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Sample records for broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate

  1. Transgenic rice expressing a codon-modified synthetic CP4-EPSPS confers tolerance to broad-spectrum herbicide, glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Chhapekar, Sushil; Raghavendrarao, Sanagala; Pavan, Gadamchetty; Ramakrishna, Chopperla; Singh, Vivek Kumar; Phanindra, Mullapudi Lakshmi Venkata; Dhandapani, Gurusamy; Sreevathsa, Rohini; Ananda Kumar, Polumetla

    2015-05-01

    Highly tolerant herbicide-resistant transgenic rice was developed by expressing codon-modified synthetic CP4--EPSPS. The transformants could tolerate up to 1% commercial glyphosate and has the potential to be used for DSR (direct-seeded rice). Weed infestation is one of the major biotic stress factors that is responsible for yield loss in direct-seeded rice (DSR). Herbicide-resistant rice has potential to improve the efficiency of weed management under DSR. Hence, the popular indica rice cultivar IR64, was genetically modified using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation with a codon-optimized CP4-EPSPS (5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase) gene, with N-terminal chloroplast targeting peptide from Petunia hybrida. Integration of the transgenes in the selected rice plants was confirmed by Southern hybridization and expression by Northern and herbicide tolerance assays. Transgenic plants showed EPSPS enzyme activity even at high concentrations of glyphosate, compared to untransformed control plants. T0, T1 and T2 lines were tested by herbicide bioassay and it was confirmed that the transgenic rice could tolerate up to 1% of commercial Roundup, which is five times more in dose used to kill weeds under field condition. All together, the transgenic rice plants developed in the present study could be used efficiently to overcome weed menace.

  2. Impact of glyphosate and glyphosate-based herbicides on the freshwater environment.

    PubMed

    Annett, Robert; Habibi, Hamid R; Hontela, Alice

    2014-05-01

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine] is a broad spectrum, post emergent herbicide and is among the most widely used agricultural chemicals globally. Initially developed to control the growth of weed species in agriculture, this herbicide also plays an important role in both modern silviculture and domestic weed control. The creation of glyphosate tolerant crop species has significantly increased the demand and use of this herbicide and has also increased the risk of exposure to non-target species. Commercially available glyphosate-based herbicides are comprised of multiple, often proprietary, constituents, each with a unique level of toxicity. Surfactants used to increase herbicide efficacy have been identified in some studies as the chemicals responsible for toxicity of glyphosate-based herbicides to non-target species, yet they are often difficult to chemically identify. Most glyphosate-based herbicides are not approved for use in the aquatic environment; however, measurable quantities of the active ingredient and surfactants are detected in surface waters, giving them the potential to alter the physiology of aquatic organisms. Acute toxicity is highly species dependant across all taxa, with toxicity depending on the timing, magnitude, and route of exposure. The toxicity of glyphosate to amphibians has been a major focus of recent research, which has suggested increased sensitivity compared with other vertebrates due to their life history traits and reliance on both the aquatic and terrestrial environments. This review is designed to update previous reviews of glyphosate-based herbicide toxicity, with a focus on recent studies of the aquatic toxicity of this class of chemicals. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Loss of glyphosate efficacy: a changing weed spectrum in Georgia cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction of glyphosate resistance into crops through genetic modification has revolutionized crop protection. Glyphosate, the proverbial silver bullet, is a broad spectrum herbicide with favorable environmental characteristics and effective broad-spectrum weed control that has greatly improved ...

  4. Electrochemical degradation and mineralization of glyphosate herbicide.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nam; Drogui, Patrick; Doan, Tuan Linh; Le, Thanh Son; Nguyen, Hoai Chau

    2017-12-01

    The presence of herbicide is a concern for both human and ecological health. Glyphosate is occasionally detected as water contaminants in agriculture areas where the herbicide is used extensively. The removal of glyphosate in synthetic solution using advanced oxidation process is a possible approach for remediation of contaminated waters. The ability of electrochemical oxidation for the degradation and mineralization of glyphosate herbicide was investigated using Ti/PbO 2 anode. The current intensity, treatment time, initial concentration and pH of solution are the influent parameters on the degradation efficiency. An experimental design methodology was applied to determine the optimal condition (in terms of cost/effectiveness) based on response surface methodology. Glyphosate concentration (C 0  = 16.9 mg L -1 ) decreased up to 0.6 mg L -1 when the optimal conditions were imposed (current intensity of 4.77 A and treatment time of 173 min). The removal efficiencies of glyphosate and total organic carbon were 95 ± 16% and 90.31%, respectively. This work demonstrates that electrochemical oxidation is a promising process for degradation and mineralization of glyphosate.

  5. [Poisonings with the herbicides glyphosate and glyphosate-trimesium].

    PubMed

    Mortensen, O S; Sørensen, F W; Gregersen, M; Jensen, K

    2000-08-28

    Generally the herbicide glyphosate is considered harmless to humans. Glyphosate-trimesium is labelled harmful (Xn), whereas glyphosate-isopropylamine carries no warning sign. As cases of serious poisoning have emerged contacts to the Poison Information Centre have been reviewed. The persons exposed were mainly smaller children and adults 20 to 59 years of age. Oral exposure was recorded in 47 persons, inhalation exposure in 24 and topical contact in 42. About one fourth of the exposed persons were asymptomatic. Most of the symptomatic poisonings demonstrated complaints from the mouth, the gastrointestinal tract and the airways. Eleven patients were admitted to hospital. Two died, one of them having ingested the isopropylamine salt, the other the trimesium salt. Death ensued quickly in the latter patient. A similar fate was observed in a child--not included in the present material--who had also ingested the trimesium compound.

  6. Effectiveness of Glyphosate Mixed With Soil-Active Herbicides

    Treesearch

    James D. Haywood; Thomas W. Melder

    1991-01-01

    Broadcasting mixtures of glyphosate and soil-active herbicides over loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings may control established weeds and emerging weed seedlings better than either glyphosate or soil-active herbicides alone. However, herbicides will injure young pines if applied improperly. To examine seedling injury, we broadcast two rates of...

  7. RETRACTED: Glyphosate herbicide induces genotoxic effect and physiological disturbances in Bulinus truncatus snails.

    PubMed

    Bakry, Fayez A; Ismail, Somaya M; Abd El-Atti, Mahmoud S

    2015-09-01

    Herbicides are being used in agriculture for controlling noxious weed. Glyphosate is a herbicide that is widely applied to cereal crops in Egypt and is used in controlling a very broad spectrum of weeds. The present study was designed to investigate the response of the snail Bulinus truncatus as a bioindicator for physiological and molecular aspects of B. truncatus snails after exposure to sublethal concentrations of glyphosate for two weeks. In treating snails, glucose concentration (GL) in the haemolymph as well as lactate (LT) in soft tissues of treated snails increased, while glycogen (GN), pyruvate (PV), total protein (TP), nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) levels in snail's tissues decreased. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR), thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), glycogen phosphorylase (GP), glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase), succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) enzymes in homogenate of snail's tissues were reduced in response to the treatment with the herbicide, while lipid peroxide (LP), sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) and transaminases (GOT and GPT) activity increased (P < 0.001). The changes in the number, position and intensity of DNA bands induced by glyphosate herbicide may be attributed to the fact that the herbicide can induce genotoxicity through DNA damage. Thus, the present result indicated that the genotoxicity products at low concentration and for long time treatment showed the hazard of herbicide addiction on man's life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of glyphosate on wheat quality characteristics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide in the world. It is a non-selective, broad spectrum, post-emergence herbicide, and therefore controls a wide range of different species. Although glyphosate is effective in weed control, side effects of this herbicide on the crop itself, micro and macro o...

  9. A red and far-red light receptor mutation confers resistance to the herbicide glyphosate

    PubMed Central

    Sharkhuu, Altanbadralt; Narasimhan, Meena L; Merzaban, Jasmeen S; Bressan, Ray A; Weller, Steve; Gehring, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Glyphosate is a widely applied broad-spectrum systemic herbicide that inhibits competitively the penultimate enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) from the shikimate pathway, thereby causing deleterious effects. A glyphosate-resistant Arabidopsis mutant (gre1) was isolated and genetic analyses indicated that a dysfunctional red (R) and far-red (FR) light receptor, phytochrome B (phyB), caused this phenotype. This finding is consistent with increased glyphosate sensitivity and glyphosate-induced shikimate accumulation in low R:FR light, and the induction of genes encoding enzymes of the shikimate pathway in high R:FR light. Expression of the shikimate pathway genes exhibited diurnal oscillation and this oscillation was altered in the phyB mutant. Furthermore, transcript analysis suggested that this diurnal oscillation was not only dependent on phyB but was also due to circadian regulatory mechanisms. Our data offer an explanation of the well documented observation that glyphosate treatment at various times throughout the day, with their specific composition of light quality and intensity, results in different efficiencies of the herbicide. PMID:24654847

  10. Concerns over use of glyphosate-based herbicides and risks associated with exposures: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Myers, John Peterson; Antoniou, Michael N; Blumberg, Bruce; Carroll, Lynn; Colborn, Theo; Everett, Lorne G; Hansen, Michael; Landrigan, Philip J; Lanphear, Bruce P; Mesnage, Robin; Vandenberg, Laura N; Vom Saal, Frederick S; Welshons, Wade V; Benbrook, Charles M

    2016-02-17

    The broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate (common trade name "Roundup") was first sold to farmers in 1974. Since the late 1970s, the volume of glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) applied has increased approximately 100-fold. Further increases in the volume applied are likely due to more and higher rates of application in response to the widespread emergence of glyphosate-resistant weeds and new, pre-harvest, dessicant use patterns. GBHs were developed to replace or reduce reliance on herbicides causing well-documented problems associated with drift and crop damage, slipping efficacy, and human health risks. Initial industry toxicity testing suggested that GBHs posed relatively low risks to non-target species, including mammals, leading regulatory authorities worldwide to set high acceptable exposure limits. To accommodate changes in GBH use patterns associated with genetically engineered, herbicide-tolerant crops, regulators have dramatically increased tolerance levels in maize, oilseed (soybeans and canola), and alfalfa crops and related livestock feeds. Animal and epidemiology studies published in the last decade, however, point to the need for a fresh look at glyphosate toxicity. Furthermore, the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer recently concluded that glyphosate is "probably carcinogenic to humans." In response to changing GBH use patterns and advances in scientific understanding of their potential hazards, we have produced a Statement of Concern drawing on emerging science relevant to the safety of GBHs. Our Statement of Concern considers current published literature describing GBH uses, mechanisms of action, toxicity in laboratory animals, and epidemiological studies. It also examines the derivation of current human safety standards. We conclude that: (1) GBHs are the most heavily applied herbicide in the world and usage continues to rise; (2) Worldwide, GBHs often contaminate drinking water sources, precipitation, and air

  11. Effects of interactions between Collembola and soil microbial community on the degradation of glyphosate-based herbicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, J.; Lee, Y. S.; Son, J.; Kim, Y.; Nam, T. H.; Cho, K.

    2017-12-01

    Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide because of its broad spectrum activity and effectiveness, however, little is known about adverse effects on non-target species and their interactions. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of glyphosate on interactions between Collembola and soil microbial community and the effect of Collembola on degradation of glyphosate. The experiment carried out in PS container filled with 30g of soil according to OECD 232 guidelines. Investigating the effects of soil microbial community and Collembola on degradation of glyphosate, we prepared defaunated field soil (only maintaining soil microbial community, sampling in May and September, 2016.) and autoclaved soil with 0, 10, 30 adults of Paronychiurus kimi (Collembola) respectively. Survived adults and hatched juveniles of P. kimi were counted after 28-day exposures in both soils spiked with 100 mg/kg of glyphosate. Glyphosate in soil of 7, 14, 21, 28 days after spiking of glyphosate based herbicide was analyzed by spectrophotometer (Jan et al., 2009). Also soil microbial community structure was investigated using phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) composition analysis of soils following the procedures given by the Sherlock Microbial Identification System (MIDI Inc., Newark, DE). Glyphosate (100mg/kg soil) has no effects on reproduction and survival of P. kimi in any soils. Also, glyphosate in soils with Collembola was more rapidly degraded. Rapid increase of soil microbial biomass(PLFAs) was shown in soil with Collembola addition. This result showed that glyphosate affected interactions between Collembola and soil microorganisms, and also soil microbial community affected by Collembola changed degradation of glyphosate.

  12. Differential Growth Responses of Marine Phytoplankton to Herbicide Glyphosate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cong; Lin, Xin; Li, Ling; Lin, Senjie

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate is a globally popular herbicide to kill weeds and its wide applications may lead to accumulation in coastal oceans as a source of phosphorus (P) nutrient or growth inhibitor of phytoplankton. We studied the physiological effects of glyphosate on fourteen species representing five major coastal phytoplankton phyla (haptophyta, bacillariophyta, dinoflagellata, raphidophyta, and chlorophyta). Based on growth responses to different concentrations of glyphosate under contrasting dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) conditions, we found that phytoplankton species could be classified into five groups. Group I (Emiliania huxleyi, Skeletonema costatum, Phaeodactylum tricornutum) could utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth in axenic culture, but in the presence of DIP, they were inhibited by both 36-μM and 360-μM glyphosate. Group II (Karenia mikimotoi, Prorocentrum minimum, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Symbiodinium sp., Heterosigma akashiwo and Alexandrium catenella) could not utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth, and in the presence of DIP growth was not affected by 36-μM but inhibited by 360-μM glyphosate. Glyphosate consistently enhanced growth of Group III (Isochrysis galbana) and inhibited Group IV (Thalassiosira weissflogii, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Chattonella marina) regardless of DIP condition. Group V (Amphidinium carterae) exhibited no measurable response to glyphosate regardless of DIP condition. This grouping is not congruent with the phylogenetic relationships of the phytoplankton species suggesting functional differentiation driven by environmental pressure. We conclude that glyphosate could be used as P-source by some species while is toxic to some other species and yet has no effects on others. The observed differential effects suggest that the continued use of glyphosate and increasing concentration of this herbicide in the coastal waters will likely exert significant impact on coastal marine phytoplankton

  13. Environmental and health effects of the herbicide glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Van Bruggen, A H C; He, M M; Shin, K; Mai, V; Jeong, K C; Finckh, M R; Morris, J G

    2018-03-01

    The herbicide glyphosate, N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine, has been used extensively in the past 40years, under the assumption that side effects were minimal. However, in recent years, concerns have increased worldwide about the potential wide ranging direct and indirect health effects of the large scale use of glyphosate. In 2015, the World Health Organization reclassified glyphosate as probably carcinogenic to humans. A detailed overview is given of the scientific literature on the movement and residues of glyphosate and its breakdown product aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA) in soil and water, their toxicity to macro- and microorganisms, their effects on microbial compositions and potential indirect effects on plant, animal and human health. Although the acute toxic effects of glyphosate and AMPA on mammals are low, there are animal data raising the possibility of health effects associated with chronic, ultra-low doses related to accumulation of these compounds in the environment. Intensive glyphosate use has led to the selection of glyphosate-resistant weeds and microorganisms. Shifts in microbial compositions due to selective pressure by glyphosate may have contributed to the proliferation of plant and animal pathogens. Research on a link between glyphosate and antibiotic resistance is still scarce but we hypothesize that the selection pressure for glyphosate-resistance in bacteria could lead to shifts in microbiome composition and increases in antibiotic resistance to clinically important antimicrobial agents. We recommend interdisciplinary research on the associations between low level chronic glyphosate exposure, distortions in microbial communities, expansion of antibiotic resistance and the emergence of animal, human and plant diseases. Independent research is needed to revisit the tolerance thresholds for glyphosate residues in water, food and animal feed taking all possible health risks into account. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide and predation threat on the behaviour of agile frog tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Mikó, Zsanett; Ujszegi, János; Gál, Zoltán; Hettyey, Attila

    2017-06-01

    The widespread application of pesticides emphasises the importance of understanding the impacts of these chemicals on natural communities. The most commonly applied broad-spectrum herbicides in the world are glyphosate-based herbicides, which have been suggested to induce significant behavioural changes in non-target organisms even at low environmental concentrations. To scrutinize the behavioural effects of herbicide-exposure we exposed agile frog (Rana dalmatina) tadpoles in an outdoor mesocosm experiment to three concentrations of a glyphosate-based herbicide (0, 2 and 6.5mg acid equivalent (a.e.) / L). To assess whether anti-predator behaviour is affected by the pesticide, we combined all levels of herbicide-exposure with three predator treatments (no predator, caged Aeshna cyanea dragonfly larvae or Lissotriton vulgaris newt adults) in a full factorial design. We observed hiding, activity, proximity to the predator cage and vertical position of tadpoles. We found that at the higher herbicide concentration tadpoles decreased their activity and more tadpoles were hiding, and at least at the lower concentration their vertical position was closer to the water surface than in tadpoles of the control treatment. Tadpoles also decreased their activity in the presence of dragonfly larvae, but did not hide more in response to either predator, nor did tadpoles avoid predators spatially. Further, exposure to the herbicide did not significantly influence behavioural responses to predation threat. Our study documents a definite influence of glyphosate-based herbicides on the behaviour of agile frog tadpoles and indicates that some of these changes are similar to those induced by dangerous predators. This may suggest that the underlying physiological mechanisms or the adaptive value of behavioural changes may similar. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Using glyphosate herbicide in converting aspen to conifers.

    Treesearch

    Donald A. Perala

    1985-01-01

    Glyphosate at 1.5 to 2.0 lbs. Per acre active ingredient will control aspen suckers, shrubs, and herbs when applied during August to early September. There appears to be some intersite variability in the efficacy of the herbicide.

  16. Removal of glyphosate herbicide from water using biopolymer membranes.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Rafael T A; Taketa, Thiago B; Gomes Neto, Reginaldo J; Oliveira, Jhones L; Campos, Estefânia V R; de Moraes, Mariana A; da Silva, Camila M G; Beppu, Marisa M; Fraceto, Leonardo F

    2015-03-15

    Enormous amounts of pesticides are manufactured and used worldwide, some of which reach soils and aquatic systems. Glyphosate is a non-selective herbicide that is effective against all types of weeds and has been used for many years. It can therefore be found as a contaminant in water, and procedures are required for its removal. This work investigates the use of biopolymeric membranes prepared with chitosan (CS), alginate (AG), and a chitosan/alginate combination (CS/AG) for the adsorption of glyphosate present in water samples. The adsorption of glyphosate by the different membranes was investigated using the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models, as well as the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The membranes were characterized regarding membrane solubility, swelling, mechanical, chemical and morphological properties. The results of kinetics experiments showed that adsorption equilibrium was reached within 4 h and that the CS membrane presented the best adsorption (10.88 mg of glyphosate/g of membrane), followed by the CS/AG bilayer (8.70 mg of glyphosate/g of membrane). The AG membrane did not show any adsorption capacity for this herbicide. The pseudo-second order model provided good fits to the glyphosate adsorption data on CS and CS/AG membranes, with high correlation coefficient values. Glyphosate adsorption by the membranes could be fitted by the Freundlich isotherm model. There was a high affinity between glyphosate and the CS membrane and moderate affinity in the case of the CS/AG membrane. Physico-chemical characterization of the membranes showed low values of solubility in water, indicating that the membranes are stable and not soluble in water. The SEM and AFM analysis showed evidence of the presence of glyphosate on CS membranes and on chitosan face on CS/AG membranes. The results showed that the glyphosate herbicide can be adsorbed by chitosan membranes and the proposed membrane-based methodology was successfully used to

  17. The herbicide Glyphosate affects nitrification in the Elbe estuary, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Tina; Lassen, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    The Elbe River is one of the biggest European rivers discharging into the North Sea. It also transports high amounts of nutrients and pollutants like pesticides. Important source regions of both nutrients and pollutants are located within the river catchment, which is dominated by agricultural land-use. From these agricultural soils, pesticides can be carried via the river and estuary into the North Sea. Glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine) is the most commonly used herbicide worldwide and mainly used to regulate unwanted plant growth and for the expedition of crop ripening. In Germany, ~ 6000 tons of glyphosate are applied yearly in agriculture and private use. Glyphosate is degradable by microorganisms and has a half-life in water of 35 to 60 days. This herbicide specifically inhibits 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS), an enzyme that catalyzes the biosynthesis of essential aromatic amino acids in plants, fungi, and bacteria. Nitrifying bacteria, which play an important role in the internal nitrogen cycling in the Elbe estuary, also possess this enzyme. The aim of our study was to quantify the concentration of glyphosate in water and sediment samples of the Elbe to get an overview about relevant environmental levels and to assess the impact of glyphosate on inhibition of nitrifying activities. To quantify the effect of glyphosate on nitrification activity, natural samples as well as pure cultures of Nitrosomonas europea (strain Nm50) were incubated with different concentrations of glyphosate over a period of some weeks. The nitrifying activity was determined according to changes of the nitrite and nitrate concentration as well as the cell number. Glyphosate was detectable in water and sediment samples in the Elbe estuary with up to 5 ppb mainly in the Port of Hamburg region. In both incubation experiments an inhibiting effect of glyphosate on nitrification could be shown. The incubated natural water sample was affected by a glyphosate

  18. Evaluation of estrogen receptor alpha activation by glyphosate-based herbicide constituents

    EPA Science Inventory

    The safety, including the endocrine disruptive capability, of glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) is a matter of intense debate. We evaluated the estrogenic potential of glyphosate, commercial GBHs and polyethoxylated tallowamine adjuvants present as co-formulants in GBHs. Glyph...

  19. Hemodialysis clearance of glyphosate following a life-threatening ingestion of glyphosate-surfactant herbicide.

    PubMed

    Garlich, F M; Goldman, M; Pepe, J; Nelson, L S; Allan, M J; Goldstein, D A; Goldfarb, D S; Hoffman, R S

    2014-01-01

    Ingestion of glyphosate-surfactant herbicides (GlySH) can result in acute kidney injury, electrolyte abnormalities, acidosis, cardiovascular collapse, and death. In severe toxicity, the use of hemodialysis is reported, but largely unsupported by kinetic analysis. We report the dialysis clearance of glyphosate following a suicidal ingestion of a glyphosate-containing herbicide. A 62-year-old man was brought to the emergency department (ED) 8.5 h after drinking a bottle of commercial herbicide containing a 41% solution of glyphosate isopropylamine, in polyoxyethyleneamine (POEA) surfactant and water. He was bradycardic and obtunded with respiratory depression necessitating intubation and mechanical ventilation. Initial laboratory results were significant for the following: pH, 7.11; PCO2, 64 mmHg; PO2, 48 mmHg; potassium, 7.8 mEq/L; Cr 3.3, mg/dL; bicarbonate, 22 mEq/L; anion gap, 18 mEq/L; and lactate, 7.5 mmol/L. Acidosis and hyperkalemia persisted despite ventilation and fluid resuscitation. The patient underwent hemodialysis 16 h post ingestion, after which he demonstrated resolution of acidosis and hyperkalemia, and improvement in clinical status. Serum glyphosate concentrations were drawn prior to, during, and after hemodialysis. The extraction ratio and hemodialysis clearance were calculated to be 91.8% and 97.5 mL/min, respectively. We demonstrate the successful clearance of glyphosate using hemodialysis, with corresponding clinical improvement in a patient with several poor prognostic factors (advanced age, large volume ingested, and impaired consciousness). The effects of hemodialysis on the surfactant compound are unknown. Hemodialysis can be considered when severe acidosis and acute kidney injury complicate ingestion of glyphosate-containing products.

  20. Glyphosate, other herbicides, and transformation products in Midwestern streams, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Kolpin, D.W.; Scribner, E.A.; Kuivila, K.M.; Sandstrom, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    The use of glyphosate has increased rapidly, and there is limited understanding of its environmental fate. The objective of this study was to document the occurrence of glyphosate and the transformation product aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in Midwestern streams and to compare their occurrence with that of more commonly measured herbicides such as acetochlor, atrazine, and metolachlor. Water samples were collected at sites on 51 streams in nine Midwestern states in 2002 during three runoff events: after the application of pre-emergence herbicides, after the application of post-emergence herbicides, and during harvest season. All samples were analyzed for glyphosate and 20 other herbicides using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry or high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The frequency of glyphosate and AMPA detection, range of concentrations in runoff samples, and ratios of AMPA to glyphosate concentrations did not vary throughout the growing season as substantially as for other herbicides like atrazine, probably because of different seasonal use patterns. Glyphosate was detected at or above 0.1 μg/1 in 35 percent of pre-emergence, 40 percent of post-emergence, and 31 percent of harvest season samples, with a maximum concentration of 8.7 μg/1. AMPA was detected at or above 0.1 μg/1 in 53 percent of pre-emergence, 83 percent of post-emergence, and 73 percent of harvest season samples, with a maximum concentration of 3.6 μg/1. Glyphosate was not detected at a concentration at or above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contamination level (MCL) of 700 μg/1 in any sample. Atrazine was detected at or above 0.1 μg/1 in 94 percent of pre-emergence, 96 percent of post-emergence, and 57 percent of harvest season samples, with a maximum concentration of 55 μg/1. Atrazine was detected at or above its MCL (3 μg/1) in 57 percent of pre-emergence and 33 percent of post-emergence samples

  1. Glyphosate resistance in common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.)from Mississippi, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glyphosate is one of the most commonly used broad-spectrum herbicides over the last 40 years. Due to widespread adoption of glyphosate-resistant (GR) crop technology, especially, corn, cotton, and soybean, several weed species in agronomic situations have developed resistance to this herbicide. Rese...

  2. Formulants of glyphosate-based herbicides have more deleterious impact than glyphosate on TM4 Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Vanlaeys, Alison; Dubuisson, Florine; Seralini, Gilles-Eric; Travert, Carine

    2018-06-04

    Roundup and Glyphogan are glyphosate-based herbicides containing the same concentration of glyphosate and confidential formulants. Formulants are declared as inert diluents but some are more toxic than glyphosate, such as the family of polyethoxylated alkylamines (POEA). We tested glyphosate alone, glyphosate-based herbicide formulations and POEA on the immature mouse Sertoli cell line (TM4), at concentrations ranging from environmental to agricultural-use levels. Our results show that formulations of glyphosate-based herbicides induce TM4 mitochondrial dysfunction (like glyphosate, but to a lesser extent), disruption of cell detoxification systems, lipid droplet accumulation and mortality at sub-agricultural doses. Formulants, especially those present in Glyphogan, are more deleterious than glyphosate and thus should be considered as active principles of these pesticides. Lipid droplet accumulation after acute exposure to POEA suggests the rapid penetration and accumulation of formulants, leading to mortality after 24 h. As Sertoli cells are essential for testicular development and normal onset of spermatogenesis, disturbance of their function by glyphosate-based herbicides could contribute to disruption of reproductive function demonstrated in mammals exposed to these pesticides at a prepubertal stage of development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Glyphosate herbicide affects belowground interactions between earthworms and symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi in a model ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Zaller, Johann G.; Heigl, Florian; Ruess, Liliane; Grabmaier, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Herbicides containing glyphosate are widely used in agriculture and private gardens, however, surprisingly little is known on potential side effects on non-target soil organisms. In a greenhouse experiment with white clover we investigated, to what extent a globally-used glyphosate herbicide affects interactions between essential soil organisms such as earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). We found that herbicides significantly decreased root mycorrhization, soil AMF spore biomass, vesicles and propagules. Herbicide application and earthworms increased soil hyphal biomass and tended to reduce soil water infiltration after a simulated heavy rainfall. Herbicide application in interaction with AMF led to slightly heavier but less active earthworms. Leaching of glyphosate after a simulated rainfall was substantial and altered by earthworms and AMF. These sizeable changes provide impetus for more general attention to side-effects of glyphosate-based herbicides on key soil organisms and their associated ecosystem services. PMID:25005713

  4. Questions concerning the potential impact of glyphosate-based herbicides on amphibians.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Norman; Reichenbecher, Wolfram; Teichmann, Hanka; Tappeser, Beatrix; Lötters, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Use of glyphosate-based herbicides is increasing worldwide. The authors review the available data related to potential impacts of these herbicides on amphibians and conduct a qualitative meta-analysis. Because little is known about environmental concentrations of glyphosate in amphibian habitats and virtually nothing is known about environmental concentrations of the substances added to the herbicide formulations that mainly contribute to adverse effects, glyphosate levels can only be seen as approximations for contamination with glyphosate-based herbicides. The impact on amphibians depends on the herbicide formulation, with different sensitivity of taxa and life stages. Effects on development of larvae apparently are the most sensitive endpoints to study. As with other contaminants, costressors mainly increase adverse effects. If and how glyphosate-based herbicides and other pesticides contribute to amphibian decline is not answerable yet due to missing data on how natural populations are affected. Amphibian risk assessment can only be conducted case-specifically, with consideration of the particular herbicide formulation. The authors recommend better monitoring of both amphibian populations and contamination of habitats with glyphosate-based herbicides, not just glyphosate, and suggest including amphibians in standardized test batteries to study at least dermal administration. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  5. The effect of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on the stability of the herbicide glyphosate during bread leavening.

    PubMed

    Low, F L; Shaw, I C; Gerrard, J A

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the ability of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to degrade the herbicide glyphosate during the fermentation cycle of the breadmaking process. Aqueous glyphosate was added to bread ingredients and kneaded by commercially available breadmaking equipment into dough cultures. Cultures were incubated in the breadmaker throughout the fermentation cycle. The recovery of glyphosate levels following fermentation was determined, thus allowing an estimation of glyphosate degradation by yeast. It was shown, for the first time, that S. cerevisiae plays a role in metabolizing glyphosate during the fermentation stages of breadmaking. Approximately 21% was degraded within 1 h. As a result of projected increases in the glyphosate use on wheat and the role of bread as a dietary staple, this may contribute to more informed decisions being made relating to the use of glyphosate on glyphosate-resistant wheat, from a public health/regulatory perspective.

  6. Efficacy of electrostatically-charged Glyphosate on ryegrass

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glyphosate, (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine, a broad spectrum, systemic, post-emergence herbicide, is used extensively for weed control in production agriculture throughout the world. The objective of this research was to determine whether or not it is beneficial to electrostatically charge herbicidal s...

  7. Effects of Glyphosate-Based Herbicide Sub-Lethal Concentrations on Fish Feeding Behavior.

    PubMed

    Giaquinto, Percilia Cardoso; de Sá, Marina Borges; Sugihara, Vanessa Seiko; Gonçalves, Bruno Bastos; Delício, Helton Carlos; Barki, Assaf

    2017-04-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides are widely used in agricultural systems. Although the target organism are particularly plant organisms, there are numerous studies showing adverse effects in aquatic animals, such as inhibition of acetyl cholinesterase, effects on kidney, liver, and gill and stressors effects. This study analyzed the effects of commercial formulation of glyphosate on feeding behavior in Pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus). Fish were exposed to three glyphosate concentrations (0.2, 0.6, and 1.8 ppm) for 15 days. At concentrations of 0.2 and 0.6 ppm, food intake decreased on day 13 and then returned to normal on day 15. At the highest glyphosate-based herbicide concentration, 1.8 ppm, food consumption decreased dramatically and did not recover on day 15. This study showed that glyphosate-based herbicide at sub-lethal concentrations can affect feed intake in pacu and consequently inhibits its growth.

  8. How-To-Do-It: Glyphosate: Herbicidal Effects, Mode of Action and Degradation in Soil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafarski, Pawel; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes the usefulness of glyphosate for a demonstration of its herbicidal properties. Includes a list of the materials, preparation of solutions, procedures, data collection and analysis for three activities involving this chemical. (CW)

  9. The need for independent research on the health effects of glyphosate-based herbicides.

    PubMed

    Landrigan, Philip J; Belpoggi, Fiorella

    2018-05-29

    Glyphosate, formulated as Roundup, is the world's most widely used herbicide. Glyphosate is used extensively on genetically modified (GM) food crops designed to tolerate the herbicide, and global use is increasing rapidly. Two recent reviews of glyphosate's health hazards report conflicting results. An independent review by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) found that glyphosate is a "probable human carcinogen". A review by the European Food Safety Agency (EFSA) found no evidence of carcinogenic hazard. These differing findings have produced regulatory uncertainty. Reflecting this regulatory uncertainty, the European Commission on November 27 2017, extended authorization for glyphosate for another 5 years, while the European Parliament opposed this decision and issued a call that pesticide approvals be based on peer-reviewed studies by independent scientists rather than on the current system that relies on proprietary industry studies. The Ramazzini Institute has initiated a pilot study of glyphosate's health hazards that will be followed by an integrated experimental research project. This evaluation will be independent of industry support and entirely sponsored by worldwide crowdfunding. The aim of the Ramazzini Institute project is to explore comprehensively the effects of exposures to glyphosate-based herbicides at current real-world levels on several toxicological endpoints, including carcinogenicity, long-term toxicity, neurotoxicity, endocrine disrupting effects, prenatal developmental toxicity, the microbiome and multi-generational effects.

  10. Occurrence and fate of the herbicide glyphosate and its degradate aminomethylphosphonic acid in the atmosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, Feng-Chih; Simcik, M.F.; Capel, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    This is the first report on the ambient levels of glyphosate, the most widely used herbicide in the United States, and its major degradation product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), in air and rain. Concurrent, weekly integrated air particle and rain samples were collected during two growing seasons in agricultural areas in Mississippi and Iowa. Rain was also collected in Indiana in a preliminary phase of the study. The frequency of glyphosate detection ranged from 60 to 100% in both air and rain. The concentrations of glyphosate ranged from 3 and from <0.1 to 2.5 µg/L in air and rain samples, respectively. The frequency of detection and median and maximum concentrations of glyphosate in air were similar or greater to those of the other high-use herbicides observed in the Mississippi River basin, whereas its concentration in rain was greater than the other herbicides. It is not known what percentage of the applied glyphosate is introduced into the air, but it was estimated that up to 0.7% of application is removed from the air in rainfall. Glyphosate is efficiently removed from the air; it is estimated that an average of 97% of the glyphosate in the air is removed by a weekly rainfall ≥30 mm.

  11. Aldo-keto reductase enzymes detoxify glyphosate and improve herbicide resistance in plants.

    PubMed

    Vemanna, Ramu S; Vennapusa, Amaranatha Reddy; Easwaran, Murugesh; Chandrashekar, Babitha K; Rao, Hanumantha; Ghanti, Kirankumar; Sudhakar, Chinta; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Makarla, Udayakumar

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, concerns about the use of glyphosate-resistant crops have increased because of glyphosate residual levels in plants and development of herbicide-resistant weeds. In spite of identifying glyphosate-detoxifying genes from microorganisms, the plant mechanism to detoxify glyphosate has not been studied. We characterized an aldo-keto reductase gene from Pseudomonas (PsAKR1) and rice (OsAKR1) and showed, by docking studies, both PsAKR1 and OsAKR1 can efficiently bind to glyphosate. Silencing AKR1 homologues in rice and Nicotiana benthamiana or mutation of AKR1 in yeast and Arabidopsis showed increased sensitivity to glyphosate. External application of AKR proteins rescued glyphosate-mediated cucumber seedling growth inhibition. Regeneration of tobacco transgenic lines expressing PsAKR1 or OsAKRI on glyphosate suggests that AKR can be used as selectable marker to develop transgenic crops. PsAKR1- or OsAKRI-expressing tobacco and rice transgenic plants showed improved tolerance to glyphosate with reduced accumulation of shikimic acid without affecting the normal photosynthetic rates. These results suggested that AKR1 when overexpressed detoxifies glyphosate in planta. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Phytoplankton growth and PSII efficiency sensitivity to a glyphosate-based herbicide (Factor 540®).

    PubMed

    Smedbol, Élise; Lucotte, Marc; Labrecque, Michel; Lepage, Laurent; Juneau, Philippe

    2017-11-01

    The use of glyphosate-based herbicides in agriculture has increased steadily since the mid 90's and there is now evidence of glyphosate leaching and contamination of aquatic ecosystems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide (Factor 540 ® ) on growth and photosynthetic capacity of algae and cyanobacteria. Six algal and three cyanobacterial species/strains, of three different taxonomic groups, were exposed to five glyphosate concentrations (10, 50, 100, 500 and 1000μgl -1 ) during 48h. All species have significant growth inhibition at concentrations varying between 50 and 500μgl -1 . The photosynthetic response, after glyphosate exposure, varied among species, but a general pattern has emerged. There was an increase in the amount of photons absorbed (ABS/RC), in dissipated (DI O /RC) and trapped (TR O /RC) energy in the photosystem II reaction centers, along with a decreased of the maximum photosystem II quantum yield (F V /F M ) and electron transport per reaction center (ET O /RC). The EC 50 and LOEC values for growth and photosynthesis were calculated and established that growth was the most affected parameter by glyphosate-based herbicide, while parameter TR O /RC was the least affected. All species showed reduced growth at glyphosate concentrations lower than the Canadian standard for the protection of aquatic life, set at 800μgl -1 or the American aquatic life benchmark for acute toxicity in non vascular plants of 12 100μgl -1 questioning the validity of these thresholds in assessing the risks related to the presence of glyphosate and glyphosate-based herbicides in aquatic systems. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of the herbicide glyphosate on non-target plant native species from Chaco forest (Argentina).

    PubMed

    Florencia, Ferreira María; Carolina, Torres; Enzo, Bracamonte; Leonardo, Galetto

    2017-10-01

    Agriculture based on transgenic crops has expanded in Argentina into areas formerly occupied by Chaco forest. Even though glyphosate is the herbicide most widely used in the world, increasing evidence indicates severe ecotoxicological effects on non-target organisms as native plants. The aim of this work is to determine glyphosate effects on 23 native species present in the remaining Chaco forests immersed in agricultural matrices. This is a laboratory/greenhouse approach studying acute effects on seedlings after 21 days. A gradient of glyphosate rates (525, 1050, 2100, 4200, and 8400g ai/Ha; recommended field application rate (RFAR) = 2100g ai/Ha) was applied on four-week seedlings cultivated in a greenhouse and response variables (phytotoxicity, growth reduction, and sensitivity to the herbicide) were measured. This gradient of herbicide rates covers realistic rates of glyphosate applications in the crop field and also those that can reach vegetation of forest relicts by off-target drift and overspray. Testing was performed following guidelines for vegetative vigour (post-germination spray). All species showed lethal or sublethal effects after the application of the 25% of RFAR (50% of species showed severe phytotoxicity or death and 70% of species showed growth reduction). The results showed a gradient of sensitivity to glyphosate by which some of the studied species are very sensitive to glyphosate and seedlings died with 25% of RFAR while other species can be classified as herbicide-tolerant. Thus, the vegetation present in the forest relicts could be strongly affected by glyphosate application on crops. Lethal and sublethal effects of glyphosate on non-target plants could promote both the loss of biodiversity in native forest relicts immersed in the agroecosystems and the selection of new crop weeds considering that some biotypes are continuously exposed to low doses of glyphosate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Glyphosate and dicamba herbicide tank mixture effects on native plant and non-genetically engineered soybean seedlings

    EPA Science Inventory

    Weed species are becoming resistant to intensive and extensive use of specific herbicides associated with the production of herbicide resistant crops, e.g., the use of glyphosate for weed management with glyphosate resistant soybeans. To counter this resistance, crops engineered ...

  15. Is it time to reassess current safety standards for glyphosate-based herbicides?

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, Bruce; Antoniou, Michael N; Benbrook, Charles M; Carroll, Lynn; Colborn, Theo; Everett, Lorne G; Hansen, Michael; Landrigan, Philip J; Lanphear, Bruce P; Mesnage, Robin; vom Saal, Frederick S; Welshons, Wade V; Myers, John Peterson

    2017-01-01

    Use of glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) increased ∼100-fold from 1974 to 2014. Additional increases are expected due to widespread emergence of glyphosate-resistant weeds, increased application of GBHs, and preharvest uses of GBHs as desiccants. Current safety assessments rely heavily on studies conducted over 30 years ago. We have considered information on GBH use, exposures, mechanisms of action, toxicity and epidemiology. Human exposures to glyphosate are rising, and a number of in vitro and in vivo studies challenge the basis for the current safety assessment of glyphosate and GBHs. We conclude that current safety standards for GBHs are outdated and may fail to protect public health or the environment. To improve safety standards, the following are urgently needed: (1) human biomonitoring for glyphosate and its metabolites; (2) prioritisation of glyphosate and GBHs for hazard assessments, including toxicological studies that use state-of-the-art approaches; (3) epidemiological studies, especially of occupationally exposed agricultural workers, pregnant women and their children and (4) evaluations of GBHs in commercially used formulations, recognising that herbicide mixtures likely have effects that are not predicted by studying glyphosate alone. PMID:28320775

  16. Is it time to reassess current safety standards for glyphosate-based herbicides?

    PubMed

    Vandenberg, Laura N; Blumberg, Bruce; Antoniou, Michael N; Benbrook, Charles M; Carroll, Lynn; Colborn, Theo; Everett, Lorne G; Hansen, Michael; Landrigan, Philip J; Lanphear, Bruce P; Mesnage, Robin; Vom Saal, Frederick S; Welshons, Wade V; Myers, John Peterson

    2017-06-01

    Use of glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) increased ∼100-fold from 1974 to 2014. Additional increases are expected due to widespread emergence of glyphosate-resistant weeds, increased application of GBHs, and preharvest uses of GBHs as desiccants. Current safety assessments rely heavily on studies conducted over 30 years ago. We have considered information on GBH use, exposures, mechanisms of action, toxicity and epidemiology. Human exposures to glyphosate are rising, and a number of in vitro and in vivo studies challenge the basis for the current safety assessment of glyphosate and GBHs. We conclude that current safety standards for GBHs are outdated and may fail to protect public health or the environment. To improve safety standards, the following are urgently needed: (1) human biomonitoring for glyphosate and its metabolites; (2) prioritisation of glyphosate and GBHs for hazard assessments, including toxicological studies that use state-of-the-art approaches; (3) epidemiological studies, especially of occupationally exposed agricultural workers, pregnant women and their children and (4) evaluations of GBHs in commercially used formulations, recognising that herbicide mixtures likely have effects that are not predicted by studying glyphosate alone. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Broad spectrum bioactive sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Maria Valéria Robles; Sarruf, Fernanda Daud; Salgado-Santos, Idalina Maria Nunes; Haroutiounian-Filho, Carlos Alberto; Kaneko, Telma Mary; Baby, André Rolim

    2008-11-03

    The development of sunscreens containing reduced concentration of chemical UV filters, even though, possessing broad spectrum effectiveness with the use of natural raw materials that improve and infer UV absorption is of great interest. Due to the structural similarities between polyphenolic compounds and organic UV filters, they might exert photoprotection activity. The objective of the present research work was to develop bioactive sunscreen delivery systems containing rutin, Passiflora incarnata L. and Plantago lanceolata extracts associated or not with organic and inorganic UV filters. UV transmission of the sunscreen delivery system films was performed by using diffuse transmittance measurements coupling to an integrating sphere. In vitro photoprotection efficacy was evaluated according to the following parameters: estimated sun protection factor (SPF); Boot's Star Rating category; UVA/UVB ratio; and critical wavelength (lambda(c)). Sunscreen delivery systems obtained SPF values ranging from 0.972+/-0.004 to 28.064+/-2.429 and bioactive compounds interacted with the UV filters positive and negatively. This behavior may be attributed to: the composition of the delivery system; the presence of inorganic UV filter and quantitative composition of the organic UV filters; and the phytochemical composition of the P. incarnata L. and P. lanceolata extracts. Among all associations of bioactive compounds and UV filters, we found that the broad spectrum sunscreen was accomplished when 1.68% (w/w) P. incarnata L. dry extract was in the presence of 7.0% (w/w) ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate, 2.0% (w/w) benzophenone-3 and 2.0% (w/w) TiO(2). It was demonstrated that this association generated estimated SPF of 20.072+/-0.906 and it has improved the protective defense against UVA radiation accompanying augmentation of the UVA/UVB ratio from 0.49 to 0.52 and lambda(c) from 364 to 368.6nm.

  18. Surfactant volume is an essential element in human toxicity in acute glyphosate herbicide intoxication.

    PubMed

    Seok, Su-Jin; Park, Jae-Seok; Hong, Joong-Rock; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Yang, Jong-Oh; Lee, Eun-Young; Song, Ho-Yeon; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2011-12-01

    Glyphosate, one of the most commonly used herbicides worldwide, has been considered as minimally toxic to humans. However, clinical toxicologists occasionally encounter cases of severe systemic toxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of glyphosate-surfactants ("glyphosate-surfactant toxicity") in patients with acute glyphosate intoxication. In all, 107 patients (69 men and 38 women, aged 52.3 ± 15.5 years) with acute glyphosate intoxication were enrolled in this study. From their medical records, we identified the formulation of ingested glyphosate products and derived clinical parameters, which focused on clinical outcome, admission days, duration in the intensive care unit, development of respiratory failure, cardiovascular deterioration, renal failure, altered mental status, and convulsions. The effect of surfactants on clinical complications was also assessed. For surfactant ingestion volumes of 8 mL, the incidence of clinical complications was (in rank order) as follows: hypotension, 47.1%; mental deterioration, 38.6%; respiratory failure, 30.0%; acute kidney injury, 17.1%; and arrhythmia, 10.0%. These complications were influenced by the volume of surfactant and not the type of surfactant-ingredient in the herbicide product. Two patients died of refractory shock, metabolic acidosis, and respiratory failure. However, the final clinical outcomes of the surviving patients were benign, and cardiovascular, respiratory, kidney, and mental functions were fully restored to normal levels. Our results indicate that treatment of patients with acute glyphosate herbicide intoxication should take into account the volume and not the type of surfactants in herbicide formulations.

  19. Metabolic profiling of goldfish (Carassius auratis) after long-term glyphosate-based herbicide exposure.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Hui; Ruan, Ling-Yu; Zhou, Jin-Wei; Fu, Yong-Hong; Jiang, Lei; Zhao, He; Wang, Jun-Song

    2017-07-01

    Glyphosate is an efficient herbicide widely used worldwide. However, its toxicity to non-targeted organisms has not been fully elucidated. In this study, the toxicity of glyphosate-based herbicide was evaluated on goldfish (Carassius auratus) after long-term exposure. Tissues of brains, kidneys and livers were collected and submitted to NMR-based metabolomics analysis and histopathological inspection. Plasma was collected and the blood biochemical indexes of AST, ALT, BUN, CRE, LDH, SOD, GSH-Px, GR and MDA were measured. Long-term glyphosate exposure caused disorders of blood biochemical indexes and renal tissue injury in goldfish. Metabolomics analysis combined with correlation network analysis uncovered significant perturbations in oxidative stress, energy metabolism, amino acids metabolism and nucleosides metabolism in glyphosate dosed fish, which provide new clues to the toxicity of glyphosate. This integrated metabolomics approach showed its applicability in discovering the toxic mechanisms of pesticides, which provided new strategy for the assessment of the environmental risk of herbicides to non-target organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular basis of glyphosate resistance: Different approaches through protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Pollegioni, Loredano; Schonbrunn, Ernst; Siehl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl-glycine) is the most-used herbicide in the world: glyphosate-based formulations exhibit broad-spectrum herbicidal activity with minimal human and environmental toxicity. The extraordinary success of this simple small molecule is mainly due to the high specificity of glyphosate towards the plant enzyme enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase in the shikimate pathway leading to biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids. Starting in 1996, transgenic glyphosate-resistant plants were introduced thus allowing the application of the herbicide to the crop (post-emergence) to remove emerged weeds without crop damage. This review focuses on the evolution of mechanisms of resistance to glyphosate as obtained through natural diversity, the gene shuffling approach to molecular evolution, and a rational, structure-based approach to protein engineering. In addition, we offer rationale for the means by which the modifications made have had their intended effect. PMID:21668647

  1. Sub-lethal effects of herbicides penoxsulam, imazamox, fluridone and glyphosate on Delta Smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus).

    PubMed

    Jin, Jiali; Kurobe, Tomofumi; Ramírez-Duarte, Wilson F; Bolotaolo, Melissa B; Lam, Chelsea H; Pandey, Pramod K; Hung, Tien-Chieh; Stillway, Marie E; Zweig, Leanna; Caudill, Jeffrey; Lin, Li; Teh, Swee J

    2018-04-01

    Concerns regarding non-target toxicity of new herbicides used to control invasive aquatic weeds in the San Francisco Estuary led us to compare sub-lethal toxicity of four herbicides (penoxsulam, imazamox, fluridone, and glyphosate) on an endangered fish species Delta Smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus). We measured 17β-estradiol (E2) and glutathione (GSH) concentrations in liver, and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in brain of female and male fish after 6 h of exposure to each of the four herbicides. Our results indicate that fluridone and glyphosate disrupted the E2 concentration and decreased glutathione concentration in liver, whereas penoxsulam, imazamox, and fluridone inhibited brain AChE activity. E2 concentrations were significantly increased in female and male fish exposed to 0.21 μM of fluridone and in male fish exposed to 0.46, 4.2, and 5300 μM of glyphosate. GSH concentrations decreased in males exposed to fluridone at 2.8 μM and higher, and glyphosate at 4.2 μM. AChE activity was significantly inhibited in both sexes exposed to penoxsulam, imazamox, and fluridone, and more pronounced inhibition was observed in females. The present study demonstrates the potential detrimental effects of these commonly used herbicides on Delta Smelt. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Soil microbial communities and glyphosate decay in soils with different herbicide application history.

    PubMed

    Guijarro, Keren Hernández; Aparicio, Virginia; De Gerónimo, Eduardo; Castellote, Martín; Figuerola, Eva L; Costa, José Luis; Erijman, Leonardo

    2018-09-01

    This study evaluates the glyphosate dissipation under field conditions in three types of soil, and aims to determine the importance of the following factors in the environmental persistence of herbicide: i) soil bacterial communities, ii) soil physicochemical properties, iii) previous exposure to the herbicide. A soil without previous record of GP application (P0) and two agricultural soils, with 5 and >10years of GP exposure (A5 and A10) were subjected to the application of glyphosate at doses of 3mg·kg -1 . The concentration of GP and AMPA was determined over time and the dynamics of soil bacterial communities was evaluated using 16S ARN ribosomal gene amplicon-sequencing. The GP exposure history affected the rate but not the extent of GP biodegradation. The herbicide was degraded rapidly, but P0 soil showed a dissipation rate significantly lower than soils with agricultural history. In P0 soil, a significant increase in the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes was observed in response to herbicide application. More generally, all soils displayed shifts in bacterial community structure, which nevertheless could not be clearly associated to glyphosate dissipation, suggesting the presence of redundant bacteria populations of potential degraders. Yet the application of the herbicide prompted a partial disruption of the bacterial association network of unexposed soil. On the other hand, higher values of linear (Kd) and nonlinear (Kf) sorption coefficient in P0 point to the relevance of cation exchange capacity (CEC), clay and organic matter to the capacity of soil to adsorb the herbicide, suggesting that bioavailability was a key factor for the persistence of GP and AMPA. These results contribute to understand the relationship between bacterial taxa exposed to the herbicide, and the importance of soil properties as predictors of the possible rate of degradation and persistence of glyphosate in soil. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of the herbicide glyphosate on avian community structure in the Oregon coast range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, M.L.; Meslow, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    A study was conducted on vegetative changes induced by the herbicide glyphosate, and the resultant habitat use of birds nesting on two clearcuts in western Oregon. About 23 percent of total plant cover was initially damaged by aerial application of glyphosate. Most measures of vegetation on the treated site decreased relative to the untreated site 1 year after glyphosate application. By 2 years post-spray, vegetation on the treated site had recovered to near pre-spray status. No difference in density of the bird community was evident between treated and untreated sites during all years of study although individual species densities were modified. Several bird species decreased their use of shrub cover, and increased their use of deciduous trees 1 year after treatment. By 2 years post-spray, many species had returned to pre-spray use of most measured habitat components. Results indicated that application of glyphosate can modify the density and habitat use of birds.

  4. Distinct non-target site mechanisms endow resistance to glyphosate, ACCase and ALS-inhibiting herbicides in multiple herbicide-resistant Lolium rigidum.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Abdallah, Ibrahim; Han, Heping; Owen, Mechelle; Powles, Stephen

    2009-09-01

    This study investigates mechanisms of multiple resistance to glyphosate, acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) and acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibiting herbicides in two Lolium rigidum populations from Australia. When treated with glyphosate, susceptible (S) plants accumulated 4- to 6-fold more shikimic acid than resistant (R) plants. The resistant plants did not have the known glyphosate resistance endowing mutation of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3 phosphate synthase (EPSPS) at Pro-106, nor was there over-expression of EPSPS in either of the R populations. However, [(14)C]-glyphosate translocation experiments showed that the R plants in both populations have altered glyphosate translocation patterns compared to the S plants. The R plants showed much less glyphosate translocation to untreated young leaves, but more to the treated leaf tip, than did the S plants. Sequencing of the carboxyl transferase domain of the plastidic ACCase gene revealed no resistance endowing amino acid substitutions in the two R populations, and the ALS in vitro inhibition assay demonstrated herbicide-sensitive ALS in the ALS R population (WALR70). By using the cytochrome P450 inhibitor malathion and amitrole with ALS and ACCase herbicides, respectively, we showed that malathion reverses chlorsulfuron resistance and amitrole reverses diclofop resistance in the R population examined. Therefore, we conclude that multiple glyphosate, ACCase and ALS herbicide resistance in the two R populations is due to the presence of distinct non-target site based resistance mechanisms for each herbicide. Glyphosate resistance is due to reduced rates of glyphosate translocation, and resistance to ACCase and ALS herbicides is likely due to enhanced herbicide metabolism involving different cytochrome P450 enzymes.

  5. Functionalized iron oxide/SBA-15 sorbent: investigation of adsorption performance towards glyphosate herbicide.

    PubMed

    Rivoira, Luca; Appendini, Marta; Fiorilli, Sonia; Onida, Barbara; Del Bubba, Massimo; Bruzzoniti, Maria Concetta

    2016-11-01

    Glyphosate is a worldwide-used herbicide occurring in many monitoring campaigns. Efficient technologies are currently unavailable for glyphosate removal from waters. In this work, a SBA-15 mesoporous silica-based material (Fe-NH 2 -SBA-15) was synthesized and studied for the adsorption of glyphosate from waters. In order to promote specific interactions between the sorbent and glyphosate via phosphoric group, iron oxide nanoparticles were encapsulated and a surface functionalization with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane was accomplished. The adsorption of glyphosate on Fe-NH 2 -SBA-15 was investigated as a function of (i) pH, (ii) ionic strength (I), and (iii) adsorbate to adsorbent ratio (C), using a two-level, three-factor experimental design. The experimental design allowed for understanding the effect of the abovementioned variables and for proposing experimental conditions for quantitative removal (pH = 2.1, I = 1⋅10 -2  M and C = 0.35) under both batch and dynamic conditions. Interaction mechanism between glyphosate and Fe-NH 2 -SBA-15 sorbent was elucidated by studying the adsorption behavior of sorbents derived from the intermediate stages of synthesis and by desorption tests. Fe-NH 2 -SBA-15 sorbent can be quantitatively regenerated by 12.5 mM NaOH, and can be reused at least for five adsorption/desorption cycles. Quantitative removal of glyphosate from inlet and effluent wastewaters from a wastewater treatment plant is shown.

  6. Physiological effects of the herbicide glyphosate on the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; Qiu, Zhihao; Zhou, Ya; Du, Yuping; Liu, Chaonan; Ye, Jing; Hu, Xiaojun

    2016-09-01

    Glyphosate has been used extensively for weed control in agriculture in many countries. However, glyphosate can be transported into the aquatic environment and might cause adverse effects on aquatic life. This study investigated the physiological characteristics of cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) after exposure to glyphosate, and the results showed that changes in cell density production, chlorophyll a and protein content are consistent. In M. aeruginosa, oxidative stress caused by glyphosate indicated that 48h of exposure increased the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) and enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD). To further investigate the toxicity of glyphosate on M. aeruginosa, the viability of treated cells was monitored and the toxin release was determined. The results indicated that glyphosate induced apoptosis of and triggered toxin release in M. aeruginosa. These results are helpful for understanding the toxic effects of glyphosate on cyanobacteria, which is important for environmental assessment and protection. These results are also useful for guidance on the application of this type of herbicide in agricultural settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of glyphosate herbicide on the gastrointestinal microflora of Hawaiian green turtles (Chelonia mydas) Linnaeus.

    PubMed

    Kittle, Ronald P; McDermid, Karla J; Muehlstein, Lisa; Balazs, George H

    2018-02-01

    In Hawaii, glyphosate-based herbicides frequently sprayed near shorelines may be affecting non-target marine species. Glyphosate inhibits aromatic amino acid biosynthesis (shikimate pathway), and is toxic to beneficial gut bacteria in cattle and chickens. Effects of glyphosate on gut bacteria in marine herbivorous turtles were assessed in vitro. When cultures of mixed bacterial communities from gastrointestinal tracts of freshly euthanized green turtles (Chelonia mydas), were exposed for 24h to six glyphosate concentrations (plus deionized water control), bacterial density was significantly lower at glyphosate concentrations≥2.2×10 -4 gL -1 (absorbance measured at 600nm wavelength). Using a modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay, the growth of four bacterial isolates (Pantoea, Proteus, Shigella, and Staphylococcus) was significantly inhibited by glyphosate concentrations≥1.76×10 -3 gL -1 . Reduced growth or lower survival of gut bacteria in green turtles exposed to glyphosate could have adverse effects on turtle digestion and overall health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of estrogen receptor alpha activation by glyphosate-based herbicide constituents.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, Robin; Phedonos, Alexia; Biserni, Martina; Arno, Matthew; Balu, Sucharitha; Corton, J Christopher; Ugarte, Ricardo; Antoniou, Michael N

    2017-10-01

    The safety, including the endocrine disruptive capability, of glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) is a matter of intense debate. We evaluated the estrogenic potential of glyphosate, commercial GBHs and polyethoxylated tallowamine adjuvants present as co-formulants in GBHs. Glyphosate (≥10,000 μg/L or 59 μM) promoted proliferation of estrogen-dependent MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Glyphosate also increased the expression of an estrogen response element-luciferase reporter gene (ERE-luc) in T47D-KBluc cells, which was blocked by the estrogen antagonist ICI 182,780. Commercial GBH formulations or their adjuvants alone did not exhibit estrogenic effects in either assay. Transcriptomics analysis of MCF-7 cells treated with glyphosate revealed changes in gene expression reflective of hormone-induced cell proliferation but did not overlap with an ERα gene expression biomarker. Calculation of glyphosate binding energy to ERα predicts a weak and unstable interaction (-4.10 kcal mol -1 ) compared to estradiol (-25.79 kcal mol -1 ), which suggests that activation of this receptor by glyphosate is via a ligand-independent mechanism. Induction of ERE-luc expression by the PKA signalling activator IBMX shows that ERE-luc is responsive to ligand-independent activation, suggesting a possible mechanism of glyphosate-mediated activation. Our study reveals that glyphosate, but not other components present in GBHs, can activate ERα in vitro, albeit at relatively high concentrations. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Yield of glyphosate-resistant sugar beets and efficiency of weed management systems with glyphosate and conventional herbicides under German and Polish crop production.

    PubMed

    Nichterlein, Henrike; Matzk, Anja; Kordas, Leszek; Kraus, Josef; Stibbe, Carsten

    2013-08-01

    In sugar beet production, weed control is one of the most important and most expensive practices to ensure yield. Since glyphosate-resistant sugar beets are not yet approved for cultivation in the EU, little commercial experience exists with these sugar beets in Europe. Experimental field trials were conducted at five environments (Germany, Poland, 2010, 2011) to compare the effects of glyphosate with the effects of conventional weed control programs on the development of weeds, weed control efficiency and yield. The results show that the glyphosate weed control programs compared to the conventional methods decreased not only the number of herbicide applications but equally in magnitude decreased the dosage of active ingredients. The results also showed effective weed control with glyphosate when the weed covering was greater and sugar beets had a later growth stage of four true leaves. Glyphosate-resistant sugar beets applied with the glyphosate herbicide two or three times had an increase in white sugar yield from 4 to 18 % in comparison to the high dosage conventional herbicide systems. In summary, under glyphosate management sugar beets can positively contribute to the increasingly demanding requirements regarding efficient sugar beet cultivation and to the demands by society and politics to reduce the use of chemical plant protection products in the environment.

  10. Glyphosate and dicamba herbicide tank mixture effects on native plant and non-genetically engineered soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Olszyk, David; Pfleeger, Thomas; Lee, E Henry; Plocher, Milton

    2015-07-01

    Crops engineered to contain genes for tolerance to multiple herbicides may be treated with several herbicides to manage weeds resistant to each herbicide. Thus, nearby non-target plants may be subjected to increased exposure to several herbicides used in combination. Of particular concern are native plants, as well as adjacent crops which have not been genetically engineered for tolerance to herbicides. We evaluated responses of seven species of native plants grown in a greenhouse and treated less than field application rates of glyphosate and/or dicamba: Andropogon gerardii, Asclepias syriaca, Eutrochium purpureum, Oenothera biennis, Polyganum lapathifolium, Solidago canadensis and Tridens flavus, and non-herbicide resistant soybean (Glycine max, Oregon line M4). Herbicide concentrations were 0.03 or 0.1 × field application rates of 1122 g ha(-1) active ingredient (a.i) (831 g ha(-1) acid glyphosate) for glyphosate and 562 g ha(-1) a.i. for dicamba. In general, plant growth responses to combinations of glyphosate and dicamba were less than the sum of growth responses to the individual herbicides (i.e., antagonistic effect), primarily when one or both herbicides alone caused a large reduction in growth. E. purpureum, P. lapathifolium and S. canadensis were the most sensitive species to both herbicides, while A. gerardii was the most tolerant, with no response to either herbicide. The combinations of herbicides resulted in responses most similar to that from dicamba alone for G. max and from glyphosate alone for T. flavus. The results of this study indicated the need for more data such as effects on native plants in the field to assess risks to non-target plants from combinations of herbicides.

  11. Glyphosate-based herbicides toxicity on life history parameters of zoophytophagous Podisus nigrispinus (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae).

    PubMed

    C Zanuncio, José; C Lacerda, Mabio; Alcántara-de la Cruz, Ricardo; P Brügger, Bruno; Pereira, Alexandre I A; F Wilcken, Carlos; E Serrão, José; S Sediyama, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    The increase of agricultural areas with glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, and use of this herbicide in Brazil, makes necessary to assess its impacts on non-target organisms. The objective was to evaluate the development, reproduction and life table parameters of Podisus nigrispinus (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) reared on GR-soybean plants treated with glyphosate formulations (Zapp-Qi, Roundup-Transorb-R and Roundup-Original) at the recommended field dose (720g acid equivalent ha -1 ). Glyphosate formulations had no affect on nymph and adult weight of this predator. Fourth instar stage was shortest with Zapp Qi. Egg-adult period was similar between treatments (26 days) with a survival over 90%. Zapp-Qi and Roundup-Transorb-R (potassium-salt: K-salt) reduced the egg, posture and nymph number per female, and the longevity and oviposition periods of this predator. Podisus nigrispinus net reproductive rate was highest in GR-soybean plants treated with Roundup-Original (isopropylamine-salt: IPA-salt). However, the duration of one generation, intrinsic and finite increase rates, and time to duplicate the population, were similar between treatments. Glyphosate toxicity on P. nigrispinus depends of the glyphosate salt type. IPA-salt was least harmless to this predator. Formulations based on K-salt altered its reproductive parameters, however, the development and population dynamic were not affect. Therefore, these glyphosate formulations are compatible with the predator P. nigrispinus with GR-soybean crop. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Expression of the hygromycin B phosphotransferase gene confers tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Peñaloza-Vázquez, A; Oropeza, A; Mena, G L; Bailey, A M

    1995-05-01

    Escherichia coli cells and tobacco (cv. Xanthi) plants transformed with the hygromycin B phosphotransferase gene were able to grow in culture medium containing glyphosate at 2.0 mM. The growth of tobacco calli in media containing increasing glyphosate concentrations was measured. The ID50 for glyphosate was 1.70±0.03 mM for hygromycin-B resistant plants, and 0.45±0.02 mM for control plants. Regenerated plants and progeny selected for resistance to hygromycin B were tested for glyphosate tolerance by spraying them with Faena herbicide (formulated glyphosate with surfactant) at a dose equal to 0.24 kg/ha. This was two times the dose required to kill 100 percent of the control plants. Phosphotransferase activity was measured in the extracts of the transformed leaves by the incorporation of (32)P from [γ(-32)P]ATP and it was observed that hygromycin B phosphotransferase was able to recognize the molecule of glyphosate as substrate.

  13. Ethoxylated adjuvants of glyphosate-based herbicides are active principles of human cell toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, R; Bernay, B; Séralini, G-E

    2013-11-16

    Pesticides are always used in formulations as mixtures of an active principle with adjuvants. Glyphosate, the active ingredient of the major pesticide in the world, is an herbicide supposed to be specific on plant metabolism. Its adjuvants are generally considered as inert diluents. Since side effects for all these compounds have been claimed, we studied potential active principles for toxicity on human cells for 9 glyphosate-based formulations. For this we detailed their compositions and toxicities, and as controls we used a major adjuvant (the polyethoxylated tallowamine POE-15), glyphosate alone, and a total formulation without glyphosate. This was performed after 24h exposures on hepatic (HepG2), embryonic (HEK293) and placental (JEG3) cell lines. We measured mitochondrial activities, membrane degradations, and caspases 3/7 activities. The compositions in adjuvants were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Here we demonstrate that all formulations are more toxic than glyphosate, and we separated experimentally three groups of formulations differentially toxic according to their concentrations in ethoxylated adjuvants. Among them, POE-15 clearly appears to be the most toxic principle against human cells, even if others are not excluded. It begins to be active with negative dose-dependent effects on cellular respiration and membrane integrity between 1 and 3ppm, at environmental/occupational doses. We demonstrate in addition that POE-15 induces necrosis when its first micellization process occurs, by contrast to glyphosate which is known to promote endocrine disrupting effects after entering cells. Altogether, these results challenge the establishment of guidance values such as the acceptable daily intake of glyphosate, when these are mostly based on a long term in vivo test of glyphosate alone. Since pesticides are always used with adjuvants that could change their toxicity, the necessity to assess their whole formulations as mixtures becomes obvious. This challenges

  14. Level of UV-B radiation influences the effects of glyphosate-based herbicide on the spotted salamander.

    PubMed

    Levis, Nicholas A; Johnson, Jarrett R

    2015-07-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides are the number one pesticide in the United States and are used commonly around the world. Understanding the affects of glyphosate-based herbicides on non-target wildlife, for example amphibians, is critical for evaluation of regulations pertaining to the use of such herbicides. Additionally, it is important to understand how variation in biotic and abiotic environmental conditions, such as UV-B light regime, could potentially affect how glyphosate-based herbicides interact with non-target species. This study used artificial pond mesocosms to identify the effects of generic glyphosate-based herbicide (GLY-4 Plus) on mortality, cellular immune response, body size, and morphological plasticity of larvae of the spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) under conditions that reflect moderate (UV(M)) and low (UV(L)) UV-B light regimes. Survival within a given UV-B level was unaffected by herbicide presence or absence. However, when herbicide was present, survival varied between UV-B levels with higher survival in UV(M) conditions. Herbicide presence in the UV(M) treatments also decreased body size and reduced cellular immune response. In the UV(L) treatments, the presence of herbicide increased body size and affected tail morphology. Finally, in the absence of herbicide, body size and cellular immune response were higher in UV(M) treatments compared to UV(L) treatments. Thus, the effects of herbicide on salamander fitness were dependent on UV-B level. As anthropogenic habitat modifications continue to alter landscapes that contain amphibian breeding ponds, salamanders may increasingly find themselves in locations with reduced canopy cover and increased levels of UV light. Our findings suggest that the probability of surviving exposure to the glyphosate-based herbicide used in this study may be elevated in more open canopy ponds, but the effects on other components of fitness may be varied and unexpected.

  15. Effects of glyphosate and two herbicide mixtures on microbial communities in prairie wetland ecosystems: a mesocosm approach.

    PubMed

    Sura, Srinivas; Waiser, Marley; Tumber, Vijay; Lawrence, John R; Cessna, Allan J; Glozier, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    A multitrophic outdoor mesocosm system was used to mimic a wetland ecosystem and to investigate the effects of glyphosate and two herbicide mixtures on wetland microbial communities. The glyphosate concentration used was 1000 times the environmentally relevant concentration (ERC). One herbicide mixture consisted of six auxin-type herbicides (2,4-D, MCPA, clopyralid, dicamba, dichlorprop, mecoprop), each at 1000 times the ERC. The second mixture was comprised of eight herbicides, including the six auxin-type herbicides as well as bromoxynil and glyphosate. For this mixture, a dose-response approach was used to treat mesocosms with the ERCs of each herbicide as the base concentration. Algal biomass and production and bacterial production and numbers for pelagic and attached communities were measured at different times over a 22-d period. The experimental results indicate that the eight-herbicide mixture, even at low concentrations, produced negative effects on microbial communities. Glyphosate on its own suppressed algal biomass and production for the duration of the study in pelagic and biofilm communities. Algal biomass and production, although initially depressed in the auxin-type herbicide treatment, were stimulated from Day 9 until experiment end. Due to their similar modes of action, the effects of this herbicide mixture appear to be a result of concentration addition. Such negative effects, however, were brief, and microbial communities recovered from herbicide exposure. Based on evidence presented in this study, it appears that glyphosate has a higher potential to inhibit primary production and chlorophyll content in pelagic and attached wetland algal communities than the auxin-type herbicide mixture. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  16. The direct and indirect effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide and nutrients on Chironomidae (Diptera) emerging from small wetlands.

    PubMed

    Baker, Leanne F; Mudge, Joseph F; Houlahan, Jeff E; Thompson, Dean G; Kidd, Karen A

    2014-09-01

    Laboratory and mesocosm experiments have demonstrated that some glyphosate-based herbicides can have negative effects on benthic invertebrate species. Although these herbicides are among the most widely used in agriculture, there have been few multiple-stressor, natural system-based investigations of the impacts of glyphosate-based herbicides in combination with fertilizers on the emergence patterns of chironomids from wetlands. Using a replicated, split-wetland experiment, the authors examined the effects of 2 nominal concentrations (2.88 mg acid equivalents/L and 0.21 mg acid equivalents/L) of the glyphosate herbicide Roundup WeatherMax, alone or in combination with nutrient additions, on the emergence of Chironomidae (Diptera) before and after herbicide-induced damage to macrophytes. There were no direct effects of treatment on the structure of the Chironomidae community or on the overall emergence rates. However, after macrophyte cover declined as a result of herbicide application, there were statistically significant increases in emergence in all but the highest herbicide treatment, which had also received no nutrients. There was a negative relationship between chironomid abundance and macrophyte cover on the treated sides of wetlands. Fertilizer application did not appear to compound the effects of the herbicide treatments. Although direct toxicity of Roundup WeatherMax was not apparent, the authors observed longer-term impacts, suggesting that the indirect effects of this herbicide deserve more consideration when assessing the ecological risk of using herbicides in proximity to wetlands. © 2014 SETAC.

  17. Delayed degradation in soil of foliar herbicides glyphosate and sulcotrione previously absorbed by plants: consequences on herbicide fate and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Doublet, Jérémy; Mamy, Laure; Barriuso, Enrique

    2009-10-01

    Following application, pesticides can be intercepted and absorbed by weeds and/or crops. Plants containing pesticides residues may then reach the soil during the crop cycle or after harvest. However, the fate in soil of pesticides residues in plants is unknown. Two commonly used foliar herbicides, glyphosate and sulcotrione, (14)C-labeled, were applied on leaves of oilseed rape and/or maize, translocation was studied, and then soil incubations of aerial parts of plants containing herbicides residues were performed. Soil treated directly with herbicides was used as control. The effects of adjuvants on herbicide plant-absorption and subsequent soil-degradation were also investigated comparing herbicides application as active ingredients and as commercial formulations. The fate in soil of herbicides residues in plants was different from that of control, and different for glyphosate and sulcotrione. Mineralization in soil of glyphosate in crops decreased compared to control, and amounts of (14)C-extractable residues, mainly composed by the metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), and non-extractable residues (NER) increased. In contrast, mineralization in soil of sulcotrione in maize increased compared to control, with a decrease in the (14)C-extractable residues and an increase in NER. The fate of both herbicides was influenced by the type of plant organ in which herbicide was incorporated, because of differences in herbicides bioavailability and organs biodegradability, but not by adjuvants. Absorption of both herbicides in plant delays their subsequent soil-degradation, and particularly, glyphosate persistence in soil could increase from two to six times. The modifications of herbicide degradation in soil due to interception by plants should be considered for environmental risks assessment.

  18. Glyphosate inhibits rust diseases in glyphosate-resistant wheat and soybean.

    PubMed

    Feng, Paul C C; Baley, G James; Clinton, William P; Bunkers, Greg J; Alibhai, Murtaza F; Paulitz, Timothy C; Kidwell, Kimberlee K

    2005-11-29

    Glyphosate is a broad-spectrum herbicide used for the control of weeds in glyphosate-resistant crops. Glyphosate inhibits 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate 3-phosphate synthase, a key enzyme in the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in plants, fungi, and bacteria. Studies with glyphosate-resistant wheat have shown that glyphosate provided both preventive and curative activities against Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici and Puccinia triticina, which cause stripe and leaf rusts, respectively, in wheat. Growth-chamber studies demonstrated wheat rust control at multiple plant growth stages with a glyphosate spray dose typically recommended for weed control. Rust control was absent in formulation controls without glyphosate, dependent on systemic glyphosate concentrations in leaf tissues, and not mediated through induction of four common systemic acquired resistance genes. A field test with endemic stripe rust inoculum confirmed the activities of glyphosate pre- and postinfestation. Preliminary greenhouse studies also demonstrated that application of glyphosate in glyphosate-resistant soybeans suppressed Asian soybean rust, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi.

  19. Potential Accumulative Effect of the Herbicide Glyphosate on Glyphosate-Tolerant Maize Rhizobacterial Communities over a Three-Year Cultivation Period

    PubMed Central

    Barriuso, Jorge; Marín, Silvia; Mellado, Rafael P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Glyphosate is a herbicide that is liable to be used in the extensive cultivation of glyphosate-tolerant cultivars. The potential accumulation of the relative effect of glyphosate on the rhizobacterial communities of glyphosate-tolerant maize has been monitored over a period of three years. Methodology/Principal Findings The composition of rhizobacterial communities is known to vary with soil texture, hence, the analyses have been performed in two agricultural fields with a different soil texture. The accumulative effects of glyphosate have been monitored by means of high throughput DNA pyrosequencing of the bacterial DNA coding for the 16S rRNA hypervariable V6 region from rhizobacterial communities. The relative composition of the rhizobacterial communities does vary in each field over the three-year period. The overall distribution of the bacterial phyla seems to change from one year to the next similarly in the untreated and glyphosate-treated soils in both fields. The two methods used to estimate bacterial diversity offered consistent results and are equally suitable for diversity assessment. Conclusions/Significance The glyphosate treatment during the three-year period of seasonal cultivation in two different fields did not seem to significantly change the maize rhizobacterial communities when compared to those of the untreated soil. This may be particularly relevant with respect to a potential authorisation to cultivate glyphosate-tolerant maize in the European Union. PMID:22096595

  20. The control of Asian rust by glyphosate in glyphosate-resistant soybeans.

    PubMed

    Feng, Paul C C; Clark, Celeste; Andrade, Gabriella C; Balbi, Maria C; Caldwell, Pat

    2008-04-01

    Glyphosate is a widely used broad-spectrum herbicide. Recent studies in glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops have shown that, in addition to its herbicidal activity, glyphosate exhibits activity against fungi, thereby providing disease control benefits. In GR wheat, glyphosate has shown both preventive and curative activities against Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Erikss) CO Johnston and Puccinia triticina Erikss, which cause stripe and leaf rusts respectively. Laboratory studies confirmed earlier observations that glyphosate has activity against Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd & P Syd which causes Asian soybean rust (ASR) in GR soybeans. The results showed that glyphosate at rates between 0.84 and 1.68 kg ha(-1) delayed the onset of ASR in GR soybeans. However, field trials conducted in Argentina and Brazil under natural infestations showed variable ASR control from application of glyphosate in GR soybeans. Further field studies are ongoing to define the activity of glyphosate against ASR. These results demonstrate the disease control activities of glyphosate against rust diseases in GR wheat and GR soybeans. Copyright (c) 2007 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Behavioral responses of juvenile Daphnia magna after exposure to glyphosate and glyphosate-copper complexes.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lone Rykær; Roslev, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) is the active ingredient in a range of popular broad-spectrum herbicide formulations. Glyphosate is a chelating agent that can form stable complexes with divalent metal ions including Cu(II). Little is known about the bioavailability and ecotoxicity of glyphosate-Cu(II) complexes to aquatic organisms. In this study, we used video tracking and behavior analysis to investigate sublethal effects of binary mixtures of glyphosate and Cu(II) to juvenile D. magna. Behavioral responses were quantified for individual D. magna after 24h and 48h exposure to glyphosate and glyhosate-Cu(II) mixtures. Sublethal concentrations resulted in decreases in swimming velocity, acceleration speed, and distance moved whereas inactive time of D. magna increased. Distance moved and inactive time were the most responsive parameters to glyphosate and glyphosate-Cu(II) exposure. On a molar basis, glyphosate-Cu(II) complexes appeared more toxic to D. magna than glyphosate alone. The 48h EC50 for glyphosate and glyphosate-Cu(II) determined from swimming distance were 75.2μM and 8.4μM, respectively. In comparison, traditional visual observation of mobility resulted in 48h EC50 values of 52.8μM and 25.5μM for glyphosate and glyphosate-Cu(II), respectively. The behavioral responses indicated that exposure of D. magna to mixtures of glyphosate and Cu(II) attenuated acute metal toxicity but increased apparent glyphosate toxicity due to complexation with Cu(II). The study suggests that glyphosate is a likely mediator of aquatic metal toxicity, and that video tracking provides an opportunity for quantitative studies of sublethal effects of pesticide complexes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of glyphosate-based herbicide on early life stages of Java medaka (Oryzias javanicus): a potential tropical test fish.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Shahrizad; Ismail, Ahmad; Alias, Mohamad Shafiq

    2014-08-30

    Glyphosate is globally a widely used herbicide, yet there is little information on their toxicity to marine fishes. Java medaka, a small tropical fish native to coastal areas in several Southeast Asian countries, is viewed as a suitable candidate for toxicity test and thus was used for this study. Java medaka adults were cultured in the laboratory and the fertilized eggs of the F2 generation were exposed to different concentrations of glyphosate-based herbicide (100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 ppm) until they hatched. The survival and hatching rates of the embryos, changes in the heart rate and morphological impairments were recorded. Generally, survival and hatching percentage decreased as glyphosate concentration increased. Absence of pectoral fin(s) and cornea, permanently bent tail, irregular shaped abdomen, and cell disruption in the fin, head and abdomen are among the common teratogenic effects observed. Furthermore, risk factor also increased with the increased in glyphosate concentrations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Exposure to a glyphosate-based herbicide during pregnancy and lactation induces neurobehavioral alterations in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Cristina E; Bartos, Mariana; Bras, Cristina; Gumilar, Fernanda; Antonelli, Marta C; Minetti, Alejandra

    2016-03-01

    The impact of sub-lethal doses of herbicides on human health and the environment is a matter of controversy. Due to the fact that evidence particularly of the effects of glyphosate on the central nervous system of rat offspring by in utero exposure is scarce, the purpose of the present study was to assess the neurobehavioral effects of chronic exposure to a glyphosate-containing herbicide during pregnancy and lactation. To this end, pregnant Wistar rats were exposed through drinking water to 0.2% or 0.4% of a commercial formulation of glyphosate (corresponding to a concentration of 0.65 or 1.30g/L of glyphosate, respectively) during pregnancy and lactation and neurobehavioral alterations in offspring were analyzed. The postnatal day on which each pup acquired neonatal reflexes (righting, cliff aversion and negative geotaxis) and that on which eyes and auditory canals were fully opened were recorded for the assessment of sensorimotor development. Locomotor activity and anxiety levels were monitored via open field test and plus maze test, respectively, in 45- and 90-day-old offspring. Pups exposed to a glyphosate-based herbicide showed early onset of cliff aversion reflex and early auditory canal opening. A decrease in locomotor activity and in anxiety levels was also observed in the groups exposed to a glyphosate-containing herbicide. Findings from the present study reveal that early exposure to a glyphosate-based herbicide affects the central nervous system in rat offspring probably by altering mechanisms or neurotransmitter systems that regulate locomotor activity and anxiety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Oxidative stress induced by glyphosate-based herbicide on freshwater turtles.

    PubMed

    Héritier, Laurent; Duval, David; Galinier, Richard; Meistertzheim, Anne-Leila; Verneau, Olivier

    2017-12-01

    Freshwater ecosystems face very strong anthropogenic pressures, among which overexploitation, habitat degradation, flow modification, species invasion, and water pollution lead to growing threats on biodiversity. Urbanization through wastewater treatment, industry through the release of inorganic and organic chemicals, and agriculture through the use of pesticides and herbicides are the main factors involved in water pollution. In France, more precisely in the Pyrénées-Orientales department, the poor quality of the watercourses is attributable overall to the use of glyphosate-based herbicides in agricultural activities. Because these chemicals can impact individuals, populations, and biodiversity, we investigated, under experimental conditions, the physiological response of animals facing abiotic contaminants. We selected as a model, juveniles of the freshwater turtle Trachemys scripta elegans. We measured the gene expression and activity of the catalase and superoxide dismutase enzymes as well as the levels of lipid peroxidation, which are all oxidative stress biomarkers, in turtles challenged with high concentrations of glyphosate-based herbicides, on the one hand, and with degraded waters collected from a local watercourse, on the other. We also measured the acetylcholinesterase activity across the same animals. We showed through variations in gene expression and enzyme activity that a glyphosate commercial formulation induced a stress in turtles. A similar outcome was obtained when turtles faced degraded waters. The results indicated that the poor quality of regional waters could be a real threat for animal health. Because turtles are globally less sensitive to contaminants than amphibians, which are lacking in the degraded waters of the Pyrénées-Orientales department, they could constitute an excellent model to follow the evolution of water quality through the study of oxidative stress biomarkers. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:3343-3350. © 2017 SETAC.

  5. Effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide on the development of Common toads (Bufo bufo L.; Amphibia) at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, Fabian; Gruber, Edith; Spangl, Bernhard; Zaller, Johann G.

    2016-04-01

    Herbicides based on the active ingredient glyphosate are frequently applied in agriculture, horticulture and private gardens all over the world. Recently, leaching of glyphosate or its metabolite (AMPA) into water bodies inhabited by amphibians has been reported. However, very little is known about non-target effects of these herbicides on amphibians and even less is known to what extent different temperatures might alter these effects. Using climate chambers, we investigated the effects of the glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup PowerFlex® (480 g L-1 glyphosate, formulated as 588 g L-1 potassium salt) on the larval development of Common toads (Bufo bufo L.; Amphibia: Anura) under different temperature regimes (15°C vs. 20°C). We established five herbicide concentrations: 0, 1.5, 3, 4 mg acid equivalent L-1 and a 4 mg a.e. L-1 pulse treatment (totally three applications of 1.5, 1.5 and another 1 mg a.e. L-1) at each temperature in a full-factorial design. Each treatment combination was replicated five times, the experiment ran for 24 days. Results showed a highly significant effect of temperature on body length and body width but no effect of herbicide concentration on these growth parameters. Moreover, highly significant interactions between herbicide and temperature on body length and body width were observed suggesting that herbicides had different effects on different temperatures. In conclusion, although Roundup PowerFlex® at the tested concentrations appeared to have no acute toxicity to larvae of Common toads, the observed effects on tadpole morphology will potentially affect competitive interactions in spawning ponds of amphibia. Our findings of herbicide x temperature interactions might become more prevalent when human-induced climate change will lead to more extreme temperatures.

  6. Toxicity of formulants and heavy metals in glyphosate-based herbicides and other pesticides.

    PubMed

    Defarge, N; Spiroux de Vendômois, J; Séralini, G E

    2018-01-01

    The major pesticides of the world are glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH), and their toxicity is highly debated. To understand their mode of action, the comparative herbicidal and toxicological effects of glyphosate (G) alone and 14 of its formulations were studied in this work, as a model for pesticides. GBH are mixtures of water, with commonly 36-48% G claimed as the active principle. As with other pesticides, 10-20% of GBH consist of chemical formulants. We previously identified these by mass spectrometry and found them to be mainly families of petroleum-based oxidized molecules, such as POEA, and other contaminants. We exposed plants and human cells to the components of formulations, both mixed and separately, and measured toxicity and human cellular endocrine disruption below the direct toxicity experimentally measured threshold. G was only slightly toxic on plants at the recommended dilutions in agriculture, in contrast with the general belief. In the short term, the strong herbicidal and toxic properties of its formulations were exerted by the POEA formulant family alone. The toxic effects and endocrine disrupting properties of the formulations were mostly due to the formulants and not to G. In this work, we also identified by mass spectrometry the heavy metals arsenic, chromium, cobalt, lead and nickel, which are known to be toxic and endocrine disruptors, as contaminants in 22 pesticides, including 11 G-based ones. This could also explain some of the adverse effects of the pesticides. In in vivo chronic regulatory experiments that are used to establish the acceptable daily intakes of pesticides, G or other declared active ingredients in pesticides are assessed alone, without the formulants. Considering these new data, this assessment method appears insufficient to ensure safety. These results, taken together, shed a new light on the toxicity of these major herbicides and of pesticides in general.

  7. Effects of sub-lethal exposure of rats to the herbicide glyphosate in drinking water: glutathione transferase enzyme activities, levels of reduced glutathione and lipid peroxidation in liver, kidneys and small intestine.

    PubMed

    Larsen, K; Najle, R; Lifschitz, A; Virkel, G

    2012-11-01

    Glyphosate (GLP), the active ingredient of many weed killing formulations, is a broad spectrum herbicide compound. Wistar rats were exposed during 30 or 90 days to the highest level (0.7 mg/L) of GLP allowed in water for human consumption (US EPA, 2011) and a 10-fold higher concentration (7 mg/L). The low levels of exposure to the herbicide did not produce histomorphological changes. The production of TBARS was similar or tended to be lower compared to control animals not exposed to the herbicide. In rats exposed to GLP, increased levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and enhanced glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity may act as a protective mechanism against possible detrimental effects of the herbicide. Overall, this work showed certain biochemical modifications, even at 3-20-fold lower doses of GLP than the oral reference dose of 2mg/kg/day (US EPA, 1993). The toxicological significance of these findings remains to be clarified. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ecotoxicological assessment of glyphosate-based herbicides: Effects on different organisms.

    PubMed

    de Brito Rodrigues, Laís; de Oliveira, Rhaul; Abe, Flávia Renata; Brito, Lara Barroso; Moura, Diego Sousa; Valadares, Marize Campos; Grisolia, Cesar Koppe; de Oliveira, Danielle Palma; de Oliveira, Gisele Augusto Rodrigues

    2017-07-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides are the most commonly used worldwide because they are effective and relatively nontoxic to nontarget species. Unlimited and uncontrolled use of such pesticides can have serious consequences for human health and ecological balance. The present study evaluated the acute toxicity and genotoxicity of 2 glyphosate-based formulations, Roundup Original (Roundup) and Glyphosate AKB 480 (AKB), on different organisms: cucumber (Cucumis sativus), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) seeds, and microcrustacean Artemia salina and zebrafish (Danio rerio) early life stages. For the germination endpoint, only L. esculentum presented significant sensitivity to AKB and L. sativa to Roundup, whereas both formulations significantly inhibited the root growth of all species tested. Both AKB and Roundup induced significant toxicity to A. salina; both are classified as category 3, which indicates a hazard for the aquatic environment, according to criteria of the Globally Harmonized Classification System. However, Roundup was more toxic than AKB, with 48-h median lethal concentration (LC50) values of 14.19 mg/L and 37.53 mg/L, respectively. For the embryo-larval toxicity test, Roundup proved more toxic than AKB for the mortality endpoint (96-h LC50 values of 10.17 mg/L and 27.13 mg/L, respectively), whereas for the hatching parameter, AKB was more toxic than Roundup. No significant genotoxicity to zebrafish larvae was found. We concluded that AKB and Roundup glyphosate-based formulations are phytotoxic and induce toxic effects in nontarget organisms such as A. salina and zebrafish early life stages. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1755-1763. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  9. Effects of low concentrations of glyphosate-based herbicide factor 540® on an agricultural stream freshwater phytoplankton community.

    PubMed

    Smedbol, Élise; Gomes, Marcelo Pedrosa; Paquet, Serge; Labrecque, Michel; Lepage, Laurent; Lucotte, Marc; Juneau, Philippe

    2018-02-01

    Residual glyphosate from glyphosate based herbicides (GBH) are ubiquitously detected in streams draining agricultural fields, and may affect phytoplankton communities present in these ecosystems. Here, the effects of the exposure (96 h) of a phytoplankton community collected in an agricultural stream to various glyphosate concentrations (1, 5, 10, 50, 100, 500 and 1000 μg l -1 ) of Factor 540 ® GBH were investigated. The lowest GBH concentration of 1 μg l -1 reduced chlorophyll a and carotenoid contents. Low glyphosate concentrations, such as 5 and 10 μg l -1 , promoted changes in the community's structure and reduced the diversity of the main algal species. At glyphosate concentrations ranging from 50 to 1000 μg l -1 , the phytoplankton community's composition was modified and new main species appeared. The highest glyphosate concentrations (500 and 1000 μg l -1 ) affected the shikimate content, the lipid peroxidation and the activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase). These results indicate that GBH can modify structural and functional properties of freshwater phytoplankton communities living in streams located in agricultural areas at glyphosate concentrations much inferior to the 800 μg l -1 threshold set by the Canadian guidelines for the protection of aquatic life. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative Metabolomic Analyses of Ipomoea lacunosa Biotypes with Contrasting Glyphosate Tolerance Captures Herbicide-Induced Differential Perturbations in Cellular Physiology.

    PubMed

    Maroli, Amith S; Nandula, Vijay K; Duke, Stephen O; Gerard, Patrick; Tharayil, Nishanth

    2018-02-28

    Glyphosate-tolerant Ipomoea lacunosa is emerging as a problematic weed in the southeastern United States. Metabolomic profiling was conducted to examine the innate physiology and the glyphosate induced perturbations in two biotypes of I. lacunosa (WAS and QUI) that had contrasting glyphosate tolerance. Compared to the less tolerant QUI-biotype, the innate metabolism of the more tolerant WAS-biotype was characterized by a higher abundance of amino acids, and pyruvate; whereas the sugar profile of the QUI biotype was dominated by the transport sugar sucrose. Glyphosate application (80 g ae/ha) caused similar shikimate accumulation in both biotypes. Compared to QUI, in WAS, the content of aromatic amino acids was less affected by glyphosate treatment, and the content of Ala, Val, Ile, and Pro increased. However, the total sugars decreased by ∼75% in WAS, compared to ∼50% decrease in QUI. The innate, higher proportional abundance, of the transport-sugar sucrose in QUI coud partly explain the higher translocation and greater sensitivity of this biotype to glyphosate. The decrease in sugars, accompanied by an increase in amino acids could delay feedback regulation of upstream enzymes of the shikimate acid pathway in WAS, which could contribute to a greater glyphosate tolerance. Our study, through a metabolomics approach, provides complementary data that elucidates the cellular physiology of herbicide tolerance in Ipomoea lacunosa biotypes.

  11. Evaluation of carcinogenic potential of the herbicide glyphosate, drawing on tumor incidence data from fourteen chronic/carcinogenicity rodent studies.

    PubMed

    Greim, Helmut; Saltmiras, David; Mostert, Volker; Strupp, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Abstract Glyphosate, an herbicidal derivative of the amino acid glycine, was introduced to agriculture in the 1970s. Glyphosate targets and blocks a plant metabolic pathway not found in animals, the shikimate pathway, required for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in plants. After almost forty years of commercial use, and multiple regulatory approvals including toxicology evaluations, literature reviews, and numerous human health risk assessments, the clear and consistent conclusions are that glyphosate is of low toxicological concern, and no concerns exist with respect to glyphosate use and cancer in humans. This manuscript discusses the basis for these conclusions. Most toxicological studies informing regulatory evaluations are of commercial interest and are proprietary in nature. Given the widespread attention to this molecule, the authors gained access to carcinogenicity data submitted to regulatory agencies and present overviews of each study, followed by a weight of evidence evaluation of tumor incidence data. Fourteen carcinogenicity studies (nine rat and five mouse) are evaluated for their individual reliability, and select neoplasms are identified for further evaluation across the data base. The original tumor incidence data from study reports are presented in the online data supplement. There was no evidence of a carcinogenic effect related to glyphosate treatment. The lack of a plausible mechanism, along with published epidemiology studies, which fail to demonstrate clear, statistically significant, unbiased and non-confounded associations between glyphosate and cancer of any single etiology, and a compelling weight of evidence, support the conclusion that glyphosate does not present concern with respect to carcinogenic potential in humans.

  12. Potential microbial toxicity and non-target impact of different concentrations of glyphosate-containing herbicide (GCH) in a model Pervious Paving System.

    PubMed

    Mbanaso, F U; Coupe, S J; Charlesworth, S M; Nnadi, E O; Ifelebuegu, A O

    2014-04-01

    Pervious Pavement Systems are Sustainable Drainage devices that meet the three-fold SUDS functions of stormwater quantity reduction, quality improvement and amenity benefits. This paper reports on a study to determine the impact of different concentrations of glyphosate-containing herbicides on non-target microorganisms and on the pollutant retention performance of PPS. The experiment was conducted using 0.0484 m(2) test rigs based on a four-layered design. Previous studies have shown that PPS can trap up to 98.7% of applied hydrocarbons, but results of this study show that application of glyphosate-containing herbicides affected this capability as 15%, 9% and 5% of added hydrocarbons were released by high (7200 mg L(-1)), medium (720 mg L(-1)) and low (72 mg L(-1)) glyphosate-containing herbicides concentrations respectively. The concentrations of nutrients released also indicate a potential for eutrophication if these effluents were to infiltrate into aquifers or be released into surface waters. The effect of glyphosate-containing herbicides application on the bacterial and fungal communities was slightly different; fungi exhibited a "top-down" trend as doses of 7200 mg L(-1) glyphosate-containing herbicides yielded the highest fungal growth whilst those with a concentration of 720 mg L(-1) glyphosate-containing herbicides applied yielded the highest bacterial growth. In the case of protists, doses of glyphosate-containing herbicides above 72 mg L(-1) were fatal, but they survived at the lower concentration, especially the ciliates Colpoda cucullus and Colpoda steinii thus indicating potential for their use as biomarkers of herbicide-polluted environments. Data also showed that at the lowest concentration of glyphosate-containing herbicides (72 mg L(-1)), biodegradation processes may not be affected as all trophic levels required for optimum biodegradation of contaminants were present. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Reconnaissance data for glyphosate, other selected herbicides, their degradation products, and antibiotics in 51 streams in nine midwestern states, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, Elisabeth A.; Battaglin, William A.; Dietze, Julie E.; Thurman, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1989, the U.S. Geological Survey has conducted periodic reconnaissance studies of streams in the Midwestern United States to determine the geographic and seasonal distribution of herbicide compounds. These studies have documented that large amounts of acetochlor, alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, metolachlor, and their degradation products are flushed into streams during post-application runoff. Additional studies show that peak herbicide concentrations tend to occur during the first runoff after herbicide application and that herbicide flushes can occur during runoff for several weeks to months following application. Since the first stream study conducted in 1989, several significant changes in herbicide use have occurred. The most substantial change is the tripling in the use of glyphosate during the past 5 years. Over this same time period (1997-2001), usage of acetochlor and atrazine increased slightly, whereas alachlor, cyanazine, and metolachlor usage decreased. During 2002, 154 samples were collected from 51 streams in nine Midwestern States during three periods of runoff. This report provides a compilation of the analytical results of five laboratory methods. Results show that glyphosate was detected in 55 (36 percent) of the samples, and aminomethylphosphonic acid (a degradation product of glyphosate) was detected in 107 (69 percent) of the samples. Atrazine, the most frequently detected herbicide, was found in 93 percent of the samples, followed by metolachlor, found in 73 percent of the samples; metolachlor ethanesulfonic acid (ESA) and oxanilic acid (OXA) were the most frequently detected herbicide degradation products, both being found in more than 95 percent of the samples. The data presented here are valuable for comparison with results from the earlier reconnaissance studies.

  14. The Glyphosate-Based Herbicide Roundup Does not Elevate Genome-Wide Mutagenesis of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tincher, Clayton; Long, Hongan; Behringer, Megan; Walker, Noah; Lynch, Michael

    2017-10-05

    Mutations induced by pollutants may promote pathogen evolution, for example by accelerating mutations conferring antibiotic resistance. Generally, evaluating the genome-wide mutagenic effects of long-term sublethal pollutant exposure at single-nucleotide resolution is extremely difficult. To overcome this technical barrier, we use the mutation accumulation/whole-genome sequencing (MA/WGS) method as a mutagenicity test, to quantitatively evaluate genome-wide mutagenesis of Escherichia coli after long-term exposure to a wide gradient of the glyphosate-based herbicide (GBH) Roundup Concentrate Plus. The genome-wide mutation rate decreases as GBH concentration increases, suggesting that even long-term GBH exposure does not compromise the genome stability of bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Tincher et al.

  15. Treatment by glyphosate-based herbicide alters life history parameters of the rose-grain aphid Metopolophium dirhodum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saska, Pavel; Skuhrovec, Jiří; Lukáš, Jan; Chi, Hsin; Tuan, Shu-Jen; Honěk, Alois

    2016-06-01

    Glyphosate is the number one herbicide in the world. We investigated the sub-lethal effects of this herbicide on the aphid Metopolophium dirhodum (Walker), using an age-stage, two-sex life table approach. Three concentrations of the herbicide (low - 33.5, medium - 66.9 and high - 133.8 mmol dm-3 of active ingredient) and distilled water as the control were used. The LC50 of the IPA salt of glyphosate on M. dirhodum was equivalent to 174.9 mmol dm-3 of the active ingredient (CI95: 153.0, 199.0). The population parameters were significantly negatively affected by herbicide application, and this negative effect was progressive with the increasing concentration of the herbicide. A difference of two orders of magnitude existed in the predicted population development of M. dirhodum between the high concentration of the herbicide and the control. This is the first study that comprehensively documents such a negative effect on the population of an herbivorous insect.

  16. Treatment by glyphosate-based herbicide alters life history parameters of the rose-grain aphid Metopolophium dirhodum

    PubMed Central

    Saska, Pavel; Skuhrovec, Jiří; Lukáš, Jan; Chi, Hsin; Tuan, Shu-Jen; Honěk, Alois

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate is the number one herbicide in the world. We investigated the sub-lethal effects of this herbicide on the aphid Metopolophium dirhodum (Walker), using an age-stage, two-sex life table approach. Three concentrations of the herbicide (low - 33.5, medium - 66.9 and high - 133.8 mmol dm−3 of active ingredient) and distilled water as the control were used. The LC50 of the IPA salt of glyphosate on M. dirhodum was equivalent to 174.9 mmol dm−3 of the active ingredient (CI95: 153.0, 199.0). The population parameters were significantly negatively affected by herbicide application, and this negative effect was progressive with the increasing concentration of the herbicide. A difference of two orders of magnitude existed in the predicted population development of M. dirhodum between the high concentration of the herbicide and the control. This is the first study that comprehensively documents such a negative effect on the population of an herbivorous insect. PMID:27302015

  17. Glyphosate induces neurotoxicity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Roy, Nicole M; Carneiro, Bruno; Ochs, Jeremy

    2016-03-01

    Glyphosate based herbicides (GBH) like Roundup(®) are used extensively in agriculture as well as in urban and rural settings as a broad spectrum herbicide. Its mechanism of action was thought to be specific only to plants and thus considered safe and non-toxic. However, mounting evidence suggests that GBHs may not be as safe as once thought as initial studies in frogs suggest that GBHs may be teratogenic. Here we utilize the zebrafish vertebrate model system to study early effects of glyphosate exposure using technical grade glyphosate and the Roundup(®) Classic formulation. We find morphological abnormalities including cephalic and eye reductions and a loss of delineated brain ventricles. Concomitant with structural changes in the developing brain, using in situ hybridization analysis, we detect decreases in genes expressed in the eye, fore and midbrain regions of the brain including pax2, pax6, otx2 and ephA4. However, we do not detect changes in hindbrain expression domains of ephA4 nor exclusive hindbrain markers krox-20 and hoxb1a. Additionally, using a Retinoic Acid (RA) mediated reporter transgenic, we detect no alterations in the RA expression domains in the hindbrain and spinal cord, but do detect a loss of expression in the retina. We conclude that glyphosate and the Roundup(®) formulation is developmentally toxic to the forebrain and midbrain but does not affect the hindbrain after 24 h exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Glyphosate in German adults - Time trend (2001 to 2015) of human exposure to a widely used herbicide.

    PubMed

    Conrad, André; Schröter-Kermani, Christa; Hoppe, Hans-Wolfgang; Rüther, Maria; Pieper, Silvia; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike

    2017-01-01

    The broadband herbicide glyphosate (N-[phosphonomethyl]-glycine) and its main metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) were analyzed by GC-MS-MS in 24h-urine samples cryo-archived by the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB). Samples collected in 2001, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, and 2015 were chosen for this retrospective analysis. All urine samples had been provided by 20 to 29 years old individuals living in Greifswald, a city in north-eastern Germany. Out of the 399 analyzed urine samples, 127 (=31.8%) contained glyphosate concentrations at or above the limit of quantification (LOQ) of 0.1μg/L. For AMPA this was the case for 160 (=40.1%) samples. The fraction of glyphosate levels at or above LOQ peaked in 2012 (57.5%) and 2013 (56.4%) after having discontinuously increased from 10.0% in 2001. Quantification rates were lower again in 2014 and 2015 with 32.5% and 40.0%, respectively. The overall trend for quantifiable AMPA levels was similar. Glyphosate and AMPA concentrations in urine were statistically significantly correlated (spearman rank correlation coefficient=0.506, p≤0.001). Urinary glyphosate and AMPA levels tended to be higher in males. The possible reduction in exposure since 2013 indicated by ESB data may be due to changes in glyphosate application in agricultural practice. The ESB will continue monitoring internal exposures to glyphosate and AMPA for following up the time trend, elucidating inter-individual differences, and contributing to the ongoing debate on the further regulation of glyphosate-based pesticides. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  19. Environmental fate and non-target impact of glyphosate-based herbicide (Roundup) in a subtropical wetland.

    PubMed

    Tsui, M T K; Chu, L M

    2008-03-01

    Mai Po Nature Reserve (Hong Kong) is an internationally important wetland for waterbirds. Roundup, a formulation based on glyphosate, has been used to control the widespread weeds within the reserve for many years but the fate and non-target impact of the herbicide is unknown. To fill this knowledge gap, we applied Roundup by hand-held sprayer to an estuarine and a freshwater pond in the dry season of year 2002. The surface water and sediment were sampled routinely for glyphosate concentrations following one month of application. In situ bioassays using local edible fish species were performed along with the herbicide application. Up to 52% of glyphosate in the surface water was transported to the unapplied regions by wind-driven current in the estuarine pond at 1 DPT (day post treatment). For both ponds, glyphosate concentrations in the water decreased rapidly after 1-3 DPT, but then decreased gradually over time. Both physical adsorption to the bottom sediments and microbial degradation are thought to contribute to these decreases. Interestingly, the persistence of glyphosate in the freshwater pond was longer than in the estuarine system, which is likely due to the considerably higher concentrations of chelating metals (i.e. Cu and Fe) present in the sediment (4.5 and 11-fold higher, respectively) which potentially reduced the bioavailability of glyphosate to the microbial decomposers. Lastly, fishes used in the in situ bioassays (both in applied and unapplied areas) showed similar survival rates, indicating that the use of Roundup at the provided application rate posed no serious hazard.

  20. Work plan for determining the occurrence of glyphosate, its transformation product AMPA, other herbicide compounds, and antibiotics in midwestern United States streams, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Thurman, E.M.; Kolpin, D.W.; Scribner, E.A.; Sandstrom, M.W.; Kuivila, K.M.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the distribution of glyphosate and its primary transformation product aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in midwestern streams during post-application and harvest-season runoff events. Water samples will be collected in 2002 during two post-herbicide-application runoff events and one harvest-season runoff event from 53 sites on streams in the Midwestern United States. All samples will be analyzed at the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Laboratory in Lawrence, Kansas, for glyphosate and 20 other herbicides. Samples will also be analyzed for a glyphosate transformation product (AMPA) and 26 other herbicide transformation products, using GC/MS or HPLC/MS. Selected samples will be analyzed for 36 antibiotics or antibiotic transformational products. Results from this study will represent the first broad-scale investigation of glyphosate and AMPA in U.S. water resources.

  1. Impact of glyphosate-tolerant soybean and glufosinate-tolerant corn production on herbicide losses in surface runoff.

    PubMed

    Shipitalo, Martin J; Malone, Robert W; Owens, Lloyd B

    2008-01-01

    Residual herbicides used in the production of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr] and corn (Zea mays L.) are often detected in surface runoff at concentrations exceeding their maximum contaminant levels (MCL) or health advisory levels (HAL). With the advent of transgenic, glyphosate-tolerant soybean and glufosinate-tolerant corn this concern might be reduced by replacing some of the residual herbicides with short half-life, strongly sorbed, contact herbicides. We applied both herbicide types to two chiseled and two no-till watersheds in a 2-yr corn-soybean rotation and at half rates to three disked watersheds in a 3-yr corn/soybean/wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)-red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) rotation and monitored herbicide losses in runoff water for four crop years. In soybean years, average glyphosate loss (0.07%) was approximately 1/7 that of metribuzin (0.48%) and about one-half that of alachlor (0.12%), residual herbicides it can replace. Maximum, annual, flow-weighted concentration of glyphosate (9.2 microg L(-1)) was well below its 700 microg L(-1) MCL and metribuzin (9.5 microg L(-1)) was well below its 200 microg L(-1) HAL, whereas alachlor (44.5 microg L(-1)) was well above its 2 microg L(-1) MCL. In corn years, average glufosinate loss (0.10%) was similar to losses of alachlor (0.07%) and linuron (0.15%), but about one-fourth that of atrazine (0.37%). Maximum, annual, flow-weighted concentration of glufosinate (no MCL) was 3.5 microg L(-1), whereas atrazine (31.5 microg L(-1)) and alachlor (9.8 microg L(-1)) substantially exceeded their MCLs of 3 and 2 microg L(-1), respectively. Regardless of tillage system, flow-weighted atrazine and alachlor concentrations exceeded their MCLs in at least one crop year. Replacing these herbicides with glyphosate and glufosinate can reduce the occurrence of dissolved herbicide concentrations in runoff exceeding drinking water standards.

  2. Forward selection for multiple resistance across the non-selective glyphosate, glufosinate and oxyfluorfen herbicides in Lolium weed species.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Pablo; Alcántara, Ricardo; Osuna, María D; Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Prado, Rafael De

    2017-05-01

    In the Mediterranean area, Lolium species have evolved resistance to glyphosate after decades of continual use without other alternative chemicals in perennial crops (olive, citrus and vineyards). In recent years, oxyfluorfen alone or mixed with glyphosate and glufosinate has been introduced as a chemical option to control dicot and grass weeds. Dose-response studies confirmed that three glyphosate-resistant Lolium weed species (L. rigidum, L. perenne, L. multiflorum) collected from perennial crops in the Iberian Peninsula have also evolved resistance to glufosinate and oxyfluorfen herbicides, despite their recent introduction. Based on the LD 50 resistance parameter, the resistance factor was similar among Lolium species and ranged from 14- to 21-fold and from ten- to 12-fold for oxyfluorfen and glufosinate respectively. Similarly, about 14-fold resistance to both oxyfluorfen and glufosinate was estimated on average for the three Lolium species when growth reduction (GR 50 ) was assessed. This study identified oxyfluorfen resistance in a grass species for the first time. A major threat to sustainability of perennial crops in the Iberian Peninsula is evident, as multiple resistance to non-selective glyphosate, glufosinate and oxyfluorfen herbicides has evolved in L. rigidum, L. perenne and L. multiflorum weeds. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Differential impact of Limnoperna fortunei-herbicide interaction between Roundup Max® and glyphosate on freshwater microscopic communities.

    PubMed

    Gattás, F; Vinocur, A; Graziano, M; Dos Santos Afonso, M; Pizarro, H; Cataldo, D

    2016-09-01

    Multiple anthropogenic stressors act simultaneously on the environment, with consequences different from those caused by single-stressor exposure. We investigated how the combination of the invasive mussel Limnoperna fortunei and a widely applied herbicide, Roundup Max®, affected freshwater microscopic communities and water quality. Further, we compared these results with those induced by the combination of the mussel and technical-grade glyphosate. We carried out a 34-day experiment in outdoor mesocosms, applying the following six treatments: 6 mg L(-1) of technical-grade glyphosate (G), the equivalent concentration of glyphosate in Roundup Max® (R), 100 mussels (M), the combination of mussels and herbicide either in the technical-grade or formulated form (MG and MR, respectively), and control (C). Herbicides significantly increased total phosphorus in water; R and MR showed greater initial total nitrogen and ammonium. R increased picoplankton abundance and caused an eightfold increase in phytoplankton, with high turbidity values; G had a lower effect on these variables. Herbicide-mussel combination induced an accelerated dissipation of glyphosate in water (MG 6.36 ± 0.83 mg G g DW(-1) day(-1) and MR 5.16 ± 1.26 mg G g DW(-1) day(-1)). A synergistic effect on ammonium was observed in MR but not in MG. MR and MG had an antagonistic effect on phytoplankton, which showed a drastic reduction due to grazing, as revealed by M. We provide evidence of differential effects of Roundup Max® and technical-grade glyphosate over water quality and microscopic communities, and in combination with mussels. However, in the combination of mussels and herbicides, mussels seem to play a leading role. In the presence of L. fortunei, the effects of higher nutrient availability provided by herbicides addition were counteracted by the filtration activity of mussels, which released nutrients, grazed on picoplankton and phytoplankton, and boosted the development of other

  4. Evaluation of carcinogenic potential of the herbicide glyphosate, drawing on tumor incidence data from fourteen chronic/carcinogenicity rodent studies

    PubMed Central

    Greim, Helmut; Saltmiras, David; Mostert, Volker; Strupp, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Glyphosate, an herbicidal derivative of the amino acid glycine, was introduced to agriculture in the 1970s. Glyphosate targets and blocks a plant metabolic pathway not found in animals, the shikimate pathway, required for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in plants. After almost forty years of commercial use, and multiple regulatory approvals including toxicology evaluations, literature reviews, and numerous human health risk assessments, the clear and consistent conclusions are that glyphosate is of low toxicological concern, and no concerns exist with respect to glyphosate use and cancer in humans. This manuscript discusses the basis for these conclusions. Most toxicological studies informing regulatory evaluations are of commercial interest and are proprietary in nature. Given the widespread attention to this molecule, the authors gained access to carcinogenicity data submitted to regulatory agencies and present overviews of each study, followed by a weight of evidence evaluation of tumor incidence data. Fourteen carcinogenicity studies (nine rat and five mouse) are evaluated for their individual reliability, and select neoplasms are identified for further evaluation across the data base. The original tumor incidence data from study reports are presented in the online data supplement. There was no evidence of a carcinogenic effect related to glyphosate treatment. The lack of a plausible mechanism, along with published epidemiology studies, which fail to demonstrate clear, statistically significant, unbiased and non-confounded associations between glyphosate and cancer of any single etiology, and a compelling weight of evidence, support the conclusion that glyphosate does not present concern with respect to carcinogenic potential in humans. PMID:25716480

  5. Glyphosate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Glyphosate ; CASRN 1071 - 83 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  6. Ecotoxicological effects of the herbicide glyphosate in non-target aquatic species: Transcriptional responses in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Milan, M; Dalla Rovere, G; Smits, M; Ferraresso, S; Pastore, P; Marin, M G; Bogialli, S; Patarnello, T; Bargelloni, L; Matozzo, V

    2018-06-01

    Glyphosate has been the most widely used herbicide worldwide over the last three decades, raising increasing concerns for its potential impacts on environmental and human health. Recent studies revealed that glyphosate occurs in soil, surface water, and groundwater, and residues are found at all levels of the food chain, such as drinking water, plants, animals, and even in humans. While research has demonstrated that glyphosate can induce a broad range of biological effects in exposed organisms, the global molecular mechanisms of action still need to be elucidated, in particular for marine species. In this study, we characterized for the first time the molecular mechanisms of action of glyphosate in a marine bivalve species after exposure to environmentally realistic concentrations. To reach such a goal, Mediterranean mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis, an ecologically and economically relevant species, were exposed for 21 days to 10, 100, and 1000 μg/L and digestive gland transcriptional profiles were investigated through RNA-seq. Differential expression analysis identified a total of 111, 124, and 211 differentially regulated transcripts at glyphosate concentrations of 10, 100, and 1000 μg/L, respectively. Five genes were found consistently differentially expressed at all investigated concentrations, including SERP2, which plays a role in the protection of unfolded target proteins against degradation, the antiapoptotic protein GIMAP5, and MTMR14, which is involved in macroautophagy. Functional analysis of differentially expressed genes reveals the disruption of several key biological processes, such as energy metabolism and Ca 2+ homeostasis, cell signalling, and endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Together, the results obtained suggest that the presence of glyphosate in the marine ecosystem should raise particular concern because of its significant effects even at the lowest concentration. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of glyphosate and the glyphosate based herbicides Roundup Original(®) and Roundup Transorb(®) on respiratory morphophysiology of bullfrog tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Rissoli, Rafael Zanelli; Abdalla, Fabio Camargo; Costa, Monica Jones; Rantin, Francisco Tadeu; McKenzie, David John; Kalinin, Ana Lucia

    2016-08-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides are widely used in agriculture and are commonly found in water bodies. Roundup Original(®) (RO) contains an isopropylamine glyphosate (GLY) salt containing the surfactant POEA, while Roundup Transorb R(®) (RTR) contains a potassium salt of GLY with unknown surfactants. Both contain different compositions of so-called "inert" ingredients, more toxic than glyphosate. Amphibian tadpoles often experience variations in O2 availability in their aquatic habitats; an ability to tolerate hypoxia can condition their survival and fitness. We evaluated the impacts of sublethal concentrations of GLY (1 mg L(-1)), RO (1 mg L(-1) GLY a.e) and RTR (1 mg L(-1) GLY a.e) on metabolic rate (V·O2 - mLO2 Kg1 h(-1)) of bullfrog tadpoles during normoxia and graded hypoxia, and related this to morphology of their skin, their major site of gas exchange. In control (CT) V·O2 remained unaltered from normoxia until 40 mmHg, indicating a critical O2 tension between 40 and 20 mmHg. GLY significantly reduced V·O2, possibly due to epidermal hypertrophy, which increased O2 diffusion distance to O2 uptake. In contrast, RTR increased V·O2 during hypoxia, indicating an influence of "inert" compounds and surfactants. V·O2 of RO did not differ from CT, suggesting that any increase in V·O2 caused by exposure was antagonized by epidermal hypertrophy. Indeed, all herbicides caused marked alterations in skin morphology, with cell and epithelium wall presenting hyperplasia or hypertrophy and chromatid rupture. In summary, GLY, RO and RTR exert different effects in bullfrog tadpoles, in particular the surfactants and inert compounds appear to influence oxygen uptake. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Broad-spectrum antibiotics in Norwegian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Holen, Øyunn; Alberg, Torunn; Blix, Hege Salvesen; Smith, Ingrid; Neteland, Marion Iren; Eriksen, Hanne Merete

    2017-03-01

    BACKGROUND One of the objectives in the action plan to reduce antimicrobial resistance in the health services in Norway is to reduce the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in Norwegian hospitals. This study describes the use of certain broad-spectrum antibiotics mentioned in the action plan in Norwegian hospitals, and assesses prescribing practices in relation to the Norwegian guidelines for antibiotic use in hospitals.MATERIAL AND METHOD Data were analysed from a nationwide non-identifiable point prevalence survey in May 2016 where all systemic use of antibiotics was recorded.RESULTS Broad-spectrum antibiotics accounted for 33 % of all antibiotics prescribed. Altogether 84 % of all broad-spectrum antibiotics were prescribed as treatment, 8 % were for prophylactic use, and 8 % were classified as other/unknown. Lower respiratory tract infections were the most frequent indication for treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics, involving 30 % of all broad-spectrum treatment.INTERPRETATION This point prevalence survey in Norwegian hospitals in spring 2016 indicates a possibility for reducing the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections and for prophylactic use. Reduction of healthcare-associated infections may also contribute.

  9. Early detection of crop injury from herbicide glyphosate by leaf biochemical parameter inversion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Early detection of crop injury from glyphosate is of significant importance in crop management. In this paper, we attempt to detect glyphosate-induced crop injury by PROSPECT (leaf optical PROperty SPECTra model) inversion through leaf hyperspectral reflectance measurements for non-Glyphosate-Resist...

  10. Effects of neonatal exposure to a glyphosate-based herbicide on female rat reproduction.

    PubMed

    Ingaramo, Paola I; Varayoud, Jorgelina; Milesi, María M; Schimpf, Marlise Guerrero; Muñoz-de-Toro, Mónica; Luque, Enrique H

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we investigated whether neonatal exposure to a glyphosate-based herbicide (GBH) alters the reproductive performance and the molecular mechanisms involved in the decidualization process in adult rats. Newborn female rats received vehicle or 2 mg/kg/day of a GBH on postnatal days (PND) 1, 3, 5 and 7. On PND90, the rats were mated to evaluate (i) the reproductive performance on gestational day (GD) 19 and (ii) the ovarian steroid levels, uterine morphology, endometrial cell proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle regulators, and endocrine pathways that regulate uterine decidualization (steroid receptors/COUP-TFII/Bmp2/Hoxa10) at the implantation sites (IS) on GD9. The GBH-exposed group showed a significant increase in the number of resorption sites on GD19, associated with an altered decidualization response. In fact, on GD9, the GBH-treated rats showed morphological changes at the IS, associated with a decreased expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors, a downregulation of COUP-TFII (Nr2f2) and Bmp2 mRNA and an increased expression of HOXA10 and the proliferation marker Ki67(Mki67) at the IS. We concluded that alterations in endometrial decidualization might be the mechanism of GBH-induced post-implantation embryo loss. © 2016 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  11. Glyphosate detection with ammonium nitrate and humic acids as potential interfering substances by pulsed voltammetry technique.

    PubMed

    Martínez Gil, Pablo; Laguarda-Miro, Nicolas; Camino, Juan Soto; Peris, Rafael Masot

    2013-10-15

    Pulsed voltammetry has been used to detect and quantify glyphosate on buffered water in presence of ammonium nitrate and humic substances. Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide active ingredient in the world. It is a non-selective broad spectrum herbicide but some of its health and environmental effects are still being discussed. Nowadays, glyphosate pollution in water is being monitored but quantification techniques are slow and expensive. Glyphosate wastes are often detected in countryside water bodies where organic substances and fertilizers (commonly based on ammonium nitrate) may also be present. Glyphosate also forms complexes with humic acids so these compounds have also been taken into consideration. The objective of this research is to study the interference of these common pollutants in glyphosate measurements by pulsed voltammetry. The statistical treatment of the voltammetric data obtained lets us discriminate glyphosate from the other studied compounds and a mathematical model has been built to quantify glyphosate concentrations in a buffer despite the presence of humic substances and ammonium nitrate. In this model, the coefficient of determination (R(2)) is 0.977 and the RMSEP value is 2.96 × 10(-5) so the model is considered statistically valid. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Non-target effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide on Common toad larvae (Bufo bufo, Amphibia) and associated algae are altered by temperature

    PubMed Central

    Baier, Fabian; Gruber, Edith; Bondar-Kunze, Elisabeth; Ivanković, Marina; Mentler, Axel; Brühl, Carsten A.; Spangl, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Background Glyphosate-based herbicides are the most widely used pesticides in agriculture, horticulture, municipalities and private gardens that can potentially contaminate nearby water bodies inhabited by amphibians and algae. Moreover, the development and diversity of these aquatic organisms could also be affected by human-induced climate change that might lead to more periods with extreme temperatures. However, to what extent non-target effects of these herbicides on amphibians or algae are altered by varying temperature is not well known. Methods We studied effects of five concentrations of the glyphosate-based herbicide formulation Roundup PowerFlex (0, 1.5, 3, 4 mg acid equivalent glyphosate L−1 as a one time addition and a pulse treatment of totally 4 mg a.e. glyphosate L−1) on larval development of Common toads (Bufo bufo, L.; Amphibia: Anura) and associated algae communities under two temperature regimes (15 vs. 20 °C). Results Herbicide contamination reduced tail growth (−8%), induced the occurrence of tail deformations (i.e. lacerated or crooked tails) and reduced algae diversity (−6%). Higher water temperature increased tadpole growth (tail and body length (tl/bl) +66%, length-to-width ratio +4%) and decreased algae diversity (−21%). No clear relation between herbicide concentrations and tadpole growth or algae density or diversity was observed. Interactive effects of herbicides and temperature affected growth parameters, tail deformation and tadpole mortality indicating that the herbicide effects are temperature-dependent. Remarkably, herbicide-temperature interactions resulted in deformed tails in 34% of all herbicide treated tadpoles at 15 °C whereas no tail deformations were observed for the herbicide-free control at 15 °C or any tadpole at 20 °C; herbicide-induced mortality was higher at 15 °C but lower at 20 °C. Discussion These herbicide- and temperature-induced changes may have decided effects on ecological interactions in

  13. Non-target effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide on Common toad larvae (Bufo bufo, Amphibia) and associated algae are altered by temperature.

    PubMed

    Baier, Fabian; Gruber, Edith; Hein, Thomas; Bondar-Kunze, Elisabeth; Ivanković, Marina; Mentler, Axel; Brühl, Carsten A; Spangl, Bernhard; Zaller, Johann G

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides are the most widely used pesticides in agriculture, horticulture, municipalities and private gardens that can potentially contaminate nearby water bodies inhabited by amphibians and algae. Moreover, the development and diversity of these aquatic organisms could also be affected by human-induced climate change that might lead to more periods with extreme temperatures. However, to what extent non-target effects of these herbicides on amphibians or algae are altered by varying temperature is not well known. We studied effects of five concentrations of the glyphosate-based herbicide formulation Roundup PowerFlex (0, 1.5, 3, 4 mg acid equivalent glyphosate L -1 as a one time addition and a pulse treatment of totally 4 mg a.e. glyphosate L -1 ) on larval development of Common toads ( Bufo bufo , L.; Amphibia: Anura) and associated algae communities under two temperature regimes (15 vs. 20 °C). Herbicide contamination reduced tail growth (-8%), induced the occurrence of tail deformations (i.e. lacerated or crooked tails) and reduced algae diversity (-6%). Higher water temperature increased tadpole growth (tail and body length (tl/bl) +66%, length-to-width ratio +4%) and decreased algae diversity (-21%). No clear relation between herbicide concentrations and tadpole growth or algae density or diversity was observed. Interactive effects of herbicides and temperature affected growth parameters, tail deformation and tadpole mortality indicating that the herbicide effects are temperature-dependent. Remarkably, herbicide-temperature interactions resulted in deformed tails in 34% of all herbicide treated tadpoles at 15 °C whereas no tail deformations were observed for the herbicide-free control at 15 °C or any tadpole at 20 °C; herbicide-induced mortality was higher at 15 °C but lower at 20 °C. These herbicide- and temperature-induced changes may have decided effects on ecological interactions in freshwater ecosystems. Although no clear dose

  14. Glyphosate induced toxicity to chickpea plants and stress alleviation by herbicide tolerant phosphate solubilizing Burkholderia cepacia PSBB1 carrying multifarious plant growth promoting activities.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Mohammad; Khan, Mohd Saghir

    2018-02-01

    In this study, strain PSBB1 isolated from Vicia faba rhizosphere was identified as Burkholderia cepacia , by 16S rDNA sequence analysis and characterized. Strain PSBB1 tolerated glyphosate up to 3200 μg ml -1 and produced IAA (81.6 μg ml -1 ), ACC deaminase (69.3 mg -1  protein h -1 ), SA (39.3 μg ml -1 ) and 2,3-DHBA (26.6 μg ml -1 ), solubilized insoluble P (50.8 μg ml -1 ) and secreted 29.4 μg ml -1 exopolysaccharides, which decreased with increasing concentrations of glyphosate. Cell damage following glyphosate application was visible under SEM and CLSM. The phytotoxicity of glyphosate on chickpea was variable but significant. B . cepacia mitigated toxicity and enhanced the size, dry matter, symbiosis, seed attributes and nutritional contents of chickpea. Further, B. cepacia strain PSBB1 declined the levels of CAT, POD, APX and GPX and MDA contents at 4332 μg kg -1 soil glyphosate. Proline also increased under glyphosate stress but declined in B. cepacia inoculated plants. The ability to tolerate higher concentration of glyphosate, the capacity to secrete plant growth regulators even under herbicide stress and potential to reduce the level of proline and antioxidant enzymes makes B. cepacia as an interesting choice for enhancing chickpea production in soils contaminated even with herbicides.

  15. Additive effects of the herbicide glyphosate and elevated temperature on the branched coral Acropora formosa in Nha Trang, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Amid, C; Olstedt, M; Gunnarsson, J S; Le Lan, H; Tran Thi Minh, H; Van den Brink, P J; Hellström, M; Tedengren, M

    2018-05-01

    The combined effects of the herbicide glyphosate and elevated temperature were studied on the tropical staghorn coral Acropora formosa, in Nha Trang bay, Vietnam. The corals were collected from two different reefs, one close to a polluted fish farm and one in a marine-protected area (MPA). In the laboratory, branches of the corals were exposed to the herbicide glyphosate at ambient (28 °C) and at 3 °C elevated water temperatures (31 °C). Effects of herbicide and elevated temperature were studied on coral bleaching using photography and digital image analysis (new colorimetric method developed here based on grayscale), chlorophyll a analysis, and symbiotic dinoflagellate (Symbiodinium, referred to as zooxanthellae) counts. All corals from the MPA started to bleach in the laboratory before they were exposed to the treatments, indicating that they were very sensitive, as opposed to the corals collected from the more polluted site, which were more tolerant and showed no bleaching response to temperature increase or herbicide alone. However, the combined exposure to the stressors resulted in significant loss of color, proportional to loss in chlorophyll a and zooxanthellae. The difference in sensitivity of the corals collected from the polluted site versus the MPA site could be explained by different symbiont types: the resilient type C3u and the stress-sensitive types C21 and C23, respectively. The additive effect of elevated temperatures and herbicides adds further weight to the notion that the bleaching of coral reefs is accelerated in the presence of multiple stressors. These results suggest that the corals in Nha Trang bay have adapted to the ongoing pollution to become more tolerant to anthropogenic stressors, and that multiple stressors hamper this resilience. The loss of color and decrease of chlorophyll a suggest that bleaching is related to concentration of chloro-pigments. The colorimetric method could be further fine-tuned and used as a precise, non

  16. Phosphate alleviation of glyphosate-induced toxicity in Hydrocharis dubia (Bl.) Backer.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Guidi; Wu, Zhonghua; Liu, Nian; Yin, Jun

    2018-05-30

    Glyphosate, as a broad-spectrum herbicide, is frequently detected in water, and phosphorus widely enters the water due to the extensive use of phosphorus-containing substances in agriculture, industries and daily life. Thus, aquatic ecosystems are exposed to both glyphosate and phosphorus, which may affect aquatic organisms. In the present research, we studied the physiological responses of the floating aquatic plant species H. dubia to different concentrations of glyphosate (0, 1, 5, 15 mg/L) with different levels of phosphate (0, 50, 100 mg/L) after 14 days (d) of treatment. We explored glyphosate toxicity in H. dubia and investigated whether phosphate addition mitigates glyphosate toxicity in this species, which will provide a theoretical basis for the ecotoxicological study of aquatic plants. The results show that glyphosate significantly reduced the chlorophyll content, leaf number and root length of H. dubia, while it significantly increased the malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), shikimate, proline, and soluble protein content and enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), guaiacol peroxidase (POD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO)) in H. dubia. After phosphate supplement, the MDA, H 2 O 2 , proline, and soluble protein contents and enzyme activities in the plants treated with glyphosate decreased. These results indicate that the concentration of glyphosate investigated in our study can cause oxidative stress and affect the growth of H. dubia. Phosphate can alleviate glyphosate-induced oxidative stress in H. dubia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification and functional analysis of a new glyphosate resistance gene from a fungus cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Tao, Bo; Shao, Bai-Hui; Qiao, Yu-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Qin; Chang, Shu-Jun; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2017-08-01

    Glyphosate is a widely used broad spectrum herbicide; however, this limits its use once crops are planted. If glyphosate-resistant crops are grown, glyphosate can be used for weed control in crops. While several glyphosate resistance genes are used in commercial glyphosate tolerant crops, there is interest in identifying additional genes for glyphosate tolerance. This research constructed a high-quality cDNA library form the glyphosate-resistant fungus Aspergillus oryzae RIB40 to identify genes that may confer resistance to glyphosate. Using a medium containing glyphosate (120mM), we screened several clones from the library. Based on a nucleotide sequence analysis, we identified a gene of unknown function (GenBank accession number: XM_001826835.2) that encoded a hypothetical 344-amino acid protein. The gene was named MFS40. Its ORF was amplified to construct an expression vector, pGEX-4T-1-MFS40, to express the protein in Escherichia coli BL21. The gene conferred glyphosate tolerance to E. coli ER2799 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Glyphosate induces cardiovascular toxicity in Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Roy, Nicole M; Ochs, Jeremy; Zambrzycka, Ewelina; Anderson, Ariann

    2016-09-01

    Glyphosate is a broad spectrum herbicide used aggressively in agricultural practices as well as home garden care. Although labeled "safe" by the chemical industry, doses tested by industry do not mimic chronic exposures to sublethal doses that organisms in the environment are exposed to over long periods of time. Given the widespread uses of and exposure to glyphosate, studies on developmental toxicity are needed. Here we utilize the zebrafish vertebrate model system to study early effects of glyphosate on the developing heart. Treatment by embryo soaking with 50μg/ml glyphosate starting at gastrulation results in structural abnormalities in the atrium and ventricle, irregular heart looping, situs inversus as well as decreased heartbeats by 48h as determined by live imaging and immunohistochemistry. Vasculature in the body was also affected as determined using fli-1 transgenic embryos. To determine if the effects noted at 48h post fertilization are due to early stage alterations in myocardial precursors, we also investigate cardiomyocyte development with a Mef2 antibody and by mef2ca in situ hybridization and find alterations in the Mef2/mef2ca staining patterns during early cardiac patterning stages. We conclude that glyphosate is developmentally toxic to the zebrafish heart. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Occurrence and levels of glyphosate and AMPA in shallow lakes from the Pampean and Patagonian regions of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Castro Berman, M; Marino, D J G; Quiroga, María Victoria; Zagarese, Horacio

    2018-06-01

    Glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) is a broad-spectrum systemic herbicide used to kill weeds that compete with commercial crops. In Argentina, the use of glyphosate-based herbicides increased dramatically (up to ∼200,000 tons on 2012) since the introduction of glyphosate-resistant crops, such as transgenic soy and resistant corn, and the adoption of non-till practices in the 1990's. Sallow lakes within the Pampa region may be potentially impacted by continuous herbicide usage. We surveyed 52 shallow lakes from the Pampa region (Buenos Aires Province, Argentina) to assess the occurrence and concentrations of glyphosate and its main degradation product (AMPA). For comparison, we also sampled 24 shallow lakes from an area with no agricultural use of glyphosate (Northern Patagonia). Glyphosate and AMPA were analyzed by UPLC-MS/MS ESI (±) in lake water, suspended particulate matter (SPM), and sediment samples. Within the Pampa region, glyphosate residues were detected in >40% of samples. Glyphosate residues were detected more frequently in sediment and surface water than in SPM samples. The mean (maximum) concentrations of glyphosate were 2.11 (4.52) μg l -1 for surface water; 0.10 (0.13) μg l -1 for SPM and 10.47 (20.34) μg kg -1 for sediment samples, respectively. Whereas, mean (maximum) concentrations of AMPA were 0.84 and (0.90) μg l -1 for surface water; 0.07 (0.07) μg l -1 for SPM; and 22.53 (32.89) μg kg -1 for sediment samples. The herbicide was not detected in samples from the Patagonian region. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the occurrence and concentrations of the herbicide in freshwater lakes of Argentina. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of glyphosate-based herbicides on survival, development and growth of invasive snail (Pomacea canaliculata).

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanggui; Li, Adela Jing; Li, Kaibin; Qin, Junhao; Li, Huashou

    2017-12-01

    This study tests the hypotheses that whether environmental relevance of glyphosate would help control spread of the invasive snail Pomacea canaliculata, or benefit its population growth worldwide. Our results showed that glyphosate induced acute toxicity to the snail only at high concentrations (96h LC50 at 175mg/L) unlikely to occur in the environment. Long-term exposures to glyphosate at sublethal levels (20 and 120mg/L) caused inhibition of food intake, limitation of growth performance and alterations in metabolic profiles of the snail. It is worth noting that glyphosate at 2mg/L benefited growth performance in P. canaliculata. Chronic exposures of glyphosate significantly enhanced overall metabolic rate and altered catabolism from protein to carbohydrate/lipid mode. Cellular responses in enzyme activities showed that the exposed snails could increase tolerance by their defense system against glyphosate-induced oxidative stress, and adjustment of metabolism to mitigate energy crisis. Our study displayed that sublethal concentrations of glyphosate might be helpful in control of the invasive species by food intake, growth performance and metabolic interruption; whether environmental relevance of glyphosate (≤2mg/L) benefits population growth of P. canaliculata is still inconclusive, which requires further field study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Toxicity of a glufosinate- and several glyphosate-based herbicides to juvenile amphibians from the Southern High Plains, USA.

    PubMed

    Dinehart, Simon K; Smith, Loren M; McMurry, Scott T; Anderson, Todd A; Smith, Philip N; Haukos, David A

    2009-01-15

    Pesticide toxicity is often proposed as a contributing factor to the world-wide decline of amphibian populations. We assessed acute toxicity (48 h) of a glufosinate-based herbicide (Ignite 280 SL) and several glyphosate-based herbicide formulations (Roundup WeatherMAX, Roundup Weed and Grass Killer Super Concentrate, Roundup Weed and Grass Killer Ready-To-Use Plus on two species of amphibians housed on soil or moist paper towels. Survival of juvenile Great Plains toads (Bufo cognatus) and New Mexico spadefoots (Spea multiplicata) was reduced by exposure to Roundup Weed and Grass Killer Ready-To-Use Plus on both substrates. Great Plains toad survival was also reduced by exposure to Roundup Weed and Grass Killer Super Concentrate on paper towels. New Mexico spadefoot and Great Plains toad survival was not affected by exposure to the two agricultural herbicides (Roundup WeatherMAX and Ignite 280 SL) on either substrate, suggesting that these herbicides likely do not pose an immediate risk to these species under field conditions.

  2. Benchmark study on glyphosate-resistant crop systems in the United States. Economics of herbicide resistance management practices in a 5 year field-scale study.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C Blake; Jordan, David L; Owen, Michael Dk; Dixon, Philip M; Young, Bryan G; Wilson, Robert G; Weller, Steven C; Shaw, David R

    2014-12-01

    Since the introduction of glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, growers have often relied on glyphosate-only weed control programs. As a result, multiple weeds have evolved resistance to glyphosate. A 5 year study including 156 growers from Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, Nebraska, North Carolina and Mississippi in the United States was conducted to compare crop yields and net returns between grower standard weed management programs (SPs) and programs containing best management practices (BMPs) recommended by university weed scientists. The BMPs were designed to prevent or mitigate/manage evolved herbicide resistance. Weed management costs were greater for the BMP approach in most situations, but crop yields often increased sufficiently for net returns similar to those of the less expensive SPs. This response was similar across all years, geographical regions, states, crops and tillage systems. Herbicide use strategies that include a diversity of herbicide mechanisms of action will increase the long-term sustainability of glyphosate-based weed management strategies. Growers can adopt herbicide resistance BMPs with confidence that net returns will not be negatively affected in the short term and contribute to resistance management in the long term. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. The effect of the herbicide glyphosate on non-target spiders: Part I. Direct effects on Lepthyphantes tenuis under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Haughton, A J; Bell, J R; Wilcox, A; Boatman, N D

    2001-11-01

    We examined the toxic effects of glyphosate to adult female Lepthyphantes tenuis (Araneae, Linyphiidae), a common spider of agricultural habitats. The overspray technique was used to investigate the effect of the herbicide on forty individuals in each of six glyphosate treatments (2160, 1440, 1080, 720, 360 and 180 g ha-1) and a distilled water control. Spiders collected from the wild were individually placed in exposure chambers and checked every 24 h over a 72-h experimental period. Mortality of L tenuis remained at less than 10% in all treatments at 24 and 48 h after spray application, and only increased marginally (to 13%) after 72 h. These results support other limited data which suggest that glyphosate is 'harmless' to non-target arthropods. More extended laboratory testing to investigate any side-effects of glyphosate on the life history of L tenuis and other non-beneficial invertebrates is required.

  4. Oxidative stress in duckweed (Lemna minor L.) induced by glyphosate: Is the mitochondrial electron transport chain a target of this herbicide?

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marcelo Pedrosa; Juneau, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the physiological responses of Lemna minor plants exposed to glyphosate. The deleterious effects of this herbicide on photosynthesis, respiration, and pigment concentrations were related to glyphosate-induced oxidative stress through hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) accumulation. By using photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chain (ETC) inhibitors we located the primary site of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in plants exposed to 500 mg glyphosate l -1 . Inhibition of mitochondrial ETC Complex I by rotenone reduced H 2 O 2 concentrations in glyphosate-treated plants. Complex III activity was very sensitive to glyphosate which appears to act much like antimycin A (an inhibitor of mitochondrial ETC Complex III) by shunting electrons from semiquinone to oxygen, with resulting ROS formation. Confocal evaluations for ROS localization showed that ROS are initially produced outside of the chloroplasts upon initial glyphosate exposure. Our results indicate that in addition to interfering with the shikimate pathway, glyphosate can induce oxidative stress in plants through H 2 O 2 formation by targeting the mitochondrial ETC, which would explain its observed effects on non-target organisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Secondary effects of glyphosate on plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glyphosate is a unique herbicide with interesting secondary effects. Unfortunately, some have assumed that the secondary effects that occur in glyphosate-susceptible plants treated with glyphosate, such as altered mineral nutrition, reduced phenolic compound production and pathogen resistance, also ...

  6. The different behaviors of glyphosate and AMPA in compost-amended soil.

    PubMed

    Erban, Tomas; Stehlik, Martin; Sopko, Bruno; Markovic, Martin; Seifrtova, Marcela; Halesova, Tatana; Kovaricek, Pavel

    2018-09-01

    The broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate is one of the most widely used pesticides. Both glyphosate and its major metabolite, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), persist in waters; thus, their environmental fates are of interest. We investigated the influence of compost dose, sampling depth, moisture and saturated hydraulic conductivity (K s ) on the persistence of these substances. The amounts of AMPA quantified by triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-QqQ-MS/MS) using isotopically labeled extraction standards were higher than those of glyphosate and differed among the samples. Both glyphosate and AMPA showed gradually decreasing concentrations with soil depth, and bootstrapped ANOVA showed significant differences between the contents of glyphosate and AMPA and their behavior related to different compost dosages and sampling depths. However, the compost dose alone did not cause significant differences among samples. Bayesian statistics revealed that the amounts of glyphosate and AMPA were both dependent on the sampling depth and compost dose, but differences were found when considering the physical factors of K s and moisture. Glyphosate was influenced by moisture but not K s , whereas AMPA was influenced by K s but not moisture. Importantly, we found behavioral differences between glyphosate and its major metabolite, AMPA, related to the physical properties of K s and moisture. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Epidemiologic studies of glyphosate and cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Mink, Pamela J; Mandel, Jack S; Sceurman, Bonnielin K; Lundin, Jessica I

    2012-08-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency and other regulatory agencies around the world have registered glyphosate as a broad-spectrum herbicide for use on multiple food and non-food use crops. Glyphosate is widely considered by regulatory authorities and scientific bodies to have no carcinogenic potential, based primarily on results of carcinogenicity studies of rats and mice. To examine potential cancer risks in humans, we reviewed the epidemiologic literature to evaluate whether exposure to glyphosate is associated causally with cancer risk in humans. We also reviewed relevant methodological and biomonitoring studies of glyphosate. Seven cohort studies and fourteen case-control studies examined the association between glyphosate and one or more cancer outcomes. Our review found no consistent pattern of positive associations indicating a causal relationship between total cancer (in adults or children) or any site-specific cancer and exposure to glyphosate. Data from biomonitoring studies underscore the importance of exposure assessment in epidemiologic studies, and indicate that studies should incorporate not only duration and frequency of pesticide use, but also type of pesticide formulation. Because generic exposure assessments likely lead to exposure misclassification, it is recommended that exposure algorithms be validated with biomonitoring data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Novel 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-Phosphate Synthase Shows High Glyphosate Tolerance in Escherichia coli and Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shengxue; Yang, Xuewen; Chen, Rongrong; Zhang, Yuwen; Lu, Wei; Liu, Yan; Wang, Jianhua; Lin, Min; Wang, Guoying

    2012-01-01

    A key enzyme in the shikimate pathway, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) is the primary target of the broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate. Identification of new aroA genes coding for EPSPS with a high level of glyphosate tolerance is essential for the development of glyphosate-tolerant crops. In the present study, the glyphosate tolerance of five bacterial aroA genes was evaluated in the E. coli aroA-defective strain ER2799 and in transgenic tobacco plants. All five aroA genes could complement the aroA-defective strain ER2799, and AM79 aroA showed the highest glyphosate tolerance. Although glyphosate treatment inhibited the growth of both WT and transgenic tobacco plants, transgenic plants expressing AM79 aroA tolerated higher concentration of glyphosate and had a higher fresh weight and survival rate than plants expressing other aroA genes. When treated with high concentration of glyphosate, lower shikimate content was detected in the leaves of transgenic plants expressing AM79 aroA than transgenic plants expressing other aroA genes. These results suggest that AM79 aroA could be a good candidate for the development of transgenic glyphosate-tolerant crops. PMID:22715408

  9. Broad-spectrum antivirals against viral fusion

    PubMed Central

    Vigant, Frederic; Santos, Nuno C.; Lee, Benhur

    2015-01-01

    Effective antivirals have been developed against specific viruses, such as HIV, Hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This ‘one bug–one drug’ approach to antiviral drug development can be successful, but it may be inadequate for responding to an increasing diversity of viruses that cause significant diseases in humans. The majority of viral pathogens that cause emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases are membrane-enveloped viruses, which require the fusion of viral and cell membranes for virus entry. Therefore, antivirals that target the membrane fusion process represent new paradigms for broad-spectrum antiviral discovery. In this Review, we discuss the mechanisms responsible for the fusion between virus and cell membranes and explore how broad-spectrum antivirals target this process to prevent virus entry. PMID:26075364

  10. The role of L-type amino acid transporters in the uptake of glyphosate across mammalian epithelial tissues.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiaqiang; Li, Gao; Wang, Zhuoyi; Si, Luqin; He, Sijie; Cai, Jialing; Huang, Jiangeng; Donovan, Maureen D

    2016-02-01

    Glyphosate is one of the most commonly used herbicides worldwide due to its broad spectrum of activity and reported low toxicity to humans. Glyphosate has an amino acid-like structure that is highly polar and shows low bioavailability following oral ingestion and low systemic toxicity following intravenous exposures. Spray applications of glyphosate in agricultural or residential settings can result in topical or inhalation exposures to the herbicide. Limited systemic exposure to glyphosate occurs following skin contact, and pulmonary exposure has also been reported to be low. The results of nasal inhalation exposures, however, have not been evaluated. To investigate the mechanisms of glyphosate absorption across epithelial tissues, the permeation of glyphosate across Caco-2 cells, a gastrointestinal epithelium model, was compared with permeation across nasal respiratory and olfactory tissues excised from cows. Saturable glyphosate uptake was seen in all three tissues, indicating the activity of epithelial transporters. The uptake was shown to be ATP and Na(+) independent, and glyphosate permeability could be significantly reduced by the inclusion of competitive amino acids or specific LAT1/LAT2 transporter inhibitors. The pattern of inhibition of glyphosate permeability across Caco-2 and nasal mucosal tissues suggests that LAT1/2 play major roles in the transport of this amino-acid-like herbicide. Enhanced uptake into the epithelial cells at barrier mucosae, including the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, may result in more significant local and systemic effects than predicted from glyphosate's passive permeability, and enhanced uptake by the olfactory mucosa may result in further CNS disposition, potentially increasing the risk for brain-related toxicities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development and Event-specific Detection of Transgenic Glyphosate-resistant Rice Expressing the G2-EPSPS Gene

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yufeng; Jin, Xi; Tang, Qiaoling; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Jiangtao; Liu, Xiaojing; Cai, Junfeng; Zhang, Xiaobing; Wang, Xujing; Wang, Zhixing

    2017-01-01

    Glyphosate is a widely used herbicide, due to its broad spectrum, low cost, low toxicity, high efficiency, and non-selective characteristics. Rice farmers rarely use glyphosate as a herbicide, because the crop is sensitive to this chemical. The development of transgenic glyphosate-tolerant rice could greatly improve the economics of rice production. Here, we transformed the Pseudomonas fluorescens G2 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene G2-EPSPS, which conferred tolerance to glyphosate herbicide into a widely used japonica rice cultivar, Zhonghua 11 (ZH11), to develop two highly glyphosate-tolerant transgenic rice lines, G2-6 and G2-7, with one exogenous gene integration. Seed germination tests and glyphosate-tolerance assays of plants grown in a greenhouse showed that the two transgenic lines could greatly improve glyphosate-tolerance compared with the wild-type; The glyphosate-tolerance field test indicated that both transgenic lines could grow at concentrations of 20,000 ppm glyphosate, which is more than 20-times the recommended concentration in the field. Isolation of the flanking sequence of transgenic rice G2-6 indicated that the 5′-terminal of T-DNA was inserted into chromosome 8 of the rice genome. An event-specific PCR test system was established and the limit of detection of the primers reached five copies. Overall, the G2-EPSPS gene significantly improved glyphosate-tolerance in transgenic rice; furthermore, it is a useful candidate gene for the future development of commercial transgenic rice. PMID:28611804

  12. Weeds and ground-dwelling predators′ response to two different weed management systems in glyphosate-tolerant cotton: A farm-scale study

    PubMed Central

    Farinós, Gema P.; Gómez, Pablo; Gutiérrez, Elena; Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Escorial, María Concepción; Ortego, Félix; Chueca, María Cristina; Castañera, Pedro

    2018-01-01

    The use of glyphosate, as a post-emergence broad-spectrum herbicide in genetically modified glyphosate-tolerant (GT) cotton, supposes a big change in weed management programs with respect to a conventional regime. Thus, alterations in arable flora and arthropod fauna must be considered when evaluating their potential impacts. A 3-year farm-scale study was conducted in a 2-ha GT cotton crop, in southern Spain, to compare the effects of conventional and glyphosate herbicide regimes on weed abundance and diversity and their consequences for ground-dwelling predators. Surveys reveal that weed density was relatively low within all treatments with a few dominant species, with significantly higher weed densities and modifications of the floristic composition in glyphosate-treated plots that led to an increase in the abundance of Portulaca oleracea and to a reduction in plant diversity. The activity-density of the main predatory arthropod taxa (spiders, ground beetles, rove beetles and earwigs) varied among years, but no significant differences were obtained between conventional and glyphosate herbicide regimes. However, significant differences between treatments were obtained for ground beetles species richness and diversity, being higher under the glyphosate herbicide regime, and a positive correlation with weed density could be established for both parameters. The implications of these findings to weed control in GT cotton are discussed. PMID:29351549

  13. Weeds and ground-dwelling predators' response to two different weed management systems in glyphosate-tolerant cotton: A farm-scale study.

    PubMed

    García-Ruiz, Esteban; Loureiro, Íñigo; Farinós, Gema P; Gómez, Pablo; Gutiérrez, Elena; Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Escorial, María Concepción; Ortego, Félix; Chueca, María Cristina; Castañera, Pedro

    2018-01-01

    The use of glyphosate, as a post-emergence broad-spectrum herbicide in genetically modified glyphosate-tolerant (GT) cotton, supposes a big change in weed management programs with respect to a conventional regime. Thus, alterations in arable flora and arthropod fauna must be considered when evaluating their potential impacts. A 3-year farm-scale study was conducted in a 2-ha GT cotton crop, in southern Spain, to compare the effects of conventional and glyphosate herbicide regimes on weed abundance and diversity and their consequences for ground-dwelling predators. Surveys reveal that weed density was relatively low within all treatments with a few dominant species, with significantly higher weed densities and modifications of the floristic composition in glyphosate-treated plots that led to an increase in the abundance of Portulaca oleracea and to a reduction in plant diversity. The activity-density of the main predatory arthropod taxa (spiders, ground beetles, rove beetles and earwigs) varied among years, but no significant differences were obtained between conventional and glyphosate herbicide regimes. However, significant differences between treatments were obtained for ground beetles species richness and diversity, being higher under the glyphosate herbicide regime, and a positive correlation with weed density could be established for both parameters. The implications of these findings to weed control in GT cotton are discussed.

  14. A Novel Naturally Occurring Class I 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-Phosphate Synthase from Janibacter sp. Confers High Glyphosate Tolerance to Rice

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Shu-yuan; Cui, Ying; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Zi-duo; Lin, Yong-jun; Zhou, Fei

    2016-01-01

    As glyphosate is a broad spectrum herbicide extensively used in agriculture worldwide, identification of new aroA genes with high level of glyphosate tolerance is essential for the development and breeding of transgenic glyphosate-tolerant crops. In this study, an aroA gene was cloned from a Janibacter sp. strain isolated from marine sediment (designated as aroAJ. sp). The purified aroAJ. sp enzyme has a Km value of 30 μM for PEP and 83 μM for S3P, and a significantly higher Ki value for glyphosate (373 μM) than aroAE. coli. AroAJ. sp is characterized as a novel and naturally occurring class I aroA enzyme with glyphosate tolerance. Furthermore, we show that aroAJ. sp can be used as an effective selectable marker in both japonica and indica rice cultivar. Transgenic rice lines were tested by herbicide bioassay and it was confirmed that they could tolerate up to 3360 g/ha glyphosate, a dosage four-fold that of the recommended agricultural application level. To our knowledge, it is the first report of a naturally occurring novel class I aroA gene which can be efficiently utilized to study and develop transgenic glyphosate-tolerant crops, and can facilitate a more economical and simplified weed control system. PMID:26754957

  15. The history and current status of glyphosate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glyphosate has been called a once-in-a-century herbicide. Since it was commercialized in 1974, its use has grown to dominate and shape the herbicide marketplace. In 2008, half of the U.S. herbicide market, as measured by amount applied, was glyphosate. Much of this use was on transgenic, glyphosate...

  16. 78 FR 60707 - Glyphosate; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... regulation amends the established tolerance for residues of the herbicide glyphosate in or on canola, seed at... expression for residues of the herbicide glyphosate in or on canola, seed at 20 ppm from the combined..., this regulation amends the established tolerance for residues of the herbicide glyphosate in or on...

  17. Co-Formulants in Glyphosate-Based Herbicides Disrupt Aromatase Activity in Human Cells below Toxic Levels

    PubMed Central

    Defarge, Nicolas; Takács, Eszter; Lozano, Verónica Laura; Mesnage, Robin; Spiroux de Vendômois, Joël; Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Székács, András

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide formulations contain declared active ingredients and co-formulants presented as inert and confidential compounds. We tested the endocrine disruption of co-formulants in six glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH), the most used pesticides worldwide. All co-formulants and formulations were comparably cytotoxic well below the agricultural dilution of 1% (18–2000 times for co-formulants, 8–141 times for formulations), and not the declared active ingredient glyphosate (G) alone. The endocrine-disrupting effects of all these compounds were measured on aromatase activity, a key enzyme in the balance of sex hormones, below the toxicity threshold. Aromatase activity was decreased both by the co-formulants alone (polyethoxylated tallow amine—POEA and alkyl polyglucoside—APG) and by the formulations, from concentrations 800 times lower than the agricultural dilutions; while G exerted an effect only at 1/3 of the agricultural dilution. It was demonstrated for the first time that endocrine disruption by GBH could not only be due to the declared active ingredient but also to co-formulants. These results could explain numerous in vivo results with GBHs not seen with G alone; moreover, they challenge the relevance of the acceptable daily intake (ADI) value for GBHs exposures, currently calculated from toxicity tests of the declared active ingredient alone. PMID:26927151

  18. Alteration of estrogen-regulated gene expression in human cells induced by the agricultural and horticultural herbicide glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Hokanson, R; Fudge, R; Chowdhary, R; Busbee, D

    2007-09-01

    Gene expression is altered in mammalian cells (MCF-7 cells), by exposure to a variety of chemicals that mimic steroid hormones or interact with endocrine receptors or their co-factors. Among those populations chronically exposed to these endocrine disruptive chemicals are persons, and their families, who are employed in agriculture or horticulture, or who use agricultural/horticultural chemicals. Among the chemicals most commonly used, both commercially and in the home, is the herbicide glyphosate. Although glyphosate is commonly considered to be relatively non-toxic, we utilized in vitro DNA microarray analysis of this chemical to evaluate its capacity to alter the expression of a variety of genes in human cells. We selected a group of genes, determined by DNA microarray analysis to be dysregulated, and used quantitative real-time PCR to corroborate their altered states of expression. We discussed the reported function of those genes, with emphasis on altered physiological states that are capable of initiating adverse health effects that might be anticipated if gene expression were significantly altered in either adults or embryos exposed in utero.

  19. Effects of a commonly used glyphosate-based herbicide formulation on early developmental stages of two anuran species.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Norman; Müller, Hendrik; Viertel, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Environmental contamination, especially due to the increasing use of pesticides, is suggested to be one out of six main reasons for the global amphibian decline. Adverse effects of glyphosate-based herbicides on amphibians have been already discussed in several studies with different conclusions, especially regarding sublethal effects at environmentally relevant concentrations. Therefore, we studied the acute toxic effects (mortality, growth, and morphological changes) of the commonly used glyphosate-based herbicide formulation Roundup® UltraMax on early aquatic developmental stages of two anuran species with different larval types (obligate vs. facultative filtrating suspension feeders), the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) and the Mediterranean painted frog (Discoglossus pictus). While X. laevis is an established anuran model organism in amphibian toxicological studies, we aim to establish D. pictus as another model for species with facultative filtrating larvae. A special focus of the present study lies on malformations in X. laevis embryos, which were investigated using histological preparations. In general, embryos and larvae of X. laevis reacted more sensitive concerning lethal effects compared to early developmental stages of D. pictus. It was suggested, that especially the different morphology of their filter apparatus and the higher volume of water pumped through the buccopharynx of X. laevis larvae lead to higher exposure to the formulation. The test substance induced similar lethal effects in D. pictus larvae as it does in the teleost standard test organism used in pesticide approval, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), whereas embryos of both species are apparently more tolerant and, conversely, X. laevis larvae about two times more sensitive. In both species, early larvae always reacted significantly more sensitive than embryos. Exposure to the test substance increased malformation rates in embryos of both species in a concentration

  20. Broad spectrum antibiotic compounds and use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Koglin, Alexander; Strieker, Matthias

    2016-07-05

    The discovery of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster in the genome of Clostridium thermocellum that produces a secondary metabolite that is assembled outside of the host membrane is described. Also described is the identification of homologous NRPS gene clusters from several additional microorganisms. The secondary metabolites produced by the NRPS gene clusters exhibit broad spectrum antibiotic activity. Thus, antibiotic compounds produced by the NRPS gene clusters, and analogs thereof, their use for inhibiting bacterial growth, and methods of making the antibiotic compounds are described.

  1. Changes in microbial community structure following herbicide (glyphosate) additions to forest soils

    Treesearch

    Alice W. Ratcliff; Matt D. Busse; Carol J. Shestak

    2006-01-01

    Glyphosate applied at the recommended field rate to a clay loam and a sandy loam forest soil resulted in few changes in microbial community structure. Total and culturable bacteria, fungal hyphal length, bacterial:fungal biomass, carbon utilization profiles (BIOLOG), and bacterial and fungal phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) were unaffected 1, 3, 7, or 30 days...

  2. Occurrence of the herbicide glyphosate and its metabolite AMPA in surface waters in Switzerland determined with on-line solid phase extraction LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Poiger, Thomas; Buerge, Ignaz J; Bächli, Astrid; Müller, Markus D; Balmer, Marianne E

    2017-01-01

    Glyphosate is currently one of the most important herbicides worldwide. Its unique properties provide for a wide range of uses in agriculture but also in non-agricultural areas. At the same time, its zwitterionic nature prevents the inclusion in multi-residue analytical methods for environmental monitoring. Consequently, despite its extensive use, data on occurrence of glyphosate in the aquatic environment is still scarce. Based on existing methods, we developed a simplified procedure for the determination of glyphosate and its main metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in water samples using derivatization with fluorenylmethyl chloroformate FMOC-Cl, combined with on-line solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) detection. This method was extensively tested on over 1000 samples of surface water, groundwater, and treated wastewater and proved to be simple, sensitive, and reliable. Limits of quantification of 0.005 μg/L were routinely achieved. Glyphosate and AMPA were detected in the vast majority of stream water samples in the area of Zurich, Switzerland, with median concentrations of 0.11 and 0.20 μg/L and 95th percentile concentrations of 2.1 and 2.6 μg/L, respectively. Stream water data and data from treated wastewater indicated that non-agricultural uses may significantly contribute to the overall loads of glyphosate and AMPA in surface waters. In the investigated groundwater samples, selected specifically because they had shown presence of other herbicides in previous monitoring programs, glyphosate and AMPA were generally not detected, except for two monitoring sites in Karst aquifers, indicating that these compounds show much less tendency for leaching.

  3. Novel AroA from Pseudomonas putida Confers Tobacco Plant with High Tolerance to Glyphosate

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hai-Qin; Chang, Su-Hua; Tian, Zhe-Xian; Zhang, Le; Sun, Yi-Cheng; Li, Yan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Glyphosate is a non-selective broad-spectrum herbicide that inhibits 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS, also designated as AroA), a key enzyme in the aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathway in microorganisms and plants. Previously, we reported that a novel AroA (PpAroA1) from Pseudomonas putida had high tolerance to glyphosate, with little homology to class I or class II glyphosate-tolerant AroA. In this study, the coding sequence of PpAroA1 was optimized for tobacco. For maturation of the enzyme in chloroplast, a chloroplast transit peptide coding sequence was fused in frame with the optimized aroA gene (PparoA1optimized) at the 5′ end. The PparoA1optimized gene was introduced into the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. W38) genome via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The transformed explants were first screened in shoot induction medium containing kanamycin. Then glyphosate tolerance was assayed in putative transgenic plants and its T1 progeny. Our results show that the PpAroA1 from Pseudomonas putida can efficiently confer tobacco plants with high glyphosate tolerance. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing the PparoA1optimized gene exhibit high tolerance to glyphosate, which suggest that the novel PpAroA1 is a new and good candidate applied in transgenic crops with glyphosate tolerance in future. PMID:21611121

  4. Studies on glyphosate-induced carcinogenicity in mouse skin: a proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    George, Jasmine; Prasad, Sahdeo; Mahmood, Zafar; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2010-03-10

    Glyphosate is a widely used broad spectrum herbicide, reported to induce various toxic effects in non-target species, but its carcinogenic potential is still unknown. Here we showed the carcinogenic effects of glyphosate using 2-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis model and proteomic analysis. Carcinogenicity study revealed that glyphosate has tumor promoting activity. Proteomic analysis using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry showed that 22 spots were differentially expressed (>2 fold) on glyphosate, 7, 12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) and 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) application over untreated control. Among them, 9 proteins (translation elongation factor eEF-1 alpha chain, carbonic anhydrase III, annexin II, calcyclin, fab fragment anti-VEGF antibody, peroxiredoxin-2, superoxide dismutase [Cu-Zn], stefin A3, and calgranulin-B) were common and showed similar expression pattern in glyphosate and TPA-treated mouse skin. These proteins are known to be involved in several key processes like apoptosis and growth-inhibition, anti-oxidant responses, etc. The up-regulation of calcyclin, calgranulin-B and down-regulation of superoxide dismutase [Cu-Zn] was further confirmed by immunoblotting, indicating that these proteins can be good candidate biomarkers for skin carcinogenesis induced by glyphosate. Altogether, these results suggested that glyphosate has tumor promoting potential in skin carcinogenesis and its mechanism seems to be similar to TPA. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Changes in ultrastructure and expression of steroidogenic factor-1 in ovaries of zebrafish Danio rerio exposed to glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Armiliato, Neide; Ammar, Dib; Nezzi, Luciane; Straliotto, Marcos; Muller, Yara M R; Nazari, Evelise M

    2014-01-01

    Glyphosate is a broad-spectrum organophosphate (OP) herbicide, highly soluble in water, and when applied in terrestrial systems it penetrates into soil, eventually reaching the aquatic community and affecting nontarget organisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of glyphosate on ovaries of zebrafish (Danio rerio). Ovaries (n = 18 per triplicate) were exposed to 65 μg/L of glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine] for 15 d. This concentration was determined according to Resolution 357/2005/CONAMA/Brazil, which establishes the permissible concentration of glyphosate in Brazilian inland waters. Nonexposed ovaries (n = 18 per triplicate) were used as control. Subsequently, morphology and expression of steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) of exposed and nonexposed ovaries was determined. No apparent changes were noted in general morphology of exposed and nonexposed ovaries. However, a significant increase in diameter of oocytes was observed after exposure to glyphosate. When ovarian ultrastructure was examined the presence of concentric membranes, appearing as myelin-like structures, associated with the external membranes of mitochondria and with yolk granules was found. After glyphosate exposure, immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting revealed greater expression of SF-1 in the oocytes, which suggests a relationship between oocyte growth and SF-1 expression. These subtle adverse effects of glyphosate on oocytes raised a potential concern for fish reproduction. These results contribute to understanding glyphosate-induced toxicity to nontarget organisms, showing subcellular and molecular impairments that may affect reproduction in +female fish.

  6. Glyphosate toxicity and carcinogenicity: a review of the scientific basis of the European Union assessment and its differences with IARC.

    PubMed

    Tarazona, Jose V; Court-Marques, Daniele; Tiramani, Manuela; Reich, Hermine; Pfeil, Rudolf; Istace, Frederique; Crivellente, Federica

    2017-08-01

    Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide worldwide. It is a broad spectrum herbicide and its agricultural uses increased considerably after the development of glyphosate-resistant genetically modified (GM) varieties. Since glyphosate was introduced in 1974, all regulatory assessments have established that glyphosate has low hazard potential to mammals, however, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) concluded in March 2015 that it is probably carcinogenic. The IARC conclusion was not confirmed by the EU assessment or the recent joint WHO/FAO evaluation, both using additional evidence. Glyphosate is not the first topic of disagreement between IARC and regulatory evaluations, but has received greater attention. This review presents the scientific basis of the glyphosate health assessment conducted within the European Union (EU) renewal process, and explains the differences in the carcinogenicity assessment with IARC. Use of different data sets, particularly on long-term toxicity/carcinogenicity in rodents, could partially explain the divergent views; but methodological differences in the evaluation of the available evidence have been identified. The EU assessment did not identify a carcinogenicity hazard, revised the toxicological profile proposing new toxicological reference values, and conducted a risk assessment for some representatives uses. Two complementary exposure assessments, human-biomonitoring and food-residues-monitoring, suggests that actual exposure levels are below these reference values and do not represent a public concern.

  7. Co-expression of P173S Mutant Rice EPSPS and igrA Genes Results in Higher Glyphosate Tolerance in Transgenic Rice

    PubMed Central

    Fartyal, Dhirendra; Agarwal, Aakrati; James, Donald; Borphukan, Bhabesh; Ram, Babu; Sheri, Vijay; Yadav, Renu; Manna, Mrinalini; Varakumar, Panditi; Achary, V. Mohan M.; Reddy, Malireddy K.

    2018-01-01

    Weeds and their devastating effects have been a great threat since the start of agriculture. They compete with crop plants in the field and negatively influence the crop yield quality and quantity along with survival of the plants. Glyphosate is an important broad-spectrum systemic herbicide which has been widely used to combat various weed problems since last two decades. It is very effective even at low concentrations, and possesses low environmental toxicity and soil residual activity. However, the residual concentration of glyphosate inside the plant has been of major concern as it severely affects the important metabolic pathways, and results in poor plant growth and grain yield. In this study, we compared the glyphosate tolerance efficiency of two different transgenic groups over expressing proline/173/serine (P173S) rice EPSPS glyphosate tolerant mutant gene (OsmEPSPS) alone and in combination with the glyphosate detoxifying encoding igrA gene, recently characterized from Pseudomonas. The molecular analysis of all transgenic plant lines showed a stable integration of transgenes and their active expression in foliar tissues. The physiological analysis of glyphosate treated transgenic lines at seed germination and vegetative stages showed a significant difference in glyphosate tolerance between the two transgenic groups. The transgenic plants with OsmEPSPS and igrA genes, representing dual glyphosate tolerance mechanisms, showed an improved root-shoot growth, physiology, overall phenotype and higher level of glyphosate tolerance compared to the OsmEPSPS transgenic plants. This study highlights the advantage of igrA led detoxification mechanism as a crucial component of glyphosate tolerance strategy in combination with glyphosate tolerant OsmEPSPS gene, which offered a better option to tackle in vivo glyphosate accumulation and imparted more robust glyphosate tolerance in rice transgenic plants. PMID:29487608

  8. Co-expression of P173S Mutant Rice EPSPS and igrA Genes Results in Higher Glyphosate Tolerance in Transgenic Rice.

    PubMed

    Fartyal, Dhirendra; Agarwal, Aakrati; James, Donald; Borphukan, Bhabesh; Ram, Babu; Sheri, Vijay; Yadav, Renu; Manna, Mrinalini; Varakumar, Panditi; Achary, V Mohan M; Reddy, Malireddy K

    2018-01-01

    Weeds and their devastating effects have been a great threat since the start of agriculture. They compete with crop plants in the field and negatively influence the crop yield quality and quantity along with survival of the plants. Glyphosate is an important broad-spectrum systemic herbicide which has been widely used to combat various weed problems since last two decades. It is very effective even at low concentrations, and possesses low environmental toxicity and soil residual activity. However, the residual concentration of glyphosate inside the plant has been of major concern as it severely affects the important metabolic pathways, and results in poor plant growth and grain yield. In this study, we compared the glyphosate tolerance efficiency of two different transgenic groups over expressing proline/173/serine (P173S) rice EPSPS glyphosate tolerant mutant gene ( OsmEPSPS ) alone and in combination with the glyphosate detoxifying encoding igrA gene, recently characterized from Pseudomonas . The molecular analysis of all transgenic plant lines showed a stable integration of transgenes and their active expression in foliar tissues. The physiological analysis of glyphosate treated transgenic lines at seed germination and vegetative stages showed a significant difference in glyphosate tolerance between the two transgenic groups. The transgenic plants with OsmEPSPS and igrA genes, representing dual glyphosate tolerance mechanisms, showed an improved root-shoot growth, physiology, overall phenotype and higher level of glyphosate tolerance compared to the OsmEPSPS transgenic plants. This study highlights the advantage of igrA led detoxification mechanism as a crucial component of glyphosate tolerance strategy in combination with glyphosate tolerant OsmEPSPS gene, which offered a better option to tackle in vivo glyphosate accumulation and imparted more robust glyphosate tolerance in rice transgenic plants.

  9. Effects of Sublethal Exposure to a Glyphosate-Based Herbicide Formulation on Metabolic Activities of Different Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzymes in Rats.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Karen; Najle, Roberto; Lifschitz, Adrián; Maté, María L; Lanusse, Carlos; Virkel, Guillermo L

    2014-07-01

    The activities of different xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in liver subcellular fractions from Wistar rats exposed to a glyphosate (GLP)-based herbicide (Roundup full II) were evaluated in this work. Exposure to the herbicide triggered protective mechanisms against oxidative stress (increased glutathione peroxidase activity and total glutathione levels). Liver microsomes from both male and female rats exposed to the herbicide had lower (45%-54%, P < 0.01) hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) levels compared to their respective control animals. In female rats, the hepatic 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (a general CYP-dependent enzyme activity) was 57% higher (P < 0.05) in herbicide-exposed compared to control animals. Conversely, this enzyme activity was 58% lower (P < 0.05) in male rats receiving the herbicide. Lower (P < 0.05) 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethlyase (EROD, CYP1A1/2 dependent) and oleandomycin triacetate (TAO) N-demethylase (CYP3A dependent) enzyme activities were observed in liver microsomes from exposed male rats. Conversely, in females receiving the herbicide, EROD increased (123%-168%, P < 0.05), whereas TAO N-demethylase did not change. A higher (158%-179%, P < 0.01) benzyloxyresorufin O-debenzylase (a CYP2B-dependent enzyme activity) activity was only observed in herbicide-exposed female rats. In herbicide-exposed rats, the hepatic S-oxidation of methimazole (flavin monooxygenase dependent) was 49% to 62% lower (P < 0.001), whereas the carbonyl reduction of menadione (a cytosolic carbonyl reductase-dependent activity) was higher (P < 0.05). Exposure to the herbicide had no effects on enzymatic activities dependent on carboxylesterases, glutathione transferases, and uridinediphospho-glucuronosyltransferases. This research demonstrated certain biochemical modifications after exposure to a GLP-based herbicide. Such modifications may affect the metabolic fate of different endobiotic and xenobiotic substances. The pharmacotoxicological significance of these

  10. Herbicide resistance and biodiversity: agronomic and environmental aspects of genetically modified herbicide-resistant plants.

    PubMed

    Schütte, Gesine; Eckerstorfer, Michael; Rastelli, Valentina; Reichenbecher, Wolfram; Restrepo-Vassalli, Sara; Ruohonen-Lehto, Marja; Saucy, Anne-Gabrielle Wuest; Mertens, Martha

    2017-01-01

    Farmland biodiversity is an important characteristic when assessing sustainability of agricultural practices and is of major international concern. Scientific data indicate that agricultural intensification and pesticide use are among the main drivers of biodiversity loss. The analysed data and experiences do not support statements that herbicide-resistant crops provide consistently better yields than conventional crops or reduce herbicide amounts. They rather show that the adoption of herbicide-resistant crops impacts agronomy, agricultural practice, and weed management and contributes to biodiversity loss in several ways: (i) many studies show that glyphosate-based herbicides, which were commonly regarded as less harmful, are toxic to a range of aquatic organisms and adversely affect the soil and intestinal microflora and plant disease resistance; the increased use of 2,4-D or dicamba, linked to new herbicide-resistant crops, causes special concerns. (ii) The adoption of herbicide-resistant crops has reduced crop rotation and favoured weed management that is solely based on the use of herbicides. (iii) Continuous herbicide resistance cropping and the intensive use of glyphosate over the last 20 years have led to the appearance of at least 34 glyphosate-resistant weed species worldwide. Although recommended for many years, farmers did not counter resistance development in weeds by integrated weed management, but continued to rely on herbicides as sole measure. Despite occurrence of widespread resistance in weeds to other herbicides, industry rather develops transgenic crops with additional herbicide resistance genes. (iv) Agricultural management based on broad-spectrum herbicides as in herbicide-resistant crops further decreases diversity and abundance of wild plants and impacts arthropod fauna and other farmland animals. Taken together, adverse impacts of herbicide-resistant crops on biodiversity, when widely adopted, should be expected and are indeed very hard

  11. Responses of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle and Vallisneria natans (Lour.) Hara to glyphosate exposure.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Guidi; Wu, Zhonghua; Yin, Jun; Chai, Lulu

    2018-02-01

    Glyphosate is a broad-spectrum herbicide that is frequently detected in water bodies and is harmful to aquatic systems. We conducted an experiment to explore the ecological sensitivity of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle and Vallisneria natans (Lour.) Hara to glyphosate. Our research focused on the physiological responses of H. verticillata and V. natans after exposure to various concentrations of glyphosate (0, 1, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 80 mg/L) in hydroponic culture after one day (1D) and seven days (7D). The results show that after 1D, the soluble protein content of H. verticillata was significantly stimulated under low herbicide concentrations. Other indices for H. verticillata and V. natans had no remarkable changes at 1D. After 7D of treatment, the soluble protein content of H. verticillata showed no significant differences, while the malondialdehyde (MDA), pigment contents and catalase (CAT) activity significantly increased at low glyphosate concentrations. Guaiacol peroxidase (POD) activity in H. verticillata significantly increased with increasing herbicide concentrations. The chlorophyll a/b ratio of H. verticillata sharply decreased above 10 mg/L. For V. natans, soluble protein, chlorophyll a, and carotenoid content; and CAT activity declined significantly after glyphosate application, while other indicators showed no significant changes. Our results indicate that glyphosate concentrations from 0 to 80 mg/L can induce oxidative stress in H. verticillate and may impede metabolism processes for protein and pigments without causing oxidative stress in V. natans. Taken together, our results suggest that the sensitivity of H. verticillata to glyphosate exposure is higher than that of V. natans. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Overlapping Residual Herbicides for Control of Photosystem (PS) II- and 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase (HPPD)-Inhibitor-Resistant Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri S. Watson) in Glyphosate-Resistant Maize

    PubMed Central

    Chahal, Parminder S.; Ganie, Zahoor A.; Jhala, Amit J.

    2018-01-01

    A Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri S. Watson) biotype has evolved resistance to photosystem (PS) II- (atrazine) and 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD)-inhibiting herbicides (mesotrione, tembotrione, and topramezone) in maize seed production field in Nebraska, USA. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of soil residual pre-emergence (PRE) herbicides followed by (fb) tank-mixture of residual and foliar active post-emergence (POST) herbicides on PS-II- and HPPD-inhibitor-resistant Palmer amaranth control, maize yield, and net economic returns. Field experiments were conducted in a grower's field infested with PS II- and HPPD-inhibitor-resistant Palmer amaranth near Shickley in Fillmore County, Nebraska, USA in 2015 and 2016. The contrast analysis suggested that saflufenacil plus dimethenamid-P or pyroxasulfone plus saflufenacil applied PRE provided 80–82% Palmer amaranth control compared to 65 and 39% control with saflufenacil and pyroxasulfone applied alone at 3 weeks after PRE (WAPRE), respectively. Among the PRE fb POST herbicide programs, 95–98% Palmer amaranth control was achieved with pyroxasulfone plus safluefenacil, or saflufenacil plus dimethenamid-P applied PRE, fb glyphosate plus topramezone plus dimethenamid-P plus atrazine, glyphosate plus diflufenzopyr plus dicamba plus pyroxasulfone, glyphosate plus diflufenzopyr plus pendimethalin, or glyphosate plus diflufenzopyr plus dicamba plus atrazine applied POST at 3 weeks after POST (WAPOST) through maize harvest. Based on contrast analysis, PRE fb POST programs provided 77–83% Palmer amaranth control at 3 WAPOST through maize harvest compared to 12–15% control with PRE-only and 66–84% control with POST-only programs. Similarly, PRE fb POST programs provided 99% biomass reduction at 6 WAPOST compared to PRE-only (28%) and POST-only (87%) programs. PRE fb POST programs provided higher maize yield (13,617 kg ha−1) and net return (US $1,724 ha−1) compared to the PRE

  13. Perinatal Glyphosate-Based Herbicide Exposure in Rats Alters Brain Antioxidant Status, Glutamate and Acetylcholine Metabolism and Affects Recognition Memory.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Cristina Eugenia; Baier, Carlos Javier; Bartos, Mariana; Bras, Cristina; Domínguez, Sergio; Mónaco, Nina; Gumilar, Fernanda; Giménez, María Sofía; Minetti, Alejandra

    2018-04-02

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (Gly-BHs) lead the world pesticide market. Although are frequently promoted as safe and of low toxicity, several investigations question its innocuousness. Previously, we described that oral exposure of rats to a Gly-BH during pregnancy and lactation decreased locomotor activity and anxiety in the offspring. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the mechanisms of neurotoxicity of this herbicide. Pregnant Wistar rats were supplied orally with 0.2 and 0.4% of Gly-BH (corresponding to 0.65 and 1.30 g/l of pure Gly, respectively) from gestational day (GD) 0, until weaning (postnatal day, PND, 21). Oxidative stress markers were determined in whole brain homogenates of PND90 offspring. The activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), transaminases, and alkaline phosphatase (AP) were assessed in prefrontal cortex (PFC), striatum, and hippocampus. Recognition memory was evaluated by the novel object recognition test. Brain antioxidant status was altered in Gly-BH-exposed rats. Moreover, AChE and transaminases activities were decreased and AP activity was increased in PFC, striatum and hippocampus by Gly-BH treatment. In addition, the recognition memory after 24 h was impaired in adult offspring perinatally exposed to Gly-BH. The present study reveals that exposure to a Gly-BH during early stages of rat development affects brain oxidative stress markers as well as the activity of enzymes involved in the glutamatergic and cholinergic systems. These alterations could contribute to the neurobehavioral variations reported previously by us, and to the impairment in recognition memory described in the present work.

  14. Managing Herbicide Drift and Early Results of Simulated Glyphosate Drift to Potato Study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The off target movement of herbicides can injure sensitive crops. Off target movement of spray droplets results from displacement by wind, poor application techniques, or improper settings or operation of application equipment. Applicators should be aware of wind speed and direction, use nozzles and...

  15. Interactions of tillage and cover crop on water, sediment, and pre-emergence herbicide loss in glyphosate-resistant cotton: implications for the control of glyphosate-resistant weed biotypes.

    PubMed

    Krutz, L Jason; Locke, Martin A; Steinriede, R Wade

    2009-01-01

    The need to control glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine]-resistant weed biotypes with tillage and preemergence herbicides in glyphosate-resistant crops (GRCs) is causing a reduction in no-tillage hectarage thereby threatening the advances made in water quality over the past decade. Consequently, if environmental gains afforded by GRCs are to be maintained, then an in-field best management practice (BMP) compatible with tillage is required for hectarage infested with glyphosate-resistant weed biotypes. Thus, 1 d after a preemergent application of fluometuron [N,N-dimethyl-N'-(3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)urea] (1.02 kg ha(-1)) and metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)acetamide] (1.18 kg ha(-1)) to a Dundee silt loam (fine-silty, mixed, active, thermic Typic Endoaqualf), simulated rainfall (60 mm h(-1)) was applied to 0.0002-ha microplots for approximately 1.25 h to elucidate tillage (no tillage [NT] and reduced tillage [RT])and cover crop (no cover [NC] and rye cover [RC]) effects on water, sediment, and herbicide loss in surface runoff. Regardless of tillage, RC delayed time-to-runoff 1.3-fold, reduced cumulative runoff volume 1.4-fold, and decreased cumulative sediment loss 4.7-fold. Cumulative fluometuron loss was not affected by tillage or cover crop. Conversely, total metolachlor loss was 1.3-fold lower in NT than RT and 1.4-fold lower in RC than NC. These data indicate that RC can be established in hectarage requiring tillage and potentially curtail water, sediment, and preemergence herbicide losses in the spring to levels equivalent to or better than that of NT, thereby protecting environmental gains provided by GRCs.

  16. Glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid chronic risk assessment for soil biota.

    PubMed

    von Mérey, Georg; Manson, Philip S; Mehrsheikh, Akbar; Sutton, Peter; Levine, Steven L

    2016-11-01

    Glyphosate is a broad-spectrum herbicide used widely in agriculture, horticulture, private gardens, and public infrastructure, where it is applied to areas such as roadsides, railway tracks, and parks to control the growth of weeds. The exposure risk from glyphosate and the primary soil metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) on representative species of earthworms, springtails, and predatory soil mites and the effects on nitrogen-transformation processes by soil microorganisms were assessed under laboratory conditions based on internationally recognized guidelines. For earthworms, the reproductive no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) was 472.8 mg glyphosate acid equivalent (a.e.)/kg dry soil, which was the highest concentration tested, and 198.1 mg/kg dry soil for AMPA. For predatory mites, the reproductive NOEC was 472.8 mg a.e./kg dry soil for glyphosate and 320 mg/kg dry soil for AMPA, the highest concentrations tested. For springtails, the reproductive NOEC was 472.8 mg a.e./kg dry soil for glyphosate and 315 mg/kg dry soil for AMPA, the highest concentrations tested. Soil nitrogen-transformation processes were unaffected by glyphosate and AMPA at 33.1 mg a.e./kg soil and 160 mg/kg soil, respectively. Comparison of these endpoints with worst-case soil concentrations expected for glyphosate (6.62 mg a.e./kg dry soil) and AMPA (6.18 mg/kg dry soil) for annual applications at the highest annual rate of 4.32 kg a.e./ha indicate very low likelihood of adverse effects on soil biota. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2742-2752. © 2016 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. © 2016 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC.

  17. The Ramazzini Institute 13-week study on glyphosate-based herbicides at human-equivalent dose in Sprague Dawley rats: study design and first in-life endpoints evaluation.

    PubMed

    Panzacchi, Simona; Mandrioli, Daniele; Manservisi, Fabiana; Bua, Luciano; Falcioni, Laura; Spinaci, Marcella; Galeati, Giovanna; Dinelli, Giovanni; Miglio, Rossella; Mantovani, Alberto; Lorenzetti, Stefano; Hu, Jianzhong; Chen, Jia; Perry, Melissa J; Landrigan, Philip J; Belpoggi, Fiorella

    2018-05-29

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) are the most widely used pesticides worldwide, and glyphosate is the active ingredient of such herbicides, including the formulation known as Roundup. The massive and increasing use of GBHs results in not only the global burden of occupational exposures, but also increased exposure to the general population. The current pilot study represents the first phase of a long-term investigation of GBHs that we are conducting over the next 5 years. In this paper, we present the study design, the first evaluation of in vivo parameters and the determination of glyphosate and its major metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in urine. We exposed Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats orally via drinking water to a dose of glyphosate equivalent to the United States Acceptable Daily Intake (US ADI) of 1.75 mg/kg bw/day, defined as the chronic Reference Dose (cRfD) determined by the US EPA, starting from prenatal life, i.e. gestational day (GD) 6 of their mothers. One cohort was continuously dosed until sexual maturity (6-week cohort) and another cohort was continuously dosed until adulthood (13-week cohort). Here we present data on general toxicity and urinary concentrations of glyphosate and its major metabolite AMPA. Survival, body weight, food and water consumption of the animals were not affected by the treatment with either glyphosate or Roundup. The concentration of both glyphosate and AMPA detected in the urine of SD rats treated with glyphosate were comparable to that observed in animals treated with Roundup, with an increase in relation to the duration of treatment. The majority of glyphosate was excreted unchanged. Urinary levels of the parent compound, glyphosate, were around 100-fold higher than the level of its metabolite, AMPA. Glyphosate concentrations in urine showed that most part of the administered dose was excreted as unchanged parent compound upon glyphosate and Roundup exposure, with an increasing pattern of glyphosate excreted

  18. Cancer Incidence among Glyphosate-Exposed Pesticide Applicators in the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Blair, Aaron; Rusiecki, Jennifer A.; Hoppin, Jane A.; Svec, Megan; Dosemeci, Mustafa; Sandler, Dale P.; Alavanja, Michael C.

    2005-01-01

    Glyphosate is a broad-spectrum herbicide that is one of the most frequently applied pesticides in the world. Although there has been little consistent evidence of genotoxicity or carcinogenicity from in vitro and animal studies, a few epidemiologic reports have indicated potential health effects of glyphosate. We evaluated associations between glyphosate exposure and cancer incidence in the Agricultural Health Study (AHS), a prospective cohort study of 57,311 licensed pesticide applicators in Iowa and North Carolina. Detailed information on pesticide use and other factors was obtained from a self-administered questionnaire completed at time of enrollment (1993–1997). Among private and commercial applicators, 75.5% reported having ever used glyphosate, of which > 97% were men. In this analysis, glyphosate exposure was defined as a) ever personally mixed or applied products containing glyphosate; b) cumulative lifetime days of use, or “cumulative exposure days” (years of use × days/year); and c) intensity-weighted cumulative exposure days (years of use × days/year × estimated intensity level). Poisson regression was used to estimate exposure–response relations between glyphosate and incidence of all cancers combined and 12 relatively common cancer subtypes. Glyphosate exposure was not associated with cancer incidence overall or with most of the cancer subtypes we studied. There was a suggested association with multiple myeloma incidence that should be followed up as more cases occur in the AHS. Given the widespread use of glyphosate, future analyses of the AHS will allow further examination of long-term health effects, including less common cancers. PMID:15626647

  19. Cancer incidence among glyphosate-exposed pesticide applicators in the Agricultural Health Study.

    PubMed

    De Roos, Anneclaire J; Blair, Aaron; Rusiecki, Jennifer A; Hoppin, Jane A; Svec, Megan; Dosemeci, Mustafa; Sandler, Dale P; Alavanja, Michael C

    2005-01-01

    Glyphosate is a broad-spectrum herbicide that is one of the most frequently applied pesticides in the world. Although there has been little consistent evidence of genotoxicity or carcinogenicity from in vitro and animal studies, a few epidemiologic reports have indicated potential health effects of glyphosate. We evaluated associations between glyphosate exposure and cancer incidence in the Agricultural Health Study (AHS), a prospective cohort study of 57,311 licensed pesticide applicators in Iowa and North Carolina. Detailed information on pesticide use and other factors was obtained from a self-administered questionnaire completed at time of enrollment (1993-1997). Among private and commercial applicators, 75.5% reported having ever used glyphosate, of which > 97% were men. In this analysis, glyphosate exposure was defined as a) ever personally mixed or applied products containing glyphosate; b) cumulative lifetime days of use, or "cumulative exposure days" (years of use times days/year); and c) intensity-weighted cumulative exposure days (years of use times days/year times estimated intensity level). Poisson regression was used to estimate exposure-response relations between glyphosate and incidence of all cancers combined and 12 relatively common cancer subtypes. Glyphosate exposure was not associated with cancer incidence overall or with most of the cancer subtypes we studied. There was a suggested association with multiple myeloma incidence that should be followed up as more cases occur in the AHS. Given the widespread use of glyphosate, future analyses of the AHS will allow further examination of long-term health effects, including less common cancers.

  20. Contact with a glyphosate-based herbicide has long-term effects on the activity and foraging of an agrobiont wolf spider.

    PubMed

    Behrend, Julia E; Rypstra, Ann L

    2018-03-01

    Animals that live in conventional agroecosystems must cope with a variety of anthropogenic chemicals. Most of the focus of toxicology is on lethality, deformities, or short-term shifts in behavior. However, for animals that succeed in spite of their exposure, it is important to determine if long-term changes are brought on by their experience. We tested the hypothesis that contact with a commercial formulation of a glyphosate-based herbicide would affect the behavior of subsequent instars in the wolf spider, Pardosa milvina, a species that thrives in the agroecosystems of eastern United States. In one experiment, we housed females carrying egg sacs on a surface treated with the herbicide for 7 h. Then we monitored their activity and foraging of the offspring 4 weeks after emergence. We repeated the same tests on adults that had been housed with herbicide during their penultimate stage. In both studies, exposed spiders displayed higher levels of activity and greater capture success than their unexposed counterparts. Exposure of penultimate instar to herbicide had larger effects on the behavior of adult males than adult females. These results suggest that herbicides have the potential to adjust the behavior of individuals in the predator community. Thus, impact on the food web and their positive or negative potential for biological control may extend beyond their role in controlling weeds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Laboratory-based experiments to investigate the impact of glyphosate-containing herbicide on pollution attenuation and biodegradation in a model pervious paving system.

    PubMed

    Mbanaso, F U; Coupe, S J; Charlesworth, S M; Nnadi, E O

    2013-01-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out to determine the effect of glyphosate-containing herbicides (GCHs) on the hydrocarbon retention and biodegradation processes known to occur in pervious pavement systems (PPSs). The PPS test rigs were based on the four-layered design detailed in CIRIA C582. This enabled the pollutant retention capacity of the PPS and biodegradation of retained pollutants by microorganisms to be investigated. The use of test rigs also enabled the impact of GCH on PPS eukaryotic organisms to be studied, by the monitoring of protist bioindicators. Results showed that GCH disrupted hydrocarbon retention by the geotextiles relative to rigs with mineral oil only added, as 9.3% and 24.5% of added hydrocarbon were found in herbicide only rigs and herbicide plus oil rigs respectively. In previous studies, PPS contaminated by mineral oil had been shown to retain 98.7% of added oils and over several weeks, biodegrade this oil in situ. Where GCH was added to experimental models, much higher concentrations of heavy metals, including Pb, Cu, and Zn, were released from the PPS in effluent, particularly where GCH and mineral oil were added together. The source of the majority of the metal contamination was thought to be the used engine oil. The herbicide generally increased the total activity of microbial communities in rig systems and had a stimulating effect on bacterial and fungal population numbers. Although the protists, which are part of the microbial community directly or indirectly responsible for biodegradation, were initially strongly affected by the herbicide, they showed resilience by quickly recovering and increasing their population compared with rigs without added herbicide, including the rigs with mineral oil added to them. However, the presence of herbicide was associated with a decrease in the species richness of recorded protist taxa and a predominance of robust, cosmopolitan or ubiquitous protist genera. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier

  2. Glyphosate affects lignin content and amino acid composition in glyphosate-resistant soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Farmers report that some glyphosate-resistant soybean varieties are visually injured by glyphosate. Glyphosate is the main herbicide that directly affects the synthesis of secondary compounds. In this work, we evaluated the effect of increasing rates of glyphosate on lignin and amino acid content, p...

  3. A novel 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase transgene for glyphosate resistance stimulates growth and fecundity in weedy rice (Oryza sativa) without herbicide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Xia, Hui; Yang, Xiao; Xu, Ting; Si, Hong Jiang; Cai, Xing Xing; Wang, Feng; Su, Jun; Snow, Allison A; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2014-04-01

    Understanding evolutionary interactions among crops and weeds can facilitate effective weed management. For example, gene flow from crops to their wild or weedy relatives can lead to rapid evolution in recipient populations. In rice (Oryza sativa), transgenic herbicide resistance is expected to spread to conspecific weedy rice (Oryza sativa f. spontanea) via hybridization. Here, we studied fitness effects of transgenic over-expression of a native 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (epsps) gene developed to confer glyphosate resistance in rice. Controlling for genetic background, we examined physiological traits and field performance of crop-weed hybrid lineages that segregated for the presence or absence of this novel epsps transgene. Surprisingly, we found that transgenic F2 crop-weed hybrids produced 48-125% more seeds per plant than nontransgenic controls in monoculture- and mixed-planting designs without glyphosate application. Transgenic plants also had greater EPSPS protein levels, tryptophan concentrations, photosynthetic rates, and per cent seed germination compared with nontransgenic controls. Our findings suggest that over-expression of a native rice epsps gene can lead to fitness advantages, even without exposure to glyphosate. We hypothesize that over-expressed epsps may be useful to breeders and, if deployed, could result in fitness benefits in weedy relatives following transgene introgression. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. A novel 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase transgene for glyphosate resistance stimulates growth and fecundity in weedy rice (Oryza sativa) without herbicide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Xia, Hui; Yang, Xiao; Xu, Ting; Si, Hong Jiang; Cai, Xing Xing; Wang, Feng; Su, Jun; Snow, Allison A; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Understanding evolutionary interactions among crops and weeds can facilitate effective weed management. For example, gene flow from crops to their wild or weedy relatives can lead to rapid evolution in recipient populations. In rice (Oryza sativa), transgenic herbicide resistance is expected to spread to conspecific weedy rice (Oryza sativa f. spontanea) via hybridization. Here, we studied fitness effects of transgenic over-expression of a native 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (epsps) gene developed to confer glyphosate resistance in rice. Controlling for genetic background, we examined physiological traits and field performance of crop–weed hybrid lineages that segregated for the presence or absence of this novel epsps transgene. Surprisingly, we found that transgenic F2 crop–weed hybrids produced 48–125% more seeds per plant than nontransgenic controls in monoculture- and mixed-planting designs without glyphosate application. Transgenic plants also had greater EPSPS protein levels, tryptophan concentrations, photosynthetic rates, and per cent seed germination compared with nontransgenic controls. Our findings suggest that over-expression of a native rice epsps gene can lead to fitness advantages, even without exposure to glyphosate. We hypothesize that over-expressed epsps may be useful to breeders and, if deployed, could result in fitness benefits in weedy relatives following transgene introgression. PMID:23905647

  5. Dynamics and environmental risk assessment of the herbicide glyphosate and its metabolite AMPA in a small vineyard river of the Lake Geneva catchment.

    PubMed

    Daouk, Silwan; Copin, Pierre-Jean; Rossi, Luca; Chèvre, Nathalie; Pfeifer, Hans-Rudolf

    2013-09-01

    The use of pesticides may lead to environmental problems, such as surface water pollution, with a risk for aquatic organisms. In the present study, a typical vineyard river of western Switzerland was first monitored to measure discharged loads, identify sources, and assess the dynamic of the herbicide glyphosate and its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA). Second, based on river concentrations, an associated environmental risk was calculated using laboratory tests and ecotoxicity data from the literature. Measured concentrations confirmed the mobility of these molecules with elevated peaks during flood events, up to 4970 ng/L. From April 2011 to September 2011, a total load of 7.1 kg was calculated, with 85% coming from vineyards and minor urban sources and 15% from arable crops. Compared with the existing literature, this load represents an important fraction (6-12%) of the estimated amount applied because of the steep vineyard slopes (∼10%). The associated risk of these compounds toward aquatic species was found to be negligible in the present study, as well as for other rivers in Switzerland. A growth stimulation was nevertheless observed for the algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus with low concentrations of glyphosate, which could indicate a risk of perturbation in aquatic ecosystems, such as eutrophication. The combination of field and ecotoxicity data allowed the performance of a realistic risk assessment for glyphosate and AMPA, which should be applied to other pesticide molecules. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  6. Epidemiologic studies of glyphosate and non-cancer health outcomes: a review.

    PubMed

    Mink, Pamela J; Mandel, Jack S; Lundin, Jessica I; Sceurman, Bonnielin K

    2011-11-01

    The United States (US) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other regulatory agencies around the world have registered glyphosate as a broad-spectrum herbicide for use on multiple food and non-food use crops. To examine potential health risks in humans, we searched and reviewed the literature to evaluate whether exposure to glyphosate is associated causally with non-cancer health risks in humans. We also reviewed biomonitoring studies of glyphosate to allow for a more comprehensive discussion of issues related to exposure assessment and misclassification. Cohort, case-control and cross-sectional studies on glyphosate and non-cancer outcomes evaluated a variety of endpoints, including non-cancer respiratory conditions, diabetes, myocardial infarction, reproductive and developmental outcomes, rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid disease, and Parkinson's disease. Our review found no evidence of a consistent pattern of positive associations indicating a causal relationship between any disease and exposure to glyphosate. Most reported associations were weak and not significantly different from 1.0. Because accurate exposure measurement is crucial for valid results, it is recommended that pesticide-specific exposure algorithms be developed and validated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Novel 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-Phosphate Synthase from Rahnella aquatilis with Significantly Reduced Glyphosate Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Ai-Sheng; Zhao, Wei; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Han, Hong-Juan; Chen, Chen; Jin, Xiao-Fen; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2012-01-01

    The 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS; EC 2.5.1.19) is a key enzyme in the shikimate pathway for the production of aromatic amino acids and chorismate-derived secondary metabolites in plants, fungi, and microorganisms. It is also the target of the broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate. Natural glyphosate resistance is generally thought to occur within microorganisms in a strong selective pressure condition. Rahnella aquatilis strain GR20, an antagonist against pathogenic agrobacterial strains of grape crown gall, was isolated from the rhizosphere of grape in glyphosate-contaminated vineyards. A novel gene encoding EPSPS was identified from the isolated bacterium by complementation of an Escherichia coli auxotrophic aroA mutant. The EPSPS, named AroAR.aquatilis, was expressed and purified from E. coli, and key kinetic values were determined. The full-length enzyme exhibited higher tolerance to glyphosate than the E. coli EPSPS (AroAE.coli), while retaining high affinity for the substrate phosphoenolpyruvate. Transgenic plants of AroAR.aquatilis were also observed to be more resistant to glyphosate at a concentration of 5 mM than that of AroAE.coli. To probe the sites contributing to increased tolerance to glyphosate, mutant R.aquatilis EPSPS enzymes were produced with the c-strand of subdomain 3 and the f-strand of subdomain 5 (Thr38Lys, Arg40Val, Arg222Gln, Ser224Val, Ile225Val, and Gln226Lys) substituted by the corresponding region of the E. coli EPSPS. The mutant enzyme exhibited greater sensitivity to glyphosate than the wild type R.aquatilis EPSPS with little change of affinity for its first substrate, shikimate-3-phosphate (S3P) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). The effect of the residues on subdomain 5 on glyphosate resistance was more obvious. PMID:22870190

  8. Low-concentration exposure to glyphosate-based herbicide modulates the complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and induces mitochondrial hyperpolarization in the Danio rerio brain.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Aline G; Jaramillo, Michael L; Remor, Aline P; Latini, Alexandra; Davico, Carla E; da Silva, Mariana L; Müller, Yara M R; Ammar, Dib; Nazari, Evelise M

    2018-06-11

    Glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl-glycine) (GLY) is the active ingredient of the most used herbicides in the world. GLY is applied in formulated products known as glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH), which could induce effects that are not predicted by toxicity assays with pure GLY. This herbicide is classified as organophosphorus compound, which is known to induce neurotoxic effects. Although this compound is classified as non-neurotoxic by regulatory agencies, acute exposure to GBH causes neurological symptoms in humans. However, there is no consensus in relation to neurotoxic effects of GBH. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the neurotoxic effects of the GBH in the zebrafish Danio rerio, focusing on acute toxicity, the activity and transcript levels of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, mitochondrial membrane potential, reactive species (RS) formation, and behavioral repertoire. Adult zebrafish were exposed in vivo to three concentrations of GBH Scout ® , which contained GLY in formulation (fGLY) (0.065, 1.0 and 10.0 mg L -1 fGLY) for 7 d, and an in vitro assay was performed using also pure GLY. Our results show that GBH induced in zebrafish brain a decrease in cell viability, inhibited mitochondrial complex enzymatic activity, modulated gene expression related to mitochondrial complexes, induced an increase in RS production, promoted hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane, and induced behavioral impairments. Together, our data contributes to the knowledge of the neurotoxic effects of GBH. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been recognized as a relevant cellular response that should not be disregarded. Moreover, this study pointed to the mitochondria as an important target of GBH. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Side-effects of glyphosate on the life parameters of Eriopis connexa (Coleoptera: Coccinelidae) in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Mirande, L; Haramboure, M; Smagghe, G; Piñeda, S; Schneider, M I

    2010-01-01

    In Argentina, transgenic soybean crop (Roundup Ready, RR) has undergone a major expansion over the last 15 years, with the consequent increase of glyphosate applications, a broad-spectrum and post emergence herbicide. Soybean crops are inhabited by several arthropods. Eriopis connexa Germar (Coleoptera: Coccinelidae) is a predator associated to soybean soft-bodies pest and have a Neotropical distribution. Nowadays, it is being considered a potentially biological control agent in South America. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the side-effects of glyphosate on larvae (third instar) and adults of this predator. Commercial compound and the maximum registered concentrations for field use were employed: GlifoGlex 48 (48% glyphosate, 192 mg a.i./litre, Gleba Argentina S.A.). The exposure was by ingestion through the treated prey (Rophalosiphum padi) or by drinking treated water during 48 h for treatment of the adult. The herbicide solutions were prepared using distilled water as solvent. The bioassays were carried out in the laboratory under controlled conditions: 23 +/- 0.5 degrees C, 75 +/- 5% RH and 16:8 (L:D) of photoperiod. Development time, weight of pupae, adult emergence, pre-oviposition period, fecundity and fertility were evaluated as endpoints. Larvae from glyphosate treatment molted earlier than controls. In addition, the weight of pupae, longevity, fecundity and fertility were drastically reduced in treated organisms. The reductions were more drastic when the treatments were performed at the third larval stage than as adult. The reproduction capacity of the predator was the most affected parameter and could be related to a hormonal disruption by glyphosate in the treated organisms. This work can confirm the deleterious effects of this herbicide on beneficial organisms. Also, it agrees with prior studies carried out on other predators associated to soybean pest, such as Chrysoperla externa (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) and Alpaida veniliae (Araneae

  10. Structural basis of glyphosate resistance resulting from the double mutation Thr97 -> Ile and Pro101 -> Ser in 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Funke, Todd; Yang, Yan; Han, Huijong; Healy-Fried, Martha; Olesen, Sanne; Becker, Andreas; Schönbrunn, Ernst

    2009-04-10

    The shikimate pathway enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) is the target of the broad spectrum herbicide glyphosate. The genetic engineering of EPSPS led to the introduction of glyphosate-resistant crops worldwide. The genetically engineered corn lines NK603 and GA21 carry distinct EPSPS enzymes. CP4 EPSPS, expressed in NK603 corn and transgenic soybean, cotton, and canola, belongs to class II EPSPS, glyphosate-insensitive variants of this enzyme isolated from certain Gram-positive bacteria. GA21 corn, on the other hand, was created by point mutations of class I EPSPS, such as the enzymes from Zea mays or Escherichia coli, which are sensitive to low glyphosate concentrations. The structural basis of the glyphosate resistance resulting from these point mutations has remained obscure. We studied the kinetic and structural effects of the T97I/P101S double mutation, the molecular basis for GA21 corn, using EPSPS from E. coli. The T97I/P101S enzyme is essentially insensitive to glyphosate (K(i) = 2.4 mm) but maintains high affinity for the substrate phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) (K(m) = 0.1 mm). The crystal structure at 1.7-A resolution revealed that the dual mutation causes a shift of residue Gly(96) toward the glyphosate binding site, impairing efficient binding of glyphosate, while the side chain of Ile(97) points away from the substrate binding site, facilitating PEP utilization. The single site T97I mutation renders the enzyme sensitive to glyphosate and causes a substantial decrease in the affinity for PEP. Thus, only the concomitant mutations of Thr(97) and Pro(101) induce the conformational changes necessary to produce catalytically efficient, glyphosate-resistant class I EPSPS.

  11. Glyphosate Application With a Janitor's Dustmop

    Treesearch

    T. W. Hicks; D. T. Cooper

    1982-01-01

    A simple, lawnmower· mounted, gravity-flow herbicide application device is described. It allows application of the nonselective herbicide, glyphosate, to grasses, with no risk of damage to adjacent, desirable plants.

  12. A glyphosate micro-emulsion formulation displays teratogenicity in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Bonfanti, Patrizia; Saibene, M; Bacchetta, R; Mantecca, P; Colombo, A

    2018-02-01

    Glyphosate is the active ingredient in broad-spectrum herbicide formulations used in agriculture, domestic area and aquatic weed control worldwide. Its market is growing steadily concurrently with the cultivation of glyphosate-tolerant transgenic crops and emergence of weeds less sensitive to glyphosate. Ephemeral and lentic waters near to agricultural lands, representing favorite habitats for amphibian reproduction and early life-stage development, may thus be contaminated by glyphosate based herbicides (GBHs) residues. Previous studies on larval anuran species highlighted increased mortality and growth effects after exposure to different GBHs in comparison to glyphosate itself, mainly because of the surfactants such as polyethoxylated tallow amine present in the formulations. Nevertheless, these conclusions are not completely fulfilled when the early development, characterized by primary organogenesis events, is considered. In this study, we compare the embryotoxicity of Roundup ® Power 2.0, a new GBH formulation currently authorized in Italy, with that of technical grade glyphosate using the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX). Our results evidenced that glyphosate was not embryolethal and only at the highest concentration (50 mg a.e./L) caused edemas. Conversely, Roundup ® Power 2.0 exhibited a 96 h LC50 of 24.78 mg a.e./L and a 96 h EC50 of 7.8 mg a.e./L. A Teratogenic Index of 3.4 was derived, pointing out the high teratogenic potential of the Roundup ® Power 2.0. Specific concentration-dependent abnormal phenotypes, such as craniofacial alterations, microphthalmia, narrow eyes and forebrain regionalization defects were evidenced by gross malformation screening and histopathological analysis. These phenotypes are coherent with those evidenced in Xenopus laevis embryos injected with glyphosate, allowing us to hypothesize that the teratogenicity observed for Roundup ® Power 2.0 may be related to the improved efficacy in delivering

  13. Improving Glyphosate Oxidation Activity of Glycine Oxidase from Bacillus cereus by Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Tao; Zhang, Kai; Chen, Yangyan; Lin, Yongjun; Wu, Gaobing; Zhang, Lili; Yao, Pei; Shao, Zongze; Liu, Ziduo

    2013-01-01

    Glyphosate, a broad spectrum herbicide widely used in agriculture all over the world, inhibits 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase in the shikimate pathway, and glycine oxidase (GO) has been reported to be able to catalyze the oxidative deamination of various amines and cleave the C-N bond in glyphosate. Here, in an effort to improve the catalytic activity of the glycine oxidase that was cloned from a glyphosate-degrading marine strain of Bacillus cereus (BceGO), we used a bacteriophage T7 lysis-based method for high-throughput screening of oxidase activity and engineered the gene encoding BceGO by directed evolution. Six mutants exhibiting enhanced activity toward glyphosate were screened from two rounds of error-prone PCR combined with site directed mutagenesis, and the beneficial mutations of the six evolved variants were recombined by DNA shuffling. Four recombinants were generated and, when compared with the wild-type BceGO, the most active mutant B3S1 showed the highest activity, exhibiting a 160-fold increase in substrate affinity, a 326-fold enhancement in catalytic efficiency against glyphosate, with little difference between their pH and temperature stabilities. The role of these mutations was explored through structure modeling and molecular docking, revealing that the Arg51 mutation is near the active site and could be an important residue contributing to the stabilization of glyphosate binding, while the role of the remaining mutations is unclear. These results provide insight into the application of directed evolution in optimizing glycine oxidase function and have laid a foundation for the development of glyphosate-tolerant crops. PMID:24223901

  14. Evidence the U.S. autism epidemic initiated by acetaminophen (Tylenol) is aggravated by oral antibiotic amoxicillin/clavulanate (Augmentin) and now exponentially by herbicide glyphosate (Roundup).

    PubMed

    Good, Peter

    2018-02-01

    Because certain hereditary diseases show autistic behavior, and autism often runs in families, researchers seek genes underlying the pathophysiology of autism, thus core behaviors. Other researchers argue environmental factors are decisive, citing compelling evidence of an autism epidemic in the United States beginning about 1980. Recognition that environmental factors influence gene expression led to synthesis of these views - an 'epigenetic epidemic' provoked by pervasive environmental agents altering expression of vulnerable genes, inducing characteristic autistic biochemistries in many mothers and infants. Two toxins most implicated in the U.S. autism epidemic are analgesic/antipyretic acetaminophen (Tylenol) and oral antibiotic amoxicillin/clavulanate (Augmentin). Recently herbicide glyphosate (Roundup) was exponentially implicated. What do these toxins have in common? Acetaminophen depletes sulfate and glutathione required to detoxify it. Oral antibiotics kill and glyphosate inhibits intestinal bacteria that synthesize methionine (precursor of sulfate and glutathione, and required to methylate DNA), bacteria that synthesize tryptophan (sole precursor of neuroinhibitor serotonin), and bacteria that restrain ammonia-generating anaerobes. Sulfate plus glutathione normally sulfate fetal adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone to DHEAS - major precursor of placental/postnatal estrogens. Glyphosate (and heavy metals) also inhibit aromatase that turns androgens to estrogens. Placental/postnatal estrogens dehydrate/mature brain myelin sheaths, mature corpus callosum and left hemisphere preferentially, dilate brain blood vessels, and elevate brain serotonin and oxytocin. Stress-induced weak androgens and estrogen depletion coherently explain white matter asymmetry and dysconnection in autism, extreme male brain, low brain blood flow, hyperexcitability, social anxiety, and insufficient maternal oxytocin at birth to limit fetal brain chloride/water and mature GABA

  15. Genotoxic effect of a binary mixture of dicamba- and glyphosate-based commercial herbicide formulations on Rhinella arenarum (Hensel, 1867) (Anura, Bufonidae) late-stage larvae.

    PubMed

    Soloneski, Sonia; Ruiz de Arcaute, Celeste; Larramendy, Marcelo L

    2016-09-01

    The acute toxicity of two herbicide formulations, namely, the 57.71 % dicamba (DIC)-based Banvel(®) and the 48 % glyphosate (GLY)-based Credit(®), alone as well as the binary mixture of these herbicides was evaluated on late-stage Rhinella arenarum larvae (stage 36) exposed under laboratory conditions. Mortality was used as an endpoint for determining acute lethal effects, whereas the single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay was employed as genotoxic endpoint to study sublethal effects. Lethality studies revealed LC5096 h values of 358.44 and 78.18 mg L(-1) DIC and GLY for Banvel(®) and Credit(®), respectively. SCGE assay revealed, after exposure for 96 h to either 5 and 10 % of the Banvel(®) LC5096 h concentration or 5 and 10 % of the Credit(®) LC5096 h concentration, an equal significant increase of the genetic damage index (GDI) regardless of the concentration of the herbicide assayed. The binary mixtures of 5 % Banvel(®) plus 5 % Credit(®) LC5096 h concentrations and 10 % Banvel(®) plus 10 % Credit(®) LC5096 h concentrations induced equivalent significant increases in the GDI in regard to GDI values from late-stage larvae exposed only to Banvel(®) or Credit(®). This study represents the first experimental evidence of acute lethal and sublethal effects exerted by DIC on the species, as well as the induction of primary DNA breaks by this herbicide in amphibians. Finally, a synergistic effect of the mixture of GLY and DIC on the induction of primary DNA breaks on circulating blood cells of R. arenarum late-stage larvae could be demonstrated.

  16. Overview of glyphosate-resistant weeds worldwide

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glyphosate is the most widely used and successful herbicide discovered to date, but its utility is now threatened by the appearance of several glyphosate-resistant weed species. Glyphosate resistance first appeared in Lolium rigidum in an apple orchard in Australia in 1996, ironically the year that ...

  17. Tolerance of loblolly pine seedlings to glyphosate

    Treesearch

    James D. Haywood; Thomas W. Melder

    1990-01-01

    Broadcasting glyphosate herbicide over loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) may provide enough early-season weed control to allow seedlings to establish themselves more rapidly, but glyphosate can, injure young trees. To examine the question of seedling injury, four rates of glyphosate were broadcast evenly over planted loblolly pine seedlings, competing...

  18. Overview of glyphosate-resistant weeds worldwide.

    PubMed

    Heap, Ian; Duke, Stephen O

    2018-05-01

    Glyphosate is the most widely used and successful herbicide discovered to date, but its utility is now threatened by the occurrence of several glyphosate-resistant weed species. Glyphosate resistance first appeared in Lolium rigidum in an apple orchard in Australia in 1996, ironically the year that the first glyphosate-resistant crop (soybean) was introduced in the USA. Thirty-eight weed species have now evolved resistance to glyphosate, distributed across 37 countries and in 34 different crops and six non-crop situations. Although glyphosate-resistant weeds have been identified in orchards, vineyards, plantations, cereals, fallow and non-crop situations, it is the glyphosate-resistant weeds in glyphosate-resistant crop systems that dominate the area infested and growing economic impact. Glyphosate-resistant weeds present the greatest threat to sustained weed control in major agronomic crops because this herbicide is used to control weeds with resistance to herbicides with other sites of action, and no new herbicide sites of action have been introduced for over 30 years. Industry has responded by developing herbicide resistance traits in major crops that allow existing herbicides to be used in a new way. However, over reliance on these traits will result in multiple-resistance in weeds. Weed control in major crops is at a precarious point, where we must maintain the utility of the herbicides we have until we can transition to new weed management technologies. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Weed control changes and genetically modified herbicide tolerant crops in the USA 1996–2012

    PubMed Central

    Brookes, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Crops that have been genetically modified (GM) to be tolerant to herbicides have been widely grown in the USA since 1996. The rapid and widespread adoption of this technology reflects the important economic and environmental benefits that farmers have derived from its use (equal to $21.7 billion additional farm income and a 225 million kg reduction in herbicide active ingredient use 1996–2012). During this time, weed control practices in these crops relative to the ‘conventional alternative’ have evolved to reflect experience of using the technology, the challenges that have arisen and the increasing focus in recent years on developing sustainable production systems. This paper examines the evidence on the changing nature of herbicides used with these crops and in particular how farmers addressed the challenge of weed resistance. The evidence shows that use of the technology has resulted in a net reduction in both the amount of herbicide used and the associated environmental impact, as measured by the EIQ indicator when compared to what can reasonably be expected if the area planted to GM HT crops reverted to conventional production methods. It also facilitated many farmers being able to derive the economic and environmental benefits associated with switching from a plough-based to a no tillage or conservation tillage production system. In terms of herbicide use, the technology has also contributed to a change the profile of herbicides used. A broad range of, mostly selective herbicides has been replaced by one or 2 broad-spectrum herbicides (mostly glyphosate) used in conjunction with one or 2 other (complementary) herbicides. Since the mid-2000s, the average amount of herbicide applied and the associated environmental load, as measured by the EIQ indicator, have increased on both GM HT and conventional crops. A primary reason for these changes has been increasing incidence of weed species developing populations resistant to herbicides and increased

  20. Weed control changes and genetically modified herbicide tolerant crops in the USA 1996-2012.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Crops that have been genetically modified (GM) to be tolerant to herbicides have been widely grown in the USA since 1996. The rapid and widespread adoption of this technology reflects the important economic and environmental benefits that farmers have derived from its use (equal to $21.7 billion additional farm income and a 225 million kg reduction in herbicide active ingredient use 1996-2012). During this time, weed control practices in these crops relative to the 'conventional alternative' have evolved to reflect experience of using the technology, the challenges that have arisen and the increasing focus in recent years on developing sustainable production systems. This paper examines the evidence on the changing nature of herbicides used with these crops and in particular how farmers addressed the challenge of weed resistance. The evidence shows that use of the technology has resulted in a net reduction in both the amount of herbicide used and the associated environmental impact, as measured by the EIQ indicator when compared to what can reasonably be expected if the area planted to GM HT crops reverted to conventional production methods. It also facilitated many farmers being able to derive the economic and environmental benefits associated with switching from a plough-based to a no tillage or conservation tillage production system. In terms of herbicide use, the technology has also contributed to a change the profile of herbicides used. A broad range of, mostly selective herbicides has been replaced by one or 2 broad-spectrum herbicides (mostly glyphosate) used in conjunction with one or 2 other (complementary) herbicides. Since the mid-2000s, the average amount of herbicide applied and the associated environmental load, as measured by the EIQ indicator, have increased on both GM HT and conventional crops. A primary reason for these changes has been increasing incidence of weed species developing populations resistant to herbicides and increased awareness of

  1. Evaluation of three herbicide resistance genes for use in genetic transformations and for potential crop protection in algae production.

    PubMed

    Brueggeman, Andrew J; Kuehler, Daniel; Weeks, Donald P

    2014-09-01

    Genes conferring resistance to the herbicides glyphosate, oxyfluorfen and norflurazon were developed and tested for use as dominant selectable markers in genetic transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and as potential tools for the protection of commercial-scale algal production facilities against contamination by organisms sensitive to these broad-spectrum herbicides. A synthetic glyphosate acetyltransferase (GAT) gene, when fitted with a strong Chlamydomonas promoter, conferred a 2.7×-fold increase in tolerance to the EPSPS inhibitor, glyphosate, in transgenic cells compared with progenitor WT cells. A mutant Chlamydomonas protoporphyrinogen oxidase (protox, PPO) gene previously shown to produce an enzyme insensitive to PPO-inhibiting herbicides, when genetically engineered, generated transgenic cells able to tolerate up to 136× higher levels of the PPO inhibitor, oxyfluorfen, than nontransformed cells. Genetic modification of the Chlamydomonas phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene-based gene sequences found in various norflurazon-resistant organisms allowed production of transgenic cells tolerant to 40× higher levels of norflurazon than nontransgenic cells. The high efficiency of all three herbicide resistance genes in producing transgenic cells demonstrated their suitability as dominant selectable markers for genetic transformation of Chlamydomonas and, potentially, other eukaryotic algae. However, the requirement for high concentrations of glyphosate and its associated negative effects on cell growth rates preclude its consideration for use in large-scale production facilities. In contrast, only low doses of norflurazon and oxyfluorfen (~1.5 μm and ~0.1 μm, respectively) are required for inhibition of cell growth, suggesting that these two herbicides may prove effective in large-scale algal production facilities in suppressing growth of organisms sensitive to these herbicides. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and

  2. Structural Basis of Glyphosate Resistance Resulting from the Double Mutation Thr97 → Ile and Pro101 → Ser in 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate Synthase from Escherichia coli*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Funke, Todd; Yang, Yan; Han, Huijong; Healy-Fried, Martha; Olesen, Sanne; Becker, Andreas; Schönbrunn, Ernst

    2009-01-01

    The shikimate pathway enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) is the target of the broad spectrum herbicide glyphosate. The genetic engineering of EPSPS led to the introduction of glyphosate-resistant crops worldwide. The genetically engineered corn lines NK603 and GA21 carry distinct EPSPS enzymes. CP4 EPSPS, expressed in NK603 corn and transgenic soybean, cotton, and canola, belongs to class II EPSPS, glyphosate-insensitive variants of this enzyme isolated from certain Gram-positive bacteria. GA21 corn, on the other hand, was created by point mutations of class I EPSPS, such as the enzymes from Zea mays or Escherichia coli, which are sensitive to low glyphosate concentrations. The structural basis of the glyphosate resistance resulting from these point mutations has remained obscure. We studied the kinetic and structural effects of the T97I/P101S double mutation, the molecular basis for GA21 corn, using EPSPS from E. coli. The T97I/P101S enzyme is essentially insensitive to glyphosate (Ki = 2.4 mm) but maintains high affinity for the substrate phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) (Km = 0.1 mm). The crystal structure at 1.7-Å resolution revealed that the dual mutation causes a shift of residue Gly96 toward the glyphosate binding site, impairing efficient binding of glyphosate, while the side chain of Ile97 points away from the substrate binding site, facilitating PEP utilization. The single site T97I mutation renders the enzyme sensitive to glyphosate and causes a substantial decrease in the affinity for PEP. Thus, only the concomitant mutations of Thr97 and Pro101 induce the conformational changes necessary to produce catalytically efficient, glyphosate-resistant class I EPSPS. PMID:19211556

  3. Improvements in the analytical methodology for the residue determination of the herbicide glyphosate in soils by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Botero-Coy, A M; Ibáñez, M; Sancho, J V; Hernández, F

    2013-05-31

    The determination of glyphosate (GLY) in soils is of great interest due to the widespread use of this herbicide and the need of assessing its impact on the soil/water environment. However, its residue determination is very problematic especially in soils with high organic matter content, where strong interferences are normally observed, and because of the particular physico-chemical characteristics of this polar/ionic herbicide. In the present work, we have improved previous LC-MS/MS analytical methodology reported for GLY and its main metabolite AMPA in order to be applied to "difficult" soils, like those commonly found in South-America, where this herbicide is extensively used in large areas devoted to soya or maize, among other crops. The method is based on derivatization with FMOC followed by LC-MS/MS analysis, using triple quadrupole. After extraction with potassium hydroxide, a combination of extract dilution, adjustment to appropriate pH, and solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up was applied to minimize the strong interferences observed. Despite the clean-up performed, the use of isotope labelled glyphosate as internal standard (ILIS) was necessary for the correction of matrix effects and to compensate for any error occurring during sample processing. The analytical methodology was satisfactorily validated in four soils from Colombia and Argentina fortified at 0.5 and 5mg/kg. In contrast to most LC-MS/MS methods, where the acquisition of two transitions is recommended, monitoring all available transitions was required for confirmation of positive samples, as some of them were interfered by unknown soil components. This was observed not only for GLY and AMPA but also for the ILIS. Analysis by QTOF MS was useful to confirm the presence of interferent compounds that shared the same nominal mass of analytes as well as some of their main product ions. Therefore, the selection of specific transitions was crucial to avoid interferences. The methodology developed

  4. Glyphosate applications,glyphosate resistant corn, and tillage on nitrification rates and distribution of nitrifying microbial communities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Conservation tillage practices have combined genetically modified glyphosate resistant corn crops along with applications of the herbicide glyphosate. We tested the null hypothesis that the soil process of nitrification and the distribution of archaeal and bacterial nitrifying communities would not ...

  5. Current state of herbicides in herbicide-resistant crops.

    PubMed

    Green, Jerry M

    2014-09-01

    Current herbicide and herbicide trait practices are changing in response to the rapid spread of glyphosate-resistant weeds. Growers urgently needed glyphosate when glyphosate-resistant crops became available because weeds were becoming widely resistant to most commonly used selective herbicides, making weed management too complex and time consuming for large farm operations. Glyphosate made weed management easy and efficient by controlling all emerged weeds at a wide range of application timings. However, the intensive use of glyphosate over wide areas and concomitant decline in the use of other herbicides led eventually to the widespread evolution of weeds resistant to glyphosate. Today, weeds that are resistant to glyphosate and other herbicide types are threatening current crop production practices. Unfortunately, all commercial herbicide modes of action are over 20 years old and have resistant weed problems. The severity of the problem has prompted the renewal of efforts to discover new weed management technologies. One technology will be a new generation of crops with resistance to glyphosate, glufosinate and other existing herbicide modes of action. Other technologies will include new chemical, biological, cultural and mechanical methods for weed management. From the onset of commercialization, growers must now preserve the utility of new technologies by integrating their use with other weed management technologies in diverse and sustainable systems. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Adsorption of glyphosate on variable-charge, volcanic ash-derived soils.

    PubMed

    Cáceres-Jensen, L; Gan, J; Báez, M; Fuentes, R; Escudey, M

    2009-01-01

    Glyphosate (N-phosphonometylglycine) is widely used due to its broad spectrum of activity and nonselective mode of action. In Chile it is the most used herbicide, but its adsorption behavior in the abundant and widespread variable charge soils is not well understood. In this study, three volcanic ash-derived soils were selected, including Andisols (Nueva Braunau and Diguillin) and Ultisols (Collipulli), to evaluate the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium isotherms, and the effect of pH in glyphosate adsorption. The influence of glyphosate on soil phosphorus retention was also studied. Glyphosate was rapidly and strongly adsorbed on the selected soils, and adsorption isotherms were well described by the Freundlich relationship with strong nonlinearity (n(fads) < 0.5). The n(fads) values were consistently higher than n(fdes) values, suggesting strong hysteresis. Adsorption (K(ads)) increased strongly when pH decreased. The presence of glyphosate (3200 mug mL(-1)) changed the adsorption behavior of phosphate at its maximum adsorption capacity. Andisol soils without the addition of glyphosate had similar mean K(ads) values for Nueva Braunau (5.68) and Diguillin (7.38). Collipulli had a mean K(ads) value of 31.58. During the successive desorption steps, glyphosate at the highest level increased K(ads) values for phosphate in the Andisol soils but had little effect in the Ultisol soil. This different behavior was probably due to the irreversible occupation of some adsorption sites by glyphosate in the Ultisol soil attributed to the dominant Kaolinite mineral. Results from this study suggest that in the two types of volcanic soils, different mechanisms are involved in glyphosate and phosphate adsorption and that long-term use of glyphosate may impose different effects on the retention and availability of phosphorus. Volcanic ash-derived soils have a particular environmental behavior in relation to the retention of organic contaminants, representing an environmental substrate

  7. Developmental exposure to glyphosate-based herbicide and depressive-like behavior in adult offspring: Implication of glutamate excitotoxicity and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Cattani, Daiane; Cesconetto, Patrícia Acordi; Tavares, Mauren Kruger; Parisotto, Eduardo Benedetti; De Oliveira, Paulo Alexandre; Rieg, Carla Elise Heinz; Leite, Marina Concli; Prediger, Rui Daniel Schröder; Wendt, Nestor Cubas; Razzera, Guilherme; Filho, Danilo Wilhelm; Zamoner, Ariane

    2017-07-15

    We have previously demonstrated that maternal exposure to glyphosate-based herbicide (GBH) leads to glutamate excitotoxicity in 15-day-old rat hippocampus. The present study was conducted in order to investigate the effects of subchronic exposure to GBH on some neurochemical and behavioral parameters in immature and adult offspring. Rats were exposed to 1% GBH in drinking water (corresponding to 0.36% of glyphosate) from gestational day 5 until postnatal day (PND)-15 or PND60. Results showed that GBH exposure during both prenatal and postnatal periods causes oxidative stress, affects cholinergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in offspring hippocampus from immature and adult rats. The subchronic exposure to the pesticide decreased L-[ 14 C]-glutamate uptake and increased 45 Ca 2+ influx in 60-day-old rat hippocampus, suggesting a persistent glutamate excitotoxicity from developmental period (PND15) to adulthood (PND60). Moreover, GBH exposure alters the serum levels of the astrocytic protein S100B. The effects of GBH exposure were associated with oxidative stress and depressive-like behavior in offspring on PND60, as demonstrated by the prolonged immobility time and decreased time of climbing observed in forced swimming test. The mechanisms underlying the GBH-induced neurotoxicity involve the NMDA receptor activation, impairment of cholinergic transmission, astrocyte dysfunction, ERK1/2 overactivation, decreased p65 NF-κB phosphorylation, which are associated with oxidative stress and glutamate excitotoxicity. These neurochemical events may contribute, at least in part, to the depressive-like behavior observed in adult offspring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Nanoparticles as potential new generation broad spectrum antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Yah, Clarence S; Simate, Geoffrey S

    2015-09-02

    The rapid emergence of antimicrobial resistant strains to conventional antimicrobial agents has complicated and prolonged infection treatment and increased mortality risk globally. Furthermore, some of the conventional antimicrobial agents are unable to cross certain cell membranes thus, restricting treatment of intracellular pathogens. Therefore, the disease-causing-organisms tend to persist in these cells. However, the emergence of nanoparticle (NP) technology has come with the promising broad spectrum NP-antimicrobial agents due to their vast physiochemical and functionalization properties. In fact, NP-antimicrobial agents are able to unlock the restrictions experienced by conventional antimicrobial agents. This review discusses the status quo of NP-antimicrobial agents as potent broad spectrum antimicrobial agents, sterilization and wound healing agents, and sustained inhibitors of intracellular pathogens. Indeed, the perspective of developing potent NP-antimicrobial agents that carry multiple-functionality will revolutionize clinical medicine and play a significant role in alleviating disease burden.

  9. Recent advances in glyphosate biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Hui; Feng, Yanmei; Fan, Xinghui; Chen, Shaohua

    2018-06-01

    Glyphosate has emerged as the most widespread herbicide to control annual and perennial weeds. Massive use of glyphosate for decades has resulted in its ubiquitous presence in the environment, and poses a threat to humans and ecosystem. Different approaches such as adsorption, photocatalytic degradation, and microbial degradation have been studied to break down glyphosate in the environment. Among these, microbial degradation is the most effective and eco-friendly method. During its degradation, various microorganisms can use glyphosate as a sole source of phosphorus, carbon, and nitrogen. Major glyphosate degradation pathways and its metabolites have been frequently investigated, but the related enzymes and genes have been rarely studied. There are many reviews about the toxicity and fate of glyphosate and its major metabolite, aminomethylphosphonic acid. However, there is lack of reviews on biodegradation and bioremediation of glyphosate. The aims of this review are to summarize the microbial degradation of glyphosate and discuss the potential of glyphosate-degrading microorganisms to bioremediate glyphosate-contaminated environments. This review will provide an instructive direction to apply glyphosate-degrading microorganisms in the environment for bioremediation.

  10. Evaluation of metabolic enzymes in response to Excel Mera 71, a glyphosate-based herbicide, and recovery pattern in freshwater teleostean fishes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Palas; Pal, Sandipan; Mukherjee, Aloke Kumar; Ghosh, Apurba Ratan

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic enzymes such as alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were evaluated in Indian teleostean fishes, namely, Anabas testudineus (Bloch) and Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch), for an exposure to 30 days of Excel Mera 71 (17.2 mg/L), a glyphosate formulation, and subsequent depuration under Liv.52, a plant extract at a dose of 187.5 mg/d/250 L for the same period in the same tissues under laboratory condition. ALT activity was significantly increased (P<0.05) in all the tissues and raised up to 229.19% in liver of A. testudineus (229.19%) and 128.61% in liver of H. fossilis. AST also increased significantly (P<0.05) and was maximum in liver of H. fossilis (526.19%) and minimum in gill of A. testudineus (124.38%). ALP activity was also raised highly in intestine of H. fossilis (490.61%) but was less in kidney of H. fossilis (149.48%). The results indicated that Excel Mera 71 caused alterations in the metabolic enzymatic activities in fish tissues and AST showed the highest alteration in both the fishes, while lowest in ALP and ALT in A. testudineus and H. fossilis, respectively. During depuration under Liv.52, all the enzyme activities came down towards the control condition which indicated the compensatory response by the fish against this herbicidal stress and it was in the following order: AST>ALT>ALP, in A. testudineus, while H. fossilis showed the following trend: ALT>AST>ALP. Therefore, these parameters could be used as indicators of herbicidal pollution in aquatic organisms and were recommended for environmental monitoring for investigating the mechanism involved in the recovery pattern.

  11. Mixture of commercial herbicides based on 2,4-D and glyphosate mixture can suppress the emergence of zooplankton from sediments.

    PubMed

    Portinho, Jorge L; Nielsen, Daryl L; Daré, Luana; Henry, Raoul; Oliveira, Régis C; Branco, Ciro C Z

    2018-07-01

    It is generally assumed that zooplankton can recolonize lakes that have been exposed to pesticides, via their dormant egg banks. Hitherto, few studies have evaluated the relative importance of dormant egg bank recruitment in the re-establishment of zooplankton communities in the presence of pesticide. This study investigated the effects of commercial products Bratt ® (a.i. 2,4-D), Roundup ® (a.i. glyphosate) and their mixture on the emergence (abundance and taxon richness) of dormant zooplankton egg banks from natural lake sediment. Sediment samples were collected from the surface sediment (<10 cm depth) in four lakes in Southeast São Paulo, Brazil. We performed a hatching experiment, in which natural lake sediments containing dormant eggs were exposed separately to Bratt ® (applied concentrations ranging from 0.30 to 20 mg L -1 ), Roundup ® (0.28-8.5 mg L -1 ), and combined mixtures of all concentrations, plus one control (non-exposure to formulated herbicides) for a period of 28 days. All tested concentrations of Bratt ® , Roundup ® and their mixture reduced the abundance and taxon richness of emerging zooplankton (except 2 mg L -1 of Bratt ® ). This effect was more pronounced in rotifers. In comparison, there were no negative effects on the emergence of microcrustaceans. These findings suggest that commercial products Bratt ® , Roundup ® and their mixture can suppress the emergence of rotifers, thereby influencing zooplankton recruitment potential in lakes impacted by the presence of these commercial herbicides. Our results stress the importance of the need for additional studies to assess the effects of pesticides on dormant egg banks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Resurrection of glyphosate resistant palmer amaranth control in conservation tillage dicamba tolerant cotton; soil health salvation using herbicide technology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Conservation agriculture hecterage in the mid-south and southeastern US has decreased because of herbicide resistant and other hard to control weeds. Producers have increasingly utilized tillage, the majority either using a moldboard plow to deeply bury weed seed and decrease emergence, or ‘vertica...

  13. The Ramazzini Institute 13-week pilot study on glyphosate and Roundup administered at human-equivalent dose to Sprague Dawley rats: effects on the microbiome.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qixing; Manservisi, Fabiana; Panzacchi, Simona; Mandrioli, Daniele; Menghetti, Ilaria; Vornoli, Andrea; Bua, Luciano; Falcioni, Laura; Lesseur, Corina; Chen, Jia; Belpoggi, Fiorella; Hu, Jianzhong

    2018-05-29

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) are broad-spectrum herbicides that act on the shikimate pathway in bacteria, fungi, and plants. The possible effects of GBHs on human health are the subject of an intense public debate for both its potential carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects, including its effects on microbiome. The present pilot study examines whether exposure to GBHs at doses of glyphosate considered to be "safe" (the US Acceptable Daily Intake - ADI - of 1.75 mg/kg bw/day), starting from in utero, may modify the composition of gut microbiome in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Glyphosate alone and Roundup, a commercial brand of GBHs, were administered in drinking water at doses comparable to the US glyphosate ADI (1.75 mg/kg bw/day) to F0 dams starting from the gestational day (GD) 6 up to postnatal day (PND) 125. Animal feces were collected at multiple time points from both F0 dams and F1 pups. The gut microbiota of 433 fecal samples were profiled at V3-V4 region of 16S ribosomal RNA gene and further taxonomically assigned and assessed for diversity analysis. We tested the effect of exposure on overall microbiome diversity using PERMANOVA and on individual taxa by LEfSe analysis. Microbiome profiling revealed that low-dose exposure to Roundup and glyphosate resulted in significant and distinctive changes in overall bacterial composition in F1 pups only. Specifically, at PND31, corresponding to pre-pubertal age in humans, relative abundance for Bacteriodetes (Prevotella) was increased while the Firmicutes (Lactobacillus) was reduced in both Roundup and glyphosate exposed F1 pups compared to controls. This study provides initial evidence that exposures to commonly used GBHs, at doses considered safe, are capable of modifying the gut microbiota in early development, particularly before the onset of puberty. These findings warrant future studies on potential health effects of GBHs in early development such as childhood.

  14. Global research production in glyphosate intoxication from 1978 to 2015: A bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Zyoud, S H; Waring, W S; Al-Jabi, S W; Sweileh, W M

    2017-10-01

    Glyphosate (N-phosphonomethylglycine) has been used as a broad-spectrum herbicide that has been widely used in the agricultural industry and also available for home use. The main aim of this study is to present a general overview of glyphosate intoxication-related publications from its introducing since the early 1970s using bibliometric technique. On June 23, 2016, a literature search of the Scopus database was performed. We then extracted and analyzed the data using well-established qualitative and quantitative bibliometric indices: Publication year, affiliation, document type, country name, subject category, journal name, publishing language, and collaboration and citation patterns. We recognized a total of 3735 publications on glyphosate published between 1973 and 2015. There were 875 publications related to glyphosate intoxication in the Scopus database published between 1978 and 2015. Articles (757) comprised 86.5% of the total publications, followed by reviews (41; 4.7%). Most publications were published in English (87.9%), followed by Portuguese (6.6%). The number of publications related to glyphosate intoxication increased from 44 in 1978-1987 up to 152 in 1996-2005 and then quadrupled in 2006-2015. The United States was the leading country with 180 documents representing 20.6%, followed by Brazil (120; 13.7%), Canada (78; 8.9%), Argentina (61; 7.0%), and France (57; 6.5%). The 85.6% of the publications was cited, and the average of citation per document was 17.13 with h-index of 55. Furthermore, the United States achieved the highest h-index of 33. Most of the global international collaborations are made with researchers from the United States, who collaborated with 23 countries/territories in 44 publications. The trends in global glyphosate-related research between 1978 and 2015 were evaluated by a bibliometric technique. Results showed that English was the leading publishing language, and the major publication type was original article. Findings showed

  15. The history and current status of glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Duke, Stephen O

    2018-05-01

    Glyphosate is the only herbicide to target the enzyme 5-enolpyruvyl-3-shikimate phosphate synthase (EPSPS). It is a high use rate, non-selective herbicide that translocates primarily to metabolic sinks, killing meristematic tissues away from the application site. Its phloem-mobile properties and slow action in killing weeds allow the herbicide to move throughout the plant to kill all meristems, making it effective for perennial weed control. Since commercialization in 1974, its use has grown to dominate the herbicide market. Much of its use is on transgenic, glyphosate-resistant crops (GRCs), which have been the dominant transgenic crops worldwide. GRCs with glyphosate provided the most effective and inexpensive weed management technology in history for a decade or more. However, as a consequence of the rapid increase in glyphosate-resistant (GR) weeds, the effectiveness of glyphosate use in GRCs is declining. Critics have claimed that glyphosate-treated GRCs have altered mineral nutrition and increased susceptibility to plant pathogens because of glyphosate's ability to chelate divalent metal cations, but the complete resistance of GRCs to glyphosate indicates that chelating metal cations do not contribute to the herbicidal activity or significantly affect mineral nutrition. The rates of increases in yields of maize, soybean, and cotton in the USA have been unchanged after high adoption rates of GRCs. Glyphosate is toxic to some plant pathogens, and thereby can act as a fungicide in GRCs. Ultra-low doses of glyphosate stimulate plant growth in glyphosate-susceptible plants by unknown mechanisms. Despite rapid and widespread increases in GR weeds, glyphosate use has not decreased. However, as GR weeds increase, adoption of alternative technologies will eventually lead to decreased use. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in

  16. Phosphorus-31, sup 15 N, and sup 13 C NMR of glyphosate: Comparison of pH titrations to the herbicidal dead-end complex with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Castellino, S.; Leo, G.C.; Sammons, R.D.

    1989-05-02

    The herbicidal dead-end ternary complex (E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph}) of glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) and the substrate shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P) has been characterized by {sup 31}P, {sup 15}N, and {sup 13}C NMR. The NMR spectra of EPSPS-bound glyphosate show unique chemical shifts ({delta}) for each of the three nuclei. By {sup 31}P NMR, glyphosate in the dead-end complex is a distinct species 3.5 ppm downfield from free glyphosate. The {sup 13}C signal of glyphosate in the dead-end complex is shifted 4 ppm downfield from that of free glyphosate. The {sup 15}N signal for glyphosate (99%) in the dead-end complexmore » is 5 ppm further downfield than that of any free zwitterionic species and 10 ppm downfield from that of the average free species at pH 10.1. The structures of each ionic state of glyphosate are modeled with force field calculations by using MacroModel. A correlation is made for the {sup 31}P {delta} and the C-P-O bond angle, and the {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N {delta} values are postulated to be related to C-C-O and C-N-C bond angles, respectively. The downfield {sup 31}P chemical shift perturbation for S3P in the EPSPS binary complex is consistent with ionization of the 3-phosphate of S3P upon binding. Comparison with the S3P {sup 31}P {delta} vs pH titration curve specifies predominantly the dianion of the 3-phosphate in the E{sup S3P} binary complex, while the E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph} complex indicates net protonation at the 3-phosphate. Chemical shift perturbations of this latter type may be explained by changes in the O-P-O bond angle.« less

  17. [Norfloxacin: a broad-spectrum quinolone for superficial eye infections].

    PubMed

    Grosset, J

    1990-09-01

    Norfloxacin is a synthetic antibiotic belonging to the fluoroquinolone class. At present, an oral formulation is available and indicated for the treatment of urinary tract infections. Because of the properties of norfloxacin, a 0.3% norfloxacin ophtalmic solution may be used by ophtalmologists. The molecular target of norfloxacin is DNA gyrase that regulates DNA replication. Norfloxacin is a broad spectrum antibiotic. A flurin atome in position 6 is responsible for the broad spectrum of activity as compared with the first generation quinolones. MICs of norfloxacin against Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and enterbacteriaceae are low or intermediate. Norfloxacin is a bactericidal drug of which MBCs are equivalent to or twice as high as MICs against the majority of organisms. The proportion of norfloxacin resistant strains is limited and, at present, no plasmid resistance has been observed. This explains the activity of norfloxacin against clinical isolates whose drug resistance is plasmid-mediated. Norfloxacin resistance is chromosomic, but the mutation rate is low. There is no cross-resistance between quinolones and other classes of drug, with the exception of drug resistance related to changes in the bacterial outer membrane proteins. A low decrease in norfloxacin susceptibility is observed in case of resistance to first generation quinolones. The above-mentioned properties make norfloxacin in ophtalmic solution a first line drug for treatment of superficial ocular infections and a second line drug for treatment of infections due to organisms resistant to other drugs.

  18. Glyphosate resistance: state of knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Sammons, Robert Douglas; Gaines, Todd A

    2014-01-01

    Studies of mechanisms of resistance to glyphosate have increased current understanding of herbicide resistance mechanisms. Thus far, single-codon non-synonymous mutations of EPSPS (5-enolypyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase) have been rare and, relative to other herbicide mode of action target-site mutations, unconventionally weak in magnitude for resistance to glyphosate. However, it is possible that weeds will emerge with non-synonymous mutations of two codons of EPSPS to produce an enzyme endowing greater resistance to glyphosate. Today, target-gene duplication is a common glyphosate resistance mechanism and could become a fundamental process for developing any resistance trait. Based on competition and substrate selectivity studies in several species, rapid vacuole sequestration of glyphosate occurs via a transporter mechanism. Conversely, as the chloroplast requires transporters for uptake of important metabolites, transporters associated with the two plastid membranes may separately, or together, successfully block glyphosate delivery. A model based on finite glyphosate dose and limiting time required for chloroplast loading sets the stage for understanding how uniquely different mechanisms can contribute to overall glyphosate resistance. PMID:25180399

  19. Sublethal Exposure to Commercial Formulations of the Herbicides Dicamba, 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid, and Glyphosate Cause Changes in Antibiotic Susceptibility in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Kurenbach, Brigitta; Marjoshi, Delphine; Amábile-Cuevas, Carlos F.; Ferguson, Gayle C.; Godsoe, William; Gibson, Paddy

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biocides, such as herbicides, are routinely tested for toxicity but not for sublethal effects on microbes. Many biocides are known to induce an adaptive multiple-antibiotic resistance phenotype. This can be due to either an increase in the expression of efflux pumps, a reduced synthesis of outer membrane porins, or both. Exposures of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to commercial formulations of three herbicides—dicamba (Kamba), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), and glyphosate (Roundup)—were found to induce a changed response to antibiotics. Killing curves in the presence and absence of sublethal herbicide concentrations showed that the directions and the magnitudes of responses varied by herbicide, antibiotic, and species. When induced, MICs of antibiotics of five different classes changed up to 6-fold. In some cases the MIC increased, and in others it decreased. Herbicide concentrations needed to invoke the maximal response were above current food maximum residue levels but within application levels for all herbicides. Compounds that could cause induction had additive effects in combination. The role of soxS, an inducer of the AcrAB efflux pump, was tested in β-galactosidase assays with soxS-lacZ fusion strains of E. coli. Dicamba was a moderate inducer of the sox regulon. Growth assays with Phe-Arg β-naphtylamide (PAβN), an efflux pump inhibitor, confirmed a significant role of efflux in the increased tolerance of E. coli to chloramphenicol in the presence of dicamba and to kanamycin in the presence of glyphosate. Pathways of exposure with relevance to the health of humans, domestic animals, and critical insects are discussed. PMID:25805724

  20. Broad-spectrum non-nucleoside inhibitors for caliciviruses.

    PubMed

    Netzler, Natalie E; Enosi Tuipulotu, Daniel; Eltahla, Auda A; Lun, Jennifer H; Ferla, Salvatore; Brancale, Andrea; Urakova, Nadya; Frese, Michael; Strive, Tanja; Mackenzie, Jason M; White, Peter A

    2017-10-01

    Viruses of the Caliciviridae cause significant and sometimes lethal diseases, however despite substantial research efforts, specific antivirals are lacking. Broad-spectrum antivirals could combat multiple viral pathogens, offering a rapid solution when no therapies exist. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is an attractive antiviral target as it is essential for viral replication and lacks mammalian homologs. To focus the search for pan-Caliciviridae antivirals, the RdRp was probed with non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNIs) developed against hepatitis C virus (HCV) to reveal both allosteric ligands for structure-activity relationship enhancement, and highly-conserved RdRp pockets for antiviral targeting. The ability of HCV NNIs to inhibit calicivirus RdRp activities was assessed using in vitro enzyme and murine norovirus cell culture assays. Results revealed that three NNIs which bound the HCV RdRp Thumb I (TI) site also inhibited transcriptional activities of six RdRps spanning the Norovirus, Sapovirus and Lagovirus genera of the Caliciviridae. These NNIs included JTK-109 (RdRp inhibition range: IC 50 4.3-16.6 μM), TMC-647055 (IC 50 range: 18.8-45.4 μM) and Beclabuvir (IC 50 range: 23.8->100 μM). In silico studies and site-directed mutagenesis indicated the JTK-109 binding site was within the calicivirus RdRp thumb domain, in a pocket termed Site-B, which is highly-conserved within all calicivirus RdRps. Additionally, RdRp inhibition assays revealed that JTK-109 was antagonistic with the previously reported RdRp inhibitor pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-6-(2'-naphthylazo-6'-nitro-4',8'-disulfonate) tetrasodium salt (PPNDS), that also binds to Site-B. Moreover, like JTK-109, PPNDS was also a potent inhibitor of polymerases from six viruses spanning the three Caliciviridae genera tested (IC 50 range: 0.1-2.3 μM). Together, this study demonstrates the potential for de novo development of broad-spectrum antivirals that target the highly-conserved RdRp thumb pocket

  1. Variable tolerance among Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) biotypes to glyphosate, 2,4-D amine, and premix formulation of glyphosate plus 2,4-D choline (Enlist Duo®) herbicide

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adoption of soybean that is resistant to 2,4-D will result in more use of glyphosate plus 2,4-D premixes and tank-mixtures. Preliminary whole-plant greenhouse assays confirm most Palmer amaranth found in Indiana are glyphosate-resistant (GR) and some biotypes exhibit tolerance to 2,4-D amine. Dose r...

  2. Novel Broad Spectrum Inhibitors Targeting the Flavivirus Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Binbin; Banavali, Nilesh K.; Jones, Susan A.; Zhang, Jing; Li, Zhong; Kramer, Laura D.; Li, Hongmin

    2015-01-01

    The flavivirus methyltransferase (MTase) is an essential enzyme that sequentially methylates the N7 and 2’-O positions of the viral RNA cap, using S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) as a methyl donor. We report here that small molecule compounds, which putatively bind to the SAM-binding site of flavivirus MTase and inhibit its function, were identified by using virtual screening. In vitro methylation experiments demonstrated significant MTase inhibition by 13 of these compounds, with the most potent compound displaying sub-micromolar inhibitory activity. The most active compounds showed broad spectrum activity against the MTase proteins of multiple flaviviruses. Two of these compounds also exhibited low cytotoxicity and effectively inhibited viral replication in cell-based assays, providing further structural insight into flavivirus MTase inhibition. PMID:26098995

  3. Location, Root Proximity, and Glyphosate-use History Modulate the Effects of Glyphosate on Fungal Community Networks of Wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glyphosate is the most-used herbicide worldwide and an essential tool for weed control in no-till cropping systems. However, concerns have been raised regarding the long-term effects of glyphosate on soil microbial communities. We examined the impact of repeated glyphosate application on bulk and rh...

  4. Glyphosate Can Decrease Germination of Glyphosate-Resistant Soybeans.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marcelo Pedrosa; Bicalho, Elisa Monteze; Smedbol, Élise; Cruz, Fernanda Vieira da Silva; Lucotte, Marc; Garcia, Queila Souza

    2017-03-22

    We investigated the effects of different concentrations of glyphosate acid and one of its formulations (Roundup) on seed germination of two glyphosate-resistant (GR) and one non-GR variety of soybean. As expected, the herbicide affected the shikimate pathway in non-GR seeds but not in GR seeds. We observed that glyphosate can disturb the mitochondrial electron transport chain, leading to H 2 O 2 accumulation in soybean seeds, which was, in turn, related to lower seed germination. In addition, GR seeds showed increased activity of antioxidant systems when compared to non-GR seeds, making them less vulnerable to oxidative stress induced by glyphosate. The differences in the responses of GR varieties to glyphosate exposure corresponded to their differences in enzymatic activity related to H 2 O 2 scavenging and mitochondrial complex III (the proposed site of ROS induction by glyphosate). Our results showed that glyphosate ought to be used carefully as a pre-emergence herbicide in soybean field crop systems because this practice may reduce seed germination.

  5. Sublethal exposure to commercial formulations of the herbicides dicamba, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and glyphosate cause changes in antibiotic susceptibility in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kurenbach, Brigitta; Marjoshi, Delphine; Amábile-Cuevas, Carlos F; Ferguson, Gayle C; Godsoe, William; Gibson, Paddy; Heinemann, Jack A

    2015-03-24

    Biocides, such as herbicides, are routinely tested for toxicity but not for sublethal effects on microbes. Many biocides are known to induce an adaptive multiple-antibiotic resistance phenotype. This can be due to either an increase in the expression of efflux pumps, a reduced synthesis of outer membrane porins, or both. Exposures of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to commercial formulations of three herbicides-dicamba (Kamba), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), and glyphosate (Roundup)-were found to induce a changed response to antibiotics. Killing curves in the presence and absence of sublethal herbicide concentrations showed that the directions and the magnitudes of responses varied by herbicide, antibiotic, and species. When induced, MICs of antibiotics of five different classes changed up to 6-fold. In some cases the MIC increased, and in others it decreased. Herbicide concentrations needed to invoke the maximal response were above current food maximum residue levels but within application levels for all herbicides. Compounds that could cause induction had additive effects in combination. The role of soxS, an inducer of the AcrAB efflux pump, was tested in β-galactosidase assays with soxS-lacZ fusion strains of E. coli. Dicamba was a moderate inducer of the sox regulon. Growth assays with Phe-Arg β-naphtylamide (PAβN), an efflux pump inhibitor, confirmed a significant role of efflux in the increased tolerance of E. coli to chloramphenicol in the presence of dicamba and to kanamycin in the presence of glyphosate. Pathways of exposure with relevance to the health of humans, domestic animals, and critical insects are discussed. Increasingly common chemicals used in agriculture, domestic gardens, and public places can induce a multiple-antibiotic resistance phenotype in potential pathogens. The effect occurs upon simultaneous exposure to antibiotics and is faster than the lethal effect of antibiotics. The magnitude of the

  6. Glyphosate-induced oxidative stress in Arabidopsis thaliana affecting peroxisomal metabolism and triggers activity in the oxidative phase of the pentose phosphate pathway (OxPPP) involved in NADPH generation.

    PubMed

    de Freitas-Silva, Larisse; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Marta; Houmani, Hayet; da Silva, Luzimar Campos; Palma, José M; Corpas, Francisco J

    2017-11-01

    Glyphosate is a broad-spectrum systemic herbicide used worldwide. In susceptible plants, glyphosate affects the shikimate pathway and reduces aromatic amino acid synthesis. Using Arabidopsis seedlings grown in the presence of 20μM glyphosate, we analyzed H 2 O 2 , ascorbate, glutathione (GSH) and protein oxidation content as well as antioxidant catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzyme activity. We also examined the principal NADPH-generating system components, including glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH). Glyphosate caused a drastic reduction in growth parameters and an increase in protein oxidation. The herbicide also resulted in an overall increase in GSH content, antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase and all enzymatic components of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle) in addition to the two oxidative phase enzymes, G6PDH and 6PGDH, in the pentose phosphate pathway involved in NADPH generation. In this study, we provide new evidence on the participation of G6PDH and 6PGDH in the response to oxidative stress induced by glyphosate in Arabidopsis, in which peroxisomal enzymes, such as catalase and glycolate oxidase, are positively affected. We suggest that the NADPH provided by the oxidative phase of the pentose phosphate pathway (OxPPP) should serve to maintain glutathione reductase (GR) activity, thus preserving and regenerating the intracellular GSH pool under glyphosate-induced stress. It is particularly remarkable that the 6PGDH activity was unaffected by pro-oxidant and nitrating molecules such as H 2 0 2 , nitric oxide or peroxynitrite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. The benefits of herbicide-resistant crops.

    PubMed

    Green, Jerry M

    2012-10-01

    Since 1996, genetically modified herbicide-resistant crops, primarily glyphosate-resistant soybean, corn, cotton and canola, have helped to revolutionize weed management and have become an important tool in crop production practices. Glyphosate-resistant crops have enabled the implementation of weed management practices that have improved yield and profitability while better protecting the environment. Growers have recognized their benefits and have made glyphosate-resistant crops the most rapidly adopted technology in the history of agriculture. Weed management systems with glyphosate-resistant crops have often relied on glyphosate alone, have been easy to use and have been effective, economical and more environmentally friendly than the systems they have replaced. Glyphosate has worked extremely well in controlling weeds in glyphosate-resistant crops for more than a decade, but some key weeds have evolved resistance, and using glyphosate alone has proved unsustainable. Now, growers need to renew their weed management practices and use glyphosate with other cultural, mechanical and herbicide options in integrated systems. New multiple-herbicide-resistant crops with resistance to glyphosate and other herbicides will expand the utility of existing herbicide technologies and will be an important component of future weed management systems that help to sustain the current benefits of high-efficiency and high-production agriculture. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Broad spectrum antiretroviral activity of 2',3'-dideoxynucleosides.

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, J E; Mitsuya, H; Blam, S B; Broder, S; Aaronson, S A

    1987-01-01

    Certain dideoxynucleosides have been shown to markedly inhibit the infectivity of human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus, the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Our present studies demonstrate that these drugs are broad spectrum antiretroviral agents capable of inhibiting the infectivity of evolutionarily divergent mammalian type C and animal lentiviruses. Under some conditions, virus infectivity could be inhibited by more than six orders of magnitude. However, the potency of these agents was shown to be greatly influenced by cell-specified determinants. Drug exposure during the initial 24 hr was almost as effective as prolonged treatment on the inhibition of a single cycle of virus infection and expression. Moreover, virus infection was shown directly to be inhibited at the level of proviral DNA synthesis. Thus the time period during which reverse transcription and provirus integration occur is the critical period required for drug action. Our findings have implications concerning strategies to be considered in attempts to utilize 2',3'-dideoxynucleosides in control and treatment of retrovirus-induced diseases of animals and humans. Images PMID:3470806

  9. Application of Broad-Spectrum Resequencing Microarray for Genotyping Rhabdoviruses▿

    PubMed Central

    Dacheux, Laurent; Berthet, Nicolas; Dissard, Gabriel; Holmes, Edward C.; Delmas, Olivier; Larrous, Florence; Guigon, Ghislaine; Dickinson, Philip; Faye, Ousmane; Sall, Amadou A.; Old, Iain G.; Kong, Katherine; Kennedy, Giulia C.; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Cole, Stewart T.; Caro, Valérie; Gessain, Antoine; Bourhy, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    The rapid and accurate identification of pathogens is critical in the control of infectious disease. To this end, we analyzed the capacity for viral detection and identification of a newly described high-density resequencing microarray (RMA), termed PathogenID, which was designed for multiple pathogen detection using database similarity searching. We focused on one of the largest and most diverse viral families described to date, the family Rhabdoviridae. We demonstrate that this approach has the potential to identify both known and related viruses for which precise sequence information is unavailable. In particular, we demonstrate that a strategy based on consensus sequence determination for analysis of RMA output data enabled successful detection of viruses exhibiting up to 26% nucleotide divergence with the closest sequence tiled on the array. Using clinical specimens obtained from rabid patients and animals, this method also shows a high species level concordance with standard reference assays, indicating that it is amenable for the development of diagnostic assays. Finally, 12 animal rhabdoviruses which were currently unclassified, unassigned, or assigned as tentative species within the family Rhabdoviridae were successfully detected. These new data allowed an unprecedented phylogenetic analysis of 106 rhabdoviruses and further suggest that the principles and methodology developed here may be used for the broad-spectrum surveillance and the broader-scale investigation of biodiversity in the viral world. PMID:20610710

  10. A Broad-Spectrum Inhibitor of CRISPR-Cas9.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Lucas B; Doxzen, Kevin W; Ma, Enbo; Liu, Jun-Jie; Knott, Gavin J; Edraki, Alireza; Garcia, Bianca; Amrani, Nadia; Chen, Janice S; Cofsky, Joshua C; Kranzusch, Philip J; Sontheimer, Erik J; Davidson, Alan R; Maxwell, Karen L; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2017-09-07

    CRISPR-Cas9 proteins function within bacterial immune systems to target and destroy invasive DNA and have been harnessed as a robust technology for genome editing. Small bacteriophage-encoded anti-CRISPR proteins (Acrs) can inactivate Cas9, providing an efficient off switch for Cas9-based applications. Here, we show that two Acrs, AcrIIC1 and AcrIIC3, inhibit Cas9 by distinct strategies. AcrIIC1 is a broad-spectrum Cas9 inhibitor that prevents DNA cutting by multiple divergent Cas9 orthologs through direct binding to the conserved HNH catalytic domain of Cas9. A crystal structure of an AcrIIC1-Cas9 HNH domain complex shows how AcrIIC1 traps Cas9 in a DNA-bound but catalytically inactive state. By contrast, AcrIIC3 blocks activity of a single Cas9 ortholog and induces Cas9 dimerization while preventing binding to the target DNA. These two orthogonal mechanisms allow for separate control of Cas9 target binding and cleavage and suggest applications to allow DNA binding while preventing DNA cutting by Cas9. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Broad-spectrum inhibition of Phytophthora infestans by fungal endophytes

    PubMed Central

    von Dahlen, Janina K; Schnake, Anika; Ginschel, Sarah; Schulz, Barbara; Rose, Laura E

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phytophthora infestans is a devastating pathogen of tomato and potato. It readily overcomes resistance genes and applied agrochemicals and hence even today causes large yield losses. Fungal endophytes provide a largely unexplored avenue of control of Phy. infestans. Not only do endophytes produce a wide array of bioactive metabolites, they may also directly compete with and defeat pathogens in planta. Here, we tested 12 fungal endophytes isolated from different plant species in vitro for their production of metabolites with anti- Phytophthora activity. Four well-performing isolates were evaluated for their ability to suppress nine isolates of Phy. infestans on agar medium and in planta. Two endophytes reliably inhibited all Phy. infestans isolates on agar medium, of which Phoma eupatorii isolate 8082 was the most promising. It nearly abolished infection by Phy. infestans in planta. Our data indicate a role for the production of anti-Phytophthora compounds by the fungus and/or an enhanced plant defense response, as evident by an enhanced anthocyanin production. Here, we present a potential biocontrol agent, which can inhibit a broad-spectrum of Phy. infestans isolates. Such broadly acting inhibition is ideal, because it allows for effective control of genetically diverse isolates and may slow the adaptation of Phy. infestans. PMID:29528408

  12. Broad spectrum microarray for fingerprint-based bacterial species identification

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microarrays are powerful tools for DNA-based molecular diagnostics and identification of pathogens. Most target a limited range of organisms and are based on only one or a very few genes for specific identification. Such microarrays are limited to organisms for which specific probes are available, and often have difficulty discriminating closely related taxa. We have developed an alternative broad-spectrum microarray that employs hybridisation fingerprints generated by high-density anonymous markers distributed over the entire genome for identification based on comparison to a reference database. Results A high-density microarray carrying 95,000 unique 13-mer probes was designed. Optimized methods were developed to deliver reproducible hybridisation patterns that enabled confident discrimination of bacteria at the species, subspecies, and strain levels. High correlation coefficients were achieved between replicates. A sub-selection of 12,071 probes, determined by ANOVA and class prediction analysis, enabled the discrimination of all samples in our panel. Mismatch probe hybridisation was observed but was found to have no effect on the discriminatory capacity of our system. Conclusions These results indicate the potential of our genome chip for reliable identification of a wide range of bacterial taxa at the subspecies level without laborious prior sequencing and probe design. With its high resolution capacity, our proof-of-principle chip demonstrates great potential as a tool for molecular diagnostics of broad taxonomic groups. PMID:20163710

  13. The herbicide glyphosate and its metabolite AMPA in the Lavaux vineyard area, western Switzerland: proof of widespread export to surface waters. Part II: the role of infiltration and surface runoff.

    PubMed

    Daouk, Silwan; De Alencastro, Luiz F; Pfeifer, Hans-Rudolf

    2013-01-01

    Two parcels of the Lavaux vineyard area, western Switzerland, were studied to assess to which extent the widely used herbicide, glyphosate, and its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) were retained in the soil or exported to surface waters. They were equipped at their bottom with porous ceramic cups and runoff collectors, which allowed retrieving water samples for the growing seasons 2010 and 2011. The role of slope, soil properties and rainfall regime in their export was examined and the surface runoff/throughflows ratio was determined with a mass balance. Our results revealed elevated glyphosate and AMPA concentrations at 60 and 80 cm depth at parcel bottoms, suggesting their infiltration in the upper parts of the parcels and the presence of preferential flows in the studied parcels. Indeed, the succession of rainy days induced the gradual saturation of the soil porosity, leading to rapid infiltration through macropores, as well as surface runoff formation. Furthermore, the presence of more impervious weathered marls at 100 cm depth induced throughflows, the importance of which in the lateral transport of the herbicide molecules was determined by the slope steepness. Mobility of glyphosate and AMPA into the unsaturated zone was thus likely driven by precipitation regime and soil characteristics, such as slope, porosity structure and layer permeability discrepancy. Important rainfall events (>10 mm/day) were clearly exporting molecules from the soil top layer, as indicated by important concentrations in runoff samples. The mass balance showed that total loss (10-20%) mainly occurred through surface runoff (96%) and, to a minor extent, by throughflows in soils (4%), with subsequent exfiltration to surface waters.

  14. The broad spectrum revisited: Evidence from plant remains

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Ehud; Wetterstrom, Wilma; Nadel, Dani; Bar-Yosef, Ofer

    2004-01-01

    The beginning of agriculture is one of the most important developments in human history, with enormous consequences that paved the way for settled life and complex society. Much of the research on the origins of agriculture over the last 40 years has been guided by Flannery's [Flannery, K. V. (1969) in The Domestication and Exploitation of Plants and Animals, eds. Ucko, P. J. & Dimbleby, G. W. (Duckworth, London), pp. 73–100] “broad spectrum revolution” (BSR) hypothesis, which posits that the transition to farming in southwest Asia entailed a period during which foragers broadened their resource base to encompass a wide array of foods that were previously ignored in an attempt to overcome food shortages. Although these resources undoubtedly included plants, nearly all BSR hypothesis-inspired research has focused on animals because of a dearth of Upper Paleolithic archaeobotanical assemblages. Now, however, a collection of >90,000 plant remains, recently recovered from the Stone Age site Ohalo II (23,000 B.P.), Israel, offers insights into the plant foods of the late Upper Paleolithic. The staple foods of this assemblage were wild grasses, pushing back the dietary shift to grains some 10,000 years earlier than previously recognized. Besides the cereals (wild wheat and barley), small-grained grasses made up a large component of the assemblage, indicating that the BSR in the Levant was even broader than originally conceived, encompassing what would have been low-ranked plant foods. Over the next 15,000 years small-grained grasses were gradually replaced by the cereals and ultimately disappeared from the Levantine diet. PMID:15210984

  15. The broad spectrum revisited: evidence from plant remains.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Ehud; Wetterstrom, Wilma; Nadel, Dani; Bar-Yosef, Ofer

    2004-06-29

    The beginning of agriculture is one of the most important developments in human history, with enormous consequences that paved the way for settled life and complex society. Much of the research on the origins of agriculture over the last 40 years has been guided by Flannery's [Flannery, K. V. (1969) in The Domestication and Exploitation of Plants and Animals, eds. Ucko, P. J. & Dimbleby, G. W. (Duckworth, London), pp. 73-100] "broad spectrum revolution" (BSR) hypothesis, which posits that the transition to farming in southwest Asia entailed a period during which foragers broadened their resource base to encompass a wide array of foods that were previously ignored in an attempt to overcome food shortages. Although these resources undoubtedly included plants, nearly all BSR hypothesis-inspired research has focused on animals because of a dearth of Upper Paleolithic archaeobotanical assemblages. Now, however, a collection of >90,000 plant remains, recently recovered from the Stone Age site Ohalo II (23,000 B.P.), Israel, offers insights into the plant foods of the late Upper Paleolithic. The staple foods of this assemblage were wild grasses, pushing back the dietary shift to grains some 10,000 years earlier than previously recognized. Besides the cereals (wild wheat and barley), small-grained grasses made up a large component of the assemblage, indicating that the BSR in the Levant was even broader than originally conceived, encompassing what would have been low-ranked plant foods. Over the next 15,000 years small-grained grasses were gradually replaced by the cereals and ultimately disappeared from the Levantine diet.

  16. Discovery of potent broad spectrum antivirals derived from marine actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Raveh, Avi; Delekta, Phillip C; Dobry, Craig J; Peng, Weiping; Schultz, Pamela J; Blakely, Pennelope K; Tai, Andrew W; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Irani, David N; Sherman, David H; Miller, David J

    2013-01-01

    Natural products provide a vast array of chemical structures to explore in the discovery of new medicines. Although secondary metabolites produced by microbes have been developed to treat a variety of diseases, including bacterial and fungal infections, to date there has been limited investigation of natural products with antiviral activity. In this report, we used a phenotypic cell-based replicon assay coupled with an iterative biochemical fractionation process to identify, purify, and characterize antiviral compounds produced by marine microbes. We isolated a compound from Streptomyces kaviengensis, a novel actinomycetes isolated from marine sediments obtained off the coast of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, which we identified as antimycin A1a. This compound displays potent activity against western equine encephalitis virus in cultured cells with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of less than 4 nM and a selectivity index of greater than 550. Our efforts also revealed that several antimycin A analogues display antiviral activity, and mechanism of action studies confirmed that these Streptomyces-derived secondary metabolites function by inhibiting the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain, thereby suppressing de novo pyrimidine synthesis. Furthermore, we found that antimycin A functions as a broad spectrum agent with activity against a wide range of RNA viruses in cultured cells, including members of the Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Picornaviridae, and Paramyxoviridae families. Finally, we demonstrate that antimycin A reduces central nervous system viral titers, improves clinical disease severity, and enhances survival in mice given a lethal challenge with western equine encephalitis virus. Our results provide conclusive validation for using natural product resources derived from marine microbes as source material for antiviral drug discovery, and they indicate that host mitochondrial electron transport is a viable target for the

  17. Discovery of Potent Broad Spectrum Antivirals Derived from Marine Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Raveh, Avi; Delekta, Phillip C.; Dobry, Craig J.; Peng, Weiping; Schultz, Pamela J.; Blakely, Pennelope K.; Tai, Andrew W.; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Irani, David N.; Sherman, David H.; Miller, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Natural products provide a vast array of chemical structures to explore in the discovery of new medicines. Although secondary metabolites produced by microbes have been developed to treat a variety of diseases, including bacterial and fungal infections, to date there has been limited investigation of natural products with antiviral activity. In this report, we used a phenotypic cell-based replicon assay coupled with an iterative biochemical fractionation process to identify, purify, and characterize antiviral compounds produced by marine microbes. We isolated a compound from Streptomyces kaviengensis, a novel actinomycetes isolated from marine sediments obtained off the coast of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, which we identified as antimycin A1a. This compound displays potent activity against western equine encephalitis virus in cultured cells with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of less than 4 nM and a selectivity index of greater than 550. Our efforts also revealed that several antimycin A analogues display antiviral activity, and mechanism of action studies confirmed that these Streptomyces-derived secondary metabolites function by inhibiting the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain, thereby suppressing de novo pyrimidine synthesis. Furthermore, we found that antimycin A functions as a broad spectrum agent with activity against a wide range of RNA viruses in cultured cells, including members of the Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Picornaviridae, and Paramyxoviridae families. Finally, we demonstrate that antimycin A reduces central nervous system viral titers, improves clinical disease severity, and enhances survival in mice given a lethal challenge with western equine encephalitis virus. Our results provide conclusive validation for using natural product resources derived from marine microbes as source material for antiviral drug discovery, and they indicate that host mitochondrial electron transport is a viable target for the

  18. Effects of spray drift of glyphosate on nontarget terrestrial plants-A critical review.

    PubMed

    Cederlund, Harald

    2017-11-01

    Glyphosate is a widely used broad-spectrum postemergent herbicide used for weed control in both agricultural and nonagricultural settings. Spray drift of glyphosate can pose a risk to nontarget terrestrial plants and plant communities outside the intended area of application, but the lack of a well-established predicted-no-effect drift rate makes properly assessing such risk difficult. For this reason, a literature review and meta-analysis was carried out with the aim to determine the level of drift that is likely to cause harm to plants and to explore what spray-reducing targets would be sufficiently protective. No-observed-adverse effect rates, lowest-observed-adverse effect rates, and effect rates giving 10, 25, and 50% effects were extracted from a total of 39 different publications. The data were combined per species, and species sensitivity distributions were constructed and fitted with a log-logistic model to assess protectiveness. No systematic differences were detected between the responses of monocotyledons or dicotyledons, but wild plants were found to be generally less sensitive to glyphosate drift than domesticated plants. The results indicate that restricting spray drift to a level below 5 g a.e./ha would protect approximately 95% of all higher plant species against minor adverse effects of glyphosate drift and that rates below 1 to 2 g a.e./ha would be almost completely protective. No studies were encountered that evaluated effects of spray drift against nonvascular plants, and therefore, the conclusions are only valid for vascular plants. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2879-2886. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  19. [Glyphosate--a non-toxic pesticide?].

    PubMed

    Pieniazek, Danuta; Bukowska, Bozena; Duda, Wirgiliusz

    2003-01-01

    Glyphosate is currently the most commonly applied herbicide and its use is still growing. Nowadays, over 50 commercial preparations containing this compound are used, and these formulations are much more toxic than their active compound, glyphosate, owing to the presence of many surfactants and carrier compounds. Toxicological investigations provide evidence that glyphosate is an extremely "safe" herbicide for animals. This is why its use in agriculture is universal. In June 1991, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) categorized this compound into class E (according to EPA there are five categories of carcinogenicity), which means that it is probably not carcinogenic to humans. Unfortunately, the study carried out by Swedish oncologists in 2001 showed that glyphosate may induce cancer of the lymphatic system. The results of the Swedish study have changed our opinion about "safety" of this herbicide. Investigations concerning both its accumulation and toxic effect in animals and plants are now under way in many laboratories.

  20. Risk Factors for Emergence of Resistance to Broad-Spectrum Cephalosporins among Enterobacter spp.

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Keith S.; Cosgrove, Sara; Harris, Anthony; Eliopoulos, George M.; Carmeli, Yehuda

    2001-01-01

    Among 477 patients with susceptible Enterobacter spp., 49 subsequently harbored third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacter spp. Broad-spectrum cephalosporins were independent risk factors for resistance (relative risk [OR] = 2.3, P = 0.01); quinolone therapy was protective (OR = 0.4, P = 0.03). There were trends toward decreased risk for resistance among patients receiving broad-spectrum cephalosporins and either aminoglycosides or imipenem. Of the patients receiving broad-spectrum cephalosporins, 19% developed resistance. PMID:11502540

  1. Assessing the spatial distribution of glyphosate-AMPA in an Argentinian farm field using a pedometric technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbera, Agustin; Zamora, Martin; Domenech, Marisa; Vega-Becerra, Andres; Castro-Franco, Mauricio

    2017-04-01

    The cultivation of transgenic glyphosate-resistant crops has been the most rapidly adopted crop technology in Argentina since 1997. Thus, more than 180 million liters of the broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate (N - phosphonomethylglicine) are applied every year. The intensive use of glyphosate combined with geomorphometrical characteristics of the Pampa region is a matter of environmental concern. An integral component of assessing the risk of soil contamination in farm fields is to describe the spatial distribution of the levels of contaminant agent. Application of pedometric techniques for this purpose has been scarcely demonstrated. These techniques could provide an estimate of the concentration at a given unsampled location, as well as the probability that concentration will exceed the critical threshold concentration. In this work, a pedometric technique for assessing the spatial distribution of glyphosate in farm fields was developed. A field located at INTA Barrow, Argentina (Lat: -38.322844, Lon: -60.25572) which has a great soil spatial variability, was divided by soil-specific zones using a pedometric technique. This was developed integrating INTA Soil Survey information and a digital elevation model (DEM) obtained from a DGPS. Firstly, 10 topographic indices derived from a DEM were computed in a Random Forest algorithm to obtain a classification model for soil map units (SMU). Secondly, a classification model was applied to those topographic indices but at a scale higher than 1:1000. Finally, a spatial principal component analysis and a clustering using Fuzzy K-means were used into each SMU. From this clustering, three soil-specific zones were determined which were also validated through apparent electrical conductivity (CEa) measurements. Three soil sample points were determined by zone. In each one, samples from 0-10, 10-20 and 20-40cm depth were taken. Glyphosate content and AMPA in each soil sample were analyzed using de UPLC-MS/MS ESI (+/-). Only

  2. GLYPHOSATE REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Activated-carbon, oxidation, conventional-treatment, filtration, and membrane studies are conducted to determine which process is best suited to remove the herbicide glyphosate from potable water. Both bench-scale and pilot-scale studies are completed. Computer models are used ...

  3. [Glyphosate and its formulations--toxicity, occupational and environmental exposure].

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, Marta; Paweł, Jarosiewicz; Bukowska, Bozena

    2013-01-01

    Glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) is an active ingredient of the most widely used herbicide formulations in protecting agricultural and horticultural crops. Numerous results (mostly published in the years 2010-2013) concerning the action of glyphosate and its formulations in the recent decade were analyzed. Initial reports about alleged biodegradability of glyphosate in the environment turned out to be wrong. It has been shown that glyphosate remains in the soil and can reach people by spreading along with groundwater. Recent publications have shown that glyphosate is detected at low concentrations in the human blood. Publications cited in this article, which indicate a possible induction of neoplastic changes by glyphosate formulation, have raised great concern and controversy in the scientific world. Presenting adverse effects of glyphosate and its formulations we focused on the role of glyphosate formulations in hormonal disorders by impeding the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and the inhibition of aromatase activity. The impact of glyphosate on oxygen reactive species formation, changes in redox system and the effect on necrosis and apoptosis in various types of cells was shown. We also revealed that glyphosate as a phosphonate herbicide does not inhibit directly the activity of acetylcholinesterase. Based on numerous studies it was noted that commercial formulations of glyphosate exhibit higher toxicity than that of the active substance itself. The discussed problems clearly show the need to evaluate the toxicity of glyphosate and its formulations and related potential threat to humans.

  4. Effect of Shufeng Jiedu capsules as a broad-spectrum antibacterial.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yanyan; Gao, Yingjie; Cui, Xiaolan

    2016-02-01

    This study sought to investigate the broad-spectrum antibacterial action of an alternative medicine, Shufeng Jiedu capsules (SFJDC). Antibacterial testing was performed to determine whether SFJDC had broad-spectrum antibacterial action in vitro, and testing was performed to verify whether SFJDC prevented death due to a Streptococcus or Staphylococcus aureus infection in mice. Results of antibacterial testing suggested that SFJDC are a broad-spectrum antibacterial and that SFJDC are superior to Lianhua Qingwen capsules as a broad-spectrum antibacterial. Results of testing revealed that SFJDC lowered the mortality rate, it reduced mortality, it increased average survival time, and it increased the lifespan of mice dying due to a Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus infection. Thus, SFJDC could become a complement to broad-spectrum antimicrobials in clinical settings.

  5. Broad-spectrum agents for flaviviral infections: dengue, Zika and beyond.

    PubMed

    Boldescu, Veaceslav; Behnam, Mira A M; Vasilakis, Nikos; Klein, Christian D

    2017-08-01

    Infections with flaviviruses, such as dengue, West Nile virus and the recently re-emerging Zika virus, are an increasing and probably lasting global risk. This Review summarizes and comments on the opportunities for broad-spectrum agents that are active against multiple flaviviruses. Broad-spectrum activity is particularly desirable to prepare for the next flaviviral epidemic, which could emerge from as-yet unknown or neglected viruses. Potential molecular targets for broad-spectrum antiflaviviral compounds include viral proteins, such as the viral protease or polymerase, and host targets that are exploited by these viruses during entry and replication, including α-glucosidase and proteins involved in nucleoside biosynthesis. Numerous compounds with broad-spectrum antiviral activity have already been identified by target-specific or phenotypic assays. For other compounds, broad-spectrum activity can be anticipated because of their mode of action and molecular targets.

  6. Mapping Proteome-wide Targets of Glyphosate in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ford, Breanna; Bateman, Leslie A; Gutierrez-Palominos, Leilani; Park, Robin; Nomura, Daniel K

    2017-02-16

    Glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide Roundup, is one of the most widely used pesticides in agriculture and home garden use. Whether glyphosate causes any mammalian toxicity remains highly controversial. While many studies have associated glyphosate with numerous adverse health effects, the mechanisms underlying glyphosate toxicity in mammals remain poorly understood. Here, we used activity-based protein profiling to map glyphosate targets in mice. We show that glyphosate at high doses can be metabolized in vivo to reactive metabolites such as glyoxylate and react with cysteines across many proteins in mouse liver. We show that glyoxylate inhibits liver fatty acid oxidation enzymes and glyphosate treatment in mice increases the levels of triglycerides and cholesteryl esters, likely resulting from diversion of fatty acids away from oxidation and toward other lipid pathways. Our study highlights the utility of using chemoproteomics to identify novel toxicological mechanisms of environmental chemicals such as glyphosate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Direct aqueous determination of glyphosate and related compounds by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry using reversed-phase and weak anion-exchange mixed-mode column.

    PubMed

    Hao, Chunyan; Morse, David; Morra, Franca; Zhao, Xiaoming; Yang, Paul; Nunn, Brian

    2011-08-19

    Analysis of the broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate and its related compounds is quite challenging. Tedious and time-consuming derivatization is often required for these substances due to their high polarity, high water solubility, low volatility and molecular structure which lacks either a chromophore or fluorophore. A novel liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS) method has been developed for the determination of glyphosate, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and glufosinate using a reversed-phase and weak anion-exchange mixed-mode Acclaim® WAX-1 column. Aqueous environmental samples are directly injected and analyzed in 12 min with no sample concentration or derivatization steps. Two multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) channels are monitored in the method for each target compound to achieve true positive identification, and ¹³C, ¹⁵N-glyphosate is used as an internal standard to carry out isotope dilution mass spectrometric (IDMS) measurement for glyphosate. The instrument detection limits (IDLs) for glyphosate, AMPA and glufosinate are 1, 2 and 0.9 μg/L, respectively. Linearity of the detector response with a minimum coefficient of determination (R² value (R² > 0.995) was demonstrated in the range of ∼10 to 10³ μg/L for each analytes. Spiked drinking water, surface water and groundwater samples were analyzed using this method and the average recoveries of analytes in three matrices ranged from 77.0 to 102%, 62.1 to 101%, 66.1 to 93.7% while relative standard deviation ranged from 6.3 to 10.2%, 2.7 to 14.8%, 2.9 to 10.7%, respectively. Factors that may affect method performance, such as metal ions, sample preservation, and storage time, are also discussed. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Potential Adverse Effects of Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Exposure in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Jenna; Finlayson, Samuel; Mahoney, Monica V; Celi, Leo Anthony

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background The potential adverse effects of empiric broad-spectrum antimicrobial use among patients with suspected but subsequently excluded infection have not been fully characterized. We sought novel methods to quantify the risk of adverse effects of broad-spectrum antimicrobial exposure among patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). Methods Among all adult patients admitted to ICUs at a single institution, we selected patients with negative blood cultures who also received ≥1 broad-spectrum antimicrobials. Broad-spectrum antimicrobials were categorized in ≥1 of 5 categories based on their spectrum of activity against potential pathogens. We performed, in serial, 5 cohort studies to measure the effect of each broad-spectrum category on patient outcomes. Exposed patients were defined as those receiving a specific category of broad-spectrum antimicrobial; nonexposed were all other patients in the cohort. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality. Secondary outcomes included length of hospital and ICU stay and nosocomial acquisition of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria (ARB) or Clostridium difficile within 30 days of admission. Results Among the study cohort of 1918 patients, 316 (16.5%) died within 30 days, 821 (42.8%) had either a length of hospital stay >7 days or an ICU length of stay >3 days, and 106 (5.5%) acquired either a nosocomial ARB or C. difficile. The short-term use of broad-spectrum antimicrobials in any of the defined broad-spectrum categories was not significantly associated with either primary or secondary outcomes. Conclusions The prompt and brief empiric use of defined categories of broad-spectrum antimicrobials could not be associated with additional patient harm. PMID:29479546

  9. Potential Adverse Effects of Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Exposure in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Jenna; Snyder, Graham M; Finlayson, Samuel; Mahoney, Monica V; Celi, Leo Anthony

    2018-02-01

    The potential adverse effects of empiric broad-spectrum antimicrobial use among patients with suspected but subsequently excluded infection have not been fully characterized. We sought novel methods to quantify the risk of adverse effects of broad-spectrum antimicrobial exposure among patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). Among all adult patients admitted to ICUs at a single institution, we selected patients with negative blood cultures who also received ≥1 broad-spectrum antimicrobials. Broad-spectrum antimicrobials were categorized in ≥1 of 5 categories based on their spectrum of activity against potential pathogens. We performed, in serial, 5 cohort studies to measure the effect of each broad-spectrum category on patient outcomes. Exposed patients were defined as those receiving a specific category of broad-spectrum antimicrobial; nonexposed were all other patients in the cohort. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality. Secondary outcomes included length of hospital and ICU stay and nosocomial acquisition of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria (ARB) or Clostridium difficile within 30 days of admission. Among the study cohort of 1918 patients, 316 (16.5%) died within 30 days, 821 (42.8%) had either a length of hospital stay >7 days or an ICU length of stay >3 days, and 106 (5.5%) acquired either a nosocomial ARB or C. difficile . The short-term use of broad-spectrum antimicrobials in any of the defined broad-spectrum categories was not significantly associated with either primary or secondary outcomes. The prompt and brief empiric use of defined categories of broad-spectrum antimicrobials could not be associated with additional patient harm.

  10. DETERMINING POTENTIAL RISK TO NATIVE PLANTS FROM HERBICIDE DRIFT: COMPARATIVE RESPONSE OF SELECTED CROP AND NATIVE PLANT SPECIES TO GLYPHOSATE AND SULFOMETURON

    EPA Science Inventory

    abstract/abstract

    While native plant communities may be at risk from herbicide use, current crop-centric test procedures for pesticide registration may not adequately represent the sensitivity of native non-crop plants to herbicides. We are designing a protocol to determi...

  11. Impact of phosphate on glyphosate uptake and toxicity in willow.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marcelo Pedrosa; Le Manac'h, Sarah Gingras; Moingt, Matthieu; Smedbol, Elise; Paquet, Serge; Labrecque, Michel; Lucotte, Marc; Juneau, Philippe

    2016-03-05

    Phosphate (PO4(3-)) has been shown to increase glyphosate uptake by willow, a plant species known for its phytoremediation potential. However, it remains unclear if this stimulation of glyphosate uptake can result in an elevated glyphosate toxicity to plants (which could prevent the use of willows in glyphosate-remediation programs). Consequently, we studied the effects of PO4(3-) on glyphosate uptake and toxicity in a fast growing willow cultivar (Salix miyabeana SX64). Plants were grown in hydroponic solution with a combination of glyphosate (0, 0.001, 0.065 and 1 mg l(-1)) and PO4(3-) (0, 200 and 400 mg l(-1)). We demonstrated that PO4(3-) fertilization greatly increased glyphosate uptake by roots and its translocation to leaves, which resulted in increased shikimate concentration in leaves. In addition to its deleterious effects in photosynthesis, glyphosate induced oxidative stress through hydrogen peroxide accumulation. Although it has increased glyphosate accumulation, PO4(3-) fertilization attenuated the herbicide's deleterious effects by increasing the activity of antioxidant systems and alleviating glyphosate-induced oxidative stress. Our results indicate that in addition to the glyphosate uptake, PO4(3-) is involved in glyphosate toxicity in willow by preventing glyphosate induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Biochemical effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content on teleostean fishes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Palas; Pal, Sandipan; Mukherjee, Aloke Kumar; Ghosh, Apurba Ratan

    2014-09-01

    Effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 at a dose of 17.20mg/l on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content were measured in different tissues of two Indian air-breathing teleosts, Anabas testudineus (Bloch) and Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) during an exposure period of 30 days under laboratory condition. AChE activity was significantly increased in all the investigated tissues of both fish species and maximum elevation was observed in brain of H. fossilis, while spinal cord of A. testudineus showed minimum increment. Fishes showed significant increase LPO levels in all the tissues; highest was observed in gill of A. testudineus but lowest LPO level was observed in muscle of H. fossilis. CAT was also enhanced in both the fishes, while GST activity in liver diminished substantially and minimum was observed in liver of A. testudineus. Total protein content showed decreased value in all the tissues, maximum reduction was observed in liver and minimum in brain of A. testudineus and H. fossilis respectively. The results indicated that Excel Mera 71 caused serious alterations in the enzyme activities resulting into severe deterioration of fish health; so, AChE, LPO, CAT and GST can be used as suitable indicators of herbicidal toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Clostridium Bacteria and Autism Spectrum Conditions: A Systematic Review and Hypothetical Contribution of Environmental Glyphosate Levels.

    PubMed

    Argou-Cardozo, Isadora; Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares

    2018-04-04

    Nowadays, there seems to be a consensus about the multifactorial nature of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The literature provides hypotheses dealing with numerous environmental factors and genes accounting for the apparently higher prevalence of this condition. Researchers have shown evidence regarding the impact of gut bacteria on neurological outcomes, altering behavior and potentially affecting the onset and/or severity of psychiatric disorders. Pesticides and agrotoxics are also included among this long list of ASD-related environmental stressors. Of note, ingestion of glyphosate (GLY), a broad-spectrum systemic herbicide, can reduce beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract microbiota without exerting any effects on the Clostridium population, which is highly resistant to this herbicide. In the present study, (i) we performed a systematic review to evaluate the relationship between Clostridium bacteria and the probability of developing and/or aggravating autism among children. For that purpose, electronic searches were performed on Medline/PubMed and Scielo databases for identification of relevant studies published in English up to December 2017. Two independent researches selected the studies and analyzed the data. The results of the present systematic review demonstrate an interrelation between Clostridium bacteria colonization of the intestinal tract and autism. Finally, (ii) we also hypothesize about how environmental GLY levels may deleteriously influence the gut-brain axis by boosting the growth of Clostridium bacteria in autistic toddlers.

  14. Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact.

    PubMed

    Bonny, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been and continue to be a subject of controversy despite their rapid adoption by farmers where approved. For the last two decades, an important matter of debate has been their impact on pesticide use, particularly for herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Some claim that these crops bring about a decrease in herbicide use, while others claim the opposite. In fact, since 1996, most cultivated GMOs have been GMHT crops, which involve the use of an associated herbicide, generally glyphosate. In their very first years of adoption, HT crops often led to some decrease in herbicide use. However, the repetition of glyphosate-tolerant crops and of glyphosate only applications in the same fields without sufficient alternation and herbicide diversity has contributed to the appearance of glyphosate-resistant weeds. These weeds have resulted in a rise in the use of glyphosate and other herbicides. This article explores this situation and the impacts of herbicide-resistant weeds, using an interdisciplinary approach and drawing on recent data. The paper analyzes the spread of GMHT crops worldwide and their consequences on herbicide use in the USA in particular. It then addresses the global development of glyphosate-resistant weeds and their impact, particularly focusing on the USA. Finally, the last section explores how industry, farmers, and weed scientists are coping with the spread of resistant weeds. The concluding comments deal more widely with trends in GM crops.

  15. Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonny, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been and continue to be a subject of controversy despite their rapid adoption by farmers where approved. For the last two decades, an important matter of debate has been their impact on pesticide use, particularly for herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Some claim that these crops bring about a decrease in herbicide use, while others claim the opposite. In fact, since 1996, most cultivated GMOs have been GMHT crops, which involve the use of an associated herbicide, generally glyphosate. In their very first years of adoption, HT crops often led to some decrease in herbicide use. However, the repetition of glyphosate-tolerant crops and of glyphosate only applications in the same fields without sufficient alternation and herbicide diversity has contributed to the appearance of glyphosate-resistant weeds. These weeds have resulted in a rise in the use of glyphosate and other herbicides. This article explores this situation and the impacts of herbicide-resistant weeds, using an interdisciplinary approach and drawing on recent data. The paper analyzes the spread of GMHT crops worldwide and their consequences on herbicide use in the USA in particular. It then addresses the global development of glyphosate-resistant weeds and their impact, particularly focusing on the USA. Finally, the last section explores how industry, farmers, and weed scientists are coping with the spread of resistant weeds. The concluding comments deal more widely with trends in GM crops.

  16. Response of Pennsylvania native plant species to dicamba and/or glyphosate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Weeds may become resistant to intensive and extensive use of specific herbicides associated with the growth of herbicide tolerant crops, e.g., the use of glyphosate for weed control with glyphosate tolerant soybeans. To counter this resistance, crops modified to contain genes for...

  17. Glyphosate, a chelating agent-relevant for ecological risk assessment?

    PubMed

    Mertens, Martha; Höss, Sebastian; Neumann, Günter; Afzal, Joshua; Reichenbecher, Wolfram

    2018-02-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs), consisting of glyphosate and formulants, are the most frequently applied herbicides worldwide. The declared active ingredient glyphosate does not only inhibit the EPSPS but is also a chelating agent that binds macro- and micronutrients, essential for many plant processes and pathogen resistance. GBH treatment may thus impede uptake and availability of macro- and micronutrients in plants. The present study investigated whether this characteristic of glyphosate could contribute to adverse effects of GBH application in the environment and to human health. According to the results, it has not been fully elucidated whether the chelating activity of glyphosate contributes to the toxic effects on plants and potentially on plant-microorganism interactions, e.g., nitrogen fixation of leguminous plants. It is also still open whether the chelating property of glyphosate is involved in the toxic effects on organisms other than plants, described in many papers. By changing the availability of essential as well as toxic metals that are bound to soil particles, the herbicide might also impact soil life, although the occurrence of natural chelators with considerably higher chelating potentials makes an additional impact of glyphosate for most metals less likely. Further research should elucidate the role of glyphosate (and GBH) as a chelator, in particular, as this is a non-specific property potentially affecting many organisms and processes. In the process of reevaluation of glyphosate its chelating activity has hardly been discussed.

  18. Subtle impacts of repeated glyphosate use on wheat-associated bacteria are small and depend on glyphosate use history

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glyphosate (Roundup) is the most widely used herbicide in the world and a critical tool for weed control in no-till wheat cropping systems. However, there are persistent concerns about non-target impacts of long-term glyphosate use on soil communities. We investigated the impacts of repeated glyphos...

  19. The effect of glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup and its co-formulant, POEA, on the motoric activity of rat intestine - In vitro study.

    PubMed

    Chłopecka, Magdalena; Mendel, Marta; Dziekan, Natalia; Karlik, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    The study was aimed at evaluating the effect of Roundup, polyoxyethylene tallow amine (POEA) and mixture of glyphosate and POEA in different levels on the motoric activity of jejunum strips. The incubation in the Roundup solutions caused a significant, mostly miorelaxant, reversible reaction of smooth muscle; only in the highest tested dose which is equivalent to the agricultural concentration (1% corresponding to 1.7g glyphosate/L) there was an irreversible disturbance of the spontaneous contractility and reactivity. The incubation in POEA solutions in the range of low doses (0.256; 1.28; 6.4mg/L) resulted in a biphasic muscle reaction (relaxation and contraction); whereas in the range of high doses, i.e. 32; 160 and 800mg/L (agricultural spray concentrations) induced only a miorelaxant, irreversible response. The results indicate very high toxicity of POEA which exceeds the toxicity of the commercial formulations. Besides, it is postulated that glyphosate and POEA may display antagonistic interaction towards the motoric activity of gastrointestinal tract. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Glyphosate induces human breast cancer cells growth via estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Thongprakaisang, Siriporn; Thiantanawat, Apinya; Rangkadilok, Nuchanart; Suriyo, Tawit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2013-09-01

    Glyphosate is an active ingredient of the most widely used herbicide and it is believed to be less toxic than other pesticides. However, several recent studies showed its potential adverse health effects to humans as it may be an endocrine disruptor. This study focuses on the effects of pure glyphosate on estrogen receptors (ERs) mediated transcriptional activity and their expressions. Glyphosate exerted proliferative effects only in human hormone-dependent breast cancer, T47D cells, but not in hormone-independent breast cancer, MDA-MB231 cells, at 10⁻¹² to 10⁻⁶M in estrogen withdrawal condition. The proliferative concentrations of glyphosate that induced the activation of estrogen response element (ERE) transcription activity were 5-13 fold of control in T47D-KBluc cells and this activation was inhibited by an estrogen antagonist, ICI 182780, indicating that the estrogenic activity of glyphosate was mediated via ERs. Furthermore, glyphosate also altered both ERα and β expression. These results indicated that low and environmentally relevant concentrations of glyphosate possessed estrogenic activity. Glyphosate-based herbicides are widely used for soybean cultivation, and our results also found that there was an additive estrogenic effect between glyphosate and genistein, a phytoestrogen in soybeans. However, these additive effects of glyphosate contamination in soybeans need further animal study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Glyphosate-Resistant and Conventional Canola (Brassica napus L.) Responses to Glyphosate and Aminomethylphosphonic Acid (AMPA) Treatment.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Elza Alves; Dayan, Franck E; Owens, Daniel K; Rimando, Agnes M; Duke, Stephen O

    2016-05-11

    Glyphosate-resistant (GR) canola contains two transgenes that impart resistance to the herbicide glyphosate: (1) the microbial glyphosate oxidase gene (gox) encoding the glyphosate oxidase enzyme (GOX) that metabolizes glyphosate to aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and (2) cp4 that encodes a GR form of the glyphosate target enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimic acid-3-phosphate synthase. The objectives of this research were to determine the phytotoxicity of AMPA to canola, the relative metabolism of glyphosate to AMPA in GR and conventional non-GR (NGR) canola, and AMPA pool sizes in glyphosate-treated GR canola. AMPA applied at 1.0 kg ha(-1) was not phytotoxic to GR or NGR. At this AMPA application rate, NGR canola accumulated a higher concentration of AMPA in its tissues than GR canola. At rates of 1 and 3.33 kg ae ha(-1) of glyphosate, GR canola growth was stimulated. This stimulatory effect is similar to that of much lower doses of glyphosate on NGR canola. Both shikimate and AMPA accumulated in tissues of these glyphosate-treated plants. In a separate experiment in which young GR and NGR canola plants were treated with non-phytotoxic levels of [(14)C]-glyphosate, very little glyphosate was metabolized in NGR plants, whereas most of the glyphosate was metabolized to AMPA in GR plants at 7 days after application. Untreated leaves of GR plants accumulated only metabolites (mostly AMPA) of glyphosate, indicating that GOX activity is very high in the youngest leaves. These data indicate that more glyphosate is transformed to AMPA rapidly in GR canola and that the accumulated AMPA is not toxic to the canola plant.

  2. Glyphosate in Runoff Waters and in the Root-Zone: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Lyndsay E.; Pezeshki, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Glyphosate is the most commonly-used herbicide in the world. The present review summarizes the discovery, prevalence, chemical and physical properties, mode of action and effects in plants, glyphosate resistance and the environmental fate of glyphosate. Numerous studies are reviewed that demonstrate that glyphosate may run off of fields where it is applied, while other studies provide evidence that plant roots can take up glyphosate. Non-target vegetation may be exposed to glyphosate in the root-zone, where it has the potential to remove aqueous glyphosate from the system. Further study on the effects of root-zone glyphosate on non-target vegetation is required to develop best management practices for land managers seeking to ameliorate the effects of root-zone glyphosate exposure. PMID:29051473

  3. [The determination of the herbicide glyphosate and its chief metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in drinking water with the aid of HPLC].

    PubMed

    Gauch, R; Leuenberger, U; Müller, U

    1989-01-01

    A method for the determination of glyphosate and its major metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) is described. With a detection limit of 0.02 microgram/l, the method suitably fulfills the requirements of the Swiss legislation (tolerance value of 0.1 micrograms/l water). The compounds are derivatized directly in the original water sample with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (FMOCC1) in order to obtain extractable and fluorescent derivatives. These are extracted with organic solvents and determined by HPLC using a fluorescence detector. Neither of the compounds could be detected in 151 tap water samples from the Canton of Berne.

  4. Gene amplification confers glyphosate resistance in Amaranthus palmeri

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Todd A.; Zhang, Wenli; Wang, Dafu; Bukun, Bekir; Chisholm, Stephen T.; Shaner, Dale L.; Nissen, Scott J.; Patzoldt, William L.; Tranel, Patrick J.; Culpepper, A. Stanley; Grey, Timothy L.; Webster, Theodore M.; Vencill, William K.; Sammons, R. Douglas; Jiang, Jiming; Preston, Christopher; Leach, Jan E.; Westra, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The herbicide glyphosate became widely used in the United States and other parts of the world after the commercialization of glyphosate-resistant crops. These crops have constitutive overexpression of a glyphosate-insensitive form of the herbicide target site gene, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Increased use of glyphosate over multiple years imposes selective genetic pressure on weed populations. We investigated recently discovered glyphosate-resistant Amaranthus palmeri populations from Georgia, in comparison with normally sensitive populations. EPSPS enzyme activity from resistant and susceptible plants was equally inhibited by glyphosate, which led us to use quantitative PCR to measure relative copy numbers of the EPSPS gene. Genomes of resistant plants contained from 5-fold to more than 160-fold more copies of the EPSPS gene than did genomes of susceptible plants. Quantitative RT-PCR on cDNA revealed that EPSPS expression was positively correlated with genomic EPSPS relative copy number. Immunoblot analyses showed that increased EPSPS protein level also correlated with EPSPS genomic copy number. EPSPS gene amplification was heritable, correlated with resistance in pseudo-F2 populations, and is proposed to be the molecular basis of glyphosate resistance. FISH revealed that EPSPS genes were present on every chromosome and, therefore, gene amplification was likely not caused by unequal chromosome crossing over. This occurrence of gene amplification as an herbicide resistance mechanism in a naturally occurring weed population is particularly significant because it could threaten the sustainable use of glyphosate-resistant crop technology. PMID:20018685

  5. Glyphosate-resistant weeds of South American cropping systems: an overview.

    PubMed

    Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Vidal, Ribas A; Balbi, Maria C; Gundel, Pedro E; Trucco, Frederico; Ghersa, Claudio M

    2008-04-01

    Herbicide resistance is an evolutionary event resulting from intense herbicide selection over genetically diverse weed populations. In South America, orchard, cereal and legume cropping systems show a strong dependence on glyphosate to control weeds. The goal of this report is to review the current knowledge on cases of evolved glyphosate-resistant weeds in South American agriculture. The first reports of glyphosate resistance include populations of highly diverse taxa (Lolium multiflorum Lam., Conyza bonariensis L., C. canadensis L.). In all instances, resistance evolution followed intense glyphosate use in fruit fields of Chile and Brazil. In fruit orchards from Colombia, Parthenium hysterophorus L. has shown the ability to withstand high glyphosate rates. The recent appearance of glyphosate-resistant Sorghum halepense L. and Euphorbia heterophylla L. in glyphosate-resistant soybean fields of Argentina and Brazil, respectively, is of major concern. The evolution of glyphosate resistance has clearly taken place in those agroecosystems where glyphosate exerts a strong and continuous selection pressure on weeds. The massive adoption of no-till practices together with the utilization of glyphosate-resistant soybean crops are factors encouraging increase in glyphosate use. This phenomenon has been more evident in Argentina and Brazil. The exclusive reliance on glyphosate as the main tool for weed management results in agroecosystems biologically more prone to glyphosate resistance evolution. Copyright (c) 2007 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Construction and Characterization of Broad-Spectrum Promoters for Synthetic Biology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sen; Liu, Qingtao; Zhang, Yunfeng; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian; Kang, Zhen

    2018-01-19

    Characterization of genetic circuits and biosynthetic pathways in different hosts always requires promoter substitution and redesigning. Here, a strong, broad-spectrum promoter, P bs , for Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was constructed, and it was incorporated into the minimal E. coli-B. subtilis-S. cerevisiae shuttle plasmid pEBS (5.8 kb). By applying a random mutation strategy, three broad-spectrum promoters P bs1 , P bs2 , and P bs3 , with different strengths were generated and characterized. These broad-spectrum promoters will expand the synthetic biology toolbox for E. coli, B. subtilis, and S. cerevisiae.

  7. Glycolysis-related proteins are broad spectrum vaccine candidates against aquacultural pathogens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohong; Sun, Jiamin; Wu, Haizhen

    2017-07-05

    Reverse vaccinology (RV) has become a popular method for developing vaccines. Although Edwardsiella tarda is deemed to be an important fish pathogen, so far, no reports have used a genome-based approach to screen vaccine candidates against E. tarda. In the current study, protective antigens of E. tarda were screened using RV. Large-scale cloning, expression and purification of potential candidates were carried out, and their immunoprotective potential was evaluated. A candidate fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA) exhibited broad spectrum protection, as did another glycolysis-related protein glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), which we reported previously, indicating the potential of other glycolysis-related proteins of E. tarda as broad spectrum protective antigens. In total, half (5 out 10) of these proteins showed prominent immunoprotective potential. Therefore, we suggest that glycolysis-related proteins are a class of potential broad spectrum protective antigens and that these proteins should be preferentially selected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Functional genomics analysis of horseweed (Conyza canadensis) with special reference to the evolution of non-target-site glyphosate resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The evolution of glyphosate resistance in weedy species places an environmentally benign herbicide in peril. The first report of a dicot plant with evolved glyphosate resistance was horseweed, which occurred in 2001. Since then, several species have evolved glyphosate resistance and genomic informat...

  9. Broad-Spectrum Antibiotic Treatment and Subsequent Childhood Type 1 Diabetes: A Nationwide Danish Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Tine D; Bergholt, Thomas; Bouaziz, Olivier; Arpi, Magnus; Eriksson, Frank; Rasmussen, Steen; Keiding, Niels; Løkkegaard, Ellen C

    2016-01-01

    Studies link antibiotic treatment and delivery by cesarean section with increased risk of chronic diseases through changes of the gut-microbiota. We aimed to evaluate the association of broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment during the first two years of life with subsequent onset of childhood type 1 diabetes and the potential effect-modification by mode of delivery. A Danish nationwide cohort study including all singletons born during 1997-2010. End of follow-up by December 2012. Four national registers provided information on antibiotic redemptions, outcome and confounders. Redemptions of antibiotic prescriptions during the first two years of life was classified into narrow-spectrum or broad-spectrum antibiotics. Children were followed from age two to fourteen, both inclusive. The risk of type 1 diabetes with onset before the age of 15 years was assessed by Cox regression. A total of 858,201 singletons contributed 5,906,069 person-years, during which 1,503 children developed type 1 diabetes. Redemption of broad-spectrum antibiotics during the first two years of life was associated with an increased rate of type 1 diabetes during the following 13 years of life (HR 1.13; 95% CI 1.02 to 1.25), however, the rate was modified by mode of delivery. Broad-spectrum antibiotics were associated with an increased rate of type 1 diabetes in children delivered by either intrapartum cesarean section (HR 1.70; 95% CI 1.15 to 2.51) or prelabor cesarean section (HR 1.63; 95% CI 1.11 to 2.39), but not in vaginally delivered children. Number needed to harm was 433 and 562, respectively. The association with broad-spectrum antibiotics was not modified by parity, genetic predisposition or maternal redemption of antibiotics during pregnancy or lactation. Redemption of broad-spectrum antibiotics during infancy is associated with an increased risk of childhood type 1 diabetes in children delivered by cesarean section.

  10. Gene amplification of 5-enol-pyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase in glyphosate-resistant Kochia scoparia.

    PubMed

    Wiersma, Andrew T; Gaines, Todd A; Preston, Christopher; Hamilton, John P; Giacomini, Darci; Robin Buell, C; Leach, Jan E; Westra, Philip

    2015-02-01

    Field-evolved resistance to the herbicide glyphosate is due to amplification of one of two EPSPS alleles, increasing transcription and protein with no splice variants or effects on other pathway genes. The widely used herbicide glyphosate inhibits the shikimate pathway enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Globally, the intensive use of glyphosate for weed control has selected for glyphosate resistance in 31 weed species. Populations of suspected glyphosate-resistant Kochia scoparia were collected from fields located in the US central Great Plains. Glyphosate dose response verified glyphosate resistance in nine populations. The mechanism of resistance to glyphosate was investigated using targeted sequencing, quantitative PCR, immunoblotting, and whole transcriptome de novo sequencing to characterize the sequence and expression of EPSPS. Sequence analysis showed no mutation of the EPSPS Pro106 codon in glyphosate-resistant K. scoparia, whereas EPSPS genomic copy number and transcript abundance were elevated three- to ten-fold in resistant individuals relative to susceptible individuals. Glyphosate-resistant individuals with increased relative EPSPS copy numbers had consistently lower shikimate accumulation in leaf disks treated with 100 μM glyphosate and EPSPS protein levels were higher in glyphosate-resistant individuals with increased gene copy number compared to glyphosate-susceptible individuals. RNA sequence analysis revealed seven nucleotide positions with two different expressed alleles in glyphosate-susceptible reads. However, one nucleotide at the seven positions was predominant in glyphosate-resistant sequences, suggesting that only one of two EPSPS alleles was amplified in glyphosate-resistant individuals. No alternatively spliced EPSPS transcripts were detected. Expression of five other genes in the chorismate pathway was unaffected in glyphosate-resistant individuals with increased EPSPS expression. These results indicate

  11. Control of Butterfly Bush with Postemergence Herbicides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Butterfly bush (Buddleja davidii) is classified as invasive in several parts of the United States. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of four herbicides and two application methods on postemergence butterfly bush control. The four herbicides included: Roundup (glyphosate)...

  12. Tolerance evaluation of vegetatively established Miscanthus x giganteus to herbicides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In spite of the recent focus on herbicide resistant weeds, herbicide resistant weeds are not new to agriculture; the first herbicide resistant weed was documented in 1957, with the first widespread resistance occurring in common groundsel with atrazine in the early 1970’s. Glyphosate resistant weed...

  13. The rice blast resistance gene Ptr encodes an atypical protein required for broad spectrum disease resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant resistance (R) genes typically encode proteins with nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NLR) domains. We identified a novel, broad-spectrum rice blast R gene, Ptr, encoding a non-NLR protein with four Armadillo repeats. Ptr was originally identified by fast neutron mutagenesis as a ...

  14. Resistance of nanobacteria isolated from urinary and kidney stones to broad-spectrum antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Sardarabadi, Hadi; Mashreghi, Mansour; Jamialahmadi, Khadijeh; Dianat, Tahere

    2014-08-01

    Nanoscopic life forms called Nanobacteria or calcifying nanoparticles (CNP) are unconventional agents. These novel organisms are very small (0.1 to 0.5 microns) and possess unusual properties such as high resistance to heat and routine antimicrobial agents. Nanobacteria are 100 times smaller than bacteria and protected by a shell of apatite, so they could be as candidate for emerging and progress of in vivo pathological calcification. In this study, the inhibitory effect of broad-spectrum antibiotics on growth of these new forms of life has been investigated. Powdered urinary and kidney stones were demineralized with HCl and neutralized with appropriate buffers and became filtered. Finally suspension was incubated in DMEM medium with Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS) and broad-spectrum antibiotics (100U/ml for penicillin and 100μg/ml for streptomycin) for 60 days. In the presence of broad-spectrum antibiotics, Scanning Electron Micrographs (SEM) showed a spherical shape of these nanobacteria. Also, Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) showed a pick for calcium and phosphor. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) results illustrated cover around the nanobacteria. The growth of calcifying nanoparticles after adding the broad-spectrum antibiotics may be due to their apatite hard shells supporting them against penetration of the antibiotics.

  15. Herbicide-Resistant Crops: Utilities and Limitations for Herbicide-Resistant Weed Management

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Since 1996, genetically modified herbicide-resistant (HR) crops, particularly glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, have transformed the tactics that corn, soybean, and cotton growers use to manage weeds. The use of GR crops continues to grow, but weeds are adapting to the common practice of using only glyphosate to control weeds. Growers using only a single mode of action to manage weeds need to change to a more diverse array of herbicidal, mechanical, and cultural practices to maintain the effectiveness of glyphosate. Unfortunately, the introduction of GR crops and the high initial efficacy of glyphosate often lead to a decline in the use of other herbicide options and less investment by industry to discover new herbicide active ingredients. With some exceptions, most growers can still manage their weed problems with currently available selective and HR crop-enabled herbicides. However, current crop management systems are in jeopardy given the pace at which weed populations are evolving glyphosate resistance. New HR crop technologies will expand the utility of currently available herbicides and enable new interim solutions for growers to manage HR weeds, but will not replace the long-term need to diversify weed management tactics and discover herbicides with new modes of action. This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of anticipated weed management options and the best management practices that growers need to implement in HR crops to maximize the long-term benefits of current technologies and reduce weed shifts to difficult-to-control and HR weeds. PMID:20586458

  16. Response of Pennsylvania native plant species, corn and soybean to tank mixes of dicamba and glyphosate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Crops such as soybean are being genetically modified to be tolerant to multiple herbicides, such as dicamba and glyphosate, in order to allow treatment with several herbicides to control the development of herbicide resistance in weeds. However, with increased use of multiple-he...

  17. Glyphosate fate in soils when arriving in plant residues.

    PubMed

    Mamy, Laure; Barriuso, Enrique; Gabrielle, Benoît

    2016-07-01

    A significant fraction of pesticides sprayed on crops may be returned to soils via plant residues, but its fate has been little documented. The objective of this work was to study the fate of glyphosate associated to plants residues. Oilseed rape was used as model plant using two lines: a glyphosate-tolerant (GT) line and a non-GT one, considered as a crucifer weed. The effects of different fragmentation degrees and placements in soil of plant residues were tested. A control was set up by spraying glyphosate directly on the soil. The mineralization of glyphosate in soil was slower when incorporated into plant residues, and the amounts of extractable and non-extractable glyphosate residues increased. Glyphosate availability for mineralization increased when the size of plant residues decreased, and as the distribution of plant residues in soil was more homogeneous. After 80 days of soil incubation, extractable (14)C-residues mostly involved one metabolite of glyphosate (AMPA) but up to 2.6% of initial (14)C was still extracted from undecayed leaves as glyphosate. Thus, the trapping of herbicides in plant materials provided a protection against degradation, and crops residues returns may increase the persistence of glyphosate in soils. This pattern appeared more pronounced for GT crops, which accumulated more non-degraded glyphosate in their tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Biotechnology: herbicide-resistant crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgenic, herbicide-resistant (HR) crops are planted on about 80% of the land covered by transgenic crops. More than 90% of HR crios are glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, the others being resistant to glufosinate. The wide-scale adoption of HR crops, largely for economic reasons, has been the mos...

  19. The Effect of Glyphosate on Human Sperm Motility and Sperm DNA Fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Anifandis, George; Katsanaki, Katerina; Lagodonti, Georgia; Messini, Christina; Simopoulou, Mara; Dafopoulos, Konstantinos; Daponte, Alexandros

    2018-05-30

    Glyphosate is the active ingredient of Roundup ® , which is one of the most popular herbicides worldwide. Although many studies have focused on the reproductive toxicity of glyphosate or glyphosate-based herbicides, the majority of them have concluded that the effect of the specific herbicide is negligible, while only a few studies indicate the male reproductive toxicity of glyphosate alone. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of 0.36 mg/L glyphosate on sperm motility and sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF). Thirty healthy men volunteered to undergo semen analysis for the purpose of the study. Sperm motility was calculated according to WHO 2010 guidelines at collection time (zero time) and 1 h post-treatment with glyphosate. Sperm DNA fragmentation was evaluated with Halosperm ® G2 kit for both the control and glyphosate-treated sperm samples. Sperm progressive motility of glyphosate-treated samples was significantly reduced after 1 h post-treatment in comparison to the respective controls, in contrast to the SDF of glyphosate-treated samples, which was comparable to the respective controls. Conclusively, under these in vitro conditions, at high concentrations that greatly exceed environmental exposures, glyphosate exerts toxic effects on sperm progressive motility but not on sperm DNA integrity, meaning that the toxic effect is limited only to motility, at least in the first hour.

  20. Aquatic hazard assessment of MON 0818, a commercial mixture of alkylamine ethoxylates commonly used in glyphosate-containing herbicide formulations. Part 1: Species sensitivity distribution from laboratory acute exposures.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Gil, Jose L; Prosser, Ryan; Poirier, David; Lissemore, Linda; Thompson, Dean; Hanson, Mark; Solomon, Keith R

    2017-02-01

    The sensitivity of 15 aquatic species, including primary producers, benthic invertebrates, cladocerans, mollusks, and fish, to MON 0818, a commercial surfactant mixture of polyoxyethylene tallow amines, was evaluated in standard acute (48-96-h) laboratory tests. In addition, the potential for chronic toxicity (8 d) was evaluated with Ceriodaphnia dubia. Exposure concentrations were confirmed. No significant effects on any endpoint were observed in the chronic test. A tier-1 hazard assessment was conducted by comparing species sensitivity distributions based on the generated data, as well as literature data, with 4 exposure scenarios. This assessment showed moderate levels of hazard (43.1% of the species exposed at or above median effective concentration levels), for a chosen worst-case scenario-unintentional direct over-spray of a 15-cm-deep body of water with the maximum label application rate for the studied formulations (Roundup Original, Vision Forestry Herbicide; 12 L formulation ha -1 , equivalent to 4.27 kg acid equivalent [a.e.] ha -1 ). The hazard decreased to impairment of 20.9% of species under the maximum application rate for more typical uses (6 L formulation ha -1 , 2.14 kg a.e. ha -1 ), and down to 6.9% for a more frequently employed application rate (2.5 L formulation ha -1 , 0.89 kg a.e. ha -1 ). Finally, the percentage (3.8%) was less than the hazardous concentration for 5% of the species based on concentrations of MON 0818 calculated from maximum measured concentrations of glyphosate in the environment. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:501-511. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  1. Broad-spectrum antimicrobial epiphytic and endophytic fungi from marine organisms: isolation, bioassay and taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Mu, Jun; Feng, Yan; Kang, Yue; Zhang, Jia; Gu, Peng-Juan; Wang, Yu; Ma, Li-Fang; Zhu, Yan-Hua

    2009-04-17

    In the search for new marine derived antibiotics, 43 epi- and endophytic fungal strains were isolated from the surface or the inner tissue of different marine plants and invertebrates. Through preliminary and secondary screening, 10 of them were found to be able to produce broad-spectrum antimicrobial metabolites. By morphological and molecular biological methods, three active strains were characterized to be Penicillium glabrum, Fusarium oxysporum, and Alternaria alternata.

  2. Identification of Inonotus obliquus polysaccharide with broad-spectrum antiviral activity against multi-feline viruses.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jin; Hu, Xiaoliang; Liu, Dafei; Wu, Hongxia; Qu, Liandong

    2017-02-01

    Inonotus obliquus polysaccharides (IOPs) are a potential drug for the prevention and treatment of cancer, cardiopathy, diabetes, AIDs, pancreatitis and other diseases. In this study, we found that IOP can act as a broad-spectrum antiviral drug against feline viruses in the in vitro experiment. Using cell models of feline calicivirus (FCV), we demonstrated that IOP treatment was capable of exhibiting anti-FCV strain F9 activity in cell-based assays and also showed low cytotoxicity. Investigation of the mechanism of action of the compound revealed that IOP treatment induces its inhibitory actions directly on virus particles through blocking viral binding/absorpting. The inhibitory activity against other FCV isolates from China was also identified. More importantly, we found that IOP exhibited broad-spectrum antiviral activity against the feline herpesvirus 1, feline influenza virus H3N2 and H5N6, feline panleukopenia virus and feline infectious peritonitis virus that can contribute to respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases in cats. These findings suggest that IOP may be a potential broad-spectrum antiviral drug against feline viruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Broad spectrum anthelmintic resistance of Haemonchus contortus in Northern NSW of Australia.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Jane; Elliott, Tim; Chambers, Michael; Chick, Bruce

    2017-07-15

    On a sheep farm in Northern New South Wales (NSW) of Australia a degree of anthelmintic resistance was suspected. With noticeable clinical signs of infection and sheep not responding to treatment, a faecal egg count reduction test was conducted to ascertain the broad spectrum of anthelmintic resistance at this farm. A number of classes of anthelmintics were assessed including organophosphate, macrocyclic lactone (ML) and in combination an ML, benzimidazole, levamisole and salicylanilide. In addition, the more recently registered classes of anthelmintics, monepantel (amino-acetonitrile derivative) and derquantel/abamectin combination (spiroindole+ML) were included. Ninety merino sheep naturally infected with a field strain of Haemonchus contortus were randomly allocated to 6 treatment groups (15 animals/group). Sheep were subsequently treated based on label recommendations and individual bodyweight. Faecal samples were collected post-treatment on Days 7, 14 and 21 to conduct faecal egg counts and group bulk larval cultures. Broad spectrum anthelmintic resistance was confirmed at this site with treatment efficacies ranging from 21.3% (monepantel) to 93.8% (derquantel/abamectin combination) against the H. contortus strain. Furthermore, resistance to the multi-combination anthelmintic containing 4 active ingredients was evident (52.5%). This broad spectrum of resistance highlights the need for integration of alternative sustainable methods in parasite control in order to slow development of resistance and increase the life time effectiveness of anthelmintics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A novel peptide with potent and broad-spectrum antiviral activities against multiple respiratory viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hanjun; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Ke; Chu, Hin; Liu, Dabin; Poon, Vincent Kwok-Man; Chan, Chris Chung-Sing; Leung, Ho-Chuen; Fai, Ng; Lin, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Anna Jin-Xia; Jin, Dong-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    A safe, potent and broad-spectrum antiviral is urgently needed to combat emerging respiratory viruses. In light of the broad antiviral activity of β-defensins, we tested the antiviral activity of 11 peptides derived from mouse β-defensin-4 and found that a short peptide, P9, exhibited potent and broad-spectrum antiviral effects against multiple respiratory viruses in vitro and in vivo, including influenza A virus H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9, SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The antiviral activity of P9 was attributed to its high-affinity binding to viral glycoproteins, as well as the abundance of basic amino acids in its composition. After binding viral particles through viral surface glycoproteins, P9 entered into cells together with the viruses via endocytosis and prevented endosomal acidification, which blocked membrane fusion and subsequent viral RNA release. This study has paved the avenue for developing new prophylactic and therapeutic agents with broad-spectrum antiviral activities. PMID:26911565

  5. Discrimination of herbicide-resistant kochia with hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, Paul W.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Jha, Prashant; Scherrer, Bryan; Donelick, Andrew; Kumar, Vipan

    2018-01-01

    A hyperspectral imager was used to differentiate herbicide-resistant versus herbicide-susceptible biotypes of the agronomic weed kochia, in different crops in the field at the Southern Agricultural Research Center in Huntley, Montana. Controlled greenhouse experiments showed that enough information was captured by the imager to classify plants as either a crop, herbicide-susceptible or herbicide-resistant kochia. The current analysis is developing an algorithm that will work in more uncontrolled outdoor situations. In overcast conditions, the algorithm correctly identified dicamba-resistant kochia, glyphosate-resistant kochia, and glyphosate- and dicamba-susceptible kochia with 67%, 76%, and 80% success rates, respectively.

  6. Glyphosate residues in rural groundwater, Nottawasaga River Watershed, Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Van Stempvoort, Dale R; Spoelstra, John; Senger, Natalie D; Brown, Susan J; Post, Ryan; Struger, John

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of glyphosate residues (glyphosate and its metabolite AMPA) in shallow groundwater in a catchment dominated by agriculture, and to examine the potential for this groundwater to store and transmit these compounds to surface waters. Glyphosate residues were found in some of the groundwater samples collected in riparian (surface seeps), upland (mostly <20 m below ground) and wetland settings (<3 m below ground). Overall, glyphosate and AMPA were detected in 10.5 and 5.0%, respectively, of the groundwater samples analyzed as part of this study. All concentrations of glyphosate were well below Canadian guidelines for drinking water quality and for protection of aquatic life. Seasonal differences in concentrations in riparian seeps were possibly related to cycles of weather, herbicide application and degradation of glyphosate. Highest concentrations were at upland sites (663 ng L(-1) of glyphosate, 698 ng L(-1) of AMPA), apparently related to localized applications. Most glyphosate detections in wetlands were >0.5 km distant from possible areas of application, and, combined with other factors, suggest an atmospheric transport and deposition delivery mechanism. In both upland and wetland settings, highest glyphosate concentrations were sometimes not at the shallowest depths, indicating influence of hydrological factors. The glyphosate/AMPA detections in riparian seeps demonstrated that these compounds are persistent enough to allow groundwater to store and transmit glyphosate residues to surface waters. Detections in the wetlands support earlier evidence that atmospheric transport and deposition may lead to glyphosate contamination of environments not intended as targets of applications. This interpretation is further supported by detections of both glyphosate and AMPA in precipitation samples collected in the same watershed. © 2016 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada Pest Management Science © 2016

  7. Spot Spraying Reduces Herbicide Concentrations in Runoff.

    PubMed

    Melland, Alice R; Silburn, D Mark; McHugh, Allen D; Fillols, Emilie; Rojas-Ponce, Samuel; Baillie, Craig; Lewis, Stephen

    2016-05-25

    Rainfall simulator trials were conducted on sugar cane paddocks across dry-tropical and subtropical Queensland, Australia, to examine the potential for spot spraying to reduce herbicide losses in runoff. Recommended rates of the herbicides glyphosate, 2,4-D, fluoroxypyr, atrazine, and diuron were sprayed onto 0, 20, 40, 50, 70, or 100% of the area of runoff plots. Simulated rainfall was applied 2 days after spraying to induce runoff at one plant cane and three ratoon crop sites. Over 50% of all herbicides were transported in the dissolved phase of runoff, regardless of the herbicide's sediment-water partition coefficient. For most sites and herbicides, runoff herbicide concentrations decreased with decreasing spray coverage and with decreasing herbicide load in the soil and cane residues. Importantly, sites with higher infiltration prior to runoff and lower total runoff had lower runoff herbicide concentrations.

  8. Simulating changes in cropping practises in conventional and glyphosate-tolerant maize. I. Effects on weeds.

    PubMed

    Colbach, Nathalie; Fernier, Alice; Le Corre, Valérie; Messéan, Antoine; Darmency, Henri

    2017-04-01

    Herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops such as those tolerant to glyphosate simplify weed management and make it more efficient, at least at short-term. Overreliance on the same herbicide though leads to the spread of resistant weeds. Here, the objective was to evaluate, with simulations, the impact on the advent of glyphosate resistance in weeds of modifications in agricultural practises resulting from introducing HT maize into cropping systems. First, we included a single-gene herbicide resistance submodel in the existing multispecific FLORSYS model. Then, we (1) simulated current conventional and probable HT cropping systems in two European regions, Aquitaine and Catalonia, (2) compared these systems in terms of glyphosate resistance, (3) identified pertinent cultural practises influencing glyphosate resistance, and (4) investigated correlations between cultural practises and species traits, using RLQ analyses. The simulation study showed that, during the analysed 28 years, (1) glyphosate spraying only results in glyphosate resistance in weeds when combined with other cultural factors favouring weed infestation, particularly no till; (2) pre-sowing glyphosate applications select more for herbicide resistance than post-sowing applications on HT crops; and (3) glyphosate spraying selects more for species traits avoiding exposure to the herbicide (e.g. delayed early growth, small leaf area) or compensating for fitness costs (e.g. high harvest index) than for actual resistance to glyphosate, (4) actual resistance is most frequent in species that do not avoid glyphosate, either via plant size or timing, and/or in less competitive species, (5) in case of efficient weed control measures, actual resistance proliferates best in outcrossing species. An advice table was built, with the quantitative, synthetic ranking of the crop management effects in terms of glyphosate-resistance management, identifying the optimal choices for each management technique.

  9. Sub-lethal glyphosate exposure alters flowering phenology and causes transient male-sterility in Brassica spp

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Herbicide resistance in weedy plant populations can develop through different mechanisms such as gene flow of herbicide resistance transgenes from crop species into compatible weedy species or by natural evolution of herbicide resistance or tolerance following selection pressure. Results from our previous studies suggest that sub-lethal levels of the herbicide glyphosate can alter the pattern of gene flow between glyphosate resistant Canola®, Brassica napus, and glyphosate sensitive varieties of B. napus and B. rapa. The objectives of this study were to examine the phenological and developmental changes that occur in Brassica crop and weed species following sub-lethal doses of the herbicides glyphosate and glufosinate. We examined several vegetative and reproductive traits of potted plants under greenhouse conditions, treated with sub-lethal herbicide sprays. Results Our results indicate that exposure of Brassica spp. to a sub-lethal dose of glyphosate results in altering flowering phenology and reproductive function. Flowering of all sensitive species was significantly delayed and reproductive function, specifically male fertility, was suppressed. Higher dosage levels typically contributed to an increase in the magnitude of phenotypic changes. Conclusions These results demonstrate that Brassica spp. plants that are exposed to sub-lethal doses of glyphosate could be subject to very different pollination patterns and an altered pattern of gene flow that would result from changes in the overlap of flowering phenology between species. Implications include the potential for increased glyphosate resistance evolution and spread in weedy communities exposed to sub-lethal glyphosate. PMID:24655547

  10. Sub-lethal glyphosate exposure alters flowering phenology and causes transient male-sterility in Brassica spp.

    PubMed

    Londo, Jason Paul; McKinney, John; Schwartz, Matthew; Bollman, Mike; Sagers, Cynthia; Watrud, Lidia

    2014-03-21

    Herbicide resistance in weedy plant populations can develop through different mechanisms such as gene flow of herbicide resistance transgenes from crop species into compatible weedy species or by natural evolution of herbicide resistance or tolerance following selection pressure. Results from our previous studies suggest that sub-lethal levels of the herbicide glyphosate can alter the pattern of gene flow between glyphosate resistant Canola®, Brassica napus, and glyphosate sensitive varieties of B. napus and B. rapa. The objectives of this study were to examine the phenological and developmental changes that occur in Brassica crop and weed species following sub-lethal doses of the herbicides glyphosate and glufosinate. We examined several vegetative and reproductive traits of potted plants under greenhouse conditions, treated with sub-lethal herbicide sprays. Our results indicate that exposure of Brassica spp. to a sub-lethal dose of glyphosate results in altering flowering phenology and reproductive function. Flowering of all sensitive species was significantly delayed and reproductive function, specifically male fertility, was suppressed. Higher dosage levels typically contributed to an increase in the magnitude of phenotypic changes. These results demonstrate that Brassica spp. plants that are exposed to sub-lethal doses of glyphosate could be subject to very different pollination patterns and an altered pattern of gene flow that would result from changes in the overlap of flowering phenology between species. Implications include the potential for increased glyphosate resistance evolution and spread in weedy communities exposed to sub-lethal glyphosate.

  11. Impacts of Repeated Glyphosate Use on Wheat-Associated Bacteria Are Small and Depend on Glyphosate Use History

    PubMed Central

    Schlatter, Daniel C.; Yin, Chuntao; Hulbert, Scot; Burke, Ian

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide worldwide and a critical tool for weed control in no-till cropping systems. However, there are concerns about the nontarget impacts of long-term glyphosate use on soil microbial communities. We investigated the impacts of repeated glyphosate treatments on bacterial communities in the soil and rhizosphere of wheat in soils with and without long-term history of glyphosate use. We cycled wheat in the greenhouse using soils from 4 paired fields under no-till (20+-year history of glyphosate) or no history of use. At each cycle, we terminated plants with glyphosate (2× the field rate) or by removing the crowns, and soil and rhizosphere bacterial communities were characterized. Location, cropping history, year, and proximity to the roots had much stronger effects on bacterial communities than did glyphosate, which only explained 2 to 5% of the variation. Less than 1% of all taxa were impacted by glyphosate, more in soils with a long history of use, and more increased than decreased in relative abundance. Glyphosate had minimal impacts on soil and rhizosphere bacteria of wheat, although dying roots after glyphosate application may provide a “greenbridge” favoring some copiotrophic taxa. IMPORTANCE Glyphosate (Roundup) is the most widely used herbicide in the world and the foundation of Roundup Ready soybeans, corn, and the no-till cropping system. However, there have been recent concerns about nontarget impacts of glyphosate on soil microbes. Using next-generation sequencing methods and glyphosate treatments of wheat plants, we described the bacterial communities in the soil and rhizosphere of wheat grown in Pacific Northwest soils across multiple years, different locations, and soils with different histories of glyphosate use. The effects of glyphosate were subtle and much less than those of drivers such as location and cropping systems. Only a small percentage of the bacterial groups were influenced by glyphosate

  12. Impacts of Repeated Glyphosate Use on Wheat-Associated Bacteria Are Small and Depend on Glyphosate Use History.

    PubMed

    Schlatter, Daniel C; Yin, Chuntao; Hulbert, Scot; Burke, Ian; Paulitz, Timothy

    2017-11-15

    Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide worldwide and a critical tool for weed control in no-till cropping systems. However, there are concerns about the nontarget impacts of long-term glyphosate use on soil microbial communities. We investigated the impacts of repeated glyphosate treatments on bacterial communities in the soil and rhizosphere of wheat in soils with and without long-term history of glyphosate use. We cycled wheat in the greenhouse using soils from 4 paired fields under no-till (20+-year history of glyphosate) or no history of use. At each cycle, we terminated plants with glyphosate (2× the field rate) or by removing the crowns, and soil and rhizosphere bacterial communities were characterized. Location, cropping history, year, and proximity to the roots had much stronger effects on bacterial communities than did glyphosate, which only explained 2 to 5% of the variation. Less than 1% of all taxa were impacted by glyphosate, more in soils with a long history of use, and more increased than decreased in relative abundance. Glyphosate had minimal impacts on soil and rhizosphere bacteria of wheat, although dying roots after glyphosate application may provide a "greenbridge" favoring some copiotrophic taxa. IMPORTANCE Glyphosate (Roundup) is the most widely used herbicide in the world and the foundation of Roundup Ready soybeans, corn, and the no-till cropping system. However, there have been recent concerns about nontarget impacts of glyphosate on soil microbes. Using next-generation sequencing methods and glyphosate treatments of wheat plants, we described the bacterial communities in the soil and rhizosphere of wheat grown in Pacific Northwest soils across multiple years, different locations, and soils with different histories of glyphosate use. The effects of glyphosate were subtle and much less than those of drivers such as location and cropping systems. Only a small percentage of the bacterial groups were influenced by glyphosate, and most of

  13. Inheritance of evolved resistance to a novel herbicide (pyroxasulfone).

    PubMed

    Busi, Roberto; Gaines, Todd A; Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Powles, Stephen B

    2014-03-01

    Agricultural weeds have rapidly adapted to intensive herbicide selection and resistance to herbicides has evolved within ecological timescales. Yet, the genetic basis of broad-spectrum generalist herbicide resistance is largely unknown. This study aims to determine the genetic control of non-target-site herbicide resistance trait(s) that rapidly evolved under recurrent selection of the novel lipid biosynthesis inhibitor pyroxasulfone in Lolium rigidum. The phenotypic segregation of pyroxasulfone resistance in parental, F1 and back-cross (BC) families was assessed in plants exposed to a gradient of pyroxasulfone doses. The inheritance of resistance to chemically dissimilar herbicides (cross-resistance) was also evaluated. Evolved resistance to the novel selective agent (pyroxasulfone) is explained by Mendelian segregation of one semi-dominant allele incrementally herbicide-selected at higher frequency in the progeny. In BC families, cross-resistance is conferred by an incompletely dominant single major locus. This study confirms that herbicide resistance can rapidly evolve to any novel selective herbicide agents by continuous and repeated herbicide use. The results imply that the combination of herbicide options (rotation, mixtures or combinations) to exploit incomplete dominance can provide acceptable control of broad-spectrum generalist resistance-endowing monogenic traits. Herbicide diversity within a set of integrated management tactics can be one important component to reduce the herbicide selection intensity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sarmentine, a natural herbicide from Piper species with multiple herbicide mechanisms of action

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sarmentine, 1-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-(2E,4E)-2,4-decadien-1-one, is a natural amide isolated from the fruits of Piper species. The compound has a number of interesting biological properties, including its broad-spectrum activity on weeds as a contact herbicide. Initial studies highlighted a similarity in ...

  15. Facts and Fallacies in the Debate on Glyphosate Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, Robin; Antoniou, Michael N

    2017-01-01

    The safety profile of the herbicide glyphosate and its commercial formulations is controversial. Reviews have been published by individuals who are consultants and employees of companies commercializing glyphosate-based herbicides in support of glyphosate's reapproval by regulatory agencies. These authors conclude that glyphosate is safe at levels below regulatory permissible limits. In contrast, reviews conducted by academic scientists independent of industry report toxic effects below regulatory limits, as well as shortcomings of the current regulatory evaluation of risks associated with glyphosate exposures. Two authors in particular (Samsel and Seneff) have published a series of commentaries proposing that long-term exposure to glyphosate is responsible for many chronic diseases (including cancers, diabetes, neuropathies, obesity, asthma, infections, osteoporosis, infertility, and birth defects). The aim of this review is to examine the evidential basis for these claimed negative health effects and the mechanisms that are alleged to be at their basis. We found that these authors inappropriately employ a deductive reasoning approach based on syllogism. We found that their conclusions are not supported by the available scientific evidence. Thus, the mechanisms and vast range of conditions proposed to result from glyphosate toxicity presented by Samsel and Seneff in their commentaries are at best unsubstantiated theories, speculations, or simply incorrect. This misrepresentation of glyphosate's toxicity misleads the public, the scientific community, and regulators. Although evidence exists that glyphosate-based herbicides are toxic below regulatory set safety limits, the arguments of Samsel and Seneff largely serve to distract rather than to give a rational direction to much needed future research investigating the toxicity of these pesticides, especially at levels of ingestion that are typical for human populations.

  16. UV-Vis Spectrophotometric Analysis and Quantification of Glyphosate for an Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felton, Daniel E.; Ederer, Martina; Steffens, Timothy; Hartzell, Patricia L.; Waynant, Kristopher V.

    2018-01-01

    Glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) is the most widely used herbicide on earth. A simple assay to quantify glyphosate concentrations in environmental samples was developed as part of an interdisciplinary effort linking introductory laboratory courses in chemistry, biology, and microbiology. In this 3 h laboratory experiment, students used…

  17. Glyphosate toxicity and the effects of long-term vegetation control on soil microbial communities

    Treesearch

    Matt D. Busse; Alice W. Ratcliff; Carol J. Stestak; Robert F. Powers

    2001-01-01

    We assessed the direct and indirect effect of the herbicide glyphosate on soil microbial communities from soil bioassays at glyphosate concentrations up to 100-fold greater than expected following a single field application. Indirect effects on microbial biomass, respiration, and metabolic diversity (Biolog and catabolic response profile) were compared seasonally after...

  18. Plant growth responses of apple and pear trees to doses of glyphosate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glyphosate is commonly used for intra-row weed management in perennial plantations, where unintended crop exposure to this herbicide can cause growth reduction. The objective of this research was to analyze the initial plant growth behavior of young apple and pear plants exposed to glyphosate. Glyph...

  19. Broadcast Applications of Glyphosate Control Nutsedge at a South Georgia Forest Tree Nursery

    Treesearch

    Stephen W. Fraedrich; L. David Dwinell; Michelle M. Cram

    2003-01-01

    Nutsedge is a major weed problem in some southern forest tree nurseries. Although herbicides can control most weeds in nurseries, control of nutsedge is usually dependent on fumigation. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of broadcast applications of glyphosate for control of nutsedge. Single and multiple applications of glyphosate at 2.2 kg ai/...

  20. Effects of field-realistic doses of glyphosate on honeybee appetitive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Lucila T; Vázquez, Diego E; Arenas, Andrés; Farina, Walter M

    2014-10-01

    Glyphosate (GLY) is a broad-spectrum herbicide used for weed control. The sub-lethal impact of GLY on non-target organisms such as insect pollinators has not yet been evaluated. Apis mellifera is the main pollinator in agricultural environments and is a well-known model for behavioural research. Honeybees are also accurate biosensors of environmental pollutants and their appetitive behavioural response is a suitable tool with which to test sub-lethal effects of agrochemicals. We studied the effects of field-realistic doses of GLY on honeybees exposed chronically or acutely to the herbicide. We focused on sucrose sensitivity, elemental and non-elemental associative olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER), and foraging-related behaviour. We found a reduced sensitivity to sucrose and learning performance for the groups chronically exposed to GLY concentrations within the range of recommended doses. When olfactory PER conditioning was performed with sucrose reward with the same GLY concentrations (acute exposure), elemental learning and short-term memory retention decreased significantly compared with controls. Non-elemental associative learning was also impaired by an acute exposure to GLY traces. Altogether, these results imply that GLY at concentrations found in agro-ecosystems as a result of standard spraying can reduce sensitivity to nectar reward and impair associative learning in honeybees. However, no effect on foraging-related behaviour was found. Therefore, we speculate that successful forager bees could become a source of constant inflow of nectar with GLY traces that could then be distributed among nestmates, stored in the hive and have long-term negative consequences on colony performance. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Protein kinase GCN2 mediates responses to glyphosate in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Faus, Isabel; Zabalza, Ana; Santiago, Julia; Nebauer, Sergio G; Royuela, Mercedes; Serrano, Ramon; Gadea, Jose

    2015-01-21

    The increased selection pressure of the herbicide glyphosate has played a role in the evolution of glyphosate-resistance in weedy species, an issue that is becoming a threat to global agriculture. The molecular components involved in the cellular toxicity response to this herbicide at the expression level are still unidentified. In this study, we identify the protein kinase GCN2 as a cellular component that fosters the action of glyphosate in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Comparative studies using wild-type and gcn2 knock-out mutant seedlings show that the molecular programme that the plant deploys after the treatment with the herbicide, is compromised in gcn2. Moreover, gcn2 adult plants show a lower inhibition of photosynthesis, and both seedlings and adult gcn2 plants accumulate less shikimic acid than wild-type after treatment with glyphosate. These results points to an unknown GCN2-dependent factor involved in the cascade of events triggered by glyphosate in plants. Data suggest either that the herbicide does not equally reach the target-enzyme in a gcn2 background, or that a decreased flux in the shikimate pathway in a gcn2 plants minimize the impact of enzyme inhibition.

  2. Effect of glyphosate on reproductive organs in male rat.

    PubMed

    Dai, Pengyuan; Hu, Ping; Tang, Juan; Li, Yansen; Li, Chunmei

    2016-06-01

    Glyphosate as an active ingredient of Roundup(®) which is thought to be one of the most popular herbicide was used worldwide. Many studies have focused on reproductive toxicity on glyphosate-based herbicide, but few evidence exists to imply the male reproductive toxicity of glyphosate alone in vivo. In this study SD rats were Lavaged with glyphosate at doses of 5, 50, 500mg/kg to detect the toxicity of glyphosate on rat testis. Glyphosate significantly decreased the average daily feed intake at dose of 50mg/kg, and the weight of seminal vesicle gland, coagulating gland as well as the total sperm count at dose of 500mg/kg. Immunohistochemistry of androgen receptor (AR) has no difference among all groups. As to testosterone, estradiol, progesterone and oxidative stress parameters, the level of them has no differences amidst all doses. Taken together, we conclude that glyphosate alone has low toxicity on male rats reproductive system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Besifloxacin, a novel fluoroquinolone, has broad-spectrum in vitro activity against aerobic and anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Haas, Wolfgang; Pillar, Chris M; Zurenko, Gary E; Lee, Jacqueline C; Brunner, Lynne S; Morris, Timothy W

    2009-08-01

    The antibacterial spectrum of besifloxacin, a novel fluoroquinolone recently approved for treatment of ocular infections, was studied using 2,690 clinical isolates representing 40 species. Overall, besifloxacin was the most potent agent tested against gram-positive pathogens and anaerobes and was generally equivalent to comparator fluoroquinolones in activity against most gram-negative pathogens. Besifloxacin demonstrated potent, broad-spectrum activity, which was particularly notable against gram-positive and gram-negative isolates that were resistant to other fluoroquinolones and classes of antibacterial agents.

  4. Managing the evolution of herbicide resistance.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jeffrey A; Tranel, Patrick J; Hager, Aaron G; Schutte, Brian; Wu, Chenxi; Chatham, Laura A; Davis, Adam S

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and managing the evolutionary responses of pests and pathogens to control efforts is essential to human health and survival. Herbicide-resistant (HR) weeds undermine agricultural sustainability, productivity and profitability, yet the epidemiology of resistance evolution - particularly at landscape scales - is poorly understood. We studied glyphosate resistance in a major agricultural weed, Amaranthus tuberculatus (common waterhemp), using landscape, weed and management data from 105 central Illinois grain farms, including over 500 site-years of herbicide application records. Glyphosate-resistant (GR) A. tuberculatus occurrence was greatest in fields with frequent glyphosate applications, high annual rates of herbicide mechanism of action (MOA) turnover and few MOAs field(-1) year(-1) . Combining herbicide MOAs at the time of application by herbicide mixing reduced the likelihood of GR A. tuberculatus. These findings illustrate the importance of examining large-scale evolutionary processes at relevant spatial scales. Although measures such as herbicide mixing may delay GR or other HR weed traits, they are unlikely to prevent them. Long-term weed management will require truly diversified management practices that minimize selection for herbicide resistance traits. © 2015 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. YODA MAP3K kinase regulates plant immune responses conferring broad-spectrum disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Sopeña-Torres, Sara; Jordá, Lucía; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Miedes, Eva; Escudero, Viviana; Swami, Sanjay; López, Gemma; Piślewska-Bednarek, Mariola; Lassowskat, Ines; Lee, Justin; Gu, Yangnan; Haigis, Sabine; Alexander, Danny; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Muñoz-Barrios, Antonio; Bednarek, Pawel; Somerville, Shauna; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Hahn, Michael G; Scheel, Dierk; Molina, Antonio

    2018-04-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) cascades play essential roles in plants by transducing developmental cues and environmental signals into cellular responses. Among the latter are microbe-associated molecular patterns perceived by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which trigger immunity. We found that YODA (YDA) - a MAPK kinase kinase regulating several Arabidopsis developmental processes, like stomatal patterning - also modulates immune responses. Resistance to pathogens is compromised in yda alleles, whereas plants expressing the constitutively active YDA (CA-YDA) protein show broad-spectrum resistance to fungi, bacteria, and oomycetes with different colonization modes. YDA functions in the same pathway as ERECTA (ER) Receptor-Like Kinase, regulating both immunity and stomatal patterning. ER-YDA-mediated immune responses act in parallel to canonical disease resistance pathways regulated by phytohormones and PRRs. CA-YDA plants exhibit altered cell-wall integrity and constitutively express defense-associated genes, including some encoding putative small secreted peptides and PRRs whose impairment resulted in enhanced susceptibility phenotypes. CA-YDA plants show strong reprogramming of their phosphoproteome, which contains protein targets distinct from described MAPKs substrates. Our results suggest that, in addition to stomata development, the ER-YDA pathway regulates an immune surveillance system conferring broad-spectrum disease resistance that is distinct from the canonical pathways mediated by described PRRs and defense hormones. © 2018 Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers with potent and broad spectrum antimicrobial activity from the marine sponge Dysidea.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shi; Canning, Corene B; Bhargava, Kanika; Sun, Xiuxiu; Zhu, Wenjun; Zhou, Ninghui; Zhang, Yifan; Zhou, Kequan

    2015-01-01

    Three polybrominated diphenyl ethers, 2-(2',4'-dibromophenoxy)-3,5-dibromophenol (1) and 2-(2',4'-dibromophenoxy)-3,4,5-tribromophenol (2) were isolated from the marine sponge Dysidea granulosa; and 2-(2',4'-dibromophenoxy)-4,6-dibromophenol (3) from Dysidea spp. They exhibited potent and broad spectrum in vitro antibacterial activity, especially against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was evaluated against 12 clinical and standard strains of Gram positive and negative bacteria. The observed MIC range was 0.1-4.0mg/L against all the Gram positive bacteria and 0.1-16.0mg/L against Gram negative bacteria. 2-(2',4″-Dibromophenoxy)-3,5-dibromophenol showed stronger broad spectrum antibacterial activity than other two compounds. 2-(2',4″-Dibromophenoxy)-3,5-dibromophenol and 2-(2',4'-dibromophenoxy)-4,6-dibromophenol are thermo-stable. The results suggest that 2-(2',4'-dibromophenoxy)-3,5-dibromophenol could be used as a potential lead molecule for anti-MRSA, anti-E. coli O157:H7, and anti-Salmonella for drug development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Brevibacillus laterosporus, a Pathogen of Invertebrates and a Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Species

    PubMed Central

    Ruiu, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Brevibacillus laterosporus, a bacterium characterized by the production of a unique canoe-shaped lamellar body attached to one side of the spore, is a natural inhabitant of water, soil and insects. Its biopesticidal potential has been reported against insects in different orders including Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Diptera and against nematodes and mollusks. In addition to its pathogenicity against invertebrates, different B. laterosporus strains show a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity including activity against phytopathogenic bacteria and fungi. A wide variety of molecules, including proteins and antibiotics, have been associated with the observed pathogenicity and mode of action. Before being considered as a biological control agent against plant pathogens, the antifungal and antibacterial properties of certain B. laterosporus strains have found medical interest, associated with the production of antibiotics with therapeutic effects. The recent whole genome sequencing of this species revealed its potential to produce polyketides, nonribosomal peptides, and toxins. Another field of growing interest is the use of this bacterium for bioremediation of contaminated sites by exploiting its biodegradation properties. The aim of the present review is to gather and discuss all recent findings on this emerging entomopathogen, giving a wider picture of its complex and broad-spectrum biocontrol activity. PMID:26462431

  8. Biological activity of sedaxane---a novel broad-spectrum fungicide for seed treatment.

    PubMed

    Zeun, Ronald; Scalliet, Gabriel; Oostendorp, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Sedaxane is a new broad-spectrum seed treatment fungicide developed by Syngenta Crop Protection for control of seed- and soil-borne diseases in a broad range of crops. Its physicochemical properties and activity spectrum have been optimised for use as a seed treatment providing both local and systemic protection of the seed and roots of target crops. Sedaxane inhibits respiration by binding to the succinate dehydrogenase complex in the fungal mitochondrium. Its activity spectrum covers seed-borne fungi such as Ustilago nuda, Tilletia caries, Monographella nivalis and Pyrenophora graminea, as well as the soil-borne fungi Rhizoctonia solani, R. cerealis and Typhula incarnata. Under greenhouse conditions, sedaxane showed high levels and consistent protection against U. nuda, P. graminea and Rhizoctonia spp. Under field conditions, efficacy against Rhizoctonia spp. resulted in increased yield compared with the untreated check. Efficacy against snow mould has been shown under very high disease pressure conditions. The combination of sedaxane plus fludioxonil against snow mould can provide resistance management for sustainable use. The broad spectrum and high level of activity in combination with excellent crop tolerance allow the use of sedaxane as a seed treatment in a wide variety of crops. It is a potential tool for precautionary resistance management when combined with other fungicides, especially against pathogens showing a potential for resistance development, such as M. nivalis. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Nanomedicine for Infectious Disease Applications: Innovation towards Broad-Spectrum Treatment of Viral Infections.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Joshua A; Lee, Jaywon; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-03-02

    Nanomedicine enables unique diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities to tackle problems in clinical medicine. As multifunctional agents with programmable properties, nanomedicines are poised to revolutionize treatment strategies. This promise is especially evident for infectious disease applications, for which the continual emergence, re-emergence, and evolution of pathogens has proven difficult to counter by conventional approaches. Herein, a conceptual framework is presented that envisions possible routes for the development of nanomedicines as superior broad-spectrum antiviral agents against enveloped viruses. With lipid membranes playing a critical role in the life cycle of medically important enveloped viruses including HIV, influenza, and Ebola, cellular and viral membrane interfaces are ideal elements to incorporate into broad-spectrum antiviral strategies. Examples are presented that demonstrate how nanomedicine strategies inspired by lipid membranes enable a wide range of targeting opportunities to gain control of critical stages in the virus life cycle through either direct or indirect approaches involving membrane interfaces. The capabilities can be realized by enabling new inhibitory functions or improving the function of existing drugs through nanotechnology-enabled solutions. With these exciting opportunities, due attention is also given to the clinical translation of nanomedicines for infectious disease applications, especially as pharmaceutical drug-discovery pipelines demand new routes of innovation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Shape and size engineered cellulosic nanomaterials as broad spectrum anti-microbial compounds.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Priyanka R; Kamble, Sunil; Sarkar, Dhiman; Anand, Amitesh; Varma, Anjani J

    2016-06-01

    Oxidized celluloses have been used for decades as antimicrobial wound gauzes and surgical cotton. We now report the successful synthesis of a next generation narrow size range (25-35nm) spherical shaped nanoparticles of 2,3,6-tricarboxycellulose based on cellulose I structural features, for applications as new antimicrobial materials. This study adds to our previous study of 6-carboxycellulose. A wide range of bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Staphloccocus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (non-pathogenic as well as pathogenic strains) were affected by these polymers in in vitro studies. Activity against Mycobacteria were noted at high concentrations (MIC99 values 250-1000μg/ml, as compared to anti-TB drug Isoniazid 0.3μg/ml). However, the broad spectrum activity of oxidized celluloses and their nanoparticles against a wide range of bacteria, including Mycobacteria, show that these materials are promising new biocompatible and biodegradable drug delivery vehicles wherein they can play the dual role of being a drug encapsulant as well as a broad spectrum anti-microbial and anti-TB drug. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Identification and Structural Characterization of Naturally-Occurring Broad-Spectrum Cyclic Antibiotics Isolated from Paenibacillus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knolhoff, Ann M.; Zheng, Jie; McFarland, Melinda A.; Luo, Yan; Callahan, John H.; Brown, Eric W.; Croley, Timothy R.

    2015-08-01

    The rise of antimicrobial resistance necessitates the discovery and/or production of novel antibiotics. Isolated strains of Paenibacillus alvei were previously shown to exhibit antimicrobial activity against a number of pathogens, such as E. coli, Salmonella, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The responsible antimicrobial compounds were isolated from these Paenibacillus strains and a combination of low and high resolution mass spectrometry with multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry was used for identification. A group of closely related cyclic lipopeptides was identified, differing primarily by fatty acid chain length and one of two possible amino acid substitutions. Variation in the fatty acid length resulted in mass differences of 14 Da and yielded groups of related MSn spectra. Despite the inherent complexity of MS/MS spectra of cyclic compounds, straightforward analysis of these spectra was accomplished by determining differences in complementary product ion series between compounds that differ in molecular weight by 14 Da. The primary peptide sequence assignment was confirmed through genome mining; the combination of these analytical tools represents a workflow that can be used for the identification of complex antibiotics. The compounds also share amino acid sequence similarity to a previously identified broad-spectrum antibiotic isolated from Paenibacillus. The presence of such a wide distribution of related compounds produced by the same organism represents a novel class of broad-spectrum antibiotic compounds.

  12. Identification of a broad-spectrum inhibitor of virus RNA synthesis: validation of a prototype virus-based approach

    PubMed Central

    Filone, Claire Marie; Hodges, Erin N.; Honeyman, Brian; Bushkin, G. Guy; Boyd, Karla; Platt, Andrew; Ni, Feng; Strom, Kyle; Hensley, Lisa; Snyder, John K.; Connor, John H.

    2013-01-01

    There are no approved therapeutics for the most deadly nonsegmented negative-strand (NNS) RNA viruses, including Ebola (EBOV). To identify new chemical scaffolds for development of broad-spectrum antivirals, we undertook a prototype-based lead identification screen. Using the prototype NNS virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), multiple inhibitory compounds were identified. Three compounds were investigated for broad-spectrum activity, and inhibited EBOV infection. The most potent, CMLDBU3402, was selected for further study. CMLDBU3402 did not show significant activity against segmented negative-strand RNA viruses suggesting proscribed broad-spectrum activity. Mechanistic analysis indicated that CMLDBU3402 blocked VSV viral RNA synthesis and inhibited EBOV RNA transcription, demonstrating a consistent mechanism of action against genetically distinct viruses. The identification of this chemical backbone as a broad-spectrum inhibitor of viral RNA synthesis offers significant potential for the development of new therapies for highly pathogenic viruses. PMID:23521799

  13. Broad-spectrum β-lactamases among Enterobacteriaceae of animal origin: molecular aspects, mobility and impact on public health.

    PubMed

    Smet, Annemieke; Martel, An; Persoons, Davy; Dewulf, Jeroen; Heyndrickx, Marc; Herman, Lieve; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Butaye, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    Broad-spectrum β-lactamase genes (coding for extended-spectrum β-lactamases and AmpC β-lactamases) have been frequently demonstrated in the microbiota of food-producing animals. This may pose a human health hazard as these genes may be present in zoonotic bacteria, which would cause a direct problem. They can also be present in commensals, which may act as a reservoir of resistance genes for pathogens causing disease both in humans and in animals. Broad-spectrum β-lactamase genes are frequently located on mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids, transposons and integrons, which often also carry additional resistance genes. This could limit treatment options for infections caused by broad-spectrum β-lactam-resistant microorganisms. This review addresses the growing burden of broad-spectrum β-lactam resistance among Enterobacteriaceae isolated from food, companion and wild animals worldwide. To explore the human health hazard, the diversity of broad-spectrum β-lactamases among Enterobacteriaceae derived from animals is compared with respect to their presence in human bacteria. Furthermore, the possibilities of the exchange of genes encoding broad-spectrum β-lactamases - including the exchange of the transposons and plasmids that serve as vehicles for these genes - between different ecosystems (human and animal) are discussed. © 2009 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Factors Influencing Observed Tillage Impacts on Herbicide Transport

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The widespread use and potential human health effects of the herbicides atrazine and glyphosate have generated interest in establishing how no-tillage impacts loading of these herbicides to runoff water in comparison to other tillage practices. In this study, potentially confounding factors such as ...

  15. Impact of irrigation rate on pre-emergence herbicide activity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The importance of preemergence herbicide applications in cotton has increased since the development of glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri). Cotton producers are relying on residual herbicides for control of Palmer amaranth, as postemergence options are limited or ineffective. S...

  16. Herbicide-resistant crop biotechnology: potential and pitfalls

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Herbicide-resistant crops are an important agricultural biotechnology that can enable farmers to effectively control weeds without harming their crops. Glyphosate-resistant (i.e. Roundup Ready) crops have been the most commercially successful varieties of herbicide-resistant crops and have been plan...

  17. Broad spectrum antiviral agent ribavirin inhibits capping of mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, B.B.; Borek, E.; Sharma, O.K.

    1979-08-13

    Ribavirin (1-..beta..-D-ribofuranosyl-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxamide) is a broad spectrum antiviral substance active against a wide range of both DNA and RNA viruses. It is, however, virtually inactive against polio virus. Its pharmacological mechanism of action was obscure. A possible common target for a chemotherapeutic agent in both DNA and RNA viruses is the capping reaction of mRNAs which inter alia involves the formation of a guanine pyrophosphate structure at the 5' terminus by mRNA guanylyl transferase. We have observed that Ribavirin triphosphate is a potent competitive inhibitor of the capping guanylation of viral mRNA. This finding could account for the antiviral potency ofmore » the drug against both DNA and RNA viruses and its ineffectiveness against a virus in which the mRNAs derived from them are not capped.« less

  18. Biosynthesis of a broad-spectrum nicotianamine-like metallophore in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ghssein, Ghassan; Brutesco, Catherine; Ouerdane, Laurent; Fojcik, Clémentine; Izaute, Amélie; Wang, Shuanglong; Hajjar, Christine; Lobinski, Ryszard; Lemaire, David; Richaud, Pierre; Voulhoux, Romé; Espaillat, Akbar; Cava, Felipe; Pignol, David; Borezée-Durant, Elise; Arnoux, Pascal

    2016-05-27

    Metal acquisition is a vital microbial process in metal-scarce environments, such as inside a host. Using metabolomic exploration, targeted mutagenesis, and biochemical analysis, we discovered an operon in Staphylococcus aureus that encodes the different functions required for the biosynthesis and trafficking of a broad-spectrum metallophore related to plant nicotianamine (here called staphylopine). The biosynthesis of staphylopine reveals the association of three enzyme activities: a histidine racemase, an enzyme distantly related to nicotianamine synthase, and a staphylopine dehydrogenase belonging to the DUF2338 family. Staphylopine is involved in nickel, cobalt, zinc, copper, and iron acquisition, depending on the growth conditions. This biosynthetic pathway is conserved across other pathogens, thus underscoring the importance of this metal acquisition strategy in infection. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Amantelides A and B, Polyhydroxylated Macrolides with Differential Broad Spectrum Cytotoxicity from a Guamanian Marine Cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Salvador-Reyes, Lilibeth A.; Sneed, Jennifer; Paul, Valerie J.; Luesch, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxicity-guided fractionation of a Guamanian cyanobacterial collection yielded the new compounds amantelides A (1) and B (2). These polyketides are characterized by a 40-membered macrolactone ring consisting of a 1,3-diol and contiguous 1,5-diol units and a tert-butyl substituent. Amantelide A (1) displayed potent cytotoxicity with sub-micromolar IC50 against HT29 colorectal adenocarcinoma and HeLa cervical carcinoma cell lines. Acetylation of the hydroxy group at C-33 in 2 caused a close to 10-fold decrease in potency. Exhaustive acetylation of the hydroxy groups abrogated the antiproliferative activity of amantelide A (1) by 20–67-fold. Further bioactivity assessment of 1 against bacterial pathogens and marine fungi indicated a broad spectrum of bioactivity. PMID:26204500

  20. Treating inflammation by blocking interleukin-1 in a broad spectrum of diseases.

    PubMed

    Dinarello, Charles A; Simon, Anna; van der Meer, Jos W M

    2012-08-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is a highly active pro-inflammatory cytokine that lowers pain thresholds and damages tissues. Monotherapy blocking IL-1 activity in autoinflammatory syndromes results in a rapid and sustained reduction in disease severity, including reversal of inflammation-mediated loss of sight, hearing and organ function. This approach can therefore be effective in treating common conditions such as post-infarction heart failure, and trials targeting a broad spectrum of new indications are underway. So far, three IL-1-targeted agents have been approved: the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra, the soluble decoy receptor rilonacept and the neutralizing monoclonal anti-IL-1β antibody canakinumab. In addition, a monoclonal antibody directed against the IL-1 receptor and a neutralizing anti-IL-1α antibody are in clinical trials.

  1. The value and validation of broad spectrum biosensors for diagnosis and biodefense

    PubMed Central

    Metzgar, David; Sampath, Rangarajan; Rounds, Megan A; Ecker, David J

    2013-01-01

    Broad spectrum biosensors capable of identifying diverse organisms are transitioning from the realm of research into the clinic. These technologies simultaneously capture signals from a wide variety of biological entities using universal processes. Specific organisms are then identified through bioinformatic signature-matching processes. This is in contrast to currently accepted molecular diagnostic technologies, which utilize unique reagents and processes to detect each organism of interest. This paradigm shift greatly increases the breadth of molecular diagnostic tools with little increase in biochemical complexity, enabling simultaneous diagnostic, epidemiologic, and biothreat surveillance capabilities at the point of care. This, in turn, offers the promise of increased biosecurity and better antimicrobial stewardship. Efficient realization of these potential gains will require novel regulatory paradigms reflective of the generalized, information-based nature of these assays, allowing extension of empirical data obtained from readily available organisms to support broader reporting of rare, difficult to culture, or extremely hazardous organisms. PMID:24128433

  2. Broad-Spectrum Molecular Detection of Fungal Nucleic Acids by PCR-Based Amplification Techniques.

    PubMed

    Czurda, Stefan; Lion, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, the incidence of life-threatening invasive fungal infections has dramatically increased. Infections caused by hitherto rare and emerging fungal pathogens are associated with significant morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. These observations render the coverage of a broad range of clinically relevant fungal pathogens highly important. The so-called panfungal or, perhaps more correctly, broad-range nucleic acid amplification techniques do not only facilitate sensitive detection of all clinically relevant fungal species but are also rapid and can be applied to analyses of any patient specimens. They have therefore become valuable diagnostic tools for sensitive screening of patients at risk of invasive fungal infections. This chapter summarizes the currently available molecular technologies employed in testing of a wide range of fungal pathogens, and provides a detailed workflow for patient screening by broad-spectrum nucleic acid amplification techniques.

  3. Broad-spectrum neodymium-doped laser glasses for high-energy chirped-pulse amplification.

    PubMed

    Hays, Greg R; Gaul, Erhard W; Martinez, Mikael D; Ditmire, Todd

    2007-07-20

    We have investigated two novel laser glasses in an effort to generate high-energy, broad-spectrum pulses from a chirped-pulse amplification Nd:glass laser. Both glasses have significantly broader spectra (>38 nm FWHM) than currently available Nd:phosphate and Nd:silicate glasses. We present calculations for small signal pulse amplification to simulate spectral gain narrowing. The technique of spectral shaping using mixed-glass architecture with an optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification front end is evaluated. Our modeling shows that amplified pulses with energies exceeding 10 kJ with sufficient bandwidth to achieve 120 fs pulsewidths are achievable with the use of the new laser glasses. With further development of current technologies, a laser system could be scaled to generate one exawatt in peak power.

  4. Factors influencing success of clinical genome sequencing across a broad spectrum of disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lise, Stefano; Broxholme, John; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Rimmer, Andy; Kanapin, Alexander; Lunter, Gerton; Fiddy, Simon; Allan, Chris; Aricescu, A. Radu; Attar, Moustafa; Babbs, Christian; Becq, Jennifer; Beeson, David; Bento, Celeste; Bignell, Patricia; Blair, Edward; Buckle, Veronica J; Bull, Katherine; Cais, Ondrej; Cario, Holger; Chapel, Helen; Copley, Richard R; Cornall, Richard; Craft, Jude; Dahan, Karin; Davenport, Emma E; Dendrou, Calliope; Devuyst, Olivier; Fenwick, Aimée L; Flint, Jonathan; Fugger, Lars; Gilbert, Rodney D; Goriely, Anne; Green, Angie; Greger, Ingo H.; Grocock, Russell; Gruszczyk, Anja V; Hastings, Robert; Hatton, Edouard; Higgs, Doug; Hill, Adrian; Holmes, Chris; Howard, Malcolm; Hughes, Linda; Humburg, Peter; Johnson, David; Karpe, Fredrik; Kingsbury, Zoya; Kini, Usha; Knight, Julian C; Krohn, Jonathan; Lamble, Sarah; Langman, Craig; Lonie, Lorne; Luck, Joshua; McCarthy, Davis; McGowan, Simon J; McMullin, Mary Frances; Miller, Kerry A; Murray, Lisa; Németh, Andrea H; Nesbit, M Andrew; Nutt, David; Ormondroyd, Elizabeth; Oturai, Annette Bang; Pagnamenta, Alistair; Patel, Smita Y; Percy, Melanie; Petousi, Nayia; Piazza, Paolo; Piret, Sian E; Polanco-Echeverry, Guadalupe; Popitsch, Niko; Powrie, Fiona; Pugh, Chris; Quek, Lynn; Robbins, Peter A; Robson, Kathryn; Russo, Alexandra; Sahgal, Natasha; van Schouwenburg, Pauline A; Schuh, Anna; Silverman, Earl; Simmons, Alison; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Taylor, John; Thakker, Rajesh V; Tomlinson, Ian; Trebes, Amy; Twigg, Stephen RF; Uhlig, Holm H; Vyas, Paresh; Vyse, Tim; Wall, Steven A; Watkins, Hugh; Whyte, Michael P; Witty, Lorna; Wright, Ben; Yau, Chris; Buck, David; Humphray, Sean; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Bell, John I; Wilkie, Andrew OM; Bentley, David; Donnelly, Peter; McVean, Gilean

    2015-01-01

    To assess factors influencing the success of whole genome sequencing for mainstream clinical diagnosis, we sequenced 217 individuals from 156 independent cases across a broad spectrum of disorders in whom prior screening had identified no pathogenic variants. We quantified the number of candidate variants identified using different strategies for variant calling, filtering, annotation and prioritisation. We found that jointly calling variants across samples, filtering against both local and external databases, deploying multiple annotation tools and using familial transmission above biological plausibility contributed to accuracy. Overall, we identified disease causing variants in 21% of cases, rising to 34% (23/68) for Mendelian disorders and 57% (8/14) in trios. We also discovered 32 potentially clinically actionable variants in 18 genes unrelated to the referral disorder, though only four were ultimately considered reportable. Our results demonstrate the value of genome sequencing for routine clinical diagnosis, but also highlight many outstanding challenges. PMID:25985138

  5. Development of a broad-spectrum antiviral with activity against Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Aman, M Javad; Kinch, Michael S; Warfield, Kelly; Warren, Travis; Yunus, Abdul; Enterlein, Sven; Stavale, Eric; Wang, Peifang; Chang, Shaojing; Tang, Qingsong; Porter, Kevin; Goldblatt, Michael; Bavari, Sina

    2009-09-01

    We report herein the identification of a small molecule therapeutic, FGI-106, which displays potent and broad-spectrum inhibition of lethal viral hemorrhagic fevers pathogens, including Ebola, Rift Valley and Dengue Fever viruses, in cell-based assays. Using mouse models of Ebola virus, we further demonstrate that FGI-106 can protect animals from an otherwise lethal infection when used either in a prophylactic or therapeutic setting. A single treatment, administered 1 day after infection, is sufficient to protect animals from lethal Ebola virus challenge. Cell-based assays also identified inhibitory activity against divergent virus families, which supports a hypothesis that FGI-106 interferes with a common pathway utilized by different viruses. These findings suggest FGI-106 may provide an opportunity for targeting viral diseases.

  6. Novel Bacterial Topoisomerase Inhibitors with Potent Broad-Spectrum Activity against Drug-Resistant Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Cédric; Salisbury, Anne-Marie; Savage, Victoria J; Duffy, Thomas; Moyo, Emmanuel; Chaffer-Malam, Nathan; Ooi, Nicola; Newman, Rebecca; Cheung, Jonathan; Metzger, Richard; McGarry, David; Pichowicz, Mark; Sigerson, Ralph; Cooper, Ian R; Nelson, Gary; Butler, Hayley S; Craighead, Mark; Ratcliffe, Andrew J; Best, Stuart A; Stokes, Neil R

    2017-05-01

    The novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitor class is an investigational type of antibacterial inhibitor of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV that does not have cross-resistance with the quinolones. Here, we report the evaluation of the in vitro properties of a new series of this type of small molecule. Exemplar compounds selectively and potently inhibited the catalytic activities of Escherichia coli DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV but did not block the DNA breakage-reunion step. Compounds showed broad-spectrum inhibitory activity against a wide range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, including biodefence microorganisms and Mycobacterium tuberculosis No cross-resistance with fluoroquinolone-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and E. coli isolates was observed. Measured MIC 90 values were 4 and 8 μg/ml against a panel of contemporary multidrug-resistant isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii and E. coli , respectively. In addition, representative compounds exhibited greater antibacterial potency than the quinolones against obligate anaerobic species. Spontaneous mutation rates were low, with frequencies of resistance typically <10 -8 against E. coli and A. baumannii at concentrations equivalent to 4-fold the MIC. Compound-resistant E. coli mutants that were isolated following serial passage were characterized by whole-genome sequencing and carried a single Arg38Leu amino acid substitution in the GyrA subunit of DNA gyrase. Preliminary in vitro safety data indicate that the series shows a promising therapeutic index and potential for low human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) inhibition (50% inhibitory concentration [IC 50 ], >100 μM). In summary, the compounds' distinct mechanism of action relative to the fluoroquinolones, whole-cell potency, low potential for resistance development, and favorable in vitro safety profile warrant their continued investigation as potential broad-spectrum antibacterial agents. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Isolation of a new broad spectrum antifungal polyene from Streptomyces sp. MTCC 5680.

    PubMed

    Vartak, A; Mutalik, V; Parab, R R; Shanbhag, P; Bhave, S; Mishra, P D; Mahajan, G B

    2014-06-01

    A new polyene macrolide antibiotic PN00053 was isolated from the fermentation broth of Streptomyces sp. wild-type strain MTCC-5680. The producer strain was isolated from fertile mountain soil of Naldehra region, Himachal Pradesh, India. The compound PN00053 was purified through various steps of chromatographic techniques and bio-activity guided fractionation followed by its characterization using physiochemical properties, spectral data ((1) H-NMR, (13) C-NMR, HMBC, HSQC, and COSY) and MS analysis. PN00053 exhibited broad spectrum in vitro antifungal activity against strains of Aspergillus fumigatus (HMR), A. fumigatus ATCC 16424, Candida albicans (I.V.), C. albicans ATCC 14503, C. krusei GO6, C. glabrata HO4, Cryptococcus neoformans, Trichophyton sp. as well as fluconazole resistant strains C. krusei GO3 and C. glabrata HO5. It did not inhibit growth of gram positive and gram-negative bacteria, displaying its specificity against fungi. PN00053 is a novel polyene macrolide isolated from a wild strain of Streptomyces sp. PM0727240 (MTCC5680), an isolate from the mountainous rocky regions of Himachal Pradesh, India. The compound is a new derivative of the antibiotic Roflamycoin [32, 33-didehydroroflamycoin (DDHR)]. It displayed broad spectrum antifungal activity against yeast and filamentous fungi. However, it did not show any antibacterial activity. The in vitro study revealed that PN00053 has better potency as compared to clinical gold standard fluconazole. The development of pathogenic resistance against the polyenes has been seldom reported. Hence, we envisage PN00053 could be a potential antifungal lead. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Broad-spectrum antiviral GS-5734 inhibits both epidemic and zoonotic coronaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Sheahan, Timothy P.; Sims, Amy C.; Graham, Rachel L.; Menachery, Vineet D.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Case, James B.; Leist, Sarah R.; Pyrc, Krzysztof; Feng, Joy Y.; Trantcheva, Iva; Bannister, Roy; Park, Yeojin; Babusis, Darius; Clarke, Michael O.; Mackman, Richard L.; Spahn, Jamie E.; Palmiotti, Christopher A.; Siegel, Dustin; Ray, Adrian S.; Cihlar, Tomas; Jordan, Robert; Denison, Mark R.; Baric, Ralph S.

    2017-01-01

    Emerging viral infections are difficult to control as heterogeneous members periodically cycle in and out of humans and zoonotic hosts, complicating the development of specific antiviral therapies and vaccines. Coronaviruses (CoVs) have a proclivity to spread rapidly into new host species causing severe disease. SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV successively emerged causing severe epidemic respiratory disease in immunologically naïve human populations throughout the globe. Broad-spectrum therapies capable of inhibiting CoV infections would address an immediate unmet medical need and could be invaluable in the treatment of emerging and endemic CoV infections. Here we show that a nucleotide prodrug GS-5734, currently in clinical development for treatment of Ebola virus disease, can inhibit SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV replication in multiple in vitro systems including primary human airway epithelial cell cultures with submicromolar IC50 values. GS-5734 was also effective against bat-CoVs, prepandemic bat-CoVs and circulating contemporary human CoV in primary human lung cells, thus demonstrating broad-spectrum anti-CoV activity. In a mouse model of SARS-CoV pathogenesis, prophylactic and early therapeutic administration of GS-5734 significantly reduced lung viral load and improved clinical signs of disease as well as respiratory functions. These data provide substantive evidence that GS-5734 may prove effective against endemic MERS-CoV in the Middle East, circulating human CoV, and possibly most importantly, emerging CoV of the future. PMID:28659436

  9. Characterization of Lr75: a partial, broad-spectrum leaf rust resistance gene in wheat.

    PubMed

    Singla, Jyoti; Lüthi, Linda; Wicker, Thomas; Bansal, Urmil; Krattinger, Simon G; Keller, Beat

    2017-01-01

    Here, we describe a strategy to improve broad-spectrum leaf rust resistance by marker-assisted combination of two partial resistance genes. One of them represents a novel partial adult plant resistance gene, named Lr75. Leaf rust caused by the fungal pathogen Puccinia triticina is a damaging disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The combination of several, additively-acting partial disease resistance genes has been proposed as a suitable strategy to breed wheat cultivars with high levels of durable field resistance. The Swiss winter wheat cultivar 'Forno' continues to show near-immunity to leaf rust since its release in the 1980s. This resistance is conferred by the presence of at least six quantitative trait loci (QTL), one of which is associated with the morphological trait leaf tip necrosis. Here, we used a marker-informed strategy to introgress two 'Forno' QTLs into the leaf rust-susceptible Swiss winter wheat cultivar 'Arina'. The resulting backcross line 'ArinaLrFor' showed markedly increased leaf rust resistance in multiple locations over several years. One of the introgressed QTLs, QLr.sfr-1BS, is located on chromosome 1BS. We developed chromosome 1B-specific microsatellite markers by exploiting the Illumina survey sequences of wheat cv. 'Chinese Spring' and mapped QLr.sfr-1BS to a 4.3 cM interval flanked by the SSR markers gwm604 and swm271. QLr.sfr-1BS does not share a genetic location with any of the described leaf rust resistance genes present on chromosome 1B. Therefore, QLr.sfr-1BS is novel and was designated as Lr75. We conclude that marker-assisted combination of partial resistance genes is a feasible strategy to increase broad-spectrum leaf rust resistance. The identification of Lr75 adds a novel and highly useful gene to the small set of known partial, adult plant leaf rust resistance genes.

  10. Impact of broad-spectrum antimicrobial treatment on the ecology of intestinal flora.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jen-Jia; Wang, Jann-Tay; Cheng, Aristine; Chuang, Yu-Chung; Sheng, Wang-Huei

    2017-06-28

    Suppression of intestinal flora by broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents facilitated risk of colonization or infection with resistant pathogen. We aimed to investigate the changes in bowel carriage of target resistant microorganisms (TRO) among patients treated with three different classes of Pseudomonas-sparing broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents (ertapenem, moxifloxacin and flomoxef) with anaerobic coverage. Risk factors for developing colonization of TRO were also analyzed. We prospectively enrolled the adult hospitalized patients (>20 years old) who were indicated for at least 7-day course with either of ertapenem, moxifloxacin or flomoxef. Rectal swabs were performed for the patients who received at least 1-day course of study antibiotics during the treatment duration. The TROs included Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacteriaceae, and Acinetobacter baumannii. MacConkey agars with study antibiotics were used to isolate the TROs and evaluate the antimicrobial resistance. The mean age of our study population was 61.6 years, and 58.8% were males. The rates of rectal colonization for Pseudomonas aeruginosa was similar among the study medications (ertapenem 13.2%, flomoxef 20%, moxifloxacin 14.3%, p = 0.809). Compared with ertapenem, flomoxef (odds ratio [OR], 4.30; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.28-14.48, p = 0.019) and moxifloxacin (OR, 6.95; 95% CI, 1.36-35.52, p = 0.019) had higher risk for colonization of ertapenem-resistant Escherichiacoli colonization. The patients who received treatment of ertapenem may have a lower risk of rectal colonization for ertapenem resistant Escherichia coli than those who received flomoxef or moxifloxacin. The rate of Pseudomonas colonization did not differ between the three study Pseudomonas-sparing agents. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Broad spectrum antibiotic enrofloxacin modulates contact sensitivity through gut microbiota in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Strzępa, Anna; Majewska-Szczepanik, Monika; Lobo, Francis M; Wen, Li; Szczepanik, Marian

    2017-07-01

    Medical advances in the field of infection therapy have led to an increasing use of antibiotics, which, apart from eliminating pathogens, also partially eliminate naturally existing commensal bacteria. It has become increasingly clear that less exposure to microbiota early in life may contribute to the observed rise in "immune-mediated" diseases, including autoimmunity and allergy. We sought to test whether the change of gut microbiota with the broad spectrum antibiotic enrofloxacin will modulate contact sensitivity (CS) in mice. Natural gut microbiota were modified by oral treatment with enrofloxacin prior to sensitization with trinitrophenyl chloride followed by CS testing. Finally, adoptive cell transfers were performed to characterize the regulatory cells that are induced by microbiota modification. Oral treatment with enrofloxacin suppresses CS and production of anti-trinitrophenyl chloride IgG1 antibodies. Adoptive transfer experiments show that antibiotic administration favors induction of regulatory cells that suppress CS. Flow cytometry and adoptive transfer of purified cells show that antibiotic-induced suppression of CS is mediated by TCR αβ + CD4 + CD25 + FoxP3 + Treg, CD19 + B220 + CD5 + IL-10 + , IL-10 + Tr1, and IL-10 + TCR γδ + cells. Treatment with the antibiotic induces dysbiosis characterized by increased proportion of Clostridium coccoides (cluster XIVa), C coccoides-Eubacterium rectale (cluster XIVab), Bacteroidetes, and Bifidobacterium spp, but decreased segmented filamentous bacteria. Transfer of antibiotic-modified gut microbiota inhibits CS, but this response can be restored through oral transfer of control gut bacteria to antibiotic-treated animals. Oral treatment with a broad spectrum antibiotic modifies gut microbiota composition and promotes anti-inflammatory response, suggesting that manipulation of gut microbiota can be a powerful tool to modulate the course of CS. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

  12. Broad-Spectrum Inhibition of the CC-Chemokine Class Improves Wound Healing and Wound Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ridiandries, Anisyah; Bursill, Christina; Tan, Joanne

    2017-01-13

    Angiogenesis is involved in the inflammation and proliferation stages of wound healing, to bring inflammatory cells to the wound and provide a microvascular network to maintain new tissue formation. An excess of inflammation, however, leads to prolonged wound healing and scar formation, often resulting in unfavourable outcomes such as amputation. CC-chemokines play key roles in the promotion of inflammation and inflammatory-driven angiogenesis. Therefore, inhibition of the CC-chemokine class may improve wound healing. We aimed to determine if the broad-spectrum CC-chemokine inhibitor "35K" could accelerate wound healing in vivo in mice. In a murine wound healing model, 35K protein or phosphate buffered saline (PBS, control) were added topically daily to wounds. Cohorts of mice were assessed in the early stages (four days post-wounding) and in the later stages of wound repair (10 and 21 days post-wounding). Topical application of the 35K protein inhibited CC-chemokine expression (CCL5, CCL2) in wounds and caused enhanced blood flow recovery and wound closure in early-mid stage wounds. In addition, 35K promoted neovascularisation in the early stages of wound repair. Furthermore, 35K treated wounds had significantly lower expression of the p65 subunit of NF-κB, a key inflammatory transcription factor, and augmented wound expression of the pro-angiogenic and pro-repair cytokine TGF-β. These findings show that broad-spectrum CC-chemokine inhibition may be beneficial for the promotion of wound healing.

  13. Comparative toxicity of two glyphosate-based formulations to Eisenia andrei under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Piola, Lucas; Fuchs, Julio; Oneto, María Luisa; Basack, Silvana; Kesten, Eva; Casabé, Norma

    2013-04-01

    Glyphosate-based products are the leading post-emergent agricultural herbicides in the world, particularly in association with glyphosate tolerant crops. However, studies on the effects of glyphosate-based formulations on terrestrial receptors are scarce. This study was conducted to evaluate the comparative toxicity of two glyphosate-based products: Roundup FG (monoammonium salt, 72% acid equivalent, glyphosate-A) and Mon 8750 (monoammonium salt, 85.4% acid equivalent, glyphosate-B), towards the earthworm Eisenia andrei. Median lethal concentration (LC50) showed that glyphosate-A was 4.5-fold more toxic than glyphosate-B. Sublethal concentrations caused a concentration-dependent weight loss, consistent with the reported effect of glyphosate as uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation. Glyphosate-A showed deleterious effects on DNA and lysosomal damage at concentrations close to the applied environmental concentrations (14.4 μg ae cm(-2)). With glyphosate-B toxic effects were observed at higher doses, close to its LC50, suggesting that the higher toxicity of formulate A could be attributed to the effects of some of the so-called "inert ingredients", either due to a direct intrinsic toxicity, or to an enhancement in the bioavailability and/or bioaccumulation of the active ingredient. Our results highlight the importance of ecotoxicological assessment not only of the active ingredients, but also of the different formulations usually employed in agricultural practices. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Trends in broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing for children with acute otitis media in the United States, 1998–2004

    PubMed Central

    Coco, Andrew S; Horst, Michael A; Gambler, Angela S

    2009-01-01

    Background Overuse of broad-spectrum antibiotics is associated with antibiotic resistance. Acute otitis media (AOM) is responsible for a large proportion of antibiotics prescribed for US children. Rates of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing for AOM are unknown. Methods Analysis of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 1998 to 2004 (N = 6,878). Setting is office-based physicians, hospital outpatient departments, and emergency departments. Patients are children aged 12 years and younger prescribed antibiotics for acute otitis media. Main outcome measure is percentage of broad-spectrum antibiotics, defined as amoxicillin/clavulanate, macrolides, cephalosporins and quinolones. Results Broad-spectrum prescribing for acute otitis media increased from 34% of visits in 1998 to 45% of visits in 2004 (P < .001 for trend). The trend was primarily attributable to an increase in prescribing of amoxicillin/clavulanate (8% to 15%; P < .001 for trend) and macrolides (9% to 15%; P < .001 for trend). Prescribing remained stable for amoxicillin and cephalosporins while decreasing for narrow-spectrum agents (12% to 3%; P < .001 for trend) over the study period. Independent predictors of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing were ear pain, non-white race, public and other insurance (compared to private), hospital outpatient department setting, emergency department setting, and West region (compared to South and Midwest regions), each of which was associated with lower rates of broad-spectrum prescribing. Age and fever were not associated with prescribing choice. Conclusion Prescribing of broad-spectrum antibiotics for acute otitis media has steadily increased from 1998 to 2004. Associations with non-clinical factors suggest potential for improvement in prescribing practice. PMID:19552819

  15. Characterization of bacterial functional groups and microbial activity in microcosms with glyphosate application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyano, Sofia; Bonetto, Mariana; Baigorria, Tomas; Pegoraro, Vanesa; Ortiz, Jimena; Faggioli, Valeria; Conde, Belen; Cazorla, Cristian; Boccolini, Monica

    2017-04-01

    Glyphosate is a worldwide used herbicide as c. 90% of transgenic crops are tolerant to it. Microbial degradation of glyphosate molecule in soil is considered the most important process that determines its persistence in the environment. However, the impact of this herbicide on target groups of soil biota remains poorly understood. Our objective was to characterize the abundance of bacterial groups and global microbial activity, under controlled conditions with application of increasing doses of glyphosate. A bioassay was carried out in microcosms using an agricultural soil (Typic Argiudoll) with registered history of glyphosate application from National Institute of Agricultural Technology (INTA, EEA Marcos Juarez, Argentina). Glyphosate of commercial formulation (74.7%) was used and the following treatments were evaluated: Soil without glyphosate (control), and Soil with doses equivalent to 1.12 and 11.2 kg ai ha-1. Microbiological parameters were estimated at 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after herbicide application by counting heterotrophic, cellulolytic, nitrogen fixing (N), and nitrifying bacteria; and fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis (FDA), microbial respiration (MR) and microbial biomass (C-BM). The N cycle related bacteria showed greater sensitivity to glyphosate with significant increases in abundance. On the other hand the C cycle parameters were strongly conditioned by the time elapsed since the application of the herbicide, as did the MR. The FDA declined with the highest dose, while the C-BM was not affected. Therefore, we conclude that in the studied experimental conditions glyphosate stimulated bacterial growth (i.e. target abundances) representing a source of N, C and nutrients. On the other hand, enzymatic activity (FDA) decreased when glyphosate was applied in the highest dose, whereas, it had no effect on the MR nor C-BM, which could be attributable to the organic matter content of the soil. However, future research in field conditions is necessary, for

  16. Perspectives on transgenic, herbicide-resistant crops in the United States almost 20 years after introduction.

    PubMed

    Duke, Stephen O

    2015-05-01

    Herbicide-resistant crops have had a profound impact on weed management. Most of the impact has been by glyphosate-resistant maize, cotton, soybean and canola. Significant economic savings, yield increases and more efficacious and simplified weed management have resulted in widespread adoption of the technology. Initially, glyphosate-resistant crops enabled significantly reduced tillage and reduced the environmental impact of weed management. Continuous use of glyphosate with glyphosate-resistant crops over broad areas facilitated the evolution of glyphosate-resistant weeds, which have resulted in increases in the use of tillage and other herbicides with glyphosate, reducing some of the initial environmental benefits of glyphosate-resistant crops. Transgenic crops with resistance to auxinic herbicides, as well as to herbicides that inhibit acetolactate synthase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase, stacked with glyphosate and/or glufosinate resistance, will become available in the next few years. These technologies will provide additional weed management options for farmers, but will not have all of the positive effects (reduced cost, simplified weed management, lowered environmental impact and reduced tillage) that glyphosate-resistant crops had initially. In the more distant future, other herbicide-resistant crops (including non-transgenic ones), herbicides with new modes of action and technologies that are currently in their infancy (e.g. bioherbicides, sprayable herbicidal RNAi and/or robotic weeding) may affect the role of transgenic, herbicide-resistant crops in weed management. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Urban contributions of glyphosate and its degradate AMPA to streams in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Thurman, E.M.; Lee, E.A.; Meyer, M.T.; Furlong, E.T.; Glassmeyer, S.T.

    2006-01-01

    Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide in the world, being routinely applied to control weeds in both agricultural and urban settings. Microbial degradation of glyphosate produces aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA). The high polarity and water-solubility of glyphosate and AMPA has, until recently, made their analysis in water samples problematic. Thus, compared to other herbicides (e.g. atrazine) there are relatively few studies on the environmental occurrence of glyphosate and AMPA. In 2002, treated effluent samples were collected from 10 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to study the occurrence of glyphosate and AMPA. Stream samples were collected upstream and downstream of the 10 WWTPs. Two reference streams were also sampled. The results document the apparent contribution of WWTP effluent to stream concentrations of glyphosate and AMPA, with roughly a two-fold increase in their frequencies of detection between stream samples collected upstream and those collected downstream of the WWTPs. Thus, urban use of glyphosate contributes to glyphosate and AMPA concentrations in streams in the United States. Overall, AMPA was detected much more frequently (67.5%) compared to glyphosate (17.5%).

  18. The unique genomic landscape surrounding the EPSPS gene in glyphosate resistant Amaranthus palmeri: A repetitive path to resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The expanding number and global distributions of herbicide resistant weedy species threaten food, feed, fiber and bioproduct sustainability and agroecosystem longevity. Amongst the most competitive weeds, Amaranthus palmeri S. Wats has rapidly evolved increased resistance to glyphosate primarily th...

  19. Toxicity evaluation of glyphosate agrochemical components using Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and DNA microarray gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masaya; Takumi, Shota; Tachikawa, Keiko; Yamauchi, Ryoko; Goto, Yoshiyuki; Matsusaki, Hiromi; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Kagami, Yoshihiro; Kusano, Teruhiko; Arizono, Koji

    2012-01-01

    Using glyphosate agrochemical components, we investigated their acute toxicity to juvenile Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) as well as their toxic impact at gene expression level on the liver tissues of adult medaka using DNA microarray. In our acute toxicity test, juvenile medaka were exposed for 96 hr to each of the following glyphosate agrochemical components: 10~160 mg/l of glyphosate, 1.25~20 mg/l of fatty acid alkanolamide surfactant (DA), and 12~416 mg/l of a fully formulated glyphosate herbicide. As a result, LC(50) values of glyphosate, DA, and the glyphosate herbicide were > 160 mg/l, 8.5 mg/l, and 76.8 mg/l, respectively. On the other hand, adult male medaka fish were exposed to each of the glyphosate agrochemical components for 48 hr at the following concentrations: 16 mg/l of glyphosate, 0.5 mg/l of DA, and 16 mg/l-glyphosate/0.5 mg/l-DA mixture. Interestingly, DNA microarray analysis revealed that there were no significant gene expression changes in the medaka liver after exposure to glyphosate. Nevertheless, 78 and 138 genes were significantly induced by DA and the glyphosate/DA mixture, respectively. Furthermore, we identified five common genes that were affected by DA and glyphosate/DA mixture. These results suggested that glyphosate itself possessed very low toxicity as previously reported by some researchers at least to the small laboratory fish, and the major toxicity of the glyphosate agrochemical resided mainly in DA and perhaps in unintentionally generated byproduct(s) of glyphosate-DA mixture.

  20. Seasonal variation in hybrid poplar tolerance to glyphosate.

    Treesearch

    Daniel Netzer; Edward Hansen

    1992-01-01

    Reports that glyphosate applied during April or May in hybrid poplar plantations usually results in tree growth increases and that later summer applications often result in tree damage, growth loss, or mortality. Introduces the concept of "physiological" and "morphological" herbicide tolerance.

  1. Toxicity assessment of glyphosate on honey bee (Apis mellifera) spermatozoa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During 2016-2017, 33.2% of managed honey bee colonies in the U.S. were lost due to Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). Commonly used pesticides are among the suspected reasons for bee mortality. N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine (glyphosate) is a widely used herbicide in the U.S. and has previously been shown ...

  2. Concerted action of target-site mutations and high EPSPS activity in glyphosate-resistant junglerice (Echinochloa colona) from California

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glyphosate is the most widely used non-selective herbicide and Echinochloa colona is an annual weed affecting field crops and orchards in California. A population carrying a glyphosate-resistance-endowing mutation in the EPSPS gene was found in the Northern Sacramento Valley. We used selfed lines ...

  3. Glyphosate-Resistant Goosegrass. Identification of a Mutation in the Target Enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate Synthase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The spontaneous occurrence of resistance to the herbicide glyphosate in weed species has been an extremely infrequent event, despite over 20 years of extensive use. Recently, a glyphosate-resistant biotype of goosegrass (Eleusine indica) was identified in Malaysia exhibiting an LD50 value approxima...

  4. Effects of glyphosate acid and the glyphosate-commercial formulation (Roundup) on Dimorphandra wilsonii seed germination: Interference of seed respiratory metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marcelo Pedrosa; da Silva Cruz, Fernanda Vieira; Bicalho, Elisa Monteze; Borges, Felipe Viègas; Fonseca, Marcia Bacelar; Juneau, Philippe; Garcia, Queila Souza

    2017-01-01

    Glyphosate-formulations are widely used in the Brazilian Cerrado (neotropical savanna) with little or no control, threatening population of the endangered species Dimorphandra wilsonii. We investigated the toxicity of different concentrations (0, 5, 25 and 50 mg l -1 ) of glyphosate acid and one of its formulations (Roundup ® ) on seed germination in D. wilsonii. Glyphosate acid and Roundup drastically decreased seed germination by decreasing seed respiration rates. The activation of antioxidant enzymes, ascorbate peroxidase and catalase assure no hydrogen peroxide accumulation in exposed seeds. Glyphosate acid and the Roundup-formulation negatively affected the activities of enzymes associated with the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), with Complex III as its precise target. The toxicity of Roundup-formulation was greater than that of glyphosate acid due to its greater effects on respiration. The herbicide glyphosate must impair D. wilsonii seed germination by disrupting the mitochondrial ETC, resulting in decreased energy (ATP) production. Our results therefore indicate the importance of avoiding (or closely regulating) the use of glyphosate-based herbicides in natural Cerrado habitats of D. wilsonni as they are toxic to seed germination and therefore threaten conservation efforts. It will likewise be important to investigate the effects of glyphosate on the seeds of other species and to investigate the impacts of these pesticides elsewhere in the world. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Herbicide dissipation from low density polyethylene mulch

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted to examine herbicide dissipation when applied to low density polyethylene (LDPE) mulch for dry scenarios vs. washing off with water. In field studies, halosulfuron, paraquat, carfentrazone, glyphosate, and flumioxazin were applied to black 1.25-mil LDPE at...

  6. Loss of function of a rice TPR-domain RNA-binding protein confers broad-spectrum disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaogang; Liao, Haicheng; Chern, Mawsheng; Yin, Junjie; Chen, Yufei; Wang, Jianping; Zhu, Xiaobo; Chen, Zhixiong; Yuan, Can; Zhao, Wen; Wang, Jing; Li, Weitao; He, Min; Ma, Bingtian; Wang, Jichun; Qin, Peng; Chen, Weilan; Wang, Yuping; Liu, Jiali; Qian, Yangwen; Wang, Wenming; Wu, Xianjun; Li, Ping; Zhu, Lihuang; Li, Shigui; Ronald, Pamela C; Chen, Xuewei

    2018-03-20

    Crops carrying broad-spectrum resistance loci provide an effective strategy for controlling infectious disease because these loci typically confer resistance to diverse races of a pathogen or even multiple species of pathogens. Despite their importance, only a few crop broad-spectrum resistance loci have been reported. Here, we report the identification and characterization of the rice bsr-k1 (broad-spectrum resistance Kitaake-1) mutant, which confers broad-spectrum resistance against Magnaporthe oryzae and Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae with no major penalty on key agronomic traits. Map-based cloning reveals that Bsr-k1 encodes a tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs)-containing protein, which binds to mRNAs of multiple OsPAL ( OsPAL1-7 ) genes and promotes their turnover. Loss of function of the Bsr-k1 gene leads to accumulation of OsPAL1-7 mRNAs in the bsr-k1 mutant. Furthermore, overexpression of OsPAL1 in wild-type rice TP309 confers resistance to M. oryzae , supporting the role of OsPAL1 Our discovery of the bsr-k1 allele constitutes a significant conceptual advancement and provides a valuable tool for breeding broad-spectrum resistant rice. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  7. Inhibition effect of glyphosate on the acute and subacute toxicity of cadmium to earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chui-Fan; Wang, Yu-Jun; Sun, Rui-Juan; Liu, Cun; Fan, Guang-Ping; Qin, Wen-Xiu; Li, Cheng-Cheng; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2014-10-01

    The acute and subacute toxicities of cadmium (Cd) to earthworm Eisenia fetida in the presence and absence of glyphosate were studied. Although Cd is highly toxic to E. fetida, the presence of glyphosate markedly reduced the acute toxicity of Cd to earthworm; both the mortality rate of the earthworms and the accumulation of Cd decreased with the increase of the glyphosate/Cd molar ratio. The subcellular distribution of Cd in E. fetida tissues showed that internal Cd was dominant in the intact cells fraction and the heat-stable proteins fraction. The presence of glyphosate reduced the concentration of Cd in all fractions, especially the intact cells. During a longer period of exposure, the weight loss of earthworm and the total Cd absorption was alleviated by glyphosate. Thus, the herbicide glyphosate can reduce the toxicity and bioavailability of Cd in the soil ecosystems at both short- and long-term exposures. © 2014 SETAC.

  8. Facts and Fallacies in the Debate on Glyphosate Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mesnage, Robin; Antoniou, Michael N.

    2017-01-01

    The safety profile of the herbicide glyphosate and its commercial formulations is controversial. Reviews have been published by individuals who are consultants and employees of companies commercializing glyphosate-based herbicides in support of glyphosate’s reapproval by regulatory agencies. These authors conclude that glyphosate is safe at levels below regulatory permissible limits. In contrast, reviews conducted by academic scientists independent of industry report toxic effects below regulatory limits, as well as shortcomings of the current regulatory evaluation of risks associated with glyphosate exposures. Two authors in particular (Samsel and Seneff) have published a series of commentaries proposing that long-term exposure to glyphosate is responsible for many chronic diseases (including cancers, diabetes, neuropathies, obesity, asthma, infections, osteoporosis, infertility, and birth defects). The aim of this review is to examine the evidential basis for these claimed negative health effects and the mechanisms that are alleged to be at their basis. We found that these authors inappropriately employ a deductive reasoning approach based on syllogism. We found that their conclusions are not supported by the available scientific evidence. Thus, the mechanisms and vast range of conditions proposed to result from glyphosate toxicity presented by Samsel and Seneff in their commentaries are at best unsubstantiated theories, speculations, or simply incorrect. This misrepresentation of glyphosate’s toxicity misleads the public, the scientific community, and regulators. Although evidence exists that glyphosate-based herbicides are toxic below regulatory set safety limits, the arguments of Samsel and Seneff largely serve to distract rather than to give a rational direction to much needed future research investigating the toxicity of these pesticides, especially at levels of ingestion that are typical for human populations. PMID:29226121

  9. Glyphosate in Irish adults - A pilot study in 2017.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Alison; Leahy, Michelle; Jones, Kate; Kenny, Laura; Coggins, Marie A

    2018-08-01

    Glyphosate is the highest volume herbicide used globally and has recently been classified as a 2 A 'probably carcinogenic to humans' by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). There is limited data to evaluate the public health impacts from glyphosate exposure. The objective of this study is to conduct an exploratory glyphosate exposure assessment study among Irish adults, who were non-occupational users of glyphosate. A convenient sampling method was used, collecting one first morning void spot urine sample from each participant. A biomonitoring survey involving the collection and analysis of 20 ml spot urine samples from 50 Irish adults was conducted in June 2017. Participants completed a short questionnaire to collect information on demographics, dietary habits and lifestyle. Glyphosate was extracted using solid phase extraction (SPE) and analysed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MC/MS). Of the 50 urine samples analysed, 10 (20%) contained detectable levels of glyphosate (0.80-1.35 µg L -1 ). Exposure concentrations are higher than those reported in comparable studies of European and American adults. Glyphosate was detectable in 20% of the samples collected from Irish adults. The low proportion of detectable glyphosate levels could be due to lower localised use of pesticides, having a small sample size or the higher analytical detection limit used in this study (0.5 µg L -1 ), which could underestimate the true exposure and warrants further investigation. Given the widespread use of glyphosate, further information on population exposure is required to advance our understanding of the relationship between chronic low dose exposure to glyphosate and human health risk. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Designing a broad-spectrum integrative approach for cancer prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Block, Keith I; Gyllenhaal, Charlotte; Lowe, Leroy; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, A R M Ruhul; Amin, Amr; Aquilano, Katia; Arbiser, Jack; Arreola, Alexandra; Arzumanyan, Alla; Ashraf, S Salman; Azmi, Asfar S; Benencia, Fabian; Bhakta, Dipita; Bilsland, Alan; Bishayee, Anupam; Blain, Stacy W; Block, Penny B; Boosani, Chandra S; Carey, Thomas E; Carnero, Amancio; Carotenuto, Marianeve; Casey, Stephanie C; Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Chen, Georgia Zhuo; Chen, Helen; Chen, Sophie; Chen, Yi Charlie; Choi, Beom K; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Coley, Helen M; Collins, Andrew R; Connell, Marisa; Crawford, Sarah; Curran, Colleen S; Dabrosin, Charlotta; Damia, Giovanna; Dasgupta, Santanu; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Decker, William K; Dhawan, Punita; Diehl, Anna Mae E; Dong, Jin-Tang; Dou, Q Ping; Drew, Janice E; Elkord, Eyad; El-Rayes, Bassel; Feitelson, Mark A; Felsher, Dean W; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Fimognari, Carmela; Firestone, Gary L; Frezza, Christian; Fujii, Hiromasa; Fuster, Mark M; Generali, Daniele; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Gieseler, Frank; Gilbertson, Michael; Green, Michelle F; Grue, Brendan; Guha, Gunjan; Halicka, Dorota; Helferich, William G; Heneberg, Petr; Hentosh, Patricia; Hirschey, Matthew D; Hofseth, Lorne J; Holcombe, Randall F; Honoki, Kanya; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Huang, Gloria S; Jensen, Lasse D; Jiang, Wen G; Jones, Lee W; Karpowicz, Phillip A; Keith, W Nicol; Kerkar, Sid P; Khan, Gazala N; Khatami, Mahin; Ko, Young H; Kucuk, Omer; Kulathinal, Rob J; Kumar, Nagi B; Kwon, Byoung S; Le, Anne; Lea, Michael A; Lee, Ho-Young; Lichtor, Terry; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Locasale, Jason W; Lokeshwar, Bal L; Longo, Valter D; Lyssiotis, Costas A; MacKenzie, Karen L; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Marino, Maria; Martinez-Chantar, Maria L; Matheu, Ander; Maxwell, Christopher; McDonnell, Eoin; Meeker, Alan K; Mehrmohamadi, Mahya; Mehta, Kapil; Michelotti, Gregory A; Mohammad, Ramzi M; Mohammed, Sulma I; Morre, D James; Muralidhar, Vinayak; Muqbil, Irfana; Murphy, Michael P; Nagaraju, Ganji Purnachandra; Nahta, Rita; Niccolai, Elena; Nowsheen, Somaira; Panis, Carolina; Pantano, Francesco; Parslow, Virginia R; Pawelec, Graham; Pedersen, Peter L; Poore, Brad; Poudyal, Deepak; Prakash, Satya; Prince, Mark; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Rathmell, Jeffrey C; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Ray, Swapan K; Reichrath, Jörg; Rezazadeh, Sarallah; Ribatti, Domenico; Ricciardiello, Luigi; Robey, R Brooks; Rodier, Francis; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha; Russo, Gian Luigi; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Samadi, Abbas K; Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro; Sanders, Andrew J; Santini, Daniele; Sarkar, Malancha; Sasada, Tetsuro; Saxena, Neeraj K; Shackelford, Rodney E; Shantha Kumara, H M C; Sharma, Dipali; Shin, Dong M; Sidransky, David; Siegelin, Markus David; Signori, Emanuela; Singh, Neetu; Sivanand, Sharanya; Sliva, Daniel; Smythe, Carl; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Stafforini, Diana M; Stagg, John; Subbarayan, Pochi R; Sundin, Tabetha; Talib, Wamidh H; Thompson, Sarah K; Tran, Phuoc T; Ungefroren, Hendrik; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Venkateswaran, Vasundara; Vinay, Dass S; Vlachostergios, Panagiotis J; Wang, Zongwei; Wellen, Kathryn E; Whelan, Richard L; Yang, Eddy S; Yang, Huanjie; Yang, Xujuan; Yaswen, Paul; Yedjou, Clement; Yin, Xin; Zhu, Jiyue; Zollo, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    Targeted therapies and the consequent adoption of "personalized" oncology have achieved notable successes in some cancers; however, significant problems remain with this approach. Many targeted therapies are highly toxic, costs are extremely high, and most patients experience relapse after a few disease-free months. Relapses arise from genetic heterogeneity in tumors, which harbor therapy-resistant immortalized cells that have adopted alternate and compensatory pathways (i.e., pathways that are not reliant upon the same mechanisms as those which have been targeted). To address these limitations, an international task force of 180 scientists was assembled to explore the concept of a low-toxicity "broad-spectrum" therapeutic approach that could simultaneously target many key pathways and mechanisms. Using cancer hallmark phenotypes and the tumor microenvironment to account for the various aspects of relevant cancer biology, interdisciplinary teams reviewed each hallmark area and nominated a wide range of high-priority targets (74 in total) that could be modified to improve patient outcomes. For these targets, corresponding low-toxicity therapeutic approaches were then suggested, many of which were phytochemicals. Proposed actions on each target and all of the approaches were further reviewed for known effects on other hallmark areas and the tumor microenvironment. Potential contrary or procarcinogenic effects were found for 3.9% of the relationships between targets and hallmarks, and mixed evidence of complementary and contrary relationships was found for 7.1%. Approximately 67% of the relationships revealed potentially complementary effects, and the remainder had no known relationship. Among the approaches, 1.1% had contrary, 2.8% had mixed and 62.1% had complementary relationships. These results suggest that a broad-spectrum approach should be feasible from a safety standpoint. This novel approach has potential to be relatively inexpensive, it should help us

  11. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ceftobiprole, an anti-MRSA cephalosporin with broad-spectrum activity.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Bindu; Schmitt-Hoffmann, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Ceftobiprole, a beta-lactam, is the first of a new generation of broad-spectrum cephalosporins in late-stage development with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in addition to broad-spectrum bactericidal activity against other Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens. The prodrug, ceftobiprole medocaril, is converted rapidly and almost completely to the active drug, ceftobiprole, upon infusion by type A esterases. In humans, ceftobiprole binds minimally (16%) to plasma proteins, and binding is independent of the drug and protein concentrations. Its steady-state volume of distribution (18.4 L) approximates the extracellular fluid volume in humans. Ceftobiprole undergoes minimal hepatic metabolism, and the primary metabolite is the beta-lactam ring-opened hydrolysis product (open-ring metabolite). Systemic exposure of the open-ring metabolite accounts for 4% of ceftobiprole exposure following single-dose administration; approximately 5% of the dose is excreted in the urine as the metabolite. Ceftobiprole does not significantly induce or inhibit relevant cytochrome P450 enzymes and is neither a substrate nor an inhibitor of P-glycoprotein. Ceftobiprole is rapidly eliminated, primarily unchanged, by renal excretion, with a terminal elimination half-life of 3 hours; the predominant mechanism responsible for elimination is glomerular filtration, with approximately 89% of the dose being excreted as the prodrug, active drug (ceftobiprole) and open-ring metabolite. The pharmacokinetics of ceftobiprole are linear following single and multiple infusions of 125-1000 mg. Steady-state drug concentrations are attained on the first day of dosing, with no appreciable accumulation when administered three times daily (every 8 hours) and twice daily (every 12 hours) in subjects with normal renal function. Low intersubject variability has been seen across studies. Ceftobiprole exposure is slightly higher (~15%) in females than in males; this difference

  12. Electronic Holography with a Broad Spectrum Laser for Time Gated Imaging Through Highly Scattering Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Marian Pei-Ling

    coherence holographic method, of an absorber through a living human hand. This thesis also includes both theoretical analyses and experimental results of a spectral dispersion holography system which, instead of optically synthesizing the broad spectrum illumination source that is used for the short coherence holography method, digitally synthesizes a broad spectrum hologram from a collection of single frequency component holograms. This system has the time gating properties of short coherence length holography, as well as experimentally demonstrated applications for imaging through multiply scattering media.

  13. Global perspective of herbicide-resistant weeds.

    PubMed

    Heap, Ian

    2014-09-01

    Two hundred and twenty weed species have evolved resistance to one or more herbicides, and there are now 404 unique cases (species × site of action) of herbicide-resistant weeds globally. ALS inhibitor-resistant weeds account for about a third of all cases (133/404) and are particularly troublesome in rice and cereals. Although 71 weed species have been identified with triazine resistance, their importance has dwindled with the shift towards Roundup Ready® crops in the USA and the reduction of triazine usage in Europe. Forty-three grasses have evolved resistance to ACCase inhibitors, with the most serious cases being Avena spp., Lolium spp., Phalaris spp., Setaria spp. and Alopecurus myosuroides, infesting more than 25 million hectares of cereal production globally. Of the 24 weed species with glyphosate resistance, 16 have been found in Roundup Ready® cropping systems. Although Conyza canadensis is the most widespread glyphosate-resistant weed, Amaranthus palmeri and Amaranthus tuberculartus are the two most economically important glyphosate-resistant weeds because of the area they infest and the fact that these species have evolved resistance to numerous other herbicide sites of action, leaving growers with few herbicidal options for their control. The agricultural chemical industry has not brought any new herbicides with novel sites of action to market in over 30 years, making growers reliant on using existing herbicides in new ways. In addition, tougher registration and environmental regulations on herbicides have resulted in a loss of some herbicides, particularly in Europe. The lack of novel herbicide chemistries being brought to market combined with the rapid increase in multiple resistance in weeds threatens crop production worldwide. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Effects of aerially applied glyphosate and hexazinone on hardwoods and pines in a loblolly pine plantation

    Treesearch

    James D. Haywood

    1993-01-01

    Three herbicide products, Roundup© (glyphosate), Pronone© 10G (hexazinone), and Velpar© L (hexazinone), were applied aerially to release a 4-year-old loblolly pine plantation from hardwood competition. Herbicide damage to pines was not excessive. Post-treatment growth of pines in herbicide-treated plots was not significantly different from growth of pines in untreated...

  15. Long-term trends in the intensity and relative toxicity of herbicide use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniss, Andrew R.

    2017-04-01

    Herbicide use is among the most criticized aspects of modern farming, especially as it relates to genetically engineered (GE) crops. Many previous analyses have used flawed metrics to evaluate herbicide intensity and toxicity trends. Here, I show that herbicide use intensity increased over the last 25 years in maize, cotton, rice and wheat. Although GE crops have been previously implicated in increasing herbicide use, herbicide increases were more rapid in non-GE crops. Even as herbicide use increased, chronic toxicity associated with herbicide use decreased in two out of six crops, while acute toxicity decreased in four out of six crops. In the final year for which data were available (2014 or 2015), glyphosate accounted for 26% of maize, 43% of soybean and 45% of cotton herbicide applications. However, due to relatively low chronic toxicity, glyphosate contributed only 0.1, 0.3 and 3.5% of the chronic toxicity hazard in those crops, respectively.

  16. Effects of glyphosate on the non-target leaf beetle Cerotoma arcuata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in field and laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jardel L; Galdino, Tarcísio V S; Silva, Geverson A R; Picanço, Marcelo C; Silva, Antônio A; Corrêa, Alberto S; Martins, Júlio C

    2018-04-06

    This study aimed to assess the glyphosate application effects on the Cerotoma arcuata Oliver (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) population in glyphosate-resistant soybean crops. Field studies were conducted with glyphosate and the insecticide endosulfan to observe the effects of these pesticides on C. arcuata, on its damages in the crop and on the populations of natural enemies in glyphosate-resistant soybean crops. Moreover, the lethal and behavioral sublethal response of C. arcuata to glyphosate and endosulfan was conducted in the laboratory. The results of the field and laboratory experiments showed that glyphosate caused moderate toxicity and high irritability in C. arcuata and that endosulfan caused high toxicity and irritability. Therefore, the direct effect of glyphosate on C. arcuata was negative and does not explain the population increases of this pest in glyphosate-resistant soybean. However, the glyphosate also decreased the density of predators. Thus, the negative effect of glyphosate on the predators may be related to population increases of C. arcuata in glyphosate-resistant soybean crops, however, more studies are needed to better evidence this relationship. This study suggests that glyphosate can impact other non-target organisms, such as herbivorous insects and natural enemies and that the use of this herbicide will need to be carefully stewarded to prevent potential disturbances in beneficial insect communities in agricultural systems.

  17. Human DDX3 protein is a valuable target to develop broad spectrum antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Brai, Annalaura; Fazi, Roberta; Tintori, Cristina; Zamperini, Claudio; Bugli, Francesca; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Stigliano, Egidio; Esté, José; Badia, Roger; Franco, Sandra; Martinez, Javier P.; Meyerhans, Andreas; Saladini, Francesco; Zazzi, Maurizio; Garbelli, Anna; Botta, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Targeting a host factor essential for the replication of different viruses but not for the cells offers a higher genetic barrier to the development of resistance, may simplify therapy regimens for coinfections, and facilitates management of emerging viral diseases. DEAD-box polypeptide 3 (DDX3) is a human host factor required for the replication of several DNA and RNA viruses, including some of the most challenging human pathogens currently circulating, such as HIV-1, Hepatitis C virus, Dengue virus, and West Nile virus. Herein, we showed for the first time, to our knowledge, that the inhibition of DDX3 by a small molecule could be successfully exploited for the development of a broad spectrum antiviral agent. In addition to the multiple antiviral activities, hit compound 16d retained full activity against drug-resistant HIV-1 strains in the absence of cellular toxicity. Pharmacokinetics and toxicity studies in rats confirmed a good safety profile and bioavailability of 16d. Thus, DDX3 is here validated as a valuable therapeutic target. PMID:27118832

  18. CMC stabilized nano silver synthesis, characterization and its antibacterial and synergistic effect with broad spectrum antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Prema, P; Thangapandiyan, S; Immanuel, G

    2017-02-20

    In the present study silver nanoparticles were synthesized by reduction of AgNO 3 using aqueous CMC solution, which acts as both reducing and capping agent. The formation of AgNO 3 nanoparticles was observed visually by color change and these nanoparticles were characterized through UV-vis spectroscopy, FTIR, XRD, SEM, EDS and AFM. The FTIR peaks observed to be ranging from 3300 to 605cm -1 . The AFM image clearly showed the surface morphology of well dispersed nanoparticles. SEM image illustrates the nanoparticles with spherical shape. The crystalline nature of the particles was assured by XRD analysis. The antimicrobial activity of nanoparticles was tested against human bacterial pathogens (Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium &Vibrio vulnificus). The bacterial growth was highly inhibited by the nanoparticles. The synergistic effect of nanoparticles in combination with selected broad spectrum antibiotics against the tested bacteria determined strong growth inhibitory activity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Broad-spectrum non-toxic antiviral nanoparticles with a virucidal inhibition mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagno, Valeria; Andreozzi, Patrizia; D'Alicarnasso, Marco; Jacob Silva, Paulo; Mueller, Marie; Galloux, Marie; Le Goffic, Ronan; Jones, Samuel T.; Vallino, Marta; Hodek, Jan; Weber, Jan; Sen, Soumyo; Janeček, Emma-Rose; Bekdemir, Ahmet; Sanavio, Barbara; Martinelli, Chiara; Donalisio, Manuela; Rameix Welti, Marie-Anne; Eleouet, Jean-Francois; Han, Yanxiao; Kaiser, Laurent; Vukovic, Lela; Tapparel, Caroline; Král, Petr; Krol, Silke; Lembo, David; Stellacci, Francesco

    2018-02-01

    Viral infections kill millions yearly. Available antiviral drugs are virus-specific and active against a limited panel of human pathogens. There are broad-spectrum substances that prevent the first step of virus-cell interaction by mimicking heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), the highly conserved target of viral attachment ligands (VALs). The reversible binding mechanism prevents their use as a drug, because, upon dilution, the inhibition is lost. Known VALs are made of closely packed repeating units, but the aforementioned substances are able to bind only a few of them. We designed antiviral nanoparticles with long and flexible linkers mimicking HSPG, allowing for effective viral association with a binding that we simulate to be strong and multivalent to the VAL repeating units, generating forces (~190 pN) that eventually lead to irreversible viral deformation. Virucidal assays, electron microscopy images, and molecular dynamics simulations support the proposed mechanism. These particles show no cytotoxicity, and in vitro nanomolar irreversible activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV), human papilloma virus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), dengue and lenti virus. They are active ex vivo in human cervicovaginal histocultures infected by HSV-2 and in vivo in mice infected with RSV.

  20. Anticancer kinase inhibitors impair intracellular viral trafficking and exert broad-spectrum antiviral effects

    PubMed Central

    Bekerman, Elena; Shulla, Ana; Brannan, Jennifer; Wang, Stanley; Barouch-Bentov, Rina; Bakken, Russell R.; Mateo, Roberto; Govero, Jennifer; Nagamine, Claude M.; Diamond, Michael S.; De Jonghe, Steven; Herdewijn, Piet; Dye, John M.; Randall, Glenn

    2017-01-01

    Global health is threatened by emerging viral infections, which largely lack effective vaccines or therapies. Targeting host pathways that are exploited by multiple viruses could offer broad-spectrum solutions. We previously reported that AAK1 and GAK, kinase regulators of the host adaptor proteins AP1 and AP2, are essential for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but the underlying mechanism and relevance to other viruses or in vivo infections remained unknown. Here, we have discovered that AP1 and AP2 cotraffic with HCV particles in live cells. Moreover, we found that multiple viruses, including dengue and Ebola, exploit AAK1 and GAK during entry and infectious virus production. In cultured cells, treatment with sunitinib and erlotinib, approved anticancer drugs that inhibit AAK1 or GAK activity, or with more selective compounds inhibited intracellular trafficking of HCV and multiple unrelated RNA viruses with a high barrier to resistance. In murine models of dengue and Ebola infection, sunitinib/erlotinib combination protected against morbidity and mortality. We validated sunitinib- and erlotinib-mediated inhibition of AAK1 and GAK activity as an important mechanism of antiviral action. Additionally, we revealed potential roles for additional kinase targets. These findings advance our understanding of virus-host interactions and establish a proof of principle for a repurposed, host-targeted approach to combat emerging viruses. PMID:28240606

  1. A Nanocomposite Hydrogel with Potent and Broad-Spectrum Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Dai, Tianjiao; Wang, Changping; Wang, Yuqing; Xu, Wei; Hu, Jingjing; Cheng, Yiyun

    2018-05-02

    Local bacterial infection is a challenging task and still remains a serious threat to human health in clinics. Systemic administration of antibiotics has only short-term antibacterial activity and usually causes adverse effects and bacterial resistance. A bioadhesive hydrogel with broad-spectrum and on-demand antibiotic activity is highly desirable. Here, we designed a pH-responsive nanocomposite hydrogel via a Schiff base linkage between oxidized polysaccharides and cationic dendrimers encapsulated with silver nanoparticles. The antibacterial components, both the cationic dendrimers and silver species, could be released in response to the acidity generated by growing bacteria. The released cationic polymer and silver exhibited a synergistic effect in antibacterial activity, and thus, the nanocomposite hydrogel showed potent antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative ( Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and Gram-positive bacteria ( Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus). The gel showed superior in vivo antibacterial efficacy against S. aureus infection compared with a commercial silver hydrogel at the same silver concentration. In addition, no obvious hemolytic toxicity, cytotoxicity, and tissue and biochemical toxicity were observed for the antibacterial hydrogel after incubation with cells or implantation. This study provides a facile and promising strategy to develop smart hydrogels to treat local bacterial infections.

  2. T-705 (favipiravir) and related compounds: Novel broad-spectrum inhibitors of RNA viral infections.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Yousuke; Takahashi, Kazumi; Shiraki, Kimiyasu; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Smee, Donald F; Barnard, Dale L; Gowen, Brian B; Julander, Justin G; Morrey, John D

    2009-06-01

    A series of pyrazinecarboxamide derivatives T-705 (favipiravir), T-1105 and T-1106 were discovered to be candidate antiviral drugs. These compounds have demonstrated good activity in treating viral infections in laboratory animals caused by various RNA viruses, including influenza virus, arenaviruses, bunyaviruses, West Nile virus (WNV), yellow fever virus (YFV), and foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Treatment has in some cases been effective when initiated up to 5-7 days after virus infection, when the animals already showed signs of illness. Studies on the mechanism of action of T-705 have shown that this compound is converted to the ribofuranosyltriphosphate derivative by host enzymes, and this metabolite selectively inhibits the influenza viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase without cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. Interestingly, these compounds do not inhibit host DNA and RNA synthesis and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. From in vivo studies using several animal models, the pyrazinecarboxamide derivatives were found to be effective in protecting animals from death, reducing viral burden, and limiting disease manifestations, even when treatment was initiated after virus inoculation. Importantly, T-705 imparts its beneficial antiviral effects without significant toxicity to the host. Prompt development of these compounds is expected to provide effective countermeasures against pandemic influenza virus and several bioweapon threats, all of which are of great global public health concern given the current paucity of highly effective broad-spectrum drugs.

  3. Breakthrough candidemia after the introduction of broad spectrum antifungal agents: A 5-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Breda, Giovanni L; Tuon, Felipe F; Meis, Jacques F; Herkert, Patricia F; Hagen, Ferry; de Oliveira, Letícia Z; Dias, Viviane de Carvalho; da Cunha, Clóvis Arns; Queiroz-Telles, Flávio

    2018-06-01

    Candidemia is the main invasive fungal disease among hospitalized patients. Several breakthrough candidemia (BrC) cases have been reported, but few studies evaluate the epidemiology, risk factors, molecular characterization, antifungal susceptibility profile and outcome of those patients, especially in developing countries and including patients using broad spectrum antifungals. We conducted a retrospective study from 2011 to 2016, including patients aged 12 years or older with candidemia. Epidemiological characteristics and risk factors for candidemia were evaluated and compared with patients with BrC using univariate and multivariate analysis. Sequential Candida isolates from BrC were identified by internal transcribed spacer sequencing, genotyped with amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting (AFLP), and tested for antifungal susceptibility. From 148 candidemia episodes, 27 breakthrough episodes (18%) were identified, with neutropenia and mucositis being independent risk factors for BrC. Candida non-albicans was more frequent in the BrC group (P < .001). AFLP showed high correlation with conventional methods of identification among breakthrough isolates and a high genetic similarity among isolates from the same patient was observed. C. albicans was the most susceptible species with low MIC values for all antifungal agents tested. In contrast, we found isolates of C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis resistant to triazoles and echinocandins. In conclusion, BrC occurred mainly in severely immunosuppressed patients, with neutropenia and mucositis. Mortality did not differ between the groups. Candida non-albicans species were more recovered from BrC, with C. albicans being the most susceptible to antifungals.

  4. Tempered mlo broad-spectrum resistance to barley powdery mildew in an Ethiopian landrace

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xintian; Deng, Weiwei; Lee, Zheng Zhou; Lopez-Ruiz, Francisco J.; Schweizer, Patrick; Ellwood, Simon R.

    2016-01-01

    Recessive mutations in the Mlo gene confer broad spectrum resistance in barley (Hordeum vulgare) to powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei), a widespread and damaging disease. However, all alleles discovered to date also display deleterious pleiotropic effects, including the naturally occurring mlo-11 mutant which is widely deployed in Europe. Recessive resistance was discovered in Eth295, an Ethiopian landrace, which was developmentally controlled and quantitative without spontaneous cell wall appositions or extensive necrosis and loss of photosynthetic tissue. This resistance is determined by two copies of the mlo-11 repeat units, that occur upstream to the wild-type Mlo gene, compared to 11–12 in commonly grown cultivars and was designated mlo-11 (cnv2). mlo-11 repeat unit copy number-dependent DNA methylation corresponded with cytological and macroscopic phenotypic differences between copy number variants. Sequence data indicated mlo-11 (cnv2) formed via recombination between progenitor mlo-11 repeat units and the 3′ end of an adjacent stowaway MITE containing region. mlo-11 (cnv2) is the only example of a moderated mlo variant discovered to date and may have arisen by natural selection against the deleterious effects of the progenitor mlo-11 repeat unit configuration. PMID:27404990

  5. Broad-Spectrum Protection against Tombusviruses Elicited by Defective Interfering RNAs in Transgenic Plants

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Teresa; Borja, Marisé; Scholthof, Herman B.; Feldstein, Paul A.; Morris, T. Jack; Jackson, Andrew O.

    1999-01-01

    We have designed a DNA cassette to transcribe defective interfering (DI) RNAs of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) and have investigated their potential to protect transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants from tombusvirus infections. To produce RNAs with authentic 5′ and 3′ termini identical to those of the native B10 DI RNA, the DI RNA sequences were flanked by ribozymes (RzDI). When RzDI RNAs transcribed in vitro were mixed with parental TBSV transcripts and inoculated into protoplasts or plants, they became amplified, reduced the accumulation of the parental RNA, and mediated attenuation of the lethal syndrome characteristic of TBSV infections. Analysis of F1 and F2 RzDI transformants indicated that uninfected plants expressed the DI RNAs in low abundance, but these RNAs were amplified to very high levels during TBSV infection. By two weeks postinoculation with TBSV, all untransformed N. benthamiana plants and transformed negative controls died. Although infection of transgenic RzDI plants initially induced moderate to severe symptoms, these plants subsequently recovered, flowered, and set seed. Plants from the same transgenic lines also exhibited broad-spectrum protection against related tombusviruses but remained susceptible to a distantly related tombus-like virus and to unrelated viruses. PMID:10233970

  6. Increase methylmercury accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana expressing bacterial broad-spectrum mercury transporter MerE

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial merE gene derived from the Tn21 mer operon encodes a broad-spectrum mercury transporter that governs the transport of methylmercury and mercuric ions across bacterial cytoplasmic membranes, and this gene is a potential molecular tool for improving the efficiency of methylmercury phytoremediation. A transgenic Arabidopsis engineered to express MerE was constructed and the impact of expression of MerE on methylmercury accumulation was evaluated. The subcellular localization of transiently expressed GFP-tagged MerE was examined in Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells. The GFP-MerE was found to localize to the plasma membrane and cytosol. The transgenic Arabidopsis expressing MerE accumulated significantly more methymercury and mercuric ions into plants than the wild-type Arabidopsis did. The transgenic plants expressing MerE was significantly more resistant to mercuric ions, but only showed more resistant to methylmercury compared with the wild type Arabidopsis. These results demonstrated that expression of the bacterial mercury transporter MerE promoted the transport and accumulation of methylmercury in transgenic Arabidopsis, which may be a useful method for improving plants to facilitate the phytoremediation of methylmercury pollution. PMID:24004544

  7. Regulation of vitamin D metabolism following disruption of the microbiota using broad spectrum antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Bora, Stephanie A; Kennett, Mary J; Smith, Philip B; Patterson, Andrew D; Cantorna, Margherita T

    2018-06-01

    Vitamin D, 25hydroxyvitamin D (25D), and 24,25dihydroxyvitamin D (24,25D) were measured before and after broad spectrum antibiotic (Abx) treatment for 2 wks. Abx treatments increased 25D and 24,25D levels suggesting that the microbiota or Abx were altering vitamin D metabolism. Increased 25D, but not 24,25D, following Abx treatments were found to be dependent on toll like receptor signaling. Conversely, the effects of Abx on 24,25D levels required that the vitamin D receptor (VDR) be expressed in tissues outside of the hematopoietic system (kidney) and not the immune system. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)23 increased following Abx treatment and the effect of Abx treatment on FGF23 (like the effect on 24,25D) was not present in VDR knockout (KO) mice. The Abx mediated increase in 24,25D was due to changes to the endocrine regulation of vitamin D metabolism. Conversely, 25D levels went up with Abx treatment of the VDR KO mice. Host sensing of microbial signals regulates the levels of 25D in the host. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. 5-Carboxy-8-hydroxyquinoline is a Broad Spectrum 2-Oxoglutarate Oxygenase Inhibitor which Causes Iron Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Aik, WeiShen; Che, Ka Hing; Li, Xuan Shirley; Kristensen, Jan B. L.; King, Oliver N. F.; Chan, Mun Chiang; Yeoh, Kar Kheng; Choi, Hwanho; Walport, Louise J.; Thinnes, Cyrille C.; Bush, Jacob T.; Lejeune, Clarisse; Rydzik, Anna M.; Rose, Nathan R.; Bagg, Eleanor A.; McDonough, Michael A.; Krojer, Tobias; Yue, Wyatt W.; Ng, Stanley S.; Olsen, Lars; Brennan, Paul E.; Oppermann, Udo; Muller-Knapp, Susanne; Klose, Robert J.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Kawamura, Akane

    2015-01-01

    2-Oxoglutarate and iron dependent oxygenases are therapeutic targets for human diseases. Using a representative 2OG oxygenase panel, we compare the inhibitory activities of 5-carboxy-8-hydroxyquinoline (IOX1) and 4-carboxy-8-hydroxyquinoline (4C8HQ) with that of two other commonly used 2OG oxygenase inhibitors, N-oxalylglycine (NOG) and 2,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (2,4-PDCA). The results reveal that IOX1 has a broad spectrum of activity, as demonstrated by the inhibition of transcription factor hydroxylases, representatives of all 2OG dependent histone demethylase subfamilies, nucleic acid demethylases and γ-butyrobetaine hydroxylase. Cellular assays show that, unlike NOG and 2,4-PDCA, IOX1 is active against both cytosolic and nuclear 2OG oxygenases without ester derivatisation. Unexpectedly, crystallographic studies on these oxygenases demonstrate that IOX1, but not 4C8HQ, can cause translocation of the active site metal, revealing a rare example of protein ligand-induced metal movement PMID:26682036

  9. Xpo7 is a broad-spectrum exportin and a nuclear import receptor.

    PubMed

    Aksu, Metin; Pleiner, Tino; Karaca, Samir; Kappert, Christin; Dehne, Heinz-Jürgen; Seibel, Katharina; Urlaub, Henning; Bohnsack, Markus T; Görlich, Dirk

    2018-05-10

    Exportins bind cargo molecules in a RanGTP-dependent manner inside nuclei and transport them through nuclear pores to the cytoplasm. CRM1/Xpo1 is the best-characterized exportin because specific inhibitors such as leptomycin B allow straightforward cargo validations in vivo. The analysis of other exportins lagged far behind, foremost because no such inhibitors had been available for them. In this study, we explored the cargo spectrum of exportin 7/Xpo7 in depth and identified not only ∼200 potential export cargoes but also, surprisingly, ∼30 nuclear import substrates. Moreover, we developed anti-Xpo7 nanobodies that acutely block Xpo7 function when transfected into cultured cells. The inhibition is pathway specific, mislocalizes export cargoes of Xpo7 to the nucleus and import substrates to the cytoplasm, and allowed validation of numerous tested cargo candidates. This establishes Xpo7 as a broad-spectrum bidirectional transporter and paves the way for a much deeper analysis of exportin and importin function in the future. © 2018 Aksu et al.

  10. XA23 is an executor R protein and confers broad-spectrum disease resistance in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunlian; Zhang, Xiaoping; Fan, Yinglun; Gao, Ying; Zhu, Qinlong; Zheng, Chongke; Qin, Tengfei; Li, Yanqiang; Che, Jinying; Zhang, Mingwei; Yang, Bing; Liu, Yaoguang; Zhao, Kaijun

    2015-02-01

    The majority of plant disease resistance (R) genes encode proteins that share common structural features. However, the transcription activator-like effector (TALE)-associated executor type R genes show no considerable sequence homology to any known R genes. We adopted a map-based cloning approach and TALE-based technology to isolate and characterize Xa23, a new executor R gene derived from wild rice (Oryza rufipogon) that confers an extremely broad spectrum of resistance to bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). Xa23 encodes a 113 amino acid protein that shares 50% identity with the known executor R protein XA10. The predicted transmembrane helices in XA23 also overlap with those of XA10. Unlike Xa10, however, Xa23 transcription is specifically activated by AvrXa23, a TALE present in all examined Xoo field isolates. Moreover, the susceptible xa23 allele has an identical open reading frame of Xa23 but differs in promoter region by lacking the TALE binding element (EBE) for AvrXa23. XA23 can trigger a strong hypersensitive response in rice, tobacco, and tomato. Our results provide the first evidence that plant genomes have an executor R gene family of which members execute their function and spectrum of disease resistance by recognizing the cognate TALEs in the pathogen. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. XA23 is an executor R protein and confers broad-spectrum disease resistance in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunlian; Zhang, Xiaoping; Fan, Yinglun; Gao, Ying; Zhu, Qinlong; Zheng, Chongke; Qin, Tengfei; Li, Yanqiang; Che, Jinying; Zhang, Mingwei; Yang, Bing; Liu, Yaoguang; Zhao, Kaijun

    2014-11-09

    The majority of plant disease resistance (R) genes encode proteins that share common structural features. However, the transcription activator-like effector (TALE) associated executor type R genes show no considerable sequence homology to any known R genes. We adopted a map-based cloning approach and TALE-based technology to isolate and characterize Xa23, a new executor R gene derived from the wild rice (Oryza rufipogon) that confers an extremely broad spectrum of resistance to bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). Xa23 encodes a 113-amino acid protein that shares 50% identity to the known executor R protein XA10. The predicted transmembrane helices in XA23 also overlap with those of XA10. Unlike Xa10, however, Xa23 transcription is specifically activated by AvrXa23, a TALE present in all examined Xoo field isolates. Moreover, the susceptible xa23 allele has an identical open reading frame of Xa23, but differs in promoter region by lacking the TALE binding-element (EBE) for AvrXa23. XA23 can trigger strong hypersensitive response in rice, tobacco and tomato. Our results provide the first evidence that plant genomes have an executor R gene family in which members execute their function and spectrum of disease resistance by recognizing the cognate TALEs in pathogen. © The Author 2014. Published by the Molecular Plant Shanghai Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of CSPB and IPPE, SIBS, CAS.

  12. Development of broad-spectrum human monoclonal antibodies for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    De Benedictis, Paola; Minola, Andrea; Rota Nodari, Elena; Aiello, Roberta; Zecchin, Barbara; Salomoni, Angela; Foglierini, Mathilde; Agatic, Gloria; Vanzetta, Fabrizia; Lavenir, Rachel; Lepelletier, Anthony; Bentley, Emma; Weiss, Robin; Cattoli, Giovanni; Capua, Ilaria; Sallusto, Federica; Wright, Edward; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Bourhy, Hervé; Corti, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Currently available rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for use in humans includes equine or human rabies immunoglobulins (RIG). The replacement of RIG with an equally or more potent and safer product is strongly encouraged due to the high costs and limited availability of existing RIG. In this study, we identified two broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies that represent a valid and affordable alternative to RIG in rabies PEP. Memory B cells from four selected vaccinated donors were immortalized and monoclonal antibodies were tested for neutralizing activity and epitope specificity. Two antibodies, identified as RVC20 and RVC58 (binding to antigenic site I and III, respectively), were selected for their potency and broad-spectrum reactivity. In vitro, RVC20 and RVC58 were able to neutralize all 35 rabies virus (RABV) and 25 non-RABV lyssaviruses. They showed higher potency and breath compared to antibodies under clinical development (namely CR57, CR4098, and RAB1) and commercially available human RIG. In vivo, the RVC20-RVC58 cocktail protected Syrian hamsters from a lethal RABV challenge and did not affect the endogenous hamster post-vaccination antibody response. © 2016 Humabs BioMed SA Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  13. The ABCs of the US Broad Spectrum Antimicrobials Program: Antibiotics, Biosecurity, and Congress

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has been increasing at an alarming rate in the United States and globally for decades, but the problem has only recently gained broad attention at the highest levels of the US government. More and more patients are dying of infections that do not respond to antibiotics that are currently available. Meanwhile, the antibacterial product pipeline remains fragile in part because of a lack of commercial interest from pharmaceutical companies. The Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) Broad Spectrum Antimicrobials (BSA) program leads the US government's effort to bridge this gap by advancing new antibacterials through late stages of clinical development. Other commentators have described in detail BARDA's structure, process, and role in antibacterial development. This commentary offers a public policy perspective on the emerging politics of antibiotic resistance in the context of US biosecurity politics and medical countermeasure (MCM) development. It identifies promising developments and difficult challenges that together will ultimately determine whether BARDA can become a global leader for antibiotic development. PMID:26569379

  14. Oxabicyclooctane-Linked Novel Bacterial Topoisomerase Inhibitors as Broad Spectrum Antibacterial Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sheo B.; Kaelin, David E.; Wu, Jin

    Bacterial resistance is eroding the clinical utility of existing antibiotics necessitating the discovery of new agents. Bacterial type II topoisomerase is a clinically validated, highly effective, and proven drug target. This target is amenable to inhibition by diverse classes of inhibitors with alternative and distinct binding sites to quinolone antibiotics, thus enabling the development of agents that lack cross-resistance to quinolones. Described here are novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs), which are a new class of gyrase and topo IV inhibitors and consist of three distinct structural moieties. The substitution of the linker moiety led to discovery of potent broad-spectrum NBTIsmore » with reduced off-target activity (hERG IC50 > 18 μM) and improved physical properties. AM8191 is bactericidal and selectively inhibits DNA synthesis and Staphylococcus aureus gyrase (IC50 = 1.02 μM) and topo IV (IC50 = 10.4 μM). AM8191 showed parenteral and oral efficacy (ED50) at less than 2.5 mg/kg doses in a S. aureus murine infection model. A cocrystal structure of AM8191 bound to S. aureus DNA-gyrase showed binding interactions similar to that reported for GSK299423, displaying a key contact of Asp83 with the basic amine at position-7 of the linker.« less

  15. Anticancer kinase inhibitors impair intracellular viral trafficking and exert broad-spectrum antiviral effects.

    PubMed

    Bekerman, Elena; Neveu, Gregory; Shulla, Ana; Brannan, Jennifer; Pu, Szu-Yuan; Wang, Stanley; Xiao, Fei; Barouch-Bentov, Rina; Bakken, Russell R; Mateo, Roberto; Govero, Jennifer; Nagamine, Claude M; Diamond, Michael S; De Jonghe, Steven; Herdewijn, Piet; Dye, John M; Randall, Glenn; Einav, Shirit

    2017-04-03

    Global health is threatened by emerging viral infections, which largely lack effective vaccines or therapies. Targeting host pathways that are exploited by multiple viruses could offer broad-spectrum solutions. We previously reported that AAK1 and GAK, kinase regulators of the host adaptor proteins AP1 and AP2, are essential for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but the underlying mechanism and relevance to other viruses or in vivo infections remained unknown. Here, we have discovered that AP1 and AP2 cotraffic with HCV particles in live cells. Moreover, we found that multiple viruses, including dengue and Ebola, exploit AAK1 and GAK during entry and infectious virus production. In cultured cells, treatment with sunitinib and erlotinib, approved anticancer drugs that inhibit AAK1 or GAK activity, or with more selective compounds inhibited intracellular trafficking of HCV and multiple unrelated RNA viruses with a high barrier to resistance. In murine models of dengue and Ebola infection, sunitinib/erlotinib combination protected against morbidity and mortality. We validated sunitinib- and erlotinib-mediated inhibition of AAK1 and GAK activity as an important mechanism of antiviral action. Additionally, we revealed potential roles for additional kinase targets. These findings advance our understanding of virus-host interactions and establish a proof of principle for a repurposed, host-targeted approach to combat emerging viruses.

  16. Development and characterization of novel chimeric monoclonal antibodies for broad spectrum neutralization of rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Pan Kyeom; Keum, Sun Ju; Osinubi, Modupe O V; Franka, Richard; Shin, Ji Young; Park, Sang Tae; Kim, Man Su; Park, Mi Jung; Lee, Soo Young; Carson, William; Greenberg, Lauren; Yu, Pengcheng; Tao, Xiaoyan; Lihua, Wang; Tang, Qing; Liang, Guodong; Shampur, Madhusdana; Rupprecht, Charles E; Chang, Shin Jae

    2017-01-01

    Current post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies virus infection has several limitations in terms of supply, cost, safety, and efficacy. Attempts to replace human or equine rabies immune globulins (HRIG or ERIG) have been made by several companies and institutes. We developed potent monoclonal antibodies to neutralize a broad spectrum of rabies viruses by screening hybridomas received from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Two kinds of chimeric human antibodies (chimeric #7 and #17) were constructed by cloning the variable regions from selected hybridomas and the constant region of a human antibody. Two antibodies were bound to antigenic site III and I/IV, respectively, and were able to neutralize 51 field isolates of rabies virus that were isolated at different times and places such as Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Australia. These two antibodies neutralize rabies viruses with high efficacy in an in vivo test using Syrian hamster and mouse models and show low risk for adverse immunogenicity.

  17. Axinellamines as Broad-Spectrum Antibacterial Agents: Scalable Synthesis and Biology

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria present an ongoing challenge to both chemists and biologists as they seek novel compounds and modes of action to out-maneuver continually evolving resistance pathways, especially against Gram-negative strains. The dimeric pyrrole–imidazole alkaloids represent a unique marine natural product class with diverse primary biological activity and chemical architecture. This full account traces the strategy used to develop a second-generation route to key spirocycle 9, culminating in a practical synthesis of the axinellamines and enabling their discovery as broad-spectrum antibacterial agents, with promising activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. While their detailed mode of antibacterial action remains unclear, the axinellamines appear to cause secondary membrane destabilization and impart an aberrant cellular morphology consistent with the inhibition of normal septum formation. This study serves as a rare example of a natural product initially reported to be devoid of biological activity surfacing as an active antibacterial agent with an intriguing mode of action. PMID:25328977

  18. Induction of Broad-Spectrum Protective Immunity against Disparate Cryptococcus Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyke, Marley C. Caballero; Chaturvedi, Ashok K.; Hardison, Sarah E.; Leopold Wager, Chrissy M.; Castro-Lopez, Natalia; Hole, Camaron R.; Wozniak, Karen L.; Wormley, Floyd L.

    2017-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a fungal disease caused by multiple Cryptococcus serotypes; particularly C. neoformans (serotypes A and D) and C. gattii (serotypes B and C). To date, there is no clinically available vaccine to prevent cryptococcosis. Mice given an experimental pulmonary vaccination with a C. neoformans serotype A strain engineered to produce interferon-γ, denoted H99γ, are protected against a subsequent otherwise lethal experimental infection with C. neoformans serotype A. Thus, we determined the efficacy of immunization with C. neoformans strain H99γ to elicit broad-spectrum protection in BALB/c mice against multiple disparate Cryptococcus serotypes. We observed significantly increased survival rates and significantly decreased pulmonary fungal burden in H99γ immunized mice challenged with Cryptococcus serotypes A, B, or D compared to heat-killed H99γ (HKH99γ) immunized mice. Results indicated that prolonged protection against Cryptococcus serotypes B or D in H99γ immunized mice was CD4+ T cell dependent and associated with the induction of predominantly Th1-type cytokine responses. Interestingly, immunization with H99γ did not elicit greater protection against challenge with the Cryptococcus serotype C tested either due to low overall virulence of this strain or enhanced capacity of this strain to evade host immunity. Altogether, these studies provide “proof-of-concept” for the development of a cryptococcal vaccine that provides cross-protection against multiple disparate serotypes of Cryptococcus. PMID:29163469

  19. Dissecting disease entities out of the broad spectrum of bipolar-disorders.

    PubMed

    Levine, Joseph; Toker, Lilach; Agam, Galila

    2018-01-01

    The etiopathology of bipolar disorders is yet unraveled and new avenues should be pursued. One such avenue may be based on the assumption that the bipolar broad spectrum includes, among others, an array of rare medical disease entities. Towards this aim we propose a dissecting approach based on a search for rare medical diseases with known etiopathology which also exhibit bipolar disorders symptomatology. We further suggest that the etiopathologic mechanisms underlying such rare medical diseases may also underlie a rare variant of bipolar disorder. Such an assumption may be further reinforced if both the rare medical disease and its bipolar clinical phenotype demonstrate a] a similar mode of inheritance (i.e, autosomal dominant); b] brain involvement; and c] data implicating that the etiopathological mechanisms underlying the rare diseases affect biological processes reported to be associated with bipolar disorders and their treatment. We exemplify our suggested approach by a rare case of autosomal dominant leucodystrophy, a disease entity exhibiting nuclear lamin B1 pathology also presenting bipolar symptomatology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Glyphosate (Ab)sorption by Shoots and Rhizomes of Native versus Hybrid Cattail (Typha).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Tianye; Sutton, Nora B; de Jager, Pim; Grosshans, Richard; Munira, Sirajum; Farenhorst, Annemieke

    2017-11-01

    Wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region of North America are integrated with farmland and contain mixtures of herbicide contaminants. Passive nonfacilitated diffusion is how most herbicides can move across plant membranes, making this perhaps an important process by which herbicide contaminants are absorbed by wetland vegetation. Prairie wetlands are dominated by native cattail (Typha latifolia) and hybrid cattail (Typha x glauca). The objective of this batch equilibrium study was to compare glyphosate absorption by the shoots and rhizomes of native versus hybrid cattails. Although it has been previously reported for some pesticides that passive diffusion is greater for rhizome than shoot components, this is the first study to demonstrate that the absorption capacity of rhizomes is species dependent, with the glyphosate absorption being significantly greater for rhizomes than shoots in case of native cattails, but with no significant differences in glyphosate absorption between rhizomes and shoots in case of hybrid cattails. Most importantly, glyphosate absorption by native rhizomes far exceeded that of the absorption occurring for hybrid rhizomes, native shoots and hybrid shoots. Glyphosate has long been used to manage invasive hybrid cattails in wetlands in North America, but hybrid cattail expansions continue to occur. Since our results showed limited glyphosate absorption by hybrid shoots and rhizomes, this lack of sorption may partially explain the poorer ability of glyphosate to control hybrid cattails in wetlands.

  1. Interactions of glyphosate use with farm characteristics and cropping patterns in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Armin; Schulte, Michael; Theuvsen, Ludwig; Steinmann, Horst-Henning

    2018-05-01

    Although glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide in the European Union, little is known about the patterns of its usage in arable farming. Therefore, a nationwide survey of 2026 German farmers was analysed to obtain further knowledge about glyphosate applications in conventional European arable farming. Given its broad range of agri-environmental and farm-type conditions, Germany can be regarded as a suitable study region to represent Central European farming. The growing season 2013/2014 was set as a reference. Farmers who participated in the survey employ diverse patterns of glyphosate use. While 23% stated that they did not use glyphosate in the season in question, others applied glyphosate to their total arable area. However, most applications occurred on specific parts of the farm. Application patterns of oilseed rape, winter wheat, maize and sugar beet were studied in detail, and U-shaped distributions of glyphosate use intensity were observed. The effects of farm type and management practices on glyphosate use patterns were mixed in the various crops. Motivation for glyphosate use differs widely within the farming community. Agricultural researchers, extension services and policy makers are recommended to mitigate vulnerabilities associated with glyphosate use, such as routine spraying and practices that increase selection pressure for the evolution of glyphosate-resistant weeds. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Optimisation of culture composition for glyphosate degradation by Burkholderia vietnamiensis strain AQ5-12.

    PubMed

    Manogaran, Motharasan; Shukor, Mohd Yunus; Yasid, Nur Adeela; Khalil, Khalilah Abdul; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima

    2018-02-01

    The herbicide glyphosate is often used to control weeds in agricultural lands. However, despite its ability to effectively kill weeds at low cost, health problems are still reported due to its toxicity level. The removal of glyphosate from the environment is usually done by microbiological process since chemical process of degradation is ineffective due to the presence of highly stable bonds. Therefore, finding glyphosate-degrading microorganisms in the soil of interest is crucial to remediate this glyphosate. Burkholderia vietnamiensis strain AQ5-12 was found to have glyphosate-degrading ability. Optimisation of biodegradation condition was carried out utilising one factor at a time (OFAT) and response surface methodology (RSM). Five parameters including carbon and nitrogen source, pH, temperature and glyphosate concentration were optimised. Based on OFAT result, glyphosate degradation was observed to be optimum at fructose concentration of 6, 0.5 g/L ammonia sulphate, pH 6.5, temperature of 32 °C and glyphosate concentration at 100 ppm. Meanwhile, RSM resulted in a better degradation with 92.32% of 100 ppm glyphosate compared to OFAT. The bacterium was seen to tolerate up to 500 ppm glyphosate while increasing concentration results in reduced degradation and bacterial growth rate.

  3. PVP capped silver nanocubes assisted removal of glyphosate from water-A photoluminescence study.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Das, Ratan

    2017-10-05

    Glyphosate [N-phosphono-methylglycine (PMG)] is the most used herbicide worldwide and it has been reported very recently that Glyphosate is very harmful and can produce lots of diseases such as alzheimer and parkinson's disease, depression, cancer, infertility including genotoxic effects. As it is mostly present in stable water body and ground water system, its detection and removal is very important. Here, we have shown a fluorescence technique for the removal of glyphosate from water using chemically synthesized polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) silver nanocrystals. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) study shows the average size of silver nanocrystals of 100nm approximately with a morphology of cubic shape. Glyphosate does not show absorption in the visible region. But both glyphosate and silver nanocrystals show strong fluorescence in the visible region. So, photoluminescence study has been successfully utilized to detect the glyphosate in water samples and on treating the glyphosate contaminated water sample with silver nanocrystals, the sample shows no emission peak of glyphosate at 458nm. Thus, this approach is a promising and very rapid method for the detection and removal of glyphosate from water samples on treatment with silver nanocubes. NMR spectra further confirms that the silver nanocrystals treated contaminated water samples are glyphosate free. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Glyphosate-Dependent Inhibition of Photosynthesis in Willow.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marcelo P; Le Manac'h, Sarah G; Hénault-Ethier, Louise; Labrecque, Michel; Lucotte, Marc; Juneau, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    We studied the physiological mechanisms involved in the deleterious effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide (Factor ® 540) on photosynthesis and related physiological processes of willow ( Salix miyabeana cultivar SX64) plants. Sixty-day-old plants grown under greenhouse conditions were sprayed with different rates (0, 1.4, 2.1, and 2.8 kg a.e ha -1 ) of the commercial glyphosate formulated salt Factor ® 540. Evaluations were performed at 0, 6, 24, 48, and 72 h after herbicide exposure. We established that the herbicide decreases chlorophyll, carotenoid and plastoquinone contents, and promotes changes in the photosynthetic apparatus leading to decreased photochemistry which results in hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) accumulation. H 2 O 2 accumulation triggers proline production which can be associated with oxidative protection, NADP + recovery and shikimate pathway stimulation. Ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione peroxidase appeared to be the main peroxidases involved in the H 2 O 2 scavenging. In addition to promoting decreases of the activity of the antioxidant enzymes, the herbicide induced decreases in ascorbate pool. For the first time, a glyphosate-based herbicide mode of action interconnecting its effects on shikimate pathway, photosynthetic process and oxidative events in plants were presented.

  5. Glyphosate-Dependent Inhibition of Photosynthesis in Willow

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Marcelo P.; Le Manac’h, Sarah G.; Hénault-Ethier, Louise; Labrecque, Michel; Lucotte, Marc; Juneau, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    We studied the physiological mechanisms involved in the deleterious effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide (Factor® 540) on photosynthesis and related physiological processes of willow (Salix miyabeana cultivar SX64) plants. Sixty-day-old plants grown under greenhouse conditions were sprayed with different rates (0, 1.4, 2.1, and 2.8 kg a.e ha-1) of the commercial glyphosate formulated salt Factor® 540. Evaluations were performed at 0, 6, 24, 48, and 72 h after herbicide exposure. We established that the herbicide decreases chlorophyll, carotenoid and plastoquinone contents, and promotes changes in the photosynthetic apparatus leading to decreased photochemistry which results in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation. H2O2 accumulation triggers proline production which can be associated with oxidative protection, NADP+ recovery and shikimate pathway stimulation. Ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione peroxidase appeared to be the main peroxidases involved in the H2O2 scavenging. In addition to promoting decreases of the activity of the antioxidant enzymes, the herbicide induced decreases in ascorbate pool. For the first time, a glyphosate-based herbicide mode of action interconnecting its effects on shikimate pathway, photosynthetic process and oxidative events in plants were presented. PMID:28261257

  6. Ten-year response of a forest bird community to an operational herbicide-shelterwood treatment in Allegheny hardwoods

    Treesearch

    Scott H. Stoleson; Todd E. Ristau; David S. deCalesta; Stephen B. Horsley

    2011-01-01

    Use of herbicides in forestry to direct successional trajectories has raised concerns over possible direct or indirect effects on non-target organisms. We studied the response of forest birds to an operational application of glyphosate and sulfometuron methyl herbicides, using a randomized block design in which half of each 8 ha block received herbicide and the other...

  7. Identifying Chloris Species from Cuban Citrus Orchards and Determining Their Glyphosate-Resistance Status

    PubMed Central

    Bracamonte, Enzo R.; Fernández-Moreno, Pablo T.; Bastida, Fernando; Osuna, María D.; Alcántara-de la Cruz, Ricardo; Cruz-Hipolito, Hugo E.; De Prado, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    The Chloris genus is a C4 photosynthetic species mainly distributed in tropical and subtropical regions. Populations of three Chloris species occurring in citrus orchards from central Cuba, under long history glyphosate-based weed management, were studied for glyphosate-resistant status by characterizing their herbicide resistance/tolerance mechanisms. Morphological and molecular analyses allowed these species to be identified as C. ciliata Sw., Chloris elata Desv., and Chloris barbata Sw. Based on the glyphosate rate that causes 50% mortality of the treated plants, glyphosate resistance (R) was confirmed only in C. elata, The R population was 6.1-fold more resistant compared to the susceptible (S) population. In addition, R plants of C. elata accumulated 4.6-fold less shikimate after glyphosate application than S plants. Meanwhile, populations of C. barbata and C. ciliata with or without glyphosate application histories showed similar LD50 values and shikimic acid accumulation rates, demonstrating that resistance to glyphosate have not evolved in these species. Plants of R and S populations of C. elata differed in 14C-glyphosate absorption and translocation. The R population exhibited 27.3-fold greater 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) activity than the S population due to a target site mutation corresponding to a Pro-106-Ser substitution found in the EPSPS gene. These reports show the innate tolerance to glyphosate of C. barbata and C. ciliata, and confirm the resistance of C. elata to this herbicide, showing that both non-target site and target-site mechanisms are involved in its resistance to glyphosate. This is the first case of herbicide resistance in Cuba. PMID:29187862

  8. Wild Coastline Birds as Reservoirs of Broad-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Miami Beach, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Potron, Anaïs; De La Cuesta, Carolina; Cleary, Timothy; Nordmann, Patrice; Munoz-Price, L. Silvia

    2012-01-01

    A high rate of broad-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli isolates was identified from seagull and pelican feces collected in the Miami Beach, Florida, area. The most commonly identified resistance determinants were CMY-2 and CTX-M-15. Those wild birds might be therefore considered vehicles for wide dissemination of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in the United States. PMID:22314536

  9. A Broad-Spectrum Integrative Design for Cancer Prevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Block, Keith I.; Gyllenhaal, Charlotte; Lowe, Leroy; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, A.R.M. Ruhul; Amin, Amr; Aquilano, Katia; Arbiser, Jack; Arreola, Alexandra; Arzumanyan, Alla; Ashraf, S. Salman; Azmi, Asfar S.; Benencia, Fabian; Bhakta, Dipita; Bilsland, Alan; Bishayee, Anupam; Blain, Stacy W.; Block, Penny B.; Boosani, Chandra S.; Carey, Thomas E.; Carnero, Amancio; Carotenuto, Marianeve; Casey, Stephanie C.; Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Chen, Georgia Zhuo; Chen, Helen; Chen, Sophie; Chen, Yi Charlie; Choi, Beom K.; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Coley, Helen M.; Collins, Andrew R.; Connell, Marisa; Crawford, Sarah; Curran, Colleen S.; Dabrosin, Charlotta; Damia, Giovanna; Dasgupta, Santanu; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Decker, William K.; Dhawan, Punita; Diehl, Anna Mae E.; Dong, Jin-Tang; Dou, Q. Ping; Drew, Janice E.; Elkord, Eyad; El-Rayes, Bassel; Feitelson, Mark A.; Felsher, Dean W.; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Fimognari, Carmela; Firestone, Gary L.; Frezza, Christian; Fujii, Hiromasa; Fuster, Mark M.; Generali, Daniele; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Gieseler, Frank; Gilbertson, Michael; Green, Michelle F.; Grue, Brendan; Guha, Gunjan; Halicka, Dorota; Helferich, William G.; Heneberg, Petr; Hentosh, Patricia; Hirschey, Matthew D.; Hofseth, Lorne J.; Holcombe, Randall F.; Honoki, Kanya; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Huang, Gloria S.; Jensen, Lasse D.; Jiang, Wen G.; Jones, Lee W.; Karpowicz, Phillip A.; Keith, W Nicol; Kerkar, Sid P.; Khan, Gazala N.; Khatami, Mahin; Ko, Young H.; Kucuk, Omer; Kulathinal, Rob J.; Kumar, Nagi B.; Kumara, H.M.C. Shantha; Kwon, Byoung S.; Le, Anne; Lea, Michael A.; Lee, Ho-Young; Lichtor, Terry; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Locasale, Jason W.; Lokeshwar, Bal L.; Longo, Valter D.; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; MacKenzie, Karen L.; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Marino, Maria; Martinez-Chantar, Maria L.; Matheu, Ander; Maxwell, Christopher; McDonnell, Eoin; Meeker, Alan K.; Mehrmohamadi, Mahya; Mehta, Kapil; Michelotti, Gregory A.; Mohammad, Ramzi M.; Mohammed, Sulma I.; Morre, D. James; Muqbil, Irfana; Muralidhar, Vinayak; Murphy, Michael P.; Nagaraju, Ganji Purnachandra; Nahta, Rita; Niccolai, Elena; Nowsheen, Somaira; Panis, Carolina; Pantano, Francesco; Parslow, Virginia R.; Pawelec, Graham; Pedersen, Peter L.; Poore, Brad; Poudyal, Deepak; Prakash, Satya; Prince, Mark; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Ray, Swapan K.; Reichrath, Jörg; Rezazadeh, Sarallah; Ribatti, Domenico; Ricciardiello, Luigi; Robey, R. Brooks; Rodier, Francis; Rupasinghe, H.P. Vasantha; Russo, Gian Luigi; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Samadi, Abbas K.; Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro; Sanders, Andrew J.; Santini, Daniele; Sarkar, Malancha; Sasada, Tetsuro; Saxena, Neeraj K.; Shackelford, Rodney E; Sharma, Dipali; Shin, Dong M.; Sidransky, David; Siegelin, Markus David; Signori, Emanuela; Singh, Neetu; Sivanand, Sharanya; Sliva, Daniel; Smythe, Carl; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Stafforini, Diana M.; Stagg, John; Subbarayan, Pochi R.; Sundin, Tabetha; Talib, Wamidh H.; Thompson, Sarah K.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Ungefroren, Hendrik; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Venkateswaran, Vasundara; Vinay, Dass S.; Vlachostergios, Panagiotis J.; Wang, Zongwei; Wellen, Kathryn E.; Whelan, Richard L.; Yang, Eddy S.; Yang, Huanjie; Yang, Xujuan; Yaswen, Paul; Yedjou, Clement; Yin, Xin; Zhu, Jiyue; Zollo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapies and the consequent adoption of “personalized” oncology have achieved notable successes in some cancers; however, significant problems remain with this approach. Many targeted therapies are highly toxic, costs are extremely high, and most patients experience relapse after a few disease-free months. Relapses arise from genetic heterogeneity in tumors, which harbor therapy-resistant immortalized cells that have adopted alternate and compensatory pathways (i.e., pathways that are not reliant upon the same mechanisms as those which have been targeted). To address these limitations, an international task force of 180 scientists was assembled to explore the concept of a low-toxicity “broad-spectrum” therapeutic approach that could simultaneously target many key pathways and mechanisms. Using cancer hallmark phenotypes and the tumor microenvironment to account for the various aspects of relevant cancer biology, interdisciplinary teams reviewed each hallmark area and nominated a wide range of high-priority targets (74 in total) that could be modified to improve patient outcomes. For these targets, corresponding low-toxicity therapeutic approaches were then suggested; many of which were phytochemicals. Proposed actions on each target and all of the approaches were further reviewed for known effects on other hallmark areas and the tumor microenvironment. Potential contrary or procarcinogenic effects were found for 3.9% of the relationships between targets and hallmarks, and mixed evidence of complementary and contrary relationships was found for 7.1%. Approximately 67% of the relationships revealed potentially complementary effects, and the remainder had no known relationship. Among the approaches, 1.1% had contrary, 2.8% had mixed and 62.1% had complementary relationships. These results suggest that a broad-spectrum approach should be feasible from a safety standpoint. This novel approach has potential to help us address disease relapse, which is a

  10. The use of inexpensive broad spectrum lower toxicity therapeutics in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Marjanovic, Goran

    2017-01-01

    The use of new and highly efficient targeted therapies for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is costly and out of reach for many health care systems. On the other hand, in recent years, few inexpensive, broad-spectrum low-toxicity therapeutics have proven to be effective both in the preclinical and clinical settings. In early-stage CLL, the use of 2000 mg of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) from the green tea extract twice a day was able to reduce the absolute leukocyte count. Supplementation of >2000 IU/day of Vitamin D in early low-risk CLL patients is able to delay disease progression and postpone the moment of initiation of the first treatment. The doses of both vitamin D and EGCG were shown to be safe in older patients. Vitamin D, EGCG and Curcumin, either as monotherapy or in combination, have additive and synergistic effects with conventional chemotherapy. Further observations have identified the improvement of response to rituximab-fludarabine-cyclophosphamide (R-FC) therapy with concomitant administration of statin and aspirin combination in relapsed/refractory CLL. Finally, high dose dexamethasone with 40mg/m 2 /day for 4 days, every 28 days, either alone or with monoclonal antibody, might be used as a salvage therapy or for debulking before transplantation in refractory/resistant cases. Dexamethasone therapy is followed by transient response and high rate of infections, but fluid retention and other toxicities are lower compared to high dose methylprednisolone schedules. The low cost therapeutics discussed in this review could not be a substitute for the more effective targeted therapies, but their use in every day practice might postpone the need for early implementation of new and costly medications.

  11. Modified lysozymes as novel broad spectrum natural antimicrobial agents in foods.

    PubMed

    Aminlari, Ladan; Hashemi, Marjan Mohammadi; Aminlari, Mahmoud

    2014-06-01

    In recent years much attention and interest have been directed toward application of natural antimicrobial agents in foods. Some naturally occurring proteins such as lactoperoxidase, lactoferrin, and lysozyme have received considerable attention and are being considered as potential antimicrobial agents in foods. Lysozyme kills bacteria by hydrolyzing the peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall of certain bacterial species, hence its application as a natural antimicrobial agent has been suggested. However, limitations in the action of lysozyme against only Gram-positive bacteria have prompted scientists to extend the antimicrobial effects of lysozyme by several types of chemical modifications. During the last 2 decades extensive research has been directed toward modification of lysozyme in order to improve its antimicrobial properties. This review will report on the latest information available on lysozyme modifications and examine the applicability of the modified lysozymes in controlling growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in foods. The results of modifications of lysozyme using its conjugation with different small molecule, polysaccharides, as well as modifications using proteolytic enzymes will be reviewed. These types of modifications have not only increased the functional properties of lysozyme (such as solubility and heat stability) but also extended the antimicrobial activity of lysozyme. Many examples will be given to show that modification can decrease the count of Gram-negative bacteria in bacterial culture and in foods by as much as 5 log CFU/mL and in some cases essentially eliminated Escherichia coli. In conclusion this review demonstrates that modified lysozymes are excellent natural food preservatives, which can be used in food industry. The subject described in this review article can lead to the development of methods to produce new broad-spectrum natural antimicrobial agents, based on modification of chicken egg white lysozyme, which

  12. Broad spectrum antimicrobial activity of melimine covalently bound to contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debarun; Cole, Nerida; Kumar, Naresh; Willcox, Mark D P

    2013-01-07

    To develop a stable antimicrobial contact lens, which is effective against the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) panel microorganisms, Acanthamoeba castellanii and drug resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Melimine was covalently incorporated into etafilcon A lenses. The amount of peptide present on the lens surface was quantified using amino acid analysis. After coating, the heat stability (121°C), lens surface hydrophobicity (by captive bubble), and in vitro cytotoxicity to mouse L929 cells of the lenses were investigated. Antimicrobial activity against the micro-organisms was evaluated by viable plate count and fluorescence microscopy, measuring the proportion of cell death compared with control lenses with no melimine. The most effective concentration was determined to be 152 ± 44 μg lens(-1) melimine on the lens surface. After coating, lenses were relatively hydrophilic and were nontoxic to mammalian cells. The activity remained high after autoclaving (e.g., 3.1, 3.9, 1.2, and 1.0 log inhibition against P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, A. castellanii, and Fusarium solani, respectively). Fluorescence microscopy confirmed significantly reduced (P < 0.001) adhesion of viable bacteria to melimine contact lenses. Viable count confirmed that lenses were active against all the bacteria and fungi from the ISO panel, Acanthamoeba and gave at least 2 log inhibition against all the multidrug resistant S. aureus and P. aeruginosa strains. Melimine may offer excellent potential for development as a broad spectrum antimicrobial coating for contact lenses, showing activity against all the bacterial and fungal ISO panel microorganisms, Acanthamoeba, and antibiotic resistant strains of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus.

  13. Disulphide-reduced psoriasin is a human apoptosis-inducing broad-spectrum fungicide

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Kyaw Zaw; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Tsumori, Toshiko; Yasui, Yukihiko; Nanjoh, Yasuko; Toga, Tetsuo; Wu, Zhihong; Grötzinger, Joachim; Jung, Sascha; Wehkamp, Jan; Schroeder, Bjoern O.; Schroeder, Jens M.; Morita, Eishin

    2015-01-01

    The unexpected resistance of psoriasis lesions to fungal infections suggests local production of an antifungal factor. We purified Trichophyton rubrum-inhibiting activity from lesional psoriasis scale extracts and identified the Cys-reduced form of S100A7/psoriasin (redS100A7) as a principal antifungal factor. redS100A7 inhibits various filamentous fungi, including the mold Aspergillus fumigatus, but not Candida albicans. Antifungal activity was inhibited by Zn2+, suggesting that redS100A7 interferes with fungal zinc homeostasis. Because S100A7-mutants lacking a single cysteine are no longer antifungals, we hypothesized that redS100A7 is acting as a Zn2+-chelator. Immunogold electron microscopy studies revealed that it penetrates fungal cells, implicating possible intracellular actions. In support with our hypothesis, the cell-penetrating Zn2+-chelator TPEN was found to function as a broad-spectrum antifungal. Ultrastructural analyses of redS100A7-treated T. rubrum revealed marked signs of apoptosis, suggesting that its mode of action is induction of programmed cell death. TUNEL, SYTOX-green analyses, and caspase-inhibition studies supported this for both T. rubrum and A. fumigatus. Whereas redS100A7 can be generated from oxidized S100A7 by action of thioredoxin or glutathione, elevated redS100A7 levels in fungal skin infection indicate induction of both S100A7 and its reducing agent in vivo. To investigate whether redS100A7 and TPEN are antifungals in vivo, we used a guinea pig tinea pedes model for fungal skin infections and a lethal mouse Aspergillus infection model for lung infection and found antifungal activity in both in vivo animal systems. Thus, selective fungal cell-penetrating Zn2+-chelators could be useful as an urgently needed novel antifungal therapeutic, which induces programmed cell death in numerous fungi. PMID:26438863

  14. Pyrodiversity and the anthropocene: the role of fire in the broad spectrum revolution.

    PubMed

    Bird, Douglas W; Bliege Bird, Rebecca; Codding, Brian F

    2016-05-06

    The Anthropocene colloquially refers to a global regime of human-caused environmental modification of earth systems associated with profound changes in patterns of human mobility, as well as settlement and resource use compared with prior eras. Some have argued that the processes generating the Anthropocene are mainly associated with population growth and technological innovation, and thus began only in the late Holocene under conditions of dense sedentism and industrial agriculture.(1) However, it now seems clear that the roots of the Anthropocene lie in complex processes of intensification that significantly predate transitions to agriculture.(2,3) What intensification is remains less clear. For some it is increasing economic productivity that increases carrying capacity, the drivers of which may be too diverse and too local to generalize.(4,5) For others using Boserup's ideas about agrarian intensification, increasing density in hunter-gatherer populations can produce declines in subsistence efficiency that increase incentives for investing labor to boost yield per unit area, which then elevates Malthusian limits on carrying capacity.(6-8) As Morgan(9) demonstrates in a comprehensive review, the legacy of such Boserupian intensification is alive, well, and controversial in hunter-gatherer archeology. This is a result of its potential for illuminating processes involved in transformations of forager socio-political and economic systems, including those dominated by harvesting more immediate-return resources and high residential mobility as well as those characterized by more delayed-return material economies with reduced residential mobility, a broader spectrum of resources, degrees of storage, and greater social stratification. Here we detail hypotheses about the processes involved in such transitions and explore the way that anthropogenic disturbance of ecosystems, especially the use of landscape fire, could be fundamentally entangled with many broad-spectrum

  15. Prophylactic broad spectrum antibiotics as a new anti-myeloma therapy.

    PubMed

    Valkovic, Toni; Nacinovic, Antica Duletic; Petranovic, Duska

    2013-12-01

    Multiple myeloma is a common, yet incurable, haematological neoplasm. The reciprocal communication between malignant plasma cells, other cell types, and the extracellular matrix in the bone marrow micro-eco system is mediated by cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion, as well as the production of different soluble factors, and is crucial for tumour growth and drug resistance. Inflammation and pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to the clonal expansion of neoplastic plasmacytes. This extremely complex pathogenesis of multiple myeloma gives us the opportunity to promote numerous novel drugs and approaches based on the paradigm of targeted therapy. Immune dysfunction is a hallmark of multiple myeloma. Intrinsic and therapy-related immunosuppression leads to an increased risk of recurrent infection, the major cause of mortality. However, little data is available regarding the possible influence of infection on the biology and progression of multiple myeloma. Some authors have shown that pathogenic microorganisms can activate tool-like receptors on myeloma cells, as well as the robust production of pro-inflammatory cytokines; together these factors can contribute to myeloma growth, survival, and progression. Therefore, we proposed a simple, inexpensive, and new approach for anti-myeloma therapy that, to the best of our knowledge, is the first one concerning the prophylactic, long-term use of broad-spectrum antibiotics during the course of disease regardless of the chosen concomitant regimens. Prophylactic treatment with antibiotics should suppress the pro-inflammatory milieu produced during recurrent bacterial infections and prevent the activation of tool-like receptors on tumour cells, which are important factors responsible for tumour growth and survival in patients with multiple myeloma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Depletion of Cultivatable Gut Microbiota by Broad-Spectrum Antibiotic Pretreatment Worsens Outcome After Murine Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Winek, Katarzyna; Engel, Odilo; Koduah, Priscilla; Heimesaat, Markus M.; Fischer, André; Bereswill, Stefan; Dames, Claudia; Kershaw, Olivia; Gruber, Achim D.; Curato, Caterina; Oyama, Naoki; Meisel, Christian; Meisel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Antibiotics disturbing microbiota are often used in treatment of poststroke infections. A bidirectional brain–gut microbiota axis was recently suggested as a modulator of nervous system diseases. We hypothesized that gut microbiota may be an important player in the course of stroke. Methods— We investigated the outcome of focal cerebral ischemia in C57BL/6J mice after an 8-week decontamination with quintuple broad-spectrum antibiotic cocktail. These microbiota-depleted animals were subjected to 60 minutes middle cerebral artery occlusion or sham operation. Infarct volume was measured using magnetic resonance imaging, and mice were monitored clinically throughout the whole experiment. At the end point, tissues were preserved for further analysis, comprising histology and immunologic investigations using flow cytometry. Results— We found significantly decreased survival in the middle cerebral artery occlusion microbiota-depleted mice when the antibiotic cocktail was stopped 3 days before surgery (compared with middle cerebral artery occlusion specific pathogen-free and sham-operated microbiota-depleted mice). Moreover, all microbiota-depleted animals in which antibiotic treatment was terminated developed severe acute colitis. This phenotype was rescued by continuous antibiotic treatment or colonization with specific pathogen-free microbiota before surgery. Further, infarct volumes on day one did not differ between any of the experimental groups. Conclusions— Conventional microbiota ensures intestinal protection in the mouse model of experimental stroke and prevents development of acute and severe colitis in microbiota-depleted mice not given antibiotic protection after cerebral ischemia. Our experiments raise the clinically important question as to whether microbial colonization or specific microbiota are crucial for stroke outcome. PMID:27056982

  17. Evaluation of Eye Protection Filters Used with Broad-Spectrum and Conventional LED Curing Lights.

    PubMed

    Soares, Carlos José; Rodrigues, Monise de Paula; Vilela, Andomar Bruno Fernandes; Rizo, Erick René Cerda; Ferreira, Lorraine Braga; Giannini, Marcelo; Price, Richard Bengt

    2017-01-01

    The high irradiance and the different emission spectra from contemporary light curing units (LCU) may cause ocular damage. This study evaluated the ability of 15 eye protection filters: 2 glasses, 1 paddle design, and 12 dedicated filters to block out harmful light from a monowave (HP-3M ESPE) and a broad-spectrum (Valo, Ultradent) LED LCU. Using the anterior sensor in the MARC-Patient Simulator (BlueLight Analytics) the irradiance that was delivered through different eye protection filters was measured three times. The LCUs delivered a similar irradiance to the top of the filter. The mean values of the light that passed through the filters as percent of the original irradiance were analyzed using two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test (a= 0.05). The emission spectra from the LCUs and through the filters were also obtained. Two-way ANOVA showed that the interaction between protective filters and LCUs significantly influenced the amount of light transmitted (p< 0.001). Tukey test showed that the amount of light transmitted through the protective filters when using the HP-3M-ESPE was significantly greater compared to when using the Valo, irrespective of the protective filter tested. When using the HP-3M-ESPE, the Glasses filter allowed significantly more light through, followed by XL 3000, ORTUS, Google Professional, Gnatus filters. The Valo filter was the most effective at blocking out the harmful light. Some protective filters were less effective at blocking the lower wavelengths of light (<420 nm). However, even in the worst scenario, the filters were able to block at least 97% of the irradiance.

  18. Reduction of Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Use in a Tertiary Children's Hospital Post Antimicrobial Stewardship Program Guideline Implementation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kelley R; Bagga, Bindiya; Arnold, Sandra R

    2016-03-01

    The core strategies recommended for antimicrobial stewardship programs, formulary restriction with preauthorization and prospective audit and feedback, can be difficult to implement with limited resources; therefore, we took an approach of guideline development and education with the goal of reducing overall antibiotic use and unwarranted use of broad-spectrum antimicrobials. Retrospective chart review before and after intervention. Le Bonheur Children's Hospital pediatric, neonatal, and cardiac ICUs. All patients in our pediatric, neonatal, and cardiac ICUs within the time frame of the study. Baseline review in our ICUs revealed excessive use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and inconsistency in managing common pediatric infections. Guidelines were developed and implemented using cycles of education, retrospective review, and feedback. Purchasing and antibiotic use data were obtained to assess changes before and after guideline implementation. Unit-specific days of therapy were measured using periodic chart audit. Segmented regression analysis was used to assess changes in purchasing and broad-spectrum antibiotic days of therapy. The change in median monthly purchases was assessed using 2-tail Student t test. Hospital-wide targeted broad-spectrum antibiotic days of therapy/1,000 patient-days during the preimplementation year averaged 105 per month and decreased 33% to 70 per month during the postimplementation year. The overall antibiotic days of therapy decreased 41%, 21%, and 18%, and targeted broad-spectrum antibiotic days of therapy decreased by 99%, 75%, and 61% in the cardiac, pediatric, and neonatal ICUs, respectively, after guideline implementation. Yearly purchases of our most common broad-spectrum antibiotics decreased 62% from $230,059 to $86,887 after guideline implementation. Median monthly purchases of these drugs before implementation were $19,389 and $11,043 after implementation (p < 0.001). Guideline implementation was successful in reducing targeted

  19. Glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid are not detectable in human milk.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Michelle K; McGuire, Mark A; Price, William J; Shafii, Bahman; Carrothers, Janae M; Lackey, Kimberly A; Goldstein, Daniel A; Jensen, Pamela K; Vicini, John L

    2016-05-01

    Although animal studies have shown that exposure to glyphosate (a commonly used herbicide) does not result in glyphosate bioaccumulation in tissues, to our knowledge there are no published data on whether it is detectable in human milk and therefore consumed by breastfed infants. We sought to determine whether glyphosate and its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) could be detected in milk and urine produced by lactating women and, if so, to quantify typical consumption by breastfed infants. We collected milk (n = 41) and urine (n = 40) samples from healthy lactating women living in and around Moscow, Idaho and Pullman, Washington. Milk and urine samples were analyzed for glyphosate and AMPA with the use of highly sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods validated for and optimized to each sample matrix. Our milk assay, which was sensitive down to 1 μg/L for both analytes, detected neither glyphosate nor AMPA in any milk sample. Mean ± SD glyphosate and AMPA concentrations in urine were 0.28 ± 0.38 and 0.30 ± 0.33 μg/L, respectively. Because of the complex nature of milk matrixes, these samples required more dilution before analysis than did urine, thus decreasing the sensitivity of the assay in milk compared with urine. No difference was found in urine glyphosate and AMPA concentrations between subjects consuming organic compared with conventionally grown foods or between women living on or near a farm/ranch and those living in an urban or suburban nonfarming area. Our data provide evidence that glyphosate and AMPA are not detectable in milk produced by women living in this region of the US Pacific Northwest. By extension, our results therefore suggest that dietary glyphosate exposure is not a health concern for breastfed infants. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02670278. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  20. Glyphosate sorption to soils of Argentina. Estimation of affinity coeficient by pedotransfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Geronimo, Eduardo; Aparicio, Virginia; Costa, José Luis

    2017-04-01

    Argentine agricultural production is fundamentally based on a technological package that combines direct seeding and glyphosate with transgenic crops (soybean, maize and cotton). Therefore, glyphosate is the most employed herbicide in the country, where 180 to 200 million liters are applied every year. Glyphosate is strongly sorbed to soil by binding to clay minerals, layer silicates, metal oxides, non-crystalline materials or organic matter. Sorption of glyphosate is a reversible process that regulates the half-life and mobility of the herbicide and it is therefore related to the risk of contaminating courses of surface and groundwater. However, this behavior may vary depending on the characteristics of the soil on which it is applied. In addition, pH is a determining factor since it modifies the net charge in the molecule and, with it, the force of the electrostatic interaction between the glyphosate and the components of the soil. For a reliable risk assessment of groundwater contamination from pesticides precise predictions of sorption coefficients are needed. The aim of this work is to study the affinity of glyphosate to different soils of Argentina and create a model to estimate the glyphosate Freundlich sorption coefficient (Kf) from easily measurable soil properties. Adsorption of glyphosate was investigated on 12 different agricultural soils of Argentina using batch equilibration technique and fit to Freundlich sorption model. The correlation coefficients and the effects of soil characteristic factors on glyphosate adsorption parameter were analyzed through principal component and multiple lineal regression analysis. Results indicate that pH and clay contents were found to be the most significant soil factors which affect the glyphosate adsorption process. The Freundlich (Kf) pedotransfer function obtained by stepwise regression analysis was Kf = 735.2*Clay - 104.2*pH + 0.7*Polsen - 3.8*Alin. A 97.9% of the variation of glyphosate sorption coefficient

  1. Glyphosate biodegradation and potential soil bioremediation by Bacillus subtilis strain Bs-15.

    PubMed

    Yu, X M; Yu, T; Yin, G H; Dong, Q L; An, M; Wang, H R; Ai, C X

    2015-11-23

    Glyphosate and glyphosate-containing herbicides have an adverse effect on mammals, humans, and soil microbial ecosystems. Therefore, it is important to develop methods for enhancing glyphosate degradation in soil through bioremediation. We investigated the potential of glyphosate degradation and bioremediation in soil by Bacillus subtilis Bs-15. Bs-15 grew well at high concentrations of glyphosate; the maximum concentration tolerated by Bs-15 reached 40,000 mg/L. The optimal conditions for bacterial growth and glyphosate degradation were less than 10,000 mg/L glyphosate, with a temperature of 35°C and a pH of 8.0. Optimal fermentation occurred at 180 rpm for 60 h with an inoculum ratio of 4%. Bs-15 degraded 17.65% (12 h) to 66.97% (96 h) of glyphosate in sterile soil and 19.01% (12 h) to 71.57% (96 h) in unsterilized soil. Using a BIOLOG ECO plate test, we observed no significant difference in average well color development values between the soil inoculated with Bs-15 and the control soil before 72 h, although there was a significant difference (P < 0.01) after 72 h. In the presence of Bs-15, the 5 functional diversity indices (Shannon index, Shannon uniformity, Simpson index, McIntosh index, and McIntosh uniformity) were greater (P < 0.01) compared with the control soil. These results indicate that Bs-15 could be used to alleviate contamination from glyphosate-containing herbicides, increasing the microbial functional diversity in glyphosate-contaminated soils and thus enhancing the bioremediation of glyphosate-contaminated soils.

  2. Wind erosion as an environmental transport pathway of glyphosate and AMPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bento, Célia P. M.; Goossens, Dirk; Rezaei, Mahrooz; Riksen, Michel; Mol, Hans G. J.; Ritsema, Coen J.; Geissen, Violette

    2017-04-01

    Glyphosate is the active ingredient of many commercial formulations of herbicides extensively used worldwide for weed control. Because glyphosate and its main metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) are considered non-volatile, their loss to the atmosphere is considered negligible. Both compounds strongly adsorb to soil particles and wind-eroded sediment and dust are thus a possible environmental transport pathway. This can result in environmental and human exposure far beyond the agricultural areas where it has been applied. Therefore, special attention is required to the airborne transport of glyphosate and AMPA. In this study, we investigated the behavior of glyphosate and AMPA in wind-eroded sediment by measuring their content in different size fractions (median diameters between 715 and 8 µm) of a loess soil, during a period of 28 days after glyphosate application. Granulometrical extraction was done using a wind tunnel and a Soil Fine Particle Extractor. Extractions were conducted on days 0, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after glyphosate application. Results indicated that glyphosate and AMPA contents were significantly higher in the finest particle fractions (median diameters between 8 and 18 µm), and lowered significantly with the increase in particle size. Glyphosate and AMPA contents correlated positively with clay, organic matter, and silt content. The dissipation of glyphosate over time was very low, which was associated to the low soil moisture content of the sediment. Consequently, the formation of AMPA was also very low. The low dissipation of glyphosate in our study indicates that the risk of glyphosate transport in dry sediment to off-target areas by wind can be very high. The highest glyphosate and AMPA contents were found in the smallest soil fractions (PM10 and less), which are easily inhaled. This contributes to the risk of human and animal exposure and, therefore, more attention should be paid to this route of exposure in environmental and human

  3. Limited uptake, translocation and enhanced metabolic degradation contribute to glyphosate tolerance in Mucuna pruriens var. utilis plants.

    PubMed

    Rojano-Delgado, Antonia María; Cruz-Hipolito, Hugo; De Prado, Rafael; Luque de Castro, María Dolores; Franco, Antonio Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Velvet bean (Mucuna pruriens, Fabaceae) plants exhibits an innate, very high resistance (i.e., tolerance) to glyphosate similar to that of plants which have acquired resistance to this herbicide as a trait. We analyzed the uptake of [(14)C]-glyphosate by leaves and its translocation to meristematic tissues, and used scanning electron micrographs to further analyze the cuticle and 3D capillary electrophoresis to investigate a putative metabolism capable of degrading the herbicide. Velvet bean exhibited limited uptake of glyphosate and impaired translocation of the compound to meristematic tissues. Also, for the first time in a higher plant, two concurrent pathways capable of degrading glyphosate to AMPA, Pi, glyoxylate, sarcosine and formaldehyde as end products were identified. Based on the results, the innate tolerance of velvet bean to glyphosate is possibly a result of the combined action of the previous three traits, namely: limited uptake, impaired translocation and enhanced degradation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Potential use of Lemna minor for the phytoremediation of isoproturon and glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Dosnon-Olette, Rachel; Couderchet, Michel; Oturan, Mehmet A; Oturan, Nihal; Eullaffroy, Philippe

    2011-07-01

    Pesticides are being detected in water bodies on an increasingly frequent basis. The present study focused on toxicity and phytoremediation potential of aquatic plants to remove phytosanitary products from contaminated water. We investigated the capacity of Lemna minor (L. minor) to eliminate two herbicides isoproturon and glyphosate from their medium. Since phytoremediation relies on healthy plants, pesticide toxicity was evaluated by exposing plants to 5 concentrations (0-20 microg L(-1) for isoproturon and 0-120 microg L(-1) for glyphosate) in culture media for 4 d using growth rate and chlorophyll a fluorescence as endpoints. At exposure concentrations of 10 microg x L(-1) for isoproturon and 80 microg x L(-1) for glyphosate, effects on growth rate and chlorophyll fluorescence were minor (< 25%), so that this initial concentration was selected to study herbicide removal After a 4-d incubation, removal yields were 25% and 8% for isoproturon and glyphosate, respectively.

  5. Genotoxic effects of glyphosate or paraquat on earthworm coelomocytes.

    PubMed

    Muangphra, Ptumporn; Kwankua, Wimon; Gooneratne, Ravi

    2014-06-01

    The potential genotoxicity (nuclear anomalies, damage to single-strand DNA) and pinocytic adherence activity of two (glyphosate-based and paraquat-based) commercial herbicides to earthworm coelomocytes (immune cells in the coelomic cavity) were assessed. Coelomocytes were extracted from earthworms (Pheretima peguana) exposed to concentrations glyphosate-based or paraquat-based herbicides on filter paper for 48 h. Three assays were performed: Micronucleus (light microscopy count of micronuclei, binuclei, and trinuclei), Comet (epifluorescent microscope and LUCIA image analyzer measure of tail DNA %, tail length, and tail moment), and Neutral Red (to detect phagocytic or pinocytic activity). The LC50 value for paraquat was 65-fold lower than for glyphosate indicating that paraquat was far more acutely toxic to P. peguana. There were significant (P < 0.05) differences from the control group in total coelomocyte micronuclei, binuclei, and trinuclei frequencies of earthworms exposed to glyphosate at 25 × 10(-1) (10(-3) LC50) and paraquat at 39 × 10(-5) (10(-4) LC50) μg cm(-2) filter paper. In earthworms exposed to glyphosate, no differences in tail DNA%, tail length, and tail moment of coelomocytes were detected. In contrast, for paraquat at 10(-1) LC50 concentration, there were significant (P < 0.05) differences between tail DNA % and tail length, and at LC50 concentration, tail moment was also significantly different when compared with controls. A decline in pinocytic adherence activity in coelomocytes occurred on exposure to glyphosate or paraquat at 10(-3) LC50 concentration. This study showed that, at concentrations well below field application rates, paraquat induces both clastogenic and aneugenic effects on earthworm coelomocytes whereas glyphosate causes only aneugenic effects and therefore does not pose a risk of gene mutation in this earthworm. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Acute mastoiditis in children: Middle ear cultures may help in reducing use of broad spectrum antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Catarina; Salgueiro, Ana Bárbara; Luís, Catarina; Correia, Paula; Brito, Maria João

    2017-01-01

    Acute mastoiditis (AM) is a suppurative infection of the mastoid air cells, representing the most frequent complication of acute otitis media. AM remains an important entity in children due to its potential complications and sequelae. We aim to describe the cases of AM admitted at our department, identify risk factors potentially associated with complications and analyse the changes in clinical approach of AM over time. Case review of clinical files of children admitted with acute mastoiditis from June 1996 to May 2013 at a Lisbon metropolitan area hospital. Data was divided into two groups (prior and after May 2005) in order to evaluate changes in AM approach over the years. 135 AM episodes were included. The median age was 3.8 years and 42% children were less than 24 months of age. Symptoms at presentation included fever (69%), ear pain (56%) and otorrhea (40%). Complications occurred in 22% patients and were more common in children under 24 months (33% vs 15%, p ≤ 0.01). Leukocyte count was significantly higher in children with complications (16.7 vs 14.5 × 10 9 /μL, p ≤ 0.05) as was C-Reactive Protein value (13 vs 6.3 mg/dL, p ≤ 0.001). There was a significant association between the development of complications and C-Reactive Protein value at admission (OR 1.892; IC95%: 1.018-2.493, p ≤ 0.01). The optimal cut-off value was 7.21 mg/dL. Over time there was a significant increase in middle ear cultures obtained by tympanocentesis during surgery (2% vs 16%, p ≤ 0,01) and also a decrease in the use of broad spectrum antibiotherapy as initial treatment (52% vs 25%,p ≤ 0,001). Children under 24 months, with high leukocyte count or with high C-Reactive Protein value should be monitored closely since complications tend to be more frequent. A CRP value of 7.21 mg/dL at admission seems to be a good cut-off to monitor children for potential complications. Throughout the period analysed more cultures were performed allowing identification of

  7. Computational approaches for discovery of common immunomodulators in fungal infections: towards broad-spectrum immunotherapeutic interventions.

    PubMed

    Kidane, Yared H; Lawrence, Christopher; Murali, T M

    2013-10-07

    newly generated or expanded data sets for further elucidation of additional drug targets. Moreover, identified immunomodulators may be used to generate experimentally testable hypotheses that could help in the discovery of broad-spectrum immunotherapeutic interventions. All of our results are available at the following supplementary website: http://bioinformatics.cs.vt.edu/~murali/supplements/2013-kidane-bmc.

  8. Computational approaches for discovery of common immunomodulators in fungal infections: towards broad-spectrum immunotherapeutic interventions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    described here can now be applied to newly generated or expanded data sets for further elucidation of additional drug targets. Moreover, identified immunomodulators may be used to generate experimentally testable hypotheses that could help in the discovery of broad-spectrum immunotherapeutic interventions. All of our results are available at the following supplementary website: http://bioinformatics.cs.vt.edu/~murali/supplements/2013-kidane-bmc PMID:24099000

  9. Toxicokinetics of the broad-spectrum pyrethroid insecticide deltamethrin in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Hüyük, R; Eraslan, G

    2017-02-01

    1. The aim of this study was to examine single-dose toxicokinetics of deltamethrin, a broad-spectrum pyrethroid insecticide, for treatment of broiler chickens. 2. Twenty male broiler chickens were used. Animals were divided into two groups, each comprising 10 animals. An intravenous dose of 0.75 mg of deltamethrin/kg body weight was given intravenously to the first group and the same dose (0.75 mg/kg body weight) was administered by intracrop by gavage to the second group. Blood samples were also collected at specified intervals. 3. Serum deltamethrin levels were measured via micro-electron capture detection with gas chromatography equipment. According to the serum deltamethrin level-time curve, deltamethrin tended to distribute according to a two-compartment open model. 4. The half-life at β phase (t 1/2 β ), mean residence time (MRT) and area under the concentration time curve in 0-∞ (AUC 0→∞ ) values after intravenous application of deltamethrin were 4.00 ± 0.76 h, 4.65 ± 0.75 h and 702.27 ± 236.07 ng h/ml, respectively. Furthermore, the absorption half-life (t 1/2a ), maximal concentration in serum after intracrop administration (C max ), time needed to reach C max (t max ), t 1/2 β , MRT and AUC 0→∞ values after intracrop application of deltamethrin were determined to be 0.18 ± 0.06 h, 19.65 ± 4.58 ng/ml, 0.70 ± 0.10 h, 7.27 ± 1.36 h, 10.46 ± 1.84 h and 153.33 ± 30.83 ng h/ml, respectively. The bioavailability of deltamethrin was 21.83%. 5. It was concluded that deltamethrin was rapidly but incompletely absorbed after intracrop administration and bioavailability was at a low level. The t 1/2 β and MRT of the deltamethrin were short for both intracrop and intravenous applications, and the risk of toxic and residual effects of deltamethrin is therefore limited.

  10. Integrated DNA walking system to characterize a broad spectrum of GMOs in food/feed matrices.

    PubMed

    Fraiture, Marie-Alice; Herman, Philippe; Lefèvre, Loic; Taverniers, Isabel; De Loose, Marc; Deforce, Dieter; Roosens, Nancy H

    2015-08-14

    In order to provide a system fully integrated with qPCR screening, usually used in GMO routine analysis, as well as being able to detect, characterize and identify a broad spectrum of GMOs in food/feed matrices, two bidirectional DNA walking methods targeting p35S or tNOS, the most common transgenic elements found in GM crops, were developed. These newly developed DNA walking methods are completing the previously implemented DNA walking method targeting the t35S pCAMBIA element. Food/feed matrices containing transgenic crops (Bt rice or MON863 maize) were analysed using the integrated DNA walking system. First, the newly developed DNA walking methods, anchored on the sequences used for the p35S or tNOS qPCR screening, were tested on Bt rice that contains these two transgenic elements. Second, the methods were assessed on a maize sample containing a low amount of the GM MON863 event, representing a more complex matrix in terms of genome size and sensitivity. Finally, to illustrate its applicability in GMO routine analysis by enforcement laboratories, the entire workflow of the integrated strategy, including qPCR screening to detect the potential presence of GMOs and the subsequent DNA walking methods to characterize and identify the detected GMOs, was applied on a GeMMA Scheme Proficiency Test matrix. Via the characterization of the transgene flanking region between the transgenic cassette and the plant genome as well as of a part of the transgenic cassette, the presence of GMOs was properly confirmed or infirmed in all tested samples. Due to their simple procedure and their short time-frame to get results, the developed DNA walking methods proposed here can be easily implemented in GMO routine analysis by the enforcement laboratories. In providing crucial information about the transgene flanking regions and/or the transgenic cassettes, this DNA walking strategy is a key molecular tool to prove the presence of GMOs in any given food/feed matrix.

  11. Ceftaroline fosamil: a novel broad-spectrum cephalosporin with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Jorgenson, Margaret R; DePestel, Daryl D; Carver, Peggy L

    2011-11-01

    To review the pharmacology, microbiology, chemistry, in vitro activity, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, safety, dosage, and administration of ceftaroline fosamil (Teflaro, Forest Laboratories, Inc.), a novel parenteral broad-spectrum cephalosporin approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on October 29, 2010, for the treatment of adults with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). A search of MEDLINE (1966-July 2011) using the search terms ceftaroline fosamil, ceftaroline, TAK-599, PPI-0903, PPI-0903M, and T-91825 was performed. Supplementary sources included program abstracts from the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, American Society of Microbiology, European Congress on Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, and the Infectious Diseases Society of America from 2005 to 2010, as well as information available from the manufacturer's Web site. All English-language articles identified from the data sources were evaluated. In vitro, preclinical, and Phase 1, 2, and 3 clinical trials were included. Clinical trials have been conducted evaluating use of ceftaroline for treatment of ABSSSI and CABP. Safety data from Phase 1, 2, and 3 clinical trials suggest that it is well tolerated and has a safety and tolerability profile common to the cephalosporin class. Ceftaroline has excellent in vitro activity against gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which makes it an attractive monotherapy for the treatment of ABSSSI. However, it lacks activity against problem gram-negative bacteria (eg, Pseudomonas spp.), which will likely limit its use for serious health care-associated infections. While its role in treating CABP is supported by excellent in vitro activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae and clinical efficacy data, currently available comparators may offer some advantages over ceftaroline. Finally

  12. Low doses of glyphosate enhance growth, CO2 assimilation, stomatal conductance and transpiration in sugarcane and eucalyptus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sublethal doses of herbicides can enhance plant growth and stimulate other process, an effect known as hormesis. The magnitude of hormesis is dependent on the plant species, the herbicide and its dose, plant development stage, and environmental parameters. Glyphosate hormesis is well established, bu...

  13. Pharmacy sales data versus ward stock accounting for the surveillance of broad-spectrum antibiotic use in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Antibiotic consumption in hospitals is commonly measured using the accumulated amount of drugs delivered from the pharmacy to ward held stocks. The reliability of this method, particularly the impact of the length of the registration periods, has not been evaluated and such evaluation was aim of the study. Methods During 26 weeks, we performed a weekly ward stock count of use of broad-spectrum antibiotics - that is second- and third-generation cephalosporins, carbapenems, and quinolones - in five hospital wards and compared the data with corresponding pharmacy sales figures during the same period. Defined daily doses (DDDs) for antibiotics were used as measurement units (WHO ATC/DDD classification). Consumption figures obtained with the two methods for different registration intervals were compared by use of intraclass correlation analysis and Bland-Altman statistics. Results Broad-spectrum antibiotics accounted for a quarter to one-fifth of all systemic antibiotics (ATC group J01) used in the hospital and varied between wards, from 12.8 DDDs per 100 bed days in a urological ward to 24.5 DDDs in a pulmonary diseases ward. For the entire study period of 26 weeks, the pharmacy and ward defined daily doses figures for all broad-spectrum antibiotics differed only by 0.2%; however, for single wards deviations varied from -4.3% to 6.9%. The intraclass correlation coefficient, pharmacy versus ward data, increased from 0.78 to 0.94 for parenteral broad-spectrum antibiotics with increasing registration periods (1-4 weeks), whereas the corresponding figures for oral broad-spectrum antibiotics (ciprofloxacin) were from 0.46 to 0.74. For all broad-spectrum antibiotics and for parenteral antibiotics, limits of agreement between the two methods showed, according to Bland-Altman statistics, a deviation of ± 5% or less from average mean DDDs at 3- and 4-weeks registration intervals. Corresponding deviation for oral antibiotics was ± 21% at a 4-weeks interval

  14. Pharmacy sales data versus ward stock accounting for the surveillance of broad-spectrum antibiotic use in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Haug, Jon B; Myhr, Randi; Reikvam, Asmund

    2011-12-13

    Antibiotic consumption in hospitals is commonly measured using the accumulated amount of drugs delivered from the pharmacy to ward held stocks. The reliability of this method, particularly the impact of the length of the registration periods, has not been evaluated and such evaluation was aim of the study. During 26 weeks, we performed a weekly ward stock count of use of broad-spectrum antibiotics--that is second- and third-generation cephalosporins, carbapenems, and quinolones--in five hospital wards and compared the data with corresponding pharmacy sales figures during the same period. Defined daily doses (DDDs) for antibiotics were used as measurement units (WHO ATC/DDD classification). Consumption figures obtained with the two methods for different registration intervals were compared by use of intraclass correlation analysis and Bland-Altman statistics. Broad-spectrum antibiotics accounted for a quarter to one-fifth of all systemic antibiotics (ATC group J01) used in the hospital and varied between wards, from 12.8 DDDs per 100 bed days in a urological ward to 24.5 DDDs in a pulmonary diseases ward. For the entire study period of 26 weeks, the pharmacy and ward defined daily doses figures for all broad-spectrum antibiotics differed only by 0.2%; however, for single wards deviations varied from -4.3% to 6.9%. The intraclass correlation coefficient, pharmacy versus ward data, increased from 0.78 to 0.94 for parenteral broad-spectrum antibiotics with increasing registration periods (1-4 weeks), whereas the corresponding figures for oral broad-spectrum antibiotics (ciprofloxacin) were from 0.46 to 0.74. For all broad-spectrum antibiotics and for parenteral antibiotics, limits of agreement between the two methods showed, according to Bland-Altman statistics, a deviation of ± 5% or less from average mean DDDs at 3- and 4-weeks registration intervals. Corresponding deviation for oral antibiotics was ± 21% at a 4-weeks interval. There is a need for caution in

  15. Glyphosate contaminated soil remediation by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma and its residual toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiecheng; Ren, Jingyu; Qu, Guangzhou; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-12-15

    Glyphosate was one of the most widely used herbicides in the world. Remediation of glyphosate-contaminated soil was conducted using atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma. The feasibility of glyphosate degradation in soil was explored, and the soil leachate toxicity after remediation was assessed via a seed germination test. The experimental results showed that approximately 93.9% of glyphosate was degraded within 45min of DBD plasma treatment with an energy yield of 0.47gkWh -1 , and the degradation process fitted the first-order kinetic model. Increasing the discharge voltage and decreasing the organic matter content of the soil were both found to facilitate glyphosate degradation. There existed appropriate soil moisture to realize high glyphosate degradation efficiency. Glyphosate mineralization was confirmed by changes of total organic carbon (TOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD), PO 4 3- and NO 3 - . The degradation intermediates including glycine, aminomethylphosphonic acid, acetic acid, formic acid, PO 4 3- and NO 3 - , CO 2 and CO were observed. A possible pathway for glyphosate degradation in the soil using this system was proposed. Based on the soil leachate toxicity test using wheat seed germination, the soil did not exhibit any hazardous effects following high-efficiency glyphosate degradation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Ceftobiprole: a review of a broad-spectrum and anti-MRSA cephalosporin.

    PubMed

    Zhanel, George G; Lam, Ashley; Schweizer, Frank; Thomson, Kristjan; Walkty, Andrew; Rubinstein, Ethan; Gin, Alfred S; Hoban, Daryl J; Noreddin, Ayman M; Karlowsky, James A

    2008-01-01

    Ceftobiprole, an investigational cephalosporin, is currently in phase III clinical development. Ceftobiprole is a broad-spectrum cephalosporin with demonstrated in vitro activity against Gram-positive cocci, including meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and meticillin-resistant S. epidermidis, penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, Gram-negative bacilli including AmpC-producing Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but excluding extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing strains. Like cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, ceftazidime, and cefepime, ceftobiprole demonstrates limited activity against anaerobes such as Bacteroides fragilis and non-fragilis Bacteroides spp. In single-step and serial passage in vitro resistance development studies, ceftobiprole demonstrated a low propensity to select for resistant subpopulations. Ceftobiprole, like cefepime, is a weak inducer and a poor substrate for AmpC beta-lactamases.Ceftobiprole medocaril, the prodrug of ceftobiprole, is converted by plasma esterases to ceftobiprole in <30 minutes. Peak serum concentrations of ceftobiprole observed at the end of a single 30-minute infusion were 35.5 mug/mL for a 500-mg dose and 59.6 mug/mL for a 750-mg dose. The volume of distribution of ceftobiprole is 0.26 L/kg ( approximately 18 L), protein binding is 16%, and its serum half-life is approximately 3.5 hours. Ceftobiprole is renally excreted ( approximately 70% in the active form) and systemic clearance correlates with creatinine clearance, meaning that dosage adjustment is required in patients with renal dysfunction. Ceftobiprole has a modest post-antibiotic effect (PAE) of approximately 0.5 hours for MRSA and a longer PAE of approximately 2 hours for penicillin-resistant pneumococci. Ceftobiprole, when administered intravenously at 500 mg once every 8 hours (2-hour infusion), has a >90% probability of achieving f T(>MIC) (free drug concentration exceeds the minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC]) for

  17. Abiotic degradation of glyphosate into aminomethylphosphonic acid in the presence of metals.

    PubMed

    Ascolani Yael, J; Fuhr, J D; Bocan, G A; Daza Millone, A; Tognalli, N; Dos Santos Afonso, M; Martiarena, M L

    2014-10-08

    Glyphosate [N-phosphono-methylglycine (PMG)] is the most used herbicide worldwide, particularly since the development of transgenic glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops. Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) is the main glyphosate metabolite, and it may be responsible for GR crop damage upon PMG application. PMG degradation into AMPA has hitherto been reckoned mainly as a biological process, produced by soil microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) and plants. In this work, we use density functional calculations to identify the vibrational bands of PMG and AMPA in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra experiments. SERS shows the presence of AMPA after glyphosate is deposited from aqueous solution on different metallic surfaces. AMPA is also detected in ATR-FTIR experiments when PMG interacts with metallic ions in aqueous solution. These results reveal an abiotic degradation process of glyphosate into AMPA, where metals play a crucial role.

  18. On the International Agency for Research on Cancer classification of glyphosate as a probable human carcinogen.

    PubMed

    Tarone, Robert E

    2018-01-01

    The recent classification by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) of the herbicide glyphosate as a probable human carcinogen has generated considerable discussion. The classification is at variance with evaluations of the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate by several national and international regulatory bodies. The basis for the IARC classification is examined under the assumptions that the IARC criteria are reasonable and that the body of scientific studies determined by IARC staff to be relevant to the evaluation of glyphosate by the Monograph Working Group is sufficiently complete. It is shown that the classification of glyphosate as a probable human carcinogen was the result of a flawed and incomplete summary of the experimental evidence evaluated by the Working Group. Rational and effective cancer prevention activities depend on scientifically sound and unbiased assessments of the carcinogenic potential of suspected agents. Implications of the erroneous classification of glyphosate with respect to the IARC Monograph Working Group deliberative process are discussed.

  19. Broad-spectrum enhanced absorption of graphene-molybdenum disulfide photovoltaic cells in metal-mirror microcavity.

    PubMed

    Jiang-Tao, Liu; Yun-Kai, Cao; Hong, Tong; Dai-Qiang, Wang; Zhen-Hua, Wu

    2018-04-06

    The optical absorption of graphene-molybdenum disulfide photovoltaic cells (GM-PVc) in wedge-shaped metal-mirror microcavities (w-MMCs) combined with a spectrum-splitting structure was studied. Results showed that the combination of spectrum-splitting structure and w-MMC can enable the light absorption of GM-PVcs to reach about 65% in the broad spectrum. The influence of processing errors on the absorption of GM-PVcs in w-MMCs was 3-14 times lower than that of GM-PVcs in wedge photonic crystal microcavities. The light absorption of GM-PVcs reached 60% in the broad spectrum, even with the processing errors. The proposed structure is easy to implement and may have potentially important applications in the development of ultra-thin and high-efficiency solar cells and optoelectronic devices.

  20. Broad-spectrum enhanced absorption of graphene-molybdenum disulfide photovoltaic cells in metal-mirror microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang-Tao, Liu; Yun-Kai, Cao; Hong, Tong; Dai-Qiang, Wang; Zhen-Hua, Wu

    2018-04-01

    The optical absorption of graphene-molybdenum disulfide photovoltaic cells (GM-PVc) in wedge-shaped metal-mirror microcavities (w-MMCs) combined with a spectrum-splitting structure was studied. Results showed that the combination of spectrum-splitting structure and w-MMC can enable the light absorption of GM-PVcs to reach about 65% in the broad spectrum. The influence of processing errors on the absorption of GM-PVcs in w-MMCs was 3-14 times lower than that of GM-PVcs in wedge photonic crystal microcavities. The light absorption of GM-PVcs reached 60% in the broad spectrum, even with the processing errors. The proposed structure is easy to implement and may have potentially important applications in the development of ultra-thin and high-efficiency solar cells and optoelectronic devices.

  1. The secreted fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase as a broad spectrum vaccine candidate against pathogenic bacteria in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongyang; Shen, Binbing; Wu, Haizhen; Zhou, Xiangyu; Wang, Qiyao; Xiao, Jingfan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-10-01

    The development of aquaculture has been hampered by different aquatic pathogens that can cause edwardsiellosis, vibriosis, or other diseases. Therefore, developing a broad spectrum vaccine against different fish diseases is necessary. In this study, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA), a conserved enzyme in the glycolytic pathway, was demonstrated to be located in the non-cytoplasmic components of five aquatic pathogenic bacteria and exhibited remarkable protection and cross-protection against these pathogens in turbot and zebrafish. Further analysis revealed that sera sampled from vaccinated turbot had a high level of specific antibody and bactericidal activity against these pathogens. Meanwhile, the increased expressions of immune response-related genes associated with antigen recognition and presentation indicated that the adaptive immune response was effectively aroused. Taken together, our results suggest that FBA can be utilized as a broad-spectrum vaccine against various pathogenic bacteria of aquaculture in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Screening of broad spectrum natural pesticides against conserved target arginine kinase in cotton pests by molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Seethalakshmi; Habeeb, S K M; Raman, Chandrasekar

    2018-03-12

    Cotton is an economically important crop and its production is challenged by the diversity of pests and related insecticide resistance. Identification of the conserved target across the cotton pest will help to design broad spectrum insecticide. In this study, we have identified conserved sequences by Expressed Sequence Tag profiling from three cotton pests namely Aphis gossypii, Helicoverpa armigera, and Spodoptera exigua. One target protein arginine kinase having a key role in insect physiology and energy metabolism was studied further using homology modeling, virtual screening, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics simulation to identify potential biopesticide compounds from the Zinc natural database. We have identified four compounds having excellent inhibitor potential against the identified broad spectrum target which are highly specific to invertebrates.

  3. Unraveling novel broad-spectrum antibacterial targets in food and waterborne pathogens using comparative genomics and protein interaction network analysis.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Ankush; Shanmugham, Buvaneswari; Rajendiran, Anjana; Pan, Archana

    2014-10-01

    Food and waterborne diseases are a growing concern in terms of human morbidity and mortality worldwide, even in the 21st century, emphasizing the need for new therapeutic interventions for these diseases. The current study aims at prioritizing broad-spectrum antibacterial targets, present in multiple food and waterborne bacterial pathogens, through a comparative genomics strategy coupled with a protein interaction network analysis. The pathways unique and common to all the pathogens under study (viz., methane metabolism, d-alanine metabolism, peptidoglycan biosynthesis, bacterial secretion system, two-component system, C5-branched dibasic acid metabolism), identified by comparative metabolic pathway analysis, were considered for the analysis. The proteins/enzymes involved in these pathways were prioritized following host non-homology analysis, essentiality analysis, gut flora non-homology analysis and protein interaction network analysis. The analyses revealed a set of promising broad-spectrum antibacterial targets, present in multiple food and waterborne pathogens, which are essential for bacterial survival, non-homologous to host and gut flora, and functionally important in the metabolic network. The identified broad-spectrum candidates, namely, integral membrane protein/virulence factor (MviN), preprotein translocase subunits SecB and SecG, carbon storage regulator (CsrA), and nitrogen regulatory protein P-II 1 (GlnB), contributed by the peptidoglycan pathway, bacterial secretion systems and two-component systems, were also found to be present in a wide range of other disease-causing bacteria. Cytoplasmic proteins SecG, CsrA and GlnB were considered as drug targets, while membrane proteins MviN and SecB were classified as vaccine targets. The identified broad-spectrum targets can aid in the design and development of antibacterial agents not only against food and waterborne pathogens but also against other pathogens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  4. Early versus late pre-intensive care unit admission broad spectrum antibiotics for severe sepsis in adults.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Shahla; Razzak, Junaid

    2010-10-06

    Severe sepsis and septic shock have recently emerged as particularly acute and lethal challenges amongst critically ill patients presenting to the emergency department (ED). There are no existing data on the current practices of management of patients with severe sepsis comparing early versus late administration of appropriate broad spectrum antibiotics as part of the early goal-directed therapy that is commenced in the first few hours of presentation. To assess the difference in outcomes with early compared to late administration of antibiotics in patients with severe sepsis in the pre-intensive care unit (ICU) admission period. We defined early as within one hour of presentation to the ED. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2009); MEDLINE (1990 to February 2010); EMBASE (1990 to February 2010); and ISI web of Science (February 2010). We also searched for relevant ongoing trials in specific websites such as www.controlled-trials.com; www.clinicalstudyresults.org; and www.update-software.com. We searched the reference lists of articles. There were no constraints based on language or publication status. We planned to include randomized controlled trials of early versus late broad spectrum antibiotics in adult patients with severe sepsis in the ED, prior to admission to the intensive care unit. Two authors independently assessed articles for inclusion. We found no studies that satisfied the inclusion criteria. Based on this review we are unable to make a recommendation on the early or late use of broad spectrum antibiotics in adult patients with severe sepsis in the ED pre-ICU admission. There is a need to do large prospective double blinded randomized controlled trials on the efficacy of early (within one hour) versus late broad spectrum antibiotics in adult severe sepsis patients. Since it makes sense to start antibiotics as soon as possible in this group of seriously ill patients, administering

  5. Oral Administration of the Broad-Spectrum Antibiofilm Compound Toremifene Inhibits Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    De Cremer, Kaat; Delattin, Nicolas; De Brucker, Katrijn; Peeters, Annelies; Kucharíková, Soña; Gerits, Evelien; Verstraeten, Natalie; Michiels, Jan; Van Dijck, Patrick; Thevissen, Karin

    2014-01-01

    We here report on the in vitro activity of toremifene to inhibit biofilm formation of different fungal and bacterial pathogens, including Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida dubliniensis, Candida krusei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. We validated the in vivo efficacy of orally administered toremifene against C. albicans and S. aureus biofilm formation in a rat subcutaneous catheter model. Combined, our results demonstrate the potential of toremifene as a broad-spectrum oral antibiofilm compound. PMID:25288093

  6. Design of Broad-Spectrum Inhibitors of Influenza A Virus M2 Proton Channels: A Molecular Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Klimochkin, Yuri N; Shiryaev, Vadim A; Petrov, Pavel V; Radchenko, Eugene V; Palyulin, Vladimir A; Zefirov, Nikolay S

    2016-01-01

    The influenza A virus M2 proton channel plays a critical role in its life cycle. However, known M2 inhibitors have lost their clinical efficacy due to the spread of resistant mutant channels. Thus, the search for broad-spectrum M2 channel inhibitors is of great importance. The goal of the present work was to develop a general approach supporting the design of ligands interacting with multiple labile targets and to propose on its basis the potential broad-spectrum inhibitors of the M2 proton channel. The dynamic dimer-of-dimers structures of the three primary M2 target variants, wild-type, S31N and V27A, were modeled by molecular dynamics and thoroughly analyzed in order to define the inhibitor binding sites. The potential inhibitor structures were identified by molecular docking and their binding was verified by molecular dynamics simulation. The binding sites of the M2 proton channel inhibitors were analyzed, a number of potential broad-spectrum inhibitors were identified and the binding modes and probable mechanisms of action of one promising compound were clarified. Using the molecular dynamics and molecular docking techniques, we have refined the dynamic dimer-ofdimers structures of the WT, S31N and V27A variants of the M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus, analyzed the inhibitor binding sites, identified a number of potential broad-spectrum inhibitor structures targeting them, and clarified the binding modes and probable mechanisms of action of one promising compound. The proposed approach is also suitable for the design of ligands interacting with other multiple labile targets.

  7. An intragenic approach to confer glyphosate resistance in chile (Capsicum annuum) by introducing an in vitro mutagenized chile EPSPS gene encoding for a glyphosate resistant EPSPS protein

    PubMed Central

    Bagga, Suman; Apodaca, Kimberly; Lucero, Yvonne

    2018-01-01

    Chile pepper (Capsicum annuum) is an important high valued crop worldwide, and when grown on a large scale has problems with weeds. One important herbicide used is glyphosate. Glyphosate inactivates the enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS), a key enzyme in the synthesis of aromatic amino acids. A transgenic approach towards making glyphosate resistant plants, entails introducing copies of a gene encoding for glyphosate-resistant EPSPS enzyme into the plant. The main objective of our work was to use an intragenic approach to confer resistance to glyphosate in chile which would require using only chile genes for transformation including the selectable marker. Tobacco was used as the transgenic system to identify different gene constructs that would allow for the development of the intragenic system for chile, since chile transformation is inefficient. An EPSPS gene was isolated from chile and mutagenized to introduce substitutions that are known to make the encoded enzyme resistant to glyphosate. The promoter for EPSPS gene was isolated from chile and the mutagenized chile EPSPS cDNA was engineered behind both the CaMV35S promoter and the EPSPS promoter. The leaves from the transformants were checked for resistance to glyphosate using a cut leaf assay. In tobacco, though both gene constructs exhibited some degree of resistance to glyphosate, the construct with the CaMV35S promoter was more effective and as such chile was transformed with this gene construct. The chile transformants showed resistance to low concentrations of glyphosate. Furthermore, preliminary studies showed that the mutated EPSPS gene driven by the CaMV35S promoter could be used as a selectable marker for transformation. We have shown that an intragenic approach can be used to confer glyphosate-resistance in chile. However, we need a stronger chile promoter and a mutated chile gene that encodes for a more glyphosate resistant EPSPS protein. PMID:29649228

  8. Glyphosate and AMPA distribution in wind-eroded sediment derived from loess soil.

    PubMed

    Bento, Célia P M; Goossens, Dirk; Rezaei, Mahrooz; Riksen, Michel; Mol, Hans G J; Ritsema, Coen J; Geissen, Violette

    2017-01-01

    Glyphosate is one of the most used herbicides in agricultural lands worldwide. Wind-eroded sediment and dust, as an environmental transport pathway of glyphosate and of its main metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), can result in environmental- and human exposure far beyond the agricultural areas where it has been applied. Therefore, special attention is required to the airborne transport of glyphosate and AMPA. In this study, we investigated the behavior of glyphosate and AMPA in wind-eroded sediment by measuring their content in different size fractions (median diameters between 715 and 8 μm) of a loess soil, during a period of 28 days after glyphosate application. Granulometrical extraction was done using a wind tunnel and a Soil Fine Particle Extractor. Extractions were conducted on days 0, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after glyphosate application. Results indicated that glyphosate and AMPA contents were significantly higher in the finest particle fractions (median diameters between 8 and 18 μm), and lowered significantly with the increase in particle size. However, their content remained constant when aggregates were present in the sample. Glyphosate and AMPA contents correlated positively with clay, organic matter, and silt content. The dissipation of glyphosate over time was very low, which was most probably due to the low soil moisture content of the sediment. Consequently, the formation of AMPA was also very low. The low dissipation of glyphosate in our study indicates that the risk of glyphosate transport in dry sediment to off-target areas by wind can be very high. The highest glyphosate and AMPA contents were found in the smallest soil fractions (PM 10 and less), which are easily inhaled and, therefore, contribute to human exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of pH and phosphate on glyphosate adsorption to Argentina soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Geronimo, Eduardo; Aparicio, Virginia; Costa, José Luis

    2017-04-01

    Glyphosate is a non-selective, post-emergence herbicide that is widely used in Argentina. Due to the similar molecular structures, glyphosate and phosphate compete for the same adsorption sites in soil. Soil pH has a strong influence in glyphosate and phosphate adsorption since it modifies the net charge of the molecules and, consequently, the force of the electrostatic interaction between these molecules and soil components. Glyphosate adsorption generally decreases as the soil pH was increased, although there were exceptions. In this work, we study the effects of pH and the presence of phosphate on the adsorption of glyphosate on six different types of Argentina soils. Batch equilibrium technique was employed to study the adsorption of glyphosate onto soils at different pH values (from 3 to 9) and phosphate content (0.5 and 1 mM). Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was applied to obtain a relationship between the sorption parameters and soil properties. The results indicated that Freundlich equations used to simulate glyphosate adsorption isotherms gave high correlation coefficients with Kf values range from 24.9 to 397.4. Clay contents and soil pH were found to be the most significant soil factors affecting the glyphosate adsorption process. The presence of phosphate significantly decreased the adsorption of glyphosate to soils. The Kf values obtained for all six soils decreased a 40% at 0.5 mM of phosphate and a 55% at 1 mM of phosphate. On the other hand, the affinity parameters of glyphosate to soils varied with changes in pH. A general trend of decrease in glyphosate adsorption with increase in pH was observed for all six studied soils. In turn, there appears to be a maximum glyphosate adsorption at pH close to 6 for most soils when the net charge of the molecule at this pH was approximately -1.7.

  10. Overexpression of BSR1 confers broad-spectrum resistance against two bacterial diseases and two major fungal diseases in rice.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Satoru; Hayashi, Nagao; Sasaya, Takahide; Mori, Masaki

    2016-06-01

    Broad-spectrum disease resistance against two or more types of pathogen species is desirable for crop improvement. In rice, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the causal bacteria of rice leaf blight, and Magnaporthe oryzae, the fungal pathogen causing rice blast, are two of the most devastating pathogens. We identified the rice BROAD-SPECTRUM RESISTANCE 1 (BSR1) gene for a BIK1-like receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase using the FOX hunting system, and demonstrated that BSR1-overexpressing (OX) rice showed strong resistance to the bacterial pathogen, Xoo and the fungal pathogen, M. oryzae. Here, we report that BSR1-OX rice showed extended resistance against two other different races of Xoo, and to at least one other race of M. oryzae. In addition, the rice showed resistance to another bacterial species, Burkholderia glumae, which causes bacterial seedling rot and bacterial grain rot, and to Cochliobolus miyabeanus, another fungal species causing brown spot. Furthermore, BSR1-OX rice showed slight resistance to rice stripe disease, a major viral disease caused by rice stripe virus. Thus, we demonstrated that BSR1-OX rice shows remarkable broad-spectrum resistance to at least two major bacterial species and two major fungal species, and slight resistance to one viral pathogen.

  11. Overexpression of BSR1 confers broad-spectrum resistance against two bacterial diseases and two major fungal diseases in rice

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Satoru; Hayashi, Nagao; Sasaya, Takahide; Mori, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Broad-spectrum disease resistance against two or more types of pathogen species is desirable for crop improvement. In rice, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the causal bacteria of rice leaf blight, and Magnaporthe oryzae, the fungal pathogen causing rice blast, are two of the most devastating pathogens. We identified the rice BROAD-SPECTRUM RESISTANCE 1 (BSR1) gene for a BIK1-like receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase using the FOX hunting system, and demonstrated that BSR1-overexpressing (OX) rice showed strong resistance to the bacterial pathogen, Xoo and the fungal pathogen, M. oryzae. Here, we report that BSR1-OX rice showed extended resistance against two other different races of Xoo, and to at least one other race of M. oryzae. In addition, the rice showed resistance to another bacterial species, Burkholderia glumae, which causes bacterial seedling rot and bacterial grain rot, and to Cochliobolus miyabeanus, another fungal species causing brown spot. Furthermore, BSR1-OX rice showed slight resistance to rice stripe disease, a major viral disease caused by rice stripe virus. Thus, we demonstrated that BSR1-OX rice shows remarkable broad-spectrum resistance to at least two major bacterial species and two major fungal species, and slight resistance to one viral pathogen. PMID:27436950

  12. Glyphosate effects on soil rhizosphere-associated bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Newman, Molli M; Hoilett, Nigel; Lorenz, Nicola; Dick, Richard P; Liles, Mark R; Ramsier, Cliff; Kloepper, Joseph W

    2016-02-01

    Glyphosate is one of the most widely used herbicides in agriculture with predictions that 1.35 million metric tons will be used annually by 2017. With the advent of glyphosate tolerant (GT) cropping more than 10 years ago, there is now concern for non-target effects on soil microbial communities that has potential to negatively affect soil functions, plant health, and crop productivity. Although extensive research has been done on short-term response to glyphosate, relatively little information is available on long-term effects. Therefore, the overall objective was to investigate shifts in the rhizosphere bacterial community following long-term glyphosate application on GT corn and soybean in the greenhouse. In this study, rhizosphere soil was sampled from rhizoboxes following 4 growth periods, and bacterial community composition was compared between glyphosate treated and untreated rhizospheres using next-generation barcoded sequencing. In the presence or absence of glyphosate, corn and soybean rhizospheres were dominated by members of the phyla Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria. Proteobacteria (particularly gammaproteobacteria) increased in relative abundance for both crops following glyphosate exposure, and the relative abundance of Acidobacteria decreased in response to glyphosate exposure. Given that some members of the Acidobacteria are involved in biogeochemical processes, a decrease in their abundance could lead to significant changes in nutrient status of the rhizosphere. Our results also highlight the need for applying culture-independent approaches in studying the effects of pesticides on the soil and rhizosphere microbial community. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of glyphosate resistance in Salsola tragus in north-eastern Oregon.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Judit; Gourlie, Jennifer A; Lutcher, Larry K; Liu, Mingyang; Mallory-Smith, Carol A

    2018-05-01

    Farmers in the low-rainfall region of eastern Oregon rely on repeated applications of non-selective herbicides, predominately glyphosate, to control Salsola tragus in no-till fallow systems. Reports of poor glyphosate effectiveness have increased in recent years. Reduced efficacy is often attributed to dust, water stress, or generally poor growing conditions during application. Inadequate control also may be the result of the evolution of glyphosate resistance. Therefore, studies were undertaken to determine if glyphosate-resistant S. tragus populations occur in Oregon. Results from dose-response studies confirmed glyphosate resistance in three of 10 Oregon Salsola tragus populations. The ratio I 50R /I 50S from dose-response curves was, on average, 3.1 for the relative dry biomass per plant and 3.2 for the % of surviving plants per pot in these three populations. Plant mortality at recommended glyphosate doses for the resistant populations was less than 30% 3 weeks after treatment. Glyphosate resistance in S. tragus highlights the imperative need to diversify weed control strategies to preserve the longevity and sustainability of herbicides in semi-arid cropping systems of the Pacific Northwest. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Biological impacts of glyphosate on morphology, embryo biomechanics and larval behavior in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuhui; Xu, Jia; Kuang, Xiangyu; Li, Shibao; Li, Xiang; Chen, Dongyan; Zhao, Xin; Feng, Xizeng

    2017-08-01

    All of these days, residues of herbicides such as glyphosate are widely distributed in the environment. The ubiquitous use of glyphosate has drawn extensive attention to its toxicity as an organic pollutant. In this study, we employed larval zebrafish as an animal model to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of glyphosate on early development via morphological, biomechanics, behavioral and physiological analyses. Morphological results showed that an obvious delay occurred in the epiboly process and body length, eye and head area were reduced at concentrations higher than 10 mg/L. The expression of ntl (no tail) shortened and krox20 (also known as Egr2b, early growth response 2b) changed as the glyphosate concentration increased, but there was no change in the expression of shh (sonic hedgehog). In addition, biomechanical analysis of the elasticity of chorion indicated that treated embryos' surface tension was declined. Furthermore, a 48-h locomotion test revealed that embryonic exposure to glyphosate significantly elevated locomotor activities, which is probably attributed to motoneuronal damage. The decreased surface tension of chorion and the increased locomotive activities may contribute to the hatching rates after glyphosate treatment. Our study enriches the researches of evaluating glyphosate toxicity and probablely plays a warning role in herbicides used in farming. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of six herbicides for control of swamp smartweed [Persicaria hydropiperoides (Michx.) Small] under flooded and moist soil conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Six herbicides (2,4-D, diquat, glyphosate, imazamox, imazapyr, and triclopyr) were tested for efficacy on swamp smartweed (Polygonum hydropiperoides Michx.) in two studies in Mississippi. In the first study in a pond, glyphosate (2.1 and 4.2 kg ai ha-1), imazapyr (0.3 and 0.5 kg ai ha-1), and tricl...

  16. NOVEL HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low-dose, high-potency herbicides are defined as those herbicides with a maximum label application rate of 0.5 pounds of active ingredient per acre. Several classes of chemicals fall into this category, including the acetolactate synthase (ALSase) inhibitor herbicides, imidazoli...

  17. Glyphosate loss by runoff and its relationship with phosphorus fertilization.

    PubMed

    Sasal, María Carolina; Demonte, Luisina; Cislaghi, Andrea; Gabioud, Emmanuel A; Oszust, José D; Wilson, Marcelo G; Michlig, Nicolás; Beldoménico, Horacio R; Repetti, María Rosa

    2015-05-13

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between glyphosate and phosphate fertilizer application and their contribution to surface water runoff contamination. The study was performed in Aquic Argiudoll soil (Tezanos Pinto series). Four treatments were assessed on three dates of rainfall simulation after fertilizer and herbicide application. The soluble phosphorus in runoff water was determined by a colorimetric method. For the determination of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), a method based on fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (FMOC) group derivatization, solid phase extraction (SPE) purification, and ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) was employed. The application of phosphorus fertilizer resulted in an increased loss of glyphosate by runoff after 1 day of application. These results suggest the need for further study to understand the interactions and to determine appropriate application timing with the goal of reducing the pollution risk by runoff.

  18. Bermudagrass (Cynodon spp) dose-response relationships with clethodim, glufosinate and glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Webster, Theodore M; Hanna, Wayne W; Mullinix, Benjamin G

    2004-12-01

    Greenhouse studies were conducted to evaluate the sensitivity of three commercial cultivars, eight experimental cultivars and common bermudagrass to clethodim, glufosinate and glyphosate. Each herbicide was applied at eight doses. Data were regressed on herbicide dose using a log-logistic curve (R2 = 0.56-0.95 for clethodim, R2 = 0.60-0.94 for glufosinate, and R2 = 0.70-0.96 for glyphosate). The herbicide rate that elicited a 50% plant response (I50) in the bermudagrass cultivars ranged from 0.04 to 0.19 kg ha(-1) clethodim, 0.19 to 1.33 kg ha(-1) glufosinate and 0.34 to 1.14 kg ha(-1) glyphosate. Relative to other cultivars, common bermudagrass was intermediate in its response to clethodim and among the most tolerant cultivars to glufosinate and glyphosate. TifSport was relatively tolerant to clethodim and glufosinate compared with other cultivars, but relatively sensitive to glyphosate. One cultivar, 94-437, was consistently among the most sensitive cultivars to each of the herbicides. While there were differential herbicide tolerances among the tested bermudagrass cultivars, there did not appear to be any naturally occurring herbicide resistance that could be commercially utilized. However, research indicated that breeding efforts should target herbicide resistance that is at least four times the registered use rate. Also, TifSport and Tifway have been identified as suitable representatives of triploid hybrid bermudagrass cultivars to be used to evaluate the success of turfgrass renovation programs. 2004 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Fitness costs and benefits of novel herbicide tolerance in a noxious weed

    PubMed Central

    Baucom, Regina S.; Mauricio, Rodney

    2004-01-01

    Glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide RoundUp, has increased dramatically in use over the past decade and constitutes a potent anthropogenic source of selection. In the southeastern United States, weedy morning glories have begun to develop tolerance to glyphosate, representing a unique opportunity to examine the evolutionary genetics of a novel trait. We found genetic variation for tolerance, indicating the potential for the population to respond to selection by glyphosate. However, the following significant evolutionary constraint exists: in the absence of glyphosate, tolerant genotypes produced fewer seeds than susceptible genotypes. The combination of strong positive directional selection in the presence of glyphosate and strong negative directional selection in its absence may indicate that the selective landscape of land use could drive the evolutionary trajectory of glyphosate tolerance. Understanding these evolutionary forces is imperative for devising comprehensive management strategies to help slow the rate of the evolution of tolerance. PMID:15326309

  20. Benchmark study on glyphosate-resistant cropping systems in the United States. Part 4: Weed management practices and effects on weed populations and soil seedbanks.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert G; Young, Bryan G; Matthews, Joseph L; Weller, Stephen C; Johnson, William G; Jordan, David L; Owen, Micheal D K; Dixon, Philip M; Shaw, David R

    2011-07-01

    Weed management in glyphosate-resistant (GR) maize, cotton and soybean in the United States relies almost exclusively on glyphosate, which raises criticism for facilitating shifts in weed populations. In 2006, the benchmark study, a field-scale investigation, was initiated in three different GR cropping systems to characterize academic recommendations for weed management and to determine the level to which these recommendations would reduce weed population shifts. A majority of growers used glyphosate as the only herbicide for weed management, as opposed to 98% of the academic recommendations implementing at least two herbicide active ingredients and modes of action. The additional herbicides were applied with glyphosate and as soil residual treatments. The greater herbicide diversity with academic recommendations reduced weed population densities before and after post-emergence herbicide applications in 2006 and 2007, particularly in continuous GR crops. Diversifying herbicides reduces weed population densities and lowers the risk of weed population shifts and the associated potential for the evolution of glyphosate-resistant weeds in continuous GR crops. Altered weed management practices (e.g. herbicides or tillage) enabled by rotating crops, whether GR or non-GR, improves weed management and thus minimizes the effectiveness of only using chemical tactics to mitigate weed population shifts. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Effects of glyphosate at environmentally relevant concentrations on the growth of and microcystin production by Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan; Zhou, Hang; Li, Zhe; Zhu, Jianqiang; Zhou, Cong; Zhao, Meirong

    2016-11-01

    The use of glyphosate, which is a well-known sterilant herbicide, has been growing rapidly because the area under the cultivation of genetically modified crops that are tolerant to this herbicide has increased. Glyphosate can enter into aquatic systems through many different ways. However, information on the potential risks of glyphosate at environmentally relevant levels to aquatic systems is still limited. In this study, we selected the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB-905 (M. aeruginosa) as a model organism to evaluate the effects of glyphosate at environmentally relevant concentrations on the former's growth and microcystin (MC) production. Our results show that low levels of glyphosate stimulate the growth of M. aeruginosa. Subsequently, there was significant increase in the total MC-LR and intracellular MC-LR, but not in extracellular MC-LR, after exposure to 0.1-2 mg/L of glyphosate. The increase in total MC-LR is mainly due to the effects of glyphosate on the cell density of M. aeruginosa. The data provided here show that low level of glyphosate in a water body is a potential environmental risk factor that stimulates the growth and enhances MC production in M. aeruginosa, which should arouse great concern.

  2. Combining glyphosate with burning or mowing improves control of Yellow Bluestem (Bothriochloa ischaemum)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, S.; Hickman, Karen R.; Harmoney, Keith R.; Leslie,, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The invasive yellow bluestem (Bothriochloa ischaemum [L.] Keng) threatens native biodiversity, and its control is of interest to land managers involved in restoration of invaded grasslands. We used single, double, and triple applications of glyphosate (2.125 kg ai.ha-1.application-1) over the course of one growing season in combinations at different timings (early, middle, late season) with and without a mechanical treatment of mowing or burning to determine the most effective control method. One year after treatment, burning and mowing prior to a mid-season single or double early, middle, and/or late season herbicide application resulted in a similar level of control of yellow bluestem relative to a triple herbicide application, all of which had greater control relative to herbicide treatment alone. Reproductive tiller density and visual obstruction increased 2 yr after treatment with two herbicide treatments applied either early and middle season or early and late season, but it was prevented with burning and mowing prior to herbicide application. With the exception of three herbicide applications, combining burning or mowing with herbicide applications provided more effective control of yellow bluestem than any individual herbicide applications. Burning or mowing likely improves glyphosate effectiveness by altering the invasive grass structure so that plants are clear of standing dead and have shorter, active regrowth to enhance herbicide effectiveness. During restoration projects requiring control of invasive yellow bluestem, an effective management option is a combination of mechanical and chemical control.

  3. Glyphosate: environmental contamination, toxicity and potential risks to human health via food contamination.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shahla Hosseini; Ogbourne, Steven M

    2016-10-01

    Glyphosate has been the most widely used herbicide during the past three decades. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) classifies glyphosate as 'practically non-toxic and not an irritant' under the acute toxicity classification system. This classification is based primarily on toxicity data and due to its unique mode of action via a biochemical pathway that only exists in a small number of organisms that utilise the shikimic acid pathway to produce amino acids, most of which are green plants. This classification is supported by the majority of scientific literature on the toxic effects of glyphosate. However, in 2005, the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) reported that glyphosate and its major metabolite, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), are of potential toxicological concern, mainly as a result of accumulation of residues in the food chain. The FAO further states that the dietary risk of glyphosate and AMPA is unlikely if the maximum daily intake of 1 mg kg(-1) body weight (bw) is not exceeded. Research has now established that glyphosate can persist in the environment, and therefore, assessments of the health risks associated with glyphosate are more complicated than suggested by acute toxicity data that relate primarily to accidental high-rate exposure. We have used recent literature to assess the possible risks associated with the presence of glyphosate residues in food and the environment.

  4. Glyphosate sorption/desorption on biochars - interactions of physical and chemical processes.

    PubMed

    Hall, Kathleen E; Spokas, Kurt A; Gamiz, Beatriz; Cox, Lucia; Papiernik, Sharon K; Koskinen, William C

    2018-05-01

    Biochar, a carbon-rich product of biomass pyrolysis, could limit glyphosate transport in soil and remediate contaminated water. The present study investigates the sorption/desorption behavior of glyphosate on biochars prepared from different hardwoods at temperatures ranging from 350 to 900 °C to elucidate fundamental mechanisms. Glyphosate (1 mg L -1 ) sorption on biochars increased with pyrolysis temperature and was highest on 900 °C biochars; however, total sorption was low on a mass basis (<0.1 mg g -1 ). Sorption varied across feedstock materials, and isotherms indicated concentration dependence. Biochars with a greater fraction of micropores exhibited lower sorption capacities, and specific surface groups were also found to be influential. Prepyrolysis treatments with iron and copper, which complex glyphosate in soils, did not alter biochar sorption capacities. Glyphosate did not desorb from biochar with CaCl 2 solution; however, up to 86% of the bound glyphosate was released with a K 2 HPO 4 solution. Results from this study suggest a combined impact of surface chemistry and physical constraints on glyphosate sorption/desorption on biochar. Based on the observed phosphate-induced desorption of glyphosate, the addition of P-fertilizer to biochar-amended soils can remobilize the herbicide and damage non-target plants; therefore, improved understanding of this risk is necessary. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Annual Glyphosate Treatments Alter Growth of Unaffected Bentgrass (Agrostis) Weeds and Plant Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Collin W.; Auer, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is becoming more common in weed ecotypes and crop species including turfgrasses, but current gaps in knowledge limit predictive ecological risk assessments and risk management plans. This project examined the effect of annual glyphosate applications on the vegetative growth and reproductive potential of two weedy bentgrasses, creeping bentgrass (CB) and redtop (RT), where the glyphosate resistance (GR) trait was mimicked by covering the bentgrass plants during glyphosate application. Five field plots were studied in habitats commonly inhabited by weedy bentgrasses including an agricultural hayfield, natural meadow, and wasteland. Results showed that annual glyphosate treatment improved bentgrass survivorship, vegetative growth, and reproductive potential compared with bentgrass in unsprayed subplots. In the second year of growth, RT plants had an 86-fold increase in flower number in glyphosate-treated subplots versus controls, while CB plants had a 20-fold increase. At the end of the three year study, plant community composition had changed in glyphosate-treated subplots in hayfield and meadow plots compared to controls. Soils in subplots receiving glyphosate had higher nitrate concentrations than controls. This is the first study to mimic the GR trait in bentgrass plants with the goal of quantifying bentgrass response to glyphosate selection pressure and understanding the impacts on surrounding plant communities. PMID:23226530

  6. Effects of glyphosate and its formulation, roundup, on reproduction in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Uren Webster, Tamsyn M; Laing, Lauren V; Florance, Hannah; Santos, Eduarda M

    2014-01-21

    Roundup and its active ingredient glyphosate are among the most widely used herbicides worldwide and may contaminate surface waters. Research suggests both Roundup and glyphosate induce oxidative stress in fish and may also cause reproductive toxicity in mammalian systems. We aimed to investigate the reproductive effects of Roundup and glyphosate in fish and the potential associated mechanisms of toxicity. To do this, we conducted a 21-day exposure of breeding zebrafish (Danio rerio) to 0.01, 0.5, and 10 mg/L (glyphosate acid equivalent) Roundup and 10 mg/L glyphosate. 10 mg/L glyphosate reduced egg production but not fertilization rate in breeding colonies. Both 10 mg/L Roundup and glyphosate increased early stage embryo mortalities and premature hatching. However, exposure during embryogenesis alone did not increase embryo mortality, suggesting that this effect was caused primarily by exposure during gametogenesis. Transcript profiling of the gonads revealed 10 mg/L Roundup and glyphosate induced changes in the expression of cyp19a1 and esr1 in the ovary and hsd3b2, cat, and sod1 in the testis. Our results demonstrate that these chemicals cause reproductive toxicity in zebrafish, although only at high concentrations unlikely to occur in the environment, and likely mechanisms of toxicity include disruption of the steroidogenic biosynthesis pathway and oxidative stress.

  7. Fate and transport of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid in surface waters of agricultural basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coupe, R.H.; Kalkhoff, S.J.; Capel, P.D.; Gregoire, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] is a herbicide used widely throughout the world in the production of many crops and is heavily used on soybeans, corn and cotton. Glyphosate is used in almost all agricultural areas of the United States, and the agricultural use of glyphosate has increased from less than 10 000 Mg in 1992 to more than 80 000 Mg in 2007. The greatest intensity of glyphosate use is in the midwestern United States, where applications are predominantly to genetically modified corn and soybeans. In spite of the increase in usage across the United States, the characterization of the transport of glyphosate and its degradate aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) on a watershed scale is lacking. Results: Glyphosate and AMPA were frequently detected in the surface waters of four agricultural basins. The frequency and magnitude of detections varied across basins, and the load, as a percentage of use, ranged from 0.009 to 0.86% and could be related to three general characteristics: source strength, rainfall runoff and flow route. Conclusions: Glyphosate use in a watershed results in some occurrence in surface water; however, the watersheds most at risk for the offsite transport of glyphosate are those with high application rates, rainfall that results in overland runoff and a flow route that does not include transport through the soil. ?? 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Possible effects of glyphosate on Mucorales abundance in the rumen of dairy cows in Germany.

    PubMed

    Schrödl, Wieland; Krüger, Susanne; Konstantinova-Müller, Theodora; Shehata, Awad A; Rulff, Ramon; Krüger, Monika

    2014-12-01

    Glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl glycine) is registered as a herbicide for many food and non-food crops, as well as non-crop areas where total vegetation control is desired. Glyphosate influences the soil mycobiota; however, the possible effect of glyphosate residues in animal feed (soybean, corn, etc.) on animal mycobiota is almost unknown. Accordingly, the present study was initiated to investigate the mycological characteristics of dairy cows in relationship to glyphosate concentrations in urine. A total of 258 dairy cows on 14 dairy farms in Germany were examined. Glyphosate was detected in urine using ELISA. The fungal profile was analyzed in rumen fluid samples using conventional microbiological culture techniques and differentiated by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. LPS-binding protein (LBP) and antibodies (IgG1, IgG2, IgA, and IgM) against fungi were determined in blood using ELISA. Different populations of Lichtheimia corymbifera, Lichtheimia ramosa, Mucor, and Rhizopus were detected. L. corymbifera and L. ramosa were significantly more abundant in animals containing high glyphosate (>40 ng/ml) concentrations in urine. There were no significant changes in IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies toward isolated fungi that were related to glyphosate concentration in urine; however, IgA antibodies against L. corymbifera and L. ramosa were significantly lower in the higher glyphosate groups. Moreover, a negative correlation between IgM antibodies against L. corymbifera, L. ramosa, and Rhizopus relative to glyphosate concentration in urine was observed. LBP also was significantly decreased in animals with higher concentrations of glyphosate in their urine. In conclusion, glyphosate appears to modulate the fungal community. The reduction of IgM antibodies and LBP indicates an influence on the innate immune system of animals.

  9. Circular RNA expression profiles in hippocampus from mice with perinatal glyphosate exposure.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ning; Tong, Yun; Zhang, Danni; Zhao, Shanshan; Fan, Xinli; Wu, Lihui; Ji, Hua

    2018-07-02

    Glyphosate is the active ingredient in numerous herbicide formulations. The roles of glyphosate in embryo-toxicity and neurotoxicity have been reported in human and animal models. Recently, several studies have reported evidence linking neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) with gestational glyphosate exposure. However, the role of glyphosate in neuronal development is still not fully understood. Our previous study found that perinatal glyphosate exposure resulted in differential microRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex of mouse offspring. However, the mechanism of glyphosate-induced neurotoxicity in the developing brain is still not fully understood. Considering the pivotal role of Circular RNAs (circRNAs) in the regulation of gene expression, a circRNA microarray method was used in this study to investigate circRNA expression changes in the hippocampus of mice with perinatal glyphosate exposure. The circRNA microarrays revealed that 663 circRNAs were significantly altered in the perinatal glyphosate exposure group compared with the control group. Among them, 330 were significantly upregulated, and the other 333 were downregulated. Furthermore, the relative expression levels of mmu-circRNA-014015, mmu-circRNA-28128 and mmu-circRNA-29837 were verified using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analyses demonstrated that stress-associated steroid metabolism pathways, such as aldosterone synthesis and secretion pathways, may be involved in the neurotoxicity of glyphosate. These results showed that circRNAs are aberrantly expressed in the hippocampus of mice with perinatal glyphosate exposure and play potential roles in glyphosate-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of Novel Glyphosate-Tolerant Japonica Rice Lines: A Step Toward Commercial Release.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ying; Huang, Shuqing; Liu, Ziduo; Yi, Shuyuan; Zhou, Fei; Chen, Hao; Lin, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide for its low cost and high efficiency. However, it is rarely applied directly in rice field due to its toxicity to rice. Therefore, glyphosate-tolerant rice can greatly decrease the cost of rice production and provide a more effective weed management strategy. Although, several approaches to develop transgenic rice with glyphosate tolerance have been reported, the agronomic performances of these plants have not been well evaluated, and the feasibility of commercial production has not been confirmed yet. Here, a novel glyphosate-tolerant gene cloned from the bacterium Isoptericola variabilis was identified, codon optimized (designated as I. variabilis-EPSPS (*)), and transferred into Zhonghua11, a widely used japonica rice cultivar. After systematic analysis of the transgene integration via PCR, Southern blot and flanking sequence isolation, three transgenic lines with only one intact I. variabilis-EPSPS (*) expression cassette integrated into intergenic regions were identified. Seed test results showed that the glyphosate tolerance of the transgenic rice was about 240 times that of wild type on plant medium. The glyphosate tolerance of transgenic rice lines was further evaluated based on comprehensive agronomic performances in the field with T3 and T5generations in a 2-year assay, which showed that they were rarely affected by glyphosate even when the dosage was 8400 g ha(-1). To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the development of glyphosate-tolerant rice lines based on a comprehensive analysis of agronomic performances in the field. Taken together, the results suggest that the selected glyphosate-tolerant rice lines are highly tolerant to glyphosate and have the possibility of commercial release. I. variabilis-EPSPS (*) also can be a promising candidate gene in other species for developing glyphosate-tolerant crops.

  11. High Permeation Rates in Liposome Systems Explain Rapid Glyphosate Biodegradation Associated with Strong Isotope Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Ehrl, Benno N; Mogusu, Emmanuel O; Kim, Kyoungtea; Hofstetter, Heike; Pedersen, Joel A; Elsner, Martin

    2018-06-19

    Bacterial uptake of charged organic pollutants such as the widely used herbicide glyphosate is typically attributed to active transporters, whereas passive membrane permeation as an uptake pathway is usually neglected. For 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) liposomes, the pH-dependent apparent membrane permeation coefficients ( P app ) of glyphosate, determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, varied from P app (pH 7.0) = 3.7 (±0.3) × 10 -7 m·s -1 to P app (pH 4.1) = 4.2 (±0.1) × 10 -6 m·s -1 . The magnitude of this surprisingly rapid membrane permeation depended on glyphosate speciation and was, at circumneutral pH, in the range of polar, noncharged molecules. These findings point to passive membrane permeation as a potential uptake pathway during glyphosate biodegradation. To test this hypothesis, a Gram-negative glyphosate degrader, Ochrobactrum sp. FrEM, was isolated from glyphosate-treated soil and glyphosate permeation rates inferred from the liposome model system were compared to bacterial degradation rates. Estimated maximum permeation rates were, indeed, 2 orders of magnitude higher than degradation rates of glyphosate. In addition, biodegradation of millimolar glyphosate concentrations gave rise to pronounced carbon isotope fractionation with an apparent kinetic isotope effect, AKIE carbon , of 1.014 ± 0.003. This value lies in the range typical of non-masked enzymatic isotope fractionation demonstrating that glyphosate biodegradation was not subject to mass transfer limitations and glyphosate exchange across the cell membrane was rapid relative to enzymatic turnover.

  12. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Samsel, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease, and, more generally, gluten intolerance, is a growing problem worldwide, but especially in North America and Europe, where an estimated 5% of the population now suffers from it. Symptoms include nausea, diarrhea, skin rashes, macrocytic anemia and depression. It is a multifactorial disease associated with numerous nutritional deficiencies as well as reproductive issues and increased risk to thyroid disease, kidney failure and cancer. Here, we propose that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide, Roundup®, is the most important causal factor in this epidemic. Fish exposed to glyphosate develop digestive problems that are reminiscent of celiac disease. Celiac disease is associated with imbalances in gut bacteria that can be fully explained by the known effects of glyphosate on gut bacteria. Characteristics of celiac disease point to impairment in many cytochrome P450 enzymes, which are involved with detoxifying environmental toxins, activating vitamin D3, catabolizing vitamin A, and maintaining bile acid production and sulfate supplies to the gut. Glyphosate is known to inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes. Deficiencies in iron, cobalt, molybdenum, copper and other rare metals associated with celiac disease can be attributed to glyphosate's strong ability to chelate these elements. Deficiencies in tryptophan, tyrosine, methionine and selenomethionine associated with celiac disease match glyphosate's known depletion of these amino acids. Celiac disease patients have an increased risk to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which has also been implicated in glyphosate exposure. Reproductive issues associated with celiac disease, such as infertility, miscarriages, and birth defects, can also be explained by glyphosate. Glyphosate residues in wheat and other crops are likely increasing recently due to the growing practice of crop desiccation just prior to the harvest. We argue that the practice of “ripening” sugar cane with glyphosate may explain the recent

  13. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance.

    PubMed

    Samsel, Anthony; Seneff, Stephanie

    2013-12-01

    Celiac disease, and, more generally, gluten intolerance, is a growing problem worldwide, but especially in North America and Europe, where an estimated 5% of the population now suffers from it. Symptoms include nausea, diarrhea, skin rashes, macrocytic anemia and depression. It is a multifactorial disease associated with numerous nutritional deficiencies as well as reproductive issues and increased risk to thyroid disease, kidney failure and cancer. Here, we propose that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide, Roundup(®), is the most important causal factor in this epidemic. Fish exposed to glyphosate develop digestive problems that are reminiscent of celiac disease. Celiac disease is associated with imbalances in gut bacteria that can be fully explained by the known effects of glyphosate on gut bacteria. Characteristics of celiac disease point to impairment in many cytochrome P450 enzymes, which are involved with detoxifying environmental toxins, activating vitamin D3, catabolizing vitamin A, and maintaining bile acid production and sulfate supplies to the gut. Glyphosate is known to inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes. Deficiencies in iron, cobalt, molybdenum, copper and other rare metals associated with celiac disease can be attributed to glyphosate's strong ability to chelate these elements. Deficiencies in tryptophan, tyrosine, methionine and selenomethionine associated with celiac disease match glyphosate's known depletion of these amino acids. Celiac disease patients have an increased risk to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which has also been implicated in glyphosate exposure. Reproductive issues associated with celiac disease, such as infertility, miscarriages, and birth defects, can also be explained by glyphosate. Glyphosate residues in wheat and other crops are likely increasing recently due to the growing practice of crop desiccation just prior to the harvest. We argue that the practice of "ripening" sugar cane with glyphosate may explain the recent

  14. Impact of computerized pre-authorization of broad spectrum antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa at a children's hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Yuho; Higuchi, Hiroshi; Suwa, Junichi; Isogai, Mihoko; Shoji, Takayo; Ito, Kenta

    2016-08-01

    The spread of antimicrobial-resistant organisms is a global concern. To stem this tide, an antimicrobial stewardship program at hospitals is essential to optimize the prescription of broad spectrum antibiotics. In this study we examined the impact of computerized pre-authorization for broad spectrum antibiotics for Pseudomonas aeruginosa at a children's hospital. An antimicrobial stewardship program at Tokyo Metropolitan Children's Medical Center was assessed between March 2010 and March 2015. A paper-based post-prescription audit was switched to computerized pre-authorization for broad antipseudomonal agents in October 2011. The prescriber was required to obtain approval from physicians in the pediatric infectious diseases division before prescribing restricted antimicrobial agents. Approved prescriptions were processed and logged electronically. We evaluated days of therapy per 1000 patient-days, the cost of antibiotics, and the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to piperacillin, ceftazidime, cefepime, piperacillin/tazobactam, carbapenems, and ciprofloxacin. Also, the average length of admission and infection-related mortality at 30 days were compared pre- and post-intervention. Administration of carbapenems, piperacillin/tazobactam, and ceftazidime decreased significantly after the introduction of computerized pre-authorization. Antibiotic costs were reduced by JPY2.86 million (USD 26,000) annually. None of the antipseudomonal agents showed decreased sensitivity. The average length of admission was shorter in post-intervention. Infection-related mortality at 30 days showed no difference between the pre- and post-intervention periods. An antimicrobial stewardship program using computerized pre-authorization decreased the use and cost of broad spectrum antibiotics without significant difference in infection-related mortality at 30 days, although our study did not improve susceptibilities of P. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The

  15. Role of bronchoalveolar lavage in immunocompromised patients with pneumonia treated with a broad spectrum antibiotic and antifungal regimen

    PubMed Central

    Hohenadel, I; Kiworr, M; Genitsariotis, R; Zeidler, D; Lorenz, J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—In a retrospective study the value of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in the diagnosis of pneumonia was investigated in 95 immunocompromised patients suffering from haematological disorders and receiving a regimen of broad spectrum antibiotics and antifungal agents (BSAR).
METHODS—With the exception of four afebrile patients, all had fever, raised C reactive protein (CRP) levels, and new infiltrates visible on chest radiography. All patients underwent BAL to identify the organism causing the pneumonia and surveillance cultures were performed regularly for pathogens at different sites. Following classification of the isolates, patients with positive cultures were subdivided into two groups, pathogenic or contaminated. We investigated whether relevant pathogens were cultured only from the BAL fluid and whether they were susceptible to BSAR.
RESULTS—Although 77 of the 95 patients were thrombocytopenic, bleeding during BAL occurred in only 15% of all patients. Ten days after the procedure the fever improved in 88% of patients, radiographic findings improved in 71%, and CRP levels improved in 75% of patients; 22% of patients died within 28 days. Pathologically relevant isolates were found in 65% of all patients. Respiratory pathogens were detected only in the BAL fluid of 29 of the 95 patients (35% Gram positive species, 40% Gram negative species, 11% Mycobacterium, 11% fungi, and 3% cytomegalovirus). In 16 of these 29 patients (55%) the pathogens cultured only from the BAL fluid were resistant to treatment. Pathogens detected only in the BAL fluid were not susceptible to a standard broad spectrum antibiotic and antifungal regimen including teicoplanin, ceftriaxon, tobramycin, and amphotericin B in 12 of the 29 patients (41%).
CONCLUSIONS—Our data suggest that 12 patients were treated with broad spectrum antimicrobial agents which were not directed at the appropriate organism on in vitro sensitivity tests without BAL. BAL is a relatively safe

  16. Toxicity of herbicides in highway runoff.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinjiang; Fong, Stephanie; Deanovic, Linda; Young, Thomas M

    2005-09-01

    Previous field monitoring at two highway sites found highway-applied herbicides in storm water runoff at maximum concentrations ranging from 10 microg/L for glyphosate and diuron to as high as 200 microg/L for oryzalin. To determine whether these herbicides at these concentrations can cause any toxicity to aquatic organisms, a standard toxicity study was conducted. Storm water was collected along Highway 37, Sonoma County, California, USA, and the herbicides isoxaben, oryzalin, diuron, clopyralid, and glyphosate were spiked into the storm water at the highest concentrations observed during the five previous field-monitoring campaigns. Three different toxicity studies were conducted and the results showed the following: No significant reduction in reproduction or increase in mortality relative to the control for an 8-d Ceriodaphnia (water flea) toxicity test; no significant increase in mortality or decrease in biomass compared to the control during a 7-d Pimephales (fish) toxicity test; and, in a 96-h Selenastrum (algae) toxicity test, both the 10-microg/L diuron treatment and the combined 50-microg/L isoxaben plus 200-microg/L oryzalin treatment produced significant (p < 0.05) reductions in algal growth compared to the controls, although the 30-microg/L clopyralid or 10-microg/L glyphosate treatments did not exhibit any toxic effects.

  17. Application Date Affects Herbicide Tolerance of Hybrid Poplars

    Treesearch

    William Danfield; James Martishus; Edward Hansen

    1983-01-01

    Several herbicides -- glyphosate (Roundup), Linuron (Lorox), pronamide (Kerb), and dichlobenil (Casoron) -- controlled weeds in a 1-year-old Populus plantation and did not seriously injure the trees when applied in early spring or late fall. Casoron was most effective but is expensive.

  18. Growth, photosynthesis, and herbicide tolerance of genetically modified hybrid poplar

    Treesearch

    Raymond A. Donahue; Tim D. Davis; Charles H. Michler; Don E. Riemenschneider; Doug R. Carter; Paula E. Marquardt; Daksha Sankhla; Narendra Sankhla; Bruce E. Haissig; J. G. Isebrands

    1994-01-01

    Poplar hybrids have high light-saturated photosynthetic rates and potential utility as a renewable biofuel, but they lack tolerance to commercially important herbicides that may be needed for successful plantation management. Tolerance to glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) has been conferred to many plants by Agrobacterium-mediated transfor-...

  19. Are herbicide-resistant crops the answer to controlling Cuscuta?

    PubMed

    Nadler-Hassar, Talia; Shaner, Dale L; Nissen, Scott; Westra, Phill; Rubin, Baruch

    2009-07-01

    Herbicide-resistant crop technology could provide new management strategies for the control of parasitic plants. Three herbicide-resistant oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) genotypes were used to examine the response of attached Cuscuta campestris Yuncker to glyphosate, imazamox and glufosinate. Cuscata campestris was allowed to establish on all oilseed rape genotypes before herbicides were applied. Unattached seedlings of C. campestris, C. subinclusa Durand & Hilg. and C. gronovii Willd. were resistant to imazamox and glyphosate and sensitive to glufosinate, indicating that resistance initially discovered in C. campestris is universal to all Cuscuta species. Glufosinate applied to C. campestris attached to glufosinate-resistant oilseed rape had little impact on the parasite, while imazamox completely inhibited C. campestris growth on the imidazolinone-resistant host. The growth of C. campestris on glyphosate-resistant host was initially inhibited by glyphosate, but the parasite recovered and resumed growth within 3-4 weeks. The ability of C. campestris to recover was related to the quality of interaction between the host and parasite and to the resistance mechanism of the host. The parasite was less likely to recover when it had low compatibility with the host, indicating that parasite-resistant crops coupled with herbicide resistance could be highly effective in controlling Cuscuta. (c) 2009 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Similarities and differences in occurrence and temporal fluctuations in glyphosate and atrazine in small Midwestern streams (USA) during the 2013 growing season

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, Barbara J.; Van Metre, Peter C.; Burley, Thomas E.; Loftin, Keith A.; Meyer, Michael T.; Nowell, Lisa H.

    2017-01-01

    Glyphosate and atrazine are the most intensively used herbicides in the United States. Although there is abundant spatial and temporal information on atrazine occurrence at regional scales, there are far fewer data for glyphosate, and studies that compare the two herbicides are rare. We investigated temporal patterns in glyphosate and atrazine concentrations measured weekly during the 2013 growing season in 100 small streams in the Midwestern United States. Glyphosate was detected in 44% of samples (method reporting level 0.2 μg/L); atrazine was detected above a threshold of 0.2 μg/L in 54% of samples. Glyphosate was detected more frequently in 12 urban streams than in 88 agricultural streams, and at concentrations similar to those in streams with high agricultural land use (> 40% row crop) in the watershed. In contrast, atrazine was detected more frequently and at higher concentrations in agricultural streams than in urban streams. The maximum concentration of glyphosate measured at most urban sites exceeded the maximum atrazine concentration, whereas at agricultural sites the reverse was true. Measurement at a 2-day interval at 8 sites in northern Missouri revealed that transport of both herbicide compounds appeared to be controlled by spring flush, that peak concentration duration was brief, but that peaks in atrazine concentrations were of longer duration than those of glyphosate. The 2-day sampling also indicated that weekly sampling is unlikely to capture peak concentrations of glyphosate and atrazine.

  1. Multiple-Herbicide Resistance Is Widespread in Roadside Palmer Amaranth Populations.

    PubMed

    Bagavathiannan, Muthukumar V; Norsworthy, Jason K

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide-resistant Palmer amaranth is a widespread issue in row-crop production in the Midsouthern US. Palmer amaranth is commonly found on roadside habitats in this region, but little is known on the degree of herbicide resistance in these populations. Herbicide resistance in roadside Palmer amaranth populations can represent the spread of an adaptive trait across a selective landscape. A large-scale survey was carried out in the Mississippi Delta region of eastern Arkansas to document the level of resistance in roadside Palmer amaranth populations to pyrithiobac and glyphosate, two important herbicides with broad history of use in the region. A total of 215 Palmer amaranth populations collected across 500 random survey sites were used in the evaluations. About 89 and 73% of the surveyed populations showed >90% survival to pyrithiobac and glyphosate, respectively. Further, only 3% of the populations were completely susceptible to glyphosate, while none of the populations was completely controlled by pyrithiobac. Among the 215 populations evaluated, 209 populations showed multiple resistance to both pyrithiobac and glyphosate at varying degrees. Dose-response assays confirmed the presence of high levels of herbicide resistance in the five selected populations (≥ 25-fold compared to a susceptible standard). Results demonstrate the prevalence of multiple-herbicide resistance in roadside Palmer amaranth populations in this region. Growers should be vigilant of Palmer amaranth infestation in roadsides adjacent to their fields and implement appropriate control measures to prevent likely spread of herbicide resistance into their fields.

  2. Why have no new herbicide modes of action appeared in recent years?

    PubMed

    Duke, Stephen O

    2012-04-01

    Herbicides with new modes of action are badly needed to manage the evolution of resistance of weeds to existing herbicides. Yet no major new mode of action has been introduced to the market place for about 20 years. There are probably several reasons for this. New potential products may have remained dormant owing to concerns that glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops have reduced the market for a new herbicide. The capture of a large fraction of the herbicide market by glyphosate with GR crops led to significantly diminished herbicide discovery efforts. Some of the reduced herbicide discovery research was also due to company consolidations and the availability of more generic herbicides. Another problem might be that the best herbicide molecular target sites may have already been discovered. However, target sites that are not utilized, for which there are inhibitors that are highly effective at killing plants, suggests that this is not true. Results of modern methods of target site discovery (e.g. gene knockout methods) are mostly not public, but there is no evidence of good herbicides with new target sites coming from these approaches. In summary, there are several reasons for a long dry period for new herbicide target sites; however, the relative magnitude of each is unclear. The economic stimulus to the herbicide industry caused by the evolution of herbicide-resistant weeds, especially GR weeds, may result in one or more new modes of action becoming available in the not too distant future. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Benchmark study on glyphosate-resistant cropping systems in the United States. Part 3: Grower awareness, information sources, experiences and management practices regarding glyphosate-resistant weeds.

    PubMed

    Givens, Wade A; Shaw, David R; Newman, Michael E; Weller, Stephen C; Young, Bryan G; Wilson, Robert G; Owen, Micheal D K; Jordan, David L

    2011-07-01

    A survey was conducted with nearly 1200 growers in US states (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Mississippi, Nebraska and North Carolina) in 2005 with the objective in part of determining the awareness of the potential for development of glyphosate resistance, the experience with glyphosate-resistant (GR) weeds and the sources of information that growers had utilized for information on glyphosate resistance. Growers were asked a series of questions to determine the level of glyphosate resistance awareness and to list the sources of information used to learn about glyphosate resistance issues. The majority of the growers (88%) were aware of a weed's potential to evolve resistance to herbicide, while 44% were aware of state-specific documented cases of GR weeds, and 15% reported having had personal experience with GR weeds. Among sources of information concerning glyphosate resistance issues, farm publications, dealers/retailers and university/extension were the most frequent responses (41, 17 and 14% respectively). Based on a 1-10 effectiveness scale, growers ranked tillage the least effective practice (5.5) and using the correct label rates of herbicides at the proper timing for the size and type of weeds present the most effective practice (8.6) with respect to how effectively the practices mitigated the evolution of GR weeds. Results from this survey can be used by researchers, extension specialists and crop advisors further to bridge the information gap between growers and themselves and better to disseminate information concerning glyphosate resistance and glyphosate resistance management practices through more targeted information and information delivery methods. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Effect of new auxin herbicide formulations on control of herbicide resistant weeds and on microbial activities in the rhizosphere

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Widespread distribution of glyphosate-resistant weeds in soybean-growing areas across Mississippi has economically affected soybean planting and follow-up crop management operations. New multiple herbicide-resistant crop (including soybean) technologies with associated formulations will soon be comm...

  5. Reductive dechlorination of the nitrogen heterocyclic herbicide picloram

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanand, K.; Nagarajan, A.; Suflita, J.M.

    Halogenated heterocyclic chemicals are widely used for manufacture of pesticides, pharmaceuticals, dyes, and explosives. Often they are environmentally mobile and can contaminate ground water reserves. Picloram, a broad spectrum herbicide, has a half life in the soil of as long as 1 year. This paper reports on the reductive dehalogenation of picloram in anoxic freshwater sediments, though not when sulfate or nitrate was available as a terminal electron acceptor, and its subsequent conversion to an unidentified product. 25 refs., 4 figs, 1 tab.

  6. The Fate and Transport of Glyphosate and its Degradation Product, Aminomethylphosphonic Acid (AMPA), in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scribner, E.; Meyer, M. T.

    2006-05-01

    Since 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has investigated the fate and transport of glyphosate and its degradation product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), in surface water, and more recently in tile-drain flow, soil, and wet deposition. According to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sources, glyphosate is among the world's most widely used herbicides. In 2004, glyphosate usage estimates indicated that between 103 and 113 million pounds were applied annually to crops in the United States. The use of glyphosate over a wide geographic area suggests that this herbicide might be a potential concern for air, water, and soil quality as well as measured in high concentrations in streams; therefore, it is important to monitor its fate and transport in ground-water/surface-water systems. National, regional, and field-scale studies conducted by the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment and Toxic Substance Hydrology Programs have studied the fate and transport of glyphosate in overland flow, tile- drain flow, surface water, soil, and wet-deposition samples. The samples were analyzed for glyphosate and AMPA by using derivatization and online solid-phase extraction with liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and LC/MS/MS methods developed by the USGS Organic Geochemistry Research Laboratory in Lawrence, Kansas. During spring, summer, and fall 2002 runoff periods in 50 Midwestern streams, glyphosate was detected at or above the 0.10 micrograms per liter detection limit in 35, 41, and 31 percent of samples, respectively. AMPA was detected in 53, 82, and 75 percent of samples, respectively. Results of 128 samples from a field study showed that glyphosate was transported as a narrow high- concentration pulse during the first period of runoff after application and that the concentration of glyphosate in runoff was greater than the concentration of AMPA. In tile-drain flow, glyphosate and AMPA were transported in a broad low-concentration pulse during these same

  7. An aggregated perylene-based broad-spectrum, efficient and label-free quencher for multiplexed fluorescent bioassays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Hu, Rong; Lv, Yi-Fan; Wu, Yuan; Liang, Hao; Huan, Shuang-Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2014-08-15

    Fluorescent sensing systems based on the quenching of fluorophores have found wide applications in bioassays. An efficient quencher will endow the sensing system a high sensitivity. The frequently used quenchers are based on organic molecules or nanomaterials, which usually need tedious synthesizing and modifying steps, and exhibit different quenching efficiencies to different fluorophores. In this work, we for the first time report that aggregated perylene derivative can serve as a broad-spectrum and label-free quencher that is able to efficiently quench a variety of fluorophores, such as green, red and far red dyes labeled on DNA. By choosing nucleases as model biomolecules, such a broad-spectrum quencher was then employed to construct a multiplexed bioassay platform through a label-free manner. Due to the high quenching efficiency of the aggregated perylene, the proposed platform could detect nuclease with high sensitivity, with a detection limit of 0.03U/mL for EcoRV, and 0.05U/mL for EcoRI. The perylene quencher does not affect the activity of nuclease, which makes it possible to design post-addition type bioassay platform. Moreover, the proposed platform allows simultaneous and multicolor analysis of nucleases in homogeneous solution, demonstrating its value of potential application in rapid screening of multiple bio-targets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel engineered cationic antimicrobial peptides display broad-spectrum activity against Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Abdelbaqi, Suha; Deslouches, Berthony; Steckbeck, Jonathan; Montelaro, Ronald; Reed, Douglas S

    2016-02-01

    Broad-spectrum antimicrobials are needed to effectively treat patients infected in the event of a pandemic or intentional release of a pathogen prior to confirmation of the pathogen's identity. Engineered cationic antimicrobial peptides (eCAPs) display activity against a number of bacterial pathogens including multi-drug-resistant strains. Two lead eCAPs, WLBU2 and WR12, were compared with human cathelicidin (LL-37) against three highly pathogenic bacteria: Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Both WLBU2 and WR12 demonstrated bactericidal activity greater than that of LL-37, particularly against F. tularensis and Y. pestis. Only WLBU2 had bactericidal activity against B. pseudomallei. WLBU2, WR12 and LL-37 were all able to inhibit the growth of the three bacteria in vitro. Because these bacteria can be facultative intracellular pathogens, preferentially infecting macrophages and dendritic cells, we evaluated the activity of WLBU2 against F. tularensis in an ex vivo infection model with J774 cells, a mouse macrophage cell line. In that model WLBU2 was able to achieve greater than 50% killing of F. tularensis at a concentration of 12.5 μM. These data show the therapeutic potential of eCAPs, particularly WLBU2, as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial for treating highly pathogenic bacterial infections.

  9. Distribution of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in agricultural topsoils of the European Union.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vera; Montanarella, Luca; Jones, Arwyn; Fernández-Ugalde, Oihane; Mol, Hans G J; Ritsema, Coen J; Geissen, Violette

    2018-04-15

    Approval for glyphosate-based herbicides in the European Union (EU) is under intense debate due to concern about their effects on the environment and human health. The occurrence of glyphosate residues in European water bodies is rather well documented whereas only few, fragmented and outdated information is available for European soils. We provide the first large-scale assessment of distribution (occurrence and concentrations) of glyphosate and its main metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in EU agricultural topsoils, and estimate their potential spreading by wind and water erosion. Glyphosate and/or AMPA were present in 45% of the topsoils collected, originating from eleven countries and six crop systems, with a maximum concentration of 2mgkg -1 . Several glyphosate and AMPA hotspots were identified across the EU. Soil loss rates (obtained from recently derived European maps) were used to estimate the potential export of glyphosate and AMPA by wind and water erosion. The estimated exports, result of a conceptually simple model, clearly indicate that particulate transport can contribute to human and environmental exposure to herbicide residues. Residue threshold values in soils are urgently needed to define potential risks for soil health and off site effects related to export by wind and water erosion. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic variation in Dip5, an amino acid permease, and Pdr5, a multiple drug transporter, regulates glyphosate resistance in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rong-Mullins, Xiaoqing; Ravishankar, Apoorva; McNeal, Kirsten A; Lonergan, Zachery R; Biega, Audrey C; Creamer, J Philip; Gallagher, Jennifer E G

    2017-01-01

    S. cerevisiae from different environments are subject to a wide range of selective pressures, whether intentional or by happenstance. Chemicals classified by their application, such as herbicides, fungicides and antibiotics, can affect non-target organisms. First marketed as RoundUp™, glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide. In plants, glyphosate inhibits EPSPS, of the shikimate pathway, which is present in many organisms but lacking in mammals. The shikimate pathway produces chorismate which is the precursor to all the aromatic amino acids, para-aminobenzoic acid, and Coenzyme Q10. Crops engineered to be resistant to glyphosate contain a homolog of EPSPS that is not bound by glyphosate. Here, we show that S. cerevisiae has a wide-range of glyphosate resistance. Sequence comparison between the target proteins, i.e., the plant EPSPS and the yeast orthologous protein Aro1, predicted that yeast would be resistant to glyphosate. However, the growth variation seen in the subset of yeast tested was not due to polymorphisms within Aro1, instead, it was caused by genetic variation in an ABC multiple drug transporter, Pdr5, and an amino acid permease, Dip5. Using genetic variation as a probe into glyphosate response, we uncovered mechanisms that contribute to the transportation of glyphosate in and out of the cell. Taking advantage of the natural genetic variation within yeast and measuring growth under different conditions that would change the use of the shikimate pathway, we uncovered a general transport mechanism of glyphosate into eukaryotic cells.

  11. Genetic variation in Dip5, an amino acid permease, and Pdr5, a multiple drug transporter, regulates glyphosate resistance in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    McNeal, Kirsten A.; Lonergan, Zachery R.; Biega, Audrey C.; Creamer, J. Philip

    2017-01-01

    S. cerevisiae from different environments are subject to a wide range of selective pressures, whether intentional or by happenstance. Chemicals classified by their application, such as herbicides, fungicides and antibiotics, can affect non-target organisms. First marketed as RoundUp™, glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide. In plants, glyphosate inhibits EPSPS, of the shikimate pathway, which is present in many organisms but lacking in mammals. The shikimate pathway produces chorismate which is the precursor to all the aromatic amino acids, para-aminobenzoic acid, and Coenzyme Q10. Crops engineered to be resistant to glyphosate contain a homolog of EPSPS that is not bound by glyphosate. Here, we show that S. cerevisiae has a wide-range of glyphosate resistance. Sequence comparison between the target proteins, i.e., the plant EPSPS and the yeast orthologous protein Aro1, predicted that yeast would be resistant to glyphosate. However, the growth variation seen in the subset of yeast tested was not due to polymorphisms within Aro1, instead, it was caused by genetic variation in an ABC multiple drug transporter, Pdr5, and an amino acid permease, Dip5. Using genetic variation as a probe into glyphosate response, we uncovered mechanisms that contribute to the transportation of glyphosate in and out of the cell. Taking advantage of the natural genetic variation within yeast and measuring growth under different conditions that would change the use of the shikimate pathway, we uncovered a general transport mechanism of glyphosate into eukaryotic cells. PMID:29155836

  12. An empirical broad spectrum antibiotic therapy in health-care-associated infections improves survival in patients with cirrhosis: A randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Merli, Manuela; Lucidi, Cristina; Di Gregorio, Vincenza; Lattanzi, Barbara; Giannelli, Valerio; Giusto, Michela; Farcomeni, Alessio; Ceccarelli, Giancarlo; Falcone, Marco; Riggio, Oliviero; Venditti, Mario

    2016-05-01

    Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of infections in cirrhosis are crucial because of their high morbidity and mortality. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) infections are on the increase in health care settings. Health-care-associated (HCA) infections are still frequently treated as community-acquired with a detrimental effect on survival. We aimed to prospectively evaluate in a randomized trial the effectiveness of a broad spectrum antibiotic treatment in patients with cirrhosis with HCA infections. Consecutive patients with cirrhosis hospitalized with HCA infections were enrolled. After culture sampling, patients were promptly randomized to receive a standard or a broad spectrum antibiotic treatment (NCT01820026). The primary endpoint was in-hospital mortality. Efficacy, side effects, and the length of hospitalization were considered. Treatment failure was followed by a change in antibiotic therapy. Ninety-six patients were randomized and 94 were included. The two groups were similar for demographic, clinical, and microbiological characteristics. The prevalence of MDR pathogens was 40% in the standard versus 46% in the broad spectrum group. In-hospital mortality showed a substantial reduction in the broad spectrum versus standard group (6% vs. 25%; P = 0.01). In a post-hoc analysis, reduction of mortality was more evident in patients with sepsis. The broad spectrum showed a lower rate of treatment failure than the standard therapy (18% vs. 51%; P = 0.001). Length of hospitalization was shorter in the broad spectrum (12.3 ± 7 days) versus standard group (18 ± 15 days; P = 0.03). Five patients in each group developed a second infection during hospitalization with a similar prevalence of MDR (50% broad spectrum vs. 60% standard). A broad spectrum antibiotic therapy as empirical treatment in HCA infections improves survival in cirrhosis. This treatment was significantly effective, safe, and cost saving. © 2015 by the American Association for the

  13. Spectroscopic Detection of Glyphosate in Water Assisted by Laser-Ablated Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    De Góes, Rafael Eleodoro; Muller, Marcia; Fabris, José Luís

    2017-01-01

    Glyphosate is one of the most widely used herbicides in the world. Its safety for both human health and aquatic biomes is a subject of wide debate. There are limits to glyphosate’s presence in bodies of water, and it is usually detected through complex analytical procedures. In this work, the presence of glyphosate is detected directly through optical interrogation of aqueous solution. For this purpose, silver nanoparticles were produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquids. Limits of detection of 0.9 mg/L and 3.2 mg/L were obtained with UV-Vis extinction and Surface Enhanced Raman spectroscopies, respectively. The sensing mechanism was evaluated in the presence of potential interferents as well as with commercial glyphosate-based herbicides. PMID:28445394

  14. Influence of cover crops on management of Amaranthus species in glyphosate- and glufosinate-resistant soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A field study was conducted from fall of 2013 through fall of 2015 to determine the effect of cereal rye and either oats, radish, or annual ryegrass on the control of Amaranthus spp. when integrated with comprehensive herbicide programs in glyphosate-resistant and glufosinate-resistant soybean. The ...

  15. Influence of weed species and time of glyphosate application on Rhizoctonia root rot of barley

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rhizoctonia solani AG-8 causes root disease in wheat, barley, canola and other small grains in the dryland inland Pacific Northwest. The pathogen survives between crops on roots of volunteers and grassy weeds. Destroying this green bridge with herbicides such as glyphosate is a common tactic to cont...

  16. Effects of cattle grazing, glyphosate, and prescribed burning on fountaingrass fuel loading in Hawai`i

    Treesearch

    J.M. Castillo; G. Enriques; M. Nakahara; D. Weise; L. Ford; R. Moraga; R. Vihnanek

    2007-01-01

    Crimson fountaingrass (Pennisetum setaceum) is a nonnative invasive grass that has occupied a significant portion of the western side of the island of Hawai`i. As a result, several fires in excess of 4,049 ha have occurred in the area over the past 20 y. We are studying the effectiveness of cattle grazing, aerial application of glyphosate herbicide, and prescribed...

  17. Effect of 2,4-D and atrazine when applied with glyphosate ripener

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Management of late-season morningglory infestations in sugarcane is accomplished with aerial applications of the postemergence herbicides 2,4-D, dicamba, or atrazine. Likewise, the aerial application of glyphosate prior to harvest to improve stalk sucrose levels is a common practice for many Louisia...

  18. Use of Glyphosate and Imazapyr for Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica) management in southern pine forests

    Treesearch

    Patrick J. Minogue; James H. Miller; Dwight K. Lauer

    2012-01-01

    Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica [L.] P. Beauv. var. major [Nees] C.E. Hubb) is one of the most invasive perennial grasses worldwide and has progressively infested managed and natural habitats in the mid-South over the past 100 years. To extend past research toward the goal of eradication on forested sites, we tested the most effective herbicides (glyphosate and...

  19. Glyphosate and AMPA in U.S. streams, groundwater, precipitation and soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, William A.; Meyer, Michael T.; Kuivila, Kathryn; Dietze, Julie E.

    2014-01-01

    Herbicides containing glyphosate are used in more than 130 countries on more than 100 crops. In the United States (U.S.), agricultural use of glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] has increased from less than 10,000 metric tons per year (active ingredient) in 1993 to more than 70,000 metric tons per year in 2006. In 2006, glyphosate accounted for about 20 percent of all herbicide use (by weight of active ingredient). Glyphosate formulations such as Roundup® are used in homes and in agriculture. Part of the reason for the popularity of glyphosate is the perception that it is an “environmentally benign” herbicide that has low toxicity and little mobility or persistence in the environment. The U.S. Geological Survey developed an analytical method using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry that can detect small amounts of glyphosate and its primary degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in water and sediment. Results from more than 2,000 samples collected from locations distributed across the U.S. indicate that glyphosate is more mobile and occurs more widely in the environment than was previously thought. Glyphosate and AMPA were detected (reporting limits between 0.1 and 0.02 micrograms per liter) in samples collected from surface water, groundwater, rainfall, soil water, and soil, at concentrations from less than 0.1 to more than 100 micrograms per liter. Glyphosate was detected more frequently in rain (86%), ditches and drains (71%), and soil (63%); and less frequently in groundwater (3%) and large rivers (18%). AMPA was detected more frequently in rain (86%), soil (82%), and large rivers (78%); and less frequently in groundwater (8%) and wetlands or vernal pools (37%). Most observed concentrations of glyphosate were well below levels of concern for humans or wildlife, and none exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Maximum Contaminant Level of 700 micrograms per liter. However, the ecosystem effects of chronic low

  20. Glyphosate sub-lethal toxicity to non-target organisms occurring in Jatropha curcas plantations in Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Saraiva, Althiéris Souza; Sarmento, Renato Almeida; Pedro-Neto, Marçal; Teodoro, Adenir Vieira; Erasmo, Eduardo Andrea Lemus; Belchior, Diana Cléssia Vieira; de Azevedo, Emiliano Brandão

    2016-10-01

    Weed management in physic nut plantations has generally been performed by spraying the herbicide glyphosate. However, the effects of glyphosate on non-target organisms present in the crop system are unknown. Here, we evaluated the toxicity of glyphosate (Roundup Transorb(®)) against the pest species Polyphagotarsonemus latus (Acari: Tarsonemidae) and Tetranychus bastosi (Acari: Tetranychidae) which can be exposed by drift. These mites are considered pests of the physic nut; however, they can also feed and reside on weeds associated with the crop, serving as food sources for predatory mites. When subjected to residue (by ingestion of sap of treated plants), and direct contact to glyphosate, P. latus reproduction was affected but T. bastosi was affected only by the residual effect. Although the herbicide caused a reduction in the number of eggs laid by the females of both pest mites, it is suggested that sublethal effects of glyphosate stimulates oviposition of P. latus and T. bastosi: both species displayed higher reproductive rates when exposed to 0.36 kg ha(-1) of the herbicide. We conclude that glyphosate negatively affects the arthropod herbivores studied and we discuss possible implications on their biological control in Jatropha curcas plantations.

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