Science.gov

Sample records for bromadiolone-resistant norway rats

  1. Reproductive success of bromadiolone-resistant rats in absence of anticoagulant pressure.

    PubMed

    Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Leirs, Herwig; Siegismund, Hans R

    2006-09-01

    Resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides in brown rats (Rattus norvegicus Berk.) is associated with pleiotropic effects, notably with an increased dietary vitamin K requirement. Owing to this disadvantage, resistance is believed to be selected against if anticoagulant selection is absent. In small experimental populations of wild brown rats, an investigation was carried out to establish whether tolerance to anticoagulant exposure changed over a period of 2 years. In the same populations, DNA microsatellite markers were used to infer parentage, and this made it possible to estimate reproductive success of sensitive and resistant rats and estimate effective population size, Ne. Even though there was evidence for a selection against resistant rats with high vitamin K requirement, anticoagulant tolerance was not seen to be significantly influenced in the absence of bromadiolone selection. As the population size under investigation was small, random genetic drift may have played a role in this. In the presence of bromadiolone selection, however, the tolerance was significantly increased, suggesting that continuous selection will increase the proportion of highly resistant rats in the population. It was found that, for both males and females, surprisingly few individuals contributed to the next generation with numerous offspring, and most breeders contributed with none or a single offspring. The expected higher reproductive success and consequent increase in proportional numbers of sensitive rats in the absence of anticoagulant selection could not be observed. Among the resistant rats, moderately resistant females were found to be better breeders than highly resistant breeders, but for resistant males the reverse was true. This could be explained by the fact that the increased vitamin K requirement results in sex differential selection; in highly resistant males the selection presumably takes place at the immature stage, whereas in females the vitamin K requirement

  2. Mitochondrial DNA Phylogeography of the Norway Rat

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ying; Lan, Zhenjiang; Kohn, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Central Eastern Asia, foremost the area bordering northern China and Mongolia, has been thought to be the geographic region where Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) have originated. However recent fossil analyses pointed to their origin in southern China. Moreover, whereas analyses of fossils dated the species' origin as ∼1.2–1.6 million years ago (Mya), molecular analyses yielded ∼0.5–2.9 Mya. Here, to study the geographic origin of the Norway rat and its spread across the globe we analyzed new and all published mitochondrial DNA cytochrome-b (cyt-b; N = 156) and D-loop (N = 212) sequences representing wild rats from four continents and select inbred strains. Our results are consistent with an origin of the Norway rat in southern China ∼1.3 Mya, subsequent prehistoric differentiation and spread in China and Asia from an initially weakly structured ancestral population, followed by further spread and differentiation across the globe during historic times. The recent spreading occurred mostly from derived European populations rather than from archaic Asian populations. We trace laboratory strains to wild lineages from Europe and North America and these represent a subset of the diversity of the rat; leaving Asian lineages largely untapped as a resource for biomedical models. By studying rats from Europe we made the observation that mtDNA diversity cannot be interpreted without consideration of pest control and, possibly, the evolution of rodenticide resistance. However, demographic models explored by forward-time simulations cannot fully explain the low mtDNA diversity of European rats and lack of haplotype sharing with their source from Asia. Comprehensive nuclear marker analyses of a larger sample of Norway rats representing the world are needed to better resolve the evolutionary history of wild rats and of laboratory rats, as well as to better understand the evolution of anticoagulant resistance. PMID:24586325

  3. Mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of the Norway rat.

    PubMed

    Song, Ying; Lan, Zhenjiang; Kohn, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    Central Eastern Asia, foremost the area bordering northern China and Mongolia, has been thought to be the geographic region where Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) have originated. However recent fossil analyses pointed to their origin in southern China. Moreover, whereas analyses of fossils dated the species' origin as ∼ 1.2-1.6 million years ago (Mya), molecular analyses yielded ∼ 0.5-2.9 Mya. Here, to study the geographic origin of the Norway rat and its spread across the globe we analyzed new and all published mitochondrial DNA cytochrome-b (cyt-b; N = 156) and D-loop (N = 212) sequences representing wild rats from four continents and select inbred strains. Our results are consistent with an origin of the Norway rat in southern China ∼ 1.3 Mya, subsequent prehistoric differentiation and spread in China and Asia from an initially weakly structured ancestral population, followed by further spread and differentiation across the globe during historic times. The recent spreading occurred mostly from derived European populations rather than from archaic Asian populations. We trace laboratory strains to wild lineages from Europe and North America and these represent a subset of the diversity of the rat; leaving Asian lineages largely untapped as a resource for biomedical models. By studying rats from Europe we made the observation that mtDNA diversity cannot be interpreted without consideration of pest control and, possibly, the evolution of rodenticide resistance. However, demographic models explored by forward-time simulations cannot fully explain the low mtDNA diversity of European rats and lack of haplotype sharing with their source from Asia. Comprehensive nuclear marker analyses of a larger sample of Norway rats representing the world are needed to better resolve the evolutionary history of wild rats and of laboratory rats, as well as to better understand the evolution of anticoagulant resistance.

  4. Cardiac and thermal homeostasis in the aging Brown Norway rat.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Brown Norway (BN) rat is a popular strain for aging studies. There is little information on effects of age on baseline cardiac and thermoregulatory parameters in undisturbed BN rats even though cardiac and thermal homeostasis is linked to many pathological deficits in the age...

  5. Cardiac and thermal homeostasis in the aging Brown Norway rat.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Brown Norway (BN) rat is a popular strain for aging studies. There is little information on effects of age on baseline cardiac and thermoregulatory parameters in undisturbed BN rats even though cardiac and thermal homeostasis is linked to many pathological deficits in the age...

  6. Derivation of embryonic stem cells from Brown Norway rats blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoyang; Lv, Zhuo; Liu, Lei; Wang, Liu; Tong, Man; Zhou, Qi

    2010-07-01

    Knockout Brown Norway (BN) rat could be a useful disease model for human disorders, however, a failure to derive embryonic stem (ES) cells disturbs the further development of the model. In this study, we reported a case of successful derivation of the BN rat ES cells with the derivation efficiency comparable to that of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. The BN rat ES cells expressed the key transcription factors, and were able to form embryonic bodies (EBs) when being differentiated in vitro. After injecting the BN rat ES cells into the SD rat blastocysts, high-contribution chimeric rats were generated and could survive to their adulthood. Our success in generating pluripotent rat ES cells will benefit the generation of the knockout rats in the future.

  7. Novel Hepatitis E Virus Genotype in Norway Rats, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Johne, Reimar; Heckel, Gerald; Plenge-Bönig, Anita; Kindler, Eveline; Maresch, Christina; Reetz, Jochen; Schielke, Anika

    2010-01-01

    Human hepatitis E virus infections may be caused by zoonotic transmission of virus genotypes 3 and 4. To determine whether rodents are a reservoir, we analyzed the complete nucleotide sequence of a hepatitis E–like virus from 2 Norway rats in Germany. The sequence suggests a separate genotype for this hepatotropic virus. PMID:20735931

  8. Norway.

    PubMed

    1987-03-01

    This background note for Norway by the U.S. State Department describes the geography, people, history, government, politics, and foreign relations of this newly oil-rich Scandinavian nation. Norwegians number 4.1 million, growing only at 0.3% per year, of Germanic origin, with 20,000 Laplanders. Infant mortality is 9/1000; life expectancy is 73 and 80 years. The government is a constitutional monarchy, with socialized medicine, education through university and social security. Norway became independent of Sweden in 1905, was a non-belligerent in both world wars, but was occupied by Nazi Germany. Subsequently Norway has required military service and is a member of NATO. Norway is a wealthy developed nation, with a positive foreign trade balance, a per capita income of $14,000, resources of oil, fish, timber, hydroelectric power, ores, and an industrial economy. Norway sends out about $471 million in foreign aid.

  9. Survey for zoonotic pathogens in Norway rat populations from Europe.

    PubMed

    Heuser, Elisa; Fischer, Stefan; Ryll, René; Mayer-Scholl, Anne; Hoffmann, Donata; Spahr, Carina; Imholt, Christian; Alfa, Dewi Murni; Fröhlich, Andreas; Lüschow, Dörte; Johne, Reimar; Ehlers, Bernhard; Essbauer, Sandra; Nöckler, Karsten; Ulrich, Rainer G

    2017-02-01

    The Norway rat Rattus norvegicus is an important reservoir of various zoonotic pathogens, such as cowpox virus and Leptospira, but also for agents of no or unknown zoonotic potential. We describe a survey of 426 Norway rats originating from five European countries and different habitats for Leptospira spp., rickettsiae, orthopoxvirus (OPV), avian metapneumovirus subtypes A and B (aMPV) and rat polyomavirus (rat PyV). Leptospira DNA was detected in 60 out of 420 (14.3%) rats, and Rickettsia DNA was found in three out of 369 (0.8%) rats investigated. PCR-based typing resulted in the identification of L. interrogans sequence type 17, which corresponds to the serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae, and Rickettsia helvetica respectively. Rat PyV DNA was detected in 103 out of 421 (24.5%) rats. OPV DNA and aMPV RNA were detected in none of the rats, but OPV-specific antibodies were detected in three out of 388 (0.8%) rats. The frequency of single Leptospira and rat PyV infections and coinfections was, independent of sex, greater for adults compared with juveniles/subadults and greater at rural sites compared with urban areas. Study results indicate a broad geographical distribution of Leptospira DNA in rats within Europe, underlining the need to investigate further the potential mechanisms leading to increased prevalence in rural habitats and to assess the relevance to public health. In contrast, rickettsia and OPV infections rarely occurred in wild rat populations. The potential influence of rat PyV on the susceptibility to infections with other pathogens should be investigated in future studies. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Norway.

    PubMed

    1992-08-01

    Norway with a territory of 386,000 sq. km or 150,000 sq. miles is slightly larger than New Mexico. In 1991 the population was estimated at 4.3 million with an annual growth rate of .5% and a literacy rate of 100%. The infant mortality rate is 7/1000 live births, and lie expectancy is 73 years for men and 80 years for women. Norway's government is a hereditary constitutional monarchy since independence n 1905. Ethnically, Norwegians are predominantly Germanic, but there are indigenous communities of Sami (Lapps) in the north, and in recent years almost 150,000 immigrants, foreign workers, and asylum-seekers have settled there. Norway's health system includes free hospital care, physicians compensation, cash benefits during illness and pregnancy, and other medical and dental plans. Until the 1981 election, Norway has been governed by Labor Party governments since 1935, except for 3 periods (1963, 1965-71, and 1972-73). Gro Harlem Brundtland is again the prime minister after forming her 3rd government in 10 years. Norway holds national elections in September 1993. Norway's large shipping fleet is modern; metals, pulp and paper products, chemicals, shipbuilding, and fishing are traditional industries, and major oil and gas discoveries in the mid-1970s transformed the economy. High oil prices in the 1983-85 period raised consumer spending, wages, and inflation. Norway is aspiring to restructure its nonoil economy in favor of efficient, nontraditional industry. The prime minister has indicated that Norway may apply for European Community (EC) membership before the end of 1992. Its main trading partners are the EC countries and its Scandinavian neighbors with the US in 5th place.

  11. Analysis of vkorc1 polymorphisms in Norway rats using the roof rat as outgroup

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Certain mutations in the vitamin K epoxide reductase subcomponent 1 gene (vkorc1) mediate rodent resistance to warfarin and other anticoagulants. Testing for resistance often involves analysis of the vkorc1. However, a genetic test for the roof rat (Rattus rattus) has yet to be developed. Moreover, an available roof rat vkorc1 sequence would enable species identification based on vkorc1 sequence and the evaluation of natural selection on particular vkorc1 polymorphisms in the Norway rat (R. norvegicus). Results We report the coding sequence, introns and 5' and 3' termini for the vkorc1 gene of roof rats (R. r. alexandrinus and R. r. frugivorus) from Uganda, Africa. Newly designed PCR primers now enable genetic testing of the roof rat and Norway rat. Only synonymous and noncoding polymorphisms were found in roof rats from Uganda. Both nominal subspecies of roof rats were indistinguishable from each other but were distinct from R. losea and R. flavipectus; however, the roof rat also shares at least three coding sequence polymorphisms with R. losea and R. flavipectus. Many of recently published vkorc1 synonymous and non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Norway rats are likely SNPs from roof rats and/or other Rattus species. Tests applied to presumably genuine Norway rat vkorc1 SNPs are consistent with a role for selection in two populations carrying the derived Phe63Cys and Tyr139Cys mutations. Conclusion Geographic mapping of vkorc1 SNPs in roof rats should be facilitated by our report. Our assay should be applicable to most species of Rattus, which are intermediate in genetic distance from roof and Norway rats. Vkorc1-mediated resistance due to non-synonymous coding SNPs is not segregating in roof rats from Uganda. By using the roof rat sequence as a reference vkorc1, SNPs now can be assigned to the correct rat species with more confidence. Sampling designs and genotyping strategies employed so far have helped detect candidate mutations

  12. Analysis of vkorc1 polymorphisms in Norway rats using the roof rat as outgroup.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Juan C; Song, Ying; Moore, Anthony; Borchert, Jeff N; Kohn, Michael H

    2010-05-24

    Certain mutations in the vitamin K epoxide reductase subcomponent 1 gene (vkorc1) mediate rodent resistance to warfarin and other anticoagulants. Testing for resistance often involves analysis of the vkorc1. However, a genetic test for the roof rat (Rattus rattus) has yet to be developed. Moreover, an available roof rat vkorc1 sequence would enable species identification based on vkorc1 sequence and the evaluation of natural selection on particular vkorc1 polymorphisms in the Norway rat (R. norvegicus). We report the coding sequence, introns and 5' and 3' termini for the vkorc1 gene of roof rats (R. r. alexandrinus and R. r. frugivorus) from Uganda, Africa. Newly designed PCR primers now enable genetic testing of the roof rat and Norway rat. Only synonymous and noncoding polymorphisms were found in roof rats from Uganda. Both nominal subspecies of roof rats were indistinguishable from each other but were distinct from R. losea and R. flavipectus; however, the roof rat also shares at least three coding sequence polymorphisms with R. losea and R. flavipectus. Many of recently published vkorc1 synonymous and non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Norway rats are likely SNPs from roof rats and/or other Rattus species. Tests applied to presumably genuine Norway rat vkorc1 SNPs are consistent with a role for selection in two populations carrying the derived Phe63Cys and Tyr139Cys mutations. Geographic mapping of vkorc1 SNPs in roof rats should be facilitated by our report. Our assay should be applicable to most species of Rattus, which are intermediate in genetic distance from roof and Norway rats. Vkorc1-mediated resistance due to non-synonymous coding SNPs is not segregating in roof rats from Uganda. By using the roof rat sequence as a reference vkorc1, SNPs now can be assigned to the correct rat species with more confidence. Sampling designs and genotyping strategies employed so far have helped detect candidate mutations underlying vkorc1-mediated

  13. Diaphragm Muscle Sarcopenia in Fischer 344 and Brown Norway Rats

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jonathan E.; Omar, Tanya S.; Mantilla, Carlos B.; Sieck, Gary C.

    2016-01-01

    The risk for respiratory diseases increases in adults >65 years of age, which may be partially due to ageing-related weakening and atrophy (i.e., sarcopenia) of the diaphragm muscle (DIAm). However, mechanisms underlying DIAm sarcopenia remain unknown. Based on existing evidence, we hypothesized that sarcopenia is most evident in type IIx and/or IIb DIAm fibres comprising more fatigable motor units. Currently, the USA National Institute on Aging supports Fischer 344 (F344) and Brown Norway (BN) rat strains for ageing related research, yet DIAm sarcopenia has not been comprehensively evaluated in either strain. Thus, the current study examined DIAm sarcopenia in older adult (24 month, 50% survival) F344 and (32 month, 50% survival) BN rats, compared to young adult (6 month) F344 and BN rats. Measurements of contractility, contractile protein concentration, fibre type distribution and fibre cross-sectional area were obtained from midcostal DIAm strips. Maximal specific force was reduced by ∼24% and ∼13% in older F344 and BN rats, respectively. Additionally, although cross-sectional area of type I and IIa DIAm fibres was unchanged in both F344 and BN rats, cross-sectional area of type IIx and/or IIb DIAm fibres was reduced by ∼20% and ∼15% in F344 and BN rats, respectively. Thus, although there was ageing-related DIAm weakness and atrophy, selective to type IIx and/or IIb DIAm fibres in both F344 and BN rats, the sarcopenic phenotype was more pronounced in F344 rats. PMID:27126607

  14. D-penicillamine-induced granulomatous hepatitis in brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Metushi, Imir G; Zhu, Xu; Uetrecht, Jack

    2014-08-01

    The mechanism of idiosyncratic drug reactions (IDRs) remains poorly understood. D-penicillamine treatment is associated with a wide range of autoimmune reactions including liver injury. An animal model which utilizes brown Norway (BN) rats has been used to investigate the mechanism of D-penicillamine-induced IDRs because it mimics the autoimmune reactions that occur in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate the type of liver injury that results from D-penicillamine treatment in BN rats. We had previously noted that D-penicillamine caused histological changes in the liver, but there was no increase in alanine transaminase (ALT), and we assumed that there was no significant injury. However, we subsequently discovered that D-penicillamine inhibits the ALT assay. In the present study, we found that treatment of BN rats with a low doses of D-penicillamine (10 or 15 mg/day) resulted in a mild increases in glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) activities; however, this was not associated with histological changes. A higher dose of D-penicillamine (20 mg/day) resulted in 63% of the rats developing a skin rash, and these rats had elevated serum GLDH and SDH levels with histopathological changes characteristic of granulomatous hepatitis. This included large clusters of leukocytes in the form of granulomas that contained neutrophils, macrophages, and CD8 T cells. These changes did not occur in the rats that did not get sick. This model may be a good model to investigate the characteristics of drug-induced granulomatous hepatitis.

  15. The role of oxidative stress in diazinon-induced tissues toxicity in Wistar and Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mahvash; Salehi, Maryam; Ahmadi, Sediq; Asgari, Alireza; Abasnezhad, Maryam; Hajigholamali, Mansoure

    2012-10-01

    Diazinon (DZN) is an organophosphate pesticide widely used in agricultural to control insects and in veterinary medicine to control ectoparasites. This study investigated the induction of oxidative stress in the brain, heart, and spleen of Wistar and Norway rats treated with acute doses of DZN. Female Wistar and Norway rats were treated with 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg of DZN by intraperitoneal injection. The animals were sacrificed 24 h after treatment, and tissues were isolated and analyzed. The result of this study shows that DZN at higher doses increased the level of malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase and glutathione S-transferase activities and decreased glutathione (GSH) level, lactate dehydrogenase, and cholinesterase activities in the brain, heart, and spleen of both rat strains. At these concentrations, DZN toxicity also lead to a significant decrease in catalase (CAT) activity in all tissues of Wistar rat and brain of Norway rat, while it increased heart CAT activity in Norway rat. However, the alteration of these parameters was observed at lower doses of DZN in Wistar rat. These results suggest that DZN at higher doses induces the production of free radicals and oxidative stress in rat tissues and strains by alteration of antioxidant enzyme activity, depletion of GSH, and increasing lipid peroxidation. Induction of oxidative stress in DZN-treated rats is in the order of brain > heart > spleen. Wistar rats appear to be more sensitive to the effects of DZN on oxidative stress induction compared to Norway rat.

  16. A Two-Year Ecological Study of Norway Rats (Rattus norvegicus) in a Brazilian Urban Slum

    PubMed Central

    Panti-May, Jesús A.; Carvalho-Pereira, Ticiana S. A.; Serrano, Soledad; Pedra, Gabriel G.; Taylor, Josh; Pertile, Arsinoê C.; Minter, Amanda; Airam, Vladimir; Carvalho, Mayara; Júnior, Nivison N.; Rodrigues, Gorete; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Ko, Albert I.; Childs, James E.; Begon, Mike; Costa, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The Norway or brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) is among the most ubiquitous of rodents. However, the lack of studies describing Norway rat populations from tropical areas have limited our understanding regarding their demography and seasonal dynamics. In this study, we describe seasonal pattern in the abundance, reproductive parameters, and morphometrics of Norway rat populations in Salvador, Brazil. Rodents were trapped over four seasonal trapping periods (2013–2014) from three valleys. A total of 802 Norway rats were trapped over the course of the study over 7653 trap-nights. Norway rat abundance was high, but there was no significant differences between seasons. The reproductive parameters (e.g. frequency of pregnant and lactating females) did not show statistical differences between seasons. Female rats collected in the rainy season were heavier and older than females from the dry season. Salvador rats had a high incidence of pregnancy and birth rate (estimated birth rate of 79 young per year) compared to previous studies. The information generated is critical for the understanding of the ecology of Norway rat, the main reservoir of Leptospira in Salvador. However, future studies examining the effect of rodent control programs aimed at reducing populations, and determining rates of recovery, will further clarify our understanding of population dynamics. PMID:27015422

  17. A Two-Year Ecological Study of Norway Rats (Rattus norvegicus) in a Brazilian Urban Slum.

    PubMed

    Panti-May, Jesús A; Carvalho-Pereira, Ticiana S A; Serrano, Soledad; Pedra, Gabriel G; Taylor, Josh; Pertile, Arsinoê C; Minter, Amanda; Airam, Vladimir; Carvalho, Mayara; Júnior, Nivison N; Rodrigues, Gorete; Reis, Mitermayer G; Ko, Albert I; Childs, James E; Begon, Mike; Costa, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The Norway or brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) is among the most ubiquitous of rodents. However, the lack of studies describing Norway rat populations from tropical areas have limited our understanding regarding their demography and seasonal dynamics. In this study, we describe seasonal pattern in the abundance, reproductive parameters, and morphometrics of Norway rat populations in Salvador, Brazil. Rodents were trapped over four seasonal trapping periods (2013-2014) from three valleys. A total of 802 Norway rats were trapped over the course of the study over 7653 trap-nights. Norway rat abundance was high, but there was no significant differences between seasons. The reproductive parameters (e.g. frequency of pregnant and lactating females) did not show statistical differences between seasons. Female rats collected in the rainy season were heavier and older than females from the dry season. Salvador rats had a high incidence of pregnancy and birth rate (estimated birth rate of 79 young per year) compared to previous studies. The information generated is critical for the understanding of the ecology of Norway rat, the main reservoir of Leptospira in Salvador. However, future studies examining the effect of rodent control programs aimed at reducing populations, and determining rates of recovery, will further clarify our understanding of population dynamics.

  18. Preliminary Survey of Ectoparasites and Associated Pathogens from Norway Rats in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Frye, M. J.; Firth, C.; Bhat, M.; Firth, M. A.; Che, X.; Lee, D.; Williams, S. H.; Lipkin, W. I.

    2015-01-01

    The Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) is a reservoir of many zoonotic pathogens and lives in close proximity to humans in urban environments. Human infection with rodent-borne disease occurs either directly through contact with a rat or its excreta, or indirectly via arthropod vectors such as fleas and ticks. Here, we report on the diversity and abundance of ectoparasitic arthropod species and associated pathogenic bacteria from 133 Norway rats trapped over a 10-mo period in Manhattan, New York, NY. Norway rats were host to the tropical rat mite [Ornithonyssus bacoti (Hirst)], the spiny rat mite (Laelaps echidnina Berlese), Laelaps nuttalli Hirst, the spined rat louse [Polyplax spinulosa (Burmeister)], and the Oriental rat flea [(Xenopsylla cheopis) (Rothschild)], with an average of 1.7 species per individual. A flea index of 4.1 X. cheopis was determined, whereas previous studies in New York City reported 0.22 fleas per rat. Multiple species of pathogenic Bartonella were identified from Oriental rat fleas that were related to Bartonella tribocorum, Bartonella rochalimae, and Bartonella elizabethae. However, no evidence of Yersinia pestis or Rickettsia spp. infection was detected in fleas. The identification of multiple medically important ectoparasite species in New York City underscores the need for future efforts to fully characterize the diversity and distribution of ectoparasites on Norway rats, and assess the risk to humans of vector-borne disease transmission. PMID:26336309

  19. Preliminary Survey of Ectoparasites and Associated Pathogens from Norway Rats in New York City.

    PubMed

    Frye, M J; Firth, C; Bhat, M; Firth, M A; Che, X; Lee, D; Williams, S H; Lipkin, W I

    2015-03-01

    The Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) is a reservoir of many zoonotic pathogens and lives in close proximity to humans in urban environments. Human infection with rodent-borne disease occurs either directly through contact with a rat or its excreta, or indirectly via arthropod vectors such as fleas and ticks. Here, we report on the diversity and abundance of ectoparasitic arthropod species and associated pathogenic bacteria from 133 Norway rats trapped over a 10-mo period in Manhattan, New York, NY. Norway rats were host to the tropical rat mite [Ornithonyssus bacoti (Hirst)], the spiny rat mite (Laelaps echidnina Berlese), Laelaps nuttalli Hirst, the spined rat louse [Polyplax spinulosa (Burmeister)], and the Oriental rat flea [(Xenopsylla cheopis) (Rothschild)], with an average of 1.7 species per individual. A flea index of 4.1 X. cheopis was determined, whereas previous studies in New York City reported 0.22 fleas per rat. Multiple species of pathogenic Bartonella were identified from Oriental rat fleas that were related to Bartonella tribocorum, Bartonella rochalimae, and Bartonella elizabethae. However, no evidence of Yersinia pestis or Rickettsia spp. infection was detected in fleas. The identification of multiple medically important ectoparasite species in New York City underscores the need for future efforts to fully characterize the diversity and distribution of ectoparasites on Norway rats, and assess the risk to humans of vector-borne disease transmission.

  20. Completion of the life cycle of Sarcocystis zuoi , a parasite from the Norway rat, Rattus norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun-Jie; Meng, Yu; Guo, Yan-Mei; Liao, Jie-Ying; Song, Jing-Ling

    2012-06-01

    Transmission experiments were performed to elucidate the life cycle of Sarcocystis zuoi found in Norway rats ( Rattus norvegicus ) in China. Two king rat snakes ( Elaphe carinata ) fed sarcocysts from the muscles of 4 naturally infected Norway rats shed sporocysts measuring 10.8 ± 0.7 × 8.0 ± 0.7 µm, with a prepatent period of 8-9 days. Sporocysts from the intestine of 2 experimentally infected king rat snakes were given to the laboratory Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats ( R. norvegicus ) and Kunming (KM) mice ( Mus musculus ). Microscopic sarcocysts developed in the skeletal muscles of SD rats. No sarcocysts were observed in KM mice. Characters of ultrastructure and molecule of sarcocysts from SD rats were confirmed as S. zuoi . Our results indicate that king rat snake is the definitive host of S. zuoi .

  1. Ozone Induces Glucose Intolerance and Systemic Metabolic Effects in Young and Aged Brown Norway Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone could impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in very young and aged rats. Brown Norway (BN) rats, 1,4, 12, and 24 months ol...

  2. Ozone Induces Glucose Intolerance and Systemic Metabolic Effects in Young and Aged Brown Norway Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone could impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in very young and aged rats. Brown Norway (BN) rats, 1,4, 12, and 24 months ol...

  3. METABOLIC RATE AS A FUNCTION OF AGE IN BROWN NORWAY AND LONG-EVANS RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brown Norway (BN) rats are commonly used in aging studies but relatively little is known on their metabolism as it varies with age. In fact, there is considerable disagreement on the wholebody metabolism of aging rats with some studies indicating a decrease and others showing an...

  4. METABOLIC RATE AS A FUNCTION OF AGE IN BROWN NORWAY AND LONG-EVANS RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brown Norway (BN) rats are commonly used in aging studies but relatively little is known on their metabolism as it varies with age. In fact, there is considerable disagreement on the wholebody metabolism of aging rats with some studies indicating a decrease and others showing an...

  5. Rat hepatitis E virus: geographical clustering within Germany and serological detection in wild Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Johne, Reimar; Dremsek, Paul; Kindler, Eveline; Schielke, Anika; Plenge-Bönig, Anita; Gregersen, Henrike; Wessels, Ute; Schmidt, Katja; Rietschel, Wolfram; Groschup, Martin H; Guenther, Sebastian; Heckel, Gerald; Ulrich, Rainer G

    2012-07-01

    Zoonotic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in industrialised countries is thought to be caused by transmission from wild boar, domestic pig and deer as reservoir hosts. The detection of HEV-specific antibodies in rats and other rodents has suggested that these animals may represent an additional source for HEV transmission to human. Recently, a novel HEV (ratHEV) was detected in Norway rats from Hamburg, Germany, showing the typical genome organisation but a high nucleotide and amino acid sequence divergence to other mammalian and to avian HEV strains. Here we describe the multiple detection of ratHEV RNA and HEV-specific antibodies in Norway rats from additional cities in north-east and south-west Germany. The complete genome analysis of two novel strains from Berlin and Stuttgart confirmed the association of ratHEV to Norway rats. The present data indicated a continuing existence of this virus in the rat populations from Berlin and Hamburg. The phylogenetic analysis of a short segment of the open reading frame 1 confirmed a geographical clustering of the corresponding sequences. Serological investigations using recombinant ratHEV and genotype 3 capsid protein derivatives demonstrated antigenic differences which might be caused by the high amino acid sequence divergence in the immunodominant region. The high amount of animals showing exclusively ratHEV RNA or anti-ratHEV antibodies suggested a non-persistent infection in the Norway rat. Future studies have to prove the transmission routes of the virus in rat populations and its zoonotic potential. The recombinant ratHEV antigen generated here will allow future seroepidemiological studies to differentiate ratHEV and genotype 3 infections in humans and animals.

  6. Brown Norway rats show impaired nNOS-mediated information transfer in renal autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuemei; Cupples, William A

    2009-01-01

    Nonselective inhibition of NO synthase (NOS) augments myogenic autoregulation of renal blood flow (RBF) and profoundly reduces RBF. Previously in Wistar rats, we showed that augmented autoregulation, but not vasoconstriction, is duplicated by intrarenal inhibition of neuronal NOS (nNOS), whereas intrarenal inhibition of inducible NOS (iNOS) has no effect on RBF or on RBF dynamics. Thus macula densa nNOS transfers information from tubuloglomerular feedback to the afferent arteriole. This information flow requires that macula densa nNOS can sufficiently alter ambient NO concentration, that is, that endothelial NOS (eNOS) and iNOS do not alter local NO concentration. Because the Brown Norway rat often shows exaggerated responses to NOS inhibition and has peculiarities of renal autoregulation that are related to NO, we used this strain to study systemic and renal vascular responses to NOS inhibition. The first experiment showed transient blood pressure reduction by bolus i.v. acetylcholine that was dose-dependent in both strains and substantially prolonged in Brown Norway rats. The depressor response decayed more rapidly after nonselective NOS inhibition and the difference between strains was lost, indicating a greater activity of eNOS in Brown Norway rats. In Brown Norway rats, selective inhibition of iNOS reduced RBF (-16% +/- 7%) and augmented myogenic autoregulation, whereas nNOS inhibition reduced RBF (-25% +/- 4%) and did not augment myogenic autoregulation. The significant responses to intrarenal iNOS inhibition, the reduced modulation of autoregulation by nNOS inhibition, and the enhanced endothelial depressor response suggest that physiological signalling by NO within the kidney is impaired in Brown Norway rats because of irrelevant or inappropriate input of NO by eNOS and iNOS.

  7. DIESEL AND CARBON PARTICLES ENHANCE HOUSE DUST MITE-INDUCED PULMONARY HYPERSENSITIVITY IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel and Carbon Particles Enhance House Dust Mite-Induced Pulmonary Hypersensitivity in Brown Norway Rats. P. Singh1, M.J. Daniels2, D. Winsett2, J. Richards2, K. Crissman2, M. Madden2 and M.I. Gilmour2. 1NCSU, Raleigh, NC and 2 USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    Ep...

  8. DIESEL AND CARBON PARTICLES ENHANCE HOUSE DUST MITE-INDUCED PULMONARY HYPERSENSITIVITY IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel and Carbon Particles Enhance House Dust Mite-Induced Pulmonary Hypersensitivity in Brown Norway Rats. P. Singh1, M.J. Daniels2, D. Winsett2, J. Richards2, K. Crissman2, M. Madden2 and M.I. Gilmour2. 1NCSU, Raleigh, NC and 2 USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    Ep...

  9. Temporal distribution and weather correlates of Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) infestations in the city of Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Tamayo Uria, Ibon; Mateu Mahiques, Jorge; Mughini Gras, Lapo

    2013-06-01

    Urban Norway rats are challenging pests, posing significant health and economic threats. Implementing ecologically based integrated rodent management (EBIRM) programmes relies primarily on the understanding of ecological relationships between rodents and their environments, with emphasis on the processes influencing rodent populations in the target ecosystem. We investigated the temporal distribution of urban Norway rat infestations in Madrid, Spain, and tested for the association of such infestations with temperature, relative humidity and precipitation by fitting a multivariate Poisson generalized linear model to a 3-year (2006-2008) daily time series of 4,689 Norway rat sightings. Norway rat infestations showed a marked seasonality, peaking in the summer. Most Norway rat sightings were reported on Mondays. Minimum temperature and relative humidity were positively associated with Norway rat infestation, whereas the association with precipitation was negative. The time series was adequately explained by the model. We identified previously unrecognized time periods that are more prone to Norway rat infestation than others and generated hypotheses about the association between weather, human outdoor activity, resource availability, rodent activity and population size. This provided local authorities engaged in preserving urban ecosystem health with basic research information to predict future rodent outbreaks and support the implementation of EBIRM programmes in urban areas.

  10. Detection of rat hepatitis E virus in wild Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) and Black rats (Rattus rattus) from 11 European countries.

    PubMed

    Ryll, René; Bernstein, Samuel; Heuser, Elisa; Schlegel, Mathias; Dremsek, Paul; Zumpe, Maxi; Wolf, Sandro; Pépin, Michel; Bajomi, Daniel; Müller, Gabi; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Spahr, Carina; Lang, Johannes; Groschup, Martin H; Ansorge, Hermann; Freise, Jona; Guenther, Sebastian; Baert, Kristof; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco; Pikula, Jiri; Knap, Nataša; Tsakmakidis, Ιoannis; Dovas, Chrysostomos; Zanet, Stefania; Imholt, Christian; Heckel, Gerald; Johne, Reimar; Ulrich, Rainer G

    2017-09-01

    Rat hepatitis E virus (HEV) is genetically only distantly related to hepeviruses found in other mammalian reservoirs and in humans. It was initially detected in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) from Germany, and subsequently in rats from Vietnam, the USA, Indonesia, China, Denmark and France. Here, we report on a molecular survey of Norway rats and Black rats (Rattus rattus) from 12 European countries for ratHEV and human pathogenic hepeviruses. RatHEV-specific real-time and conventional RT-PCR investigations revealed the presence of ratHEV in 63 of 508 (12.4%) rats at the majority of sites in 11 of 12 countries. In contrast, a real-time RT-PCR specific for human pathogenic HEV genotypes 1-4 and a nested broad-spectrum (NBS) RT-PCR with subsequent sequence determination did not detect any infections with these genotypes. Only in a single Norway rat from Belgium a rabbit HEV-like genotype 3 sequence was detected. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a clustering of all other novel Norway and Black rat-derived sequences with ratHEV sequences from Europe, the USA and a Black rat-derived sequence from Indonesia within the proposed ratHEV genotype 1. No difference in infection status was detected related to age, sex, rat species or density of human settlements and zoological gardens. In conclusion, our investigation shows a broad geographical distribution of ratHEV in Norway and Black rats from Europe and its presence in all settlement types investigated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Age-related histological changes in kidneys of Brown Norway rat.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Akira; Yoneshige, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Shin; Tsujio, Masashi; Mitani, Sawane; Yamato, Osamu

    2014-03-01

    In this study, age-dependent histological changes in the kidneys of Brown Norway rat, a strain useful for conducting aging research, were evaluated. Examination was performed at 3, 12, 18, 24 and 30 months of age. Sclerotic and hypertrophic changes of the glomeruli were observed, and quantitative scores of these changes persistently increased with age. A marginal increase in scores was observed for glomerular cystic changes and tubulointerstitial damage. Further, urothelial hyperplasia was observed in the renal papillae, particularly at 30 months of age. In conclusion, the findings of the present study demonstrate that the Brown Norway strain exhibits persistent, but mild progression of age-dependent renal histological changes.

  12. Leptospira in breast tissue and milk of urban Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    DE Oliveira, D; Figueira, C P; Zhan, L; Pertile, A C; Pedra, G G; Gusmão, I M; Wunder, E A; Rodrigues, G; Ramos, E A G; Ko, A I; Childs, J E; Reis, M G; Costa, F

    2016-08-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis caused by bacteria of the genus Leptospira. The disease is globally distributed and a major public health concern. The Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) is the main reservoir of the pathogen in urban slums of developing and developed countries. The potential routes of intra-specific leptospire transmission in rats are largely unknown. Herein, we identified pathogenic Leptospira spp. in breast tissue and milk of naturally infected rats. We examined kidney, breast tissue and milk from 24 lactating rats for the presence of leptospires using immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and scanning electronic microscopy. All 24 rats had evidence for Leptospira in the kidneys, indicating chronic carriage. The majority of kidney-positive rats had detectable leptospires in milk (18, 75%) and breast tissue (16, 67%), as evidenced by immunofluorescence assay and immunohistochemistry. Four (17%) milk samples and two (8%) breast tissue samples were positive by quantitative real-time PCR. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the presence of leptospires in breast tissue. No major pathological changes in breast tissue were found. This study, for the first time, identified leptospires in the milk and breast tissue of wild Norway rats, suggesting the possibility of milk-borne transmission of leptospirosis to neonates.

  13. EFFECTS OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS DISEASE ON INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS DISEASE ON INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION IN BROWN NORWAY RATS (P. Singhl, D.W. Winsett2, M.J. Daniels2,
    C.A.J. Dick', K.B. Adlerl and M.I. Gilmour2, INCSU, Raleigh, N.C., 2NHEERL/ORD/ USEPA, RTP, N.C. and 3UNC, Chapel Hill, N.C.)The interaction between ...

  14. EFFECTS OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS DISEASE ON INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS DISEASE ON INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION IN BROWN NORWAY RATS (P. Singhl, D.W. Winsett2, M.J. Daniels2,
    C.A.J. Dick', K.B. Adlerl and M.I. Gilmour2, INCSU, Raleigh, N.C., 2NHEERL/ORD/ USEPA, RTP, N.C. and 3UNC, Chapel Hill, N.C.)The interaction between ...

  15. Age- and Brain Region-Specific Differences in Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in Brown Norway Rats

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Differences in various mitochondrial bioenergetics parameters in different brain regions in different age groups.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Pandya, J.D., J. Royland , R.C. McPhail, P.G. Sullivan, and P. Kodavanti. Age-and Brain Region-Specific Differences in Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in Brown Norway Rats. NEUROBIOLOGY OF AGING. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, USA, 42: 25-34, (2016).

  16. Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) as a potential reservoir for Echinococcus granulosus: A public health implication.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Moein, Khaled A; Hamza, Dalia A

    2016-12-01

    Cystic hydatidosis is a re-emerging parasitic zoonosis with worldwide distribution. The current study was carried out to investigate the possible role of rats in the epidemiology of such disease in urban and suburban areas. For this purpose, a total of 50 feral Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) were collected from urban and suburban settings, Cairo, Egypt. Rats were examined to be infected with cystic hydatidosis through serological examination by IHA test as well as post-mortem examination of internal organs, histopathological or molecular identification of the collected cysts. Moreover, 42 persons inhabiting suburban areas were tested for cystic hydatidosis by IHA. The overall seroprevalence rates of cystic hydatidosis in the examined rats and persons were 36% and 11.9% respectively. Cysts from 3 rats were identified as E. granulosus hydatid cysts (one via histopathological examination while the others by molecular technique and genotyped as G6 strain). The results of the current study highlight the possible role of Norway rat in the epidemiological cycle of E. granulosus especially in urban and suburban settings.

  17. Migration of Norway rats resulted in the worldwide distribution of Seoul hantavirus today.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xian-Dan; Guo, Wen-Ping; Wang, Wen; Zou, Yang; Hao, Zong-Yu; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Dong, Xue; Qu, Yong-Gang; Li, Ming-Hui; Tian, Hai-Feng; Wen, Jian-Fan; Plyusnin, Alexander; Xu, Jianguo; Zhang, Yong-Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Despite the worldwide distribution, most of the known Seoul viruses (SEOV) are closely related to each other. In this study, the M and the S segment sequences of SEOV were recovered from 130 lung tissue samples (mostly of Norway rats) and from six patient serum samples by reverse transcription-PCR. Genetic analysis revealed that all sequences belong to SEOV and represent 136 novel strains. Phylogenetic analysis of all available M and S segment sequences of SEOV, including 136 novel Chinese strains, revealed four distinct groups. All non-Chinese SEOV strains and most of the Chinese variants fell into the phylogroup A, while the Chinese strains originating from mountainous areas clustered into three other distinct groups (B, C, and D). We estimated that phylogroup A viruses may have arisen only within the last several centuries. All non-Chinese variants appeared to be directly originated from China. Thus, phylogroup A viruses distributed worldwide may share a recent ancestor, whereas SEOV seems to be as diversified genetically as other hantaviruses. In addition, all available mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences of Norway rats, including our 44 newly recovered mtDNA sequences, were divided into two phylogenetic groups. The first group, which is associated with the group A SEOV variants, included most of rats from China and also all non-Chinese rats, while the second group consisted of a few rats originating only from mountain areas in China. We hypothesize that an ancestor of phylogroup A SEOV variants was first exported from China to Europe and then spread through the New World following the migration of Norway rats.

  18. Migration of Norway Rats Resulted in the Worldwide Distribution of Seoul Hantavirus Today

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xian-Dan; Guo, Wen-Ping; Wang, Wen; Zou, Yang; Hao, Zong-Yu; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Dong, Xue; Qu, Yong-Gang; Li, Ming-Hui; Tian, Hai-Feng; Wen, Jian-Fan; Plyusnin, Alexander; Xu, Jianguo

    2012-01-01

    Despite the worldwide distribution, most of the known Seoul viruses (SEOV) are closely related to each other. In this study, the M and the S segment sequences of SEOV were recovered from 130 lung tissue samples (mostly of Norway rats) and from six patient serum samples by reverse transcription-PCR. Genetic analysis revealed that all sequences belong to SEOV and represent 136 novel strains. Phylogenetic analysis of all available M and S segment sequences of SEOV, including 136 novel Chinese strains, revealed four distinct groups. All non-Chinese SEOV strains and most of the Chinese variants fell into the phylogroup A, while the Chinese strains originating from mountainous areas clustered into three other distinct groups (B, C, and D). We estimated that phylogroup A viruses may have arisen only within the last several centuries. All non-Chinese variants appeared to be directly originated from China. Thus, phylogroup A viruses distributed worldwide may share a recent ancestor, whereas SEOV seems to be as diversified genetically as other hantaviruses. In addition, all available mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences of Norway rats, including our 44 newly recovered mtDNA sequences, were divided into two phylogenetic groups. The first group, which is associated with the group A SEOV variants, included most of rats from China and also all non-Chinese rats, while the second group consisted of a few rats originating only from mountain areas in China. We hypothesize that an ancestor of phylogroup A SEOV variants was first exported from China to Europe and then spread through the New World following the migration of Norway rats. PMID:22090114

  19. Differential resolution of inflammation and recovery after renal ischemia-reperfusion injury in Brown Norway compared with Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Sáenz-Morales, David; Conde, Elisa; Blanco-Sánchez, Ignacio; Ponte, Belen; Aguado-Fraile, Elia; de Las Casas, Gonzalo; García-Martos, Maria; Alegre, Laura; Escribese, Maria M; Molina, Ana; Santiuste, Carmen; Liaño, Fernando; García-Bermejo, Maria-Laura

    2010-05-01

    To investigate mechanisms conferring susceptibility or resistance to renal ischemia, we used two rat strains known to exhibit different responses to ischemia-reperfusion. We exposed proximal tubule cells isolated from Sprague Dawley or Brown Norway rats, to a protocol of hypoxia, followed by reoxygenation in vitro. The cells isolated from both rat strains exhibited comparable responses in the disruption of intercellular adhesions and cytoskeletal damage. In vivo, after 24 h of reperfusion, both strains showed similar degrees of injury. However, after 7 days of reperfusion, renal function and tubular structure almost completely recovered and inflammation resolved, but only in Brown Norway rats. Hypoxia-inducible factor-dependent gene expression, ERK1/2, and Akt activation were different in the two strains. Inflammatory mediators MCP-1, IL-10, INF-gamma, IL-1beta, and TNF-alpha were similarly induced at 24 h in both strains but were downregulated earlier in Brown Norway rats, which correlated with shorter NFkappaB activation in the kidney. Moreover, VLA-4 expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes and VCAM-1 expression in kidney tissues were initially similar at 24 h but reached basal levels earlier in Brown Norway rats. The faster resolution of inflammation in Brown Norway rats suggests that this strain might be a useful experimental model to determine the mechanisms that promote repair of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  20. The simultaneous occurrence of human norovirus and hepatitis E virus in a Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Wolf, Sandro; Reetz, Jochen; Johne, Reimar; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Petri, Samuel; Kanig, Hanna; Ulrich, Rainer G

    2013-07-01

    Wild rats can be reservoirs and vectors for several human pathogens. An initial RT-PCR screening of the intestinal contents of Norway rats trapped in the sewer system of Copenhagen, Denmark, for caliciviruses revealed the presence of a human norovirus in one of 11 rodents. Subsequent phylogenetic analysis of the ~4.0-kb 3'-terminus of the norovirus genome resulted in the identification of a recombinant GI.b/GI.6 strain. The simultaneous detection of hepatitis E virus-like particles in the feces of this rat by transmission electron microscopy was confirmed by RT-PCR and sequence determination, resulting in the identification of a novel rat hepatitis E virus.

  1. Fluoxetine augments ventilatory CO2 sensitivity in Brown Norway but not Sprague Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Matthew R.; Echert, Ashley E.; Puissant, Madeleine M.; Mouradian, Gary C.

    2013-01-01

    The Brown Norway (BN; BN/NHsdMcwi) rat exhibits a deficit in ventilatory CO2 sensitivity and a modest serotonin (5-HT) deficiency. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine would augment CO2 sensitivity in BN but not Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Ventilation during room air or 7 % CO2 exposure was measured before, during and after 3 weeks of daily injections of saline or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day) in adult male BN and SD rats. Fluoxetine had minimal effects on room air breathing in BN and SD rats (p>0.05), although tidal volume (VT) was reduced in BN rats (p<0.05). There were also minimal effects of fluoxetine on CO2 sensitivity in SD rats, but fluoxetine increased minute ventilation, breathing frequency and VT during hypercapnia in BN rats (p<0.05). The augmented CO2 response was reversible upon withdrawal of fluoxetine. Brain levels of biogenic amines were largely unaffected, but 5-HIAA and the ratio of 5-HIAA/5-HT were reduced (p<0.05) consistent with selective and effective 5-HT reuptake inhibition. Thus, fluoxetine increases ventilatory CO2 sensitivity in BN but not SD rats, further suggesting altered 5-HT system function may contribute to the inherently low CO2 sensitivity in the BN rat. PMID:23454023

  2. Fluoxetine augments ventilatory CO2 sensitivity in Brown Norway but not Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Matthew R; Echert, Ashley E; Puissant, Madeleine M; Mouradian, Gary C

    2013-04-01

    The Brown Norway (BN; BN/NHsdMcwi) rat exhibits a deficit in ventilatory CO2 sensitivity and a modest serotonin (5-HT) deficiency. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine would augment CO2 sensitivity in BN but not Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Ventilation during room air or 7% CO2 exposure was measured before, during and after 3 weeks of daily injections of saline or fluoxetine (10mg/(kgday)) in adult male BN and SD rats. Fluoxetine had minimal effects on room air breathing in BN and SD rats (p>0.05), although tidal volume (VT) was reduced in BN rats (p<0.05). There were also minimal effects of fluoxetine on CO2 sensitivity in SD rats, but fluoxetine increased minute ventilation, breathing frequency and VT during hypercapnia in BN rats (p<0.05). The augmented CO2 response was reversible upon withdrawal of fluoxetine. Brain levels of biogenic amines were largely unaffected, but 5-HIAA and the ratio of 5-HIAA/5-HT were reduced (p<0.05) consistent with selective and effective 5-HT reuptake inhibition. Thus, fluoxetine increases ventilatory CO2 sensitivity in BN but not SD rats, further suggesting altered 5-HT system function may contribute to the inherently low CO2 sensitivity in the BN rat.

  3. Capillaria hepatica in wild Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) from Vancouver, Canada.

    PubMed

    Rothenburger, Jamie L; Himsworth, Chelsea G; Chang, Victoria; LeJeune, Manigandan; Leighton, Frederick A

    2014-07-01

    Capillaria hepatica is a parasitic nematode that infects the liver of rats (Rattus spp.), and occasionally other mammalian species, including humans. Despite its broad geographic distribution and host range, the ecology of this parasite remains poorly understood. We characterized the ecology of C. hepatica in urban Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) in Vancouver, Canada. The overall prevalence of C. hepatica among Norway rats was 36% (241/671); however, there was significant variation in prevalence among city blocks. Using a generalized linear mixed model to control for clustering by block (where OR is odds ratio and CI is confidence interval), we found C. hepatica infection was negatively associated with season (spring [OR=0.14, 95% CI=0.05-0.39]; summer [OR=0.14, 95% CI=0.03-0.61]; winter [OR=0.34, 95% CI=0.13-0.84], compared to fall) and positively associated with sexual maturity (OR: 7.29, 95% CI=3.98-13.36) and presence of cutaneous bite wounds (OR=1.87, 95% CI=1.11-3.16). Our understanding of the ecology of C. hepatica in rats is hindered by a paucity of data regarding the main mechanisms of transmission (e.g., environmental exposure vs. active cannibalism). However, associations among infection, season, maturity, and bite wounds could suggest that social interactions, possibly including cannibalism, may be important in transmission.

  4. RNASeq-derived transcriptome comparisons reveal neuromodulatory deficiency in the CO2 insensitive brown Norway rat.

    PubMed

    Puissant, Madeleine M; Echert, Ashley E; Yang, Chun; Mouradian, Gary C; Novotny, Tyler; Liu, Pengyuan; Liang, Mingyu; Hodges, Matthew R

    2014-11-10

    Raphé-derived serotonin (5-HT) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) play important roles in fundamental, homeostatic control systems such as breathing and specifically the ventilatory CO2 chemoreflex. Brown Norway (BN) rats exhibit an inherent and severe ventilatory insensitivity to hypercapnia but also exhibit relatively normal ventilation at rest and during other conditions, similar to multiple genetic models of 5-HT system dysfunction in mice. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that the ventilatory insensitivity to hypercapnia in BN rats is due to altered raphé gene expression and the consequent deficiencies in raphé-derived neuromodulators such as TRH. Medullary raphé transcriptome comparisons revealed lower expression of multiple 5-HT neuron-specific genes in BN compared to control Dahl salt-sensitive rats, predictive of reduced central nervous system monoamines by bioinformatics analyses and confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography measurements. In particular, raphé Trh mRNA and peptide levels were significantly reduced in BN rats, and injections of the stable TRH analogue Taltirelin (TAL) stimulated breathing dose-dependently, with greater effects in BN versus control Sprague-Dawley rats. Importantly, TAL also effectively normalized the ventilatory CO2 chemoreflex in BN rats, but TAL did not affect CO2 sensitivity in control Sprague-Dawley rats. These data establish a molecular basis of the neuromodulatory deficiency in BN rats, and further suggest an important functional role for TRH signalling in the mammalian CO2 chemoreflex.

  5. RNASeq-derived transcriptome comparisons reveal neuromodulatory deficiency in the CO2 insensitive brown Norway rat.

    PubMed

    Puissant, Madeleine M; Echert, Ashley E; Yang, Chun; Mouradian, Gary C; Novotny, Tyler; Liu, Pengyuan; Liang, Mingyu; Hodges, Matthew R

    2015-01-15

    Raphé-derived serotonin (5-HT) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) play important roles in fundamental, homeostatic control systems such as breathing and specifically the ventilatory CO2 chemoreflex. Brown Norway (BN) rats exhibit an inherent and severe ventilatory insensitivity to hypercapnia but also exhibit relatively normal ventilation at rest and during other conditions, similar to multiple genetic models of 5-HT system dysfunction in mice. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that the ventilatory insensitivity to hypercapnia in BN rats is due to altered raphé gene expression and the consequent deficiencies in raphé-derived neuromodulators such as TRH. Medullary raphé transcriptome comparisons revealed lower expression of multiple 5-HT neuron-specific genes in BN compared to control Dahl salt-sensitive rats, predictive of reduced central nervous system monoamines by bioinformatics analyses and confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography measurements. In particular, raphé Trh mRNA and peptide levels were significantly reduced in BN rats, and injections of the stable TRH analogue Taltirelin (TAL) stimulated breathing dose-dependently, with greater effects in BN versus control Sprague-Dawley rats. Importantly, TAL also effectively normalized the ventilatory CO2 chemoreflex in BN rats, but TAL did not affect CO2 sensitivity in control Sprague-Dawley rats. These data establish a molecular basis of the neuromodulatory deficiency in BN rats, and further suggest an important functional role for TRH signalling in the mammalian CO2 chemoreflex.

  6. Angiogenesis and airway reactivity in asthmatic Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Elizabeth M; Jenkins, John; Schmieder, Anne; Eldridge, Lindsey; Zhang, Qiong; Moldobaeva, Aigul; Zhang, Huiying; Allen, John S; Yang, Xiaoxia; Mitzner, Wayne; Keupp, Jochen; Caruthers, Shelton D; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2015-01-01

    Expanded and aberrant bronchial vascularity, a prominent feature of the chronic asthmatic airway, might explain persistent airway wall edema and sustained leukocyte recruitment. Since it is well established that there are causal relationships between exposure to house dust mite (HDM) and the development of asthma, determining the effects of HDM in rats, mammals with a bronchial vasculature similar to humans, provides an opportunity to study the effects of bronchial angiogenesis on airway function directly. We studied rats exposed bi-weekly to HDM (Der p 1; 50 μg/challenge by intranasal aspiration, 1, 2, 3 weeks) and measured the time course of appearance of increased blood vessels within the airway wall. Results demonstrated that within 3 weeks of HDM exposure, the number of vessels counted within airway walls of bronchial airways (0.5-3 mm perimeter) increased significantly. These vascular changes were accompanied by increased airway responsiveness to methacholine. A shorter exposure regimen (2 weeks of bi-weekly exposure) was insufficient to cause a significant increase in functional vessels or reactivity. Yet, 19F/1H MR imaging at 3T following αvβ3-targeted perfluorocarbon nanoparticle infusion revealed a significant increase in 19F signal in rat airways after 2 weeks of bi-weekly HDM, suggesting earlier activation of the process of neovascularization. Although many antigen-induced mouse models exist, mice lack a bronchial vasculature and consequently lack the requisite human parallels to study bronchial edema. Overall, our results provide an important new model to study the impact of bronchial angiogenesis on chronic inflammation and airways hyperreactivity.

  7. Thirst and salt appetite responses in young and old Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Thunhorst, Robert L; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2003-02-01

    Male Brown Norway rats aged 4 mo (young) and 20 mo (old) received a series of experimental challenges to body fluid homeostasis over approximately 3 mo. Water was available for drinking in some tests, and both water and 0.3 M NaCl were available in others. The series included three episodes of extracellular fluid depletion (i.e., furosemide + 20 h of sodium restriction), two tests involving intracellular fluid depletion (i.e., hypertonic saline: 1 or 2 M NaCl at 2 ml/kg body wt sc), one test involving overnight food and fluid restriction, and testing with captopril adulteration of the drinking water (0.1 mg/ml) for several days. Old rats were significantly heavier than young rats throughout testing. Old rats drank less water and 0.3 M NaCl after sodium deprivation than young rats, in terms of absolute and body weight-adjusted intakes. Old rats drank only half as much water as young rats in response to subcutaneous hypertonic NaCl when intakes were adjusted for body weight. Old rats drank less 0.3 M NaCl than young rats after overnight food and fluid restriction when intakes were adjusted for body weight. In response to captopril adulteration of the drinking water, young rats significantly increased daily ingestion of 0.3 M NaCl when it was available as an alternative to water and significantly increased daily water intakes when only water was available, in terms of absolute and body weight-adjusted intakes. Old rats had no response to captopril treatment. These results add important new information to previous reports that aging rats have diminished thirst and near-absent salt appetite responses to regulatory challenges.

  8. Genome sequence of the brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Richard A.; Weinstock, George M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Sodergren, Erica J.; Scherer, Steven; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Worley, Kim C.; Burch, Paula E.; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Hines, Sandra; Lewis, Lora; DeRamo, Christine; Delgado, Oliver; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Miner, George; Morgan, Margaret; Hawes, Alicia; Gill, Rachel; Holt, Robert A.; Adams, Mark D.; Amanatides, Peter G.; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Barnstead, Mary; Chin, Soo; Evans, Cheryl A.; Ferriera, Steven; Fosler, Carl; Glodek, Anna; Gu, Zhiping; Jennings, Don; Kraft, Cheryl L.; Nguyen, Trixie; Pfannkoch, Cynthia M.; Sitter, Cynthia; Sutton, Granger G.; Venter, J. Craig; Woodage, Trevor; Smith, Douglas; Lee, Hong-Maei; Gustafson, Erik; Cahill, Patrick; Kana, Arnold; Doucette-Stamm, Lynn; Weinstock, Keith; Fechtel, Kim; Weiss, Robert B.; Dunn, Diane M.; Green, Eric D.; Blakesley, Robert W.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; de Jong, Pieter J.; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhu, Baoli; Marra, Marco; Schein, Jacqueline; Bosdet, Ian; Fjell, Chris; Jones, Steven; Krzywinski, Martin; Mathewson, Carrie; Siddiqui, Asim; Wye, Natasja; McPherson, John; Zhao, Shaying; Fraser, Claire M.; Shetty, Jyoti; Shatsman, Sofiya; Geer, Keita; Chen, Yixin; Abramzon, Sofyia; Nierman, William C.; Havlak, Paul H.; Chen, Rui; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Ren, Yanru; Song, Xing-Zhi; Li, Bingshan; Liu, Yue; Qin, Xiang; Cawley, Simon; Cooney, A.J.; D'Souza, Lisa M.; Martin, Kirt; Wu, Jia Qian; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Jackson, Andrew R.; Kalafus, Kenneth J.; McLeod, Michael P.; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Virk, Davinder; Volkov, Andrei; Wheeler, David A.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Eichler, Evan E.; Tuzun, Eray; Birney, Ewan; Mongin, Emmanuel; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Woodwark, Cara; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Bork, Peer; Suyama, Mikita; Torrents, David; Alexandersson, Marina; Trask, Barbara J.; Young, Janet M.; et al.

    2004-02-02

    The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is an indispensable tool in experimental medicine and drug development, having made inestimable contributions to human health. We report here the genome sequence of the Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality 'draft' covering over 90 percent of the genome. The BN rat sequence is the third complete mammalian genome to be deciphered, and three-way comparisons with the human and mouse genomes resolve details of mammalian evolution. This first comprehensive analysis includes genes and proteins and their relation to human disease, repeated sequences, comparative genome-wide studies of mammalian orthologous chromosomal regions and rearrangement breakpoints, reconstruction of ancestral karyotypes and the events leading to existing species, rates of variation, and lineage-specific and lineage-independent evolutionary events such as expansion of gene families, orthology relations and protein evolution.

  9. Bacteria Isolated from Conspecific Bite Wounds in Norway and Black Rats: Implications for Rat Bite–Associated Infections In People

    PubMed Central

    Zabek, Erin; Tang, Patrick; Parsons, Kirbee L.; Koehn, Martha; Jardine, Claire M.; Patrick, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bites associated with wild and domestic Norway and black rats (Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus) may have a variety of health consequences in people. Bite-related infections are among the most significant of these consequences; however, there is little data on the infectious agents that can be transmitted from rats to people through biting. This is problematic because without an accurate understanding of bite-related infection risks, it is difficult for health professionals to evaluate the adequacy of existing guidelines for empirical therapy. The objectives of this study were to increase our knowledge of the bacterial species associated with rat bites by studying bite wounds that wild rats inflict upon one another and to review the literature regarding rat bites and bite wound management. Wild Norway and black rats (n=725) were trapped in Vancouver, Canada, and examined for bite wounds in the skin. All apparently infected wounds underwent aerobic and anaerobic culture, and isolated bacteria were identified. Thirty-six rats had bite wound–related infections, and approximately 22 different species of bacteria belonging to 18 genera were identified. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common isolate; however, the majority of infections (72.5%) were polymicrobial. Rat bites can result in infection with a number of aerobic and anaerobic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In humans, these wounds are best managed through early recognition and cleansing. The benefit of prophylactic antimicrobial treatment is debatable, but given the deep puncturing nature of rodent bites, we suggest that they should be considered a high risk for infection. Antibiotics selected should include coverage for a broad range of bacterial species. PMID:24528094

  10. Bacteria isolated from conspecific bite wounds in Norway and black rats: implications for rat bite-associated infections in people.

    PubMed

    Himsworth, Chelsea G; Zabek, Erin; Tang, Patrick; Parsons, Kirbee L; Koehn, Martha; Jardine, Claire M; Patrick, David M

    2014-02-01

    Bites associated with wild and domestic Norway and black rats (Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus) may have a variety of health consequences in people. Bite-related infections are among the most significant of these consequences; however, there is little data on the infectious agents that can be transmitted from rats to people through biting. This is problematic because without an accurate understanding of bite-related infection risks, it is difficult for health professionals to evaluate the adequacy of existing guidelines for empirical therapy. The objectives of this study were to increase our knowledge of the bacterial species associated with rat bites by studying bite wounds that wild rats inflict upon one another and to review the literature regarding rat bites and bite wound management. Wild Norway and black rats (n=725) were trapped in Vancouver, Canada, and examined for bite wounds in the skin. All apparently infected wounds underwent aerobic and anaerobic culture, and isolated bacteria were identified. Thirty-six rats had bite wound-related infections, and approximately 22 different species of bacteria belonging to 18 genera were identified. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common isolate; however, the majority of infections (72.5%) were polymicrobial. Rat bites can result in infection with a number of aerobic and anaerobic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In humans, these wounds are best managed through early recognition and cleansing. The benefit of prophylactic antimicrobial treatment is debatable, but given the deep puncturing nature of rodent bites, we suggest that they should be considered a high risk for infection. Antibiotics selected should include coverage for a broad range of bacterial species.

  11. Oxygen consumption during maximal exercise in Fischer 344 x Brown Norway F1 hybrid rats.

    PubMed

    Olfert, I Mark; Balouch, Jamal; Mathieu-Costello, Odile

    2004-08-01

    We characterized O2 consumption (VO2) during treadmill exercise in 12-, 24-, and 35-month-old Fischer 344 x Brown Norway F1 hybrid (F344BNF1) rats. When accounting for differences in body mass (Mb), (O2)peak decreased by 10% and 33% in 24- and 35-month-old rats, respectively, compared with rats at 12 months (analysis of covariance, p < .01). O2 cost per unit work at VO2peak (i.e., VO2peak/work) was greater in 35-month-old rats compared with 12- and 24-month-old rats (p < .001). During submaximal exercise, the O2 cost was greater in 24- and 35-month-old than 12-month-old rats (p < .01). Analysis of covariance revealed similar patterns irrespective of differences in Mb or lean Mb as covariates. The underlying mechanism responsible for increasing O2 consumption in aged F344BNF1 rats during exercise, although partly explained by mechanical inefficiencies of locomotion, still remains to be determined. Copyright 2004 The Gerontological Society of America

  12. Acute Exacerbation of Sleep Apnea by Hyperoxia Impairs Cognitive Flexibility in Brown-Norway Rats

    PubMed Central

    Topchiy, Irina; Amodeo, Dionisio A.; Ragozzino, Michael E.; Waxman, Jonathan; Radulovacki, Miodrag; Carley, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine whether learning deficits occur during acute exacerbation of spontaneous sleep related breathing disorder (SRBD) in rats with high (Brown Norway; BN) and low (Zucker Lean; ZL) apnea propensity. Design: Spatial acquisition (3 days) and reversal learning (3 days) in the Morris water maze (MWM) with polysomnography (12:00–08:00): (1) with acute SRBD exacerbation (by 20-h hyperoxia immediately preceding reversal learning) or (2) without SRBD exacerbation (room air throughout). Setting: Randomized, placebo-controlled, repeated-measures design. Participants: 14 BN rats; 16 ZL rats. Interventions: 20-h hyperoxia. Measurements and Results: Apneas were detected as cessation of respiration ≥ 2 sec. Swim latency in MWM, apnea indices (AI; apneas/hour of sleep) and percentages of recording time for nonrapid eye movement (NREM), rapid eye movement (REM), and total sleep were assessed. Baseline AI in BN rats was more than double that of ZL rats (22.46 ± 2.27 versus 10.7 ± 0.9, P = 0.005). Hyperoxia increased AI in both BN (34.3 ± 7.4 versus 22.46 ± 2.27) and ZL rats (15.4 ± 2.7 versus 10.7 ± 0.9) without changes in sleep stage percentages. Control (room air) BN and ZL rats exhibited equivalent acquisition and reversal learning. Acute exacerbation of AI by hyperoxia produced a reversal learning performance deficit in BN but not ZL rats. In addition, the percentage of REM sleep and REM apnea index in BN rats during hyperoxia negatively correlated with reversal learning performance. Conclusions: Acute exacerbation of sleep related breathing disorder by hyperoxia impairs reversal learning in a rat strain with high apnea propensity, but not a strain with a low apnea propensity. This suggests a non-linear threshold effect may contribute to the relationships between sleep apnea and cognitive dysfunctions, but strain-specific differences also may be important. Citation: Topchiy I, Amodeo DA, Ragozzino ME, Waxman J, Radulovacki M, Carley DW. Acute

  13. The contact allergen dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and respiratory allergy in the Th2-prone Brown Norway rat.

    PubMed

    Kuper, C Frieke; Stierum, Rob H; Boorsma, Andre; Schijf, Marcel A; Prinsen, Menk; Bruijntjes, Joost P; Bloksma, Nanne; Arts, Josje H E

    2008-04-18

    All LMW respiratory allergens known to date can also induce skin allergy in test animals. The question here was if in turn skin allergens can induce allergy in the respiratory tract. Respiratory allergy was tested in Th2-prone Brown Norway (BN) rats by dermal sensitization with the contact allergen dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB; 1%, day 0; 0.5%, day 7) and a head/nose-only inhalation challenge of 27mg/m3 of DNCB (15 min, day 21), using a protocol that successfully identified chemical respiratory allergens. Skin allergy to DNCB was examined in BN rats and Th1-prone Wistar rats in a local lymph node assay followed by a topical patch challenge of 0.1% DNCB. Sensitization of BN rats via the skin induced DNCB-specific IgG in serum, but not in all animals, and an increased number of CD4+ cells in the lung parenchyma. Subsequent inhalation challenge with DNCB did not provoke apneas or allergic inflammation (signs of respiratory allergy) in the BN rats. However, microarray analysis of mRNA isolated from the lung revealed upregulation of the genes for Ccl2 (MCP-1), Ccl4 (MIP-1beta), Ccl7 and Ccl17. Skin challenge induced considerably less skin irritation and allergic dermatitis in the BN rat than in the Wistar rat. In conclusion, the Th2-prone BN rat appeared less sensitive to DNCB than the Wistar rat; nevertheless, DNCB induced allergic inflammation in the skin of BN rats but even a relatively high challenge concentration did not induce allergy in the respiratory tract, although genes associated with allergy were upregulated in lung tissue.

  14. Persistent ductus arteriosus in the Brown-Norway inbred rat strain.

    PubMed

    Bökenkamp, Regina; Gittenberger-De Groot, Adriana C; Van Munsteren, Conny J; Grauss, Robert W; Ottenkamp, Jaap; Deruiter, Marco C

    2006-10-01

    Persistent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is a common cardiovascular anomaly in children caused by the pathologic persistence of the left sixth pharyngeal arch artery. The inbred Brown-Norway (BN) rat presents with increased vascular fragility due to an aortic elastin deficit resulting from decreased elastin synthesis. The strikingly high prevalence of PDA in BN rats in a pilot study led us to investigate this vascular anomaly in 12 adolescent BN rats. In all BN rats, a PDA was observed macroscopically, whereas a ligamentum arteriosum was found in adult controls. The macroscopic appearance of the PDA was tubular (n = 2), stenotic (n = 8), or diverticular (n = 2). The PDA had the structure of a muscular artery with intimal thickening. In the normal closing ductus of the neonatal controls, the media consisted of layers of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) intermingled with layers of elastin. The intima was thin and poor in elastin. By contrast, the media of PDA in BN rats elastin lamellae were absent and the intima contained many elastic fibers. The abnormal distribution of elastin in the PDA of BN rats suggests that impaired elastin metabolism is related to the persistence of the ductus and implicates a genetically determined factor that may link the PDA with aortic fragility.

  15. Spatial reference memory in normal aging Fischer 344 × Brown Norway F1 hybrid rats.

    PubMed

    McQuail, Joseph A; Nicolle, Michelle M

    2015-01-01

    Fischer 344 × Brown Norway F1 (F344 × BN-F1) hybrid rats express greater longevity with improved health relative to aging rodents of other strains; however, few behavioral reports have thoroughly evaluated cognition across the F344 × BN-F1 lifespan. Consequently, this study evaluated spatial reference memory in F344 × BN-F1 rats at 6, 18, 24, or 28 months of age in the Morris water maze. Reference memory decrements were observed between 6 and 18 months and 18 and 24 months. At 28 months, spatial learning was not worse than 24 months, but swim speed was significantly slower. Reliable individual differences revealed that ∼50% of 24- to 28-month-old rats performed similarly to 6 months, whereas others were spatial learning impaired. Aged rats were impaired at learning within daily training sessions but not impaired at retaining information between days of training. Aged rats were also slower to learn to escape onto the platform, regardless of strategy. In summary, these data clarify the trajectory of cognitive decline in aging F344 × BN-F1 rats and elucidate relevant behavioral parameters.

  16. Glial glucocorticoid receptors in aged Fisher 344 (F344) and F344/Brown Norway rats

    PubMed Central

    Kasckow, J; Xiao, C; Herman, JP

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptors (GR) regulate glial function, and changes in astrocyte gene expression are implicated in age-related pathology. We evaluated changes in astroglial GR expression in two strains of rats – Fisher 344 (F344; 4, 12 and 24 months) and F344/Brown Norway strain (F344/BN; 4, 12 and 30 months). In both strains basal levels of corticosterone were higher in the oldest groups of rats. Age-related increases in GR (+) astrocytes but not the percent of astrocytes expressing GR were observed in the hippocampus CA1 region in F344 rats. Age-related decreases in CA1 GR (+) astrocytes and the percentage of GR (+) astrocytes were observed in the F344/BN strain only. Similar strain-specific changes were observed in the dentate gyrus. In the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus: 1) F344 rats exhibited significant decreases in the overall number of glial profiles with age, 2) F344/BN rats exhibited decreases in the numbers of GR (+) astrocytes with aging and 3) the proportion of GR (+) astrocytes decreased in older F344/BN, but not F344 rats. Overall, the data demonstrate age- and strain-related alterations in GR astrocytic expression that may explain unique phenotypic differences in brain function observed in both strains. PMID:19249343

  17. Role of cyclooxygenase in vasodilation of retinal blood vessels induced by bradykinin in Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Naoki; Saito, Maki; Mori, Asami; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the role of cyclooxygenase (COX) in bradykinin (BK)-induced vasodilation of retinal blood vessels in Brown Norway rats using a novel in vivo fluorescent fundus imaging technique. Under artificial ventilation, the animals were treated with tetrodotoxin, and the decreased blood pressure and heart rate were adjusted to the normal ranges by infusing pressor agents. Diameters of retinal blood vessels contained in the fluorescent fundus images were measured. Intravenous infusion of BK (1-30 microg/kg/min) increased diameters of retinal blood vessels and decreased blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner. The retinal vasodilator responses to BK were significantly attenuated by treatment with either indomethacin, a non-selective COX inhibitor, or nimesulide, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, but not with SC-560, a selective COX-1 inhibitor. These COX inhibitors failed to affect the depressor responses to BK. Under conditions of nitric oxide (NO) synthase blockade with N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, no inhibitory effects of indomethacin on BK-induced vasodilation of retinal blood vessels were observed. These results suggest that the vasodilator effects of BK on retinal blood vessels are partly mediated through a COX-2-dependent pathway in Brown Norway rats. The prostanoid-dependent component of BK-induced retinal vasodilator response seems to be mediated by a mechanism that involves NO.

  18. Norway rats reciprocate help according to the quality of help they received.

    PubMed

    Dolivo, Vassilissa; Taborsky, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Direct reciprocity, according to the decision rule 'help someone who has helped you before', reflects cooperation based on the principle of postponed benefits. A predominant factor influencing Homo sapiens' motivation to reciprocate is an individual's perceived benefit resulting from the value of received help. But hitherto it has been unclear whether other species also base their decision to cooperate on the quality of received help. Previous experiments have demonstrated that Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus, cooperate using direct reciprocity decision rules in a variant of the iterated Prisoner's Dilemma, where they preferentially help cooperators instead of defectors. But, as the quality of obtained benefits has not been varied, it is yet unclear whether rats use the value of received help as decision criterion to pay help back. Here, we tested whether rats distinguish between different cooperators depending purely on the quality of their help. Our data show that a rat's propensity to reciprocate help is, indeed, adjusted to the perceived quality of the partner's previous help. When cooperating with two conspecific partners expending the same effort, rats apparently rely on obtained benefit to adjust their level of returned help.

  19. Chromosome substitution modulates resistance to ischemia reperfusion injury in Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Basile, David P; Dwinell, Melinda R; Wang, Shur-Jen; Shames, Brian D; Donohoe, Deborah L; Chen, Shaoying; Sreedharan, Rajasree; Van Why, Scott K

    2013-02-01

    Brown Norway rats (BN, BN/NHsdMcwi) are profoundly resistant to developing acute kidney injury (AKI) following ischemia reperfusion. To help define the genetic basis for this resistance, we used consomic rats, in which individual chromosomes from BN rats were placed into the genetic background of Dahl SS rats (SS, SS/JrHsdMcwi) to determine which chromosomes contain alleles contributing to protection from AKI. The parental strains had dramatically different sensitivity to ischemia reperfusion with plasma creatinine levels following 45 min of ischemia and 24 h reperfusion of 4.1 and 1.3 mg/dl in SS and BN, respectively. No consomic strain showed protection similar to the parental BN strain. Nine consomic strains (SS-7(BN), SS-X(BN), SS-8(BN), SS-4(BN), SS-15(BN), SS-3(BN), SS-10(BN), SS-6(BN), and SS-5(BN)) showed partial protection (plasma creatinine about 2.5-3.0 mg/dl), suggesting that multiple alleles contribute to the severity of AKI. In silico analysis was performed using disease ontology database terms and renal function quantitative trait loci from the Rat Genome Database on the BN chromosomes giving partial protection from AKI. This tactic identified at least 36 candidate genes, with several previously linked to the pathophysiology of AKI. Thus, natural variants of these alleles or yet-to-be identified alleles on these chromosomes provide protection against AKI. These alleles may be potential modulators of AKI in susceptible patient populations.

  20. Differential age-associated regulation of clusterin expression in prostate lobes of brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Omwancha, Josephat; Anway, Matthew D; Brown, Terry R

    2009-02-01

    Serum androgen concentrations decline with age in male Brown Norway rats and castration induces apoptosis of luminal secretory epithelial cells in the ventral but not in the dorsal and lateral prostate lobes. Clusterin has been described as an androgen-repressed gene and a protein with either anti- or pro-apoptotic actions. We measured clusterin mRNA and protein levels, the effects of aging and castration on clusterin protein levels and clusterin immunolocalization within the prostatic ductal network in the prostate lobes of young and aged rats. Whereas levels of clusterin mRNA and protein expression measured by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively, were higher in the ventral and lateral lobes of aged (24 months) compared to young (4 months) rats, no age-dependent differences were observed in the dorsal lobe. Clusterin expression was localized by immunohistochemistry exclusively to the proximal duct segment of young rats, but extended to the distal segment of the ventral and lateral lobes of aged rats. Despite an age-related decrease in serum testosterone concentration, clusterin gene expression was not altered in the dorsal lobe. After castration, levels of clusterin expression increased significantly in the ventral and lateral lobes despite the absence of epithelial cell apoptosis in the latter. In castrated rats, clusterin expression extended throughout the proximal-distal duct regions of the prostate lobes of young and aged rats. Regulation of clusterin expression in the prostate lobes of aging rats appears complex and is neither directly repressed by androgen nor dependent on apoptotic-induced stress.

  1. Differential Age-Associated Regulation of Clusterin Expression in Prostate Lobes of Brown Norway Rats

    PubMed Central

    Omwancha, Josephat; Anway, Matthew D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Serum androgen concentrations decline with age in male Brown Norway rats and castration induces apoptosis of luminal secretory epithelial cells in the ventral but not in the dorsal and lateral prostate lobes. Clusterin has been described as an androgen-repressed gene and a protein with either anti- or pro-apoptotic actions. Methods We measured clusterin mRNA and protein levels, the effects of aging and castration on clusterin protein levels and clusterin immunolocalization within the prostatic ductal network in the prostate lobes of young and aged rats. Results Whereas levels of clusterin mRNA and protein expression measured by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively, were higher in the ventral and lateral lobes of aged (24 months) compared to young (4 months) rats, no age-dependent differences were observed in the dorsal lobe. Clusterin expression was localized by immunohistochemistry exclusively to the proximal duct segment of young rats, but extended to the distal segment of the ventral and lateral lobes of aged rats. Despite an age-related decrease in serum testosterone concentration, clusterin gene expression was not altered in the dorsal lobe. After castration, levels of clusterin expression increased significantly in the ventral and lateral lobes despite the absence of epithelial cell apoptosis in the latter. In castrated rats, clusterin expression extended throughout the proximal-distal duct regions of the prostate lobes of young and aged rats. Conclusion Regulation of clusterin expression in the prostate lobes of aging rats appears complex and is neither directly repressed by androgen nor dependent on apoptotic-induced stress. PMID:18942093

  2. Effects of paraoxon on serum biochemical parameters and oxidative stress induction in various tissues of Wistar and Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mahvash; Salehi, Maryam; Asgari, Alireza; Ahmadi, Sediq; Abbasnezhad, Maryam; Hajihoosani, Reza; Hajigholamali, Mansoure

    2012-11-01

    This study investigates the effects of different doses of paroxon (POX), an active metabolite of the organophosphate pesticide parathion, on some serum biochemical parameters and induction of oxidative stress in various tissues of female Wistar and Norway rats. The rats were intraperitoneally treated with 0.3, 0.7, 1 and 1.5 mg/kg of POX. The parameters were evaluated after 24h. The results showed that the decreased glutathione level and catalase, glutathione-S-transferase and lactate dehydrogenase activities in tissues of Wistar rat were higher than Norway rat at higher doses of POX. At these concentrations, POX increased superoxide dismutase activity, malondialdehyde level and some serum biochemical indices. In conclusion, POX induces the production of free radicals and oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner. Induction of oxidative stress in POX-treated rats is in the order of brain > liver > heart > kidney>spleen. Wistar rat is found to be more sensitive to the toxicity of POX compared to Norway rat.

  3. Allergen-induced airway remodeling in brown norway rats: structural and metabolic changes in glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Narayanan; Siddiqui, Sana; Jo, Taisuke; Martin, James G; Ludwig, Mara S

    2012-01-01

    Increased proteoglycan (PG) deposition is a feature of airway remodeling in asthma. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) mediate many of the biological and mechanical properties of PGs by providing docking sites through their carbohydrate chains to bioactive ligands; therefore, it is imperative to define structural and metabolic changes of GAGs in asthma. Using a Brown Norway (BN) ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized and -challenged rat model to induce airway remodeling, we found excessive deposition of chondroitin/dermatan (CS/DS)-, heparan (HS), and keratan (KS) sulfate GAGs in the airways and bronchoalveolar lavage cells of OVA-challenged rats. Disaccharide composition of CS/DS of OVA-challenged rats was significantly different compared with saline-treated (SAL) control rats, with increased levels of 0-, 6-, and 4-sulfated disaccharides. Increases in the amount and a change in the proportion of CS/DS versus HS GAGs were noted in OVA-challenged rats. The higher content and sulfation of CS/DS disaccharides was reflected by the increased expression of xylosyltransferase-I, β1,3-glucuronosyltransferase-I, chondroitin-4, and chondroitin-6 sulfotransferase genes and protein expression of xylosyltransferase-I and β1,3-glucuronosyltransferase-I in OVA-challenged rats. Genes encoding the core proteins of the CS/DS and KS-containing PGs, such as versican, biglycan, decorin, and lumican, were overexpressed in OVA-challenged rats. Our results suggest that GAG biosynthetic enzymes may be involved in the altered expression of GAGs in the airways and are potential targets for inhibiting excess PG-GAG deposition and the airway remodeling process in asthma.

  4. Assessment of autoimmunity-inducing potential using the brown Norway rat challenge model.

    PubMed

    White, K L; David, D W; Butterworth, L F; Klykken, P C

    2000-03-15

    The development of autoimmune disease in humans is thought to occur as a result of the interactions of a genetic predisposition of the host and environmental factors. There is evidence that treatment with certain drugs and exposure to environmental toxicants increase the risk associated with the development and severity of autoimmune disease. When exposed to certain chemicals, Brown Norway (BN) rats develop autoimmune disease similar to human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) characterized by elevation of antibody levels to self and non-self antigens which can result in the formation of immune complexes and lead to a fatal glomerulonephritis. A unique characteristic of the BN rat model is that the increase in IgE is self-limiting with levels eventually returning to normal. The objective of these studies was to determine if the BN rat and the self-limiting nature of the IgE response could be used in identifying compounds capable of initiating autoimmune responses. Two compounds known to produce autoimmunity, mercuric chloride and D-penicillamine, were studied as were, trichloroethylene and silicone gel, two agents suspected of inducing autoimmune disease. The results indicated that the BN rat model may prove useful for detecting compounds with the potential to produce autoimmunity, particularly if a HgCl(2) challenge is incorporated into the evaluation.

  5. Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Bass, V; Gordon, C J; Jarema, K A; MacPhail, R C; Cascio, W E; Phillips, P M; Ledbetter, A D; Schladweiler, M C; Andrews, D; Miller, D; Doerfler, D L; Kodavanti, U P

    2013-12-15

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased α2-macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2>1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation.

  6. Sex differences in performance on a cognitive bias task in Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gillian R; Cullum, Philippa; Martin, Stacey; Healy, Susan D

    2016-12-01

    Cognitive biases, which are defined as distortions in cognitive processes that are influenced by a background emotional state, can provide information about an individual's affective state. For instance, negative cognitive biases, where individuals assess ambiguous situations as unrewarding, are commonly found in humans suffering from anxiety disorders. Cognitive biases are also increasingly used as indicators of affective state in animals. As it is not clear whether female and male animals differ in performance on cognitive bias tasks, we used a spatial location task to examine cognitive bias in female and male adult Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus). We trained the rats to distinguish between reward and unrewarded locations, and then provided food pots at ambiguous, intermediate positions. We found that, during testing, females were slowest to approach the unrewarded location, while they approached ambiguous and rewarded locations similarly quickly. In contrast, the males approached all locations quickly. This sex difference is consistent with previous evidence that male rats are quicker than females to extinguish previously learned associations. Cognitive bias tasks could therefore be used to examine sex differences in learning strategies, as well as providing opportunities to test predictions about sex differences in welfare requirements.

  7. TNF-alpha enhanced allergic sensitization to house dust mite in brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Lambert, A L; Selgrade, M K; Winsett, D W; Gilmour, M I

    2001-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that pulmonary exposure to residual oil fly ash (ROFA) resulted in enhanced sensitization to house dust mite (HDM) and augmented the development of allergic lung disease after allergen challenge. This effect was associated with increased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), a macrophage- and epithelial cell-derived cytokine that promotes granulocyte migration to the lung. The present study examined whether exogenous administration of TNF-alpha enhances sensitization to HDM. One day prior to pulmonary sensitization with 10 microg HDM (5 microg each on days 1 and 3), female Brown Norway rats were instilled via the trachea with either 2.0 microg recombinant rat TNF-alpha, 2.0 microg bovine serum albumin (BSA), or 1,000 microg ROFA, and were challenged with 10 microg HDM 14 days later. Antigen-induced immediate bronchoconstriction responses, antigen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) titers, lymphocyte proliferation, (cytokines (TNF-alpha and interleukin [IL]-13), and eosinophils were elevated in rats treated with ROFA or TNF-alpha compared with BSA-treated controls after HDM challenge. Intratracheal administration of anti-TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody during ROFA exposure did not reduce ROFA-enhanced lymphocyte proliferation or IgE titers, but had a trend for reduced pulmonary inflammation. This study demonstrates that TNF-alpha has similar adjuvant activity as ROFA, but other factors may fulfill this function when TNF-alpha activity is blocked.

  8. Vitamin K supplementation does not prevent bone loss in ovariectomized Norway rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite plausible biological mechanisms, the differential abilities of phylloquinone (PK) and menaquinones (MKn) to prevent bone loss remain controversial. The objective of the current study was to compare the effects of PK, menaquinone-4 (MK-4) and menaquinone-7 (MK-7) on the rate of bone loss in ovariectomized (OVX) Norway rats. A secondary aim was to compare the effects of vitamin K with those of bisphosphonates (BP) on bone loss. Methods Rats (n = 96) were randomized to 6 dosing groups [n = 16/group; Sham; OVX; OVX + BP (100 μg/kg/100 μg/mL saline sc); OVX + PK; OVX + MK-4; and OVX + MK-7] for 6 wk. Equimolar daily doses of 107 mg PK/kg, 147 mg MK-4/kg, and 201 mg MK-7/kg diet were provided. Results BP significantly increased bone strength and bone mineral density (BMD) vs. OVX (P < 0.05). However, PK, MK-4 or MK-7 did not change bone strength or BMD compared to the OVX group. Whereas supplementation of PK, MK-4 and MK-7 increased serum and tibia concentrations of each respective form, PK concentrations were consistently higher despite equimolar intakes. Conclusion PK, MK-4, and MK-7 do not appear to prevent bone loss in OVX rats when administered concurrent with adequate intake of other nutrients. PMID:22348311

  9. Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged brown Norway rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, V.; Gordon, C.J.; Jarema, K.A.; MacPhail, R.C.; Cascio, W.E.; Phillips, P.M.; Ledbetter, A.D.; Schladweiler, M.C.; Andrews, D.; Miller, D.; Doerfler, D.L.; Kodavanti, U.P.

    2013-12-15

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased α{sub 2}-macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2 > 1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation. - Highlights: • Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. • Acute ozone exposure produces profound metabolic alterations in rats. • Age influences metabolic risk factors in aging BN rats. • Acute metabolic effects are reversible and repeated exposure reduces these effects. • Ozone

  10. Brown Norway chromosome 1 congenic reduces symptoms of renal disease in fatty Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Warden, Craig H; Slupsky, Carolyn; Griffey, Stephen M; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Min, Esther; Le, Anh; Fisler, Janis S; Hansen, Susan; Haj, Fawaz; Stern, Judith S

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that a congenic rat with Brown Norway (BN) alleles on chromosome 1 reduces renal disease of 15-week old fatty Zucker rats (ZUC). Development of renal disease in fatty BN congenic and fatty ZUC rats from 9 through 28 weeks is now examined. Analysis of urine metabolites by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy revealed a significantly increased urinary loss of glucose, myo-inositol, urea, creatine, and valine in ZUC. Food intake was lower in the BN congenic rats at weeks 9-24, but they weighed significantly more at 28 weeks compared with the ZUC group. Fasting glucose was significantly higher in ZUC than congenic and adiponectin levels were significantly lower in ZUC, but there was no significant genotype effect on Insulin levels. Glucose tolerance tests exhibited no significant differences between ZUC and congenic when values were normalized to basal glucose levels. Quantitative PCR on livers revealed evidence for higher gluconeogenesis in congenics than ZUC at 9 weeks. Plasma urea nitrogen and creatinine were more than 2-fold higher in 28-week ZUC. Twelve urine protein markers of glomerular, proximal and distal tubule disease were assayed at three ages. Several proteins that indicate glomerular and proximal tubular disease increased with age in both congenic and ZUC. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) level, a marker whose levels decrease with distal tubule disease, was significantly higher in congenics. Quantitative histology of 28 week old animals revealed the most significant genotype effect was for tubular dilation and intratubular protein. The congenic donor region is protective of kidney disease, and effects on Type 2 diabetes are likely limited to fasting glucose and adiponectin. The loss of urea together with a small increase of food intake in ZUC support the hypothesis that nitrogen balance is altered in ZUC from an early age.

  11. Experimental evidence for reciprocity in allogrooming among wild-type Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Schweinfurth, Manon K; Stieger, Binia; Taborsky, Michael

    2017-06-21

    If individuals help more those who have previously helped them, stable cooperation may ensue through alternation of roles between donors and recipients. Allogrooming, which is costly to donors and beneficial to recipients, is often exchanged between social partners. Arguably, allogrooming and allopreening are the most frequently exchanged social services and have been used as a standard model of reciprocal cooperation. However, evidence for the application of reciprocity rules among social partners allogrooming each other hitherto is merely correlational. Here, we tested whether female Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) apply the decision rule characterising direct reciprocity: help someone who has helped you before, by experimentally manipulating both the need for allogrooming and the behavioural response. Furthermore, we checked whether trading of grooming services is influenced by the rank of the social partner. We show that rats groom social partners reciprocally and prefer to do so up the hierarchy, i.e. they groom dominant partners more often than subordinates, while reciprocating with both. This provides experimental evidence that animals render a costly social service by applying reciprocity decision rules when showing a natural hygienic behaviour. The fact that allogrooming is more readily shown up the hierarchy may suggest an appeasing function.

  12. Niche-related learning in laboratory paradigms: the case of maze behavior in Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Timberlake, William

    2002-08-21

    The general hypothesis underlying this paper is that behavior in traditional paradigms of laboratory learning is based on niche-related mechanisms. The specific hypothesis is that the behavior of Norway rats in laboratory mazes is based on niche-related mechanisms related to trail following and navigating. I evaluate seven types of evidence for this hypothesis: (a) resemblance of maze behavior to behavior in unconstrained settings; (b) importance of experimenter tuning of apparatus and procedures; (c) overdetermination of laboratory behavior; (d) reverse-engineering of niche-related mechanisms from laboratory data; (e) prediction of laboratory results from ecological data; (f) contribution of specific relative to general mechanisms; and (g) phylogenetic conservation and ecologically-based convergence and divergence of maze mechanisms. I conclude there is strong evidence for the hypothesis that behavior of rats in laboratory mazes is based on niche-related mechanisms. I suggest that a niche-related approach to laboratory learning paradigms has conceptual generality and the potential to facilitate connections with the study of neurophysiology, genetics, and evolution. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  13. Impact of diet on ozone-induced pulmonary and systemic effects in female Brown Norway (BN) rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Impact of diet on ozone-induced pulmonary and systemic effects in female Brown Norway (BN) ratsV.L. Bass1, M.C. Schladweiler2, S. Snow5, C.J. Gordon4, K.A. Jarema4, P. Phillips4, A.D. Ledbetter2, D.B. Miller3, J.E. Richards2, U.P. Kodavanti2. 1. SPH, UNC, Chapel Hill2. EPHD, NHE...

  14. Impact of diet on ozone-induced pulmonary and systemic effects in female Brown Norway (BN) rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Impact of diet on ozone-induced pulmonary and systemic effects in female Brown Norway (BN) ratsV.L. Bass1, M.C. Schladweiler2, S. Snow5, C.J. Gordon4, K.A. Jarema4, P. Phillips4, A.D. Ledbetter2, D.B. Miller3, J.E. Richards2, U.P. Kodavanti2. 1. SPH, UNC, Chapel Hill2. EPHD, NHE...

  15. Repeated allergen exposure of sensitized Brown-Norway rats induces airway cell DNA synthesis and remodelling.

    PubMed

    Salmon, M; Walsh, D A; Koto, H; Barnes, P J; Chung, K F

    1999-09-01

    Chronic inflammation in asthmatic airways can lead to characteristic airway smooth muscle (ASM) thickening and pathological changes within the airway wall. This study assessed the effect of repeated allergen exposure on ASM and epithelial cell deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis, cell recruitment and airway wall pathology. Brown-Norway rats were sensitized and then exposed to ovalbumin or saline aerosol every 3 days on six occasions. After the final exposure, rats were administered twice daily for 7 days with the DNA S-phase marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Using a triple immunohistochemical staining technique, BrdU incorporation into ASM and epithelium was quantified employing computer-assisted image analysis. There were >3-fold mean increases in BrdU incorporation into ASM from 1.3% of cells (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-1.6) in saline controls to 4.7% (95% CI 2.6-6.7) after allergen exposure (p<0.001), and in airway epithelium, from 1.3 (95% CI 0.6-2.0) BrdU-positive cells x mm basement membrane(-1) in saline controls to 4.9 (95% CI 3.0-6.7) after allergen exposure (p<0.001). There was increased subepithelial collagen deposition and mucus secretion along with a significant eosinophil and lymphocyte recruitment to the airways. Increased rates of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in both airway smooth muscle and epithelial cells along with changes to the airway wall pathology may precede the establishment of smooth muscle thickening and airway remodelling after repeated allergen exposure in rats. This model seems to be appropriate for studying structural changes within the airways as observed in asthma.

  16. Digested Ara h 1 has sensitizing capacity in Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Bøgh, K L; Kroghsbo, S; Dahl, L; Rigby, N M; Barkholt, V; Mills, E N C; Madsen, C B

    2009-10-01

    Food allergies are a public health issue of growing concern, with peanuts in particular being associated with severe reactions. The peanut allergen, Ara h 1, belongs to the cupin plant food allergen family, which, unlike other structural families, appears to be broken down rapidly following gastrointestinal digestion. Using Ara h 1 as a model allergen, the ability of digested protein to sensitize has been investigated. Ara h 1 was purified from whole roasted peanuts. Intact Ara h 1 was digested in an in vitro model, simulating the human gastrointestinal digestion process. Digestion products were analysed for peptide sizes and their ability to aggregate. Brown Norway (BN) rats, used as an animal model, were immunized with purified intact Ara h 1 or the gastrointestinal digestion products thereof. The sensitizing capacity was evaluated by analyses of specific antibody (IgG1, IgG2a and IgE) responses and ability to trigger mediator release of rat basophilic leukaemia (RBL)-2H3 cells. The present study showed that Ara h 1 was broken down, resulting in peptide fragments of sizes<2.0 kDa, of which approximately 50% was in aggregated complexes of Mr up to 20 kDa. Ara h 1 digesta were shown to have sensitizing capacity in BN rats, being capable of inducing specific IgG and IgE antibodies. The IgE response was functional, having the capacity to induce specific degranulation of RBL cells. From this study, it can be concluded that lability of a food allergen to gastrointestinal digestion does not necessarily abrogate its allergenic sensitizing potential.

  17. Cholesterol diet counteracts repeated anesthesia/infusion-induced cognitive deficits in male Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Hohsfield, Lindsay A; Ehrlich, Daniela; Humpel, Christian

    2013-11-01

    A variety of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are associated with alterations in cholesterol levels and metabolism. Moreover, convincing evidence shows that high cholesterol diet can lead to learning and memory impairments. On the other hand, a significant body of research has also demonstrated that learning is improved by elevated dietary cholesterol. Despite these conflicting findings, it is clear that cholesterol plays an important role in these cognitive properties. However, it remains unclear how this blood-brain barrier (BBB)-impenetrable molecule affects the brain and under what circumstances it provides either detrimental or beneficial effects to learning and memory. The aim of this study was to characterize the effects of 5% cholesterol diet on six-month-old inbred Brown Norway rats. More important, we sought to examine the role that cholesterol can play when repeated anesthesia and intravenous infusion disrupts cognitive function. This present study supports previous work showing that enriched cholesterol diet leads to significant alterations in neuroinflammation and BBB disruption. Following repeated anesthesia and intravenous infusion of saline we observe that animals under normal diet conditions exhibit significant deficiencies in spatial learning and cholinergic neuron populations compared to animals under enriched cholesterol diet, which do not show such deficiencies. These findings indicate that cholesterol diet can protect against or counteract anesthesia/infusion-induced cognitive deficits. Ultimately, these results suggest that cholesterol homeostasis serves an important functional role in the brain and that altering this homeostasis can either exert positive or negative effects on cognitive properties.

  18. Immunological Interactive Effects between Pollen Grains and Their Cytoplasmic Granules on Brown Norway Rats.

    PubMed

    Abou Chakra, Oussama R; Sutra, Jean-Pierre; Rogerieux, Françoise; Peltre, Gabriel; Sénéchal, Hélène; Lacroix, Ghislaine

    2009-09-01

    : Grass pollen is one of the most important aeroallergen vectors in Europe. Under some meteorological factors, pollen grains can release pollen cytoplasmic granules (PCGs). PCGs induce allergic responses. Several studies have shown that during a period of thunderstorms the number of patients with asthma increases because of higher airborne concentrations of PCGs. : The aims of the study were to assess the allergenicity of interactive effects between pollen and PCGs and to compare it with allergenicity of Timothy grass pollen and PCGs in Brown Norway rats. : Rats were sensitized (day 0) and challenged (day 21) with pollen grains and/or PCGs. Four groups were studied: pollen-pollen (PP), PCGs-PCGs (GG), pollen-PCGs (PG), and PCGs-pollen (GP). Blood samples, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and bronchial lymph node were collected at day 25. IgE and IgG1 levels in sera were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Alveolar cells, protein, and cytokine concentrations were quantified in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. T-cell proliferation, in response to pollen or granules, was performed by lymph node assay. : Interactive effects between pollen and PCGs increased IgE and IgG1 levels when compared with those of the negative control. These increases were lower than those of the PP group but similar to the levels obtained by the GG group. Whatever was used in the sensitization and/or challenge phase, PCGs increased lymphocyte and Rantes levels compared with those of the pollen group. The interactive effects increased IL-1α and IL-1β compared with those of the PP and GG groups. : Immunologic interactive effects have been shown between pollen and PCGs. For humoral and cellular allergic responses, interactive effects between the 2 aeroallergenic sources used in this study seem to be influenced mainly by PCGs.

  19. Immunological Interactive Effects between Pollen Grains and Their Cytoplasmic Granules on Brown Norway Rats

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Grass pollen is one of the most important aeroallergen vectors in Europe. Under some meteorological factors, pollen grains can release pollen cytoplasmic granules (PCGs). PCGs induce allergic responses. Several studies have shown that during a period of thunderstorms the number of patients with asthma increases because of higher airborne concentrations of PCGs. Objective The aims of the study were to assess the allergenicity of interactive effects between pollen and PCGs and to compare it with allergenicity of Timothy grass pollen and PCGs in Brown Norway rats. Methods Rats were sensitized (day 0) and challenged (day 21) with pollen grains and/or PCGs. Four groups were studied: pollen-pollen (PP), PCGs-PCGs (GG), pollen-PCGs (PG), and PCGs-pollen (GP). Blood samples, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and bronchial lymph node were collected at day 25. IgE and IgG1 levels in sera were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Alveolar cells, protein, and cytokine concentrations were quantified in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. T-cell proliferation, in response to pollen or granules, was performed by lymph node assay. Results Interactive effects between pollen and PCGs increased IgE and IgG1 levels when compared with those of the negative control. These increases were lower than those of the PP group but similar to the levels obtained by the GG group. Whatever was used in the sensitization and/or challenge phase, PCGs increased lymphocyte and Rantes levels compared with those of the pollen group. The interactive effects increased IL-1α and IL-1β compared with those of the PP and GG groups. Conclusions Immunologic interactive effects have been shown between pollen and PCGs. For humoral and cellular allergic responses, interactive effects between the 2 aeroallergenic sources used in this study seem to be influenced mainly by PCGs. PMID:23283149

  20. Multiple Paternity in the Norway Rat, Rattus norvegicus, from Urban Slums in Salvador, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa, Federico; Richardson, Jonathan L; Dion, Kirstin; Mariani, Carol; Pertile, Arsinoe C; Burak, Mary K; Childs, James E; Ko, Albert I; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2016-03-01

    The Norway rat, Rattus norvegicus, is one of the most important pest species globally and the main reservoir of leptospires causing human leptospirosis in the urban slums of tropical regions. Rodent control is a frequent strategy in those settings to prevent the disease but rapid growth from residual populations and immigration limit the long-term effectiveness of interventions. To characterize the breeding ecology of R. norvegicus and provide needed information for the level of genetic mixing, which can help identify inter-connected eradication units, we estimated the occurrence of multiple paternity, distances between mothers and sires, and inbreeding in rats from urban slum habitat in Salvador, Brazil. We genotyped 9 pregnant females, their 66 offspring, and 371 males at 16 microsatellite loci. Multiple paternity was observed in 22% (2/9) of the study litters. Of the 12 sires that contributed to the 9 litters, we identified 5 (42%) of those sires among our genotyped males. Related males were captured in close proximity to pregnant females (the mean inter-parent trapping distance per litter was 70 m, ±58 m SD). Levels of relatedness between mother-sire pairs were higher than expected and significantly higher than relatedness between all females and non-sire males. Our findings indicate multiple paternity is common, inbreeding is apparent, and that mother-sire dyads occur in close proximity within the study area. This information is relevant to improve the spatial definition of the eradication units that may enhance the effectiveness of rodent management programs aimed at preventing human leptospirosis. High levels of inbreeding may also be a sign that eradication efforts are successful.

  1. Development and Characterization of an Effective Food Allergy Model in Brown Norway Rats

    PubMed Central

    Abril-Gil, Mar; Garcia-Just, Alba; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J.; Franch, Àngels; Castell, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Background Food allergy (FA) is an adverse health effect produced by the exposure to a given food. Currently, there is no optimal animal model of FA for the screening of immunotherapies or for testing the allergenicity of new foods. Objective The aim of the present study was to develop an effective and rapid model of FA in Brown Norway rats. In order to establish biomarkers of FA in rat, we compared the immune response and the anaphylactic shock obtained in this model with those achieved with only intraperitoneal immunization. Methods Rats received an intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin (OVA) with alum and toxin from Bordetella pertussis, and 14 days later, OVA by oral route daily for three weeks (FA group). A group of rats receiving only the i.p. injection (IP group) were also tested. Serum anti-OVA IgE, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgA antibodies were quantified throughout the study. After an oral challenge, body temperature, intestinal permeability, motor activity, and mast cell protease II (RMCP-II) levels were determined. At the end of the study, anti-OVA intestinal IgA, spleen cytokine production, lymphocyte composition of Peyer’s patches and mesenteric lymph nodes, and gene expression in the small intestine were quantified. Results Serum OVA-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b concentrations rose with the i.p. immunization but were highly augmented after the oral OVA administration. Anti-OVA IgE increased twofold during the first week of oral OVA gavage. The anaphylaxis in both IP and FA groups decreased body temperature and motor activity, whereas intestinal permeability increased. Interestingly, the FA group showed a much higher RMCP II serum protein and intestinal mRNA expression. Conclusions These results show both an effective and relatively rapid model of FA assessed by means of specific antibody titres and the high production of RMCP-II and its intestinal gene expression. PMID:25923134

  2. Anticoagulant resistance in the United Kingdom and a new guideline for the management of resistant infestations of Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus Berk.).

    PubMed

    Buckle, Alan

    2013-03-01

    Anticoagulant resistance was first discovered in UK Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus Berk.) in 1958 and has been present ever since. The possible detrimental impact of resistance on effective rodent control was quickly recognised, and, for almost three decades, extensive research was conducted on the geographical distribution and severity of anticoagulant resistance in UK rats. Various schemes for the eradication of resistant rats were also implemented. At first, surveys showed resistance only to the first-generation anticoagulants, such as warfarin, chlorophacinone and coumatetralyl, but, later, resistance to the more potent second-generation anticoagulants, such as difenacoum and bromadiolone, was also discovered. Unlike some European countries, where only one or two resistance mutations occur, virtually all known rat resistance mutations occur in the United Kingdom, and five (Leu128Gln, Tyr139Ser, Tyr139Cys, Tyr139Phe and Leu120Gln) are known to have significant impacts on anticoagulant efficacy. Little is currently known of the geographical extent of anticoagulant resistance among Norway rats in the United Kingdom because no comprehensive survey has been conducted recently. At an operational level, anticoagulants generally retain their utility for Norway rat control, but it is impossible to control resistant rats in some areas because of restrictions on the use of the more potent resistance-breaking compounds. This paper reviews the development of resistance in Norway rats in the United Kingdom, outlines the present situation for resistance management and introduces a new resistance management guideline from the UK Rodenticide Resistance Action Group.

  3. Commensal ecology, urban landscapes, and their influence on the genetic characteristics of city-dwelling Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Gardner-Santana, L C; Norris, D E; Fornadel, C M; Hinson, E R; Klein, S L; Glass, G E

    2009-07-01

    Movement of individuals promotes colonization of new areas, gene flow among local populations, and has implications for the spread of infectious agents and the control of pest species. Wild Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) are common in highly urbanized areas but surprisingly little is known of their population structure. We sampled individuals from 11 locations within Baltimore, Maryland, to characterize the genetic structure and extent of gene flow between areas within the city. Clustering methods and a neighbour-joining tree based on pairwise genetic distances supported an east-west division in the inner city, and a third cluster comprised of historically more recent sites. Most individuals (approximately 95%) were assigned to their area of capture, indicating strong site fidelity. Moreover, the axial dispersal distance of rats (62 m) fell within typical alley length. Several rats were assigned to areas 2-11.5 km away, indicating some, albeit infrequent, long-distance movement within the city. Although individual movement appears to be limited (30-150 m), locations up to 1.7 km are comprised of relatives. Moderate F(ST), differentiation between identified clusters, and high allelic diversity indicate that regular gene flow, either via recruitment or migration, has prevented isolation. Therefore, ecology of commensal rodents in urban areas and life-history characteristics of Norway rats likely counteract many expected effects of isolation or founder events. An understanding of levels of connectivity of rat populations inhabiting urban areas provides information about the spatial scale at which populations of rats may spread disease, invade new areas, or be eradicated from an existing area without reinvasion.

  4. An oral Brown Norway rat model for food allergy: comparison of age, sex, dosing volume, and allergen preparation.

    PubMed

    Pilegaard, Kirsten; Madsen, Charlotte

    2004-03-15

    The purpose of the presented experiments was to study the possibility of using the Brown Norway rat as a model for food allergy in our laboratory. Specific serum IgE against ovalbumin (OVA) was induced after dosing male and female Brown Norway rats daily by gavage for 35 days. The influence of various preparations of allergen: OVA grade II, OVA grade V, and fresh egg white, age (4 versus 8 weeks), dosing volumes, and animal suppliers was studied. A general finding was that females had statistically significantly higher specific IgE and IgG titres and number of responders than males. Egg white preparation, age, dosing volume, and animal supplier did not statistically significantly influence the median IgE and IgG titres and number of responders. The difference between immune responses in males and females could not be attributed to variations in daily intake of OVA or exposure via the lung. In our hands, the oral Brown rat food allergy model gives rise to a moderate number of IgE responders, 13-38 and 38-75% in males and females, respectively. For further experiments with this model in our laboratory, females seem the sex of choice.

  5. Age-related declines in thirst and salt appetite responses in male Fischer 344×Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Thunhorst, Robert L; Beltz, Terry; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2014-08-01

    The F344×BN strain is the first generational cross between Fischer 344 (F344) and Brown Norway (BN) rats. The F344×BN strain is widely used in aging studies as it is regarded as a model of "healthy" aging (Sprott, 1991). In the present work, male F344×BN rats aged 4mo (young, n=6) and 20mo (old, n=9) received a series of experimental challenges to body fluid homeostasis to determine their thirst and salt appetite responses. Corresponding urinary responses were measured in some of the studies. Following sodium depletion, old rats ingested less saline solution (0.3M NaCl) than young rats on a body weight basis, but both ages drank enough saline solution to completely repair the accrued sodium deficits. Following intracellular dehydration, old rats drank less water than young rats, again on a body weight basis, and were less able than young rats to drink amounts of water proportionate to the osmotic challenge. Compared with young rats, old rats drank less of both water and saline solution after combined food and fluid restriction, and also were refractory to the stimulatory effects of low doses of captopril on water drinking and sodium ingestion. Age differences in urinary water and sodium excretion could not account for the age differences in accumulated water and sodium balances. These results extend observations of diminished behavioral responses of aging animals to the F344×BN rat strain and support the idea that impairments in behavior contribute more to the waning ability of aging animals to respond to body fluid challenges than do declines in kidney function. In addition, the results suggest that behavioral defense of sodium homeostasis is less diminished with age in the F344×BN strain compared to other strains so far studied.

  6. Inhaled multiwalled carbon nanotubes modulate the immune response of trimellitic anhydride-induced chemical respiratory allergy in brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Staal, Yvonne C M; van Triel, Jos J; Maarschalkerweerd, Thérèse V P; Arts, Josje H E; Duistermaat, Evert; Muijser, Hans; van de Sandt, Johannes J M; Kuper, C Frieke

    2014-10-01

    The interaction between exposure to nanomaterials and existing inflammatory conditions has not been fully established. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT; Nanocyl NC 7000 CAS no. 7782-42-5; count median diameter in atmosphere 61 ± 5 nm) were tested by inhalation in high Immunoglobulin E (IgE)-responding Brown Norway (BN) rats with trimellitic anhydride (TMA)-induced respiratory allergy. The rats were exposed 2 days/week over a 3.5-week period to a low (11 mg/m(3)) or a high (22 mg/m(3)) concentration of MWCNT. Nonallergic animals exposed to MWCNT and unexposed allergic and nonallergic rats served as controls. At the end of the exposure period, the allergic animals were rechallenged with TMA. Histopathological examination of the respiratory tract showed agglomerated/aggregated MWCNT in the lungs and in the lung-draining lymph nodes. Frustrated phagocytosis was observed as incomplete uptake of MWCNT by the alveolar macrophages and clustering of cells around MWCNT. Large MWCNT agglomerates/aggregates were found in granulomas in the allergic rats, suggesting decreased macrophage clearance in allergic rats. In allergic rats, MWCNT exposure decreased serum IgE levels and the number of lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage. In conclusion, MWCNT did not aggravate the acute allergic reaction but modulated the allergy-associated immune response.

  7. Species Abundance Distribution of Ectoparasites on Norway Rats (Rattus norvegicus) from a Localized Area in Southwest China

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xian Guo; Dong, Wen Ge; Men, Xing Yuan; Qian, Ti Jun; Wu, Dian; Ren, Tian Guang; Qin, Feng; Song, Wen Yu; Yang, Zhi Hua; Fletcher, Quinn E

    2016-01-01

    Background: The species of ectoparasites that live on a specific host in a geographical region form an ectoparasite community. Species abundance distributions describe the number of individuals observed for each different species that is encountered within a community. Based on properties of the species abundance distribution, the expected total number of species present in the community can be estimated. Methods: Preston’s lognormal distribution model was used to fit the expected species abundance distribution curve. Using the expected species abundance distribution curve, we estimated the total number of expected parasite species present and the amount of species that were likely missed by our sampling in the field. Results: In total, 8040 ectoparasites (fleas, sucking lice, gamasid mites and chigger mites) were collected from 431 Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) from a localized area in southwest China. These ectoparasites were identified to be 47 species from 26 genera in 10 families. The majority of ectoparasite species were chigger mites (family Trombiculidae) while the majority of individuals were sucking lice in the family Polyplacidae. The expected species abundance distribution curve demonstrated the classic pattern that the majority of ectoparasite species were rare and that there were a few common species. The total expected number of ectoparasite species on R. norvegicus was estimated to be 85 species, and 38 species were likely missed by our sampling in the field. Conclusions: Norway rats harbor a large suite of ectoparasites. Future field investigations should sample large numbers of host individuals to assess ectoparasite populations. PMID:27308277

  8. Species Abundance Distribution of Ectoparasites on Norway Rats (Rattus norvegicus) from a Localized Area in Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xian Guo; Dong, Wen Ge; Men, Xing Yuan; Qian, Ti Jun; Wu, Dian; Ren, Tian Guang; Qin, Feng; Song, Wen Yu; Yang, Zhi Hua; Fletcher, Quinn E

    2016-06-01

    The species of ectoparasites that live on a specific host in a geographical region form an ectoparasite community. Species abundance distributions describe the number of individuals observed for each different species that is encountered within a community. Based on properties of the species abundance distribution, the expected total number of species present in the community can be estimated. Preston's lognormal distribution model was used to fit the expected species abundance distribution curve. Using the expected species abundance distribution curve, we estimated the total number of expected parasite species present and the amount of species that were likely missed by our sampling in the field. In total, 8040 ectoparasites (fleas, sucking lice, gamasid mites and chigger mites) were collected from 431 Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) from a localized area in southwest China. These ectoparasites were identified to be 47 species from 26 genera in 10 families. The majority of ectoparasite species were chigger mites (family Trombiculidae) while the majority of individuals were sucking lice in the family Polyplacidae. The expected species abundance distribution curve demonstrated the classic pattern that the majority of ectoparasite species were rare and that there were a few common species. The total expected number of ectoparasite species on R. norvegicus was estimated to be 85 species, and 38 species were likely missed by our sampling in the field. Norway rats harbor a large suite of ectoparasites. Future field investigations should sample large numbers of host individuals to assess ectoparasite populations.

  9. Resveratrol supplementation influences bone properties in the tibia of hindlimb-suspended mature Fisher 344 × Brown Norway male rats.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Stephanie M; Jackson, Janna R; Ryan, Michael J; Gigliotti, Joseph C; Alway, Stephen E; Tou, Janet C

    2012-12-01

    The deleterious bone effects of mechanical unloading have been suggested to be due to oxidative stress and (or) inflammation. Resveratrol has both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties; therefore, the study's objective was to determine whether providing resveratrol in the low supplementation range for a short duration prevents bone loss during mechanical unloading. Mature (6 months old) Fischer 344 × Brown Norway male rats were hindlimb-suspended (HLS) or kept ambulatory for 14 days. Rats were provided either trans-resveratrol (RES; 12.5 mg/kg body mass per day) or deionized distilled water by oral gavage for 21 days (7 days prior to and during the 14 days of HLS). Bone mass was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Bone microstructure was determined by microcomputed tomography. HLS of rats resulted in femur trabecular bone deterioration. Resveratrol supplementation did not attenuate trabecular bone deterioration in HLS rats. Unexpectedly, HLS-RES rats had the lowest tibial bone mineral content (P < 0.05), calcium content and lower cortical thickness (P < 0.05), and increased porosity compared with HLS/control rats. Plasma osteocalcin was also lower (P < 0.04) in HLS/resveratrol rats. There were no significant effects on plasma C-reactive protein, a marker of systemic inflammation, or total antioxidant capacity. However, HLS-RES rats showed a negative relationship (r(2) = 0.69, P = 0.02) between plasma osteocalcin and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, a marker of lipid peroxidation. Based on the results, resveratrol supplementation of 6-month-old HLS male rats had no bone protective effects and possibly even detrimental bone effects.

  10. Toluene effects on the motor activity of adolescent, young-adult, middle-age and senescent male Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    MacPhail, R C; Farmer, J D; Jarema, K A

    2012-01-01

    Life stage is an important risk factor for toxicity. Children and aging adults, for example, are more susceptible to certain chemicals than are young adults. In comparison to children, relatively little is known about susceptibility in older adults. Additionally, few studies have compared toxicant susceptibility across a broad range of life stages. Results are presented for behavioral evaluations of male Brown Norway rats obtained as adolescents (1 month), or young (4 months), middle-age (12 months) and senescent (24 months) adults. Motor activity was evaluated in photocell devices during 30-min sessions. Age-related baseline characteristics and sensitivity to toluene (0, 300, 650, or 1000mg/kg, p.o.) were determined. In Experiment 1, young-adult, middle-age and senescent rats were treated with corn-oil vehicle before five weekly test sessions. Baselines of horizontal and vertical activity decreased with age, but each age-group's averages remained stable across weeks of testing. Baseline activity of older rats was more variable than that of the young adults; older rats were also more variable individually from week to week. Toluene (1000mg/kg) increased horizontal activity proportionately more in senescent rats (ca. 300% of control) than in middle-age or young-adult rats (ca.145-175% of control). Experiment 2 established toluene dose-effect functions in individual adolescent, young-adult, middle-age and senescent rats; each rat received all treatments, counterbalanced across four weekly sessions. Toluene produced dose-related increases in horizontal activity that increased proportionately with age. Experiment 3 replicated the effects of toluene (1000mg/kg) in Experiment 1, showing that toluene-induced increases in horizontal activity were greatest in the oldest rats. Collectively, the results show that aging increased susceptibility to toluene and also increased variability in toluene response. Given the rapid growth of the aged population, further research is

  11. Systemic administration of the neurotensin NTS₁-receptor agonist PD149163 improves performance on a memory task in naturally deficient male brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Ashley A; Matazel, Katelin S; Esser, Melissa K; Feifel, David; Prus, Adam J

    2014-12-01

    Agonists for the neurotensin NTS₁ receptor consistently exhibit antipsychotic effects in animal models without producing catalepsy, suggesting that NTS₁-receptor agonists may be a novel class of drugs to treat schizophrenia. Moreover, studies utilizing NTS₁ agonists have reported improvements in some aspects of cognitive functioning, including prepulse inhibition and learning procedures, which suggest an ability of NTS₁-receptor agonists to diminish neurocognitive deficits. The present study sought to assess both baseline delay-induced memory performance and the effects of NTS₁-receptor activation on learning and memory consolidation in male Long-Evans and Brown Norway rats using a delayed nonmatch-to-position task radial arm-maze task. In the absence of drugs, Brown Norway rats displayed a significant increase in spatial memory errors following 3-, 7-, and 24-hr delay, whereas Long-Evans rats exhibited an increase in spatial memory errors following only a 7-, and 24-hr delay. With Brown Norway rats, administration of PD149163 before or after an information trial significantly reduced errors during a retention trial after a 24 hr delay. Administration of the NTS(1/2)-receptor antagonist SR142948 prior to the information trial did not affect retention-trial errors. These data are consistent with previous findings that Brown Norway rats have natural cognitive deficits and that they may be useful for assessing putative antipsychotic drugs for cognitive efficacy. Moreover, the results of this study support previous findings suggesting that NTS₁-receptor agonists may improve some aspects of cognitive functioning.

  12. Genetic mapping of Eutr1, a locus controlling E2-induced pyometritis in the Brown Norway rat, to RNO5.

    PubMed

    Gould, Karen A; Pandey, Jyotsna; Lachel, Cynthia M; Murrin, Clare R; Flood, Lisa A; Pennington, Karen L; Schaffer, Beverly S; Tochacek, Martin; McComb, Rodney D; Meza, Jane L; Wendell, Douglas L; Shull, James D

    2005-11-01

    In certain rat strains, chronic estrogen administration can lead to pyometritis, an inflammation of the uterus accompanied by infection and the accumulation of intraluminal pus. In this article, we report that the Brown Norway (BN) rat is highly susceptible to pyometritis induced by 17beta-estradiol (E2). The susceptibility of the BN rat to E2-induced pyometritis appears to segregate as a recessive trait in crosses to the resistant August x Copenhagen Irish (ACI) strain. In a (BN x ACI)F(2) population, we find strong evidence for a major genetic determinant of susceptibility to E2-induced pyometritis on rat chromosome 5 (RNO5). Our data are most consistent with a model in which the BN allele of this locus, designated Eutr1 (Estrogen-induced uterine response 1), acts in an incompletely dominant manner to control E2-induced pyometritis. Furthermore, we have confirmed the contribution of Eutr1 to E2-induced uterine pyometritis using an RNO5 congenic rat strain. In addition to Eutr1, we obtained evidence suggestive of linkage for five additional loci on RNO2, 4, 11, 17, and X that control susceptibility to E2-induced pyometritis in the (BN x ACI)F(2) population.

  13. Age-related changes in cardiac structure and function in Fischer 344 x Brown Norway hybrid rats.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Timothy A; McKiernan, Susan H; Douglas, Pamela S; Wanagat, Jonathan; Aiken, Judd M

    2006-01-01

    The effects of aging on cardiovascular function and cardiac structure were determined in a rat model recommended for gerontological studies. A cross-sectional analysis assessed cardiac changes in male Fischer 344 x Brown Norway F1 hybrid rats (FBN) from adulthood to the very aged (n = 6 per 12-, 18-, 21-, 24-, 27-, 30-, 33-, 36-, and 39-mo-old group). Rats underwent echocardiographic and hemodynamic analyses to determine standard values for left ventricular (LV) mass, LV wall thickness, LV chamber diameter, heart rate, LV fractional shortening, mitral inflow velocity, LV relaxation time, and aortic/LV pressures. Histological analyses were used to assess LV fibrotic infiltration and cardiomyocyte volume density over time. Aged rats had an increased LV mass-to-body weight ratio and deteriorated systolic function. LV systolic pressure declined with age. Histological analysis demonstrated a gradual increase in fibrosis and a decrease in cardiomyocyte volume density with age. We conclude that, although significant physiological and morphological changes occurred in heart function and structure between 12 and 39 mo of age, these changes did not likely contribute to mortality. We report reference values for cardiac function and structure in adult FBN male rats through very old age at 3-mo intervals.

  14. Characteristics of the Built Environment and the Presence of the Norway Rat in New York City: Results From a Neighborhood Rat Surveillance Program, 2008-2010.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah; Bragdon, Caroline; Olson, Carolyn; Merlino, Mario; Bonaparte, Sancia

    2016-06-01

    Characteristics of an urban setting such as New York City (NYC), including readily available putrescible waste and ample underground infrastructure, make it highly attractive to the Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus). To identify property and neighborhood characteristics associated with rat presence, recent inspectional results were analyzed from over 77,000 properties in the Bronx and Manhattan. Variables capturing the location and density of factors believed to promote rat populations were tested individually and in combination in models predicting rat activity. We found that property-specific characteristics typically associated with high garbage volume, including large numbers of residential units, public ownership, and open-space designation (parks, outdoor recreation, or vacant land) were the most important factors in explaining increased rat presence across neighborhoods in NYC. Interventions that involved improved garbage management and street sanitation within a designated area reduced the likelihood of finding rats, especially in medium- and high-poverty neighborhoods. Neighborhood characteristics, such as being near a railroad or subway line, having a school nearby, the presence of numerous restaurants, or having older infrastructure, also contributed to the increased likelihood of rats. Our results support the use of built environment data to target community-level interventions and capture emerging rat infestations.

  15. Effect of High Fructose and High Fat Diets on Pulmonary Sensitivity, Motor Activity, and Body Composition of Brown Norway Rats Exposed to Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diet-induced obesity has been suggested to lead to increased susceptibility to air pollutants such as ozone (03); however, there is little experimental evidence. Thirty day old male and female Brown Norway rats were fed a normal, high-fructose or high-fat diet for 12 weeks and th...

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF IMMEDIATE AND LATE PHASE AIRWAY RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE CHALLENGE IN BROWN NORWAY RATS AND CORRELATIONS AMONG PHYSIOLOGICAL MEDIATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    CHARACTERIZATION OF IMMEDIATE AND LATE PHASE AIRWAY RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE CHALLENGE IN BROWN NORWAY RATS AND CORRELATIONS AMONG PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL MEDIATORS (P.
    SinghI, D.W. Winsett2, M.J. Daniels2, J. Richards2, K. Crissman2, D.L. Doerfler2 and M.I. Gilmour2, 1NCSU, Ra...

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF IMMEDIATE AND LATE PHASE AIRWAY RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE CHALLENGE IN BROWN NORWAY RATS AND CORRELATIONS AMONG PHYSIOLOGICAL MEDIATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    CHARACTERIZATION OF IMMEDIATE AND LATE PHASE AIRWAY RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE CHALLENGE IN BROWN NORWAY RATS AND CORRELATIONS AMONG PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL MEDIATORS (P.
    SinghI, D.W. Winsett2, M.J. Daniels2, J. Richards2, K. Crissman2, D.L. Doerfler2 and M.I. Gilmour2, 1NCSU, Ra...

  18. Effect of High Fructose and High Fat Diets on Pulmonary Sensitivity, Motor Activity, and Body Composition of Brown Norway Rats Exposed to Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diet-induced obesity has been suggested to lead to increased susceptibility to air pollutants such as ozone (03); however, there is little experimental evidence. Thirty day old male and female Brown Norway rats were fed a normal, high-fructose or high-fat diet for 12 weeks and th...

  19. [The effect of the domestication of Norway rats and silver foxes on the serotonin S1A- and S2-receptors of the brain].

    PubMed

    Avgustinovich, D F

    1992-01-01

    The specific radioligand binding of serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 receptors was determined in the frontal cortex and in the hypothalamus of Norway rats and silver foxes. Aggressive wild rats and silver foxes and animals selected for many generations for nonaggressive behavior towards man (domestication) were compared. The binding of the 5-HT1A receptors was found to be significantly higher in domesticated Norway rats and lower in domesticated foxes than in aggressive animals. The specific binding of the 5-HT2 receptors was found to be similar in aggressive and domesticated animals, both in rats and foxes. The data obtained indicate the involvement of 5-HT1A receptors in the hypothalamus into the process of domestication.

  20. Gene expression changes are age-dependent and lobe-specific in the brown Norway rat model of prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bethel, Carlise R; Chaudhary, Jaideep; Anway, Matthew D; Brown, Terry R

    2009-06-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an age-related enlargement of the prostate, characterized by increased proliferation of stromal and epithelial cells. Despite its prevalence, the etiology of BPH is unknown. The Brown Norway rat is a model for age-dependent, lobe-specific hyperplasia of the prostate. Histological analyses of the dorsal and lateral lobes from aged rats reveal focal areas characterized by increased numbers of luminal epithelial cells, whereas the ventral lobe is unaffected. This study examined differential gene expression by lobe and age in the Brown Norway rat prostate. The objective was to identify genes with different levels of expression in the prostate lobes from 4-month (young) and 24-month (old) animals, and to subsequently link changes in gene expression to mechanisms of prostate aging. The number of age-dependent differentially expressed genes was greatest in the dorsal compared to the ventral and lateral lobes. Minimal redundancy was observed among the differentially expressed genes in the three lobes. Age-related changes in the expression levels of 14 candidate genes in the dorsal, lateral and ventral lobes were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Genes that exhibited age-related differences in their expression were associated with proliferation, oxidative stress, and prostate cancer progression, including topoisomerase II alpha (Topo2a), aurora kinase B (Aurkb), stathmin 1 (Stmn1), and glutathione S-transferase pi. Immunohistochemistry for Topo2a, Aurkb, and Stmn1 confirmed age-related changes in protein localization in the lateral lobe of young and aged prostates. These findings provide clues to the molecular events associated with aging in the prostate. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Gene Expression Changes are Age-Dependent and Lobe-Specific in the Brown Norway Rat Model of Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bethel, Carlise R.; Chaudhary, Jaideep; Anway, Matthew D.; Brown, Terry R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an age-related enlargement of the prostate, characterized by increased proliferation of stromal and epithelial cells. Despite its prevalence, the etiology of BPH is unknown. Methods The Brown Norway rat is a model for age-dependent, lobe-specific hyperplasia of the prostate. Histological analyses of the dorsal and lateral lobes from aged rats reveal focal areas characterized by increased numbers of luminal epithelial cells, whereas the ventral lobe is unaffected. This study examined differential gene expression by lobe and age in the Brown Norway rat prostate. The objective was to identify genes with different levels of expression in the prostate lobes from 4-month (young) and 24-month (old) animals, and to subsequently link changes in gene expression to mechanisms of prostate aging. Results The number of age-dependent differentially expressed genes was greatest in the dorsal compared to the ventral and lateral lobes. Minimal redundancy was observed among the differentially expressed genes in the three lobes. Age-related changes in the expression levels of fourteen candidate genes in the dorsal, lateral and ventral lobes were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Genes that exhibited age-related differences in their expression were associated with proliferation, oxidative stress, and prostate cancer progression, including topoisomerase II alpha (Topo2a), aurora kinase B (Aurkb), stathmin 1 (Stmn1), and glutathione S-transferase pi. Immunohistochemistry for Topo2a, Aurkb, and Stmn1 confirmed age-related changes in protein localization in the lateral lobe of young and aged prostates. Conclusion These findings provide clues to the molecular events associated with aging in the prostate. PMID:19204916

  2. Infections by Leptospira interrogans, Seoul Virus, and Bartonella spp. Among Norway Rats (Rattus norvegicus) from the Urban Slum Environment in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Fleur Helena; Rodrigues, Gorete; Farias, Helena; de Faria, Marcus Tucunduva; Wunder, Elsio A.; Osikowicz, Lynn M.; Kosoy, Michael Y.; Reis, Mitermayer Galvão; Ko, Albert I.; Childs, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) are reservoir hosts for zoonotic pathogens that cause significant morbidity and mortality in humans. Studies evaluating the prevalence of zoonotic pathogens in tropical Norway rat populations are rare, and data on co-infection with multiple pathogens are nonexistent. Herein, we describe the prevalence of leptospiral carriage, Seoul virus (SEOV), and Bartonella spp. infection independently, in addition to the rates of co-infection among urban, slum-dwelling Norway rats in Salvador, Brazil, trapped during the rainy season from June to August of 2010. These data were complemented with previously unpublished Leptospira and SEOV prevalence information collected in 1998. Immunofluorescence staining of kidney impressions was used to identify Leptospira interrogans in 2010, whereas isolation was used in 1998, and western blotting was used to detect SEOV antibodies in 2010, whereas enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used in 1998: in 2010, Bartonella spp. were isolated from a subsample of rats. The most common pathogen in both years was Leptospira spp. (83%, n=142 in 1998, 63%, n=84 in 2010). SEOV was detected in 18% of individuals in both 1998 and 2010 (n=78 in 1998; n=73 in 2010), and two species of Bartonella were isolated from 5 of 26 rats (19%) tested in 2010. The prevalence of all agents increased significantly with rat mass/age. Acquisition of Leptospira spp. occurred at a younger mass/age than SEOV and Bartonella spp. infection, suggesting differences in the transmission dynamics of these pathogens. These data indicate that Norway rats in Salvador serve as reservoir hosts for all three of these zoonotic pathogens and that the high prevalence of leptospiral carriage in Salvador rats poses a high degree of risk to human health. PMID:24359425

  3. Infections by Leptospira interrogans, Seoul virus, and Bartonella spp. among Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) from the urban slum environment in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa, Federico; Porter, Fleur Helena; Rodrigues, Gorete; Farias, Helena; de Faria, Marcus Tucunduva; Wunder, Elsio A; Osikowicz, Lynn M; Kosoy, Michael Y; Reis, Mitermayer Galvão; Ko, Albert I; Childs, James E

    2014-01-01

    Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) are reservoir hosts for zoonotic pathogens that cause significant morbidity and mortality in humans. Studies evaluating the prevalence of zoonotic pathogens in tropical Norway rat populations are rare, and data on co-infection with multiple pathogens are nonexistent. Herein, we describe the prevalence of leptospiral carriage, Seoul virus (SEOV), and Bartonella spp. infection independently, in addition to the rates of co-infection among urban, slum-dwelling Norway rats in Salvador, Brazil, trapped during the rainy season from June to August of 2010. These data were complemented with previously unpublished Leptospira and SEOV prevalence information collected in 1998. Immunofluorescence staining of kidney impressions was used to identify Leptospira interrogans in 2010, whereas isolation was used in 1998, and western blotting was used to detect SEOV antibodies in 2010, whereas enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used in 1998: in 2010, Bartonella spp. were isolated from a subsample of rats. The most common pathogen in both years was Leptospira spp. (83%, n=142 in 1998, 63%, n=84 in 2010). SEOV was detected in 18% of individuals in both 1998 and 2010 (n=78 in 1998; n=73 in 2010), and two species of Bartonella were isolated from 5 of 26 rats (19%) tested in 2010. The prevalence of all agents increased significantly with rat mass/age. Acquisition of Leptospira spp. occurred at a younger mass/age than SEOV and Bartonella spp. infection, suggesting differences in the transmission dynamics of these pathogens. These data indicate that Norway rats in Salvador serve as reservoir hosts for all three of these zoonotic pathogens and that the high prevalence of leptospiral carriage in Salvador rats poses a high degree of risk to human health.

  4. 20-HETE contributes to myogenic activation of skeletal muscle resistance arteries in Brown Norway and Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Frisbee, J C; Roman, R J; Falck, J R; Krishna, U M; Lombard, J H

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the role of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), a product of arachidonic acid omega-hydroxylation via cytochrome P450 (CP450) 4A enzymes, in regulating myogenic activation of skeletal muscle resistance arteries from normotensive Brown Norway (BN) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Gracilis arteries (GA) were isolated from each animal, viewed via television microscopy, and vessel diameter responses to elevated transmural pressure were measured with a video micrometer under control conditions and following pharmacological inhibition of the CP450 4A enzyme system. Under control conditions, GA from both rat groups exhibited strong, endothelium-independent myogenic activation, which was impaired following treatment with either 17-octadecynoic acid (17-ODYA) or dibromo-dodecenylmethylsulfimide (DDMS), two mechanistically different inhibitors of 20-HETE production. The addition of tetraethylammonium (KCa channel inhibitor) to 17-ODYA-treated GA restored myogenic reactivity to levels comparable to those under control conditions. Treatment of GA from BN and SD rats with 6(Z),15(Z)-20-HEDE, a selective antagonist for 20-HETE receptors, mimicked the effects of 17-ODYA and DDMS treatment on myogenic reactivity. These results suggest that the production of 20-HETE via CP450 4A enzymes contributes to the myogenic activation of skeletal muscle resistance arteries from normotensive BN and SD rats. 20-HETE may act through a receptor-mediated process to block vascular smooth muscle KCa channels in response to the elevated transmural pressure.

  5. Restraint stress-induced reduction in prepulse inhibition in Brown Norway rats: Role of the CRF2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Jane E.; Conti, Lisa H.

    2011-01-01

    Stress plays a role in many psychiatric disorders that are characterized by deficits in prepulse inhibition (PPI), a form of sensorimotor gating. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is one of the most important neurotransmitters involved in behavioral components of the stress response. Central infusion of CRF reduces PPI in both rats and mice. In mice, it has been shown that CRF1 receptor activation mediates the effect of exogenous CRF on PPI. However, the roles of the two CRF receptors in a stress-induced reduction in PPI are not known. We sought to determine whether CRF1 and/or CRF2 receptor blockade attenuates a stress-induced reduction of PPI in rats. In separate experiments, we assessed PPI in Brown Norway rats after exposure to five days of 2-hour restraint, and after pretreatment with the CRF1 receptor antagonist, CP-154,526 (20.0 mg/kg), or the CRF2 receptor antagonist, antisauvagine-30 (10.0 µg). Repeated, but not acute, restraint decreased PPI and attenuated the increase in PPI caused by repeated PPI testing. Blockade of the CRF1 receptor did not attenuate the effect of repeated restraint on PPI or grooming behavior. While CRF2 receptor blockade did attenuate the effect of repeated restraint on PPI, repeated ICV infusion of the selective CRF2 receptor agonist urocortin III, did not affect PPI. These findings demonstrate the effect of stress on sensorimotor gating and suggest that the CRF2 receptor mediates this effect in rats. PMID:21185316

  6. Chronic paracetamol treatment influences indices of reactive oxygen species accumulation in the aging Fischer 344 X Brown Norway rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Rice, Kevin M; Meduru, Sarath; Kakarla, Sunil K; Katta, Anjaiah; Mupparaju, Sriram P; Kidd, Brent; Goebel, Lynne J; Blough, Eric R

    2012-01-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and alterations in cell signaling characterize aging in the Fischer 344 X Brown Norway (FBN) rat aorta. Other work has suggested that increases in ROS may be related to vascular wall thickening and the development of hypertension. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is a potent antioxidant that has been found to diminish free radicals in ischemia-reperfusion studies. However, it remains unclear whether chronic paracetamol administration influences signaling or ROS accumulation in the aging aorta. FBN rats (27 months old; n=8) were subjected to 6 months of treatment with a therapeutic dose of paracetamol (30 mg/kg/day) and compared to age-matched untreated FBN rat controls (n=8). Compared to measurements in the aortae of 6-month old animals, tunica media thickness, tissue superoxide levels, and protein oxidation levels were 38 ± 7%, 92 ± 31%, and 7 ± 2% higher in the aortae of 33-month control animals (p ≤0.05). Chronic paracetamol treatment decreased tunica media thickness and the amount of oxidized protein by 13 ± 4% and 30 ± 1%, respectively (p ≤0.05). This finding of diminished aortic thickening was associated with increased phosphorylation (activation) of the mitogen activated protein kinases and diminished levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Taken together, these data suggest that chronic paracetamol treatment may decrease the deleterious effects of aging in the FBN rat aorta.

  7. Autoimmunity induced by HgCl/sub 2/ in Brown-Norway rats. I. Production of monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, F.; Kuhn, J.; Ventura, M.; Vial, M.C.; Fournie, G.; Druet, P.

    1986-05-01

    Mercuric chloride (HgCl/sub 2/) induces in Brown-Norway rats (BN) a B cell polyclonal activation resulting in autoimmune diseases. Spleen cells from BN rats injected with HgCl/sub 2/ were fused with IR983F, a non-secreting rat myeloma cell line, in order to obtain monoclonal antibodies reacting with autoantigens or IgE-producing hybridomas. After screening for immunoglobulin-producing clones, the authors found 5% clones with anti-tissue activity, 8% with anti-TNP activity, and 41% secreting IgE. Among the anti-tissue monoclonal antibodies, one recognizes both TNP and mesangial structures of rat normal glomeruli, which could be an as yet unrecognized mechanism of nephrotoxicity. These experiments 1) confirm that HgCl/sub 2/ induces polyclonal activation, 2) show that the mercury model is of interest to obtain monoclonal IgE and various autoantibodies, and 3) suggest a new possible mechanism of antibody-mediated renal injury.

  8. Patterns in Leptospira Shedding in Norway Rats (Rattus norvegicus) from Brazilian Slum Communities at High Risk of Disease Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Federico; Wunder, Elsio A.; De Oliveira, Daiana; Bisht, Vimla; Rodrigues, Gorete; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Ko, Albert I.; Begon, Mike; Childs, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Background We address some critical but unknown parameters of individuals and populations of Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) that influence leptospiral infection, maintenance and spirochetal loads shed in urine, which contaminates the environment ultimately leading to human infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Our study, conducted in Salvador, Brazil, established the average load of leptospires in positive kidneys to be 5.9 x 106 per mL (range 3.1-8.2 x106) genome equivalents (GEq), similar to the 6.1 x 106 per ml (range 2.2-9.4 x106) average obtained from paired urines, with a significant positive correlation (R2=0.78) between the two. Based on bivariate and multivariate modeling, we found with both kidney and urine samples that leptospiral loads increased with the age of rats (based on the index of body length to mass), MAT titer and the presence of wounding/scars, and varied with site of capture. Some associations were modified by sex but trends were apparent. Combining with data on the demographic properties and prevalence of leptospiral carriage in rat populations in Salvador, we estimated that daily leptospiral loads shed in the urine of a population of 82 individuals exceeded 9.1 x 1010 leptospires. Conclusions/Significance These factors directly influence the risk of leptospiral acquisition among humans and provide essential epidemiological information linking properties of rat populations with risk of human infection. PMID:26047009

  9. Distinct retinohypothalamic innervation patterns predict the developmental emergence of species-typical circadian phase preference in nocturnal Norway rats and diurnal nile grass rats.

    PubMed

    Todd, William D; Gall, Andrew J; Weiner, Joshua A; Blumberg, Mark S

    2012-10-01

    How does the brain develop differently to support nocturnality in some mammals, but diurnality in others? To answer this question, one might look to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which is entrained by light via the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT). However, because the SCN is more active during the day in all mammals studied thus far, it alone cannot determine circadian phase preference. In adult Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus), which are nocturnal, the RHT also projects to the ventral subparaventricular zone (vSPVZ), an adjacent region that expresses an in-phase pattern of SCN-vSPVZ neuronal activity. In contrast, in adult Nile grass rats (Arvicanthis niloticus), which are diurnal, an anti-phase pattern of SCN-vSPVZ neuronal activity is expressed. We hypothesized that these species differences result in part from a weak or absent RHT-to-vSPVZ projection in grass rats. Here, using a developmental comparative approach, we assessed species differences in behavior, hypothalamic activity, and RHT anatomy. We report that a robust retina-to-vSPVZ projection develops in Norway rats around the end of the second postnatal week when nocturnal wakefulness and the in-phase pattern of neuronal activity emerge. In grass rats, however, such a projection does not develop and the emergence of the anti-phase pattern during the second postnatal week is accompanied by increased diurnal wakefulness. When considered within the context of previously published reports on RHT projections in a variety of species, the current findings suggest that how and when the retina connects to the hypothalamus differentially shapes brain and behavior to produce animals that occupy opposing temporal niches.

  10. Characteristics of long non-coding RNAs in the Brown Norway rat and alterations in the Dahl salt-sensitive rat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Li, Liping; Xu, Haiming; Liu, Yong; Yang, Chun; Cowley, Allen W; Wang, Niansong; Liu, Pengyuan; Liang, Mingyu

    2014-11-21

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are potentially important mediators of genomic regulation. lncRNAs, however, remain poorly characterized in the rat model organism widely used in biomedical research. Using poly(A)-independent and strand-specific RNA-seq, we identified 1,500 to 1,800 lncRNAs expressed in each of the following tissues of Brown Norway rats: the renal cortex, renal outer medulla, liver, cardiac left ventricle, adrenal gland, and hypothalamus. Expression and the binding of histone H3K4me3 to promoter regions were confirmed for several lncRNAs. Rat lncRNA expression appeared to be more tissue-specific than mRNA. Rat lncRNAs had 4.5 times fewer exons and 29% shorter transcripts than mRNA. The median cumulative abundance of rat lncRNAs was 53% of that of mRNA. Approximately 28% of the lncRNAs identified in the renal outer medulla appeared to lack a poly(A) tail. Differential expression of 74 lncRNAs was detected in the renal outer medulla between Dahl SS rats, a model of salt-sensitive hypertension, and salt-insensitive, congenic SS.13(BN26) rats fed a high-salt diet. Two of the differentially expressed lncRNAs, which were confirmed, were located within the congenic region and contained several sequence variants. The study identified genome-wide characteristics of lncRNAs in the rat model and suggested a role of lncRNAs in hypertension.

  11. Increased resistance to LPS-induced myocardial dysfunction in the Brown Norway rats versus Dahl S rats: roles of inflammatory cytokines and nuclear factor kappaB pathway.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianhai; An, Jianzhong; Wei, Na; Guan, Tongju; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Shi, Yang

    2010-03-01

    We previously demonstrated that hearts from Brown Norway (BN) rats were more resistant to ischemic injury than hearts from Dahl S (SS) rats. Here we determined the susceptibility to LPS-induced cardiomyopathy in these rats and examined the involvement of inflammatory signaling. Both strains were treated with LPS (20 mg/kg) via i.p. injection for 6 h. Myocardial function was assessed by the Langendorff system, and proinflammatory cytokines were measured by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. LPS significantly reduced left ventricular developed pressure in both strains. Interestingly, the decrease of left ventricular developed pressure in BN rat hearts was approximately 25% less than that in SS rat hearts. Furthermore, LPS significantly reduced the peak rate of contraction and the peak rate of relaxation in SS hearts but not in BN hearts. No differences in LPS-induced decreases in coronary flow rate were observed between BN and SS rats. In addition, LPS-induced increases in proinflammatory cytokines, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6, were significantly lower in both plasma and hearts of BN rats compared with production in SS rats. LPS notably up-regulated the expression of proinflammatory enzymes, iNOS and cyclooxygenase 2, in SS hearts but not in BN hearts. Interestingly, LPS did not stimulate Toll-like receptor 4 or its adaptor myeloid differentiation factor 88 expression in the hearts of either strain but did increase IkappaB and P65 phosphorylation, less prominently in BN hearts than in SS hearts. These data indicate that reduced production of proinflammatory cytokines and diminished nuclear factor kappaB activation are major mechanisms by which BN hearts are more resistant to LPS-induced myocardial dysfunction than SS hearts.

  12. Assessment of the Sensitizing Potential of Processed Peanut Proteins in Brown Norway Rats: Roasting Does Not Enhance Allergenicity

    PubMed Central

    Kroghsbo, Stine; Rigby, Neil M.; Johnson, Philip E.; Adel-Patient, Karine; Bøgh, Katrine L.; Salt, Louise J.; Mills, E. N. Clare; Madsen, Charlotte B.

    2014-01-01

    Background IgE-binding of process-modified foods or proteins is the most common method for examination of how food processing affects allergenicity of food allergens. How processing affects sensitization capacity is generally studied by administration of purified food proteins or food extracts and not allergens present in their natural food matrix. Objectives The aim was to investigate if thermal processing increases sensitization potential of whole peanuts via the oral route. In parallel, the effect of heating on sensitization potential of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1 was assessed via the intraperitoneal route. Methods Sensitization potential of processed peanut products and Ara h 1 was examined in Brown Norway (BN) rats by oral administration of blanched or oil-roasted peanuts or peanut butter or by intraperitoneal immunization of purified native (N-), heated (H-) or heat glycated (G-)Ara h 1. Levels of specific IgG and IgE were determined by ELISA and IgE functionality was examined by rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cell assay. Results In rats dosed orally, roasted peanuts induced significant higher levels of specific IgE to NAra h 1 and 2 than blanched peanuts or peanut butter but with the lowest level of RBL degranulation. However, extract from roasted peanuts was found to be a superior elicitor of RBL degranulation. Process-modified Ara h 1 had similar sensitizing capacity as NAra h 1 but specific IgE reacted more readily with process-modified Ara h 1 than with native. Conclusions Peanut products induce functional specific IgE when dosed orally to BN rats. Roasted peanuts do not have a higher sensitizing capacity than blanched peanuts. In spite of this, extract from roasted peanuts is a superior elicitor of RBL cell degranulation irrespectively of the peanut product used for sensitization. The results also suggest that new epitopes are formed or disclosed by heating Ara h 1 without glucose. PMID:24805813

  13. Vitamin A metabolism is altered in brown Norway and long-Evans rats infused with naftidrofuryl or erythromycin intravenously.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Rainer; Fielenbach, Tanja; Rave, Gerhard; Blömer, Anne; Kellersmann, Richard

    2002-07-01

    Enzymatic retinyl ester hydrolysis is a key reaction for maintaining cellular retinol homeostasis. The ability of naftidrofuryl and erythromycin to inhibit retinol liberation by retinyl ester hydrolase (REH) in vitro suggests an ability to interfere with vitamin A metabolism in vivo, particularly during hepatic processing. To address this question, systemic and local response to these agents were studied in Brown Norway (BN) and Long-Evans (LE) rats. The study was conducted in two parts: a drug-loading phase and a washout phase. Analysis of variance of the time course changes in plasma retinol during the post-treatment period (Days 10-18) showed rat strain (p < 0.04) and time (p < 0.001; strain-by-time interactive effect, p < 0.001) to be significant factors, but drug exposure (p = 0.19) was not significant. Endpoints included hepatic REH activity, size and composition of the liver vitamin A stores, and retinoid content of the kidneys. Rats recovering from naftidrofuryl dosing demonstrated a lower REH activity than did animals recovering from erythromycin treatment (p < 0.009). The major side effect of erythromycin is vitamin A accumulation in the liver (p < 0.001) and reductions in retinol reserves (p < 0.02) were among the consequences of naftidrofuryl treatment. In the kidney of LE rats, there were higher concentrations of vitamin A (p < 0.003) secondary to naftidrofuryl exposure. Together our data suggest that clinically achievable concentrations of the drugs, given as a continuous infusion, produce aberrations in vitamin A metabolism.

  14. Assessment of the sensitizing potential of processed peanut proteins in Brown Norway rats: roasting does not enhance allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Kroghsbo, Stine; Rigby, Neil M; Johnson, Philip E; Adel-Patient, Karine; Bøgh, Katrine L; Salt, Louise J; Mills, E N Clare; Madsen, Charlotte B

    2014-01-01

    IgE-binding of process-modified foods or proteins is the most common method for examination of how food processing affects allergenicity of food allergens. How processing affects sensitization capacity is generally studied by administration of purified food proteins or food extracts and not allergens present in their natural food matrix. The aim was to investigate if thermal processing increases sensitization potential of whole peanuts via the oral route. In parallel, the effect of heating on sensitization potential of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1 was assessed via the intraperitoneal route. Sensitization potential of processed peanut products and Ara h 1 was examined in Brown Norway (BN) rats by oral administration of blanched or oil-roasted peanuts or peanut butter or by intraperitoneal immunization of purified native (N-), heated (H-) or heat glycated (G-)Ara h 1. Levels of specific IgG and IgE were determined by ELISA and IgE functionality was examined by rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cell assay. In rats dosed orally, roasted peanuts induced significant higher levels of specific IgE to NAra h 1 and 2 than blanched peanuts or peanut butter but with the lowest level of RBL degranulation. However, extract from roasted peanuts was found to be a superior elicitor of RBL degranulation. Process-modified Ara h 1 had similar sensitizing capacity as NAra h 1 but specific IgE reacted more readily with process-modified Ara h 1 than with native. Peanut products induce functional specific IgE when dosed orally to BN rats. Roasted peanuts do not have a higher sensitizing capacity than blanched peanuts. In spite of this, extract from roasted peanuts is a superior elicitor of RBL cell degranulation irrespectively of the peanut product used for sensitization. The results also suggest that new epitopes are formed or disclosed by heating Ara h 1 without glucose.

  15. Drug ligand-induced activation of translocator protein (TSPO) stimulates steroid production by aged brown Norway rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, J Y; Chen, H; Midzak, A; Burnett, A L; Papadopoulos, V; Zirkin, B R

    2013-06-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO; 18 kDA) is a high-affinity cholesterol-binding protein that is integrally involved in cholesterol transfer from intracellular stores into mitochondria, the rate-determining step in steroid formation. Previous studies have shown that TSPO drug ligands are able to activate steroid production by MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells and by mitochondria isolated from steroidogenic cells. We hypothesized herein that the direct, pharmacological activation of TSPO might induce aged Leydig cells, which are characterized by reduced T production, to produce significantly higher levels of T both in vitro and in vivo. To test this, we first examined the in vitro effects of the TSPO selective and structurally distinct drug ligands N,N-dihexyl-2-(4-fluorophenyl)indole-3-acetamide (FGIN-1-27) and benzodiazepine 4'-chlorodiazepam (Ro5-4864) on steroidogenesis by Leydig cells isolated from aged (21-24 months old) and young adult (3-6 months old) Brown Norway rats. The ligands stimulated Leydig cell T production significantly, and equivalently, in cells of both ages, an effect that was significantly inhibited by the specific TSPO inhibitor 5-androsten-3,17,19-triol (19-Atriol). Additionally, we examined the in vivo effects of administering FGIN-1-27 to young and aged rats. In both cases, serum T levels increased significantly, consistent with the in vitro results. Indeed, serum T levels in aged rats administered FGIN-1-27 were equivalent to T levels in the serum of control young rats. Taken together, these results indicate that although there are reduced amounts of TSPO in aged Leydig cells, its direct activation is able to increase T production. We suggest that this approach might serve as a therapeutic means to increase steroid levels in vivo in cases of primary hypogonadism.

  16. Characterization of the Immunogenicity and Allergenicity of Two Cow's Milk Hydrolysates--A Study in Brown Norway Rats.

    PubMed

    Bøgh, K L; Barkholt, V; Madsen, C B

    2015-05-01

    Hypoallergenic infant formulas based on hydrolysed milk proteins are used in the diet for cow's milk allergic infants. For a preclinical evaluation of the immunogenicity and allergenicity of new protein ingredients for such hypoallergenic infant formulas as well as for the investigation of which characteristics of hydrolysates that contribute to allergenicity, in vivo models are valuable tools. In this study, we examine the immunogenicity and allergenicity of two hydrolysates in a Brown Norway (BN) rat model, using i.p. dosing, which allows for the use of small quantities. Intact BLG, hydrolysed BLG and a hydrolysed whey product suitable for use in extensively hydrolysed formulas were thoroughly characterized for protein chemical features and administered to BN rats by i.p. immunization with or without adjuvant. Sera were analysed for specific IgG and IgE for evaluation of sensitizing capacity, immunogenicity and antibody-binding capacity. For evaluation of eliciting capacity a skin test was performed. The study showed that the hydrolysates had no residual allergenicity, lacking the capacity to sensitize and elicit reactions in the BN rats. Dosing with or without adjuvant induced a large difference in immunogenicity. Only antibodies from rats sensitized to intact BLG with adjuvant were able to bind the hydrolysates, and the whey-based hydrolysate only showed immunogenicity when dosed with adjuvant. This study showed that hydrolysates can be evaluated by an i.p. animal model, but that the choice of in vitro tests used for evaluation of antibody responses may greatly influence the result as well as may the use of adjuvant.

  17. Involvement of cysteinyl leukotrienes in airway smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis after repeated allergen exposure in sensitized Brown Norway rats

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Michael; Walsh, David A; Huang, Tung-Jung; Barnes, Peter J; Leonard, Thomas B; Hay, Douglas W P; Chung, K Fan

    1999-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle thickening is a characteristic feature of airway wall remodelling in chronic asthma. We have investigated the role of the leukotrienes in airway smooth muscle (ASM) and epithelial cell DNA synthesis and ASM thickening following repeated allergen exposure in Brown Norway rats sensitized to ovalbumin. There was a 3 fold increase in ASM cell DNA synthesis, as measured by percentage bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, in repeatedly ovalbumin-exposed (4.1%, 3.6–4.6; mean, 95% c.i.) compared to chronically saline-exposed rats (1.3%, 0.6–2.1; P<0.001). Treatment with a 5-lipoxygenase enzyme inhibitor (SB 210661, 10 mg kg−1, p.o.) and a specific cysteinyl leukotriene (CysLT1) receptor antagonist, pranlukast (SB 205312, 30 mg kg−1, p.o.), both attenuated ASM cell DNA synthesis. Treatment with a specific leukotriene B4 (BLT) receptor antagonist (SB 201146, 15 mg kg−1, p.o.) had no effect. There was also a significant, 2 fold increase in the number of epithelial cells incorporating BrdU per unit length of basement membrane after repeated allergen exposure. This response was not inhibited by treatment with SB 210661, pranlukast or SB 201146. A significant increase in ASM thickness was identified following repeated allergen exposure and this response was attenuated significantly by SB 210661, pranlukast and SB 201146. Rats exposed to chronic allergen exhibited bronchial hyperresponsiveness to acetylcholine and had significant eosinophil recruitment into the lungs. Treatment with SB 210661, pranlukast or SB 201146 significantly attenuated eosinophil recruitment into the lungs, whilst having no significant effect on airway hyperresponsiveness. These data indicate that the cysteinyl leukotrienes are important mediators in allergen-induced ASM cell DNA synthesis in rats, while both LTB4 and cysteinyl leukotrienes contribute to ASM thickening and eosinophil recruitment following repeated allergen exposure. PMID:10455261

  18. Toluene effects on oxidative stress in brain regions of young-adult, middle-age, and senescent Brown Norway rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S.; Royland, Joyce E.; Richards, Judy E.; Besas, Jonathan; MacPhail, Robert C.

    2011-11-15

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental contaminants is not well understood. To extend knowledge in this area, we examined effects in rat brain of the volatile organic compound, toluene. The objective was to test whether oxidative stress (OS) plays a role in the adverse effects caused by toluene exposure, and if so, if effects are age-dependent. OS parameters were selected to measure the production of reactive oxygen species (NADPH Quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), NADH Ubiquinone reductase (UBIQ-RD)), antioxidant homeostasis (total antioxidant substances (TAS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase ({gamma}-GCS), glutathione transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GRD)), and oxidative damage (total aconitase and protein carbonyls). In this study, Brown Norway rats (4, 12, and 24 months) were dosed orally with toluene (0, 0.65 or 1 g/kg) in corn oil. Four hours later, frontal cortex, cerebellum, striatum, and hippocampus were dissected, quick frozen on dry ice, and stored at - 80 Degree-Sign C until analysis. Some parameters of OS were found to increase with age in select brain regions. Toluene exposure also resulted in increased OS in select brain regions. For example, an increase in NQO1 activity was seen in frontal cortex and cerebellum of 4 and 12 month old rats following toluene exposure, but only in the hippocampus of 24 month old rats. Similarly, age and toluene effects on glutathione enzymes were varied and brain-region specific. Markers of oxidative damage reflected changes in oxidative stress. Total aconitase activity was increased by toluene in frontal cortex and cerebellum at 12 and 24 months, respectively. Protein carbonyls in both brain regions and in all age groups were increased by toluene, but step-down analyses indicated toluene effects were statistically significant only in 12 month old rats. These results indicate changes in OS parameters with age and toluene exposure

  19. Assessment of biochemical and behavioral effects of carbaryl and methomyl in Brown-Norway rats from preweaning to senescence.

    PubMed

    Moser, Virginia C; Phillips, Pamela M; McDaniel, Katherine L

    2015-05-04

    Factors impacting life stage-specific sensitivity to chemicals include toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic changes. To evaluate age-related differences in the biochemical and behavioral impacts of two typical N-methyl carbamate pesticides, we systematically compared their dose-response and time-course in preweanling (postnatal day, PND, 18) and adult male Brown Norway rats (n=9-10/dose or time) ranging from adolescence to senescence (1, 4, 12, 24 mo). Carbaryl was administered orally at 3, 7.5, 15, or 22.5mg/kg and data were collected at 40 min after dosing, or else given at 3 or 15 mg/kg and data collected at 30, 60, 120, and 240 min. Methomyl was studied only in adult and senescent rat (4, 12, 24 mo) in terms of dose-response (0.25. 0.6, 1.25, 2.5mg/kg) and time-course (1.25mg/kg at 30, 60, 120, 240 min). Motor activity as well as brain and erythrocyte (RBC) cholinesterase (ChE) activity were measured in the same animals. In the carbaryl dose-response, PND18 rats were the most sensitive to the brain ChE-inhibiting effects of carbaryl, but 12- and 24-mo rats showed more motor activity depression even at similar levels of brain ChE inhibition. We have previously reported that brain ChE inhibition, but not motor activity effects, closely tracked carbaryl tissue levels. There were no age-related differences in methomyl-induced ChE inhibition across doses, but greater motor activity depression was again observed in the 12- and 24-mo rats. Carbaryl time-course data showed that motor activity depression reached a maximum later, and recovered slower, in the 12- and 24-mo rats compared to the younger ages; slowest recovery and maximal effects were seen in the 24-mo rats. Acetylcholinesterase sensitivity (concentration-inhibition curves) was measured in vitro using control tissues from each age. Inhibitory concentrations of carbaryl were somewhat lower in PND18, 12-, and 24-mo tissues compared to 1- and 4-mo, but there were no differences with methomyl-treated tissues. Thus

  20. Toluene effects on oxidative stress in brain regions of young-adult, middle-age, and senescent Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S; Royland, Joyce E; Richards, Judy E; Besas, Jonathan; Macphail, Robert C

    2011-11-01

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental contaminants is not well understood. To extend knowledge in this area, we examined effects in rat brain of the volatile organic compound, toluene. The objective was to test whether oxidative stress (OS) plays a role in the adverse effects caused by toluene exposure, and if so, if effects are age-dependent. OS parameters were selected to measure the production of reactive oxygen species (NADPH Quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), NADH Ubiquinone reductase (UBIQ-RD)), antioxidant homeostasis (total antioxidant substances (TAS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), glutathione transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GRD)), and oxidative damage (total aconitase and protein carbonyls). In this study, Brown Norway rats (4, 12, and 24 months) were dosed orally with toluene (0, 0.65 or 1g/kg) in corn oil. Four hours later, frontal cortex, cerebellum, striatum, and hippocampus were dissected, quick frozen on dry ice, and stored at -80°C until analysis. Some parameters of OS were found to increase with age in select brain regions. Toluene exposure also resulted in increased OS in select brain regions. For example, an increase in NQO1 activity was seen in frontal cortex and cerebellum of 4 and 12 month old rats following toluene exposure, but only in the hippocampus of 24 month old rats. Similarly, age and toluene effects on glutathione enzymes were varied and brain-region specific. Markers of oxidative damage reflected changes in oxidative stress. Total aconitase activity was increased by toluene in frontal cortex and cerebellum at 12 and 24 months, respectively. Protein carbonyls in both brain regions and in all age groups were increased by toluene, but step-down analyses indicated toluene effects were statistically significant only in 12month old rats. These results indicate changes in OS parameters with age and toluene exposure resulted in oxidative

  1. Accumulation of dietary methylmercury in the testes of the adult brown norway rat: Impaired testicular and epididymal function

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, A.S.; Chen, H.; Zirkin, B.R.; Rabuck, L.D.

    1998-05-01

    The widespread consumption of fish containing elevated concentrations of methylmercury has prompted concern over the health effects of such a diet. Previous studies with rodents have indicated that exposure to dietary mercury (Hg) impairs male reproductive health. However, adverse effects were observed following doses in the range of milligrams per kilogram of body weight, whereas typical human consumption in the United States is in the range of micrograms per kilogram of body weight. This study examined the effects of dietary Hg on male rats using levels of the metal that are more similar to those typically consumed by humans. For 19 weeks, adult male Brown Norway rats were administered methylmercury twice weekly at 0.8, 8.0, or 80 {micro}g/kg. Intratesticular testosterone levels in the high-dose group were reduced by 44$, suggesting that steroidogenesis in these animals was dramatically impaired. Although sperm production was not significantly affected, numbers of sperm in the cauda epididymides of the high-dose group were reduced by 17%. Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between fertility and testicular Hg content. These results raise the possibility that exposure to Hg at levels consumed by humans may result in steroidogenic impairment, reduced sperm counts, and fertility problems.

  2. Factors affecting carriage and intensity of infection of Calodium hepaticum within Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) from an urban slum environment in Salvador, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Walker, R; Carvalho-Pereira, T; Serrano, S; Pedra, G; Hacker, K; Taylor, J; Minter, A; Pertile, A; Panti-May, A; Carvalho, M; Souza, F N; Nery, N; Rodrigues, G; Bahiense, T; Reis, M G; Ko, A I; Childs, J E; Begon, M; Costa, F

    2017-01-01

    Urban slum environments in the tropics are conducive to the proliferation and the spread of rodent-borne zoonotic pathogens to humans. Calodium hepaticum (Brancroft, 1893) is a zoonotic nematode known to infect a variety of mammalian hosts, including humans. Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) are considered the most important mammalian host of C. hepaticum and are therefore a potentially useful species to inform estimates of the risk to humans living in urban slum environments. There is a lack of studies systematically evaluating the role of demographic and environmental factors that influence both carriage and intensity of infection of C. hepaticum in rodents from urban slum areas within tropical regions. Carriage and the intensity of infection of C. hepaticum were studied in 402 Norway rats over a 2-year period in an urban slum in Salvador, Brazil. Overall, prevalence in Norway rats was 83% (337/402). Independent risk factors for C. hepaticum carriage in R. norvegicus were age and valley of capture. Of those infected the proportion with gross liver involvement (i.e. >75% of the liver affected, a proxy for a high level intensity of infection), was low (8%, 26/337). Sixty soil samples were collected from ten locations to estimate levels of environmental contamination and provide information on the potential risk to humans of contracting C. hepaticum from the environment. Sixty percent (6/10) of the sites were contaminated with C. hepaticum. High carriage levels of C. hepaticum within Norway rats and sub-standard living conditions within slum areas may increase the risk to humans of exposure to the infective eggs of C. hepaticum. This study supports the need for further studies to assess whether humans are becoming infected within this community and whether C. hepaticum is posing a significant risk to human health.

  3. Species Specific Behavioural Patterns (Digging and Swimming) and Reaction to Novel Objects in Wild Type, Wistar, Sprague-Dawley and Brown Norway Rats

    PubMed Central

    Stryjek, Rafał; Modlińska, Klaudia; Pisula, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to analyse species-specific forms of behaviour (digging and swimming) and response to novelty in laboratory rats and their wild type counterparts at a very early stage of laboratorization. Three behavioural phenomena were taken into account: burrowing, spontaneous swimming, and neophobic behaviour. Principal Findings Wild-type rats and three strains of laboratory rats were involved in experiments: Warsaw-Wild-Captive-Pisula-Stryjek (WWCPS), Wistar, Sprague-Dawley, and Brown Norway rats were compared in spontaneous swimming test, while WWCPS and Wistar rats were studied in burrowing and neophobia experiments. Wild rats were found to be faster at building tunnels than Wistar rats and at constructing more complex burrow systems. The experiment on neophobia showed that Wistar rats exhibited less neophobic responses and were more often trapped. WWCPS rats showed highly neophobic behaviour and were rarely trapped in this experiment. The experiment on swimming showed that WWCPS rats showed more complex water tank related activity than their laboratory counterparts. They swam and explored under surface environment. Conclusions The three experiments showed profound behavioural differences in quasi-natural forms of behaviour between wild type rats (WWCPS) and three laboratory strains frequently used in behavioural studies. PMID:22815778

  4. Carriage of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus by Wild Urban Norway Rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    PubMed Central

    Himsworth, Chelsea G.; Miller, Ruth R.; Montoya, Vincent; Hoang, Linda; Romney, Marc G.; Al-Rawahi, Ghada N.; Kerr, Thomas; Jardine, Claire M.; Patrick, David M.; Tang, Patrick; Weese, J. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important cause of multi-drug-resistant infections in people, particularly indigent populations. MRSA can be transmitted between people and domestic animals, but the potential for transmission between people and commensal pests, particularly rodents, had not been investigated. The objective of this study was to identify the presence and characterize the ecology of MRSA in rats (Rattus spp.) from in an impoverished, inner-city neighborhood. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from rats trapped in 33 city blocks and one location within the adjacent port. Bacterial culture was performed and MRSA isolates were characterized using a variety of methods, including whole-genome sequencing (WGS). The ecology of MRSA in rats was described using phylogenetic analysis, geospatial analysis, and generalized linear mixed models. MRSA was identified 22 of 637 (3.5%) rats tested, although prevalence varied from 0 – 50% among blocks. Isolates belonged to 4 clusters according to WGS, with the largest cluster (n = 10) containing isolates that were genetically indistinguishable from community-acquired USA300 MRSA strains isolated from people within the study area. MRSA strains demonstrated both geographic clustering and dispersion. The odds of an individual rat carrying MRSA increased with increased body fat (OR = 2.53, 95% CI = 1.33 – 4.82), and in the winter (OR = 5.29, 95% CI = 1.04 – 26.85) and spring (OR = 5.50, 95% CI = 1.10 – 27.58) compared to the fall. The results show that urban rats carried the same MRSA lineages occurring in local human and/or animal populations, supporting recent transmission from external sources. MRSA carriage was influenced by season, most likely as a result of temporal variation in rat behavior and rat-human interactions. PMID:24498421

  5. Carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by wild urban Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Himsworth, Chelsea G; Miller, Ruth R; Montoya, Vincent; Hoang, Linda; Romney, Marc G; Al-Rawahi, Ghada N; Kerr, Thomas; Jardine, Claire M; Patrick, David M; Tang, Patrick; Weese, J Scott

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important cause of multi-drug-resistant infections in people, particularly indigent populations. MRSA can be transmitted between people and domestic animals, but the potential for transmission between people and commensal pests, particularly rodents, had not been investigated. The objective of this study was to identify the presence and characterize the ecology of MRSA in rats (Rattus spp.) from in an impoverished, inner-city neighborhood. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from rats trapped in 33 city blocks and one location within the adjacent port. Bacterial culture was performed and MRSA isolates were characterized using a variety of methods, including whole-genome sequencing (WGS). The ecology of MRSA in rats was described using phylogenetic analysis, geospatial analysis, and generalized linear mixed models. MRSA was identified 22 of 637 (3.5%) rats tested, although prevalence varied from 0 - 50% among blocks. Isolates belonged to 4 clusters according to WGS, with the largest cluster (n = 10) containing isolates that were genetically indistinguishable from community-acquired USA300 MRSA strains isolated from people within the study area. MRSA strains demonstrated both geographic clustering and dispersion. The odds of an individual rat carrying MRSA increased with increased body fat (OR = 2.53, 95% CI = 1.33-4.82), and in the winter (OR = 5.29, 95% CI = 1.04-26.85) and spring (OR = 5.50, 95% CI = 1.10-27.58) compared to the fall. The results show that urban rats carried the same MRSA lineages occurring in local human and/or animal populations, supporting recent transmission from external sources. MRSA carriage was influenced by season, most likely as a result of temporal variation in rat behavior and rat-human interactions.

  6. Behavioral effects of bidirectional selection for behavior towards human in virgin and lactate Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Konoshenko, Maria Yu; Plyusnina, Irina Z

    2012-06-01

    Although numerous studies have demonstrated strong differences in behavioral, hormonal and neurobiological characteristics between male rats selected for elimination (tame) and enhancement (aggressive) of aggressiveness towards humans, few studies have examined changes in female behavior under this selection. The objective of the current work was to evaluate the effects of bidirectional selection for aggressiveness towards humans on behavioral profiles of virgin and lactating rats compared with the behavior in tame, aggressive and unselected (wild-type) females. The behavior of virgin females was studied using the light-dark box, the startle response test and the modified glove test. Tame females were less anxious and more tolerant towards humans than unselected and aggressive rats. Principal component analysis of all behavioral parameters produced three independent factors, explaining 66.37% of the total variability. The measures of behavior towards humans and the measures of anxiety mainly loaded on PC1 (first principal component) which separated the tame females from the unselected and aggressive ones. These data suggest the genetic correlation between the selected behavior towards humans and anxiety-related behavior in virgin rats. No significant effect of line was found for PC2 scores, associated with risk assessment behavior. Measurements of freezing behavior mainly loaded on PC3, and this component separated rats of different genetic groups from each other. The behavior of lactating rats was studied in maternal defense and pup retrieval tests. Females of selected lines did not significantly differ in behavioral measurements of these tests and were characterized by higher maternal motivation than unselected rats. It is suggested that long-term breeding of tame and aggressive rats in captivity has reduced the threshold for maternal behavior. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mechanisms of cardioprotection resulting from Brown Norway chromosome 16 substitution in the salt-sensitive Dahl rat.

    PubMed

    Kriegel, Alison J; Didier, Daniela N; Li, Peigang; Lazar, Jozef; Greene, Andrew S

    2012-08-17

    The SS-16(BN)/Mcwi consomic rat was produced by the introgression of chromosome 16 from the Brown Norway (BN/NHsdMcwi) rat onto the genetic background of the Dahl salt-sensitive (SS/Mcwi) rat by marker-assisted breeding. We have previously shown that the normotensive SS-16(BN)/Mcwi consomic strain is better protected from developing left ventricular dysfunction and fibrosis with aging than the hypertensive SS/Mcwi parental strain; however, the mechanism of this protection was not clear since the SS-16(BN)/Mcwi had both lowered blood pressure and an altered genetic background compared with SS/Mcwi. Microarray analysis of SS-16(BN)/Mcwi and SS/Mcwi left ventricle tissue and subsequent protein pathway analysis were used to identify alterations in gene expression in signaling pathways involved with the observed cardioprotection on the SS background. The SS-16(BN)/Mcwi rats exhibited much higher mRNA levels of expression of transcription factor JunD, a gene found on chromosome 16. Additionally, high levels of differential gene expression were found in pathways involved with angiogenesis, oxidative stress, and growth factor signaling. We tested the physiological relevance of these pathways by experimentally determining the responsiveness of neonatal cardiomyocytes to factors from identified pathways and found that cells isolated from SS-16(BN)/Mcwi rats had a greater growth response to epidermal growth factor and endothelin-1 than those from parental SS/Mcwi. We also demonstrate that the SS-16(BN)/Mcwi is better protected from developing fibrosis with surgically elevated afterload than other normotensive strains, indicating that gene-gene interactions resulting from BN chromosomal substitution confer specific cardioprotection. When combined with our previous findings, these data suggest that that SS-16(BN)/Mcwi may have an increased angiogenic potential and better protection from oxidative stress than the parental SS/Mcwi strain. Additionally, the early transient

  8. Effect of high-fructose and high-fat diets on pulmonary sensitivity, motor activity, and body composition of brown Norway rats exposed to ozone

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    pulmonary parameters, BALF biomarkers, body composition, motor activity data collected from rats exposed to ozone after high fructose or high fat diets.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Gordon , C., P. Phillips , A. Johnstone , T. Beasley , A. Ledbetter , M. Schladweiler , S. Snow, and U. Kodavanti. Effect of High Fructose and High Fat Diets on Pulmonary Sensitivity, Motor Activity, and Body Composition of Brown Norway Rats Exposed to Ozone. INHALATION TOXICOLOGY. Taylor & Francis, Inc., Philadelphia, PA, USA, 28(5): 203-15, (2016).

  9. Role of 20-HETE in the antihypertensive effect of transfer of chromosome 5 from Brown Norway to Dahl salt-sensitive rats

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jan M.; Fan, Fan; Murphy, Sydney; Schreck, Carlos; Lazar, Jozef; Jacob, Howard J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether substitution of chromosome 5 containing the CYP4A genes from Brown Norway rat onto the Dahl S salt-sensitive (SS) genetic background upregulates the renal production of 20-HETE and attenuates the development of hypertension. The expression of CYP4A protein and the production of 20-HETE were significantly higher in the renal cortex and outer medulla of SS.5BN (chromosome 5-substituted Brown Norway rat) consomic rats fed either a low-salt (LS) or high-salt (HS) diet than that seen in SS rats. The increase in the renal production of 20-HETE in SS.5BN rats was associated with elevated expression of CYP4A2 mRNA. MAP measured by telemetry rose from 117 ± 1 to 183 ± 5 mmHg in SS rats fed a HS diet for 21 days, but only increased to 151 ± 5 mmHg in SS.5BN rats. The pressure-natriuretic and diuretic responses were twofold higher in SS.5BN rats compared with SS rats. Protein excretion rose to 354 ± 17 mg/day in SS rats fed a HS diet for 21 days compared with 205 ± 13 mg/day in the SS.5BN rats, and the degree of glomerular injury was reduced. Baseline glomerular capillary pressure (Pgc) was similar in SS.5BN rats (43 ± 1 mmHg) and Dahl S (44 ± 2 mmHg) rats. However, Pgc increased to 59 ± 3 mmHg in SS rats fed a HS diet for 7 days, while it remained unaltered in SS.5BN rats (43 ± 2 mmHg). Chronic administration of an inhibitor of the synthesis of 20-HETE (HET0016, 10 mg·kg−1·day−1 iv) reversed the antihypertensive phenotype seen in the SS.5BN rats. These findings indicate that the transfer of chromosome 5 from the BN rat onto the SS genetic background increases the renal expression of CYP4A protein and the production of 20-HETE and that 20-HETE contributes to the antihypertensive and renoprotective effects seen in the SS.5BN consomic strain. PMID:22442195

  10. Role of 20-HETE in the antihypertensive effect of transfer of chromosome 5 from Brown Norway to Dahl salt-sensitive rats.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jan M; Fan, Fan; Murphy, Sydney; Schreck, Carlos; Lazar, Jozef; Jacob, Howard J; Roman, Richard J

    2012-05-15

    This study examined whether substitution of chromosome 5 containing the CYP4A genes from Brown Norway rat onto the Dahl S salt-sensitive (SS) genetic background upregulates the renal production of 20-HETE and attenuates the development of hypertension. The expression of CYP4A protein and the production of 20-HETE were significantly higher in the renal cortex and outer medulla of SS.5(BN) (chromosome 5-substituted Brown Norway rat) consomic rats fed either a low-salt (LS) or high-salt (HS) diet than that seen in SS rats. The increase in the renal production of 20-HETE in SS.5(BN) rats was associated with elevated expression of CYP4A2 mRNA. MAP measured by telemetry rose from 117 ± 1 to 183 ± 5 mmHg in SS rats fed a HS diet for 21 days, but only increased to 151 ± 5 mmHg in SS.5(BN) rats. The pressure-natriuretic and diuretic responses were twofold higher in SS.5(BN) rats compared with SS rats. Protein excretion rose to 354 ± 17 mg/day in SS rats fed a HS diet for 21 days compared with 205 ± 13 mg/day in the SS.5(BN) rats, and the degree of glomerular injury was reduced. Baseline glomerular capillary pressure (Pgc) was similar in SS.5(BN) rats (43 ± 1 mmHg) and Dahl S (44 ± 2 mmHg) rats. However, Pgc increased to 59 ± 3 mmHg in SS rats fed a HS diet for 7 days, while it remained unaltered in SS.5(BN) rats (43 ± 2 mmHg). Chronic administration of an inhibitor of the synthesis of 20-HETE (HET0016, 10 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) iv) reversed the antihypertensive phenotype seen in the SS.5(BN) rats. These findings indicate that the transfer of chromosome 5 from the BN rat onto the SS genetic background increases the renal expression of CYP4A protein and the production of 20-HETE and that 20-HETE contributes to the antihypertensive and renoprotective effects seen in the SS.5(BN) consomic strain.

  11. Using fine-scale spatial genetics of Norway rats to improve control efforts and reduce leptospirosis risk in urban slum environments.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jonathan L; Burak, Mary K; Hernandez, Christian; Shirvell, James M; Mariani, Carol; Carvalho-Pereira, Ticiana S A; Pertile, Arsinoê C; Panti-May, Jesus A; Pedra, Gabriel G; Serrano, Soledad; Taylor, Josh; Carvalho, Mayara; Rodrigues, Gorete; Costa, Federico; Childs, James E; Ko, Albert I; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2017-04-01

    The Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) is a key pest species globally and responsible for seasonal outbreaks of the zoonotic bacterial disease leptospirosis in the tropics. The city of Salvador, Brazil, has seen recent and dramatic increases in human population residing in slums, where conditions foster high rat density and increasing leptospirosis infection rates. Intervention campaigns have been used to drastically reduce rat numbers. In planning these interventions, it is important to define the eradication units - the spatial scale at which rats constitute continuous populations and from where rats are likely recolonizing, post-intervention. To provide this information, we applied spatial genetic analyses to 706 rats collected across Salvador and genotyped at 16 microsatellite loci. We performed spatially explicit analyses and estimated migration levels to identify distinct genetic units and landscape features associated with genetic divergence at different spatial scales, ranging from valleys within a slum community to city-wide analyses. Clear genetic breaks exist between rats not only across Salvador but also between valleys of slums separated by <100 m-well within the dispersal capacity of rats. The genetic data indicate that valleys may be considered separate units and identified high-traffic roads as strong impediments to rat movement. Migration data suggest that most (71-90%) movement is contained within valleys, with no clear source population contributing to migrant rats. We use these data to recommend eradication units and discuss the importance of carrying out individual-based analyses at different spatial scales in urban landscapes.

  12. Comparative microarray analysis and pulmonary changes in Brown Norway rats exposed to ovalbumin and concentrated air particulates.

    PubMed

    Heidenfelder, Brooke L; Reif, David M; Harkema, Jack R; Cohen Hubal, Elaine A; Hudgens, Edward E; Bramble, Lori A; Wagner, James G; Morishita, Masako; Keeler, Gerald J; Edwards, Stephen W; Gallagher, Jane E

    2009-03-01

    The interaction between air particulates and genetic susceptibility has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. The overall objective of this study was to determine the effects of inhalation exposure to environmentally relevant concentrated air particulates (CAPs) on the lungs of ovalbumin (ova) sensitized and challenged Brown Norway rats. Changes in gene expression were compared with lung tissue histopathology, morphometry, and biochemical and cellular parameters in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Ova challenge was responsible for the preponderance of gene expression changes, related largely to inflammation. CAPs exposure alone resulted in no significant gene expression changes, but CAPs and ova-exposed rodents exhibited an enhanced effect relative to ova alone with differentially expressed genes primarily related to inflammation and airway remodeling. Gene expression data was consistent with the biochemical and cellular analyses of the BALF, the pulmonary pathology, and morphometric changes when comparing the CAPs-ova group to the air-saline or CAPs-saline group. However, the gene expression data were more sensitive than the BALF cell type and number for assessing the effects of CAPs and ova versus the ova challenge alone. In addition, the gene expression results provided some additional insight into the TGF-beta-mediated molecular processes underlying these changes. The broad-based histopathology and functional genomic analyses demonstrate that exposure to CAPs exacerbates rodents with allergic inflammation induced by an allergen and suggests that asthmatics may be at increased risk for air pollution effects.

  13. Effects of concentrated ambient particles and diesel engine exhaust on allergic airway disease in Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Harkema, Jack R; Wagner, James G; Kaminski, Norbert E; Morishita, Masako; Keeler, Gerald J; McDonald, Jacob D; Barrett, Edward G

    2009-11-01

    Increased concentrations of airborne fine particulate matter (PM2.5; particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter < or = 2.5 microm) are associated with increases in emergency room visits and hospitalizations of asthmatic patients. Emissions from local stationary combustion sources (e.g., coal-burning power plants) or mobile motor vehicles (e.g., diesel-powered trucks) have been identified as potential contributors to the development or exacerbation of allergic airway disease. In the present study, a rodent model of allergic airway disease was used to study the effects of concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) or diesel engine exhaust (DEE) on the development of allergic airway disease in rats sensitized to the allergen ovalbumin (OVA). The overall objective of our project was to understand the effects of PM2.5 on the development of OVA-induced allergic airway disease. Our specific aims were to test the following hypotheses: (1) exposure to CAPs during OVA challenge enhances epithelial remodeling of the airway and inflammation in rats previously sensitized to the allergen; and (2) exposure to DEE during OVA sensitization, or during OVA challenge, exacerbates epithelial remodeling of the airway and inflammation in rats. In the DEE studies, Brown Norway (BN) rats were sensitized with three daily intranasal (IN) instillations of 0.5% OVA, and then two weeks later were challenged with IN OVA or saline for 3 consecutive days. Rats were exposed to DEE diluted to mass concentrations of 30 or 300 microg/m3 diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) or to filtered air during either the sensitization or challenge periods. For the CAPs studies, the same OVA sensitization and challenge rat model was used but exposures to Detroit, Michigan, CAPs were limited to the OVA challenge period. Two separate 3-day CAPs exposures were conducted (week 1, high mean mass concentration = 595 microg/m3; week 2, low mean mass concentration = 356 microg/m3) during OVA challenge. In both the DEE and CAPs

  14. Ear mange mites (Notoedres muris) in black and Norway rats (Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus) from inner-city Vancouver, Canada.

    PubMed

    Anholt, Heather; Himsworth, Chelsea; Rothenburger, Jamie; Proctor, Heather; Patrick, David M

    2014-01-01

    The ear mange mite, Notoedres muris (Astigmata: Sarcoptidae), is a parasitic burrowing mite of black and Norway rats (Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus), which causes a proliferative dermatitis primarily affecting the ears. We characterize the ecology of N. muris in a group of black and Norway rats trapped in an inner-city area of Vancouver, Canada. Rats (n = 725) were trapped for 1 yr (September 2011-August 2012) in 43 city blocks (0.82 km(2)) and one property (0.03 km(2)) within an international shipping port at the northern border of the study area. Mite infestation was diagnosed in 15 of 32 rats (47%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 30.9-53.6%) trapped in a large indoor facility at the port property. No affected animals were identified outside this facility, either within the port property or in any of the blocks under study. There was a positive relationship between infestation and both weight and nose-to-rump length (proxies for age), suggesting transmission through intraspecific social contact within colonies. This is the first report of N. muris in Canada. The focal distribution of N. muris at the port may reflect an importation event.

  15. Mercuric chloride-induced protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) in brown Norway (BN) rats

    SciTech Connect

    Knoflach, P.; Weiser, M.M.; Albini, B.

    1986-03-05

    Prolonged exposure to low doses of mercuric chloride (MC) may induce immunologically mediated kidney disease in man and animals. Mercury compounds are of growing importance as environmental pollutants. Twenty female BN rats were gavaged with 150 microgram MC/100 gm body weight 3x/wk for up to 39 wks. Starting with wk 2, rat intestines demonstrated linear IgG and IgA deposits along the vascular and intestinal basement membranes (VBM and IBM). Serum antibodies to IBM were observed during the first 4 wks of gavage. At wk 11, first granular deposits of IgG and C3 were observed along VBM. Only after wk 35 were granular deposits also seen along the IBM. Using radioactive chromium chloride, 50% of rats with granular deposits along BM showed significantly increased protein loss into the intestines. Thus, granular deposits of IgG and C3 along the IBM, probably representing immune complexes, may lead to PLE. This animal model may contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of PLE in man described in graft-vrs-host reactions following bone marrow grafts, allergic enteritides, inflammatory bowel disease, and arsenic intoxication, as well as the assessment of biological effects of environmental pollutants.

  16. Effet of Combined Nitrogen Dioxide and Carbon Nanoparticle Exposure on Lung Function During Ovalbumin Sensitization in Brown Norway Rat

    PubMed Central

    Layachi, Skander; Rogerieux, Françoise; Robidel, Franck; Lacroix, Ghislaine; Bayat, Sam

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of particulate and gaseous pollutants in their effects on the severity of allergic inflammation and airway responsiveness are not well understood. We assessed the effect of exposure to NO2 in the presence or absence of repetitive treatment with carbon nanoparticle (CNP) during allergen sensitization and challenges in Borwn-Norway (BN) rat, in order to assess their interactions on lung function and airway responses (AR) to allergen and methacholine (MCH), end-expiratory lung volume (EELV), bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cellular content, serum and BALF cytokine levels and histological changes. Animals were divided into the following groups (n = 6): Control; CNP (Degussa-FW2): 13 nm, 0.5 mg/kg instilled intratracheally ×3 at 7-day intervals; OVA: ovalbumin-sensitised; OVA+CNP: both sensitized and exposed to CNP. Rats were divided into equal groups exposed either to air or to NO2, 10 ppm, 6 h/d, 5d/wk for 4 weeks. Exposure to NO2, significantly enhanced lung inflammation and airway reactivity, with a significantly larger effect in animals sensitized to allergen, which was related to a higher expression of TH1 and TH2-type cytokines. Conversely, exposure to NO2 in animals undergoing repeated tracheal instillation of CNP alone, increased BALF neutrophilia and enhanced the expression of TH1 cytokines: TNF-α and IFN-γ, but did not show an additive effect on airway reactivity in comparison to NO2 alone. The exposure to NO2 combined with CNP treatment and allergen sensitization however, unexpectedly resulted in a significant decrease in both airway reactivity to allergen and to methacholine, and a reduction in TH2-type cytokines compared to allergen sensitization alone. EELV was significantly reduced with sensitization, CNP treatment or both. These data suggest an immunomodulatory effect of repeated tracheal instillation of CNP on the proinflammatory effects of NO2 exposure in sensitized BN rat. Furthermore, our findings suggest that NO2, CNP and

  17. Effect of combined nitrogen dioxide and carbon nanoparticle exposure on lung function during ovalbumin sensitization in Brown Norway rat.

    PubMed

    Layachi, Skander; Rogerieux, Françoise; Robidel, Franck; Lacroix, Ghislaine; Bayat, Sam

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of particulate and gaseous pollutants in their effects on the severity of allergic inflammation and airway responsiveness are not well understood. We assessed the effect of exposure to NO(2) in the presence or absence of repetitive treatment with carbon nanoparticle (CNP) during allergen sensitization and challenges in Brown-Norway (BN) rat, in order to assess their interactions on lung function and airway responses (AR) to allergen and methacholine (MCH), end-expiratory lung volume (EELV), bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cellular content, serum and BALF cytokine levels and histological changes. Animals were divided into the following groups (n = 6): Control; CNP (Degussa-FW2): 13 nm, 0.5 mg/kg instilled intratracheally ×3 at 7-day intervals; OVA: ovalbumin-sensitised; OVA+CNP: both sensitized and exposed to CNP. Rats were divided into equal groups exposed either to air or to NO(2), 10 ppm, 6 h/d, 5d/wk for 4 weeks. Exposure to NO(2), significantly enhanced lung inflammation and airway reactivity, with a significantly larger effect in animals sensitized to allergen, which was related to a higher expression of TH1 and TH2-type cytokines. Conversely, exposure to NO(2) in animals undergoing repeated tracheal instillation of CNP alone, increased BALF neutrophilia and enhanced the expression of TH1 cytokines: TNF-α and IFN-γ, but did not show an additive effect on airway reactivity in comparison to NO(2) alone. The exposure to NO(2) combined with CNP treatment and allergen sensitization however, unexpectedly resulted in a significant decrease in both airway reactivity to allergen and to methacholine, and a reduction in TH2-type cytokines compared to allergen sensitization alone. EELV was significantly reduced with sensitization, CNP treatment or both. These data suggest an immunomodulatory effect of repeated tracheal instillation of CNP on the proinflammatory effects of NO(2) exposure in sensitized BN rat. Furthermore, our findings suggest that NO

  18. Natural Babesia infection sought in black and Norway rats trapped in five Egyptian Governorates.

    PubMed

    el Bahrawy, A F; Nafei, S M; Morsy, T A; Farrag, A M

    1993-08-01

    Babesiosis is a protozoal disease caused by members of the genus Babesia transmitted by the ixodid ticks. It is a parasite of various mammalian hosts as bovine (B. bovis), equine (B. equi), rodent (B. microti), canine (B. canis) and others. Human cases of babesiosis have been reported from several countries including Egypt. It is now well established that man may become infected (Fulminating or Subclinical) with several species of Babesia without prior splenectomy. In this paper, a total of 398 Rattus rattus and 90 R. norvegicus were trapped in Suez, Ismailia, Port Said, North Sinai and South Sinai Governorates. Blood films were taken from the atil after a simple cut of its end. The films were fixed in acetone free methyl alcohol and stained with Giemsa stain as usual. The results showed that all rats trapped in Ismailia had Babesia infection, then decreased in North Sinai, Port Said, South Sinai and was zero in Suez. As double infection. Trypanosoma lewisi was found in rats trapped in Port Said, North Sinai and South Sinai. But none had Theileria infection. The medical and veterinary importance of these results were discussed.

  19. Comparison of the effects of semicarbazide and {beta}-aminopropionitrile on the arterial extracellular matrix in the Brown Norway rat

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, Nathalie; Kakou, Augustine; Challande, Pascal; Lacolley, Patrick; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary

    2009-09-15

    To investigate a putative role for semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) in arterial extracellular matrix (ECM) organization, we compared arteries of growing Brown Norway (BN) rats after chronic administration of semicarbazide (SCZ) and {beta}-aminopropionitrile (BAPN), two inhibitors with different properties and relative specificities for SSAO and lysyl oxidase (LOX). The BN model is particularly well adapted to evaluating effects of toxic compounds on the arterial elastic network. We measured aortic LOX and SSAO activities and quantified several ECM parameters. After a pilot study comparing doses previously studied and testing for additivity, we studied low and high equimolar doses of SCZ and BAPN. Both compounds similarly inhibited LOX, whereas SCZ inhibited SSAO far more effectively than BAPN. Both decreased carotid wall rupture pressure, increased tail tendon collagen solubility, decreased aortic insoluble elastin (% dry weight) and dose-dependently increased defects in the internal elastic lamina of abdominal aorta, iliac and renal arteries. Our results suggest that either these effects are mediated by LOX inhibition, SCZ being slightly more effective than BAPN in our conditions, or SSAO acts similarly to and in synergy with LOX on ECM, the greater SCZ effect reflecting the simultaneous inhibition of both enzymes. However, the high SCZ dose increased aortic collagen and ECM proteins other than insoluble elastin markedly more than did equimolar BAPN, possibly revealing a specific effect of SSAO inhibition. To discriminate between the two above possibilities, and to demonstrate unequivocally a specific effect of SSAO inhibition on ECM formation or organization, we must await availability of more specific inhibitors.

  20. Involvement of T helper 17 cells in D-penicillamine-induced autoimmune disease in Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xu; Li, Jinze; Liu, Feng; Uetrecht, Jack P

    2011-04-01

    Idiosyncratic drug reactions (IDRs) are poorly understood, but their clinical characteristics suggest that they are immune mediated. Penicillamine-induced autoimmunity in Brown Norway rats has been utilized as an animal model for mechanistic studies of one type of IDR because it closely mimics the autoimmune syndromes that it causes in humans. Our previous work suggested that it is T-cell mediated. It has been shown that T helper 17 (Th17) cells play a central role in many types of autoimmune diseases. This study was designed to test whether Th17 cells are involved in the pathogenesis of penicillamine-induced autoimmunity and to establish an overall serum cytokine/chemokine profile for this IDR. In total, 24 serum cytokines/chemokines were determined and revealed a dynamic process. In sick animals, interleukin (IL) 6 and transforming growth factor-β1, known to be driving forces of Th17 differentiation, were consistently increased at both early and late stages of penicillamine treatment; however, no significant changes in these cytokines were observed in animals that did not develop autoimmunity. IL-17, a characteristic cytokine produced by Th17 cells, was increased in sick animals at both the messenger RNA and serum protein level. In addition, serum concentrations of IL-22, another characteristic cytokine produced by Th17 cells, were found to be elevated. Furthermore, the percentage of IL-17-producing CD4 T cells was significantly increased but only in sick animals. These data strongly suggest that Th17 cells are involved in penicillamine-induced autoimmunity. Such data provide important mechanistic clues that may help to predict which drug candidates will cause a relatively high incidence of such autoimmune IDRs.

  1. Sex differences in the recognition of and innate antiviral responses to Seoul virus in Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Michele F; Bajic, Vladimir B; Klein, Sabra L

    2008-05-01

    Among rodents that carry hantaviruses, more males are infected than females. Male rats also have elevated copies of Seoul virus RNA and reduced transcription of immune-related genes in the lungs than females. To further characterize sex differences in antiviral defenses and whether these differences are mediated by gonadal hormones, we examined viral RNA in the lungs, virus shedding in saliva, and antiviral defenses among male and female rats that were intact, gonadectomized neonatally, or gonadectomized in adulthood. Following inoculation with Seoul virus, high amounts viral RNA persisted longer in lungs from intact males than intact females. Removal of the gonads in males reduced the amount of viral RNA to levels comparable with intact females at 40 days post-inoculation (p.i.). Intact males shed more virus in saliva than intact females 15 days p.i.; removal of the gonads during either the neonatal period or in adulthood increased virus shedding in females and decreased virus shedding in males. Induction of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs; Tlr7 and Rig-I), expression of antiviral genes (Myd88, Visa, Jun, Irf7, Ifnbeta, Ifnar1, Jak2, Stat3, and Mx2), and production of Mx protein was elevated in the lungs of intact females compared with intact males. Gonadectomy had more robust effects on the induction of PRRs than on downstream IFNbeta or Mx2 expression. Putative androgen and estrogen response elements are present in the promoters of several of these antiviral genes, suggesting the propensity for sex steroids to directly affect dimorphic antiviral responses against Seoul virus infection.

  2. Repeated exposure to cat urine induces complex behavioral, hormonal, and c-fos mRNA responses in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Yin, Baofa; Gu, Chen; Lu, Yi; Hegab, Ibrahim M; Yang, Shengmei; Wang, Aiqin; Wei, Wanhong

    2017-08-01

    Prey species show specific adaptations that allow recognition, avoidance, and defense against predators. This study was undertaken to investigate the processing of a chronic, life-threatening stimulus to Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus). One hundred forty-four Norway rats were tested by repeated presentation of cat urine for 1 h at different days in a defensive withdrawal apparatus. Rats exposed to urine for short periods showed significantly larger defensive behavioral and medial hypothalamic c-fos messenger RNA (mRNA) responses than other groups. These defensive responses habituated shortly after the presentation of cat urine. Serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone increased significantly when animals were repeatedly exposed to cat urine. However, the hormonal responses took longer to habituate than the behavioral and molecular responses did. We conclude that the behavioral and c-fos mRNA responses are "primed" for habituation to repeated exposures to cat urine, while the hormonal responses show "resistance." The results support our hypothesis that the strongest anti-predator responses at three levels would occur during short-term exposure to cat urine and that these responses would subsequently disappear on prolonged exposure. This study assists understanding the way in which the different levels of defensive responses are integrated and react during chronic stress.

  3. Repeated exposure to cat urine induces complex behavioral, hormonal, and c-fos mRNA responses in Norway rats ( Rattus norvegicus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Baofa; Gu, Chen; Lu, Yi; Hegab, Ibrahim M.; Yang, Shengmei; Wang, Aiqin; Wei, Wanhong

    2017-08-01

    Prey species show specific adaptations that allow recognition, avoidance, and defense against predators. This study was undertaken to investigate the processing of a chronic, life-threatening stimulus to Norway rats ( Rattus norvegicus). One hundred forty-four Norway rats were tested by repeated presentation of cat urine for 1 h at different days in a defensive withdrawal apparatus. Rats exposed to urine for short periods showed significantly larger defensive behavioral and medial hypothalamic c-fos messenger RNA (mRNA) responses than other groups. These defensive responses habituated shortly after the presentation of cat urine. Serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone increased significantly when animals were repeatedly exposed to cat urine. However, the hormonal responses took longer to habituate than the behavioral and molecular responses did. We conclude that the behavioral and c-fos mRNA responses are "primed" for habituation to repeated exposures to cat urine, while the hormonal responses show "resistance." The results support our hypothesis that the strongest anti-predator responses at three levels would occur during short-term exposure to cat urine and that these responses would subsequently disappear on prolonged exposure. This study assists understanding the way in which the different levels of defensive responses are integrated and react during chronic stress.

  4. Prevention of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis and experimental autoimmune pinealitis in (Lewis x Brown-Norway) F1 rats by HgCl2 injections.

    PubMed Central

    Saoudi, A; Bellon, B; de Kozak, Y; Kuhn, J; Vial, M C; Thillaye, B; Druet, P

    1991-01-01

    Mercuric chloride (HgCl2) induces in Brown-Norway (BN) and (Lewis x Brown-Norway) F1 hybrid rats a transient autoimmune disease characterized by the production of various antibodies to self and non-self antigens and by a dramatic increase of serum IgE. Experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) can be induced in Lewis (LEW) and (LEW x BN) F1 hybrid rats by a single immunization with retinal S-antigen (S-Ag). Besides uveoretinitis, animals immunized with S-Ag develop an autoimmune pinealitis (EAP). We demonstrate in this study that (LEW x BN) F1 hybrid rats, injected with HgCl2 7 days before S-Ag immunization, are quite efficiently protected against EAU and EAP. We also show that HgCl2-induced protection is neither due to a cytotoxic effect of HgCl2 nor to CD8+ T-cell dependent mechanisms nor to the HgCl2-induced increase of serum IgE concentration. The role of other hypothetical mechanisms, such as anti-S-Ag anti-idiotypic antibodies and/or HgCl2-induced unbalance between T-helper cell subsets, is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1748484

  5. Sex differences in immune responses and viral shedding following Seoul virus infection in Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Klein, S L; Bird, B H; Glass, G E

    2001-07-01

    In the field, male rodents are more frequently infected with hantaviruses than females. This study examined whether patterns of immune responses against hantavirus differed between the sexes. Male and female Long Evans rats (Rattus norvegicus) were inoculated with Seoul virus, and antibody and cytokine responses, as well as virus shedding were assessed. Males were more likely to shed virus in saliva, to shed virus through multiple routes (saliva, urine, and feces), and to have viral RNA in the spleen than females. Anti-Seoul virus IgG responses were higher in males than females. In both sexes, splenic IFNgamma and IL-4 production increased following infection. After infection, males had higher Th1 immune responses (i.e., IgG2a, IFNgamma, and IL-2) than females; in contrast, Th2 immune responses (i.e., IgG1, IL-4, and IL-10) were similar between the sexes. These data suggest that immune responses to Seoul virus differ between the sexes.

  6. Host stress and immune responses during aerosol challenge of Brown Norway rats with Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Gater, Susan T.; Peters, Kristen N.; Kocsis, Andrew G.; Dhariwala, Miqdad O.; Anderson, Deborah M.; Anderson, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Inhalation exposure models are becoming the preferred method for the comparative study of respiratory infectious diseases due to their resemblance to the natural route of infection. To enable precise delivery of pathogen to the lower respiratory tract in a manner that imposes minimal biosafety risk, nose-only exposure systems have been developed. Early inhalation exposure technology for infectious disease research grew out of technology used in asthma research where predominantly the Collison nebulizer is used to generate an aerosol by beating a liquid sample against glass. Although infectious aerosol droplets of 1–5 μm in size can be generated, the Collison often causes loss of viability. In this work, we evaluate a gentler method for aerosolization of living cells and describe the use of the Sparging Liquid Aerosol Generator (SLAG) in a rat pneumonic plague model. The SLAG creates aerosols by continuous dripping of liquid sample on a porous metal disc. We show the generation of 0.5–1 μm Yersinia pestis aerosol particles using the SLAG with spray factors typically ranging from 10−7 to 10−8 with no detectable loss of bacterial viability. Delivery of these infectious particles via nose-only exposure led to the rapid development of lethal pneumonic plague. Further, we evaluated the effect of restraint-stress imposed by the nose-only exposure chamber on early inflammatory responses and bacterial deposition. Elevated serum corticosterone which peaked at 2 h post-procedure indicated the animals experienced stress as a result of restraint in the nose-only chamber. However, we observed no correlation between elevated corticosterone and the amount of bacterial deposition or inflammation in the lungs. Together these data demonstrate the utility of the SLAG and the nose-only chamber for aerosol challenge of rodents by Y. pestis. PMID:23226684

  7. A Comparative Assessment of Track Plates to Quantify Fine Scale Variations in the Relative Abundance of Norway Rats in Urban Slums.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Kathryn P; Minter, Amanda; Begon, Mike; Diggle, Peter J; Serrano, Soledad; Reis, Mitermayer G; Childs, James E; Ko, Albert I; Costa, Federico

    2016-06-01

    Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) living in urban environments are a critical public health and economic problem, particularly in urban slums where residents are at a higher risk for rat borne diseases, yet convenient methods to quantitatively assess population sizes are lacking. We evaluated track plates as a method to determine rat distribution and relative abundance in a complex urban slum environment by correlating the presence and intensity of rat-specific marks on track plates with findings from rat infestation surveys and trapping of rats to population exhaustion. To integrate the zero-inflated track plate data we developed a two-component mixture model with one binary and one censored continuous component. Track plate mark-intensity was highly correlated with signs of rodent infestation (all coefficients between 0.61 and 0.79 and all p-values < 0.05). Moreover, the mean level of pre-trapping rat-mark intensity on plates was significantly associated with the number of rats captured subsequently (Odds ratio1.38; 95% CI 1.19-1.61) and declined significantly following trapping (Odds ratio 0.86; 95% CI 0.78-0.95). Track plates provided robust proxy measurements of rat abundance and distribution and detected rat presence even when populations appeared 'trapped out'. Tracking plates are relatively easy and inexpensive methods that can be used to intensively sample settings such as urban slums, where traditional trapping or mark-recapture studies are impossible to implement, and therefore the results can inform and assess the impact of targeted urban rodent control campaigns.

  8. Steroidogenic fate of the Leydig cells that repopulate the testes of young and aged Brown Norway rats after elimination of the preexisting Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haolin; Guo, Jingjing; Ge, Renshan; Lian, Qingquan; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Zirkin, Barry R

    2015-12-01

    The capacity of Brown Norway rat Leydig cells to produce testosterone (T) decreases with aging. In a previous study, we reported that a new generation of Leydig cells can be restored in both young and old rat testes after a single injection of ethane dimethanesulfonate (EDS), and that the abilities of the new Leydig cells in young and old rats to produce T were equivalent. Our objective herein was to compare the steroidogenic fate of the new Leydig cells over time. Young (3 month-old) and old (18 month-old) rats were injected with EDS to eliminate the existing Leydig cells. Ten weeks after EDS, Leydig cells had been restored and T production by the new Leydig cells isolated from young and old rat testes was equivalent. Thirty weeks after EDS treatment of young rats, the ability of the new Leydig cells to produce T had not diminished from 10 weeks post-EDS. In contrast, at 30 weeks post-EDS, T production by new cells in old rat testes was reduced significantly from the 10-week level. Serum T levels at 10 and 30 weeks were consistent with Leydig cell T production. Serum LH levels did not differ in any group. Thus, although the Leydig cells restored to both young and old rats after EDS initially produced T at high, equivalent levels, the cells in the old testes did not maintain this ability. These results suggest that: 1) the cells from which new populations of Leydig cells are derived may differ depending upon the age of the rat; and/or 2) factors extrinsic to the new Leydig cells in young and old testes differ, and it is these differences that are responsible for reductions in T by the newly formed Leydig cells in the testes of old rats.

  9. A high-salt diet further impairs age-associated declines in cognitive, behavioral, and cardiovascular functions in male Fischer brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Gaurav; Asghar, Mohammad; Patki, Gaurav; Bohat, Ritu; Jafri, Faizan; Allam, Farida; Dao, An T; Mowrey, Christopher; Alkadhi, Karim; Salim, Samina

    2013-09-01

    Aging-associated declines in cognitive, emotional, and cardiovascular function are well known. Environmental stress triggers critical changes in the brain, further compromising cardiovascular and behavioral health during aging. Excessive dietary salt intake is one such stressor. Here, we tested the effect of high salt (HS) on anxiety, learning-memory function, and blood pressure (BP) in male Fischer brown Norway (FBN) rats. Adult (A; 2 mo) and old (O; 20 mo) male rats were fed normal-salt (NS; 0.4% NaCl) or HS (8% NaCl) diets for 4 wk after being implanted with telemeter probes for conscious BP measurement. Thereafter, tests to assess anxiety-like behavior and learning-memory were conducted. The rats were then killed, and samples of plasma, urine, and brain tissue were collected. We found that systolic BP was higher in O-NS (117 ± 1.2 mm Hg) than in A-NS (105 ± 0.8 mm Hg) rats (P < 0.05). Furthermore, BP was higher in O-HS (124 ± 1.4 mm Hg) than in O-NS (117 ± 1.2 mm Hg) rats (P < 0.05). Moreover, anxiety-like behavior (light-dark and open-field tests) was not different between A-NS and O-NS rats but was greater in O-HS rats than in A-NS, O-NS, or A-HS rats (P < 0.05). Short-term memory (radial arm water maze test) was similar in A-NS and O-NS rats but was significantly impaired in O-HS rats compared with A-NS, O-NS, or A-HS rats (P < 0.05). Furthermore, oxidative stress variables (in plasma, urine, and brain) as well as corticosterone (plasma) were greater in O-HS rats when compared with A-NS, O-NS, or A-HS rats (P < 0.05). The antioxidant enzyme glyoxalase-1 expression was selectively reduced in the hippocampus and amygdala of O-HS rats compared with A-NS, O-NS, or A-HS rats (P < 0.05), whereas other antioxidant enzymes, glutathione reductase 1, manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD), and Cu/Zn SOD remained unchanged. We suggest that salt-sensitive hypertension and behavioral derangement are associated with a redox imbalance in the brain of aged FBN rats.

  10. Kirkenes, Norway

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-09

    This image from NASA Terra spacecraft shows the town of Kirkenes in northernmost Norway, with its 3400 inhabitants, as they prepare for an expected boom as a shipping hub, as global warming has led to the opening up of the Northern Sea Route.

  11. Remote monitoring of the progression of primary pneumonic plague in Brown Norway rats in high-capacity, high-containment housing

    PubMed Central

    Coate, Eric A.; Kocsis, Andrew G.; Peters, Kristen N.; Anderson, Paul E.; Ellersieck, Mark R.; Fine, Deborah M.; Anderson, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Development of new vaccines, diagnostics and therapeutics for biodefense or other relatively rare infectious diseases is hindered by the lack of naturally occurring human disease on which to conduct clinical trials of efficacy. To overcome this experimental gap, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration established the Animal Rule, in which efficacy testing in two well-characterized animal models that closely resemble human disease may be accepted in lieu of large scale clinical trials for diseases with limited natural human incidence. In this report, we evaluated the Brown Norway rat as a model for pneumonic plague and describe the natural history of clinical disease following inhalation exposure to Yersinia pestis. In high-capacity, high-containment housing, we monitored temperature, activity, heart rate and rhythm by capturing electronic impulses transmitted from abdominal telemeter implants. Using this system, we show that reduced activity and development of fever are sensitive indications of disease progression. Furthermore, we identified heart arrhythmias as contributing factors to the rapid progression to lethality following the fever response. Together these data validate the Brown Norway rat as an experimental model for human pneumonic plague and provide new insight that may ultimately lead to novel approaches in post-exposure treatment of this devastating infection. PMID:24719212

  12. Remote monitoring of the progression of primary pneumonic plague in Brown Norway rats in high-capacity, high-containment housing.

    PubMed

    Coate, Eric A; Kocsis, Andrew G; Peters, Kristen N; Anderson, Paul E; Ellersieck, Mark R; Fine, Deborah M; Anderson, Deborah M

    2014-07-01

    Development of new vaccines, diagnostics, and therapeutics for biodefense or other relatively rare infectious diseases is hindered by the lack of naturally occurring human disease on which to conduct clinical trials of efficacy. To overcome this experimental gap, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration established the Animal Rule, in which efficacy testing in two well-characterized animal models that closely resemble human disease may be accepted in lieu of large-scale clinical trials for diseases with limited natural human incidence. In this report, we evaluated the Brown Norway rat as a model for pneumonic plague and describe the natural history of clinical disease following inhalation exposure to Yersinia pestis. In high-capacity, high-containment housing, we monitored temperature, activity, heart rate, and rhythm by capturing electronic impulses transmitted from abdominal telemeter implants. Using this system, we show that reduced activity and development of fever are sensitive indications of disease progression. Furthermore, we identified heart arrhythmias as contributing factors to the rapid progression to lethality following the fever response. Together, these data validate the Brown Norway rat as an experimental model for human pneumonic plague and provide new insight that may ultimately lead to novel approaches in postexposure treatment of this devastating infection.

  13. Introgression of Brown Norway CYP4A genes on to the Dahl salt-sensitive background restores vascular function in SS-5(BN) consomic rats.

    PubMed

    Lukaszewicz, Kathleen M; Falck, John R; Manthati, Vijaya L; Lombard, Julian H

    2013-03-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that the Dahl SS (salt-sensitive) rat has vascular dysfunction due, in part, to the up-regulation of the CYP4A/20-HETE (cytochrome P450 ω-hydroxylase 4A)/20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid) system. To assess the role of vascular 20-HETE, SS rats were compared with SS-5(BN) consomic rats, carrying CYP4A alleles on chromosome 5 from the normotensive BN (Brown Norway) introgressed on to the SS genetic background. Cerebral arteries from SS-5(BN) rats had less CYP4A protein than arteries from SS rats fed either NS (normal-salt, 0.4% NaCl) or HS (high-salt, 4.0% NaCl) diet. ACh (acetylcholine)-induced dilation of MCAs (middle cerebral arteries) from SS and SS-5(BN) rats was present in SS-5(BN) rats fed on either an NS or HS diet, but absent in SS rats. In SS rats fed on either diet, ACh-induced dilation was restored by acute treatment with the CYP4A inhibitor DDMS (N-methyl-sulfonyl-12,12-dibromododec-11-enamide) or the 20-HETE antagonist 20-HEDE [20-hydroxyeicosa-6(Z),15(Z)-dienoic acid]. The restored response to ACh in DDMS-treated SS rats was inhibited by L-NAME (N(G)nitro-L-arginine methyl ester) and unaffected by indomethacin or MS-PPOH [N-methylsulfonyl-6-(2-propargyloxyphenyl)hexanamide]. Vascular relaxation responses to the NO donor C(5)FeN(6)Na(2)O were intact in both SS and SS-5(BN) rats and unaffected by the acute addition of DDMS, indicating that the vascular dysfunction of the SS rat is due to a reduced bioavailability of NO instead of failure of the VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) to respond to the vasodilator. Superoxide levels in cerebral arteries of SS-5(BN) rats [evaluated semi-quantitatively by DHE (dihydroethidium) fluorescence] were lower than those in the arteries of SS rats. These findings indicate that SS rats have an up-regulation of the CYP4A/20-HETE pathway resulting in elevated ROS (reactive oxygen species) and reduced NO bioavailability causing vascular dysfunction.

  14. [The black death in Norway].

    PubMed

    Oeding, P

    1990-06-30

    The old Icelandic annals tell that the Black Death came to Bergen, Norway, in 1349 with a ship from England. This was probably at the beginning of September. From Bergen the plague spread rapidly northwards and southwards along the coast and over land to Eastern Norway. The Black Death remained in Norway for approximately six months. The epidemic must have been started by infected black rats and rat fleas in the grain cargo of the ship. The account in the annals, and experiences from other countries, indicate that pneumonic plague was dominant in Bergen at the start of the epidemic. After that the Black Death must have spread partly as pneumonic plague but mainly probably as bubonic plague, transmitted via human fleas from person to person. The rats cannot have played a part except in the initial phase. The annals say that 2/3 of Norway's population died. This is probably a big exaggeration. The mortality in Norway can hardly have been more than 40-50%. Even this is high compared with an estimated mortality of approximately 33% in England and on the continent.

  15. The influence of social environment in early life on the behavior, stress response, and reproductive system of adult male Norway rats selected for different attitudes to humans.

    PubMed

    Gulevich, R G; Shikhevich, S G; Konoshenko, M Yu; Kozhemyakina, R V; Herbeck, Yu E; Prasolova, L A; Oskina, I N; Plyusnina, I Z

    2015-05-15

    The influence of social disturbance in early life on behavior, response of blood corticosterone level to restraint stress, and endocrine and morphometric indices of the testes was studied in 2-month Norway rat males from three populations: not selected for behavior (unselected), selected for against aggression to humans (tame), and selected for increased aggression to humans (aggressive). The experimental social disturbance included early weaning, daily replacement of cagemates from days 19 to 25, and subsequent housing in twos till the age of 2months. The social disturbance increased the latent period of aggressive behavior in the social interaction test in unselected males and reduced relative testis weights in comparison to the corresponding control groups. In addition, experimental unselected rats had smaller diameters of seminiferous tubules and lower blood testosterone levels. In the experimental group, tame rats had lower basal corticosterone levels, and aggressive animals had lower hormone levels after restraint stress in comparison to the control. The results suggest that the selection in two directions for attitude to humans modifies the response of male rats to social disturbance in early life. In this regard, the selected rat populations may be viewed as a model for investigation of (1) neuroendocrinal mechanisms responsible for the manifestation of aggression and (2) interaction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal systems in stress.

  16. INTROGRESSION OF BROWN NORWAY CYP4A GENES ONTO THE DAHL SALT-SENSITIVE BACKGROUND RESTORES VASCULAR FUNCTION IN SS-5BN CONSOMIC RATS

    PubMed Central

    Lukaszewicz, Kathleen M; Falck, John R; Manthati, Vijaya L.; Lombard, Julian H

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rat has vascular dysfunction due, in part, to the upregulation of the cytochrome P450-4A ω-hydroxylase (CYP4A)/20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) system. To assess the role of vascular 20-HETE, SS were compared to SS-5BN consomic rats, carrying CYP4A alleles on chromosome 5 from the normotensive Brown Norway introgressed onto the SS genetic background. Cerebral arteries from SS-5BN had less CYP4A protein than arteries from SS rats fed either normal salt (NS, 0.4% NaCl) or high salt (HS, 4.0% NaCl) diet. Acetylcholine (ACh)-induced dilation of middle cerebral arteries (MCA) from SS and SS-5BN was present in MCA of SS-5BN fed either NS or HS diet, but absent in SS. In SS fed either diet, ACh-induced dilation was restored by acute treatment with the CYP4A inhibitor DDMS or the 20-HETE antagonist 20-HEDE. The restored response to ACh in DDMS-treated SS was inhibited by L-NAME and unaffected by indomethacin or MS-PPOH. Vascular relaxation responses to the nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside were intact in both SS and SS-5BN rats and unaffected by the acute addition of DDMS, indicating the vascular dysfunction of the SS rat is due to a reduced bioavailability of NO instead of failure the vascular smooth muscle cells to respond to the vasodilator. Superoxide levels in cerebral arteries of SS-5BN rats (evaluated semi-quantitatively by DHE fluorescence) were lower than those in arteries of SS rats. These findings indicate SS rats have an upregulation of the CYP4A/20-HETE pathway resulting in elevated ROS and reduced NO bioavailability resulting in vascular dysfunction. PMID:22938512

  17. Exercise training in late middle-aged male Fischer 344 x Brown Norway F1-hybrid rats improves skeletal muscle aerobic function.

    PubMed

    Betik, Andrew C; Baker, David J; Krause, Daniel J; McConkey, Marina J; Hepple, Russell T

    2008-07-01

    The Fischer 344 x Brown Norway F1-hybrid (F344BN) rat has become an increasingly popular and useful strain for studying age-related declines in skeletal muscle function because this strain lives long enough to experience significant declines in muscle mass. Since exercise is often considered a mechanism to combat age-related declines in muscle function, determining the utility of this strain of rat for studying the effects of exercise on the ageing process is necessary. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the plasticity of skeletal muscle aerobic function in late middle-aged male rats following 7 weeks of treadmill exercise training. Training consisted of 60 min per day, 5 days per week with velocity gradually increasing over the training period according to the capabilities of individual rats. The final 3 weeks involved 2 min high-intensity intervals to increase the training stimulus. We used in situ skeletal muscle aerobic metabolic responses and in vitro assessment of muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity to describe the adaptations of aerobic function from the training. Training increased running endurance from 11.3 +/- 0.6 to 15.5 +/- 0.8 min, an improvement of approximately 60%. Similarly, distal hindlimb muscles from trained rats exhibited a higher maximal oxygen consumption in situ (23.2 +/- 1.3 versus 19.7 +/- 0.8 mumol min(-1) for trained versus sedentary rats, respectively) and greater citrate synthase and complex IV enzyme activities in gastrocnemius (29 and 19%, respectively) and plantaris muscles (24 and 28%, respectively) compared with age-matched sedentary control animals. Our results demonstrate that skeletal muscles from late middle-aged rats adapt to treadmill exercise by improving skeletal muscle aerobic function and mitochondrial enzyme activities. This rat strain seems suitable for further investigations using exercise as an intervention to combat ageing-related declines of skeletal muscle aerobic function.

  18. Pharmacological characterization of the late phase reduction in lung functions and correlations with microvascular leakage and lung edema in allergen-challenged Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Mauser, Peter J; House, Aileen; Jones, Howard; Correll, Craig; Boyce, Christopher; Chapman, Richard W

    2013-12-01

    Late phase airflow obstruction and reduction in forced vital capacity are characteristic features of human asthma. Airway microvascular leakage and lung edema are also present in the inflammatory phase of asthma, but the impact of this vascular response on lung functions has not been precisely defined. This study was designed to evaluate the role of increased lung microvascular leakage and edema on the late phase changes in forced vital capacity (FVC) and peak expiratory flow (PEF) in allergen-challenged Brown Norway rats using pharmacological inhibitors of the allergic inflammatory response. Rats were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin aerosol and forced expiratory lung functions (FVC, PEF) and wet and dry lung weights were measured 48 h after antigen challenge. Ovalbumin challenge reduced FVC (63% reduction) and PEF (33% reduction) and increased wet (65% increase) and dry (51% increase) lung weights. The antigen-induced reduction in FVC and PEF was completely inhibited by oral treatment with betamethasone and partially attenuated by inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism including indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor), 7-TM and MK-7246 (CRTH2 antagonists) and montelukast (CysLT1 receptor antagonist). Antagonists of histamine H1 receptors (mepyramine) and 5-HT receptors (methysergide) had no significant effects indicating that these pre-formed mast cell mediators were not involved. There was a highly significant (P < 0.005) correlation for the inhibition of FVC reduction and increase in wet and dry lung weights by these pharmacological agents. These results strongly support the hypothesis that lung microvascular leakage and the associated lung edema contribute to the reduction in forced expiratory lung functions in antigen-challenged Brown Norway rats and identify an important role for the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid metabolism in these responses.

  19. The effect of restraint stress on prepulse inhibition and on corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and CRF receptor gene expression in Wistar-Kyoto and Brown Norway rats

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Jane E.; Burian, Linda C.; Covault, Jonathan; Conti, Lisa H.

    2010-01-01

    Stress plays a role in many psychiatric disorders that are characterized by deficits in prepulse inhibition (PPI), a form of sensorimotor gating. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is one of the most important neurotransmitters involved in behavioral components of the stress response, and central infusion of CRF decreases PPI in rodents. We recently demonstrated that restraint stress decreases PPI and attenuates the increase in PPI caused by repeated testing. To broaden our investigation into how restraint affects PPI, we subjected Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and Brown Norway (BN) rats to 10 consecutive days of 2-hour restraint, or to brief handling, prior to assessing PPI. We next examined the effects of 1 or 10 days of 2-hour restraint on plasma corticosterone levels in order to determine whether the endocrine response to stress parallels the behavioral effect of stress. Finally, we examined the effects of 1 or 10 days of 2-hour restraint on CRF and CRF receptor gene expression in the amygdala, hippocampus, frontal cortex, and hypothalamus in order to determine whether a temporal pattern of gene expression parallels the change in the behavioral response to stress. The major findings of the present study are that 1) restraint stress attenuates the increase in PPI caused by repeated testing in both WKY and BN rats, and BN rats are more sensitive to the effects of restraint on PPI than WKY rats, 2) restraint-induced increases in corticosterone levels mirror the effect of restraint on PPI in WKY rats but not in BN rats, 3) laterality effects on gene expression were observed for the amygdala, whereby restraint increases CRF gene expression in the left, but not right, amygdala, and 4) some restraint-induced changes in CRF and CRF receptor gene expression precede changes in PPI while other changes coincide with altered PPI in a rat strain- and brain region-dependent manner. PMID:20709096

  20. Episodic ozone exposure in adult and senescent Brown Norway rats: acute and delayed effect on heart rate, core temperature and motor activity.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Johnstone, A F; Aydin, C; Phillips, P M; MacPhail, R C; Kodavanti, U P; Ledbetter, A D; Jarema, K A

    2014-06-01

    Setting exposure standards for environmental pollutants may consider the aged as a susceptible population but the few published studies assessing susceptibility of the aged to air pollutants are inconsistent. Episodic ozone (O₃) is more reflective of potential exposures occurring in human populations and could be more harmful to the aged. This study used radiotelemetry to monitor heart rate (HR), core temperature (T(c)) and motor activity (MA) in adult (9-12 months) and senescent (20-24 months) male, Brown Norway rats exposed to episodic O₃ (6 h/day of 1 ppm O₃ for 2 consecutive days/week for 13 weeks). Acute O₃ initially led to marked drops in HR and T(c). As exposures progressed each week, there was diminution in the hypothermic and bradycardic effects of O₃. Senescent rats were less affected than adults. Acute responses were exacerbated on the second day of O₃ exposure with adults exhibiting greater sensitivity. During recovery following 2 d of O₃, adult and senescent rats exhibited an elevated T(c) and HR during the day but not at night, an effect that persisted for at least 48 h after O₃ exposure. MA was elevated in adults but not senescent rats during recovery from O₃. Overall, acute effects of O₃, including reductions in HR and T(c), were attenuated in senescent rats. Autonomic responses during recovery, included an elevation in T(c) with a pattern akin to that of a fever and rise in HR that were independent of age. An attenuated inflammatory response to O₃ in senescent rats may explain the relatively heightened physiological response to O₃ in younger rats.

  1. Susceptibility of adult and senescent Brown Norway rats to repeated ozone exposure: an assessment of behavior, serum biochemistry and cardiopulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Jarema, K A; Lehmann, J R; Ledbetter, A D; Schladweiler, M C; Schmid, J E; Ward, W O; Kodavanti, U P; Nyska, A; MacPhail, R C

    2013-02-01

    Ozone (O₃) is a pervasive air pollutant that produces pulmonary and cardiovascular dysfunction and possible neurological dysfunction. Young and old individuals are recognized as being susceptible to O₃; however, remarkably little is known about susceptibility with senescence. This study explored the pulmonary, cardiovascular and neurological effects of O₃ exposure in adult (4 m) and senescent (20 m) Brown Norway rats exposed to 0 or 0.8 ppm O₃ for 6 h, 1 d/week, for 17 weeks. Ventilatory function was assessed 1 and 7 d after each exposure (Buxco). Heart rate, blood pressure (tail cuff) and motor activity were measured biweekly. Blood, aorta and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were analyzed 24 h after the last exposure for pulmonary inflammation, serum biomarkers and aorta mRNA markers of vascular disease. Measures of normal ventilatory function declined following each O₃ exposure in both adult and senescent rats, however, senescent rats took weeks to exhibit a decline. Evidence for residual respiratory effects of O₃ 7 d after exposure in both age groups was observed. O₃ had no effect on either heart rate or blood pressure, but decreased motor activity in both age groups. BALF indicated mild neutrophilic inflammation and protein leakage in adults. Age affected 17/58 serum analytes, O₃ affected 6/58; 2/58 showed an age-O₃ interaction. Leptin, adiponectin, lipocalin and insulin were increased in senescent rats. Overall, adult rats exhibited more immediate effects of episodic O₃ than senescent rats. Residual effects were, however, obtained in both ages of rat, especially for ventilatory endpoints.

  2. Strain differences in cytochrome P450 mRNA and protein expression, and enzymatic activity among Sprague Dawley, Wistar, Brown Norway and Dark Agouti rats.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Yoshihiro; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Watanabe, Kensuke P; Kawai, Yusuke K; Ohno, Marumi; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2016-05-03

    Rat cytochrome P450 (CYP) exhibits inter-strain differences, but their analysis has been scattered across studies under different conditions. To identify these strain differences in CYP more comprehensively, mRNA expression, protein expression and metabolic activity among Wistar (WI), Sprague Dawley (SD), Dark Agouti (DA) and Brown Norway (BN) rats were compared. The mRNA level and enzymatic activity of CYP1A1 were highest in SD rats. The rank order of Cyp3a2 mRNA expression mirrored its protein expression, i.e., DA>BN>SD>WI, and was similar to the CYP3A2-dependent warfarin metabolic activity, i.e., DA>SD>BN>WI. These results suggest that the strain differences in CYP3A2 enzymatic activity are caused by differences in mRNA expression. Cyp2b1 mRNA levels, which were higher in DA rats, did not correlate with its protein expression or enzymatic activity. This suggests that the strain differences in enzymatic activity are not related to Cyp2b1 mRNA expression. In conclusion, WI rats tended to have the lowest CYP1A1, 2B1 and 3A2 mRNA expression, protein expression and enzymatic activity among the strains. In addition, SD rats had the highest CYP1A1 mRNA expression and activity, while DA rats had higher CYP2B1 and CYP3A2 mRNA and protein expression. These inter-strain differences in CYP could influence pharmacokinetic considerations in preclinical toxicological studies.

  3. Genetic bases of estrogen-induced tumorigenesis in the rat: mapping of loci controlling susceptibility to mammary cancer in a Brown Norway x ACI intercross.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Beverly S; Lachel, Cynthia M; Pennington, Karen L; Murrin, Clare R; Strecker, Tracy E; Tochacek, Martin; Gould, Karen A; Meza, Jane L; McComb, Rodney D; Shull, James D

    2006-08-01

    Exposure to estrogens is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Our laboratory has shown that the ACI rat is uniquely susceptible to 17beta-estradiol (E2)-induced mammary cancer. We previously mapped two loci, Emca1 and Emca2 (estrogen-induced mammary cancer), that act independently to determine susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancer in crosses between the susceptible ACI rat strain and the genetically related, but resistant, Copenhagen (COP) rat strain. In this study, we evaluate susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancer in a cross between the ACI strain and the unrelated Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. Whereas nearly 100% of the ACI rats developed mammary cancer when treated continuously with E2, BN rats did not develop palpable mammary cancer during the 196-day course of E2 treatment. Susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancer segregated as a dominant or incompletely dominant trait in a cross between BN females and ACI males. In a population of 251 female (BN x ACI)F(2) rats, we observed evidence for a total of five genetic determinants of susceptibility. Two loci, Emca4 and Emca5, were identified when mammary cancer status at sacrifice was evaluated as the phenotype, and three additional loci, Emca6, Emca7, and Emca8, were identified when mammary cancer number was evaluated as the phenotype. A total of three genetic interactions were identified. These data indicate that susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancer in the BN x ACI cross behaves as a complex trait controlled by at least five loci and multiple gene-gene interactions.

  4. Effect of Age, Estrogen Status, and Late-Life GPER Activation on Cardiac Structure and Function in the Fischer344×Brown Norway Female Rat.

    PubMed

    Alencar, Allan K; da Silva, Jaqueline S; Lin, Marina; Silva, Ananssa M; Sun, Xuming; Ferrario, Carlos M; Cheng, Cheping; Sudo, Roberto T; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Wang, Hao; Groban, Leanne

    2017-02-01

    Age-associated changes in cardiac structure and function, together with estrogen loss, contribute to the progression of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction in older women. To investigate the effects of aging and estrogen loss on the development of its precursor, asymptomatic left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, echocardiograms were performed in 10 middle-aged (20 months) and 30 old-aged (30 months) female Fischer344×Brown-Norway rats, 4 and 8 weeks after ovariectomy (OVX) and sham procedures (gonads left intact). The cardioprotective potential of administering chronic G1, the selective agonist to the new G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), was further evaluated in old rats (Old-OVX+G1) versus age-matched, vehicle-treated OVX and gonadal intact rats. Advanced age and estrogen loss led to decreases in myocardial relaxation and elevations in filling pressure, in part, due to reductions in phosphorylated phospholamban and increases in cardiac collagen deposition. Eight weeks of G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor activation in Old-OVX+G1 rats reversed the adverse effects of age and estrogen loss on myocardial relaxation through increases in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase expression and reductions in interstitial fibrosis. These findings may explain the preponderance of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction in older postmenopausal women and provide a promising, late-life therapeutic target to reverse or halt the progression of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction.

  5. Development of a respiratory sensitization/elicitation protocol of toluene diisocyanate (TDI) in Brown Norway rats to derive an elicitation-based occupational exposure level.

    PubMed

    Pauluhn, Jürgen

    2014-05-07

    Toluene diisocyanate (TDI), a known human asthmagen, was investigated in skin-sensitized Brown Norway rats for its concentration×time (C×t)-response relationship on elicitation-based endpoints. The major goal of study was to determine the elicitation inhalation threshold dose in sensitized, re-challenged Brown Norway rats, including the associated variables affecting the dosimetry of inhaled TDI-vapor in rats and as to how these differences can be translated to humans. Attempts were made to duplicate at least some traits of human asthma by using skin-sensitized rats which were subjected to single or multiple inhalation-escalation challenge exposures. Two types of dose-escalation protocols were used to determine the elicitation-threshold C×t; one used a variable C (Cvar) and constant t (tconst), the other a constant C (Cconst) and variable t (tvar). The selection of the "minimal irritant" C was based an ancillary pre-studies. Neutrophilic granulocytes (PMNs) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) were considered as the endpoint of choice to integrate the allergic pulmonary inflammation. These were supplemented by physiological measurements characterizing nocturnal asthma-like responses and increased nitric oxide in exhaled breath (eNO). The Cconst×tvar regimen yielded the most conclusive dose-response relationship as long C was high enough to overcome the scrubbing capacity of the upper airways. Based on ancillary pre-studies in naïve rats, the related human-equivalent respiratory tract irritant threshold concentration was estimated to be 0.09ppm. The respective 8-h time-adjusted asthma-related human-equivalent threshold C×t-product (dose), in 'asthmatic' rats, was estimated to be 0.003ppm. Both thresholds are in agreement of the current ACGIH TLV(®) of TDI and published human evidence. In summary, the findings from this animal model suggest that TDI-induced respiratory allergy is likely to be contingent on two interlinked, sequentially occurring mechanisms

  6. Protection against age-dependent renal injury in the F344xBrown Norway male rat is associated with maintained nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Moningka, Natasha C; Sasser, Jennifer M; Croker, Byron; Carter, Christy; Baylis, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Age-dependent renal damage is influenced by genetic background and the Fisher344xBrown Norway (F344xBN) rat is resistant to glomerular injury. In vulnerable strains, a fall in renal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) contributes to age-dependent renal damage. Here, we investigated renal NOS in young (3 months) and old (30 months) male F344xBN to test the hypothesis that renal NOS is maintained in "protected" strains. We also examined if 6 months of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockade using angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition (ACEI) and angiotensin receptor blockade (ARB) provides further benefit in these "protected" old rats. Aging increased tubulointerstitial injury but glomerular sclerosis was minimal and NOS and superoxide dismutase abundance increased. There was no change in the NOS inhibitor, ADMA (asymmetric dimethylarginine) or its regulatory enzymes. RAS blockade with ARB protected against tubulointerstitial injury and increased nNOSα, but ACEI, which also increased nNOSα, had no protective effect on the tubulointerstitium. We conclude that the glomerular sclerosis-resistant aged male F344xBN rat maintains renal NOS, thus reinforcing our hypothesis that progressive glomerular injury is related to renal NOS deficiency. The tubulointerstitial injury seen with aging is reversed with 6 months of ARB but not ACEI and is not associated with renal NOS.

  7. Acid hydrolysis of wheat gluten induces formation of new epitopes but does not enhance sensitizing capacity by the oral route: a study in "gluten free" Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Kroghsbo, Stine; Andersen, Nanna B; Rasmussen, Tina F; Jacobsen, Susanne; Madsen, Charlotte B

    2014-01-01

    Acid hydrolyzed wheat proteins (HWPs) are used in the food and cosmetic industry as emulsifiers. Cases of severe food allergic reactions caused by HWPs have been reported. Recent data suggest that these reactions are caused by HWPs produced by acid hydrolysis. To examine the sensitizing capacity of gluten proteins per se when altered by acid or enzymatic hydrolysis relative to unmodified gluten in rats naïve to gluten. High IgE-responder Brown Norway (BN) rats bred on a gluten-free diet were sensitized without the use of adjuvant to three different gluten products (unmodified, acid hydrolyzed and enzymatic hydrolyzed). Rats were sensitized by intraperitoneal (i.p.) immunization three times with 200 µg gluten protein/rat or by oral dosing for 35 days with 0.2, 2 or 20 mg gluten protein/rat/day. Sera were analyzed for specific IgG and IgE and IgG-binding capacity by ELISA. IgE functionality was measured by rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) assay. Regardless of the route of dosing, all products had sensitizing capacity. When sensitized i.p., all three gluten products induced a strong IgG1 response in all animals. Acid hydrolyzed gluten induced the highest level of specific IgE but with a low functionality. Orally all three gluten products induced specific IgG1 and IgE but with different dose-response relations. Sensitizing rats i.p. or orally with unmodified or enzymatic hydrolyzed gluten induced specific IgG1 responses with similar binding capacity which was different from that of acid hydrolyzed gluten indicating that acid hydrolysis of gluten proteins induces formation of 'new' epitopes. In rats not tolerant to gluten acid hydrolysis of gluten enhances the sensitizing capacity by the i.p. but not by the oral route. In addition, acid hydrolysis induces formation of new epitopes. This is in contrast to the enzymatic hydrolyzed gluten having an epitope pattern similar to unmodified gluten.

  8. Effect of a cocoa-enriched diet on immune response and anaphylaxis in a food allergy model in Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Abril-Gil, Mar; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Franch, Àngels; Castell, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that cocoa intake decreased Th2 immune-related antibodies in rats. In consequence, we aimed to study in depth this cocoa action, particularly assessing its effect on a rat model of food allergy (FA) and also on an anaphylactic response. The involvement of the intestinal immune system was analyzed to allow the action mechanisms to be investigated. The role of cocoa flavonoids in the antiallergic properties of cocoa was also established. Brown Norway rats were fed either a reference diet or diets containing conventional cocoa (CC) or nonfermented cocoa (NFC). FA to ovalbumin (OVA) was induced and, later, an anaphylactic response was provoked. As expected, the synthesis of anti-OVA IgE and other Th2-related antibodies was inhibited by CC diet. In addition, the release of mast cell protease II after anaphylaxis was partially prevented by CC, although other variables were not modified. The CC diet also attenuated the increase of some Th2-related cytokines released from mesenteric lymph node and spleen cells, and modulated the intestinal gene expression of molecules involved in allergic response. These results demonstrated the local and systemic influence of CC diet. The effects of the NFC diet were weaker than those of CC, suggesting that cocoa components other than flavonoids play a role in cocoa's action. In conclusion, by acting on intestinal and systemic immune functions, a cocoa-enriched diet in rats exhibited a protective effect against FA and partially against anaphylaxis, making this a food of high interest to the fields of health and immunonutrition.

  9. FMRI and fcMRI phenotypes map the genomic effect of chromosome 13 in Brown Norway and Dahl salt-sensitive rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhixin; Ward, B Douglas; Dwinell, Melinda R; Lombard, Julian H; Pawela, Christopher P

    2014-04-15

    Genes have been implicated as major contributors to many biological traits and susceptibility to specific diseases. However, the mechanisms of genotype action on central nervous system function have been elusive. It has been previously observed that inbred Brown Norway (BN) rats exhibit a number of quantitative complex traits markedly different from those of inbred Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. These strains have become so important to cardiovascular research that a novel chromosome substitution approach was used to create SS and BN strains that have a single chromosome replaced by the homologous chromosome of the other strain. The present study was conducted in an effort to evaluate whether fMRI neuroimaging measures could be employed as a phenotype of genetic influence on neural biology in SS, BN, and consomic SSBN13 rat strains. Electrical forepaw stimulation evoked robust differential BOLD-fMRI activation along the thalamocortical pathway among the three strains across different stimulus frequencies. Moreover, using the fMRI-guided seeds in thalamus and somatosensory cortex for the analysis of fcMRI, we were able to characterize the strain-specific difference in secondary somatosensory cortex, temporal association cortex, and the CA3 region. We were also able to define the genetic influences of Chr-13 on the projection and integration of sensory information in consomic SS-13(BN) strain. We provided objective imaging evidence supporting the hypothesis that rat strain-specific fMRI and fcMRI combined with consomic strategy can be a useful tool in identifying the complex genetic divergence that is related to neural circuits. These findings prove the concept of neuroimaging-based phenotypes as a novel approach to visualize and fine-map the genetic effects onto brain biology at a systems level.

  10. Activation of GPR30 improves exercise capacity and skeletal muscle strength in senescent female Fischer344 × Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Alencar, Allan; Lin, Marina; Sun, Xuming; Sudo, Roberto T; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Lowe, Dawn A; Groban, Leanne

    2016-06-17

    The molecular mechanisms of muscle weakness and sarcopenia in postmenopausal women are largely unknown. To determine the effect of a new estrogen receptor, GPR30, in the maintenance of exercise capacity and skeletal muscle function in females, the selective GPR30 agonist, G1 (100 μg/kg/day), or vehicle (V, soybean oil) was administered subcutaneously daily (n = 7 per group) to ovariectomized (OVX) 27-month-old Fischer 344 × Brown Norway (F344BN) female rats. Following 8 weeks of treatment, the exercise capacity (treadmill walk time to exhaustion) was reduced in OVX vs. sham rats (5.1 ± 1.4 vs. 11.0 ± 0.9 min, P < 0.05), and chronic G1 restored exercise capacity (12.9 ± 1.2 min; P < 0.05 vs. OVX-V). Similarly, the peak twitch of electrically stimulated soleus muscles was decreased by 22% in OVX vs. sham rats (P < 0.05), and G1 attenuated this decline (P < 0.05). Western blot analysis showed that chronic G1 treatment attenuated OVX-associated decreases in heat shock protein (HSP) 90, HSP70, and HSP27 expressions. In vitro studies using the L6 myoblast cell line demonstrated that G1 increased mRNA levels of HSPs in cultured cells. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the activation of GPR30 mitigates the adverse effects of estrogen loss on exercise capacity and skeletal muscle contractile function in old F344BN rats. The protective effects of GPR30 might be through its upregulation of heat shock proteins in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Brown Norway rat asthma model of diphenylmethane-4,4'-diisocyanate (MDI): determination of the elicitation threshold concentration of after inhalation sensitization.

    PubMed

    Pauluhn, Jürgen; Poole, Alan

    2011-03-15

    Occupational exposure to polymeric diphenylmethane-diisocyanate (MDI), a known human asthmagen, can be attributed to two potential routes: the skin and the respiratory tract. While the skin as the route of sensitization was the focus of a previous investigation (Pauluhn, 2008), this paper describes a modified sensitization protocol using a 5-day inhalation exposure (days 0-4) of Brown Norway (BN) rats to two concentration x exposure time (C x t) relationships of 1000, 5000, and 10,000 mg MDI/m³ x min at exposure durations of either 10 or 360-min. Apart from the differences in the induction protocol, all other experimental variables remained identical. This was followed by four 30-min inhalation challenges to 40 mg MDI/m³ on target days 20, 25, 50, and 65. After the last challenge, changes in breathing patterns delayed in onset were recorded and allergic lung inflammation was probed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). In a subsequent study groups of rats were sensitized using the 10-min C x t protocol and challenged 3-times at 40 mg MDI/m³. At the fourth challenge a dose-escalation regimen was used to determine the elicitation threshold on 'asthmatic' rats. Consistent with the skin-sensitization protocol, the most sensitive endpoints characterizing an allergic pulmonary inflammation were again BAL-neutrophils and physiological measurements showing respiratory changes delayed in onset. The dose-escalation challenge yielded an elicitation threshold of 5 mg MDI-aerosol/m³ at 30 min challenge duration. In topically sensitized rats this threshold was estimated to be 3mg/m³. In summary, these data suggest the C x t product of MDI-aerosol that triggers an elicitation response in 'asthmatic' rats is slightly below of that causing acute pulmonary irritation in naïve rats. The high concentration delivered to the respiratory tract during the 10-min exposure period elicited a more vigorous response than the similar C x t at 360 min. Therefore, short high-level exposure

  12. Effects of probiotics, probiotic DNA and the CpG oligodeoxynucleotides on ovalbumin-sensitized Brown-Norway rats via TLR9/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yan; Huang, Juan; Tang, Wenjing; Chen, Bing; Cai, Wei

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of living probiotics, probiotic DNA and the synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides containing CpG motifs (CpG-ODN) on both immune response and intestinal barrier function in ovalbumin-sensitized rat and the underlying mechanisms. Brown-Norway rats were orally sensitized with ovalbumin, and living probiotics, probiotic DNA extraction, synthetic CpG-ODN or non-CpG ODN control was administered. In the living probiotics, probiotic DNA and CpG-ODN groups, the allergic response was significantly inhibited, the Th1/Th2 cytokine balance was shifted away from Th2 side, the percentage of CD4(+) CD25(+high) Treg cells was increased, and the intestinal barrier function was improved. The levels of toll-like receptor (TLR) 9 mRNA and nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity, as well as the IκB-α phosphorylation (p-IκB-α) was significantly increased in these three intervention groups compared with the OVA-positive group, whereas no such effects were found in the non-CpG ODN control group. These data show that the probiotic genomic DNA and the synthetic CpG-ODN was comparable with living probiotics in preventing food allergic response by immune modulation and intestinal barrier function enhancement, and the activation of TLR9/NF-κB signal pathway might be involved in this process.

  13. PREVALENCE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI AND SALMONELLA SPP. IN THE FECES OF WILD URBAN NORWAY AND BLACK RATS (RATTUS NORVEGICUS AND RATTUS RATTUS) FROM AN INNER-CITY NEIGHBORHOOD OF VANCOUVER, CANADA.

    PubMed

    Himsworth, Chelsea G; Zabek, Erin; Desruisseau, Andrea; Parmley, E Jane; Reid-Smith, Richard; Jardine, Claire M; Tang, Patrick; Patrick, David M

    2015-07-01

    Although rat feces are widely suspected to be a source of pathogenic bacteria, few investigators have studied fecal pathogens in rats. We investigated the prevalence and characteristics of Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. in Norway and black rats (Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus, respectively) from an urban neighborhood of Vancouver, Canada, collected September 2011-August 2012. Colon content was cultured for E. coli and Salmonella spp. and screened for the seven most-common enteropathogenic Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) serotypes by PCR. Isolates were tested for antimicrobial resistance and Salmonella isolates were serotyped. We detected E. coli in 397/633 (62.7%) urban rats. Forty-one of 397 (6.5%) E. coli isolates were resistant to ≥ 1 antimicrobial while 17 (4.3%) were multidrug resistant (including two isolates demonstrating extended-spectrum β-lactamase resistance). Ten of 633 (1.6%) urban rats were carrying STEC serotypes including O145, O103, O26, and O45. Norway rats were more likely to be carrying E. coli compared to black rats, and there was geographic clustering of specific resistance patterns and STEC serotypes. Salmonella spp. were detected in 3/633 (0.5%) rats including serotypes Derby, Indiana, and Enteritidis. In contrast to zoonotic pathogens for which rats are the natural reservoir (e.g., Leptospira interrogans, Rickettsia typhi, Seoul virus), rats likely acquired E. coli and Salmonella spp. from their environment. The ability of rats to be a 'sponge' for environmental pathogens has received little consideration, and the ecology and public health significance of these organisms in rats requires further investigation.

  14. Anti-angiogenic Nanotherapy Inhibits Airway Remodeling and Hyper-responsiveness of Dust Mite Triggered Asthma in the Brown Norway Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, Gregory M.; Jenkins, John; Schmieder, Anne H.; Moldobaeva, Aigul; Cui, Grace; Zhang, Huiying; Yang, Xiaoxia; Zhong, Qiong; Keupp, Jochen; Sergin, Ismail; Paranandi, Krishna S.; Eldridge, Lindsey; Allen, John S.; Williams, Todd; Scott, Michael J.; Razani, Babak; Wagner, Elizabeth M.

    2017-01-01

    Although angiogenesis is a hallmark feature of asthmatic inflammatory responses, therapeutic anti-angiogenesis interventions have received little attention. Objective: Assess the effectiveness of anti-angiogenic Sn2 lipase-labile prodrugs delivered via αvβ3-micellar nanotherapy to suppress microvascular expansion, bronchial remodeling, and airway hyper-responsiveness in Brown Norway rats exposed to serial house dust mite (HDM) inhalation challenges. Results: Anti-neovascular effectiveness of αvβ3-mixed micelles incorporating docetaxel-prodrug (Dxtl-PD) or fumagillin-prodrug (Fum-PD) were shown to robustly suppress neovascular expansion (p<0.01) in the upper airways/bronchi of HDM rats using simultaneous 19F/1H MR neovascular imaging, which was corroborated by adjunctive fluorescent microscopy. Micelles without a drug payload (αvβ3-No-Drug) served as a carrier-only control. Morphometric measurements of HDM rat airway size (perimeter) and vessel number at 21d revealed classic vascular expansion in control rats but less vascularity (p<0.001) after the anti-angiogenic nanotherapies. CD31 RNA expression independently corroborated the decrease in airway microvasculature. Methacholine (MCh) induced respiratory system resistance (Rrs) was high in the HDM rats receiving αvβ3-No-Drug micelles while αvβ3-Dxtl-PD or αvβ3-Fum-PD micelles markedly and equivalently attenuated airway hyper-responsiveness and improved airway compliance. Total inflammatory BAL cells among HDM challenged rats did not differ with treatment, but αvβ3+ macrophages/monocytes were significantly reduced by both nanotherapies (p<0.001), most notably by the αvβ3-Dxtl-PD micelles. Additionally, αvβ3-Dxtl-PD decreased BAL eosinophil and αvβ3+ CD45+ leukocytes relative to αvβ3-No-Drug micelles, whereas αvβ3-Fum-PD micelles did not. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the potential of targeted anti-angiogenesis nanotherapy to ameliorate the inflammatory hallmarks of asthma in a

  15. Anti-angiogenic Nanotherapy Inhibits Airway Remodeling and Hyper-responsiveness of Dust Mite Triggered Asthma in the Brown Norway Rat.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Gregory M; Jenkins, John; Schmieder, Anne H; Moldobaeva, Aigul; Cui, Grace; Zhang, Huiying; Yang, Xiaoxia; Zhong, Qiong; Keupp, Jochen; Sergin, Ismail; Paranandi, Krishna S; Eldridge, Lindsey; Allen, John S; Williams, Todd; Scott, Michael J; Razani, Babak; Wagner, Elizabeth M

    2017-01-01

    Although angiogenesis is a hallmark feature of asthmatic inflammatory responses, therapeutic anti-angiogenesis interventions have received little attention. Objective: Assess the effectiveness of anti-angiogenic Sn2 lipase-labile prodrugs delivered via αvβ3-micellar nanotherapy to suppress microvascular expansion, bronchial remodeling, and airway hyper-responsiveness in Brown Norway rats exposed to serial house dust mite (HDM) inhalation challenges. Results: Anti-neovascular effectiveness of αvβ3-mixed micelles incorporating docetaxel-prodrug (Dxtl-PD) or fumagillin-prodrug (Fum-PD) were shown to robustly suppress neovascular expansion (p<0.01) in the upper airways/bronchi of HDM rats using simultaneous (19)F/(1)H MR neovascular imaging, which was corroborated by adjunctive fluorescent microscopy. Micelles without a drug payload (αvβ3-No-Drug) served as a carrier-only control. Morphometric measurements of HDM rat airway size (perimeter) and vessel number at 21d revealed classic vascular expansion in control rats but less vascularity (p<0.001) after the anti-angiogenic nanotherapies. CD31 RNA expression independently corroborated the decrease in airway microvasculature. Methacholine (MCh) induced respiratory system resistance (Rrs) was high in the HDM rats receiving αvβ3-No-Drug micelles while αvβ3-Dxtl-PD or αvβ3-Fum-PD micelles markedly and equivalently attenuated airway hyper-responsiveness and improved airway compliance. Total inflammatory BAL cells among HDM challenged rats did not differ with treatment, but αvβ3(+) macrophages/monocytes were significantly reduced by both nanotherapies (p<0.001), most notably by the αvβ3-Dxtl-PD micelles. Additionally, αvβ3-Dxtl-PD decreased BAL eosinophil and αvβ3(+) CD45(+) leukocytes relative to αvβ3-No-Drug micelles, whereas αvβ3-Fum-PD micelles did not. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the potential of targeted anti-angiogenesis nanotherapy to ameliorate the inflammatory hallmarks of asthma in

  16. Effect of high-fructose and high-fat diets on pulmonary sensitivity, motor activity, and body composition of brown Norway rats exposed to ozone.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Phillips, P M; Johnstone, A F M; Beasley, T E; Ledbetter, A D; Schladweiler, M C; Snow, S J; Kodavanti, U P

    2016-04-01

    Diet-induced obesity has been suggested to lead to increased susceptibility to air pollutants such as ozone (O3); however, there is little experimental evidence. Thirty day old male and female Brown Norway rats were fed a normal, high-fructose or high-fat diet for 12 weeks and then exposed to O3 (acute - air or 0.8 ppm O3 for 5 h, or subacute - air or 0.8 ppm O3 for 5 h/d 1 d/week for 4 weeks). Body composition was measured non-invasively using NMR. Ventilatory parameters and exploratory behavior were measured after the third week of subacute exposure. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and blood chemistry data were collected 18 h after acute O3 and 18 h after the fourth week of subacute O3. The diets led to increased body fat in male but not female rats. O3-induced changes in ventilatory function were either unaffected or improved with the fructose and fat diets. O3-induced reduction in exploratory behavior was attenuated with fructose and fat diets in males and partially in females. O3 led to a significant decrease in body fat of males fed control diet but not the fructose or fat diet. O3 led to significant increases in BALF eosinophils, increase in albumin, and reductions in macrophages. Female rats appeared to be more affected than males to O3 regardless of diet. Overall, treatment with high-fructose and high-fat diets attenuated some O3 induced effects on pulmonary function, behavior, and metabolism. Exacerbation of toxicity was observed less frequently.

  17. Genomic analyses of the Formosan harvest mouse (Micromys minutus) and comparisons to the brown Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) and the house mouse (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    Lin, Liang-Kong; Ma, Gwo-Chin; Chen, Tze-Ho; Lin, Wen-Hsiang; Lee, Dong-Jay; Wen, Pao-Ying; Wu, Sheng-Hai; Chen, Ming

    2013-10-01

    The harvest mouse, Micromys minutus (MMIN), has a very wide range of distribution (from the British Isles across the Euroasian continent to Japan and Taiwan). We studied an isolated population of MMIN in Taiwan, which is at the southeastern margin of the species' geographic distribution, and compared its genetic complement with those of the same species previously reported from other geographic locations and with two model rodent species, the house mouse (Mus musculus) and the brown Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus). The diploid number (2N) of MMIN was 68, consistent with that reported for other populations. However, variations were noted in the fundamental number (FN) and the shape and banding patterns of the individual chromosomes among populations. The FN of MMIN was estimated to be 72, including 2 bi-armed autosomes, 31 one-armed autosomes, and one pair of one-armed sex chromosomes. Here, we propose the first ideogram for MMIN. C-banding, Ag-NOR, and the locations of 18S rRNA gene sequences (MMIN chromosomes no. 10, 14, 19, 29, 31, 33, and X) mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) are also reported. Additionally, we compared the 18S rDNA sequences and performed cross-species X chromosome painting (FISH) for M. minutus, M. musculus, and R. norvegicus. The results indicate that both genetic elements are rather conserved across species. Thus, implications for the phylogenetic position of Micromys were limited.

  18. Range Measurement and a Habitat Suitability Map for the Norway Rat in a Highly Developed Urban Environment

    PubMed Central

    Oyedele, Dauda Taofik; Sah, Shahrul Anuar Mohd; Kairuddinand, Liyana; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Mohd Muhiyuddin

    2015-01-01

    Studies of habitat suitability (HS) are essential when animals’ habitats have been altered or when animals migrate to a habitat different from their natural habitat. This study assessed HS and used an integrated geographic information system in the assessment of Rattus norvegicus in a highly developed urban environment. Using data from the Campbell market and the police quarters of George Town, Malaysia, home range (through the use of 100% Minimum Convex Polygon [MCP], 95% MCP and 95% Harmonic Mean [HM]) was estimated. Home range for male rats at Campbell market reached an asymptote, with a slight increase, at 96 radio fixes (home range = 133.52 m2; core area = 29.39 m2). Female rats reached an asymptote at 62 radio fixes (home range = 13.38 m2; core area = 9.17 m2). At Campbell market, male rats emerged at 1900 hours every day, whereas females emerged at 2000 hours; at police quarters, the most common time of emergence for males was 2000 hours and for females was 2200. Raster charts of R. norvegicus showed that rat hot spots can be grouped into 4 zones (market, shop houses, settlement and general places). The standardised raster chart isolated the market as the major rallying points of the rats (hot spots) by producing the highest rats frequencies of 255. All of the habitat suitability thresholds, including the built-up points, skip bins, water source and nature of the site explored in this study, produced a structural pattern (monotonic increase or decrease) of habitat suitability. PMID:26868708

  19. Range Measurement and a Habitat Suitability Map for the Norway Rat in a Highly Developed Urban Environment.

    PubMed

    Oyedele, Dauda Taofik; Sah, Shahrul Anuar Mohd; Kairuddinand, Liyana; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Mohd Muhiyuddin

    2015-12-01

    Studies of habitat suitability (HS) are essential when animals' habitats have been altered or when animals migrate to a habitat different from their natural habitat. This study assessed HS and used an integrated geographic information system in the assessment of Rattus norvegicus in a highly developed urban environment. Using data from the Campbell market and the police quarters of George Town, Malaysia, home range (through the use of 100% Minimum Convex Polygon [MCP], 95% MCP and 95% Harmonic Mean [HM]) was estimated. Home range for male rats at Campbell market reached an asymptote, with a slight increase, at 96 radio fixes (home range = 133.52 m(2); core area = 29.39 m(2)). Female rats reached an asymptote at 62 radio fixes (home range = 13.38 m(2); core area = 9.17 m(2)). At Campbell market, male rats emerged at 1900 hours every day, whereas females emerged at 2000 hours; at police quarters, the most common time of emergence for males was 2000 hours and for females was 2200. Raster charts of R. norvegicus showed that rat hot spots can be grouped into 4 zones (market, shop houses, settlement and general places). The standardised raster chart isolated the market as the major rallying points of the rats (hot spots) by producing the highest rats frequencies of 255. All of the habitat suitability thresholds, including the built-up points, skip bins, water source and nature of the site explored in this study, produced a structural pattern (monotonic increase or decrease) of habitat suitability.

  20. Alteration of mercuric chloride-induced autoimmune glomerulonephritis in brown-Norway rats by herring oil, evening primrose oil and OKY-046 a selective TXA-synthetase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, N

    1987-05-01

    Repeated subcutaneous (SC) injections of mercuric chloride (MC) in Brown Norway (BN) rats induce an autoimmune glomerulonephritis (GN) due to antiglomerular basement membrane (BM) antibody deposition in the glomeruli. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects on MC-induced autoimmune GN of OKY-046, a selective TXA-synthetase inhibitor herring oil (HO), which is rich in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (5.6%) precursor of the three series of prostaglandins (PGs) and of (inactive) thromboxane (TXA3), and evening primrose oil (EPO), which is rich in linoleic acid (LA) (72%) and gamma-linolenic acid (GLNA) (9%), precursors of the one series of PGs, mainly PGE1, and of (inactive) TXA1. The administration of OKY-046 significantly inhibited proteinuria, partially prevented fibrin thrombi (FT) formation in the glomeruli, decreased urinary TXB, enhanced 6ketoPGF excretion and, increased survival rate of the animals from 60% (group receiving only MC) to 86%. However, OKY-046 did not prevent body weight (BW) loss or the development and deposition of IgG in the glomeruli. Increased intake of HO (80 days prior and throughout the experiment) and avoidance of arachidonic acid (AA) intake produced an effect comparable to that of OKY-046 in the rats. Furthermore, HO significantly inhibited the deposition of IgG in the glomeruli, increased the survival rate of the animals to 100% and further enhanced the increased urinary PGE excretion induced by MC. However, HO did not prevent BW loss in the animals. Increased intake of EPO and avoidance of AA intake produced an effect comparable to that of HO. Additionally, EPO completely prevented BW loss induced by MC in these animals. These findings suggest that the metabolites of AA, EPA and GLNA play an important role either in the development or in the modulation of this model of MC induced GN.

  1. Toluene effects on Oxidative Stress in Brain regions of Young-adult, Middleage,and Senescent Brown Norway Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental contaminants is not well understood. To extend knowledge in this area, we examined effects in rat brain of the volatile organic compound toluene. The objective was to test whether oxidative stress plays a role in the adver...

  2. Toluene effects on Oxidative Stress in Brain regions of Young-adult, Middleage,and Senescent Brown Norway Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental contaminants is not well understood. To extend knowledge in this area, we examined effects in rat brain of the volatile organic compound toluene. The objective was to test whether oxidative stress plays a role in the adver...

  3. A Mixed Methods Approach to Exploring the Relationship between Norway Rat (Rattus norvegicus) Abundance and Features of the Urban Environment in an Inner-City Neighborhood of Vancouver, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Himsworth, Chelsea G.; Parsons, Kirbee L.; Feng, Alice Y. T.; Kerr, Thomas; Jardine, Claire M.; Patrick, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Urban rats (Rattus spp.) are among the most ubiquitous pest species in the world. Previous research has shown that rat abundance is largely determined by features of the environment; however, the specific urban environmental factors that influence rat population density within cities have yet to be clearly identified. Additionally, there are no well described tools or methodologies for conducting an in-depth evaluation of the relationship between urban rat abundance and the environment. In this study, we developed a systematic environmental observation tool using methods borrowed from the field of systematic social observation. This tool, which employed a combination of quantitative and qualitative methodologies, was then used to identify environmental factors associated with the relative abundance of Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) in an inner-city neighborhood of Vancouver, Canada. Using a multivariate zero-inflated negative binomial model, we found that a variety of factors, including specific land use, building condition, and amount of refuse, were related to rat presence and abundance. Qualitative data largely supported and further clarified observed statistical relationships, but also identified conflicting and unique situations not easily captured through quantitative methods. Overall, the tool helped us to better understand the relationship between features of the urban environment and relative rat abundance within our study area and may useful for studying environmental determinants of zoonotic disease prevalence/distribution among urban rat populations in the future. PMID:24830847

  4. A mixed methods approach to exploring the relationship between Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) abundance and features of the urban environment in an inner-city neighborhood of Vancouver, Canada.

    PubMed

    Himsworth, Chelsea G; Parsons, Kirbee L; Feng, Alice Y T; Kerr, Thomas; Jardine, Claire M; Patrick, David M

    2014-01-01

    Urban rats (Rattus spp.) are among the most ubiquitous pest species in the world. Previous research has shown that rat abundance is largely determined by features of the environment; however, the specific urban environmental factors that influence rat population density within cities have yet to be clearly identified. Additionally, there are no well described tools or methodologies for conducting an in-depth evaluation of the relationship between urban rat abundance and the environment. In this study, we developed a systematic environmental observation tool using methods borrowed from the field of systematic social observation. This tool, which employed a combination of quantitative and qualitative methodologies, was then used to identify environmental factors associated with the relative abundance of Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) in an inner-city neighborhood of Vancouver, Canada. Using a multivariate zero-inflated negative binomial model, we found that a variety of factors, including specific land use, building condition, and amount of refuse, were related to rat presence and abundance. Qualitative data largely supported and further clarified observed statistical relationships, but also identified conflicting and unique situations not easily captured through quantitative methods. Overall, the tool helped us to better understand the relationship between features of the urban environment and relative rat abundance within our study area and may useful for studying environmental determinants of zoonotic disease prevalence/distribution among urban rat populations in the future.

  5. Social status does not predict responses to Seoul virus infection or reproductive success among male Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Hinson, Ella R; Hannah, Michele F; Norris, Douglas E; Glass, Gregory E; Klein, Sabra L

    2006-03-01

    Trade-offs exist among life history strategies that are used to increase survival and reproduction; such that, males that engage in more competitive behaviors may be more susceptible to infection. Hantaviruses are transmitted horizontally between rodents through the passage of virus in saliva during wounding and male rodents are more likely to be infected with hantaviruses than females. To determine whether a trade-off exists between dominance and susceptibility to Seoul virus infection, male Long Evans rats were group housed (3/cage) with a female rat and aggressive and subordinate behaviors were monitored during a 10 day group housing condition. After behavioral testing, males were individually housed, inoculated with Seoul virus, and blood, saliva, and fecal samples were collected. Dominant males initiated more aggressive encounters than subordinate males. Dominant and subordinate males, however, had similar steroid hormone concentrations, anti-Seoul virus IgG responses, and weight gain over the course of infection. A similar proportion of dominant and subordinate males shed virus in saliva and feces during infection. Using microsatellite DNA markers paternity was assigned to pups derived during the group housing period. In contrast to our initial hypothesis, dominant and subordinate males sired a similar percentage of pups. Taken together, host social status may not predict reproductive success or susceptibility to hantaviruses in rodent reservoir populations.

  6. Enhanced Antigen-Specific Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity and Immunoglobulin G2b Responses after Oral Administration of Viable Lactobacillus casei YIT9029 in Wistar and Brown Norway Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Waard, R.; Garssen, J.; Snel, J.; Bokken, G. C. A. M.; Sako, T.; Huis in 't Veld, J. H. J.; Vos, J. G.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the effects of orally administered viable Lactobacillus casei Shirota strain YIT9029 on the immunity parameters of Wistar and Brown Norway rats were examined. For this purpose, we used the Trichinella spiralis host resistance model. Two weeks before and during T. spiralis infection, rats were fed 109 viable L. casei bacteria 5 days per week. The T. spiralis-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response was significantly enhanced in both Wistar and Brown Norway rats given L. casei. In both rat strains fed L. casei, serum T. spiralis-specific immunoglobulin G2b (IgG2b) concentrations were also significantly increased. In the model, no significant effects of L. casei on larval counts or inflammatory reactions in the tongue musculature, body weights, or lymphoid organ weights were observed. Serum specific antibody responses, other than IgG2b, were not changed by feeding of L. casei. In contrast to L. casei, it was shown that orally administered Bifidobacterium breve or Bifidobacterium bifidum had no influence on the measured infection and immunity indices in the rat infection model. Since the rat DTH response is considered to be a manifestation of Th1 cell-mediated immunity and the IgG2b isotype has been associated with Th1 activity, it was concluded that Th1 cells could play an active role in the immunomodulatory effects of orally administered L. casei. Furthermore, our data do not indicate that the effect of oral supplementation with L. casei is dependent on the genetic background of the host. PMID:11427423

  7. Brown Norway rats, a putative schizophrenia model, show increased electroencephalographic activity at rest and decreased event-related potential amplitude, power, and coherence in the auditory sensory gating paradigm.

    PubMed

    Tomimatsu, Yoshiro; Hibino, Ryosuke; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    In recent schizophrenia clinical research, electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillatory activities induced by a sensory stimulus or behavioral tasks have gained considerable interest as functional and pathophysiological biomarkers. The Brown Norway (BN) rat is a putative schizophrenia model that shows naturally low sensorimotor gating and deficits in cognitive performance, although other phenotypes have not been studied. The present study aimed to investigate the neurophysiological features of BN rats, particularly EEG/event-related potential (ERP). EEG activity was recorded at rest and during the auditory sensory gating paradigm under an awake, freely moving condition. Frequency and ERP analysis were performed along with time-frequency analysis of evoked power and intertrial coherence. Compared with Wistar-Kyoto rats, a well-documented control line, BN rats showed increased EEG power at rest, particularly in the theta and gamma ranges. In ERP analysis, BN rats showed reduced N40-P20 amplitude but normal sensory gating. The rats also showed reduced evoked power and intertrial coherence against auditory stimuli. These results suggest that BN rats show features of EEG/ERP measures clinically relevant to schizophrenia and may provide additional opportunities for translational research.

  8. Seoul virus suppresses NF-κB-mediated inflammatory responses of antigen presenting cells from Norway rats

    PubMed Central

    Au, Rebecca Y.; Jedlicka, Anne E.; Li, Wei; Pekosz, Andrew; Klein, Sabra L.

    2010-01-01

    Hantavirus infection reduces antiviral defenses, increases regulatory responses, and causes persistent infection in rodent hosts. To address whether hantaviruses alter the maturation and functional activity of antigen presenting cells (APCs), rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) and macrophages (BMDMs) were generated and infected with Seoul virus (SEOV) or stimulated with TLR ligands. SEOV infected both DCs and macrophages, but copies of viral RNA, viral antigen, and infectious virus titers were higher in macrophages. The expression of MHCII and CD80, production of IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α, and expression of Ifnβ were attenuated in SEOV-infected APCs. Stimulation of APCs with poly I:C prior to SEOV infection increased the expression of activation markers and production of inflammatory cytokines and suppressed SEOV replication. Infection of APCs with SEOV suppressed LPS-induced activation and innate immune responses. Hantaviruses reduce the innate immune response potential of APCs derived from a natural host, which may influence persistence of these zoonotic viruses in the environment. PMID:20170933

  9. Discovery of a Novel Coronavirus, China Rattus Coronavirus HKU24, from Norway Rats Supports the Murine Origin of Betacoronavirus 1 and Has Implications for the Ancestor of Betacoronavirus Lineage A

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Li, Kenneth S. M.; Tsang, Alan K. L.; Fan, Rachel Y. Y.; Luk, Hayes K. H.; Cai, Jian-Piao; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Wang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We discovered a novel Betacoronavirus lineage A coronavirus, China Rattus coronavirus (ChRCoV) HKU24, from Norway rats in China. ChRCoV HKU24 occupied a deep branch at the root of members of Betacoronavirus 1, being distinct from murine coronavirus and human coronavirus HKU1. Its unique putative cleavage sites between nonstructural proteins 1 and 2 and in the spike (S) protein and low sequence identities to other lineage A betacoronaviruses (βCoVs) in conserved replicase domains support ChRCoV HKU24 as a separate species. ChRCoV HKU24 possessed genome features that resemble those of both Betacoronavirus 1 and murine coronavirus, being closer to Betacoronavirus 1 in most predicted proteins but closer to murine coronavirus by G+C content, the presence of a single nonstructural protein (NS4), and an absent transcription regulatory sequence for the envelope (E) protein. Its N-terminal domain (NTD) demonstrated higher sequence identity to the bovine coronavirus (BCoV) NTD than to the mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) NTD, with 3 of 4 critical sugar-binding residues in BCoV and 2 of 14 contact residues at the MHV NTD/murine CEACAM1a interface being conserved. Molecular clock analysis dated the time of the most recent common ancestor of ChRCoV HKU24, Betacoronavirus 1, and rabbit coronavirus HKU14 to about the year 1400. Cross-reactivities between other lineage A and B βCoVs and ChRCoV HKU24 nucleocapsid but not spike polypeptide were demonstrated. Using the spike polypeptide-based Western blot assay, we showed that only Norway rats and two oriental house rats from Guangzhou, China, were infected by ChRCoV HKU24. Other rats, including Norway rats from Hong Kong, possessed antibodies only against N protein and not against the spike polypeptide, suggesting infection by βCoVs different from ChRCoV HKU24. ChRCoV HKU24 may represent the murine origin of Betacoronavirus 1, and rodents are likely an important reservoir for ancestors of lineage A βCoVs. IMPORTANCE While

  10. Discovery of a novel coronavirus, China Rattus coronavirus HKU24, from Norway rats supports the murine origin of Betacoronavirus 1 and has implications for the ancestor of Betacoronavirus lineage A.

    PubMed

    Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y; Li, Kenneth S M; Tsang, Alan K L; Fan, Rachel Y Y; Luk, Hayes K H; Cai, Jian-Piao; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Wang, Ming; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-03-01

    We discovered a novel Betacoronavirus lineage A coronavirus, China Rattus coronavirus (ChRCoV) HKU24, from Norway rats in China. ChRCoV HKU24 occupied a deep branch at the root of members of Betacoronavirus 1, being distinct from murine coronavirus and human coronavirus HKU1. Its unique putative cleavage sites between nonstructural proteins 1 and 2 and in the spike (S) protein and low sequence identities to other lineage A betacoronaviruses (βCoVs) in conserved replicase domains support ChRCoV HKU24 as a separate species. ChRCoV HKU24 possessed genome features that resemble those of both Betacoronavirus 1 and murine coronavirus, being closer to Betacoronavirus 1 in most predicted proteins but closer to murine coronavirus by G+C content, the presence of a single nonstructural protein (NS4), and an absent transcription regulatory sequence for the envelope (E) protein. Its N-terminal domain (NTD) demonstrated higher sequence identity to the bovine coronavirus (BCoV) NTD than to the mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) NTD, with 3 of 4 critical sugar-binding residues in BCoV and 2 of 14 contact residues at the MHV NTD/murine CEACAM1a interface being conserved. Molecular clock analysis dated the time of the most recent common ancestor of ChRCoV HKU24, Betacoronavirus 1, and rabbit coronavirus HKU14 to about the year 1400. Cross-reactivities between other lineage A and B βCoVs and ChRCoV HKU24 nucleocapsid but not spike polypeptide were demonstrated. Using the spike polypeptide-based Western blot assay, we showed that only Norway rats and two oriental house rats from Guangzhou, China, were infected by ChRCoV HKU24. Other rats, including Norway rats from Hong Kong, possessed antibodies only against N protein and not against the spike polypeptide, suggesting infection by βCoVs different from ChRCoV HKU24. ChRCoV HKU24 may represent the murine origin of Betacoronavirus 1, and rodents are likely an important reservoir for ancestors of lineage A βCoVs. While bats and birds are

  11. Longyearbyen, Svalbard, Norway

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-10

    Longyearbyen is the administrative center of Svalbard and is located on Spitsbergen, the largest island of the Svalbard archipelago, part of the Kingdom of Norway. NASA Terra satellite captured this image on July 12, 2003.

  12. Cell Proliferation and Expression of Cell Cycle Regulatory Proteins that Control the G1/S Transition Are Age Dependent and Lobe Specific in the Brown Norway Rat Model of Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jinchun; Brown, Terry R.

    2008-01-01

    Age-dependent epithelial cell hyperplasia in the dorsal and lateral lobes of Brown Norway rats is analogous to benign prostatic hyperplasia in aging men. A major question is whether differential lobe-specific and age-dependent proliferation of cells, rather than cell survival, contributes to the hyperplasia. Although serum testosterone (T) levels decline in aged rats, active cell proliferation was detected as Ki67-positive cells in the dorsal and lateral lobes. We determined whether androgens differentially affect cell proliferation and cell-cycle regulatory proteins in the prostate lobes of young and aged rats. Castrated rats were treated with different doses of T to restore serum levels to those of intact young or aged rats. Rates of cell proliferation, measured by 5-bromodeoxyuridine labeling, peaked after 3-d T treatment in all lobes. 5-bromodeoxyuridine-labeling indices were higher in the dorsal and lateral lobes of aged than of young rats with equivalent serum T levels. No age-dependent difference was seen in the ventral lobe. Cell proliferation was marked by increased levels of cyclins D1 and E and cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6, decreased p27 and increased phosphorylation of Rb. Levels of cyclins D1 and E were higher in the dorsal and lateral lobes of intact and T-treated aged than young rats. Confocal immunofluorescent microscopy documented changes in cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and cyclin D1 subcellular localization. Cyclin D1 nuclear localization correlated with the time frame for cell proliferation. In conclusion, rates of cell proliferation and levels of cell-cycle regulatory proteins that control the G1/S transition exhibit lobe-specific and age-dependent differences in response to androgens. PMID:17962342

  13. Cell proliferation and expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins that control the G1/S transition are age dependent and lobe specific in the Brown Norway rat model of prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jinchun; Brown, Terry R

    2008-01-01

    Age-dependent epithelial cell hyperplasia in the dorsal and lateral lobes of Brown Norway rats is analogous to benign prostatic hyperplasia in aging men. A major question is whether differential lobe-specific and age-dependent proliferation of cells, rather than cell survival, contributes to the hyperplasia. Although serum testosterone (T) levels decline in aged rats, active cell proliferation was detected as Ki67-positive cells in the dorsal and lateral lobes. We determined whether androgens differentially affect cell proliferation and cell-cycle regulatory proteins in the prostate lobes of young and aged rats. Castrated rats were treated with different doses of T to restore serum levels to those of intact young or aged rats. Rates of cell proliferation, measured by 5-bromodeoxyuridine labeling, peaked after 3-d T treatment in all lobes. 5-bromodeoxyuridine-labeling indices were higher in the dorsal and lateral lobes of aged than of young rats with equivalent serum T levels. No age-dependent difference was seen in the ventral lobe. Cell proliferation was marked by increased levels of cyclins D1 and E and cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6, decreased p27 and increased phosphorylation of Rb. Levels of cyclins D1 and E were higher in the dorsal and lateral lobes of intact and T-treated aged than young rats. Confocal immunofluorescent microscopy documented changes in cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and cyclin D1 subcellular localization. Cyclin D1 nuclear localization correlated with the time frame for cell proliferation. In conclusion, rates of cell proliferation and levels of cell-cycle regulatory proteins that control the G1/S transition exhibit lobe-specific and age-dependent differences in response to androgens.

  14. Oral administration of drugs with hypersensitivity potential induces germinal center hyperplasia in secondary lymphoid organ/tissue in Brown Norway rats, and this histological lesion is a promising candidate as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Akitoshi Miyawaki, Izuru; Yamada, Toru; Kimura, Juki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2013-08-15

    It is important to evaluate the potential of drug hypersensitivity as well as other adverse effects during the preclinical stage of the drug development process, but validated methods are not available yet. In the present study we examined whether it would be possible to develop a new predictive model of drug hypersensitivity using Brown Norway (BN) rats. As representative drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans, phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), amoxicillin (AMX), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were orally administered to BN rats for 28 days to investigate their effects on these animals by examinations including observation of clinical signs, hematology, determination of serum IgE levels, histology, and flow cytometric analysis. Skin rashes were not observed in any animals treated with these drugs. Increases in the number of circulating inflammatory cells and serum IgE level did not necessarily occur in the animals treated with these drugs. However, histological examination revealed that germinal center hyperplasia was commonly induced in secondary lymphoid organs/tissues in the animals treated with these drugs. In cytometric analysis, changes in proportions of lymphocyte subsets were noted in the spleen of the animals treated with PHT or CBZ during the early period of administration. The results indicated that the potential of drug hypersensitivity was identified in BN rat by performing histological examination of secondary lymphoid organs/tissues. Data obtained herein suggested that drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans gained immune reactivity in BN rat, and the germinal center hyperplasia induced by administration of these drugs may serve as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence. - Highlights: • We tested Brown Norway rats as a candidate model for predicting drug hypersensitivity. • The allergic drugs did not induce skin rash, whereas D-penicillamine did so in the rats. • Some of allergic drugs increased

  15. Acid Hydrolysis of Wheat Gluten Induces Formation of New Epitopes but Does Not Enhance Sensitizing Capacity by the Oral Route: A Study in “Gluten Free” Brown Norway Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kroghsbo, Stine; Andersen, Nanna B.; Rasmussen, Tina F.; Madsen, Charlotte B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acid hydrolyzed wheat proteins (HWPs) are used in the food and cosmetic industry as emulsifiers. Cases of severe food allergic reactions caused by HWPs have been reported. Recent data suggest that these reactions are caused by HWPs produced by acid hydrolysis. Objectives To examine the sensitizing capacity of gluten proteins per se when altered by acid or enzymatic hydrolysis relative to unmodified gluten in rats naïve to gluten. Methods High IgE-responder Brown Norway (BN) rats bred on a gluten-free diet were sensitized without the use of adjuvant to three different gluten products (unmodified, acid hydrolyzed and enzymatic hydrolyzed). Rats were sensitized by intraperitoneal (i.p.) immunization three times with 200 µg gluten protein/rat or by oral dosing for 35 days with 0.2, 2 or 20 mg gluten protein/rat/day. Sera were analyzed for specific IgG and IgE and IgG-binding capacity by ELISA. IgE functionality was measured by rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) assay. Results Regardless of the route of dosing, all products had sensitizing capacity. When sensitized i.p., all three gluten products induced a strong IgG1 response in all animals. Acid hydrolyzed gluten induced the highest level of specific IgE but with a low functionality. Orally all three gluten products induced specific IgG1 and IgE but with different dose-response relations. Sensitizing rats i.p. or orally with unmodified or enzymatic hydrolyzed gluten induced specific IgG1 responses with similar binding capacity which was different from that of acid hydrolyzed gluten indicating that acid hydrolysis of gluten proteins induces formation of ‘new’ epitopes. Conclusions In rats not tolerant to gluten acid hydrolysis of gluten enhances the sensitizing capacity by the i.p. but not by the oral route. In addition, acid hydrolysis induces formation of new epitopes. This is in contrast to the enzymatic hydrolyzed gluten having an epitope pattern similar to unmodified gluten. PMID:25207551

  16. Norway's Regional Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kintzer, Frederick C.

    1974-01-01

    Created in 1969 as a 3-college system coordinated by the Regional College section of the Ministry of Education, the current 6 institutions represent Norway's attempt to extend equal opportunity and employment-oriented education to rural and remote areas. (Editor)

  17. Norway. [CME Country Reports].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France). Documentation Center for Education in Europe.

    In Norway all children, regardless of nationality, who are of compulsory school age (7-16 years old) have a right and obligation to attend compulsory school. The local school board is responsible for arranging auxiliary teaching for pupils who require extra help, in accordance with the instructions issued by the Ministry of Church and Education.…

  18. Educational Assessment in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tveit, Sverre

    2014-01-01

    Norway has seen major changes in the field of educational assessment over the past decade, following the 2001 '"PISA shock" that stimulated reform of the entire primary and secondary education systems: new outcome-based curricula with cross-disciplinary basic skills were accompanied by major revision of assessment regulations,…

  19. Educational Assessment in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tveit, Sverre

    2014-01-01

    Norway has seen major changes in the field of educational assessment over the past decade, following the 2001 '"PISA shock" that stimulated reform of the entire primary and secondary education systems: new outcome-based curricula with cross-disciplinary basic skills were accompanied by major revision of assessment regulations,…

  20. Oral administration of drugs with hypersensitivity potential induces germinal center hyperplasia in secondary lymphoid organ/tissue in Brown Norway rats, and this histological lesion is a promising candidate as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence in humans.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Akitoshi; Miyawaki, Izuru; Yamada, Toru; Kimura, Juki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2013-08-15

    It is important to evaluate the potential of drug hypersensitivity as well as other adverse effects during the preclinical stage of the drug development process, but validated methods are not available yet. In the present study we examined whether it would be possible to develop a new predictive model of drug hypersensitivity using Brown Norway (BN) rats. As representative drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans, phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), amoxicillin (AMX), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were orally administered to BN rats for 28days to investigate their effects on these animals by examinations including observation of clinical signs, hematology, determination of serum IgE levels, histology, and flow cytometric analysis. Skin rashes were not observed in any animals treated with these drugs. Increases in the number of circulating inflammatory cells and serum IgE level did not necessarily occur in the animals treated with these drugs. However, histological examination revealed that germinal center hyperplasia was commonly induced in secondary lymphoid organs/tissues in the animals treated with these drugs. In cytometric analysis, changes in proportions of lymphocyte subsets were noted in the spleen of the animals treated with PHT or CBZ during the early period of administration. The results indicated that the potential of drug hypersensitivity was identified in BN rat by performing histological examination of secondary lymphoid organs/tissues. Data obtained herein suggested that drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans gained immune reactivity in BN rat, and the germinal center hyperplasia induced by administration of these drugs may serve as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence.

  1. The relationship between socioeconomic indices and potentially zoonotic pathogens carried by wild Norway rats: a survey in Rhône, France (2010-2012).

    PubMed

    Ayral, F; Artois, J; Zilber, A-L; Widén, F; Pounder, K C; Aubert, D; Bicout, D J; Artois, M

    2015-02-01

    Leptospira interrogans, hantaviruses (particularly Seoul virus), hepatitis E virus (HEV), and Toxoplasma gondii are rat-associated zoonoses that are responsible for human morbidity and mortality worldwide. This study aimed to describe the infection patterns of these four pathogens in wild rats (Rattus norvegicus) across socioeconomic levels in neighbourhoods in Lyon, France. The infection or exposure status was determined using polymerase chain reaction or serology for 178 wild rats captured in 23 locations; additionally, confirmatory culture or mouse inoculation was performed. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate whether morphological and socioeconomic data could predict the infection status of the rats. This study revealed that the rat colony's age structure may influence the prevalence of L. interrogans, hantavirus, and HEV. In addition, areas with high human population densities and low incomes may be associated with a greater number of infected rats and an increased risk of disease transmission.

  2. Norway: health system review.

    PubMed

    Ringard, Ånen; Sagan, Anna; Sperre Saunes, Ingrid; Lindahl, Anne Karin

    2013-01-01

    Norways five million inhabitants are spread over nearly four hundred thousand square kilometres, making it one of the most sparsely populated countries in Europe. It has enjoyed several decades of high growth, following the start of oil production in early 1970s, and is now one of the richest countries per head in the world. Overall, Norways population enjoys good health status; life expectancy of 81.53 years is above the EU average of 80.14, and the gap between overall life expectancy and healthy life years is around half the of EU average. The health care system is semi decentralized. The responsibility for specialist care lies with the state (administered by four Regional Health Authorities) and the municipalities are responsible for primary care. Although health care expenditure is only 9.4% of Norways GDP (placing it on the 16th place in the WHO European region), given Norways very high value of GDP per capita, its health expenditure per head is higher than in most countries. Public sources account for over 85% of total health expenditure; the majority of private health financing comes from households out-of-pocket payments.The number of practitioners in most health personnel groups, including physicians and nurses, has been increasing in the last few decades and the number of health care personnel per 100 000 inhabitants is high compared to other EU countries. However, long waiting times for elective care continue to be a problem and are cause of dissatisfaction among the patients. The focus of health care reforms has seen shifts over the past four decades. During the 1970s the focus was on equality and increasing geographical access to health care services; during the 1980s reforms aimed at achieving cost containment and decentralizing health care services; during the 1990s the focus was on efficiency. Since the beginning of the millennium the emphasis has been given to structural changes in the delivery and organization of health care and to policies

  3. Distribution of Leptospira interrogans by Multispacer Sequence Typing in Urban Norway Rats (Rattus norvegicus): A Survey in France in 2011-2013

    PubMed Central

    Bicout, Dominique J.; Kodjo, Angeli; Artois, Marc; Djelouadji, Zoheira

    2015-01-01

    Background Urban leptospirosis has increasingly been reported in both developing and developed countries. The control of the disease is limited because our understanding of basic aspects of the epidemiology, including the transmission routes of leptospires among rat populations, remains incomplete. Through the ability to distinguish among Leptospira strains in rats, multispacer sequence typing (MST) could provide a modern understanding of Leptospira epidemiology; however, to our knowledge, the distribution of Leptospira strains among urban rat colonies has not been investigated using MST. Aims and Methodology The objective of this study was to identify the Leptospira strains present in rats (Rattus norvegicus) in Lyon (France) using MST and to characterize their spatial distribution. Kidneys and urine were collected from rats trapped live in seven locations in the city and in one suburban location. Each location was considered to represent a rat colony. Bacterial cultures and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays were performed, and the L. interrogans DNA identified was then genotyped using MST. The distributions of Leptospira strains were spatially described. Key Results Among 84 wild rats, MST profiles were obtained in 35 of 37 rats that had a positive result for L. interrogans by bacterial culture and/or qPCR analyses. All of the MST profiles were related to reference strains previously isolated from human patients that belong to the serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae and the serovars [strain(s)] Copenhageni [Wijinberg or M20] (n = 26), Icterohaemorrhagiae [CHU Réunion] (n = 7), Icterohaemorrhagiae [R1] (n = 1) and Copenhageni [Shibaura 9] (n = 1). Each colony was infected with leptospires having the same MST profile. Major Conclusions This study demonstrated that MST could be used for the purpose of field studies, either on culture isolates or on DNA extracted from kidneys and urine, to distinguish among L. interrogans isolates in rats. MST could

  4. Autoimmunity induced by HgCl/sub 2/ in Brown-Norway rats. II. Monoclonal antibodies sharing specificities and idiotypes with mouse natural monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Lymberi, P.; Hirsch, F.; Kuhn, J.; Ternynck, T.; Druet, P.; Avrameas, S.

    1986-05-01

    Spleen cells derived from BN rats receiving HgCl/sub 2/ were fused with the nonsecreting rat myeloma cell line IR983F. Supernatants from immunoglobulin-secreting hybrids for antibody activity against actin, tubulin, autologous and heterologous myosin, myoglobin, dsDNA, peroxidase, and the haptens TNP, NIP, NNP, and NBrP were severed. Six monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were found to react with antigen(s) of the panel. At least three groups of antibody specificities were identified: 1) clones reacting with TNP (1 IgM, 1 Ige); 2) clones reacting with horseradish peroxidase (1 IgM); and 3) clones possessing widespread reactivity for several antigens as found for mouse natural autoantibodies (2 IgM, 1 IgE). The idiotypic (Id) determinants of the 59 mAb were also analyzed. All rat mAb that possessed widespread reactivities bore this Id. Similar studies were performed in sera from normal and mercury-stimulated rats. The results indicate 1) a role for HgCl/sub 2/ in the stimulation of natural antibodies producing cells and 2) the existence of interspecies cross-reactive Id among mouse and rat natural antibodies.

  5. Differential sensitivity to LPS-induced myocardial dysfunction in the isolated brown Norway and Dahl S rat hearts: roles of mitochondrial function, NF-κB activation, and TNF-α production.

    PubMed

    An, Jianzhong; Du, Jianhai; Wei, Na; Guan, Tongju; Camara, Amadou K S; Shi, Yang

    2012-03-01

    Recently, we reported that Brown Norway (BN) rats were more resistant to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced myocardial dysfunction than Dahl S (SS) rats. This differential sensitivity was exemplified by reduced production of proinflammatory cytokines and diminished nuclear factor-κB pathway activation. To further clarify the mechanisms of different susceptibility of these two strains to endotoxin, this study was designed to examine the alterations of cardiac and mitochondrial bioenergetics, proinflammatory cytokines, and signaling pathways after hearts were isolated and exposed to LPS ex vivo. Isolated BN and SS hearts were perfused with LPS (4 μg/mL) for 30 min in the Langendorff preparation. Lipopolysaccharide depressed cardiac function as evident by reduced left ventricular developed pressure and decreased peak rate of contraction and relaxation in SS hearts but not in BN hearts. These findings are consistent with our previous in-vivo data. Under complex I substrates, a higher oxygen consumption and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production were observed in mitochondria from SS hearts than those from BN hearts. Lipopolysaccharide significantly increased H2O2 levels in both SS and BN heart mitochondria; however, the increase in oxygen consumption and H2O2 production in BN heart mitochondria was much lower than that in SS heart mitochondria. In addition, LPS significantly decreased complex I activity in SS hearts but not in BN hearts. Furthermore, LPS induced higher levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and increased phosphorylation of IκκB and p65 more in SS hearts than in BN hearts. Our results clearly demonstrate that less mitochondrial dysfunction combined with a reduced production of tumor necrosis factor-α and diminished activation of nuclear factor-κB are involved in the mechanisms by which isolated BN hearts were more resistant to LPS-induced myocardial dysfunction.

  6. Porphyrias in Norway.

    PubMed

    Mykletun, Mira; Aarsand, Aasne Karine; Støle, Egil; Villanger, Jørild Haugen; Tollånes, Mette Christophersen; Baravelli, Carl; Sandberg, Sverre

    2014-04-29

    Porphyria is an umbrella term for a group of largely hereditary diseases that are due to defective haem synthesis. The diseases have a varied and partly overlapping range of symptoms and presentations. The commonest forms of porphyria are porphyria cutanea tarda, acute intermittent porphyria and erythropoietic protoporphyria. The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of the prevalence and pathological manifestations of porphyrias in Norway. Information on all patients registered with the Norwegian Porphyria Centre (NAPOS) up to 2012 was used to estimate the prevalence and incidence of porphyrias in Norway. Figures on symptoms, precipitating factors and follow-up routines were obtained from the Norwegian Porphyria Registry, which includes 70% of Norwegians registered with NAPOS as having porphyria. The prevalence of porphyria cutanea tarda was approximately 10 : 100,000 and that of acute intermittent porphyria approximately 4 : 100,000. The total incidence of all porphyrias was approximately 0.5-1 : 100,000 per year. Diagnostic delay, i.e. the time passing between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis, varied from 1-17 years depending on the type of porphyria. There was wide variation in the frequency with which patients with the various types of porphyria went for medical check-ups. The prevalence of acute intermittent porphyria and porphyria cutanea tarda appears to be higher in Norway than in most other countries. Data from the Norwegian Porphyria Registry makes it possible to demonstrate differences in treatment and follow-up of porphyria patients and may be used to initiate necessary measures.

  7. Renal carriage of Leptospira species in rodents from Mediterranean Chile: The Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) as a relevant host in agricultural lands.

    PubMed

    Correa, Juana P; Bucarey, Sergio A; Cattan, Pedro E; Landaeta-Aqueveque, Carlos; Ramírez-Estrada, Juan

    2017-07-29

    We evaluated the renal carriage of Leptospira species in rodent communities from Mediterranean Chile using a PCR technique. We found that animals inhabiting agricultural areas were almost three times more infected than in wild areas (14.4% vs. 4.4%). The Norwegian rat (Rattus norvegicus), an invasive murid ubiquitous in the country, was the most infected species (38.1%). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of dextromethorphan in preventing cholecalciferol-induced poison shyness and sickness-induced anorexia in the laboratory Norway rat.

    PubMed

    Gould, Elaine M; Holmes, Selena J

    2008-02-01

    Overcoming bait and poison shyness is critical to the success of pest control operations against rats and other rodents. The authors hypothesized that the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blocker, dextromethorphan, could prevent the acquired memory of sickness and sickness-induced anorexia resulting from rodents eating poisoned bait. Cholecalciferol (1/4 LD(50)) was mixed with dextromethorphan and fed to rats on two 2 day sessions, with an 18 day break in between. Dextromethorphan did not prevent poison shyness; during the second poisoning period, both the cholecalciferol only and the cholecalciferol plus dextromethorphan groups had lower intakes of the bait compared with the control and dextromethorphan only groups. In addition to the previously recorded symptoms of cholecalciferol poisoning, the rats in this trial were observed to have nose bleeds, weepy eyes, laboured breathing and, in the case of the cholecalciferol only treated group, a period of decreased water intake followed by a period of increased water intake. There was also a period of increased water intake in the cholecalciferol plus dextromethorphan group. Dextromethorphan failed to prevent poison shyness and the anorectic effect of cholecalciferol. However, it did reduce anorexia from 17 days in the cholecaliferol group to 8 days in the cholecalciferol plus dextromethorphan group.

  9. Gold and d-penicillamine induce vasculitis and up-regulate mRNA for IL-4 in the Brown Norway rat: support for a role for Th2 cell activity

    PubMed Central

    QASIM, F J; THIRU, S; GILLESPIE, K

    1997-01-01

    d-penicillamine (DP) and gold salts which are used as immune-modulating agents in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis are known to be capable of causing autoimmune manifestations. Most autoimmune diseases in man are dominated by Th1-type responses, and one might presume that effective immunotherapy counteracts Th1 activity, perhaps by causing a shift to a Th2 response. The mechanism of action of gold and DP is not clear, but some clues may be obtained from their effects in animal models. DP, gold salts and mercuric chloride (HgCl2) are known to induce Th2-dominated autoimmune syndromes in genetically susceptible rodent strains, and we have demonstrated recently that HgCl2 up-regulates messenger RNA (mRNA) for IL-4 in the Brown Norway (BN) rat. In the BN rat HgCl2 treatment is also associated with the development of vasculitis, and anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO) antibodies are found in the serum. The present study examined and confirmed the hypothesis that, since gold and DP induce an autoimmune syndrome similar to HgCl2 in the BN rat, they may also induce vasculitis and an up-regulation in mRNA for IL-4. Tissue injury was assessed macroscopically and histologically on day 5 and day 15 after the start of injections with gold, DP or HgCl2, serum titres of IgE and presence of anti-MPO antibodies were determined using ELISA, and a semi-quantitative assay using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to assay the level of mRNA for IL-4 in spleen and caecum. The relative degree of tissue injury reflected the potency of induction of IgE by the three agents (HgCl2 being most potent and DP least potent). The lesions were identical histologically, supporting the premise that the vasculitis is a manifestation of the autoimmune syndrome rather than non-specific HgCl2 toxicity. Both gold and DP induced less up-regulation of mRNA for IL-4 than HgCl2. HgCl2 (but not gold or DP) induced anti-MPO antibodies. It would be interesting to examine patients treated with

  10. IR in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haakenaasen, Randi; Lovold, Stian

    2003-01-01

    Infrared technology in Norway started at the Norwegian Defense Research Establishment (FFI) in the 1960s, and has since then spread to universities, other research institutes and industry. FFI has a large, integrated IR activity that includes research and development in IR detectors, optics design, optical coatings, advanced dewar design, modelling/simulation of IR scenes, and image analysis. Part of the integrated activity is a laboratory for more basic research in materials science and semiconductor physics, in which thin films of CdHgTe are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and processed into IR detectors by various techniques. FFI also has a lot of experience in research and development of tunable infrared lasers for various applications. Norwegian industrial activities include production of infrared homing anti-ship missiles, laser rangefinders, various infrared gas sensors, hyperspectral cameras, and fiberoptic sensor systems for structural health monitoring and offshore oil well diagnostics.

  11. Selective induction of glutathione S-transferases in round spermatids from the Brown-Norway rat by the chemotherapeutic regimen for testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Delbès, Geraldine; Chan, Donovan; Hales, Barbara F; Trasler, Jacquetta M; Robaire, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    Chemotherapeutic drugs can affect DNA in male germ cells, thereby impacting on the integrity of the genome transmitted to offspring. Drug metabolizing enzymes can protect cells from xenobiotic insult. We analyzed the expression pattern of such enzymes in isolated round spermatids from rats exposed to drugs used to treat testicular cancer: bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP). The number of isozymes expressed and the overall relative expression values were highest for the glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). Moreover, BEP treatment significantly increased the expression of 8 GSTs and 3 aldehyde dehydrogenases. Increased expression of GST isozymes was confirmed by qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Although Gst genes can be targets for epigenetic modifications, promoter DNA methylation was not affected by BEP treatment. As GSTs are involved in drug resistance mechanisms, we hypothesize that BEP induction of GST expression may lead to the survival of damaged germ cells and the production of abnormal sperm.

  12. Differential effects of enalapril and losartan on body composition and indices of muscle quality in aged male Fischer 344 × Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Carter, Christy S; Giovannini, Silvia; Giovaninni, Silvia; Seo, Dong-Oh; DuPree, Jameson; Morgan, Drake; Chung, Hae Young; Lees, Hazel; Daniels, Michael; Hubbard, Gene B; Lee, Shuko; Ikeno, Yuji; Foster, Thomas C; Buford, Thomas W; Marzetti, Emanuele

    2011-06-01

    The primary purpose of the present set of studies was to provide a direct comparison of the effects of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor enalapril and the angiotensin receptor blocker losartan on body composition, physical performance, and muscle quality when administered late in life to aged rats. Overall, enalapril treatment consistently attenuated age-related increases in adiposity relative to both placebo and losartan. The maximal effect was achieved after 3 months of treatment (between 24 and 27 months of age), at a dose of 40 mg/kg and was observed in the absence of any changes in physical activity, body temperature, or food intake. In addition, the reduction in fat mass was not due to changes in pathology given that enalapril attenuated age-related increases in tumor development relative to placebo- and losartan-treated animals. Both enalapril and losartan attenuated age-related decreases in grip strength, suggesting that changes in body composition appear dissociated from improvements in physical function and may reflect a differential impact of enalapril and losartan on muscle quality. To link changes in adiposity to improvements in skeletal muscle quality, we performed gene array analyses to generate hypotheses regarding cell signaling pathways altered with enalapril treatment. Based on these results, our primary follow-up pathway was mitochondria-mediated apoptosis of myocytes. Relative to losartan- and placebo-treated rats, only enalapril decreased DNA fragmentation and caspase-dependent apoptotic signaling. These data suggest that attenuation of the severity of skeletal muscle apoptosis promoted by enalapril may represent a distinct mechanism through which this compound improves muscle strength/quality.

  13. Longyearbyen, Svalbard, Norway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Longyearbyen is the administrative center of Svalbard and is located on Spitsbergen, the largest island of the Svalbard archipelago, part of the Kingdom of Norway. It is the world's northernmost town with over 1000 people. The settlement was founded in 1906 by John Longyear, owner of the Arctic Coal Company. Until the early 1990s the coal mining industry was the major employer of Longyearbyen. Near Longyearbyen, the Global Crop Diversity Trust administers the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, an Arctic safe capable of storing millions of crop seeds as a safeguard against natural and human disasters. Last week, the first deposit of 250,000 different species of crop seeds was made into the repository. The perspective view was created by draping a simulated natural color image over an ASTER-derived digital elevation model.

    The image was acquired July 12, 2003, and is located at 78.2 degrees north latitude, 15.6 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  14. Use of Monte Carlo simulations with a realistic rat phantom for examining the correlation between hematopoietic system response and red marrow absorbed dose in Brown Norway rats undergoing radionuclide therapy with {sup 177}Lu- and {sup 90}Y-BR96 mAbs

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, Erik; Ljungberg, Michael; Martensson, Linda; Nilsson, Rune; Tennvall, Jan; Strand, Sven-Erik; Joensson, Bo-Anders

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Biokinetic and dosimetry studies in laboratory animals often precede clinical radionuclide therapies in humans. A reliable evaluation of therapeutic efficacy is essential and should be based on accurate dosimetry data from a realistic dosimetry model. The aim of this study was to develop an anatomically realistic dosimetry model for Brown Norway rats to calculate S factors for use in evaluating correlations between absorbed dose and biological effects in a preclinical therapy study. Methods: A realistic rat phantom (Roby) was used, which has some flexibility that allows for a redefinition of organ sizes. The phantom was modified to represent the anatomic geometry of a Brown Norway rat, which was used for Monte Carlo calculations of S factors. Kinetic data for radiolabeled BR96 monoclonal antibodies were used to calculate the absorbed dose. Biological data were gathered from an activity escalation study with {sup 90}Y- and {sup 177}Lu-labeled BR96 monoclonal antibodies, in which blood cell counts and bodyweight were examined up to 2 months follow-up after injection. Reductions in white blood cell and platelet counts and declines in bodyweight were quantified by four methods and compared to the calculated absorbed dose to the bone marrow or the total body. Results: A red marrow absorbed dose-dependent effect on hematological parameters was observed, which could be evaluated by a decrease in blood cell counts. The absorbed dose to the bone marrow, corresponding to the maximal tolerable activity that could safely be administered, was determined to 8.3 Gy for {sup 177}Lu and 12.5 Gy for {sup 90}Y. Conclusions: There was a clear correlation between the hematological effects, quantified with some of the studied parameters, and the calculated red marrow absorbed doses. The decline in body weight was stronger correlated to the total body absorbed dose, rather than the red marrow absorbed dose. Finally, when considering a constant activity concentration, the phantom

  15. 77 FR 58592 - Modified Norway Post Agreement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... Modified Norway Post Agreement AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission is noticing a recently-filed Postal Service request to include a modified Norway Post Agreement... existing bilateral agreement for inbound competitive services with Posten Norge AS (Modified Norway...

  16. Sex Education in Multicultural Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartz, Tiffany

    2007-01-01

    Scandinavia has long been admired by American liberals and sex education advocates who cite comparable rates of adolescent sexuality, yet lower rates of teenage pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases and abortion in Scandinavia. The United States has, however, two variables with which Scandinavia in general, and Norway in particular, has not…

  17. Sleipner mishap jolts booming Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-02

    This paper reports on Norway's buoyant offshore industry that was stunned when the concrete substructure for Sleipner natural gas field's main production platform sank in the Grandsfjord off Stavanger late last month. The accident, a blow to Norway's gas sales program in Europe, came with offshore activity in the Norwegian North Sea moving into a new boom period. Currently, 10 oil and gas fields are under development, and several projects are on the drawing board. Aker Oil and Gas, a leading offshore firm, says the country's construction industry will be working at capacity for the next 4 years. Norwegian oil production has been hovering just below 2 million b/d since the beginning of this year, making Norway the North Sea's largest producer, a position formerly held by the U.K. Gas production averages about 3 bcfd. With European gas demand sharply increasing, Norway is under pressure to increase output from new fields in the mid to late 1990s. The Sleipner setback forces state owned Den norske stats oljeselskap AS (Statoil) to cast around for supplies. Sleipner was to have begun deliveries to a consortium of continental gas companies in October 1993. Statoil believes it can fill the gap from existing fields in Norwegian waters.

  18. Sex Education in Multicultural Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartz, Tiffany

    2007-01-01

    Scandinavia has long been admired by American liberals and sex education advocates who cite comparable rates of adolescent sexuality, yet lower rates of teenage pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases and abortion in Scandinavia. The United States has, however, two variables with which Scandinavia in general, and Norway in particular, has not…

  19. Saltfjellet-Svartisen Park, Norway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Arctic Circle cuts through the western coast of Norway and the Saltfjellet-Svartisen National Park. This area features many glacial fjords, alpine mountain formations with glacier tongues, as well as gently sloping mountain plateaus and forested lowland valleys. The largest city here is Mo I Rana, (just off the image to the east) with a population of 25,000 (26th most populous city in Norway). Once supported entirely by the town's steel mill, the area has developed into a tourist center.

    The image covers an area of 51 x 57 km, was acquired on August 23, 2006, and is located near 66.6 degrees north latitude, 13 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  20. Saltfjellet-Svartisen Park, Norway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Arctic Circle cuts through the western coast of Norway and the Saltfjellet-Svartisen National Park. This area features many glacial fjords, alpine mountain formations with glacier tongues, as well as gently sloping mountain plateaus and forested lowland valleys. The largest city here is Mo I Rana, (just off the image to the east) with a population of 25,000 (26th most populous city in Norway). Once supported entirely by the town's steel mill, the area has developed into a tourist center.

    The image covers an area of 51 x 57 km, was acquired on August 23, 2006, and is located near 66.6 degrees north latitude, 13 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  1. Clinical cowpox cases in Norway.

    PubMed

    Tryland, M; Myrmel, H; Holtet, L; Haukenes, G; Traavik, T

    1998-01-01

    In 1994, a human and a feline case of cowpox virus infection appeared in the western part of Norway. Cowpox has not been diagnosed with certainty in Norway since the beginning of this century, when it was associated with the use of cowpox virus as a vaccine against smallpox. The human infection manifested as a spontaneously emerged, severe ulceration at the medial angle of the right eye in a 37-y-old woman, and developed into a relatively severe dermatitis. The ulcer healed slowly, leaving a scar. The feline infection was represented by a febrile, dehydrated and anorectic 6-months-old non-pedigree short-hair, with crater-like ulcers all over the body. After antibiotic and fluid therapy, revision of the skin lesions and amputation of a gangrenous toe, the cat recovered. Electron microscopy of the isolates and cultivation of virus on chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryos confirmed the suspicion of cowpox virus infection.

  2. History and range of Norway maple

    Treesearch

    David J. Nowak; Rowan A. Rowntree

    1990-01-01

    The Norway maple, Acer platanoldes, was introduced into the United States about 1756 after being cultivated in England since 1683. This species remained in relative obscurity in the U.S. until the mid- to late-1800's, but is now one of the most popular urban trees. In certain regions of the United States, Norway maples dominate street tree...

  3. Alternative Education and Home Schooling in Norway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Christian W.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the issue of balance between community rules and personal freedom as it relates to who should control the education of children in Norway. Reviews the historical development of alternative education in Norway, including the growth of private schools and home schooling. Comments on future educational needs and the provision of good…

  4. Severe human Babesia divergens infection in Norway.

    PubMed

    Mørch, K; Holmaas, G; Frolander, P S; Kristoffersen, E K

    2015-04-01

    Human babesiosis is a rare but potentially life-threatening parasitic disease transmitted by ixodid ticks, and has not previously been reported in Norway. We report a case of severe babesiosis that occurred in Norway in 2007. The patient had previously undergone a splenectomy. He was frequently exposed to tick bites in an area endemic for bovine babesiosis in the west of Norway. The patient presented with severe haemolysis and multiorgan failure. Giemsa-stained blood smears revealed 30% parasitaemia with Babesia spp. He was treated with quinine in combination with clindamycin, apheresis, and supportive treatment with ventilatory support and haemofiltration, and made a complete recovery. This is the first case reported in Norway; however Babesia divergens seroprevalence in cattle in Norway is high, as is the risk of Ixodes ricinus tick bite in the general population. Babesiosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained febrile haemolytic disease.

  5. Norway

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... to occasionally form a strong and dangerous whirlpool, the Maelstrom. It gained notoriety through numerous fictional tales, including "A Descent Into the Maelstrom" by the American author Edgar Allan Poe. Modern scientific studies of ...

  6. Regulation and competition without privatization: Norway`s experience

    SciTech Connect

    Moen, J.; Hamrin, J.

    1996-03-01

    The competitive market for the hydro-based Norwegian electricity system is working well, with end-user prices only slightly above the wholesale market. Pool prices are reflecting only weather-related variations, and no market power abuses are evident. The challenge now is to restructure ownership of the wires and retail suppliers to lower wheeling costs and avoid cross-subsidization. Since the Norwegian Energy Act came into effect in 1991, the electricity industry in Norway has operated as one of the most deregulated electricity industries in the world. The Energy Act introduced third party access to the retail market and competition in electricity production. The generation, sale and purchase of electricity is now highly competitive, with customers free to buy electricity from any generator, trader or the electricity Pool. Transmission pricing was separated from power purchasing arrangements, so that the buying and selling of electricity as a product is distinct from the transmission of electricity as a service. Transmission and distribution networks continue to maintain natural monopolies, with network owners providing wheeling service across their networks to customers who are connected to them. These monopoly sectors of the industry are subject to regulation by the government-appointed regulatory body, Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Administration (NVE). Regulation is on a cost-of-service basis, with the revenue allowance determined by NVE. The main force behind the Norwegian reform was the desire for efficiency gains to be achieved through a total restructure of the commercial character of the energy service industry (ESI). Unlike the U.K., in Norway the monopoly franchise for both generation and retail supply was removed in one step without any transition period, and the old pool was reformed to provide the needed structure for this new competitive energy market.

  7. Cremation in Norway: regulation, changes and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hadders, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In this article, I explore the development of modern cremation and cremation events in Norway. I focus on the multiple ontologies of cremation events and the relationships between the living mourners and the dead during the gradual transformation of the social person within Christian, secular as well as Hindu traditions in Norway. Within Christian tradition, this is a linear process that I intentionally contrast with the predominantly cyclical process within the Hindu tradition. I illustrate how various cosmological, eschatological, soteriological, economical, environmental, as well as socio-political factors regulate and shape the form and content of cremation events and disposal in Norway. PMID:24273434

  8. Cremation in Norway: regulation, changes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hadders, Hans

    2013-05-01

    In this article, I explore the development of modern cremation and cremation events in Norway. I focus on the multiple ontologies of cremation events and the relationships between the living mourners and the dead during the gradual transformation of the social person within Christian, secular as well as Hindu traditions in Norway. Within Christian tradition, this is a linear process that I intentionally contrast with the predominantly cyclical process within the Hindu tradition. I illustrate how various cosmological, eschatological, soteriological, economical, environmental, as well as socio-political factors regulate and shape the form and content of cremation events and disposal in Norway.

  9. Select fire perforating system application in Norway

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    Phillips Petroleum Co. Norway, used the special features of the Halliburton Selector Fire (HSF) System to perforate selected reservoir sections over very long intervals in horizontal wells in Greater Ekofisk Area fields in the Norwegian North Sea. Basic operations of the tool and three case history applications were presented at Offshore Europe `95 in Aberdeen by E. Kleepa and R. Nilson, Halliburton Norway (Inc.) and K. Bersaas, Phillips Petroleum Co. Norway, in paper SPE 30409 ``Tubing conveyed perforating in the Greater Ekofisk Area using the Halliburton Select Fire System.`` Highlights are summarized here.

  10. Interstrain Differences in the Development of Pyometra after Estrogen Treatment of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Brossia, Lisa Jane; Roberts, Christopher Sean; Lopez, Jennifer T; Bigsby, Robert M; Dynlacht, Joseph R

    2009-01-01

    This case report describes the unanticipated development of pyometra in Brown Norway rats after treatment with estrogen. Sprague Dawley and Brown Norway rats were ovariectomized and randomly assigned to treatment groups (subcutaneous implantation of either a capsule containing 20 mg 17β-estradiol or an empty capsule, as a control). After irradiation of only the right eye, the rats were followed for several months in an attempt to determine the effects of estrogen on radiation cataractogenesis and investigate potential strain differences in this phenomenon. However, all Brown Norway rats that received estradiol treatment developed pyometra, whereas none the Sprague Dawley or control Brown Norway rats did. This case demonstrates the potential adverse effects of exogenous estrogen therapy, which are strain-specific in the rat. Caution should be taken when designing estrogen-related experiments involving Brown Norway rats and other potentially sensitive strains. PMID:19807973

  11. Child injuries in Bergen, Norway.

    PubMed

    Brudvik, C

    2000-12-01

    We undertook a prospective collection of data on all children below the age of 16 presenting with a history of trauma to the Accident and Emergency Department and at Haukeland University Hospital in the city of Bergen, Norway, during 1998. Our study included 7.041 new injuries, giving an annual injury incidence of 9% for preschool children, and 13% for children aged 6 to 15. Boys were injured more often than girls, and they hurt themselves equally at all age groups. Girls, however, had the lowest incidence of injury at 4-6 years of age, and two peaks at 2 and at 10-12 years of age. In the youngest children there was a predominance of head injury (51%) while in school children upper extremity injury was the commonest (46%). Most of the younger children sustained their injuries at home, while older children were injured both at home and school. Sixty percent of all medically treated patients with injuries associated with roller blade, skateboard or snowboard activities sustained a fracture. These newer sports create a new injury pattern, but soccer and bicycle injuries still predominate. On comparing our data with previous studies performed a decade ago, we found a significant decline in bicycle injuries (p=0.019), but burns are still as common (p=0.35), which suggests a need to focus more on burns prevention.

  12. Glaciological investigation on Midtdalsbreen, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorteberg, H. K.

    2009-04-01

    Parameters as thermal regimes, velocity, snow variation and melting of the glacier have an impact on the moraine formation in the front of glaciers. The purpose of this exploration was to study how important the glaciological parameters is for the moraine formation in front of Midtdalsbreen in Norway (60˚ 33'N, 7˚ 25'E). To investigate the formation, glaciological parameter as temperature and velocity was surveyed. All investigation was accomplished in the ablation area, from the front and 500m inwards. Observations show that the moraine forms in the front was formed with transportation of sediments, wich are freezed under the base of the glacier sole. The transportation take places through the natural flow of the glaciers. Glacier velocity mesurments show that the velocity in the frontal part was approximately 7cm pr. day. Further inwards the velocity was approximately 12cm. Measurements of the thermal regime indicated that the glacier has a cold layer, approximately 15m tick, and had a beneath temperate layer. In the front, where the glacier thickness is lower than 15m thick, the glacier is cold-based. The further indicates that the sediments freeze to the glacier sole, where the glacier thickness is 15 meters or less.

  13. Environmental impact assessment in Estonia and Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Holm-Hansen, J.

    1997-11-01

    Authorities in Eastern European countries are looking for best available policy tools from the West, and policy instruments tailored for a Western context are being introduced massively in the former state socialist countries of Europe. This study examines some of the contextual factors that hamper the introduction of modern, Western tools of environmental management within previously state socialist countries. These are highlighted through a comparison of how environmental impact assessment (EIA) is put into practice in Estonia and Norway. Estonia and Norway belong to the same European Baltic-Nordic region, but the two countries have a dramatically different history for most of this century.

  14. 76 FR 166 - Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... COMMISSION Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... on fresh and chilled Atlantic salmon from Norway. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it... and chilled Atlantic salmon from Norway would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence...

  15. Stable ozone layer in Norway and USSR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, K.; Svenoe, T.; Terez, E. I.; Terez, G. A.; Roldugin, V.; Larsen, S. H. H.

    1994-01-01

    Long-term column ozone density measurements have been carried out in Norway and USSR. Data from Tromso and two meridional chains in USSR are analyzed, and most of the stations show that no significant decreasing trend in ozone has occurred during the last two decades.

  16. Geographical distribution of Phytophthora ramorum in Norway

    Treesearch

    María- Luz Herrero; Brita Toppe; Trond Rafoss

    2008-01-01

    In November 2002, Phytophthora ramorum was detected for the first time in Norway. It was isolated from Rhododendron catawbiense imported earlier the same year. After the first detection, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority has carried out surveys from 2003 to 2006. The surveys were first directed to nurseries and garden centres....

  17. Accreditation of occupational health services in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Bjørnstad, O.

    2015-01-01

    Background In 2010, an accreditation system for occupational health services (OHS) in Norway was implemented. Aims To examine OHS experiences of the accreditation system in Norway 4 years after its implementation. Methods A web-based questionnaire was sent to all accredited OHS asking about their experiences with the accreditation system. Responses were compared with a similar survey conducted in 2011. Results The response rate was 76% (173/228). OHS reported that the most common changes they had had to make to achieve accreditation were: improvement of their quality assurance system (53%), a plan for competence development (44%) and increased staffing in occupational hygiene (36%) and occupational medicine (28%). The OHS attributed improved quality in their own OHS (56%) and in OHS in Norway (47%), to the accreditation process. Conclusions The accreditation system was well accepted by OHS, who reported that it had improved the quality of their OHS and of OHS in Norway. The results are similar to the findings of a 2011 survey. PMID:26276757

  18. Vocational Education and Training in Norway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farstad, Halfdan

    This volume on Norway describes the country's initial and continuing vocational education and training (VET) system. Chapter 1 provides background information on political and administrative structures; population; and economy and labor force. Chapter 2 describes briefly the Norwegian education and training system. Chapter 3 describes the VET…

  19. Improved predictions of atmospheric icing in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engdahl, Bjørg Jenny; Nygaard, Bjørn Egil; Thompson, Gregory; Bengtsson, Lisa; Berntsen, Terje

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric icing of ground structures is a problem in cold climate locations such as Norway. During the 2013/2014 winter season two major power lines in southern Norway suffered severe damage due to ice loads exceeding their design values by two to three times. Better methods are needed to estimate the ice loads that affect various infrastructure, and better models are needed to improve the prediction of severe icing events. The Wind, Ice and Snow loads Impact on Infrastructure and the Natural Environment (WISLINE) project, was initiated to address this problem and to explore how a changing climate may affect the ice loads in Norway. Creating better forecasts of icing requires a proper simulation of supercooled liquid water (SLW). Preliminary results show that the operational numerical weather prediction model (HARMONIE-AROME) at MET-Norway generates considerably lower values of SLW as compared with the WRF model when run with the Thompson microphysics scheme. Therefore, we are piecewise implementing specific processes found in the Thompson scheme into the AROME model and testing the resulting impacts to prediction of SLW and structural icing. Both idealized and real icing cases are carried out to test the newly modified AROME microphysics scheme. Besides conventional observations, a unique set of specialized instrumentation for icing measurements are used for validation. Initial results of this investigation will be presented at the conference.

  20. Innovation in Education--Norway. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalin, Per

    One in a series of five descriptive case studies dealing with innovation, this study on Norway elucidates the functions of the National Council for Innovation in Education (NCIE), an advisory council which was formed to regulate experimentation and reform in the entire Norwegian school system. With major emphasis on democratization, the objectives…

  1. Diphtheria outbreak in Norway: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Inge; Wallace, Sean; Mengshoel, Anne Torunn; Høiby, E Arne; Brandtzæg, Petter

    2011-12-01

    We describe an outbreak of diphtheria in Norway that occurred in 2008 and affected 3 unvaccinated family members. The epidemic caught the public health system off-guard on most levels; the diagnosis was distrusted due to its rarity, no diphtheria anti-toxin was available, and notification procedures were not rigorously followed.

  2. VHF radar measurements over Andoya (Northern Norway)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czechowsky, P.; Reid, I. M.; Ruester, R.; Schmidt, G.

    1989-01-01

    The Mobile SOUSY Radar was operated during the MAP/WINE, the MAC/SINE, and MAC/Epsilon campaigns at Andoya in Northern Norway. A comparison between summer and winter results is presented, in particular the generation and development of the scattering regions, the different power spectral densities and the aspect sensitivities which were derived from six different beam directions.

  3. Genetic characterization of salmonid alphavirus in Norway.

    PubMed

    Hjortaas, M J; Jensen, B Bang; Taksdal, T; Olsen, A B; Lillehaug, A; Trettenes, E; Sindre, H

    2016-02-01

    Pancreas disease (PD), caused by salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 (SAV3), emerged in Norwegian aquaculture in the 1980s and is now endemic along the south-western coast. In 2011, the first cases of PD caused by marine salmonid alphavirus subtype 2 (SAV2) were reported. This subtype has spread rapidly among the fish farms outside the PD-endemic zone and is responsible for disease outbreaks at an increasing numbers of sites. To describe the geographical distribution of salmonid alphavirus (SAV), and to assess the time and site of introduction of marine SAV2 to Norway, an extensive genetic characterization including more than 200 SAV-positive samples from 157 Norwegian marine production sites collected from May 2007 to December 2012 was executed. The first samples positive for marine SAV2 originated from Romsdal, in June 2010. Sequence analysis of the E2 gene revealed that all marine SAV2 included in this study were nearly identical, suggesting a single introduction into Norwegian aquaculture. Further, this study provides evidence of a separate geographical distribution of two subtypes in Norway. SAV3 is present in south-western Norway, and marine SAV2 circulates in north-western and Mid-Norway, a geographical area which since 2010 constitutes the endemic zone for marine SAV2.

  4. Measurement of acid precipitation in Norway

    Treesearch

    Arne Semb

    1976-01-01

    Since January 1972, chemical analysis of daily precipitation samples from about 20 background stations in Norway has been carried out on a routine basis. Air monitoring is carried out at six stations. The chemical analysis programme is: sulphate, pH and acidity in precipitation, sulphates and sulphur dioxide in air. In addition, more detailed chemical analysis of...

  5. Ataxia with Vitamin E Deficiency in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Elkamil, Areej; Johansen, Krisztina K.; Aasly, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED) is a rare autosomal recessive neurological disorder which usually starts in childhood. The clinical presentation is very similar to Friedreich ataxia, most patients have progressive truncal and extremity ataxia, areflexia, positive Babinski sign, dysarthria and sensory neuropathy. Methods We made an inquiry to our colleagues in Norway, we included information from a prevalence study published southern Norway and added data from our own known case. Results A newly published prevalence study of hereditary ataxias (total of 171 subjects) found only one subject with AVED in Southeast Norway. We describe two more patients, one from the Central part and one from the Northern part of Norway. All 3 cases had age of onset in early childhood (age of 4–5 years) and all experienced gait ataxia and dysarthria. The genetic testing confirmed that they had pathogenic mutations in the α-tocopherol transfer protein gene (TTPA). All were carriers of the non-sense c.400C > T mutation, one was homozygous for that mutation and the others were compound heterozygous, either with c.358G > A or c.513_514insTT. The homozygous carrier was by far the most severely affected case. Conclusions We estimate the occurrence of AVED in Norway to be at least 0.6 per million inhabitants. We emphasize that all patients who develop ataxia in childhood should be routinely tested for AVED to make an early diagnosis for initiating treatment with high dose vitamin E to avoid severe neurological deficits. PMID:25614784

  6. National Report Norway: Arctic Access to Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekke, P.

    2015-09-01

    Norway has long traditions as a space nation, much due to our northern latitude. Our space science activities are concentrated into relatively few areas. This concentration is necessary due to limited resources, both in funding and personnel. The main scientific activities are within Solar-terrestrial physics and cosmology. The first field has been a priority since before the space age and is still the major priority. The usage of the ground infrastructure in Northern Norway and on Svalbard is essential in studying the middle and upper atmosphere and the interaction with the Sun. This includes the utilization of sounding rockets, both small and large, and ground based installations like radars, lidars and other optical instrumentation. The planned use of Svalbard as a launch site for large stratospheric balloons may allow the cosmology community access to our northern infrastructure. The solar physics community is also heavily involved in the HINODE and IRIS missions and Norway is supporting downlink of data via the Svalbard Station for these missions. The sounding rocket program is in close collaboration with many countries like Germany, USA, France, Canada and Japan. Two scientific sounding rocket programs are currently being pursued: The ICI series (from Svalbard) and MaxiDusty (from Andoya). A series of scientific publications have recently appeared from the ECOMA campaign a few years ago. A significant improvement of today's polar and ionospheric research infrastructure in Northern Norway and Svalbard has recently been put on the ESFRI roadmap for European research infrastructure through the 5105 and EISCAT 3D initiatives. The Norwegian government has recently decided to upgrade the VLBI facilities at Svalbard.

  7. Nacap installs Norway's first land lines

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-08-01

    Norway's first gas pipeline on land - forming a part of the Statpipe gas gathering, transportation, and treatment system - is currently being installed by Nacap BV under extremely unusual conditions, both in terms of terrain to be crossed and safety standards to be adhered to. Nacap is constructing the 12 mile long twin pipeline of 30 in. and 28 in. diameters, two-thirds of which run under three deep fjords. Special construction techniques used for installing the pipeline are described.

  8. Fern rhizomes as fodder in Norway.

    PubMed

    Alm, Torbjørn

    2016-09-06

    Although ferns are often known under collective names in Norway, e.g. blom, a substantial number of vernacular names for individual fern species are known, in particular for useful or poisonous taxa. In the past, the rhizomes (Norwegian: moldfôr) of selected species were collected for fodder. Only scattered records of such use are available from southern Norway, and the tradition's core area is found in the two North Norwegian counties of Nordland and Troms, in accordance with the longer winters encountered in the north, frequently leading to fodder shortage in early spring. The tradition extends northeastwards into Finnmark, but is less well documented there. Although numerous sources mention the use of fern rhizomes for fodder, the fern species hiding behind the tradition are incompletely known. This paper aims at reviewing available data in terms of identifyng the species used for fodder, the history and geographical distribution of such use, and other relevant traditions, e.g. the timing and mode of collection, and the way the rhizomes were used. The study is based on data extracted from a variety of archival and literature sources; the latter retrived from my database of more than 7500 publications providing information on plant names and plant uses in Norway. More than 200 individual records mention the use of fern rhizomes for fodder in Norway. Only a fraction of these, typically made by botanist recording data on plant uses, provides information on the identity of the species used. Based on these, Dryopteris filix-mas and Matteuccia struthiopteris stand out as the most important species serving as sources of fern rhizomes for fodder. Locally, Dryopteris expansa was the preferred species, and this taxon may to some extent be overlooked in the records so far available. With a few exceptions, Norwegian folk tradition singles out Athyrium filix-femina as a harmful and poisonous species, causing livestock to go blind and lame, but whether this is true or not

  9. Norway's ICT Accessibility Legislation, Methods and Indicators.

    PubMed

    Rygg, Malin; Rømen, Dagfinn; Sterri, Brynhild Runa

    2016-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the Norwegian legislation on Universal Design of information and communication technology (ICT) and how the Norwegian Authority for Universal Design of ICT works to enforce and achieve the goals behind the legislation. The Authority uses indicators to check websites for compliance with the regulations. This paper describes the rationale and intended use for the indicators and how they are used for both supervision and benchmarks as well as a way of gathering data to give an overview of the current state of Universal Design of websites in Norway.

  10. Daylight and absenteeism--evidence from Norway.

    PubMed

    Markussen, Simen; Røed, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Based on administrative register data from Norway, we examine the impact of hours of daylight on sick-leave absences among workers. Our preferred estimates imply that an additional hour of daylight increases the daily entry rate to absenteeism by 0.5 percent and the corresponding recovery rate by 0.8 percent, ceteris paribus. The overall relationship between absenteeism and daylight hours is negative. Absenteeism is also sensitive to weather conditions. Heavy snowfall raises the incidence of absence during the winter, while warm weather reduces the probability of returning to work during the summer.

  11. Epidemiology of hip fractures in Norway.

    PubMed

    Falch, J A; Ilebekk, A; Slungaard, U

    1985-02-01

    During the 2-year period 1978-1979, a total of 2109 hip fractures (of the proximal end of the femur) occurred in Oslo. The age- and sex-specific annual incidence was the highest ever reported. A previous hip fracture had occurred in 13 per cent of the women and 6.8 per cent of the men. In 1979, a total of 5920 hip fractures was reported in Norway. Compared with Oslo, all other counties had a lower incidence. The number of fractures in Oslo was five times greater in 1982 compared with 1950. This increase cannot be explained only by the increasing number of elderly persons.

  12. Spatial distribution of precipitation extremes in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verpe Dyrrdal, Anita; Skaugen, Thomas; Lenkoski, Alex; Thorarinsdottir, Thordis; Stordal, Frode; Førland, Eirik J.

    2015-04-01

    Estimates of extreme precipitation, in terms of return levels, are crucial in planning and design of important infrastructure. Through two separate studies, we have examined the levels and spatial distribution of daily extreme precipitation over catchments in Norway, and hourly extreme precipitation in a point. The analyses were carried out through the development of two new methods for estimating extreme precipitation in Norway. For daily precipitation we fit the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution to areal time series from a gridded dataset, consisting of daily precipitation during the period 1957-today with a resolution of 1x1 km². This grid-based method is more objective and less manual and time-consuming compared to the existing method at MET Norway. In addition, estimates in ungauged catchments are easier to obtain, and the GEV approach includes a measure of uncertainty, which is a requirement in climate studies today. Further, we go into depth on the debated GEV shape parameter, which plays an important role for longer return periods. We show that it varies according to dominating precipitation types, having positive values in the southeast and negative values in the southwest. We also find indications that the degree of orographic enhancement might affect the shape parameter. For hourly precipitation, we estimate return levels on a 1x1 km² grid, by linking GEV distributions with latent Gaussian fields in a Bayesian hierarchical model (BHM). Generalized linear models on the GEV parameters, estimated from observations, are able to incorporate location-specific geographic and meteorological information and thereby accommodate these effects on extreme precipitation. Gaussian fields capture additional unexplained spatial heterogeneity and overcome the sparse grid on which observations are collected, while a Bayesian model averaging component directly assesses model uncertainty. We find that mean summer precipitation, mean summer temperature, latitude

  13. 77 FR 10772 - Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... COMMISSION Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway Determination On the basis of the record \\1... countervailing duty order and antidumping duty order on fresh and chilled Atlantic salmon from Norway would not... are contained in USITC Publication 4303 (February 2012), entitled Fresh and Chilled Atlantic...

  14. A Report on the HEAD-Ache in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjeldvoll, Arild; Welle-Strand, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The article examines different understandings of school leadership in Norway by reporting the findings of a HEAD Project (2004-8). The article discusses how school leadership training in Norway has responded to the government's educational policy aims and strategies in the context of globalization. using the concept of "education value…

  15. Secondary Education in Norway. Bulletin, 1930, No. 17

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loftfield, Gabriel E.

    1930-01-01

    The main purposes of this study are: (1) to assemble and report the facts about secondary education in Norway, and (2) to interpret to some extent the educational philosophy of that country. A minor purpose is to furnish the data that will help place properly in the schools of the United States any young people from Norway who may come here to…

  16. Consumptive orientation of anglers in Engerdal, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aas, Østein; Kaltenborn, Bjørn Petter

    1995-09-01

    In a study of consumptiveness among Swedish and Norwegian anglers in Engerdal, eastern Norway, three segments of low-, mid-, and high-consumptive anglers were identified by replicating a methodology of an earlier study of North American anglers. The Engerdal anglers were somewhat more catch-oriented than the North American anglers. Anglers in Norway fish to satisfy a complex set of experience preferences. Low-consumptive anglers rate nature experiences higher than mid- and high-consumptive anglers. High-consumptive anglers have a somewhat narrower range of experience preferences and are more oriented towards competitive aspects of fishing. All anglers generally support management efforts directed toward restricting other types of use of the waters, such as reducing pollution and reducing local fishermen's leisure gill-net fishing. They also support stocking of fish, but oppose actions restricting angling. However, low-consumptive anglers do not oppose angling restrictions to the same degree as mid- and high-consumptive groups. Low-consumptive fishermen show a higher degree of specialization and report higher overall satisfaction with their fishing trips than the other two groups.

  17. Evaluation of seasonal ensemble forecasts in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tore Sinnes, Svein; Engeland, Kolbjørn; Langsholt, Elin; Roar Sælthun, Nils

    2017-04-01

    Throughout the winter and spring season, seasonal forecasts are used by the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE) in order to assess the probability for sever floods or for low seasonal runoff volumes. The latter is especially important for hydropower production. The seasonal forecasts are generated by a set of 145 lumped, elevation distributed HBV models distributed all over Norway. The observed weather is used to establish the initial snow cover, soil moisture and groundwater levels in the HBV model. Subsequently, scenarios are created by using time series of observed weather the previous 50 years, creating a total of 50 ensembles. The predictability of this seasonal forecasting system depends therefore on the importance of the initial conditions, and in Norway the seasonal snow cover is especially important. The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of the seasonal forecasts of flood peaks and seasonal runoff volumes and especially to evaluate of the predictability depends on (i) catchment climatology and (ii) issue dates and lead times. For achieving these aims, evaluation criterions assessing reliability and sharpness were used. The results shows that the predictability is the highest for catchments where the spring runoff is dominated by snow melt. The predictability is the highest for the shortest lead times (up to 1 months ahead).The predictive performance is higher for runoff volumes than for the flood peaks.

  18. Playing with LISEM: Experiences from Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greipsland, Inga; Krzeminska, Dominika

    2017-04-01

    Reducing soil loss from agricultural land is an important environmental challenge that is of relevance for both the European Soil Thematic Strategy (EC 2002) and the Water Framework Directive (EC 2000). Agricultural land in Norway is scarce, covering only around 3% of the total land area (The World Bank, 2015), which puts stress on preserving soil quality for food production. Additionally, reducing sediment loss is a national priority because of associated transport of pollutants such as phosphorous, which can cause eutrophication in nearby waterbodies. It is necessary to find tools that can estimate the effect of different scenarios on erosion processes on agricultural areas. We would like to present the challenges experienced and the results obtained by using LISEM (Limburg Soil Erosion Model) on the plot- subcatchment- and catchment scale in southeastern Norway. The agricultural catchment has been the subject of long-term monitoring of water quality. Challenges included spatial upscaling of local calibration, calibration on areas with very low soil loss rates and equifinality. In this poster, we want to facilitate a discussion about the possibilities of and limitations to the model for predicting hydrological and soil erosion processes at different scales.

  19. [Medical publishing in Norway 1905-2005].

    PubMed

    Nylenna, Magne; Larsen, Øivind

    2005-06-02

    The nation-building process in Norway took mainly place before the Norwegian-Swedish union came to a close in 1905. This was not a dramatic change, though the end of the union did bring a lift to Norwegian national consciousness. In 1905 there were three general medical journals in Norway and approximately 1200 doctors. German was the most important language of international science, but most scientific publishing was done in Norwegian. After the Second World War, English became the dominating language of scientific communication. Twentieth-century medicine and medical publishing was an era of specialisation and internationalisation. Norwegian medicine has to a large extent been internationalised through Nordic cooperation, with the Nordic specialist journals being of particular importance. With increasing professionalism in research, international English-language journals have become the major channels of communication, though several Norwegian-language journals (on paper or on the internet) have been established and are of crucial importance to a national identity within medical specialties. In 2005 there is only one general medical journal in Norwegian, in a country with approximately 20,000 doctors. A national identity related to medical publishing is not given much attention, though national medicine is still closely tied in with national culture. Good clinical practice should be based on a firm knowledge of local society and local tradition. This is a challenge in contemporary medical publishing.

  20. Total OH reactivity emissions from Norway spruce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, Anke; Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios; Bonn, Boris; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Lelieveld, Jos; Williams, Jonathan

    2013-04-01

    Forest emissions represent a strong potential sink for the main tropospheric oxidant, the hydroxyl radical (OH). In forested environments, the comparison of the directly determined overall sink of OH radicals, the total OH reactivity, and the individually measured OH sink compounds often exposes a significant gap. This "missing" OH reactivity can be high and influenced by both direct biogenic emissions and secondary photo-oxidation products. To investigate the source of the missing OH sinks in forests, total OH reactivity emission rates were determined for the first time from a Norway spruce (Picea abies) throughout spring, summer and autumn 2011. The total OH reactivity was measured inside a branch enclosure using the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) with a Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) as the detector. In parallel, separate volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission rates were monitored by a second PTR-MS, including the signal of isoprene, acetaldehyde, total monoterpenes and total sesquiterpenes. The comparison of known and PTR-MS detected OH sink compounds and the directly measured total OH reactivity emitted from Norway spruce revealed unmeasured and possibly unknown primary biogenic emissions. These were found to be highest in late summer during daytime coincident with highest temperatures and ozone levels.

  1. Adult Education and Indigenous Peoples in Norway. International Survey on Adult Education for Indigenous Peoples. Country Study: Norway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Svein

    Adult education for indigenous peoples in Norway was examined. First, information on government institutions, indigenous organizations, international agencies, and nongovernmental organizations engaged in adult education for Norway's indigenous peoples was compiled. Next, questionnaires and survey techniques were used to research the policy and…

  2. AGING-RELATED CARBARYL EFFECTS IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid increase in older adults in the population highlights the importance ofunderstanding the role of aging in susceptibility to environmental contaminants. Aspart of a larger research program on life-stage susceptibility, this experiment determined the effect of the carbama...

  3. AGING-RELATED CARBARYL EFFECTS IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid increase in older adults in the population highlights the importance ofunderstanding the role of aging in susceptibility to environmental contaminants. Aspart of a larger research program on life-stage susceptibility, this experiment determined the effect of the carbama...

  4. AN OBSERVATIONAL ASSESSMENT OF AGING IN BROWN NORWAY RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The growth of the aging population highlights the need for laboratory animal models that can be used to (1) efficiently monitor the health ofaging research colonies, and (2) aid in unraveling the mechanisms ofsusceptibility to toxic chemicals and disease. An observational assessm...

  5. SERUM BIOMARKERS OF AGING IN THE BROWN NORWAY RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Serum biomarkers to identify susceptibility to disease in aged humans are well researched. On the other hand, our understanding of biomarkers in animal models of aging is limited. Hence, we applied a commercially available panel of 58 serum analytes to screen for possible biomark...

  6. SERUM BIOMARKERS OF AGING IN THE BROWN NORWAY RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Serum biomarkers to identify susceptibility to disease in aged humans are well researched. On the other hand, our understanding of biomarkers in animal models of aging is limited. Hence, we applied a commercially available panel of 58 serum analytes to screen for possible biomark...

  7. AN OBSERVATIONAL ASSESSMENT OF AGING IN BROWN NORWAY RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The growth of the aging population highlights the need for laboratory animal models that can be used to (1) efficiently monitor the health ofaging research colonies, and (2) aid in unraveling the mechanisms ofsusceptibility to toxic chemicals and disease. An observational assessm...

  8. Towards operational permafrost modeling for Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westermann, S.; Lilleøren, K. S.; Schuler, T. V.; Gisnâs, K.; Etzelmüller, B.

    2012-04-01

    In the course of the 21st century, thawing of permafrost is expected to occur in large areas as a consequence of climate change, which could trigger a number of climatic feedback mechanisms on the local to global scale. As the vast and remote permafrost areas cannot be sufficiently covered by ground-based monitoring of soil temperatures in boreholes alone, it is desirable to exploit the wealth of multi-sensor-multi-source data to assess the thermal ground conditions on large scales. In Norway, permafrost conditions range from mountain permafrost over organic-rich wetlands to high-arctic permafrost in Svalbard. Furthermore, the availability of gridded data sets from various sources makes it a well-suited test region to evaluate the performance of soil thermal models run with different input data, which facilitates comparing and benchmarking requirements on data quality. Soil temperatures can be modeled using Fourier's law of heat conduction, so that the key challenge is to supply accurate time series of three key input variables at suitable spatial and temporal resolutions: 1. land surface temperature, 2. snow depth, and 3. soil and snow thermal properties. We developed a framework for transient and distributed modeling the ground thermal regime in Norway, CryoGRID 2.0. In the model, the subsurface heat flow is treated in terms of 1D heat conduction using the land or snow surface temperature as upper boundary condition. The model features a dynamical representation of the snow cover and explicitly accounts for the heat flux through the snow pack. The spatio-temporal distribution of ground temperatures is calculated for a spatial resolution of 1 km for mainland Norway. The model is driven by operationally gridded data of daily air temperature and snow depth available at http://senorge.no. These datasets are available for the period 1957 to date having a spatial resolution of 1 km2. Spatial distributions of the ground thermal properties (e.g. heat conductivity

  9. Incidence of hip fracture in southeastern Norway

    PubMed Central

    Reikerås, O.

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of hip fracture has been studied extensively, but there is still some doubt whether the age-specific incidence is increasing. The proportion of trochanteric fractures has varied and has also been said to be increasing. We studied data on 1,730 prospectively registered cases from 1998–2003 and computed age- and gender-specific incidence rates for intracapsular and trochanteric fractures. The incidence of hip fracture for women over 50 years was 1,263 and for men 452 per 100,000. The proportion of trochanteric fractures was 38% for women and 41% for men. There was no significant difference in the proportion of trochanteric fractures either between or within the genders, and the proportion did not exceed 50% in any age group. These findings confirm the high incidence of hip fracture in Norway but do not indicate any increase. The proportion of trochanteric fractures also seems to be stable. PMID:17033761

  10. Diabetes: cost of illness in Norway

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus places a considerable burden on patients in terms of morbidity and mortality and on society in terms of costs. Costs related to diabetes are expected to increase due to increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to estimate the health care costs attributable to type 1 and type 2 diabetes in Norway in 2005. Methods Data on inpatient hospital services, outpatient clinic visits, physician services, drugs, medical equipment, nutrition guidance, physiotherapy, acupuncture, foot therapy and indirect costs were collected from national registers and responses to a survey of 584 patients with diabetes. The study was performed with a prevalence approach. Uncertainty was explored by means of bootstrapping. Results When hospital stays with diabetes as a secondary diagnosis were excluded, the total costs were €293 million, which represents about 1.4% of the total health care expenditure. Pharmaceuticals accounted for €95 million (32%), disability pensions €48 million (16%), medical devices €40 million (14%) and hospital admissions €21 million (7%). Patient expenditures for acupuncture, physiotherapy and foot therapy were many times higher than expenditure for nutritional guidance. Indirect costs (lost production from job absenteeism) accounted for €70.1 million (24% of the €293 million) and included sick leave (€16.7 million), disability support and disability pensions (€48.2 million) and other indirect costs (€5.3 million). If all diabetes related hospital stays are included (primary- and secondary diagnosis) total costs amounts to €535 million, about 2.6% of the total health care expenditure in Norway. Conclusions Diabetes represents a considerable burden to society in terms of health care costs and productivity losses. PMID:20854689

  11. Drugged drivers in Norway with benzodiazepine detections.

    PubMed

    Skurtveit, Svetlana; Abotnes, Bjørg; Christophersen, Asbjørg S

    2002-01-24

    Norwegian drugged drivers with benzodiazepine (BZD) detections have been studied with regard to drug use pattern and rearrest rate. During 1995, 3343 drivers were apprehended by the police in Norway due to the suspicion of influence by drugs. Blood samples from all drivers were sent to the National Institute of Forensic Toxicology (NIFT). The samples were analysed using a standard program covering the most commonly abused drugs on the marked in Norway. BZDs, representing some of the most frequently detected drugs, were found in approximately 30% (n = 1051) of the cases, represented by 14% (n = 150) female and 86% (n = 901) male drivers. In 8% of the cases, one BZD only was detected, half of these cases with one BZD could reflect therapeutic use. One or more BZDs were combined with illegal drug(s) (73%), other prescribed drugs (10%), and/or alcohol (24%). 62% of the drivers with BZD detections, had earlier been arrested for the same offence, or six cases per rearrested driver. The frequency of earlier arrests were lower for female (34%) than for male (67%) drivers. Alcohol was most frequently found for those arrested for the first time before 1992, while BZD or illegal drugs were most frequently found for those with their first arrest during 1992-1995. Our study shows that apprehended drivers using BZD are mainly represented by drug abusers due to frequent multi-drug use, blood concentrations representing doses above therapeutic levels and high rearrest rate for the same offence. A treatment program or other reactions, are thus necessary in addition to fines, prison penalty and suspension of driving licence.

  12. World's first concrete TLP takes shape off Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-15

    The world's first concrete tension leg platform (TLP) is being assembled offshore Norway for development of Heidrun field by Conoco Norway Inc. to meet a target for first oil production on Aug. 1, 1995. Development of Heidrun fields is in many ways a frontier project. It lies in 350 m of water in the Norwegian Sea off central Norway and is the most northerly development in Norwegian waters. It sees introduction of the concrete floater and the use of titanium drilling risers. It is the first development offshore Norway to utilize off loading of produced oil directly into shuttle tankers without storage. Installation methods for Heidrun's topsides and foundations were designed to avoid the requirement for heavy lift vessels. And concrete was used for the first time to make module support beams in the TLP hull. The paper describes the exploration history of the field, TLP details, marine operations at Heidrun, and contracts.

  13. Denmark-Norway, 1761-1769: Two Missed Opportunities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspaas, Per Pippin

    2013-05-01

    Despite a promising start in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Denmark-Norway was not a Great Power of Astronomy any longer when the eighteenth-century transits of Venus occurred. Official activity relating to the transit of 1761 was very limited; in this respect, Denmark-Norway was completely overshadowed by Sweden and Russia. In 1769 steps were taken to invite an astronomer of international reputation, the Jesuit Father Maximilianus Hell. He arrived in 1768 and left the country two years later, having published an elaborate report in the name of the King Christian VII. Although Hell's observations from Vardoehus were successful, Denmark-Norway failed to re-establish itself as a country capable of delivering noteworthy contributions to the European community of astronomers. Sweden and Russia displayed a higher level of activity, both quantitatively and qualitatively, making the impression of Denmark-Norway's lagging behind even stronger.

  14. Forcible Entry and the German Invasion of Norway, 1940

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    1James Butler, Grand Strategy Vol. II (London: Her Majesty’s Stationary Office, 1957), 144-145. 2Thomas K . Derry, The...York: Robert M. McBride and Company, 1943), 69-70. 11Gennette, 35. 12Thomas K . Derry, The Campaign in Norway (London: Her Majesty’s Stationary Office...Luftwaffe in the Campaign in Norway (Military Study B-485. Historical Division, US Army European Command, August 1946), 3. 5Thomas K . Derry, The Campaign

  15. Water footprint of hydro power in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engeland, Kolbjørn; Tallaksen, Lena; Haakon Bakken, Tor; Killingtveit, Ånund

    2015-04-01

    The IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy (IPCC, 2012) assesses the potential for renewable energy sources to replace fossil-based fuels and benchmarks the technologies with respect to a set of criteria, including their water footprint measured as m3/MWh. While most of the renewable technologies show a typical range of 1-5 m3/MWh, the very sparse data on hydropower range from a minimum of 0.04 to a maximum of 209 m3/MWh. More recent studies on water footprint from hydropower indicate that the water consumption rates could go even far beyond the numbers published by IPCC (2012). The methodological approach behind these numbers are, however, criticized as it appears over-simplistic and several issues need to be defined and clarified in order to present the 'true picture' of the water footprint of hydropower. Despite this, the rather high numbers for hydropower may imply a reputational risk for the sector and also be a direct investment risk in new projects if hydropower is considered a "large-scale water consumer". Estimation of water footprint has two important components (i) definition of water footprint (including system boundaries), and (ii) estimation of evaporation, which is assumed to constitute the main water loss from hydropower. Here we will mainly address the second topic and have chosen to use a water footprint definition based on net evapotranspiration from reservoirs. Thus, we need estimates of evapotranspiration from the land surface prior to inundation and the evaporation from the reservoir after it has been filled up. The primary objective of the study is to estimate water footprint of hydropower in Norway and in particular to answer the following questions: (i) How does different environmental variables influence water footprint estimation in Norway?, and in particular (ii) What is the total/specific water footprint from Norwegian hydropower production? To answer these questions we tested how environmental variables like climate and vegetation

  16. Aging effects on oxidative phosphorylation in rat adrenocortical mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Solinas, Paola; Fujioka, Hisashi; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Tandler, Bernard; Hoppel, Charles L

    2014-06-01

    Does aging in itself lead to alteration in adrenocortical mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation? Mitochondria from Fischer 344 (F344) rats (6 and 24 months old), Brown Norway rats (6 and 32 months old) and F344-Brown Norway hybrid rats (6 and 30 months old) were compared. Mitochondria were isolated from extirpated adrenal cortex. The yields of mitochondria were quantitatively similar in all rat strains irrespective of age. In order to assess the activity of each mitochondrial complex, several different substrates were tested and the rate of oxidative phosphorylation measured. Aging does not affect mitochondrial activity except in the F344 rat adrenal cortex where the maximal ADP-stimulated oxidative phosphorylation decreased with age. We hypothesize that impaired synthesis of steroid hormones by the adrenal cortex with age in F344 rats might be due to decreased adrenocortical mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. We conclude that aging results in adrenocortical mitochondria effects that are non-uniform across different rat strains.

  17. Fog chemistry at three sites in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youliang; Zhang, Jinwei; Marcotte, Aurelie R.; Karl, Matthias; Dye, Christian; Herckes, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Fog composition was investigated at three sites in Norway, one in suburban Oslo and two coastal sites in the area of the Mongstad refinery. Overall fog frequency during the study periods was low. Fog pH was around 5 with slightly lower values at Hakadal, the suburban site, compared to the coastal sites, which were slightly above 5. Major ions at the coastal sites were sodium and chloride consistent with the marine environment. The ion chemistry at the suburban site was dominated by ammonium, sulfate and nitrate, consistent with fogs in anthropogenically impacted environments. Overall concentrations of major ions were very low, orders of magnitude lower than those in polluted urban fogs. Organic matter concentrations were also low (< 3 mgC/L) consistent with limited anthropogenic impact and little biogenic activity in the winter months. Selected amine concentrations were determined and ranged from nanomolar concentrations for ethylamines to several hundred nanomolar concentrations for dimethylamine, the most abundant amine investigated. While N-nitrosodimehylamine was detected in fog, the concentrations were very low in the fogs.

  18. An aircraft noise study in Norway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gjestland, Truls T.; Liasjo, Kare H.; Bohn, Hans Einar

    1990-01-01

    An extensive study of aircraft noise is currently being conducted in Oslo, Norway. The traffic at Oslo Airport Fornebu that includes both national and international flights, totals approximately 350 movements per day: 250 of these are regular scheduled flights with intermediate and large size aircraft, the bulk being DC9 and Boeing 737. The total traffic during the summer of 1989 was expected to resemble the maximum level to which the regular traffic will increase before the new airport can be put into operation. The situation therefore represented a possibility to study the noise impact on the communities around Fornebu. A comprehensive social survey was designed, including questions on both aircraft and road traffic noise. A random sample of 1650 respondents in 15 study areas were contacted for an interview. These areas represent different noise levels and different locations relative to the flight paths. The interviews were conducted in a 2 week period just prior to the transfer of charter traffic from Gardemoen to Fornebu. In the same period the aircraft noise was monitored in all 15 areas. In addition the airport is equipped with a permanent flight track and noise monitoring system. The noise situation both in the study period and on an average basis can therefore be accurately described. In August a group of 1800 new respondents were subjected to identical interviews in the same 15 areas, and the noise measurement program was repeated. Results of the study are discussed.

  19. Atmospheric rivers and extreme precipitation in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whan, Kirien; Haarsma, Rein; Sillmann, Jana

    2017-04-01

    'Atmospheric rivers' are long, narrow regions of high water vapour content that are responsible for the horizontal transport of moisture to higher latitudes. They are associated with the majority of extreme precipitation events in Norway throughout the observational record. These extreme precipitation events can be associated with flooding that has large impacts on society, such as the October 2014 event in Flåm. We examined changes in extreme precipitation between the current and future climates in the coupled global climate model, EC-EARTH, using high-resolution simulations ( 25 km) that can resolve extratropical storms and atmospheric rivers. We use the r-largest method (r=3) to fit stationary (no covariates) and non-stationary (with an index of atmospheric rivers as a covariate) generalised extreme value distributions to the block maxima of annual precipitation. The value of a regional 'index flood' type approach is explored and future changes in the largest precipitation events of the year that are associated with atmospheric rivers are presented.

  20. Disability pension rates among immigrants in Norway.

    PubMed

    Claussen, Bjørgulf; Smeby, Lisbeth; Bruusgaard, Dag

    2012-04-01

    Immigrants from low-income countries are more likely than ethnic Norwegians to receive disability pensions. In a previous study in Oslo, we showed that occupational position probably accounted for all of this difference. The present article presents a study of the total population, with data on education and age at receipt of pension. Census and social security data for all persons living in Norway from 1992 to 2003 were used to identify new disability pensions to those aged 30-55 years and eligible in 1992, comprising 15.9% females and 11.4% males. Age-adjusted relative risk was 2.03 (95% CI 1.97-2.08) for non-Western males and 1.30 (1.26-1.36) for non-Western females compared with Westerners, and more than three times higher for males from North Africa/the Middle East. Education did not explain any of the risk differences, but when adjusting for age at pension receipt the differences disappeared completely. This is probably due to their being in predominantly unskilled occupations where there is also a low pension age among ethnic Norwegians.

  1. [Education and use of drugs in Norway].

    PubMed

    Hjellvik, Vidar; Mahic, Milada; Tverdal, Aage

    2012-10-16

    Many studies have demonstrated that a low socioeconomic status is associated with poor health. The aim of the study was to investigate whether use of prescription drugs, generally and within selected categories, varies with education. Data on education from the 2001 Population and Housing Census for 645,023 men and women born in the period 1960-1969 and living in Norway in 2001 were linked to data from the Norwegian Prescription Database on drugs dispensed in the period 2004-2009. The overall frequency of drug dispensing was compared with six levels of education. The relative risk associated with limited education (≤ 10 years) compared with long education (> 10 years) of having at least one drug dispensed during the period was calculated for 42 selected drug categories. There was a dose-response relationship between education and the number of drug prescriptions dispensed. Subjects with lower secondary education collected prescription drugs about three times as often on average as subjects with researcher education. The average relative risk of drug dispensing for subjects with short education (≤ 10 years) compared with long (>10 years) for the 42 selected drug categories was 1.29 for men and 1.31 for women. Given that dispensing of drugs is an expression of state of health, our findings support earlier studies that have shown that there is social inequality in the health of the adult population.

  2. Predicting deep reservoir quality, offshore Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, J.E. )

    1996-01-01

    Reducing risk by predicting deep reservoir potential has long been the goal of the explorationist. To successfully evaluate deep reservoir potential requires the integration of information on depositional setting, mineralogy, texture (i.e. grain size and sorting), burial history, temperature, porosity, and permeability. In 1991, prior to the 14th Round, exploration potential on the Halten Terrace (Offshore Norway) was limited by reservoir predictions (based on generalized mineralogy trends) which suggested economic basement was 4000m. However, an integrated reservoir study conducted between 1991-1993 concluded that in certain Jurassic facies, significant deep reservoir potential existed. The study predicted that coarser-grained, quartz-rich braided stream, delta front, and offshore shelf sandbodies would have good porosity and permeability below 4000m, particularly there early chlorite grain coatings were present to inhibit silica cement. In the spring of 1995, the discovery of significant hydrocarbon reserves below 4000m on Block 6406/2 confirmed these predictions and proved that integrated reservoir characterization can lead to accurate deep reservoir quality predictions. The integrated methodology used will be discussed.

  3. Fertilization Affects Branching Pattern in Norway Spruce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmroth, S.; Stenberg, P.; Smolander, H.

    2001-12-01

    The increase in stand productivity from fertilization can be attributed to an increase in photosynthetic capacity, and a faster accumulation of leaf area index (LAI). Differences in the steady-state LAI are likely to reflect differences in PAR interception and/or conversion efficiency at shoot and leaf level. Furthermore, shoots ability to export carbohydrates to developing buds could be the mechanism responsible for light dependent branching. Within-canopy distribution of PAR and leaf area form the core in process-based models that are used to assess impacts of changes in the environment on production and resource use efficiency of forest stands. However, feedback between structure and radiation environment is not often incorporated in the models. We studied the relationships between light availability, shoot structure and branching pattern in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) at a long-term fertilization experiment at Flakaliden research area in northern Sweden. Sampling of shoots was designed to cover the variation in canopy exposure within the live crown zone, where current shoots were still found. Canopy openness was used as a measure of the light availability at the shoot?s position. Our data showed that, at similar canopy openness, shoots of fertilized trees were longer and the number and total length of daughters were higher than in control trees. Fertilization increased the steady-state LAI and resulted in a deeper canopy, i.e. foliage is produced and survive at much lower light levels.

  4. Carbon sequestration by young Norway spruce monoculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorny, R.; Rajsnerova, P.; Kubásek, J.

    2012-04-01

    Many studies have been focused on allometry, wood-mass inventory, carbon (C) sequestration, and biomass expansion factors as the first step for the evaluation of C sinks of different plant ecosystems. To identify and quantify these terrestrial C sinks, and evaluate CO2 human-induced emissions on the other hand, information for C balance accounting (for impletion of commitment to Kyoto protocol) are currently highly needed. Temperate forest ecosystems have recently been identified as important C sink. Carbon sink might be associated with environmental changes (elevated [CO2], air temperature, N deposition etc.) and large areas of managed fast-growing young forests. Norway spruce (Pice abies L. Karst) is the dominant tree species (35%) in Central European forests. It covers 55 % of the total forested area in the Czech Republic, mostly at high altitudes. In this contribution we present C sequestration by young (30-35 year-old) Norway spruce monocultures in highland (650-700 m a.s.l., AT- mean annual temperature: 6.9 ° C; P- annual amount of precipitation: 700 mm; GL- growing season duration: 150 days) and mountain (850-900 m a.s.l.; AT of 5.5 ° C; P of 1300 mm; and GL of 120 days) areas and an effect of a different type of thinning. However, the similar stem diameter at the breast height and biomass proportions among above-ground tree organs were obtained in the both localities; the trees highly differ in their height, above-ground organ's biomass values and total above ground biomass, particularly in stem. On the total mean tree biomass needle, branch and stem biomass participated by 22 %, 24 % and 54 % in highland, and by 19 %, 23 % and 58 % in mountain area, respectively. Silvicultural management affects mainly structure, density, and tree species composition of the stand. Therefore, dendrometric parameters of a tree resulted from genotype, growth conditions and from management history as well. Low type of thinning (LT; common in highland) stimulates rather tree

  5. Microbiological analysis of seed sprouts in Norway.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Lucy J; Johannessen, Gro S; Gjerde, Bjørn K; Loncarevic, Semir

    2002-05-05

    As part of larger survey of microbial contamination of fruits and vegetables in Norway, four different sprouted seed products were analysed for bacterial and parasitic contaminants (n = 300 for bacterial analyses and n = from 17 to 171 for parasite analyses, depending on parasite). Escherichia coli O157, Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, Cyclospora oocysts, Ascaris eggs and other helminth parasites were not detected in any of the sprout samples. Thermotolerant coliform bacteria (TCB) were isolated from approximately 25% of the sprout samples, with the highest percentage of TCB positive samples in alfalfa sprouts. Most TCB were Enterobacter spp. and Klebsiella. E. coli was isolated from 8 of 62 TCB positive mung bean sprout samples. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 8% of the sprout samples and Giardia cysts were detected in 2% of the samples. All the Cryptosporidium positive samples, and most of the Giardia positive samples, were mung bean sprouts. Parasite concentrations in positive samples were low (between 1 and 3 oocysts/cysts per 50 g sprouts). Sprout irrigation water was also analysed for microbial contaminants. E. coli O157 and L. monocytogenes were not detected. TCB were isolated from approximately 40% of the water samples. Salmonella reading was isolated from three samples of spent irrigation water on 3 consecutive days. Cryptosporidium and Giardia were also isolated from spent irrigation water. Additionally, eight samples of unsprouted mung bean seed were analysed for Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts. One or both of these parasites were detected in six of the unsprouted seed samples at concentrations of between 1 and 5 oocysts/cysts per 100 g unsprouted seed. Whilst our results support spent irrigation water as the most suitable matrix for testing for bacteria, unsprouted seed is considered the more useful matrix for analysing for parasite contaminants.

  6. Use pattern for contraceptive implants in Norway.

    PubMed

    Øvre-Eide, Vigdis; Skjeldestad, Finn Egil

    2016-11-01

    Knowledge about global use patterns of contraceptive implants is limited. This study aims to describe implant use patterns from a user and a prescriber perspective. In a cross-sectional design, we estimated the annual number of users by calculating doses sold per 1000 women-years in the Norwegian Prescription Database for 2006-2012. For each contraceptive method, we calculated on an annual basis a proportion of defined daily doses of all hormonal contraceptives in five-year age groups. Data were analyzed in SPSS version 22, using chi-square test, t-test, and survival analysis. Sales from pharmacies for contraceptive implants more than doubled over the study years and were consistently higher in the younger age groups. The collection rate was 9.3 per 1000 women in 2012, when implant sales amounted to 2.4% of all daily doses of hormonal contraceptives sold. General practitioners and doctors with no specialty were the major prescribers to those starting to use contraceptive implants (starters), whereas gynecologists prescribed nearly 12% of the volume, with a higher proportion to women >35 years of age than younger women. The cumulative proportions of continued users at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months were 96.1, 78.6, 51.9, and 34.9%, respectively, significantly lower for users who had prescribing doctors with no specialty. At end of the first expiration period, 21% of starters continued using implants. Implants play a minor role in the overall use of hormonal contraception in Norway. One in five starters continue as long-term users. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  7. Snow water equivalent mapping in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tveito, O. E.; Udnæs, H.-C.; Engeset, R.; Førland, E. J.; Isaksen, K.; Mengistu, Z.

    2003-04-01

    In high latitude area snow covers the ground large parts of the year. Information about the water volume as snow is of major importance in many respects. Flood forecasters at NVE need it in order to assess possible flood risks. Hydropower producers need it to plan the most efficient production of the water in their reservoirs, traders to estimate the potential energy available for the market. Meteorologists on their side use the information as boundary conditions in weather forecasting models. The Norwegian meteorological institute has provided snow accumulation maps for Norway for more than 50 years. These maps are now produced twice a month in the winter season. They show the accumulated precipitation in the winter season from the day the permanent snow cover is established. They do however not take melting into account, and do therefore not give a good description of the actual snow amounts during and after periods with snowmelt. Due to an increased need for a direct measure of water volumes as snow cover, met.no and NVE initialized a joint project in order to establish maps of the actual snow cover expressed in water equivalents. The project utilizes recent developments in the use of GIS in spatial modeling. Daily precipitation and temperature are distributed in space by using objective spatial interpolation methods. The interpolation considers topographical and other geographical parameters as well as weather type information. A degree-day model is used at each modeling point to calculate snow-accumulation and snowmelt. The maps represent a spatial scale of 1x1 km2. The modeled snow reservoir is validated by snow pillow values as well traditional snow depth observations. Preliminary results show that the new snow modeling approach reproduces the snow water equivalent well. The spatial approach also opens for a wide use in the terms of areal analysis.

  8. Permafrost Observatory Project: A Contribution to the Thermal State of Permafrost in Norway and Svalbard, TSP NORWAY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, H.; Berthling, I.; Blikra, L.; Dehls, J.; Etzelmuller, B.; Farbrot, H.; Humlum, O.; Isaksen, K.; Juliussen, H.; Lauknes, T.; Midttomme, K.; Rønning, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Norwegian funded IPY project 'Permafrost Observatory Project: A Contribution to the Thermal State of Permafrost in Norway and Svalbard', (TSP NORWAY) is part of the TSP cluster. The main goal of TSP NORWAY is to measure and model the permafrost distribution in Norway and Svalbard, focussing on its thermal state, thickness and associated periglacial processes, including increased knowledge of the mountain permafrost distribution related to geohazard studies on rockslides. TSP NORWAY will contribute to IPY by providing a spatially distributed set of observations on the present status of permafrost temperatures and active layer thicknesses, and periglacial processes in Svalbard and Norway. Special focus is given to empirical and numerical modelling of permafrost distribution and thermal ground heat fluxes to address future climate variability on permafrost distribution and associated geomorphic activity. Permafrost distribution in the North Atlantic area is strongly climatically controlled, mainly by the North Atlantic Drift, providing much less permafrost than in any other high latitude terrestrial region on the Northern Hemisphere. Hopefully a first Nordic permafrost map will be based on Nordic permafrost collaboration during IPY. The TSP NORWAY project has established two permafrost observatories with intensive permafrost and periglacial monitoring sites in maritime and continental areas. One in Troms, northern Norway, which will be part of the north Scandinavian Permafrost Observatory extending into northernmost Sweden and Finland, and the Svalbard Nordenskiöld Land Permafrost Observatory also with both maritime and continental sites. The first Norwegian permafrost database, NORPERM, with all permafrost data from Norway and Svalbard, collected before and during IPY, has been established at the Norwegian Geological Survey. NORPERM shall contribute data as requested in the IPY data protocol and the TSP cluster to the international Global Terrestrial Network on

  9. Hepatic cobalt and copper levels in lambs in Norway.

    PubMed

    Sivertsen, T; Plassen, C

    2004-01-01

    Cobalt and copper concentrations were measured in 599 lamb livers collected at slaughter from 58 sheep flocks in 6 different parts of Norway in 1993. Information about pasture, additional feeding and mineral supplements in the flocks was obtained through a questionnaire. Average hepatic levels of cobalt in the lamb flocks varied from < 0.003 to 0.22 microg/g ww, and of copper from 5 to 240 microg/g ww. Flocks with deficient or marginal cobalt status were found in all parts of southern Norway, but primarily in the west and south-west. Some flocks with marginal copper status were found in the south-west, while flocks with signs of excessive hepatic copper concentrations were found mainly in inner parts of central and northern Norway. Hepatic copper concentrations were significantly higher in lambs that had grazed mountain pastures than in those that had grazed lowland pastures in the summer.

  10. Hepatitis E in Norway: seroprevalence in humans and swine.

    PubMed

    Lange, H; Øverbø, J; Borgen, K; Dudman, S; Hoddevik, G; Urdahl, A M; Vold, L; Sjurseth, S K

    2017-01-01

    In Norway, no published data on seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in humans and swine exists. Serum samples from blood donors, veterinarians, swine farm workers and swine were analysed by ELISA to estimate the seroprevalence of HEV in Norway and to investigate the association between direct contact with swine and HEV seroprevalence in humans. The seroprevalence of HEV IgG antibodies was 30% (24/79) in farm workers, 13% (21/163) in veterinarians, 14% (162/1200) in blood donors and 90% (137/153) in swine. Our results show a high seroprevalence of HEV in humans and swine in Norway. HEV seroprevalence in farm workers and blood donors increased with age, and veterinarians working with swine were twice as likely to be HEV seropositive compared to other veterinarians. High HEV seroprevalence in farm workers and veterinarians working with swine support previous reports suggesting swine as a reservoir for HEV infections in humans in Europe.

  11. Surveying perceptions of landslide risk management in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Jessica Ka Yi; Eidsvig, Unni

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced precipitation due to climate change leads to increase in both frequency and intensity of landslides in Norway. A proactive approach to risk management is therefore required to significantly reduce the losses associated with landslides. Opinions and perceptions from practitioners on the performance of landslide risk management can provide insights on areas for improvement in the landslide risk management strategies in Norway. The Risk Management Index (RMI), proposed by Cardona et al. (2004), is a well-established method to measure perceptions of disaster management of selected actors holistically. The RMI is measured based on opinion questionnaires to technical staff, decision-makers, and stakeholders involved in all stages of risk reduction strategies. It is a composite index that considers a wide variety of strategies to manage risks, including structural and non-structural measures, acceptance strategies, disaster management, and risk transfer. The RMI method was modified to be implemented in landslide hazards and to fit with Norwegian conditions. An opinion survey was conducted in autumn 2015 to measure perceptions of landslide risk management in Norway. Perceptions were surveyed for two time periods: 2015 and 2050, and are based on national, county, and municipality levels. Based on the survey results, performance of landslide risk management at any administrative levels in Norway is perceived to improve from `significant' in 2015 to `significant' to `outstanding' in 2050. Knowledge and technology, climate, risk perceptions, and anthropogenic activities are mostly considered by respondents for their 2050 perceptions. Several aspects of landslide risk management in Norway can be improved. For example, landslide hazard evaluation and mapping should be prioritised in Norway. Upgrading, retrofitting, and reconstruction of assets may also be included in the landslide risk reduction strategies. In addition, there should be more focus on inter

  12. Monitoring of Agricultural Landscape in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, H. G.; Engan, G.

    2012-07-01

    An overall societal aim is to ensure a sustainable use and management of agricultural landscapes. This requires continuous delivery of reliable and up-to-date information to decision-makers. To be able to deliver this information, a monitoring program for agricultural landscapes was initiated in Norway 13 years ago. The program documents and reports on land use / land cover changes from data captured through interpretation of true colour aerial photos using stereo instruments. The monitoring programme is based on a sample of 1000 squares of 1 × 1 km and the entire sample of squares is photographed over a five-year period. Each square is then mapped repeatedly every fifth year to record changes. Aerial photo interpretation is based on a custom classification system which is built up hierarchically, with three levels. The first level comprises seven land type classes: Agricultural land, Bare ground, Semi-natural open vegetation, Unforested wetland vegetation, Forest, Urban areas and Water. These land classes are further divided into 24 land types at level two, and approximately 100 land types at level 3. In addition to land type units we map both line elements like stone fences and point elements like buildings and solitary threes. By use of indicators that describe status and change focusing on themes of particular policy interest, we can report on whether policy aims are being fulfilled or not. Four indicator themes have been in focus hitherto: landscape spatial structure, biological diversity, cultural heritage and accessibility. Our data is stored in databases and most of the data quality check/structure process and analyses are now being made in open source software like PostGIS and PostSQL. To assess the accuracy of the photo-interpretation, ground truthing is carried out on 10 % of the squares. The results of this operation document the benefits of having access to photos of the same area from two different years. The program is designed first and foremost to

  13. Friction at the bed of Engabreen, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, D.; Iverson, N. R.; Hooyer, T. S.; Jackson, M.; Moore, P. L.

    2001-12-01

    Basal sliding plays an important role in glacier dynamics. In models of temperate-glacier sliding, the local shear traction on the bed is usually assumed to be zero, owing to the thin water film that lubricates the ice-rock interface. In reality, debris beneath glaciers causes friction, but the extent of this friction is poorly known. To measure the local shear traction on the bed of a temperate glacier, we installed an instrumented panel at the bed of Engabreen, Norway, beneath an ice thickness of~230 m. The panel was installed at the top of a vertical shaft accessed from tunnels in the bedrock beneath the glacier, where the Svartisen Subglacial Laboratory is housed. Mounted flush with the glacier bed, the panel contained a flat, disk-shaped, granite tablet (0.33~m diameter), such that debris-bearing ice slid over the tablet with zero form drag. The panel consisted of an aluminum frame that was filled with fiberglass insulation and held together by couplings made of insulating plastic to reduce the heat flux from the vertical shaft. The rock tablet was held in a carriage that rested on thrust bearings with near-zero friction. Sensors in the panel measured the shear traction on the tablet during sliding, pressure in the water film above the tablet, temperature in the panel, total stress normal to the panel, and sliding speed. The shear traction on the rock tablet was significantly higher than predicted by abrasion theory (Hallet), about 0.1~Mpa. Over the duration of the experiment (6~days), this value fluctuated by up to 15%, probably due to large clasts sporadically sliding across the tablet. Water pressure was high, about 2.6~MPa, and sliding speed was irregular but eventually reached a steady value of 0.2~m d-1. Due to thermistor malfunction, the upward heat flux to the ice could not be calculated, but it was probably higher than the background value. The high basal shear traction was likely caused by a thin layer of water-saturated sediment that separated ice

  14. 77 FR 12800 - Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway: Revocation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... International Trade Administration Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway: Revocation of Antidumping and... chilled Atlantic salmon (``salmon'') from Norway would not be likely to lead to the continuation or... initiated and the ITC instituted sunset reviews of the AD and CVD orders on salmon from Norway, pursuant...

  15. Polar Bears, Hot Coffee, Wireless Schools, and Much More: Teaching American Studies in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her experience and her observations as a Roving Scholar of American Studies in Norway through the Norway Fulbright Foundation grant. The author visited upper secondary schools all over Norway, teaching lessons to both students and teachers on topics related to U.S. history, government, culture, and geography. She…

  16. Polar Bears, Hot Coffee, Wireless Schools, and Much More: Teaching American Studies in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her experience and her observations as a Roving Scholar of American Studies in Norway through the Norway Fulbright Foundation grant. The author visited upper secondary schools all over Norway, teaching lessons to both students and teachers on topics related to U.S. history, government, culture, and geography. She…

  17. Rural Migration Patterns in Norway: Some Observations concerning Recent Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Beryl

    In Norway, there has been a change from net out-migration from rural areas to net in-migration since about 1970; however, this apparent change is a manifestation of changes in occupational patterns and characteristics of certain age groups. The rise in technical and professional occupations has been dramatic, and a particularly high proportion of…

  18. Sex Differences in Adolescent Suicides in Norway, 1990-1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groholt, Berit; Ekeberg, Oivind; Wichstrom, Lars; Haldorsen, Tor

    1999-01-01

    Suicides of persons under the age of 20 between 1990 and 1992 in Norway were examined for gender differences. Females more often attempted suicide, wrote farewell notes, and used less violent methods. The adjusted risk for suicide related to affective disorders and disruptive disorders differed little, as did the effect of frequent use of alcohol…

  19. Students and the Governance of Higher Education in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelsen, Svein; Stensaker, Bjorn

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the question of student participation in higher education governance at the national and the institutional levels in Norway. Two ideal-type perspectives on governance are developed in order to illuminate the Norwegian case: a democratic perspective and a market perspective. The article provides a brief overview of the…

  20. Cry Wolf!: Narratives of Wolf Recovery in France and Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skogen, Ketil; Mauz, Isabelle; Krange, Olve

    2008-01-01

    Due to strict protection through the last decades, wolves have returned to many areas from which they have been absent for a long time. This is a conservation success story, but the wolves also cause conflicts wherever they arrive. We have studied the situation in southeastern Norway and in the French Alps, where the conflict patterns are similar.…

  1. OECD Review of Career Guidance Policies. Norway: Country Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    Norway's career guidance system and policies were evaluated. The review team met with policymakers and guidance practitioners in the public and private sectors, analyzed data from a national questionnaire, and reviewed pertinent documentation. The evaluation focused on the following areas: splitting educational/vocational guidance from personal…

  2. Digitally Literate Teachers in Leading Edge Schools in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almas, Aslaug Grov; Krumsvik, Rune

    2007-01-01

    This paper highlights digitally literate, in-service teachers in leading edge schools in Norway and focuses on how they, in their professional development, adapt digital literacy. Today we find a consensus among policy-makers, researchers, teacher-educators and teachers that digital literacy must be given high priority and needs to be explored…

  3. The Bookshelf: Digitisation and Access to Copyright Items in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skarstein, Vigdis Moe

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the challenges faced in digitising copyright-protected books and other materials within the National Library of Norway. Design/methodology/approach: Following a description of Bokhylla, or The Bookshelf, the paper outlines the strategies adopted within the National Library of Norway…

  4. Perspectives on Quality Assurance in Higher Education in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lycke, Kirsten Hofgaard

    2004-01-01

    Quality assurance is well known internationally but the notion is relatively new in Norway. To understand some of the issues and dilemmas that emerge in the Norwegian reception of quality assurance in higher education, this article traces how quality assurance is gaining its form and how international trends are understood, transposed and adopted…

  5. Norway's Day-Care Initiative: A Municipal Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemeth, Beate; Lokken, Gisle

    2012-01-01

    Norway is gearing up to provide places in day care centres for all children aged between one and six and the need for more facilities has therefore increased substantially in recent years. In Tromso, the municipality has become closely involved in child-care pedagogics and architecture; a design competition it launched has brought rewarding…

  6. Alternative Sport Programmes and Social Inclusion in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skille, Eivind Asrum; Waddington, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the "alternative" sport and physical activities provided by the Sports City Programme (SCP) in Norway, which are designed to attract more young people (especially inactive young people) to take part in physical activities. In particular, it examines whether these "alternative" sports have been more…

  7. Perspectives on Quality Assurance in Higher Education in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lycke, Kirsten Hofgaard

    2004-01-01

    Quality assurance is well known internationally but the notion is relatively new in Norway. To understand some of the issues and dilemmas that emerge in the Norwegian reception of quality assurance in higher education, this article traces how quality assurance is gaining its form and how international trends are understood, transposed and adopted…

  8. The Public-Private Partnership in ECEC Provision in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haug, Peder

    2014-01-01

    This article seeks to answer three central questions pertaining to public-private partnership in early childhood education and care (ECEC provision) in Norway: How has public-private partnership developed during the last four decades? How is public-private partnership understood in Norwegian ECEC policy? What seem to be the future challenges in…

  9. The Sami School System in Norway and International Cooperation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todal, Jon

    2003-01-01

    In Norway, a separate curriculum for primary and lower secondary schools has been introduced in indigenous Sami areas, and some jurisdiction over the school system has been transferred to the Sami Parliament. These recent initiatives are discussed against a backdrop of three international relationships: between the Sami people and other speakers…

  10. Cry Wolf!: Narratives of Wolf Recovery in France and Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skogen, Ketil; Mauz, Isabelle; Krange, Olve

    2008-01-01

    Due to strict protection through the last decades, wolves have returned to many areas from which they have been absent for a long time. This is a conservation success story, but the wolves also cause conflicts wherever they arrive. We have studied the situation in southeastern Norway and in the French Alps, where the conflict patterns are similar.…

  11. The Public-Private Partnership in ECEC Provision in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haug, Peder

    2014-01-01

    This article seeks to answer three central questions pertaining to public-private partnership in early childhood education and care (ECEC provision) in Norway: How has public-private partnership developed during the last four decades? How is public-private partnership understood in Norwegian ECEC policy? What seem to be the future challenges in…

  12. Norway's New Culture Policy and the Arts: Values in Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klausen, Arne Martin

    The basis for the New Norwegian Culture policy (NCC) is discussed in terms of the political attempt to extend the fundamental values of equality and social security into art and cultural life. The NCC is a result of a series of reports presented in the early 1970s which reflected a desire to see a broader welfare policy in Norway. The old form of…

  13. New Public Management in Educational Reform in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solhaug, Trond

    2011-01-01

    The article focuses on the similarities and differences in using new public management (NPM) administrative arrangements in educational policy as they have been presented in the educational reform process carried out this millennium by two governments in Norway: the Centre-Conservative government and the current Red-Green coalition government.…

  14. DSM-III and Norway. History, attitudes and future.

    PubMed

    Malt, U F

    1986-01-01

    The first Norwegian evaluation of the DSM-III system of classification occurred in 1980. A Norwegian translation of the diagnostic criteria was published as part of a textbook in psychiatry in 1984. The Mini DSM-III (Quick reference) was published in 1985. The DSM-III system has been generally well accepted in Norway and is currently used in most research projects besides the ICD system. Several training courses have been arranged for senior psychiatrists and psychologists. Introduction to the DSM-III system is also part of the obligatory training course for psychiatric residents in Norway. From 1987 Norway will use a clinical modification of the ICD-9 system of classification. This modification applies 5 digit coding and includes diagnostic categories found in the DSM-III system but not in the 4 digit ICD-9 version. The DSM-III system of classification represents a major step forward in psychiatric classification. However, revisions are necessary to increase clinical validity. Although Norwegian psychiatry has been inspired by the DSM-III system, Norway remains committed to the ICD systems. The goal must be to make further revisions of the DSM-III and ICD systems, and in the end unite the strengths of these two systems of psychiatric classification.

  15. New Public Management in Educational Reform in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solhaug, Trond

    2011-01-01

    The article focuses on the similarities and differences in using new public management (NPM) administrative arrangements in educational policy as they have been presented in the educational reform process carried out this millennium by two governments in Norway: the Centre-Conservative government and the current Red-Green coalition government.…

  16. World Perspective Case Descriptions on Educational Programs for Adults: Norway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aksjoberg, Tore

    The case description of an adult education program in Norway contained in this document is part of a set that reflects a cooperative effort by adult educators to increase international understanding of various educational programs for adults in their societal context. A face sheet provides this information: name, organization, and address of the…

  17. The Bookshelf: Digitisation and Access to Copyright Items in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skarstein, Vigdis Moe

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the challenges faced in digitising copyright-protected books and other materials within the National Library of Norway. Design/methodology/approach: Following a description of Bokhylla, or The Bookshelf, the paper outlines the strategies adopted within the National Library of Norway…

  18. Ambient noise levels and detection threshold in Norway.

    PubMed

    Demuth, Andrea; Ottemöller, Lars; Keers, Henk

    2016-01-01

    Ambient seismic noise is caused by a number of sources in specific frequency bands. The quantification of ambient noise makes it possible to evaluate station and network performance. We evaluate noise levels in Norway from the 2013 data set of the Norwegian National Seismic Network as well as two temporary deployments. Apart from the station performance, we studied the geographical and temporal variations, and developed a local noise model for Norway. The microseism peaks related to the ocean are significant in Norway. We, therefore, investigated the relationship between oceanic weather conditions and noise levels. We find a correlation of low-frequency noise (0.125-0.25 Hz) with wave heights up to 900 km offshore. High (2-10 Hz) and intermediate (0.5-5 Hz) frequency noise correlates only up to 450 km offshore with wave heights. From a geographic perspective, stations in southern Norway show lower noise levels for low frequencies due to a larger distance to the dominant noise sources in the North Atlantic. Finally, we studied the influence of high-frequency noise levels on earthquake detectability and found that a noise level increase of 10 dB decreases the detectability by 0.5 magnitude units. This method provides a practical way to consider noise variations in detection maps.

  19. Norway's Day-Care Initiative: A Municipal Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemeth, Beate; Lokken, Gisle

    2012-01-01

    Norway is gearing up to provide places in day care centres for all children aged between one and six and the need for more facilities has therefore increased substantially in recent years. In Tromso, the municipality has become closely involved in child-care pedagogics and architecture; a design competition it launched has brought rewarding…

  20. Sex Differences in Adolescent Suicides in Norway, 1990-1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groholt, Berit; Ekeberg, Oivind; Wichstrom, Lars; Haldorsen, Tor

    1999-01-01

    Suicides of persons under the age of 20 between 1990 and 1992 in Norway were examined for gender differences. Females more often attempted suicide, wrote farewell notes, and used less violent methods. The adjusted risk for suicide related to affective disorders and disruptive disorders differed little, as did the effect of frequent use of alcohol…

  1. Rural Migration Patterns in Norway: Some Observations concerning Recent Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Beryl

    In Norway, there has been a change from net out-migration from rural areas to net in-migration since about 1970; however, this apparent change is a manifestation of changes in occupational patterns and characteristics of certain age groups. The rise in technical and professional occupations has been dramatic, and a particularly high proportion of…

  2. Students and the Governance of Higher Education in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelsen, Svein; Stensaker, Bjorn

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the question of student participation in higher education governance at the national and the institutional levels in Norway. Two ideal-type perspectives on governance are developed in order to illuminate the Norwegian case: a democratic perspective and a market perspective. The article provides a brief overview of the…

  3. Cultural Identification and Second Language Pronunciation of Americans in Norway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lybeck, Karen

    2002-01-01

    Proposes to measure sojourner's acculturation in terms of their social exchange networks, measuring second language success in terms of pronunciation. Provides strong evidence to support Schumann's (1978) acculturation theory. The acculturation experiences and second language pronunciation of 9 American women residing in Norway are described and…

  4. Impact of acid precipitation on freshwater ecosystems on Norway

    Treesearch

    Richard F. Wright; Torstein Dale; Egil T. Gjessing; George R. Hendrey; Arne Henriksen; Merete Johannessen; Ivar P. Muniz

    1976-01-01

    Extensive studies of precipitation chemistry during the last 20 years have clearly shown that highly polluted precipitation falls over large areas of Scandinavia, and that this pollution is increasing in severity and geographical extent. Precipitation in southern Norway, Sweden, and Finland contains large amounts of H+, SO4...

  5. Proceedings of the Full Board Meeting (Ustaoset, Norway, June 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Council of Scientific Unions, Paris (France). Abstracting Board.

    The proceedings of the 1972 full board meeting of the International Council of Scientific Unions Abstracting Board (ICSU AB) held in Ustaoset, Norway are contained in this volume. The first part of the Proceedings is a detailed description of the activities of the Board. Activities of ICSU AB Member Unions and Member Countries in all aspects of…

  6. A historical review of gravimetric observations in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragnvald Pettersen, Bjørn

    2016-10-01

    The first gravity determinations in Norway were made by Edward Sabine in 1823 with a pendulum instrument by Henry Kater. Seventy years later a Sterneck pendulum was acquired by the Norwegian Commission for the International Arc Measurements. It improved the precision and eventually reduced the bias of the absolute calibration from 85 to 15 mGal. The last pendulum observations in Norway were made in 1955 with an instrument from Cambridge University. At a precision of ±1 mGal, the purpose was to calibrate a section of the gravity line from Rome, Italy, to Hammerfest, Norway. Relative spring gravimeters were introduced in Norway in 1946 and were used to densify and expand the national gravity network. These data were used to produce regional geoids for Norway and adjacent ocean areas. Improved instrument precision allowed them to connect Norwegian and foreign fundamental stations as well. Extensive geophysical prospecting was made, as in other countries. The introduction of absolute gravimeters based on free-fall methods, especially after 2004, improved the calibration by 3 orders of magnitude and immediately revealed the secular changes of the gravity field in Norway. This was later confirmed by satellite gravimetry, which provides homogeneous data sets for global and regional gravity models. The first-ever determinations of gravity at sea were made by pendulum observations onboard the Norwegian polar vessel Fram during frozen-in conditions in the Arctic Ocean in 1893-1896. Simultaneously, an indirect method was developed at the University of Oslo for deducing gravity at sea with a hypsometer. The precision of both methods was greatly superseded by relative spring gravimeters 50 years later. They were employed extensively both at sea and on land. When GPS allowed precise positioning, relative gravimeters were mounted in airplanes to cover large areas of ocean faster than before. Gravimetry is currently being applied to study geodynamical phenomena relevant to

  7. Climate change impacts on flood seasonality in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vormoor, Klaus; Heistermann, Maik; Lawrence, Deborah; Bronstert, Axel

    2013-04-01

    The hydrological impacts of climate change on floods have been studied by ensemble based modeling in 115 catchments in Norway (Lawrence & Hisdal 2011). Despite of a considerable variation in the projections, consistent regional patterns of hydrological change are evident. Spatial patterns of directional change in flood magnitude allow for drawing conclusions about dominating flood-generating processes and for differentiating regions with similar flood regimes. Since the magnitude of floods results from the seasonality of precipitation, snowmelt/snow storage, and the preconditions in a catchment, seasonal flood frequency analysis can help to understand the influence of flood-generating processes under a changing climate. Currently, regional patterns of flood regimes in Norway separate regions which are dominated by high flows during the spring and early summer snowmelt season (inland and northernmost regions) from regions where autumn and winter pluvial floods are dominant (western Norway along the coast). However, projected increase in winter temperature, reduced snow storage and earlier snowmelt will probably lead to a reduction in flood probability in inland and northern Norway. In western Norway and along the coast, the probability of large floods is likely to increase due to projected increases in seasonal and extreme rainfall. In addition, there are some areas which probably will be dominated by a mixed regime in the future where both snowmelt- and rainfall-dominated events will occur. Based on an ensemble model approach in a subset of representative catchments, we study the role of seasonality contributing to flood hazards in Norway. Seasonal flood frequency analyses are used to explore changes in flood seasonality. Peak flow series are analyzed using a Peak Over Threshold (POT) approach, and changes in the return periods are estimated based on the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD). A model re-calibration is performed based on the series distance approach

  8. Ethnic differences in the incidence of cancer in Norway.

    PubMed

    Hjerkind, Kirsti V; Qureshi, Samera A; Møller, Bjørn; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Deapen, Dennis; Kumar, Bernadette; Ursin, Giske

    2017-04-15

    Traditionally there have been differences in cancer incidence across geographic regions. When immigrants have moved from low-income to high-income countries, their incidence have changed as they have adapted to the lifestyle in the new host country. Given worldwide changes in lifestyle factors over time, we decided to examine cancer incidence in immigrant groups in Norway, a country with a recent immigration history, complete cancer registration and universal public health care. We linked immigration history for the complete population to information on cancer diagnosis from the Cancer Registry of Norway for the period 1990-2012. Age-standardized (world) overall and site-specific cancer incidence were estimated for different immigrant groups and compared to incidence among individuals born in Norway. Among 850,008 immigrants, 9,158 men and 10,334 women developed cancer, and among 5,508,429 Norwegian-born, 263,316 men and 235,020 women developed cancer. While incidence of breast and colorectal cancer were highest among individuals born in Norway and other high-income countries, other cancer types were higher in immigrants from low-income countries. Lung cancer incidence was highest in Eastern European men, and men and women from Eastern Europe had high incidence of stomach cancer. Incidence of liver cancer was substantially higher in immigrants from low-income countries than in individuals born in Norway and other high-income countries. Our results mirror known cancer challenges across the world. Although cancer incidence overall is lower in immigrants from low-income countries, certain cancers, such as lung, liver and stomach cancer, represent major challenges in specific immigrant groups. © 2017 UICC.

  9. PHENOTYPIC COMPARISON OF ALLERGIC AIRWAY RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE IN THREE RAT STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Brown Norway (BN) rats develop a robust response to antigens in the lung characterized by a large increase in allergen-specific immune function and pulmonary eosinophilia. The objective of this study was to investigate alternative models by determining if other rat s...

  10. Differences in Age-Related Alterations in Muscle Contraction Properties in Rat Tongue and Hindlimb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Nadine P.; Ota, Fumikazu; Nagai, Hiromi; Russell, John A.; Leverson, Glen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Because of differences in muscle architecture and biomechanics, the purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle contractile properties of rat hindlimb and tongue were differentially affected by aging. Method: Deep peroneal and hypoglossal nerves were stimulated in 6 young and 7 old Fischer 344-Brown Norway rats to allow…

  11. PHENOTYPIC COMPARISON OF ALLERGIC AIRWAY RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE IN THREE RAT STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Brown Norway (BN) rats develop a robust response to antigens in the lung characterized by a large increase in allergen-specific immune function and pulmonary eosinophilia. The objective of this study was to investigate alternative models by determining if other rat s...

  12. Differences in Age-Related Alterations in Muscle Contraction Properties in Rat Tongue and Hindlimb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Nadine P.; Ota, Fumikazu; Nagai, Hiromi; Russell, John A.; Leverson, Glen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Because of differences in muscle architecture and biomechanics, the purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle contractile properties of rat hindlimb and tongue were differentially affected by aging. Method: Deep peroneal and hypoglossal nerves were stimulated in 6 young and 7 old Fischer 344-Brown Norway rats to allow…

  13. Transnational spaces of care: migrant nurses in Norway.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Lise Widding

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that international nurse recruitment from Latvia to Norway is not a win–win situation. The gains and losses of nurse migration are unevenly distributed between sender and receiver countries. On the basis of empirical research and interviews with Latvian nurses and families they left behind, this article argues that nurse migration transforms families and communities and that national health services now become global workplaces. Some decades ago feminist research pointed to the fact that the welfare state was based on a male breadwinner family and women’s unpaid production of care work at home. Today this production of unpaid care is “outsourced” from richer to poorer countries and is related to an emergence of transnational spaces of care. International nurse recruitment and global nurse care chains in Norway increasingly provide the labor that prevents the new adult worker model and gender equality politics from being disrupted in times where families are overloaded with elder care loads.

  14. Impacts of extreme weather events on transport infrastructure in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauenfelder, Regula; Solheim, Anders; Isaksen, Ketil; Romstad, Bård; Dyrrdal, Anita V.; Ekseth, Kristine H. H.; Gangstø Skaland, Reidun; Harbitz, Alf; Harbitz, Carl B.; Haugen, Jan E.; Hygen, Hans O.; Haakenstad, Hilde; Jaedicke, Christian; Jónsson, Árni; Klæboe, Ronny; Ludvigsen, Johanna; Meyer, Nele K.; Rauken, Trude; Sverdrup-Thygeson, Kjetil

    2016-04-01

    With the latest results on expected future increase in air temperature and precipitation changes reported by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the climate robustness of important infrastructure is of raising concern in Norway, as well as in the rest of Europe. Economic consequences of natural disasters have increased considerably since 1950. In addition to the effect of demographic changes such as population growth, urbanization and more and more concentration of valuable assets, this increase is also related to an augmenting frequency of extreme events, such as storms, flooding, drought, and landslides. This change is also observable in Norway, where the increased frequency of strong precipitation has led to frequent flooding and landslide events during the last 20 years. A number of studies show that climate change causes an increase in both frequency and intensity of several types of extreme weather, especially when it comes to precipitation. Such extreme weather events greatly affect the transport infrastructure, with numerous and long closures of roads and railroads, in addition to damage and repair costs. Frequent closures of railroad and roads lead to delay or failure in delivery of goods, which again may lead to a loss of customers and/or - eventually - markets. Much of the Norwegian transport infrastructure is more than 50 years old and therefore not adequately dimensioned, even for present climatic conditions. In order to assess these problems and challenges posed to the Norwegian transport infrastructure from present-day and future extreme weather events, the project "Impacts of extreme weather events on infrastructure in Norway (InfraRisk)" was performed under the research Council of Norway program 'NORKLIMA', between 2009 and 2013. The main results of the project are: - Moderate to strong precipitation events have become more frequent and more intense in Norway over the last 50 years, and this trend continues throughout the 21st

  15. Survey of nematodes associated with terrestrial slugs in Norway.

    PubMed

    Ross, J L; Ivanova, E S; Hatteland, B A; Brurberg, M B; Haukeland, S

    2016-09-01

    A survey of nematodes associated with terrestrial slugs was conducted for the first time in Norway. A total of 611 terrestrial slugs were collected from 32 sample sites. Slugs were identified by means of morphological examination, dissection of genitalia and molecular analysis using mitochondrial DNA. Twelve slug species were identified, representing four different slug families. Internal nematodes were identified by means of morphological analysis and the sequencing of the 18S rRNA gene. Of the sample sites studied, 62.5% were found to be positive for nematode parasites, with 18.7% of all slugs discovered being infected. Five nematode species were identified in this study: Alloionema appendiculatum, Agfa flexilis, Angiostoma limacis, Angiostoma sp. and Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita. Of these species, only one nematode was previously undescribed (Angiostoma sp.). This is the first record of the presence of A. appendiculatum, A. flexilis and A. limacis in Norway.

  16. Petroleum and economic development. The cases of Mexico and Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Mallakh, R.E.; Noveng, O.; Poulson, B.W.

    1984-01-01

    As non-OPEC oil and gas exporters Mexico and Norway are of growing importance, the former because of its vast reserves and proximity to the energy-demanding US and the latter because of its proximity to W Europe and its high degree of supply security. The authors use the term 'Petrolization' to describe the impact of rapid growth in petroleum output on a nations's economy. Both countries have experienced rapid growth of petroleum output in the context of a substantial industrial base accompanied by major structural changes in the industrial and non-industrial sectors of the economies. While it is possible to compare and contrast the two countries simultaneously, this book examines the two countries' case studies separately. Each country is firstly analysed in descriptive terms. This is then followed by a coherent examination of econometric models which have been used to describe the economic development of Norway and Mexico.

  17. The Alta schist, North Norway: unique rock with unique history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heldal, Tom; Aasly, Kari; Meyer, Gurli

    2015-04-01

    Near the small town of Alta, northernmost Norway, are more than thousand small and large schist quarries, some of them dating back to the 1850's. It was the need for roofing material on a local church and a hospital that triggered the production. Since then, the Alta schist has been widely applied in Norway and abroad, known for its quality for roofing material and hard floor covering. The quality lies in the processes behind the formation of the schist. Emplacement of thrust nappes during the Caledonian mountain chain formation in the Silurian caused deformation and metamorphism of the rocks. The Alta schist is situated in one such nappe sheet, where arkosic sandstone where flattened and transformed into mylonite. This made fine mica layers along which the rock can be split, rythmically spaced and separated by quartz-dominated bands. The production of the Alta schist is still characterized by old craft traditions, reflecting a rich history and culture around the schist production.

  18. A retrospective view on research in neuroscience in Norway.

    PubMed

    Gjerstad, L; Gilhus, N E; Storstein, A

    2008-01-01

    This brief historical review on neuroscience in Norway shows a comparatively high research activity with many important results. The Norwegian zoologist Fridtjof Nansen, who later became a famous Arctic explorer, was the first to formulate the neuron doctrine. 'The Oslo School of Neuroanatomy' contributed enormously to the understanding of the detailed anatomy and chemistry of the central nervous system. Norwegian neurophysiologists made important findings from studies of hippocampus including the inhibitory basket cell, the LTP phenomenon and the 'hippocampal-slice-technique'. In clinical neuroscience the description of Refsum's disease and studies of myasthenia gravis and multiple sclerosis have been of particular importance. Two of 13 centres of excellence in Norway selected in 2003 were from neuroscience, and The Norwegian Research Council has its own programme for neuroscience. The Norwegian Neurological Association arranges annual meetings to promote interest in neurological research.

  19. National independence, women's political participation, and life expectancy in Norway.

    PubMed

    Nobles, Jenna; Brown, Ryan; Catalano, Ralph

    2010-05-01

    This study investigates the role of national independence and women's political participation on population health using historical lifespan data from Norway. We use time-series methods to analyze data measuring the actual length of time lived by Norwegian birth cohorts spanning a 61 year period surrounding the political emancipation of Norway from Sweden in 1905 and the establishment of a Norwegian monarchy in 1906. The use of a discrete, historical event improves our ability to interpret the population health effects of national independence and women's political participation as causal. We find a large and significant positive effect on the lifespan of Norwegian females born in the 1906 cohort. Interestingly, the effect does not extend to all living females during the Norwegian drive toward sovereignty. We conclude that the beneficial effects were likely conferred through intrauterine biological transfers and/or neonatal investments specific to the first year of life. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Adoption of routine telemedicine in Norway: the current picture

    PubMed Central

    Zanaboni, Paolo; Knarvik, Undine; Wootton, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Telemedicine appears to be ready for wider adoption. Although existing research evidence is useful, the adoption of routine telemedicine in healthcare systems has been slow. Objective We conducted a study to explore the current use of routine telemedicine in Norway, at national, regional, and local levels, to provide objective and up-to-date information and to estimate the potential for wider adoption of telemedicine. Design A top-down approach was used to collect official data on the national use of telemedicine from the Norwegian Patient Register. A bottom-up approach was used to collect complementary information on the routine use of telemedicine through a survey conducted at the five largest publicly funded hospitals. Results Results show that routine telemedicine has been adopted in all health regions in Norway and in 68% of hospitals. Despite being widely adopted, the current level of use of telemedicine is low compared to the number of face-to-face visits. Examples of routine telemedicine can be found in several clinical specialties. Most services connect different hospitals in secondary care, and they are mostly delivered as teleconsultations via videoconference. Conclusions Routine telemedicine in Norway has been widely adopted, probably for geographical reasons, as in other settings. However, the level of use of telemedicine in Norway is rather low, and it has significant potential for further development as an alternative to face-to-face outpatient visits. This study is a first attempt to map routine telemedicine at regional, institutional, and clinical levels, and it provides useful information to understand the adoption of telemedicine in routine healthcare and to measure change in future updates. PMID:24433942

  1. Adoption of routine telemedicine in Norway: the current picture.

    PubMed

    Zanaboni, Paolo; Knarvik, Undine; Wootton, Richard

    2014-12-01

    Background Telemedicine appears to be ready for wider adoption. Although existing research evidence is useful, the adoption of routine telemedicine in healthcare systems has been slow. Objective We conducted a study to explore the current use of routine telemedicine in Norway, at national, regional, and local levels, to provide objective and up-to-date information and to estimate the potential for wider adoption of telemedicine. Design A top-down approach was used to collect official data on the national use of telemedicine from the Norwegian Patient Register. A bottom-up approach was used to collect complementary information on the routine use of telemedicine through a survey conducted at the five largest publicly funded hospitals. Results Results show that routine telemedicine has been adopted in all health regions in Norway and in 68% of hospitals. Despite being widely adopted, the current level of use of telemedicine is low compared to the number of face-to-face visits. Examples of routine telemedicine can be found in several clinical specialties. Most services connect different hospitals in secondary care, and they are mostly delivered as teleconsultations via videoconference. Conclusions Routine telemedicine in Norway has been widely adopted, probably for geographical reasons, as in other settings. However, the level of use of telemedicine in Norway is rather low, and it has significant potential for further development as an alternative to face-to-face outpatient visits. This study is a first attempt to map routine telemedicine at regional, institutional, and clinical levels, and it provides useful information to understand the adoption of telemedicine in routine healthcare and to measure change in future updates.

  2. Adoption of routine telemedicine in Norway: the current picture.

    PubMed

    Zanaboni, Paolo; Knarvik, Undine; Wootton, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Telemedicine appears to be ready for wider adoption. Although existing research evidence is useful, the adoption of routine telemedicine in healthcare systems has been slow. We conducted a study to explore the current use of routine telemedicine in Norway, at national, regional, and local levels, to provide objective and up-to-date information and to estimate the potential for wider adoption of telemedicine. Design : A top-down approach was used to collect official data on the national use of telemedicine from the Norwegian Patient Register. A bottom-up approach was used to collect complementary information on the routine use of telemedicine through a survey conducted at the five largest publicly funded hospitals. Results show that routine telemedicine has been adopted in all health regions in Norway and in 68% of hospitals. Despite being widely adopted, the current level of use of telemedicine is low compared to the number of face-to-face visits. Examples of routine telemedicine can be found in several clinical specialties. Most services connect different hospitals in secondary care, and they are mostly delivered as teleconsultations via videoconference. Routine telemedicine in Norway has been widely adopted, probably for geographical reasons, as in other settings. However, the level of use of telemedicine in Norway is rather low, and it has significant potential for further development as an alternative to face-to-face outpatient visits. This study is a first attempt to map routine telemedicine at regional, institutional, and clinical levels, and it provides useful information to understand the adoption of telemedicine in routine healthcare and to measure change in future updates.

  3. Parasites of wild sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax from Norway.

    PubMed

    Sterud, Erik

    2002-04-05

    Thirteen wild sea bass from the Oslo fjord in south-eastern Norway were examined for parasites. Nineteen species were found, comprising 5 protozoans, 1 monogenean, 8 digeneans, 1 cestode, 2 nematodes and 2 crustaceans. Based on the similarity to the parasitic fauna of Mediterranean sea bass, it is predicted that sea bass farmers in Northern Europe will experience the same parasite problems as sea bass farmers in warmer regions.

  4. First drilling in Norwegian sea off Norway yields encouraging results

    SciTech Connect

    Bergsager, E.

    1981-06-08

    Three exploratory wells drilled in the Norwegian Sea penetrated Jurassic sandstones with excellent reservoir qualities, rich source rock, and some evidence of hydrocarbons. Constituting the first wells drilled north of the 62nd parallel off Norway, they produced encouraging evidence of prospective structures. The Norwegian continental shelf north of the North Sea contains areas of thick sedimentary basins having an areal extent 8-9 times that of the Norwegian North Sea.

  5. DNA methylome of the 20-gigabase Norway spruce genome

    PubMed Central

    Ausin, Israel; Feng, Suhua; Yu, Chaowei; Liu, Wanlu; Kuo, Hsuan Yu; Jacobsen, Elise L.; Zhai, Jixian; Gallego-Bartolome, Javier; Wang, Lin; Egertsdotter, Ulrika; Street, Nathaniel R.; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Wang, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation plays important roles in many biological processes, such as silencing of transposable elements, imprinting, and regulating gene expression. Many studies of DNA methylation have shown its essential roles in angiosperms (flowering plants). However, few studies have examined the roles and patterns of DNA methylation in gymnosperms. Here, we present genome-wide high coverage single-base resolution methylation maps of Norway spruce (Picea abies) from both needles and somatic embryogenesis culture cells via whole genome bisulfite sequencing. On average, DNA methylation levels of CG and CHG of Norway spruce were higher than most other plants studied. CHH methylation was found at a relatively low level; however, at least one copy of most of the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway genes was found in Norway spruce, and CHH methylation was correlated with levels of siRNAs. In comparison with needles, somatic embryogenesis culture cells that are used for clonally propagating spruce trees showed lower levels of CG and CHG methylation but higher level of CHH methylation, suggesting that like in other species, these culture cells show abnormal methylation patterns. PMID:27911846

  6. Effects on accidents of periodic motor vehicle inspection in Norway.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Peter; Elvik, Rune

    2007-01-01

    An extensive programme of periodic motor vehicle inspection was introduced in Norway after 1995, when the treaty between Norway and the European Union (EU) granting Norway (not a member of the EU) access to the EU inner market took effect (The EEA treaty). This paper evaluates the effects on accidents of periodic inspections of cars. Trucks and buses were not included in the study. Negative binomial regression models were fitted to data on accidents and inspections created by merging data files provided by a major insurance company and by the Public Roads Administration. Technical defects prior to inspection were associated with an increased accident rate. Inspections were found to strongly reduce the number of technical defects in cars. Despite this, no effect of inspections on accident rate were found. This finding is inconsistent with the fact that technical defects appear to increase the accident rate; one would expect the repair of such defects to reduce the accident rate. Potential explanations of the findings in terms of behavioural adaptation among car owners are discussed. It is suggested that car owners adapt driving behaviour to the technical condition of the car and that the effect attributed to technical defects before inspection may in part be the result of a tendency for owners who are less concerned about safety to neglect the technical condition of their cars. These car owners might have had a higher accident rate than other car owners irrespective of the technical condition of the car.

  7. International medical graduates' perceptions of entering the profession in Norway.

    PubMed

    Skjeggestad, Erik; Sandal, Gro Mjeldheim; Gulbrandsen, Pål

    2015-06-30

    There is little knowledge available about how it feels for an international medical graduate arriving in Norway. We have investigated how the initial period as an employee of the Norwegian health services is perceived. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 16 international medical graduates who had foreign training and citizenship. They had worked as doctors in Norway for less than two years. Transcriptions of the interviews were analysed using the Systematic Text Condensation method. Their background for working in Norway varied. Some had an affiliation to the country and a social network, which appeared to be a support during the initial period. Many perceived the authorisation process as bureaucratic and as throwing suspicion on them. The doctors felt that they could cope with most of their work assignments, but reported having faced challenges in terms of language, a lack of insight into systems and uncertainty regarding what was expected of the doctor's role in a Norwegian context. There was also uncertainty associated with a perceived absence of collegial support. Because of the availability of jobs, some had adjusted their career plans towards psychiatry, geriatrics or general practice. It appears that preparatory measures such as training courses, tests and the authorisation process fail to provide the practice-related experience and local knowledge that many doctors feel that they need in their new job situation. Measures such as language training and introduction to systems would be likely to improve their general well-being as well as integration.

  8. Population decline and plague in late medieval Norway.

    PubMed

    Brothen, J A

    1996-01-01

    Norwegian scholars have engaged in considerable research over the last half century in an attempt to assess the impact of the Black Plague of 1349 on population and society in Norway. Evidence has been put forward relating the incidence of plague to a continuance of population decline over the two centuries following its initial introduction. Estimates of population decline in Norway between 1350 and 1550 indicate a reduction by as much as 65%. Two directions of study have emerged, one concentrating on land abandonment known as the "Ødegard Project." The other is represented by the recent works of Ole Jørgen Benedictow presenting epidemiological and osteo-archaeological research. An examination of the available literature raises questions concerning the degree to which plague, and its recurrence, directly affected population decline in Norway during the Late Middle Ages. While evidence of the virulence of the plague and the degree of farm abandonment is compelling, a direct relationship to population decline may not be as great as implied by the research. Other explanatory factors, especially social and economic responses to plague, have been given limited attention.

  9. An antibiotic's journey from marketing authorization to use, Norway.

    PubMed

    Årdal, Christine; Blix, Hege Salvesen; Plahte, Jens; Røttingen, John-Arne

    2017-03-01

    Here we describe in detail marketing authorization and reimbursement procedures for medicinal products in Norway, with particular reference to nine novel antibiotics that received marketing authorization between 2005 and 2015. The description illustrates that, in places like Norway, with effective antibiotic stewardship policies and an associated low prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection, there is little need for newer, more expensive antibiotics whose therapeutic superiority to existing compounds has not been demonstrated. Since resistance begins to emerge as soon as an antibiotic is used, Norway's practice of leaving newer antibiotics on the shelf is consistent with the goal of prolonging the effectiveness of newer antibiotics. An unintended consequence is that the country has signalled to the private sector that there is little commercial value in novel antibiotics, which may nevertheless still be needed to treat rare or emerging infections. Every country aims to improve infection control and to promote responsible antibiotic use. However, as progress is made, antibiotic-resistant bacteria should become less common and, consequently, the need for, and the commercial value of, novel antibiotics will probably be reduced. Nevertheless, antibiotic innovation continues to be essential. This dilemma will have to be resolved through the introduction of alternative reward systems for antibiotic innovation. The DRIVE-AB (Driving re-investment in research and development and responsible antibiotic use) research consortium in Europe has been tasked with identifying ways of meeting this challenge.

  10. Radioactive fallout in Norway from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests.

    PubMed

    Bergan, Tone D

    2002-01-01

    Historical data on radioactivity in air and precipitation samples have been collected and analysed from study sites in Norway. The purpose of the study was to investigate the correlation between air concentration, precipitation and deposition, and identify areas with high deposition. Areas with high precipitation have been compared with monitoring stations in other countries. The base line data contain measurements of total beta in air and precipitation on a daily basis for the period 1956-1982. Radioactive fallout correlated strongly with annual precipitation which varies from 280 to 4200mm per year in Norway. The deposition of 137Cs was calculated to be 3.23+/-1.20kBq/m2 per 1,000 mm precipitation for the period 1955-1975. Also, the relationship between total beta and 137Cs has been investigated, in order to estimate the age of fallout. The age of fallout in Norway ranges from 3 to 9 months during the test periods, which is considerably shorter than the global average, where the mean residence time for debris in the lower stratosphere is estimated to be 1.3 years. There is no evidence of local fallout from tests on Novaya Zemlya reaching Norwegian areas.

  11. Growth strategy of Norway spruce under air elevated [CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorny, R.; Urban, O.; Holisova, P.; Sprtova, M.; Sigut, L.; Slipkova, R.

    2012-04-01

    Plants will respond to globally increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) by acclimation or adaptation at physiological and morphological levels. Considering the temporal onset, physiological responses may be categorized as short-term and morphological ones as long-term responses. The degree of plant growth responses, including cell division and cell expansion, is highly variable. It depends mainly on the specie's genetic predisposition, environment, mineral nutrition status, duration of CO2 enrichment, and/or synergetic effects of other stresses. Elevated [CO2] causes changes in tissue anatomy, quantity, size, shape and spatial orientation and can result in altered sink strength. Since, there are many experimental facilities for the investigation of elevated [CO2] effects on trees: i) closed systems or open top chambers (OTCs), ii) semi-open systems (for example glass domes with adjustable lamella windows - DAWs), and iii) free-air [CO2] enrichments (FACE); the results are still unsatisfactory due to: i) relatively short-term duration of experiments, ii) cultivation of young plants with different growth strategy comparing to old ones, iii) plant cultivation under artificial soil and weather conditions, and iv) in non-representative stand structure. In this contribution we are discussing the physiological and morphological responses of Norway spruce trees cultivated in DAWs during eight consecutive growing seasons in the context with other results from Norway spruce cultivation under air-elevated [CO2] conditions. On the level of physiological responses, we discuss the changes in the rate of CO2 assimilation, assimilation capacity, photorespiration, dark respiration, stomatal conductance, water potential and transpiration, and the sensitivity of these physiological processes to temperature. On the level of morphological responses, we discuss the changes in bud and growth phenology, needle and shoot morphology, architecture of crown and root system, wood

  12. In vivo tropisms and kinetics of rat theilovirus infection in immunocompetent and immunodeficient rats.

    PubMed

    Drake, Michael T; Besch-Williford, Cindy; Myles, Matthew H; Davis, Justin W; Livingston, Robert S

    2011-09-01

    Rat theilovirus (RTV) is a cardiovirus related to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus. While RTV is a prevalent viral pathogen of rats used in biomedical research, the pathogenesis and characterization of RTV infections is not well understood. In the studies reported herein, we used immunohistochemistry to identify viral antigens in enterocytes of the small intestines of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Fecal viral shedding in immunocompromised and immunocompetent rats following oral gavage with RTV1 was high for the first 2 weeks of infection with persistent shedding of high viral loads being observed in immunocompromised nude rats but not in immunocompetent rats. RTV was also detected in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen of immunocompromised rats but not immunocompetent rats. In addition, the magnitude of serum antibody responses differed between immunocompetent rat strains with Brown Norway and SD rats having a significantly higher antibody response than CD or Fischer 344 rats. These data suggest that RTV1 has a tropism for the epithelial cells of the small intestine, immunocompetent rats have differing serum antibody responses to RTV infection, and sustained fecal shedding and extraintestinal dissemination of RTV1 occurs in rats deficient in T cell-dependent adaptive immunity. RTV infection in immunocompromised and immunocompetent rats has merit as a model for further studies of theilovirus pathogenesis following oral viral exposure.

  13. Domestication and diversification: a comparative analysis of the play fighting of the Brown Norway, Sprague-Dawley, and Wistar laboratory strains of (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Himmler, Stephanie M; Modlinska, Klaudia; Stryjek, Rafal; Himmler, Brett T; Pisula, Wojciech; Pellis, Sergio M

    2014-08-01

    Laboratory strains of rats are a commonly used subject to study play behavior. Recent research has shown that play in one laboratory strain of rat (e.g., Long-Evans hooded) differs in a number of ways from its wild counterparts. These findings suggest that domestication affects some aspects of play behavior. However, there are multiple strains of laboratory rats, which have been domesticated through different lineages all derived from wild rats and it cannot be assumed that all domestic strains are identical in their play. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the play behavior of three other strains of laboratory rats (e.g., Wistar, Sprague-Dawley, and Brown Norway). All strains were similar to each other as they all engaged in high frequencies of play, tolerated similar interanimal distances before initiating playful defense and displayed similar acrobatic capacities, suggesting domestication produces some common changes in play and other factors that influence play. However, strains differed significantly from one another in the use of tactics that promote bodily contact during play. Indeed, in this regard, some strains were more similar to wild rats than others, suggesting that some domestication-induced changes are either unique or more prominent in some laboratory strains than others. Such a mosaic pattern of transformation not only offers the possibility of using strain differences to characterize the genetic factors contributing to different facets of play, but also cautions researchers from making rat-general conclusions from studies on any one strain.

  14. Inbred Rat Strains Mimic the Disparate Human Response to Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    Norway rats were exquisitely susceptible to the virus and died with extensive hepatic necrosis 3 to I 5 days after inoculation of only 5 plaque...many of the animals necropsied (Table 11). Rats dying of hepatic necrosis uniformly had large quantities of virus in the liver and blood. Their brain...at least a 100-fold difference between the lethality of RVF virus for rats susceptible to hepatic necrosis and more resistant strains. Ten-fold in

  15. Handling of quarry waste from schist production at Oppdal, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willy Danielsen, Svein; Alnæs, Lisbeth; Azrague, Kamal; Suleng, Jon

    2017-04-01

    Handling of quarry waste from schist production at Oppdal, Norway Svein Willy Danielsen1), Lisbeth Alnæs2), Kamal Azrague2), Jon Suleng3) 1) Geomaterials Consultant, Trondheim Norway, 2) SINTEF, Trondheim, Norway, 3) AF Gruppen AS, Oppdal, Norway A significant amount of aggregate research in Norway has been focused on the recovery and use of surplus sizes from hard rock aggregate quarries. The use of sand sized quarry waste (QW) from crushing/processing has been motivated by the rapid depletion of traditional sand/gravel resources, increasing land-use conflicts, and the need to minimise QW deposits which for some quarries are becoming a critical factor for economy as well as for environmental reasons. With an annual aggregate production of 77 million tons, out of which approximately 83 % comes from hard rock, the annual volume of size < 4 mm will be of the order of 19 million tons. Converting this into construction aggregates is a major challenge in order to obtain satisfactory mass balance. This challenge is even bigger for quarries producing decorative stones. E.g. the quarrying and production of schist products for building purpose normally utilises as little as 10-15 % of the excavated rock. Oppdal in central Norway is a main supplier of schist products for flooring, roofing and decorative purpose. The high percentage of QW is due to strict requirements to the finished products, both regarding processing and the character of the parent rock. The need to deposit large amounts of QW is a serious setback for the quarry economy. Within a limited time horizon the volumes of QW can threaten the further exploitation by merely choking the quarry. On the opposite side - any process that can convert the QW into sellable products will give a tremendous added value for the producer. Besides, the area in question is about to drain out its available aggregate resources, having to rely on long-transported sand and gravel. This has consequences not only for the economy, but

  16. Blood pressure and risk of prostate cancer: Cohort Norway (CONOR).

    PubMed

    Martin, Richard M; Vatten, Lars; Gunnell, David; Romundstad, Pål

    2010-03-01

    Some studies suggest that raised blood pressure may increase prostate cancer risk. We investigated associations of blood pressure with prostate cancer within the CONOR collaborative cohorts of Norway. Between 1994 and 2003, 82,098 men from ten population-based cohorts in Norway completed standardised questionnaires and physical examinations, including resting blood pressure. The unique 11-digit identification number of Norwegian citizens allowed linkage with the Cancer Registry of Norway. A total of 78,768 (96%) men who were cancer-free at baseline and average age of 50.3 years (standard deviation, SD: 15.2) were followed up for a mean of 9.15 years. 11.4% of these men used antihypertensive drugs at baseline. During follow-up (1994-2006), 1,974 incident prostate cancers were diagnosed. We found a 4% (95% confidence interval, CI = 0-9%) increased risk of prostate cancer per one SD (18.3 mmHg) increase in systolic blood pressure and similar findings for diastolic blood pressure (hazard ratio, HR: 1.05 per SD; 95% CI = 1.01-1.10). The association was stronger for advanced (HR: 1.16 per SD increase in systolic blood pressure; 95% CI = 1.05-1.27) compared with localised (1.01; 0.95-1.08) prostate cancer (p for heterogeneity in hazard ratios = 0.02). Raised blood pressure was associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer, particularly advanced cancers at diagnosis. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these findings may provide biological insights into prostate carcinogenesis. Even if the association was causal, our data suggest that raised blood pressure would account for only 3% of prostate cancers, so the public health impact of this association may be limited.

  17. Scenarios of annual and seasonal runoff for Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roald, L. A.; Skaugen, T. E.; Beldring, S.; Væringstad, T.; Engeset, R.; Førland, E. J.

    2003-04-01

    Scenarios of the annual and seasonal runoff for the period 2030-49 compared to the recent period 1980-99 have been developed. The scenarios are based on daily temperature and precipitation series from the research project: Regional Climate Development Under Global Warming (RegClim) in Norway. The study utilises dynamically downscaled series for the period 1980-99 and for the scenario period 2030-49 based on the GSDIO simulation with the global climate model ECHAM4/OPYC3 of the Max Planck Institute für Meteorologie in Hamburg. The runoff has been modelled by a gridded version of the HBV-model with grid size 1 x 1 km^2 as well as a basin based HBV-model for 42 Norwegian river basins. The main results were: i) increase in the annual runoff in almost all parts of Norway, most in the west, where the mean annual runoff may increase by 400 to 1100 mm, and only a marginal increase in East Norway and in Finnmark; ii) largest increase in the winter runoff in lowland areas close to the coast; iii) increasing spring runoff in the inland areas, especially in the north; iv) decreasing summer runoff; v) increasing autumn runoff in most regions, most on the west coast. The evapotranspiration will increase moderately, and the water equivalent will decrease for the snow cover by 1.April in lowland regions, but will increase in the high alpine areas. The year to year variability of the runoff will remain as under the present climate.

  18. Oral health equality during 30 years in Norway.

    PubMed

    Holst, Dorthe

    2008-08-01

    To study the relationship between income and edentulousness and having a functional dentition from 1975 to 2002, and to examine whether or not the findings can be characterized as a social gradient. Four datasets were collected by personal interviews and precoded questionnaires by Statistics Norway in 1975, 1985, 1995 and 2002. The datasets were representative of the non-institutionalized adult population in Norway. Each year, the sampled persons were distributed into five income quintiles. Four effects were examined of the relationship between income quintiles and edentulousness and functional dentition (1) the absolute equality effect, (2) the period effect, (3) the relative equality effect, and (4) the gradient effect. The main finding is that in absolute terms oral health is more equally distributed in 2002 than in 1975, and the lowest income groups benefited the most in oral health. Among the elderly, however, having a functional dentition was less equally distributed in 2002. The relative differences increased for the oldest for each new birth cohort; thus, the chances of being edentulous was 7.5 times higher in the lowest income group versus the highest group in 2002, whereas the chances were only two times higher in 1972. Having lost all natural teeth was infrequent in 2002, and inequality wiped out in the population below > or = 60 years. A small social gradient was still in 2002. The condition of edentulousness is a result of accumulated incidences of dental diseases and fragmented access to dental care. Economic barriers and unavailability of dental care postponed necessary restorative dental care and resulted in more drastic treatment solutions previously especially in the rural areas in Norway.

  19. First oil pipeline to Norway crosses Norwegian trench

    SciTech Connect

    Johsrud, P.

    1988-05-02

    Norsk Hydro AS laid the first oil pipeline from North Sea fields to Norway last summer as part of the Oseberg transportation system. The line was hydrostatically tested last fall in preparation for start-up next year. After several appraisal wells and extensive evaluation work, the operator for the field, Norsk Hydro, presented a development plan which was approved by the Norwegian parliament in the spring of 1984. This article describes the development phases, the transportation system, and how the trench crossing was done.

  20. Three individuals, three stories, three burials from medieval Trondheim, Norway

    PubMed Central

    Ersland, Geir Atle; Daux, Valérie; Parson, Walther; Wilkinson, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the life stories of three individuals who lived in Trondheim, Norway, during the 13th century. Based on skeletal examinations, facial reconstructions, genetic analyses, and stable oxygen isotope analyses, the birthplace, mobility, ancestry, pathology, and physical appearance of these people are presented. The stories are discussed within the relevant historical context. These three people would have been ordinary citizens, without any privileges out of the ordinary, which makes them quite rare in the academic literature. Through the study of individuals one gets a unique look into the Norwegian medieval society. PMID:28671986

  1. Towards an operational soil temperature product for Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etzelmüller, B.; Westermann, S.; Gisnås, K.; Schuler, T.

    2012-12-01

    In this century, thawing of permafrost is expected to occur in large areas due to climate change, which may become a trigger for climatic feedback mechanisms on the local to global scale. While it is not feasible to cover the vast permafrost areas by ground-based monitoring of soil temperatures in boreholes, wealth of novel multi-sensor-multi-source data could be exploited to assess the thermal ground conditions on large scales. In Norway, a wide range of permafrost conditions occurs - from mountain permafrost over organic-rich wetlands to high-arctic permafrost in Svalbard. Furthermore, gridded data sets from various sources are available so that it is a well-suited test region to evaluate and benchmark the performance of various modeling approaches. While soil temperatures can be modeled using Fourier's law of heat conduction, it is crucial to drive such models by accurate time series of the key input variables at suitable spatial and temporal resolutions. For soil thermal models, these are land surface temperature, snow depth and soil and snow thermal properties. We present a framework for transient and distributed modeling the ground thermal regime in Norway, CryoGRID 2.0. In the model, the subsurface heat flow is treated in terms of 1D heat conduction using the land or snow surface temperature as upper boundary condition. The model features a dynamical representation of the snow cover and explicitly accounts for the heat flux through the snow pack. The model is driven by operationally gridded data of daily air temperature and snow depth available at http://senorge.no. These datasets are available from 1957 to present-day at a spatial resolution of 1 km. The spatial distributions of ground thermal properties (e.g. thermal conductivity) and surface cover are derived from geological maps, borehole measurements and remote sensing data. We present model runs from South Norway highlighting the capacity of the approach to simulate permafrost distribution and duration

  2. Development of White and Norway Spruce Trees from Several Seed Sources 29 Years After Planting

    Treesearch

    James P. King; Paul O. Rudolf

    1969-01-01

    A 29-year-old test of trees grown from seven white spruce and six Norway spruce seed sources and planted in Wisconsin and Minnesota demonstrates the importance of seed-source selection and indicates that trees from some Norway spruce sources equal or surpass the native white spruce.

  3. State-Based Curriculum-Making: Approaches to Local Curriculum Work in Norway and Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mølstad, Christina Elde

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates how state authorities in Norway and Finland design national curriculum to provide different policy conditions for local curriculum work in municipalities and schools. The topic is explored by comparing how national authorities in Norway and Finland create a scope for local curriculum. The data consist of interviews with…

  4. Reinforcing Norway in War: A Dilemma in Norwegian National Security Policy,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-15

    into the concept of the Nordic Balance, coined by Arne Olar Brundtland of the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs. Although Nordic countries...Olav and Tammes, Rolf. The Soviet Naval Threat and Norway. Oslo: National Defence College of Norway, 1986. Skogan, John Kristen and Brundtland , Arne

  5. Breeding for resistance in Norway spruce to the root and butt rot fungi Heterobasidion spp

    Treesearch

    G. Swedjemark; A.K. Borg-Karlson; B. Karlsson

    2012-01-01

    Results from previous studies of resistance in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) to the pathogens Heterobasidion spp. show significant genotypic variation in fungal growth and spore susceptibility among Norway spruce clones. The genetic variation and the heritability are large enough for practical breeding purposes and...

  6. A density management diagram for Norway spruce in the temperate Europe montane region

    Treesearch

    Giorgio Vacchiano; R. Justin DeRose; John D. Shaw; Miroslav Svoboda; Renzo Motta

    2013-01-01

    Norway spruce is one of the most important conifer tree species in Europe, paramount for timber provision, habitat, recreation, and protection of mountain roads and settlements from natural hazards. Although natural Norway spruce forests exhibit diverse structures, even-aged stands can arise after disturbance or as the result of common silvicultural practice, including...

  7. State-Based Curriculum-Making: Approaches to Local Curriculum Work in Norway and Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mølstad, Christina Elde

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates how state authorities in Norway and Finland design national curriculum to provide different policy conditions for local curriculum work in municipalities and schools. The topic is explored by comparing how national authorities in Norway and Finland create a scope for local curriculum. The data consist of interviews with…

  8. Ips typographus and Ophiostoma polonicum versus Norway spruce: joint attack and host defense

    Treesearch

    Erik Christiansen

    1991-01-01

    During the years 1971 to 1982, major epidemics of the spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus L., occurred in southeastern Norway and adjoining parts of Sweden. The outbreaks were triggered by large-scale wind-felling and long-lasting drought (Worrell 1983). This "epidemic of the century," hitting our important timber tree, Norway spruce,

  9. Adolescents with Turkish background in Norway and Sweden: a comparative study of their psychological adaptation.

    PubMed

    Virta, Erkki; Sam, David L; Westin, Charles

    2004-02-01

    Using a questionnaire survey, this study compared psychological adaptation (self-esteem, life satisfaction, and mental health problems) of Turkish adolescents in Norway and Sweden, and examined to what extent ethnic and majority identities, acculturation strategies, and perceived discrimination accounted for adaptation among Turkish adolescents. The samples consisted of 407 Turks (111 in Norway and 296 in Sweden) with a mean age of 15.2 years and 433 host adolescents (207 in Norway, 226 in Sweden) with a mean age of 15.6 years. Turks in Norway reported poorer psychological adaptation than Turks in Sweden. Predictors of good adaptation were Turkish identity and integration, whereas poor adaptation was related to marginalization and perceived discrimination. The results indicated that the poorer adaptation of Turks in Norway compared to that of Turks in Sweden could be due to lower degree of Turkish identity and higher degree of perceived discrimination.

  10. 76 FR 38698 - Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway; Scheduling of Full Five-Year Reviews Concerning...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... COMMISSION Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway; Scheduling of Full Five-Year Reviews Concerning the Countervailing Duty Order and Antidumping Duty Order on Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway AGENCY... the antidumping duty order on fresh and chilled Atlantic salmon from Norway would be likely to lead...

  11. 76 FR 70409 - Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway: Final Results of Full Third Sunset Review of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... International Trade Administration Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway: Final Results of Full Third... sunset review of the antidumping duty (AD) order on fresh and chilled Atlantic salmon from Norway... the AD order on fresh and chilled Atlantic salmon from Norway pursuant to section 751(c) of the...

  12. Suicide among Indigenous Sami in Arctic Norway, 1970-1998.

    PubMed

    Silviken, A; Haldorsen, T; Kvernmo, S

    2006-01-01

    Suicide mortality was examined between 1970 and 1998 in a cohort of 19,801 persons categorized as indigenous Sami in Arctic Norway. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR) were calculated using the suicide rates of the rural population of Arctic Norway as reference. There was a significant moderate increased risk for suicide among indigenous Sami (SMR = 1.27, 95% Confidence interval (CI): 1.02-1.56). In the study period, 89 suicides occurred in the cohort (70 men and 19 women) with increased suicide mortality both for indigenous Sami males (SMR = 1.27; 95% CI: 0.99-1.61) and females (SMR = 1.27; 95% CI: 0.77-1.99). Significant increased suicide mortality was found for young Sami aged 15-24 for both males (SMR = 1.82; 95% CI: 1.13-2.78) and females (SMR = 3.17; 95% CI: 1.17-6.91). Significant increased suicide mortality was found for indigenous Sami males residing in Sami core area (SMR = 1.54; 95% CI: 1.04-2.20) and for indigenous Sami males not belonging to semi-nomadic reindeer herding (SMR = 1.30; 95% CI: 1.00-1.65). Clusters of suicides in Sami core area may explain the increased suicide mortality found in subgroups among indigenous Sami.

  13. Competition policy for health care provision in Norway.

    PubMed

    Brekke, Kurt R; Straume, Odd Rune

    2017-02-01

    Competition policy has played a very limited role for health care provision in Norway. The main reason is that Norway has a National Health Service (NHS) with extensive public provision and a wide set of sector-specific regulations that limit the scope for competition. However, the last two decades, several reforms have deregulated health care provision and opened up for provider competition along some dimensions. For specialised care, the government has introduced patient choice and (partly) activity (DRG) based funding, but also corporatised public hospitals and allowed for more private provision. For primary care, a reform changed the payment scheme to capitation and (a higher share of) fee-for-service, inducing almost all GPs on fixed salary contracts to become self-employed. While these reforms have the potential for generating competition in the Norwegian NHS, the empirical evidence is quite limited and the findings are mixed. We identify a set of possible caveats that may weaken the incentives for provider competition - such as the partial implementation of DRG pricing, the dual purchaser-provider role of regional health authorities, and the extensive consolidation of public hospitals - and argue that there is great scope for competition policy measures that could stimulate provider competition within the Norwegian NHS.

  14. Avoiding disturbance: midwifery practice in home birth settings in Norway.

    PubMed

    Blix, Ellen

    2011-10-01

    to explore midwifery practice in home birth settings in Norway, especially practice assumed by the midwives to promote normal labour and birth. in-depth interviews transcribed verbatim and analysed using a grounded theory method. home birth settings in Norway. 12 midwives who regularly attended home births and who had assisted a minimum of 30 home births between 1990 and 2007. the core category 'avoiding disturbance' was identified during the analyses, indicating that the midwives prevented the woman from being disturbed and protected her from disturbance if it occurred during labour. The core category must be understood in the light of the midwives' attitudes towards and beliefs about labour and birth. The labour process could be disturbed by the midwife, the birthing woman, the partner and other supporting persons, and older children. The midwives regarded labour as work to be done by the woman, as a sexual process, and had a basic understanding that labour and birth usually had good outcomes. factors regarded as beneficial for the woman and her labour, like a partner, friends and helpers supporting the woman and doing important and necessary work, and a midwife observing the woman, fetus and course of labour, could also be perceived as sources of disturbance. the effect of a calm, undisturbed environment on the labour course should be explored further. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Hepatitis C--a health problem also in Norway].

    PubMed

    Vik, Inger Sofie Samdal; Skaug, Kjell; Dalgard, Olav; Steen, Tore W; Hoddevik, Gunnar

    2008-02-28

    Hepatitis C is a large global health problem; approximately 20 - 30 000 are infected in Norway. Hepatitis C-infection is often chronic and can progress into chronic liver disease, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The most important transmission route is through percutaneous exposure to infected blood. The aim of this article is to describe the clinical course, microbiological diagnostic approaches, therapy, prophylaxis and public health aspects of Hepatitis C infection. The paper is based on results from annual health examinations (conducted since 2001) of persons who abuse drugs intravenously in Oslo, from diagnostic work in a national reference laboratory for Hepatitis C and studies of literature (retrieved from Pubmed). The prevalence of Hepatitis C varies by country and subgroup of patients. In Norway the prevalence is 0.13 % among new blood donors, 0.7 % among pregnant women, 0.55 % in the general adult population and approximately 70 % among persons who abuse drugs intravenously. Treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin induces sustained virological response in 80 % of patients with genotypes 2 and 3 and in 30 - 40 % of those with genotype 1.

  16. Fallout 137Cs in reindeer herders in Arctic Norway.

    PubMed

    Skuterud, Lavrans; Thørring, Håvard

    2015-03-03

    Reindeer herders in the Arctic were among the most heavily exposed populations to the global fallout from nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 1960s, due to high transfer of radionuclides in the lichens-reindeer-human food chain. Annual studies of (137)Cs in reindeer herders in Kautokeino, Norway, were initiated in 1965 to monitor radiation doses and follow environmental (137)Cs behavior. The (137)Cs concentrations declined from the peak in 1965 with effective half-times of 6-8 years, only interrupted by a temporary doubling in levels from 1986 to 1987 due to the Chernobyl fallout. During the period of 1950-2010 an average herder received an integrated effective dose from incorporated (137)Cs of about 18 mSv. This dose represents an insignificant increase in the risk for developing cancer. Health studies even show a significantly lower cancer incidence among Sámis and reindeer herders in northern Norway compared to other populations in the same area.

  17. [Whooping cough--an increasing problem in Norway].

    PubMed

    Dudman, Susanne Gjeruldsen; Trøseid, Marius; Jonassen, Tom Øystein; Steinbakk, Martin

    2006-01-26

    The incidence of whooping cough has increased in recent years in Norway, especially amongst older children and adults; in 2004 it was 168/100,000. This article is based on our own experience and a review of available literature, identified on Medline with the search word "pertussis". Whooping cough, a disease caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis, is transmitted via respiratory droplets. Sources of infection for infants are often their parents and siblings. Older children and adolescents contract whooping cough mostly in school, whereas adults usually get the disease from children or colleagues. The typical symptoms are bouts of violent coughing with the classic whoop and post-tussive vomiting. A milder clinical picture can be seen in vaccinated persons, reinfected patients, and in persons above the age of 15. Infants are most at risk of developing serious disease and have the highest numbers of hospitalizations, complications and mortality. But complications are also seen in adolescents and adults, including urinary incontinence, rib fractures and pneumonia. The diagnosis is made by culture or PCR in nasopharyngeal secretions, as well as by detection of antibodies to B. pertussis in serum. If treatment is indicated, macrolides are the drugs of choice; these shorten the duration of symptoms and the period of contagiousness if given in the early stages of the disease. To help combat whooping cough in Norway, from 2006 an extra vaccine booster dose will be given to children at the age of seven.

  18. Estimating costs of sea lice control strategy in Norway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yajie; Bjelland, Hans Vanhauwaer

    2014-12-01

    This paper explores the costs of sea lice control strategies associated with salmon aquaculture at a farm level in Norway. Diseases can cause reduction in growth, low feed efficiency and market prices, increasing mortality rates, and expenditures on prevention and treatment measures. Aquaculture farms suffer the most direct and immediate economic losses from diseases. The goal of a control strategy is to minimize the total disease costs, including biological losses, and treatment costs while to maximize overall profit. Prevention and control strategies are required to eliminate or minimize the disease, while cost-effective disease control strategies at the fish farm level are designed to reduce the losses, and to enhance productivity and profitability. Thus, the goal can be achieved by integrating models of fish growth, sea lice dynamics and economic factors. A production function is first constructed to incorporate the effects of sea lice on production at a farm level, followed by a detailed cost analysis of several prevention and treatment strategies associated with sea lice in Norway. The results reveal that treatments are costly and treatment costs are very sensitive to treatment types used and timing of the treatment conducted. Applying treatment at an early growth stage is more economical than at a later stage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Association between prescribing hypnotics for parents and children in Norway.

    PubMed

    Holdø, Ingvild; Handal, Marte; Skurtveit, Svetlana; Bramness, Jørgen G

    2013-09-01

    To describe the dispensing of the hypnotic alimemazine to children aged 0-3 years and investigate the association between dispensing of alimemazine to children and dispensed hypnotics to their parents. An observational cohort study linking information from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway and the Norwegian Prescription Database. Hypnotics dispensed to parents in a 1-year period before pregnancy was associated with dispensed alimemazine for children aged 0-3 years. All children born in Norway in 2008 (N=59 325) and their mothers and fathers were included. Dispensed alimemazine to children during the first 3 years of life. Three percent of children received alimemazine. Dispensed hypnotics to mothers increased the risk of the child receiving a prescription for alimemazine, OR of 2.3 (1.7-3.0) for boys and 1.7 (1.2-2.4) for girls. When both parents had been dispensed prescriptions for hypnotics, the risk increased nearly threefold. A dispensed alimemazine prescription was also associated with dispensed prescriptions for antidepressants to both mother and father, mother's smoking, the child's gender and child's prescriptions for antibiotics, respiratory drugs and dermatological steroids. Dispensed alimemazine to children under 3 was associated with parents' previous use of hypnotics, indicating that factors other than the child's health influence the use of hypnotic drugs in infancy and toddler years. The frequent usage of alimemazine in children below 3 years and the association with parents' use of hypnotics should concern prescribing doctors.

  20. A controlled vocabulary for nursing and allied health in Norway.

    PubMed

    Flor, P; Jakobsson, A; Mogset, I; Taylor, S; Aasen, S E

    2001-03-01

    Nursing and allied health libraries at educational institutions in Norway have generally indexed their book collections with uncontrolled terms. With the reorganization of higher education in 1994, the majority of these libraries joined BIBSYS, which is a joint library system for higher education and research in Norway. This has led to chaos when searching the joint catalogue for literature on nursing and related fields. A term such as 'behaviour problems' may have up to five synonyms. In an attempt to improve the quality of searching the health literature, BIBSYS appointed a working group in the Spring of 1999 to find a suitable controlled vocabulary for this subject area, and to see how this vocabulary could be integrated into BIBSYS. The group presented its recommendations in October 1999. The report has been well received by the BIBSYS Board and by user groups. There are no Norwegian vocabularies that are suitable for use in nursing and allied health, therefore it will be necessary to translate and combine existing thesauri. The group has looked at the Nordic Multilingual Thesaurus on Health Promotion, the Swedish Spriline Thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) and CINAHL Subject Heading List. Other relevant thesauri are AMED/CATS Thesaurus, Bioethics Thesaurus (Bioethicsline) and the RCN thesaurus. The group recommends the development of a Norwegian thesaurus based on a translation of parts of MeSH and CINAHL Subject Heading List.

  1. Control of bovine ringworm by vaccination in Norway.

    PubMed

    Lund, Arve; Bratberg, Anna Marie; Næss, Bjørn; Gudding, Roar

    2014-03-15

    Bovine ringworm caused by Trichophyton verrucosum is a notifiable disease in Norway. New infected herds are reported to the Norwegian Food Safety Authority. To limit spread of the disease, restrictions are imposed on holdings including access to common pastures and sale of live animals. Bovine ringworm has been endemic in the Norwegian dairy population for decades. Since 1980 a vaccine (Bovilis Ringvac LTF-130, Merck Animal Health) has been available. The vaccine contains an attenuated strain of T. verrucosum and stimulates humoral and cellular immune responses conferring protection. Efficacy and safety of the vaccine have been evaluated in experimental and field studies. Vaccination campaigns in densely populated counties have contributed to a substantial decrease in number of ringworm outbreaks. The annual incidence of new infected herds decreased from 1.7% in 1980 to 0.043% in 2004. Few herds remained with restrictions and a "mopping up" project was established to offer assistance specifically to these holdings. A milestone was achieved in 2009; no new herds with cases of clinical ringworm caused by T. verrucosum were reported to the authorities. By end of 2012, there are only two herds with restrictions. Vaccination during the last 30 years has been a key control measure in the effort to prevent disease outbreaks and eradicate bovine ringworm in Norway.

  2. [Comparisons outpatient drug prescriptions: France, Denmark, Norway, Sweden].

    PubMed

    Dezileaux, Barbara; Martinez, Florie

    2016-06-01

    Comparisons outpatient drug prescriptions: France, Denmark, Norway, Sweden. Project compares quantitatively outpatient drug prescriptions in France, Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Data were obtained from national databases; the unit of measurement was defined daily dose per 1000 inhabitants. The five most prescribed drug classes were compared in each country in 2009, then benzodiazepines and antibiotics from 2006 to 2012. A literature review was focused on the context of prescriptions for each country. In 2009, the five most prescribed drug classes in the four countries represented seven classes in total. France was not the biggest prescriber of drugs, but from 2006 to 2012 benzodiazepines and antibiotics were prescribed much more in France than in the other countries. The evolution of prescriptions was different for each country, and very stable in France. In 2009, France was not the biggest drugs consumer of all classes, but was characterized by high prescriptions in some classes. Copyright © 2016 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. A prevalence survey of infections among hospitalized patients in Norway.

    PubMed

    Hovig, B; Lystad, A; Opsjøn, H

    1981-12-01

    The prevalence rates of infections among hospitalized patients in 15 Norwegian hospitals on 28 November 1979 is reported. A total of 7833 patients were included in the study, representing approximately 35 per cent of patients in somatic hospitals in Norway on that day. The prevalence rate of all infections was 17 per cent and for hospital infections 9 per cent. Hospital infections were most frequent in haematology and intensive care departments (23 and 22 per cent respectively) while the lowest rates were found in ophtalmology and psychiatry (2 per cent). Urinary tract infections played a major role both overall (33.5 per cent) and in hospital infections (41.9 per cent). In community acquired infections alone lower respiratory tract infections were slightly more common than urinary tract infections (26.6 per cent of infections versus 24.1 per cent). The study also comprises data on frequency of bacteriological examination in infected patients and on usage of indwelling urinary catheters in patients with urinary tract infections. The rates are compared to studies in other countries. We found the prevalence survey method to be an acceptable way of assessing infection rates among hospitalized patients in Norway. The greatest benefit of the survey is believed to be the ability to increase the awareness of infection problems in hospitals among health personnel.

  4. Questioning complacency: climate change impacts, vulnerability, and adaptation in Norway.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Karen; Eriksen, Siri; Sygna, Linda; Naess, Lars Otto

    2006-03-01

    Most European assessments of climate change impacts have been carried out on sectors and ecosystems, providing a narrow understanding of what climate change really means for society. Furthermore, the main focus has been on technological adaptations, with less attention paid to the process of climate change adaptation. In this article, we present and analyze findings from recent studies on climate change impacts, vulnerability, and adaptation in Norway, with the aim of identifying the wider social impacts of climate change. Three main lessons can be drawn. First, the potential thresholds and indirect effects may be more important than the direct, sectoral effects. Second, highly sensitive sectors, regions, and communities combine with differential social vulnerability to create both winners and losers. Third, high national levels of adaptive capacity mask the barriers and constraints to adaptation, particularly among those who are most vulnerable to climate change. Based on these results, we question complacency in Norway and other European countries regarding climate change impacts and adaptation. We argue that greater attention needs to be placed on the social context of climate change impacts and on the processes shaping vulnerability and adaptation.

  5. Mitochondrial DNA variation in the Viking age population of Norway.

    PubMed

    Krzewińska, Maja; Bjørnstad, Gro; Skoglund, Pontus; Olason, Pall Isolfur; Bill, Jan; Götherström, Anders; Hagelberg, Erika

    2015-01-19

    The medieval Norsemen or Vikings had an important biological and cultural impact on many parts of Europe through raids, colonization and trade, from about AD 793 to 1066. To help understand the genetic affinities of the ancient Norsemen, and their genetic contribution to the gene pool of other Europeans, we analysed DNA markers in Late Iron Age skeletal remains from Norway. DNA was extracted from 80 individuals, and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms were detected by next-generation sequencing. The sequences of 45 ancient Norwegians were verified as genuine through the identification of damage patterns characteristic of ancient DNA. The ancient Norwegians were genetically similar to previously analysed ancient Icelanders, and to present-day Shetland and Orkney Islanders, Norwegians, Swedes, Scots, English, German and French. The Viking Age population had higher frequencies of K*, U*, V* and I* haplogroups than their modern counterparts, but a lower proportion of T* and H* haplogroups. Three individuals carried haplotypes that are rare in Norway today (U5b1b1, Hg A* and an uncommon variant of H*). Our combined analyses indicate that Norse women were important agents in the overseas expansion and settlement of the Vikings, and that women from the Orkneys and Western Isles contributed to the colonization of Iceland. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA variation in the Viking age population of Norway

    PubMed Central

    Krzewińska, Maja; Bjørnstad, Gro; Skoglund, Pontus; Olason, Pall Isolfur; Bill, Jan; Götherström, Anders; Hagelberg, Erika

    2015-01-01

    The medieval Norsemen or Vikings had an important biological and cultural impact on many parts of Europe through raids, colonization and trade, from about AD 793 to 1066. To help understand the genetic affinities of the ancient Norsemen, and their genetic contribution to the gene pool of other Europeans, we analysed DNA markers in Late Iron Age skeletal remains from Norway. DNA was extracted from 80 individuals, and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms were detected by next-generation sequencing. The sequences of 45 ancient Norwegians were verified as genuine through the identification of damage patterns characteristic of ancient DNA. The ancient Norwegians were genetically similar to previously analysed ancient Icelanders, and to present-day Shetland and Orkney Islanders, Norwegians, Swedes, Scots, English, German and French. The Viking Age population had higher frequencies of K*, U*, V* and I* haplogroups than their modern counterparts, but a lower proportion of T* and H* haplogroups. Three individuals carried haplotypes that are rare in Norway today (U5b1b1, Hg A* and an uncommon variant of H*). Our combined analyses indicate that Norse women were important agents in the overseas expansion and settlement of the Vikings, and that women from the Orkneys and Western Isles contributed to the colonization of Iceland. PMID:25487335

  7. Measuring and mapping rock wall permafrost across Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnin, Florence; Etzelmuller, Bernd; Hilger, Paula; Westermann, Sebastian; Isaksen, Ketil; Hermans, Reginald

    2017-04-01

    The investigation of rock wall permafrost is of high relevance for geohazards assessment and for understanding cold-climate landscape evolution since its changes over time can cause slope instability and trigger rock falls. The destabilization of steep slopes is a serious threat to human activities and lives in Norway, especially because most of rock walls lie directly above houses, infrastructures and large water bodies with potential of high-energy displacement waves. Rock wall permafrost has been investigated since the early 2010s in alpine massifs of western Norway thanks to the CryoLINK project (2008-2011). The CryoWALL project (2015-2019) aims at extending this preliminary study to the nation-wide scale. It consists in systematic measurements of rock surface temperature (RST) in order model and to map the spatial distribution of rock wall permafrost. In between August 2015 and August 2016, 20 RST loggers (Geoprecision mini data loggers, accuracy ± 0.1°C, precision 0.01°C, sensors PT1000) were installed at 10 cm depth of 7 selected sites. These loggers are distributed along a latitudinal transect (from 60°50'N to 69°46'N), cover various elevations and sun-exposures, and are completed by 4 other loggers installed in Jotunheimen in 2009 and 2010. The RST time series are used for (a) characterizing the distribution of rock wall permafrost across Norway, (b) running steady-state and transient numerical models of rock wall permafrost at selected sites, and to (c) calibrate a general linear regression model that will be used to (d) predict the spatial distribution of rock wall permafrost at the national scale. In this communication we will introduce the RST measurement installations and sites, as well as the first RST records that encompass 6 years of continuous measurements in Jotunheimen, and 1 year of record for 13 other loggers. The preliminary analysis shows that RST differs by 3°C between N and S faces in Southern Norway, with mean annual RST as low as

  8. Ice Sheet Oscillations During the Last Deglaciation in Western Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohne, O. S.; Mangerud, J.; Svendsen, J.; Gyllencreutz, R.

    2009-12-01

    About 25-26ka cal BP, the Scandinavian Ice Sheet merged with the British Ice Sheet on the continental shelf in the northern part of the North Sea (Sejrup et al., 2009). The Norwegian Channel, that hosted a major ice stream, became finally deglaciated at around 18.5ka cal BP. The deglaciation of western Norway started first in the south and not later than 17-16 ka cal BP, the Jæren region was partly ice-free (Knudsen, 2006). The early deglaciation history in the Hardangerfjord-Bergen area was characterized by some rapid ice-margin oscillations. The extent and timing of the ice front variations are not well constrained, but probably they occurred sometime between 16-14.5ka cal BP. A main difficulty with the exact timing is the radiocarbon plateau around 12.3 ka 14C BP. Subsequently, during the Allerød, the ice sheet withdrew more than 50 km from the coastline, until it again started to re-advance. The recorded sea-level response of this re-advance indicates that the re-growth of the ice sheet started in the mid-Allerød, approximately at 13.6ka cal BP (Lohne et al., 2007), and it seems clear that the resulting ice sheet advance continued until the very end of the Younger Dryas when the prominent Herdla-Halsnøy Moraine was formed. In the 500-800 m deep Hardangerfjord the re-advance stopped at a bedrock threshold where the Halsnøy Moraine subsequently formed. As appear from the sediment stratigraphy in a lake basin on Halsnøy the advancing ice-margin reached the island slightly before the Vedde Ash fall (c. 12.1ka cal BP). The ice-front then halted on the bedrock sill, but stratigraphic evidence indicates that the fjord-glacier continued to grow in thickness. Marginal moraines from Halsnøy can be traced up to a level of about 1000 m a.s.l., 40 km further inland, reflecting a massive buildup of the ice sheet. The advancing ice-sheet reached its maximum position, both in the Bergen and Hardangerfjorden area, late in the YD. A more precise dating by radiocarbon is

  9. Integrated database for rapid mass movements in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaedicke, C.; Lied, K.; Kronholm, K.

    2009-03-01

    Rapid gravitational slope mass movements include all kinds of short term relocation of geological material, snow or ice. Traditionally, information about such events is collected separately in different databases covering selected geographical regions and types of movement. In Norway the terrain is susceptible to all types of rapid gravitational slope mass movements ranging from single rocks hitting roads and houses to large snow avalanches and rock slides where entire mountainsides collapse into fjords creating flood waves and endangering large areas. In addition, quick clay slides occur in desalinated marine sediments in South Eastern and Mid Norway. For the authorities and inhabitants of endangered areas, the type of threat is of minor importance and mitigation measures have to consider several types of rapid mass movements simultaneously. An integrated national database for all types of rapid mass movements built around individual events has been established. Only three data entries are mandatory: time, location and type of movement. The remaining optional parameters enable recording of detailed information about the terrain, materials involved and damages caused. Pictures, movies and other documentation can be uploaded into the database. A web-based graphical user interface has been developed allowing new events to be entered, as well as editing and querying for all events. An integration of the database into a GIS system is currently under development. Datasets from various national sources like the road authorities and the Geological Survey of Norway were imported into the database. Today, the database contains 33 000 rapid mass movement events from the last five hundred years covering the entire country. A first analysis of the data shows that the most frequent type of recorded rapid mass movement is rock slides and snow avalanches followed by debris slides in third place. Most events are recorded in the steep fjord terrain of the Norwegian west coast, but

  10. Comparing screening mammography for early breast cancer detection in Vermont and Norway.

    PubMed

    Hofvind, Solveig; Vacek, Pamela M; Skelly, Joan; Weaver, Donald L; Geller, Berta M

    2008-08-06

    Most screening mammography in the United States differs from that in countries with formal screening programs by having a shorter screening interval and interpretation by a single reader vs independent double reading. We examined how these differences affect early detection of breast cancer by comparing performance measures and histopathologic outcomes in women undergoing opportunistic screening in Vermont and organized screening in Norway. We evaluated recall, screen detection, and interval cancer rates and prognostic tumor characteristics for women aged 50-69 years who underwent screening mammography in Vermont (n = 45 050) and in Norway (n = 194 430) from 1997 through 2003. Rates were directly adjusted for age by weighting the rates within 5-year age intervals to reflect the age distribution in the combined data and were compared using two-sided Z tests. The age-adjusted recall rate was 9.8% in Vermont and 2.7% in Norway (P < .001). The age-adjusted screen detection rate per 1000 woman-years after 2 years of follow-up was 2.77 in Vermont and 2.57 in Norway (P = .12), whereas the interval cancer rate per 1000 woman-years was 1.24 and 0.86, respectively (P < .001). Larger proportions of invasive interval cancers in Vermont than in Norway were 15 mm or smaller (55.9% vs 38.2%, P < .001) and had no lymph node involvement (67.5% vs 57%, P = .01). The prognostic characteristics of all invasive cancers (screen-detected and interval cancer) were similar in Vermont and Norway. Screening mammography detected cancer at about the same rate and at the same prognostic stage in Norway and Vermont, with a statistically significantly lower recall rate in Norway. The interval cancer rate was higher in Vermont than in Norway, but tumors that were diagnosed in the Vermont women tended to be at an earlier stage than those diagnosed in the Norwegian women.

  11. [Smoking and art. History of smoking in Norway in paintings].

    PubMed

    Larsen, I F

    1997-12-10

    The habit of smoking was well-known in Norway in the first half of the sixteenth century. Tobacco-smoking is seen in Norwegian paintings. In the nineteenth century, long and artistic pipes were used by men relaxing after a pleasant dinner. In self portraits of Christian Krohg and Edvard Munch we see them smoking pipes and cigarettes surrounded by smoke. In an exhibition of portraits of Norwegian Authors, ten out of seventy authors were portrayed with a pipe, a cigar or a cigarette. There are various interpretations of the use of smoking in art. A simple explanation is that this was an accepted part of life at that time. The authors may have believed that they concentrated better when they smoked and elegance may have been of importance for many of them. The symbolic significance of cigarette-smoking has been of great value in the marketing of tobacco-products.

  12. The occurrence of rabies in the Svalbard Islands of Norway.

    PubMed

    Prestrud, P; Krogsrud, J; Gjertz, I

    1992-01-01

    After the first recorded outbreak of rabies in the Svalbard Islands (Norway) in 1980, brain tissue from 817 trapped arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus) was tested for rabies by a direct fluorescent antibody test. During the same period (1980 to 1990), 29 arctic foxes, 23 polar bears (Ursus maritimus), 19 reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) and five ringed seals (Phoca hispida) were also tested using the same technique. These animals had either been found dead, killed because of abnormal behavior or were apparently healthy when they were collected. Rabies virus antigen was not detected in any of the trapped foxes. Rabies was confirmed in two foxes in 1981, two foxes and one reindeer in 1987, and in one fox in 1990. The presence of rabies in the Svalbard archipelago probably resulted from immigration over the sea ice of an infected host.

  13. On the formation of lignin polysaccharide networks in Norway spruce.

    PubMed

    Oinonen, Petri; Zhang, Liming; Lawoko, Martin; Henriksson, Gunnar

    2015-03-01

    In this study we were mirroring suggested in vivo phenomena of lignin-hemicellulose complex formation in vitro, by cross-linking Norway spruce (Picea abies) galactoglucomannans, xylans and lignin moieties to high molecular weight complexes by laccase treatment. We were able to observe the oxidation and cross-linking of non-condensed guaiacyl-type phenolic moieties attached to both of the hemicelluloses by (31)P NMR and size-exclusion chromatography. We suggest that hemicelluloses-lignin complexes form covalently linked structural units during the early stages of lignification via radical enzymatic cross-linking catalyzed by laccase. This work shows that the hemicellulose molecules in wood are covalently linked to two or more lignin units thereby making them suited for forming network structures.

  14. Generic substitution: micro evidence from register data in Norway.

    PubMed

    Dalen, Dag Morten; Furu, Kari; Locatelli, Marilena; Strøm, Steinar

    2011-02-01

    The importance of prices, doctor and patient characteristics, and market institutions for the likelihood of choosing generic drugs instead of the more expensive original brand-name version are examined. Using an extensive dataset extracted from The Norwegian Prescription Database containing all prescriptions dispensed to individuals in February 2004 and 2006 on 23 different drugs (chemical substances) in Norway, we find strong evidence for the importance of both doctor and patient characteristics for the choice probabilities. The price difference between brand and generic versions and insurance coverage both affect generic substitution. Moreover, controlling for the retail chain affiliation of the dispensing pharmacy, we find that pharmacies play an important role in promoting generic substitution. In markets with more recent entry of generic drugs, brand-name loyalty proves to be much stronger, giving less explanatory power to our demand model.

  15. Convergence or divergence? Reforming primary care in Norway and Britain.

    PubMed

    Lian, Olaug S

    2003-01-01

    Many countries are currently reorganizing their health services in response to cultural, economic, and technological changes. Because the changes are global, different countries are drawn toward similar reform programs. But countries' cultural, economic, and political differences also may lead to divergent responses. This article examines the convergence thesis by comparing recent changes in primary care in Norway and Britain. There seems to be a convergence in objectives, a divergence in remuneration systems, and both divergence and convergence in organizational structures. To understand the dynamics of change, divergence is discussed in relation to the social context of the political initiatives. Divergences are explained by economic, political, and cultural differences, as well as differences in physicians' political power and density.

  16. ["Now I am humble. Indeed." From Germany to Norway in 1934].

    PubMed

    Hem, E; Børdahl, P E

    2000-12-10

    A huge refugee problem arose when the Nazis came to power in Germany in 1933. The most acute stages were just after 1933 and from the summer of 1938. This refugee drama involved all the western countries, including Norway. This paper describes the fate of the German gynaecologist Hans Saenger (1884-1943), professor in Munich, who in 1933 was dispelled by the Nazis because of his Jewish descent. He fled to Norway in 1934 and settled in Fredrikstad. However, the attitude in Norway to refugees in general and Jews in particular was hostile, mainly because of fear of unemployment. Prejudice and xenophobia were of importance, also in the medical profession.

  17. Crustal structure beneath southern Norway imaged by magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherevatova, M.; Smirnov, M.; Korja, T.; Kaikkonen, P.; Pedersen, L. B.; Hübert, J.; Kamm, J.; Kalscheuer, T.

    2014-07-01

    We use data from two magnetotelluric profiles, ToSca10 and ToSca'09, over the Scandinavian Mountains to study the crustal structure in southern Norway. The profiles cross the major tectonic structures of the Caledonian orogen as well as the western margin of the Precambrian Baltica. Dimensionality and strike analyses indicate generally 3-D behavior of the data. However, the majority of the used data distinguishes a preferable strike direction, which is supported by the geology of the region. Hence, we employ 2-D inversion and choose to invert the determinant of the impedance tensor to mitigate 3-D effects in the data on our 2-D models. Magnetotelluric data from both profiles are inverted using a damped least squares solution based on a singular value decomposition. We improved the solution by defining the inverse model covariance matrix through gradient or Laplacian smoothing operators. The two-dimensional inversion models of the ToSca'09 and ToSca'10 field data from southern Norway derived from the damped least squares scheme with the Laplacian inverse model covariance matrix are presented. Resistive rocks, extending to the surface, image the autochthonous Southwest Scandinavian Domain and the allochthonous Western Gneiss Region. Near-surface conductors, which are located between the resistive Caledonian nappes and Precambrian basement, delineate highly conductive shallow-sea sediments, so called alum shales. They exhibit a decollement along which the Caledonian nappes were overthrust. A deeper, upper to mid-crustal conducting layer in the Southwest Scandinavian Domain may depict the remnants of closed ocean basins formed during the accretions and collisions of various Sveconorwegian terranes. In ToSca'10, the Caledonian nappes, the conducting alum shales and the deeper conductor are terminated in the west by the Faltungsgraben shear complex which represents a crustal scale boundary between the Western Gneiss Region in the west and the Southwest Scandinavian

  18. Musculoskeletal symptoms among seafood production workers in North Norway.

    PubMed

    Aasmoe, Lisbeth; Bang, Berit; Egeness, Cathrine; Løchen, Maja-Lisa

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints among male and female production workers in different types of seafood industries in North Norway and to analyse associations between musculoskeletal symptoms and some possible risk factors in the seafood industry. A self-administered anonymous questionnaire, covering several aspects concerning occupational environment and health issues, was mailed to employees in seafood-processing plants in North Norway. A total of 1767 employees in 118 seafood-processing plants participated giving a 50% response rate. This included 744 production workers in whitefish, shrimp and salmon industries, and 129 administrative workers in all types of seafood industries. The prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms was high among seafood production workers. The odds ratio for symptoms from upper limbs was significantly higher for females compared to men. Production workers had the highest relative risk for symptoms from wrist/hands (OR = 4.1-9.4) and elbows (OR = 3.5-5.2) when compared to administrative workers. The main difference between types of seafood industries was the high prevalence of symptoms from wrist/hands among female (82%) and male (64%) production workers in the salmon industry compared to whitefish (62 and 47%, respectively) and shrimp industry (66 and 37%, respectively). Musculoskeletal symptoms were found among the majority of production workers in the whitefish, shrimp and salmon industry, the highest prevalence being among female workers. The main difference between types of seafood industries was the high prevalence of symptoms from wrist/hands among workers in the salmon industry. Cold work was an important risk factor for musculoskeletal symptoms.

  19. Incidence of knee cartilage surgery in Norway, 2008–2011

    PubMed Central

    Engen, Cathrine Nørstad; Årøen, Asbjørn; Engebretsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Objective A systematic and long-term data collection on the treatment of focal cartilage defects (FCDs) of the knee is needed. This can be achieved through the foundation of a National Knee Cartilage Defect Registry. The aim of this study was to establish the nationwide burden of knee cartilage surgery, defined as knee surgery in patients with an FCD. We also aimed to identify any geographical differences in incidence rates, patient demographics or trends within this type of surgery. Setting A population-based study with retrospective identification of patients undergoing knee cartilage surgery in Norway through a mandatory public health database from 2008 to 2011. Participants We identified all patients undergoing cartilage surgery, or other knee surgery in patients with an FCD. All eligible surgeries were assessed for inclusion on the basis of certain types of ICD-10 and NOMESKO Classification of Surgical Procedures codes. Primary and secondary outcome measures The variables were diagnostic and surgical codes, geographic location of the performing hospital, age and sex of the patients. Yearly incidence and incidence rates were calculated. Age-adjusted incidences for risk ratios and ORs between geographical areas were also calculated. Results A total of 10 830 cases of knee cartilage surgery were identified, with slight but significant decreases from 2008 to 2011 (p<0.0003). The national incidence rate was 56/100 000 inhabitants and varied between regions, counties and hospitals. More than 50% of the procedures were palliative and nearly 400 yearly procedures were reparative or restorative. Conclusions Knee cartilage surgery is common in Norway, counting 2500 annual cases with an age-adjusted incidence rate of 68.8/100 000 inhabitants. There are significant geographical variations in incidence and trends of surgery and in trends between public and private hospitals. We suggest that a national surveillance system would be beneficial for the future evaluation

  20. Polychlorinated biphenyls in the atmosphere of southern Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Haugen, J.E. ); Wania, F. ); Lei, Y.D. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry)

    1999-07-15

    Atmospheric concentrations of seven polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners (IUPAC No. 101, 105, 118, 138/163, 153, 156, 180) were measured every week from 1992 to 1995 in Lista, a coastal station in Southern Norway. This data set of 200 samples was analyzed with respect to the influence of time, temperature, air mass origin, and wind speed on both the absolute level and the relative congeneric composition of the PCBs. The geometric mean concentration of the sum of the seven PCB congeners was 114 pg[center dot]m[sup [minus]3], which is in the range observed at urban locations in Europe during the early 1990s. No obvious concentration decrease could be observed during the 4 years. PCB concentrations showed a clear seasonal fluctuation with higher levels during the summer. The temperature dependence of the air concentrations of individual congeners increased with the number of chlorine atoms per molecule resulting in an increase in the relative importance of the higher chlorinated congeners during warm periods. Air arriving in Southern Norway from southwesterly directions had slightly higher concentrations than air coming from the North, whereas the relative composition of the PCB congeners was not influenced by air mass origin. At higher wind speed the concentrations of PCBs decreased. Episodes of conspicuously elevated PCB concentrations neither were associated with a particular air mass origin nor had an unusual congeneric composition. The data analysis suggests that whereas regional air transport from central Europe contributes to the occurrence of PCBs in Lista, a large fraction of the PCBs stems likely from local sources.

  1. Getting Norway to eat healthier: what are the opportunities?

    PubMed

    Oostindjer, Marije; Amdam, Gro V; Egelandsdal, Bjørg

    2015-02-01

    Increased food consumption and the related problem of obesity have spurred initiatives to motivate consumers to eat healthier. Some strategies have shown positive but only short-term effects, as consumers or other stakeholders do not accept them sufficiently in the long term. The aim of this study was to investigate opportunities for healthier eating in Norway according to both consumers and other stakeholders. Five focus-group sessions were conducted with individuals working in the food industry, retail, public health, research and various non-governmental organisations related to food consumption. Topics that were discussed in the focus groups were transformed into a consumer survey, which was conducted with 1178 respondents. The focus groups often indicated a specific responsibility for the food industry to get people to eat healthier. Survey respondents indicated that all actors in the food chain had responsibility for healthier eating in the population, but agreed that the food industry, as well as the health authority, have major responsibilities. Food education was regarded as a favourable strategy in the focus groups and by survey respondents to help people to eat healthier, as were less advertising of unhealthy food and developing new healthy food products. Such strategies should be focused on parents, families, schools and children according to both focus group and survey participants. Implementation challenges include consumers wanting freedom to choose what they eat and consumers wanting food information that is easier to understand. this study showed that consumers and other stakeholders see opportunities for healthier eating in Norway by providing more food education and clearer food information, targeted towards children, families and parents. © 2014 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  2. Inhaled Ozone (O3)-Induces Changes in Serum Metabolomic and Liver Transcriptomic Profiles in Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollution has been linked to increased incidence of diabetes. Recently, we showed that ozone (03) induces glucose intolerance, and increases serum leptin and epinephrine in Brown Norway rats. In this study, we hypothesized that 03 exposure will cause systemic changes in metab...

  3. Inhaled Ozone (O3)-Induces Changes in Serum Metabolomic and Liver Transcriptomic Profiles in Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollution has been linked to increased incidence of diabetes. Recently, we showed that ozone (03) induces glucose intolerance, and increases serum leptin and epinephrine in Brown Norway rats. In this study, we hypothesized that 03 exposure will cause systemic changes in metab...

  4. Age-related changes in body composition in laboratory rats: Strain and gender comparisons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long Evans (LE), Sprague Dawley (SD), Fischer 344 (F344), and Brown Norway (BN) rats are all commonly used as laboratory research subjects. These strains have been studied under many conditions, but few studies have measured changes in body composition as the animals age. Underst...

  5. Age-related changes in body composition in laboratory rats: Strain and gender comparisons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long Evans (LE), Sprague Dawley (SD), Fischer 344 (F344), and Brown Norway (BN) rats are all commonly used as laboratory research subjects. These strains have been studied under many conditions, but few studies have measured changes in body composition as the animals age. Underst...

  6. Hydrothermal Origin for Carbonate Globules in ALH84001 by Analogy with Similar Carbonates from Spitsbergen (Norway)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.; Amundsen, H. E. F.; Blake, D. F.; Bunch, T.

    2002-01-01

    Basalts and xenoliths from Spitsbergen (Norway) contain carbonate globules nearly identical to those in ALH84001. The Spitsbergen globules formed from hydrothermal waters by analogy, so did those in ALH84001. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Hydrothermal Origin for Carbonate Globules in ALH84001 by Analogy with Similar Carbonates from Spitsbergen (Norway)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.; Amundsen, H. E. F.; Blake, D. F.; Bunch, T.

    2002-01-01

    Basalts and xenoliths from Spitsbergen (Norway) contain carbonate globules nearly identical to those in ALH84001. The Spitsbergen globules formed from hydrothermal waters by analogy, so did those in ALH84001. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Environmental Impact Assessment in Norway--Understanding Implementation as a Function of Professional Culture?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmelin, Lars

    2001-01-01

    Describes the environmental impact assessment (EIA) in Norway using a survey of the paradigm of environmental management carried out in the central and regional Norwegian environmental administrations. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/YDS)

  9. Consequence assessment of large rock slope failures in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppikofer, Thierry; Hermanns, Reginald L.; Horton, Pascal; Sandøy, Gro; Roberts, Nicholas J.; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Böhme, Martina; Yugsi Molina, Freddy X.

    2014-05-01

    Steep glacially carved valleys and fjords in Norway are prone to many landslide types, including large rockslides, rockfalls, and debris flows. Large rockslides and their secondary effects (rockslide-triggered displacement waves, inundation behind landslide dams and outburst floods from failure of landslide dams) pose a significant hazard to the population living in the valleys and along the fjords shoreline. The Geological Survey of Norway performs systematic mapping of unstable rock slopes in Norway and has detected more than 230 unstable slopes with significant postglacial deformation. This large number necessitates prioritisation of follow-up activities, such as more detailed investigations, periodic displacement measurements, continuous monitoring and early-warning systems. Prioritisation is achieved through a hazard and risk classification system, which has been developed by a panel of international and Norwegian experts (www.ngu.no/en-gb/hm/Publications/Reports/2012/2012-029). The risk classification system combines a qualitative hazard assessment with a consequences assessment focusing on potential life losses. The hazard assessment is based on a series of nine geomorphological, engineering geological and structural criteria, as well as displacement rates, past events and other signs of activity. We present a method for consequence assessment comprising four main steps: 1. computation of the volume of the unstable rock slope; 2. run-out assessment based on the volume-dependent angle of reach (Fahrböschung) or detailed numerical run-out modelling; 3. assessment of possible displacement wave propagation and run-up based on empirical relations or modelling in 2D or 3D; and 4. estimation of the number of persons exposed to rock avalanches or displacement waves. Volume computation of an unstable rock slope is based on the sloping local base level technique, which uses a digital elevation model to create a second-order curved surface between the mapped extent of

  10. Time trends in the incidence and prevalence of multiple sclerosis in Norway during eight decades.

    PubMed

    Grytten, N; Torkildsen, Ø; Myhr, K-M

    2015-01-01

    Norway has been subjected to numerous epidemiological investigations on the prevalence and incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS), dating back to 1935. The objective of this study was to review the studies on the prevalence and incidence of MS in Norway, provide an update on the prevalence of MS in Norway, and describe the time trends in the prevalence and incidence of MS in relation to risk factors, case ascertainment, and data. We performed a systematic search on PubMed and MEDLINE up to November 2014 using the search string 'multiple sclerosis prevalence in Norway' or 'multiple sclerosis incidence in Norway'. In addition, we scrutinized the reference lists of the publications identified for relevant citations. We retrieved data on the distribution of MS in Norway on December 31, 2013 from the Norwegian Multiple Sclerosis Registry and Biobank and the Norwegian Patient Registry. We identified 29 articles. From 1961 to 2014, the reported prevalence of MS increased from 20 to 203 per 100,000 inhabitants, and the incidence increased from 1.9 to 8.0 per 100,000. The nationwide crude prevalence in Norway, based on the Norwegian Patient Registry, was 208 per 100,000 on December 31, 2013. The reported prevalence of MS in Norway has increased 10-fold, with several possible causes. During eight decades, neurological health services have generally become more accessible to the population, and transforming diagnostic criteria has made the diagnosis of MS more precise and valid. There have also been changes in lifestyle behavior and known risk factors, such as vitamin D and smoking, that might have contributed to the increased incidence of MS. A possible role of increased survival in MS needs to be examined further.

  11. Area Report. Developments in Microwave Antennas and Applications in Sweden, Denmark, and Norway.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-31

    if by block nimber) Denmark anechoic chamber near field testing Norway microwaves phased arrays Sweden industrial application radiometer antennas of...Stockholm. At the University of Gothenburg, phased - array technology is being developed for relative- ly small and simple systems and specific...whether to investigate some microwave antenna systems, for example, phased arrays . The main efforts in Norway are found at the Technical University of

  12. Genetic susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal damage in the rat. Evidence based on kidney-specific genome transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, P C; Churchill, M C; Bidani, A K; Griffin, K A; Picken, M; Pravenec, M; Kren, V; St Lezin, E; Wang, J M; Wang, N; Kurtz, T W

    1997-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that genetic factors can determine susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal damage, we derived an experimental animal model in which two genetically different yet histocompatible kidneys are chronically and simultaneously exposed to the same blood pressure profile and metabolic environment within the same host. Kidneys from normotensive Brown Norway rats were transplanted into unilaterally nephrectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-RT1.N strain) that harbor the major histocompatibility complex of the Brown Norway strain. 25 d after the induction of severe hypertension with deoxycorticosterone acetate and salt, proteinuria, impaired glomerular filtration rate, and extensive vascular and glomerular injury were observed in the Brown Norway donor kidneys, but not in the SHR-RT1.N kidneys. Control experiments demonstrated that the strain differences in kidney damage could not be attributed to effects of transplantation-induced renal injury, immunologic rejection phenomena, or preexisting strain differences in blood pressure. These studies (a) demonstrate that the kidney of the normotensive Brown Norway rat is inherently much more susceptible to hypertension-induced damage than is the kidney of the spontaneously hypertensive rat, and (b) establish the feasibility of using organ-specific genome transplants to map genes expressed in the kidney that determine susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal injury in the rat. PMID:9294102

  13. Plasma and hypothalamic peptide-hormone levels regulating somatotroph function and energy balance in fed and fasted states: a comparative study in four strains of rats.

    PubMed

    Kappeler, L; Zizzari, P; Grouselle, D; Epelbaum, J; Bluet-Pajot, M T

    2004-12-01

    Both growth hormone (GH)/insulin growth factor (IGF)-1 axis and energy balance have been implicated in longevity independently. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effect of a 72-h fasting period at 3 months of age in four different rat strains: (i) Wistar and (ii) Fischer 344 rats, which develop obesity with age, and (iii) Brown Norway and (iv) Lou C rats, which do not. Wistar rats ate more, were significantly bigger, and presented with higher plasma leptin and lower ghrelin levels and hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) content than rats from the three other strains. Plasma insulin and IGF-1 levels were lower in Brown Norway and Lou C rats, and somatostatin content was lower in Brown Norway rats only. Glycaemia was lower in Lou C rats that displayed a lower relative food intake compared to Fischer and Wistar rats. Brown Norway rats showed a greater caloric efficiency than the three other strains. Concerning major hypothalamic neuropeptides implicated in feeding, similar amounts were detected in the four strains for neuropeptide Y, agouti-related peptide, galanin, melanin-concentrating hormone, alpha-melanocortin-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and corticotropin-releasing hormone. Orexin A appeared to be slightly elevated in Fischer rats and cocaine amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART)(55-102) diminished in Brown Norway. At the mRNA level, orexin A, GHSR1, alpha-MSH and CART expression were higher in Wistar and Lou C rats. Principal component analysis confirmed the presence of two main factors in the ad libitum rat population; the first being associated with growth-related parameters and the second being associated with food intake regulation. Hypothalamic GHRH and somatostatin content were positively correlated with feeding-related neuropeptides such as alpha-MSH for GHRH, and orexin A and CART for both peptides. Plasma ghrelin levels were negatively correlated with leptin and IGF-1 levels. Finally, a 72-h fasting period

  14. Prophylactic neuroprotection by blueberry-enriched diet in a rat model of light-induced retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, François; Waterhouse, Jenna; Nason, Janette; Kalt, Wilhelmina

    2013-04-01

    The role of anthocyanins is controversial in vision health. This study investigates the impact of a blueberry-enriched diet as neuroprotectant in a rat model of light-induced retinopathy. Thirty-eight albino Wistar rats and 25 pigmented Brown-Norway rats were fed by gavage with long (7 weeks) and short (2 weeks) intervention with fortified blueberry juice (1 ml; 2.8 mg cyanidin 3-glucoside equivalents) or with a placebo solution (7 weeks) that contained the abundant nonanthocyanin blueberry phenolic, namely, chlorogenic acid, before being submitted to 2 hours of intense light regimen (1.8×10(4) lux). Retinal health was measured by fitting electroretinogram responses with the Naka-Rushton equation. The light-induced retinal damage was severe in the placebo groups, with the maximum amplitude of the electroretinogram being significantly reduced in both Wistar and Brown-Norway rats. The maximum amplitude of the electroretinogram was significantly protected from the light insult in the Wistar rats supplemented with blueberry juice for 7 or 2 weeks, and there was no significant difference between these two groups. The same dietary intervention in the Brown-Norway groups failed to protect the retina. Histological examination of retinal section confirmed the electroretinography results, showing protection of the outer nuclear layer of the retina in the Wistar rats fed with blueberries, while all placebo-fed rats and blueberry-fed Brown-Norway rats showed evidence of retinal damage concentrated in the superior hemiretina. The neuroprotective potential of anthocyanins in this particular model is discussed in terms of interaction with rhodopsin/phototransduction and in terms of antioxidative capacity.

  15. Norway's historical and projected water balance in TWh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddeland, Ingjerd; Holmqvist, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Hydroelectric power production is closely linked to the water cycle, and variations in power production numbers reflect variations in weather. The expected climate changes will influence electricity supply through changes in annual and seasonal inflow of water to hydropower reservoirs. In Norway, more than 95 percent of the electricity production is from hydroelectric plants, and industry linked to hydropower has been an important part of the society for more than a century. Reliable information on historical and future available water resources is hence of crucial importance both for short and long-term planning and adaptation purposes in the hydropower sector. Traditionally, the Multi-area Power-market Simulator (EMPS) is used for modelling hydropower production in Norway. However, due to the models' high level of details and computational demand, this model is only used for historical analyses and a limited number of climate projections. A method has been developed that transfers water fluxes (mm day-1) and states (mm) into energy units (GWh mm-1), based on hydrological modelling of a limited number of catchments representing reservoir inflow to more than 700 hydropower plants in Norway. The advantages of using the conversion factor method, compared to EMPS, are its simplicity and low computational requirements. The main disadvantages are that it does not take into account flood losses and the time lag between inflow and power production. The method is used operationally for weekly and seasonal energy forecasts, and has proven successful at the range of results obtained for reproducing historical hydropower production numbers. In hydropower energy units, mean annual precipitation for the period 1981-2010 is estimated at 154 TWh year-1. On average, 24 TWh year-1 is lost through evapotranspiration, meaning runoff equals 130 TWh year-1. There are large interannual variations, and runoff available for power production ranges from 91 to 165 TWh year-1. The snow pack

  16. Seasonal variation of BVOC emissions from Norway spruce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Schurgers, Guy; Ekberg, Anna; Arneth, Almut; Holst, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are known as a source of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) due to their high reactivity in the atmosphere [1, 2]. Dominant boreal forest species (pine, spruce and birch) have been considered to be high monoterpene (MT) emitters [3, 4], and BVOC emissions and compound composition vary considerably under different temperature and light conditions through growing season [5, 6]. We characterize the canopy BVOC emissions variation from a Norway spruce dominated boreal forest in Central Sweden (Norunda, 60°05'N, 17°29'E). Air samples were taken during growing season (June to September 2013) from transparent dynamic branch chambers set up on Norway spruce at 20m agl. using a scaffolding tower. Air samples were collected every hour from the chamber with Tenax-TA adsorbent tubes and a pocket pump, and analyzed later by gas chromatography and a mass selective detector (GC-MS) to quantify trapped terpenoid compounds. Total terpenoids emission rates in August were found to be highest even though the highest average air temperature was observed in July. Isoprene could not be detected in any sample in June and in most samples from September, but during peak season. Emissions of Isoprene, MT and sesquiterpenes (SQT) showed a clear diurnal pattern in July and August with highest emissions at noon time, however, the composition of terpenoids was slightly changing among different months. The most complex chemical composition with 13 different MT species occurred in late July, while 9 SQT species occurred in the middle of August. However, the fraction of dominant MT species (Limonene, α-Pinene, β-Pinene and Camphene) of the total terpenoids emission was almost constant throughout the whole season from June to September except for β-Pinene which showed a higher fraction in August. References [1]M.Ehn et al., 2014, Nature, 506(7489), 476-479. [2]M.Kulmala et al., 2004, Atmos. Environ., 4, 557-562. [3]J.Rinne et al., 2005, Boreal Environ

  17. Dirofilaria repens infection in a dog imported to Norway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Dirofilaria repens infection was diagnosed in a dog that had been imported to Norway from Hungary three years previously. The dog was a four-year-old castrated male mixed-breed dog and presented for examination of two masses on the right thoracic wall. Fine needle sampling from the subcutaneous nodules and subsequent cytological examination revealed a high number of microfilariae and a pyogranulomatous inflammation. At re-examination approximately 3 weeks later, both masses had apparently disappeared spontaneously, based on both inspection and palpation. However, examination of peripheral blood by a modified Knott’s test revealed a high number of unsheathed microfilariae with mean length of 360 μm and mean width of 6-7 μm, often with the classic umbrella handle appearance of D. repens. Polymerase chain reaction and sequencing confirmed the D. repens diagnosis. Subcutaneous dirofilariosis caused by D. repens is probably the most common cause of human zoonotic dirofilariosis in Europe, but currently is rarely encountered in northern countries such as Norway. However, travelling, import and relocation of dogs have increased, and thus the geographical range of these parasites is likely to increase from traditionally endemic southern regions. Increasing numbers of autochthonous cases of D. repens infections in dogs have been reported in eastern and central Europe. Although infection with D. repens often induces only mild signs or subclinical infections in dogs, they nevertheless represent a reservoir for zoonotic transmission and thus a public health concern, and, in addition, due to the long prepatent period and the high frequency of subclinical infections or infections with unspecific clinical signs, could easily be missed. Lack of experience and expectation of these parasites may mean that infection is underdiagnosed in veterinary clinics in northern countries. Also, predicted climate changes suggest that conditions in some countries where this infection is

  18. Debris flow early warning systems in Norway: organization and tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleivane, I.; Colleuille, H.; Haugen, L. E.; Alve Glad, P.; Devoli, G.

    2012-04-01

    In Norway, shallow slides and debris flows occur as a combination of high-intensity precipitation, snowmelt, high groundwater level and saturated soil. Many events have occurred in the last decades and are often associated with (or related to) floods events, especially in the Southern of Norway, causing significant damages to roads, railway lines, buildings, and other infrastructures (i.e November 2000; August 2003; September 2005; November 2005; Mai 2008; June and Desember 2011). Since 1989 the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE) has had an operational 24 hour flood forecasting system for the entire country. From 2009 NVE is also responsible to assist regions and municipalities in the prevention of disasters posed by landslides and snow avalanches. Besides assisting the municipalities through implementation of digital landslides inventories, susceptibility and hazard mapping, areal planning, preparation of guidelines, realization of mitigation measures and helping during emergencies, NVE is developing a regional scale debris flow warning system that use hydrological models that are already available in the flood warning systems. It is well known that the application of rainfall thresholds is not sufficient to evaluate the hazard for debris flows and shallow slides, and soil moisture conditions play a crucial role in the triggering conditions. The information on simulated soil and groundwater conditions and water supply (rain and snowmelt) based on weather forecast, have proved to be useful variables that indicate the potential occurrence of debris flows and shallow slides. Forecasts of runoff and freezing-thawing are also valuable information. The early warning system is using real-time measurements (Discharge; Groundwater level; Soil water content and soil temperature; Snow water equivalent; Meteorological data) and model simulations (a spatially distributed version of the HBV-model and an adapted version of 1-D soil water and energy balance

  19. Routine outcome measures in Norway: Only partly implemented.

    PubMed

    Ruud, Torleif

    2015-01-01

    Norway has not had any strategy exclusively for the implementation of routine outcome measurement in the mental health services, but some efforts have been made as part of strategies for a national patient register and quality indicators. Fifteen years after the decision to make the rating of the Global Assessment of Functioning scale (GAF) mandatory at admission and discharge of each treatment episode in adult mental health services, this is still not fully implemented. An unknown and probably very low proportion of mental health services use GAF as a routine outcome measure in everyday clinical practice. Well-established electronic patient records in the mental health services and established procedures for reporting routine data to the National Patient Register should make it possible to collect and use routine outcome data. Implementation of routine outcome measurement in mental health services must be done with due emphasis on the critical steps in the various phases of the implementation process. The regional health authorities have a key role in establishing electronic systems that make relevant outcome measurements available in a seamless way for clinicians as well as for patients, and by contributing to a culture where quality and outcome are valued and given priority.

  20. Quantitative variability of renewable energy resources in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christakos, Konstantinos; Varlas, George; Cheliotis, Ioannis; Aalstad, Kristoffer; Papadopoulos, Anastasios; Katsafados, Petros; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan

    2017-04-01

    Based on European Union (EU) targets for 2030, the share of renewable energy (RE) consumption should be increased at 27%. RE resources such as hydropower, wind, wave power and solar power are strongly depending on the chaotic behavior of the weather conditions and climate. Due to this dependency, the prediction of the spatiotemporal variability of the RE resources is more crucial factor than in other energy resources (i.e. carbon based energy). The fluctuation of the RE resources can affect the development of the RE technologies, the energy grid, supply and prices. This study investigates the variability of the potential RE resources in Norway. More specifically, hydropower, wind, wave, and solar power are quantitatively analyzed and correlated with respect to various spatial and temporal scales. In order to analyze the diversities and their interrelationships, reanalysis and observational data of wind, precipitation, wave, and solar radiation are used for a quantitative assessment. The results indicate a high variability of marine RE resources in the North Sea and the Norwegian Sea.

  1. Gridded snow maps supporting avalanche forecasting in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, K.; Humstad, T.; Engeset, R. V.; Andersen, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present gridded maps indicating key parameters for avalanche forecasting with a 1 km x 1 km resolution. Based on the HBV hydrology model, snow parameters are modeled based on observed and interpolated precipitation and temperature data. Modeled parameters include for example new snow accumulated the last 24 and 72 hours, snow-water equivalent, and snow-water content. In addition we use meteorological parameters from the UK weather prediction model "Unified Model" such as wind and radiation to model snow-pack properties. Additional loading in lee-slopes by wind-transport is modeled based on prevailing wind conditions, snow-water content and snow age. A depth hoar index accounts for days with considerable negative temperature gradients in the snow pack. A surface hoar index based on radiation and humidity is currently under development. The maps are tested against field reports from avalanche observers throughout Norway. All data is available via a web-platform that combines maps for geo-hazards such as floods, landslides and avalanches. The maps are used by the Norwegian avalanche forecasting service, which is currently in a test phase. The service will be operational by winter 2012/2013.

  2. MabCent: Arctic marine bioprospecting in Norway.

    PubMed

    Svenson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The deep waters surrounding the coastline of the northern parts of Norway represent an exciting biotope for marine exploration. Dark and cold Arctic water generates a hostile environment where the ability to adapt is crucial to survival. These waters are nonetheless bountiful and a diverse plethora of marine organisms thrive in these extreme conditions, many with the help of specialised chemical compounds. In comparison to warmer, perhaps more inviting shallower tropical waters, the Arctic region has not been as thoroughly investigated. MabCent is a Norwegian initiative based in Tromsø that aims to change this. Since 2007, scientists within MabCent have focussed their efforts on the study of marine organisms inhabiting the Arctic waters with the long term goal of novel drug discovery and development. The activities of MabCent are diverse and range from sampling the Arctic ice shelf to the chemical synthesis of promising secondary metabolites discovered during the screening process. The current review will present the MabCent pipeline from isolation to identification of new bioactive marine compounds via an extensive screening process. An overview of the main activities will be given with particular focus on isolation strategies, bioactivity screening and structure determination. Pitfalls, hard earned lessons and the results so far are also discussed.

  3. Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection in moose (Alces alces) in Norway.

    PubMed

    Pūraitė, Irma; Rosef, Olav; Paulauskas, Algimantas; Radzijevskaja, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is a tick-borne bacterium that infects a wide range of animal species. The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of A. phagocytophilum in Norwegian moose Alces alces and to characterize the bacteria by sequencing of partial msp4 and 16S rRNA genes. Hunters collected spleen samples from 99 moose of different ages during 2013 and 2014 in two areas: Aust-Agder County (n = 70) where Ixodes ricinus ticks are abundant and Oppland County (n = 29) where ticks were either absent, or abundance very low. A. phagocytophilum was detected only in moose from the I. ricinus - abundant area. The overall prevalence of infection according to 16S rRNA and msp4 gene-based PCR was 41.4% and 31.4% respectively. Sequence analysis of the partial 16S rRNA and msp4 gene revealed two and eight different sequence types respectively. Four of eight msp4 sequence types determined in this study were unique, while others were identical to sequences derived from other ruminants and ticks. The present study indicates that moose could be a potential wildlife reservoir of A. phagocytophilum in Norway.

  4. Maternal Health Coping Strategies of Migrant Women in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Viken, Berit; Lyberg, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the maternal health coping strategies of migrant women in Norway. The ethnic and cultural background of the Norwegian population have become increasingly diverse. A challenge in practice is to adjust maternal health services to migrant women's specific needs. Previous studies have revealed that migrant women have difficulty achieving safe pregnancies and childbirths. Data were obtained by means of 17 semistructured interviews with women from South America, Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and Africa. Qualitative content analysis was employed. One overall theme is as follows: keeping original traditions while at the same time being willing to integrate into Norwegian society, and four themes emerged as follows: balancing their sense of belongingness; seeking information and support from healthcare professionals; being open to new opportunities and focusing on feeling safe in the new country. The results were interpreted in the light of Bronfenbrenner's ecological model. To provide quality care, healthcare professionals should focus on the development of migrant women's capabilities. Adaptation of maternal health services for culturally diverse migrant women also requires a culturally sensitive approach on the part of healthcare professionals. PMID:25866676

  5. 250 Fireballs Observed in Norway 100 Years Ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorve, J.

    2014-07-01

    In 1941 the Norwegian Academy of Sciences, presented a study in the Mathematcal-Natural Sciences section, by the Norwegian astronomer Sigurd Einbu. In this report, the information of each fireball is presented in a table containing eight parameters, including their radiants. The report also contains several illustrations. For about 60 of the most interesting fireballs, Einbu included additional information, as describing them in more details. Like, those fireballs producing infrasonic sounds, and/or having superbolide brightness. Also, the strong smell of sulfur, have been reported by a number of persons in a meteorite drop zone. Also, a unique incident of four bright fireballs that were observed within a period of 12 hours, all with the same radiant. During this period, we also experienced the brightest fireball that ever has been observed in Norway, the Trysil superbolide, of 1927. This paper discusses Einbu's report. With respect to when it was published, is surprisingly well suited to also to be read and studied by interested researchers.

  6. Groundwater flow beneath Late Weichselian glacier ice in Nordfjord, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Carolyn A.; Mickelson, D. M.; Anderson, M. P.; Winguth, C.

    Basal water pressure and water flow patterns are significant factors in controlling the behavior of an ice sheet, because they influence ice-sheet thickness, stability and extent. Water produced by basal melting may infiltrate the subsurface, or occur as sheet or channelized flow at the ice/bed interface. We examine subglacial groundwater conditions along a flowline of the Scandinavian ice sheet through Nordfjord, in the western fjords region of southern Norway, using a steady-state, two-dimensional groundwater-flow model. Meltwater input to the groundwater model is calculated by a two-dimensional, time-dependent, thermomechanically coupled ice-flow model oriented along the same flowline. Model results show that the subglacial sediments could not have transmitted all the meltwater out of the fjord during times of ice advance and when the ice sheet was at its maximum position at the edge of the continental shelf. In order for pore-water pressures to remain below the overburden pressure of the overlying ice, other paths of subglacial drainage are necessary to remove excess water. During times of retreat, the subglacial aquifer is incapable of transmitting all the meltwater that was probably generated. Pulses of meltwater reaching the bed could explain non-climatically driven margin readvances during the overall retreat phase.

  7. Prevalence of suicidal behaviour among indigenous Sami in northern Norway.

    PubMed

    Silviken, Anne

    2009-06-01

    To summarize knowledge about suicidal behaviour among indigenous Sami living in northern Norway. This summary is based on data from a register-based follow-up study (Study I) and the North Norwegian Youth Study (Study II)--a longitudinal questionnaire study conducted in 1994-1995 and 1997-1998. The cohort from Study I included 19,801 persons with Sami ethnic ancestry, 10,573 (53.4%) men and 9228 (46.6%) women. The cross-sectional sample analysed from Study II (1994/1995/T1) included 2691 adolescents (1402 females, 52%, and 1,289 males, 48%) aged 16-18 years. Study I indicated that there was a significant moderate increased risk for suicide among indigenous Sami (SMR = 1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02-1.56) compared to the reference population. In Study II, there were no significant ethnic differences in the prevalence of suicide attempts between Sami adolescents (10.5%) and their non-Sami peers (9.2%). Although the finding of a moderate significant increased risk of suicide among Sami is consistent with the general findings among Indigenous peoples, the suicide rates found among Sami is moderate compared to several others Indigenous peoples. When it comes to suicide attempts, no ethnic differences in prevalence of suicide attempts were found between Sami adolescents and their non-Sami peers.

  8. A proposed new framework for valorization of geoheritage in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Rolv; Bergengren, Anna; Heldal, Tom

    2015-04-01

    The geological history of Norway is a complex one, . The exploitation of geological resources of different kinds has always provided the backbone of the Norwegian community. Nevertheless, the perception of geology and the geological processes that created the landscape is little appreciated, compared to bio-diversity and cultural heritage. Some geological localities play an important role in our perception and scientific understanding of the landscape. Other localities are, or could be, important tourist destinations. Other localities can in turn be important for geoscience education on all levels, whereas other plays a major role in the understanding of geodiversity and geoheritage and should be protected as natural monuments. A database based on old registrations has been compiled and a web mapping server is recently launched based on old and new registrations. However, no systematical classification and identification of important sites has been done for the last thirty years. We are now calling for a crowdsourcing process in the geological community in order to validate and valorize the registrations, as well as defining new points and areas of interest. Furthermore, we are developing a valorization system for these localities. The framework for this system is based on studies from inventories in other countries, as well as suggestions from ProGeo. The aim is to raise awareness of important sites, and how they are treated and utilized for scientific, or educational purposes, as tourist destinations or heritage sites. Our presentation will focus on the development of the framework and its implications.

  9. Late Holocene sea-level change in Arctic Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Robert L.; Gehrels, W. Roland; Charman, Dan J.; Saher, Margot H.; Marshall, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Relative sea-level data from the pre-industrial era are required for validating geophysical models of glacio-isostatic adjustment as well as for testing models used to make sea-level predictions based on future climate change scenarios. We present the first late Holocene (past ˜3300 years) relative sea-level reconstruction for northwestern Norway based on investigations in South Hinnøya in the Vesterålen - Lofoton archipelago. Sea-level changes are reconstructed from analyses of salt-marsh and estuarine sediments and the micro-organisms (foraminifera and testate amoebae) preserved within. The 'indicative meaning' of the microfauna is established from their modern distributions. Records are dated by radiocarbon, 201Pb, 137Cs and chemostratigraphical analyses. Our results show a continuous relative sea-level decline of 0.7-0.9 mm yr-1 for South Hinnøya during the late Holocene. The reconstruction extends the relative sea-level trend recorded by local tide gauge data which is only available for the past ˜25 years. Our reconstruction demonstrates that existing models of shoreline elevations and GIA overpredict sea-level positions during the late Holocene. We suggest that models might be adjusted in order to reconcile modelled and reconstructed sea-level changes and ultimately improve understanding of GIA in Fennoscandia.

  10. Fatal diving accidents in western Norway 1983-2007.

    PubMed

    Ramnefjell, M P; Morild, I; Mørk, S J; Lilleng, P K

    2012-11-30

    Despite efforts to reduce their number, fatal diving accidents still occur. The circumstances and post-mortem findings in 40 fatal diving accidents in western Norway from 1983 through 2007 were investigated. Diving experience, medical history and toxicology reports were retrieved. The material consisted of recreational divers, professional saturation divers and professional divers without experience with saturation. In 33 cases the diving equipment was examined as part of the forensic investigation. In 27 cases defects in the diving equipment were found. For six divers such defects were responsible for the fatal accidents. Eighteen divers died on the surface or less than 10 m below surface. Five divers reached below 100 msw, and two of them died at this depth. The fatalities were not season-dependent. However, wave-height and strength of currents were influential factors in some cases. Twelve divers were diving alone. Twenty divers had one buddy, 9 of these divers were alone at the time of death. The cause of death was drowning in 31 out of 40 divers; one of them had a high blood-ethanol concentration, in two other divers ethanol was found in the urine, indicating previous ethanol consumption. Nine divers died from sudden decompression, pulmonary barotraumas, underwater trauma and natural causes. The study shows that most of the fatal diving accidents could be avoided if adequate diving safety procedures had been followed.

  11. Food advertising towards children and young people in Norway.

    PubMed

    Bugge, Annechen Bahr

    2016-03-01

    Despite the fact that no studies have been carried out to map the amount of unhealthy food advertising aimed at Norwegian children and adolescents, it is still widely held belief that this type of advertising is disproportionately common. As a consequence, one of the issues high on the agenda in Norway in the 2000s was the possibility of imposing restrictions on advertising for unhealthy foods to children. The purpose of this study is to contribute with a research-based foundation for implementing this health initiative by mapping food marketing in media channels widely used by children and adolescents. In sum, the study shows that the food industry spends a lot of resources to influence young consumers' eating and drinking habits. Compared with studies from USA, UK and Australia, however, there are, strong indications that there is significantly less unhealthy food advertising in Scandinavian countries. Similar to a previous Swedish study, this study shows that Norwegian children and young people were exposed to little advertising for unhealthy food products through media channels such as TV, the Internet, magazines, comics and cinemas. The study also supports critical remarks from some researchers that the extensive use of the international discourse as a political argument and recommendation for Norwegian conditions is not accurate. For the future it may be beneficial to look more closely at the relationship between advertising and health policy, and how this relationship can be further developed to improve children and young people's diet.

  12. First 100 ms of HF modification at Tromso, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djuth, F. T.; Isham, B.; Rietveld, M. T.; Hagfors, T.; La Hoz, C.

    Experiments were performed with the high-power high-frequency HF facility at Troms o Norway to test theoretical predictions for the excitation of ion and Langmuir oscillations in the ionosphere The principal diagnostic of wave-plasma interactions was the VHF radar at the European Incoherent Scatter EISCAT facility High resolution radar techniques were used to monitor the temporal development of the ion and Langmuir oscillations HF pulses 100 ms in duration were periodically transmitted into a smooth background F region plasma Measurements of the radar backscatter spectra show that all key spectral features predicted by strong Langmuir turbulence SLT theory modified Zakharov model are simultaneously present in the plasma and that their evolution is in agreement with theoretical expectations However several new features have been observed that cannot be anticipated by current theory because of limitations in the electric field strength within the simulations The experimental results reinforce the notion that new theoretical developments are needed to accommodate the large HF electric fields produced at Troms o and HAARP Gakona Alaska and to treat the electron acceleration process in a self-consistent fashion The F region response to two HF effective radiated power levels sim 58 MW and sim 125 MW was investigated at Troms o These ERP values include absorptive losses resulting from the sunlit D region In general the results at 58 MW ERP and 125 MW ERP are consistent with many of the SLT

  13. Nursing during World War II: Finnmark County, Northern Norway

    PubMed Central

    Immonen, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This study is part the project “Nursing in Borderland – Finnmark 1939–1950” within nursing history that sheds light on nursing and health care during World War II in Finnmark County, Northern Norway. The study focuses on challenges in nursing care that arose during the war because of war activities in the Barents area. This article focuses on challenges caused by shortage of supplies. The aim of the project is to widen the understanding of development within health care and living conditions in the area. Study design This is a historical study using narratives, government documents and literature. Methods Interviews with nurses and persons active in health care during World War II constitute the main data of the research. Thematic issues that arise from interviews are analysed. Primary and secondary written sources are used in analysing the topics. Because of war activities, deportation and burning of the county, archives were partly destroyed. Central archives can contribute with annual reports, whereas local archives are fragmentary. There are a number of reports written soon after the War, as well as a number of biographical books of newer date. Results Challenges caused by war, which appear in the interviews, are: 1) shortage of supplies, 2) increased workload, 3) multicultural society, 4) ethical dilemmas, 5) deportation of the population. In this paper, focus is on challenges caused by shortage of supplies. Conclusions Both institutions, personnel and patients were marked by the war. This has to be taken in consideration in health care today. PMID:23630668

  14. Governance of public health: Norway in a Nordic context.

    PubMed

    Helgesen, Marit K

    2014-11-01

    The two pillars of public health are health promotion and disease prevention. Based on a notion of governance in the state -local relation as changing from hierarchical via New Public Management (NPM) to New Public Governance (NPG), the governance of public health in Norway is contrasted to governance of public health in the other Nordic states: Denmark, Finland and Sweden. The article aims to present and discuss the governance of public health as it is played out in the state-local relationship. The method is to study central state documents in the four countries, as well as articles, research reports and papers on public health. The article shows that the governance modes (hierarchy, NPM and NPG) exist in parallel, but that their mechanisms actually vary in use. Legal, economic and informational mechanisms are, to a varying degree, in use. In Finnish and Swedish public health policies, health promotion is at the forefront; while Danish and Norwegian public health policies spur the local governments to carry out interventions to prevent disease and hospital admissions. © 2014 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  15. Nursing during World War II: Finnmark County, Northern Norway.

    PubMed

    Immonen, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    This study is part the project "Nursing in Borderland - Finnmark 1939-1950" within nursing history that sheds light on nursing and health care during World War II in Finnmark County, Northern Norway. The study focuses on challenges in nursing care that arose during the war because of war activities in the Barents area. This article focuses on challenges caused by shortage of supplies. The aim of the project is to widen the understanding of development within health care and living conditions in the area. This is a historical study using narratives, government documents and literature. Interviews with nurses and persons active in health care during World War II constitute the main data of the research. Thematic issues that arise from interviews are analysed. Primary and secondary written sources are used in analysing the topics. Because of war activities, deportation and burning of the county, archives were partly destroyed. Central archives can contribute with annual reports, whereas local archives are fragmentary. There are a number of reports written soon after the War, as well as a number of biographical books of newer date. CHALLENGES CAUSED BY WAR, WHICH APPEAR IN THE INTERVIEWS, ARE: 1) shortage of supplies, 2) increased workload, 3) multicultural society, 4) ethical dilemmas, 5) deportation of the population. In this paper, focus is on challenges caused by shortage of supplies. Both institutions, personnel and patients were marked by the war. This has to be taken in consideration in health care today.

  16. Climatology of aerosol optical properties in Northern Norway and Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-C.; Hamre, B.; Frette, Ø.; Stamnes, J. J.

    2012-10-01

    We present comparisons between estimates of the aerosol optical thickness and the Ångström exponent in Northern Norway and Svalbard based on data from AERONET stations at Andenes (69° N, 16° E, 379 m altitude) and Hornsund (77° N, 15° E, 10 m altitude) for the period 2008-2010. The three-year annual mean values for the aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm τ(500) at Andenes and Hornsund were 0.11 and 0.10, respectively. At Hornsund, there was less variation of the monthly mean value of τ(500) than at Andenes. The annual mean values of the Ångström exponent α at Andenes and Hornsund were 1.18 and 1.37, respectively. At Andenes and Hornsund α was found to be larger than 1.0 in 68% and 93% of the observations, respectively, indicating that fine-mode particles were dominating at both sites. Both sites had a similar seasonal variation of the aerosol size distribution although one site is in an Arctic area while the other site is in a sub-arctic area.

  17. Aerosol optical properties in Northern Norway and Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-C.; Hamre, B.; Frette, Ø.; Blindheim, S.; Stebel, K.; Sobolewski, P.; Toledano, C.; Stamnes, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    We present comparisons between estimates of the aerosol optical thickness and the Ångström exponent in Northern Norway and Svalbard based on data from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) stations at Andenes (69.28° N, 16.01° E, 379 m altitude) and Hornsund (77.00° N, 15.56° E, 10 m altitude) for the period 2008-2011. The four-year annual mean values for the aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm τ(500) at Andenes and Hornsund both were 0.10. At Hornsund, there was less variation of the monthly mean value of τ(500) than at Andenes. The annual mean values of the Ångström exponent α at Andenes and Hornsund were 1.25 and 1.37, respectively. At Andenes and Hornsund α was found to be larger than 1.1 in 64% and 86% of the observations, respectively, indicating that fine-mode particles were dominating at both sites. Both sites had a similar seasonal variation of the aerosol size distribution although one site is in an arctic area while the other site is in a sub-arctic area.

  18. Aerosol optical properties in Northern Norway and Svalbard.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chun; Hamre, Børge; Frette, Øyvind; Muyimbwa, Dennis; Blindheim, Sandra; Stebel, Kerstin; Sobolewski, Piotr; Toledano, Carlos; Stamnes, Jakob J

    2016-02-01

    We present comparisons between estimates of the aerosol optical thickness and the Ångström exponent in Northern Norway and Svalbard based on data from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) stations at Andenes (69.28°N, 16.01°E, 379 m altitude) and Hornsund (77.00°N, 15.56°E, 10 m altitude) for the period 2008-2013. The five/six-year annual mean values for the aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm τ(500) at Andenes and Hornsund both were 0.09. At Hornsund, there was less variation of the monthly mean value of τ(500) than at Andenes. The annual mean values of the Ångström exponent α at Andenes and Hornsund were 1.29 and 1.34, respectively. At Andenes and Hornsund α was found to be larger than 1.1 in 68% and 84% of the observations, respectively, indicating that fine-mode particles were dominating at both sites. Both sites had a similar aerosol size distribution during summer although one site is in an arctic area while the other site is in a subarctic area.

  19. Monitoring of raptors and their contamination levels in Norway.

    PubMed

    Gjershaug, Jan Ove; Kålås, John Atle; Nygård, Torgeir; Herzke, Dorte; Folkestad, Alv Ottar

    2008-09-01

    This article summarizes results from raptor monitoring and contamination studies in Norway of the golden eagle, gyrfalcon, white-tailed sea eagle, osprey, peregrine, and merlin. Golden eagle and gyrfalcon populations have been monitored since 1990 as part of the "Monitoring Programme for Terrestrial Ecosystems" (TOV). No long-term trend in the population size or productivity of golden eagle has been shown in any of the 5 study areas. The reproductive output of gyrfalcon is monitored in 3 areas. It is positively correlated with the populations of its main prey species, the rock ptarmigan and the willow ptarmigan. The white-tailed sea eagle population has been monitored since 1974 by the Norwegian Ornithological Society, and the population is increasing. The levels of pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls are low in the eggs of both the golden eagle and the gyrfalcon, but elevated levels and effects on reproduction have been indicated for a coastal subpopulation of golden eagle. The pollutant levels in white-tailed sea eagle are lower than in the Baltic population of sea eagles, and shell thinning was never severe overall, but individual eggs have contained pollutant concentrations above critical levels. The levels of pollutants in the bird-eating falcons, peregrine, and merlin were higher than in other species. New emerging pollutants, like brominated diphenylethers and perfluorinated organic compounds, could be detected in all species. By incorporating available published and unpublished data, we were able to produce time trends for pollutants and shell thickness over 4 decades.

  20. Stand age and fine root biomass, distribution and morphology in a Norway spruce chronosequence in southeast Norway.

    PubMed

    Børja, Isabella; De Wit, Heleen A; Steffenrem, Arne; Majdi, Hooshang

    2008-05-01

    We assessed the influence of stand age on fine root biomass and morphology of trees and understory vegetation in 10-, 30-, 60- and 120-year-old Norway spruce stands growing in sandy soil in southeast Norway. Fine root (< 1, 1-2 and 2-5 mm in diameter) biomass of trees and understory vegetation (< 2 mm in diameter) was sampled by soil coring to a depth of 60 cm. Fine root morphological characteristics, such as specific root length (SRL), root length density (RLD), root surface area (RSA), root tip number and branching frequency (per unit root length or mass), were determined based on digitized root data. Fine root biomass and morphological characteristics related to biomass (RLD and RSA) followed the same tendency with chronosequence and were significantly higher in the 30-year-old stand and lower in the 10-year-old stand than in the other stands. Among stands, mean fine root (< 2 mm) biomass ranged from 49 to 398 g m(-2), SLR from 13.4 to 19.8 m g(-1), RLD from 980 to 11,650 m m(-3) and RSA from 2.4 to 35.4 m(2) m(-3). Most fine root biomass of trees was concentrated in the upper 20 cm of the mineral soil and in the humus layer (0-5 cm) in all stands. Understory fine roots accounted for 67 and 25% of total fine root biomass in the 10- and 120-year-old stands, respectively. Stand age had no affect on root tip number or branching frequency, but both parameters changed with soil depth, with increasing number of root tips and decreasing branching frequency with increasing soil depth for root fractions < 2 mm in diameter. Specific (mass based) root tip number and branching density were highest for the finest roots (< 1 mm) in the humus layer. Season (spring or fall) had no effect on tree fine root biomass, but there was a small and significant increase in understory fine root biomass in fall relative to spring. All morphological characteristics showed strong seasonal variation, especially the finest root fraction, with consistently and significantly higher values in

  1. Comparison of Alcohol Consumption and Alcohol Policies in the Czech Republic and Norway.

    PubMed

    Hnilicová, Helena; Nome, Siri; Dobiášová, Karolína; Zvolský, Miroslav; Henriksen, Roger; Tulupova, Elena; Kmecová, Zuzana

    2017-06-01

    The Czech Republic is characterized by high alcohol consumption and is well known as the world's biggest consumer of beer. In contrast, the alcohol consumption in Norway is relatively low. In this article, we describe and discuss alcohol policy development in the Czech Republic since the mid-1980s to the present and its impact on the alcohol consumption and compare our findings, including the dynamics of the total alcohol consumption and the development of drinking patterns among young people, with the situation in Norway. The study uses the methodology of "process tracing". Selected national statistics, research outcomes and related policy documents were analyzed to identify possible relations between the alcohol consumption and the alcohol policy in two different environments and institutional/policy settings. There was a clear difference in alcohol consumption trends in both countries in the last three decades. Norway was characterized by low alcohol consumption with tendency to decline in the last years. In contrast, the Czech Republic showed an upward trend. In addition, alcohol consumption among Czech youth has been continuously increasing since 1995, whereas the opposite trend has occurred in Norway since the late 1990s. The results revealed that the alcohol-control policies of the Czech Republic and Norway were significantly different during the study period. Norway had a very restrictive alcohol policy, in contrast to the liberal alcohol policy adopted in the Czech Republic, in particular after political transition in 1990. Liberalization of social life together with considerable decline of alcohol price due to complete privatization of alcohol production and sale contributed to an increase of the alcohol consumption in the Czech Republic. Persistently high alcohol consumption among general population and its growth among young people in the Czech Republic pose social, economic and health threats. Norway could provide the inspiration to Czech politicians

  2. Cross-national comparison of screening mammography accuracy measures in U.S., Norway, and Spain.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Laia; Hofvind, Solveig; Hubbard, Rebecca A; Román, Marta; Benkeser, David; Sala, Maria; Castells, Xavier

    2016-08-01

    To compare accuracy measures for mammographic screening in Norway, Spain, and the US. Information from women aged 50-69 years who underwent mammographic screening 1996-2009 in the US (898,418 women), Norway (527,464), and Spain (517,317) was included. Screen-detected cancer, interval cancer, and the false-positive rates, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) for recalls (PPV-1), PPV for biopsies (PPV-2), 1/PPV-1 and 1/PPV-2 were computed for each country. Analyses were stratified by age, screening history, time since last screening, calendar year, and mammography modality. The rate of screen-detected cancers was 4.5, 5.5, and 4.0 per 1000 screening exams in the US, Norway, and Spain respectively. The highest sensitivity and lowest specificity were reported in the US (83.1 % and 91.3 %, respectively), followed by Spain (79.0 % and 96.2 %) and Norway (75.5 % and 97.1 %). In Norway, Spain and the US, PPV-1 was 16.4 %, 9.8 %, and 4.9 %, and PPV-2 was 39.4 %, 38.9 %, and 25.9 %, respectively. The number of women needed to recall to detect one cancer was 20.3, 6.1, and 10.2 in the US, Norway, and Spain, respectively. Differences were found across countries, suggesting that opportunistic screening may translate into higher sensitivity at the cost of lower specificity and PPV. • Positive predictive value is higher in population-based screening programmes in Spain and Norway. • Opportunistic mammography screening in the US has lower positive predictive value. • Screening settings in the US translate into higher sensitivity and lower specificity. • The clinical burden may be higher for women screened opportunistically.

  3. Norway maple displays greater seasonal growth and phenotypic plasticity to light than native sugar maple.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Alain; Fontaine, Bastien; Berninger, Frank; Dubois, Karine; Lechowicz, Martin J; Messier, Christian; Posada, Juan M; Valladares, Fernando; Brisson, Jacques

    2012-11-01

    Norway maple (Acer platanoides L), which is among the most invasive tree species in forests of eastern North America, is associated with reduced regeneration of the related native species, sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh) and other native flora. To identify traits conferring an advantage to Norway maple, we grew both species through an entire growing season under simulated light regimes mimicking a closed forest understorey vs. a canopy disturbance (gap). Dynamic shade-houses providing a succession of high-intensity direct-light events between longer periods of low, diffuse light were used to simulate the light regimes. We assessed seedling height growth three times in the season, as well as stem diameter, maximum photosynthetic capacity, biomass allocation above- and below-ground, seasonal phenology and phenotypic plasticity. Given the north European provenance of Norway maple, we also investigated the possibility that its growth in North America might be increased by delayed fall senescence. We found that Norway maple had significantly greater photosynthetic capacity in both light regimes and grew larger in stem diameter than sugar maple. The differences in below- and above-ground biomass, stem diameter, height and maximum photosynthesis were especially important in the simulated gap where Norway maple continued extension growth during the late fall. In the gap regime sugar maple had a significantly higher root : shoot ratio that could confer an advantage in the deepest shade of closed understorey and under water stress or browsing pressure. Norway maple is especially invasive following canopy disturbance where the opposite (low root : shoot ratio) could confer a competitive advantage. Considering the effects of global change in extending the potential growing season, we anticipate that the invasiveness of Norway maple will increase in the future.

  4. Effects of chronic overload on muscle hypertrophy and mTOR signaling in adult and aged rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We examined the effect of 28 days of overload on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling in young adult (Y; 6 mo old) and aged (O; 30 mo old) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats subjected to bilateral synergist ablation (SA) of two-thirds of the gas...

  5. Comparing Screening Mammography for Early Breast Cancer Detection in Vermont and Norway

    PubMed Central

    Hofvind, Solveig; Vacek, Pamela M.; Skelly, Joan; Weaver, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    Background Most screening mammography in the United States differs from that in countries with formal screening programs by having a shorter screening interval and interpretation by a single reader vs independent double reading. We examined how these differences affect early detection of breast cancer by comparing performance measures and histopathologic outcomes in women undergoing opportunistic screening in Vermont and organized screening in Norway. Methods We evaluated recall, screen detection, and interval cancer rates and prognostic tumor characteristics for women aged 50–69 years who underwent screening mammography in Vermont (n = 45 050) and in Norway (n = 194 430) from 1997 through 2003. Rates were directly adjusted for age by weighting the rates within 5-year age intervals to reflect the age distribution in the combined data and were compared using two-sided Z tests. Results The age-adjusted recall rate was 9.8% in Vermont and 2.7% in Norway (P < .001). The age-adjusted screen detection rate per 1000 woman-years after 2 years of follow-up was 2.77 in Vermont and 2.57 in Norway (P = .12), whereas the interval cancer rate per 1000 woman-years was 1.24 and 0.86, respectively (P < .001). Larger proportions of invasive interval cancers in Vermont than in Norway were 15 mm or smaller (55.9% vs 38.2%, P < .001) and had no lymph node involvement (67.5% vs 57%, P = .01). The prognostic characteristics of all invasive cancers (screen-detected and interval cancer) were similar in Vermont and Norway. Conclusion Screening mammography detected cancer at about the same rate and at the same prognostic stage in Norway and Vermont, with a statistically significantly lower recall rate in Norway. The interval cancer rate was higher in Vermont than in Norway, but tumors that were diagnosed in the Vermont women tended to be at an earlier stage than those diagnosed in the Norwegian women. PMID:18664650

  6. Back-analysis of the 1756 Tjellefonna rockslide (western Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandøy, Gro; Oppikofer, Thierry; Nilsen, Bjørn

    2014-05-01

    The 22nd of February 1756 the largest historically recorded rockslide in Norway took place at Tjelle in Lang Fjord (western Norway). Three displacement waves of up to 50 meters were created by the impact of the failed rock mass constituting the Tjellefonna rockslide. A total of 32 people were killed and several houses and boats around the fjord were destroyed. This study presents a back-analysis of the Tjellefonna rockslide by (1) reconstructing the topography before the rockslide, (2) assessing the volumes of the initial rockslide mass, the onshore deposits and offshore deposits, (3) assessing the major discontinuities involved in the rockslide, and (4) by 2D numerical slope stability modelling for a detailed study of the parameters and trigger factors that affected the slope stability. The topography before the rockslide is reconstructed using (1) the Sloping Local Base Level technique and (2) a manual ART reconstruction in the PolyWorks software. Both topographic reconstructions yield an initial rockslide volume between 9.2 and 10.4 million m3, which is lower than previous estimates (12-15 million m3). The onshore deposits are estimated to 7.6 million m3 and only 3.9 million m3 deposited in the fjord. Finally, the volume impacting the fjord (3.9 million m3) is important for the generation of rockslide-triggered displacement waves, which highlights the necessity of precise volume estimations prior to back-analyses of landslide-triggered displacement waves. The granitic to granodioritic gneissic rock mass at Tjellefonna have high to very high mechanical strength. However, field mapping reveals that the intact rock strength is compromised by a combination of a variably developed foliation, extensive faulting and four persistent joint sets. The foliation is often folded into open folds with sub-horizontal axial planes. The foliation, faults and two joint sets are sub-parallel to Langfjorden and to regional structural lineaments. The back walls of the Tjellefonna

  7. Ethical questions in landslide management and risk reduction in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taurisano, A.; Lyche, E.; Thakur, V.; Wiig, T.; Øvrelid, K.; Devoli, G.

    2012-04-01

    The loss of lives caused by landslides in Norway is smaller than in other countries due to the low population density in exposed areas. However, annual economic losses from damage to properties and infrastructures are vast. Yet nationally coordinated efforts to manage and reduce landslide and snow avalanche risk are a recent challenge, having started only in the last decade. Since 2009, this has been a task of the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE) under the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy. Ongoing work includes collection of landslide data, production of susceptibility and hazard maps, planning of mitigation measures along with monitoring and early warning systems, assistance to areal planning, providing expertise in emergencies and disseminating information to the public. These activities are realized in collaboration with the Norwegian Geological Survey (NGU), the Meteorological Institute, the Road and Railway authorities, universities and private consultant companies. As the total need for risk mitigating initiatives is by far larger than the annual budget, priority assessment is crucial. This brings about a number of ethical questions. 1. Susceptibility maps have been produced for the whole country and provide a first indication of areas with potential landslide or snow avalanche hazard, i.e. areas where special attention and expert assessments are needed before development. Areas where no potential hazard is shown can in practice be developed without further studies, which call for relatively conservative susceptibility maps. However, conservative maps are problematic as they too often increase both cost and duration of building projects beyond the reasonable. 2. Areas where hazard maps or risk mitigation initiatives will be funded are chosen by means of cost-benefits analyses which are often uncertain. How to estimate the benefits if the real probability for damage can only be judged on a very subjective level but not really calculated

  8. Timing and distribution of postglacial rockfalls in western Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laute, Katja; Beylich, Achim A.; Winkler, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    A high number of rockfalls have occurred within the mountainous fjord landscape in western Norway during its geologically recent past. However, neither the temporal patterns of these rockfalls nor the specific causes have yet been systematically investigated. The focus of this study is (i) to reconstruct a chronology of rockfalls within two defined and lithologically mostly homogenous study areas (Nord- and Sognefjord) and (ii) to identify the likely triggers and controlling factors of those rockfalls. The inner parts of the Nord- and Sognefjord systems located closely to the Jostedalsbreen ice cap in western Norway have been selected as study areas. A number of 48 potential rockfall test sites have been selected to date with nine identified age- control points (moraines and bedrock outcrops of known age) available for this study. First investigations have started by applying Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD) at seven larger rockfall deposits as well as at five moraines of known age within two steep, parabolic-shaped and glacier-connected neighbouring drainage basins, Erdalen (79.5 km2) and Bødalen (60.1 km2), both located in inner Nordfjord. At each site, 50 to 100 impacts using a mechanical Proceq N-type instrument were sampled from the surface of 5 to 50 individual rockfall boulders located at the outer margins of the rockfall deposits. In order to avoid sampling of more recent rockfalls or redistributed debris material, the sampling strategy applied preferred a high number of individual boulders sampled with few impacts each against sampling few boulders but with a higher number of impacts. First results show that the mean Rebound (R-) values measured at the seven rockfall deposits fall into significant different age ranges. Based on the SHD measurements obtained from the moraines and one additional control point, the determined rockfall age ranges are spread between the Preboral (with Schmidt-hammer rebound (R-) value means and 95% confidence intervals

  9. Circadian rhythm of outside-nest activity in wild (WWCPS), albino and pigmented laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Stryjek, Rafał; Modlińska, Klaudia; Turlejski, Krzysztof; Pisula, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    The domestication process of the laboratory rat has been going on for several hundred generations in stable environmental conditions, which may have affected their physiological and behavioural functions, including their circadian system. Rats tested in our ethological experiments were laboratory-bred wild Norway rats (WWCPS), two strains of pigmented laboratory rats (Brown Norway and Long Evans), and two strains of albino rats (Sprague-Dawley and Wistar). Rats were placed in purpose-built enclosures and their cycle of activity (time spent actively outside the nest) has been studied for one week in standard light conditions and for the next one in round-the-clock darkness. The analysis of circadian pattern of outside-nest activity revealed differences between wild, pigmented laboratory, and albino laboratory strains. During daytime, albino rats showed lower activity than pigmented rats, greater decrease in activity when the light was turned on and greater increase in activity when the light was switched off, than pigmented rats. Moreover albino rats presented higher activity during the night than wild rats. The magnitude of the change in activity between daytime and nighttime was also more pronounced in albino rats. Additionaly, they slept outside the nest more often during the night than during the day. These results can be interpreted in accordance with the proposition that intense light is an aversive stimulus for albino rats, due to lack of pigment in their iris and choroid, which reduces their ability to adapt to light. Pigmented laboratory rats were more active during lights on, not only in comparison to the albino, but also to the wild rats. Since the difference seems to be independent of light intensity, it is likely to be a result of the domestication process. Cosinor analysis revealed a high rhythmicity of circadian cycles in all groups.

  10. Switching statins in Norway after new reimbursement policy: a nationwide prescription study.

    PubMed

    Sakshaug, Solveig; Furu, Kari; Karlstad, Øystein; Rønning, Marit; Skurtveit, Svetlana

    2007-10-01

    To assess the changes in prescribing of statins in Norway after implementation of the new reimbursement regulations for statins in June 2005. Data were retrieved from the Norwegian Prescription Database covering the total population in Norway (4.6 million). Outcome measures were the proportion of atorvastatin users switching to simvastatin and changes in the proportion of new statin users receiving simvastatin. Based on retail costs for all statin prescriptions dispensed in Norway, expenditure was measured in Norwegian currency. One-year prevalences of statin use increased from 6.3 to 6.8% for women and from 7.5 to 8.1% for men from the year before to the year after the new statin regulations. Of atorvastatin users (N = 131,222), 39% switched to simvastatin during the 13-month period after the implementation. The proportion of switching was higher in women (41%) than in men (36%). In May 2005, 48% of the new statin users received simvastatin. The proportion of new users receiving simvastatin increased rapidly after implementation of the new regulations to 68% in June 2005 and reached 92% in June 2006. Expenditure was reduced from 120 million to 95 million Euro when comparing the year before with the year after the new statin regulations. The new reimbursement policy for statins has had a great impact on physicians' prescribing of statins in Norway. Physicians in Norway acknowledge the importance of contributing to cost containment.

  11. Economic consequences of the Chernobyl accident in Norway in 1986 and 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Tveten, U.

    1988-01-01

    In the accident consequence assessment (ACA) area there is extensive cooperation between the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden), performed within the Nordic Safety Program, and partially funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers, via the Nordic Liaison Committee for Atomic Energy. One of the 17 projects in the ACA-related program area is concerned with the economic consequences of the Chernobyl accident in Finland, Norway, and Sweden. This paper is limited to describing conditions in Norway. There are areas in Norway where the Chernobyl fallout is >100 kBq/m{sup 2}, and the total amount of radiocesium deposited over Norway is estimated by the National Institute for Radiation Hygiene to be 6% of the radiocesium released from the reactor. The areas where ground concentrations are highest are mostly in sparsely populated mountain areas. These areas are, however, important in connection with several nutritional pathways, notably, sheep, goats, reindeer, and freshwater fish. The purpose of this paper is to summarize information on mitigating actions and economic consequences of the deposited radioactive materials to Norwegian agriculture in the 1986-87 and 1987-88 slaughtering periods.

  12. Explaining socioeconomic inequalities in exclusive breast feeding in Norway.

    PubMed

    Bærug, Anne; Laake, Petter; Løland, Beate Fossum; Tylleskär, Thorkild; Tufte, Elisabeth; Fretheim, Atle

    2017-08-01

    In high-income countries, lower socioeconomic position is associated with lower rates of breast feeding, but it is unclear what factors explain this inequality. Our objective was to examine the association between socioeconomic position and exclusive breast feeding, and to explore whether socioeconomic inequality in exclusive breast feeding could be explained by other sociodemographic characteristics, for example, maternal age and parity, smoking habits, birth characteristics, quality of counselling and breastfeeding difficulties. We used data from a questionnaire sent to mothers when their infants were five completed months as part of a trial of a breastfeeding intervention in Norway. We used maternal education as an indicator of socioeconomic position. Analyses of 1598 mother-infant pairs were conducted using logistic regression to assess explanatory factors of educational inequalities in breast feeding. Socioeconomic inequalities in exclusive breast feeding were present from the beginning and persisted for five completed months, when 22% of the most educated mothers exclusively breast fed compared with 7% of the least educated mothers: OR 3.39 (95% CI 1.74 to 6.61). After adjustment for all potentially explanatory factors, the OR was reduced to 1.49 (95% CI 0.70 to 3.14). This decrease in educational inequality seemed to be mainly driven by sociodemographic factors, smoking habits and breastfeeding difficulties, in particular perceived milk insufficiency. Socioeconomic inequalities in exclusive breast feeding at 5 months were largely explained by sociodemographic factors, but also by modifiable factors, such as smoking habits and breastfeeding difficulties, which can be amenable to public health interventions. NCT01025362. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Characteristics of methadone-related fatalities in Norway.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Jean-Paul; Khiabani, Hassan Z; Hilberg, Thor; Karinen, Ritva; Slørdal, Lars; Waal, Helge; Mørland, Jørg

    2015-11-01

    There are currently over 7000 patients enrolled in opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) programs in Norway. A rise in methadone-related deaths proportional to increasing methadone sales over the period 2000-2006 has been observed, but the causative factors for these fatalities have been elusive. In the present study, individual characteristics, methadone concentrations and additional toxicological findings were analyzed. Methadone intoxication deaths (n = 264) were divided into 3 groups according to toxicological findings in whole blood: group 1 - methadone detected alone, or together with one additional drug at low or therapeutic levels, or a low concentration of ethanol (<1 g/L) (n = 21); group 2 - multiple additional drugs/substances detected below lethal levels (n = 175); group 3 - one or more additional drugs/substances detected at lethal levels, or ethanol >3 g/L (n = 55). Methadone blood concentrations in decedents who had been enrolled in OMT were higher than for decedents not in treatment, in all groups. Blood methadone concentrations around 1 mg/L were present in fatal multi-drug intoxications in OMT patients. Results suggest that some patients may be at risk of dying when combining therapeutic concentrations of methadone with other psychoactive substances. Somatic disease was a common finding among deceased OMT patients. Concentrations in methadone users not enrolled in OMT were predominantly between 0.3 and 0.4 mg/L and were not related to the presence of other drugs. However, methadone concentrations below 0.1 mg/L may be associated with intoxication following methadone use, both alone and in combination with other drugs. Younger male users (mean age 34 years) seemed to have a higher susceptibility to methadone intoxication.

  14. Visual impairment in children and adolescents in Norway.

    PubMed

    Haugen, Olav H; Bredrup, Cecilie; Rødahl, Eyvind

    2016-06-01

    BACKGROUND Due to failures in reporting and poor data security, the Norwegian Registry of Blindness was closed down in 1995. Since that time, no registration of visual impairment has taken place in Norway. All the other Nordic countries have registries for children and adolescents with visual impairment. The purpose of this study was to survey visual impairments and their causes in children and adolescents, and to assess the need for an ophthalmic registry.MATERIAL AND METHOD Data were collected via the county teaching centres for the visually impaired in the period from 2005 - 2010 on children and adolescents aged less than 20 years with impaired vision (n = 628). This was conducted as a point prevalence study as of 1 January 2004. Visual function, ophthalmological diagnosis, systemic diagnosis and additional functional impairments were recorded.RESULTS Approximately two-thirds of children and adolescents with visual impairment had reduced vision, while one-third were blind. The three largest diagnostic groups were neuro-ophthalmic diseases (37 %), retinal diseases (19 %) and conditions affecting the eyeball in general (14 %). The prevalence of additional functional impairments was high, at 53 %, most often in the form of motor problems or cognitive impairments.INTERPRETATION The results of the study correspond well with similar investigations in the other Nordic countries. Our study shows that the registries associated with teaching for the visually impaired are inadequate in terms of medical data, and this underlines the need for an ophthalmic registry of children and adolescents with visual impairment.

  15. Pervasive growth reduction in Norway spruce forests following wind disturbance.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Rupert; Blennow, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades the frequency and severity of natural disturbances by e.g., strong winds and insect outbreaks has increased considerably in many forest ecosystems around the world. Future climate change is expected to further intensify disturbance regimes, which makes addressing disturbances in ecosystem management a top priority. As a prerequisite a broader understanding of disturbance impacts and ecosystem responses is needed. With regard to the effects of strong winds--the most detrimental disturbance agent in Europe--monitoring and management has focused on structural damage, i.e., tree mortality from uprooting and stem breakage. Effects on the functioning of trees surviving the storm (e.g., their productivity and allocation) have been rarely accounted for to date. Here we show that growth reduction was significant and pervasive in a 6.79 million hectare forest landscape in southern Sweden following the storm Gudrun (January 2005). Wind-related growth reduction in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) forests surviving the storm exceeded 10% in the worst hit regions, and was closely related to maximum gust wind speed (R(2) = 0.849) and structural wind damage (R(2) = 0.782). At the landscape scale, wind-related growth reduction amounted to 3.0 million m(3) in the three years following Gudrun. It thus exceeds secondary damage from bark beetles after Gudrun as well as the long-term average storm damage from uprooting and stem breakage in Sweden. We conclude that the impact of strong winds on forest ecosystems is not limited to the immediately visible area of structural damage, and call for a broader consideration of disturbance effects on ecosystem structure and functioning in the context of forest management and climate change mitigation.

  16. Geographical heterogeneity of Y-chromosomal lineages in Norway.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Berit Myhre; Stenersen, Margurethe; Lu, Tim T; Olaisen, Bjørnar

    2006-12-01

    Y-chromosomal variation at five biallelic markers (Tat, YAP, 12f2, SRY(10831) and 92R7) and nine multiallelic short tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385I/II and DYS388) in a Norwegian population sample are presented. The material consists of 1766 unrelated males of Norwegian origin. The geographical distribution of the population sample reflects fairly well the population distribution around the year 1942, which is the median birth year of the index persons. Seven hundred and twenty-one different Y-STR haplotypes but 726 different lineages (Y-STRs plus biallelic markers) were encountered. We observed six known (P*(xR1a), BR(xDE, J, N3, P), R1a, N3, DE, J), and one previously undescribed haplogroup (probably a subgroup within haplogroup P*(xR1a)). Four of the haplogroups (P*(xR1a), BR(xDE, J, N3, P), R1a and N3) represented about 98% of the population sample. The analysis of population pairwise differences indicates that the Norwegian Y-chromosome distribution most closely resembles those observed in Iceland, Germany, the Netherlands and Denmark. Within Norway, geographical substructuring was observed between regions and counties. The substructuring reflects to some extent the European Y-chromosome gradients, with higher frequency of P*(xR1a) in the south-west and of R1a in the east. Heterogeneity in major founder groups, geographical isolation, severe epidemics, historical trading links and population movements may have led to population stratification and have most probably contributed to the observed regional differences in distribution of haplotypes within two of the major haplogroups.

  17. Pervasive Growth Reduction in Norway Spruce Forests following Wind Disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Seidl, Rupert; Blennow, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    Background In recent decades the frequency and severity of natural disturbances by e.g., strong winds and insect outbreaks has increased considerably in many forest ecosystems around the world. Future climate change is expected to further intensify disturbance regimes, which makes addressing disturbances in ecosystem management a top priority. As a prerequisite a broader understanding of disturbance impacts and ecosystem responses is needed. With regard to the effects of strong winds – the most detrimental disturbance agent in Europe – monitoring and management has focused on structural damage, i.e., tree mortality from uprooting and stem breakage. Effects on the functioning of trees surviving the storm (e.g., their productivity and allocation) have been rarely accounted for to date. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show that growth reduction was significant and pervasive in a 6.79·million hectare forest landscape in southern Sweden following the storm Gudrun (January 2005). Wind-related growth reduction in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) forests surviving the storm exceeded 10% in the worst hit regions, and was closely related to maximum gust wind speed (R2 = 0.849) and structural wind damage (R2 = 0.782). At the landscape scale, wind-related growth reduction amounted to 3.0 million m3 in the three years following Gudrun. It thus exceeds secondary damage from bark beetles after Gudrun as well as the long-term average storm damage from uprooting and stem breakage in Sweden. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that the impact of strong winds on forest ecosystems is not limited to the immediately visible area of structural damage, and call for a broader consideration of disturbance effects on ecosystem structure and functioning in the context of forest management and climate change mitigation. PMID:22413012

  18. Social inequalities in mental health in Norway: possible explanatory factors

    PubMed Central

    Dalgard, Odd Steffen

    2008-01-01

    Background It is well known that there is a social gradient in mental health, the prevalence of mental disorders stepwise increasing by lower social status. The reason for this, however, is not clear, and the purpose of the present study was to explore possible mediating factors between social status and mental health. Methods The study has a cross-sectional design, and was based on a nationwide survey in Oslo, Norway, counting 12 310 people in the age of 30–60 years. Immigrants from non-western countries were excluded. Socio-demographic data were gathered from existing registers, whereas data on health, psychosocial variables and life style were gathered by structured interview. As indicator of mental health was used a 10-items version of Hopkins Symptom Checklist, measuring psychological distress. Measures of general self-efficacy and sense of powerlessness was used as indicators of control of own life situation. Results A strong social gradient in mental health was found, the prevalence of psychological distress increasing by decreasing social status. Psychosocial factors, including self-efficacy, sense of powerlessness, control of work, social support and negative life events, in particular economic problems, as well as life style factors (physical exercise, BMI, smoking) and somatic health, likewise showed a social gradient, all risk factors increasing by decreasing social status. When adjusting for the risk factors in multivariate statistical analyses, the social gradient in mental health was eliminated. Low self-efficacy and sense of powerlessness emerged as important explanatory factors, alongside with poor social support, economic problems, smoking and somatic disorder. Conclusion Both individual characteristics, supposedly linked to the personality, like low self-efficacy, and factors related to the actual life situation, like economic problems and a feeling of powerlessness, contribute to the social gradient in mental health, and both aspects should be

  19. Prevalence of airway symptoms among hairdressers in Bergen, Norway

    PubMed Central

    Hollund, B; Moen, B; Lygre, S; Florvaag, E; Omenaas, E

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess respiratory symptoms among hairdressers in Norway.
METHODS—The study was based on a questionnaire sent to 100 hairdressers (91% responding) and 95 office workers (84% responding). The questionnaire sought information about allergy, respiratory symptoms in the past year, and symptoms after exposures to different types of pollutants, working conditions, and smoking habits. A population based control group was established because the hairdressers and office workers differed in age and smoking habits.
RESULTS—The prevalence of respiratory symptoms in the past year did not differ significantly between hairdressers and office workers after adjusting for age, atopy, and smoking. The hairdressers over 40 years of age reported significantly more symptoms—such as wheezing and breathlessness—in the past year than the office workers of the same age. Compared with the population based control group, both hairdressers younger than 30 and those over 40 reported more symptoms—such as breathlessness in the past year. The oldest hairdressers reported such symptoms as wheezing and breathlessness more often than did the younger hairdressers. These differences in breathlessness were significant after adjusting for smoking and wheezing. The same trend was not found among the office workers. The hairdressers reported significantly more wheezing, breathlessness, runny eyes, and blocked or runny nose from exposure to hair dyes, permanent oils, bleaching powder, and other chemicals used in a hairdressing salon, compared with the office workers. Prevalence of symptoms during exposure to other types of generel pollutants was similar in the two groups.
CONCLUSIONS—Hairdressers are exposed to low levels of various irritating chemicals every day. The prevalences of acute symptoms related to the exposure of hairdressers to hairdressing chemicals are very high. Hairdressers, especially the oldest hairdressers, have more asthma-like symptoms than the

  20. Rabies in the arctic fox population, Svalbard, Norway.

    PubMed

    Mørk, Torill; Bohlin, Jon; Fuglei, Eva; Åsbakk, Kjetil; Tryland, Morten

    2011-10-01

    Arctic foxes, 620 that were trapped and 22 found dead on Svalbard, Norway (1996-2004), as well as 10 foxes trapped in Nenets, North-West Russia (1999), were tested for rabies virus antigen in brain tissue by standard direct fluorescent antibody test. Rabies antigen was found in two foxes from Svalbard and in three from Russia. Blood samples from 515 of the fox carcasses were screened for rabies antibodies with negative result. Our results, together with a previous screening (1980-1989, n=817) indicate that the prevalence of rabies in Svalbard has remained low or that the virus has not been enzootic in the arctic fox population since the first reported outbreak in 1980. Brain tissues from four arctic foxes (one from Svalbard, three from Russia) in which rabies virus antigen was detected were further analyzed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction direct amplicon sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Sequences were compared to corresponding sequences from rabies virus isolates from other arctic regions. The Svalbard isolate and two of the Russian isolates were identical (310 nucleotides), whereas the third Russian isolate differed in six nucleotide positions. However, when translated into amino acid sequences, none of these substitutions produced changes in the amino acid sequence. These findings suggest that the spread of rabies virus to Svalbard was likely due to migration of arctic foxes over sea ice from Russia to Svalbard. Furthermore, when compared to other Arctic rabies virus isolates, a high degree of homology was found, suggesting a high contact rate between arctic fox populations from different arctic regions. The high degree of homology also indicates that other, and more variable, regions of the genome than this part of the nucleoprotein gene should be used to distinguish Arctic rabies virus isolates for epidemiologic purposes.

  1. The Eurasian Ice Sheet and the deglaciation of western Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svendsen, John Inge; Mangerud, Jan; Briner, Jason; Hughes, Anna L. C.; Lohne, Øystein S.; Goehring, Brent M.; Gyllencreutz, Richard

    2013-04-01

    New time-slice reconstructions of the Eurasian Ice Sheet limits reveal that the timing of both the maximum ice sheet extent and the subsequent retreat were spatially variable. This variability most likely reflects regional contrasts in geographic setting, internal ice sheet dynamics and the forcing mechanisms. Here we report fresh results from an ongoing field campaign in southern Norway. The inferred ice sheet history is based on a number of radiocarbon dates from various geological contexts as well cosmogenic nuclide (CN) dating of glacially transported boulders. We discuss the ice-recession along the western flank of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and until the final deglaciation of the fjords. One important conclusion is that the ice stream that occupied the Norwegian Trough, and that was active during the LGM, broke up extremely rapid at around 20 ka leaving the islands Utsira and Karmøy permanently ice free. The adjacent areas of the Norwegian mainland remained ice covered for another 4 thousand years until about 16 ka when the ice margin along the coast gradually started to retreat eastwards. However, this second stage of ice sheet retreat was interrupted by several re-advances. The largest advance probably peaked at the very end of the Younger Dryas stadial (11.6 ka) forming a system of prominent end moraines along the coast. The outlet glaciers that filled the main fjord troughs during this event started to break up very rapidly by means of calving at the onset of the Holocene warming, evidently a climatic response. The main fjords became totally ice free not later than 500 years into the Holocene, and a thousand years later the remaining part of the ice sheet was gone. It is calculated that the melting during the early Holocene (11.6-10.0 ka) was more than ten times faster than at Greenland today.

  2. The EISCAT_3D Project in Norway: E3DN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Hoz, C.; Oksavik, K.

    2013-12-01

    EISCAT_3D (E3D) is a project to build the next generation of incoherent scatter radars endowed with 3-dimensional scalar and vector capabilities that will replace the current EISCAT radars in Northern Scandinavia. One active (transmitting) site in Norway and four passive (receiving) sites in the Nordic countries will provide 3-D vector imaging capabilities by rapid scanning and multi-beam forming. The unprecedented flexibility of the solid-state transmitter with high duty-cycle, arbitrary wave-forming and polarisation and its pulsed power of 10 MW will provide unrivalled experimental capabilities to investigate the highly non-stationary and non-homogeneous state of the polar upper atmosphere. Aperture Synthesis Imaging Radar (ASIR) will to endow E3D with imaging capabilities in 3-dimensions that includes sub-beam resolution. Complemented by pulse compression, it will provide 3-dimensional images of certain types of incoherent scatter radar targets resolved to about 100 metres at 100 km range, depending on the signal-to-noise ratio. The Norwegian scientific programme is inspired by the pioneer polar scientist Kristian Birkeland (picture) and includes pressing questions on polar upper atmospheric research, among others: (Q1) How to proceed beyond the present simplistic, static, stationary and homogeneous analysis of upper atmospheric and ionospheric processes? (Q2) How does space weather affect ionospheric processes and how to support modelling and space weather services? (Q3) How to advance fundamental plasma physics by employing the ionosphere as a natural plasma physics laboratory? (Q4) How does the influx of extraterrestrial material interact with the upper atmosphere and where does the material originate from? (Q5) How does solar activity couple from geospace into the lower atmosphere and climate system, and does this energy change the wave forcing of geospace from below? Kristian Birkeland, Norwegian scientist and pioneer in polar and auroral research.

  3. Comparative oxygen barometry in granulites, Bamble sector, SE Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Harlov, D.E. )

    1992-07-01

    Oxygen fugacities have been estimated for the high-grade portion of the Bamble granulite facies terrane, SE Norway, using both titaniferous magnetite-ilmenite and orthopyroxene-titaniferous magnetite-quartz oxygen barometers. The two oxygen barometers show good agreement, for samples indicating high titaniferous magnetite-ilmenite temperatures whereas agreement is poor for low-temperature samples. Oxygen fugacities estimated from titaniferous magnetite-ilmenite are considerably lower than those estimated from orthopyroxene-titaniferous magnetite-quartz. This discrepancy increases with a decrease in temperature, which appears to reflect preferential resetting of the hematite content in the ilmenite grains, without much alteration of the more numerous titaniferous magnetite or orthopyroxene grains. The mean temperature for non-reset samples, 795 {plus minus} 60C (1{sigma}), agrees well with temperatures obtained from garnet-orthopyroxene K{sub D} exchange thermometry in the same region, 785 {plus minus} 60C (1{sigma}). The non-reset oxygen fugacities also agree well with an independent study of the Bamble granulites by Cameron. The QUIlP equilibrium (Quartz-Ulvospinel-Ilmenite-Pyroxene) is used to project self-consistent equilibrium temperatures and oxygen fugacities for samples reset due to hematite loss from the ilmenite grains. These projected temperatures and oxygen fugacities agree reasonably well with non-reset samples. The mean projected temperature is 830 {plus minus} 40C (1{sigma}). This agreement strongly supports the conclusion that low titaniferous magnetite-ilmenite temperatures (down to 485C) and accompanying low-oxygen fugacities are the result of hematite loss from the ilmenite grains at some time after granulite-facies metamorphism.

  4. TOXICOGENOMIC ANALYSIS OF TOLUENE EXPOSURE AT 3 AGES IN BROWN NORWAY RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major concern in assessing toxicity to environmental exposures is differential

    susceptibility in subsets of the population. Aging adults, who comprise the fastest

    growing segment of the population, may possess a greater sensitivity due to changes in

    metabol...

  5. Age-and Brain Region-Specific Differences in Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in Brown Norway Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondria are central regulators of energy homeostasis and play a pivotal role in mechanisms of cellular senescence. The objective of the present study was to evaluate mitochondrial bio­-energetic parameters in five brain regions [brainstem (BS), frontal cortex (FC), cereb...

  6. Serum biomarkers in young adult and aged Brown Norway (BN) rats following episodic (weekly) ozone exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone (03) is an air pollutant that is associated with cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Older adults are considered to be particularly susceptible to oxidant air pollutants such as 03. Serum biomarkers are being sought that would lead to better predictions of susceptibili...

  7. Does obesity increase susceptibility to ozone? Respiratory, behavioral, and metabolic assessments in Brown Norway rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    There may be a link between obesity and susceptibility to the respiratory, cardiovascular, and other health effects of air pollutants. Furthermore, it has been proposed that some air pollutants are obesogenic and may contribute to obesity. In view of the epidemic growth of obesit...

  8. Field trials of second-generation anticoagulants against difenacoum-resistant Norway rat populations.

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, J. H.; Shepherd, D. S.; Quy, R.

    1982-01-01

    Trials of rodenticidal baits containing 50 p.p.m. difenacoum, 50 p.p.m. bromadiolone or 20 p.p.m. brodifacoum were carried out on farmsteads against populations of Rattus norvegicus containing difenacoum-resistant individuals. Six difenacoum treatments failed in 14--42 days of baiting. Two treatments with bromadiolone succeeded in 23 and 33 days, but four further treatments lasting 35--56 days failed to eradicate the populations. Brodifacoum gave virtually complete control of six populations in 21--73 days and of the ten residual populations left behind by the other two compounds, after baiting for a further 11--85 days. The performance of both bromadiolone and brodifacoum was well below that reported by previous investigators, indicating the possibility of low-grade resistance to these compounds in the difenacoum-resistant strain. PMID:7130704

  9. Carbaryl neurotoxicity across the life-span of the Brown-Norway rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Demographics show that the proportion of older adults is increasing every year. While there has been considerable attention paid to potential sensitivity of the young to environmental chemicals, there is much less known about the relative vulnerability of the aged. Differences in...

  10. CARBARYL EFFECTS ON OXIDATIVE STRESS IN BRAIN REGIONS OF ADOLESCENT AND SENESCENT BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidative stress (OS) plays an important role in susceptibility and disease in old age. Understanding age-related susceptibility is crucial in assessing the human health risks of chemicals. Growing evidence implicates as in carbamate toxicity in addition to cholinesterase-inhibit...

  11. EFFECTS OF TOLUENE ON BRAIN OXIDATIVE STRESS PARAMETERS IN AGING BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aging-related susceptibility to environmental chemicals is poorly understood. Oxidative stress (OS) appears to play an important role in susceptibility and disease in old age. The objectives of this study, therefore, were to test whether OS is a potential toxicity pathway for tol...

  12. NEUROTOXICITY OF CARBARYL IN THE AGING BROWN NORWAY RAT: EFFECTS ON CORE TEMPERATURE AND MOTOR ACTIVITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA is pursuing a variety of research efforts to assess the susceptibility of the aged to neurotoxicants. The BN strain is a popular animal model for aging studies but there is a need for improved methods of monitoring their physiological responses to neurotoxicants over t...

  13. TOXICITY PATHWAY ANALYSIS IN AGING BROWN NORWAY RAT BRAIN FOLLOWING ACUTE TOLUENE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental stressors is poorly understood. To investigate the contribution of different life stages on response to toxicants, we examined the effects of acute exposure by oral gavage of the volatile organic solvent toluene (0.00, 0.3...

  14. Serum biomarkers in young adult and aged Brown Norway (BN) rats following episodic (weekly) ozone exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone (03) is an air pollutant that is associated with cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Older adults are considered to be particularly susceptible to oxidant air pollutants such as 03. Serum biomarkers are being sought that would lead to better predictions of susceptibili...

  15. NEUROTOXICITY OF CARBARYL IN THE AGING BROWN NORWAY RAT: EFFECTS ON CORE TEMPERATURE AND MOTOR ACTIVITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA is pursuing a variety of research efforts to assess the susceptibility of the aged to neurotoxicants. The BN strain is a popular animal model for aging studies but there is a need for improved methods of monitoring their physiological responses to neurotoxicants over t...

  16. AGE-RELATED TOXICITY PATHWAY ANALYSIS IN BROWN NORWAY RAT BRAIN FOLLOWING ACUTE TOLUENE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental exposures is poorly understood. To investigate-the contribution of different life stages on response to toxicants, we examined the effects of an acute exposure to the volatile organic compound, toluene (0.0 or 1.0 g/kg), i...

  17. AGE-RELATED EFFECTS OF TOLUENE ON THE MOTOR ACTIVITY OF BROWN NORWAY RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Senescence raises many uncertainties regarding susceptibility to environmental exposures. Compromises in reserve and repair mechanisms, and alterations in metabolic capacity, may make the aging population more susceptible to environmental contaminants. Additionally, increased var...

  18. EFFECT OF AGING ON THE CARDIOVASCULAR AND THERMOREGULATORY RESPONSE TO TOLUENE IN THE BROWN NORWAY RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the proportion of aged in the U.S. will expand markedly for the next several decades, the U.S.EPA is assessing if the aged are more susceptible to environmental toxicants. The neurotoxicity of toluene (TOL) has been well characterized in young adults but has not been studie...

  19. Thermoregulatory, Cardiovascular, and Metabolic Responses to Mild Caloric Restriction in the Brown Norway Rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been demonstrated to prolong the life span of a variety of species. CR-induced reduction in core temperature (Tc) is considered a key mechanism responsible for prolonging life span in rodents; however, little is known on the regulation of CR-induced h...

  20. TOXICOGENOMIC ANALYSIS OF TOLUENE EXPOSURE AT 3 AGES IN BROWN NORWAY RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major concern in assessing toxicity to environmental exposures is differential

    susceptibility in subsets of the population. Aging adults, who comprise the fastest

    growing segment of the population, may possess a greater sensitivity due to changes in

    metabol...

  1. EFFECT OF AGING ON THE CARDIOVASCULAR AND THERMOREGULATORY RESPONSE TO TOLUENE IN THE BROWN NORWAY RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the proportion of aged in the U.S. will expand markedly for the next several decades, the U.S.EPA is assessing if the aged are more susceptible to environmental toxicants. The neurotoxicity of toluene (TOL) has been well characterized in young adults but has not been studie...

  2. Age-related behavioral effects of methomyI in Brown Norway rats.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methomyl is a cholinesterase-inhibiting carbamate pesticide that is used in the field on cotton and a variety of fruits and vegetables. Concerns have been raised generally about age-related differences in susceptibility to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides, especially for chil...

  3. Vitamin K supplementation does not prevent bone loss in ovariectomized Norway rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Despite plausible biological mechanisms, the differential abilities of phylloquinone (PK) and m