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Sample records for bromine thermochemical cycle

  1. Thermochemical cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. E.; Soliman, M. A.; Carty, R. H.; Conger, W. L.; Cox, K. E.; Lawson, D.

    1975-01-01

    The thermochemical production of hydrogen is described along with the HYDRGN computer program which attempts to rate the various thermochemical cycles. Specific thermochemical cycles discussed include: iron sulfur cycle; iron chloride cycle; and hybrid sulfuric acid cycle.

  2. Molten-Phase Hydrolysis Stage Analysis and Experiments for the Calcium Bromine Thermochemical Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Richard D.; Panchal, C.B.; Lottes, Steven A.; Lyczkowski, Robert W.; Yang, Jianhong

    2007-07-01

    The goal of the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative as linked with the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative for Gas Reactor Deployment is to develop a cost-effective, proliferation-resistant, low-greenhouse-gas emissions, and sustainable, nuclear-based energy supply system. The calcium-bromine cycle under development at Argonne National Laboratory combines both experimental and modeling studies of a novel continuous 'hybrid' cycle for hydrogen production, where 'hybrid' means that both nuclear heat and electricity are employed. Engineering the calcium-bromine cycle for continuous operation should facilitate its practical development since there will be an inherent advantage to using components and materials which will operate in a constant, non-cycling chemical and thermal environment. This paper focuses on the first and important calcium bromide hydrolysis stage to generate hydrogen bromide, which when split by electrolysis, produces hydrogen. (authors)

  3. A thermochemical data bank for cycle analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carty, R. H.; Funk, J. E.; Conger, W. L.; Soliman, M. A.; Cox, K. E.

    1976-01-01

    The use of a computer program PAC-2 to produce a thermodynamic data bank for various materials used in water splitting cycles is described. The sources of raw data and a listing of 439 materials for which data are available are presented. The use of the data bank in conjunction with two other programs, CEC-72 and HYDRGN, is also discussed. The integration of these three programs implement an evaluation procedure for thermochemical water splitting cycles. CEC-72 is a program used to predict the equilibrium composition of the various chemical reactions in the cycle. HYDRGN is a program which is used to calculate changes in thermodynamic properties, work of separation, amount of recycle, internal heat regeneration, total thermal energy, and process thermal efficiency for a thermochemical cycle.

  4. A thermochemical data bank for cycle analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carty, R. H.; Funk, J. E.; Conger, W. L.; Soliman, M. A.; Cox, K. E.

    1976-01-01

    The use of a computer program PAC-2 to produce a thermodynamic data bank for various materials used in water splitting cycles is described. The sources of raw data and a listing of 439 materials for which data are available are presented. The use of the data bank in conjunction with two other programs, CEC-72 and HYDRGN, is also discussed. The integration of these three programs implement an evaluation procedure for thermochemical water splitting cycles. CEC-72 is a program used to predict the equilibrium composition of the various chemical reactions in the cycle. HYDRGN is a program which is used to calculate changes in thermodynamic properties, work of separation, amount of recycle, internal heat regeneration, total thermal energy, and process thermal efficiency for a thermochemical cycle.

  5. The sulfur thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokiya, M.

    1981-07-01

    Results of research on sulfur-cycle hydrogen production are presented. An H2S cycle using MoS2 as a catalyst is mentioned as showing promise for thermochemical water splitting, with an equilibrium reaction yield of 7%. Use of I or Pt as catalysts raised efficiencies to 16 and 12%, respectively, and further studies employing hybrid cycles with CO2-S and noble metals are reviewed. Thermal decomposition reactions with sulfuric acid are examined, noting a potential 30% thermal efficiency, and sulfur cycle research being undertaken at various industrial laboratories is outlined. It is noted that experiments with sulfuric acid salts for water electrolysis at Los Alamos will probably use solar collectors as a heat source.

  6. Studies of thermochemical water-splitting cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remick, R. J.; Foh, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    Higher temperatures and more isothermal heat profiles of solar heat sources are developed. The metal oxide metal sulfate class of cycles were suited for solar heat sources. Electrochemical oxidation of SO2 and thermochemical reactions are presented. Electrolytic oxidation of sulfur dioxide in dilute sulfuric acid solutions were appropriate for metal oxide metal sulfate cycles. The cell voltage at workable current densities required for the oxidation of SO2 was critical to the efficient operation of any metal oxide metal sulfate cycle. A sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolysis cell for the splitting of water via optimization of the anode reaction is discussed. Sulfuric acid concentrations of 30 to 35 weight percent are preferred. Platinized platinum or smooth platinum gave the best anode kinetics at a given potential of the five materials examined.

  7. Development of the Hybrid Sulfur Thermochemical Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, William A.; Steimke, John L

    2005-09-23

    The production of hydrogen via the thermochemical splitting of water is being considered as a primary means for utilizing the heat from advanced nuclear reactors to provide fuel for a hydrogen economy. The Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process is one of the baseline candidates identified by the U.S. Department of Energy [1] for this purpose. The HyS Process is a two-step hybrid thermochemical cycle that only involves sulfur, oxygen and hydrogen compounds. Recent work has resulted in an improved process design with a calculated overall thermal efficiency (nuclear heat to hydrogen, higher heating value basis) approaching 50%. Economic analyses indicate that a nuclear hydrogen plant employing the HyS Process in conjunction with an advanced gas-cooled nuclear reactor system can produce hydrogen at competitive prices. Experimental work has begun on the sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer, the major developmental component in the cycle. Proof-of-concept tests have established proton-exchange-membrane cells (a state-of-the-art technology) as a viable approach for conducting this reaction. This is expected to lead to more efficient and economical cell designs than were previously available. Considerable development and scale-up issues remain to be resolved, but the development of a viable commercial-scale HyS Process should be feasible in time to meet the commercialization schedule for Generation IV gas-cooled nuclear reactors.

  8. Fuel processing and thermochemical/photochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    A long sought goal of energy research has been to find a method to produce hydrogen fuel economically by splitting water using sunlight as the source of energy. Implementing method of producing useful fuels from raw materials using sunlight on a large scale generally involves significant capital and energy costs. Sunlight is an attractive means of providing a renewable source of energy to drive the process after providing the initial capital outlay. However, the combination of capital costs to provide concentrated solar energy and the elaborate and expensive plants required to carry out the chemical processes puts a heavy financial burden on this approach to a clean and renewable energy economy. Solar driven fuel processing methods include thermal decomposition, thermochemical, photochemical, electrochemical, biochemical, and hybrid reactions. The range of approaches to carry out these processes runs the gamut from well established chemical engineering practices with near term predictable costs, to long term basic photochemical processes, the details of which are still speculative.

  9. Bromine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2011-01-01

    All U.S. production of bromine in 2010 came from underground brines in Arkansas. It was the leading mineral commodity produced in the state in terms of value. Albemarle Corp. and Chemtura Corp. recovered bromine.

  10. Bromine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    The element bromine is found principally as a dissolved species in seawater, evaporitic (salt) lakes and underground brines associated with petroleum deposits. Seawater contains about 65 parts per million of bromine or an estimated 907 Gt (100 trillion st). In the Middle East, the highly saline waters of the Dead Sea are estimated to contain 907 Mt (1 billion st) of bromine. Bromine also may be recovered from seawater as a coproduct during evaporation to produce salt.

  11. Bromine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2012-01-01

    The element bromine is found principally as a dissolved species in seawater, evaporitic (salt) lakes and underground brines associated with petroleum deposits. Seawater contains about 65 parts per million of bromine or an estimated 100 Tt (110 trillion st). In the Middle East, the highly saline waters of the Dead Sea are estimated to contain 1 Gt (1.1billion st) of bromine. Bromine is also recovered from seawater as a coproduct during evaporation to produce salt.

  12. Bromine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2010-01-01

    The entire U.S. production of bromine in 2009 came from underground brines in Arkansas, where it was the leading mineral commodity produced in terms of value. Two companies, Albermarle Corp. and Chemtura Corp., were responsible for bromine recovery. Worldwide, the United States is still the leading producer. However, U.S. dominance has decreased, as countries like China, Israel, Japan and Jordan have strengthened their positions as world producers of elemental bromine.

  13. Thermochemical cycle analysis using linked CECS72 and HYDRGN computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donovan, L. F.

    1977-01-01

    A combined thermochemical cycle analysis computer program was designed. Input to the combined program is the same as input to the thermochemical cycle analysis program except that the extent of the reactions need not be specified. The combined program is designed to be run interactively from a computer time-sharing terminal. This mode of operation allows correction or modification of the cycle to take place during cycle analysis. A group of 13 thermochemical cycles was used to test the combined program.

  14. ALTERNATIVE FLOWSHEETS FOR THE SULFUR-IODINE THERMOCHEMICAL HYDROGEN CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,LC; LENTSCH,RD; BESENBRUCH,GE; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JE

    2003-02-01

    OAK-B135 A hydrogen economy will need significant new sources of hydrogen. Unless large-scale carbon sequestration can be economically implemented, use of hydrogen reduces greenhouse gases only if the hydrogen is produced with non-fossil energy sources. Nuclear energy is one of the limited options available. One of the promising approaches to produce large quantities of hydrogen from nuclear energy efficiently is the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) thermochemical water-splitting cycle, driven by high temperature heat from a helium Gas-Cooled Reactor. They have completed a study of nuclear-driven thermochemical water-splitting processes. The final task of this study was the development of a flowsheet for a prototype S-I production plant. An important element of this effort was the evaluation of alternative flowsheets and selection of the reference design.

  15. Advanced Electrochemical Technologies for Hydrogen Production by Alternative Thermochemical Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Lvov, Serguei; Chung, Mike; Fedkin, Mark; Lewis, Michele; Balashov, Victor; Chalkova, Elena; Akinfiev, Nikolay; Stork, Carol; Davis, Thomas; Gadala-Maria, Francis; Stanford, Thomas; Weidner, John; Law, Victor; Prindle, John

    2011-01-06

    Hydrogen fuel is a potentially major solution to the problem of climate change, as well as addressing urban air pollution issues. But a key future challenge for hydrogen as a clean energy carrier is a sustainable, low-cost method of producing it in large capacities. Most of the world's hydrogen is currently derived from fossil fuels through some type of reforming processes. Nuclear hydrogen production is an emerging and promising alternative to the reforming processes for carbon-free hydrogen production in the future. This report presents the main results of a research program carried out by a NERI Consortium, which consisted of Penn State University (PSU) (lead), University of South Carolina (USC), Tulane University (TU), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Thermochemical water decomposition is an emerging technology for large-scale production of hydrogen. Typically using two or more intermediate compounds, a sequence of chemical and physical processes split water into hydrogen and oxygen, without releasing any pollutants externally to the atmosphere. These intermediate compounds are recycled internally within a closed loop. While previous studies have identified over 200 possible thermochemical cycles, only a few have progressed beyond theoretical calculations to working experimental demonstrations that establish scientific and practical feasibility of the thermochemical processes. The Cu-Cl cycle has a significant advantage over other cycles due to lower temperature requirements – around 530 °C and below. As a result, it can be eventually linked with the Generation IV thermal power stations. Advantages of the Cu-Cl cycle over others include lower operating temperatures, ability to utilize low-grade waste heat to improve energy efficiency, and potentially lower cost materials. Another significant advantage is a relatively low voltage required for the electrochemical step (thus low electricity input). Other advantages include common chemical agents and

  16. Methane-methanol cycle for the thermochemical production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Dreyfuss, Robert M.; Hickman, Robert G.

    1976-01-01

    A thermochemical reaction cycle for the generation of hydrogen from water comprising the following sequence of reactions wherein M represents a metal: CH.sub.4 + H.sub.2 O .fwdarw. CO + 3H.sub.2 (1) co + 2h.sub.2 .fwdarw. ch.sub.3 oh (2) ch.sub.3 oh + so.sub.2 + mo .fwdarw. mso.sub.4 + ch.sub.4 (3) mso.sub.4 .fwdarw. mo + so.sub.2 + 1/2o.sub.2 (4) the net reaction is the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen.

  17. Solar hydrogen production with cerium oxides thermochemical cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binotti, Marco; Di Marcoberardino, Gioele; Biassoni, Mauro; Manzolini, Giampaolo

    2017-06-01

    This paper discusses the hydrogen production using a solar driven thermochemical cycle. The thermochemical cycle is based on nonstoichiometric cerium oxides redox and the solar concentration system is a solar dish. Detailed optical and redox models were developed to optimize the hydrogen production performance as function of several design parameters (i.e. concentration ratio, reactor pressures and temperatures) The efficiency of the considered technology is compared against two commercially available technologies namely PV + electrolyzer and Dish Stirling + electrolyzer. Results show that solar-to-fuel efficiency of 21.2% can be achieved at design condition assuming a concentration ratio around 5000, reduction and oxidation temperatures of 1500°C and 1275 °C. When moving to annual performance, the annual yield of the considered approach can be as high as 16.7% which is about 43% higher than the best competitive technology. The higher performance implies that higher installation costs around 40% can be accepted for the innovative concept to achieve the same cost of hydrogen.

  18. Bromine isotope analysis - a tool for investigating biogeochemical cycle of bromine-containing organic and inorganic compounds in the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, F.; Bernstein, A.; Levin, E.; Ronen, Z.; Halicz, L.

    2012-04-01

    Bromine naturally occurs mainly in the form of bromide and is usually considered as a conservative tracer in the groundwater system. However, nowadays many synthetically produced organobromine compounds are introduced into the environment by humans. Due to a possible toxic effect of these compounds, investigation of their fate in the nature is of the utmost importance. In this sense, examination of isotopic composition of inorganic and organic bromine may serve as a powerful tool for understanding Br geochemical cycle. Due to a relatively small mass difference between the isotopes 81Br and 79Br, bromine isotope fractionation originating from biotic and abiotic processes is expected to be in the range of several permille. Therefore, a highly precise technique for the bromine isotope ratio analysis is required. This work presents a new methodology for the precise determination of bromine isotope ratio in inorganic bromides and individual organic compounds by MC-ICPMS. Attained external precision (2σ) up to 0.1‰ allowed employment of the developed technique for determination of the bromine isotope composition in organic and inorganic bromides and Br KIE in biogeochemical processes.

  19. Membranes for H2 generation from nuclear powered thermochemical cycles.

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, Tina Maria; Ambrosini, Andrea; Garino, Terry J.; Gelbard, Fred; Leung, Kevin; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Iyer, Ratnasabapathy G.; Axness, Marlene

    2006-11-01

    In an effort to produce hydrogen without the unwanted greenhouse gas byproducts, high-temperature thermochemical cycles driven by heat from solar energy or next-generation nuclear power plants are being explored. The process being developed is the thermochemical production of Hydrogen. The Sulfur-Iodide (SI) cycle was deemed to be one of the most promising cycles to explore. The first step of the SI cycle involves the decomposition of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} into O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O at temperatures around 850 C. In-situ removal of O{sub 2} from this reaction pushes the equilibrium towards dissociation, thus increasing the overall efficiency of the decomposition reaction. A membrane is required for this oxygen separation step that is capable of withstanding the high temperatures and corrosive conditions inherent in this process. Mixed ionic-electronic perovskites and perovskite-related structures are potential materials for oxygen separation membranes owing to their robustness, ability to form dense ceramics, capacity to stabilize oxygen nonstoichiometry, and mixed ionic/electronic conductivity. Two oxide families with promising results were studied: the double-substituted perovskite A{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}Co{sub 1-y}B{sub y}O{sub 3-{delta}} (A=La, Y; B=Cr-Ni), in particular the family La{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}Co{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCM), and doped La{sub 2}Ni{sub 1-x}M{sub x}O{sub 4} (M = Cu, Zn). Materials and membranes were synthesized by solid state methods and characterized by X-ray and neutron diffraction, SEM, thermal analyses, calorimetry and conductivity. Furthermore, we were able to leverage our program with a DOE/NE sponsored H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} decomposition reactor study (at Sandia), in which our membranes were tested in the actual H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} decomposition step.

  20. Thermochemical and Vapor Pressure Behavior of Anthracene and Brominated Anthracene Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jinxia; Suuberg, Eric M

    2013-03-25

    The present work concerns the thermochemical and vapor pressure behavior of the anthracene (1) + 2-bromoanthracene (2) and anthracene (1) + 9-bromoanthracene (3) systems. Solid-liquid equilibrium temperature and differential scanning calorimetry studies indicate the existence of a minimum melting solid state near an equilibrium temperature of 477.65 K at x1 = 0.74 for the (1) + (2) system. Additionally, solid-vapor equilibrium studies for the (1) + (2) system show that the vapor pressure of the mixtures depends on composition, but does not follow ideal Raoult's law behaviour. The (1) + (3) system behaves differently from the (1) + (2) system. The (1) + (3) system has a solid solution like phase diagram. The system consists of two phases, an anthracene like phase and a 9-bromoanthracene like phase, while (1) + (2) mixtures only form a single phase. Moreover, experimental studies of the two systems suggest that the (1) + (2) system is in a thermodynamically lower energy state than the (1) + (3) system.

  1. Thermochemical and Vapor Pressure Behavior of Anthracene and Brominated Anthracene Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Suuberg, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    The present work concerns the thermochemical and vapor pressure behavior of the anthracene (1) + 2-bromoanthracene (2) and anthracene (1) + 9-bromoanthracene (3) systems. Solid-liquid equilibrium temperature and differential scanning calorimetry studies indicate the existence of a minimum melting solid state near an equilibrium temperature of 477.65 K at x1 = 0.74 for the (1) + (2) system. Additionally, solid-vapor equilibrium studies for the (1) + (2) system show that the vapor pressure of the mixtures depends on composition, but does not follow ideal Raoult’s law behaviour. The (1) + (3) system behaves differently from the (1) + (2) system. The (1) + (3) system has a solid solution like phase diagram. The system consists of two phases, an anthracene like phase and a 9-bromoanthracene like phase, while (1) + (2) mixtures only form a single phase. Moreover, experimental studies of the two systems suggest that the (1) + (2) system is in a thermodynamically lower energy state than the (1) + (3) system. PMID:24319314

  2. Commercial Alloys for Sulfuric Acid Vaporization in Thermochemical Hydrogen Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas M. Lillo; Karen M. Delezene-Briggs

    2005-10-01

    Most thermochemical cycles being considered for producing hydrogen include a processing stream in which dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated, vaporized and then decomposed over a catalyst. The sulfuric acid vaporizer is exposed to highly aggressive conditions. Liquid sulfuric acid will be present at a concentration of >96 wt% (>90 mol %) H2SO4 and temperatures exceeding 400oC [Brown, et. al, 2003]. The system will also be pressurized, 0.7-3.5 MPa, to keep the sulfuric acid in the liquid state at this temperature and acid concentration. These conditions far exceed those found in the commercial sulfuric acid generation, regeneration and handling industries. Exotic materials, e.g. ceramics, precious metals, clad materials, etc., have been proposed for this application [Wong, et. al., 2005]. However, development time, costs, reliability, safety concerns and/or certification issues plague such solutions and should be considered as relatively long-term, optimum solutions. A more cost-effective (and relatively near-term) solution would be to use commercially-available metallic alloys to demonstrate the cycle and study process variables. However, the corrosion behavior of commercial alloys in sulfuric acid is rarely characterized above the natural boiling point of concentrated sulfuric acid (~250oC at 1 atm). Therefore a screening study was undertaken to evaluate the suitability of various commercial alloys for concentration and vaporization of high-temperature sulfuric acid. Initially alloys were subjected to static corrosion tests in concentrated sulfuric acid (~95-97% H2SO4) at temperatures and exposure times up to 200oC and 480 hours, respectively. Alloys with a corrosion rate of less than 5 mm/year were then subjected to static corrosion tests at a pressure of 1.4 MPa and temperatures up to 375oC. Exposure times were shorter due to safety concerns and ranged from as short as 5 hours up to 144 hours. The materials evaluated included nickel-, iron- and cobalt

  3. Materials study supporting thermochemical hydrogen cycle sulfuric acid decomposer design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, Michael S.

    Increasing global climate change has been driven by greenhouse gases emissions originating from the combustion of fossil fuels. Clean burning hydrogen has the potential to replace much of the fossil fuels used today reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere. The sulfur iodine and hybrid sulfur thermochemical cycles coupled with high temperature heat from advanced nuclear reactors have shown promise for economical large-scale hydrogen fuel stock production. Both of these cycles employ a step to decompose sulfuric acid to sulfur dioxide. This decomposition step occurs at high temperatures in the range of 825°C to 926°C dependent on the catalysis used. Successful commercial implementation of these technologies is dependent upon the development of suitable materials for use in the highly corrosive environments created by the decomposition products. Boron treated diamond film was a potential candidate for use in decomposer process equipment based on earlier studies concluding good oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. However, little information was available relating the interactions of diamond and diamond films with sulfuric acid at temperatures greater than 350°C. A laboratory scale sulfuric acid decomposer simulator was constructed at the Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute at the University of Missouri-Columbia. The simulator was capable of producing the temperatures and corrosive environments that process equipment would be exposed to for industrialization of the sulfur iodide or hybrid sulfur thermochemical cycles. A series of boron treated synthetic diamonds were tested in the simulator to determine corrosion resistances and suitability for use in thermochemical process equipment. These studies were performed at twenty four hour durations at temperatures between 600°C to 926°C. Other materials, including natural diamond, synthetic diamond treated with titanium, silicon carbide, quartz, aluminum nitride, and Inconel

  4. Synfuels from fusion: producing hydrogen with the Tandem Mirror Reactor and thermochemical cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, R.W.; Ribe, F.L.

    1981-01-21

    This volume contains the following sections: (1) the Tandem Mirror fusion driver, (2) the Cauldron blanket module, (3) the flowing microsphere, (4) coupling the reactor to the process, (5) the thermochemical cycles, and (6) chemical reactors and process units. (MOW)

  5. Materials considerations for the coupling of thermochemical hydrogen cycles to tandem mirror reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Krikorian, O.H.

    1980-10-10

    Candidate materials are discussed and initial choices made for the critical elements in a liquid Li-Na Cauldron Tandem Mirror blanket and the General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Cycle for thermochemical hydrogen production. V and Ti alloys provide low neutron activation, good radiation damage resistance, and good chemical compatibility for the Cauldron design. Aluminide coated In-800H and siliconized SiC are materials choices for heat exchanger components in the thermochemical cycle interface.

  6. An analysis of hydrogen production via closed-cycle schemes. [thermochemical processings from water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, R. E.; Cox, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    A thermodynamic analysis and state-of-the-art review of three basic schemes for production of hydrogen from water: electrolysis, thermal water-splitting, and multi-step thermochemical closed cycles is presented. Criteria for work-saving thermochemical closed-cycle processes are established, and several schemes are reviewed in light of such criteria. An economic analysis is also presented in the context of energy costs.

  7. An analysis of hydrogen production via closed-cycle schemes. [thermochemical processings from water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, R. E.; Cox, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    A thermodynamic analysis and state-of-the-art review of three basic schemes for production of hydrogen from water: electrolysis, thermal water-splitting, and multi-step thermochemical closed cycles is presented. Criteria for work-saving thermochemical closed-cycle processes are established, and several schemes are reviewed in light of such criteria. An economic analysis is also presented in the context of energy costs.

  8. Low-temperature, manganese oxide-based, thermochemical water splitting cycle

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bingjun; Bhawe, Yashodhan; Davis, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    Thermochemical cycles that split water into stoichiometric amounts of hydrogen and oxygen below 1,000 °C, and do not involve toxic or corrosive intermediates, are highly desirable because they can convert heat into chemical energy in the form of hydrogen. We report a manganese-based thermochemical cycle with a highest operating temperature of 850 °C that is completely recyclable and does not involve toxic or corrosive components. The thermochemical cycle utilizes redox reactions of Mn(II)/Mn(III) oxides. The shuttling of Na+ into and out of the manganese oxides in the hydrogen and oxygen evolution steps, respectively, provides the key thermodynamic driving forces and allows for the cycle to be closed at temperatures below 1,000 °C. The production of hydrogen and oxygen is fully reproducible for at least five cycles. PMID:22647608

  9. Low-temperature, manganese oxide-based, thermochemical water splitting cycle.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingjun; Bhawe, Yashodhan; Davis, Mark E

    2012-06-12

    Thermochemical cycles that split water into stoichiometric amounts of hydrogen and oxygen below 1,000 °C, and do not involve toxic or corrosive intermediates, are highly desirable because they can convert heat into chemical energy in the form of hydrogen. We report a manganese-based thermochemical cycle with a highest operating temperature of 850 °C that is completely recyclable and does not involve toxic or corrosive components. The thermochemical cycle utilizes redox reactions of Mn(II)/Mn(III) oxides. The shuttling of Na(+) into and out of the manganese oxides in the hydrogen and oxygen evolution steps, respectively, provides the key thermodynamic driving forces and allows for the cycle to be closed at temperatures below 1,000 °C. The production of hydrogen and oxygen is fully reproducible for at least five cycles.

  10. Carbonate thermochemical cycle for the production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Jack L [Knoxville, TN; Dole, Leslie R [Knoxville, TN; Ferrada, Juan J [Knoxville, TN; Forsberg, Charles W [Oak Ridge, TN; Haire, Marvin J [Oak Ridge, TN; Hunt, Rodney D [Oak Ridge, TN; Lewis, Jr, Benjamin E [Knoxville, TN; Wymer, Raymond G [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-02-23

    The present invention is directed to a thermochemical method for the production of hydrogen from water. The method includes reacting a multi-valent metal oxide, water and a carbonate to produce an alkali metal-multi-valent metal oxide compound, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen.

  11. Carbonate Thermochemical Cycle for the Production of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrada, Juan J; Collins, Jack Lee; Dole, Leslie Robert; Forsberg, Charles W; Haire, Marvin Jonathan; Hunt, Rodney Dale; Lewis Jr, Benjamin E; Wymer, Raymond; Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a thermochemical method for the production of hydrogen from water. The method includes reacting a multi-valent metal oxide, water and a carbonate to produce an alkali metal-multi-valent metal oxide compound, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen.

  12. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur - Reaction between barium sulfide and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653-866 C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. An expression was derived for the rate of hydrogen formation.

  13. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur - Reaction between barium sulfide and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653-866 C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. An expression was derived for the rate of hydrogen formation.

  14. A thermochemical data bank for cycle analysis. [water decomposition for hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carty, R.; Funk, J.; Conger, W.; Soliman, M.; Cox, K.

    1976-01-01

    The use of the computer program PAC-2 to produce a thermodynamic data bank for various materials used in water-splitting cycles is described. The sources of raw data and a listing of 439 materials for which data are presently available are presented. This paper also discusses the use of the data bank in conjunction with two other programs, CEC-72 and HYDRGN. The integration of these three programs implement an evaluation procedure for thermochemical water splitting cycles. CEC-72 is a program used to predict the equilibrium composition of the various chemical reactions in the cycle. HYDRGN is a program which is used to calculate changes in thermodynamic properties, work of separation, amount of recycle, internal heat regeneration, total thermal energy and process thermal efficiency for a thermochemical cycle.

  15. A thermochemical data bank for cycle analysis. [water decomposition for hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carty, R.; Funk, J.; Conger, W.; Soliman, M.; Cox, K.

    1976-01-01

    The use of the computer program PAC-2 to produce a thermodynamic data bank for various materials used in water-splitting cycles is described. The sources of raw data and a listing of 439 materials for which data are presently available are presented. This paper also discusses the use of the data bank in conjunction with two other programs, CEC-72 and HYDRGN. The integration of these three programs implement an evaluation procedure for thermochemical water splitting cycles. CEC-72 is a program used to predict the equilibrium composition of the various chemical reactions in the cycle. HYDRGN is a program which is used to calculate changes in thermodynamic properties, work of separation, amount of recycle, internal heat regeneration, total thermal energy and process thermal efficiency for a thermochemical cycle.

  16. Membrane Separation Processes for the Benefit of the Sulfur-Iodine and Hybrid Sulfur Thermochemical Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Orme; John R. Klaehn; Frederick F. Stewart

    2009-05-01

    Thermochemical cycles have been proposed as processes for the manufacture of hydrogen from water in which the only effluent is oxygen. In this paper, membrane-based technologies are described that have the promise of enabling the further development of thermochemical cycle processes. In direct service of the sulfur-iodine (S-I) cycle, membranes have been studied for the concentration of HI and sulfuric acid using pervaporation. In this work, Nafion® and SPEEK membranes have effectively concentrated both acids at temperatures as high as 134 ºC without any significant degradation. Measured fluxes of water and separation factors are commercially competitive and have been characterized with respect to acid concentration in the feed streams. Further, hydrogen permeability is discussed at 300 ºC with the goal of providing a method for the removal of the product gas from HI in the decomposition step, thus increasing the productiveness of the equilibrium limited reaction.

  17. Hydrogen production by water decomposition using a combined electrolytic-thermochemical cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farbman, G. H.; Brecher, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    A proposed dual-purpose power plant generating nuclear power to provide energy for driving a water decomposition system is described. The entire system, dubbed Sulfur Cycle Water Decomposition System, works on sulfur compounds (sulfuric acid feedstock, sulfur oxides) in a hybrid electrolytic-thermochemical cycle; performance superior to either all-electrolysis systems or presently known all-thermochemical systems is claimed. The 3345 MW(th) graphite-moderated helium-cooled reactor (VHTR - Very High Temperature Reactor) generates both high-temperature heat and electric power for the process; the gas stream at core exit is heated to 1850 F. Reactor operation is described and reactor innards are illustrated. A cost assessment for on-stream performance in the 1990's is optimistic.

  18. Hydrogen production by water decomposition using a combined electrolytic-thermochemical cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farbman, G. H.; Brecher, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    A proposed dual-purpose power plant generating nuclear power to provide energy for driving a water decomposition system is described. The entire system, dubbed Sulfur Cycle Water Decomposition System, works on sulfur compounds (sulfuric acid feedstock, sulfur oxides) in a hybrid electrolytic-thermochemical cycle; performance superior to either all-electrolysis systems or presently known all-thermochemical systems is claimed. The 3345 MW(th) graphite-moderated helium-cooled reactor (VHTR - Very High Temperature Reactor) generates both high-temperature heat and electric power for the process; the gas stream at core exit is heated to 1850 F. Reactor operation is described and reactor innards are illustrated. A cost assessment for on-stream performance in the 1990's is optimistic.

  19. Comparative life cycle assessment of lignocellulosic ethanol production: biochemical versus thermochemical conversion.

    PubMed

    Mu, Dongyan; Seager, Thomas; Rao, P Suresh; Zhao, Fu

    2010-10-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass can be converted into ethanol through either biochemical or thermochemical conversion processes. Biochemical conversion involves hydrolysis and fermentation while thermochemical conversion involves gasification and catalytic synthesis. Even though these routes produce comparable amounts of ethanol and have similar energy efficiency at the plant level, little is known about their relative environmental performance from a life cycle perspective. Especially, the indirect impacts, i.e. emissions and resource consumption associated with the production of various process inputs, are largely neglected in previous studies. This article compiles material and energy flow data from process simulation models to develop life cycle inventory and compares the fossil fuel consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, and water consumption of both biomass-to-ethanol production processes. The results are presented in terms of contributions from feedstock, direct, indirect, and co-product credits for four representative biomass feedstocks i.e., wood chips, corn stover, waste paper, and wheat straw. To explore the potentials of the two conversion pathways, different technological scenarios are modeled, including current, 2012 and 2020 technology targets, as well as different production/co-production configurations. The modeling results suggest that biochemical conversion has slightly better performance on greenhouse gas emission and fossil fuel consumption, but that thermochemical conversion has significantly less direct, indirect, and life cycle water consumption. Also, if the thermochemical plant operates as a biorefinery with mixed alcohol co-products separated for chemicals, it has the potential to achieve better performance than biochemical pathway across all environmental impact categories considered due to higher co-product credits associated with chemicals being displaced. The results from this work serve as a starting point for developing full life cycle

  20. Comparative Life Cycle Assessment of Lignocellulosic Ethanol Production: Biochemical Versus Thermochemical Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Dongyan; Seager, Thomas; Rao, P. Suresh; Zhao, Fu

    2010-10-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass can be converted into ethanol through either biochemical or thermochemical conversion processes. Biochemical conversion involves hydrolysis and fermentation while thermochemical conversion involves gasification and catalytic synthesis. Even though these routes produce comparable amounts of ethanol and have similar energy efficiency at the plant level, little is known about their relative environmental performance from a life cycle perspective. Especially, the indirect impacts, i.e. emissions and resource consumption associated with the production of various process inputs, are largely neglected in previous studies. This article compiles material and energy flow data from process simulation models to develop life cycle inventory and compares the fossil fuel consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, and water consumption of both biomass-to-ethanol production processes. The results are presented in terms of contributions from feedstock, direct, indirect, and co-product credits for four representative biomass feedstocks i.e., wood chips, corn stover, waste paper, and wheat straw. To explore the potentials of the two conversion pathways, different technological scenarios are modeled, including current, 2012 and 2020 technology targets, as well as different production/co-production configurations. The modeling results suggest that biochemical conversion has slightly better performance on greenhouse gas emission and fossil fuel consumption, but that thermochemical conversion has significantly less direct, indirect, and life cycle water consumption. Also, if the thermochemical plant operates as a biorefinery with mixed alcohol co-products separated for chemicals, it has the potential to achieve better performance than biochemical pathway across all environmental impact categories considered due to higher co-product credits associated with chemicals being displaced. The results from this work serve as a starting point for developing full life cycle

  1. Synfuels from fusion: using the tandem mirror reactor and a thermochemical cycle to produce hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, R.W.

    1982-11-01

    This study is concerned with the following area: (1) the tandem mirror reactor and its physics; (2) energy balance; (3) the lithium oxide canister blanket system; (4) high-temperature blanket; (5) energy transport system-reactor to process; (6) thermochemical hydrogen processes; (7) interfacing the GA cycle; (8) matching power and temperature demands; (9) preliminary cost estimates; (10) synfuels beyond hydrogen; and (11) thermodynamics of the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/-H/sub 2/O system. (MOW)

  2. Revisiting the BaO2/BaO redox cycle for solar thermochemical energy storage.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, A J; Sastre, D; Serrano, D P; Pizarro, P; Coronado, J M

    2016-03-21

    The barium peroxide-based redox cycle was proposed in the late 1970s as a thermochemical energy storage system. Since then, very little attention has been paid to such redox couples. In this paper, we have revisited the use of reduction-oxidation reactions of the BaO2/BaO system for thermochemical heat storage at high temperatures. Using thermogravimetric analysis, reduction and oxidation reactions were studied in order to find the main limitations associated with each process. Furthermore, the system was evaluated through several charge-discharge stages in order to analyse its possible degradation after repeated cycling. Through differential scanning calorimetry the heat stored and released were also determined. Oxidation reaction, which was found to be slower than reduction, was studied in more detail using isothermal tests. It was observed that the rate-controlling step of BaO oxidation follows zero-order kinetics, although at high temperatures a deviation from Arrhenius behaviour was observed probably due to hindrances to anionic oxygen diffusion caused by the formation of an external layer of BaO2. This redox couple was able to withstand several redox cycles without deactivation, showing reaction conversions close to 100% provided that impurities are previously eliminated through thermal pre-treatment, demonstrating the feasibility of this system for solar thermochemical heat storage.

  3. Status of the DOE /STOR/-sponsored national program on hydrogen production from water via thermochemical cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    A pure thermochemical cycle is a system of linked regenerative chemical reactions which accepts only water and heat and produces hydrogen. Thermochemical cycles are potentially a more efficient and cheaper means of producing hydrogen from water than is the generation of electricity followed by electrolysis. The Energy Storage Systems Division of the Department of Energy is currently funding a national program on thermochemical hydrogen production. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is responsible for the technical management of this program. The goal is to develop a cycle which can potentially operate with an efficiency greater than 40% using a heat source providing a maximum available temperature of 1150 K. A closed bench-scale demonstration of such a cycle would follow. This cycle would be labeled a 'reference cycle' and would serve as a baseline against which future cycles would be compared.

  4. Status of the DOE /STOR/-sponsored national program on hydrogen production from water via thermochemical cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    A pure thermochemical cycle is a system of linked regenerative chemical reactions which accepts only water and heat and produces hydrogen. Thermochemical cycles are potentially a more efficient and cheaper means of producing hydrogen from water than is the generation of electricity followed by electrolysis. The Energy Storage Systems Division of the Department of Energy is currently funding a national program on thermochemical hydrogen production. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is responsible for the technical management of this program. The goal is to develop a cycle which can potentially operate with an efficiency greater than 40% using a heat source providing a maximum available temperature of 1150 K. A closed bench-scale demonstration of such a cycle would follow. This cycle would be labeled a 'reference cycle' and would serve as a baseline against which future cycles would be compared.

  5. Status of the DOE (STOR)-sponsored national program on hydrogen production from water via thermochemical cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    The program structure is presented. The activities of the thermochemical cycles program are grouped according to the following categories: (1) specific cycle development, (2) support research and technology, (3) cycle evaluation. Specific objectives and status of on-going activities are discussed. Chemical reaction series for the production of hydrogen are presented. Efficiency and economic evaluations are also discussed.

  6. Corrosive Resistant Diamond Coatings for the Acid Based Thermo-Chemical Hydrogen Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Prelas

    2009-06-25

    This project was designed to test diamond, diamond-like and related materials in environments that are expected in thermochemical cycles. Our goals were to build a High Temperature Corrosion Resistance (HTCR) test stand and begin testing the corrosive properties of barious materials in a high temperature acidic environment in the first year. Overall, we planned to test 54 samples each of diamond and diamond-like films (of 1 cm x 1 cm area). In addition we use a corrosion acceleration method by treating the samples at a temperature much larger than the expected operating temperature. Half of the samples will be treated with boron using the FEDOA process.

  7. Life cycle assessment of microalgae to biofuel: Thermochemical processing through hydrothermal liquefaction or pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennion, Edward P.

    Microalgae are currently being investigated as a renewable transportation fuel feedstock based on various advantages that include high annual yields, utilization of poor quality land, does not compete with food, and can be integrated with various waste streams. This study focuses on directly assessing the impact of two different thermochemical conversion technologies on the microalgae-to-biofuel process through life cycle assessment. A system boundary of a "well to pump" (WTP) is defined and includes sub-process models of the growth, dewatering, thermochemical bio-oil recovery, bio-oil stabilization, conversion to renewable diesel, and transport to the pump. Models were validated with experimental and literature data and are representative of an industrial-scale microalgae-to-biofuel process. Two different thermochemical bio-oil conversion systems are modeled and compared on a systems level, hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and pyrolysis. The environmental impact of the two pathways were quantified on the metrics of net energy ratio (NER), defined here as energy consumed over energy produced, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Results for WTP biofuel production through the HTL pathway were determined to be 1.23 for the NER and GHG emissions of -11.4 g CO2 eq (MJ renewable diesel)-1. WTP biofuel production through the pyrolysis pathway results in a NER of 2.27 and GHG emissions of 210 g CO2 eq (MJ renewable diesel)-1. The large environmental impact associated with the pyrolysis pathway is attributed to feedstock drying requirements and combustion of co-products to improve system energetics. Discussion focuses on a detailed breakdown of the overall process energetics and GHGs, impact of modeling at laboratory-scale compared to industrial-scale, environmental impact sensitivity to engineering systems input parameters for future focused research and development, and a comparison of results to literature.

  8. Copper chloride electrolyzer for the production of hydrogen via the copper-chlorine thermochemical cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Rahul Dev

    Hydrogen is considered a key element in solving the upcoming energy crisis, it is not the primary fuel source but an "energy carrier" similar to electricity and has to be produced using some other hydrogen rich source. Thermochemical water decomposition is a promising alternative to steam-methane reforming and electrolytic water splitting for a sustainable method of large-scale hydrogen production. The Copper-Chlorine thermochemical cycle is one of prime contenders among all the other thermochemical cycles being studied because of its low energy requirements compared to others and mild operating conditions, therefore making it available to be readily integrated to the available nuclear reactors or solar energy installations. This present work focuses on the study and development of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer cell for the Copper-Chlorine thermo chemical cycle to obtain a better understanding through experiments and models of this process. Different operating and design parameters such as temperature, flow rate, current density, membranes and gas diffusion layers were considered to reduce the voltage and hence increase the efficiency of the electrolyzer. The effects of catalyst and mass transfer were studied on the thin film electrode using a rotating disk electrode (RDE) setup. A mathematical model was also developed to monitor the performance of the electrolyzer by predicting the change in concentration of copper chloride in the system with respect to time. It is observed that flow rate and temperature plays a major role in decreasing the voltage drop. There was no effect of catalyst in the anode when compared to a bare anode at lower flow rates; but at higher flow rates there was significant decrease in voltage drop when a carbon cloth was placed at the anode end. High surface area carbon black has comparable activity towards CuCl oxidation with conventional catalyst like Platinum or Ruthenium oxide. It is also seen that mass transfers possess a

  9. Solar Thermochemical Fuels Production: Solar Fuels via Partial Redox Cycles with Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-19

    HEATS Project: The University of Minnesota is developing a solar thermochemical reactor that will efficiently produce fuel from sunlight, using solar energy to produce heat to break chemical bonds. The University of Minnesota is envisioning producing the fuel by using partial redox cycles and ceria-based reactive materials. The team will achieve unprecedented solar-to-fuel conversion efficiencies of more than 10% (where current state-of-the-art efficiency is 1%) by combined efforts and innovations in material development, and reactor design with effective heat recovery mechanisms and demonstration. This new technology will allow for the effective use of vast domestic solar resources to produce precursors to synthetic fuels that could replace gasoline.

  10. Thermochemical cycles for energy storage: Thermal decomposition of ZnSO4 systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentworth, W. E.

    1992-04-01

    The overall objective of our research has been to develop thermochemical cycles that can be used for energy storage. A specific cycle involving ammonium hydrogen sulfate (NH4HSO4) has been proposed. Each reaction in the proposed cycle has been examined experimentally. Emphasis has been placed on the basic chemistry of these reactions. In the concluding phase of this research, we have shown that when NH4HSO4 is mixed with ZnO and decomposed, the resulting products can be released stepwise (H2O (gaseous) at approximately 163 C, NH3 (gaseous) at 365-418 C, and a mixture of SO2 (gaseous) and SO3 (gaseous) at approximately 900 C) and separated by controlling the reaction temperature. Side reactions do not appear to be significant and the respective yields are high, as would be required for the successful use of this energy storage reaction in the proposed cycle. Thermodynamic, kinetic, and other reaction parameters have been measured for the various steps of the reaction. Finally, we have completed a detailed investigation of one particular reaction: the thermal decomposition of zinc sulfate (ZnSO4). We have demonstrated that this reaction can be accelerated and the temperature required reduced by the addition of excess ZnO, V2A5, and possibly other metal oxides.

  11. Thermochemical cycles for energy storage: Thermal decomposition of ZnCO sub 4 systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wentworth, W.E. )

    1992-04-01

    The overall objective of our research has been to develop thermochemical cycles that can be used for energy storage. A specific cycle involving ammonium hydrogen sulfate (NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4}) has been proposed. Each reaction in the proposed cycle has been examined experimentally. Emphasis has been placed on the basic chemistry of these reactions. In the concluding phase of this research, reported herein, we have shown that when NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4} is mixed with ZnO and decomposed, the resulting products can be released stepwise (H{sub 2}A{sub (g)} at {approximately}163{degrees}C, NH{sub 3(g)} at 365--418{degrees}C, and a mixture of SO{sub 2(g)} and SO{sub 3(g)} at {approximately}900{degrees}C) and separated by controlling the reaction temperature. Side reactions do not appear to be significant and the respective yields are high as would be required for the successful use of this energy storage reaction in the proposed cycle. Thermodynamic, kinetic, and other reaction parameters have been measured for the various steps of the reaction. Finally we have completed a detailed investigation of one particular reaction: the thermal decomposition of zinc sulfate (ZnSO{sub 4}). We have demonstrated that this reaction can be accelerated and the temperature required reduced by the addition of excess ZnO, V{sub 2}A{sub 5} and possibly other metal oxides.

  12. System and process for producing fuel with a methane thermochemical cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Diver, Richard B.

    2015-12-15

    A thermochemical process and system for producing fuel are provided. The thermochemical process includes reducing an oxygenated-hydrocarbon to form an alkane and using the alkane in a reforming reaction as a reducing agent for water, a reducing agent for carbon dioxide, or a combination thereof. Another thermochemical process includes reducing a metal oxide to form a reduced metal oxide, reducing an oxygenated-hydrocarbon with the reduced metal oxide to form an alkane, and using the alkane in a reforming reaction as a reducing agent for water, a reducing agent for carbon dioxide, or a combination thereof. The system includes a reformer configured to perform a thermochemical process.

  13. Solar Metal Sulfate-Ammonia Based Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle for Hydrogen Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Cunping (Inventor); T-Raissi, Ali (Inventor); Muradov, Nazim (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Two classes of hybrid/thermochemical water splitting processes for the production of hydrogen and oxygen have been proposed based on (1) metal sulfate-ammonia cycles (2) metal pyrosulfate-ammonia cycles. Methods and systems for a metal sulfate MSO.sub.4--NH3 cycle for producing H2 and O2 from a closed system including feeding an aqueous (NH3)(4)SO3 solution into a photoctalytic reactor to oxidize the aqueous (NH3)(4)SO3 into aqueous (NH3)(2)SO4 and reduce water to hydrogen, mixing the resulting aqueous (NH3)(2)SO4 with metal oxide (e.g. ZnO) to form a slurry, heating the slurry of aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4 and ZnO(s) in the low temperature reactor to produce a gaseous mixture of NH3 and H2O and solid ZnSO4(s), heating solid ZnSO4 at a high temperature reactor to produce a gaseous mixture of SO2 and O2 and solid product ZnO, mixing the gaseous mixture of SO2 and O2 with an NH3 and H2O stream in an absorber to form aqueous (NH4)(2)SO3 solution and separate O2 for aqueous solution, recycling the resultant solution back to the photoreactor and sending ZnO to mix with aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4 solution to close the water splitting cycle wherein gaseous H2 and O2 are the only products output from the closed ZnSO4--NH3 cycle.

  14. Conceptual design study FY 1981: synfuels from fusion - using the tandem mirror reactor and a thermochemical cycle to produce hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Krikorian, O.H.

    1982-02-09

    This report represents the second year's effort of a scoping and conceptual design study being conducted for the express purpose of evaluating the engineering potential of producing hydrogen by thermochemical cycles using a tandem mirror fusion driver. The hydrogen thus produced may then be used as a feedstock to produce fuels such as methane, methanol, or gasoline. The main objective of this second year's study has been to obtain some approximate cost figures for hydrogen production through a conceptual design study.

  15. Advances in Acid Concentration Membrane Technology for the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart; Christopher J. Orme

    2006-11-01

    One of the most promising cycles for the thermochemical generation of hydrogen is the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) process, where aqueous HI is thermochemically decomposed into H2 and I2 at approximately 350 degrees Celsius. Regeneration of HI is accomplished by the Bunsen reaction (reaction of SO2, water, and iodine to generate H2SO4 and HI). Furthermore, SO2 is regenerated from the decomposition of H2SO4 at 850 degrees Celsius yielding the SO2 as well as O2. Thus, the cycle actually consists of two concurrent oxidation-reduction loops. As HI is regenerated, co-produced H2SO4 must be separated so that each may be decomposed. Current flowsheets employ a large amount (~83 mol% of the entire mixture) of elemental I2 to cause the HI and the H2SO4 to separate into two phases. To aid in the isolation of HI, which is directly decomposed into hydrogen, water and iodine must be removed. Separation of iodine is facilitated by removal of water. Sulfuric acid concentration is also required to facilitate feed recycling to the sulfuric acid decomposer. Decomposition of the sulfuric acid is an equilibrium limited process that leaves a substantial portion of the acid requiring recycle. Distillation of water from sulfuric acid involves significant corrosion issues at the liquid-vapor interface. Thus, it is desirable to concentrate the acid without boiling. Recent efforts at the INL have concentrated on applying pervaporation through Nafion-117, Nafion-112, and sulfonated poly(etheretherketone) (S-PEEK) membranes for the removal of water from HI/water and HI/Iodine/water feedstreams. In pervaporation, a feed is circulated at low pressure across the upstream side of the membrane, while a vacuum is applied downstream. Selected permeants sorb into the membrane, transport through it, and are vaporized from the backside. Thus, a concentration gradient is established, which provides the driving force for transport. In this work, membrane separations have been performed at temperatures as high as

  16. High pressure sulfuric acid decomposition experiments for the sulfur-iodine thermochemical cycle.

    SciTech Connect

    Velasquez, Carlos E; Reay, Andrew R.; Andazola, James C.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Gelbard, Fred

    2005-09-01

    A series of three pressurized sulfuric acid decomposition tests were performed to (1) obtain data on the fraction of sulfuric acid catalytically converted to sulfur dioxide, oxygen, and water as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) demonstrate real-time measurements of acid conversion for use as process control, (3) obtain multiple measurements of conversion as a function of temperature within a single experiment, and (4) assess rapid quenching to minimize corrosion of metallic components by undecomposed acid. All four of these objectives were successfully accomplished. This report documents the completion of the NHI milestone on high pressure H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} decomposition tests for the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) thermochemical cycle project. All heated sections of the apparatus, (i.e. the boiler, decomposer, and condenser) were fabricated from Hastelloy C276. A ceramic acid injection tube and a ceramic-sheathed thermocouple were used to minimize corrosion of hot liquid acid on the boiler surfaces. Negligible fracturing of the platinum on zirconia catalyst was observed in the high temperature decomposer. Temperature measurements at the exit of the decomposer and at the entry of the condenser indicated that the hot acid vapors were rapidly quenched from about 400 C to less than 20 C within a 14 cm length of the flow path. Real-time gas flow rate measurements of the decomposition products provided a direct measurement of acid conversion. Pressure in the apparatus was preset by a pressure-relief valve that worked well at controlling the system pressure. However, these valves sometimes underwent abrupt transitions that resulted in rapidly varying gas flow rates with concomitant variations in the acid conversion fraction.

  17. Dissociation of manganese(III) oxide as part of a thermochemical water splitting cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Todd Michael

    A three-step thermochemical cycle to produce renewable hydrogen was proposed, which utilizes manganese(III) oxide and thermal energy to produce hydrogen. Most work on the cycle has focused on the hydrogen generating and product recovery steps with little work on the dissociation. It is essential to understand the dissociation because the feasibility of the cycle is based on this reaction having a high conversion. Because of the importance of the reduction step, this reaction has been selected as the topic of this dissertation. Additionally, because the dispersion of Mn2O3 particles into an Aerosol Flow Reactor (AFR) is important, feeding concepts were developed as well. Two powder feeding systems were developed: a Spinning Wheel Feeder (SWF) and a Fluidized Bed Feeder (FBF). Results of statistical particle size distribution studies indicated that the FBF was the better choice to disperse Mn2O3 powder. Additionally, results in an AFR demonstrated that the FBF was able to produce higher dissociation conversions. A study in a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA) indicated multiple mechanisms were controlling Mn2O3 dissociation. The first half reaction of the dissociation was calculated to be controlled by an Avrami-Erofeev mechanism and had an activation energy of 106.4+/-1.9 kJ/mol. The second half reaction had a duel mechanism utilizing an Avrami-Erofeev and Order of Reaction (OOR) mechanism. The mechanisms had activation energies of 251.2+/-6.5 and 110.7+/-24.6 kJ/mol respectively. Mn2O3 dissociation investigations were done in an AFR. They revealed oxygen is a significant factor and to effectively control the dissociation with temperature and gas flow rate, the oxygen concentration must be below 0.25%. Experimental runs that had oxygen concentrations less than 0.25% were used to calculate reaction rate constants. The Avrami-Erofeev mechanisms were combined into a single mechanism. Rate constants for the Avrami-Erofeev and OOR mechanisms were 1.8E7+/-1.3E7 and 5.6E3

  18. Thermochemical water-splitting cycle, bench-scale investigations and process engineering. Annual report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Caprioglio, G.; McCorkle, K.H.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Rode, J.S.

    1980-03-01

    A program to investigate thermochemical water splitting has been under way at General Atomic Company (GA) since October 1972. This document is an annual progress report of Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored process development work on the GA sulfur-iodine thermochemical water splitting cycle. The work consisted of laboratory bench-scale investigations, demonstration of the process in a closed-loop cycle demonstrator, and process engineering design studies. A bench-scale system, consisting of three subunits, has been designed to study the cycle under continuous flow conditions. The designs of subunit I, which models the main solution reaction and product separation, and subunit II, which models the concentration and decomposition of sulfuric acid, were presented in an earlier annual report. The design of subunit III, which models the purification and decomposition of hydrogen iodide, is given in this report. Progress on the installation and operation of subunits I and II is described. A closed-loop cycle demonstrator was installed and operated based on a DOE request. Operation of the GA sulfur-iodine cycle was demonstrated in this system under recycle conditions. The process engineering addresses the flowsheet design of a large-scale production process consisting of four chemical sections (I through IV) and one helium heat supply section (V). The completed designs for sections I through V are presented. The thermal efficiency of the process calculated from the present flowsheet is 47%.

  19. Commercial Activated Carbon for the Catalytic Production of Hydrogen via the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Ginosar; Lucia M. Petkovic; Kyle C. Burch

    2011-07-01

    Eight activated carbon catalysts were examined for their catalytic activity to decompose hydroiodic acid (HI) to produce hydrogen; a key reaction in the sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical water splitting cycle. Activity was examined under a temperature ramp from 473 to 773 K. No statistically significant correlation was found between catalyst sample properties and catalytic activity. Four of the eight samples were examined for one week of continuous operation at 723 K. All samples appeared to be stable over the period of examination.

  20. Bioenergy co-products derived from microalgae biomass via thermochemical conversion--life cycle energy balances and CO2 emissions.

    PubMed

    Khoo, H H; Koh, C Y; Shaik, M S; Sharratt, P N

    2013-09-01

    An investigation of the potential to efficiently convert lipid-depleted residual microalgae biomass using thermochemical (gasification at 850 °C, pyrolysis at 550 °C, and torrefaction at 300 °C) processes to produce bioenergy derivatives was made. Energy indicators are established to account for the amount of energy inputs that have to be supplied to the system in order to gain 1 MJ of bio-energy output. The paper seeks to address the difference between net energy input-output balances based on a life cycle approach, from "cradle-to-bioenergy co-products", vs. thermochemical processes alone. The experimental results showed the lowest results of Net Energy Balances (NEB) to be 0.57 MJ/MJ bio-oil via pyrolysis, and highest, 6.48 MJ/MJ for gas derived via torrefaction. With the complete life cycle process chain factored in, the energy balances of NEBLCA increased to 1.67 MJ/MJ (bio-oil) and 7.01 MJ/MJ (gas). Energy efficiencies and the life cycle CO2 emissions were also calculated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Kinetics of Thermochemical Reactions Important in the Venus Atmospheric Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to experimentally measure the rates of several thermochemical gas-solid reactions between sulfur gases in the Venus atmosphere and reactive minerals on the hot Venus surface. Despite the great importance of these reactions for the maintenance of significant amounts of sulfur gases (and thus for the maintenance of the global cloud cover) in the atmosphere of Venus, essentially no kinetic data are currently available for them.

  2. Thermal tests of a multi-tubular reactor for hydrogen production by using mixed ferrites thermochemical cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Pardo, Aurelio; Denk, Thorsten; Vidal, Alfonso

    2017-06-01

    The SolH2 project is an INNPACTO initiative of the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, with the main goal to demonstrate the technological feasibility of solar thermochemical water splitting cycles as one of the most promising options to produce H2 from renewable sources in an emission-free way. A multi-tubular solar reactor was designed and build to evaluate a ferrite thermochemical cycle. At the end of this project, the ownership of this plant was transferred to CIEMAT. This paper reviews some additional tests with this pilot plant performed in the Plataforma Solar de Almería with the main goal to assess the thermal behavior of the reactor, evaluating the evolution of the temperatures inside the cavity and the relation between supplied power and reached temperatures. Previous experience with alumina tubes showed that they are very sensitive to temperature and flux gradients, what leads to elaborate an aiming strategy for the heliostat field to achieve a uniform distribution of the radiation inside the cavity. Additionally, the passing of clouds is a phenomenon that importantly affects all the CSP facilities by reducing their efficiency. The behavior of the reactor under these conditions has been studied.

  3. Thermochemical hydrogen generation.

    PubMed

    Wentorf, R H; Hanneman, R E

    1974-07-26

    The basic concepts for thermochemical hydrogen generation processes have been summarized in this article. A useful set of criteria has been described for the screening and selection of potentially viable, multistep, closedcycle thermochemical processes for hydrogen generation. Three illustrative, new closed-cycle processes have been discussed, indicating potential, overall thermal efficiencies ranging from approximately 40 to 60 percent. Combined thermochemical-electrolytic schemes also warrant further consideration. Principal technical problems in the development of such thermochemical closed-cycle and mixed-cycle processes are expected to include primarily materials compatibility, reaction kinetics, separation techniques, and heat-exchanger systems. As natural gas supplies decline and prices rise, new open-cycle thermochemical processes based on water and other fossil fuel feedstocks will be the first important new technology in supplying the growing hydrogen needs of industry for at least the next two decades. Conventional electrolysis technology does not appear to be a competitor for large-scale supplies in this century unless very low off-peak electrical power rates become available, although electrolysis will be the best technique for some small-scale uses. Further analysis will be required to determine if closed-cycle thermochemical or mixed-cycle methods will displace electrolysis or other methods as the principal technology for the production of hydrogen on a large scale for the longer term.

  4. Engineering scoping study of the production of hydrogen and oxygen from the cerium oxide-sodium phosphate/carbonate thermochemical cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Goeller, H.E.

    1984-04-01

    One potential industrial application of solar energy is for the production of hydrogen (and oxygen) using a cycle of thermochemical reactions. This report provides a preliminary evaluation of the engineering feasibility of such an operation based on the cerium oxide-sodium phosphate/carbonate thermochemical cycle to produce 2 metric tons of hydrogen per day. Material and heat balances were developed, and equipment was sized. The preliminary pilot plant layout was then compared with a plant of the same capacity for producing hydrogen by the electrolysis of water. The use of water electrolysis seems superior and cheaper in all respects. 7 figures, 4 tables.

  5. Kinetics of thermochemical gas-solid reactions important in the Venus sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The thermochemical net reaction CaCO3 + SO2 yields CaSO4 + CO is predicted to be an important sink for incorporation of SO2 into the Venus crust. The reaction rate law was established to understand the dependence of rate on experimental variables such as temperature and partial pressure of SO2, CO2, and O2. The experimental approach was a variant of the thermogravimetric method often employed to study the kinetics of thermochemical gas-solid reactions. Clear calcite crystals were heated at constant temperature in SO2-bearing gas streams for varying time periods. Reaction rate was determined by three independent methods. A weighted linear least squares fit to all rate data yielded a rate equation. Based on the Venera 13, 14 and Vega 2 observations of CaO content of the Venus atmosphere, SO2 at the calculated rate would be removed from the Venus atmosphere in about 1,900,00 years. The most plausible endogenic source of the sulfur needed to replenish atmospheric SO2 is volcanism. The annual amount of erupted material needed for the replenishment depends on sulfur content; three ratios are used to calculate rates ranging from 0.4 to 11 cu km/year. This geochemically derived volcanism rate can be used to test if geophysically derived rates are correct. The work also suggests that Venus is less volcanically active than the Earth.

  6. Pt/TiO2 (Rutile) Catalysts for Sulfuric Acid Decomposition in Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    L. M. Petkovic; D. M. Ginosar; H. W. Rollins; K. C. Burch; P. J. Pinhero; H. H. Farrell

    2008-04-01

    Thermochemical cycles consist of a series of chemical reactions to produce hydrogen from water at lower temperatures than by direct thermal decomposition. All the sulfur-based cycles for water splitting employ the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. This work reports the studies performed on platinum supported on titania (rutile) catalysts to investigate the causes of catalyst deactivation under sulfuric acid decomposition reaction conditions. Samples of 1 wt% Pt/TiO2 (rutile) catalysts were submitted to flowing concentrated sulfuric acid at 1123 K and atmospheric pressure for different times on stream (TOS) between 0 and 548 h. Post-operation analyses of the spent catalyst samples showed that Pt oxidation and sintering occurred under reaction conditions and some Pt was lost by volatilization. Pt loss rate was higher at initial times but total loss appeared to be independent of the gaseous environment. Catalyst activity showed an initial decrease that lasted for about 66 h, followed by a slight recovery of activity between 66 and 102 h TOS, and a period of slower deactivation after 102 h TOS. Catalyst sulfation did not seem to be detrimental to catalyst activity and the activity profile suggested that a complex dynamical situation involving platinum sintering, volatilization, and oxidation, along with TiO2 morphological changes affected catalyst activity in a non-monotonic way.

  7. Thermochemical CO2 splitting via redox cycling of ceria reticulated foam structures with dual-scale porosities.

    PubMed

    Furler, Philipp; Scheffe, Jonathan; Marxer, Daniel; Gorbar, Michal; Bonk, Alexander; Vogt, Ulrich; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-06-14

    Efficient heat transfer of concentrated solar energy and rapid chemical kinetics are desired characteristics of solar thermochemical redox cycles for splitting CO2. We have fabricated reticulated porous ceramic (foam-type) structures made of ceria with dual-scale porosity in the millimeter and micrometer ranges. The larger void size range, with dmean = 2.5 mm and porosity = 0.76-0.82, enables volumetric absorption of concentrated solar radiation for efficient heat transfer to the reaction site during endothermic reduction, while the smaller void size range within the struts, with dmean = 10 μm and strut porosity = 0-0.44, increases the specific surface area for enhanced reaction kinetics during exothermic oxidation with CO2. Characterization is performed via mercury intrusion porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Samples are thermally reduced at 1773 K and subsequently oxidized with CO2 at temperatures in the range 873-1273 K. On average, CO production rates are ten times higher for samples with 0.44 strut porosity than for samples with non-porous struts. The oxidation rate scales with specific surface area and the apparent activation energy ranges from 90 to 135.7 kJ mol(-1). Twenty consecutive redox cycles exhibited stable CO production yield per cycle. Testing of the dual-scale RPC in a solar cavity-receiver exposed to high-flux thermal radiation (3.8 kW radiative power at 3015 suns) corroborated the superior performance observed in the TGA, yielding a shorter cycle time and a mean solar-to-fuel energy conversion efficiency of 1.72%.

  8. ENERGY EFFICIENCY LIMITS FOR A RECUPERATIVE BAYONET SULFURIC ACID DECOMPOSITION REACTOR FOR SULFUR CYCLE THERMOCHEMICAL HYDROGEN PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.; Edwards, T.

    2009-06-11

    A recuperative bayonet reactor design for the high-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition step in sulfur-based thermochemical hydrogen cycles was evaluated using pinch analysis in conjunction with statistical methods. The objective was to establish the minimum energy requirement. Taking hydrogen production via alkaline electrolysis with nuclear power as the benchmark, the acid decomposition step can consume no more than 450 kJ/mol SO{sub 2} for sulfur cycles to be competitive. The lowest value of the minimum heating target, 320.9 kJ/mol SO{sub 2}, was found at the highest pressure (90 bar) and peak process temperature (900 C) considered, and at a feed concentration of 42.5 mol% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. This should be low enough for a practical water-splitting process, even including the additional energy required to concentrate the acid feed. Lower temperatures consistently gave higher minimum heating targets. The lowest peak process temperature that could meet the 450-kJ/mol SO{sub 2} benchmark was 750 C. If the decomposition reactor were to be heated indirectly by an advanced gas-cooled reactor heat source (50 C temperature difference between primary and secondary coolants, 25 C minimum temperature difference between the secondary coolant and the process), then sulfur cycles using this concept could be competitive with alkaline electrolysis provided the primary heat source temperature is at least 825 C. The bayonet design will not be practical if the (primary heat source) reactor outlet temperature is below 825 C.

  9. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen production from S-I thermochemical process coupled to a high temperature gas reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldi, M. R.; Francois, J. L.; Castro-Uriegas, D.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to quantify the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated to the hydrogen produced by the sulfur-iodine thermochemical process, coupled to a high temperature nuclear reactor, and to compare the results with other life cycle analysis (LCA) studies on hydrogen production technologies, both conventional and emerging. The LCA tool was used to quantify the impacts associated with climate change. The product system was defined by the following steps: (i) extraction and manufacturing of raw materials (upstream flows), (U) external energy supplied to the system, (iii) nuclear power plant, and (iv) hydrogen production plant. Particular attention was focused to those processes where there was limited information from literature about inventory data, as the TRISO fuel manufacture, and the production of iodine. The results show that the electric power, supplied to the hydrogen plant, is a sensitive parameter for GHG emissions. When the nuclear power plant supplied the electrical power, low GHG emissions were obtained. These results improve those reported by conventional hydrogen production methods, such as steam reforming. (authors)

  10. Activated Carbon Catalysts for the Production of Hydrogen for the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar; Harry W. Rollins; Kyle C Burch; Cristina Deiana; Hugo S. Silva; Maria F. Sardella; Dolly Granados

    2009-05-01

    Seven activated carbon catalysts obtained from a variety of raw material sources and preparation methods were examined for their catalytic activity to decompose hydroiodic acid (HI) to produce hydrogen; a key reaction in the sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical water splitting cycle. Activity was examined under a temperature ramp from 473 to 773 K. Within the group of ligno-cellulosic steam-activated carbon catalysts, activity increased with surface area. However, both a mineral-based steam-activated carbon and a ligno-cellulosic chemically-activated carbon displayed activities lower than expected based on their higher surface areas. In general, ash content was detrimental to catalytic activity while total acid sites, as determined by Bohem’s titrations, seemed to favor higher catalytic activity within the group of steam-activated carbons. These results suggest, one more time, that activated carbon raw materials and preparation methods may have played a significant role in the development of surface characteristics that eventually dictated catalyst activity and stability as well.

  11. Life-Cycle Assessment of a Distributed-Scale Thermochemical Bioenergy Conversion System

    Treesearch

    Hongmei Gu; Richard Bergman

    2016-01-01

    Expanding bioenergy production from woody biomass has the potential to decrease net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and improve the energy security of the United States. Science-based and internationally accepted life-cycle assessment (LCA) is an effective tool for policy makers to make scientifically informed decisions on expanding renewable energy production from...

  12. Solar Thermochemical Energy Storage Through Carbonation Cycles of SrCO3/SrO Supported on SrZrO3.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Nathan R; Barde, Amey; Randhir, Kelvin; Li, Like; Hahn, David W; Mei, Renwei; Klausner, James F; AuYeung, Nick

    2015-11-01

    Solar thermochemical energy storage has enormous potential for enabling cost-effective concentrated solar power (CSP). A thermochemical storage system based on a SrO/SrCO3 carbonation cycle offers the ability to store and release high temperature (≈1200 °C) heat. The energy density of SrCO3/SrO systems supported by zirconia-based sintering inhibitors was investigated for 15 cycles of exothermic carbonation at 1150 °C followed by decomposition at 1235 °C. A sample with 40 wt % of SrO supported by yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) shows good energy storage stability at 1450 MJ m(-3) over fifteen cycles at the same cycling temperatures. After further testing over 45 cycles, a decrease in energy storage capacity to 1260 MJ m(-3) is observed during the final cycle. The decrease is due to slowing carbonation kinetics, and the original value of energy density may be obtained by lengthening the carbonation steps. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Thermodynamic Analysis of the Use a Chemical Heat Pump to Link a Supercritical Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactor and a Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycle for Hydrogen Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granovskii, Mikhail; Dincer, Ibrahim; Rosen, Marc A.; Pioro, Igor

    Increases in the power generation efficiency of nuclear power plants (NPPs) are mainly limited by the permissible temperatures in nuclear reactors and the corresponding temperatures and pressures of the coolants in reactors. Coolant parameters are limited by the corrosion rates of materials and nuclear-reactor safety constraints. The advanced construction materials for the next generation of CANDU reactors, which employ supercritical water (SCW) as a coolant and heat carrier, permit improved “steam” parameters (outlet temperatures up to 625°C and pressures of about 25 MPa). An increase in the temperature of steam allows it to be utilized in thermochemical water splitting cycles to produce hydrogen. These methods are considered by many to be among the most efficient ways to produce hydrogen from water and to have advantages over traditional low-temperature water electrolysis. However, even lower temperature water splitting cycles (Cu-Cl, UT-3, etc.) require an intensive heat supply at temperatures higher than 550-600°C. A sufficient increase in the heat transfer from the nuclear reactor to a thermochemical water splitting cycle, without jeopardizing nuclear reactor safety, might be effectively achieved by application of a heat pump, which increases the temperature of the heat supplied by virtue of a cyclic process driven by mechanical or electrical work. Here, a high-temperature chemical heat pump, which employs the reversible catalytic methane conversion reaction, is proposed. The reaction shift from exothermic to endothermic and back is achieved by a change of the steam concentration in the reaction mixture. This heat pump, coupled with the second steam cycle of a SCW nuclear power generation plant on one side and a thermochemical water splitting cycle on the other, increases the temperature of the “nuclear” heat and, consequently, the intensity of heat transfer into the water splitting cycle. A comparative preliminary thermodynamic analysis is conducted

  14. Review of the Two-Step H2O/CO2-Splitting Solar Thermochemical Cycle Based on Zn/ZnO Redox Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Loutzenhiser, Peter G.; Meier, Anton; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a comprehensive overview of the work to date on the two‑step solar H2O and/or CO2 splitting thermochemical cycles with Zn/ZnO redox reactions to produce H2 and/or CO, i.e., synthesis gas—the precursor to renewable liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The two-step cycle encompasses: (1) The endothermic dissociation of ZnO to Zn and O2 using concentrated solar energy as the source for high-temperature process heat; and (2) the non-solar exothermic oxidation of Zn with H2O/CO2 to generate H2/CO, respectively; the resulting ZnO is then recycled to the first step. An outline of the underlying science and the technological advances in solar reactor engineering is provided along with life cycle and economic analyses. PMID:28883361

  15. Review of the Two-Step H₂O/CO₂-Splitting Solar Thermochemical Cycle Based on Zn/ZnO Redox Reactions.

    PubMed

    Loutzenhiser, Peter G; Meier, Anton; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2010-11-12

    This article provides a comprehensive overview of the work to date on the two‑step solar H₂O and/or CO₂ splitting thermochemical cycles with Zn/ZnO redox reactions to produce H₂ and/or CO, i.e., synthesis gas-the precursor to renewable liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The two-step cycle encompasses: (1) The endothermic dissociation of ZnO to Zn and O₂ using concentrated solar energy as the source for high-temperature process heat; and (2) the non-solar exothermic oxidation of Zn with H₂O/CO2 to generate H₂/CO, respectively; the resulting ZnO is then recycled to the first step. An outline of the underlying science and the technological advances in solar reactor engineering is provided along with life cycle and economic analyses.

  16. Brominated dibenzofurans

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Brominated dibenzofurans ; no CASRN Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  17. Cesium Neonide: Molecule or Thermochemical Exercise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, P. G.; Clack, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    Thermochemical cycles are used to decide which hypothetical compounds might exist and, if not, what is the factor that condemns them to non-existence. Hypothetical compounds of rare gases provide examples of the approach with added historical interest that thermochemical considerations led to prediction and demonstration that XePtF-6 was stable.…

  18. Thermochemical cycles for energy storage: Thermal decomposition of ZnCO{sub 4} systems. Final topical report, January 1, 1982--December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Wentworth, W.E.

    1992-04-01

    The overall objective of our research has been to develop thermochemical cycles that can be used for energy storage. A specific cycle involving ammonium hydrogen sulfate (NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4}) has been proposed. Each reaction in the proposed cycle has been examined experimentally. Emphasis has been placed on the basic chemistry of these reactions. In the concluding phase of this research, reported herein, we have shown that when NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4} is mixed with ZnO and decomposed, the resulting products can be released stepwise (H{sub 2}A{sub (g)} at {approximately}163{degrees}C, NH{sub 3(g)} at 365--418{degrees}C, and a mixture of SO{sub 2(g)} and SO{sub 3(g)} at {approximately}900{degrees}C) and separated by controlling the reaction temperature. Side reactions do not appear to be significant and the respective yields are high as would be required for the successful use of this energy storage reaction in the proposed cycle. Thermodynamic, kinetic, and other reaction parameters have been measured for the various steps of the reaction. Finally we have completed a detailed investigation of one particular reaction: the thermal decomposition of zinc sulfate (ZnSO{sub 4}). We have demonstrated that this reaction can be accelerated and the temperature required reduced by the addition of excess ZnO, V{sub 2}A{sub 5} and possibly other metal oxides.

  19. Rubberized, Brominated Epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W.; Kourtides, D.; Parker, J.; Nir, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy composite materials made with resins containing bromine and rubber additives. New composites tougher and more resistant to fire. Flame resistance increased by introducing bromine via commercial brominated flame-retartant polymeric additives.

  20. Thermochemical generation of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Petersen, G. R. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    The direct fluid contact heat exchange with H2SO4 at about 330 C prior to high temperature decomposition at about 830 C in the oxygen release step of several thermochemical cycles for splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen provides higher heat transfer rates, savings in energy and permits use of cast vessels rather than expensive forged alloy indirect heat exchangers. Among several candidate perfluorocarbon liquids tested, only perfluoropropylene oxide polymers having a degree of polymerization from about 10 to 60 were chemically stable, had low miscibility and vapor pressure when tested with sulfuric acid at temperatures from 300 C to 400 C.

  1. Thermochemical Production of Hydrogen from Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamberger, C. E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the possible advantages of decomposing water by means of thermochemical cycles. Explains that, if energy consumption can be minimized, this method is capable of producing hydrogen more efficiently than electrolysis. (GA)

  2. Thermochemical Production of Hydrogen from Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamberger, C. E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the possible advantages of decomposing water by means of thermochemical cycles. Explains that, if energy consumption can be minimized, this method is capable of producing hydrogen more efficiently than electrolysis. (GA)

  3. Enhanced hydrogen production by doping Pr into Ce0.9Hf0.1O2 for thermochemical two-step water-splitting cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qing-Long; Tamaura, Yutaka

    2014-03-01

    We synthesized (Ce0.9Hf0.1)1-xPrxO2-δ (x=0, 0.05 and 0.1) using the polymerized complex method. The synthesized samples, as well as the samples after thermochemical two-step water-splitting cycles have a fluorite structure and Pr exists in the solid solutions with both trivalent and tetravalent states, as suggested by powder X-ray Diffraction (XRD) Patterns. The reduction fraction of Ce4+ in redox cycles (oxidation step in air) and two-step water-splitting cycles (oxidation step in steam) indicates that the addition of Pr into Ce-Hf oxide solid solution cannot improve the reduction fraction of Ce4+ during the redox cycles but both the reduction fraction of Ce4+ and H2 yield are significantly enhanced during two-step water-splitting cycles. The chemical composition of 10 mol% Pr doped Ce0.9Hf0.1O2 exhibits the highest reactivity for hydrogen production in H2-generation step by yielding an average amount of 5.72 ml g-1 hydrogen gas, which is much higher than that evolved by Ce0.9Hf0.1O2 (4.50 ml g-1). The enhancement effect of doping Pr on the performance during two-step water-splitting cycles is because of the multivalent properties of Pr, which can: (1) reduce the amount of Ce3+ oxidized by contamination air (contamination air eliminated by partial oxidation of Pr3+ to Pr4+) in H2-generation step; (2) enhance the reaction rate in H2-generation step by improving the ionic conductivity (extrinsic oxygen vacancies created by the substitution of Ce4+ by Pr3+).

  4. Bromine Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, B

    2001-04-09

    The production and handling in 1999 of about 200 million kilograms of bromine plus substantial derivatives thereof by Great Lakes Chemical Corp. and Albemarle Corporation in their southern Arkansas refineries gave OSHA Occupational Injury/Illness Rates (OIIR) in the range of 0.74 to 1.60 reportable OIIRs per 200,000 man hours. OIIRs for similar industries and a wide selection of other U.S. industries range from 1.6 to 23.9 in the most recent OSHA report. Occupational fatalities for the two companies in 1999 were zero compared to a range in the U.S.of zero for all computer manufacturing to 0.0445 percent for all of agriculture, forestry and fishing in the most recent OSHA report. These results show that bromine and its compounds can be considered as safe chemicals as a result of the bromine safety standards and practices at the two companies. The use of hydrobromic acid as an electrical energy storage medium in reversible PEM fuel cells is discussed. A study in 1979 of 20 megawatt halogen working fluid power plants by Oronzio de Nora Group found such energy to cost 2 to 2.5 times the prevailing base rate at that time. New conditions may reduce this relative cost. The energy storage aspect allows energy delivery at maximum demand times where the energy commands premium rates. The study also found marginal cost and performance advantages for hydrobromic acid over hydrochloric acid working fluid. Separate studies in the late 70s by General Electric also showed marginal performance advantages for hydrobromic acid.

  5. Innovative solar thermochemical water splitting.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Roy E. Jr.; Siegel, Nathan P.; Evans, Lindsey R.; Moss, Timothy A.; Stuecker, John Nicholas; Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Miller, James Edward; Allendorf, Mark D.; James, Darryl L.

    2008-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is evaluating the potential of an innovative approach for splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen using two-step thermochemical cycles. Thermochemical cycles are heat engines that utilize high-temperature heat to produce chemical work. Like their mechanical work-producing counterparts, their efficiency depends on operating temperature and on the irreversibility of their internal processes. With this in mind, we have invented innovative design concepts for two-step solar-driven thermochemical heat engines based on iron oxide and iron oxide mixed with other metal oxides (ferrites). The design concepts utilize two sets of moving beds of ferrite reactant material in close proximity and moving in opposite directions to overcome a major impediment to achieving high efficiency--thermal recuperation between solids in efficient counter-current arrangements. They also provide inherent separation of the product hydrogen and oxygen and are an excellent match with high-concentration solar flux. However, they also impose unique requirements on the ferrite reactants and materials of construction as well as an understanding of the chemical and cycle thermodynamics. In this report the Counter-Rotating-Ring Receiver/Reactor/Recuperator (CR5) solar thermochemical heat engine and its basic operating principals are described. Preliminary thermal efficiency estimates are presented and discussed. Our ferrite reactant material development activities, thermodynamic studies, test results, and prototype hardware development are also presented.

  6. Bromination of Phenol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This "Science note" examines the bromination of phenol, a reaction that is commonly taught at A-level and IB (International Baccalaureate) as an example of electrophilic substitution. Phenol undergoes bromination with bromine or bromine water at room temperature. A white precipitate of 2,4,6-tribromophenol is rapidly formed. This…

  7. Bromination of Phenol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This "Science note" examines the bromination of phenol, a reaction that is commonly taught at A-level and IB (International Baccalaureate) as an example of electrophilic substitution. Phenol undergoes bromination with bromine or bromine water at room temperature. A white precipitate of 2,4,6-tribromophenol is rapidly formed. This…

  8. 49 CFR 173.228 - Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride. 173... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.228 Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride. (a) Bromine pentafluoride and bromine trifluoride are authorized in packagings as follows: (1) Specification 3A150,...

  9. 49 CFR 173.228 - Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride. 173... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.228 Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride. (a) Bromine pentafluoride and bromine trifluoride are authorized in packagings as follows: (1) Specification 3A150,...

  10. 49 CFR 173.228 - Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride. 173... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.228 Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride. (a) Bromine pentafluoride and bromine trifluoride are authorized in packagings as follows: (1) Specification 3A150,...

  11. 49 CFR 173.228 - Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride. 173... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.228 Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride. (a) Bromine pentafluoride and bromine trifluoride are authorized in packagings as follows: (1) Specification 3A150,...

  12. 49 CFR 173.228 - Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride. 173... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.228 Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride. (a) Bromine pentafluoride and bromine trifluoride are authorized in packagings as follows: (1) Specification 3A150,...

  13. Thermochemical water-splitting cycle, bench-scale investigations, and process engineering. Final report, February 1977-December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, J.H.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Brown, L.C.; O'Keefe, D.R.; Allen, C.L.

    1982-05-01

    The sulfur-iodine water-splitting cycle is characterized by the following three reactions: 2H/sub 2/O + SO/sub 2/ + I/sub 2/ ..-->.. H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ + 2HI; H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ ..-->.. H/sub 2/O + SO/sub 2/ + 1/2 O/sub 2/; and 2HI ..-->.. H/sub 2/ + I/sub 2/. This cycle was developed at General Atomic after several critical features in the above reactions were discovered. These involved phase separations, catalytic reactions, etc. Estimates of the energy efficiency of this economically reasonable advanced state-of-the-art processing unit produced sufficiently high values (to approx.47%) to warrant cycle development effort. The DOE contract was largely directed toward the engineering development of this cycle, including a small demonstration unit (CLCD), a bench-scale unit, engineering design, and costing. The work has resulted in a design that is projected to produce H/sub 2/ at prices not yet generally competitive with fossil-fuel-produced H/sub 2/ but are projected to be favorably competitive with respect to H/sub 2/ from fossil fuels in the future.

  14. Hydrolysis of CuCl{sub 2} in the Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production : experimental studies using a spray reactor with an ultrasonic atomizer.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrandon, M. S.; Lewis, M. A.; Alvarez, F.; Shafirovich, E.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Texas at El Paso

    2010-03-01

    The Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle is being developed as a hydrogen production method. Prior proof-of-concept experimental work has shown that the chemistry is viable while preliminary modeling has shown that the efficiency and cost of hydrogen production have the potential to meet DOE's targets. However, the mechanisms of CuCl{sub 2} hydrolysis, an important step in the Cu-Cl cycle, are not fully understood. Although the stoichiometry of the hydrolysis reaction, 2CuCl{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O {leftrightarrow} Cu{sub 2}OCl{sub 2} + 2HCl, indicates a necessary steam-to-CuCl{sub 2} molar ratio of 0.5, a ratio as high as 23 has been typically required to obtain near 100% conversion of the CuCl{sub 2} to the desired products at atmospheric pressure. It is highly desirable to conduct this reaction with less excess steam to improve the process efficiency. Per Le Chatelier's Principle and according to the available equilibrium-based model, the needed amount of steam can be decreased by conducting the hydrolysis reaction at a reduced pressure. In the present work, the experimental setup was modified to allow CuCl{sub 2} hydrolysis in the pressure range of 0.4-1 atm. Chemical and XRD analyses of the product compositions revealed the optimal steam-to-CuCl{sub 2} molar ratio to be 20-23 at 1 atm pressure. The experiments at 0.4 atm and 0.7 atm showed that it is possible to lower the steam-to-CuCl{sub 2} molar ratio to 15, while still obtaining good yields of the desired products. An important effect of running the reaction at reduced pressure is the significant decrease of CuCl concentration in the solid products, which was not predicted by prior modeling. Possible explanations based on kinetics and residence times are suggested.

  15. Thermochemical production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Dreyfuss, Robert M.

    1976-07-13

    A thermochemical reaction cycle for the generation of hydrogen from water comprising the following sequence of reactions wherein M represents a metal and Z represents a metalloid selected from the arsenic-antimony-bismuth and selenium-tellurium subgroups of the periodic system: 2MO + Z + SO.sub.2 .fwdarw. MZ + MSO.sub.4 (1) mz + h.sub.2 so.sub.4 .fwdarw. mso.sub.4 + h.sub.2 z (2) 2mso.sub.4 .fwdarw. 2mo + so.sub.2 + so.sub.3 + 1/20.sub.2 (3) h.sub.2 z .fwdarw. z + h.sub.2 (4) h.sub.2 o + so.sub.3 .fwdarw. h.sub.2 so.sub.4 (5) the net reaction is the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen.

  16. Low cycle fatigue behavior of Ti6Al4V thermochemically nitrided for its use in hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, D; Manero, J M; Gil, F J; Planell, J A

    2001-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys have many attractive properties including high specific strength, low density, and excellent corrosion resistance. Besides, titanium and the Ti6Al4V alloy have long been recognized as materials with high biocompatibility. These properties have led to the use of these materials in biomedical applications. Despite these advantages, the lack of good wear resistance makes difficult the use of titanium and Ti6Al4V in some biomedical applications, like articulating components of prostheses. Some surface treatments are available in order to correct these problems, like thermal surface treatment by means of nitrogen gaseous diffusion at high temperature. Nitrogen enters into the material by diffusion, creating a surface layer of increased hardness. Low cycle fatigue behavior in air of Ti6Al4V alloy has been studied. Results show a reduction of low cycle fatigue life up to 10% compared to the not-treated material. Studies suggest it is not related to the titanium nitride surface layer, but to microstructural changes caused by the high temperature treatment.

  17. Development and experimental study for hydrogen production from the thermochemical two-step water splitting cycles with a CeO2 coated new foam device design using solar furnace system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyun seok; Kodama, Tatsuya; Gokon, Nobuyuki; Kim, Jong kyu; Lee, Sang nam; Kang, Yong heack

    2017-06-01

    A solar reactor containing a CeO2-coated reactive foam device for producing hydrogen via a thermochemical two-step water splitting cycle was proposed and experimentally tested. Modeling of the optical properties of the 40 kWth KIER (Korea Institute of Energy Research) solar furnace was performed to design and prepare the optimized foam matrix shape and the new solar reactor. Solar demonstration of the solar reactor was accomplished in the KIER 40 kWth solar furnace and hydrogen was produced successfully during the water decomposition step. The conical shape foam device was suggested and tested the temperature gradients and hydrogen productivity. Finally, five cyclic test was conducted with the conical shape CeO2-coated foam device, the total hydrogen production was 1394.32 Ncm3 during the five cycles and the average hydrogen production per cycle was 278.86 Ncm3.

  18. Thermochemical energy systems research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nix, R. G.

    1983-08-01

    Research on Heat-pump thermochemical energy systems and thermochemical reduction of CO2 to CO for open-loop solar energy transport is described. Analysis of the NaOH-H2O heat-pumped system indicted cost effectiveness relative to hot oil solar system with parabolic trough receivers for production of 0.101 MPa saturated steam high-temperature heat-pumped systems are being defined.

  19. Recover bromine on site

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, P.; Mahajan, S.; Beatty, R.D.; Rostrup-Nielsen, T.; Schubert, D.W.; Lu, Phat Tan

    1993-04-01

    Chemists have long recognized the importance of recovering bromine from waste streams, and attempts to do so catalytically date back more than 50 years. Although the early interest in bromine recovery was driven primarily by economics, increased environmental pressures are providing additional incentives to recycle this element. As the acceptability of discharging wastes into the environment decreases, the cost of doing so increases, creating a need for alternative handling. The authors interest in waste bromine recovery was driven by both economic and environmental factors. In their evaluation of a research program that included a bromination step as part of a synthesis process, Catalytica researchers found that the process would be feasible commercially only if the waste HBr produced were recycled on site to bromine. A nonbromine route was eventually adopted for this particular research program, but the need for an economical and environmentally sound process for recycling HBr to bromine was recognized. The development of this process became a project in its own right. This process eliminates the need to form and ship aqueous sodium bromide offsite. It converts the waste HBr directly to bromine by catalytic oxidation.

  20. Measurements of stratospheric bromine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlacek, W. A.; Lazrus, A. L.; Gandrud, B. W.

    1984-01-01

    From 1974 to 1977, molecules containing acidic bromine were sampled in the stratosphere by using tetrabutyl ammonium hydroxide impregnated filters. Sampling was accomplished by WB-57F aircraft and high-altitude balloons, spanning latitudes from the equator to 75 deg N and altitudes up to 36.6 km. Analytical results are reported for 4 years of measurements and for laboratory simulations that determined the filter collection efficiencies for a number of brominated species. Mass mixing ratios for the collected bromine species in air average about 27 pptm in the stratosphere. Seasonal variability seems to be small.

  1. Measurements of stratospheric bromine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlacek, W. A.; Lazrus, A. L.; Gandrud, B. W.

    1984-01-01

    From 1974 to 1977, molecules containing acidic bromine were sampled in the stratosphere by using tetrabutyl ammonium hydroxide impregnated filters. Sampling was accomplished by WB-57F aircraft and high-altitude balloons, spanning latitudes from the equator to 75 deg N and altitudes up to 36.6 km. Analytical results are reported for 4 years of measurements and for laboratory simulations that determined the filter collection efficiencies for a number of brominated species. Mass mixing ratios for the collected bromine species in air average about 27 pptm in the stratosphere. Seasonal variability seems to be small.

  2. Capabilities to Support Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Ginosar

    2009-05-01

    This report presents the results of a study to determine if Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has the skilled staff, instrumentation, specialized equipment, and facilities required to take on work in thermochemical research, development, and demonstration currently being performed by the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). This study outlines the beneficial collaborations between INL and other national laboratories, universities, and industries to strengthen INL's thermochemical efforts, which should be developed to achieve the goals of the NHI in the most expeditious, cost effective manner. Taking on this work supports INL's long-term strategy to maintain leadership in thermochemical cycle development. This report suggests a logical path forward to accomplish this transition.

  3. Solid bromine complexers

    DOEpatents

    Grimes, Patrick G.

    1987-01-20

    The cell of the invention comprises a housing, a zinc or cadmium anode, a chemically non-reactive counterelectrode and cathodic halogen. The cathodic halogen is selected from chlorine and bromine, and preferably is bromine. The cell also is provided with an aqueous metal halide containing electrolyte in which the metal ions are of the same metal as the metal of the anode and halide anions are of the same halogen as the cathodic halogen material. Importantly, in the present invention, anion exchange resins provide a convenient means for storing the halogen generated during charging of the cell and providing a source of halogen to be used in the discharge of the cell.

  4. Thermochemical hydrogen production by a vanadium/chlorine process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoche, K. F.; Schuster, P.; Ritterbex, T.

    A pure thermochemical cycle of the vanadium/chlorine family similar to the one proposed earlier by Funk et al. (1964) is investigated experimentally with respect to certain chemical reactions. A complete mass and energy balance of this cycle is given. The thermal efficiency is calculated to be approximately 40%.

  5. Lithium/bromine cell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W.G.; Skarstad, P.M.; Hayes, T.G.; Owens, B.B.

    1980-01-01

    Bromine is attractive as a cathode material because cells with a high energy density and high cell voltage are theoretically possible. The addition of small amounts of certain salts or organic compounds results in bromine solutions of sufficient conductivity for cathode applications. However, given these highly conductive bromine cathodes, lithium/bromine cells are limited in rate and practical available capacity by the high resistivity of the discharge product. The rate of resistance increase for the best bromine cells in this study is more than one order of magnitude greater than that observed for corresponding lithium/iodine cells. Lithium/bromine cells can function at pacemaker rates and they may be superior to cells used in early pacemakers. However, the authors have not found the lithium/bromine cells described to be superior to existing lithium/iodine cells available for cardiac pacemakers. 17 refs.

  6. Brominated Flame Retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) belong to a large class of compounds known as organohalogens. BFRs are currently the largest marketed flame retardant group due to their high performance efficiency and low cost. In the commercial market, more than 75 different BFRs are recogniz...

  7. Brominated Flame Retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) belong to a large class of compounds known as organohalogens. BFRs are currently the largest marketed flame retardant group due to their high performance efficiency and low cost. In the commercial market, more than 75 different BFRs are recogniz...

  8. Thermochemical water decomposition processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Thermochemical processes which lead to the production of hydrogen and oxygen from water without the consumption of any other material have a number of advantages when compared to other processes such as water electrolysis. It is possible to operate a sequence of chemical steps with net work requirements equal to zero at temperatures well below the temperature required for water dissociation in a single step. Various types of procedures are discussed, giving attention to halide processes, reverse Deacon processes, iron oxide and carbon oxide processes, and metal and alkali metal processes. Economical questions are also considered.

  9. Thermochemical water decomposition processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Thermochemical processes which lead to the production of hydrogen and oxygen from water without the consumption of any other material have a number of advantages when compared to other processes such as water electrolysis. It is possible to operate a sequence of chemical steps with net work requirements equal to zero at temperatures well below the temperature required for water dissociation in a single step. Various types of procedures are discussed, giving attention to halide processes, reverse Deacon processes, iron oxide and carbon oxide processes, and metal and alkali metal processes. Economical questions are also considered.

  10. Thermochemical reactor systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Lipinski, Wojciech; Davidson, Jane Holloway; Chase, Thomas Richard

    2016-11-29

    Thermochemical reactor systems that may be used to produce a fuel, and methods of using the thermochemical reactor systems, utilizing a reactive cylindrical element, an optional energy transfer cylindrical element, an inlet gas management system, and an outlet gas management system.

  11. Bromine-Chlorine Coupling in the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, Michael Y.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Rodriquez, Jose M.; Prather, Michael J.

    1996-01-01

    The contribution from the chlorine and bromine species in the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole is evaluated. Since chlorine and bromine compounds are of different industrial origin, it is desirable, from a policy point of view, to be able to attribute chlorine-catalyzed loss of ozone with those reactions directly involving chlorine species, and likewise for bromine-catalyzed loss. In the stratosphere, however, most of the chemical families are highly coupled, and, for example, changes in the chlorine abundance will alter the partitioninig in other families and thus the rate of ozone loss. This modeling study examines formation of the Antarctic ozone hole for a wide range of bromine concentrations (5 - 25 pptv) and for chlorine concentrations typical of the last two decades (1.5, 2.5 and 3.5 ppbv). We follow the photochemical evolution of a single parcel of air, typical of the inner Antarctic vortex (50 mbar, 70 deg. S, NO(sub y) = 2 ppbv, with Polar Stratospheric Clouds(PSC)) from August 1 to November 1. For all of these ranges of chlorine and bromine loading, we would predict a substantial ozone hole (local depletion greater than 90%) within the de-nitrified, PSC- perturbed vortex. The contributions of the different catalytic cycles responsible for ozone loss are tabulated. The deep minimum in ozone is driven primarily by the chlorine abundance. As bromine levels decrease, the magnitude of the chlorine-catalyzed ozone loss increases to take up the slack. This is because bromine suppresses ClO by accelerating the conversion of ClO an Cl2O2 back to HCI. For this range of conditions, the local relative efficiency of ozone destruction per bromine atom to that per chlorine atom (alpha-factor) ranges from 33 to 55, decreasing with increase of bromine.

  12. Bromine accumulations in pine trees growing around bromine production plants

    SciTech Connect

    Tainter, F.H.; Bailey, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    Soil and pine foliage samples were collected from 92 plots located around five bromine production plants in union and Columbia Counties, Arkansas, during January-February 1977. Analysis of pine tissues for the major salt components of brine showed that bromine was the only component accumulating in these tissues and that the amount of bromine decreases exponentially with the distance from the emission sources. Bromine content in plots closest to the sources ranged from 170-550 ppM in 1-year-old needles and from 140-1000 ppM in 2-year-old needles. Some visible injury was evident in trees growing closer than 0.48 km from the sources, but tissues with bromine contents of 800 to 1000 ppM from the closest plots exhibited no visible injury. Bromine did not accumulate in organic litter or in the soil.

  13. Global Distribution of Organo-Bromine Gases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawardena, Rohith

    Both man-made and natural trace organo-bromine gases are present in the atmosphere in minute quantities --in the order of a few parts per trillion by volume. The man-made species CBrF_3 and CBrClF _2 are believed to be an important source of bromine to the stratosphere where they act as catalysts in the chlorofluorocarbon-ozone-depletion hypothesis. A high resolution capillary column EC-GC method with and O_2 doped detector was developed, System V, to measure these and related organo -bromine gases in the atmosphere. It was developed from a packed column EC-GC method, System I, that was used to measure CH_3I at sub pptv levels but could measure only one organo-bromine gas, CBrClF _2. The development work to improve upon System I involved testing and matching different types of columns, carrier gases, make-up gases to the detector and detector temperatures to obtain operating conditions with optimum resolution, very high sensitivity and sufficiently stable baseline to measure atmospheric organo-bromine gases. During this development work, nine organo-bromine gases were identified in clean background air. The precision of analysis of each system used was sufficient to determine the distributions and time course behavior of the species studied. During the course of this study, samples collected weekly at 11 remote stations around the world spanning latitudes from 82^circN down to 42^circS were analyzed for these organo-bromine gases. In addition, samples collected for 10 years at Cape Meares - Oregon, Cape Matatula - American Samoa, Cape Grim - Tasmania and at the South Pole during the austral summer months were analyzed for long term trends of CBrF_3 and CBrClF_2 . Significant altitudinal differences, interhemispheric gradients and seasonal cycles were observed for certain gases. Long-term trends were observed for CBrF _3 and CBrClF_2. CBrF _3 showed an exponential increase. From 1979 to 1987, its northern and southern hemispheric concentrations have increased at

  14. Thermochemical nitrate reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.L.; Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1992-09-01

    A series of preliminary experiments was conducted directed at thermochemically converting nitrate to nitrogen and water. Nitrates are a major constituent of the waste stored in the underground tanks on the Hanford Site, and the characteristics and effects of nitrate compounds on stabilization techniques must be considered before permanent disposal operations begin. For the thermochemical reduction experiments, six reducing agents (ammonia, formate, urea, glucose, methane, and hydrogen) were mixed separately with {approximately}3 wt% NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} solutions in a buffered aqueous solution at high pH (13); ammonia and formate were also mixed at low pH (4). Reactions were conducted in an aqueous solution in a batch reactor at temperatures of 200{degrees}C to 350{degrees}C and pressures of 600 to 2800 psig. Both gas and liquid samples were analyzed. The specific components analyzed were nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia. Results of experimental runs showed the following order of nitrate reduction of the six reducing agents in basic solution: formate > glucose > urea > hydrogen > ammonia {approx} methane. Airnmonia was more effective under acidic conditions than basic conditions. Formate was also effective under acidic conditions. A more thorough, fundamental study appears warranted to provide additional data on the mechanism of nitrate reduction. Furthermore, an expanded data base and engineering feasibility study could be used to evaluate conversion conditions for promising reducing agents in more detail and identify new reducing agents with improved performance characteristics.

  15. Discovery and characterization of Isofistularin-3, a marine brominated alkaloid, as a new DNA demethylating agent inducing cell cycle arrest and sensitization to TRAIL in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Florean, Cristina; Schnekenburger, Michael; Lee, Jin-Young; Kim, Kyung Rok; Mazumder, Aloran; Song, Sungmi; Kim, Jae-Myun; Grandjenette, Cindy; Kim, Jeoung-Gyun; Yoon, Ah-Young; Dicato, Mario; Kim, Kyu-Won; Christov, Christo; Han, Byung-Woo; Proksch, Peter; Diederich, Marc

    2016-01-01

    We characterized the brominated alkaloid Isofistularin-3 (Iso-3), from the marine sponge Aplysina aerophoba, as a new DNA methyltransferase (DNMT)1 inhibitor. Docking analysis confirmed our in vitro DNMT inhibition data and revealed binding of Iso-3 within the DNA binding site of DNMT1. Subsequent increased expression of tumor suppressor gene aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) could be correlated to decreased methylation of CpG sites within the essential Sp1 regulatory region of its promoter. Iso-3 induced growth arrest of cancer cells in G0/G1 concomitant with increased p21 and p27 expression and reduced cyclin E1, PCNA and c-myc levels. Reduced proliferation was accompanied by morphological changes typical of autophagy revealed by fluorescent and transmission electron microscopy and validated by LC3I-II conversion. Furthermore, Iso-3 strongly synergized with tumor-necrosis-factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) in RAJI [combination index (CI) = 0.22] and U-937 cells (CI = 0.21) and increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis via a mechanism involving reduction of survivin expression but not of Bcl-2 family proteins nor X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). Iso-3 treatment decreased FLIPL expression and triggered activation of endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress with increased GRP78 expression, eventually inducing TRAIL receptor death receptor (DR)5 surface expression. Importantly, as a potential candidate for further anticancer drug development, Iso-3 reduced the viability, colony and in vivo tumor forming potential without affecting the viability of PBMCs from healthy donors or zebrafish development. PMID:27006469

  16. Discovery and characterization of Isofistularin-3, a marine brominated alkaloid, as a new DNA demethylating agent inducing cell cycle arrest and sensitization to TRAIL in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Florean, Cristina; Schnekenburger, Michael; Lee, Jin-Young; Kim, Kyung Rok; Mazumder, Aloran; Song, Sungmi; Kim, Jae-Myun; Grandjenette, Cindy; Kim, Jeoung-Gyun; Yoon, Ah-Young; Dicato, Mario; Kim, Kyu-Won; Christov, Christo; Han, Byung-Woo; Proksch, Peter; Diederich, Marc

    2016-04-26

    We characterized the brominated alkaloid Isofistularin-3 (Iso-3), from the marine sponge Aplysina aerophoba, as a new DNA methyltransferase (DNMT)1 inhibitor. Docking analysis confirmed our in vitro DNMT inhibition data and revealed binding of Iso-3 within the DNA binding site of DNMT1. Subsequent increased expression of tumor suppressor gene aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) could be correlated to decreased methylation of CpG sites within the essential Sp1 regulatory region of its promoter. Iso-3 induced growth arrest of cancer cells in G0/G1 concomitant with increased p21 and p27 expression and reduced cyclin E1, PCNA and c-myc levels. Reduced proliferation was accompanied by morphological changes typical of autophagy revealed by fluorescent and transmission electron microscopy and validated by LC3I-II conversion. Furthermore, Iso-3 strongly synergized with tumor-necrosis-factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) in RAJI [combination index (CI) = 0.22] and U-937 cells (CI = 0.21) and increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis via a mechanism involving reduction of survivin expression but not of Bcl-2 family proteins nor X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). Iso-3 treatment decreased FLIPL expression and triggered activation of endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress with increased GRP78 expression, eventually inducing TRAIL receptor death receptor (DR)5 surface expression. Importantly, as a potential candidate for further anticancer drug development, Iso-3 reduced the viability, colony and in vivo tumor forming potential without affecting the viability of PBMCs from healthy donors or zebrafish development.

  17. Solar hydrogen production using Ce1-xLixO2-δ solid solutions via a thermochemical, two-step water-splitting cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qing-Long; Lee, Chong-il; Shigeta, Satoshi; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Tamaura, Yutaka

    2012-10-01

    The reactivity of Ce1-xLixO2-δ (x=0.025, 0.05, 0.075 and 0.1) solid solutions during the redox and two-step water-splitting cycles has been investigated in this work. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) indicate that there are two reaction mechanisms in the O2-releasing step and the shift in the reaction mechanisms occurs in the O2-releasing step because of sintering at high temperatures, and a decrease in the concentration of lattice oxygen occurs as the O2-releasing step proceeds. The reaction in the O2-releasing step follows a second-order mechanism over a temperature range of 1000-1170 °C and a contracting-area model over a temperature range of 1170-1500 °C. According to direct gas mass spectroscopy (DGMS), ceria doped at 5 mol% Li exhibits the highest reactivity in the O2-releasing step during both redox cycles in air and two-step water-splitting cycles, whereas ceria doped at 2.5 mol% Li yields the highest amount of hydrogen (4.79 ml/g) in the H2-generation step during the two-step water-splitting cycles, which is higher than ceria doped with other metals. DGMS and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) suggest that the average reaction rate in the H2-generation step is influenced by the concentration of extrinsic oxygen vacancies, and thus, the reactivity in the H2-generation step, to some degree, could be tuned by varying the concentration of extrinsic oxygen vacancies (Li content).

  18. Improvement of cycle behaviour of SiO/C anode composite by thermochemically generated Li 4SiO 4 inert phase for lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veluchamy, Angathevar; Doh, Chil-Hoon; Kim, Dong-Hun; Lee, Jung-Hun; Lee, Duck-Jun; Ha, Kyung-Hwa; Shin, Hye-Min; Jin, Bong-Soo; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Moon, Seong-In; Park, Cheol-Wan

    A new anode composite material is prepared by thermal treatment of a blend made of silicon monoxide (SiO) and lithium hydroxide (LiOH) at 550 °C followed by ball milling with graphite. X-ray diffraction pattern confirms the presence of Li 4SiO 4 in the thermally treated (SiO + LiOH) material. The electrode appears to be smooth and glassy as evident from observation with a scanning electron microscope (SEM), possibly due to the presence of nano-silicon and Li 4SiO 4 particles, and exhibits superior performance with a charge capacity of ∼333 mAh g -1 at the 100th cycle with a low-capacity fade on cycling. Cyclic voltammograms of the electrode predict high power capability. On the other hand, the electrode comprising of only SiO and C prepared through ball milling, devoid of Li 4SiO 4, shows hard crust particulates in the electrode exhibiting low charge-discharge capacities with cycling.

  19. Thermochemical solar hydrogen generation.

    PubMed

    Licht, Stuart

    2005-10-07

    Solar direct, indirect and hybrid thermochemical processes are presented for the generation of hydrogen and compared to alternate solar hydrogen processes. A hybrid solar thermal/electrochemical process combines efficient photovoltaics and concentrated excess sub-bandgap heat into highly efficient elevated temperature solar electrolysis of water and generation of H2 fuel utilizing the thermodynamic temperature induced decrease of E(H2O) with increasing temperature. Theory and experiment is presented for this process using semiconductor bandgap restrictions and combining photodriven charge transfer, with excess sub-bandgap insolation to lower the water potential, and their combination into highly efficient solar generation of H2 is attainable. Fundamental water thermodynamics and solar photosensitizer constraints determine solar energy to hydrogen fuel conversion efficiencies in the 50% range over a wide range of insolation, temperature, pressure and photosensitizer bandgap conditions.

  20. Solchem thermochemical power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, T. A.

    1981-05-01

    The operating principles of the Solchem thermochemical energy transport system are described. The concept, in which a pipe-linked field of parabolic-dish solar concentrators is used to convert a carbon dioxide and methane mixture into hydrogen, carbon monoxide and steam at each receiver-heat exchanger, allows the transfer of heat from the collectors in gaseous form to a central plant. The transfer gases remain relatively cool in the process, with heat energy being produced at the user site by a catalytically induced chemical reaction that re-converts the processed gases into methane and carbon dioxide. In recently conducted tests, energy delivery at 600 C was obtained while feed and return pipes remained at 100 and 160 C, respectively. The use of salt tanks for energy storage and steam generation is also discussed.

  1. Spring measurements of tropospheric bromine at Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturges, William T.; Schnell, Russell C.; Dutton, Geoffrey S.; Garcia, Samuel R.; Lind, John A.

    1993-02-01

    The partitioning of bromine in the lower troposphere between particulate, inorganic gaseous, and organic gaseous phases was measured during the arctic spring. Rapid photochemical production of particulate Br from organic gaseous Br was indicated by (1) an inverse correlation between particulate bromide and organic gaseous bromine, (2) a diurnal cycle in the ratio of these two phases, and (3) a diurnal cycle in the ratio of organic gaseous Br to Cl. Organic gaseous Br and Cl were correlated indicating a common, possibly marine, source.

  2. Screening analysis of solar thermochemical hydrogen concepts.

    SciTech Connect

    Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Kolb, Gregory J.

    2008-03-01

    A screening analysis was performed to identify concentrating solar power (CSP) concepts that produce hydrogen with the highest efficiency. Several CSP concepts were identified that have the potential to be much more efficient than today's low-temperature electrolysis technology. They combine a central receiver or dish with either a thermochemical cycle or high-temperature electrolyzer that operate at temperatures >600 C. The solar-to-hydrogen efficiencies of the best central receiver concepts exceed 20%, significantly better than the 14% value predicted for low-temperature electrolysis.

  3. Comparison of electrolytic, thermochemical, and other hydrogen-production processes

    SciTech Connect

    Carty, R.; Whaley, T.

    1981-01-01

    An overview is presented of the following six hydrogen production process categories: catalytic steam reforming of light hydrocarbons; partial oxidation of less-reactive feedstocks such as coal and heavy oil; reaction of active metals or metal hydrides with water or acids; electrolysis of water; thermochemical hydrogen cycles; and photolysis of water. These processes are compared technically, and to the extent possible, economically.

  4. Bromine and thyroid hormone activity.

    PubMed Central

    Allain, P; Berre, S; Krari, N; Laine, P; Barbot, N; Rohmer, V; Bigorgne, J C

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To examine the possible consequences of high plasma concentrations of bromine on thyroid hormone. METHODS--Bromine was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in the plasma of 799 patients consulting for thyroid disorders. Because the mean (SD) bromine concentration in the plasma of healthy subjects is 4 (1) mg/l, concentrations above 6 mg/l were regarded as outside the normal range. Bromine, free thyroxine (FT4), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) values were compared. RESULTS--The percentage of patients with normal, low, and high FT4 and TSH plasma activities, measured separately, did not differ between patients with low and high bromine concentrations. The percentage of patients with high TSH but normal FT4 values was significantly higher in the group with bromine values of more than 6 mg/l than in the group with bromine concentrations below this (p < 0.02). CONCLUSION--An increase in plasma bromine could potentiate an increase in plasma TSH concentration, probably as a consequence of a minor inhibitory effect on thyroid activity. PMID:8320326

  5. Thermochemical energy storage and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nix, R. G.

    1982-08-01

    Thermochemical energy storage and transport (TEST) were studied. Cases studied include a large central receiver heat utility and a small industrial process heat application with distributed parabolic dish solar collectors. The TEST does not appear to be generally cost effective; however, there are special cases of cost effectiveness. It is recommended that research on thermochemical processes emphasize the manufacture of renewable fuels using solar energy and the search for more cost effective TEST systems.

  6. MTCI/Thermochem stream reforming process for biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, M.N.; Durai-Swamy, K.; Voelker, G.

    1995-11-01

    Manufacturing and Technology Conversion International, Inc. (MTCI) has developed a novel technology to convert solid fuels including biomass, coal, municipal solid waste (MSW) and wastewater sludges into usable syngas by steam reforming in an indirectly heated, fluid-bed reactor. MTCI has licensed and patented the technology to ThermoChem, Inc. Both MTCI and ThermoChem have built two modular commercial-scale demonstration units: one for recycle paper mill rejects (similar to refuse-derived fuel [RDF]), and another for chemical recovery of black liquor. ThermoChem has entered into an agreement with Ajinkyatara Cooperative Sugar Factory, India, for building a 10 MW combined cycle power generation facility based on bagasse & agro-residue gasification.

  7. Bromine function in halite geochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Billo, S.M. )

    1991-06-01

    Of the halogens or salt formers, bromine is the only nonmetal which occurs naturally as a poisonous liquid much denser than water. The power of its atoms, expressed by a valence of 1 and 5, makes it unite directly with a large number of metallic elements to form salts. As a rare and strongly electronegative element of group VII in the periodic table, bromine exists in seawater and evaporitic brines as bromide with a ratio to chlorinity of 0.00348. Most water detains only about 1 ppm bromide for each 300 ppm of chloride. The most abundant source of bromine is ocean water (65 ppm Br), but richer peps occur in salt deposits and primarily in mineral brines. Atomic absorption spectrophotometric resolutions of Permian Castile halites exposed low values of bromine compared with its higher quantities in modern oceans like the Mediterranean. Bromine analyses of the two petrographically distinct forms of halite that characterize many ancient evaporite deposits, as in the Elk Point basin fields of Alberta, imply they crystallized from brines of noticeably different concentrations. Bromine in halite has been used as a paleosalinity indicator and a stratigraphic marker. Bromine liquid, with an atomic weight of 79.904 and atomic number 35, is used in producing gasoline antiknock mixtures, fumigants, photographic chemicals, drilling fluids, and fire retardants. It is also highly toxic and corrosive as bromine gas. Bromine contents greater than 1 ppm may be unsafe in the atmosphere, and a dose of 500 ppm can lead to death in less than an hour.

  8. Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Research (STCH)

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Eight cycles in a coordinated set of projects for Solar Thermochemical Cycles for Hydrogen production (STCH) were self-evaluated for the DOE-EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Program at a Working Group Meeting on October 8 and 9, 2008. This document reports the initial selection process for development investment in STCH projects, the evaluation process meant to reduce the number of projects as a means to focus resources on development of a few most-likely-to-succeed efforts, the obstacles encountered in project inventory reduction and the outcomes of the evaluation process. Summary technical status of the projects under evaluation is reported and recommendations identified to improve future project planning and selection activities.

  9. INTRODUCTION TO BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are a large and diverse class of major industrial products used to provide fire safety. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), Hexabromocylocodecane (HBCD), and Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) are the major commercial compounds. TBBPA is a react...

  10. High Performance Electrolyzers for Hybrid Thermochemical Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. John W. Weidner

    2009-05-10

    Extensive electrolyzer testing was performed at the University of South Carolina (USC). Emphasis was given to understanding water transport under various operating (i.e., temperature, membrane pressure differential and current density) and design (i.e., membrane thickness) conditions when it became apparent that water transport plays a deciding role in cell voltage. A mathematical model was developed to further understand the mechanisms of water and SO2 transport, and to predict the effect of operating and design parameters on electrolyzer performance.

  11. Thermochemical cycles for the production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Steinberg, M.; Dang, V.D.

    Two-step processes for the preparation of hydrogen are described: CrCl/sub 3/(g) ..-->.. CrCl/sub 2/(g) + 1/2Cl/sub 2/(g) and CrCl/sub 2/(s) + HCl(g) reversible CrCl/sub 3/(s) + 1/2H/sub 2/(g); UCl/sub 4/(g) ..-->.. UCl/sub 3/(g) + 1/2Cl/sub 2/(g) and UCl/sub 3/(s) + HCl(g) ..-->.. UCl/sub 4/(s) + 1/2H/sub 2/(g); and CaSO/sub 4/(s) ..-->.. CaO(s) + SO/sub 2/(g) + 1/2O/sub 2/(g) and CaO(s) + SO/sub 2/(g) + H/sub 2/O(l) ..-->.. CaSO/sub 4/(s) + H/sub 2/(g). The high temperature available from solar collectors, high temperature gas reactors or fusion reactors is utilized in the first step in which the reaction is endothermic. The efficiency is at least 60% and with process heat recovery, the efficiency may be increased up to 74.4%. An apparatus fr carrying out the process in conjunction with a fusion reactor, is described.

  12. Zinc-bromine battery development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Lew; Vanschalwijk, Walter; Albert, George; Tarjanyi, Mike; Leo, Anthony; Lott, Stephen

    1990-05-01

    This report describes development activities on the zinc-bromine battery system conducted by Energy Research Corporation (ERC). The project was a cost-shared program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and managed through Sandia. The project began in September 1985 and ran through January 1990. The zinc-bromine battery has been identified as a promising alternative to conventional energy storage options for many applications. The low cost of the battery reactants and the potential for long life make the system an attractive candidate for bulk energy storage applications, such as utility load leveling. The battery stores energy by the electrolysis of an aqueous zinc bromide salt to zinc metal and dissolved bromine. Zinc is plated as a layer on the electrode surface while bromine is dissolved in the electrolyte and carried out of the stack. The bromine is then extracted from the electrolyte with an organic complexing agent in the positive electrolyte storage tank. On discharge the zinc and bromine are consumed, regenerating the zinc bromide salt.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations and thermochemistry of reactive ion etching of silicon by chlorine, chlorine dimer, bromine, and bromine dimer cations

    SciTech Connect

    Valone, S.M.; Hanson, D.E.; Kress, J.D.

    1998-05-08

    Simulations of Cl plasma etch of Si surfaces with MD techniques agree reasonably well with the available experimental information on yields and surface morphologies. This information has been supplied to a Monte Carlo etch profile resulting in substantial agreement with comparable inputs provided through controlled experiments. To the extent that more recent measurements of etch rates are more reliable than older ones, preliminary MD simulations using bond-order corrections to the atomic interactions between neighboring Si atoms on the surface improves agreement with experiment through an increase in etch rate and improved agreement with XPS measurements of surface stoichiometry. Thermochemical and geometric analysis of small Si-Br molecules is consistent with the current notions of the effects of including brominated species in etchant gases.

  14. Probing the tropical tropopause layer for organic and inorganic bromine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Bodo; Pfeilsticker, Klaus; Atlas, Elliot; Cheung, Ross; Chipperfield, Martyn; Colosimo, Fedele; Deutschmann, Tim; Elkins, Jim; Fahey, David; Feng, Wu; Festa, James; Gao, Ru-Shan; Hossaini, Ryan; Navarro, Maria; Raecke, Rasmus; Scalone, Lisa; Spolaor, Max; Thornberry, Troy; Tsai, Catalina; Stutz, Jochen

    2016-04-01

    Bromine chemistry impacts the levels of ozone in the upper troposphere and the stratosphere. An accurate quantitative understanding of the sources, sinks, and chemical transformation of bromine species is thus important to understand the photochemistry and budget of bromine in the tropical upper troposphere, tropopause layer and lowermost stratosphere (UT/TTL/LS). These regions are also known to serve as a gateway for delivery of ozone depleting gases to the stratosphere. CH3Br, halons, short-lived organic bromine precursors (VSLS), such as CHBr3, CH2Br2, and possibly inorganic product gases have been identified as the main bromine gases delivered to the stratosphere. However, many important details of the transport and delivery of VSLS and inorganic bromine compounds through the TTL are still uncertain. Moreover, a number of chemical processes, including the transformation of the source gases and cycling of inorganic bromine species at low ambient temperature and on ice particles are also poorly understood. The presentation reports measurements of CH4, O3, NO2, and BrO performed by different instruments and techniques during the 2013 NASA-ATTREX flights in the TTL and LS. The interpretation of our measurements is supported by chemical transport model (SLIMCAT) simulations. SLIMCAT results, in conjunction with extensive radiative transfer calculations using the Monte Carlo model McArtim, also are used to improve retrieval of O3, NO2, and BrO concentrations from limb scattered sunlight measurements made with the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique during ATTREX. The chemical transport model also allows us to attribute observed concentration variations to transport and to photochemical processes. When properly accounting for the transport-related concentration variations in methane and ozone, we find that measured BrO mostly agrees with model simulations. An exception are regions where the contribution of the short-lived CH2Br2 or the

  15. Process for the thermochemical production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Norman, John H.; Russell, Jr., John L.; Porter, II, John T.; McCorkle, Kenneth H.; Roemer, Thomas S.; Sharp, Robert

    1978-01-01

    Hydrogen is thermochemically produced from water in a cycle wherein a first reaction produces hydrogen iodide and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 by the reaction of iodine, sulfur dioxide and water under conditions which cause two distinct aqueous phases to be formed, i.e., a lighter sulfuric acid-bearing phase and a heavier hydrogen iodide-bearing phase. After separation of the two phases, the heavier phase containing most of the hydrogen iodide is treated, e.g., at a high temperature, to decompose the hydrogen iodide and recover hydrogen and iodine. The H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 is pyrolyzed to recover sulfur dioxide and produce oxygen.

  16. Hybrid Sulfur Thermochemical Process Development Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, William A.; Buckner, Melvin R.

    2005-07-21

    The Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Thermochemical Process is a means of producing hydrogen via water-splitting through a combination of chemical reactions and electrochemistry. Energy is supplied to the system as high temperature heat (approximately 900 C) and electricity. Advanced nuclear reactors (Generation IV) or central solar receivers can be the source of the primary energy. Large-scale hydrogen production based on this process could be a major contributor to meeting the needs of a hydrogen economy. This project's objectives include optimization of the HyS process design, analysis of technical issues and concerns, creation of a development plan, and laboratory-scale proof-of-concept testing. The key component of the HyS Process is the SO2-depolarized electrolyzer (SDE). Studies were performed that showed that an electrolyzer operating in the range of 500-600 mV per cell can lead to an overall HyS cycle efficiency in excess of 50%, which is superior to all other currently proposed thermochemical cycles. Economic analysis indicated hydrogen production costs of approximately $1.60 per kilogram for a mature nuclear hydrogen production plant. However, in order to meet commercialization goals, the electrolyzer should be capable of operating at high current density, have a long operating lifetime , and have an acceptable capital cost. The use of proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) technology, which leverages work for the development of PEM fuel cells, was selected as the most promising route to meeting these goals. The major accomplishments of this project were the design and construction of a suitable electrolyzer test facility and the proof-of-concept testing of a PEM-based SDE.

  17. Mineral Resource of the Month: Bromine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schnebele, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Bromine, along with mercury, is one of only two elements that are liquid at room temperature. Bromine is a highly volatile and corrosive reddish-brown liquid that evaporates easily and converts to a metal at extreme pressures — above about 540,000 times atmospheric pressure. Bromine occurs in seawater, evaporitic (salt) lakes and underground brines associated with petroleum deposits. 

  18. 49 CFR 173.249 - Bromine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bromine. 173.249 Section 173.249 Transportation... PACKAGINGS Bulk Packaging for Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.249 Bromine. When... bromine service built prior to August 31, 1991, may continue in service under the requirements...

  19. 49 CFR 173.249 - Bromine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bromine. 173.249 Section 173.249 Transportation... PACKAGINGS Bulk Packaging for Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.249 Bromine. When... bromine service built prior to August 31, 1991, may continue in service under the requirements...

  20. 49 CFR 173.249 - Bromine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bromine. 173.249 Section 173.249 Transportation... PACKAGINGS Bulk Packaging for Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.249 Bromine. When... bromine service built prior to August 31, 1991, may continue in service under the requirements...

  1. 49 CFR 173.249 - Bromine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bromine. 173.249 Section 173.249 Transportation... PACKAGINGS Bulk Packaging for Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.249 Bromine. When... bromine service built prior to August 31, 1991, may continue in service under the requirements...

  2. Bromine and carbon isotope effects during photolysis of brominated phenols.

    PubMed

    Zakon, Yevgeni; Halicz, Ludwik; Gelman, Faina

    2013-12-17

    In the present study, carbon and bromine isotope effects during UV-photodegradation of bromophenols in aqueous and ethanolic solutions were determined. An anomalous relatively high inverse bromine isotope fractionation (εreactive position up to +5.1‰) along with normal carbon isotope effect (εreactive position of -12.6‰ to -23.4‰) observed in our study may be attributed to coexistence of both mass-dependent and mass-independent isotope fractionation of C-Br bond cleavage. Isotope effects of a similar scale were observed for all the studied reactions in ethanol, and for 4-bromophenol in aqueous solution. This may point out related radical mechanism for these processes. The lack of any carbon and bromine isotope effects during photodegradation of 2-bromophenol in aqueous solution possibly indicates that C-Br bond cleavage is not a rate-limiting step in the reaction. The bromine isotope fractionation, without any detectable carbon isotope effect, that was observed for 3-bromophenol photolysis in aqueous solution probably originates from mass-independent fractionation.

  3. Thermochemical Radii of Complex Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roobottom, Helen K.; Jenkins, H. Donald B.; Passmore, Jack; Glasser, Leslie

    1999-11-01

    Using rectilinear correlations of lattice energy with the inverse cubic root of the volume per molecule of complex salts of type MX (1:1), M2X (2:1), and MX2 (1:2) we have generated a comprehensive self-consistent tabulation of more than 400 thermochemical radii for complex ions. These radii can be used in the Kapustinskii equation to generate lattice energies and also as ion size parameters.

  4. Thermochemical Processes in Plasma Aerodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    A4(I 5th Workshop Thermochemical and Plasma Processes in Aerodynamics Saint-Petersburg 19 - 21 JUNE, 2006 Hypersonic Systems Research Institute...69 8 CONTENTS: 1 A. V Korabelnikov, A.L. Kuranov ( Hypersonic Systems Research Institute of the Leninetz Holding Company, St. Petersburg) HSRI Works...11 2 B. V Farmakovskiy, T.S. Vinogradova (CSRI <Promethee»), St. Petersburg), A. V Koravelnikov, A.L. Kuranov ( Hypersonic Systems Research

  5. Hybrid Thermochemical/Biological Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert C.

    The conventional view of biorefineries is that lignocellulosic plant material will be fractionated into cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and terpenes before these components are biochemically converted into market products. Occasionally, these plants include a thermochemical step at the end of the process to convert recalcitrant plant components or mixed waste streams into heat to meet thermal energy demands elsewhere in the facility. However, another possibility for converting high-fiber plant materials is to start by thermochemically processing it into a uniform intermediate product that can be biologically converted into a bio-based product. This alternative route to bio-based products is known as hybrid thermochemical/biological processing. There are two distinct approaches to hybrid processing: (a) gasification followed by fermentation of the resulting gaseous mixture of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen (H2), and carbon dioxide (CO2) and (b) fast pyrolysis followed by hydrolysis and/or fermentation of the anhydrosugars found in the resulting bio-oil. This article explores this "cart before the horse" approach to biorefineries.

  6. Development of a circulating zinc-bromine battery, phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellows, R.; Einstein, H.; Grimes, P.; Kantner, E.; Malachesky, P. A.; Newby, K.; Tsien, H.; Young, A.

    1983-10-01

    This report summarizes Phase 2 of a multi-phase program aimed at developing Exxon's circulating zinc-bromine battery into an advanced energy storage system. Previous work at Exxon had developed a basic zinc-bromine battery system approach. This approach utilizes carbon-plastic electrodes in a bipolar stack design, a circulating electrolyte with separable bromine complexes, and shunt current protection. Phase 2 was highlighted by the successful scale-up and demonstration of a 20 kWh zinc-bromine battery module. Important technology improvements were demonstrated in the areas of extended life cycling, low cost stack technology, high power/high efficiency supported electrolytes, and system auxiliaries. The basic technology was augmented via increases in parametric testing, materials testing, and electrolyte studies. Production cost estimates from Phase 1 ($28/kWh in 1980) were projected to an OEM price of $37/kWh using the A.D. Little costing method. A design has been developed for a prototype 20 kWh energy storage system which will be delivered to Sandia National laboratories in 1983 near the completion of Phase 3.

  7. Zinc-bromine battery design for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Bellows, R.; Grimes, P.; Einstein, H.; Kantner, E.; Malachesky, P.; Newby, K.

    1982-01-01

    Design projections for zinc-bromine batteries are attractive for electric vehicle applications in terms of low manufacturing costs ($28/kWh) and good performance characteristics. Zinc-bromine batery projections (60 to 80 Wh/kg, 130 to 200 W/kg) compare favorably to both current lead acid batteries and proposed advanced battery candidates. The performance of recently developed battery components with 1200 cm/sup 2/ electrodes in a 120V, 10 kWh module is described. Similarly constructed smaller scale (600 cm/sup 2/) components have shown lifetimes exceeding 400 cycles and the ability to follow both regenerative braking (J227aD) and random cycling regimes. Initial dynamometer evaluations of full scale 20 kWh batteries is expected in early 1984.

  8. Thermochemical differentiation and intermittent convection of the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotelkin, Vycheslav; Lobkovsky, Leopold

    2010-05-01

    The numerical experiments are based on the thermochemical model of mantle convection. The model includes the description of the endothermic phase transition at the upper/lower mantle boundary. The aim of this work is the influence of thermochemical processes on mantle convection. As regards the thermochemical differentiation takes place near the mantle boundaries. The differentiation in the D" layer is due to melting with the rise in temperature and the descent of molten iron-bearing components of mantle material into the core. This process generates the lighter fraction, particularly produces the lower mantle plums. It takes place only if the current temperature exceeds the melting temperature. The differentiation near the outer mantle boundary is due to extracting the lighter mantle components into the crust. These thermochemical processes take place when the hot substance is lifting and the pressure falls. The growth of the continental crust on the outer surface is modeling. The oceanic crust returns into mantle throw the subducting zones. The modeling includes the "gabbro-eclogite" transition of oceanic crust. As regards the generation of heavy eclogitic material is located at the depths 80-100 km. Seismic tomography of deep mantle layers showed that the mantle really contains large inclusions of heavy, supposedly eclogitic material. The numerical experiments give a strong nonlinear interaction (either accelerating or slowing down) between the thermochemical processes and mantle convection. It leads to an impulsive character of geodynamics and promotes the formation of different cycles in the evolutionary process. Periods of gradual evolution are interrupted by the geodynamic activity outbursts. These peaks of geodynamic activity play a key role in the geological history of the Earth. Analogous oscillations of geodynamic process produce interaction heavy and light density inhomogeneities with the endothermic phase transition. When convection is layered then the

  9. Efficiency maximization in solar-thermochemical fuel production: challenging the concept of isothermal water splitting.

    PubMed

    Ermanoski, I; Miller, J E; Allendorf, M D

    2014-05-14

    Widespread adoption of solar-thermochemical fuel production depends on its economic viability, largely driven by the efficiency of use of the available solar resource. Herein, we analyze the efficiency of two-step cycles for thermochemical hydrogen production, with emphasis on efficiency. Owing to water thermodynamics, isothermal H2 production is shown to be impractical and inefficient, irrespective of reactor design or reactive oxide properties, but an optimal temperature difference between cycle steps, for which efficiency is the highest, can be determined for a wide range of other operating parameters. A combination of well-targeted pressure and temperature swing, rather than either individually, emerges as the most efficient mode of operation of a two-step thermochemical cycle for solar fuel production.

  10. Electronic properties of bromine-doped carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, Marvin L.

    2002-07-15

    Intercalation of bromine molecules (Br2) into single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) ropes is studied using the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method. Electronic and vibrational properties of the SWNT and Br2 are studied for various bromine concentrations. A drastic change in the charge transfer, bromine stretching-mode, and bromine bond-length is observed when the bromine-bromine distance decreases. Calculated electronic structures show that, at high bromine concentrations, the bromine ppsigma level broadens due to the interbromine interaction. These states overlap with the electronic bands of the SWNT near the Fermi level which results in a substantial charge transfer from carbon to bromine.

  11. Stage efficiency in the analysis of thermochemical water decomposition processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conger, W. L.; Funk, J. E.; Carty, R. H.; Soliman, M. A.; Cox, K. E.

    1976-01-01

    The procedure for analyzing thermochemical water-splitting processes using the figure of merit is expanded to include individual stage efficiencies and loss coefficients. The use of these quantities to establish the thermodynamic insufficiencies of each stage is shown. A number of processes are used to illustrate these concepts and procedures and to demonstrate the facility with which process steps contributing most to the cycle efficiency are found. The procedure allows attention to be directed to those steps of the process where the greatest increase in total cycle efficiency can be obtained.

  12. Stage efficiency in the analysis of thermochemical water decomposition processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conger, W. L.; Funk, J. E.; Carty, R. H.; Soliman, M. A.; Cox, K. E.

    1976-01-01

    The procedure for analyzing thermochemical water-splitting processes using the figure of merit is expanded to include individual stage efficiencies and loss coefficients. The use of these quantities to establish the thermodynamic insufficiencies of each stage is shown. A number of processes are used to illustrate these concepts and procedures and to demonstrate the facility with which process steps contributing most to the cycle efficiency are found. The procedure allows attention to be directed to those steps of the process where the greatest increase in total cycle efficiency can be obtained.

  13. Bromine Chemistry in the Tropical UTLS during the 2011, 2013 and 2014 ATTREX Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, J.; Spolaor, M.; Festa, J.; Tsai, J. Y.; Colosimo, S. F.; Cheung, R.; Werner, B.; Deutschmann, T.; Scalone, L.; Raecke, R.; Tricoli, U.; Pfeilsticker, K.; Navarro, M. A.; Atlas, E. L.

    2014-12-01

    Bromine chemistry impacts the levels of ozone in the upper troposphere and the stratosphere. An accurate quantitative understanding of the sources, sinks, and chemical transformation of bromine species is thus important to understand the bromine budget in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), which also serves as a gate to the stratosphere. Vertical transport of very short-lived organic bromine precursors, such as CHBr3, CH2Br2 and inorganic product gases has been identified as the main source of bromine in the UTLS. However, the contribution of inorganic vs. organic compounds is not well quantified, particularly in the tropical UTLS. A number of chemical processes, including the role of ice particles for the transformation and cycling of inorganic bromine species are also poorly understood. A limb scanning Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy Instrument was deployed on-board NASA's unmanned high-altitude Global Hawk aircraft during the 2011, 2013, and 2014 NASA Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX). Flights in the eastern and western Pacific were performed to study, among other topics, the chemistry of bromine and ozone in the subtropical and tropical UTLS. Here we will present observations of BrO, NO2 and other trace species made by this instrument at altitudes between 15 - 20 km. The measurement methodology as well as the procedure to retrieve vertical trace gas concentration profiles will be briefly presented. The combination of those observations with the measurements of organic bromine species from the University of Miami's Whole Air Sampler (GWAS) will be used to determine and interpret the bromine budget in the UTLS.

  14. System for thermochemical hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, R.W.; Galloway, T.R.; Krikorian, O.H.

    1981-05-22

    Method and apparatus are described for joule boosting a SO/sub 3/ decomposer using electrical instead of thermal energy to heat the reactants of the high temperature SO/sub 3/ decomposition step of a thermochemical hydrogen production process driven by a tandem mirror reactor. Joule boosting the decomposer to a sufficiently high temperature from a lower temperature heat source eliminates the need for expensive catalysts and reduces the temperature and consequent materials requirements for the reactor blanket. A particular decomposer design utilizes electrically heated silicon carbide rods, at a temperature of 1250/sup 0/K, to decompose a cross flow of SO/sub 3/ gas.

  15. Solar thermochemical process interface study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The design and analyses of a subsystem of a hydrogen production process are described. The process is based on solar driven thermochemical reactions. The subject subsystem receives sulfuric acid of 60% concentration at 100 C, 1 atm pressure. The acid is further concentrated, vaporized, and decomposed (at a rate of 122 g moles/sec H2SO4) into SO2, O2, and water. The produce stream is cooled to 100 C. Three subsystem options, each being driven by direct solar energy, were designed and analyzed. The results are compared with a prior study case in which solar energy was provided indirectly through a helium loop.

  16. Solar thermochemical process interface study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-02-01

    The design and analyses of a subsystem of a hydrogen production process are described. The process is based on solar driven thermochemical reactions. The subject subsystem receives sulfuric acid of 60% concentration at 100 C, 1 atm pressure. The acid is further concentrated, vaporized, and decomposed (at a rate of 122 g moles/sec H2SO4) into SO2, O2, and water. The produce stream is cooled to 100 C. Three subsystem options, each being driven by direct solar energy, were designed and analyzed. The results are compared with a prior study case in which solar energy was provided indirectly through a helium loop.

  17. CFD studies on biomass thermochemical conversion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiqun; Yan, Lifeng

    2008-06-01

    Thermochemical conversion of biomass offers an efficient and economically process to provide gaseous, liquid and solid fuels and prepare chemicals derived from biomass. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling applications on biomass thermochemical processes help to optimize the design and operation of thermochemical reactors. Recent progression in numerical techniques and computing efficacy has advanced CFD as a widely used approach to provide efficient design solutions in industry. This paper introduces the fundamentals involved in developing a CFD solution. Mathematical equations governing the fluid flow, heat and mass transfer and chemical reactions in thermochemical systems are described and sub-models for individual processes are presented. It provides a review of various applications of CFD in the biomass thermochemical process field.

  18. Combustion of thermochemically torrefied sugar cane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Valix, M; Katyal, S; Cheung, W H

    2017-01-01

    This study compared the upgrading of sugar bagasse by thermochemical and dry torrefaction methods and their corresponding combustion behavior relative to raw bagasse. The combustion reactivities were examined by non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis. Thermochemical torrefaction was carried out by chemical pre-treatment of bagasse with acid followed by heating at 160-300°C in nitrogen environment, while dry torrefaction followed the same heating treatment without the chemical pretreatment. The results showed thermochemical torrefaction generated chars with combustion properties that are closer to various ranks of coal, thus making it more suitable for co-firing applications. Thermochemical torrefaction also induced greater densification of bagasse with a 335% rise in bulk density to 340kg/m(3), increased HHVmass and HHVvolume, greater charring and aromatization and storage stability. These features demonstrate the potential of thermochemical torrefaction in addressing the practical challenges in using biomass such as bagasse as fuel.

  19. CFD Studies on Biomass Thermochemical Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiqun; Yan, Lifeng

    2008-01-01

    Thermochemical conversion of biomass offers an efficient and economically process to provide gaseous, liquid and solid fuels and prepare chemicals derived from biomass. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling applications on biomass thermochemical processes help to optimize the design and operation of thermochemical reactors. Recent progression in numerical techniques and computing efficacy has advanced CFD as a widely used approach to provide efficient design solutions in industry. This paper introduces the fundamentals involved in developing a CFD solution. Mathematical equations governing the fluid flow, heat and mass transfer and chemical reactions in thermochemical systems are described and sub-models for individual processes are presented. It provides a review of various applications of CFD in the biomass thermochemical process field. PMID:19325848

  20. Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program: 1986 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Wood and crop residues constitute a vast majority of the biomass feedstocks available for conversion, and thermochemical processes are well suited for conversion of these materials. Thermochemical conversion processes can generate a variety of products such as gasoline hydrocarbon fuels, natural gas substitutes, or heat energy for electric power generation. The US Department of Energy is sponsoring research on biomass conversion technologies through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been designated the Technical Field Management Office for the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program with overall responsibility for the Program. This report briefly describes the Thermochemical Conversion Program structure and summarizes the activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1986. 88 refs., 31 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Recent review of thermochemical hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beghi, G. E.

    A survey is presented on the development to date of thermochemical water decomposition methods for the production of hydrogen. It is shown that: (1) both the technological feasibility of thermochemical processes and their competitiveness with water electrolysis have been demonstrated; (2) the scaling up of thermochemical methods to industrial production levels may proceed with existing technology; (3) the slowing down of programs concerned with the development of high temperature nuclear reactors could delay the scaling up of thermochemical hydrogen production to industrial levels; (4) this delay could, however, increase interest in such water decomposition processes as those employing photoreactions; and (5) the efficiency of thermochemical hydrogen production is highest in the case of systems with dedicated heat sources rated above 1000 MWth.

  2. Hydrogen-Bromine Secondary Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A secondary battery is described utilizing hydrogen and halogen as primary reactants. It comprises inert anode and cathode initially contacting an aqueous solution of an acid and an alkali metal bromide. The hydrogen generated during charging of the cell is stored as gas, while the bromine becomes dissolved predominantly in the lower layers of the acid electrolyte. Preferred components are phosphoric acid and lithium bromide.

  3. Inorganic bromine in the marine boundary layer: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, R.; Keene, W. C.; Pszenny, A. A. P.; Arimoto, R.; Ayers, G. P.; Baboukas, E.; Cainey, J. M.; Crutzen, P. J.; Duce, R. A.; Hönninger, G.; Huebert, B. J.; Maenhaut, W.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Turekian, V. C.; van Dingenen, R.

    2003-06-01

    The cycling of inorganic bromine in the marine boundary layer (mbl) has received increased attention in recent years. Bromide, a constituent of sea water, is injected into the atmosphere in association with sea-salt aerosol by breaking waves on the ocean surface. Measurements reveal that supermicrometer sea-salt aerosol is depleted in bromine by about 50% relative to conservative tracers, whereas marine submicrometer aerosol is often enriched in bromine. Model calculations, laboratory studies, and field observations strongly suggest that these depletions reflect the chemical transformation of particulate bromide to reactive inorganic gases that influence the processing of ozone and other important constituents of marine air. However, currently available techniques cannot reliably quantify many \\chem{Br}-containing compounds at ambient concentrations and, consequently, our understanding of inorganic Br cycling over the oceans and its global significance are uncertain. To provide a more coherent framework for future research, we have reviewed measurements in marine aerosol, the gas phase, and in rain. We also summarize sources and sinks, as well as model and laboratory studies of chemical transformations. The focus is on inorganic bromine over the open oceans, excluding the polar regions. The generation of sea-salt aerosol at the ocean surface is the major tropospheric source producing about 6.2 Tg/a of bromide. The transport of Br from continents (as mineral aerosol, and as products from biomass-burning and fossil-fuel combustion) can be of local importance. Transport of degradation products of long-lived Br-containing compounds from the stratosphere and other sources contribute lesser amounts. Available evidence suggests that, following aerosol acidification, sea-salt bromide reacts to form Br2 and BrCl that volatilize to the gas phase and photolyze in daylight to produce atomic Br and Cl. Subsequent transformations can destroy tropospheric ozone, oxidize

  4. Inorganic bromine in the marine boundary layer: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, R.; Keene, W. C.; Pszenny, A. A. P.; Arimoto, R.; Ayers, G. P.; Baboukas, E.; Cainey, J. M.; Crutzen, P. J.; Duce, R. A.; Hönninger, G.; Huebert, B. J.; Maenhaut, W.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Turekian, V. C.; van Dingenen, R.

    2003-09-01

    The cycling of inorganic bromine in the marine boundary layer (mbl) has received increased attention in recent years. Bromide, a constituent of sea water, is injected into the atmosphere in association with sea-salt aerosol by breaking waves on the ocean surface. Measurements reveal that supermicrometer sea-salt aerosol is substantially depleted in bromine (often exceeding 50%) relative to conservative tracers, whereas marine submicrometer aerosol is often enriched in bromine. Model calculations, laboratory studies, and field observations strongly suggest that the supermicrometer depletions reflect the chemical transformation of particulate bromide to reactive inorganic gases that influence the processing of ozone and other important constituents of marine air. Mechanisms for the submicrometer enrichments are not well understood. Currently available techniques cannot reliably quantify many Br containing compounds at ambient concentrations and, consequently, our understanding of inorganic Br cycling over the oceans and its global significance are uncertain. To provide a more coherent framework for future research, we have reviewed measurements in marine aerosol, the gas phase, and in rain. We also summarize sources and sinks, as well as model and laboratory studies of chemical transformations. The focus is on inorganic bromine over the open oceans outside the polar regions. The generation of sea-salt aerosol at the ocean surface is the major tropospheric source producing about 6.2 Tg/a of bromide. The transport of Br from continents (as mineral aerosol, and as products from biomass-burning and fossil-fuel combustion) can be of local importance. Transport of degradation products of long-lived Br containing compounds from the stratosphere and other sources contribute lesser amounts. Available evidence suggests that, following aerosol acidification, sea-salt bromide reacts to form Br2 and BrCl that volatilize to the gas phase and photolyze in daylight to produce atomic

  5. Solar thermochemical splitting of water to generate hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Rao, C N R; Dey, Sunita

    2017-05-18

    Solar photochemical means of splitting water (artificial photosynthesis) to generate hydrogen is emerging as a viable process. The solar thermochemical route also promises to be an attractive means of achieving this objective. In this paper we present different types of thermochemical cycles that one can use for the purpose. These include the low-temperature multistep process as well as the high-temperature two-step process. It is noteworthy that the multistep process based on the Mn(II)/Mn(III) oxide system can be carried out at 700 °C or 750 °C. The two-step process has been achieved at 1,300 °C/900 °C by using yttrium-based rare earth manganites. It seems possible to render this high-temperature process as an isothermal process. Thermodynamics and kinetics of H2O splitting are largely controlled by the inherent redox properties of the materials. Interestingly, under the conditions of H2O splitting in the high-temperature process CO2 can also be decomposed to CO, providing a feasible method for generating the industrially important syngas (CO+H2). Although carbonate formation can be addressed as a hurdle during CO2 splitting, the problem can be avoided by a suitable choice of experimental conditions. The choice of the solar reactor holds the key for the commercialization of thermochemical fuel production.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide thermochemical oscillator as driver for primordial RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Ball, Rowena; Brindley, John

    2014-06-06

    This paper presents and tests a previously unrecognized mechanism for driving a replicating molecular system on the prebiotic earth. It is proposed that cell-free RNA replication in the primordial soup may have been driven by self-sustained oscillatory thermochemical reactions. To test this hypothesis, a well-characterized hydrogen peroxide oscillator was chosen as the driver and complementary RNA strands with known association and melting kinetics were used as the substrate. An open flow system model for the self-consistent, coupled evolution of the temperature and concentrations in a simple autocatalytic scheme is solved numerically, and it is shown that thermochemical cycling drives replication of the RNA strands. For the (justifiably realistic) values of parameters chosen for the simulated example system, the mean amount of replicant produced at steady state is 6.56 times the input amount, given a constant supply of substrate species. The spontaneous onset of sustained thermochemical oscillations via slowly drifting parameters is demonstrated, and a scheme is given for prebiotic production of complementary RNA strands on rock surfaces.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide thermochemical oscillator as driver for primordial RNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Rowena; Brindley, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents and tests a previously unrecognized mechanism for driving a replicating molecular system on the prebiotic earth. It is proposed that cell-free RNA replication in the primordial soup may have been driven by self-sustained oscillatory thermochemical reactions. To test this hypothesis, a well-characterized hydrogen peroxide oscillator was chosen as the driver and complementary RNA strands with known association and melting kinetics were used as the substrate. An open flow system model for the self-consistent, coupled evolution of the temperature and concentrations in a simple autocatalytic scheme is solved numerically, and it is shown that thermochemical cycling drives replication of the RNA strands. For the (justifiably realistic) values of parameters chosen for the simulated example system, the mean amount of replicant produced at steady state is 6.56 times the input amount, given a constant supply of substrate species. The spontaneous onset of sustained thermochemical oscillations via slowly drifting parameters is demonstrated, and a scheme is given for prebiotic production of complementary RNA strands on rock surfaces. PMID:24647902

  8. Stability of Bromine Intercalated Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Previous evidence suggested that bromine intercalation compounds of crystalline graphite spontaneously deintercalate when the bromine atmosphere is removed. However, results show that bromine intercalated P-100 graphite fibers are stable for long periods of time. They are stable under vacuum conditions, high humidity, and current densities up to 24,000 A/sq cm. They are thermally stable to 200 C, and at temperatures as high as 400 C still retain 80 percent of the conductivity gained by intercalation. At temperatures greater than 300 C, there is significant oxidative degradation of the fibers. The environmental stability shown by the bromine compound makes it a promising candidate for practical applications in aerospace technology.

  9. Sensitivity of Ozone to Bromine in the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, R. J.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Kovalenko, L. J.; Sioris, C. E.; Wennberg, P. O.; Chance, K.; Ko, M. K. W.; McLinden, C. A.

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of BrO suggest that inorganic bromine (Br(sub y)) at and above the tropopause is 4 to 8 ppt greater than assumed in models used in past ozone trend assessment studies. This additional bromine is likely carried to the stratosphere by short-lived biogenic compounds and their decomposition products, including tropospheric BrO. Including this additional bromine in an ozone trend simulation increases the computed ozone depletion over the past approx.25 years, leading to better agreement between measured and modeled ozone trends. This additional Br(sub y) (assumed constant over time) causes more ozone depletion because associated BrO provides a reaction partner for ClO, which increases due to anthropogenic sources. Enhanced Br(sub y) causes photochemical loss of ozone below approx.14 km to change from being controlled by HO(sub x) catalytic cycles (primarily HO2+O3) to a situation where loss by the BrO+HO2 cycle is also important.

  10. Sensitivity of Ozone to Bromine in the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, R. J.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Kovalenko, L. J.; Sioris, C. E.; Wennberg, P. O.; Chance, K.; Ko, M. K. W.; McLinden, C. A.

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of BrO suggest that inorganic bromine (Br(sub y)) at and above the tropopause is 4 to 8 ppt greater than assumed in models used in past ozone trend assessment studies. This additional bromine is likely carried to the stratosphere by short-lived biogenic compounds and their decomposition products, including tropospheric BrO. Including this additional bromine in an ozone trend simulation increases the computed ozone depletion over the past approx.25 years, leading to better agreement between measured and modeled ozone trends. This additional Br(sub y) (assumed constant over time) causes more ozone depletion because associated BrO provides a reaction partner for ClO, which increases due to anthropogenic sources. Enhanced Br(sub y) causes photochemical loss of ozone below approx.14 km to change from being controlled by HO(sub x) catalytic cycles (primarily HO2+O3) to a situation where loss by the BrO+HO2 cycle is also important.

  11. Biomass thermochemical conversion program. 1985 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Wood and crop residues constitute a vast majority of the biomass feedstocks available for conversion, and thermochemical processes are well suited for conversion of these materials. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research on this conversion technology for renewable energy through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The Program is part of DOE's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division, Office of Renewable Technologies. This report briefly describes the Thermochemical Conversion Program structure and summarizes the activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1985. 32 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Biomass thermochemical conversion program: 1987 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program is to generate a base of scientific data and conversion process information that will lead to establishment of cost-effective processes for conversion of biomass resources into clean fuels. To accomplish this objective, in fiscal year 1987 the Thermochemical Conversion Program sponsored research activities in the following four areas: Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology; Gasification Technology; Direct Combustion Technology; Program Support Activities. In this report an overview of the Thermochemical Conversion Program is presented. Specific research projects are then described. Major accomplishments for 1987 are summarized.

  13. Mineral resource of the month: bromine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2009-01-01

    The article offers information on bromine, a natural element considered as a dissolved species in seawater, saltwater lakes and underground brines linked with petroleum deposits. Bromine belongs to the halogen group of elements and is characterized with brownish-red color and beach-like odor. It is commonly used in flame retardants, agriculture and drilling.

  14. Brominated carbon black: An EDXD study

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Marilena; Gontrani, Lorenzo

    2014-06-19

    An energy dispersive X-Ray study of pure and brominated carbon black was carried out. The analysis of the diffraction patterns reveals that the low bromine load (ca.1% mol) is trapped into the structure, without significantly modifying it. This allows the application of the difference methods, widely tested for electrolyte solutions, inorganic matrices containing metals and isomorphic substitutions.

  15. Bromination of olefins with HBr and DMSO.

    PubMed

    Karki, Megha; Magolan, Jakob

    2015-04-03

    A simple and inexpensive methodology is reported for the conversion of alkenes to 1,2-dibromo alkanes via oxidative bromination using HBr paired with dimethyl sulfoxide, which serves as the oxidant as well as cosolvent. The substrate scope includes 21 olefins brominated in good to excellent yields. Three of six styrene derivatives yielded bromohydrins under the reaction conditions.

  16. Interrupting the Nazarov Cyclization with Bromine.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Devon J; Kwon, Yonghoon; Scully, Thomas W; West, F G

    2016-12-16

    The generation of dibrominated cyclopentenones via an interrupted Nazarov cyclization is reported. The installation of two bromine atoms occurs at the α and α' positions of the cyclopentenyl scaffold via successive nucleophilic and electrophilic bromination of the 2-oxidocyclopentenyl cation and its resulting enolate. Notably, the reaction proceeds with good diastereoselectivity, favoring the symmetrical product.

  17. Enhanced water management using bromine chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Sergent, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper focuses on bromine chemistry and some of its unique properties, with regard to providing solutions to new and changing problems. Bromine Chemistry offers many unique properties for enhancing a water management program. Regardless of the method used to generate a residual, hypobromous acid delivers faster kill rates than an equimolar concentration of hypochlorous acid at an elevated pH or in the presence of ammonia or nitrogenous materials. In addition, the faster degradation of most bromine compounds relative to their chlorinated analogs increases the environmental acceptability of most brominated effluents relative to chlorination. Based on these advantages, the application of bromine chemistry to water treatment requirements has moved out of the speculative research phase and has moved into the sphere of a practical, commercial reality.

  18. Design of GA thermochemical water-splitting process for the Mirror Advanced Reactor System

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.C.

    1983-04-01

    GA interfaced the sulfur-iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle to the Mirror Advanced Reactor System (MARS). The results of this effort follow as one section and part of a second section to be included in the MARS final report. This section describes the process and its interface to the reactor. The capital and operating costs for the hydrogen plant are described.

  19. Bromine isotopic signature facilitates de novo sequencing of peptides in free-radical-initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jungjoo; Kwon, Hyuksu; Jang, Inae; Jeon, Aeran; Moon, Jingyu; Lee, Sun Young; Kang, Dukjin; Han, Sang Yun; Moon, Bongjin; Oh, Han Bin

    2015-02-01

    We recently showed that free-radical-initiated peptide sequencing mass spectrometry (FRIPS MS) assisted by the remarkable thermochemical stability of (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) is another attractive radical-driven peptide fragmentation MS tool. Facile homolytic cleavage of the bond between the benzylic carbon and the oxygen of the TEMPO moiety in o-TEMPO-Bz-C(O)-peptide and the high reactivity of the benzylic radical species generated in •Bz-C(O)-peptide are key elements leading to extensive radical-driven peptide backbone fragmentation. In the present study, we demonstrate that the incorporation of bromine into the benzene ring, i.e. o-TEMPO-Bz(Br)-C(O)-peptide, allows unambiguous distinction of the N-terminal peptide fragments from the C-terminal fragments through the unique bromine doublet isotopic signature. Furthermore, bromine substitution does not alter the overall radical-driven peptide backbone dissociation pathways of o-TEMPO-Bz-C(O)-peptide. From a practical perspective, the presence of the bromine isotopic signature in the N-terminal peptide fragments in TEMPO-assisted FRIPS MS represents a useful and cost-effective opportunity for de novo peptide sequencing.

  20. SUNgas: Thermochemical Approaches to Solar Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Jane

    2013-04-01

    Solar energy offers an intelligent solution to reduce anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and to meet an expanding global demand for energy. A transformative change from fossil to solar energy requires collection, storage, and transport of the earth's most abundant but diffuse and intermittent source of energy. One intriguing approach for harvest and storage of solar energy is production of clean fuels via high temperature thermochemical processes. Concentrated solar energy is the heat source and biomass or water and carbon dioxide are the feedstocks. Two routes to produce fuels using concentrated solar energy and a renewable feed stock will be discussed: gasification of biomass or other carbonaceous materials and metal oxide cycles to produce synthesis gas. The first and most near term route to solar fuels is to gasify biomass. With conventional gasification, air or oxygen is supplied at fuel-rich levels to combust some of the feedstock and in this manner generate the energy required for conversion to H2 and CO. The partial-combustion consumes up to 40% of the energetic value of the feedstock. With air combustion, the product gas is diluted by high levels of CO2 and N2. Using oxygen reduces the product dilution, but at the expense of adding an oxygen plant. Supplying the required heat with concentrated solar radiation eliminates the need for partial combustion of the biomass feedstock. As a result, the product gas has an energetic value greater than that of the feedstock and it is not contaminated by the byproducts of combustion. The second promising route to solar fuels splits water and carbon dioxide. Two-step metal-oxide redox cycles hold out great potential because they the temperature required to achieve a reasonable degree of dissociation is lower than direct thermal dissociation and O2 and the fuel are produced in separate steps. The 1^st step is the endothermic thermal dissociation of the metal oxide to the metal or lower-valence metal oxide. The 2

  1. Bromine and selenium in human aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, J D; Raie, R M; Smith, H

    1981-01-01

    The bromine and selenium concentrations of healthy and atheromatous human aorta and of other organs are reported. No relation between age and concentration in the aorta is found. The selenium levels of the aorta are similar to those of other internal organs; the content of the three layers show no significant differences. The bromine concentrations of the media are higher than those of the other layers, which are similar to those of the internal organs. A possibly greater concentration of bromine in atheromatous medial tissue is indicated. PMID:7240426

  2. Polyfunctional epoxies. I - Rubber-toughened brominated and nonbrominated formulations for graphite composites. II - Nonrubber versus rubber-toughened brominated formulations for graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z.; Gilwee, W. J.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A new trifunctional epoxy resin, Tris-(hydroxyphenyl) methane triglycidyl ether, is compared to a state-of-the-art tetraglycidyl 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM), in graphite composites. Rubber-toughened brominated formulations of the epoxy resin are compared to nonbrominated ones in terms of their mechanical performance, environmental stability, thermochemical behavior, and flame retardancy. It is shown that the new resin performs almost the same way as the TGDDM does, but has improved glass transition temperature and environmental properties. Brominated polymeric additives (BPA) of different molecular weights are tested as a Br source to flame retardant graphite epoxy composites. The optimal molecular weight of the BPA and its polymeric backbone length are derived and compared with a 10 percent rubber-toughened formulation of the epoxy resin. Results indicate that when the Br content in the graphite composite is increased without the use of rubber, the mechanical properties improved. The use of BPAs as tougheners for graphite composites is also considered.

  3. Thermochemical decomposition of water based on reactions of chromium and barium compounds.

    PubMed

    Bamberger, C E; Richardson, D M; Bredig, M A; Cheng, K

    1975-08-29

    A potentially useful thermochemical cycle developed for the production of hydrogen and oxygen from water consists of three chemical reactions that take place in the temperature range from 400 degrees to 1200 degrees K. The oxidation and reduction of chromium compounds by barium hydroxide and the hydrolytic disproportionation of barium chromate(IV) and barium chromate(V), the reactions which constitute the proposed cycle, have been demonstrated.

  4. Penetration of polar brominated DBPs through the activated carbon columns during total organic bromine analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Zhang, Xiangru; Krasner, Stuart W; Shang, Chii; Zhai, Hongyan; Liu, Jiaqi; Yang, Mengting

    2011-10-01

    Total organic bromine (TOBr) is a collective parameter representing all the brominated organic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in water samples. TOBr can be measured using the adsorption-pyrolysis method according to Standard Method 5320B. This method involves that brominated organic DBPs are separated from inorganic halides and concentrated from aqueous solution by adsorption onto the activated carbon (AC). Previous studies have reported that some commonly known brominated DBPs can partially penetrate through the AC during this adsorption step. In this work, the penetration of polar brominated DBPs through AC and ozone-modified AC was explored with two simulated drinking water samples and one chlorinated wastewater effluent sample. Polar brominated DBPs were selectively detected with a novel precursor ion scan method using electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. The results show that 3.4% and 10.4% of polar brominated DBPs (in terms of total ion intensity) in the chlorinated Suwannee River fulvic acid and humic acid samples, respectively, penetrated through the AC, and 19.6% of polar brominated DBPs in the chlorinated secondary wastewater effluent sample penetrated through the AC. The ozone-modification of AC minimized the penetration of polar brominated DBPs during the TOBr analysis.

  5. Comparative environmental analysis of waste brominated plastic thermal treatments.

    PubMed

    Bientinesi, M; Petarca, L

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this research activity is to investigate the environmental impact of different thermal treatments of waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE), applying a life cycle assessment methodology. Two scenarios were assessed, which both allow the recovery of bromine: (A) the co-combustion of WEEE and green waste in a municipal solid waste combustion plant, and (B) the staged-gasification of WEEE and combustion of produced syngas in gas turbines. Mass and energy balances on the two scenarios were set and the analysis of the life cycle inventory and the life cycle impact assessment were conducted. Two impact assessment methods (Ecoindicator 99 and Impact 2002+) were slightly modified and then used with both scenarios. The results showed that scenario B (staged-gasification) had a potentially smaller environmental impact than scenario A (co-combustion). In particular, the thermal treatment of staged-gasification was more energy efficient than co-combustion, and therefore scenario B performed better than scenario A, mainly in the impact categories of "fossil fuels" and "climate change". Moreover, the results showed that scenario B allows a higher recovery of bromine than scenario A; however, Br recovery leads to environmental benefits for both the scenarios. Finally the study demonstrates that WEEE thermal treatment for energy and matter recovery is an eco-efficient way to dispose of this kind of waste.

  6. Comparative environmental analysis of waste brominated plastic thermal treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Bientinesi, M. Petarca, L.

    2009-03-15

    The aim of this research activity is to investigate the environmental impact of different thermal treatments of waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE), applying a life cycle assessment methodology. Two scenarios were assessed, which both allow the recovery of bromine: (A) the co-combustion of WEEE and green waste in a municipal solid waste combustion plant, and (B) the staged-gasification of WEEE and combustion of produced syngas in gas turbines. Mass and energy balances on the two scenarios were set and the analysis of the life cycle inventory and the life cycle impact assessment were conducted. Two impact assessment methods (Ecoindicator 99 and Impact 2002+) were slightly modified and then used with both scenarios. The results showed that scenario B (staged-gasification) had a potentially smaller environmental impact than scenario A (co-combustion). In particular, the thermal treatment of staged-gasification was more energy efficient than co-combustion, and therefore scenario B performed better than scenario A, mainly in the impact categories of 'fossil fuels' and 'climate change'. Moreover, the results showed that scenario B allows a higher recovery of bromine than scenario A; however, Br recovery leads to environmental benefits for both the scenarios. Finally the study demonstrates that WEEE thermal treatment for energy and matter recovery is an eco-efficient way to dispose of this kind of waste.

  7. An exemplary case of a bromine explosion event linked to cyclone development in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blechschmidt, A.-M.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J. P.; Kaleschke, L.; Strong, K.; Theys, N.; Weber, M.; Zhao, X.; Zien, A.

    2016-02-01

    Intense, cyclone-like shaped plumes of tropospheric bromine monoxide (BrO) are regularly observed by GOME-2 on board the MetOp-A satellite over Arctic sea ice in polar spring. These plumes are often transported by high-latitude cyclones, sometimes over several days despite the short atmospheric lifetime of BrO. However, only few studies have focused on the role of polar weather systems in the development, duration and transport of tropospheric BrO plumes during bromine explosion events. The latter are caused by an autocatalytic chemical chain reaction associated with tropospheric ozone depletion and initiated by the release of bromine from cold brine-covered ice or snow to the atmosphere. In this manuscript, a case study investigating a comma-shaped BrO plume which developed over the Beaufort Sea and was observed by GOME-2 for several days is presented. By making combined use of satellite data and numerical models, it is shown that the occurrence of the plume was closely linked to frontal lifting in a polar cyclone and that it most likely resided in the lowest 3 km of the troposphere. In contrast to previous case studies, we demonstrate that the dry conveyor belt, a potentially bromine-rich stratospheric air stream which can complicate interpretation of satellite retrieved tropospheric BrO, is spatially separated from the observed BrO plume. It is concluded that weather conditions associated with the polar cyclone favoured the bromine activation cycle and blowing snow production, which may have acted as a bromine source during the bromine explosion event.

  8. An exemplary case of a bromine explosion event linked to cyclone development in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blechschmidt, A.-M.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J. P.; Kaleschke, L.; Strong, K.; Theys, N.; Weber, M.; Zhao, X.; Zien, A.

    2015-09-01

    Intense, cyclone-like shaped plumes of tropospheric bromine monoxide (BrO) are regularly observed by GOME-2 on board the MetOp-A satellite over Arctic sea ice in polar spring. These plumes are often transported by high latitude cyclones, sometimes over several days despite the short atmospheric lifetime of BrO. However, only few studies have focused on the role of polar weather systems in the development, duration and transport of tropospheric BrO plumes during bromine explosion events. The latter are caused by an autocatalytic chemical chain reaction associated with tropospheric ozone depletion and initiated by the release of bromine from cold brine covered ice or snow to the atmosphere. In this manuscript, a case study investigating a comma-shaped BrO plume which developed over the Beaufort Sea and was observed by GOME-2 for several days is presented. By making combined use of satellite data and numerical models, it is shown that the occurrence of the plume was closely linked to frontal lifting in a polar cyclone and that it most likely resided in the lowest 3 km of the troposphere. In contrast to previous case studies, we demonstrate that the dry conveyor belt, a potentially bromine-rich stratospheric air stream which can complicate interpretation of satellite retrieved tropospheric BrO, is spatially separated from the observed BrO plume. It is concluded that weather conditions associated with the polar cyclone favored the bromine activation cycle and blowing snow production, which may have acted as a bromine source during the bromine explosion event.

  9. PCBs, PBBs and Brominated Flame Retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter introduces selected organohalogen chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB5), polychiorinated biphenyls (PBBs), and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) with emphasis on the background, physicochemical properties, environmental levels, health effects and possib...

  10. Brominated Flame Retardants and Perfluorinated Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) belong to a large class of chemicals known as organohalogens. It is believed that both BFRs and PFCs saved lives by reducing flammability of materials commonly used and bactericidal (biocidal) properties. Thes...

  11. Brominated Flame Retardants and Perfluorinated Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) belong to a large class of chemicals known as organohalogens. It is believed that both BFRs and PFCs saved lives by reducing flammability of materials commonly used and bactericidal (biocidal) properties. Thes...

  12. PCBs, PBBs and Brominated Flame Retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter introduces selected organohalogen chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB5), polychiorinated biphenyls (PBBs), and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) with emphasis on the background, physicochemical properties, environmental levels, health effects and possib...

  13. Systematic vibration thermodynamic properties of bromine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G. Y.; Sun, W. G.; Liao, B. T.

    2015-11-01

    Based on the analysis of the maturity and finiteness of vibrational levels of bromine molecule in ground state and evaluating the effect on statistical computation, according to the elementary principles of quantum statistical theorem, using the full set of bromine molecular vibrational levels determined with algebra method, the statistical contribution for bromine systematical macroscopic thermodynamic properties is discussed. Thermodynamic state functions Helmholtz free energy, entropy and observable vibration heat capacity are calculated. The results show that the determination of full set of vibrational levels and maximum vibrational quantum number is the key in the correct statistical analysis of bromine systematical thermodynamic property. Algebra method results are clearly different from data of simple harmonic oscillator and the related algebra method results are no longer analytical but numerical and are superior to simple harmonic oscillator results. Compared with simple harmonic oscillator's heat capacities, the algebra method's heat capacities are more consistent with the experimental data in the given temperature range of 600-2100 K.

  14. Stability and metastability of bromine clathrate polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Andrew H; Molinero, Valeria

    2013-05-23

    Clathrate hydrates are crystals in which water forms a network of fully hydrogen-bonded polyhedral cages that contain small guests. Clathrate hydrates occur mostly in two cubic crystal polymorphs, sI and sII. Bromine is one of two guests that yield a hydrate with the tetragonal structure (TS), the topological dual of the Frank-Kasper σ phase. There has been a long-standing disagreement on whether bromine hydrate also forms metastable sI and sII crystals. To date there are no data on the thermodynamic range of stability (e.g., the melting temperatures) of the metastable polymorphs. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations with the coarse-grained model of water mW to (i) investigate the thermodynamic stability of the empty and guest-filled the sI, sII, TS, and HS-I hydrate polymorphs, (ii) develop a coarse-grained model of bromine compatible with mW water, and (iii) evaluate the stability of the bromine hydrate polymorphs. The mW model predicts the same relative energy of the empty clathrate polymorphs and the same phase diagram as a function of water-guest interaction than the fully atomistic TIP4P water model. There is a narrow region in water-guest parameter space for which TS is marginally more stable than sI or sII. We parametrize a coarse-grained model of bromine compatible with mW water and use it to determine the order of stability of the bromine hydrate polymorphs. The melting temperatures of the bromine hydrate polymorphs predicted by the coarse-grained model are 281 ± 1 K for TS, 279 ± 1 K for sII, and 276 ± 1 K for sI. The closeness of the melting temperatures supports the plausibility of formation of metastable sII and sI bromine hydrates.

  15. 75 FR 16104 - Bromine Registration Review Final Decision; Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... AGENCY Bromine Registration Review Final Decision; Notice of Availability AGENCY: Environmental... registration review decision for the pesticide Bromine, case 4015. Registration review is EPA's periodic review... registration review decision for bromine, case 4015. Bromine is a bromide releasing antimicrobial...

  16. Process for thermochemically producing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.; Richardson, Donald M.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen is produced by the reaction of water with chromium sesquioxide and strontium oxide. The hydrogen producing reaction is combined with other reactions to produce a closed chemical cycle for the thermal decomposition of water.

  17. Bromine accumulation in acidic black colluvial soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortizas, Antonio Martínez; Vázquez, Cruz Ferro; Kaal, Joeri; Biester, Harald; Casais, Manuela Costa; Rodríguez, Teresa Taboada; Lado, Luis Rodríguez

    2016-02-01

    Recent investigations showed that bromine is incorporated to soil organic matter (SOM), its content increasing with humification. But few research was done on its long-term accumulation and the role played by pedogenetic processes, as those involved in organic matter stabilization. We investigated bromine content and distribution in four deep, acidic, organic-rich, Holocene soils from an oceanic area of Western Europe. Bromine concentrations (93-778 μg g-1) in the silt + clay (<50 μm) fraction were on average 3-times higher than those (17-250 μg g-1) in the fine earth (<2 mm), the former containing almost all bromine (90 ± 5%). Inventories were between 148 and 314 g m-2, indicating a rather large variability in a small area, and total estimated retention was low (6-16%). The degree of SOM bromination, expressed as the Br/C molar ratio, varied between 0.03 and 1.20 mmol Br/mol C. The ratio was highly correlated (n = 23, r2 0.88, p < 0.01) with the age of the SOM for the last ∼12 ka. Partial least squares modeling indicates that bromine concentration depends on the amount of organic matter stabilized as aluminium-OM associations, and to a lesser extent on soil acidity (pH) and iron-OM associations. Thus, at scales of thousands of years, bromine accumulation in acidic soils is linked to the pool of metal-clay-stabilized organic matter.

  18. Biomass for thermochemical conversion: targets and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Tanger, Paul; Field, John L.; Jahn, Courtney E.; DeFoort, Morgan W.; Leach, Jan E.

    2013-01-01

    Bioenergy will be one component of a suite of alternatives to fossil fuels. Effective conversion of biomass to energy will require the careful pairing of advanced conversion technologies with biomass feedstocks optimized for the purpose. Lignocellulosic biomass can be converted to useful energy products via two distinct pathways: enzymatic or thermochemical conversion. The thermochemical pathways are reviewed and potential biotechnology or breeding targets to improve feedstocks for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion are identified. Biomass traits influencing the effectiveness of the thermochemical process (cell wall composition, mineral and moisture content) differ from those important for enzymatic conversion and so properties are discussed in the language of biologists (biochemical analysis) as well as that of engineers (proximate and ultimate analysis). We discuss the genetic control, potential environmental influence, and consequences of modification of these traits. Improving feedstocks for thermochemical conversion can be accomplished by the optimization of lignin levels, and the reduction of ash and moisture content. We suggest that ultimate analysis and associated properties such as H:C, O:C, and heating value might be more amenable than traditional biochemical analysis to the high-throughput necessary for the phenotyping of large plant populations. Expanding our knowledge of these biomass traits will play a critical role in the utilization of biomass for energy production globally, and add to our understanding of how plants tailor their composition with their environment. PMID:23847629

  19. Intro to NREL's Thermochemical Pilot Plant

    ScienceCinema

    Magrini, Kim

    2016-07-12

    NREL's Thermochemical Pilot Plant converts biomass into higher hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals.NREL is researching biomass pyrolysis. The lab is examining how to upgrade bio-oils via stabilization. Along with this, NREL is developing the engineering system requirements for producing these fuels and chemicals at larger scales.

  20. Thermochemical characteristics of chitosan-polylactide copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goruynova, P. E.; Larina, V. N.; Smirnova, N. N.; Tsverova, N. E.; Smirnova, L. A.

    2016-05-01

    The energies of combustion of chitosan and its block-copolymers with different polylactide contents are determined in a static bomb calorimeter. Standard enthalpies of combustion and formation are calculated for these substances. The dependences of the thermochemical characteristics on block-copolymer composition are determined and discussed.

  1. Thermochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-06-01

    The state-of-the-art thermochemical conversion pilot plant includes several configurable, complementary unit operations for testing and developing various reactors, filters, catalysts, and other unit operations. NREL engineers and scientists as well as clients can test new processes and feedstocks in a timely, cost-effective, and safe manner to obtain extensive performance data on processes or equipment.

  2. 2009 Thermochemical Conversion Platform Review Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, John

    2009-12-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Thermochemical Conversion platform review meeting, held on April 14-16, 2009, at the Sheraton Denver Downtown, Denver, Colorado.

  3. Intro to NREL's Thermochemical Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Magrini, Kim

    2013-09-27

    NREL's Thermochemical Pilot Plant converts biomass into higher hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals.NREL is researching biomass pyrolysis. The lab is examining how to upgrade bio-oils via stabilization. Along with this, NREL is developing the engineering system requirements for producing these fuels and chemicals at larger scales.

  4. 1982 annual report: Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the Thermochemical Conversion Program's activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1982. The objective of the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program is to generate scientific data and fundamental biomass converison process information that, in the long term, could lead to establishment of cost effective processes for conversion of biomass resources into clean fuels and petrochemical substitutes. The goal of the program is to improve the data base for biomass conversion by investigating the fundamental aspects of conversion technologies and exploring those parameters which are critical to these conversion processes. To achieve this objective and goal, the Thermochemical Conversion Program is sponsoring high-risk, long-term research with high payoff potential which industry is not currently sponsoring, nor is likely to support. Thermochemical conversion processes employ elevated temperatures to convert biomass materials into energy. Process examples include: combustion to produce heat, steam, electricity, direct mechanical power; gasification to produce fuel gas or synthesis gases for the production of methanol and hydrocarbon fuels; direct liquefaction to produce heavy oils or distillates; and pyrolysis to produce a mixture of oils, fuel gases, and char. A bibliography of publications for 1982 is included.

  5. Abiotic Bromination of Soil Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Leri, Alessandra C; Ravel, Bruce

    2015-11-17

    Biogeochemical transformations of plant-derived soil organic matter (SOM) involve complex abiotic and microbially mediated reactions. One such reaction is halogenation, which occurs naturally in the soil environment and has been associated with enzymatic activity of decomposer organisms. Building on a recent finding that naturally produced organobromine is ubiquitous in SOM, we hypothesized that inorganic bromide could be subject to abiotic oxidations resulting in bromination of SOM. Through lab-based degradation treatments of plant material and soil humus, we have shown that abiotic bromination of particulate organic matter occurs in the presence of a range of inorganic oxidants, including hydrogen peroxide and assorted forms of ferric iron, producing both aliphatic and aromatic forms of organobromine. Bromination of oak and pine litter is limited primarily by bromide concentration. Fresh plant material is more susceptible to bromination than decayed litter and soil humus, due to a labile pool of mainly aliphatic compounds that break down during early stages of SOM formation. As the first evidence of abiotic bromination of particulate SOM, this study identifies a mechanistic source of the natural organobromine in humic substances and the soil organic horizon. Formation of organobromine through oxidative treatments of plant material also provides insights into the relative stability of aromatic and aliphatic components of SOM.

  6. Abiotic Bromination of Soil Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Leri, Alessandra C.; Ravel, Bruce

    2015-11-17

    Biogeochemical transformations of plant-derived soil organic matter (SOM) involve complex abiotic and microbially mediated reactions. One such reaction is halogenation, which occurs naturally in the soil environment and has been associated with enzymatic activity of decomposer organisms. Building on a recent finding that naturally produced organobromine is ubiquitous in SOM, we hypothesized that inorganic bromide could be subject to abiotic oxidations resulting in bromination of SOM. Through lab-based degradation treatments of plant material and soil humus, we have shown that abiotic bromination of particulate organic matter occurs in the presence of a range of inorganic oxidants, including hydrogen peroxide and assorted forms of ferric iron, producing both aliphatic and aromatic forms of organobromine. Bromination of oak and pine litter is limited primarily by bromide concentration. Fresh plant material is more susceptible to bromination than decayed litter and soil humus, due to a labile pool of mainly aliphatic compounds that break down during early stages of SOM formation. As the first evidence of abiotic bromination of particulate SOM, this study identifies a mechanistic source of the natural organobromine in humic substances and the soil organic horizon. Formation of organobromine through oxidative treatments of plant material also provides insights into the relative stability of aromatic and aliphatic components of SOM.

  7. The milling of pristine and brominated P-100 graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillehay, M. E.; Gaier, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques were developed for the ball milling of pristine and brominated P-100 graphite fibers. Because of the lubrication properties of graphite, large ball loads (50 percent by volume) were required. Use of 2-propanol as a milling medium enhanced the efficiency of the process. Milled brominated P-100 fibers had resistivities which were indistinguishable from milled pristine P-100 fibers. Apparent loss of bromine from the brominated fibers suggests that bromine would not be the intercalate of choice in applications where milled fibers of this type are required. Other intercalates which do not degas may be more appropriate for a milled fiber application. These same results, however, do provide evidence that bromine molecules leave the fiber surface when removed from overpressure of bromine. While exploring possible solvent media for milling purposes, it was found that brominated fibers are stable in a wide variety of organic solvents.

  8. Moving bed reactor for solar thermochemical fuel production

    DOEpatents

    Ermanoski, Ivan

    2013-04-16

    Reactors and methods for solar thermochemical reactions are disclosed. Embodiments of reactors include at least two distinct reactor chambers between which there is at least a pressure differential. In embodiments, reactive particles are exchanged between chambers during a reaction cycle to thermally reduce the particles at first conditions and oxidize the particles at second conditions to produce chemical work from heat. In embodiments, chambers of a reactor are coupled to a heat exchanger to pre-heat the reactive particles prior to direct exposure to thermal energy with heat transferred from reduced reactive particles as the particles are oppositely conveyed between the thermal reduction chamber and the fuel production chamber. In an embodiment, particle conveyance is in part provided by an elevator which may further function as a heat exchanger.

  9. 40 CFR 721.2925 - Brominated aromatic ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Brominated aromatic ester. 721.2925... Substances § 721.2925 Brominated aromatic ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a brominated aromatic ester (PMN P-95-1128...

  10. 40 CFR 721.3085 - Brominated phthalate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Brominated phthalate ester. 721.3085... Substances § 721.3085 Brominated phthalate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as brominated phthalate ester (PMN P-90-581) is...

  11. Numerical simulation of bromine crossover behavior in flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yaobin; Cheng, Shijian; Chu, Dandan; Li, Xin

    2017-03-01

    Br2 and HBr has its own series of advantages as the positive electrolyte solution, so some batteries select the Br2/Br- as the positive electrolyte solution, such as sodium polysulfide/bromine flow battery, zinc/bromine flow battery, vanadium/ bromine flow batteries and hydrogen/bromine flow batteries. But the crossover benavior of bromine occurs in these batteries too, resulting in cross-contamination, capacity loss and affecting battery's performance. In this work, we build numerical models to study the influence of bromine crossover phenomenon on the three forms of bromine crossover, the concentration of electrolyte on the cathode side and the flow rate of the negative side in the quinone bromine flow battery, to find the main models affecting the bromine crossover and the impact of bromine crossover on battery performance. It was found that the three ways of crossover through the membranes was mainly by diffusion. By reducing the concentration of positive electrolyte solution, the bromine crossover can be reduced and Coulomb Efficiency can be improved. Rising the flow rate of the electrolyte solution on the negative side and reducing the differential between positive side's pressure and negative side's pressure can also reduce the amount of bromine crossover to improve Coulomb efficiency in the battery.

  12. 21 CFR 180.30 - Brominated vegetable oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Brominated vegetable oil. 180.30 Section 180.30... Brominated vegetable oil. The food additive brominated vegetable oil may be safely used in accordance with... used on an interim basis as a stabilizer for flavoring oils used in fruit-flavored beverages, for...

  13. 21 CFR 180.30 - Brominated vegetable oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Brominated vegetable oil. 180.30 Section 180.30... Brominated vegetable oil. The food additive brominated vegetable oil may be safely used in accordance with... used on an interim basis as a stabilizer for flavoring oils used in fruit-flavored beverages, for...

  14. 21 CFR 180.30 - Brominated vegetable oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Brominated vegetable oil. 180.30 Section 180.30... Brominated vegetable oil. The food additive brominated vegetable oil may be safely used in accordance with... used on an interim basis as a stabilizer for flavoring oils used in fruit-flavored beverages, for...

  15. 21 CFR 180.30 - Brominated vegetable oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Brominated vegetable oil. 180.30 Section 180.30... Brominated vegetable oil. The food additive brominated vegetable oil may be safely used in accordance with... used on an interim basis as a stabilizer for flavoring oils used in fruit-flavored beverages, for...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10124 - Brominated polyaromatic compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Brominated polyaromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10124 Brominated polyaromatic compound (generic). (a) Chemical substance... brominated polyaromatic compound (PMN P-06-617) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10124 - Brominated polyaromatic compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Brominated polyaromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10124 Brominated polyaromatic compound (generic). (a) Chemical substance... brominated polyaromatic compound (PMN P-06-617) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10124 - Brominated polyaromatic compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Brominated polyaromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10124 Brominated polyaromatic compound (generic). (a) Chemical substance... brominated polyaromatic compound (PMN P-06-617) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10124 - Brominated polyaromatic compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Brominated polyaromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10124 Brominated polyaromatic compound (generic). (a) Chemical substance... brominated polyaromatic compound (PMN P-06-617) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  20. 40 CFR 721.3085 - Brominated phthalate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brominated phthalate ester. 721.3085... Substances § 721.3085 Brominated phthalate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as brominated phthalate ester (PMN P-90-581) is...

  1. 40 CFR 721.2925 - Brominated aromatic ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brominated aromatic ester. 721.2925... Substances § 721.2925 Brominated aromatic ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a brominated aromatic ester (PMN P-95-1128...

  2. 40 CFR 721.3085 - Brominated phthalate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Brominated phthalate ester. 721.3085... Substances § 721.3085 Brominated phthalate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as brominated phthalate ester (PMN P-90-581)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.3085 - Brominated phthalate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Brominated phthalate ester. 721.3085... Substances § 721.3085 Brominated phthalate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as brominated phthalate ester (PMN P-90-581)...

  4. 40 CFR 721.2925 - Brominated aromatic ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Brominated aromatic ester. 721.2925... Substances § 721.2925 Brominated aromatic ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a brominated aromatic ester (PMN...

  5. 40 CFR 721.2925 - Brominated aromatic ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Brominated aromatic ester. 721.2925... Substances § 721.2925 Brominated aromatic ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a brominated aromatic ester (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 721.3085 - Brominated phthalate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Brominated phthalate ester. 721.3085... Substances § 721.3085 Brominated phthalate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as brominated phthalate ester (PMN P-90-581)...

  7. Sulfate production by reactive bromine: Implications for the global sulfur and reactive bromine budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Schmidt, J. A.; Shah, V.; Jaeglé, L.; Sherwen, T.; Alexander, B.

    2017-07-01

    Sulfur and reactive bromine (Bry) play important roles in tropospheric chemistry and the global radiation budget. The oxidation of dissolved SO2 (S(IV)) by HOBr increases sulfate aerosol abundance and may also impact the Bry budget, but is generally not included in global climate and chemistry models. In this study, we implement HOBr + S(IV) reactions into the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model and evaluate the global impacts on both sulfur and Bry budgets. Modeled HOBr mixing ratios on the order of 0.1-1.0 parts per trillion (ppt) lead to HOBr + S(IV) contributing to 8% of global sulfate production and up to 45% over some tropical ocean regions with high HOBr mixing ratios (0.6-0.9 ppt). Inclusion of HOBr + S(IV) in the model leads to a global Bry decrease of 50%, initiated by the decrease in bromide recycling in cloud droplets. Observations of HOBr are necessary to better understand the role of HOBr + S(IV) in tropospheric sulfur and Bry cycles.

  8. Effects of vapor pressure on thermodynamic equilibrium in multiphase flow for thermochemical hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, K.; Naterer, G. F.; Wang, Z. L.

    2013-12-01

    This paper examines the effects of H2O vapor pressure on the equilibrium conditions of a CuCl2 hydrolysis reactor in the thermochemical Cu-Cl cycle of hydrogen production. A new predictive model is developed to determine the minimum steam requirement in the reactor based on the chemical equilibrium condition, reactor pressure and fraction of gaseous reactant. Experimental data, at three separate vapour pressures of steam, compared well with the new predictive formulation.

  9. Optically pumped molecular bromine laser. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.W.

    1990-12-01

    An optically pumped molecular bromine laser was studied to investigate the quenching kinetics state of Br2. This included characterization of the pressure dependence of the laser output power. The approach was to excite molecular bromine in a sealed cell with a Nd:YAG pumped dye laser. Unresolved side fluorescence and amplified stimulated emission (ASE) spectra were recorded. ASE offered the advantage of a simpler optical system with no externally induced wavelength dependencies. Stimulated emission as a signal monitor offered greater resolution than side fluorescence spectra and facilitated spectroscopic assignment. (JS)

  10. Bromine and Chlorine Go Separate Ways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph shows the relative concentrations of bromine and chlorine at various locations on Earth and Mars. Typically, bromine and chlorine stick together in a fixed ratio, as in martian meteorites and Earth seawater. But sometimes the elements split apart and their relative quantities diverge. This separation is usually caused by evaporation processes, as in the Dead Sea on Earth. On Mars, at Meridiani Planum and Gusev Crater, this split has been observed to an even greater degree than seen on Earth. This puzzling result is currently being further explored by Mars Exploration Rover scientists. Data for the Mars locations were taken by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

  11. Bromine and Chlorine Go Separate Ways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph shows the relative concentrations of bromine and chlorine at various locations on Earth and Mars. Typically, bromine and chlorine stick together in a fixed ratio, as in martian meteorites and Earth seawater. But sometimes the elements split apart and their relative quantities diverge. This separation is usually caused by evaporation processes, as in the Dead Sea on Earth. On Mars, at Meridiani Planum and Gusev Crater, this split has been observed to an even greater degree than seen on Earth. This puzzling result is currently being further explored by Mars Exploration Rover scientists. Data for the Mars locations were taken by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

  12. Ninth Spectrum of Bromine: Br IX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Y. N.; van Kleef, Th A. M.

    1981-03-01

    The spectrum of bromine was photographed on a 6.60 m and a 10.7 m grazing incidence spectrograph in the region 300-90 Å. The source used was a triggered spark. The ninth spectrum of bromine was analysed on the basis of 3d9-3d84p transitions between 125-104 Å. Parametric level fitting calculations support the analysis. 44 lines are classified in this spectrum. Some Br VIII lines appearing in this region have been accurately measured.

  13. Process for recovering bromine from waste liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, M.; Mohri, A.; Ota, K.; Yamada, T.; Yokomichi, I.

    1982-04-13

    This is a process for recovering bromine from a waste liquid formed in the production of an aniline derivative by ammonolysis of a nuclear substituted bromobenzene derivative with a halogen atom or a functional group. The waste liquid is first subjected to chlorine treatment in alkaline region to remove most part of ammonia and aniline derivatives, and then it is subjected to chlorine treatment in acidic region to recover bromine. The process does not involve danger of explosion accidents and can be smoothly operated.

  14. Master equation simulations of a model of a thermochemical system.

    PubMed

    Kawczyński, Andrzej L; Nowakowski, Bogdan

    2003-09-01

    Master equation approach is used to study the influence of fluctuations on the dynamics of a model thermochemical system. For appropriate values of parameters, the deterministic description of the system gives the subcritical or supercritical Hopf bifurcations. For small systems (containing 100 000 particles) close to the supercritical Hopf bifurcation, the stochastic trajectories obtained from numerical simulations do not allow to distinguish between damped oscillations around a stable focus and sustained oscillations around a small stable limit cycle. This uncertainty disappears if the number of particles in the system is increased (up to 1 000 000). Close to subcritical Hopf bifurcation the stochastic trajectory of the system jumps from the basin of attraction of a stable focus to the basin of attraction of a stable limit cycle. In this case the time dependencies of temperature and concentration of reactant in the system are apparently similar to intermittent chaotic oscillations. The mean first passage time for the transitions from the stable focus to the stable limit cycle show the characteristic exponential dependence on the number of particles. This passage time depends very strongly on the bifurcation parameter (reaction heat), which determines the distance between the stable focus and an unstable limit cycle.

  15. Measurements of bromine containing organic compounds at the tropical tropopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauffler, S. M.; Atlas, E. L.; Flocke, F.; Lueb, R. A.; Stroud, V.; Travnicek, W.

    The amount of bromine entering the stratosphere from organic source gases is a primary factor involved in determining the magnitude of bromine catalyzed loss of ozone. Thirty two whole air samples were collected at the tropical tropopause during the NASA STRAT Campaign in Feb., Aug., and Dec., 1996 and were analyzed for brominated organic compounds. Total organic bromine was 17.4±0.9 ppt with 55% from methyl bromide, 38% from the Halons, 6% from dibromomethane, and 0.8% from bromochloromethane and dichlorobromomethane. One flight showed the presence of 0.42 ppt of additional organic bromine from bromoform and dibromochloromethane.

  16. Physical and thermochemical properties of cereal straws

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaly, A.E. ); Al-Taweel, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Cereal straws are one of the most commonly available lignocellulosic materials that can be converted to different types of fuels and chemical feedstocks through a variety of thermochemical conversion processes. This study provides information on moisture content, bulk density, particle size, heating values, proximate analysis, ultimate analysis, ash composition, and ash feasibility characteristics for four cereal straws (wheat, barley, oats, and rye). The type of straw and the crop variety have significant effects on the chemical properties of straw.

  17. Physical and thermochemical properties of rice husk

    SciTech Connect

    Mansaray, K.G.; Ghaly, A.E.

    1997-11-01

    Rice husk a major by-product of the rice milling industry, is one of the most commonly available lignocellulosic materials that can be converted to different types of fuels and chemical feedstocks through a variety of thermochemical conversion processes. Proper understanding of the physical and thermochemical properties of rice husk is necessary for the design of thermochemical conversion systems. This study provides information on moisture content, bulk density, particle size, heating values, proximate analysis, ultimate analysis, ash composition, and ash fusibility characteristics for six rice husk varieties. The moisture content ranged from 8.68 to 10.44%, and the bulk density ranged from 86 to 114 kg/m{sup 3}. The results showed excessive volatile release of over 60%, high ash content ranging from 15.30 to 24.60% (dry weight basis), and high silica content of the ash ranging from 90 to 97%. The lower heating values ranged from 13.24 to 16.20 MJ/kg (dry weight basis). The ash fusion temperatures of all the varieties were found to be over 1,600 C. The differences in varietal characteristics have significant effects on the chemical properties of rice husk.

  18. Preparation of ionic membranes for zinc/bromine storage batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assink, R. A.; Arnold, C., Jr.

    Zinc/bromine flow batteries are being developed for vehicular and utility load leveling applications. During charge, an aqueous zinc bromide salt is electrolyzed to zinc metal and molecular bromine. During discharge, the zinc and bromine react to again form the zinc bromide salt. One serious disadvantage of the microporous separators presently used in the zinc/bromine battery is that modest amounts of bromine and negatively charged bromine moieties permeate through these materials and react with the zinc anode. This results in partial self-discharge of the battery and low coulombic efficiencies. Our approach to this problem is to impregnate the microporous separators with a soluble cationic polyelectrolyte. In laboratory screening tests a sulfonated polysulfone resin and fully fluorinated sulfonic acid polymer substantially reduced bromine permeation with only modest increases in the area resistance.

  19. Graphite fiber intercalation: Dynamics of the bromine intercalation process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Zinolabedini, R.

    1985-01-01

    The resistance of pitch-based graphite fibers was monitored, in situ, during a series of bromine intercalation experiments. The threshold pressure for the bromine intercalation of pitch-based fibers was estimated to be 102 torr. When the bromine atmosphere was removed from the reaction chamber, the resistivity of the intercalated graphite fibers increased consistently. This increase was attributed to loss of bromine from the perimeter of the fiber. The loss was confirmed by mapping the bromine concentration across the diameter of single intercalated fibers with either energy dispersive spectroscopy or scanning Auger microscopy. A statistical study comparing fibers intercalated in bromine vapor with fibers intercalated in bromine liquid showed that similar products were obtained with both methods of intercalation.

  20. Thermally dissociated chlorine and bromine molecular jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frick, J.

    1980-12-01

    High temperature nozzle sources producing thermal dissociation of chlorine and bromine are described. Scattering between molecular potential functions in nonelastic transfer of energy processes and chemical reactions was investigated by molecular beam technique. It is shown that the recombination freezes up faster when the nozzlehole duct is shorter.

  1. BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS: WHY DO WE CARE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) save lives and property by preventing the spread of fires or delaying the time of flashover, enhancing the time people have to escape. The worldwide production of BFRs exceeded 200,000 metric tons in 2003 placing them in the high production vol...

  2. A Substitute Foe "Bromine in Carbon Tetrachloride"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Joshua M.; Landolt, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    The addition of a dilute solution of bromine in carbon tetrachloride to a compound to test for carbon-carbon multiple bonds, which is one of the widely cited qualitative tests employed in organic chemistry is presented. Major advantages of this approach include the ease and rapidness of the procedure, the stability of the test solution over time,…

  3. HEALTH EFFECTS OF BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS (BFRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Brominated flame retardant use has increased dramatically in order to provide fire safety to consumers. However, there is growing concern about widespread environmental contamination and potential health risks from some of these products. The most used products...

  4. HEALTH ASPECTS OF BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS (BFRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to reduce the societal costs of fires, flammability standards have been set for consumer products and equipment. Flame retardants containing bromine have constituted the largest share of this market due both to their efficiency and cost. While there are at least 75 dif...

  5. Structure and functionality of bromine doped graphite.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Rashid; Kemper, A F; Cao, Chao; Cheng, H P

    2013-04-28

    First-principles calculations are used to study the enhanced in-plane conductivity observed experimentally in Br-doped graphite, and to study the effect of external stress on the structure and functionality of such systems. The model used in the numerical calculations is that of stage two doped graphite. The band structure near the Fermi surface of the doped systems with different bromine concentrations is compared to that of pure graphite, and the charge transfer between carbon and bromine atoms is analyzed to understand the conductivity change along different high symmetry directions. Our calculations show that, for large interlayer separation between doped graphite layers, bromine is stable in the molecular form (Br2). However, with increased compression (decreased layer-layer separation) Br2 molecules tend to dissociate. While in both forms, bromine is an electron acceptor. The charge exchange between the graphite layers and Br atoms is higher than that with Br2 molecules. Electron transfer to the Br atoms increases the number of hole carriers in the graphite sheets, resulting in an increase of conductivity.

  6. Structure and functionality of bromine doped graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdan, Rashid; Kemper, A. F.; Cao Chao; Cheng, H. P.

    2013-04-28

    First-principles calculations are used to study the enhanced in-plane conductivity observed experimentally in Br-doped graphite, and to study the effect of external stress on the structure and functionality of such systems. The model used in the numerical calculations is that of stage two doped graphite. The band structure near the Fermi surface of the doped systems with different bromine concentrations is compared to that of pure graphite, and the charge transfer between carbon and bromine atoms is analyzed to understand the conductivity change along different high symmetry directions. Our calculations show that, for large interlayer separation between doped graphite layers, bromine is stable in the molecular form (Br{sub 2}). However, with increased compression (decreased layer-layer separation) Br{sub 2} molecules tend to dissociate. While in both forms, bromine is an electron acceptor. The charge exchange between the graphite layers and Br atoms is higher than that with Br{sub 2} molecules. Electron transfer to the Br atoms increases the number of hole carriers in the graphite sheets, resulting in an increase of conductivity.

  7. HEALTH EFFECTS OF BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS (BFRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Brominated flame retardant use has increased dramatically in order to provide fire safety to consumers. However, there is growing concern about widespread environmental contamination and potential health risks from some of these products. The most used products...

  8. Bromination of selected pharmaceuticals in water matrices.

    PubMed

    Benitez, F Javier; Acero, Juan L; Real, Francisco J; Roldan, Gloria; Casas, Francisco

    2011-11-01

    The bromination of five selected pharmaceuticals (metoprolol, naproxen, amoxicillin, phenacetin, and hydrochlorothiazide) was studied with these compounds individually dissolved in ultra-pure water. The apparent rate constants for the bromination reaction were determined as a function of the pH, obtaining the sequence amoxicillin>naproxen>hydrochlorothiazide≈phenacetin≈metoprolol. A kinetic mechanism specifying the dissociation reactions and the species formed for each compound according to its pK(a) value and the pH allowed the intrinsic rate constants to be determined for each elementary reaction. There was fairly good agreement between the experimental and calculated values of the apparent rate constants, confirming the goodness of the proposed reaction mechanism. In a second stage, the bromination of the selected pharmaceuticals simultaneously dissolved in three water matrices (a groundwater, a surface water from a public reservoir, and a secondary effluent from a WWTP) was investigated. The pharmaceutical elimination trend agreed with the previously determined rate constants. The influence of the main operating conditions (pH, initial bromine dose, and characteristics of the water matrix) on the degradation of the pharmaceuticals was established. An elimination concentration profile for each pharmaceutical in the water matrices was proposed based on the use of the previously evaluated apparent rate constants, and the theoretical results agreed satisfactorily with experiment. Finally, chlorination experiments performed in the presence of bromide showed that low bromide concentrations slightly accelerate the oxidation of the selected pharmaceuticals during chlorine disinfection.

  9. A Substitute Foe "Bromine in Carbon Tetrachloride"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Joshua M.; Landolt, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    The addition of a dilute solution of bromine in carbon tetrachloride to a compound to test for carbon-carbon multiple bonds, which is one of the widely cited qualitative tests employed in organic chemistry is presented. Major advantages of this approach include the ease and rapidness of the procedure, the stability of the test solution over time,…

  10. Brominated organic species in the arctic atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, W. W.; Heidt, L. E.; Pollock, W.; Sperry, P. D.; Cicerone, R. J.; Gladney, E. S.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements are reported of four gas-phase, brominated organic species found in the Arctic atmosphere during March and April 1983. Volume mixing ratios for CH3Br, CH2BrCH2Br, CHBr3, and CH2Br2 were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis from samples taken Arctic wide, including at the geographic North Pole and during a tropopause folding event over Baffin Bay near Thule, Greenland. Methyl bromide mixing ratios were reasonably constant at 11 plus or minus 4 pptv, while the other three brominated organics showed a high degree of variability. Bromoform (2 to 46 pptv) was found to be the dominant contributor to gaseous organic bromine to the Arctic troposphere at 38 plus or minus 10 percent followed by CH2Br2 (3 to 60 pptv) at 29 plus or minus 6 percent. Both CH3Br and CH2BrCH2Br (1 to 37 pptv) reservoirs contained less than 20 percent of the organically bound bromine. Stratospheric samples, taken during a tropopause folding event, showed mixing ratios for all four species at levels high enough to support a stratospheric total volume mixing ratio of 249 pptv Br (888 ngBr/SCM).

  11. HEALTH ASPECTS OF BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS (BFRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to reduce the societal costs of fires, flammability standards have been set for consumer products and equipment. Flame retardants containing bromine have constituted the largest share of this market due both to their efficiency and cost. While there are at least 75 dif...

  12. BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS: CAUSE FOR CONCERN?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have routinely been added to consumer products for several decades in a successful effort to reduce fire-related injury and property damage. Recently, concern for this emerging class of chemicals has risen due to the occurrence of several class...

  13. BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS: WHY DO WE CARE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) save lives and property by preventing the spread of fires or delaying the time of flashover, enhancing the time people have to escape. The worldwide production of BFRs exceeded 200,000 metric tons in 2003 placing them in the high production vol...

  14. Brominated flame retardants as food contaminants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This book chapter reviews analytical methods for the three major brominated flame retardant (BFR) classes in use today, tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBP-A), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a "legacy" BFR no longer in use, polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), and a...

  15. Thermochemical Modeling of the Uranium-Cerium-Oxygen System

    SciTech Connect

    Voit, Stewart L; Besmann, Theodore M

    2010-10-01

    The objective of the Fuel Cycle R&D Program, Advanced Fuels campaign is to provide the research and development necessary to develop low loss, high quality nuclear fuels for ultra-high burnup reactor operation. Primary work in this area will be focused on the ceramic and metallic fuel systems. The goal of the current work is to enhance the understanding of ceramic nuclear fuel thermochemistry to support fuel research and development efforts. The thermochemical behavior of oxide nuclear fuel under irradiation is dependent on the oxygen to metal ratio (O:M). In fluorite-structured fuel, the actinide metal cation is bonded with {approx}2 oxygen atoms on a crystal lattice and as the metal atoms fission, fission fragments and free oxygen are created. The resulting fission fragments will contain some oxide forming elements, however these are insufficient to bind to all the liberated oxygen and therefore, there is an average increase in O:M with fuel burnup. Some of the fission products also form species that will migrate to and react with the cladding surface in a phenomenon known as Fuel Clad Chemical Interaction (FCCI). Cladding corrosion is life-limiting so it is desirable to understand influencing factors, such as oxide thermochemistry, which can be used to guide the design and fabrication of higher burn up fuel. A phased oxide fuel thermochemical model development effort is underway within the Advanced Fuels Campaign. First models of binary oxide systems are developed. For nuclear fuel system this means U-O and transuranic systems such as Pu-O, Np-O and Am-O. Next, the binary systems will be combined to form pseudobinary systems such as U-Pu-O, etc. The model development effort requires the use of data to allow optimization based on known thermochemical parameters as a function of composition and temperature. Available data is mined from the literature and supplemented by experimental work as needed. Due to the difficulty of performing fuel fabrication development

  16. Search for Possible Stratospheric Bromine Reservoir Species: Theoretical Study of the Photostability of Mono-, Tri-, and Pentacoordinated Bromine Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, TImothy J.; Mejia, Cesar N.; Beran, J. O.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Previous work has shown that pentacoordinated bromine compounds have their lowest excited electronic states shifted to the blue relative to monocoordinated bromine molecules, and that this shift may be large enough to render them photostable in the lower stratosphere. Our earlier work has also shown that certain pentacoordinated bromine compounds are thermodynamically stable relative to their mono- or tricoordinated isomers, suggesting that if a bromine stratospheric reservoir species exists, then it is most likely a pentacoordinated compound. In this study we have examined the singlet excited electronic states of several bromine compounds in order to assess their photostability excited states in mono-, tri-, and pentacoordinated bromine molecules. Due to the strong spin-orbit mixing in bromine, we have also examined the lowest triplet excited state.

  17. Search for Possible Stratospheric Bromine Reservoir Species: Theoretical Study of the Photostability of Mono-, Tri-, and Pentacoordinated Bromine Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, TImothy J.; Mejia, Cesar N.; Beran, J. O.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Previous work has shown that pentacoordinated bromine compounds have their lowest excited electronic states shifted to the blue relative to monocoordinated bromine molecules, and that this shift may be large enough to render them photostable in the lower stratosphere. Our earlier work has also shown that certain pentacoordinated bromine compounds are thermodynamically stable relative to their mono- or tricoordinated isomers, suggesting that if a bromine stratospheric reservoir species exists, then it is most likely a pentacoordinated compound. In this study we have examined the singlet excited electronic states of several bromine compounds in order to assess their photostability excited states in mono-, tri-, and pentacoordinated bromine molecules. Due to the strong spin-orbit mixing in bromine, we have also examined the lowest triplet excited state.

  18. Study of the liquid vapor equilibrium in the bromine-hydrobromic acid-water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benizri, R.; Lessart, P.; Courvoisier, P.

    1984-01-01

    A glass ebullioscope was built and at atmospheric pressure, liquid-vapor equilibria relative to the Br2-HBr-H2O system, in the concentration range of interest for evaluation of the Mark 13 cycle was studied. Measurements were performed for the brome-azeotrope (HBr-H2O) pseudo-binary system and for the ternary system at temperatures lower than 125 C and in the bromine concentration range up to 13% wt.

  19. Thermochemical energy storage with ammonia: Aiming for the sunshot cost target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavine, Adrienne S.; Lovegrove, Keith M.; Jordan, Joshua; Anleu, Gabriela Bran; Chen, Chen; Aryafar, Hamarz; Sepulveda, Abdon

    2016-05-01

    Thermochemical energy storage has the potential to reduce the cost of concentrating solar thermal power. This paper presents recent advances in ammonia-based thermochemical energy storage (TCES), supported by an award from the U.S. Dept. of Energy SunShot program. Advances have been made in three areas: identification of promising approaches for underground containment of the gaseous products of the dissociation reaction, demonstration that ammonia synthesis can be used to generate steam for a supercritical-steam Rankine cycle, and a preliminary design for integration of the endothermic reactors within a tower receiver. Based on these advances, ammonia-based TCES shows promise to meet the 15/kWht SunShot cost target.

  20. Ammonia synthesis for producing supercritical steam in the context of solar thermochemical energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Aryafar, Hamarz; Warrier, Gopinath; Lovegrove, Keith M.; Lavine, Adrienne S.

    2016-05-01

    In ammonia-based solar thermochemical energy storage systems, the stored energy is released when the hydrogen (H2) and nitrogen (N2) react exothermically to synthesize ammonia (NH3), providing thermal energy to a power block for electricity generation. However, ammonia synthesis has not yet been shown to reach temperatures consistent with the highest performance modern power blocks. Two similar ammonia synthesis reactors with different lengths have been used to study the ammonia synthesis reaction at high temperature and pressure and to begin the process of model improvement and validation. With the longer reactor, supercritical steam with flow rate up to 0.09 g/s has been heated from less than 350°C to ˜650°C. This result shows the technical feasibility of using ammonia-based thermochemical energy storage in a CSP plant with a supercritical steam Rankine cycle power block.

  1. Thermochemical Process Development Unit: Researching Fuels from Biomass, Bioenergy Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-01-01

    The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique facility dedicated to researching thermochemical processes to produce fuels from biomass.

  2. Design and construction of a cascading pressure reactor prototype for solar-thermochemical hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermanoski, Ivan; Grobbel, Johannes; Singh, Abhishek; Lapp, Justin; Brendelberger, Stefan; Roeb, Martin; Sattler, Christian; Whaley, Josh; McDaniel, Anthony; Siegel, Nathan P.

    2016-05-01

    Recent work regarding the efficiency maximization for solar thermochemical fuel production in two step cycles has led to the design of a new type of reactor—the cascading pressure reactor—in which the thermal reduction step of the cycle is completed in multiple stages, at successively lower pressures. This approach enables lower thermal reduction pressures than in single-staged reactors, and decreases required pump work, leading to increased solar to fuel efficiencies. Here we report on the design and construction of a prototype cascading pressure reactor and testing of some of the key components. We especially focus on the technical challenges particular to the design, and their solutions.

  3. Membrane Processes for the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart; Christopher J. Orme; Michael G. Jones

    2007-03-01

    Removal of water from aqueous hydriodic acid (HI) by pervaporation using Nafion-117® membranes has been studied. In this work, Nafion membranes have been used to separate water from HI at concentrations from 18 to 70 % and at temperatures ranging from 22 °C to 109 °C. Initial fluxes of the more dilute acid solutions were as high as 1500 g/m2h with a separation factor (á) of 139. Furthermore, separation factors as high as 500-700 were obtained for more concentrated samples. In general, increased temperatures yielded higher fluxes with lower separation factors and higher feed concentrations gave lower fluxes with higher separation factors. Activation energies of transport (EJ) values have been calculated for lower and higher concentration HI feeds and compared to pure water pervaporation. These data suggest that the degree of protonation and mole fraction water in the feed influence transport kinetics and that boundary layers issues become more prevalent at higher HI concentrations. Additionally, initial data using a sweep gas in place of the vacuum permeate trapping system was shown to provide similar flux magnitudes as the vacuum system providing versatility for potential plant applications.

  4. CuC1 thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Qinbai [Chicago, IL; Liu, Renxuan [Chicago, IL

    2012-01-03

    An electrochemical cell for producing copper having a dense graphite anode electrode and a dense graphite cathode electrode disposed in a CuCl solution. An anion exchange membrane made of poly(ethylene vinyl alcohol) and polyethylenimine cross-linked with a cross-linking agent selected from the group consisting of acetone, formaldehyde, glyoxal, glutaraldehyde, and mixtures thereof is disposed between the two electrodes.

  5. Kinetic bromine isotope effect: example from the microbial debromination of brominated phenols.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Anat; Ronen, Zeev; Levin, Elena; Halicz, Ludwik; Gelman, Faina

    2013-03-01

    The increasing use of kinetic isotope effects for environmental studies has motivated the development of new compound-specific isotope analysis techniques for emerging pollutants. Recently, high-precision bromine isotope analysis in individual brominated organic compounds was proposed, by the coupling of gas chromatography to a multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer using strontium as an external spike for instrumental bias correction. The present study, for the first time, demonstrates an application of this technique for determining bromine kinetic isotope effects during biological reaction, focusing on the reductive debromination of brominated phenols under anaerobic conditions. Results show bromine isotope enrichment factors (ε) of -0.76 ± 0.08, -0.46 ± 0.19, and -0.20 ± 0.06 ‰ for the debromination of 4-bromophenol, 2,4-dibromophenol, and 2,4,6-tribromophenol, respectively. These values are rather low, yet still high enough to be obtained with satisfying certainty. This further implies that the analytical method may be also appropriate for future environmental applications.

  6. THERMOCHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATED SOLAR POWER

    SciTech Connect

    PROJECT STAFF

    2011-10-31

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is an integral part of a concentrated solar power (CSP) system. It enables plant operators to generate electricity beyond on sun hours and supply power to the grid to meet peak demand. Current CSP sensible heat storage systems employ molten salts as both the heat transfer fluid and the heat storage media. These systems have an upper operating temperature limit of around 400 C. Future TES systems are expected to operate at temperatures between 600 C to 1000 C for higher thermal efficiencies which should result in lower electricity cost. To meet future operating temperature and electricity cost requirements, a TES concept utilizing thermochemical cycles (TCs) based on multivalent solid oxides was proposed. The system employs a pair of reduction and oxidation (REDOX) reactions to store and release heat. In the storage step, hot air from the solar receiver is used to reduce the oxidation state of an oxide cation, e.g. Fe3+ to Fe2+. Heat energy is thus stored as chemical bonds and the oxide is charged. To discharge the stored energy, the reduced oxide is re-oxidized in air and heat is released. Air is used as both the heat transfer fluid and reactant and no storage of fluid is needed. This project investigated the engineering and economic feasibility of this proposed TES concept. The DOE storage cost and LCOE targets are $15/kWh and $0.09/kWh respectively. Sixteen pure oxide cycles were identified through thermodynamic calculations and literature information. Data showed the kinetics of re-oxidation of the various oxides to be a key barrier to implementing the proposed concept. A down selection was carried out based on operating temperature, materials costs and preliminary laboratory measurements. Cobalt oxide, manganese oxide and barium oxide were selected for developmental studies to improve their REDOX reaction kinetics. A novel approach utilizing mixed oxides to improve the REDOX kinetics of the selected oxides was proposed. It partially

  7. Thermochemical energy storage for a lunar base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Mckissock, Barbara I.; Difilippo, Frank

    1992-01-01

    A thermochemical solar energy storage concept involving the reversible reaction CaO + H2O yields Ca(OH)2 is proposed as a power system element for a lunar base. The operation and components of such a system are described. The CaO/H2O system is capable of generating electric power during both the day and night. Mass of the required amount of CaO is neglected since it is obtained from lunar soil. Potential technical problems, such as reactor design and lunar soil processing, are reviewed.

  8. Sixteenth thermochemical conversion contractors' meeting: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-08-01

    The research activities sponsored by the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program are directed toward exploiting the unique natural properties of biomass. Currently, this research can be divided into three areas: innovative direct combustion technology; gasification technology; and liquid fuels technology. These proceedings describe on-going projects in each of these categories. In an effort to provide a broader perspective of biomass research sponsored by DOE, brief overview descriptions of the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program and microalgae research sponsored by the Aquatic Species Program are given at the beginning of these proceedings. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each project description for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  9. Brominated flame retardants: cause for concern?

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, Linda S; Staskal, Daniele F

    2004-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have routinely been added to consumer products for several decades in a successful effort to reduce fire-related injury and property damage. Recently, concern for this emerging class of chemicals has risen because of the occurrence of several classes of BFRs in the environment and in human biota. The widespread production and use of BFRs; strong evidence of increasing contamination of the environment, wildlife, and people; and limited knowledge of potential effects heighten the importance of identifying emerging issues associated with the use of BFRs. In this article, we briefly review scientific issues associated with the use of tetrabromobisphenol A, hexabromocyclododecane, and three commercial mixtures of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and discuss data gaps. Overall, the toxicology database is very limited; the current literature is incomplete and often conflicting. Available data, however, raise concern over the use of certain classes of brominated flame retardants. PMID:14698924

  10. Biodegradation of brominated and organophosphorus flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Waaijers, Susanne L; Parsons, John R

    2016-04-01

    Brominated flame retardants account for about 21% of the total production of flame retardants and many of these have been identified as persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic. Nevertheless, debromination of these chemicals under anaerobic conditions is well established, although this can increase their toxicity. Consequently, the production and use of these chemicals has been restricted and alternative products have been developed. Many of these are brominated compounds and share some of the disadvantages of the chemicals they are meant to replace. Therefore, other, nonbrominated, flame retardants such as organophosphorus compounds are also being used in increasing quantities, despite the fact that knowledge of their biodegradation and environmental fate is often lacking. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Membrane-less hydrogen bromine flow battery.

    PubMed

    Braff, William A; Bazant, Martin Z; Buie, Cullen R

    2013-01-01

    In order for the widely discussed benefits of flow batteries for electrochemical energy storage to be applied at large scale, the cost of the electrochemical stack must come down substantially. One promising avenue for reducing stack cost is to increase the system power density while maintaining efficiency, enabling smaller stacks. Here we report on a membrane-less hydrogen bromine laminar flow battery as a potential high-power density solution. The membrane-less design enables power densities of 0.795 W cm(-2) at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, with a round-trip voltage efficiency of 92% at 25% of peak power. Theoretical solutions are also presented to guide the design of future laminar flow batteries. The high-power density achieved by the hydrogen bromine laminar flow battery, along with the potential for rechargeable operation, will translate into smaller, inexpensive systems that could revolutionize the fields of large-scale energy storage and portable power systems.

  12. Marine bacterial degradation of brominated methanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, K.D.; Lidstrom, M.E.; Oremland, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Brominated methanes are ozone-depleting compounds whose natural sources include marine algae such as kelp. Brominated methane degradation by bacteria was investigated to address whether bacterial processes might effect net emission of these compounds to the atmosphere. Bacteria in seawater collected from California kelp beds degraded CH2Br2 but not CHBr3. Specific inhibitors showed that methanotrophs and nitrifiers did not significantly contribute to CH2Br2 removal. A seawater enrichment culture oxidized 14CH2Br2 to 14CO2 as well as 14CH3Br to 14CO2. The rates of CH2Br2 degradation in laboratory experiments suggest that bacterial degradation of CH2Br2 in a kelp bed accounts for <1% of the CH2Br2 produced by the kelp. However, the half-life of CH2Br2 due to bacterial removal appears faster than hydrolysis and within an order of magnitude of volatilization to the atmosphere.Brominated methanes are ozone-depleting compounds whose natural sources include marine algae such as kelp. Brominated methane degradation by bacteria was investigated to address whether bacterial processes might effect net emission of these compounds to the atmosphere. Bacteria in seawater collected from California kelp beds degraded CH2Br2 but not CHBr3. Specific inhibitors showed that methanotrophs and nitrifiers did not significantly contribute to CH2Br2 removal. A seawater enrichment culture oxidized 14CH2Br2 to 14CO2 as well as 14CH3Br to 14CO2. The rates of CH2Br2 degradation in laboratory experiments suggest that bacterial degradation of CH2Br2 in a kelp bed accounts for <1% of the CH2Br2 produced by the kelp. However, the half-life of CH2Br2 due to bacterial removal appears faster than hydrolysis and within an order of magnitude of volatilization to the atmosphere.

  13. Catalytic bromine recovery from HBr waste

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, P.F.; Beatty, R.D.; Mahajan, S.

    1993-12-31

    Waste HBr is formed during the bromination of many organic molecules, such as flame retardants, pharmaceuticals, and agricultural chemicals. For over 50 years attempts to recover the bromine from waste HBr by catalytic oxidation have been unsuccessful due to low catalyst activity and stability. The discovery of a new high-activity catalysts with excellent long-term stability and life capable of high HBr conversion below 300{degrees}C has made catalytic oxidation of waste HBr commercially feasible. The oxidation of anhydrous HBr using oxygen is highly exothermic, giving an adiabatic temperature rise of 2000{degrees}C. Use of 48 wt% HBr in the oxidation reduces the adiabatic temperature rise to only 300{degrees}C. A multitubular heat exchanger type of reactor can then be used to manage the heat. A 5,000 kg/yr pilot plant was built to verify the performance of the catalyst, the suitability of the reactor materials of construction, and the multibular reactor concept. The pilot unit has a single full-scale reactor tube 4 m long and 2.54 cm in diameter with a hot oil jacket for heat management. Excellent catalyst stability was observed during a 600 h catalyst-life test. HBr conversion of 99% was maintained throughout the run, and over 360 kg of bromine was produced. The temperature at a localized hot spot near the reactor inlet was only 15-20{degrees}C above the reactor inlet temperature, indicating efficient heat management.

  14. Course of bromination of thiazole and 2-methylthiazole

    SciTech Connect

    Gol'dfarb, Ya. L.; Belen'kii, L.I.; Gromova, G.P.

    1986-12-01

    Bromination of thiazole by bromine in the presence of aluminum chloride in neutral solvent or without solvent takes place at the 2-position. Such an orientation contradicts the traditional addition-cleavage mechanism, and agrees with the ylid mechanism of electrophilic substitution. 2-Methylthiazole brominates at the 5-position, and the reaction is impeded in the presence of aluminum chloride; this is due to heterocycle deactivation by complexation with the Lewis acid at the nitrogen atom.

  15. Silver-Catalyzed Decarboxylative Bromination of Aliphatic Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xinqiang; Song, Tao; Wang, Zhentao; Chen, He; Cui, Lei; Li, Chaozhong

    2017-03-13

    The silver-catalyzed Hunsdiecker bromination of aliphatic carboxylic acids is described. With Ag(Phen)2OTf as the catalyst and dibromoisocyanuric acid as the brominating agent, various aliphatic carboxylic acids underwent decarboxylative bromination to provide the corresponding alkyl bromides under mild conditions. This method not only is efficient and general but also enjoys wide functional group compatibility. An oxidative radical mechanism involving Ag(II) intermediates is proposed.

  16. CHEETAH: A next generation thermochemical code

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L.; Souers, P.

    1994-11-01

    CHEETAH is an effort to bring the TIGER thermochemical code into the 1990s. A wide variety of improvements have been made in Version 1.0. We have improved the robustness and ease of use of TIGER. All of TIGER`s solvers have been replaced by new algorithms. We find that CHEETAH solves a wider variety of problems with no user intervention (e.g. no guesses for the C-J state) than TIGER did. CHEETAH has been made simpler to use than TIGER; typical use of the code occurs with the new standard run command. CHEETAH will make the use of thermochemical codes more attractive to practical explosive formulators. We have also made an extensive effort to improve over the results of TIGER. CHEETAH`s version of the BKW equation of state (BKWC) is able to accurately reproduce energies from cylinder tests; something that other BKW parameter sets have been unable to do. Calculations performed with BKWC execute very quickly; typical run times are under 10 seconds on a workstation. In the future we plan to improve the underlying science in CHEETAH. More accurate equations of state will be used in the gas and the condensed phase. A kinetics capability will be added to the code that will predict reaction zone thickness. Further ease of use features will eventually be added; an automatic formulator that adjusts concentrations to match desired properties is planned.

  17. TEA: A Code Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature-pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows & Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows & Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  18. Hydrogen-bromine fuel cell advance component development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charleston, Joann; Reed, James

    1988-01-01

    Advanced cell component development is performed by NASA Lewis to achieve improved performance and longer life for the hydrogen-bromine fuel cells system. The state-of-the-art hydrogen-bromine system utilizes the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) technology, similar to the SPE technology developed for the hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell system. These studies are directed at exploring the potential for this system by assessing and evaluating various types of materials for cell parts and electrode materials for Bromine-hydrogen bromine environment and fabricating experimental membrane/electrode-catalysts by chemical deposition.

  19. Recycling of plastic waste: Screening for brominated flame retardants (BFRs).

    PubMed

    Pivnenko, K; Granby, K; Eriksson, E; Astrup, T F

    2017-08-30

    Flame retardants are chemicals vital for reducing risks of fire and preventing human casualties and property losses. Due to the abundance, low cost and high performance of bromine, brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have had a significant share of the market for years. Physical stability on the other hand, has resulted in dispersion and accumulation of selected BFRs in the environment and receiving biota. A wide range of plastic products may contain BFRs. This affects the quality of waste plastics as secondary resource: material recycling may potentially reintroduce the BFRs into new plastic product cycles and lead to increased exposure levels, e.g. through use of plastic packaging materials. To provide quantitative and qualitative data on presence of BFRs in plastics, we analysed bromophenols (tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), dibromophenols (2,4- and 2,6-DBP) and 2,4,6-tribromophenol (2,4,6-TBP)), hexabromocyclododecane stereoisomers (α-, β-, and γ-HBCD), as well as selected polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in samples of household waste plastics, virgin and recycled plastics. A considerable number of samples contained BFRs, with highest concentrations associated with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS, up to 26,000,000ngTBBPA/g) and polystyrene (PS, up to 330,000ng∑HBCD/g). Abundancy in low concentrations of some BFRs in plastic samples suggested either unintended addition in plastic products or degradation of higher molecular weight BFRs. The presence of currently restricted flame retardants (PBDEs and HBCD) identified in the plastic samples illustrates that circular material flows may be contaminated for extended periods. The screening clearly showed a need for improved documentation and monitoring of the presence of BFRs in plastic waste routed to recycling. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. NMR investigation of non-brominated and brominated epoxy ester prepolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žigon, M.; Osredkar, U.; Šebenik, A.

    1992-03-01

    1H, 13C and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy has been used to investigate the structure of epoxy ester prepolymers, based on non-brominated DGEBA-type or brominated DGETBBA-type epoxy resins, and on an oligomeric carboxylic acid. In the presence of a quaternary phosphonium salt, besides diglycidylether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) or diglycidylether of tetrabromobisphenol A (DGETBBA) and their higher oligomers, monoesters with characteristic R-CH 2-CH(OH)-CH 2-OCOR' groups were detected in prevailing quantities. In dependence of the epoxy-carboxy ratio, isomeric monoesters with hydroxymethyl groups, diesters and diols might also be present.

  1. Horizontal and vertical structure of reactive bromine events probed by bromine monoxide MAX-DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, William R.; Peterson, Peter K.; Frieß, Udo; Sihler, Holger; Lampel, Johannes; Platt, Ulrich; Moore, Chris; Pratt, Kerri; Shepson, Paul; Halfacre, John; Nghiem, Son V.

    2017-08-01

    Heterogeneous photochemistry converts bromide (Br-) to reactive bromine species (Br atoms and bromine monoxide, BrO) that dominate Arctic springtime chemistry. This phenomenon has many impacts such as boundary-layer ozone depletion, mercury oxidation and deposition, and modification of the fate of hydrocarbon species. To study environmental controls on reactive bromine events, the BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment (BROMEX) was carried out from early March to mid-April 2012 near Barrow (Utqiaġvik), Alaska. We measured horizontal and vertical gradients in BrO with multiple-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) instrumentation at three sites, two mobile and one fixed. During the campaign, a large crack in the sea ice (an open lead) formed pushing one instrument package ˜ 250 km downwind from Barrow (Utqiaġvik). Convection associated with the open lead converted the BrO vertical structure from a surface-based event to a lofted event downwind of the lead influence. The column abundance of BrO downwind of the re-freezing lead was comparable to upwind amounts, indicating direct reactions on frost flowers or open seawater was not a major reactive bromine source. When these three sites were separated by ˜ 30 km length scales of unbroken sea ice, the BrO amount and vertical distributions were highly correlated for most of the time, indicating the horizontal length scales of BrO events were typically larger than ˜ 30 km in the absence of sea ice features. Although BrO amount and vertical distribution were similar between sites most of the time, rapid changes in BrO with edges significantly smaller than this ˜ 30 km length scale episodically transported between the sites, indicating BrO events were large but with sharp edge contrasts. BrO was often found in shallow layers that recycled reactive bromine via heterogeneous reactions on snowpack. Episodically, these surface-based events propagated aloft when aerosol extinction was higher (> 0.1 km

  2. Current Research on Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R. M.; Magrini-Bair, K. A.; Nimlos, M. R.; Pepiot, P.; Donohoe, B. S.; Hensley, J. E.; Phillips, S. D.

    2012-04-05

    The thermochemical research platform at the National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is primarily focused on conversion of biomass to transportation fuels using non-biological techniques. Research is conducted in three general areas relating to fuels synthesis via thermochemical conversion by gasification: (1) Biomass gasification fundamentals, chemistry and mechanisms of tar formation; (2) Catalytic tar reforming and syngas cleaning; and (3) Syngas conversion to mixed alcohols. In addition, the platform supports activities in both technoeconomic analysis (TEA) and life cycle assessment (LCA) of thermochemical conversion processes. Results from the TEA and LCA are used to inform and guide laboratory research for alternative biomass-to-fuels strategies. Detailed process models are developed using the best available material and energy balance information and unit operations models created at NREL and elsewhere. These models are used to identify cost drivers which then form the basis for research programs aimed at reducing costs and improving process efficiency while maintaining sustainability and an overall net reduction in greenhouse gases.

  3. Biomass thermochemical gasification: Experimental studies and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay

    The overall goals of this research were to study the biomass thermochemical gasification using experimental and modeling techniques, and to evaluate the cost of industrial gas production and combined heat and power generation. This dissertation includes an extensive review of progresses in biomass thermochemical gasification. Product gases from biomass gasification can be converted to biopower, biofuels and chemicals. However, for its viable commercial applications, the study summarizes the technical challenges in the gasification and downstream processing of product gas. Corn stover and dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), a non-fermentable byproduct of ethanol production, were used as the biomass feedstocks. One of the objectives was to determine selected physical and chemical properties of corn stover related to thermochemical conversion. The parameters of the reaction kinetics for weight loss were obtained. The next objective was to investigate the effects of temperature, steam to biomass ratio and equivalence ratio on gas composition and efficiencies. DDGS gasification was performed on a lab-scale fluidized-bed gasifier with steam and air as fluidizing and oxidizing agents. Increasing the temperature resulted in increases in hydrogen and methane contents and efficiencies. A model was developed to simulate the performance of a lab-scale gasifier using Aspen Plus(TM) software. Mass balance, energy balance and minimization of Gibbs free energy were applied for the gasification to determine the product gas composition. The final objective was to optimize the process by maximizing the net energy efficiency, and to estimate the cost of industrial gas, and combined heat and power (CHP) at a biomass feedrate of 2000 kg/h. The selling price of gas was estimated to be 11.49/GJ for corn stover, and 13.08/GJ for DDGS. For CHP generation, the electrical and net efficiencies were 37 and 86%, respectively for corn stover, and 34 and 78%, respectively for DDGS. For

  4. A thermochemical study of ceria: exploiting an old material for new modes of energy conversion and CO2 mitigation.

    PubMed

    Chueh, William C; Haile, Sossina M

    2010-07-28

    We present a comprehensive thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of the suitability of cerium oxide (ceria) for thermochemical fuel production. Both portions of the two-step cycle, (i) oxygen release from the oxide at 1773 and 1873 K under inert atmosphere, and (ii) hydrogen release upon hydrolysis at 1073 K, are examined theoretically as well as experimentally. We observe gravimetric fuel productivity that is in quantitative agreement with equilibrium, thermogravimetric studies of ceria. Despite the non-stoichiometric nature of the redox cycle, in which only a portion of the cerium atoms change their oxidation state, the fuel productivity of 8.5-11.8 ml of H(2) per gram of ceria is competitive with that of other solid-state thermochemical cycles currently under investigation. The fuel production rate, which is also highly attractive, at a rate of 4.6-6.2 ml of H(2) per minute per gram of ceria, is found to be limited by a surface-reaction step rather than by ambipolar bulk diffusion of oxygen through the solid ceria. An evaluation of the thermodynamic efficiency of the ceria-based thermochemical cycle suggests that, even in the absence of heat recovery, solar-to-fuel conversion efficiencies of 16 to 19 per cent can be achieved, assuming a suitable method for obtaining an inert atmosphere for the oxygen release step.

  5. Design of efficient Mn-based redox materials for thermochemical heat storage at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, Alfonso J.; Serrano, David P.; Pizarro, P.; Coronado, Juan M.

    2016-05-01

    Mn-based oxides are promising materials for thermochemical heat storage based on redox cycles, since they are abundant materials whose reduction and oxidation reactions take place in the temperature range at which future CSP plants will work. However, sintering processes related to high temperature cycling can lead to a complete material deactivation that eventually will suppose the loss of cyclability. In this work we present two approaches that have been proposed as to overcome such deactivation. In this respect morphological and chemical modifications were studied. Results showed that even if the first cycle oxidation is enhanced by the presence of macroporosity, sintering also affects to that structures causing a decrease on the oxidation rate. Conversely, chemical modifications, namely addition of cations of Cr and Fe can stabilize the oxidation rate over long term cycling. Specially, by incorporating Fe to the Mn oxide structure the oxidation reaction is remarkably stabilized and improved.

  6. Stratospheric Inorganic Bromine Loading Inferred from CONTRAST BrO and Organic Bromine Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salawitch, R. J.; Wales, P.; Nicely, J. M.; Anderson, D. C.; Canty, T. P.; Atlas, E. L.; Schauffler, S.; Donets, V.; Lueb, R.; Navarro, M. A.; Apel, E. C.; Blake, N. J.; Hills, A. J.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Riemer, D. D.; Chen, D.; Huey, L. G.; Tanner, D.; Volkamer, R. M.; Koenig, T. K.; Baidar, S.; Dix, B. K.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Wolfe, G.; Hanisco, T. F.; Hall, S. R.; Ullmann, K.; Fernandez, R.; Saiz-Lopez, A.; Kinnison, D. E.; Lamarque, J. F.; Honomichl, S.; Pan, L.

    2016-12-01

    The CONvective TRansport of Active Species in the Tropics (CONTRAST) and Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) aircraft campaigns sampled the tropical Western Pacific in the winter of 2014. In this region, strong convection provides an efficient pathway to transport very short lived (VSL) biogenic bromocarbons and their degradation products from the marine boundary layer to the stratosphere, where they contribute to ozone depletion. A stratospheric tracer-tracer relation will be developed based on CONTRAST and ATTREX whole air sampler observations of CFC-11, a commonly measured stratospheric tracer, and bromocarbons. This relation will be used to calculate the release of inorganic bromine both from VSL source gas injection and from long-lived bromocarbons as a function of CFC-11. Additionally, a photochemical box model will be used to infer inorganic bromine loading using CONTRAST BrO observations taken in the lower stratosphere using CIMS and DOAS instruments. The inferred inorganic bromine loading will be combined with the tracer-tracer relation to provide an estimate of VSL product gas injection. This work will provide an observations-based method for calculating stratospheric inorganic bromine loading from CFC-11 to be used in future modelling studies.

  7. Integrated solar reforming for thermochemical energy transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenman, T.

    1987-12-01

    This report presents a design study of two reforming processes as applied to the concept of solar thermochemical energy transport. Conceptual designs were carried out for steam-methane and CO2-methane reforming plants. A solar central receiver reformer was designed as an integrated reactor with the chemical reaction tubes placed inside the receiver cavity. The two plant designs were compared for their energy efficiency and capital cost. The CO2 reforming plant design results in higher energy efficiency but requires a catalyst which is still in an experimental stage of development. A third design was performed as a modification of the steam reforming plant utilizing a Direct Contact system, in which the process steam is generated by utilizing the heat of condensation. This system resulted in the highest energy efficiency. A comparison of the capital cost of these three plant designs shows them to be equivalent within the estimation accuracy of 25 percent.

  8. Method for thermochemical decomposition of water

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, Bernard M.; Schreiner, Felix

    1977-01-11

    Water is thermochemically decomposed to produce hydrogen by the following sequence of reactions: KI, NH.sub.3, CO.sub. 2 and water in an organic solvent such as ethyl or propyl alcohol are reacted to produce KHCO 3 and NH.sub.4 I. The KHCO.sub.3 is thermally decomposed to K.sub.2 CO.sub.3, H.sub.2 O and CO.sub.2, while the NH.sub.4 I is reacted with Hg to produce HgI.sub.2, NH.sub.3 and H.sub.2. The K.sub.2 CO.sub.3 obtained by calcining KHCO.sub.3 is then reacted with HgI.sub.2 to produce Hg, KI, CO and O.sub.2. All products of the reaction are recycled except hydrogen and oxygen.

  9. Integrated solar thermochemical reaction system for steam methane reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Feng; Diver, Rich; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Cameron, Richard J.; Humble, Paul H.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Dagle, Robert A.; Wegeng, Robert S.

    2015-06-05

    Solar-aided upgrade of the energy content of fossil fuels, such as natural gas, can provide a near-term transition path towards a future solar-fuel economy and reduce carbon dioxide emission from fossil fuel consumption. Both steam and dry reforming a methane-containing fuel stream have been studied with concentrated solar power as the energy input to drive the highly endothermic reactions but the concept has not been demonstrated at a commercial scale. Under a current project with the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL is developing an integrated solar thermochemical reaction system that combines solar concentrators with micro- and meso-channel reactors and heat exchangers to accomplish more than 20% solar augment of methane higher heating value. The objective of our three-year project is to develop and prepare for commercialization such solar reforming system with a high enough efficiency to serve as the frontend of a conventional natural gas (or biogas) combined cycle power plant, producing power with a levelized cost of electricity less than 6¢/kWh, without subsidies, by the year 2020. In this paper, we present results from the first year of our project that demonstrated a solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency as high as 69% with a prototype reaction system.

  10. Integrated solar thermochemical reaction system for steam methane reforming

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Feng; Diver, Rich; Caldwell, Dustin D.; ...

    2015-06-05

    Solar-aided upgrade of the energy content of fossil fuels, such as natural gas, can provide a near-term transition path towards a future solar-fuel economy and reduce carbon dioxide emission from fossil fuel consumption. Both steam and dry reforming a methane-containing fuel stream have been studied with concentrated solar power as the energy input to drive the highly endothermic reactions but the concept has not been demonstrated at a commercial scale. Under a current project with the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL is developing an integrated solar thermochemical reaction system that combines solar concentrators with micro- and meso-channel reactors and heatmore » exchangers to accomplish more than 20% solar augment of methane higher heating value. The objective of our three-year project is to develop and prepare for commercialization such solar reforming system with a high enough efficiency to serve as the frontend of a conventional natural gas (or biogas) combined cycle power plant, producing power with a levelized cost of electricity less than 6¢/kWh, without subsidies, by the year 2020. In this paper, we present results from the first year of our project that demonstrated a solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency as high as 69% with a prototype reaction system.« less

  11. The Addition of Bromine to 1,2-Diphenylethene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amburgey-Peters, Judith C.; Haynes, Leroy W.

    2005-01-01

    The bromination of 1,2-diphenylethene, using a variety of solvents and brominating agents, can be used in both introductory and advanced organic chemistry courses. The reactions can be used to illustrate the effects of changing solvents and reagents, as well as to reveal interesting aspects of organic reaction mechanisms.

  12. Potential hazards of brominated carbon sorbents for mercury emission control.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Teresa M; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-02-17

    Mercury is a toxic air pollutant, emitted from the combustion of coal. Activated Carbon (AC) or other carbon sorbent (CS) injection into coal combustion flue gases can remove elemental mercury through an adsorption process. Recently, a brominated CS with biomass ash as the carbon source (Br-Ash) was developed as an alternative for costly AC-based sorbent for mercury capture. After mercury capture, these sorbents are disposed in landfill, and the stability of bromine and captured mercury is of paramount importance. The objective of this study is to determine the fate of mercury and bromine from Br-Ash and brominated AC after their service. Mercury and bromine leaching tests were conducted using the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). The mercury was found to be stable on both the Br-Ash and commercial brominated AC sorbents, while the bromine leached into the aqueous phase considerably. Mercury pulse injection tests on the sorbent material after leaching indicate that both sorbents retain significant mercury capture capability even after the majority of bromine was removed. Testing of the Br-Ash sorbent over a wider range of pH and liquid:solid ratios resulted in leaching of <5% of mercury adsorbed on the Br-Ash. XPS analysis indicated more organically bound Br and less metal-Br bonds after leaching.

  13. 40 CFR 721.10534 - Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10534 Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... aliphatic alcohol (PMN P-12-260) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10534 - Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10534 Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... aliphatic alcohol (PMN P-12-260) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  15. The Addition of Bromine to 1,2-Diphenylethene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amburgey-Peters, Judith C.; Haynes, Leroy W.

    2005-01-01

    The bromination of 1,2-diphenylethene, using a variety of solvents and brominating agents, can be used in both introductory and advanced organic chemistry courses. The reactions can be used to illustrate the effects of changing solvents and reagents, as well as to reveal interesting aspects of organic reaction mechanisms.

  16. CHEETAH: A fast thermochemical code for detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L.E.

    1993-11-01

    For more than 20 years, TIGER has been the benchmark thermochemical code in the energetic materials community. TIGER has been widely used because it gives good detonation parameters in a very short period of time. Despite its success, TIGER is beginning to show its age. The program`s chemical equilibrium solver frequently crashes, especially when dealing with many chemical species. It often fails to find the C-J point. Finally, there are many inconveniences for the user stemming from the programs roots in pre-modern FORTRAN. These inconveniences often lead to mistakes in preparing input files and thus erroneous results. We are producing a modern version of TIGER, which combines the best features of the old program with new capabilities, better computational algorithms, and improved packaging. The new code, which will evolve out of TIGER in the next few years, will be called ``CHEETAH.`` Many of the capabilities that will be put into CHEETAH are inspired by the thermochemical code CHEQ. The new capabilities of CHEETAH are: calculate trace levels of chemical compounds for environmental analysis; kinetics capability: CHEETAH will predict chemical compositions as a function of time given individual chemical reaction rates. Initial application: carbon condensation; CHEETAH will incorporate partial reactions; CHEETAH will be based on computer-optimized JCZ3 and BKW parameters. These parameters will be fit to over 20 years of data collected at LLNL. We will run CHEETAH thousands of times to determine the best possible parameter sets; CHEETAH will fit C-J data to JWL`s,and also predict full-wall and half-wall cylinder velocities.

  17. Thermochemical Modeling of Nonequilibrium Oxygen Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neitzel, Kevin Joseph

    The development of hypersonic vehicles leans heavily on computational simulation due to the high enthalpy flow conditions that are expensive and technically challenging to replicate experimentally. The accuracy of the nonequilibrium modeling in the computer simulations dictates the design margin that is required for the thermal protection system and flight dynamics. Previous hypersonic vehicles, such as Apollo and the Space Shuttle, were primarily concerned with re-entry TPS design. The strong flow conditions of re-entry, involving Mach numbers of 25, quickly dissociate the oxygen molecules in air. Sustained flight, hypersonic vehicles will be designed to operate in Mach number ranges of 5 to 10. The oxygen molecules will not quickly dissociate and will play an important role in the flow field behavior. The development of nonequilibrium models of oxygen is crucial for limiting modeling uncertainty. Thermochemical nonequilibrium modeling is investigated for oxygen flows. Specifically, the vibrational relaxation and dissociation behavior that dominate the nonequilibrium physics in this flight regime are studied in detail. The widely used two-temperature (2T) approach is compared to the higher fidelity and more computationally expensive state-to-state (STS) approach. This dissertation utilizes a wide range of rate sources, including newly available STS rates, to conduct a comprehensive study of modeling approaches for hypersonic nonequilibrium thermochemical modeling. Additionally, the physical accuracy of the computational methods are assessed by comparing the numerical results with available experimental data. The numerical results and experimental measurements present strong nonequilibrium, and even non-Boltzmann behavior in the vibrational energy mode for the sustained hypersonic flight regime. The STS approach is able to better capture the behavior observed in the experimental data, especially for stronger nonequilibrium conditions. Additionally, a reduced order

  18. Fire-retardant coatings based on organic bromine/phenoxy or brominated epoxy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.M.; Chiu, Ing L.

    1989-06-01

    Thin phenoxy and brominated epoxy/curing agent films were prepared by solvent casting on Mylar and Kapton. Thicknesses were approximated assuming volume additivity. Important parameters were uniformity of thickness, distribution of the bromine-containing fire retardant, adhesion to carrier substrate (either Mylar or Kapton), and uniformity of the coating, i.e., absence of pinholes, blush, blistering, etc. Wetting behavior was modified using fluoro, silicone or polyurea surfactants. Several solvent systems were examined and a ternary solvent system was ultimately used. Distribution of fire-retardant bromine was analyzed using electron microprobe, x-ray fluorescence and wet chemical methods. Significant discrepancies in the /mu/m-scale analyses of the microprobe measurements have not been resolved. Some of the brominated fire retardants were insoluble in the resin systems and the phase separation was immediately obvious. Similarly, some of the crystallizable epoxies could not be cast easily into homogeneous, amorphous films. Castings were made on a standard 8'' /times/ 10'' aluminum vacuum plate polished with jeweler's rouge prior to every casting. Solvent was removed in a forced air or vacuum oven. Removal and/or curing was accelerated with temperature. The fire-retardant bromine was required to be stable in alcohol/salt solutions. Final formulation used after a significant amount of testing was phenoxy resin PKHC in a ternary solvent system composed of methylethyl ketone, cellosolve acetate and toluene. Tetrabromobisphenol A was used as the flame retardant with FC-430 as surfactant. The dying schedule was 30 minutes at 150/degree/C. 4 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Effects of milling brominated P-100 graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Dillehay, Michael E.; Hambourger, Paul D.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary procedures have been developed for the ball milling of pristine and brominated P-100 graphite fibers. Because of the lubricative properties of graphite, large ball loads (50 percent by volume) are required. Use of 2-propanol as a milling medium enhances the efficiency of the process. The fibers, when allowed to settle from the milling medium, tend to be preferentially aligned with rather few fibers standing up. Milled, brominated P-100 fibers have resistivities that are indistinguishable from their pristine counterparts, apparently because of loss of bromine. This suggests that bromine would not be the intercalate of choice in applications where milled fibers of this type are required. It was found that brominated graphite fibers are stable in a wide variety of organic solvents.

  20. DOE Thermochemical Users Facility A Proving Ground for Biomass Technology

    SciTech Connect

    2003-11-01

    The National Bioenergy Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provides a state-of-the-art Thermochemical Users Facility (TCUF) for converting renewable, biomass feedstocks into a variety of products.

  1. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review. Thermochemical Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Grabowski, Paul E.

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Thermochemical Conversion Platform Review meeting.

  2. Heterogeneous processing of bromine compounds by atmospheric aerosols: Relation to the ozone budget

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.M.; Henson, B.F.; Dubey, M.K.; Casson, J.L.; Johal, M.S.; Wilson, K.R.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The depletion of ozone, particularly above Antarctica, has been investigated extensively to formulate public policy on the use of halocarbons. While it has been shown that heterogeneous reactions of chlorine compounds on stratospheric particulates cause the ozone hole, little is known of the analogous bromine mechanisms, even though it has been recognized for two decades that catalytic destruction of ozone by bromine could be more efficient than chlorine. Furthermore, field measurements and modeling calculations suggest that these heterogeneous (gas/surface) reactions are not restricted to the Antarctic regions but occur globally. The authors have performed laboratory measurements of the uptake of bromine compounds and other halogens on simulated stratospheric aerosols to help elucidate their role in catalytic ozone destruction cycles. Their studies contribute to the data base required to make assessments of the effects of human activities on global change, including the Montreal Protocol.

  3. In situ measurements of BrO and the photochemistry of inorganic bromine in the Arctic stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Karena April

    Bromine plays a major role in catalytic removal of stratospheric ozone, particularly in the polar regions in winter. The total abundance of bromine species in the stratosphere, and its distribution among ozone-destroying forms, such as Br and BrO, and reservoir forms is, however, poorly understood. A lightweight, balloon-borne instrument employing chemical conversion/resonance fluorescence to measure BrO and ClO in situ was developed to help extend the existing knowledge of stratospheric bromine chemistry. A high-resolution profile of BrO was recorded up to 27 km in the Arctic vortex during a balloon flight from Kiruna, Sweden on February 3, 1995. Because the instrument launch took place before sunrise, while descent occurred near local noon, the resulting measurements provide information on the diurnal cycling of inorganic bromine species and the daytime BrO abundance. On ascent, high levels of BrO (10 ± 2 pptv) were observed at high solar zenith angles (SZA) in a region between 18 and 23 km where ClO abundances were also enhanced. Above 23 km, BrO mixing ratios observed on ascent were as low as 5 ± 1 pptv near SZA = 90o, increasing with altitude and solar zenith angle to 11 ± 1 at the ceiling altitude. On descent, the BrO mixing ratio exhibited more uniform values, 10 ± 2 pptv, with altitude. A photochemical model was used to evaluate inorganic bromine photochemistry under the measurement conditions. These studies indicate that, in the region above 23 km, ClO abundances are consistent with the presence of NO2, implying that the air parcel sampled had not recently experienced heterogeneous processing. Measured BrO diurnal behavior can be reproduced assuming photolysis of BrONO2 at sunrise, however, production of BrO from photolysis of HOBr cannot be ruled out. Between 18 and 23 km, elevated ClO abundances indicate a history of heterogeneous processing and decreased NO2. Morning abundances of BrO in this region are best explained by model calculations

  4. Critically Evaluated Thermochemical Properties of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, María Victoria; Temprado, Manuel; Chickos, James S.; Nagano, Yatsuhisa

    2008-12-01

    Experimental thermochemical properties of benzene, toluene, and 63 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, published within the period 1878-2008 (over 350 references), are reported. Available experimental data for the enthalpies of combustion used to calculate enthalpies of formation in the condensed state, combined with sublimation, vaporization, and fusion enthalpies, are critically evaluated. Whenever possible, recommended values for these thermochemical properties and for the enthalpies of formation in the gas state at T =298.15K are provided.

  5. Thermochemical Considerations in Self-Sustaining Synthesis of Refractory Compounds,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    shown * that relate position of the elemental reactants in the periodic table and gram molecular weight of the reacted products to a thermochemical...trends were noted that relate thermochemical potential factors to position of the reactant elements in the periodic table and to stoichio- metry of the...patent appeared in the late 1960s [Refs. 9 and 101. Some related U.S. research, was published in the early 1970s [Refs. 11, 12, 13, * and 14), and at

  6. Brominated flame retardants in US food.

    PubMed

    Schecter, Arnold; Harris, T Robert; Shah, Nirav; Musumba, Alice; Päpke, Olaf

    2008-02-01

    We and others recently began studying brominated flame retardant levels in various matrices in the US including human milk and other food. This paper reviews the food studies. In our studies, ten to thirteen polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners were measured, usually including BDE 209. All US women's milk samples were contaminated with PBDEs from 6 to 419 ng/g, lipid, orders of magnitude higher than levels reported in European studies, and are the highest reported worldwide. We compared our market basket studies of meat, fish and dairy products with other US food studies of meat and fish. US studies showed somewhat higher levels of PBDEs than reported elsewhere. Fish were most highly contaminated (median 616 pg/g), then meat (median190 pg/g) and dairy products (median 32.2 pg/g). However, unlike some European countries where fish predominates, dietary intake of PBDEs in the US is mostly from meat, then fish and then dairy products. Broiling can decrease the amount of PBDEs per serving. We also measured levels of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), another brominated flame retardant, in human milk. The levels are lower than PBDEs, 0.16-1.2 ng/g, similar to European levels, unlike PBDEs where US levels are much higher than European levels.

  7. Are brominated flame retardants endocrine disruptors?

    PubMed

    Legler, Juliette; Brouwer, Abraham

    2003-09-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are a group of compounds that have received much attention recently due to their similarity with "old" classes of organohalogenated compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), in terms of their fate, stability in the environment and accumulation in humans and wildlife. Toxic effects, including teratogenicity, carcinogenicity and neurotoxicity, have been observed for some BFR congeners, in particular the brominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs). This concise review focuses on the potency of BFRs and to disrupt endocrine systems, and attempts to answer the question whether or not BFRs are endocrine disruptors. Evidence is provided on the disruption of the thyroid hormone system by BFRs, with particular emphasis on the BDEs, as most recent data is available on this class of flame retardants. Similar to the hydroxylated PCBs, in vitro mechanistic studies as well as animal experiments have demonstrated the effects of BDEs on thyroid hormone transport and metabolism. An overview of possible effects of BFRs on the estrogen system is also provided. Research gaps are outlined, as well as ongoing and future studies in the European community aimed at contributing to comprehensive risk assessments based on the endocrine-disrupting effects of BFRs.

  8. New infrared spectroscopic database for bromine nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Georg; Birk, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Fourier transform infrared measurements of bromine nitrate have been performed in the spectral region 675-1400 cm-1 at 0.014 cm-1 spectral resolution. Absorption cross sections were derived from 38 spectra covering the temperature range from 203 to 296 K and air pressure range from 0 to 190 mbar. For line-by-line analysis, further spectra were recorded at 0.00094 cm-1 spectral resolution at 223 and 293 K. The sample was synthesized from ClONO2 and Br2. Band strengths of the bands ν3 around 803 cm-1 and ν2 around 1286 cm-1 were determined from three pure BrONO2 measurements at different temperatures and pressures. Number densities in the absorption cell were derived from pressure measurements of the purified sample taking into account small amounts of impurities determined spectroscopically. Resulting band strengths are Sν3 = 2.872(52) × 10-17 cm2 molec-1 cm-1 and Sν2 = 3.63(15) × 10-17 cm2 molec-1 cm-1. Absorption cross sections of all measurements were scaled to these band strengths. Further data reduction was achieved with an interpolation scheme based on two-dimensional polynomials in ln(pressure) and temperature. The database is well-suited for remote-sensing application and should reduce the atmospheric bromine nitrate error budget substantially.

  9. 40 CFR 415.290 - Applicability; description of the bromine production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... bromine production subcategory. 415.290 Section 415.290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Bromine Production Subcategory § 415.290 Applicability; description of the bromine production... bromine by the brine-mining process and by the Trona process....

  10. 40 CFR 415.290 - Applicability; description of the bromine production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... bromine production subcategory. 415.290 Section 415.290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Bromine Production Subcategory § 415.290 Applicability; description of the bromine production... bromine by the brine-mining process and by the Trona process....

  11. 40 CFR 415.290 - Applicability; description of the bromine production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... bromine production subcategory. 415.290 Section 415.290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Bromine Production Subcategory § 415.290 Applicability; description of the bromine production... bromine by the brine-mining process and by the Trona process....

  12. 40 CFR 415.290 - Applicability; description of the bromine production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... bromine production subcategory. 415.290 Section 415.290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Bromine Production Subcategory § 415.290 Applicability; description of the bromine production... bromine by the brine-mining process and by the Trona process....

  13. 40 CFR 415.290 - Applicability; description of the bromine production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... bromine production subcategory. 415.290 Section 415.290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Bromine Production Subcategory § 415.290 Applicability; description of the bromine production... bromine by the brine-mining process and by the Trona process....

  14. Cyclic Performance Analysis of Hydrogen/Bromine Flow Batteries for Grid-Scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, KT; Tucker, MC; Ding, M; Ridgway, P; Battaglia, VS; Srinivasan, V; Weber, AZ

    2014-06-03

    This paper explores the critical factors dominating the cycle performance of the hydrogen/bromine redox flow battery (RFB). Carbon electrode oxidation to CO2 was seen as the dominant side reaction, which can be prevented by operating the cell below 1.4 V. Crossover of bromide species from the positive to the negative electrode, especially during charge, dominates the coulombic efficiency, and can result in dissolution of the Pt catalyst if an adequate hydrogen supply is not maintained. This paper also describes the tradeoffs in voltaic, energy, and coulombic efficiencies during cycling, including the determination of the peak energy efficiency with respect to the HBr concentration and current density. Long-term cycling demonstrates negligible cell-component degradation over 600 cycles (approximate to 3 months), with capacity loss caused by the bromine from the system, which can be mitigated by proper system design. The data and methodologies provided in this paper can be used to understand better the operation of this and other RFBs.

  15. Use of Bromine and Bromo-Organic Compounds in Organic Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Indranirekha; Borah, Arun Jyoti; Phukan, Prodeep

    2016-06-22

    Bromination is one of the most important transformations in organic synthesis and can be carried out using bromine and many other bromo compounds. Use of molecular bromine in organic synthesis is well-known. However, due to the hazardous nature of bromine, enormous growth has been witnessed in the past several decades for the development of solid bromine carriers. This review outlines the use of bromine and different bromo-organic compounds in organic synthesis. The applications of bromine, a total of 107 bromo-organic compounds, 11 other brominating agents, and a few natural bromine sources were incorporated. The scope of these reagents for various organic transformations such as bromination, cohalogenation, oxidation, cyclization, ring-opening reactions, substitution, rearrangement, hydrolysis, catalysis, etc. has been described briefly to highlight important aspects of the bromo-organic compounds in organic synthesis.

  16. Production of bromoform and dibromomethane by Giant Kelp: Factors affecting release and comparison to anthropogenic bromine sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, K.D.; North, W.J.; Lidstrom, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    Macrocystis pyrifera (Giant Kelp), a dominant macroalgal species in southern California, produced 171 ng per g fresh wt (gfwt) per day of CHBr3 and 48 ng gfwt-1 d-1 of CH2Br2 during laboratory incubations of whole blades. Comparable rates were measured during in situ incubations of intact fronds. Release of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 by M. pyrifera was affected by light and algal photosynthetic activity, suggesting that environmental factors influencing kelp physiology can affect halomethane release to the atmosphere. Data from H2O2 additions suggest that brominated methane production during darkness is limited by bromide oxidant supply. A bromine budget constructed for a region of southern California indicated that bromine emitted from the use of CH3Br as a fumigant (1 x 108 g Br yr-1) dominates macroalgal sources (3 x 106 g Br yr-1). Global projections, however, suggest that combined emissions of marine algae (including microalgae) contribute substantial amounts of bromine to the global cycle, perhaps on the same order of magnitude as anthropogenic sources.

  17. Hydrogen-Bromine Flow Battery: Hydrogen Bromine Flow Batteries for Grid Scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    GRIDS Project: LBNL is designing a flow battery for grid storage that relies on a hydrogen-bromine chemistry which could be more efficient, last longer and cost less than today’s lead-acid batteries. Flow batteries are fundamentally different from traditional lead-acid batteries because the chemical reactants that provide their energy are stored in external tanks instead of inside the battery. A flow battery can provide more energy because all that is required to increase its storage capacity is to increase the size of the external tanks. The hydrogen-bromine reactants used by LBNL in its flow battery are inexpensive, long lasting, and provide power quickly. The cost of the design could be well below $100 per kilowatt hour, which would rival conventional grid-scale battery technologies.

  18. Bromine content and brominated flame retardants in food and animal feed from the UK.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, A R; Mortimer, D; Rose, M; Smith, F; Panton, S; Garcia-Lopez, M

    2016-05-01

    Current occurrence data for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) and hexa-bromocyclododecane (HBCD) measured in most commonly consumed foods (n = 156) and animal feeds (n = 51) sampled in the UK, demonstrates an ongoing ubiquity of these contaminants in human and animal diets. PBDE concentrations for the sum of 17 measured congeners ranged from 0.02 ng/g to 8.91 ng/g whole weight for food, and 0.11 ng/g to 9.63 ng/g whole weight for animal feeds. The highest concentration ranges, and mean values were detected in fish, processed foods and fish feeds. HBCD diastereomers (alpha-HBCD was the most commonly detected) generally occurred at lower concentrations (from <0.01 ng/g to 10.1 ng/g for food and <0.01 ng/g to 0.66 ng/g for animal feed) and less frequently than PBDEs, but tetrabromobisphenol A which was also measured, was rarely detected. The total bromine content of the samples was also determined in an attempt to use a mass balance approach to investigate some of these samples for the occurrence of novel and emerging BFRs. Although the approach was further refined by measuring organic bromine content, the concentrations of bromine were too high (in most cases by orders of magnitude) to allow use of the approach. A selected sub-set of samples was screened by GC-MS, for the presence of novel/emerging brominated flame retardants (PBT, TBX, PBEB, DBHCTD, HCTBPH and OBTMPI) but these were not detected at the higher limits of detection that result from full scan (GC-MS) screening. This data will contribute to the EU wide risk assessment on these contaminants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Snowmelt onset hinders bromine monoxide heterogeneous recycling in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burd, Justine A.; Peterson, Peter K.; Nghiem, Son V.; Perovich, Don K.; Simpson, William R.

    2017-08-01

    Reactive bromine radicals (bromine atoms, Br, and bromine monoxide, BrO) deplete ozone and alter tropospheric oxidation chemistry during the Arctic springtime (February-June). As spring transitions to summer (May-June) and snow begins to melt, reactive bromine events cease and BrO becomes low in summer. In this study, we explore the relationship between the end of the reactive bromine season and snowmelt timing. BrO was measured by Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer at Utqiaġvik (Barrow), AK, from 2012 to 2016 and on drifting buoys deployed in Arctic sea ice from 2011 to 2016, a total of 13 site and year combinations. The BrO seasonal end date (SED) was objectively determined and was compared to surface-air-temperature-derived melt onset date (MOD). The SED was highly correlated with the MOD (N = 13, R2 = 0.983, RMS = 1.9 days), and BrO is only observed at subfreezing temperatures. In subsets of these sites and years where ancillary data were available, we observed that snowpack depth reduced and rain precipitation occurred within a few days of the SED. These data are consistent with snowpack melting hindering BrO recycling, which is necessary to maintain enhanced BrO concentrations. With a projected warmer Arctic, a shift to earlier snowmelt seasons could alter the timing and role of halogen chemical reactions in the Arctic with impacts on ozone depletion and mercury deposition.Plain Language SummaryReactive <span class="hlt">bromine</span> events in the Arctic are common in spring and deplete ozone and cause mercury deposition. These events are affected by snow and ice, which are changing in the Arctic; therefore, we need to understand how environmental conditions affect reactive <span class="hlt">bromine</span> chemistry. We find that the reactive <span class="hlt">bromine</span> season ends when snowpack begins to melt. Through these full seasonal observations, we find that reactive <span class="hlt">bromine</span> events occur to warmer temperatures than previously reported</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6662814','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6662814"><span>The biosynthesis of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> pyrrolnitrin derivatives by Pseudomonas aureofaciens.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>van Pée, K H; Salcher, O; Fischer, P; Bokel, M; Lingens, F</p> <p>1983-12-01</p> <p>The mutant strain ACN of Pseudomonas aureofaciens ATCC 15926 produces several bromo derivatives of pyrrolnitrin. Five <span class="hlt">brominated</span> amino- and three <span class="hlt">brominated</span> nitrophenyl pyrrole compounds could be isolated, and their structures were established by 1H NMR, UV and mass spectroscopy. The isolated amino compounds showed no biological activity; the nitro derivatives inhibited the growth of Neurospora crassa ATCC 9276, though not as effective as pyrrolnitrin itself. 2-Carboxy-4-(2-amino-3-bromophenyl)pyrrole (X) is demonstrated to be an intermediate in the biosynthesis of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> pyrrolnitrin; the biosynthetic pathway to bromo derivatives of pyrrolnitrin is discussed.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=169763','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=169763"><span>Inactivation by <span class="hlt">bromine</span> of single poliovirus particles in water.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Floyd, R; Johnson, J D; Sharp, D G</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>Quantitative electron microscopy shows that Freon-extracted poliovirus, velocity banded in a sucrose gradient, contains over 95% single particles. This well-dispersed virus reacts quite rapidly with <span class="hlt">bromine</span> in turbulent flowing water, losing plaque titer at the rate of one log10 unit in 10s at pH 7, 2 C, and at a <span class="hlt">bromine</span> concentration of 2.2 muM. At 10 and 20 C the rate of disinfection (log10 plaque-forming units per second) is faster, and at both temperatures it increases in approximately linear fashion with increasing <span class="hlt">bromine</span> concentration. At 2 C such a linear relationship is not observed. Images PMID:11745</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JQSRT.196..165N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JQSRT.196..165N"><span>Hyperfine structure constants of atomic <span class="hlt">bromine</span> (Br I)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ni, Xue; Deng, Lunhua; Wang, Hailing</p> <p>2017-07-01</p> <p>The absorption spectrum of the neutral <span class="hlt">bromine</span> (Br I), lying in the region from 11,300 cm-1 to 12,600 cm-1 has been investigated using concentration modulation absorption spectroscopy with a tunable Ti:Sapphire laser. The <span class="hlt">bromine</span> atoms were excited by discharging the mixture of Helium and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> vapour in a hollow discharge glass tube. The hyperfine structure spectra of 45 lines were analyzed. Hyperfine structure constants A and B were derived for 20 even and 27 odd levels amongst which constants for 12 even and 21 odd levels were newly reported.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6634477','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6634477"><span>(Development of <span class="hlt">Bromine</span>-77 from the LAMPF facility)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>The objective of the work was to conduct the necessary studies required to evaluate the efficacy, potential benefit and role of <span class="hlt">bromine</span>-77 labeled steroids in the detection and evaluation of treatment for hormone-dependent tumors. This report presents progress on the following tasks: An initial investigation concentrating on the radiobromination at carbon-6 or carbon-7 in selected simple steroids utilizing the nuclides, <span class="hlt">bromine</span>-82 and <span class="hlt">bromine</span>-77, analytical spectroscopy of radiolabeled compounds, and investigating the biodistribution, toxicology and tumor affinity of labeled agents.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4678425','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4678425"><span>Ruthenium-Catalyzed meta-Selective C—H <span class="hlt">Bromination</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Teskey, Christopher J; Lui, Andrew Y W; Greaney, Michael F</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The first example of a transition-metal-catalyzed, meta-selective C–H <span class="hlt">bromination</span> procedure is reported. In the presence of catalytic [{Ru(p-cymene)Cl2}2], tetrabutylammonium tribromide can be used to functionalize the meta C–H bond of 2-phenylpyridine derivatives, thus affording difficult to access products which are highly predisposed to further derivatization. We demonstrate this utility with one-pot <span class="hlt">bromination</span>/arylation and <span class="hlt">bromination</span>/alkenylation procedures to deliver meta-arylated and meta-alkenylated products, respectively, in a single step. PMID:26288217</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19054543','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19054543"><span>Alkaline reforming of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> fire-retardant plastics: fate of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> and antimony.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Onwudili, Jude A; Williams, Paul T</p> <p>2009-02-01</p> <p>High-impact polystyrene (HIPS) flame retarded with decabromodiphenyl ether (DDE), has been reacted in supercritical water from 380 to 450 degrees C and 21.5 to 31.0 MPa pressure in a batch reactor. Different concentrations of sodium hydroxide additive were used in situ to neutralize the corrosive inorganic <span class="hlt">bromine</span> species released during the reactions. It appeared that supercritical water conditions lowered the decomposition temperature of both the fire-retardant DDE and HIPS. The reaction products included oils (up to 76 wt%), char (up to 18 wt%) and gas (up to 2.4 wt%) which was mainly methane. The presence of the alkaline water led to up to 97 wt% debromination of the product oil, producing virtually <span class="hlt">bromine</span>-free oil feedstock. The removal of antimony from the oil product during processing was of the order of 98 wt%. The oil consisted of many single- and multiple-ringed aromatic compounds, many of which had alkyl substituents and/or aliphatic C(n)-bridges (n=1-4). The major single-ringed compounds included toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, propylbenzene and alpha-methylstyrene. Bibenzyl (diphenylethane), stilbene, diphenylmethane, diphenylpropane, diphenylcyclopropane, diphenylpropene, diphenylbutane, diphenylbutene and diphenylbuta-1,3-diene were the major C(n)-bridged compounds. Diphenyl ether and acetophenone were the major oxygenated compounds found. The process thus has the potential to produce <span class="hlt">bromine</span>-free and antimony-free oils from fire-retardant plastics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AGUFM.V42E..06N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AGUFM.V42E..06N"><span>New <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Adventures in Modern Mineralogy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Navrotsky, A.</p> <p>2001-12-01</p> <p>Much current interest in mineralogy involves complex, hydrated, and often poorly crystalline materials found in the low temperature environment found as products of both natural processes and human activity. Examples of such materials include zeolites, clays, hydrotalcites, manganese oxides, iron-aluminum oxyhydroxides, and sulfate minerals. Such materials are active as catalysts, ion exchangers, and transport agents for contaminants. Both structural and thermodynamic characterization of such materials has been difficult in the past, but advances in spectroscopy, diffraction, and oxide melt solution calorimetry make much more definitive studies possible at present. Systematic energetic trends have been recently observed for the formation and hydration of framework-structured zeolites and manganese oxides. Similar trends are being sought for the layered materials, clays, and hydrotalcites. The role of water in the stabilization of low temperature phases reflects a close balance between energetically favorable bonding and loss of entropy during hydration. Detailed compositional, structural, and <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> analysis of the same samples is required to properly interpret calorimetric data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21764419','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21764419"><span>TG-MS investigation of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> products from the degradation of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> flame retardants in high-impact polystyrene.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Grause, Guido; Karakita, Daiki; Ishibashi, Jun; Kameda, Tomohito; Bhaskar, Thallada; Yoshioka, Toshiaki</p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>The thermal degradation of flame retardant containing high-impact polystyrene (HIPS-Br), one of the most commonly employed plastics in electric and electronic appliances, was examined by thermogravimetry coupled with mass spectroscopy (TG-MS) in order to understand the threat that is posed by the release of hazardous <span class="hlt">brominated</span> compounds. The HIPS samples contained decabromodiphenylether (DPE) and decabromodibenzyl (DDB) as the flame retardants as well as Sb2O3 as the synergist. The largest number of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> compounds was obtained in the presence of DPE and Sb2O3 and DDB without Sb2O3. From the degradation of DPE, <span class="hlt">brominated</span> benzenes, phenols, diphenylethers, and dibenzofurans were identified, and from the degradation of DDB, <span class="hlt">brominated</span> benzenes, dibenzyls, and phenanthrenes were formed. The interaction between the flame retardant and the polymer matrix resulted in α-bromoethylbenzene. The formation of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> dibenzodioxins was not observed, probably, due to the low phenol concentration in the polymer melt. No other report has, to our knowledge, ever reported on the formation of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> phenanthrenes from flame retardants. Because they share similar steric features, it may well be that <span class="hlt">brominated</span> phenanthrenes are similar in their carcinogen and mutagen potential to dibenzofurans and dibenzodioxins. A plausible mechanism for the formation of the observed compounds is presented, and the role of the synergist is considered. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/971908','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/971908"><span>Active <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> tables - thermochemistry for the 21st century.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ruscic, B.; Chemistry</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Active <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Tables (ATcT) are a good example of a significant breakthrough in chemical science that is directly enabled by the US DOE SciDAC initiative. ATcT is a new paradigm of how to obtain accurate, reliable, and internally consistent thermochemistry and overcome the limitations that are intrinsic to the traditional sequential approach to thermochemistry. The availability of high-quality consistent <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> values is critical in many areas of chemistry, including the development of realistic predictive models of complex chemical environments such as combustion or the atmosphere, or development and improvement of sophisticated high-fidelity electronic structure computational treatments. As opposed to the traditional sequential evolution of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> values for the chemical species of interest, ATcT utilizes the <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Network (TN) approach. This approach explicitly exposes the maze of inherent interdependencies normally ignored by the conventional treatment, and allows, inter alia, a statistical analysis of the individual measurements that define the TN. The end result is the extraction of the best possible thermochemistry, based on optimal use of all the currently available knowledge, hence making conventional tabulations of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> values obsolete. Moreover, ATcT offer a number of additional features that are neither present nor possible in the traditional approach. With ATcT, new knowledge can be painlessly propagated through all affected <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> values. ATcT also allows hypothesis testing and evaluation, as well as discovery of weak links in the TN. The latter provides pointers to new experimental or theoretical determinations that can most efficiently improve the underlying <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> body of knowledge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26641878','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26641878"><span>Climate Impact and Economic Feasibility of Solar <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Jet Fuel Production.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Falter, Christoph; Batteiger, Valentin; Sizmann, Andreas</p> <p>2016-01-05</p> <p>Solar thermochemistry presents a promising option for the efficient conversion of H2O and CO2 into liquid hydrocarbon fuels using concentrated solar energy. To explore the potential of this fuel production pathway, the climate impact and economic performance are analyzed. Key drivers for the economic and ecological performance are <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> energy conversion efficiency, the level of solar irradiation, operation and maintenance, and the initial investment in the fuel production plant. For the baseline case of a solar tower concentrator with CO2 capture from air, jet fuel production costs of 2.23 €/L and life <span class="hlt">cycle</span> greenhouse gas (LC GHG) emissions of 0.49 kgCO2-equiv/L are estimated. Capturing CO2 from a natural gas combined <span class="hlt">cycle</span> power plant instead of the air reduces the production costs by 15% but leads to LC GHG emissions higher than that of conventional jet fuel. Favorable assumptions for all involved process steps (30% <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> energy conversion efficiency, 3000 kWh/(m(2) a) solar irradiation, low CO2 and heliostat costs) result in jet fuel production costs of 1.28 €/L at LC GHG emissions close to zero. Even lower production costs may be achieved if the commercial value of oxygen as a byproduct is considered.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19350916','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19350916"><span>Existence state of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> as an indicator of the source of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> flame retardants in indoor dust.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Suzuki, Go; Kida, Akiko; Sakai, Shin-ichi; Takigami, Hidetaka</p> <p>2009-03-01</p> <p>Indoor dust is an important medium for human exposure to <span class="hlt">brominated</span> flame retardants (BFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). In this study, we used micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRFS), digital optical microscopy, and gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry to investigate the existence state of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> as an indicator of the source of BFRs in indoor dusts and in dusts from the interior of televisions collected in Japan. By means of micro XRFS <span class="hlt">bromine</span> mapping conducted at a 0.5-s dwell time, we were able to detect <span class="hlt">bromine</span> levels as low as about 0.1% at each point of about a beam diameter of 50 microm across. The presence of fragments containing 1.0% or more <span class="hlt">bromine</span> was confirmed in 27 of the 48 dust samples tested. Using magnified images of the fragments, we classified them roughly into particulates and fibrous substances. We analyzed PBDEs in the fragments containing high concentrations of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> (> or = 0.1%) and confirmed that the fragments contained PBDEs, mainly BDE 209. Furthermore, to detect <span class="hlt">bromine</span> concentrations < or = 0.1% in the dust samples, we analyzed the samples at a dwell time of 100 s to enhance the detection sensitivity of mapping; atthis dwell time, we confirmed the presence of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> in the dust coating. Our results suggest that <span class="hlt">bromine</span> is transferred from products to dust matrixes not only through miniaturization and subsequent direct migration into dust as plastic and textile fragments but also through other pathways such as vaporization and airborne transfer of microparticulates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12850089','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12850089"><span>Relevance of BFRs and thermal conditions on the formation pathways of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> and <span class="hlt">brominated</span>-chlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Weber, Roland; Kuch, Bertram</p> <p>2003-09-01</p> <p>The widespread use of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> flame-retarded products in the last two decades has resulted in an increasing presence of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> in thermal processes such as waste combustion and accidental fires. <span class="hlt">Brominated</span> and <span class="hlt">brominated</span>-chlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDDs/PBDFs, PXDDs/PXDFs) are micropollutants of concern arising from such processes. The present review aims to evaluate the relevance of these compound classes in actual thermal processes. Four categories of thermal processes are discussed in this respect according to their potential for PBDD/PBDF and PXDD/PXDF generation: thermal stress, pyrolysis/gasification, insufficient combustion conditions and controlled combustion conditions. Under thermal stress situations, as they may occur in production or recycling processes, PBDDs/PBDFs precursors like polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDE) can have a relevant potential for PBDD/PBDF formation via a simple elimination. Under insufficient combustion conditions as they are present in, e.g. accidental fires and uncontrolled burning as well as gasification/pyrolysis processes, considerable amounts of PBDDs/PBDFs can be formed from BFRs, preferably via the precursor pathway. In contrast, under controlled combustion conditions, BFRs and PBDDs/PBDFs can be destroyed with high efficiency. The relevance of de novo synthesis of PXDDs/PXDFs is discussed for this condition. Providing a basis for the understanding of PXDD/PXDF formation in actual thermal processes, the present paper also summarises the formation pathways of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> and <span class="hlt">brominated</span>-chlorinated PXDDs/PXDFs from <span class="hlt">brominated</span> flame retardants (BFRs) investigated during laboratory thermolysis experiments. Relevant mechanistic steps for PBDD/PBDF formation from <span class="hlt">brominated</span> precursors are discussed including elimination reactions, condensation steps and debromination/hydrogenation reactions. In addition, chlorination/<span class="hlt">bromination</span> and halogen exchange reactions are briefly discussed with respect for their</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24484005','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24484005"><span>Magnetic trapping of cold <span class="hlt">bromine</span> atoms.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rennick, C J; Lam, J; Doherty, W G; Softley, T P</p> <p>2014-01-17</p> <p>Magnetic trapping of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> atoms at temperatures in the millikelvin regime is demonstrated for the first time. The atoms are produced by photodissociation of Br2 molecules in a molecular beam. The lab-frame velocity of Br atoms is controlled by the wavelength and polarization of the photodissociation laser. Careful selection of the wavelength results in one of the pair of atoms having sufficient velocity to exactly cancel that of the parent molecule, and it remains stationary in the lab frame. A trap is formed at the null point between two opposing neodymium permanent magnets. Dissociation of molecules at the field minimum results in the slowest fraction of photofragments remaining trapped. After the ballistic escape of the fastest atoms, the trapped slow atoms are lost only by elastic collisions with the chamber background gas. The measured loss rate is consistent with estimates of the total cross section for only those collisions transferring sufficient kinetic energy to overcome the trapping potential.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870007337','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870007337"><span>In search of stratospheric <span class="hlt">bromine</span> oxide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lestrade, John Patrick</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>The Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) is capable of recording spectra in the wavelength range of 200 to 12000 Angstroms. Data from a recent Spacelab 1 ATLAS mission has imaged the terrestrial airglow at tangent ray heights of 90 and 150 km. These data contain information about trace atmospheric constituents such as <span class="hlt">bromine</span> oxide (BrO), hydroxyl (OH), and chlorine dioxide (OClO). The abundances of these species are critical to stratospheric models of catalytic ozone destruction. Heretofore, very few observations were made especially for BrO. Software was developed to purge unwanted solar features from the airglow spectra. The next step is a measure of the strength of the emission features for BrO. The final analysis will yield the scale height of this important compound.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28458244','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28458244"><span>Cadmium, lead and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> in beached microplastics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Massos, Angelo; Turner, Andrew</p> <p>2017-08-01</p> <p>Samples of microplastic (n = 924) from two beaches in south west England have been analysed by field-portable-x-ray fluorescence (FP-XRF) spectrometry, configured in a low-density mode and with a small-spot facility, for the heavy metals, Cd and Pb, and the halogen, Br. Primary plastics in the form of pre-production pellets were the principal type of microplastic (>70%) on both beaches, with secondary, irregularly-shaped fragments representing the remainder of samples. Cadmium and Pb were detected in 6.9% and 7.5% of all microplastics, respectively, with concentrations of either metal that exceeded 10(3) μg g(-1) usually encountered in red and yellow pellets or fragments. Respective correlations of Cd and Pb with Se and Cr were attributed to the presence of the coloured, inorganic pigments, cadmium sulphoselenide and lead chromate. <span class="hlt">Bromine</span>, detected in 10.4% of microplastics and up to concentrations of about 13,000 μg g(-1), was mainly encountered in neutrally-coloured pellets. Its strong correlation with Sb, whose oxides are effective fire suppressant synergists, suggests the presence of a variety of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> flame retardants arising from the recycling of plastics originally used in casings for heat-generating electrical equipment. The maximum bioaccessible concentrations of Cd and Pb, evaluated using a physiological extraction based on the chemical characteristics of the proventriculus-gizzard of the northern fulmar, were about 50 μg g(-1) and 8 μg g(-1), respectively. These concentrations exceed those estimated for the diet of local seabirds by factors of about 50 and 4, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6545237','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6545237"><span>Development of <span class="hlt">Bromine</span>-77 from the LAMPF facility</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mettler, F.A. Jr.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>The objective of the work is to conduct the necessary studies required to evaluate the efficacy, potential benefit and role of <span class="hlt">bromine</span>-77 labelled steroids in the detection and evaluation of treatment for hormone-dependent tumors. The synthetic goals of the project are to prepose estradiol derivatives which are labelled with <span class="hlt">bromine</span>-77 at specific positions in the steroid nucleus. In addition, animal studies imaging studies, and cooperative studies are being conducted. (KJD)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=546609','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=546609"><span>Algicidal Effect of <span class="hlt">Bromine</span> and Chlorine on Chlorella pyrenoidosa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kott, Yehuda; Hershkovitz, Galila; Shemtob, A.; Sless, J. B.</p> <p>1966-01-01</p> <p>Chlorella pyrenoidosa was found to grow rapidly in tap water. Peak growth was reached after 2 to 3 days. Chlorine and <span class="hlt">bromine</span>, added to such water, were shown to be effective inhibitors of algal growth. <span class="hlt">Bromine</span> and bromamine were primarily algicidal, whereas chlorine and chloramines were mainly algistatic. It is assumed that the mechanisms of action of these halogens on Chlorella are not the same. PMID:5914499</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27090765','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27090765"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> valorization and characterization of household biowaste.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vakalis, S; Sotiropoulos, A; Moustakas, K; Malamis, D; Vekkos, K; Baratieri, M</p> <p>2016-04-15</p> <p>Valorization of municipal solid waste (MSW), by means of energy and material recovery, is considered to be a crucial step for sustainable waste management. A significant fraction of MSW is comprised from food waste, the treatment of which is still a challenge. Therefore, the conventional disposal of food waste in landfills is being gradually replaced by recycling aerobic treatment, anaerobic digestion and waste-to-energy. In principle, thermal processes like combustion and gasification are preferred for the recovery of energy due to the higher electrical efficiency and the significantly less time required for the process to be completed when compared to biological process, i.e. composting, anaerobic digestion and transesterification. Nonetheless, the high water content and the molecular structure of biowaste are constraining factors in regard to the application of thermal conversion pathways. Investigating alternative solutions for the pre-treatment and more energy efficient handling of this waste fraction may provide pathways for the optimization of the whole process. In this study, by means of utilizing drying/milling as an intermediate step, thermal treatment of household biowaste has become possible. Household biowaste has been thermally processed in a bench scale reactor by means of torrefaction, carbonization and high temperature pyrolysis. According to the operational conditions, fluctuating fractions of biochar, bio-oil (tar) and syngas were recovered. The <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> properties of the feedstock and products were analyzed by means of Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA), Ultimate and Proximate analysis and Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR). The analysis of the products shows that torrefaction of dried household biowaste produces an energy dense fuel and high temperature pyrolysis produces a graphite-like material with relatively high yield.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26755752','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26755752"><span>Solar photochemical and <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> splitting of water.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rao, C N R; Lingampalli, S R; Dey, Sunita; Roy, Anand</p> <p>2016-02-28</p> <p>Artificial photosynthesis to carry out both the oxidation and the reduction of water has emerged to be an exciting area of research. It has been possible to photochemically generate oxygen by using a scheme similar to the Z-scheme, by using suitable catalysts in place of water-oxidation catalyst in the Z-scheme in natural photosynthesis. The best oxidation catalysts are found to be Co and Mn oxides with the e(1) g configuration. The more important aspects investigated pertain to the visible-light-induced generation of hydrogen by using semiconductor heterostructures of the type ZnO/Pt/Cd1-xZnxS and dye-sensitized semiconductors. In the case of heterostructures, good yields of H2 have been obtained. Modifications of the heterostructures, wherein Pt is replaced by NiO, and the oxide is substituted with different anions are discussed. MoS2 and MoSe2 in the 1T form yield high quantities of H2 when sensitized by Eosin Y. Two-step <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> splitting of H2O using metal oxide redox pairs provides a strategy to produce H2 and CO. Performance of the Ln0.5A0.5MnO3 (Ln = rare earth ion, A = Ca, Sr) family of perovskites is found to be promising in this context. The best results to date are found with Y0.5Sr0.5MnO3. © 2016 The Author(s).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6805067','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6805067"><span>Biomass <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Conversion Program. 1983 Annual report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.</p> <p>1984-08-01</p> <p>Highlights of progress achieved in the program of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> conversion of biomass into clean fuels during 1983 are summarized. Gasification research projects include: production of a medium-Btu gas without using purified oxygen at Battelle-Columbus Laboratories; high pressure (up to 500 psia) steam-oxygen gasification of biomass in a fluidized bed reactor at IGT; producing synthesis gas via catalytic gasification at PNL; indirect reactor heating methods at the Univ. of Missouri-Rolla and Texas Tech Univ.; improving the reliability, performance, and acceptability of small air-blown gasifiers at Univ. of Florida-Gainesville, Rocky Creek Farm Gasogens, and Cal Recovery Systems. Liquefaction projects include: determination of individual sequential pyrolysis mechanisms at SERI; research at SERI on a unique entrained, ablative fast pyrolysis reactor for supplying the heat fluxes required for fast pyrolysis; work at BNL on rapid pyrolysis of biomass in an atmosphere of methane to increase the yields of olefin and BTX products; research at the Georgia Inst. of Tech. on an entrained rapid pyrolysis reactor to produce higher yields of pyrolysis oil; research on an advanced concept to liquefy very concentrated biomass slurries in an integrated extruder/static mixer reactor at the Univ. of Arizona; and research at PNL on the characterization and upgrading of direct liquefaction oils including research to lower oxygen content and viscosity of the product. Combustion projects include: research on a directly fired wood combustor/gas turbine system at Aerospace Research Corp.; adaptation of Stirling engine external combustion systems to biomass fuels at United Stirling, Inc.; and theoretical modeling and experimental verification of biomass combustion behavior at JPL to increase biomass combustion efficiency and examine the effects of additives on combustion rates. 26 figures, 1 table.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1177612','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1177612"><span>Lifecycle assessment of microalgae to biofuel: Comparison of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> processing pathways</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bennion, Edward P.; Ginosar, Daniel M.; Moses, John; Agblevor, Foster; Quinn, Jason C.</p> <p>2015-01-16</p> <p>Microalgae are currently being investigated as a renewable transportation fuel feedstock based on various advantages that include high annual yields, utilization of poor quality land, does not compete with food, and can be integrated with various waste streams. This study focuses on directly assessing the impact of two different <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> conversion technologies on the microalgae to biofuel process through life <span class="hlt">cycle</span> assessment. A system boundary of a “well to pump” (WTP) is defined and includes sub-process models of the growth, dewatering, <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> bio-oil recovery, bio-oil stabilization, conversion to renewable diesel, and transport to the pump. Models were validated with experimental and literature data and are representative of an industrial-scale microalgae to biofuel process. Two different <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> bio-oil conversion systems are modeled and compared on a systems level, hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and pyrolysis. The environmental impact of the two pathways were quantified on the metrics of net energy ratio (NER), defined here as energy consumed over energy produced, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Results for WTP biofuel production through the HTL pathway were determined to be 1.23 for the NER and GHG emissions of -11.4 g CO<sub>2-eq</sub> (MJ renewable diesel)<sup>-1</sup>. WTP biofuel production through the pyrolysis pathway results in a NER of 2.27 and GHG emissions of 210 g CO2 eq (MJ renewable diesel)-1. The large environmental impact associated with the pyrolysis pathway is attributed to feedstock drying requirements and combustion of co-products to improve system energetics. Discussion focuses on a detailed breakdown of the overall process energetics and GHGs, impact of modeling at laboratory- scale compared to industrial-scale, environmental impact sensitivity to engineering systems input parameters for future focused research and development and a comparison of results to literature.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1177612-lifecycle-assessment-microalgae-biofuel-comparison-thermochemical-processing-pathways','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1177612-lifecycle-assessment-microalgae-biofuel-comparison-thermochemical-processing-pathways"><span>Lifecycle assessment of microalgae to biofuel: Comparison of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> processing pathways</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Bennion, Edward P.; Ginosar, Daniel M.; Moses, John; ...</p> <p>2015-01-16</p> <p>Microalgae are currently being investigated as a renewable transportation fuel feedstock based on various advantages that include high annual yields, utilization of poor quality land, does not compete with food, and can be integrated with various waste streams. This study focuses on directly assessing the impact of two different <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> conversion technologies on the microalgae to biofuel process through life <span class="hlt">cycle</span> assessment. A system boundary of a “well to pump” (WTP) is defined and includes sub-process models of the growth, dewatering, <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> bio-oil recovery, bio-oil stabilization, conversion to renewable diesel, and transport to the pump. Models were validated with experimentalmore » and literature data and are representative of an industrial-scale microalgae to biofuel process. Two different <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> bio-oil conversion systems are modeled and compared on a systems level, hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and pyrolysis. The environmental impact of the two pathways were quantified on the metrics of net energy ratio (NER), defined here as energy consumed over energy produced, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Results for WTP biofuel production through the HTL pathway were determined to be 1.23 for the NER and GHG emissions of -11.4 g CO2-eq (MJ renewable diesel)-1. WTP biofuel production through the pyrolysis pathway results in a NER of 2.27 and GHG emissions of 210 g CO2 eq (MJ renewable diesel)-1. The large environmental impact associated with the pyrolysis pathway is attributed to feedstock drying requirements and combustion of co-products to improve system energetics. Discussion focuses on a detailed breakdown of the overall process energetics and GHGs, impact of modeling at laboratory- scale compared to industrial-scale, environmental impact sensitivity to engineering systems input parameters for future focused research and development and a comparison of results to literature.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1220117','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1220117"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Conversion: Using Heat and Catalysts to Make Biofuels and Bioproducts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-29</p> <p>This fact sheet discusses the Bioenergy Technologies Office's <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> conversion critical technology goal. And, how through the application of heat, robust <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> processes can efficiently convert a broad range of biomass.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991STIN...9217025R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991STIN...9217025R"><span>Gas transport in polybutadiene treated with aqueous <span class="hlt">bromine</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rein, D. H.; Baddour, R. F.; Cohen, R. E.</p> <p>1991-10-01</p> <p>Diffusion, solubility and permeability coefficients were measured for He, CO2, Ar and CH4 in polybutadiene (PB) and in polybutadiene reacted in the solid state to various extents with aqueous <span class="hlt">bromine</span>. Analysis of the sorption curves and x ray emission spectra showed that the <span class="hlt">bromination</span> created a heterogeneous membrane with an outer <span class="hlt">brominated</span> skin and an unreacted core. At relatively low extent of <span class="hlt">bromination</span>, the diffusion and permeability coefficients for CO2, Ar and CH4 became immeasurably small after about 3 percent <span class="hlt">bromination</span>. The ideal separation factor for gas pairs with different molecular size increased with <span class="hlt">bromination</span>, suggesting applications in gas separation processes. Tailoring the structure of existing commodity polymers through chemical modification is an attractive approach to improving the properties of membranes for gas separation and barrier applications. Systematic alterations of the polymer structure also provide a convenient route for studying the effects of molecular architecture on the permeability. Substitutions to the backbone or side chains affect the intrasegmental mobility and intersegmental chain packing, resulting in changes in gas diffusivity, solubility and permeability coefficients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AGUFM.C11D..05P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AGUFM.C11D..05P"><span>Airborne Observations of Reactive <span class="hlt">Bromine</span> Transport in the Arctic</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Peterson, P.; Sihler, H.; Pöhler, D.; Zielcke, J.; General, S.; Friess, U.; Platt, U.; Simpson, W. R.; Nghiem, S. V.; Shepson, P. B.; Stirm, B. H.; Wagner, T.; Caulton, D.; Fuentes, J. D.; Pratt, K.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>The return of sunlight in the polar spring leads to production of reactive halogen species from surface snowpacks, altering the chemical composition of the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer. In particular, <span class="hlt">bromine</span> chemistry is implicated in boundary layer ozone depletion events (ODEs) and altered oxidation of atmospheric pollutants. Currently, many uncertainties exist regarding the vertical extent of this chemistry, as well as the transport and sustained recycling of these halogens aloft. Here, we present airborne BrO and aerosol particle measurements obtained during the 2012 <span class="hlt">Bromine</span> Ozone Mercury EXperiment on 13 March near Barrow, AK. Airborne differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) observations showed a <span class="hlt">bromine</span> monoxide (BrO) plume, disconnected from the surface, moving with the wind. The amount of BrO observed in the lofted plume remained constant over the course of the three hour flight, indicating heterogeneous recycling of reactive <span class="hlt">bromine</span> was taking place. Concurrent in-situ measurements of size-resolved aerosol number concentrations, together with DOAS retrievals of aerosol particle extinction profiles, indicated this lofted <span class="hlt">bromine</span> plume was transported and maintained at elevated levels through reactions on supermicron aerosol particles, independently of surface snowpack <span class="hlt">bromine</span> chemistry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800041336&hterms=Bromine&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DBromine','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800041336&hterms=Bromine&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DBromine"><span>Atmospheric <span class="hlt">bromine</span> and ozone perturbations in the lower stratosphere</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Yung, Y. L.; Pinto, J. P.; Watson, R. T.; Sander, S. P.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>The role of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> compounds in the photochemistry of the natural and perturbed stratosphere has been reexamined using an expanded reaction scheme and the results of recent laboratory studies of several key reactions. The most important finding is that through the reaction BrO + ClO yielding Br + Cl + O2 there is a synergistic effect between <span class="hlt">bromine</span> and chlorine which results in an efficient catalytic destruction of ozone in the lower stratosphere. One-dimensional photochemical model results indicate that BrO is the major <span class="hlt">bromine</span> species throughout the stratosphere, followed by BrONO2, HBr, HOBr and Br. It is shown from the foregoing that <span class="hlt">bromine</span> is more efficient than chlorine as a catalyst for destroying ozone, and the implications for stratospheric ozone of possible future growth in the industrial and agricultural use of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> are discussed. <span class="hlt">Bromine</span> concentrations of 20 pptv (2 x 10 to the -11th power), as suggested by recent observations, can decrease the present-day integrated ozone column density by 2.4%, and can enhance ozone depletion from steady-state chlorofluoromethane release at 1973 rates by a factor of 1.1-1.2.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800041336&hterms=bromine&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dbromine','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800041336&hterms=bromine&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dbromine"><span>Atmospheric <span class="hlt">bromine</span> and ozone perturbations in the lower stratosphere</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Yung, Y. L.; Pinto, J. P.; Watson, R. T.; Sander, S. P.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>The role of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> compounds in the photochemistry of the natural and perturbed stratosphere has been reexamined using an expanded reaction scheme and the results of recent laboratory studies of several key reactions. The most important finding is that through the reaction BrO + ClO yielding Br + Cl + O2 there is a synergistic effect between <span class="hlt">bromine</span> and chlorine which results in an efficient catalytic destruction of ozone in the lower stratosphere. One-dimensional photochemical model results indicate that BrO is the major <span class="hlt">bromine</span> species throughout the stratosphere, followed by BrONO2, HBr, HOBr and Br. It is shown from the foregoing that <span class="hlt">bromine</span> is more efficient than chlorine as a catalyst for destroying ozone, and the implications for stratospheric ozone of possible future growth in the industrial and agricultural use of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> are discussed. <span class="hlt">Bromine</span> concentrations of 20 pptv (2 x 10 to the -11th power), as suggested by recent observations, can decrease the present-day integrated ozone column density by 2.4%, and can enhance ozone depletion from steady-state chlorofluoromethane release at 1973 rates by a factor of 1.1-1.2.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EGUGA..19..222N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EGUGA..19..222N"><span>Very-short-lived <span class="hlt">brominated</span> substances (VSLBr) and inorganic <span class="hlt">bromine</span> (Bry) in the Pacific tropical tropopause layer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Navarro, Maria A.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Cuevas, Carlos A.; Kinnison, Douglas; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Tilmes, Simone; Rodriguez-Lloveras, Xavier; Filus, Michal; Harris, Neil R. P.; Meneguz, Elena; Ashfold, Matthew J.; Manning, Alistair J.; Fernandez, Rafael P.; Schauffler, Sue; Donets, Valeria; Thornberry, Troy; Rollins, Andrew; Elkins, James W.; Hintsa, Eric J.</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Organic very-short-lived <span class="hlt">brominated</span> substances (VSLBr) and inorganic <span class="hlt">bromine</span> species (Bry) play an important role in the chemistry of upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS) region. Their distribution, vertical structure, and variability provide information about sources and transport. In addition, an accurate quantification of the reactive and reservoirs species defines the halogen budget and assists in the assessment of the ozone depletion potential for <span class="hlt">brominated</span> trace gases. In the last decade, there have been efforts to better understand the chemical and physical processes that occur in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL), including convection, dehydration, and heterogeneous recycling reactions, which influence the partitioning of the trace gas species that enter the stratosphere. However, uncertainties in the estimation of the organic and inorganic partitioning of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> and the input to the stratosphere still persist. Based on the measurements of samples collected by the Global Hawk Whole Air Sampler (GWAS) during the NASA-Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment (ATTREX), and chemistry climate simulations (using CAM-Chem along ATTREX flight tracks), we will examine the vertical distribution of selected organic species in the UT/LS of the Eastern and Western Pacific. We also will describe the budget and partitioning of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> at the tropical tropopause and evaluate the contribution of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> to ozone destruction in the lower stratosphere.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16580706','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16580706"><span>Alkaline hydrothermal treatment of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> high impact polystyrene (HIPS-Br) for <span class="hlt">bromine</span> and <span class="hlt">bromine</span>-free plastic recovery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Brebu, Mihai; Bhaskar, Thallada; Muto, Akinori; Sakata, Yusaku</p> <p>2006-08-01</p> <p>A method to recover both Br and Br-free plastic from <span class="hlt">brominated</span> flame retardant high impact polystyrene (HIPS-Br) was proposed. HIPS-Br containing 15% Br was treated in autoclave at 280 degrees C using water or KOH solution of various amounts and concentrations. Hydrothermal treatment (30 ml water) leads to 90% debromination of 1g HIPS-Br but plastic is strongly degraded and could not be recovered. Alkaline hydrothermal treatment (45 ml or 60 ml KOH 1M) showed similar debromination for up to 12 g HIPS-Br and plastic was recovered as pellets with molecular weight distribution close to that of the initial material. Debromination occurs at melt plastic/KOH solution interface when liquid/vapour equilibrium is attained inside autoclave (280 degrees C and 7 MPa in our experimental conditions) and depends on the plastic amount/KOH volume ratio. The antimony oxide synergist from HIPS-Br remains in recovered plastic during treatment. A pictorial imagination of the proposed debromination process is presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22749124','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22749124"><span>Reduction of hazards from copper(I) chloride in a Cu-Cl <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> hydrogen production plant.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ghandehariun, Samane; Wang, Zhaolin; Rosen, Marc A; Naterer, Greg F</p> <p>2012-08-30</p> <p>The copper-chlorine <span class="hlt">cycle</span> of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> water splitting, using various heat sources, is a promising technology for hydrogen production. The chemical hazards accompanying the new technology affect significantly the industrialization of the <span class="hlt">cycle</span>, but have scarcely been examined. This paper addresses this need by examining the copper(I) chloride (CuCl) hazards that may be generated in the <span class="hlt">cycle</span>. Regardless of the variations of Cu-Cl <span class="hlt">cycle</span>, copper(I) chloride is always present, serving as an intermediate compound that may cause health concerns. In this paper, the CuCl hazards are quantified for each process from the generation source of the hazards along with the paths where the CuCl may be present. The processes of greatest relevance include oxygen production, heat recovery, solidification, and dissolution. The options for reducing the CuCl hazards in a Cu-Cl <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> hydrogen production plant are evaluated from the perspectives of variations of the Cu-Cl <span class="hlt">cycle</span>, process integration, heat recovery, and equipment design. It is concluded that using the intake reactant Cu(2)OCl(2) for the oxygen production step to absorb CuCl vapor is the most preferable option compared with other alternatives such as absorbing CuCl vapor with water or CuCl(2), building additional structures inside the oxygen production reactor, and cooling the exiting gas at the outlet of the oxygen reactor. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016cems.book..141B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016cems.book..141B"><span>Recent Developments in Factsage <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Software and Databases</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bale, Christopher W.; Bélisle, E.; Chartrand, P.; Decterov, S. A.; Eriksson, G.; Gheribi, A.; Hack, K.; Jung, I.-H.; Melançon, J.; Pelton, A. D.; Petersen, S.; Robelin, C.</p> <p></p> <p>The FactSage® package consists of a series of information, database and calculation modules that enable one to access pure substances and solution databases and perform <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> equilibrium calculations. FactSage was originally founded by process pyrometallurgists and has since expanded its applications to include hydrometallurgy, electrometallurgy, corrosion, glass technology, combustion, ceramics, geology, environmental studies, etc. With the various modules one can perform a wide variety of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> calculations and generate tables and graphs of complex chemical equilibria and phase diagrams for multicomponent systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21997216','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21997216"><span>Evidence of magnetic isotope effects during <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> sulfate reduction.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Oduro, Harry; Harms, Brian; Sintim, Herman O; Kaufman, Alan J; Cody, George; Farquhar, James</p> <p>2011-10-25</p> <p><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> sulfate reduction experiments with simple amino acid and dilute concentrations of sulfate reveal significant degrees of mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionation. Enrichments of up to 13‰ for (33)S are attributed to a magnetic isotope effect (MIE) associated with the formation of thiol-disulfide, ion-radical pairs. Observed (36)S depletions in products are explained here by classical (mass-dependent) isotope effects and mixing processes. The experimental data contrasts strongly with multiple sulfur isotope trends in Archean samples, which exhibit significant (36)S anomalies. These results support an origin other than <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> sulfate reduction for the mass-independent signals observed for early Earth samples.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5305708','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5305708"><span>Evaluation of wastewater treatment requirements for <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> biomass liquefaction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Elliott, D.C. )</p> <p>1992-04-01</p> <p>Biomass can provide a substantial energy source. Liquids are preferred for use as transportation fuels because of their high energy density and handling ease and safety. Liquid fuel production from biomass can be accomplished by any of several different processes including hydrolysis and fermentation of the carbohydrates to alcohol fuels, thermal gasification and synthesis of alcohol or hydrocarbon fuels, direct extraction of biologically produced hydrocarbons such as seed oils or algae lipids, or direct <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> conversion of the biomass to liquids and catalytic upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels. This report discusses direct <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> conversion to achieve biomass liquefaction and the requirements for wastewater treatment inherent in such processing. 21 refs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750058206&hterms=splitting+water&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dsplitting%2Bwater','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750058206&hterms=splitting+water&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dsplitting%2Bwater"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> production of hydrogen via multistage water splitting processes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Funk, J. E.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>This paper presents and reviews the fundamental thermodynamic principles underlying <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> water splitting processes. The overall system is considered first and the temperature limitation in process thermal efficiency is developed. The relationship to an ideal water electrolysis cell is described and the nature of efficient multistage reaction processes is discussed. The importance of the reaction entropy change and the relation of the reaction free energy change to the work of separation is described. A procedure for analyzing <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> water splitting processes is presented and its use to calculate individual stage efficiency is demonstrated. A number of processes are used to illustrate the concepts and procedures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900051346&hterms=Earth+Sphere&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DEarth%2BSphere','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900051346&hterms=Earth+Sphere&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DEarth%2BSphere"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> nonequilibrium issues for earth reentry of Mars mission vehicles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mitcheltree, R. A.; Gnoffo, P. A.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> environment about an axisymmetric 60-deg sphere-cone with a circular aft skirt is computed using the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm. Earth entry at 12 km/sec is examined at 70-km and 80-km altitude for two vehicle base radii of 2 m and 6 m. These four test cases bracket some proposed scenarios for earth reentry of a manned Mars mission aerobrake at this velocity. <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> nonequilibrium results are examined for each case and compared with thermal equilibrium results produced by artificially accelerating vibrational relaxation rates and with equilibrium results produced by a viscous shock layer method.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25266684','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25266684"><span>A techno-economic review of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> cellulosic biofuel pathways.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Brown, Tristan R</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Recent advances in the <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> processing of biomass have resulted in efforts to commercialize several cellulosic biofuel pathways. Until commercial-scale production is achieved, however, techno-economic analysis is a useful methodology for quantifying the economic competitiveness of these pathways with petroleum, providing one indication of their long-term feasibility under the U.S. revised Renewable Fuel Standard. This review paper covers techno-economic analyses of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> cellulosic biofuel pathways in the open literature, discusses and compares their results, and recommends the adoption of additional analytical methodologies that will increase the value of future pathway analyses.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3203815','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3203815"><span>Evidence of magnetic isotope effects during <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> sulfate reduction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Oduro, Harry; Harms, Brian; Sintim, Herman O.; Kaufman, Alan J.; Cody, George; Farquhar, James</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> sulfate reduction experiments with simple amino acid and dilute concentrations of sulfate reveal significant degrees of mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionation. Enrichments of up to 13‰ for 33S are attributed to a magnetic isotope effect (MIE) associated with the formation of thiol-disulfide, ion-radical pairs. Observed 36S depletions in products are explained here by classical (mass-dependent) isotope effects and mixing processes. The experimental data contrasts strongly with multiple sulfur isotope trends in Archean samples, which exhibit significant 36S anomalies. These results support an origin other than <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> sulfate reduction for the mass-independent signals observed for early Earth samples. PMID:21997216</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPCRD..44a3101B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPCRD..44a3101B"><span>Critical Evaluation of <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Properties of C1-C4 Species: Updated Group-Contributions to Estimate <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Properties</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Burke, S. M.; Simmie, J. M.; Curran, H. J.</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>A review of literature on enthalpies of formation and molar entropies for alkanes, alkenes, alcohols, hydroperoxides, and their associated radicals has been compiled and critically evaluated. By comparing literature values, the overall uncertainty in <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> properties of small hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons can be highlighted. In general, there is good agreement between heat of formation values in the literature for stable species; however, there is greater uncertainty in the values for radical species and for molar entropy values. Updated values for a group-additivity method for the estimation of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> properties based on the evaluated literature data are proposed. The new values can be used to estimate <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> data for larger, combustion-relevant species for which no calculations or measurements currently exist, with increased confidence.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017A%26A...601A..44G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017A%26A...601A..44G"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> modelling of brown dwarf discs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Greenwood, A. J.; Kamp, I.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Woitke, P.; Thi, W.-F.; Rab, Ch.; Aresu, G.; Spaans, M.</p> <p>2017-05-01</p> <p>The physical properties of brown dwarf discs, in terms of their shapes and sizes, are still largely unexplored by observations. ALMA has by far the best capabilities to observe these discs in sub-mm CO lines and dust continuum, while also spatially resolving some discs. To what extent brown dwarf discs are similar to scaled-down T Tauri discs is currently unknown, and this work is a step towards establishing a relationship through the eventual modelling of future observations. We use observations of the brown dwarf disc ρ Oph 102 to infer a fiducial model around which we build a small grid of brown dwarf disc models, in order to model the CO, HCN, and HCO+ line fluxes and the chemistry which drives their abundances. These are the first brown dwarf models to be published which relate detailed, 2D radiation <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> disc models to observational data. We predict that moderately extended ALMA antenna configurations will spatially resolve CO line emission around brown dwarf discs, and that HCN and HCO+ will be detectable in integrated flux, following our conclusion that the flux ratios of these molecules to CO emission are comparable to that of T Tauri discs. These molecules have not yet been observed in sub-mm wavelengths in a brown dwarf disc, yet they are crucial tracers of the warm surface-layer gas and of ionization in the outer parts of the disc. We present the prediction that if the physical and chemical processes in brown dwarf discs are similar to those that occur in T Tauri discs - as our models suggest - then the same diagnostics that are used for T Tauri discs can be used for brown dwarf discs (such as HCN and HCO+ lines that have not yet been observed in the sub-mm), and that these lines should be observable with ALMA. Through future observations, either confirmation (or refutation) of these ideas about brown dwarf disc chemistry will have strong implications for our understanding of disc chemistry, structure, and subsequent planet formation in brown</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981aes.....8.3285F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981aes.....8.3285F"><span>An exergetic/energetic/economic analysis of three hydrogen production processes - Electrolysis, hybrid, and <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Funk, J. E.; Eisermann, W.</p> <p></p> <p>This paper presents the results of a combined first and second law analysis, along with capital and operating costs, for hydrogen production from water by means of electrolytic, hybrid, and <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> processes. The processes are SPE and Lurgi electrolysis with light water reactor power generation and sulfur <span class="hlt">cycle</span> hybrid, <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> and SPE electrolysis with a very high temperature reactor primary energy source. Energy and Exergy (2nd law) flow diagrams for the process are shown along with the location and magnitude of the process irreversibilities. The overall process thermal (1st law) efficiencies vary from 25 to 51% and the exergetic (2nd law) efficiencies, referred to the fuel for the primary energy source, vary from 22 to 45%. Capital and operating costs, escalated to 1979 dollars, are shown for each process for both the primary energy source and the hydrogen production plant. All costs were taken from information available in the open literature and are for a plant capacity of 100 x 10 to the 6th SCF/day. Production costs vary from 10 to 18 $/GJ, based on the higher heating value of hydrogen, and are based on a 90% plant operating factor with a 21% annual charge on total capital costs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24745557','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24745557"><span><span class="hlt">Brominated</span> flame retardant exposure of aircraft personnel.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Strid, Anna; Smedje, Greta; Athanassiadis, Ioannis; Lindgren, Torsten; Lundgren, Håkan; Jakobsson, Kristina; Bergman, Åke</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The use of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> flame retardants (BFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in aircraft is the result of high fire safety demands. Personnel working in or with aircraft might therefore be exposed to several BFRs. Previous studies have reported PBDE exposure in flight attendants and in passengers. One other group that may be subjected to significant BFR exposure via inhalation, are the aircraft maintenance workers. Personnel exposure both during flights and maintenance of aircraft, are investigated in the present study. Several BFRs were present in air and dust sampled during both the exposure scenarios; PBDEs, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis (2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane. PBDEs were also analyzed in serum from pilots/cabin crew, maintenance workers and from a control group of individuals without any occupational aircraft exposure. Significantly higher concentrations of PBDEs were found in maintenance workers compared to pilots/cabin crew and control subjects with median total PBDE concentrations of 19, 6.8 and 6.6 pmol g(-1) lipids, respectively. Pilots and cabin crew had similar concentrations of most PBDEs as the control group, except for BDE-153 and BDE-154 which were significantly higher. Results indicate higher concentrations among some of the pilots compared to the cabin crew. It is however, evident that the cabin personnel have lower BFR exposures compared to maintenance workers that are exposed to such a degree that their blood levels are significantly different from the control group. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.epa.gov/assessing-and-managing-chemicals-under-tsca/tsca-work-plan-chemical-technical-supplement','PESTICIDES'); return false;" href="https://www.epa.gov/assessing-and-managing-chemicals-under-tsca/tsca-work-plan-chemical-technical-supplement"><span>TSCA Work Plan Chemical Technical Supplement – Physicochemical Properties and Environmental Fate of the <span class="hlt">Brominated</span> Phthalates Cluster (BPC) Chemicals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/search.htm">EPA Pesticide Factsheets</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>TSCA Work Plan Chemical Technical Supplement – Physicochemical Properties and Environmental Fate of the <span class="hlt">Brominated</span> Phthalates Cluster (BPC) Chemicals -- <span class="hlt">Brominated</span> Phthalates Cluster Flame Retardants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/40139','TREESEARCH'); return false;" href="https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/40139"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> properties of flame gases from fine wildland fuels</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/">Treesearch</a></p> <p>Frank A. Albini</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>Describes a theoretical model for calculating <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> properties of the gaseous fuel that burns in the free flame at the edge of a spreading fire in fine forest fuels. Predicted properties are the heat of combustion, stoichiometric air/fuel mass ratio, mass-averaged temperature, and mass fraction of unburned fuel in the gas mixture emitted from the flame-...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27796970','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27796970"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> conversion of waste tyres-a review.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Labaki, Madona; Jeguirim, Mejdi</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>A review of the energy recovery from waste tyres is presented and focuses on the three <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> processes used to valorise waste tyres: pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion/incineration. After recalling the chemical composition of tyres, the thermogravimetric behaviours of tyres or their components under different atmospheres are described. Different kinetic studies on the <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> processes are treated. Then, the three processes were investigated, with a particular attention given to the gasification, due to the information unavailability on this process. Pyrolysis is a <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> conversion to produce a hydrocarbon rich gas mixture, condensable liquids or tars, and a carbon-rich solid residue. Gasification is a form of pyrolysis, carried out at higher temperatures and under given atmosphere (air, steam, oxygen, carbon dioxide, etc.) in order to yield mainly low molecular weight gaseous products. Combustion is a process that needs a fuel and an oxidizer with an ignition system to produce heat and/or steam. The effects of various process parameters such as temperature, heating rate, residence time, catalyst addition, etc. on the energy efficiency and the products yields and characteristics are mainly reviewed. These <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> processes are considered to be the more attractive and practicable methods for recovering energy and material from waste tyres. For the future, they are the main promising issue to treat and valorise used tyres. However, efforts should be done in developing more efficient technical systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=228441','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=228441"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Conversion of Livestock Wastes: Carbonization of Swine Solids</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/find-a-publication/">USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Animal manure represents a significant portion of the total sustainable U.S. renewable energy sources that can serve as a bioenergy feedstock in <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> conversion processes. The process of slow pyrolysis or carbonization promotes the conversion of animal manure like swine manure into charcoa...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1218328','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1218328"><span>Biomass Program 2007 Program Peer Review - <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Conversion Platform Summary</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>none,</p> <p>2009-10-27</p> <p>This document discloses the comments provided by a review panel at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Program Peer Review held on November 15-16, 2007 in Baltimore, MD and the Biomass Program Peer Review for the <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Platform, held on July 9th and 10th in Golden, Colorado.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25799954','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25799954"><span>Molecular thermodynamics of metabolism: quantum <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> calculations for key metabolites.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hadadi, N; Ataman, M; Hatzimanikatis, V; Panayiotou, C</p> <p>2015-04-28</p> <p>The present work is the first of a series of papers aiming at a coherent and unified development of the thermodynamics of metabolism and the rationalization of feasibility analysis of metabolic pathways. The focus in this part is on high-level quantum chemical calculations of the <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> quantities of relatively heavy metabolites such as amino acids/oligopeptides, nucleosides, saccharides and their derivatives in the ideal gas state. The results of this study will be combined with the corresponding hydration/solvation results in subsequent parts of this work in order to derive the desired <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> quantities in aqueous solutions. The above metabolites exist in a vast conformational/isomerization space including rotational conformers, tautomers or anomers exhibiting often multiple or cooperative intramolecular hydrogen bonding. We examine the challenges posed by these features for the reliable estimation of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> quantities. We discuss conformer search, conformer distribution and averaging processes. We further consider neutral metabolites as well as protonated and deprotonated metabolites. In addition to the traditional presentation of gas-phase acidities, basicities and proton affinities, we also examine heats and free energies of ionic species. We obtain simple linear relations between the <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> quantities of ions and the formation quantities of their neutral counterparts. Furthermore, we compare our calculations with reliable experimental measurements and predictive calculations from the literature, when available. Finally, we discuss the next steps and perspectives for this work.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ACP....1613015H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ACP....1613015H"><span>Seasonal variation of tropospheric <span class="hlt">bromine</span> monoxide over the Rann of Kutch salt marsh seen from space</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hörmann, Christoph; Sihler, Holger; Beirle, Steffen; Penning de Vries, Marloes; Platt, Ulrich; Wagner, Thomas</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>The Rann of Kutch (India and Pakistan) is one of the largest salt deserts in the world. Being a so-called "seasonal salt marsh", it is regularly flooded during the Indian summer monsoon. We present 10 years of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> monoxide (BrO) satellite observations by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) over the Great and Little Rann of Kutch. OMI spectra were analysed using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) and revealed recurring high BrO vertical column densities (VCDs) of up to 1.4 × 1014 molec cm-2 during April/May, but no significantly enhanced column densities during the monsoon season (June-September). In the following winter months, the BrO VCDs are again slightly enhanced while the salty surface dries up. We investigate a possible correlation of enhanced reactive <span class="hlt">bromine</span> concentrations with different meteorological parameters and find a strong relationship between incident UV radiation and the total BrO abundance. In contrast, the second Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument (GOME-2) shows about 4 times lower BrO VCDs over the Rann of Kutch than found by OMI and no clear seasonal <span class="hlt">cycle</span> is observed. One reason for this finding might be the earlier local overpass time of GOME-2 compared to OMI (around 09:30 vs. 13:30 LT), as the ambient conditions significantly differ for both satellite instruments at the time of the measurements. Further possible reasons are discussed and mainly attributed to instrumental issues. OMI additionally confirms the presence of enhanced BrO concentrations over the Dead Sea valley (Israel/Jordan), as suggested by former ground-based observations. The measurements indicate that the Rann of Kutch salt marsh is probably one of the strongest natural point sources of reactive <span class="hlt">bromine</span> compounds outside the polar regions and is therefore supposed to have a significant impact on local and regional ozone chemistry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17310701','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17310701"><span>Fate of higher <span class="hlt">brominated</span> PBDEs in lactating cows.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kierkegaard, Amelie; Asplund, Lillemor; de Wit, Cynthia A; McLachlan, Michael S; Thomas, Gareth O; Sweetman, Andrew J; Jones, Kevin C</p> <p>2007-01-15</p> <p>Dietary intake studies of lower <span class="hlt">brominated</span> diphenyl ethers (BDEs) have shown that fish and animal products are important vectors of human exposure, but almost no data exist for higher <span class="hlt">brominated</span> BDEs. Therefore, the fate of hepta- to decaBDEs was studied in lactating cows exposed to a naturally contaminated diet by analyzing feed, feces, and milk samples from a previous mass balance study of PCB. Tissue distribution was studied in one cow slaughtered after the experiment. BDE-209 was the dominant congener in feed, organs, adipose tissues, and feces, but not in milk. In contrast to PCBs and lower <span class="hlt">brominated</span> BDEs, concentrations of hepta- to decaBDEs in adipose tissue were 9-80 times higher than in milk fat and the difference increased with degree of <span class="hlt">bromination</span>/log K(OW). The congener profiles in adipose tissue and feed differed; BDE-207, BDE-196, BDE-197, and BDE-182 accumulated to a surprisingly greater extent in the fat compared to their isomers, suggesting metabolic debromination of BDE-209 to these BDEs. The results indicate that meat rather than dairy product consumption may be an important human exposure route to higher <span class="hlt">brominated</span> BDEs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19066481','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19066481"><span>Dietary iodine and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> intakes in Ukrainian subjects.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shiraishi, Kunio; Ko, Susumu; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Zamostyan, Pavlo V; Tsigankov, Nikolay Y</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Dietary iodine and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> intakes in Ukrainian subjects were estimated in relation to the health effects on inhabitants after the Chernobyl accident. Two hundred and eighty-six total diets were collected from twenty-five regions for Ukrainians by a duplicate portion study. Iodine and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> were rapidly determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after chemical separation. The range, median, and geometric mean of iodine intakes were 2.86-698, 44.7, and 48.1 microg per person per day, respectively. Those of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> were 0.627-16.9, 2.97, and 2.92 mg per person per day, respectively. Daily intakes of both elements in Ukrainians were lower than previously reported values. The iodine intake in areas contaminated by the Chernobyl accident was lower than that in non-contaminated areas. The low iodine intake in both areas would be related to the high prevalence of goiters throughout the whole country. The low <span class="hlt">bromine</span> intakes indicated Ukrainians were not exposed to <span class="hlt">bromine</span>-containing foods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol25/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol25-sec180-519.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol25/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol25-sec180-519.pdf"><span>40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual <span class="hlt">bromine</span>; tolerances for residues.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... checks of residual <span class="hlt">bromine</span> using a <span class="hlt">bromine</span> test kit. To assure safe use of the additives, the label and... bromide ion levels. (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances with regional registrations....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol24/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol24-sec180-519.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol24/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol24-sec180-519.pdf"><span>40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual <span class="hlt">bromine</span>; tolerances for residues.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... checks of residual <span class="hlt">bromine</span> using a <span class="hlt">bromine</span> test kit. To assure safe use of the additives, the label and... bromide ion levels. (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances with regional registrations....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol25/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol25-sec180-519.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol25/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol25-sec180-519.pdf"><span>40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual <span class="hlt">bromine</span>; tolerances for residues.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... checks of residual <span class="hlt">bromine</span> using a <span class="hlt">bromine</span> test kit. To assure safe use of the additives, the label and... bromide ion levels. (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances with regional registrations....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol23/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol23-sec180-519.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol23/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol23-sec180-519.pdf"><span>40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual <span class="hlt">bromine</span>; tolerances for residues.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... checks of residual <span class="hlt">bromine</span> using a <span class="hlt">bromine</span> test kit. To assure safe use of the additives, the label and... bromide ion levels. (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances with regional registrations....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5963541','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5963541"><span>Redox battery including a <span class="hlt">bromine</span> positive electrode and a chromium ion negative electrode and method</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Giner, J.D.; Stark, H.H.</p> <p>1984-09-04</p> <p>A redox flow battery with a positive half-cell compartment containing bromide ion, <span class="hlt">bromine</span> and a complexing organic liquid for <span class="hlt">bromine</span>, and a negative electrode half-cell compartment containing chromium ion, and including electrolyte fluid communication therebetween.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.3538V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.3538V"><span>What can <span class="hlt">bromine</span> in ice cores tell us about Arctic sea ice in the past?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vallelonga, Paul; Spolaor, Andrea; Maffazzoli, Niccolo; Kjær, Helle; Barbante, Carlo; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Bromine</span> is of interest as a potential sea ice proxy due to its role in polar atmospheric chemistry, particularly the photochemical "<span class="hlt">bromine</span> explosion" events which occur over the seasonal sea ice surface. A growing body of literature has demonstrated that <span class="hlt">bromine</span> is reliably deposited and preserved in polar ice caps and can be used to investigate variability over timescales varying from seasonal to multimillenial. For sea ice reconstructions, <span class="hlt">bromine</span> and sodium are usually evaluated with respect to their relative abundances in seawater. Competing processes of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> enrichment due to the <span class="hlt">bromine</span> explosion, and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> depletion due to scavenging and deposition, must be taken into account when comparing results from coastal and inland sampling sites. We will review existing <span class="hlt">bromine</span>-based sea ice reconstructions and present new data for locations from Svalbard, Severnaya Zemlya, Northwest Greenland (NEEM ice core) and central East Greenland (Renland ice core).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982whe..conf.....K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982whe..conf.....K"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> hydrogen production based on magnetic fusion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Krikorian, O. H.; Brown, L. C.</p> <p>1982-06-01</p> <p>Conceptual design studies were carried out on an integrated fusion/chemical plant system using a Tandem Mirror Reactor fusion energy source to drive the General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Water-Splitting <span class="hlt">Cycle</span> and produce hydrogen as a future feedstock for synthetic fuels. Blanket design studies for the Tandem Mirror Reactor show that several design alternatives are available for providing heat at sufficiently high temperatures to drive the General Atomic <span class="hlt">Cycle</span>. The concept of a Joule-boosted decomposer is introduced in one of the systems investigated to provide heat electrically for the highest temperature step in the <span class="hlt">cycle</span> (the SO3 decomposition step), and thus lower blanket design requirements and costs. Flowsheeting and conceptual process designs have been developed for a complete fusion-driven hydrogen plant, and the information has been used to develop a plot plan for the plant and to estimate hydrogen production costs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/981918','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/981918"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemically</span> Driven Gas-Dynamic Fracturing (TDGF)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Michael Goodwin</p> <p>2008-12-31</p> <p>This report concerns efforts to increase oil well productivity and efficiency via a method of heating the oil-bearing rock of the well, a technique known as <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Gas-Dynamic Fracturing (TGDF). The technique uses either a chemical reaction or a combustion event to raise the temperature of the rock of the well, thereby increasing oil velocity, and oil pumping rate. Such technology has shown promise for future application to both older wellheads and also new sites. The need for such technologies in the oil extraction field, along with the merits of the TGDF technology is examined in Chapter 1. The theoretical basis underpinning applications of TGDF is explained in Chapter 2. It is shown that productivity of depleted well can be increased by one order of magnitude after heating a reservoir region of radius 15-20 m around the well by 100 degrees 1-2 times per year. Two variants of thermal stimulation are considered: uniform heating and optimal temperature distribution in the formation region around the perforation zone. It is demonstrated that the well productivity attained by using equal amounts of thermal energy is higher by a factor of 3 to 4 in the case of optimal temperature distribution as compared to uniform distribution. Following this theoretical basis, two practical approaches to applying TDGF are considered. Chapter 3 looks at the use of chemical intiators to raise the rock temperature in the well via an exothermic chemical reaction. The requirements for such a delivery device are discussed, and several novel fuel-oxidizing mixtures (FOM) are investigated in conditions simulating those at oil-extracting depths. Such FOM mixtures, particularly ones containing nitric acid and a chemical initiator, are shown to dramatically increase the temperature of the oil-bearing rock, and thus the productivity of the well. Such tests are substantiated by preliminary fieldwork in Russian oil fields. A second, more cost effective approach to TGDF is considered in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011SPIE.8029E..1JV','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011SPIE.8029E..1JV"><span>Environmental monitoring of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> flame retardants</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vagula, Mary C.; Kubeldis, Nathan; Nelatury, Charles F.</p> <p>2011-06-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Brominated</span> flame retardants (BFRs) are synthetic organobromide compounds which inhibit ignition and combustion processes. Because of their immense ability to retard fire and save life and property, they have been extensively used in many products such as TVs, computers, foam, plastics etc. The five major classes of BFRs are tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), pentabromodiphenyl ether, octabromodiphenyl ether, and decabromodiphenyl ether. The last three are also commonly called PBDEs. BDE-85 and BDE-209 are the two prominent congeners of PBDEs and this study reports the adverse effects of these congeners in rodents. Exposure of rat sciatic nerves to 5 μg/mL and 20 μg/mL of BDE-85 and BDE-209 respectively lead to significant, concentration dependent reduction in nerve conduction function. Glucose absorption in the rat intestinal segments exposed to 5 μg/mL of BDE-85 and BDE-209 was significantly reduced for both the compounds tested. Lastly, mice when exposed to 0.25 mg/kg body weight for four days showed a disruption in oxidant and antioxidant equilibrium. The tissues namely liver and brain have shown increase in the levels of lipid hydroperoxides indicating oxidative stress. Moreover, all the protective enzymes namely superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase, and glutathione S transferase (GST) have shown tissue specific alterations indicating the induction of damaging oxidative stress and setting in of lipid peroxidation in exposed animals. The results indicate monitoring of PBDEs in the environment is essential because levels as low as 5 μg/mL and 0.25 mg/kg body weight were able to cause damage to the functions of rodents.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28377327','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28377327"><span><span class="hlt">Brominated</span> flame retardant: environmental and exposed individuals' health impact.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dufour, Patrice; Charlier, Corinne</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Since Antiquity, men have used chemicals to protect their goods against fire. Effective and easy to use, <span class="hlt">brominated</span> flame retardants are used since decades massively in plastic industry. Such like other organohalogenated compounds, <span class="hlt">brominated</span> flame retardants are very persistent in the environment and able to accumulate along the food chain. Many authors highlight their presence in the environment, in many animal species and in the human serum. Worryingly, man is exposed as soon as the pregnancy and then by the breastfeeding. This exposition may have consequence on our health. Many studies (in vitro, in vivo or epidemiologic) highlight <span class="hlt">brominated</span> flame retardant negative effects on the endocrine system, mainly on the thyroid function but also on the reproduction, the neurodevelopment in the children and on the metabolism with increasing diabetes risk. If authorities and some big enterprises are aware about the problematic, new studies are needed to confirm previous results, elucidate endocrine disrupting mechanisms and highlight hypothetical synergies with other pollutants such like PCBs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991JOM....43l..35P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991JOM....43l..35P"><span>A rotating disk study of gold dissolution by <span class="hlt">bromine</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pesic, Batric; Sergent, Rodney H.</p> <p>1991-12-01</p> <p>Gold dissolution with <span class="hlt">bromine</span> was studied using the rotating disk technique with Geobrom™ 3400 as a source of <span class="hlt">bromine</span>. The parameters studied were speed of rotation, lixiviant concentration, pH, temperature, sulfuric acid and hydrochloric acid concentrations, and the concentrations of various cations (i.e., copper, iron, zinc, aluminum, manganese, potassium, and sodium) and anions (i.e., chloride, bromide, sulfate, nitrate, and iodide). According to the Lavich plot and activation energy, gold dissolution is controlled by a chemical reaction rate. Copper, iron, and manganese in their highest oxidation states, as well as aluminum, zinc, sodium, and potassium, have no effect on the rate of gold dissolution. The presence of manganous ion substantially decreases the gold dissolution rate. The kinetic performance of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> was found to be dramatically better than the performance of cyanide and thiourea.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930051388&hterms=Bromine&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DBromine','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930051388&hterms=Bromine&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DBromine"><span>The <span class="hlt">bromine</span> content of micrometeorites - Arguments for stratospheric contamination</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Bromine</span>-salt nanocrystals are associated with a porous chondritic micrometeorite (W7029E5) that was collected in the lower stratosphere. These salt nanocrystals occur together with volcanic Na and K salt nanocrystals embedded in sulfuric acid droplets that were originally adhered to the particle. These materials were concentrated during hexane rinsing as part of routine curation procedures at the NASA Johnson Space Center Cosmic Dust Curatorial Facility. This observation is fortuitous to the extent that the concentration of nanocrystals and sulfuric acid is an experimental artifact of curation. If <span class="hlt">bromine</span> is a stratospheric contaminant due to surface adsorption, there should be a positive linear relationship between the mass-normalized residence time and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> content of individual micrometeorites. I show that the predicted correlation exists using a new model to calculate the stratospheric residence time of individual nonspherical micrometeorites in the slow-settling Wilson-Huang regime of the stratosphere.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750051367&hterms=bromine&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dbromine','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750051367&hterms=bromine&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dbromine"><span>The chemistry of atmospheric <span class="hlt">bromine</span>. [catalyst for ozone destruction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Wofsy, S. C.; Mcelroy, M. B.; Yung, Y. L.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Bromine</span> may act as a catalyst for recombination of ozone and could be more efficient than either nitric oxide or chlorine. The lower atmosphere contains small concentrations of gaseous <span class="hlt">bromine</span> produced in part by marine activity and volatilization of particulate material released during the combustion of leaded gasoline, with an additional contribution due to the use of methyl bromide as an agricultural fumigant. Observations by Lazrus et al., (1975) indicate small concentrations of <span class="hlt">bromine</span>, about 10 to the -11th power (v/v), in the contemporary stratosphere and appear to imply a reduction of approximately 0.3% in the global budget of O3. Estimates are given for future reductions in O3 which might occur if the use of CH3Br as an agricultural fumigant were to continue to grow at present rates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930051388&hterms=bromine&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dbromine','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930051388&hterms=bromine&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dbromine"><span>The <span class="hlt">bromine</span> content of micrometeorites - Arguments for stratospheric contamination</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Bromine</span>-salt nanocrystals are associated with a porous chondritic micrometeorite (W7029E5) that was collected in the lower stratosphere. These salt nanocrystals occur together with volcanic Na and K salt nanocrystals embedded in sulfuric acid droplets that were originally adhered to the particle. These materials were concentrated during hexane rinsing as part of routine curation procedures at the NASA Johnson Space Center Cosmic Dust Curatorial Facility. This observation is fortuitous to the extent that the concentration of nanocrystals and sulfuric acid is an experimental artifact of curation. If <span class="hlt">bromine</span> is a stratospheric contaminant due to surface adsorption, there should be a positive linear relationship between the mass-normalized residence time and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> content of individual micrometeorites. I show that the predicted correlation exists using a new model to calculate the stratospheric residence time of individual nonspherical micrometeorites in the slow-settling Wilson-Huang regime of the stratosphere.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982JElS..129.1747K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982JElS..129.1747K"><span>Sessile drop studies on polybromide/zinc-<span class="hlt">bromine</span> battery electrolyte</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kinoshita, K.; Leach, S. C.</p> <p>1982-08-01</p> <p>The sessile drop method was employed to examine the interfacial tension and contact angle of polybromide oil drops. <span class="hlt">Bromine</span> in equilibrium with an aqueous phase and a polybromide oil phase were added to a battery cell with a ruthenized titanium electrode with the electrode surface facing up. A polybromide oil drop was placed on the electrode surface while the height of the drop was measured with a cathetometer and 35 mm photographs were taken of the drop profiles. The sessile drop was analyzed to find the interfacial tension and contact angle of the drop. Interfacial tensions were calculated which were lower than reported for two-phase systems having organic and aqueous phases. The results are regarded as significant for applications of zinc-<span class="hlt">bromine</span> batteries, indicating that small polybromide oil phase drops can enhance the mass transfer of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> from a polybromide to the electrode.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993JGR....98.7409R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993JGR....98.7409R"><span>The <span class="hlt">bromine</span> content of micrometeorites - Arguments for stratospheric contamination</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rietmeijer, F. J. M.</p> <p>1993-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Bromine</span>-salt nanocrystals are associated with a porous chondritic micrometeorite (W7029E5) that was collected in the lower stratosphere. These salt nanocrystals occur together with volcanic Na and K salt nanocrystals embedded in sulfuric acid droplets that were originally adhered to the particle. These materials were concentrated during hexane rinsing as part of routine curation procedures at the NASA Johnson Space Center Cosmic Dust Curatorial Facility. This observation is fortuitous to the extent that the concentration of nanocrystals and sulfuric acid is an experimental artifact of curation. If <span class="hlt">bromine</span> is a stratospheric contaminant due to surface adsorption, there should be a positive linear relationship between the mass-normalized residence time and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> content of individual micrometeorites. I show that the predicted correlation exists using a new model to calculate the stratospheric residence time of individual nonspherical micrometeorites in the slow-settling Wilson-Huang regime of the stratosphere.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6806699','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6806699"><span>Development of <span class="hlt">Bromine</span>-77 from the LAMPF facility</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mettler, F.A.; Hylarides, M.</p> <p>1982-12-03</p> <p>The objective of the work is to conduct the necessary studies required to evaluate the efficacy, potential benefit and role of <span class="hlt">bromine</span>-77 labelled steroids in the detection and evaluation of treatment for hormone-dependent tumors. The synthetic goals of 1982-3 included the synthesis estradiol derivatives which were radiohalogenated in the A- or C-ring with <span class="hlt">bromine</span>-77 or <span class="hlt">bromine</span>-82. Estradiol derivatives in which the radiohalogen was incorporated into the C-ring were prepared and purified with high specific activity. Biodistribution studies of the resultant compounds will be performed on rats in the near future. Various synthetic approaches toward estradiol which is radiohalogenated in the 1-position are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol24/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol24-sec180-519.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol24/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol24-sec180-519.pdf"><span>40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual <span class="hlt">bromine</span>; tolerances for residues.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... polybrominated ion-exchange resin (as a source of <span class="hlt">bromine</span>) under the supervision of trained personnel. (2... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual <span class="hlt">bromine</span>... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual <span class="hlt">bromine</span>; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/865587','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/865587"><span>Method and apparatus for maintaining the pH in zinc-<span class="hlt">bromine</span> battery systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Grimes, Patrick G.</p> <p>1985-09-10</p> <p>A method and apparatus for maintaining the pH level in a zinc-<span class="hlt">bromine</span> battery features reacting decomposition hydrogen with <span class="hlt">bromine</span> in the presence of a catalyst. The catalyst encourages the formation of hydrogen and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> ions. The decomposition hydrogen is therefore consumed, alloying the pH of the system to remain substantially at a given value.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21231885','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21231885"><span>Temporal effects in porcine skin following <span class="hlt">bromine</span> vapor exposure.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Price, Jennifer A; Rogers, James V; Wendling, Morgan Q S; Plahovinsak, Jennifer L; Perry, Mark R; Reid, Frances M; Kiser, Robyn C; Graham, John S</p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Bromine</span> is an industrial chemical that causes severe cutaneous burns. When selecting or developing effective treatments for <span class="hlt">bromine</span> burns, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms of tissue damage and wound healing. This study investigated the effect of cutaneous <span class="hlt">bromine</span> vapor exposure on gene expression using a weanling swine burn model by microarray analysis. Ventral abdominal sites were exposed to a mean calculated <span class="hlt">bromine</span> vapor concentration of 0.51 g/L for 7 or 17 min. At 6 h, 48 h, and 7 days post-exposure, total RNA from skin samples was isolated, processed, and analyzed with Affymetrix GeneChip® Porcine Genome Arrays (N = 3 per experimental group). Differences in gene expression were observed with respect to exposure duration and sampling time. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) revealed four common biological functions (cancer, cellular movement, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, and tissue development) among the top ten functions of each experimental group, while canonical pathway analysis revealed 9 genes (ARG2, CCR1, HMOX1, ATF2, IL-8, TIMP1, ESR1, HSPAIL, and SELE) that were commonly shared among four significantly altered signaling pathways. Among these, the transcripts encoding HMOX1 and ESR1 were identified using IPA as common potential therapeutic targets for Phase II/III clinical trial or FDA-approved drugs. The present study describes the transcriptional responses to cutaneous <span class="hlt">bromine</span> vapor exposure identifying molecular networks and genes that could serve as targets for developing therapeutics for <span class="hlt">bromine</span>-induced skin injury.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/982123','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/982123"><span>A Study of the Theoretical Potential of <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Exhaust Heat Recuperation for Internal Combustion Engines</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Chakravarthy, Veerathu K; Daw, C Stuart; Pihl, Josh A; Conklin, Jim</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>We present a detailed thermodynamic analysis of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> recuperation (TCR) applied to an idealized internal combustion engine with single-stage work extraction. Results for several different fuels are included. For a stoichiometric mixture of methanol and air, TCR can increase the estimated ideal engine Second Law efficiency by about 3% for constant pressure reforming and over 5% for constant volume reforming. For ethanol and isooctane the estimated Second Law efficiency increases for constant volume reforming are 9% and 11%, respectively. The Second Law efficiency improvements from TCR result primarily from the higher intrinsic exergy of the reformed fuel and pressure boost associated with gas mole increase. Reduced combustion irreversibility may also yield benefits for future implementations of combined <span class="hlt">cycle</span> work extraction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/986776','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/986776"><span>A Study of the Theoretical Potential of <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Exhaust Heat Recuperation in Internal Combustion Engines</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Daw, C Stuart; Pihl, Josh A; Chakravarthy, Veerathu K; Conklin, Jim</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>A detailed thermodynamic analysis of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> recuperation (TCR) applied to an idealized internal combustion engine with single-stage work extraction is presented. Results for several different fuels are included. For a stoichiometric mixture of methanol and air, TCR can increase the estimated ideal engine second law efficiency by about 3% for constant pressure reforming and over 5% for constant volume reforming. For ethanol and isooctane, the estimated second law efficiency increases for constant volume reforming are 9 and 11%, respectively. The second law efficiency improvements from TCR result primarily from the higher intrinsic exergy of the reformed fuel and pressure boost associated with the gas mole increase. Reduced combustion irreversibility may also yield benefits for future implementations of combined <span class="hlt">cycle</span> work extraction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5448949','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5448949"><span>Effective Heat and Mass Transport Properties of Anisotropic Porous Ceria for Solar <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Fuel Generation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Haussener, Sophia; Steinfeld, Aldo</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>High-resolution X-ray computed tomography is employed to obtain the exact 3D geometrical configuration of porous anisotropic ceria applied in solar-driven <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> <span class="hlt">cycles</span> for splitting H2O and CO2. The tomography data are, in turn, used in direct pore-level numerical simulations for determining the morphological and effective heat/mass transport properties of porous ceria, namely: porosity, specific surface area, pore size distribution, extinction coefficient, thermal conductivity, convective heat transfer coefficient, permeability, Dupuit-Forchheimer coefficient, and tortuosity and residence time distributions. Tailored foam designs for enhanced transport properties are examined by means of adjusting morphologies of artificial ceria samples composed of bimodal distributed overlapping transparent spheres in an opaque medium. PMID:28817039</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20685112','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20685112"><span>Seasonal variation in the chemical composition of the bioenergy feedstock Laminaria digitata for <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> conversion.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Adams, J M M; Ross, A B; Anastasakis, K; Hodgson, E M; Gallagher, J A; Jones, J M; Donnison, I S</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>To avoid negative impacts on food production, novel non-food biofuel feedstocks need to be identified and utilised. One option is to utilise marine biomass, notably fast-growing, large marine 'plants' such as the macroalgal kelps. This paper reports on the changing composition of Laminaria digitata throughout it growth <span class="hlt">cycle</span> as determined by new technologies. The potential of Laminaria sp. as a feedstock for biofuel production and future biorefining possibilities was assessed through proximate and ultimate analysis, initial pyrolysis rates using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), metals content and pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Samples harvested in March contained the lowest proportion of carbohydrate and the highest ash and alkali metal content, whereas samples harvested in July contained the highest proportions of carbohydrate, lowest alkali metals and ash content. July was therefore considered the most suitable month for harvesting kelp biomass for <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> conversion to biofuels. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28817039','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28817039"><span>Effective Heat and Mass Transport Properties of Anisotropic Porous Ceria for Solar <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Fuel Generation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Haussener, Sophia; Steinfeld, Aldo</p> <p>2012-01-19</p> <p>High-resolution X-ray computed tomography is employed to obtain the exact 3D geometrical configuration of porous anisotropic ceria applied in solar-driven <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> <span class="hlt">cycles</span> for splitting H2O and CO2. The tomography data are, in turn, used in direct pore-level numerical simulations for determining the morphological and effective heat/mass transport properties of porous ceria, namely: porosity, specific surface area, pore size distribution, extinction coefficient, thermal conductivity, convective heat transfer coefficient, permeability, Dupuit-Forchheimer coefficient, and tortuosity and residence time distributions. Tailored foam designs for enhanced transport properties are examined by means of adjusting morphologies of artificial ceria samples composed of bimodal distributed overlapping transparent spheres in an opaque medium.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10656411','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10656411"><span><span class="hlt">Brominated</span> anisoles and cresols in the red alga Polysiphonia sphaerocarpa.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Flodin, C; Whitfield, F B</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>The red marine alga Polysiphonia sphaerocarpa was extracted by a simultaneous steam distillation-solvent extraction technique and several <span class="hlt">brominated</span> compounds were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The compounds detected were 2,4-dibromoanisole, 2,4,6-tribromoanisole, 3-bromocresol, 3,5-dibromocresol, 3-bromo-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 2-bromophenol, 4-bromophenol, 2,4-dibromophenol, 2,6-dibromophenol and 2,4,6-tribromophenol. This is the first time <span class="hlt">brominated</span> anisoles and cresols have been detected in marine algae.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPS...288..187S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPS...288..187S"><span>Levelized cost of energy and sensitivity analysis for the hydrogen-<span class="hlt">bromine</span> flow battery</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Singh, Nirala; McFarland, Eric W.</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>The technoeconomics of the hydrogen-<span class="hlt">bromine</span> flow battery are investigated. Using existing performance data the operating conditions were optimized to minimize the levelized cost of electricity using individual component costs for the flow battery stack and other system units. Several different configurations were evaluated including use of a <span class="hlt">bromine</span> complexing agent to reduce membrane requirements. Sensitivity analysis of cost is used to identify the system elements most strongly influencing the economics. The stack lifetime and round-trip efficiency of the cell are identified as major factors on the levelized cost of electricity, along with capital components related to hydrogen storage, the bipolar plate, and the membrane. Assuming that an electrocatalyst and membrane with a lifetime of 2000 <span class="hlt">cycles</span> can be identified, the lowest cost market entry system capital is 220 kWh-1 for a 4 h discharge system and for a charging energy cost of 0.04 kWh-1 the levelized cost of the electricity delivered is 0.40 kWh-1. With systems manufactured at large scales these costs are expected to be lower.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1850i0004K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1850i0004K"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> storage for CSP via redox structured reactors/heat exchangers: The RESTRUCTURE project</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Karagiannakis, George; Pagkoura, Chrysoula; Konstandopoulos, Athanasios G.; Tescari, Stefania; Singh, Abhishek; Roeb, Martin; Lange, Matthias; Marcher, Johnny; Jové, Aleix; Prieto, Cristina; Rattenbury, Michael; Chasiotis, Andreas</p> <p>2017-06-01</p> <p>The present work provides an overview of activities performed in the framework of the EU-funded collaborative project RESTRUCTURE, the main goal of which was to develop and validate a compact structured reactor/heat exchanger for <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> storage driven by 2-step high temperature redox metal oxide <span class="hlt">cycles</span>. The starting point of development path included redox materials qualification via both theoretical and lab-scale experimental studies. Most favorable compositions were cobalt oxide/alumina composites. Preparation of small-scale structured bodies included various approaches, ranging from perforated pellets to more sophisticated honeycomb geometries, fabricated by extrusion and coating. Proof-of-concept of the proposed novel reactor/heat exchanger was successfully validated in small-scale structures and the next step included scaling up of redox honeycombs production. Significant challenges were identified for the case of extruded full-size bodies and the final qualified approach related to preparation of cordierite substrates coated with cobalt oxide. The successful experimental evaluation of the pilot reactor/heat exchanger system constructed motivated the preliminary techno-economic evaluation of the proposed novel <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> energy storage concept. Taking into account experimental results, available technologies and standard design aspects a model for a 70.5 MWe CSP plant was defined. Estimated LCOE costs were calculated to be in the range of reference values for Combined <span class="hlt">Cycle</span> Power Plants operated by natural gas. One of main cost contributors was the storage system itself, partially due to relatively high cost of cobalt oxide. This highlighted the need to identify less costly and equally efficient to cobalt oxide redox materials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17156788','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17156788"><span>Recent developments in the analysis of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> flame retardants and <span class="hlt">brominated</span> natural compounds.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Covaci, Adrian; Voorspoels, Stefan; Ramos, Lourdes; Neels, Hugo; Blust, Ronny</p> <p>2007-06-15</p> <p>This article reviews recent literature on the analysis of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> flame retardants (BFRs) and <span class="hlt">brominated</span> natural compounds (BNCs). The main literature sources are reviews from the last five years and research articles reporting new analytical developments published between 2003 and 2006. Sample pretreatment, extraction, clean-up and fractionation, injection techniques, chromatographic separation, detection methods, quality control and method validation are discussed. Only few new techniques, such as solid-phase microextraction (SPME) or pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), have been investigated for their ability of combining the extraction and clean-up steps. With respect to the separation of BFRs, the most important developments were the use of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and the growing tendency for liquid-chromatographic techniques for hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) stereoisomers and of tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBP-A). At the detection stage, mass spectrometry (MS) has been developed as well-established and reliable technology in the identification and quantification of BFRs. A growing attention has been paid to quality assurance. Interlaboratory exercises directed towards BFRs have grown in popularity and have enabled laboratories to validate analytical methods and to guarantee the quality of their results. The analytical procedures used for the identification and characterization of several classes of BNCs, such as methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs) (also metabolites of PBDEs), halogenated methyl or dimethyl bipyrroles (DBPs), are reviewed here for the first time. These compounds were generally identified during the routine analysis of BFRs and have received little attention until recently. For each topic, an overview is presented of its current status.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27087522','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27087522"><span>Sensing and inactivation of Bacillus anthracis Sterne by polymer-<span class="hlt">bromine</span> complexes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>D'Angelo, Paola A; Bromberg, Lev; Hatton, T Alan; Wilusz, Eugene</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>We report on the performance of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP-Br), <span class="hlt">brominated</span> poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-Br), and <span class="hlt">brominated</span> poly(allylamine-co-4-aminopyridine) (PAAm-APy-Br) for their ability to decontaminate Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores in solution while also allowing for the sensing of the spores. The polymers were <span class="hlt">brominated</span> by <span class="hlt">bromine</span> using carbon tetrachloride or potassium tribromide as solvents, with <span class="hlt">bromine</span> loadings ranging from 1.6 to 4.2 mEq/g of polymer. B. anthracis Sterne spores were exposed to increasing concentrations of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> polymers for 5 min, while the kinetics of the sporicidal activity was assessed. All <span class="hlt">brominated</span> polymers demonstrated spore log-kills of 8 within 5 min of exposure at 12 mg/mL aqueous polymer concentration. Sensing of spores was accomplished by measuring the release of dipicolinic acid (DPA) from the spore using time-resolved fluorescence. Parent, non-<span class="hlt">brominated</span> polymers did not cause any release of DPA and the spores remained viable. In contrast, spores exposed to the <span class="hlt">brominated</span> polymers were inactivated and the release of DPA was observed within minutes of exposure. Also, this release of DPA continued for a long time after spore inactivation as in a controlled release process. The DPA release was more pronounced for spores exposed to <span class="hlt">brominated</span> PVP and <span class="hlt">brominated</span> PEG-8000 compared to <span class="hlt">brominated</span> PAAm-APy and <span class="hlt">brominated</span> PEG-400. Using time-resolved fluorescence, we detected as low as 2500 B. anthracis spores, with PEG-8000 being more sensitive to low spore numbers. Our results suggest that the <span class="hlt">brominated</span> polymers may be used effectively as decontamination agents against bacterial spores while also providing the sensing capability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/825828','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/825828"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Processing of Radioactive Waste Using Powder Metal Fuels</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ojovan, M. I.; Sobolev, I. A.; Dmitriev, S. A.; Panteleev, V. I.; Karlina, O. K.; Klimov. V. L.</p> <p>2003-02-25</p> <p>Problematic radioactive wastes were generated during various activities of both industrial facilities and research institutions usually in relative small amounts. These can be spent ion exchange resins, inorganic absorbents, wastes from research nuclear reactors, irradiated graphite, mixed, organic or chlorine-containing radioactive waste, contaminated soils, un-burnable heavily surface-contaminated materials, etc. Conventional treatment methods encounter serious problems concerning processing efficiency of such waste, e.g. complete destruction of organic molecules and avoiding of possible emissions of radionuclides, heavy metals and chemically hazardous species. Some contaminations cannot be removed from surface using common decontamination methods. Conditioning of ash residues obtained after treatment of solid radioactive waste including ashes received from treating problematic wastes also is a complicated task. Moreover due to relative small volume of specific type radioactive waste the development of target treatment procedures and facilities to conduct technological processes and their deployment could be economically unexpedient and ecologically no justified. <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> processing technologies are used for treating and conditioning problematic radioactive wastes. The <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> processing uses powdered metal fuels (PMF) that are specifically formulated for the waste composition and react chemically with the waste components. The composition of the PMF is designed in such a way as to minimize the release of hazardous components and radionuclides in the off gas and to confine the contaminants in the ash residue. The <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> procedures allow decomposition of organic matter and capturing hazardous radionuclides and chemical species simultaneously. A significant advantage of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> processing is its autonomy. <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> treatment technologies use the energy of exothermic reactions in the mixture of radioactive or hazardous waste with PMF</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992Metic..27Q.280R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992Metic..27Q.280R"><span><span class="hlt">Bromine</span> in Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs): Evidence for Stratospheric Contamination</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rietmeijer, F. J. M.</p> <p>1992-07-01</p> <p>Chondritic IDPs that are collected in the lower stratosphere are enriched in <span class="hlt">bromine</span>: up to 40 x CI in an individual IDP [1]. The average enrichment is 19 x CI [2]. Volatile element enrichments in chondritic IDPs show a general increase with increased element volatility [1,2] which is consistent with solar nebula condensation models. However, the <span class="hlt">bromine</span> enrichment is markedly up from the general volatile element enrichment trend. Stratospheric <span class="hlt">bromine</span> derives from anthropogenic and volcanic activities and micrometeoroid ablation and evaporation [3]. It is possible that a portion or all <span class="hlt">bromine</span> in IDPs is stratospheric surface contamination. In this case there should be an inverse correlation between <span class="hlt">bromine</span> content and IDP size [1,4]. This correlation is not obvious because it may be complicated by the different ability of exposed IDP surfaces to adsorb volatile elements [1]. To evaluate this model it is important to know whether <span class="hlt">bromine</span> occurs in a distinct mineral phase [5] or in a surface layer that might not survive the curatorial rinsing procedure. Another factor is the IDP stratospheric residence time. In my continued AEM analyses of ultrathin CP IDP sections, I recently observed round Br-containing grains associated with CP IDP W7029E5. These grains (11.6-744 nm in diameter) have a volatile matrix with abundant nanocrystals. Their bulk composition shows the presence of Na, K, Br, Cl, and S. Polycrystalline rings in their diffraction patterns are consistent with KBrO(sub)3, KCl, Na(sub)2SO(sub)3 and Na(sub)2S(sub)2 [Gail Fraundorf, written comm., 1991]. These round grains resemble sulfuric acid droplets associated with silica grains in other CP IDPs [6]. The sulfuric acid was washed off the silica grain surface during curatorial hexane rinsing of IDPs. The AEM data confirm a Br-bearing layer on W7029E5. This study is the first, and so far only, observation of Br-bearing material associated with chondritic IDPs in support of a stratospheric <span class="hlt">bromine</span> surface</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1850i0006T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1850i0006T"><span>Experimental proof of concept of a pilot-scale <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> storage unit</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tescari, Stefania; Singh, Abhishek; de Oliveira, Lamark; Breuer, Stefan; Agrafiotis, Christos; Roeb, Martin; Sattler, Christian; Marcher, Johnny; Pagkoura, Chrysa; Karagiannakis, George; Konstandopoulos, Athanasios G.</p> <p>2017-06-01</p> <p>The present study presents installation and operation of the first pilot scale thermal storage unit based on <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> redox-<span class="hlt">cycles</span>. The reactive core is composed of a honeycomb ceramic substrate, coated with cobalt oxide. This concept, already analyzed and presented at lab-scale, is now implemented at a larger scale: a total of 280 kg of storage material including 90 kg of cobalt oxide. The storage block was implemented inside an existing solar facility and connected to the complete experimental set-up. This experimental set-up is presented, with focus on the measurement system and the possible improvement for a next campaign. Start-up and operation of the system is described during the first complete charge-discharge <span class="hlt">cycle</span>. The effect of the chemical reaction on the stored capacity is clearly detected by analysis of the temperature distribution data obtained during the experiments. Furthermore two consecutive <span class="hlt">cycles</span> show no evident loss of reactivity inside the material. The system is <span class="hlt">cycled</span> between 650°C and 1000°C. In this temperature range, the total energy stored was about 50 kWh, corresponding to an energy density of 630 kJ/kg. In conclusion, the concept feasibility was successfully shown, together with a first calculation on the system performance.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990PhDT.......104T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990PhDT.......104T"><span>Kinetics of the Reactions of <span class="hlt">Bromine</span> Monoxide Radicals with Chlorine Monoxide and <span class="hlt">Bromine</span> Monoxide, and the Chemiluminescent Reactions of Fluorine with Dimethyl Sulfide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Turnipseed, Andrew Allen</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>The chemistry of BrO radicals has been investigated using the technique of discharge flow coupled to mass spectrometry. BrO radicals play an important role in <span class="hlt">bromine</span> chemistry of the stratosphere where they are predicted to be one of the most predominant forms of <span class="hlt">bromine</span>. The reactions of BrO + BrO and Bro + ClO are rate determining steps in two catalytic destruction <span class="hlt">cycles</span> for ozone which do not involve O atoms and should be important in the lower stratosphere and in the recently discovered ozone "hole" in Antarctica. Up to 25% of the ozone depletion is thought to occur through the coupling of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> and chlorine chemistry in the BrO + ClO reaction. The present study has investigated the reaction of BrO + BrO over the temperature range of 253-400 K and found that the rate coefficient can be fit with the Arrhenius expression k_7(T) = (1.06 +/- 0.20) times 10 ^{-12} exp((251 +/- 56)/T) cm^3 molec ^{-1} s^{-1 }. The reaction exhibits a small negative temperature dependence and is in good agreement with past measurements. Furthermore the branching ratio into the channel forming Br_2 has been measured to be 0.12 +/- 0.04 at room temperature. The rate coefficient for the BrO + ClO reaction has been found to fit the Arrhenius expression k_5(T) = (2.59 +/- 0.36) times 10^{-12} exp((445 +/- 50)/T) cm^3 molec^{-1} s^ {-1} over the temperature range 234-408 K. Three product channels have been identified and quantified: (a) ClOO + Br, (b) OClO + Br, and (c) BrCl + O _2 as a function of temperature. These measurements have shown that the BrO + ClO reaction does proceed at a fast enough rate at low temperatures to be a major factor in ozone destruction in the polar stratosphere. A third study completed was of the reaction of F_2 + dimethyl sulfide which produces intense chemiluminescence. This reaction was undertaken in order to understand the workings of the F_2 -induced chemiluminescence detector for gas chromatography developed in our laboratory. It was found that this</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JSSCh.253....6A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JSSCh.253....6A"><span>High-temperature <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> energy storage based on redox reactions using Co-Fe and Mn-Fe mixed metal oxides</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>André, Laurie; Abanades, Stéphane; Cassayre, Laurent</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p>Metal oxides are potential materials for <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> heat storage via reversible endothermal/exothermal redox reactions, and among them, cobalt oxide and manganese oxide are attracting attention. The synthesis of mixed oxides is considered as a way to answer the drawbacks of pure metal oxides, such as slow reaction kinetics, loss-in-capacity over <span class="hlt">cycles</span> or sintering issues, and the materials potential for <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> heat storage application needs to be assessed. This work proposes a study combining thermodynamic calculations and experimental measurements by simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis and calorimetry, in order to identify the impact of iron oxide addition to Co and Mn-based oxides. Fe addition decreased the redox activity and energy storage capacity of Co3O4/CoO, whereas the reaction rate, reversibility and <span class="hlt">cycling</span> stability of Mn2O3/Mn3O4 was significantly enhanced with added Fe amounts above 15 mol%, and the energy storage capacity was slightly improved. The formation of a reactive cubic spinel explained the improved re-oxidation yield of Mn-based oxides that could be <span class="hlt">cycled</span> between bixbyite and cubic spinel phases, whereas a low reactive tetragonal spinel phase showing poor re-oxidation was formed below 15 mol% Fe. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations predict accurately the behavior of both systems. The possibility to identify other suitable mixed oxides becomes conceivable, by enabling the selection of transition metal additives for tuning the redox properties of mixed metal oxides destined for <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> energy storage applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25479688','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25479688"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> conversion of microalgal biomass into biofuels: a review.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Wei-Hsin; Lin, Bo-Jhih; Huang, Ming-Yueh; Chang, Jo-Shu</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Following first-generation and second-generation biofuels produced from food and non-food crops, respectively, algal biomass has become an important feedstock for the production of third-generation biofuels. Microalgal biomass is characterized by rapid growth and high carbon fixing efficiency when they grow. On account of potential of mass production and greenhouse gas uptake, microalgae are promising feedstocks for biofuels development. <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> conversion is an effective process for biofuel production from biomass. The technology mainly includes torrefaction, liquefaction, pyrolysis, and gasification. Through these conversion technologies, solid, liquid, and gaseous biofuels are produced from microalgae for heat and power generation. The liquid bio-oils can further be upgraded for chemicals, while the synthesis gas can be synthesized into liquid fuels. This paper aims to provide a state-of-the-art review of the <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> conversion technologies of microalgal biomass into fuels. Detailed conversion processes and their outcome are also addressed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780069546&hterms=energy+input&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Denergy%2Binput','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780069546&hterms=energy+input&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Denergy%2Binput"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> water decomposition. [hydrogen separation for energy applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Funk, J. E.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>At present, nearly all of the hydrogen consumed in the world is produced by reacting hydrocarbons with water. As the supply of hydrocarbons diminishes, the problem of producing hydrogen from water alone will become increasingly important. Furthermore, producing hydrogen from water is a means of energy conversion by which thermal energy from a primary source, such as solar or nuclear fusion of fission, can be changed into an easily transportable and ecologically acceptable fuel. The attraction of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> processes is that they offer the potential for converting thermal energy to hydrogen more efficiently than by water electrolysis. A <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> hydrogen-production process is one which requires only water as material input and mainly thermal energy, or heat, as an energy input. Attention is given to a definition of process thermal efficiency, the thermodynamics of the overall process, the single-stage process, the two-stage process, multistage processes, the work of separation and a process evaluation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780069546&hterms=solar+water+electrolysis&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dsolar%2Bwater%2Belectrolysis','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780069546&hterms=solar+water+electrolysis&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dsolar%2Bwater%2Belectrolysis"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> water decomposition. [hydrogen separation for energy applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Funk, J. E.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>At present, nearly all of the hydrogen consumed in the world is produced by reacting hydrocarbons with water. As the supply of hydrocarbons diminishes, the problem of producing hydrogen from water alone will become increasingly important. Furthermore, producing hydrogen from water is a means of energy conversion by which thermal energy from a primary source, such as solar or nuclear fusion of fission, can be changed into an easily transportable and ecologically acceptable fuel. The attraction of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> processes is that they offer the potential for converting thermal energy to hydrogen more efficiently than by water electrolysis. A <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> hydrogen-production process is one which requires only water as material input and mainly thermal energy, or heat, as an energy input. Attention is given to a definition of process thermal efficiency, the thermodynamics of the overall process, the single-stage process, the two-stage process, multistage processes, the work of separation and a process evaluation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/937521','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/937521"><span><span class="hlt">THERMOCHEMICAL</span> MODELING OF REFRACTORY CORROSION IN SLAGGING COAL GASIFIERS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Besmann, Theodore M</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Slagging coal gasifiers suffer corrosive attack on the refractory liner and these interactions were <span class="hlt">thermochemically</span> simulated. The slag is observed to penetrate the refractory, which complicates modeling the phase behavior of the slag-penetrated interior of the refractory. A simple strategy was adopted such that step-wise changes in composition with decreasing slag content were assumed to account for the compositional changes as slag penetrates the refractory. The <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> equilibrium calculations following this strategy typically yielded three solution phases as well as the stoichiometric crystalline phases AlPO4 and Ca3(PO4)2 depending on composition/penetration. Under some conditions a slag liquid miscibility gap exists such that two slag liquids co-exist.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120015040','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120015040"><span>Quantitative <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Measurements in High-Pressure Gaseous Combustion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kojima, Jun J.; Fischer, David G.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>We present our strategic experiment and <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> analyses on combustion flow using a subframe burst gating (SBG) Raman spectroscopy. This unconventional laser diagnostic technique has promising ability to enhance accuracy of the quantitative scalar measurements in a point-wise single-shot fashion. In the presentation, we briefly describe an experimental methodology that generates transferable calibration standard for the routine implementation of the diagnostics in hydrocarbon flames. The diagnostic technology was applied to simultaneous measurements of temperature and chemical species in a swirl-stabilized turbulent flame with gaseous methane fuel at elevated pressure (17 atm). Statistical analyses of the space-/time-resolved <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> data provide insights into the nature of the mixing process and it impact on the subsequent combustion process in the model combustor.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26504212','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26504212"><span>Airborne measurements of organic <span class="hlt">bromine</span> compounds in the Pacific tropical tropopause layer.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Navarro, Maria A; Atlas, Elliot L; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Rodriguez-Lloveras, Xavier; Kinnison, Douglas E; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Tilmes, Simone; Filus, Michal; Harris, Neil R P; Meneguz, Elena; Ashfold, Matthew J; Manning, Alistair J; Cuevas, Carlos A; Schauffler, Sue M; Donets, Valeria</p> <p>2015-11-10</p> <p>Very short-lived <span class="hlt">brominated</span> substances (VSLBr) are an important source of stratospheric <span class="hlt">bromine</span>, an effective ozone destruction catalyst. However, the accurate estimation of the organic and inorganic partitioning of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> and the input to the stratosphere remains uncertain. Here, we report near-tropopause measurements of organic <span class="hlt">brominated</span> substances found over the tropical Pacific during the NASA Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment campaigns. We combine aircraft observations and a chemistry-climate model to quantify the total <span class="hlt">bromine</span> loading injected to the stratosphere. Surprisingly, despite differences in vertical transport between the Eastern and Western Pacific, VSLBr (organic + inorganic) contribute approximately similar amounts of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> [∼6 (4-9) parts per trillion] [corrected] to the stratospheric input at the tropical tropopause. These levels of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> cause substantial ozone depletion in the lower stratosphere, and any increases in future abundances (e.g., as a result of aquaculture) will lead to larger depletions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4653143','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4653143"><span>Airborne measurements of organic <span class="hlt">bromine</span> compounds in the Pacific tropical tropopause layer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Navarro, Maria A.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Rodriguez-Lloveras, Xavier; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Tilmes, Simone; Filus, Michal; Harris, Neil R. P.; Meneguz, Elena; Ashfold, Matthew J.; Manning, Alistair J.; Cuevas, Carlos A.; Schauffler, Sue M.; Donets, Valeria</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Very short-lived <span class="hlt">brominated</span> substances (VSLBr) are an important source of stratospheric <span class="hlt">bromine</span>, an effective ozone destruction catalyst. However, the accurate estimation of the organic and inorganic partitioning of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> and the input to the stratosphere remains uncertain. Here, we report near-tropopause measurements of organic <span class="hlt">brominated</span> substances found over the tropical Pacific during the NASA Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment campaigns. We combine aircraft observations and a chemistry−climate model to quantify the total <span class="hlt">bromine</span> loading injected to the stratosphere. Surprisingly, despite differences in vertical transport between the Eastern and Western Pacific, VSLBr (organic + inorganic) contribute approximately similar amounts of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> [∼6 (4−9) parts per thousand] to the stratospheric input at the tropical tropopause. These levels of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> cause substantial ozone depletion in the lower stratosphere, and any increases in future abundances (e.g., as a result of aquaculture) will lead to larger depletions. PMID:26504212</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25560260','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25560260"><span>Estimation of the residual <span class="hlt">bromine</span> concentration after disinfection of cooling water by statistical evaluation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Megalopoulos, Fivos A; Ochsenkuehn-Petropoulou, Maria T</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>A statistical model based on multiple linear regression is developed, to estimate the <span class="hlt">bromine</span> residual that can be expected after the <span class="hlt">bromination</span> of cooling water. Make-up water sampled from a power plant in the Greek territory was used for the creation of the various cooling water matrices under investigation. The amount of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> fed to the circuit, as well as other important operational parameters such as concentration at the cooling tower, temperature, organic load and contact time are taken as the independent variables. It is found that the highest contribution to the model's predictive ability comes from cooling water's organic load concentration, followed by the amount of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> fed to the circuit, the water's mean temperature, the duration of the <span class="hlt">bromination</span> period and finally its conductivity. Comparison of the model results with the experimental data confirms its ability to predict residual <span class="hlt">bromine</span> given specific <span class="hlt">bromination</span> conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4901998','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4901998"><span>Regiodefined synthesis of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> hydroxyanthraquinones related to proisocrinins</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Roy, Joyeeta; Mal, Tanushree; Jana, Supriti</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Summary Dibromobenzoisofuranone 12, synthesized in six steps, was regiospecifically annulated with 5-substituted cyclohexenones 13/36 in the presence of LiOt-Bu to give <span class="hlt">brominated</span> anthraquinones 14/38 in good yields. Darzens condensation of 30 was shown to give chain-elongated anthraquinone 32. Alkaline hydrolysis of 38 furnished 39 representing desulfoproisocrinin F. PMID:27340445</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=90525&keyword=Bromine&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=90718988&CFTOKEN=99248257','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=90525&keyword=Bromine&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=90718988&CFTOKEN=99248257"><span>ENHANCED FORMATION OF CHLORINATED PICS BY THE ADDITION OF <span class="hlt">BROMINE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A systematic series of experiments were performed on a pilot-scale rotary kiln incinerator simulator in which liquid surrogate wastes containing varied levels of chlorine and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> were burned. The surrogate wastes used were a series of mixtures of methylene chloride and methyl...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1008493','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1008493"><span><span class="hlt">Bromine</span> in blood, EEG and transaminases in methyl bromide workers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Verberk, M M; Rooyakkers-Beemster, T; de Vlieger, M; van Vliet, A G</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>In 33 methyl bromide users, slight electroencephalographic changes (in 10 subjects) and a small increase in serum transaminases were found which could be related to <span class="hlt">bromine</span> concentration in blood. No relationship was found with subjective symptoms, general neurological examination or the results of serum protein electrophoresis. PMID:444442</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=90525&keyword=bromine&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=90525&keyword=bromine&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50"><span>ENHANCED FORMATION OF CHLORINATED PICS BY THE ADDITION OF <span class="hlt">BROMINE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A systematic series of experiments were performed on a pilot-scale rotary kiln incinerator simulator in which liquid surrogate wastes containing varied levels of chlorine and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> were burned. The surrogate wastes used were a series of mixtures of methylene chloride and methyl...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol31/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol31-sec721-3420.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol31/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol31-sec721-3420.pdf"><span>40 CFR 721.3420 - <span class="hlt">Brominated</span> arylalkyl ether.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3420 <span class="hlt">Brominated</span> arylalkyl ether. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 34637, June 18, 2014. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol32/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol32-sec721-2925.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol32/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol32-sec721-2925.pdf"><span>40 CFR 721.2925 - <span class="hlt">Brominated</span> aromatic ester.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a <span class="hlt">brominated</span> aromatic ester (PMN P-95-1128... water. Requirements as specified in § 721.90 (a)(1), (b)(1), and (c)(1). (b) Specific requirements. The...) Recordkeeping. Recordkeeping requirements as specified in § 721.125 (a), (b), (c), (f), (g), (h), (i), and (k...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1489311','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1489311"><span>[Detection of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> uptake in cadavers from seawater].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Powitz, G</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Pieces of animal and human lungs were placed in seawater. The fluids pressed of it produced in X-ray fluorescence analysis <span class="hlt">bromine</span> concentrations, which exceeded the physiological level. These experiments created the supposition to interpret correctly relevant findings in the victims of flight accidents.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/8202','TREESEARCH'); return false;" href="https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/8202"><span>Electrophilic aromatic substitution of catechins: <span class="hlt">Bromination</span> and benzylation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/">Treesearch</a></p> <p>G.W. McGraw; Richard W. Hemingway</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>Relative yields of C-6, C-8. and C-6 and C-8 substituted catechins obtained from the reaction of (+)-catechin or 3',4',5-7-tetra-O-methyl-(+)-catechin with pyridinium hydrobromide-perbromide, <span class="hlt">bromine</span>, p-hydroxybenzyl alcohol, or o-hydroxybenzyl alcohol showed differing selectivities depending upon the...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title21-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title21-vol3-sec180-30.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title21-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title21-vol3-sec180-30.pdf"><span>21 CFR 180.30 - <span class="hlt">Brominated</span> vegetable oil.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false <span class="hlt">Brominated</span> vegetable oil. 180.30 Section 180.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD OR IN CONTACT WITH FOOD ON AN INTERIM BASIS PENDING ADDITIONAL STUDY Specific...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/782591','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/782591"><span>Instructions and Changes to the NEWPEP <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Code</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>DOBBS,JENNIFER L.; GRUBELICH,MARK C.</p> <p>2001-04-01</p> <p>The NEWPEP <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> code is a computer program that has been developed to help predict the performance of a user generated propellant system. Sandia has used the program to model the use of different oxidizer/fuel combinations. The program has been adapted to fit Sandia's need by expanding the programs combustion species database and the ingredient list. This paper provides the user with a thorough set of operating instructions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10115386','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10115386"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> data for CVD modeling from ab initio calculations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ho, P.; Melius, C.F.</p> <p>1993-12-31</p> <p>Ab initio electronic-structure calculations are combined with empirical bond-additivity corrections to yield <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> properties of gas-phase molecules. A self-consistent set of heats of formation for molecules in the Si-H, Si-H-Cl, Si-H-F, Si-N-H and Si-N-H-F systems is presented, along with preliminary values for some Si-O-C-H species.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6748099','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6748099"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> pretreatment of water hyacinth for improved biomethanation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Patel, V.; Desai, M.; Madamwar, D. )</p> <p>1993-07-01</p> <p>Water hyacinth was subjected to various <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> pretreatments and used as a substrate in anaerobic digestion for biomethanation. Results indicate that the pretreatment increased the solubility of biomass and improved gas production. Best results were obtained when water hyacinth was treated at pH 11.00 and temperature 121[degrees]C. Severe treatment conditions showed a negative effect, especially on methanogenic bacteria, caused by toxic compounds produced during treatment. 19 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005EL.....71..530L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005EL.....71..530L"><span>Coherence resonances in an autonomous <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> model with internal fluctuations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lemarchand, A.; Nowakowski, B.</p> <p>2005-08-01</p> <p>Direct simulations of the master equation associated with a two-variable homogeneous <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> model are performed in order to analyze the effects of internal fluctuations on excitability and periodic oscillations. In both regimes, coherence resonances are observed in the absence of external noise and external forcing. These results suggest that the control of the combustion of lean premixed gas requires a stochastic description at a mesoscopic level.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110020738','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110020738"><span>Observations of Circumstellar <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Equilibrium: The Case of Phosphorus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>We will present observations of phosphorus-bearing species in circumstellar envelopes, including carbon- and oxygen-rich shells 1. New models of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> equilibrium chemistry have been developed to interpret, and constrained by these data. These calculations will also be presented and compared to the numerous P-bearing species already observed in evolved stars. Predictions for other viable species will be made for observations with Herschel and ALMA.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1265704','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1265704"><span>Lignin structural alterations in <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> pretreatments with limited delignification</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Pu, Yunqiao; Hu, Fan; Huang, Fang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.</p> <p>2015-08-02</p> <p>Lignocellulosic biomass has a complex and rigid cell wall structure that makes biomass recalcitrant to biological and chemical degradation. Among the three major structural biopolymers (i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) in plant cell walls, lignin is considered the most recalcitrant component and generally plays a negative role in the biochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels. The conversion of biomass to biofuels through a biochemical platform usually requires a pretreatment stage to reduce the recalcitrance. Pretreatment renders compositional and structural changes of biomass with these changes ultimately govern the efficiency of the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Dilute acid, hot water, steam explosion, and ammonia fiber expansion pretreatments are among the leading <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> pretreatments with a limited delignification that can reduce biomass recalcitrance. Practical applications of these pretreatment are rapidly developing as illustrated by recent commercial scale cellulosic ethanol plants. While these <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> pretreatments generally lead to only a limited delignification and no significant change of lignin content in the pretreated biomass, the lignin transformations that occur during these pretreatments and the roles they play in recalcitrance reduction is an important research aspect. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of lignin alterations during these limited delignification <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> pretreatments, with emphasis on lignin chemical structures, molecular weights, and redistributions in the pretreated biomass.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1265704-lignin-structural-alterations-thermochemical-pretreatments-limited-delignification','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1265704-lignin-structural-alterations-thermochemical-pretreatments-limited-delignification"><span>Lignin structural alterations in <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> pretreatments with limited delignification</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Pu, Yunqiao; Hu, Fan; Huang, Fang; ...</p> <p>2015-08-02</p> <p>Lignocellulosic biomass has a complex and rigid cell wall structure that makes biomass recalcitrant to biological and chemical degradation. Among the three major structural biopolymers (i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) in plant cell walls, lignin is considered the most recalcitrant component and generally plays a negative role in the biochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels. The conversion of biomass to biofuels through a biochemical platform usually requires a pretreatment stage to reduce the recalcitrance. Pretreatment renders compositional and structural changes of biomass with these changes ultimately govern the efficiency of the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Dilute acid, hot water, steam explosion,more » and ammonia fiber expansion pretreatments are among the leading <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> pretreatments with a limited delignification that can reduce biomass recalcitrance. Practical applications of these pretreatment are rapidly developing as illustrated by recent commercial scale cellulosic ethanol plants. While these <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> pretreatments generally lead to only a limited delignification and no significant change of lignin content in the pretreated biomass, the lignin transformations that occur during these pretreatments and the roles they play in recalcitrance reduction is an important research aspect. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of lignin alterations during these limited delignification <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> pretreatments, with emphasis on lignin chemical structures, molecular weights, and redistributions in the pretreated biomass.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhDT.......106L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhDT.......106L"><span>Dynamics of Compressible Convection and <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Mantle Convection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Xi</p> <p></p> <p>The Earth's long-wavelength geoid anomalies have long been used to constrain the dynamics and viscosity structure of the mantle in an isochemical, whole-mantle convection model. However, there is strong evidence that the seismically observed large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) in the lowermost mantle are chemically distinct and denser than the ambient mantle. In this thesis, I investigated how chemically distinct and dense piles influence the geoid. I formulated dynamically self-consistent 3D spherical convection models with realistic mantle viscosity structure which reproduce Earth's dominantly spherical harmonic degree-2 convection. The models revealed a compensation effect of the chemically dense LLSVPs. Next, I formulated instantaneous flow models based on seismic tomography to compute the geoid and constrain mantle viscosity assuming <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> convection with the compensation effect. <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> models reconcile the geoid observations. The viscosity structure inverted for <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> models is nearly identical to that of whole-mantle models, and both prefer weak transition zone. Our results have implications for mineral physics, seismic tomographic studies, and mantle convection modelling. Another part of this thesis describes analyses of the influence of mantle compressibility on thermal convection in an isoviscous and compressible fluid with infinite Prandtl number. A new formulation of the propagator matrix method is implemented to compute the critical Rayleigh number and the corresponding eigenfunctions for compressible convection. Heat flux and thermal boundary layer properties are quantified in numerical models and scaling laws are developed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26434606','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26434606"><span>Quantum Chemical Study of the <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Properties of Organophosphorous Compounds.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Khalfa, A; Ferrari, M; Fournet, R; Sirjean, B; Verdier, L; Glaude, P A</p> <p>2015-10-22</p> <p>Organophosphorous compounds are involved in many toxic compounds such as fungicides, pesticides, or chemical warfare nerve agents. The understanding of the decomposition chemistry of these compounds in the environment is largely limited by the scarcity of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> data. Because of the high toxicity of many of these molecules, experimental determination of their <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> properties is very difficult. In this work, standard gas-phase thermodynamic data, i.e., enthalpies of formation (ΔfH298°), standard entropies (S298°), and heat capacities (Cp°(T)), were determined using quantum chemical calculations and more specifically the CBS-QB3 composite method, which was found to be the best compromise between precision and calculation time among high accuracy composite methods. A large number of molecules was theoretically investigated, involving trivalent and pentavalent phosphorus atoms, and C, H, O, N, S, and F atoms. These data were used to propose 83 original groups, used in the semiempirical group contribution method proposed by Benson. Thanks to these latter group values, <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> properties of several nerve agents, common pesticides and herbicides have been evaluated. Bond dissociations energies (BDE), useful for the analysis the thermal stability of the compounds, were also determined in several molecules of interest.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080007391','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080007391"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> generation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lawson, Daniel D. (Inventor); England, Christopher (Inventor)</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Mixing of carbon in the form of high sulfur coal with sulfuric acid reduces the temperature of sulfuric acid decomposition from 830.degree. C. to between 300.degree. C. and 400.degree. C. The low temperature sulfuric acid decomposition is particularly useful in thermal chemical <span class="hlt">cycles</span> for splitting water to produce hydrogen. Carbon dioxide is produced as a commercially desirable byproduct. Lowering of the temperature for the sulfuric acid decomposition or oxygen release step simplifies equipment requirements, lowers thermal energy input and reduces corrosion problems presented by sulfuric acid at conventional cracking temperatures. Use of high sulfur coal as the source of carbon for the sulfuric acid decomposition provides an environmentally safe and energy efficient utilization of this normally polluting fuel.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFMDI41A1738H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFMDI41A1738H"><span>Vertically Discontinuous Seismic Signatures From Continuous <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Plumes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Harris, A. C.; Kincaid, C.; Savage, B.</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>To interpret seismic signatures associated with mantle upwellings, we must understand the distribution of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> heterogeneities within mantle plumes. <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> heterogeneities are expected to arise within plumes by the incorporation of subducted lithosphere (Eclogite and Harzburgite) that has reached the plume source region (thermal boundary layers in the mantle). We analyze laboratory experiments in conjunction with seismic velocity models to predict the seismic signature of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> plumes. Laboratory experiments are fully three-dimensional and use glucose syrup (Rayleigh number: 106) to model the mantle and a two-layer subducted lithosphere, where composition (viscosity and density) is controlled by water content. Experiments show heterogeneous upwellings with variations in both temperature and composition that are more complex than predicted in previous plume models. Spatial distributions for temperature and composition in representative, repeatable types of <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> upwellings are tracked through time, scaled to mantle values and used to calculate predicted seismic velocities. Apparent seismic velocity signals are estimated for patterns in <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> heterogeneity with length scales ranging from 1 to 300 km and excess temperatures from 50 to 300°C. Results show that if plumes are purely thermal they can be identified in the usual way, by slow velocities. However, if plumes are a mixture of compositions, as predicted by laboratory models, their velocity structure is more complex. An Ecolgite lens within a plume at ~300km depth with an excess temperature of 250°C can have the same velocity as regular mantle with no excess temperature. A Harzburgite lobe of a plume head (up to half of the plume volume) at 300km depth with an excess temperature of 225°C can have the same Vs as regular mantle with no excess temperature, but can only mask up to 55°C in Vp. Spatial variations in temperature control velocity structure above 300km</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/9466','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/9466"><span>Development of Zinc/<span class="hlt">Bromine</span> Batteries for Load-Leveling Applications: Phase 1 Final Report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Eidler, Phillip</p> <p>1999-07-01</p> <p>The Zinc/<span class="hlt">Bromine</span> Load-Leveling Battery Development contract (No. 40-8965) was partitioned at the outset into two phases of equal length. Phase 1 started in September 1990 and continued through December 1991. In Phase 1, zinc/<span class="hlt">bromine</span> battery technology was to be advanced to the point that it would be clear that the technology was viable and would be an appropriate choice for electric utilities wishing to establish stationary energy-storage facilities. Criteria were established that addressed most of the concerns that had been observed in the previous development efforts. The performances of 8-cell and 100-cell laboratory batteries demonstrated that the criteria were met or exceeded. In Phase 2, 100-kWh batteries will be built and demonstrated, and a conceptual design for a load-leveling plant will be presented. At the same time, work will continue to identify improved assembly techniques and operating conditions. This report details the results of the efforts carried out in Phase 1. The highlights are: (1) Four 1-kWh stacks achieved over 100 <span class="hlt">cycles</span>, One l-kWh stack achieved over 200 <span class="hlt">cycles</span>, One 1-kWh stack achieved over 300 <span class="hlt">cycles</span>; (2) Less than 10% degradation in performance occurred in the four stacks that achieved over 100 <span class="hlt">cycles</span>; (3) The battery used for the zinc loading investigation exhibited virtually no loss in performance for loadings up to 130 mAh/cm{sup 2}; (4) Charge-current densities of 50 ma/cm{sup 2} have been achieved in minicells; (5) Fourteen consecutive no-strip <span class="hlt">cycles</span> have been conducted on the stack with 300+ <span class="hlt">cycles</span>; (6) A mass and energy balance spreadsheet that describes battery operation was completed; (7) Materials research has continued to provide improvements in the electrode, activation layer, and separator; and (8) A battery made of two 50-cell stacks (15 kWh) was produced and delivered to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for testing. The most critical development was the ability to assemble a battery stack that remained leak free. The</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..MARP54005E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..MARP54005E"><span>Discovery of Novel Perovskites for Solar <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Water Splitting from High-Throughput First-Principles Calculations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Emery, Antoine; Wolverton, Chris</p> <p></p> <p>Among the several possible routes of hydrogen synthesis, <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> water splitting (TWS) <span class="hlt">cycles</span> is a promising method for large scale production of hydrogen. The choice of metal oxide used in a TWS <span class="hlt">cycle</span> is critical since it governs the rate and efficiency of the gas splitting process. In this work, we present a high-throughput density functional theory (HT-DFT) study of ABO3 perovskite compounds to screen for thermodynamically favorable two-step <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> water splitting materials. We demonstrate the use of two screens, based on thermodynamic stability and oxygen vacancy formation energy, on 5,329 different compositions to predict 139 stable potential candidate materials for water splitting applications. Several of these compounds have not been experimentally explored yet and present promising avenues for further research. Additionally, the large dataset of compounds and stability in our possession allowed us to revisit the structural maps for perovskites. This study shows the benefit of using first-principles calculations to efficiently screen an exhaustively large number of compounds at once. It provides a baseline for further studies involving more detailed exploration of a restricted number of those compounds.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982nmsu.rept.....M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982nmsu.rept.....M"><span>Solar <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> energy conversion and transport</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>McCrary, J. H.; McCrary, G. E.</p> <p>1982-11-01</p> <p>The high temperature catalytic dissociation of SO3 and the CO2-CH4 reforming-methanation <span class="hlt">cycle</span> are important chemical processes being considered in the development and application of solar-thermal energy conversion, transport, and storage systems. Separate facilities for evaluating chemical converter-heat exchangers at temperatures to 1000 C with high flow rates of SO3 and of mixtures of CO2 and CH4 feedstocks have been assembled and operated on the NMSU campus. A number of receiver elements (chemical reactors) have been tested in these laboratory facilities in an effort to optimize catalyst parameters and catalyst reactor configurations. These tests led to the design and fabrication of both low power and high power solar energy receivers which were operated successfully at the White Sands solar Furnace. Energy delivery methanation reactor design and parametric studies led to the fabrication and operation of laboratory closed-loop, energy conversion, transport, and delivery system. These latter experiments met with limited but promising success. Carbon deposition, though a problem, is believed to be controllable with the optimization of catalyst parameters and feedstock composition.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1850i0002A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1850i0002A"><span>Experimental and thermodynamic study of Co-Fe and Mn-Fe based mixed metal oxides for <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> energy storage application</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>André, Laurie; Abanades, Stéphane; Cassayre, Laurent</p> <p>2017-06-01</p> <p>Metal oxides are potential materials for <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> heat storage, and among them, cobalt oxide and manganese oxide are attracting attention. Furthermore, studies on mixed oxides are ongoing, as the synthesis of mixed oxides could be a way to answer the drawbacks of pure metal oxides, such as slow reaction kinetics, loss-in-capacity over <span class="hlt">cycles</span> or sintering, selected for <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> heat storage application. The addition of iron oxide is under investigation and the obtained results are presented. This work proposes a comparison of thermodynamic modelling with experimental data in order to identify the impact of iron oxide addition to cobalt oxide and manganese oxide. Fe addition decreased the redox activity and energy storage capacity of Co3O4, whereas the <span class="hlt">cycling</span> stability of Mn2O3 was significantly improved with added Fe amounts above 20 mol% while the energy storage capacity was unchanged. The thermodynamic modelling method to predict the behavior of the Mn-Fe-O and Co-Fe-O systems was validated, and the possibility to identify other mixed oxides becomes conceivable, by enabling the selection of transition metals additives for metal oxides destined for <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> energy storage applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20000115610','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20000115610"><span>A Simulation of Bromoform's Contribution to Stratospheric <span class="hlt">Bromine</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Nielsen, J. Eric; Douglass, Anne R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Many chlorinated and <span class="hlt">brominated</span> compounds that are inert in the troposphere are destroyed in the stratosphere and act as an in-situ source of stratospheric reactive chlorine and <span class="hlt">bromine</span>. Other halogenated compounds that are reactive in the troposphere might contribute to the stratosphere's halogen budget in two ways. First, like their unreactive companions, rapid convective transport might carry them to the upper troposphere and make them available for subsequent advection by the mean circulation into the stratosphere before they are oxidized or photolyzed. Second, it is more likely that they are destroyed in the troposphere, and the chlorine and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> that is released might then be transported to the stratosphere. We evaluate the relative influence of these processes on stratospheric <span class="hlt">bromine</span> in a three-dimensional chemistry and transport model which simulates the distribution of bromoform (CHBr3). CHBr3 is parameterized as a short-lived, ocean-surface source gas whose destruction by photolysis and reaction with hydroxyl (OH) in the troposphere and stratosphere yields inorganic <span class="hlt">bromine</span> (Br(sub y)). Many of the observed features of CHBr3 are simulated well, and comparisons with observations are used to show that the model represents aspects of transport in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere that are critical to the evaluation. In particular, the model maintains the observed troposphere-stratosphere distinctness in transport pathways and reproduces the observed seasonal dependence of the mixture of air in the middle- and high-latitude lowermost stratosphere. We estimate that adding CHBr3 to models which already include the long-lived organic <span class="hlt">brominated</span> compounds (halons and methyl bromide) will increase the simulated stratospheric mass of Br(sub y) by about 15 percent. In-situ stratospheric destruction of CHBr3 produces Br(sub y) in amounts which are comparable to that transported into the stratosphere after photolysis and oxidation of CHBr3 in the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27897055','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27897055"><span>Novel <span class="hlt">brominated</span> metabolites from Bryozoa: a functional analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Maltseva, Arina L; Kotenko, Olga N; Kutyumov, Vladimir A; Matvienko, Darya A; Shavarda, Alexey L; Winson, Michael K; Ostrovsky, Andrew N</p> <p>2017-08-01</p> <p>Marine invertebrates are a promising source of novel natural products with biological activities. The phylum Bryozoa is relatively under-investigated in this context, although a number of compounds with medical potential has been discovered in recent years. Here, we report on the novel group of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> metabolites from the bryozoan Terminoflustra membranaceatruncata, including analysis of biological activities of the tribrominated terminoflustrindole A (Cm-1) and the structures of the related dibrominated variants terminoflustrindoles B and C. Terminoflustrindole A was previously shown to have fungicidal properties. Although they vary by just one <span class="hlt">bromine</span> group in each case from terminoflustrindole A, in this study, we report that terminoflustrindoles B and C exhibit no antimicrobial activity in the same assays. In addition to displaying antifungal activity, Terminoflustrindole A was also found to exhibit potent cytotoxic activity when tested against tumour cell lines. The gradient distribution of this compound within the bryozoan colony was demonstrated using LC-MS-analysis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013mss..confERD11S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013mss..confERD11S"><span>High Resolution Coherent 3d Spectroscopy of <span class="hlt">Bromine</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Strangfeld, Benjamin R.; Wells, Thresa A.; House, Zuri R.; Chen, Peter C.</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>The high resolution gas phase electronic spectrum of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> is rather congested due to many overlapping vibrational and rotational transitions with similar transition frequencies, and also due to isotopomeric effects. Expansion into the second dimension will remove some of this congestion; however through the implementation of High Resolution Coherent 3D Spectroscopy, the density of peaks is further reduced by at least two orders of magnitude. This allows for the selective examination of a small number of spatially resolved multidimensional bands, separated by vibrational quantum number and by isotopomer, which facilitates the fitting of many rovibrational peaks in <span class="hlt">bromine</span>. The ability to derive information about the molecular constants for the electronic states involved will be discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3177243','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3177243"><span>New Methods for Labeling RGD Peptides with <span class="hlt">Bromine</span>-76</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lang, Lixin; Li, Weihua; Jia, Hong-Mei; Fang, De-Cai; Zhang, Shushu; Sun, Xilin; Zhu, Lei; Ma, Ying; Shen, Baozhong; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Direct <span class="hlt">bromination</span> of the tyrosine residues of peptides and antibodies with <span class="hlt">bromine</span>-76, to create probes for PET imaging, has been reported. For peptides that do not contain tyrosine residues, however, a prosthetic group is required to achieve labeling via conjugation to other functional groups such as terminal α-amines or lysine ε-amines. The goal of this study was to develop new strategies for labeling small peptides with Br-76 using either a direct labeling method or a prosthetic group, depending on the available functional group on the peptides. A new labeling agent, N-succinimidyl-3-[76Br]bromo-2,6-dimethoxybenzoate ([76Br]SBDMB) was prepared for cyclic RGD peptide labeling. N-succinimidyl-2, 6-dimethoxybenzoate was also used to pre-attach a 2, 6-dimethoxybenzoyl (DMB) moiety to the peptide, which could then be labeled with Br-76. A competitive cell binding assay was performed to determine the binding affinity of the <span class="hlt">brominated</span> peptides. PET imaging of U87MG human glioblastoma xenografted mice was performed using [76Br]-BrE[c(RGDyK)]2 and [76Br]-BrDMB-E[c(RGDyK)]2. An ex vivo biodistribution assay was performed to confirm PET quantification. The mechanisms of <span class="hlt">bromination</span> reaction between DMB-c(RGDyK) and the <span class="hlt">brominating</span> agent CH3COOBr were investigated with the SCRF-B3LYP/6-31G* method with the Gaussian 09 program package. The yield for direct labeling of c(RGDyK) and E[c(RGDyK)]2 using chloramine-T and peracetic acid at ambient temperature was greater than 50%. The yield for [76Br]SBDMB was over 60% using peracetic acid. The conjugation yields for labeling c(RGDfK) and c(RGDyK) were over 70% using the prosthetic group at room temperature. Labeling yield for pre-conjugated peptides was over 60%. SDMB conjugation and <span class="hlt">bromination</span> did not affect the binding affinity of the peptides with integrin receptors. Both [76Br]Br-E[c(RGDyK)]2 and [76Br]BrDMB-E[c(RGDyK)]2 showed high tumor uptake in U87MG tumor bearing mice. The specificity of the imaging tracers was</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21386233','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21386233"><span>The crystal structure and superconducting properties of monatomic <span class="hlt">bromine</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Duan, Defang; Meng, Xing; Tian, Fubo; Chen, Changbo; Wang, Liancheng; Ma, Yanming; Cui, Tian; Liu, Bingbing; He, Zhi; Zou, Guangtian</p> <p>2010-01-13</p> <p>The crystal structure and superconducting properties of monatomic <span class="hlt">bromine</span> under high pressure have been studied by first-principles calculations. We have found the following phase transition sequence with increasing pressure: from body-centered orthorhombic (bco, phase II) to body-centered tetragonal structure (bct, phase III) at 126 GPa, then to face-centered cubic structure (fcc, phase IV) at 157 GPa, which is stable at least up to 300 GPa. The calculated superconducting critical temperature T(c) = 1.46 K at 100 GPa is consistent with the experimental value of 1.5 K. In addition, our results of T(c) decrease with increasing pressure in all the monatomic phases of <span class="hlt">bromine</span>, similar to monatomic iodine. Further calculations show that the decrease of λ with pressure in phase IV is mainly attributed to the weakening of the 'soft' vibrational mode caused by pressure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017Icar..293..114K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017Icar..293..114K"><span>Search for HBr and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> photochemistry on Venus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.; Belyaev, Denis A.</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p>HBr (1-0) R2 2605.8/6.2 cm-1, the strongest line of the strongest band of HBr, was observed when searching for this species on Venus. The observation was conducted using the NASA IRTF and a high-resolution long-slit spectrograph CSHELL with resolving power of 4 × 104. 101 spectra of Venus were analyzed, and the retrieved HBr abundances varied from -8 to + 5 ppb. Their mean value is -1.2 ppb, standard deviation is 2.5 ppb, and uncertainty of the mean is 0.25 ppb. The negative value presumes a systematic error, and the estimated upper limit of the HBr mixing ratio at the cloud tops of Venus is ∼1 ppb. From the simultaneously retrieved CO2 abundances, this corresponds to an altitude of 78 km for the uniform distribution of HBr. A simplified version of the <span class="hlt">bromine</span> photochemistry is included into the photochemical model (Krasnopolsky 2012, Icarus 218, 230-246). Photolysis of HBr and its reactions with O and H deplete the HBr mixing ratio at 70-80 km relative to that below 60 km by a factor of ≈300. Reanalysis of the observational data with the calculated profile of HBr gives an upper limit of 20-70 ppb for HBr below 60 km and the aerosol optical depth of 0.7 at 70 km and 3.84 μm. The <span class="hlt">bromine</span> chemistry may be effective on Venus even under the observed upper limit. However, if a Cl/Br ratio in the Venus atmosphere is similar to that in the Solar System, then HBr is ≈1 ppb in the lower atmosphere and the <span class="hlt">bromine</span> chemistry is insignificant. Thermodynamic calculations based on the chemical kinetic model (Krasnopolsky 2013, Icarus 225, 570-580) predict HBr as a major <span class="hlt">bromine</span> species in the lower atmosphere.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15099731','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15099731"><span>Analysis of Ah receptor pathway activation by <span class="hlt">brominated</span> flame retardants.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Brown, David J; Van Overmeire, Ilse; Goeyens, Leo; Denison, Michael S; De Vito, Michael J; Clark, George C</p> <p>2004-06-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Brominated</span> flame-retardants (BFRs) are used as additives in plastics to decrease the rate of combustion of these materials, leading to greater consumer safety. As the use of plastics has increased, the production and use of flame-retardants has also grown. Many BFRs are persistent and have been detected in environmental samples, raising concerns about the biological/toxicological risk associated with their use. Most BFRs appear to be non-toxic, however there is still some concern that these compounds, or possible contaminants in BFRs mixtures could interact with cellular receptors. In this study we have examined the interaction of decabromodiphenyl ether, Firemaster BP4A (tetrabromobisphenol A), Firemaster PHT4 (tetrabromophthalic anhydride), hexabromobenzene, pentabromotoluene, decabromobiphenyl, Firemaster BP-6 (2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl) and possible contaminants of BFR mixtures with the Ah receptor. Receptor binding and activation was examined using the Gel Retardation Assay and increased expression of dioxin responsive genes was detected using the reporter gene based CALUX assay. The results demonstrate the ability of BFRs to activate the AhR signal transduction pathway at moderate to high concentrations as assessed using both assays. AhR-dependent activation by BFRs may be due in part to contaminants present in commercial/technical mixtures. This was suggested by our comparative analysis of Firemaster BP-6 versus its primary component 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl. Some technical mixtures of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> flame-retardants contain <span class="hlt">brominated</span> biphenyls, dioxins or dibenzofurans as contaminants. When tested in the CALUX assay these compounds were found to be equivalent to, or more active than their chlorinated analogues. Relative effective potency values were determined from dose response curves for these <span class="hlt">brominated</span> HAHs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015CPL...639..109R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015CPL...639..109R"><span>Fluorescent carbon 'quantum' dots from <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> functionalization of carbon nanoparticles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rednic, Monica I.; Lu, Zhuomin; Wang, Ping; LeCroy, Gregory E.; Yang, Fan; Liu, Yun; Qian, Haijun; Terec, Anamaria; Veca, L. Monica; Lu, Fushen; Sun, Ya-Ping</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Fluorescent carbon 'quantum' dots are generally obtained by deliberate chemical functionalization of carbon nanoparticles or by 'one-pot' carbonization processing. For brightly fluorescent carbon dots with optoelectronic polymers, a hybrid approach was developed to use pre-processed and selected carbon nanoparticles as precursor for surface passivation by poly(9-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) in one-pot <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> processing, thus taking advantage of the more controllable feature from the deliberate functionalization and also the versatility associated with the one-pot synthesis. The PVK-carbon dots were characterized by optical spectroscopy, microscopy, and other techniques. The broad applicability of the hybrid approach is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ThEng..60..367I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ThEng..60..367I"><span>The <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> analysis of the effectiveness of various gasification technologies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ivanov, P. P.; Kovbasyuk, V. I.; Medvedev, Yu. V.</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>The authors studied the process of gasification of solid fuels and wastes by means of modified model accounting the absence of equilibrium in the Boudouard reaction. A comparison was made between auto- and allothermal gasification, and it was demonstrated that the former method is more advantageous with respect to (as an indicator) <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> efficiency. The feasibility of producing highly calorific synthesis gas using an oxygen blast is discussed. A thermodynamic model of the facility for producing such synthesis gas has been developed that involves the gas turbine used for driving an oxygen plant of the adsorption type.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/863922','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/863922"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> generation of hydrogen and oxygen from water</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Robinson, Paul R.; Bamberger, Carlos E.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> cyclic process for the production of hydrogen exploits the reaction between sodium manganate (NaMnO.sub.2) and titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) to form sodium titanate (Na.sub.2 TiO.sub.3), manganese (II) titanate (MnTiO.sub.3) and oxygen. The titanate mixture is treated with sodium hydroxide, in the presence of steam, to form sodium titanate, sodium manganate (III), water and hydrogen. The sodium titanate-manganate (III) mixture is treated with water to form sodium manganate (III), titanium dioxide and sodium hydroxide. Sodium manganate (III) and titanium dioxide are recycled following dissolution of sodium hydroxide in water.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/864097','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/864097"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> generation of hydrogen and oxygen from water</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Robinson, Paul R.; Bamberger, Carlos E.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> cyclic process for the production of hydrogen exploits the reaction between sodium manganate (NaMnO.sub.2) and titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) to form sodium titanate (Na.sub.2 TiO.sub.3), manganese (II) titanate (MnTiO.sub.3) and oxygen. The titanate mixture is treated with sodium hydroxide, in the presence of steam, to form sodium titanate, sodium manganate (III), water and hydrogen. The sodium titanate-manganate (III) mixture is treated with water to form sodium manganate (III), titanium dioxide and sodium hydroxide. Sodium manganate (III) and titanium dioxide are recycled following dissolution of sodium hydroxide in water.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6771897','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6771897"><span>Vehicular fuels and oxychemicals from biomass <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> tars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Soltes, E.J.; Lin, S.C.K.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>Catalytic hydroprocessing (hydrotreating and hydrocracking) of biomass <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> tars can yield mixtures of liquid hydrocarbons and alkyl aromatics of chemical compositions similar to those presently used in diesel and gasoline engine fuels. Phenolics can be coproduced. Compositions of hydroprocessed tars are similar regardless of biomass feedstock used, suggesting that the two-stage process of pyrolysis and hydroprocessing may afford a somewhat universal route to the generation of useful hydrocarbons and oxychemicals from a variety of agricultural and forestry residues. 26 references, 6 figures, 1 table.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19782803','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19782803"><span>Current technologies for analysis of biomass <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> processing: a review.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bahng, Mi-Kyung; Mukarakate, Calvin; Robichaud, David J; Nimlos, Mark R</p> <p>2009-10-05</p> <p>Pyrolysis and gasification are two of the more promising utilization methods for the conversion of biomass toward a clean fuel source. To truly understand and model these processes requires detailed knowledge ranging from structural information of raw biomass, elemental composition, gas-phase reaction kinetics and mechanisms, and product distributions (both desired and undesired). The various analytical methods of biomass pyrolysis/gasification processing are discussed, including reactor types, analytical tools, and recent examples in the areas of (a) compositional analysis, (b) structural analysis, (c) reaction mechanisms, and (d) kinetic studies on biomass <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> processing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6882450','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6882450"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> hydrogen production studies at LLNL: a status report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Krikorian, O.H.</p> <p>1982-06-08</p> <p>Currently, studies are underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) on <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> hydrogen production based on magnetic fusion energy (MFE) and solar central receivers as heat sources. These areas of study were described earlier at the previous IEA Annex I Hydrogen Workshop (Juelich, West Germany, September 23-25, 1981), and a brief update will be given here. Some basic research has also been underway at LLNL on the electrolysis of water from fused phosphate salts, but there are no current results in that area, and the work is being terminated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014FrMat...1...29R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014FrMat...1...29R"><span>Preparation of different carbon materials by <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> conversion of Lignin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rosas, Juana; Berenguer, Raul; Valero-Romero, Maria; Rodriguez-Mirasol, Jose; Cordero, Tomás</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Lignin valorization plays a crucial role within the modern biorefinery scheme from both the economic and environmental points of view; and the structure and composition of lignin becomes it an ideal precursor for the preparation of advanced carbon materials with high added-value. This review provides an overview of the different carbonaceous materials obtained by <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> conversion of lignin, such as activated carbons, carbon fibers, template carbons; high ordered carbons; giving information about the new strategies in terms of the preparation method and their possible applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15002352','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15002352"><span>Estimating Equivalency of Explosives Through A <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Maienschein, J L</p> <p>2002-07-08</p> <p>The Cheetah <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> computer code provides an accurate method for estimating the TNT equivalency of any explosive, evaluated either with respect to peak pressure or the quasi-static pressure at long time in a confined volume. Cheetah calculates the detonation energy and heat of combustion for virtually any explosive (pure or formulation). Comparing the detonation energy for an explosive with that of TNT allows estimation of the TNT equivalency with respect to peak pressure, while comparison of the heat of combustion allows estimation of TNT equivalency with respect to quasi-static pressure. We discuss the methodology, present results for many explosives, and show comparisons with equivalency data from other sources.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/39431','TREESEARCH'); return false;" href="https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/39431"><span>Multi-scale visualization and characterization of lignocellulosic plant cell wall deconstruction during <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> pretreatment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/">Treesearch</a></p> <p>Shishir P. S. Chundawat; Bryon S. Donohoe; Leonardo da Costa Sousa; Thomas Elder; Umesh P. Agarwal; Fachuang Lu; John Ralph; Michael E. Himmel; Venkatesh Balan; Bruce E. Dale</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Deconstruction of lignocellulosic plant cell walls to fermentable sugars by <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> and/or biological means is impeded by several poorly understood ultrastructural and chemical barriers. A promising <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> pretreatment called ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) overcomes the native recalcitrance of cell walls through subtle morphological and physicochemical...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=315470','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=315470"><span>Eosinophils generate <span class="hlt">brominating</span> oxidants in allergen-induced asthma</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wu, Weijia; Samoszuk, Michael K.; Comhair, Suzy A.A.; Thomassen, Mary Jane; Farver, Carol F.; Dweik, Raed A.; Kavuru, Mani S.; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Hazen, Stanley L.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Eosinophils promote tissue injury and contribute to the pathogenesis of allergen-triggered diseases like asthma, but the chemical basis of damage to eosinophil targets is unknown. We now demonstrate that eosinophil activation in vivo results in oxidative damage of proteins through <span class="hlt">bromination</span> of tyrosine residues, a heretofore unrecognized pathway for covalent modification of biologic targets in human tissues. Mass spectrometric studies demonstrated that 3-bromotyrosine serves as a specific “molecular fingerprint” for proteins modified through the eosinophil peroxidase-H2O2 system in the presence of plasma levels of halides. We applied a localized allergen challenge to model the effects of eosinophils and <span class="hlt">brominating</span> oxidants in human lung injury. Endobronchial biopsy specimens from allergen-challenged lung segments of asthmatic, but not healthy control, subjects demonstrated significant enrichments in eosinophils and eosinophil peroxidase. Baseline levels of 3-bromotyrosine in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) proteins from mildly allergic asthmatic individuals were modestly but not statistically significantly elevated over those in control subjects. After exposure to segmental allergen challenge, lung segments of asthmatics, but not healthy control subjects, exhibited a >10-fold increase in BAL 3-bromotyrosine content, but only two- to threefold increases in 3-chlorotyrosine, a specific oxidation product formed by neutrophil- and monocyte-derived myeloperoxidase. These results identify reactive <span class="hlt">brominating</span> species produced by eosinophils as a distinct class of oxidants formed in vivo. They also reveal eosinophil peroxidase as a potential therapeutic target for allergen-triggered inflammatory tissue injury in humans. PMID:10811853</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010IJMSp.289..167G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010IJMSp.289..167G"><span>High precision determination of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> isotope ratio by GC-MC-ICPMS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gelman, Faina; Halicz, Ludwik</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This work presents a new methodology for the precise determination of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> isotope ratio in individual organic compounds based on the simultaneous introduction of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> organic compounds and strontium as an external spike into MC-ICPMS. Using the proposed methodology, an external precision (2[sigma]) up to 0.1[per mille sign] has been attained. The new approach for the <span class="hlt">bromine</span> isotope ratio analysis could be applied for the investigating the fate of the organobromine compounds in the environment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AIPC.1734e0006B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AIPC.1734e0006B"><span>ABO3 (A = La, Ba, Sr, K; B = Co, Mn, Fe) perovskites for <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> energy storage</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Babiniec, Sean M.; Coker, Eric N.; Ambrosini, Andrea; Miller, James E.</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>The use of perovskite oxides as a medium for <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> energy storage (TCES) in concentrating solar power systems is reported. The known reduction/oxidation (redox) active perovskites LaxSr1-xCoyMn1-yO3 (LSCM) and LaxSr1-xCoyFe1-yO3 (LSCF) were chosen as a starting point for such research. Materials of the LSCM and LSCF family were previously synthesized, their structure characterized, and thermodynamics reported for TCES operation. Building on this foundation, the reduction onset temperatures are examined for LSCM and LSCF compositions. The reduction extents and onset temperatures are tied to the crystallographic phase and reaction enthalpies. The effect of doping with Ba and K is discussed, and the potential shortcomings of this subset of materials families for TCES are described. The potential for long-term stability of the most promising material is examined through thermogravimetric <span class="hlt">cycling</span>, scanning electron microscopy, and dilatometry. The stability over 100 <span class="hlt">cycles</span> (450-1050 °C) of an LSCM composition is demonstrated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5101631','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5101631"><span>Experimental Demonstration of the <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Reduction of Ceria in a Solar Aerosol Reactor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We report on the experimental demonstration of an aerosol solar reactor for the thermal reduction of ceria, as part of a <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> redox <span class="hlt">cycle</span> for splitting H2O and CO2. The concept utilizes a cavity-receiver enclosing an array of alumina tubes, each containing a downward gravity-driven aerosol flow of ceria particles countercurrent to an inert sweep gas flow for intrinsic separation of reduced ceria and oxygen. A 2 kWth lab-scale prototype with a single tube was tested under radiative fluxes approaching 4000 suns, yielding reaction extents of up to 53% of the thermodynamic equilibrium at 1919 K within residence times below 1 s. Upon thermal redox <span class="hlt">cycling</span>, fresh primary particles of 2.44 μm mean size initially formed large agglomerates of 1000 μm mean size, then sintered into stable particles of 150 μm mean size. The reaction extent was primarily limited by heat transfer for large particles/agglomerates (mean size > 200 μm) and by the gas phase advection of product O2 for smaller particles. PMID:27853339</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27853339','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27853339"><span>Experimental Demonstration of the <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Reduction of Ceria in a Solar Aerosol Reactor.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Welte, Michael; Barhoumi, Rafik; Zbinden, Adrian; Scheffe, Jonathan R; Steinfeld, Aldo</p> <p>2016-10-12</p> <p>We report on the experimental demonstration of an aerosol solar reactor for the thermal reduction of ceria, as part of a <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> redox <span class="hlt">cycle</span> for splitting H2O and CO2. The concept utilizes a cavity-receiver enclosing an array of alumina tubes, each containing a downward gravity-driven aerosol flow of ceria particles countercurrent to an inert sweep gas flow for intrinsic separation of reduced ceria and oxygen. A 2 kWth lab-scale prototype with a single tube was tested under radiative fluxes approaching 4000 suns, yielding reaction extents of up to 53% of the thermodynamic equilibrium at 1919 K within residence times below 1 s. Upon thermal redox <span class="hlt">cycling</span>, fresh primary particles of 2.44 μm mean size initially formed large agglomerates of 1000 μm mean size, then sintered into stable particles of 150 μm mean size. The reaction extent was primarily limited by heat transfer for large particles/agglomerates (mean size > 200 μm) and by the gas phase advection of product O2 for smaller particles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017ACP....1711313F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017ACP....1711313F"><span><span class="hlt">Brominated</span> VSLS and their influence on ozone under a changing climate</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Falk, Stefanie; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Krysztofiak, Gisèle; Jöckel, Patrick; Graf, Phoebe; Lennartz, Sinikka T.</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p>Very short-lived substances (VSLS) contribute as source gases significantly to the tropospheric and stratospheric <span class="hlt">bromine</span> loading. At present, an estimated 25 % of stratospheric <span class="hlt">bromine</span> is of oceanic origin. In this study, we investigate how climate change may impact the ocean-atmosphere flux of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> VSLS, their atmospheric transport, and chemical transformations and evaluate how these changes will affect stratospheric ozone over the 21st century. Under the assumption of fixed ocean water concentrations and RCP6.0 scenario, we find an increase of the ocean-atmosphere flux of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> VSLS of about 8-10 % by the end of the 21st century compared to present day. A decrease in the tropospheric mixing ratios of VSLS and an increase in the lower stratosphere are attributed to changes in atmospheric chemistry and transport. Our model simulations reveal that this increase is counteracted by a corresponding reduction of inorganic <span class="hlt">bromine</span>. Therefore the total amount of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> from VSLS in the stratosphere will not be changed by an increase in upwelling. Part of the increase of VSLS in the tropical lower stratosphere results from an increase in the corresponding tropopause height. As the depletion of stratospheric ozone due to <span class="hlt">bromine</span> depends also on the availability of chlorine, we find the impact of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> on stratospheric ozone at the end of the 21st century reduced compared to present day. Thus, these studies highlight the different factors influencing the role of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> VSLS in a future climate.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3778398','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3778398"><span><span class="hlt">Bromination</span> of hydrocarbons with CBr4, initiated by light-emitting diode irradiation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ohtani, Bunsho; Kikushima, Kotaro</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Summary The <span class="hlt">bromination</span> of hydrocarbons with CBr4 as a <span class="hlt">bromine</span> source, induced by light-emitting diode (LED) irradiation, has been developed. Monobromides were synthesized with high efficiency without the need for any additives, catalysts, heating, or inert conditions. Action and absorption spectra suggest that CBr4 absorbs light to give active species for the <span class="hlt">bromination</span>. The generation of CHBr3 was confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and GC–MS spectrometry analysis, indicating that the present <span class="hlt">bromination</span> involves the homolytic cleavage of a C–Br bond in CBr4 followed by radical abstraction of a hydrogen atom from a hydrocarbon. PMID:24062826</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27461437','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27461437"><span>Elemental <span class="hlt">Bromine</span> Production by TiO2 Photocatalysis and/or Ozonation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Parrino, Francesco; Camera Roda, Giovanni; Loddo, Vittorio; Palmisano, Leonardo</p> <p>2016-08-22</p> <p>Significant production of elemental <span class="hlt">bromine</span> (Br2 ) was observed for the first time when treating bromide containing solutions at acidic pH, with TiO2 photocatalyst, ozone, or a combination thereof. Br2 selectivities up to approximately 85 % were obtained and the corresponding <span class="hlt">bromine</span> mass balance values satisfied. The process is general and may be applied at a laboratory scale for green <span class="hlt">bromination</span> reactions, or industrially as a cheap, safe, and environmentally sustainable alternative to the currently applied <span class="hlt">bromine</span> production methods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880045626&hterms=specific+heat&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dspecific%2Bheat','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880045626&hterms=specific+heat&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dspecific%2Bheat"><span>Specific heat of pristine and <span class="hlt">brominated</span> graphite fibers, composites and HOPG. [Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hung, Ching-Chen; Maciag, Carolyn</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>Differential scanning calorimetry was used to obtain specific heat values of pristine and <span class="hlt">brominated</span> P-100 graphite fibers and <span class="hlt">brominated</span> P-100/epoxy composite as well as pristine and <span class="hlt">brominated</span> highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) for comparison. Based on the experimental results obtained, specific heat values are calculated for several different temperatures, with a standard deviation estimated at 1.4 percent of the average values. The data presented here are useful in designing heat transfer devices (such as airplane de-icing heaters) from <span class="hlt">bromine</span> fibers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17903468','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17903468"><span>Robust flow-batch coulometric/biamperometric titration system: determination of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> index and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> number of petrochemicals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pasquini, Celio; de Aquino, Emerson Vidal; das Virgens Reboucas, Marcio; Gonzaga, Fabiano Barbieri</p> <p>2007-09-26</p> <p>A flow-batch system was constructed and evaluated to perform coulometric titrations with biamperometric end point detection. The flow section of the system is employed for sampling by injecting a sample volume (50-300 microL) in a flow injection-like system. About 1.5 mL of a suitable carrier solution is delivered by a peristaltic pump in order to quantitatively transfer the sample to the system titration cell (2.0 mL total inner volume). The carrier contains the coulometric precursor for the titrant species. The cell contains two pairs of platinum electrodes used for coulometric generation of reagent and biamperometric detection and is actively stirred. The titrant species is generated and the titration is performed by the usual batch procedure with the excess of titrant being detected by biamperometry following the analysis of the titration curve. System operation is computer controlled and all operations are automated, including titration curve analysis and cell cleaning after the titration is ended. The system is characterized by its robustness because its operation does not depend on flow rates, and the work using coulometric methods which generate gases at the counter-electrode is not troublesome. The flow-batch system has been evaluated for determination of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> index and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> number (relative to the total reactive olefin content) in petrochemicals according to an ASTM procedure. Typical precision (R.S.D.) is between 0.5 and 6% for different petrochemicals whose <span class="hlt">bromine</span> number/index vary from 1000 to 10mg of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> per 100g of sample, respectively. Recoveries for standard additions are between 92 and 123% for 10mg of Br(2) per 100g increments and 98 to 101% for 100mg per 100g increments. Accuracy of the proposed system was evaluated against results obtained by the standard ASTM with no significant difference detected at 95% confidence level.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22710086','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22710086"><span>Compound Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA) for chlorine and <span class="hlt">bromine</span>: a review of techniques and applications to elucidate environmental sources and processes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cincinelli, Alessandra; Pieri, Francesca; Zhang, Yuan; Seed, Mike; Jones, Kevin C</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>Chlorinated and <span class="hlt">brominated</span> compounds belong to the class of organohalogen compounds that have received attention because of their widespread occurrence, use and applications. Understanding the sources and transformation processes of these contaminants in the environment enables assessment of their possible impact on humans and ecosystems. Recently new and innovative methods of Compound Specific Isotope Analysis have started to be applied to characterize the origin and fate of compounds, their breakdown products and degradation rates in different environmental compartments. Almost all studies have focussed on determination of isotopes of C and H, only recently new methodologies have been developed to measure isotopes of Cl and Br. This review firstly gives a brief description of chemistry properties and geochemical <span class="hlt">cycle</span> of chlorine and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> followed by a summary of their uses and applications. In the second section, an overview of CSIA techniques and new challenges and successful applications are also presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5821197','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5821197"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> gasification of high-moisture biomass feedstocks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Butner, R.S.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Elliott, D.C.</p> <p>1985-02-14</p> <p>A significant energy resource base exists in the Midwest in the form of crop residues and wastes. Estimates have been made that this resource is on the magnitude of 1.5 Quads (1 Quad = 10/sup 15/ Btu's). One obstacle to the full utilization of this resource is the high moisture content of many crop residues. A DOE-funded research program being conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory is investigating a low-temperature, mixed catalyst <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> system which efficiently converts high-moisture biomass to a medium Btu gas consisting of methane and hydrogen. Experimental data indicates that carbon conversions in excess of 90% may be obtained. Feedstock slurries containing up to 95% moisture have been used successfully in the batch reactor. Feedstocks used in the system include sorghum, sunflowers, napier grass, aquatic plants and food processing wastes. The ability to convert high-moisture biomass to fuels via this <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> process may allow greater utilization of the significant biomass resource base which exists in the Mdwest. 6 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1326468-thermochemical-compatibility-oxidation-resistance-advanced-lwr-fuel-cladding','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1326468-thermochemical-compatibility-oxidation-resistance-advanced-lwr-fuel-cladding"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Compatibility and Oxidation Resistance of Advanced LWR Fuel Cladding</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Besmann, T. M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Unocic, K. A.</p> <p>2016-06-21</p> <p>We assessed the <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> compatibility of potential replacement cladding materials for zirconium alloys in light water reactors. Considered were FeCrAl steel (similar to Kanthal APMT), Nb-1%Zr (similar to PWC-11), and a hybrid SiC-composite with a metallic barrier layer. The niobium alloy was also seen as requiring an oxidation protective layer, and a diffusion silicide was investigated. Metallic barrier layers for the SiC-composite reviewed included a FeCrAl alloy, Nb-1%Zr, and chromium. <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> calculations were performed to determine oxidation behavior of the materials in steam, and for hybrid SiC-composites possible interactions between the metallic layer and SiC. Additionally, experimental exposures of SiC-alloymore » reaction couples at 673K, 1073K, and 1273K for 168 h in an inert atmosphere were made and microanalysis performed. Whereas all materials were determined to oxidize under higher oxygen partial pressures in the steam environment, these varied by material with expected protective oxides forming. Finally, the computed and experimental results indicate the formation of liquid phase eutectic in the FeCrAl-SiC system at the higher temperatures.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10151505','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10151505"><span>Evaluation of wastewater treatment requirements for <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> biomass liquefaction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Elliott, D.C.</p> <p>1992-05-01</p> <p>The broad range of processing conditions involved in direct biomass liquefaction lead to a variety of product properties. The aqueous byproduct streams have received limited analyses because priority has been placed on analysis of the complex organic liquid product. The range of organic contaminants carried in the aqueous byproducts directly correlates with the quantity and quality of contaminants in the liquid oil product. The data in the literature gives a general indication of the types and amounts of components expected in biomass liquefaction wastewater; however, the data is insufficient to prepare a general model that predicts the wastewater composition from any given liquefaction process. Such a model would be useful in predicting the amount of water that would be soluble in a given oil and the level of dissolved water at which a second aqueous-rich phase would separate from the oil. Both biological and <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> processes have proposed for wastewater treatment, but no treatment process has been tested. Aerobic and anaerobic biological systems as well as oxidative and catalytic reforming <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> systems should be considered.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5181736','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5181736"><span>Evaluation of wastewater treatment requirements for <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> biomass liquefaction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Elliott, D.C.</p> <p>1992-05-01</p> <p>The broad range of processing conditions involved in direct biomass liquefaction lead to a variety of product properties. The aqueous byproduct streams have received limited analyses because priority has been placed on analysis of the complex organic liquid product. The range of organic contaminants carried in the aqueous byproducts directly correlates with the quantity and quality of contaminants in the liquid oil product. The data in the literature gives a general indication of the types and amounts of components expected in biomass liquefaction wastewater; however, the data is insufficient to prepare a general model that predicts the wastewater composition from any given liquefaction process. Such a model would be useful in predicting the amount of water that would be soluble in a given oil and the level of dissolved water at which a second aqueous-rich phase would separate from the oil. Both biological and <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> processes have proposed for wastewater treatment, but no treatment process has been tested. Aerobic and anaerobic biological systems as well as oxidative and catalytic reforming <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> systems should be considered.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1326468','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1326468"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Compatibility and Oxidation Resistance of Advanced LWR Fuel Cladding</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Besmann, T. M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Unocic, K. A.</p> <p>2016-06-21</p> <p>We assessed the <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> compatibility of potential replacement cladding materials for zirconium alloys in light water reactors. Considered were FeCrAl steel (similar to Kanthal APMT), Nb-1%Zr (similar to PWC-11), and a hybrid SiC-composite with a metallic barrier layer. The niobium alloy was also seen as requiring an oxidation protective layer, and a diffusion silicide was investigated. Metallic barrier layers for the SiC-composite reviewed included a FeCrAl alloy, Nb-1%Zr, and chromium. <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> calculations were performed to determine oxidation behavior of the materials in steam, and for hybrid SiC-composites possible interactions between the metallic layer and SiC. Additionally, experimental exposures of SiC-alloy reaction couples at 673K, 1073K, and 1273K for 168 h in an inert atmosphere were made and microanalysis performed. Whereas all materials were determined to oxidize under higher oxygen partial pressures in the steam environment, these varied by material with expected protective oxides forming. Finally, the computed and experimental results indicate the formation of liquid phase eutectic in the FeCrAl-SiC system at the higher temperatures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1326468','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1326468"><span><span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Compatibility and Oxidation Resistance of Advanced LWR Fuel Cladding</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Besmann, T. M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Unocic, K. A.</p> <p>2016-06-21</p> <p>We assessed the <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> compatibility of potential replacement cladding materials for zirconium alloys in light water reactors. Considered were FeCrAl steel (similar to Kanthal APMT), Nb-1%Zr (similar to PWC-11), and a hybrid SiC-composite with a metallic barrier layer. The niobium alloy was also seen as requiring an oxidation protective layer, and a diffusion silicide was investigated. Metallic barrier layers for the SiC-composite reviewed included a FeCrAl alloy, Nb-1%Zr, and chromium. <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> calculations were performed to determine oxidation behavior of the materials in steam, and for hybrid SiC-composites possible interactions between the metallic layer and SiC. Additionally, experimental exposures of SiC-alloy reaction couples at 673K, 1073K, and 1273K for 168 h in an inert atmosphere were made and microanalysis performed. Whereas all materials were determined to oxidize under higher oxygen partial pressures in the steam environment, these varied by material with expected protective oxides forming. Finally, the computed and experimental results indicate the formation of liquid phase eutectic in the FeCrAl-SiC system at the higher temperatures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19576469','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19576469"><span>Microwave assisted extraction of iodine and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> from edible seaweed for inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry determination.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Romarís-Hortas, Vanessa; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar</p> <p>2009-08-15</p> <p>The feasibility of microwave energy to assist the solubilisation of edible seaweed samples by tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) has been investigated to extract iodine and <span class="hlt">bromine</span>. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been used as a multi-element detector. Variables affecting the microwave assisted extraction/solubilisation (temperature, TMAH volume, ramp time and hold time) were firstly screened by applying a fractional factorial design (2(5-1)+2), resolution V and 2 centre points. When extracting both halogens, results showed statistical significance (confidence interval of 95%) for TMAH volume and temperature, and also for the two order interaction between both variables. Therefore, these two variables were finally optimized by a 2(2)+star orthogonal central composite design with 5 centre points and 2 replicates, and optimum values of 200 degrees C and 10 mL for temperature and TMAH volume, respectively, were found. The extraction time (ramp and hold times) was found statistically non-significant, and values of 10 and 5 min were chosen for the ramp time and the hold time, respectively. This means a fast microwave heating <span class="hlt">cycle</span>. Repeatability of the over-all procedure has been found to be 6% for both elements, while iodine and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> concentrations of 24.6 and 19.9 ng g(-1), respectively, were established for the limit of detection. Accuracy of the method was assessed by analyzing the NIES-09 (Sargasso, Sargassum fulvellum) certified reference material (CRM) and the iodine and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> concentrations found have been in good agreement with the indicative values for this CRM. Finally, the method was applied to several edible dried and canned seaweed samples.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GGG....17..895L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GGG....17..895L"><span>Constraining mantle viscosity structure for a <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> mantle using the geoid observation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Xi; Zhong, Shijie</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Long-wavelength geoid anomalies provide important constraints on mantle dynamics and viscosity structure. Previous studies have successfully reproduced the observed geoid using seismically inferred buoyancy in whole-mantle convection models. However, it has been suggested that large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) underneath Pacific and Africa in the lower mantle are chemically distinct and are likely denser than the ambient mantle. We formulate instantaneous flow models based on seismic tomographic models to compute the geoid and constrain mantle viscosity by assuming both <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> and whole-mantle convection. Geoid modeling for the <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> model is performed by considering the compensation effect of dense <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> piles and removing buoyancy structure of the compensation layer in the lower mantle. <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> models well reproduce the observed geoid, thus reconciling the geoid with the interpretation of LLSVPs as dense <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> piles. The viscosity structure inverted for <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> models is nearly identical to that of whole-mantle models. In the preferred model, the lower mantle viscosity is ˜10 times higher than the upper mantle viscosity that is ˜10 times higher than the transition zone viscosity. The weak transition zone is consistent with the proposed high water content there. The geoid in <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> mantle models is sensitive to seismic structure at midmantle depths, suggesting a need to improve seismic imaging resolution there. The geoid modeling constrains the vertical extent of dense and stable chemical piles to be within ˜500 km above CMB. Our results have implications for mineral physics, seismic tomographic studies, and mantle convection modeling.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Chemical+AND+bonds&pg=7&id=EJ1090646','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Chemical+AND+bonds&pg=7&id=EJ1090646"><span>Obtaining the Iodine Value of Various Oils via <span class="hlt">Bromination</span> with Pyridinium Tribromide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Simurdiak, Michael; Olukoga, Olushola; Hedberg, Kirk</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>A laboratory exercise was devised that allows students to rapidly and fairly accurately determine the iodine value of oleic acid. This method utilizes the addition of elemental <span class="hlt">bromine</span> to the unsaturated bonds in oleic acid, due to <span class="hlt">bromine</span>'s relatively fast reaction rate compared to that of the traditional Wijs solution method. This method also…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=titration&pg=2&id=EJ1002584','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=titration&pg=2&id=EJ1002584"><span>A Multistep Synthesis Incorporating a Green <span class="hlt">Bromination</span> of an Aromatic Ring</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Cardinal, Pascal; Greer, Brandon; Luong, Horace; Tyagunova, Yevgeniya</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Electrophilic aromatic substitution is a fundamental topic taught in the undergraduate organic chemistry curriculum. A multistep synthesis that includes a safer and greener method for the <span class="hlt">bromination</span> of an aromatic ring than traditional <span class="hlt">bromination</span> methods is described. This experiment is multifaceted and can be used to teach students about…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Acids&pg=2&id=EJ1090646','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Acids&pg=2&id=EJ1090646"><span>Obtaining the Iodine Value of Various Oils via <span class="hlt">Bromination</span> with Pyridinium Tribromide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Simurdiak, Michael; Olukoga, Olushola; Hedberg, Kirk</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>A laboratory exercise was devised that allows students to rapidly and fairly accurately determine the iodine value of oleic acid. This method utilizes the addition of elemental <span class="hlt">bromine</span> to the unsaturated bonds in oleic acid, due to <span class="hlt">bromine</span>'s relatively fast reaction rate compared to that of the traditional Wijs solution method. This method also…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20188948','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20188948"><span>Determination of iodine and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> in coal and atmospheric particles by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sun, Mingxing; Gao, Yunchuan; Wei, Biwen; Wu, Xiaowei</p> <p>2010-04-15</p> <p><span class="hlt">Bromine</span> and iodine in atmospheric particles or coal can cause environmental problems such as destruction of ozone in the atmosphere; therefore, the presence of these compounds has recently received increased attention. Here, a rapid and reliable method for the simultaneous determination of total <span class="hlt">bromine</span> and iodine using ICP-MS analysis is described. Samples were dissolved in mixtures of 5 mL of HNO(3) and 2 mL of H(2)O(2) in a high pressure microwave digester. The solution was then oxidized by per-sulfate (Na(2)S(2)O(8)) in addition to a small amount of silver nitrate, after which the total <span class="hlt">bromine</span> and iodine were measured simultaneously by ICP-MS. The signal memory effects of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> and iodine during analysis were effectively decreased by washing with a new mixture agent (2% alcohol acidic solution, pH 1-2 adjusted with HCl). The detection limits for <span class="hlt">bromine</span> and iodine using this method were about 3.2 microg L(-1) and 1.1 microg L(-1), respectively. Additionally, the spike recoveries were between 78.7% and 121% for <span class="hlt">bromine</span> and iodine analysis, while the relative standard deviations ranged from 4.3% to 9.7%, and from 1.5% to 3.4% for <span class="hlt">bromine</span> and iodine, respectively. The results of this study indicate that the method described here is suitable for the analysis of micro-amounts of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> and iodine in atmospheric particles and coal samples.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol32/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol32-sec721-10416.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol32/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol32-sec721-10416.pdf"><span>40 CFR 721.10416 - <span class="hlt">Brominated</span> polyphenyl ether (generic) (P-11-264).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>...) (P-11-264). 721.10416 Section 721.10416 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10416 <span class="hlt">Brominated</span> polyphenyl ether (generic) (P-11-264). (a) Chemical... as <span class="hlt">brominated</span> polyphenyl ether (PMN P-11-264) is subject to reporting under this section for...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol32/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol32-sec721-10416.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol32/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol32-sec721-10416.pdf"><span>40 CFR 721.10416 - <span class="hlt">Brominated</span> polyphenyl ether (generic) (P-11-264).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>...) (P-11-264). 721.10416 Section 721.10416 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10416 <span class="hlt">Brominated</span> polyphenyl ether (generic) (P-11-264). (a) Chemical... as <span class="hlt">brominated</span> polyphenyl ether (PMN P-11-264) is subject to reporting under this section for...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20095529','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20095529"><span>Bayesian statistical modeling of disinfection byproduct (DBP) <span class="hlt">bromine</span> incorporation in the ICR database.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Francis, Royce A; Vanbriesen, Jeanne M; Small, Mitchell J</p> <p>2010-02-15</p> <p>Statistical models are developed for <span class="hlt">bromine</span> incorporation in the trihalomethane (THM), trihaloacetic acids (THAA), dihaloacetic acid (DHAA), and dihaloacetonitrile (DHAN) subclasses of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) using distribution system samples from plants applying only free chlorine as a primary or residual disinfectant in the Information Collection Rule (ICR) database. The objective of this study is to characterize the effect of water quality conditions before, during, and post-treatment on distribution system <span class="hlt">bromine</span> incorporation into DBP mixtures. Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are used to model individual DBP concentrations and estimate the coefficients of the linear models used to predict the <span class="hlt">bromine</span> incorporation fraction for distribution system DBP mixtures in each of the four priority DBP classes. The <span class="hlt">bromine</span> incorporation models achieve good agreement with the data. The most important predictors of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> incorporation fraction across DBP classes are alkalinity, specific UV absorption (SUVA), and the bromide to total organic carbon ratio (Br:TOC) at the first point of chlorine addition. Free chlorine residual in the distribution system, distribution system residence time, distribution system pH, turbidity, and temperature only slightly influence <span class="hlt">bromine</span> incorporation. The bromide to applied chlorine (Br:Cl) ratio is not a significant predictor of the <span class="hlt">bromine</span> incorporation fraction (BIF) in any of the four classes studied. These results indicate that removal of natural organic matter and the location of chlorine addition are important treatment decisions that have substantial implications for <span class="hlt">bromine</span> incorporation into disinfection byproduct in drinking waters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Stilbenes&id=EJ717320','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Stilbenes&id=EJ717320"><span>The Evolution of a Green Chemistry Laboratory Experiment: Greener <span class="hlt">Brominations</span> of Stilbene</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McKenzie, Lallie C.; Huffman, Lauren M.; Hutchison, James E.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The use of green metrics to compare three <span class="hlt">bromination</span> laboratory procedures demonstrates the effectiveness of an incremental greening process for chemistry curricula. Due to this process, the <span class="hlt">bromination</span> of alkenes can be introduced to students through the use of a safe, effective, modern practice.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21922838','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21922838"><span>[Study on modes of occurrence of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> in coals using sequential chemical extraction procedure].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Peng, Bing-Xian; Wu, Dai-She; Li, Ping</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>Modes of occurrence of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> in eight coals from Sichuan and Chongqing were studied using inductively coupled plasma spectrometry and sequential chemical extraction. The results showed that the <span class="hlt">bromine</span> mainly occur the water-soluble, ion exchangeable, carbonate, Fe-Mn oxides and organic fraction in these coals, which average total extraction rate was 88.2%. In bituminous coal and anthracite, the mean relative amount was 22.3% and 20.0% for organic <span class="hlt">bromine</span>, 14.0% and 19.2% for the <span class="hlt">bromine</span> of carbonate bound and almost equal for the <span class="hlt">bromine</span> from water soluble and Fe-Mn oxidizes. The ion exchangeable <span class="hlt">bromine</span> may be mainly adsorbed to organic matter in these coals. The relative amount of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> in various modes of occurrence may not be very closely related to its sedimentary environment during the formation of coal. <span class="hlt">Bromine</span> in coals from Sichuan and Chongqing should be paid more attention because its potential leachable rate was 36.62% - 86.80% and potential leachable content was 7.092- 20.10 microg/g.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Titration&pg=2&id=EJ1002584','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Titration&pg=2&id=EJ1002584"><span>A Multistep Synthesis Incorporating a Green <span class="hlt">Bromination</span> of an Aromatic Ring</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Cardinal, Pascal; Greer, Brandon; Luong, Horace; Tyagunova, Yevgeniya</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Electrophilic aromatic substitution is a fundamental topic taught in the undergraduate organic chemistry curriculum. A multistep synthesis that includes a safer and greener method for the <span class="hlt">bromination</span> of an aromatic ring than traditional <span class="hlt">bromination</span> methods is described. This experiment is multifaceted and can be used to teach students about…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=alkene&pg=2&id=EJ717320','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=alkene&pg=2&id=EJ717320"><span>The Evolution of a Green Chemistry Laboratory Experiment: Greener <span class="hlt">Brominations</span> of Stilbene</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McKenzie, Lallie C.; Huffman, Lauren M.; Hutchison, James E.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The use of green metrics to compare three <span class="hlt">bromination</span> laboratory procedures demonstrates the effectiveness of an incremental greening process for chemistry curricula. Due to this process, the <span class="hlt">bromination</span> of alkenes can be introduced to students through the use of a safe, effective, modern practice.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22812492','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22812492"><span>Fundamental mechanisms of DNA radiosensitization: damage induced by low-energy electrons in <span class="hlt">brominated</span> oligonucleotide trimers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Park, Yeunsoo; Polska, Katarzyna; Rak, Janusz; Wagner, J Richard; Sanche, Léon</p> <p>2012-08-16</p> <p>The replacement of nucleobases with <span class="hlt">brominated</span> analogs enhances DNA radiosensitivity. We examine the chemistry of low-energy electrons (LEEs) in this sensitization process by experiments with thin films of the oligonucleotide trimers TBrXT, where BrX = 5-BrU (5-bromouracil), 5-BrC (5-bromocytosine), 8-BrA (8-bromoadenine), or 8-BrG (8-bromoguanine). The products induced from irradiation of thin (∼ 2.5 nm) oligonucleotide films, with 10 eV electrons, under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) are analyzed by HPLC-UV. The number of damaged <span class="hlt">brominated</span> trimers ranges from about 12 to 15 × 10(-3) molecules per incident electron, whereas under the identical conditions, these numbers drop to 4-7 × 10(-3) for the same, but nonbrominated oligonucleotides. The results of HPLC analysis show that the main degradation pathway of trinucleotides containing <span class="hlt">brominated</span> bases involve debromination (i.e., loss of the <span class="hlt">bromine</span> atom and its replacement with a hydrogen atom). The electron-induced sum of products upon <span class="hlt">bromination</span> increases by factors of 2.1 for the pyrimidines and 3.2 for the purines. Thus, substitution of any native nucleobase with a <span class="hlt">brominated</span> one in simple models of DNA increases LEE-induced damage to DNA and hence its radiosensitivity. Furthermore, besides the <span class="hlt">brominated</span> pyrimidines that have already been tested in clinical trials, <span class="hlt">brominated</span> purines not only appear to be promising sensitizers for radiotherapy, but could provide a higher degree of radiosensitization.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol32/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol32-sec721-10280.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol32/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol32-sec721-10280.pdf"><span>40 CFR 721.10280 - Benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, <span class="hlt">brominated</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10280 Benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, <span class="hlt">brominated</span>. (a... benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, <span class="hlt">brominated</span> (PMN P-10-476; CAS No. 1195978-93-8)) is subject...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol31/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol31-sec721-10280.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol31/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol31-sec721-10280.pdf"><span>40 CFR 721.10280 - Benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, <span class="hlt">brominated</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10280 Benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, <span class="hlt">brominated</span>. (a... benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, <span class="hlt">brominated</span> (PMN P-10-476; CAS No. 1195978-93-8)) is subject...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25925817','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25925817"><span>Improving the <span class="hlt">Thermochemical</span> Energy Storage Performance of the Mn2 O3 /Mn3 O4 Redox Couple by the Incorporation of Iron.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Carrillo, Alfonso J; Serrano, David P; Pizarro, Patricia; Coronado, Juan M</p> <p>2015-06-08</p> <p>Redox <span class="hlt">cycles</span> of manganese oxides (Mn2 O3 /Mn3 O4 ) are a promising alternative for <span class="hlt">thermochemical</span> heat storage systems coupled to concentrated solar power plants as manganese oxides are abundant and inexpensive materials. Although their cyclability for such a purpose has been proved, sintering processes, related to the high-temperature conditions at which charge-discharge <span class="hlt">cycles</span> are performed, generally cause a <span class="hlt">cycle-to-cycle</span> decrease in the oxidation rate of Mn3 O4 . To guarantee proper operation, both reactions should present stable reaction rates. In this study, it has been demonstrated that the incorporation of Fe, which is also an abundant material, into the manganese oxides improves the redox performance of this system by increasing the heat storage density, narrowing the redox thermal hysteresis, and, above all, stabilizing and enhancing the oxidation rate over long-term operation, which counteracts the negative effects caused by sintering, although its presence is not avoided.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=194363&keyword=Bromine&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=90718988&CFTOKEN=99248257','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=194363&keyword=Bromine&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=90718988&CFTOKEN=99248257"><span>Levels of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> diphenylether, dibenzo-P-dioxin, and dibenzofuran in flue gases of a municipal waste combustor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Due to the extensive use of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> flame retardants (BFRs), including <span class="hlt">brominated</span> diphenylether (BDE) formulations, for various domestic and industrial applications, the presence of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> chemicals in the waste stream is to be expected for decades. As much as 40% to 50% o...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=194363&keyword=bromine&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=194363&keyword=bromine&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50"><span>Levels of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> diphenylether, dibenzo-P-dioxin, and dibenzofuran in flue gases of a municipal waste combustor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Due to the extensive use of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> flame retardants (BFRs), including <span class="hlt">brominated</span> diphenylether (BDE) formulations, for various domestic and industrial applications, the presence of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> chemicals in the waste stream is to be expected for decades. As much as 40% to 50% o...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1612298S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1612298S"><span>Deriving an atmospheric budget of total organic <span class="hlt">bromine</span> using airborne in-situ measurements of <span class="hlt">brominated</span> hydrocarbons in the Western Pacific during SHIVA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sala, Stephan; Bönisch, Harald; Keber, Timo; Oram, Dave; Mills, Graham; Engel, Andreas</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Halogenated hydrocarbons play a major role as precursors for stratospheric ozone depletion. Released from the surface in the troposphere, the halocarbons reach the stratosphere via transport through the tropical tropopause layer. The contribution of the so called very short lived species (VSLS), having atmospheric lifetimes of less than half a year as sources gases for stratospheric <span class="hlt">bromine</span> is significant. Source gas observations of long-lived <span class="hlt">bromine</span> compounds and VSLS have so far not been able to explain the amount of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> derived in the stratosphere from observations of BrO and modeling of the ratio of BrO to total <span class="hlt">bromine</span>. Due to the short lifetimes and the high atmospheric variability, the representativeness of the available observations of VSLS source gases remains unclear, as these may vary with region and display seasonal variability. During the SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) project an extensive dataset with over 700 samples of ambient air of all halogen species relevant for the atmospheric budget of total organic <span class="hlt">bromine</span> (long lived halocarbons: H-1301, H-1211, H-1202, H-2402 and CH3Br, very short lived substances: CHBr3, CH2Br2, CHBr2Cl, CHBrCl2 and CHBrCl) have been collected from onboard the FALCON aircraft in the West Pacific region. Measurements were performed with the newly developed fully-automated in-situ instrument GHOST-MS (Gas chromatograph for the Observation of Tracers - coupled with a Mass Spectrometer) by the Goethe University of Frankfurt and with the onboard whole-air sampler WASP with subsequent ground based state-of-the-art GC/MS analysis by the University of East Anglia. We will present the datasets, compare these to other observation, derive a <span class="hlt">bromine</span> budget for the West Pacific and derive an estimate of the amount of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> from VSLS reaching the stratosphere. Using the mean mixing ratios in the upper troposphere of the halocarbons mentioned above, the calculated budget of the total organic</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988JPS....22..423S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988JPS....22..423S"><span>Theoretical performance of hydrogen-<span class="hlt">bromine</span> rechargeable SPE fuel cell</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Savinell, R. F.; Fritts, S. D.</p> <p>1988-04-01</p> <p>A mathematical model was formulated to describe the performance of a hydrogen-<span class="hlt">bromine</span> fuel cell. Porous electrode theory was applied to the carbon felt flow-by electrode and was coupled to theory describing the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) system. Parametric studies using the numerical solution to this model were performed to determine the effect of kinetic, mass transfer, and design parameters on the performance of the fuel cell. The results indicate that the cell performance is most sensitive to the transport properties of the SPE membrane. The model was also shown to be a useful tool for scale-up studies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987sert.nasa..321S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987sert.nasa..321S"><span>Theoretical performance of hydrogen-<span class="hlt">bromine</span> rechargeable SPE fuel cell</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Savinell, Robert F.; Fritts, S. D.</p> <p>1987-09-01</p> <p>A mathematical model was formulated to describe the performance of a hydrogen-<span class="hlt">bromine</span> fuel cell. Porous electrode theory was applied to the carbon felt flow-by electrode and was coupled to theory describing the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) system. Parametric studies using the numerical solution to this model were performed to determine the effect of kinetic, mass transfer, and design parameters on the performance of the fuel cell. The results indicate that the cell performance is most sensitive to the transport properties of the SPE membrane. The model was also shown to be a useful tool for scale-up studies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18539291','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18539291"><span>Environmental analysis of higher <span class="hlt">brominated</span> diphenyl ethers and decabromodiphenyl ethane.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kierkegaard, Amelie; Sellström, Ulla; McLachlan, Michael S</p> <p>2009-01-16</p> <p>Methods for environmental analysis of higher <span class="hlt">brominated</span> diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), in particular decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209), and the recently discovered environmental contaminant decabromodiphenyl ethane (deBDethane) are reviewed. The extensive literature on analysis of BDE209 has identified several critical issues, including contamination of the sample, degradation of the analyte during sample preparation and GC analysis, and the selection of appropriate detection methods and surrogate standards. The limited experience with the analysis of deBDethane suggests that there are many commonalities with BDE209. The experience garnered from the analysis of BDE209 over the last 15 years will greatly facilitate progress in the analysis of deBDethane.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AGUFM.A41A0025S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AGUFM.A41A0025S"><span>OMI Observations of <span class="hlt">Bromine</span> Monoxide Emissions from Volcanoes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Suleiman, R. M.; Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Gonzalez Abad, G.; Kurosu, T. P.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>We analyze <span class="hlt">bromine</span> monoxide (BrO) data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) for emissions from various volcanoes. We use OMI data from 2005 to 2014 to investigate BrO signatures from Galapagos, Kasatochi and Eyjafjallajökull volcanoes. Elevated signatures of BrO daily averages were found over Eyjafjallajökull. SO2 cross sections are updated in the operational BrO algorithm and their effect on the volcanic BrO signature is studied. Comparison between two different sets of SO2 cross sections is made and results still show BrO enhancement over the Eyjafjallajökull region.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930001907','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930001907"><span>Future chlorine-<span class="hlt">bromine</span> loading and ozone depletion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Prather, Michael J.; Ibrahim, Abdel Moneim; Sasaki, Toru; Stordal, Frode; Visconti, Guido</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>The prediction of future ozone requires three elements: (1) a scenario for the net emissions of chemically and radiatively active trace gases from the land and oceans; (2) a global atmospheric model that projects the accumulation of these gases; and (3) a chemical transport model that describes the distribution of ozone for a prescribed atmospheric composition and climate. This chapter, of necessity, presents models for all three elements and focuses on the following: (1) atmospheric abundance of chlorine and <span class="hlt">bromine</span> in the form of halocarbons; and (2) the associated perturbations to stratospheric ozone.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730007949','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730007949"><span>Dissociation rate of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> diatomics in an argon heat bath</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Razner, R.; Hopkins, D.</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>The evolution of a collection of 300 K <span class="hlt">bromine</span> diatomics embedded in a heat bath of argon atoms at 1800 K was studied by computer, and a dissociation-rate constant for the reaction Br2 + BR + Ar yields Br + Ar was determined. Previously published probability distributions for energy and angular momentum transfers in classical three-dimensional Br2-Ar collisions were used in conjunction with a newly developed Monte Carlo scheme for this purpose. Results are compared with experimental shock-tube data and the predictions of several other theoretical models. A departure from equilibrium is obtained which is significantly greater than that predicted by any of these other theories.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870020512','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870020512"><span>Theoretical performance of hydrogen-<span class="hlt">bromine</span> rechargeable SPE fuel cell</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Savinell, Robert F.; Fritts, S. D.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>A mathematical model was formulated to describe the performance of a hydrogen-<span class="hlt">bromine</span> fuel cell. Porous electrode theory was applied to the carbon felt flow-by electrode and was coupled to theory describing the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) system. Parametric studies using the numerical solution to this model were performed to determine the effect of kinetic, mass transfer, and design parameters on the performance of the fuel cell. The results indicate that the cell performance is most sensitive to the transport properties of the SPE membrane. The model was also shown to be a useful tool for scale-up studies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988JPS....23..365C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988JPS....23..365C"><span>Performance of zinc/<span class="hlt">bromine</span> cells having a propionitrile electrolyte</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cathro, K. J.</p> <p>1988-07-01</p> <p>A study has been made of a small, zinc/<span class="hlt">bromine</span>, circulated-electrolyte cell having a propionitrile-based electrolyte on the positive side and an aqueous electrolyte on the negative. It has been shown that the faradaic efficiency is approximately 50 percent when using a microporous plastic separator, but that this increases to nearly 90 percent if the separator is changed to a filter paper/microporous plastic compound type. A small, further increase in faradaic efficiency can be obtained by incorporating a quaternary ammonium bromide into the propionitrile phase. In addition, some information is presented on cell resistance and the effect of temperature and discharge current density on cell performance.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900046277&hterms=Bromine&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DBromine','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900046277&hterms=Bromine&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DBromine"><span>The effect of length and diameter on the resistivity of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> intercalated graphite fibers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Gaier, James R.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>The resistivity of <span class="hlt">bromine</span> intercalated graphite fibers has been shown to vary with both the diameter and the length of the fibers. This is due to <span class="hlt">bromine</span> depletion from the fiber surface. Model calculations assuming a 1.0 micron <span class="hlt">bromine</span> depletion zone for P-100, and 3.0 microns for vapor-grown graphite fibers fit the respective diameter dependence of their resistivities quite well. Length dependence data imply a <span class="hlt">bromine</span> depletion zone along the length of P-100 fibers which is also a few microns, but that of vapor grown fibers appears to be as large as 300 microns. Despite these values, microfilaments, which are much smaller than the expected depletion zones, do form residual <span class="hlt">bromine</span> intercalation compounds with resistivities about one-half of their pristine value.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18197369','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18197369"><span>New radiopaque acrylic bone cement. II. Acrylic bone cement with <span class="hlt">bromine</span>-containing monomer.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rusu, M C; Ichim, I C; Popa, M; Rusu, M</p> <p>2008-07-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Bromine</span>-containing methacrylate, 2-(2-bromopropionyloxy) ethyl methacrylate (BPEM), had been used in the formulation of acrylic radiopaque cements. The effect of this monomer incorporated into the liquid phase of acrylic bone cement, on the curing parameters, thermal properties, water absorption, density, compression tests and radiopacity was studied. A decrease of maximum temperature and an increase of the setting time were observed with the addition of the <span class="hlt">bromine</span>-containing monomer in the radiolucent cement composition. Adding BPEM in radiolucent acrylic bone cements composition results in the decrease of glass transition temperature and increase of its thermal stability. Acrylic bone cements modified with <span class="hlt">bromine</span>-containing comonomer are characterized by polymerization shrinkage lower than the radiolucent cement. Addition of <span class="hlt">bromine</span>-containing comonomer in radiolucent acrylic bone cement composition determines the increase of compressive strength. Acrylic bone cements modified with <span class="hlt">bromine</span>-containing comonomer proved to be radiopaque.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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