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Sample records for broth microdilution reference

  1. Validation of EUCAST zone diameter breakpoints against reference broth microdilution.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, S; Bjelkenbrant, C; Kahlmeter, G

    2014-06-01

    The European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) began harmonizing clinical breakpoints in Europe 2002. In 2009, work to develop a disc diffusion method began and the first disc diffusion breakpoints calibrated to EUCAST clinical MIC breakpoints were published in December 2009. In this study we validated EUCAST clinical zone diameter breakpoints against the International Standard Organization (ISO) reference broth microdilution. A collection of 544 isolates (238 Gram-negative and 306 Gram-positive) were tested against a panel of antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed with broth microdilution as described by ISO and disc diffusion in accordance with EUCAST methodology. Inhibition zone diameters and MIC values were interpreted and categorized (S, I and R) according to EUCAST clinical breakpoint table version 2.0. Categorical agreement (CA) as well as minor (mD), major (MD) and very major (VMD) discrepancies were determined. There was in general good correlation between susceptibility test results obtained with disc diffusion and broth microdilution. Overall CA was 97.3% for all combinations of organisms and antimicrobial agents (n = 5231) and the overall discrepancy rates were 110 (2.1%) mD, 24 (0.5%) MD and 7 (0.1%) VMD. The overall CA for Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms were 98.7% (2346 tests) and 96.2% (2942 tests), respectively. Seven VMD were observed, five for Gram-positive organisms (coagulase negative staphylococci (n = 2) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 3)) and two for Gram-negative organisms (Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Minor discrepancies were mainly observed in Gram-negatives and were related to different antimicrobial agents and species.

  2. A Reference Broth Microdilution Method for Dalbavancin In Vitro Susceptibility Testing of Bacteria that Grow Aerobically.

    PubMed

    Koeth, Laura M; DiFranco-Fisher, Jeanna M; McCurdy, Sandra

    2015-09-09

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is performed to assess the in vitro activity of antimicrobial agents against various bacteria. The AST results, which are expressed as minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) are used in research for antimicrobial development and monitoring of resistance development and in the clinical setting for antimicrobial therapy guidance. Dalbavancin is a semi-synthetic lipoglycopeptide antimicrobial agent that was approved in May 2014 by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections caused by Gram-positive organisms. The advantage of dalbavancin over current anti-staphylococcal therapies is its long half-life, which allows for once-weekly dosing. Dalbavancin has activity against Staphylococcus aureus (including both methicillin-susceptible S. aureus [MSSA] and methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA]), coagulase-negative staphylococci, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus anginosus group, β-hemolytic streptococci and vancomycin susceptible enterococci. Similar to other recent lipoglycopeptide agents, optimization of CLSI and ISO broth susceptibility test methods includes the use of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a solvent when preparing stock solutions and polysorbate 80 (P80) to alleviate adherence of the agent to plastic. Prior to the clinical studies and during the initial development of dalbavancin, susceptibility studies were not performed with the use of P-80 and MIC results tended to be 2-4 fold higher and similarly higher MIC results were obtained with the agar dilution susceptibility method. Dalbavancin was first included in CLSI broth microdilution methodology tables in 2005 and amended in 2006 to clarify use of DMSO and P-80. The broth microdilution (BMD) procedure shown here is specific to dalbavancin and is in accordance with the CLSI and ISO methods, with step-by-step detail and focus on the critical steps added for clarity.

  3. A Reference Broth Microdilution Method for Dalbavancin In Vitro Susceptibility Testing of Bacteria that Grow Aerobically.

    PubMed

    Koeth, Laura M; DiFranco-Fisher, Jeanna M; McCurdy, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is performed to assess the in vitro activity of antimicrobial agents against various bacteria. The AST results, which are expressed as minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) are used in research for antimicrobial development and monitoring of resistance development and in the clinical setting for antimicrobial therapy guidance. Dalbavancin is a semi-synthetic lipoglycopeptide antimicrobial agent that was approved in May 2014 by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections caused by Gram-positive organisms. The advantage of dalbavancin over current anti-staphylococcal therapies is its long half-life, which allows for once-weekly dosing. Dalbavancin has activity against Staphylococcus aureus (including both methicillin-susceptible S. aureus [MSSA] and methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA]), coagulase-negative staphylococci, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus anginosus group, β-hemolytic streptococci and vancomycin susceptible enterococci. Similar to other recent lipoglycopeptide agents, optimization of CLSI and ISO broth susceptibility test methods includes the use of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a solvent when preparing stock solutions and polysorbate 80 (P80) to alleviate adherence of the agent to plastic. Prior to the clinical studies and during the initial development of dalbavancin, susceptibility studies were not performed with the use of P-80 and MIC results tended to be 2-4 fold higher and similarly higher MIC results were obtained with the agar dilution susceptibility method. Dalbavancin was first included in CLSI broth microdilution methodology tables in 2005 and amended in 2006 to clarify use of DMSO and P-80. The broth microdilution (BMD) procedure shown here is specific to dalbavancin and is in accordance with the CLSI and ISO methods, with step-by-step detail and focus on the critical steps added for clarity. PMID:26381422

  4. Comparison of CLSI broth macrodilution and microdilution methods for echinocandin susceptibility testing of 5 Candida species.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Lawrence H; Baltch, Aldona L; Ritz, William J; Smith, Raymond P

    2011-11-01

    In order to compare the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) broth macrodilution and microdilution methods of susceptibility testing for echinocandins and yeast, 55 strains of Candida representing 5 species were tested using the CLSI-recommended broth macro- and microdilution methods. Small (1-3 log(2)) but potentially important method-, species-, and drug-dependent differences in MICs were observed.

  5. Recommendation for a Standardised Method of Broth Microdilution Susceptibility Testing for Porcine Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Prüller, Sandra; Frömke, Cornelia; Kaspar, Heike; Klein, Günter; Kreienbrock, Lothar; Kehrenberg, Corinna

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to establish and standardise a broth microdilution susceptibility testing method for porcine Bordetella (B.) bronchiseptica. B. bronchiseptica isolates from different geographical regions and farms were genotyped by macrorestriction analysis and subsequent pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. One reference and one type strain plus two field isolates of B. bronchiseptica were chosen to analyse growth curves in four different media: cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth (CAMHB) with and without 2% lysed horse blood, Brain-Heart-Infusion (BHI), and Caso broth. The growth rate of each test strain in each medium was determined by culture enumeration and the suitability of CAMHB was confirmed by comparative statistical analysis. Thereafter, reference and type strain and eight epidemiologically unrelated field isolates of B. bronchiseptica were used to test the suitability of a broth microdilution susceptibility testing method following CLSI-approved performance standards given in document VET01-A4. Susceptibility tests, using 20 antimicrobial agents, were performed in five replicates, and data were collected after 20 and 24 hours incubation and statistically analysed. Due to the low growth rate of B. bronchiseptica, an incubation time of 24 hours resulted in significantly more homogeneous minimum inhibitory concentrations after five replications compared to a 20-hour incubation. An interlaboratory comparison trial including susceptibility testing of 24 antimicrobial agents revealed a high mean level of reproducibility (97.9%) of the modified method. Hence, in a harmonization for broth microdilution susceptibility testing of B. bronchiseptica, an incubation time of 24 hours in CAMHB medium with an incubation temperature of 35°C and an inoculum concentration of approximately 5 x 10(5) cfu/ml was proposed.

  6. Recommendation for a Standardised Method of Broth Microdilution Susceptibility Testing for Porcine Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Prüller, Sandra; Frömke, Cornelia; Kaspar, Heike; Klein, Günter; Kreienbrock, Lothar; Kehrenberg, Corinna

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to establish and standardise a broth microdilution susceptibility testing method for porcine Bordetella (B.) bronchiseptica. B. bronchiseptica isolates from different geographical regions and farms were genotyped by macrorestriction analysis and subsequent pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. One reference and one type strain plus two field isolates of B. bronchiseptica were chosen to analyse growth curves in four different media: cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth (CAMHB) with and without 2% lysed horse blood, Brain-Heart-Infusion (BHI), and Caso broth. The growth rate of each test strain in each medium was determined by culture enumeration and the suitability of CAMHB was confirmed by comparative statistical analysis. Thereafter, reference and type strain and eight epidemiologically unrelated field isolates of B. bronchiseptica were used to test the suitability of a broth microdilution susceptibility testing method following CLSI-approved performance standards given in document VET01-A4. Susceptibility tests, using 20 antimicrobial agents, were performed in five replicates, and data were collected after 20 and 24 hours incubation and statistically analysed. Due to the low growth rate of B. bronchiseptica, an incubation time of 24 hours resulted in significantly more homogeneous minimum inhibitory concentrations after five replications compared to a 20-hour incubation. An interlaboratory comparison trial including susceptibility testing of 24 antimicrobial agents revealed a high mean level of reproducibility (97.9%) of the modified method. Hence, in a harmonization for broth microdilution susceptibility testing of B. bronchiseptica, an incubation time of 24 hours in CAMHB medium with an incubation temperature of 35°C and an inoculum concentration of approximately 5 x 10(5) cfu/ml was proposed. PMID:25910232

  7. Recommendation for a Standardised Method of Broth Microdilution Susceptibility Testing for Porcine Bordetella bronchiseptica

    PubMed Central

    Prüller, Sandra; Frömke, Cornelia; Kaspar, Heike; Klein, Günter; Kreienbrock, Lothar; Kehrenberg, Corinna

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to establish and standardise a broth microdilution susceptibility testing method for porcine Bordetella (B.) bronchiseptica. B. bronchiseptica isolates from different geographical regions and farms were genotyped by macrorestriction analysis and subsequent pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. One reference and one type strain plus two field isolates of B. bronchiseptica were chosen to analyse growth curves in four different media: cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth (CAMHB) with and without 2% lysed horse blood, Brain-Heart-Infusion (BHI), and Caso broth. The growth rate of each test strain in each medium was determined by culture enumeration and the suitability of CAMHB was confirmed by comparative statistical analysis. Thereafter, reference and type strain and eight epidemiologically unrelated field isolates of B. bronchiseptica were used to test the suitability of a broth microdilution susceptibility testing method following CLSI-approved performance standards given in document VET01-A4. Susceptibility tests, using 20 antimicrobial agents, were performed in five replicates, and data were collected after 20 and 24 hours incubation and statistically analysed. Due to the low growth rate of B. bronchiseptica, an incubation time of 24 hours resulted in significantly more homogeneous minimum inhibitory concentrations after five replications compared to a 20-hour incubation. An interlaboratory comparison trial including susceptibility testing of 24 antimicrobial agents revealed a high mean level of reproducibility (97.9%) of the modified method. Hence, in a harmonization for broth microdilution susceptibility testing of B. bronchiseptica, an incubation time of 24 hours in CAMHB medium with an incubation temperature of 35°C and an inoculum concentration of approximately 5 x 105 cfu/ml was proposed. PMID:25910232

  8. In vitro antibiotic susceptibilities of Burkholderia mallei (causative agent of glanders) determined by broth microdilution and E-test.

    PubMed

    Heine, H S; England, M J; Waag, D M; Byrne, W R

    2001-07-01

    In vitro susceptibilities to 28 antibiotics were determined for 11 strains of Burkholderia mallei by the broth microdilution method. The B. mallei strains demonstrated susceptibility to aminoglycosides, macrolides, quinolones, doxycycline, piperacillin, ceftazidime, and imipenem. For comparison and evaluation, 17 antibiotic susceptibilities were also determined by the E-test. E-test values were always lower than the broth dilution values. Establishing and comparing antibiotic susceptibilities of specific B. mallei strains will provide reference information for assessing new antibiotic agents.

  9. Comparison study of broth macrodilution and microdilution antifungal susceptibility tests for the filamentous fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, I; Guarro, J; Llop, C; Soler, L; Fernández-Ballart, J

    1996-01-01

    An evaluation of broth dilution antifungal susceptibility tests was performed by determining both the micro- and macrodilution MICs of amphotericin B, fluconazole, ketoconazole, 5-fluorocytosine, miconazole, and itraconazole against representative species of opportunistic hyphomycetes (Fusarium spp. and Cladosporium [Cladophialophora] spp.) and ascomycetes (Chaetomium spp.). A total of 78 strains were tested, the majority of them twice and some three times on different days. Both methods were performed according to the recommendations of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (Document M27-P), with the exception of the temperature of incubation, which was 25 degrees C in our case. A spectrophotometric method for inoculum preparation, RPMI 1640 medium buffered with morpholinepropanesulfonic acid (pH 7.0), and an additive drug dilution procedure were used. The MICs obtained by the two methods were read after 48, 72, and 96 h of incubation for Fusarium spp. and after 72, 96, and 120 h for the remaining isolates. The kappa test was used to calculate the degree of agreement. Considering the three fungal groups together, a good agreement between the results of both tests was observed with almost all the drugs at the different incubation times. There were no cases of poor agreement. The highest level (kappa index = 1) was observed with ketoconazole at the second-day reading. These results support the further evaluation of the broth microdilution test as an alternative to the reference broth macrodilution susceptibility test. PMID:8878589

  10. In Vitro Antibiotic Susceptibilities of Yersinia pestis Determined by Broth Microdilution following CLSI Methods

    PubMed Central

    Hershfield, Jeremy; Marchand, Charles; Miller, Lynda; Halasohoris, Stephanie; Purcell, Bret K.; Worsham, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro susceptibilities to 45 antibiotics were determined for 30 genetically and geographically diverse strains of Yersinia pestis by the broth microdilution method at two temperatures, 28°C and 35°C, following Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) methods. The Y. pestis strains demonstrated susceptibility to aminoglycosides, quinolones, tetracyclines, β-lactams, cephalosporins, and carbapenems. Only a 1-well shift was observed for the majority of antibiotics between the two temperatures. Establishing and comparing antibiotic susceptibilities of a diverse but specific set of Y. pestis strains by standardized methods and establishing population ranges and MIC50 and MIC90 values provide reference information for assessing new antibiotic agents and also provide a baseline for use in monitoring any future emergence of resistance. PMID:25583720

  11. Verification of an Automated, Digital Dispensing Platform for At-Will Broth Microdilution-Based Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth P; Kirby, James E

    2016-09-01

    With rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria, there is often a need to perform susceptibility testing for less commonly used or newer antimicrobial agents. Such testing can often be performed only by using labor-intensive, manual dilution methods and lies outside the capacity of most clinical labs, necessitating reference laboratory testing and thereby delaying the availability of susceptibility data. To address the compelling clinical need for microbiology laboratories to perform such testing in-house, we explored a novel, automated, at-will broth microdilution-based susceptibility testing platform. Specifically, we used the modified inkjet printer technology in the HP D300 digital dispensing system to dispense, directly from stock solutions into a 384-well plate, the 2-fold serial dilution series required for broth microdilution testing. This technology was combined with automated absorbance readings and data analysis to determine MICs. Performance was verified by testing members of the Enterobacteriaceae for susceptibility to ampicillin, cefazolin, ciprofloxacin, colistin, gentamicin, meropenem, and tetracycline in comparison to the results obtained with a broth microdilution reference standard. In precision studies, essential and categorical agreement levels were 96.8% and 98.3%, respectively. Furthermore, significantly fewer D300-based measurements were outside ±1 dilution from the modal MIC, suggesting enhanced reproducibility. In accuracy studies performed using a panel of 80 curated clinical isolates, rates of essential and categorical agreement and very major, major, and minor errors were 94%, 96.6%, 0%, 0%, and 3.4%, respectively. Based on these promising initial results, it is anticipated that the D300-based methodology will enable hospital-based clinical microbiology laboratories to perform at-will broth microdilution testing of antimicrobials and to address a critical testing gap. PMID:27335151

  12. Quality control ranges for testing broth microdilution susceptibility of Flavobacterium columnare and F. psychrophilium to nine antimicrobials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multi-laboratory broth microdilution method trial was performed to standardize the specialized test conditions required for fish pathogens Flavobacterium columnare and F. pyschrophilum. Nine laboratories tested the quality control (QC) strains Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Aeromonas salmonicid...

  13. Subculture on potato dextrose agar as a complement to the broth microdilution assay for Malassezia pachydermatis.

    PubMed

    Prado, Marilena R; Brito, Erika H S; Brilhante, Raimunda S N; Cordeiro, Rossana A; Leite, João J G; Sidrim, José J C; Rocha, Marcos F G

    2008-10-01

    The main aim of this study was to verify the efficacy of subculture on potato dextrose agar (PDA) as a complement to the in vitro susceptibility test for Malassezia pachydermatis strains by a broth microdilution method, as well as to determine the MIC and MFC of azole derivatives, amphotericin B and caspofungin. The microdilution assay was performed in 96-well plates using a modified RPMI 1640 medium. The M. pachydermatis strains were resistant to caspofungin. All strains (n=50) had shown MIC values of <0.03, <0.03, 2.0, 4.0 and 4.0 microg/ml for itraconazole, ketoconazole, voriconazole, fluconazole and amphotericin B, respectively. Thus, the subculture on PDA improved the analysis of the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of M. pachydermatis.

  14. Successful use of broth microdilution in susceptibility tests for methicillin-resistant (heteroresistant) staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Thornsberry, C; McDougal, L K

    1983-11-01

    We studied the broth microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing procedure to see whether it could be made reliable for determining resistance of staphylococci to methicillin, oxacillin, nafcillin, and cephalothin. With 45 selected strains of Staphylococcus aureus and 12 selected strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis we found that the addition of 2% NaCl to cation-supplemented Mueller-Hinton broth permitted us to discriminate reliably between resistant and susceptible organisms. A screening test in which resistant staphylococci grew on agar containing 4% NaCl and methicillin (10 micrograms/ml), oxacillin (6 micrograms/ml), or nafcillin (6 micrograms/ml) incubated at 35 degrees C for 24 h (additional 24 h if no growth) was also reliable. In vitro cephalothin resistance occurred in heteroresistant S. aureus but usually did not occur in heteroresistant S. epidermidis.

  15. Successful use of broth microdilution in susceptibility tests for methicillin-resistant (heteroresistant) staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Thornsberry, C; McDougal, L K

    1983-11-01

    We studied the broth microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing procedure to see whether it could be made reliable for determining resistance of staphylococci to methicillin, oxacillin, nafcillin, and cephalothin. With 45 selected strains of Staphylococcus aureus and 12 selected strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis we found that the addition of 2% NaCl to cation-supplemented Mueller-Hinton broth permitted us to discriminate reliably between resistant and susceptible organisms. A screening test in which resistant staphylococci grew on agar containing 4% NaCl and methicillin (10 micrograms/ml), oxacillin (6 micrograms/ml), or nafcillin (6 micrograms/ml) incubated at 35 degrees C for 24 h (additional 24 h if no growth) was also reliable. In vitro cephalothin resistance occurred in heteroresistant S. aureus but usually did not occur in heteroresistant S. epidermidis. PMID:6643661

  16. CLSI broth microdilution method for testing susceptibility of Malassezia pachydermatis to thiabendazole.

    PubMed

    Nascente, Patrícia da Silva; Meinerz, Ana Raquel Mano; de Faria, Renata Osório; Schuch, Luiz Filipe Damé; Meireles, Mário Carlos Araújo; de Mello, João Roberto Braga

    2009-04-01

    Thiabendazole, classified as antiparasitic and also used as an antifungal drug, can be found as otological solution indicated for treatment of parasitic and fungal external otitis in small animals. Malassezia pachydermatis is a yeast recognized as a normal inhabitant on the skin and mucous membranes of dogs and cats. However, it is considered an opportunistic agent that causes external otitis and dermatitis in these animals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effect of thiabendazole against 51 isolates of M. pachydermatis using the CLSI Broth Microdilution method that has been adapted for this yeast species (NCCLS, 2002). Based on this test, the Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC) of thiabendazol was calculated. Subsequently, the susceptibility of each isolate against this antifungal was determined. It was observed that the MIC of thiabendazole against M. pachydermatis ranged from 0.03 to > 4 µg/mL. A total of 13.7% of the isolates were found to be resistant, 47.1% were intermediate and 39.2% were sensitive to the drug. The rate of resistance of the yeasts against thiabendazole was similar to the results previously obtained with other antifungals, while the adapted broth microdilution technique used in this study proved to be efficient. PMID:24031347

  17. Multicenter evaluation of broth microdilution method for susceptibility testing of Cryptococcus neoformans against fluconazole.

    PubMed Central

    Sanati, H; Messer, S A; Pfaller, M; Witt, M; Larsen, R; Espinel-Ingroff, A; Ghannoum, M

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a microdilution method for measuring the susceptibility of Cryptococcus neoformans to fluconazole. The present study evaluated the interlaboratory agreement of the results for the microdilution method obtained at three different sites and compared this method with the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards M27-P reference method. Excellent interlaboratory agreement among the results obtained at the three sites was achieved with this method (83 and 96% agreement within 1 and 2 log2 dilutions, respectively). An overall agreement of 90% between the microdilution method and the M27-P method was observed, demonstrating the comparability of the two methods. However, there are inherent problems with the M27-P method in relation to measuring C. neoformans susceptibility, including suboptimal growth of the organism in RPMI 1640, a longer incubation period, and a narrow range of MICs. On the basis of these data, the microdilution method tested in this study is recommended for inclusion in the National Committee for Laboratory Standards method for testing the antifungal susceptibility of C. neoformans. PMID:8727919

  18. Evaluation of agar dilution and broth microdilution methods to determine the disinfectant susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guoyan; Yang, Qianru; Long, Mei; Guo, Lijuan; Li, Bei; Meng, Yue; Zhang, Anyun; Wang, Hongning; Liu, Shuliang; Zou, Likou

    2015-11-01

    A variety of disinfectants have been widely used in veterinary hygiene, food industries and environments, which could induce the development of bacterial resistance to disinfectants. The methods used to investigate antimicrobial effects of disinfectant vary considerably among studies, making comparisons difficult. In this study, agar dilution and broth microdilution methods were used to compare the antimicrobial activities of four quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) against foodborne and zoonotic pathogens. The potential relationship between the presence of QACs resistance genes and phenotypic resistance to QACs was also investigated. Our results indicated that the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) determined by two methods might be different depended upon different QACs and bacteria applied. Regardless of the testing methods, Klebsiella pneumoniae was more tolerant among Gram-negative strains to four QACs, followed by Salmonella and Escherichia coli. The agreement between MICs obtained by the two methods was good, for benzalkonium chloride (78.15%), didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) (82.35%), cetylpyridinium chloride (CTPC) (97.48%) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) (99.16%), respectively. Among all Gram-negative bacteria, 94.55% (n=52) of qacEΔ1-positive strains showed higher MICs (512 mg l(-1)) to CTAB. The qacEΔ1 gene was highly associated (P<0.05) with the high MICs of QACs (⩾512 mg l(-1)). In addition, DDAC remained as the most effective disinfectant against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. This is the first study that compared the agar dilution and broth microdilution methods to assess the antimicrobial activity of QACs. The study demonstrated the need to standardize method that would be used in evaluating QACs antimicrobial properties in the future.

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility of animal and human isolates of Clostridium difficile by broth microdilution.

    PubMed

    Pirš, Tina; Avberšek, Jana; Zdovc, Irena; Krt, Brane; Andlovic, Alenka; Lejko-Zupanc, Tatjana; Rupnik, Maja; Ocepek, Matjaž

    2013-09-01

    A total of 188 human (n = 92) and animal (n = 96) isolates of Clostridium difficile of different PCR ribotypes were screened for susceptibility to 30 antimicrobials using broth microdilution. When comparing the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, the isolates of animal origin were significantly more often resistant to oxacillin, gentamicin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (P<0.01). The most significant difference between the animal and human populations (P = 0.0006) was found in the level of imipenem resistance, with a prevalence of 53.3 % in isolates of human origin and 28.1 % in isolates of animal origin. Overall, the results show similar MICs for the majority of tested antimicrobials for isolates from human and animal sources, which were collected from the same geographical region and in the same time interval. This supports the hypothesis that C. difficile could be transmissible between human and animal hosts. Resistant isolates have been found in all animal species tested, including food and companion animals, and also among non-toxigenic isolates. The isolates of the most prevalent PCR ribotype 014/020 had low resistance rates for moxifloxacin, erythromycin, rifampicin and daptomycin, but a high resistance rate for imipenem. Multiresistant strains were found in animals and humans, belonging to PCR ribotypes 012, 017, 027, 045, 046, 078 and 150, and also to non-toxigenic strains of PCR ribotypes 010 and SLO 080.

  20. Oxacillin susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus saprophyticus using disk diffusion, agar dilution, broth microdilution, and the Vitek GPS-105 card.

    PubMed

    Ramotar, K; Woods, W; Toye, B

    2001-08-01

    Eighty-three mecA negative isolates of S. saprophyticus had oxacillin zone diameters broth microdilution, or the Vitek GPS-105 card. Greater than 90% of these isolates would be considered resistant using NCCLS M7-A5, M100-S10 criteria. These results suggest that the current NCCLS MIC and zone diameter breakpoints for oxacillin resistance in coagulase-negative Staphylococci are not appropriate for S. saprophyticus as they do not correlate with the presence of the mecA gene.

  1. In vitro susceptibility tests for cationic peptides: comparison of broth microdilution methods for bacteria that grow aerobically.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, A; Cirioni, O; Barchiesi, F; Del Prete, M S; Fortuna, M; Caselli, F; Scalise, G

    2000-06-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of 90 clinical isolates of gram-positive and gram-negative aerobic bacteria to six cationic peptides, buforin II, cecropin P1, indolicidin, magainin II, nisin, and ranalexin, were evaluated by two broth microdilution methods. The first method was performed according to the procedures outlined by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards for bacteria that grow aerobically, while the second was performed according to the procedures recently proposed by the R. E. W. Hancock laboratory for testing antimicrobial peptides. Overall, the first method produced MICs two- and fourfold higher than the second method. PMID:10817731

  2. Improved Broth Microdilution Method for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Francisella Noatunensis Orientalis.

    PubMed

    Soto, Esteban; Halliday-Simmonds, Iona; Francis, Stewart; Fraites, Trellor; Martínez-López, Beatriz; Wiles, Judy; Hawke, John P; Endris, Richard D

    2016-09-01

    In this project we optimized a minimal inhibitory concentration testing protocol for Francisella noatunensis orientalis. Thirty-three F. noatunensis orientalis isolates recovered from different fish species and locations were tested, and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 was used as a quality control reference strain. A modified cation-adjusted Mueller Hinton broth supplemented with 2% IsoVitalex and 0.1% glucose (MMH) was tested at a pH of 6.4 ± 0.1, 7.1 ± 0.1, and 7.3 ± 0.1. Growth curves generated for F. noatunensis orientalis indicated that MMH at a pH of 6.4 ± 0.1 provided optimal growth. There were no significant differences in the growth curves obtained from isolates recovered from different fish species or from fresh or marine water. The pH of 6.4 ± 0.1 in the MMH media interfered with the inhibitory properties of the potentiated sulfonamides (ormetoprim-sulfadimethoxine and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) when using the E. coli ATCC reference strain. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of eight antimicrobials (gentamicin, enrofloxacin, ampicillin, oxytetracycline, erythromycin, florfenicol, flumequine, and oxolinic acid) were similar for all F. noatunensis orientalis isolates. The in vitro susceptibility data provided here can provide a baseline for monitoring the development of antimicrobial resistance among F. noatunensis orientalis isolates, as well as provide valuable data in the development of potential therapeutics. Received October 27, 2015; accepted April 13, 2016. PMID:27484609

  3. Standardized methods and quality control limits for agar and broth microdilution susceptibility testing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis, and Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    PubMed

    Waites, Ken B; Duffy, Lynn B; Bébéar, Cécile M; Matlow, Anne; Talkington, Deborah F; Kenny, George E; Totten, Patricia A; Bade, Donald J; Zheng, Xiaotian; Davidson, Maureen K; Shortridge, Virginia D; Watts, Jeffrey L; Brown, Steven D

    2012-11-01

    An international multilaboratory collaborative study was conducted to develop standard media and consensus methods for the performance and quality control of antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis, and Ureaplasma urealyticum using broth microdilution and agar dilution techniques. A reference strain from the American Type Culture Collection was designated for each species, which was to be used for quality control purposes. Repeat testing of replicate samples of each reference strain by participating laboratories utilizing both methods and different lots of media enabled a 3- to 4-dilution MIC range to be established for drugs in several different classes, including tetracyclines, macrolides, ketolides, lincosamides, and fluoroquinolones. This represents the first multilaboratory collaboration to standardize susceptibility testing methods and to designate quality control parameters to ensure accurate and reliable assay results for mycoplasmas and ureaplasmas that infect humans.

  4. Collaborative investigation of broth microdilution and semisolid agar dilution for in vitro susceptibility testing of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Shawar, R; Paetznick, V; Witte, Z; Ensign, L G; Anaissie, E; LaRocco, M

    1992-08-01

    A study was performed in two laboratories to evaluate the effect of growth medium and test methodology on inter- and intralaboratory variations in the MICs of amphotericin B (AMB), flucytosine (5FC), fluconazole (FLU), itraconazole (ITRA), and the triazole Sch 39304 (SCH) against 14 isolates of Candida albicans. Testing was performed by broth microdilution and semisolid agar dilution with the following media, buffered to pH 7.0 with morpholinepropanesulfonic acid (MOPS): buffered yeast nitrogen base (BYNB), Eagle's minimal essential medium (EMEM), RPMI 1640 medium (RPMI), and synthetic amino acid medium for fungi (SAAMF). Inocula were standardized spectrophotometrically, and endpoints were defined by the complete absence of growth for AMB and by no more than 25% of the growth in the drug-free control for all other agents. Comparative analyses of median MICs, as determined by each test method, were made for all drug-medium combinations. Both methods yielded similar (+/- 1 twofold dilution) median MICs for AMB in EMEM and RPMI, 5FC in all media, and FLU in EMEM, RPMI, and SAAMF. In contrast, substantial between-method variations in median MICs were seen for AMB in BYNB and SAAMF, FLU In BYNB, and ITRA and SCH in all media. Interlaboratory concordance of median MICs was good for AMB, 5FC, and FLU but poor for ITRA and SCH in all media. Endpoint determinations were analyzed by use of kappa statistical analyses for evaluating the strength of observer agreement. Moderate to almost perfect interlaboratory agreement occurred with AMB and 5FC in all media and with FLU in EMEM, RPMI, and SAAMF, irrespective of the test method. Slight to almost perfect interlaboratory agreement occurred with ITRA and SCH in EMEM, RPMI, and SAAMF when tested by semisolid agar dilution but not broth microdilution. Kappa values assessing intralaboratory agreement between methods were high for 5FC in all media, for AMB in BYNB, ENEM, and RPMI, and for FLU in EMEM, RPMI, and SAAMF. One laboratory

  5. Collaborative investigation of broth microdilution and semisolid agar dilution for in vitro susceptibility testing of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Shawar, R; Paetznick, V; Witte, Z; Ensign, L G; Anaissie, E; LaRocco, M

    1992-01-01

    A study was performed in two laboratories to evaluate the effect of growth medium and test methodology on inter- and intralaboratory variations in the MICs of amphotericin B (AMB), flucytosine (5FC), fluconazole (FLU), itraconazole (ITRA), and the triazole Sch 39304 (SCH) against 14 isolates of Candida albicans. Testing was performed by broth microdilution and semisolid agar dilution with the following media, buffered to pH 7.0 with morpholinepropanesulfonic acid (MOPS): buffered yeast nitrogen base (BYNB), Eagle's minimal essential medium (EMEM), RPMI 1640 medium (RPMI), and synthetic amino acid medium for fungi (SAAMF). Inocula were standardized spectrophotometrically, and endpoints were defined by the complete absence of growth for AMB and by no more than 25% of the growth in the drug-free control for all other agents. Comparative analyses of median MICs, as determined by each test method, were made for all drug-medium combinations. Both methods yielded similar (+/- 1 twofold dilution) median MICs for AMB in EMEM and RPMI, 5FC in all media, and FLU in EMEM, RPMI, and SAAMF. In contrast, substantial between-method variations in median MICs were seen for AMB in BYNB and SAAMF, FLU In BYNB, and ITRA and SCH in all media. Interlaboratory concordance of median MICs was good for AMB, 5FC, and FLU but poor for ITRA and SCH in all media. Endpoint determinations were analyzed by use of kappa statistical analyses for evaluating the strength of observer agreement. Moderate to almost perfect interlaboratory agreement occurred with AMB and 5FC in all media and with FLU in EMEM, RPMI, and SAAMF, irrespective of the test method. Slight to almost perfect interlaboratory agreement occurred with ITRA and SCH in EMEM, RPMI, and SAAMF when tested by semisolid agar dilution but not broth microdilution. Kappa values assessing intralaboratory agreement between methods were high for 5FC in all media, for AMB in BYNB, ENEM, and RPMI, and for FLU in EMEM, RPMI, and SAAMF. One laboratory

  6. Collaborative investigation of broth microdilution and semisolid agar dilution for in vitro susceptibility testing of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Shawar, R; Paetznick, V; Witte, Z; Ensign, L G; Anaissie, E; LaRocco, M

    1992-08-01

    A study was performed in two laboratories to evaluate the effect of growth medium and test methodology on inter- and intralaboratory variations in the MICs of amphotericin B (AMB), flucytosine (5FC), fluconazole (FLU), itraconazole (ITRA), and the triazole Sch 39304 (SCH) against 14 isolates of Candida albicans. Testing was performed by broth microdilution and semisolid agar dilution with the following media, buffered to pH 7.0 with morpholinepropanesulfonic acid (MOPS): buffered yeast nitrogen base (BYNB), Eagle's minimal essential medium (EMEM), RPMI 1640 medium (RPMI), and synthetic amino acid medium for fungi (SAAMF). Inocula were standardized spectrophotometrically, and endpoints were defined by the complete absence of growth for AMB and by no more than 25% of the growth in the drug-free control for all other agents. Comparative analyses of median MICs, as determined by each test method, were made for all drug-medium combinations. Both methods yielded similar (+/- 1 twofold dilution) median MICs for AMB in EMEM and RPMI, 5FC in all media, and FLU in EMEM, RPMI, and SAAMF. In contrast, substantial between-method variations in median MICs were seen for AMB in BYNB and SAAMF, FLU In BYNB, and ITRA and SCH in all media. Interlaboratory concordance of median MICs was good for AMB, 5FC, and FLU but poor for ITRA and SCH in all media. Endpoint determinations were analyzed by use of kappa statistical analyses for evaluating the strength of observer agreement. Moderate to almost perfect interlaboratory agreement occurred with AMB and 5FC in all media and with FLU in EMEM, RPMI, and SAAMF, irrespective of the test method. Slight to almost perfect interlaboratory agreement occurred with ITRA and SCH in EMEM, RPMI, and SAAMF when tested by semisolid agar dilution but not broth microdilution. Kappa values assessing intralaboratory agreement between methods were high for 5FC in all media, for AMB in BYNB, ENEM, and RPMI, and for FLU in EMEM, RPMI, and SAAMF. One laboratory

  7. Quality control guidelines for disk diffusion and broth microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility tests with seven drugs for veterinary applications.

    PubMed

    Odland, B A; Erwin, M E; Jones, R N

    2000-01-01

    This multicenter study proposes antimicrobial susceptibility (MIC and disk diffusion methods) quality control (QC) parameters for seven compounds utilized in veterinary health. Alexomycin, apramycin, tiamulin, tilmicosin, and tylosin were tested by broth microdilution against various National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS)-recommended QC organisms (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Streptococcus pneumoniae ATCC 49619, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853). In addition, disk diffusion zone diameter QC limits were determined for apramycin, enrofloxacin, and premafloxacin by using E. coli ATCC 25922, P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853, and S. aureus ATCC 25923. The results from five or six participating laboratories produced >/=99.0% of MICs and >/=95.0% of the zone diameters within suggested guidelines. The NCCLS Subcommittee for Veterinary Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing has recently approved these ranges for publication in the next M31 document. PMID:10618141

  8. Development of Similar Broth Microdilution Methods to Determine the Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Flavobacterium columnare and F. psychrophilum.

    PubMed

    Gieseker, Charles M; Crosby, Tina C; Mayer, Tamara D; Bodeis, Sonya M; Stine, Cynthia B

    2016-03-01

    Flavobacterium columnare and F. psychrophilum are major fish pathogens that cause diseases that may require antimicrobial therapy. Choice of appropriate treatment is dependent upon determining the antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates. Therefore we optimized methods for broth microdilution testing of F. columnare and F. psychrophilum to facilitate standardizing an antimicrobial susceptibility test. We developed adaptations to make reproducible broth inoculums and confirmed the proper incubation time and media composition. We tested the stability of potential quality-control bacteria and compared test results between different operators. Log phase occurred at 48 h for F. columnare and 72-96 h for F. psychrophilum, confirming the test should be incubated at 28°C for approximately 48 h and at 18°C for approximately 96 h, respectively. The most consistent susceptibility results were achieved with plain, 4-g/L, dilute Mueller-Hinton broth supplemented with dilute calcium and magnesium. Supplementing the broth with horse serum did not improve growth. The quality-control strains, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida ATCC 33658, yielded stable minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) against all seven antimicrobials tested after 30 passes at 28°C and 15 passes at 18°C. In comparison tests, most MICs of the isolates agreed 100% within one drug dilution for ampicillin, florfenicol, and oxytetracycline. The agreement was lower with the ormetoprim-sulfdimethoxine combination, but there was at least 75% agreement for all but one isolate. These experiments have provided methods to help standardize antimicrobial susceptibility testing of these nutritionally fastidious aquatic bacteria. Received June 24, 2015; accepted October 2, 2015.

  9. [Results from a German interlaboratory test to establish the broth microdilution method for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration of bacteria from animals].

    PubMed

    Wallmann, Jürgen; Böttner, Alexander; Hafez, H Mohamed; Kehrenberg, Corinna; Kietzmann, Manfred; Klarmann, Dieter; Klein, Günter; Krabisch, Peter; Kühn, Tilman; Luhofer, Gabriele; Richter, Angelika; Schwarz, Stefan; Sigge, Claudia; Traeder, Wolfgang; Waldmann, Karl-Heinz; Werckenthin, Christiane; Zschiesche, Eva

    2005-01-01

    In accordance with NCCLS guideline M31-A2, the DVG working group "antimicrobial resistance" developed a standard operating procedure (SOP) for the determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antimicrobial agents by broth microdilution. This SOP was evaluated for its fitness for use in a national interlaboratory test. A total of 32 participating laboratories tested five strains (including two internationally accepted reference strains and three field strains representing in total three different bacterial species) three times at a one week interval each, using uniform microtitre plates. In 31 of the 32 laboratories more than 80% of MIC determinations performed yielded values in the expected range. In total 94.0% of the results were reproducible, with a lesser deviation of 4.0% from the expected values for laboratories performing MIC determination as a matter of routine (46.9%), compared to 7.9% for laboratories without such routine (53.1%). Comparing the consistency of results on the basis of the tested strains, a higher reproducibility of the results was observed for reference strains (96.1%) than for field strains (92.6%). In particular results obtained for the Streptococcus uberis field strain were afflicted with a higher error ratio (98 deviations from the expected values). Among the tested antimicrobial agents, a higher variability of results was recorded only for gentamicin with 16.7% divergent MIC determinations (mean value 6.0%). The high reproducibility of the results confirmed by this interlaboratory study underlines the robustness of the developed SOP as well as broth microdilutions as the method of choice for MIC determina tion.

  10. Comparison of agar dilution and antibiotic gradient strip test with broth microdilution for susceptibility testing of swine Brachyspira species.

    PubMed

    Mirajkar, Nandita S; Gebhart, Connie J

    2016-03-01

    Production-limiting diseases in swine caused by Brachyspira are characterized by mucohemorrhagic diarrhea (B. hyodysenteriae and "B. hampsonii") or mild colitis (B. pilosicoli), while B. murdochii is often isolated from healthy pigs. Emergence of novel pathogenic Brachyspira species and strains with reduced susceptibility to commonly used antimicrobials has reinforced the need for standardized susceptibility testing. Two methods are currently used for Brachyspira susceptibility testing: agar dilution (AD) and broth microdilution (BMD). However, these tests have primarily been used for B. hyodysenteriae and rarely for B. pilosicoli. Information on the use of commercial susceptibility testing products such as antibiotic gradient strips is lacking. Our main objective was to validate and compare the susceptibility results, measured as the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), of 6 antimicrobials for 4 Brachyspira species (B. hyodysenteriae, "B. hampsonii", B. pilosicoli, and B. murdochii) by BMD and AD (tiamulin, valnemulin, lincomycin, tylosin, and carbadox) or antibiotic gradient strip (doxycycline) methods. In general, the results of a high percentage of all 4 Brachyspira species differed by ±1 log2 dilution or less by BMD and AD for tiamulin, valnemulin, lincomycin, and tylosin, and by BMD and antibiotic gradient strip for doxycycline. The carbadox MICs obtained by BMD were 1-5 doubling dilutions different than those obtained by AD. BMD for Brachyspira was quicker to perform with less ambiguous interpretation of results when compared with AD and antibiotic gradient strip methods, and the results confirm the utility of BMD in routine diagnostics. PMID:26965233

  11. In Vitro Comparison of Ertapenem, Meropenem, and Imipenem against Isolates of Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria and Nocardia by Use of Broth Microdilution and Etest.

    PubMed

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Killingley, Jessica; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Bridge, Linda; Wallace, Richard J

    2016-06-01

    We compared the activities of the carbapenems ertapenem, meropenem, and imipenem against 180 isolates of rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) and 170 isolates of Nocardia using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. A subset of isolates was tested using the Etest. The rate of susceptibility to ertapenem and meropenem was limited and less than that to imipenem for the RGM. Analysis of major and minor discrepancies revealed that >90% of the isolates of Nocardia had higher MICs by the broth microdilution method than by Etest, in contrast to the lower broth microdilution MICs seen for >80% of the RGM. Imipenem remains the most active carbapenem against RGM, including Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus For Nocardia, imipenem was significantly more active only against Nocardia farcinica Although there may be utility in testing the activities of the newer carbapenems against Nocardia, their activities against the RGM should not be routinely tested. Testing by Etest is not recommended by the CLSI. PMID:27053677

  12. In Vitro Amphotericin B Susceptibility of Malassezia pachydermatis Determined by the CLSI Broth Microdilution Method and Etest Using Lipid-Enriched Media

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; Peláez, Teresa; Cutuli, Maite; García, Marta E.

    2014-01-01

    We determined the in vitro amphotericin B susceptibility of 60 Malassezia pachydermatis isolates by the CLSI broth microdilution method and the Etest using lipid-enriched media. All isolates were susceptible at MICs of ≤1 μg/ml, confirming the high activity of amphotericin B against this yeast species. Overall, the essential agreement between the tested methods was high (80% and 96.7% after 48 h and 72 h, respectively), and all discrepancies were regarded as nonsubstantial. PMID:24752258

  13. In vitro susceptibility of bovine mastitis pathogens to a combination of penicillin and framycetin: development of interpretive criteria for testing by broth microdilution and disk diffusion.

    PubMed

    Pillar, C M; Stoneburner, A; Shinabarger, D L; Abbeloos, E; Goby, L; Bradley, Andrew J

    2014-10-01

    Dry cow therapy is an important part of mastitis control. This therapy typically consists of an antibiotic or antibiotics administered at a single dose by intramammary infusion at dry off to treat or prevent infection by prevalent mastitis pathogens. A combination dry cow therapy consisting of the active components penicillin and framycetin is currently used in several countries. Despite its use, standardized methods for the susceptibility testing of this combination against mastitis pathogens have not been established. In this study, which used Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute methodology, preliminary interpretive criteria for the broth microdilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) testing of mastitis pathogens to penicillin combined with framycetin (2:1 wt/wt) were established based on the amount of drug achieved and maintained postadministration in the udder. Based on resulting MIC distributions of recent veterinary field isolates and a subset of isolates preselected for resistance to β-lactams or aminoglycosides and concentrations achieved postadministration, criteria for broth microdilution testing of the combination (susceptible, intermediate, resistant in micrograms per milliliter) were set as follows: Escherichia coli ≤8/4, 16/8, ≥32/16; Staphylococcus spp. ≤2/1, 4/2-8/4, >16/8; Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae <0.25/0.12, 0.5/0.25-2/1, >4/2. A disk diffusion test using disks containing 100 μg of framycetin and 10 IU of penicillin was also developed, and preliminary interpretive criteria (susceptible, intermediate, resistant in millimeters) were set based on correlation to broth MIC values and the minimization of interpretive errors between isolates tested concurrently by broth microdilution and disk diffusion as follows: E. coli ≥18, 16-17, ≤15; Staphylococcus spp. ≥21, 18-20, ≤17; Strep. uberis and Strep. dysgalactiae ≥21, 19-20, ≤18. In addition, ranges for the quality control of the testing of

  14. Comparative evaluation of the VITEK 2, disk diffusion, etest, broth microdilution, and agar dilution susceptibility testing methods for colistin in clinical isolates, including heteroresistant Enterobacter cloacae and Acinetobacter baumannii strains.

    PubMed

    Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R; de Smet, Anne Marie G A; Diederen, Bram M W; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; van Keulen, Peter H J

    2007-10-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance in gram-negative bacteria has recently renewed interest in colistin as a therapeutic option. The increasing use of colistin necessitates the availability of rapid and reliable methods for colistin susceptibility testing. We compared seven methods of colistin susceptibility testing (disk diffusion, agar dilution on Mueller-Hinton [MH] and Isosensitest agar, Etest on MH and Isosensitest agar, broth microdilution, and VITEK 2) on 102 clinical isolates collected from patient materials during a selective digestive decontamination or selective oral decontamination trial in an intensive-care unit. Disk diffusion is an unreliable method to measure susceptibility to colistin. High error rates and low levels of reproducibility were observed in the disk diffusion test. The colistin Etest, agar dilution, and the VITEK 2 showed a high level of agreement with the broth microdilution reference method. Heteroresistance for colistin was observed in six Enterobacter cloacae isolates and in one Acinetobacter baumannii isolate. This is the first report of heteroresistance to colistin in E. cloacae isolates. Resistance to colistin in these isolates seemed to be induced upon exposure to colistin rather than being caused by stable mutations. Heteroresistant isolates could be detected in the broth microdilution, agar dilution, Etest, or disk diffusion test. The VITEK 2 displayed low sensitivity in the detection of heteroresistant subpopulations of E. cloacae. The VITEK 2 colistin susceptibility test can therefore be considered to be a reliable tool to determine susceptibility to colistin in isolates of genera that are known not to exhibit resistant subpopulations. In isolates of genera known to (occasionally) exhibit heteroresistance, an alternative susceptibility testing method capable of detecting heteroresistance should be used.

  15. Comparison of minimum inhibitory concentration by broth microdilution testing versus standard disc diffusion testing in the detection of penicillin, erythromycin and ciprofloxacin resistance in viridans group streptococci.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yasunori; Goldsmith, Colin E; Coulter, Wilson A; Mason, Charlene; Dooley, James S G; Lowery, Colm J; Millar, B Cherie; Moore, John E

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability of disc diffusion testing with penicillin, erythromycin and ciprofloxacin within the viridans group streptococci (VGS). In total, the antibiotic susceptibilities of 167 VGS isolates were compared by standard disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods, and these phenotypic data were compared to the carriage of the respective gene resistance determinants [ermB and mefA/E (macrolides); QRDR, gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE (quinolones)]. Overall, there were 35 discrepancies [resistant by MIC and susceptible by zone diameter (21.0%)] between MIC and disc diameter when penicillin susceptibility was interpreted by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute criteria. Scattergrams showed a bimodal distribution between non-susceptible and susceptible strains when erythromycin susceptibility was tested by both methods. Thirty-four (20.4%) isolates were categorized as resistant by MIC breakpoints, while disc diameter defined these as having intermediate resistance. With ciprofloxacin, three isolates (1.8%) showed minor discrepancies between MIC breakpoints and disc diameter. Isolates non-susceptible to all three antimicrobial agents tested were reliably distinguished from susceptible isolates by disc diffusion testing, except for the detection of low-level resistance to penicillin, where broth microdilution or an alternative quantitative MIC method should be used. Otherwise, we conclude that disc diffusion testing is a reliable method to detect strains of VGS non-susceptible to penicillin, erythromycin and ciprofloxacin, as demonstrated with their concordance to their gene resistance characteristics.

  16. Comparison of the Vitek 2 Antifungal Susceptibility System with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) Broth Microdilution Reference Methods and with the Sensititre YeastOne and Etest Techniques for In Vitro Detection of Antifungal Resistance in Yeast Isolates ▿ ‖

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Bernal-Martinez, Leticia; Cuesta, Isabel; Buitrago, Maria J.; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan L.

    2010-01-01

    The commercial technique Vitek 2 system for antifungal susceptibility testing of yeast species was evaluated. A collection of 154 clinical yeast isolates, including amphotericin B- and azole-resistant organisms, was tested. Results were compared with those obtained by the reference procedures of both the CLSI and the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). Two other commercial techniques approved for clinical use, the Etest and the Sensititre YeastOne, were included in the comparative exercise as well. The average essential agreement (EA) between the Vitek 2 system and the reference procedures was >95%, comparable with the average EAs observed between the reference procedures and the Sensititre YeastOne and Etest. The EA values were >97% for Candida spp. and stood at 92% for Cryptococcus neoformans. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) between the commercial techniques and the reference procedures were statistically significant (P < 0.01). Percentages of very major errors were 2.6% between Vitek 2 and the EUCAST technique and 1.6% between Vitek 2 and the CLSI technique. The Vitek 2 MIC results were available after 14 to 18 h of incubation for all Candida spp. (average time to reading, 15.5 h). The Vitek 2 system was shown to be a reliable technique to determine antifungal susceptibility testing of yeast species and a more rapid and easier alternative for clinical laboratories than the procedures developed by either the CLSI or EUCAST. PMID:20220169

  17. Different antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods to detect ertapenem resistance in Enterobacteriaceae: VITEK2, MicroScan, Etest, disk diffusion, and broth microdilution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Miae; Chung, Hae-Sun

    2015-05-01

    We investigated different antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods to detect ertapenem resistance in Enterobacteriaceae. A total of 72 Enterobacteriaceae isolates were collected from a clinical microbiology laboratory of a tertiary university hospital, all of which were detected ertapenem resistance by the VITEK2 system. Bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility were determined using the VITEK2. Ertapenem susceptibility test was performed using the MicroScan, Etest and a disk diffusion test. Ertapenem MICs were confirmed using the broth microdilution (BMD). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV, respectively) of each method for the detection of ertapenem resistance were calculated. Carbapenemases and AmpC β-lactamase were screened using phenotypic methods. Among the 72 isolates, 20 isolates (27.8%) were resistant to ertapenem. Etest showed high sensitivity and specificity (85.0% and 88.5%, respectively) and excellent concordance with BMD. The disk diffusion test had the lowest sensitivity of 50.0%. The VITEK2 showed the lowest essential and categorical agreement (30.5% and 27.8%, respectively). The MicroScan showed relatively good agreement with BMD compared to the VITEK2. Most category disagreements were minor errors. There were 3 very major errors in both the MicroScan and disk diffusion test. Only 1 isolate was positive for carbapenemase screening test and all of the isolates were positive for AmpC screening test. In conclusion, the detection of ertapenem resistance in Enterobacteriaceae has limitations using routine testing such as an automated system or disk diffusion. Confirmation of results by an additional MIC test is recommended for accurate resistance results of ertapenem.

  18. Comparison of a spectrophotometric microdilution method with RPMI-2% glucose with the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards reference macrodilution method M27-P for in vitro susceptibility testing of amphotericin B, flucytosine, and fluconazole against Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Tudela, J L; Berenguer, J; Martínez-Suárez, J V; Sanchez, R

    1996-01-01

    The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards has proposed a reference broth macrodilution method for in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of yeasts (the M27-P method). This method is cumbersome and time-consuming and includes MIC endpoint determination by visual and subjective inspection of growth inhibition after 48 h of incubation. An alternative microdilution procedure was compared with the M27-P method for determination of the amphotericin B, flucytosine, and fluconazole susceptibilities of 8 American Type Culture Collection strains (6 of them were quality control or reference strains) and 50 clinical isolates of candida albicans. This microdilution method uses as culture medium RPMI 1640 supplemented with 18 g of glucose per liter (RPMI-2% glucose). Preparation of drugs, basal medium, and inocula was done by following the recommendations of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The MIC endpoint was calculated objectively from the turbidimetric data read at 24 h. Increased growth of C. albicans in RPMI-2% glucose and its spectrophotometric reading allowed for the rapid (24 h) and objective calculation of MIC endpoints compared with previous microdilution methods with standard RPMI 1640. Nevertheless, good agreement was shown between the M27-P method and this microdilution test. The MICs obtained for the quality control or reference strains by the microdilution method were in the ranges published for those strains. For clinical isolates, the percentages of agreement were 100% for amphotericin B and fluconazole and 98.1% for flucytosine. These data suggest that this microdilution method may serve as a less subjective and more rapid alternative to the M27-P method for antifungal susceptibility testing of yeasts. PMID:8878570

  19. Comparison of four reading methods of broth microdilution based on the clinical and laboratory standards institute M27-A3 method for Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Morishige, Hiromi; Mano, Yoko; Oguri, Toyoko; Furuya, Nobuhiko

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to compare the susceptibilities of 5 reference strains and 28 isolates of Candida spp., to micafungin, amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, and miconazole, obtained by visually determined minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) using the agitation method (V-A), as described in the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A3 document; visual determinations without agitation (V-NA); and spectrophotometric determinations for the presence or absence of agitation (SP-A and SP-NA, respectively). Our results indicate that when the V-NA, SP-A, and SP-NA-the 3 alternative microdilution procedures for MIC endpoint determinations-were compared with the V-A, excellent agreements were observed between the V-NA and V-A rather than with the spectrophotometric methods (between the SP-A or SP-NA, and V-A). Furthermore, many errors occurred while using the SP-A method in the presence of agitation and some isolates showed major errors. Three of 5 isolates that showed very major errors between the spectrophotometric SP-A or SP-NA, and the reference V-A method were trailing isolates. Therefore, it was suggested that the MICs of Candida spp. obtained by the V-NA method were more precise than those by the conventional SP-A method. PMID:23383435

  20. Multicenter evaluation of commercial frozen plates for microdilution broth antifungal susceptibility testing of yeasts and comparison of MIC limits recommended in NCCLS M27-A2.

    PubMed

    Makimura, Koichi; Oguri, Toyoko; Mikami, Yuzuru; Kume, Hikaru; Hanazawa, Ryo; Abe, Michiko; Ikeda, Reiko; Shinoda, Takako

    2005-01-01

    A commercial kit, Frozen Plate for Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Yeasts, Eiken (Eiken Chemical Co., Ltd., Tokyo), was tested in a multi-institute study to evaluate the agreement between interinstitute MICs and National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) M27-A2 recommendation limits of MIC value. The kit was reported as a method equivalent to the standardized guidelines for antifungal susceptibility testing by the Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards-1994, the Japanese Society for Medical Mycology, and which is widely used in Japan for amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, miconazole, and itraconazole. The degrees of inter-institute and NCCLS agreements were good to excellent especially with 48-hr incubation for all antifungal agents. However, the percent agreements to NCCLS recommendations against itraconazole were poor. Overall, MIC values obtained using the frozen plate antifungal susceptibility testing kit, with 48-hr incubation, were thought to be reliable and convenient alternatives to the data obtained by the NCCLS M27-A2 reference macrodilution and microdilution method. This kit will allow matching of results between international laboratories. However, the MIC value for itraconazole requires careful interpretation. PMID:15722594

  1. Detection of amphotericin B resistance in Candida haemulonii and closely related species by use of the Etest, Vitek-2 yeast susceptibility system, and CLSI and EUCAST broth microdilution methods.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jong Hee; Kim, Mi-Na; Jang, Sook Jin; Ju, Min Young; Kim, Soo Hyun; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook

    2012-06-01

    The emerging fungal pathogens Candida haemulonii and Candida pseudohaemulonii often show high-level resistance to amphotericin B (AMB). We compared the utilities of five antifungal susceptibility testing methods, i.e., the Etest using Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with glucose and methylene blue (Etest-MH), the Etest using RPMI agar supplemented with glucose (Etest-RPG), the Vitek-2 yeast susceptibility system, and the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) broth microdilution methods, for the detection of AMB-resistant isolates of C. haemulonii and closely related species. Thirty-eight clinical isolates (8 C. haemulonii, 10 C. pseudohaemulonii, and 20 Candida auris isolates) were analyzed. Of the 18 C. haemulonii and C. pseudohaemulonii isolates, 18, 15, 18, 10, and 9 exhibited AMB MICs of >1 μg/ml by the Etest-MH, Etest-RPG, Vitek-2, CLSI, and EUCAST methods, respectively. All 20 C. auris isolates showed AMB MICs of ≤1 μg/ml by all five methods. Of the methods, the Etest-MH generated the broadest distribution of AMB MICs for all 38 isolates and showed the best discrimination between the C. haemulonii and C. pseudohaemulonii isolates (4 to 32 μg/ml) and those of C. auris (0.125 to 0.5 μg/ml). Taking the Etest-MH as the reference method, the essential agreements (within two dilutions) for the Etest-RPG, Vitek-2, CLSI, and EUCAST methods were 84, 92, 55, and 55%, respectively; the categorical agreements were 92, 92, 79, and 76%, respectively. This study provides the first data on the efficacy of the Etest-MH and its excellent agreement with Vitek-2 for discriminating AMB-resistant from AMB-susceptible isolates of these Candida species.

  2. Agreement Assessment of Tigecycline Susceptibilities Determined by the Disk Diffusion and Broth Microdilution Methods among Commonly Encountered Resistant Bacterial Isolates: Results from the Tigecycline In Vitro Surveillance in Taiwan (TIST) Study, 2008 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jien-Wei; Ko, Wen-Chien; Huang, Cheng-Hua; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Lu, Chin-Te; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Tsao, Shih-Ming; Chen, Yao-Shen; Liu, Yung-Ching; Chen, Wei-Yu; Jang, Tsrang-Neng; Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Chen, Chih-Ming; Shi, Zhi-Yuan; Pan, Sung-Ching; Yang, Jia-Ling; Kung, Hsiang-Chi; Liu, Chun-Eng; Cheng, Yu-Jen; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lu, Po-Liang; Sun, Wu; Wang, Lih-Shinn; Yu, Kwok-Woon; Chiang, Ping-Cherng; Lee, Ming-Hsun; Lee, Chun-Ming; Hsu, Gwo-Jong

    2012-01-01

    The Tigecycline In Vitro Surveillance in Taiwan (TIST) study, initiated in 2006, is a nationwide surveillance program designed to longitudinally monitor the in vitro activity of tigecycline against commonly encountered drug-resistant bacteria. This study compared the in vitro activity of tigecycline against 3,014 isolates of clinically important drug-resistant bacteria using the standard broth microdilution and disk diffusion methods. Species studied included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; n = 759), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE; n = 191), extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli (n = 602), ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 736), and Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 726) that had been collected from patients treated between 2008 and 2010 at 20 hospitals in Taiwan. MICs and inhibition zone diameters were interpreted according to the currently recommended U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) criteria and the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) criteria. The MIC90 values of tigecycline against MRSA, VRE, ESBL-producing E. coli, ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae, and A. baumannii were 0.5, 0.125, 0.5, 2, and 8 μg/ml, respectively. The total error rates between the two methods using the FDA criteria were high: 38.4% for ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae and 33.8% for A. baumannii. Using the EUCAST criteria, the total error rate was also high (54.6%) for A. baumannii isolates. The total error rates between these two methods were <5% for MRSA, VRE, and ESBL-producing E. coli. For routine susceptibility testing of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae and A. baumannii against tigecycline, the broth microdilution method should be used because of the poor correlation of results between these two methods. PMID:22155819

  3. Agreement assessment of tigecycline susceptibilities determined by the disk diffusion and broth microdilution methods among commonly encountered resistant bacterial isolates: results from the Tigecycline In Vitro Surveillance in Taiwan (TIST) study, 2008 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jien-Wei; Ko, Wen-Chien; Huang, Cheng-Hua; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Lu, Chin-Te; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Tsao, Shih-Ming; Chen, Yao-Shen; Liu, Yung-Ching; Chen, Wei-Yu; Jang, Tsrang-Neng; Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Chen, Chih-Ming; Shi, Zhi-Yuan; Pan, Sung-Ching; Yang, Jia-Ling; Kung, Hsiang-Chi; Liu, Chun-Eng; Cheng, Yu-Jen; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lu, Po-Liang; Sun, Wu; Wang, Lih-Shinn; Yu, Kwok-Woon; Chiang, Ping-Cherng; Lee, Ming-Hsun; Lee, Chun-Ming; Hsu, Gwo-Jong; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2012-03-01

    The Tigecycline In Vitro Surveillance in Taiwan (TIST) study, initiated in 2006, is a nationwide surveillance program designed to longitudinally monitor the in vitro activity of tigecycline against commonly encountered drug-resistant bacteria. This study compared the in vitro activity of tigecycline against 3,014 isolates of clinically important drug-resistant bacteria using the standard broth microdilution and disk diffusion methods. Species studied included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; n = 759), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE; n = 191), extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli (n = 602), ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 736), and Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 726) that had been collected from patients treated between 2008 and 2010 at 20 hospitals in Taiwan. MICs and inhibition zone diameters were interpreted according to the currently recommended U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) criteria and the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) criteria. The MIC(90) values of tigecycline against MRSA, VRE, ESBL-producing E. coli, ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae, and A. baumannii were 0.5, 0.125, 0.5, 2, and 8 μg/ml, respectively. The total error rates between the two methods using the FDA criteria were high: 38.4% for ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae and 33.8% for A. baumannii. Using the EUCAST criteria, the total error rate was also high (54.6%) for A. baumannii isolates. The total error rates between these two methods were <5% for MRSA, VRE, and ESBL-producing E. coli. For routine susceptibility testing of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae and A. baumannii against tigecycline, the broth microdilution method should be used because of the poor correlation of results between these two methods.

  4. Broth Microdilution Method To Detect Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases and AmpC β-Lactamases in Enterobacteriaceae Isolates by Use of Clavulanic Acid and Boronic Acid as Inhibitors ▿

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seok Hoon; Song, Wonkeun; Kim, Jae-Seok; Kim, Han-Sung; Lee, Kyu Man

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the performance of the broth microdilution (BMD) method to detect production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and AmpC β-lactamases in Enterobacteriaceae by using clavulanic acid (CA) and boronic acid (BA) as ESBL and AmpC β-lactamase inhibitors, respectively. A total of 100 clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae were analyzed. Mueller-Hinton broth containing serial twofold dilutions of cefotaxime (CTX), ceftazidime (CAZ), aztreonam (ATM), or cefepime (FEP) with or without either or both CA and BA was prepared. An eightfold or greater decrease in the MIC of CTX, CAZ, ATM, or FEP in the presence of CA and BA was considered a positive result for ESBL and plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamase (PABL), respectively. In tests with CA, expanded-spectrum β-lactams containing BA (CTX-BA, CAZ-BA, ATM-BA, and FEP-BA) showed higher positive rates in detecting ESBL producers than those without BA. The combination of CTX- and CAZ-based BMD tests with CA and BA showed sensitivity and specificity of 100% for the detection of ESBLs and PABLs. The BMD testing could be applicable for routine use in commercially available semiautomated systems for the detection of ESBLs and PABLs in Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:19710269

  5. Telavancin demonstrates activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin, daptomycin, and linezolid in broth microdilution MIC and one-compartment pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jordan R; Barber, Katie E; Hallesy, Jessica; Raut, Animesh; Rybak, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates have arisen with reduced susceptibility to several anti-MRSA agents. Telavancin (TLV), a novel anti-MRSA agent, retains low MICs against these organisms. Our objective was to determine the MICs for TLV, daptomycin (DAP), vancomycin (VAN), and linezolid (LZD) against daptomycin-nonsusceptible (DNS) S. aureus, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), heteroresistant VISA (hVISA), and linezolid-resistant (LZD(r)) S. aureus. We also evaluated these agents against each phenotype in pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) models. Seventy DNS, 100 VISA, 180 hVISA, and 25 LZD(r) MRSA isolates were randomly selected from our library and tested to determine their MICs against TLV, DAP, VAN, and LZD via broth microdilution and a Trek panel. Four isolates were randomly selected for 168-h in vitro models to evaluate treatment with TLV at 10 mg/kg of body weight/day, DAP at 10 mg/kg/day, VAN at 1 g every 12 h (q12h), and LZD at 600 mg q12h. The MIC50/90 for TLV, DAP, VAN, and LZD against 70 DNS S. aureus isolates were 0.06/0.125 μg/ml, 2/4 μg/ml, 1/2 μg/ml, and 2/2 μg/ml, respectively. Against 100 VISA isolates, the MIC50/90 were 0.06/0.125 μg/ml, 1/1 μg/ml, 4/8 μg/ml, and 1/2 μg/ml, respectively. Against 170 hVISA isolates, the MIC50/90 were 0.06/0.125 μg/ml, 0.5/1 μg/ml, 1/2 μg/ml, and 1/2 μg/ml, respectively. Against 25 LZD(r) isolates, the MIC50/90 were 0.03/0.06 μg/ml, 1/1 μg/ml, 2/2 μg/ml, and 8/8 μg/ml, respectively. The TLV MIC was >0.125 μg/ml for 10/365 (2.7%) isolates. In PK/PD models, TLV was universally bactericidal at 168 h and statistically superior to all antibiotics against DNS S. aureus strain R2334. These data further establish the potency of TLV against resistant MRSA. The model data demonstrate in vitro bactericidal activity of TLV against hVISA, VISA, DNS S. aureus, and LZD(r) S. aureus strains. Further clinical research is warranted.

  6. Clinical evaluation of a frozen commercially prepared microdilution panel for antifungal susceptibility testing of seven antifungal agents, including the new triazoles posaconazole, ravuconazole, and voriconazole.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Diekema, D J; Messer, S A; Boyken, L; Huynh, H; Hollis, R J

    2002-05-01

    A commercially prepared frozen broth microdilution panel (Trek Diagnostic Systems, Westlake, Ohio) was compared with a reference microdilution panel for antifungal susceptibility testing of two quality control (QC) strains and 99 clinical isolates of Candida spp. The antifungal agents tested included amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, ravuconazole, and voriconazole. Microdilution testing was performed according to NCCLS recommendations. MIC endpoints were read visually after 48 h of incubation and were assessed independently for each microdilution panel. The MICs for the QC strains were within published limits for both the reference and Trek microdilution panels. Discrepancies among MIC endpoints of no more than 2 dilutions were used to calculate the percent agreement. Acceptable levels of agreement between the Trek and reference panels were observed for all antifungal agents tested against the 99 clinical isolates. The overall agreement for each antifungal agent ranged from 96% for ravuconazole to 100% for amphotericin B. The Trek microdilution panel appears to be a viable alternative to frozen microdilution panels prepared in-house. PMID:11980944

  7. Multidrug-Resistant Candida auris Misidentified as Candida haemulonii: Characterization by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry and DNA Sequencing and Its Antifungal Susceptibility Profile Variability by Vitek 2, CLSI Broth Microdilution, and Etest Method.

    PubMed

    Kathuria, Shallu; Singh, Pradeep K; Sharma, Cheshta; Prakash, Anupam; Masih, Aradhana; Kumar, Anil; Meis, Jacques F; Chowdhary, Anuradha

    2015-06-01

    Candida auris is a multidrug-resistant yeast that causes a wide spectrum of infections, especially in intensive care settings. We investigated C. auris prevalence among 102 clinical isolates previously identified as Candida haemulonii or Candida famata by the Vitek 2 system. Internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequencing confirmed 88.2% of the isolates as C. auris, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) easily separated all related species, viz., C. auris (n = 90), C. haemulonii (n = 6), C. haemulonii var. vulnera (n = 1), and Candida duobushaemulonii (n = 5). The in vitro antifungal susceptibility was determined using CLSI broth microdilution (CLSI-BMD), the Vitek 2 antifungal susceptibility test, and the Etest method. C. auris isolates revealed uniformly elevated fluconazole MICs (MIC50, 64 μg/ml), and an alarming percentage of isolates (37%) exhibited elevated caspofungin MICs by CLSI-BMD. Notably, 34% of C. auris isolates had coexisting elevated MICs (≥2 μg/ml) for both fluconazole and voriconazole, and 10% of the isolates had elevated coexisting MICs (≥2 μg/ml) to two additional azoles, i.e., posaconazole and isavuconazole. In contrast to reduced amphotericin B MICs by CLSI-BMD (MIC50, 1 μg/ml) for C. auris, elevated MICs were noted by Vitek 2 (MIC50, 8 μg/ml), which were statistically significant. Candida auris remains an unnoticed pathogen in routine microbiology laboratories, as 90% of the isolates characterized by commercial identification systems are misidentified as C. haemulonii. MALDI-TOF MS proved to be a more robust diagnostic technique for rapid identification of C. auris. Considering that misleading elevated MICs of amphotericin B by the Vitek AST-YS07 card may lead to the selection of inappropriate therapy, a cautionary approach is recommended for laboratories relying on commercial systems for identification and antifungal susceptibility testing of rare yeasts.

  8. [Helicobacter pylori antibiotic sensitivity by microdilution].

    PubMed

    Rivas, F; Rivera, P; Hernández, F; Hevia, F; Guillén, F; Tamayo, G

    2000-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has been recognized as the major aetiologic agent of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers and also a risk factor for gastric cancer; eradication of H pylori prevents peptic ulcer recurrence and may also decrease the prevalence of gastric cancer in high risk populations around the world. Currently the only accepted indication for treatment is ulcer disease and maltosa, infected with Helicobacter pilory. However treatment is difficult and easily develops resistance. The elaboration of an antibiotic profile is recommended after a treatment failure. There is a lack of information in developing countries so the aim of this work was to determine the antibiotic profile of 51 strains isolated from patients gastric biopsies attended at Hospital San Juan de Dios in Costa Rica, using egg yolk broth and finding a resistance of 63.0% to metronidazole with a breakpoint of 8.0 microg/ml and 20.0% resistance to tetracycline (MIC1.0 microg/ml), 6.0% to clarithromicyn with a MIC of 0.125 microg/ml. There was no resistance to amoxicilin (MIC 0.015 microg/ml). The microdilution technique is very laborious, but highly reproducible with results accordingly to previous work, and we recommended it for the designing of therapeutical scheme.

  9. In vitro evaluation of Malassezia pachydermatis susceptibility to azole compounds using E-test and CLSI microdilution methods.

    PubMed

    Cafarchia, Claudia; Figueredo, Luciana A; Iatta, Roberta; Colao, Valeriana; Montagna, Maria T; Otranto, Domenico

    2012-11-01

    Dermatitis caused by Malassezia spp., one of most common skin disease in dogs, requires prolonged therapy and/or high doses of antifungal agents. In the present study, the antifungal susceptibility of M. pachydermatis to ketoconazole (KTZ), fluconazole (FLZ), itraconazole (ITZ), posaconazole (POS) and voriconazole (VOR) was evaluated in vitro using both CLSI reference broth microdilution (CLSI BMD) and E-test. A total of 62 M. pachydermatis strains from dogs with and without skin lesions were tested. M. pachydermatis strains were susceptible to ITZ, KTZ and POS using both test methods, with the highest MIC found in tests of FLZ. Essential agreement between the two methods ranged from 87.1% (VOR) to 91.9% (ITZ), and categorical agreement from 74.2% (FLZ) to 96.8% (ITZ). Minor error discrepancies were observed between the two methods, with major discrepancies observed for KTZ. A higher MIC(50) value for FLZ was noted with M. pachydermatis genotype B. The MICs(50) of M. pachydermatis genotype B for KTZ, VOR and POS were higher in isolates from dogs with skin lesions than those in isolates from animals without skin lesions. The results suggest a link between genotypes of M. pachydermatis and in vitro drug susceptibility. The categorical agreement for both E-test and CLSI BMD methods found in this investigation confirms the E-test as a reliable diagnostic method for routine use in clinical mycology laboratories. PMID:22471886

  10. [Comparison of microdilution and disk diffusion methods for the detection of fluconazole and voriconazole susceptibility against clinical Candida glabrata isolates and determination of changing susceptibility with new CLSI breakpoints].

    PubMed

    Hazırolan, Gülşen; Sarıbaş, Zeynep; Arıkan Akdağlı, Sevtap

    2016-07-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated species as the causative agent of Candida infections. However, in recent years, the isolation rate of non-albicans Candida species have increased. In many centers, Candida glabrata is one of the commonly isolated non-albicans species of C.glabrata infections which are difficult-to-treat due to decreased susceptibility to fluconazole and cross-resistance to other azoles. The aims of this study were to determine the in vitro susceptibility profiles of clinical C.glabrata isolates against fluconazole and voriconazole by microdilution and disk diffusion methods and to evaluate the results with both the previous (CLSI) and current species-specific CLSI (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) clinical breakpoints. A total of 70 C.glabrata strains isolated from clinical samples were included in the study. The identification of the isolates was performed by morphologic examination on cornmeal Tween 80 agar and assimilation profiles obtained by using ID32C (BioMérieux, France). Broth microdilution and disk diffusion methods were performed according to CLSI M27-A3 and CLSI M44-A2 documents, respectively. The results were evaluated according to CLSI M27-A3 and M44-A2 documents and new vs. species-specific CLSI breakpoints. By using both previous and new CLSI breakpoints, broth microdilution test results showed that voriconazole has greater in vitro activity than fluconazole against C.glabrata isolates. For the two drugs tested, very major error was not observed with disk diffusion method when microdilution method was considered as the reference method. Since "susceptible" category no more exists for fluconazole vs. C.glabrata, the isolates that were interpreted as susceptible by previous breakpoints were evaluated as susceptible-dose dependent by current CLSI breakpoints. Since species-specific breakpoints remain yet undetermined for voriconazole, comparative analysis was not possible for this agent. The results obtained

  11. [Assessment of 2 automated microdilution techniques compared to an agar dilution method in determining sensitivity to fosfomycin in strains of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Gil-Romero, Yolanda; Regodón-Domínguez, Marta; Wilhelmi de Cal, Isabel; López-Fabal, Fátima; Gómez-Garcés, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenems-resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates has been widely reported. Fosfomycin has been shown to act synergistically with other antimicrobials. The agar dilution method was approved for susceptibility testing for fosfomycin and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, broth microdilution methods are the basis of systems currently used in clinical microbiology laboratories. The results of this study indicate that these methods are acceptable as susceptibility testing methods for fosfomycin against these organisms.

  12. Comparative evaluation of macrodilution and alamar colorimetric microdilution broth methods for antifungal susceptibility testing of yeast isolates.

    PubMed Central

    To, W K; Fothergill, A W; Rinaldi, M G

    1995-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of the macrodilution method and the Alamar colorimetric method for the susceptibility testing of amphotericin B, fluconazole, and flucytosine was conducted with 134 pathogenic yeasts. The clinical isolates included 28 Candida albicans, 17 Candida tropicalis, 15 Candida parapsilosis, 12 Candida krusei, 10 Candida lusitaniae, 9 Candida guilliermondii, 18 Torulopsis glabrata, and 25 Cryptococcus neoformans isolates. The macrodilution method was performed and interpreted according to the recommendations of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (document M27-P), and the Alamar colorimetric method was performed according to the manufacturer's instructions. For the Alamar colorimetric method, MICs were determined at 24 and 48 h of incubation for Candida species and T. glabrata and at 48 and 72 h of incubation for C. neoformans. The overall agreement within +/- 1 dilution for Candida species and T. glabrata against the three antifungal agents was generally good, with the values for amphotericin B, fluconazole, and flucytosine being 85.3, 77.9, and 86.2%, respectively, at the 24-h readings and 69.3, 65.2, and 97.2%, respectively, at the 48-h readings. Most disagreement was noted with fluconazole against C. tropicalis and T. glabrata. Our studies indicate that determination of MICs at 24 h by the Alamar colorimetric method is a valid alternate method for testing amphotericin B, fluconazole, and flucytosine against Candida species but not for testing fluconazole against C. tropicalis and T. glabrata. For flucytosine, much better agreement can be demonstrated against Candida species and T. glabrata at the 48-h readings by the Alamar method.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8567901

  13. Species of Genus Ganoderma (Agaricomycetes) Fermentation Broth: A Novel Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Agent.

    PubMed

    Cilerdzic, Jasmina; Kosanic, Marijana; Stajić, Mirjana; Vukojevic, Jelena; Ranković, Branislav

    2016-01-01

    The bioactivity of Ganoderma lucidum basidiocarps has been well documented, but there are no data on the medicinal properties of its submerged cultivation broth nor on the other species of the genus Ganoderma. Thus the aim of this study was to test the potential antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of fermentation broth obtained after submerged cultivation of G. applanatum, G. carnosum, and G. lucidum. DPPH· scavenging ability, total phenols, and flavonoid contents were measured to determine the antioxidative potential of Ganoderma spp. fermentation filtrates, whereas their antimicrobial potential was studied using the microdilution method. DPPH· scavenging activity of G. lucidum fermentation filtrates was significantly higher than that of G. applanatum and G. carnosum, with the maximum (39.67%) obtained from strain BEOFB 432. This filtrate also contained the highest concentrations of phenols (134.89 μg gallic acid equivalents/mL) and flavonoids (42.20 μg quercetin equivalent/mL). High correlations between the activity and phenol content in the extracts showed that these compounds were active components of the antioxidative activity. G. lucidum strain BEOFB 432 was the most effective antibacterial agent, whereas strain BEOFB 434 has proven to be the most effective antifungal agent. The study showed that Ganoderma spp. fermentation filtrates are novel potent antioxidative and antimicrobial agents that could be obtained more quickly and cheaper than basidiocarps. PMID:27649601

  14. Multicenter comparative evaluation of six commercial systems and the national committee for clinical laboratory standards m27-a broth microdilution method for fluconazole susceptibility testing of Candida species.

    PubMed

    Morace, G; Amato, G; Bistoni, F; Fadda, G; Marone, P; Montagna, M T; Oliveri, S; Polonelli, L; Rigoli, R; Mancuso, I; La Face, S; Masucci, L; Romano, L; Napoli, C; Tatò, D; Buscema, M G; Belli, C M C; Piccirillo, M M; Conti, S; Covan, S; Fanti, F; Cavanna, C; D'Alò, F; Pitzurra, L

    2002-08-01

    Fluconazole susceptibility among 800 clinical Candida isolates (60% C. albicans) and two control strains (C. krusei ATCC 6258 and C. parapsilosis ATCC 22019) was tested with the NCCLS M27-A method (gold standard) and six commercial products (Candifast, disk, Etest, Fungitest, Integral System Yeasts, and Sensititre YeastOne). Results were classified as susceptible, susceptible-dose dependent, or resistant using M27-A breakpoints or, for Fungitest, Integral System Yeasts, and Candifast, as susceptible, intermediate, or resistant, according to the manufacturers' instructions. Concordance with NCCLS M27-A results was analyzed with the chi(2) test. Intra- and interlaboratory reproducibility was also evaluated. NCCLS M27-A (90.1%), Etest (93.1%), Sensititre YeastOne (93.1%), disk (96.7%), Fungitest (92.6%), Integral System Yeasts (40.6%), and Candifast (6.0%) classified the indicated percentages of C. albicans isolates as susceptible. Among non-C. albicans strains, the percentages of susceptible isolates were as follows: NCCLS M27-A, 74.0%; Etest, 83.8%; Sensititre YeastOne, 64.1%; disk, 60.6%; Fungitest, 76.6%; Integral System Yeasts, 28.3%; and Candifast, 27.4%. All methods except Candifast and Integral System Yeasts showed good agreement with NCCLS M27-A results for both C albicans and non-C. albicans isolates. Intralaboratory reproducibility was excellent for NCCLS M27-A, Etest, Sensititre YeastOne, disk, and Fungitest (88 to 91%). Similar results emerged from the interlaboratory reproducibility evaluation. Our findings indicate that some commercial methods can be useful for fluconazole susceptibility testing of clinical Candida isolates. Those characterized by a lack of medium standardization and/or objective interpretative criteria should be avoided. Particular caution is necessary when testing is being done for clinical and epidemiological purposes. PMID:12149358

  15. Multicenter Comparative Evaluation of Six Commercial Systems and the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards M27-A Broth Microdilution Method for Fluconazole Susceptibility Testing of Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Morace, G.; Amato, G.; Bistoni, F.; Fadda, G.; Marone, P.; Montagna, M. T.; Oliveri, S.; Polonelli, L.; Rigoli, R.; Mancuso, I.; La Face, S.; Masucci, L.; Romano, L.; Napoli, C.; Tatò, D.; Buscema, M. G.; Belli, C. M. C.; Piccirillo, M. M.; Conti, S.; Covan, S.; Fanti, F.; Cavanna, C.; D'Alò, F.; Pitzurra, L.

    2002-01-01

    Fluconazole susceptibility among 800 clinical Candida isolates (60% C. albicans) and two control strains (C. krusei ATCC 6258 and C. parapsilosis ATCC 22019) was tested with the NCCLS M27-A method (gold standard) and six commercial products (Candifast, disk, Etest, Fungitest, Integral System Yeasts, and Sensititre YeastOne). Results were classified as susceptible, susceptible-dose dependent, or resistant using M27-A breakpoints or, for Fungitest, Integral System Yeasts, and Candifast, as susceptible, intermediate, or resistant, according to the manufacturers' instructions. Concordance with NCCLS M27-A results was analyzed with the χ2 test. Intra- and interlaboratory reproducibility was also evaluated. NCCLS M27-A (90.1%), Etest (93.1%), Sensititre YeastOne (93.1%), disk (96.7%), Fungitest (92.6%), Integral System Yeasts (40.6%), and Candifast (6.0%) classified the indicated percentages of C. albicans isolates as susceptible. Among non-C. albicans strains, the percentages of susceptible isolates were as follows: NCCLS M27-A, 74.0%; Etest, 83.8%; Sensititre YeastOne, 64.1%; disk, 60.6%; Fungitest, 76.6%; Integral System Yeasts, 28.3%; and Candifast, 27.4%. All methods except Candifast and Integral System Yeasts showed good agreement with NCCLS M27-A results for both C albicans and non-C. albicans isolates. Intralaboratory reproducibility was excellent for NCCLS M27-A, Etest, Sensititre YeastOne, disk, and Fungitest (88 to 91%). Similar results emerged from the interlaboratory reproducibility evaluation. Our findings indicate that some commercial methods can be useful for fluconazole susceptibility testing of clinical Candida isolates. Those characterized by a lack of medium standardization and/or objective interpretative criteria should be avoided. Particular caution is necessary when testing is being done for clinical and epidemiological purposes. PMID:12149358

  16. Effects of incubation temperature, inoculum size, and time of reading on broth microdilution susceptibility test results for amphotericin B fgainst Fusarium.

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, I; Guarro, J; Sala, J; Riba, M D

    1997-01-01

    In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing for filamentous fungi remains unstandardized and is unreliable for determining adequate therapy. A study was performed to evaluate the effect of inoculum size (10(2), 10(3), 10(4), and 10(5) conidia/ml), incubation time (48 and 72 h), and temperature (25, 30, and 35 degrees C) on MICs of amphotericin B for Fusarium spp. (20 strains). The inoculum size showed the clearest effect: when the inoculum was varied from 10(2) to 10(5) conidia/ml, the geometric mean MICs showed increases of between 10- and 19-fold in all the combined conditions of temperature and incubation time assayed. Time of incubation had less effect (increases of between two- and threefold in approximately half of the geometric mean MICs), and temperature especially had little effect (the increases were no higher than twofold). The effects of interaction between inoculum size and temperature on MICs were not statistically significant, while the combined effects of inoculum size and time of reading and of time of reading and temperature produced systematic variation in MICs. PMID:9087494

  17. In vitro evaluation of Augmentin by broth microdilution and disk diffusion susceptibility testing: regression analysis, tentative interpretive criteria, and quality control limits.

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, P C; Barry, A L; Thornsberry, C; Gavan, T L; Jones, R N

    1983-01-01

    Augmentin (Beecham Laboratories, Bristol, Tenn.), a combination drug consisting of two parts amoxicillin to one part clavulanic acid and a potent beta-lactamase inhibitor, was evaluated in vitro in comparison with ampicillin or amoxicillin or both for its inhibitory and bactericidal activities against selected clinical isolates. Regression analysis was performed and tentative disk diffusion susceptibility breakpoints were determined. A multicenter performance study of the disk diffusion test was conducted with three quality control organisms to determine tentative quality control limits. All methicillin-susceptible staphylococci and Haemophilus influenzae isolates were susceptible to Augmentin, although the minimal inhibitory concentrations for beta-lactamase-producing strains of both groups were, on the average, fourfold higher than those for enzyme-negative strains. Among the Enterobacteriaceae, Augmentin exhibited significantly greater activity than did ampicillin against Klebsiella pneumoniae, Citrobacter diversus, Proteus vulgaris, and about one-third of the Escherichia coli strains tested. Bactericidal activity usually occurred at the minimal inhibitory concentration. There was a slight inoculum concentration effect on the Augmentin minimal inhibitory concentrations. On the basis of regression and error rate-bounded analyses, the suggested interpretive disk diffusion susceptibility breakpoints for Augmentin are: susceptible, greater than or equal to 18 mm; resistant, less than or equal to 13 mm (gram-negative bacilli); and susceptible, greater than or equal to 20 mm (staphylococci and H. influenzae). The use of a beta-lactamase-producing organism, such as E. coli Beecham 1532, is recommended for quality assurance of Augmentin susceptibility testing. PMID:6625554

  18. Recovery of succinic acid from fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Kurzrock, Tanja; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2010-03-01

    Succinic acid is of high interest as bio-feedstock for the chemical industry. It is a precursor for a variety of many other chemicals, e.g. 1,4-butandiol, tetrahydrofuran, biodegradable polymers and fumaric acid. Besides optimized production strains and fermentation processes it is indispensable to develop cost-saving and energy-effective downstream processes to compete with the current petrochemical production process. Various methods such as precipitation, sorption and ion exchange, electrodialysis, and liquid-liquid extraction have been investigated for the recovery of succinic acid from fermentation broth and are reviewed critically here. PMID:19898782

  19. The risk of lead contamination in bone broth diets.

    PubMed

    Monro, J A; Leon, R; Puri, B K

    2013-04-01

    The preparation and consumption of bone broth is being increasingly recommended to patients, for example as part of the gut and psychology syndrome (GAPS) diet for autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, dyslexia, dyspraxia, depression and schizophrenia, and as part of the paleolithic diet. However, bones are known to sequester the heavy metal lead, contamination with which is widespread throughout the modern environment. Such sequestered lead can then be mobilised from the bones. We therefore hypothesised that bone broth might carry a risk of being contaminated with lead. A small, blinded, controlled study of lead concentrations in three different types of organic chicken broth showed that such broths do indeed contain several times the lead concentration of the water with which the broth is made. In particular, broth made from skin and cartilage taken off the bone once the chicken had been cooked with the bones in situ, and chicken-bone broth, were both found to have markedly high lead concentrations, of 9.5 and 7.01 μg L(-1), respectively (compared with a control value for tap water treated in the same way of 0.89 μg L(-1)). In view of the dangers of lead consumption to the human body, we recommend that doctors and nutritionists take the risk of lead contamination into consideration when advising patients about bone broth diets. PMID:23375414

  20. In Vitro Activity of Ceftolozane-Tazobactam as Determined by Broth Dilution and Agar Diffusion Assays against Recent U.S. Escherichia coli Isolates from 2010 to 2011 Carrying CTX-M-Type Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases

    PubMed Central

    Estabrook, Mark; Bussell, Brianne; Clugston, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Ceftolozane MIC50/MIC90s were 4/8 μg/ml when tested against 26 CTX-M-14-type-producing isolates and 64/>64 μg/ml against 219 CTX-M-15-type-producing isolates. The addition of 4 μg/ml tazobactam lowered the ceftolozane MIC50/MIC90s to ≤0.25/0.5 μg/ml by broth microdilution and Etest. The zone diameters for the ceftolozane-tazobactam disks were 23 to 29 mm for 92.2% of the isolates. PMID:25143578

  1. Determination of Hydrogen Sulfide in Fermentation Broths Containing SO21

    PubMed Central

    Acree, T. E.; Sonoff, Elisabeth P.; Splittstoesser, D. F.

    1971-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of hydrogen sulfide in fermentation broths containing up to 100 μg of SO2 per ml is described. The method involves the sparging of H2S from the broth into a cadmium hydroxide absorption solution, the formation of methylene blue from the absorbed sulfide, and the measuring of this color spectrophotometrically. The use of cadmium hydroxide instead of zinc acetate, the common absorbent, substantially reduced the interference of SO2 with the analysis. PMID:5111300

  2. In vitro drug susceptibility of 40 international reference rapidly growing mycobacteria to 20 antimicrobial agents

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Hui; Li, Guilian; Wan, Li; Jiang, Yi; Liu, Haican; Zhao, Xiuqin; Zhao, Zhongfu; Wan, Kanglin

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are human pathogens that are relatively easily identified by acid-fast staining but are proving difficult to treat in the clinic. In this study, we performed susceptibility testing of 40 international reference RGM species against 20 antimicrobial agents using the cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton (CAMH) broth microdilution based on the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay recommended by the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The results demonstrated that RGM organisms were resistant to the majority of first-line antituberculous agents but not to second-line fluoroquinolones or aminoglycosides. Three drugs (amikacin, tigecycline and linezolid) displayed potent antimycobacterial activity against all tested strains. Capreomycin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin emerged as promising candidates for the treatment of RGM infections, and cefoxitin and meropenem were active against most strains. Mycobacterium chelonae (M. chelonae), M. abscessus, M. bolletii, M. fortuitum, M. boenickei, M. conceptionense, M. pseudoshottsii, M. septicum and M. setense were the most resistant RGM species. These results provide significant insight into the treatment of RGM species and will assist optimization of clinical criteria. PMID:26629031

  3. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Cinnamomum zeylanicum leaf broth.

    PubMed

    Smitha, S L; Philip, Daizy; Gopchandran, K G

    2009-10-15

    Development of biologically inspired experimental processes for the synthesis of nanoparticles is an important branch of nanotechnology. The synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Cinnamomum zeylanicum leaf broth as the reducing agent is reported. The morphology of the particles formed consists of a mixture of gold nanoprisms and spheres with fcc (111) structure of gold. At lower concentrations of the extract, formation of prism shaped Au particles dominates, while at higher concentrations almost spherical particles alone are observed. Good crystallinity of the nanoparticles with fcc phase is evident from XRD patterns, clear lattice fringes in the high resolution TEM image and bright circular rings in the SAED pattern. Au nanoparticles grown are observed to be photoluminescent and the intensity of photoemission is found to increase with increase in leaf broth concentration. The ability to modulate the shape of nanoparticles as observed in this study for gold nanoparticles opens up the exciting possibility of developing further synthetic routes employing ecofriendly sources.

  4. Separation of gamma-aminobutyric acid from fermented broth.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Qiu, Ting; Chen, Yan; Cao, Yusheng

    2011-12-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-proteinaceous amino acid that is widely distributed in nature and acts as the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. This study aimed to find a separation method for getting high-purity GABA from a fermented broth. Firstly, a fermented broth with a high content of GABA (reaching 997 ± 51 mM) was prepared by fermentation with Lactobacillus brevis NCL912. GABA purification was conducted by successive centrifugation, filtration, decoloration, desalination, ion-exchange chromatography (IEC), and crystallization. Inorganic salt (Na₂SO₄) was removed from the both by desalination with 70% ethanol solution. A ninhydrin test strip was designed for the real-time detection of GABA during IEC. The recovery rate for the whole purification process was about 50%. The purified product was characterized by thin-layer chromatography and HPLC, and its purity reached 98.66 ± 2.36%.

  5. Bacteriophage Transduction in Staphylococcus aureus: Broth-Based Method.

    PubMed

    Krausz, Kelsey L; Bose, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    The ability to move DNA between Staphylococcus strains is essential for the genetic manipulation of this bacterium. Often in the Staphylococci, this is accomplished through transduction using generalized transducing phage and can be performed in different ways and therefore the presence of two transduction procedures in this book. The following protocol is a relatively easy-to-perform, broth-based procedure that we have used extensively to move both plasmids and chromosomal fragments between strains of Staphylococcus aureus.

  6. Selective enumeration of propionibacteria in Emmental-type cheese using Petrifilm™ aerobic count plates added to lithium glycerol broth.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Rosângela; Luiz, Lívia M Pinheiro; Alves, Maura Pinheiro; Valence-Bertel, Florence; Nero, Luís Augusto; de Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes

    2013-08-01

    Propionibacteria derived from dairy products are relevant starter cultures for the production of Swiss and Emmental-type cheeses, and the monitoring of which is mandatory for proper quality control. This study aimed to evaluate an alternative procedure to enumerate propionibacteria, in order to develop a reliable and practical methodology to be employed by dairy industries. 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) inhibitory activity was tested against five reference strains (CIRM 09, 38, 39, 40 and 116); TTC at 0·0025% (w/v) was not inhibitory, with the exception of one strain (CIRM 116). Subsequently, the four TTC-resistant strains, three commercial starter cultures (PS-1, PB-I, and CHOO) and twelve Emmental-type cheese samples were subjected to propionibacteria enumeration using Lithium Glycerol (LG) agar, and Petrifilm™ Aerobic Count (AC) plates added to LG broth (anaerobic incubation at 30 °C for 7 d). Petrifilm™ AC added to LG broth presented high counts than LG agar (P<0·05) for only two reference strains (CIRM 39, and 40) and for all commercial starter cultures. Cheese sample counts obtained by both procedures did not show significant differences (P<0·05). Significant correlation indexes were observed between the counts recorded by both methods (P<0·05). These results demonstrate the reliability of Petrifilm™ AC plates added to LG broth in enumerating select Propionibacterium spp., despite some limitations observed for specific commercial starter cultures.

  7. Paradigm Diagnostics Salmonella Indicator Broth (PDX-SIB) for detection of Salmonella on selected environmental surfaces.

    PubMed

    Olstein, Alan; Griffith, Leena; Feirtag, Joellen; Pearson, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The Paradigm Diagnostics Salmonella Indicator Broth (PDX-SIB) is intended as a single-step selective enrichment indicator broth to be used as a simple screening test for the presence of Salmonella spp. in environmental samples. This method permits the end user to avoid multistep sample processing to identify presumptively positive samples, as exemplified by standard U.S. reference methods. PDX-SIB permits the outgrowth of Salmonella while inhibiting the growth of competitive Gram-negative and -positive microflora. Growth of Salmonella-positive cultures results in a visual color change of the medium from purple to yellow when the sample is grown at 37 +/- 1 degree C. Performance of PDX-SIB has been evaluated in five different categories: inclusivity-exclusivity, methods comparison, ruggedness, lot-to-lot variability, and shelf stability. The inclusivity panel included 100 different Salmonella serovars, 98 of which were SIB-positive during the 30 to 48 h incubation period. The exclusivity panel included 33 different non-Salmonella microorganisms, 31 of which were SIB-negative during the incubation period. Methods comparison studies included four different surfaces: S. Newport on plastic, S. Anatum on sealed concrete, S. Abaetetuba on ceramic tile, and S. Typhimurium in the presence of 1 log excess of Citrobacter freundii. Results of the methods comparison studies demonstrated no statistical difference between the SIB method and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration-Bacteriological Analytical Manual reference method, as measured by the Mantel-Haenszel Chi-square test. Ruggedness studies demonstrated little variation in test results when SIB incubation temperatures were varied over a 34-40 degrees C range. Lot-to-lot consistency results suggest no detectable differences in manufactured goods using two reference Salmonella serovars and one non-Salmonella microorganism.

  8. Production of 1,3-propanediol by Klebsiella pneumoniae from glycerol broth.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ke-Ke; Zhang, Jian-An; Liu, De-Hua; Sun, Yan; Yang, Ming-De; Xu, Jing-Ming

    2006-11-01

    Broth containing 152 g glycerol l(-1) from Candida krusei culture was converted to 1,3-propanediol by Klebsiella pneumoniae. Residual glucose in the broth promoted growth of K. pneumoniae while acetate was inhibitory. After desalination treatment of glycerol broth by electrodialysis, the acetate in the broth was removed. A fed-batch culture with electrodialytically pretreated broth as substrate was developed giving 53 g 1,3-propanediol l(-1) with a yield of 0.41 g g(-1) glycerol and a productivity of 0.94 g l(-1) h(-1).

  9. Comparison of growth kinetics for healthy and heat-injured Listeria monocytogenes in eight enrichment broths.

    PubMed

    Silk, Todd M; Roth, Tatiana M T; Donnelly, C W

    2002-08-01

    Detection of Listeria in food products is often limited by performance of enrichment media used to support growth of Listeria to detectable levels. In this study, growth curves were generated using healthy and heat-injured Listeria monocytogenes strain F5069 in three nonselective and five selective enrichment broths. Nonselective enrichment media included the current Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual Listeria enrichment broth base (BAM), Listeria repair broth (LRB), and Trypticase soy broth. Selective enrichment media included BAM with selective agents and LRB with selective agents, BCM L. monocytogenes preenrichment broth, Fraser broth, and UVM-modified Listeria enrichment broth. The Gompertz equation was used to model the growth of L. monocytogenes. Gompertz parameters were used to calculate exponential growth rate, lag-phase duration (LPD), generation time, maximum population density (MPD), and time required for repair of injured cells. Statistical differences (P < 0.05) in broth performance were noted for LPD and MPD when healthy and injured cells were inoculated into the broths. With the exception of Fraser broth, there were no significant differences in the time required for the repair of injured cells. Results indicate that the distinction between selective and nonselective broths in their ability to grow healthy Listeria and to repair sublethally injured cells is not solely an elementary issue of presence or absence of selective agents.

  10. Spectrophotometric method for determining gibberellic acid in fermentation broths.

    PubMed

    Berríos, Julio; Illanes, Andrés; Aroca, Germán

    2004-01-01

    A novel method for the quantitative determination of gibberellic acid in fermentation broths has been developed. It is based on the kinetic of the reaction of conversion of gibberellic acid to gibberellenic acid. The method is simple, reliable, faster than most of methods known, and free of the interferences which commonly affect spectrophotometric methods currently in use. Its threshold sensitivity is 0.1 g and its accuracy is greater than 97% for concentrations of gibberellic acid ranging from 0.1 to 1 g l(-1).

  11. Viability of Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 in Nutrient Broth, Luria-Bertani Broth and Brain Heart Infusion over 11 Weeks

    PubMed Central

    Low, Samuel Xin Zher; Aw, Zhen Qin; Loo, Bryan Zong Lin; Lee, Kun Cheng; Oon, Jack Si Hao; Lee, Chin How; Ling, Maurice Han Tong

    2013-01-01

    Background: Escherichia coli is a widely studied prokaryotic system. A recent study had demonstrated that reduced growth of E. coli after extended culture in Luria-Bertani broth is a result of depletion of fermentable sugars but able to sustain extended cell culture due to the presence of amino acids, which can be utilized as a carbon source. However, this had not been demonstrated in other media. The study aimed to determine the growth and viability of E. coli ATCC 8739 in 3 different media, Nutrient Broth (NB), Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) and Luria-Bertani Broth (LB) over 11 weeks. Methods: Growth of E. coli ATCC 8739 was determined by optical density. Viability was determined by serial dilution/spread-plate enumeration. After 11 weeks, the media were exhausted by repeated culture. Glucose was added to the exhausted media to determine whether glucose is the growth-limiting factor. Results: Our results showed that cell density in all 3 media increased to about 1 × 109 cells/ml by the end of week 1, from the inoculation density of 2.67 × 105 cells/ml, peaked at about 1 × 1013 cells/ml at week 4, before declining to about 5 × 107 cells/ml at week 7. Cell density is highly correlated to genomic DNA content (r2 = 0.93) but poorly correlated to optical density (r2< 0.2). Our results also showed that the spent media were able to support further growth after glucose-supplementation. Conclusion: NB, LB and BHI are able to support extended periods of culture and glucose depletion is the likely reason for declining cell growth. PMID:26120385

  12. Microbiologic and clinical value of primary broth cultures of wound specimens collected with swabs.

    PubMed Central

    Silletti, R P; Ailey, E; Sun, S; Tang, D

    1997-01-01

    In order to assess the microbiologic and clinical value of primary broth culture of wound specimens collected with swabs and submitted to the laboratory in transport medium, we compared the results of primary agar culture with the results of a corresponding primary broth culture for 344 aerobic specimens and 176 anaerobic specimens. While 8.7% (45 of 520) of the specimens yielded organisms from the primary broth culture that were not recovered from the corresponding primary agar culture, only 5.0% (26 of 520) of the specimens yielded organisms from the primary broth culture other than Staphylococcus epidermidis, viridans group streptococci, and Corynebacterium spp. Moreover, the primary broth culture of only 0.6% (3 of 520) of the specimens yielded organisms not recovered from the primary agar culture that caused a change in the therapy of the patient. Our conclusion is that primary broth cultures are unnecessary for the processing of wound specimens properly collected with swabs. PMID:9230370

  13. Effect of fermented broth from lactic acid bacteria on pathogenic bacteria proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, S; Martínez-Blanco, H; Rodríguez-Aparicio, L B; Ferrero, M A

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the effect that 5 fermented broths of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains have on the viability or proliferation and adhesion of 7 potentially pathogenic microorganisms was tested. The fermented broth from Lactococcus lactis C660 had a growth inhibitory effect on Escherichia coli K92 that reached of 31%, 19% to Pseudomonas fluorescens, and 76% to Staphylococcus epidermidis. The growth of Staph. epidermidis was negatively affected to 90% by Lc. lactis 11454 broth, whereas the growth of P. fluorescens (25%) and both species of Staphylococcus (35% to Staphylococcus aureus and 76% to Staph. epidermidis) were inhibited when they were incubated in the presence of Lactobacillus casei 393 broth. Finally, the fermented broth of Lactobacillus rhamnosus showed an inhibitory effect on growth of E. coli K92, Listeria innocua, and Staph. epidermidis reached values of 12, 28, and 76%, respectively. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most affected strain because the effect was detected from the early stages of growth and it was completely abolished. The results of bacterial adhesion revealed that broths from Lc. lactis strains, Lactobacillus paracasei, and Lb. rhamnosus caused a loss of E. coli K92 adhesion. Bacillus cereus showed a decreased of adhesion in the presence of the broths of Lc. lactis strains and Lb. paracasei. Listeria innocua adhesion inhibition was observed in the presence of Lb. paracasei broth, and the greatest inhibitory effect was registered when this pathogenic bacterium was incubated in presence of Lc. lactis 11454 broth. With respect to the 2 Pseudomonas, we observed a slight adhesion inhibition showed by Lactobacillus rhamnosus broth against Pseudomonas putida. These results confirm that the effect caused by the different LAB assayed is also broth- and species-specific and reveal that the broth from LAB tested can be used as functional bioactive compounds to regulate the adhesion and biofilm synthesis and ultimately lead to preventing food and

  14. Effect of fermented broth from lactic acid bacteria on pathogenic bacteria proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, S; Martínez-Blanco, H; Rodríguez-Aparicio, L B; Ferrero, M A

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the effect that 5 fermented broths of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains have on the viability or proliferation and adhesion of 7 potentially pathogenic microorganisms was tested. The fermented broth from Lactococcus lactis C660 had a growth inhibitory effect on Escherichia coli K92 that reached of 31%, 19% to Pseudomonas fluorescens, and 76% to Staphylococcus epidermidis. The growth of Staph. epidermidis was negatively affected to 90% by Lc. lactis 11454 broth, whereas the growth of P. fluorescens (25%) and both species of Staphylococcus (35% to Staphylococcus aureus and 76% to Staph. epidermidis) were inhibited when they were incubated in the presence of Lactobacillus casei 393 broth. Finally, the fermented broth of Lactobacillus rhamnosus showed an inhibitory effect on growth of E. coli K92, Listeria innocua, and Staph. epidermidis reached values of 12, 28, and 76%, respectively. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most affected strain because the effect was detected from the early stages of growth and it was completely abolished. The results of bacterial adhesion revealed that broths from Lc. lactis strains, Lactobacillus paracasei, and Lb. rhamnosus caused a loss of E. coli K92 adhesion. Bacillus cereus showed a decreased of adhesion in the presence of the broths of Lc. lactis strains and Lb. paracasei. Listeria innocua adhesion inhibition was observed in the presence of Lb. paracasei broth, and the greatest inhibitory effect was registered when this pathogenic bacterium was incubated in presence of Lc. lactis 11454 broth. With respect to the 2 Pseudomonas, we observed a slight adhesion inhibition showed by Lactobacillus rhamnosus broth against Pseudomonas putida. These results confirm that the effect caused by the different LAB assayed is also broth- and species-specific and reveal that the broth from LAB tested can be used as functional bioactive compounds to regulate the adhesion and biofilm synthesis and ultimately lead to preventing food and

  15. Broth medium for enrichment of Vibrio fluvialis from the environment.

    PubMed Central

    Nishibuchi, M; Roberts, N C; Bradford, H B; Seidler, R J

    1983-01-01

    A medium was designed for the enrichment and enumeration of Vibrio fluvialis from environmental samples. The medium contains 1% peptone plus 4% sodium chloride and 5 micrograms of novobiocin per ml, pH 8.5. This V. fluvialis enrichment medium (FEM) was tested, in comparison with alkaline peptone (AP), in field samplings. A total of 177 samples (estuarine waters and sediment, sewage, and crabs) collected over a 14-month period were examined with FEM and with AP broth. Results showed that FEM was more effective than AP in detecting V. fluvialis, particularly from water and sewage samples with low salinities (less than 6%). The best recovery of V. fluvialis occurred when both enrichment media were used simultaneously. PMID:6625569

  16. Beta-lactam stability in frozen microdilution PASCO MIC panels using strains with known resistance mechanisms as biosensors.

    PubMed

    Valdezate, S; Martínez-Beltrán, J; de Rafael, L; Baquero, F; Cantón, R

    1996-10-01

    The stability of amoxicillin/clavulanate, piperacillin/tazobactam, cefepime, imipenem, and meropenem in PASCO (PASCO System, DIFCO Laboratories, Detroit, MI, USA) frozen microdilution susceptibility panels stored for 16 weeks at -20 degrees C and -70 degrees C was evaluated. The increase in MIC values for the five American-Type Culture Collection (ATCC) quality control strains for susceptibility testing recommended by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) and for 13 strains with different well-characterized resistance mechanisms was indicative of bioactivity deterioration. The overall agreement (+/- 1 twofold dilution) at purchase between the MIC values of PASCO frozen microdilution susceptibility panels and the standard agar dilution method was 97.7%. Minimum inhibitory concentration values for the associations of amoxicillin/clavulanate and piperacillin/tazobactam remained unchanged for the study period at -70 degrees C. In contrast, a carbapenem bioactivity decrease was detected only with strains having well-characterized resistance mechanisms from the 12th week onwards. At -20 degrees C, antibiotic deterioration with these latter strains was observed earlier than with ATCC strains: the activity of meropenem and imipenem remained unchanged only for the first 2 weeks, while a loss of activity was detected for amoxicillin/clavulanate and piperacillin/tazobactam at the 7th and 10th week, respectively. Cefepime was highly stable both at -20 degrees C and -70 degrees C. Strains with well-characterized resistance mechanisms should be used in routine quality control studies of antibiotic stability for susceptibility testing panels during the storage period. PMID:8985656

  17. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Borrelia burgdorferi: a microdilution MIC method and time-kill studies.

    PubMed Central

    Dever, L L; Jorgensen, J H; Barbour, A G

    1992-01-01

    The susceptibility of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme borreliosis, to various antimicrobial agents varies widely among published studies. These differences are probably due in part to variations in susceptibility testing techniques and growth endpoint determinations. We developed a microdilution method for determining the MICs of antibiotics against B. burgdorferi. The method incorporated BSK II medium, a final inoculum of 10(6) cells per ml, and a 72-h incubation period and was found to be simple and highly reproducible. A variety of antibiotics and strains of B. burgdorferi and one strain of Borrelia hermsii were examined by this method. MICs of penicillin, ceftriaxone, and erythromycin for the B31 strain of B. burgdorferi were 0.06, 0.03, and 0.03 microgram/ml, respectively. We compared the MICs obtained by the microdilution method with those obtained by a macrodilution method using similar criteria for endpoint determinations and found the values obtained by both methods to be in close agreement. To further investigate the bactericidal activities of penicillin, ceftriaxone, and erythromycin against strain B31, we used subsurface plating to determine MBCs and we also performed time-kill studies. The MBCs of penicillin, ceftriaxone, and erythromycin were 0.125, 0.03, and 0.06 micrograms/ml, respectively. Time-kill curves demonstrated a greater than or equal to 3-log10-unit killing after 72 h with penicillin, ceftriaxone, and erythromycin; ceftriaxone provided the greatest reduction in CFU. The described methods offer a more standardized and objective approach to susceptibility testing of B. burgdorferi. Images PMID:1400969

  18. Recovery of Salmonella by Using Selenite Brilliant Green Sulfa Enrichment Broth

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chiao-tang; Yuo, Chung-Yee; Shen, Hui-Ching; Li, A-Mai; Chen, Chao-yu; Chou, Jui-ling; Huang, Shiao-ping

    1999-01-01

    The efficacy and sensitivity of selenite brilliant green sulfa enrichment (SBG) broth for the isolation of Salmonella from fecal specimens were evaluated by using both clinical and artificially infected (artificial) fecal specimens. An examination of 1,588 clinical fecal specimens found Salmonella in 296 specimens, including 89 cases detected by the direct-plating xylose-lysine-desoxycholate method and an additional 207 cases detected after enrichment with SBG broth. Therefore, the recovery of Salmonella with SBG broth is increased 3.3-fold over that by the direct-plating method alone. Furthermore, the isolation rate of Salmonella is higher when using SBG broth than when using gram-negative (GN) broth or GN broth supplemented with sodium selenite. To determine the sensitivity for the recovery of Salmonella, artificial specimens containing various amounts of Salmonella were prepared and analyzed. The results indicated that the sensitivity is also higher with SBG broth than with GN broth. Moreover, the optimal incubation period for SBG broth can be extended to 24 h. In conclusion, the SBG enrichment method provides a higher recovery rate of Salmonella from fecal specimens. PMID:10565941

  19. Comparative performance of isolation methods using Preston broth, Bolton broth and their modifications for the detection of Campylobacter spp. from naturally contaminated fresh and frozen raw poultry meat.

    PubMed

    Seliwiorstow, T; De Zutter, L; Houf, K; Botteldoorn, N; Baré, J; Van Damme, I

    2016-10-01

    The performance of different isolation methods was evaluated for the detection of Campylobacter from naturally contaminated raw poultry meat. Therefore, fresh and frozen poultry meat samples were analysed using the standard procedure (ISO 10272-1:2006), enrichment in Preston broth, and enrichment in modified Bolton broth (supplemented with (i) potassium clavulanate (C-BB), (ii) triclosan (T-BB), (iii) polymyxin B (P-BB)). The enrichment cultures were streaked onto both modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate agar (mCCDA) and RAPID'Campylobacter agar (RCA). Moreover, direct plating on mCCDA and RCA was performed to quantify Campylobacter. In total, 33 out of 59 fresh retail meat samples (55.9%) were Campylobacter positive. For both fresh and frozen poultry meat samples, enrichment in Bolton broth (ISO 10272-1:2006) resulted in a higher number of positive samples than enrichment in Preston broth. Supplementation of Bolton broth with potassium clavulanate (C-BB) and triclosan (T-BB) enhanced the Campylobacter recovery from fresh poultry meat compared to non-supplemented Bolton broth, although the use of C-BB was less applicable than T-BB for Campylobacter recovery from frozen samples. Additionally, the use of RCA resulted in a higher isolation rate compared to mCCDA. The present study demonstrates the impact of culture medium on the recovery of Campylobacter from fresh and frozen naturally contaminated poultry meat samples and can support laboratories in choosing the most appropriate culturing method to detect Campylobacter. PMID:27391222

  20. Succinic acid adsorption from fermentation broth and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Davison, Brian H; Nghiem, Nhuan P; Richardson, Gerald L

    2004-01-01

    More than 25 sorbents were tested for uptake of succinic acid from aqueous solutions. The best resins were then tested for successive loading and regeneration using hot water. The key desired properties for an ideal sorbent are high capacity, complete stable regenerability, and specificity for the product. The best resins have a stable capacity of about 0.06 g of succinic acid/g of resin at moderate concentrations (1-5 g/L) of succinic acid. Several sorbents were tested more exhaustively for uptake of succinic acid and for successive loading and regeneration using hot water. One resin, XUS 40285, has a good stable isotherm capacity, prefers succinate over glucose, and has good capacities at both acidic and neutral pH. Succinic acid was removed from simulated media containing salts, succinic acid, acetic acid, and sugar using a packed column of sorbent resin, XUS 40285. The fermentation byproduct, acetate, was completely separated from succinate. A simple hot water regeneration successfully concentrated succinate from 10 g/L (inlet) to 40-110 g/L in the effluent. If successful, this would lower separation costs by reducing the need for chemicals for the initial purification step. Despite promising initial results of good capacity (0.06 g of succinic/g of sorbent), 70% recovery using hot water, and a recovered concentration of >100 g/L, this regeneration was not stable over 10 cycles in the column. Alternative regeneration schemes using acid and base were examined. Two (XUS 40285 and XFS-40422) showed both good stable capacities for succinic acid over 10 cycles and >95% recovery in a batch operation using a modified extraction procedure combining acid and hot water washes. These resins showed comparable results with actual broth. PMID:15054284

  1. Supplementation of Bolton broth with triclosan improves detection of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in chicken carcass rinse.

    PubMed

    Chon, Jung-Whan; Kim, Young-Ji; Kim, Hong-Seok; Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyunsook; Song, Kwang-Young; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2014-07-01

    We compared Bolton enrichment broth supplemented with antimicrobial triclosan (T-Bolton broth) and normal Bolton broth for the isolation of Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) and Campylobacter coli (C. coli) from chicken carcass rinse. Whole chickens were rinsed with buffered peptone water prior to enrichment in normal Bolton broth or T-Bolton broth, followed by inoculation onto modified charcoal-cefoperazone-deoxycholate agar (mCCDA). Suspect colonies were confirmed by PCR. We observed a significantly higher number of C. jejuni or C. coli-positive samples in the T-Bolton broth (71.3%) than in the normal Bolton broth (27.5%) (p<0.05). Furthermore, the number of contaminated mCCDA plates was lower after enrichment in T-Bolton broth (3.8%) than in the normal Bolton broth (75%) (p<0.05), indicating that T-Bolton broth has higher selectivity. Finally, we identified extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli as the predominant competing flora in normal Bolton broth. In conclusion, the use of T-Bolton broth results in significant elimination of competing bacteria.

  2. Identification of Candida species and susceptibility testing with Sensititre YeastOne microdilution panel to 9 antifungal agents

    PubMed Central

    Kucukates, Emine; Gultekin, Nuh N.; Alisan, Zeynep; Hondur, Nur; Ozturk, Recep

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the species incidence and susceptibility pattern to 9 antifungal agents of yeasts isolated from various clinical specimens of colonized or infected patients treated in the coronary and surgical intensive care units (ICU). Methods: A total of 421 ICU patients were treated at the Cardiology Institute, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey between June 2013 and May 2014, and 44 Candida species were isolated from blood, urine, endotracheal aspiration fluid, sputum, and wounds of 16 ICU patients. Identification of Candida was performed using CHROMagar. Antifungal susceptibility was determined by a Sensititre YeastOne colorimetric microdilution panel. Results: Candida albicans (C. albicans) was the most commonly observed microorganism 23 (54%); the other microorganisms isolated were Candida tropicalis 12 (27%), Candida glabrata 5 (11%), Candida parapsilosis 1 (2%), Candida lusitaniae 1 (2%), Candida sake 1 (2%), and Geotrichum capitatum 1 (2%). All isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B and 5-flucytosine. Geotrichum capitatum excepted, the other isolates were also susceptible to anidulafungin, micafungin, and caspofungin. Candida parapsilosis was found to be susceptible to all the studied antifungals. High MIC rates for azole group of antifungal drugs were found for C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata. The rate of colonisation was 3.8% (16/421). Only 0.7% (3/421) patients out of a total of 421 developed candidemia. Conclusion: We found that the yeast colonization and infection rates of patients in our ICUs are very low. Candida albicans is still the most common species. We detected a decreasing susceptibility to azole compounds. PMID:27381534

  3. Membrane-based recovery and dehydration of alcohols from fermentation broths - of materials and modules

    EPA Science Inventory

    Distillation combined with molecular sieve dehydration is the current state of the art for fuel grade ethanol production from fermentation broths. As the liquid biofuels industry transitions to lignocellulosic feedstocks, expands the end product portfolio to include other alcoho...

  4. Energy efficient recovery and dehydration of ethanol from fermentation broths by Membrane Assisted Vapor Stripping technology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Distillation combined with molecular sieve dehydration is the current state of the art for fuel grade ethanol production from fermentation broths. To improve the sustainability of bioethanol production, energy efficient separation alternatives are needed, particularly for lower ...

  5. Separation technologies for the recovery and dehydration of alcohols from fermentation broths

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multi-column distillation followed by molecular sieve adsorption is currently the standard method for producing fuel grade ethanol from dilute fermentation broths in modern corn-to-ethnol facilities. As the liquid biofuels industry transitions to lignocellulosic feedstocks, expan...

  6. Fructo-oligosaccharides purification from a fermentative broth using an activated charcoal column.

    PubMed

    Nobre, C; Teixeira, J A; Rodrigues, L R

    2012-02-15

    In this study, a simple and efficient process to purify fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) from a fermentative broth was proposed using a single activated charcoal column. The FOS adsorption onto the activated charcoal was modeled by a pseudo-second order model. Several volumes and concentrations of water/ethanol were studied to optimize the selective desorption of sugars from the broth mixture at 25°C. Mixtures containing 50.6% (w/w) of FOS (FOS content in the fermentative broth) were purified to 92.9% (w/w) with a FOS recovery of 74.5% (w/w). Moreover, with the proposed process, fractions with purity up to 97% (w/w) of FOS were obtained. This purification process was also found to be efficient in the desalting of the fermentative broth. PMID:22100432

  7. [Kinetic simulation of enhanced biological phosphorus removal with fermentation broth as carbon source].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Yin-Guang

    2013-07-01

    As a high-quality carbon source, fermentation broth could promote the phosphorus removal efficiency in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR). The transformation of substrates in EBPR fed with fermentation broth was well simulated using the modified activated sludge model No. 2 (ASM2) based on the carbon source metabolism. When fermentation broth was used as the sole carbon source, it was found that heterotrophic bacteria acted as a promoter rather than a competitor to the phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAO). When fermentation broth was used as a supplementary carbon source of real municipal wastewater, the wastewater composition was optimized for PAO growth; and the PAO concentration, which was increased by 3.3 times compared to that in EBPR fed with solely real municipal wastewater, accounting for about 40% of the total biomass in the reactor.

  8. Comparative analysis of mixing distribution in aerobic stirred bioreactor for simulated yeasts and fungus broths.

    PubMed

    Cascaval, Dan; Galaction, Anca-Irina; Turnea, Marius

    2007-01-01

    The study on mixing distribution for an aerobic stirred bioreactor and simulated (solutions of carboxymethylcellulose sodium salt), yeasts (S. cerevisiae) and fungus (P. chrysogenum pellets and free mycelia) broths indicated the significant variation of mixing time on the bioreactor height. The experiments suggested the possibility to reach a uniform mixing in whole bulk of the real broths for a certain value of rotation speed or biomass concentration domain. For S. cerevisiae broths the optimum rotation speed increased to 500 rpm with the biomass accumulation from 40 to 150 g/l d.w. Irrespective of their morphology, for fungus cultures the existence of optimum rotation speed (500 rpm) has been recorded only for biomass concentration below 24 g/l d.w. The influence of aeration rate depends on the apparent viscosity/biomass concentration and on the impellers and sparger positions. By increasing the apparent viscosity for simulated broths, or biomass amount for real broths, the shape of the curves describing the mixing time variation is significantly changed for all the considered positions. The intensification of the aeration induced the increase of mixing time, which reached a maximum value, decreasing then, due to the flooding phenomena. This variation became more pronounced at higher viscosities for simulated broths, at higher yeasts concentration, and at lower pellets or filamentous fungus concentration, respectively. By means of the experimental data and using MATLAB software, some mathematical correlations for mixing time have been proposed for each broth and considered position inside the bioreactor. These equations offer a good agreement with the experiment, the maximum deviation being +/-7.3% for S. cerevisiae broths.

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Australian isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae using a new broth dilution method.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Märit; Oxberry, Sophy L; Hampson, David J

    2002-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibilities of 76 field isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae from different states of Australia were tested in a newly developed broth dilution procedure. The antimicrobial agents used were tiamulin, valnemulin, tylosin, erythromycin, lincomycin and clindamycin. The results from the broth dilution susceptibility testing of 39 of the isolates were compared with results obtained for the same isolates using the agar dilution method. Amongst the isolates tested by broth dilution, 17 were from three farms and had been collected over a number of years. Their pulsed field gel electrophoresis pattern previously had been determined. The broth dilution technique was simple to use, less labor intensive than agar dilution, and gave clear end points. The results obtained using the two methods generally corresponded well, although in a few cases the MIC obtained by broth dilution were lower than those with agar dilution. For the 76 isolates tested by broth dilution, the MIC(90) (mg/l) was: tiamulin, 1; valnemulin, 0.5; tylosin>256; erythromycin>256; lincomycin, 64 and clindamycin, 16. Only minor differences in susceptibility patterns were found amongst isolates from different Australian states. Over all the isolates, and also amongst the isolates obtained from different years on the three farms, there was no trend for the susceptibility of the isolates to alter with time. PMID:11731165

  10. Update of contemporary antimicrobial resistance rates across China: reference testing results for 12 medical centers (2011).

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana; Hu, Bijie; Ni, Yuxing; Lin, Stephen S F; Mendes, Rodrigo E; Wang, Yao

    2013-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (R) surveillance across Asia and especially in China has documented unique patterns and mechanisms. This 2011 study reports results for 2278 isolates from 12 hospitals in China (94-216 strains/site); most from bacteremia (20.4%), pneumonias (29.1%), or skin and skin structure infections (20.9%). Samples were tested by reference broth microdilution methods, interpreted by published susceptibility (S) breakpoints. The most common species were Staphylococcus aureus (343, 45.8% MRSA), Escherichia coli (EC; 288), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PSA; 221), Klebsiella spp. (KSP; 208), acinetobacters (ACB; 178), enterobacters (155), Streptococcus pneumoniae (SPN; 154, 46.8% penicillin-S), and enterococci (ENT; 137). Among 849 Gram-positive (GP) cocci, linezolid, tigecycline (TIG), daptomycin, and vancomycin provided best antimicrobial coverage (≥99.7% S). Resistance patterns of concern were 0.3% VISA, 15.4% teicoplanin non-S coagulase-negative staphylococci, 1.5% vancomycin-R ENT (all Enterococcus faecium), 1.9% levofloxacin-R β-haemolytic streptococci, and 35.1 and 12.7% ceftriaxone-non-S rates for SPN and viridans group streptococci, respectively. For Gram-negative bacilli, R among Enterobacteriaceae was highest against β-lactams (extended spectrum β-lactamase-phenotype strains at 73.6 and 42.8% in EC and KSP, respectively; carbapenem-R was only 2.1-4.3% with KPC and IMP type enzymes detected in KSP). The widest spectrum agents were cefoperazone/sulbactam (79.5-86.1%), piperacillin/tazobactam (88.9-92.0%), TIG (98.6-100%), amikacin (AMK; 91.8-93.7%), and meropenem (95.7-97.1% S). PSA was most inhibited by AMK (90.5% S) and colistin (COL; 99.5%), with cefepime (67.9%) best among the tested β-lactams. Only COL (100% S) and TIG (MIC90, 2 μg/mL) showed significant potencies against ACB. In conclusion, R among pathogens from 12 Chinese hospitals illustrates several agents active against GP pathogens, but more serious R problems were noted among

  11. Biological evaluation of Phellinus linteus-fermented broths as anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Jung; Lien, Hsiu-Man; Chang, Hsiao-Yun; Huang, Chao-Lu; Liu, Jau-Jin; Chang, Yun-Chieh; Chen, Chia-Chang; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2014-07-01

    Phellinus linteus and its constituent hispolon induce potent anti-inflammatory activity in macrophages. Efficient production of the effective constituent and the biological function of P. linteus in the regulation of innate sensing have rarely been investigated. The aim of this study was to efficiently manufacture P. linteus-fermented broth containing the effective constituent, hispolon, and evaluate its immunoregulatory functions in macrophages. Four distinct fermented broths (PL1-4) and the medium dialyzate (MD) were prepared to screen suitable culture conditions for the mycelial growth of P. linteus. The P. linteus-fermented broth exhibited a dose-responsive inhibition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production by murine macrophages. In addition, the P. linteus-fermented broths suppressed macrophage LPS-mediated nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Among the tested samples from P. linteus, PL4 contained vast amounts of hispolon and showed the greatest anti-inflammatory activity in both the RAW264.7 cells and murine primary peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEMs). This study demonstrates that the purification of the effective constituent from P. linteus-fermented broth may enable the production of a potent therapeutic agent for anti-inflammation in macrophages. PMID:24503424

  12. Broth versus solid agar culture of swab samples of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue.

    PubMed

    Varettas, Kerry

    2013-12-01

    As part of the donor assessment protocol, bioburden assessment must be performed on allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples collected at the time of tissue retrieval. Swab samples of musculoskeletal tissue allografts from cadaveric donors are received at the microbiology department of the South Eastern Area Laboratory Services (Australia) to determine the presence of bacteria and fungi. This study will review the isolation rate of organisms from solid agar and broth culture of swab samples of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue over a 6-year period, 2006-2011. Swabs were inoculated onto horse blood agar (anaerobic, 35 °C) and chocolate agar (CO2, 35 °C) and then placed into a cooked meat broth (aerobic, 35 °C). A total of 1,912 swabs from 389 donors were received during the study period. 557 (29.1 %) swabs were culture positive with the isolation of 713 organisms, 249 (34.9 %) from solid agar culture and an additional 464 (65.1 %) from broth culture only. This study has shown that the broth culture of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal swab samples recovered a greater amount of organisms than solid agar culture. Isolates such as Clostridium species and Staphylococcus aureus would not have been isolated from solid agar culture alone. Broth culture is an essential part of the bioburden assessment protocol of swab samples of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue in this laboratory.

  13. Supplementing chicken broth with monosodium glutamate reduces hunger and desire to snack but does not affect energy intake in women.

    PubMed

    Carter, Brett E; Monsivais, Pablo; Perrigue, Martine M; Drewnowski, Adam

    2011-11-01

    The effect of monosodium glutamate (MSG) supplementation in soup or broth on satiety is not well understood. In the present study, the relative effects of four chicken broths with or without added MSG on motivational ratings and energy intakes at the next meal were compared using a double-blinded, within-subject design. A total of thirty-five normal-weight women, aged 20-40 years, took part in four study sessions. The four broths were base chicken broth (63 kJ), broth with added MSG (1.19 g) and nucleotides (0.03 g), broth with added MSG (1.22 g), and broth with added fat (BAF; 681 kJ). The preloads were presented twice at 09.00 and 11.15 hours for a maximum cumulative dose of 2.44 g MSG. Motivational ratings were collected before and at 15 min intervals post-ingestion for a total of 210 min. A test lunch meal was served at 12.00 hours, and plate waste was measured. The addition of MSG to chicken broth did not increase energy intakes at lunch or affect motivational ratings over the entire testing session. Both hunger and desire to snack between the second preload exposure and the test meal were significantly reduced in the MSG condition relative to the base broth condition (both, P = 0.03). However, only the BAF significantly suppressed energy intakes at lunch compared with the base broth control condition. Supplementing chicken broth with MSG can increase subjective ratings for satiety but does not alter energy intake at the next meal relative to an equal energy broth without added MSG.

  14. Preconcentrating (within the broth) secreted extracellular proteins during a bakers' yeast fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Effler, W.T. Jr.; Pandey, N.K.; Tanner, R.D.; Malaney, G.W.; Scott, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    Proteins secreted by yeast during the fermentation process are spacially fractionated (concentrated at a particular vertical position) within the fermentation vessel due to the phenomenon of bubble fractionation, despite moderately vigorous mixing. The degree of fractionation is influenced by the conditions in which the fermentation takes place. The broth pH strongly influences the extent of fractionation of specific proteins. In addition fractionation is enhanced under anaerobic conditions, presumably because there are more CO2 bubbles present for hydrophobic protein adsorption. The addition of moderate levels of salt to the broth reduces the fractionation for most (but not all) of the proteins.

  15. [Effective Prevention of Hand-Foot Syndrome by the Consumption of Dried Bonito Broth].

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Kenya; Shinagawa, Yoko; Ogawa, Kohei; Kobayashi, Yuji; Abe, Hiroyuki; Yokoo, Takeshi; Kamimura, Hiroteru; Kawai, Hirokazu; Suda, Takeshi; Yamagiwa, Satoshi; Baba, Hiroshi; Terai, Shuji

    2016-04-01

    To examine whether the consumption of dried bonito both is effective for the prevention of hand-foot syndrome(HFS), concentrated bonito broth was administered to 10 patients with HCC who were treated with sorafenib. Among the 10 patients, seven showed an increase in peripheral blood flow, as observed on Doppler ultrasonography. Only one patient showed Grade 1 HFS on day 14 after the initiation of sorafenib (10%); this incidence rate of HFS was significantly lower than that obtained in our previous studies and reported data. These results suggest that consumption of dried bonito broth contributes to the prevention of HFS by maintaining peripheral blood flow.

  16. [Effective Prevention of Hand-Foot Syndrome by the Consumption of Dried Bonito Broth].

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Kenya; Shinagawa, Yoko; Ogawa, Kohei; Kobayashi, Yuji; Abe, Hiroyuki; Yokoo, Takeshi; Kamimura, Hiroteru; Kawai, Hirokazu; Suda, Takeshi; Yamagiwa, Satoshi; Baba, Hiroshi; Terai, Shuji

    2016-04-01

    To examine whether the consumption of dried bonito both is effective for the prevention of hand-foot syndrome(HFS), concentrated bonito broth was administered to 10 patients with HCC who were treated with sorafenib. Among the 10 patients, seven showed an increase in peripheral blood flow, as observed on Doppler ultrasonography. Only one patient showed Grade 1 HFS on day 14 after the initiation of sorafenib (10%); this incidence rate of HFS was significantly lower than that obtained in our previous studies and reported data. These results suggest that consumption of dried bonito broth contributes to the prevention of HFS by maintaining peripheral blood flow. PMID:27220795

  17. Identification and Differentiation of Clinically Relevant Mycobacterium Species Directly from Acid-Fast Bacillus-Positive Culture Broth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haijing; Turhan, Vedat; Chokhani, Laxmi; Stratton, Charles W.; Dunbar, Sherry A.; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium species cause a variety of clinical diseases, some of which may be species specific. Therefore, it is clinically desirable to rapidly identify and differentiate mycobacterial isolates to the species level. We developed a rapid and high-throughput system, MycoID, to identify Mycobacterium species directly from acid-fast bacillus (AFB)-positive mycobacterial culture broth. The MycoID system incorporated broad-range PCR followed by suspension array hybridization to identify 17 clinically relevant mycobacterial complexes, groups, and species in one single reaction. We evaluated a total of 271 AFB-positive culture broth specimens, which were identified by reference standard methods in combination with biochemical and molecular tests. The overall identification agreement between the standard and the MycoID system was 89.7% (perfect match) or 97.8% (one match in codetection). In comparison to the standard, the MycoID system possessed an overall sensitivity of 97.1% and specificity of 98.8%. The 159 Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex isolates were further identified to the species level by MycoID as being M. avium (n = 98; 61.1%), M. intracellulare (n = 57; 35.8%), and mixed M. avium and M. intracellulare (n = 2; 1.3%). M. avium was recovered more frequently from sterile sites than M. intracellulare (odds ratio, 4.6; P = 0.0092). The entire MycoID procedure, including specimen processing, can be completed within 5 h, providing rapid and reliable identification and differentiation of mycobacterium species that is amenable to automation. Additional differentiation of Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex strains into M. avium and M. intracellulare may provide a tool to better understand the role of Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex isolates in human disease. PMID:19794046

  18. Enumeration of starter cultures during yogurt production using Petrifilm AC plates associated with acidified MRS and M17 broths.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Marília M; Freitas, Rosangela; Nero, Luís A; Carvalho, Antônio F

    2009-05-01

    The efficiency of Petrifilm AC (3M Microbiology, St. Paul, MN, USA) associated with the broths M17 and de Mann-Rogosa-Sharpe (MRS) at pH 5.4 was evaluated to enumerate Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus during the yogurt production. Commercial and reference strains of these microorganisms were experimentally inoculated in nonfat milk and incubated at 42 degrees C for 4 h for yogurt production. At the moment of inoculation and after incubation, aliquots were collected, submitted to dilution using the broths M17 and MRS at pH 5.4, and plated for Strep. salivarius and Lb. bulgaricus enumeration according ISO 9232 and at Petrifilm AC plates, respectively. M17 plates were incubated at 42 degrees C, and MRS plates were incubated at 35 degrees C under anaerobiosis. After 48 h, the formed colonies were enumerated and the counts were compared by correlation and analysis of variance (P<0.05). In addition, colonies were randomly selected from all plates and characterized according to Gram staining and morphology. The obtained results indicated that Petrifilm AC plates associated to M17 and MRS at pH 5.4 can be considered as a suitable alternative for Strep. salivarius and Lb. bulgaricus enumeration during yogurt production, with slight interferences due to the acidity of MRS at the moment of inoculation, and due to the acidity of yogurt at the end of fermentation process. It was also observed that the MRS at pH 5.4 was not sufficiently selective for Lb. delbrueckii enumeration, despite it is indicated by the official protocol from ISO 9232.

  19. Dithiolopyrrolone antibiotic formation induced by adding valeric acid to the culture broth of Saccharothrix algeriensis.

    PubMed

    Merrouche, Rabiâa; Bouras, Noureddine; Coppel, Yannick; Mathieu, Florence; Monje, Marie-Carmen; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Lebrihi, Ahmed

    2010-06-25

    Three new antibiotics were isolated from the fermentation broth of Saccharothrix algeriensis NRRL B-24137 and characterized as the dithiolopyrrolone derivatives valerylpyrrothine (1), isovalerylpyrrothine (2), and formylpyrrothine (3) as well as the known antibiotic aureothricin. The production of the dithiolopyrrolone derivatives was induced by adding valeric acid to the culture medium. The compounds exhibited moderate antimicrobial activity in vitro.

  20. Evaluation of a newly developed triple buffered peptone broth for detection of Salmonella in broiler feed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactose broth (LB) and buffered peptone (BP) are used as pre-enrichment media to recover Salmonella from feed. Bacterial utilization of feed carbohydrates results in the production of acidic byproducts causing a drop in the media pH which can injure or kill Salmonella and yield false negative resul...

  1. Use of Mueller-Hinton broth and agar in the germ tube test.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Antonella Souza; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Severo, Cecília Bittencourt; Guazzelli, Luciana da Silva; Oliveira, Flávio de Mattos; Severo, Luiz Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is often isolated from clinical samples, thus its presumptive differentiation from other species of the same genus can be based on its ability to form the germ tube in human serum. Nevertheless, there are two other species that share this characteristic: C. dubliniensis and C. africana. The aim of this study was to compare four different substrates to perform the germ tube (GT) test. The Candida spp. isolates were identified using a manual system (135 C. albicans, 24 C. tropicalis and one C. dubliniensis). The germ tube test was performed with fresh, previously frozen serum and Mueller-Hinton (MH) broth and agar. GT was observed in 96% (130/136) of the isolates through the fresh serum technique, 94% (128/136) through previously frozen serum, 92% (125/136) in MH agar, and 90% (122/136) in MH broth. The sensitivity of each test was higher than 90%, with 100% specificity. Both the MH agar and broth were able to identify the true positives, and false positives were not found. However, some C. albicans isolates were not identified. MH agar and broth may be used in laboratory for the rapid presumptive identification of C. albicans, as an alternative method for germ tube test.

  2. Production of cell-free xanthan fermentation broth by cell adsorption on fibers

    PubMed

    Yang; Lo; Chattopadhyay

    1998-03-01

    Xanthan gum is a microbial polysaccharide widely used in food and oil-drilling industries. Xanthan gum produced from the current commercial fermentation process usually contains cells and cell debris, which lower the filterability of the xanthan solution and limit its applications. The production of cell-free xanthan gum fermentation broth is thus desirable. The feasibility of removing cells from the xanthan fermentation broth by cell adsorption to various woven fibrous materials was studied. It was found that both cotton and polyester fibers could be used to adsorb Xanthomonas campestris cells present in the fermentation broth either during batch fermentation or after the fermentation. Almost all cells were removed from the fermentation broth by adsorption to fibers. Cotton terry cloth had rough surfaces and was the preferred material for cell adsorption. Cell adsorption to cotton was faster than to polyester fibers. The adsorption kinetics can be modeled by a first-order rate equation. The adsorption rate constants were 30-40% higher for cotton than for polyester. Cell adsorption was not efficient in the absence of xanthan gum, suggesting that the exopolysaccharide, xanthan gum, was important for efficient cell adsorption to fibers. PMID:9548777

  3. Quality control guidelines for National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards recommended broth macrodilution testing of amphotericin B, fluconazole, and flucytosine.

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, M A; Bale, M; Buschelman, B; Lancaster, M; Espinel-Ingroff, A; Rex, J H; Rinaldi, M G; Cooper, C R; McGinnis, M R

    1995-01-01

    Amphotericin B, fluconazole, and flucytosine (5FC) were tested in a multilaboratory study to establish quality control (QC) guidelines for yeast antifungal susceptibility testing. Ten candidate QC strains were tested in accordance with National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards M27-P guidelines against the three antifungal agents in each of six laboratories. Each laboratory was assigned a unique lot of RPMI 1640 broth medium as well as a lot of RPMI 1640 common to all of the laboratories. The candidate QC strains were tested 20 times each against the three antifungal agents in both unique and common lots of RPMI 1640. A minimum of 220 MICs per drug per organism were generated during the study. Overall, 95% of the MICs of amphotericin B, fluconazole, and 5FC fell within the desired 3 log2-dilution range (mode +/- 1 log2 dilution). Excellent performance with all three drugs was observed for Candida parapsilosis ATCC 22019 and C. krusei ATCC 6258. With these strains, on-scale 3 log2-dilution ranges encompassing 96 to 99% of the MICs of all three drugs were established. These two strains are recommended for QC testing of amphotericin B, fluconazole, and 5FC. Reference ranges were also established for an additional four strains for use in method development and for training. Four strains failed to perform adequately for recommendation as either QC or reference strains. PMID:7615713

  4. Downstream extraction process development for recovery of organic acids from a fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Bekatorou, Argyro; Dima, Agapi; Tsafrakidou, Panagiotia; Boura, Konstantina; Lappa, Katerina; Kandylis, Panagiotis; Pissaridi, Katerina; Kanellaki, Maria; Koutinas, Athanasios A

    2016-11-01

    The present study focused on organic acids (OAs) recovery from an acidogenic fermentation broth, which is the main problem regarding the use of OAs for production of ester-based new generation biofuels or other applications. Specifically, 10 solvents were evaluated for OAs recovery from aqueous media and fermentation broths. The effects of pH, solvent/OAs solution ratios and application of successive extractions were studied. The 1:1 solvent/OAs ratio showed the best recovery rates in most cases. Butyric and isobutyric acids showed the highest recovery rates (80-90%), while lactic, succinic, and acetic acids were poorly recovered (up to 45%). The OAs recovery was significantly improved by successive 10-min extractions. Alcohols presented the best extraction performance. The process using repeated extractions with 3-methyl-1-butanol led to the highest OAs recovery. However, 1-butanol can be considered as the most cost-effective option taking into account its price and availability. PMID:27560489

  5. Two-stage electrodialytic concentration of glyceric acid from fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Habe, Hiroshi; Shimada, Yuko; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Kitamoto, Dai; Itagaki, Masayuki; Watanabe, Kunihiko; Yanagishita, Hiroshi; Sakaki, Keiji

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this research was the application of a two-stage electrodialysis (ED) method for glyceric acid (GA) recovery from fermentation broth. First, by desalting ED, glycerate solutions (counterpart is Na+) were concentrated using ion-exchange membranes, and the glycerate recovery and energy consumption became more efficient with increasing the initial glycerate concentration (30 to 130 g/l). Second, by water-splitting ED, the concentrated glycerate was electroconverted to GA using bipolar membranes. Using a culture broth of Acetobacter tropicalis containing 68.6 g/l of D-glycerate, a final D-GA concentration of 116 g/l was obtained following the two-stage ED process. The total energy consumption for the D-glycerate concentration and its electroconversion to D-GA was approximately 0.92 kWh per 1 kg of D-GA. PMID:20674487

  6. Impact of boiling conditions on the molecular and sensory profile of a vegetable broth.

    PubMed

    Mougin, Alice; Mauroux, Olivier; Matthey-Doret, Walter; Barcos, Eugenia Maria; Beaud, Fernand; Bousbaine, Ahmed; Viton, Florian; Smarrito-Menozzi, Candice

    2015-02-11

    Low-pressure cooking has recently been identified as an alternative to ambient and high-pressure cooking to provide food with enhanced organoleptic properties. This work investigates the impact of the cooking process at different pressures on the molecular and sensory profile of a vegetable broth. Experimental results showed similar sensory and chemical profiles of vegetable broths when boiling at 0.93 and 1.5 bar, while an enhancement of sulfur volatile compounds correlated with a greater leek content and savory aroma was observed when boiling at low pressure (80 °C/0.48 bar). Thus, low-pressure cooking would allow preserving the most labile volatiles likely due to the lower water boiling temperature and the reduced level of oxygen. This study evidenced chemical and sensory impact of pressure during cooking and demonstrated that the flavor profile of culinary preparations can be enhanced by applying low-pressure conditions. PMID:25579390

  7. Impact of boiling conditions on the molecular and sensory profile of a vegetable broth.

    PubMed

    Mougin, Alice; Mauroux, Olivier; Matthey-Doret, Walter; Barcos, Eugenia Maria; Beaud, Fernand; Bousbaine, Ahmed; Viton, Florian; Smarrito-Menozzi, Candice

    2015-02-11

    Low-pressure cooking has recently been identified as an alternative to ambient and high-pressure cooking to provide food with enhanced organoleptic properties. This work investigates the impact of the cooking process at different pressures on the molecular and sensory profile of a vegetable broth. Experimental results showed similar sensory and chemical profiles of vegetable broths when boiling at 0.93 and 1.5 bar, while an enhancement of sulfur volatile compounds correlated with a greater leek content and savory aroma was observed when boiling at low pressure (80 °C/0.48 bar). Thus, low-pressure cooking would allow preserving the most labile volatiles likely due to the lower water boiling temperature and the reduced level of oxygen. This study evidenced chemical and sensory impact of pressure during cooking and demonstrated that the flavor profile of culinary preparations can be enhanced by applying low-pressure conditions.

  8. Downstream extraction process development for recovery of organic acids from a fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Bekatorou, Argyro; Dima, Agapi; Tsafrakidou, Panagiotia; Boura, Konstantina; Lappa, Katerina; Kandylis, Panagiotis; Pissaridi, Katerina; Kanellaki, Maria; Koutinas, Athanasios A

    2016-11-01

    The present study focused on organic acids (OAs) recovery from an acidogenic fermentation broth, which is the main problem regarding the use of OAs for production of ester-based new generation biofuels or other applications. Specifically, 10 solvents were evaluated for OAs recovery from aqueous media and fermentation broths. The effects of pH, solvent/OAs solution ratios and application of successive extractions were studied. The 1:1 solvent/OAs ratio showed the best recovery rates in most cases. Butyric and isobutyric acids showed the highest recovery rates (80-90%), while lactic, succinic, and acetic acids were poorly recovered (up to 45%). The OAs recovery was significantly improved by successive 10-min extractions. Alcohols presented the best extraction performance. The process using repeated extractions with 3-methyl-1-butanol led to the highest OAs recovery. However, 1-butanol can be considered as the most cost-effective option taking into account its price and availability.

  9. Nanofiltration, bipolar electrodialysis and reactive extraction hybrid system for separation of fumaric acid from fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Prochaska, Krystyna; Staszak, Katarzyna; Woźniak-Budych, Marta Joanna; Regel-Rosocka, Magdalena; Adamczak, Michalina; Wiśniewski, Maciej; Staniewski, Jacek

    2014-09-01

    A novel approach based on a hybrid system allowing nanofiltration, bipolar electrodialysis and reactive extraction, was proposed to remove fumaric acid from fermentation broth left after bioconversion of glycerol. The fumaric salts can be concentrated in the nanofiltration process to a high yield (80-95% depending on pressure), fumaric acid can be selectively separated from other fermentation components, as well as sodium fumarate can be conversed into the acid form in bipolar electrodialysis process (stack consists of bipolar and anion-exchange membranes). Reactive extraction with quaternary ammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) or alkylphosphine oxides (Cyanex 923) solutions (yield between 60% and 98%) was applied as the final step for fumaric acid recovery from aqueous streams after the membrane techniques. The hybrid system permitting nanofiltration, bipolar electrodialysis and reactive extraction was found effective for recovery of fumaric acid from the fermentation broth.

  10. Growth of healthy and sanitizer-injured Salmonella cells on mung bean sprouts in different commercial enrichment broths.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qianwang; Mikš-Krajnik, Marta; D'Souza, Craig; Yang, Yishan; Heo, Da-Jeong; Kim, Si-Kyung; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2015-12-01

    The ability of nine commercial broths to enrich healthy and 90% sanitizer-injured Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella cocktail on mung bean sprouts was evaluated to select an optimum broth for detection. Results showed that S. Typhimurium multiplied faster and reached a higher population in buffered peptone water (BPW), Salmonella AD media (AD) and ONE broth-Salmonella (OB), compared with other broths. Healthy and 90% sanitizer-injured Salmonella at low concentrations increased by 4.0 log CFU/ml in these three broths. However, no Salmonella growth was observed in lactose broth (LB). Further investigation showed that during incubation, pH of LB dropped from 6.7 to 4.2, due to production of lactic (66 mM) and acetic acids (62 mM) by lactic acid bacteria that were identified as dominant microbiota in bean sprouts. Though no cell membrane damage was detected by propidium monoazide combined with real-time PCR, it was found that LB inhibited Salmonella growth, especially from low inoculum levels. This study suggests that in consideration of effectiveness and cost, BPW would be a suitable enrichment broth to use for isolating and detecting Salmonella on mung bean sprouts, while using LB might cause false negative results in Salmonella detection by either PCR or standard cultural method. PMID:26338131

  11. Growth of healthy and sanitizer-injured Salmonella cells on mung bean sprouts in different commercial enrichment broths.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qianwang; Mikš-Krajnik, Marta; D'Souza, Craig; Yang, Yishan; Heo, Da-Jeong; Kim, Si-Kyung; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2015-12-01

    The ability of nine commercial broths to enrich healthy and 90% sanitizer-injured Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella cocktail on mung bean sprouts was evaluated to select an optimum broth for detection. Results showed that S. Typhimurium multiplied faster and reached a higher population in buffered peptone water (BPW), Salmonella AD media (AD) and ONE broth-Salmonella (OB), compared with other broths. Healthy and 90% sanitizer-injured Salmonella at low concentrations increased by 4.0 log CFU/ml in these three broths. However, no Salmonella growth was observed in lactose broth (LB). Further investigation showed that during incubation, pH of LB dropped from 6.7 to 4.2, due to production of lactic (66 mM) and acetic acids (62 mM) by lactic acid bacteria that were identified as dominant microbiota in bean sprouts. Though no cell membrane damage was detected by propidium monoazide combined with real-time PCR, it was found that LB inhibited Salmonella growth, especially from low inoculum levels. This study suggests that in consideration of effectiveness and cost, BPW would be a suitable enrichment broth to use for isolating and detecting Salmonella on mung bean sprouts, while using LB might cause false negative results in Salmonella detection by either PCR or standard cultural method.

  12. Early and Efficient Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Sputum by Microscopic Observation of Broth Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kidenya, Benson R.; Kabangila, Rodrick; Peck, Robert N.; Mshana, Stephen E.; Webster, Lauren E.; Koenig, Serena P.; Johnson, Warren D.; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.

    2013-01-01

    Early, efficient and inexpensive methods for the detection of pulmonary tuberculosis are urgently needed for effective patient management as well as to interrupt transmission. These methods to detect M. tuberculosis in a timely and affordable way are not yet widely available in resource-limited settings. In a developing-country setting, we prospectively evaluated two methods for culturing and detecting M. tuberculosis in sputum. Sputum samples were cultured in liquid assay (micro broth culture) in microplate wells and growth was detected by microscopic observation, or in Löwenstein–Jensen (LJ) solid media where growth was detected by visual inspection for colonies. Sputum samples were collected from 321 tuberculosis (TB) suspects attending Bugando Medical Centre, in Mwanza, Tanzania, and were cultured in parallel. Pulmonary tuberculosis cases were diagnosed using the American Thoracic Society diagnostic standards. There were a total of 200 (62.3%) pulmonary tuberculosis cases. Liquid assay with microscopic detection detected a significantly higher proportion of cases than LJ solid culture: 89.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84.7% to 93.3%) versus 77.0% (95% CI, 71.2% to 82.8%) (p = 0.0007). The median turn around time to diagnose tuberculosis was significantly shorter for micro broth culture than for the LJ solid culture, 9 days (interquartile range [IQR] 7–13), versus 21 days (IQR 14–28) (p<0.0001). The cost for micro broth culture (labor inclusive) in our study was US $4.56 per sample, versus US $11.35 per sample for the LJ solid culture. The liquid assay (micro broth culture) is an early, feasible, and inexpensive method for detection of pulmonary tuberculosis in resource limited settings. PMID:23469014

  13. Antitumor Compounds from the Stout Camphor Mushroom Taiwanofungus camphoratus (Higher Basidiomycetes) Spent Culture Broth.

    PubMed

    Jia, Wei; Bai, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Zhong; Feng, Na; Feng, Jie; Yan, Meng-Qiu; Zhu, Li-Na; Jia, Xin-Cheng; Wang, Ming-Dao; Zhang, Jing-song; Fan, Hua

    2015-01-01

    A known compound, 5-(hydroxymethyl) furan-2-carbaldehyde, and a novel compound, 3-isobutyl-1-methoxy-4-(4'-(3-methylbut-2-enyloxy)phenyl)-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione were isolated from spent broth from submerged cultures of Taiwanofungus camphoratus. Their structures were elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (1H, 13C, and 2D) and mass spectra. These compounds inhibited the proliferation of K562 and HepG2 tumor cells in vitro.

  14. Diagnostic assays for identification of microorganisms and antimicrobial resistance determinants directly from positive blood culture broth.

    PubMed

    Pence, Morgan A; McElvania TeKippe, Erin; Burnham, Carey-Ann D

    2013-09-01

    The detection of blood stream infections is one of the most important functions of the clinical microbiology laboratory. Sepsis is a clinical emergency, and mortality increases if commencement of appropriate antimicrobial therapy is delayed. Automated blood culture systems are the most sensitive approach for detection of the causative agent of sepsis. Several laboratory methods have been developed to expedite identification of organisms directly from positive blood culture broth. The principle and analytical performance characteristics of these methods are described in this review.

  15. Superparamagnetic poly(methyl methacrylate) beads for nattokinase purification from fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chengli; Xing, Jianmin; Guan, Yueping; Liu, Huizhou

    2006-09-01

    An effective method for purification of nattokinase from fermentation broth using magnetic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) beads immobilized with p-aminobenzamidine was proposed in this study. Firstly, magnetic PMMA beads with a narrow size distribution were prepared by spraying suspension polymerization. Then, they were highly functionalized via transesterification reaction with polyethylene glycol. The surface hydroxyl-modified magnetic beads obtained were further modified with chloroethylamine to transfer the surface amino-modified magnetic functional beads. The morphology and surface functionality of the magnetic beads were examined by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared. An affinity ligand, p-aminobenzamidine was covalently immobilized to the amino-modified magnetic beads by the glutaraldehyde method for nattokinase purification directly from the fermentation broth. The purification factor and the recovery of the enzyme activity were found to be 8.7 and 85%, respectively. The purification of nattokinase from fermentation broth by magnetic beads only took 40 min, which shows a very fast purification of nattokinase compared to traditional purification methods. PMID:16736086

  16. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of extract obtained from Aspergillus candidus MTCC 2202 broth filtrate.

    PubMed

    Malpure, Pankaj P; Shah, Abhishek S; Juvekar, Archana R

    2006-06-01

    Antioxidant potential of Aspergillus candidus MTCC 2202 broth filtrate extract was studied using different antioxidant models, whereas anti-inflammatory potential was studied using carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema model. The ethyl acetate extract at 1000 microg/ml showed maximum scavenging activity of the stable radical 1,1-diphenyl,2-picryl hydrazyl upto 96.65% (IC50=430.36 microg/ml) and scavenging of the radical cation, 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonate) upto 92.25% (IC50=606.29 microg/ml) at the same concentration. The extract had good reducing power, however showed moderate inhibition for conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid reactive acid substances (59.56 and 51.45%). The total phenolic content of various extracts of A. candidus broth filtrate was measured and a correlation between radical scavenging activities of extracts with total phenolic content was observed. The ethyl acetate extract (125 mg/kg ip) showed significant anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema model. The exhibited antioxidant activity of ethyl acetate extract of A. candidus broth filtrate was comparable with BHA and ascorbic acid, while anti-inflammatory activity was comparable with standard diclofenac sodium.

  17. Biosynthesis of Gold Nanoparticles by Foliar Broths: Roles of Biocompounds and Other Attributes of the Extracts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Biosynthesis of nanoparticles has arisen as a promising alternative to conventional synthetic methodologies owing to its eco-friendly advantages, and the involved bioprotocol still needs further clarification. This research, for the first time from the standpoint of statistics, confirmed an electrostatic force or ionic bond-based interaction between the chloroauric ions and the involved bioconstituents and manifested that reducing sugars and flavonoids were both important reductants responsible for conversion of Au(III) to Au(0). The result also demonstrated that the proteins were not the reducing agents, yet they might be protection agents in biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Besides, a significant linear relationship was found between the anti-oxidant ability of the foliar broths and their capability to reduce Au(III) into Au(0). Furthermore, the preliminary investigation based on the boxplot on the size/shape distribution of the biosynthesized GNPs revealed that gold nanospheres with higher degree of homogeneity in size tended to be promoted by foliar broths containing higher content of reducing sugars/flavonoids and proteins. Otherwise, i.e., for those broths with lower content of the above biocompounds, sphere GNPs of wider size distribution or even gold nanotriangles tended to be fabricated. (See supplementary material 1) PMID:20676207

  18. Superparamagnetic poly(methyl methacrylate) beads for nattokinase purification from fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chengli; Xing, Jianmin; Guan, Yueping; Liu, Huizhou

    2006-09-01

    An effective method for purification of nattokinase from fermentation broth using magnetic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) beads immobilized with p-aminobenzamidine was proposed in this study. Firstly, magnetic PMMA beads with a narrow size distribution were prepared by spraying suspension polymerization. Then, they were highly functionalized via transesterification reaction with polyethylene glycol. The surface hydroxyl-modified magnetic beads obtained were further modified with chloroethylamine to transfer the surface amino-modified magnetic functional beads. The morphology and surface functionality of the magnetic beads were examined by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared. An affinity ligand, p-aminobenzamidine was covalently immobilized to the amino-modified magnetic beads by the glutaraldehyde method for nattokinase purification directly from the fermentation broth. The purification factor and the recovery of the enzyme activity were found to be 8.7 and 85%, respectively. The purification of nattokinase from fermentation broth by magnetic beads only took 40 min, which shows a very fast purification of nattokinase compared to traditional purification methods.

  19. UV-Heat Treatments for the Control of Foodborne Microbial Pathogens in Chicken Broth

    PubMed Central

    Gouma, M.; Gayán, E.; Raso, J.; Condón, S.; Álvarez, I.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation established the process criteria for using UV-C light and mild heat (UV-H treatment) to inactivate 5-Log10 cycles (performance criterion) of common foodborne pathogen populations, Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, when inoculated in chicken broth. To define the target microorganism and the proper UV-H treatment conditions (including UV dose, treatment time, and temperature) that would achieve the stated performance criterion, mathematical equations based on Geeraerd's model were developed for each microorganism. For the sake of comparison, inactivation equations for heat treatments were also performed on the same chicken broth and for the same microorganisms. L. monocytogenes was the most UV-H resistant microorganism at all temperatures, requiring a UV dose between 6.10 J/mL (5.6 min) and 2.26 J/mL (2.09 min) to achieve 5-Log10 reductions. In comparison with UV treatments at room temperatures, the combination of UV and mild heat allowed both the UV dose and treatment time to be reduced by 30% and 63% at 55°C and 60°C, respectively. Compared to heat treatments, the UV-H process reduced the heating time for 5-Log10 reductions of all the investigated microorganisms in chicken broth from 20-fold to 2-fold when the operating temperature varied from 53 to 60°C. PMID:26539493

  20. Direct measurement of the yield stress of filamentous fermentation broths with the rotating vane technique.

    PubMed

    Leong-Poi, L; Allen, D G

    1992-07-01

    The existence of a yield stress in filamentous fermentation broths has important transport phenomena implications in the design and operation of bioreactors. In this study, the constant shear rate vane method was assessed for directly measuring the yield stress of filamentous Aspergillus niger fermentation broths, as well as model fluids (ketchup, yogurt, and pulp suspensions). The method involved rotating 4-, 6-, and 8-bladed vanes (7.2 cm < or = height < or = 15 cm; 4.0 cm < or = dia. < or= 6 cm) at speeds of 0.01 to 0.64 rpm in the fluid and plotting the torque as a function of time. Based on visual observations, the consistency of the results with vane type and speed and comparison with previous work on nonbiological samples, it was concluded that the method is an effective and consistent technique for yield stress measurements on filamentous fermentation broths. Based on comparisons with concentric cylinder viscometer results, it was also concluded that the value determined via the vane method was a "static" yield stress (values of up to 28 Pa) which was much greater than the extrapolated (or "dynamic") yield stress determined via the concentric cylinder viscometer. PMID:18601131

  1. Separation of salvianic acid A from the fermentation broth of engineered Escherichia coli using macroporous resins.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chen-Long; Zhao, Guang-Rong

    2015-08-01

    Salvianic acid A (also known as danshensu) is a plant-derived polyphenolic acid, and has a variety of physiological and pharmacological activities. Our laboratory previously constructed an unprecedented artificial biosynthetic pathway in Escherichia coli and established the fermentation process to produce salvianic acid A. Here, we developed an efficient method for separating salvianic acid A from the fermentation broth of engineered Escherichia coli by macroporous resins. Among ten tested macroporous resins, the static and dynamic adsorption/desorption experiments demonstrated that X5 resin was the best to separate salvianic acid A from fermentation broth. Other parameters during static and dynamic procedures were also investigated. Under the optimum separation conditions, the average adsorption capacity of SAA were 10.66±0.54 mg/g dry resin and the desorption ratio was 85.6±4.1%. The purity and recovery yield of salvianic acid A in the final dry product were 90.2±1.5 and 81.5±2.3%, respectively. The results show that adsorption separation with macroporous resin X5 was an efficient method to prepare salvianic acid A from fermentation broth. This work will benefit the development and application of plant-derived salvianic acid A and its derivatives. PMID:26097085

  2. A Chlorhexidine- Agar Plate Culture Medium Protocol to Complement Standard Broth Culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, Shady; Chatellier, Sonia; Mirande, Caroline; van Belkum, Alex; Canard, Isabelle; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using parallel inoculation of a solid culture medium and a liquid broth provides the gold standard for the diagnosis of tuberculosis. Here, we evaluated a chlorhexidine decontamination-MOD9 solid medium protocol versus the standard NALC-NaOH-Bactec 960 MGIT protocol for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis by culture. Three-hundred clinical specimens comprising 193 sputa, 30 bronchial aspirates, 10 broncho-alveolar lavages, 47 stools, and 20 urines were prospectively submitted for the routine diagnosis of tuberculosis. The contamination rates were 5/300 (1.7%) using the MOD9 protocol and 17/300 (5.7%) with the Bactec protocol, respectively (P < 0.05, Fisher exact test). Of a total of 50 Mycobacterium isolates (48 M. tuberculosis and two Mycobacterium abscessus) were cultured. Out of these 50, 48 (96%) isolates were found using the MOD9 protocol versus 35 (70%) when using the Bactec protocol (P < 0.05, Fisher exact test). The time to positivity was 10.1 ± 3.9 days versus 14.7 ± 7.3 days, respectively, (P < 0.05, Student’s t-test). These data confirmed the usefulness of parallel inoculation of a solid culture medium with broth for the recovery of M. tuberculosis in agreement with current recommendations. More specifically, chlorhexidine decontamination and inoculation of the MOD9 solid medium could be proposed to complement the standard Bactec 960 MGIT broth protocol. PMID:26834733

  3. A Chlorhexidine- Agar Plate Culture Medium Protocol to Complement Standard Broth Culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Asmar, Shady; Chatellier, Sonia; Mirande, Caroline; van Belkum, Alex; Canard, Isabelle; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using parallel inoculation of a solid culture medium and a liquid broth provides the gold standard for the diagnosis of tuberculosis. Here, we evaluated a chlorhexidine decontamination-MOD9 solid medium protocol versus the standard NALC-NaOH-Bactec 960 MGIT protocol for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis by culture. Three-hundred clinical specimens comprising 193 sputa, 30 bronchial aspirates, 10 broncho-alveolar lavages, 47 stools, and 20 urines were prospectively submitted for the routine diagnosis of tuberculosis. The contamination rates were 5/300 (1.7%) using the MOD9 protocol and 17/300 (5.7%) with the Bactec protocol, respectively (P < 0.05, Fisher exact test). Of a total of 50 Mycobacterium isolates (48 M. tuberculosis and two Mycobacterium abscessus) were cultured. Out of these 50, 48 (96%) isolates were found using the MOD9 protocol versus 35 (70%) when using the Bactec protocol (P < 0.05, Fisher exact test). The time to positivity was 10.1 ± 3.9 days versus 14.7 ± 7.3 days, respectively, (P < 0.05, Student's t-test). These data confirmed the usefulness of parallel inoculation of a solid culture medium with broth for the recovery of M. tuberculosis in agreement with current recommendations. More specifically, chlorhexidine decontamination and inoculation of the MOD9 solid medium could be proposed to complement the standard Bactec 960 MGIT broth protocol. PMID:26834733

  4. Supercritical Fluid Chromatography as an Alternative Tool for the Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Metarhizium brunneum Metabolites from Culture Broth.

    PubMed

    Taibon, Judith; Sturm, Sonja; Seger, Christoph; Werth, Marion; Strasser, Hermann; Stuppner, Hermann

    2015-12-01

    A fast and selective ultrahigh-performance supercritical fluid chromatography photodiode array detector method was established for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of destruxins, cyclic hexadepsipeptides, from fungal culture broth samples. Prior to analysis, sample purification was carried out using an off-line solid-phase extraction protocol on a reversed-phase material in order to remove unwanted matrix constituents. For separation, detection, and identification, an ultrahigh-performance supercritical fluid chromatography photodiode array detector system hyphenated to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer was utilized. Analyses were performed on an Acquity ethylene bridged hybrid 2-ethylpyridine sub 2 µm particle size column with CO2 and an acidified (0.02% trifluor acetic acid) modifier mixture of methanol/acetonitrile (8/2 v/v) serving as mobile phase. For the optimal separation of destruxins, the amount of the modifier was increased in a 10 min linear gradient from 2% to 20%, and the column outlet pressure and temperature was set at 140 bars and 60 °C, respectively. Seventeen analytes were separated within an elution window of 4 minutes. Five destruxin congeners (destruxin A, destruxin B, destruxin D, destruxin E, and destruxin E-diol) were identified using reference material. Additionally, eight analytes were tentatively assigned as known destruxins by the evaluation of mass spectrometry data performed as multiple reaction monitoring experiments in the positive electrospray ionization mode. PMID:26366754

  5. Supercritical Fluid Chromatography as an Alternative Tool for the Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Metarhizium brunneum Metabolites from Culture Broth.

    PubMed

    Taibon, Judith; Sturm, Sonja; Seger, Christoph; Werth, Marion; Strasser, Hermann; Stuppner, Hermann

    2015-12-01

    A fast and selective ultrahigh-performance supercritical fluid chromatography photodiode array detector method was established for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of destruxins, cyclic hexadepsipeptides, from fungal culture broth samples. Prior to analysis, sample purification was carried out using an off-line solid-phase extraction protocol on a reversed-phase material in order to remove unwanted matrix constituents. For separation, detection, and identification, an ultrahigh-performance supercritical fluid chromatography photodiode array detector system hyphenated to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer was utilized. Analyses were performed on an Acquity ethylene bridged hybrid 2-ethylpyridine sub 2 µm particle size column with CO2 and an acidified (0.02% trifluor acetic acid) modifier mixture of methanol/acetonitrile (8/2 v/v) serving as mobile phase. For the optimal separation of destruxins, the amount of the modifier was increased in a 10 min linear gradient from 2% to 20%, and the column outlet pressure and temperature was set at 140 bars and 60 °C, respectively. Seventeen analytes were separated within an elution window of 4 minutes. Five destruxin congeners (destruxin A, destruxin B, destruxin D, destruxin E, and destruxin E-diol) were identified using reference material. Additionally, eight analytes were tentatively assigned as known destruxins by the evaluation of mass spectrometry data performed as multiple reaction monitoring experiments in the positive electrospray ionization mode.

  6. Highly specific separation for antitumor Spiropreussione A from endophytic fungal [Preussia sp.] fermentation broth by one-step macroporous resins AB-8 treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Wang, Chunlan; Chen, Xiaomei; Lyu, Jing; Guo, Shunxing

    2013-11-01

    It is attractive to pharmaceutical works to seek useful material from endophytic fungi. Spiropreussione A (SA) which is isolated from endophytic fungus Preussia sp. is a novel anti-tumor product. Since previous preparation method cannot provide enough SA, and considering the large volume of broth and low concentration of the target product, macroporous resins were introduced to separate SA in our study. Four kinds of macroporous resins ADS-8, H103, X-5 and AB-8 were applied for separating SA, and AB-8 was selected as the optimal resin according to its performances through static and dynamic measurements. HPLC was used to analyze SA in all samples. Under optimal conditions, the specific SA adsorption capacity of AB-8 resin was 15.23mg/g, and the purity increased by 2.5-fold from 35.0% in broth to 90.0% in eluent with 70.0% recovery yield by a one-step treatment. Conclusively, our study achieved the goal of separating and purifying SA in high efficiency, and offered references for further fermentation works. PMID:24029597

  7. Pre-treatment step with Leuconostoc mesenteroides or L. pseudomesenteroides strains removes furfural from Zymomonas mobilis ethanolic fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Hunter, William J; Manter, Daniel K

    2014-10-01

    Furfural is an inhibitor of growth and ethanol production by Zymomonas mobilis. This study used a naturally occurring (not GMO) biological pre-treatment to reduce that amount of furfural in a model fermentation broth. Pre-treatment involved inoculating and incubating the fermentation broth with strains of Leuconostoc mesenteroides or Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides. The Leuconostoc strains converted furfural to furfuryl alcohol without consuming large amounts of dextrose in the process. Coupling this pre-treatment to ethanolic fermentation reduced furfural in the broth and improved growth, dextrose uptake and ethanol formation. Pre-treatment permitted ethanol formation in the presence of 5.2 g L(-1) furfural, which was otherwise inhibitive. The pre-treatment and presence of the Leuconostoc strains in the fermentation broth did not interfere with Z. mobilis ethanolic fermentation or the amounts of ethanol produced. The method suggests a possible technique for reducing the effect that furfural has on the production of ethanol for use as a biofuel.

  8. Production of staphylococcal enterotoxins in microbial broth and milk by Staphylococcus aureus strains harboring seh gene.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Justyna; Podkowik, Magdalena; Bystroń, Jarosław; Bania, Jacek

    2016-10-17

    Twenty Staphylococcus aureus strains harboring seh gene, including one carrying also sec gene and 11 sea gene, were grown in BHI+YE broth and milk and were tested for SEA, SEC and SEH production. All strains decreased pH of BHI+YE broth at 24h and increased them at 48h. Seventeen S. aureus strains grown in milk changed pH for no >0.3 unit until 48h. Three other S. aureus strains significantly decreased pH during growth in milk. All S. aureus produced SEH in BHI+YE broth in amounts ranging from 95 to 1292ng/ml, and from 170 to 4158ng/ml at 24 and 48h, respectively. SEH production in milk by 17 strains did not exceed 23ng/ml at 24h and 36ng/ml at 48h. Three S. aureus strains able to decrease milk pH produced 107-3029ng/ml and 320-4246ng/ml of SEH in milk at 24 and 48h, respectively. These strains were grown in milk and BHI+YE broth with pH stabilized at values near neutral leading to a significant decrease of SEH production. Representative weak SEH producers were grown in milk at reduced pH resulting in moderate increase in SEH production. SEA was produced in milk by 10S. aureus strains at 24-151ng/ml at 24h, and 31-303ng/ml at 48h. SEA production in milk was higher or comparable as in BHI+YE broth in 3 strains and lower for remaining strains. Production of SEC by sec-positive S. aureus strains was lower in milk than in BHI+YE broth, ranging from 131 to 2319ng/ml at 24 and 48h in milk and 296-30,087ng/ml in BHI+YE at 24 and 48h. Both lacE and lacG transcripts involved in lactose metabolism were significantly up-regulated in milk in strong SEH producers. In these strains hld, rot and sarA transcripts were up-regulated in milk as compared to weak SEH producers. Stabilization of milk pH at a value of raw milk significantly down-regulated hld, rot and sarA RNA in strong SEH producers. Milk was generally found unfavorable for enterotoxin production. However, certain S. aureus strains were not restricted in SEH and SEA expression in milk, unlike SEC which remained down

  9. Development of an adsorption procedure for the direct separation and purification of prodigiosin from culture broth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuedong; Tao, Jinli; Wei, Dongzhi; Shen, Yaling; Tong, Wangyu

    2004-12-01

    A novel procedure for the direct separation and purification of prodigiosin based on adsorption chromatography is provided. A surfactant (Tween 80; 0.1%, w/v) was used to improve prodigiosin release from the cell envelope. An adsorbent (X-5 resin) with high loading capacity (7.3 mg/g) was selected for the direct recovery of prodigiosin from culture broth by static adsorption or in situ separation. This technology not only simplified the separation process, but also made the recovery yield (83%) much higher when compared with the conventional method (50%). As a result, it will be particularly suited for large-scale separation and purification of prodigiosin.

  10. Shock Compression and Recovery of Microorganism-Loaded Broths and AN Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazell, P. J.; Beveridge, C.; Groves, K.; Stennett, C.

    2009-12-01

    The microorganisms Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Zygosaccharomyces bailii and an oil-based emulsion, have been subjected to shock compression using the flyer-plate technique to initial pressures of 0.8 GPa (in the suspension). In each experiment, a stainless steel capsule was used to contain the broths and allow for recovery without contamination. Where cavitation was mostly suppressed by virtue of simultaneous shock and dynamic compression, no kill was observed. By introducing an air gap behind the suspension, limited kill was measured in the yeast. Results also suggest that stable emulsification occurs in coarse oil-based emulsions that are subjected to shock.

  11. NMR studies of a bacterial cell culture medium (LB broth): cyclic nucleotides in yeast extracts.

    PubMed

    Rayner, M H; Sadler, P J; Scawen, M D

    1990-03-01

    The composition of LB broth (tryptone, yeast extract and NaCl) was investigated by 1H,31P-NMR spectroscopy, FPLC and gel electrophoresis. An unexpected finding was the high level of 2'3'-cyclic nucleotides, detected by characteristic 31P-NMR resonances in the region 20-21 ppm, originating from the yeast component. 31P-NMR resonances for cyclic nucleotides were observed during the autolysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, and in model reactions of RNase with RNA.

  12. Antibacterial activity of 11 essential oils against Bacillus cereus in tyndallized carrot broth.

    PubMed

    Valero, M; Salmerón, M C

    2003-08-15

    The antibacterial activity of 11 essential oils from aromatic plants against the strain INRA L2104 of the foodborne pathogen Bacillus cereus grown in carrot broth at 16 degrees C was studied. The quantity needed by the essential oils of nutmeg, mint, clove, oregano, cinnamon, sassafras, sage, thyme or rosemary to produce 14-1110% relative extension of the lag phase was determined. Total growth inhibition of bacterial spores was observed for some of the antimicrobial agents assayed. The addition of 5 microl cinnamon essential oil per 100 ml of broth in combination with refrigeration temperatures of

  13. Fermentation broth components influence droplet coalescence and hinder advanced biofuel recovery during fermentation.

    PubMed

    Heeres, Arjan S; Schroën, Karin; Heijnen, Joseph J; van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Cuellar, Maria C

    2015-08-01

    Developments in synthetic biology enabled the microbial production of long chain hydrocarbons, which can be used as advanced biofuels in aviation or transportation. Currently, these fuels are not economically competitive due to their production costs. The current process offers room for improvement: by utilizing lignocellulosic feedstock, increasing microbial yields, and using cheaper process technology. Gravity separation is an example of the latter, for which droplet growth by coalescence is crucial. The aim of this study was to study the effect of fermentation broth components on droplet coalescence. Droplet coalescence was measured using two setups: a microfluidic chip and regular laboratory scale stirred vessel (2 L). Some fermentation broth components had a large impact on droplet coalescence. Especially components present in hydrolysed cellulosic biomass and mannoproteins from the yeast cell wall retard coalescence. To achieve a technically feasible gravity separation that can be integrated with the fermentation, the negative effects of these components on coalescence should be minimized. This could be achieved by redesign of the fermentation medium or adjusting the fermentation conditions, aiming to minimize the release of surface active components by the microorganisms. This way, another step can be made towards economically feasible advanced biofuel production.

  14. 2,3-Butanediol recovery from fermentation broth by alcohol precipitation and vacuum distillation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sangjun; Kim, Duk-Ki; Song, Hyohak; Lee, Hee Jong; Park, Sunghoon; Seung, Doyoung; Chang, Yong Keun

    2014-04-01

    This study presents a new and effective downstream process to recover 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD) from fermentation broth which is produced by a recombinant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain. The ldhA-deficient K. pneumoniae strain yielded about 90 g/L of 2,3-BD, along with a number of by-products, such as organic acids and alcohols, in a 65 h fed-batch fermentation. The pH-adjusted cell-free fermentation broth was firstly concentrated until 2,3-BD reached around 500 g/L by vacuum evaporation at 50°C and 50 mbar vacuum pressure. The concentrated solution was further treated using light alcohols, including methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol, for the precipitation of organic acids and inorganic salts. Isopropanol showed the highest removal efficiency, in which 92.5% and 99.8% of organic acids and inorganic salts were precipitated, respectively. At a final step, a vacuum distillation process enabled the recovery of 76.2% of the treated 2,3-BD, with 96.1% purity, indicating that fermentatively produced 2,3-BD is effectively recovered by a simple alcohol precipitation and vacuum distillation.

  15. Antibacterial activity of 11 essential oils against Bacillus cereus in tyndallized carrot broth.

    PubMed

    Valero, M; Salmerón, M C

    2003-08-15

    The antibacterial activity of 11 essential oils from aromatic plants against the strain INRA L2104 of the foodborne pathogen Bacillus cereus grown in carrot broth at 16 degrees C was studied. The quantity needed by the essential oils of nutmeg, mint, clove, oregano, cinnamon, sassafras, sage, thyme or rosemary to produce 14-1110% relative extension of the lag phase was determined. Total growth inhibition of bacterial spores was observed for some of the antimicrobial agents assayed. The addition of 5 microl cinnamon essential oil per 100 ml of broth in combination with refrigeration temperatures of

  16. 2,3-Butanediol recovery from fermentation broth by alcohol precipitation and vacuum distillation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sangjun; Kim, Duk-Ki; Song, Hyohak; Lee, Hee Jong; Park, Sunghoon; Seung, Doyoung; Chang, Yong Keun

    2014-04-01

    This study presents a new and effective downstream process to recover 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD) from fermentation broth which is produced by a recombinant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain. The ldhA-deficient K. pneumoniae strain yielded about 90 g/L of 2,3-BD, along with a number of by-products, such as organic acids and alcohols, in a 65 h fed-batch fermentation. The pH-adjusted cell-free fermentation broth was firstly concentrated until 2,3-BD reached around 500 g/L by vacuum evaporation at 50°C and 50 mbar vacuum pressure. The concentrated solution was further treated using light alcohols, including methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol, for the precipitation of organic acids and inorganic salts. Isopropanol showed the highest removal efficiency, in which 92.5% and 99.8% of organic acids and inorganic salts were precipitated, respectively. At a final step, a vacuum distillation process enabled the recovery of 76.2% of the treated 2,3-BD, with 96.1% purity, indicating that fermentatively produced 2,3-BD is effectively recovered by a simple alcohol precipitation and vacuum distillation. PMID:24144809

  17. Population cell differentiation of Serratia marcescens on agar surface and in broth culture.

    PubMed

    Lai, H C; Lai, M J; Lin-Chao, S; Lu, K T; Ho, S W

    1997-11-01

    The bacterium Serratia marcescens shows population surface migration (swarming) phenomenum on an LB swarming plate, and differentiated cells can be observed at the swarming front. How the cell population differentiates during swarming on the agar surface is not known, neither is it clear whether cells with differentiated characteristics can be observed in broth culture. To monitor the population cell differentiation in a highly sensitive way without cell destruction, experiments were designed using bacterial luciferase genes luxAB as the reporter genes to allow direct monitoring of the differentiating cells through bioluminescence. An isogenic S. marcescens strain was constructed with luxAB under the control of the promoter of flagellin gene hag (phag::luxAB). Patterns of cell differentiation were monitored either by direct X-ray film exposure and/or by Autolumat luminometer detection. Results show that population cell differentiation on the agar surface occurs first in a temporal and then spatial way during colonial growth. It was also found that cells harvested from both the spreading agar plate and broth culture showed differentiation patterns similar to those from swarming cells, suggesting that the agar surface culture may not be essential for the formation of differentiated cells.

  18. Reference Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bivens-Tatum, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    This article presents interesting articles that explore several different areas of reference assessment, including practical case studies and theoretical articles that address a range of issues such as librarian behavior, patron satisfaction, virtual reference, or evaluation design. They include: (1) "Evaluating the Quality of a Chat Service"…

  19. Reference Revolutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Marilyn Gell

    1998-01-01

    Describes developments in Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) electronic reference services. Presents a background on networked cataloging and the initial implementation of reference services by OCLC. Discusses the introduction of OCLC FirstSearch service, which today offers access to over 65 databases, future developments in integrated…

  20. Dried-bonito aroma components enhance salivary hemodynamic responses to broth tastes detected by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomona; Saito, Kana; Nakamura, Akio; Saito, Tsukasa; Nammoku, Takashi; Ishikawa, Masashi; Mori, Kensaku

    2012-01-25

    To elucidate the effects of aroma from dried bonito (katsuo-bushi) on broth tastes caused by the central integration of flavor, optical imaging of salivary hemodynamic responses was conducted using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). A reconstituted dried bonito flavored broth produced a significantly larger hemodynamic response than the odorless broth taste solutions for 5 of the 10 panelists, who felt that the combination of the aroma with the tastes was congruent. In the remaining 5 panelists who felt the combination incongruent, the flavored broth did not cause the enhancement of response. Moreover, when the odor-active smoky parts were removed from the flavoring, the reconstituted flavoring did not enhance the response in the former five panelists. These results indicate that NIRS offers a sensitive method to detect the effect of specific congruent aroma components from dried-bonito broth on the taste-related salivary hemodynamic responses, dependent on the perceptual experience of the combination of aromas and tastes. PMID:22224859

  1. Ready Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koltay, Emery

    1999-01-01

    Includes the following ready reference information: "Publishers' Toll-Free Telephone Numbers"; "How to Obtain an ISBN (International Standard Book Number)"; "How to Obtain an ISSN (International Standard Serial Number)"; and "How to Obtain an SAN (Standard Address Number)". (AEF)

  2. Antilisterial activity of hops beta acids in broth with or without other antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Shen, C; Sofos, J N

    2008-11-01

    Hops beta acids (HBA) are parts of hops flowers used to preserve wort and provide flavor in beer, and are reported as having antimicrobial properties. This study evaluated the antilisterial activity of HBA alone or in combination with other known antimicrobials in a culture broth medium. Listeria monocytogenes (10-strain mixture) was inoculated (2.6 to 2.8 log CFU/mL) into tryptic soy broth supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract (TSBYE) without (control) or with HBA (0.5 to 5.0 microg/mL), potassium lactate (1.0%), sodium diacetate (0.25%), or acetic acid (0.1%), alone or in combination with HBA (0.5 to 3.0 microg/mL). Survival/growth of the pathogen during storage at 4 degrees C (35 d), 10 degrees C (20 d), or 25 degrees C (2 d) was periodically monitored by spiral plating onto tryptic soy agar plus 0.6% yeast extract. As expected, TSBYE without antimicrobials (control) supported rapid pathogen growth with growth rates of 0.40, 2.88, and 9.58 log CFU/mL/d at 4, 10, and 25 degrees C, respectively; corresponding Y(end) values exceeded 9.0 log CFU/mL at 35, 20, and 2 d storage. HBA used alone (1.0 to 5.0 microg/mL) inhibited growth of L. monocytogenes at all 3 temperatures, with inhibition being more pronounced at higher concentrations and at the lower storage temperature (4 degrees C). The antilisterial activity of HBA (0.5 to 3.0 microg/mL) was enhanced when combined with sodium diacetate, acetic acid, or potassium lactate, achieving complete inhibition at 4 degrees C when 3.0 microg/mL HBA were used in combination with each of the above antimicrobials. Overall, HBA exhibited promising antilisterial activity in a broth medium and further studies are needed to investigate its potential antilisterial effects in food products. PMID:19021815

  3. Lytic enzyme production optimization using low-cost substrates and its application in the clarification of xanthan gum culture broth

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Cíntia Reis; Silva, Marilia Lordelo Cardoso; Kamida, Helio Mitoshi; Goes-Neto, Aristoteles; Koblitz, Maria Gabriela Bello

    2014-01-01

    Lytic enzymes are widely used in industrial biotechnology as they are able to hydrolyze the bacterial cell wall. One application of these enzymes is the clarification of the culture broth for the production of xanthan gum, because of its viability in viscous media and high specificity. The screening process for filamentous fungi producing lytic enzymes, the optimization of production of these enzymes by the selected microorganism, and the optimization of the application of the enzymes produced in the clarification of culture broth are presented in this article. Eleven fungal isolates were tested for their ability to produce enzymes able to increase the transmittance of the culture broth containing cells of Xanthomonas campestris. To optimize the secretion of lytic enzymes by the selected microorganism the following variables were tested: solid substrate, initial pH, incubation temperature, and addition of inducer (gelatin). Thereafter, secretion of the enzymes over time of incubation was assessed. To optimize the clarification process a central composite rotational design was applied in which the pH of the reaction medium, the dilution of the broth, and the reaction temperature were evaluated. The isolate identified as Aspergillus tamarii was selected for increasing the transmittance of the broth from 2.1% to 54.8%. The best conditions for cultivation of this microorganism were: use of coconut husk as solid substrate, with 90% moisture, at 30°C for 20 days. The lytic enzymes produced thereby were able to increase the transmittance of the culture broth from 2.1% to 70.6% at 65°C, without dilution and without pH adjustment. PMID:25473487

  4. Biodegradation of nitrobenzene in a lysogeny broth medium by a novel halophilic bacterium Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian; Deng, Xinping; Wang, Jinjun; Chen, Yucheng; He, Lin; Sun, Yuchuan; Song, Caixia; Zhou, Zhifeng

    2014-12-15

    The Bacillus licheniformis strain YX2, a novel nitrobenzene-degrading halophilic bacterium, was isolated from active sludge obtained from a pesticide factory. Strain YX2 can withstand highly acidic and alkaline conditions and high temperatures. Degradation of nitrobenzene (200mgL(-1)) by YX2 exceeded 70% after 72h in lysogeny broth medium (pH 4-9). Under optimal degradation conditions (33°C, pH 7 in LB medium) YX2 degraded 50, 100, 200, and 600mgL(-1) nitrobenzene within 36, 36, 72, and 156h, respectively. Even in the presence of benzene, phenol or aniline, strain YX2 efficiently degraded nitrobenzene. Furthermore, strain YX2 completely degraded 600mgL(-1) nitrobenzene in 7% NaCl (w/w). Thus, our data show that strain YX2 may have promise for removing nitrobenzene from complex wastewaters with high salinity and variable pH.

  5. Determination of Ideal Broth Formulations Needed to Prepare Hydrous Hafnium Oxide Microspheres via the Internal Gelation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Jack Lee; Hunt, Rodney Dale; Simmerman, S. G.

    2009-02-01

    A simple test-tube methodology was used to determine optimum process parameters for preparing hydrous hafnium oxide microspheres by the internal gelation process. Broth formulations of hafnyl chloride [HfOCl{sub 2}], hexamethylenetetramine, and urea were found that can be used to prepare hydrous hafnium oxide gel spheres in the temperature range of 70-90 C. A few gel-forming runs were made in which microspheres were prepared with some of these formulations in order to equate the test-tube gelation times with actual gelation times. These preparations confirmed that the test-tube methodology is reliable for determining the ideal broths.

  6. Determination of Ideal Broth Formulations Needed to Prepare Hydrous Aluminum Oxide Microspheres via the Internal Gelation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Jack Lee; Pye, S. L.

    2009-02-01

    A simple test-tube methodology was used to determine optimum process parameters for preparing hydrous aluminum oxide microspheres by the internal gelation process. Broth formulations of aluminum, hexamethylenetetramine, and urea were found that can be used to prepare hydrous aluminum oxide gel spheres in the temperature range of 60-90 C. A few gel-forming runs were made in which microspheres were prepared with some of these formulations in order to equate the test-tube gelation times with actual gelation times. These preparations confirmed that the test-tube methodology is reliable for determining the ideal broths.

  7. Lethal paralytic shellfish poisoning from consumption of green mussel broth, Western Samar, Philippines, August 2013

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Ruth Alma; de los Reyes, Vikki Carr; Sucaldito, Ma Nemia; Tayag, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Background In July 2013, the Philippines’ Event-Based Surveillance & Response Unit received a paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) report from Tarangnan, Western Samar. A team from the Department of Health conducted an outbreak investigation to identify the implicated source and risk factors in coastal villages known for green mussel production and exportation. Methods A case was defined as a previously well individual from Tarangan, Western Samar who developed gastrointestinal symptoms and any motor and/or sensory symptoms after consumption of shellfish from 29 June to 4 July 2013 in the absence of any known cause. The team reviewed medical records, conducted active case finding and a case-control study. Relatives of cases who died were interviewed. Sera and urine specimens, green mussel and seawater samples were tested for saxitoxin levels using high performance liquid chromatography. Results Thirty-one cases and two deaths were identified. Consumption of > 1 cup of green mussel broth was associated with being a case. Seawater sample was positive for Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum and green mussel samples were positive for saxitoxin. Inspection revealed villagers practice open defecation and improper garbage disposal. Conclusion This PSP outbreak was caused by the consumption of the green mussel broth contaminated by saxitoxin. As a result of this outbreak, dinoflagellate and saxitoxin surveillance was established, and since the outbreak, there have been no harmful algal blooms event or PSP case reported since. A “Save Cambatutay Bay” movement, focusing on proper waste disposal practice and clean-up drives has been mobilized. PMID:26306212

  8. [Identification of Staphylococcus aureus within 2 hours in blood culture broths].

    PubMed

    Langlet, S; Scheftel, J M; Monteil, H; Ghnassia, J C

    1999-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus identification is one of the priorities of the microbiological diagnosis of the staphylococcal infections. Current identification methods are carried out after a first step of colony isolation on agar media. We describe a fluorogenic method for S. aureus identification, which is directly applied to blood culture broths. This method uses a gel tube which allows an optimized microculture of the bacteria. 129 clinical samples of blood cultures (HEC) containing gram positive cocci in grapelike clusters (35 Vital bottles, 94 Bactec bottles), and 77 inoculated blood culture (HE) with collection strains of S. aureus are included in the study. Bacteria are concentrated and separated from other components of sample in the gel tube. Staphylococci are revealed during a microculture in the gel phase, by using a colorimetric substrate of their dehydrogenases. Then, staphylococci are recovered in an adapted culture medium containing human prothrombin and a fluorogenic substrate, which is specific for the staphylocoagulase. After 1 to 2 h incubation at 37 degrees C, a blue fluorescence shows the presence of S. aureus. Among the 40 HEC containing S. aureus the test is positive for 37 samples. For 3 cases, the test is not interpretable, due to non lysis red blood cells in the gel phase of the tube. No false positive result is observed for the HEC containing coagulase-negative staphylococci. Moreover, our method is positive with the 77 HE. 94.7% of tested samples (HEC and HE) show a fluorescence after only one hour and half. Sensibility and specificity are both 100%. We propose a rapid method for S. aureus identification directly applied to blood culture broths. This method saves 24 h, avoiding the isolation step on agar. Therefore, the treatment of staphylococcal infections and possible isolation measures could earlier set up.

  9. Activity of a long-acting echinocandin, CD101, determined using CLSI and EUCAST reference methods, against Candida and Aspergillus spp., including echinocandin- and azole-resistant isolates

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, Michael A.; Messer, Shawn A.; Rhomberg, Paul R.; Jones, Ronald N.; Castanheira, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of CD101, a novel echinocandin with a long serum elimination half-life, and comparator (anidulafungin and caspofungin) antifungal agents against a collection of Candida and Aspergillus spp. isolates. Methods CD101 and comparator agents were tested against 106 Candida spp. and 67 Aspergillus spp. isolates, including 27 isolates of Candida harbouring fks hotspot mutations and 12 itraconazole non-WT Aspergillus, using CLSI and EUCAST reference susceptibility broth microdilution (BMD) methods. Results Against WT and fks mutant Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis, the activity of CD101 [MIC90 = 0.06, 0.12 and 0.03 mg/L, respectively (CLSI method values)] was comparable to that of anidulafungin (MIC90 = 0.03, 0.12 and 0.03 mg/L, respectively) and caspofungin (MIC90 = 0.12, 0.25 and 0.12 mg/L, respectively). WT Candida krusei isolates were very susceptible to CD101 (MIC = 0.06 mg/L). CD101 activity (MIC50/90 = 1/2 mg/L) was comparable to that of anidulafungin (MIC50/90 = 2/2 mg/L) against Candida parapsilosis. CD101 (MIC mode = 0.06 mg/L for C. glabrata) was 2- to 4-fold more active against fks hotspot mutants than caspofungin (MIC mode = 0.5 mg/L). CD101 was active against Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus (MEC90 range = ≤0.008–0.03 mg/L). The essential agreement between CLSI and EUCAST methods for CD101 was 92.0%–100.0% among Candida spp. and 95.0%–100.0% among Aspergillus spp. Conclusions The activity of CD101 is comparable to that of other members of the echinocandin class for the prevention and treatment of serious fungal infections. Similar results for CD101 activity versus Candida and Aspergillus spp. may be obtained with either CLSI or EUCAST BMD methods. PMID:27287236

  10. Reference Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkus, Henk G.

    Reference materials for measurement of particle size and porosity may be used for calibration or qualification of instruments or for validation of operating procedures or operators. They cover a broad range of materials. On the one hand there are the certified reference materials, for which governmental institutes have certified one or more typical size or porosity values. Then, there is a large group of reference materials from commercial companies. And on the other hand there are typical products in a given line of industry, where size or porosity values come from the analysis laboratory itself or from some round-robin test in a group of industrial laboratories. Their regular application is essential for adequate quality control of particle size and porosity measurement, as required in e.g., ISO 17025 on quality management. In relation to this, some quality requirements for certification are presented.

  11. Poroelastic references

    SciTech Connect

    Morency, Christina

    2014-12-12

    This file contains a list of relevant references on the Biot theory (forward and inverse approaches), the double-porosity and dual-permeability theory, and seismic wave propagation in fracture porous media, in RIS format, to approach seismic monitoring in a complex fractured porous medium such as Brady?s Geothermal Field.

  12. Ready Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koltay, Emery

    2001-01-01

    Includes four articles that relate to ready reference, including a list of publishers' toll-free telephone numbers and Web sites; how to obtain an ISBN (International Standard Book Number) and an ISSN (International Standard Serial Number); and how to obtain an SAN (Standard Address Number), for organizations that are involved in the book…

  13. Pre-treatment step with Leuconostoc mesenteroides or L. pseudomesenteroides strains removes furfural from Zymomonas mobilis ethanolic fermentation broth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Furfural (furan-2-carboxaldehyde), formed during dilute acid hydrolysis of biomass, is an inhibitor of growth and ethanol production by Zymomonas mobilis. The present study used a biological pre-treatment to reduce that amount of furfural in a model biofuel fermentation broth. The pre-treatment in...

  14. [Simultaneous determination of organic acids and saccharides in lactic acid fermentation broth from biomass using high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Ouyang, Jia; Li, Xin; Lian, Zhina; Cai, Cong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: A high performance liquid chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of organic acids and saccharides in lactic acid fermentation broth from biomass was developed. A Bio-Rad Aminex HPX-87H column was used at 55 degrees C. The mobile phase was 5 mmol/L sulfuric acid solution at a flow rate of 0.6 mL/min. The samples were detected by a refractive index detector (RID). The results showed that six organic acids and three saccharides in fermentation broth were completely separated and determined in 17 min. The linear correlation coefficients were above 0.999 8 in the range of 0.15-5.19 g/L. Under the optimized conditions, the recoveries of the organic acids and saccharides in Rhizopus oryzae fermentation broth at two spiked levels were in the range of 96.91%-103.11% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 6) of 0.81%-4.61%. This method is fast and accurate for the quantitative analysis of the organic acids and saccharides in microbial fermentation broths.

  15. Performance of serum-free broth media for growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Starliper, C.E.; Schill, W.B.; Mathias, J.

    1998-01-01

    Growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum was compared in 14 different broth media; 13 serum-free, and 1 that contained newborn calf serum, KDM2+M. Supplementation with 1% v/v R. salmoninarum MCO4M metabolite was evaluated for 6 of the media that do not utilize it as part of their ingredients. Viable cells were enumerated on Days 10, 20, and 30 post inoculation to evaluate performance. The experiment was repeated 3 times using high, low, and medium (trials 1 to 3, respectively) cell concentrations as inoculum. In general there was no optimal medium and all performed well. The choice of which to employ depends on the ease of preparation and presence of certain ingredients that might affect subsequent assays. In trials 2 and 3, the pH was estimated using test papers at the same time as cells were counted. Maximum pH increase occurred with KDM2+M and those media containing charcoal. For most media, a simple pH determination could be used as a means to check that growth has occurred in a culture, particularly if charcoal was added directly to the media and a visual inspection could not be made to detect growth.

  16. An improved HPLC-DAD method for clavulanic acid quantification in fermentation broths of Streptomyces clavuligerus.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Malule, Howard; Junne, Stefan; López, Carlos; Zapata, Julian; Sáez, Alex; Neubauer, Peter; Rios-Estepa, Rigoberto

    2016-02-20

    Clavulanic acid (CA) is an important secondary metabolite commercially produced by cultivation of Streptomyces clavuligerus (Sc). It is a potent inhibitor of bacterial β-lactamases. In this work, a specific and improved high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method, using a C-18 reversed phase column, diode array detector and gradient elution for CA quantification in fermentation broths of Sc, was developed and successfully validated. Samples were imidazole-derivatized for the purpose of creating a stable chromophore (clavulanate-imidazole). The calibration curve was linear over a typical range of CA concentration between 0.2 and 400mg/L. The detection and quantification limits were 0.01 and 0.02mg/L, respectively. The precision of the method was evaluated for CA spiked into production media and a recovery of 103.8%, on average, was obtained. The clavulanate-imidazole complex was not stable when the samples were not cooled during the analysis. The recovery rate was 39.3% on average. This assay was successfully tested for CA quantification in samples from Sc fermentation, using both, a chemically defined and a complex medium.

  17. Ergosterols from the Culture Broth of Marine Streptomyces anandii H41-59

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang-Mei; Li, Hong-Yu; Hu, Chen; Sheng, Hui-Fan; Zhang, Ying; Lin, Bi-Run; Zhou, Guang-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    An actinomycete strain, H41-59, isolated from sea sediment in a mangrove district, was identified as Streptomyces anandii on the basis of 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis as well as the investigation of its morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics. Three new ergosterols, ananstreps A–C (1–3), along with ten known ones (4–13), were isolated from the culture broth of this strain. The gross structures of these new compounds were elucidated on the basis of extensive analysis of spectroscopic data, including HR-ESI-MS, and NMR. The cytotoxicities of these isolates against human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MCF-7, human glioblastoma cell line SF-268, and human lung cancer cell line NCI-H460 and their antibacterial activities in inhibiting the growth of Candida albicans and some other pathogenic microorganisms were tested. Compounds 3–8, 10 and 11 displayed cytotoxicity with IC50 values in a range from 13.0 to 27.8 μg/mL. However, all the tested compounds showed no activity on C. albicans and other bacteria at the test concentration of 1 mg/mL with the paper disc diffusion method. PMID:27153073

  18. Compounds in a particular production lot of tryptic soy broth inhibit Staphylococcus aureus cell growth.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Masaki; Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus Newman strain and several methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clinical isolates were grown on agar plates prepared with conventional lots of tryptic soy broth (TSB). Cell growth of these strains was inhibited on agar plates containing TSB of a particular product lot (lot A), whereas the cell growth of S. aureus RN4220 strain and several other MRSA clinical isolates was not inhibited. The cell growth of a strain of S. epidermidis was also inhibited on agar plates containing TSB of lot A, whereas the cell growth of Bacillus subtilis, Lactococcus lactis, Klebsiella pneumonia, Salmonella enterica, Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli was not inhibited. Although cell growth of the Newman strain was inhibited on agar plates containing TSB of lot A that was autoclaved in stainless steel or glass containers, cell growth inhibition was not observed when the medium was autoclaved in polypropylene containers. Compounds that inhibited the cell growth of the Newman strain were extracted from a polypropylene tube that was preincubated with liquid medium prepared from TSB of lot A. These findings suggest that polypropylene-binding compounds in TSB of lot A inhibited the cell growth of S. aureus Newman strain, some MRSA clinical isolates, and S. epidermidis.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of a neem cake extract in a broth model meat system.

    PubMed

    Del Serrone, Paola; Nicoletti, Marcello

    2013-08-02

    This work reports on the antimicrobial activity of an ethyl acetate extract of neem (Azadirachta indica) cake (NCE) against bacteria affecting the quality of retail fresh meat in a broth model meat system. NCE (100 µg) was also tested by the agar disc diffusion method. It inhibited the growth of all tested microorganisms. The NCE growth inhibition zone (IZ) ranged 11.33-22.67 mm while the ciprofloxacin (10 µg) IZ ranged from 23.41-32.67 mm. There was no significant difference (p ≤ 0.05) between the antimicrobial activity of NCE and ciprofloxacin vs. C. jejuni and Leuconostoc spp. The NCE antibacterial activity was moreover determined at lower concentrations (1:10-1:100,000) in micro-assays. The percent growth reduction ranged from 61 ± 2.08-92 ± 3.21. The higher bacterial growth reduction was obtained at 10 µg concentration of NCE. Species-specific PCR and multiplex PCR with the DNA dye propidium monoazide were used to directly detect viable bacterial cells from experimentally contaminated meat samples. The numbers of bacterial cells never significantly (p ≤ 0.05) exceeded the inocula concentration used to experimentally contaminate the NCE treated meat. This report represents a screening methodology to evaluate the antimicrobial capability of a herbal extract to preserve meat.

  20. A fast method for the quantification of methylamine in fermentation broths by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Jérôme, Valérie; Hermann, Markus; Hilbrig, Frank; Freitag, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a method for the quantitative analysis of the methylamine concentration in fermentation broths of Hyphomicrobium zavarzinii ZV 580 cultures. For this purpose an established method for the quantification of free amino acids in such matrices was adapted and validated. The detection limit was 10 microM, the calibration curve showed good linearity (R2=0.9998) in the concentration range between 0.1 and 8 mM. The standard deviation of the injection-to-injection reproducibility (n=10) of the retention coefficient was <1%, that of the peak area<5%. In case of the sample-to-sample reproducibility (n=8), the standard deviation was <5% for the retention coefficient and <10% for the peak area. The validated method was successfully applied for monitoring a fed-batch bioprocess (starting volume: 8L, initial methylamine hydrochloride concentration: 10 mM) producing a dye-linked formaldehyde dehydrogenase in H. zavarzinii ZV 580. PMID:18082472

  1. Oil and air dispersion in a simulated fermentation broth as a function of mycelial morphology.

    PubMed

    Lucatero, Savidra; Larralde-Corona, Claudia Patricia; Corkidi, Gabriel; Galindo, Enrique

    2003-01-01

    The culture conditions of a multiphase fermentation involving morphologically complex mycelia were simulated in order to investigate the influence of mycelial morphology (Trichoderma harzianum) on castor oil and air dispersion. Measurements of oil drops and air bubbles were obtained using an image analysis system coupled to a mixing tank. Complex interactions of the phases involved could be clearly observed. The Sauter diameter and the size distributions of drops and bubbles were affected by the morphological type of biomass (pellets or dispersed mycelia) added to the system. Larger oil drop sizes were obtained with dispersed mycelia than with pellets, as a result of the high apparent viscosity of the broth, which caused a drop in the power drawn, reducing oil drop break-up. Unexpectedly, bubble sizes observed with dispersed mycelia were smaller than with pellets, a phenomenon which can be explained by the segregation occurring at high biomass concentrations with the dispersed mycelia. Very complex oil drops were produced, containing air bubbles and a high number of structures likely consisting of small water droplets. Bubble location was influenced by biomass morphology. The percentage (in volume) of oil-trapped bubbles increased (from 32 to 80%) as dispersed mycelia concentration increased. A practically constant (32%) percentage of oil-trapped bubbles was observed with pelleted morphology at all biomass concentrations. The results evidenced the high complexity of phases interactions and the importance of mycelial morphology in such processes. PMID:12675561

  2. Antimicrobial Activity of a Neem Cake Extract in a Broth Model Meat System

    PubMed Central

    Del Serrone, Paola; Nicoletti, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    This work reports on the antimicrobial activity of an ethyl acetate extract of neem (Azadirachta indica) cake (NCE) against bacteria affecting the quality of retail fresh meat in a broth model meat system. NCE (100 µg) was also tested by the agar disc diffusion method. It inhibited the growth of all tested microorganisms. The NCE growth inhibition zone (IZ) ranged 11.33–22.67 mm while the ciprofloxacin (10 µg) IZ ranged from 23.41–32.67 mm. There was no significant difference (p ≤ 0.05) between the antimicrobial activity of NCE and ciprofloxacin vs. C. jejuni and Leuconostoc spp. The NCE antibacterial activity was moreover determined at lower concentrations (1:10–1:100,000) in micro-assays. The percent growth reduction ranged from 61 ± 2.08–92 ± 3.21. The higher bacterial growth reduction was obtained at 10 µg concentration of NCE. Species-specific PCR and multiplex PCR with the DNA dye propidium monoazide were used to directly detect viable bacterial cells from experimentally contaminated meat samples. The numbers of bacterial cells never significantly (p ≤ 0.05) exceeded the inocula concentration used to experimentally contaminate the NCE treated meat. This report represents a screening methodology to evaluate the antimicrobial capability of a herbal extract to preserve meat. PMID:23917814

  3. Purification and characterization of an endoxylanase from the culture broth of Bacillus cereus BSA1.

    PubMed

    Mandal, A; Kar, S; Das Mohapatra, P K; Maity, C; Pati, B R; Mondal, K C

    2011-01-01

    An extracellular xylanase from the fermented broth of Bacillus cereus BSA1 was purified and characterized. The enzyme was purified to 3.43 fold through ammonium sulphate precipitation, DEAE-cellulose chromatography and followed by gel filtration through Sephadex G-100 column. The molecular mass of the purified xylanse was about 33 kDa. The enzyme was an endoxylanase as it initially degraded xylan to xylooligomers. The purified enzyme showed optimum activity at 55 degrees C and at pH 7.0 and remained reasonably stable in a wide range ofpH (5.0-8.0) and temperature (40-65 degrees C). The Km and Vmax values were found to be 8.2 mg/ml and 181.8 micromol/(min mg), respectively. The enzyme had no apparent requirement ofcofactors, and its activity was strongly inhibited by Cu++, Hg++. It was also a salt tolerant enzyme and stable upto 2.5 M of NaCl and retained its 85% activity at 3.0 M. For stability and substrate binding, the enzyme needed hydrophobic interaction that revealed when most surfactants inhihited xylanase activity. Since the enzyme was active over wide range ofpH, temperature and remained active in higher salt concentration, it could find potential uses in biobleaching process in paper industries.

  4. Isolation of α-arbutin from Xanthomonas CGMCC 1243 fermentation broth by macroporous resin adsorption chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunqiao; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Luo; Xu, Tao; Tan, Tianwei; Wang, Fang; Deng, Li

    2013-04-15

    α-Arbutin is a glycosylated hydroquinone which has inhibitory function against tyrosinase. In this work, a one-step isolation of α-arbutin from Xanthomonas CGMCC 1243 fermentation broth by macroporous resin adsorption chromatography was investigated. The research results indicated that S-8 resin offered the best adsorption and desorption capacities for α-arbutin than others and its equilibrium adsorption data were well-fitted to the Freundlich isotherm. In order to optimize the operating parameters for separating α-arbutin, dynamic adsorption and desorption tests on S-8 column chromatography were carried out. Under optimized conditions (adsorption volume of 7 bed volume (BV), mobile phase of 25% (v/v) ethanol solution and elution volume of 3 BV), the purity and recovery of α-arbutin were 97.3% (w/w) and 90.9% (w/w), respectively. The product was identified as α-arbutin by (13)C NMR and (1)H NMR analysis. Moreover, we scaled up S-8 column from laboratory test (10 cm × 2 cm ID) to large scale (500 cm × 100 cm ID) without diminishing α-arbutin yield. In conclusion, the results in this work provide a one-step and cost-effective method for large-scale production of α-arbutin.

  5. Modeling of the Competitive Growth of Listeria monocytogenes and Lactococcus lactis in Vegetable Broth

    PubMed Central

    Breidt, Frederick; Fleming, Henry P.

    1998-01-01

    Current mathematical models used by food microbiologists do not address the issue of competitive growth in mixed cultures of bacteria. We developed a mathematical model which consists of a system of nonlinear differential equations describing the growth of competing bacterial cell cultures. In this model, bacterial cell growth is limited by the accumulation of protonated lactic acid and decreasing pH. In our experimental system, pure and mixed cultures of Lactococcus lactis and Listeria monocytogenes were grown in a vegetable broth medium. Predictions of the model indicate that pH is the primary factor that limits the growth of L. monocytogenes in competition with a strain of L. lactis which does not produce the bacteriocin nisin. The model also predicts the values of parameters that affect the growth and death of the competing populations. Further development of this model will incorporate the effects of additional inhibitors, such as bacteriocins, and may aid in the selection of lactic acid bacterium cultures for use in competitive inhibition of pathogens in minimally processed foods. PMID:9726854

  6. Analysis of mixtures of fatty acids and fatty alcohols in fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yilan; Chen, Ting; Yang, Maohua; Wang, Caixia; Huo, Weiyan; Yan, Daojiang; Chen, Jinjin; Zhou, Jiemin; Xing, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Microbial production of fatty acids and fatty alcohols has attracted increasing concerns because of energy crisis and environmental impact of fossil fuels. Therefore, simple and efficient methods for the extraction and quantification of these compounds become necessary. In this study, a high-performance liquid chromatography-refractive index detection (HPLC-RID) method was developed for the simultaneous quantification of fatty acids and fatty alcohols in these samples. The optimum chromatographic conditions are C18 column eluted with methanol:water:acetic acid (90:9.9:0.1, v/v/v); column temperature, 26°C; flow rate, 1.0mL/min. Calibration curves of all selected analytes showed good linearity (r(2)≥0.9989). The intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the 10 compounds were less than 4.46% and 5.38%, respectively, which indicated that the method had good repeatability and precision. Besides, a method for simultaneous extraction of fatty acids and fatty alcohols from fermentation broth was optimized by orthogonal design. The optimal extraction conditions were as follows: solvent, ethyl acetate; solvent to sample ratio, 0.5:1; rotation speed, 2min at 260rpm; extraction temperature, 10°C. This study provides simple and fast methods to simultaneously extract and quantify fatty acids and fatty alcohols for the first time. It will be useful for the study of microbial production of these products.

  7. Commercial Lysogeny Broth culture media and oxidative stress: a cautious tale.

    PubMed

    Ezraty, Benjamin; Henry, Camille; Hérisse, Marion; Denamur, Erick; Barras, Frédéric

    2014-09-01

    Lysogeny Broth (LB), most often misnamed Luria-Bertani medium, ranks among the most commonly used growth media in microbiology. Surprisingly, we observed that oxidative levels vary with the commercial origin of the LB ready to use powder. Indeed, growth on solid media of Escherichia coli and Salmonella derivatives lacking antioxidative stress defenses, such as oxyR mutant devoid of the H2O2-sensing transcriptional activator or Hpx(-) strains lacking catalases and peroxidases, exhibit different phenotypes on LB-Sigma or LB-Difco. Using gene fusion and exogenously added catalase, we found that LB-Sigma contains higher levels of H2O2 than LB-Difco. Also we observed differences in population counts of 82 clinical and environmental isolates of E. coli, depending on the LB used. Further investigations revealed a significant influence of the commercial origin of agar as well. Besides being a warning to the wide population of LB users, our observations provide researchers in the oxidative stress field with a tool to appreciate the severity of mutations in antioxidative stress defenses.

  8. Dried bonito broth improves cognitive function via the histaminergic system in mice.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Yoshizu; Mimura, Masako; Yamada, Keiko; Sugita, Mayu; Shibakusa, Tetsuro; Koyama, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Bonito extract, i.e., dried bonito broth (DBB), has been reported to counteract mental fatigue and to increase performance in a simple calculation task, but the mechanism by which DBB increases task performance is not known. The brain neurotransmitter histamine is biosynthesized only from histidine in the tuberomammillary nucleus. Histamine neurons are projected to almost all areas of the cerebral cortex, and histamine has various behavioral and neurobiological functions, particularly in recognition memory. Here we used a mouse model to investigate the effects of the oral ingestion of DBB, which contains abundant histidine, as well as the ingestion of histidine on cognitive function. In a retention trial of novel object recognition test, the administration of 1.6 g/kg of DBB and 500 mg/kg of histidine significantly increased the animals' exploratory behavior toward a novel object, and that these agents significantly increased the spontaneous alternation behavior ratio in a Y-maze under conditions of scopolamine-induced amnesia, which induced learning and memory impairment. These results suggested the improvement of spatial short-term working memory in a scopolamine amnesia model, as well as the strengthening of visual cognitive function by a single ingestion of DBB and histidine. Interestingly, the administration of αFMH, which is an inhibitor of histamine biosynthesis, eliminated the increase in the spontaneous alternation behavior ratio by DBB ingestion in the scopolamine-induced amnesia model, suggesting that DBB may improve working memory impairment via activation of the histaminergic neuron system.

  9. Ion-exclusion chromatography determination of organic acid in uridine 5'-monophosphate fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Niu, Huanqing; Chen, Yong; Xie, Jingjing; Chen, Xiaochun; Bai, Jianxin; Wu, Jinglan; Liu, Dong; Ying, Hanjie

    2012-09-01

    Simultaneous determination of organic acids using ion-exclusion liquid chromatography and ultraviolet detection is described. The chromatographic conditions are optimized when an Aminex HPX-87H column (300 × 7.8 mm) is employed, with a solution of 3 mmol/L sulfuric acid as eluent, a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min and a column temperature of 60°C. Eight organic acids (including orotic acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, citric acid, pyruvic acid, malic acid, succinic acid, lactic acid and acetic acid) and one nucleotide are successfully quantified. The calibration curves for these analytes are linear, with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.999. The average recovery of organic acids is in the range of 97.6% ∼ 103.1%, and the relative standard deviation is in the range of 0.037% ∼ 0.38%. The method is subsequently applied to obtain organic acid profiles of uridine 5'-monophosphate culture broth fermented from orotic acid by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These data demonstrate the quantitative accuracy for nucleotide fermentation mixtures, and suggest that the method may also be applicable to other biological samples. PMID:22634191

  10. The influences of fish infusion broth on the biogenic amines formation by lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Küley, Esmeray; Özogul, Fatih; Balikçi, Esra; Durmus, Mustafa; Ayas, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    The influences of fish infusion decarboxylase broth (IDB) on biogenic amines (BA) formation by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were investigated. BA productions by single LAB strains were tested in five different fish (anchovy, mackerel, white shark, sardine and gilthead seabream) IDB. The result of the study showed that significant differences in ammonia (AMN) and BA production were observed among the LAB strains in fish IDB (p < 0.05). The highest AMN and TMA production by LAB strains were observed for white shark IDB. The all tested bacteria had decarboxylation activity in fish IDB. The uppermost accumulated amines by LAB strains were tyramine (TYM), dopamine, serotonin and spermidine. The maximum histamine production was observed in sardine (101.69 mg/L) and mackerel (100.84 mg/L) IDB by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris and Pediococcus acidophilus, respectively. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis and Pediococcus acidophilus had a high TYM producing capability (2943 mg/L and 1157 mg/L) in sardine IDB. PMID:24294229

  11. The antimicrobial effects of selenium nanoparticle-enriched probiotics and their fermented broth against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lactic acid bacteria are considered important probiotics for prevention of some infections. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of selenium dioxide on the antifungal activity of Lactobacillus plantarum and L. johnsonii against Candida albicans. Methods Lactobacillus plantarum and L. johnsonii cells, grown in the presence and absence of selenium dioxide, and their cell-free spent culture media were tested for antifungal activity against C. albicans ATCC 14053 by a hole-plate diffusion method and a time-kill assay. Results Both L. plantarum and L. johnsonii reduced selenium dioxide to cell-associated elemental selenium nanoparticles. The cell-free spent culture media, from both Lactobacillus species that had been grown with selenium dioxide for 48 h, showed enhanced antifungal activity against C. albicans. Enhanced antifungal activity of cell biomass against C. albicans was also observed in cultures grown with selenium dioxide. Conclusions Selenium dioxide-treated Lactobacillus spp. or their cell-free spent broth inhibited the growth of C. albicans and should be investigated for possible use in anti-Candida probiotic formulations in future. PMID:24906455

  12. Morphological engineering of Streptomyces hygroscopicus var. geldanus: regulation of pellet morphology through manipulation of broth viscosity.

    PubMed

    O'Cleirigh, C; Casey, J T; Walsh, P K; O'Shea, D G

    2005-08-01

    Actinomycetes, especially members of the genus Streptomyces, are responsible for producing the majority of known antibiotics. The production of antibiotics by filamentous organisms is often dependent on the morphology and size distribution of the pellet population within the culture. Particle interaction and subsequent pellet formation are primarily dependent on the rate of collision of particles in culture, which is in turn, a function of fluid turbulence. The microbial polysaccharide xanthan gum was used to artificially regulate the apparent viscosity (mu(a)) of S. hygroscopicus fermentation broths with the aim of controlling particle interaction, aggregation and hence pellet formation. An increase in both pellet count and biomass concentration from approximately 2,000 to 8,000 pellets ml(-1) and 0.9-2.1 g l(-1) dry weight of biomass, as well a decrease in the mean pellet volume from 0.014 to 0.004 mm(3) was observed in cultures supplemented with 3 g l(-1) xanthan gum. The addition of xanthan gum significantly alters fluid rheology by increasing the mu(a). Counter-intuitively, an increase in the mu(a) within the experimental range examined resulted in an increase in the rate of gas-liquid mass transfer. This was attributed to the predominantly diffusive nature of oxygen transfer in shake flask cultures.

  13. Dried bonito broth improves cognitive function via the histaminergic system in mice.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Yoshizu; Mimura, Masako; Yamada, Keiko; Sugita, Mayu; Shibakusa, Tetsuro; Koyama, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Bonito extract, i.e., dried bonito broth (DBB), has been reported to counteract mental fatigue and to increase performance in a simple calculation task, but the mechanism by which DBB increases task performance is not known. The brain neurotransmitter histamine is biosynthesized only from histidine in the tuberomammillary nucleus. Histamine neurons are projected to almost all areas of the cerebral cortex, and histamine has various behavioral and neurobiological functions, particularly in recognition memory. Here we used a mouse model to investigate the effects of the oral ingestion of DBB, which contains abundant histidine, as well as the ingestion of histidine on cognitive function. In a retention trial of novel object recognition test, the administration of 1.6 g/kg of DBB and 500 mg/kg of histidine significantly increased the animals' exploratory behavior toward a novel object, and that these agents significantly increased the spontaneous alternation behavior ratio in a Y-maze under conditions of scopolamine-induced amnesia, which induced learning and memory impairment. These results suggested the improvement of spatial short-term working memory in a scopolamine amnesia model, as well as the strengthening of visual cognitive function by a single ingestion of DBB and histidine. Interestingly, the administration of αFMH, which is an inhibitor of histamine biosynthesis, eliminated the increase in the spontaneous alternation behavior ratio by DBB ingestion in the scopolamine-induced amnesia model, suggesting that DBB may improve working memory impairment via activation of the histaminergic neuron system. PMID:25355438

  14. Development of a selective broth medium for the detection of injured Campylobacter jejuni by capacitance monitoring.

    PubMed

    Line, J Eric; Pearson, Kirsten G

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of these studies was to develop a conductimetric method for the rapid detection of Campylobacter jejuni. Numerous basal medium components were analyzed to develop a growth-enhancing broth medium for detection of freeze-injured Campylobacter cells using a conductimetric system. The final medium was composed of a modified Campy-Line agar from which the agar and triphenyltetrazolium chloride were removed and the amino acid, L-arginine was added. Pure isolates of C. jejuni. (frozen and thawed to produce stressed cells) were utilized to test the detection methodology. Monitoring of significant changes in the capacitance signal was found suitable for detection of Campylobacter proliferation. Using stressed pure cultures, Campylobacter growth was repeatedly detected at very low inoculum levels (about one cell per well). There was a direct linear relationship between detection times (DTs) and the initial inoculum level. For example, using a single strain, the mean DT (n = 20) at the 10 CFU/ml inoculum level was 28.6 h, with 100% of the inoculated wells detecting. The mean DTs at the 100, 1,000, and 10,000 CFU/ml inoculum levels were 24.9, 21.4, and 17.0 h, respectively. This study demonstrates that conductimetric methods can be utilized for the rapid detection of C. jejuni.

  15. Purification of monoclonal antibodies from whole hybridoma fermentation broth by fluidized bed adsorption.

    PubMed

    Thömmes, J; Halfar, M; Lenz, S; Kula, M R

    1995-02-01

    To achive the coarse purification of a monoclonal antibody from whole hybridoma fermentation broth a fluidized bed cation exchange process was used. The procedure consisted of application of the crude sample and washing of the bed in a fluidized mode and elution in a fixed bed mode. A completely clarified eluate was obtained with purification factors between 4 and 8 and a concentration of the desired product (monoclonal antibody) by a factor of more than 3 was achived. Thus, a combination of the three early steps of the downstream process clarification, concentration and coarse purification was possible. Two different materials were tested: a commercially available agarose-based matrix (Stream-line-SP), and a self-derivatized material based on controlled-pore glass (Bioran). Initial experiments were performed to describe the fluidization of the glass material. Comparison with the agarose material showed several differences, the agarose matrix allowing liquid flow closer to plug flow than the glass material. Increased backmixing in the liquid phase was detected when fluidizing the glass adsorbent compared with the agarose-based matrix. Despite this fact, comparison of the two materials with respect to antibody binding and elution demonstrated a similar performance. (c) 1995 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. The in vitro susceptibility of Scedosporium prolificans to ajoene, allitridium and a raw extract of garlic (Allium sativum).

    PubMed

    Davis, Stephen R; Perrie, Rosemary; Apitz-Castro, Rafael

    2003-03-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of 20 medical isolates of Scedosporium prolificans to ajoene, allitridium and raw garlic extract derived from cloves of garlic (Allium sativum) was tested using the NCCLS reference method (with minor modifications) for broth microdilution. The results demonstrate that both garlic derivatives and raw garlic extract appear to have in vitro activity against S. prolificans.

  17. Brain heart infusion broth may not be a required component for the decontamination process for the isolation of Mycobacterium avium subspecies Paratuberculosis from fecal samples using ESP broth cultures.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Sreekumari; Berghaus, Roy D; Johnson, Jill; Pence, Mel; Byrum, Beverly; Farrell, Troy; Baldwin, Charles

    2007-11-01

    Based on the authors' laboratory experience indicating that increased bacterial contamination in Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) cultures may be because of the addition of brain heart infusion broth (BHI) during the decontamination process, this study was designed to examine whether BHI is a required component for the isolation of MAP from ESP(R) broth cultures. Twenty-six National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) proficiency test samples supplied for the year 2005 were used for the comparison. Two paired sets of samples were processed in the experiment. In one set, the hexadecylpyridinium chloride monohydrate (HPC) and antibiotic brew were prepared in half strength BHI and for the other set, HPC and antibiotic brew were prepared in sterile distilled water. Culture of the 26 samples using the BHI/HPC decontamination method identified 13 (50%) positives, whereas culture using the water/HPC decontamination method identified 14 (54%) positives. The proportions of samples with a positive result did not differ significantly between the 2 decontamination methods. Although in most cases it took longer to identify a positive result by the BHI method, the difference between methods with respect to the number of days to a positive culture result was not statistically significant. Retrospective data collected from the Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory, Ohio also suggest that inclusion of BHI in the decontamination protocol may not have any effect on MAP recovery or contamination rate. Elimination of BHI from broth cultures may increase the sensitivity of MAP isolation, and reduce the cost of testing.

  18. Determination of Ideal Broth Formulations Needed to Prepare Hydrous Cerium Oxide Microspheres via the Internal Gelation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Jack Lee; Chi, Anthony

    2009-02-01

    A simple test tube methodology was used to determine optimum process parameters for preparing hydrous cerium oxide microspheres via the internal gelation process.1 Broth formulations of cerium ammonium nitrate [(NH4)2Ce(NO3)6], hexamethylenetetramine, and urea were found that can be used to prepare hydrous cerium oxide gel spheres in the temperature range of 60 to 90 C. A few gel-forming runs were made in which microspheres were prepared with some of these formulations to be able to equate the test-tube gelation times to actual gelation times. These preparations confirmed that the test-tube methodology is reliable for determining the ideal broth formulations.

  19. Biodegradation of 1,2,3,4-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in liquid broth by brown-rot fungi.

    PubMed

    Perlatti, Bruno; da Silva, Maria Fátima das Graças Fernandes; Fernandes, João Batista; Forim, Moacir Rossi

    2013-11-01

    Dioxins are a class of extremely hazardous molecules that might pose a threat to the environment. This work evaluated the microbial degradation of 1,2,3,4-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (1,2,3,4-TCDD), in liquid broth using three brown-rot fungi and one white-rot fungi as control. A fast and reliable extraction method with recoveries of over 98% together with a validated GC-MS method was developed, and applied to quantify 1,2,3,4-TCDD in liquid broth, mycelia and reaction flask, with detection limits of 10 ppb. Among the four strains tested, brown-rot fungus Aspergillus aculeatus showed best results, removing up to 21% of dioxin after 30-day incubation. The results open both a path for biotechnological interest in bioremediation purposes and environmental behavior studies by using brown-rot fungus.

  20. Submerged-Culture Mycelia and Broth of the Maitake Medicinal Mushroom Grifola frondosa (Higher Basidiomycetes) Alleviate Type 2 Diabetes-Induced Alterations in Immunocytic Function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Hui; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Hsu, Tai-Hao; Lo, Hui-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (T2DM), a disease with impaired glucose, protein and lipid metabolism, low-grade chronic inflammation, and immune dysfunction, is a global public health crisis. We previously demonstrated that Grifola frondosa has bioactivities in improving glycemic responses in diabetic rats. Herein, we investigated the immunomodulatory effects of the submerged-culture mycelia and broth of G. frondosa on the peripheral blood cells (PBL) and splenocytes. Male Wistar rats were administered with saline (normal rats) or streptozotocin plus nicotinamide (T2DM rats) and were intragastrically administered with placebo, fermented mycelia, broth, or mycelia plus broth (1 g kg-1 day-1) for two weeks. In normal rats, ingestion of mycelia significantly decreased monocytes and ingestion of mycelia and broth significantly decreased the productions of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 from the PBL and splenocytes. In T2DM rats, ingestion of mycelia, broth, and mycelia plus broth significantly alleviated the increases in 2 h postprandial blood glucose and the productions of IFN-γ from the T-leukocytes, IL-4, and IL-6 from the monocytes and IL-4 from the T-splenocytes, as well as significantly improved the productions of tumor-necrosis factor-α from the macrophages. In conclusion, submerged-culture mycelia and broth of G. frondosa may decrease cell-medicated immunity in normal rats and improve hyperglycemia and diabetes-induced alterations in cell-medicated and innate immunities in T2DM rats.

  1. Inhibition of verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli in model broth and rumen systems by carvacrol and thymol.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Lucia; McDonnell, Mary J; Burgess, Catherine M; O'Brien, Martin; Navarro-Villa, Alberto; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2010-04-30

    The antimicrobial activities of thymol and carvacrol were assessed against a selection of verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) strains (n=11) and other bacterial species and spoilage bacteria (n=7) using a model broth system. The effects of pH, temperature, water activity, sodium chloride concentrations, inoculum size and the presence of competing microflora on the activities of thymol and carvacrol against E. coli O157:H7 strain 380-94 were also determined. The minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations (MIC and MBC, respectively) and numbers of surviving E. coli O157:H7 were determined following incubation. The mean numbers of VTEC surviving exposure to thymol or carvacrol at concentrations of >/=500mug/ml were between 2.0 and 7.8log cfu/ml less than the numbers in the corresponding controls. The susceptibility of E. coli O157:H7 to carvacrol or thymol was found to increase with decreasing storage temperature, water activity, pH and E. coli O157:H7 inoculum size. Sodium chloride (0.5-2.5%) and the presence of a microflora cocktail did not significantly (p>0.05) affect the antimicrobial activities of thymol or carvacrol against E. coli O157:H7. The antimicrobial activity of carvacrol against E. coli O157:H7 was also tested in a model rumen system. A MIC of 500mug/ml carvacrol reduced E. coli O157:H7 inoculated at levels of 10(3) and 10(6)cfu/ml to undetectable levels in the system after 24h incubation. This concentration of carvacrol significantly (p<0.05) decreased the total gas production and volatile fatty acid concentrations in the model rumen assay.

  2. Detonation nanodiamonds for rapid detection of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in broth culture media.

    PubMed

    Soo, Po-Chi; Kung, Ching-Jen; Horng, Yu-Tze; Chang, Kai-Chih; Lee, Jen-Jyh; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2012-09-18

    Routinely used molecular diagnostic methods for mycobacterium identification are expensive and time-consuming. To tackle this problem, we develop a method to streamline identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in broth culture media by using detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs) as a platform to effectively capture the antigen secreted by MTBC which is cultured in BACTEC MGIT 960, followed by the analysis of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The 5 nm DNDs can capture the MTBC secretory antigen without albumin interference. With on diamond digestion, we confirm the DND captured antigen is cell filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10) because its Mascot analysis shows a score of 68. The dot blotting method further verifies a positive reaction with anti-CFP-10, indicating that CFP-10 is secreted in the medium of mycobacterium growth indicator tube (MGIT) and captured by DNDs. The minimal CFP-10 protein detection limit was 0.09 μg/mL. Furthermore, our approach can avoid the false-positive identification of MTBC by immunological methods due to cross-reactivity. Five hundred consecutive clinical specimens subjected to routine mycobacteria identification in hospital were used in this study, and the sensitivity of our method is 100% and the specificity is 98%. The analysis of each MTBC sample from culture solution can be finished within 1 h and thus shortens the turnaround time of MTBC identification of gold standard culture methods. In sum, DND MALDI-TOF MS for the detection of MTBC is rapid, specific, safe, reliable, and inexpensive. PMID:22905748

  3. [Lysine production by Brevibacterium divaricatum NTU-2 and its recovery from the fermentation broth].

    PubMed

    Su, Y C; Hwang, S M; Huang, J H

    1990-08-01

    An accumulation of L-lysine of about 42 g/l (as L-lysine-HCl) was obtained by cultivating Brevibacterium divaricatum NTU-2 in a medium containing 10.0% glucose, 4.0% (NH4)2 SO4, 0.1% KH2 PO4, 0.04% Mg SO4.7H2 O, 30 ml/l soybean meal hydrolysate, 50 mg/l DL-methionine, 100 micrograms/l d-biotin, 100 micrograms/l thiamine-HCl and 5% CaCO3 at pH 7.0. The yield was about 48.8% based on consumed glucose. The L-lysine accumulated in the broth was recovered and purified by simply using a strong cation-exchange resin, Diaion SK1B. The absorbed L-lysine was eluted with 4% ammonia water, and the average adsorption and desorption rates estimated (by 10 repeated experiments) were found to be 96.1% and 97.5%, respectively. The eluate was concentrated to about 50% by volume and adjusted to pH 4.0 with 8 N HCl. The solution was concentrated again to one half volume and followed by adding three volumes of 95% ethanol. The crude crystals of L-lysine-HCl in purity of 89.5% were obtained by filtration. The recovery was 93.5%. The resulting crude crystals were then dissolved in water, and subjected to decolorization with 0.5% active carbon. The decolorized solution thus obtained was recrystalized by concentration and 95% ethanol addition. After filtration and drying at 80 degrees C for 3 hr, white crystalline L-lysine with purity of 99.2% was finally obtained. The overall recovery of L-lysine was up to 86.7%. PMID:2128693

  4. Extraction of natural red colorants from the fermented broth of Penicillium purpurogenum using aqueous two-phase polymer systems.

    PubMed

    Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria Carvalho; Lopes, André Moreni; Pessoa, Adalberto; Teixeira, Maria Francisca Simas

    2015-01-01

    Safety concerns related to the increasing and widespread application of synthetic coloring agents have increased the demand for natural colorants. Fungi have been employed in the production of novel and safer colorants. In order to obtain the colorants from fermented broth, suitable extraction systems must be developed. Aqueous two-phase polymer systems (ATPPS) offer a favorable chemical environment and provide a promising alternative for extracting and solubilizing these molecules. The aim of this study was to investigate the partitioning of red colorants from the fermented broth of Penicillium purpurogenum using an ATPPS composed of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and sodium polyacrylate (NaPA). Red colorants partitioned preferentially to the top (PEG-rich phase). In systems composed of PEG 6,000 g/mol/NaPA 8,000 g/mol, optimum colorant partition coefficient (KC ) was obtained in the presence of NaCl 0.1 M (KC  = 10.30) while the PEG 10,000 g/mol/NaPA 8,000 g/mol system in the presence of Na2 SO4 0.5 M showed the highest KC (14.78). For both polymers, the mass balance (%MB) and yield in the PEG phase (%ηTOP ) were close to 100 and 79%, respectively. The protein selectivity in all conditions evaluated ranged from 2.0-3.0, which shows a suitable separation of the red colorants and proteins present in the fermented broth. The results suggest that the partitioning of the red colorants is dependent on both the PEG molecular size and salt type. Furthermore, the results obtained support the potential application of ATPPS as the first step of a purification process to recover colorants from fermented broth of microorganisms.

  5. Isolation of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli from Ground Beef Using Multiple Combinations of Enrichment Broths and Selective Agars.

    PubMed

    Brusa, Victoria; Piñeyro, Pablo E; Galli, Lucía; Linares, Luciano H; Ortega, Emanuel E; Padola, Nora L; Leotta, Gerardo A

    2016-03-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are foodborne pathogens, and beef cattle are recognized as the principal reservoir. The aims of this study were (1) to identify the most sensitive combination of selective enrichment broths and agars for STEC isolation in artificially inoculated ground beef samples, and (2) to evaluate the most efficient combination(s) of methods for naturally contaminated ground beef samples. A total of 192 ground beef samples were artificially inoculated with STEC and non-stx bacterial strains. A combination of four enrichment broths and three agars were evaluated for sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value for STEC isolation from experimentally inoculated samples. Enrichments with either modified tryptic soy broth (mTSB) containing 8 mg/L novobiocin (mTSB-8) or modified Escherichia coli (mEC) broth followed by isolation in MacConkey agar were the most sensitive combinations for STEC isolation of artificially inoculated samples. Independently, both enrichments media followed by isolation in MacConkey were used to evaluate ground beef samples from 43 retail stores, yielding 65.1% and 58.1% stx-positive samples by RT-PCR, respectively. No difference was observed in the isolate proportions between these two methods (8/25 [32%] and 8/28 [28.6%]). Identical serotypes and stx genotypes were observed in STEC strains isolated from the same samples by either method. In this study, no single enrichment protocol was sufficient to detect all STEC in artificially inoculated samples and had considerable variation in detection ability with naturally contaminated samples. Moreover, none of the single or combinations of multiple isolation agars used were capable of identifying all STEC serogroups in either artificially inoculated or naturally occurring STEC-contaminated ground beef. Therefore, it may be prudent to conclude that there is no single method or combination of isolation methods capable of identifying all STEC serogroups

  6. [Simultaneous determination of meso-erythritol and L-erythrulose in fermentation broth using high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Ge, Chiyu; Zhang, Junli; Chen, Jianhua

    2012-08-01

    A high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of meso-erythritol and L-erythrulose in fermentation broth. The chromatographic conditions were as follows: Lichrospher 5-NH2 column (250 mm x 4.6 mm) with the temperature of 30 degrees C, acetonitrile-water (90: 10, v/v) as mobile phase with the flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. meso-Erythritol was detected by refractive index (RI) detector at 35 degrees C and L-erythrulose was detected by ultraviolet (UV) detector at 277 nm at room temperature. The linear range for meso-erythritol was 1.00 - 100.00 g/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 5. The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) for meso-erythritol were 0.10 g/L and 0.45 g/L, respectively. The linear range for L-erythrulose was 1.00 - 100.00 g/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.995 8. The LOD and LOQ for L-erythrulose were 0.50 g/L and 0.87 g/L, respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of intraday and interday for meso-erythritol were less than 3.28% and 5.30%, respectively. The intraday and interday RSDs for L-erythrulose were less than 2.16% and 2.25%, respectively. The recoveries of meso-erythritol and L-erythrulose in fermentation broth were greater than 99%. The samples from fermentation broth were detected at different time points. The measurement by the novel HPLC method was not affected by the other components in the fermentation broth. Furthermore, the HPLC method can be used for the determination of the substrate meso-erythritol and the product L-erythrulose simultaneously.

  7. Extraction of natural red colorants from the fermented broth of Penicillium purpurogenum using aqueous two-phase polymer systems.

    PubMed

    Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria Carvalho; Lopes, André Moreni; Pessoa, Adalberto; Teixeira, Maria Francisca Simas

    2015-01-01

    Safety concerns related to the increasing and widespread application of synthetic coloring agents have increased the demand for natural colorants. Fungi have been employed in the production of novel and safer colorants. In order to obtain the colorants from fermented broth, suitable extraction systems must be developed. Aqueous two-phase polymer systems (ATPPS) offer a favorable chemical environment and provide a promising alternative for extracting and solubilizing these molecules. The aim of this study was to investigate the partitioning of red colorants from the fermented broth of Penicillium purpurogenum using an ATPPS composed of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and sodium polyacrylate (NaPA). Red colorants partitioned preferentially to the top (PEG-rich phase). In systems composed of PEG 6,000 g/mol/NaPA 8,000 g/mol, optimum colorant partition coefficient (KC ) was obtained in the presence of NaCl 0.1 M (KC  = 10.30) while the PEG 10,000 g/mol/NaPA 8,000 g/mol system in the presence of Na2 SO4 0.5 M showed the highest KC (14.78). For both polymers, the mass balance (%MB) and yield in the PEG phase (%ηTOP ) were close to 100 and 79%, respectively. The protein selectivity in all conditions evaluated ranged from 2.0-3.0, which shows a suitable separation of the red colorants and proteins present in the fermented broth. The results suggest that the partitioning of the red colorants is dependent on both the PEG molecular size and salt type. Furthermore, the results obtained support the potential application of ATPPS as the first step of a purification process to recover colorants from fermented broth of microorganisms. PMID:26097197

  8. A selective broth enrichment combined with real-time nuc-mecA-PCR in the exclusion of MRSA.

    PubMed

    Pasanen, Tanja; Korkeila, Maija; Mero, Sointu; Tarkka, Eveliina; Piiparinen, Heli; Vuopio-Varkila, Jaana; Vaara, Martti; Tissari, Päivi

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the performance of a selective enrichment broth combined with Taqman-based real-time duplex nuc-mecA-PCR to expedite the screening of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We found the broth to be able to select MRSA strains (oxacillin MIC range 4-256 microg/ml) from MSSA strains. A total of 31 MRSA strains were found from 1250 clinical samples screened. The nuc-mecA-PCR was positive from all enrichment broths containing MRSA. From the remaining 1219 samples negative for MRSA on culture/subculture, 138 samples were nuc+/mecA+ in PCR. The sensitivity of the test was 93.5%, specificity 88.6%, positive predictive value 17.3%, and negative predictive value 99.8% as compared to culture. Thus, with this method, the negative MRSA results can be reliably reported within 24-48 h from sampling. The method is a practical additional alternative to those already described for the same purpose.

  9. Multicenter evaluation of a broth macrodilution antifungal susceptibility test for yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Fromtling, R A; Galgiani, J N; Pfaller, M A; Espinel-Ingroff, A; Bartizal, K F; Bartlett, M S; Body, B A; Frey, C; Hall, G; Roberts, G D

    1993-01-01

    Thirteen laboratories collaborated to optimize interlaboratory agreement of results of a broth macrodilution procedure for testing three classes of antifungal drugs against pathogenic yeasts. The activities of amphotericin B, flucytosine, and ketoconazole were tested against 100 coded isolates of Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Candida lusitaniae, Torulopsis (Candida) glabrata, and Cryptococcus neoformans. Two starting yeast inoculum sizes (5 x 10(4) and 2.5 x 10(3) cells per ml) were compared, and readings were taken after 24 and 48 h of incubation. All other test conditions were standardized. The resultant turbidities in all tubes were estimated visually on a scale from 0 to 4+ turbidity, and MIC-0, MIC-1, and MIC-2 were defined as the lowest drug concentrations that reduced growth to 0, 1+, or 2+ turbidity, respectively. For flucytosine, agreement among laboratories varied between 57 and 87% for different inocula, times of incubation, and end point criteria. Agreement was maximized (85%) when the lower inoculum was incubated for 2 days and the MICs were defined as 1+ turbidity or less. For amphotericin B, variations in test conditions produced much smaller differences in interlaboratory agreement. For ketoconazole, interlaboratory agreement was poorer by all end point criteria. However, MIC-2 endpoints distinguished T. glabrata as resistant compared with the other species. Overall, the studies indicated that readings from the lower inoculum obtained on the second day of reading result in the greatest interlaboratory agreement. In combination with data from previous multicenter studies (National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, Antifungal Susceptibility Testing: Committee Report, Vol. 5, No. 17, 1988; M. A. Pfaller, L. Burmeister, M. S. Bartlett, and M. G. Rinaldi, J. Clin. Microbiol. 26:1437-1441, 1988; M. A. Pfaller, M. G. Rinaldi, J. N. Galgiani, M. S. Bartlett, B.A. Body, A. Espinel-Ingroff, R.A. Fromtling, G.S. Hall, C

  10. Identification of Gram-Negative Bacteria and Genetic Resistance Determinants from Positive Blood Culture Broths by Use of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Multiplex Microarray-Based Molecular Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ledeboer, Nathan A.; Lopansri, Bert K.; Dhiman, Neelam; Cavagnolo, Robert; Carroll, Karen C.; Granato, Paul; Thomson, Richard; Butler-Wu, Susan M.; Berger, Heather; Samuel, Linoj; Pancholi, Preeti; Swyers, Lettie; Hansen, Glen T.; Tran, Nam K.; Polage, Christopher R.; Thomson, Kenneth S.; Hanson, Nancy D.; Winegar, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Bloodstream infection is a serious condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The outcome of these infections can be positively affected by the early implementation of effective antibiotic therapy based on the identification of the infecting organism and genetic markers associated with antibiotic resistance. In this study, we evaluated the microarray-based Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay in the identification of 8 genus or species targets and 6 genetic resistance determinants in positive blood culture broths. A total of 1,847 blood cultures containing Gram-negative organisms were tested using the BC-GN assay. This comprised 729 prospective fresh, 781 prospective or retrospective frozen, and 337 simulated cultures representing 7 types of aerobic culture media. The results were compared to those with standard bacterial culture and biochemical identification with nucleic acid sequence confirmation of the resistance determinants. Among monomicrobial cultures, the positive percent agreement (PPA) of the BC-GN assay with the reference method was as follows; Escherichia coli, 100%; Klebsiella pneumoniae, 92.9%; Klebsiella oxytoca, 95.5%; Enterobacter spp., 99.3%; Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 98.9%; Proteus spp., 100%; Acinetobacter spp., 98.4%; and Citrobacter spp., 100%. All organism identification targets demonstrated >99.5% negative percent agreement (NPA) with the reference method. Of note, 25/26 cultures containing K. pneumoniae that were reported as not detected by the BC-GN assay were subsequently identified as Klebsiella variicola. The PPA for identification of resistance determinants was as follows; blaCTX-M, 98.9%; blaKPC, 100%; blaNDM, 96.2%; blaOXA, 94.3%; blaVIM, 100%; and blaIMP, 100%. All resistance determinant targets demonstrated >99.9% NPA. Among polymicrobial specimens, the BC-GN assay correctly identified at least one organism in 95.4% of the broths and correctly identified all organisms present in 54.5% of the broths

  11. Identification of Gram-Negative Bacteria and Genetic Resistance Determinants from Positive Blood Culture Broths by Use of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Multiplex Microarray-Based Molecular Assay.

    PubMed

    Ledeboer, Nathan A; Lopansri, Bert K; Dhiman, Neelam; Cavagnolo, Robert; Carroll, Karen C; Granato, Paul; Thomson, Richard; Butler-Wu, Susan M; Berger, Heather; Samuel, Linoj; Pancholi, Preeti; Swyers, Lettie; Hansen, Glen T; Tran, Nam K; Polage, Christopher R; Thomson, Kenneth S; Hanson, Nancy D; Winegar, Richard; Buchan, Blake W

    2015-08-01

    Bloodstream infection is a serious condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The outcome of these infections can be positively affected by the early implementation of effective antibiotic therapy based on the identification of the infecting organism and genetic markers associated with antibiotic resistance. In this study, we evaluated the microarray-based Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay in the identification of 8 genus or species targets and 6 genetic resistance determinants in positive blood culture broths. A total of 1,847 blood cultures containing Gram-negative organisms were tested using the BC-GN assay. This comprised 729 prospective fresh, 781 prospective or retrospective frozen, and 337 simulated cultures representing 7 types of aerobic culture media. The results were compared to those with standard bacterial culture and biochemical identification with nucleic acid sequence confirmation of the resistance determinants. Among monomicrobial cultures, the positive percent agreement (PPA) of the BC-GN assay with the reference method was as follows; Escherichia coli, 100%; Klebsiella pneumoniae, 92.9%; Klebsiella oxytoca, 95.5%; Enterobacter spp., 99.3%; Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 98.9%; Proteus spp., 100%; Acinetobacter spp., 98.4%; and Citrobacter spp., 100%. All organism identification targets demonstrated >99.5% negative percent agreement (NPA) with the reference method. Of note, 25/26 cultures containing K. pneumoniae that were reported as not detected by the BC-GN assay were subsequently identified as Klebsiella variicola. The PPA for identification of resistance determinants was as follows; blaCTX-M, 98.9%; blaKPC, 100%; blaNDM, 96.2%; blaOXA, 94.3%; blaVIM, 100%; and blaIMP, 100%. All resistance determinant targets demonstrated >99.9% NPA. Among polymicrobial specimens, the BC-GN assay correctly identified at least one organism in 95.4% of the broths and correctly identified all organisms present in 54.5% of the broths

  12. Identification of Gram-Negative Bacteria and Genetic Resistance Determinants from Positive Blood Culture Broths by Use of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Multiplex Microarray-Based Molecular Assay.

    PubMed

    Ledeboer, Nathan A; Lopansri, Bert K; Dhiman, Neelam; Cavagnolo, Robert; Carroll, Karen C; Granato, Paul; Thomson, Richard; Butler-Wu, Susan M; Berger, Heather; Samuel, Linoj; Pancholi, Preeti; Swyers, Lettie; Hansen, Glen T; Tran, Nam K; Polage, Christopher R; Thomson, Kenneth S; Hanson, Nancy D; Winegar, Richard; Buchan, Blake W

    2015-08-01

    Bloodstream infection is a serious condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The outcome of these infections can be positively affected by the early implementation of effective antibiotic therapy based on the identification of the infecting organism and genetic markers associated with antibiotic resistance. In this study, we evaluated the microarray-based Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay in the identification of 8 genus or species targets and 6 genetic resistance determinants in positive blood culture broths. A total of 1,847 blood cultures containing Gram-negative organisms were tested using the BC-GN assay. This comprised 729 prospective fresh, 781 prospective or retrospective frozen, and 337 simulated cultures representing 7 types of aerobic culture media. The results were compared to those with standard bacterial culture and biochemical identification with nucleic acid sequence confirmation of the resistance determinants. Among monomicrobial cultures, the positive percent agreement (PPA) of the BC-GN assay with the reference method was as follows; Escherichia coli, 100%; Klebsiella pneumoniae, 92.9%; Klebsiella oxytoca, 95.5%; Enterobacter spp., 99.3%; Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 98.9%; Proteus spp., 100%; Acinetobacter spp., 98.4%; and Citrobacter spp., 100%. All organism identification targets demonstrated >99.5% negative percent agreement (NPA) with the reference method. Of note, 25/26 cultures containing K. pneumoniae that were reported as not detected by the BC-GN assay were subsequently identified as Klebsiella variicola. The PPA for identification of resistance determinants was as follows; blaCTX-M, 98.9%; blaKPC, 100%; blaNDM, 96.2%; blaOXA, 94.3%; blaVIM, 100%; and blaIMP, 100%. All resistance determinant targets demonstrated >99.9% NPA. Among polymicrobial specimens, the BC-GN assay correctly identified at least one organism in 95.4% of the broths and correctly identified all organisms present in 54.5% of the broths

  13. Rapid, sensitive, and validated method for detection of Salmonella in food by an enrichment broth culture - nested PCR combination assay.

    PubMed

    Saroj, Sunil D; Shashidhar, R; Karani, Manisha; Bandekar, Jayant R

    2008-06-01

    A rapid nested PCR assay for detection of Salmonella from food was developed. The sensitivity of the assay developed was comparable to the traditional culture based methods with an advantage in reduction of assay time. The assay procedure with artificially contaminated samples was able to detect as low as 4CFU Salmonella/25g of food samples (sprout, carrot, cucumber and poultry meat). With two synthetic primers of 26 mer TS11 and 25 mer TS4, a 1.2kb fragment was amplified which served as a template for amplification of final 375bp product using TS11 and TS5 primers. No non-specific amplification from the native microbial flora of food samples was observed. The reaction generates a single band specific to Salmonella which allows the analyst to interpret data at ease and without any confusion. Enriched broth serves as template for the reaction which removes labour intensive DNA isolation procedures. In case of artificially contaminated samples, 6h enriched lactose broth can serve as template. However, for market samples where the organisms are under environmental stress, it is desirable to use template from Rappaport Vasiliadis medium. The assay also employes internal amplification control, which is amplified into a 300bp fragment and thus serves as positive control for the reaction and any possibility of false negative due to inhibitory action of food components on PCR reaction can be ruled out. PMID:18406104

  14. Multi-probe real-time PCR identification of four common Candida species in blood culture broth.

    PubMed

    Foongladda, Suporn; Mongkol, Nanthanida; Petlum, Pornphan; Chayakulkeeree, Methee

    2014-06-01

    We developed a single-tube real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay with multiple hybridization probes for detecting Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, C. glabrata, and C. parapsilosis. Primers were designed to amplify 18S rRNA gene of the genus Candida, and DNA probes were designed to hybridize two areas of the amplicons. The amplification curves and specific melting peaks of the probes hybridized with PCR product were used for definite species identifications. The reaction specificity was 100 % when evaluating the assay using DNA samples from 21 isolates of fungal and bacterial species. The assay was further evaluated in 129 fungal blood culture broth samples which were culture positive for fungus. Of the 129 samples, 119 were positively identified as: C. albicans (39), C. tropicalis (30), C. parapsilosis (23), C. glabrata (20), Candida spp. (5), and two samples containing mixed C. glabrata/C. albicans and C. glabrata/C. tropicalis. The five Candida spp. were identified by sequencing analysis as C. krusei, C. dubliniensis, C. aquaetextoris, and two isolates of C. athensensis. Of the ten samples which showed negative PCR results, six were Cryptococcus neoformans, and the others were Trichosporon sp., Rhodotorula sp., Fusarium sp., and Penicillium marneffei. Our findings show that the assay was highly effective in identifying the four medically important Candida species. The results can be available within 3 h after positivity of a blood culture broth sample.

  15. Use of Two Selective Media and a Broth Motility Test Can Aid in Identification or Exclusion of Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Vicki A.; Peak, K. Kealy; Veguilla, William O.; Reeves, Frank; Heberlein-Larson, Lea; Cannons, Andrew C.; Amuso, Phil; Cattani, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    During the anthrax attack of 2001, the Florida Department of Health (FDOH) Bureau of Laboratories in Tampa received hundreds of isolates suspected of being Bacillus anthracis. None were confirmed to be B. anthracis since most isolates were motile and not even in the Bacillus cereus group. Although the sentinel laboratories now send fewer isolates to FDOH laboratories, should another attack occur the number of isolates submitted would likely increase dramatically, and this upsurge would seriously challenge personnel who are expected to be busy examining an increased number of environmental samples. We examined two selective and differential growth media and alternative motility methods that could be used to streamline the processing of suspicious isolates. Of 60 isolates previously sent to the FDOH laboratory, 56 were endospore-forming gram-positive rods and only 7 grew on mannitol-egg yolk-polymyxin B agar and/or the Anthracis chromogenic agar. Microscopic observation of early-log-phase growth (2 to 3 h) in a shaking broth was the best method to detect motility in 40 isolates that appeared nonmotile in the motility media investigated. One of these growth media and microscopic examination of shaken broth cultures can be used to show that an isolate is not B. anthracis before expensive molecular and antibody-based tests are performed. By doing so, costs could be reduced and analysis time shortened. PMID:16145074

  16. [Determination of sugars, organic acids and alcohols in microbial consortium fermentation broth from cellulose using high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Fan, Guifang; Du, Ran; Li, Peipei; Jiang, Li

    2015-08-01

    A high performance liquid chromatographic method was established for the determination of metabolites (sugars, organic acids and alcohols) in microbial consortium fermentation broth from cellulose. Sulfate was first added in the samples to precipitate calcium ions in microbial consortium culture medium and lower the pH of the solution to avoid the dissociation of organic acids, then the filtrates were effectively separated using high performance liquid chromatography. Cellobiose, glucose, ethanol, butanol, glycerol, acetic acid and butyric acid were quantitatively analyzed. The detection limits were in the range of 0.10-2.00 mg/L. The linear correlation coefficients were greater than 0.999 6 in the range of 0.020 to 1.000 g/L. The recoveries were in the range of 85.41%-115.60% with the relative standard deviations of 0.22% -4.62% (n = 6). This method is accurate for the quantitative analysis of the alcohols, organic acids and saccharides in microbial consortium fermentation broth from cellulose.

  17. Inactivation of Escherichia coli in broth and sausage by combined high pressure and Lactobacillus casei cell extract.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyun-Jung; Yousef, Ahmed E

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of combined high pressure and Lactobacillus casei cell extract (CE) on Escherichia coli O157 strains with variation in pressure resistance in broth and sausage. Pressure-resistant (O157:H7 and O157:H12) and -sensitive (O157-M1 and O157-M2) E. coli strains were used. Pressure treatment at 350 MPa for 20 min in broth caused 1.1-1.2 logs reduction in O157:H12 and O157:H7 and 4.1-5.5 logs reduction in the O157-M1 and O157-M2. When high pressure was treated in the presence of CE (32 CEAU/mL), the combination treatment caused a significant inactivation in the pressure-resistant O157:H7 strains resulting in the viability loss of 4.3-4.6 logs and the synergistic effect increased with increase in treatment time (p < 0.05). Similar result was observed in sausage. Differential scanning calorimetry thermogram showed that the presence of Lb. casei CE may cause considerable damage to cellular components of E. coli during the high pressure treatment. The synergy between high pressure processing and Lb. casei OSY-LB6A CE against pressure-resistant E. coli O157 strains suggests the feasibility of using this combination to minimize the risk of transmission of E. coli O157 by food.

  18. Two new cyclopeptides from the co-culture broth of two marine mangrove fungi and their antifungal activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Song; Ding, Weijia; Li, Chunyuan; Cox, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The strategy that co-cultivation two microorganisms in a single confined environment were recently developed to generate new active natural products. In the study, two new cyclic tetrapeptides, cyclo (D-Pro-L-Tyr-L-Pro-L-Tyr) (1) and cyclo (Gly-L-Phe-L-Pro-L-Tyr) (2) were isolated from the co-culture broth of two mangrove fungi Phomopsis sp. K38 and Alternaria sp. E33. Their antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Gaeumannomyces graminis, Rhzioctonia cerealis, Helminthosporium sativum and Fusarium graminearum was evaluated. Materials and Methods: Different column chromatographic techniques with different solvent systems were used to separate the constituents of the n-butyl alcohol extract of the culture broth. The structures of compounds 1 and 2 were identified by analysis of spectroscopic data (one-dimensional, two-dimensional - nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry) and Marfey's analytic method. Dilution method was used for the evaluation of antifungal activity. Results: Compounds 1 and 2 were identified as cyclo (D-Pro-L-Tyr-L-Pro-L-Tyr) and cyclo (Gly-L-Phe-L-Pro-L-Tyr), respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 showed moderate to high antifungal activities as compared with the positive control. Conclusions: Compounds 1 and 2 are new cyclopeptides with moderate antifungal activity being worthy of consideration for the development and research of antifungal agents. PMID:25422539

  19. Functional magnetic mesoporous nanoparticles for efficient purification of laccase from fermentation broth in magnetically stabilized fluidized bed.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Guo, Chen; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2013-12-01

    A magnetically stabilized fluidized bed (MSFB) with the Cu(2+)-chelated magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MMSNPs-Cu(2+)) was established to purify laccase directly from the fermentation broth of Trametes versicolor. The MMSNPs-Cu(2+) particles in the MSFB maintained a stable bed expansion of two to threefold at a flow rate of 120-180 cm/h. At the optimal magnetic field intensity of 120 Gs, both the maximal Bodenstein number and the smallest axial dispersion coefficient were achieved, which resulted in a stable fluidization stage. The dynamic binding capacity of laccase in the MSFB decreased from 192.5 to144.3 mg/g when the flow velocity through the bed increased from 44.2 to 69.8 cm/h. The MSFB with MMSNPs-Cu(2+) achieved efficient laccase purification from the fermentation broth with 62.4-fold purification of laccase and 108.9 % activity yield. These results provided an excellent platform for the application of these magnetic mesoporous nanoparticles integrated with the MSFB in developing novel protein purification process.

  20. Effect of Sex on Flavor-related and Functional Compounds in Freeze-dried Broth Made from Korean Native Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Jayasena, Dinesh D.; Jung, Samooel; Alahakoon, Amali U.; Nam, Ki Chang

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the flavour characteristics of meat-based broth, quantification of flavour-related and functional compounds, and factors affecting the availability of such compounds are minimal. The present study was designed to determine the effects of sex on flavor-related and functional compounds in freeze-dried broth (FDB) made from Korean native chickens (KNC). Male and female KNC from a commercial strain (WoorimatdagTM) were reared under similar commercial conditions. FDB was separately prepared using male and female birds aged 100 d (six birds of each sex) and analyzed for nucleotide, free amino acid, betaine, carnitine, carnosine, anserine, and creatine contents, and fatty acid composition. The levels of betaine, carnitine and creatine in FDB were not significantly different between the two sexes (p>0.05) in KNC. Carnosine and anserine were not detected in FDB samples. However, FDB from female chickens had significantly higher inosine-5-monophosphate and arachidonic acid contents than did FDB from male chickens. FDB prepared with male KNC contained higher levels of inosine, linoleic acid, glycine, alanine, lysine, and serine (p<0.05). However, glutamic acid, oleic acid, and DHA were present in comparable amounts (p>0.05) in FDB made from male and female KNC. Our findings suggest that the sex of KNC has significant effect on the contents of flavor-related compounds, but not functional compounds. PMID:26761282

  1. Reference Frames and Relativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Clifford

    1989-01-01

    Stresses the importance of a reference frame in mechanics. Shows the Galilean transformation in terms of relativity theory. Discusses accelerated reference frames and noninertial reference frames. Provides examples of reference frames with diagrams. (YP)

  2. SEL, a Selective Enrichment Broth for Simultaneous Growth of Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyochin; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2008-01-01

    Multipathogen detection on a single-assay platform not only reduces the cost for testing but also provides data on the presence of pathogens in a single experiment. To achieve this detection, a multipathogen selective enrichment medium is essential to allow the concurrent growth of pathogens. SEL broth was formulated to allow the simultaneous growth of Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes. The results were compared to those obtained with the respective individual selective enrichment broths, Rappaport-Vassiliadis (RV) for S. enterica, modified E. coli broth with 20 mg of novobiocin/liter for E. coli O157:H7, and Fraser broth for L. monocytogenes, and a currently used universal preenrichment broth (UPB). The growth of each pathogen in SEL inoculated at 101 or 103 CFU/ml was superior to that in the respective individual enrichment broth, except in the case of RV, in which Salmonella cells inoculated at both concentrations grew equally well. In mixed-culture experiments with cells of the three species present in equal concentrations or at a 1:10:1,000 ratio, the overall growth was proportional to the initial inoculation levels; however, the growth of L. monocytogenes was markedly suppressed when cells of this species were present at lower concentrations than those of the other two species. Further, SEL was able to resuscitate acid- and cold-stressed cells, and recovery was comparable to that in nonselective tryptic soy broth containing 6% yeast extract but superior to that in the respective individual selective broths. SEL promoted the growth of all three pathogens in a mixture in ready-to-eat salami and in turkey meat samples. Moreover, each pathogen was readily detected by a pathogen-specific immunochromatographic lateral-flow or multiplex PCR assay. Even though the growth of each pathogen in SEL was comparable to that in UPB, SEL inhibited greater numbers of nontarget organisms than did UPB. In summary, SEL was demonstrated to

  3. Assessment of tolerance induction by Origanum vulgare L. essential oil or carvacrol in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultivated in a meat-based broth and in a meat model.

    PubMed

    da Silva Luz, Isabelle; Gomes-Neto, Nelson Justino; Magnani, Marciane; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2015-12-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of Origanum vulgare L. essential oil (OVEO) and carvacrol in inhibiting the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027, as well as the development of direct tolerance and cross-tolerance when this bacterium was challenged with sublethal amounts of these substances in a meat-based broth and in a meat model. OVEO and carvacrol at their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), 1/2 MIC and 1/4 MIC decreased the viable cell counts of P. aeruginosa in meat-based broth. Direct tolerance or cross-tolerance was not induced after exposure of the assayed bacterial strain to sublethal amounts of OVEO or carvacrol in meat-based broth and in an artificially contaminated ground beef. Bacterial cells progressively subcultured in meat-based broth with increasing amounts of the tested substances survived up to the MIC of OVEO and to 1/2 MIC of carvacrol. The results reveal a lack of induction of tolerance in P. aeruginosa by exposure to OVEO or carvacrol in meat-based broth and in a meat model.

  4. Detection of salmonellae in chicken feces by a combination of tetrathionate broth enrichment, capillary PCR, and capillary gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Carli, K T; Unal, C B; Caner, V; Eyigor, A

    2001-05-01

    This report describes a rapid detection procedure for salmonellae from chicken feces by the combination of tetrathionate primary enrichment (preenrichment [PE])-bacterial lysis-capillary PCR and capillary gel electrophoresis. Pure Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis 64K was reisolated and detected by capillary PCR after buffered peptone water and nutrient broth, tetrathionate broth base Hajna (TTBH), and tetrathionate broth (TTB) preenrichments. When the same culture was mixed with intestinal homogenate, bacteriological reisolation and capillary PCR detection was achieved only by TTBH and TTB preenrichments. Capillary gel electrophoresis revealed that a Salmonella genus-specific 281-bp PCR product was detected when Salmonella strains but not non-Salmonella strains were tested. The detection limit of capillary PCR with whole-cell DNA extracted from pure Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis 64K, Typhimurium LT2-CIP60-62, and Gallinarum 64K was 3, 3, and 9 CFU ml(-1), respectively. The detection limit of capillary PCR from whole-cell DNA extracted from intestinal homogenate artificially contaminated with the same three strains was 3, 3, and 7 CFU ml(-1), respectively. We compared the results of the capillary PCR and bacteriological examination from the natural samples. Thirty-five of 53 naturally contaminated samples produced a specific PCR product. In 9 of the 35 PCR-positive samples, Salmonella could not be detected bacteriologically either by PE or a primary and delayed secondary enrichment (DSE) combination. In the 18 PCR-negative samples, 4 samples were found to harbor Salmonella by both PE and DSE and 14 samples were positive after DSE. Fifty-three additional intestinal homogenate samples, which were negative by their PE and DSE in bacteriological examination, were found to be also negative by their PCRs. The total time required to detect Salmonella with the capillary PCR method we used was approximately 20 h. If samples are from clinically diseased

  5. Ultrasonic disruption of fungal mycelia for efficient recovery of polysaccharide-protein complexes from viscous fermentation broth of a medicinal fungus.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Yi-Ching; Liu, Xing-Xun; Wang, Wing-Qiang; Wu, Jian-Yong

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity ultrasound (US) was applied to facilitate the extraction of intracellular and extracellular polysaccharide-protein complexes (PSPs) from the viscous mycelial fermentation broth of a medicinal fungus Cordyceps sinensis Cs-HK1. The US treatment caused the disruption of fungal mycelia, a dramatic reduction of the apparent broth viscosity, and the release of intracellular products into the liquid medium. The degree of mycelium disruption and the rate of intracellular product release were dependent on US power intensity, treatment period and biomass concentration of broth. The extraction or release kinetics of total water-soluble products and PSPs (yield Y versus time t) under the effect of US was fitted closely to the Elovich model Y=Yo+Y1 lnt and parabolic model Y=Yo+Y1t(½), respectively. Another interesting effect of the US treatment was a notable increase in the antioxidant cytoprotective activity of PSP against H2O2 induced cell death.

  6. [The immunomodulating properties of the filtrates of Klebsiella culture broth and the nature of the immunomodulating factor].

    PubMed

    Borisova, E V; Polishchuk, E I; Sel'nikova, O P; Mishina, L N; Borisov, V A

    1996-01-01

    Influence of broth culture filtrates (BCF) of Klebsiella on delayed type hypersensitivity (DTN) in mice has been studied. BCF of plasmid-containing virulent strains and non-plasmid avirulent strains have been found to suppress DTH to xenogenic splenocytes. Gel filtration data have shown that immunosuppressive factor possesses molecular weight about 180-800 kDa. BCF treated with etanol-ether mixture got to soluble fraction that evidenced for its lipid nature. This factor can be inactivated or reactivated by the treatment with trichloracetic acid, phenol and other chemicals. A new factor is found in reactivated BCF. It induces the ability of E. coli O55 to suppress DTH in mice and looks like Shigella factor. It is supposed that Klebsiella immunosuppressive factors are connected with lipopolysaccharide.

  7. Effects of LB broth, naphthalene concentration, and acetone on the naphthalene degradation activities by Pseudomonas putida G7.

    PubMed

    Chang, Su-Yun; Liu, Xue-Gong; Ren, Bi-Qiong; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Honggui; Wan, Yao

    2015-01-01

    Luria-Bertani broth and acetone were usually used in naphthalene degradation experiments as nutrient and solvent. However, their effect on the degradation was seldom mentioned. In this work, we investigated the effect of LB, naphthalene concentration, and acetone on the degradation of naphthalene by Pseudomonas putida G7, which is useful for the degradation of naphthalene on future field remediation. By adding LB, the naphthalene degradation efficiencies and naphthalene dioxygenase were both decreased by 98%, while the catechol dioxygenase was decreased by 90%. Degradation of naphthalene was also inhibited when naphthalene concentration was 56 ppm and higher, which was accompanied with the accumulation of orange-colored metabolism products. However, acetone can stimulate the degradation of naphthalene, and the stimulation was more obvious when naphthalene concentration was lower than 2000 ppm. By assaying the enzyme activities of naphthalene dioxygenase and catechol dioxygenase, it was thought that the degradation efficiency was depending on the more sensitive enzymes on the complicated conditions.

  8. Purification of nattokinase by reverse micelles extraction from fermentation broth: effect of temperature and phase volume ratio.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Guo; Xing, Jian-Min; Chang, Tian-Shi; Liu, Hui-Zhou

    2006-03-01

    Nattokinase is a novel fibrinolytic enzyme that is considered to be a promising agent for thrombosis therapy. In this study, reverse micelles extraction was applied to purify and concentrate nattokinase from fermentation broth. The effects of temperature and phase volume ratio used for the forward and backward extraction on the extraction process were examined. The optimal temperature for forward and backward extraction were 25 degrees C and 35 degrees C respectively. Nattokinase became more thermosensitive during reverse micelles extraction. And it could be enriched in the stripping phase eight times during backward extraction. It was found that nattokinase could be purified by AOT reverse micelles with up to 80% activity recovery and with a purification factor of 3.9.

  9. Survival and recovery of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 at low temperature and water activity in a broth system.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, Kathleen J; Rowe, Tara A; Blair, Ian S; McDowell, David A; Sheridan, James J

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the survival of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in a broth system under conditions of low temperature (4 degrees C) and low water activity (aw, 0.92 to 0.96). Incubation under these conditions resulted in significant reductions in the viability of stationary phase cells, determined by direct plating on selective XLD medium. Reductions in viable numbers were related to injury associated with initial osmotic shock (hyperosmosis) and further injury associated with longer-term storage under the above conditions. Such injured cells were, however, capable of recovering on a nonselective medium (TSA) and contributing to overall viable cell numbers in nonselective post-storage conditions. Storage at more extreme conditions, at lower aw values, led to cell death at rates influenced by storage temperature. Finally, the data obtained are considered in relation to pathogen survival on the surfaces of beef carcasses during chilling. PMID:17199519

  10. Impact of changes in broth composition on Chlorella vulgaris cultivation in a membrane photobioreactor (MPBR) with permeate recycle.

    PubMed

    Discart, V; Bilad, M R; Marbelia, L; Vankelecom, I F J

    2014-01-01

    A membrane photobioreactor (MPBR) is a proven and very useful concept in which microalgae can be simultaneously cultivated and pre-harvested. However, the behavior with respect to accumulation of algogenic organic matter, including transparent exopolymeric particles (TEPs), counter ions and unassimilated nutrients due to the recycling of the medium is still unclear, even though the understanding of this behavior is essential for the optimization of microalgae processing. Therefore, the dynamics of these compounds, especially TEPs, during coupled cultivation and harvesting of Chlorella vulgaris in an MPBR with permeate recycle are addressed in this study. Results show that TEPs are secreted during algae cell growth, and that their presence is thus inevitable. In the system with permeate recycle, substances such as counter ions and unassimilated nutrients get accumulated in the system. This was proven to limit the algae growth, together with the occurrence of bioflocculation due to an increasing broth pH.

  11. Fabivirga thermotolerans gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel marine bacterium isolated from culture broth of a marine cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Tang, M; Chen, C; Li, J; Xiang, W; Wu, H; Wu, J; Dai, S; Wu, H; Li, T; Wang, G

    2016-02-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, red, non-spore-forming, strictly aerobic bacterium, designated strain A4T, was isolated from culture broth of a marine cyanobacterium. Cells were flexible rods with gliding motility. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, revealed that strain A4T formed a coherent cluster with members of the genera Roseivirga and Fabibacter, and represents a distinct lineage in the family Flammeovirgaceae. Thermotolerance and a distinctive cellular fatty acid profile could readily distinguish this isolate from any bacteria of the genera Roseivirga and Fabibacter with a validly published name. On the basis of the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic characteristics, strain A4T is suggested to represent a novel species in a novel genus, for which the name Fabivirga thermotolerans gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is A4T ( = KCTC 42507T = CGMCC 1.15111T).

  12. Reference Service Policy Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, William F.

    This reference service policy manual provides general guidelines to encourage reference service of the highest possible quality and to insure uniform practice. The policy refers only to reference service in the University Libraries and is intended for use in conjunction with other policies and procedures issued by the Reference Services Division.…

  13. A simple one pot purification of bacterial amylase from fermented broth based on affinity toward starch-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Paul, Tanima; Chatterjee, Saptarshi; Bandyopadhyay, Arghya; Chattopadhyay, Dwiptirtha; Basu, Semanti; Sarkar, Keka

    2015-08-18

    Surface-functionalized adsorbant particles in combination with magnetic separation techniques have received considerable attention in recent years. Selective manipulation on such magnetic nanoparticles permits separation with high affinity in the presence of other suspended solids. Amylase is used extensively in food and allied industries. Purification of amylase from bacterial sources is a matter of concern because most of the industrial need for amylase is met by microbial sources. Here we report a simple, cost-effective, one-pot purification technique for bacterial amylase directly from fermented broth of Bacillus megaterium utilizing starch-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION). SPION was prepared by co-precipitation method and then functionalized by starch coating. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID, zeta potential, and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The starch-coated nanoparticles efficiently purified amylase from bacterial fermented broth with 93.22% recovery and 12.57-fold purification. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) revealed that the molecular mass of the purified amylase was 67 kD, and native gel showed the retention of amylase activity even after purification. Optimum pH and temperature of the purified amylase were 7 and 50°C, respectively, and it was stable over a range of 20°C to 50°C. Hence, an improved one-pot bacterial amylase purification method was developed using starch-coated SPION.

  14. Reach for Reference. Four Recent Reference Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safford, Barbara Ripp

    2004-01-01

    This article provides descriptions of four new science and technology encyclopedias that are appropriate for inclusion in upper elementary and/or middle school reference collections. "The Macmillan Encyclopedia of Weather" (Stern, Macmillan Reference/Gale), a one-volume encyclopedia for upper elementary and middle level students, is a…

  15. Evaluation of Optimal Storage Temperature, Time, and Transport Medium for Detection of Group B Streptococcus in StrepB Carrot Broth

    PubMed Central

    Trotman-Grant, Ashton; Raney, Trisha

    2012-01-01

    The performances of the ESwab and Amies transport media were evaluated for optimal survival of group B streptococcus (GBS) in StrepB carrot broth. ESwab was superior to Amies at all temperatures evaluated but was optimal at 21°C and 24°C, whereas recovery in Amies was significantly decreased at these temperatures. PMID:22518853

  16. Growth Kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes in Broth and Beef Frankfurters– Determination of Lag Phase Duration and Exponential Growth Rate under Isothermal Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to develop a new kinetic model to describe the isothermal growth of microorganisms. The new model was tested with Listeria monocytogenes in broth and frankfurters, and compared with two commonly used models - Baranyi and modified Gompertz models. Bias factor (BF)...

  17. Swab transport in Amies gel followed by frozen storage in skim milk tryptone glucose glycerol broth (STGGB) for studies of respiratory bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hare, Kim M; Stubbs, Elizabeth; Beissbarth, Jemima; Morris, Peter Stanley; Leach, Amanda J

    2010-06-01

    Nasopharyngeal carriage studies are needed to monitor changes in important bacterial pathogens in response to vaccination and antibiotics. Commercial swab transport followed by transfer to skim milk tryptone glucose glycerol broth for frozen storage is an option for studies of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis.

  18. Fundamentals of Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulac, Carolyn M.

    2012-01-01

    The all-in-one "Reference reference" you've been waiting for, this invaluable book offers a concise introduction to reference sources and services for a variety of readers, from library staff members who are asked to work in the reference department to managers and others who wish to familiarize themselves with this important area of…

  19. American Indian Reference Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1976

    Designed to aid librarians, school teachers, and others in need of American Indian references and reference sources, this compilation covers a wide variety of material which has generally been scattered throughout various individual references. Specifically, this reference book includes: (1) Location of Tribes by State; (2) Locations of Tribes by…

  20. Personal Reference in English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Gregory L.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a systematic investigation of the factors underlying the choice of personal reference. Five experiments examine how native-English-speaking undergraduates of Brown University refer to a professor or student in various situations. The Rule of Polite Reference (RPR) explains how speakers choose the way they will refer to a person in a given…

  1. Statistical Reference Datasets

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    Statistical Reference Datasets (Web, free access)   The Statistical Reference Datasets is also supported by the Standard Reference Data Program. The purpose of this project is to improve the accuracy of statistical software by providing reference datasets with certified computational results that enable the objective evaluation of statistical software.

  2. Live, Digital Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Discusses digital reference services, also known as virtual reference, chat reference, or online reference, based on a round table discussion at the 2002 American Library Association annual conference in Atlanta. Topics include numbers and marketing; sustainability; competition and models; evaluation methods; outsourcing; staffing and training;…

  3. Broth and agar hop-gradient plates used to evaluate the beer-spoilage potential of Lactobacillus and Pediococcus isolates.

    PubMed

    Haakensen, M; Schubert, A; Ziola, B

    2009-03-15

    Identification of the beer-spoilage Lactobacillus and Pediococcus bacteria has largely taken two approaches; identification of spoilage-associated genes or identification of specific species of bacteria regardless of ability to grow in beer. The problem with these two approaches is that they are either overly inclusive (i.e., detect all bacteria of a given species regardless of spoilage potential) or overly selective (i.e., rely upon individual, putative spoilage-associated genes). Our goal was to design a method to assess the ability of Lactobacillus and Pediococcus to spoil beer that is independent of speciation or genetic background. In searching for a method by which to differentiate between beer-spoilage bacteria and bacteria that cannot grow in beer, we explored the ability of lactobacilli and pediococci isolates to grow in the presence of varying concentrations of hop-compounds and ethanol in broth medium versus on agar medium. The best method for differentiating between bacteria that can grow in beer and bacteria that do not pose a threat as beer-spoilage organisms was found to be a hop-gradient agar plate containing ethanol. This hop-gradient agar plate technique provides a rapid and simple solution to the dilemma of assessing the ability of Lactobacillus and Pediococcus isolates to grow in beer, and provides new insights into the different strategies used by these bacteria to survive under the stringent conditions of beer.

  4. Comparison of the membrane subproteomes during growth of a new pseudomonas strain on lysogeny broth medium, glucose, and phenol.

    PubMed

    Papasotiriou, Dimitrios G; Markoutsa, Stavroula; Meyer, Bjoern; Papadioti, Anastasia; Karas, Michael; Tsiotis, Georgios

    2008-10-01

    Study of the bacterial membrane proteome is a field of growing interest in the research of nutrient transport and processing. Pseudomonas sp. strain phDV1, a Gram-negative bacterium selected for its ability to degrade aromatic compounds, was monitored under different growth substrate conditions, using lysogeny broth medium (LB), glucose, and phenol as sole carbon source. The aim of this study was to characterize the membrane subproteomes of the Pseudomonas strain by proteomic means to assess the protein composition of this subcellular compartments, which appears fundamental for the biodegradation of aromatic compounds. A total number of 129 different proteins have been identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF, 19 of which are membrane proteins that belong to the inner membrane and 10 that belong to the outer membrane. Two membrane proteins were only expressed in the presence of the aromatic substrate. We identified a membrane protein involved in aromatic hydrocarbon degradation as well as a probable porin which may, in fact, function as an aromatic compound-specific porin. Although the presence of different transporters have been reported for different aromatic compounds such as toluene and benzoic acid, to our knowledge, these are the first phenol-inducible membrane transporters identified.

  5. Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus from food contact surfaces in a meat-based broth and sensitivity to sanitizers.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Evandro Leite; Meira, Quênia Gramile Silva; de Medeiros Barbosa, Isabella; Athayde, Ana Júlia Alves Aguiar; da Conceição, Maria Lúcia; de Siqueira Júnior, José Pinto

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the capacity of adhesion, the detachment kinetic and the biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus isolated from food services on stainless steel and polypropylene surfaces (2 × 2 cm) when cultivated in a meat-based broth at 28 and 7 °C. It was also to study the efficacy of the sanitizers sodium hypochlorite (250 mg/L) and peracetic acid (30 mg/L) in inactivating the bacterial cells in the preformed biofilm. S. aureus strains adhered in high numbers regardless the assayed surface kind and incubation temperature over 72 h. Cells detachment of surfaces revealed high persistence over the incubation period. Number of cells needed for biofilm formation was noted at all experimental systems already after 3 days. Peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite were not efficient in completely removing the cells of S. aureus adhered on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces. From these results, the assayed strains revealed high capacity to adhere and form biofilm on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces under different growth conditions. Moreover, the cells in biofilm matrix were resistant for total removal when submitted to the exposure to sanitizers. PMID:24948915

  6. A laccase with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity from the broth of mycelial culture of the mushroom Lentinus tigrinus.

    PubMed

    Xu, LiJing; Wang, HeXiang; Ng, TziBun

    2012-01-01

    A 59 kDa laccase with inhibitory activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (IC(50) = 2.4 μM) was isolated from the broth of mycelial culture of the mushroom Lentinus tigrinus. The isolation procedure involved ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and CM-cellulose, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The laccase was adsorbed on both types of ion exchangers. About 95-fold purification was achieved with a 25.9% yield of the enzyme. The procedure resulted in a specific enzyme activity of 76.6 U/mg. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was GIPDLHDLTV, which showed little similarity to other mushroom laccase and other Lentinus tigrinus strain laccase. Its characteristics were different from previously reported laccase of other Lentinus tigrinus strain. Maximal laccase activity was observed at a pH of 4 and at a temperature of 60°C, respectively. This study yielded the information about the potentially exploitable activities of Lentinus tigrinus laccase. PMID:22536022

  7. A Laccase with HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activity from the Broth of Mycelial Culture of the Mushroom Lentinus tigrinus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, LiJing; Wang, HeXiang; Ng, TziBun

    2012-01-01

    A 59 kDa laccase with inhibitory activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (IC50 = 2.4 μM) was isolated from the broth of mycelial culture of the mushroom Lentinus tigrinus. The isolation procedure involved ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and CM-cellulose, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The laccase was adsorbed on both types of ion exchangers. About 95-fold purification was achieved with a 25.9% yield of the enzyme. The procedure resulted in a specific enzyme activity of 76.6 U/mg. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was GIPDLHDLTV, which showed little similarity to other mushroom laccase and other Lentinus tigrinus strain laccase. Its characteristics were different from previously reported laccase of other Lentinus tigrinus strain. Maximal laccase activity was observed at a pH of 4 and at a temperature of 60°C, respectively. This study yielded the information about the potentially exploitable activities of Lentinus tigrinus laccase. PMID:22536022

  8. Pyruvatibacter mobilis gen. nov., sp. nov., a marine bacterium from the culture broth of Picochlorum sp. 122.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanghua; Tang, Mingxing; Wu, Hualian; Dai, Shikun; Li, Tao; Chen, Chenghao; He, Hui; Fan, Jiewei; Xiang, Wenzhou; Li, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic bacterium, designated strain GYP-11T, was isolated from the culture broth of a marine microalga, Picochloruma sp. 122. Cells were dimorphic rods; free living cells were motile by means of a single polar flagellum, and star-shaped-aggregate-forming cells were attached with stalks and non-motile. Sodium pyruvate or Tween 20 was required for growth on marine agar 2216.16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that this isolate shared 94.07 % similarity with its closest type strain, Parvibaculum hydrocarboniclasticum EPR92T. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that strain GYP-11T represents a distinct lineage in a robust clade consisting of strain GYP-11T, alphaproteobacterium GMD21A06 and Candidatus Phaeomarinobacter ectocarpi Ec32. This clade was close to the genera Parvibaculum and Tepidicaulis in the order Rhizobiales. Chemotaxonomic and physiological characteristics, including cellular fatty acids and carbon source profiles, also readily distinguished strain GYP-11T from all established genera and species. Thus, it is concluded that strain GYP-11T represents a novel species of a new genus in the order Rhizobiales, for which the name Pyruvatibacter mobilis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Pyruvatibacter mobilis is GYP-11T ( = CGMCC 1.15125T = KCTC 42509T).

  9. Best Reference Sources 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coutts, Brian; McConnell, Tamara

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated list of the best reference materials published in 2001. Discusses activity in the reference publishing industry; costs; and lists print materials, Web sites, databases, and CD-ROMs. (LRW)

  10. Genetics Home Reference

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Genetics Home Reference Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of ... of this page please turn Javascript on. The Genetics Home Reference (GHR) Web site — ghr.nlm.nih. ...

  11. Academic Library Reference Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batt, Fred

    This examination of the philosophy and objectives of academic library reference services provides an overview of the major reference approaches to fulfilling the following primary objectives of reference services: (1) providing accurate answers to patrons' questions and/or helping patrons find sources to pursue their research needs; (2) building…

  12. Chemical Analysis of a "Miller-Type" Complex Prebiotic Broth: Part I: Chemical Diversity, Oxygen and Nitrogen Based Polymers.

    PubMed

    Wollrab, Eva; Scherer, Sabrina; Aubriet, Frédéric; Carré, Vincent; Carlomagno, Teresa; Codutti, Luca; Ott, Albrecht

    2016-06-01

    In a famous experiment Stanley Miller showed that a large number of organic substances can emerge from sparking a mixture of methane, ammonia and hydrogen in the presence of water (Miller, Science 117:528-529, 1953). Among these substances Miller identified different amino acids, and he concluded that prebiotic events may well have produced many of Life's molecular building blocks. There have been many variants of the original experiment since, including different gas mixtures (Miller, J Am Chem Soc 77:2351-2361, 1955; Oró Nature 197:862-867, 1963; Schlesinger and Miller, J Mol Evol 19:376-382, 1983; Miyakawa et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci 99:14,628-14,631, 2002). Recently some of Miller's remaining original samples were analyzed with modern equipment (Johnson et al. Science 322:404-404, 2008; Parker et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci 108:5526-5531, 2011) and a total of 23 racemic amino acids were identified. To give an overview of the chemical variety of a possible prebiotic broth, here we analyze a "Miller type" experiment using state of the art mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. We identify substances of a wide range of saturation, which can be hydrophilic, hydrophobic or amphiphilic in nature. Often the molecules contain heteroatoms, with amines and amides being prominent classes of molecule. In some samples we detect ethylene glycol based polymers. Their formation in water requires the presence of a catalyst. Contrary to expectations, we cannot identify any preferred reaction product. The capacity to spontaneously produce this extremely high degree of molecular variety in a very simple experiment is a remarkable feature of organic chemistry and possibly prerequisite for Life to emerge. It remains a future task to uncover how dedicated, organized chemical reaction pathways may have arisen from this degree of complexity.

  13. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of selected Iranian essential oils against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli in nutrient broth medium.

    PubMed

    Mohsenzadeh, Mohammad

    2007-10-15

    The antibacterial effect of different concentrations (0.01 to 15%) of thyme (Thymus vulgaris), peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) caraway seed (Carum carvi), fennel (Foeniculum vulgar), tarragon (Artmesia dracunculus) and pennyroyal (Mentha pullegium) essential oils on the Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli was studied in nutrient broth medium. The MIC values of peppermint, fennel, thyme, pennyroyal and caraway essential oils against Escherichia coli were 0.5 +/- 0.03, 1 +/- 0.03, 0.3 +/- 0.01, 0.7 +/- 0.03 and 0.6 +/- 0.02% and in contrast, for Staphylococcus aureus were 0.4 +/- 0.01, 2 +/- 0.13, 0.1 +/- 0.01, 0.5 +/- 0.02 and 0.5 +/- 0.02%, respectively. The MBC values of peppermint, fennel, thyme, pennyroyal and caraway essential oils for Escherichia coli were 0.7 +/- 0.02, 2 +/- 0.05, 0.5 +/- 0.02, 1 +/- 0.02 and 0.8 +/- 0.02 and for Staphylococcus aureus were 0.5 +/- 0.02, 4 +/- 0.26, 0.3 +/- 0.02, 0.7 +/- 0.02 and 0.6 +/- 0.01, respectively. Statistical evaluation of the results indicated that the essential oils of thyme (Thymus vulgaris) showed the broadest spectrum of action (p < 0.05). Essential oils of peppermint (Mentha piperita), caraway seed (Carum carvi), pennyroyal (Menthae pullegium) and fennel (Foeniculum vulgar) had moderate effect against tested microorganisms and in contrast, tarragon essential oil were less effective against tested microorganisms. In conclusion, essential oils of edible plants could be a potential source for inhibitory substances for some foodborne pathogens. Natural substances that extracted from plants have applications in controlling pathogens in foods.

  14. Chemical Analysis of a "Miller-Type" Complex Prebiotic Broth. Part I: Chemical Diversity, Oxygen and Nitrogen Based Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollrab, Eva; Scherer, Sabrina; Aubriet, Frédéric; Carré, Vincent; Carlomagno, Teresa; Codutti, Luca; Ott, Albrecht

    2016-06-01

    In a famous experiment Stanley Miller showed that a large number of organic substances can emerge from sparking a mixture of methane, ammonia and hydrogen in the presence of water (Miller, Science 117:528-529, 1953). Among these substances Miller identified different amino acids, and he concluded that prebiotic events may well have produced many of Life's molecular building blocks. There have been many variants of the original experiment since, including different gas mixtures (Miller, J Am Chem Soc 77:2351-2361, 1955; Oró Nature 197:862-867, 1963; Schlesinger and Miller, J Mol Evol 19:376-382, 1983; Miyakawa et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci 99:14,628-14,631, 2002). Recently some of Miller's remaining original samples were analyzed with modern equipment (Johnson et al. Science 322:404-404, 2008; Parker et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci 108:5526-5531, 2011) and a total of 23 racemic amino acids were identified. To give an overview of the chemical variety of a possible prebiotic broth, here we analyze a "Miller type" experiment using state of the art mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. We identify substances of a wide range of saturation, which can be hydrophilic, hydrophobic or amphiphilic in nature. Often the molecules contain heteroatoms, with amines and amides being prominent classes of molecule. In some samples we detect ethylene glycol based polymers. Their formation in water requires the presence of a catalyst. Contrary to expectations, we cannot identify any preferred reaction product. The capacity to spontaneously produce this extremely high degree of molecular variety in a very simple experiment is a remarkable feature of organic chemistry and possibly prerequisite for Life to emerge. It remains a future task to uncover how dedicated, organized chemical reaction pathways may have arisen from this degree of complexity.

  15. Augmentation of antibiotic activity by low-frequency electric and electromagnetic fields examining Staphylococcus aureus in broth media.

    PubMed

    Matl, F D; Obermeier, A; Zlotnyk, J; Friess, W; Stemberger, A; Burgkart, R

    2011-07-01

    Systemic treatment of biomaterial-associated bacterial infections with high doses of antibiotics is an established therapeutic concept. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the influence of magnetic, electromagnetic, and electric fields on gentamicin-based, antibiotic therapy. It has been previously reported that these fields are successful in the treatment of bone healing and reducing osteitis in infected tibia-pseudarthroses. Four separate experimental setups were used to expose bacterial cultures of Staphylococcus aureus both in Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB) and on Mueller-Hinton agar (MHA), in the presence of gentamicin, to (1) a low-frequency magnetic field (MF) 20 Hz, 5 mT; (2) a low-frequency MF combined with an additional alternating electric field (MF + EF) 20 Hz, 5 mT, 470 mV/cm; (3) a sinusoidal alternating electric field (EF AC) 20 Hz, 470 mV/cm; and (4) a direct current electric field (EF DC) 588 mV/cm. No significant difference between samples and controls was detected on MHA. However, in MHB each of the four fields applied showed a significant growth reduction of planktonically grown Staphylococcus aureus in the presence of gentamicin between 32% and 91% within 24 h of the experiment. The best results were obtained by a direct current EF, decreasing colony-forming units (CFU)/ml more than 91%. The application of electromagnetic fields in the area of implant and bone infections could offer new perspectives in antibiotic treatment and antimicrobial chemotherapy. PMID:21437921

  16. A new diimide derivative from the co-culture broth of two mangrove fungi (strain no. E33 and K38).

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Yuan; Ding, Wei-Jia; Shao, Chang-Lun; She, Zhi-Gang; Lin, Yong-Cheng

    2010-09-01

    A new diimide derivative, named (-)-byssochlamic acid bisdiimide (1), was isolated from the mixed broth of two mangrove fungi (strain no. K38 and E33) from the South China sea coast. The structure of 1 was determined by comprehensive spectroscopic methods, including 1D and 2D NMR (COSY, HMQC, and HMBC) and semi-synthesis. Primary bioassays showed that 1 had weak cytotoxic activity against Hep-2 and HepG2 cells.

  17. Pea Broth Enhances the Biocontrol Efficacy of Lysobacter capsici AZ78 by Triggering Cell Motility Associated with Biogenesis of Type IV Pilus.

    PubMed

    Tomada, Selena; Puopolo, Gerardo; Perazzolli, Michele; Musetti, Rita; Loi, Nazia; Pertot, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cells can display different types of motility, due to the presence of external appendages such as flagella and type IV pili. To date, little information on the mechanisms involved in the motility of the Lysobacter species has been available. Recently, L. capsici AZ78, a biocontrol agent of phytopathogenic oomycetes, showed the ability to move on jellified pea broth. Pea broth medium improved also the biocontrol activity of L. capsici AZ78 against Plasmopara viticola under greenhouse conditions. Noteworthy, the quantity of pea residues remaining on grapevine leaves fostered cell motility in L. capsici AZ78. Based on these results, this unusual motility related to the composition of the growth medium was investigated in bacterial strains belonging to several Lysobacter species. The six L. capsici strains tested developed dendrite-like colonies when grown on jellified pea broth, while the development of dendrite-like colonies was not recorded in the media commonly used in motility assays. To determine the presence of genes responsible for biogenesis of the flagellum and type IV pili, the genome of L. capsici AZ78 was mined. Genes encoding structural components and regulatory factors of type IV pili were upregulated in L. capsici AZ78 cells grown on the above-mentioned medium, as compared with the other tested media. These results provide new insight into the motility mechanism of L. capsici members and the role of type IV pili and pea compounds on the epiphytic fitness and biocontrol features of L. capsici AZ78. PMID:27507963

  18. One-step isolation of adenosine triphosphate from crude fermentation broth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by anion-exchange chromatography using supermacroporous cryogel.

    PubMed

    Yun, Junxian; Shen, Shaochuan; Chen, Fang; Yao, Kejian

    2007-12-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an important high-energy compound widely used in biological and therapeutic fields. It can be produced by phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) with microbial cells in industrial scale and the effective isolation of ATP from microbial fermentation broth is a challenging work. In this work, we develop a novel one-step method to directly separate ATP from fermentation broth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by anion-exchange chromatography using supermacroporous cryogel. The cryogel bed with tertiary amine groups was prepared by grafting N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) monomer chains onto the matrix of a polyacrylamide-based cryogel in a glass column and its properties of liquid dispersion, water permeability, porosity as well as the ligand density were measured. Chromatographic separation of ATP from the fermentation broth by the cryogel was carried out using deionised water and 0.01 M HCl as running buffer, respectively. The breakthrough characteristics and elution performance in the cryogel bed were revealed and analyzed. The purities of the obtained ATP were analyzed quantitatively by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The maximal purity of ATP by the one-step separation method was 95.5% using 0.01 M HCl as running buffer in this work. The corresponding chromatographic behaviors were investigated and analyzed.

  19. Pea Broth Enhances the Biocontrol Efficacy of Lysobacter capsici AZ78 by Triggering Cell Motility Associated with Biogenesis of Type IV Pilus

    PubMed Central

    Tomada, Selena; Puopolo, Gerardo; Perazzolli, Michele; Musetti, Rita; Loi, Nazia; Pertot, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cells can display different types of motility, due to the presence of external appendages such as flagella and type IV pili. To date, little information on the mechanisms involved in the motility of the Lysobacter species has been available. Recently, L. capsici AZ78, a biocontrol agent of phytopathogenic oomycetes, showed the ability to move on jellified pea broth. Pea broth medium improved also the biocontrol activity of L. capsici AZ78 against Plasmopara viticola under greenhouse conditions. Noteworthy, the quantity of pea residues remaining on grapevine leaves fostered cell motility in L. capsici AZ78. Based on these results, this unusual motility related to the composition of the growth medium was investigated in bacterial strains belonging to several Lysobacter species. The six L. capsici strains tested developed dendrite-like colonies when grown on jellified pea broth, while the development of dendrite-like colonies was not recorded in the media commonly used in motility assays. To determine the presence of genes responsible for biogenesis of the flagellum and type IV pili, the genome of L. capsici AZ78 was mined. Genes encoding structural components and regulatory factors of type IV pili were upregulated in L. capsici AZ78 cells grown on the above-mentioned medium, as compared with the other tested media. These results provide new insight into the motility mechanism of L. capsici members and the role of type IV pili and pea compounds on the epiphytic fitness and biocontrol features of L. capsici AZ78. PMID:27507963

  20. Evaluation of different buffered peptone water (BPW) based enrichment broths for detection of Gram-negative foodborne pathogens from various food matrices.

    PubMed

    Margot, H; Zwietering, M H; Joosten, H; O'Mahony, Emer; Stephan, R

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of changing the composition of the pre-enrichment medium buffered peptone water (BPW) on the growth of stressed and unstressed Gram-negative foodborne pathogens in a one-broth enrichment strategy. BPW supplemented with an available iron source and sodium pyruvate, along with low levels of 8-hydroxyquinoline and sodium deoxycholate (BPW-S) improved the recovery of desiccated Cronobacter spp. from powdered infant formula. Growth of Salmonella and STEC was comparable in all BPW variants tested for different food matrices. In products with high levels of Gram-negative background flora (e.g. sprouts), the target organisms could not be reliably detected by PCR in any of the BPW variants tested unless the initial level exceeded 10(3) cfu/10 g of sprouts. Based on these results we suggest BPW-S for a one-broth enrichment strategy of stressed Gram-negative foodborne pathogens from dry products. However, a one-broth enrichment strategy based on BPW variants tested in this evaluation is not recommended for produce with a high level of Gram-negative background flora due to very high detection limits. PMID:26267889

  1. Mangromicins, six new anti-oxidative agents isolated from a culture broth of the actinomycete, Lechevalieria aerocolonigenes K10-0216.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Takuji; Kamiya, Yoshiyuki; Iwatsuki, Masato; Takahashi, Yōko; Ōmura, Satoshi

    2014-07-01

    We have been continually searching for novel chemical compounds from culture broths of various actinomycetes using a physicochemical screening system. During the course of this program, we have previously reported the discovery of two new natural products, designated mangromicins A and B, discovered in a broth of a rare actinomycete strain, Lechevalieria aerocolonigenes K10-0216. Mangromicins have a unique and rare structure, a cyclopentadecane skeleton with a tetrahydrofuran unit and a 5,6-dihydro-4-hydroxy-2-pyrone moiety. New mangromicin analogs were isolated by using an improved production medium. As a consequence, six analogs, together with mangromicins A and B, were isolated from a cultured broth of L. aerocolonigenes K10-0216. We named them mangromicins D, E, F, G, H and I. All mangromicins showed radical scavenging activities against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals and nitric oxide generated from LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, a murine macrophage cell line. Among the analogs, mangromicins A and I showed the most potent DPPH radical scavenging activity and nitric oxide scavenging activity, respectively.

  2. Evaluation of different buffered peptone water (BPW) based enrichment broths for detection of Gram-negative foodborne pathogens from various food matrices.

    PubMed

    Margot, H; Zwietering, M H; Joosten, H; O'Mahony, Emer; Stephan, R

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of changing the composition of the pre-enrichment medium buffered peptone water (BPW) on the growth of stressed and unstressed Gram-negative foodborne pathogens in a one-broth enrichment strategy. BPW supplemented with an available iron source and sodium pyruvate, along with low levels of 8-hydroxyquinoline and sodium deoxycholate (BPW-S) improved the recovery of desiccated Cronobacter spp. from powdered infant formula. Growth of Salmonella and STEC was comparable in all BPW variants tested for different food matrices. In products with high levels of Gram-negative background flora (e.g. sprouts), the target organisms could not be reliably detected by PCR in any of the BPW variants tested unless the initial level exceeded 10(3) cfu/10 g of sprouts. Based on these results we suggest BPW-S for a one-broth enrichment strategy of stressed Gram-negative foodborne pathogens from dry products. However, a one-broth enrichment strategy based on BPW variants tested in this evaluation is not recommended for produce with a high level of Gram-negative background flora due to very high detection limits.

  3. One-step isolation of adenosine triphosphate from crude fermentation broth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by anion-exchange chromatography using supermacroporous cryogel.

    PubMed

    Yun, Junxian; Shen, Shaochuan; Chen, Fang; Yao, Kejian

    2007-12-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an important high-energy compound widely used in biological and therapeutic fields. It can be produced by phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) with microbial cells in industrial scale and the effective isolation of ATP from microbial fermentation broth is a challenging work. In this work, we develop a novel one-step method to directly separate ATP from fermentation broth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by anion-exchange chromatography using supermacroporous cryogel. The cryogel bed with tertiary amine groups was prepared by grafting N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) monomer chains onto the matrix of a polyacrylamide-based cryogel in a glass column and its properties of liquid dispersion, water permeability, porosity as well as the ligand density were measured. Chromatographic separation of ATP from the fermentation broth by the cryogel was carried out using deionised water and 0.01 M HCl as running buffer, respectively. The breakthrough characteristics and elution performance in the cryogel bed were revealed and analyzed. The purities of the obtained ATP were analyzed quantitatively by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The maximal purity of ATP by the one-step separation method was 95.5% using 0.01 M HCl as running buffer in this work. The corresponding chromatographic behaviors were investigated and analyzed. PMID:18024244

  4. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  5. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  6. Optical voltage reference

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, R.; Kotter, D.

    1994-04-26

    An optical voltage reference for providing an alternative to a battery source is described. The optical reference apparatus provides a temperature stable, high precision, isolated voltage reference through the use of optical isolation techniques to eliminate current and impedance coupling errors. Pulse rate frequency modulation is employed to eliminate errors in the optical transmission link while phase-lock feedback is employed to stabilize the frequency to voltage transfer function. 2 figures.

  7. In Vitro Activity of Ceftazidime-Avibactam against Contemporary Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from U.S. Medical Centers by Census Region, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Castanheira, Mariana; Flamm, Robert K.; Farrell, David J.; Jones, Ronald N.; Sader, Helio S.

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro antibacterial activities of ceftazidime-avibactam and comparator agents were evaluated using reference broth microdilution methods against 1,743 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates collected in 2014 from 69 U.S. medical centers, representing each of the nine census regions. Ceftazidime-avibactam demonstrated potent activity against P. aeruginosa, including many isolates not susceptible to ceftazidime, meropenem, and piperacillin-tazobactam. In each of the nine census regions, ceftazidime-avibactam demonstrated the highest percentage of susceptible isolates. PMID:26810650

  8. Reference Point Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Ayse; Koedijk, Kees; Noussair, Charles N; Pownall, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that, when confronted with a decision to be taken under risk, individuals use reference payoff levels as important inputs. The purpose of this paper is to study which reference points characterize decisions in a setting in which there are several plausible reference levels of payoff. We report an experiment, in which we investigate which of four potential reference points: (1) a population average payoff level, (2) the announced expected payoff of peers in a similar decision situation, (3) a historical average level of earnings that others have received in the same task, and (4) an announced anticipated individual payoff level, best describes decisions in a decontextualized risky decision making task. We find heterogeneity among individuals in the reference points they employ. The population average payoff level is the modal reference point, followed by experimenter's stated expectation of a participant's individual earnings, followed in turn by the average earnings of other participants in previous sessions of the same experiment. A sizeable share of individuals show multiple reference points simultaneously. The reference point that best fits the choices of the individual is not affected by a shock to her income. PMID:27672374

  9. Reference Point Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Ayse; Koedijk, Kees; Noussair, Charles N.; Pownall, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that, when confronted with a decision to be taken under risk, individuals use reference payoff levels as important inputs. The purpose of this paper is to study which reference points characterize decisions in a setting in which there are several plausible reference levels of payoff. We report an experiment, in which we investigate which of four potential reference points: (1) a population average payoff level, (2) the announced expected payoff of peers in a similar decision situation, (3) a historical average level of earnings that others have received in the same task, and (4) an announced anticipated individual payoff level, best describes decisions in a decontextualized risky decision making task. We find heterogeneity among individuals in the reference points they employ. The population average payoff level is the modal reference point, followed by experimenter's stated expectation of a participant's individual earnings, followed in turn by the average earnings of other participants in previous sessions of the same experiment. A sizeable share of individuals show multiple reference points simultaneously. The reference point that best fits the choices of the individual is not affected by a shock to her income. PMID:27672374

  10. Rethinking Virtual Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Virtual reference services seem a natural extension of libraries digital collections and the emphasis on access to the library anytime, anywhere. If patrons use the library from home, it makes sense to provide them with person-to-person online reference. The Library of Congress (LC), OCLC, and several large library systems have developed and…

  11. An Online Reference System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisman, Janet; Treat, William

    1984-01-01

    Describes a computer aid developed to assist in academic library reference service using the DataPhase Circulation System, an automated system that features full cataloging records in database and permits local programing. Access points (subject, type of reference work, course) and database structure and user screens are highlighted. (EJS)

  12. Marketing Reference Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, O. Gene

    1995-01-01

    Relates the marketing concept to library reference services. Highlights include a review of the literature and an overview of marketing, including research, the marketing mix, strategic plan, marketing plan, and marketing audit. Marketing principles are applied to reference services through the marketing mix elements of product, price, place, and…

  13. Reference Point Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Ayse; Koedijk, Kees; Noussair, Charles N.; Pownall, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that, when confronted with a decision to be taken under risk, individuals use reference payoff levels as important inputs. The purpose of this paper is to study which reference points characterize decisions in a setting in which there are several plausible reference levels of payoff. We report an experiment, in which we investigate which of four potential reference points: (1) a population average payoff level, (2) the announced expected payoff of peers in a similar decision situation, (3) a historical average level of earnings that others have received in the same task, and (4) an announced anticipated individual payoff level, best describes decisions in a decontextualized risky decision making task. We find heterogeneity among individuals in the reference points they employ. The population average payoff level is the modal reference point, followed by experimenter's stated expectation of a participant's individual earnings, followed in turn by the average earnings of other participants in previous sessions of the same experiment. A sizeable share of individuals show multiple reference points simultaneously. The reference point that best fits the choices of the individual is not affected by a shock to her income.

  14. Ethics and Reference Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danielson, Elena S.

    1997-01-01

    While revised ethical codes provide helpful guidelines, reference archivists face many ethical questions raised by rapidly evolving technology, changing expectations, and inconsistent privacy laws that have no clear answers. Discusses issues related to reference searching, codification of ethics, cultural property and the responsibility of…

  15. China Connections Reference Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalat, Marie B.; Hoermann, Elizabeth F.

    This reference book focuses on six aspects of the geography of the People's Republic of China. They are: territory, governing units, population and land use, waterways, land forms, and climates. Designed as a primary reference, the book explains how the Chinese people and their lifestyles are affected by China's geography. Special components…

  16. In vitro susceptibility of Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale to several antimicrobial drugs.

    PubMed

    Soriano, V E; Vera, N A; Salado, C R; Fernández, R P; Blackall, P J

    2003-01-01

    As part of the basic characterization of Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale, the minimal inhibitory concentrations of 10 antimicrobial drugs were determined for reference strains and Mexican isolates by a broth microdilution method. For optimal growth of the organisms, a supplemented brain-heart infusion broth was used. The susceptibility of O. rhinotracheale to amoxicillin, enrofloxacin, and oxytetracycline was variable. However, consistent higher minimal inhibitory concentrations values were obtained for gentamicin, fosfomycin, trimethoprim, sulfamethazine, sulfamerazine, sulfaquinoxaline, and sulfachloropyridazine. Obtained results among Mexican isolates indicate a marked antimicrobial drug resistance trend. PMID:12887209

  17. EPA QUICK REFERENCE GUIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Quick Reference Guides are compilations of information on chemical and biological terrorist agents. The information is presented in consistent format and includes agent characteristics, release scenarios, health and safety data, real-time field detection, effect levels, samp...

  18. Value of Information References

    DOE Data Explorer

    Morency, Christina

    2014-12-12

    This file contains a list of relevant references on value of information (VOI) in RIS format. VOI provides a quantitative analysis to evaluate the outcome of the combined technologies (seismology, hydrology, geodesy) used to monitor Brady's Geothermal Field.

  19. Enterprise Reference Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickham, Grandin; Saile, Lynn; Havelka, Jacque; Fitts, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Johnson Space Center (JSC) offers two extensive libraries that contain journals, research literature and electronic resources. Searching capabilities are available to those individuals residing onsite or through a librarian s search. Many individuals have rich collections of references, but no mechanisms to share reference libraries across researchers, projects, or directorates exist. Likewise, information regarding which references are provided to which individuals is not available, resulting in duplicate requests, redundant labor costs and associated copying fees. In addition, this tends to limit collaboration between colleagues and promotes the establishment of individual, unshared silos of information The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) team has utilized a centralized reference management tool during the development, test, and operational phases of this project. The Enterprise Reference Library project expands the capabilities developed for IMM to address the above issues and enhance collaboration across JSC. Method: After significant market analysis for a multi-user reference management tool, no available commercial tool was found to meet this need, so a software program was built around a commercial tool, Reference Manager 12 by The Thomson Corporation. A use case approach guided the requirements development phase. The premise of the design is that individuals use their own reference management software and export to SharePoint when their library is incorporated into the Enterprise Reference Library. This results in a searchable user-specific library application. An accompanying share folder will warehouse the electronic full-text articles, which allows the global user community to access full -text articles. Discussion: An enterprise reference library solution can provide a multidisciplinary collection of full text articles. This approach improves efficiency in obtaining and storing reference material while greatly reducing labor, purchasing and

  20. Precision displacement reference system

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Dubois, Robert R.; Strother, Jerry D.

    2000-02-22

    A precision displacement reference system is described, which enables real time accountability over the applied displacement feedback system to precision machine tools, positioning mechanisms, motion devices, and related operations. As independent measurements of tool location is taken by a displacement feedback system, a rotating reference disk compares feedback counts with performed motion. These measurements are compared to characterize and analyze real time mechanical and control performance during operation.

  1. Membrane reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Redey, L.; Bloom, I.D.

    1988-01-21

    A reference electrode utilizes a small thin, flat membrane of a highly conductive glass placed on a small diameter insulator tube having a reference material inside in contact with an internal voltage lead. When the sensor is placed in a non-aqueous ionic electrolytic solution, the concentration difference across the glass membrane generates a low voltage signal in precise relationship to the concentration of the species to be measured, with high spatial resolution. 2 figs.

  2. USGS reference materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1995-01-01

    Every year in the United States, millions of measurements are made on the chemical composition of items that affect us on a daily basis. Determining the accuracy of these measurements is based on the analysis of appropriate reference materials whose composition was previously determined through rigorous testing. Today, reference materials help us evaluate the composition of the food we eat, medicine we use, soil we grow our crops in, and hundreds of other products that affect our everyday lives.

  3. Reference Man anatomical model

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, M.

    1994-10-01

    The 70-kg Standard Man or Reference Man has been used in physiological models since at least the 1920s to represent adult males. It came into use in radiation protection in the late 1940s and was developed extensively during the 1950s and used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its Publication 2 in 1959. The current Reference Man for Purposes of Radiation Protection is a monumental book published in 1975 by the ICRP as ICRP Publication 23. It has a wealth of information useful for radiation dosimetry, including anatomical and physiological data, gross and elemental composition of the body and organs and tissues of the body. The anatomical data includes specified reference values for an adult male and an adult female. Other reference values are primarily for the adult male. The anatomical data include much data on fetuses and children, although reference values are not established. There is an ICRP task group currently working on revising selected parts of the Reference Man document.

  4. Extraction and purification of recombinant human serum albumin from Pichia pastoris broths using aqueous two-phase system combined with hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuesheng; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Zhiming; Du, Li; Hao, Aiyu; Jiang, Bo; Tian, Mingyu; Li, Qiao; Jia, Qian; Wang, Shicong; Xiu, Zhilong

    2012-07-01

    Recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) is considered as an alternative of human serum albumin and used to treat patients with severe burn, shock or blood loss. However, separation and purification of rHSA are difficult and have become the bottle neck in industrial production. In this study, ethanol/K₂HPO₄ aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) were integrated to provide a new approach for the extraction and purification of rHSA from high density fermentation broth. Using a 0.01-73 L ATPS scale, the extraction of rHSA from the fermentation broth attained an average recovery of 100.4%. At the same time, 99.8% of cells and 87.2% of polysaccharides as well as some other protein impurities were also removed. The activity of proteinase A in the broth was also remarkably decreased. The purified rHSA appeared as a single band on reduced SDS-PAGE gel, and it had a purity of 99.1% as determined by HPLC. It was essentially identical to the plasma-derived HSA in terms of molecular weight and circular dichroism spectrum. The total recovery of rHSA was 75.2%, which was 1.1-2.0 times higher than that obtained from conventional processes. Residual polysaccharide was reduced to 1.61 μg/mg rHSA and the degree of coloring was lower than that of plasma-derived HSA. The procedure employed in this study has the advantages of simple operation, shorter time, low energy consumption and high yield, and it could produce rHSA with high purity. It is therefore suitable in the production of rHSA and other biological products produced by high-density fermentation. PMID:22658659

  5. Effects of the Essential Oil from Origanum vulgare L. on Survival of Pathogenic Bacteria and Starter Lactic Acid Bacteria in Semihard Cheese Broth and Slurry.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Geany Targino; de Carvalho, Rayssa Julliane; de Sousa, Jossana Pereira; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Schaffner, Donald; de Souza, Evandro Leite; Magnani, Marciane

    2016-02-01

    This study assessed the inhibitory effects of the essential oil from Origanum vulgare L. (OVEO) on Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and a mesophilic starter coculture composed of lactic acid bacteria (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris) in Brazilian coalho cheese systems. The MIC of OVEO was 2.5 μl/ml against both S. aureus and L. monocytogenes and 0.6 μl/ml against the tested starter coculture. In cheese broth containing OVEO at 0.6 μl/ml, no decrease in viable cell counts (VCC) of both pathogenic bacteria was observed, whereas the initial VCC of the starter coculture decreased approximately 1.0 log CFU/ml after 24 h of exposure at 10°C. OVEO at 1.25 and 2.5 μl/ml caused reductions of up to 2.0 and 2.5 log CFU/ml in S. aureus and L. monocytogenes, respectively, after 24 h of exposure in cheese broth. At these same concentrations, OVEO caused a greater decrease of initial VCC of the starter coculture following 4 h of exposure. Higher concentrations of OVEO were required to decrease the VCC of all target bacteria in semisolid coalho cheese slurry compared with cheese broth. The VCC of Lactococcus spp. in coalho cheese slurry containing OVEO were always lower than those of pathogenic bacteria under the same conditions. These results suggest that the concentrations of OVEO used to control pathogenic bacteria in semihard cheese should be carefully evaluated because of its inhibitory effects on the growth of starter lactic acid cultures used during the production of the product.

  6. Effects of the Essential Oil from Origanum vulgare L. on Survival of Pathogenic Bacteria and Starter Lactic Acid Bacteria in Semihard Cheese Broth and Slurry.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Geany Targino; de Carvalho, Rayssa Julliane; de Sousa, Jossana Pereira; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Schaffner, Donald; de Souza, Evandro Leite; Magnani, Marciane

    2016-02-01

    This study assessed the inhibitory effects of the essential oil from Origanum vulgare L. (OVEO) on Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and a mesophilic starter coculture composed of lactic acid bacteria (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris) in Brazilian coalho cheese systems. The MIC of OVEO was 2.5 μl/ml against both S. aureus and L. monocytogenes and 0.6 μl/ml against the tested starter coculture. In cheese broth containing OVEO at 0.6 μl/ml, no decrease in viable cell counts (VCC) of both pathogenic bacteria was observed, whereas the initial VCC of the starter coculture decreased approximately 1.0 log CFU/ml after 24 h of exposure at 10°C. OVEO at 1.25 and 2.5 μl/ml caused reductions of up to 2.0 and 2.5 log CFU/ml in S. aureus and L. monocytogenes, respectively, after 24 h of exposure in cheese broth. At these same concentrations, OVEO caused a greater decrease of initial VCC of the starter coculture following 4 h of exposure. Higher concentrations of OVEO were required to decrease the VCC of all target bacteria in semisolid coalho cheese slurry compared with cheese broth. The VCC of Lactococcus spp. in coalho cheese slurry containing OVEO were always lower than those of pathogenic bacteria under the same conditions. These results suggest that the concentrations of OVEO used to control pathogenic bacteria in semihard cheese should be carefully evaluated because of its inhibitory effects on the growth of starter lactic acid cultures used during the production of the product. PMID:26818985

  7. Development of predictive models for the survival of Campylobacter jejuni (ATCC 43051) on cooked chicken breast patties and in broth as a function of temperature.

    PubMed

    Yoon, K S; Burnette, C N; Oscar, T P

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to model the kinetics of the survival of Campylobacter jejuni on cooked chicken breast patties and in broth as a function of temperature. Both patties and broth were inoculated with 10(6) stationary-phase cells of a single strain of C. jejuni (ATCC 43051) and incubated at constant temperatures from 4 to 30 degrees C in 2 degrees C increments under aerobic conditions. In most cases, a three-phase linear model fit the primary survival curves well (r2 = 0.97 to 0.99) at all incubation temperatures regardless of model medium, indicating the presence of a resistant subpopulation of C. jejuni that would not be eliminated without thermal processing. Secondary models predicting lag time (LT) and specific death rate (SDR) as functions of temperature were also developed. The Davey and Boltzmann models were identified as appropriate secondary models for LT and SDR, respectively, on the basis of goodness of fit (Boltzmann model, r2 = 0.96; Davey model, r2 = 0.93) and prediction bias and accuracy factor tests. The results obtained indicate that C. jejuni can survive well at both refrigeration and ambient temperatures regardless of model medium. Reduced survival of C. jejuni, characterized by shorter lag times and faster death rates, was observed both on patties and in broth at ambient temperatures. In addition, the average maximum reduction of C. jejuni at 4 to 30 degrees C was 1.5 log units regardless of storage temperature or model medium. These findings suggest that C. jejuni found on contaminated poultry products has the potential to survive under conditions that are not permissive for growth and thus could cause foodborne illness if the poultry is not sufficiently cooked. PMID:14717353

  8. Growth and inactivation of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in broth and validation in ground pork meat during simulated home storage abusive temperature and home pan-frying

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiang; Lahou, Evy; De Boeck, Elien; Devlieghere, Frank; Geeraerd, Annemie; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    Ground pork meat with natural microbiota and inoculated with low initial densities (1–10 or 10–100 CFU/g) of Salmonella enterica or Listeria monocytogenes was stored under abusive temperature at 10°C and thermally treated by a simulated home pan-frying procedure. The growth and inactivation characteristics were also evaluated in broth. In ground pork meat, the population of S. enterica increased by less than one log after 12-days of storage at 10°C, whereas L. monocytogenes increased by 2.3 to 2.8 log units. No unusual intrinsic heat resistance of the pathogens was noted when tested in broth at 60°C although shoulders were observed on the inactivation curves of L. monocytogenes. After growth of S. enterica and L. monocytogenes at 10°C for 5 days to levels of 1.95 log CFU/g and 3.10 log CFU/g, respectively, in ground pork meat, their inactivation in the burger subjected to a simulated home pan-frying was studied. After thermal treatment S. enterica was undetectable but L. monocytogenes was recovered in three out of six of the 25 g burger samples. Overall, the present study shows that data on growth and inactivation of broths are indicative but may underestimate as well as overestimate behavior of pathogens and thus need confirmation in food matrix conditions to assess food safety in reasonably foreseen abusive conditions of storage and usual home pan-frying of meat burgers in Belgium. PMID:26579079

  9. Growth and inactivation of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in broth and validation in ground pork meat during simulated home storage abusive temperature and home pan-frying.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Lahou, Evy; De Boeck, Elien; Devlieghere, Frank; Geeraerd, Annemie; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    Ground pork meat with natural microbiota and inoculated with low initial densities (1-10 or 10-100 CFU/g) of Salmonella enterica or Listeria monocytogenes was stored under abusive temperature at 10°C and thermally treated by a simulated home pan-frying procedure. The growth and inactivation characteristics were also evaluated in broth. In ground pork meat, the population of S. enterica increased by less than one log after 12-days of storage at 10°C, whereas L. monocytogenes increased by 2.3 to 2.8 log units. No unusual intrinsic heat resistance of the pathogens was noted when tested in broth at 60°C although shoulders were observed on the inactivation curves of L. monocytogenes. After growth of S. enterica and L. monocytogenes at 10°C for 5 days to levels of 1.95 log CFU/g and 3.10 log CFU/g, respectively, in ground pork meat, their inactivation in the burger subjected to a simulated home pan-frying was studied. After thermal treatment S. enterica was undetectable but L. monocytogenes was recovered in three out of six of the 25 g burger samples. Overall, the present study shows that data on growth and inactivation of broths are indicative but may underestimate as well as overestimate behavior of pathogens and thus need confirmation in food matrix conditions to assess food safety in reasonably foreseen abusive conditions of storage and usual home pan-frying of meat burgers in Belgium. PMID:26579079

  10. Effects on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and meat starter cultures of bovine lactoferrin in broth and microencapsulated lactoferrin in dry sausage batters.

    PubMed

    Al-Nabulsi, Anas A; Holley, Richard A

    2007-01-01

    The effects of lactoferrin (LF) alone or with various chelating agents on the growth of 5 strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and 7 meat starter cultures were evaluated. E.coli O157:H7 and starter cultures were grown at 13 or 26 degrees C in Lauria (LB) or All Purpose Tween (APT) broths, respectively, with both broths being supplemented with 2.9% NaCl. LF alone prevented the growth of E. coli O157:H7 strains 0627 and 0628 but other strains grew. The antimicrobial effectiveness of LF was enhanced by EDTA but LF alone did not affect the growth of meat starter cultures in broth. However, when LF plus EDTA and sodium bicarbonate (SB) were used the growth of all meat starter cultures except Lactobacillus curvatus was reduced. During dry sausage manufacture with L. curvatus and Staphylococcus carnosus starter cultures the effects of LF, unencapsulated or microencapsulated in paste-like and dried powder forms, in sausage batters with or without EDTA and SB, on the viability of E. coli O157:H7 were examined. The reduction of E. coli O157:H7 during sausage manufacture was significantly enhanced (p<0.05) by all LF treatments. The largest reduction (4.2 log units) was obtained with unencapsulated LF. However, some of the apparent reduction in E.coli O157:H7 numbers with all treatments was due to cell injury rather than lethality, since significantly greater numbers were recovered on APT agar overlaid with the selective medium cefixime-tellurite Sorbitol McConkey agar (ct-SMAC) than on ct-SMAC alone. The narrow spectrum of LF activity and induction of injury rather than inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 limit the effectiveness of this agent against the pathogen in fermented meats.

  11. Setting reference targets

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, R.E.

    1997-04-01

    Reference Targets are used to represent virtual quantities like the magnetic axis of a magnet or the definition of a coordinate system. To explain the function of reference targets in the sequence of the alignment process, this paper will first briefly discuss the geometry of the trajectory design space and of the surveying space, then continue with an overview of a typical alignment process. This is followed by a discussion on magnet fiducialization. While the magnetic measurement methods to determine the magnetic centerline are only listed (they will be discussed in detail in a subsequent talk), emphasis is given to the optical/mechanical methods and to the task of transferring the centerline position to reference targets.

  12. Evaluation of Trans-Vag Broth, Colistin-Nalidixic Agar, and CHROMagar StrepB for Detection of Group B Streptococcus in Vaginal and Rectal Swabs from Pregnant Women in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kwatra, Gaurav; Madhi, Shabir A.; Cutland, Clare L.; Buchmann, Eckhart J.

    2013-01-01

    Maternal vaginal colonization with group B streptococcus (GBS) is a major risk factor for invasive GBS infection in newborns. The CDC-recommended method for detecting GBS colonization is to culture vaginal and rectal swabs in a selective broth followed by subculture on blood agar or a selective medium. A high incidence of antimicrobial resistance in the fecal microflora can compromise the recovery of GBS from the selective broth. Here, we compared CHROMagar StrepB (CA), Columbia colistin-nalidixic agar (CNA), and Trans-Vag selective broth enrichment for the isolation of GBS from 130 vaginal and 130 rectal swabs from pregnant women. The swabs were randomized for plating first on either CA or CNA, and they then were inoculated in Trans-Vag broth. GBS was cultured from 37.7% of the vaginal swabs and 33.1% of the rectal swabs. There were no differences in the detection rates for the vaginal swabs between CA (31.5%), CNA (26.2%), and the selective broth (30.0%). The sensitivities in relation to a composite score were 83.7%, 69.4%, and 79.6%, respectively. However, recovery of GBS from the rectal swabs was significantly higher from CA (29.2%; P < 0.0001) and CNA (23.8%; P = 0.002) than from the selective broth (9.2%). The sensitivities were 88.4%, 72.1%, and 27.9%, respectively. The order of plating on the solid medium was significant (P = 0.003), with GBS detection rates of 30.8% and 24.6% when swabs were plated first and second, respectively. These findings show that a selective broth is not suitable for the recovery of GBS from rectal swabs in settings such as ours, due to masking of the GBS colonies by persistent microflora. PMID:23698527

  13. Evaluation of Trans-Vag broth, colistin-nalidixic agar, and CHROMagar StrepB for detection of group B Streptococcus in vaginal and rectal swabs from pregnant women in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kwatra, Gaurav; Madhi, Shabir A; Cutland, Clare L; Buchmann, Eckhart J; Adrian, Peter V

    2013-08-01

    Maternal vaginal colonization with group B streptococcus (GBS) is a major risk factor for invasive GBS infection in newborns. The CDC-recommended method for detecting GBS colonization is to culture vaginal and rectal swabs in a selective broth followed by subculture on blood agar or a selective medium. A high incidence of antimicrobial resistance in the fecal microflora can compromise the recovery of GBS from the selective broth. Here, we compared CHROMagar StrepB (CA), Columbia colistin-nalidixic agar (CNA), and Trans-Vag selective broth enrichment for the isolation of GBS from 130 vaginal and 130 rectal swabs from pregnant women. The swabs were randomized for plating first on either CA or CNA, and they then were inoculated in Trans-Vag broth. GBS was cultured from 37.7% of the vaginal swabs and 33.1% of the rectal swabs. There were no differences in the detection rates for the vaginal swabs between CA (31.5%), CNA (26.2%), and the selective broth (30.0%). The sensitivities in relation to a composite score were 83.7%, 69.4%, and 79.6%, respectively. However, recovery of GBS from the rectal swabs was significantly higher from CA (29.2%; P<0.0001) and CNA (23.8%; P=0.002) than from the selective broth (9.2%). The sensitivities were 88.4%, 72.1%, and 27.9%, respectively. The order of plating on the solid medium was significant (P=0.003), with GBS detection rates of 30.8% and 24.6% when swabs were plated first and second, respectively. These findings show that a selective broth is not suitable for the recovery of GBS from rectal swabs in settings such as ours, due to masking of the GBS colonies by persistent microflora.

  14. Multifunctional reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Redey, Laszlo; Vissers, Donald R.

    1983-01-01

    A multifunctional, low mass reference electrode of a nickel tube, thermocouple means inside the nickel tube electrically insulated therefrom for measuring the temperature thereof, a housing surrounding the nickel tube, an electrolyte having a fixed sulfide ion activity between the housing and the outer surface of the nickel tube forming the nickel/nickel sulfide/sulfide half-cell. An ion diffusion barrier is associated with the housing in contact with the electrolyte. Also disclosed is a cell using the reference electrode to measure characteristics of a working electrode.

  15. Multifunctional reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Redey, L.; Vissers, D.R.

    1981-12-30

    A multifunctional, low mass reference electrode of a nickel tube, thermocouple means inside the nickel tube electrically insulated therefrom for measuring the temperature thereof, a housing surrounding the nickel tube, an electrolyte having a fixed sulfide ion activity between the housing and the outer surface of the nickel tube forming the nickel/nickel sulfide/sulfide half-cell are described. An ion diffusion barrier is associated with the housing in contact with the electrolyte. Also disclosed is a cell using the reference electrode to measure characteristics of a working electrode.

  16. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    A stable reference electrode for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na.sub.3 AlF.sub.6, wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution.

  17. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, D.R.

    1988-08-16

    A stable reference electrode is described for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution. 1 fig.

  18. NASCAP programmer's reference manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, M. J.; Stannard, P. R.; Katz, I.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP) is a computer program designed to model the electrostatic charging of complicated three-dimensional objects, both in a test tank and at geosynchronous altitudes. This document is a programmer's reference manual and user's guide. It is designed as a reference to experienced users of the code, as well as an introduction to its use for beginners. All of the many capabilities of NASCAP are covered in detail, together with examples of their use. These include the definition of objects, plasma environments, potential calculations, particle emission and detection simulations, and charging analysis.

  19. Sensitivity of solid culture, broth culture, and real-time PCR assays for milk and colostrum samples from Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis-infectious dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Laurin, Emilie; McKenna, Shawn; Chaffer, Marcelo; Keefe, Greg

    2015-12-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) can be shed in feces, milk, and colostrum. The goal of this study was to assess assays that detect MAP in these sample types, including effects of lactation stage or season. Understanding the performance of these assays could improve how they are used, limiting the risk of infection to calves. Forty-six previously confirmed MAP-positive cows from 7 Atlantic Canadian dairy farms were identified for colostrum sampling and monthly sampling of milk and feces over a 12-mo period. Samples were assayed for MAP using solid culture, broth culture, and direct real-time PCR (qPCR). Across assay types, test sensitivity when applied to milk samples averaged 25% of that when applied to fecal samples. For colostrum samples, sensitivity depended on assay type, with sensitivity of qPCR being approximately 46% of that in feces. Across sample types, sensitivity of qPCR was higher than that of the other assays. Sensitivity of qPCR, when applied to milk samples, was significantly higher in summer than in other seasons. Summer was also the season with highest agreement between milk and fecal samples collected within the same month. Our results suggest that qPCR would detect more cows shedding MAP in their milk and colostrum than solid or broth culture assays, particularly during the summer, thus providing better management information to limit exposure of calves to this infectious organism. PMID:26476944

  20. Real-time identification of bacteria and Candida species in positive blood culture broths by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, Agnès; Suarez, Stéphanie; Beretti, Jean-Luc; Dauphin, Brunhilde; Bille, Emmanuelle; Meyer, Julie; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Alanio, Alexandre; Berche, Patrick; Nassif, Xavier

    2010-05-01

    Delays in the identification of microorganisms are a barrier to the establishment of adequate empirical antibiotic therapy of bacteremia. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) allows the identification of microorganisms directly from colonies within minutes. In this study, we have adapted and tested this technology for use with blood culture broths, thus allowing identification in less than 30 min once the blood culture is detected as positive. Our method is based on the selective recovery of bacteria by adding a detergent that solubilizes blood cells but not microbial membranes. Microorganisms are then extracted by centrifugation and analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS. This strategy was first tested by inoculating various bacterial and fungal species into negative blood culture bottles. We then tested positive patient blood or fluid samples grown in blood culture bottles, and the results obtained by MALDI-TOF-MS were compared with those obtained using conventional strategies. Three hundred twelve spiked bottles and 434 positive cultures from patients were analyzed. Among monomicrobial fluids, MALDI-TOF-MS allowed a reliable identification at the species, group, and genus/family level in 91%, 5%, and 2% of cases, respectively, in 20 min. In only 2% of these samples, MALDI-TOF MS did not yield any result. When blood cultures were multibacterial, identification was improved by using specific databases based on the Gram staining results. MALDI-TOF-MS is currently the fastest technique to accurately identify microorganisms grown in positive blood culture broths.

  1. Using poly([1-vinyl-3-hexylimidazolium] [bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide]) to adsorb bio-ethanol from a Chamaecyparis obtuse leaves fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Tang, Baokun; Bi, Wentao; Row, Kyung Ho

    2013-06-01

    Poly([1-vinyl-3-hexylimidazolium] [bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide]) (poly([VHIM][Tf2N])) was assessed for its ability to adsorb bio-ethanol from Chamaecyparis obtuse leaves fermentation broths. Poly([VHIM][Tf2N]) was prepared by poly([VHIM][Br]) ion exchange with Li(Tf2N). Poly([VHIM][Br]) was obtained using a thermal-initiated polymerization method. The factors affecting the adsorption capacity of poly([VHIM][Tf2N]), such as the initial concentration of bio-ethanol in the fermentation broth, adsorption temperature and dosage of the adsorbent, as well as the adsorption kinetics and equilibrium of poly([VHIM][Tf2N]) were investigated. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherms used to describe the adsorption of bio-ethanol on the adsorbent showed good correlation coefficients of 0.97, 0.96 and 0.98, respectively. A comparison of the separation factors for ethanol/water, ethanol/glucose and ethanol/xylose revealed poly([VHIM][Tf2N]) to have preferential selectivity for bio-ethanol. Compared to activated carbon, poly([VHIM][Tf2N]) exhibited higher adsorption capacity for bio-ethanol under the same adsorption conditions. The adsorbent could be used for 5 cycles with good efficiency, highlighting its reusability as an adsorbent.

  2. Determination of direct photolysis rate constants and OH radical reactivity of representative odour compounds in brewery broth using a continuous flow-stirred photoreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jürgens, Marion; Jacob, Fritz; Ekici, Perihan; Friess, Albrecht; Parlar, Harun

    A method based on photolysis was developed for the appropriate treatment of organic pollutants in air exhausting from breweries upon wort decoction, and thereby causing smell nuisance. A continuous flow stirred photoreactor was built-up exclusively, allowing OH radicals to react with selected odorous compounds contained in exhaust vapours, such as: 2-methylpropanal, 3-methylbutanal, 2-methylbutanal, 3-methyl-1-butanol, n-hexanal, 2-methylbutyl isobutyrate, 2-undecanone, phenyl acetaldehyde, myrcene, limonene, linalool, humulene, dimethylsulphide, and dimethyltrisulphide. These substances were quantified in brewery broth before and after UV irradiation using high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HRGC-MS). For odour analysis, high-resolution gas chromatography-flame ionisation detection (HRGC-FID) coupled with sensory methods was used. Determined quantum yields of about 10 -3 for phenyl acetaldehyde, myrcene, and humulene pointed out that direct photolysis contributed to their decay. Quantum yields of below 10 -4 for the other substances indicated that UV irradiation did not contribute significantly to their degradation processes. Hydroxyl radical reaction rate constants and Henry constants of organic compounds were also measured. Substances accompanied with low Henry constants converted rapidly, whereas those with higher ones, relatively slowly. Determined aroma values concluded that after UV-H 2O 2 treatment, only dimethylsulphide and myrcene remained as important odorous compounds, but in significantly reduced concentrations. The UV-H 2O 2 treatment of brewery broth has been proved effective to reduce smell-irritating substances formed upon wort decoction.

  3. Discrepancies between disk diffusion and broth susceptibility studies of the activity of ticarcillin plus clavulanic acid against ticarcillin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Manian, F A; Alford, R H

    1986-01-01

    Ticarcillin and clavulanic acid in combination were tested against 40 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates resistant to ticarcillin by disk diffusion. A total of 21 isolates (53%) were susceptible to ticarcillin-clavulanate by disk diffusion, under currently recommended criteria for ticarcillin susceptibility. Macro-broth dilution tests (ticarcillin plus clavulanic acid, 2 micrograms/ml) confirmed susceptibility (MIC less than or equal to 64 micrograms/ml) of only 8 (38%) of 21 isolates. Time-kill studies of disk diffusion susceptible isolates indicated 2 log10 or greater killing of most isolates at 6 h in broth containing ticarcillin (64 micrograms/ml) combined with clavulanic acid (1, 2, 5, or 10 micrograms/ml). After 6 h, regrowth was common in all concentrations of clavulanic acid except 10 micrograms/ml. Regrowth populations were resistant to ticarcillin-clavulanate by MIC determination. Poor bactericidal activity of ticarcillin-clavulanate against ticarcillin-resistant P. aeruginosa was confirmed, as most isolates did not undergo 99.9% or greater killing at 24 h in all concentrations of clavulanic acid. Serotype O-11 was our most common serotype and was associated with disk diffusion "pseudosusceptibility." Concomitant disk diffusion testing of ticarcillin-clavulanate and ticarcillin is recommended for testing the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to ticarcillin-clavulanate by disk diffusion. P. aeruginosa isolates resistant to ticarcillin should as a rule be considered also resistant to ticarcillin-clavulanate, despite apparent susceptibility by disk diffusion. PMID:3092732

  4. Isotope reference materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of the same isotopically homogeneous sample by any laboratory worldwide should yield the same isotopic composition within analytical uncertainty. International distribution of light element isotopic reference materials by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology enable laboratories to achieve this goal.

  5. Generating Multimodal References

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Sluis, Ielka; Krahmer, Emiel

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a new computational model for the generation of multimodal referring expressions (REs), based on observations in human communication. The algorithm is an extension of the graph-based algorithm proposed by Krahmer, van Erk, and Verleg (2003) and makes use of a so-called Flashlight Model for pointing. The Flashlight Model…

  6. Dietary Reference Intakes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) are recommendations intended to provide a framework for nutrient intake evaluation, as well as meal planning on the basis of nutrient adequacy. They are nutrient, not food based recommendations, created with chronic disease risk reduction as the primary goal, as ...

  7. Role and Reference Grammar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Valin, Robert D., Jr.

    This paper discusses Role and Reference Grammar (RRG), which is a structuralist-formalist theory of grammar. RRG grew out of an attempt to answer two fundamental questions: (1) what would linguistic theory look like if it were based on the analysis of Lakhota, Tagalog, and Dyirbal, rather than on the analysis of English?; and (2) how can the…

  8. Volunteeer's Reference Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Julie; And Others

    For Postpartum Education for Parents (PEP) volunteers, this reference guide provides background information about the common concerns of parents. Extensively reviewed for accuracy and content by pediatricians, psychologists, obstetricians, nurses, and childbirth educators, the guide contains a summary discussion of the postpartum infant and…

  9. The Reference Encounter Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Marilyn Domas

    1983-01-01

    Develops model of the reference interview which explicitly incorporates human information processing, particularly schema ideas presented by Marvin Minsky and other theorists in cognitive processing and artificial intelligence. Questions are raised concerning use of content analysis of transcribed verbal protocols as methodology for studying…

  10. Hospitality Services Reference Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This reference book provides information needed by employees in hospitality services occupations. It includes 29 chapters that cover the following topics: the hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization and management structures; safety practices and emergency procedures; technology; property maintenance and repair; purchasing…

  11. Reference Collections and Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Lois

    1999-01-01

    Reviews six reference materials for young people: "The New York Public Library Kid's Guide to Research"; "National Audubon Society First Field Guide. Mammals"; "Star Wars: The Visual Dictionary"; "Encarta Africana"; "World Fact Book, 1998"; and "Factastic Book of 1001 Lists". Includes ordering information.(AEF)

  12. The Unreliability of References

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barden, Dennis M.

    2008-01-01

    When search consultants, like the author, are invited to propose their services in support of a college or university seeking new leadership, they are generally asked a fairly standard set of questions. But there is one question that they find among the most difficult to answer: How do they check a candidate's references to ensure that they know…

  13. A GUJARATI REFERENCE GRAMMAR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARDONA, GEORGE

    THIS REFERENCE GRAMMAR WAS WRITTEN TO FILL THE NEED FOR AN UP-TO-DATE ANALYSIS OF THE MODERN LANGUAGE SUITABLE FOR LANGUAGE LEARNERS AS WELL AS LINGUISTS. THE AUTHOR LISTS IN THE INTRODUCTION THOSE STUDIES PREVIOUS TO THIS ONE WHICH MAY BE OF INTEREST TO THE READER. INCLUDED IN HIS ANALYSIS OF THE LANGUAGE ARE MAJOR CHAPTERS ON--(1) PHONOLOGY, (2)…

  14. Reference Book Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Bill, Ed.

    For each reference work there is a 5 1/2 x 8 1/2" card with information about the work in brief, standardized format. The card indicates what the subject coverage is, the types of materials included, the service given, frequency of publication, procedure for use, an example of the procedure, a sample entry with explanatory notes, other places to…

  15. Reference-Dependent Sympathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Deborah A.

    2010-01-01

    Natural disasters and other traumatic events often draw a greater charitable response than do ongoing misfortunes, even those that may cause even more widespread misery, such as famine or malaria. Why is the response disproportionate to need? The notion of reference dependence critical to Prospect Theory (Kahneman & Tversky, 1979) maintains that…

  16. Reflections on Reference Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Kerryn A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes programmatic changes in reference services at the Johns Hopkins University (Maryland) medical library and speculates on the future. Topics include institutional restructuring and consolidation; improvements in technology infrastructure; external economic pressure; and fiscal accountability, including library funding and cost center…

  17. Chat Reference. SPEC Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronan, Jana, Comp.; Turner, Carol, Comp.

    2002-01-01

    This SPEC (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center) Kit presents the results of a survey of Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries designed to gather data on chat reference service. A total of 66 of 124 ARL member libraries responded to the survey. A copy of the questionnaire with tabulated results is presented. Representative…

  18. International reference ionosphere 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, Dieter; Rawer, K.; Bossy, L.; Kutiev, I.; Oyama, K.-I.; Leitinger, R.; Kazimirovsky, E.

    1990-01-01

    The International Reference Ionosphere 1990 (IRI-90) is described. IRI described monthly averages of the electron density, electron temperature, ion temperature, and ion composition in the altitude range from 50 to 1000 km for magnetically quiet conditions in the non-auroral ionosphere. The most important improvements and new developments are summarized.

  19. THAI, REFERENCE GRAMMAR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NOSS, RICHARD B.

    A REFERENCE GRAMMAR FOR THE THAI LANGUAGE IS PROVIDED. THE MAIN STRUCTURAL FEATURES OF STANDARD SPOKEN THAI ARE OUTLINED AND ELABORATED BY SUBCLASSIFICATION AND EXAMPLE. IN ADDITION, AN INDEX OF MINOR FORM-CLASS MEMBERS IS PROVIDED. THE APPROACH TO CLASSIFICATION OF GRAMMATICAL FEATURES FOLLOWS CURRENT TECHNIQUES OF AMERICAN DESCRIPTIVE…

  20. Multimedia Reference Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzberg, Carol S.

    2001-01-01

    Presents suggestions for content-rich classroom encyclopedias on CO-ROM and DVD, including: the Encarta Reference Suite 2001; the 2001 Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia, School Edition; the Britannica 2001 DVD; and the World Book 2001 Deluxe Edition, v5.0. (SM)

  1. Reference Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Jepsen, Richard

    2011-11-02

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review in which principal investigator discusses project progress to develop a representative set of Reference Models (RM) for the MHK industry to develop baseline cost of energy (COE) and evaluate key cost component/system reduction pathways.

  2. Selecting a Reference Object

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jared E.; Carlson, Laura A.; Hill, Patrick L.

    2011-01-01

    One way to describe the location of an object is to relate it to another object. Often there are many nearby objects, each of which could serve as a candidate to be the reference object. A common theoretical assumption is that features that make a given object salient relative to the candidate set are instrumental in determining which is selected.…

  3. OSH technical reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    In an evaluation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Occupational Safety and Health programs for government-owned contractor-operated (GOCO) activities, the Department of Labor`s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recommended a technical information exchange program. The intent was to share written safety and health programs, plans, training manuals, and materials within the entire DOE community. The OSH Technical Reference (OTR) helps support the secretary`s response to the OSHA finding by providing a one-stop resource and referral for technical information that relates to safe operations and practice. It also serves as a technical information exchange tool to reference DOE-wide materials pertinent to specific safety topics and, with some modification, as a training aid. The OTR bridges the gap between general safety documents and very specific requirements documents. It is tailored to the DOE community and incorporates DOE field experience.

  4. The NPL reference hazemeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, G. H. C.

    1992-09-01

    The reference hazemeter is a development of a commercial pivotable sphere hazemeter. The principle improvements are a high quality photometer and its associated electronic and temperature controller, a stable power supply for the source and the determination of the lamp current of illuminants A and C, improvements to the optics to achieve a well shaped beam, and mechanical modifications to accommodate the improvements and allow a good mechanical movement. Various tests were carried out to validate the instrument behavior. These identified systematic errors caused by inter-reflections. To reduce the inter-reflection errors, the blue filter and the input lenses were antireflection coated. The reference hazemeter complies with BS 2782--methods of testing plastics; part 5--optical and color properties; method 521A--determination of haze of film and sheet. A calibration service using the hazemeter is now in operation.

  5. The Brewer reference triad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioletov, V. E.; Kerr, J. B.; McElroy, C. T.; Wardle, D. I.; Savastiouk, V.; Grajnar, T. S.

    2005-10-01

    It has been more than 20 years since the Brewer reference triad was established by Environment Canada at Toronto. The triad serves as a reference for traveling standard instruments that are used to calibrate Brewer spectrophotometers around the world. The members of the triad are calibrated on a regular basis at Mauna Loa, Hawaii. Regular tests made with an internal quartz halogen lamp make it possible to track the instrument response between the calibrations. A new analysis of available column ozone data records indicates that the uncertainty in the daily values derived from each instrument is approximately 0.6%. The random errors of individual observations are within +/-1% for 90% of all measurements. Sources of potential errors in the individual Brewer measurements as well as quality control tools are also discussed.

  6. Alignment reference device

    DOEpatents

    Patton, Gail Y.; Torgerson, Darrel D.

    1987-01-01

    An alignment reference device provides a collimated laser beam that minimizes angular deviations therein. A laser beam source outputs the beam into a single mode optical fiber. The output end of the optical fiber acts as a source of radiant energy and is positioned at the focal point of a lens system where the focal point is positioned within the lens. The output beam reflects off a mirror back to the lens that produces a collimated beam.

  7. Reference Undulator Measurement Results

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary; Levashov, Yurii; /SLAC

    2011-08-18

    The LCLS reference undulator has been measured 22 times during the course of undulator tuning. These measurements provide estimates of various statistical errors. This note gives a summary of the reference undulator measurements and it provides estimates of the undulator tuning errors. We measured the reference undulator many times during the tuning of the LCLS undulators. These data sets give estimates of the random errors in the tuned undulators. The measured trajectories in the reference undulator are stable and straight to within {+-}2 {micro}m. Changes in the phase errors are less than {+-}2 deg between data sets. The phase advance in the cell varies by less than {+-}2 deg between data sets. The rms variation between data sets of the first integral of B{sub x} is 9.98 {micro}Tm, and the rms variation of the second integral of B{sub x} is 17.4 {micro}Tm{sup 2}. The rms variation of the first integral of B{sub y} is 6.65 {micro}Tm, and the rms variation of the second integral of B{sub y} is 12.3 {micro}Tm{sup 2}. The rms variation of the x-position of the fiducialized beam axis is 35 {micro}m in the final production run This corresponds to an rms uncertainty in the K value of {Delta}K/K = 2.7 x 10{sup -5}. The rms variation of the y-position of the fiducialized beam axis is 4 {micro}m in the final production run.

  8. Celestial Reference Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.

    2013-03-01

    Concepts and Background: This paper gives an overview of modern celestial reference frames as realized at radio frequencies using the Very Long baseline Interferometry (VLBI) technique. We discuss basic celestial reference frame concepts, desired properties, and uses. We review the networks of antennas used for this work. We briefly discuss the history of the science of astrometry touching upon the discovery of precession, proper motion, nutation, and parallax, and the field of radio astronomy. Building Celestial Frames: Next, we discuss the multi-step process of building a celestial frame: First candidate sources are identified based on point-like properties from single dish radio telescopes surveys. Second, positions are refined using connected element interferometers such as the Very Large Array, and the ATCA. Third, positions of approximately milli-arcsecond (mas) accuracy are determined using intercontinental VLBI surveys. Fourth, sub-mas positions are determined by multiyear programs using intercontinental VLBI. These sub-mas sets of positions are then verified by multiple teams in preparation for release to non-specialists in the form of an official IAU International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). The process described above has until recently been largely restricted to work at S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz). However, in the last decade sub-mas work has expanded to include celestial frames at K-band (24 GHz), Ka-band (32 GHz), and Q-band (43 GHz). While these frames currently have the disadvantage of far smaller data sets, the astrophysical quality of the sources themselves improves at these higher frequencies and thus make these frequencies attractive for realizations of celestial reference frames. Accordingly, we review progress at these higher frequency bands. Path to the Future: We discuss prospects for celestial reference frames over the next decade. We present an example of an error budget for astrometric VLBI and discuss the budget's use as a tool for

  9. Celestial Reference Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.

    2013-09-01

    Concepts and Background: This paper gives an overview of modern celestial reference frames as realized at radio frequencies using the Very Long baseline Interferometry (VLBI) technique. We discuss basic celestial reference frame concepts, desired properties, and uses. We review the networks of antennas used for this work. We briefly discuss the history of the science of astrometry touching upon the discovery of precession, proper motion, nutation, and parallax, and the field of radio astronomy. Building Celestial Frames: Next, we discuss the multi-step process of building a celestial frame: First candidate sources are identified based on point-like properties from single dish radio telescopes surveys. Second, positions are refined using connected element interferometers such as the Very Large Array, and the ATCA. Third, positions of approximately milli-arcsecond (mas) accuracy are determined using intercontinental VLBI surveys. Fourth, sub-mas positions are determined by multiyear programs using intercontinental VLBI. These sub-mas sets of positions are then verified by multiple teams in preparation for release to non-specialists in the form of an official IAU International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). The process described above has until recently been largely restricted to work at S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz). However, in the last decade sub-mas work has expanded to include celestial frames at K-band (24 GHz), Ka-band (32 GHz), and Q-band (43 GHz). While these frames currently have the disadvantage of far smaller data sets, the astrophysical quality of the sources themselves improves at these higher frequencies and thus make these frequencies attractive for realizations of celestial reference frames. Accordingly, we review progress at these higher frequency bands. Path to the Future: We discuss prospects for celestial reference frames over the next decade. We present an example of an error budget for astrometric VLBI and discuss the budget's use as a tool for

  10. Optimizing testing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus species.

    PubMed

    Baker, C N; Huang, M B; Tenover, F C

    1994-07-01

    Selection of the appropriate NaCl concentration for test medium for oxacillin susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci has been problematic when using different antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods. Broth microdilution, using cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth + 2% NaCl, is the currently recommended reference method. There is currently no recommendation for the addition of NaCl to agar for dilution susceptibility tests when Staphylococcus species are tested with oxacillin. We examined the effects of adding 0, 2%, 4%, and 5% NaCl to Mueller-Hinton agar and broth for agar dilution, Etest, and broth microdilution tests. The results of these tests were compared with the reference broth microdilution results and with the results of a hybridization assay using a mec gene probe. We tested 223 strains of staphylococci, 128 of which were mec gene positive and had oxacillin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) > or = 4 micrograms/ml. Seven strains of S. aureus were mec probe negative but were oxacillin resistant. Seven coagulase-negative strains (three S. epidermidis, one S. haemolyticus, and three S. simulans) were mec probe positive and were oxacillin susceptible. The MICs for oxacillin-resistant strains increased two- to fourfold with the addition of 2% NaCl, but the MICs for oxacillin-susceptible strains were unchanged. Major and very major interpretative rates ranged from 18.2% to 20.2% for agar dilution and Etest without NaCl added to the medium, and these rates decreased to < 1% with the addition of 2% NaCl to the medium. The addition of 4% or 5% NaCl caused major error rates of > 17% for all test methods.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Optimizing testing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus species.

    PubMed

    Baker, C N; Huang, M B; Tenover, F C

    1994-07-01

    Selection of the appropriate NaCl concentration for test medium for oxacillin susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci has been problematic when using different antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods. Broth microdilution, using cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth + 2% NaCl, is the currently recommended reference method. There is currently no recommendation for the addition of NaCl to agar for dilution susceptibility tests when Staphylococcus species are tested with oxacillin. We examined the effects of adding 0, 2%, 4%, and 5% NaCl to Mueller-Hinton agar and broth for agar dilution, Etest, and broth microdilution tests. The results of these tests were compared with the reference broth microdilution results and with the results of a hybridization assay using a mec gene probe. We tested 223 strains of staphylococci, 128 of which were mec gene positive and had oxacillin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) > or = 4 micrograms/ml. Seven strains of S. aureus were mec probe negative but were oxacillin resistant. Seven coagulase-negative strains (three S. epidermidis, one S. haemolyticus, and three S. simulans) were mec probe positive and were oxacillin susceptible. The MICs for oxacillin-resistant strains increased two- to fourfold with the addition of 2% NaCl, but the MICs for oxacillin-susceptible strains were unchanged. Major and very major interpretative rates ranged from 18.2% to 20.2% for agar dilution and Etest without NaCl added to the medium, and these rates decreased to < 1% with the addition of 2% NaCl to the medium. The addition of 4% or 5% NaCl caused major error rates of > 17% for all test methods.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7820997

  12. Epidemiology of Salmonella sp. in California cull dairy cattle: prevalence of fecal shedding and diagnostic accuracy of pooled enriched broth culture of fecal samples

    PubMed Central

    Abu Aboud, Omran A.; Adaska, John M.; Williams, Deniece R.; Rossitto, Paul V.; Champagne, John D.; Lehenbauer, Terry W.; Atwill, Robert; Li, Xunde

    2016-01-01

    Background The primary objective of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the crude, seasonal and cull-reason stratified prevalence of Salmonella fecal shedding in cull dairy cattle on seven California dairies. A secondary objective was to estimate and compare the relative sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) for pools of 5 and 10 enriched broth cultures of fecal samples for Salmonella sp. detection. Methods Seven dairy farms located in the San Joaquin Valley of California were identified and enrolled in the study as a convenience sample. Cull cows were identified for fecal sampling once during each season between 2014 and 2015, specifically during spring, summer, fall, and winter, and 10 cows were randomly selected for fecal sampling at the day of their sale. In addition, study personnel completed a survey based on responses of the herd manager to questions related to the previous four month’s herd management. Fecal samples were frozen until testing for Salmonella. After overnight enrichment in liquid broth, pools of enrichment broth (EBP) were created for 5 and 10 samples. All individual and pooled broths were cultured on selective media with putative Salmonella colonies confirmed by biochemical testing before being serogrouped and serotyped. Results A total of 249 cull cows were enrolled into the study and their fecal samples tested for Salmonella. The survey-weighted period prevalence of fecal shedding of all Salmonella sp. in the cull cow samples across all study herds and the entire study period was 3.42% (N = 249; SE 1.07). The within herd prevalence of Salmonella shed in feces did not differ over the four study seasons (P = 0.074). The Se of culture of EBP of five samples was 62.5% (SE = 17.12), which was not statistically different from the Se of culture of EBP of 10 (37.5%, SE = 17.12, P = 0.48). The Sp of culture of EBP of five samples was 95.24% (SE = 3.29) and for pools of 10 samples was 100.00% (SE = 0). There was no statistical difference

  13. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in liquid broth medium and during processing of fermented sausage using autochthonous starter cultures.

    PubMed

    Pragalaki, T; Bloukas, J G; Kotzekidou, P

    2013-11-01

    The antimicrobial effect of two autochthonous starter cultures of Lactobacillus sakei was evaluated in vitro (in liquid broth medium) and in situ assays. The inactivation of foodborne pathogens Listeria monocytogenes (serotype 4ab No 10) and Escherichia coli O157:H7 ATCC 43888 was investigated during the production of fermented sausage according to a typical Greek recipe using L. sakei strains as starter cultures. The inactivation kinetics were modeled using GInaFiT, a freeware tool to assess microbial survival curves. By the end of the ripening period, the inhibition of L. monocytogenes was significant in treatments with L. sakei 8416 and L. sakei 4413 compared to the control treatment. A 2.2-log reduction of the population of E. coli O157:H7 resulted from the autochthonous starter culture L. sakei 4413 during sausage processing. The use of the autochthonous starter cultures constitutes an additional improvement to the microbial safety by reducing foodborne pathogens. PMID:23793080

  14. Separation of clavulanic acid from fermented broth of amino acids by an aqueous two-phase system and ion-exchange adsorption.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Clovis Sacardo; Cuel, Maressa Fabiano; Barreto, Verônica Orlandin; Kwong, Wu Hong; Hokka, Carlos O; Barboza, M

    2012-02-15

    The clavulanic acid is a substance which inhibits the β-lactamases used with penicillins for therapeutic treatment. After the fermentation, by-products of low molecular weight such as amino acids lysine, histidine, proline and tyrosine are present in the fermented broth. To remove these impurities the techniques of extraction by an aqueous two-phase system of 17% polyethylene glycol molecular weight 600 and 15% potassium phosphate were used for a partial purification. A subsequent ion-exchange adsorption was used for the recuperation of the clavulanic acid of the top phase and purification getting a concentration factor of 2 and purification of 100% in relation to the amino acids lysine, histidine, proline and tyrosine.

  15. FK409, a novel vasodilator isolated from the acid-treated fermentation broth of Streptomyces griseosporeus. I. Taxonomy, fermentation, isolation, and physico-chemical and biological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hino, M; Iwami, M; Okamoto, M; Yoshida, K; Haruta, H; Okuhara, M; Hosoda, J; Kohsaka, M; Aoki, H; Imanaka, H

    1989-11-01

    FK409, a novel vasodilator with anti-platelet aggregation activity, has been isolated from the acid-treated fermentation broth of Streptomyces griseosporeus No. 16917, which was cultured on a medium containing NaNO3 for 4 days. FK409 was purified from the culture-filtrate by extraction with ethyl acetate after adjusting the pH to 3.0 with HC1, followed by silica gel chromatography. The molecular formula of this compound was determined to be C8H13N3O4. In vitro, FK409 showed a potent relaxation activity on noradrenaline induced contraction of rat aorta. In addition to the vasodilating activity, this compound also showed potent anti-aggregation activities towards rabbit platelets. In vivo, intravenously administered FK409 resulted in marked blood pressure lowering in rats. PMID:2584140

  16. New compounds, nanaomycin F and G, discovered by physicochemical screening from a culture broth of Streptomyces rosa subsp. notoensis OS-3966.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Takuji; Boonsnongcheep, Panitch; Kimura, Toru; Iwatsuki, Masato; Sato, Noriko; Nonaka, Kenichi; Prathanturarug, Sompop; Takahashi, Yōko; Ōmura, Satoshi

    2015-11-01

    Two new compounds, nanaomycin F and G, were isolated by physicochemical screening method from cultured broth of Streptomyces rosa subsp. notoensis OS-3966, which is known to produce nanaomycin A, B, C, D, and E. Nanaomycin F is a new nanaomycin analog, a 4a-hydroxyl analog of nanaomycin B. Nanaomycin G has a unique skeleton with 1-indanone infused with a tetrahydropyran ring. Nanaomycin A possesses broad antimicrobial activity but nanaomycin F and G demonstrated no bioactivity against all bacteria and fungi tested in this study. In addition, in both nanaomycin F and G, the production of superoxide radicals was majorly decreased in comparison to nanaomycin A. It was considered that the antimicrobial properties were lost as a result of the decrease in production of the superoxide radicals.

  17. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in liquid broth medium and during processing of fermented sausage using autochthonous starter cultures.

    PubMed

    Pragalaki, T; Bloukas, J G; Kotzekidou, P

    2013-11-01

    The antimicrobial effect of two autochthonous starter cultures of Lactobacillus sakei was evaluated in vitro (in liquid broth medium) and in situ assays. The inactivation of foodborne pathogens Listeria monocytogenes (serotype 4ab No 10) and Escherichia coli O157:H7 ATCC 43888 was investigated during the production of fermented sausage according to a typical Greek recipe using L. sakei strains as starter cultures. The inactivation kinetics were modeled using GInaFiT, a freeware tool to assess microbial survival curves. By the end of the ripening period, the inhibition of L. monocytogenes was significant in treatments with L. sakei 8416 and L. sakei 4413 compared to the control treatment. A 2.2-log reduction of the population of E. coli O157:H7 resulted from the autochthonous starter culture L. sakei 4413 during sausage processing. The use of the autochthonous starter cultures constitutes an additional improvement to the microbial safety by reducing foodborne pathogens.

  18. Influence of carvacrol and 1,8-cineole on cell viability, membrane integrity, and morphology of Aeromonas hydrophila cultivated in a vegetable-based broth.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Jossana Pereira; de Oliveira, Kataryne Árabe Rimá; de Figueiredo, Regina Celia Bressan Queiroz; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of carvacrol (CAR) and 1,8-cineole (CIN) alone (at the MIC) or in combination at subinhibitory amounts (both at 1/8 MIC) on the cell viability, membrane permeability, and morphology of Aeromonas hydrophila INCQS 7966 (A. hydrophila) cultivated in a vegetable-based broth. CAR and CIN alone or in combination severely affected the viability of the bacteria and caused dramatic changes in the cell membrane permeability, leading to cell death, as observed by confocal laser microscopy. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy images of bacterial cells exposed to CAR or CIN or the mixture of both compounds revealed severe changes in cell wall structure, rupture of the plasma membrane, shrinking of cells, condensation of cytoplasmic content, leakage of intracellular material, and cell collapse. These findings suggest that CAR and CIN alone or in combination at subinhibitory amounts could be applied to inhibit the growth of A. hydrophila in foods, particularly as sanitizing agents in vegetables.

  19. Epidemiology of Salmonella sp. in California cull dairy cattle: prevalence of fecal shedding and diagnostic accuracy of pooled enriched broth culture of fecal samples

    PubMed Central

    Abu Aboud, Omran A.; Adaska, John M.; Williams, Deniece R.; Rossitto, Paul V.; Champagne, John D.; Lehenbauer, Terry W.; Atwill, Robert; Li, Xunde

    2016-01-01

    Background The primary objective of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the crude, seasonal and cull-reason stratified prevalence of Salmonella fecal shedding in cull dairy cattle on seven California dairies. A secondary objective was to estimate and compare the relative sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) for pools of 5 and 10 enriched broth cultures of fecal samples for Salmonella sp. detection. Methods Seven dairy farms located in the San Joaquin Valley of California were identified and enrolled in the study as a convenience sample. Cull cows were identified for fecal sampling once during each season between 2014 and 2015, specifically during spring, summer, fall, and winter, and 10 cows were randomly selected for fecal sampling at the day of their sale. In addition, study personnel completed a survey based on responses of the herd manager to questions related to the previous four month’s herd management. Fecal samples were frozen until testing for Salmonella. After overnight enrichment in liquid broth, pools of enrichment broth (EBP) were created for 5 and 10 samples. All individual and pooled broths were cultured on selective media with putative Salmonella colonies confirmed by biochemical testing before being serogrouped and serotyped. Results A total of 249 cull cows were enrolled into the study and their fecal samples tested for Salmonella. The survey-weighted period prevalence of fecal shedding of all Salmonella sp. in the cull cow samples across all study herds and the entire study period was 3.42% (N = 249; SE 1.07). The within herd prevalence of Salmonella shed in feces did not differ over the four study seasons (P = 0.074). The Se of culture of EBP of five samples was 62.5% (SE = 17.12), which was not statistically different from the Se of culture of EBP of 10 (37.5%, SE = 17.12, P = 0.48). The Sp of culture of EBP of five samples was 95.24% (SE = 3.29) and for pools of 10 samples was 100.00% (SE = 0). There was no statistical difference

  20. Hypolipidemic Effects of Biopolymers Extracted from Culture Broth, Mycelia, and Fruiting Bodies of Auricularia auricula-judae in Dietary-induced Hyperlipidemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hun; Yang, Byung-Keun; Jeong, Yong-Tae; Kim, Guk-Nam; Jeong, Yu-Sun; Kim, Sang-Min; Mehta, Pradeep

    2007-01-01

    Hypolipidemic effect of biopolymers extracted from culture broth (CP), mycelia (MP), and fruiting bodies (FP) of Auricularia auricula-judae was investigated in dietary-induced hyperlipidemic rats. The experimental animals were administrated (100 mg/kg body weight) with different biopolymers, daily for 4 weeks. Hypolipidemic effects were achieved in all the experimental groups, however, FP was proved to be the most potent one. The administration of the FP reduced the plasma triglyceride, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and atherogenic index by 24.3, 28.5, 36.4, and 40.9%, respectively, while increased the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level (9.0%), when compared to the saline (control) administered group. PMID:24015062

  1. Growth of Stressed Strains of Four Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Serogroups in Five Enrichment Broths.

    PubMed

    Verhaegen, Bavo; De Reu, Koen; Heyndrickx, Marc; Van Damme, Inge; De Zutter, Lieven

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate (i) the behavior of several strains of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O103, O111, and O145) exposed to different stress conditions and (ii) the growth dynamics of stressed and nonstressed non-O157 STEC cells in five enrichment media. STEC strains were exposed to acid, cold, and freeze stresses. Lethal and sublethal injuries were determined by plating in parallel on selective and nonselective agar media. Freeze stress (8 days, 20°C) caused the most lethal (95.3% ± 2.5%) injury, as well as the most sublethal (89.1% ± 8.8%) injury in the surviving population. Growth of stressed and nonstressed pure cultures of non-O157 STEC on modified tryptic soy broth, buffered peptone water (BPW), BPW with sodium pyruvate, Brila, and STEC enrichment broth (SEB) was determined using total viable counts. To compare growth capacities, growth after 7 and 24 h of enrichment was measured; lag phases and maximum growth rates were also calculated. In general, growth on BPW resulted in a short lag phase followed by a high maximum growth rate during the enrichment of all tested strains when using all three stress types. Furthermore, BPW ensured the highest STEC count after 7 h of growth. Supplementing the medium with sodium pyruvate did not improve the growth dynamics. The two selective media, Brila and SEB, were less efficient than BPW, but Brila's enrichment performance was remarkably better than that of SEB. This study shows that irrespective of the effect of background flora, BPW is still recommended for resuscitation of non-O157 STEC.

  2. Real-Time Identification of Bacteria and Candida Species in Positive Blood Culture Broths by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry▿

    PubMed Central

    Ferroni, Agnès; Suarez, Stéphanie; Beretti, Jean-Luc; Dauphin, Brunhilde; Bille, Emmanuelle; Meyer, Julie; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Alanio, Alexandre; Berche, Patrick; Nassif, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Delays in the identification of microorganisms are a barrier to the establishment of adequate empirical antibiotic therapy of bacteremia. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) allows the identification of microorganisms directly from colonies within minutes. In this study, we have adapted and tested this technology for use with blood culture broths, thus allowing identification in less than 30 min once the blood culture is detected as positive. Our method is based on the selective recovery of bacteria by adding a detergent that solubilizes blood cells but not microbial membranes. Microorganisms are then extracted by centrifugation and analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS. This strategy was first tested by inoculating various bacterial and fungal species into negative blood culture bottles. We then tested positive patient blood or fluid samples grown in blood culture bottles, and the results obtained by MALDI-TOF-MS were compared with those obtained using conventional strategies. Three hundred twelve spiked bottles and 434 positive cultures from patients were analyzed. Among monomicrobial fluids, MALDI-TOF-MS allowed a reliable identification at the species, group, and genus/family level in 91%, 5%, and 2% of cases, respectively, in 20 min. In only 2% of these samples, MALDI-TOF MS did not yield any result. When blood cultures were multibacterial, identification was improved by using specific databases based on the Gram staining results. MALDI-TOF-MS is currently the fastest technique to accurately identify microorganisms grown in positive blood culture broths. PMID:20237092

  3. Antares Reference Telescope System

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, V.K.; Kaprelian, E.; Swann, T.; Parker, J.; Wolfe, P.; Woodfin, G.; Knight, D.

    1983-01-01

    Antares is a 24-beam, 40-TW carbon-dioxide laser-fusion system currently nearing completion at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 24 beams will be focused onto a tiny target (typically 300 to 1000 ..mu..m in diameter) located approximately at the center of a 7.3-m-diameter by 9.3-m-long vacuum (10/sup -6/ torr) chamber. The design goal is to position the targets to within 10 ..mu..m of a selected nominal position, which may be anywhere within a fixed spherical region 1 cm in diameter. The Antares Reference Telescope System is intended to help achieve this goal for alignment and viewing of the various targets used in the laser system. The Antares Reference Telescope System consists of two similar electro-optical systems positioned in a near orthogonal manner in the target chamber area of the laser. Each of these consists of four subsystems: (1) a fixed 9X optical imaging subsystem which produces an image of the target at the vidicon; (2) a reticle projection subsystem which superimposes an image of the reticle pattern at the vidicon; (3) an adjustable front-lighting subsystem which illuminates the target; and (4) an adjustable back-lighting subsystem which also can be used to illuminate the target. The various optical, mechanical, and vidicon design considerations and trade-offs are discussed. The final system chosen (which is being built) and its current status are described in detail.

  4. Antares reference telescope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, V. K.; Kaprelian, E.; Swann, T.; Parker, J.; Wolfe, P.; Woodfin, G.; Knight, D.

    Antares is a 24 beam, 40 TW carbon dioxide laser fusion system currently nearing completion. The 24 beams will be focused onto a tiny target. It is to position the targets to within 10 (SIGMA)m of a selected nominal position, which may be anywhere within a fixed spherical region 1 cm in diameter. The Antares reference telescope system is intended to help achieve this goal for alignment and viewing of the various targets used in the laser system. The Antares reference telescope system consists of two similar electrooptical systems positioned in a near orthogonal manner in the target chamber area of the laser. Each of these consists of four subsystems: (1) a fixed 9% optical imaging subsystem which produces an image of the target at the vidicon; (2) a reticle projection subsystem which superimposes an image of the reticle pattern at the vidicon; (3) an adjustable front lighting subsystem which illuminates the target; and (4) an adjustable back lighting subsystem which also can be used to illuminate the target. The various optical, mechanical, and vidicon design considerations and tradeoffs are discussed. The final system chosen and its current status are described.

  5. Coal data: A reference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This report, Coal Data: A Reference, summarizes basic information on the mining and use of coal, an important source of energy in the US. This report is written for a general audience. The goal is to cover basic material and strike a reasonable compromise between overly generalized statements and detailed analyses. The section ``Supplemental Figures and Tables`` contains statistics, graphs, maps, and other illustrations that show trends, patterns, geographic locations, and similar coal-related information. The section ``Coal Terminology and Related Information`` provides additional information about terms mentioned in the text and introduces some new terms. The last edition of Coal Data: A Reference was published in 1991. The present edition contains updated data as well as expanded reviews and additional information. Added to the text are discussions of coal quality, coal prices, unions, and strikes. The appendix has been expanded to provide statistics on a variety of additional topics, such as: trends in coal production and royalties from Federal and Indian coal leases, hours worked and earnings for coal mine employment, railroad coal shipments and revenues, waterborne coal traffic, coal export loading terminals, utility coal combustion byproducts, and trace elements in coal. The information in this report has been gleaned mainly from the sources in the bibliography. The reader interested in going beyond the scope of this report should consult these sources. The statistics are largely from reports published by the Energy Information Administration.

  6. Nuclear Science References Database

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko, B.; Běták, E.; Singh, B.; Totans, J.

    2014-06-15

    The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center (http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr)

  7. Long life reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Yonco, Robert M.; Nagy, Zoltan

    1989-01-01

    An external, reference electrode is provided for long term use with a high temperature, high pressure system. The electrode is arranged in a vertical, electrically insulative tube with an upper portion serving as an electrolyte reservior and a lower portion in electrolytic communication with the system to be monitored. The lower end portion includes a flow restriction such as a porous plug to limit the electrolyte release into the system. A piston equalized to the system pressure is fitted into the upper portion of the tube to impart a small incremental pressure to the electrolyte. The piston is selected of suitable size and weight to cause only a slight flow of electrolyte through the porous plug into the high pressure system. This prevents contamination of the electrolyte but is of such small flow rate that operating intervals of a month or more can be achieved.

  8. Long life reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Yonco, R.M.; Nagy, Z.

    1987-07-30

    An external, reference electrode is provided for long term use with a high temperature, high pressure system. The electrode is arranged in a vertical, electrically insulative tube with an upper portion serving as an electrolyte reservoir and a lower portion in electrolytic communication with the system to be monitored. The lower end portion includes a flow restriction such as a porous plug to limit the electrolyte release into the system. A piston equalized to the system pressure is fitted into the upper portion of the tube to impart a small incremental pressure to the electrolyte. The piston is selected of suitable size and weight to cause only a slight flow of electrolyte through the porous plug into the high pressure system. This prevents contamination of the electrolyte but is of such small flow rate that operating intervals of a month or more can be achieved. 2 figs.

  9. Long life reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Yonco, R.M.; Nagy, Z.

    1989-04-04

    An external, reference electrode is provided for long term use with a high temperature, high pressure system. The electrode is arranged in a vertical, electrically insulative tube with an upper portion serving as an electrolyte reservoir and a lower portion in electrolytic communication with the system to be monitored. The lower end portion includes a flow restriction such as a porous plug to limit the electrolyte release into the system. A piston equalized to the system pressure is fitted into the upper portion of the tube to impart a small incremental pressure to the electrolyte. The piston is selected of suitable size and weight to cause only a slight flow of electrolyte through the porous plug into the high pressure system. This prevents contamination of the electrolyte but is of such small flow rate that operating intervals of a month or more can be achieved. 2 figs.

  10. Tank characterization reference guide

    SciTech Connect

    De Lorenzo, D.S.; DiCenso, A.T.; Hiller, D.B.; Johnson, K.W.; Rutherford, J.H.; Smith, D.J.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-09-01

    Characterization of the Hanford Site high-level waste storage tanks supports safety issue resolution; operations and maintenance requirements; and retrieval, pretreatment, vitrification, and disposal technology development. Technical, historical, and programmatic information about the waste tanks is often scattered among many sources, if it is documented at all. This Tank Characterization Reference Guide, therefore, serves as a common location for much of the generic tank information that is otherwise contained in many documents. The report is intended to be an introduction to the issues and history surrounding the generation, storage, and management of the liquid process wastes, and a presentation of the sampling, analysis, and modeling activities that support the current waste characterization. This report should provide a basis upon which those unfamiliar with the Hanford Site tank farms can start their research.

  11. PASCAL/48 reference manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. C.; Hamm, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    PASCAL/48 is a programming language for the Intel MCS-48 series of microcomputers. In particular, it can be used with the Intel 8748. It is designed to allow the programmer to control most of the instructions being generated and the allocation of storage. The language can be used instead of ASSEMBLY language in most applications while allowing the user the necessary degree of control over hardware resources. Although it is called PASCAL/48, the language differs in many ways from PASCAL. The program structure and statements of the two languages are similar, but the expression mechanism and data types are different. The PASCAL/48 cross-compiler is written in PASCAL and runs on the CDC CYBER NOS system. It generates object code in Intel hexadecimal format that can be used to program the MCS-48 series of microcomputers. This reference manual defines the language, describes the predeclared procedures, lists error messages, illustrates use, and includes language syntax diagrams.

  12. Accurate Optical Reference Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, N.

    2006-08-01

    Current and near future all-sky astrometric catalogs on the ICRF are reviewed with the emphasis on reference star data at optical wavelengths for user applications. The standard error of a Hipparcos Catalogue star position is now about 15 mas per coordinate. For the Tycho-2 data it is typically 20 to 100 mas, depending on magnitude. The USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC) observing program was completed in 2004 and reductions toward the final UCAC3 release are in progress. This all-sky reference catalogue will have positional errors of 15 to 70 mas for stars in the 10 to 16 mag range, with a high degree of completeness. Proper motions for the about 60 million UCAC stars will be derived by combining UCAC astrometry with available early epoch data, including yet unpublished scans of the complete set of AGK2, Hamburg Zone astrograph and USNO Black Birch programs. Accurate positional and proper motion data are combined in the Naval Observatory Merged Astrometric Dataset (NOMAD) which includes Hipparcos, Tycho-2, UCAC2, USNO-B1, NPM+SPM plate scan data for astrometry, and is supplemented by multi-band optical photometry as well as 2MASS near infrared photometry. The Milli-Arcsecond Pathfinder Survey (MAPS) mission is currently being planned at USNO. This is a micro-satellite to obtain 1 mas positions, parallaxes, and 1 mas/yr proper motions for all bright stars down to about 15th magnitude. This program will be supplemented by a ground-based program to reach 18th magnitude on the 5 mas level.

  13. Reference Artifacts for NDE

    SciTech Connect

    Bono, M; Hibbard, R; Martz, H E

    2003-02-11

    Two reference artifacts will be fabricated for this study. One of the artifacts will have a cylindrical geometry and will contain features similar to those on an SNRT target. The second artifact will have a spherical geometry and will contain features similar to those on a Double Shell target. The artifacts were designed for manufacturability and to provide a range of features that can be measured using NDE methods. The cylindrical reference artifact is illustrated in Figure 1. This artifact consists of a polystyrene body containing two steps and a machined slot, into which will fit a tracer made of doped polystyrene. The polystyrene body contains several grooves and can be fabricated entirely on a diamond turning machine. The body can be machined by turning a PS rod to a diameter slightly greater than the finished diameter of 2 mm. The part can be moved off-axis to face it off and to machine the steps, slot, and grooves. The tracer contains a drilled hole and a milled slot, which could be machined with a single setup on a milling machine. Once assembled, the artifact could be placed in a Be tube or other structure relevant to target assemblies. The assembled artifact will contain many features that could be measured using various NDE methods. Some of these features are: Diameter; Maximum height; Step height; Dimensions of upper step; Radius at the union of the bottom of step and the vertical wall; Sizes of the grooves; Distance from step to groove; Slot width; Slot height; Location of the groove beneath the tracer; Diameter and location of drilled hole in tracer; and Size and location of slot in tracer. The spherical reference artifact is illustrated in Figure 2. This artifact is intended to replicate a double shell target, which consists of concentric polymer spheres separated by aerogel. The artifact consists of an upper hemispherical shell composed of 1% BrCH, which mates via a step joint with a hemispherical component made of polystyrene. This lower component

  14. Resistance of Listeria monocytogenes F2365 cells to synthetic gastric fluid is greater following growth on ready-to-eat deli turkey meat than in brain heart infusion broth.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Luke D; Faith, Nancy G; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2007-11-01

    Ready-to-eat (RTE) deli meats have been categorized as high-risk foods for contraction of foodborne listeriosis. Several recent listeriosis outbreaks have been associated with the consumption of RTE deli turkey meat. In this study, we examined whether the growth of Listeria monocytogenes F2365 on commercially prepared RTE deli turkey meat causes listerial cells to become more resistant to inactivation by synthetic gastric fluid (SGF). Listerial cells grown on turkey meat to late logarithmic-early stationary phase were significantly more resistant to SGF at pH 7.0, 5.0, or 3.5 than listerial cells grown in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth. The pH was lower in the fluid in packages of turkey meat than in BHI broth (6.5 versus 7.5). However, listerial cells grown in BHI broth adjusted to a lower pH (6.0) did not exhibit enhanced resistance to SGF. The lesser resistance to SGF of listerial cells grown in BHI broth may be due, in part, to the presence of glucose (0.2%). This study indicates the environment presented by the growth of L. monocytogenes on deli turkey meat affects its ability to survive conditions it encounters in the gastrointestinal tract.

  15. Self-assembling systems based on quaternized derivatives of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane in nutrient broth as antimicrobial agents and carriers for hydrophobic drugs.

    PubMed

    Pashirova, Tatiana N; Lukashenko, Svetlana S; Zakharov, Sergey V; Voloshina, Alexandra D; Zhiltsova, Elena P; Zobov, Vladimir V; Souto, Eliana B; Zakharova, Lucia Ya

    2015-03-01

    Aggregation properties of mono (mono-CS) and dicationic (di-CS) surfactants, namely quaternised derivatives of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO), have been evaluated in water and in nutrient broths of different pH, i.e. in Hottinger broth (рН=7.2) and Sabouraud dextrose broth (рН=5.6). Aggregation capacity of surfactants was shown to be responsible for the solubilization properties of a complex composed of a hydrophobic probe (Sudan I) and a selected drug (quercetin), contributing to the antimicrobial activity of this surfactant system. The effect of N-methyl-d-glucamine (NmDg) additive on the antimicrobial activity of mono-CS, and its aggregation and solubilization parameters, has also been evaluated. A substantial decrease in critical micelle concentration (CMC) of cationic surfactants in nutrient broths (up to 60 times) has been reported. Twofold dilution of monocationic surfactant by NmDg slightly changed the CMC of surfactant; however, it provided a remarkable increase in solubilization capacity (∼by 4 times) and decrease in its toxicity. The data anticipate the potential use of DABCO quaternized derivatives as innovative non-toxic delivery systems for hydrophobic drugs.

  16. Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Cree, Johnathan V.; Dansu, A.; Fuhr, P.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; McIntyre, T.; Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Starke, M.; Banerjee, Pranab; Kuruganti, T.; Castello, C.

    2013-04-01

    The Buildings Technologies Office (BTO), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), is initiating a new program in Sensor and Controls. The vision of this program is: • Buildings operating automatically and continuously at peak energy efficiency over their lifetimes and interoperating effectively with the electric power grid. • Buildings that are self-configuring, self-commissioning, self-learning, self-diagnosing, self-healing, and self-transacting to enable continuous peak performance. • Lower overall building operating costs and higher asset valuation. The overarching goal is to capture 30% energy savings by enhanced management of energy consuming assets and systems through development of cost-effective sensors and controls. One step in achieving this vision is the publication of this Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide. The purpose of the guide is to inform building owners and operators of the current status, capabilities, and limitations of sensor technologies. It is hoped that this guide will aid in the design and procurement process and result in successful implementation of building sensor and control systems. DOE will also use this guide to identify research priorities, develop future specifications for potential market adoption, and provide market clarity through unbiased information

  17. COSY INFINITY reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Berz, M.

    1990-07-01

    This is a reference manual for the arbitrary order particle optics and beam dynamics code COSY INFINITY. It is current as of June 28, 1990. COSY INFINITY is a code to study and design particle optical systems, including beamlines, spectrometers, and particle accelerators. At its core it is using differential algebraic (DA) methods, which allow a very systematic and simple calculation of high order effects. At the same time, it allows the computation of dependences on system parameters, which is often interesting in its own right and can also be used for fitting. COSY INFINITY has a full structured object oriented language environment. This provides a simple interface for the casual user. At the same time, it offers the demanding user a very flexible and powerful tool for the study and design of systems, and more generally, the utilization of DA methods. The power and generality of the environment is perhaps best demonstrated by the fact that the physics routines of COSY INFINITY are written in its own input language and are very compact. The approach also considerably facilitates the implementation of new features because they are incorporated with the same commands that are used for design and study. 26 refs.

  18. Eddy-Current Reference Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, H. H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic properties of metallic reference standards duplicated and stabilized for eddy-current coil measurements over long times. Concept uses precisely machined notched samples of known annealed materials as reference standards.

  19. Students' Perceptions of Reference Letters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Brian K.; Appel, Jonathan; Smith, Donald H.; Hoofnagle, Kara

    2006-01-01

    This study examines students' perceptions of reference letters. Students (n = 444) were asked to describe how they perceived reference letters. Four themes were uncovered. First, some students perceived reference letters as useful for employers. Second, some students perceived the letters as important for students seeking employment or admission…

  20. Fundamentals of Managing Reference Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Whether a library's reference collection is large or small, it needs constant attention. Singer's book offers information and insight on best practices for reference collection management, no matter the size, and shows why managing without a plan is a recipe for clutter and confusion. In this very practical guide, reference librarians will learn:…

  1. Knowledge Management and Reference Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandhi, Smiti

    2004-01-01

    Many corporations are embracing knowledge management (KM) to capture the intellectual capital of their employees. This article focuses on KM applications for reference work in libraries. It defines key concepts of KM, establishes a need for KM for reference services, and reviews various KM initiatives for reference services.

  2. Reference Policies and Procedures Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA.

    This guide to services of the reference department of Fenwick Library, George Mason University, is intended for use by staff in the department, as well as the general public. Areas covered include (1) reference desk services to users; (2) reference desk support procedures; (3) off desk services; (4) collection development, including staff…

  3. Web Reference: A Virtual Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Janet

    1999-01-01

    Presents ideas and strategies to enhance digital reference services available via the Internet in public libraries. Describes print publications which include Web reference columns; subject guides, both print and online; and the resources of the Internet Public Library and other virtual reference desks. (LRW)

  4. Capillary reference half-cell

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Stephen H.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a reference half-cell electrode wherein intermingling of test fluid with reference fluid does not affect the performance of the reference half-cell over a long time. This intermingling reference half-cell may be used as a single or double junction submersible or surface reference electrode. The intermingling reference half-cell relies on a capillary tube having a first end open to reference fluid and a second end open to test fluid wherein the small diameter of the capillary tube limits free motion of fluid within the capillary to diffusion. The electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary in contact with the reference fluid. The method of operation of the present invention begins with filling the capillary tube with a reference solution. After closing the first end of the capillary, the capillary tube may be fully submerged or partially submerged with the second open end inserted into test fluid. Since the electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary, and since the test fluid may intermingle with the reference fluid through the second open end only by diffusion, this intermingling capillary reference half-cell provides a stable voltage potential for long time periods.

  5. Capillary reference half-cell

    DOEpatents

    Hall, S.H.

    1996-02-13

    The present invention is a reference half-cell electrode wherein intermingling of test fluid with reference fluid does not affect the performance of the reference half-cell over a long time. This intermingling reference half-cell may be used as a single or double junction submersible or surface reference electrode. The intermingling reference half-cell relies on a capillary tube having a first end open to reference fluid and a second end open to test fluid wherein the small diameter of the capillary tube limits free motion of fluid within the capillary to diffusion. The electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary in contact with the reference fluid. The method of operation of the present invention begins with filling the capillary tube with a reference solution. After closing the first end of the capillary, the capillary tube may be fully submerged or partially submerged with the second open end inserted into test fluid. Since the electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary, and since the test fluid may intermingle with the reference fluid through the second open end only by diffusion, this intermingling capillary reference half-cell provides a stable voltage potential for long time periods. 11 figs.

  6. Co-reference and reasoning.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Clare R; Johnson-Laird, P N

    2004-01-01

    Co-reference occurs when two or more noun phrases refer to the same individual, as in the following inferential problem: Mark is kneeling by the fire or he is looking at the TV but not both. / Mark is kneeling by the fire. / Is he looking at the TV? In three experiments, we compared co-referential reasoning problems with problems referring to different individuals. Experiment 1 showed that co-reference improves accuracy. In Experiment 2, we replicated that finding and showed that co-reference speeds up both reading and inference. Experiment 3 showed that the effects of co-reference are greatest when the premises and the conclusion share co-referents. These effects led the participants to make illusory inferences--that is, to draw systematically invalid conclusions. The results are discussed in terms of the mental model theory of reasoning.

  7. Adequacy of Petrifilm™ Aerobic Count plates supplemented with de Man, Rogosa & Sharpe broth and chlorophenol red for enumeration of lactic acid bacteria in salami.

    PubMed

    de Castilho, Natália Parma Augusto; Okamura, Vivian Tiemi; Camargo, Anderson Carlos; Pieri, Fábio Alessandro; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2015-12-01

    The present study aimed to assess the performance of alternative protocols to enumerate lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in salami. Fourteen cultures and two mixed starter cultures were plated using six protocols: 1) Petrifilm™ Aerobic Count (AC) with MRS broth and chlorophenol red (CR), incubated under aerobiosis or 2) under anaerobiosis, 3) MRS agar with CR, 4) MRS agar with bromocresol purple, 5) MRS agar at pH5.7, and 6) All Purpose Tween agar. Samples of salami were obtained and the LAB microbiota was enumerated by plating according protocols 1, 2, 3 and 5. Regression analysis showed a significant correlation between the tested protocols, based on culture counts (p<0.05). Similar results were observed for salami, and no significant differences of mean LAB counts between selected protocols (ANOVA, p>0.05). Colonies were confirmed as LAB, indicating proper selectivity of the protocols. The results showed the adequacy of Petrifilm™ AC supplemented with CR for the enumeration of LAB in salami. PMID:26291606

  8. Adequacy of Petrifilm™ Aerobic Count plates supplemented with de Man, Rogosa & Sharpe broth and chlorophenol red for enumeration of lactic acid bacteria in salami.

    PubMed

    de Castilho, Natália Parma Augusto; Okamura, Vivian Tiemi; Camargo, Anderson Carlos; Pieri, Fábio Alessandro; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2015-12-01

    The present study aimed to assess the performance of alternative protocols to enumerate lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in salami. Fourteen cultures and two mixed starter cultures were plated using six protocols: 1) Petrifilm™ Aerobic Count (AC) with MRS broth and chlorophenol red (CR), incubated under aerobiosis or 2) under anaerobiosis, 3) MRS agar with CR, 4) MRS agar with bromocresol purple, 5) MRS agar at pH5.7, and 6) All Purpose Tween agar. Samples of salami were obtained and the LAB microbiota was enumerated by plating according protocols 1, 2, 3 and 5. Regression analysis showed a significant correlation between the tested protocols, based on culture counts (p<0.05). Similar results were observed for salami, and no significant differences of mean LAB counts between selected protocols (ANOVA, p>0.05). Colonies were confirmed as LAB, indicating proper selectivity of the protocols. The results showed the adequacy of Petrifilm™ AC supplemented with CR for the enumeration of LAB in salami.

  9. Purification of low-concentration phenazine-1-carboxylic acid from fermentation broth of Pseudomonas sp. M18 via free flow electrophoresis with gratis gravity.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jing; Fan, Liu-Yin; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Chen-Gang; Li, Si; Xu, Yu-Quan; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2010-10-01

    The low-concentration phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) ( = 0.3 mM) extracted from fermentation broth of Pseudomonas sp. M18 was selected to be purified with a newly facile free flow electrophoresis (FFE) device with gratis gravity. Three factors of pH value and concentration of background buffer, and the cooling circle of FFE device were investigated for the purification of PCA in the FFE device. It was found that the pH value and concentration of background buffer had mild influences on the separation of PCA whether with cooling circle or not. However, the cooling circle had a much greater impact on the separation of PCA. The controlling of the band zone of PCA in FFE chamber would be difficult if without cooling circle, while the controlling would become easy if with cooling circle. Under the optimal conditions (10 mM pH 5.5 phosphate as background buffer, 30 mM pH 5.5 phosphate buffer as electrode solution, 5.46 mL/min background flux, 10 min residence time of injected sample, and 500 V), PCA could be continuously prepared from its impurities with relative high purity. The flux of sample injection was 115 μL/min, viz. 7 mL sample throughput per hour, and the recovery was up to 85%. All of the experiments indicated that the FFE technique was a good alternative tool for the study on natural biological control agents.

  10. Centrifugal partition extraction, a new method for direct metabolites recovery from culture broth: case study of torularhodin recovery from Rhodotorula rubra.

    PubMed

    Ungureanu, Camelia; Marchal, Luc; Chirvase, Ana Aurelia; Foucault, Alain

    2013-03-01

    Centrifugal partition extraction (CPE), close to centrifugal partition chromatography, put in contact in a continuous way two immiscible liquid phases. This work presents early experiments on CPE use for solid-liquid-liquid extraction. It was applied to the direct treatment of culture broth for metabolites recovery. Torularhodin is one of the carotenoid pigments produced by the yeast Rhodotorula sp., with a terminal carboxylic group considered nowadays as a powerful antioxidant to be included in food and drugs formulations. Torularhodin was extracted from Rhodotorula rubra ICCF 209 cells by CPE. The recovery of torularhodin reaches 74 μg/g of biomass i.e. 294 μg/L of culture medium. The efficiency of the extraction step increased with the operating flow rate. The extraction yield could reach 91% with a contact time lower than 2 min. A 300 mL apparatus allowed a feed at 90 mL/min. The technique is proposed for extraction or sample preparation before analysis.

  11. Study of the rheological properties of a fermentation broth of the fungus Beauveria bassiana in a bioreactor under different hydrodynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Ramírez, Diola Marina; Medina-Torres, Luis; Valencia-López, José Javier; Calderas, Fausto; López Miranda, Javier; Medrano-Roldán, Hiram; Solís-Soto, Aquiles

    2012-11-01

    Fermentation with filamentous fungi in a bioreactor is a complex dynamic process that is affected by flow conditions and the evolution of the rheological properties of the medium. These properties are mainly affected by the biomass concentration and the morphology of the fungus. In this work, the rheological properties of a fermentation with the fungus Beauveria bassiana under different hydrodynamic conditions were studied and the rheological behavior of this broth was simulated through a mixture of carboxymethyl cellulose sodium and cellulose fibers (CMCNa-SF). The bioreactor was a 10 L CSTR tank operated at different stir velocities. Rheological results were similar at 100 and 300 rpm for both systems. However, there was a significant increase in the viscosity accompanied by a change in the consistence index, calculated according to the power law model, for both systems at 800 rpm. The systems exhibited shear-thinning behavior at all stir velocities, which was determined with the power law model. The mixing time was observed to increase as the cellulose content in the system increased and, consequently, the efficiency of mixing diminished. These results are thought to be due to the rheological and morphological similarities of the two fungal systems. These results will help in the optimization of scale-up production of these fungi. PMID:23124340

  12. Fermentative utilization of coffee mucilage using Bacillus coagulans and investigation of down-stream processing of fermentation broth for optically pure l(+)-lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Neu, Anna-Katrin; Pleissner, Daniel; Mehlmann, Kerstin; Schneider, Roland; Puerta-Quintero, Gloria Inés; Venus, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    In this study, mucilage, a residue from coffee production, was investigated as substrate in fermentative l(+)-lactic acid production. Mucilage was provided as liquid suspension consisting glucose, galactose, fructose, xylose and sucrose as free sugars (up to 60gL(-1)), and used directly as medium in Bacillus coagulans batch fermentations carried out at 2 and 50L scales. Using mucilage and 5gL(-1) yeast extract as additional nitrogen source, more than 40gL(-1) lactic acid was obtained. Productivity and yield were 4-5gL(-1)h(-1) and 0.70-0.77g lactic acid per g of free sugars, respectively, irrespective the scale. Similar yield was found when no yeast extract was supplied, the productivity, however, was 1.5gL(-1)h(-1). Down-stream processing of culture broth, including filtration, electrodialysis, ion exchange chromatography and distillation, resulted in a pure lactic acid formulation containing 930gL(-1)l(+)-lactic acid. Optical purity was 99.8%. PMID:27035470

  13. Viability of respiratory pathogens cultured from nasopharyngeal swabs stored for up to 12 years at -70°C in skim milk tryptone glucose glycerol broth.

    PubMed

    Hare, Kim M; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi C; Leach, Amanda J

    2011-09-01

    Nasopharyngeal carriage studies are needed to monitor changes in important bacterial pathogens in response to vaccination and antibiotics. The ability to store original specimens frozen in skim milk tryptone glucose glycerol broth (STGGB) allows additional studies to be conducted without the need for further expensive field collection. Although sub-cultured isolates remain viable in this medium for many years, limited data are available to indicate viability of relatively low numbers of organisms present in nasopharyngeal specimens stored frozen over long periods of time. We conducted several studies whereby swabs stored in STGGB at -70°C for up to 12 years were thawed and aliquots cultured. Recovery of Streptococcus pneumoniae (72% positive from 269 swabs), Haemophilus influenzae (62% from 214) and Moraxella catarrhalis (81% from 162) was not significantly different from the original cultures: 69% (Risk Difference [RD] 3.0, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] -4.7, 10.7), 66% (RD -4.7, 95% CI -13.8, 4.4) and 78% (RD 3.1, 95% CI -5.7, 11.9) positive respectively. There was no trend in recovery from swabs stored for increasing lengths of time. We conclude that studies which rely on the viability of these respiratory pathogens can be conducted using original swabs stored at -70°C for at least 12 years.

  14. Studies on a novel approach for the separation of L-phenylalanine amino acid from fermentation broth using a newly developed charged ultrafiltration membrane. I. Single solute system

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.K.; Huang, R.Y.M. )

    1994-01-01

    A newly developed thin-film composite (TFC) ultrafiltration membrane made of sulfonated poly(phenylene oxide) (SPPO) was used to establish the feasibility of separating L-phenylalanine from the fermentation broth containing a number of dissolved inorganic and organic solutes as an alternative approach to the currently used complex and uneconomical conventional ion-exchange schemes. It was found that the rejection of inorganic salts in a single component system was highly dependent on the feed solution concentration and varied inversely with it. The pH of the feed solution was found to have a strong effect on the rejection of L-phenylalanine, changing it from - 10 to 90%. This rejection behavior was identical for the two TFC-SPPO membrane samples which had molecular weight cutoff ratings of 10,000 and 20,000, respectively, although the permeate flux of the latter sample was almost twice that of the former sample. It was found that glucose molecules were not rejected by the membrane. 11 refs., 18 figs., 2 tab.

  15. Fermentative utilization of coffee mucilage using Bacillus coagulans and investigation of down-stream processing of fermentation broth for optically pure l(+)-lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Neu, Anna-Katrin; Pleissner, Daniel; Mehlmann, Kerstin; Schneider, Roland; Puerta-Quintero, Gloria Inés; Venus, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    In this study, mucilage, a residue from coffee production, was investigated as substrate in fermentative l(+)-lactic acid production. Mucilage was provided as liquid suspension consisting glucose, galactose, fructose, xylose and sucrose as free sugars (up to 60gL(-1)), and used directly as medium in Bacillus coagulans batch fermentations carried out at 2 and 50L scales. Using mucilage and 5gL(-1) yeast extract as additional nitrogen source, more than 40gL(-1) lactic acid was obtained. Productivity and yield were 4-5gL(-1)h(-1) and 0.70-0.77g lactic acid per g of free sugars, respectively, irrespective the scale. Similar yield was found when no yeast extract was supplied, the productivity, however, was 1.5gL(-1)h(-1). Down-stream processing of culture broth, including filtration, electrodialysis, ion exchange chromatography and distillation, resulted in a pure lactic acid formulation containing 930gL(-1)l(+)-lactic acid. Optical purity was 99.8%.

  16. Potential of the waste from beer fermentation broth for bio-ethanol production without any additional enzyme, microbial cells and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jung Hwan; Shah, Nasrullah; Ul-Islam, Mazhar; Park, Joong Kon

    2011-08-10

    The potential of the waste from beer fermentation broth (WBFB) for the production of bio-ethanol using a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process without any extra additions of saccharification enzymes, microbial cells or carbohydrate was tested. The major microbial cells in WBFB were isolated and identified. The variations in compositions of WBFB with stock time were investigated. There was residual activity of starch hydrolyzing enzymes in WBFB. The effects of reaction modes e.g. static and shaking on bio-ethanol production were studied. After 7 days of cultivation using the supernatant of WBFB at 30 °C the ethanol concentration reached 103.8 g/L in shaking culture and 91.5 g/L in static culture. Agitation experiments conducted at a temperature-profile process in which temperature was increased from 25 to 67 °C shortened the simultaneous process time. The original WBFB was more useful than the supernatant of WBFB in getting the higher concentration of ethanol and reducing the fermentation time. From this whole study it was found that WBFB is a cheap and suitable source for bio-ethanol production. PMID:22112515

  17. Aliikangiella marina gen. nov., sp. nov., a marine bacterium from the culture broth of Picochlorum sp. 122, and proposal of Kangiellaceae fam. nov. in the order Oceanospirillales.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanghua; Tang, Mingxing; Wu, Huanlian; Dai, Shikun; Li, Tao; Chen, Chenghao; He, Hui; Fan, Jiewei; Xiang, Wenzhou; Li, Xiang

    2015-12-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming, long rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain GYP-15T, was isolated from the culture broth of a marine microalga, Picochloruma sp. 122. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that strain GYP-15T shared 90.6 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with its closest relative, Kangiella aquimarina KCTC 12183T, and represents a distinct phylogenetic lineage in a robust clade consisting of GYP-15T and members of the genera Kangiella and Pleionea in the order Oceanospirillales. Chemotaxonomic and physiological characteristics, including major cellular fatty acids, NaCl tolerance and pattern of carbon source utilization, could also readily distinguish strain GYP-15T from all established genera and species. Thus, it is concluded that strain GYP-15T represents a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Aliikangiella marina gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Aliikangiella marina is GYP-15T ( = MCCC 1K01163T = KCTC 42667T). Based on phylogenetic results, 16S rRNA gene signature nucleotide pattern and some physiological characteristics, the three genera Kangiella, Pleionea and Aliikangiella are proposed to make up a novel family, Kangiellaceae fam. nov., in the order Oceanospirillales.

  18. Wenzhouxiangella marina gen. nov, sp. nov, a marine bacterium from the culture broth of Picochlorum sp. 122, and proposal of Wenzhouxiangellaceae fam. nov. in the order Chromatiales.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanghua; Tang, Mingxing; Li, Tao; Dai, Shikun; Wu, Huanlian; Chen, Chenghao; He, Hui; Fan, Jiewei; Xiang, Wenzhou; Li, Xiang

    2015-06-01

    A Gram-stain negative, non-motile, non-phototrophic, non-alkaliphilic, obligately aerobic, chemoheterotrophic, and rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain Ma-11(T), was isolated from the culture broth of a marine microalga, Picochloruma sp. 122. Phylogenetic analyses showed that strain Ma-11(T) has less than 91 % similarity to its closest relative, Thioalkalivibrio sulfidiphilus HL-EbGR7(T), represents a distinct phylogenetic lineage in the order Chromatiales, and could not be assigned to any defined families in this order. Chemotaxonomic, genetic and physiological characteristics, including major fatty acids, genomic G+C content, lack of motility, aerophilicity and chemoheterotrophicity, could readily distinguish strain Ma-11(T) from any established members of the order Chromatiales. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and its signature nucleotide pattern, a new family Wenzhouxiangellaceae fam. nov. comprising the genus Wenzhouxiangella gen. nov. and species Wenzhouxiangella marina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Ma-11(T) (=CGMCC 1.14936(T) = KCTC 42284(T) = MCCC 1K00261(T)).

  19. Optical probe with reference fiber

    DOEpatents

    Da Silva, Luiz B.; Chase, Charles L.

    2006-03-14

    A system for characterizing tissue includes the steps of generating an emission signal, generating a reference signal, directing the emission signal to and from the tissue, directing the reference signal in a predetermined manner relative to the emission signal, and using the reference signal to compensate the emission signal. In one embodiment compensation is provided for fluctuations in light delivery to the tip of the probe due to cable motion.

  20. Reach for Reference: Elementary-Middle School Science Reference Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safford, Barbara Ripp

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a brief review of some new school science reference works. Two of the sources are traditional, while one is considered experimental. The two traditional reference works reviewed are "The American Heritage Children's Science Dictionary" for upper elementary grades, and "The American Heritage Student Science Dictionary" for…

  1. Statewide Supplemental Reference Service: New Jersey's Model for Backup Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromberg, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the history of backup reference service in the state of New Jersey including the transition from regional backup service; describes the current statewide service; and considers future service possibilities in light of recent trends, including a decrease in the number of reference questions being received in libraries. (LRW)

  2. Reference Readiness for AV Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drolet, Leon L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews 50 reference tools which librarians can use to answer almost any audiovisual question including queries on trivia, equipment selection, biographical information, and motion picture ratings. (LLS)

  3. Dangers of broth after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Shikha; Sukkar, Louisa; Wynter, Lucy; Richards, Kate; Cheung, Jason; Chadban, Steve J

    2015-04-01

    Serum creatinine is routinely used to monitor renal function in transplant recipients. External factors including diet, exercise and hydration status can also influence serum creatinine concentration on a day-to-day basis. We describe a case of a patient whose serum creatinine increased from 128 to 171 μmol/L after ingestion of creatinine-rich (3098 μmol/L) soup. A renal biopsy was performed but revealed no cause for the rise in creatinine and by the next day, serum creatinine had returned to baseline. We conducted two experiments to examine the effect of soup ingestion by healthy volunteers. We measured the creatinine concentration of various store-bought stock preparations and found creatinine concentrations less than one-quarter of that contained in our patient's homemade soup. A creatinine-rich soup (4334 μmol/L) was ingested by six healthy volunteers age 33 (± 6.5) years with baseline normal serum creatinine 68 (± 14) μmol/L. Mean (standard deviation) serum creatinine increased to 77 (± 11) μmol/L 4 hours after soup ingestion (P = 0.0015, paired t-test). Mean (standard deviation) creatinine clearance, extrapolated from the 4 hour urine collection following soup ingestion, was high (267 ± 198 mL/min) exhibiting a supra-normal creatinine clearance. The rate of serum creatinine rise was lower in volunteers compared with the transplant patient, consistent with the concept of renal functional reserve. Our case highlights the importance of taking dietary changes into account when interpreting serum creatinine as a measure of allograft function.

  4. Robot at the Reference Desk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Karen F.

    1986-01-01

    Describes how a librarian, assisted by a knowledge engineer, developed a computerized reference assistance system for a separate government documents department. Rationale for the expert system, problems in selecting reference materials and user questions to computerize, and the formulation of a workable human/computer interface are covered. A…

  5. Are Reference Desks Dying Out?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Scott

    2007-01-01

    This article examines how librarians are struggling to redefine, and in some cases eliminate, the venerable institution of reference desk services and it explores the new ways in which reference questions get answered at university libraries. These include fielding questions through e-mail, instant messaging, and other mobile technologies, making…

  6. Expert Systems for Reference Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrot, James R.

    1986-01-01

    Discussion of library reference work that may be suitable for use of expert systems focuses on (1) information and literature searches, and (2) requests to interpret bibliographic references and locate items listed. Systems and computer-assisted instruction modules designed for information retrieval at the University of Waterloo Library are…

  7. Queuing Theory and Reference Transactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terbille, Charles

    1995-01-01

    Examines the implications of applying the queuing theory to three different reference situations: (1) random patron arrivals; (2) random durations of transactions; and (3) use of two librarians. Tables and figures represent results from spreadsheet calculations of queues for each reference situation. (JMV)

  8. The Virtual Reference Librarian's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipow, Anne Grodzins

    This book is a practical guide to librarians and their administrators who are thinking about or in the early stages of providing virtual reference service. Part 1, "The Decision to Go Virtual," provides a context for thinking about virtual reference, including the benefits and problems, getting in the virtual frame of mind, and shopping for…

  9. Antimicrobial properties of lauric arginate alone or in combination with essential oils in tryptic soy broth and 2% reduced fat milk.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiumin; Davidson, P Michael; Zhong, Qixin

    2013-08-16

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of lauric arginate (LAE) when used alone or in combination with the essential oil (EO) from cinnamon leaf and EO components, thymol and eugenol. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) for Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Enteritidis were determined by the microbroth dilution method in tryptic soy broth (TSB) at their optimal growth temperatures. The MIC for LAE was 11.8ppm against L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 and 23.5ppm against S. Enteritidis. Synergistic antimicrobial activity was demonstrated against L. monocytogenes with combinations of LAE and cinnamon leaf oil or eugenol, while the LAE and thymol combination showed additive antimicrobial activity. Conversely, antagonistic effects were shown for all combinations against E. coli O157:H7 and S. Enteritidis. Beef extract, at 2 or 5% w/v in TSB, showed no effects on the MIC and MBC of LAE against L. monocytogenes, while soluble starch from potato, at 2-10% w/v in TSB, increased the MIC and MBC. When tested in 2% reduced fat milk, significantly higher levels of antimicrobials were required to achieve similar inhibitions as in TSB. The growth curves of bacteria at 21°C followed similar trends as in TSB, showing synergism against the Gram-positive L. monocytogenes and antagonism against the two Gram-negative bacteria. Findings suggest that application of LAE could enhance microbial food safety, especially when used in combination with EO to inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23845430

  10. Relative gene expression in acid-adapted Escherichia coli O157:H7 during lactoperoxidase and lactic acid challenge in Tryptone Soy Broth.

    PubMed

    Parry-Hanson, Angela A; Jooste, Piet J; Buys, Elna M

    2010-09-20

    Cross-protection of acid-adapted Escherichia coli O157:H7 against inimical stresses is mediated by the glucose-repressed sigma factor RpoS. However, many food systems in which E. coli O157:H7 occurs are complex and contain glucose. This study was aimed at investigating the contribution of acid and lactoperoxidase (LP)-inducible genes to cross-protection of E. coli O157:H7 against LP system and lactic acid (LA) in Tryptone Soy Broth (TSB). Acid-adapted and non-adapted E. coli O157:H7 were challenged to activated LP and LA at pH 4.0 and 5.0 in TSB for 6h at 25°C followed by expression of acid and LP-inducible genes. Acid-adapted E. coli showed cross-protection against activated LP and LA. All the acid-inducible genes tested were repressed at pH 4.0 with or without activated LP system. At pH 7.4, gadA, ompC and ompF were induced in acid-adapted cells. Induction of corA occurred in non-adapted cells but was repressed in acid-adapted cells. Although acid-inducible genes were repressed at pH 4.0, high resistance of acid-adapted cells indicates that expression of acid-inducible genes occurred during acid adaptation and not the actual challenge. Repression of rpoS indicates that RpoS-independent systems contribute to cross-protection in acid-adapted E. coli O157:H7.

  11. Identification of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genes associated with growth suppression in stationary-phase nutrient broth cultures and in the chicken intestine.

    PubMed

    Rychlik, Ivan; Martin, Gerald; Methner, Ulrich; Lovell, Margaret; Cardova, Lenka; Sebkova, Alena; Sevcik, Mojmor; Damborsky, Jiri; Barrow, Paul A

    2002-12-01

    Over 2,800 Tn 5 insertion mutants of Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium were screened for the loss of ability to suppress the multiplication of a spectinomycin-resistant (Spc(r)) but otherwise isogenic S. enterica sv. Typhimurium strain, when the Spc(r) mutant was added to 24-h LB broth cultures of the mutants. Selected "growth non-suppressive" (GNS) mutants were defective in respiration (insertions in arcA and fnr), amino acid biosynthesis (aroA and aroD), nutrient uptake and its regulation (tdcC and crp), and chemotaxis (fliD). In the last GNS mutant, the transposon inactivated yhjH, an ORF with unknown function which shows sequence similarity to di-guanylate cyclase and to novel two-component signal transduction proteins. In newly hatched chickens, all of the mutants, with the exception of the fliDmutant, were also unable to suppress colonization of the alimentary tract by the parent strain inoculated 1 day later. Defined mutations in luxS or sdiA,genes which contribute to quorum sensing in S. enterica sv. Typhimurium, had no effect on the stationary-phase growth suppression. Analysis of a transcriptional fusion construct indicated that yhjH was moderately expressed in the exponential phase of growth and up-regulated upon entry into stationary phase. Expression of yhjH was also considerably suppressed by the addition of supernatant from a 24-h stationary-phase S. enterica sv. Typhimurium culture, suggesting that the gene belongs to a new sensing and signaling regulatory pathway in S. enterica sv. Typhimurium.

  12. Decreasing the Level of Ethyl Acetate in Ethanolic Fermentation Broths of Escherichia coli KO11 by Expression of Pseudomonas putida estZ Esterase†

    PubMed Central

    Hasona, Adnan; York, S. W.; Yomano, L. P.; Ingram, L. O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2002-01-01

    During the fermentation of sugars to ethanol relatively high levels of an undesirable coproduct, ethyl acetate, are also produced. With ethanologenic Escherichia coli strain KO11 as the biocatalyst, the level of ethyl acetate in beer containing 4.8% ethanol was 192 mg liter−1. Although the E. coli genome encodes several proteins with esterase activity, neither wild-type strains nor KO11 contained significant ethyl acetate esterase activity. A simple method was developed to rapidly screen bacterial colonies for the presence of esterases which hydrolyze ethyl acetate based on pH change. This method allowed identification of Pseudomonas putida NRRL B-18435 as a source of this activity and the cloning of a new esterase gene, estZ. Recombinant EstZ esterase was purified to near homogeneity and characterized. It belongs to family IV of lipolytic enzymes and contains the conserved catalytic triad of serine, aspartic acid, and histidine. As expected, this serine esterase was inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and the histidine reagent diethylpyrocarbonate. The native and subunit molecular weights of the recombinant protein were 36,000, indicating that the enzyme exists as a monomer. By using α-naphthyl acetate as a model substrate, optimal activity was observed at pH 7.5 and 40°C. The Km and Vmax for α-naphthyl acetate were 18 μM and 48.1 μmol · min−1 · mg of protein−1, respectively. Among the aliphatic esters tested, the highest activity was obtained with propyl acetate (96 μmol · min−1 · mg of protein−1), followed by ethyl acetate (66 μmol · min−1 · mg of protein−1). Expression of estZ in E. coli KO11 reduced the concentration of ethyl acetate in fermentation broth (4.8% ethanol) to less than 20 mg liter−1. PMID:12039716

  13. The influence of the cell free solution of lactic acid bacteria on tyramine production by food borne-pathogens in tyrosine decarboxylase broth.

    PubMed

    Toy, Nurten; Özogul, Fatih; Özogul, Yesim

    2015-04-15

    The function of cell-free solutions (CFSs) of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on tyramine and other biogenic amine production by different food borne-pathogens (FBPs) was investigated in tyrosine decarboxylase broth (TDB) using HPLC. Cell free solutions were prepared from four LAB strains. Two different concentrations which were 50% (5 ml CFS+5 ml medium/1:1) and 25% (2.5 ml CFS+7.5 ml medium/1:3) CFS and the control without CFS were prepared. Both concentration of CFS of Streptococcus thermophilus and 50% CFS of Pediococcus acidophilus inhibited tyramine production up to 98% by Salmonella paratyphi A. Tyramine production by Escherichia coli was also inhibited by 50% CFS of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and 25% CFS of Leuconostoc lactis. subsp. cremoris. The inhibitor effect of 50% CFS of P. acidophilus was the highest on tyramine production (55%) by Listeria monocytogenes, following Lc. lactis subsp. lactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris (20%) whilst 25% CFS of Leu. mes. subsp. cremoris and Lc. lactis subsp. lactis showed stimulator effects (160%). The stimulation effects of 50% CFS of S. thermophilus and Lc. lactis subsp. lactis were more than 70% by Staphylococcus aureus comparing to the control. CFS of LAB strains showed statistically inhibitor effect since lactic acid inhibited microbial growth, decreased pH quickly and reduced the formation of AMN and BAs. Consequently, in order to avoid the formation of high concentrations of biogenic amines in fermented food by bacteria, it is advisable to use CFS for food and food products.

  14. Gelatiniphilus marinus gen. nov., sp. nov., a bacterium from the culture broth of a microalga, Picochlorum sp. 122, and emended description of the genus Hwangdonia.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingxing; Tan, Li; Wu, Hualian; Dai, Shikun; Li, Tao; Chen, Chenghao; Li, Jiaying; Fan, Jiewei; Xiang, Wenzhou; Li, Xiang; Wang, Guanghua

    2016-08-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain GYP-24T, was isolated from the culture broth of a marine microalga, Picochlorum sp. 122. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain GYP-24T forms a robust cluster with H.wangdoniaseohaensis KCTC 32177T (95.8 % sequence similarity) in the family Flavobacteriaceae. Growth of strain GYP-24T was observed at 15, 22, 28, 30, 33 and 37 °C (optimal 30-33 °C), pH 6.0-10.0 (optimal pH 7.0-8.0) and in the presence of 0.5-4 % (w/v) NaCl (optimal 2-3 %). The only menaquinone of strain GYP-24T was MK-6, and the G+C content of the genomic DNA was 36.9 mol%. The major fatty acid profile comprised iso-C17 : 0 3-OH, summed feature 3 (C16 : 1 ω7c/ω6c), iso-C15 : 1 G and iso-C15 : 0. The major polar lipids of strain GYP-24T were phosphatidylethanolamine, one unidentified phospholipid, three unidentified aminolipids and three unidentified lipids. Comprehensive analyses based on polyphasic characterization of GYP-24T indicated that it represents a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Gelatiniphilus marinus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GYP-24T (=KCTC 42903T=MCCC 1K01730T). An emended description of the genus Hwangdonia is also given.

  15. Evaluation of cycloserine-cefoxitin fructose agar (CCFA), CCFA with horse blood and taurocholate, and cycloserine-cefoxitin mannitol broth with taurocholate and lysozyme for recovery of Clostridium difficile isolates from fecal samples.

    PubMed

    Tyrrell, Kerin L; Citron, Diane M; Leoncio, Eliza S; Merriam, C Vreni; Goldstein, Ellie J C

    2013-09-01

    Cycloserine-cefoxitin fructose agar (CCFA), CCFA with horse blood and taurocholate (CCFA-HT), and cycloserine-cefoxitin mannitol broth with taurocholate and lysozyme (CCMB-TAL) were compared for recovery of Clostridium difficile from 120 stool specimens. Compared to CCFA, CCFA-HT enhanced C. difficile growth and improved recovery by 4%. In a separate study, 9% (8/91) of stool samples previously C. difficile negative on plate medium were C. difficile positive when cultured in CCMB-TAL.

  16. Generalizing indexical-functional reference

    SciTech Connect

    Schoppers, M.; Shu, R.

    1996-12-31

    The goals of situated agents generally do not specify particular objects: they require only that some suitable object should be chosen and manipulated (e.g. any red block). Situated agents engaged in deictic reference grounding, however, may well track a chosen referent object with such fixity of purpose that an unchosen object may be regarded as an obstacle even though it satisfies the agent`s goals. In earlier work this problem was bridged by hand-coding. This paper lifts the problem to the symbol level, endowing agents with perceptual referent selection actions and performing those actions as required to allow or disallow opportunistic re-selection of referents. Our work preserves the ability of situated agents to find and track specific objects, adds an ability to automatically exploit the opportunities allowed by nonspecific references, and provides a starting point for studying how much opportunistic perception is appropriate.

  17. Improved ultrasonic standard reference blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eitzen, D. G.; Sushinsky, G. F.; Chwirut, D. J.; Bechtoldt, C. J.; Ruff, A. W.

    1976-01-01

    A program to improve the quality, reproducibility and reliability of nondestructive testing through the development of improved ASTM-type ultrasonic reference standards is described. Reference blocks of aluminum, steel, and titanium alloys are to be considered. Equipment representing the state-of-the-art in laboratory and field ultrasonic equipment was obtained and evaluated. RF and spectral data on ten sets of ultrasonic reference blocks have been taken as part of a task to quantify the variability in response from nominally identical blocks. Techniques for residual stress, preferred orientation, and micro-structural measurements were refined and are applied to a reference block rejected by the manufacturer during fabrication in order to evaluate the effect of metallurgical condition on block response. New fabrication techniques for reference blocks are discussed and ASTM activities are summarized.

  18. Reference and Standard Atmosphere Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dale L.; Roberts, Barry C.; Vaughan, William W.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the development of standard and reference atmosphere models along with the history of their origin and use since the mid 19th century. The first "Standard Atmospheres" were established by international agreement in the 1920's. Later some countries, notably the United States, also developed and published "Standard Atmospheres". The term "Reference Atmospheres" is used to identify atmosphere models for specific geographical locations. Range Reference Atmosphere Models developed first during the 1960's are examples of these descriptions of the atmosphere. This paper discusses the various models, scopes, applications and limitations relative to use in aerospace industry activities.

  19. Computerizing the Reference Desk Schedule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deHaas, Pat

    1983-01-01

    Discussion of the scheduling procedures of librarians' hours at the reference desk at the Rutherford Humanities and Social Sciences Library, University of Alberta, highlights services provided, the preference table system, and manual scheduling versus computer scheduling. (EJS)

  20. Genetics Home Reference: WAGR syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs and symptoms of WAGR syndrome can include childhood-onset obesity, inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), and kidney failure. When WAGR syndrome includes childhood-onset obesity, it is often referred to as WAGRO syndrome. ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: isolated hyperchlorhidrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is characterized by the excessive loss of salt (sodium chloride or NaCl) in sweat. In particular, "hyperchlorhidrosis" refers ... levels of chloride found in sweat, although both sodium and chloride are released. Because the salt is abnormally released ...

  2. International reference standards in coagulation.

    PubMed

    Raut, Sanj; Hubbard, Anthony R

    2010-07-01

    Measurement of coagulation factor activity using absolute physico-chemical techniques is not possible and estimation therefore relies on comparative bioassay relative to a reference standard with a known or assigned potency. However the inherent variability of locally prepared and calibrated reference standards can give rise to poor agreement between laboratories and methods. Harmonisation of measurement between laboratories at the international level relies on the availability of a common source of calibration for local reference standards and this is provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) International Standards which define the International Unit for the analyte. This article describes the principles, practices and problems of biological standardisation and the development and use of reference standards for assays of coagulation factors, with particular emphasis on WHO International Standards for both concentrates and plasma.

  3. Improved ultrasonic standard reference blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eitzen, D. G.

    1975-01-01

    A program to improve the quality, reproducibility and reliability of nondestructive testing through the development of improved ASTM-type ultrasonic reference standards is described. Reference blocks of aluminum, steel, and titanium alloys were considered. Equipment representing the state-of-the-art in laboratory and field ultrasonic equipment was obtained and evaluated. Some RF and spectral data on ten sets of ultrasonic reference blocks were taken as part of a task to quantify the variability in response from nominally identical blocks. Techniques for residual stress, preferred orientation, and microstructural measurements were refined and are applied to a reference block rejected by the manufacturer during fabrication in order to evaluate the effect of metallurgical condition on block response.

  4. Space Station reference configuration description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The data generated by the Space Station Program Skunk Works over a period of 4 months which supports the definition of a Space Station reference configuration is documented. The data were generated to meet these objectives: (1) provide a focal point for the definition and assessment of program requirements; (2) establish a basis for estimating program cost; and (3) define a reference configuration in sufficient detail to allow its inclusion in the definition phase Request for Proposal (RFP).

  5. Quality specifications for reference methods.

    PubMed

    Thienpont, L M

    1999-11-01

    Reference methods are a key element to the objective of traceability in laboratory medicine. However, to serve this purpose adequately, minimum analytical quality specifications are required. Here, possible strategies for deriving such specifications are presented, being based on concepts developed before by a European Working Group. Distinction is made between "genuine requirements" for reference methods (direct calibration with primary reference materials; absence of sample-related effects) and "performance specifications" (limits for random, systematic and total error, the latter in association with the number of measurements). While the former requirements are considered as conditio sine-qua-non, the latter specifications should be variable, which means that they should be tailored to the specific application of the methods. In general, it is advocated to derive performance specifications for reference methods from desirable specifications of routine methods (analyte-related), although other models should not be ruled out beforehand. Further, it is recommended that reference laboratories make special efforts to demonstrate and maintain a uniform level of quality of reference methods.

  6. Performance criteria for reference measurement procedures and reference materials.

    PubMed

    Schimmel, Heinz; Zegers, Ingrid

    2015-05-01

    The concept of metrological traceability of measurement results to property values assigned to measurement standards of higher metrological order or to the International System of Units (SI) through sequential calibrations, using reference materials and reference measurement procedures, plays a key role in ensuring that end user measurement procedures perform at an acceptable level in the clinical context. The aim is that measurement results produced over time or by different end users or with different end user measurement procedures for the same measurand will be equivalent within their corresponding uncertainties. These goals can only be reached under certain conditions and if requirements laid down in international standards on calibration concepts, reference measurement procedures and reference materials are fulfilled. Calibration hierarchies have to be implemented correctly and parameters contributing to measurement uncertainty and systematic bias need to be controlled and eliminated, respectively, by technically improving methods and reference materials and intermediate calibrators used for effectively achieving equivalence of measurement results and for meeting analytical performance requirements for in vitro diagnostic devices.

  7. Evaluation of the PREVI® Isola automated seeder system compared to reference manual inoculation for antibiotic susceptibility testing by the disk diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Le Page, S; van Belkum, A; Fulchiron, C; Huguet, R; Raoult, D; Rolain, J-M

    2015-09-01

    The disk diffusion (DD) method remains the most popular manual technique for antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) in clinical microbiology laboratories. This is because of its simplicity, reproducibility, and limited cost compared to (automated) microdilution systems, which are usually less sensitive at detecting certain important mechanisms of resistance. Here, we evaluate the PREVI® Isola automated seeder system using a new protocol for spreading bacterial suspensions (eight deposits of calibrated inocula of bacteria, followed by two rounds of rotation) in comparison with manual DD reference testing on a large series of clinical and reference strains. The average time required for seeding one agar plate for DD with this new protocol was 51 s per plate, i.e., 70 agar plates/h. Reproducibility and repeatability was assessed on three reference and three randomly chosen clinical strains, as usually requested by the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST), and was excellent compared to the manual method. The standard deviations of zones of growth inhibition showed no statistical discrimination. The correlation between the two methods, assessed using 294 clinical isolates and a panel of six antibiotics (n = 3,528 zones of growth inhibition measured), was excellent, with a correlation coefficient of 0.977. The new PREVI® Isola protocol adapted for DD had a sensitivity of 99 % and a specificity of 100 % compared to the manual technique for interpreting DD as recommended by the EUCAST. PMID:26092031

  8. Sequence Factorization with Multiple References

    PubMed Central

    Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The success of high-throughput sequencing has lead to an increasing number of projects which sequence large populations of a species. Storage and analysis of sequence data is a key challenge in these projects, because of the sheer size of the datasets. Compression is one simple technology to deal with this challenge. Referential factorization and compression schemes, which store only the differences between input sequence and a reference sequence, gained lots of interest in this field. Highly-similar sequences, e.g., Human genomes, can be compressed with a compression ratio of 1,000:1 and more, up to two orders of magnitude better than with standard compression techniques. Recently, it was shown that the compression against multiple references from the same species can boost the compression ratio up to 4,000:1. However, a detailed analysis of using multiple references is lacking, e.g., for main memory consumption and optimality. In this paper, we describe one key technique for the referential compression against multiple references: The factorization of sequences. Based on the notion of an optimal factorization, we propose optimization heuristics and identify parameter settings which greatly influence 1) the size of the factorization, 2) the time for factorization, and 3) the required amount of main memory. We evaluate a total of 30 setups with a varying number of references on data from three different species. Our results show a wide range of factorization sizes (optimal to an overhead of up to 300%), factorization speed (0.01 MB/s to more than 600 MB/s), and main memory usage (few dozen MB to dozens of GB). Based on our evaluation, we identify the best configurations for common use cases. Our evaluation shows that multi-reference factorization is much better than single-reference factorization. PMID:26422374

  9. Characterization of interim reference shales

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.; Sullivan, S.; Mason, G.

    1986-03-01

    Measurements have been made on the chemical and physical properties of two oil shales designated as interim reference oil shales by the Department of Energy. One oil shale is a Green River Formation, Parachute Creek Member, Mahogany Zone Colorado oil shale from the Anvil Points mine and the other is a Clegg Creek Member, New Albany shale from Kentucky. Material balance Fischer assays, kerogen concentrates, carbon aromaticities, thermal properties, and bulk mineralogic properties have been determined for the oil shales. The measured properties of the interim reference shales are comparable to results obtained from previous studies on similar shales. The western interim reference shale has a low carbon aromaticity, high Fischer assay conversion to oil, and a dominant carbonate mineralogy. The eastern interim reference shale has a high carbon aromaticity, low Fischer assay conversion to oil, and a dominant silicate mineralogy. Chemical and physical properties, including ASTM distillations, have been determined for shale oils produced from the interim reference shales. The distillation data were used in conjunction with API correlations to calculate a large number of shale oil properties that are required for computer models such as ASPEN. The experimental determination of many of the shale oil properties was beyond the scope of this study. Therefore, direct comparison between calculated and measured values of many properties could not be made. However, molecular weights of the shale oils were measured. In this case, there was poor agreement between measured molecular weights and those calculated from API and other published correlations. 23 refs., 12 figs., 15 tabs.

  10. Isolation of Mycobacterium kumamotonense from a patient with pulmonary infection and latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Fanourios; Mavromanolakis, Dimitrios Nikitas; Zande, Marina Chari; Gitti, Zoe Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium kumamotonense is a novel, slow-growing non-chromogenic nontuberculous mycobacterium, which belongs to Mycobacterium terrae complex. We report, for the first time in Greece, the isolation of M. kumamotonense from an immunocompetent patient with pulmonary infection and latent tuberculosis. M. kumamotonense was identified by sequencing analysis of 16S rDNA and 65-kDa heat shock protein genes while by commercial molecular assays it was misidentified as Mycobacterium celatum. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by the reference broth microdilution method. The strain was susceptible to amikacin, clarithromycin, rifampin, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, rifabutin, ethambutol and linezolid. PMID:27080783

  11. Disk diffusion susceptibility testing of ticarcillin plus clavulanic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, P C; Jones, R N; Barry, A L; Thornsberry, C

    1984-01-01

    Disk diffusion susceptibility testing of ticarcillin plus the beta-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid was performed on 489 clinical isolates, and the results were compared with reference broth microdilution susceptibilities. Four different disks containing 75 micrograms of ticarcillin plus 2.5, 5, 10, and 15 micrograms of clavulanic acid were evaluated. Based on test performance and clavulanic acid stability, the 75-10-micrograms disk is recommended. Interpretive criteria for ticarcillin as published by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards appear to be satisfactory for the combination drug, but because the number of ticarcillin-clavulanic acid-resistant isolates was small, this proposal must be considered only tentative. PMID:6715524

  12. Virtual Reference, Real Money: Modeling Costs in Virtual Reference Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eakin, Lori; Pomerantz, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Libraries nationwide are in yet another phase of belt tightening. Without an understanding of the economic factors that influence library operations, however, controlling costs and performing cost-benefit analyses on services is difficult. This paper describes a project to develop a cost model for collaborative virtual reference services. This…

  13. Swahili Learners' Reference Grammar. African Language Learners' Reference Grammar Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Katrina Daly; Schleicher, Antonia Folarin

    This reference grammar is written for speakers of English who are learning Swahili. Because many language learners are not familiar with the grammatical terminology, this book explains the basic terminology and concepts of English grammar that are necessary for understanding the grammar of Swahili. It assumes no formal knowledge of English grammar…

  14. Reference standards for software evaluation.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, J; Wellek, S; Willems, J L

    1990-09-01

    The field of automated ECG analysis was one of the earliest topics in Medical Informatics and may be regarded as a model both for computer-assisted medical diagnosis and for evaluating medical diagnostic programs. The CSE project has set reference standards of two kinds: In a broad sense, a standard how to perform a comprehensive evaluation study, in a narrow sense, standards as specific references for evaluating computer ECG programs. The evaluation methodology used within the CSE project is described as a basis for presentation of results which are published elsewhere in this issue. PMID:2233375

  15. When Is Cataphoric Reference Recognised?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filik, Ruth; Sanford, Anthony J.

    2008-01-01

    Pronouns typically have explicit antecedents in the prior discourse otherwise processing difficulty is experienced. However, it has been argued [Gordon, P. C., & Hendrick, R. (1997). "Intuitive knowledge of linguistic co-reference." "Cognition, 62", 325-370; Gordon, P. C., & Hendrick, R. (1998). "The representation and processing of co-reference…

  16. Selected Reference Books of 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIlvaine, Eileen

    1999-01-01

    Reviews a selection of recent scholarly and general reference works under the categories of Periodicals and Newspapers, Philosophy, Literature, Film and Radio, Art and Architecture, Music, Political Science, Women's Studies, and History. A brief summary of new editions of standard works is provided at the end of the articles. (AEF)

  17. Selected Reference Books of 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIlvaine, Eileen

    2001-01-01

    This annotated bibliography, a semiannual series, presents a selection of recent scholarly and general reference works, published in 2000. Works are in the following areas: dictionaries; religion; literature; film; music; political science; history; archaeology; and science and technology. New editions of standard works are highlighted at the end.…

  18. Selected Reference Books of 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIlvaine, Eileen

    1998-01-01

    Reviews a selection of recent scholarly and general reference works under the categories of Book Reviews, Proverbs, Literature, Archives, Social Sciences, Women's Studies, History and Area Studies, and Sciences. A brief summary of new editions of standard works is provided at the end of the articles. (AEF)

  19. Bibliographies, Reference Works, and Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Clark A.

    1985-01-01

    Explores the history of science in America from the viewpoint of access to sources. Considered are a number of specific bibliographic and other reference works, as well as important recent projects and developments that aim to preserve and improve access to archival and other documentation and historical data for future use. (JN)

  20. Manitoba. Reference Series No. 28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of External Affairs, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet, one of a series featuring the Canadian provinces, presents a brief overview of Manitoba and is suitable for teacher reference or student reading. Separate sections discuss agriculture, mining, energy, transportation and communication, fishing, forestry, fur trapping, health and social services, education, and political life. Specific…

  1. The Principal and Reference Letters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Agnes E.; Permuth, Steve; Gray, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Requests to write letters of reference for former teachers can be legally problematic. Principals should know relevant state laws; have employees sign a release from liability; provide only factual information; maintain fair personnel files; avoid telephone recommendations; disclose information on a need-to-know basis; and avoid performance…

  2. Usenet as a Reference Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klassen, Tim W.

    1995-01-01

    Describes Usenet, an Internet service that provides access to computerized discussion groups, and examines how it can be used as a reference tool. Topics include subject groups, appropriate questions, exhausting local resources before posting, explaining Usenet to patrons, sending the question, and evaluating the answer. (AEF)

  3. Criminal Justice - Selected Reference Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, John D., III, Comp.

    This bibliography reviews approximately 70 reference materials on criminal justice. Entries are presented in eight categories--dictionaries, indexes and abstracts, professional position papers, working conditions and unions, law and the police, crime, prisons and prisoners, and victimization. Types of publications included under the subject…

  4. Human Rights: The Essential Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Carol; Hansen, Carol Rae; Wilde, Ralph; Bronkhorst, Daan; Moritz, Frederic A.; Rolle, Baptiste; Sherman, Rebecca; Southard, Jo Lynn; Wilkinson, Robert; Poole, Hilary, Ed.

    This reference work documents the history of human rights theory, explains each article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, explores the contemporary human rights movement, and examines the major human rights issues facing the world today. This book is the first to combine historical and contemporary perspectives on these critical…

  5. Quebec. Reference Series No. 30.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of External Affairs, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet, one of a series featuring the Canadian provinces, presents a brief overview of Quebec and is suitable for teacher reference or student reading. Separate sections discuss geography, climate, population, history, political history, recent politics, agriculture, forestry, mining, manufacturing and industry, hydroelectric power,…

  6. Tractor Transmissions. A Teaching Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Agricultural Engineering and Vocational Agriculture, Athens, GA.

    The manual was developed as a reference for teaching students about transmissions in farm tractors. The manual is divided into five sections: (1) transmission history, (2) gears and bearings in transmission, (3) sliding-gear transmissions, (4) planetary gearing, and (5) glossary. The working principles of the sliding-gear transmission, the most…

  7. Alberta. Reference Series No. 26.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of External Affairs, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet, one of a series featuring the Canadian provinces, presents a brief overview of Alberta and is suitable for teacher reference or student reading. Separate sections discuss the history and population, the provincial government, the economy, transportation, communications, mineral resources, agriculture, manufacturing, forest products,…

  8. Space Station reference configuration update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, Tom F., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The reference configuration of the NASA Space Station as of November 1985 is presented in a series of diagrams, drawings, graphs, and tables. The configurations for components to be contributed by ESA, Canada, and Japan are included. Brief captions are provided, along with answers to questions raised at the conference.

  9. Selected Reference Books of 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIlvaine, Eileen

    1993-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of 40 recent scholarly and general works of interest to reference workers in university libraries. Topics areas covered include philosophy, religion, language, literature, architecture, economics, law, area studies, Russia and the Soviet Union, women's studies, and Christopher Columbus. New editions and…

  10. Selected Reference Books of 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIlvaine, Eileen

    1997-01-01

    Presents an annotated list of recent scholarly and general reference books as compiled by Columbia University libraries. Subject categories include religion, literature, women's studies, film studies, art and architecture, political science, history and area studies, technology, and new editions and supplements. (LRW)

  11. Measurement at the Reference Desk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Howard D.

    1981-01-01

    Proposes using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) for the analysis of routine library statistics to measure how well certain goals are being reached and discusses variables and procedures that might be used. Information on SPSS, sample selection, and Yule's Q analysis is appended, and 18 references are listed. (RAA)

  12. Childhood Obesity. Special Reference Briefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winick, Myron

    This reference brief deals with the problem of childhood obesity and how it can lead to obesity in the adult. Eighty-four abstracts are presented of studies on the identification, prevention, and treatment of obesity in children, focusing on diet and psychological attitudes. Subjects of the studies were children ranging in age from infancy through…

  13. Reference As Others Do It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffman, Steve

    1999-01-01

    Describes customer call centers that provide customer service and support in business and considers how their routines could be adapted to library operations. Topics include centralized staff; interactive voice response; automated call distribution; question analysis; sophisticated software; training and monitoring; telephone reference; and…

  14. Expert Systems in Reference Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roysdon, Christine, Ed.; White, Howard D., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Eleven articles introduce expert systems applications in library and information science, and present design and implementation issues of system development for reference services. Topics covered include knowledge based systems, prototype development, the use of artificial intelligence to remedy current system inadequacies, and an expert system to…

  15. Ontario. Reference Series No. 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of External Affairs, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet, one of a series featuring the Canadian provinces, presents a brief overview of Ontario and is suitable for teacher reference or student reading. Separate sections discuss geography, climate, history, agriculture, forestry, fishing, mining, manufacturing, transportation, energy, arts and culture, sports and recreation, and people and…

  16. Chapter 11: Dietary reference intakes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) are a set of recommendations intended to provide guidance in evaluating nutrient intakes and planning meals on the basis of nutrient adequacy. In contrast to their predecessor, Recommended Dietary Allowances last published in 1989, the DRIs differ in two ways: th...

  17. A REFERENCE GRAMMAR OF PANJABI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GILL, HARJEET S.; GLEASON, HENRY A., JR.

    A REFERENCE GRAMMAR WAS PREPARED FOR STUDENTS OF PANJABI. THE INTENTION OF THE COMPILERS WAS TO MAKE IT USEFUL TO THOSE PREPARING TEACHING MATERIALS FOR PANJABI, THOSE TEACHING THE LANGUAGE BY MODERN AURAL-LINGUAL METHODS, OR OTHER USERS (NOT NECESSARILY PROFESSIONAL LINGUISTS) WHO WISH A DESCRIPTION BASED EQUALLY ON THE SPOKEN AND THE WRITTEN…

  18. [Developmental Placement.] Collected Research References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjorklund, Gail

    Drawing on information and references in the ERIC system, this literature review describes research related to a child's developmental placement. The issues examined include school entrance age; predictive validity, reliability, and features of Gesell School Readiness Assessment; retention; and the effectiveness of developmental placement. A…

  19. New reference values for calcium.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    The nutrition societies of Germany, Austria and Switzerland are the joint editors of the 'reference values for nutrient intake'. They have revised the reference values for the intake of calcium and published them in June 2013. The reference values for the calcium intake for infants are derived from the calcium content of breast milk. For infants from 4 to <12 months of age, the calcium intake from solid foods is included in addition to the calcium intake from breast milk. Thus, the reference values for infants are estimated values; they are 220 mg/day for infants to <4 months and 330 mg/day for infants from 4 to <12 months of age. As a parameter for determining the calcium requirement in children and adolescents, calcium retention is taken into account. The average requirement is calculated by the factorial method. A balanced calcium metabolism is calculated based upon calcium balance studies and used as a parameter for the determination of the calcium requirement in adults. On the basis of the average requirement, recommended calcium intake levels for children, adolescents and adults are derived. Depending on age, the recommended calcium intake ranges between 600 mg/day for children aged 1 to <4 years and 1,200 mg/day for adolescents aged 13 to <19 years; for adults, it is 1,000 mg/day. PMID:24356454

  20. Mobile Technologies and Roving Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penner, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    As 21st century librarians, we have made apt adjustments for reaching out into the digital world, but we need to consider the students who still use library services within our walls. We can use available handheld, mobile technologies to help patrons too shy to approach the desk and free library staff to bring reference service directly to patrons.

  1. Saskatchewan. Reference Series No. 27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of External Affairs, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet, one of a series featuring the Canadian provinces, presents a brief overview of Saskatchewan and is suitable for teacher reference or student reading. Separate sections discuss history, economy, oil, uranium, potash, coal, minerals and metals, agriculture, forestry, tourism and recreation, arts and culture, and people. Specific topics…

  2. Newfoundland. Reference Series No. 34.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of External Affairs, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet, one of a series featuring the Canadian provinces, presents a brief overview of Newfoundland and is suitable for teacher reference or student reading. Separate sections discuss geography and climate, history, economy, population and settlement, arts and culture, leisure and recreation, and heritage. Specific topics include the…

  3. Guam and Micronesia Reference Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetzfridt, Nicholas J.; Goniwiecha, Mark C.

    1993-01-01

    This article lists reference sources for studying Guam and Micronesia. The entries are arranged alphabetically by main entry within each section in the categories of: (1) bibliographical works; (2) travel and guide books; (3) handbooks and surveys; (4) dictionaries; (5) yearbooks; (6) periodical and newspaper publications; and (7) audiovisual…

  4. Preliminary Evaluation of the Research-Use-Only (RUO) iCubate iC-GPC Assay for Identification of Select Gram-Positive Bacteria and Their Resistance Determinants in Blood Culture Broths.

    PubMed

    Buchan, Blake W; Reymann, Garrett C; Granato, Paul A; Alkins, Brenda R; Jim, Patricia; Young, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    The iC-GPC assay (iCubate, Huntsville, AL) provides a molecular option for the rapid, on-demand analysis of positive blood cultures. A preliminary evaluation of the iC-GPC assay using 203 clinical or seeded specimens demonstrated a sensitivity of 93.8% to 100% and a specificity of 98.0% to 100% for the identification of five Gram-positive bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus faecium) and three associated genetic resistance determinants (mecA, vanA, and vanB) in positive blood culture broths.

  5. Preliminary Evaluation of the Research-Use-Only (RUO) iCubate iC-GPC Assay for Identification of Select Gram-Positive Bacteria and Their Resistance Determinants in Blood Culture Broths

    PubMed Central

    Reymann, Garrett C.; Alkins, Brenda R.; Jim, Patricia; Young, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The iC-GPC assay (iCubate, Huntsville, AL) provides a molecular option for the rapid, on-demand analysis of positive blood cultures. A preliminary evaluation of the iC-GPC assay using 203 clinical or seeded specimens demonstrated a sensitivity of 93.8% to 100% and a specificity of 98.0% to 100% for the identification of five Gram-positive bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus faecium) and three associated genetic resistance determinants (mecA, vanA, and vanB) in positive blood culture broths. PMID:26468498

  6. Preliminary Evaluation of the Research-Use-Only (RUO) iCubate iC-GPC Assay for Identification of Select Gram-Positive Bacteria and Their Resistance Determinants in Blood Culture Broths.

    PubMed

    Buchan, Blake W; Reymann, Garrett C; Granato, Paul A; Alkins, Brenda R; Jim, Patricia; Young, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    The iC-GPC assay (iCubate, Huntsville, AL) provides a molecular option for the rapid, on-demand analysis of positive blood cultures. A preliminary evaluation of the iC-GPC assay using 203 clinical or seeded specimens demonstrated a sensitivity of 93.8% to 100% and a specificity of 98.0% to 100% for the identification of five Gram-positive bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus faecium) and three associated genetic resistance determinants (mecA, vanA, and vanB) in positive blood culture broths. PMID:26468498

  7. Reference Material for Seebeck Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, F.; Lenz, E.; Haupt, S.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a measurement method and a measuring system to determine absolute Seebeck coefficients of thermoelectric bulk materials with the aim of establishing reference materials for Seebeck coefficients. Reference materials with known thermoelectric properties are essential to allow a reliable benchmarking of different thermoelectric materials for application in thermoelectric generators to convert thermal into electrical energy or vice versa. A temperature gradient (1 to 8) K is induced across the sample, and the resulting voltage is measured by using two differential Au/Pt thermocouples. On the basis of the known absolute Seebeck coefficients of Au and Pt, the unknown Seebeck coefficient of the sample is calculated. The measurements are performed in inert atmospheres and at low pressure (30 to 60) mbar in the temperature range between 300 K and 860 K. The measurement results of the Seebeck coefficients of metallic and semiconducting samples are presented. Achievable relative measurement uncertainties of the Seebeck coefficient are on the order of a few percent.

  8. Developing a quick reference formulary.

    PubMed

    Huntzinger, P E

    2001-10-01

    The establishment of the Department of Defense Basic Core Formulary was an attempt by the Department of Defense to equilibrate its pharmacy benefit among military treatment facilities. Department of Defense military treatment facilities are required to make available to beneficiaries items on the Basic Core Formulary. Military treatment facilities may augment the Basic Core Formulary through local pharmacy and therapeutic committee actions that result in different formularies among military treatment facilities. Formulary differences among military treatment facilities also arise because the Coast Guard, which is under the jurisdiction of the Department of Transportation in peacetime, is not required to adhere to the Basic Core Formulary at present. Because of formulary differences, most military treatment facilities make available abbreviated, quick reference versions of their formularies to patients. This article describes the development of a quick reference formulary at a Coast Guard military treatment facility pharmacy.

  9. The Calibration Reference Data System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, P.; Miller, T.

    2016-07-01

    We describe a software architecture and implementation for using rules to determine which calibration files are appropriate for calibrating a given observation. This new system, the Calibration Reference Data System (CRDS), replaces what had been previously used for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) calibration pipelines, the Calibration Database System (CDBS). CRDS will be used for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) calibration pipelines, and is currently being used for HST calibration pipelines. CRDS can be easily generalized for use in similar applications that need a rules-based system for selecting the appropriate item for a given dataset; we give some examples of such generalizations that will likely be used for JWST. The core functionality of the Calibration Reference Data System is available under an Open Source license. CRDS is briefly contrasted with a sampling of other similar systems used at other observatories.

  10. The International Celestial Reference System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomalont, E.

    2016-05-01

    The International Celestial Reference System (ICRS) is a set of prescriptions, conventions, observational techniques and modeling required to define an celestial inertial frame. The origin of the frame is the solar-system barycenter. The ICRS was adopted by the International Astronomical Union in 1997 as the replacement of the FK5 system. The frame is called the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF), and is realized (defined) by the accurate position of 295 radio sources, distributed over the sky, and the accuracy of the frame orientation is about 10 microarcsec. This review will cover: the history of the development of the ICRS; the basics of the major observational technique of Very Long Baseline Interferometry; the use of the fundamental observable, the group delay; experimental strategies to optimize the accuracy; the computational methods for analyzing the large data base; the two major error limitations; and the possible of ICRS/Gaia interactions.

  11. National Software Reference Library (NSRL)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    National Software Reference Library (NSRL) (PC database for purchase)   A collaboration of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Defense Computer Forensics Laboratory (DCFL),the U.S. Customs Service, software vendors, and state and local law enforement organizations, the NSRL is a tool to assist in fighting crime involving computers.

  12. HANFORD WASTE MINERALOGY REFERENCE REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    DISSELKAMP RS

    2010-06-29

    This report lists the observed mineral phases present in the Hanford tanks. This task was accomplished by performing a review of numerous reports that used experimental techniques including, but not limited to: x-ray diffraction, polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and particle size distribution analyses. This report contains tables that can be used as a quick reference to identify the crystal phases observed in Hanford waste.

  13. HANFORD WASTE MINEROLOGY REFERENCE REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    DISSELKAMP RS

    2010-06-18

    This report lists the observed mineral phase phases present in the Hanford tanks. This task was accomplished by performing a review of numerous reports using experimental techniques including, but not limited to: x-ray diffraction, polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and particle size distribution analyses. This report contains tables that can be used as a quick reference to identify the crystal phases present observed in Hanford waste.

  14. Microgrid cyber security reference architecture.

    SciTech Connect

    Veitch, Cynthia K.; Henry, Jordan M.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Hart, Derek H.

    2013-07-01

    This document describes a microgrid cyber security reference architecture. First, we present a high-level concept of operations for a microgrid, including operational modes, necessary power actors, and the communication protocols typically employed. We then describe our motivation for designing a secure microgrid; in particular, we provide general network and industrial control system (ICS)-speci c vulnerabilities, a threat model, information assurance compliance concerns, and design criteria for a microgrid control system network. Our design approach addresses these concerns by segmenting the microgrid control system network into enclaves, grouping enclaves into functional domains, and describing actor communication using data exchange attributes. We describe cyber actors that can help mitigate potential vulnerabilities, in addition to performance bene ts and vulnerability mitigation that may be realized using this reference architecture. To illustrate our design approach, we present a notional a microgrid control system network implementation, including types of communica- tion occurring on that network, example data exchange attributes for actors in the network, an example of how the network can be segmented to create enclaves and functional domains, and how cyber actors can be used to enforce network segmentation and provide the neces- sary level of security. Finally, we describe areas of focus for the further development of the reference architecture.

  15. Reference Inflow Characterization for River Resource Reference Model (RM2)

    SciTech Connect

    Neary, Vincent S

    2011-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) is leading an effort to develop reference models for marine and hydrokinetic technologies and wave and current energy resources. This effort will allow the refinement of technology design tools, accurate estimates of a baseline levelized cost of energy (LCoE), and the identification of the main cost drivers that need to be addressed to achieve a competitive LCoE. As part of this effort, Oak Ridge National Laboratory was charged with examining and reporting reference river inflow characteristics for reference model 2 (RM2). Published turbulent flow data from large rivers, a water supply canal and laboratory flumes, are reviewed to determine the range of velocities, turbulence intensities and turbulent stresses acting on hydrokinetic technologies, and also to evaluate the validity of classical models that describe the depth variation of the time-mean velocity and turbulent normal Reynolds stresses. The classical models are found to generally perform well in describing river inflow characteristics. A potential challenge in river inflow characterization, however, is the high variability of depth and flow over the design life of a hydrokinetic device. This variation can have significant effects on the inflow mean velocity and turbulence intensity experienced by stationary and bottom mounted hydrokinetic energy conversion devices, which requires further investigation, but are expected to have minimal effects on surface mounted devices like the vertical axis turbine device designed for RM2. A simple methodology for obtaining an approximate inflow characterization for surface deployed devices is developed using the relation umax=(7/6)V where V is the bulk velocity and umax is assumed to be the near-surface velocity. The application of this expression is recommended for deriving the local inflow velocity acting on the energy extraction planes of the RM2 vertical axis rotors, where V=Q/A can be calculated given a USGS gage flow time

  16. Ultra scale-down characterization of the impact of conditioning methods for harvested cell broths on clarification by continuous centrifugation-Recovery of domain antibodies from rec E. coli.

    PubMed

    Chatel, Alex; Kumpalume, Peter; Hoare, Mike

    2014-05-01

    The processing of harvested E. coli cell broths is examined where the expressed protein product has been released into the extracellular space. Pre-treatment methods such as freeze-thaw, flocculation, and homogenization are studied. The resultant suspensions are characterized in terms of the particle size distribution, sensitivity to shear stress, rheology and solids volume fraction, and, using ultra scale-down methods, the predicted ability to clarify the material using industrial scale continuous flow centrifugation. A key finding was the potential of flocculation methods both to aid the recovery of the particles and to cause the selective precipitation of soluble contaminants. While the flocculated material is severely affected by process shear stress, the impact on the very fine end of the size distribution is relatively minor and hence the predicted performance was only diminished to a small extent, for example, from 99.9% to 99.7% clarification compared with 95% for autolysate and 65% for homogenate at equivalent centrifugation conditions. The lumped properties as represented by ultra scale-down centrifugation results were correlated with the basic properties affecting sedimentation including particle size distribution, suspension viscosity, and solids volume fraction. Grade efficiency relationships were used to allow for the particle and flow dynamics affecting capture in the centrifuge. The size distribution below a critical diameter dependent on the broth pre-treatment type was shown to be the main determining factor affecting the clarification achieved.

  17. Modeling the behavior of Listeria monocytogenes during enrichment in half Fraser broth; impact of pooling and the duration of enrichment on the detection of L. monocytogenes in food.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Jean-Christophe; Kalmokoff, Martin; Ells, Timothy; Favret, Sandra; Desreumaux, Jennifer; Decourseulles Brasseur, Emilie; Gnanou Besse, Nathalie

    2016-12-01

    A stochastic model describing the growth of Listeria monocytogenes during enrichment in half Fraser was developed for the purpose of estimating the effects of modifications to the first enrichment step of the EN ISO 11290-1 detection method. Information pertaining to the variability of growth rates, physiological state of the cell, and the behavior of individual cells contaminating the food were obtained from previously published studies. We used this model to investigate the impact of pooling enrichment broths (wet pooling) on the performance of the standard method. For validation of the model, the numbers of L. monocytogenes occurring in 88 naturally contaminated foods following pre-enrichment were compared to model-simulated microbial counts. The model was then used to perform simulations representative of the natural contamination observed for smoked salmon in the European baseline survey of 2010-2011. The model-estimated L. monocytogenes levels following individual enrichment or following the pooling of five broths where only one would be contaminated were compared. The model indicated a 10% loss of method sensitivity resulting from wet pooling. The model also predicted a 5% decrease in the sensitivity of the method when the duration of the enrichment was reduced from 24 to 22 h. PMID:27554154

  18. Modeling the behavior of Listeria monocytogenes during enrichment in half Fraser broth; impact of pooling and the duration of enrichment on the detection of L. monocytogenes in food.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Jean-Christophe; Kalmokoff, Martin; Ells, Timothy; Favret, Sandra; Desreumaux, Jennifer; Decourseulles Brasseur, Emilie; Gnanou Besse, Nathalie

    2016-12-01

    A stochastic model describing the growth of Listeria monocytogenes during enrichment in half Fraser was developed for the purpose of estimating the effects of modifications to the first enrichment step of the EN ISO 11290-1 detection method. Information pertaining to the variability of growth rates, physiological state of the cell, and the behavior of individual cells contaminating the food were obtained from previously published studies. We used this model to investigate the impact of pooling enrichment broths (wet pooling) on the performance of the standard method. For validation of the model, the numbers of L. monocytogenes occurring in 88 naturally contaminated foods following pre-enrichment were compared to model-simulated microbial counts. The model was then used to perform simulations representative of the natural contamination observed for smoked salmon in the European baseline survey of 2010-2011. The model-estimated L. monocytogenes levels following individual enrichment or following the pooling of five broths where only one would be contaminated were compared. The model indicated a 10% loss of method sensitivity resulting from wet pooling. The model also predicted a 5% decrease in the sensitivity of the method when the duration of the enrichment was reduced from 24 to 22 h.

  19. Influence of aerobic and anaerobic conditions on survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in Luria-Bertani broth, farm-yard manure and slurry.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Alexander V; van Overbeek, Leo; Termorshuizen, Aad J; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    2011-03-01

    The influence of aerobic and anaerobic conditions on the survival of the enteropathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella serovar Typhimurium was investigated in microcosms with broth, cattle manure or slurry. These substrates were inoculated with a green fluorescent protein transformed strain of the enteropathogens at 10(7) cells g(-1) dry weight. Survival data was fitted to the Weibull model. The survival curves in aerobic conditions generally showed a concave curvature, while the curvature was convex in anaerobic conditions. The estimated survival times showed that E. coli O157:H7 survived significantly longer under anaerobic than under aerobic conditions. Survival ranged from approximately. 2 weeks for aerobic manure and slurry to more than six months for anaerobic manure at 16 °C. On average, in 56.3% of the samplings, the number of recovered E. coli O157:H7 cells by anaerobic incubation of Petri plates was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in comparison with aerobic incubation. Survival of Salmonella serovar Typhimurium was not different between aerobic and anaerobic storage of LB broth or manure as well as between aerobic and anaerobic incubation of Petri dishes. The importance of changes in microbial community and chemical composition of manure and slurry was distinguished for the survival of E. coli O157:H7 in different oxygen conditions.

  20. Sentinel 2 global reference image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechoz, C.; Poulain, V.; Massera, S.; Languille, F.; Greslou, D.; de Lussy, F.; Gaudel, A.; L'Helguen, C.; Picard, C.; Trémas, T.

    2015-10-01

    Sentinel-2 is a multispectral, high-resolution, optical imaging mission, developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) in the frame of the Copernicus program of the European Commission. In cooperation with ESA, the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) is responsible for the image quality of the project, and will ensure the CAL/VAL commissioning phase. Sentinel-2 mission is devoted the operational monitoring of land and coastal areas, and will provide a continuity of SPOT- and Landsat-type data. Sentinel-2 will also deliver information for emergency services. Launched in 2015 and 2016, there will be a constellation of 2 satellites on a polar sun-synchronous orbit, imaging systematically terrestrial surfaces with a revisit time of 5 days, in 13 spectral bands in visible and shortwave infra-red. Therefore, multi-temporal series of images, taken under the same viewing conditions, will be available. So as to ensure for the multi-temporal registration of the products, specified to be better than 0.3 pixels at 2σ, a Global Reference Image (GRI) will be produced during the CAL/VAL period. This GRI is composed of a set of Sentinel-2 acquisitions, which geometry has been corrected by bundle block adjustment. During L1B processing, Ground Control Points will be taken between this reference image and the sentinel-2 acquisition processed and the geometric model of the image corrected, so as to ensure the good multi-temporal registration. This paper first details the production of the reference during the CALVAL period, and then details the qualification and geolocation performance assessment of the GRI. It finally presents its use in the Level-1 processing chain and gives a first assessment of the multi-temporal registration.

  1. PVWatts Version 1 Technical Reference

    SciTech Connect

    Dobos, A. P.

    2013-10-01

    The NREL PVWatts(TM) calculator is a web application developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that estimates the electricity production of a grid-connected photovoltaic system based on a few simple inputs. PVWatts combines a number of sub-models to predict overall system performance, and makes several hidden assumptions about performance parameters. This technical reference details the individual sub-models, documents assumptions and hidden parameters, and explains the sequence of calculations that yield the final system performance estimation.

  2. Reference electrode for electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Kessie, R.W.

    1988-07-28

    A reference electrode device is provided for a high temperature electrolytic cell used to electrolytically recover uranium from spent reactor fuel dissolved in an anode pool, the device having a glass tube to enclose the electrode and electrolyte and serve as a conductive membrane with the cell electrolyte, and an outer metal tube about the glass tube to serve as a shield and basket for any glass sections broken by handling of the tube to prevent their contact with the anode pool, the metal tube having perforations to provide access between the bulk of the cell electrolyte and glass membrane. 4 figs.

  3. Electrolytic cell with reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kessie, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    A reference electrode device is provided for a high temperature electrolytic cell used to electrolytically recover uranium from spent reactor fuel dissolved in an anode pool, the device having a glass tube to enclose the electrode and electrolyte and serve as a conductive membrane with the cell electrolyte, and an outer metal tube about the glass tube to serve as a shield and basket for any glass sections broken by handling of the tube to prevent their contact with the anode pool, the metal tube having perforations to provide access between the bulk of the cell electrolyte and glass membrane.

  4. Influence of applied volume on efficacy of 3-minute surgical reference disinfection method prEN 12791.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Günter; Ostermeyer, Christiane

    2004-12-01

    For assessment of the efficacy of surgical hand disinfection, European reference method prEN 12791 prescribes that the hands must be kept wet with the reference alcohol for 3 min regardless of the applied volume. The aim of this study was to determine whether the applied volume of the reference disinfectant n-propanol (60%, vol/vol) influences the effect on the resident hand flora. Ten experiments with 200 reference disinfections were analyzed. Hands were washed for 1 min with soap. The bacterial prevalue was obtained by rubbing fingertips in tryptic soy broth for 1 min. After this, each subject treated the hands with n-propanol (60%, vol/vol) by using as many portions as necessary to keep hands wet for a total of 3 min. Bacterial postvalues (immediate effect) were obtained for one hand, and the other hand was gloved for 3 h. After the gloves were taken off, a second postvalue was obtained (sustained effect). Most surgical reference disinfections (73%) were achieved with 9 ml of the reference alcohol, followed by 12 ml (24%) and 6 ml (3%). There was no significant difference between the mean log10 reduction values for the three treatment groups, both in terms of the immediate effect (P = 0.333, as determined by analysis of variance) and in terms of the sustained effect (P = 0.442). A higher number of portions did not correlate with a higher reduction factor (for immediate effect, Pearson's correlation coefficient = -0.028 [P = 0.689]; for sustained effect, Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.059 [P = 0.404]). If the hands were kept wet with the reference alcohol for the total application time, the applied volume could vary, but this did not alter the efficacy.

  5. Reference atmospheres: VIRA II -Venus International Reference Atmosphere update.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasova, Ludmila

    2012-07-01

    VIRA I was started in 1982 (30 years ago) and published in1985 (ASR,v5,n11, 1985) by G. Keating, A. Kliore, and V. Moroz. The purpose was to produce a concise, descriptive model summarizing the physical properties of the atmosphere of Venus, which by then had been extensively observed by instruments on board the Venera and Pioneer space probes. VIRA was used by many scientists and engineers in their studies as referent standard of atmospheric data. Afterwards several missions have obtained new data. In particular the experiments on late Veneras and Venus Express. Experiments on board of VEX, working on the orbit for 6 years, provide new high quality data on atmospheric structure, clouds properties, dynamics, composition of the atmosphere, thermal balance, ionosphere. These new data will be used for VIRA update. Original data consists of 7 Chapters.(1 ) Models of the structure of the atmosphere of Venus from the surface to 100 km altitude, (2) Circulation of the atmosphere from surface to 100 km, (3) Particulate matter in the Venus atmosphere, (4) Models of Venus neutral upper atmosphere: structure and composition, (5) Composition of the atmosphere below 100 km altitude, (6) Solar and thermal radiation in the Venus atmosphere, (7) The Venus ionosphere. By 2002 Gerry Keating collected materials to update VIRA. But only two chapter were published: (1 ) Models of the structure of the atmosphere of Venus from the surface to 100 km altitude (Zasova et al, 2006, Cosmic Research, 44, N4), (5) Composition of the atmosphere below 100 km altitude (De Bergh et al. 2006, PSS). Both these chapters were based on the data, obtained before VEX. At the moment the structure of the original VIRA looks acceptable for VIRA II also, however, new Chapters may be added. At COSPAR 2014 in Moscow the session on Reference atmospheres (RAPS), may be proposed to continue discussion on VIRA, and start working on MIRA, and complete VIRA and publish (including CD) after COSPAR 2016 (or may be even

  6. Quantifying antimicrobial resistance at veal calf farms.

    PubMed

    Bosman, Angela B; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Wagenaar, Jaap; Stegeman, Arjan; Vernooij, Hans; Mevius, Dik

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to determine a sampling strategy to quantify the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance on veal calf farms, based on the variation in antimicrobial resistance within and between calves on five farms. Faecal samples from 50 healthy calves (10 calves/farm) were collected. From each individual sample and one pooled faecal sample per farm, 90 selected Escherichia coli isolates were tested for their resistance against 25 mg/L amoxicillin, 25 mg/L tetracycline, 0.5 mg/L cefotaxime, 0.125 mg/L ciprofloxacin and 8/152 mg/L trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (tmp/s) by replica plating. From each faecal sample another 10 selected E. coli isolates were tested for their resistance by broth microdilution as a reference. Logistic regression analysis was performed to compare the odds of testing an isolate resistant between both test methods (replica plating vs. broth microdilution) and to evaluate the effect of pooling faecal samples. Bootstrap analysis was used to investigate the precision of the estimated prevalence of resistance to each antimicrobial obtained by several simulated sampling strategies. Replica plating showed similar odds of E. coli isolates tested resistant compared to broth microdilution, except for ciprofloxacin (OR 0.29, p ≤ 0.05). Pooled samples showed in general lower odds of an isolate being resistant compared to individual samples, although these differences were not significant. Bootstrap analysis showed that within each antimicrobial the various compositions of a pooled sample provided consistent estimates for the mean proportion of resistant isolates. Sampling strategies should be based on the variation in resistance among isolates within faecal samples and between faecal samples, which may vary by antimicrobial. In our study, the optimal sampling strategy from the perspective of precision of the estimated levels of resistance and practicality consists of a pooled faecal sample from 20 individual animals, of which 90 isolates are

  7. Reference ballistic imaging database performance.

    PubMed

    De Kinder, Jan; Tulleners, Frederic; Thiebaut, Hugues

    2004-03-10

    Ballistic imaging databases allow law enforcement to link recovered cartridge cases to other crime scenes and to firearms. The success of these databases has led many to propose that all firearms in circulation be entered into a reference ballistic image database (RBID). To assess the performance of an RBID, we fired 4200 cartridge cases from 600 9mm Para Sig Sauer model P226 series pistols. Each pistol fired two Remington cartridges, one of which was imaged in the RBID, and five additional cartridges, consisting of Federal, Speer, Winchester, Wolf, and CCI brands. Randomly selected samples from the second series of Remington cartridge cases and from the five additional brands were then correlated against the RBID. Of the 32 cartridges of the same make correlated against the RBID, 72% ranked in the top 10 positions. Likewise, of the 160 cartridges of the five different brands correlated against the database, 21% ranked in the top 10 positions. Generally, the ranking position increased as the size of the RBID increased. We obtained similar results when we expanded the RBID to include firearms with the same class characteristics for breech face marks, firing pin impressions, and extractor marks. The results of our six queries against the RBID indicate that a reference ballistics image database of new guns is currently fraught with too many difficulties to be an effective and efficient law enforcement tool.

  8. Multipass Steering: A Reference Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessey, Michael; Tiefenback, Michael

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a reference implementation of a protocol to compute corrections that bring all beams in one of the CEBAF linear accelerators (linac) to axis, including, with a larger tolerance, the lowest energy pass using measured beam trajectory data. This method relies on linear optics as representation of the system; we treat beamline perturbations as magnetic field errors localized to regions between cryomodules, providing the same transverse momentum kick to each beam. We produce a vector of measured beam position data with which we left-multiply the pseudo-inverse of a coefficient array, A, that describes the transport of the beam through the linac using parameters that include the magnetic offsets of the quadrupole magnets, the instrumental offsets of the BPMs, and the beam initial conditions. This process is repeated using a reduced array to produce values that can be applied to the available correcting magnets and beam initial conditions. We show that this method is effective in steering the beam to a straight axis along the linac by using our values in elegant, the accelerator simulation program, on a model of the linac in question. The algorithms in this reference implementation provide a tool for systematic diagnosis and cataloging of perturbations in the beam line. Supported by Jefferson Lab, Old Dominion University, NSF, DOE.

  9. New SCIAMACHY Solar Reference Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbig, Tina; Bramstedt, Klaus; Weber, Mark; Burrows, John P.

    2016-04-01

    The Scanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) aboard ESA's ENVISAT satellite platform was operating from 2002 until 2012. It was designed to measure the radiance backscattered from the Earth and hence determine total columns and vertical profiles of atmospheric trace gas species. Furthermore SCIAMACHY performed daily sun observations via a diffuser. Solar spectra in the wavelength range from 212 nm to 1760 nm and two narrow bands from 1930 to 2040 nm and 2260 to 2380 nm are measured with a spectral resolution of 0,2 to 1,5 nm in the different channels. Recent developments in the SCIAMACHY calibration (e.g. a physical model of the scanner unit including degradation effects, and an on-ground to in-flight correction using the on-board white light source (WLS)) are used for the generation of a new SCIAMACHY solar reference spectrum as a first step towards a 10 years time series of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) data. For validation comparisons with other solar reference spectra are performed.

  10. High stability wavefront reference source

    DOEpatents

    Feldman, Mark; Mockler, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    A thermally and mechanically stable wavefront reference source which produces a collimated output laser beam. The output beam comprises substantially planar reference wavefronts which are useful for aligning and testing optical interferometers. The invention receives coherent radiation from an input optical fiber, directs a diverging input beam of the coherent radiation to a beam folding mirror (to produce a reflected diverging beam), and collimates the reflected diverging beam using a collimating lens. In a class of preferred embodiments, the invention includes a thermally and mechanically stable frame comprising rod members connected between a front end plate and a back end plate. The beam folding mirror is mounted on the back end plate, and the collimating lens mounted to the rods between the end plates. The end plates and rods are preferably made of thermally stable metal alloy. Preferably, the input optical fiber is a single mode fiber coupled to an input end of a second single mode optical fiber that is wound around a mandrel fixedly attached to the frame of the apparatus. The output end of the second fiber is cleaved so as to be optically flat, so that the input beam emerging therefrom is a nearly perfect diverging spherical wave.

  11. High stability wavefront reference source

    DOEpatents

    Feldman, M.; Mockler, D.J.

    1994-05-03

    A thermally and mechanically stable wavefront reference source which produces a collimated output laser beam is disclosed. The output beam comprises substantially planar reference wavefronts which are useful for aligning and testing optical interferometers. The invention receives coherent radiation from an input optical fiber, directs a diverging input beam of the coherent radiation to a beam folding mirror (to produce a reflected diverging beam), and collimates the reflected diverging beam using a collimating lens. In a class of preferred embodiments, the invention includes a thermally and mechanically stable frame comprising rod members connected between a front end plate and a back end plate. The beam folding mirror is mounted on the back end plate, and the collimating lens mounted to the rods between the end plates. The end plates and rods are preferably made of thermally stable metal alloy. Preferably, the input optical fiber is a single mode fiber coupled to an input end of a second single mode optical fiber that is wound around a mandrel fixedly attached to the frame of the apparatus. The output end of the second fiber is cleaved so as to be optically flat, so that the input beam emerging therefrom is a nearly perfect diverging spherical wave. 7 figures.

  12. Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2010-01-01

    In 1990, the U.S. Congress enacted the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act (CWPPRA) in response to growing awareness of a land loss crisis in Louisiana. Projects funded by CWPPRA require monitoring and evaluation of project effectiveness, and there is also a need to assess the cumulative effects of all projects to achieve a sustainable coastal environment. In 2003, the Louisiana Office of Coastal Protection and Restoration (OCPR) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) received approval from the CWPPRA Task Force to implement the Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS) as a mechanism to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of CWPPRA projects at the project, region, and coastwide levels. The CRMS design implements a multiple reference approach by using aspects of hydrogeomorphic functional assessments and probabilistic sampling. The CRMS program is as dynamic as the coastal habitats it monitors. The program is currently funded through CWPPRA and provides data for a variety of user groups, including resource managers, academics, landowners, and researchers.

  13. 33 CFR 183.210 - Reference areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reference areas. 183.210 Section... of More Than 2 Horsepower General § 183.210 Reference areas. (a) The forward reference area of a boat...) The aft reference area of a boat is the aft most two feet of the top surface of the hull or deck,...

  14. 33 CFR 183.310 - Reference areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reference areas. 183.310 Section... of 2 Horsepower or Less General § 183.310 Reference areas. (a) The forward reference area of a boat... aft reference area of a boat is the aftmost two feet of the top surface of the hull or deck,...

  15. 33 CFR 183.310 - Reference areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reference areas. 183.310 Section... of 2 Horsepower or Less General § 183.310 Reference areas. (a) The forward reference area of a boat... aft reference area of a boat is the aftmost two feet of the top surface of the hull or deck,...

  16. 33 CFR 183.210 - Reference areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reference areas. 183.210 Section... of More Than 2 Horsepower General § 183.210 Reference areas. (a) The forward reference area of a boat...) The aft reference area of a boat is the aft most two feet of the top surface of the hull or deck,...

  17. 33 CFR 183.310 - Reference areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reference areas. 183.310 Section... of 2 Horsepower or Less General § 183.310 Reference areas. (a) The forward reference area of a boat... aft reference area of a boat is the aftmost two feet of the top surface of the hull or deck,...

  18. 33 CFR 183.210 - Reference areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reference areas. 183.210 Section... of More Than 2 Horsepower General § 183.210 Reference areas. (a) The forward reference area of a boat...) The aft reference area of a boat is the aft most two feet of the top surface of the hull or deck,...

  19. 33 CFR 183.310 - Reference areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reference areas. 183.310 Section... of 2 Horsepower or Less General § 183.310 Reference areas. (a) The forward reference area of a boat... aft reference area of a boat is the aftmost two feet of the top surface of the hull or deck,...

  20. 33 CFR 183.210 - Reference areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reference areas. 183.210 Section... of More Than 2 Horsepower General § 183.210 Reference areas. (a) The forward reference area of a boat...) The aft reference area of a boat is the aft most two feet of the top surface of the hull or deck,...

  1. 33 CFR 183.210 - Reference areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reference areas. 183.210 Section... of More Than 2 Horsepower General § 183.210 Reference areas. (a) The forward reference area of a boat...) The aft reference area of a boat is the aft most two feet of the top surface of the hull or deck,...

  2. 33 CFR 183.310 - Reference areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reference areas. 183.310 Section... of 2 Horsepower or Less General § 183.310 Reference areas. (a) The forward reference area of a boat... aft reference area of a boat is the aftmost two feet of the top surface of the hull or deck,...

  3. The Art of Collection Development: Reference Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, John P.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses selecting for a reference collection, creative budgeting, cutting a deal, collection awareness (strengths/needs), Web site reviews, R-Net (reviews from diverse areas and institutions), and print vs. electronic reference products. Reference librarian adhere to high standards for reference book and Web sites, teach assessment techniques,…

  4. Bibliographic databases: help in preparing reference lists.

    PubMed

    Biancuzzo, M

    1995-01-01

    Typing bibliography references is time consuming. It is also frustrating to have to retype references when you submit a manuscript to journals using different reference styles. Now you don't need to retype them. Computer programs have been developed which help you reorganize your references to many different styles. This experienced nurse author compares several of these programs for you. PMID:7613563

  5. Instant Messaging Reference: How Does It Compare?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desai, Christina M.

    2003-01-01

    Compares a digital reference service that uses instant messaging with traditional, face-to-face reference based on experiences at the Southern Illinois University library. Addresses differences in reference questions asked, changes in the reference transaction, student expectations, bibliographic instruction, and librarian attitudes and procedures…

  6. American Folklore: A Guide to Reference Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibbee, Jo

    1989-01-01

    This annotated bibliography represents a core collection of reference sources on American folklore. In addition to general references, genre specific reference sources are listed in the following areas: folk narrative; folk music; customary folklore; material culture; ethnic and regional bibliographies; and applied folklore. (39 references) (CLB)

  7. Improving the Quality of Telephone Reference Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Brian

    1995-01-01

    Discusses telephone reference services in libraries. Topics include characteristics of quality phone reference; policies and guidelines for quality service; a survey of pertinent literature evaluating telephone reference; training; and technology for telephone reference, including cellular and cordless phones, electronic resources, and automated…

  8. 40 CFR 1042.910 - Reference materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reference as prescribed in 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Anyone may inspect copies at the U.S. EPA, Air... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reference materials. 1042.910 Section... Other Reference Information § 1042.910 Reference materials. Documents listed in this section have...

  9. 40 CFR 1042.910 - Reference materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reference as prescribed in 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Anyone may inspect copies at the U.S. EPA, Air... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reference materials. 1042.910 Section... Other Reference Information § 1042.910 Reference materials. Documents listed in this section have...

  10. Rapid identification of Salmonella serovars in feces by specific detection of virulence genes, invA and spvC, by an enrichment broth culture-multiplex PCR combination assay.

    PubMed

    Chiu, C H; Ou, J T

    1996-10-01

    In order to make a rapid and definite diagnosis of Salmonella enteritis in children, an enrichment broth culture-multiplex PCR combination assay was devised to identify Salmonella serovars directly from fecal samples. Two pairs of oligonucleotide primers were prepared according to the sequences of the chromosomal invA and plasmid spvC genes. PCR with these two primers would produce either one amplicon (from the invA gene) or two amplicons (from the invA and spvC genes), depending on whether or not the Salmonella bacteria contained a virulence plasmid. The fecal sample was diluted 10- to 20-fold into gram-negative enrichment broth and incubated to eliminate inhibitory compounds and also to allow selective enrichment of the bacteria. One or two amplicons were obtained, the expected result if Salmonella bacteria were present. The detection limit of this PCR was about 200 bacteria per reaction mixture. The primers were specific, as no amplification products were obtained with 18 species and 22 isolates of non-Salmonella bacteria tested which could be present in the feces or cause contamination. In contrast, when 23 commonly seen Salmonella serovars (38 isolates) were tested, all were shown to carry the invA gene and seven concomitantly harbored the spvC gene of the virulence plasmid. This assay was applied to the diagnosis of Salmonella enteritis in 57 children who were suffering from mucoid and/or bloody diarrhea. Of the 57 children, 38 were PCR positive and 22 were culture positive. There were two culture-positive samples that were not detected by PCR. Thus, this PCR assay showed an efficiency of 95% (38 of 40), which is much higher than the 60% (24 of 40) by culture alone. Not only is this method more sensitive, rapid, and efficient but it will cause only an incremental increase in the cost of stool processing, since enrichment cultivation of fecal samples from diarrheal patients using gram-negative enrichment broth is a routine practice for identification in many

  11. Caseview: building the reference set.

    PubMed

    Lévy, Pierre P

    2004-01-01

    There is a worldwide consensus for using the diagnosis related groups (DRG) when considering hospital activity. This tool leads to the production of tables of numbers (case mix), the interpretation of which is difficult. Therefore, methods aimed at facilitating this interpretation are needed. One of such methods is the case view, i.e. a graphical representation of the case mix. It reduces, in a way, each DRG to a "pixel", the set of the DRGs being an image (the case view). The reference set should be organized according to three criteria: medical/surgical, nosological and economic. This method can be used to answer theoretical questions or to visualize activity at the level of a hospital or at the level of a department. The purpose of this paper is to present important principles inherent in this graphic representation, both at the level of the method and at the level of the user.

  12. Background stratospheric aerosol reference model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Wang, P.

    1989-01-01

    In this analysis, a reference background stratospheric aerosol optical model is developed based on the nearly global SAGE 1 satellite observations in the non-volcanic period from March 1979 to February 1980. Zonally averaged profiles of the 1.0 micron aerosol extinction for the tropics and the mid- and high-altitudes for both hemispheres are obtained and presented in graphical and tabulated form for the different seasons. In addition, analytic expressions for these seasonal global zonal means, as well as the yearly global mean, are determined according to a third order polynomial fit to the vertical profile data set. This proposed background stratospheric aerosol model can be useful in modeling studies of stratospheric aerosols and for simulations of atmospheric radiative transfer and radiance calculations in atmospheric remote sensing.

  13. SNAP operating system reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Sabuda, J.D.; Polito, J.; Walker, J.L.; Grant, F.H. III

    1982-03-01

    The SNAP Operating System (SOS) is a FORTRAN 77 program which provides assistance to the safeguards analyst who uses the Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation (SAFE) and the Safeguards Network Analysis Procedure (SNAP) techniques. Features offered by SOS are a data base system for storing a library of SNAP applications, computer graphics representation of SNAP models, a computer graphics editor to develop and modify SNAP models, a SAFE-to-SNAP interface, automatic generation of SNAP input data, and a computer graphic post-processor for SNAP. The SOS Reference Manual provides detailed application information concerning SOS as well as a detailed discussion of all SOS components and their associated command input formats. SOS was developed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research and the US Naval Surface Weapons Center by Pritsker and Associates, Inc., under contract to Sandia National Laboratories.

  14. Hazard Communication Project: reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    This reference manual covers the following course objectives: to inform employees of their employer's requirements under the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200); to instruct employees on the procedures for obtaining and using information on hazardous materials, including understanding labeling systems and the material safety data sheet (MSDS) information; to provide information on 11 classes of chemicals, including their common uses, potential physical and health hazards, detection methods, and safety measures to follow. There are 14 lessons, ranging in length from 30 minutes to 1 (one) hour. The lessons are contained on 6 disks that are programmed to run on an IBM-compatible PC with an EGA graphics card and monitor. The program will not run on monochrome or CGA systems.

  15. NUCLEAR SCIENCE REFERENCES CODING MANUAL

    SciTech Connect

    WINCHELL,D.F.

    2007-04-01

    This manual is intended as a guide for Nuclear Science References (NSR) compilers. The basic conventions followed at the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC), which are compatible with the maintenance and updating of and retrieval from the Nuclear Science References (NSR) file, are outlined. The NSR database originated at the Nuclear Data Project (NDP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory as part of a project for systematic evaluation of nuclear structure data.1 Each entry in this computer file corresponds to a bibliographic reference that is uniquely identified by a Keynumber and is describable by a Topic and Keywords. It has been used since 1969 to produce bibliographic citations for evaluations published in Nuclear Data Sheets. Periodic additions to the file were published as the ''Recent References'' issues of Nuclear Data Sheets prior to 2005. In October 1980, the maintenance and updating of the NSR file became the responsibility of the NNDC at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The basic structure and contents of the NSR file remained unchanged during the transfer. In Chapter 2, the elements of the NSR file such as the valid record identifiers, record contents, and text fields are enumerated. Relevant comments regarding a new entry into the NSR file and assignment of a keynumber are also given in Chapter 2. In Chapter 3, the format for keyword abstracts is given followed by specific examples; for each TOPIC, the criteria for inclusion of an article as an entry into the NSR file as well as coding procedures are described. Authors preparing Keyword abstracts either to be published in a Journal (e.g., Nucl. Phys. A) or to be sent directly to NNDC (e.g., Phys. Rev. C) should follow the illustrations in Chapter 3. The scope of 1See W.B.Ewbank, ORNL-5397 (1978). the literature covered at the NNDC, the categorization into Primary and Secondary sources, etc., is discussed in Chapter 4. Useful information regarding permitted character sets, recommended abbreviations, etc., is

  16. Primary Atomic Clock Reference System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An artist's concept of the Primary Atomic Clock Reference System (PARCS) plarned to fly on the International Space Station (ISS). PARCS will make even more accurate atomic time available to everyone, from physicists testing Einstein's Theory of Relativity, to hikers using the Global Positioning System to find their way. In ground-based atomic clocks, lasers are used to cool and nearly stop atoms of cesium whose vibrations are used as the time base. The microgravity of space will allow the atoms to be suspended in the clock rather than circulated in an atomic fountain, as required on Earth. PARCS is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with principal investigators at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado, Boulder. See also No. 0103191

  17. Primary Atomic Clock Reference System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An artist's concept of the Primary Atomic Clock Reference System (PARCS) plarned to fly on the International Space Station (ISS). PARCS will make even more accurate atomic time available to everyone, from physicists testing Einstein's Theory of Relativity, to hikers using the Global Positioning System to find their way. In ground-based atomic clocks, lasers are used to cool and nearly stop atoms of cesium whose vibrations are used as the time base. The microgravity of space will allow the atoms to be suspended in the clock rather than circulated in an atomic fountain, as required on Earth. PARCS is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with principal investigators at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado, Boulder. See also No. 0100120.

  18. Generic Crystalline Disposal Reference Case

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, Scott Leroy; Chu, Shaoping; Harp, Dylan Robert; Perry, Frank Vinton; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-02-20

    A generic reference case for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in crystalline rock is outlined. The generic cases are intended to support development of disposal system modeling capability by establishing relevant baseline conditions and parameters. Establishment of a generic reference case requires that the emplacement concept, waste inventory, waste form, waste package, backfill/buffer properties, EBS failure scenarios, host rock properties, and biosphere be specified. The focus in this report is on those elements that are unique to crystalline disposal, especially the geosphere representation. Three emplacement concepts are suggested for further analyses: a waste packages containing 4 PWR assemblies emplaced in boreholes in the floors of tunnels (KBS-3 concept), a 12-assembly waste package emplaced in tunnels, and a 32-assembly dual purpose canister emplaced in tunnels. In addition, three failure scenarios were suggested for future use: a nominal scenario involving corrosion of the waste package in the tunnel emplacement concepts, a manufacturing defect scenario applicable to the KBS-3 concept, and a disruptive glaciation scenario applicable to both emplacement concepts. The computational approaches required to analyze EBS failure and transport processes in a crystalline rock repository are similar to those of argillite/shale, with the most significant difference being that the EBS in a crystalline rock repository will likely experience highly heterogeneous flow rates, which should be represented in the model. The computational approaches required to analyze radionuclide transport in the natural system are very different because of the highly channelized nature of fracture flow. Computational workflows tailored to crystalline rock based on discrete transport pathways extracted from discrete fracture network models are recommended.

  19. A new protocol to detect multiple foodborne pathogens with PCR dipstick DNA chromatography after a six-hour enrichment culture in a broad-range food pathogen enrichment broth.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masahiro; Natori, Tatsuya; Kubota-Hayashi, Sayoko; Miyata, Machiko; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Kawamoto, Keiko; Kurazono, Hisao; Makino, Souichi; Ezaki, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    A quick foodborne pathogen screening method after six-hour enrichment culture with a broad-range food pathogen enrichment broth is described. Pathogenic factors of Salmonella enterica, Shigella spp., enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, and enterohemorrhagic E. coli are amplified with a cocktail primer and rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which finishes amplification in 30 min. The PCR amplicon was differentiated with a dipstick DNA chromatography assay in 5-10 min. Starting from a four- to six-hour enrichment culture, this assay was finished within 45 min. Detection sensitivity of this protocol was less than 2.5 CFU/25 g for S. enterica and 3.3 CFU/25 g for enterohemorrhagic E. coli in spiked ground meat experiments.

  20. Ultra Scale-Down Characterization of the Impact of Conditioning Methods for Harvested Cell Broths on Clarification by Continuous Centrifugation—Recovery of Domain Antibodies from rec E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Chatel, Alex; Kumpalume, Peter; Hoare, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The processing of harvested E. coli cell broths is examined where the expressed protein product has been released into the extracellular space. Pre-treatment methods such as freeze–thaw, flocculation, and homogenization are studied. The resultant suspensions are characterized in terms of the particle size distribution, sensitivity to shear stress, rheology and solids volume fraction, and, using ultra scale-down methods, the predicted ability to clarify the material using industrial scale continuous flow centrifugation. A key finding was the potential of flocculation methods both to aid the recovery of the particles and to cause the selective precipitation of soluble contaminants. While the flocculated material is severely affected by process shear stress, the impact on the very fine end of the size distribution is relatively minor and hence the predicted performance was only diminished to a small extent, for example, from 99.9% to 99.7% clarification compared with 95% for autolysate and 65% for homogenate at equivalent centrifugation conditions. The lumped properties as represented by ultra scale-down centrifugation results were correlated with the basic properties affecting sedimentation including particle size distribution, suspension viscosity, and solids volume fraction. Grade efficiency relationships were used to allow for the particle and flow dynamics affecting capture in the centrifuge. The size distribution below a critical diameter dependant on the broth pre-treatment type was shown to be the main determining factor affecting the clarification achieved. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 913–924. © 2013 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24284936

  1. The role of broth enrichment in Staphylococcus aureus cultivation and transmission from the throat to newborn infants: results from the Swedish hygiene intervention and transmission of S. aureus study.

    PubMed

    Mernelius, S; Löfgren, S; Lindgren, P-E; Matussek, A

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is detected by direct plating, whereas incubation in enrichment broth prior to plating to increase the proportion of positive samples has not been fully evaluated. S. aureus throat colonization has been suggested to be more common than colonization of the anterior nares, but no data are available on the transmission of S. aureus from the throat. Swab samples were collected from the anterior nares and umbilicus from newborn infants (n = 168), anterior nares, throat, skin lesions, and vagina from parents (n = 332), and anterior nares, throat, and skin lesions from healthcare workers (n = 231) at three maternity wards. spa typing was used to elucidate the transmission routes of S. aureus. The use of enrichment broth prior to plating increased the proportion of positive samples by 46%. The prevalence of S. aureus colonization in adults was 58%. Throat colonization (47%) was significantly more common than colonization in any of the other screened sites (p < 0.001). In total, 103 out of 168 (61%) newborn infants were colonized during their hospital stay. Overall, 124 S. aureus transmissions to newborn infants were detected. Although we detected an increased risk of transmission from the nares as compared to the throat, with an odds ratio of 4.8 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.8-12.7], we detected a transmission rate of 7 % from the throat. We show that S. aureus throat colonization is more common than colonization in any of the other sites among the parents and staff. We also show evidence of transmission from the throat.

  2. Multi-center and multi-method evaluation of in vitro activities of ceftaroline against S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Koeth, Laura M; Apfalter, Petra; Becker, Karsten; Gesu, Giovanni; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Lahiri, Sushmita D; Alm, Richard A; Ambler, Jane; Iaconis, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    This five-site study was performed to assess the reproducibility of ceftaroline MIC and disk results for Staphylococcus aureus. Three commercial broth microdilution, three gradient diffusion and ceftaroline 5μg disk diffusion methods were compared to a reference broth microdilution method against challenge isolates (n = 41) and isolates collected at four European sites (n = 30/site). For four MIC methods (Sensititre and three gradient diffusion methods), 99.0% of consolidated MIC results were within +/- 1 dilution of the reference MIC. Categorical agreement rates based on EUCAST breakpoints for the challenge isolates were 75.6-100% and for disk testing were 78.0-92.7%. There was no clear distinction between isolates with MIC results of 1 and 2mg/L with regard to variation in MIC or molecular genotyping results. The addition of an intermediate category for isolates with MIC results of 2mg/L would help to identify these isolates as borderline susceptible/non-susceptible isolates. PMID:27233426

  3. Multi-center and multi-method evaluation of in vitro activities of ceftaroline against S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Koeth, Laura M; Apfalter, Petra; Becker, Karsten; Gesu, Giovanni; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Lahiri, Sushmita D; Alm, Richard A; Ambler, Jane; Iaconis, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    This five-site study was performed to assess the reproducibility of ceftaroline MIC and disk results for Staphylococcus aureus. Three commercial broth microdilution, three gradient diffusion and ceftaroline 5μg disk diffusion methods were compared to a reference broth microdilution method against challenge isolates (n = 41) and isolates collected at four European sites (n = 30/site). For four MIC methods (Sensititre and three gradient diffusion methods), 99.0% of consolidated MIC results were within +/- 1 dilution of the reference MIC. Categorical agreement rates based on EUCAST breakpoints for the challenge isolates were 75.6-100% and for disk testing were 78.0-92.7%. There was no clear distinction between isolates with MIC results of 1 and 2mg/L with regard to variation in MIC or molecular genotyping results. The addition of an intermediate category for isolates with MIC results of 2mg/L would help to identify these isolates as borderline susceptible/non-susceptible isolates.

  4. Research Notes and Information References

    1994-12-01

    The RNS (Research Notes System) is a set of programs and databases designed to aid the research worker in gathering, maintaining, and using notes taken from the literature. The sources for the notes can be books, journal articles, reports, private conversations, conference papers, audiovisuals, etc. The system ties the databases together in a relational structure, thus eliminating data redundancy while providing full access to all the information. The programs provide the means for access andmore » data entry in a way that reduces the key-entry burden for the user. Each note has several data fields. Included are the text of the note, the subject classification (for retrieval), and the reference identification data. These data are divided into four databases: Document data - title, author, publisher, etc., fields to identify the article within the document; Note data - text and page of the note; Sublect data - subject categories to ensure uniform spelling for searches. Additionally, there are subsidiary files used by the system, including database index and temporary work files. The system provides multiple access routes to the notes, both structurally (access method) and topically (through cross-indexing). Output may be directed to a printer or saved as a file for input to word processing software.« less

  5. International Reference Ionosphere - Status 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilitza, D.; Reinisch, B.; Triskova, L.; Friedrich, M.

    The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) is the standard for ionospheric densities and temperatures as recommended by the International Union of Radio Science (URSI) and the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). A COSPAR/URSI Working Group is in charge of developing and improving the model. It currently consists of 43 members who work on different aspects of the modeling effort. By charter IRI is an empirical model that attempts to represent the combined ionospheric database of ground and space observations as accurately as possible. IRI provides monthly averages of the electron density, total electron content, electron temperature, ion temperature, ion composition (O+, H+, He+, N+, O2+, NO+, Cluster+) and vertical ion drift (at the equator). This paper reports about the most recent activities of the IRI Working Group and about the most recent updates of the IRI model. We review the presentations, discussions, and results of the 2003 IRI Workshop held in Grahamstown, South Africa. Special emphasis will be given to the improvements that are of importance for the IRI model now being proposed as ISO standard

  6. Gender agreement and multiple referents.

    PubMed

    Finocchiaro, Chiara; Mahon, Bradford Z; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    We report a new pattern of usage in current, spoken Italian that has implications for both psycholinguistic models of language production and linguistic theories of language change. In Italian, gender agreement is mandatory for both singular and plural nouns. However, when two or more nouns of different grammatical gender appear in a conjoined noun phrase (NP), masculine plural agreement is required. In this study, we combined on-line and off-line methodologies in order to assess the mechanisms involved in gender marking in the context of multiple referents. The results of two pronoun production tasks showed that plural feminine agreement was significantly more difficult than plural masculine agreement. In a separate study using offline judgements of acceptability, we found that agreement violations in Italian are tolerated more readily in the case of feminine conjoined noun phrases (e.g., la mela e la banana 'the:fem apple:fem and the: fem banana: fem') than masculine conjoined noun phrases (e.g., il fiore e il libro 'the:mas flower: mas and the:mas book:mas'). Implications of these results are discussed both at the level of functional architecture within the language production system and at the level of changes in language use. PMID:21037930

  7. Gender agreement and multiple referents.

    PubMed

    Finocchiaro, Chiara; Mahon, Bradford Z; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    We report a new pattern of usage in current, spoken Italian that has implications for both psycholinguistic models of language production and linguistic theories of language change. In Italian, gender agreement is mandatory for both singular and plural nouns. However, when two or more nouns of different grammatical gender appear in a conjoined noun phrase (NP), masculine plural agreement is required. In this study, we combined on-line and off-line methodologies in order to assess the mechanisms involved in gender marking in the context of multiple referents. The results of two pronoun production tasks showed that plural feminine agreement was significantly more difficult than plural masculine agreement. In a separate study using offline judgements of acceptability, we found that agreement violations in Italian are tolerated more readily in the case of feminine conjoined noun phrases (e.g., la mela e la banana 'the:fem apple:fem and the: fem banana: fem') than masculine conjoined noun phrases (e.g., il fiore e il libro 'the:mas flower: mas and the:mas book:mas'). Implications of these results are discussed both at the level of functional architecture within the language production system and at the level of changes in language use.

  8. Argon Purification Reference and Recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-05-23

    This engineering note is a reference for future consideration on the purification of argon. The original concern was for the possibility of argon contamination from components in the cryostats over long-term storage. An argon purification system could also be useful for purifying the contents of the argon dewar. The general conclusion is that most of the systems researched are too expensive at this time, but the recommended choice would be Centorr Furnaces. There were three basic types of purification systems which were to be considered. The first was the molecular sieve. This method would have been the preferred one, because it was claimed that it could purify liquid argon, removing liquid oxygen from the argon. However, none of the commercial companies researched provided this type of purification for use with liquid argon. Most companies said that this type of purification was impossible, and tests at IB-4 confirmed this. The second system contained a copper oxide to remove gaseous oxygen from argon gas. The disadvantage of this system wass that the argon had to be heated to a gas, and then cooled back down to liquid. The third system was similar to the second, except that it used tungsten or another material like titanium. This system also needed to heat the argon to gas, however the advantage of this system was that it supposedly removed all contaminants, that is, everything except for inert gases. Of the three systems, the third is the type manufactured by Centorr Furnaces, which uses a titanium charge.

  9. Reference materials for cellular therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bravery, Christopher A; French, Anna

    2014-09-01

    The development of cellular therapeutics (CTP) takes place over many years, and, where successful, the developer will anticipate the product to be in clinical use for decades. Successful demonstration of manufacturing and quality consistency is dependent on the use of complex analytical methods; thus, the risk of process and method drift over time is high. The use of reference materials (RM) is an established scientific principle and as such also a regulatory requirement. The various uses of RM in the context of CTP manufacturing and quality are discussed, along with why they are needed for living cell products and the analytical methods applied to them. Relatively few consensus RM exist that are suitable for even common methods used by CTP developers, such as flow cytometry. Others have also identified this need and made proposals; however, great care will be needed to ensure any consensus RM that result are fit for purpose. Such consensus RM probably will need to be applied to specific standardized methods, and the idea that a single RM can have wide applicability is challenged. Written standards, including standardized methods, together with appropriate measurement RM are probably the most appropriate way to define specific starting cell types. The characteristics of a specific CTP will to some degree deviate from those of the starting cells; consequently, a product RM remains the best solution where feasible. Each CTP developer must consider how and what types of RM should be used to ensure the reliability of their own analytical measurements.

  10. Research Notes and Information References

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, III, Dean S.

    1994-12-01

    The RNS (Research Notes System) is a set of programs and databases designed to aid the research worker in gathering, maintaining, and using notes taken from the literature. The sources for the notes can be books, journal articles, reports, private conversations, conference papers, audiovisuals, etc. The system ties the databases together in a relational structure, thus eliminating data redundancy while providing full access to all the information. The programs provide the means for access and data entry in a way that reduces the key-entry burden for the user. Each note has several data fields. Included are the text of the note, the subject classification (for retrieval), and the reference identification data. These data are divided into four databases: Document data - title, author, publisher, etc., fields to identify the article within the document; Note data - text and page of the note; Sublect data - subject categories to ensure uniform spelling for searches. Additionally, there are subsidiary files used by the system, including database index and temporary work files. The system provides multiple access routes to the notes, both structurally (access method) and topically (through cross-indexing). Output may be directed to a printer or saved as a file for input to word processing software.

  11. Gender agreement and multiple referents

    PubMed Central

    Finocchiaro, Chiara; Mahon, Bradford Z.; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2010-01-01

    We report a new pattern of usage in current, spoken Italian that has implications for both psycholinguistic models of language production and linguistic theories of language change. In Italian, gender agreement is mandatory for both singular and plural nouns. However, when two or more nouns of different grammatical gender appear in a conjoined noun phrase (NP), masculine plural agreement is required. In this study, we combined on-line and off-line methodologies in order to assess the mechanisms involved in gender marking in the context of multiple referents. The results of two pronoun production tasks showed that plural feminine agreement was significantly more difficult than plural masculine agreement. In a separate study using offline judgements of acceptability, we found that agreement violations in Italian are tolerated more readily in the case of feminine conjoined noun phrases (e.g., la mela e la banana ‘the:fem apple:fem and the: fem banana: fem’) than masculine conjoined noun phrases (e.g., il fiore e il libro ‘the:mas flower: mas and the:mas book:mas’). Implications of these results are discussed both at the level of functional architecture within the language production system and at the level of changes in language use.* PMID:21037930

  12. Fortran 5 cross-reference

    SciTech Connect

    Brenneman, D.J.; Singer, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    This manual describes FSTCOM and ROUTS, two cross-referencing programs. The programs have been prepared by EG and G Idaho, Inc. at the Idaho Nuclear Engineering Laboratory and are written in CDC FORTRAN 5, following the standard FORTRAN 77 conventions. FSTCOM and ROUTS facilitate the creation of documentation for programs. Additionally, the programs are of great help in the debugging process due to the nature of their output. To aid the user, the programs are carefully documented. In fact, most users can run FSTCOM or ROUTS by simply referring to the prologue at the beginning of each program. FSTCOM creates reports concerning the common blocks in a FORTRAN 5 program by using a FTN5 compiled listing as input. Common block information contained in the listing is collected in an interface file for future output. However, it is important to note that only the common variables actually used in the program will be stored in the interface file. ROUTS generates a report concerning the program units and the procedures they call. Like FSTCOM, ROUTS uses a FTN5 compiled listing as input. The program unit information is collected into an interface file that is sorted by the CYBER SORT/MERGE utility to produce a report. 2 figures, 4 tables.

  13. Establishment of reference standards in biosimilar studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aijing; Tzeng, Jung-Ying; Chow, Shein-Chung

    2013-07-31

    When an innovative biological product goes off-patent, biopharmaceutical or biotechnological companies may file an application for regulatory approval of biosimilar products. In practice, however, important information on the innovative (reference) product may not be available for assessment. Thus, it is important to first establish a reference standard while assessing biosimilarity between a biosimilar product and the reference product. In this paper, reference standard is established through the biosimilarity index approach based on a reference-replicated study (or R-R study), in which the reference product is compared with itself under various scenarios. The reference standard can then be used for assessing the degree of similarity between the test and reference drugs in biosimilar studies.

  14. Chinese-Mandarin Basic Course: References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This is a collection of reference materials to be used with the Chinese-Mandarin Basic Course textbooks. This collection consists of information on romanization systems, indexes for reading and writing characters, and other tables for quick reference. (NCR)

  15. Independent Study Unit on Accelerated Reference Frames

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poultney, S. K.

    1973-01-01

    Presents a list of topics, research areas, references, and laboratory equipment which is prepared to facilitate general-science students' understanding of physics aspects in accelerated reference frames after their study of circular motion and Galilean relativity in mechanics. (CC)

  16. Reference surfaces for bridge scour depths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landers, Mark N.; Mueller, David S.

    1993-01-01

    Depth of scour is measured as the vertical distance between scoured channel geometry and a measurement reference surface. A scour depth measurement can have a wide range depending on the method used to establish the reference surface. A consistent method to establish reference surfaces for bridge scour measurements is needed to facilitate transferability of scour data an scour analyses. This paper describes and evaluates techniques for establishing reference surfaces from which local and contraction scour are measured.

  17. Reference Use of Online Databases: An Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friend, Linda; Bonta, Bruce

    Since July 1978 the general reference section of the Pennsylvania State University library has compiled statistical information related to the use of online searching for reference purposes. An evaluation form completed by the librarian for each online reference search recorded such information as search date; status of requestor; printed sources…

  18. The Internet: A Ready Reference Library?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Michael R.

    1998-01-01

    An academic librarian answered 24 questions using reference books, then tried to answer the same questions using an Internet search engine (Metacrawler). Evaluates the results of the Internet searches and discusses implications for library reference services and reference book publishers; Internet user expectations and satisfaction; and librarians…

  19. 49 CFR 171.7 - Reference material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... incorporation by reference by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR..., into § 173.417. (2) Table 1 to 49 CFR 171.7—Materials Not Incorporated by Reference Source and name of material 49 CFR reference American Biological Safety Association 1202 Allanson Road, Mundelein, IL...

  20. 49 CFR 171.7 - Reference material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... incorporation by reference by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR..., amendment 1 (2011). Table 1 to 49 CFR 171.7—Materials Not Incorporated by Reference Source and name of material 49 CFR reference American Biological Safety Association 1202 Allanson Road, Mundelein, IL...