earth cations with the ability to exchange most of their constituent exchange cations as well as hydrate/dehydrate without change to their structural framework. Because zeolites have extremely high cation exchange capabilities, they are very attractive media for plant growth. It is possible to partially or fully saturate plant-essential cations on zeolites. Zeoponic systems will probably have their greatest applications at planetary bases (e.g., lunar bases). Lunar raw materials will have to be located that are suited for the synthesis of zeolites and other exchange resings. Lunar 'soil' simulants have been or are being prepared for zeolite/smectite synthesis and 'soil' dissolution studies.

  6. Short-Term Effects of Grade Retention on the Growth Rate of Woodcock-Johnson III Broad Math and Reading Scores

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; West, Stephen G.; Hughes, Jan N.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effects of grade retention in first grade on the growth of the Woodcock-Johnson broad mathematics and reading scores over three years using linear growth curve modeling on an academically at-risk sample. A large sample (n = 784) of first grade children who were at risk for retention were initially identified based on low literacy scores. Scores representing propensity for retention were constructed based on 72 variables collected in comprehensive baseline testing in first grade. We closely matched 97 pairs of retained and promoted children based on their propensity scores using optimal matching procedures. This procedure adjusted for baseline differences between the retained and promoted children. We found that grade retention decreased the growth rate of mathematical skills but had no significant effect on reading skills. In addition, several potential moderators of the effect of retention on growth of mathematical and reading skills were identified including limited English language proficiency and children's conduct problems. PMID:19083352

  7. Growth and characterization of epitaxial aluminum layers on gallium-arsenide substrates for superconducting quantum bits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournet, J.; Gosselink, D.; Miao, G.-X.; Jaikissoon, M.; Langenberg, D.; McConkey, T. G.; Mariantoni, M.; Wasilewski, Z. R.

    2016-06-01

    The quest for a universal quantum computer has renewed interest in the growth of superconducting materials on semiconductor substrates. High-quality superconducting thin films will make it possible to improve the coherence time of superconducting quantum bits (qubits), i.e., to extend the time a qubit can store the amplitude and phase of a quantum state. The electrical losses in superconducting qubits highly depend on the quality of the metal layers the qubits are made from. Here, we report on the epitaxy of single-crystal Al (011) layers on GaAs (001) substrates. Layers with 110 nm thickness were deposited by means of molecular beam epitaxy at low temperature and monitored by in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction performed simultaneously at four azimuths. The single-crystal nature of the layers was confirmed by ex situ high-resolution x-ray diffraction. Differential interference contrast and atomic force microscopy analysis of the sample’s surface revealed a featureless surface with root mean square roughness of 0.55 nm. A detailed in situ study allowed us to gain insight into the nucleation mechanisms of Al layers on GaAs, highlighting the importance of GaAs surface reconstruction in determining the final Al layer crystallographic orientation and quality. A highly uniform and stable GaAs (001)-(2× 4) reconstruction reproducibly led to a pure Al (011) phase, while an arsenic-rich GaAs (001)-(4× 4) reconstruction yielded polycrystalline films with an Al (111) dominant orientation. The near-atomic smoothness and single-crystal character of Al films on GaAs, in combination with the ability to trench GaAs substrates, could set a new standard for the fabrication of superconducting qubits.

  8. Custom fabrication of biomass containment devices using 3-D printing enables bacterial growth analyses with complex insoluble substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Cassandra E.; Beri, Nina R.; Gardner, Jeffrey G.

    2016-09-21

    Physiological studies of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation are challenging for several reasons, one of which is the difficulty in obtaining a reproducibly accurate real-time measurement of bacterial growth using insoluble substrates. Current methods suffer from several problems including (i) high background noise due to the insoluble material interspersed with cells, (ii) high consumable and reagent cost and (iii) significant time delay between sampling and data acquisition. A customizable substrate and cell separation device would provide an option to study bacterial growth using optical density measurements. To test this hypothesis we used 3-D printing to create biomass containment devices that allow interaction between insoluble substrates and microbial cells but do not interfere with spectrophotometer measurements. Evaluation of materials available for 3-D printing indicated that UV-cured acrylic plastic was the best material, being superior to nylon or stainless steel when examined for heat tolerance, reactivity, and ability to be sterilized. Cost analysis of the 3-D printed devices indicated they are a competitive way to quantitate bacterial growth compared to viable cell counting or protein measurements, and experimental conditions were scalable over a 100-fold range. The presence of the devices did not alter growth phenotypes when using either soluble substrates or insoluble substrates. Furthermore, we applied biomass containment to characterize growth of Cellvibrio japonicus on authentic lignocellulose (non-pretreated corn stover), and found physiological evidence that xylan is a significant nutritional source despite an abundance of cellulose present.

  9. Custom fabrication of biomass containment devices using 3-D printing enables bacterial growth analyses with complex insoluble substrates

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Cassandra E.; Beri, Nina R.; Gardner, Jeffrey G.

    2016-09-21

    Physiological studies of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation are challenging for several reasons, one of which is the difficulty in obtaining a reproducibly accurate real-time measurement of bacterial growth using insoluble substrates. Current methods suffer from several problems including (i) high background noise due to the insoluble material interspersed with cells, (ii) high consumable and reagent cost and (iii) significant time delay between sampling and data acquisition. A customizable substrate and cell separation device would provide an option to study bacterial growth using optical density measurements. To test this hypothesis we used 3-D printing to create biomass containment devices that allow interactionmore » between insoluble substrates and microbial cells but do not interfere with spectrophotometer measurements. Evaluation of materials available for 3-D printing indicated that UV-cured acrylic plastic was the best material, being superior to nylon or stainless steel when examined for heat tolerance, reactivity, and ability to be sterilized. Cost analysis of the 3-D printed devices indicated they are a competitive way to quantitate bacterial growth compared to viable cell counting or protein measurements, and experimental conditions were scalable over a 100-fold range. The presence of the devices did not alter growth phenotypes when using either soluble substrates or insoluble substrates. Furthermore, we applied biomass containment to characterize growth of Cellvibrio japonicus on authentic lignocellulose (non-pretreated corn stover), and found physiological evidence that xylan is a significant nutritional source despite an abundance of cellulose present.« less

  10. Custom fabrication of biomass containment devices using 3-D printing enables bacterial growth analyses with complex insoluble substrates.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Cassandra E; Beri, Nina R; Gardner, Jeffrey G

    2016-11-01

    Physiological studies of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation are challenging for several reasons, one of which is the difficulty in obtaining a reproducibly accurate real-time measurement of bacterial growth using insoluble substrates. Current methods suffer from several problems including (i) high background noise due to the insoluble material interspersed with cells, (ii) high consumable and reagent cost and (iii) significant time delay between sampling and data acquisition. A customizable substrate and cell separation device would provide an option to study bacterial growth using optical density measurements. To test this hypothesis we used 3-D printing to create biomass containment devices that allow interaction between insoluble substrates and microbial cells but do not interfere with spectrophotometer measurements. Evaluation of materials available for 3-D printing indicated that UV-cured acrylic plastic was the best material, being superior to nylon or stainless steel when examined for heat tolerance, reactivity, and ability to be sterilized. Cost analysis of the 3-D printed devices indicated they are a competitive way to quantitate bacterial growth compared to viable cell counting or protein measurements, and experimental conditions were scalable over a 100-fold range. The presence of the devices did not alter growth phenotypes when using either soluble substrates or insoluble substrates. We applied biomass containment to characterize growth of Cellvibrio japonicus on authentic lignocellulose (non-pretreated corn stover), and found physiological evidence that xylan is a significant nutritional source despite an abundance of cellulose present. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of graphene oxide ratio on the cell adhesion and growth behavior on a graphene oxide-coated silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jin-Tak; Choi, Mun-Ki; Sim, Yumin; Lim, Jung-Taek; Kim, Gil-Sung; Seong, Maeng-Je; Hyung, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Keun Soo; Umar, Ahmad; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2016-09-01

    Control of living cells on biocompatible materials or on modified substrates is important for the development of bio-applications, including biosensors and implant biomaterials. The topography and hydrophobicity of substrates highly affect cell adhesion, growth, and cell growth kinetics, which is of great importance in bio-applications. Herein, we investigate the adhesion, growth, and morphology of cultured breast cancer cells on a silicon substrate, on which graphene oxides (GO) was partially formed. By minimizing the size and amount of the GO-containing solution and the further annealing process, GO-coated Si samples were prepared which partially covered the Si substrates. The coverage of GO on Si samples decreases upon annealing. The behaviors of cells cultured on two samples have been observed, i.e. partially GO-coated Si (P-GO) and annealed partially GO-coated Si (Annealed p-GO), with a different coverage of GO. Indeed, the spreading area covered by the cells and the number of cells for a given culture period in the incubator were highly dependent on the hydrophobicity and the presence of oxygenated groups on GO and Si substrates, suggesting hydrophobicity-driven cell growth. Thus, the presented method can be used to control the cell growth via an appropriate surface modification.

  12. Effect of graphene oxide ratio on the cell adhesion and growth behavior on a graphene oxide-coated silicon substrate

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jin-Tak; Choi, Mun-Ki; Sim, Yumin; Lim, Jung-Taek; Kim, Gil-Sung; Seong, Maeng-Je; Hyung, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Keun Soo; Umar, Ahmad; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Control of living cells on biocompatible materials or on modified substrates is important for the development of bio-applications, including biosensors and implant biomaterials. The topography and hydrophobicity of substrates highly affect cell adhesion, growth, and cell growth kinetics, which is of great importance in bio-applications. Herein, we investigate the adhesion, growth, and morphology of cultured breast cancer cells on a silicon substrate, on which graphene oxides (GO) was partially formed. By minimizing the size and amount of the GO-containing solution and the further annealing process, GO-coated Si samples were prepared which partially covered the Si substrates. The coverage of GO on Si samples decreases upon annealing. The behaviors of cells cultured on two samples have been observed, i.e. partially GO-coated Si (P-GO) and annealed partially GO-coated Si (Annealed p-GO), with a different coverage of GO. Indeed, the spreading area covered by the cells and the number of cells for a given culture period in the incubator were highly dependent on the hydrophobicity and the presence of oxygenated groups on GO and Si substrates, suggesting hydrophobicity-driven cell growth. Thus, the presented method can be used to control the cell growth via an appropriate surface modification. PMID:27652886

  13. Effect of substrate component on the growth and survival of juvenile sunray surf clam ( Mactra chinensis Philippi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuekai; Li, Zhuang; Huo, Zhongming; Yan, Xiwu; Yang, Feng; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Xingzhi

    2016-08-01

    Substrate is a critical environmental factor affecting the activity of bivalves. To examine the effect of the substrate component on the growth and survival of juvenile sunray surf clam ( Mactra chinensis Philippi), a series of short-term experiments were conducted using a variety of substrates with different ratios of sand to mud. The experimental group cultured without substrate showed poor survival, with all juveniles died after day 20. The juveniles cultured in mud without sand showed a lower survival rate (25.54% ± 0.40% on day 45) than those in other groups. The juveniles cultured in sand without mud, or the mixtures of sand and mud with a ratio of 1:1 and 2:1, respectively, exhibited modest survival at day 45. Maximal weight gain rate ( WGR), shell length growth rate ( LGR), and specific growth rate ( SGR) were observed when the sand concentration was 61.97%, 77.69%, and 64.64%, respectively. As the fast growth and high survival were observed when the sand to mud ratio was 1:1 (50% sand) and 2:1 (67% sand), a sand concentration of more than 50% is optimal. The optimal concentration of sand in the substrate for rearing juvenile sunray surf clams was 67% which resulted in the fastest growth and highest survival. These results can be used to developing a nursery/farming technique of improving the yield of sunray surf clams.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell growth behavior on micro/nano hierarchical surfaces of titanium substrates.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinkun; Ma, Pingping; Hu, Yan; Xu, Gaoqiang; Zhou, Jun; Cai, Kaiyong

    2015-03-01

    Surface topography of an orthopedic implant plays an essential role in the regulation of bone formation with surrounding bone tissue. To investigate the effects of surface topography of titanium (Ti) substrates on cellular behavior of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), a series of micro/nano hierarchical structures were fabricated onto micro-structured titanium (Micro-Ti) substrates via a sol-gel method with spin-coat technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface profiler, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle measurement were employed to certify the successful fabrication of micro/nano hierarchical structures with the presence of various nano-sized TiO2 grains (20 nm, 40 nm and 80 nm, respectively) onto micro-structured surfaces. The formation mechanism of the micro/nano hierarchical structures was proposed. Moreover, the effects of those hierarchical structures on the growth behavior of MSCs were evaluated both on cellular and molecular levels in vitro. The results confirmed that micro/nano hierarchical structures with large grains (80 nm) greatly promoted the proliferation and differentiation of MSCs comparing with other small grains (20 nm and 40 nm). The study provides an alternative for the fabrication of hierarchically structured Ti implants for potential orthopedic application.

  15. Engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for growth and succinate production from levoglucosan, a pyrolytic sugar substrate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Um, Youngsoon; Bott, Michael; Woo, Han Min

    2015-10-01

    Thermochemical processing provides continuous production of bio-oils from lignocellulosic biomass. Levoglucosan, a pyrolytic sugar substrate C6H10O5 in a bio-oil, has been used for ethanol production using engineered Escherichia coli. Here we provide the first example for succinate production from levoglucosan with Corynebacterium glutamicum, a well-known industrial amino acid producer. Heterologous expression of a gene encoding a sugar kinase from Lipomyces starkeyi, Gibberella zeae or Pseudomonas aeruginosa was employed for levoglucosan conversion in C. glutamicum because the wild type was unable to utilize levoglucosan as sole carbon source. As result, expression of a levoglucosan kinase (LGK) of L. starkeyi only enabled growth with levoglucosan as sole carbon source in CgXII minimal medium by catalyzing conversion of levoglucosan to glucose-6-phosphate. Subsequently, the lgk gene was expressed in an aerobic succinate producer of C. glutamicum, strain BL-1. The recombinant strain showed a higher succinate yield (0.25 g g(-1)) from 2% (w/v) levoglucosan than the reference strain BL-1 from 2% (w/v) glucose (0.19 g g(-1)), confirming that levoglucosan is an attractive carbon substrate for C. glutamicum producer strains. In summary, we demonstrated that a pyrolytic sugar could be a potential carbon source for microbial cell factories. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Some Like It Flat: Decoupled h-BN Monolayer Substrates for Aligned Graphene Growth.

    PubMed

    Roth, Silvan; Greber, Thomas; Osterwalder, Jürg

    2016-12-27

    On the path to functional graphene electronics, suitable templates for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of high-mobility graphene are of great interest. Among various substrates, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has established itself as one of the most promising candidates. The nanomesh, a h-BN monolayer grown on the Rh(111) surface where the lattice mismatch of h-BN and rhodium leads to a characteristic corrugation of h-BN, offers an interesting graphene/h-BN interface, different from flat graphene/h-BN systems hitherto studied. In this report, we describe a two-step CVD process for graphene formation on h-BN/Rh(111) at millibar pressures and describe the influence of the surface texture on the CVD process. During a first exposure to the 3-pentanone precursor, carbon atoms are incorporated in the rhodium subsurface, which leads to decoupling of the h-BN layer from the Rh(111) surface. This is reflected in the electronic band structure, where the corrugation-induced splitting of the h-BN bands vanishes. In a second 3-pentanone exposure, a graphene layer is formed on the flat h-BN layer, evidenced by the appearance of the characteristic linear dispersion of its π band. The graphene layer grows incommensurate and highly oriented. The formation of graphene/h-BN on rhodium opens the door to scalable production of well-aligned heterostacks since single-crystalline thin-film Rh substrates are available in large dimensions.

  17. Current Trends in Bioethanol Production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Substrate, Inhibitor Reduction, Growth Variables, Coculture, and Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Tesfaw, Asmamaw; Assefa, Fassil

    2014-01-01

    Bioethanol is one of the most commonly used biofuels in transportation sector to reduce greenhouse gases. S. cerevisiae is the most employed yeast for ethanol production at industrial level though ethanol is produced by an array of other yeasts, bacteria, and fungi. This paper reviews the current and nonmolecular trends in ethanol production using S. cerevisiae. Ethanol has been produced from wide range of substrates such as molasses, starch based substrate, sweet sorghum cane extract, lignocellulose, and other wastes. The inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates can be reduced by repeated sequential fermentation, treatment with reducing agents and activated charcoal, overliming, anion exchanger, evaporation, enzymatic treatment with peroxidase and laccase, in situ detoxification by fermenting microbes, and different extraction methods. Coculturing S. cerevisiae with other yeasts or microbes is targeted to optimize ethanol production, shorten fermentation time, and reduce process cost. Immobilization of yeast cells has been considered as potential alternative for enhancing ethanol productivity, because immobilizing yeasts reduce risk of contamination, make the separation of cell mass from the bulk liquid easy, retain stability of cell activities, minimize production costs, enable biocatalyst recycling, reduce fermentation time, and protect the cells from inhibitors. The effects of growth variables of the yeast and supplementation of external nitrogen sources on ethanol optimization are also reviewed.

  18. Current Trends in Bioethanol Production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Substrate, Inhibitor Reduction, Growth Variables, Coculture, and Immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Assefa, Fassil

    2014-01-01

    Bioethanol is one of the most commonly used biofuels in transportation sector to reduce greenhouse gases. S. cerevisiae is the most employed yeast for ethanol production at industrial level though ethanol is produced by an array of other yeasts, bacteria, and fungi. This paper reviews the current and nonmolecular trends in ethanol production using S. cerevisiae. Ethanol has been produced from wide range of substrates such as molasses, starch based substrate, sweet sorghum cane extract, lignocellulose, and other wastes. The inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates can be reduced by repeated sequential fermentation, treatment with reducing agents and activated charcoal, overliming, anion exchanger, evaporation, enzymatic treatment with peroxidase and laccase, in situ detoxification by fermenting microbes, and different extraction methods. Coculturing S. cerevisiae with other yeasts or microbes is targeted to optimize ethanol production, shorten fermentation time, and reduce process cost. Immobilization of yeast cells has been considered as potential alternative for enhancing ethanol productivity, because immobilizing yeasts reduce risk of contamination, make the separation of cell mass from the bulk liquid easy, retain stability of cell activities, minimize production costs, enable biocatalyst recycling, reduce fermentation time, and protect the cells from inhibitors. The effects of growth variables of the yeast and supplementation of external nitrogen sources on ethanol optimization are also reviewed. PMID:27379305

  19. Characterization of new exopolysaccharide production by Rhizobium tropici during growth on hydrocarbon substrate.

    PubMed

    Castellane, Tereza Cristina Luque; Campanharo, João Carlos; Colnago, Luiz Alberto; Coutinho, Isabel Duarte; Lopes, Érica Mendes; Lemos, Manoel Victor Franco; de Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes

    2017-03-01

    Exopolysaccharide (EPS) are produced by a diverse of rhizobia species and has been demonstrated to be a bioemulsifier with potential applications in the degradation of hydrocarbons. In the present study, attempts were made to obtain the new exopolysaccharide production by Rhizobium tropici (SEMIA 4080 and MUTZC3) strains during growth on hydrocarbon substrate. Under the different cultivation conditions, the high molecular weight exopolysaccharides from Rhizobium tropici strains cultivated for 96h mainly consisted of carbohydrates (79-85%) and a low percentage of protein. The EPSC3-D differed from the others, with only 60% of carbohydrate. However, all strains produced polymers with distinct rheology properties, such as viscosity of each EPS sample, suitable for different applications. In addition, RP-HPLC, FTIR and NMR studies revealed EPS produced by rhizobia strains were similar indicating minimal difference between EPS compositions.

  20. Simulation of Epitaxial Growth of DNA-nanoparticle Superlattices on Pre-patterned Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Saijie; Li, Ting; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2015-03-01

    DNA self-assembly is a well-developed approach towards the construction of a great variety of nanoarchitectures. E-beam lithography is widely used for high-resolution nanoscale patterning. Recently, a new technique combining the two methods was developed to epitaxially grow DNA-mediated nanoparticle superlattices on a pre-patterned surface. Here we use multi-scale simulations to study and predict the formation and defects of the absorbed superlattice monolayer. We demonstrate that the epitaxial growth is enthalpy driven and show that the anisotropy of the DNA-mediated substrates leads to structure defects. We develop design rules to dramatically reduce defects of the attached layer. Ultimately, with the assist of our simulation, this technique will open the door for the construction of well-ordered, three-dimensional novel metamaterials. This work was supported by the the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) FA9550-11-1-0275.

  1. Direct growth of graphene on quartz substrate as saturable absorber for femtosecond solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S. C.; Man, B. Y.; Jiang, S. Z.; Chen, C. S.; Liu, M.; Yang, C.; Gao, S. B.; Feng, D. J.; Hu, G. D.; Huang, Q. J.; Chen, X. F.; Zhang, C.

    2014-08-01

    We present a novel method for the direct metal-free growth of graphene on quartz substrate. The direct-grown graphene yields excellent nonlinear saturable absorption properties and is demonstrated to be suitable as a saturable absorber (SA) for an ultrafast solid-state laser. Nearly Fourier-limited 367 fs was obtained at a central wavelength of 1048 nm with a repetition rate of 105.7 MHz. At a pump power of 7.95 W, the average output power was 1.93 W and the highest pulse energy reached 18.3 nJ, with a peak power of 49.8 kW. Our work opens an easy route for making a reliable graphene SA with a mode-locking technique and also displays an exciting prospect in making low-cost and ultrafast lasers.

  2. Aerobic degradation of trichloroethylene by co-metabolism using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Bing; Wang, Cui-Ping; Fan, Jun-Zhao; Sun, Hong-Wen

    2014-05-22

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common groundwater contaminant of toxic and carcinogenic concern. Aerobic co-metabolic processes are the predominant pathways for TCE complete degradation. In this study, Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied as the active microorganism to degrade TCE under aerobic condition by co-metabolic degradation using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates. Operating conditions influencing TCE degradation efficiency were optimized. TCE co-metabolic degradation rate reached the maximum of 80% under the optimized conditions of degradation time of 3 days, initial OD600 of microorganism culture of 0.14 (1.26×10⁷ cell/mL), initial phenol concentration of 100 mg/L, initial TCE concentration of 0.1 mg/L, pH of 6.0, and salinity of 0.1%. The modified transformation capacity and transformation yield were 20 μg (TCE)/mg (biomass) and 5.1 μg (TCE)/mg (phenol), respectively. Addition of nutrient broth promoted TCE degradation with phenol as growth substrate. It was revealed that catechol 1,2-dioxygenase played an important role in TCE co-metabolism. The dechlorination of TCE was complete, and less chlorinated products were not detected at the end of the experiment. TCE could also be co-metabolized in the presence of gasoline; however, the degradation rate was not high (28%). When phenol was introduced into the system of TCE and gasoline, TCE and gasoline could be removed at substantial rates (up to 59% and 69%, respectively). This study provides a promising approach for the removal of combined pollution of TCE and gasoline.

  3. [Physical and chemical effects and plant growth suitability of substrates in subsurface flow wetland].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Xu; Li, Guang-he; Zhang, Hong-tao

    2006-05-01

    Substrate, which not only takes part in the pollutant-removing, but influences the plant growth, plays an important role in subsurface flow wetland. With X-ray fluorescence measurement and X-ray diffractometer, the elements and minerals in zeolite and shale were confirmed, and the removal mechanics of nitrogen, phosphate and hydrogen ion in substrates were explained respectively. The investigation show that the zeolite has abounded with micropores and mesopores, while the shale has only mesopores, which causes the NH4+ -N adsorption capability of the shale is less than zeolite. The PO4(3-) -P removal and hydrogen ion buffer capacity of shale are greater than those of zeolite because CaCO3 is one of the main contents of shale. In pilot-plant system to treat starch waste water, the reeds and acorus aclamuc were either planted in shale and zeolite, and the phytum's indexes in shale including relative green concentration, average plant height, root stem ratio were higher than those in zeolite. The root vitality of reeds and acorus aclamuc planted in shale were 3.7 and 1.6 times of those in zeolite respectively. Total nitrogen and phosphorus contents in the plant organization of acorus aclamuc in shale were 7.8 and 3.4 times of those in zeolite; total nitrogen and phosphorus contents in the plant organization of reeds in shale were 3.3 and 2.2 times of those in zeolite. The results indicate that shale provides a steady pH for the plant's root in the acid waste water and it is more suitable for plant growth than zeolite.

  4. Aerobic Degradation of Trichloroethylene by Co-Metabolism Using Phenol and Gasoline as Growth Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Bing; Wang, Cui-Ping; Fan, Jun-Zhao; Sun, Hong-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common groundwater contaminant of toxic and carcinogenic concern. Aerobic co-metabolic processes are the predominant pathways for TCE complete degradation. In this study, Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied as the active microorganism to degrade TCE under aerobic condition by co-metabolic degradation using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates. Operating conditions influencing TCE degradation efficiency were optimized. TCE co-metabolic degradation rate reached the maximum of 80% under the optimized conditions of degradation time of 3 days, initial OD600 of microorganism culture of 0.14 (1.26 × 107 cell/mL), initial phenol concentration of 100 mg/L, initial TCE concentration of 0.1 mg/L, pH of 6.0, and salinity of 0.1%. The modified transformation capacity and transformation yield were 20 μg (TCE)/mg (biomass) and 5.1 μg (TCE)/mg (phenol), respectively. Addition of nutrient broth promoted TCE degradation with phenol as growth substrate. It was revealed that catechol 1,2-dioxygenase played an important role in TCE co-metabolism. The dechlorination of TCE was complete, and less chlorinated products were not detected at the end of the experiment. TCE could also be co-metabolized in the presence of gasoline; however, the degradation rate was not high (28%). When phenol was introduced into the system of TCE and gasoline, TCE and gasoline could be removed at substantial rates (up to 59% and 69%, respectively). This study provides a promising approach for the removal of combined pollution of TCE and gasoline. PMID:24857922

  5. Growth of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes on anisotropically etched silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orofeo, Carlo M.; Ago, Hiroki; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Takahasi, Koji; Tsuji, Masaharu

    2010-09-01

    Directional controllability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is an important issue for future nanoelectronics applications. For direct integration of carbon nanotubes with modern electronics, aligned growth of carbon nanotubes on SiO2/Si is desirable. We developed a new method to horizontally align SWNTs directly on SiO2/Si substrate by creating trenches on Si(100) through anisotropic etching followed by thermal oxidation. The V-shaped trenches highly improved the alignment of SWNTs and the degree of alignment is comparable to the step-templated alignment of carbon nanotubes on crystals. The trenches also improved the density of aligned nanotubes due to the combination of ``trench-guided'' and gas-flow guided alignment. Our new insights on carbon nanotube alignment on SiO2/Si will greatly contribute to future large-scale nanoelectronic applications.Directional controllability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is an important issue for future nanoelectronics applications. For direct integration of carbon nanotubes with modern electronics, aligned growth of carbon nanotubes on SiO2/Si is desirable. We developed a new method to horizontally align SWNTs directly on SiO2/Si substrate by creating trenches on Si(100) through anisotropic etching followed by thermal oxidation. The V-shaped trenches highly improved the alignment of SWNTs and the degree of alignment is comparable to the step-templated alignment of carbon nanotubes on crystals. The trenches also improved the density of aligned nanotubes due to the combination of ``trench-guided'' and gas-flow guided alignment. Our new insights on carbon nanotube alignment on SiO2/Si will greatly contribute to future large-scale nanoelectronic applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SEM images of SWNTs grown under different CVD conditions. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00170h

  6. Zeoponic Plant Growth Substrate Development at the Johnson Space Center and Possible Use at a Martian Outpost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruener, John E.; Ming, Douglas W.

    2000-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) is developing a substrate, termed zeoponics, that will slowly release all of the essential nutrients into solution for plant growth experiments in advanced life support system testbeds. This substrate is also potentially useful in the near future on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station and could eventually be used at an outpost on Mars. Chemical analyses of the Martian soil by the Viking and Mars Pathfinder missions have indicated that several of the elements required for plant growth are available in the soil. It may be possible to use the martian soil as the bulk substrate for growing food crops, while using smaller amounts of zeoponic substrate as an amendment to rectify any nutrient deficiencies.

  7. Effect of doped substrates on the growth of GaAs nanowires via metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Peng, Yan; Guo, Jingwei; La, Dongsheng; Xu, Zhaopeng; Wang, Haiyan

    2017-08-01

    Vertical GaAs nanowires were grown on different doped substrates via Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition by catalyst assisted vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. It is found that both n and p type doped substrates affect catalyst distribution during the formation of alloy catalysts. The catalyst density decreases with an increase in the doping concentration of the substrates. In the growth of GaAs nanowires, the growth rate, which is mostly determined by the atoms diffusion from the pyrolysis of precursors on the surface of nanowires and substrates, is proportional to the catalyst densities. Moreover, the structures of as-grown nanowires are all pure zinc blende without any defects. These results will be valuable for the applications of nanowire-based optical and electrical devices.

  8. Nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Van Der Hofstadt, M; Hüttener, M; Juárez, A; Gomila, G

    2015-07-01

    With the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM), the Nanomicrobiology field has advanced drastically. Due to the complexity of imaging living bacterial processes in their natural growing environments, improvements have come to a standstill. Here we show the in situ nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of single bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope. To achieve this, we minimized the lateral shear forces responsible for the detachment of weakly adsorbed bacteria on planar substrates with the use of the so called dynamic jumping mode with very soft cantilever probes. With this approach, gentle imaging conditions can be maintained for long periods of time, enabling the continuous imaging of the bacterial cell growth and division, even on planar substrates. Present results offer the possibility to observe living processes of untrapped bacteria weakly attached to planar substrates.

  9. Growth and characterization of large, high quality single crystal diamond substrates via microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nad, Shreya

    Single crystal diamond (SCD) substrates can be utilized in a wide range of applications. Important issues in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of such substrates include: shrinking of the SCD substrate area, stress and cracking, high defect density and hence low electronic quality and low optical quality due to high nitrogen impurities. The primary objective of this thesis is to begin to address these issues and to find possible solutions for enhancing the substrate dimensions and simultaneously improving the quality of the grown substrates. The deposition of SCD substrates is carried out in a microwave cavity plasma reactor via the microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. The operation of the reactor was first optimized to determine the safe and efficient operating regime. By adjusting the matching of the reactor cavity with the help of four internal tuning length variables, the system was further matched to operate at a maximum overall microwave coupling efficiency of ˜ 98%. Even with adjustments in the substrate holder position, the reactor remains well matched with a coupling efficiency of ˜ 95% indicating good experimental performance over a wide range of operating conditions. SCD substrates were synthesized at a high pressure of 240 Torr and with a high absorbed power density of 500 W/cm3. To counter the issue of shrinking substrate size during growth, the effect of different substrate holder designs was studied. An increase in the substrate dimensions (1.23 -- 2.5 times) after growth was achieved when the sides of the seeds were shielded from the intense microwave electromagnetic fields in a pocket holder design. Using such pocket holders, high growth rates of 16 -- 32 mum/hr were obtained for growth times of 8 -- 72 hours. The polycrystalline diamond rim deposition was minimized/eliminated from these growth runs, hence successfully enlarging the substrate size. Several synthesized CVD SCD substrates were laser cut and separated

  10. Tolerance of GaAs as an original substrate for HVPE growth of free standing GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Mio; Sato, T.; Suemasu, T.; Hasegawa, F.

    2004-09-01

    In order to investigate possibility of thick GaN growth on a GaAs substrate by halide vapar phase epitaxy (HVPE), GaN was grown on GaAs(111)/Ti wafer with Ti deposited by E-gun. It was found that surface treatment of the GaAs substrate by HF solution deteriorated greatly the tolerence of GaAs and that Ti can protected GaAs from erosion by NH3. By depositing Ti on GaAs(111)A surface, a millor-like GaN layer could be grown at 1000 °C for 1 hour without serious deterioration of the original GaAs substrate. By increasing the growth rate, a thick free standing GaN will be obtained with GaAs as an original substrate in near future.

  11. Growth characteristics of different heart cells on novel nanopatch substrate during electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Stout, David A; Raimondo, Emilia; Marostica, Giuliano; Webster, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    During a heart attack, the heart's oxygen supply is cut off, and cardiomyocytes perish. Unfortunately, once these tissues are lost, they cannot be replaced and results in cardiovascular disease-the leading cause of deaths worldwide. Advancements in medical research have been targeted to understand and combat the death of these cardiomyocytes. For example, new research (in vitro) has demonstrated that one can expand cardiomyocyte adhesion and proliferation using polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) (50:50 (weight percent)) supplemented with carbon nanofibers (CNFs) to create a cardiovascular patch. However, the examination of other cardiovascular cell types has not been investigated. Therefore, the purpose of this present in vitro study was to determine cell growth characteristics of three different important cardiovascular cell types (aortic endothelial, fibroblast and cardiomyocyte) onto the substrate. Cells were seeded onto different PLGA:CNF ratio composites to determine if CNF density has an effect on cell growth, both in static and electrically stimulated environments. During continuous electrical stimulation (rectangle, 2 nm, 5 V/cm, 1 Hz), cardiomyocyte cell density increased in comparison to its static counterparts after 24, 72 and 120 hours. A minor rise in Troponin I excretion in electrical stimulation compared to static conditions indicated nominal cardiomyocyte cell function during cell experiments. Endothelial and fibroblast cell growth experiments indicated the material hindered or stalled proliferation during both static and electrical stimulation experiments, thus supporting the growth of cardiomyocytes onto the dead tissue zone. Furthermore, the results specified that CNF density did have an effect on PLGA:CNF composite cytocompatibility properties with the best results coming from the 50:50 [PLGA:CNF (weight percent:weight percent)] composite. Therefore, this study provides further evidence that a conductive scaffold using nanotechnology should be

  12. Galvanic-cell-induced growth of Ag nanosheet-assembled structures as sensitive and reproducible SERS substrates.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongbo; Meng, Guowen; Huang, Qing; Zhu, Chuhong; Zhang, Zhuo; Li, Xiangdong

    2012-11-19

    SERS up: Ag nanosheet-assembled structures with controlled morphologies were achieved on indium tin oxide substrates by galvanic-cell-induced growth (see figure). These structures exhibit a highly active and homogeneous surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect, and show promising potential as reliable SERS substrates for detection of trace polychlorinated biphenyls. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Bulk growth and surface characterization of epitaxy ready cadmium zinc telluride substrates for use in IR imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, J. P.; Martinez, B.; Betz, T. E. M.; Mackenzie, J.; Kumar, F. J.; Burgess, L.

    2017-02-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (Cd1-xZnxTe or CZT) is a compound semiconductor substrate material that has been used for infrared detector (IR) applications for many years. CZT is a perfect substrate for the epitaxial growth of Mercury Cadmium Telluride (Hg1-xCdxTe or MCT) epitaxial layers and remains the material of choice for many high performance IR detectors and focal plane arrays that are used to detect across wide IR spectral bands. Critical to the fabrication of high performance MCT IR detectors is a high quality starting CZT substrate, this being a key determinant of epitaxial layer crystallinity, defectivity and ultimately device electro-optical performance. In this work we report on a new source of substrates suitable for IR detector applications, grown using the Travelling Heater Method (THM). This proven method of crystal growth has been used to manufacture high quality IR specification CZT substrates where industry requirements for IR transmission, dislocations, tellurium precipitates and copper impurity levels have been met. Results will be presented for the chemo-mechanical (CMP) polishing of CZT substrates using production tool sets that are identical to those that are used to produce epitaxy-ready surface finishes on related IR compound semiconductor materials such as GaSb and InSb. We will also discuss the requirements to scale CZT substrate manufacture and how with a new III-V like approach to both CZT crystal growth and substrate polishing, we can move towards a more standardized product and one that can ultimately deliver a standard round CZT substrate, as is the case for competing IR materials such as GaSb, InSb and InP.

  14. Direct Growth of Graphene-like Films on Single Crystal Quartz Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonau, Siarhei

    Direct growth of graphene-like (GL) films (nano-crystalline graphite films) on single crystal quartz substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from methane and molecular beam growth (MBG) is reported. The GL films have been characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and electrical measurements. Raman spectroscopy reveals nanocrystalline structure of the films grown at different conditions. The thinnest CVD grown GL films obtained so far have a thickness of 1.5 nm, a relatively rough surface structure and electrical conductivity in the range of 20 kO/square. Low temperature Hall-effect measurements performed on these films have revealed that the major charge carriers are holes with mobility of 40 cm2/Vs at room temperature. While inferior to graphene in terms of electronic properties, the graphene-like films possess very high chemical sensitivity. Study of MBG grown films revealed formation of a non-conductive carbon layer of low crystallinity on the initial stage of the growth process. In order to study the influence of the quartz substrate on the film formation process we performed ab initio simulation of the MBG process. For this simulation we used an atom-by-atom approach, which, we believe, is a closer approximation to the real molecular beam deposition process reported so far. The simulation showed that the initial formation of the film follows the atomic structure of the substrate. This leads to a high content of sp3 hybridized atoms at the initial stage of growth and explains formation of a non-conductive film. Additionally, we demonstrated how a non-conductive film becomes conductive with the increase of the film thickness. These results agree fairly well with the data obtained by AFM, electrical, and Raman measurements conducted on the films grown by MBG. High chemical sensitivity of GL films has been demonstrated by measuring the change in their conductance during exposure to a NO2-containing atmosphere. Sensitivity of CVD

  15. Growth of YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ on alkaline earth flouride substrates and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Foote, M. C.; Hunt, B. D.; Barner, J. B.

    1993-03-01

    The growth and characterization of YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ (YBCO) thin films grown by laser ablation on MgF 2 (100), CaF 2 (100), SrF 2 (100), and BaF 2 (100) substrates, and on CaF 2 and BaF 2 thin films on LaAlO 3 (100) substrates, are described. High quality superconducting YBCO films could be grown directly only on the BaF 2 substrates and thin films. YBCO films grown directly on MgF 2 or CaF 2 substrates were insulating and showed clear signs of interdiffusion and reaction, as measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Superconducting YBCO films could be grown on SrF 2 and CaF 2 substrates and thin films only with an yttria-stabilized zirconia buffer layer and/or with a low YBCO growth temperature, while YBCO grown on MgF 2 yielded insulating films for all growth conditions investigated. The highest quality YBCO films were obtained on BaF 2 substrates ( Tc=87.6 K, ΔTc=0.3 K). These results are discussed in terms of the thermodynamic stability of possible reaction products and the temperature dependence of the ionic mobilities.

  16. Growth of high quality germanium films on patterned silicon substrates and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanamu, Ganesh

    The principal objective of this work is to determine optimal pattern structures for highest quality (defect free) heteroepitaxial growth. High quality films of Ge on Si are of significant importance and can be used in high electron mobility devices, photodetectors for optical communications (1.3mum or 1.55mum) and integrating III-V optoelectronic devices. However, a 4% lattice mismatch and ˜ 50% thermal expansion mismatch between Ge and Si create three major challenges in growing high quality Ge films on Si, (a) high surface roughness due to a pronounced <110> crosshatch pattern, (b) high dislocation densities in Ge films and (c) high density of microcracks and wafer bending. A common way of reducing lattice and thermal expansion mismatch is to form a "virtual substrate (VS)" by growing a graded composition followed by a uniform layer of the desired epitaxial film on a defect-free Si substrate. Virtual graded layers could not decrease the dislocation densities to the numbers acceptable for most of the devices. Mathews et al. first proposed that limiting the lateral dimensions of the sample prior to growth could reduce the dislocation density. Later On Fitzgerald proposed that patterning decreases the dislocation density in the films. In this work we show high quality crosshatch-free Ge films with dislocation density ˜ 105 cm-2 on the nano-patterned Si and also high quality GaAs films on the Ge/Si virtual substrate. The first step in this research was to perform a systematic study to identify the role of pattern width on the quality of Ge growth. We investigated micrometer and submicrometer scale patterns. We demonstrated that the quality of the heteroepitaxial layers improves as the pattern width decreases. Then we have decreased the pattern width to nanometer-scale dimensions. Significant improvement of the Ge film quality was observed. We used novel interferometric lithography techniques combined with reactive ion and wet chemical etching to fabricate Si

  17. Effect of the crystalline constitution of TiO2 substrates on the growth of ultrathin Mo layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noirfalise, X.; Renaux, F.; Cossement, D.; Sebaihi, Noham; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Snyders, R.

    2012-11-01

    Metallic molybdenum was deposited by magnetron sputtering on amorphous and (110) rutile TiO2 substrates. An interfacial reaction between the deposited Mo and the TiO2 substrates generating Ti3 +, Ti2 + oxidation states is evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Our XPS data suggest, as compared to the (110) rutile substrate, a higher reactivity of the amorphous TiO2 leading to a stronger Mo oxidation. In both cases, this reaction, leads to the formation of MoOx nanostructures at the interfaces. The growth mechanism of the Mo deposit as a function of the crystalline constitution of the TiO2 substrate was analyzed by processing the XPS data using the Quases ® software. The data reveal a layer-by-layer growth of the Mo deposit on the (110) rutile substrate and a Stranski-Krastanov growth on the amorphous one. We explain these different growth modes based on the TiO2 surface reactivity and electronic structure using the Cabrera-Mott theory. This explanation is supported by Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass spectrometry profiling.

  18. Si substrates texturing and vapor-solid-solid Si nanowhiskers growth using pure hydrogen as source gas

    SciTech Connect

    Nordmark, H.; Holmestad, R.; Nagayoshi, H.; Matsumoto, N.; Nishimura, S.; Terashima, K.; Marioara, C. D.; Walmsley, J. C.; Ulyashin, A.

    2009-02-15

    Scanning and transmission electron microscopies have been used to study silicon substrate texturing and whisker growth on Si substrates using pure hydrogen source gas in a tungsten hot filament reactor. Substrate texturing, in the nanometer to micrometer range of mono- and as-cut multicrystalline silicon, was observed after deposition of WSi{sub 2} particles that acted as a mask for subsequent hydrogen radical etching. Simultaneous Si whisker growth was observed for long residence time of the source gas and low H{sub 2} flow rate with high pressure. The whiskers formed via vapor-solid-solid growth, in which the deposited WSi{sub 2} particles acted as catalysts for a subsequent metal-induced layer exchange process well below the eutectic temperature. In this process, SiH{sub x} species, formed by substrate etching by the H radicals, diffuse through the metal particles. This leads to growth of crystalline Si whiskers via metal-induced solid-phase crystallization. Transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to study the WSi{sub 2} particles and the structure of the Si substrates in detail. It has been established that the whiskers are partly crystalline and partly amorphous, consisting of pure Si with WSi{sub 2} particles on their tips as well as sometimes being incorporated into their structure.

  19. Large interface diffusion in endotaxial growth of MnP films on GaP substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Nateghi, N. Ménard, D.; Masut, R. A.

    2014-10-07

    The metal organic vapor deposition of MnP films on GaP (100) substrates is shown to have a substantial endotaxial component. A study of the growth time evolution of the endotaxial depths of MnP grains reveals a diffusion-controlled growth with a relatively large diffusion coefficient of Mn in GaP. The value (2.2 ± 1.5) × 10⁻¹⁵ (cm²/s) obtained at 650 °C is at least two orders of magnitude larger than the reported Mn diffusion in bulk GaP. GaP surface mounds provide further indirect evidence that this large diffusion coefficient is concurrent with the out-diffusion of Ga atoms at the growing MnP/GaP interface. No trace of dislocations could be observed at or near this interface, which strongly suggests that Mn diffusion occurs through vacant sites generated by the difference between the crystallographic structures of MnP and GaP.

  20. Growth-induced optical anisotropy of epitaxial garnet films grown on (110)-oriented substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, K.; Iyi, N.; Kimura, S.; Chevrier, F.; Devignes, J. M.; Le Gall, H.

    1986-08-01

    Garnet films of nominal composition (Y,Nd)3Ga5O12, were grown on (110) 1°-off Gd3Ga5O12 substrates for investigation of their growth-induced optical anisotropy. Optical birefringence and directions of the electric vectors of polarized rays passing through the films were measured under a polarizing microscope using a Brace-Köhler compensator. The growth-induced anisotropy of these films optically exhibited orthorhombic characteristics with the X, Y, and Z optic elasticity axes coinciding with the [001], [110], and [1¯10] directions, respectively. The crystallographic data obtained by means of single-crystal diffractometry suggested that the cubic crystal system of the garnet film was distorted, though very slightly, to an orthorhombic one with a,b, and c axes that coincided, respectively, with the [1¯10],[001], and [110] of the original cubic cell. In addition, by annealing at 1150 °C, this distortion disappeared and the crystal system reverted to cubic.

  1. Characterization of Xylanolytic Enzymes in Clostridium cellulovorans: Expression of Xylanase Activity Dependent on Growth Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Kosugi, Akihiko; Murashima, Koichiro; Doi, Roy H.

    2001-01-01

    Xylanase activity of Clostridium cellulovorans, an anaerobic, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, was characterized. Most of the activity was secreted into the growth medium when the bacterium was grown on xylan. Furthermore, when the extracellular material was separated into cellulosomal and noncellulosomal fractions, the activity was present in both fractions. Each of these fractions contained at least two major and three minor xylanase activities. In both fractions, the pattern of xylan hydrolysis products was almost identical based on thin-layer chromatography analysis. The major xylanase activities in both fractions were associated with proteins with molecular weights of about 57,000 and 47,000 according to zymogram analyses, and the minor xylanases had molecular weights ranging from 45,000 to 28,000. High α-arabinofuranosidase activity was detected exclusively in the noncellulosomal fraction. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that cellulosomes derived from xylan-, cellobiose-, and cellulose-grown cultures had different subunit compositions. Also, when xylanase activity in the cellulosomes from the xylan-grown cultures was compared with that of cellobiose- and cellulose-grown cultures, the two major xylanases were dramatically increased in the presence of xylan. These results strongly indicated that C. cellulovorans is able to regulate the expression of xylanase activity and to vary the cellulosome composition depending on the growth substrate. PMID:11717260

  2. Molten salt-based growth of bulk GaN and InN for substrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth

    2007-08-01

    An atmospheric pressure approach to growth of bulk group III-nitrides is outlined. Native III-nitride substrates for optoelectronic and high power, high frequency electronics are desirable to enhance performance and reliability of these devices; currently, these materials are available in research quantities only for GaN, and are unavailable in the case of InN. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions associated with traditional crystal growth techniques place these activities on the extreme edges of experimental physics. The novel techniques described herein rely on the production of the nitride precursor (N{sup 3-}) by chemical and/or electrochemical methods in a molten halide salt. This nitride ion is then reacted with group III metals in such a manner as to form the bulk nitride material. The work performed during the period of funding (February 2006-September 2006) focused on establishing that mass transport of GaN occurs in molten LiCl, the construction of a larger diameter electrochemical cell, the design, modification, and installation of a made-to-order glove box (required for handling very hygroscopic LiCl), and the feasibility of using room temperature molten salts to perform nitride chemistry experiments.

  3. Molten Salt-Based Growth of Bulk GaN and InN for Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth; Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2006-09-01

    An atmospheric pressure approach to growth of bulk group III-nitrides is outlined. Native III-nitride substrates for optoelectronic and high power, high frequency electronics are desirable to enhance performance and reliability of these devices; currently, these materials are available in research quantities only for GaN, and are unavailable in the case of InN. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions associated with traditional crystal growth techniques place these activities on the extreme edges of experimental physics. The technique described herein relies on the production of the nitride precursor (N3-) by chemical and/or electrochemical methods in a molten halide salt. This nitride ion is then reacted with group III metals in such a manner as to form the bulk nitride material. The work performed during the period of funding (July 2004-September 2005) focused on the initial measurement of the solubility of GaN in molten LiCl as a function of temperature, the construction of electrochemical cells, the modification of a commercial glove box (required for handling very hygroscopic LiCl), and on securing intellectual property for the technique.

  4. Growth and characterization of InAs quantum dots on Si(0 0 1) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z. M.; Hul'ko, O.; Kim, H. J.; Liu, J.; Sugahari, T.; Shi, B.; Xie, Y. H.

    2004-11-01

    Self-assembled InAs quantum dots were grown on (0 0 1) orientated Si substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Growth condition dependence of dot formation was studied. The evolution of size and shape of quantum dots with InAs coverage was examined using plan-view and cross-section transmission electron microscopy. Dot formation started at below 1 monolayer (ML) of InAs coverage, indicating Volmer-Weber growth mode. Dot size and density grew with increasing InAs coverage up to 0.7 ML. Dot density was observed to be strongly dependent on arsenic (As) beam equivalent pressure (BEP). A decrease of As BEP from 9.2×10 -6 to 1.2×10 -7 torr resulted in an increase in dot density from 4.3×10 9 to 1.8×10 11 cm -2 at a constant InAs coverage of 0.7 ML. Further increase in InAs coverage led to a clear broadening of dot size distribution and a slight decrease in dot density, presumably due to coarsening.

  5. Asymmetric, bimodal trade-offs during adaptation of Methylobacterium to distinct growth substrates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Chun; Chou, Hsin-Hung; Marx, Christopher J

    2009-11-01

    Trade-offs between selected and nonselected environments are often assumed to exist during adaptation. This phenomenon is prevalent in microbial metabolism, where many organisms have come to specialize on a narrow breadth of substrates. One well-studied example is methylotrophic bacteria that can use single-carbon (C(1)) compounds as their sole source of carbon and energy, but generally use few, if any, multi-C compounds. Here, we use adaptation of experimental populations of the model methylotroph, Methylobacterium extorquens AM1, to C(1) (methanol) or multi-C (succinate) compounds to investigate specialization and trade-offs between these two metabolic lifestyles. We found a general trend toward trade-offs during adaptation to succinate, but this was neither universal nor showed a quantitative relationship with the extent of adaptation. After 1500 generations, succinate-evolved strains had a remarkably bimodal distribution of fitness values on methanol: either an improvement comparable to the strains adapted on methanol or the complete loss of the ability to grow on C(1) compounds. In contrast, adaptation to methanol resulted in no such trade-offs. Based on the substantial, asymmetric loss of C(1) growth during growth on succinate, we suggest that the long-term maintenance of C(1) metabolism across the genus Methylobacterium requires relatively frequent use of C(1) compounds to prevent rapid loss.

  6. Growth and field emission of carbon nanotubes on electroplated Ni catalyst coated on glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaemyung; No, Kwangsoo; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2001-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are grown on Ni catalyst coated on soda-lime glass substrates using chemical vapor deposition of C2H2 gas at 550 °C. Ni film is coated on the surface of Ag film using the electroplating method. Ni was etched by ammonia (NH3) gas in order to form nanometer sized catalytic particles before carbon nanotube growth. Pd film is applied as a gas activator to decrease the growth temperature of carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes grown on Ni catalyst particles showed a multiwalled structure with defective graphite sheets at the wall. The turn-on voltage was about 2.8 V/μm with an emission current density of 10 μA/cm2, and the threshold voltage was about 4.0 V/μm with an emission current density of 10 mA/cm2. The Fowler-Nordheim plot showed a good linear fit, indicating that the emission current of carbon nanotubes follows Fowler-Nordheim behavior. The calculated field enhancement factor was 2850.

  7. [Macrokinetic basis for the model of microbial growth in a limited volume under constant conditions with a single leading substrate].

    PubMed

    Gendugov, V M; Glazunov, G P

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of the macrokinetic approach and continuum and chemical/biochemical gross reaction conceptions, an equation describing the complete dynamics of microbial growth and decline as function of a variable concentration of the leading substrate was deduced. This equation allows us to distinguish quantitatively and qualitatively the stages of microbial growth and the intervals of microbial tolerance to the initial concentration of the leading substrate. Adequacy of the model was confirmed by comparison with experimental dynamics of aerobic microorganisms in the samples of groundwater collected from a region polluted with uranium.

  8. MOVPE growth of GaN on 6-inch SOI-substrates: effect of substrate parameters on layer quality and strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemettinen, J.; Kauppinen, C.; Rudzinski, M.; Haapalinna, A.; Tuomi, T. O.; Suihkonen, S.

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate that higher crystalline quality, lower strain and improved electrical characteristics can be achieved in gallium nitride (GaN) epitaxy by using a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate compared to a bulk silicon (Si) substrate. GaN layers were grown by metal–organic vapor phase epitaxy on 6-inch bulk Si and SOI wafers using the standard step graded AlGaN and AlN approach. The GaN layers grown on SOI exhibited lower strain according to x-ray diffraction analysis. Defect selective etching measurements suggested that the use of SOI substrate for GaN epitaxy reduces the dislocation density approximately by a factor of two. Furthermore, growth on SOI substrate allows one to use a significantly thinner AlGaN buffer compared to bulk Si. Synchrotron radiation x-ray topography analysis confirmed that the stress relief mechanism in GaN on SOI epitaxy is the formation of a dislocation network to the SOI device Si layer. In addition, the buried oxide layer significantly improves the vertical leakage characteristics as the onset of the breakdown is delayed by approximately 400 V. These results show that the GaN on the SOI platform is promising for power electronics applications.

  9. Method for improving the growth of cadmium telluride on a gallium arsenide substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, J.L.

    1990-12-31

    A method for preparing a gallium arsenide substrate, prior to growing a layer of cadmium telluride on a support surface thereof. The preparation includes the steps of cleaning the gallium arsenide substrate and thereafter forming prepatterned shapes on the support surface of the gallium arsenide substrate. The layer of cadmium telluride then grown on the prepared substrate results in dislocation densities of approximately 1{times}10{sup 6}/cm{sup 2} or less. The prepatterned shapes on the support surface of the gallium arsenide substrate are formed by reactive ion etching an original outer surface of the gallium arsenide substrate and into the body of the gallium arsenide substrate to a depth of at least two microns. The prepatterned shapes have the appearance of cylindrical mesas each having a diameter of at lease twelve microns. After the mesas are formed on the support surface of the gallium arsenide substrate, the substrate is again cleaned.

  10. Electrochemical growth of controlled tip shapes of ZnO nanorod arrays on silicon substrate and enhanced photoluminescence emission from nanopyramid arrays compared with flat-head nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimanesh, Mahmoud; Hassan, Z.; Zainal, Norzaini

    2017-10-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod arrays (NRAs) with different morphologies such as; perfect hexagon flat-head, pyramidal, compact pencil, nail-shaped, and high-compact ZnO nanorod thin films, were successfully grown on silicon substrates. These NRAs were formed on substrates using a simple low-temperature electrochemical method without adding any catalyst or template via the precursors of zinc nitrate hexahydrate [Zn(NO3)2·6H2O] and hexamethylenetetramine [HMT; C6H12N4] with an equal molar concentration of 0.025 mol/l. The morphologies of the ZnO nanorods (NRs) could be controlled and transformed successfully in to other morphologies by changing the growth conditions, such as; growth temperature and applied current density. Detailed structural investigations reveal that the synthesized various NRs are single crystalline with wurtzite hexagonal phase and preferentially grow along the c-axis direction. The room temperature photoluminescence spectra show that each spectrum consists of an ultraviolet (UV) band and a relative broad visible light emission and infrared emission peak. The enhanced light emission intensity at UV peak (∼375 nm) is observed significantly from ZnO nanopyramid (NP) arrays because of the conical shape of NP. The photoluminescence intensity of the UV peak from the NPs is found to be 1.5-17 times larger than those from the other various NRs.

  11. Vitamin B12 Production by Marine Bacteria in Organic Substrate Limited, Slow Growth Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas-Mendoza, J.; Cajal-Medrano, R.; Maske, H.

    2016-02-01

    The conditions and processes governing the B12 vitamin dissemination through planktonic organisms are little understood. It is generally assumed that bacteria produce B12 vitamin and the whole auxotrophic plankton community consumes it. We used natural marine bacteria communities and marine bacteria Dinoroseobacter shibae cultures, growing in substrate-limited continuous cultures at low specific growth rates [0.1 to 1 d-1] to measure intracellular and dissolved B12 production, bacterial and viral abundance, particulate organic carbon, and nitrogen, bacterial production, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, ETS activity, and taxonomic composition. We find dissolved B12 vitamin at concentrations between 0 to 1.4 pM with no relation to growth or respiration rates. The intracellular B12 vitamin normalized to cell volume ranged between 1x10-2 to 4.6x10-2 pmol μm3 showing a significant relationship with growth rate [y=0.02(m)1.07; r2=0.78; p≤0.05; y=intracellular B12 production, pmol μm3 day-1; m=specific growth rate, day-1], and respiration rates [y=2.4ln(x)-2.66; r2=0.87; p≤0.05; x=CO2 production, μM day-1]. The vitamin B12 producing bacteria D. shibae, showed a dissolved B12 concentration between 0 and 1.8 pM, whereas intracellular B12 normalized to cell volume varied between 1.1x10-2 to 1.8x10-2 pmol μm-3, responding significantly to growth rate [y=0.01(m)0.56; r2=0.85; p≤0.05], and to respiration rates [y=3.01ln(x)-7.56, r2=0.97, p≤0.05; x=CO2 production, μM day-1]. The lack of correlation of dissolved B12 vitamin with the metabolic activity suggests that the dissolved B12 concentration depends on the interactions among vitamin B12 producers and consumers while the bacterial metabolism is regulating the intracellular production of B12 vitamin.

  12. Nucleation and growth of diamond on Si, Cu and Au substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, C. M.; Tsagaropoulos, G.; Baglio, J.; Dwight, K.; Wold, A.

    1990-12-01

    A hot tungsten filament reactor was used to deposit diamond films on silicon, copper and gold substrates. Diamond can be readily nucleated on all three substrates, but the nucleation density is greatly enhanced by prescratching with 0.25 micron diamond paste. Visual examination of photomicrographs of diamond crystallites formed on prescratched silicon substrates indicates that no new nuclei are formed between one and two hrs of deposition. However, new nuclei are formed throughout this period when the substrate is copper or gold. Deposited diamond films adhered to silicon substrates, but could be readily removed from copper and gold substrates.

  13. Nucleation and growth of diamond on Si, Cu, and Au substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, C.-M.; Tsagaropoulos, G.; Baglio, J.; Dwight, K.; Wold, A.

    1991-03-01

    A hot tungsten filament reactor was used to deposit diamond films on silicon, copper, and gold substrates. Diamond can be readily nucleated on all three substrates, but the nucleation density is greatly enhanced by prescratching with 0.25-μm diamond paste. Visual examination of photomicrographs of diamond crystallites formed on prescratched silicon substrates indicates that no new nuclei are formed between 1 and 2 hr of deposition. However, new nuclei are formed throughout this period when the substrate is copper or gold. Deposite diamond films adhered to silicon substrates, but could be readily removed from copper and gold substrates.

  14. Design and development of green roof substrate to improve runoff water quality: plant growth experiments and adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Raja, Franklin D

    2014-10-15

    Many studies worldwide have investigated the potential benefits achievable by transforming brown roofs of buildings to green roofs. However, little literature examined the runoff quality/sorption ability of green roofs. As the green roof substrate is the main component to alter the quality of runoff, this investigation raises the possibility of using a mixture of low-cost inorganic materials to develop a green roof substrate. The tested materials include exfoliated vermiculite, expanded perlite, crushed brick and sand along with organic component (coco-peat). Detailed physical and chemical analyses revealed that each of these materials possesses different characteristics and hence a mix of these materials was desirable to develop an optimal green roof substrate. Using factorial design, 18 different substrate mixes were prepared and detailed examination indicated that mix-12 exhibited desirable characteristics of green roof substrate with low bulk density (431 kg/m(3)), high water holding capacity (39.4%), air filled porosity (19.5%), and hydraulic conductivity (4570 mm/h). The substrate mix also provided maximum support to Portulaca grandiflora (380% total biomass increment) over one month of growth. To explore the leaching characteristics and sorption capacity of developed green roof substrate, a down-flow packed column arrangement was employed. High conductivity and total dissolved solids along with light metal ions (Na, K, Ca and Mg) were observed in the leachates during initial stages of column operation; however the concentration of ions ceased during the final stages of operation (600 min). Experiments with metal-spiked deionized water revealed that green roof substrate possess high sorption capacity towards various heavy metal ions (Al, Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and Cd). Thus the developed growth substrate possesses desirable characteristics for green roofs along with high sorption capacity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The broad-spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor BB-94 inhibits growth, HER3 and Erk activation in fulvestrant-resistant breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kirkegaard, Tove; Yde, Christina W; Kveiborg, Marie; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E

    2014-07-01

    Breast cancer cells can switch from estrogen receptor α (ER)- to human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-driven cell growth upon acquiring antiestrogen resistance. HER ligands are cleaved by metalloproteinases leading to release of active HER ligands, activation of HER receptors and consequently increased cell growth. In this study, we investigated the importance of HER receptors, in particular HER3, and HER ligand shedding for growth and signaling in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and MCF-7-derived sublines resistant to the antiestrogen fulvestrant. The HER3/HER4 ligand heregulin 1β induced phosphorylation of HER3, Akt and Erk, and partly rescued fulvestrant-inhibited growth of MCF-7 cells. HER3 ligands were found to be produced and shed from the fulvestrant-resistant cells as conditioned medium from fulvestrant-resistant MCF-7 cells induced phosphorylation of HER3 and Akt in MCF-7 cells. This was prevented by treatment of resistant cells with the metalloproteinase inhibitor TAPI-2. Only the broad-spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor BB-94, and not the more selective inhibitors GM6001 or TAPI-2, which inhibited shedding of the HER ligands produced by the fulvestrant-resistant cells, was able to inhibit growth and activation of HER3 and Erk in resistant cells. Compared to MCF-7, fulvestrant-resistant cells have increased HER3 phosphorylation, but knockdown of HER3 had no inhibitory effect on resistant cell growth. The EGFR inhibitor gefitinib exhibited only a minor growth inhibition, whereas the pan-HER inhibitor CI-1033 exerted growth arrest. Thus, neither HER3 nor EGFR alone are the main driver of fulvestrant-resistant cell growth and treatment should target both receptors. Ligand shedding is not a treatment target, as receptor activation occurred, independent of release of ligands. Only the broad-spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor BB-94 could abrogate HER3 and Erk activation in the resistant cells, which stresses the complexity of the resistance

  16. High-salinity growth conditions promote Tat-independent secretion of Tat substrates in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    van der Ploeg, René; Monteferrante, Carmine G; Piersma, Sjouke; Barnett, James P; Kouwen, Thijs R H M; Robinson, Colin; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2012-11-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis contains two Tat translocases, which can facilitate transport of folded proteins across the plasma membrane. Previous research has shown that Tat-dependent protein secretion in B. subtilis is a highly selective process and that heterologous proteins, such as the green fluorescent protein (GFP), are poor Tat substrates in this organism. Nevertheless, when expressed in Escherichia coli, both B. subtilis Tat translocases facilitated exclusively Tat-dependent export of folded GFP when the twin-arginine (RR) signal peptides of the E. coli AmiA, DmsA, or MdoD proteins were attached. Therefore, the present studies were aimed at determining whether the same RR signal peptide-GFP precursors would also be exported Tat dependently in B. subtilis. In addition, we investigated the secretion of GFP fused to the full-length YwbN protein, a strict Tat substrate in B. subtilis. Several investigated GFP fusion proteins were indeed secreted in B. subtilis, but this secretion was shown to be completely Tat independent. At high-salinity growth conditions, the Tat-independent secretion of GFP as directed by the RR signal peptides from the E. coli AmiA, DmsA, or MdoD proteins was significantly enhanced, and this effect was strongest in strains lacking the TatAy-TatCy translocase. This implies that high environmental salinity has a negative influence on the avoidance of Tat-independent secretion of AmiA-GFP, DmsA-GFP, and MdoD-GFP. We conclude that as-yet-unidentified control mechanisms reject the investigated GFP fusion proteins for translocation by the B. subtilis Tat machinery and, at the same time, set limits to their Tat-independent secretion, presumably via the Sec pathway.

  17. Candida guilliermondii isolated from HIV-infected human secretes a 50 kDa serine proteinase that cleaves a broad spectrum of proteinaceous substrates.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, André Luis Souza; Soares, Rosangela Maria de Araújo

    2005-01-01

    Non-albicans Candida species cause 35-65% of all candidemias in the general population, especially in immunosuppressed individuals. Here, we describe a case of a 19-year-old HIV-infected man with pneumonia due to a yeast-like organism. This clinical yeast isolate was identified as Candida guilliermondii through mycological tests. C. guilliermondii was cultivated in brain heart infusion medium for 48 h at 37 degrees C. After sequential centrifugation and concentration steps, the free-cell culture supernatant was obtained and extracellular proteolytic activity was assayed firstly using gelatin-SDS-PAGE. A 50 kDa proteolytic enzyme was detected with activity at physiological pH. This activity was completely blocked by 10 mM phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride (PMSF), a serine proteinase inhibitor, suggesting that this extracellular proteinase belongs to the serine proteinase class. E-64, a strong cysteine proteinase inhibitor, and pepstatin A, a specific aspartic proteolytic inhibitor, did not interfere with the 50 kDa proteinase. Conversely, a zinc-metalloproteinase inhibitor (1,10-phenanthroline) restrained the proteinase activity released by C. guilliermondii by approximately 50%. Proteinases are a well-known class of enzymes that participate in a vast context of yeast-host interactions. In an effort to establish a functional implication for this extracellular serine-type enzyme, we investigated its capacity to hydrolyze some serum proteins and extracellular matrix components. We demonstrated that the 50 kDa exocellular serine proteinase cleaved human serum albumin, non-immune human immunoglobulin G, human fibronectin and human placental laminin, generating low molecular mass polypeptides. Collectively, these results showed for the first time the ability of an extracellular proteolytic enzyme other than aspartic-type proteinases in destroying a broad spectrum of relevant host proteins by a clinical species of non-albicans Candida.

  18. Growth of nano hexagon-like flake arrays cerium carbonate created with PAH as the substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Hu, Y.H.; Liu, Z.G.; Wang, X.F.; Wang, M.T.

    2015-01-15

    Petals-like Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} on Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} nano hexagon-like flake arrays have been precipitatingly fabricated using PAH substrates. By changing the way of feeding, PAH concentration and aging time, petals-like Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} was created best when adding PAH into the Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solution, joined (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution along with mixing, PAH concentration is 0.9 g/L, aging time is 4 h. A growth mechanism was proposed to account for the growth of the petals-like Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} with PAH as the substrate. Poly allylamine hydrochloride (PAH) is as template agent which forms π-allyl complex with Ce{sup 3+} and controls the morphology of Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} particle. PAH and Ce{sup 3+} form π-allyl complex, and then induce the formation of Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} crystal nucleus. And infrared spectrum analysis verified. XRD show that after adding PAH which is adsorbed on the crystal plane, the growth of Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} crystal is inhibited on (2 4 2), the growth is promoted on (2 0 2) which is differentiated into the new (1 5 1), (2 2 2) is unchanged, Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} crystal is accumulated petals shape by hexagon-like flake. UV absorption spectra show that CeO{sub 2} as prepared precursor Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} after calcinations in air at high temperatures, the petal-like CeO{sub 2} has strong UV absorption and reflection effects, and absorption interval changed significantly by the move to UVA from UVB. - Graphical abstract: Each Ce-atom connects three Cl-atoms and three allyls in three dimensional spaces. To take the plane as a reference plane which is arrayed with three Ce-atom as equilateral triangle. The triangular each vertex is Ce-atom, the triangular center place is Cl-atom, the equilateral triangle which is mutually perpendicular with Ce-triangle surface and the inclined angle is 60° is made up with three Cl-atoms. - Highlights: • Petals

  19. Growth of GaN films on PLD-deposited TaC substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, K. W.; Derenge, M. A.; Zheleva, T. S.; Vispute, R. D.; Jones, K. A.

    2010-09-01

    GaN films were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on TaC substrates that were created by pulsed laser deposition of TaC onto (0 0 0 1) SiC substrates at ˜1000 °C. This was done to determine if good quality TaC films could be grown, and if good quality GaN films could be grown on this closely lattice matched to GaN, conductive material. This was done by depositing the TaC on on-axis and 3° or 8° off-axis (0 0 0 1) SiC at temperatures ranging from 950 to 1200 °C, and examining them using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The GaN films were grown on as-deposited TaC films, and films annealed at 1200, 1400, or 1600 °C, and examined using the same techniques. The TaC films were polycrystalline with a slight (1 1 1) texture, and the grains were ˜200 nm in diameter. Films grown on-axis were found to be of higher quality than those grown on off-axis substrates, but the latter could be improved to a comparable quality by annealing them at 1200-1600 °C for 30 min. TaC films deposited at temperatures above 1000 °C were found to react with the SiC. GaN films could be deposited onto the TaC when the surface was nitrided with NH 3 for 3 min at 1100 °C and the low temperature buffer layer was AlN. However, the GaN did not nucleate easily on the TaC film, and the crystallites did not have the desired (0 0 0 1) preferred orientation. They were ˜10 times larger than those typically seen in films grown on SiC or sapphire. Also the etch pit concentration in the GaN films grown on the TaC was more than 2 orders of magnitude less than it was for growth on the SiC.

  20. Au impact on GaAs epitaxial growth on GaAs (111){sub B} substrates in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Zhi-Ming; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Sun, Wen; Zhang, Zhi; Yang, Lei; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2013-02-11

    GaAs growth behaviour under the presence of Au nanoparticles on GaAs {l_brace}111{r_brace}{sub B} substrate is investigated using electron microscopy. It has been found that, during annealing, enhanced Ga surface diffusion towards Au nanoparticles leads to the GaAs epitaxial growth into {l_brace}113{r_brace}{sub B} faceted triangular pyramids under Au nanoparticles, governed by the thermodynamic growth, while during conventional GaAs growth, growth kinetics dominates, resulting in the flatted triangular pyramids at high temperature and the epitaxial nanowires growth at relatively low temperature. This study provides an insight of Au nanoparticle impact on GaAs growth, which is critical for understanding the formation mechanisms of semiconductor nanowires.

  1. Surface stability and the selection rules of substrate orientation for optimal growth of epitaxial II-VI semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Wan-Jian; Yang, Ji-Hui; Zaunbrecher, Katherine; Gessert, Tim; Barnes, Teresa; Wei, Su-Huai; Yan, Yanfa

    2015-10-05

    The surface structures of ionic zinc-blende CdTe (001), (110), (111), and (211) surfaces are systematically studied by first-principles density functional calculations. Based on the surface structures and surface energies, we identify the detrimental twinning appearing in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of II-VI compounds as the (111) lamellar twin boundaries. To avoid the appearance of twinning in MBE growth, we propose the following selection rules for choosing optimal substrate orientations: (1) the surface should be nonpolar so that there is no large surface reconstructions that could act as a nucleation center and promote the formation of twins; (2) the surface structure should have low symmetry so that there are no multiple equivalent directions for growth. These straightforward rules, in consistent with experimental observations, provide guidelines for selecting proper substrates for high-quality MBE growth of II-VI compounds.

  2. Growth Studies of Probiotic Bacteria on Short Chain Glucomannan, a Potential Prebiotic Substrate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-05

    PROBIOTIC BACTERIA ON SHORT CHAIN GLUCOMANNAN, A POTENTIAL PREBIOTIC SUBSTRATE by Wayne S. Muller Steve Arcidiacono Adam Liebowitz Ken Racicot...PROBIOTIC BACTERIA ON SHORT CHAIN GLUCOMANNAN, A POTENTIAL PREBIOTIC SUBSTRATE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER PE...commercial prebiotic substrates. All three substrates had similar degree of polymerization (DP) of 2-9. Five probiotic bacteria were evaluated for

  3. Bulk growth and surface characterization of epitaxy ready cadmium zinc telluride substrates for use in IR imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, J. P.; Martinez, B.; Betz, T. E. M.; MacKenzie, J.; Kumar, F. J.; Bindley, G.

    2016-05-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is an important compound semiconductor material upon which Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) layers are deposited epitaxially to form structures that are used in high performance detectors covering a wide infrared (IR) spectral band. The epitaxial growth of high quality MCT layers presents many technical challenges and a critical determinant of material performance is the quality of the underlying bulk CZT substrate. CZT itself is a difficult material to manufacture where traditional methods of bulk growth are complex and low yielding, which constrains the supply of commercially available substrates. In this work we report on the epitaxy-ready finishing of Travelling Heather Method (THM) grown Cd0.96Zn0.04Te substrates. The THM method is well established for the growth of high quality CZT crystals used in nuclear, X-ray and spectroscopic imaging applications and in this work we demonstrate the application of this technique to the growth of IR specification CZT substrates with areas of up to 5 cm x 5 cm square. We will discuss the advantages of the THM method over alternative methods of bulk CZT growth where the high yield and material uniformity advantages of this technique will be demonstrated. Chemo-mechanical polishing (CMP) of 4 cm x 4 cm CZT substrates reveals that III-V (InSb/GaSb) like levels of epitaxy-ready surface finishing may be obtained with modified process chemistries. Surface quality assessments will be made by various surface analytical and microscopy techniques from which the suitability of the material for subsequent assessment of quality by epitaxial growth will be ascertained.

  4. Cloning and characterization of four rabbit aldo-keto reductases featuring broad substrate specificity for xenobiotic and endogenous carbonyl compounds: relationship with multiple forms of drug ketone reductases.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Arai, Yuki; Ikari, Akira; Tajima, Kazuo; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Yamano, Shigeru; Hara, Akira; Kitade, Yukio

    2014-04-01

    Multiple forms of reductases for several drug ketones were isolated from rabbit liver, but their interrelationship and physiologic roles remain unknown. We isolated cDNAs for four aldo-keto reductases (AKR1C30, AKR1C31, AKR1C32, and AKR1C33), which share high amino acid sequence identity with the partial sequences of two rabbit naloxone reductases. The four recombinant enzymes reduced a variety of carbonyl compounds, including endogenous α-dicarbonyls (e.g., isatin and diacetyl), aldehydes (e.g., farnesal and 4-oxo-2-nonenal), and ketosteroids. They differed in specificity for drug ketones and ketosteroids. Although daunorubicin and befunolol were common substrates of all of the enzymes, AKR enzymes specifically reduced naloxone (AKR1C30, AKR1C32, and AKR1C33), metyrapone (AKR1C32 and AKR1C33), loxoprofen (AKR1C31 and AKR1C32), ketotifen (AKR1C30), and naltrexone and fenofibric acid (AKR1C33). AKR1C30 reduced only 17-keto-5β-androstanes, whereas the other enzymes were active toward 3-, 17-, and 20-ketosteroids, and AKR1C33 further reduced 3-keto groups of bile acids and 7α-hydroxy-5β-cholestanes. In addition, AKR1C30, AKR1C31, AKR1C32, and AKR1C33 were selectively inhibited by carbenoxolone, baccharin, phenolphthalein, and zearalenone, respectively. The mRNAs for the four enzymes were ubiquitously expressed in male rabbit tissues, in which highly expressed tissues were the brain, heart, liver, kidney, intestine, colon, and testis (for AKR1C30 and AKR1C31); brain, heart, liver, kidney, testis, lung, and adrenal gland (for AKR1C32); and liver and intestine (for AKR1C33). Thus, the four enzymes correspond to the multiple drug ketone reductases, and may function in the metabolisms of steroids, isatin and reactive carbonyl compounds, and bile acid synthesis.

  5. Epitaxial growth and electrochemical transfer of graphene on Ir(111)/α-Al2O3(0001) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Shinji; Saito, Yuta; Kodama, Hideyuki; Sawabe, Atsuhito

    2016-07-01

    Low-pressure chemical vapor deposition growth of graphene on Iridium (Ir) layers epitaxially deposited on α-Al2O3 (0001) substrates was investigated. The X-ray diffraction, Raman and reflection high energy electron diffraction characterizations revealed that graphene films were epitaxially grown on Ir(111) layers, and the in-plane epitaxial relationship between graphene, Ir(111), and α-Al2O3(0001) was graphene ⟨ 1 1 ¯ 00 ⟩//Ir⟨ 11 2 ¯ ⟩//α-Al2O3⟨ 11 2 ¯ 0 ⟩. The graphene on Ir(111) was electrochemically transferred onto SiO2/Si substrates. We also demonstrated the reuse of the Ir(111)/α-Al2O3(0001) substrates in multiple growth and transfer cycles.

  6. MBE growth of HgCdTe on GaSb substrates for application in next generation infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, R.; Antoszewski, J.; Lei, W.; Madni, I.; Umana-Membrenao, G.; Faraone, L.

    2017-06-01

    HgCdTe has dominated the high performance end of the IR detector market for decades. At present, the cost to fabricate HgCdTe based advanced infrared devices is relatively high. One approach to address this problem is to use cost effective alternative substrate, mainly Si and GaAs. Recently, GaSb has emerged as a new alternative with better lattice matching. In this paper, recent progress in molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth of HgCdTe infrared material at UWA is reported. HgCdTe has been grown on GaSb substrates by MBE, and has shown a lower Etch Pit Density (EPD) and higher minority carrier lifetime in comparison to other alternative substrates. This result makes GaSb an interesting and promising alternative substrate material for HgCdTe epitaxy.

  7. The effect of substrate temperature and growth rate on the doping efficiency of single crystal boron doped diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Demlow, SN; Rechenberg, R; Grotjohn, T

    2014-10-01

    The substrate growth temperature dependence of the plasma gas-phase to solid-phase doping efficiency in single crystal, boron doped diamond (BDD) deposition is investigated. Single crystal diamond (SCD) is grown by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (MPACVD) on high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) type Ib substrates. Samples are grown at substrate temperatures of 850-950 degrees C for each of five doping concentration levels, to determine the effect of the growth temperature on the doping efficiency and defect morphology. The substrate temperature during growth is shown to have a significant effect on the grown sample defect morphology, and a temperature dependence of the doping efficiency is also shown. The effect of the growth rate on the doping efficiency is discussed, and the ratio of the boron concentration in the gas phase to the flux of carbon incorporated into the solid diamond phase is shown to be a more predictive measure of the resulting boron concentration than the gas phase boron to carbon ratio that is more commonly reported. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of glycosides on behavior of Oenococcus oeni in wine conditions: growth, substrates and aroma compounds.

    PubMed

    Maturano, Carmen; Saguir, Fabiana María

    2017-08-01

    Autochthonous Oenococcus oeni strains (MS9, MS20 and MS46) with good malolactic performance and yielding adequate diacetyl levels, were selected to investigate the effect of synthetic and grape glycosides on bacterial growth, substrate utilization and β-glucosidase (βGlu), α-arabinofuranosidase (αAra) and α-rhamnopyranosidase (αRha) activities in a wine-like medium containing 6% ethanol, pH 4.0 (WBM). Then, changes in the volatile compounds profile were evaluated at the end of malolactic fermentation (MLF) carried out by the MS46 strain in WBM containing 1 mg L(-1) of natural glycoside. All strains grew and efficiently degraded L-malic acid in WBM where βGlu and αAra activities were found but not αRha. In presence of a synthetic glycoside (eriodictyol 7-O-β-rutinoside) βGlu activity was significantly enhanced for two of the cultures tested (MS20 and MS460) while a low αRha activity was induced, presenting MS46 the better performance. Glycosides extracted from fermented grape musts under different conditions allowed maximum growths, L-malic acid utilization rates and glycosidase activities in the MS46 strain. Thus, βGlu, αAra and αRha activities increased between 30-50 and 3-11% respectively. This indirectly correlated to significant changes in total esters and higher alcohols at the end of MLF, which increased by up to 140 and 30% respectively. Moreover, ethyl and acetate esters formed up to 100-fold than alcohols or esters degraded highlighted the main role of this microorganism in the esters synthesis. Results obtained encourage the potential use of selected indigenous O. oeni strains as a tool to enhance wine complexity through MLF, mainly on highly fruity aroma.

  9. Effect of substrate morphology slope distributions on light scattering, nc-Si:H film growth, and solar cell performance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Yun; Santbergen, Rudi; Jäger, Klaus; Sever, Martin; Krč, Janez; Topič, Marko; Hänni, Simon; Zhang, Chao; Heidt, Anna; Meier, Matthias; van Swaaij, René A C M M; Zeman, Miro

    2014-12-24

    Thin-film silicon solar cells are often deposited on textured ZnO substrates. The solar-cell performance is strongly correlated to the substrate morphology, as this morphology determines light scattering, defective-region formation, and crystalline growth of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H). Our objective is to gain deeper insight in these correlations using the slope distribution, rms roughness (σ(rms)) and correlation length (lc) of textured substrates. A wide range of surface morphologies was obtained by Ar plasma treatment and wet etching of textured and flat-as-deposited ZnO substrates. The σ(rms), lc and slope distribution were deduced from AFM scans. Especially, the slope distribution of substrates was represented in an efficient way that light scattering and film growth direction can be more directly estimated at the same time. We observed that besides a high σ(rms), a high slope angle is beneficial to obtain high haze and scattering of light at larger angles, resulting in higher short-circuit current density of nc-Si:H solar cells. However, a high slope angle can also promote the creation of defective regions in nc-Si:H films grown on the substrate. It is also found that the crystalline fraction of nc-Si:H solar cells has a stronger correlation with the slope distributions than with σ(rms) of substrates. In this study, we successfully correlate all these observations with the solar-cell performance by using the slope distribution of substrates.

  10. Substrate preparation effects on defect density in molecular beam epitaxial growth of CdTe on CdTe (100) and (211)B

    DOE PAGES

    Perkins, Craig; Barnes, Teresa M; Burton, George L.; ...

    2017-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that growth of CdTe on CdTe (100) and (211)B substrates via molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) results in planar defect densities 2 and 3 orders of magnitude higher than growth on InSb (100) substrates, respectively. To understand this shortcoming, MBE growth on CdTe substrates with a variety of substrate preparation methods is studied by scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, cross sectional transmission electron microscopy, and atom probe tomography (APT). Prior to growth, carbon is shown to remain on substrate surfaces even after atomic hydrogen cleaning. APT revealed that following the growth ofmore » films, trace amounts of carbon remained at the substrate/film interface. This residual carbon may lead to structural degradation, which was determined as the main cause of higher defect density.« less

  11. Growth of SiO 2 on InP substrate by liquid phase deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Po Hsun; Yang, Chyi Da

    2010-04-01

    We have grown silicon dioxide (SiO 2) on indium phosphorous (InP) substrate by liquid phase deposition (LPD) method. With inserting InP wafer in the treatment solution composed of SiO 2 saturated hydrofluorosilicic acid (H 2SiF 6), 0.1 M boric acid (H 3BO 3) and 1.74 M diluted hydrochloric acid (HCl), the maximum deposition rate and refractive index for the as-grown LPD-SiO 2 film were about 187.5 Å/h and 1.495 under the constant growth temperature of 40 °C. The secondary ion mass spectroscope (SIMS) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) confirmed that the elements of silicon, oxygen, and chloride were found in the as-grown LPD-SiO 2 film. On the other hand, the effects of treatment solution incorporated with the hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) that can regulate the concentration of OH - ion were also shown in this article. The experimental results represented that the deposition rate decreases with increasing the concentration of hydrogen peroxide due to the reduced concentration of SiO 2 saturated H 2SiF 6 in treatment solution.

  12. Manufacturable MBE growth process for Sb-based photodetector materials on large diameter substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubyshev, Dmitri; Qiu, Yueming; Fastenau, Joel M.; Liu, Amy W. K.; Koerperick, Edwin J.; Olesberg, Jon T.; Norton, Dennis, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Antimony-based photodetector materials have attracted considerable interest for their potential and demonstrated performance in infrared detection and imaging applications. Mid-wavelength infrared detector has been demonstrated using bulk InAsSb/AlAsSb-based nBn structures. Heterostructures based on InAs/Ga(In)Sb strained layer superlattices create a type-II band alignment that can be tailored to cover a wide range of the mid- and long-wavelength infrared absorption bands by varying the thickness and composition of the constituent materials. Through careful design, these Sb-based detectors can realize desirable features such as higher operating temperature, better uniformity, suppression of Auger recombination, reduction of tunneling currents, and higher quantum efficiency. The manufacturing challenge of these structures is the reproducible growth of high-quality Sb-based epiwafers due to their complex designs including large numbers of alternating thin layers and mixed group-V elements. In this paper, we discuss the manufacturability of such epiwafers on 3" and 4" diameter GaSb substrates by molecular beam epitaxy using multi-wafer production tools. Various techniques were used to characterize the material properties of these wafers, including high-resolution x-ray diffraction, low-temperature photoluminescence, Nomarski optical microscopy, and atomic force microscopy.

  13. A multi-step kinetic model for substrate assimilation and bacterial growth: application to benzene biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Bordel, S; Muñoz, R; Díaz, L F; Villaverde, S

    2007-08-01

    A multi-step kinetic model based on the concept of synthesizing unit (SU) was developed for describing benzene biodegradation in Pseudomonas putida F1. The model herein presented considered substrate arrival rates to the SU rather than concentrations, and provided a reasonable good fit of the dynamics of both catechol and biomass concentrations experimentally determined. It was based on very general assumptions and could be applied to any process accumulating metabolic intermediates. Conventional growth models considering a single step can be regarded as a particular case of this multi-step model. Despite the merits of this model, its applicability strongly depends on the knowledge of the complex induction-repression and inhibition mechanisms governing the different catabolic steps of the degradation pathway, which in most cases are difficult to elucidate experimentally and/or to model mathematically. In this particular case repression of benzene oxidation by catechol and self-inhibition of catechol transformation were experimentally confirmed and considered in the simulation, resulting in a good fit (relative average error of 6%) of the experimental data. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Growth, structure and magnetism of self-organized epitaxial nano-alloys on a metallic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, S.; Moreau, N.; Repain, V.; Chacon, C.; Girard, Y.; Klein, J.; Lagoute, J.; Bulou, H.; Scheurer, F.; Goyhenex, C.; Ohresser, Ph.

    2013-03-01

    The CoPt alloy is one of the most studied bimetallic compounds, due to its potential application for magnetic recording. We report here on CoxPt1-x nano-alloys deposited on the well-known Au(111) reconstructed surface since it has been recognized as a powerful substrate in order to investigate the magnetic properties of metallic nano-clusters. The growth of CoxPt1-x clusters on the Au(111) surface observed by STM revealed a morphological transition from single layer to bilayer islands with the Co concentration x. Using molecular dynamics calculations, we show that this transition is driven by the local strain due to Co atoms. These results are interpreted by a competition between the interface energy, the mixing energy and the elastic energy. Using X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism, we have studied the magnetic properties of these nano-alloys. The out-of-plane anisotropy of pure Co clusters strongly decreases, until it goes in-plane for 40% of Pt. This spin reorientation transition is interpreted by a phenomenological pair model for magnetic anisotropy.

  15. Characterization of nitrogen substrate limitation on Escherichia coli's growth by parameter identification tools.

    PubMed

    Rios-Lozano, M; Guerrero-Torres, V; Badillo-Corona, A; Chairez, I; Garibay-Orijel, C

    2016-07-01

    Carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (CNR) has shown to be a relevant factor in microorganisms growth and metabolites production. It is usual that this factor compromises the productivity yield of different microorganisms. However, CNR has been rarely modeled and therefore the nature of its specific influence on metabolites production has not been understood clearly. This paper describes a parametric characterization of the CNR effect on the Escherichia coli metabolism. A set of parameters was proposed to introduce a mathematical model that considers the biomass, substrate and several byproducts dynamical behavior under batch regimen and CNR influence. Identification algorithm used to calculate the parameters considers a novel least mean square strategy that formalizes the CNR influence in E. coli metabolism. This scheme produced a step-by-step method that was suitable for obtaining the set of parameters that describes the model. This method was evaluated under two scenarios: (a) using the data from a set of numerical simulations where the model was tested under the presence of artificial noises and (b) the information obtained from a set of experiments under different CNR. In both cases, a leave-one-experiment-out cross-validation study was considered to evaluate the model prediction capabilities. Feasibility of the parametric identification method was proven in both considered scenarios.

  16. High Performance Bioanode Development for Fermentable Substrates via Controlled Electroactive Biofilm Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Ichihashi, Osamu; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Borole, Abhijeet P

    2014-11-11

    A bioanode was optimized to generate current densities reaching 38.4 4.9 A m-2, which brings bioelectrochemical systems closer to commercial consideration. Glucose and lactate were fed together in a continuous or fed-batch mode. The current density increased from 2.3 A m-2 to 38.4 A m-2 over a 33 day period and remained stable thereafter. The coulombic efficiency ranged from 50% to 80%. A change in substrate concentration from 200 mg L-1 to 5 mg L-1 decreased maximum current density from 38.4 A m-2 to 12.3 A m-2. The anode consortia included Firmicutes (55.0%), Proteobacteria (41.8%) and Bacteroidetes (2.1%) constituting two potential electrogenic genera: Geobacter (6.8%) and Aeromonas (31.9%). The current production was found to be limited by kinetics during the growth period (33 days), and mass transfer, thereafter. The results indicate the necessity of removing spent biomass for efficient long term operation and treatment of wastewater streams.

  17. The controlled growth of GaN microrods on Si(111) substrates by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foltynski, Bartosz; Garro, Nuria; Vallo, Martin; Finken, Matthias; Giesen, Christoph; Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei; Cantarero, Andrés; Heuken, Michael

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a selective area growth (SAG) approach for growing GaN microrods on patterned SiNx/Si(111) substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) is studied. The surface morphology, optical and structural properties of vertical GaN microrods terminated by pyramidal shaped facets (six { 10 1 bar 1} planes) were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), room temperature photoluminescence (PL) and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. Measurements revealed high-quality GaN microcolumns grown with silane support. Characterized structures were grown nearly strain-free (central frequency of Raman peak of 567±1 cm-1) with crystal quality comparable to bulk crystals (FWHM=4.2±1 cm-1). Such GaN microrods might be used as a next-generation device concept for solid-state lighting (SSL) applications by realizing core-shell InGaN/GaN multi-quantum wells (MQWs) on the n-GaN rod base.

  18. Modeling electromagnetically driven free-surface flows motivated by the Ribbon Growth on Substrate (RGS) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckstein, P.; Galindo, V.; Schönecker, A.; Gerbeth, G.

    2017-07-01

    The Ribbon Growth on Substrate (RGS) technology is a crystallization technique that allows direct casting of silicon wafers and sheets of advanced metal-silicide compounds. With the potential of reaching high crystallization rates, it promises a very efficient approach for future photo-voltaic silicon wafer production compared to well-established processes in industry. However, a number of remaining problems, like process stability and controllability, need to be addressed for the RGS technology to eventually become a competitor in the near future. In this regard, it is very desirable to gain detailed insights into the characteristic process dynamics. To comply with this demand, we have developed a new numerical tool based on OpenFOAM (foam-extend), capable of simulating the free-surface dynamics of the melt flow under the influence of an applied alternating magnetic field. Our corresponding model thereby resolves the interaction of hydrodynamic and magnetodynamic effects in three-dimensional space. Although we currently focus on the RGS process, the modeling itself has been formulated in a more general form, which may be used for the investigation of similar problems, too. Here we provide a brief overview of these developments.

  19. Gallium arsenide (GaAs) island growth under SiO(2) nanodisks patterned on GaAs substrates.

    PubMed

    Tjahjana, Liliana; Wang, Benzhong; Tanoto, Hendrix; Chua, Soo-Jin; Yoon, Soon Fatt

    2010-05-14

    We report a growth phenomenon where uniform gallium arsenide (GaAs) islands were found to grow underneath an ordered array of SiO(2) nanodisks on a GaAs(100) substrate. Each island eventually grows into a pyramidal shape resulting in the toppling of the supported SiO(2) nanodisk. This phenomenon occurred consistently for each nanodisk across a large patterned area of approximately 50 x 50 microm(2) (with nanodisks of 210 nm diameter and 280 nm spacing). The growth mechanism is attributed to a combination of 'catalytic' growth and facet formation.

  20. Atomic force microscopy investigation of growth process of organic TCNQ aggregates on SiO2 and mica substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Qing; Hu, Hao; Pan, Li-Da; Xiao, Jiang; Du, Shi-Xuan; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2010-08-01

    Deposition patterns of tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) molecules on different surfaces are investigated by atomic force microscopy. A homemade physical vapour deposition system allows the better control of molecule deposition. Taking advantage of this system, we investigate TCNQ thin film growth on both SiO2 and mica surfaces. It is found that dense island patterns form at a high deposition rate, and a unique seahorse-like pattern forms at a low deposition rate. Growth patterns on different substrates suggest that the fractal pattern formation is dominated by molecule-molecule interaction. Finally, a phenomenal “two-branch" model is proposed to simulate the growth process of the seahorse pattern.

  1. The broad-spectrum antiviral compound ST-669 restricts chlamydial inclusion development and bacterial growth and localizes to host cell lipid droplets within treated cells.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Valiant, William G; Eriksen, Steven G; Hruby, Dennis E; Allen, Robert D; Rockey, Daniel D

    2014-07-01

    Novel broad-spectrum antimicrobials are a critical component of a strategy for combating antibiotic-resistant pathogens. In this study, we explored the activity of the broad-spectrum antiviral compound ST-669 for activity against different intracellular bacteria and began a characterization of its mechanism of antimicrobial action. ST-669 inhibits the growth of three different species of chlamydia and the intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii in Vero and HeLa cells but not in McCoy (murine) cells. The antichlamydial and anti-C. burnetii activity spectrum was consistent with those observed for tested viruses, suggesting a common mechanism of action. Cycloheximide treatment in the presence of ST-669 abrogated the inhibitory effect, demonstrating that eukaryotic protein synthesis is required for tested activity. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that different chlamydiae grow atypically in the presence of ST-669, in a manner that suggests the compound affects inclusion formation and organization. Microscopic analysis of cells treated with a fluorescent derivative of ST-669 demonstrated that the compound localized to host cell lipid droplets but not to other organelles or the host cytosol. These results demonstrate that ST-669 affects intracellular growth in a host-cell-dependent manner and interrupts proper development of chlamydial inclusions, possibly through a lipid droplet-dependent process.

  2. Au-Seeded Growth of Vertical and in-Plane III–V Nanowires on Graphite Substrates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Graphene is promising as a transparent, flexible, and possibly cost-effective substrate for nanowire-based devices. We have investigated Au-seeded III–V nanowire growth with graphite as a model substrate. The highest yield of undoped vertical nanowires was found for InAs, but we also observed vertical nanowires for the InP, GaP, and GaAs materials. The yield of vertical nanowires for GaP and GaAs was strongly improved by supplying the p-dopant DEZn before nanowire growth but not by supplying H2S or HCl. In-plane GaAs and GaP nanowire growth exhibited an unexpected behavior, where the seed particles seemingly reflected on the side facets of other nanowires. These results pave the way for vertical and in-plane hybrid graphene- nanowire devices. PMID:24592968

  3. Microbial enrichment of a novel growing substrate and its effect on plant growth.

    PubMed

    Trifonova, R; Postma, J; Schilder, M T; van Elsas, J D

    2009-10-01

    The quality of torrefied grass fibers (TGF) as a new potting soil ingredient was tested in a greenhouse experiment. TGF was colonized with previously selected microorganisms. Four colonization treatments were compared: (1) no inoculants, (2) the fungus Coniochaeta ligniaria F/TGF15 alone, (3) the fungus followed by inoculation with two selected bacteria, and (4) the fungus with seven selected bacteria. Cultivation-based and DNA-based methods, i.e., PCR-DGGE and BOX-PCR, were applied to assess the bacterial and fungal communities established in the TGF. Although colonization was not performed under sterile conditions, all inoculated strains were recovered from TGF up to 26 days incubation. Stable fungal and bacterial populations of 10(8) and 10(9) CFU/g TGF, respectively, were reached. As a side effect of the torrefaction process that aimed at the chemical stabilization of grass fibers, potentially phytotoxic compounds were generated. These phytotoxic compounds were cold-extracted from the fibers and analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Four of 15 target compounds that had previously been found in the extract of TGF were encountered, namely phenol, 2-methoxyphenol, benzopyran-2-one, and tetrahydro-5,6,7,7a-benzofuranone. The concentration of these compounds decreased significantly during incubation. The colonized TGF was mixed with peat (P) in a range of 100%:0%, 50%:50%, 20%:80%, and 0%:100% TGF/P (w/w), respectively, to assess suitability for plant growth. Germination of tomato seeds was assessed three times, i.e., with inoculated TGF that had been incubated for 12, 21, and 26 days. In these tests, 90-100% of the seeds germinated in 50%:50% and 20%:80% TGF/P, whereas on average only 50% of the seeds germinated in pure TGF. Germination was not improved by the microbial inoculants. However, plant fresh weight as well as leaf area of 28-day-old tomato plants were significantly increased in all treatments where C. ligniaria F/TGF15 was inoculated compared

  4. Evolution and prevention of meltback etching: Case study of semipolar GaN growth on patterned silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, Michel; Tottereau, Olivier; Feuillet, Guy; Vennéguès, Philippe; Zúñiga-Pérez, Jesus

    2017-09-01

    Meltback etching, a deteriorating chemical reaction occurring between gallium and silicon under typical metal organic chemical vapor deposition growth conditions, is a common problem that often limits the development of GaN on silicon substrates, in particular, patterned substrates, and therefore must be circumvented. To further understand this reaction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was performed in cross-section, and a proposed 2-dimensional model on how meltback etching evolves throughout the growth process is discussed, which indicated an inter-diffusion reaction occurring primarily between gallium and silicon where gallium from GaN diffuses into the silicon substrate while silicon from the substrate diffuses out and incorporates into the GaN crystal. Moreover, we demonstrate an anisotropic behavior of the gallium penetrating the silicon substrate, which has shown to be delimited by the Si {111 } planes. Finally, an approach to prevent meltback etching by changing the fractions of nitrogen and hydrogen in the carrier gas is presented and discussed.

  5. Growth of tin oxide thin films composed of nanoparticles on hydrophilic and hydrophobic glass substrates by spray pyrolysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paloly, Abdul Rasheed; Satheesh, M.; Martínez-Tomás, M. Carmen; Muñoz-Sanjosé, Vicente; Rajappan Achary, Sreekumar; Bushiri, M. Junaid

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we have demonstrated the growth of tin oxide (SnO2) thin films composed of nanoparticles on hydrophobic (siliconized) and hydrophilic (non-siliconized) glass substrates by using the spray pyrolysis technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the formation of SnO2 thin films with tetragonal rutile-phase structure. Average particle size of nanoparticles was determined to be in the range of 3-4 nm measured from the front view images obtained by a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FESEM), while the size of nanoparticle clusters, when present, were in the range of 11-20 nm. Surface morphology of SnO2 films grown over hydrophobic substrates revealed larger isolated particles which are less crowded compared to the highly crowded and agglomerated smaller particles in films on hydrophilic substrates. Blue shift in the band gap is observed in samples in which the average particle size is slightly larger than the exciton Bohr radius. Photoluminescence (PL) analysis of samples grown over hydrophobic substrates exhibited an intense defect level emission and a weak near band edge emission. The enhanced visible emission from these SnO2 thin films is attributed to lattice defects formed during the film growth due to the mismatch between the film and the hydrophobic substrate surface.

  6. Growth mode and defect evaluation of GaSb on GaAs substrate: a transmission electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shenghong; Balakrishnan, Ganesh; Huffaker, Diana L

    2011-06-01

    We use transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques to confirm and analyze the interfacial misfit (IMF) and non-IMF growth modes for GaSb epilayers on GaAs substrates. Under optimized IMF growth conditions, only pure 90 degrees dislocations are generated along both [110] and [1-10] directions and located exactly at the epi-substrate interface, which leads to very low density of misfit dislocations propagating from the GaSb/GaAs interface along the growth direction, compared to the non-IMF growth condition. The mechanism of defect annihilation indicates that this IMF mergence process happens without formation of threading dislocations into the GaSb epilayer, which is a completely relaxed growth mode with extremely low defect density. Based on scanning several sets of wafer surfaces, plan-view TEM confirms that the misfit defect densities are estimated to be approximately 5 x 10(5) cm(-2) for IMF growth mode and approximately 10(9) cm(-2) for non-IMF growth mode.

  7. Effects of water depth and substrate color on the growth and body color of the red sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Senhao; Dong, Shuanglin; Gao, Qinfeng; Ren, Yichao; Wang, Fang

    2015-05-01

    Three color variants of the sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus are recognized, the red one is highly valued in the market. When the red variant is cultured in ponds in China, its body color changes from red to celadon in 3-6 months. The effects of water depth and substrate color on the growth and body color of this animal were investigated. Juveniles of red A. japonicus were cultured in cages suspended at a range of water depths (20, 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm). The specific growth rate of red sea cucumbers was significantly higher in animals cultured at deeper water layers compared with those grown at shallowers. Body weights were greatest for sea cucumbers cultured at a depth of 150 cm and their survival rates were highest at a depth of 200 cm. A scale to evaluate the color of red sea cucumbers ( R value) was developed using a Pantone standard color card. All stocked animals in the 9-month trial retained a red color, however the red body color was much more intense in sea cucumbers cultured at shallower depths, while animals suspended in deeper layers became pale. In a separate trial, A. japonicus were cultured in suspended cages with seven different colored substrates. Substrate color had a significant effect on the growth and body-color of red A. japonicus. The yield were greatest for A. japonicus cultured on a yellow substrate, followed by green > white > orange > red > black and blue. All sea cucumbers in the 7-month trial retained a red color, although the red was most intense (highest R value) in animals cultured on a blue substrate and pale (lowest R value) for animals cultured on a green substrate.

  8. Plasma assisted growth of MoO{sub 3} films on different substrate locations relative to sublimation source

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rabindar K. Saini, Sujit K.; Kumar, Prabhat; Singh, Megha; Reddy, G. B.

    2016-05-06

    In the present paper, we reported the role of substrate locations relative to source on the growth of MoO{sub 3} films deposited on Ni coated glass substrates using plasma assisted sublimation process (PASP). According to the XRD and SEM results, substrate location is very crucial factor to control the morphology of MoO{sub 3} films and the best nanostructure growth (in terms of alignments and features) is obtained in case of Sample B (in which substrate is placed on source). The structural results point out that all films exhibit only orthorhombic phase of molybdenum oxide (i.e. α-MoO{sub 3})but the most preferential growth is recorded in Sample B due to the presence of intense peaks crossponding to only (0 k 0) family of crystal planes (k = 2, 4,6..). The Raman analysis again confirms the orthorhombic nature of MoO{sub 3} NFs and details of vibrational bondsin Sample B have been given in the present report. The MoO{sub 3} NFs show intense PL emission in wavelength range of 300-700 nm with three peaks located at 415, 490, and 523 nm in accordance to the improved crystallinity in Sample B.

  9. Epitaxial growth of multiwall carbon nanotube from stainless steel substrate and effect on electrical conduction and field emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weiwei; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Ningsheng; Tan, Yuanming; Zhan, Runze; Shen, Yan; Xu, Zhi; Bai, Xuedong; Chen, Jun; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi

    2017-07-01

    The epitaxial growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is an important subject of research. Recent attention has been paid to finding new strategies for the controlled growth of single-wall CNTs with a defined chirality. In addition, many potential applications require multiwall CNTs (MWCNTs) to grow vertically from the substrate and the interface property is crucial. Here, we report for the first time that MWCNTs can grow directly from the surface of a substrate by epitaxy, based on the experimental study of individual multiwall carbon nanotubes on a large-area stainless steel substrate, which is a very useful system for electrical and mechanical applications. In particular, evidence is given of the lattice matching between the MWCNT and the lattice of a hexagonal Cr2O3: (Fe, Mn) film formed on the surface of the substrate. Furthermore, a method is developed to increase the density of the MWCNTs; a mechanism of simultaneous top and bottom growth is proposed. The resultant significantly improved electrical transport and field emission properties are also presented, showing the Ohmic contact for electrical conduction and high performance in resisting the catastrophic cold-cathode vacuum breakdown of the CNTs.

  10. Epitaxial growth of multiwall carbon nanotube from stainless steel substrate and effect on electrical conduction and field emission.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weiwei; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Ningsheng; Tan, Yuanming; Zhan, Runze; Shen, Yan; Xu, Zhi; Bai, Xuedong; Chen, Jun; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi

    2017-07-28

    The epitaxial growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is an important subject of research. Recent attention has been paid to finding new strategies for the controlled growth of single-wall CNTs with a defined chirality. In addition, many potential applications require multiwall CNTs (MWCNTs) to grow vertically from the substrate and the interface property is crucial. Here, we report for the first time that MWCNTs can grow directly from the surface of a substrate by epitaxy, based on the experimental study of individual multiwall carbon nanotubes on a large-area stainless steel substrate, which is a very useful system for electrical and mechanical applications. In particular, evidence is given of the lattice matching between the MWCNT and the lattice of a hexagonal Cr2O3: (Fe, Mn) film formed on the surface of the substrate. Furthermore, a method is developed to increase the density of the MWCNTs; a mechanism of simultaneous top and bottom growth is proposed. The resultant significantly improved electrical transport and field emission properties are also presented, showing the Ohmic contact for electrical conduction and high performance in resisting the catastrophic cold-cathode vacuum breakdown of the CNTs.

  11. Drawing circuits with carbon nanotubes: scratch-induced graphoepitaxial growth of carbon nanotubes on amorphous silicon oxide substrates.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Jin; Chung, Yoon Jang; Kim, Yun Ho; Han, Jeongho; Lee, Young-Kook; Kong, Ki-Jeong; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Young Kuk; Kim, Byoung Gak; Lee, Jeong-O

    2014-06-13

    Controlling the orientations of nanomaterials on arbitrary substrates is crucial for the development of practical applications based on such materials. The aligned epitaxial growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on specific crystallographic planes in single crystalline sapphire or quartz has been demonstrated; however, these substrates are unsuitable for large scale electronic device applications and tend to be quite expensive. Here, we report a scalable method based on graphoepitaxy for the aligned growth of SWNTs on conventional SiO₂/Si substrates. The "scratches" generated by polishing were found to feature altered atomic organizations that are similar to the atomic alignments found in vicinal crystalline substrates. The linear and circular scratch lines could promote the oriented growth of SWNTs through the chemical interactions between the C atoms in SWNT and the Si adatoms in the scratches. The method presented has the potential to be used to prepare complex geometrical patterns of SWNTs by 'drawing' circuits using SWNTs without the need for state-of-the-art equipment or complicated lithographic processes.

  12. Microcontact printing of laminin on oxygen plasma activated substrates for the alignment and growth of Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Yao; Huang, Yi-Cheng; Chiang, Hongsen; Wo, Andrew M; Huang, Yi-You

    2007-02-01

    Microenvironment mimicking biological situation is a vital issue in tissue regeneration. With much progress being made, one of the major challenges remains to develop a convenient method to fabricate the scaffold microenvironment suitable for cell attachment and proliferation. This article demonstrates the efficacy of microcontact printed laminin, an extracellular matrix protein, on three different oxygen plasma treatment substrates-tissue culture polystyrene, poly(methyl methacrylate) films, and chitosan films-for alignment and growth of the Schwann cells in in vitro culturing. Replica molding of polydimethylsiloxane elastomeric stamps, fabricated from patterned SU-8 structure on silicon master, was used to print laminin on the three substrates. Pattern and growth of Schwann cells for low (10(3) cells/cm(2)) and increased cell density (2 x 10(4) cells/cm(2)) on the varied substrates with and without microcontact printed laminin were characterized. Results of in vitro cell culture of Schwann cells showed a high degree of cell orientation on the laminin-micropatterned substrates for both cell densities. However, different cell seeding densities will strongly impact the morphology and orientation of Schwann cells. Microcontact printing proves to be a convenient means to pattern cell-recognition molecules on scaffold for cell-guilded growth in tissue regeneration. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. In Situ Stress Measurements During GaN Growth on Ion-Implanted AlN/Si Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Jarod C.; Tungare, Mihir; Weng, Xiaojun; Leathersich, Jeffrey M.; Shahedipour-Sandvik, Fatemeh; Redwing, Joan M.

    2012-05-01

    In situ wafer curvature measurements were used in combination with postgrowth structural characterization to study the evolution of film stress and microstructure in GaN layers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on N+ ion-implanted AlN/Si (111) substrates. The results were compared with growth on identical unimplanted substrates. In situ stress measurements revealed that, for the unimplanted sample, the GaN initiated growth under compressive stress of -1.41 GPa which arose due to lattice mismatch with the AlN buffer layer. In contrast, GaN growth on the ion-implanted sample began at lower compressive stress of -0.84 GPa, suggesting a reduction in epitaxial stress. In both cases, the compressive growth stress was fully relaxed after ~0.7 μm and minimal tensile stress was generated during growth. During post-growth cooling, tensile stress was introduced in the GaN layer of both samples due to thermal expansion mismatch. Post-growth optical microscopy characterization, however, demonstrated that the ion-implanted sample had lower density of channeling cracks compared with the unimplanted sample. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images of the sample grown on ion-implanted Si with no post-implantation nitrogen annealing revealed the formation of horizontal cracks in the implanted region beneath the AlN buffer layer. The weakened layer acts to decouple the GaN film from the Si substrate and thereby reduces the density of channeling cracks in the film after growth.

  14. Properties of topological insulator Bi2Se3 films prepared by thermal evaporation growth on different substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min.

    2017-02-01

    Topological insulator Bi2Se3 thin films were grown by the thermal evaporation deposition on different substrates and their phase structures and magneto-transport properties were discussed. The films growth is along the c-axis, and their surfaces exhibited terrace-like quintuple layers. Resistivity upturn as well as weak anti-localization was observed only in the film with Si and LAO substrates. The linear magneto-resistance (LMR) under high field was found, which was associated with the gapless topological surface states and the quantum origin. The results indicate that the films are highly uniform.

  15. Microcalorimetric study of the anaerobic growth of Escherichia coli: measurements of the affinity of whole cells for various energy substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Belaich, A; Belaich, J P

    1976-01-01

    Microcalorimetry has been used to determine the affinity of whole cells of Escherichia coli for glucose, galactose, fructose, and lactose. Anaerobic growth thermograms were analyzed, and the Km and Vmax values for these energy substrates were measured at pH 7.8. Results obtained with this technique using various organisms growing anaerobically on different sugars are compared. This comparison shows that in practically all cases the cellular rate of catabolic activity is a hyperbolic function of the energy substrate concentrations at low sugar concentrations. In some cases this technique also allows determination of kinetics at high sugar concentrations. PMID:1373

  16. Ridge InGaAs/InP multi-quantum-well selective growth in nanoscale trenches on Si (001) substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.; Zhou, X.; Li, M.; Kong, X.; Mi, J.; Wang, M.; Wang, W.; Pan, J.

    2016-01-11

    Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of InGaAs/InP multi-quantum-well in nanoscale V-grooved trenches on Si (001) substrate was studied using the aspect ratio trapping method. A high quality GaAs/InP buffer layer with two convex (111) B facets was selectively grown to promote the highly uniform, single-crystal ridge InP/InGaAs multi-quantum-well structure growth. Material quality was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and room temperature micro-photoluminescence measurements. This approach shows great promise for the fabrication of photonics devices and nanolasers on Si substrate.

  17. Precipitation growth of graphene under exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride to form heterostructures on cobalt substrate by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Renjing; Khanaki, Alireza; Tian, Hao; He, Yanwei; Cui, Yongtao; Xu, Zhongguang; Liu, Jianlin

    2017-07-01

    Research on graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructures has attracted much attention for band engineering and device performance optimization of graphene. However, the growth of graphene/h-BN heterostructure is still challenging, which usually requires high growth temperature and long growth duration. In this paper, we demonstrate graphene/h-BN heterostructures by growing graphene onto the substrates which consist of exfoliated h-BN flakes on Co thin films using molecular beam epitaxy. The heterostructure samples grown at different temperatures and growth times were characterized by Raman, optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, microwave impedance microscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. It is found that the graphene/h-BN heterostructures were formed by the formation of graphene underneath rather than on top of the h-BN flakes. The growth mechanism is discussed.

  18. Retinal flat cells are a substrate that facilitates retinal neuron growth and fiber formation.

    PubMed

    Li, H P; Sheffield, J B

    1986-03-01

    When embryonic chick neural retinas are dissociated into a suspension of single cells and plated in stationary cultures, "flat cells" spread out and form a monolayer to which the neuronal cells attach. It has been shown previously that the flat cells are related to the Müller cell population of the retina. The neuronal cells form aggregates interconnected by bundles of axon-like fibers. The authors have been able to isolate relatively pure flat cells by shaking off the neuronal aggregates after 5 or 6 days of culture. In order to determine if the flat cells have a unique relationship with the neuronal cells, freshly dissociated neural retina cells were added to monolayers of flat cells and their behavior compared to that on chick embryo mesodermal cells. It has been observed by phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy that the growth behavior of the retina cells on flat cells is significantly different from that on mesodermal cells. On flat cells, neuronal retina cells form flat patches in which new growing flat cells fuse with the monolayer, and neuronal cells attach as single cells or small clusters. Axon-like fibers are present several hours after plating, and by day 4 an extensive network of fibers connects single cells and clusters on the surface of the monolayer. When retina cells are plated onto mesodermal cells, the cells form aggregates which are organized along the long axis of the mesodermal cells. The flat cells provide a unique substrate for the differentiation and neurite extension of neuronal cells from embryonic chick retina.

  19. Epitaxial growth of highly-crystalline spinel ferrite thin films on perovskite substrates for all-oxide devices

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Jarrett A.; Gao, Ran; Schiffer, Peter; Martin, Lane W.

    2015-01-01

    The potential growth modes for epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 on SrTiO3 (001) are investigated through control of the energetics of the pulsed-laser deposition growth process (via substrate temperature and laser fluence). We find that Fe3O4 grows epitaxially in three distinct growth modes: 2D-like, island, and 3D-to-2D, the last of which is characterized by films that begin growth in an island growth mode before progressing to a 2D growth mode. Films grown in the 2D-like and 3D-to-2D growth modes are atomically flat and partially strained, while films grown in the island growth mode are terminated in islands and fully relaxed. We find that the optimal structural, transport, and magnetic properties are obtained for films grown on the 2D-like/3D-to-2D growth regime boundary. The viability for including such thin films in perovskite-based all-oxide devices is demonstrated by growing a Fe3O4/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 spin valve epitaxially on SrTiO3. PMID:26030835

  20. Growth hormone stimulates protein synthesis during hypocaloric parenteral nutrition. Role of hormonal-substrate environment.

    PubMed Central

    Manson, J M; Smith, R J; Wilmore, D W

    1988-01-01

    The influence of growth hormone (GH) on protein metabolism and fuel utilization was investigated in eight paired studies of normal volunteers. GH (10 mg) was given daily during one period, and saline was injected during control studies. For 6 days, subjects received parenteral nutrition that provided adequate dietary nitrogen, vitamin, and minerals, but energy intake varied to provide 30-100% of requirements. On Day 7, the feedings were discontinued and an oral glucose load (100 g) was administered. The level of energy intake did not markedly influence the actions of GH. During nutrient infusions, GH caused positive nitrogen balance (1.0 +/- 0.3 g/m2/day vs. -1.2 +/- 0.3 in controls, p less than 0.001) and increased protein synthesis (16.8 +/- 0.7 g N/m2/day vs. 13.9 +/- 0.8, p less than 0.01). No change in the rate of protein breakdown or excretion of 3-methylhistidine occurred. GH was associated with an increase in insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I concentrations (IGF-I, 9.1 +/- 0.6 IU/ml vs. 3.3 +/- 0.5, p less than 0.001). After discontinuation of the parenteral nutrition and administration of the oral glucose load, glucose concentrations tended to be higher after GH; however, despite a two- to threefold increase in insulin response, muscle glucose uptake was attenuated (1.10 +/- 0.19 g/kg forearm vs. 1.64 +/- 0.30 in controls, p less than 0.05). Compared with control conditions, GH appeared to attenuate the increase in amino acid nitrogen efflux from muscle after the administration of oral glucose. These data demonstrate that the protein anabolic effect of GH, which occurs even during hypocaloric feedings, is related to multiple mechanisms that favor protein synthesis. These include the increase in plasma concentrations of GH, insulin IGF-I and fat utilization. GH administration results in a hormonal-substrate environment that favors nitrogen retention and protein synthesis. GH may be beneficial in promoting protein synthesis in surgical patients

  1. PDMS substrate stiffness affects the morphology and growth profiles of cancerous prostate and melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Prauzner-Bechcicki, Szymon; Raczkowska, Joanna; Madej, Ewelina; Pabijan, Joanna; Lukes, Jaroslav; Sepitka, Josef; Rysz, Jakub; Awsiuk, Kamil; Bernasik, Andrzej; Budkowski, Andrzej; Lekka, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    A deep understanding of the interaction between cancerous cells and surfaces is particularly important for the design of lab-on-chip devices involving the use of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). In our studies, the effect of PDMS substrate stiffness on mechanical properties of cancerous cells was investigated in conditions where the PDMS substrate is not covered with any of extracellular matrix proteins. Two human prostate cancer (Du145 and PC-3) and two melanoma (WM115 and WM266-4) cell lines were cultured on two groups of PDMS substrates that were characterized by distinct stiffness, i.e. 0.75 ± 0.06 MPa and 2.92 ± 0.12 MPa. The results showed the strong effect on cellular behavior and morphology. The detailed analysis of chemical and physical properties of substrates revealed that cellular behavior occurs only due to substrate elasticity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Topotaxial growth of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires on iron substrate in thermal annealing method

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Himanshu Srivastava, A. K.; Babu, Mahendra; Rai, Sanjay; Ganguli, Tapas

    2016-06-28

    A detail cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of as-grown α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowire sample, synthesized on iron substrate by thermal annealing method, was carried out to understand the mechanism of growth in this system. Iron undergoes sequential oxidation to form a layered structure of Fe/FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires grow on to the top of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. It was found that subsequent oxide layers grow topotaxially on the grains of iron, which results in a direct orientation relationship between the α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowire and the parent grain of iron. The results also showed that the grains of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer, which were uniquely oriented in [110] direction, undergo highly anisotropic growth to form the nanowire. This anisotropic growth occurs at a twin interface, given by (−11−1), in the α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. It was concluded that the growth at twin interface could be the main driving factor for such anisotropic growth. These observations are not only helpful in understanding the growth mechanism of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires, but it also demonstrates a way of patterning the nanowires by controlling the texture of iron substrate.

  3. Marine heterotrophic bacteria in continuous culture, the bacterial carbon growth efficiency, and mineralization at excess substrate and different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Mercado, Alejandrina; Cajal-Medrano, Ramón; Maske, Helmut

    2007-07-01

    To model the physiological potential of marine heterotrophic bacteria, their role in the food web, and in the biogeochemical carbon cycle, we need to know their growth efficiency response within a matrix of different temperatures and degrees of organic substrate limitation. In this work, we present one part of this matrix, the carbon growth efficiencies of marine bacteria under different temperatures and nonlimiting organic and inorganic substrate supply. We ran aerobic turbidostats with glucose enriched seawater, inoculated with natural populations of heterotrophic marine bacteria at 10, 14, 18, 22, and 26 degrees C. The average cell-specific growth rates increased with temperature from 1.17 to 2.6 h-1. At steady-state total CO2 production, biomass production [particulate organic carbon (POC) and nitrogen (PON)], and viruslike particle abundance was measured. CO2 production and specific growth rate increased with increasing temperature. Bacterial carbon growth efficiency (BCGE), the particulate carbon produced per dissolved carbon utilized, varied between 0.12 and 0.70. Maximum BCGE values and decreased specific respiration rates occurred at higher temperatures (22 and 26 degrees C) and growth rates. This trend was largely attributable to an increase in POC per cell abundance; when the BCGE was recalculated, parameterizing the biomass as the product of cell concentration and a constant cellular carbon content, the opposite trend was observed.

  4. Structural properties, crystal quality and growth modes of MOCVD-grown AlN with TMAl pretreatment of sapphire substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haiding; Wu, Feng; tahtamouni, T. M. Al; Alfaraj, Nasir; Li, Kuang-Hui; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D.; Li, Xiaohang

    2017-10-01

    The growth of high quality AlN epitaxial films relies on precise control of the initial growth stages. In this work, we examined the influence of the trimethylaluminum (TMAl) pretreatment of sapphire substrates on the structural properties, crystal quality and growth modes of heteroepitaxial AlN films on (0 0 0 1) sapphire substrates. Without the pretreatment, the AlN films nucleated on the smooth surface but exhibited mixed crystallographic Al- (N-) polarity, resulting in rough AlN film surfaces. With increasing the pretreatment time from 1 to 5 s, the N-polarity started to be impeded. However, small islands were formed on sapphire surface due to the decompostion of TMAl. As a result, small voids became noticeable at the nucleation layer (NL) because the growth started as quasi three-dimensional (3D) but transformed to 2D mode as the film grew thicker and got coalesced, leading to smoother and Al-polar films. On the other hand, longer pretreatment time of 40 s formed large 3D islands on sapphire, and thus initiated a 3D-growth mode of the AlN film, generating Al-polar AlN nanocolumns with different facets, which resulted into rougher film surfaces. The epitaxial growth modes and their correlation with the AlN film crystal quality under different TMAl pretreatments are also discussed.

  5. Low-temperature GaN growth on silicon substrates by single gas-source epitaxy and photo-excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, R.A.; Tolle, J.; Chizmeshya, A.V.G.; Roucka, R.; Ritter, Cole; Kouvetakis, J.; Tsong, I.S.T.

    2005-08-15

    We report a unique low-temperature growth method for epitaxial GaN on Si(111) substrates via a ZrB{sub 2}(0001) buffer layer. The method utilizes the decomposition of a single gas-source precursor (D{sub 2}GaN{sub 3}){sub 3} on the substrate surface to form GaN. The film growth process is further promoted by irradiation of ultraviolet light to enhance the growth rate and ordering of the film. The best epitaxial film quality is achieved at a growth temperature of 550 deg. C with a growth rate of 3 nm/min. The films exhibit intense photoluminescence emission at 10 K with a single peak at 3.48 eV, indicative of band-edge emission for a single-phase hexagonal GaN film. The growth process achieved in this study is compatible with low Si processing temperatures and also enables direct epitaxy of GaN on ZrB{sub 2} in contrast to conventional metalorganic chemical vapor deposition based approaches.

  6. Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth of Tetragonal FeS Films on SrTiO3 (001) Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Lin, Hai-Cheng; Huang, Wan-Tong; Hu, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Xi; Xue, Qi-Kun; Ji, Shuai-Hua

    2017-08-01

    We report the successful growth of tetragonal FeS film with one or two unit-cell (UC) thickness on SrTiO3(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. Large lattice constant mismatch with the substrate leads to high density of defects in single UC FeS, while it has been significantly reduced in double UC thick film due to the lattice relaxation. The scanning tunneling spectra on the surface of FeS thin film reveal the electronic doping effect of single UC FeS from the substrate. In addition, at the Fermi level, the energy gaps of approximate 1.5 meV are observed in films of both thicknesses at 4.6 K and below. The absence of coherence peaks of gap spectra may be related to the preformed Cooper-pairs without phase coherence.

  7. Direct growth of patterned graphene on SiO2 substrates without the use of catalysts or lithography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Seung; Joo, Kisu; Jerng, Sahng-Kyoon; Lee, Jae Hong; Yoon, Euijoon; Chun, Seung-Hyun

    2014-09-07

    We demonstrate a one-step fabrication of patterned graphene on SiO2 substrates through a process free from catalysts, transfer, and lithography. By simply placing a shadow mask during the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of graphene, an arbitrary shape of graphene can be obtained on SiO2 substrate. The formation of graphene underneath the shadow mask was effectively prevented by the low-temperature, catalyst-free process. Growth conditions were optimized to form polycrystalline graphene on SiO2 substrates and the crystalline structure was characterized by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Patterned graphene on SiO2 functions as a field-effect device by itself. Our method is compatible with present device processing techniques, and should be highly desirable for the proliferation of graphene applications.

  8. Direct Growth of a-Plane GaN on r-Plane Sapphire Substrate by Metalorganic Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Masahiro; Mochimizo, Noriaki; Hoshino, Katsuyuki; Tadatomo, Kazuyuki

    2007-02-01

    We have investigated the direct growth of nonpolar a-plane GaN layers on an r-plane sapphire substrate by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE). A high-density nucleation of GaN islands was obtained on the r-plane sapphire substrate at the initial stage of the high-temperature growth without a buffer layer, which resulted in a two-dimensional (2D) growth mode. We studied the effects of V/III ratio growth conditions on the surface morphology and growth features of an a-plane GaN layer. The results showed that a high density of pits with an inverse-pyramidal shape were formed at a high V/III ratio, whereas a relatively low density of pits were formed at a low V/III ratio due to the increase in the rate of lateral growth along the c-axis direction. We successfully grew a-plane GaN layers with a flat and pit-free surface using the “two-step growth method”. The method consisted of growing a first layer at a high V/III ratio and growing a second layer at a low V/III ratio. We found that the first layer plays an important role in GaN layer growth. The formation of a void-free GaN layer with sidewall facets in the first step leads to a flat and pit-free layer grown at a high rate of lateral growth along the c-axis direction in the second step.

  9. Morphology and Optical Properties of Zinc Oxide Films Grown on Metal Coated Glass Substrates by Aqueous Chemical Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakar, M. A.; Hamid, M. A. A.; Jalar, A.; Shamsudin, R.

    2013-04-01

    Zinc oxide films were deposited on three different metal coated substrates (gold, nickel and platinum) by aqueous chemical growth method. This paper discusses the effect of metal coated substrates on the morphology and optical properties of grown ZnO films. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) were employed to characterize the samples. All the as-deposited ZnO films exhibit crystalline hexagonal wurzite structure. The crystallite size of the ZnO films were in the range of 29 to 32 nm. FESEM micrographs revealed hexagonal rod, oval-like and flower-like ZnO structures formed on all metal coated substrates. The Pt coated film contains higher density hexagonal rod as compared to others metal coated substrate. Most probably the Pt lattice parameter is the nearest to ZnO compared to nickel and gold. The optical band gap energy, Eg of ZnO films were estimated to be 3.30 eV which is near to bulk Eg, 3.37 eV. This indicates that the ZnO grown by aqueous chemical growth is able to produce similar quality properties to other conventional method either films or bulk size.

  10. Growth of monolayer MoS2 films in a quasi-closed crucible encapsulated substrates by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong; Pu, Hongbin; Lin, Tao; Li, Lianbi; Zhang, Shan; Sun, Gaopeng

    2017-07-01

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (m-MoS2) has attracted significant interest due to its unique electronic and optical properties. Herein, we report the successful fabrication of high quality and continuous m-MoS2 films in a quasi-closed crucible encapsulated substrates via a three-zone chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. Quasi-closed crucible lowers the concentration of precursors around substrates and makes the sulfurization rate gentle, which is beneficial for invariable m-MoS2 growth. Characterization results indicate that as-grown m-MoS2 films are of high crystallinity and high quality comparable to the exfoliated MoS2. This approach is also adapted to the growth of other transition metal dichalcogenides.

  11. Effect of nanohole size on selective area growth of InAs nanowire arrays on Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoye; Yang, Wenyuan; Wang, Baojun; Ji, Xianghai; Xu, Shengyong; Wang, Wei; Chen, Qing; Yang, Tao

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated the influence of nanohole size on selective-area growth (SAG) of InAs nanowire (NW) arrays on Si(111) substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The growth of well-defined and position-controlled InAs NW arrays with united vertical orientation can be achieved on the patterned substrates with a certain range of nanohole size, which paves the way for the fabrication of high-electron-mobility and surrounding-gate transistor arrays using NWs as channels. Moreover, it is found that more than one NW are increasingly likely grown per nanohole as the nanohole size increases, and the NWs become increasingly thin and short. This is considered to be due to the supersaturation of adsorbed species in the nanohole and the intense competition for adatoms among multiple NWs per nanohole.

  12. Growth and tribological properties of diamond films on silicon and tungsten carbide substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhika, R.; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2016-11-01

    Hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique was used to deposit microcrystalline diamond (MCD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films on silicon (Si) and tungsten carbide (WC-6Co) substrates. Friction coefficient of larger diamond grains deposited on WC-6Co substrate shows less value approximately 0.2 while this differs marginally on films grown on Si substrate. The study claims that for a less friction coefficient, the grain size is not necessarily smaller. However, the less friction coefficient (less than 0.1 saturated value) in MCD and NCD deposited on Si is explained by the formation of graphitized tribolayer. This layer easily forms when diamond phase is thermodynamically unstable.

  13. Low temperature growth of ZnO nanostructures on flexible polystyrene substrates for optical, photoluminescence and wettability applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durga Prasad, Muvva; Pasha Shaik, Ummar; Madhurima, V.; Ghanashyam Krishna, M.

    2016-08-01

    The growth of ZnO nanostructures on flexible polystyrene substrates by a simple vacuum thermal evaporation process is reported. The ZnO films are deposited on polystyrene surfaces of 6 μm thickness which are initially anchored on glass substrates. The as-deposited films are annealed at temperatures up to 180 °C for 6-24 h after which the polystyrene is lifted off from the glass substrates to yield nanostructured films on a flexible substrate. At 180 °C there is transformation of the partially oxidized as-deposited films into nearly stoichiometric ZnO. This is accompanied by the formation of nanostructures such as nanorods, nanotubes and nanodoughnuts. The films, which were 50-200 nm in thickness, are polycrystalline in nature and also exhibit Zn/ZnO core-shell structures under favorable conditions. The nanostructures exhibit transmission greater than 80% in the visible and near infrared regions and band gaps of the order of 4 eV. The films exhibit strong blue photoluminescence and the peak position as well as intensity of emission can be tuned by varying thickness and annealing conditions. To demonstrate the flexibility, the ZnO coated polystyrene substrates were wrapped around a LED to show UV blocking property. Wettability studies indicate that films are hydrophobic with water contact angles between 92°-95°.

  14. Growth and characterization of GaAs layers on Si substrates by migration-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Liu, John K.; Radhakrishnan, Gouri; Katz, Joseph; Sakai, Shiro

    1988-01-01

    Migration-enhanced molecular beam epitaxial (MEMBE) growth and characterization of the GaAs layer on Si substrates (GaAs/Si) are reported. The MEMBE growth method is described, and material properties are compared with those of normal two-step MBE-grown or in situ annealed layers. Micrographs of cross-section view transmission electron microscopy and scanning surface electron microscopy of MEMBE-grown GaAs/Si showed dislocation densities of 10 to the 7th/sq cm. AlGaAs/GaAs double heterostructures have been successfully grown on MEMBE GaAs/Si by both metalorganic chemical vapor deposition and liquid phase epitaxy.

  15. Growth and characterization of Czochralski-grown n and p-type GaAs for space solar cell substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, R. T.

    1983-01-01

    Progress in LEC (liquid encapsulated Czochralski) crystal growth techniques for producing high-quality, 3-inch-diameter, n- and p-type GaAs crystals suitable for solar cell applications is described. The LEC crystals with low dislocation densities and background impurities, high electrical mobilities, good dopant uniformity, and long diffusion lengths were reproducibly grown through control of the material synthesis, growth and doping conditions. The capability for producing these large-area, high-quality substrates should positively impact the manufacturability of highly efficiency, low cost, radiation-hard GaAs solar cells.

  16. Epitaxial nanolayers of quaterrylene: Influence of the substrate on the growth of the first and second monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, R.; Franke, S.; Wagner, C.; Dienel, T.; Fritz, T.; Mannsfeld, S.C.B.

    2006-04-17

    We present a combined low energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy study on the growth of the first and second monolayers (MLs) of quaterrylene on single crystalline Au(111). For the first ML, we observe a point-on-line coincident growth of flat lying molecules which agrees well with our potential energy calculations. In contrast, we observe alternating upstanding and flat lying molecules in the second layer. This behavior nicely demonstrates that the substrate has a very strong influence on the structure of the first layer, whereas the second layer is much weakly affected and exhibits properties comparable to the bulk.

  17. Effect of Fe coating of nucleation sites on epitaxial growth of Fe oxide nanocrystals on Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibe, Takafumi; Watanabe, Kentaro; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    We studied the effect of Fe coating on the epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 nanocrystals (NCs) over Fe-coated Ge epitaxial nuclei on Si(111). To completely cover Ge nuclei with Fe, some amount of Fe (>8 monolayers) must be deposited. Such covering is a key to epitaxial growth because an Fe coating layer prevents the oxidation of Ge surfaces during Fe3O4 formation, resulting in the epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 on them. This study demonstrates that an appropriate Fe coating of nucleation sites leads to the epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 NCs on Si substrates, indicating the realization of environmentally friendly and low-cost Fe3O4 NCs as the resistance random access memory material.

  18. Growth of coincident site lattice matched semiconductor layers and devices on crystalline substrates

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J

    2013-08-13

    Methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and said devices are disclosed. The methods include but are not limited to providing a substrate having a crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter (a). The method further includes growing a crystalline semiconductor layer on the crystalline substrate surface by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy, without any buffer layer between the crystalline semiconductor layer and the crystalline surface of the substrate. The crystalline semiconductor layer will be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the substrate lattice parameter (a). The lattice parameter (a') maybe related to the lattice parameter (a) by a scaling factor derived from a geometric relationship between the respective crystal lattices.

  19. Comparison of CSD-YBCO growth on different single crystal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert, J.; Bäcker, M.; Falter, M.; Schroeder-Obst, D.

    2008-02-01

    2G HTS Coated Conductors properties can be improved by comparing different raw materials, precursor production routes and coating and annealing conditions. To suppress the influence of varying substrate tapes and buffer layer qualities on the HTS layers, a standard substrate is needed to improve the Jc values. In this work various pure single crystal substrates (SrTiO3 [STO], (LaAlO3)0.3(Sr2AlTaO6)0.7 [LSAT], LaAlO3 [LAO], NdGaO3 [NdGaO]) are investigated to find the material which is best in terms of price, texture and morphological layout and instantaneous availability. YBCO films deposited onto these substrates via chemical solution deposition (CSD) are analysed using XRD texture analysis, surface morphology analysis (high resolution AFM) and inductive measurement of the critical current density.

  20. Growth optimization and characterization of GaN epilayers on multifaceted (111) surfaces etched on Si(100) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ansah-Antwi, KwaDwo Konadu Chua, Soo Jin; Soh, Chew Beng; Liu, Hongfei

    2015-11-15

    The four nearest Si(111) multifaceted sidewalls were exposed inside an array of 3 μm-wide square holes patterned on an Si(100) substrate, and this patterned Si(100) substrate was used as a substrate for the deposition of a gallium nitride (GaN) epilayer. Subsequently the effect that the growth pressure, the etched-hole profiles, and the etched-hole arrangement had upon the quality of the as-grown GaN was investigated. The coalescence of the as-grown GaN epilayer on the exposed Si(111) facets was observed to be enhanced with reduced growth pressure from 120 to 90 Torr. A larger Si(001) plane area at the bottom of the etched holes resulted in bidirectional GaN domains, which resulted in poor material quality. The bidirectional GaN domains were observed as two sets of six peaks via a high-resolution x-ray diffraction phi scan of the GaN(10-11) reflection. It was also shown that a triangular array of etched holes was more desirable than square arrays of etched holes for the growth high-quality and continuous GaN films.

  1. Stimulation by potassium ions of the growth of Rhizopus oligosporus during liquid-and solid-substrate fermentations.

    PubMed

    Peñaloza, W; Davey, C L; Hedger, J N; Kell, D B

    1991-03-01

    Soya beans and several other beans and cereals have been used as substrates for tempe fermentation with the fungus Rhizopus oligosporus Saito. Except for the presence of alkaloids, the chemical composition of lupins (Lupinus mutabilis Sweet) is similar to that of soya beans. Therefore the potential of lupins for tempe production in regions with a long tradition of lupin consumption is promising. The preparation of the fermentation substrate when using bitter lupins (which contain significan quantities of alkaloids) as starting material includes a debittering stage to remove the alkaloids. However, we found that the debittering process yielded lupins that did not support the mycelial growth required in the tempe fermentation. We discovered that potassium is preferentially leached out during the debittering process. The effect of potassium on fungal biomass formation was monitored using a computerized system that determines biomass accretion by measurement of the electrical capacitance at radio frequencies. The importance of potassium for the growth of R. oligosporus was confirmed in liquid cultures. A linear relationship was found between biomass yield and K(+) concentration in the range of 1 to 10 mg/l. The present report represents one of the few demonstrations of a mineral deficiency during the growth of a fungus on a natural, solid substrate.

  2. Investigation of AlN thin film growth on MgO(111) substrates using low temperature helicon sputtering system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wei-Fan; Kao, Hui-Ling; Lin, Zih-Ping

    2016-02-01

    An aluminum nitride (AlN) thin film has been grown on annealed magnesium oxide (MgO) (111)-plane substrate using low temperature helicon sputtering system. Both AlN films on as-received and annealed MgO(111) substrate are single crystalline with AlN[0001] || MgO[111]. X-ray rocking curve shows that AlN film on annealed MgO exhibits superior crystalline quality, which means more suitable for AlN crystal growth. Two different growths were found for the deposition of AlN on annealed MgO. It is believed that the partially recovered substrate surface caused by annealing process provides atomic smooth surface terraces with small lattice mismatch for AlN crystal to grow in 2D mode, enhance grain size, and thus reduce the dislocation density. This is the first time demonstrated for the growth mechanism of single crystal AlN thin film prepared on MgO(111) by sputtering system.

  3. Growth of vertical and defect free InP nanowires on SrTiO3(001) substrate and comparison with growth on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, K.; Dumont, H.; Saint-Girons, G.; Penuelas, J.; Patriarche, G.; Hocevar, M.; Zwiller, V.; Gendry, M.

    2012-03-01

    We present a study of the molecular beam epitaxy of InP nanowires (NWs) on (001) oriented SrTiO3 (STO) substrates using vapor liquid solid mechanism and gold-indium as metal catalyst. The growth direction of InP NWs grown on STO(001) is compared with NWs grown on (001) and (111) oriented silicon substrates. Gold-indium dewetting under a flux of indium results in the majority of InP NWs growing vertically from the surface of STO(001). With the growth parameters we have used the NWs have a pure wurtzite structure and are free of stacking faults and cubic segments. The structural quality of the NWs is confirmed by micro-photoluminescence measurements showing a narrow peak linewidth of 6.5 meV.

  4. Stabilisation of spent mushroom substrate for application as a plant growth-promoting organic amendment.

    PubMed

    Paula, Fabiana S; Tatti, Enrico; Abram, Florence; Wilson, Jude; O'Flaherty, Vincent

    2017-07-01

    Over three million tonnes of spent mushroom substrate (SMS) are produced in Europe every year as a by-product of the cultivation of Agaricus bisporus. The management of SMS has become an increasing challenge for the mushroom production industry, and finding environmentally and economically sustainable solutions for this organic residue is, therefore, highly desirable. Due to its physical properties and nutrient content, SMS has great potential to be employed in agricultural and horticultural sectors, and further contribute to reduce the use of non-renewable resources, such as peat. However, SMS is often regarded as not being stable and/or mature, which hampers its wide use for crop production. Here, we demonstrate the stabilisation of SMS and its subsequent use as organic fertiliser and partial peat replacement in horticulture. The stabilisation was performed in a laboratory-scale composting system, with controlled temperature and aeration. Physical and chemical parameters were monitored during composting and provided information on the progress of the process. Water soluble carbohydrates (WSC) content was found to be the most reliable parameter to predict SMS stability. In situ oxygen consumption indicated the main composting phases, reflecting major changes in microbial activity. The structure of the bacterial community was also found to be a potential predictor of stability, as the compositional changes followed the composting progress. By contrast, the fungal community did not present clear successional process along the experiment. Maturity and quality of the stabilised SMS were assessed in a horticultural growing trial. When used as the sole fertiliser source, SMS was able to support Lolium multiflorum (Italian ryegrass) growth and significantly improved grass yield with a concentration-dependent response, increasing grass biomass up to 300%, when compared to the untreated control. In summary, the results indicated that the method employed was efficient in

  5. Synthesis of epitaxial Si(100) nanowires on Si(100) substrate using vapor liquid solid growth in anodic aluminum oxide nanopore arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T.; Senz, S.; Shingubara, S.; Gösele, U.

    2007-06-01

    The synthesis of epitaxial Si nanowires with growth direction parallel to Si [100] on Si(100) substrate was demonstrated using a combination of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template, catalytic gold film sandwiched between the template and the Si(100) substrate and vapor-liquid-solid growth using SiH4 as the Si source. After growing out from the AAO nanopores, most Si nanowires changed their diameter and growth direction into larger diameter and <111> direction.

  6. Effects of U0126 and MK2206 on cell growth and re-growth of endometriotic stromal cells grown on substrates of varying stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Sachiko; Pouly, Jean-Luc; Canis, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common gynecological disorder responsible for infertility and pelvic pain. A complete cure for patients with endometriosis awaits new targets and strategies. Here we show that U0126 (a MEK inhibitor) and MK2206 (an AKT inhibitor) synergistically inhibit cell growth of deep endometriotic stromal cells (DES) grown on polyacrylamide gel substrates (PGS) of varying stiffness (2 or 30 kilopascal [kPa]) or plastic in vitro. No significant differences in cell proliferation were observed among DES, endometrial stromal cells of patients with endometriosis (EES) from the proliferative phase (P), EES-S (secretory phase) and EES-M (menstrual phase) compared to cells grown on a substrate of the same stiffness at both higher (U0126 [30 μM] and MK2206 [9 μM]) and lower (U0126 [15 μM] and MK2206 [4.5 μM]) combined doses. However, cell re-growth of DES after drug discontinuation was higher than that of EES-P and EES-S when cells were grown on rigid substrates at both combined doses. Combination U0126 and MK2206 treatment is more effective than each drug alone in cell growth inhibition of DES. However, further studies are required to investigate the mechanisms underlying high cell survival and proliferation after drug discontinuation for developing target therapies that prevent recurrence. PMID:28218307

  7. Growth of TiO{sub 2} Thin Film on Various Substrates using RF Magnetron Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Riyaz Ahmad Mohamed; Nayan, Nafarizal

    2011-03-30

    The conductivity of Titanium Dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) thin film fabricated using Radio Frequency (RF) Magnetron Sputtering on Silicon (Si), Indium doped--Tin Oxide (ITO) and microscope glass (M) substrates is presented in this paper. The dependant of thin film thickness and type of substrate been discussed. TiO{sub 2} was deposited using Ti target in Ar+O{sub 2}(45:10) mixture at 250 W for 45, 60, 75, 90, 105 and 120 minute. Resultant thickness varies from 295 nm to 724 nm with deposition rate 6.4 nm/min. On the other hand, resistivity, Rs value for ITO substrate is between 5.72x10{sup -7} to 1.54x10{sup -6{Omega}}.m, Si substrate range is between 3.52x10{sup -6} to 1.76x10{sup -5{Omega}}.m and M substrate range is between 99 to 332 {Omega}.m. The value of resistivity increases with the thickness of the thin film.

  8. Substrate Structures For Growth Of Highly Oriented And/Or Epitaxial Layers Thereon

    DOEpatents

    Arendt, Paul N.; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Groves, James R.; Jia, Quanxi

    2005-07-26

    A composite substrate structure including a substrate, a layer of a crystalline metal oxide or crystalline metal oxynitride material upon the substrate, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the crystalline metal oxide or crystalline metal oxynitride material layer is provided together with additional layers such as one or more layers of a buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer. Jc's of 2.3×106 A/cm2 have been demonstrated with projected Ic's of 320 Amperes across a sample 1 cm wide for a superconducting article including a flexible polycrystalline metallic substrate, an inert oxide material layer upon the surface of the flexible polycrystalline metallic substrate, a layer of a crystalline metal oxide or crystalline metal oxynitride material upon the layer of the inert oxide material, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the crystalline metal oxide or crystalline metal oxynitride material layer, a layer of a buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer, and, a top-layer of a high temperature superconducting material upon the layer of a buffer material.

  9. PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE4 Modulates Phytochrome-Mediated Control of Hypocotyl Growth Orientation1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Schepens, Isabelle; Boccalandro, Hernán E.; Kami, Chitose; Casal, Jorge J.; Fankhauser, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Gravity and light are major factors shaping plant growth. Light perceived by phytochromes leads to seedling deetiolation, which includes the deviation from vertical hypocotyl growth and promotes hypocotyl phototropism. These light responses enhance survival of young seedlings during their emergence from the soil. The PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE (PKS) family is composed of four members in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana): PKS1 to PKS4. Here we show that PKS4 is a negative regulator of both phytochrome A- and B-mediated inhibition of hypocotyl growth and promotion of cotyledon unfolding. Most prominently, pks4 mutants show abnormal phytochrome-modulated hypocotyl growth orientation. In dark-grown seedlings hypocotyls change from the original orientation defined by seed position to the upright orientation defined by gravity and light reduces the magnitude of this shift. In older seedlings with the hypocotyls already oriented by gravity, light promotes the deviation from vertical orientation. Based on the characterization of pks4 mutants we propose that PKS4 inhibits changes in growth orientation under red or far-red light. Our data suggest that in these light conditions PKS4 acts as an inhibitor of asymmetric growth. This hypothesis is supported by the phenotype of PKS4 overexpressers. Together with previous findings, these results indicate that the PKS family plays important functions during light-regulated tropic growth responses. PMID:18390804

  10. Microbial ecology of extreme environments: Antarctic dry valley yeasts and growth in substrate-limited habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishniac, H. S.

    1982-01-01

    The success of the Antarctic Dry Valley yeasts presumeably results from adaptations to multiple stresses, to low temperatures and substrate-limitation as well as prolonged resting periods enforced by low water availability. Previous investigations have suggested that the crucial stress is substrate limitation. Specific adaptations may be pinpointed by comparing the physiology of the Cryptococcus vishniacii complex, the yeasts of the Tyrol Valley, with their congeners from other habitats. Progress was made in methods of isolation and definition of ecological niches, in the design of experiments in competition for limited substrate, and in establishing the relationships of the Cryptococcus vishniacii complex with other yeasts. In the course of investigating relationships, a new method for 25SrRNA homology was developed. For the first time it appears that 25SrRNA homology may reflect parallel or convergent evolution.

  11. Effect of storage on the respirometric relationship between substrate utilization and microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Ciggin, A S; Orhon, D

    2014-09-01

    The paper evaluated the impact of substrate storage on the respirometric assessment of process stoichiometry based on oxygen uptake rate (OUR) measurements. Two parallel sequencing batch reactors were operated with pulse feeding of synthetic substrate mixture at a sludge age of 8 days and 2 days. During the cycle experiments with acetate, 40-45% of acetate was converted to polyhydroxybutyrate, which was partly consumed during each cycle. Respirometric analysis also yielded OUR profiles for the corresponding cyclic operation. A mass balance expression was derived based on oxygen utilization. Oxygen demands calculated on the basis of partial PHB utilization closely matched the experimental values retrieved from OUR profiles within limits of analytical precision. The relative contribution of storage mechanism represented more than 50% of overall oxygen demand. Substrate storage, when totally disregarded or not properly evaluated, was observed to involve an error of around 10% on overall the oxygen demand.

  12. Growth of ZnO:Al thin films onto different substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Prepelita, Petronela; Medianu, R.; Garoi, F.; Moldovan, A.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we present some results regarding undoped and doped ZnO thin films deposited on various substrates like glass, silicon and kapton by rf magnetron sputtering. The influence of the amount of aluminum as well as the usage of different substrates on the final photovoltaic properties of the thin films is studied. For this, structural-morphological and optical investigations on the thin films are conducted. It was found that three important factors must be taken into account for adjusting the final desired application intended for the deposited thin films. These factors are: deposition conditions, the nature of both the dopant material and the substrate. A comparison study between undoped and doped case is also realized. Smooth Al doped ZnO thin films with a polycrystalline structure and a lower roughness than undoped ZnO are obtained.

  13. Growth and characterization of CdS thin films on polymer substrates for photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Park, Yongseob; Kim, Eung Kwon; Lee, Suho; Lee, Jaehyeong

    2014-05-01

    In this work, cadmium sulfide (CdS) films were deposited on flexible polymer substrates such as polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). The r.f. magnetron sputtering, which is cost-effective scalable technique, was used for the film deposition. The structural and optical properties of the films grown at different sputtering pressures were investigated. When the CdS film was deposited at lower pressure, the crystallinity and the preferred orientation toward c-axis in hexagonal phase was improved. However, the optical transmittance was reduced as the sputtering pressure was decreased. Compared with the glass substrate, CdS films grown on polymer substrates were exhibited some wore structural and optical characteristics. CdTe thin film solar cell applied to sputtered CdS as a window layer showed a maximum efficiency of 11.6%.

  14. Growth of carbon nanotubes by Fe-catalyzed chemical vapor processes on silicon-based substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelucci, Renato; Rizzoli, Rita; Vinciguerra, Vincenzo; Fortuna Bevilacqua, Maria; Guerri, Sergio; Corticelli, Franco; Passini, Mara

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, a site-selective catalytic chemical vapor deposition synthesis of carbon nanotubes on silicon-based substrates has been developed in order to get horizontally oriented nanotubes for field effect transistors and other electronic devices. Properly micro-fabricated silicon oxide and polysilicon structures have been used as substrates. Iron nanoparticles have been obtained both from a thin Fe film evaporated by e-gun and from iron nitrate solutions accurately dispersed on the substrates. Single-walled nanotubes with diameters as small as 1 nm, bridging polysilicon and silicon dioxide “pillars”, have been grown. The morphology and structure of CNTs have been characterized by SEM, AFM and Raman spectroscopy.

  15. Nickel enhanced graphene growth directly on dielectric substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wofford, Joseph M. E-mail: lopes@pdi-berlin.de; Lopes, Joao Marcelo J. E-mail: lopes@pdi-berlin.de; Riechert, Henning; Speck, Florian; Seyller, Thomas

    2016-07-28

    The efficacy of Ni as a surfactant to improve the crystalline quality of graphene grown directly on dielectric Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy is examined. Simultaneously exposing the substrate to a Ni flux throughout C deposition at 950 °C led to improved charge carrier mobility and a Raman spectrum indicating less structural disorder in the resulting nanocrystalline graphene film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that no residual Ni could be detected in the film and showed a decrease in the intensity of the defect-related component of the C1s level. Similar improvements were not observed when a lower substrate temperature (850 °C) was used. A close examination of the Raman spectra suggests that Ni reduces the concentration of lattice vacancies in the film, possibly by catalytically assisting adatom incorporation.

  16. Investigation of Si-substrate preparation for GaAs-on-Si MBE growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayambaki, M.; Callec, R.; Constantinidis, G.; Papavassiliou, Ch.; Löchtermann, E.; Krasny, H.; Papadakis, N.; Panayotatos, P.; Georgakilas, A.

    1995-12-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and material characterization techniques have been used to investigate different chemical treatments for the preparation of Si substrates for GaAs-on-Si molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The need for a Si surface passivating oxide is justified and three different oxidizing solutions are compared for substrate cleanliness and oxide volatility. It is shown that the SC2 solution HCl : H 2O 2 : H 2O (1 : 1 : 6) at 75°C is an appropriate treatment for the final Si cleaning step, since it results to a very volatile oxide that can be desorbed at 750°C, without compromising Si surface cleanliness and GaAs purity. Si wafers with optimized preparation/packaging may also be used as "EPI-ready" substrates within some time after manufacturing.

  17. Epitaxial growth of homogeneous single-crystalline AlN films on single-crystalline Cu (1 1 1) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenliang; Yang, Weijia; Liu, Zuolian; Lin, Yunhao; Zhou, Shizhong; Qian, Huirong; Gao, Fangliang; Yang, Hui; Li, Guoqiang

    2014-03-01

    The homogeneous and crack free single-crystalline AlN thin films have been epitaxially grown on single-crystalline Cu (1 1 1) substrates with an in-plane alignment of AlN [11-20]//Cu [1-10] by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technology with an integrated laser rastering program. The as-grown AlN films are studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), polarized light microscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The spectroscopic ellipsometry reveals the excellent thickness uniformity of as-grown AlN films on the Cu (1 1 1) substrates with a root-mean-square (RMS) thickness inhomogeneity less than 2.6%. AFM and FESEM measurements indicate that very smooth and flat surface AlN films are obtained with a surface RMS roughness of 2.3 nm. The X-ray reflectivity image illustrates that there is a maximum of 1.2 nm thick interfacial layer existing between the as-grown AlN and Cu (1 1 1) substrates and is confirmed by HRTEM measurement, and reciprocal space mapping shows that almost fully relaxed AlN films are achieved only with a compressive strain of 0.48% within ∼321 nm thick films. This work demonstrates a possibility to obtain homogeneous and crack free single-crystalline AlN films on metallic substrates by PLD with optimized laser rastering program, and brings up a broad prospect for the application of acoustic filters that require abrupt hetero-interfaces between the AlN films and the metallic electrodes.

  18. Homoepitaxial growth of catalyst-free GaN wires on N-polar substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. J.; Perillat-Merceroz, G.; Sam-Giao, D.; Durand, C.; Eymery, J.

    2010-10-01

    The shape of c-oriented GaN nanostructures is found to be directly related to the crystal polarity. As evidenced by convergent beam electron diffraction applied to GaN nanostructures grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy on c-sapphire substrates: wires grown on nitridated sapphire have the N-polarity ([0001¯]) whereas pyramidal crystals have Ga-polarity ([0001]). In the case of homoepitaxy, the GaN wires can be directly selected using N-polar GaN freestanding substrates and exhibit good optical properties. A schematic representation of the kinetic Wulff's plot points out the effect of surface polarity.

  19. Effect of petroleum-derived substances on life history traits of black bean aphid (Aphis fabae Scop.) and on the growth and chemical composition of broad bean.

    PubMed

    Rusin, Milena; Gospodarek, Janina; Nadgórska-Socha, Aleksandra; Barczyk, Gabriela

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effects of various petroleum-derived substances, namely petrol, diesel fuel and spent engine oil, on life history traits and population dynamics of the black bean aphid Aphis fabae Scop. and on growth and chemical composition of its host plant Vicia faba L. Each substance was tested separately, using two concentrations (9 g kg(-1) and 18 g kg(-1)). The experiment was conducted in four replications (four pots with five plants in each pot per treatment). Plants were cultivated in both control and contaminated soils. After six weeks from soil contamination and five weeks from sowing the seeds, observations of the effect of petroleum-derived substances on traits of three successive generations of aphids were conducted. Aphids were inoculated separately on leaves using cylindrical cages hermetically closed on both sides. Contamination of aphid occurred through its host plant. Results showed that all tested substances adversely affected A. fabae life history traits and population dynamics: extension of the prereproductive period, reduction of fecundity and life span, reduction of the population intrinsic growth rate. In broad bean, leaf, roots, and shoot growth was also impaired in most conditions, whereas nutrient and heavy metal content varied according to substances, their concentration, as well as plant part analysed. Results indicate that soil contamination with petroleum-derived substances entails far-reaching changes not only in organisms directly exposed to these pollutants (plants), but also indirectly in herbivores (aphids) and consequently provides information about potential negative effects on further links of the food chain, i.e., for predators and parasitoids.

  20. A one-dimensional model for the growth of CdTe quantum dots on Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, S. C.; Ferreira, S. O.

    2006-03-01

    Recent experiments involving CdTe films grown on Si(111) substrates by hot wall epitaxy revealed features not previously observed [S.O. Ferreira, et al., J. Appl. Phys. 93 (2003) 1195]. This system, which follows the Volmer Weber growth mode with nucleation of isolated 3D islands for less than one monolayer of evaporated material, was described by a peculiar behavior of the quantum dot (QD) size distributions. In this work, we proposed a kinetic deposition model to reproduce these new features. The model, which includes thermally activated diffusion and evaporation of CdTe, qualitatively reproduced the experimental QD size distributions. Moreover, the model predicts a transition from Stranski Krastanow growth mode at lower temperatures to Volmer Weber growth mode at higher ones characterized through the QD width distributions.

  1. Direct Growth of CdTe on a (211) Si Substrate with Vapor Phase Epitaxy Using a Metallic Cd Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iso, Kenji; Gokudan, Yuya; Shiraishi, Masumi; Murakami, Hisashi; Koukitu, Akinori

    2017-10-01

    We successfully performed epitaxial CdTe growth on a Si (211) substrate with vapor-phase epitaxy using a cost-effective metallic cadmium source as a group-II precursor. The thermodynamic data demonstrate that the combination of metallic Cd and diisopropyl-telluride (DiPTe) with a H2 carrier gas enables the growth of CdTe crystals. A CdTe single crystal with a (422) surface orientation was obtained when a growth temperature between 600°C and 650°C was employed. The surface morphology and crystalline quality were improved with increasing film thickness. The full-width at half-maximum of the x-ray rocking curves with a film thickness of 15.7 μm for the skew-symmetrical (422) and asymmetrical (111) reflection were 528 arcsec and 615 arcsec, respectively.

  2. Development of a root feeding system based on a fiber ion-exchange substrate for space plant growth chamber "Vitacycle".

    PubMed

    Berkovich, Yu A; Krivobok, N M; Krivobok, S M; Matusevich, V V; Soldatov, V S

    2003-01-01

    Selecting a plant root nutrient delivery system is one of the key aspects of designing root modules for space plant growth chambers. This article examines a number of the nutrient delivery systems and shows the most suitable technique for providing nutrients to roots in microgravity, which to date are ion-exchange artificial soils. In addition, this article characterizes the ion composition and hydrophysical parameters of a new Russian artificial ion charged fiber substrate, BIONA-V3. The BIONA-V3 substrate is comprised of ion-exchange resin fibers. The experimental data concerning the effects of anionic and cationic components on plant biomass is presented. Preliminary experiments with BIONA-V3 showed that 1 kg of dry BIONA-V3 produces up to 2.4 kg (fresh mass) of cabbage leaf or 180 g of dry plant mass per 1 dm3 of the substrate. Therefore, the root zone volume can be as small as 120 cm3 per plant. Further optimizing the nutrient composition of the resin fibers can increase space plant growth chamber productivity.

  3. MBE growth of Sb-based bulk nBn infrared photodetector structures on 6-inch GaSb substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Amy W. K.; Lubyshev, Dmitri; Qiu, Yueming; Fastenau, Joel M.; Wu, Ying; Furlong, Mark J.; Tybjerg, Marius; Martinez, Rebecca J.; Mowbray, Andrew; Smith, Brian

    2015-06-01

    The GaSb-based 6.1 Å lattice constant family of materials and heterostructures provides rich bandgap engineering possibilities and have received considerable attention for their potential and demonstrated performance in infrared (IR) detection and imaging applications. Mid-wave and long-wave IR photodetectors are progressing toward commercial manufacturing applications. To succeed, they must move from research laboratory settings to general semiconductor production, and high-quality GaSb-based epitaxial wafers with diameter larger than the current standard 3-inch are highly desirable. 4-inch GaSb substrates have been in production for a couple of years and are now commercially available. Recently, epi-ready GaSb substrates with diameter in excess of 6-inch were successfully produced. In this work, we report on the MBE (Molecular Beam Epitaxy) growth of generic MWIR bulk nBn photodetectors on 6-inch diameter GaSb substrates. The surface morphology, optical and structural quality of the epiwafers as evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), Nomarski microscopy, low temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD) will be discussed. Current density versus voltage (J-V) and photoresponsivity measurements from large-area mesa diode fabricated will also be reported. Material and device properties of these 6-inch epiwafers will be compared to similar structures grown on commercially available 4-inch diameter GaSb substrates.

  4. Effects of substrate water potential in root growth of Agave salmiana Otto ex Salm-Dyck seedlings.

    PubMed

    Peña-Valdivia, Cecilia B; Sánchez-Urdaneta, Adriana B

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that root of maguey (Agave salmiana Otto ex Salm-Dyck) seedlings reacts during the first 24 h to low substrate water potential (PsiW), by anatomical modifications. Three-4 cm root length seedlings were planted in vermiculite for 24 h at PsiW between -0.03 and -2.35 MPa. Root dimensions, proline content and anatomy were evaluated. Substrate PsiW between -0.65 and -2.35 MPa did not significantly affect longitudinal root growth. However, proline content significantly increased from 1.6 to 2.1 micromoles mg(-1). Significant reductions of transverse root area (41%), thickness of mucilage covering the epidermis (47%), thickness of epidermis (between 15 and 46%), area of the parenchyma (between 35 and 41%) and number of vessels (up to 28%) were observed with PsiW of -2.35 MPa. In contrast, thickness of xylem wall, diameter of xylem vessels and the number of cells of the cortex of the differentiation root region significantly increased (64, 17, and 97%, respectively). The anatomical changes associated with low substrate PsiW indicate a net increase of root apoplatic paths; structures involved in water conduction increased their diameter under low substrate PsiW conditions and anatomical changes occurred during the first 24 h of water stress.

  5. Hierarchical ZnO Nanowire Growth with Tunable Orientations on Versatile Substrates Using Atomic Layer Deposition Seeding

    SciTech Connect

    Bielinski, Ashley R.; Kazyak, Eric; Schleputz, Christian M.; Jung, Hee Joon; Wood, Kevin N.; Dasgupta, Neil P.

    2015-07-14